The Future

by David Siegel

A Nobel Prize is more than just an award for an outstanding contribution. By the wider public it is often also perceived as a statement on a person’s general intellectual capacity and insight into current and future problems. Nobel Laureates are considered genuine geniuses and it is thus not surprising that their advice and analyses are highly sought after. A prominent example is Steven Chu. The American physicist, who received a share of the 1997 Physics Prize "for the development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light", was, in 2009, nominated as the United States Secretary of Energy by President Obama and served in this position until 2013. Later in 2009, President Obama himself was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, thus pushing the share of Nobel Laureates in the US government distinctly above average.

Other Nobel Laureates underscored their outstanding potential outside the political arena by doing something seemingly natural: getting a second Nobel Prize. The American physicist John Bardeen, the Polish physicist and chemist Marie Curie, the American chemist Linus Pauling and the British biochemist Frederick Sanger form the club of double Laureates.

It thus seems as if listening to what Nobel Laureates have to say about the future should be highly rewarding. And nowhere is the opportunity to do so greater than at a Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. In this topic cluster we will look at both historical and current Lindau lectures to find out what Nobel Laureates envisioned for mankind then and now.


Scientists, Pessimists and Catastrophes

If you have talked about the future with your colleagues, friends or family, you might have noticed that almost always both optimists and pessimists can be found. And you might also have experienced that discussions can be conducted fiercely, if not emotionally at times. In Lindau, things are different. Since the vast majority of lecturing Laureates are educated as scientists and thus used to weighing and communicating arguments, discussions are less emotional and more technical in nature. Still, in few cases some strong concern for mankind may be detected. Interestingly, it almost always appears to have something to do with a guy called Thomas Robert Malthus. His name occurs in many of the lectures collected below.

Malthus was an English cleric, who, in 1798, published an “Essay On the Principle of Population”. Therein he outlined what became known as Malthus’ Iron Law of Population. Malthus believed that humans generally reproduced exponentially, while the growth of food production could be linear at best. Sooner or later population could be expected to outgrow food supply, so Malthus. The consequence would be a catastrophic global event, during which world population would be forced back to a sustainable level via famine, epidemics and war. For Malthus, the foundations of the catastrophe were tightly linked to general human nature. He was hence pessimistic with regards to whether it could be avoided.

Today we know that the global Malthusian catastrophe never occurred despite continuous overexponential growth of the world’s population. The “impact factor” of Malthus’ work remains to be high nonetheless. At the 2011 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, for example, the Belgian biochemist Christian de Duve talked about the future of mankind. His ideas are surprisingly congruent with those of Malthus:


Christian de Duve (2011) - The Future of Life

It’s a great pleasure to be with all of you here, thank you for coming and thank you for this nice introduction. I should tell you that I have a jacket and I have a tie at the hotel, but I hope you will excuse this informal attire. Thank you, if somebody has a jacket, he’s allowed to take it off. Now, let’s see if this machine works, great. So before talking about the future of life, I would like to spend a little time going back, just a few million years, as you can see this is a scale. Now, I don’t know why you are applauding, but never mind, wait till the end of the lecture. What you see is a scale of time, eight millions of years. That’s a great deal from your point of view and my point of view, eight million years ago, that is 8.000 millennia, But in terms of the history of life, this is just an instant, because the first animals appeared 600 million years ago, that’s about half a mile from here. And the first signs of life on earth were detected in terrains that are almost 3.6 billion years ago, But it’s those last years are particularly important for us humans. And what I'm showing on this scale of time is the volume of the brain, the volume of the brain of the individuals, whose skulls, fossil skulls were found mostly in Africa during those times, and what I want to show is the change in the volume, the size of the brain during that time. There you have on the right the size of the brain of the chimpanzee, which is 350 cubic centimetres and which is about the biggest size for an animal brain, compared to size in the whole of animal kingdom, except of course for humans. Now, something happened around six million years ago or even later, here you have an individual called Australopithecus africanus. He’s a sort of remote cousin of Lucy, you’ve heard of Lucy of course, and Lucy had a brain of about 400 cubic centimetres, and he lived for about half a million years, and then became extinct, so the length of that line shows the time during which fossil skulls of this individual of the species had been found. And so let’s continue, here you see the next one, Paranthropus boisei, and then it goes on, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster, Homo erectus, who lived, as you can see, Then we have heidelbergensis and then we have neanderthalensis. And then we have you and me with a slightly smaller brain than the neanderthal, smaller but probably more efficient. And so this is the whole history of the brain, and we can connect all these, we see something which is really the most extraordinary event in the whole of evolution, this is this fantastic rise in the size of the brain over just about two million years. Remember it took 600 million years for the brain of the chimpanzee to reach this size, 600 million. And here, in a couple of million years, you see the size growing up fourfold. This is an absolutely extraordinary event, nobody has explained it from the genetic point of view, and I think very few genes can be involved in this, so this is a really extraordinary thing. It’s extraordinary in terms of the size, the fastness, but it’s also extraordinary in terms of smallness. Because just four times as many neurons, four times, makes a difference between a chimpanzee and a human being. Now, the chimpanzees as you know, they do make a few tools from time to time, they can use a branch, remove the leaves, stick the branch into a termite nest and then wait and they pick it out again and they lick the termites off. And that’s how they get insects to feed on. And that’s manufacturing your tools, so there is some intelligence involved in that. But we, our ancestors, with about twice that brain size, we make stone tools. Chimpanzee also, he would use a stone to crush a nut or to crush his neighbours’ head, but our ancestors did much better. They didn’t just pick up a stone, they started carving it and fashioning it into all kinds of different tools, and so they made stone tools of greater efficiency or sophistication. But that’s still nothing against what we have been doing, now, with just four times as many neurons as the chimp, we are sending man to the moon, we are sending messages all over the world, we are decrypting the human genome, we are manipulating life, we are doing all those extraordinary things that, you know better than I do, are being done today, with just four times as many neurons as the chimpanzee. I think this is absolutely remarkable and the neurobiologists will have to explain how, with such a small difference, you can make, I mean there can be such a huge difference in the results. Okay, now I want to look at the end of this story in terms of numbers. So there is another timescale, we are going to look at the population in terms of time. Half a billion years ago - well, there was no census, but it’s estimated that the human population was about 3.000 individuals. It’s estimated that there were about 10.000 human beings. Okay, then 10.000 years ago, that’s when the first human settlements started, when they started cultivating land and raising cattle and so on, five to ten million individuals. Half a billion, that’s quite a lot already. I was almost finished school at that time, I almost entered university, but anyway, doesn’t matter. Two billion, that’s what I learnt at school, we are two billions. So in the meantime it’s changed, from 1930 to 1970, that’s four years before i got a Nobel prize, four billion. Just in one lifetime, from two to four. Today, or yesterday, 2009 six and a half billion, tomorrow maybe nine billion, maybe more, we don’t know. So this is really a staggering increase in population, this is even more frightening when you see the curve how suddenly more than exponential fashion this number has risen. What this means is that we, the human species, Homo sapiens sapiens, we are, among all the living organisms that have ever existed on this planet. We are the most successful species. We started in Central Africa, in small bands roaming Central Africa, we have come to invade the whole of our planet, to occupy almost every liveable corner of this planet. We’ve come to use virtually all the resources that are available for our own benefit, we have really become tremendously successful. But this success has a price. I was explaining how we have become the most successful, by far the most successful species on this planet, but as I said, there’s a price to pay and let’s see the cost of success. You open your television, you open your newspaper, you open your radio and you hear of it. So I just list the price, because everyone knows that the cost of our success is exhaustion of natural resources, almost complete exhaustion. It’s loss of biodiversity, every day species, living species disappear. Deforestation, desertification, we are losing forests in the Amazon at a fantastic rate, the deserts are becoming wider. Climate changes, we all know about climate changes, but we hear only about climate change in the newspapers, but climate change is just a small aspect of this whole tragedy that we have inflicted on our planet. Energy crisis, you know how we all try to find new ways to power our needs because we are using more and more energy. We are using more energy in one day than our ancestors did in a year in the African savannah. Pollution, we are polluting the earth to the point of making it unliveable in certain parts of the world. Overcrowded cities, that’s becoming a major, if you ever travel to Tokyo or Mexico city or Sao Paolo or even go to London, Paris, Brussels, and you will find the effects of too many people living on a too small piece of land. Conflicts and wars, I don’t have to tell you, I’ve seen two wars in my lifetime and today the wars or conflicts are raging all over the world. I don’t have to tell you about that. And of course, the main problem, of course, of our success is that there are simply too many of us. There are too many of us. Now who is the culprit? Who is responsible for this? Well, it’s not a ‘who’, it’s a ‘what’. It is natural selection. I think Dr. Arber has told you about the theory of natural selection and I'm sure you are all familiar with the theory of natural selection. Just let me remind you, with natural selection, what you start with is diversity, variation. Variation brings about conflict, competition between the different variants for the available resources. And out of that conflict there will emerge those individuals or those groups that are best fit to survive and especially to reproduce under the existing conditions. So natural selection is simply the automatic obligatory emergence under certain given conditions of those particular species or individuals or groups that are best fit to survive. And to reproduce, especially to reproduce under those conditions. That is natural selection. Now, we have to remember about natural selection one very important point: Natural selection acts on the immediate, on the here-and-now level. Natural selection doesn’t look into the future, natural selection doesn’t look into the future and calculate the amount of energy that remains available and say natural selection takes care only of the hic-and-nunc, the now-and-here. So, now try and go back to the early history of our species, at that time, say 200.000 years ago, you saw there were about 10.000 human beings. Well, those 10.000 human beings 200.000 years ago, they were not all in one place. They were in little groups of maybe 30 or 50 individuals, and they were roaming around the African savannah or the African forests, and what were they doing? Well, they were looking for food, because their main problem, their main concern was to survive. To survive and make young, reproduce, survive and reproduce, and so they were looking for food, they were looking for animals to hunt, because they also needed some hunting at that time. And so what were the qualities that were useful to our ancestors 200.000 years ago, when they were doing this, looking for food, looking for shelter, fighting predators. Well, I would summarize the quality that was needed at that time was group selfishness, two words. Selfishness because, if you have to survive, you have to take care of your own, you don’t think about the others, you want to survive, you must be selfish, you must be egoistic, you are looking for your own means of survival. But if you are part of a group, then it becomes more advantageous for the members of the group to help each other than to fight each other. Because if they cooperate, they have a better chance of surviving, and so natural selection will privilege those qualities or those genetic traits that were favourable to the survival and/or production of the groups’ concern, that is group selfishness. But, as I said, this was not the only group, there were 50 or 100 such groups doing the same thing, roaming through the savannah or the forest in Central Africa. From time to time they would meet, two groups would meet. And what would happen? Well, they each were looking for the best hunting grounds, looking for the best places to find food, the best shelter and so: Conflict. What happened when they met was conflict, each trying to get the better hunting grounds or the better food, each trying to get the better females, the most attractive females at least, and so on. So in addition to intra-group selfishness, you had inter-group hostility, conflict, aggressiveness. So the traits that were selected 200.000 years ago in our ancestors, because they were useful to them at the time, were intra-group selfishness and inter-group hostility. And look at the world today: Things have not changed. Things have not changed. The groups have changed. They are no longer tribes or families or clans, they are groups of human beings grouped around some thing like a nation, religion, belief, culture and so on. But the fighting goes on, I’ve seen two and the fight goes on all over the world today. Inter-group hostility is still very much alive today, and intra-group selfishness is still alive today, bankers work for bankers, and the scientists for scientists and so on. So I don’t mean that scientists work for humanity, those I know, but in general we all work for our own. And so group selfishness is still acting today, our genes have not changed because over those 200.000 years, there has been no reason for them. There has been no circumstance where it would have been useful to them to change. So things have not changed today, and is there something that we can do? What can we do to try and offset those bad effects of natural selection that has imprinted in our genes? Those nasty traits were useful to our ancestors but are obnoxious and harmful to us today. I think that the fact that there’s something wrong with human nature was already detected several thousand years ago by those wise men who wrote the bible. They of course didn’t know anything about genes, about DNA, about natural selection, but they knew something about human nature and they knew something about heredity. And so they detected the fact that there is something wrong in our human nature, and so they invented an explanation. And so they invented the Garden of Eden and Adam and Eve and the serpent and the tree and the apple and the sin, the original sin, which is responsible for this flaw in human nature that they invented. And so, my latest book is called Genetics of Original Sin, which is an explanation or an attempt to explain what it is. Then I come to the last question: Is there something that we can do? Well, in that latest book, Genetics of Original Sin, I consider seven options. Seven scenarios for the future, so I come to the topic of my lecture and I have five minutes more. First: Do nothing. That’s what we are doing today almost, do nothing. Well, if we do nothing, I think what will happen is easy to predict. Things will only get worse. Things can only get worse, we’ll just let natural selection continue to do its nasty work, things will get worse, and they will very soon get so bad that life will become very difficult on this planet, that the conditions for life will be menaced and endangered more and more, and that we, the human species will progressively move towards extinction. You have seen that all those that preceded us, my first slide, ended by becoming extinct, the neanderthals only 35.000 years ago, why not us, why not we? Well, that’s a good question, but you have to remember that if ten billion individuals have to go extinct, that’s not the same thing as 10.000 in Central Africa. Ten billion all over the world, that means that before we will become extinct, the most unimaginable apocalyptic events can take place, fights and epidemics and what not. If we let things go, there wont’ be enough food for everyone, there won’t be climate to sustain us, so we are doomed if we don’t do something about it. Fortunately, we have received from natural selection a gift no other living species possesses. We of all the living organisms on this planet that have ever existed, we are the only ones who are capable, thanks to this brain that we have received from natural selection - that you’ve seen has grown in the last years – thanks to this brain, we have received the ability to do something natural selection cannot do. We can look into the future, we can make predictions about what will happen if we do something or if we do something else. We can make decisions about the future and we can act according to those decisions. So we can act against natural selection, we are the only living organisms on this planet that have the ability to purposefully, intentionally, willingly, consciously acting against natural selection. And therefore, that is what we have to do before it becomes too late. And so the first thing we can do: Improve our genes. We have bad genes? So okay, let’s do what we do in plants and animals, remove the bad genes and replace them with good genes. We can make GMOs, genetically modified organisms, why not make GMHs, genetically modified humans? Well, technically this is not quite possible, for reasons that we won’t go into, we can do it with animals, but with humans it would be more difficult. Ethically, of course, it’s something that nobody wants to do today, and in any case, suppose it was technically and ethically possible, we wouldn’t know what to do. We simply wouldn't know what to do, because we don’t know the relationship between genes and abilities. We would like to make a new little Mozart, we wouldn't know what genes to remove and what genes to implant to make a new Mozart or to make a new Venus Williams or a new Angela Merkel. We wouldn't know what to do. Therefore forget it, this is not a solution. Next possibility: Rewire the brain. Now, I use the word ‘rewiring’ because that’s a very technical way of putting it, what I mean is education, educate. Because rewiring the brain, I think it’s very important to know about that and, as you know, neurobiologists have made major discoveries in the last few decades about how the brain is wired. We have been told that when we are born, very little of our brain is yet wired, and the wiring takes place under the influence of all the stimuli, sounds and visual stimuli and touch and so on. A baby receives influences from the outside, and those influences will create networks in the baby’s brain. So the brain is wired at a very young age, and as you see, this is important for the point I will make, and so what we need is education. Education of the young, especially. And if you need education, this means that you need educators. So the question is, if you are going to educate, you need educators, but who is going to educate the educators? So we have another question: Where will we find the wise men and women who will do the education of the educators? One obvious answer to that is the religions. The religions have been very much involved in the last millennia almost, centuries, in educating the young and even the adult. They have a whole world network of schools and parishes and meeting halls and churches where they can influence. Some religions, like the catholic religion, can influence one billion people in this whole world, so they have a huge ability or power to do what is needed, the education. And here, I hope you won’t blame me or be too disappointed, I think the religions are not doing their job properly. I think they are more busy defending their own beliefs, their own ideologies, their own doctrines, their own hierarchies, they are much more involved with their own survival than with the survival of the world. They are more involved with lobbying happy in the next world but not in this world. And so I think, unfortunately, I hope there will be a change, and there was signs today that there is a change, I think there should come, from people like you, an influence that goes up to the hierarchy and tell those old men that there’s need for change. I'm glad you agree with me, at least some of you. So, anyway, I think that with you people and your contemporaries in this world, this may still happen, and I hope very much it will happen. In the meantime, there’s another religion which is protecting environment. Now, I think that’s a very important thing to do, we’ve seen to what extent that development of the human species has harmed the environment, and so I think this new concern, because this did not exist when I was young. This started just after the war, this concern for the environment is very recent, and I think this is extremely important, and we should all participate in this job. But here again, I think the organisations that try to defend the environment don’t do it the way they should do or some of them don’t, because they have turned into political parties. They are defending political styles like they are against multinational corporations and they are against capitalism, but anyway, they have become political parties, more than they have become environmental movements. Another problem with the environmental movement is that it has degenerated into some kind of a religion, which is sort of a Jean-Jacques Rousseau kind of religion that is based on the belief that nature is perfect. That you shouldn’t touch nature, because nature is sacred, and anything that is natural is good and we should not interfere with nature, we should not interfere with life on earth and so on. Now, that is ridiculous, because nature is not good, nature is not bad, nature is indifferent. Natural selection doesn’t look at the qualities of the organisms that it allows to emerge, it’s blind. It’s passive and so nature is just, nature has as much solicitude for the mould that makes penicillin and for the virus that causes HIV, AIDS. It has as much solicitude for the poet and for the scorpion. Nature is not good, it’s not bad, it’s indifferent. So again, I think we should protect the environment, but we should try to free this concern for the environment, which is extremely important, we should free it from its political implications and from its ideological implications. Okay, next scenario... Amazing, all the men are applauding also. Well, I'm glad, not amazing, it means they are intelligent. Give women a chance, now listen. This is not, I'm not a social worker, I'm not a politician, so I'm not defending some kind of a feminist agenda. What I'm acting here, speaking as a scientist. In mammals, the females are less tainted by this original sin, by this flaw that I have mentioned because of their biological nature. They are less aggressive, the wars have been raged mostly by men, not by women. Women tend to the sick, they tend to the wounded, they tend to the sexual needs of the soldiers, but they rarely fight, they rarely fight, except in exceptional surroundings. They are not aggressive, except if their young are threatened, then a female can become aggressive. So biologically, genetically they are less aggressive than the males. Also they have much more influence than the males on the early education of the young. They give birth to those babies, this is not going to change in the near future, they give birth to the babies and they nurture them, they feed the babies. And so they provide the very early education to the babies, and therefore I think they are biologically better placed to lead the world. Unfortunately, what we see now - and I always end with unfortunate things - but what we see in the world today is that, maybe in order to gain the power that I would like them to have, women have to behave like men, on the political side or on the tennis court and so on. So anyway, I think it’s important to give women a chance. Now, I can see that my chairman, you know there’s nothing after this, so if I have two more minutes they won’t mind, I hope. I'm not taking anybody’s time. So let’s look at the last option, which obviously is the most important one of all, population control. Because all the ills that I have mentioned are due to one single cause, there simply are too many human beings in the world. You have seen the curve that I showed. It’s staggering, it’s frightening to see how quickly our numbers have increased just in that time, fourfold increase, from the time I was born to today. It’s terrible, terrifying. And so we have to do something about it. Now, you know, Thomas Malthus was an economist at the end of the 18th century, and he predicted this, he said human beings will multiply geometrically, exponentially, the resources can only multiply arithmetically, linearly, and therefore some day the time will come when there will be too many mouths to feed, as compared to the amount of food available. And so he said that there are only two solutions. One is to do what the hunters do, cull, remove the sick, the old and so on, get rid of them. And the other possibility is prevent the extra human beings from being born. So either you remove or you prevent them from being born. Now, we’ve been very good at removing, not the sick and the old, but mostly the young. In the last two wars, I don’t know how many million young men and women have lost their lives before they were able to reproduce. So this has been a rather sickening method of preventing the population from being born. But obviously the most civilised way is to prevent them from being born than to kill them after they are born. So that’s what we ought to do, and for 200 years people said Malthus was wrong, because every time when Malthus was going to be proved right, some new development was made, technique in agriculture, or expanding resources, and so the earth was allowed or made to feed more and more individuals. But today the writing is on the wall. Today there is no place, we can’t start seeding the moon or even Mars, forget about those things. We have to live on this little planet, and this little planet has become too small, or we have become too many. So we really, I think this is the major lesson of this, we have to do something about population control if possible by preventing, by birth control. I hope I haven’t been too long, but I'm coming to my conclusion. I just want to read it because I want to make sure that it’s clear. All is not lost, but the writing is on the wall. If we don’t act soon to overcome our genetic tendency to intra-group selfishness and inter-group hostility, the future of humanity and of much of life on earth will be gravely endangered, possibly leading to total extinction under conditions that can only be visualised as apocalyptic. Here I turn to the young, this is the most wonderful thing about these Lindau Nobel meetings, and as long as I can be physically able to come, I will come back, because here is where we meet the young people of the world. And they are here and I would like to turn to all you young people in this audience and say to them, I want to tell you: My generation, our generation has made a mess of things. It’s up to you to do better. The future is in your hands. Good luck. Thank you, thank you so much!

Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier bei Ihnen zu sein. Vielen Dank für Ihr Kommen und für diese nette Vorstellung. Ich sollte Ihnen vielleicht mitteilen, dass ich ein Jackett habe, und eine Krawatte, im Hotel, aber ich hoffe, Sie verzeihen mir diese etwas legere Aufmachung. Vielen Dank. Sollte jemand ein Jackett anhaben, dann darf er es natürlich ablegen. Jetzt wollen wir doch mal sehen, ob dieses Gerät funktioniert, großartig. Also, bevor wir uns der Zukunft des Lebens zuwenden, möchte ich gerne erst etwas in der Zeit zurückgehen, nur ein paar Millionen Jahre. Wie Sie hier sehen, ist das eine Skala. Mir ist nicht ganz klar, warum Sie jetzt applaudieren, aber kein Problem, warten Sie bis zum Ende dieses Vortrags. Was Sie hier sehen ist eine Zeitskala, 8 Millionen Jahre. Das ist ein langer Zeitraum aus Ihrer Sicht, und aus meiner. Aber in Bezug auf die Geschichte des Lebens ist das nur ein Augenblick, denn die ersten Tiere traten vor sechshundert Millionen Jahren auf, das ist etwa eine halbe Meile von hier. Und die ersten Spuren des Lebens auf der Erde wurden in Gebieten entdeckt aus einer Zeit von vor beinahe 3,6 Milliarden Jahren, sechsunddreißighundert Millionen Jahre zurück, vor einer sehr, sehr langen Zeit also verglichen mit diesen allerletzten Jahren in der Geschichte des Lebens. Aber genau diese letzten Jahre sind von besonderer Bedeutung für uns Menschen. Und was ich auf dieser Skala zeige ist das Volumen des Gehirns, das Volumen des Gehirns der Individuen, deren Schädel, fossile Schädel aus jener Zeit vor allem in Afrika gefunden wurden, und was ich zeigen möchte ist die Änderung des Volumens, der Größe des Gehirns während dieser Zeit. Hier zur Rechten haben wir die Größe des Gehirns des Schimpansen, etwa 350 Kubikzentimeter und so etwa das größte Gehirn eines Tieres im Vergleich zur Körpergröße im gesamten Tierreich, abgesehen natürlich vom Menschen. Dann, vor etwa 6 Millionen Jahren, oder sogar später, geschah etwas, hier gab es ein Individuum mit der Bezeichnung Australopithecus africanus. Er ist eine Art entfernter Verwandter von Lucy, natürlich haben Sie alle schon von Lucy gehört, und Lucy hatte ein Gehirn von etwa 400 Kubikzentimetern und lebte etwa eine halbe Million Jahre und starb dann aus. Die Länge dieser Linie zeigt daher den Zeitraum, aus dem Funde fossiler Schädel dieses Exemplars, nicht dieses Exemplars sondern der Spezies, gefunden wurden. Und lassen Sie uns fortfahren, hier sehen Sie den nächsten, Paranthropus boisei, und weiter geht es mit Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster, Homo erectus, der, wie Sie sehen können, ein und eine halbe Million Jahre lebte, bevor er ausstarb. Danach haben wir heidelbergensis und danach neandertalensis. Und danach kamen Sie und ich mit einem etwas kleineren Gehirn als das des Neandertalers, kleiner, aber vermutlich effizienter. Und das ist die ganze Geschichte des Gehirns, und wenn wir dies alles verknüpfen, sehen wir etwas, das wirklich das außergewöhnlichste Ereignis in der ganzen Evolution ist, dies ist der fantastische Anstieg der Größe des Gehirns über ungefähr 2 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Erinnern wir uns, das Gehirn des Schimpansen brauchte sechshundert Millionen Jahre, um diese Größe zu erreichen, sechshundert Millionen. Und hier sehen Sie, wie sich die Größe in nur 2 Millionen Jahren vervierfacht. Das ist ein absolut außergewöhnliches Ereignis, niemand konnte das bisher aus genetischer Sicht erklären und ich glaube, es können nur sehr wenige Gene daran beteiligt gewesen sein, daher ist es ein wirklich außergewöhnliches Geschehen. Es ist außergewöhnlich in Bezug auf die Größe, auf die Schnelligkeit, aber es ist auch außergewöhnlich in Bezug auf die Kleinheit. Denn nur 4 Mal so viele Neuronen, vier Mal, machen den Unterschied aus zwischen einem Schimpansen und einem Menschen. sie können einen Zweig nehmen, die Blätter entfernen, den Zweig in ein Termitennest stecken, dann warten und ihn wieder herausziehen, dann lecken sie die Termiten ab. So kommen Sie an Insekten, um sich davon zu ernähren. Und das ist Herstellen von Werkzeugen, wozu eine gewisse Intelligenz erforderlich ist. Aber wir, d. h. unsere Vorfahren, mit ungefähr der doppelten Gehirngröße, wir fertigten Werkzeuge aus Stein. Auch Schimpansen benutzen einen Stein, um eine Nuss zu knacken oder den Schädel des Nachbarn, aber unsere Vorfahren waren viel besser. Sie hoben den Stein nicht nur auf, sie begannen, ihn zu behauen und alle möglichen Arten von Werkzeug daraus zu formen, und so stellten sie wirkungsvollere und raffiniertere Steinwerkzeuge her. Aber selbst das ist nichts im Vergleich zu dem, was wir leisten. Mit nur vier Mal so vielen Neuronen wie der Schimpanse schicken wir Menschen zum Mond, wir senden Nachrichten um die ganze Welt, wir entschlüsseln das menschliche Genom, wir manipulieren das Leben, wir tun all die außergewöhnlichen Dinge, die, das wissen Sie besser als ich, heute getan werden, mit nur vier Mal so vielen Neuronen wie der Schimpanse. Ich halte das für absolut bemerkenswert und die Neurobiologen werden erklären müssen, wie es mit einem solch kleinen Unterschied möglich ist, ich meine, wie es damit zu einem so großen Unterschied bei den Ergebnissen kommen kann. OK, jetzt möchte ich mit Ihnen das Ende der Geschichte zahlenmäßig betrachten. Hier ist eine andere Zeitskala, wir betrachten die Bevölkerung in Relation zur Zeit. Vor einer halben Milliarde Jahre – gut, es gab keinen Zensus, aber es wird vermutet, dass die menschliche Bevölkerung aus dreitausend Individuen bestand – vor 200.000 Jahren, zu einer Zeit also, als wir uns bereits von den Neandertalern getrennt hatten, wird geschätzt, dass es etwa 10.000 Menschen gab. OK, dann vor 10 000 Jahren, das ist zur Zeit der ersten menschlichen Siedlungen, als die Menschen begannen, Land zu kultivieren und Vieh zu halten usw., fünf bis zehn Millionen Individuen. Vor 1.600 Jahren, zu Zeiten von Galileo, von Descartes, nicht vor 1.600 Jahren, sondern im Jahr 1600, eine halbe Milliarde, das ist bereits eine ganze Menge, eine halbe Milliarde. Zu der Zeit war ich fast schon mit der Schule fertig, besuchte beinahe die Universität, aber egal, das spielt keine Rolle. Zwei Milliarden, das ist die Zahl, die ich in der Schule lernte, wir sind 2 Milliarden. So in der Zwischenzeit hat sich das geändert, von 1930 bis 1970, das sind vier Jahre bevor ich einen Nobelpreis erhielt, vier Milliarden. Im Verlauf nur eines Lebens, von zwei auf vier. Heute, oder gestern, 2009, sechseinhalb Milliarden, morgen, vielleicht neun Milliarden, vielleicht mehr, wer weiß. Das ist also wirklich ein atemberaubendes Bevölkerungswachstum, es ist sogar noch erschreckender, wenn Sie die Kurve betrachten, sehen wie diese Zahl plötzlich mehr als exponentiell ansteigt. Was dies bedeutet ist, dass wir, die menschliche Rasse, Homo sapiens sapiens, unter all den lebenden Organismen, die je auf diesem Planeten existiert haben, wir sind die erfolgreichste Spezies. Wir begannen in Zentralafrika, in kleinen Horden, die in Zentralafrika umherstreiften, wir haben unseren gesamten Planeten eingenommen, beinahe jedes bewohnbare Fleckchen dieses Planeten besetzt. Wir nutzen beinahe alle verfügbaren Ressourcen zu unserem eigenen Vorteil, wir sind wirklich ungeheuer erfolgreich geworden. Aber dieser Erfolg hat einen Preis. Ich habe erklärt, wie wir zur erfolgreichsten, bei weitem erfolgreichsten Spezies auf diesem Planeten geworden sind, aber, wie ich schon sagte, es gibt einen Preis, der bezahlt werden muss, und betrachten wir einmal die Kosten dieses Erfolgs. Sie schalten Ihren Fernseher ein, Sie schlagen Ihre Zeitung auf, Sie schalten Ihr Radio ein und Sie hören davon. Daher führe ich den Preis einfach nur auf, denn jeder weiß, dass die Kosten unseres Erfolgs die Erschöpfung der natürlichen Ressourcen sind, beinahe die vollständige Erschöpfung. Es ist der Verlust der Artenvielfalt, jeden Tag verschwinden Spezies, lebende Spezies. Abholzung, Versteppung, die Wälder im Amazonasgebiet verschwinden mit atemberaubender Geschwindigkeit, die Wüsten breiten sich aus. Klimaveränderungen, wir alle wissen von den Klimaveränderungen, aber wir hören vom Klimawandel nur in der Zeitung, aber der Klimawandel ist nur ein kleiner Aspekt der ganzen Tragödie, die wir über unseren Planeten gebracht haben. Energiekrise, Sie wissen, wie wir alle versuchen, neue Wege zur Deckung unseres Energiebedarfs zu finden, denn wir verbrauchen immer mehr Energie. Wir verbrauchen an einem Tag mehr Energie als unsere Vorfahren in der afrikanischen Savanne in einem Jahr. Umweltverschmutzung, wir verschmutzen die Erde in einem Ausmaß, das sie in bestimmten Gegenden unbewohnbar macht. Überbevölkerte Städte, das wird zu einem Hauptproblem, wenn Sie einmal nach Tokio oder Mexiko City oder Sao Paolo oder sogar London, Paris, Brüssel reisen, dann begegnen Ihnen die Auswirkungen von zu vielen Menschen auf zu wenig Raum. Konflikte und Kriege, das brauche ich Ihnen nicht zu erzählen, ich habe in meinem Leben zwei Kriege erlebt, und Kriege und Konflikte toben heute auf der ganzen Welt. All das brauche ich Ihnen nicht zu erzählen. Und natürlich, das Hauptproblem unseres Erfolges ist natürlich, dass es einfach zu viele von uns gibt. Es gibt zu viele von uns. Und wer ist schuld daran? Wer ist dafür verantwortlich? Nun, es ist nicht ein „Wer“, sondern ein „Was“. Es ist die natürliche Selektion. Ich glaube, Dr. Arber hat Ihnen bereits die Theorie der natürlichen Selektion vorgestellt, und ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen die Theorie der natürlichen Selektion. Lassen Sie mich nur kurz erwähnen, bei der natürlichen Selektion beginnen Sie mit Vielfalt, Variabilität. Variabilität führt zu Konflikt, Wettbewerb zwischen den verschiedenen Varianten um die verfügbaren Ressourcen. Und aus diesem Konflikt gehen die Individuen oder Gruppen hervor, die am überlebensfähigsten sind, und insbesondere, die sich unter den herrschenden Bedingungen am besten fortpflanzen konnten. Natürliche Selektion ist also einfach das automatische, zwangsläufige Hervorgehen unter bestimmten gegebenen Bedingungen der Spezies oder Individuen oder Gruppen, die am ehesten fähig sind, zu überleben, und sich fortzupflanzen, insbesondere sich fortzupflanzen unter diesen Umständen, das ist natürliche Selektion. Jetzt dürfen wir bei der natürlichen Selektion aber einen wichtigen Aspekt nicht vergessen: Natürliche Selektion handelt unmittelbar, im Hier und Jetzt. Natürliche Selektion wirft keinen Blick in die Zukunft, natürliche Selektion wirft keinen Blick in die Zukunft und berechnet, welche Menge an Energie noch zur Verfügung steht, und sagt „Stopp“, wir müssen uns ändern, sonst gibt es nicht mehr… Natürliche Selektion kann das nicht, natürliche Selektion kümmert sich nur um das Hic und Nunc, das Hier und Jetzt. Versuchen wir jetzt einmal, in die Frühgeschichte unserer Spezies zurückzugehen, in eine Zeit, sagen wir vor 200.000 Jahren, zu der es, wie Sie gesehen haben, etwa 10.000 Menschen gab. Nun, diese 10.000 Menschen vor 200.000 Jahren lebten nicht alle an einem Ort. Sie lebten in kleinen Horden von vielleicht 30 oder 50 Individuen und sie durchstreiften die afrikanische Savanne oder die afrikanischen Wälder, und was taten sie? Nun, sie suchten nach Nahrung, sie suchten nach Nahrung, denn Ihr Hauptproblem, Ihr Hauptanliegen war das Überleben. Das Überleben und das Produzieren von Nachwuchs, Fortpflanzung, Überleben und Fortpflanzung, und so suchten sie nach Nahrung, sie suchten nach Tieren zum Jagen, denn zu jener Zeit mussten sie auch ab und zu jagen. Und welche Eigenschaften nützten unseren Vorfahren vor 200.000 Jahren am meisten, wenn sie dies taten, Nahrung suchen, Unterschlupf suchen, gegen Raubtiere kämpfen. Nun, ich würde sagen, die zu dieser Zeit benötigte Eigenschaft war gruppenbezogener Egoismus, zwei Wörter. Egoismus, weil Sie sich um sich selbst kümmern müssen, wenn Sie ums Überleben kämpfen, Sie denken nicht an die Anderen, Sie wollen überleben, Sie müssen eigennützig sein, Sie müssen egoistisch sein, Sie suchen nach eigenen Mitteln zum Überleben. Wenn Sie jedoch Teil einer Gruppe sind, ist es für die Mitglieder dieser Gruppe von größerem Vorteil, einander zu helfen, statt einander zu bekämpfen. Denn wenn sie zusammenarbeiten, steigen Ihre Chancen zu überleben, und daher bevorzugt die natürliche Selektion die Eigenschaften oder die genetischen Merkmale, die für das Überleben und/oder die Produktion des Anliegens der Gruppe nützlich waren, also Gruppenegoismus. Aber wie ich schon sagte, war dies nicht die einzige Gruppe, es gab 50 oder 100 solcher Gruppen, die alle das Gleiche taten, sie durchstreiften die Savanne oder die Wälder Zentralafrikas. Von Zeit zu Zeit begegneten sie sich, zwei Gruppen begegneten sich. Und was geschah? Nun, jede Gruppe suchte nach den besten Jagdgründen, nach den besten Stellen, um Nahrung zu finden, den besten Unterschlupf, und daher: Konflikt. Wenn Sie aufeinandertrafen gab es Konflikt, jeder versuchte, die besseren Jagdgründe oder die bessere Nahrung zu erlangen, jeder versuchte, die besten Weibchen, die attraktivsten Weibchen zumindest, zu erobern und so weiter. Also gab es neben dem auf die Gruppe bezogenen Egoismus Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen, Konflikt, Aggressivität. Die Eigenschaften, die bei unseren Vorfahren vor 200.000 Jahren selektiert wurden, da sie ihnen zu dieser Zeit nützten, waren also auf die Gruppe bezogener Egoismus und Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen. Und sehen wir uns die Welt heute an: Es hat sich nichts geändert. Es hat sich nichts geändert. Die Gruppen haben sich geändert. Nicht länger sind es Stämme, Familien oder Clans, es sind Menschengruppen, die sich um etwas wie Nation, Religion, Glaube, Kultur usw. scharen. Aber die Kämpfe gehen weiter, ich habe zwei gesehen, und der Kampf geht heute auf der ganzen Welt weiter. Die Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen ist heute immer noch sehr existent, und der auf die Gruppe bezogene Egoismus ist heute noch existent, Bankleute arbeiten für Bankleute, Wissenschaftler für Wissenschaftler und so weiter. Ich meine also nicht, dass Wissenschaftler für die Menschheit arbeiten, die, die ich kenne, sondern im Allgemeinen arbeiten wir alle für uns selbst. Und so ist der Gruppenegoismus heute immer noch aktiv, unsere Gene haben sich nicht geändert, denn in diesen 200.000 Jahren gab es für sie keinen Grund dazu. Es gab keinerlei Umstand, durch den es für sie nützlich gewesen wäre, sich zu ändern. Daher hat sich bis heute nichts geändert, und gibt es etwas, das wir tun können? Was können wir tun, um zu versuchen, diese negativen Auswirkungen natürlicher Selektion, die sich in unseren Genen eingeprägt hat, auszugleichen. Diese hässlichen Eigenschaften, die für unsere Vorfahren vorteilhaft waren, aber für uns heute abscheulich und schädlich sind. Ich glaube, die Tatsache, dass etwas mit der menschlichen Natur nicht stimmt, wurde bereits vor mehreren Tausend Jahren von jenen weisen Menschen erkannt, die die Bibel schrieben. Sie wussten natürlich nichts über Gene, über DNA, über natürliche Selektion, aber sie wussten etwas über die menschliche Natur und sie wussten etwas über Vererbung. Und so erkannten Sie, dass etwas mit der menschlichen Natur nicht stimmt, und so erfanden sie eine Erklärung. Und so erfanden sie den Garten Eden, und Adam und Eva, und die Schlange, und den Baum und den Apfel und die Sünde, die Ursünde, die für diesen Fehler in der menschlichen Natur verantwortlich ist, den sie erfanden. Und daher heißt mein neuestes Buch „Die Genetik der Ursünde“, und es ist eine Erklärung oder ein Versuch zu erklären, was das ist. Und damit komme ich zur letzten Frage: Gibt es etwas, das wir tun können? Nun, in diesem neusten Buch, Die Genetik der Ursünde, betrachte ich sieben Möglichkeiten. Sieben Szenarien für die Zukunft, und damit komme ich zum Thema meines Vortrags und ich habe noch fünf Minuten. Erstens: Nichts tun. Das ist das, was wir heute tun, beinahe nichts. Nun, wenn wir nichts tun, ist es leicht vorherzusagen, was geschehen wird, denke ich. Es wird immer schlechter werden. Es kann nur immer schlechter werden, wir überlassen der natürlichen Selektion einfach ihre hässliche Arbeit und es wird schlechter werden, und bald wird es so schlimm sein, dass Leben auf diesem Planeten äußerst schwierig wird, dass die Bedingungen für das Leben mehr und mehr bedroht und gefährdet werden, und dass wir, die menschliche Rasse sich schrittweise dem Aussterben nähert. Sie haben selbst gesehen, dass alle, die vor uns da waren, meine erste Folie, mit dem Aussterben endeten, die Neandertaler vor nur 35 000 Jahren, warum also nicht wir, warum nicht wir? Tja, das ist eine gute Frage, aber Sie müssen bedenken, dass das Aussterben von zehn Milliarden Individuen nicht dasselbe ist wie das Aussterben von 10.000 in Zentralafrika. Zehn Milliarden über die ganze Welt verteilt, das heißt, dass, bevor wir aussterben, die undenkbarsten, apokalyptischen Ereignisse stattfinden können, Feuer, Epidemien und was nicht alles. Wenn wir den Dingen ihren Lauf lassen, wird es nicht genug zu essen für Alle geben, kein Klima, das uns erhält, daher sind wir dem Untergang geweiht, wenn wir nichts dagegen tun. Zum Glück haben wir von der natürlichen Selektion ein Geschenk bekommen, das keine andere lebende Spezies besitzt. Wir von allen lebenden Organismen, die jemals auf diesem Planeten existiert haben, wir sind die Einzigen, die in der Lage sind, dank dieses Gehirns, das wir von der natürlichen Selektion erhalten haben dank dieses Gehirns haben wir die Fähigkeit erhalten, etwas zu tun, wozu die natürliche Selektion nicht in der Lage ist. Wir können einen Blick in die Zukunft werfen, wir können Annahmen treffen über das, was geschehen wird, wenn wir dies tun oder wenn wir jenes tun. Wir können Entscheidungen für die Zukunft treffen und wir können uns diesen Entscheidungen entsprechend verhalten. Daher können wir auch gegen die natürliche Selektion handeln, wir sind die einzigen lebenden Organismen auf diesem Planeten mit der Fähigkeit, gezielt, absichtlich, willentlich, bewusst gegen die natürliche Selektion zu handeln. Und daher ist dies genau das, was wir tun müssen, bevor es zu spät ist. Und daher ist das Erste, was wir tun können: unsere Gene verbessern. Wir haben schlechte Gene? OK, tun wir also, was wir mit Pflanzen und Tieren machen, entfernen wir die schlechten Gene und ersetzen sie durch gute Gene. Wir können GMOs produzieren, genetisch modifizierte Organismen, warum also nicht auch GMMs, genetisch modifizierte Menschen? Nun, technisch ist dies nicht ganz möglich, aus Gründen, auf die wir hier nicht eingehen werden, wir können das bei Tieren machen, aber bei Menschen wäre es ungleich schwieriger. Ethisch ist das natürlich etwas, das niemand heute machen möchte, und auf jeden Fall, selbst wenn es technisch und ethisch möglich wäre, wüssten wir gar nicht, was wir tun sollten. Wir wüssten ganz einfach nicht, was wir tun sollten, da wir nichts über die Zusammenhänge zwischen Genen und Fähigkeiten wissen. Wollten wir einen neuen kleinen Mozart erschaffen, wir wüssten nicht, welche Gene zu entfernen wären und welche Gene hinzuzufügen, um einen neuen Mozart zu erschaffen, oder um eine neue Venus Williams oder eine neue Angela Merkel zu erschaffen. Wir wüssten nicht, was zu tun wäre. Daher vergessen Sie es, dies ist keine Lösung. Nächste Möglichkeit: Neuverdrahtung des Gehirns. Jetzt verwende ich das Wort „Verdrahtung“, weil es ein sehr technischer Ausdruck ist, was ich meine ist Erziehung, erziehen. Denn eine Neuverdrahtung des Gehirns, ich glaube, es ist sehr wichtig darüber Bescheid zu wissen, und, wie Sie wissen, haben Neurobiologen in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten wichtige Erkenntnisse darüber gewonnen, wie das Gehirn verdrahtet ist. Uns wurde gesagt, dass, wenn wir geboren werden, nur ein kleiner Teil des Gehirns bereits verdrahtet ist, und dass die Verdrahtung unter dem Einfluss all der Stimuli, Geräusche und visuellen Stimuli und Berührung und so weiter, erfolgt. Ein Baby nimmt die Einflüsse der Umwelt auf und diese Einflüsse erzeugen Netze im Gehirn des Babys. So wird das Gehirn schon in sehr jungen Jahren verdrahtet und, wie Sie sehen, ist das wichtig für das, auf das ich hinaus will, und daher ist das, was wir brauchen, Erziehung. Insbesondere Erziehung in jungen Jahren. Und wenn wir Erziehung brauchen, bedeutet das, dass wir Erzieher brauchen. Daher lautet die Frage, wenn Sie erziehen möchten, brauchen Sie Erzieher, aber wer erzieht die Erzieher? Damit kommen wir zu einer anderen Frage: Wo finden wir die weisen Männer und Frauen, die sich der Erziehung der Erzieher widmen? Eine offensichtliche Antwort darauf ist, bei den Religionen. Die Religionen sind seit beinahe einem Jahrtausend, Jahrhunderten, stark an der Erziehung der Jugend und sogar der Erwachsenen beteiligt. Sie verfügen über ein weltumspannendes Netz aus Schulen und Gemeinden und Versammlungshallen und Kirchen, in denen sie Einfluss nehmen können. Manche Religionen, wie die katholische Religion, können eine Milliarde Menschen auf der ganzen Welt beeinflussen, sie verfügen daher über ein riesiges Potenzial oder die Macht, zu tun, was nötig ist, die Erziehung. Und genau da, Ich hoffe, Sie nehmen es mir nicht übel oder sind jetzt enttäuscht, denke ich, dass die Religionen Ihre Aufgabe nicht richtig erfüllen. Ich denke, Sie sind mehr damit beschäftigt, ihren eigenen Glauben zu verteidigen, ihre eigenen Ideologien, ihre eigenen Doktrinen, ihre eigenen Hierarchien, sie sind weit mehr mit ihrem eigenen Überleben beschäftigt als mit dem Überleben der Welt. Sie sind mehr mit glücklicher Lobbyarbeit in der nächsten Welt beschäftigt, aber nicht in dieser Welt. Und daher glaube ich, leider, ich hoffe, es wird sich etwas ändern, und es gab heute Anzeichen, dass sich etwas ändert, ich denke es muss, von Leuten wie Ihnen, ein Anstoß ausgehen, der die Hierarchie hinaufgeht, und diesen alten Männern mitteilt, dass Veränderung notwendig ist. Ich bin froh, dass Sie mir da zustimmen, zumindest einige von Ihnen. So, egal, Ich glaube, dass mit Ihnen hier und Ihren Zeitgenossen in dieser Welt, dies immer noch geschehen kann, und ich hoffe sehr, dass es geschehen wird. Mittlerweile gibt es eine andere Religion, nämlich den Schutz der Umwelt. Nun, ich glaube, das ist eine sehr wichtige Sache, wir haben gesehen, in welchem Ausmaß die Entwicklung der menschlichen Rasse die Umwelt geschädigt hat, und daher glaube ich, dieses neue Anliegen, denn dieses gab es noch nicht, als ich jung war. Dies begann kurz nach dem Krieg, diese Sorge um die Umwelt gibt es noch nicht sehr lange, und ich glaube, sie ist extrem wichtig, und wir sollten alle zu dieser Aufgabe beitragen. Aber auch hier glaube ich, die Organisationen, die versuchen, die Umwelt zu schützen, machen das nicht so, wie sie es machen sollten, manche zumindest nicht, denn sie sind zu politischen Parteien geworden. Sie verteidigen Politikstile, etwa sind sie gegen multinationale Konzerne und sie sind gegen Kapitalismus, aber wie dem auch sei, sie sind mehr zu politischen Parteien geworden als zu Umweltschutzbewegungen. Ein weiteres Problem mit den Umweltschutzbewegungen ist, dass sie zu einer Art Religion degeneriert sind, einer Art Jean-Jacques-Rousseau-Religion, die auf dem Glauben basiert, die Natur sei perfekt. Dass man in die Natur nicht eingreifen sollte, denn die Natur ist heilig, und alles, was natürlich ist, ist gut, und wir sollten uns in die Natur nicht einmischen, wir sollten uns in das Leben auf der Erde nicht einmischen und so weiter. Nun, das ist lächerlich, denn die Natur ist nicht gut, die Natur ist nicht schlecht, die Natur ist gleichgültig. Die natürliche Selektion achtet nicht auf die Eigenschaften der Organismen, denen sie gestattet, zu entstehen, sie ist blind. Sie ist passiv, die Natur sorgt gleichermaßen für den Schimmelpilz, der Penicillin hervorbringt, wie für das Virus, das HIV, AIDS, verursacht. Sie sorgt gleichermaßen für den Dichter wie für den Skorpion. Die Natur ist nicht gut, sie ist nicht schlecht, sie ist gleichgültig. Und noch mal, ich glaube, wir sollten die Umwelt schützen, aber wir sollten versuchen, diese Sorge um die Umwelt, die extrem wichtig ist, frei zu machen, wir sollten sie freimachen von ihren politischen Verwicklungen und von ihren ideologischen Verwicklungen. OK, nächstes Szenario… Erstaunlich, auch alle Männer applaudieren. Nun, Ich freue mich, es ist nicht erstaunlich, es bedeutet, dass sie intelligent sind. Gebt Frauen eine Chance, na gut, es geht hier nicht um, ich bin kein Sozialarbeiter, ich bin kein Politiker, daher vertrete ich auch nicht irgendein feministisches Programm. Was ich hier tue, ich spreche als Wissenschaftler. Bei Säugetieren sind die Weibchen weniger durch diese Ursünde verdorben, durch diesen Fehler, den ich erwähnt habe, aufgrund ihrer biologischen Natur. Sie sind weniger aggressiv, Kriege wurden überwiegend von Männern ausgefochten, nicht von Frauen. Frauen kümmern sich um die Kranken, sie kümmern sich um die Verwundeten, sie kümmern sich um die sexuellen Bedürfnisse der Soldaten, aber sie kämpfen selten, sie kämpfen selten, außer unter außergewöhnlichen Umständen. Sie sind nicht aggressiv, außer, wenn ihre Jungen bedroht werden, dann kann ein Weibchen aggressiv werden. Daher sind sie biologisch, genetisch weniger aggressiv als die Männchen. Auch üben sie sehr viel mehr Einfluss aus als die Männchen auf die Früherziehung der Jungen. Sie gebären diese Babys, das wird sich auch in naher Zukunft nicht ändern, sie gebären die Babys und sie nähren sie, sie füttern die Babys. Und so sorgen sie für die sehr frühe Erziehung der Babys und sind daher, glaube ich, biologisch besser geeignet die Welt zu führen. Leider sehen wir heutzutage – und ich gelange am Ende immer zu bedauerlichen Gegebenheiten – aber was wir in der heutigen Welt sehen ist, dass – vielleicht um die Macht zu erlangen, von der ich wünschte, dass sie sie hätten – dass sich Frauen wie Männer verhalten müssen, ob auf der politischen Bühne oder auf dem Tennisplatz und so weiter. Aber wie dem auch sei, ich glaube, es ist wichtig, Frauen eine Chance zu geben. Nun, ich sehe meinen Vorsitzenden… Sie wissen, dass danach nichts mehr kommt, daher habe ich doch zwei weitere Minuten… Sie nehmen es mir nicht übel, hoffe ich. Ich nehme niemandem die Zeit weg. OK, gut. Lassen Sie uns daher die letzte Option betrachten, die offensichtlich die wichtigste von allen ist, Bevölkerungskontrolle. Denn alles Übel, das ich erwähnt habe, hat eine einzige Ursache, es gibt einfach zu viele Menschen auf der Welt. Sie haben die Kurve gesehen, die ich gezeigt habe. Es ist atemberaubend, es ist beängstigend zu sehen, wie schnell unsere Zahl in der kurzen Zeit gestiegen ist, eine Vervierfachung, vom Jahr, in dem ich geboren wurde, bis heute. Es ist schrecklich, erschreckend. Und deshalb müssen wir etwas dagegen tun. Nun, wie Sie wissen war Thomas Malthus ein Ökonom am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts, und er hat dies vorhergesagt, er sagte, dass sich die Menschen geometrisch, exponentiell vermehren werden, die Ressourcen jedoch nur arithmetisch, linear wachsen können und dass daher der Tag kommen wird, an dem es zu viele Mäuler zu stopfen gibt im Verhältnis zur verfügbaren Nahrung. Und daher, so sagte er, gibt es nur zwei Lösungen. Zum einen, es wie die Jäger zu machen, auszumerzen, die Kranken, die Alten auszusieben, sie loszuwerden. Und die andere Möglichkeit ist zu verhindern, dass überzählige Menschen geboren werden. Also entweder aussieben oder verhindern, dass sie geboren werden. Nun, wir sind sehr gut im Aussieben, nicht die Kranken und die Alten, sondern vor allem die jungen Menschen. In den letzten beiden Kriegen, ich weiß nicht, wie viele Millionen junger Männer und Frauen ihr Leben verloren, bevor sie in der Lage waren, sich fortzupflanzen. Das war also eine eher widerliche Art zu verhindern, dass Menschen geboren werden. Dennoch ist der humanere Weg ganz offensichtlich, ihre Geburt zu verhindern, als sie nach der Geburt zu töten. Dies sollten wir daher tun, und 200 Jahre lang sagten die Leute, Malthus hätte Unrecht, denn jedes Mal, wenn Malthus’ Vorhersage kurz davor war, sich zu bewahrheiten, gab es irgendeine neue Entwicklung, Technik in der Landwirtschaft oder Ausbau der Ressourcen, und so wurde der Erde gestattet bzw. sie wurde gezwungen, mehr und mehr Individuen zu ernähren. Heute jedoch kann es niemand mehr übersehen. Heute gibt es keinen Raum mehr, wir können nicht den Mond bepflanzen oder gar den Mars, vergessen Sie so was. Wir müssen auf diesem kleinen Planeten leben und dieser kleine Planet ist zu eng geworden, oder wir sind zu viele geworden. Also müssen wir wirklich, ich denke, das ist die wichtigste Lektion daraus, müssen wir etwas gegen das Bevölkerungswachstum tun, wenn möglich durch Verhinderung, durch Geburtenkontrolle. Ich hoffe, ich habe nicht zu sehr überzogen, aber ich komme jetzt zu meinem Fazit. Ich möchte es vorlesen, denn ich möchte sichergehen, dass es klar wird. Es ist noch nicht alles verloren, aber es ist nicht mehr zu übersehen. Wenn wir nicht bald handeln, um unsere genetische Tendenz zum gruppenbezogenen Egoismus und zur Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen zu überwinden, ist die Zukunft der Menschheit und eines Großteils des Lebens auf der Erde in ernster Gefahr, möglicherweise mit dem Ergebnis eines völligen Aussterbens unter Bedingungen, die man sich nur als apokalyptisch vorstellen kann. Und hiermit wende ich mich an die jungen Leute, das ist das Beste an diesen Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertreffen, und so lange ich körperlich in der Lage bin zu kommen, werde ich wiederkommen, denn hier treffen wir die jungen Leute dieser Welt. Und sie sind hier und ich möchte mich an all die jungen Leute in diesem Publikum wenden und Ihnen sagen, ich möchte Ihnen sagen: Meine Generation, unsere Generation hat ein Chaos angerichtet. Es liegt an Ihnen, es besser zu machen. Die Zukunft liegt in Ihrer Hand. Viel Erfolg. Danke, danke, vielen Dank!

Christian de Duve
The Future of Life
(00:21:24 - 00:24:38)

 

Food: Fact and Fiction

So why has the Malthusian catastrophe not occurred? The answer is simple: food production grew faster than predicted. Reasons for this unexpected growth are improvements in agricultural technology and efficiency. A true expert in this field was Finnish Nobel Laureate Artturi Virtanen. Virtanen had received the 1945 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his research and inventions in agricultural and nutrition chemistry [...]”. At the 1961 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, he discussed the question of global food supply and gave a detailed account of the scientific advances and success stories that enabled global food production to keep up with population growth. He also took an optimistic look into the future of global food.


Artturi Virtanen
Opportunities of Nutrition for Mankind and Chemistry (German presentation)
(00:50:04 - 00:55:32)


Today (2014), more than half a century after Virtanen’s predictions, we can say that his optimism was justified. Even though world population doubled since 1961, food production did not fall behind. But will this continue to be the case? Or will we not inevitably run into a catastrophe, even if it occurs later than predicted? At the 2013 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, 1997 Physics Laureate and former United States Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave an answer:


Steven Chu (2013) - The Energy and Climate Change Challenges and Opportunities

I’m going to start right into the talk. Very briefly the outline of the talk is to first show that technical innovations based on science have truly changed the world. That if necessity is the mother of all inventions, then we have the "mother of all necessities", namely how to deal with climate change. And finally, science and innovation again is needed to transform the world as it has in the past. So let me remind you very quickly: the invention of the steam engine, the improvement of the steam engine really issued in a new era. And here you see an iconic warship Temeraire being towed by a steam belching tug boat to its final berth where it’s going to be chopped up for scrap. It’s really the setting of an era and the opening of a new age. There are other transformative technologies. For example in an institution I worked at for 9 years, AT&T Bell Laboratories, they were developing vacuum tubes in the ‘20s and ‘30s and ‘40s because they needed vacuum tubes for long distance communication. For those of you in the audience who are under the age of 60: That’s what a vacuum tube looks like. But these things burned out. They were heated up to red hot and eventually they burned out after 1, 2, 3, 4 years. And this is not good for transcontinental undersea cables. So they wanted to develop a solid state vacuum tube. And they set out on a programme that lasted 9, 10 years; a concerted programme to say let’s use our understanding of quantum mechanics and see if we can develop a solid state vacuum tube. The inventors Shockley, Brattain, Bardeen were awarded the Nobel Prize for this work. That was the first transistor. It looks pretty ugly, something only a mother could love. (laughter) However, they knew it would lead to other things. This is the first integrated circuit - even uglier - with only 4 components. And yet over a period of several decades, constant improvements, constant innovation went from a 4-device circuit like this to devices that have 10 billion or more transistors in a single chip, perhaps a centimetre square. In addition to that innovations in optical fibres, lasers, innovations in wireless technology really transformed the world. So out of this I want to emphasise, as you’ve heard before, that fundamental research is the foundation for the development of this technology. However, mission-driven R&D was also necessary, and it occurred over several decades. So let me now explain innovations in agriculture. In 1898 Sir William Crookes, who invented the Crookes tube, a precursor to actually an electron tube, delivers an inaugural address as president of the BritishAassociation for the Advancement of Science. But he doesn’t deliver a normal ordinary address, thank you for being here, I’m so glad to be part of this, blah; he gets up there and opens the lecture by saying, 'England and all civilised countries are in deadly peril.' And he explains that the artificial fertilisers that were being imported from Chile, Chilean saltpetre, based on the rate of mining that saltpetre and shipping it to Europe, would be depleted within a few decades. That would no longer sustain the soils of Europe, and he predicted mass starvation. However, he said, 'It is the chemist who must come to the rescue ... before we’re in the actual grip of actual death, the chemist will step in and postpone the day of famine.' - I thought that would go well with the Lindau conference and chemists. This set off an incredible race, believe it or not. Starting with Wilhelm Ostwald, the chemist in those days, who thought he developed a way of taking nitrogen and making it into ammonia. And that was the first step in making nitrogen-based fertiliser. And indeed he convinced the German company BASF to hire a chemist to prove that what he saw glimmers of in the laboratory was indeed true. And it turned out not to be true. And it was this man, Fritz Haber, who succeeded and got the Nobel Prize in 1918, collaborating with this man, Carl Bosch, who was hired by Ostwald to see if his original idea worked. In fact, I should say Haber was driven also by a competition. He wasn’t really going to do this but he was driven by a very deep conversation with another chemist, Nernst. Now this development, the synthesis of ammonia, was deemed so important they gave a Nobel Prize to Haber in 1918. They gave a second one to Bosch in 1931. And indeed when Gerhard Ertl got his Nobel Prize for understanding catalysis it was mentioned in the Nobel Prize announcement, I should also say that Ostwald and Nernst also got Nobel Prizes in chemistry. So sometimes you can get a Nobel Prize and lose a scientific race. Anyway, the Haber-Bosch process enabled the world to feed itself, even though the population doubled. But the population more than doubled, it soon tripled. And in the late 1960s a Stanford professor, Paul Ehrlich said that, in a popular book, The Population Bomb. And he wrote, ‘The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s and 1980s despite crash programmes hundreds of millions of people will starve to death – in spite of these crash programmes.' And so the question is, what actually happened? What happened actually was quite not what he expected. that had very, very thick kernels and very short stems, because the kernels were so thick and heavy that with normal wheat they would collapse under its own weight. And these strains of wheat could actually withstand artificial fertilisers and a sudden growth spurt. And so this had a profound impact on agriculture. And to show you how profound an impact: When we go from 1960 to 2005, the population more than doubled, 3 billion to 6.5 billion people. This was the grain production in the world. This was the land put under agricultural cultivation for grains, for human feed. And so the population doubled and yet we'd use the same amount of land. But we now know even despite this incredible advance that we really need a second green revolution in order to go further. We might have to go to perennial crops, much less tillage or no tillage, drought resistance for sure, and perhaps nitrogen fixation. Now, you’re probably thinking, well there’s technological fixes. We’re now 7 billion people. By 2025 we estimate to grow to 8 billion people, by 2050 9 billion people. And so what’s the point? We get a technological fix. Our population grows. We get into another mess. Where do we go from here? Ah, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. This is the projection of the population growth depending on 3 estimated fertility rates around the world. And what it really is saying is the following: By the end of this century it may be probable or possible that the population will actually peak and decline. Why is this? It’s because we’ve been noticing over the last 2 decades across all cultures, all religions, everything: The richer you get, the more you go into middle class life, you have fewer children. There may be many reasons for this: Education of women, infant mortality goes away or is greatly reduced, late night TV - choose your favourite.(laughter) But in any case for the first time we see that if you get past this century, there is light at the end of the tunnel. But you could possibly get to a sustainable world, because the population will stabilise, and indeed it may even shrink. Which puts us into another paradigm because in a growing population it’s a sort of a mild Ponzi scheme: more young people taking care of fewer old people - good. You can be somewhat inefficient. Fewer younger people taking care of older people, harder. So we have to think about that again with sustainability. So let’s talk about this necessity. The reason why I chose to leave Stanford to become a bureaucrat, shudder (laugh), and even to go to Washington, is the following. These are direct temperature measurements of the land surface of the Earth. These are several groups. The latest group went in with the eye that all the groups did the wrong thing. There was data selection; they didn’t analyse the data right. But in the end they found that indeed they may have analysed the data right. So this is 1800 to 2010, the mean average surface temperature. And you notice over this time period a few things. First, we don’t understand this plateau, or possibly even dipping. There’s another recent plateau that many people made a lot of noise about. And so we cannot predict why there are these plateaus and perhaps dips. We certainly can predict the little bumps. But we can see over a 200 year period that the temperature seems to have been rising. And in that period over the last 30 or so years, maybe ¾ of the temperature increase has occurred. And so what are the consequences of this? Well, the sea level is rising. It has gone in past millennia with hardly any change in average sea level height, it's now going above 3 millimetres per year. And there’s been a lot of toing and froing about what’s this due to? Are the glaciers really melting? And the most compelling evidence is now coming from satellite measurements. This is a GRACE satellite measurement. This is an artist’s conception of 2 satellites co-orbiting the earth, where the distance between the 2 satellites is very precisely measured. And little changes in gravity perturb these orbits and hence the distance between them. And by monitoring the distance between these 2 satellites you can actually measure the local changes in gravitational traction of the earth. And what they do when they fly over Greenland is they find: yes indeed, the ice sheet in Greenland is declining. And this is the period 2002 to 2012. The sensitivity is so good you can see summer, winter, summer, winter. But it’s not only declining, it's accelerating. It's real. They can monitor parts of Antarctica. They can monitor the Himalayan plateau. But they found the Himalayan plateau is not yet declining, right. And in parts of Antarctica it is and other parts it’s increasing. But the point here is that improved sensitivity, improved measurements, will really tell you what’s going on. Now there have been heat waves. There was a heat wave in Europe in 2003; over 50,000 people died in that single heat wave. There was a heat wave in Russia in 2010; 10 to 15,000 people died in that heat wave. But you say, well you can’t really tell a single event, whether this is a real change. It just could be an extreme single event. And so that is a valid point. So this is data from a reinsurance company - a reinsurance company is a company that insures insurance companies. Now what does that mean? If you’re an insurance company and there’s a massive flood, a massive earthquake, a massive hurricane, you don’t have the assets to pay the premiums. So you take out insurance to ensure that you can actually pay out the premiums. And so re-insurance companies are concerned about major weather events and other catastrophes. So this is Munich Re, a reinsurance company. The brown is earthquakes over a 30 year period: 1980 to 2010 and beginning of 2011. The green are meteorological events, storms. The blue are floods. The yellow are extreme heat waves, cold waves, droughts, forest fires. And this is just the number in the United States, not losses, just the number. And the United States is a well-reported country - we have lots of monitors. But what you see is the number of events seems to be climbing. In that same period, that 30 year period, with a temperature climb. In terms of insurance losses, well there were a lot. This dark blue is insured losses, the light blue is uninsured losses. If you look at this dotted line, the trend line: in the United States we went from $40 billion a year to over $170 billion a year. So this is beginning to be real money - even by Washington standards. So anyway, this is happening. And what I feel very strongly about this is... I feel we don’t understand a lot of the climate miles. We will be able to understand the climate miles in the current years and decades. But I prefer to take a very epidemiological point of view towards climate change. The way we took that view when there was a suspicion that cancer was caused by smoking – not all cancers but if you smoked you had a higher probability of cancer. And after 10 or 20 years it became very clear smoking increased the probability of getting cancer. Even though we did not have a biological molecular view of how it happened. We may not have a detailed climate model view of what’s happening, but we know something is happening if it’s correlated with the increasing temperature. So now you can say and you might have heard that the temperature has increased in previous eras, epochs. This is a long time, this right here is the present time and you’re going backward in time, this is 600,000 years ago. This is a proxy for a measurement of temperature. It is actually the amount of deuterium you’ll find in ice core samples in Greenland and in Antarctica. Why are you measuring deuterium, the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen? Deuterium weighs more than hydrogen, therefore it evaporates less quickly. And so if it evaporates and is transported over Antarctica and it comes down in snow, you’ll have depleted deuterium. And so by using this proxy, it’s a rough measure of temperature. So here we are in a very warm period relative to the last 600,000 years. You go back, this is in the ice ages. And you go back to here where you’re in another warm period with slightly higher temperatures. It’s estimated it's about 2 degrees centigrade average higher. And it's estimated, based on other evidence that I don’t have time go to into, that the sea level was at least 6.6 metres higher in this little warm period. You also can measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth. You can measure, that’s been trapped in these glaciers, the amount of nitrogen oxide, methane. And you notice at this very tail endpiece, you see these very sharp vertical lines – that’s the change in greenhouse gases in the last 200 years. And I want you to notice that we are off the scale of what has happened in the last 600,000 years. Indeed, we’re off the scale of what happened in the last 2 million years. And so that’s why there’s nervousness. Because when you have greenhouse gases, you’re trapping more heat - you don’t really know what’s going to happen. The technique is very much like geology. In this stratified rock that you look at in the geological record you have stratified layers of ice. And you go deeper and deeper into the ice cores. And then you have a time record of what’s been deposited in terms of these isotopic elements. And that’s how we get the data. There’s a lot of cross correlation with other methods to validate that this indeed is giving you the right answer. The carbon dioxide has increased, but it might have been due to natural causes. And what’s the signature that it has to do with humans? Well, the first suspicion is that this is the amount of CO2, going back a few thousand years, 5,000 years, and this is the start of the industrial revolution. So you say, um that’s a little suspicious. Also this is the population increase of the world, streaming up, starting about at the industrial revolution. But it’s just more than that. Because we have a rough idea of how much fossil fuel we put up since the start of the industrial revolution. And the numbers roughly match. So this CO2 by counting seems to be consistent with the industrial revolution. But it’s even better than that. You can look at isotopes of carbon. Carbon 14 is produced in the upper atmosphere due to cosmic rays. And then this carbon 14, which is radioactive, diffuses down into the lower biosphere, it gets mixed with all things living or inorganic. You and I have carbon 14 in our bodies. When we die - imagine you were put in a very exclusively good mausoleum, good for 10 million years. What will happen? Well, carbon 14 has a half-life of 5,700 years. When you exhume the body a million years later, it has no more carbon 14; you just got carbon 12. Now you take us and put us in a power plant. And up goes our carbon, recycled into the atmosphere. And what happens is, if there’s a significant amount of fossil fuel release, you’re adding carbon 12, not carbon 14 – remember that carbon 14 is made in the upper atmosphere. And at a steady state you would just have a steady ratio of carbon 14. So here’s the ratio of carbon 14 in the green, going down, down, down as the amount of carbon dioxide goes up, up, up. Wait a minute: data runs out in 1950. What happened in 1950? Well, what happened in the 1950s is, the first thing I’d say, it’s followed soon by Russia, the Soviet Union, were doing atmospheric testing of hydrogen bombs. Those things made a lot of carbon 14. And so the carbon 14 went sky rocketing up. And this is in the northern hemisphere, in the light green. And this is fascinating: those oscillations are the mixing of the upper stratosphere with the lower atmosphere, the yearly mixing. This time delay is the time it takes the northern hemisphere to mix with the southern hemisphere and so you have a measure of that. You see the ocean mixing, picking up of the radioactive carbon made by hydrogen bombs, first in the northern hemisphere, then in the southern hemisphere. And things seem to be going back to an equilibrium. However, it’s going down too fast. And if you look at the numbers it turns out, within 25% uncertainty - that’s the carbon 14 – that dilution of carbon 14 is consistent with the fossil fuel we burned. So it has got finger prints on it, that indeed seem to be due to humans. It’s been at least fossilised carbon that has been exhumed. Alright let’s talk briefly about science and innovation. This is why I became a director of a national lab and became Secretary of Energy, because I believe that science and technology can give us better solutions. So I’m going to very briefly talk about energy efficiency and clean energy sources. Refrigerators are wonderful, they keep your food cold. But as features got incorporated into refrigerators, for example frost free where you blow hot air into a refrigerator so you don’t have frozen ice in your freezer section, that means you had to re-cool it and your efficiency was plunging. So in 1975, starting with the State of California, we introduced refrigerator standards that insisted that the refrigerators that could be sold had to be above a certain efficiency. And of course the efficiency went up. Compared to 1975 today’s refrigerators are about 22% bigger - the average American refrigerator is enormous, it's 22 cubic feet - but it costs 3 times less to own and operate than in 1975. By the way, the size of American refrigerators is beginning to plateau. Not because of the size of the American appetite - it has to do with the size of the kitchen door. But when you’re improving the efficiency of refrigerators it was always assumed that refrigerators would then cost more. And first cost in the United States matter. Maybe you couldn’t afford the extra couple of hundred dollars to buy an efficient refrigerator. So I and a team of people said, well let’s look at the data, is that really true? And so here are refrigerators: before standards, the first Californian standards, second Californian standards, third Californian standards, federal standards - there are 6 of them in here. This is when standards start. This is the purchase price and the cost of operation. This is on a log graph. So that if you didn’t have standards you might assume that perhaps the cost of operation would be here, about $4,000 or $4,500; instead it's $1,500. A big deal. This is the purchase price of the refrigerator. It didn’t have an influence on the purchase price. We looked at other appliances. Clothes washers - ooops, standards made the purchase price go down. What’s happening? And indeed it’s not only clothes washers; in room air conditioners, in central air conditioners, the same thing happened. The introduction of standards made the first price go down. Maybe because it forced manufacturers to retool and they got more efficient. We don’t know the real reason, we’re data collectors, we’re physicists. But in any case, let me go to something else. Electric vehicles. Our goal is to produce an electric vehicle by 2022 that would cost... a 4 or 5 passenger car that would cost about $20,000/$25,000. And we call this 'EV Everywhere'. We got the president to announce this. So this was a good coup for us. You could say, well, you know electric cars, who wants to buy electric car, not a very exciting tiny thing. But let me tell you, I have a friend who owns one of these babies. This is a Tesla S - a very, very exciting car. You know - I don’t know why, who wants to go to 0-60 in 4½ seconds, but that’s what it does. And it goes 300 miles on a single charge. And if you look on the inside, that big thing in there is an LED display touch screen that is like a humongous iPhone. And you can touch it and it’s as intuitive as an iPhone. My friend, I’ve ridden in this a couple of times, and he just raves about it. He loves this car. But this car costs nearly $80,000. And so you’ve got to get the price of the car down. The performance is there, it has more luggage space than a normal car; it has a front and a back trunk, because the battery is underneath. So in 2008 the cost of manufacturing batteries was about $1,000 a kilowatt hour. And 2012 it was cut in half. Tesla claims its cost of its batteries is about $300 a kilowatt hour. Our target in the Department of Energy was: by 2022, can you get this down to maybe $150 a kilowatt hour? But it’s not only the cost. You also have to have durability; it’s got to last 8,000, 10,000, moderately deep discharges. It has to be temperature tolerant so that it can work at high temperatures, it can work at low temperatures. But if you have these qualities, at this cost or even somewhere between this cost and that cost, you have your $25,000 car that can go 300 miles, maybe 0 to 60 in 7 seconds. But that’s what we’re trying to push. Let me talk about clean energy sources. The first thing, I’m going to focus on renewables. You might ask, is there enough energy heating the Earth to even come close? And the answer is 'maybe'. There is 174 PW - peta is 10^12 - of energy heating the earth. A lot of it gets reflected back by clouds, by the atmosphere, reflected by land, but 89 petawatts are absorbed. How does that compare to what we use? Well, this is how much in kilowatt hours we use a year. This is how much is absorbed a year. And this is how much we use. So we have... it's 2 times 10^-4 of what is absorbed. So there is a little room to improve what we can do. And so it’s not clear whether - of course we can’t capture anything close to even 1/10th of this energy – but can we capture 1/10th of 1% of the energy is the issue. Now let me talk about transportation fuel. Batteries - 300 miles. Well, you can’t go 500 miles, there’s limitations in charging, but that’s actually improving dramatically. But let me tell you how good liquid transportation fuel is. And I don’t see in the foreseeable future a battery-powered plane, a commercially battery-powered plane. If you look over energy density - the amount of energy per volume, amount of energy per weight – what you find up near the top are these chemical fuels: diesel fuel, gasoline, body fat. Kerosene, ethanol - much lower energy density. Methanol, still much lower energy density. Where are lithium ion batteries? They’re so close to zero it’s hard to see. So the lithium ion batteries of today are 1½ orders of magnitude worse. But they don’t need to get an order of magnitude better. They can get a factor of 4 better. And now you’re in 300/400 miles, because the motor is so much smaller, the motor is so much more efficient. Ok so it doesn’t have this big a gap. But again for airplanes you need this stuff. I just want to take a little aside and, since I’m a professor and you’re students, I’m going to give you a quiz. What does a Boeing 777 have in common with a Bar-tailed Godwit? What’s a Bar-tailed Godwit? It’s a bird; it’s a bird about this big. This is a strange bird: it spends, 'summers' in Alaska and then it decides to fly to New Zealand, you know, in the seasonal change. Most of the time it does a fuelling stop in China but some of them actually fly nonstop from Alaska to New Zealand. Once they start flying they’re on more or less autopilot. No food, no nothing. And so when this bird takes off and when a 777 takes off, they can both fly non-stop for 11,000 kilometres. They both take off with half of their weight in fuel. And when you land: one skinny bird. But it is that high energy density of body fat, as long as the airplane... which is comparable to airplane fuel, which makes a body fat so good - unless you don’t want body fat. I’m going to skip this on terpene, because I’m running out. It has to do with unusual biofuels. It turns out that pine trees create a compound that is very, very close in oxidation states of carbon to gasoline – much better than methane, much better than carbohydrates. And so what you have here is an idea that we’re funding through an innovative funding agency RPE, which actually taps these pine trees the way you tap it for maple sugar, and you genetically modify it to get up the production of this terpene up by an order of magnitude, and we’re going to pilot this. And perhaps by just having trees already grown for lumber, you can tap them and continuously extract a compound that is very, very close to a fuel that you would want to use in an airplane or a car. And so just as a way of using land in a novel way that perhaps would work. We also are working very hard on transmission systems and energy storage. These transmission systems especially need new electronics that can up the voltage very much more efficiently, so you can get the voltage up to a million volts DC. You can send that DC power over lines: 1,000 miles with 5% loss in energy already has happened in China. So that means you can port renewable energy over 1,000’s of miles without that much loss in energy. But it costs a lot of money to get DC line voltages up and down. And so we want to develop electronics, higher frequency electronics. So instead of working at 50 hertz or 60 hertz, you work at 50 or 60 kilohertz. And you think this is a dream, but in actual fact in the RPE’s last conference a small company brought in a prototype of this converter that replaced a 70,000 pound transformer. He could pick it up by himself, in the trunk of a car, put it down in a suitcase, and it does the same thing. And so if this becomes commercially available this will be a very big deal. Also batteries. Solar energy. Solar energy has dramatically come down from $8 for a fully installed utility scale in 2004 to less than $4 in 2010. The Department of Energy goal was to get it to $1 a watt - a watt is a certain illumination power – where you think the solar module, instead of being $1.70 in 2004 could it be 40 cents? Now that is not completely a pipe dream; right now the spot price is 70 cents. And so it turns out that all the other things in the solar thing are becoming the real issue. The solar module itself, and now soon the electronics, will be less than half the cost of solar farms. But there’s still a lot of technological headroom. Normally what you do is you take very purified silicon, you cast it in ingot, you saw it up into bricks and then take a very fine diamond string saw and chop it into wafers maybe .15 millimetres thick. And you dope it and make it into a solar cell. RPE and the Department of Energy are funding an innovative approach to a new start-up company. And their approach is the following: you take a strawberry, you dip it into white chocolate, you pull it out and you can control the amount of white chocolate on the strawberry. Similarly you take a carbon substrate, you dip it in molten silicon, you hold it up, it dribbles off. And maybe instead of 150 microns you can make a 30 micron piece of silicon. Why do you want to do that? Half the cost of the solar module is the cost of silicon, and this stuff is non-recoverable. And so then you drop... at first glance you could drop the cost by ¼. And they’re getting solar conversion efficiencies now comparable with this method. So the quality of these cells is actually comparable. So that would be exciting. Here is another thing: if you live in Germany the cost of installing on your roof top solar panels is about $2.50 a watt. In the United States it costs $6 a watt. What’s going on here? Is it the cost of labour? I think not, it’s the cost of other things, especially other, what we call soft costs: licencing costs, inspection costs, things like that. And so, 'Unlike physics, where we can fundamentally figure out the upper limit for efficiency of solar cells, there’s no such upper limit to bureaucracy.' And so we have now been focusing more on actually getting the soft costs of bureaucracy down in various towns and cities across the United States. I’m going to skip this, but there’s a thing coming along which says: With very inexpensive energy storage in solar, you can put this stuff on your roof top, you can put a battery in your home, and all of a sudden you can be 80% off the grid. And this could be very disruptive. In fact, it could be so disruptive that utility companies will lose their customers. And so they are beginning to get nervous and are beginning to fight solar installations, at least in the United States. And so here’s a solution. Let the utility companies own the equipment. They maintain the equipment, they install the equipment, the module and the battery. And this is not new, that’s the way the old telephone system worked: they owned the phone; they took care of the phone, you just got phone service. So you just get electricity service for less than the cost of normal electricity. Why can it be less? It’s because... well, what do you get? You get a battery in your home that makes you immune to blackouts, for at least a few days. What does the company get? The company gets a battery in your home, which is away from the elements. So it’s a much more benign environment. And they would love to distribute batteries at the end of their distribution systems. And they get standardised equipment. And they own it. So they’re a piece of the investment, which is a growth industry. So in these things we started in the Department of Energy - they are very, very ambitious. And I tell you, as I told my students and postdocs over the last 25 years: but in setting our aim too low and achieving our mark.’ That was said by Michelangelo. So, you students, remember that. Fail, fail fast, move on - but set your aim high. Now you know as I was in politics and there were some parts of politics I really didn’t like. There was very unfair press coverage, and sometimes you get slammed. And then 7 days, 6 days after I announced I was stepping down from Secretary of Energy, I see this newspaper article, where... (laughter, applause) Let me read you some of the lines. Energy Secretary Steven Chu awoke Thursday morning to find himself sleeping next to a giant solar panel he met the previous evening - didn’t even remember the manufacturer’s name. According to sources, Chu’s encounter with the crystalline-silicon solar receptor was his most regrettable dalliance since 2009, when an extended fling with a 90-foot wind turbine nearly ended his marriage.’ I walked into work that morning. My public affairs person says, we’ve got to respond to this. So I said ok. Rolled up my sleeves, licking my chops, and out we came with a press release about noon. with the allegations made in this week’s edition of the Onion. While I’m not going to confirm or deny the charges specifically, I will say that clean renewable solar power is a growing source of U.S. jobs and is becoming more and more affordable; so it’s no surprise that lots of Americans are falling in love with solar.’ And they would not let me put in ‘despite your sexual preferences’. So you’re looking very nervous. Rather than ask for permission I’m going to ask for forgiveness. I think we have a moral responsibility to deal with this climate change issue, because it’s going to affect the most innocent victims of society: it’s the poorest people of the world, which contributed nothing to this, and those yet to be born. And there is an ancient Native American saying that says And I really need his forgiveness, but I’m not going to look at him, because I’m going to show a little movie. This is a movie of Voyager 1 that’s now finally leaving the outer reaches of the solar wind. But it was designed to look at the planets and fly by the planets; and it was launched in the 1970s. So when it was leaving the orbit of Pluto, Carl Sagan asked the NASA people, Turn the cameras backward and see if you can find Earth. And what does Earth look like at a distance, the distance of Pluto?' And this is what he found. From this distance the earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it is everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilisation, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors, so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner – how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely spec in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known so far to harbour life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot - the only home we’ve ever known. Thank you.

Ich werde gleich mit meinem Vortrag beginnen. Um Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick zu geben: Zunächst möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie wissenschaftsbasierte technische Innovationen die Welt grundlegend verändert haben. Zweitens ist zwar die Not die Mutter der Erfindung, die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels dagegen die Mutter der Notwendigkeit. Und schließlich waren und sind Wissenschaft und Innovation die Voraussetzung für die Umgestaltung der Welt. Denken Sie nur daran, wie die Erfindung bzw. Weiterentwicklung der Dampfmaschine eine ganz neue Ära einleitete. Hier sehen Sie, wie das legendäre Kriegsschiff Temeraire von einem dampfbetriebenen Schlepper zur Verschrottung an seinen letzten Liegeplatz gebracht wird. Es ist der Untergang einer Ära und der Beginn einer neuen. Auch andere Technologien veränderten die Welt. AT+T Bell Laboratories, wo ich neun Jahre lang tätig war, entwickelte beispielsweise in den 20er, 30er und 40er Jahren Vakuumröhren, weil diese für die Fernkommunikation benötigt wurden. Für alle unter 60-Jährigen im Publikum: So sieht eine Vakuumröhre aus. Da sie jedoch glühend heiß wurde, brannte sie nach ein, zwei, drei, vier Jahren durch, was für transkontinentale Seekabel nicht gut ist. Man wollte also eine Festkörper-Vakuumröhre entwickeln. Zu diesem Zweck wurde ein konzertiertes Programm ausgearbeitet, das insgesamt neun oder zehn Jahre lief. Dabei sollte unser Verständnis der Quantenmechanik zur Anwendung kommen. Die Erfinder Shockley, Brattain und Bardeen erhielten für diese Arbeit den Nobelpreis. Hier sehen Sie den ersten Transistor. Er ist ziemlich hässlich, etwas, das nur eine Mutter lieben kann. Doch sie wussten, dass dieser Transistor nur der Anfang war. Das hier ist die erste integrierte Schaltung, noch hässlicher, die aus nur vier Bauteilen besteht. Doch im Verlauf der nächsten Jahrzehnte entstanden aus diesem vierteiligen Schaltkreis durch konstante Verbesserung und Innovation Geräte mit vielleicht einen Quadratzentimeter großen Chips, auf denen sich jeweils zehn Milliarden Mal mehr Transistoren befinden. Die Welt wandelte sich aber auch aufgrund von Innovationen in den Bereichen Lichtwellenleiter, Laser- und Funktechnologie. Wie Sie bereits gehört haben, ist Grundlagenforschung die Basis für die Entwicklung dieser Technologien. Auch ich möchte das noch einmal betonen. Dennoch war auch aufgabenorientierte F+E notwendig. Sie erfolgte über viele Jahrzehnte. Ich möchte Ihnen etwas über Innovationen in der Landwirtschaft erzählen. seine Antrittsrede als Präsident der British Association for the Advancement of Science. Dabei handelte es sich jedoch nicht um eine normale Rede – vielen Dank, dass Sie alle gekommen sind, ich freue mich heute hier sein zu dürfen, blabla. Vielmehr begann sie mit dem Satz: 'England und alle zivilisierten Länder befinden sich in tödlicher Gefahr.' Dann erläuterte Crookes, dass die Vorkommen des aus Chile importierten Salpeters für Kunstdünger in einigen Jahrzehnten erschöpft sein würden, wenn der Salpeter weiterhin in diesem Tempo abgebaut und nach Europa geliefert wird. Die Böden bei uns würden auszehren, was eine große Hungersnot zur Folge hätte. und den Tag der Hungersnot hinausschieben.' Ich dachte mir, dieser Satz würde auf der Lindauer Tagung bei den Chemikern gut ankommen. Ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, diese Rede löste ein unglaubliches Rennen aus. Da war zunächst einmal Wilhelm Ostwald, der Chemiker seiner Zeit, der glaubte einen Weg gefunden zu haben, wie man aus Stickstoff Ammoniak machen kann. Das war der erste Schritt hin zur Entwicklung von Kunstdüngern auf Stickstoffbasis. Er überzeugte die deutsche Firma BASF, einen Chemiker damit zu beauftragen, die Richtigkeit seiner Beobachtungen im Labor zu belegen. Die Ergebnisse zeigten jedoch, dass er falsch lag. Diesem Mann, Fritz Haber, gelang schließlich die Herstellung eines solchen Düngers; er erhielt dafür 1918 den Nobelpreis. Er arbeitete mit Carl Bosch, den Sie hier sehen, zusammen; Bosch war von Ostwald beauftragt worden herauszufinden, ob seine ursprüngliche Idee funktionierte. Doch auch Haber wurde von der Konkurrenz angetrieben. Er wollte sich eigentlich gar nicht mit dem Thema beschäftigen, doch eine äußerst anregende Diskussion mit einem anderen Chemiker namens Nernst weckte seinen Ehrgeiz. Diese Entdeckung, die so genannte Ammoniaksynthese, wurde für so bedeutsam erachtet, dass Haber dafür 1918 der Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Als Gerhard Ertl 2007 für seine Forschung zur Katalyse mit dem Nobelpreis ausgezeichnet wurde, hieß es bei der Bekanntgabe des Preisträgers: 'Endlich beginnen wir den Haber-Bosch-Prozess zu verstehen.' Zweieinhalb Nobelpreise für eine große Sache. Ich möchte noch erwähnen, dass Ostwald und Nernst ebenfalls den Chemie-Nobelpreis erhielten. Man kann also diese Auszeichnung verliehen bekommen und gleichzeitig ein wissenschaftliches Rennen verlieren. Infolge des Haber-Bosch-Prozesses konnte sich jedenfalls die Welt ernähren, obwohl sich ihre Bevölkerung verdoppelte. Doch bald hatte sie sich nicht nur verdoppelt, sondern verdreifacht. Ende der 60er Jahre schrieb Paul Ehrlich, Professor an der Standford University in seinem bekannten Buch "Die Bevölkerungsbombe": In den 70er und 80er Jahren werden trotz Sofortprogrammen hunderte Millionen Menschen verhungern'. Doch wie kam es wirklich? Keineswegs so, wie Ehrlich es erwartet hatte. Zwei Jahre später erhielt ein Mann namens Norman Borlaug den Friedensnobelpreis für die Hybdridentwicklung von kurzstieligen Weizensorten mit sehr dicken Körnern. Die Körner waren so schwer, dass normale Weizenpflanzen unter ihrem Gewicht zusammengebrochen wären. Die neuen Weizensorten konnten Kunstdüngern und plötzlichen Wachstumsschüben standhalten. Seine Forschungsarbeit hatte also tiefgreifende Auswirkungen auf die Landwirtschaft. Wie tiefgreifend, belegen diese Zahlen: Zwischen 1960 und 2005 stieg die Bevölkerungszahl um mehr als das Doppelte, von 3 auf 6,5 Milliarden Menschen. Hier sehen Sie die weltweite Getreideproduktion, hier die für den Anbau von Getreide als Nahrungsmittel genutzten landwirtschaftlichen Flächen. Obwohl sich die Bevölkerung verdoppelt hat, benötigen wir heute nicht mehr Boden als früher. Dennoch wissen wir, dass trotz dieses unglaublichen Fortschrittes eine zweite grüne Revolution notwendig ist, um das Problem zu lösen. Wir brauchen winterharte Getreidesorten, eine Reduktion bzw. den Wegfall der Bodenbearbeitung, natürlich Dürreresistenz und möglicherweise eine Stickstofffixierung. Nun, Sie denken wahrscheinlich, dass es hierfür technische Lösungen gibt. Auf der Erde leben mittlerweile 7 Milliarden Menschen. Bis 2025 werden es schätzungsweise 8 Milliarden, bis 2050 9 Milliarden sein. Worum geht es also? Wir lösen das Problem technologisch. Unsere Bevölkerung wächst. Der nächste Schlamassel ist da. Was dann? Ah, da ist Licht am Ende des Tunnels. Diese Folie stellt eine Hochrechnung des weltweiten Bevölkerungswachstums für drei unterschiedliche Geburtenziffern dar. Die Zahlen sagen vor allem Eines aus: Bis zum Ende dieses Jahrhundert ist es wahrscheinlich bzw. möglich, dass die Bevölkerungszahlen zunächst einen Höchststand erreichen, dann aber sinken. Warum? Weil wir im Verlauf der letzten 20 Jahre in allen Kulturen, Religionen usw. festgestellt haben, dass die Leute umso weniger Kinder haben, je wohlhabender und stärker verankert im Mittelstand sie sind. Die Gründe hierfür sind vielfältig: Frauenbildung, starker Rückgang der Säuglingssterblichkeit, Late Night-Shows – suchen Sie es sich aus. Jedenfalls sehen wir für das nächste Jahrhundert zum ersten Mal Licht am Ende des Tunnels. Demnach wäre eine nachhaltige Welt möglich, weil sich die Bevölkerungszahlen stabilisieren und de facto möglicherweise sogar sinken. Das wäre jedoch ein Paradigmenwechsel. Bei einer wachsenden Bevölkerung entwickelt sich eine Art Schneeballsystem: Mehr Junge kümmern sich um weniger Alte – gut. Effizienz ist nicht so wichtig. Weniger Junge kümmern sich um mehr Alte? Schwierig. Wir müssen also die Sache mit der Nachhaltigkeit noch einmal überdenken. Lassen Sie uns über die Notwendigkeit reden. Der Grund, warum ich mich entschlossen habe Stanford zu verlassen und Bürokrat zu werden, schauder (lacht), und sogar nach Washington zu gehen, ist folgender. Sie sehen hier die direkt auf der Landoberfläche gemessene Jahresdurchschnittstemperatur. Diese Messungen wurden von verschiedenen Arbeitsgruppen durchgeführt. Die letzte war der Ansicht, dass alle anderen Gruppen die Sache falsch angegangen seien; sie hätten nicht die richtigen Daten analysiert. Am Ende stellte sich jedoch heraus, dass doch die richtigen Daten analysiert worden waren. Das ist also die durchschnittliche Oberflächentemperatur zwischen 1800 und 2010. Hier fallen verschiedene Dinge auf. Zunächst einmal verstehen wir diese Plateauphase, die möglichweise sogar einen Temperaturrückgang darstellt, nicht. In jüngerer Zeit gab es noch eine weitere solche Plateauphase, um die viele Leute großes Aufheben gemacht haben. Die Voraussetzungen für diese Plateauphasen bzw. einen möglichen Rückgang der Temperatur lassen sich derzeit noch nicht vorhersagen, obwohl wir natürlich diese kleinen Ausschläge prognostizieren können. Es wird aber deutlich, dass die Temperatur über einen Zeitraum von 200 Jahren offensichtlich gestiegen und Dreiviertel dieses Anstiegs in den letzten 30 Jahren erfolgt ist. Welche Konsequenzen hat das? Nun, der Meeresspiegel steigt. In den letzten Jahrtausenden hat sich die durchschnittliche Höhe des Meeresspiegels kaum verändert, jetzt sind es mehr als 3 Millimeter pro Jahr. Über die Gründe hierfür gehen die Meinungen auseinander. Schmelzen die Gletscher wirklich ab? Die schlüssigsten Beweise liefern heute Satellitenmessungen. Das ist eine künstlerische Darstellung des GRACE-Satelliten. Er besteht aus zwei die Erde umkreisenden Satelliten, deren Abstand zueinander präzise gemessen wird. Ihre Umlaufbahnen und damit auch ihr Abstand zueinander werden durch kleinste Abweichungen der Schwerkraft gestört. Durch Überwachung dieses Abstandes lassen sich die lokalen Veränderungen der Erdanziehungskraft messen. Als die Satelliten über Grönland flogen, stellte man fest, dass der grönländische Eisschild zwischen 2002 und 2012 tatsächlich kleiner geworden war. Die Messempfindlichkeit ist so gut, dass man sogar Sommer und Winter unterscheiden kann. Doch das Eis wird nicht nur weniger, es schmilzt auch schneller. Das ist eine Tatsache. Die Satelliten können auch Teile der Antarktis und die Himalaya-Hochebene überwachen. Im Himalaya schmilzt das Eis noch nicht, in der Antarktis nur in manchen Gebieten, in anderen dagegen nimmt es zu. Der Punkt ist, dass wir aufgrund der verbesserten Messempfindlichkeit die Lage besser beurteilen können. Es gab auch Hitzewellen. In einer solchen Hitzewelle starben 2003 in Europa mehr als 50.000 Menschen. In einer anderen Hitzewelle in Russland starben 2010 10.000 bis 15.000 Menschen. Von einem einzelnen Geschehnis lässt sich natürlich nicht auf eine grundlegende Veränderung schließen. Es könnte sich einfach um ein einmaliges extremes Ereignis handeln. Das ist also ein berechtigter Punkt. Hier sehen Sie Daten eines Rückversicherers, d.h. einer Versicherung, die Versicherungsunternehmen versichert. Was bedeutet das? Stellen Sie sich vor, Sie sind eine Versicherung und haben nach einem Hochwasser, einem Erdbeben oder einem Hurrikan kein Geld mehr, um die Prämien auszubezahlen. Also schließen Sie eine Versicherung ab, um diese Prämienzahlung zu gewährleisten. Der Rückversicherer ist also von größeren Wetterereignissen und anderen Katastrophen indirekt betroffen. Das ist ein solches Rückversicherungsunternehmen, die Münchner Rück. Erdbeben sind braun dargestellt, über einen Zeitraum von 30 Jahren, 1980 bis 2010 bzw. Anfang 2011. Grün bedeutet meteorologische Ereignisse, Stürme. Hochwasser sind blau dargestellt. Gelb steht für extreme Hitze- oder Kältewellen, Dürre, Waldbrände. Das hier sind die Zahlen für die Vereinigten Staaten; wohlgemerkt die Zahlen, nicht die Verluste. Die Datenlage für die USA ist sehr gut, es gibt zahlreiche Messpunkte. Sie sehen, dass die Zahl solcher Ereignisse in den letzten 30 Jahren während des Temperaturanstieges immer weiter zugenommen hat. Die Versicherungsverluste waren erheblich; versicherte Verluste sind hier dunkelblau, unversicherte hellblau dargestellt. Diese gepunktete Linie ist der Trend: In den Vereinigten Staaten stiegen die Verluste von jährlich 40 Milliarden Dollar auf mehr als 170 Milliarden Dollar pro Jahr. Wir haben es hier also selbst für Washingtoner Verhältnisse nicht mehr mit Peanuts zu tun. Das ist also die Lage. Meiner Ansicht nach verstehen wir die Klimameilen noch viel zu wenig. Das wird sich aber in den nächsten Jahren bzw. Jahrzehnten ändern. Ich bevorzuge jedoch eine epidemiologische Betrachtungsweise des Klimawandels, ähnlich wie damals, als man vermutete, dass Krebs durch Rauchen versursacht wird – nicht jeder Krebs, aber bei Rauchern war die Krebsgefahr höher. auch wenn wir den Zusammenhang molekularbiologisch nicht erklären konnten. Wir mögen heute noch nicht über ein detailliertes Modell der Klimasituation verfügen, doch wir wissen, dass sich im Zusammenhang mit dem Temperaturanstieg etwas verändert. Sie haben vielleicht schon einmal gehört, dass es auch in früheren Erdzeitaltern zu Temperaturanstiegen gekommen ist. Das ist ein sehr langer Zeitraum. Sie sehen hier die Gegenwart, die Daten gehen 600.000 Jahre zurück. Anstelle der Temperatur wurde in diesen Eisbohrkernen aus Grönland und der Antarktis die Menge an Deuterium gemessen. Warum misst man das Verhältnis von Deuterium zu Wasserstoff? Da Deuterium schwerer ist als Wasserstoff, verdunstet es langsamer. Geht das verdunstete und über die Antarktis geleitete Wasser als Schnee nieder, enthält es weniger Deuterium. Die Messung des Deuteriumgehaltes ermöglicht also eine ungefähre Temperaturbestimmung. Wir befinden uns gerade in einer im Vergleich zu den letzten 600.000 Jahren sehr warmen Periode. Weiter zurück haben wir die Eiszeiten. Noch weiter zurück erkennt man eine weitere Warmperiode mit leicht erhöhten Temperaturen. Die Durchschnittstemperatur lag damals schätzungsweise um etwa 2 °C höher. Daten, die ich heute aus Zeitgründen nicht näher erläutern kann, deuten darauf hin, dass auch der Meeresspiegel in dieser kurzen Warmzeit anstieg, und zwar um mindestens 6,6 Meter. Weiterhin lässt sich der Kohlendioxidgehalt bestimmen, ebenso wie die Menge an Stickoxid oder Methan. All diese Verbindungen sind im Gletschereis eingeschlossen. Hier ganz am Ende erkennen Sie diese scharfen senkrechten Linien Auf dieser Skala entsprechen 200 Jahre einer vertikalen Linie. Bitte beachten Sie, dass die heutigen Werte außerhalb dessen liegen, was in den letzten 600.000 Jahren, ja sogar den letzten zwei Millionen Jahren stattgefunden hat. Deswegen sind wir so nervös. Schließlich wird durch die Treibhausgase mehr Wärme gespeichert, und man weiß einfach nicht, welche Folgen das hat. Die Analyse der Eisbohrkerne ähnelt der geologischen Untersuchung von Schichtgesteinen im geologischen Inventar. Der Bohrkern besteht aus verschiedenen Eisschichten, in die man immer tiefer eindringt. Anhand der darin enthaltenen Isotope lässt sich eine Zeitskala aufstellen. Auf diese Weise erhalten wir die Daten. Um sicherzustellen, dass sie auch tatsächlich stimmen, sind verschiedene Kreuzkorrelationen mit anderen Verfahren möglich. Der Kohlendioxidgehalt ist also gestiegen, was jedoch auch natürliche Ursachen haben könnte. Doch woran erkennt man, dass dieser Anstieg menschengemacht ist? Sie sehen hier die CO2-Menge vor etwa 5000 Jahren; das ist der Beginn der industriellen Revolution. Schon ein wenig verdächtig, nicht wahr? Gleichzeitig nahm auch die Weltbevölkerung ab diesem Zeitpunkt zu. Doch das ist noch nicht alles. Wir kennen die ungefähre Menge an fossilen Brennstoffen, die wir seit Beginn des industriellen Zeitalters verbraucht haben. Diese Zahlen stimmen mit dem heutigen CO2-Gehalt in etwa überein. Der CO2-Anstieg scheint also mit der industriellen Revolution begonnen zu haben. Doch es kommt noch besser. Schauen wir uns einmal die Kohlenstoffisotope an. In der oberen Atmosphäre wird infolge von kosmischer Strahlung radioaktiver Kohlenstoff 14 gebildet, der dann in die untere Biosphäre diffundiert und sich dort mit allen organischen und anorganischen Verbindungen mischt. Sie und ich haben also Kohlenstoff 14 in unserem Körper. Stellen Sie sich vor, man würde uns nach unserem Tod in einem exklusiven Mausoleum bestatten, das noch in 10 Millionen Jahren existiert. Was würde passieren? Kohlenstoff 14 hat eine Halbwertszeit von 5700 Jahren. Würde man uns also in einer Million Jahren exhumieren, enthielte unser Körper keinen Kohlenstoff 14 mehr, nur noch Kohlenstoff 12. Würde man uns dann in einem Kraftwerk verbrennen, würde der Kohlenstoff aus unserem Körper wieder in die Atmosphäre gelangen. Bei Freisetzung größerer Mengen an fossilen Brennstoffen sammelt sich Kohlenstoff 12 an, nicht Kohlenstoff 14 Im stabilen Zustand bestünde ein ausgeglichenes Verhältnis zwischen Kohlenstoff 12 und Kohlenstoff 14. So aber sinkt der Kohlenstoff 14-Gehalt, hier grün dargestellt, zunehmend, während der Kohlendioxidgehalt immer weiter steigt. Doch einen Moment – für die 50er Jahren fehlen die Daten. Was ist in dieser Zeit geschehen? Die USA, kurz darauf auch die Sowjetunion, führten Atombombentests in der Atmosphäre durch. Dabei entstand sehr viel Kohlenstoff 14, das weit in die Höhe getragen wurde. Das ist die Nordhalbkugel, hier hellgrün dargestellt. Diese Oszillationen stellen die jährliche Vermischung der oberen Stratosphäre mit der unteren Atmosphäre dar. Faszinierend. Da diese Verzögerung der Zeitspanne entspricht, die bis zur Vermischung der nördlichen mit der südlichen Hemisphäre vergeht, steht uns ein Zeitmaß zur Verfügung. Sie erkennen die Vermischung der Ozeane, die Aufnahme des durch die Wasserstoffbomben entstandenen radioaktiven Kohlenstoffs zunächst auf der Nordhalbkugel, dann auf der Südhalbkugel. Danach scheint sich wieder ein Gleichgewicht einzustellen. Dennoch sinkt der Kohlenstoff 14-Gehalt zu schnell. Schaut man sich die Zahlen an, stellt man fest, dass die Verdünnung von Kohlenstoff 14, wie Sie hier sehen, innerhalb eines Unsicherheitsbereiches von 25% unserem Verbrauch an fossilen Brennstoffen entspricht. Diese Entwicklung trägt also in der Tat den Fingerabdruck des Menschen. Durch uns wurde zumindest der fossile Kohlenstoff wieder ans Tageslicht befördert. Ich möchte nun kurz das Thema Wissenschaft und Innovationen ansprechen. Ich wurde Leiter eines nationalen Labors und Energieminister, weil ich der Ansicht bin, dass Wissenschaft und Technologie bessere Lösungen ermöglichen. Deshalb schnell ein paar Worte zur Energieeffizienz und sauberen Energiequellen. Kühlschränke sind etwas Wunderbares, sie halten unsere Lebensmittel frisch. Bei No-Frost-Kühlschränken wird jedoch heiße Luft eingeblasen, um ein Vereisen des Gefrierfaches zu verhindern. Das bedeutet aber, dass der Kühlschrank erneut gekühlt werden muss, wodurch die Energieeffizienz sinkt. Deshalb führten wir 1975 zunächst im Bundesstaat Kalifornien Standards für Kühlschränke ein, gemäß denen neue Kühlschränke eine gewisse Mindestenergieeffizienz aufweisen mussten. Und natürlich stieg die Effizienz. Im Vergleich zu 1975 sind die heutigen Kühlschränke, was Anschaffung und Betrieb angeht, dreimal so günstig, und das, obwohl sie inzwischen um etwa 22% größer sind – ein durchschnittlicher amerikanischer Kühlschrank ist riesig, er fasst 623 Liter. Mittlerweile stagniert die Kühlschrankgröße übrigens – nicht weil die Amerikaner weniger Appetit haben, sondern wegen der Größe der Küchentür. Man nahm stets an, dass die Kosten eines Kühlschranks bei einer Verbesserung seiner Energieeffizienz steigen würden. Die Anschaffungskosten sind aber in den USA wichtig, da sich nicht jeder den Kauf eines energieeffizienten Kühlschranks, der ein paar hundert Dollar mehr kostet, leisten kann. Aus diesem Grund schaute ich mir mit meiner Arbeitsgruppe die Daten an, um herauszufinden, ob diese Annahme richtig ist. Hier sehen Sie die Kühlschränke vor Einführung der Standards, nach den unterschiedlichen Einführungszeitpunkten in Kalifornien, nach Einführung der landesweiten Standards, insgesamt sechs Kurven. Hier wurden die Standards erstmals eingeführt; das sind Kaufpreis und Betriebskosten, als Graph der Logarithmusfunktion dargestellt. Man könnte annehmen, dass die Betriebskosten nach Einführung der Standards vielleicht bei etwa 4000 oder 4500 Dollar lagen; stattdessen betrugen sie nur 1500 Dollar. Nicht schlecht. Das ist der Kaufpreis des Kühlschranks. Auch hierauf hatten die Standards keinen Einfluss. Daraufhin untersuchten wir andere Haushaltsgeräte. Waschmaschinen – sieh an, durch die Standards sank der Kaufpreis. Wie kam das? Dasselbe Phänomen trat bei Raumklimageräten und zentralen Klimaanlagen auf. Die Einführung der Standards führte zu einer Senkung der Erstkosten, möglicherweise weil die Hersteller zur Umrüstung ihrer Maschinen gezwungen waren, wodurch sie wirtschaftlicher produzieren konnten. Wir kennen den eigentlichen Grund nicht, wir sammeln nur Daten, wir sind Physiker. Doch jetzt zu einem anderen Thema. Elektroautos. Unser Ziel ist die Entwicklung eines Elektroautos für vier oder fünf Personen zu einem Kaufpreis von etwa 20.000 bis 25.000 Dollar bis 2022. Wir tauften es 'EV Everywhere'. Präsident Obama kündigte dieses Projekt an, womit er einen echten Coup für uns landete. Doch wer möchte schon ein Elektroauto kaufen, so ein winziges Ding, das ist nicht gerade spannend. Doch Sie müssen wissen, ich habe einen Freund, der so ein Baby besitzt. Es handelt sich um einen Tesla S – ein ungemein aufregendes Auto. Ich weiß zwar nicht, wer in 4,5 Sekunden von 0 auf 60 beschleunigen möchte, doch mit diesem Auto ist das möglich. Außerdem bewältigt es mit einer einzigen Batterieladung eine Strecke von 480 Kilometern. Im Inneren sehen Sie einen großen Touchscreen mit LED-Anzeige, der wie ein riesiges iPhone, d.h. intuitiv funktioniert und auf Berührung reagiert. Ich bin ein paar Mal mit diesem Auto gefahren. Mein Freund schwärmt davon, er liebt diesen Wagen. Aber er kostet fast 80.000 Dollar. Man muss also den Preis senken. Von der Ausstattung her schneidet er gut ab; er verfügt über mehr Stauraum als ein normales Auto, da er aufgrund dessen, dass sich die Batterie auf der Unterseite befindet, vorne und hinten einen Kofferraum besitzt. Nach Angaben von Tesla kostet die Kilowattstunde bei ihren Batterien etwa 300 Dollar. Unser Ziel im Energieministerium war eine Senkung des Kilowattstundenpreises auf ca. Die Batterien müssen bei mäßig starker Entladung 8000 bis 10.000 Stunden halten. Zudem müssen sie temperaturtolerant sein, damit sie bei hohen und niedrigen Temperaturen einsatzfähig sind. Wenn die Batterien die genannten Merkmale aufweisen und zu diesem Preis hergestellt werden können, die Produktionskosten vielleicht sogar hier dazwischen liegen, dann haben wir unser 25.000 Dollar-Auto mit einer Reichweite von 480 Kilometern, das in sieben Sekunden von 0 auf 60 beschleunigen kann. Diese Entwicklung möchten wir forcieren. Kommen wir nun zum Thema saubere Energiequellen. Zunächst möchte ich mich schwerpunktmäßig mit den erneuerbaren Energien beschäftigen. Sie fragen sich vielleicht, ob überhaupt genügend Energie vorhanden ist, um die Erde so stark aufzuheizen. Die Antwort lautet 'vielleicht'. Derzeit wird die Erde mit einer Energie von 174 Petawatt, also 10^12 Watt erwärmt. Ein Großteil davon wird von den Wolken, der Atmosphäre und dem Boden reflektiert, doch 89 Petawatt werden absorbiert. Wieviel ist das im Vergleich zu dem, was wir verbrauchen? Hier sehen Sie unseren Kilowattstundenverbrauch pro Jahr. Das ist die Energiemenge, die jährlich absorbiert wird, das ist unser Verbrauch. Wir verbrauchen also nur das 2x10^-4-Fache der absorbierten Menge. Daher verfügen wir über einen gewissen Handlungsspielraum für die Verbesserung der Situation. Natürlich können wir noch nicht einmal annähernd ein Zehntel dieser Energie nutzen, die Frage ist vielmehr, ob wir ein Zehntel von 1% der Energie nutzen können. Wie sieht es mit Kraftstoffen aus? Batterien – 480 Kilometer. aber die Reichweite verbessert sich aktuell spektakulär. Ich möchte auch eine Lanze für den Flüssigkraftstoff brechen. Ein mit herkömmlichen Batterien betriebenes Flugzeug sehe ich nämlich in absehbarer Zukunft nicht. Schaut man sich die Energiedichte an, d.h. die Energiemenge pro Volumen bzw. Gewicht stehen diese chemischen Kraftstoffe ganz oben: Diesel, Benzin und Körperfett. Kerosin und Ethanol weisen eine erheblich niedrigere Energiedichte auf; die von Methanol ist sogar noch geringer. Und die Lithiumionenbatterien? Sie liegen so nahe bei Null, dass man sie kaum sieht. Die Energiedichte der heutigen Lithiumionenbatterien ist also um die anderthalbfache Größenordnung geringer. Die Batterien müssen aber gar nicht um eine ganze Größenordnung effizienter werden, sondern nur um den Faktor vier. Dann hat man eine Reichweite von 480/640 Kilometern, weil der Motor sehr viel kleiner und damit erheblich leistungsstärker ist. Der Abstand ist nicht so groß. Für Flugzeuge braucht man aber diese Kraftstoffe. Ich möchte kurz ein wenig abschweifen, und da ich der Professor bin und Sie die Studenten, gebe ich Ihnen ein Rätsel auf. Was haben eine Boeing 777 und eine Pfuhlschnepfe gemeinsam? Was ist eine Pfuhlschnepfe? Ein Vogel, etwa so groß. Er ist ein wenig seltsam: Er verbringt den 'Sommer' in Alaska und fliegt dann zum Jahreszeitenwechsel nach Neuseeland. Meistens macht er in China Pause, um aufzutanken, doch manchmal fliegt er auch nonstop von Alaska nach Neuseeland. Sobald er erst einmal losgeflogen ist, schaltet er mehr oder weniger auf Autopilot. Er frisst nicht, er tut nichts dergleichen. Sowohl dieser Vogel als auch die Boeing 777 können also nach dem Start nonstop 11.000 Kilometer fliegen. Zu Beginn ihres Fluges macht der Treibstoff die Hälfte ihres Gewichts aus. Bei der Landung ist der Vogel dann natürlich abgemagert. Die Energiedichte von Körperfett entspricht also der von Flugzeugkraftstoff. Eine tolle Energiequelle – außer man möchte kein Körperfett. Ich überspringe diese Terpen-Geschichte, weil mir die Zeit davonläuft. Es geht dabei um ungewöhnliche Biokraftstoffe. Kiefern erzeugen eine Verbindung namens Terpen, die bezüglich der Oxidationsstadien von Kohlenstoff sehr stark dem Benzin ähnelt und damit Methan und Kohlenwasserstoffen weit überlegen ist. Unsere Idee war es, diese Kiefern ähnlich wie Ahornbäume anzuzapfen und sie genetisch so zu modifizieren, dass die Terpenproduktion um bis zu einer Größenordnung zunimmt. Dieses Pilotprojekt wird von der innovativen Förderorganisation RPE finanziert. Die aus bereits zum Zwecke der Holzgewinnung angepflanzten Bäumen kontinuierlich extrahierte benzinähnliche Verbindung könnte als Kraftstoff für Flugzeuge und Autos dienen. Auf diese Weise ließe sich der Boden auf neuartige Weise nutzen. Darüber hinaus arbeiten wir intensiv an Systemen zur Übertragung und Speicherung von Energie. Insbesondere bei der Energieübertragung sind für einen wesentlich effizienteren Betrieb neue elektronische Systeme erforderlich, um die Spannung auf eine Million V DC zu erhöhen. Diese DC-Leistung lässt sich mit einem Energieverlust von 5% über 1600 Kilometer durch Starkstromleitungen übertragen. In China ist dies bereits Realität. Das bedeutet also, dass man erneuerbare Energie ohne wesentlichen Energieverlust über 1600 Kilometer transportieren kann. Das Herauf- und Herunterregeln der Spannung in diesen DC-Leitungen ist jedoch sehr teuer. Wir wollten daher elektronische Systeme mit höheren Frequenzen als den heute üblichen 50 oder 60 Kilohertz entwickeln. Sie halten das vielleicht für einen Traum, doch auf der letzten RPE-Tagung stellte eine kleine Firma einen Prototyp dieses Stromwandlers vor, der einen über 30.000 Kilogramm schweren Transformator ersetzt. Er kann von einer Person hochgehoben und in den Kofferraum eines Wagens gelegt oder in einem Koffer transportiert werden. Die Leistung ist dabei die gleiche. Wenn dieses elektronische Bauteil auf den Markt kommt, wird das eine große Sache, genau wie die Batterien. Solarenergie. Die Kosten für Solarenergie sind drastisch gefallen, von 8 Dollar für eine komplett installierte gewerbliche Solaranlage im Jahr 2004 auf weniger als 4 Dollar im Jahr 2010. Das Ziel des Energieministeriums war eine Senkung auf 1 Dollar pro Watt – die Lichtleistung wird unter anderem in Watt gemessen. Könnte das Solarmodul statt 1,70 Dollar im Jahr 2004 in Zukunft vielleicht nur noch 40 Cent kosten? Das ist keineswegs völlig aus der Luft gegriffen, aktuell liegt der Spotpreis bereits bei 70 Cent. Problematisch sind bei der Solarenergie also die anderen Aspekte. Das Solarmodul selbst und bald auch die Elektronik machen nur die Hälfte der Kosten eines Solarparks aus. Technologisch ist hier noch viel Platz nach oben. Normalerweise gießt man hochgereinigtes Silizium zu Barren, sägt diese in Blöcke und danach mittels einer sehr feinen Diamantseilsäge in Wafer einer Stärke von vielleicht 0,15 Millimeter. Anschließend werden diese Wafer durch Dotierung in Solarzellen umgewandelt. RPE und das Energieministerium finanzieren aktuell den innovativen Ansatz eines neuen Start-up-Unternehmens. Er sieht folgendermaßen aus: Wenn Sie eine Erdbeere in weiße Schokolade tauchen, können Sie nach dem Herausziehen entscheiden, wie viel Schokolade an der Erdbeere hängenbleiben soll. Entsprechend kann man ein Kohlenstoffsubstrat in geschmolzenes Silizium tauchen; nimmt man das Substrat heraus, tropft das Silizium ab. Auf diese Weise lassen sich Siliziumstücke einer Stärke von 30 Mikrometer anstelle von 150 Mikrometer herstellen. Warum wollen wir das? Die Hälfte der Kosten des Solarmoduls gehen auf das Konto des Siliziums; diese Kosten sind uneinbringlich verloren. Auf den ersten Blick könnte dieses Verfahren die Kosten um ein Viertel senken. Außerdem ließe sich damit die Effizienz der Solarenergieumwandlung, d.h. die Qualität dieser Zellen vergleichen. Das wäre eine spannende Sache. Und noch etwas: In Deutschland kostet die Installation eines Sonnenkollektors auf dem Dach etwa 2,50 Dollar, in den USA 6 Dollar pro Watt. Was ist der Grund für diesen Unterschied? Hängt er mit den Lohnkosten zusammen? Ich vermute, es geht eher um andere Aufwendungen, vor allem um die so genannten weichen Kosten, d.h. Lizenz- und Prüfgebühren etc. existiert eine solche Obergrenze für die Bürokratie nicht.' Unsere Bemühungen konzentrieren sich daher aktuell in erster Linie auf die Senkung der im Zusammenhang mit der Bürokratie anfallenden weichen Kosten in verschiedenen amerikanischen Städten und Bundesstaaten. Ich werde auf diesen Aspekt nicht näher eingehen, doch eine Entwicklung zeichnet sich jetzt bereits ab: Wenn Sie infolge der enorm kostengünstigen Speicherung von Solarenergie Sonnenkollektoren auf Ihrem Dach installieren und sich eine Batterie für zuhause anschaffen, könnten Sie urplötzlich zu 80% vom Stromnetz unabhängig sein. Das wäre ziemlich revolutionär. Es wäre möglicherweise sogar so revolutionär, dass Energieversorger ihre Kunden verlieren könnten. Aus diesem Grund werden sie langsam nervös und fangen an, diese Technik zu bekämpfen, zumindest in den USA. Doch es gibt eine Lösung. Die Energieversorger werden Eigentümer der Solarmodule und Batterien und sind für ihre Installation zuständig. Diese Idee ist nicht neu; das alte Telefonsystem funktionierte so. Der Telefongesellschaft gehörte das Telefon, sie stellte seine Funktionstüchtigkeit sicher und war für den Service verantwortlich. Auf diese Weise wäre eine Stromversorgung zu einem erheblich günstigeren Preis möglich. Wie kann das sein? Nun, schauen wir uns an, welchen Nutzen Sie davon haben. Mit der Batterie in Ihrem Haus sind Sie zumindest für ein paar Tage gegen Stromausfälle gefeit. Was hat der Energieversorger davon? Er installiert eine Batterie bei Ihnen zuhause in einem geschützten Umfeld, wo sie nicht der Witterung ausgesetzt ist. Außerdem möchte er schlussendlich seine Batterien verkaufen. Und er verfügt über standardisierte Bauteile. Sie gehören ihm, stellen also in einer solchen Wachstumsbranche eine Investition dar. Alle diese wirklich ambitionierten Projekte brachten wir im Energieministerium auf den Weg. Ich möchte gerne einen Satz von Michelangelo zitieren, den ich auch meinen Studenten und Postdocs in den letzten 25 Jahren immer wieder gesagt habe: sondern darin, dass wir sie zu niedrig stecken und nicht über sie hinauswachsen.’ Denken Sie daran: Scheitern, schnell scheitern, weitermachen – aber sich immer hohe Ziele stecken. Während meiner Tätigkeit als Energieminister fand ich bestimmte Dinge in der Politik äußerst unangenehm. Die Berichterstattung war zuweilen sehr unfair, wir wurden oftmals heftig kritisiert. Dann, sechs oder sieben Tage nachdem ich meinen Rücktritt als Energieminister bekanntgegeben hatte, stieß ich auf diesen Zeitungsartikel. Ich möchte Ihnen einige Zeilen daraus vorlesen: den er am Abend zuvor während einer ausgelassenen Kneipentour in D.C. kennengelernt hatte. Nicht einmal der Name des Herstellers war ihm erinnerlich. Wie bekannt wurde, bezeichnete Chu seine Begegnung mit dem Solarrezeptor aus kristallinem Silizium als denjenigen Seitensprung, den er am meisten bereue, seit 2009 eine längere Affäre mit einer 27 Meter hohen Windkraftanlage beinahe seine Ehe beendet hatte.’ Als ich am nächsten Morgen zur Arbeit ging, meinte mein Berater in öffentlichen Angelegenheiten, dass wir darauf reagieren sollten. Ich sagte ok, krempelte die Ärmel hoch, machte mich ans Werk und arbeitete bis Mittag eine Pressemitteilung aus. dass meine Entscheidung gegen eine zweite Legislaturperiode als Energieminister in keinerlei Zusammenhang mit den in der dieswöchigen Ausgabe des Onion erhobenen Anschuldigungen steht. Ich möchte die Vorwürfe im Einzelnen weder bestätigen noch dementieren, betone aber, dass saubere erneuerbare Solarenergie zunehmend Arbeitsplätze in den USA schafft und immer kostengünstiger wird. Es ist also keine Überraschung, dass sich viele Amerikaner in diese Technologie verlieben.’ Den Satzteil ‘ungeachtet ihrer sexuellen Vorlieben’ musste ich leider streichen. Sie sehen ziemlich nervös aus. Ich bitte, wenn auch nicht um Erlaubnis, so doch um Verzeihung. Meiner Ansicht nach sind wir moralisch dafür verantwortlich, uns mit dem Klimawandel auseinanderzusetzen, denn seine Opfer werden diejenigen sein, die völlig unschuldig an diesem Problem sind, nämlich die Ärmsten der Welt und die, die noch nicht geboren worden sind. Es gibt ein altes Indianersprichwort: ‘Wir erben das Land nicht von unseren Vorfahren, sondern borgen es von unseren Kindern.’ Hoffentlich verzeiht er mir – ich schaue ihn nicht an – denn ich werde noch einen kleinen Film zeigen. Er wurde von der Voyager 1 aufgenommen, die jetzt endgültig den Einflussbereich des Sonnenwindes verlässt. Die in den 70er Jahren gestartete Raumsonde sollte an den Planeten vorbeifliegen und sie erforschen. Als sie die Umlaufbahn des Pluto verließ, bat Carl Sagan die NASA-Mitarbeiter, die Kameras nach hinten auf die Erde zu richten. Er wollte wissen, wie die Erde aus der Entfernung von Pluto aussieht. Hier ist sein Kommentar: Aus dieser Entfernung betrachtet scheint die Erde nicht von besonderem Interesse zu sein. Für uns Menschen ist das jedoch anders. Denken wir doch einmal über diesen Punkt nach. Das ist hier, unser Zuhause, das sind wir. Jeder Mensch, den wir lieben, den wir kennen, von dem wir jemals gehört haben, jeder Mensch, den es je gegeben hat, lebte hier, auf diesem Punkt. All unsere Freude und unser Leid, tausende von überzeugten Religionen, Ideologien und Wirtschaftstheorien, jeder Jäger und Sammler, jeder Held oder Feigling, jeder Schöpfer oder Zerstörer einer Zivilisation, jeder König und Bauer, jedes junge Liebespaar, jede Mutter und jeder Vater, jedes erwartungsfrohe Kind, jeder Erfinder und Entdecker, jeder Moralapostel, jeder korrupte Politiker, jeder Superstar, jeder Staatsführer, jeder Heilige und jeder Sünder in der Geschichte der Menschheit lebte hier Die Erde ist eine sehr kleine Bühne in einer riesigen kosmischen Arena. Denken wir nur an die Ströme von Blut, die all die Generäle und Herrscher vergossen haben, um für kurze Zeit ruhmvoll und triumphierend herrschen zu können – über einen Bruchteil eines Punktes im All. Denken wir an die endlosen Grausamkeiten, welche die Bewohner einer Region dieses Pixels den kaum von ihnen zu unterscheidenden Bewohnern einer anderen Region angetan haben. Wie oft sie sich missverstehen, wie sehr sie darauf aus sind, einander zu töten, wie leidenschaftlich sie einander hassen! Unser eitles Gehabe, unsere eingebildete Wichtigkeit, der Wahn, dass wir im Universum einen besonderen Platz einnehmen Unser Planet ist ein einsamer Fleck in der großen ihn umhüllenden kosmischen Dunkelheit. Wir sind unbedeutend in dieser unermesslichen Weite, und nichts weist darauf hin, dass irgendjemand oder irgendetwas von irgendwoher kommen wird, um uns vor uns selbst zu schützen. Nach allem, was wir bisher wissen, ist die Erde die einzige Welt, auf der es Leben gibt. Zumindest in der näheren Zukunft existiert kein anderer Ort im Universum, wohin die Menschheit auswandern könnte. Ihn besuchen, ja. Sich dort niederlassen, noch nicht. Die Erde ist der Ort, an dem wir uns bewähren müssen – ob wir wollen oder nicht. Es heißt, dass die Beschäftigung mit der Astronomie demütig macht und den Charakter formt. Dieses von weit her aufgenommene Bild unserer winzigen Welt ist vielleicht das beste Beispiel dafür, wie töricht unsere Selbstgefälligkeit ist. Für mich unterstreicht es unsere Verantwortung, freundlicher miteinander umzugehen und diesen blassblauen Punkt im All zu bewahren und wertzuschätzen Vielen Dank.

Steven Chu
The Energy and Climate Change Challenges and Opportunities
(00:05:36 - 00:09:11)

 

With the suggestion that world population could stabilize at the end of the 21st century, Chu pushes the importance of the food question a couple of ranks down. Consequently, he dedicates the second, longer part of his talk to associated issues, which are currently dominating most scientific and non-scientific discussions about the future: climate change and the looming shortage of fossil fuels.

Energy: Predictions

Global food production can be sustainable already today, because plants obtain all the energy required for their growth from sunlight. Other important nutrients, such as carbon and in some cases even nitrogen, they can extract from air. The resources required for feeding the world are thus unlikely to “run out” anytime soon. However, what works well for plants does unfortunately not (yet) work for mankind. In order to meet our energy needs, we still largely rely on fossil fuels such as oil, coal or gas. These energy carriers have an excellent energy density and are rather easy to transport. They are thus ideally suited to fuel power stations, cars and planes or to heat our homes, even in remote locations. However, their formation from dead plant material takes millions of years. This strictly limits the amount of fossil fuels available to us. And at some point, we will inevitably run out. The big question is when.

In the 1970s, a newly founded non-organization called the “Club of Rome” (www.clubofrome.org) caused concern with a rather pessimistic assessment of the global oil reserves. In the year of the global oil crisis, 1973, a member of the Club and Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dennis Gabor, talked in Lindau. In line with the Club’s official position, Gabor predicted a world catastrophe in “give or take a hundred years” due to natural resource depletion. He further specified that already the next 25 years would destroy the illusion of continuous “wealth, peace and happiness”


Dennis Gabor (1973) - The Predicament of Mankind

In the world, the consumption of energy and of raw materials grows about 5% per year, that is doubling in 14 years. Now, this is mainly happening in the industrialised third of the world. In the whole world population it is growing at the rate of a little over 2% a year, and this means doubling over 35 years. And this is mostly happening in the poor countries. This has been summed up in the brief sentence, the rich are getting richer, the poor are getting children. The Club of Rome calls itself an international non-organisation, it has no president, no secretary, no budget. There’s just a body of 85 carefully selected people of all nations in the world and we have no intention of letting the membership grow above 100. But don’t be alarmed, the tenure is not certain in the Club of Rome, if somebody doesn’t work for it, he is dropped immediately. So there’s always still room in this 100. Well, regrettably we have only a small representation from the communist countries and we have nobody officially from the USSR. Though one of the meetings of the Club of Rome was held in Moscow and we know that some very highly placed Russians are following our proceedings very carefully and with sympathy but officially they have not joined us. Now, as regards to work of the Club of Rome, from the beginning the Club of Rome was looking for the comprehensive method to deal with the problems of the world. Of our extremely complicated world system. And we are very lucky that we made contact in ’68 with Prof. J. Forrester of the MIT, who at that time had just finished his city dynamics. Forrester was the first to construct computer models of a city and show how it grew from its beginning from a green field to its maximum and then decayed. And this agreed extremely well with observations. And this model comes up in various policies and something very disturbing came out, this is what Forrester calls the count and intuitive behaviour of complicated social systems. As Forrester says, nature has not equipped us with an intuitive insight into complicated multiple nonlinear feedback circuits. We did not need this in the course of evolution, but we certainly need it now. Because the complication of social events has grown beyond our intuitive comprehension. Almost everything that is good, that appears good immediately, everything that helps us in four or five years, will almost certainly turn against us in the long term. This is what the electronic computer can do. I have a strong belief that the electronic computer has come just in time to save our industrial civilisation which has grown above our heads. Now,Forrester undertook at the institution of the Club of Rome to construct a world model. And this he did in a remarkably short time, his book World Dynamics came out in 1971. After that, the work was continued by his student Dennis Meadows with an international team of 17 people, and this was financed by the Volkswagen Foundation. This came out last year, in ’72, the book is called The Limits to Growth and has been translated into 20 languages. Now, I’ve no time to talk in detail of this book, I hope many of you have read it, almost certainly you have seen abstracts of it. And so I just sum it up in brief. The model has got five variants: world population, industrial production, per capita food consumption, the earth resources and pollution. And these are linked with one another by a great number of complicated relations which partly could be taken from experience, partly had to be guessed. Had to be guessed but there was just no other way of producing a complete world model. Now, one can feed different policies in this computer and then see what effect they have. The computer is always set, so that from 1900 - 1970 it runs on the historical path. Then one can put in various policies and in a few minutes it will run the earth to 2100. Now, the computer is frightfully complicated, there’s no point in showing it, it goes far beyond human intuition. But the results are extremely simple. And extremely unpalatable. If we go on as we are doing now, the real world catastrophe in something like a 100 years, give or take twenty years. An overshoot of world population and the world consumption. Followed by a sharp decline, by depletion of natural resources. If we are very foolish, there may be also a pollution catastrophe. I really won’t talk very much about that, because I can’t quite believe that man can be so foolish as to poison itself. It’s bad enough, the depletion catastrophe would be quite bad enough. Now, as you could expect, these results have been received by most economists, though not by all I'm glad to say, with extraordinary hostility. And yet there’s nothing implausible in them, there’s no complicated machinery needed, rule of thumb calculation shows that if you look at the world resources, give or take factors of two, three, five, and look at our increasing consumption, then the world’s resources will exhaust not in 10 years, not in 1,000 years, but something in the matter of 100 years. First our land and mineral resources will be as good as exhausted in something like that time. Now, against this the economists argue: This has been often said before, Malthus, you know, but the discovery of new resources and new technologies has always helped to overcome scarcities. As regards new resources, they can of course postpone the catastrophe but they cannot eliminate forever. As regards new technologies, I hope that this naive belief in the technologies in us applied scientists and technologists will be right. But what I object to is this: The economists don’t really tell us what they are scared of. They just cannot imagine a world in which growth has stopped because they are convinced, and not without reason, that our world and in particular the free economy world is kept stable only by continual growth. By everybody hoping or actually having it better next year than this year. And they just cannot visualise the stationary society when we have stopped growing in material consumption. Now, this is what I call ostrichism. The ostrich puts her head in the sand and hopes that everything was right until now, why shouldn't it go on so forever. That will certainly not go on forever. Well, of course,Forrester and Meadows have also stabilised us, without this catastrophe in them. They have also studied plans which go over into a stable situation around the year 2100. But I'm afraid these are also somewhat disheartening. Because they are somewhat poor words. And it’s naturally enough. If we made a fair distribution of the resources of the earth, even increase several times, and distributed them to the world population, which by that time will be of the order of between 7,000 and 15,000 million people, then of course it will give a living standard still well above that of India and Africa, but far below ours. But I have another objection against this. In these Forrester and Meadow’s curves, the depletion still goes on. It still goes on and it will be stable all right for a few hundred years. Now, what is a few hundred years? Homo sapiens has at least a hundred thousand years behind him. And the biologist assure us that he’s fit for another few hundred thousand years. Now, a few hundred years of prosperity and light between several hundred thousand years of darkness, that’s not good enough. So what we scientists and technologists must create is a new technology. One which uses only inexhaustible or safe-renewing resources. May I remind you, it was not so very long ago when all the world lived on a self-renewing resource, timber, wood. It was used for burning, it was used for building houses and it renewed itself in the forest. Now, of course humanity has become far too big for a timber economy. Also for a coal economy. But new economies can be created, when I say inexhaustible resources it is really possible to think of resources which should out-last a million years or so. This has not calmed of course the opponents of Forrester and Meadows. The hostility still continues, people just don’t want to believe it and they just don’t want to believe that the catastrophes are a hundred years away. But while all this talk is going on, a forerun of the catastrophe is actually appearing at our door. I'm referring to the fuel and energy crisis, which is right at our door. Now, this is a crisis of the highly developed countries, chiefly of the United States, concerns in Europe just as well. United States has 6% of the world’s population, and they consume 33% of the world’s energy. That’s ten times more than the rest, so the rest contains also England, France, Germany, Japan etc. They consume 50 times more than what they have in India. One could say that’s all right, so long as they consume their own, their own oil, their own coal etc. One may have been foolish until then but morally no objections to using up your own. But this was only until a few years ago, it’s not like this. A typical depletion catastrophe has happened in the meantime. It’s like this, if you plot here the oil production for the United States, it goes up left. Starting from nothing here, here we are just 1973. And the demand curve has started overshooting this just about these years and it goes up like this. While the oil production of the United States, something like this, to give you an idea, at the moment but by this time about two thirds of the oil will have to be imported and one third produced internally. This is the real, actually just that type of overshoot which occurs in Meadow’s curves, when the global overshoot comes, it’s perhaps 100 years away, the local overshoot is right here. The same applies in Europe, of course Europe has always existed almost 100% on imported oil, but we have also been very foolish, we have let coal mining decay or stagnate and we have converted many of our coal burning in electric plants to oil, when oil was cheap. Now, this crisis illustrates how badly we are lacking in long-term foresight. It could have been foreseen and it was indeed foreseen just like the big oil companies. The research departments of big oil companies have made a precise forecast of this, which are considered by everybody. But during the same time, the sales departments of the same oil companies were urging more and more consumption. And as regards the governments, the governments just don’t dare to tell the people that they have no foresight and we are running into a serious crisis. Really nobody can claim nowadays that they haven’t heard of it, that he is ignorant of it. I don’t know how it is in Germany but in America it’s been published in all the good newspapers. Most of the magazines have published long and very careful articles on it. But the man on the street just doesn’t want to believe it. The man on the street wants to believe that it’s an imagination of the big oil companies to get higher prices for the petrol. Let’s forget the political part of it and see what technology can do to alleviate this situation. I'm afraid we have indeed, we have indeed been very, very slow. We must make a confession, it’s not just the politicians who are to blame and the economists and the sales people. The big achievements of technology, since the war, have been either prestige or luxury achievements. Such as the Polaris submarine for defence, absolutely astonishing thing, if you look at it from technical angle. Or the multiple anti-atomic missile or such luxury project like the man on the moon and the supersonic airplane. Well, it is no excuse for us technologists that this was foisted on us by politicians. There rules also the pressure of the advanced industries and the pressure of the inventors themselves, from the principle which rules our lives, that what can be made must be made. This causes variations and it is not surprising that a considerable part of people especially of younger people are now becoming very suspicious of technology and feel that maybe technology has taken the bit in its teeth. Well, I must confess I'm not quite unhappy about it, that this first trouble is coming right now. Because it gives us the right kick to start now. It may be the right challenge which a civilisation needs to keep alive, according to Toynbee. To save our civilisation. Now, there may be some of you, especially among the younger people here in the audience, who don’t think that our consumer society is worth saving. It’s easy to become contemptuous about the consumer society when we think of such things as forced sales, throw-away goods, pollutions, solar suburbs, mindless racing about in large motor cars, power boats, snowmobiles. Yes, but the consumer society has also secured a high standard of living and considerable degree of security for hundreds of millions of people. There’s definitely more happiness among the common people now than there ever was in the world. Perhaps, when we have finished with this crisis, in probably not less than 20 years there will be less of the mindless race and more of the good in our society. What then is the reasonable program for science and technology? Taking first things first, we must confess that there’s no way of making up for the ten lost years. Running a little program inside the Club of Rome, and they have got information from the best experts of all sides, and the consensus is that nothing we can do, we produce substitutes, synthetic fuel inside ten years in appreciable quantities. Incidentally neither will be supplied from the USSR, they start running seven or eight years. We definitely have been so foolish that in a few years there will be quite certainly a very considerable shortage of fuel and, if we are as foolish as can be expected, very considerable unemployment, because so much of our world is based now on the waste of fuel and energy. To make it more detailed, it’s rather interesting that now they are taking the German war time development, coal classification and other things, and progress is now rather poor. There is one single pilot plant only for coal classification in America, and there's not a single coal liquefaction plant going yet. It will take about ten years before coal classification plants can be built on a big scale. And by that time the American mining of coal will have to be doubled. And by the year 2000 it will have to be quadrupled. Now, think about this as a technical and social difficulty. Of course, it doesn’t mean, new technology doesn’t mean doubling or quadrupling the number of miners but certainly it means putting under ground, people who’s fathers and grandfathers were not miners. And that won’t be an easy social problem. So then here we are very, very backward. In this rather long interim period, ten years, maybe even more, temporary relief must be found from such measures as secondary exploitation of oil wells. Nowadays half, sometimes even more than half of the oil remains in the oil wells. That will have to be pumped out somehow to help us with our difficulty. Now, of course new exploration. Then of course the electric plants which we are now firing with oil have to be converted back to coal. And what is the easiest of all is the exploitation of tar sands and of oil shale. Incidentally the figures which had been bandied about by oil shale are completely wrong. It is not at all true that those civilisations with an increased consumption could leave an oil shale for another 100 or 150 years. That’s just not true. The oil shale deposits are roughly equal to the remaining oil deposits. At the same time, of course there will have to be reasonable saving measures, such as smaller motorcars, in particular in America,more use of public transport, more bicycles, less air conditioning with more efficient devices. Now, to this I must mention, what worries me very much and other people, is that our free society reacts to badly to this sort of crisis. In America, two years ago, they enacted the anti-pollution act, by 1975, it has been put off till 1976, the production of unburned fuel, nitrogasses etc, to be put down by 90%. Now, what is the reaction of Detroit? The simplest would have been of course to make smaller motor cars. No, they make the same horsepower, but as the non-polluting engine is so much less efficient, the new cars of this year,instead of the usual twelve miles to the American gallon, can do only do ten or nine. And they say, by the time they are finished, they will do perhaps six. This was the reaction of Detroit. This sort of thing worries me very much because it means that, unless free enterprise takes on a little sense, there won’t be free enterprise. And then of course political measures such as international agreements to secure at least the present supply from the Middle East countries. And pre-agreements between the free economy and the communist countries, well, there is hope for that but not immediately. The enormous pipeline, for instance, for national gas has to be built. Exploration is still to be done in Siberia, etc, etc. The Siberian liquidified natural gas and oil will not flow for seven or eight years in the best case. Now,alright, so we have lost time, but there is no reason for not starting our preparations at once. The research on coal classification and coal liquefaction, which has been so much neglected that we are falling back to official jobs now about 50 years. This must be taken up on a large scale. The long term outlook is good. If the price of liquid fuel is allowed to rise to about three times the present, which is a healthy thing because there will be less waste, then a great number of substitutes can come in. First of all tar sands, oil shale, but then also there is a serious hope that atomic energy will be able to produce synthetic fuels. That is the most interesting of the hopes. This, in particular there exists the Canadian reactor called the CANDU, which works on the uranium-thorium cycle, burns about equal amounts of uranium and thorium. So it’s very cheap and abundant fuel. And absolutely non-radioactive primary coolant. The primary coolant is high-boiling organics liquid which has only - the bombardment with neutrons gives only stable constituents. And then the secondary coolant, which is always water, is of course even freer. So there’s no fear of radioactive damage. Now, at this point I come also to the point which was already mentioned by Herrn Minister Ehmke, the fear of people of nuclear stations. Nowadays, when a nuclear station is near somebody in America, then the price of the land and of real estate is as certain to fall as if Negros would be going there. This is of course, the excuse is of course that nuclear plants are dangerous. Well, as regards explosion danger of nuclear plants, the lowest estimate is ten to the minus eight per year. That is to say one plant explosion by failing of every sort of safety in a hundred million years. Now, my friends the nuclear engineers assure me that if we had been ever safe steam plants, then no steam plant would ever have been built. So as I say, it is already possible to foresee that there’ll be no shortage of liquid fuel. Otherwise, nuclear energy promises mostly hydrogen economy and I don’t like the idea of hydrogen economy very much. Per volume it’s much worse than petrol and the danger in case of accidents of course even much bigger as the evaporation of hydrogen is so much more than of petrol. But, as I said, there’s hope that in the end we’ll be able to synthesise hydrocarbons to about three times the price. And why not? We have had our energy ridiculously cheap. In the United States it’s about six or seven percent of GNP, all the expenditure on energy, including oil. And the expenditure on food is 16 to 18%. Now, I think it would be perfectly right in our industrial civilisation if we spent as much on energy as we spend on food. As regards mineral resources, there again we have to dig much deeper. At present, all the mineral resource extract oil costs only about three percent of the GNP. So there is again the hope that we will be able to exploit deeper mineral resources once we have got reasonably cheap nuclear energy. But by reasonably cheap I mean something like three times more than the present, which should also enable the nuclear energy stations to put in all the safety devices, put them under ground with recirculating water, no contamination of rivers etc, etc. Nuclear power development has not been really neglected, of course enormous money has been spent on it. It’s only that the development is a little slow. In order to make reactors really efficient, there must be either breeder reactors or very big such uranium-thorium reactors, and in both cases the optimistic estimate is that they will be starting about 1990. Now, in the United States at the moment there are 150 atomic plants planned, quite big ones, quite big units, so ... 5,000 megawatts. But even if the opposition of the environmentalists can be overcome, which is by no means certain and they all will be built, only 25% of the electric energy in 1980 will be supplied by nuclear power. In England it will be somewhat better, it’s already 10%, it may well be 25% by then. As I say now, we have got the opposition of the environmentalists, which partly of course has got a psychological origin. The nuclear reactor is of course an offspring of the atomic bomb. And, as regards the first plants, they never exploded but contamination was by no means impossible. You may ask me, what about fusion? Because of the hydrogen in the seas. But now the position is very different. Because we know that there’s enough low grade uranium granite and dissolved in very low concentration in the sea, from which you could extract it at probably not more than about two to five times the present cost of uranium, and that’s a very small part. Uranium oxide is only a very small part of the cost of the finished fuel. And, as regards the total fuelling costs of a station, it is about one tenth of its capital cost. So it’s by no means important, if you never get fusion, you still have an inexhaustible source of power, because the rivers wash so much uranium into the seas that a very profligate humanity, with of energy, could exist for unlimited time. But of course it would be nice to get nuclear energy by fusion. For a simple reason that fusion does not produce plutonium. The real danger in nuclear energy is of course plutonium. One could, according to several experts, increase the world consumption now at four times the present population and twice the American consumption, which means a 50-fold increase in world energy production. We have a serious danger of changing the climate. Then perhaps it might become dangerous. But can we give this power into the hands of humanity as it is? Into the hands in particular of adolescent nationalists? Well, for this reason I would much like to of course to have fusion power. But subjectively I don’t give it a very big chance. Certainly we ought to be rationing hundreds of millions of dollars which it will cost. And I say in all my life I’ve never met such an exciting and wonderful idea as producing fusion by implosion of little grains of lithium deuterite or DD. It’s an absolutely fantastic idea to compress the little grain about 10,000 times and then bring it to controlled nuclear explosion. But, as I say, we must consider it as a windfall, if it comes all the better, but it cannot be put into any reasonable program. There are really better hopes for geothermal energy. Geothermal energy, of course in Germany it’s not important, in all Europe except Iceland it’s not important, but in America it might be important. And far too little money has been spent on it so far. Far too little research has been done, there are protagonists of it who say that if we dig shafts five kilometre deep and next to it another, say four kilometres deep and pour water into the one, then we get a wonderful supply of steam from the others and we can easily build stations of several thousand megawatts each. But it’s possible. I don’t know yet what the economy - there is nobody there to indicate it. There may be not too many places in the world. Now, with solar power, solar power is the cheapest possible and the cleanest possible, and the most expensive. Because there is no upset of the climate. Solar energy is first converted into electricity and then liberated as heat that doesn’t make any difference. But unfortunately, the lowest estimate of solar energy is twice that of nuclear power and that comes from the inventor himself. I'm an inventor myself and know that the estimates of inventors must be multiplied by pi! So I should say six or seven times of nuclear energy and we would probably be nearer to it. And here I wish of course that we could break the iron law of economics that the cream has to be taken off first. That the cheapest way of getting energy is the one which comes first. I wish we could persuade at least the very, very rich Arabic countries to have solar energy instead of plutonium producing nuclear plants. Well, otherwise, if you think of the plutonium danger, then I must say, like Alvin Weinberg, the great American expert, our best hope is that we can make out of the tenders of these nuclear stations a dedicated priesthood. These considerations of physics and technology lead us quite naturally to the human factor. As I’ve always said in my book, up to now we were up against nature, from now on we are up against human nature. And the past history of mankind, which is incessant wars, does not encourage of course to believe that we have come to the end of our folly. I must still cling to the hope that the folly of a nuclear war now would be such that perhaps mankind will abstain from, from total suicide. This is always the assumption which goes through all our prophecies, no nuclear war and no total warfare of any kind. Of course, this is still only unconditional, the other thing for producing a better world would be to help the developing nations. And here again this crisis in our development which I have talked might produce such an upset in our countries that we cut down even further the already very insufficient foreign aid. Nevertheless, that foreign aid could exist at all, that it does exist at all is a sign of human progress. This idea, a hundred years ago, at the time of the economics of Ricardo etc. would have been absolutely impossible to give something for nothing, to give something to the Africans or the Indians so that they should develop their own industries - absolutely unthinkable. So when I come to human nature, and I don’t want to say very much about this, it’s always my chief preoccupation, how is human nature fitting into a peaceful world? Is it possible that - a peaceful, rich world should be possible on an economical stationary scale. Of course, humans have existed in an almost stationary world for thousands of years. The development is very small but that was in poverty. And the dangers come of course with riches and freedom. Can we change human nature? I should say that one can very much change human nature indeed. But the strongest inborn traits of human nature are certainly the will to material satisfaction and the will to survive. And yet this has been changed into the exact opposite by the monasteries, in which the monks themselves imposed ascetic life, taking on not just ordinary poverty at random but uncalled for hardships. And as regards human life, well, brave soldiers have been educated everywhere and may I remind you, for instance, that young Janissaries, the Christian children who were taken in the Balkans by the Turks when they had murdered their parents, they were educated into brave soldiers who wanted nothing more than to fall gloriously in battle. So human nature can be turned into the exact opposite. Now why shouldn't it be possible to put a little more sense into us. I should say, because we have never seriously considered this. Yes, the monasteries know how to do it. The military have also known it, but they have never seriously considered what education with a proper conditioning to put, to smooth out these little kinks of human nature which can go wrong so much and give so much trouble. I think it can be done and the main thing is to give people, to give the young people a strong feeling that our world is not the worst of all possible worlds. That our consumer civilisation is indeed worth saving. And it has not smashed up and I hope that something will come in its place. At the moment of course whatever condition and manipulation exists here, it’s just the wrong way. We are being manipulated to consume and to waste. This is the strongest manipulation of the western world, the sales pressure, the inducement to spend and to waste. The excuse is of course that this keeps the industry going. It’s the duty of any good American to buy a big car, because it gives work to the trade and also to burn as much oil as possible. To over-heat his house etc, etc. This of course cannot go on forever. This sort of propaganda must stop. I think it’s quite likely that if it’s an effort shared by all the people, as in kids of war, the response will be quite a good one. If for instance one lets the petrol prices go up to three times, so that rich can own big cars and the poor can’t, then there will be trouble. There’s one other thing that I would like to see, and this is also something mentioned by Minister Ehmke, this is deurbanisation. You see the enormous growth of megalopolis, especially in the developing countries and the United States, it is a frightful phenomenon which alone is a big danger. But there’s another advantage in deurbanisation. In smaller towns, where people can go to their work on bicycles, they consume far less energy than in the big towns. And so I wish that part of the unemployment which will be caused by the drop in our oil wasting industries, we should use for deurbanisation, for decentralisation. And communication is to replace commuting. Can we really replace our material crunching, energy wasting industrial civilisation by knowledge and communication society? This has been incidentally suggested to the Japanese that instead of the consumer society want a knowledge and communication society. That is a beautiful idea, but if you want to realise it, you must start with a new education. First of all, which satisfies people that this is not the not the worst of all possible worlds, and that we owe it to our ancestors who had to work so hard to get on with it instead of smashing it up. Then of course to establish the non-energy wasting, non-material wasting values, which I think it can also succeed if you started in earnest. Summing up, if the rapid material growth of the first 25 years has given the impression that now at least mankind is on a straight way towards peace and happiness, the next 25years are likely to destroy this illusion. We must realise that we are living on an earth which is now becoming too small for us. Applied scientists and technologists methodically revised their priorities. The first priority is to get our civilisation going and not to continue with this irresponsible wasting of energy and material resources. So as for to create at least a bearable life on an overcrowded earth. And I have full confidence that the technologists who rise to this challenge and with the seriousness which we mastered problems before us. I want to add just one more word, what is at stake is not just our world, but also our freedom. It’s our democracy. Because if our democracy doesn’t rise to these problems, then democracy will have to cease. There will have to be some kind of emergency war measures and they have a tendency to linger on after the emergency has passed. Anyway the emergency will not pass so quickly, in 20 years we may overcome the energy crisis, after that comes the other, I should say the Forrester and Meadows difficulty. And anyway, getting into a stationary state is not so easy. I once gave a lecture in a German circle and von Weizsäcker, who was the present, said “if you go on like this, then we must put as much energy into breaking the social system as we have put into accelerating it.” I think this is roughly true. Now, may I quote also what a great historian, Arnold Toynbee, said of this, of the great danger which threatens democracy by the system that we have identified hope with continual growth, and now we have to stop growth, whether we like it or not. He said: “We cannot be sure that even in England parliamentary democracy will be able to survive the frightful ordeal of having to divert to a stationary state on a material plain.” This is the problem before us, nothing less is at stake, not just our wealth, it’s also our democracy and freedom. Thank you.

Der Energie- und Rohstoffverbrauch der Welt steigt alljährlich um 5%, das entspricht einer Verdoppelung in 14 Jahren. Dies gilt jedoch hauptsächlich für das industrialisierte Drittel der Erde. Bezogen auf die gesamte Weltbevölkerung steigt der Verbrauch um etwas mehr als 2% jährlich, verdoppelt sich also in 35 Jahren. Dies wiederum trifft hauptsächlich auf die armen Länder zu und das bringt uns zu dem Fazit: Die Reichen werden immer reicher, die Armen bekommen Kinder. Der Club of Rome bezeichnet sich selbst als internationale Nichtorganisation, er hat keinen Präsidenten, keinen Sekretär, kein Budget. Er ist lediglich ein Gremium aus 85 sorgfältig ausgewählten Personen aus allen Nationen der Welt und die Zahl der Mitglieder soll 100 auch nie übersteigen. Aber keine Angst, das Amt im Club of Rome ist kein Amt auf Lebenszeit, wenn jemand nicht wirklich dafür arbeitet, wird er sofort entlassen. Es gibt also immer noch Platz bei diesen 100. Nun, leider sind die kommunistischen Länder nur schwach vertreten und es gibt keine offizielle Vertretung der UdSSR, obwohl eine Tagung des Club of Rome in Moskau stattfand und wir wissen, dass einige Russen in sehr hohen Positionen unsere Arbeit sehr aufmerksam und mit Sympathie verfolgen, offiziell sind sie aber keine Mitglieder. Lassen Sie mich jetzt etwas zur Arbeit des Club of Rome erzählen: Von Anfang an suchte der Club of Rome nach einer universellen Methode, um die Probleme der Welt, unseres extrem komplizierten Weltsystems zu lösen. Und glücklicherweise kam 1968 der Kontakt mit Prof. J. Forrester vom MIT zustande, der damals gerade seine Studien zur Dynamik von Städten abgeschlossen hatte. Forrester entwarf die ersten Computermodelle einer Stadt und zeigte ihre Entstehung und Entwicklung vom Brachland bis zu ihrer Blüte und ihrem Niedergang. Dies stimmte perfekt mit realen Beobachtungen überein. Dieses Modell wurde in verschiedenen Systemen angewandt und es zeigte sich etwas sehr Beunruhigendes, was Forrester als das intuitive Verhalten komplexer sozialer Systeme bezeichnet. Nach Forrester hat uns die Natur nicht mit einer intuitiven Einsicht in komplexe, nichtlineare multiple Feedbackschleifen ausgestattet. Wir brauchten dies im Lauf der Evolution auch nicht, heute ist es aber wichtig, weil die Komplexität sozialer Ereignisse über unser intuitives Verständnis hinausgewachsen ist. Fast alles, was im Moment gut ist oder gut scheint und was uns die nächsten vier oder fünf Jahren helfen wird, wird sich auf lange Sicht gegen uns wenden. Genau das kann der Computer berechnen. Ich glaube fest daran, dass der Computer gerade rechtzeitig kam, um unsere industrielle Zivilisation, die uns über den Kopf gewachsen ist, zu retten. Im Club of Rome begann Forrester, ein Modell für die Welt zu entwickeln, was ihm in bemerkenswert kurzer Zeit gelang. Sein Buch „World Dynamics“ erschien 1971. Danach wurde die Arbeit von seinem Studenten Dennis Meadows mit einem internationalen Team aus 17 Personen und Finanzierung durch die Volkswagen-Stiftung fortgeführt. Dieses Buch erschien letztes Jahr, 1972, unter dem Titel „Die Grenzen des Wachstums“ und wurde in 20 Sprachen übersetzt. Ich habe jetzt nicht die Zeit, um ausführlich über das Buch zu sprechen, ich hoffe, viele von Ihnen haben es gelesen, ganz sicher wenigstens in Auszügen. Daher will ich den Inhalt nur kurz zusammenfassen. Das Modell basiert auf fünf Variablen: Weltbevölkerung, Industrieproduktion, Nahrungsverbrauch pro Kopf, Naturressourcen und Verschmutzung. Diese Variablen sind durch eine große Zahl komplizierter Beziehungen miteinander verknüpft, die teils auf Erfahrung, teils aber auch einfach auf Schätzungen beruhten, weil man keine andere Möglichkeit hatte, um ein Modell der gesamten Welt zu erzeugen. In den Computer kann man nun verschiedene Modelle eingeben und beobachten, was sich entwickelt. Der Computer ist so eingerichtet, dass er die historische Entwicklung von 1900 - 1970 gespeichert hat. Dann kann man verschiedene Modelle eingeben und in wenigen Minuten zeigt er das Ergebnis für die Erde im Jahr 2100. Der Computer ist allerdings schrecklich kompliziert, man kann ihn nicht wirklich verstehen, er geht über das menschliche Verständnis hinaus. Aber die Ergebnisse, die er liefert, sind überaus einfach. Und überaus beunruhigend. Wenn wir einfach so weitermachen wie bisher, kommt es in etwa 100 Jahren plus minus 20 Jahren zur weltweiten Katastrophe durch Überbevölkerung und ständig steigenden Verbrauch. Dann folgt ein steiler Niedergang durch die Erschöpfung der natürlichen Ressourcen. Und wenn wir völlig verrückt sind, kommt es vielleicht auch zu einer Verschmutzungskatastrophe. Ich will nicht allzu viel darüber sprechen, denn ich kann nicht glauben, dass die Menschheit so verrückt sein kann, sich selbst zu vergiften. Es ist auch so schon schlimm genug, die Erschöpfung aller Ressourcen ist schlimm genug. Wie Sie sich denken können, wurden diese Ergebnisse von vielen Wirtschaftsexperten, wenn auch nicht von allen, wie ich mit Freude sagen kann, extrem feindselig aufgenommen. Dennoch sind sie absolut plausibel, man braucht keine komplizierte Maschine, einfache Faustregeln zeigen, wenn man die Ressourcen der Erde betrachtet, mit einem Faktor von zwei, drei oder fünf arbeitet und unseren steigenden Verbrauch sieht, dass die weltweiten Ressourcen nicht in zehn, nicht in 1000, aber vielleicht in 100 Jahren erschöpft sein werden, als erste werden Land und Bodenschätze zur Neige gehen. Wirtschaftsexperten kommen oft mit dem Argument: Weißt Du, das wurde schon oft prophezeit, Malthus, wie Sie wissen, aber durch die Entdeckung neuer Ressourcen und durch neue Technologien haben wir jede Krise bewältigt. Neue Ressourcen können natürlich die Katastrophe etwas hinauszögern, aber nicht wirklich verhindern. Und neue Technologien, nun, ich hoffe wirklich, dass dieser naive Glaube an die Technik bei uns Forschern der angewandten Naturwissenschaften und Technologen gerechtfertigt ist. Was mir aber wirklich missfällt, ist die Tatsache, dass die Wirtschaftsexperten uns nicht wirklich sagen, was sie eigentlich fürchten. Sie können sich einfach keine Welt vorstellen, in der es kein Wachstum mehr gibt, weil sie überzeugt sind – und nicht ohne Grund – dass unsere Welt, insbesondere die freien Volkswirtschaften, nur durch stetiges Wachstum stabil bleibt. Jeder hofft oder erlebt sogar, dass es ihm von Jahr zu Jahr besser geht. Eine stagnierende Gesellschaft, in der der materielle Verbrauch nicht mehr wächst, können sie sich einfach nicht vorstellen. Für mich ist das eine Vogel-Strauß-Methode. Der Strauß steckt seinen Kopf in den Sand und glaubt, weil bisher alles in Ordnung war, wird es auch so bleiben. Aber die Dinge werden nicht so bleiben. Natürlich haben Forrester und Meadows auch Szenarien jenseits dieser Katastrophen aufgezeigt. Sie arbeiteten an Untersuchungen, die etwa um das Jahr 2100 wieder eine stabile Situation zeigen. Ich fürchte aber, dass diese auch nicht wirklich Anlass zu Hoffnung geben, denn sie sind nur für die armen Länder gut. Und es ist doch klar: Wenn wir die Ressourcen der Erde gerecht verteilen, sogar mehrfach vergrößern und an die gesamte Weltbevölkerung verteilen wollten, die dann irgendwo zwischen 7 und 15 Milliarden Menschen liegen wird, dann hätte man natürlich einen Lebensstandard, der höher als der in Indien oder Afrika ist, aber immer noch weit niedriger als der unsere. Ich habe aber noch einen anderen Einwand gegen diese Szenarien. In diesen Kurven von Forrester und Meadows werden die Ressourcen trotzdem weiter aufgebraucht. Alles geht ungehindert weiter und wird für einige hundert Jahre stabil bleiben. Aber was sind ein paar hundert Jahre? Der Homo sapiens lebt seit mindestens 100.000 Jahren auf der Erde und die Biologen versichern uns, dass er weitere 100.000 Jahre und mehr schaffen kann. Einige hundert Jahre Wohlstand und Licht gegenüber mehreren hunderttausend Jahren Dunkelheit – das genügt nicht. Wir Wissenschaftler und Techniker sind also gefordert, neue Technologien zu entwickeln. Technologien, die nur unerschöpfliche oder nachwachsende Rohstoffe verbrauchen. Darf ich sie daran erinnern, dass die Welt vor nicht allzu langer Zeit weitgehend von einer nachwachsenden Ressource, nämlich Holz, lebte. Es wurde als Brennholz und als Baustoff genutzt und wuchs immer wieder nach. Natürlich ist die Weltbevölkerung viel zu groß für eine auf Holz basierende Wirtschaft geworden, das gleiche gilt für Kohle. Aber man kann neue Wirtschaftskonzepte entwerfen und wenn ich von unerschöpflichen Ressourcen spreche, dann denke ich tatsächlich an solche, die eine Million Jahre oder länger verfügbar sind. Natürlich hat dies die Gegner von Forrester und Meadows nicht überzeugt. Sie bleiben feindselig, denn die Menschen wollen diese Visionen nicht glauben, sie wollen einfach nicht wahrhaben, dass diese Katastrophen schon in hundert Jahren eintreten sollen. Und während sie noch diskutieren, ist ein Vorgeschmack auf die Katastrophe bereits zu spüren. Ich spreche von der Öl- und Energiekrise, die wir gerade durchleben. Nun ist dies eine Krise der hochentwickelten Länder, allen voran der USA, aber auch Europas. In den USA leben 6% der Weltbevölkerung, die jedoch 33% der weltweiten Energie verbrauchen. Das ist das Zehnfache der anderen Länder, zu denen auch England, Frankreich, Deutschland, Japan usw. gehören. Und sie verbrauchen das 50-fache der Bevölkerung Indiens. Nun könnte man sagen, das ist in Ordnung, solange sie ihre eigenen Rohstoffe verbrauchen, ihr eigenes Öl, ihre eigene Kohle usw. Man war vielleicht gedankenlos, aber moralisch gibt es nichts dagegen einzuwenden, seine eigenen Reserven aufzubrauchen. Dies galt jedoch nur bis vor einigen Jahren, heute ist es anders. In der Zwischenzeit ist die Katastrophe zur Neige gehender Reserven tatsächlich akut geworden. Wenn man hier die Ölproduktion für die USA aufzeichnet, so geht die Kurve nach links oben. Ausgehend von Null hier, hier haben wir erst 1973. Und die Nachfrage hat das Angebot in diesen wenigen Jahren um so viel überholt, das ist diese Kurve hier. Dagegen die Ölproduktion der USA, hier etwa, nur um Ihnen eine Vorstellung zu geben aber Sie sehen, hier wird man etwa zwei Drittel des Öls importieren müssen und nur ein Drittel wird noch im Land erzeugt. Das ist die Realität, genau diese Schere, die in Meadows’ Kurven zu sehen ist; wenn weltweit die Nachfrage das Angebot übertrifft, vielleicht in 100 Jahren erst, dann haben wir genau das. Das gleiche gilt in Europa, natürlich hat Europa schon immer fast 100% seines Öls importiert, aber wir waren auch sehr sorglos, wir haben den Niedergang des Kohleabbaus zugelassen und viele Kohlefeuerungen in Kraftwerken auf Öl umgerüstet, als das Öl billig war. Diese Krise zeigt uns, wie sehr es uns an Voraussicht mangelt. Sie wäre vorhersehbar gewesen und sie wurde auch vorhergesehen, auch bei den großen Ölgesellschaften. Die Forschungsabteilungen großer Ölgesellschaften haben diese Situation präzise vorhergesagt und ihre Zahlen offen gelegt. Aber gleichzeitig wurde der Verbraucher von den Vertriebsabteilungen der gleichen Ölgesellschaften zu immer mehr Ölverbrauch gedrängt. Und die Regierungen – nun sie wagen es einfach nicht, den Menschen zu sagen, dass sie nicht vorausschauend planen und wir auf eine große Krise zusteuern. Niemand kann heute ernsthaft behaupten, er hätte nichts davon gehört oder gewusst. Ich weiß nicht, wie das in Deutschland ist, aber in Amerika haben alle großen Zeitungen Artikel zu diesem Thema gebracht. Die meisten Magazine haben lange, sorgfältig recherchierte Beiträge veröffentlicht. Aber der Mann auf der Straße will es einfach nicht glauben. Er glaubt lieber, dass dies eine Erfindung der großen Ölgesellschaften sei, um die Preise für Benzin in die Höhe zu treiben. Vergessen wir aber einmal den politischen Aspekt und betrachten wir, wie die Technik die Lage erleichtern kann. Leider muss ich sagen, dass wir hier tatsächlich sehr, sehr langsam sind. Wir müssen zugeben, dass nicht nur die Politiker und die Wirtschaftsexperten und die Verkäufer schuld sind. Die großen technischen Errungenschaften seit dem Krieg waren entweder Prestige- oder Luxusprojekte. Zum Beispiel das Polaris-U-Boot für die Verteidigung, ein wirklich erstaunliches Gerät, zumindest aus technischer Sicht. Oder der Mehrfach-Atomsprengkopf oder Luxusprojekte wie die Mondlandung und das Überschallflugzeug. Dass uns dies alles von den Politikern aufgezwungen wurde, ist aber keine Entschuldigung für uns Techniker. Auch hier herrscht der Druck fortschrittlicher Industrien und der Druck der Erfinder selbst, das Prinzip, das unser Leben beherrscht – alles, was machbar ist, muss gemacht werden. Dadurch kommt es natürlich zu Auswüchsen und man darf sich nicht wundern, dass heute viele, vor allem jüngere Menschen, der Technik misstrauen und das Gefühl haben, dass Technik unkontrollierbar geworden ist. Ich muss gestehen, dass ich nicht ganz unglücklich darüber bin, dass diese erste Krise gerade jetzt eintritt. Sie gibt uns den Anstoß, jetzt mit dem Umdenken zu beginnen. Vielleicht ist das die Herausforderung, die eine Zivilisation nach Toynbee braucht, um zu überleben, um unsere Zivilisation zu retten. Einige von Ihnen, vor allem die jüngeren Zuhörer, glauben vielleicht, dass unsere Konsumgesellschaft es nicht wert ist, gerettet zu werden. Tatsächlich ist es leicht, die Konsumgesellschaft zu verdammen, wenn man zum Beispiel an Dingen wie Kaufzwang, Wegwerfgüter, Verschmutzung, trostlose Vorstädte, sinnlose Rennen mit schnellen Autos, Powerboats, Schneemobilen denkt. Aber die Konsumgesellschaft hat auch für viele Millionen Menschen einen hohen Lebensstandard und ein hohes Maß an Sicherheit gebracht. Der Durchschnittsmensch ist heute definitiv glücklicher als früher. Wenn wir diese Krise überwunden haben, wird es vielleicht in weniger als 20 Jahren weniger sinnlose Raserei und mehr Gutes in unserer Gesellschaft geben. Was wäre nun also ein vernünftiges Programm für Wissenschaft und Technik? Nun, zuallererst müssen wir zugeben, dass wir die zehn verlorenen Jahre nicht aufholen können. Im Rahmen eines kleinen Projekts des Club of Rome dass wir nichts tun können als nach Ersatzprodukten zu suchen, in zehn Jahren werden wir vielleicht synthetisches Öl in beträchtlichen Mengen herstellen können. Übrigens wird nichts von der UdSSR geliefert werden, sie werden erst in sieben oder acht Jahren damit beginnen. Wir waren tatsächlich verrückt genug, dass wir in wenigen Jahren eine massive Ölkrise erleben werden und, wenn wir so gedankenlos sind wie zu erwarten ist, auch eine massive Arbeitslosigkeit, weil vieles in unserer Welt heute auf Öl- und Energieverschwendung beruht. Interessanterweise kommt man jetzt wieder auf deutsche Entwicklungen aus den Kriegsjahren zurück, Kohleklassifizierung und andere Dinge, aber die Fortschritte sind nur gering. Es gibt nur ein einziges Pilotwerk für die Kohleklassifizierung in Amerika und noch keine einzige Kohleverflüssigungsanlage. Bis die Kohleklassifizierung in großem Maßstab möglich ist, wird es noch etwa zehn Jahre dauern und bis dahin müsste der Kohleabbau in Amerika verdoppelt werden. Und bis zum Jahr 2000 sogar vervierfacht. Dies ist ein technisches und ein gesellschaftliches Problem. Natürlich bedeutet diese neue Technologie nicht eine Verdoppelung oder Vervierfachung der Anzahl an Bergleuten, aber man muss für den Kohlebergbau Leute unter Tage schicken, deren Väter und Großväter keine Bergleute waren. Das wird durchaus ein soziales Problem werden. Hier sind wir also noch ganz weit zurück. In dieser recht langen Übergangszeit von zehn Jahren, vielleicht auch mehr, müssen wir vorübergehend auf Maßnahmen wie die Sekundärausbeutung von Ölbohrlöchern zurückgreifen. Heute verbleibt die Hälfte, teilweise auch mehr Öl in den Bohrlöchern. Dieses Öl müsste man hochpumpen, um uns über die Jahre zu helfen. Und natürlich neue Lagerstätten erforschen. Die Kraftwerke, die heute mit Öl betrieben werden, müssen auf Kohle umgerüstet werden. Und am einfachsten von allem ist die Nutzung von Teersand und Ölschiefer. Übrigens sind die Zahlen, die über Ölschiefer genannt wurden, völlig falsch. Es stimmt keineswegs, dass Gesellschaften mit einem hohen Verbrauch noch weitere 100 bis 150 Jahre von Ölschiefer leben könnten. Das stimmt einfach nicht. Die Ölschieferlager sind etwa gleich den restlichen Öllagerstätten. Natürlich werden darüber hinaus auch Energiesparmaßnahmen notwendig sein, wie zum Beispiel kleinere Autos, vor allem in Amerika, stärkere Nutzung öffentlicher Verkehrsmittel, mehr Fahrräder, weniger Klimaanlagen mit effizienteren Geräten. Was mich und auch andere Leute beunruhigt, ist die Tatsache, dass unsere freie Gesellschaft falsch auf diese Krise reagiert. Vor zwei Jahren wurde in Amerika ein Gesetz gegen Luftverschmutzung erlassen, 1975 wurde es auf 1976 verschoben, damit sollte der Ausstoß unverbrannten Öls, von Stickoxiden usw. um 90% verringert werden. Und wie reagiert man in Detroit? Das Einfachste wäre der Bau kleinerer Autos gewesen. Aber nein, sie bauen Autos mit der gleichen Motorleistung, da aber der schadstoffarme Motor weniger effizient ist, fahren die neuen Fahrzeuge jetzt statt zwölf nur noch neun oder zehn Meilen mit einer Gallone. Und wie man hört, sollen es später sogar nur noch sechs sein. Das war die Reaktion aus Detroit. Dies ärgert mich sehr, denn es bedeutet, dass es kein freies Unternehmertum gibt, solange freie Unternehmen nicht zur Vernunft kommen. Natürlich brauchen wir auch Maßnahmen auf der politischen Ebene, wie internationale Verträge, um wenigstens die momentanen Liefermengen aus dem Nahen Osten zu sichern; ebenso Vorverträge zwischen den freien Wirtschaftsnationen und den kommunistischen Ländern, aber das wird wohl noch etwas dauern. Es muss zum Beispiel die Riesen-Pipeline für Erdgas gebaut werden, es müssen Probebohrungen in Sibirien stattfinden usw. Erdgas und Öl aus Sibirien werden aber frühestens in sieben oder acht Jahren zur Verfügung stehen. Wir haben also Zeit verloren, aber es gibt keinen Grund, nicht sofort mit unseren Vorbereitungen zu starten. Die Forschung zu Kohleklassifizierung und -verflüssigung, die so lange vernachlässigt wurde, dass wir um 50 Jahre. Dies muss in großem Maßstab erfolgen, denn langfristig ist die Aussicht gut. Wenn der Preis für Kraftstoff auf etwa das Dreifache des heutigen Preises steigt, was sinnvoll wäre, denn dann gäbe es nicht mehr so viel Verschwendung, erhalten viele Ersatzprodukte ihre Chance, allen voran Teersand, Ölschiefer, aber es gibt auch die Hoffnung, dass man mit Hilfe der Atomenergie synthetische Kraftstoffe herstellen kann. Und dies ist die interessanteste Hoffnung. Es gibt den so genannten CANDU-Reaktor in Kanada, der mit Uran-Thorium betrieben wird und etwa gleiche Mengen an Uran und Thorium verbrennt. Also ein Brennstoff, der billig und reichlich vorhanden ist. Und als Primärkühlmittel hochsiedende organische Flüssigkeit, die absolut nicht radioaktiv ist; der Neutronenbeschuss dient nur zum Erhalt stabiler Bestandteile. Und das Sekundärkühlmittel ist immer Wasser, also noch harmloser. Radioaktive Verstrahlung ist hier also nicht zu befürchten. Jetzt komme ich zu einem Punkt, den bereits Herr Minister Ehmke angesprochen hat, der weitverbreiteten Angst vor Atomkraftwerken. Wenn heute in Amerika irgendwo ein Atomkraftwerk gebaut wird, dann fallen die Preise für Grundstücke und Immobilien in der Gegend ebenso sicher als würden Schwarze sich dort niederlassen – weil Atomkraftwerke angeblich gefährlich sind. Die Explosionsgefahr eines Atomkraftwerks liegt nach niedrigsten Schätzungen bei 10 hoch minus 8 pro Jahr, das entspricht einer Explosion durch Versagen einer Sicherheitseinrichtung in hundert Millionen Jahren. Einige meiner Freunde, die Nuklearingenieure sind, sagen, wenn man absolut sichere Dampfkraftwerke verlangt hätte, dann wäre nie ein Dampfkraftwerk gebaut worden. Ich meine daher, man kann voraussagen, dass es keinen Mangel an Flüssigkraftstoff geben wird. Sonst wäre die Alternative zur Atomenergie Wasserstoff und dieser Gedanke gefällt mir gar nicht. Wasserstoff ist in der gleichen Menge viel schlechter als Benzin und die Gefahr bei einem Unfall ist viel größer, weil die Wasserstoffverdampfung wesentlich schlimmer als die von Benzin ist. Aber wie ich schon sagte, können wir hoffen, dass uns letztlich die Herstellung synthetischer Kohlenwasserstoffe zu etwa dem dreifachen Preis gelingen wird. Und warum auch nicht? Unsere Energie war bisher lächerlich billig. In den USA machen die Ausgaben für Energie, einschließlich Öl, etwa sechs oder sieben Prozent des BIP aus, und die Ausgaben für Lebensmittel 16 bis 18%. Ich würde es für richtig halten, wenn unsere Industriegesellschaft ebenso viel Geld für Energie wie für Lebensmittel ausgibt. Was die Mineralölreserven angeht, müssen wir auch hier noch tiefer bohren. Die Kosten für die Mineralölgewinnung liegen heute nur bei drei Prozent des BIP. Auch hier kann man hoffen, dass wir mit relativ billiger Atomkraft in der Lage sein werden, tiefere Lagerstätten zu erschließen. Und mit relativ billig meine ich einen Preis, der etwa beim Dreifachen des heutigen Preises liegt und der es dann auch gestatten würde, in Atomkraftwerken alle notwendigen Sicherheitseinrichtungen einzubauen, sie mit geschlossenen Wasserkreisläufen auszustatten, Verseuchung von Oberflächengewässern zu vermeiden usw. Die Entwicklung der Kernkraft wurde nicht vernachlässigt, es wurden tatsächlich hohe Summen in diese Technologie investiert. Leider geht die Entwicklung nur langsam voran. Um wirtschaftliche Reaktoren zu erhalten, benötigt man entweder Brüterreaktoren oder sehr große Uran-Thorium-Reaktoren und für beide Alternativen sehen optimistische Schätzungen eine Nutzung nicht vor 1990 voraus. In den USA sind derzeit 150 Atomkraftwerke in der Planung, richtig große Anlagen, um die 5.000 Megawatt. Aber auch wenn die Bedenken von Umweltschützern zerstreut werden können, was keineswegs sicher ist, und sie alle gebaut werden, werden 1980 nur 25% des Stroms aus Atomkraft stammen. In England sieht es etwas besser aus, dort ist man bereits bei 10% und bis 1980 werden es vielleicht 25% sein. Ich hatte bereits die Bedenken der Umweltschützer erwähnt, die natürlich teilweise auch psychologische Ursachen haben. Natürlich ist ein Kernreaktor ein Abkömmling der Atombombe. Und was die ersten Kraftwerke angeht, sie sind zwar nie explodiert, aber eine Verseuchung war keineswegs ausgeschlossen. Sie fragen jetzt vielleicht: Was ist mit der Fusionsenergie? Vor 20 Jahren war sie die einzige Hoffnung auf eine unerschöpfliche Energiequelle, weil genug Wasserstoff im Meer vorhanden ist. Heute sieht das anders aus, wir wissen, dass im Meer genug niedrig angereichertes Uraniumgranit in sehr niedriger Konzentration zu finden ist, das zu etwa dem Zwei- bis Fünffachen der heutigen Kosten für Uran gewonnen werden könnte, das ist sehr wenig. Auf Uranoxid entfällt nur ein sehr kleiner Teil der Gesamtkosten für das fertige Öl und etwa ein Zehntel der Kapitalkosten für den Gesamtölbedarf einer Anlage. Es ist also überhaupt nicht wichtig, wenn man nie eine Fusion hat, man hat trotzdem eine unerschöpfliche Energiequelle, da die Flüsse so viel Uran in das Meer spülen, dass auch eine überaus verschwenderische Menschheit für unbegrenzte Zeit mit dieser Energie auskommen könnte. Aber natürlich wäre es schön, Kernenergie durch Fusion zu erzeugen, weil dabei kein Plutonium entsteht. Die wirkliche Gefahr der Kernenergie ist nämlich das Plutonium. Nach Meinung von Experten könnte der weltweite Verbrauch auf das Vierfache der aktuellen Bevölkerung und das doppelte des US-Verbrauchs erhöht werden, das bedeutet eine 50-fache Steigerung der weltweiten Energieerzeugung. Es besteht aber die ernsthafte Gefahr einer Klimaveränderung, dann würde es vielleicht gefährlich werden. Können wir diese Macht der Menschheit, so wie sie heute ist, anvertrauen? Vor allem ein paar dieser jugendlichen Nationalisten? Natürlich würde ich daher die Fusionsenergie favorisieren. Subjektiv gebe ich ihr aber keine große Chance. Natürlich müssen wir die Hunderte Millionen Dollar, die sie kosten wird, in Betracht ziehen und ich muss sagen, in meinem ganzen Leben ist mir nie eine derart aufregende, wunderbare Idee begegnet wie die, eine Kernfusion durch Implosion kleiner Körnchen von Lithiumdeuterit oder DD zu erzeugen. Es ist eine absolut fantastische Vorstellung, diese Körnchen auf das etwa 10.000-fache zu verdichten und dann eine kontrollierte Nuklearexplosion herbeizuführen. Aber wie gesagt, wir müssen das eher als einen Glücksfall betrachten – wenn er eintritt, ist es gut, man kann ihn aber nicht wirklich in ein ernsthaftes Programm aufnehmen. Besser sieht es für die geothermische Energie aus. Die Geothermie ist natürlich in Deutschland unbedeutend, in ganz Europa, außer in Island, ist das so, aber in Amerika könnte sie wichtig werden. Und bisher wurde noch viel zu wenig in diese Energie investiert, es wurde viel zu wenig geforscht, es gibt einige wenige Verfechter, die sagen, wenn wir fünf Kilometer tiefe Löcher und daneben ein vielleicht vier Kilometer tiefes weiteres Loch bohren und Wasser in eines der Löcher gießen, dann erhalten wir aus den anderen Bohrlöchern wunderbaren Dampf und man könnte problemlos Kraftwerke mit jeweils mehreren Tausend Megawatt bauen. Es ist möglich. Ich weiß noch nicht, wie dies wirtschaftlich aussehen wird – darüber gibt es noch keine Erkenntnisse, möglicherweise gibt es nicht allzu viele Standorte auf der Welt, die in Frage kommen. Dann gibt es natürlich die Solarenergie. Nun, Solarenergie ist die billigste und sauberste Energie überhaupt – aber auch die teuerste. Denn sie bringt das Klima nicht durcheinander. Solarenergie wird zuerst in Strom umgewandelt und dann als Wärme freigesetzt, wie andere auch. Aber leider liegen die niedrigsten Kostenschätzungen für die Solarenergie bei etwa dem Doppelten der Atomenergie und diese stammen vom Erfinder selbst. Ich selbst bin Erfinder und weiß, dass deren Schätzungen mit pi multipliziert werden müssen! Man käme dann auf das Sechs- oder Siebenfache der Kosten für Atomenergie, das ist sicher realistischer. Hier würde ich mir natürlich wünschen, dass man das eiserne Gesetz der Wirtschaft durchbrechen könnte, dass nämlich der Rahm zuerst abgeschöpft wird – das heißt in diesem Fall, dass die billigste Art der Energieerzeugung zuerst genutzt wird. Ich wünschte, wir könnten zumindest die sehr reichen arabischen Länder überzeugen, Solarenergie an Stelle von Atomkraftwerken, die Plutonium erzeugen, zu nutzen. Ansonsten muss ich mit Alvin Weinberg, dem großen amerikanischen Experten sagen, wenn man an die Gefahr durch Plutonium denkt, können wir im besten Fall hoffen, dass die Befürworter dieser Atomkraftwerke zu einer Art neuen „Priesterschaft“ werden. All diese Überlegungen über Physik und Technologie führen uns unweigerlich zum Faktor Mensch. Wie ich in meinem Buch schon mehrfach feststellte, bisher verhielten wir uns gegen die Natur, von jetzt an verhalten wir uns gegen die menschliche Natur. Und die Geschichte der Menschheit, die aus endlosen Kriegen bestand, gibt nicht gerade Grund zu der Annahme, dass wir in Zukunft vernünftiger handeln werden. Ich klammere mich noch an die Hoffnung, dass der Wahnsinn eines Atomkriegs trotz allem so schrecklich wäre, dass die Menschheit vielleicht darauf verzichtet – und damit auf ihre totale Auslöschung. Dies ist die Annahme, die all unseren Vorhersagen zugrunde liegt, kein Atomkrieg und kein totaler Krieg jedweder Art. Dies ist natürlich die Grundvoraussetzung; eine andere Art, die Welt zu verbessern, wäre die Unterstützung der Entwicklungsländer. Auch hier könnte die Krise in unserer Entwicklung, von der ich sprach, zu solchen Umwälzungen in unseren Ländern führen, dass wir die ohnehin sehr unzureichende Auslandshilfe weiter beschneiden. Dennoch ist schon die Tatsache, dass es so etwas wie Entwicklungshilfe gibt, ein Zeichen für den menschlichen Fortschritt. Vor 100 Jahren, zu Zeiten der Wirtschaftslehre nach Ricardo u.a., wäre es absolut undenkbar gewesen, etwas umsonst zu geben, den Afrikanern oder den Indern etwas zu schenken, damit sie ihre eigene Industrie aufbauen können. Wenn ich mich mit der Natur des Menschen beschäftige, und ich möchte darüber heute nicht allzu viel sagen, stelle ich mir immer die große Frage, wie die menschliche Natur in eine friedliche Welt passt? Ist es möglich, dass eine friedliche, wohlhabende Welt in einem stationären wirtschaftlichen Umfeld existiert? Natürlich haben Menschen Tausende von Jahren in einer praktisch stagnierenden Welt gelebt. Die Entwicklung ging sehr langsam, aber damals waren alle arm. Gefährlich wird es, wenn Reichtum und Freiheit ins Spiel kommen. Können wir die menschliche Natur ändern? Ich denke, man kann sie tatsächlich ändern, aber die stärksten angeborenen Instinkte des Menschen sind sicherlich das Streben nach materieller Befriedigung und der Wille zu überleben. Jedoch wurde sogar dies auch ins Gegenteil verkehrt, zum Beispiel durch die Klöster, in denen Mönche in Askese leben und nicht nur einfache Armut, sondern große Mühsal auf sich nehmen. Und was den Überlebenswillen angeht – nun, überall werden tapfere Soldaten herangezogen, denken sie nur an die jungen Janitscharen, christliche Kinder, die von den Türken auf dem Balkan gefangen genommen wurden und die ihre Eltern getötet haben. Sie wurden zu tapferen Soldaten erzogen, die nichts mehr wollten als ehrenvoll im Kampf zu sterben. Die menschliche Natur kann also durchaus in ihr Gegenteil verkehrt werden. Warum sollte es dann nicht möglich sein, mehr Vernunft walten zu lassen. Wahrscheinlich, weil wir nie ernsthaft darüber nachgedacht haben. Ja, die Klöster wissen, wie es geht. Auch die Militärs, aber sie haben auch nie ernsthaft darüber nachgedacht, durch Erziehung mit einer geeigneten Konditionierung diese kleinen Abgründe der menschlichen Natur auszumerzen, die so viel anrichten und so viele Probleme bereiten können. Ich glaube, dass es möglich ist und das Wichtigste dabei ist es, die Menschen, vor allem die jungen Menschen, davon zu überzeugen, dass unsere Welt nicht die schlechteste aller Welten ist. Dass unsere Konsumgesellschaft es tatsächlich wert ist, gerettet zu werden. Sie ist bisher nicht gescheitert und ich hoffe, es wird etwas Anderes an ihre Stelle treten. Was wir heute an Druck und Manipulation erleben, ist einfach der falsche Weg. Wir werden zu Konsum und Verschwendung manipuliert. Das ist die stärkste Manipulation der westlichen Welt, Kaufdruck, die Verführung zu Konsum und zu Verschwendung. Natürlich wird dadurch die Industrie am Leben erhalten. Es ist die Pflicht jedes guten Amerikaners, ein großes Auto zu kaufen, weil er damit Arbeitsplätze sichert, und möglichst viel Öl zu verbrauchen, um sein Haus zu überhitzen usw. Das kann nicht endlos so weitergehen, diese Art der Propaganda muss aufhören. Und ich bin überzeugt, dass es uns gelingen wird, wenn wir alle zusammenhalten, wie Soldaten im Krieg. Lässt man zum Beispiel die Benzinpreise auf das Dreifache steigen, so dass sich nur noch Reiche große Autos leisten können, die Armen aber nicht, dann gibt es Probleme. Ein weiterer Punkt, den ich ansprechen möchte und der auch von Minister Ehmke schon erwähnt wurde, ist die Deurbanisierung. Wir sehen diese riesigen Megastädte entstehen, vor allem in den Entwicklungsländern und den USA, ein erschreckendes Phänomen, das für sich allein bereits eine große Gefahr darstellt. Aber die Deurbanisierung hat noch einen anderen Vorteil. In kleineren Städten, in denen die Menschen mit dem Fahrrad zur Arbeit fahren können, verbrauchen sie viel weniger Energie als in Großstädten. Einen Teil der Arbeitslosigkeit, die durch den Niedergang unserer Öl verschwendenden Industrien entstehen wird, sollte man daher durch gezielte Deurbanisierung oder Dezentralisierung, auffangen. Und Kommunikation muss das Pendeln zum Arbeitsplatz ersetzen. Können wir unsere industrielle Zivilisation, die viel zu viel Material verschlingt und Energie verschwendet, tatsächlich durch eine Wissens- und Kommunikationsgesellschaft ersetzen? Dies wurde übrigens auch den Japanern vorgeschlagen, die statt der Konsumgesellschaft eine Wissens- und Kommunikationsgesellschaft wollten. Schöne Idee, aber um sie zu realisieren, muss man bei der Erziehung ansetzen. Allen voran müssen wir die Menschen überzeugen, dass dies nicht die schlechteste aller Welten ist und dass wir sie von unseren Vorfahren geerbt haben, die sie uns mit viel Mühe und Arbeit hinterlassen und nicht zerstört haben. Im nächsten Schritt müsste man Sparsamkeit in Energieverbrauch und Konsum als neue Werte vermitteln, auch das kann gelingen, wenn man es ernsthaft will. Kurz gefasst: Wenn das rasche materielle Wachstum der letzten 25 Jahre den Eindruck hinterlässt, dass die Menschheit jetzt zumindest auf einem langsamen Weg zu Frieden und Glück ist, dann werden die nächsten 25 Jahre diese Illusion wahrscheinlich zerstören. Wir müssen erkennen, dass wir auf einer Erde leben, die jetzt zu klein für uns wird. Naturwissenschaftler und Techniker haben ihre Prioritäten methodisch überarbeitet. Erste Priorität ist es jetzt, unsere Zivilisation zu erhalten und die unverantwortliche Energie- und Ressourcenverschwendung zu stoppen, um zumindest ein erträgliches Leben auf einer übervölkerten Erde zu ermöglichen. Und ich vertraue voll und ganz darauf, dass die Technologie diese Herausforderung und die Probleme, die vor uns liegen, entschlossen bewältigen wird. Ich möchte nur noch eine Bemerkung anschließen: Auf dem Spiel steht nicht nur unsere Welt, sondern auch unsere Freiheit. Unsere Demokratie. Denn wenn unsere Demokratie diesen Problemen nicht gewachsen ist, dann wird sie verschwinden. Dann werden Notstandsmaßnahmen erlassen werden, die meist auch bestehen bleiben, wenn der Notstand vorüber ist. Nun, dieser Notstand wird nicht so schnell vorbei sein, in 20 Jahren haben wir wohl die Energiekrise überstanden, aber dann wird eine andere kommen, ganz nach dem Modell von Forrester und Meadows. Und einen materiell stationären Zustand zu erreichen, ist nicht einfach. Ich habe einmal einen Vortrag vor einem deutschen Publikum gehalten und von Weizsäcker, der der Präsident war, sagte: um das Sozialsystem zu bremsen, wie wir gebraucht haben, um es in Schwung zu bringen.“ Ich denke, dass ist richtig. Ich möchte noch zitieren, was der große Historiker Arnold Toynbee dazu sagte: und jetzt müssen wir dem Wachstum Einhalt gebieten, ob es uns gefällt oder nicht.“ Er sagte: „Nicht einmal in England können wir sicher sein, dass die parlamentarische Demokratie die schwere Prüfung des Übergangs in ein materiell stationäres System überleben wird.” Dies ist das Problem, das vor uns liegt, auf dem Spiel steht nicht nur unser Wohlstand, sondern auch unsere Demokratie und unsere Freiheit. Vielen Dank.

Dennis Gabor
The Predicament of Mankind
(00:38:17 - 00:40:52)

 

Today we know that this prediction was too pessimistic. But there are, of course, more recent opinions. 1988 Physics Laureate Jack Steinberger believes that we have until about 2035 to find an alternative to oil, for example:


Jack Steinberger (2008) - What Future for Energy and Climate?

So in my lifetime the population of the planet has grown by factor 3, from 2 billion to 6.6 billion. And in the same period the global energy used and greenhouse gas production have increased by a factor of about 8. And the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, the CO2 in the atmosphere has risen from 280 parts per million to 380 parts per million. This is a very substantial amount over a short period of time, in the inset it’s over a period of time of a couple of hundred years and in the bigger picture it’s in a period of time of a thousand years. To compare it with ice age timing which we see also a little bit, which are much, much slower. So this is very, very different. The temperature has risen by about point 8 degrees since the beginning of the industrial age and the sea level has risen 20 centimetres. These are measured quantities which some people question but I think are, it’s nearly impossible to question these. And here this gives a picture of the, these things I have from the most consequent organisation studying these questions which is the international panel on climate change. This is the growth of energy over the last 50 years in different regions of our globe. The first one is the United States of course, Europe is here, let me focus also on China which is there and you can see that in the United States and in Europe the growth has been about 1% per year and in China right now the growth is 3.6% per year. And notice that China has overtaken in the total energy use, the United States. And of course for me as best I know energy use and CO2 production and oil consumption, fossil fuel consumption are the same thing. So this is to give you a little notion of the energy use by sector. The electricity is about 40%, transport is about 20%, the industrial consumption is about 20% and building heating is about 20%. And the present energy sources are fossil fuels 80%, so fossil fuels are essentially all the energy on which our economy and our life depends. And renewable combustible fuels are 11%, hydro power is 2.3% and nuclear is 7%. This is the rest of the 20%. So how long will this fossil fuel last? One problem is that these fossil fuels will not last; another problem is that they contaminate our atmosphere. Of course how long they last depends on how much there is and how fast we use them and on this scenario which I’m using here to see how long they will last, I assume that the resources, the ones which are known, of course there are others which are not known but I don’t know what they are. So if I take the known oil, natural gas and coal resources and I assume that the present population will grow 1% a year which is what it’s doing now. And that the per capita energy use will grow by 2.5 % per year, which is what it is now on the average. Then the oil will be gone in 25 years and after that time if you use natural gas for whatever we used oil, in addition to what we use it now, it will last 10 years more. So both oil and natural gas will be gone in 35 years. And if after that we learn how to make fuel for transportation out of coal, which is, Hitler knew how to do so I suppose we can also learn how to do it again, then the resources will be gone altogether in 60 years. So it’s a very finite amount of time and your children and grandchildren will, may be there and of course it will not happen like this because before all this is gone there will be some social changes. And I hope they’ll be very much sooner. The atmospheric CO2 level will be 700 parts per million, so almost 3 times what it was before all this happened. And the temperature rise will be about 6 degrees centigrade and the sea level rise will be several metres. And these changes will of course cause large problems in the societies and there will be conflicts which will be as a result of that but I cannot comment on those things. This is just a graph which I took from Llewellyn Smith who gave us a seminar on this which gives an illustration of how fast all these things are happening, this is the use of fossil fuel over time and the time scale is 10,000 years. So this is since the time which we started learning how to write, nothing happened and then all of a sudden we use all the fossil fuels but they’ll be gone in a very short time. But humanity hopefully will survive a little bit longer. Now what can be done to try to avoid this catastrophe? And one important thing to remember is that all these responses take substantial amount of time and the time scale which is there is only a few decades and any kind of response is also a few decades. So it’s certainly very interesting to respond as quickly as possible and over a shorter time as possible to try to mitigate the problem. Of course one thing is to reduce the population, I think this would be a very important and good thing. One would be of course a way to do this which would be effective would be a nuclear war, it would also have the benefit of putting dust into the atmosphere which reduces the temperature. And another important thing is to reduce consumption, the trouble is that reduction of consumption of energy is very much in conflict with our expanding and competitive economy which requires right now for success an ever increasing production. So how to reduce consumption, I think we could live in a way which is not so much worse, consuming less. But our economy, how to accommodate this is not obvious. Another thing of course is increase the energy efficiency in buildings or in transportation and other things. This is just to illustrate the, this is a graph which is produced by the Human, by the United Nations Human Development, this is called the Human Development Index by some United Nations organisations. And it shows the energy used per capita, this was done in about the year 2000, energy used per capita in different countries. And the energy, the Human Development Index is based on education level, on health level, health, medical treatment level as they evaluated. And the GDP, the production index per capita. And you can see that you can achieve, according to them, an index, China has an index of .75 and uses 1.8 kilowatt hours per person and the US has an index of .93 and uses 12,000 kilowatt hours per person. The human development index people think .8 should be adequate for people to get along on. That may be 2,000 kilowatt hours per person is quite easily achievable. Now how can you avoid using fossil fuels to produce energy? And let me focus on electricity, solar energy is clearly there is plenty of it, and I will then focus when I'm through with this on thermal solar power and what is being done to develop this technology. This in my opinion is an absolutely clear way to go and I think we should do more to develop it. Then there is nuclear power which you could use much more, it’s now at 20% or less than 20% of the electric power which is used. There is big public opposition to it, it’s cheap and its pretty much ok in my opinion, but there are certain questions which is the question of how to deal with the waste for long term storage and possible accidents and the vulnerability to terror attacks. And the fact that nuclear energy plants, energy technology is also useful for making nuclear weapon technology. So the things are related. So there are some hesitation about using nuclear energy. But I think it’s much better than using fossil fuels. There are hydro electric energies, of course an extremely fine way of making electric power. But I think the extension of the present use of hydro electric power is not very easy. There is wind energy and it’s being developed in many places now with good intensity, I think it has a very serious problem with it, namely the wind power is very unsteady with time. And storing electric energy which is produced by wind power is a technological challenge which I don’t know how to meet. So I don’t think wind power is as good a possibility by far as solar power in the deserts. There is geothermal which is not accessible everywhere, it’s now a very small amount and I don’t know how big its possibilities are but I think they’re limited. And there’s another thing which I want to say just a sentence about which is carbon sequestration and storage, the notion has been put forward that you, this doesn’t avoid the use of fossil fuels but if you use fossil fuels then you capture the CO2 which is produced and you put it under pressure into the ground, somewhere deep into the ocean or into some hole in the ground. And it would, as best I can tell, increase the price of electricity production by about a factor 2. It’s not impossible to imagine that it could be done on a large scale but the technology has not been explored, almost nothing is known about the reliability of storing CO2 under high pressure deep in the ground or deep in the sea. And so before anybody can really propose this, development work has to be done in order to check this. And of course it has the disadvantage for me that it doesn’t save the use of fossil fuels. It would be nice if a future generation could still have some fossil fuels which it could use. And so we’re worried about the problem of trying to do something and one thing which one has to keep in mind is that whatever solution you propose has to be equitable in the relationship between the effect on developing countries, compared to those which are already developed so this must always be taken into account. And well the problem of reducing the use is I’ve already commented on, it conflicts with our market economy. One absolutely, I mean to illustrate this a little bit also, one very clear way to try to reduce the use is to make a CO2 tax, a tax for carbon consumption, everybody who uses it has to pay that tax. It would encourage you to finding other ways and would discourage the use of carbon. But our economy being what it is and our governments having to worry about that, it has not been adopted by any country, it would have to be adopted in a global way. And clearly from a political point of view the biggest problem is that if you do it in your own country you have to pay a certain price but your benefit is not in your own country, it’s globally and unless the rest of the world does the same thing or does it comparably you won’t benefit from it. So it requires a global collaboration, global political cooperation which we certainly have never achieved, it would be a fantastic achievement, but I am very pessimistic about it. Ok now I will finish what I can tell you about by giving you a little bit of an idea of what is happening to exploit the possibility of getting thermal solar energy from deserts. And my pictures I take it just for Europe but for the rest of the world similar. That essentially the bulk of electricity for Europe would be produced by captors of solar energy in the desert region, it would require about, a few percent of the deserts of the world to supply all the electric power of the world. The captor would convert the solar energy into heat of some liquid, some thermal vector liquid which now they use some oil which can go to temperature of about 350 degrees centigrade. And that you could, then one big advantage of this technology is that the heat which you produce is really relatively easy to store in masses of material which have enough thermal capacity, the material which is used now in present development projects is a gas, a salt mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate which can go to temperatures of the order of, I think something like 500 degrees. And you can keep this, of course you are limited in the volume, it costs you money to make the volume of this storage systems. But you can quite easily do it at prices which are not too much, so that you can store overnight. And so you can make electricity for day and night in the desert, which is with a fairly good efficiency over the whole year. And then you require a normal steam turbine, whatever heat vector you have produced has to drive a normal steam power turbine. And then what you also need is something which doesn’t exist, is the network of transmission lines, electric transmission over distances which are much larger than those which are presently used, presently they may be hundreds of kilometres but you need now thousands of kilometres. And AC doesn’t work but DC works and you can do it at a price which is acceptable but it’s something you have to worry about. And the technology is known. So I show you some pictures of some developments in the United States, federally nothing is going on but California with Schwarzenegger has a very strong program of having solar concentrators in the Mojave desert and there are also projects in Nevada, in Spain and this has been going on since the early 1980’s, in Spain there are now some projects, one of them is just coming in to operation in southern Spain. And there they are focusing very much also on storage, over night storage which is not yet happening very much in America. And there are 2 projects which, or 3 projects in Spain which I’ll call attention to. Then there’s a project in Italy where a different thermal vector is proposed. And then there are 2 new projects or 3 new projects in America, in California which I just heard about in the last weeks, and which I find quite interesting. So this is in the Mojave desert and the concentrating devices are hyperbolic or parabolic mirrors which you see there in long rows and they focus the light, they are about 5 metres across and they focus a light on a tube which is about 8 centimetres in diameter, which contains oil, which can go up to a temperature of about 350 degrees centigrade, Carlo you can correct me, you know better. And there are now of the order of 400 or 500 megawatts of these systems in place. And they’ve been functioning for 20 years and it’s not trivial to keep them in operation and there are problems, but they’ve been managing to keep them with a substantial efficiency. So it’s some demonstration that the technique can work. I should, for those who are not familiar, the 450 megawatts which they can produce corresponds to about 1 normal coal or gas electric plant except that this one doesn’t work at night. Here is a project in Spain, it's called Andasol, which has been now in construction for a few years, just this month it's supposed to come into operation, I don’t know whether its really come into operation yet or not but it uses also storage, it uses the same parabolic troughs and the same liquid. Here this shows you the location in southern Spain and this shows you one of these tanks, one of these tanks is if I remember now right, is 35 metres in diameter and 13 metres high and contains the salt. And they have 2 of these tanks for the storage. This is, show another kind of method which is, has very great advantages and has also some disadvantages is solar tower where you reflect the solar light. You focus the solar light from a field of reflectors on the ground on to a cylinder on top of a tower which contains the thermal vector fluid. And this is a plant in southern Spain which is under construction, which is going to make 17 megawatts, it will have storage, bigger storage than the Andasol plants. And it uses the same salt for the thermal vector. This is clearly an interesting technology. Here is some proposed project in Italy, in Sicily, which is proposing to, which is exploring the possibility of using together with these parabolic reflectors, using molten salt, it’s technically a challenge to use this molten salt, this project has been going for a while. And some troughs have been tested but the whole project doesn’t exist yet. And so to end with a few words about new larger projects in California. For me the interesting thing was that they use different technologies, so it’s not so easy to convince yourself just what the best technology is and we should really pursue more, much stronger development effort in exploring these technologies. The 3 new projects, I’ve listed 2, since then I found out about a third and so let me talk about these 2. There’s a solar tower project which, but now uses water for the thermal fluid at a very high pressure and a very substantial temperature. A temperature over 300 degrees centigrade and a pressure of the order of, if I remember, 200 bars or 280 bars. And there’s a comparable project and these are now, they have just been approved by the, or accepted by the power companies in California, uses a different kind of mirror than the parabolic trough. A mirror which is called Fresnel, I won’t describe it, doesn’t matter, it's very simple physics and optics, it has some advantages and to me it makes sense. But I’m not competent to really make a judgement. Which they think they can make more cheap than the current parabolic ones. So let me stop with that, let me just say renewable energy at acceptable cost. By the way, I should have said that for the Spanish plants the government has agreed to give the companies which are building these, a price for electricity which they deliver, which is 3 times the present price in Spain. But the American new projects, they are being offered a price for their electricity which is less than double the present price, so they think they can make it cheaper. And I think there’s good reason to believe that you can make solar thermal electricity at a price which is absolutely comparable to what you can expect in the next 10 years for fossil fuel electric power. So the technology I think is available now. The thing which is the challenge is to find some global political will and collaboration which can realise such a thing. Thank you very much.

Während meines Lebens hat die Bevölkerung des Planeten um den Faktor 3 zugenommen, von 2 Milliarden auf 6,6 Milliarden. Und in derselben Zeitspanne sind der globale Energieverbrauch und die Treibhausgasproduktion etwa um den Faktor 8 gestiegen. Und das Treibhausgas in der Atmosphäre, das CO2 in der Atmosphäre ist von 280 Parts per Million auf 380 Parts per Million geklettert. Das ist ein sehr beträchtlicher Betrag über einen kurzen Zeitraum, der Ausschnitt zeigt einen Zeitraum von ein paar Hundert Jahren und das größere Bild stellt einen Zeitraum von tausend Jahren dar. Um das mit den Zeiträumen der Eiszeit zu vergleichen, von denen wir auch ein bisschen sehen, die sind sehr, sehr viel langsamer. Das ist also etwas ganz anderes. Die Temperatur ist seit Beginn des Industriezeitalters um 0,8 Grad gestiegen und der Meeresspiegel um 20 Zentimeter. Das sind gemessene Zahlen, die manche Menschen in Frage stellen, aber ich glaube, sie sind…, es ist beinahe unmöglich, sie in Frage zu stellen. Und hier sehen Sie ein Bild der, diese Dinge habe ich von der konsequentesten Organisation, die diese Fragen untersucht, nämlich dem Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Weltklimarat). Es zeigt den Anstieg an Energie in den letzten 50 Jahren in verschiedenen Regionen unseres Globus. Der erste Block zeigt natürlich die Vereinigten Staaten, Europa ist hier, lassen Sie mich auch China hervorheben, das hier ist, und Sie erkennen, dass in den Vereinigten Staaten und in Europa das Wachstum etwa 1% pro Jahr beträgt und in China beträgt das Wachstum zurzeit gerade 3,6 % pro Jahr. Und beachten Sie, dass China die USA was den Gesamtenergieverbrauch anbelangt überholt hat. Und natürlich ist, soweit ich weiß, Energieverbrauch und CO2-Produktion und Ölverbrauch, Verbrauch fossiler Brennstoffe ein und dasselbe. Das sollte Ihnen einen kleinen Eindruck vom Energieverbrauch nach Sektor vermitteln. Elektrizität macht dabei 40%, Transport 20%, der industrielle Verbrauch etwa 20% und Gebäudeheizung etwa 20% aus. Und die derzeitigen Energiequellen sind zu 80% fossile Brennstoffe, fossile Brennstoffe stellen im Wesentlichen die gesamte Energie, von der unsere Wirtschaft und unser Leben abhängen. Und erneuerbare Brennstoffe stellen etwa 11%, Wasserkraft 2,3% und Kernenergie 7%. Das ist der Rest der 20%. Wie lange also werden diese fossilen Brennstoffe reichen? Ein Problem ist, dass diese fossilen Brennstoffe nicht reichen werden, ein anderes ist, dass sie unsere Atmosphäre verschmutzen. Wie lange sie reichen hängt natürlich davon ab, wie viel es davon gibt und wie schnell wir sie aufbrauchen, und in diesem Szenario, anhand dessen ich darstellen möchte, wie lange sie reichen, nehme ich an, dass die Ressourcen, die, die wir kennen, natürlich gibt es andere, die wir nicht kennen, aber ich weiß nicht, welche das sind. Wenn ich also die bekannten Öl-, Gas- und Kohlereserven zugrunde lege und annehme, dass die gegenwärtige Bevölkerung um 1% pro Jahr wächst, was sie zurzeit tut, und dass der pro Kopf Verbrauch an Energie um 2,5% pro Jahr steigt, was zurzeit durchschnittlich der Fall ist, wird das Öl in 25 Jahren verbraucht sein, und wenn man danach Erdgas für all die Dinge verwendet, für die man davor Öl verwendet hat, zusätzlich zu dem, für das wir es jetzt verwenden, reicht es noch weitere 10 Jahre. Öl und Gas werden also beide in 35 Jahren verbraucht sein. Und wenn wir danach herausfinden, wie man Treibstoff für den Transport aus Kohle herstellt, was…, Hitler wusste, wie das geht, also nehme ich an, wir können das auch wieder herausfinden, dann sind die Ressourcen allesamt in 60 Jahren aufgebraucht. Das ist also ein sehr endlicher Zeitraum und Ihre Kinder und Enkelkinder werden, möglicherweise, dabei sein und natürlich wird es nicht einfach so geschehen, denn bevor das alles weg ist, wird es einige soziale Veränderungen geben. Und ich hoffe, dass es sie sehr viel früher gibt. Der CO2-Gehalt in der Atmosphäre wird bei 700 Parts per Million liegen, also etwa 3 Mal so hoch wie er war, bevor das alles geschah. Und die Temperatur wird um 6° C gestiegen sein und der Meeresspiegel um mehrere Meter. Und diese Veränderungen führen natürlich zu großen Problemen in den Gesellschaften und aufgrund all dessen wird es Konflikte geben, aber ich kann zu diesen Dingen nichts sagen. Das ist einfach ein Diagramm, das ich von Llewellyn Smith übernommen habe, der bei uns ein Seminar darüber gehalten hat. Es liefert eine Vorstellung davon, wie schnell all diese Dinge geschehen, das ist der Verbrauch an fossilen Brennstoffen und die Zeitskala liegt bei 10.000 Jahren. Das beginnt also bei der Zeit, in der wir lernten zu schreiben, nichts geschah und dann, plötzlich, verbrauchen wir alle fossilen Brennstoffe, aber sie werden in sehr kurzer Zeit aufgebraucht sein. Aber die Menschheit wird hoffentlich ein bisschen länger überleben. Nun, was können wir tun, um diese Katastrophe zu vermeiden? Und eines dürfen wir dabei nicht vergessen, nämlich dass all diese Reaktionen eine beträchtliche Menge Zeit brauchen und die vorhandene Zeitskala ist nur ein paar Jahrzehnte und jede Reaktion braucht auch ein paar Jahrzehnte. Daher ist es sicherlich sehr von Vorteil, so schnell wie möglich zu reagieren und in so kurzer Zeit wie möglich zu versuchen, das Problem zu beheben. Eine Maßnahme ist natürlich, die Bevölkerung zu reduzieren, das wäre, glaube ich, eine sehr wichtige und sinnvolle Maßnahme. Eine dazu wäre natürlich, eine Möglichkeit, die effektiv ist, wäre ein Atomkrieg, der hätte auch den Vorteil, Staub in die Atmosphäre zu wirbeln, was die Temperatur senken würde. Eine weitere wichtige Maßnahme ist die Reduzierung des Verbrauchs, das Problem ist nur, dass eine Reduzierung des Energieverbrauchs in starkem Widerspruch zu unserer wachsenden und auf Wettbewerb basierenden Wirtschaft steht, die im Moment für ein erfolgreiches Bestehen eine ständig wachsende Produktion erfordert. Wie also den Verbrauch reduzieren, ich glaube, wir könnten auf eine Art leben, die nicht so viel schlechter wäre und dabei weniger verbrauchen. Aber unsere Wirtschaft, wie man diese anpassen könnte liegt nicht auf der Hand. Eine weitere Maßnahme ist natürlich, die Energieeffizienz in Gebäuden oder beim Transport oder in anderen Bereichen zu steigern. Das ist einfach zur Darstellung der…, das ist ein Diagramm, das von der Menschlichen…, vom Index zur menschlichen Entwicklung der Vereinten Nationen produziert wird, das wird von einigen Organisationen der Vereinten Nationen Entwicklungsindex genannt. Und er zeigt den Energieverbrauch pro Kopf, dieser stammt etwa aus dem Jahr 2000, Energieverbrauch pro Kopf in verschiedenen Ländern. Und die Energie…, der Entwicklungsindex basiert auf dem Bildungsniveau, dem Gesundheitsniveau, der Gesundheit, dem Niveau der medizinischen Versorgung wie sie es beurteilt haben. Und dem BIP, dem Bruttoinlandsprodukt pro Kopf. Und sie sehen, dass man, ihrer Meinung nach, einen Index erreichen kann, China hat einen Index von 0,75 und verbraucht 1.800 Kilowattstunden pro Kopf und die USA haben einen Index von 0,93 und verbrauchen 12.000 Kilowattstunden pro Person. Der Entwicklungsindex…, man nimmt an, dass ,8 ausreichend ist, um vernünftig leben zu können. Nun, wie können wir den Einsatz fossiler Brennstoffe zur Energieerzeugung vermeiden? Und ich möchte mich dabei auf den Strom konzentrieren, Sonnenenergie, es gibt ganz klar jede Menge davon, und danach, wenn ich damit fertig bin, gehe ich auf thermische Sonnenkraft ein und was getan wird, um diese Technologie zu entwickeln. Das ist meiner Meinung nach ganz klar der Weg, den wir gehen sollten und ich finde, wir sollten mehr in ihre Entwicklung investieren. Dann gibt es noch die Kernenergie, die man sehr viel intensiver nutzen könnte, sie liegt jetzt bei 20% oder weniger als 20% der verbrauchten elektrischen Energie. Es gibt starken öffentlichen Wiederstand dagegen, sie ist günstig und ganz OK meiner Meinung nach, aber da gibt es bestimmte Fragen, nämlich die Frage nach dem Umgang mit dem Müll zur langfristigen Lagerung und mögliche Unfälle und die Anfälligkeit gegenüber Terrorangriffen. Und die Tatsache, das Atomkraftwerke, Energietechnologie kann auch zur Herstellung nuklearer Waffentechnologie eingesetzt werden. Die Dinge hängen also zusammen. Es gibt also einige Bedenken gegen den Einsatz von Kernenergie. Ich glaube aber, sie ist sehr viel besser als die Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe. Da gibt es Strom aus Hydroenergie, natürlich ein äußerst sauberer Weg, elektrische Energie zu produzieren. Ich glaube aber, dass die Ausweitung der gegenwärtigen Nutzung der elektrischen Hydroenergie nicht ganz einfach ist. Da ist die Windenergie, und sie wird in manchen Gegenden mit ziemlicher Intensität entwickelt, sie hat aber, denke ich, ein ernstes Problem, nämlich Windkraft ist über die Zeit sehr unbeständig. Und die Speicherung elektrischer Energie aus Windkraft ist eine technische Herausforderung, von der ich nicht weiß, wie wir diese bewältigen sollen. Daher glaube ich nicht, dass Windkraft eine bei weitem so gute Möglichkeit ist wie Sonnenkraft in der Wüste. Da gibt es Erdwärme, die nicht überall zugänglich ist, sie macht derzeit einen sehr kleinen Teil aus und ich weiß nicht, wie groß die Möglichkeiten sind, aber ich glaube, sie sind begrenzt. Und es gibt noch etwas, auf das ich kurz eingehen möchte, nämlich die Kohlenstoffbindung und -speicherung, es wurde die Idee verbreitet, dass man, das vermeidet nicht die Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe, aber, wenn man fossile Brennstoffe nutzt, dann fängt man das produzierte CO2 ein und presst es unter Druck unter die Erde, irgendwo tief im Meer oder in ein Loch im Boden. Das würde, soweit ich das beurteilen kann, den Preis der Stromproduktion um den Faktor 2 erhöhen. Die Vorstellung, dass dies einmal in großem Stil getan werden könnte, ist nicht völlig abwegig, aber die Technik ist noch nicht erforscht, man weiß beinahe nichts über die Verlässlichkeit der Speicherung von CO2 unter hohem Druck tief in der Erde oder tief im Meer. Und bevor irgendjemand dies wirklich vorschlagen kann, muss daher erst noch Entwicklungsarbeit geleistet werden, um dies zu prüfen. Und natürlich hat das für mich den Nachteil, dass es die Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe nicht vermeidet. Es wäre schön, wenn eine zukünftige Generation auch noch ein paar fossile Brennstoffe hätte, die sie nutzen könnte. Und so machen wir uns Sorgen über das Problem, versuchen, etwas zu tun, und etwas, das wir nicht vergessen dürfen, ist, dass, egal welche Lösung man vorschlägt, diese die gleichen Auswirkungen auf Entwicklungsländer haben muss wie auf die bereits entwickelten Länder, das muss man immer berücksichtigen. Und, gut, das Problem der Nutzungsverringerung ist, ich habe es bereits erwähnt, sie steht im Konflikt mit unserer Marktwirtschaft. Ein absolut, ich möchte das auch ein bisschen verdeutlichen, ein ganz klarer Weg, zu versuchen, den Verbrauch einzuschränken, ist die Erhebung einer CO2-Steuer für den Kohlenstoffverbrauch, jeder, der es verbraucht, muss diese Steuer zahlen. Es wäre ein Anreiz, andere Wege zu finden, und würde davon abhalten, Kohlenstoff zu nutzen. Aber da unsere Wirtschaft ist, wie sie ist, und sich unsere Regierungen darüber Sorgen machen müssen, wurde sie in keinem Land eingeführt, sie müsste global eingeführt werden. Und aus politischer Sicht ist klar das größte Problem, dass Sie bei Einführung im eigenen Land einen bestimmten Preis bezahlen, aber der Vorteil liegt nicht in Ihrem eigenen Land, er ist global, und wenn nicht der Rest der Welt das Gleiche macht oder etwas Vergleichbares macht, haben Sie selbst nichts davon. Es erfordert also eine globale Zusammenarbeit, globale politische Zusammenarbeit, die wir ganz sicher niemals erreicht haben, es wäre eine fantastische Leistung, aber in bin sehr pessimistisch, was das anbelangt. OK, jetzt möchte ich zum Schluss zu dem kommen, worüber ich etwas sagen kann, indem ich Ihnen eine kleine Vorstellung davon vermittle, was getan wird, die Möglichkeit zu nutzen, thermische Sonnenenergie aus der Wüste zu gewinnen. Und meine Bilder beziehen sich nur auf Europa, aber der Rest der Welt ist ähnlich. Damit im Wesentlichen das Gros an Strom für Europa durch Kollektoren von Sonnenenergie in der Wüstenregion gewonnen werden könnte, wären ungefähr ein paar Prozent der Wüsten der Welt erforderlich, um den gesamten elektrischen Strom der Welt zu liefern. Der Kollektor wandelt die Sonnenenergie in die Wärme einer Flüssigkeit um, irgendein flüssiger Wärmeträger, wozu man im Moment irgendein Öl einsetzt, das Temperaturen von bis zu 350° C erreichen kann. Und das man dann, dann ist ein großer Vorteil dieser Technologie, dass die erzeugte Wärme relativ einfach in Massen an Material mit ausreichender Wärmekapazität gespeichert werden kann. Das derzeit in Entwicklungsprojekten verwendete Material ist ein Gas, eine Salzmischung aus Natrium- und Kaliumnitrat, das Temperaturen in der Größenordnung von, ich glaube etwas um die 500 Grad erreichen kann. Und das kann man aufbewahren, natürlich ist man in Bezug auf das Volumen eingeschränkt, es kostet Geld, das Volumen dieser Speichersysteme herzustellen. Aber man kann das ziemlich einfach zu Preisen herstellen, die nicht zu hoch sind, sodass eine Speicherung über Nacht möglich ist. Und so kann man Strom für Tag und Nacht in der Wüste erzeugen, und das mit einer ziemlich hohen Effizienz das ganze Jahr über. Und dann erfordert es eine normale Dampfturbine, egal welchen Wärmeträger man erzeugt hat, er muss eine normale Dampfkraftturbine antreiben. Und was man dann noch braucht ist etwas, das es nicht gibt, ein Netz aus Übertragungsleitungen, elektrische Übertragung über Entfernungen, die sehr viel größer als die momentan genutzten sind, zurzeit sprechen wir von vielleicht Hunderten von Kilometern, jetzt braucht man aber Tausende von Kilometern. Und Wechselstrom funktioniert nicht, Gleichstrom schon und es ist zu einem Preis möglich, der akzeptabel ist, aber etwas, über das man sich Gedanken machen muss. Und die Technik ist bekannt. So, ich zeige Ihnen ein paar Bilder von Entwicklungen in den Vereinigten Staaten, auf Bundesebene geschieht nichts, aber Kalifornien mit Schwarzenegger hat ein sehr starkes Programm zur Errichtung von Sonnenkonzentratoren in der Mojave-Wüste und es gibt auch Projekte in Nevada, in Spanien, das geht bereits seit den frühen 1980ern, in Spanien gibt es jetzt ein paar Projekte, eines davon geht gerade in Betrieb in Südspanien. Und dort konzentriert man sich auch stark auf die Speicherung, Über-Nacht-Speicherung, das geschieht in den USA noch nicht so sehr. Und es gibt 2 Projekte, die, oder 3 Projekte in Spanien, auf die ich hinweisen möchte. Dann gibt es ein Projekt in Italien, wo ein anderer Wärmeträger im Gespräch ist. Und dann gibt es 2 neue Projekte, oder 3 neue Projekte in Amerika, in Kalifornien, von denen ich gerade in den letzten Wochen gehört habe, die ich ziemlich interessant finde. So, das hier ist in der Mojave-Wüste und die Konzentratoren sind hyperbolische oder parabolische Spiegel, die Sie hier in langen Reihen sehen und sie konzentrieren das Licht, sie haben einen Durchmesser von etwa 5 Metern und sie konzentrieren das Licht auf ein Rohr mit etwa 8 Zentimetern Durchmesser, das Öl enthält, das sich auf bis zu 350 Grad Celsius aufheizen kann, Carlo, Du kannst mich korrigieren, Du weißt das besser. Und es gibt bereits Systeme in der Größenordnung von 400 oder 500 Megawatt. Und sie sind bereits seit 20 Jahren in Betrieb und es ist nicht trivial, sie in Betrieb zu halten, es gibt Probleme, aber man hat es geschafft, sie mit erheblicher Effizienz zu erhalten. Das ist also ein Beweis, dass die Technik funktionieren kann. Ich sollte, für die, die sich nicht so auskennen, die 450 Megawatt, die sie erzeugen können, entsprechen einem normalen Kohle- oder Gaskraftwerk, außer dass dieses hier nicht nachts arbeitet. Hier ist ein Projekt in Spanien, Andasol genannt, das sich jetzt seit ein paar Jahren im Bau befindet, es soll genau diesen Monat in Betrieb gehen, ich weiß nicht, ob es bereits in Betrieb genommen wurde oder nicht, aber es verwendet auch Speicher, es verwendet die gleichen Parabolrinnen und die gleiche Flüssigkeit. Hier sehen Sie den Standort in Südspanien und dies zeigt Ihnen einen dieser Tanks, einer dieser Tanks hat, wenn ich mich recht entsinne, 35 Meter Durchmesser und ist 13 Meter hoch und enthält das Salz. Und es gibt 2 dieser Tanks zur Speicherung. Das zeigt eine andere Methode, die sehr große Vorteile hat und auch einige Nachteile, der Solarturm ist die Stelle, an der das Sonnenlicht reflektiert wird. Man konzentriert das Sonnenlicht über ein Feld von Reflektoren auf der Erde auf einen Zylinder an der Spitze des Turms, der den flüssigen Wärmeträger enthält. Und das ist ein Werk in Südspanien, das sich im Bau befindet, das 17 Megawatt erzeugen wird, es wird auch Speicher haben, größere Speicher als das Kraftwerk in Andasol. Und es verwendet das gleiche Salz als Wärmeträger. Das ist klar eine interessante Technologie. Hier ist ein geplantes Projekt in Italien, in Sizilien, bei dem man vorhat…, das die Möglichkeit erforscht, zusammen mit diesen Parabolreflektoren geschmolzenes Salz zu verwenden, technisch ist das eine Herausforderung geschmolzenes Salz zu verwenden, dieses Projekt ist schon eine Weile im Gange. Und es wurden bereits einige Rinnen getestet, aber das ganze Projekt existiert noch nicht. Und so möchte ich mit ein paar Worten zu neuen, größeren Projekten in Kalifornien schließen. Interessant für mich war, dass man verschiedene Techniken einsetzt, es ist also nicht so einfach, sich davon zu überzeugen, was die beste Technik ist, und wir sollten wirklich sehr viel mehr, sehr viel stärkere Entwicklungsanstrengungen in die Erforschung dieser Technologie investieren. Die 3 neuen Projekte, ich habe 2 aufgeführt, und danach von dem dritten erfahren, daher lassen Sie mich über diese beiden hier sprechen. Da gibt es ein Solarturmprojekt, das…, das aber jetzt Wasser als Wärmeträger verwendet, unter sehr hohem Druck und einer ziemlich hohen Temperatur. Einer Temperatur von über 300° C und einem Druck in der Größenordnung von, wenn ich mich recht erinnere, 200 bar oder 280 bar. Und das ist ein vergleichbares Projekt und diese sind jetzt…, sie wurden gerade genehmigt von, oder akzeptiert von den Stromerzeugern in Kalifornien, verwenden eine andere Art Spiegel als die Parabolrinne. Ein Spiegel, der Fresnel genannt wird, ich werde ihn nicht beschreiben, spielt keine Rolle, das ist ganz einfache Physik oder Optik, er hat einige Vorteile und für mich ergibt das Sinn. Aber ich bin nicht kompetent genug, um ein echtes Urteil abzugeben. Von dem sie glauben, dass sie ihn billiger herstellen können als die aktuellen Parabolspiegel. Lassen Sie mich damit aufhören, lassen Sie mich einfach sagen, erneuerbare Energie zu akzeptablen Kosten… übrigens hätte ich erwähnen sollen, dass bei den spanischen Kraftwerken die Regierung zugestimmt hat, den Firmen, die sie bauen, einen Preis für den gelieferten Strom zu zahlen, der 3 Mal über dem derzeitigen Preis in Spanien liegt. Aber die neuen amerikanischen Projekte, ihnen wurde ein Preis für ihren Strom angeboten, der weniger als das Doppelte des aktuellen Preises beträgt, sie glauben also, sie können ihn billiger erzeugen. Und ich glaube, es gibt einen guten Grund anzunehmen, dass man Strom aus Sonnenwärmekraft zu einem Preis erzeugen kann, der absolut vergleichbar ist mit dem, den man in den nächsten zehn Jahren für elektrischen Strom aus fossilen Brennstoffen erwarten kann. Die Technologie, glaube ich, steht also bereits zur Verfügung. Die eigentliche Herausforderung besteht darin, global den politischen Willen und die Zusammenarbeit aufzubringen, die so etwas realisieren kann. Vielen Dank.

Jack Steinberger
What Future for Energy and Climate?
(00:04:24 - 00:06:36)

 

1998 Physics Laureate Robert Laughlin gives us a little more time. In his 2012 Lindau lecture “Powering the Future”, he puts the end of fossil oil closer to the year 2100:


Robert Laughlin (2012) - Powering the Future

Hi everybody, can you hear in the back, the mic works ok. Ok, so we don’t need these, ok great. Today I’m going to give one of the energy climate lectures. I myself have been watching the climate talks enjoying the controversy. And I trust those of you who are students understand that this is not work for which I won the Nobel Prize. I have many hobbies in my career and one of them is writing books. One of them is destroying the Lindau signs. Sorry about that. Feel like Inspector Clouseau. So I have a hobby, writing books, and this is... The topic today is the subject of a book I’ve written called Powering the Future. Now that’s the last I’m going to say about books because we’re not supposed to do commercial things here. But anyway that explains the background that like you I’m interested in energy and I find the best way to master a thing sometimes is to write about it. Making sure that we have references so we know what we’re talking about. Now as you know energy is exceedingly political, climate too. And my task today for you folks is to try and remove the politics as best we can and to approach the problem scientifically. Now, this turns out to be hard to do. And so I’m going to show you a way of doing it that I think, well I hope, will be helpful. Now, probably we want to start with the Earth. Everyone is concerned about the Earth and one of the things that will come out this afternoon, we should talk about, is that the Earth is extremely old. We on the other hand are short lived things. And so the problem of saving the Earth isn’t necessarily the same as the problem of energy. Now, that’s one of the messages I want to give you today that I like to separate these things because the Earth is a much more mighty and magnificent thing than the energy problem. The energy problem is engineering and that’s what I want to talk about. I’m very myself interested in climate but I wish to separate the climate problem as a matter of all time, as a great matter of all time, that generations and generations in the future will be worried about and focus on something more imminent which is diminishing amounts of energy reserves. Now, I’ll remind you that the world uses lots of energy. There’s only one place in the world this could be and that’s Hong Kong. But I wish to remind everybody that most of the extra energy use that’s coming in our lifetime will not be in Europe or America but will be in Asia. And the amounts of energy we’re talking about are exceedingly large. Hong Kong is of course a favourite example because it’s filled with bright light but there are countless other examples. This is familiar; this is the Bund in Shanghai. It’s a very buzzed up place and you’ll notice there are lots of cars, ok. So it isn’t true that folks in China don’t like cars. They actually love cars just the way we do. This could only be one place and that’s Tokyo. So what we do in the western countries needn’t have much effect on events to come because a lot of history that’s about to be written will be written in Asia, not here. Now the world uses lots of energy and you can see it from space. This is a picture that’s familiar to you. Here’s the world version of it and we know who is using most of the power now. But the point is in the future, as the next century develops, the big new users will be on this side of the picture. Now, that light is coming mostly from fossil fuels and the amount of them is enormous. Since I’m an American, I like to state things in terms of water in the States. So the amount of oil that the world uses every day is the same as the amount of water in the Mississippi river that flows past New Orleans in 15 minutes. If we expand that to the oil equivalent of everything including the coal burned, it’s about 30 minutes. Now, this extraordinary amount of energy is what powers the world and what makes it possible for us to live well. And I’ll remind you that this extraordinary thing is recent in history. It’s less than 200 years old. The problem I want to place on your plate today is thinking about what happens when this goes away. What is going to happen historically when this stupendous amount of flow of resources out of the earth becomes exhausted and it can’t occur anymore? This is a controversial graph because the oil people are always doing better and they’re pushing this number out. But the basic idea is very simple. This is the oil reserves as recorded in the British Petroleum statistical review of world energy. You notice the units here; it’s tonnes. So I’m going to, these mass of the units. So that’s the amount and the slope of this line is the draw rate, how fast we’re using up. That's the number that I showed you in the previous graph. Now there are several different ways to do this calculation. The one I like best is to use the oil reserves in Saudi Arabia. And the reason why is because Saudi Arabia is the flywheel of the world. When the Saudi, or the bank, so when the Saudi reserves are gone, they peak. Then there’s no extra. So you expect the price of oil to become unstable at this point. Well calculating with Saudi reserves alone gives this line with the Middle East in toto. It’s a little longer, it’s about this long. So I anticipate trouble of some kind, serious trouble in the oil supply somewhere around here, somewhere in the next century, at the end of this century. Now, keep your eye on the measurement here. It’s a trillion tonnes. Let’s look at the coal graph. This is coal and this is a little more reliable because the coal geology is simpler than the petroleum geology. So you notice there are a lot more tonnes of coal than there are tonnes of oil. But notice the slope. We burn coal at prodigious rate. And the same calculation gives a problem with the coal supply somewhere in 2 centuries from now, more or less. This of course assumes no change in current practices and you’re asking yourself: But let’s be conservative and just say that there are troubles brewing somewhere between 1 century and 2 centuries from now when the entire basis of civilised life becomes exhausted. Now, what I’m going to ask you to do today is to think about this time. Ok? I want you to travel with me to a time beyond this, to this time out here. Go with me in your mind to this time and imagine what it is like. That’s what we’re going to do today. You can do this calculation easily because those people they don’t exist yet. But you know genetics is very powerful. Especially you’ll know this if you’ve had children. Those people don’t exist yet but nonetheless you know them. You know them because they’re carbon copies of you literally. They’re just like us, they think the way that we do, they laugh at the same jokes, they have the same naughty minds, they’re just as greedy, they’re just as determined to make things better for the kids. Just like us. So, what I want you to do is think about the problem from the point of view of a person living after these terrible crises have happened. And ask yourself what happened. What happened, how did the past evolve? And what did those people of the ancient past do? And how did the world make it through this terrible time? You know it did because you exist, ok. So what happened? The reason for doing this is that we’ve now banished all politics and what I think I’ll show you is the problem is easier to understand backwards than it is forwards. Now, I wish to remind everybody that the Earth is incredibly old. I like to explain this age in terms of water. So the amount of rain that falls on the Earth in a year is typically a metre, about the size of a dog. The amount of rain that has fallen since the Industrial Revolution is 200 metres, about the size of a large building or a large dam. The amount of rain that has fallen since the time of Moses is enough to fill up all the oceans. The amount of rain that has fallen since the end of the Ice Ages is enough to fill up the oceans 4 times. The amount of rain that has fallen since the dinosaurs died is enough to fill up the oceans 20,000 times or the entire volume of the Earth 30 times. The amount of rain that has fallen since coal formed is enough to fill up the entire volume of the Earth 140 times. The amount of rain that has fallen since oxygen formed on the Earth is enough to fill up the entire volume of the Earth 1,000 times. Now, I mention this because to make the point that the Earth has been around a long time and has suffered terrible traumas. So you know for sure it has staying power and you also know that saving the Earth is something that you must do on the Earth’s time. So you don’t save the Earth on a 10 year scale or a 20 year scale or 100 year scale. You save the Earth on a million year scale or 1,000 million year scale. Much, much longer than a human lifetime. Now, with regard to the carbon in the air it is not possible to save the Earth on its own time by cutting back on carbon emissions by 20%. This only causes the exhaustion time to get 20% longer. It’s still a bat of an eyelash of geologic time. And I remind you that the carbon problem in the atmosphere is cumulative. You put the carbon in the air; it stays there, at least in the near term. Therefore the conservation that we do is not relevant to saving the Earth at all. The time scale is wrong. It doesn’t matter if you burn up the carbon in 200 years or 300 years, the end result is the same. There is no more carbon left to burn and all of it is in the air. Now if we’re serious about saving the Earth from carbon on the Earth’s time, it is necessary to reduce the carbon burning to zero. And well, as you all know that’s rather difficult. So the disparity between the Earth’s time and our time is why I wish to separate the problem of saving the Earth from the problem of energy. Energy is a 2 century problem and it’s an engineering problem and it’s something that’s happening right now geologically whereas the integrity of the Earth is an issue of deep time, something that will concern people living on the Earth for 1,000s and 1,000s and 1,000s of years in the future. The energy problem that we’re living through is an instant compared to the Earth not a long drawn out drama. So, let’s now do the experiment. I’m going to jump over all the political arguments about energy and climate and ask the question: What is the earth like in this future time? Have you all got it? Ok, we’re going to just take our mind. We’re going to fly into the future, do a science fiction experiment. Go in the future, you’re living in the future now and you’re talking about the past. What is your life like, ok? Well, I wish not to talk about this. The route to this future time might be difficult because usually when human beings don’t have enough of something they fight over it. Now, as I said this is something... I am a very optimistic man and I don’t want to think about this. Or more precisely, I am myself rather determined that such a thing should not happen. Now, first question. And I’d like a show of hands people. In this future time there’s no more petroleum left. Either you ban the burning or it’s gone, one of the 2. Show of hands please. Who of you thinks that these people in the future will be driving cars? Now please look around you and notice that the number of hands up is about 75%. Ok, this turns out to be a highly significant number. Now, we’re going to come back to this but ok. Now second question. In this future time, are these people going to be riding in airplanes? Remember there’s no more petroleum left, no coal, no oil, no nothing, natural gas gone. Are these people going to be riding in airplanes? Show of hands please. Look around you please. Same result, ok, about 75%. Now the final question. This future time, no more coal to burn, no more oil, these people go to the wall and flick on the light switch. Do the lights come on? Ok, notice again everyone raises his hand, ok. Now, let me point out before we go on that you did this without considering the technology at all, ok. In other words you all understood that I was asking a question about economics. So right away we’ve established that this energy problem viewed backwards is at least partially an economics problem that you must judge in part by the psychology of the people living at the time. Now it so happens that the result of this vote is world universal. I’ve done this experiment in over 10 countries and the result is always the same. It also turns out to be independent of age group which is interesting. So roughly 75% of the people say we’re going to have cars and planes and everybody says the lights will come on. Now of those of you who said that people will drive cars... Let’s get rid of this. So let’s go back to the cars now. Ok, those of you who said yes about the cars, why? Remember there’s no gas, I mean there’s no petroleum. Ok? No petroleum left, no coal and you said people will drive cars. Why did say that? Somebody said electric. Slow down? So somebody said electric. So people will drive cars because they’re electric. People will drive cars because you’ve got to get from point A to point B. Commerce. Commerce, people will use cars because they need commerce. It’s a habit. People will drive cars because it’s a habit. Remember we’re defying the laws of physics here, right? No more petroleum. The earth has been trying to get off of petroleum for my entire lifetime and it hasn’t worked. Remember the Mississippi flowing. Commerce. Anybody else? Convenient. People will drive cars because they’re convenient. My experiment is not working, I’ll try one more. You’re so close I’ll tell you. It didn’t happen this time but it almost always does. Almost always the men say dumb things like: “Well, people will drive cars because there is solar energy or people will drive cars because we have bio fuels.” And almost always the right answer comes from a woman who is in the front and she says quietly: And now what we’ve had is a conversation about economics that really counts. In other words, much of what will happen in the future isn’t determined by technical means but is determined by just animal drives of people. And that is something that is an invariant which you realise if you have children. I have this wonderful story of I was I Beijing many years ago with my son. We were in a big car, stopped in traffic and there were bicycles by the side of the car and a fellow with a Mao suit was looking in at us. And I wanted to teach my son a lesson so I said: “Ok now, you see this guy over here. What is he thinking?” And without missing a beat my son said: “He’s thinking: I wish I had a car.” Whereupon of course I was a very proud dad because of course that’s exactly what he was thinking and I felt very small for trying to teach my son a lesson. When I tell this story in my lectures at Stanford every single student from China gets this great big smile on their face because they know that’s exactly what he was thinking. Now, this tells you something important about the energy use. The idea that that the future will not be energy intensive cannot be because it’s violating some basic laws of economics that come to us from human nature. So getting out of the problem by using less is a non-starter. And the reason is because of the nature of you and me. Ok? Now as for this one, this one is harder and in a way more important. Ok, then I ask... Ok, let’s do the experiment. It won’t work but I’ll try it anyway. Ok, those of you who said that we’re going to have planes. What powers them? Fuel cells, bio fuels. Cold fusion. From you I might have known, alright, cold fusion. Ok anybody? Nobody is for nuclear reactors? Ok. Wishful thinking. Ok, so most of you are physicist and so it won’t come as a big shock to you that these are all ridiculous because of weight. In other words, when you’re flying you cannot have an energy source that’s heavy so nuclear reactors are out. Actually batteries are out. Solar cells, there just isn’t enough surface area on an airplane to get enough power to overcome the glide slope of the plane; we can’t carry any payload. So clearly think it through. The only thing that can power the airplanes is something similar to what powers them now because ordinary fuels that we use today are optimal. Remember kerosene, gasoline and so forth, alkanes are the same thing as fat. And plants and animals invented fat for a reason. It has the most energy per kilogram allowed by physical law. Actually no, be careful, hydrogen is better. Hydrogen is better but like if anybody wants to go on a hydrogen powered plane. You’re welcome to go; I’m going to stay here. I’ll see you in heaven. Hydrogen is bulky and it’s just a pain in the neck to deal with. So the fuels that we use today are physically optimal and that in turn tells you something very important. That in this future time there must grow up a new industry that makes the kinds of fuels that we have today synthetically. Now this is regardless of anything... Because remember you all told me, you made the decision about airplanes not knowing anything about the technology. So the technology has to follow the demand. And so that’s one of the developments that’s got to happen. And so the idea of a perfect carbon free future is just not going to happen. And the reason is simply that airplanes won’t fly if it does. Ok? Now what about this last item, lights come on? May I ask why you said the lights will come on? Why will the lights come on in this future time? There’s no more coal to burn. Renewable energy. Renewable energy. So lights will come because energy is renewable, lights will be come on because of fusion. Bio engineering. We don’t want to work in the dark, bio engineering. Ok now, this one is a little harder. I’m with you on all these answers but I want to broach something that you probably haven’t thought of. Namely this. If you remember your history, Governor Schwarzenegger was elected because the previous government was executed by the voters in California. In California we had a regulatory failure in the electricity market and the electricity... The lights didn’t come on for a full year. And what happened political was the voters blamed the government for the failure even though they were not responsible for it. And Governor Davis at the time was the first governor of California ever to be impeached and the second governor ever to be impeached in America. And it all came because the lights went out. I have very good friends from Russia who grew up in the Soviet Union and they explained to me, you know: Even Stalin knew that you don’t let the lights go out, ok. Because if they do, you’ll be out of office and it might not be through an election, ok. Now, so this has an implication. When there are political forces involved there is political reason for the price of electricity not to rise. Ok? The voters don’t like it. Therefore this brings me into a prediction that’s very scary. In this future time voters will never vote for power that is more expensive than nuclear power. In other words I don’t know... You don’t know whether nuclear power will survive or not or whether there will be alternatives but you do know the price. The price per joule cannot be significantly higher than it is now because the voters won’t stand for it. So people in Germany who just voted away their nuclear power this is food for thought. When things get tough politically it’s much easier for people to invent reasons why the people of the past were misguided and you should have had nuclear energy all along. It’s easier for them to invent a myth than it is for them to pay more money. And so there is a real possibility that if the alternate energy price, unsubsidised price, doesn’t go below nuclear energy that nuclear energy will come back. And just to drive this point home I’d like all of you to think very hard about what's occurring in Japan right now. Japan just had the second worst nuclear accident in history. And they just turned 2 reactors back on. They are the vanguard nation in this subject because they have no energy resources on their soil. And this is the kind of dilemma that people will be facing in the future when they have to decide between lower standard of living, less money and so forth or nuclear power. So it’s something to worry about. If you don’t do something nuclear power is there in the background waiting to come forward when it’s needed whether you want it or not. Now, I’m nearing the end of my time here and I think I’ve got the basic ideas that I wanted out for you to think about. The first was that many of the events to come are fixed by economics. The second is that part of the energy economy has to be synthetic fuel, that’s carbon based because there is no other way that airplanes can fly. And the third is that there’s a price conundrum with regard to electricity. So that we can expect in the future there is a price inversion where electric joules become cheap and carbon joules become expensive whereas it’s the reverse today. And when that event happens it will be like a pond turning over, that the entire nature of economic decisions will change because now electricity is cheap. Now there’s more. We could talk extensive about where the carbon would come from and there’s an issue there with regard to... my slides aren’t working. Let’s use this picture. There’s an issue of whether the carbon you need for the fuels is coming from agriculture or not. But I want to defer that question for later discussions this afternoon. The point is that the pricing of the joules is fixed by things we know now that aren’t determined by research in the future and that the energy economics of this future time is sort of preordained by things that we know today. And the message I want to leave you with finally is that when we’re all thinking about how to solve this energy problem, the beginning of wisdom, of what to do is thinking through carefully what is to be necessarily. Ok I’m done, thanks everybody for coming. Applause

Hallo allerseits, kann man mich auch hinten verstehen? Das Mikrofon funktioniert. Ok, dann brauchen wir die hier nicht, ok gut. Heute werde ich einen meiner Vorträge über Energie und Klima halten. Ich habe selbst die Vorträge zum Klima verfolgt und die Meinungsverschiedenheiten genossen. Und ich nehme doch sehr an, dass die Studenten unter Ihnen verstehen, dass das nicht die Arbeit ist, für die ich den Nobelpreis erhalten habe. Ich habe viele Hobbys in meinem Werdegang und eines davon ist das Schreiben von Büchern. Eines davon ist es Lindauschilder zu zerstören. Entschuldigung dafür. Ich fühle mich wie Inspektor Clouseau. Ich habe also ein Hobby, das Schreiben von Büchern, und das ist... Das Thema heute ist Gegenstand eines Buches, das ich geschrieben habe, Nun, das ist alles, was ich zu Büchern sagen werde, denn wir sollen hier keine Werbung machen. Das erklärt aber immerhin den Grund dafür, warum ich wie Sie ein Interesse an Energie habe, und ich glaube, man verinnerlicht ein Thema am besten, wenn man ein Buch darüber schreibt. Ich möchte nur sicherstellen, dass wir Referenzpunkte haben, damit wir wissen worüber wir sprechen. Wie Sie wissen, ist Energie ein äußerst politisches Thema, auch das Klima. Und meine Aufgabe heute ist es, für Sie hier zu versuchen, die Politik so gut wie möglich auszublenden und das Problem wissenschaftlich anzugehen. Nun, das entpuppt sich als schwierig. Und darum werde ich Ihnen einen Weg zeigen, um dies zu bewerkstelligen, der, wie ich denke bzw. hoffe, hilfreich sein wird. Nun, vermutlich sollten wir mit der Erde beginnen. Jeder ist um die Erde besorgt und eines der Dinge, die sich heute Nachmittag herausstellen werden und über die wir sprechen sollten, ist, dass die Erde äußerst alt ist. Wir andererseits sind kurzlebige Geschöpfe. Und somit ist das Problem die Erde zu retten nicht zwangsläufig gleichzusetzen mit dem Energieproblem. Das ist also eine der Botschaften, die ich Ihnen heute mit auf den Weg geben möchte, dass ich diese Dinge getrennt behandeln möchte, denn die Erde ist um einiges gewaltiger und überwältigender als das Energieproblem. Das Energieproblem ist technischer Natur und darüber möchte ich sprechen. Ich habe selbst ein sehr großes Interesse am Klima, aber ich möchte die Klimaproblematik als eine immerwährende Angelegenheit gesondert behandeln - als eine gewaltige, immerwährende Angelegenheit, über die sich Generation um Generation in der Zukunft Sorgen machen wird - und mit etwas Unmittelbarerem beschäftigen, den schwindenden Energiereserven. Nun, ich erinnere Sie daran, dass die Welt eine große Menge an Energie verbraucht. Das hier kann nur ein Ort auf der Welt sein und zwar Hong Kong. Aber ich will jeden daran erinnern, dass der größte Teil der zusätzlichen Energie zu unseren Lebzeiten nicht in Europa oder Amerika, sondern in Asien verbraucht werden wird. Und die Energiemengen, über die wir hier sprechen, sind äußert groß. Hong Kong ist natürlich mein Lieblingsbeispiel, weil es voller greller Lichter ist, aber es gibt noch unzählige andere Beispiele. Das hier ist bekannt; das ist der Bund in Shanghai. Es ist ein sehr geschäftiger Ort und Sie werden feststellen, dass dort viele Autos sind. Es ist also nicht wahr, dass die Menschen in China keine Autos mögen. Eigentlich lieben sie Autos genauso wie wir. Das kann nur ein Ort sein; das ist Tokio. Somit wird das, was wir in den westlichen Ländern tun, nicht unbedingt viel Auswirkung auf die zukünftigen Ereignisse haben, da viel der künftigen Geschichte in Asien und nicht hier geschrieben werden wird. Die Welt verbraucht heute große Mengen an Energie und man kann das vom Weltall aus sehen. Das ist ein Bild, das Ihnen bekannt ist. Hier ist die Weltvariante davon und wir wissen, wer heute die meiste Energie verbraucht. Aber die Sache ist die, dass in der Zukunft, im Laufe des nächsten Jahrhunderts, die großen Energieverbraucher auf der anderen Seite des Bildes sein werden. Nun, dieses Licht entsteht hauptsächlich aus fossilen Brennstoffen und deren Verbrauch ist gewaltig. Da ich Amerikaner bin, drücke ich Dinge gerne in Form von Wasser in den Vereinigten Staaten aus. Die Menge an Öl, die auf der Welt täglich verbraucht wird, entspricht der Wassermenge, die im Mississippi in 15 Minuten an New Orleans vorbei fließt. Wenn wir das auf alle Energieträger inklusive der verbrannten Kohle erweitern, dann sind es etwa 30 Minuten. Nun, diese außerordentliche Energiemenge treibt unsere Welt an und ermöglicht es uns gut zu leben. Und ich erinnere Sie daran, dass diese außergewöhnliche Sache neu in der Geschichte ist. Das gibt es noch nicht länger als 200 Jahre. Das Problem, das ich Ihnen heute darlegen will, ist darüber nachzudenken, was geschieht, wenn wir das nicht mehr haben. Was wird geschichtlich geschehen, wenn dieser gewaltige Rohstofffluss, der aus unserer Erde kommt, erschöpft sein wird und es nicht weitergeht wie bisher? Das hier ist ein umstrittenes Diagramm, da die Ölkonzerne immer besser arbeiten und diese Zahl weiter nach außen schieben. Aber die Grundidee ist sehr einfach. Das sind die Ölreserven, wie sie im "British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy" verzeichnet sind. Sie sehen die Einheiten hier; das sind Tonnen. Also werde ich das als Masseeinheit verwenden. Das ist also die Menge, und die Neigung der Linie ist die Fördermenge bzw. wie schnell wir es aufbrauchen. Das ist die Zahl, die ich Ihnen im vorherigen Diagramm gezeigt habe. Nun, es gibt mehrere verschiedene Arten, um diese Berechnung anzustellen. Ich verwende am liebsten die Ölreserven von Saudi Arabien. Und der Grund ist, dass Saudi Arabien das Schwungrad der Welt ist. Wenn die Saudi... oder die Bank. Wenn also die Reserven der Saudis verbraucht sind, ist die Spitze erreicht. Dann gibt es kein zusätzliches mehr. Also kann man davon ausgehen, dass der Ölpreis an diesem Punkt instabil wird. Nun, wenn man mit den saudischen Reserven alleine rechnet, kommt man auf diese Linie. Mit dem gesamten Mittleren Osten ist sie etwas länger. Sie ist etwa so lang. Ich erwarte, dass es irgendwelchen Ärger, großen Ärger mit der Ölversorgung geben wird, irgendwo hier, irgendwann im nächsten Jahrhundert bzw. am Ende dieses Jahrhunderts. Nun, behalten Sie diese Messung hier im Kopf. Das sind Billionen Tonnen. Sehen wir uns das Kohlediagramm an. Das hier ist Kohle und dieses Diagramm ist ein wenig verlässlicher, weil die Geologie der Kohle einfacher ist als beim Öl. Sie sehen also, dass es viel mehr Tonnen Kohle als Tonnen Öl gibt. Aber sehen Sie die Neigung. Wir verbrennen Kohle mit einer gewaltigen Geschwindigkeit. Und die gleiche Berechnung ergibt ein Problem mit der Kohleversorgung in etwa zwei Jahrhunderten, mehr oder weniger. Das setzt natürlich voraus, dass sich an den heutigen Gepflogenheiten nichts ändert und Sie fragen sich: Aber lassen Sie uns zurückhaltend sein und nur sagen, dass diese Schwierigkeiten sich zwischen einem und zwei Jahrhunderten in der Zukunft zusammenbrauen, wenn die gesamte Grundlage zivilisierten Lebens erschöpft sein wird. Nun, ich möchte Sie heute bitten über diese Zeit nachzudenken. Ok? Ich möchte Sie bitten, mit mir in eine Zeit jenseits dieses Punktes zu reisen, zu dieser Zeit hier außen. Reisen Sie in Ihren Gedanken in diese Zeit und stellen Sie sich vor, wie sie aussieht. Das ist es, was wir heute tun werden. Sie können diese Berechnung leicht anstellen, denn diese Menschen existieren noch nicht. Aber Sie wissen ja, dass die Gene eine sehr große Macht besitzen. Vor allem werden Sie das wissen, wenn Sie Kinder haben. Diese Menschen existieren noch nicht, dennoch kennen Sie sie. Sie kennen sie, weil sie im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes Kohlenstoffkopien von Ihnen sind. Sie sind genau wie wir, sie denken wie wir, sie lachen über dieselben Witze, sie haben dieselben unanständigen Gedanken, sie sind genauso gierig, sie sind genauso entschlossen, die Dinge für ihre Kinder besser zu machen. Sie sind genau wie wir. Ich möchte also, dass Sie über das Problem aus der Sicht eines Menschen nachdenken, der in der Zeit nach diesen schrecklichen Krisen lebt. Fragen Sie sich, was geschehen ist? Was ist geschehen, wie ist die Vergangenheit verlaufen? Und was taten diese Menschen aus ferner Vergangenheit? Und wie schaffte es die Welt durch diese schreckliche Zeit? Sie wissen es, denn Sie existieren, ok? Was passierte also? Der Grund dafür ist, dass wir nun alle Politik außen vor gelassen haben und ich glaube, ich werde Ihnen so verdeutlichen, dass das Problem leichter zu verstehen ist, wenn man es von hinten statt von vorne aufrollt. Nun, ich möchte Sie alle daran erinnern, dass die Erde unglaublich alt ist. Ich möchte Ihnen dieses Alter mit Hilfe von Wasser versinnbildlichen. Nun, die Regenmenge, die jährlich auf die Erde fällt, ist normalerweise ein Meter, etwa die Höhe eines Hundes. Die Regenmenge, die seit der Industriellen Revolution gefallen ist, beträgt 200 Meter, etwa die Höhe eines großen Gebäudes oder großen Dammes. Die Regenmenge, die seit der Zeit von Moses gefallen ist, reicht aus, um alle Ozeane zu füllen. Die Regenmenge, die seit dem Ende der Eiszeiten gefallen ist, reicht aus, um die Ozeane viermal zu füllen. Die Regenmenge, die seit dem Aussterben der Dinosaurier gefallen ist, reicht aus, um die Ozeane 20.000-mal oder das gesamte Erdvolumen 30-mal zu füllen. Der Regen, der gefallen ist, seit Kohle sich gebildet hat, reicht aus, um die gesamte Erde 140-mal auszufüllen. Die Regenmenge, die gefallen ist, seit sich Sauerstoff auf der Erde gebildet hat, reicht aus, um die Erde 1.000-mal auszufüllen. Nun, ich erwähne das, um das Argument vorzubringen, dass es die Erde schon lange gibt und dass sie schreckliche Traumata erlitten hat. Sie wissen also mit Sicherheit, dass sie Durchhaltevermögen hat und Sie wissen auch, dass die Rettung der Erde etwas ist, was in einer geologischen Zeitspanne getan werden muss. Man rettet die Erde also nicht in einer Zeitspanne von 10, 20 oder 100 Jahren. Man rettet die Erde in einer Zeitspanne von einer Milliarde Jahren. Viel, viel länger als die Lebenszeit eines Menschen. Nun, im Hinblick auf den Kohlenstoff in der Luft ist es nicht möglich, die Erde in einem solchen geologischen Zeitraum zu retten, indem man die Kohlenstoffemissionen um 20% reduziert. Dadurch wird der Zeitraum bis zur Erschöpfung nur 20% länger. Das ist noch immer nur ein Wimpernschlag auf geologischer Skala. Und ich erinnere Sie daran, dass das Kohlenstoffproblem in unserer Atmosphäre kumulativ ist. Man pustet den Kohlenstoff in die Luft und er bleibt dort zumindest für die nächste Zeit. Deshalb ist der Umweltschutz, den wir betreiben, letztlich irrelevant für die Rettung der Erde. Die Zeitskala ist die falsche. Es spielt keine Rolle, ob man den Kohlenstoff in 200 oder 300 Jahren verbrennt. Es gibt keinen Kohlenstoff mehr zum Verbrennen und alles davon ist in der Luft. Wenn wir es also ernst meinen damit, die Erde auf einer geologischen Zeitskala vor dem Kohlenstoff zu retten, ist es notwendig, die Verbrennung von Kohlenstoff auf null zu senken. Und na ja, das ist, wie Sie alle wissen, recht schwierig. Wegen dieser Disparität, also zwischen der geologischen Zeit und unserer Zeit, möchte ich das Problem mit der Rettung der Erde vom Energieproblem getrennt behandeln. Energie ist ein Problem in den nächsten zwei Jahrhunderten, es ist ein technisches Problem und etwas, das geologisch gesehen jetzt passiert, wohingegen die Unversehrtheit der Erde ein langfristiges Problem ist, etwas, das die Menschen auf der Erde Abertausende Jahre lang in der Zukunft betreffen wird. Die Energieproblematik, die wir gerade durchleben, ist nur ein Augenblick im Hinblick auf die Erde und kein langgezogenes Drama. So, lassen Sie uns jetzt den Versuch machen. Ich werde alle politischen Streitereien über die Energie und das Klima überspringen und die Frage stellen: Wie wird die Erde in dieser Zukunft aussehen? Haben Sie das alle verstanden? Ok, wir werden uns einen Moment zum Überlegen nehmen. Wir werden in die Zukunft fliegen, ein Science-Fiction-Experiment machen. Gehen Sie in die Zukunft, Sie leben jetzt in der Zukunft und Sie sprechen über die Vergangenheit. Wie sieht Ihr Leben aus? Na ja, ich will eigentlich nicht darüber sprechen. Der Weg in diese Zukunft könnte schwierig sein, da Menschen für gewöhnlich, wenn sie nicht genug von einer Sache haben, darum kämpfen. Nun, wie ich schon sagte, das ist etwas... Ich bin ein sehr optimistischer Mensch und ich möchte nicht darüber nachdenken. Oder genauer gesagt bin ich selbst vielmehr der Auffassung, dass so etwas nicht passieren sollte. Nun, erste Frage. Und ich möchte, dass Sie die Hände heben. In der Zukunft gibt es kein Benzin mehr. Entweder wird das Verbrennen verboten oder es ist keines mehr da, eines von beidem. Handzeichen bitte. Wer von Ihnen glaubt, dass diese Menschen in der Zukunft Autos fahren werden? Sehen Sie sich jetzt bitte um. Und Sie stellen fest, dass die Zahl der gehobenen Hände bei etwa 75% liegt. Gut, es zeigt sich, dass das eine recht erhebliche Anzahl ist. Wir werden darauf zurückkommen, aber gut. Jetzt die zweite Frage. Werden die Menschen in dieser Zukunft mit Flugzeugen fliegen? Erinnern Sie sich daran, es gibt kein Benzin mehr, keine Kohle, kein Öl, gar nichts, das Erdgas ist weg. Werden diese Menschen mit Flugzeugen fliegen? Handzeichen bitte. Sehen Sie sich bitte um. Das gleiche Ergebnis, ok, etwa 75%. Nun zur letzten Frage. In dieser Zukunft - keine Kohle mehr zum Verbrennen, kein Öl mehr - diese Menschen gehen zur Wand und legen den Lichtschalter um. Gehen die Lichter an? Gut, beachten Sie nun, dass jeder die Hand hebt. Nun, lassen Sie mich klarstellen, bevor wir darauf eingehen, dass Sie dies taten, ohne die Technologie überhaupt zu berücksichtigen. Anders gesagt haben Sie alle verstanden, dass ich eine wirtschaftliche Frage gestellt habe. Wir haben also gleich festgestellt, dass dieses Energieproblem rückwirkend betrachtet zumindest teilweise ein wirtschaftliches Problem ist, das man zum Teil unter Einbeziehung der Psychologie der Menschen, die zu dieser Zeit leben, beurteilen muss. Es stellt sich heraus, dass das Ergebnis dieser Abstimmung auf der ganzen Welt gleich ist. Ich habe dieses Experiment in über 10 Ländern durchgeführt und das Ergebnis ist immer das gleiche. Es stellt sich außerdem heraus, dass es von der Altersgruppe unabhängig ist, was interessant ist. Circa 75% der Menschen meinen also, dass wir Autos und Flugzeuge haben werden und jeder meint, die Lichter gingen an. Nun, die von Ihnen, die meinten, dass die Menschen Autos fahren würden... Lassen Sie mich die Folie wechseln. Also lassen Sie uns nun zurück zu den Autos kommen. Ok, die unter Ihnen, die ja zu den Autos sagten, warum? Erinnern Sie sich daran, dass es kein Benzin gibt. Ok? Kein Benzin mehr übrig, keine Kohle und sie sagten, die Menschen würden Autos fahren. Warum haben Sie das gesagt? Jemand sagte elektrisch. Langsamer fahren? Also jemand sagte elektrisch. Also werden die Menschen Autos fahren, weil diese elektrisch sind. Die Menschen werden Autos fahren, weil man von A nach B kommen muss. Handel Handel, die Menschen werden Autos benutzen, weil sie den Handel brauchen. Es ist eine Gewohnheit. Die Menschen werden Autos fahren, weil es eine Gewohnheit ist. Erinnern Sie sich daran, dass wir uns gerade über die Gesetze der Physik hinwegsetzen, nicht wahr? Kein Benzin mehr. Mein ganzes Leben lang hat man versucht vom Benzin loszukommen und es hat nicht funktioniert. Erinnern sie sich, wie der Mississippi fließt. Handel. Jemand anders? Bequem. Die Menschen werden Autos fahren, weil sie bequem sind. Mein Experiment funktioniert nicht. Ich werde noch einen versuchen. Sie sind so nahe dran, dass ich es Ihnen verraten werde. Diesmal ist es nicht geschehen, aber sonst ist es fast immer der Fall. Fast immer sagen die Männer dumme Dinge wie: "Na ja, die Menschen werden Autos fahren, weil es Solarenergie gibt, oder die Menschen werden Autos fahren, weil sie Biokraftstoffe haben." Und fast immer kommt die richtige Antwort von einer Frau die vorne sitzt und leise sagt: "Weil sie sie wollen." Worauf ich antworte: "Ja, weil sie sie wollen." Ok. Und was wir nun hatten, ist ein Gespräch über Wirtschaft und das ist es, was wirklich zählt. In anderen Worten: Vieles von dem, was in der Zukunft geschehen wird, wird nicht durch technische Maßnahmen entschieden, sondern einfach nur durch die animalischen Triebe der Menschen. Und das bleibt immer gleich, wie sie feststellen, wenn sie Kinder haben. Ich habe diese wundervolle Geschichte. Ich war vor vielen Jahren mit meinem Sohn in Peking. Wir saßen in einem großen Auto, hielten im Verkehr und neben dem Auto waren viele Fahrräder und ein Mann im Mao-Anzug schaute zu uns herein. Und ich wollte meinen Sohn belehren und sagte: "Ok, siehst du den Typen hier drüben? Was denkt er?" Und mein Sohn antwortete ohne zu zögern: "Er denkt: Ich wünschte, ich hätte ein Auto." Daraufhin war ich natürlich ein sehr stolzer Vater, denn natürlich ist das genau, was er dachte, und ich schämte mich sehr, weil ich versucht hatte, meinen Sohn zu belehren. Wenn ich diese Geschichte bei meinen Vorlesungen in Stanford erzähle, hat jeder Student aus China dieses riesengroße Grinsen im Gesicht, weil sie wissen, dass es genau das war, was er dachte. Nun, das sagt Ihnen etwas Wichtiges über den Energiekonsum. Die Vorstellung, die Zukunft würde nicht energieintensiv sein, ist nicht möglich, weil sie die Grundregeln der Wirtschaftslehre, die aus der menschlichen Natur resultieren, verletzt. Das Problem zu lösen, indem man weniger verbraucht, ist also nicht möglich. Und der Grund dafür findet sich in meiner und Ihrer Natur. Ok? Nun zu diesem Punkt hier, das ist schwieriger und um einiges wichtiger. Ok, nun frage ich... Ok, lassen Sie uns das Experiment wagen. Es wird nicht klappen, aber ich versuche es trotzdem. Frage an die unter Ihnen, die sagten, wir würden Flugzeuge haben: Was treibt diese an? Brennstoffzellen. Biokraftstoffe. Brennstoffzellen, Biokraftstoffe. Kalte Fusion. Kalte Fusion. Von Ihnen hätte ich nichts anderes erwarten sollen, na gut, Kalte Fusion. Ok, sonst noch jemand? Keiner hier für Kernreaktoren? Na gut. Wunschdenken. Gut, also die meisten von Ihnen sind ja Physiker und somit wird es Sie nicht sonderlich schockieren, dass all diese Ansätze wegen des Gewichts lächerlich sind. Anders gesagt, wenn man fliegt, kann man keine Energiequelle nutzen, die schwer ist, also sind Kernreaktoren ausgeschlossen. Sogar Batterien sind ausgeschlossen. Solarzellen, auf einem Flugzeug findet sich einfach nicht genug Fläche, um genug Energie zu erhalten, damit man genug Auftrieb erzeugen kann; man kann also keine Nutzlast befördern. Durchdenken Sie es also gut. Das einzige, das ein Flugzeug antreiben kann, ist etwas, das dem ähnelt, das sie jetzt antreibt, denn die konventionellen Kraftstoffe, die wir heute benutzen, sind optimal dafür. Erinnern Sie sich, dass Kerosin, Benzin und so weiter, Alkane das Gleiche sind wie Fett. Und die Pflanzen und Tiere haben das Fett aus einem Grund entwickelt. Es weist die höchste Energiedichte pro Kilogramm auf, die die Gesetze der Physik zulassen. Eigentlich stimmt das nicht, Vorsicht, Wasserstoff ist besser. Wasserstoff ist besser, aber als ob irgendjemand in ein wasserstoffbetriebenes Flugzeug steigen wollte. Sie können das gerne tun, ich bleibe hier. Ich sehe Sie dann im Himmel. Wasserstoff ist unhandlich und ein Ärgernis im Umgang. Die Kraftstoffe, die wir heute nutzen, sind also physikalisch optimal und das wiederum sagt etwas sehr Wichtiges aus. Dass es in der Zukunft eine Industrie geben muss, die die Kraftstoffe, die wir heute nutzen, synthetisch herstellt. Nun, das ist alles in allem... Denn erinnern Sie sich, was Sie mir alle gesagt haben, Sie trafen eine Entscheidung bezüglich der Flugzeuge, ohne etwas über die Technologie zu wissen. Die Technologie muss sich also den Anforderungen anpassen. Also ist das eine der Entwicklungen, die stattfinden müssen. Und somit wird die Vorstellung einer kohlenstofffreien Zukunft einfach nicht wahr werden. Und einfach nur deshalb, da Flugzeuge nicht fliegen werden, wenn sie wahr wird.Ok? Nun, was ist mit dem letzten Punkt, die Lichter gehen an? Darf ich Sie fragen, warum Sie sagten, die Lichter gingen an? Warum werden die Lichter in dieser Zukunft angehen? Es gibt keine Kohle mehr, um sie zu verbrennen. Erneuerbare Energien. Erneuerbare Energien. Die Lichter werden also angehen, weil es erneuerbare Energien gibt, die Lichter werden an sein, weil es Kernfusion gibt. Wir möchten nicht im Dunkeln arbeiten. Bioengineering. Wir möchten nicht im Dunkeln arbeiten, Bioengineering. Nun gut, das ist ein wenig schwieriger. Ich stimme all Ihren Antworten zu, aber ich möchte etwas ansprechen, das Sie wohl nicht bedacht haben. Folgendes nämlich: Wenn Sie zurückdenken, wurde Gouverneur Schwarzenegger gewählt, weil die Vorgängerregierung von den Wählern in Kalifornien abgesägt wurde. In Kalifornien gab es ein regulatorisches Versagen auf dem Strommarkt und der Elektrizität... Die Lichter blieben ein ganzes Jahr aus. Und was nun politisch geschah, war, dass die Wähler die Regierung für diesen Ausfall verantwortlich machten, obwohl sie nicht daran schuld war. Und Gouverneur Davis war zu dieser Zeit der erste Gouverneur von Kalifornien, der jemals seines Amtes enthoben wurde und der zweite in ganz Amerika. Und zu alldem kam es, weil die Lichter ausgingen. Ich habe sehr gute Freunde aus Russland, die in der Sowjetunion aufwuchsen und mir Folgendes erklärten: Denn wenn man das tut, verliert man sein Amt und das muss nicht durch eine Wahl geschehen." Also das hat eine Begleiterscheinung. Wenn politische Kräfte involviert sind, gibt es politische Gründe, dass der Strompreis nicht steigt. Ok? Die Wähler mögen das nicht. Deshalb bringt mich das zu einer Vorhersage, die sehr furchteinflößend ist. In der Zukunft werden die Wähler niemals für Energie stimmen, die teurer ist als Kernenergie. Ich weiß also nicht... Man weiß nicht, ob die Kernenergie überlebt oder nicht oder ob es Alternativen geben wird, aber man kennt den Preis. Der Preis pro Joule darf nicht erheblich höher liegen als jetzt, denn die Wähler werden dafür nicht einstehen. Die Menschen in Deutschland, die gerade die Kernenergie "abgewählt" haben, geben einem Grund zum Nachdenken. Wenn die Dinge politisch schwierig werden, ist es leichter für die Menschen Gründe zu erfinden, warum die Menschen in der Vergangenheit fehlgeleitet waren und man die Kernenergie die ganze Zeit hätte nutzen sollen. Es ist einfacher für sie einen Mythos aufzubauen, als mehr Geld zu bezahlen. Und somit ist es wirklich wahrscheinlich, dass, falls der Preis für alternative Energien, der nicht subventionierte Preis, nicht unter den der Kernenergie fällt, die Kernenergie wieder zurückkehrt. Und nur um das noch einmal ganz klar zu machen, denken Sie genau darüber nach, was gerade in Japan passiert. Japan hatte gerade den zweitschlimmsten Nuklearunfall in der Geschichte. Und sie haben gerade zwei Reaktoren wieder in Betrieb genommen. Sie sind eine Vorreiternation auf diesem Gebiet, da sie keine Energieressourcen auf eigenem Boden besitzen. Und das ist die Art von Dilemma, mit dem sich die Menschen in Zukunft konfrontiert sehen werden, wenn sie sich zwischen einem niedrigeren Lebensstandard, weniger Geld usw. oder der Kernenergie entscheiden müssen. Das ist also etwas, um das man sich Sorgen machen muss. Wenn man nichts unternimmt, wartet da immer noch die Kernenergie im Hintergrund und kommt wieder hervor, wenn sie gebraucht wird, ob man nun will oder nicht. Nun, ich nähere mich dem Ende meiner Redezeit hier und ich denke, ich habe Ihnen die Grundideen, über die Sie meiner Meinung nach nachdenken sollten, mitgeteilt. Die erste war, dass viele künftige Ereignisse von der Wirtschaft bestimmt werden. Die zweite war, dass ein Teil der Energiewirtschaft synthetischen Kraftstoff herstellen muss, der kohlenstoffbasiert ist, denn es gibt keine andere Möglichkeit, Flugzeuge zum Fliegen zu bringen. Und die dritte ist, dass es eine Preisumkehr bei der Elektrizität geben wird. Dass wir also in der Zukunft erwarten können, dass eine Preisumkehr stattfinden wird, in der elektrische Joules billig werden und auf Kohlenstoff basierende Joules teuer werden, während es heute umgekehrt ist. Und wenn das eintritt, wird es sein als kippe ein Teich um, d.h. das gesamte Wesen wirtschaftlicher Entscheidungen wird sich ändern, da der Strom nun billig ist. Nun, es gibt da noch mehr zu sagen. Wir könnten exzessiv darüber sprechen, wo der Kohlenstoff herkommt und es gibt da eine Frage bezüglich... meine Dias funktionieren nicht. Verwenden wir dieses Bild. Es stellt sich da die Frage, ob der Kohlenstoff, den man für die Kraftstoffe braucht, aus der Landwirtschaft kommt oder nicht. Aber ich möchte diese Frage auf spätere Diskussionen heute Nachmittag verschieben. Der Punkt ist, dass der Preis pro Joule von Dingen bestimmt wird, von denen wir jetzt wissen, dass sie nicht von künftiger Forschung abhängen, und dass die Energiewirtschaft dieser Zukunft sozusagen vorherbestimmt ist von Dingen, über die wir heute Bescheid wissen. Die Botschaft, die ich Ihnen letztlich mit auf den Weg geben will, ist, dass wenn wir alle darüber nachdenken, wie wir dieses Energieproblem lösen können, der Anfang aller Weisheit, aller Maßnahmen darin liegt gründlich darüber nachzudenken, was notwendig ist. Ok, ich bin fertig, ich danke Ihnen allen für Ihr Kommen.

Robert Laughlin
Powering the Future
(00:05:44 - 00:08:27)

 

In the case of fossil fuel shortage, another big question standing to reason is “How will it happen?” In a discussion with young students, which was also filmed at the 2012 Lindau meeting, Laughlin chose rather drastic words to describe his vision of an unmanaged fossil fuel shortage:


The Energy Endgame (2012) - In the next 100 years or so, we will run out of fossil fuels. In this film, Nobel laureates Mario Molina and Robert Laughlin challenge three young physicists to think seriously about the looming energy crisis and their children’s futures.

Begegnung mit dem Universum Endspiel Energie Mario Molina war an der Entdeckung der Verbindung zwischen CFC-Emissionen und der Zerstörung der Ozonschicht beteiligt. Diese Erfahrung machte ihn optimistisch, dass Wissenschaft und Politik gemeinsam das Energieproblem lösen können. Robert Laughlin ist da skeptischer. Er ist überzeugt, dass wirtschaftliche Einflüsse politische Lösungen verhindern könnten. Auf welcher Seite der Nobelpreisträger stehen unsere Nachwuchswissenschaftler? Wie können wir die Menschen davon überzeugen, dass die Energieprobleme der Jahre 2020 oder 2050 bereits heute von grundlegender Bedeutung sind? Wir können nicht bis 2019 warten, um ein Problem von 2020 zu lösen. Zur Lösung des Problems muss man Emissionen teuer machen. Man muss also die Energie teurer machen, damit Alternativen eingeführt werden, die heute noch nicht so preisgünstig sind. Viele Menschen in der Gesellschaft zeigen wenig Verständnis, wenn es darum geht, mehr für Benzin zu bezahlen. Wenn in den USA ein Politiker sagt "Okay, ich erhöhe die Benzinpreise", kommt das einem politischen Selbstmord gleich. Aber das würde doch Sinn machen. Wir müssen die Frage stellen, warum der Ölpreis so ist, wie er ist. Verbrauchen wir zu viel? Nein, das ist eine unlogische Schlussfolgerung, dass der Ölpreis so ist wie er ist, weil wir zu viel verbrauchen. Das stimmt einfach nicht. Es geht um Angebot und Nachfrage. Es gibt Leute, die nach Öl gebohrt haben, Öl gefunden und gefördert haben und jetzt berechnen sie natürlich höchste Preise, um höchste Profite zu erzielen. Warum werden nicht einfach Gesetze verabschiedet, die den Preis fixieren? Nun, das geht nicht. Brennstoffe sind in Europa mehr oder weniger doppelt so teuer wie in den Vereinigten Staaten. Man muss sich das einmal auf der Zunge zergehen lasse. Das kann doch nicht sein. Es gibt eine international wettbewerbsfähige Industrie wie die Luftfahrtindustrie. Die Lufthansa kann ja nicht doppelt so viel für ihren Treibstoff bezahlen wie die US-amerikanischen Fluggesellschaften, weil es um eine treibstoffintensive Industrie geht. Und wenn der Preis doppelt so hoch ist, wäre sie aus dem Geschäft raus. Also muss es Ausnahmen geben. Und deshalb gibt es eine Sonderregelung in den europäischen, in den EU-Gesetzen, die Fluggesellschaften von hohen Treibstoffpreisen befreit. Sie beschreiben das, was ich als Marktversagen bezeichne. Natürlich ist Öl billig, man muss es nur aus dem Boden holen. Deshalb wird es schwierig, damit zu konkurrieren. Die Solarenergie wird schon billiger, aber nicht schnell genug. Und um ein Marktversagen zu korrigieren, müssen wir über staatliche Interventionen reden. Aber es muss ein globales Einverständnis bestehen. Alle Länder müssen sich einig sein und dann kann etwas geschehen. So einfach ist das. Es könnte etwas geschehen, aber natürlich ist es doch extrem schwierig. Mir ging es um den Aspekt der Unmöglichkeit. Und das stimmt einfach nicht. Das Energieproblem ist ein technisches Problem. Man muss es aus einer technischen Perspektive betrachten und dann lösen. Und das ist etwas Anderes als die Verabschiedung von Gesetzen, um die Wirtschaft zu regulieren. Er interessiert sich stärker für legislative Prozesse, für die Verabschiedung von Gesetzen, die das Verhalten der Menschen regeln sollen. Er möchte regulieren, ich aber möchte technische Lösungen finden. Und das ist der Unterschied. Wenn der Preis für alternative Energien nicht schnell genug fällt, muss es eine Art von internationaler Vereinbarung geben, die dieses Marktversagen direkt oder indirekt ausgleicht. Machen Sie sich überhaupt Sorgen um die Zukunft Ihrer Nachkommen? Ja, mit Sicherheit. Ich möchte mal eine Frage in den Raum stellen: Wie lange dauert es noch, bevor die fossilen Energien verbraucht sind, wie lange dauert das noch? Das hängt vom Verbrauch ab, wir müssen den drosseln ... Schätzen Sie, nein, nein, Sie weichen der Frage aus. Raten Sie einfach. Sie meinen 100 Jahre. Und Sie? Das ist die grobe Schätzung, plus oder minus Standardabweichung. Ok, 100 Jahre. Lassen Sie uns von einem Worst-Case-Szenario ausgehen: Alles läuft schief, die 100 Jahre sind rum und die fossile Energie ist verbraucht. Und dann? Ich glaube, wir dürfen es nicht so weit kommen lassen. Nein, nein. Das ist keine zulässige Antwort. Denn Sie wissen doch, dass es in der Politik immer auf die schlechtest möglichste Lösung hinausläuft. Es ist also nicht unangemessen zu fragen: Was ist die Folge? Glauben Sie wirklich, dass das passieren muss? Die Dringlichkeit ist allen bekannt. Es muss sich doch nicht so entwickeln. Wenn ich kurz unterbrechen darf: Die Aussage ist falsch. Wenn wir den Verbrauch der fossilen Brennstoffe um 20% senken, was bereits unglaublich schwierig ist, braucht es nur 20% länger, bis alles verbraucht ist. Es ist also gar nicht so verrückt, darüber nachzudenken, dass uns die Energie ausgeht. Ich möchte Sie also wirklich in die Enge treiben und fragen: Was passiert dann? Wir werden gezwungen sein, uns andere Lösungen einfallen zu lassen und die werden wir immer haben. Sie glauben, dass ein Wunder geschehen wird? Nein, ich glaube, dass geforscht werden muss und geforscht werden wird. Ich möchte Sie daran erinnern, dass Forschung keine Energie produziert. Energie ist konserviert. Forschung erstellt nur Papiere. Heute muss es Kernenergie sein. Es hängt also davon ab, wie schnell die Kernenergie und einige der erneuerbaren ... Ich denke, wir müssen ... Was passiert, wenn keine Kernenergie mehr zur Verfügung steht? Nun, das gibt uns etwas mehr Zeit und dann ... Ja. Die Solarenergie und Biobrennstoffe und andere Dinge müssen ... Es stimmt, wir müssen uns mit der Realität auseinandersetzen, dass die Ressourcen begrenzt sind. Wir müssen also darüber nachdenken, wann die fossilen Brennstoffe verbraucht sind. Aber gleichzeitig müssen wir auch offensiv daran arbeiten, erneuerbare Energiequellen zu erschließen. Ja, und was mir an seinem Beitrag auch gefallen hat, ist die Tatsache, dass es nicht nur um die Frage geht, ob wir an die globale Erwärmung glauben oder nicht, sondern dass wir einfach diese Begrenztheit der Ressourcen akzeptieren müssen. Das war meiner Meinung nach ein sehr cleverer Schachzug, um die Emotionen raus zu nehmen und einfach zu sagen: Okay, wir wissen, dass die Ressourcen begrenzt sind. Was tun wir also? Es gibt einen Gedanken, den ich gerne in dieser Runde einbringen möchte. Üblicherweise fangen Menschen, wenn sie von irgendetwas nicht genug haben, an zu kämpfen. Ja, das stimmt. Ok, sie kämpfen. Ja, das stimmt. Nun, das ist nicht nur Geschichte. So sind wir als Menschen. Stellen Sie sich vor, was passieren würde, wenn die zweitwichtigste Sache der Welt nach der Nahrung knapp würde. Was würde passieren? Krieg. Und wir sprechen über eine äußerst moderne, technische Kriegsführung. Und wer wird diese Kriege führen? Ich nicht. Ich werde tot sein. Sie wahrscheinlich auch nicht, Sie werden auch schon tot sein. Aber Ihre Enkel, Ur-Ur-Ur-Enkel, werden gezwungen sein, eine schreckliche Entscheidung zu treffen. Schütze ich meine Familie oder lasse ich die anderen Menschen gewinnen? Und normalerweise ist man sich selbst das Wichtigste. Es geht also darum, dass Ihre Kinder betroffen sind, wenn wir darüber nachdenken, wie wir die Zukunft sichern können. Das ist also das Thema, das zur Debatte steht und enorm wichtig ist, nämlich die Möglichkeit, dass in der Übergangszeit schrecklich gekämpft wird und Menschen sterben werden. Ich persönlich denke, dass das eine stärkere Bedrohung ist als die Zerstörung der Welt. Andere denken anders darüber, aber ich halte das für das größte Problem. Es gibt optimistische und pessimistische Sichtweisen. Die Zivilisation hat Fortschritte gemacht. Wir stehen heute besser da. Natürlich gibt es viele Probleme, aber uns stehen auch Lösungen zur Verfügung. Die Solarenergie beispielsweise ist teurer, aber nicht so sehr viel teurer, dass die Zivilisation ausgelöscht werden müsste oder Kriege entstehen müssen usw. Es ist doch klar. Man kann Berechnungen anstellen. Man bräuchte nur ein kleines Stück der Sahara-Wüste, um Energie für den gesamten Planeten herzustellen. Aber Sie müssen natürlich sehr hart daran arbeiten, solche Ideen umzusetzen, um genau diese Alternative zu vermeiden, die meiner Meinung nach nicht unvermeidbar ist. Ja, ich glaube, dass wir in einer sehr entscheidenden Zeit leben, weil viele Entwicklungsländer ... Wir haben in der Tat eine Zeitlang fast die gleiche Energiemenge verbraucht. Aber es sind in Wirklichkeit die Entwicklungsländer, deren Energieverbrauch jetzt rasant steigt. Aber wir verfügen über dieses Wissen und sie können deshalb einige dieser Phasen überspringen. Sie haben Solarmodule in Fußbällen. Sie fangen nicht bei null an... Ja, eine andere Methode ... Ok, die Fußbälle, die Energie beim Fußballspielen erzeugen... Das ist die optimistische Sichtweise. Ich freue mich wirklich, so etwas zu hören. Aber ich möchte keine dummen Dinge hören. Diese Angelegenheit ist todernst. Wenn Sie mit so verrückten Science-Fiction-Sachen, solchem Unsinn für den weltweiten Brennstoffverbrauch ankommen, werden Sie mit Sicherheit im Krieg enden. Das ist todernst. Heute sind wir reich, weil die Zivilisation Möglichkeiten gefunden hat, Energie aus dem Boden zu gewinnen. Und unser Wohlstand ist Energie. Es ist eine unlogische Schlussfolgerung, davon auszugehen, dass wir auch nach dem Verbrauch der fossilen Brennstoffe noch reich sein werden. Es gibt überhaupt keinen Grund, so etwas anzunehmen. Aber wie viel teurer ist denn die Solarenergie? Wirtschaftswissenschaftler ... Ich muss Ihnen leider widersprechen...Wirtschaftsexperten, unabhängige Wirtschaftsexperten und viele andere beziffern die Kosten für den Ersatz auf 1 oder 2% des weltweiten BIP. Das ist vernachlässigbar, die Wirtschaft wird sich verdoppeln oder verdreifachen. Die Menschen, die sich damit sehr sorgfältig beschäftigt haben, sind sich einig, dass das definitiv möglich ist. Das ist doch Unsinn. Die einhellige Meinung der Leute, die Energie produzieren und damit für die Grundlage unseres Lebens sorgen, ist doch, dass Solarenergie Nonsens ist. Und darum investieren sie nicht in Solarenergie. Das ist falsch. Aber es wird doch in Solarenergie investiert. Warum ist die Wirtschaft dann einhellig ... Wirtschaftswissenschaftler sind Idioten. Sie stellen keine Energie her. Sie sitzen nur dumm herum und lassen sich Theorien einfallen. Die Menschen, die Energie produzieren ... Ich komme gerade aus Sevilla. Dort gibt es ein riesiges solarthermisches Kraftwerk und die verkaufen das. Natürlich ist das viel teurer, aber sie stellen Photovoltaik-Zellen in einem so großen Maßstab her, dass sie billiger verkaufen können als konzentrierte Solarenergie. Die Kosten für die Solarenergie sind also gar nicht mehr so weit von denen für fossile Brennstoffe entfernt. Und die Differenz zwischen den Kosten der heutigen Solarenergie und der fossilen Brennstoffe macht nur einen Bruchteil der Gesamtwirtschaft aus. Ich bin zuversichtlich, dass junge Menschen wie Sie mit anderen jungen Menschen zusammenarbeiten und dass Sie diese schwierigen wirtschaftlichen Fragen usw. tatsächlich bewältigen werden, wenn Sie sich wirklich clever genug anstellen. Und wir haben positive Beispiele dafür. Es gibt Dinge, die wirklich funktionieren und die uns einen Schritt nach vorne gebracht haben. Und es gibt Dinge, die schrecklich danebengegangen sind. Finden Sie das heraus und sorgen Sie dafür, dass das nicht noch mal passiert. Glaubt Ihr, dass wir uns tatsächlich in einer so unheilvollen und katastrophalen Lage befinden, wie Laughlin beschrieben hat? Werden wir in den nächsten 100 Jahren Rohstoffkriege führen? Ich finde, wir müssen diese Möglichkeit im Auge behalten, weil Energie ein solch wichtiger Bestandteil unseres Lebens ist. Wir müssen uns dessen bewusst sein und wissen, wie wichtig das alles ist, aber auch die Zeit nutzen, Forschung zu betreiben und sicherzustellen, dass wir Fortschritte im Bereich der Energie realisieren, damit wir niemals diesen Punkt erreichen. Der Pessimismus veranlasst die Studenten dazu, intensiv über ein paar sehr wichtige Aspekte nachzudenken, die nicht abstrakt sind - Schwierigkeiten in der Zukunft, wenn die Energieversorgung in der Welt knapp wird. Was ich glaube, ist doch etwas optimistischer. Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass Menschen Probleme lösen können. Aber sie packen das erst an, wenn sie sich betroffen fühlen. Deshalb möchte ich sie betroffen machen und dann werden sie die Probleme schon lösen. Mir hat die eher positive Haltung von Molina gefallen. Das pessimistische Bild ist vielleicht ganz gut, um zu sensibilisieren und ein Problembewusstsein zu wecken, ... Wenn man Lösungen erreichen will, ist es aus meiner Sicht interessanter, mögliche Lösungen ins Visier zu nehmen und nicht alles schwarz zu malen. Ich glaube dennoch, dass die Zukunft rosig ist. Ich stimme nicht mit der Einschätzung von Dr. Laughlin überein, dass alles so pessimistisch ist und die Menschen wegen begrenzter Ressourcen Kriege führen werden. Ja, natürlich werden wir immer kämpfen, weil Menschen immer verschiedener Meinung sind. Aber in der Vergangenheit haben Menschen doch auch bewiesen, dass wir zusammenstehen können, wenn es darum geht, die großen globalen Probleme zu lösen. Es beginnt mit dem Glauben daran, dass der Schlüssel für zukünftige Herausforderungen und Möglichkeiten im Verstehen der Natur liegt. Und die Wissenschaft ist die Disziplin, die uns dabei unterstützt, die Natur zu verstehen. Es ist großartig, hier in Lindau zu sein, weil es im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes der einzige Ort auf der Welt ist, wo wir einen Austausch mit den hellsten Köpfen - von Nobelpreisträgern wie Dudley Herschbach bis hin zu den intelligentesten jungen Studenten - erleben. Man möchte wirklich mit den besten und hellsten Köpfen auf Tuchfühlung gehen - und die sind hier in Lindau. Wenn es einen Grund gibt, warum Mars bei diesem Treffen vertreten sein muss, ist es der, dass die Landwirtschaft im Sinne ihrer Nachhaltigkeit zu den Bereichen mit dem größten Fußabdruck weltweit gehört. Ja, ganz bestimmt. Allerdings denken die besten Köpfe der Physik, Chemie und Medizin oft gar nicht darüber nach, wie sie Einfluss darauf nehmen können. Wenn man die Auswirkungen der Landwirtschaft auf unseren Planeten und die damit zusammenhängenden Herausforderungen für die kommenden 10, 15, 20 Jahre bedenkt, haben wir wirklich eine entscheidende Funktion als Impulsgeber für die Lösung einiger dieser Probleme. Wir suchen talentierte Leute, aber auch Menschen, die zu einer Veränderung beitragen wollen. Meine Promotion wird von Mars finanziert. Zu Beginn hatte ich schon etwas Angst, dass eine Finanzierung durch die Industrie sehr profitorientiert sein würde und man sich nicht für Grundlagenforschung oder einfach dafür interessieren würde, neue Dinge kennenzulernen. Ich habe aber stattdessen festgestellt, dass Mars wirklich ein Unternehmen mit hohen Grundsätzen ist und es wirklich so einiges gibt, was die nie tun würden, und so einiges, was sie speziell aus Prinzip tun würden. Die Mars-Stipendiaten sind erstklassige Talente, die Zugang zu einer erstklassigen Gemeinschaft haben. Und genau dort geschieht Zusammenarbeit. Besonders wunderbar wird die Zusammenarbeit dann, wenn großartige Grundlagenforschung und Entdeckungen der Hochschulen in den Privatsektor übertragen werden. Wie lautet die denkbar schwierigste Frage, die Sie gerne stellen würden? Wie wollen Sie den Regionen helfen, von denen Sie derzeit unterstützt werden? Wie wollen Sie das Problem des Nahrungsmitteltransportes lösen? Welche Rolle können Berechnungen und Modellentwicklungen in Ihrer Forschung spielen? Wir haben nicht auf alle Fragen eine Antwort und einige dieser Lösungen sind größer als wir. Es geht nicht nur darum, unsere Kunden zu beglücken, sondern wir müssen in vielen unserer Lieferketten auch Funktionen als Partner und Impulsgeber für Veränderungen übernehmen. Wir bei Mars sind grundlegend davon überzeugt, dass viele derzeit bestehende Probleme noch nicht gelöst sind und neue Möglichkeiten tatsächlich in erster Linie wissenschaftsbasiert sein werden. Deshalb sind Menschen, die wirklich unternehmerisch denkende Wissenschaftler sind und die, wie Steve Jobs zu sagen pflegte, einen "Eindruck" im Universum hinterlassen wollen, bei uns genau richtig. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass eine Zusammenarbeit zwischen den besten Wissenschaftlern aller Sektoren entscheidend dafür ist, diese massiven Herausforderungen erfolgreich in Angriff zu nehmen. Es kommt auf Vordenkerqualitäten an. Und wenn es um die Zusammenarbeit geht, werden viele von Ihnen in diesem Kontext die Vordenker sein. Wissenschaft ist immer kooperativ. Man kann nichts allein machen. Alles, worüber man nachdenkt, und alle Methoden, die man einsetzt, haben eine Geschichte. Und wir leisten unseren kleinen Beitrag dazu, die Geschichte weiterzuführen. Das ist der eigentliche Glanz der Unternehmung.

The Energy Endgame
In the next 100 years or so, we will run out of fossil fuels. In this film, Nobel laureates Mario Molina and Robert Laughlin challenge three young physicists to think seriously about the looming energy crisis and their children’s futures.
(00:06:36 - 00:07:38)

 

One year later, the question of energy was discussed by a Panel including the Nobel Laureates Ertl, Grubbs, Schrock and Michel. Answering the question “What will the world be like in a thousand years?” the panel admitted to the difficulty of such predictions and even came up with the possibility of a very natural solution to almost all of mankind’s problems:


Panel Discussion (2013) - 'Chemical Energy Conversion and Storage' (with Nobel Laureates Ertl, Grubbs, Kohn, Michel, Schrock)

Chairman: Ladies and gentlemen, young investigators, welcome to the panel discussion 'Chemical Energy Storage and Conversion'. This morning we have had a very good and nice, almost everything covering introduction by Steven Chu on this topic. Also in the past years we had many discussions on this stage by Nobel Laureates. These Nobel Laureates related to energy supply, shortage of fossil fuels and the consequences of burning fossil fuels for the climate, for the life on our planet and human life in general. So this time the focus will be a little different. We would like to discuss what chemistry could do to solve the energy problem. It is clear that the highest energy density, you have seen the slide from Steven Chu this morning, is achieved in chemical bonds. So the best way to store energy, and this is for example done by photosynthesis, is in chemical bonds. For example what we use for driving our cars or flying our planes, diesel, gasoline, kerosene. And it is also clear that fuels are needed. For example as I said for flying planes. You cannot do that with sun panels. Electricity is already available from renewable sources: from photovoltaics, from wind and from water power. But electricity has to be stored also in some form. We can use batteries, mechanical devices. But again the best way would be to store it, if you don’t need it on the spot, in chemical bonds. The replacement of liquid fossil fuels is still in far reach. The use of the power of the sun as Walter Kohn who is unfortunately not coming because he is not feeling well, to this panel discussion. So Walter Kohn has a film called The Power of the Sun. And I’m convinced that to use the sun is mandatory. Furthermore we need non-toxic basic chemicals. One example would be water which is abundant, not expensive for example for something like artificial photosynthesis. So that this would be light induced water splitting to produce hydrogen or to use photosynthesis in a similar way for CO2 reduction. This requires large efforts in chemistry since all these processes are difficult to perform and require for example the development of inexpensive non-toxic and highly efficient catalysts before appropriate devices can become of practical use. This is one of the big challenges for chemistry in this century. Therefore we want to discuss this topic today in this panel discussion. And now I would like to start this discussion by giving the word to our panellists. One after the other should make a statement about his opinion on chemical storage and conversion of energy. So I think we could start with Gerhard Ertl please. Gerhard Ertl: Thank you very much. As you mentioned it’s not essentially the problem of energy conversion. There is enough energy in the sun light, less than 1% of sun light would be needed to serve the needs of the whole population of the world. But the energy has to be stored and transported. And electricity of course can be used to split water electrolytically. Or it can also be used to convert the electrical energy, the chemical energy for example in batteries. There are still many, many problems to be solved. For example fuel cells are considered to be the future source for driving cars. But fuel cells are not so far advanced that you can have a routine use of fuel cells in cars. And batteries, of course, are very heavy and their lifetime is also not very long. So these are other demands. And apart from this fact you can convert hydrogen into other chemicals like organic molecules. This also needs a catalysis. So catalysis will be the key technique for solving these problems in the future. Chairman: Thank you very much. Professor Grubbs. Robert Grubbs: So the big problem is energy storage as was indicated. And it’s a very, especially batteries is a really interesting chemical problem. In batteries there’s the whole issue of the electrodes, the chemistry, the basic chemistry that takes place. And then you get into the electrolytes and the separators. And so there’s a phenomenal amount of really good material science that’s associated with batteries. And we still have a very long way to go to be able to make cars that you can plug in and drive long distances etc. So this is an area which I think a lot of chemists really need to work on. There are tons of people there but it provides some really interesting problems. I’m associated with a company that’s trying to develop a new chemistry for batteries. And it’s very challenging but lots and lots of fun. So I think that’s going to be one of the key things once one learns how to do the energy conversion, is how you store it. How you keep power over night. How you put it into an automobile and drive etc. So that’s one of the key features that I think will be coming along. Chairman: Thank you. Richard. Richard Schrock: Thank you. Well, I tell my wife sometimes that everything is chemistry. And I don’t think everything is chemistry in terms of energy conversion and sustainability and the like. But certainly as you just heard a lot of it is. And of course it’s natural. Also it’s true. Photo system 2, water splitting. Ok that’s good inorganic chemistry and I’m an inorganic chemist. And a lot of it involves metals, transition metals. And none of that is going to go away. Whether it’s heterogeneous or homogeneous, catalysis with transition metals, that already does fantastic things. Is going to be called upon to do yet even more fantastic things. And so there’s a lot of scope out there. Whether it's batteries, water splitting, whatever it is. And also interdisciplinary, very much so as you also heard, certainly material scientists and chemists and electrochemists and organic chemists - everyone has an opportunity here to work together to really solve these big, big problems. I was surprised to hear some of the things that are being considered these days. And I was contacted by the Department of Energy - there might be somebody here from the department of energy, I know there is somewhere. And one of their ideas is of course how to store hydrogen. Now that’s not a problem that people haven’t addressed. They’ve been considering various ways to store hydrogen because it’s so difficult to store as a gas and use it in your automobile. But one of the ways that they considered or are considering to store it, believe it or not, is to make ammonia. And then to get hydrogen back from ammonia by just reversing that process. All catalytic processes are reversible. And each of those, especially making ammonia which is something I’m interested in, is an enormous challenge. So these are 20, 25, who knows how many years in the future. And of course they’re not all going to pay off. So there will be many of them that just never go anywhere. But if one, if 10% of them pay off or even 5% of them pay off, it can be very, very important to us all. And I expect that but unfortunately I won’t be around to see that. Chairman: Thank you. Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: My advice would be to try to stay electric as long as you can. Of course photovoltaic cells, thermo solar plants and wind mills give you electric energy. And so the basic problem is how to store the energy. And it’s very clear for me, the prime goal has to be to get batteries which are 10,000 times rechargeable. And which have a higher energy density as at the present today. And as outlined by Steve Chu, if you increase the energy density by a factor of 4 and the batteries are already there, that you can get, you can produce cars which cover the same distance without refuelling, as cars with current ignition engines. So this would be really an ultimate goal. Of course you also need to store energy in other instances. Electricity you can store, I would think also when the battery problem is solved in your home. And I was pretty much impressed travelling once to Bangalore, to the Indian Institute of Science. In Bangalore you have power failures 5 times a day. What they did was actually they had 2 rooms full of car batteries. They charged, in 1 room the batteries were charged and the other room they were used for the extra generator. So they only could use extra generator powered by car batteries. So if we would have to store energy we can have the whole thing distributed all over the house. And each house could have a room in the basement where you store batteries and have this supply for that. Without having that of course we still have to go the way to produce energy rich chemicals. And we live in an oxidised world so we have to get energy by reducing something. And the difficult thing is if you have enough electricity, you electrolyse water, produce hydrogen. Hydrogen you use to convert carbon dioxide from a nearby power plant into methane or methanol. You also can convert it by chemical synthesis up to kerosene and use it then for powering jets, for jets. This is how it has to happen so these are the changes which we have to see. We have to make these processes more important. And as Professor Ertl said catalysts are the key for the chemical conversions and I completely agree on that. Chairman: Thank you. Maybe there is immediately one question from my side. Is charging the battery not a problem? If you want to be mobile, you drive longer distances. Even Steve Chu said this morning 300 miles is no problem. But charging it, like we are going to a gas station, filling in the gasoline and then we go on. It would certainly take some time. And if you do it very quickly the battery will probably degrade faster. So this is one of the problems. Or is that problem solved? I don’t know. Gerhard Ertl: I think we should not concentrate on a single source of energy. It will be a mixture, a mixture of different sources. And the first step I think would be to save energy. That you could save energy asking the industry to build smaller cars and to introduce a speed limit on the freeways which you don’t have here in Germany. You could save a lot here. So these are essentially political decisions which are necessary. And science then can help to accomplish these issues. But first of all we must have regulations from politics which save our energy consumption. Chairman: And certainly also public transport. In Germany we are not even able to reduce the speed on the freeway, to tell people that probably not everybody should drive a car anymore. That would be very difficult, I see that too. So in general it’s a toy of all the Germans and maybe many others, many other people in the world. You wanted to say something on the battery problem? Robert Grubb: Yeah the speed of recharging and there’s all kinds of crazy schemes that people are developing. I think Tesla in California is setting up battery exchange programmes. So you drive up and you exchange batteries. And there’s lots, that’s probably not going to be an effective way in the end. So I think again it’s just a materials problem, how fast you can charge, how you can deal with the heat, how you can deal with all of the other issues. And it’s a very interesting engineering problem which, there’s progress being made but we have a long way to go. Chairman: There is one question maybe I can, directly have to find, we have not too many but a few. That was related to the problem of batteries. It was on lithium, let me see if I can find that: like lithium or possibly other rare elements? Isn’t there as well a problem that mining destroys nature?“ An example is the impressive salt lake in Bolivia, that is now used to get the lithium out. I mean this is a general problem I believe that we will have in many places, do we have enough lithium to make all these batteries? Robert Grubb: Probably not. But also there’s now a lot of other sort of chemistries that people are looking at. So I think lithium is probably going to be one of those but there are many other chemistries that people are looking at which will replace lithium. Those are going to be the next generation batteries, I think. Gerhard Ertl: About 10 years ago the car industry propagated very strongly the use of fuel cells. And Mercedes claimed that within 5 years all cars from Mercedes would be fuelled by fuel cells. About 5 years ago I met a representative from Volvo and he told, the future will be lithium ion batteries, just wait 5 years and all cars will be equipped with lithium ion batteries. So there are fashions coming and going again. We cannot know what will be the final solution to that. Chairman: Hartmut Hartmut Michel: Yeah I wanted to say according to the information I have there is no shortage of lithium. There is no shortage of lithium. Richard Schrock: I am not a geologist but I didn’t know we were running out of lithium. And certainly there are alternatives, of course sodium get more bang for their buck, so that would be better. There are a few problems associated with sodium like all other alternatives, even lithium. We are running out of elements, that’s true. I hear we only have, I don’t know what the estimate is, but phosphorus is in danger in fact. Hartmut Michel: That is right. Richard Schrock: I don’t think it pertains to batteries but I’m not sure. But yeah, ok you don’t run out of elements but you run out of concentrated forms of them. So if you dilute the elements then you’ve got to put in a lot of energy to get them back in concentrated form. So this is a problem neither created nor destroyed. But certainly they become less concentrated. So that is a problem in the long run but I feel that there are probably, you know, unknown sources of, that would be more expensive to extract what we need from the unknown sources but unknown sources are unconsidered sources. I mean like everything else we take elements from the most available source and the cheapest one. And then when that is depleted, if it is depleted we move on to the next most available source. And certainly if you count all the lithium and sodium and potassium and so on in sea water, it’s a very large number. So I don’t think we’re going to run out right away. Chairman: Good, I think we should stay a little longer with electricity. There is another question here and I will reformulate it a little bit. I mean it’s almost impossible to use it on the spot. We need to store it. Either in batteries, we have discussed that, or in chemical bonds or pumping up water or other devices. And in Germany for example this is quite a large problem. So we have wind power at the North Sea, at the Baltic Sea. Not enough power lines to serve the rest of the country. And a similar situation is certainly found with photovoltaics. So this is a big problem, for the rest of the world the same way, I believe. Do you want to make any comments how to solve the problem? It’s again political and also personal. And you don’t want to have a power line through your garden. Gerhard Ertl: There is a hot debate about creating new power lines, of course. This is really a political issue. Science cannot provide a solution to that. You have to build some. And of course if you have electricity, the most convenient way to convert it into chemical bonds is to form hydrogen. And then use the hydrogen to transform it into other chemicals. There are techniques available. Sufficient processes have been well known for decades. So it is just a question but what do you want to do and how to achieve this. But in principle it’s possible. Chairman: Professor Ertl you mentioned that there could be a conversion using CO2. And there are quite a few questions concerning that. Maybe I read one from Jacob Kennedy from Caltech, Do you think it is necessary? Is it a necessary bridge between fossil and alternative fuels? Is storage enough, for example as a carbonate mineral, or transformation to value added products, necessary to make it economically viable?“ So that goes also in some other directions, but I think the main topic is CO2 reduction. Gerhard Ertl: It’s a way to emphasise sustainable energy supply. You first burn something, it creates CO2 and then restore CO2 and transform it back. It’s always a question of the balance between input and output. So in principle it can be done. And there are several attempts to do this work along these lines. Chairman: Is there still something to do for CO2 reduction, conversion on the catalytic side? How far is this? You know you mentioned ... Richard Schrock: There is definitely something to do because. I mean you know CO2 and water are at the end of the road. So thermodynamically they’re way down there. And of course people talk casually about converting CO2 but you’ve got to put energy in to do that. You can’t, no process - I shouldn’t say there are no processes. I think you sit and look at some of the things that have been proposed. There might be a couple that are exothermic but almost all of them are endothermic. So that means you’ve got to put energy in. And this is, it’s a zero sum game I think in the end to talk about converting CO2 catalytically or storing CO2. I mean you have to look at the numbers in terms of the amount of CO2 that man is putting up there and do the calculations. And then you find out that there’s just almost no way for man, and again this involves energy, to store that amount of CO2 in some element or some compound like carbonate in order to get rid of it. It’s just, I’m very pessimistic, and again I’m not an expert, but the numbers that we’re talking about, if you want to reduce CO2 are just absolutely enormous. The Haber Bosch process uses hydrogen. And they get the hydrogen from really methane and water to give CO2 and hydrogen. So they produce, the Haber Bosch process, along with everything else, produces a huge amount of CO2. And they use nitrogen of course. And I’ve forgotten the number. Well they consume enough nitrogen to make 10^8 tonnes or so of ammonia per year. But the amount of nitrogen that is available is like 10^15 tones. So 10^8 tones is nothing. Of course that has nothing to do with our storing of energy and so forth. It’s just, I’m just trying to impress you with the numbers. The amount of CO2 that you have to sequester or do something with in order to reduce it, given the fact that it’s being formed all the time in huge quantities. And there’s a lot of it there. Just extremely large. Chairman: So there are a few more questions concerning the CO2. Maybe you have already answered but try to answer the first question. The enormous amount that we see from, also from factories is certainly very difficult to convert. Richard Schrock: If you just look at the number of planes that are flying around and add the number of automobiles flying around and the number of Haber Bosch scale processes that are producing CO2 and burning of methane in oil fields and everything. It’s very, it's staggering the amount that is being produced. And it’s casual to talk about, well not casual but 400 parts per million doesn’t sound like much. But throughout all over the earth it amounts to a huge amount of CO2 that we’re putting in there. Hartmut Michel: Of course we normally forget that a major source of CO2 is cement production and also steel production, that’s enormous. Chairman: That is right. We just had a discussion with people from ThyssenKrupp in Duisburg and they told us the amount of CO2 that they are storing. They have a very big storage tank in Duisburg where you can put in 300,000 m3 of gas. And they said they can fill 150 of these tanks per day with the steel production that is available. But the interesting point, this is highly enriched. So if there would be a method to convert it, certainly we need a good catalyst, hydrogen from non-fossil fuels, to convert that to methane or to methanol or to some other valuable product. That would be excellent. So, Robert Schlögl, our institute will probably work on that. But as a success, depends on catalysis again. Richard Schrock: The most optimistic thing would be to actually come up with a catalytic process that would use solar as its ultimate energy source. Whether it produces hydrogen or whatever. And a catalyst to combine CO2 to make whatever you want to make. Along with water that would be a good product. We know that’s safe. It’s going to be very, very difficult. And it will be, in terms of energy this is an endothermic catalytic reaction almost certainly. So one way or other you’ve got to put in some energy to use CO2. Sorry to sound so pessimistic. But it’s a big, big problem. Chairman: There was one question, this is kind of related. The CO2 problem we have probably now finished. There is still a lot to do for chemistry to develop a process that can convert CO2 to something useful that we can use in an energy cycle. Here is one question, "Why developing batteries instead of a possible methanol economy?“ So there has been the book by Ola some years ago that made some suggestions. In the meantime there has been a discussion again, problems with methanol. What is your opinion about that? This is kind of related to this question. Hartmut Michel: It’s very clear cut, that the best is to stay electric when you are electric. The point is that of course you always lose energy when you do the chemical conversion. And the end, the major point is that an ignition engine, for which you’d use methanol or kerosene or whatever, is very in efficient. Only 20% of the energy in the fuel is used at the end to drive the car, to drive the wheels. And if you stay electric it's 80% of the energy in the battery is used to drive the car. And that’s a very clear point in favour of staying electric. Always the efficiency of electrolysing water is not 100%. And in all these processes you lose energy at the end. To stay electric is the best thing. And in my opinion electricity generation, electricity supply would be the best if we would have superconducting cables which would connect photovoltaic fields, areas in Arizona, Mexico, in the Sahara, in China and Australia. Because the sun is shining somewhere everywhere. And if we have superconducting cables connecting the fields and supplying the electricity to consumers we would not have to store electricity. We simply can use the energy here in the night which is at the same time produced in Australia. So producing superconducting cables would be the best thing to do. Gerhard Ertl: This again is a question of the costs. Gerhard Ertl: You shouldn’t forget that. Chairman: That is right. Gerhard Ertl: Building up such a net would be very expensive and maintenance would be even more expensive. So I am not very optimistic with this solution. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: So I am more of a bystander here because I am not an expert in these fields. But I would like to just raise a question and that is, Can you have a vision of a fossil fuel world, what would that look like? Is that a science fiction world or is it something that we could have in our, at least not too distant future? That would maybe use fossil oils for maybe raw material for certain productions but not really use it up for just burning. Is there such a possibility or is this just... Gerhard Ertl: Methanol technology was just mentioned. You can produce methanol from CO2 and hydrogen by catalytic processes. And then use methanol as energy source in a fuel cell. So the methanol fuel cell is a clear option. There are again serious problems with poisoning. You need very, very clean materials, otherwise electrodes and catalysts are poisoned. So these problems, as long as they are not solved, this will not be a solution of our long-term problems. Astrid Gräslund: I guess that because this would cost a lot of money, so it would change our lifestyle quite considerably. We cannot live the way that we do now. So it’s difficult to foresee perhaps and for of course the rest of the world even more so. Chairman: That’s a general problem. I mean in many electrolysers, fuel cells, there are expensive materials, precious metals. Many of the catalysts that work really well also for splitting water, they contain ruthenium, iridium, rhodium, platinum, metals that are very expensive. And we don’t have enough of them. So that seems to be a problem and I believe that this is also a place where chemistry has to do something. You have mentioned that several times in your talk. Even try to replace a ruthenium catalyst by iron or something, unsuccessfully. Robert Grubb: But there is a large programme going on in the US now. It's run by Harry Gray at our place, who is trying to find non-rare metals as a source for hydrogen splitting. And they’re making some progress. And Dan Nocera who is at MIT making progress at using non-nobles for making oxygen as part of the splitting process. And so these are things that I think people are working on very hard right now. And I’m pretty optimistic about that area. Chairman: Very good. So I think this block, electricity and a few other aspects, we have now more or less covered. I think there is a good way and Hartmut is convinced that we should go more electric and this is certainly right. At the moment I don’t know the numbers, maybe 25/30% is electricity of our energy demand, the rest is fuels for heating, for driving cars. And this has to be replaced. And at the moment I don’t see any good and direct way to create a renewable liquid fuel for example or gaseous fuel that we can use. And certainly we can drive a car with electricity, that’s no problem, but to fly a plane with electricity, with sun panels, will be difficult. Or even these big ships that we are using for transport, that is also not so easy. So there is a demand to find a solution for that. Richard Schrock: Just 2 things: if you want energy quickly and everywhere, in ships, maybe not planes. I know this probably isn’t popular in Germany but there is something called nuclear energy. Which you know in terms of bang for your buck, quickly and a lot of it, it’s available, it works. And 75% of France is run on nuclear energy. That’s probably not very well known. But ultimately we have to put in energy in some way in all of these things. And of course the way it’s done now is that big ball in the sky. I mean we’re really 98.5% nuclear because the sun provides everything except what you get from radio activity through natural decay in the ground. So we’ve got to use solar power some way in the end, I think, because there’s really no way around it, unless it’s nuclear, at least in the short time. But ultimately the sun is going to be around a long time and that’s why we’re all here and surviving. So that’s what we got to plan on in the future. Chairman: You are certainly right but you know in Germany the decision has been made after Fukushima, also in some other countries. And I believe it is very difficult to do something also against the will of the majority of the population in a country. That’s a political issue. But certainly it would make sense. Richard Schrock: Now I hear some people are opposed to windmills because they’re ugly. Richard Schrock: They make noise, whoof, whoof, whoof, so they don’t want to live near them. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: Joking aside. I would say that here of course one has to consider time scales. So what you are deciding now in Germany about windmills and nuclear power and so on, it is now. And maybe not 40 years ago what would be the situation then when we had the global warming perhaps being very noticeable. I mean we really had to do something. Chairman: That is right. Astrid Gräslund: Then there will be a completely different situation, I think, also for the political decision makers. So I think for now we will have to struggle on. And of course we should, as you indicate here, do our research so that we have the methodologies, technologies available. But I don’t think we should expect any politician to make us, make them go into technologies in large scale yet. Chairman: Astrid you are completely right. But you know I am not pro-nuclear. But I just want to say also for the young people here. I mean if I ask you who is for or who is against nuclear power, I think there will be a minority to be pro nuclear power. But on the other hand I think it is important to keep the knowledge and to further develop the technology to make safe nuclear power plants. And nobody in Germany, almost nobody I know of one place, and in particular the young people, they don’t go in this field, to work in this field anymore. So within one generation this will be lost. And that is a danger. We had the case with Chernobyl and other just-across-the-border power plants that have a problem. And we are feeling these problems. And you cannot avoid it, it’s a global problem. And we have to think along these lines and really find a solution also for this problem, I believe. Gerhard Ertl: What you mentioned concerns existing power plants. Chairman: Also new ones. Gerhard Ertl: But I think what is even more serious is what to do with the waste, the nuclear waste. And this problem has not been solved so far. You know in Germany we have a strong debate about a place where we could deposit the nuclear waste. This is of course also a problem for chemistry in some respects. Chairman: Exactly. Gerhard Ertl: But very often it’s just swept under the carpet. Chairman: That is one of the major problems. It’s also the reason that I’m really. We have to solve this problem in some way. And there is no good solution yet. Robert Grubb: And so in the US, there were a lot of solutions proposed. And we have lots of open land and area but the people nearby of course didn’t want it in their back yard. So there’s always, always this issue. But the other part, I think you raised a really important issue, is that I was on another panel, an advisory group which was considering nuclear power. And finding experts in the field is really difficult now because no one is going into the field over the last number of years. And so as you say if we’re forced into it it’s going to have to be, how are we going to restart the field. Chairman: That is right. Okay, so there was not a single question about nuclear power here. But let us go into some other questions. This is concerning using biology. There was one question, what can we learn from biology for the process? That is pretty clear. Everybody of us will agree, I think, that one can learn from it. And maybe chemistry has to find different solutions, you cannot use the same systems. But we can perhaps use the biological system. And there are many questions concerning that. And maybe you can try to answer some of them. One was concerning photosynthesis. Is it feasible to solve the energy needs by harvesting the energy from the sun and store it in fuels? What are the expected energy numbers, expected from this method?“ And quite a number of other questions related to that. For example, Can sugar cane be an effective source of bio fuels, this is Brazil? Are bio fuels economically viable and environmentally friendly?“ And so on. Hartmut. He already made a statement, but this was on Saturday and you were not there, so he will repeat. Hartmut Michel: Okay. The overall process of photosynthesis has a pretty low efficiency. Starting from the beginning only about 47% of the sunlight, energy wise, is absorbed by the plants. And then we have, because you know there is much more energy in the light quanta. Of course there is more energy in the blue quanta than in the red quanta. And there already is only about 40% of the energy in the light quanta is then stored in the primary reaction. And the losses go on. You need about 9.4 photons to produce 2 molecules of fixed hydrogen which you then could use to produce, which you then use to produce carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide fixation in the plants is another problem because the enzyme cannot discriminate accurately enough between oxygen O2 and carbon dioxide CO2. And in every third cycle it incorporates an O2 instead of a CO2 into the sugar, into the C5 sugar. And this leads to loss of energy of 30 to 40%. Another point is that photosynthesis is optimised for low light intensities. So even here in Germany if you have full sunlight, 80% of the sunlight is not used. The electron flow through the reaction centres is limiting that. And you get damage of the reaction centre. And nature has partly solved the damage by exchanging the central subunit of the photo system to 3 times an hour. It gets probably photo-oxidised with the subunit and has to be replaced. And this is what the plants manage to do. But I don’t think we can do that in a kind of technological solution. Taking together all these limiting factors the theoretical upper limit for photosynthesis is continued to be 5% for use of the plants. But actually when you measure the biomass which you produce, which you get under optimal conditions with various plants, then this value is about 1%. Then you go further to production of bio fuels. You have to invest in say tractor fuels. You have to collect the stuff, you have to put energy to produce the fertiliser. And then more than 50% of the energy in the bio fuel you have to put in from fossil fuels. So that’s another point. And when you consider German bio diesel then it’s less than 0.1% of the sun’s energy which is in the German bio diesel. So the overall process is extremely inefficient. And when you do further simple calculations to find out how much area you would need to substitute Germany’s consumption for car petrol and car diesel. Then you end up that all agricultural land of Germany would just be sufficient to supply 8 to 10% of Germany’s gasoline and diesel. So this is nothing. On the other hand we, already in Germany we use 20% of the land for growing corn/maize in order to supply the material for biogas production. And as a result of that food price went up, but the income of the farmers increased. And the farmer lobby is a strong lobby in favour of producing bio fuels because they really have lots of profits from that. There can be no doubt about that. And it’s difficult against the farmer’s lobby, they have support by politician to argue against that. What makes me most negative against bio fuels is the palm oil production in the tropics. And this clearly leads to the clearing of the rain forest in order to start up oil palm plantations. And you may have read about the hazing in Singapore which is due to the illegal cutting, burning of rain forest in Sumatra Island. And this of course has to be stopped. And I don’t think there is any political solution for that. We simply should not use palm oil as a diesel source. And we should not import this kind of bio fuel to Europe or to the US. Chairman: Good. Thank you. Also the situation in Brazil. I think using sugar cane is, the calculation, I heard, is a few percent at least, storage of the sun energy. Hartmut Michel: No, it's 0.2%, it’s very easy to calculate. But the advantage of Brazil is that sugar cane is, that you use, they squeeze the stems to burn and use this energy for distillation of the fermentation product, to get the alcohol. For that reason the energy input and bio ethanol production in Brazil is pretty low. And it's economically possible. Chairman: I think in America there is a similar situation with corn. Richard Schrock: A similar situation with corn. I think some estimates were that it's actually, you have to put in more energy than you get out. If you count everything in terms of fertiliser, making the fertiliser and growing the corn, and processing the corn, and fermenting the corn, and distilling all of the, you know, to get out the ethanol and so on. And purifying it and so on. In the end it costs more than you get. So that’s definitely not what we want. And I don’t know if you’ve heard those numbers Bob, but, or maybe you have too, but there’s no longer a lot of enthusiasm for corn, at least in the US. Chairman: This is changing the situation, which is good. Robert Grubb: The other thing that’s happened over the last couple of years: A few years ago there was a whole green tech movement and venture capitalists. And so there were a large number of companies started which were going to use enzymes and various modified enzymes for making butanol and making all kinds of fuels. Those companies then went public. Their market caps were huge. Now their market caps are very small. Because there’s a whole issue about scaling: How do you scale biological processes on a large scale, how do you keep from contamination, etc, etc. Richard Schrock: I mean earth does a pretty good job of scaling, it covers the earth with green plants. But man has a hard time dealing with that. That’s certainly a problem, a big problem, scaling. Gerhard Ertl: So even 0.5% only efficiency would in principle be no problem. There is enough energy available from the sun. But the problems arise mainly from the influence on the environment. And the competition between food production and energy production, fuel production. It’s a very, very difficult issue. And that’s why the only possibility I think which is reasonable is to use waste, waste from biological products to form fuel. But not to grow, growing the plants for transforming it into fuels. But from waste you can do it. Chairman: Yes, as a side product, you will not solve the whole problem with it but maybe a tiny bit, sure. And that’s what is also done particularly in Bavaria I believe, if I remember that right. Richard Schrock: It's really coming down to, there’s really no one solution. There are many solutions and many of the many solutions are difficult solutions. But I wish we had a magic sun that we can all use somehow on earth. But we don’t. I suppose fusion is still being researched but they always say they’re almost there and I don’t think they ever really are. But that’s a pipe dream to have a sun on earth, unfortunately. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: I would just like to comment one thing about that. And that is that a couple of years ago I was travelling in northern Germany. And I was really struck by that almost every single one family house had solar panels on the roof. Which is the only place in this world where I have seen that. Obviously this was some kind of political move. Chairman: Yes or subsidised strongly. Astrid Gräslund: So it was heavily subsidised. But I mean it doesn’t take more than that obviously. And then people could afford it, states could probably afford it. I don’t know if they continue to do it but the need is maybe less. Richard Schrock: I don’t know, maybe you have the numbers or you have the numbers. That if solar panels were available, if they fell out of the sky, that would be one thing. But we have to make silicon, we have to make the solar panels. And I don’t know what the break-even point is in terms of energy and cost and so on. When do we go positive in the energy game with solar panels? Hartmut Michel: Actually the thing is that in Germany of course it’s not actually subsidies by the government. But the point is that the local power company has to buy your electricity which you produce from photovoltaic cells. Currently, I think, for newly installed photovoltaic cells at about just below 30 Euro cents per kWh. And that’s of course really high. And if you install these photovoltaic cells on your roof you have a guaranteed profit of 8% every year for the next 20 years. And even insurance companies go into that. This has caused other problems because now in order for paying this energy to these investors, the price of the kWh for the general consumer, even for the cleaning lady, went up by 6 cent per kWh. And as a result of that also the production costs are going up in Germany for the industry. And lots of industry are now thinking of cutting down production in Germany. And setting up the production in the US because energy is very cheap in the US, primarily to the gas fracking. So this has economical consequences and one clearly has to think about that when you do that. Also within Germany there are consequences. Most of the photovoltaic cells in Germany are installed in Bavaria, if you look around, not in Lower Saxony. The point is in Germany that Bavaria makes a surplus of 2 billion Euro each year. So the people in Bavaria get 2 billion Euro from people in North Rhine-Westphalia. There’s not much instalment of photovoltaic cells in the Ruhr area. So the people in the Ruhr area pay the people in Bavaria money for using that electricity. So these of course are internal consequences which have not been thought about when these laws were introduced. Also one has to say I think the breakeven point, the real breakeven point in Italy certainly is about 13 Euro cent per kWh. And this is already in reach, within this year or next year we will have that. So it will be economically valuable in the Mediterranean space, in Spain, Italy and Greece to produce the electricity by using photovoltaic cells. Then of course we can import that electricity from there by, not by superconducting but by these high voltage direct current cables - which were mentioned also by Steve Chu in his talk this morning. Robert Grubb: Yes, that is a possibility. Chairman: I have one more biological question. It’s kind of clear that hydrogen is an important central chemical for Haber Bosch, for maybe also driving cars, for other processes. So we have to make it in some way. So there was a question, "What is the best way to make hydrogen?“ And related to the biological side there are also efforts to use algae or cyanobacteria to directly make hydrogen. Maybe you can comment on that, too. And what are your ideas to get the hydrogen. I mean one way is clearly electrolysis of water. If we want to do that on a very large scale we have to develop also new catalyst for the electrolysis, for the electrolysers and so on. But that is probably in reach. But is there also a direct method like sunlight and use water splitting in plants? Richard Schrock: Would anybody have an answer to the bio question, I don’t know, algae? Hartmut Michel: I still think the yield would be very, very low and you still have the problem about damage for the system. And also it's biology and biology will die. And so it’s not as stable as the chemical means are. And economically I do not see any future for biohydrogen. Gerhard Ertl: I think electrolysis will certainly be the solution of this problem. And you have to pay for it because there is an O voltage in the cell which costs energy. So the main problem is to find proper electrodes which reduce the O voltage. And it’s mainly the oxygen electrode which causes this problem, not the hydrogen electrode. So as soon as we have a solution for that it will become much more efficient also to split water through electrolysis. Chairman: There was an interesting question, coating of electrodes for water splitting both ways. In electrolysers, also fuel cells, there is a problem that is exactly related to what you are saying. So there is still some need for chemical work. The question here was if nano technology can contribute, carbon nano tubes, things like that. I mean people are trying that, to coat electrodes, to bring the over voltage down. Gerhard Ertl: The catalysis has been a nano technology since it was invented, long before this... Chairman: Sure, I'm only quoting. Gerhard Ertl: So by inventing a new name it doesn’t solve the problems. Chairman: Very good. So we are doing quite well on the questions. So what is the best way to obtain hydrogen then? Some more ideas, except for electrolysis. I mean is there not something like... Richard Schrock: You have to get it by, you have solar source of water splitting, I think that’s the only way. You’re taking energy from the sun and you’re producing something that you can use to burn to give water. I mean I might be sounding like Dan Nocera here. Richard Schrock: But you know it’s good in a way. I mean people talk about hydrogen this and hydrogen that. But you can’t go out and buy it except in a small tank. I mean we need huge, huge amounts. And the only way you're going to get it is from water and most chemists know that you have to do something to get H2 out of water. Chairman: I think so too. I mean all the solutions that we have discussed are only partial solutions on a rather small scale. Except for the electricity problem that looks quite okay now. There are solutions but for making direct solar fuels there is no good solution yet. And I also don’t see at the moment a good solution for replacing fossil fuels. And they are running out. I mean there are still, you mentioned the fracking, there are resources still. But let’s project into the next 100 years or 200 years. We need a solution to replace the fossil fuels because they will eventually be eaten up by us for driving cars, flying planes, heating our rooms, our houses, all that. And then we must have a solution. And the only possible at the moment seems to be to use water, non-toxic, abundant, cheap. And sun light. So I don’t see anything else. So I think we need all of you to think about it and to go into this field and find a solution. It will be very difficult to do it like plants outside. The catalyst is awfully complicated. Professor Michel has mentioned that the lifetime of the major enzyme that is doing the water splitting is only 20 or 30 minutes. So to make something like that chemically is extremely difficult. Chemistry cannot yet do that. I mean Jean-Marie Lehn in his talk, he was a little bit in this adaptive chemistry: self-repair, self-replication, all these problems but we are still far away from that. And for that reason I also think that there is still room for chemistry, for new chemistry, for good chemistry to do something in this direction. Richard Schrock: Fortunately a lot of those problems are inorganic chemistry problems, so I’m pleased to hear that in a way. And all you inorganic chemists go to it. Because we’re going to need transition metal chemistry for many of the things that we’re talking about: coating electrodes, doing this, doing that, splitting water and so on. It’s not going to go away and we have to move, as Bob mentioned, more towards earth abundant metals. Because there just aren’t possibilities of scaling with some metals, on the scale that we would have to scale. That’s not going to happen. Chairman: Yes. Okay. Gerhard Ertl: I just want to make a comment concerning predictions. When I was a student nuclear fusion was just coming into consideration. And there was a prediction in 50 years we will have reactors for nuclear fusion. Now that’s 60 years ago and we are still waiting for solutions to that. Now they say in 50 years we will be able to build a reactor. And the same thing is with fossil fuels. When I was a student there was also a prediction by Club of Rome which said in 20 years there will be no resource available anymore. This was 50 years ago again. So we still have resources. And optimists of course claim we will find new sources. But this is not a solution to the problem. You are right in some decades or centuries all these resources will be exhausted. So we will be forced to find alternative solutions for that. No other way. Chairman: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: If I may comment, I think you are quite right, that there have to come solutions. And of course it's just the necessity that will force them to come. And at the moment we don’t see them. However, personally at least, I see not the lack of fossil fuel to be the serious problem but what we are doing while we are burning it and that this is causing too bad consequences for everything around us. Not maybe for myself but for my great-grandchildren or your grandchildren. That is, I think, the serious part for me. But it will, of course, only future can tell how bad this will be, we won’t see it. Chairman: Yes, thank you. There were a few more questions of a very general kind. I think we should not go into that, it’s more politics and money for research and all that. It is certainly very important to do that. So I think principle, is there some urgent question from you. We are listening. Any statement from ... yes okay. Question: Going to predictions. Do you think that really like in 1,000 years we’re going to look back and see this as a really strange blip in history? Where, I mean in a 1,000 years we’re going to have renewable energy from solar sources in such abundant quantities that this time is going to be seen really, really strange in retrospect. I mean we’re going to have huge problems with climate crisis but it’s going to be reversible at some point. What do you think? Richard Schrock: What do you think the population of the earth will be in a 1,000 years? Question: It’s probably going to stabilise. Richard Schrock: Nature is going to unfortunately take care of a lot of these overpopulation problems eventually. Sorry to say, but it's inevitable (laugh). Hartmut Michel: Maybe in 100 years we know when it is already sorted out. Richard Schrock: It's sorted within 100 years. Gerhard Ertl: If you look back 100 years the world was completely different, so nobody would have predicted how the world would look like in 100 years from 1930. So it’s almost impossible to make any prediction, what will happen in the next 100 years in the future. No chance. Hartmut Michel: Let me also add that you have seen this morning this ice age cycle in Steve Chu’s talk. And there is some likelihood that we will have another ice age in the not so distant future. And so we have to cope with that also. And then of course if we have the same ice ages, then Berlin will be under the ice. And we will not be sitting here because there’s a few 100 metres of ice up here. Richard Schrock: And that will last for how many years, 100 years? Hartmut Michel: No that will last for the next 80/90,000 years. Richard Schrock: 80/90,000 years?! Hartmut Michel: Yes. Richard Schrock: Okay, problem solved. So let's going to have a party. Astrid Gräslund: From being Swedish I can tell you that of course we have had a rather recent ice age there. And only about 10,000 years ago did it start to really go away. And now we can see, again look forward to that we are now probably in the middle of an interglacial period. So it will be a few thousand years. And then it will come back, no matter what. I mean we could maybe counteract it by heating a lot but it won’t help I think in the long run. So certainly these very long periods of time are something completely different. And the glacial periods have come and gone as we saw this morning. And that is the time frame that we have really no insight into. However I would say that that shouldn’t stop us from, I mean we should solve problems here and now, that is our job. And maybe for our grandchildren. But we don’t ... Chairman: It’s also a great chance for science and mankind in general to find solutions for these problems. I mean to use up the fossil fuels that have been collected by photosynthesis over millions of years. We used them up within 100 or 200 years. And maybe we should not have done that, but it was a great time. Richard Schrock: If this ice age actually arrives and there are some humans who survive, you might consider what kind of human being will come out the other side. I don’t know. You don’t see any dinosaurs walking around, there are sort of birds, so... Robert Grubb: But in the short term there are many problems to solve. And the nice future about it is, a lot of them are chemistry but a lot of them are going to require a lot of good fundamental new sciences being developed. And so in the process of doing this we actually are going to have a good time. Chairman: Good. Question: Hi my name is Nil from Chualongkom University in Thailand. It is my great pleasure to be here and to meet all of you. Thank you so much for your time. So my question is related to electric vehicles. So in order to have an advancement in this field, do you think it’s possible that it might cause another problem of electric production? Like when you produce electricity. Would it be possible that if you want to produce in a huge amount you might need to do it from coal? Or you might destroy other, you might raise other issues about environment? Chairman: Difficult to understand. I could not understand. Maybe you could repeat the main point. Question: Sure, so the question that I have is that if you wanted to produce electric vehicles you might want to use a lot of electricity. And in order to do that would it be possible that you might raise another issue, like you might need to have more coal power plant and that could raise another environment problem. Chairman: I think we try to avoid that. We try to avoid to use coal. I think it’s certainly a problem. To go electric will certainly require more electricity. And we should not use for example burning coal and power plants and not capturing the CO2, if we want to do that. It should be from renewable sources. That would be the right way to go I believe. Hartmut Michel: I am pretty much convinced that coal will still be the major source for production of kerosene for jets in the future, unfortunately. Robert Grubb: There was an interesting article in the Washington Post by Zachariah who suggested that the best thing that could be done for CO2 control would be for the US to teach China how to do fracking properly. So they could switch their coal plants to natural gas. And that drops 10’s of percents of the CO2 emission, up to 30/40%. That’s an interesting extreme view but I think it’s an interesting one. Chairman: There is certainly also some, there will be some questions about the fracking I believe. We had that in the past and we had an interesting discussion on that on Saturday. I don’t know if somebody wants to repeat the point here. And discuss it with you, what kind of danger. Astrid Gräslund: I think even explain what it is. Chairman: Okay, so there is a way to pressurise with chemicals or water the holes, the drilling holes and then get in a more efficient way and more of natural gas and also oil out of the wells. This is called fracking, fracturing. And this has been done... Richard Schrock: Isn’t it banned? I thought it was banned in some countries, even now, France, I don’t know about Germany. Chairman: It is done in many countries. Richard Schrock: People do not like others going underground and you know doing things that they don’t understand. And at their own homes. Gerhard Ertl: We should not forget that this has serious influence on the environment, just the consumption of water. There was a joke in Germany: "Let us do fracking and then we become independent from the oil import from Russia.“ And then the answer was , "But then we don’t have any water. Then let us import the water from Russia." Chairman: Good, I saw one more question here, was that right? Can you come to the front, otherwise you don’t get the microphone. Question: I wanted to get back at the very beginning of the panel discussion and Mr. Ertl. He mentioned that it’s not only about conversion, it’s also about saving energy. Maybe the panel could comment on that. Because that is something we can do right away and not in the future. Chairman: This is a broad field. Professor Ertl. Gerhard Ertl: I think everybody will agree that energy will be not as cheap as it is at the moment, in the future. So energy will become more expensive. And this automatically forces you to save energy. It’s against the economy which has a regulation power in this. Of course there are many different ways to save power: to reduce the heating of your buildings, to reduce the air conditioning, to build smaller cars - there are many, many possibilities. As long as energy is so cheap there is no pressure on you to do it. So make it more expensive. At such a meeting a couple of years ago I proposed to increase the price of gasoline to €3 and there was a large outcry. We are nearly as far now, jaja. Chairman: Do you want to comment on that? Robert Grubb: It’s just that a good chunk of the energy goes into housing and buildings and stuff. So that’s a very easy place to do saving. So that’s a place that I think has been ignored. Because part of the problem is in an individual house, because of very large capital cost you have immediately. And so you weigh that against paying a few extra bucks a month over a long period of time. So there’s probably going to have to be some legislative things that sort of force these issues. Richard Schrock: I think a lot of ... at MIT we have, every place has buildings that were built some time ago. And they’re all single pane windows and there are a lot of them. And it costs an enormous amount of money to run the university just in terms of heating. But it also costs an enormous amount of money to replace all those windows with more energy efficient windows – and that all takes energy. So I don’t know what the economists have decided as to how worthwhile this is and how that all plays out. But retrofitting buildings and houses and so on to become really energy efficient is very expensive in itself, very wasteful in energy or uses energy in many ways. But if that’s the way to go then that’s what we’ll have to do. Chairman: On the other hand in the last 20/30 years in particular in Germany there have been enormous efforts to bring down the gas mileage ... or to bring it up. And I remember when I bought my first car, a VW or something like that, it was taking 10/12, it was a small engine, 10/12 litres for 100 kilometres. Now the same car would probably take 3 or 4, and with diesel and all the technology. It also cost money but there are systems that work. And a lot has been done. Also insulating houses, windows, all that, everywhere. Robert Grubb: I point out, I’ve sat on a number of panels where people are talking about saving energy. And I look around and we’re all sitting around in wool suits. You know it’s really bad that we chose northern European clothing as sort of the standard around the world. We should be dressing so we don’t have to. So you get the air conditioner cranked way up so you can wear a suit. Chairman: That’s right. Okay good, please microphone, you, we have a few more minutes. Question: Hi. I have a question about the earlier part of the discussion. It was mentioned that nuclear energy is falling out of favour with the public. And certainly there have been plenty of examples in the last few years of the potential consequences, the negative consequences of when there is failure with nuclear power. Do you think that this negative reputation is deserved or is perhaps the risk worth any potential benefits? Or do the negatives outweigh the positives for nuclear energy? Chairman: Good question, not easy to answer. Richard Schrock: Are we on the record here or... Richard Schrock: We may read about this tomorrow in the newspapers. Anybody want to take a shot at that one? Robert Grubb: The perception has changed. I was on some committees where there were lots of discussions about nuclear power and everything was going along. And countries were talking about doing it which one wouldn’t suspect would do it. And then Japan happened and all those discussions ended, so. Astrid Gräslund: I could comment again about the situation in Sweden because we have had it over quite a long time. which is not from those more or less renewable or non-fossil sources. And in the meantime of course the public opinion has swayed back and forth and mostly one way. But for instance we had for a certain number of years a law forbidding further development or even planning new power plants by nuclear power. That has been removed. So now you can actually both plan and, well construct if you like. But of course nobody is yet buying. But I at least can see that in the small rather we’ll say pragmatic country of Sweden. This is not going to be a big problem in the future. This is my guess. I mean we will keep our nuclear power. We will probably renovate it when the time comes. We may not increase it a lot maybe but who knows. Depending on the needs. And certainly there is no movement that we should somehow turn things down prematurely right now. That is a non-issue. Other Swedes here could correct me if I am wrong. Maybe I don’t hear what young people talk about. But this is certainly the overall idea I get. Chairman: What is your opinion? Question: I’m certainly not qualified to express mine here. Chairman: But that is an opinion. There was one more last question. I think. You, please. Question: Professor Grubbs mentioned earlier that he’s associated to a company producing I think batteries. And I wonder at what stage during the development of a new technology it makes sense to use subsidies from the state to make the new technology available to a broader audience or to make it viable in the sense of economic way? Or whether we should wait for technology to mature first and then bring it to the market? Chairman: Germany is a very good example for that. Question: I think that Germany is a good example in heavily subsidising. Chairman: There is this renewable energy law in Germany and that was causing the massive shift to renewable energy, photovoltaics and wind in particular. It was heavily subsidised and had some outbursts as professor Michel already explained. The tax payer in the end is paying for it. If they are willing to do so it's fine because I believe that there are new ideas, new developments - hopefully in the right direction - and employment in this field. So I think it’s a good idea to do that in the right way. But the government has to decide and the decision has to be made in a clever way. Batteries - I don’t know, I don’t know the situation how that is. You ask to subsidise the development of batteries. Question: Not exactly only batteries, it was just a general question. Chairman: General. Question: But we could just as well take the same money that we use for subsidies and invest it directly into research or more target oriented development. Chairman: That’s right. That’s another possibility. Richard Schrock: It would be nice to have politicians who knew something about science. I don’t know... Chairman: It’s not so bad in Germany. Richard Schrock: At least in the US there isn’t a large percentage that know much about science and what should or should not be supported with subsidies and so on. I don’t know who they listen to but they don’t seem to themselves have much knowledge in science. Maybe that’s going to be in the papers too, I don’t know. Chairman: Our chancellor is a physicist, that helps. Okay good, thank you very much. I think we should slowly come to the end. I thank everybody on the panel. I will maybe shortly wrap up what we have heard here. And what we have done. I think biofuels, we agree more or less on that, are problematic. Although for example in Germany we have 5 or 10% ethanol in our gasoline. We have biodiesel and this is going on. Maybe it will be stopped, I don’t know. There is also renewable energy law and that is the same source for that development. But it is seen as a problematic thing also by politicians now I think worldwide. Maybe with an exception of Brazil and others who pursue that still. That we have to go more electric in a way that is certainly right. In particular because we have no solution to replace fossil fuels that we are using for driving our cars, flying our planes and all that. There is no good solution for that. So the move to electricity that can be produced in a renewable way is certainly the right decision in the moment. And I hope there will be development in the battery sector, in the car sector and so on. We have to save energy, that is very clear. I mentioned that there is also a good development in several countries. Some points are under discussion. We were just buying a house and we heard that it would be better to not insulate it for various reasons of climate and so on. So we have to think about that. And the third point we discussed quite a bit was nuclear power. And we had a split opinion in a way. I think some people say we have to use what we have and we have to continue. And we have to also invest in the technology and teaching people so that we don’t lose the knowledge in this field. And the people who know about the technology and can help, in case we have to go back to it in the future. And clearly the storage problem, long time storage of the waste, is not solved yet. And it’s not completely safe. Fukushima was a good example, it’s not completely safe. Okay. Another point? And the last and most important point and for all of you, we don’t have as I mentioned a solution to make solar fuels. So we need the input of chemistry to develop a catalytic, better catalysts and devices. For example for light induced water splitting to make hydrogen or to directly make carbon-containing compounds like in photosynthesis for that by some way. Either looking at what photosynthesis and what nature is teaching us or to go completely different new ways that smart chemists like you have to come up with in the near future, I hope. So I think that is closing the panel now and I thank everybody on the stage for a great one and a half hours. Thank you for coming and thank you for listening.

Gesprächsleiter: Meine Damen und Herren, junge Forscher: Willkommen zum Podiumsgespräch über die Heute Morgen hatten wir eine sehr gute und schöne Einführung in dieses Thema von Steven Chu, die fast sämtliche Aspekte berücksichtigte. Außerdem hatten wir in früheren Jahren auf diesem Podium zahlreiche Diskussionen mit Nobelpreisträgern. Diese Nobelpreisträger beschäftigten sich mit der Energieversorgung, mit dem Mangel an fossilen Brennstoffen sowie den Konsequenzen der Verbrennung fossiler Brennstoffe für das Klima, für das Leben auf der Erde und das menschliche Leben im Allgemeinen. Diesmal wird der Schwerpunkt etwas anders liegen. Wir möchten darüber diskutieren, was die Chemie zur Lösung dieses Problems beitragen könnte. Es ist klar, dass die höchste Energiedichte in chemischen Bindungen erreicht wird. Die beste Art der Speicherung von Energie, und dies geschieht beispielsweise in der Photosynthese, sind chemische Bindungen. Was wir beispielsweise zum Antrieb für unsere Autos oder zum Betreiben unserer Flugzeuge verwenden, sind Diesel, Benzin und Kerosin. Und es steht ebenfalls fest, dass Brennstoffe benötigt werden; zum Beispiel – wie ich sagte – um Flugzeuge fliegen zu können. Das lässt sich mit Sonnenkollektoren nicht erreichen. Elektrizität steht bereits aus erneuerbaren Ressourcen zur Verfügung: aus photovoltaischen Quellen, aus Wind- und aus Wasserenergie. Elektrizität muss jedoch auch in irgendeiner Form gespeichert werden. Wir können Batterien verwenden, mechanische Geräte. Die beste Art der Speicherung von Energie – wenn wir sie nicht sofort benötigen – bestünde jedoch darin, sie in chemischen Bindungen zu speichern. Ein Ersatz für flüssige fossile Brennstoffe liegt noch in weiter Ferne. Die Verwendung der Sonnenenergie, wie Walter Kohn sagt ... Er nimmt an dieser Podiumsdiskussion leider nicht teil, da es ihm nicht gut geht. Walter Kohn hat also einen Film mit dem Titel The Power of the Sun produziert. Und ich bin davon überzeugt, dass die Verwendung der Sonnenenergie unerlässlich ist. Weiterhin benötigen wir nichtgiftige, chemische Grundstoffe. Ein Beispiel wäre zum Beispiel Wasser, das im Überfluss vorhanden und billig ist, etwa für so etwas wie künstliche Photosynthese. Dies wäre also die lichtinduzierte Spaltung von Wasser, um Wasserstoff herzustellen oder um die Photosynthese auf ähnliche Weise für die Reduktion von CO2 zu verwenden. Dies macht einen großen chemischen Aufwand erforderlich, da alle diese Prozesse sehr schwer durchzuführen sind und zum Beispiel die Entwicklung kostengünstiger, nichttoxischer und hocheffizienter Katalysatoren erfordern, bevor entsprechende Geräte irgendwie praktisch nutzbar werden können. Dies ist eine der großen Herausforderungen für die Chemie in diesem Jahrhundert. Daher möchten wir dieses Thema heute in dieser Podiumsdiskussion diskutieren. Und nun möchte ich diese Diskussion beginnen, indem ich das Wort unseren Diskussionsteilnehmern erteile. Einer nach dem anderen sollte seine Meinung zur chemischen Speicherung und Umwandlung von Energie darlegen. Ich denke, wir könnten mit Gerhard Ertl anfangen. Bitte. Gerhard Ertl: Vielen Dank. Wie Sie gesagt haben: Es ist im Wesentlichen nicht das Problem der Energieumwandlung. Das Sonnenlicht enthält genug Energie, weniger als ein Prozent des Sonnenlichts würden benötigt werden, um den Bedarf der gesamten Weltbevölkerung zu decken. Die Energie muss jedoch gespeichert und transportiert werden. Und Elektrizität kann natürlich verwendet werden, um Wasser elektrolytisch aufzuspalten. Oder sie kann auch verwendet werden, die elektrische Energie umzuwandeln, zum Beispiel die chemische Energie in Batterien. Es gibt noch viele, viele Probleme, die gelöst werden müssen. So erwägt man zum Beispiel Brennstoffzellen als die künftige Energiequelle von Autos. Doch Brennstoffzellen sind noch nicht so weit entwickelt, dass man sie routinemäßig in Autos verwenden könnte. Und Batterien sind natürlich sehr schwer, und außerdem ist ihre Lebensdauer nicht sehr lang. Dies sind also die anderen Herausforderungen. Außerdem kann man Wasserstoff in andere chemische Verbindungen, wie zum Beispiel organische Moleküle, umwandeln. Auch hierfür wird eine Katalyse benötigt. Katalyse wird daher die Schlüsseltechnologie für die künftige Lösung dieser Probleme sein. Gesprächsleiter: Vielen Dank. Professor Grubbs. Robert Grubbs. Wie bereits gesagt wurde, ist das große Problem also die Speicherung von Energie. Und es ist ein sehr...., besonders Batterien sind ein sehr interessantes chemisches Problem. Bei Batterien haben wir es mit dem gesamten Problem der Elektroden, der Chemie, der grundlegenden Chemie zu tun, um die es hierbei geht. Und dann ist da noch die Frage der Elektrolyte und der Separatoren. Daher gibt es eine riesige Menge von Fragen einer guten Materialforschung, die mit Batterien in Zusammenhang steht. Und es ist noch ein sehr weiter Weg, bis wir Autos herstellen können, die man an eine Energiequelle anschließen und dann größere Entfernungen damit zurücklegen kann etc. Ich denke also, dass dies ein Bereich ist, in dem viele Chemiker arbeiten müssen. Es gibt sehr viele Leute in diesem Bereich, aber er hält einige wirklich interessante Probleme bereit. Ich arbeite für ein Unternehmen, das versucht, eine neue Chemie für Batterien zu entwickeln, und dies stellt uns vor große Herausforderungen, macht aber auch sehr, sehr viel Spaß. Ich denke, das wird eines der wichtigsten Dinge sein, wenn man einmal verstanden hat, wie man Energie umwandelt: Wie man sie speichert. Wie speichert man Energie über Nacht? Wie bringt man sie in ein Auto und fährt damit usw. Das, denke ich, ist eine der Hauptfragen, die sich uns stellen wird. Gesprächsleiter: Vielen Dank. Richard. Richard Schrock: Danke. Nun, ich sage meiner Frau manchmal, dass alles Chemie ist. Und ich glaube nicht, dass alles Chemie im Sinne von Energieumwandlung und Nachhaltigkeit und Ähnlichem ist. Doch mit Sicherheit, wie wir soeben gehört haben, ist sehr viel Chemie. Und selbstverständlich ist es natürlich. Außerdem ist es wahr. Photosystem 2, Wasseraufspaltung. Ok, das ist gute anorganische Chemie, und ich bin anorganischer Chemiker. Und viel davon hat mit Metallen zu tun, Übergangsmetallen. Diese Themen werden bei uns bleiben und uns nicht wieder verlassen. Egal, ob es heterogen oder homogen ist, Katalyse mit Übergangsmetallen: Das ermöglicht bereits fantastische Dinge. Und man wird sich darauf stützen, um noch fantastischere Dinge zu tun. Es gibt hier ein sehr großes Betätigungsfeld: ob es Batterien sind, Wasseraufspaltung, was immer es ist. Und außerdem [geht es hier um] Interdisziplinarität, und zwar sehr stark, wie sie bereits gehört haben, mit Sicherheit. Materialforscher und Chemiker und Elektrochemiker und organische Chemiker: Jeder hat hier eine Möglichkeit zusammenzuarbeiten, um diese großen, großen Probleme wirklich zu lösen. Ich war erstaunt, einige der Dinge zu hören, die man heutzutage diskutiert. Man meldete sich vom Energieministerium bei mir – vielleicht ist jemand vom Energieministerium unter den Zuhörern, ich glaube irgendwo ist jemand von dort. Und eine ihrer Ideen befasst sich natürlich mit der Speicherung von Wasserstoff. Nun, das ist kein Problem, mit dem sich noch niemand beschäftigt hätte. Sie haben sich mit verschiedenen Methoden der Speicherung von Wasserstoff beschäftigt, da es als Gas so schwer zu speichern und in Automobilen zu verwenden ist. Eine der Methoden, die Sie für seine Speicherung in Erwägung gezogen haben oder ziehen, glauben Sie es oder nicht, ist die Herstellung von Ammoniak. Und um Wasserstoff aus Ammoniak zu erhalten, kehrt man diesen Vorgang einfach um. Alle katalytischen Prozesse sind reversibel. Und all diese Dinge, besonders die Herstellung von Ammoniak, für die ich mich interessiere, stellen eine große Herausforderung dar. Diese Dinge liegen also 20, 25, wer weiß wie viel Jahre in der Zukunft. Und natürlich werden sich nicht alle Forschungen auszahlen. Viele von ihnen werden niemals von Erfolg gekrönt sein. Doch wenn eine, wenn 10 % oder selbst 5 % von Ihnen von Erfolg gekrönt sind, so kann dies für uns alle sehr, sehr wichtig sein. Und ich erwarte das, doch leider werde ich nicht mehr da sein, es zu erleben. Gesprächsleiter: Danke sehr. Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: Mein Ratschlag würde lauten: Man sollte versuchen, so lange wie möglich bei elektrischer Energie zu bleiben. Natürlich geben uns photovoltaische Zellen, solarthermische Kraftwerke und Windmühlen elektrische Energie. Das Grundproblem ist daher, wie diese Energie gespeichert werden kann. Für mich ist die Sache sehr klar: Unser wichtigstes Ziel muss es sein, Batterien zu bekommen, die 10.000 mal neu aufgeladen werden können. Und welche von ihnen haben eine höhere Energiedichte als diejenigen, die wir heute verwenden? Und wie bereits von Steve Chu dargelegt wurde: Wenn man die Energiedichte um einen Faktor von vier erhöht – und diese Batterien stehen bereits zur Verfügung, man kann solche bekommen – dann kann man Autos herstellen, die ohne Zufuhr neuer Energie dieselben Entfernungen zurücklegen können wie gegenwärtige Autos mit Benzinmotoren. Dies wäre also tatsächlich ein Endziel. Natürlich muss man Energie auch in anderen Fällen speichern. Man kann Elektrizität, denke ich, wenn das Batterieproblem gelöst ist, auch im eigenen Haus speichern. Ich war auf einer Reise nach Bangalore, zum indischen Wissenschaftsinstitut, höchst beeindruckt. In Bangalore kommt es fünfmal am Tag zu Stromausfällen. Man hatte dort zwei Räume voller Autobatterien. Man lud sie auf. In einem Zimmer wurden die Batterien aufgeladen, und die Batterien des anderen Zimmers wurden für den Zusatzgenerator verwendet. Sie konnten also nur einen Zusatzgenerator verwenden, der von Autobatterien gespeist wurde. Wenn wir also Energie speichern müssten, könnten wir das Ganze über das ganze Haus verteilt haben. Jedes Haus könnte im Keller einen Raum haben, in dem man Batterien vorrätig hat und für diesen Zweck bereithält. Ohne diese Möglichkeit müssen wir natürlich die Produktion energiereicher chemischer Verbindungen verfolgen. Und wir leben in einer oxidierten Welt, so dass wir Energie gewinnen müssen, indem wir etwas reduzieren. Und die schwierige Sache ist: Wenn man genug Elektrizität hat, elektrolysiert man Wasser, stellt man Wasserstoff her. Wasserstoff verwendet man, um Kohlendioxid aus einem nahegelegenen Kraftwerk in Methan oder Methanol zu verwandeln. Sie können es durch chemische Synthese auch bis zu Kerosin umwandeln und es dann zum Betreiben von Flugzeugen, von Jet-Motoren verwenden. So wird dies geschehen müssen. Dies sind demnach die Veränderungen, die stattfinden müssen. Wir müssen diese Prozesse wichtiger machen. Und wie Professor Ertl sagte, sind Katalysatoren der Schlüssel für chemische Umwandlungen, und ich stimme dem vollkommen zu. Gesprächsleiter: Danke sehr. Vielleicht gibt es hier sofort eine Frage meinerseits. Zwei von Ihnen haben gesagt, dass Batterien, die Entwicklung von Batterien sehr wichtig ist. Stellt das Laden der Batterien kein Problem dar? Wenn man mobil sein möchte, fährt man immer längere Entfernungen. Selbst Steven Chu sagte heute Morgen, dass 300 Meilen kein Problem sind. Doch das Aufladen – wie wenn wir zu einer Tankstelle fahren, das Benzin einfüllen, und dann weiterreisen – es würde bestimmt einige Zeit kosten. Und wenn man es sehr schnell durchführt, wird die Batterie wahrscheinlich eine geringere Lebensdauer haben. Dies ist also eines der Probleme. Oder ist das Problem gelöst? Ich weiß es nicht. Gerhard Ertl: Ich denke, wir sollten uns nicht auf eine einzige Energiequelle konzentrieren. Es wird eine Mischung sein, eine Mischung verschiedener Quellen. Und der erste Schritt, denke ich, wäre das Einsparen von Energie. Dass man Energie sparen könnte, indem man die Industrie auffordert, kleinere Autos zu bauen, und indem man eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf den Autobahnen einführt, die es hier in Deutschland nicht gibt. So ließe sich sehr viel Energie sparen. Dies sind im Wesentlichen politische Entscheidungen, die notwendig sind. Und die Wissenschaft kann helfen, diese Probleme zu lösen. Doch als Erstes benötigen wir Vorschriften der Politik, die unseren Energieverbrauch einschränken. Gesprächsleiter: Und natürlich auch öffentliche Verkehrsmittel. In Deutschland sind wir noch nicht einmal in der Lage, die Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf den Autobahnen zu reduzieren, den Leuten zu sagen, dass wahrscheinlich nicht mehr jeder ein Auto fahren sollte. Das wäre sehr schwierig, das sehe ich auch. Im Prinzip ist es der Deutschen liebstes Spielzeug, und vielleicht vieler anderer, vieler anderer Völker der Welt. Sie wollten etwas zum Problem der Batterien sagen? Robert Grubbs: Ja, zur Geschwindigkeit des Aufladen. Es gibt da alle möglichen verrückten Pläne, an denen Leute arbeiten. Ich glaube, dass Tesla in Kalifornien Batterieaustauschprogramme einrichtet. Man fährt also einfach zur Tankstelle und wechselt die Batterien aus. Es gibt viele Ideen, die sich wahrscheinlich letztlich nicht als effektiv erweisen werden. Ich denke also nach wie vor, dass es hauptsächlich ein Materialproblem ist, wie schnell man aufladen kann, wie man mit der Hitze fertig wird, wie man all die anderen Probleme handhabt. Es ist ein äußerst interessantes technisches Problem. Man macht Fortschritte, doch wir haben noch einen weiten Weg vor uns. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt da eine Frage... vielleicht kann ich... muss ich sie direkt finden. Wir haben nicht sehr viele, aber einige Fragen. Sie betraf das Problem der Batterien. Es ging um Lithium, lassen Sie mich versuchen, sie zu finden: „Wie können wir mit dem möglichen Mangel an Elementen, die für die Herstellung von Batterien benötigt werden, wie zum Beispiel von Lithium oder möglicherweise anderer seltener Elemente, fertig werden? Gibt es da nicht auch das Problem, dass Bergbau die Natur zerstört?“ Ein Beispiel ist der beeindruckende Salzsee in Bolivien, den man gegenwärtig verwendet, um Lithium dort herauszubekommen. Ich denke, dies ist ein allgemeines Problem, das wir meines Erachtens an vielen Orten haben werden. Verfügen wir über genug Lithium, um alle diese Batterien herzustellen? Robert Grubbs: Wahrscheinlich nicht. Doch es gibt jetzt viele andere Arten von Chemie, mit denen sich Leute befassen. Ich denke daher, dass Lithium eines der Elemente ist, die man hierfür verwenden wird. Doch Chemiker beschäftigen sich mit vielen anderen Elementen, die Lithium ersetzen werden. Das werden, denke ich, die Batterien der nächsten Generation sein. Gerhard Ertl: Vor etwa zehn Jahren propagierte die Autoindustrie sehr stark die Verwendung von Brennstoffzellen, und Mercedes behauptete, dass innerhalb von fünf Jahren alle Autos von Mercedes mit Brennstoffzellen betrieben werden würden. Vor fünf Jahren traf ich jedoch einen Vertreter von Volvo, und er sagte mir, dass die Zukunft Lithiumionen-Batterien gehören werde: Es gibt also Moden, die kommen und gehen. Wir können nicht wissen, was letztendlich die Lösung dieses Problem sein wird. Gesprächsleiter: Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: Ja, ich möchte sagen, dass es nach meiner Information keinen Mangel an Lithium gibt. Es gibt keinen Mangel an Lithium. Richard Schrock: Ich bin kein Geologe, aber ich wusste nicht, dass uns das Lithium ausgeht. Und mit Sicherheit gibt es Alternativen. Natürlich bekommt man bei Natrium mehr für das gleiche Geld, das wäre also besser. Es gibt einige Probleme im Zusammenhang mit Natrium, wie bei allen Alternativen, selbst bei Lithium. Uns gehen die Elemente aus, das ist wahr. Ich habe gehört, dass wir nur.... Ich weiß nicht, wie die Schätzungen lauten, aber bei Phosphor besteht tatsächlich die Gefahr, dass es uns ausgeht. Hartmut Michel: Das stimmt. Richard Schrock: Ich glaube nicht, dass dies für Batterien relevant ist, aber ich bin mir nicht sicher. Aber ja, ok, uns gehen nicht die Elemente aus, sondern die Elemente in konzentrierter Form. Wenn man also die Elemente verdünnt, dann muss man sehr viel Energie aufwenden, um sie in konzentrierter Form zurückzugewinnen. Dies ist also ein Problem: weder geschaffen, noch zerstört. Doch gewiss werden sie weniger konzentriert. Das ist also auf lange Sicht ein Problem, aber ich denke, dass es wahrscheinlich, wissen Sie, unbekannte Ressourcen gibt, es wäre teurer, dasjenige, was wir brauchen, aus unbekannten Ressourcen zu ziehen, doch unbekannte Ressourcen sind Ressourcen, die noch nicht bedacht wurden. Was ich meine ist, wie sonst auch: Nehmen wir Elemente aus den am meisten verfügbaren und billigsten Ressourcen. Wenn die aufgebraucht sind, wenn es nichts mehr davon gibt, gehen wir weiter zur nächsten meistverfügbaren Ressource. Gewiss: Wenn man all das Lithium, und Natrium, und Kalium im Meerwasser zusammenrechnet, dann ergibt das eine sehr große Menge. Ich denke also nicht, dass wir schon bald keine Elemente mehr haben werden. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Ich denke, wir sollten etwas länger beim Thema Elektrizität bleiben. Ich habe hier eine andere Frage, und ich werde sie ein wenig umformulieren. um den Strom zu verteilen und zu speichern.“ Ich meine, es ist so gut wie unmöglich, sie auf der Stelle zu verwenden. Wir müssen sie speichern. Entweder in Batterien – das haben wir diskutiert – oder in chemischen Bindungen oder indem wir Wasser auf eine bestimmte Höhe pumpen oder mithilfe anderer Vorrichtungen. In Deutschland ist dies zum Beispiel ein sehr großes Problem. Wir haben also Windenergie an der Nordsee, an der Ostsee. Jedoch nicht genug Stromleitungen, um den Rest des Landes zu versorgen. Und eine ähnliche Situation besteht auch bei der photovoltaischen Energiegewinnung. Dies ist also ein großes Problem. Ich glaube, es besteht für den Rest der Welt in gleicher Weise. Möchten Sie irgendwelche Bemerkungen dazu machen, wie man dieses Problem lösen könnte? Es ist wiederum politisch und auch persönlich: Man möchte nicht, dass ein Stromkabel durch den eigenen Garten verläuft. Gerhard Ertl: Es gibt natürlich eine erhitzte Debatte über das Verlegen neuer Stromkabel. Dies ist in der Tat eine politische Frage. Die Wissenschaft kann darauf keine Antwort geben. Einige Stromleitungen muss man bauen. Und wenn man über Elektrizität verfügt, dann besteht natürlich die bequemste Methode sie in chemische Bindungen umzuwandeln darin, Wasserstoff herzustellen, und den Wasserstoff dann dazu zu verwenden, ihn in andere chemische Verbindungen zu transformieren. Hierfür sind Technologien vorhanden. Hierfür ausreichende Prozesse sind seit Jahrzehnten bestens bekannt. Es besteht also nur die Frage, was man tun will, und wie man es erreicht. Doch im Prinzip ist es möglich. Gesprächsleiter: Professor Ertl, Sie haben erwähnt, dass es eine Umwandlung unter Verwendung von CO2 geben könnte. Und ich habe hier eine Reihe von Fragen dazu. Vielleicht könnte ich eine von Jakob Kennedy vom Caltech vorlesen: Glauben Sie, dass sie notwendig sein wird? Ist es eine notwendige Brücke zwischen fossilen und alternativen Brennstoffen? Reicht die Speicherung aus, zum Beispiel als ein Karbonatmineral, oder ist die Umwandlung in Mehrwertprodukte erforderlich, um es ökonomisch tragbar zu machen?“ Das geht auch in einige andere Richtungen, doch ich glaube, das Hauptthema ist die Reduktion von CO2. Gerhard Ertl: Es ist eine Möglichkeit, die Versorgung mit erneuerbarer Energie zu betonen. Man verbrennt zuerst etwas, das erzeugt CO2, und dann stellt man CO2 wieder her und verwandelt es wieder zurück. Es ist immer eine Frage des Gleichgewichts zwischen Input und Output. Im Prinzip ist es also machbar. Und es gibt mehrere Versuche, diese Arbeiten nach diesen Prinzipien durchzuführen. Gesprächsleiter: Gibt es noch eine Rolle für die CO2-Reduktion, für die Umwandlung auf der katalytischen Seite? Wie weit ist man hiermit vorangekommen? Wissen Sie, Sie erwähnten... aber dies ist ein umfangreicher, sehr schmutziger Prozess. Richard Schrock: Es gibt garantiert etwas zu tun, denn ich meine, wissen Sie, CO2 und Wasser kommen am Ende dabei heraus. Thermodynamisch gesehen liegen sie ganz weit hier unten. Und natürlich reden die Leute beiläufig über die Umwandlung von CO2, doch auch darin muss man Energie investieren. Man kann nicht, kein Prozess – ich sollte nicht sagen, dass es keine Prozesse gibt. Ich denke, man lehnt sich zurück und schaut sich einige der Dinge an, die vorgeschlagen wurden. Es mag einige geben, die exothermisch sind, doch fast alle sind endothermisch. Das bedeutet also, dass man Energie darin investieren muss. Und d.h., es ist ein Nullsummenspiel. Letztlich, denke ich, muss man, um über die katalytische Umwandlung von CO2 oder die Speicherung von CO2 zu reden, sich die Zahlen anschauen, was die Mengen von CO2 betrifft, die der Mensch hiervon produziert, und die Berechnungen durchführen. Und dann stellt man fest, dass es für den Menschen fast keine Möglichkeit gibt – und dies hat wiederum mit Energieaufwand zu tun –, solche Mengen von CO2 in irgend einem Element oder einer anderen Verbindung wie etwa Karbonaten zu speichern, um sie loszuwerden. Es ist nur so.... Ich bin sehr pessimistisch. Darüber hinaus bin ich kein Experte, doch die Zahlen über die wir sprechen, wenn man CO2 reduzieren will, sind absolut enorm. Das Haber-Bosch-Verfahren verwendet Wasserstoff. Und es verwendet Wasserstoff aus Methan und Wasser, um CO2 zu erhalten und Wasserstoff. Es produziert also, das Haber-Bosch-Verfahren, neben allem anderen sonst, eine riesige Menge von CO2. Und man verwendet natürlich auch Stickstoff, und ich habe die Zahlen vergessen. Nun ja, wie verbrauchen genug Stickstoff, um jährlich 10^8 Tonnen Ammoniak oder so zu produzieren. Die verfügbare Menge Stickstoff beträgt jedoch etwa 10^15 Tonnen. Das hat natürlich nichts mit unserer Speicherung von Energie usw. zu tun. Ich versuche bloß, es ist nur, dass ich Sie mit den Zahlen zu beeindrucken versuche. Die Menge von CO2, die man bereitstellen oder mit der man etwas tun muss, um sie zu reduzieren, angesichts der Tatsache, dass es ständig in riesigen Mengen hergestellt wird. Und es gibt jede Menge davon. Eine extrem große Menge. Gesprächsleiter: CO2 betreffend gibt es noch ein paar andere Fragen. Vielleicht haben Sie sie bereits beantwortet, doch versuchen Sie die erste Frage zu beantworten. Die riesigen Mengen, die wir von Fabriken sehen, sind sicherlich sehr schwer umzuwandeln. Richard Schrock: Wenn man sich ansieht, wie viele Flugzeuge herumfliegen, und die Zahl der Automobile hinzuaddiert, die umherfahren, und die Zahl der Verfahren im Maßstab von Haber-Bosch, die CO2 produzieren, und das Verbrennen von Methan in Ölfeldern und all das. Es ist sehr... es ist unglaublich, welche Menge produziert wird. Und man redet so leicht darüber, nun ja, nicht so beiläufig, aber 400 Teile pro Millionen klingt nicht nach viel. Doch verteilt über die gesamte Erde ergibt sich eine riesige Menge CO2, die wir ihr hinzufügen. Hartmut Michel: Und natürlich vergessen wir normalerweise, dass eine Hauptquelle von CO2 die Zementproduktion ist, und auch die Stahlproduktion, das ist enorm. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Ich hatte vor kurzem eine Diskussion mit Leuten von Thyssen-Krupp in Duisburg, und sie erzählten uns, welche Menge von CO2 sie speichern. Sie haben in Duisburg einen sehr großen Speichertank, in den sie 300.000 Kubikmeter Gas einleiten können. Und sie sagten, dass sie mit der vorhandenen Stahlproduktion 150 dieser Tanks am Tag füllen können. Noch der interessante Punkt ist: dies ist hoch angereichert. Wenn es also eine Methode der Umwandlung gäbe – selbstverständlich benötigen wir einen guten Katalysator –, Wasserstoff aus nichtfossilen Brennstoffen, um das in Methan oder in Methanol umzuwandeln, oder in ein anderes wertvolles Produkt, so wäre das hervorragend. Also, Robert Schlögl, unser Institut wird wahrscheinlich daran arbeiten. Was jedoch den Erfolg betrifft, so hängt dieser wiederum von der Katalyse ab. Richard Schrock: Die optimistischste Sache wäre, tatsächlich einen katalytischen Prozess zu finden, der als letztliche Energiequelle Sonnenenergie verwendet, ob er Wasserstoff oder was immer sonst produziert. Und einen Katalysator, um CO2 zu kombinieren, um herzustellen, was immer wir herstellen wollen. Zusammen mit Wasser wäre das ein gutes Produkt. Wir wissen, dass das sicher ist. Das wird sehr, sehr schwer sein. Und es wird... bezüglich der Energie ist dies mit an Sicherheit grenzender Wahrscheinlichkeit eine endothermische katalytische Reaktion. Auf die eine oder andere Art muss man Energie aufwenden, um CO2 zu verwenden. Es tut mir leid, dass ich so pessimistisch klinge. Aber es ist ein großes, großes Problem. Gesprächsleiter: Es gab da eine Frage, diese steht damit in Zusammenhang. Das CO2-Problem haben wir wahrscheinlich jetzt abgeschlossen. Die Chemie hat noch viel zu tun, um einen Prozess zu entwickeln, der CO2 in etwas Nützliches umwandeln kann, dass wir in einem Energiezyklus verwenden können. Hier ist eine Frage: „Warum Batterien entwickeln statt einer möglichen Methanol-Wirtschaft?“ Es gab da vor einigen Jahren das Buch von Ola, das einige Vorschläge gemacht hat. Zwischenzeitlich hat es erneut eine Diskussion gegeben, Probleme mit Methanol. Was ist Ihre Meinung dazu? Das steht mit dieser Frage irgendwie in Zusammenhang. Hartmut Michel: Es ist eine ganz klare Sache, dass man am besten elektrisch bleibt, wenn man sich auf elektrische Energie stützt. Die Sache ist, dass man natürlich immer Energie verliert, wenn man die chemische Umwandlung durchführt. Und letztendlich ist der Hauptpunkt der, dass ein Verbrennungsmotor, für den man Methanol oder Kerosin oder was auch sonst verwendet, sehr ineffizient ist. Letztlich werden nur 20 % der Energie des Brennstoffs zum Betreiben des Autos verwendet, um die Räder anzutreiben. Und wenn man bei der elektrischen Energie bleibt, sind es 80 % der Energie in der Batterie, die zur Bewegung des Autos verwendet werden. Und das ist ein klares Argument dafür, bei elektrischer Energie zu bleiben. Die Effizienz der elektrolytischen Aufspaltung von Wasser beträgt nicht 100 %. Und bei all diesen Prozessen verliert man am Ende Energie. Bei der elektrischen Energie zu bleiben, ist das Beste. Und nach meiner Meinung wäre die Herstellung von Elektrizität, die Versorgung mit Elektrizität das Beste, wenn wir über supraleitende Kabel verfügten, die zu photovoltaischen Feldern, Gebieten in Arizona, Mexico, in der Sahara, in China und Australien eine Verbindung herstellten. Weil irgendwo immer die Sonne scheint. Und wenn wir supraleitende Kabel besäßen, die die Felder verbinden und den Kunden die Elektrizität liefern würden, dann müssten wir keine Elektrizität speichern. Wir könnten einfach des Nachts hier die Energie verbrauchen, die gleichzeitig in Australien produziert wird. Die Herstellung supraleitender Kabel wäre das Beste, was Sie tun können. Gerhard Ertl: Dies ist erneut eine Frage der Kosten. Gerhard Ertl: Das sollten Sie nicht vergessen. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist richtig. Gerhard Ertl: Ein solches Stromnetz aufzubauen, wäre sehr teuer, und seine Wartung wäre sogar noch teurer. Ich bin daher, was diese Lösung betrifft, nicht sehr optimistisch. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Also ich bin eher ein Außenseiter in diesen Dingen, da ich in diesen Fachgebieten keine Expertin bin. Doch ich möchte zumindest eine Frage aufwerfen, und zwar folgende: Kann man sich eine Welt mit fossilen Brennstoffen vorstellen, und wie würde sie aussehen? Ist das eine Science-Fiction-Welt, oder ist es etwas, das in nicht allzu ferner Zukunft Wirklichkeit sein könnte? Das wären vielleicht fossile Öle, vielleicht für Rohmaterialien für bestimmte Produktionen, aber nicht einfach zur Verbrennung. Besteht diese Möglichkeit, oder ist es lediglich ... Gerhard Ertl: Die Methanol-Technologie wurde soeben erwähnt. Man kann Methanol in einem katalytischen Prozess aus CO2 und Wasserstoff gewinnen, und Methanol dann als Energiequelle in einer Brennstoffzelle verwenden. Die Methanol-Brennstoffzelle ist also eine klare Option. Auch hier bestehen ernsthafte Probleme mit Bezug auf eine mögliche Vergiftung. Man benötigt sehr, sehr saubere Materialien, ansonsten sind Elektroden und Katalysatoren vergiftet. Also diese Probleme, solange sie ungelöst sind, verhindern, dass dies eine Lösung für unsere längerfristigen Probleme ist. Astrid Gräslund: Ich vermute, da dies sehr viel Geld kosten würde, dass es unseren Lebensstil beträchtlich verändern würde. Wir können nicht zu leben, wie wir es jetzt tun. Es ist daher vielleicht schwer vorauszusehen, und für den Rest der Welt, noch schwieriger. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt ein generelles Problem. Ich denke, in vielen Elektrolysegeräten, Brennstoffzellen, befinden sich teure Materialien, wertvolle Metalle. Viele der Katalysatoren, die auch für die Spaltung von Wasser erfolgreich eingesetzt werden können, enthalten Ruthenium, Iridium, Rhodium, Platin: Metalle, die sehr teuer sind. Und uns steht nicht genug davon zur Verfügung. Das scheint also ein Problem zu sein, und ich glaube, dass dies ein Punkt ist, an dem sich die Chemie etwas einfallen lassen muss. Sie haben das in ihrem Vortrag mehrfach erwähnt, selbst den erfolglosen Versuch, Katalysatoren aus Ruthenium durch Eisen oder etwas anderes zu ersetzen. Robert Grubbs: Aber in den USA wird gegenwärtig ein umfangreiches Programm durchgeführt. Es wird von Harry Gray bei uns durchgeführt. Er versucht, nicht seltene Metalle als Quelle für die Aufspaltung von Wasserstoff zu finden. Und sie machen einige Fortschritte. Und Dan Nocera, der am MIT arbeitet, macht Fortschritte bei der Verwendung nicht-edler Metalle für die Herstellung von Sauerstoff als Teil des Spaltungsprozesses. Und so denke ich, dass dies Dinge sind, an denen Leute zurzeit sehr intensiv forschen. Und ich bin, was diesen Bereich betrifft, ziemlich optimistisch. Gesprächsleiter: Sehr gut. Also ich denke, diesen Themenblock, Elektrizität und ein paar andere Aspekte, haben wir nun mehr oder weniger abgedeckt. Ich denke, es gibt da einen guten Weg, und Hartmut ist davon überzeugt, dass wir weiter in Richtung Elektrizität gehen sollten, und dies ist sicher richtig. Gegenwärtig sind mir die Zahlen nicht bekannt, vielleicht 25 oder 30 % unseres Energiebedarfs ist ein Bedarf an elektrischer Energie, der Rest sind Brennstoffe für Heizzwecke, das Betreiben von Pkws. Und dies muss ersetzt werden. Zurzeit sehe ich keinen guten und direkten Weg, zum Beispiel eine erneuerbare Brennstoffflüssigkeit herzustellen, oder einen gasförmigen Brennstoff, den wir verwenden können. Sicherlich können wir ein Auto mit Elektrizität betreiben, das ist kein Problem. Aber ein Flugzeug mit Elektrizität zu fliegen, mit Hilfe von Sonnenkollektoren, wird schwierig sein. Oder auch diese großen Schiffe, die wir zu Transportzwecken verwenden, das ist ebenfalls nicht so leicht. Daher besteht ein Bedarf, eine Lösung dafür zu finden. Richard Schrock: Nur zwei Dinge: Wenn Sie schnell und überall Energie verfügbar haben wollen, in Schiffen, vielleicht nicht in Flugzeugen. Ich weiß, dass dies in Deutschland nicht populär ist, aber es gibt etwas namens Kernenergie. Kernenergie ist verfügbar und sie funktioniert: Man erhält hier in kurzer Zeit mit geringem Einsatz ein sehr großes Resultat. Das ist wahrscheinlich nicht sehr bekannt. Doch in allen diesen Fällen müssen wir letztlich in irgendeiner Form Energie aufwenden. Und heute geht man hier natürlich so vor, dass man sich dabei auf den großen Ball am Himmel stützt. Was ich sagen will: Tatsächlich stützen wir uns zu 98,5 % auf nukleare Energie, da die Sonne alles liefert, mit Ausnahme dessen, was man aus Radioaktivität gewinnt, durch den natürlichen Zerfall in der Erde. Wir müssen also auf irgendeine Weise schließlich Sonnenenergie verwenden, denke ich, da sie sich auf keine Weise umgehen lässt, es sei denn, durch Nuklearenergie, zumindest kurzfristig. Aber letztendlich wird es die Sonne noch eine ganze Weile geben, und das ist der Grund dafür, warum wir alle hier sind und überleben. Darauf müssen wir uns also bei unseren Plänen für die Zukunft stützen. Gesprächsleiter: Sie haben sicher recht, doch wissen Sie, in Deutschland hat man nach Fukushima eine Entscheidung getroffen, auch in anderen Ländern. Und außerdem glaube ich, dass es sehr schwer ist, gegen den Willen der Mehrheit der Bevölkerung eines Landes etwas zu tun. Das ist eine politische Frage. Doch es wäre sicher sinnvoll. Richard Schrock: Nun, ich habe gehört einige Leute haben etwas gegen Windmühlen, weil sie hässlich sind. Richard Schrock: Sie machen ein Geräusch – Wuuf, Wuuf, Wuuf – die Leute wollen daher nicht in ihrer Nähe wohnen. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Spaß beiseite. Ich würde sagen, dass man hier natürlich auch zeitliche Maßstäbe in Erwägung ziehen muss. Was man also heute in Deutschland entscheidet, bezüglich Windmühlen und Kernkraft usw., das geschieht jetzt, und nicht vor 40 Jahren. Wie sah die Situation damals aus, als wir das Global Warming hatten, das vielleicht sehr deutlich wurde: Ich meine, wir mussten wirklich etwas tun. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Astrid Gräslund: Dann wird es eine völlig andere Situation geben, denke ich, auch für die politischen Entscheidungsträger. Daher denke ich, dass wir in der gegenwärtigen Situation einfach weiter kämpfen müssen. Und selbstverständlich sollten wir, wie sie hier angegeben haben, unsere Forschung betreiben, damit wir die Methodologie, Technologien verfügbar haben. Ich denke jedoch nicht, dass sie noch von irgendeinem Politiker erwarten sollten, dass er uns, dass er sie zu Technologien im großen Maßstab macht. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid, Sie haben vollkommen Recht. Doch Sie wissen, dass ich kein Freund der Kernenergie bin. Ich möchte jedoch auch etwas zu den jungen Leuten hier sagen. Ich meine, wenn ich Sie frage, wer für und wer gegen Kernenergie ist, so denke ich, dass eine Minderheit Kernenergie befürwortet. Doch andererseits denke ich, dass es wichtig ist, das Wissen zu pflegen und die Technologie weiterzuentwickeln, um sichere Kernkraftwerke bauen zu können. Und niemand in Deutschland, fast niemand den ich kenne, und insbesondere kein junger Mensch, geht mehr in dieses Arbeitsfeld, um in diesem Bereich zu arbeiten. Innerhalb einer Generation wird dieses Wissen verloren sein. Das ist eine Gefahr. Wir hatten den Fall von Tschernobyl und von anderen Kernkraftwerken knapp außerhalb unserer Grenzen, die ein Problem hatten. Und wir bekommen diese Probleme mit. Das lässt sich nicht verhindern, es ist ein globales Problem. Und wir müssen in diese Richtung denken und auch für dieses Problem eine Lösung finden, glaube ich. Gerhard Ertl: Was sie erwähnten, betrifft existierende Kernkraftwerke. Gesprächsleiter: Auch neue. Gerhard Ertl: Aber ich denke, was noch ein größeres Problem ist, ist die Entsorgung des Abfalls, des nuklearen Abfalls. Und bis jetzt wurde dieses Problem nicht gelöst. Wissen Sie, in Deutschland haben wir eine heftige Diskussion über den Ort, an dem wir den nuklearen Abfall endlagern könnten. In mancher Hinsicht ist dies natürlich auch ein Problem für die Chemie. Gesprächsleiter: Genau. Gerhard Ertl: Doch häufig wird es einfach unter den Teppich gekehrt. Gesprächsleiter: Dies ist eines der Hauptprobleme. Es ist auch der Grund, warum ich wirklich ... Wir müssen dieses Problem irgendwie lösen. Und es gibt bislang keine gute Lösung. Robert Grubbs: Also, in den USA hat man viele Lösungen vorgeschlagen. Wir haben sehr viel offenes Land und menschenleere Gegenden, aber die angrenzenden Leute wollen natürlich nicht, dass man den Abfall in ihrem Hinterhof endlagert. Es gibt also immer, immer dieses Problem. Andererseits, denke ich, dass Sie eine wirklich wichtige Frage aufgeworfen haben. Ich war in einem anderen Ausschuss, einem Beraterstab, der Nuklearenergie betrachtete. Und Experten auf diesem Gebiet zu finden, ist bis heute wirklich sehr schwer, weil in den letzten Jahren niemand mehr in dieses Arbeitsfeld gegangen ist. Und wie sie gesagt haben: Wenn wir zur Verwendung von Kernenergie gezwungen sind, wenn sie verwendet werden muss, wie beleben wir dieses Arbeitsfeld dann erneut? Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Ok, es gab keine Frage zur Kernkraft. Wenden wir uns jedoch einigen anderen Fragen zu. Diese betrifft die Verwendung der Biologie. Da gab es eine Frage: Was können wir von der Biologie für diesen Prozess lernen. Das ist ziemlich klar. Jeder von uns, denke ich, wird zustimmen, dass man von der Biologie lernen kann. Und vielleicht muss die Chemie andere Lösungen finden, kann sie nicht dieselben Systeme verwenden. Doch vielleicht können wir das biologische System verwenden. Und es gibt diesbezüglich viele Fragen. Und vielleicht können Sie versuchen, einige von ihnen zu beantworten. Eine betraf die Photosynthese. in dem wir die Sonnenenergie „ernten“ und in Brennstoffen speichern? Von welchen zu erwartenden Zahlen gehen wir aus? Was lässt sich aus dieser Methode erhoffen?“ Und es gibt noch eine Reihe anderer Fragen, die damit in Zusammenhang stehen. Zum Beispiel: Kann Zuckerrohr eine effektive Quelle für biologische Brennstoffe sein, d. h.: in Brasilien? Sind biologische Brennstoffe ökonomisch und umweltfreundlich?“ Und so weiter. Hartmut. Er hat bereits eine Stellungnahme dazu gemacht, doch das war am Samstag, und sie waren nicht da. Er wird sie also wiederholen. Hartmut Michel: Ok. Der Gesamtprozess der Photosynthese hat eine ziemlich geringe Effizienz. Beginnen wir mit dem Anfang: Nur etwa 47 % des Sonnenlichts werden, was die Energie betrifft, von den Pflanzen absorbiert. Und dann haben wir, ... denn, wissen Sie, in den Lichtquanten befindet sich wesentlich mehr Energie. Natürlich sind die blauen Lichtquanten energiereicher als die roten. Und nur etwa 40 % der Energie in den Lichtquanten wird dann in der Primärreaktionen gespeichert. Und die Energieverluste setzen sich fort. Man braucht etwa 9,4 Photonen, um zwei Moleküle gebundenen Wasserstoff zu produzieren, der dann verwendet werden könnte, der dann verwendet werden könnte, um CO2 herzustellen. Die Fixierung von CO2 in den Pflanzen ist ein weiteres Problem, da das Enzym nicht genau genug zwischen Sauerstoff (O2) und Kohlendioxyd (CO2) unterscheiden kann. Und in jedem dritten Zyklus baut es statt ein CO2 ein O2 in den Zucker ein, in den C5-Zucker. Und dies führt zu einem Energieverlust von 30 bis 40 %. Ein weiterer Punkt betrifft die Tatsache, dass die Photosynthese für geringe Lichtintensitäten optimiert ist. Also selbst hier in Deutschland, wenn man volle Sonneneinstrahlung hat, werden 80 % des Sonnenlichts nicht genutzt. Der Elektronenfluss durch die Reaktionszentren setzt dem eine Grenze. Und die Reaktionszentren werden beschädigt. Die Natur hat diese Beschädigung teilweise behoben, indem sie die zentrale Untereinheit des Photosystems zwei-, dreimal in der Stunde austauscht. Sie wird wahrscheinlich mit der Untereinheit photooxidiert und muss ersetzt werden. Und den Pflanzen gelingt es, dies zu tun. Aber ich glaube nicht, dass wir bei einer technologischen Lösung dazu in der Lage wären. Wenn wir alle diese begrenzenden Faktoren zusammennehmen, sieht man die theoretische obere Grenze für die Photosynthese bei 5 %. Wenn man jedoch tatsächlich die Biomasse misst, die man produziert, die man unter optimalen Bedingungen mit verschiedenen Pflanzen erhält, dann beträgt dieser Wert etwa 1 %. Dann geht man weiter zur Produktion von biologischen Brennstoffen. Man muss zum Beispiel in Traktorbrennstoffe investieren. Man muss das Zeug sammeln, man muss Energie aufwenden, um Düngemittel zu produzieren. Und dann muss man mehr als 50 % der Energie, die zur Produktion der biologischen Brennstoffe erforderlich ist, aus fossilen Brennstoffen nehmen. Das ist also ein weiterer Gesichtspunkt. Und wenn Sie deutsches Bio-Diesel betrachten, dann enthält es weniger als 0,1 % der Sonnenenergie. Der Gesamtprozess ist also äußerst ineffizient. Und wenn man weitere Berechnungen anstellt, um herauszufinden, welche Flächen man benötigt, um den deutschen Verbrauch von Autobenzin und Autodiesel zu ersetzen, so stellt sich heraus, dass das gesamte deutsche Agrarland gerade einmal dazu ausreichen würde, Das ist also gar nichts. Andererseits verwenden wir in Deutschland bereits 20 % der Grasfläche für den Anbau von Mais, um den Rohstoff für die Biogasproduktion bereitzustellen. Und infolge davon stiegen die Lebensmittelpreise an, das Einkommen der Bauern nahm aber zu. Und die Lobby der Bauern ist eine starke Lobby, die sich für die Produktion biologischer Kraftstoffe einsetzt, weil sie tatsächlich große Profite daraus ziehen. Daran kann kein Zweifel bestehen. Und gegen die Lobby der Bauern hat man es schwer. Sie haben Unterstützung von Politikern, um dagegen zu argumentieren. Was mich am stärksten gegen biologische Brennstoffe einnimmt, ist die Palmölproduktion in den Tropen. Dies führt zur Rodung des Regenwaldes, um Plantagen für Ölpalmen anzupflanzen. Vielleicht haben Sie etwas über die Rauchschwaden in Singapur gelesen, die auf die illegale Rodung und Verbrennung des Regenwalds auf der Insel Sumatra zurückzuführen sind. Und dies muss natürlich unterbunden werden. Und ich denke, es gibt keine politische Lösung hierfür. Wir sollten ganz einfach Palmöl nicht als Quelle für Diesel verwenden. Und wir sollten diese Art von biologischen Brennstoffen weder nach Europa noch in die USA importieren. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Vielen Dank. Also die Situation in Brasilien. Ich denke, dass die Verwendung von Zuckerrohr, dass die Berechnung, habe ich gehört, zumindest ein paar Prozent der Sonnenenergie speichert. Hartmut Michel: Nein, es sind 0,2 %. Es ist sehr einfach zu berechnen. Doch der Vorteil von Brasilien ist, dass das Zuckerrohr, das man verwendet, ... sie pressen die Rohre, um diese Energie zu verbrennen und für die Destillation des Fermentationsprodukts zu verwenden, um den Alkohol zu gewinnen. Aus diesem Grund sind der Energieaufwand und die Bioäthanol-Produktion in Brasilien sehr gering. Und das Ganze ist ökonomisch machbar. Gesprächsleiter: Ich denke in Amerika gibt es eine ähnliche Situation mit Mais. Richard Schrock: Eine ähnliche Situation mit Mais. Ich denke, nach einigen Schätzungen ist es tatsächlich so, dass man mehr Energie investieren muss, als man herausbekommt. Wenn man alles mitzählt: den Dünger, die Herstellung des Düngers und das Anpflanzen von Mais, seine Verarbeitung, seine Fermentierung, und all das zu destillieren, wissen Sie, um den Äthanol herauszubekommen usw. Und ihn dann in reiner Form zu gewinnen. Letztendlich kostet das mehr, als man herausbekommt. Das ist also definitiv nicht, was wir wollen. Und ich weiß nicht, Bob, ob du diese Zahlen gehört hast, aber es gibt nicht mehr viel Begeisterung für Mais, zumindest in den USA. Gesprächsleiter: Das ändert die Situation, was gut ist. Robert Grubbs: Die andere Sache, die im Laufe der letzten paar Jahre passiert ist: Vor ein paar Jahren gab es eine ganze Bewegung grüner Technologie und entsprechende Risikokapitalgeber. Und also wurde eine große Zahl von Unternehmen gegründet, die Enzyme und verschiedene modifizierte Enzyme für die Herstellung von Butanol verwenden würden und die Herstellung verschiedener Arten von Brennstoffen. Diese Unternehmen gingen dann an die Börse. Ihre Börsenwerte waren riesig. Jetzt sind ihre Börsenwerte sehr gering. Denn es gibt die ganze Frage der Größenordnung: Wie bestimmt man die Größe biologischer Prozesse in großem Umfang? Wie verhindert man Verunreinigungen etc., etc. Richard Schrock: Ich denke, die Erde hat das Größenproblem recht gut gelöst: Sie bedeckt ihre Oberfläche mit grünen Pflanzen. Doch der Mensch hat ein Problem damit. Das ist gewiss ein Problem, ein großes Problem, das Problem der Größenordnung. Gerhard Ertl: Also, eine Effizienz von nur 0,5 % wäre im Prinzip kein Problem. Von der Sonne steht uns genug Energie zur Verfügung. Sondern die Probleme entstehen hauptsächlich durch den Einfluss auf die Umwelt, und durch den Wettbewerb zwischen der Produktion von Lebensmitteln und von Energie, von Brennstoffen. Es ist eine sehr, sehr schwierige Frage. Und deshalb denke ich, dass die einzige Möglichkeit, die vernünftig ist, in der Verwendung von Abfallprodukten besteht, von Abfallprodukten biologische Produkte, um daraus Brennstoff zu erzeugen. Aber nicht darin etwas anzupflanzen, Pflanzen anzubauen, um sie in Brennstoffe zu verwandeln. Doch mit Abfallprodukten kann man das machen. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, ein Nebenprodukt. Man wird damit nicht das ganze Problem lösen, aber vielleicht einen kleinen Teil, sicher. Und das wird auch besonders in Bayern getan, glaube ich, wenn ich mich recht erinnere. Richard Schrock: Letztlich ist es eine Frage von... Es gibt tatsächlich nicht die eine Lösung. Es gibt viele Lösungen und viele der vielen Lösungen sind schwierige Lösungen. Aber ich wünschte mir, wir hätten eine Zaubersonne, die wir alle irgendwie auf der Erde nutzen können. Aber die haben wir nicht. Ich nehme an, dass die Kernfusion nach wie vor erforscht wird, aber man hört immer, dass sie fast am Ziel sind. Ich denke [jedoch] nicht, dass sie je angekommen sind. Aber das ist ein Wunschtraum, eine Sonne auf der Erde zu haben, leider. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Ich möchte lediglich eine Sache dazu sagen, und zwar Folgendes: vor ein paar Jahren reiste ich in Norddeutschland. Und was mir wirklich auffiel, war die Tatsache, dass fast jedes Haus Sonnenkollektoren auf dem Dach hatte. Nirgendwo sonst auf der Welt habe ich das gesehen. Offensichtlich stand eine Art politischer Motivation dahinter. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, oder es war stark gefördert. Astrid Gräslund: Also, es war stark gefördert. Doch ich meine, offensichtlich braucht es nicht mehr als das. Und dann konnten sich die Leute es leisten. Wahrscheinlich könnten es sich Staaten leisten. Ich weiß nicht, ob sie es weiterhin tun, aber der Bedarf ist möglicherweise geringer. Richard Schrock: Ich weiß nicht, vielleicht haben Sie die Zahlen, oder Sie haben die Zahlen. Wenn Sonnenkollektoren zur Verfügung stünden, wenn sie vom Himmel fielen, das wäre eine Sache. Doch wir müssen Silikon herstellen, müssen die Sonnenkollektoren produzieren. Und ich weiß nicht, ab welchem Punkt der Aufwand und die Energie sich die Waage halten usw. Ab welchem Punkt des Energiespiels mit Sonnenkollektoren schreiben wir schwarze Zahlen? Hartmut Michel: Tatsächlich verhält sich die Sache in Deutschland so, das Sonnenenergie nicht durch die Regierung finanziell unterstützt wird, sondern es ist so, dass das örtliche Elektrizitätswerk einem die Energie abkaufen muss, die man mithilfe von photovoltaischen Zellen produziert. Gegenwärtig, glaube ich, ist es so, dass bei neuinstallierten photovoltaischen Zellen die Kilowattstunde mit knapp unter 0,30 € bezahlt wird. Und das ist natürlich ein wirklich hoher Betrag. Und wenn man diese photovoltaischen Zellen auf seinem Dach installiert, hat man jedes Jahr für die nächsten 20 Jahre einen garantierten Profit von 8 %. Und selbst Versicherungsagenturen machen hierbei mit. Dies hat zu anderen Problemen geführt, denn jetzt hat sich, um diese Energie von diesen Investoren bezahlen zu können, der Preis für die Kilowattstunde für den normalen Kunden, selbst für die Putzfrau, um sechs Cent erhöht. Und dies hat zur Folge, dass auch die Produktionskosten der deutschen Industrie in die Höhe gehen. Viele Industrien denken jetzt darüber nach, ihre Produktion in Deutschland herunterzufahren und sie stattdessen in den USA durchzuführen, weil Energie in den USA sehr günstig ist, hauptsächlich wegen des Gas-Frackings. Dies hat also wirtschaftliche Konsequenzen, und man muss klarerweise darüber nachdenken, wenn man das tut. Auch innerhalb von Deutschland gibt es Konsequenzen. Die meisten der photovoltaischen Zellen in Deutschland sind in Bayern installiert, wenn man sich umschaut, nicht in Niedersachsen. Die Sache ist, dass innerhalb Deutschlands Bayern jährlich einen Überschuss von 2 Milliarden Euro produziert. Die Leute in Bayern erhalten also 2 Milliarden Euro von den Leuten in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Im Ruhrgebiet gibt es nur wenige Installationen von photovoltaischen Zellen. Also bezahlen die Leute im Ruhrgebiet denjenigen in Bayern Geld für die Verwendung dieser Elektrizität. Dies sind natürlich interne Konsequenzen, über die man nicht nachgedacht hat, als diese Gesetze eingeführt wurden. Außerdem muss man sagen, denke ich, dass die Gewinnschwelle, dass die reale Rentabilitätsgrenze in Italien mit Sicherheit bei etwa 0,13 € pro Kilowattstunde liegt. Und dies ist bereits in Reichweite. Dieses oder nächstes Jahr werden wir diesen Wert erreichen. Es wird also im Mittelmeerraum wirtschaftlich tragbar sein, in Spanien, Italien und Griechenland, Elektrizität unter Verwendung photovoltaischen Zellen zu produzieren. Und dann können wir natürlich diese Elektrizität auch von dort importieren, nicht durch supraleitende Kabel, sondern durch diese Hochspannungsgleichstromkabel, die auch heute Morgen von Steve Chu in seinem Vortrag erwähnt wurden. Robert Grubbs: Ja, das ist eine Möglichkeit. Gesprächsleiter: Ich habe noch eine biologische Frage. Es ist ziemlich klar, dass Wasserstoff für Haber Bosch ein ziemlich zentrales Element ist, vielleicht auch für die Betreibung von PKWs und für andere Prozesse. Wir müssen es also auf irgendeine Weise herstellen. Hier also war eine Frage: „Welches ist die beste Methode zur Herstellung von Wasserstoff?“ Und im Zusammenhang mit der biologischen Vorgehensweise gibt es auch Bemühungen, Algen zu verwenden oder Cyano-Bakterien, um Wasserstoff direkt herzustellen. Vielleicht können Sie auch dazu etwas sagen. Und was sind Ihre Überlegungen zur Gewinnung von Wasserstoff? Ich denke, eine Methode ist klarerweise die Elektrolyse von Wasser. Wenn wir das im großen Maßstab durchführen wollen, müssen wir auch einen neuen Katalysator für die Elektrolyse entwickeln, für die Elektrolysegeräte usw. Doch das ist wahrscheinlich innerhalb unserer Reichweite. Aber gibt es auch eine direkte Methode, wie zum Beispiel Sonnenlicht, und die Verwendung der Wasseraufspaltung in Pflanzen? Richard Schrock: Hat jemand eine Antwort auf diese biologische Frage? Ich weiß nicht, Algen? Hartmut Michel: Ich denke noch immer, dass der Gewinn sehr, sehr gering wäre, und man hätte weiterhin das Problem der Beschädigung des Systems. Und außerdem ist es biologisch, und Lebewesen sterben. Und damit ist es nicht so stabil, wie es chemische Mittel sind. Und wirtschaftlich sehe ich keine Zukunft für biologisch gewonnenen Wasserstoff. Gerhard Ertl: Ich bin der Meinung, dass die Elektrolyse mit Sicherheit die Lösung dieses Problems sein wird. Und man muss dafür bezahlen, denn es gibt eine Überspannung in der Zelle, die Energie kostet. Das Hauptproblem besteht also darin, die richtigen Elektroden zu finden, die die Überspannung reduzieren. Und es ist in der Hauptsache die Sauerstoffelektrode, die dieses Problem verursacht, nicht die Wasserstoffelektrode. Sobald wir daher eine Lösung dafür haben, wird es also auch sehr viel effizienter, Wasser durch Elektrolyse zu spalten. Gesprächsleiter: Es gab da eine interessante Frage, die Beschichtung von Elektroden für die Aufspaltung von Wasser in beide Richtungen. In Elektrolysegeräten, auch in Brennstoffzellen, besteht ein Problem, das direkt mit dem in Zusammenhang steht, was sie sagen. Es gibt also noch immer einigen Bedarf an chemischer Arbeit. Die Frage hier war, ob die Nanotechnologie einen Beitrag liefern kann, Kohlenstoff-Nanoröhren, derartige Dinge. Ich meine, man versucht das, Elektroden zu Beschichten, um die Überspannung zu reduzieren. Gerhard Ertl: Die Katalyse war seit ihrer Erfindung einen Nanotechnologie, lange bevor dies .... Gesprächsleiter: Sicher, ich zitiere nur. Gerhard Ertl: Also, durch die Erfindung eines neuen Namens werden die Probleme nicht gelöst. Gesprächsleiter: Sehr gut. Wir kommen mit den Fragen gut voran. Also was ist nun die beste Methode zur Gewinnung von Wasserstoff? Einige weitere Ideen, außer der Elektrolyse? Ich meine, gibt es nicht so etwas wie... Richard Schrock: Man muss es gewinnen über, man muss eine solare Quelle für die Wasserspaltung haben. Ich denke, es gibt keine andere Möglichkeit. Man nimmt Energie von der Sonne und produziert etwas, das man zum Verbrennen verwenden kann, um Wasser zu erhalten. Ich meine, ich könnte hier vielleicht klingen wie Dan Nocera. Richard Schrock: Doch Sie wissen, dass das auf eine Weise gut ist. Ich meine, die Leute reden über Wasserstoff dies und Wasserstoff das. Aber man kann nicht einfach los ziehen und ihn kaufen, es sei denn in einem kleinen Behälter. Was ich sagen will: Wir benötigen riesige, riesige Mengen. Und die einzige Möglichkeit, die zu bekommen, besteht in einer Gewinnung aus Wasser, die meisten Chemiker wissen, dass man etwas tun muss, um H2 aus Wasser zu bekommen. Gesprächsleiter: Das denke ich auch. Ich meine, alle Lösungen, die wir diskutiert haben, sind nur Teillösungen in einem ziemlich kleinen Maßstab. Mit Ausnahme des Elektrizitätsproblems, das nun ziemlich ok aussieht. Es gibt Lösungen, doch für die Produktion von direkten solaren Brennstoffen gibt es bislang noch keine gute Lösung. Und gegenwärtig sehe ich auch keine gute Lösung für den Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe. Und sie gehen uns aus. Ich meine, noch gibt es – Sie erwähnten das Fracking – noch gibt es Ressourcen. Doch denken wir 100 oder 200 Jahre weiter. Wir brauchen eine Lösung für den Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe, weil sie durch das Fahren unserer Autos, das Fliegen unserer Flugzeuge, die Beheizung unserer Zimmer, unserer Häuser und all das von uns letztendlich aufgebraucht werden wird. Und die einzige Möglichkeit scheint im Moment die zu sein, Wasser zu verwenden, das nicht giftig ist, in Mengen vorhanden und billig. Und Sonnenlicht. Also ich sehe nichts anderes. Ich denke also, dass alle von Ihnen darüber nachdenken und sich in dieses Arbeitsgebiet begeben und eine Lösung finden müssen. Es wird sehr schwierig sein, dies zu tun wie die Pflanzen draußen. Der Katalysator ist fürchterlich kompliziert. Professor Michel hat erwähnt, dass die Lebensdauer des wichtigen Enzyms, das die Aufspaltung des Wassers vornimmt, lediglich 20 oder 30 Minuten beträgt. So etwas auf chemischem Wege herzustellen, ist äußerst schwierig. Noch kann die Chemie das nicht. Ich meine Jean-Marie Lehn in seinem Vortrag, der steckte ein wenig in seiner adaptiven Chemie: Selbstreparatur, Selbstreplikation, alle diese Probleme; aber wir sind noch sehr weit davon entfernt. Und aus diesem Grunde bin ich auch der Meinung, dass es noch Raum für die Chemie gibt, für neue Chemie, für gute Chemie, um etwas in diese Richtung zu tun. Richard Schrock: Zum Glück sind eine Menge dieser Probleme der anorganischen Chemie. Ich bin also in gewisser Weise darüber erfreut, dies zu hören. Und alle Sie anorganische Chemiker: nehmen Sie sich der Sache an. Weil wir für viele dieser Probleme, über die wir sprechen, Übergangsmetallchemie benötigen werden: für das Beschichtung von Elektroden, um dies und das zu tun, Wasser aufzuspalten usw. Die Probleme werden nicht weggehen, und wir müssen uns, wie Bob erwähnt hat, mehr in Richtung auf Metalle zubewegen, die auf der Erde in großen Mengen vorhanden sind. Weil bei einigen Metallen sich in größerem Maßstab nichts machen lassen wird, in den Größenordnungen, die wir erreichen müssen. Das wird nicht passieren. Gesprächsleiter: Ja. Ok. Gerhard Ertl: Ich möchte nur eine Bemerkung über Vorhersagen machen. Als ich Student war, kam die Kernfusion gerade erst ins Gespräch. Und man sagte voraus, dass man in 50 Jahren Reaktoren für Kernfusion haben würde. Das ist nun 60 Jahre her, und wir warten noch immer auf Lösungen dafür. Nun sagt man, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sein werden, einen Reaktor zu bauen. Und dasselbe gilt für fossile Brennstoffe. Als ich Student war, gab es eine Vorhersage des Club of Rome, die feststellte, dass es in 20 Jahren keine Ressourcen mehr geben würde. Auch dies ist nun 50 Jahre her. Wir haben immer noch Ressourcen. Und Optimisten behaupten natürlich, dass wir neue Ressourcen finden werden. Doch dies ist keine Lösung des Problems. Man hat darin Recht, dass in einigen Jahrzehnten oder Jahrhunderten alle diese Ressourcen aufgebraucht sein werden. Wir werden also gezwungen sein, alternative Lösungen dafür zu finden. Es gibt keinen anderen Weg. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Wenn ich dazu etwas sagen darf. Ich denke Sie haben ganz Recht, dass Lösungen kommen müssen. Und natürlich ist es ganz einfach die Notwendigkeit, die sie erzwingen wird. Im Moment sehen wir sie nicht. Zumindest persönlich halte ich jedoch nicht den Mangel an fossilen Brennstoffen für ein ernstes Problem, sondern das, was wir tun, während wir sie verbrennen, und das dies zu schlechte Folgen für alles um uns herum hat. Vielleicht nicht für mich, aber für meine Urenkel oder ihre Enkel. Das ist meines Erachtens der schwierige Aspekt. Aber es wird natürlich..., nur die Zukunft kann zeigen, wie schlimm dies sein wird. Wir werden es nicht erleben. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, danke sehr. Es gab noch einige weitere Fragen allgemeiner Art. Ich denke, wir sollten darauf nicht eingehen. Es handelt sich dabei mehr um Politik und Forschungsgelder und all das. Es ist sicherlich sehr wichtig, das zu tun. Ich denke, dass im Prinzip.... Gibt es eine dringende Frage von Ihnen? Wir sind ganz Ohr. Irgendeine Stellungnahme von ... ja, ok. Frage: Zur Frage der Prognosen. Glauben Sie wirklich, dass wir in 1000 Jahren zurückschauen und dies als eine wirklich seltsame, kurzlebige Phase in der Geschichte ansehen werden?... Wo,... ich meine, in 1000 Jahren werden wir aus solaren Quellen erneuerbare Energien in solch riesigen Mengen zur Verfügung haben, dass die gegenwärtige Zeit rückblickend als sehr, sehr merkwürdig erscheinen wird. Ich meine, wir werden riesige Probleme mit der Klimakrise bekommen, doch sie wird ab einem bestimmten Punkt reversibel sein. Was meinen Sie? Richard Schrock: Wie groß, glauben Sie, wird die Weltbevölkerung in 1000 Jahren sein? Frage: Sie wird sich wahrscheinlich stabilisieren. Richard Schrock: Die Natur wird leider viele dieser Überbevölkerungprobleme schließlich lösen. Es tut mir leid das zu sagen, doch es ist unausweichlich (Lachen). Hartmut Michel: Vielleicht wissen wir in 100 Jahren, wann das Problem endlich gelöst sein wird. Richard Schrock: Es wird innerhalb von hundert Jahren gelöst. Gerhard Ertl: Wenn Sie 100 Jahre zurückblicken, sah die Welt vollkommen anders aus. Niemand würde im Jahr 1930 vorhergesagt haben, wie die Welt in 100 Jahren aussehen würde. Es ist daher so gut wie unmöglich, irgendeine Vorhersage darüber zu machen, was in den nächsten 100 Jahren passieren wird. Keine Chance. Hartmut Michel: Lassen Sie mich außerdem hinzufügen, dass Sie heute Morgen in Steven Chus Vortrag diesen Eiszeitenzyklus gesehen haben. Und es besteht eine gewisse Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass wir in nicht allzu ferner Zukunft eine weitere Eiszeit erleben werden. Also müssen wir auch damit fertig werden. Und dann, wenn wir dieselben Eiszeiten haben, wird Berlin natürlich unter einer Eisdecke liegen. Und wir werden dann nicht hier sitzen, weil über uns eine mehrere 100 Meter dicke Eisschicht liegen wird. Richard Schrock: Und wie lange wird das dauern, 100 Jahre? Hartmut Michel: Und das wird die nächsten 80 oder 90.000 Jahre dauern. Richard Schrock: 80 oder 90.000 Jahre?! Hartmut Michel: Ja. Richard Schrock: Ok, Problem gelöst. Machen wir also eine Party. Astrid Gräslund: Als jemand aus Schweden kann ich Ihnen sagen, dass wir vor relativ kurzer Zeit dort eine Eiszeit hatten, und erst vor ungefähr 10.000 Jahren begann sie wirklich, sich zurückzuziehen. Und nun können wir sehen, und uns darauf freuen, dass wir uns zurzeit wahrscheinlich in der Mitte zwischen zwei Eiszeiten befinden. Wir werden also ein paar 1000 Jahre haben. Und dann kommt das Eis zurück; was immer sonst passiert. Ich denke, wir könnten vielleicht Einfluss darauf nehmen, indem wir sehr viel heizen, doch ich glaube, dass es letztlich nichts helfen würde. Also gewiss, diese sehr langen Zeiträume sind etwas völlig anderes. Und wie wir heute Morgen gesehen haben, sind die Eiszeiten gekommen und wieder verschwunden. Und es ist der zeitliche Rahmen, in den wir wirklich keinerlei Einsicht haben. Dennoch würde ich sagen, dass uns dies nicht davon abhalten sollte.... Ich meine, wir sollten hier und jetzt Probleme lösen, das ist unsere Aufgabe. Und vielleicht für unsere Enkel. Aber wir wissen nicht ... Gesprächsleiter: Es ist also eine große Chance für die Wissenschaft und die Menschheit im Allgemeinen, Lösungen für diese Probleme zu finden. Ich meine: die fossilen Brennstoffe, die über Millionen von Jahren durch Photosynthese entstanden sind, aufzubrauchen. Wir haben sie innerhalb von 100 oder 200 Jahren verbraucht, und vielleicht hätten wir das nicht tun sollen, aber es war eine tolle Zeit. Richard Schrock: Wenn diese Eiszeit wirklich kommt, und es einige Menschen gibt, die sie überleben, kann man sich fragen, was für Menschen das sein werden, die da am anderen Ende herauskommen. Ich weiß nicht: Man sieht keine Dinosaurier herumlaufen. Es gibt Vögel, also... Robert Grubbs: Doch in der Zwischenzeit müssen viele Probleme gelöst werden. Und die gute Eigenschaft dieser Probleme ist, dass viele von ihnen chemische Probleme sind, jedoch viele von ihnen erfordern eine Menge guter, neuer Grundlagenforschung, die noch zu entwickeln ist. Und im Prozess der Durchführung, werden wir sehr viel Spaß haben. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Frage: Hi, mein Name ist Nil von der Chualongkom Universität in Thailand. Es ist mir eine große Freude, hier zu sein und Sie alle zu treffen. Haben Sie vielen Dank für Ihre Zeit. Also meine Frage bezieht sich auf elektrische Fahrzeuge. Um also einen Fortschritt auf diesem Gebiet zu machen: Glauben Sie, dass es möglich ist, dass dies ein anderes Problem der Produktion von Elektrizität verursacht. Ähnlich, wie wenn man Elektrizität produziert. Wäre es möglich, dass man – wenn man Elektrizität in großen Mengen produzieren muss – sich auf Kohle stützen muss? Oder man würde andere Zerstörungen, man könnte andere Probleme für die Umwelt verursachen. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist schwer zu verstehen. Ich habe es nicht verstanden. Könnten Sie den Hauptpunkt wiederholen? Frage: Sicher. Also die Frage, die ich habe, lautet: Wenn man Elektrofahrzeuge produzieren wollte, könnte man dabei sehr viel Elektrizität verwenden wollen. Und um das tun zu können: Wäre es möglich, dass man dadurch ein weiteres Problem erzeugt? Es könnte zum Beispiel sein, dass man mehr Kohlekraftwerke braucht, und das könnte ein anderes Umweltproblem verursachen. Gesprächsleiter: Ich denke, wir versuchen das zu vermeiden. Wir versuchen die Verwendung von Kohle zu vermeiden. Ich denke das ist sicher ein Problem. Um auf Elektrizität umsteigen zu können, werden wir mit Sicherheit zunächst mehr Elektrizität verwenden müssen. Und wir sollten beispielsweise dazu keine Kohle verbrennen oder Kraftwerke einsetzen und kein CO2 einfangen, wenn wir das tun wollten. Sie sollte aus nachhaltigen Ressourcen stammen. Das wäre meines Erachtens die richtige Vorgehensweise. Hartmut Michel: Ich bin ziemlich davon überzeugt, dass Kohle die Hauptquelle für die Produktion von Kerosin für die Flugzeuge in der Zukunft sein wird, bedauerlicherweise. Robert Grubbs: In der Washington Post stand ein interessanter Artikel von Zachariah, der den Vorschlag machte, dass das Beste, was man zur Kontrolle der CO2-Emissionen tun könne, dieses wäre: dass die USA den Chinesen erklärt, wie man Fracking korrekt durchführt, damit sie ihre Kohlekraftwerke gegen Naturgas eintauschen. Und dadurch würde die CO2-Emissionen um mehrere 10 % sinken, um bis zu 30 bis 40 %. Das ist eine interessant extreme Ansicht, jedoch eine interessante, wie ich finde. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt mit Sicherheit einige, es wird Fragen bezüglich des Fracking geben, glaube ich. Wir hatten das in der Vergangenheit, und wir hatten am Samstag eine interessante Diskussion darüber. Ich weiß nicht, ob jemand das hier wiederholen möchte, und mit Ihnen diskutieren möchte, welche Art der Gefahr besteht. Astrid Gräslund: Erklären Sie doch, was es ist, denke ich. Gesprächsleiter: Ok, also es gibt eine Methode mithilfe von Chemikalien oder Wasser die Löcher, die Bohrlöcher, unter Druck zu setzen und dann auf effizientere Weise mehr Naturgas oder Öl aus dem Bohrloch zu bekommen. Dies wird als Fracking bezeichnet, als „Zerbrechen“. Und dies hat man getan.... Richard Schrock: Ist es nicht verboten? Ich dachte, dass sei in einigen Ländern verboten, selbst heute, in Frankreich. Wie es sich in Deutschland verhält, weiß ich nicht. Gesprächsleiter: Es wird in vielen Ländern durchgeführt. Richard Schrock: Den Leuten gefällt es nicht, wenn unterirdisch Dinge getan werden, die sie nicht verstehen. Und in der Nähe ihrer eigenen Häuser. Gerhard Ertl: Wir sollten nicht vergessen, dass dies tiefgreifende Auswirkungen auf die Umwelt hat, allein schon der Wasserverbrauch. In Deutschland gab es einen Witz: „Lasst uns Fracking einführen, dann werden wir von den Ölimporten aus Russland unabhängig.“ Und die Antwort war: „Aber dann haben wir kein Wasser. Lasst uns dann das Wasser aus Russland importieren.“ Gesprächsleiter: Gut, ich habe hier eine weitere Frage gesehen, war das richtig? Können Sie nach vorne kommen? Ansonsten können Sie das Mikrofon nicht bekommen. Frage: Ich wollte auf den Beginn der Podiumsdiskussion zurückkommen und auf Herrn Ertl. Er erwähnte, dass es nicht nur um die Umwandlung, sondern auch um das Einsparen von Energie geht. Vielleicht könnten die anderen Teilnehmer der Diskussion das kommentieren, denn dies ist etwas, was wir sofort tun können und nicht erst in der Zukunft. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist ein weites Feld. Professor Ertl. Gerhard Ertl: Ich denke, jeder wird zustimmen, dass Energie in Zukunft nicht so billig sein wird wie im Moment. Die Energie wird also teurer werden. Und das zwingt uns automatisch, Energie zu sparen. Dies nicht zu tun, wäre gegen die Wirtschaftlichkeit, die eine regulierende Kraft auf uns ausgeübt. Natürlich gibt es viele verschiedene Methoden, Energie zu sparen: die Beheizung unserer Gebäude zu verringern, weniger Klimaanlagen zu verwenden, kleinerer Autos zu bauen – es gibt viele, viele Möglichkeiten. Solange die Energie so billig ist, besteht kein Druck, dies zu tun. Machen wir sie also teuer. Auf solch einem Treffen machte ich vor ein paar Jahren den Vorschlag, den Benzinpreis auf drei Euro zu erhöhen, und es gab einen großen Aufschrei. Wir sind nun fast soweit, ja ja. Gesprächsleiter: Möchten Sie das kommentieren? Robert Grubbs: Es ist einfach so, dass ein großer Teil der Energie in Häuser und Gebäude und dergleichen investiert wird. Es ist sehr leicht, dort Einsparungen zu machen. Ich denke, dies ist ein Bereich, der ignoriert worden ist. Denn ein Teil des Problems besteht in dem einzelnen Haus, aufgrund des sehr hohen Kapitalaufwands, der dadurch sofort entsteht. Und daher wägt man das gegen leicht erhöhte monatliche Kosten über einen längeren Zeitraum ab. Es wird also wahrscheinlich einige gesetzliche Regelungen geben müssen, die diese Dinge erzwingen. Richard Schrock: Ich denke sehr häufig an.... Am MIT haben wir... Jeder Campus hat Gebäude, die vor langer Zeit gebaut wurden. Und sie sind alle einfach verglast, und es gibt sehr viele davon. Und es kostet eine ungeheure Menge Geld, eine Universität zu unterhalten, allein schon, was die Heizkosten betrifft. Es kostet jedoch ebenfalls eine große Menge Geld, alle Fenster durch energiesparende Fenster zu ersetzen – und das alles kostet auch Energie. Ich weiß also nicht, was die Ökonomen entschieden haben, ob sich dies lohnt, und wie das alles am Ende zusammenhängt. Doch der nachträgliche Einbau von energiesparenden Fenstern in Gebäude und Häuser usw., um wirklich Energie effizient zu werden, ist selbst sehr kostspielig, verschwendet viel Energie und benötigt Energie auf vielfältige Weise. Doch wenn das der richtige Weg ist, dann müssen wir ihn gehen. Gesprächsleiter: Andererseits gibt es besonders in Deutschland in den letzten 20 oder 30 Jahren enorme Anstrengungen, den Benzinverbrauch in PKWs zu verringern bzw. die Entfernung pro Liter zu erhöhen. Ich erinnere mich, als ich mein erstes Auto kaufte, ein VW oder so etwas, waren es 10-12 Liter, es war ein kleiner Motor, 10-12 Liter pro 100 km. Dasselbe Auto würde heute wahrscheinlich nur 3 oder 4 Liter benötigen, mit Diesel und all dieser Technologie. Die kostet auch Geld, aber es gibt Systeme, die funktionieren. Und es ist in diesem Punkt viel geschehen. Auch bei der Isolierung von Häusern, Fenstern, und all dem, überall. Robert Grubbs: Ich erwähnte, dass ich in einer Reihe von Ausschüssen gesessen habe, in denen die Leute über das Sparen von Energie diskutiert haben. Und ich schaute mich um und ich sah, dass alle in Kleidungsstücken aus Wolle umhersaßen. Wissen Sie, es ist wirklich schlecht, dass wir die nordeuropäische Bekleidung als eine Art Standard auf der ganzen Welt verwenden. Wir sollten uns so anziehen, dass wir das nicht müssen. Man schaltet die Klimaanlage hoch, damit man ein Anzug anziehen kann. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist richtig. Ok, gut. Bitte das Mikrofon. Sie. Wir haben noch ein paar Minuten. Frage: Hi. Ich habe eine Frage zum früheren Teil der Diskussion. Es wurde erwähnt, dass die Kernenergie in der Öffentlichkeit zunehmend unbeliebter wird. Und gewiss hat es in den letzten paar Jahren viele Beispiele für die negativen Konsequenzen gegeben, die sich ergeben, wenn Kernkraftwerke versagen. Denken Sie, dass dieser negative Ruf verdient ist, oder sind die potenziellen Vorteile das Risiko wert? Oder überwiegend in Fragen der Kernenergie die negativen die positiven Aspekte? Gesprächsleiter: Eine gute Frage, nicht leicht zu beantworten. Richard Schrock: Schneidet man mit, was wir hier sagen, oder .... Richard Schrock: Vielleicht lesen wir darüber morgen in der Zeitung. Möchte jemand dazu etwas sagen? Robert Grubbs: Die Wahrnehmung hat sich geändert. Ich war in einigen Komitees, in denen sehr viel diskutiert wurde über Kernenergie, und alles ging seinen Weg. Und es gab Länder, die darüber sprachen sie einzuführen, von denen man dies nicht erwartet hätte. Und dann kam es zu dem Unfall in Japan, und alle diese Diskussionen endeten. Astrid Gräslund: Ich könnte etwas über die Situation in Schweden sagen, da wir die Diskussion über eine lange Zeit geführt haben. der nicht aus diesen mehr oder weniger erneuerbaren oder nicht-fossilen Quellen stammt. Und in der Zwischenzeit ist die öffentliche Meinung hin und her gependelt, und hauptsächlich in eine Richtung. Aber wir hatten zum Beispiel für eine bestimmte Anzahl von Jahren ein Gesetz, dass die weitere Entwicklung oder auch nur Planung neuer Nuklearkraftwerke verboten hat. Das Gesetz wurde aufgeschoben. Jetzt kann man also tatsächlich Kernkraftwerke planen und, wenn man will, bauen. Doch natürlich kauft sie noch niemand. Doch ich kann zumindest sehen, dass dies in dem kleinen, eher – sagen wir pragmatischen – Land Schweden in Zukunft kein großes Problem sein wird. Das ist meine Vermutung. Ich denke, wir werden unsere Kernkraft behalten. Wie werden sie wahrscheinlich renovieren, wenn die Zeit dazu gekommen ist. Wie werden sie vielleicht nicht sonderlich erhöhen, aber wer weiß. Es hängt vom Bedarf ab. Und mit Sicherheit gibt es keine Bewegung, dass wir die Dinge jetzt irgendwie verfrüht abdrehen sollten. Das ist kein wirkliches Problem. Andere Schweden hier könnten mich korrigieren, falls ich mich da irre. Vielleicht höre ich nicht, worüber die jungen Leute reden. Doch zumindest ist dies der Gesamteindruck, den ich bekomme. Gesprächsleiter: Was ist Ihre Meinung? Frage: Ich bin mit Sicherheit nicht qualifiziert, meine Meinung hier auszudrücken. Gesprächsleiter: Aber das ist eine Meinung. Applaus.) Da war noch eine weitere, letzte Frage, glaube ich. Sie, bitte. Frage: Professor Grubbs erwähnte vorhin, dass er mit einem Unternehmen assoziiert ist, das, glaube ich, Batterien herstellt. Und ich frage mich, in welchem Stadium der Entwicklung einer neuen Technologie es sinnvoll ist, staatliche Subventionen zu verwenden, um die Technologie einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit verfügbar zu machen oder um sie in ökonomischer Hinsicht tragbar zu machen. Oder ob wir zunächst warten sollten, bis die Technologie ausgereift ist, und sie dann erst auf den Markt bringen? Gesprächsleiter: Deutschland ist ein sehr gutes Beispiel dafür. Frage: Ich glaube, dass Deutschland ein gutes Beispiel für starke Förderung ist. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt in Deutschland dieses Gesetz über erneuerbare Energie, und es bewirkte den massiven Umschwung in Richtung auf erneuerbare Energie, insbesondere auf photovoltaische und Windenergie. Sie wurde stark subventioniert und hatte einige sprunghafte Anstiege, wie Professor Michel bereits erklärte. Letztlich zahlt der Steuerzahler dafür. Wenn Sie dazu bereit sind, ist das ok, denn ich glaube, dass es neue Ideen, neue Entwicklungen gibt – hoffentlich in die richtige Richtung – und Arbeitsplätze in diesem Bereich. Ich denke, also es ist eine gute Idee, das auf die richtige Weise zu tun. Doch die Regierung muss die Entscheidung treffen, und die Entscheidung muss auf intelligente Weise getroffen werden. Batterien – ich weiß nicht, ich kenne die Situation nicht, wie es sich damit verhält. Sie verlangen, dass die Entwicklung von Batterien finanziell unterstützt wird. Frage: Nicht exakt nur Batterien. Das war nur eine allgemeine Frage. Gesprächsleiter: Allgemein. Frage: Aber wir könnten genauso gut dasselbe Geld nehmen, das wir für Subventionen verwenden, und es direkt in die Forschung oder für eine stärker zielgerichtete Entwicklung ausgeben. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Das ist eine andere Möglichkeit. Richard Schrock: Es wäre sehr gut, Politiker zu haben, die etwas von Wissenschaft verstehen. Ich weiß nicht… Gesprächsleiter: Es ist nicht so schlecht in Deutschland. Richard Schrock: Zumindest in den USA gibt es keinen großen Prozentsatz, der etwas von Wissenschaft versteht, und davon, was subventioniert werden sollte oder nicht, usw. Ich weiß nicht, wem die zuhören, aber sie scheinen selbst nicht viel Kenntnisse über Wissenschaften zu haben. Vielleicht wird auch das in der Zeitung stehen, ich weiß nicht. Gesprächsleiter: Unsere Kanzlerin ist Physikerin, das hilft. Ok, gut. Vielen Dank. Ich glaube, wir sollten langsam ans Ende kommen. Ich danke allen Teilnehmern auf dem Podium. Ich werde vielleicht kurz zusammenfassen, was wir hier gehört haben. Und was wir getan haben. Ich denke, dass biologische Brennstoffe, darüber sind wir uns mehr oder weniger einig, problematisch sind, obwohl wir zum Beispiel in Deutschland 5 oder 10 % Methanol in unserem Benzin haben. Wir haben Bio-Diesel und dieser Trend geht weiter. Vielleicht wird er gestoppt, ich weiß es nicht. Es gibt auch ein Gesetz über erneuerbare Energie, und das ist dieselbe Quelle für diese Entwicklung. Es wird jedoch jetzt von Politikern, ich glaube weltweit, als eine problematische Sache wahrgenommen. Vielleicht mit Ausnahme von Brasilien und anderen Ländern, die nach wie vor diesen Wege beschreiten. Dass wir irgendwie uns mehr in Richtung Elektrizität bewegen müssen, ist sicherlich richtig. Besonders deshalb, weil wir keine Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe haben, die wir zum Fahren unserer Autos, Fliegen unserer Flugzeuge usw. verwenden. Es gibt keine gute Lösung dafür. Also ist die Bewegung in Richtung Elektrizität, die auf erneuerbare Weise produziert werden kann im Moment mit Sicherheit die richtige Entscheidung. Und ich hoffe, dass es auf dem Gebiet der Batterien Entwicklungen geben wird, auf dem Automobilsektor usw. Wir müssen Energie sparen, das ist sehr deutlich. Ich erwähnte, dass es in mehreren Ländern auch eine gute Entwicklung gibt. Einige Punkte werden diskutiert. Wir kauften gerade ein Haus und wir hörten, dass es besser wäre, es nicht zu isolieren, aus mehreren mit dem Klima zusammenhängenden Gründen, usw. Wir müssen also darüber nachdenken. Und der dritte Punkt, den wir recht ausführlich diskutiert haben, war die Kernenergie. Und wir hatten in gewisser Weise geteilte Meinungen. Ich glaube, einige Leute sagen, wir müssen verwenden, was wir haben, und wir müssen weitermachen. Und wir müssen auch in die Technologie investieren und Leute darin ausbilden, damit wird das Wissen auf diesem Gebiet nicht verlieren. Und die Leute, die diese Technologie kennen, können helfen, für den Fall, dass wir in Zukunft darauf zurückkommen müssen. Und klarerweise ist das Lagerungsproblem, die längerfristige Lagerung der Abfallmaterialien, ein noch ungelöstes Problem. Fukushima war ein gutes Beispiel. Diese Energieform ist nicht völlig sicher. Ok. Ein weiterer Punkt? Und der letzte und wichtigste Punkt für Sie alle: Wir haben, wie ich sagte, keine Lösung zur Produktion von Brennstoffen aus Sonnenenergie. Wir benötigen den Input der Chemie zur Entwicklung einer katalytischen, ... besserer Katalysatoren und Geräte. Zum Beispiel für die lichtinduzierte Wasseraufspaltung zur Produktion von Wasserstoff oder zur direkten Herstellung von kohlenstoffenthaltenden Komponenten wie in der Photosynthese, auf irgend eine Weise. Entweder, indem wir schauen, was die Photosynthese und was die Natur uns lehren, oder indem wir völlig neue Wege gehen, die clevere Chemiker wie Sie in naher Zukunft finden müssen, hoffe ich. Also, ich denke, dass dies das Podiumsgespräch jetzt beendet und danke allen auf dem Podium für sehr gute anderthalb Stunden. Vielen Dank für das Kommen und vielen Dank für das Zuhören. Applaus. Ende.

Panel Discussion
"Chemical Energy Conversion and Storage" (with Nobel Laureates Ertl, Grubbs, Kohn, Michel, Schrock)
(01:02:45 - 01:04:38)

 

Energy: Ways Out

Such extreme solutions taken aside, what are the future energy sources Nobel Laureates believe in most? One of the protagonists is solar energy. Clean, sustainable and available in incredible quantities it has many advocates amongst the Laureates. One of them is 1998 Chemistry Laureate Walter Kohn. At the 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting he showed parts of his movie “The Power of the Sun”. Therein, Monty Python star John Cleese explained how much energy the sun actually provides:


Walter Kohn (2009) - An Earth Powered Predominantly by Solar and Wind Energy

Good morning, happy to see many of you again and I look forward to seeing some of you even further this afternoon. You’ve had to restructure things, like these proteins restructure themselves according to needs and so we are going to speak about, and show you something about solar energy mostly. And I’ll make very few introductory remarks. Solar energy is of course an enormous boom to us, there’s a huge amount of energy coming down, many orders of magnitude more than we humans need or claim to need. And so the role of science is obvious, the role of science is to find ways in putting this super abundance of energy to good use in an energy hungry world. There are 2 broad forms of energy, both of which are derived from the sun. Namely solar and wind energy. And many of us believe that mankind’s dependence on fossils which is coming to an end, the so called peak oil moment in history when oil production reaches its peak and begins to decline, everybody is watching for that like for a comet in the sky, when will that come. And there of course is no clear prediction but some things can be said with, well as Professor Kroto said, with whatever near certainty, it’s going to happen before the middle of the century which is practically now. My own study of the data leads me to 2 different results, one of which is related to population that I’ve already mentioned and that is peak oil, the top of the production of oil followed by a very rapid decline in a few decades and the other one is peak oil per person and that’s a different time. Now my estimates based on other people’s work say that peak oil per person should come around in around 7 years. That’s a major and immediate problem. My government, I’m an American, for many years just denied the existence of this problem, I mean very dramatically President Bush a few weeks after coming into office, pulled out of the Kyoto agreement and that was a very dramatic and many of us felt very unfortunate step. We are now in a much better situation but at that time, it’s a long story and we can talk about that this afternoon, I began to become a film maker. And I felt the government is not going to take the initiative, or my government will not take the initiative, so let’s try and build a fire under them by popular pressure. And this film that I’m going to show you now and we can do some more, show you some more things this afternoon, came about this way. And I’m ready to go so can I. Until about 200 years ago we humans largely depended for our energy needs on our own muscles, on animals and on burning wood. When we ran short of wood we discovered a marvellous source of energy stored in fossil fuels. Coal, gas and oil. Fossil fuels are nothing more than the transformed remains of plants and animals that died millions of years ago. When we burn them we release the energy of the ancient sun light that helped create them in the first place. But we have come to be dangerously dependent on fossil fuels, even addicted to them. Not only does that accelerate global warming, we’re likely to run out of cheap oil and gas by mid century. Coal though much more abundant is highly toxic. So we must do something urgently. In the developed world we must learn to use less energy, a 50% reduction may be necessary. And we must turn increasingly to renewable energy sources. One of our most promising solutions may be to turn back to our old friend the sun. Do you know that the solar energy that strikes the earth surface for one hour is enough to feed the world’s current electricity needs for one year? So why haven’t we gone solar already, I mean it’s pollution free, there’s no global warming, there’s no dependence on foreign oil powers, it’s decentralised so it’s virtually terrorist proof and effectively there’s an infinite supply. I mean it sounds like the dream solution doesn’t it. But will it work? This film is all about sun light, what it is, how we are learning to use it and what the future may hold. Our story starts however long ago and far away. Many ancient peoples worshiped the sun, the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaton founded the first religion in history to have a single god and that god was the sun. The writers of the bible acknowledged its primacy by having god’s first instruction be ‘let there be light’. But what exactly was this stuff light? No one had any clear idea until the eminent English scientist Isaac Newton took an educated guess about 300 years ago and wrote 'are not the rays of light very small bodies emitted from shining substances’. that as he knew travelled in straight lines. Newton’s guess was a good one as Einstein would later show. But a very different guess was made by a Dutch man Christiaan Huygens, Huygens observed the waves made by a stone dropped in water, he had a brilliant insight, suggesting that light as he said spreads by spherical surfaces and waves. Here’s a drawing that Huygens made to illustrate waves of light flowing from a candle. Huygens had created the wave theory of light but like Newton he couldn’t back up his theory with experimental results. And so things stood until 1803 when a Londoner called Thomas Young was invited to make a presentation on light in the famous lecture theatre at the Royal Institution. people came to be educated, to see, to learn about science, it was almost evidently like a magic show. These physics students at Stanford University are replicating one of Thomas Young’s experiments. Light from a single source must enter 2 narrow slits and eventually hit a screen some distance away. The reason that Young did this experiment was to try to see if light was a wave or a particle. Was Newton right or Huygens? The light from each slit spreads out like waves of water, each wave interferes with the others creating a pattern of light and dark patches. And that could be perfectly naturally explained by the wave theory and couldn’t be explained at all by Newton’s theory. So Christiaan Huygens theory was right, light is a wave. But that’s not the end of the story. In the early 19th century no one thought there was much connection between light, electricity and magnetism, they seemed like 3 very different phenomena. Then here at the Royal Institution a young scientist called Michael Faraday started doing experiments with an electro magnet and he discovered that electricity and magnetism were 2 sides of the same coin. Another British scientist, James Clark Maxwell then set out to formulate Faraday’s findings mathematically. And his equations predicted the existence of electro magnetic waves. He calculated the speed of these waves and he noticed that it was exactly the same as the speed of light that had previously been measured. So suddenly he finds himself confronted with the fact that light is a wave phenomenon and it is an electro magnetic wave phenomena. One of the great insights of natural science. German scientist Heinrich Hertz experimented by shining lights on electrical circuits and results seem to confirm Maxwell’s theory. Our knowledge is complete said Hertz, a refutation of these views is unthinkable, the wave theory of light is a certainty. However Hertz assistant, Philip Lenard decided to look more closely at one of the experiments where there was a gap in the electrical circuit. let’s go ahead and fire up the high voltage. Lenard found that if you shown light at low frequencies, red, green or blue, on these 2 metal balls, nothing happened but if the light was above a certain frequency, into the ultra violet, electrons escaped from the metal and jumped across the gap, completing the circuit and creating a spark. Now that didn’t sound like the action of a wave. a threshold, a sudden change going from violet to ultra violet if light is a wave, smooth and continuous in how it delivers its energy. But if light is a particle, a threshold makes a lot more sense. but here there was this new class of experiment that could very easily be explained by a particle theory but not by the wave theory, what to do with this. No one could have predicted the problem would be solved by a patent office clerk in Switzerland but that’s what Albert Einstein was when he came up with the answer. In 1905 Einstein had the revolutionary insight that light had a dual nature. In some context as Maxwell and Hertz had shown it was a wave, but in others as in Lenard’s measurements it consisted of discrete quanta of energy or photons. The higher the frequency the greater their energy. Amazingly Newton and Huygens had both been correct. An experiment using modern equipment at Stanford shows very clearly that Einstein was right. so what we have here is we have a very sensitive photo detector and its connected to these optics through this fibre optic cable which basically just funnels light into the detector. So we actually need to cover up these optics and we need to actually shut the room lights off and I’ll use this flash light as a light source to get photons into the detector. In darkness you hear no evidence of photons striking the detector, as the light becomes stronger you hear a growing rush of photons, when the light is dimmed there are fewer and fewer photons reaching the detector until you begin to hear the photons one by one. But nobody else could understand how light could be both a wave and a particle, not even the famous physicist Max Planck. and in this letter he says many complementary things about Einstein and then he comes to Einstein’s theory of a photon and he says you should forgive Einstein, even a very great man can make a big mistake occasionally. And of course eventually Einstein got his Nobel Prize for that work. It wasn’t relatively that won him his Nobel Prize, it was what he called the photo electric effect. and this genius touch, as I emphasise again, that transcends the simple analysis and the major logic and that is what is truly great about this great mind. The entire history and development of modern work on solar electricity depends on Einstein’s understanding of this photo electric effect. In this context light consists of lots of individual packets of energy, ready to react with what ever they strike. Einstein’s insight had set the stage for the future advent of solar power. In the mid 20th century some of the greatest developments in applied technology were made at Bell Labs, the Bell telephone laboratories in New Jersey. Here in 1947 William Shockley, John Bardeen and others developed the transistor, the most important electronic discovery of the century. It was both a switch and an amplifier and it transformed everything from telephones to computing. You can really speak of the world before the transistor and the world after the transistor. Doctor Walter Kohn worked here as a young man in the 1950’s. it was known to everybody in physics as the number one laboratory in the world. My recollection is that there were approximately 3,000 people working there, you know everybody was doing his thing but everybody was connected to other people who were doing their things. It was this connection that brought together the work of 3 scientists to create the world’s first practical solar cell. Daryl Chapin was an electrical engineer, he’d been experimenting with early selenium cells for powering telephone lines in remote areas. A physicist Gerald Pearson was trying to develop a rectifier to replace mechanical telephone switching devices and a chemist, Calvin Fuller was working with the semi conductor silicon as part of the transistor project. Bell scientists liked silicon because of its electronic characteristics and because it was abundant, it’s basically sand and makes up more than ¼ of the earths surface. A single atom of silicone has 4 active electrons which are called valence electrons. In a crystallise silicon each of these valence electrons, together with a valence electron of a neighbouring silicon atom forms a bond adjoining those 2 atoms. However perfect it looks solid silicon like all semi conductors doesn’t work electronically unless a small fraction of the silicon atoms are replaced by foreign atoms called impurities. you introduce these miniscule fractions of impurities, I say miniscule part in a million, part in a billion atoms, suddenly all kinds of exciting things can be made to happen. The chemist Kelvin Fuller developed a highly controlled process for diffusing impurities into silicon, I’m interrupting here quickly, we are short of time, partly because we’ve run late, there have been problems here and partly because the film runs a little longer than the time that was assigned to me. So what we have decided to do in discussion is we will show you a few more sections of this film, so please excuse the abruptness of the transition and we will show some more depending on interest this afternoon when the students will meet with me as has been the case the last few days. Ok so can I see the list of chapters. But will it become a major part of the world’s energy mix. That depends on people like Terry Jester, she’s worked in photovoltaic’s since the 1970’s feeling so committed and feeling like what we were doing and what we could do would change the world and change the future. Terry Jester is director of operations at this factory which is now owned by Shell. It has been making solar panels for more than 25 years. The whole time the primary target has been to cut costs, to increase the efficiency of the solar panels or to make them in a cheaper way. Shell is one of the oil companies that appear to take solar power seriously. They recently unveiled a large installation to power water pumps near Bakersfield California. The reliability of this product is one major technical reason to do something like this. As you can hear you don’t hear anything, there’s no moving parts. In terms of environment, apart from no noise, it is also not polluting, it doesn’t need any fuel and the fuel is currently coming from above. California and some other states have offered subsidies to business and home owners to encourage the development of the industry. But it was in Japan that this idea really took off. In some ways Japan is an extremely traditional society, it treasures beauty in everything it creates. This has been home to the same family for over 200 years, they still serve tea in the time honoured way but Japan has other tastes too. Spend a few minutes in down town Tokyo or Osaka and you’ll realise how deep is the Japanese love affair with technology and how much energy is required by this industrial super power. It is very important, we don’t have so many coals, petroleum, natural gasses and other, uranium etc, therefore we should create the energy by ourselves. they had a large will to invest in solar power. Sharp started researching in solar cell technology in 1959, and were the first to produce a solar cell in Japan. In 1961, Sharp became the first to apply solar technology to a consumer product by producing the solar powered radio. As with cars, Japanese companies came from nowhere and soon became world class in electronics. Subsidies drove the market. This traditional Japanese house is now powered by solar panels. For our children’s generation to keep a clean environment is very important. This year Kyoto protocol will become effective, so from now on this becomes a more important issue. Our dream is to install solar systems for all Japanese houses. All across Japan modern apartment blocks and factories are sprouting solar panels. The secret of success in Japan was wholehearted government encouragement and subsidy. that they wanted to stimulate the growth of solar power in Japan to actually be an important part of the electrical distribution in the country. But because the price of all electricity in Japan is so high, solar power is now almost competitive on price alone. as opposed to the 75% originally but the number of people wanting to buy the systems continues to increase. So the systems are very close to being economic now. and they’ve both taken a truly leading visionary role in driving the technology, in supporting the technology. Both countries have tremendous political support for clean energy. And to me it’s a little bit ironic in that we could be looking in the future at importing solar panels, just as we import oil today because as a result of the markets being both in Germany and Japan, the industry, the centres of excellence have generally gravitated towards those 2 countries. The Germans have embraced solar power as enthusiastically as the Japanese. What's called the world’s largest solar installation was dedicated in June 2005 at Mühlhausen in Bavaria. It spreads over several acres and provides up to 10 megawatts of power for the electricity grid... So you notice there was a little pow wow here and my time is up but I wanted to tell you a very important section is coming right after this, it’s about solar energy in the developing world and we’ll start at that point this afternoon, for those who would like to come over and see it there. And we’ll hopefully make arrangements for people to be comfortable and maybe even sit on chairs. In any case to close for the moment I’ve been very optimistic, become very optimistic about the real possibility of a kind of, after a certainly somewhat turbulent transition from fossil fuels to renewable fuels, that the world can manage on solar and wind energy alone. I’m not saying it should do that but I would not be at all surprised if those would be the 2 principle sources of energy after the transition away from fossil fuels. This is not totally a fantasy, if you look at the fraction of total energy now produced by sun and wind you would say this is an absolute madness of Walter Kohn. But if you look a little more closely you’ll see that over the last 5 years, every year solar energy and wind energy similarly has grown by about 30%. Now everybody here has had experience with exponential functions and 30%, even if you start with a tiny amount, now if you take solar and wind together, it’s something like a few percent of the world’s energy. But already in 10 years it will have grown by a factor of perhaps 5 or 6. In 20 years by a factor of 25 and in 30 years, this is exponential growth, by a factor of over 100. There are no physical limitations to this growth, I mean there’s enough, plenty of area, I mentioned to you, I think somebody else mentioned that earlier, perhaps Professor Kroto, the amount of sunlight falling on the earth is thousands of times more than we need for electricity production. Even wind which has more limitations because of the structural demands on large turbines, even wind in principle can produce more than the entire energy needed by the world. Together in practice and if you look at the record, recent record, I believe that this is a possibility. Do not misunderstand me, I’m not here contradicting Professor Molina’s thesis which he accredited to a couple of people in Princeton, the so-called wedge picture, it’s not really a theory, it’s just if you have several sources of energy you add the energies. But we wanted to be very concrete and just look at what seems to us the most probable main sources of energy in the future and we were surprised and pleased by these results. So now it’s up to us and especially up to you to really do it. Thank you very much.

Guten Morgen, ich freue mich, dass ich viele von Ihnen wiedersehe und den einen oder anderen vielleicht heute Nachmittag nochmal treffe. Sie mussten ein bisschen umorganisieren, genau wie sich diese Proteine entsprechend den Anforderungen neu strukturieren. Ich werde heute hauptsächlich über Sonnenenergie sprechen und Ihnen dazu Einiges zeigen. Zunächst aber ein paar einführende Anmerkungen. Sonnenenergie bedeutet für uns natürlich einen enormen Vorteil, denn diese auf die Erde treffende Energiemenge ist um viele Größenordnungen größer als das, was wir Menschen benötigen oder beanspruchen. Die Rolle der Wissenschaft ist daher offensichtlich: Wir müssen Wege finden, diese unglaubliche Energiefülle in unserer energiehungrigen Welt sinnvoll zu nutzen. Von der Sonne stammen zwei Hauptenergieformen, die Sonnenenergie und die Windenergie. Viele von uns sind der Ansicht, dass die Abhängigkeit des Menschen von den zur Neige gehenden fossilen Brennstoffen... Der Zeitpunkt des sogenannten Ölfördermaximums, wenn die Ölproduktion ihren Höhepunkt erreicht und zu sinken beginnt - jeder hält danach Ausschau wie nach einem Kometen am Himmel, doch wann wird dieser Zeitpunkt kommen? Natürlich gibt es noch keine klare Vorhersage, doch eines lässt sich, wie Sie von Professor Kroto gehört haben, mit fast hundertprozentiger Sicherheit sagen, dass nämlich dieser Zeitpunkt noch vor der Mitte dieses Jahrhunderts eintreten wird, also im Prinzip jetzt. Mein eigenes Studium der Daten führt mich zu zwei unterschiedlichen Ergebnissen. Das eine, das ich bereits erwähnt habe, bezieht sich auf die Gesamtbevölkerung, nämlich das Ölfördermaximum, das von einem sehr raschen Rückgang innerhalb einiger Jahrzehnte gefolgt wird, das andere auf das Ölfördermaximum pro Person - hier gilt eine andere Zeitrechnung. Meine auf den Arbeiten anderer Leute beruhenden Schätzungen besagen, dass das Ölfördermaximum pro Person in etwa 7 Jahren erreicht sein wird. Das stellt ein ernstes und unmittelbares Problem dar. Meine Regierung - ich bin Amerikaner - leugnet seit vielen Jahren einfach die Existenz dieses Problems. Kaum einige Wochen im Amt, stieg Präsident Bush aus dem Kyoto-Abkommen aus, ein äußerst dramatischer und nach Ansicht vieler von uns sehr bedauernswerter Schritt. Wir sind jetzt in einer sehr viel besseren Situation, doch damals... Das ist eine lange Geschichte und wir können heute Nachmittag darüber reden. Ich wurde also Filmemacher. Da ich den Eindruck hatte, dass die Regierung - also meine Regierung - die Initiative nicht übernehmen wird, wollte ich versuchen ihnen durch öffentlichen Druck ein wenig Feuer unter dem Hintern zu machen. Auf diese Weise kam dieser Film zustande, den ich Ihnen jetzt präsentieren werde. Ich zeige Ihnen heute Nachmittag auch gerne noch mehr davon. Ich bin jetzt soweit, kann ich bitte anfangen? Bis vor etwa 200 Jahren waren wir Menschen hauptsächlich von unserer eigenen Muskelkraft, Tieren und dem Verbrennen von Holz abhängig, um unseren Energiebedarf zu decken. Als das Holz knapp wurde, entdeckten wir eine wunderbare Energiequelle, die in fossilen Brennstoffen gespeichert war: Kohle, Gas und Öl. Fossile Brennstoffe sind nichts weiter als umgewandelte Reste von Pflanzen und Tieren, die vor Millionen von Jahren starben. Bei ihrer Verbrennung wird die Energie des urzeitlichen Sonnenlichts freigesetzt, das überhaupt erst zu ihrem Entstehen geführt hat. Doch unsere Abhängigkeit von fossilen Brennstoffen hat ein gefährliches Ausmaß erreicht, wir sind regelrecht süchtig. Nicht nur beschleunigt sie die globale Erwärmung, billiges Öl und Gas werden wahrscheinlich bis zur Jahrhundertmitte zur Neige gehen. Kohle liegt zwar in weitaus größerer Menge vor, ist aber hochtoxisch. Wir müssen also dringend etwas tun. In den Industrieländern müssen wir lernen weniger Energie zu verbrauchen; möglicherweise ist eine Reduktion um 50% notwendig. Zudem müssen wir uns verstärkt erneuerbaren Energiequellen zuwenden. Eine der vielversprechendsten Lösungen könnte die Rückkehr zu unserer alten Freundin, der Sonne sein. Wussten Sie, dass die Sonnenenergie, die in einer Stunde auf die Erdoberfläche trifft, ausreicht, den aktuellen Stromverbrauch der ganzen Welt für ein Jahr zu decken? Warum haben wir nicht längst auf Solarenergie umgestellt? Diese Energie ist schadstofffrei, führt nicht zur globalen Erwärmung oder Abhängigkeit von fremden Ölmächten, ist dezentralisiert und damit praktisch terroristensicher und zudem eine niemals versiegende Quelle. Ich finde, das klingt nach einer Traumlösung, oder? Aber wird es funktionieren? Dieser Film handelt vom Sonnenlicht, was es ist, wie wir lernen es zu nutzen und was die Zukunft bereithält. Unsere Geschichte beginnt jedoch vor langer Zeit an einem fernen Ort. Viele Urvölker verehrten die Sonne. Der ägyptische Pharao Echnaton gründete die erste Religion in der Geschichte, in der es nur einen Gott gab, die Sonne. Die Verfasser der Bibel würdigten ihre vorrangige Stellung, indem sie Gottes erste Anweisung 'Es werde Licht' sein ließen. Aber was genau ist Licht eigentlich? Niemand hatte eine klare Vorstellung davon, bis der berühmte englische Wissenschaftler Isaac Newton vor etwa 300 Jahren eine wohlbegründete Vermutung niederschrieb: Nun, Newtons Vorstellung von Licht war wirklich recht simpel; er fand heraus, dass Licht aus einem Strom von Teilchen bestand, die sich seines Wissens nach auf geraden Linien bewegten. Wie Einstein später beweisen würde, war Newtons Annahme nicht so falsch. Der Niederländer Christiaan Huygens ging jedoch von einer ganz anderen Vermutung aus; er beobachtete die Wellen, die ein ins Wasser geworfener Stein erzeugte, und hatte eine brillante Idee, nämlich dass sich Licht in Form von Kugelflächen und -wellen ausbreitet. Hier sehen Sie eine von Huygens angefertigte Skizze, die von einer Kerze ausgehende Lichtwellen darstellt. Huygens hatte die Wellentheorie des Lichts aufgestellt, doch wie Newton konnte er seine Theorie nicht mit experimentellen Ergebnissen untermauern. So lagen die Dinge, bis 1803 ein Londoner namens Thomas Young gebeten wurde, im berühmten Vorlesungssaal an der Royal Institution einen Vortrag über Licht zu halten. Die 1799 gegründete Royal Institution wurde sofort ein großer Erfolg. Die Leute kamen, um etwas zu lernen, zu schauen, etwas über die Wissenschaft zu erfahren; es war offensichtlich beinahe wie eine Zaubervorstellung. Diese Physikstudenten an der Stanford University wiederholten eines von Thomas Youngs Experimenten. Licht aus einer einzelnen Quelle muss durch zwei schmale Schlitze hindurchtreten und schließlich in einem gewissen Abstand auf einen Schirm treffen. Der Grund warum Young dieses Experiment durchführte, war, dass er sehen wollte, ob es sich bei Licht um eine Welle oder ein Teilchen handelt. Hatte Newton Recht oder Huygens? Das Licht aus den beiden Schlitzen breitete sich wie Wasserwellen aus, wobei jede Welle mit den anderen interferierte, so dass ein Muster aus hellen und dunklen Stellen entstand. Auf dem zweiten Schirm schwankte die Lichtintensität überall sehr regelmäßig. Das ließ sich durch die Wellentheorie auf perfekt natürliche Weise erklären, nicht aber durch Newtons Theorie. Christiaan Huygens Theorie war also richtig, Licht besitzt Wellenform. Doch das ist noch nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts hielt es niemand für möglich, dass es eine Verbindung zwischen Licht, Elektrizität und Magnetismus gibt; sie schienen drei ganz unterschiedliche Phänomene zu sein. Dann begann hier an der Royal Institution ein junger Wissenschaftler mit Namen Michael Faraday Experimente mit einem Elektromagneten durchzuführen und entdeckte, dass Elektrizität und Magnetismus zwei Seiten einer Medaille sind. Ein anderer britischer Wissenschaftler, James Clark Maxwell, machte sich an die mathematische Formulierung von Faradays Ergebnissen. Seine Gleichungen sagten die Existenz elektromagnetischer Wellen vorher. Maxwell entdeckte also auf mathematischem Wege die elektromagnetischen Wellen und berechnete ihre Geschwindigkeit. Er stellte fest, dass sie genau der Geschwindigkeit des Lichts entsprach, die zuvor gemessen worden war. Plötzlich sah er sich also mit der Tatsache konfrontiert, dass Licht ein Wellenphänomen ist, und zwar ein elektromagnetisches Wellenphänomen. Eine der großen Erkenntnisse der Naturwissenschaften. Der deutsche Wissenschaftler Heinrich Hertz bestrahlte in einem Experiment elektrische Stromkreise mit Licht; die Ergebnisse schienen Maxwells Theorie zu bestätigen. Für Hertz war der Erkenntnisprozess abgeschlossen, eine Anfechtung der Ergebnisse undenkbar und die Wellentheorie des Lichts eine Gewissheit. Doch Hertz' Assistent Philip Lenard beschloss, sich eines der Experimente, bei dem der Stromkreis eine Lücke aufwies, noch einmal etwas genauer anzuschauen. Momentan liegt keine hohe Spannung an, weswegen nichts passiert. Fahren wir also fort und erhöhen die Spannung. Lenard fand heraus, dass bei Bestrahlung dieser beiden Metallkugeln mit Licht einer niedrigen Frequenz, also rot, grün oder blau, nichts geschah; bei Bestrahlung mit Licht oberhalb einer bestimmten Frequenz, also im Ultraviolett-Bereich, entwichen jedoch Elektronen aus dem Metall und übersprangen die Lücke. Dadurch schloss sich der Stromkreis und ein Funke wurde erzeugt. Nun, das hörte sich nicht nach dem Verhalten einer Welle an. Wenn Licht Wellenform besitzt und seine Energie gleichmäßig und kontinuierlich abgibt, ergibt eine Schwelle, ein plötzlicher Wechsel von Violett zu Ultraviolett keinen Sinn. Wenn Licht aber ein Teilchen ist, ergibt eine Schwelle schon viel mehr Sinn. Hier lag ein unglaubliches Paradoxon vor. So viele Experimente konnten scheinbar nur durch die Wellentheorie erklärt werden, doch diese neue Klasse von Experimenten ließ sich ganz leicht durch eine Teilchentheorie, nicht aber durch die Wellentheorie erklären. Was also tun? Niemand hätte vorhersagen können, dass das Problem von einem Schweizer Patentprüfer gelöst werden würde, doch genau das war Albert Einstein, als er mit der Antwort aufwartete. In manchen Zusammenhängen handelt es sich bei Licht, wie Maxwell und Hertz gezeigt hatten, um eine Welle, in anderen Zusammenhängen - wie z.B. bei Lenards Messungen - besteht es aus einzelnen Energiequanten oder Photonen. Mit steigender Frequenz nimmt auch seine Energie zu. Erstaunlicherweise waren sowohl Newton als auch Huygens beide im Recht. Ein in Stanford durchgeführtes Experiment mit moderner Ausstattung zeigte ganz eindeutig, dass Einstein richtig lag. Wir möchten gerne einzelne Photonen beobachten. Das hier ist ein hochempfindlicher Photodetektor, der über dieses Glasfaserkabel, das im Grunde genommen das Licht nur in den Detektor weiterleitet, an dieses optische System angeschlossen ist. Wir müssen die Optik abdecken und die Zimmerbeleuchtung ausschalten. Ich werde diese Taschenlampe als Lichtquelle benutzen, um Photonen in den Detektor zu leiten. Im Dunkeln gibt es keinen akustischen Hinweis darauf, dass Photonen auf den Detektor treffen, doch wenn das Licht stärker wird, hört man die zunehmend herandrängenden Photonen. Dimmt man das Licht, erreichen immer weniger Photonen den Detektor, bis man allmählich die einzelnen Photonen hören kann. Das zeigt, dass Einstein Recht hatte und Licht in der Tat aus Teilchen besteht. Doch niemand sonst konnte verstehen, warum Licht gleichzeitig eine Welle und ein Teilchen sein konnte, nicht einmal der berühmte Physiker Max Planck. Wir kennen heute das Empfehlungsschreiben, das Max Planck für Einstein verfasste. Es enthält zahlreiche ergänzende Kommentare. Bezüglich Einsteins Photonentheorie merkte Planck an, man solle Einstein vergeben, auch dem größten Mann könnte gelegentlich ein großer Irrtum unterlaufen. Natürlich erhielt Einstein letztendlich für diese Arbeit den Nobelpreis. Er erhielt den Nobelpreis nicht für die Relativitätstheorie, sondern für den von ihm so bezeichneten photoelektrischen Effekt. Der photoelektrische Effekt ist wirklich ein Geniestreich. Es brauchte Mut und natürlich auch Wissen, aber vor allem, ich betone es nochmal, diesen genialen Ansatz, der die simple Analyse und grundlegende Logik transzendiert. Das ist das wahrlich Erhabene an diesem großen Geist. Die gesamte Geschichte und Entwicklung der modernen Errungenschaften im Solarstrombereich hängt von Einsteins Verständnis dieses photoelektrischen Effekts ab. In diesem Zusammenhang besteht Licht aus vielen einzelnen Energiepaketen, die mit allem reagieren, auf das sie treffen. Einsteins Erkenntnis hat die Voraussetzungen für das kommende Zeitalter der Solarenergie geschaffen. Mitte des 20. Jahrhunderts erfolgten einige der größten Entwicklungen im Bereich der angewandten Technik in den Bell Labs, den Laboratorien der Bell-Telefongesellschaft in New Jersey. Hier entwickelten 1947 William Shockley, John Bardeen und andere den Transistor, die bedeutendste elektronische Errungenschaft des Jahrhunderts. Der Transistor bestand aus einem Schalter und einem Verstärker und transformierte alles vom Telefon bis zum Computer. Er revolutionierte alles. Man kann von einer Welt vor und einer nach dem Transistor sprechen. Walter Kohn arbeitete hier als junger Mann in den 50er Jahren. Als ich die Bell Labs das erste Mal betrat, war ich von dem Ort sehr eingeschüchtert. Jeder in der Physik wusste, dass dieses Labor die Nummer Eins weltweit war. Meiner Erinnerung nach arbeiteten hier damals etwa 3000 Menschen. Jeder kümmerte sich um seine Arbeit, trotzdem waren alle irgendwie vernetzt. Es war diese Vernetzung, die die Arbeit von drei Wissenschaftlern zusammenbrachte, so dass die weltweit erste praxistaugliche Solarzelle entstand. Daryl Chapin war Elektroingenieur und hatte mit den ersten Selenzellen für die Stromversorgung von Telefonleitungen in abgelegenen Gegenden experimentiert. Der Physiker Gerald Pearson versuchte einen Gleichrichter als Ersatz für mechanische Telefonvermittlungsanlagen zu entwickeln und der Chemiker Calvin Fuller arbeitete im Rahmen des Transistorprojekts mit dem Halbleiter Silizium. Die Wissenschaftler bei Bell schätzten Silizium aufgrund seiner elektronischen Eigenschaften und der Tatsache, dass es reichlich vorhanden ist; es besteht im Wesentlichen aus Sand und macht mehr als 1/4 der Erdoberfläche aus. Ein einzelnes Siliziumatom besitzt vier aktive Elektronen, die als Valenzelektronen bezeichnet werden. In einem kristallisierten Silizium bilden diese Valenzelektronen jeweils zusammen mit einem Valenzelektron eines benachbarten Siliziumatoms eine Bindung und verknüpfen so diese beiden Atome. Doch wie perfekt es auch aussehen mag, Silizium in fester Form hat wie alle Halbleiter erst dann einen elektronischen Effekt, wenn ein kleiner Anteil der Siliziumatome durch Fremdatome, sogenannte Verunreinigungen ersetzt worden ist. Reines Silizium ist eine der langweiligsten Substanzen, die man sich vorstellen kann, und verhält sich meist sehr unspektakulär. Führt man aber diese winzigen Mengen an Verunreinigungen ein, 1 ppm oder 1 ppb, lassen sich auf einmal alle möglichen aufregenden Sachen damit anstellen. Der Chemiker Kelvin Fuller entwickelte einen hochgradig gesteuerten Prozess zur Diffusion von Verunreinigungen in Silizium. Nehmen Sie z.B. Phosphor... Ich unterbreche hier rasch, wir haben keine Zeit mehr, teilweise weil wir zu spät dran sind - es gab Probleme - und teilweise weil der Film etwas länger dauert, als die mir zugestandene Zeit. Wir haben deshalb gerade beschlossen, Ihnen noch einige Ausschnitte aus diesem Film zu zeigen - bitte entschuldigen Sie diesen abrupten Übergang - und Ihnen heute Nachmittag, wenn ich mich so wie in den letzten Tagen mit den Studenten treffe, je nach Interesse noch weitere zu präsentieren. Ok, kann ich bitte die Aufzählung der Kapitel haben? Sie wird jedoch einen großen Anteil am weltweiten Energiemix darstellen. Das hängt von Menschen wie Terry Jester ab; sie arbeitet seit den 70er Jahren in der Photovoltaikbranche. Es war einfach eine tolle Sache zu dieser Gruppe von Menschen zu gehören, 80/90 Stunden die Woche zu arbeiten, so ein Engagement zu verspüren und das Gefühl zu haben, dass das, was wir taten oder tun könnten, die Welt und die Zukunft vielleicht verändert. Terry Jester ist Technische Leiterin in diesem Werk, das heute Shell gehört. Dort werden seit mehr als 25 Jahren Sonnenkollektoren hergestellt. Hauptziel war stets die Senkung der Kosten und die Steigerung der Effizienz bzw. die günstigere Herstellung der Sonnenkollektoren. Shell ist eine der Ölfirmen, die Sonnenenergie anscheinend ernst nehmen. Vor kurzem nahmen sie in der Nähe von Bakersfield, Kalifornien eine riesige Anlage zur Stromversorgung von Wasserpumpen in Betrieb. Bei dieser Anlage des Semitropic Water Storage District handelt es sich um ein 1 Megawatt-System. Die Zuverlässigkeit dieses Produktes ist einer der wichtigsten technischen Gründe für die Installation einer solchen Anlage. Wie Sie hören, hören Sie nichts, keine sich bewegenden Teile. Was die Umwelt angeht, verursacht die Anlage nicht nur keinen Lärm, sondern emittiert auch keine Schadstoffe. Außerdem benötigt sie keinen Kraftstoff, da dieser ja derzeit von oben kommt. Kalifornien und einige andere Bundesstaaten haben der Solarindustrie und den Eigenheimbesitzern Zuschüsse angeboten, um die Entwicklung dieser Branche zu fördern. Der eigentliche Boom begann jedoch in Japan. In gewisser Weise ist Japan eine außerordentlich traditionelle Gesellschaft, die bei allem, was sie erzeugt, die Schönheit schätzt. Dieses Haus ist seit mehr als 200 Jahren im Besitz ein- und derselben Familie; hier wird der Tee immer noch in altehrwürdiger Weise serviert. Doch Japan mag es auch anders: Wenn Sie sich einige Minuten in der Innenstadt von Tokio oder Osaka aufhalten, wird Ihnen klar, wie tief die Liebe der Japaner zur Technologie ist und wie viel Energie diese industrielle Supermacht benötigt. In Japan gibt es nur sehr wenige natürliche Energieressourcen. Das ist sehr wichtig, wir haben nicht so viel Kohle, Erdöl, Erdgas oder z.B. Uran usw., deswegen müssen wir selbst Energie erzeugen. Da Japan bezüglich Strom- und Energieversorgung unabhängig sein wollte, war es willens in Solarenergie zu investieren. Sharp begann 1959 mit der Solarzellforschung und produzierte als erstes Unternehmen eine Solarzelle in Japan. Wie bei den Autos kamen die japanischen Unternehmen aus dem Nichts und gehörten bei der Elektronik schon bald zur Weltspitze. Der Markt wurde von Fördermitteln bestimmt. Dieses traditionelle japanische Haus erhält seine Energie heute von Sonnenkollektoren. Für die Generation unserer Kinder ist es sehr wichtig, die Umwelt sauber zu halten. Dieses Jahr tritt das Kyoto-Protokoll in Kraft; ab sofort wird das also ein noch wichtigeres Thema. Unser Traum ist es, Solarsysteme in allen japanischen Häusern zu installieren. In ganz Japan sprießen moderne Wohnblöcke und Fabriken mit Sonnenkollektoren aus dem Boden. Das Geheimnis des Erfolgs in Japan bestand in der rückhaltlosen Unterstützung der Regierung und den Fördermitteln. Zu einer wirklichen Veränderung kam es 1994, als die japanische Regierung entschied, dass sie das Wachstum der Solarenergie in Japan so fördern möchte, dass diese Technik zu einem wichtigen Bestandteil der Stromversorgung im Land wird. Da der Strompreis grundsätzlich in Japan sehr hoch ist, ist die Solarenergie heute schon allein wegen des Preises beinahe wettbewerbsfähig. In der ersten Phase bezahlt die japanische Regierung einen Zuschuss von 5% für das Solarsystem im Gegensatz zu den ursprünglichen 75%; dennoch steigt die Anzahl der Personen, die diese Systeme erwerben möchte, weiter. Damit rechnen sich die Systeme mittlerweile fast. Heute wird dieser Markt de facto von zwei Ländern beherrscht, Deutschland und Japan. Beide nehmen eine wahrhaft führende und visionäre Rolle bei der Entwicklung und Förderung dieser Technologie ein und verfügen beim Thema saubere Energie über enorme politische Unterstützung. Mir kommt es ein bisschen ironisch vor, dass wir in Zukunft vielleicht Sonnenkollektoren importieren wie heute Öl, weil sich die Branche, die Exzellenzzentren infolge dessen, dass sich die Märkte in Deutschland und Japan befinden, hauptsächlich auf diese beiden Länder konzentrieren werden. Die Deutschen haben die Sonnenenergie genauso begeistert angenommen wie die Japaner. Im Juni 2005 wurde im bayerischen Mühlhausen die weltweit größte Solaranlage in Betrieb genommen. Sie bedeckt eine Fläche von mehreren Hektar und erzeugt bis zu 10 Megawatt Elektrizität für das Stromnetz... Sie haben gemerkt, es gab eine kleine Diskussion hier und meine Zeit ist um, aber ich wollte Ihnen noch sagen, dass direkt im Anschluss ein sehr wichtiger Abschnitt über Solarenergie in den Entwicklungsländern kommt. Wir werden heute Nachmittag an dieser Stelle weitermachen, für diejenigen, die vorbeikommen und den restlichen Film sehen möchten. Ich hoffe, wir können es den Leuten dann auch gemütlicher machen, so dass sie vielleicht sogar auf Stühlen sitzen können. In jedem Fall möchte ich aber für den Moment damit schließen, dass ich nach einem sicherlich in gewisser Weise turbulenten Übergang von fossilen Brennstoffen zu erneuerbaren Energien bezüglich der realen Möglichkeit, dass die Welt mit Sonnen- und Windenergie alleine gut zurechtkommt, inzwischen sehr optimistisch bin. Ich sage nicht, dass das so sein muss, aber ich wäre in keiner Weise überrascht, wenn Sonne und Wind nach dem Übergang von den fossilen Brennstoffen die beiden wichtigsten Energiequellen wären. Das ist absolut kein Hirngespinst, betrachtet man den Anteil der heute durch Sonne und Wind erzeugten Gesamtenergie. Sie sagen vielleicht, Walter Kohn ist total verrückt, aber wenn Sie etwas genauer hinschauen, sehen Sie, dass Sonnen- und Windenergie in den letzten 5 Jahren jährlich um etwa 30% gestiegen sind. Nun, jeder von Ihnen hat schon einmal etwas von Exponentialfunktionen gehört. Selbst wenn man mit einer winzigen Menge anfängt, sind 30%... Sonnen- und Windenergie zusammengenommen machen zwar nur ein paar Prozent der weltweiten Energie aus, aber schon in 10 Jahren kann diese Zahl um vielleicht den Faktor 5 oder 6 gestiegen sein, in 20 Jahren um den Faktor 25 und in 30 Jahren - das ist exponentielles Wachstum - um einen Faktor von mehr als 100. Diesem Wachstum sind keine physikalischen Grenzen gesetzt. Es gibt genügend Platz und die Menge des auf die Erde fallenden Sonnenlichts ist das Tausendfache dessen, was wir für die Stromerzeugung benötigen. Das habe ich ja bereits erwähnt oder jemand anderer hat es erwähnt, vielleicht Professor Kroto. Selbst der Wind unterliegt infolge der strukturellen Anforderungen an große Turbinen mehr Beschränkungen, obwohl auch er im Prinzip mehr Energie erzeugen kann, als die gesamte Welt benötigt. In Anbetracht der jüngsten Bilanz halte ich Sonnen- und Windenergie somit für eine konkrete Möglichkeit. Bitte missverstehen Sie mich nicht, ich möchte Professor Molinas These, die er einigen Leuten aus Princeton zuschreibt, dem sogenannten Keildiagramm, nicht widersprechen. Es handelt sich ja nicht wirklich um eine Theorie, sondern bedeutet nur, dass man bei mehreren Energiequellen die Energien addiert. Wir wollten aber ganz konkret werden und einen Blick darauf werfen, was wir für die wahrscheinlichsten Hauptenergiequellen der Zukunft halten. Die Ergebnisse waren für uns überraschend und erfreulich. Jetzt liegt es an uns und vor allem an Ihnen, sie auch wirklich umzusetzen. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals.

Walter Kohn
An Earth Powered Predominantly by Solar and Wind Energy
(00:06:38 - 00:07:30)


Unfortunately though, there are some obstacles on the way to cheap and efficient solar power. Many of them have to do with the fact that it is not always sunny everywhere. This seemingly trivial circumstance causes major technical problems. It means, for example, that energy needs to be stored in some kind of battery for use during night or sun-free days. Or, thinking of huge solar power stations in a desert, that electric energy needs to be transported over very long distances before it can be consumed. Today, both batteries and efficient long-range transport of electrical energy are still costly, especially when compared to fossil fuels.

But there might be solutions to these issues. At the 2013 Lindau Panel Discussion, 1988 Chemistry Laureate Hartmut Michel gave his vision of a world which is continuously powered by solar energy:


Panel Discussion (2013) - 'Chemical Energy Conversion and Storage' (with Nobel Laureates Ertl, Grubbs, Kohn, Michel, Schrock)

Chairman: Ladies and gentlemen, young investigators, welcome to the panel discussion 'Chemical Energy Storage and Conversion'. This morning we have had a very good and nice, almost everything covering introduction by Steven Chu on this topic. Also in the past years we had many discussions on this stage by Nobel Laureates. These Nobel Laureates related to energy supply, shortage of fossil fuels and the consequences of burning fossil fuels for the climate, for the life on our planet and human life in general. So this time the focus will be a little different. We would like to discuss what chemistry could do to solve the energy problem. It is clear that the highest energy density, you have seen the slide from Steven Chu this morning, is achieved in chemical bonds. So the best way to store energy, and this is for example done by photosynthesis, is in chemical bonds. For example what we use for driving our cars or flying our planes, diesel, gasoline, kerosene. And it is also clear that fuels are needed. For example as I said for flying planes. You cannot do that with sun panels. Electricity is already available from renewable sources: from photovoltaics, from wind and from water power. But electricity has to be stored also in some form. We can use batteries, mechanical devices. But again the best way would be to store it, if you don’t need it on the spot, in chemical bonds. The replacement of liquid fossil fuels is still in far reach. The use of the power of the sun as Walter Kohn who is unfortunately not coming because he is not feeling well, to this panel discussion. So Walter Kohn has a film called The Power of the Sun. And I’m convinced that to use the sun is mandatory. Furthermore we need non-toxic basic chemicals. One example would be water which is abundant, not expensive for example for something like artificial photosynthesis. So that this would be light induced water splitting to produce hydrogen or to use photosynthesis in a similar way for CO2 reduction. This requires large efforts in chemistry since all these processes are difficult to perform and require for example the development of inexpensive non-toxic and highly efficient catalysts before appropriate devices can become of practical use. This is one of the big challenges for chemistry in this century. Therefore we want to discuss this topic today in this panel discussion. And now I would like to start this discussion by giving the word to our panellists. One after the other should make a statement about his opinion on chemical storage and conversion of energy. So I think we could start with Gerhard Ertl please. Gerhard Ertl: Thank you very much. As you mentioned it’s not essentially the problem of energy conversion. There is enough energy in the sun light, less than 1% of sun light would be needed to serve the needs of the whole population of the world. But the energy has to be stored and transported. And electricity of course can be used to split water electrolytically. Or it can also be used to convert the electrical energy, the chemical energy for example in batteries. There are still many, many problems to be solved. For example fuel cells are considered to be the future source for driving cars. But fuel cells are not so far advanced that you can have a routine use of fuel cells in cars. And batteries, of course, are very heavy and their lifetime is also not very long. So these are other demands. And apart from this fact you can convert hydrogen into other chemicals like organic molecules. This also needs a catalysis. So catalysis will be the key technique for solving these problems in the future. Chairman: Thank you very much. Professor Grubbs. Robert Grubbs: So the big problem is energy storage as was indicated. And it’s a very, especially batteries is a really interesting chemical problem. In batteries there’s the whole issue of the electrodes, the chemistry, the basic chemistry that takes place. And then you get into the electrolytes and the separators. And so there’s a phenomenal amount of really good material science that’s associated with batteries. And we still have a very long way to go to be able to make cars that you can plug in and drive long distances etc. So this is an area which I think a lot of chemists really need to work on. There are tons of people there but it provides some really interesting problems. I’m associated with a company that’s trying to develop a new chemistry for batteries. And it’s very challenging but lots and lots of fun. So I think that’s going to be one of the key things once one learns how to do the energy conversion, is how you store it. How you keep power over night. How you put it into an automobile and drive etc. So that’s one of the key features that I think will be coming along. Chairman: Thank you. Richard. Richard Schrock: Thank you. Well, I tell my wife sometimes that everything is chemistry. And I don’t think everything is chemistry in terms of energy conversion and sustainability and the like. But certainly as you just heard a lot of it is. And of course it’s natural. Also it’s true. Photo system 2, water splitting. Ok that’s good inorganic chemistry and I’m an inorganic chemist. And a lot of it involves metals, transition metals. And none of that is going to go away. Whether it’s heterogeneous or homogeneous, catalysis with transition metals, that already does fantastic things. Is going to be called upon to do yet even more fantastic things. And so there’s a lot of scope out there. Whether it's batteries, water splitting, whatever it is. And also interdisciplinary, very much so as you also heard, certainly material scientists and chemists and electrochemists and organic chemists - everyone has an opportunity here to work together to really solve these big, big problems. I was surprised to hear some of the things that are being considered these days. And I was contacted by the Department of Energy - there might be somebody here from the department of energy, I know there is somewhere. And one of their ideas is of course how to store hydrogen. Now that’s not a problem that people haven’t addressed. They’ve been considering various ways to store hydrogen because it’s so difficult to store as a gas and use it in your automobile. But one of the ways that they considered or are considering to store it, believe it or not, is to make ammonia. And then to get hydrogen back from ammonia by just reversing that process. All catalytic processes are reversible. And each of those, especially making ammonia which is something I’m interested in, is an enormous challenge. So these are 20, 25, who knows how many years in the future. And of course they’re not all going to pay off. So there will be many of them that just never go anywhere. But if one, if 10% of them pay off or even 5% of them pay off, it can be very, very important to us all. And I expect that but unfortunately I won’t be around to see that. Chairman: Thank you. Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: My advice would be to try to stay electric as long as you can. Of course photovoltaic cells, thermo solar plants and wind mills give you electric energy. And so the basic problem is how to store the energy. And it’s very clear for me, the prime goal has to be to get batteries which are 10,000 times rechargeable. And which have a higher energy density as at the present today. And as outlined by Steve Chu, if you increase the energy density by a factor of 4 and the batteries are already there, that you can get, you can produce cars which cover the same distance without refuelling, as cars with current ignition engines. So this would be really an ultimate goal. Of course you also need to store energy in other instances. Electricity you can store, I would think also when the battery problem is solved in your home. And I was pretty much impressed travelling once to Bangalore, to the Indian Institute of Science. In Bangalore you have power failures 5 times a day. What they did was actually they had 2 rooms full of car batteries. They charged, in 1 room the batteries were charged and the other room they were used for the extra generator. So they only could use extra generator powered by car batteries. So if we would have to store energy we can have the whole thing distributed all over the house. And each house could have a room in the basement where you store batteries and have this supply for that. Without having that of course we still have to go the way to produce energy rich chemicals. And we live in an oxidised world so we have to get energy by reducing something. And the difficult thing is if you have enough electricity, you electrolyse water, produce hydrogen. Hydrogen you use to convert carbon dioxide from a nearby power plant into methane or methanol. You also can convert it by chemical synthesis up to kerosene and use it then for powering jets, for jets. This is how it has to happen so these are the changes which we have to see. We have to make these processes more important. And as Professor Ertl said catalysts are the key for the chemical conversions and I completely agree on that. Chairman: Thank you. Maybe there is immediately one question from my side. Is charging the battery not a problem? If you want to be mobile, you drive longer distances. Even Steve Chu said this morning 300 miles is no problem. But charging it, like we are going to a gas station, filling in the gasoline and then we go on. It would certainly take some time. And if you do it very quickly the battery will probably degrade faster. So this is one of the problems. Or is that problem solved? I don’t know. Gerhard Ertl: I think we should not concentrate on a single source of energy. It will be a mixture, a mixture of different sources. And the first step I think would be to save energy. That you could save energy asking the industry to build smaller cars and to introduce a speed limit on the freeways which you don’t have here in Germany. You could save a lot here. So these are essentially political decisions which are necessary. And science then can help to accomplish these issues. But first of all we must have regulations from politics which save our energy consumption. Chairman: And certainly also public transport. In Germany we are not even able to reduce the speed on the freeway, to tell people that probably not everybody should drive a car anymore. That would be very difficult, I see that too. So in general it’s a toy of all the Germans and maybe many others, many other people in the world. You wanted to say something on the battery problem? Robert Grubb: Yeah the speed of recharging and there’s all kinds of crazy schemes that people are developing. I think Tesla in California is setting up battery exchange programmes. So you drive up and you exchange batteries. And there’s lots, that’s probably not going to be an effective way in the end. So I think again it’s just a materials problem, how fast you can charge, how you can deal with the heat, how you can deal with all of the other issues. And it’s a very interesting engineering problem which, there’s progress being made but we have a long way to go. Chairman: There is one question maybe I can, directly have to find, we have not too many but a few. That was related to the problem of batteries. It was on lithium, let me see if I can find that: like lithium or possibly other rare elements? Isn’t there as well a problem that mining destroys nature?“ An example is the impressive salt lake in Bolivia, that is now used to get the lithium out. I mean this is a general problem I believe that we will have in many places, do we have enough lithium to make all these batteries? Robert Grubb: Probably not. But also there’s now a lot of other sort of chemistries that people are looking at. So I think lithium is probably going to be one of those but there are many other chemistries that people are looking at which will replace lithium. Those are going to be the next generation batteries, I think. Gerhard Ertl: About 10 years ago the car industry propagated very strongly the use of fuel cells. And Mercedes claimed that within 5 years all cars from Mercedes would be fuelled by fuel cells. About 5 years ago I met a representative from Volvo and he told, the future will be lithium ion batteries, just wait 5 years and all cars will be equipped with lithium ion batteries. So there are fashions coming and going again. We cannot know what will be the final solution to that. Chairman: Hartmut Hartmut Michel: Yeah I wanted to say according to the information I have there is no shortage of lithium. There is no shortage of lithium. Richard Schrock: I am not a geologist but I didn’t know we were running out of lithium. And certainly there are alternatives, of course sodium get more bang for their buck, so that would be better. There are a few problems associated with sodium like all other alternatives, even lithium. We are running out of elements, that’s true. I hear we only have, I don’t know what the estimate is, but phosphorus is in danger in fact. Hartmut Michel: That is right. Richard Schrock: I don’t think it pertains to batteries but I’m not sure. But yeah, ok you don’t run out of elements but you run out of concentrated forms of them. So if you dilute the elements then you’ve got to put in a lot of energy to get them back in concentrated form. So this is a problem neither created nor destroyed. But certainly they become less concentrated. So that is a problem in the long run but I feel that there are probably, you know, unknown sources of, that would be more expensive to extract what we need from the unknown sources but unknown sources are unconsidered sources. I mean like everything else we take elements from the most available source and the cheapest one. And then when that is depleted, if it is depleted we move on to the next most available source. And certainly if you count all the lithium and sodium and potassium and so on in sea water, it’s a very large number. So I don’t think we’re going to run out right away. Chairman: Good, I think we should stay a little longer with electricity. There is another question here and I will reformulate it a little bit. I mean it’s almost impossible to use it on the spot. We need to store it. Either in batteries, we have discussed that, or in chemical bonds or pumping up water or other devices. And in Germany for example this is quite a large problem. So we have wind power at the North Sea, at the Baltic Sea. Not enough power lines to serve the rest of the country. And a similar situation is certainly found with photovoltaics. So this is a big problem, for the rest of the world the same way, I believe. Do you want to make any comments how to solve the problem? It’s again political and also personal. And you don’t want to have a power line through your garden. Gerhard Ertl: There is a hot debate about creating new power lines, of course. This is really a political issue. Science cannot provide a solution to that. You have to build some. And of course if you have electricity, the most convenient way to convert it into chemical bonds is to form hydrogen. And then use the hydrogen to transform it into other chemicals. There are techniques available. Sufficient processes have been well known for decades. So it is just a question but what do you want to do and how to achieve this. But in principle it’s possible. Chairman: Professor Ertl you mentioned that there could be a conversion using CO2. And there are quite a few questions concerning that. Maybe I read one from Jacob Kennedy from Caltech, Do you think it is necessary? Is it a necessary bridge between fossil and alternative fuels? Is storage enough, for example as a carbonate mineral, or transformation to value added products, necessary to make it economically viable?“ So that goes also in some other directions, but I think the main topic is CO2 reduction. Gerhard Ertl: It’s a way to emphasise sustainable energy supply. You first burn something, it creates CO2 and then restore CO2 and transform it back. It’s always a question of the balance between input and output. So in principle it can be done. And there are several attempts to do this work along these lines. Chairman: Is there still something to do for CO2 reduction, conversion on the catalytic side? How far is this? You know you mentioned ... Richard Schrock: There is definitely something to do because. I mean you know CO2 and water are at the end of the road. So thermodynamically they’re way down there. And of course people talk casually about converting CO2 but you’ve got to put energy in to do that. You can’t, no process - I shouldn’t say there are no processes. I think you sit and look at some of the things that have been proposed. There might be a couple that are exothermic but almost all of them are endothermic. So that means you’ve got to put energy in. And this is, it’s a zero sum game I think in the end to talk about converting CO2 catalytically or storing CO2. I mean you have to look at the numbers in terms of the amount of CO2 that man is putting up there and do the calculations. And then you find out that there’s just almost no way for man, and again this involves energy, to store that amount of CO2 in some element or some compound like carbonate in order to get rid of it. It’s just, I’m very pessimistic, and again I’m not an expert, but the numbers that we’re talking about, if you want to reduce CO2 are just absolutely enormous. The Haber Bosch process uses hydrogen. And they get the hydrogen from really methane and water to give CO2 and hydrogen. So they produce, the Haber Bosch process, along with everything else, produces a huge amount of CO2. And they use nitrogen of course. And I’ve forgotten the number. Well they consume enough nitrogen to make 10^8 tonnes or so of ammonia per year. But the amount of nitrogen that is available is like 10^15 tones. So 10^8 tones is nothing. Of course that has nothing to do with our storing of energy and so forth. It’s just, I’m just trying to impress you with the numbers. The amount of CO2 that you have to sequester or do something with in order to reduce it, given the fact that it’s being formed all the time in huge quantities. And there’s a lot of it there. Just extremely large. Chairman: So there are a few more questions concerning the CO2. Maybe you have already answered but try to answer the first question. The enormous amount that we see from, also from factories is certainly very difficult to convert. Richard Schrock: If you just look at the number of planes that are flying around and add the number of automobiles flying around and the number of Haber Bosch scale processes that are producing CO2 and burning of methane in oil fields and everything. It’s very, it's staggering the amount that is being produced. And it’s casual to talk about, well not casual but 400 parts per million doesn’t sound like much. But throughout all over the earth it amounts to a huge amount of CO2 that we’re putting in there. Hartmut Michel: Of course we normally forget that a major source of CO2 is cement production and also steel production, that’s enormous. Chairman: That is right. We just had a discussion with people from ThyssenKrupp in Duisburg and they told us the amount of CO2 that they are storing. They have a very big storage tank in Duisburg where you can put in 300,000 m3 of gas. And they said they can fill 150 of these tanks per day with the steel production that is available. But the interesting point, this is highly enriched. So if there would be a method to convert it, certainly we need a good catalyst, hydrogen from non-fossil fuels, to convert that to methane or to methanol or to some other valuable product. That would be excellent. So, Robert Schlögl, our institute will probably work on that. But as a success, depends on catalysis again. Richard Schrock: The most optimistic thing would be to actually come up with a catalytic process that would use solar as its ultimate energy source. Whether it produces hydrogen or whatever. And a catalyst to combine CO2 to make whatever you want to make. Along with water that would be a good product. We know that’s safe. It’s going to be very, very difficult. And it will be, in terms of energy this is an endothermic catalytic reaction almost certainly. So one way or other you’ve got to put in some energy to use CO2. Sorry to sound so pessimistic. But it’s a big, big problem. Chairman: There was one question, this is kind of related. The CO2 problem we have probably now finished. There is still a lot to do for chemistry to develop a process that can convert CO2 to something useful that we can use in an energy cycle. Here is one question, "Why developing batteries instead of a possible methanol economy?“ So there has been the book by Ola some years ago that made some suggestions. In the meantime there has been a discussion again, problems with methanol. What is your opinion about that? This is kind of related to this question. Hartmut Michel: It’s very clear cut, that the best is to stay electric when you are electric. The point is that of course you always lose energy when you do the chemical conversion. And the end, the major point is that an ignition engine, for which you’d use methanol or kerosene or whatever, is very in efficient. Only 20% of the energy in the fuel is used at the end to drive the car, to drive the wheels. And if you stay electric it's 80% of the energy in the battery is used to drive the car. And that’s a very clear point in favour of staying electric. Always the efficiency of electrolysing water is not 100%. And in all these processes you lose energy at the end. To stay electric is the best thing. And in my opinion electricity generation, electricity supply would be the best if we would have superconducting cables which would connect photovoltaic fields, areas in Arizona, Mexico, in the Sahara, in China and Australia. Because the sun is shining somewhere everywhere. And if we have superconducting cables connecting the fields and supplying the electricity to consumers we would not have to store electricity. We simply can use the energy here in the night which is at the same time produced in Australia. So producing superconducting cables would be the best thing to do. Gerhard Ertl: This again is a question of the costs. Gerhard Ertl: You shouldn’t forget that. Chairman: That is right. Gerhard Ertl: Building up such a net would be very expensive and maintenance would be even more expensive. So I am not very optimistic with this solution. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: So I am more of a bystander here because I am not an expert in these fields. But I would like to just raise a question and that is, Can you have a vision of a fossil fuel world, what would that look like? Is that a science fiction world or is it something that we could have in our, at least not too distant future? That would maybe use fossil oils for maybe raw material for certain productions but not really use it up for just burning. Is there such a possibility or is this just... Gerhard Ertl: Methanol technology was just mentioned. You can produce methanol from CO2 and hydrogen by catalytic processes. And then use methanol as energy source in a fuel cell. So the methanol fuel cell is a clear option. There are again serious problems with poisoning. You need very, very clean materials, otherwise electrodes and catalysts are poisoned. So these problems, as long as they are not solved, this will not be a solution of our long-term problems. Astrid Gräslund: I guess that because this would cost a lot of money, so it would change our lifestyle quite considerably. We cannot live the way that we do now. So it’s difficult to foresee perhaps and for of course the rest of the world even more so. Chairman: That’s a general problem. I mean in many electrolysers, fuel cells, there are expensive materials, precious metals. Many of the catalysts that work really well also for splitting water, they contain ruthenium, iridium, rhodium, platinum, metals that are very expensive. And we don’t have enough of them. So that seems to be a problem and I believe that this is also a place where chemistry has to do something. You have mentioned that several times in your talk. Even try to replace a ruthenium catalyst by iron or something, unsuccessfully. Robert Grubb: But there is a large programme going on in the US now. It's run by Harry Gray at our place, who is trying to find non-rare metals as a source for hydrogen splitting. And they’re making some progress. And Dan Nocera who is at MIT making progress at using non-nobles for making oxygen as part of the splitting process. And so these are things that I think people are working on very hard right now. And I’m pretty optimistic about that area. Chairman: Very good. So I think this block, electricity and a few other aspects, we have now more or less covered. I think there is a good way and Hartmut is convinced that we should go more electric and this is certainly right. At the moment I don’t know the numbers, maybe 25/30% is electricity of our energy demand, the rest is fuels for heating, for driving cars. And this has to be replaced. And at the moment I don’t see any good and direct way to create a renewable liquid fuel for example or gaseous fuel that we can use. And certainly we can drive a car with electricity, that’s no problem, but to fly a plane with electricity, with sun panels, will be difficult. Or even these big ships that we are using for transport, that is also not so easy. So there is a demand to find a solution for that. Richard Schrock: Just 2 things: if you want energy quickly and everywhere, in ships, maybe not planes. I know this probably isn’t popular in Germany but there is something called nuclear energy. Which you know in terms of bang for your buck, quickly and a lot of it, it’s available, it works. And 75% of France is run on nuclear energy. That’s probably not very well known. But ultimately we have to put in energy in some way in all of these things. And of course the way it’s done now is that big ball in the sky. I mean we’re really 98.5% nuclear because the sun provides everything except what you get from radio activity through natural decay in the ground. So we’ve got to use solar power some way in the end, I think, because there’s really no way around it, unless it’s nuclear, at least in the short time. But ultimately the sun is going to be around a long time and that’s why we’re all here and surviving. So that’s what we got to plan on in the future. Chairman: You are certainly right but you know in Germany the decision has been made after Fukushima, also in some other countries. And I believe it is very difficult to do something also against the will of the majority of the population in a country. That’s a political issue. But certainly it would make sense. Richard Schrock: Now I hear some people are opposed to windmills because they’re ugly. Richard Schrock: They make noise, whoof, whoof, whoof, so they don’t want to live near them. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: Joking aside. I would say that here of course one has to consider time scales. So what you are deciding now in Germany about windmills and nuclear power and so on, it is now. And maybe not 40 years ago what would be the situation then when we had the global warming perhaps being very noticeable. I mean we really had to do something. Chairman: That is right. Astrid Gräslund: Then there will be a completely different situation, I think, also for the political decision makers. So I think for now we will have to struggle on. And of course we should, as you indicate here, do our research so that we have the methodologies, technologies available. But I don’t think we should expect any politician to make us, make them go into technologies in large scale yet. Chairman: Astrid you are completely right. But you know I am not pro-nuclear. But I just want to say also for the young people here. I mean if I ask you who is for or who is against nuclear power, I think there will be a minority to be pro nuclear power. But on the other hand I think it is important to keep the knowledge and to further develop the technology to make safe nuclear power plants. And nobody in Germany, almost nobody I know of one place, and in particular the young people, they don’t go in this field, to work in this field anymore. So within one generation this will be lost. And that is a danger. We had the case with Chernobyl and other just-across-the-border power plants that have a problem. And we are feeling these problems. And you cannot avoid it, it’s a global problem. And we have to think along these lines and really find a solution also for this problem, I believe. Gerhard Ertl: What you mentioned concerns existing power plants. Chairman: Also new ones. Gerhard Ertl: But I think what is even more serious is what to do with the waste, the nuclear waste. And this problem has not been solved so far. You know in Germany we have a strong debate about a place where we could deposit the nuclear waste. This is of course also a problem for chemistry in some respects. Chairman: Exactly. Gerhard Ertl: But very often it’s just swept under the carpet. Chairman: That is one of the major problems. It’s also the reason that I’m really. We have to solve this problem in some way. And there is no good solution yet. Robert Grubb: And so in the US, there were a lot of solutions proposed. And we have lots of open land and area but the people nearby of course didn’t want it in their back yard. So there’s always, always this issue. But the other part, I think you raised a really important issue, is that I was on another panel, an advisory group which was considering nuclear power. And finding experts in the field is really difficult now because no one is going into the field over the last number of years. And so as you say if we’re forced into it it’s going to have to be, how are we going to restart the field. Chairman: That is right. Okay, so there was not a single question about nuclear power here. But let us go into some other questions. This is concerning using biology. There was one question, what can we learn from biology for the process? That is pretty clear. Everybody of us will agree, I think, that one can learn from it. And maybe chemistry has to find different solutions, you cannot use the same systems. But we can perhaps use the biological system. And there are many questions concerning that. And maybe you can try to answer some of them. One was concerning photosynthesis. Is it feasible to solve the energy needs by harvesting the energy from the sun and store it in fuels? What are the expected energy numbers, expected from this method?“ And quite a number of other questions related to that. For example, Can sugar cane be an effective source of bio fuels, this is Brazil? Are bio fuels economically viable and environmentally friendly?“ And so on. Hartmut. He already made a statement, but this was on Saturday and you were not there, so he will repeat. Hartmut Michel: Okay. The overall process of photosynthesis has a pretty low efficiency. Starting from the beginning only about 47% of the sunlight, energy wise, is absorbed by the plants. And then we have, because you know there is much more energy in the light quanta. Of course there is more energy in the blue quanta than in the red quanta. And there already is only about 40% of the energy in the light quanta is then stored in the primary reaction. And the losses go on. You need about 9.4 photons to produce 2 molecules of fixed hydrogen which you then could use to produce, which you then use to produce carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide fixation in the plants is another problem because the enzyme cannot discriminate accurately enough between oxygen O2 and carbon dioxide CO2. And in every third cycle it incorporates an O2 instead of a CO2 into the sugar, into the C5 sugar. And this leads to loss of energy of 30 to 40%. Another point is that photosynthesis is optimised for low light intensities. So even here in Germany if you have full sunlight, 80% of the sunlight is not used. The electron flow through the reaction centres is limiting that. And you get damage of the reaction centre. And nature has partly solved the damage by exchanging the central subunit of the photo system to 3 times an hour. It gets probably photo-oxidised with the subunit and has to be replaced. And this is what the plants manage to do. But I don’t think we can do that in a kind of technological solution. Taking together all these limiting factors the theoretical upper limit for photosynthesis is continued to be 5% for use of the plants. But actually when you measure the biomass which you produce, which you get under optimal conditions with various plants, then this value is about 1%. Then you go further to production of bio fuels. You have to invest in say tractor fuels. You have to collect the stuff, you have to put energy to produce the fertiliser. And then more than 50% of the energy in the bio fuel you have to put in from fossil fuels. So that’s another point. And when you consider German bio diesel then it’s less than 0.1% of the sun’s energy which is in the German bio diesel. So the overall process is extremely inefficient. And when you do further simple calculations to find out how much area you would need to substitute Germany’s consumption for car petrol and car diesel. Then you end up that all agricultural land of Germany would just be sufficient to supply 8 to 10% of Germany’s gasoline and diesel. So this is nothing. On the other hand we, already in Germany we use 20% of the land for growing corn/maize in order to supply the material for biogas production. And as a result of that food price went up, but the income of the farmers increased. And the farmer lobby is a strong lobby in favour of producing bio fuels because they really have lots of profits from that. There can be no doubt about that. And it’s difficult against the farmer’s lobby, they have support by politician to argue against that. What makes me most negative against bio fuels is the palm oil production in the tropics. And this clearly leads to the clearing of the rain forest in order to start up oil palm plantations. And you may have read about the hazing in Singapore which is due to the illegal cutting, burning of rain forest in Sumatra Island. And this of course has to be stopped. And I don’t think there is any political solution for that. We simply should not use palm oil as a diesel source. And we should not import this kind of bio fuel to Europe or to the US. Chairman: Good. Thank you. Also the situation in Brazil. I think using sugar cane is, the calculation, I heard, is a few percent at least, storage of the sun energy. Hartmut Michel: No, it's 0.2%, it’s very easy to calculate. But the advantage of Brazil is that sugar cane is, that you use, they squeeze the stems to burn and use this energy for distillation of the fermentation product, to get the alcohol. For that reason the energy input and bio ethanol production in Brazil is pretty low. And it's economically possible. Chairman: I think in America there is a similar situation with corn. Richard Schrock: A similar situation with corn. I think some estimates were that it's actually, you have to put in more energy than you get out. If you count everything in terms of fertiliser, making the fertiliser and growing the corn, and processing the corn, and fermenting the corn, and distilling all of the, you know, to get out the ethanol and so on. And purifying it and so on. In the end it costs more than you get. So that’s definitely not what we want. And I don’t know if you’ve heard those numbers Bob, but, or maybe you have too, but there’s no longer a lot of enthusiasm for corn, at least in the US. Chairman: This is changing the situation, which is good. Robert Grubb: The other thing that’s happened over the last couple of years: A few years ago there was a whole green tech movement and venture capitalists. And so there were a large number of companies started which were going to use enzymes and various modified enzymes for making butanol and making all kinds of fuels. Those companies then went public. Their market caps were huge. Now their market caps are very small. Because there’s a whole issue about scaling: How do you scale biological processes on a large scale, how do you keep from contamination, etc, etc. Richard Schrock: I mean earth does a pretty good job of scaling, it covers the earth with green plants. But man has a hard time dealing with that. That’s certainly a problem, a big problem, scaling. Gerhard Ertl: So even 0.5% only efficiency would in principle be no problem. There is enough energy available from the sun. But the problems arise mainly from the influence on the environment. And the competition between food production and energy production, fuel production. It’s a very, very difficult issue. And that’s why the only possibility I think which is reasonable is to use waste, waste from biological products to form fuel. But not to grow, growing the plants for transforming it into fuels. But from waste you can do it. Chairman: Yes, as a side product, you will not solve the whole problem with it but maybe a tiny bit, sure. And that’s what is also done particularly in Bavaria I believe, if I remember that right. Richard Schrock: It's really coming down to, there’s really no one solution. There are many solutions and many of the many solutions are difficult solutions. But I wish we had a magic sun that we can all use somehow on earth. But we don’t. I suppose fusion is still being researched but they always say they’re almost there and I don’t think they ever really are. But that’s a pipe dream to have a sun on earth, unfortunately. Chairman: Astrid Astrid Gräslund: I would just like to comment one thing about that. And that is that a couple of years ago I was travelling in northern Germany. And I was really struck by that almost every single one family house had solar panels on the roof. Which is the only place in this world where I have seen that. Obviously this was some kind of political move. Chairman: Yes or subsidised strongly. Astrid Gräslund: So it was heavily subsidised. But I mean it doesn’t take more than that obviously. And then people could afford it, states could probably afford it. I don’t know if they continue to do it but the need is maybe less. Richard Schrock: I don’t know, maybe you have the numbers or you have the numbers. That if solar panels were available, if they fell out of the sky, that would be one thing. But we have to make silicon, we have to make the solar panels. And I don’t know what the break-even point is in terms of energy and cost and so on. When do we go positive in the energy game with solar panels? Hartmut Michel: Actually the thing is that in Germany of course it’s not actually subsidies by the government. But the point is that the local power company has to buy your electricity which you produce from photovoltaic cells. Currently, I think, for newly installed photovoltaic cells at about just below 30 Euro cents per kWh. And that’s of course really high. And if you install these photovoltaic cells on your roof you have a guaranteed profit of 8% every year for the next 20 years. And even insurance companies go into that. This has caused other problems because now in order for paying this energy to these investors, the price of the kWh for the general consumer, even for the cleaning lady, went up by 6 cent per kWh. And as a result of that also the production costs are going up in Germany for the industry. And lots of industry are now thinking of cutting down production in Germany. And setting up the production in the US because energy is very cheap in the US, primarily to the gas fracking. So this has economical consequences and one clearly has to think about that when you do that. Also within Germany there are consequences. Most of the photovoltaic cells in Germany are installed in Bavaria, if you look around, not in Lower Saxony. The point is in Germany that Bavaria makes a surplus of 2 billion Euro each year. So the people in Bavaria get 2 billion Euro from people in North Rhine-Westphalia. There’s not much instalment of photovoltaic cells in the Ruhr area. So the people in the Ruhr area pay the people in Bavaria money for using that electricity. So these of course are internal consequences which have not been thought about when these laws were introduced. Also one has to say I think the breakeven point, the real breakeven point in Italy certainly is about 13 Euro cent per kWh. And this is already in reach, within this year or next year we will have that. So it will be economically valuable in the Mediterranean space, in Spain, Italy and Greece to produce the electricity by using photovoltaic cells. Then of course we can import that electricity from there by, not by superconducting but by these high voltage direct current cables - which were mentioned also by Steve Chu in his talk this morning. Robert Grubb: Yes, that is a possibility. Chairman: I have one more biological question. It’s kind of clear that hydrogen is an important central chemical for Haber Bosch, for maybe also driving cars, for other processes. So we have to make it in some way. So there was a question, "What is the best way to make hydrogen?“ And related to the biological side there are also efforts to use algae or cyanobacteria to directly make hydrogen. Maybe you can comment on that, too. And what are your ideas to get the hydrogen. I mean one way is clearly electrolysis of water. If we want to do that on a very large scale we have to develop also new catalyst for the electrolysis, for the electrolysers and so on. But that is probably in reach. But is there also a direct method like sunlight and use water splitting in plants? Richard Schrock: Would anybody have an answer to the bio question, I don’t know, algae? Hartmut Michel: I still think the yield would be very, very low and you still have the problem about damage for the system. And also it's biology and biology will die. And so it’s not as stable as the chemical means are. And economically I do not see any future for biohydrogen. Gerhard Ertl: I think electrolysis will certainly be the solution of this problem. And you have to pay for it because there is an O voltage in the cell which costs energy. So the main problem is to find proper electrodes which reduce the O voltage. And it’s mainly the oxygen electrode which causes this problem, not the hydrogen electrode. So as soon as we have a solution for that it will become much more efficient also to split water through electrolysis. Chairman: There was an interesting question, coating of electrodes for water splitting both ways. In electrolysers, also fuel cells, there is a problem that is exactly related to what you are saying. So there is still some need for chemical work. The question here was if nano technology can contribute, carbon nano tubes, things like that. I mean people are trying that, to coat electrodes, to bring the over voltage down. Gerhard Ertl: The catalysis has been a nano technology since it was invented, long before this... Chairman: Sure, I'm only quoting. Gerhard Ertl: So by inventing a new name it doesn’t solve the problems. Chairman: Very good. So we are doing quite well on the questions. So what is the best way to obtain hydrogen then? Some more ideas, except for electrolysis. I mean is there not something like... Richard Schrock: You have to get it by, you have solar source of water splitting, I think that’s the only way. You’re taking energy from the sun and you’re producing something that you can use to burn to give water. I mean I might be sounding like Dan Nocera here. Richard Schrock: But you know it’s good in a way. I mean people talk about hydrogen this and hydrogen that. But you can’t go out and buy it except in a small tank. I mean we need huge, huge amounts. And the only way you're going to get it is from water and most chemists know that you have to do something to get H2 out of water. Chairman: I think so too. I mean all the solutions that we have discussed are only partial solutions on a rather small scale. Except for the electricity problem that looks quite okay now. There are solutions but for making direct solar fuels there is no good solution yet. And I also don’t see at the moment a good solution for replacing fossil fuels. And they are running out. I mean there are still, you mentioned the fracking, there are resources still. But let’s project into the next 100 years or 200 years. We need a solution to replace the fossil fuels because they will eventually be eaten up by us for driving cars, flying planes, heating our rooms, our houses, all that. And then we must have a solution. And the only possible at the moment seems to be to use water, non-toxic, abundant, cheap. And sun light. So I don’t see anything else. So I think we need all of you to think about it and to go into this field and find a solution. It will be very difficult to do it like plants outside. The catalyst is awfully complicated. Professor Michel has mentioned that the lifetime of the major enzyme that is doing the water splitting is only 20 or 30 minutes. So to make something like that chemically is extremely difficult. Chemistry cannot yet do that. I mean Jean-Marie Lehn in his talk, he was a little bit in this adaptive chemistry: self-repair, self-replication, all these problems but we are still far away from that. And for that reason I also think that there is still room for chemistry, for new chemistry, for good chemistry to do something in this direction. Richard Schrock: Fortunately a lot of those problems are inorganic chemistry problems, so I’m pleased to hear that in a way. And all you inorganic chemists go to it. Because we’re going to need transition metal chemistry for many of the things that we’re talking about: coating electrodes, doing this, doing that, splitting water and so on. It’s not going to go away and we have to move, as Bob mentioned, more towards earth abundant metals. Because there just aren’t possibilities of scaling with some metals, on the scale that we would have to scale. That’s not going to happen. Chairman: Yes. Okay. Gerhard Ertl: I just want to make a comment concerning predictions. When I was a student nuclear fusion was just coming into consideration. And there was a prediction in 50 years we will have reactors for nuclear fusion. Now that’s 60 years ago and we are still waiting for solutions to that. Now they say in 50 years we will be able to build a reactor. And the same thing is with fossil fuels. When I was a student there was also a prediction by Club of Rome which said in 20 years there will be no resource available anymore. This was 50 years ago again. So we still have resources. And optimists of course claim we will find new sources. But this is not a solution to the problem. You are right in some decades or centuries all these resources will be exhausted. So we will be forced to find alternative solutions for that. No other way. Chairman: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: If I may comment, I think you are quite right, that there have to come solutions. And of course it's just the necessity that will force them to come. And at the moment we don’t see them. However, personally at least, I see not the lack of fossil fuel to be the serious problem but what we are doing while we are burning it and that this is causing too bad consequences for everything around us. Not maybe for myself but for my great-grandchildren or your grandchildren. That is, I think, the serious part for me. But it will, of course, only future can tell how bad this will be, we won’t see it. Chairman: Yes, thank you. There were a few more questions of a very general kind. I think we should not go into that, it’s more politics and money for research and all that. It is certainly very important to do that. So I think principle, is there some urgent question from you. We are listening. Any statement from ... yes okay. Question: Going to predictions. Do you think that really like in 1,000 years we’re going to look back and see this as a really strange blip in history? Where, I mean in a 1,000 years we’re going to have renewable energy from solar sources in such abundant quantities that this time is going to be seen really, really strange in retrospect. I mean we’re going to have huge problems with climate crisis but it’s going to be reversible at some point. What do you think? Richard Schrock: What do you think the population of the earth will be in a 1,000 years? Question: It’s probably going to stabilise. Richard Schrock: Nature is going to unfortunately take care of a lot of these overpopulation problems eventually. Sorry to say, but it's inevitable (laugh). Hartmut Michel: Maybe in 100 years we know when it is already sorted out. Richard Schrock: It's sorted within 100 years. Gerhard Ertl: If you look back 100 years the world was completely different, so nobody would have predicted how the world would look like in 100 years from 1930. So it’s almost impossible to make any prediction, what will happen in the next 100 years in the future. No chance. Hartmut Michel: Let me also add that you have seen this morning this ice age cycle in Steve Chu’s talk. And there is some likelihood that we will have another ice age in the not so distant future. And so we have to cope with that also. And then of course if we have the same ice ages, then Berlin will be under the ice. And we will not be sitting here because there’s a few 100 metres of ice up here. Richard Schrock: And that will last for how many years, 100 years? Hartmut Michel: No that will last for the next 80/90,000 years. Richard Schrock: 80/90,000 years?! Hartmut Michel: Yes. Richard Schrock: Okay, problem solved. So let's going to have a party. Astrid Gräslund: From being Swedish I can tell you that of course we have had a rather recent ice age there. And only about 10,000 years ago did it start to really go away. And now we can see, again look forward to that we are now probably in the middle of an interglacial period. So it will be a few thousand years. And then it will come back, no matter what. I mean we could maybe counteract it by heating a lot but it won’t help I think in the long run. So certainly these very long periods of time are something completely different. And the glacial periods have come and gone as we saw this morning. And that is the time frame that we have really no insight into. However I would say that that shouldn’t stop us from, I mean we should solve problems here and now, that is our job. And maybe for our grandchildren. But we don’t ... Chairman: It’s also a great chance for science and mankind in general to find solutions for these problems. I mean to use up the fossil fuels that have been collected by photosynthesis over millions of years. We used them up within 100 or 200 years. And maybe we should not have done that, but it was a great time. Richard Schrock: If this ice age actually arrives and there are some humans who survive, you might consider what kind of human being will come out the other side. I don’t know. You don’t see any dinosaurs walking around, there are sort of birds, so... Robert Grubb: But in the short term there are many problems to solve. And the nice future about it is, a lot of them are chemistry but a lot of them are going to require a lot of good fundamental new sciences being developed. And so in the process of doing this we actually are going to have a good time. Chairman: Good. Question: Hi my name is Nil from Chualongkom University in Thailand. It is my great pleasure to be here and to meet all of you. Thank you so much for your time. So my question is related to electric vehicles. So in order to have an advancement in this field, do you think it’s possible that it might cause another problem of electric production? Like when you produce electricity. Would it be possible that if you want to produce in a huge amount you might need to do it from coal? Or you might destroy other, you might raise other issues about environment? Chairman: Difficult to understand. I could not understand. Maybe you could repeat the main point. Question: Sure, so the question that I have is that if you wanted to produce electric vehicles you might want to use a lot of electricity. And in order to do that would it be possible that you might raise another issue, like you might need to have more coal power plant and that could raise another environment problem. Chairman: I think we try to avoid that. We try to avoid to use coal. I think it’s certainly a problem. To go electric will certainly require more electricity. And we should not use for example burning coal and power plants and not capturing the CO2, if we want to do that. It should be from renewable sources. That would be the right way to go I believe. Hartmut Michel: I am pretty much convinced that coal will still be the major source for production of kerosene for jets in the future, unfortunately. Robert Grubb: There was an interesting article in the Washington Post by Zachariah who suggested that the best thing that could be done for CO2 control would be for the US to teach China how to do fracking properly. So they could switch their coal plants to natural gas. And that drops 10’s of percents of the CO2 emission, up to 30/40%. That’s an interesting extreme view but I think it’s an interesting one. Chairman: There is certainly also some, there will be some questions about the fracking I believe. We had that in the past and we had an interesting discussion on that on Saturday. I don’t know if somebody wants to repeat the point here. And discuss it with you, what kind of danger. Astrid Gräslund: I think even explain what it is. Chairman: Okay, so there is a way to pressurise with chemicals or water the holes, the drilling holes and then get in a more efficient way and more of natural gas and also oil out of the wells. This is called fracking, fracturing. And this has been done... Richard Schrock: Isn’t it banned? I thought it was banned in some countries, even now, France, I don’t know about Germany. Chairman: It is done in many countries. Richard Schrock: People do not like others going underground and you know doing things that they don’t understand. And at their own homes. Gerhard Ertl: We should not forget that this has serious influence on the environment, just the consumption of water. There was a joke in Germany: "Let us do fracking and then we become independent from the oil import from Russia.“ And then the answer was , "But then we don’t have any water. Then let us import the water from Russia." Chairman: Good, I saw one more question here, was that right? Can you come to the front, otherwise you don’t get the microphone. Question: I wanted to get back at the very beginning of the panel discussion and Mr. Ertl. He mentioned that it’s not only about conversion, it’s also about saving energy. Maybe the panel could comment on that. Because that is something we can do right away and not in the future. Chairman: This is a broad field. Professor Ertl. Gerhard Ertl: I think everybody will agree that energy will be not as cheap as it is at the moment, in the future. So energy will become more expensive. And this automatically forces you to save energy. It’s against the economy which has a regulation power in this. Of course there are many different ways to save power: to reduce the heating of your buildings, to reduce the air conditioning, to build smaller cars - there are many, many possibilities. As long as energy is so cheap there is no pressure on you to do it. So make it more expensive. At such a meeting a couple of years ago I proposed to increase the price of gasoline to €3 and there was a large outcry. We are nearly as far now, jaja. Chairman: Do you want to comment on that? Robert Grubb: It’s just that a good chunk of the energy goes into housing and buildings and stuff. So that’s a very easy place to do saving. So that’s a place that I think has been ignored. Because part of the problem is in an individual house, because of very large capital cost you have immediately. And so you weigh that against paying a few extra bucks a month over a long period of time. So there’s probably going to have to be some legislative things that sort of force these issues. Richard Schrock: I think a lot of ... at MIT we have, every place has buildings that were built some time ago. And they’re all single pane windows and there are a lot of them. And it costs an enormous amount of money to run the university just in terms of heating. But it also costs an enormous amount of money to replace all those windows with more energy efficient windows – and that all takes energy. So I don’t know what the economists have decided as to how worthwhile this is and how that all plays out. But retrofitting buildings and houses and so on to become really energy efficient is very expensive in itself, very wasteful in energy or uses energy in many ways. But if that’s the way to go then that’s what we’ll have to do. Chairman: On the other hand in the last 20/30 years in particular in Germany there have been enormous efforts to bring down the gas mileage ... or to bring it up. And I remember when I bought my first car, a VW or something like that, it was taking 10/12, it was a small engine, 10/12 litres for 100 kilometres. Now the same car would probably take 3 or 4, and with diesel and all the technology. It also cost money but there are systems that work. And a lot has been done. Also insulating houses, windows, all that, everywhere. Robert Grubb: I point out, I’ve sat on a number of panels where people are talking about saving energy. And I look around and we’re all sitting around in wool suits. You know it’s really bad that we chose northern European clothing as sort of the standard around the world. We should be dressing so we don’t have to. So you get the air conditioner cranked way up so you can wear a suit. Chairman: That’s right. Okay good, please microphone, you, we have a few more minutes. Question: Hi. I have a question about the earlier part of the discussion. It was mentioned that nuclear energy is falling out of favour with the public. And certainly there have been plenty of examples in the last few years of the potential consequences, the negative consequences of when there is failure with nuclear power. Do you think that this negative reputation is deserved or is perhaps the risk worth any potential benefits? Or do the negatives outweigh the positives for nuclear energy? Chairman: Good question, not easy to answer. Richard Schrock: Are we on the record here or... Richard Schrock: We may read about this tomorrow in the newspapers. Anybody want to take a shot at that one? Robert Grubb: The perception has changed. I was on some committees where there were lots of discussions about nuclear power and everything was going along. And countries were talking about doing it which one wouldn’t suspect would do it. And then Japan happened and all those discussions ended, so. Astrid Gräslund: I could comment again about the situation in Sweden because we have had it over quite a long time. which is not from those more or less renewable or non-fossil sources. And in the meantime of course the public opinion has swayed back and forth and mostly one way. But for instance we had for a certain number of years a law forbidding further development or even planning new power plants by nuclear power. That has been removed. So now you can actually both plan and, well construct if you like. But of course nobody is yet buying. But I at least can see that in the small rather we’ll say pragmatic country of Sweden. This is not going to be a big problem in the future. This is my guess. I mean we will keep our nuclear power. We will probably renovate it when the time comes. We may not increase it a lot maybe but who knows. Depending on the needs. And certainly there is no movement that we should somehow turn things down prematurely right now. That is a non-issue. Other Swedes here could correct me if I am wrong. Maybe I don’t hear what young people talk about. But this is certainly the overall idea I get. Chairman: What is your opinion? Question: I’m certainly not qualified to express mine here. Chairman: But that is an opinion. There was one more last question. I think. You, please. Question: Professor Grubbs mentioned earlier that he’s associated to a company producing I think batteries. And I wonder at what stage during the development of a new technology it makes sense to use subsidies from the state to make the new technology available to a broader audience or to make it viable in the sense of economic way? Or whether we should wait for technology to mature first and then bring it to the market? Chairman: Germany is a very good example for that. Question: I think that Germany is a good example in heavily subsidising. Chairman: There is this renewable energy law in Germany and that was causing the massive shift to renewable energy, photovoltaics and wind in particular. It was heavily subsidised and had some outbursts as professor Michel already explained. The tax payer in the end is paying for it. If they are willing to do so it's fine because I believe that there are new ideas, new developments - hopefully in the right direction - and employment in this field. So I think it’s a good idea to do that in the right way. But the government has to decide and the decision has to be made in a clever way. Batteries - I don’t know, I don’t know the situation how that is. You ask to subsidise the development of batteries. Question: Not exactly only batteries, it was just a general question. Chairman: General. Question: But we could just as well take the same money that we use for subsidies and invest it directly into research or more target oriented development. Chairman: That’s right. That’s another possibility. Richard Schrock: It would be nice to have politicians who knew something about science. I don’t know... Chairman: It’s not so bad in Germany. Richard Schrock: At least in the US there isn’t a large percentage that know much about science and what should or should not be supported with subsidies and so on. I don’t know who they listen to but they don’t seem to themselves have much knowledge in science. Maybe that’s going to be in the papers too, I don’t know. Chairman: Our chancellor is a physicist, that helps. Okay good, thank you very much. I think we should slowly come to the end. I thank everybody on the panel. I will maybe shortly wrap up what we have heard here. And what we have done. I think biofuels, we agree more or less on that, are problematic. Although for example in Germany we have 5 or 10% ethanol in our gasoline. We have biodiesel and this is going on. Maybe it will be stopped, I don’t know. There is also renewable energy law and that is the same source for that development. But it is seen as a problematic thing also by politicians now I think worldwide. Maybe with an exception of Brazil and others who pursue that still. That we have to go more electric in a way that is certainly right. In particular because we have no solution to replace fossil fuels that we are using for driving our cars, flying our planes and all that. There is no good solution for that. So the move to electricity that can be produced in a renewable way is certainly the right decision in the moment. And I hope there will be development in the battery sector, in the car sector and so on. We have to save energy, that is very clear. I mentioned that there is also a good development in several countries. Some points are under discussion. We were just buying a house and we heard that it would be better to not insulate it for various reasons of climate and so on. So we have to think about that. And the third point we discussed quite a bit was nuclear power. And we had a split opinion in a way. I think some people say we have to use what we have and we have to continue. And we have to also invest in the technology and teaching people so that we don’t lose the knowledge in this field. And the people who know about the technology and can help, in case we have to go back to it in the future. And clearly the storage problem, long time storage of the waste, is not solved yet. And it’s not completely safe. Fukushima was a good example, it’s not completely safe. Okay. Another point? And the last and most important point and for all of you, we don’t have as I mentioned a solution to make solar fuels. So we need the input of chemistry to develop a catalytic, better catalysts and devices. For example for light induced water splitting to make hydrogen or to directly make carbon-containing compounds like in photosynthesis for that by some way. Either looking at what photosynthesis and what nature is teaching us or to go completely different new ways that smart chemists like you have to come up with in the near future, I hope. So I think that is closing the panel now and I thank everybody on the stage for a great one and a half hours. Thank you for coming and thank you for listening.

Gesprächsleiter: Meine Damen und Herren, junge Forscher: Willkommen zum Podiumsgespräch über die Heute Morgen hatten wir eine sehr gute und schöne Einführung in dieses Thema von Steven Chu, die fast sämtliche Aspekte berücksichtigte. Außerdem hatten wir in früheren Jahren auf diesem Podium zahlreiche Diskussionen mit Nobelpreisträgern. Diese Nobelpreisträger beschäftigten sich mit der Energieversorgung, mit dem Mangel an fossilen Brennstoffen sowie den Konsequenzen der Verbrennung fossiler Brennstoffe für das Klima, für das Leben auf der Erde und das menschliche Leben im Allgemeinen. Diesmal wird der Schwerpunkt etwas anders liegen. Wir möchten darüber diskutieren, was die Chemie zur Lösung dieses Problems beitragen könnte. Es ist klar, dass die höchste Energiedichte in chemischen Bindungen erreicht wird. Die beste Art der Speicherung von Energie, und dies geschieht beispielsweise in der Photosynthese, sind chemische Bindungen. Was wir beispielsweise zum Antrieb für unsere Autos oder zum Betreiben unserer Flugzeuge verwenden, sind Diesel, Benzin und Kerosin. Und es steht ebenfalls fest, dass Brennstoffe benötigt werden; zum Beispiel – wie ich sagte – um Flugzeuge fliegen zu können. Das lässt sich mit Sonnenkollektoren nicht erreichen. Elektrizität steht bereits aus erneuerbaren Ressourcen zur Verfügung: aus photovoltaischen Quellen, aus Wind- und aus Wasserenergie. Elektrizität muss jedoch auch in irgendeiner Form gespeichert werden. Wir können Batterien verwenden, mechanische Geräte. Die beste Art der Speicherung von Energie – wenn wir sie nicht sofort benötigen – bestünde jedoch darin, sie in chemischen Bindungen zu speichern. Ein Ersatz für flüssige fossile Brennstoffe liegt noch in weiter Ferne. Die Verwendung der Sonnenenergie, wie Walter Kohn sagt ... Er nimmt an dieser Podiumsdiskussion leider nicht teil, da es ihm nicht gut geht. Walter Kohn hat also einen Film mit dem Titel The Power of the Sun produziert. Und ich bin davon überzeugt, dass die Verwendung der Sonnenenergie unerlässlich ist. Weiterhin benötigen wir nichtgiftige, chemische Grundstoffe. Ein Beispiel wäre zum Beispiel Wasser, das im Überfluss vorhanden und billig ist, etwa für so etwas wie künstliche Photosynthese. Dies wäre also die lichtinduzierte Spaltung von Wasser, um Wasserstoff herzustellen oder um die Photosynthese auf ähnliche Weise für die Reduktion von CO2 zu verwenden. Dies macht einen großen chemischen Aufwand erforderlich, da alle diese Prozesse sehr schwer durchzuführen sind und zum Beispiel die Entwicklung kostengünstiger, nichttoxischer und hocheffizienter Katalysatoren erfordern, bevor entsprechende Geräte irgendwie praktisch nutzbar werden können. Dies ist eine der großen Herausforderungen für die Chemie in diesem Jahrhundert. Daher möchten wir dieses Thema heute in dieser Podiumsdiskussion diskutieren. Und nun möchte ich diese Diskussion beginnen, indem ich das Wort unseren Diskussionsteilnehmern erteile. Einer nach dem anderen sollte seine Meinung zur chemischen Speicherung und Umwandlung von Energie darlegen. Ich denke, wir könnten mit Gerhard Ertl anfangen. Bitte. Gerhard Ertl: Vielen Dank. Wie Sie gesagt haben: Es ist im Wesentlichen nicht das Problem der Energieumwandlung. Das Sonnenlicht enthält genug Energie, weniger als ein Prozent des Sonnenlichts würden benötigt werden, um den Bedarf der gesamten Weltbevölkerung zu decken. Die Energie muss jedoch gespeichert und transportiert werden. Und Elektrizität kann natürlich verwendet werden, um Wasser elektrolytisch aufzuspalten. Oder sie kann auch verwendet werden, die elektrische Energie umzuwandeln, zum Beispiel die chemische Energie in Batterien. Es gibt noch viele, viele Probleme, die gelöst werden müssen. So erwägt man zum Beispiel Brennstoffzellen als die künftige Energiequelle von Autos. Doch Brennstoffzellen sind noch nicht so weit entwickelt, dass man sie routinemäßig in Autos verwenden könnte. Und Batterien sind natürlich sehr schwer, und außerdem ist ihre Lebensdauer nicht sehr lang. Dies sind also die anderen Herausforderungen. Außerdem kann man Wasserstoff in andere chemische Verbindungen, wie zum Beispiel organische Moleküle, umwandeln. Auch hierfür wird eine Katalyse benötigt. Katalyse wird daher die Schlüsseltechnologie für die künftige Lösung dieser Probleme sein. Gesprächsleiter: Vielen Dank. Professor Grubbs. Robert Grubbs. Wie bereits gesagt wurde, ist das große Problem also die Speicherung von Energie. Und es ist ein sehr...., besonders Batterien sind ein sehr interessantes chemisches Problem. Bei Batterien haben wir es mit dem gesamten Problem der Elektroden, der Chemie, der grundlegenden Chemie zu tun, um die es hierbei geht. Und dann ist da noch die Frage der Elektrolyte und der Separatoren. Daher gibt es eine riesige Menge von Fragen einer guten Materialforschung, die mit Batterien in Zusammenhang steht. Und es ist noch ein sehr weiter Weg, bis wir Autos herstellen können, die man an eine Energiequelle anschließen und dann größere Entfernungen damit zurücklegen kann etc. Ich denke also, dass dies ein Bereich ist, in dem viele Chemiker arbeiten müssen. Es gibt sehr viele Leute in diesem Bereich, aber er hält einige wirklich interessante Probleme bereit. Ich arbeite für ein Unternehmen, das versucht, eine neue Chemie für Batterien zu entwickeln, und dies stellt uns vor große Herausforderungen, macht aber auch sehr, sehr viel Spaß. Ich denke, das wird eines der wichtigsten Dinge sein, wenn man einmal verstanden hat, wie man Energie umwandelt: Wie man sie speichert. Wie speichert man Energie über Nacht? Wie bringt man sie in ein Auto und fährt damit usw. Das, denke ich, ist eine der Hauptfragen, die sich uns stellen wird. Gesprächsleiter: Vielen Dank. Richard. Richard Schrock: Danke. Nun, ich sage meiner Frau manchmal, dass alles Chemie ist. Und ich glaube nicht, dass alles Chemie im Sinne von Energieumwandlung und Nachhaltigkeit und Ähnlichem ist. Doch mit Sicherheit, wie wir soeben gehört haben, ist sehr viel Chemie. Und selbstverständlich ist es natürlich. Außerdem ist es wahr. Photosystem 2, Wasseraufspaltung. Ok, das ist gute anorganische Chemie, und ich bin anorganischer Chemiker. Und viel davon hat mit Metallen zu tun, Übergangsmetallen. Diese Themen werden bei uns bleiben und uns nicht wieder verlassen. Egal, ob es heterogen oder homogen ist, Katalyse mit Übergangsmetallen: Das ermöglicht bereits fantastische Dinge. Und man wird sich darauf stützen, um noch fantastischere Dinge zu tun. Es gibt hier ein sehr großes Betätigungsfeld: ob es Batterien sind, Wasseraufspaltung, was immer es ist. Und außerdem [geht es hier um] Interdisziplinarität, und zwar sehr stark, wie sie bereits gehört haben, mit Sicherheit. Materialforscher und Chemiker und Elektrochemiker und organische Chemiker: Jeder hat hier eine Möglichkeit zusammenzuarbeiten, um diese großen, großen Probleme wirklich zu lösen. Ich war erstaunt, einige der Dinge zu hören, die man heutzutage diskutiert. Man meldete sich vom Energieministerium bei mir – vielleicht ist jemand vom Energieministerium unter den Zuhörern, ich glaube irgendwo ist jemand von dort. Und eine ihrer Ideen befasst sich natürlich mit der Speicherung von Wasserstoff. Nun, das ist kein Problem, mit dem sich noch niemand beschäftigt hätte. Sie haben sich mit verschiedenen Methoden der Speicherung von Wasserstoff beschäftigt, da es als Gas so schwer zu speichern und in Automobilen zu verwenden ist. Eine der Methoden, die Sie für seine Speicherung in Erwägung gezogen haben oder ziehen, glauben Sie es oder nicht, ist die Herstellung von Ammoniak. Und um Wasserstoff aus Ammoniak zu erhalten, kehrt man diesen Vorgang einfach um. Alle katalytischen Prozesse sind reversibel. Und all diese Dinge, besonders die Herstellung von Ammoniak, für die ich mich interessiere, stellen eine große Herausforderung dar. Diese Dinge liegen also 20, 25, wer weiß wie viel Jahre in der Zukunft. Und natürlich werden sich nicht alle Forschungen auszahlen. Viele von ihnen werden niemals von Erfolg gekrönt sein. Doch wenn eine, wenn 10 % oder selbst 5 % von Ihnen von Erfolg gekrönt sind, so kann dies für uns alle sehr, sehr wichtig sein. Und ich erwarte das, doch leider werde ich nicht mehr da sein, es zu erleben. Gesprächsleiter: Danke sehr. Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: Mein Ratschlag würde lauten: Man sollte versuchen, so lange wie möglich bei elektrischer Energie zu bleiben. Natürlich geben uns photovoltaische Zellen, solarthermische Kraftwerke und Windmühlen elektrische Energie. Das Grundproblem ist daher, wie diese Energie gespeichert werden kann. Für mich ist die Sache sehr klar: Unser wichtigstes Ziel muss es sein, Batterien zu bekommen, die 10.000 mal neu aufgeladen werden können. Und welche von ihnen haben eine höhere Energiedichte als diejenigen, die wir heute verwenden? Und wie bereits von Steve Chu dargelegt wurde: Wenn man die Energiedichte um einen Faktor von vier erhöht – und diese Batterien stehen bereits zur Verfügung, man kann solche bekommen – dann kann man Autos herstellen, die ohne Zufuhr neuer Energie dieselben Entfernungen zurücklegen können wie gegenwärtige Autos mit Benzinmotoren. Dies wäre also tatsächlich ein Endziel. Natürlich muss man Energie auch in anderen Fällen speichern. Man kann Elektrizität, denke ich, wenn das Batterieproblem gelöst ist, auch im eigenen Haus speichern. Ich war auf einer Reise nach Bangalore, zum indischen Wissenschaftsinstitut, höchst beeindruckt. In Bangalore kommt es fünfmal am Tag zu Stromausfällen. Man hatte dort zwei Räume voller Autobatterien. Man lud sie auf. In einem Zimmer wurden die Batterien aufgeladen, und die Batterien des anderen Zimmers wurden für den Zusatzgenerator verwendet. Sie konnten also nur einen Zusatzgenerator verwenden, der von Autobatterien gespeist wurde. Wenn wir also Energie speichern müssten, könnten wir das Ganze über das ganze Haus verteilt haben. Jedes Haus könnte im Keller einen Raum haben, in dem man Batterien vorrätig hat und für diesen Zweck bereithält. Ohne diese Möglichkeit müssen wir natürlich die Produktion energiereicher chemischer Verbindungen verfolgen. Und wir leben in einer oxidierten Welt, so dass wir Energie gewinnen müssen, indem wir etwas reduzieren. Und die schwierige Sache ist: Wenn man genug Elektrizität hat, elektrolysiert man Wasser, stellt man Wasserstoff her. Wasserstoff verwendet man, um Kohlendioxid aus einem nahegelegenen Kraftwerk in Methan oder Methanol zu verwandeln. Sie können es durch chemische Synthese auch bis zu Kerosin umwandeln und es dann zum Betreiben von Flugzeugen, von Jet-Motoren verwenden. So wird dies geschehen müssen. Dies sind demnach die Veränderungen, die stattfinden müssen. Wir müssen diese Prozesse wichtiger machen. Und wie Professor Ertl sagte, sind Katalysatoren der Schlüssel für chemische Umwandlungen, und ich stimme dem vollkommen zu. Gesprächsleiter: Danke sehr. Vielleicht gibt es hier sofort eine Frage meinerseits. Zwei von Ihnen haben gesagt, dass Batterien, die Entwicklung von Batterien sehr wichtig ist. Stellt das Laden der Batterien kein Problem dar? Wenn man mobil sein möchte, fährt man immer längere Entfernungen. Selbst Steven Chu sagte heute Morgen, dass 300 Meilen kein Problem sind. Doch das Aufladen – wie wenn wir zu einer Tankstelle fahren, das Benzin einfüllen, und dann weiterreisen – es würde bestimmt einige Zeit kosten. Und wenn man es sehr schnell durchführt, wird die Batterie wahrscheinlich eine geringere Lebensdauer haben. Dies ist also eines der Probleme. Oder ist das Problem gelöst? Ich weiß es nicht. Gerhard Ertl: Ich denke, wir sollten uns nicht auf eine einzige Energiequelle konzentrieren. Es wird eine Mischung sein, eine Mischung verschiedener Quellen. Und der erste Schritt, denke ich, wäre das Einsparen von Energie. Dass man Energie sparen könnte, indem man die Industrie auffordert, kleinere Autos zu bauen, und indem man eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf den Autobahnen einführt, die es hier in Deutschland nicht gibt. So ließe sich sehr viel Energie sparen. Dies sind im Wesentlichen politische Entscheidungen, die notwendig sind. Und die Wissenschaft kann helfen, diese Probleme zu lösen. Doch als Erstes benötigen wir Vorschriften der Politik, die unseren Energieverbrauch einschränken. Gesprächsleiter: Und natürlich auch öffentliche Verkehrsmittel. In Deutschland sind wir noch nicht einmal in der Lage, die Höchstgeschwindigkeit auf den Autobahnen zu reduzieren, den Leuten zu sagen, dass wahrscheinlich nicht mehr jeder ein Auto fahren sollte. Das wäre sehr schwierig, das sehe ich auch. Im Prinzip ist es der Deutschen liebstes Spielzeug, und vielleicht vieler anderer, vieler anderer Völker der Welt. Sie wollten etwas zum Problem der Batterien sagen? Robert Grubbs: Ja, zur Geschwindigkeit des Aufladen. Es gibt da alle möglichen verrückten Pläne, an denen Leute arbeiten. Ich glaube, dass Tesla in Kalifornien Batterieaustauschprogramme einrichtet. Man fährt also einfach zur Tankstelle und wechselt die Batterien aus. Es gibt viele Ideen, die sich wahrscheinlich letztlich nicht als effektiv erweisen werden. Ich denke also nach wie vor, dass es hauptsächlich ein Materialproblem ist, wie schnell man aufladen kann, wie man mit der Hitze fertig wird, wie man all die anderen Probleme handhabt. Es ist ein äußerst interessantes technisches Problem. Man macht Fortschritte, doch wir haben noch einen weiten Weg vor uns. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt da eine Frage... vielleicht kann ich... muss ich sie direkt finden. Wir haben nicht sehr viele, aber einige Fragen. Sie betraf das Problem der Batterien. Es ging um Lithium, lassen Sie mich versuchen, sie zu finden: „Wie können wir mit dem möglichen Mangel an Elementen, die für die Herstellung von Batterien benötigt werden, wie zum Beispiel von Lithium oder möglicherweise anderer seltener Elemente, fertig werden? Gibt es da nicht auch das Problem, dass Bergbau die Natur zerstört?“ Ein Beispiel ist der beeindruckende Salzsee in Bolivien, den man gegenwärtig verwendet, um Lithium dort herauszubekommen. Ich denke, dies ist ein allgemeines Problem, das wir meines Erachtens an vielen Orten haben werden. Verfügen wir über genug Lithium, um alle diese Batterien herzustellen? Robert Grubbs: Wahrscheinlich nicht. Doch es gibt jetzt viele andere Arten von Chemie, mit denen sich Leute befassen. Ich denke daher, dass Lithium eines der Elemente ist, die man hierfür verwenden wird. Doch Chemiker beschäftigen sich mit vielen anderen Elementen, die Lithium ersetzen werden. Das werden, denke ich, die Batterien der nächsten Generation sein. Gerhard Ertl: Vor etwa zehn Jahren propagierte die Autoindustrie sehr stark die Verwendung von Brennstoffzellen, und Mercedes behauptete, dass innerhalb von fünf Jahren alle Autos von Mercedes mit Brennstoffzellen betrieben werden würden. Vor fünf Jahren traf ich jedoch einen Vertreter von Volvo, und er sagte mir, dass die Zukunft Lithiumionen-Batterien gehören werde: Es gibt also Moden, die kommen und gehen. Wir können nicht wissen, was letztendlich die Lösung dieses Problem sein wird. Gesprächsleiter: Hartmut. Hartmut Michel: Ja, ich möchte sagen, dass es nach meiner Information keinen Mangel an Lithium gibt. Es gibt keinen Mangel an Lithium. Richard Schrock: Ich bin kein Geologe, aber ich wusste nicht, dass uns das Lithium ausgeht. Und mit Sicherheit gibt es Alternativen. Natürlich bekommt man bei Natrium mehr für das gleiche Geld, das wäre also besser. Es gibt einige Probleme im Zusammenhang mit Natrium, wie bei allen Alternativen, selbst bei Lithium. Uns gehen die Elemente aus, das ist wahr. Ich habe gehört, dass wir nur.... Ich weiß nicht, wie die Schätzungen lauten, aber bei Phosphor besteht tatsächlich die Gefahr, dass es uns ausgeht. Hartmut Michel: Das stimmt. Richard Schrock: Ich glaube nicht, dass dies für Batterien relevant ist, aber ich bin mir nicht sicher. Aber ja, ok, uns gehen nicht die Elemente aus, sondern die Elemente in konzentrierter Form. Wenn man also die Elemente verdünnt, dann muss man sehr viel Energie aufwenden, um sie in konzentrierter Form zurückzugewinnen. Dies ist also ein Problem: weder geschaffen, noch zerstört. Doch gewiss werden sie weniger konzentriert. Das ist also auf lange Sicht ein Problem, aber ich denke, dass es wahrscheinlich, wissen Sie, unbekannte Ressourcen gibt, es wäre teurer, dasjenige, was wir brauchen, aus unbekannten Ressourcen zu ziehen, doch unbekannte Ressourcen sind Ressourcen, die noch nicht bedacht wurden. Was ich meine ist, wie sonst auch: Nehmen wir Elemente aus den am meisten verfügbaren und billigsten Ressourcen. Wenn die aufgebraucht sind, wenn es nichts mehr davon gibt, gehen wir weiter zur nächsten meistverfügbaren Ressource. Gewiss: Wenn man all das Lithium, und Natrium, und Kalium im Meerwasser zusammenrechnet, dann ergibt das eine sehr große Menge. Ich denke also nicht, dass wir schon bald keine Elemente mehr haben werden. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Ich denke, wir sollten etwas länger beim Thema Elektrizität bleiben. Ich habe hier eine andere Frage, und ich werde sie ein wenig umformulieren. um den Strom zu verteilen und zu speichern.“ Ich meine, es ist so gut wie unmöglich, sie auf der Stelle zu verwenden. Wir müssen sie speichern. Entweder in Batterien – das haben wir diskutiert – oder in chemischen Bindungen oder indem wir Wasser auf eine bestimmte Höhe pumpen oder mithilfe anderer Vorrichtungen. In Deutschland ist dies zum Beispiel ein sehr großes Problem. Wir haben also Windenergie an der Nordsee, an der Ostsee. Jedoch nicht genug Stromleitungen, um den Rest des Landes zu versorgen. Und eine ähnliche Situation besteht auch bei der photovoltaischen Energiegewinnung. Dies ist also ein großes Problem. Ich glaube, es besteht für den Rest der Welt in gleicher Weise. Möchten Sie irgendwelche Bemerkungen dazu machen, wie man dieses Problem lösen könnte? Es ist wiederum politisch und auch persönlich: Man möchte nicht, dass ein Stromkabel durch den eigenen Garten verläuft. Gerhard Ertl: Es gibt natürlich eine erhitzte Debatte über das Verlegen neuer Stromkabel. Dies ist in der Tat eine politische Frage. Die Wissenschaft kann darauf keine Antwort geben. Einige Stromleitungen muss man bauen. Und wenn man über Elektrizität verfügt, dann besteht natürlich die bequemste Methode sie in chemische Bindungen umzuwandeln darin, Wasserstoff herzustellen, und den Wasserstoff dann dazu zu verwenden, ihn in andere chemische Verbindungen zu transformieren. Hierfür sind Technologien vorhanden. Hierfür ausreichende Prozesse sind seit Jahrzehnten bestens bekannt. Es besteht also nur die Frage, was man tun will, und wie man es erreicht. Doch im Prinzip ist es möglich. Gesprächsleiter: Professor Ertl, Sie haben erwähnt, dass es eine Umwandlung unter Verwendung von CO2 geben könnte. Und ich habe hier eine Reihe von Fragen dazu. Vielleicht könnte ich eine von Jakob Kennedy vom Caltech vorlesen: Glauben Sie, dass sie notwendig sein wird? Ist es eine notwendige Brücke zwischen fossilen und alternativen Brennstoffen? Reicht die Speicherung aus, zum Beispiel als ein Karbonatmineral, oder ist die Umwandlung in Mehrwertprodukte erforderlich, um es ökonomisch tragbar zu machen?“ Das geht auch in einige andere Richtungen, doch ich glaube, das Hauptthema ist die Reduktion von CO2. Gerhard Ertl: Es ist eine Möglichkeit, die Versorgung mit erneuerbarer Energie zu betonen. Man verbrennt zuerst etwas, das erzeugt CO2, und dann stellt man CO2 wieder her und verwandelt es wieder zurück. Es ist immer eine Frage des Gleichgewichts zwischen Input und Output. Im Prinzip ist es also machbar. Und es gibt mehrere Versuche, diese Arbeiten nach diesen Prinzipien durchzuführen. Gesprächsleiter: Gibt es noch eine Rolle für die CO2-Reduktion, für die Umwandlung auf der katalytischen Seite? Wie weit ist man hiermit vorangekommen? Wissen Sie, Sie erwähnten... aber dies ist ein umfangreicher, sehr schmutziger Prozess. Richard Schrock: Es gibt garantiert etwas zu tun, denn ich meine, wissen Sie, CO2 und Wasser kommen am Ende dabei heraus. Thermodynamisch gesehen liegen sie ganz weit hier unten. Und natürlich reden die Leute beiläufig über die Umwandlung von CO2, doch auch darin muss man Energie investieren. Man kann nicht, kein Prozess – ich sollte nicht sagen, dass es keine Prozesse gibt. Ich denke, man lehnt sich zurück und schaut sich einige der Dinge an, die vorgeschlagen wurden. Es mag einige geben, die exothermisch sind, doch fast alle sind endothermisch. Das bedeutet also, dass man Energie darin investieren muss. Und d.h., es ist ein Nullsummenspiel. Letztlich, denke ich, muss man, um über die katalytische Umwandlung von CO2 oder die Speicherung von CO2 zu reden, sich die Zahlen anschauen, was die Mengen von CO2 betrifft, die der Mensch hiervon produziert, und die Berechnungen durchführen. Und dann stellt man fest, dass es für den Menschen fast keine Möglichkeit gibt – und dies hat wiederum mit Energieaufwand zu tun –, solche Mengen von CO2 in irgend einem Element oder einer anderen Verbindung wie etwa Karbonaten zu speichern, um sie loszuwerden. Es ist nur so.... Ich bin sehr pessimistisch. Darüber hinaus bin ich kein Experte, doch die Zahlen über die wir sprechen, wenn man CO2 reduzieren will, sind absolut enorm. Das Haber-Bosch-Verfahren verwendet Wasserstoff. Und es verwendet Wasserstoff aus Methan und Wasser, um CO2 zu erhalten und Wasserstoff. Es produziert also, das Haber-Bosch-Verfahren, neben allem anderen sonst, eine riesige Menge von CO2. Und man verwendet natürlich auch Stickstoff, und ich habe die Zahlen vergessen. Nun ja, wie verbrauchen genug Stickstoff, um jährlich 10^8 Tonnen Ammoniak oder so zu produzieren. Die verfügbare Menge Stickstoff beträgt jedoch etwa 10^15 Tonnen. Das hat natürlich nichts mit unserer Speicherung von Energie usw. zu tun. Ich versuche bloß, es ist nur, dass ich Sie mit den Zahlen zu beeindrucken versuche. Die Menge von CO2, die man bereitstellen oder mit der man etwas tun muss, um sie zu reduzieren, angesichts der Tatsache, dass es ständig in riesigen Mengen hergestellt wird. Und es gibt jede Menge davon. Eine extrem große Menge. Gesprächsleiter: CO2 betreffend gibt es noch ein paar andere Fragen. Vielleicht haben Sie sie bereits beantwortet, doch versuchen Sie die erste Frage zu beantworten. Die riesigen Mengen, die wir von Fabriken sehen, sind sicherlich sehr schwer umzuwandeln. Richard Schrock: Wenn man sich ansieht, wie viele Flugzeuge herumfliegen, und die Zahl der Automobile hinzuaddiert, die umherfahren, und die Zahl der Verfahren im Maßstab von Haber-Bosch, die CO2 produzieren, und das Verbrennen von Methan in Ölfeldern und all das. Es ist sehr... es ist unglaublich, welche Menge produziert wird. Und man redet so leicht darüber, nun ja, nicht so beiläufig, aber 400 Teile pro Millionen klingt nicht nach viel. Doch verteilt über die gesamte Erde ergibt sich eine riesige Menge CO2, die wir ihr hinzufügen. Hartmut Michel: Und natürlich vergessen wir normalerweise, dass eine Hauptquelle von CO2 die Zementproduktion ist, und auch die Stahlproduktion, das ist enorm. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Ich hatte vor kurzem eine Diskussion mit Leuten von Thyssen-Krupp in Duisburg, und sie erzählten uns, welche Menge von CO2 sie speichern. Sie haben in Duisburg einen sehr großen Speichertank, in den sie 300.000 Kubikmeter Gas einleiten können. Und sie sagten, dass sie mit der vorhandenen Stahlproduktion 150 dieser Tanks am Tag füllen können. Noch der interessante Punkt ist: dies ist hoch angereichert. Wenn es also eine Methode der Umwandlung gäbe – selbstverständlich benötigen wir einen guten Katalysator –, Wasserstoff aus nichtfossilen Brennstoffen, um das in Methan oder in Methanol umzuwandeln, oder in ein anderes wertvolles Produkt, so wäre das hervorragend. Also, Robert Schlögl, unser Institut wird wahrscheinlich daran arbeiten. Was jedoch den Erfolg betrifft, so hängt dieser wiederum von der Katalyse ab. Richard Schrock: Die optimistischste Sache wäre, tatsächlich einen katalytischen Prozess zu finden, der als letztliche Energiequelle Sonnenenergie verwendet, ob er Wasserstoff oder was immer sonst produziert. Und einen Katalysator, um CO2 zu kombinieren, um herzustellen, was immer wir herstellen wollen. Zusammen mit Wasser wäre das ein gutes Produkt. Wir wissen, dass das sicher ist. Das wird sehr, sehr schwer sein. Und es wird... bezüglich der Energie ist dies mit an Sicherheit grenzender Wahrscheinlichkeit eine endothermische katalytische Reaktion. Auf die eine oder andere Art muss man Energie aufwenden, um CO2 zu verwenden. Es tut mir leid, dass ich so pessimistisch klinge. Aber es ist ein großes, großes Problem. Gesprächsleiter: Es gab da eine Frage, diese steht damit in Zusammenhang. Das CO2-Problem haben wir wahrscheinlich jetzt abgeschlossen. Die Chemie hat noch viel zu tun, um einen Prozess zu entwickeln, der CO2 in etwas Nützliches umwandeln kann, dass wir in einem Energiezyklus verwenden können. Hier ist eine Frage: „Warum Batterien entwickeln statt einer möglichen Methanol-Wirtschaft?“ Es gab da vor einigen Jahren das Buch von Ola, das einige Vorschläge gemacht hat. Zwischenzeitlich hat es erneut eine Diskussion gegeben, Probleme mit Methanol. Was ist Ihre Meinung dazu? Das steht mit dieser Frage irgendwie in Zusammenhang. Hartmut Michel: Es ist eine ganz klare Sache, dass man am besten elektrisch bleibt, wenn man sich auf elektrische Energie stützt. Die Sache ist, dass man natürlich immer Energie verliert, wenn man die chemische Umwandlung durchführt. Und letztendlich ist der Hauptpunkt der, dass ein Verbrennungsmotor, für den man Methanol oder Kerosin oder was auch sonst verwendet, sehr ineffizient ist. Letztlich werden nur 20 % der Energie des Brennstoffs zum Betreiben des Autos verwendet, um die Räder anzutreiben. Und wenn man bei der elektrischen Energie bleibt, sind es 80 % der Energie in der Batterie, die zur Bewegung des Autos verwendet werden. Und das ist ein klares Argument dafür, bei elektrischer Energie zu bleiben. Die Effizienz der elektrolytischen Aufspaltung von Wasser beträgt nicht 100 %. Und bei all diesen Prozessen verliert man am Ende Energie. Bei der elektrischen Energie zu bleiben, ist das Beste. Und nach meiner Meinung wäre die Herstellung von Elektrizität, die Versorgung mit Elektrizität das Beste, wenn wir über supraleitende Kabel verfügten, die zu photovoltaischen Feldern, Gebieten in Arizona, Mexico, in der Sahara, in China und Australien eine Verbindung herstellten. Weil irgendwo immer die Sonne scheint. Und wenn wir supraleitende Kabel besäßen, die die Felder verbinden und den Kunden die Elektrizität liefern würden, dann müssten wir keine Elektrizität speichern. Wir könnten einfach des Nachts hier die Energie verbrauchen, die gleichzeitig in Australien produziert wird. Die Herstellung supraleitender Kabel wäre das Beste, was Sie tun können. Gerhard Ertl: Dies ist erneut eine Frage der Kosten. Gerhard Ertl: Das sollten Sie nicht vergessen. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist richtig. Gerhard Ertl: Ein solches Stromnetz aufzubauen, wäre sehr teuer, und seine Wartung wäre sogar noch teurer. Ich bin daher, was diese Lösung betrifft, nicht sehr optimistisch. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Also ich bin eher ein Außenseiter in diesen Dingen, da ich in diesen Fachgebieten keine Expertin bin. Doch ich möchte zumindest eine Frage aufwerfen, und zwar folgende: Kann man sich eine Welt mit fossilen Brennstoffen vorstellen, und wie würde sie aussehen? Ist das eine Science-Fiction-Welt, oder ist es etwas, das in nicht allzu ferner Zukunft Wirklichkeit sein könnte? Das wären vielleicht fossile Öle, vielleicht für Rohmaterialien für bestimmte Produktionen, aber nicht einfach zur Verbrennung. Besteht diese Möglichkeit, oder ist es lediglich ... Gerhard Ertl: Die Methanol-Technologie wurde soeben erwähnt. Man kann Methanol in einem katalytischen Prozess aus CO2 und Wasserstoff gewinnen, und Methanol dann als Energiequelle in einer Brennstoffzelle verwenden. Die Methanol-Brennstoffzelle ist also eine klare Option. Auch hier bestehen ernsthafte Probleme mit Bezug auf eine mögliche Vergiftung. Man benötigt sehr, sehr saubere Materialien, ansonsten sind Elektroden und Katalysatoren vergiftet. Also diese Probleme, solange sie ungelöst sind, verhindern, dass dies eine Lösung für unsere längerfristigen Probleme ist. Astrid Gräslund: Ich vermute, da dies sehr viel Geld kosten würde, dass es unseren Lebensstil beträchtlich verändern würde. Wir können nicht zu leben, wie wir es jetzt tun. Es ist daher vielleicht schwer vorauszusehen, und für den Rest der Welt, noch schwieriger. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt ein generelles Problem. Ich denke, in vielen Elektrolysegeräten, Brennstoffzellen, befinden sich teure Materialien, wertvolle Metalle. Viele der Katalysatoren, die auch für die Spaltung von Wasser erfolgreich eingesetzt werden können, enthalten Ruthenium, Iridium, Rhodium, Platin: Metalle, die sehr teuer sind. Und uns steht nicht genug davon zur Verfügung. Das scheint also ein Problem zu sein, und ich glaube, dass dies ein Punkt ist, an dem sich die Chemie etwas einfallen lassen muss. Sie haben das in ihrem Vortrag mehrfach erwähnt, selbst den erfolglosen Versuch, Katalysatoren aus Ruthenium durch Eisen oder etwas anderes zu ersetzen. Robert Grubbs: Aber in den USA wird gegenwärtig ein umfangreiches Programm durchgeführt. Es wird von Harry Gray bei uns durchgeführt. Er versucht, nicht seltene Metalle als Quelle für die Aufspaltung von Wasserstoff zu finden. Und sie machen einige Fortschritte. Und Dan Nocera, der am MIT arbeitet, macht Fortschritte bei der Verwendung nicht-edler Metalle für die Herstellung von Sauerstoff als Teil des Spaltungsprozesses. Und so denke ich, dass dies Dinge sind, an denen Leute zurzeit sehr intensiv forschen. Und ich bin, was diesen Bereich betrifft, ziemlich optimistisch. Gesprächsleiter: Sehr gut. Also ich denke, diesen Themenblock, Elektrizität und ein paar andere Aspekte, haben wir nun mehr oder weniger abgedeckt. Ich denke, es gibt da einen guten Weg, und Hartmut ist davon überzeugt, dass wir weiter in Richtung Elektrizität gehen sollten, und dies ist sicher richtig. Gegenwärtig sind mir die Zahlen nicht bekannt, vielleicht 25 oder 30 % unseres Energiebedarfs ist ein Bedarf an elektrischer Energie, der Rest sind Brennstoffe für Heizzwecke, das Betreiben von Pkws. Und dies muss ersetzt werden. Zurzeit sehe ich keinen guten und direkten Weg, zum Beispiel eine erneuerbare Brennstoffflüssigkeit herzustellen, oder einen gasförmigen Brennstoff, den wir verwenden können. Sicherlich können wir ein Auto mit Elektrizität betreiben, das ist kein Problem. Aber ein Flugzeug mit Elektrizität zu fliegen, mit Hilfe von Sonnenkollektoren, wird schwierig sein. Oder auch diese großen Schiffe, die wir zu Transportzwecken verwenden, das ist ebenfalls nicht so leicht. Daher besteht ein Bedarf, eine Lösung dafür zu finden. Richard Schrock: Nur zwei Dinge: Wenn Sie schnell und überall Energie verfügbar haben wollen, in Schiffen, vielleicht nicht in Flugzeugen. Ich weiß, dass dies in Deutschland nicht populär ist, aber es gibt etwas namens Kernenergie. Kernenergie ist verfügbar und sie funktioniert: Man erhält hier in kurzer Zeit mit geringem Einsatz ein sehr großes Resultat. Das ist wahrscheinlich nicht sehr bekannt. Doch in allen diesen Fällen müssen wir letztlich in irgendeiner Form Energie aufwenden. Und heute geht man hier natürlich so vor, dass man sich dabei auf den großen Ball am Himmel stützt. Was ich sagen will: Tatsächlich stützen wir uns zu 98,5 % auf nukleare Energie, da die Sonne alles liefert, mit Ausnahme dessen, was man aus Radioaktivität gewinnt, durch den natürlichen Zerfall in der Erde. Wir müssen also auf irgendeine Weise schließlich Sonnenenergie verwenden, denke ich, da sie sich auf keine Weise umgehen lässt, es sei denn, durch Nuklearenergie, zumindest kurzfristig. Aber letztendlich wird es die Sonne noch eine ganze Weile geben, und das ist der Grund dafür, warum wir alle hier sind und überleben. Darauf müssen wir uns also bei unseren Plänen für die Zukunft stützen. Gesprächsleiter: Sie haben sicher recht, doch wissen Sie, in Deutschland hat man nach Fukushima eine Entscheidung getroffen, auch in anderen Ländern. Und außerdem glaube ich, dass es sehr schwer ist, gegen den Willen der Mehrheit der Bevölkerung eines Landes etwas zu tun. Das ist eine politische Frage. Doch es wäre sicher sinnvoll. Richard Schrock: Nun, ich habe gehört einige Leute haben etwas gegen Windmühlen, weil sie hässlich sind. Richard Schrock: Sie machen ein Geräusch – Wuuf, Wuuf, Wuuf – die Leute wollen daher nicht in ihrer Nähe wohnen. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Spaß beiseite. Ich würde sagen, dass man hier natürlich auch zeitliche Maßstäbe in Erwägung ziehen muss. Was man also heute in Deutschland entscheidet, bezüglich Windmühlen und Kernkraft usw., das geschieht jetzt, und nicht vor 40 Jahren. Wie sah die Situation damals aus, als wir das Global Warming hatten, das vielleicht sehr deutlich wurde: Ich meine, wir mussten wirklich etwas tun. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Astrid Gräslund: Dann wird es eine völlig andere Situation geben, denke ich, auch für die politischen Entscheidungsträger. Daher denke ich, dass wir in der gegenwärtigen Situation einfach weiter kämpfen müssen. Und selbstverständlich sollten wir, wie sie hier angegeben haben, unsere Forschung betreiben, damit wir die Methodologie, Technologien verfügbar haben. Ich denke jedoch nicht, dass sie noch von irgendeinem Politiker erwarten sollten, dass er uns, dass er sie zu Technologien im großen Maßstab macht. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid, Sie haben vollkommen Recht. Doch Sie wissen, dass ich kein Freund der Kernenergie bin. Ich möchte jedoch auch etwas zu den jungen Leuten hier sagen. Ich meine, wenn ich Sie frage, wer für und wer gegen Kernenergie ist, so denke ich, dass eine Minderheit Kernenergie befürwortet. Doch andererseits denke ich, dass es wichtig ist, das Wissen zu pflegen und die Technologie weiterzuentwickeln, um sichere Kernkraftwerke bauen zu können. Und niemand in Deutschland, fast niemand den ich kenne, und insbesondere kein junger Mensch, geht mehr in dieses Arbeitsfeld, um in diesem Bereich zu arbeiten. Innerhalb einer Generation wird dieses Wissen verloren sein. Das ist eine Gefahr. Wir hatten den Fall von Tschernobyl und von anderen Kernkraftwerken knapp außerhalb unserer Grenzen, die ein Problem hatten. Und wir bekommen diese Probleme mit. Das lässt sich nicht verhindern, es ist ein globales Problem. Und wir müssen in diese Richtung denken und auch für dieses Problem eine Lösung finden, glaube ich. Gerhard Ertl: Was sie erwähnten, betrifft existierende Kernkraftwerke. Gesprächsleiter: Auch neue. Gerhard Ertl: Aber ich denke, was noch ein größeres Problem ist, ist die Entsorgung des Abfalls, des nuklearen Abfalls. Und bis jetzt wurde dieses Problem nicht gelöst. Wissen Sie, in Deutschland haben wir eine heftige Diskussion über den Ort, an dem wir den nuklearen Abfall endlagern könnten. In mancher Hinsicht ist dies natürlich auch ein Problem für die Chemie. Gesprächsleiter: Genau. Gerhard Ertl: Doch häufig wird es einfach unter den Teppich gekehrt. Gesprächsleiter: Dies ist eines der Hauptprobleme. Es ist auch der Grund, warum ich wirklich ... Wir müssen dieses Problem irgendwie lösen. Und es gibt bislang keine gute Lösung. Robert Grubbs: Also, in den USA hat man viele Lösungen vorgeschlagen. Wir haben sehr viel offenes Land und menschenleere Gegenden, aber die angrenzenden Leute wollen natürlich nicht, dass man den Abfall in ihrem Hinterhof endlagert. Es gibt also immer, immer dieses Problem. Andererseits, denke ich, dass Sie eine wirklich wichtige Frage aufgeworfen haben. Ich war in einem anderen Ausschuss, einem Beraterstab, der Nuklearenergie betrachtete. Und Experten auf diesem Gebiet zu finden, ist bis heute wirklich sehr schwer, weil in den letzten Jahren niemand mehr in dieses Arbeitsfeld gegangen ist. Und wie sie gesagt haben: Wenn wir zur Verwendung von Kernenergie gezwungen sind, wenn sie verwendet werden muss, wie beleben wir dieses Arbeitsfeld dann erneut? Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Ok, es gab keine Frage zur Kernkraft. Wenden wir uns jedoch einigen anderen Fragen zu. Diese betrifft die Verwendung der Biologie. Da gab es eine Frage: Was können wir von der Biologie für diesen Prozess lernen. Das ist ziemlich klar. Jeder von uns, denke ich, wird zustimmen, dass man von der Biologie lernen kann. Und vielleicht muss die Chemie andere Lösungen finden, kann sie nicht dieselben Systeme verwenden. Doch vielleicht können wir das biologische System verwenden. Und es gibt diesbezüglich viele Fragen. Und vielleicht können Sie versuchen, einige von ihnen zu beantworten. Eine betraf die Photosynthese. in dem wir die Sonnenenergie „ernten“ und in Brennstoffen speichern? Von welchen zu erwartenden Zahlen gehen wir aus? Was lässt sich aus dieser Methode erhoffen?“ Und es gibt noch eine Reihe anderer Fragen, die damit in Zusammenhang stehen. Zum Beispiel: Kann Zuckerrohr eine effektive Quelle für biologische Brennstoffe sein, d. h.: in Brasilien? Sind biologische Brennstoffe ökonomisch und umweltfreundlich?“ Und so weiter. Hartmut. Er hat bereits eine Stellungnahme dazu gemacht, doch das war am Samstag, und sie waren nicht da. Er wird sie also wiederholen. Hartmut Michel: Ok. Der Gesamtprozess der Photosynthese hat eine ziemlich geringe Effizienz. Beginnen wir mit dem Anfang: Nur etwa 47 % des Sonnenlichts werden, was die Energie betrifft, von den Pflanzen absorbiert. Und dann haben wir, ... denn, wissen Sie, in den Lichtquanten befindet sich wesentlich mehr Energie. Natürlich sind die blauen Lichtquanten energiereicher als die roten. Und nur etwa 40 % der Energie in den Lichtquanten wird dann in der Primärreaktionen gespeichert. Und die Energieverluste setzen sich fort. Man braucht etwa 9,4 Photonen, um zwei Moleküle gebundenen Wasserstoff zu produzieren, der dann verwendet werden könnte, der dann verwendet werden könnte, um CO2 herzustellen. Die Fixierung von CO2 in den Pflanzen ist ein weiteres Problem, da das Enzym nicht genau genug zwischen Sauerstoff (O2) und Kohlendioxyd (CO2) unterscheiden kann. Und in jedem dritten Zyklus baut es statt ein CO2 ein O2 in den Zucker ein, in den C5-Zucker. Und dies führt zu einem Energieverlust von 30 bis 40 %. Ein weiterer Punkt betrifft die Tatsache, dass die Photosynthese für geringe Lichtintensitäten optimiert ist. Also selbst hier in Deutschland, wenn man volle Sonneneinstrahlung hat, werden 80 % des Sonnenlichts nicht genutzt. Der Elektronenfluss durch die Reaktionszentren setzt dem eine Grenze. Und die Reaktionszentren werden beschädigt. Die Natur hat diese Beschädigung teilweise behoben, indem sie die zentrale Untereinheit des Photosystems zwei-, dreimal in der Stunde austauscht. Sie wird wahrscheinlich mit der Untereinheit photooxidiert und muss ersetzt werden. Und den Pflanzen gelingt es, dies zu tun. Aber ich glaube nicht, dass wir bei einer technologischen Lösung dazu in der Lage wären. Wenn wir alle diese begrenzenden Faktoren zusammennehmen, sieht man die theoretische obere Grenze für die Photosynthese bei 5 %. Wenn man jedoch tatsächlich die Biomasse misst, die man produziert, die man unter optimalen Bedingungen mit verschiedenen Pflanzen erhält, dann beträgt dieser Wert etwa 1 %. Dann geht man weiter zur Produktion von biologischen Brennstoffen. Man muss zum Beispiel in Traktorbrennstoffe investieren. Man muss das Zeug sammeln, man muss Energie aufwenden, um Düngemittel zu produzieren. Und dann muss man mehr als 50 % der Energie, die zur Produktion der biologischen Brennstoffe erforderlich ist, aus fossilen Brennstoffen nehmen. Das ist also ein weiterer Gesichtspunkt. Und wenn Sie deutsches Bio-Diesel betrachten, dann enthält es weniger als 0,1 % der Sonnenenergie. Der Gesamtprozess ist also äußerst ineffizient. Und wenn man weitere Berechnungen anstellt, um herauszufinden, welche Flächen man benötigt, um den deutschen Verbrauch von Autobenzin und Autodiesel zu ersetzen, so stellt sich heraus, dass das gesamte deutsche Agrarland gerade einmal dazu ausreichen würde, Das ist also gar nichts. Andererseits verwenden wir in Deutschland bereits 20 % der Grasfläche für den Anbau von Mais, um den Rohstoff für die Biogasproduktion bereitzustellen. Und infolge davon stiegen die Lebensmittelpreise an, das Einkommen der Bauern nahm aber zu. Und die Lobby der Bauern ist eine starke Lobby, die sich für die Produktion biologischer Kraftstoffe einsetzt, weil sie tatsächlich große Profite daraus ziehen. Daran kann kein Zweifel bestehen. Und gegen die Lobby der Bauern hat man es schwer. Sie haben Unterstützung von Politikern, um dagegen zu argumentieren. Was mich am stärksten gegen biologische Brennstoffe einnimmt, ist die Palmölproduktion in den Tropen. Dies führt zur Rodung des Regenwaldes, um Plantagen für Ölpalmen anzupflanzen. Vielleicht haben Sie etwas über die Rauchschwaden in Singapur gelesen, die auf die illegale Rodung und Verbrennung des Regenwalds auf der Insel Sumatra zurückzuführen sind. Und dies muss natürlich unterbunden werden. Und ich denke, es gibt keine politische Lösung hierfür. Wir sollten ganz einfach Palmöl nicht als Quelle für Diesel verwenden. Und wir sollten diese Art von biologischen Brennstoffen weder nach Europa noch in die USA importieren. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Vielen Dank. Also die Situation in Brasilien. Ich denke, dass die Verwendung von Zuckerrohr, dass die Berechnung, habe ich gehört, zumindest ein paar Prozent der Sonnenenergie speichert. Hartmut Michel: Nein, es sind 0,2 %. Es ist sehr einfach zu berechnen. Doch der Vorteil von Brasilien ist, dass das Zuckerrohr, das man verwendet, ... sie pressen die Rohre, um diese Energie zu verbrennen und für die Destillation des Fermentationsprodukts zu verwenden, um den Alkohol zu gewinnen. Aus diesem Grund sind der Energieaufwand und die Bioäthanol-Produktion in Brasilien sehr gering. Und das Ganze ist ökonomisch machbar. Gesprächsleiter: Ich denke in Amerika gibt es eine ähnliche Situation mit Mais. Richard Schrock: Eine ähnliche Situation mit Mais. Ich denke, nach einigen Schätzungen ist es tatsächlich so, dass man mehr Energie investieren muss, als man herausbekommt. Wenn man alles mitzählt: den Dünger, die Herstellung des Düngers und das Anpflanzen von Mais, seine Verarbeitung, seine Fermentierung, und all das zu destillieren, wissen Sie, um den Äthanol herauszubekommen usw. Und ihn dann in reiner Form zu gewinnen. Letztendlich kostet das mehr, als man herausbekommt. Das ist also definitiv nicht, was wir wollen. Und ich weiß nicht, Bob, ob du diese Zahlen gehört hast, aber es gibt nicht mehr viel Begeisterung für Mais, zumindest in den USA. Gesprächsleiter: Das ändert die Situation, was gut ist. Robert Grubbs: Die andere Sache, die im Laufe der letzten paar Jahre passiert ist: Vor ein paar Jahren gab es eine ganze Bewegung grüner Technologie und entsprechende Risikokapitalgeber. Und also wurde eine große Zahl von Unternehmen gegründet, die Enzyme und verschiedene modifizierte Enzyme für die Herstellung von Butanol verwenden würden und die Herstellung verschiedener Arten von Brennstoffen. Diese Unternehmen gingen dann an die Börse. Ihre Börsenwerte waren riesig. Jetzt sind ihre Börsenwerte sehr gering. Denn es gibt die ganze Frage der Größenordnung: Wie bestimmt man die Größe biologischer Prozesse in großem Umfang? Wie verhindert man Verunreinigungen etc., etc. Richard Schrock: Ich denke, die Erde hat das Größenproblem recht gut gelöst: Sie bedeckt ihre Oberfläche mit grünen Pflanzen. Doch der Mensch hat ein Problem damit. Das ist gewiss ein Problem, ein großes Problem, das Problem der Größenordnung. Gerhard Ertl: Also, eine Effizienz von nur 0,5 % wäre im Prinzip kein Problem. Von der Sonne steht uns genug Energie zur Verfügung. Sondern die Probleme entstehen hauptsächlich durch den Einfluss auf die Umwelt, und durch den Wettbewerb zwischen der Produktion von Lebensmitteln und von Energie, von Brennstoffen. Es ist eine sehr, sehr schwierige Frage. Und deshalb denke ich, dass die einzige Möglichkeit, die vernünftig ist, in der Verwendung von Abfallprodukten besteht, von Abfallprodukten biologische Produkte, um daraus Brennstoff zu erzeugen. Aber nicht darin etwas anzupflanzen, Pflanzen anzubauen, um sie in Brennstoffe zu verwandeln. Doch mit Abfallprodukten kann man das machen. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, ein Nebenprodukt. Man wird damit nicht das ganze Problem lösen, aber vielleicht einen kleinen Teil, sicher. Und das wird auch besonders in Bayern getan, glaube ich, wenn ich mich recht erinnere. Richard Schrock: Letztlich ist es eine Frage von... Es gibt tatsächlich nicht die eine Lösung. Es gibt viele Lösungen und viele der vielen Lösungen sind schwierige Lösungen. Aber ich wünschte mir, wir hätten eine Zaubersonne, die wir alle irgendwie auf der Erde nutzen können. Aber die haben wir nicht. Ich nehme an, dass die Kernfusion nach wie vor erforscht wird, aber man hört immer, dass sie fast am Ziel sind. Ich denke [jedoch] nicht, dass sie je angekommen sind. Aber das ist ein Wunschtraum, eine Sonne auf der Erde zu haben, leider. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Ich möchte lediglich eine Sache dazu sagen, und zwar Folgendes: vor ein paar Jahren reiste ich in Norddeutschland. Und was mir wirklich auffiel, war die Tatsache, dass fast jedes Haus Sonnenkollektoren auf dem Dach hatte. Nirgendwo sonst auf der Welt habe ich das gesehen. Offensichtlich stand eine Art politischer Motivation dahinter. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, oder es war stark gefördert. Astrid Gräslund: Also, es war stark gefördert. Doch ich meine, offensichtlich braucht es nicht mehr als das. Und dann konnten sich die Leute es leisten. Wahrscheinlich könnten es sich Staaten leisten. Ich weiß nicht, ob sie es weiterhin tun, aber der Bedarf ist möglicherweise geringer. Richard Schrock: Ich weiß nicht, vielleicht haben Sie die Zahlen, oder Sie haben die Zahlen. Wenn Sonnenkollektoren zur Verfügung stünden, wenn sie vom Himmel fielen, das wäre eine Sache. Doch wir müssen Silikon herstellen, müssen die Sonnenkollektoren produzieren. Und ich weiß nicht, ab welchem Punkt der Aufwand und die Energie sich die Waage halten usw. Ab welchem Punkt des Energiespiels mit Sonnenkollektoren schreiben wir schwarze Zahlen? Hartmut Michel: Tatsächlich verhält sich die Sache in Deutschland so, das Sonnenenergie nicht durch die Regierung finanziell unterstützt wird, sondern es ist so, dass das örtliche Elektrizitätswerk einem die Energie abkaufen muss, die man mithilfe von photovoltaischen Zellen produziert. Gegenwärtig, glaube ich, ist es so, dass bei neuinstallierten photovoltaischen Zellen die Kilowattstunde mit knapp unter 0,30 € bezahlt wird. Und das ist natürlich ein wirklich hoher Betrag. Und wenn man diese photovoltaischen Zellen auf seinem Dach installiert, hat man jedes Jahr für die nächsten 20 Jahre einen garantierten Profit von 8 %. Und selbst Versicherungsagenturen machen hierbei mit. Dies hat zu anderen Problemen geführt, denn jetzt hat sich, um diese Energie von diesen Investoren bezahlen zu können, der Preis für die Kilowattstunde für den normalen Kunden, selbst für die Putzfrau, um sechs Cent erhöht. Und dies hat zur Folge, dass auch die Produktionskosten der deutschen Industrie in die Höhe gehen. Viele Industrien denken jetzt darüber nach, ihre Produktion in Deutschland herunterzufahren und sie stattdessen in den USA durchzuführen, weil Energie in den USA sehr günstig ist, hauptsächlich wegen des Gas-Frackings. Dies hat also wirtschaftliche Konsequenzen, und man muss klarerweise darüber nachdenken, wenn man das tut. Auch innerhalb von Deutschland gibt es Konsequenzen. Die meisten der photovoltaischen Zellen in Deutschland sind in Bayern installiert, wenn man sich umschaut, nicht in Niedersachsen. Die Sache ist, dass innerhalb Deutschlands Bayern jährlich einen Überschuss von 2 Milliarden Euro produziert. Die Leute in Bayern erhalten also 2 Milliarden Euro von den Leuten in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Im Ruhrgebiet gibt es nur wenige Installationen von photovoltaischen Zellen. Also bezahlen die Leute im Ruhrgebiet denjenigen in Bayern Geld für die Verwendung dieser Elektrizität. Dies sind natürlich interne Konsequenzen, über die man nicht nachgedacht hat, als diese Gesetze eingeführt wurden. Außerdem muss man sagen, denke ich, dass die Gewinnschwelle, dass die reale Rentabilitätsgrenze in Italien mit Sicherheit bei etwa 0,13 € pro Kilowattstunde liegt. Und dies ist bereits in Reichweite. Dieses oder nächstes Jahr werden wir diesen Wert erreichen. Es wird also im Mittelmeerraum wirtschaftlich tragbar sein, in Spanien, Italien und Griechenland, Elektrizität unter Verwendung photovoltaischen Zellen zu produzieren. Und dann können wir natürlich diese Elektrizität auch von dort importieren, nicht durch supraleitende Kabel, sondern durch diese Hochspannungsgleichstromkabel, die auch heute Morgen von Steve Chu in seinem Vortrag erwähnt wurden. Robert Grubbs: Ja, das ist eine Möglichkeit. Gesprächsleiter: Ich habe noch eine biologische Frage. Es ist ziemlich klar, dass Wasserstoff für Haber Bosch ein ziemlich zentrales Element ist, vielleicht auch für die Betreibung von PKWs und für andere Prozesse. Wir müssen es also auf irgendeine Weise herstellen. Hier also war eine Frage: „Welches ist die beste Methode zur Herstellung von Wasserstoff?“ Und im Zusammenhang mit der biologischen Vorgehensweise gibt es auch Bemühungen, Algen zu verwenden oder Cyano-Bakterien, um Wasserstoff direkt herzustellen. Vielleicht können Sie auch dazu etwas sagen. Und was sind Ihre Überlegungen zur Gewinnung von Wasserstoff? Ich denke, eine Methode ist klarerweise die Elektrolyse von Wasser. Wenn wir das im großen Maßstab durchführen wollen, müssen wir auch einen neuen Katalysator für die Elektrolyse entwickeln, für die Elektrolysegeräte usw. Doch das ist wahrscheinlich innerhalb unserer Reichweite. Aber gibt es auch eine direkte Methode, wie zum Beispiel Sonnenlicht, und die Verwendung der Wasseraufspaltung in Pflanzen? Richard Schrock: Hat jemand eine Antwort auf diese biologische Frage? Ich weiß nicht, Algen? Hartmut Michel: Ich denke noch immer, dass der Gewinn sehr, sehr gering wäre, und man hätte weiterhin das Problem der Beschädigung des Systems. Und außerdem ist es biologisch, und Lebewesen sterben. Und damit ist es nicht so stabil, wie es chemische Mittel sind. Und wirtschaftlich sehe ich keine Zukunft für biologisch gewonnenen Wasserstoff. Gerhard Ertl: Ich bin der Meinung, dass die Elektrolyse mit Sicherheit die Lösung dieses Problems sein wird. Und man muss dafür bezahlen, denn es gibt eine Überspannung in der Zelle, die Energie kostet. Das Hauptproblem besteht also darin, die richtigen Elektroden zu finden, die die Überspannung reduzieren. Und es ist in der Hauptsache die Sauerstoffelektrode, die dieses Problem verursacht, nicht die Wasserstoffelektrode. Sobald wir daher eine Lösung dafür haben, wird es also auch sehr viel effizienter, Wasser durch Elektrolyse zu spalten. Gesprächsleiter: Es gab da eine interessante Frage, die Beschichtung von Elektroden für die Aufspaltung von Wasser in beide Richtungen. In Elektrolysegeräten, auch in Brennstoffzellen, besteht ein Problem, das direkt mit dem in Zusammenhang steht, was sie sagen. Es gibt also noch immer einigen Bedarf an chemischer Arbeit. Die Frage hier war, ob die Nanotechnologie einen Beitrag liefern kann, Kohlenstoff-Nanoröhren, derartige Dinge. Ich meine, man versucht das, Elektroden zu Beschichten, um die Überspannung zu reduzieren. Gerhard Ertl: Die Katalyse war seit ihrer Erfindung einen Nanotechnologie, lange bevor dies .... Gesprächsleiter: Sicher, ich zitiere nur. Gerhard Ertl: Also, durch die Erfindung eines neuen Namens werden die Probleme nicht gelöst. Gesprächsleiter: Sehr gut. Wir kommen mit den Fragen gut voran. Also was ist nun die beste Methode zur Gewinnung von Wasserstoff? Einige weitere Ideen, außer der Elektrolyse? Ich meine, gibt es nicht so etwas wie... Richard Schrock: Man muss es gewinnen über, man muss eine solare Quelle für die Wasserspaltung haben. Ich denke, es gibt keine andere Möglichkeit. Man nimmt Energie von der Sonne und produziert etwas, das man zum Verbrennen verwenden kann, um Wasser zu erhalten. Ich meine, ich könnte hier vielleicht klingen wie Dan Nocera. Richard Schrock: Doch Sie wissen, dass das auf eine Weise gut ist. Ich meine, die Leute reden über Wasserstoff dies und Wasserstoff das. Aber man kann nicht einfach los ziehen und ihn kaufen, es sei denn in einem kleinen Behälter. Was ich sagen will: Wir benötigen riesige, riesige Mengen. Und die einzige Möglichkeit, die zu bekommen, besteht in einer Gewinnung aus Wasser, die meisten Chemiker wissen, dass man etwas tun muss, um H2 aus Wasser zu bekommen. Gesprächsleiter: Das denke ich auch. Ich meine, alle Lösungen, die wir diskutiert haben, sind nur Teillösungen in einem ziemlich kleinen Maßstab. Mit Ausnahme des Elektrizitätsproblems, das nun ziemlich ok aussieht. Es gibt Lösungen, doch für die Produktion von direkten solaren Brennstoffen gibt es bislang noch keine gute Lösung. Und gegenwärtig sehe ich auch keine gute Lösung für den Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe. Und sie gehen uns aus. Ich meine, noch gibt es – Sie erwähnten das Fracking – noch gibt es Ressourcen. Doch denken wir 100 oder 200 Jahre weiter. Wir brauchen eine Lösung für den Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe, weil sie durch das Fahren unserer Autos, das Fliegen unserer Flugzeuge, die Beheizung unserer Zimmer, unserer Häuser und all das von uns letztendlich aufgebraucht werden wird. Und die einzige Möglichkeit scheint im Moment die zu sein, Wasser zu verwenden, das nicht giftig ist, in Mengen vorhanden und billig. Und Sonnenlicht. Also ich sehe nichts anderes. Ich denke also, dass alle von Ihnen darüber nachdenken und sich in dieses Arbeitsgebiet begeben und eine Lösung finden müssen. Es wird sehr schwierig sein, dies zu tun wie die Pflanzen draußen. Der Katalysator ist fürchterlich kompliziert. Professor Michel hat erwähnt, dass die Lebensdauer des wichtigen Enzyms, das die Aufspaltung des Wassers vornimmt, lediglich 20 oder 30 Minuten beträgt. So etwas auf chemischem Wege herzustellen, ist äußerst schwierig. Noch kann die Chemie das nicht. Ich meine Jean-Marie Lehn in seinem Vortrag, der steckte ein wenig in seiner adaptiven Chemie: Selbstreparatur, Selbstreplikation, alle diese Probleme; aber wir sind noch sehr weit davon entfernt. Und aus diesem Grunde bin ich auch der Meinung, dass es noch Raum für die Chemie gibt, für neue Chemie, für gute Chemie, um etwas in diese Richtung zu tun. Richard Schrock: Zum Glück sind eine Menge dieser Probleme der anorganischen Chemie. Ich bin also in gewisser Weise darüber erfreut, dies zu hören. Und alle Sie anorganische Chemiker: nehmen Sie sich der Sache an. Weil wir für viele dieser Probleme, über die wir sprechen, Übergangsmetallchemie benötigen werden: für das Beschichtung von Elektroden, um dies und das zu tun, Wasser aufzuspalten usw. Die Probleme werden nicht weggehen, und wir müssen uns, wie Bob erwähnt hat, mehr in Richtung auf Metalle zubewegen, die auf der Erde in großen Mengen vorhanden sind. Weil bei einigen Metallen sich in größerem Maßstab nichts machen lassen wird, in den Größenordnungen, die wir erreichen müssen. Das wird nicht passieren. Gesprächsleiter: Ja. Ok. Gerhard Ertl: Ich möchte nur eine Bemerkung über Vorhersagen machen. Als ich Student war, kam die Kernfusion gerade erst ins Gespräch. Und man sagte voraus, dass man in 50 Jahren Reaktoren für Kernfusion haben würde. Das ist nun 60 Jahre her, und wir warten noch immer auf Lösungen dafür. Nun sagt man, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sein werden, einen Reaktor zu bauen. Und dasselbe gilt für fossile Brennstoffe. Als ich Student war, gab es eine Vorhersage des Club of Rome, die feststellte, dass es in 20 Jahren keine Ressourcen mehr geben würde. Auch dies ist nun 50 Jahre her. Wir haben immer noch Ressourcen. Und Optimisten behaupten natürlich, dass wir neue Ressourcen finden werden. Doch dies ist keine Lösung des Problems. Man hat darin Recht, dass in einigen Jahrzehnten oder Jahrhunderten alle diese Ressourcen aufgebraucht sein werden. Wir werden also gezwungen sein, alternative Lösungen dafür zu finden. Es gibt keinen anderen Weg. Gesprächsleiter: Astrid. Astrid Gräslund: Wenn ich dazu etwas sagen darf. Ich denke Sie haben ganz Recht, dass Lösungen kommen müssen. Und natürlich ist es ganz einfach die Notwendigkeit, die sie erzwingen wird. Im Moment sehen wir sie nicht. Zumindest persönlich halte ich jedoch nicht den Mangel an fossilen Brennstoffen für ein ernstes Problem, sondern das, was wir tun, während wir sie verbrennen, und das dies zu schlechte Folgen für alles um uns herum hat. Vielleicht nicht für mich, aber für meine Urenkel oder ihre Enkel. Das ist meines Erachtens der schwierige Aspekt. Aber es wird natürlich..., nur die Zukunft kann zeigen, wie schlimm dies sein wird. Wir werden es nicht erleben. Gesprächsleiter: Ja, danke sehr. Es gab noch einige weitere Fragen allgemeiner Art. Ich denke, wir sollten darauf nicht eingehen. Es handelt sich dabei mehr um Politik und Forschungsgelder und all das. Es ist sicherlich sehr wichtig, das zu tun. Ich denke, dass im Prinzip.... Gibt es eine dringende Frage von Ihnen? Wir sind ganz Ohr. Irgendeine Stellungnahme von ... ja, ok. Frage: Zur Frage der Prognosen. Glauben Sie wirklich, dass wir in 1000 Jahren zurückschauen und dies als eine wirklich seltsame, kurzlebige Phase in der Geschichte ansehen werden?... Wo,... ich meine, in 1000 Jahren werden wir aus solaren Quellen erneuerbare Energien in solch riesigen Mengen zur Verfügung haben, dass die gegenwärtige Zeit rückblickend als sehr, sehr merkwürdig erscheinen wird. Ich meine, wir werden riesige Probleme mit der Klimakrise bekommen, doch sie wird ab einem bestimmten Punkt reversibel sein. Was meinen Sie? Richard Schrock: Wie groß, glauben Sie, wird die Weltbevölkerung in 1000 Jahren sein? Frage: Sie wird sich wahrscheinlich stabilisieren. Richard Schrock: Die Natur wird leider viele dieser Überbevölkerungprobleme schließlich lösen. Es tut mir leid das zu sagen, doch es ist unausweichlich (Lachen). Hartmut Michel: Vielleicht wissen wir in 100 Jahren, wann das Problem endlich gelöst sein wird. Richard Schrock: Es wird innerhalb von hundert Jahren gelöst. Gerhard Ertl: Wenn Sie 100 Jahre zurückblicken, sah die Welt vollkommen anders aus. Niemand würde im Jahr 1930 vorhergesagt haben, wie die Welt in 100 Jahren aussehen würde. Es ist daher so gut wie unmöglich, irgendeine Vorhersage darüber zu machen, was in den nächsten 100 Jahren passieren wird. Keine Chance. Hartmut Michel: Lassen Sie mich außerdem hinzufügen, dass Sie heute Morgen in Steven Chus Vortrag diesen Eiszeitenzyklus gesehen haben. Und es besteht eine gewisse Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass wir in nicht allzu ferner Zukunft eine weitere Eiszeit erleben werden. Also müssen wir auch damit fertig werden. Und dann, wenn wir dieselben Eiszeiten haben, wird Berlin natürlich unter einer Eisdecke liegen. Und wir werden dann nicht hier sitzen, weil über uns eine mehrere 100 Meter dicke Eisschicht liegen wird. Richard Schrock: Und wie lange wird das dauern, 100 Jahre? Hartmut Michel: Und das wird die nächsten 80 oder 90.000 Jahre dauern. Richard Schrock: 80 oder 90.000 Jahre?! Hartmut Michel: Ja. Richard Schrock: Ok, Problem gelöst. Machen wir also eine Party. Astrid Gräslund: Als jemand aus Schweden kann ich Ihnen sagen, dass wir vor relativ kurzer Zeit dort eine Eiszeit hatten, und erst vor ungefähr 10.000 Jahren begann sie wirklich, sich zurückzuziehen. Und nun können wir sehen, und uns darauf freuen, dass wir uns zurzeit wahrscheinlich in der Mitte zwischen zwei Eiszeiten befinden. Wir werden also ein paar 1000 Jahre haben. Und dann kommt das Eis zurück; was immer sonst passiert. Ich denke, wir könnten vielleicht Einfluss darauf nehmen, indem wir sehr viel heizen, doch ich glaube, dass es letztlich nichts helfen würde. Also gewiss, diese sehr langen Zeiträume sind etwas völlig anderes. Und wie wir heute Morgen gesehen haben, sind die Eiszeiten gekommen und wieder verschwunden. Und es ist der zeitliche Rahmen, in den wir wirklich keinerlei Einsicht haben. Dennoch würde ich sagen, dass uns dies nicht davon abhalten sollte.... Ich meine, wir sollten hier und jetzt Probleme lösen, das ist unsere Aufgabe. Und vielleicht für unsere Enkel. Aber wir wissen nicht ... Gesprächsleiter: Es ist also eine große Chance für die Wissenschaft und die Menschheit im Allgemeinen, Lösungen für diese Probleme zu finden. Ich meine: die fossilen Brennstoffe, die über Millionen von Jahren durch Photosynthese entstanden sind, aufzubrauchen. Wir haben sie innerhalb von 100 oder 200 Jahren verbraucht, und vielleicht hätten wir das nicht tun sollen, aber es war eine tolle Zeit. Richard Schrock: Wenn diese Eiszeit wirklich kommt, und es einige Menschen gibt, die sie überleben, kann man sich fragen, was für Menschen das sein werden, die da am anderen Ende herauskommen. Ich weiß nicht: Man sieht keine Dinosaurier herumlaufen. Es gibt Vögel, also... Robert Grubbs: Doch in der Zwischenzeit müssen viele Probleme gelöst werden. Und die gute Eigenschaft dieser Probleme ist, dass viele von ihnen chemische Probleme sind, jedoch viele von ihnen erfordern eine Menge guter, neuer Grundlagenforschung, die noch zu entwickeln ist. Und im Prozess der Durchführung, werden wir sehr viel Spaß haben. Gesprächsleiter: Gut. Frage: Hi, mein Name ist Nil von der Chualongkom Universität in Thailand. Es ist mir eine große Freude, hier zu sein und Sie alle zu treffen. Haben Sie vielen Dank für Ihre Zeit. Also meine Frage bezieht sich auf elektrische Fahrzeuge. Um also einen Fortschritt auf diesem Gebiet zu machen: Glauben Sie, dass es möglich ist, dass dies ein anderes Problem der Produktion von Elektrizität verursacht. Ähnlich, wie wenn man Elektrizität produziert. Wäre es möglich, dass man – wenn man Elektrizität in großen Mengen produzieren muss – sich auf Kohle stützen muss? Oder man würde andere Zerstörungen, man könnte andere Probleme für die Umwelt verursachen. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist schwer zu verstehen. Ich habe es nicht verstanden. Könnten Sie den Hauptpunkt wiederholen? Frage: Sicher. Also die Frage, die ich habe, lautet: Wenn man Elektrofahrzeuge produzieren wollte, könnte man dabei sehr viel Elektrizität verwenden wollen. Und um das tun zu können: Wäre es möglich, dass man dadurch ein weiteres Problem erzeugt? Es könnte zum Beispiel sein, dass man mehr Kohlekraftwerke braucht, und das könnte ein anderes Umweltproblem verursachen. Gesprächsleiter: Ich denke, wir versuchen das zu vermeiden. Wir versuchen die Verwendung von Kohle zu vermeiden. Ich denke das ist sicher ein Problem. Um auf Elektrizität umsteigen zu können, werden wir mit Sicherheit zunächst mehr Elektrizität verwenden müssen. Und wir sollten beispielsweise dazu keine Kohle verbrennen oder Kraftwerke einsetzen und kein CO2 einfangen, wenn wir das tun wollten. Sie sollte aus nachhaltigen Ressourcen stammen. Das wäre meines Erachtens die richtige Vorgehensweise. Hartmut Michel: Ich bin ziemlich davon überzeugt, dass Kohle die Hauptquelle für die Produktion von Kerosin für die Flugzeuge in der Zukunft sein wird, bedauerlicherweise. Robert Grubbs: In der Washington Post stand ein interessanter Artikel von Zachariah, der den Vorschlag machte, dass das Beste, was man zur Kontrolle der CO2-Emissionen tun könne, dieses wäre: dass die USA den Chinesen erklärt, wie man Fracking korrekt durchführt, damit sie ihre Kohlekraftwerke gegen Naturgas eintauschen. Und dadurch würde die CO2-Emissionen um mehrere 10 % sinken, um bis zu 30 bis 40 %. Das ist eine interessant extreme Ansicht, jedoch eine interessante, wie ich finde. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt mit Sicherheit einige, es wird Fragen bezüglich des Fracking geben, glaube ich. Wir hatten das in der Vergangenheit, und wir hatten am Samstag eine interessante Diskussion darüber. Ich weiß nicht, ob jemand das hier wiederholen möchte, und mit Ihnen diskutieren möchte, welche Art der Gefahr besteht. Astrid Gräslund: Erklären Sie doch, was es ist, denke ich. Gesprächsleiter: Ok, also es gibt eine Methode mithilfe von Chemikalien oder Wasser die Löcher, die Bohrlöcher, unter Druck zu setzen und dann auf effizientere Weise mehr Naturgas oder Öl aus dem Bohrloch zu bekommen. Dies wird als Fracking bezeichnet, als „Zerbrechen“. Und dies hat man getan.... Richard Schrock: Ist es nicht verboten? Ich dachte, dass sei in einigen Ländern verboten, selbst heute, in Frankreich. Wie es sich in Deutschland verhält, weiß ich nicht. Gesprächsleiter: Es wird in vielen Ländern durchgeführt. Richard Schrock: Den Leuten gefällt es nicht, wenn unterirdisch Dinge getan werden, die sie nicht verstehen. Und in der Nähe ihrer eigenen Häuser. Gerhard Ertl: Wir sollten nicht vergessen, dass dies tiefgreifende Auswirkungen auf die Umwelt hat, allein schon der Wasserverbrauch. In Deutschland gab es einen Witz: „Lasst uns Fracking einführen, dann werden wir von den Ölimporten aus Russland unabhängig.“ Und die Antwort war: „Aber dann haben wir kein Wasser. Lasst uns dann das Wasser aus Russland importieren.“ Gesprächsleiter: Gut, ich habe hier eine weitere Frage gesehen, war das richtig? Können Sie nach vorne kommen? Ansonsten können Sie das Mikrofon nicht bekommen. Frage: Ich wollte auf den Beginn der Podiumsdiskussion zurückkommen und auf Herrn Ertl. Er erwähnte, dass es nicht nur um die Umwandlung, sondern auch um das Einsparen von Energie geht. Vielleicht könnten die anderen Teilnehmer der Diskussion das kommentieren, denn dies ist etwas, was wir sofort tun können und nicht erst in der Zukunft. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist ein weites Feld. Professor Ertl. Gerhard Ertl: Ich denke, jeder wird zustimmen, dass Energie in Zukunft nicht so billig sein wird wie im Moment. Die Energie wird also teurer werden. Und das zwingt uns automatisch, Energie zu sparen. Dies nicht zu tun, wäre gegen die Wirtschaftlichkeit, die eine regulierende Kraft auf uns ausgeübt. Natürlich gibt es viele verschiedene Methoden, Energie zu sparen: die Beheizung unserer Gebäude zu verringern, weniger Klimaanlagen zu verwenden, kleinerer Autos zu bauen – es gibt viele, viele Möglichkeiten. Solange die Energie so billig ist, besteht kein Druck, dies zu tun. Machen wir sie also teuer. Auf solch einem Treffen machte ich vor ein paar Jahren den Vorschlag, den Benzinpreis auf drei Euro zu erhöhen, und es gab einen großen Aufschrei. Wir sind nun fast soweit, ja ja. Gesprächsleiter: Möchten Sie das kommentieren? Robert Grubbs: Es ist einfach so, dass ein großer Teil der Energie in Häuser und Gebäude und dergleichen investiert wird. Es ist sehr leicht, dort Einsparungen zu machen. Ich denke, dies ist ein Bereich, der ignoriert worden ist. Denn ein Teil des Problems besteht in dem einzelnen Haus, aufgrund des sehr hohen Kapitalaufwands, der dadurch sofort entsteht. Und daher wägt man das gegen leicht erhöhte monatliche Kosten über einen längeren Zeitraum ab. Es wird also wahrscheinlich einige gesetzliche Regelungen geben müssen, die diese Dinge erzwingen. Richard Schrock: Ich denke sehr häufig an.... Am MIT haben wir... Jeder Campus hat Gebäude, die vor langer Zeit gebaut wurden. Und sie sind alle einfach verglast, und es gibt sehr viele davon. Und es kostet eine ungeheure Menge Geld, eine Universität zu unterhalten, allein schon, was die Heizkosten betrifft. Es kostet jedoch ebenfalls eine große Menge Geld, alle Fenster durch energiesparende Fenster zu ersetzen – und das alles kostet auch Energie. Ich weiß also nicht, was die Ökonomen entschieden haben, ob sich dies lohnt, und wie das alles am Ende zusammenhängt. Doch der nachträgliche Einbau von energiesparenden Fenstern in Gebäude und Häuser usw., um wirklich Energie effizient zu werden, ist selbst sehr kostspielig, verschwendet viel Energie und benötigt Energie auf vielfältige Weise. Doch wenn das der richtige Weg ist, dann müssen wir ihn gehen. Gesprächsleiter: Andererseits gibt es besonders in Deutschland in den letzten 20 oder 30 Jahren enorme Anstrengungen, den Benzinverbrauch in PKWs zu verringern bzw. die Entfernung pro Liter zu erhöhen. Ich erinnere mich, als ich mein erstes Auto kaufte, ein VW oder so etwas, waren es 10-12 Liter, es war ein kleiner Motor, 10-12 Liter pro 100 km. Dasselbe Auto würde heute wahrscheinlich nur 3 oder 4 Liter benötigen, mit Diesel und all dieser Technologie. Die kostet auch Geld, aber es gibt Systeme, die funktionieren. Und es ist in diesem Punkt viel geschehen. Auch bei der Isolierung von Häusern, Fenstern, und all dem, überall. Robert Grubbs: Ich erwähnte, dass ich in einer Reihe von Ausschüssen gesessen habe, in denen die Leute über das Sparen von Energie diskutiert haben. Und ich schaute mich um und ich sah, dass alle in Kleidungsstücken aus Wolle umhersaßen. Wissen Sie, es ist wirklich schlecht, dass wir die nordeuropäische Bekleidung als eine Art Standard auf der ganzen Welt verwenden. Wir sollten uns so anziehen, dass wir das nicht müssen. Man schaltet die Klimaanlage hoch, damit man ein Anzug anziehen kann. Gesprächsleiter: Das ist richtig. Ok, gut. Bitte das Mikrofon. Sie. Wir haben noch ein paar Minuten. Frage: Hi. Ich habe eine Frage zum früheren Teil der Diskussion. Es wurde erwähnt, dass die Kernenergie in der Öffentlichkeit zunehmend unbeliebter wird. Und gewiss hat es in den letzten paar Jahren viele Beispiele für die negativen Konsequenzen gegeben, die sich ergeben, wenn Kernkraftwerke versagen. Denken Sie, dass dieser negative Ruf verdient ist, oder sind die potenziellen Vorteile das Risiko wert? Oder überwiegend in Fragen der Kernenergie die negativen die positiven Aspekte? Gesprächsleiter: Eine gute Frage, nicht leicht zu beantworten. Richard Schrock: Schneidet man mit, was wir hier sagen, oder .... Richard Schrock: Vielleicht lesen wir darüber morgen in der Zeitung. Möchte jemand dazu etwas sagen? Robert Grubbs: Die Wahrnehmung hat sich geändert. Ich war in einigen Komitees, in denen sehr viel diskutiert wurde über Kernenergie, und alles ging seinen Weg. Und es gab Länder, die darüber sprachen sie einzuführen, von denen man dies nicht erwartet hätte. Und dann kam es zu dem Unfall in Japan, und alle diese Diskussionen endeten. Astrid Gräslund: Ich könnte etwas über die Situation in Schweden sagen, da wir die Diskussion über eine lange Zeit geführt haben. der nicht aus diesen mehr oder weniger erneuerbaren oder nicht-fossilen Quellen stammt. Und in der Zwischenzeit ist die öffentliche Meinung hin und her gependelt, und hauptsächlich in eine Richtung. Aber wir hatten zum Beispiel für eine bestimmte Anzahl von Jahren ein Gesetz, dass die weitere Entwicklung oder auch nur Planung neuer Nuklearkraftwerke verboten hat. Das Gesetz wurde aufgeschoben. Jetzt kann man also tatsächlich Kernkraftwerke planen und, wenn man will, bauen. Doch natürlich kauft sie noch niemand. Doch ich kann zumindest sehen, dass dies in dem kleinen, eher – sagen wir pragmatischen – Land Schweden in Zukunft kein großes Problem sein wird. Das ist meine Vermutung. Ich denke, wir werden unsere Kernkraft behalten. Wie werden sie wahrscheinlich renovieren, wenn die Zeit dazu gekommen ist. Wie werden sie vielleicht nicht sonderlich erhöhen, aber wer weiß. Es hängt vom Bedarf ab. Und mit Sicherheit gibt es keine Bewegung, dass wir die Dinge jetzt irgendwie verfrüht abdrehen sollten. Das ist kein wirkliches Problem. Andere Schweden hier könnten mich korrigieren, falls ich mich da irre. Vielleicht höre ich nicht, worüber die jungen Leute reden. Doch zumindest ist dies der Gesamteindruck, den ich bekomme. Gesprächsleiter: Was ist Ihre Meinung? Frage: Ich bin mit Sicherheit nicht qualifiziert, meine Meinung hier auszudrücken. Gesprächsleiter: Aber das ist eine Meinung. Applaus.) Da war noch eine weitere, letzte Frage, glaube ich. Sie, bitte. Frage: Professor Grubbs erwähnte vorhin, dass er mit einem Unternehmen assoziiert ist, das, glaube ich, Batterien herstellt. Und ich frage mich, in welchem Stadium der Entwicklung einer neuen Technologie es sinnvoll ist, staatliche Subventionen zu verwenden, um die Technologie einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit verfügbar zu machen oder um sie in ökonomischer Hinsicht tragbar zu machen. Oder ob wir zunächst warten sollten, bis die Technologie ausgereift ist, und sie dann erst auf den Markt bringen? Gesprächsleiter: Deutschland ist ein sehr gutes Beispiel dafür. Frage: Ich glaube, dass Deutschland ein gutes Beispiel für starke Förderung ist. Gesprächsleiter: Es gibt in Deutschland dieses Gesetz über erneuerbare Energie, und es bewirkte den massiven Umschwung in Richtung auf erneuerbare Energie, insbesondere auf photovoltaische und Windenergie. Sie wurde stark subventioniert und hatte einige sprunghafte Anstiege, wie Professor Michel bereits erklärte. Letztlich zahlt der Steuerzahler dafür. Wenn Sie dazu bereit sind, ist das ok, denn ich glaube, dass es neue Ideen, neue Entwicklungen gibt – hoffentlich in die richtige Richtung – und Arbeitsplätze in diesem Bereich. Ich denke, also es ist eine gute Idee, das auf die richtige Weise zu tun. Doch die Regierung muss die Entscheidung treffen, und die Entscheidung muss auf intelligente Weise getroffen werden. Batterien – ich weiß nicht, ich kenne die Situation nicht, wie es sich damit verhält. Sie verlangen, dass die Entwicklung von Batterien finanziell unterstützt wird. Frage: Nicht exakt nur Batterien. Das war nur eine allgemeine Frage. Gesprächsleiter: Allgemein. Frage: Aber wir könnten genauso gut dasselbe Geld nehmen, das wir für Subventionen verwenden, und es direkt in die Forschung oder für eine stärker zielgerichtete Entwicklung ausgeben. Gesprächsleiter: Das stimmt. Das ist eine andere Möglichkeit. Richard Schrock: Es wäre sehr gut, Politiker zu haben, die etwas von Wissenschaft verstehen. Ich weiß nicht… Gesprächsleiter: Es ist nicht so schlecht in Deutschland. Richard Schrock: Zumindest in den USA gibt es keinen großen Prozentsatz, der etwas von Wissenschaft versteht, und davon, was subventioniert werden sollte oder nicht, usw. Ich weiß nicht, wem die zuhören, aber sie scheinen selbst nicht viel Kenntnisse über Wissenschaften zu haben. Vielleicht wird auch das in der Zeitung stehen, ich weiß nicht. Gesprächsleiter: Unsere Kanzlerin ist Physikerin, das hilft. Ok, gut. Vielen Dank. Ich glaube, wir sollten langsam ans Ende kommen. Ich danke allen Teilnehmern auf dem Podium. Ich werde vielleicht kurz zusammenfassen, was wir hier gehört haben. Und was wir getan haben. Ich denke, dass biologische Brennstoffe, darüber sind wir uns mehr oder weniger einig, problematisch sind, obwohl wir zum Beispiel in Deutschland 5 oder 10 % Methanol in unserem Benzin haben. Wir haben Bio-Diesel und dieser Trend geht weiter. Vielleicht wird er gestoppt, ich weiß es nicht. Es gibt auch ein Gesetz über erneuerbare Energie, und das ist dieselbe Quelle für diese Entwicklung. Es wird jedoch jetzt von Politikern, ich glaube weltweit, als eine problematische Sache wahrgenommen. Vielleicht mit Ausnahme von Brasilien und anderen Ländern, die nach wie vor diesen Wege beschreiten. Dass wir irgendwie uns mehr in Richtung Elektrizität bewegen müssen, ist sicherlich richtig. Besonders deshalb, weil wir keine Antwort auf die Frage nach dem Ersatz fossiler Brennstoffe haben, die wir zum Fahren unserer Autos, Fliegen unserer Flugzeuge usw. verwenden. Es gibt keine gute Lösung dafür. Also ist die Bewegung in Richtung Elektrizität, die auf erneuerbare Weise produziert werden kann im Moment mit Sicherheit die richtige Entscheidung. Und ich hoffe, dass es auf dem Gebiet der Batterien Entwicklungen geben wird, auf dem Automobilsektor usw. Wir müssen Energie sparen, das ist sehr deutlich. Ich erwähnte, dass es in mehreren Ländern auch eine gute Entwicklung gibt. Einige Punkte werden diskutiert. Wir kauften gerade ein Haus und wir hörten, dass es besser wäre, es nicht zu isolieren, aus mehreren mit dem Klima zusammenhängenden Gründen, usw. Wir müssen also darüber nachdenken. Und der dritte Punkt, den wir recht ausführlich diskutiert haben, war die Kernenergie. Und wir hatten in gewisser Weise geteilte Meinungen. Ich glaube, einige Leute sagen, wir müssen verwenden, was wir haben, und wir müssen weitermachen. Und wir müssen auch in die Technologie investieren und Leute darin ausbilden, damit wird das Wissen auf diesem Gebiet nicht verlieren. Und die Leute, die diese Technologie kennen, können helfen, für den Fall, dass wir in Zukunft darauf zurückkommen müssen. Und klarerweise ist das Lagerungsproblem, die längerfristige Lagerung der Abfallmaterialien, ein noch ungelöstes Problem. Fukushima war ein gutes Beispiel. Diese Energieform ist nicht völlig sicher. Ok. Ein weiterer Punkt? Und der letzte und wichtigste Punkt für Sie alle: Wir haben, wie ich sagte, keine Lösung zur Produktion von Brennstoffen aus Sonnenenergie. Wir benötigen den Input der Chemie zur Entwicklung einer katalytischen, ... besserer Katalysatoren und Geräte. Zum Beispiel für die lichtinduzierte Wasseraufspaltung zur Produktion von Wasserstoff oder zur direkten Herstellung von kohlenstoffenthaltenden Komponenten wie in der Photosynthese, auf irgend eine Weise. Entweder, indem wir schauen, was die Photosynthese und was die Natur uns lehren, oder indem wir völlig neue Wege gehen, die clevere Chemiker wie Sie in naher Zukunft finden müssen, hoffe ich. Also, ich denke, dass dies das Podiumsgespräch jetzt beendet und danke allen auf dem Podium für sehr gute anderthalb Stunden. Vielen Dank für das Kommen und vielen Dank für das Zuhören. Applaus. Ende.

Panel Discussion
"Chemical Energy Conversion and Storage" (with Nobel Laureates Ertl, Grubbs, Kohn, Michel, Schrock)
(00:27:47 - 00:29:40)

As indicated by the sceptical comments of Gerhard Ertl in the snippet above, the superconducting cables mentioned by Michel are controversial. A small clash on this subject also occurred also at the 2012 Lindau Panel Discussion:


Panel Discussion (2012) - Panel Discussion on Mainau Island on the topic of the future of energy supply and storage.

Introduction: Dear Nobel laureates and young researchers, Minister Bauer, ladies and gentlemen, dear panellists. Welcome to the castle’s garden. After a week of discussions about science, your life and the laureate’s lives within science, among cultures and among generations we will today connect science with society even more than we have under the last week. So, today we will hear a discussion about energy, which without doubt is a very important issue to all of us within science and society. It will be a very interesting discussion and I can only invite you and Geoffrey will probably repeat that to engage yourself in the discussion. So after that discussion the next thing will be the lunch break. Geoffrey will also remind you of that later on. And I am very looking forward to seeing all of you at 3.30 in the castle’s court yard for the official farewell ceremony. So now I hand over the role to Geoffrey Carr who is moderator for today’s panel discussion. And I wish us all a very interesting coming 90 minutes. Welcome. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you Count, thank you Countess. Good morning everyone, good morning laureates, panellists, princes, potentates, minsters, ladies and gentleman. Welcome to Mainau. I am Geoffrey Carr; I’m science editor of the Economist which is a weekly news magazine for those of you who have never come across it if there are such people. It’s my pleasure to be the moderator of this panel discussion of the 62nd Nobel Laureate Meeting. They have been kind enough to invite me back for 4 years now. I don’t know how much longer I can keep going but I will do it as long as they keep inviting me, it’s a great time, it’s great fun. And it’s exciting times to be a physicist as well. So it’s a wonderful coincidence, maybe not entirely a coincidence from what I hear that this meeting on physics coincided with the announcement of the Higgs boson. Or at least that a particle which might possibly, may be a little bit be the Higgs boson when we finish doing the measurements. I normally come to the whole meeting but my day job kept me in London unfortunately because I had to persuade our editor, who is in many ways estimable man, but doesn’t know much about physics that this was important enough to put on the cover of our magazine. Which we have done. So we have a nice big juicy science story this week, which is good. And it’s unfortunate that it meant that I’ve missed the meeting and missed all the excitement here. I’ve also missed the energy discussions. So if I repeat anything that’s been said before my apologies. It could be argued that energy is the most pressing problem that’s facing mankind at the moment. Because if you have enough energy and it’s cheap enough every other problem is tractable. Food is tractable, water is tractable, transport is tractable, manufacturing is tractable, dealing with pollution is tractable. All of these things can be done with enough cheap energy. If we don’t have enough cheap energy it’s back to the caves for a lot of us I’m afraid. We won’t be able to keep the industrial civilisation going. So it is a crucial, crucial issue. At the moment we rely on fossil fuels. There’s a lot of fossil fuel around. So we’re not in immediate danger of running out. But it’s not a great position to be to rely on one energy source. And it’s not a great position for 2 reasons. One is the problem of carbon dioxide and climate change, which I’ve been asked to steer clear of at this meeting, because we want to discuss the technology of alternative energies. But it is an important issue nevertheless. And so it probably will come up in the discussions later. The other thing is that fossil fuels will eventually run out. They won’t run out immediately but we should be thinking about replacing them. And also if you can get the technology right, I mean we’re always looking for cheaper energy sources, the cost of fossil fuel is not going to go down. It’s most unlikely. I mean we’ve seen some new reserves brought on in the form of shale gas which has brought the price of methane down in the short term. But that won’t last forever. The extraction costs are unlikely to go... We should be looking for new technologies that can generate power, extract power from the environment, generate power more and more efficiently and more cheaply. And more stably for the environment as well. There is no shortage of energy around though even apart from fossil fuels. The sums, I did the sums last night. I think they’re right even though I was a bit tired. I reckon that the sun delivers to earth in just over an hour as much energy as the human race consumes every year. So if you wanted to use solar power there’s a plentiful supply of it. For those who distrust solar energy for various reasons there’s a lot of fissionable material in the earth’s crust that can be mined. There’s uranium and there’s also, as I'm sure we’ll hear later, thorium which is in greater abundance although we don’t have yet seriously working technology to use it. There’s a lot of heat in the earth as well and this could be tapped using geothermal power. And for the really brave or possibly foolhardy there’s the idea of fusion, which we’ll also come to later. I did a quick count. There’s about a dozen alternative technologies to providing, to burning fossil fuels to generate electricity and transport. The problem is they all have disadvantages because if they didn’t have disadvantages we’d use them already. I mean they would have just been brought in by economics. So we’re here to discuss the alternatives, debate which of them should be adopted. And we have 4 eminent people in the field to do it. 2 of them are old lags. At least they’re old lags as far as I’m concerned. I’ve had them on the panel before. One of them is Carlo Rubbia here. He is a laureate, 1984 physics. He was director-general of CERN. He was responsible for discovering the W and Z bosons, which transmit the weak nuclear force, which is sort of relevant to this week’s news. We have Georg Schütte; he is state secretary in the Ministry of Education and Research here in Germany. His ministry is responsible for, partly responsible for implementing Germany’s energy strategy, which, I read, has the modest goal of eliminating nuclear power by 2022, 10 years’ time, and doubling the use of renewable energy from 17% to 35% of the total by the end of this decade. Is that correct? Yes, so that should be easy. And the other 2 are newcomers as far as I know. One of them is Robert Laughlin, who was laureate in 1998, physics again. Published a book called “Power in the Future” with the inevitable subtitle which is longer than the title: So perhaps we don’t need the discussion after all. It’s all in the book. He’s backing a mixture of nuclear, I believe, a mixture of nuclear power and solar thermal generation, which is a form of solar power that’s less familiar perhaps. It doesn’t use the solar cells that you put on your roof but uses the sun’s heat directly to heat up fluids so it makes steam and drives turbines. But it also means you can store the heat over night which deals with part of the problem of the sun going down every evening. And he’s also interested in using waste materials and algae to produce bio fuels. And our last member is Martin Keilhacker. He is head of the working group on energy at the German Physical Society. And he was once director of the Joint European Torus, which was the first European attempt to do nuclear fusion. So as I understand it he sees fusion power as the ultimate solution. So the plan is this. I’ll give all the panellists about 10 minutes to ramble on about what they’d like to do. Much more than 10 minutes and I shall stop them and call the next person because the main point of this morning’s festivities is that you should join the discussion. There are 2 microphones. Start lining up towards the end of the panel discussion if you have questions to ask and I hope you do. And we will keep going either until the questions run out or until it’s lunch time. Thank you very much. Applause. Sorry, I should just say Dr. Schütte will be the first of the discussants. I’d like him to explain how he’s going to plug this gap that will be introduced when they take all the nuclear power stations away. Whether he will, we’ll find out. Georg Schütte: So, if what we internationally now call energiewende... It’s a German term that made inroads into international parlour now if you want to change our energy system, So we have to face a tremendous challenge. It is a challenge which was triggered through a continuous change of public opinion in the past 30 to 40 years in Germany, one has to admit. And we had to face a new reality after the tragic events in Japan. And so politicians and various groups of society got together to discuss for a longer period of time how we were going to organise our energy system in the future. And we decided to phase out nuclear energy in the next 10 years. We decided to increase the use or take advantage of opportunities to use renewable energies so that by 2050 80% of the German electricity consumption will come from renewable sources. And we tried to do this while at the same time taking into account that we have to do it in a climate neutral way. As a matter of fact we want to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 also by 80% as compared to the early 1990’s. So, that is an ambitious goal and we have made several steps in between. We want to increase the use of renewable energies and we have already reached a level of 20%. So we already use more renewable energies than we take advantage of nuclear energy at this point in time. And I am fairly optimistic that we will be able to increase the use of renewables. Nuclear energy already before Fukushima was labelled in Germany as an interim technology on a way to a more renewable future. Since it was an interim technology, we now have to replace nuclear energy to some extent by fossil energy and to a large extent this will be gas. So we face a formidable challenge.We have to increase the use of renewable energy. We have to build the right distribution networks in Germany to do this. We have to build new power plants substituting nuclear power plants by other sources of power. And we have to increase storage capacity because renewable energy sources do require a large amount of storage capacity. And this is the challenge. A further challenge is that one has to take all these factors into account. So we talk about a systemic approach to rebuilding the energy system in Germany. And that we cannot do without the support of the technicians and scientists and researchers. What we learned however in the past 30 years as well is that scientific ideas which are standing alone face the risk of not getting the type of societal support that is necessary to build such an infrastructure which affects everybody in a given country. So a systemic approach also has to take into account that one has to find acceptance for technologies in a broad population. And this is what we do in Germany. Do we have a blueprint for this? No. This is a longer term process. We talk about a process of 4 decades at least. And we do this step by step. And this means that one needs experts group. That one needs advice from the research community. We need advice from the engineering communities. And we have to talk to the people, who as a matter of fact also use and take advantage of renewable energy technology and who have to agree that distribution networks go through their back yard. They have to agree that storage capacities will be built in their vicinity. And that is the challenge we face in Germany. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. I would have one question. One can debate... Well, it’s sensible to build nuclear power stations, absolutely. There are arguments on both sides. Once you’ve built it, once it’s a piece of operating plant, they’re relatively cheap to run. Your power stations, you know some of them have got a bit elderly but there’s still quite a lot that have got decades of life in them. Retiring a piece of plant that is useful is quite an expensive thing to do. Germany is not an earth quake zone. Japan is not going to happen here. Is it actually a sensible...? It may be perfectly sensible to say we will build no more nuclear power stations. Is it actually sensible to retire the existing ones? Georg Schütte: From the point of view of a given plant and the economic basis of running that plant it might not be economically sensible. Then the next step of deliberation is: What kind of cost do we take into account? Is it just the operating cost of the plant? Do we take into account dismantling? Do we take into account how we treat nuclear waste? So we might get a different type of bill at the very end. The overall question is: Do we find public acceptance for a technology of this sort? And in Germany the reality is no. And this is a reality and we have to take that type of reality into account. Geoffrey Carr: That's fair enough but you can accept public opinion, I don’t know, I’m not an expert on German politics obviously. I’ve got enough difficulty with Britain’s. But sometimes there are things up with which the people will not put. Sometimes there are things which they might think they wouldn’t put up with but when you actually explain the reality they’ll change their mind. And I wonder... As you said I think the short term alternative to using nuclear power, at least partly, is to plug the gap with fossil fuels. Okay, you can use gas which is the least damaging of them but, yeah, nevertheless you are pumping more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere if you do that. It’s not... A nuclear power station in an earthquake free zone is not a source of pollution. It is perhaps a source of fear but fear can be overcome. Georg Schütte: Right, we have had more than 50 years since the late 1960’s in order to explain this and we have not been so successful. Look at Austria. They built a nuclear power plant and they didn’t even start to run it. So they seem to have a similar problem and it cannot be... My opinion is that this is a sort of social reality which we also have to take into account. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. Carlo, I think you can be next. Carlo Rubbia: Yes, let me start with some general considerations. I’d like to discuss a little bit about possible developments for the future on which we are working. I shouldn’t forget this is a physics meeting and physics is our subject. Now, let me first of all say one thing: that we are entering a new epoch. Man generated epoch called Anthropocene. I learned the word Anthropocene from Paul Crutzen for the first time. I don’t know whether he’s the one invented the name but certainly I learned from him. And these are very remarkable situations. We are in front of a situation which every year 90 million new people are coming on this earth. There is a real population explosion. Now 7 billion people which we’ve just reached are an incredible number. Let me simply tell you that it corresponds to a continuous line of individuals every 20 metres. And if you put one after the other, all of us, we reach the distance from earth to the sun. And let me remind you also that the sun... The light of the sun takes 8 minutes to travel from the sun to the earth. We have over the history of earth, over the few hundred thousand years in which mankind existed, 100 billion humans. We are on the threshold of a future with unprecedented environmental risks. The combined effect of climate change, resource scarcity and also biodiversity and ecosystem resilience, the time of increased demand poses a real threat to humanity welfare. Such a future generates an unacceptable risk that will undermine the resilience of the planet and its inhabitants. In this epoch there is an unacceptable risk that human pressure on the planet should it continue on a business as usual trajectory will trigger abrupt and irreversible changes with catastrophic outcomes for human society and life as we know it. A transition to a safe and prosperous future is possible but we are running out of time. And to succeed would require the full use of humanities extraordinary capacity for innovation and creativity within new economic development pathways that are fully integrated with the precepts of global sustainability. Worldwide cooperation will be necessary engaging science and society, guided by the principle of responsibly and equity. Real political leadership is required in order to tackle the systemic issues. The expanding population demands more and more food, water and energy, requires a greater consumption of mineral resources and exerts increasing pressure on the environment. In order to be ultimately successful, in order to avoid irreversible changes with possible catastrophic outcome for humanity, all human capacities for innovation and creativity will have to be created, integrated within the framework, a new framework of global sustainability. So far the earth has a remarkable capacity to buffer the expansion of human activities allowing for continuing economic growth in spite of serious ecological decline. However, the growing impact of unsustainable pattern and production consumption combined with a growing population mean that business as usual trajectory or activity would no longer yield the historic pattern of economic growth. To this effect, I would like to spend a few examples on how science and technology can in fact help us in making an acceptable and better future. These alternative studies are studies that we are performing, together with my colleagues... I perform them together with my colleagues at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam Germany, we are now presently working. And I would like to spend a few minutes on 2 subjects which seem to me of considerable importance. One as to the question of how can you get fossils without Co2 emissions. The current worldwide energy supply is based mainly on availability of fossil fuels. Although there is much talk of the exhaustibility of resources, they will remain indispensible in the decades to come. But in addition to the development of renewable energy sources in consideration of climatic changes, a more efficient and more friendly utilisation of fossil fuels has become an urgent necessity. The transformation of exiting energy technology into low emission innovative solution of fossils will contribute to a significant reduction of Co2, is one of the most important scientific and technological challenges of our time. Amongst the various fossils, natural gas is the one with the smallest Co2 emissions. When investigated with IASS and with KIT, the scientific and technical aspect of a different and highly innovative method which has the remarkable alternative of producing the combustion with zero Co2 emissions. It’s called the spontaneous internal dissociation of natural gas, CH4, into hydrogen and black carbon. It is so called methane cracking or methane decarbonisation. And it’s based on the splitting of the methane molecule into its atomic components. Hydrogen becomes the final source with about 80% of the energy. The released solid carbon in the form of carbon black can be removed mechanically and eventually used in the manufacture of tyres, batteries and even of fuel. The practical implementation of a Co2 free technology for the production of hydrogen from methane, if successful, will have a significant impact in many different sectors. Producing fossil hydrogen without Co2 emissions will also open the way to recombine the vast amount already accumulated of Co2 waste with hydrogen in order to produce a natural gas based liquid fuel in replace with oil. Co2 and hydrogen can combine to produce methanol and water, a liquid substitute to gasoline in all distant transport application. If in the concentrated source, it could be indefinitely recycled and transform the Co2 from a liability to an asset. Methanol is a commercial chemical. Methanol is an excellent fuel in its own right. It can be blended with gasoline or used in a methanol fuel cell producing electricity directly combined with air. Methanol can be converted into ethylene, the key material to provide hydrocarbon fuels and their products. Therefore it would be able to replace oil, both as a fuel and as a chemical raw material, without costly new infrastructure and without Co2 emissions. It would provide a feasible and safe way to store energy. Making available a convenient liquid fuel and provide mankind with unlimited source of hydrocarbon mitigating the danger of global warming. Especially in the second phase when it may become possible to produce hydrogen from solar energy. A second problem which I would like to mention is a new interesting development. It’s the question of transporting electricity at very long distances as was already pointed out by my previous speaker. And on the planet there are plenty of potential energy sources for renewable energy. For instance solar energy is about 100,000 times today’s primary energy. Wind and hydro are also vastly available. But renewable energies are generally situated in suitably chosen areas of substantial size which are often located far away from densely populated area. In the North Sea there is the opportunity of building offshore turbines on a 60,000 square kilometre area which can provide electric energy for the entire European Union. In the Sun Belt the electric energy produced by a concentrated solar power system with the size like Lake Nasser equals the total Middle East oil production. However, all this renewable energy primary use electricity with respect to the one of heat from fossils. An additional reason for connecting to great distance is very high power electricity is related to the intrinsic variability of wind and solar which will also be discussed. The worldwide deployment to this new form of energy like wind, geothermal and solar cannot occur without renewed investment in the transmission infrastructures. New connection should be built to link areas with vast potential to generate clean energy to the areas which have a convenient demand of electric power. Superconductors, because of the absent ohmic resistance, have the property of exactly zero electric losses. The dominant losses are then the only static thermal losses to the cryostat while they’re independent of the amount of current transported. In 1986 the biggest breakthrough has been the discovery of high temperature superconductivity by Nobel laureate Bednorz and Müller. Because of their critical temperature well above the one of cheap, readily available liquid helium cooling, this new material has changed impact of superconductivity. In January 2001 the committee has been again astonished by the sudden announcement of Akimitsu and a report on superconductivity at 40 Kelvin by magnesium diboride. This surprisingly simple and cheap compound can be readily manufactured into wires and it is based on precursors which are very abundant and cheaper than any other competing superconductor. Magnesium diboride is therefore a major new step in the development in these applications. Transporting electricity a distance of over several thousand kilometres compared to the one of existing pipelines of natural gas or oil may become possible with very modest cryogenic losses and for very high electric powers. These cables are in the form of very narrow tubes buried underground in a very modest, about 30 centimetre diameters. The practicalisation of superconducting line has several elements in common with established practice to natural gas pipelines. The cable is under the ground and periodic cooling installations located on the surface at every several hundred kilometres. They are both cross country transmission systems with many features associated with change in elevation, temperature variation and other similar situation. In the case of natural gas pipeline this problem has been successfully solved and they are also expected to be solved also for the superconducting lines. The longest natural gas pipeline is between Russia and China and is about 5,200 miles, 8,400 kilometres. Similar distance may become possible for the energy transport of comparable energy powers. To conclude I believe there are a lot of very beautiful new ideas which the scientific community is developing. And these are absolutely necessary in order to make sure that we have in front of us a future which is acceptable and possible and satisfactory for all of us in this beautiful world. Thank you very much. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Robert Laughlin, give us your pearls of wisdom. Robert Laughlin: Well Carlo, you took all my time. This is a joke of course. We have talked about this meeting before we went on the air here. And one of the things we want is to encourage questions out of the audience. So I’ll do my best to be short and also to be a little provocative. One of the things that’s come out already is that we have an imminent problem, not just with climate but with the actual energy supplies. And this is the thing I prefer myself to focus on because I think it’s a more immediate problem. Now the idea has also come out in these discussions that the technical means, technical means for really attacking the problem certainly exist. We know for sure that the sun is ample for solving the problem. And we know that all physicists tend to like the sun for this reason. Now, and we also know about the tradeoffs with nuclear energy. Now, I want to throw a couple of controversial matters out with the hope that we’ll get attacked and then we can talk about them. So first the sun. Just before I came to this meeting I checked the BP statistical review of energy for this year to check that sure enough in the world the total fraction of alternate energy, meaning wind and sun, wind, sun and bio, is 1.6% of the total energy budget. Of that 1.6% almost all of it is wind. The sun is a negligible fraction of the world energy budget now. So how is this possible when the sun is so ample? Well, there’s a cost reality. And if we are going to be technical people that really solve the problem, we have to attack not only the possibilities of technical means but also the costs. So the sun has a cost problem we know. And one of our tasks is to get that cost problem under control before disaster hits. Now the other... So it’s cost, so I want to bring up the issue of costs even though I’m a scientist. Now the second thing has to do with the famous vote in Germany to disassemble nuclear power. Now I have given talks in this country since the spring on this subject. And I bring up a very controversial idea that I want to plant in your heads right now. At this present time in history jewels are cheap. So if we get desperate for energy, both fossil coal and fossil natural gas are plentiful. And the price is extremely low especially given the new advances in fracking. So giving up nuclear energy now means as a practical matter burning more fuel. Now we want to supplant the nuclear energy with wind and sun. But there’s a cost issue there and also a supply sustainability issue there which we probably need to talk about. Because industries can’t tolerate those high costs and be internationally competitive. And customers will not stand having the power cut off. So the alternatives that we talk about usually have a fossil backup and that fossil backup is the dark little secret of alternate energy. Something that we ought to talk about more because that’s the weak, that’s the Achilles heel of alternate energy. Now I have asked people in thinking through this problem, to skip over the politics and do a science fiction experiment where we imagine a time roughly 2 centuries from now, when nobody burns fossil fuel out of the ground anymore. Either because it’s gone or because they voted to keep it in the ground. And I want to ask people what is life like. And in particular how did those people of the past make the transition from fossil dependence to whatever one has now. Now, one of the things on the table is the political need to have cheap electricity. We’ve talked about this a lot. And now I ask people to think what will happen when your great, great, great, great grandchildren have to make a choice between no lights and nuclear energy. Will they vote for much higher energy costs or will they invent reasons why nuclear energy was the right thing to have all along and bring it back. Now, if you think this is a ludicrous thought experiment. I call your attention to events taking place in Japan at the moment. Where Japan just suffered the second worst nuclear accident known in history, nonetheless the people of Japan, this government are struggling with the question of what we do if we turn off our nuclear reactors. And last I looked 2 of them came back on, ok. So the events in Japan are highly relevant to the question of whether you can pass laws to demand alternate energy in the face of very hard realities such as market demand for power on the one hand and frankly national security on the other. Now with luck I’ve stimulated everybody so you’ll ask a bunch of embarrassing questions that we can’t answer and I’m going to stop. Geoffrey Carr: Right thanks very much. On to Dr. Keilhacker. Applause. Martin Keilhacker: The theme of today is supply and storage. So let me spend a few minutes about 2 novel ideas or techniques on which some of my colleagues are working. I would like to remind you that at the moment the volatile or fluctuating energy from wind and sun contributes about 10% to the electricity in Germany. Together with biomass and so on it’s 20%. But recent studies have shown if this increases a little and we are still capable of keeping the net stable. But recent studies have shown that if we increase it to the goal which we have for 2020 which is 30% renewable energies fluctuating, most of them, then one will need quite much more storage than we have at the moment. And as you know the most effective storage is hydropower. But we cannot increase that very much. So one idea, one technique which has already been demonstrated... I also want to point out we need something very quickly, as has been pointed out by 2 of my colleague speakers before. So one technique is to use the electricity from wind or sun, photovoltaic, to produce in the end methane in 2 steps, to produce a gas. In the first step you use the electricity to produce from water hydrogen by electrolysis. And here you can already use the hydrogen if you want in fuel cells for mobility for example. But the real idea is to go one step further and to combine the hydrogen with Co2 and you form in a chemical reaction, you form methane. And this methane, which is equivalent to natural gas, you can then transport in the already existing network of Germany or Europe. And this, the gas network, which will surprise some people I guess, transports at least twice as much energy as the electric grid in Germany. So twice as much energy is transported in gas pipelines than by the grid. So this is a very, very efficient, already existing transport system and also the storage system is very good. We keep store in Germany of gasses and this is about 1/3 of the annual electricity consumption of Germany, This is a completely different, many orders of magnitude different. So of course the efficiency, the efficiency to get hydrogen is about 70% and the efficiency then to get methane, the total efficiency is 55% or something like that. Of course this is... Still you have gas and you produce Co2. You could also then go back to electricity and then of course you have your energy efficiency goes down further to 30%. So it’s not very efficient. But still it is a possibility which can be... which we could have in the short term. So this is being discussed and researched in Germany quite a lot. The other idea is a bit more... Let’s say more an idea but nevertheless some, This is to produce so to speak artificial hydroelectric power stations by using the deep sea. To have the pressure difference between the surface of the water and let’s say 2,000 metre down which is 200 bars. And you dump a hollow concrete spheres or some other bodies down and then to save the energy you pump out the water and create some atmospheric pressure. And if you want the energy back, you let the water go through the turbine again and you produce electricity. So, I’m not so sure whether this... I mean it is according to first calculations with industry, this is just about as much... costs as much as other means like building a new hydropower station and so on. But it would be a possibility to have with every wind power station perhaps such a reservoir which also if it’s not as deep, it can be used as a socket for placing the wind turbine on it. So anyway these are new ideas. In general I want to say that the problems of renewables and then of transport and storage can, to our knowledge, only be solved on... not on a national scale but on at least a European scale. We need very urgently a European network to extend the European network. The electricity grid with high voltage lines which is possible. And the same with storage. And also of course if we consider the cost, then it really doesn’t make sense to have photovoltaic in Germany. One should have it in the Sahara or in the south of Spain or in Sicily. And then we come again to the problem how do you transport the energy. But there are possibilities, the high voltage lines already exist and they are only a small contribution in cost to the total cost. So this is possible. And then of course you get much more efficient. Thank you. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you Dr. Keilhacker. Could I encourage people to go to the mics and ask a few questions. And while all that is going on I have one of my own. You talk about a European grid which strikes me as a very sensible idea. And you talk about pump storage in the oceans. I would have thought the answer to pump storage if you’ve got a European gird is one word, Norway. Can you not persuade the Norwegians to act as the battery of Europe? Martin Keilhacker: Well, Norway is discussed as the Holy Grail by many German scenario makers but the reality is quite different. I mean the present reservoirs are just sufficient to cover the needs of the Norwegians. And there is the possibility to increase this by 5 or 10 gigawatt or something like this. And Germany has just only a few weeks ago, has signed a contract with Norway for a high voltage under the sea transmission line which will have 1.2 gigajoules. This is about what one nuclear reactor, one block of nuclear reactor has or some other big power stations. And this is certainly very useful but it will in the end not really solve the problem if we want to go to 80% renewables. I mean I have my doubts whether this is possible, much more than 50%. But if we want, certainly the storage and this will not be solved by going to Norway because the Norwegians, the British as far as I know want... Geoffrey Carr: Yes we would like a slice of Norway as well. Martin Keilhacker: And the Netherlands have already a line in that market and Sweden and so on and so on. Geoffrey Carr: Sorry about the bells. Question: I’m from the US and I work on fusion research. And thank you to all the panel members. We’ve heard a lot of really good things about how we can make more energy in the future. But I would just like to pose a question sort of down the other pathway. Earlier in the week we heard a talk by Doctor Fert about, you know, a very novel way of having computers use so much less energy. And just do you think that that can actually be significant? Or those sort of energy saving matters is that just so small compared to how much energy we need that it hardly matters? Geoffrey Carr: Who would like to take that one? Ah, Carlo. Carlo Rubbia: I could try to give the answers to the question. First of all we are not talking only about electric energy. We’re talking about total energy. Electricity is only 1/3 of it. But our largest consumption is coming from other activities, roughly home and industries producing various materials. It would seem to me that the right direction which one should go is to try to reduce... especially in our countries saving of the other aspect of the energy, namely buildings, houses, energy transport, cars etc. And electricity it’s of course...it’s a very delicate issue and the question which you raise is certainly important. Now in that respect it would seem to me 1 or 2 things. I think our energy supply will depend very much for instance on the fact that we decide to have an electric car instead of having an oil driven car with all the possible advantages. And therefore it would seem to me that electricity per se is a problem quite independently of the specific use of it. Now in this respect I want to add 2 important points. One point is: One way is extending the network. We already said that the present networks are not sufficient. You mentioned very clearly the necessity of a European network. It seems to me that we have to reconstruct transport of energy from the beginning. We have to be able to transport large amounts of electricity over big distances. Now the average distance of an electric line is a few hundred kilometres. The longest distance of a natural gas line as you mentioned is 8,000 kilometres. We’ve got to follow that line. If you get a much wider surface and much wider cooperation in the utilisation of the energy, I think we will be able to compensate problems in a much more effective way. The second point is there is one form of electric energy which storage is very successful, which was not mentioned by any previous speaker, which is what's called... It’s associated with solar energy. All the Spanish concentrating solar power systems use storage in the form of heat storage. You take sunlight and you heat it to 500 degrees centigrade and then you store the liquid, hot liquid in a very efficient way. And that can last for days. In fact, this is now presently used in most of the applications of concentrating solar energy in the future. This seems to be a very promising technology. Because it is about a factor 1,000 more efficient than carrying water up and down, keeping hot liquid. And hot liquid is naturally there if there is sunlight, you see. If we want to one day have a system to transport energy from Sahara to Europe, there is no doubt that storage will have to be associated. And the method of storage in terms of liquid, hot liquid is there. And it will become a practical solution. Robert Laughlin: We have a long line here but I can’t resist. I run a course on energy at Stanford that I run in the fall. And one of the students who is from Saudi Arabia wrote a piece on this which you can go read. And he pointed out that at present the computer industry including the internet uses about as much energy as the commercial airline industry. And also it’s growing exponentially. And so we calculated how long before the computer industry was the entire energy cost of the world. And of course it’s a silly thing but it’s not so silly. It’s a small number of decades. Now, the point is that the computer used right now is not limited by energy cost. Your phone, your cell phone could be much more efficient but you’re buying that, the little gadgets in there. So, we’ve now discussed the fact that this is not a stupid question and in fact the internet is taking a lot of energy and it’s getting... you know like this. And second of all that you are responsible because you people like all those little gizmos on your phones. Georg Schütte: Measures to increase energy efficiency are the low hanging fruits of the German energiewende. So we want to increase efficiency and reduce electricity consumption by 50% in the next 4 decades. The problem is the rebound effects which we saw in the past. And you mentioned just one of them, introduction of IT and new technologies that overcompensate the efficiency gains which we have made before. So green IT is a big issue. Geoffrey Carr: I’m going to take chairman’s privilege and just make one other point which is: Every discussion about energy efficiency, the discussion is in the context of the 1 billion people who are in the developed world. There are 6 times as many, soon to be 8 times as many people out there who want to be like us. Energy efficiency, efficient technology is obvious but you're not going to be able to conserve your way out of the problem by conserving something that doesn’t even exist anymore which is their demand. So energy efficiency is a good idea but it can’t possibly be the answer to the question. Thanks very much for the question. Question: I am from the University of California. And we here live right by the dessert and our faculty uniformly agree that solar cells in the dessert is completely impractical. The cost of transporting the energy from the dessert back into the LA area is simply not going to work. And they’ve explored a large range of possibilities on that. This plot of humanity, the way I see it, is that we found places on our planet which were too hot so we invented air conditioning. We find that the sun is not always up so we should bring it to us. And the way to do that is to use nuclear energy. And I feel that there is no other solution other than nuclear energy. The question is: If you look at the disaster in Japan you will note that the reactors were built on old fission designs from the 1970s. So isn’t it true that we could, while we wait for fusion to become practical, focus our efforts on safe fission like pebble bed reactors and devices of this nature. Geoffrey Carr: I hesitate to say: Carlo, can you address the question of nuclear technologies? You have 2 minutes. Carlo Rubbia: Well, let me say I don’t think there is much more uranium around than there is oil or natural gas if we are using it at present level. Today about 6% of the total primary energy is nuclear. The rest is coming from elsewhere. So it would seem to me that if you wish to go nuclear and sooner or later there will be people which will realise that nuclear resources are there to be exploited, you have to depend on a different nuclear. And you have mentioned the fusion as one example. The other examples are some exotic materials which really do solve this problem on a longer time base. It seems to me that if you were going to say nuclear is the main solution for the future of energy in the near term, we would like to multiply the amount of nuclear energy by a substantial factor, maybe a factor of 5 or the factor 10, 50% nuclear. This is certainly possible but it will give us a few problems like Yucca Mountain in your country. What are you going to do with the waste? And other questions. And I don’t know that there is enough enrichment or other things available to do this. So this seems to me that the only way out of it, to get nuclear on the road again is by very strong, massive effort on innovative. The present day nuclear seems to me to fill up the gap. They know what it is. There’s the good factors, the bad factors. We know that is a debate at question. Some people think one way; some people think a different way. But it seems to me the only way out of that is innovation, innovation, innovation. Geoffrey Carr: I’ll take another question actually. The lady at the front. Question: Hi, I am…?(inaudible 55.57) also from the United States and my question in regards... So, my question is how are we going to put in infrastructure for all these great, wonderful new technologies? Is it going to be a global effort where we put in methane pumps everywhere or, you know, to transport electricity back from the Sahara back to Germany? I mean how are we going to actually put the infrastructure and motivate society to support us in these... in implementing the newer technologies? Geoffrey Carr: That’s a political question. Georg Schütte: There is no master plan which says that one has to build this here, this there. It’s an evolutionary process with a lot of players involved. So you have to provide business incentives for those who build distribution networks to create those networks. We have to provide incentives to build wind mills out, off shore wind mills. We currently in Germany had a problem in that we do have the off shore wind mills but we don’t have the connection to the mainland. And what happens if the connections fails or breaks down for a certain while? Or if the power produced off shore cannot be distributed in land? So you have to provide also for regulations that make sure that the investment of those... that the off shore investment pays off in a given time. So, it is a huge regulatory effort. It is a huge infrastructure planning effort and it works, as I said, evolutionary and stepwise. If we are good, we will be able to coordinate it on a European level. How to do this on a worldwide level? Probably not. There is no global master plan. It will evolve from various regions and it will have to take into account the specificities of a given region. We heard about Southern California for example with a given environment there. And it will be different from what you have in northern Europe for example. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you very much. Question: My name is Rico Friedrich from Freiberg in Germany and I would like to know the opinion from the panel on what they think how heat, so how to heat up rooms in the winter maybe in future time can be provided renewable. Because as to my knowledge 40 to 50% of the primary energy use in Germany goes into heating up rooms. And therefore this is a kind of critical issue and I would like to know your opinion how to do that in the future in a renewable way. Thank you. Martin Keilhacker: Well, as you have rightly said this is a large contribution to the energy, in efficiency so to speak. And it has already been mentioned before that this is a field where certainly something has to be done and will pay off. So incentives again have to be given to insulate the houses better. This of course is mainly possibly by new houses. And then if a house is well insulated, then it is easy to heat it by, for example, electrically driven heat pumps or something like this which take the energy out of the air or water or whatever. And even perhaps, if there is enough electricity, by direct electric heating. So I think this will be done heating at lower temperatures. So like you install in your room heating in the floor or in the walls and so this technology exists. And I think this can be done. The only, as has already been pointed out, there is... It’s difficult to start the momentum, you have to give incentives. This should be done much more I think. Geoffrey Carr: Anybody else? Thank you very much. Yes. Question: Hello and thanks for considering my question. With energy usage expected to rise drastically as middle classes emerge in the BRIC nations, it’s my opinion that fission and eventually fusion must play a critical role. My question is: Can and maybe more importantly should scientists and engineers attempt to restrict this source so as to leverage the promotion of responsible energy conservation techniques? Geoffrey Carr: That sounds like one for you actually. Robert Laughlin: Well, it isn’t but I’ll answer it anyway. I don’t know how to do that, do you? Question: No. Robert Laughlin: Well, I can’t tell somebody what kind of energy they can use and what they can’t. My government tries to do it and sometimes in a very heavy handed way. But they’re not always successful. So I think the answer is: No, it is not possible. Geoffrey Carr: And I would also, again taking chairman’s privilege. If I understood your question correctly, you’re saying that scientists and engineers should take this upon themselves to do that. That’s a political decision to do this sort of thing. What you’re proposing is almost ultra vires from what is the proper role of the scientist, isn’t it? Question: Right, but I believe we all have a responsibility to do what we think is right. And I think conservation and trying to cut down on the amount of energy used. The amount of energy wasted, that that’s our responsibility. To have some type of power to be able… Geoffrey Carr: How does that connect with what technology is used to generate the electricity that we do use? I don’t see the connection. Or you’re saying people who work in nuclear power should make these decisions? I mean... Question: As we get more and more fusion reactors and fission reactors, we’ll have the power to operate them and I guess we could... Robert Laughlin: You look at the history of nuclear reactor building and you’ll see it’s very complicated. In the States for example we’re not building any more of them even though the present administration wanted to. So in some countries there’s powerful opposition to nuclear energy and other nations such as India there’s powerful support. Now, the fact of the matter is that we as technology work for voters. I’m sorry. I mean you can have this fantasy that scientists are the most powerful people in the world but they’re not. We are not at the mercy but we’re actually the servants of the people who get elected. And so the question you’re asking is quintessentially political. I’m just not qualified... none of us is actually qualified to answer. Carlo Rubbia: I would like to believe that it’s certainly true that developed country can run with much less energy consumption. And reductions, massive reduction in the amount of energy we need is something we can and we should do. But we should not forget there is also another very large group of people in developing countries. And they represent the quasi totality of the population. And they are running on a much smaller amount of energy per person as we do. And clearly it’s perfectly normal for them and correct and right that they should get more energy per person in order to be able to maintain a balance between what they do and what we do. And I believe the real energy problem is not so much the fact that we have to reduce our consumption. Because I think, this is something which one way or the other we’ll have to do. But the real problem is what to do with the demanding energy consumption which is in the developing countries very rapidly growing. If you go for instance to China, you find that in China today every week there is a new coal fuelled power station being constructed. This is the problem of the Co2 emissions. This is the problem of the future of the planet. Because it’s there that this action will be decided. So we have to find a way in which they could get a reasonable amount of energy with a reasonable amount of acceptability of the situations. And certainly the solution of burning coal massively is not a solution. And I think this is something which only science can solve. And we being the people which have the highest amount of scientific knowledge we have the responsibility of solving the problem. Not only for us but also for them. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you very much for your perspective. Person at the back. Question: Hello, my name is Nick Chancellor. I’m from the University of Southern California. And my question is about a related use for coal and oil and that’s: How do you think renewable energy will effect for example petrochemicals and the chemicals that we get from coal that we use to make plastics and things like this? Do you believe that in a renewable future we’ll have to figure out some way to get these from carbon dioxide and water in the atmosphere or plants or something like that? Or do you think fossil substances will be reserved for petrochemical uses while we continue to use renewable sources for energy? Geoffrey Carr: Personally I thought it was an entirely economic question, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t continue to use them. Robert Laughlin: There’s an interesting number that may help you parse this. At present just little under 5% of the oil, the kilograms of oil that come out of the ground are used in all the petro chemistry. That includes all pesticides, all plastics, the works. And so it’s actually a very small fraction of the total oil budget. The rest of it is used for transport. Now that number is small enough that it’s perfectly obvious you could supplant the carbon use of petrochemicals with plants. For better or worse I think we’re stuck with the plastic industry forever even after the oil runs out. Geoffrey Carr: Thanks for the question, anyone else, lady there. Question: My name is…?(inaudible 67.32). I’m a postdoc in theoretical physics at MIT. I am also from the USA originally. And a question that has really been bugging me for the last several years in fact is that we’re working on all of these sustainable technologies. You see lots of people driving around Cambridge Massachusetts with their nice Prius. But we need rare earth metals. We need metals that there are limited amounts on earth for these sustainable technologies, for the motors that go into the windmills that we’re putting off shore. We need these metals that are also in...behind borders (inaudible 68.07) that are not always easy for us to access. So my question I guess is a little bit political but also scientific. Which is that we have to figure out how do we make our sustainable energy development sustainable. And so I wonder kind of where things are with that. And also there’s an economic question in there too, or political question. Geoffrey Carr: A sustainability question here. Who would like to take that one on? Georg Schütte: Thank you for the question and it’s a good question. What can one do? One has to take a look at the life cycle of material and take a much closer look at the reuse of materials. If we would use all the precious metals which are in our cell phones, it could be on a sustainable basis already by reusing those materials. And we have to do that not only with cell phones but in other instances as well. But yet there is nothing for free. You always have to pay a price and one has to take into account the external costs. If we do that with nuclear power plants, we also have to do it with solar panels and other renewable energy technologies. But cycling effects are just one solution which is the one of choice I would say. Robert Laughlin: There are lots of people worrying about the rare earth supply. And of course the Chinese are really happy because they have most of the rare earths. However, remember the rare earth magnets for example gain you mainly... They lower the cost because they’re small magnets. It’s perfectly possible to make motors without rare earths. Ok, so don’t worry. It’s going to be fine. If the rare earths aren’t enough we’ll make it another way. Geoffrey Carr: Maybe they should open up the old mine in Ytterby, where they were all discovered in the first place. At the back. Question: Hi, Jan Fiete from CERN. First of all I would like to say that I like this discussion because we’re discussing much more than nuclear and I think we are much more creative than nuclear. So it’s good that we go ahead in this sense. In any case as it came up, Fukushima came up of course. I would like to say that Fukushima should be more for us than interpreting or checking if other nuclear power plants are sitting in an earthquake zones or not. I mean we have seen the high standard industrial nation was not able to build a plant that sustained the incident that happened. It was not able to sustain everything they thought of. And I think this is essentially an engineering problem. I mean probably it can be made safer and things have to be worked on and all the ideas we could have, all the potential things that could happen could be addressed engineeringly. But then the question is to be asked how expensive does it get. And I think this is the fair price to which one should compare other sources of energies: How expensive does nuclear power get if you include all the potential dangers that apparently are neglected up to now? Carlo Rubbia: I would like to comment more generally what you said in the following sentence. It is certainly true that the cheapest energy today is probably burning coal. It’s also clear however that this is only estimated direct cost. There is a very interesting paper for instance given by an MIT team which has shown that if you add all the indirect costs to the consumptions of coal, you find out that the renewable energy would be much cheaper than burning coal. And therefore it seems to me that the real problem there is the one of estimating not only the cost per se of just taking a piece of coal and burning it but all the consequences of it. And the most important one of course is the fact, as I said, with the creation of greenhouse gases. And this kind of situation... When you look at this, you realise that this situation is completely distorted with respect to what we’re accustomed to do now, that the first step therefore should be to give to coal the right costs. And start from there in order to decide which way to go for the future energies. Geoffrey Carr: So, how would you do that, carbon tax? How do you factor the external costs of fossil fuels? Carlo Rubbia: We all know that the costs are there. I mean you can estimate them. The question is whether you should charge them or not. Martin Keilhacker: There are several studies which look for the external costs and compare the different systems, yes. Carlo Rubbia: It’s a fact that they are very a distorting image. Geoffrey Carr: You can identify them but you have to build them into the price, otherwise they won’t be meaningful. Martin Keilhacker: But you also... Some people are also surprised how much the renewables, how much is in them in the external costs because the material used and so on. Geoffrey Carr: We’ve got several people in the queue. It would probably help if nobody else came up now. We’ll probably just about get through all the questions that we’ve got there before lunch. So, if you haven’t got into the queue already, tough. You'll have to come and talk to the panellists after lunch. Question: So did I understand the answer correctly that for nuclear power it would be similar if you would include all the indirect costs? Then it would be much more expensive than outlined in the initial speeches? Carlo Rubbia: Correct, I agree with you. Robert Laughlin: Please, the nuclear power we’re talking about is not our nuclear power, it’s Japanese nuclear power. And the people of Japan are in the process of doing this cost calculus right now. So what you need to do is be quiet and watch what they do because they have no coal. They have no backup. All of their alternate comes from the sea, it’s imported. So costing things is of course extremely hard to do. The only way I know how to do it is let people do it, ok? So there’s a costing exercise that’s happening right before your eyes. And at this point I’d say the right thing to do is stop theorising and watch the experiment. Applause. Question: Well, I’m a student from Hamburg in Germany and my question goes to Georg Schütte. And it’s actually related to what we were talking about now. So you put forwards that Germany wants to get 80% of its energy from renewable sources in a very short time now. And I understand from Professor Laughlin, he says you cannot do that unless you get the costs down of that renewable power sources to the level where it is now. I would like to know: What is the strategy of the German government to achieve that? Or do you think Professor Laughlin is wrong with this argument? Georg Schütte: The first one is to be precise. I spoke about 80% of electricity from renewable sources. So we do not talk about total energy consumption. That’s a major difference. Whether we will be able to achieve it or not, I don’t know. But it is the objective and we try to stepwise reach it. We have to see by 2015 where we will be. But what I do know is that there was a very strong public sentiment in Germany that wanted that choice. And so we have to face the challenge. Do you have an alternative? Question. No, but my question is: How do you think politics can contribute to actually really, like do it at this speed and get costs down? What are the main means politics have? Martin Keilhacker He is asking for a master plan more or less which you correctly said we don’t have a real a long term master plan. Georg Schütte: Well, it’s a matter of incentives and of policy approaches. You can provide assistance to businesses and incentives to businesses to do the work which is necessary. What do we do as a ministry, as science and research ministry? We got together with other sponsors and started a research program, funding for a major research program on energy storage. We put out €200 million now for research on energy storage capacities. We will invest a similar amount of money into research on networks and distribution networks and smart grids. So we provide support for basic research and applied research. We do provide money that goes into alliances of research institutes and enterprises so they combine forces. So, the public Euro which is being invested is matched by double or 3 times the amount of private funding for joint research endeavours. That we can do. Competition, we contribute to improvement of technologies and yet you also need regulation. And the political fight is about what degree of regulation do you need in order to create a market and to what extent can a market create solutions by an in itself. Question: My name is Daniel Brunner. I’m from Palma de Mallorca in Spain. And I’m afraid this is rather an economical question. But we have seen how the price drops dramatically in the computer industry just by mass production and the basically very professional way of producing. So is something similar not possible for solar cells or almost logical? Geoffrey Carr: Well the short answer is yes. As you look at the... We were discussing this earlier that you see precisely that phenomena happening. Anybody want to take that one on? I claim that we see it. Robert Laughlin: Geoffrey has seen some reports that I haven’t seen. So I have to answer cautiously. My guess would be no. And it has to do with the basics of the semiconductor manufacture, how it works, the nature of the problem and so forth. I think myself that the dramatic changes in pricing we’ve seen in photovoltaic cells recently is extremely complicated by the exchange rate between western currencies and the Yuan. And I think part of the effect is mirrors. That will become clearer over time. And it’s possible I’m wrong, that the real price did come down. But my understanding of how the semiconductor works is that Moore’s law will not repeat itself in photocells. Geoffrey Carr: My understanding from what I have seen is that you’re absolutely right in the short term if we’re just talking about the last 18 months, 2 years. The Chinese are clearly trying to manipulate the market. But if you’re looking over a scale of 15 or 20 years you’ve seen a 3 order of magnitude fall in the price. I can’t remember the exact figures but from something like a 1,000 to... Robert Laughlin: By the way I just don’t believe it. Geoffrey Carr: You don’t believe it. Well, I’ll dig out the data and discover that I’m wrong. But we’ll agree to disagree on this one. I think you’re right on this. Carlo Rubbia: May I simply comment on that? It seems to me the one thing is the cost of the solar panel. Per se the cost of the solar panel is reduced and is coming down. The second problem is the system, the system is complicated. Now at the present moment the major cost of generating electricity is not so much the panel itself but the whole system. It takes the DC voltage, 1 volt into something which can be used in the network, the transport and this, that or the other. And those values are much more difficult to reduce in cost than the single component which is the solar panel. So even if the solar panel were to come down quite substantially, the overall cost of the photovoltaic system will be not that much affected by it because of the complexity of the overall problem. So, I would share what he says that the in fact photovoltaic is an expensive program. And there are no obviously evident factors that miracles may occur in such a way that you can squash it down similar to the cost of burning coal or things like that. Geoffrey Carr: Thanks very much, lady there. Question: Hello again. So this question is especially for Dr. Rubbia but maybe some of the rest of the panel will also have input. Just in your opening statement you mentioned both a liquid fuel and then the superconducting way of turning supporting power. And both of those sounded amazing and almost too good to be true. So I guess I’m wondering: What is the drawback there? Is it just a cost issue or why aren’t we already doing that? Carlo Rubbia: There’s 2 points, you said 2 important things. One is can I produce fossils like natural gas without a single drop Co2. This is an absolutely fantastic possibility and is in my view is within reach. And the reason is as follows. That CH4 is 4 hydrogen and 1 carbon. The hydrogen is carrying most of the energy and the carbon is only about 20% of it. The rest being hydrogen. So if you can transform natural gas into hydrogen plus black carbon, black carbon is a well-known material for instance to create tyres or to create all kind of carbon fibres and things like this, if that happens, then you solve the problem because there is no counter indication about using all the methane which there is around, there is plenty of it. There are also clathrates and other possible future for energy coming from methane. Methane is a very abundant things in nature. Not only in the depths but also all over the place. And if you have that, then you solve the problem as an intermediate step waiting for the time and the effort to transform in a truly, if you like renewable system, for the future of mankind. Now, we have done some experiments. We are doing some experiments and we succeeded now to reach about even up to 70% of transformation of methane into hydrogen at a very reasonable temperature of 800 degrees centigrade. So you take gas and it will naturally split very quickly into black carbon which is a dust which goes around. And you get the black cloud of it and hydrogen which comes out. 70% in 900 degrees is a result which we have. Now there are 2 directions which are working together with the specialist. One of them is catalysers. There catalysers exist which can reduce the temperature even further. We have a team in Rostock which is working on that. And the second possibility is to do some kind of a device in which the bubbles of natural methane are producing very small bubbles so there is a lot of surface and little volume and therefore the transformation occurs more successfully. Both methods look promising. And it seems to me if such a thing comes as you correctly say that could be a good way of solving the problem. The second question you mentioned is superconductivity. Superconductivity is a booming field. We received yesterday the presentation from LHC; it’s a superconductor, a system of unprecedented size. Superconductivity would be able to give us a possibility of transforming the electric energy system into a system which is comparable, as I mentioned some time ago... This is very close to being a reality. We have now a model; we’re developing, which looks quite... Somebody is laughing there, I don’t know why, but anyway. Geoffrey Carr: I caused it. Sorry. Carlo Rubbia: But anyway the conclusion is... Those are... Let me say all those ideas are not necessarily true. I mean even during the period of the time of the Silicon Valley situation only 1 out of 3 or 4 ideas were actually successful. But you have to try and that is what we are doing. We are trying and this is possibly hope, thank you. Robert Laughlin: Mr. Moderator, I cannot let him get away with that. I’ll be very short. A fact: 1,000 kilometre high tension line at the reaches we have now has about a little under... It’s about a kilovolt, about a megavolt, ok. It has about a little less than 7% ohmic loss, it’s nothing. And it could easily be made less simply by making the wires bigger. Why don’t we do that? Simply because the line is expensive. It costs a billion dollars to make a line that big. And the interest on the billion dollars at this point begins to equal the market value of the power you’re stuffing down the line. So using superconductivity to transport electricity is stupid, stupid. Geoffrey Carr: Next question please. Question: …(inaudible 86.11) science from Japan. My question is quite different from the future energy problem. So many people discuss about the nuclear power plant problem in Fukushima This problem, what do you think, we face that, it’s a current problem of Fukushima, what is the future for a blueprint to deal with the aftermath of the Fukushima, the nuclear power problem, what do you think? Robert Laughlin: May I ask a question? The sound is not good. So I don’t completely understand. Geoffrey Carr: Can you summarise your question in about 10 words. Question: What do you think is Fukushima power plant problem was over, or not? Robert Laughlin: May I answer that? Geoffrey Carr: Yes please do. Robert Laughlin: Once when I was taking off in an airplane from New Orleans, we hit a bird. A bird came in the engine and it made a loud bang and gas began coming out of the engine. And we all began praying for our lives at this point. And I was sitting next to an airplane engineer and he said: He said: “Well it’s something people learn the hard way. There was a plane taking off from Gander, Newfoundland. And they threw a blade and the blade went through a hydraulic line, lost control of the plane and the plane went down and everybody died.” And he explained that with these powerful technologies now and then a terrible accident happens. And that’s just the way powerful technologies are. If you send a man to the moon, it’s risky and you should not be surprised when someone loses their life. Now in this case he said: “What happened is people analysed the problem, understood that throwing the blade is bad. And they instituted a regulation that the jet engine should have a big steel can around it so that if it throws a blade there’s no problem.” Now, nuclear accidents are like this. They’re great big terrible things. And every time one happens people retrench and try new designs. So I personally don’t think it’s the end, no. Geoffrey Carr: I think this might have to be the last question because people are getting hungry. Sorry for the other 2. What's your question? Actually good idea. We’ll take all 3 questions. Question: My name is Ibrahim…?(inaudible 89.21), I’m a postdoctoral researcher in biophysics at the École normale supérieure in Paris. I’m from Niger. And it’s the world fourth producer of uranium, I believe. It’s a country that is 2½ times the size of France and about 70% of that is the Sahara Desert. So, as I sit here as a young researchers I feel... privileged I feel to be able to be part of this discussion. But then I think that there are probably a bunch of kids in Niger who could be geographically at the centre and geographically in the position to come up with the next solution. But the problem is that probably the university is not well funded so they’re not at the same level as the American students and Japanese students that have paraded here with well directed questions. So as you think about finding a solution, what are we thinking about in terms of those developing countries where the solution could actually come from? Applause Geoffrey Carr: Thank you, we’ll answer that question and we’ll take the other 2 questions afterwards. Georg Schütte: About a week ago we sat together here with the science minister and science counsellors from the G8 plus 5 countries. And we discussed the whole issue of green economy. You know the new buzz word about the future. And we all agreed about that we know something about the set of green technologies. And we started to argue whether nuclear, just like we do here, is a green technology or not. But other than that there was a lot of common agreement. And once we started to discuss about a green economy colleagues for example from South Africa said that the major challenge for South Africa is how to fight poverty. The second major challenge is how to be inclusive. And the third challenge related to that is how to include the major part of the population into an education system. And once we have achieved that then we’ll discuss the rest. What was fairly obvious is that we have to discuss those technologies combined with the issues which you raised because it is a global challenge and we can only face it if we face and meet the different challenges. And it’s even more complicated, I agree. But to take a close look on green technologies in Europe certainly does not suffice. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. Question: I’m from Ethiopia and I’m working on solar materials for concentrating solar power systems in South Africa. So, my question is as a critical part of the concentrating solar power systems is an absorbing surface, lots of materials have been developed for the systems. But they degrade at high temperature so what do you think about it? Geoffrey Carr: Alright, 3 minutes maximum, possibly 90 seconds. Carlo Rubbia: Ok. Well, concentrating solar power. We have a team of people working at IASS on concentrating solar power. And indeed solar power is a very exciting alternative to the photovoltaic in the sense that it provides with a very economical way to produce large amount of energy from the sun. It has a storage in it. It is producing electricity with a... a generation of electricity with a standard method of producing electricity which is cheap. So there are all the elements today which indicate that in the future years concentrating solar power may become a very serious contender for solar energy. Indeed, in the presentation for the solar in the Sahara Desert a lot of people are concentrating in the possibility of using concentrating solar. Concentrating solar is a system which mirrors collect light in terms of heat. The heat is about 550 degrees, which is the same temperature that you have in the sodium nuclear reactor, except there is no sodium and there is no reactor. But it is the temperature. And that temperature then is used into a conversion, into generate electricity with it. All that looks quite attractive and the real question is the cost. Now, what we are working on essentially in making cheaper? We believe that a factor 2 to 3 in the reduction of the cost of solar is potentially available. If that would be so, then the solar energy in this particular form will become entirely competitive with other sources like natural gas or if you like coal. And this is the goal which I’m behind and we’re working on it. And I believe there is an interesting chance that such a thing will develop itself in the future. Geoffrey Carr: Perfect, thanks. And you have the privilege of the last question. Question: My question is just 10 words. I’m from Japan and my name is Takami. And my question is: How do you think about the emotional point of views? I mean the current thinking the nuclear power is effective, everybody knows. But I actually work with volunteers at the place being hit by the tsunami and the earthquake. In this place people are so devastated and feel uneasy because whenever you go in front of the place the ground is so contaminated by that material. How do you take the emotional point into account to tackle these kind of issues? Robert Laughlin: I’d be happy to answer that if you like. When I heard about the tsunami, I immediately thought of all my friends in Sendai. I’d been there many times and I’ve walked around the town that got... part of the town that got wiped out by the tsunami which of course was vastly worse than the nuclear accident. So how do you feel when people you know are badly hurt? Your heart goes out to them and you feel terrible. And I did. There’s no answer I can give. Geoffrey Carr: I think you make an important point there that people also forget which is that 1,000’s of people were killed in that tsunami and... Robert Laughlin: 10’s of 1,000’s. Geoffrey Carr: 10’s of 1,000’s yeah and I don’t think... I think I’m right in saying that no one has actually died as a direct result of the nuclear accident or if they have it’s a hand full. And a sense of proportion is sometimes necessary. We ascribe things like the tsunami as acts of god, they’re acts of nature and somehow accept that, even though they’re disastrous, we think we have control over technology but we don’t. You know, we have a little control over technology but it will occasionally go wrong. We shouldn’t give up on things just because they go wrong occasionally any more than we should give up on building cities in earth quake zones because they sometimes get flattened by tsunamis. And I think, you know, it’s a question of whether you have a hopeful view of the future or not. And thank you, that was a great question to end with. Thank you very much, thank you. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: So if I could just end by thanking all the panellists, Dr. Schütte, Dr. Laughlin, Dr. Keilhacker and of course Dr. Rubbia. And most of all thanking you for your wonderful questions. I hope you’ve enjoyed the session, I certainly have. Thank you to Count and Countess again for organising the whole thing. You're all invited to lunch and we’re also invited to the castle at 3.30 for the closing ceremony. Thank you all very much. Applause.

Liebe Nobelpreisträger und Nachwuchswissenschaftler, lieber Herr Minister Bauer, meine Damen und Herren, liebe Diskussionsteilnehmer. Willkommen im Schlossgarten. Nach einer Woche der Diskussionen über die Wissenschaft, Ihr Leben und das Leben der Nobelpreisträger innerhalb der Wissenschaft, zwischen Kulturen und zwischen Generationen, werden wir heute die Wissenschaft und die Gesellschaft in einem noch höheren Maß miteinander verbinden, als wir dies in der letzten Woche getan haben. Heute werden wir eine Diskussion über das Thema Energie hören, das zweifellos für uns alle in der Wissenschaft und der Gesellschaft sehr wichtig ist. Es wird eine sehr interessante Diskussion sein, und ich lade Sie herzlich ein - und Geoffrey wird das wahrscheinlich wiederholen - sich an der Diskussion zu beteiligen. Im Anschluss an diese Diskussion folgt als nächstes die Mittagspause. Auch daran wird Geoffrey Sie später erinnern. Und ich freue mich sehr darauf, Sie alle um 15:30 Uhr im Vorhof des Schlosses bei der offiziellen Abschiedszeremonie wiederzusehen. Ich übergebe nun an Geoffrey Carr, der die heutige Podiumsdiskussion moderieren wird, und wünsche uns allen sehr interessante 90 Minuten. Willkommen. Vielen Dank, Herr Graf, vielen Dank, Frau Gräfin. Ihnen allen einen guten Morgen - guten Morgen, liebe Nobelpreisträger, Diskussionsteilnehmer, Fürsten, Machthaber, Minister, meine Damen und Herren. Willkommen in Mainau. Mein Name ist Geoffrey Carr, ich bin Wissenschaftsredakteur bei "The Economist", einem wöchentlich erscheinenden Nachrichtenmagazin - für jene von Ihnen, welche die Zeitschrift nicht kennen, falls es solche Leute gibt. Ich freue mich, der Moderator dieser Podiumsdiskussion der 62. Tagung der Nobelpreisträger in Lindau zu sein. Man ist so freundlich, mich seit vier Jahren immer wieder einzuladen. Ich weiß nicht, wie lange ich das aufrechterhalten kann, aber ich werde es weiterhin tun, solange man mich weiter einlädt, es ist großartig, es macht viel Spaß. Außerdem sind es aufregende Zeiten für Physiker. Somit ist es ein wunderbarer Zufall - vielleicht nicht ganz und gar ein Zufall -, wenn ich höre, dass dieses Treffen zum Thema Physik mit der Bekanntmachung des Higgs-Bosons oder zumindest eines Teilchens zusammenfällt, das vielleicht ein kleines bisschen das Higgs-Boson sein könnte, wenn wir mit den Messungen fertig sind. Normalerweise komme ich für das ganze Treffen, aber leider hielt mich mein Hauptberuf in London fest, da ich unseren Herausgeber, der in vielerlei Hinsicht ein schätzenswerter Mensch ist, aber nicht viel über Physik weiß, davon überzeugen musste, dass diese Neuigkeit wichtig genug sei, um sie auf dem Titelblatt unserer Zeitschrift unterzubringen. Was wir getan haben. Wir haben also in dieser Woche eine schöne, große, knackige Wissenschaftsgeschichte, und das ist gut. Leider bedeutete dies, dass ich das Treffen und den ganzen Trubel hier verpasst habe. Außerdem habe ich die Energie-Diskussionen verpasst. Ich bitte also um Entschuldigung, falls ich etwas wiederhole, was bereits gesagt wurde. Man könnte die These vertreten, dass Energie das dringendste Problem ist, mit dem die Menschheit im Augenblick konfrontiert ist. Wenn man genug Energie zur Verfügung hat und sie billig genug ist, dann kann man jedes andere Problem in den Griff bekommen. Das Ernährungsproblem kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem der Wasserversorgung kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem des Transports kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem der Produktion kann man in den Griff bekommen, die Umweltverschmutzung kann man in den Griff bekommen. All diese Probleme können mit einer ausreichenden Menge preiswerter Energie gelöst werden. Wenn wir nicht genügend preiswerte Energie zur Verfügung haben, befürchte ich, dass das für viele von uns bedeutet: "Zurück in die Höhlen". Wir werden nicht in der Lage sein, die industrielle Zivilisation aufrechtzuerhalten. Somit ist dies ein entscheidendes, ein ganz entscheidendes Thema. Im Moment sind wir auf fossile Brennstoffe angewiesen. Es gibt eine Menge fossiler Brennstoffe. Also besteht keine unmittelbare Gefahr, dass sie uns ausgehen. Allerdings ist es keine gute Situation, wenn man auf eine einzelne Energiequelle angewiesen ist, und zwar aus zwei Gründen. Ein Grund ist das Problem des Kohlendioxids und des Klimawandels. Man hat mich gebeten, dieses Thema bei diesem Treffen zu vermeiden, da wir die Technologie alternativer Energien diskutieren möchten. Dennoch ist es ein wichtiges Thema und wird wahrscheinlich später in der Diskussion noch einmal aufkommen. Der andere Punkt ist, dass die fossilen Brennstoffe irgendwann zu Ende gehen werden. Sie werden nicht sofort erschöpft sein, aber wir sollten uns Gedanken darüber machen, wie wir sie ersetzen. Und auch darüber, wie man die Technologie richtig handhabt. Wir sind immer auf der Suche nach günstigeren Energiequellen. Die Kosten für fossile Brennstoffe werden nicht sinken. Das ist höchst unwahrscheinlich. Wir haben einige neue Reserven in Form von Schiefergas erlebt, das kurzfristig zu einer Preissenkung bei Methan geführt hat. Aber das wird nicht ewig anhalten. Es ist unwahrscheinlich, dass die Förderkosten sinken werden. Wir sollten nach neuen Technologien Ausschau halten, die Energie erzeugen, Energie aus der Umwelt gewinnen. Die immer effizienter und günstiger werden und außerdem weniger belastend für die Umwelt Energie erzeugen können. Selbst wenn man die fossilen Brennstoffe unberücksichtigt lässt, herrscht kein Mangel an Energie. Ich habe das gestern Abend ausgerechnet und ich denke, dass ich richtig gerechnet habe, obwohl ich ein bisschen müde war. Ich schätze, dass die Sonne der Erde in etwas mehr als einer Stunde ebenso viel Energie liefert, wie die Menschheit jedes Jahr verbraucht. Wenn man Solarenergie nutzen wollte - sie ist im Überfluss vorhanden. Für jene, die aus unterschiedlichen Gründen nicht auf Solarenergie vertrauen, gibt es eine Menge an spaltbarem Material in der Erdkruste, das abgebaut werden kann. Da gibt es Uran und auch, wie wir bestimmt später hören werden, Thorium, das in größeren Mengen vorliegt, obwohl wir zur Zeit noch über keine wirklich funktionierende Technologie verfügen, um es zu nutzen. Außerdem gibt es sehr viel Wärme in der Erde, die man erschließen könnte, indem man geothermische Energie nutzt. Und für die wirklich Mutigen - oder vielleicht Törichten - ist da die Idee der Kernfusion, auf die wir ebenfalls später noch eingehen werden. Ich habe kurz nachgezählt: Es gibt ungefähr ein Dutzend alternativer Technologien, Alternativen zum Verbrennen fossiler Brennstoffe, um Elektrizität zu erzeugen und den Energiebedarf für die die verschiedenen Arten des Transports zu decken. Das Problem ist, dass sie alle Nachteile haben - denn wenn sie keine Nachteile hätten, würden wir sie bereits nutzen. Dann hätte man aus Gründen der Wirtschaftlichkeit bereits auf sie zugegriffen. Wir sind also hier, um die Alternativen zu diskutieren und zu erörtern, welche man einführen und einsetzen sollte. Dafür haben wir vier Personen eingeladen, die auf diesem Gebiet hervorragende Kenntnisse besitzen. Zwei von ihnen sind alte Bekannte, zumindest sind sie alte Bekannte, was mich betrifft. Ich hatte sie bereits einmal auf dem Podium. Einer von ihnen ist Carlo Rubbia hier. Er ist ein Nobelpreisträger, Nobelpreis für Physik 1984. Er war Generaldirektor des CERN. Er war verantwortlich für die Entdeckung der W- und Z-Bosonen, welche die schwache Kernkraft übertragen, die für die Neuigkeiten dieser Woche mehr oder weniger relevant ist. Wir haben Georg Schütte; er ist Staatssekretär im Ministerium für Bildung und Forschung hier in Deutschland. Sein Ministerium ist verantwortlich, teilweise verantwortlich, für die Implementierung der deutschen Energiestrategie, die, wie ich lese, das bescheidene Ziel verfolgt, bis 2022, in zehn Jahren, die Kernenergie abzuschaffen, und bis zum Ende des Jahrzehnts den Einsatz erneuerbarer Energie von 17 % des Gesamtverbrauchs auf 35 % zu verdoppeln. Ist das korrekt? Ja, somit sollte das einfach sein. Und die beiden anderen sind Newcomer, soweit ich weiß. Einer von ihnen ist Robert Laughlin, der 1998 den Nobelpreis erhielt, wiederum für Physik. Er hat ein Buch mit dem Titel "Power in the Future" veröffentlicht, das den unvermeidlichen Untertitel trägt, der länger als der Titel ist: "How we will eventually solve the energy crisis and fuel the civilisation of tomorrow" Es steht alles in dem Buch. Er befürwortet eine Mischung von Kernenergie und solarthermischer Energieerzeugung. Dies ist eine Form von Solarenergie, die vielleicht weniger bekannt ist. Sie bedient sich nicht der Solarzellen, die man sich aufs Dach setzt, sondern nutzt die Wärme der Sonne direkt, um Flüssigkeiten aufzuheizen, sodass Dampf produziert und Turbinen angetrieben werden. Das bedeutet aber auch, dass man die Wärme über Nacht speichern kann, womit das Problem, dass die Sonne jeden Abend untergeht, teilweise gelöst wird. Außerdem interessiert er sich für den Einsatz von Abfallstoffen und Algen für die Produktion von Biotreibstoffen. Und unser letzter Teilnehmer ist Martin Keilhacker. Er ist Vorsitzender des Arbeitskreises Energie der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft. Und er war Direktor des Joint European Torus - des ersten europäischen Versuchs, eine Kernfusion herbeizuführen. So wie ich ihn verstanden habe, sieht er Fusionsenergie als die ultimative Lösung an. Wir werden folgendermaßen vorgehen. Ich werde allen Diskussionsteilnehmern ungefähr zehn Minuten geben, um sich darüber auszulassen, was sie gerne tun würden. Wenn es sehr viel länger als zehn Minuten dauert, werde ich sie unterbrechen und an den nächsten übergeben, denn der Schwerpunkt der Festlichkeiten heute Morgen liegt darauf, dass Sie sich an der Diskussion beteiligen sollen. Es gibt zwei Mikrofone. Stellen Sie sich gegen Ende der Podiumsdiskussion an, wenn Sie Fragen haben - und ich hoffe, dass Sie welche haben werden. Wir werden weitermachen, bis uns entweder die Fragen ausgehen oder es Zeit zum Mittagessen ist. Vielen Dank. Entschuldigen Sie - ich sollte noch sagen, dass Dr. Schütte der erste der Diskutanten sein wird. Ich möchte ihn bitten zu erklären, wie er diese Lücke stopfen möchte, die entstehen wird, wenn alle Kernkraftwerke stillgelegt sein werden. Ob er es uns erklären wird, werden wir herausfinden. Wenn das, was wir nun international "Energiewende" nennen - ein deutscher Begriff, der sich in die internationale Ausdrucksweise gedrängt hat, wenn es um die Veränderung des Energiesystems geht, die Art und Weise, auf die wir das tun - einfach wäre, dann hätten es andere schon vorher getan. Wir werden uns einer gewaltigen Herausforderung stellen müssen. Man muss zugeben, dass diese Herausforderung durch einen kontinuierlichen Wandel der öffentlichen Meinung in Deutschland im Lauf der letzten 30 bis 40 Jahre ausgelöst wurde. Und wir sahen uns nach den tragischen Ereignissen in Japan mit einer neuen Realität konfrontiert. Also setzten sich Politiker und verschiedene gesellschaftliche Gruppen zusammen, um über einen längeren Zeitraum zu erörtern, wie wir unser Energiesystem künftig organisieren werden. Und wir beschlossen, in den nächsten zehn Jahren aus der Kernenergie auszusteigen. Wir beschlossen, die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien zu verstärken oder Möglichkeiten der Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien wahrzunehmen, damit bis zum Jahr 2050 der Strombedarf in Deutschland zu 80 % aus erneuerbaren Quellen gedeckt werden kann. Wir versuchten, dies umzusetzen und dabei gleichzeitig zu berücksichtigen, dass wir es auf eine klimaneutrale Art und Weise tun müssen. Tatsächlich wollen wir die Treibhausgasemissionen bis 2050 im Vergleich zu den frühen 90er Jahren ebenfalls um 80 % verringern. Dies ist also ein ehrgeiziges Ziel und wir haben zwischendurch verschiedene Schritte realisiert. Wir wollen die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken und wir haben bereits einen Stand von 20 % erreicht. Wir nutzen also gegenwärtig bereits mehr erneuerbare Energien, als wir Kernenergie nutzen. Und ich bin ziemlich optimistisch, dass wir die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken können. Schon vor Fukushima galt Kernenergie in Deutschland als eine Übergangstechnologie auf dem Weg zu einer stärker von erneuerbaren Energien geprägten Zukunft. Da sie eine Übergangstechnologie war, müssen wir Kernenergie nun bis zu einem gewissen Umfang durch fossile Brennstoffe ersetzen. Zu einem großen Teil wird das Gas sein. Wir stehen also vor einer gewaltigen Herausforderung. Wir müssen die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken. Um das tun zu können, müssen wir die richtigen Verteilnetze in Deutschland aufbauen. Wir müssen neue Kraftwerke bauen, um Kernkraftwerke durch andere Energiequellen zu ersetzen. Und wir müssen die Speicherkapazität erhöhen, denn erneuerbare Energiequellen erfordern viel Speicherkapazität. Und das ist die Herausforderung. Eine weitere Herausforderung besteht darin, dass man alle diese Faktoren berücksichtigen muss. Wir sprechen also von einem systemischen Ansatz, um das Energiesystem in Deutschland umzuorganisieren. Und das können wir ohne die Unterstützung von Technikern, Wissenschaftlern und Forschern nicht tun. Allerdings haben wir in den letzten 30 Jahren auch gelernt, dass wissenschaftliche Ideen, die isoliert dastehen, Gefahr laufen, nicht die Art von gesellschaftlicher Unterstützung zu erhalten, die erforderlich ist, um solch eine Infrastruktur zu schaffen, die einen jeden in dem jeweiligen Land betrifft. Ein systemischer Ansatz muss also auch berücksichtigen, dass man in der breiten Bevölkerung Akzeptanz für Technologien finden muss. Das ist es, was wir in Deutschland tun. Haben wir dafür einen Plan? Nein. Dies ist ein längerfristiger Prozess. Wir sprechen von einem Prozess, der mindestens über vier Jahrzehnte dauern wird. Und wir tun das Schritt für Schritt. Und das bedeutet, dass man Expertengruppen braucht. Das man Rat aus der Forschungsgemeinschaft benötigt. Wir brauchen den Rat der Ingenieursverbände. Und wir müssen mit den Menschen sprechen, die tatsächlich auch die Technologie der erneuerbaren Energien nutzen und davon Vorteile haben und die zustimmen müssen, dass Verteilnetze über ihre Grundstücke verlaufen. Sie müssen zustimmen, dass in ihrer Nähe Speicherkapazitäten errichtet werden. Und das ist die Herausforderung, mit der wir in Deutschland konfrontiert sind. Vielen Dank. Ich hätte eine Frage. Man kann darüber streiten ... Nun ja, es ist sinnvoll, Kernkraftwerke zu bauen, absolut. Auf beiden Seiten gibt es Argumente. Sobald Sie es gebaut haben, sobald es in Betrieb ist, sind sie relativ günstig, was den Unterhalt angeht. Wissen Sie, einige Ihrer Kraftwerke sind ein bisschen betagt, aber es gibt immer noch ziemlich viele, die noch Jahrzehnte Lebenszeit vor sich haben. Ein funktionstüchtiges Kraftwerk stillzulegen ist eine ziemlich teure Angelegenheit. Deutschland ist kein Erdbebengebiet. Japan wird hier nicht passieren. Ist es wirklich sinnvoll ...? Es mag absolut sinnvoll sein zu sagen, dass wir keine neuen Kernkraftwerke bauen werden. Ist es tatsächlich sinnvoll, die bestehenden stillzulegen? Vom Standpunkt des jeweiligen Kraftwerks und der wirtschaftlichen Basis des Betriebs dieses Kraftwerks aus betrachtet mag es vielleicht nicht wirtschaftlich sinnvoll sein. Dann ist der nächste Schritt der Überlegung: Welche Art von Kosten kalkulieren wir ein? Sind es nur die Betriebskosten des Kraftwerks? Rechnen wir den Abbau mit ein? Kalkulieren wir mit ein, wie wir mit dem radioaktiven Müll umgehen? Damit könnten wir letztendlich eine andere Art von Rechnung bekommen. Die zentrale Frage lautet: Finden wir öffentliche Anerkennung für eine Technologie dieser Art? Und in Deutschland ist die Realität: nein. Und das ist eine Realität, und wir müssen diese Art von Realität in die Überlegungen miteinbeziehen. So weit, so gut - aber können Sie die öffentliche Meinung akzeptieren? Ich weiß nicht. Selbstverständlich bin ich kein Experte, was deutsche Politik angeht. Ich tue mich mit der britischen schwer genug. Aber manchmal gibt es Dinge, mit denen sich die Leute nicht abfinden werden. Manchmal gibt es Dinge, bei denen sie vielleicht denken, dass sie sich damit nicht abfinden würden, aber wenn Sie Ihnen die Realität erklären, werden sie ihre Meinung ändern. Und ich frage mich ... Wie Sie sagten, glaube ich, dass die kurzfristige Alternative zum Einsatz von Kernkraft darin besteht, zumindest teilweise die Lücke mit fossilen Brennstoffen zu überbrücken. Okay, man kann Gas verwenden, was davon der am wenigsten schädliche ist, aber trotzdem pumpen Sie mehr Treibhausgase in die Atmosphäre, wenn Sie das tun. Es ist nicht ... Ein Kernkraftwerk in einer erdbebenfreien Zone ist keine Quelle von Umweltverschmutzung. Es ist vielleicht eine Quelle der Angst, aber Angst kann überwunden werden. Also, wir hatten seit den späten 60er Jahren mehr als 50 Jahre Zeit, um das zu erklären, und wir waren damit nicht so erfolgreich. Schauen Sie sich Österreich an. Sie haben ein Kernkraftwerk gebaut und es noch nicht einmal in Betrieb genommen. Es scheint also so zu sein, dass sie ein ähnliches Problem haben, und es kann nicht ... Aus meiner Sicht ist dies eine Art von sozialer Realität ist, die wir mit berücksichtigen müssen. Vielen Dank. Carlo, ich glaube, Sie können der nächste sein. Ja, lassen Sie mich mit einigen allgemeinen Erklärungen beginnen. Ich würde gern ein wenig über mögliche künftige Entwicklungen, an denen wir arbeiten, diskutieren. Ich sollte nicht vergessen, dass dies ein Physikertreffen und Physik unser Thema ist. Lassen Sie mich zunächst eines sagen: dass wir in ein neues Zeitalter eintreten, ein vom Menschen hervorgebrachtes Zeitalter, das Anthropozän genannt wird. Ich lernte den Begriff Anthropozän zum ersten Mal von Paul Crutzen. Ich weiß nicht, ob er der Erfinder des Worts ist, aber auf jeden Fall habe ich es von ihm gelernt. Und dies sind sehr außergewöhnliche Situationen. Wir stehen vor der Situation, dass jedes Jahr 90 Millionen neue Menschen auf diese Welt kommen. Es gibt eine echte Bevölkerungsexplosion. Die Zahl von sieben Milliarden Menschen, die wir gerade erreicht haben, ist eine unglaubliche Zahl. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen einfach sagen, dass sie einer ununterbrochenen Linie von Menschen alle 20 Meter entspricht. Wenn Sie einen nach dem anderen der Reihe nach aufstellen, überbrücken wir die Entfernung von der Erde zur Sonne. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen auch in Erinnerung rufen, dass die Sonne ... Das Sonnenlicht benötigt acht Minuten, um von der Sonne zur Erde zu gelangen. Im Verlaufe der Geschichte der Erde, der wenigen Hunderttausend Jahre, seit denen die Menschheit existiert, Wir stehen an der Schwelle zu einer Zukunft mit noch nie dagewesenen Umweltgefahren: der kombinierte Effekt des Klimawandels und der Ressourcenknappheit. Außerdem geht es um Biodiversität und die Widerstandsfähigkeit der Ökosysteme. Die Zeit der erhöhten Nachfrage stellt eine wirkliche Gefahr für das Wohlergehen der Menschheit dar. Eine solche Zukunft führt zu einem inakzeptablen Risiko, das die Widerstandsfähigkeit des Planeten und seiner Bewohner schwächen wird. In diesem Zeitalter gibt es ein inakzeptables Risiko, dass die vom Menschen verursachte Belastung des Planeten, sollten wir weitermachen wie bisher, unerwartete und unwiderrufliche Veränderungen mit katastrophalen Folgen für die menschliche Gesellschaft und das Leben, wie wir es kennen, auslösen wird. Ein Übergang in eine sichere und von jeglicher Not befreite Zukunft ist möglich, aber uns läuft die Zeit davon. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, wäre es erforderlich, die außergewöhnliche Kapazität der Menschheit für Innovation und Kreativität auf den Pfaden einer neuen wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, die vollständig mit den Grundsätzen globaler Nachhaltigkeit integriert sind, in vollem Umfang auszuschöpfen. Eine weltweite Kooperation wird notwendig sein, die Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft verpflichtet und vom Grundsatz der Verantwortlichkeit und Gleichheit geleitet ist. Es erfordert echte politische Führung, um die systemischen Probleme anzugehen. Die expandierende Bevölkerung verlangt mehr und mehr Nahrung, Wasser und Energie. Sie erfordert einen höheren Verbrauch von Bodenschätzen und übt einen wachsenden Druck auf die Umwelt aus. Um letztendlich erfolgreich zu sein und nicht wieder rückgängig zu machende Veränderungen mit möglicherweise katastrophalen Folgen von der Menschheit abzuwenden, werden wir die gesamte menschliche Innovations- und Schaffenskraft innerhalb eines neuen Rahmens globaler Nachhaltigkeit integrieren müssen. Bislang hat die Erde eine bemerkenswerte Fähigkeit, die Ausbreitung der menschlichen Aktivitäten aufzufangen und dadurch ein beständiges wirtschaftliches Wachstum trotz einer ernsten ökologischen Verschlechterung zu erlauben. Jedoch bedeutet die zunehmende Auswirkung eines nicht nachhaltigen Musters von Produktion und Verbrauch, in Verbindung mit dem Bevölkerungswachstum, sollten wir weitermachen wie bisher, dass das historische Muster des wirtschaftlichen Wachstums so nicht fortgesetzt werden könnte. In diesem Zusammenhang würde ich gerne einige Beispiele dafür anführen, wie Wissenschaft und Technologie uns tatsächlich helfen, eine akzeptable und bessere Zukunft zu schaffen. Diese alternativen Studien sind Studien, die wir, die ich und meine Kollegen am Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam in Deutschland, wo wir zur Zeit arbeiten, durchführen. Und ich würde gerne ein paar Minuten auf zwei Themen verwenden, die mir von ziemlich großer Bedeutung zu sein scheinen. Eines ist die Frage, wie man fossile Brennstoffe ohne CO2-Emissionen nutzt. Zur Zeit basiert die weltweite Energieversorgung hauptsächlich auf der Verfügbarkeit von fossilen Brennstoffen. Obwohl viel über die Begrenztheit der Ressourcen gesprochen wird, werden sie in den kommenden Jahrzehnten unverzichtbar sein. In Anbetracht der Klimaveränderungen ist es zusätzlich zur Entwicklung erneuerbarer Energiequellen dringend erforderlich geworden, fossile Brennstoffe effizienter und umweltfreundlicher zu nutzen. Die Verwandlung neuer und spannender Energie-Technologien in innovative Nutzungslösungen für fossile Brennstoffe bei niedrigen CO2-Emissionen wird für eine signifikanten Verminderung von CO2 sorgen. Sie ist eine der wichtigsten wissenschaftlichen und technologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Unter den verschiedenen fossilen Brennstoffen ist Gas derjenige mit den geringsten CO2-Emissionen. Am IASS und am KIT (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie) wurden der wissenschaftliche und der technische Aspekt einer anderen, höchst innovativen Methode untersucht, bei der es um eine bemerkenswerte, alternative Verbrennung ohne CO2-Emissionen geht. Sie wird als spontane die innere Dissoziation eines natürlichen Gases, CH4, zu Wasserstoff und Ruß bezeichnet. Es handelt sich dabei um das sogenannte "Methan-Cracken" oder die Methan-Dekarbonisation, die auf der Spaltung des Methan-Moleküls in seine atomaren Bestandteile basiert. Wasserstoff wird zur letzten Quelle mit ungefähr 80 % der Energie. Der freigesetzte feste Kohlenstoff in Form von Ruß kann mechanisch entfernt werden und schließlich für die Herstellung von Reifen, Batterien und sogar Treibstoff verwendet werden. Die praktische Implementierung einer CO2-freien Technologie für die Produktion von Wasserstoff aus Methan wird, falls sie erfolgreich sein sollte, in mehreren verschiedenen Bereichen einen entscheidenden Einfluss haben. Die Produktion von fossilem Wasserstoff ohne CO2-Emissionen wird außerdem einen Weg eröffnen, die bereits angesammelte Unmenge von CO2-Abfällen mit Wasserstoff zu rekombinieren, um eine natürliche, auf Gas basierende Treibstoff-Flüssigkeit als Ersatz für Öl herzustellen. CO2 und Wasserstoff können sich verbinden, um Methanol und Wasser zu ergeben, einen flüssigen Ersatz für Benzin, der bei allen Langstreckentransporten zum Einsatz kommt. Sofern es in der konzentrierten Quelle vorliegt, könnte es unendlich recycelt werden und das CO2 von einer Bürde in einen Vorteil verwandeln. Methanol ist eine Handels-Chemikalie. Methanol ist selbst ein hervorragender Treibstoff. Es kann mit Benzin vermischt oder in einer Methanol-Brennstoffzelle dazu eingesetzt werden, direkt in Kombination mit Luft Elektrizität zu erzeugen. Methanol kann zu Ethylen umgewandelt werden, dem wichtigsten Stoff für die Bereitstellung von Kohlenwasserstoff-Brennstoffen und ihren Produkten. Daher könnte es ohne eine teure neue Infrastruktur und ohne CO2-Emissionen Öl ersetzen: sowohl als Brennstoff als auch als chemischer Rohstoff. Dies würde eine praktikable und sichere Methode der Energiespeicherung darstellen, indem so ein praktischer flüssiger Brennstoff zur Verfügung gestellt wird. Sie würde der Menschheit eine unbegrenzte Quelle von Kohlenwasserstoff bereitstellen und die Gefahr der globalen Erwärmung verringern, insbesondere in der zweiten Phase, in der es vielleicht möglich wird, Wasserstoff aus Solarenergie herzustellen. Ein zweites Problem, das ich erwähnen möchte, ist eine neue interessante Entwicklung. Es betrifft die Frage des Transports von elektrischer Energie über große Entfernungen, wie dies schon der Vorredner betonte. Auf unserem Planeten gibt es eine Fülle von potenziellen Energiequellen für erneuerbare Energie. Beispielsweise beträgt die Sonnenenergie ungefähr das 100.000-fache der heutigen Primärenergie. Wind und Wasserenergie stehen ebenfalls in großen Mengen zur Verfügung. Allerdings befinden sich erneuerbare Energien im Allgemeinen in entsprechend ausgewählten, großflächigen Gebieten, die oft weit entfernt von dicht besiedelten Gebieten liegen. In der Nordsee gibt es die Möglichkeit, in einem 60.000 Quadratkilometer großen Gebiet Offshore-Turbinen zu errichten, die elektrische Energie für die gesamte Europäische Union liefern können. Die elektrische Energie, die im Sonnengürtel von einem konzentrierenden Solarenergie-System in der Größenordnung des Nassersees produziert wird, entspricht der gesamten Ölproduktion des Mittleren Osten. Wie auch immer, der primäre Nutzen all dieser erneuerbaren Energie ist die Gewinnung von Elektrizität, im Gegensatz zu fossilen Brennstoffen, die zum Heizen verwendet werden. Ein zusätzlicher Grund, um Verbindungen über große Entfernungen herzustellen, ist der, dass Hochleistungselektrizität mit der intrinsischen Veränderlichkeit von Wind- und Sonnenenergie zu tun hat, was wir ebenfalls erörtern werden. Der weltweite Einsatz dieser neuen Energieformen, wie etwa Windenergie, geothermische Energie und Sonnenenergie, ist auf erneute Investitionen in die Infrastrukturen für ihre Übertragung angewiesen. Neue Verbindungen sollten installiert werden, um Gebiete mit großem Potenzial für die Erzeugung sauberer Energie mit Gebieten zu verbinden, die einen Bedarf an verlässlicher elektrischer Energie haben. Supraleiter besitzen aufgrund des Fehlens von elektrischem Widerstand die Eigenschaft, dass der Verlust an elektrischer Energie exakt Null beträgt. Die dominierenden Verluste sind dann die nur statischen thermischen Verluste an den Kryostaten, während sie unabhängig von der transportierten Strommenge sind. Der größte Durchbruch war 1986 die Entdeckung der Hochtemperatur-Supraleitung durch die Nobelpreisträger Bednorz und Müller. Aufgrund seiner kritischen Temperatur, die deutlich über der von günstiger und ohne Weiteres verfügbarer flüssiger Stickstoff-Kühlung liegt, hat dieser neue Stoff die Bedeutung der Supraleitung verändert. Im Januar 2001 wurde das Komitee erneut durch die plötzliche Bekanntmachung von Akimitsu und einem Bericht zur Supraleitung bei 40 Kelvin durch Magnesiumdiborid in Erstaunen versetzt. Diese überraschend einfache und kostengünstige Verbindung kann einfach und ohne Weiteres zu Kabeln verarbeitet werden und basiert auf Vorläufern, die reichlich vorhanden und günstiger als jeder andere konkurrierende Supraleiter sind. Magnesiumdiborid ist somit ein wichtiger neuer Schritt bei der Entwicklung dieser Anwendungen. Elektrizität über eine Entfernung von mehr als einigen tausend Kilometern zu transportieren, kann verglichen mit dem Transport über bestehende Pipelines für Erdgas oder Öl, mit sehr niedrigen kryogenischen Verlusten und für sehr hohe elektrische Energien möglich werden. Diese Kabel sind in Form von sehr engen Röhren mit einem sehr geringen Durchmesser von ungefähr 30 Zentimetern unterirdisch verlegt. Die praktische Umsetzung der supraleitenden Kabel hat mehrere Aspekte mit der etablierten Praxis bezüglich der Pipelines für Erdgas gemeinsam. Das Kabel verläuft unterirdisch, und an der Oberfläche sind im Abstand von einigen hundert Kilometern regelmäßig Kühlungsvorrichtungen installiert. Beide Leitungen sind querfeldein verlaufende Übertragungssysteme mit vielen Besonderheiten, die mit Höhenunterschieden, Temperaturschwankungen und anderen ähnlichen Umständen zusammenhängen. Im Fall der Erdgas-Pipelines wurden diese Probleme erfolgreich gelöst, und es ist zu erwarten, dass sie auch hinsichtlich der supraleitenden Leitungen gelöst werden. Die längste Erdgas-Pipeline verläuft von Russland nach China und ist ungefähr 5.200 Meilen, also 8.400 Kilometer lang. Ähnliche Entfernungen können für den Energietransport von vergleichbaren elektrischen Energien möglich werden. Um zum Schluss zu kommen: ich glaube, dass die Wissenschaftsgemeinde gegenwärtig viele sehr schöne neue Ideen entwickelt. Und diese sind absolut notwendig, um zu gewährleisten, dass wir auf dieser schönen Welt eine Zukunft vor uns haben, die annehmbar und machbar und für uns alle zufriedenstellend ist. Herzlichen Dank. Robert Laughlin, geben Sie uns die Perlen Ihrer Weisheit. Carlo, Sie haben meine ganze Zeit verbraucht. Das ist natürlich ein Scherz. Wir haben im Vorfeld über dieses Treffen gesprochen, bevor wir hier auf Sendung gingen. Und wir möchten das Publikum dazu ermuntern, Fragen zu stellen. Daher werde ich mein Bestes tun, mich kurz zu fassen und auch ein wenig zu provozieren. Eine Sache, die sich bereits gezeigt hat, ist, dass es nicht nur bezüglich des Klimas, sondern auch bezüglich der gegenwärtigen Energieversorgung ein unmittelbar bevorstehendes Problem gibt. Und das ist die Sache, auf die ich mich lieber konzentrieren möchte, denn ich denke, dass es ein uns hautnah betreffendes Problem ist. In diesen Diskussionen hat sich außerdem herausgestellt, dass die technischen Mittel, um dieses Problem erfolgreich in Angriff zu nehmen, auf jeden Fall vorhanden sind. Wir wissen, dass die Sonne mit Sicherheit genügend Energie bietet, um das Problem zu lösen. Und wir wissen, dass alle Physiker aus diesem Grund dazu neigen, die Sonne zu mögen. Und wir wissen auch von den Kompromissen mit der Kernenergie. Ich möchte nun ein paar kontroverse Themen in die Runde werfen, in der Hoffnung, dass ich angegriffen werde und dann darüber sprechen kann. Als erstes also die Sonne. Kurz bevor ich zu diesem Treffen kam, sah ich in der "BP Statistical Review of World Energy" für dieses Jahr nach, um abzuklären, dass tatsächlich der weltweite Gesamtanteil der alternativen Energie, also Wind-, Sonnen- und Bioenergie, Die Sonne ist zur Zeit ein zu vernachlässigender Anteil des Welt-Energie-Budgets. Wie ist das möglich, da die Sonne doch so überreichliche Energiereserven hat? Nun, es ist eine Kostenrealität. Und wenn wir Techniker sein möchten, die das Problem wirklich lösen, dann müssen wir nicht nur die Möglichkeiten der technischen Mittel, sondern auch die Kosten angehen. Die Sonne hat ein Kostenproblem, das uns bekannt ist. Und eine unserer Aufgaben ist es, jenes Kostenproblem unter Kontrolle zu bekommen, bevor es zur Katastrophe kommt. Und das andere ... Es geht also um die Kosten, daher möchte ich die Frage der Kosten aufwerfen, obwohl ich Wissenschaftler bin. Die zweite Sache hat mit der berühmten Abstimmung in Deutschland zu tun, aus der Kernenergie auszusteigen. Seit dem Frühjahr halte ich in diesem Land zu diesem Thema Vorträge. Und ich mache einen sehr kontroversen Vorschlag, den ich jetzt in Ihre Köpfe pflanzen möchte. Zum gegenwärtigen historischen Zeitpunkt sind Juwelen günstig. Wenn wir also verzweifelt Energie brauchen, sind sowohl fossile Kohle als auch fossiles Erdgas reichlich vorhanden. Und der Preis ist sehr niedrig, insbesondere in Anbetracht der neuesten Fortschritte beim Fracking. Praktisch gesehen bedeutet die Kernenergie aufzugeben, mehr Brennstoffe zu verbrennen. Wir möchten nun die Kernenergie durch Wind und Sonne ersetzen. Aber dabei gibt es ein Kostenproblem und auch ein Problem der Versorgung und Nachhaltigkeit, über das wir wahrscheinlich sprechen müssen. Denn die Industrien können nicht diese hohen Kosten tolerieren und international wettbewerbsfähig sein. Und die Kunden werden es nicht hinnehmen, dass der Strom abgeschaltet wird. Die Alternativen, über die wir sprechen, haben üblicherweise eine Absicherung in Form von fossilen Brennstoffen, und das ist das kleine dunkle Geheimnis der alternativen Energie. Etwas, über das wir mehr sprechen sollten, denn das ist die Schwachstelle, die Achilles-Ferse der alternativen Energie. Ich habe Leute darum gebeten, dieses Problem zu durchdenken, die Politik zu ignorieren und ein Science-Fiction-Experiment durchzuführen, bei dem wir uns eine Zeit in ungefähr zwei Jahrhunderten vorstellen, in der niemand mehr fossile Brennstoffe aus der Erde verbrennt. Entweder, weil es keine mehr gibt, oder weil man sich darauf geeinigt hat, sie in der Erde zu lassen. Und ich möchte die Leute danach fragen, wie das Leben ist. Und vor allem danach, wie jene Leute aus der Vergangenheit den Übergang von der Abhängigkeit von fossilen Brennstoffen zu dem, was auch immer man heute hat, bewerkstelligten. Eine der Sachen auf dem Tisch ist die politische Notwendigkeit, günstige Energie zur Verfügung zu haben. Darüber haben wir viel gesprochen. Und nun bitte ich Leute, darüber nachzudenken, was passieren wird, wenn ihre Ur-ur-ur-ur-Enkel eine Wahl treffen müssen, entweder kein Licht oder Kernenergie zu haben. Werden sie für sehr viel höhere Energiekosten stimmen oder werden sie sich Gründe ausdenken, warum Kernenergie die ganze Zeit über das richtige war, und sie zurückholen? Wenn Sie denken, dass dies ein albernes Gedankenexperiment ist, dann möchte ich Ihre Aufmerksamkeit auf Ereignisse lenken, die sich zur Zeit in Japan zutragen. Wo Japan gerade den zweitschlimmsten Kernunfall der uns bekannten Geschichte erlebt hat, ringen dennoch gerade die Menschen in Japan, ringt diese Regierung gerade mit der Frage, was wir tun, wenn wir unsere Kernreaktoren abschalten. Das letzte Mal, als ich hinsah, wurden zwei von ihnen wieder in Betrieb genommen, o.k. Die Ereignisse in Japan sind also in höchstem Maße relevant für die Frage, ob man Gesetze erlassen kann, um angesichts sehr harter Realitäten wie der Marktnachfrage nach Energie auf der einen und nationaler Sicherheit auf der anderen Seite alternative Energie zu verlangen. Mit etwas Glück habe ich jetzt alle gereizt, so dass Sie eine Menge peinlicher Fragen stellen werden, die ich nicht beantworten kann, und jetzt werde ich aufhören. Ja, vielen Dank. Weiter zu Dr. Keilhacker. Das heutige Thema betrifft Versorgung und Speicherung. Lassen Sie mich also ein paar Minuten auf zwei neue Ideen oder Techniken verwenden, an denen einige meiner Kollegen arbeiten. Ich möchte Sie daran erinnern, dass im Augenblick die unbeständige und schwankende Energie aus Wind und Sonne ungefähr 10 % der Elektrizität in Deutschland erzeugt. Zusammen mit Bioenergie und so kommt man auf 20 %. Allerdings haben neuere Studien nachgewiesen, dass wir das Netz stabil halten können, wenn dies noch ein wenig ansteigt, dass wir aber, wenn wir den Anteil bis zu der Zielmarke steigern, die wir uns für das Jahr 2020 gesetzt haben, nämlich 30 % erneuerbare Energie, der Großteil davon schwankend, dann werden wir sehr viel mehr Speicherkapazität benötigen, als wir zur Zeit haben. Und wie Sie wissen, ist der effektivste Speicher Wasserkraft. Aber dies können wir nicht sehr viel mehr erhöhen. Eine Idee, eine Technik, die bereits dargelegt wurde ... Ich möchte auch darauf hinweisen, dass wir sehr schnell etwas brauchen, wie dies meine beiden Kollegen und Vorredner betont haben. Eine Technik ist also der Einsatz der aus Wind oder Sonne, photovoltaisch, gewonnenen Elektrizität, um am Ende in zwei Schritten Methan, also ein Gas herzustellen. Im ersten Schritt nutzt man die Elektrizität, um mittels Elektrolyse aus dem Wasser Wasserstoff zu bekommen. Hier kann man bereits, wenn man möchte, den Wasserstoff zum Beispiel in Brennstoffzellen für die Mobilität verwenden. Aber die eigentliche Idee besteht darin, einen Schritt weiterzugehen und den Wasserstoff mit CO2 zu verbinden, und dann bilden Sie in einer chemischen Reaktion Methan. Und dieses Methan, das äquivalent zu Erdgas ist, können Sie in dem bereits vorhandenen Netzwerk in Deutschland und Europa transportieren. Und dieses Gas-Netzwerk transportiert - und das wird, wie ich denke, einige überraschen - mindestens doppelt so viel Energie wie das Stromnetz in Deutschland. Über Gas-Pipelines wird also doppelt so viel Energie wie über das Stromnetz transportiert. Es handelt sich somit um ein sehr, sehr effizientes, bereits vorhandenes Transportsystem, und auch das Speichersystem ist sehr gut. In Deutschland lagern wir Gase, und das macht ungefähr ein Drittel des jährlichen Energieverbrauchs aus, 200 Terawatt. Wohingegen wir beispielsweise hier in den Seen 50 Gigawatt haben. Das ist etwas ganz Anderes und unterscheidet sich um viele Größenordnungen. Die Effizienz der Wasserstoffausbeute beträgt 70 % und die anschließende Effizienz der Methanausbeute, die Gesamteffizienz beträgt 55 % oder so ähnlich. Natürlich ist das ... Man hat jedoch immer noch Gas und produziert CO2. Man könnte dann wieder zur Elektrizität zurückgehen, und dann sinkt die Effizienz natürlich noch weiter, auf 30 %. Das ist also nicht sehr effizient. Aber immerhin ist es eine Möglichkeit, die wir kurzfristig realisieren könnten. Diese Möglichkeit wird in Deutschland ziemlich gründlich diskutiert und erforscht. Die andere Idee ist ein bisschen mehr ... sagen wir, mehr eine Idee. Dennoch arbeiten zwei meiner Kollegen gemeinsam mit der deutschen Industrie daran, sozusagen künstliche Wasserkraftwerke herzustellen, indem man die Tiefsee und den Druckunterschied zwischen der Wasseroberfläche und dem Wasser vielleicht 2.000 Meter tiefer nutzt, der 200 Bar beträgt. Sie lassen hohle Betonkugeln oder andere Gegenstände nach unten fallen. Um die Energie zu speichern, pumpen Sie dann das Wasser heraus und erzeugen atmosphärischen Druck. Wenn Sie die Energie wieder freisetzen möchten, dann lassen Sie das Wasser wieder durch die Turbine laufen und erzeugen Elektrizität. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob das ... Laut ersten Berechnungen mit der Industrie kostet dies genau so viel wie andere Maßnahmen, wie der Bau eines neuen Wasserkraftwerks und so weiter. Aber es wäre eine Möglichkeit, bei jedem Windkraftwerk vielleicht ein solches Reservoir zu haben, das man, auch wenn es nicht so tief ist, als Sockel verwenden könnte, um darauf die Windturbine zu setzen. Immerhin, dies sind die neuen Ideen. Im Allgemeinen möchte ich sagen, dass die Probleme der erneuerbaren Energien, des Transports und der Speicherung nach unserem jetzigen Wissensstand nicht auf nationaler, sondern höchstens auf mindestens europäischer Ebene lösbar sind. Wir brauchen sehr dringend ein europäisches Netzwerk, um das europäische Netzwerk, das Stromnetz mit Hochspannungsleitungen zu erweitern. Das ist möglich. Gleiches gilt für die Speicherung. Und natürlich macht es, wenn wir die Kosten betrachten, nicht wirklich Sinn, Photovoltaik in Deutschland zu haben. Das sollte man in der Sahara oder im Süden Spaniens oder in Sizilien zum Einsatz bringen. Und dann stehen wir wieder vor dem Problem, wie man die Energie transportiert. Aber es gibt Möglichkeiten. Die Hochspannungsleitungen sind bereits vorhanden und stellen nur einen kleinen Betrag der Gesamtkosten dar. Das ist also möglich. Und dann wird man sehr viel effizienter. Vielen Dank. Vielen Dank. Dr. Keilhacker. Kann ich die Leute dazu ermuntern, zu den Mikros zu gehen und ein paar Fragen zu stellen? Und in der Zwischenzeit habe ich selbst eine. Sie sprechen von einem europäischen Stromnetz, was mir eine sehr vernünftige Idee zu sein scheint. Und Sie sprechen von Pumpspeicherung in den Ozeanen. Ich hätte gedacht, dass die Antwort auf Pumpspeicherung, wenn es um ein europäisches Stromnetz geht, ein Wort ist: Norwegen. Können Sie nicht die Norweger dazu überreden, als Batterie für Europa zu fungieren? Nun, Norwegen wird von vielen deutschen Szenarienmachern als Heiliger Gral diskutiert, aber die Realität ist ganz anders. Die derzeitigen Reservoirs sind gerade ausreichend, um den Bedarf der Norweger zu decken. Es gibt die Möglichkeit, dies um fünf oder zehn Gigawatt oder so ähnlich zu steigern. Deutschland hat erst vor einigen Wochen mit Norwegen einen Vertrag für eine unterseeische Hochspannungsübertragungsleitung unterzeichnet, die 1,2 Gigajoule haben wird. Das entspricht dem, was ein Kernreaktor, ein Block eines Kernreaktors oder ein anderes großes Kraftwerk hat. Das ist sicherlich sehr sinnvoll, wird aber letztendlich das Problem nicht wirklich lösen, wenn wir auf 80 % erneuerbare Energien kommen wollen. Ich habe da meine Zweifel, ob mehr als 50 % möglich sind. Wenn wir das aber wollen, brauchen wir auf jeden Fall den Speicher, und das wird nicht gelöst werden, indem wir uns an Norwegen wenden, denn die Norweger - soweit ich weiß, möchten die Briten ... Ja, wir hätten ebenfalls gerne eine Scheibe von Norwegen. Und die Niederlande haben bereits eine Leitung in jenem Markt, und Schweden auch, und so weiter und so fort. Es tut mir leid - die Glocke läutet. Ich komme aus den USA und arbeite in der Fusionsforschung. Vielen Dank an alle Podiumsmitglieder. Wir haben viele wirklich gute Sachen darüber gehört, wie wir in Zukunft mehr Geld verdienen können. Aber ich würde gerne eine Frage stellen, die in die andere Richtung geht. Zu Beginn dieser Woche haben wir in einem Vortrag von Dr. Fert gehört, dass es eine ganz neue Methode gibt, mit der sich der Energieverbrauch von Computern stark senken lässt. Glauben Sie, dass dies tatsächlich von Bedeutung sein kann? Oder sind diese Energieeinsparungen im Vergleich zur benötigten Energie so gering, dass sie kaum ins Gewicht fallen? Wer möchte diese Frage übernehmen? Ah, Carlo. Ich würde gerne versuchen, die Antworten auf diese Frage zu geben. Als erstes sprechen wir nicht nur von elektrischer Energie. Wir sprechen von der Gesamtmenge der Energie. Die Elektrizität macht davon nur ein 1/3 aus. Aber der größte Teil unseres Verbrauchs resultiert aus anderen Aktivitäten, aus privaten Wohnungen und Industrien, die verschiedene Stoffe herstellen. Mir scheint, dass der richtige Weg, den man einschlagen sollte, darin besteht zu versuchen, den Energieverbrauch zu reduzieren, indem man, insbesondere in unseren Ländern, bei dem anderen Aspekt der Energie, nämlich bei Gebäuden, Häusern, beim Energietransport, bei Autos etc., Einsparungen macht. Und Elektrizität ist natürlich ... ein sehr schwieriges Thema, und die Frage, die Sie aufwerfen, ist auf jeden Fall wichtig. In dieser Hinsicht scheinen mir ein oder zwei Dinge wichtig zu sein. Erstens glaube ich nicht, dass Computer die größte Sorge in Bezug auf die Zukunft unserer Energieversorgung sein werden. Ich denke, dass unsere Energieversorgung sehr stark davon abhängen wird, ob wir uns zum Beispiel entscheiden, ein Elektro-Auto zu fahren anstelle eines mit Benzin betriebenes Autos, mit all den Vorteilen der Elektromobililtät. Daher scheint es mir so, dass Elektrizität per se ein Problem ist, mehr oder weniger unabhängig von ihrer spezifischen Verwendung. Diesbezüglich möchte ich zwei wichtige Punkte ergänzen. Der eine Punkt ist: Ein Weg besteht darin, das Netzwerk zu erweitern. Wir sagten bereits, dass die aktuellen Netzwerke nicht ausreichen. Sie haben die Notwendigkeit eines europäischen Netzwerks deutlich hervorgehoben. Mir scheint, dass wir den Energietransport grundlegend neu aufbauen müssen. Wir müssen in der Lage sein, große Energiemengen über weite Entfernungen zu transportieren. Die Durchschnittslänge einer elektrischen Leitung beträgt einige hundert Kilometer. Die längste Strecke einer Erdgasleitung beträgt, wie Sie sagten, 8.000 Kilometer. Diese Linie müssen wir verfolgen. Wenn Sie eine sehr viel größere Flächendeckung und eine deutlich umfassendere Kooperation bei der Nutzung der Energie haben, dann werden wir meiner Ansicht nach die Probleme auf sehr viel effektivere Art und Weise kompensieren können. Der zweite Punkt ist, dass es eine Form von elektrischer Energie gibt, die mit großem Erfolg gespeichert wird. Sie wurde von keinem der Vorredner erwähnt und wird als Wärmespeicherung bezeichnet. Sie steht mit der Solarenergie in Verbindung. Alle konzentrierenden Solarenergie-Systeme nutzen Energiespeicherung in Form von Wärmespeicherung. Man nimmt das Sonnenlicht, heizt [die Speicherflüssigkeit] auf 500° C auf und speichert sie, diese heiße Flüssigkeit, dann auf eine sehr effiziente Art und Weise. So kann die Wärmeenergie tagelang gespeichert werden. Tatsächlich wird dieses Verfahren zur Zeit bei den meisten Anwendungen eingesetzt, bei denen es um die Konzentration von Solarenergie für die Zukunft geht. Es scheint eine sehr vielversprechende Technologie zu sein, denn heißes Wasser zu speichern ist ungefähr 1000mal effizienter als Wasser hinauf- und hinunterzutragen. Und heiße Flüssigkeit gibt es natürlich, sofern es Sonnenlicht gibt. Sollten wir eines Tages über ein Energietransportsystem von der Sahara nach Europa verfügen wollen, wird eine Speicherung der Energie ohne Zweifel damit verbunden sein müssen. Die Methode für die Speicherung in Form von Flüssigkeit, heißer Flüssigkeit existiert bereits, und sie wird zu einer praktischen Lösung werden. Wir haben eine lange Schlange hier, aber ich kann nicht widerstehen. Ich leite im Herbst einen Kurs zum Thema Energie an der Stanford University. Einer der Studenten, der aus Saudi-Arabien stammt, hat zu diesem Thema einen Artikel geschrieben, den Sie sich durchlesen können. Er wies darauf hin, dass im Augenblick die Computer-Industrie einschließlich des Internets ungefähr so viel Energie verbraucht wie die kommerzielle Luftfahrtindustrie. Außerdem wächst sie exponentiell. Wir berechneten also, wie lange es dauern würde, bis die Computer-Industrie für die Gesamt-Energiekosten der Welt verantwortlich sein würde. Natürlich ist das albern - aber völlig albern ist es nicht. Es handelt sich um wenige Jahrzehnte. Der Punkt ist nun der, dass der zur Zeit verwendete Computer keinen Einschränkungen durch Energiekosten unterliegt. Ihr Telefon, Ihr Mobiltelefon, könnte sehr viel effizienter sein, aber Sie kaufen das hier, die kleinen Spielereien hier drin. Wir haben den Umstand erörtert, dass dies keine dumme Frage ist, und tatsächlich verbraucht das Internet eine Menge Energie und wird ... Sie wissen schon: so.... Zweitens - Sie sind verantwortlich, denn Menschen wie Sie lieben alle jene kleinen technischen Spielereien auf Ihren Telefonen. Maßnahmen zur Steigerung der Energieeffizienz sind die niedrig hängenden Früchte der deutschen Energiewende. Daher möchten wir die Effizienz steigern und den Elektrizitätsverbrauch in den nächsten vier Jahrzehnten um 50 % reduzieren. Das Problem sind die Rebound-Effekte, die wir in der Vergangenheit beobachtet haben. Sie haben davon nur einen erwähnt, die Einführung von IT und von neuen Technologien, die die Effizienzsteigerungen, die wir zuvor erreicht haben, überkompensieren. Grüne IT ist daher ein großes Thema. Ich werde vom Privileg des Vorsitzenden Gebrauch machen und noch einen weiteren Punkt anbringen, und zwar folgenden: Jede Diskussion um Energieeffizienz wird im Kontext der einen Milliarde Menschen geführt, die in der entwickelten Welt leben. Es gibt sechsmal so viele, demnächst achtmal so viele dort draußen, die so sein möchten wie wir. Energieeffizienz, effiziente Technologie - ja klar. Aber Sie werden den Ausweg aus dem Problem nicht durch Sparen finden können, indem Sie etwas einsparen, was nicht einmal mehr existiert und dem Bedarf [dieser vielen Menschen] entspricht. Energieeffizienz ist eine gute Idee, aber sie kann unmöglich die Antwort auf die Frage sein. Vielen Dank für die Frage. Ich komme von der University of California. Wir leben direkt am Rande der Wüste und unsere Dozenten sind einhellig der Meinung, dass Solarzellen in der Wüste absolut praxisfern sind. Mit den Kosten, um die Energie wieder in das Gebiet von L.A. zu transportieren, wird es schlichtweg nicht funktionieren. Und sie haben in dieser Hinsicht viele Möglichkeiten erforscht. Die Handlungsweise der Menschheit, so wie ich sie sehe, bestand darin, dass wir Orte auf unserem Planeten fanden, die zu heiß waren, so dass wir Klimaanlagen erfanden. Wir stellen fest, dass die Sonne nicht immer scheint, und deshalb sollten wir sie zu uns holen. Und das Mittel, um das zu tun, ist die Kernenergie. Ich glaube, dass es keine andere Lösung als Kernenergie gibt. Die Frage ist: Wenn man sich die Katastrophe in Japan anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die Reaktoren nach alten Plänen für Kernspaltung aus den 70er Jahren entworfen und gebaut wurden. Ist es also nicht wahr, dass wir, während wir darauf warten, dass die Kernfusion praktisch umsetzbar wird, unsere Anstrengungen auf sichere Kernspaltung, wie Kugelhaufenreaktoren und Maßnahmen dieser Art, konzentrieren könnten. Ich zögere zu sagen: Carlo, können Sie sich mit der Frage der Kerntechnologien befassen? Sie haben zwei Minuten. Lassen Sie mich sagen, dass ich nicht glaube, dass wir sehr viel mehr Uran zur Verfügung haben als Öl oder Erdgas, wenn unser Verbrauch auf dem derzeitigen Niveau bleibt. Heutzutage sind ungefähr 6 % der gesamten Primärenergie Kernenergie. Der Rest stammt aus anderen Quellen. Wenn Sie sich also auf die Kernenergie konzentrieren möchten und es früher oder später Leute gibt, die erkennen, dass da nukleare Ressourcen sind, die ausgebeutet werden können, sind Sie auf eine andere Art von Kernenergie angewiesen. Sie haben die Kernfusion als ein Beispiel angeführt. Die anderen Beispiele sind einige exotische Stoffe, die längerfristig tatsächlich eine Lösung dieses Problems darstellen. Mir scheint, dass, wenn Sie sagen möchten, dass Kernenergie kurzfristig die Hauptlösung für die Zukunft der Energie ist, wir den Anteil der Kernenergie gern mit einem beträchtlichen Faktor multiplizieren möchten, vielleicht mit einem Faktor von 5 oder 10, also 50 % Kernenergie. Das ist sicherlich möglich, wird uns aber einige Probleme wie Yucca Mountain in Ihrem Land bescheren. Was werden Sie mit dem Müll machen? Und es gibt andere Fragen. Und ich weiß nicht, ob genug Anreicherung oder andere Dinge verfügbar sind, um das zu tun. Daher sieht es für mich so aus, dass der einzige Ausweg, das einzige Mittel, um die Kernenergie wieder ans Rollen zu bekommen, in sehr starken und massiven Bemühungen um Innovationen liegt. Die heutige Kernenergie scheint mir die Lücke zu füllen. Man weiß, was es ist. Es gibt gute und schlechte Faktoren. Wir wissen, dass es eine Debatte gibt. Manche Leute denken in die eine Richtung, manche Leute denken in die andere Richtung. Mir scheint, der einzige Ausweg ist Innovation, Innovation, Innovation. Ich werde eine weitere Frage aufnehmen. Die Dame vorne. Hi, ich bin ... und komme auch aus den USA. Meine Frage lautet: Wie werden wir eine Infrastruktur für alle diese großartigen und wundervollen neuen Technologien aufbauen? Wird es eine globale Bemühung sein, bei der wir überall Methan-Pumpen aufstellen oder Elektrizität von der Sahara wieder nach Deutschland transportieren? Ich meine: Wie werden wir die Infrastruktur de facto realisieren und die Gesellschaft motivieren, uns bei der Implementierung der neueren Technologien zu unterstützen? Das ist eine politische Frage. Es gibt kein Gesamtkonzept, das besagt, dass man dies hier und jenes dort bauen soll. Es ist ein evolutionärer Prozess, an dem viele Akteure beteiligt sind. Sie müssen also geschäftliche Anreize für diejenigen schaffen, die Verteil-Netzwerke bauen, um solche Netzwerke zu erschaffen. Wir müssen für Anreize sorgen, um Offshore-Windgeneratoren zu errichten. In Deutschland hatten wir das Problem, dass wir zwar die Offshore-Windgeneratoren, aber keine Verbindung zum Festland haben. Und was passiert, wenn die Verbindung fehlschlägt oder für eine bestimmte Zeit ausfällt; oder wenn die offshore erzeugte Energie im Inland nicht verteilt werden kann? Man muss also auch für Vorschriften sorgen, die sicherstellen, dass die Offshore-Investitionen sich innerhalb einer bestimmten Zeit rentieren. Es ist also ein riesengroßer regulatorischer Aufwand. Es ist ein Aufwand von ungeheuer umfangreicher Infrastrukturplanung, und er funktioniert, wie ich sagte, evolutionär und schrittweise. Wenn wir gut sind, werden wir es auf europäischer Ebene koordinieren können. Wie können wir das auf globaler Ebene tun? Vielleicht gar nicht. Es gibt kein globales Gesamtkonzept. Es wird sich in unterschiedlichen Regionen herausbilden und die Besonderheiten der jeweiligen Region berücksichtigen müssen. Beispielsweise haben wir vorhin etwas über Südkalifornien und die entsprechenden Umweltbedingungen dort gehört. Und dies wird sich davon unterscheiden, was man beispielsweise in Nordeuropa vorfindet. Vielen Dank. Mein Name ist Rico Friedrich aus Freiberg in Deutschland und ich wüsste gerne die Ansicht der Podiumsmitglieder zu der Frage, wie man in der Zukunft das Heizen von Wohnraum mit Hilfe von erneuerbaren Energien bestreiten kann. Meines Wissens entfallen 40 bis 50 % des Primärenergieverbrauchs in Deutschland auf Heizung. Daher ist dies eine Frage von entscheidender Bedeutung und ich wüsste gerne Ihre Meinung dazu, wie man dies künftig mit erneuerbaren Energien bewerkstelligen kann. Wie Sie richtig sagten, ist das sozusagen ein großer Beitrag zum effizienten Umgang mit Energie. Bereits zuvor war angemerkt worden, dass dies ein Bereich ist, in dem auf jeden Fall etwas getan werden muss und in dem sich Investitionen auszahlen werden. Es müssen also wiederum Anreize geschaffen werden, um die Häuser besser zu isolieren. Das ist natürlich hauptsächlich bei neuen Häusern möglich. Wenn ein Haus gut isoliert ist, dann ist es einfach, es beispielsweise mit elektrisch betriebenen Wärmepumpen oder ähnlichen Methoden zu heizen, die die Energie aus der Luft oder dem Wasser oder was auch immer gewinnen. Und vielleicht sogar, wenn genug Elektrizität vorhanden ist, direkt mit Elektroheizung. Ich denke, dass es durch Heizen mit niedrigeren Temperaturen erfolgen wird, also durch Fußbodenheizung oder eine in die Wände integrierte Heizung. Und ich glaube, dass dies realisierbar ist. Wie bereits dargelegt wurde, besteht die einzige Schwierigkeit darin, einen Startimpuls zu geben. Man muss Anreize geben. Dies sollte meiner Meinung nach sehr viel stärker geschehen. Noch jemand? Vielen Dank. Ja. Hallo und vielen Dank für die Berücksichtigung meiner Frage. Bei dem zu erwartenden drastischen Anstieg des Energieverbrauchs durch die Entstehung von Mittelklassen in den BRIC-Staaten müssen meiner Ansicht nach Kernspaltung und letztendlich auch Kernfusion eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Meine Frage ist: Können und - vielleicht noch wichtiger - sollen Wissenschaftler und Ingenieure versuchen, diese Quelle einzuschränken, um so die Förderung von verantwortungsbewussten Methoden der Energieeinsparung zu unterstützen? Das klingt eigentlich nach einer Frage für Sie. Das ist zwar nicht der Fall, aber ich werde sie trotzdem beantworten.Ich weiß nicht, wie man das macht - wissen Sie es? Nein. Ich kann niemandem sagen, welche Art von Energie er nutzen kann und welche nicht. Meine Regierung versucht es, und zwar manchmal auf eine sehr unbeholfene Art und Weise. Sie ist dabei allerdings nicht immer erfolgreich. Daher denke ich, dass die Antwort lautet: Nein, das ist nicht möglich. Und ich werde wieder von dem Privileg des Vorsitzenden Gebrauch machen und auch etwas dazu sagen. Wenn ich Ihre Frage richtig verstanden habe, dann sagen Sie, dass Wissenschaftler und Ingenieure es auf sich nehmen sollten, dies zu tun. So etwas zu tun ist eine politische Entscheidung. Was Sie vorschlagen, geht beinahe über die Befugnisse der angemessenen Rolle des Wissenschaftlers hinaus, oder? Richtig, aber ich glaube, wir alle haben eine Verantwortung, dasjenige zu tun, was wir für richtig halten. Und ich bin der Meinung, dass es richtig ist, Energie einzusparen und zu versuchen, den Energieverbrauch zu senken. Die Menge der verschwendeten Energie, das ist unsere Verantwortung. Eine Form von Macht zu haben, um in der Lage zu sein ... In welcher Beziehung steht das zu der Frage, welche Technologie verwendet wird, um die Elektrizität zu erzeugen, die wir verbrauchen? Ich sehe den Zusammenhang nicht. Oder sagen Sie, dass die Leute, die in Kernkraftwerken arbeiten, diese Entscheidungen treffen sollten? Ich meine ... Wenn wir mehr und mehr Fusionsreaktoren und Kernspaltungsreaktoren bekommen, werden wir die Macht haben, sie zu betreiben, und ich vermute, wir könnten ... Werfen Sie einen Blick auf die Geschichte des Kernkraftwerkbaus und Sie werden sehen, dass sie sehr kompliziert ist. In den USA zum Beispiel bauen wir keine zusätzlichen Kraftwerke, obwohl die derzeitige Regierung es wollte. In einigen Ländern gibt es also einen starken Widerstand gegen die Kernenergie und in anderen Nationen, so wie in Indien, eine starke Unterstützung. Tatsache ist, dass wir als Technologen für die Wähler arbeiten. Ich bedauere es - ich meine, man kann diese Fantasievorstellung haben, dass Wissenschaftler die mächtigsten Menschen der Welt sind - aber sie sind es nicht. Wir sind ihnen zwar nicht ausgeliefert, aber wir sind in der Tat die Diener der Leute, die gewählt werden. Und damit ist die von Ihnen gestellte Frage durch und durch politisch. Ich bin einfach nicht qualifiziert ... tatsächlich ist keiner von uns qualifiziert, sie zu beantworten. Ich würde gerne glauben, dass es auf jeden Fall stimmt, dass ein Auto in einem entwickelten Land sehr viel weniger Energie verbraucht. Die benötigte Energiemenge zu reduzieren, massiv zu reduzieren, ist etwas, das wir tun können und tun sollten. Aber wir sollten nicht vergessen, dass es auch viele Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern gibt und dass sie gewissermaßen die Gesamtheit der Bevölkerung darstellen. Sie verbrauchen pro Kopf sehr viel weniger Energie als wir. Und offensichtlich ist es absolut normal für sie und korrekt und richtig, dass sie mehr Energie pro Kopf bekommen sollten, damit eine Balance aufrechterhalten werden kann zwischen dem, was sie tun, und dem, was wir tun. Und ich glaube, dass das reale Energieproblem nicht so sehr auf dem Umstand beruht, dass wir unseren Verbrauch senken müssen, denn ich bin der Meinung, dass wir dies so oder so tun müssen. Aber das wirkliche Problem besteht darin, was mit dem erhöhten Energieverbrauch in den Entwicklungsländern zu tun ist, der schnell weiter anwächst. Wenn Sie beispielsweise China nehmen, dann stellen Sie fest, dass zur Zeit in China jede Woche ein neues mit Kohle betriebenes Kraftwerk gebaut wird. Das ist das Problem der CO2-Emissionen. Das ist das Problem der Zukunft des Planeten. Denn dort wird sie beschlossen werden. Wir müssen also einen Weg finden, damit sie mit dem rechten Maß an Akzeptanz ihrer Situation eine angemessene Menge an Energie bekommen können. Kohle in großen Mengen zu verbrennen ist gewiss keine Lösung. Ich denke, dass dies etwas ist, was nur die Wissenschaft lösen kann. Und da wir diejenigen mit dem größten wissenschaftlichen Wissen sind, sind wir dafür verantwortlich, das Problem zu lösen. Nicht nur für uns, sondern auch für sie. Vielen Dank für die Darlegung Ihres Standpunkts. Die Person hinten. Hallo, mein Name ist Nick Chancellor von der University of Southern California. Meine Frage bezieht sich auf eine verwandte Nutzung von Kohle und Öl: Wie wird sich Ihrer Meinung nach die erneuerbare Energie zum Beispiel auf Petrochemikalien und die Chemikalien, die wir für die Herstellung von Plastik und ähnlichem aus Kohle gewinnen, auswirken? Denken Sie, dass wir in einer Zukunft der erneuerbaren Energien uns eine Methode ausdenken müssen, um sie aus Kohlenstoffdioxid und Wasser in der Atmosphäre oder Pflanzen oder so etwas zu gewinnen? Oder denken Sie, dass fossile Substanzen für die petrochemische Verwendung reserviert werden, während wir weiterhin erneuerbare Quellen für Energie nutzen? Ich persönlich würde meinen, dass dies eine rein ökonomische Fragestellung ist. Es gibt keinen Grund, warum man sie nicht weiterhin verwenden sollte. Es gibt eine interessante Zahl, die Ihnen vielleicht dabei hilft, dies zu analysieren und zu verstehen. Zurzeit werden in der gesamten Petrochemie nur etwas weniger als 5 % des aus dem Boden geförderten Öls verwendet, einschließlich aller Pestizide, allen Plastiks, sämtlicher sonstigen Verwendungen. Tatsächlich stellt es also nur einen kleinen Teil des gesamten Öl-Budgets dar. Der Rest davon wird für den Transport verwendet. Dieser Betrag ist so gering, dass vollkommen klar ist, dass man die Verwendung von Kohlenstoff in Petrochemie durch Pflanzen ersetzen könnte. Ich glaube, wir sind wohl oder übel für immer auf die Plastik-Industrie angewiesen, auch nachdem die Ölvorräte erschöpft sind. Danke für die Frage. Noch jemand? Die Dame dort. Mein Name ist ... Ich arbeite als Postdoc in theoretischer Physik am MIT. Und eine Frage, die mich in den letzten Jahren genervt hat, ist, dass wir an all diesen nachhaltigen Technologien arbeiten - man sieht viele Leute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, mit ihrem schönen Prius herumfahren -, aber wir brauchen Seltenerdmetalle. Wir brauchen Metalle, deren Vorkommen auf der Erde begrenzt sind, für diese nachhaltigen Technologien, für die Motoren in den Windmühlen, die wir offshore errichten. Wir brauchen diese Metalle, die sich auch in ... hinter Grenzen befinden und für uns daher nicht immer leicht zugänglich sind. Meine Frage ist daher vermutlich ein wenig politisch, aber auch wissenschaftlich. Was müssen wir tun, um die Entwicklung nachhaltiger Energie nachhaltig zu gestalten? Ich frage mich, wie es damit steht. Darin liegt auch eine ökonomische oder politische Frage. Eine Nachhaltigkeitsfrage hier. Wer möchte diese übernehmen? Danke für die Frage - es ist eine gute Frage. Was kann man tun? Man muss sich den Lebenszyklus eines Stoffs und ganz besonders die Wiederverwendung von Stoffen genau anschauen. Wenn wir die ganzen Edelmetalle in unseren Mobiltelefonen verwenden, könnte dies auf einer nachhaltigen Basis bereits durch die Wiederverwendung dieser Stoffe geschehen. Wir müssen dies nicht nur bei Mobiltelefonen, sondern ebenso auch in anderen Fällen tun. Trotzdem gibt es nichts umsonst. Man muss immer einen Preis zahlen und auch die externen Kosten berücksichtigen. Wenn wir das bei Kernkraftwerken tun, müssen wir es auch bei Solarkollektoren und anderen Technologien erneuerbarer Energie tun. Recycling ist nur eine Lösung, und ich würde sagen, es ist die Lösung der Wahl. Viele Leute sorgen sich um die Versorgung mit seltenen Erden. Und natürlich sind die Chinesen wirklich sehr glücklich, weil sie den Großteil der seltenen Erden haben. Wie auch immer - denken Sie an die Magnete aus seltenen Erden, die hauptsächlich deshalb die Kosten senken, weil sie kleine Magneten sind. Es ist durchaus möglich, Motoren ohne seltene Erden herzustellen. Machen Sie sich also keine Sorgen. Es wird gut. Wenn es nicht genug seltene Erden gibt, werden wir sie auf andere Art und Weise herstellen. Vielleicht sollte man die alte Miene in Ytterby wieder in Betrieb nehmen, wo sie als erstes entdeckt wurden. Hinten. Hi, Jan Fiete vom CERN. Zunächst möchte ich sagen, dass mir diese Diskussion gefällt, weil wir sehr viel mehr als Kernenergie diskutieren, und ich denke, wir sind sehr viel kreativer, als einfach nur Kernenergie zu verwenden. Es ist gut, dass wir in diesem Sinne fortfahren. Da die Rede von Fukushima war, möchte ich sagen, dass Fukushima für uns mehr bedeuten sollte, als zu analysieren oder nachzuprüfen, ob andere Kernkraftwerke sich in Erdbebengebieten befinden oder nicht. Wir haben erlebt, dass diese hochindustrialisierte Nation nicht in der Lage war, ein Kraftwerk zu bauen, das diesem Vorfall, der sich dort ereignete, standhalten konnte. Es war nicht in der Lage, alles auszuhalten, das sie sich ausdenken konnten. Und ich glaube, dass dies im Wesentlichen ein Problem des Engineering ist. Wahrscheinlich kann man es sicherer machen, und man muss manches bearbeiten, und alle Ideen, die wir von all den potenziellen Dingen, die passieren könnten, haben, könnten mit Mitteln des Engineering angegangen werden. Aber dann muss gefragt werden, wie teuer es wird. Ich denke, das ist der angemessene Preis, an dem man andere Energiequellen messen kann: Wie teuer wird die Kernenergie, wenn man all die potenziellen Gefahren miteinbezieht, die anscheinend bis jetzt vernachlässigt wurden? Was Sie gesagt haben, würde ich in dem folgenden Satz gerne allgemeiner kommentieren. Es ist sicherlich wahr, dass heute die günstigste Energie wahrscheinlich das Verbrennen von Kohle ist. Trotzdem ist auch klar, dass dies nur die geschätzten direkten Kosten sind. Zum Beispiel gibt es einen sehr interessanten Aufsatz einer Arbeitsgruppe am MIT, die nachgewiesen hat, dass man, wenn man alle indirekten Kosten zum Kohleverbrauch hinzurechnet, feststellt, dass alternative Energie sehr viel günstiger wäre als die Verbrennung von Kohle. Daher scheint mir das wirkliche Problem nicht nur darin zu bestehen, die Kosten an sich einzuschätzen, die beim Verbrennen eines Stücks Kohle entstehen, sondern alle sich daraus ergebenden Konsequenzen. Die wichtigste davon ist, wie ich bereits sagte, die Entstehung von Treibhausgasen. Und eine solche Situation ... Wenn man sich das anschaut, erkennt man, dass diese Situation hinsichtlich dessen, was wir nun zu tun gewohnt sind, völlig verzerrt ist und dass es daher der erste Schritt sein sollte, Kohle die korrekten Kosten zuzuschreiben. Davon ausgehend sollte man entscheiden, welchen Weg man bei den zukünftigen Energien gehen sollte. Wie würden Sie das tun - mit einer Kohlenstoff-Steuer? Wie berechnet man die externen Kosten fossiler Brennstoffe? Wir alle wissen, dass es diese Kosten gibt. Man kann sie schätzen. Die Frage ist, ob man sie berechnet oder nicht. Ja, es gibt mehrere Studien, welche die externen Kosten betrachten und die verschiedenen Systeme vergleichen. Es ist eine Tatsache, dass sie ein sehr verzerrtes Bild sind. Man kann sie identifizieren, aber man muss sie in die Preise einrechnen, andernfalls haben sie keine Bedeutung. Manche Leute sind ebenfalls davon überrascht, wie hoch die externen Kosten für die erneuerbaren Energien aufgrund des verwendeten Materials und so weiter sind. Wir haben mehrere Leute in der Schlange. Es wäre wahrscheinlich hilfreich, wenn jetzt niemand mehr dazu kommt. Vermutlich werden wir mit den Fragen, die wir haben, bis zum Mittagessen gerade eben fertig sein. Wenn Sie es also bis jetzt nicht in die Schlange geschafft haben, wird's schwierig. Sie werden nach dem Mittagessen auf die Diskussionsteilnehmer zugehen müssen. Habe ich also die Antwort richtig verstanden, dass es sich bei der Kernkraft ähnlich verhalten würde, wenn man alle indirekten Kosten miteinbezöge? Dass sie dann sehr viel teurer wäre, als in den anfänglichen Reden dargestellt? Korrekt, ich stimme Ihnen zu. Bitte - die Kernkraft, von der wir sprechen, ist nicht unsere Kernkraft, es ist die japanische Kernkraft. Und das Volk von Japan ist gerade dabei, diese Kostenrechnung durchzuführen. Was Sie also tun müssen, ist, abwarten und zuschauen, was sie tun, denn sie haben keine Kohle. Sie haben kein Backup. Alle ihre alternativen Formen der Energie kommen über das Meer, sie sind importiert. Die Kosten einer Sache zu berechnen ist natürlich sehr schwierig. Die einzige Methode, die ich dafür kenne, ist, es die Leute tun zu lassen - o.k.? Vor Ihren Augen ereignet sich also gerade ein Experiment in Kostenkalkulation. Und an diesem Punkt würde ich sagen, man sollte mit dem Theoretisieren aufhören und das Experiment beobachten. Ich bin Student und komme aus Hamburg in Deutschland, und meine Frage richtet sich an Georg Schütte. Sie hat in der Tat mit dem zu tun, worüber wir gerade sprechen. Sie haben erwähnt, dass Deutschland innerhalb einer sehr kurzen Zeit 80 % seiner Energie aus erneuerbaren Quellen beziehen möchte. Wenn ich Professor Laughlin richtig verstehe, sagt er, dass dies nicht machbar ist, es sei denn, man kann die Kosten der erneuerbaren Energiequellen auf das Niveau senken, auf dem sich die Energiepreise jetzt befinden. Ich würde gerne wissen: Mit welcher Strategie versucht die deutsche Regierung, das zu erreichen? Oder denken Sie, dass Professor Laughlin mit seinem Argument nicht Recht hat? Erstens muss man präzise sein. Ich sprach von 80 % Elektrizität aus erneuerbaren Quellen. Wir sprechen hier also nicht vom Gesamt-Energieverbrauch. Das ist ein großer Unterschied. Ob wir das erreichen können oder nicht, weiß ich nicht. Aber es ist das Ziel, und wir versuchen, es schrittweise zu erreichen. Was ich jedoch weiß, ist, dass es in Deutschland eine sehr starke öffentliche Meinung gab, die diese Entscheidung wollte. Also müssen wir uns der Herausforderung stellen. Sehen Sie eine Alternative? Nein, aber meine Frage ist: Wie kann die Politik Ihrer Meinung nach dazu beitragen, das zum Beispiel tatsächlich in diesem Tempo zu tun und die Kosten zu senken? Was sind die wichtigsten Mittel, die der Politik zur Verfügung stehen? Er fragt mehr oder weniger nach einem Gesamtkonzept, wozu Sie richtigerweise sagten, dass wir kein wirkliches langfristiges Gesamtkonzept haben. Es ist eine Frage von Anreizen und politischen Strategien. Man kann Unternehmen mit Unterstützung versorgen und ihnen Anreize geben, damit sie die erforderliche Arbeit tun. Was tun wir als Ministerium, als Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Forschung? Wir haben uns mit anderen Sponsoren zusammengetan und die Finanzierung für ein Forschungsprogramm, ein großes Forschungsprogramm zur Energiespeicherung gestartet. Wir haben jetzt 200 Millionen EUR für die Erforschung von Energiespeicherungsmöglichkeiten zur Verfügung gestellt. Wir werden eine ähnliche Geldsumme in die Forschung zu Netzwerken und Verteilnetzwerken und intelligenten Netzen investieren. Damit unterstützen wir Grundlagenforschung und angewandte Forschung. Wir stellen Geld zur Verfügung, das an Kooperationen von Forschungsinstituten und Unternehmen geht, sodass sie ihre Kräfte bündeln. Jedem von der öffentlichen Hand investierten Euro steht das Doppelte oder Dreifache dieses Betrags an privatem Sponsoring für gemeinsame Forschungsbemühungen gegenüber. Das können wir tun. Wettbewerb wird zur Verbesserung von Technologien beitragen, trotzdem braucht man auch Regulierung. Der politische Kampf dreht sich darum, welches Maß an Regulierung man benötigt, um einen Markt zu schaffen, und inwieweit ein Markt durch und für sich selbst Lösungen schaffen kann. Mein Name ist Daniel Brunner. Ich komme aus Palma de Mallorca in Spanien. Ich befürchte, dies ist eher eine ökonomische Frage. Aber wir haben erlebt, wie der Preis in der Computer-Industrie nur aufgrund der Massenproduktion und der prinzipiell sehr professionellen Produktionsweise dramatisch gefallen ist. Ist daher etwas Ähnliches bei Solarzellen nicht möglich oder sogar fast logisch? Kurz gesagt, die Antwort ist ja. Wir haben dies vorher erörtert, dass wir genau dieses Phänomen erleben werden. Möchte jemand diese Frage übernehmen? Ich behaupte, dass wir es erleben werden. Geoffrey hat ein paar Berichte gesehen, die ich nicht gesehen habe. Daher muss ich bei meiner Antwort vorsichtig sein. Meine Vermutung wäre nein. Und das hat mit den Grundlagen der Halbleiter-Produktion zu tun, wie sie funktioniert, mit der Natur des Problems und so weiter. Ich selbst glaube, dass die dramatischen Veränderungen in den Preisen, die wir jüngst bei Photovoltaik-Zellen gesehen haben, durch den Wechselkurs zwischen den westlichen Währungen und dem Yuan extrem kompliziert gemacht werden. Und ich denke, es handelt sich zum Teil um Spiegelwirkungen. Das wird mit der Zeit deutlicher werden. Es ist möglich, dass ich falsch liege, dass der tatsächliche Preis gesunken ist. Aber mein Verständnis der Funktionsweise von Halbleitern ist, dass sich das Mooresche Gesetz bei Photozellen nicht wiederholen wird. Meine Einsicht auf der Grundlage dessen, was ich gesehen habe, lautet: Sie haben in der kurzfristigen Betrachtung absolut Recht, wenn wir nur von den letzten achtzehn Monaten, den letzten zwei Jahren sprechen. Die Chinesen versuchen ganz klar, den Markt zu manipulieren. Wenn Sie sich aber einen Zeitraum von 15 oder 20 Jahren anschauen, haben Sie einen Preissturz von drei Größenordnungen gesehen. Ich kann mich nicht an die genauen Zahlen erinnern, aber von ungefähr 1.000 ... Nebenbei bemerkt - ich glaube es einfach nicht. Sie glauben es nicht. Nun, dann werde ich die Daten hervorkramen und feststellen, dass ich Unrecht habe. Einigen wir uns darauf, dass wir uns hier nicht einig sind. Ich glaube, diesbezüglich haben Sie Recht. Darf ich dies kommentieren? Mir scheint, dass das eine die Kosten von Sonnenkollektoren sind. Per se sind die Kosten für Solarkollektoren gesunken und gehen weiter zurück. Das zweite Problem ist das System: das System ist kompliziert. Im Augenblick entstehen die Hauptkosten für die Stromerzeugung weniger durch den Kollektor selbst, sondern durch das gesamte System. Es nimmt die Gleichspannung, 1 Volt, und verwandelt sie in etwas, das im Netz verwendet werden kann, für die Übertragung im Netz, und für dieses oder jenes. Die Kosten für diese Werte zu reduzieren, ist sehr viel schwieriger, als die Kosten für die einzelnen Komponenten, die Solarkollektoren, zu senken. Selbst wenn die Kosten für Solarkollektoren erheblich sinken würden, würde sich dies auf die Gesamtkosten des photovoltaischen Systems aufgrund der Komplexität des Gesamtproblems nicht so sehr auswirken. Ich würde also seine Ansicht teilen, wenn er sagt, dass in der Tat die Photovoltaik ein teures Programm ist. Und es gibt keine offensichtlich evidenten Faktoren dafür, dass sich Wunder einer solchen Art ereignen könnten, dass man seine Kosten drücken könnte, ähnlich wie die Kosten für das Verbrennen von Kohle oder solchen Dingen. Vielen Dank. Die Dame dort. Nochmals Hallo. Diese Frage ist insbesondere an Dr. Rubbia gerichtet, aber vielleicht werden einige von den übrigen Diskussionsteilnehmern auch etwas dazu zu sagen haben. In Ihrem Eröffnungsstatement hatten Sie sowohl einen flüssigen Brennstoff als auch danach die Methode der Supraleitung erwähnt. Beides klang erstaunlich und fast zu gut, um wahr zu sein. Ich frage mich also: Was ist der Haken daran? Ist es nur eine Frage der Kosten oder warum tun wir das nicht schon? Hier sind zwei Punkte, Sie sagten zwei wichtige Dinge. Das eine ist, ob ich fossile Brennstoffe wie Erdgas ohne einen einzigen Tropfen CO2 herstellen kann. Das ist eine absolut fantastische Möglichkeit, die meiner Meinung nach in Reichweite ist. Der Grund ist folgender. CH4 besteht aus vier Wasserstoffatomen und einem Kohlenstoffatom. Der Wasserstoff trägt den Großteil der Energie, und der Kohlenstoff ist nur ungefähr 20 % davon, der Rest ist Wasserstoff. Wenn man also Erdgas in Wasserstoff plus Ruß umwandeln kann - Ruß ist ein wohlbekannter Stoff, der beispielsweise bei der Herstellung von Reifen oder allen Arten von Kohlenstofffasern und ähnlichen Dingen Verwendung findet -, wenn das passiert, dann löst man das Problem, denn es gibt keine Kontraindikation, das gesamte vorliegende Methan einzusetzen - davon gibt es eine Menge. Außerdem gibt es Clathrate und andere mögliche Zukunftsideen für Energie, die aus Methan stammt. Methan kommt in der Natur in Hülle und Fülle vor, und zwar nicht nur in der Tiefe, sondern überall. Und wenn Sie das haben, lösen Sie das Problem als einen Zwischenschritt und warten die Zeit und die Bemühung ab, um es in ein wirklich erneuerbares System für die Zukunft der Menschheit zu verwandeln. Nun, wir haben einige Experimente durchgeführt. Wir führen einige Experimente durch und haben es jetzt geschafft, eine Umwandlungsrate von 70 % von Methan zu Wasserstoff bei einer sehr annehmbaren Temperatur von 800 ° C zu erreichen. Man nimmt das Gas und es wird sich naturgemäß sehr schnell zu Ruß, herumfliegendem Staub in Form einer schwarzen Wolke, und Wasserstoff aufspalten. 70 % bei 900 ° ist das Resultat, das wir haben. Zusammen mit den Spezialisten wird in zwei Richtungen weitergearbeitet. Einmal geht es um die Katalysatoren. Es gibt Katalysatoren, welche die Temperatur noch weiter senken können. Wir haben eine Arbeitsgruppe in Rostock, die daran arbeitet. Eine zweite Möglichkeit besteht darin, sich einer Vorrichtung zu bedienen, in der natürliches Methan kleine Blasen hervorbringt, so dass man eine große Oberfläche und ein kleines Volumen hat und somit die Umwandlung erfolgreicher geschieht. Beide Methoden sehen vielversprechend aus. Mir scheint, falls so etwas kommt, dass dies, wie Sie richtigerweise sagen, ein guter Weg sein könnte, um das Problem zu lösen. Die zweite Frage, von der Sie sprachen, ist Supraleitung. Supraleitung ist ein Gebiet, das boomt. Gestern bekamen wir die Präsentation über den LHC (Large Hadron Collider = Großer Hadronen-Speicherring); das ist ein Supraleiter, ein System von beispielloser Größe. Supraleitung wäre in der Lage, uns eine Möglichkeit zu geben, das System der elektrischen Energie in ein System umzuwandeln, das, wie ich vor einiger Zeit sagte, vergleichbar ist mit ... Dies steht kurz vor der Verwirklichung. Wir haben nun ein Modell, das wir entwickeln, und es sieht ziemlich .. Da lacht jemand, ich weiß nicht warum, aber egal. Das war ich. Entschuldigung, Auf jeden Fall ist die Schlussfolgerung ... Lassen Sie mich sagen, dass all diese Ideen nicht zwangsläufig wahr werden. Selbst zur Zeit von Silicon Valley war von drei oder vier Ideen nur eine tatsächlich erfolgreich. Aber man muss es versuchen, und das tun wir. Wir versuchen es, und das ist vielleicht ein Stück Hoffnung. Danke. Herr Moderator, das kann ich ihm nicht durchgehen lassen. Ich werde mich sehr kurz fassen. Ein Fakt: Eine 1.000 Kilometer lange Hochspannungsleitung in dem Umfang, wie wir sie jetzt haben, besitzt etwas weniger als ... ungefähr ein Kilovolt, ungefähr ein Megavolt, o.k. Sie hat etwas weniger als 7 % Ohmschen Verlust, das ist nichts. Man könnte das ganz einfach verringern, indem man einfach die Kabel vergrößert. Warum tun wir das nicht? Schlicht und einfach deshalb, weil die Leitung teuer ist. Es kostet eine Milliarde Dollar, um eine so große Leitung herzustellen. Und die Zinsen für diese Milliarde Dollar werden an diesem Punkt äquivalent zum Marktwert der Energie, die man in die Leitung packt. Supraleitung für den Transport von Energie zu verwenden, ist dumm, dumm. Die nächste Frage, bitte. So viele Leute diskutieren über das Problem des Kernkraftwerks in Fukushima. Was denken Sie über dieses Problem, vor dem wir stehen? Gegenwärtig ist es ein Problem von Fukushima. Was gibt es für einen Plan für die Zukunft, um mit den Folgen von Fukushima umzugehen, mit dem Problem der Kernkraft? Was ist Ihre Ansicht? Eine Frage. Der Ton ist nicht gut. Daher verstehe ich nicht alles. Können Sie Ihre Frage in ungefähr zehn Wörtern zusammenfassen? Glauben Sie, dass das Problem des Kernkraftwerks von Fukushima vorbei ist oder nicht? Darf ich darauf antworten? Ja bitte. Als ich einmal in einem Flugzeug von New Orleans aus abflog, stießen wir mit einem Vogel zusammen. Ein Vogel geriet ins Triebwerk, es gab einen lauten Knall, und Gas begann aus dem Triebwerk auszutreten. An diesem Punkt fingen wir alle an, für unser Leben zu beten. Ich saß neben einem Flugzeugkonstrukteur und er sagte: Er sage: "Das ist etwas, was man auf die harte Tour lernt. In Gander in Neufundland startete einmal ein Flugzeug. Das Schaufelblatt löste sich und durchtrennte eine Hydraulik-Leitung, es gab keine Kontrolle mehr über das Flugzeug, es stürzte ab und alle starben." Und er erläuterte, dass bei diesen leistungsstarken Technologien gelegentlich ein schrecklicher Unfall passiert. Und genau so sind leistungsstarke Technologien nun einmal. Wenn Sie jemanden zum Mond schicken, birgt das Risiken, und man sollte sich nicht wundern, wenn jemand sein Leben verliert. In diesem Fall sagte mein Sitznachbar: "Was passierte, war, dass man das Problem analysierte und feststellte, dass es gefährlich ist, wenn sich das Schaufelblatt löst und herausgeschleudert wird. Und man schrieb vor, dass das Triebwerk von einer großen Stahlbüchse umgeben sein musste, damit es, falls ein Schaufelblatt herausgeschleudert wird, zu keinem Problem kommen würde." Mit Kernreaktorunfällen verhält es sich ebenso. Es sind große, furchtbare Ereignisse. Jedes Mal, wenn ein solcher Unfall geschieht, ziehen sich die Leute zurück und probieren neue Konstruktionen aus. Daher glaube ich persönlich nicht, dass es das Ende ist, nein. Ich glaube, dies muss vielleicht die letzte Frage sein, da die Leute hungrig werden. Das tut mir leid für die zwei anderen. Was ist Ihre Frage? In der Tat eine gute Idee. Wir werden alle drei Fragen nehmen. Mein Name ist Ibrahim ... Ich forsche als Postdoc an der École normale supérieure in Paris. Ich komme aus Niger, das meines Wissens der viertgrößte Uran-Produzent ist. Es ist ein Land, das zweieinhalb mal so groß ist wie Frankreich. 70 % des Landes sind Sahara. Daher fühle ich mich, wenn ich hier als junger Forscher sitze, ... privilegiert, dass ich an dieser Diskussion teilnehmen kann. Allerdings denke ich dann, dass es vielleicht ein paar Studenten in Niger gibt, die, geografisch betrachtet, im Zentrum und in der Position sein könnten, sich das nächste Lösungskonzept zu überlegen. Aber das Problem ist, dass die Universität wahrscheinlich finanziell nicht gut ausgestattet ist, so dass diese Studenten sich nicht auf demselben Niveau befinden wie die amerikanischen und japanischen Studenten, die hier mit gezielten Fragen aufmarschiert sind. Während Sie nun darüber nachdenken, wie man zu einer Lösung kommen kann, was denken wir da hinsichtlich jener Entwicklungsländer, aus denen tatsächlich eine Lösung kommen könnte? Danke. Wir werden diese Frage beantworten und uns danach um die beiden anderen Fragen kümmern. Vor ungefähr einer Woche saßen wir hier mit dem Wissenschaftsminister und den Wissenschaftsräten der G8+5-Länder und erörterten das gesamte Thema der Green Economy. Sie kennen das neue Schlagwort der Zukunft. Und wir stimmten alle überein, dass wir gewisse Kenntnisse über die vorhandenen grünen Technologien hatten. Und dann begannen wir darüber zu streiten - genau wie wir es hier tun -, ob Kernenergie eine grüne Technologie ist oder nicht. Davon abgesehen gab es eine breite Übereinstimmung. Und nachdem wir angefangen hatten, über eine Green Economy zu diskutieren, sagten Kollegen aus - zum Beispiel - Südafrika, dass die größte Herausforderung für Südafrika im Kampf gegen die Armut besteht. Die zweite große Herausforderung ist die Inklusion. Und die dritte, damit zusammenhängende Herausforderung besteht darin, den Großteil der Bevölkerung in ein Bildungssystem einzubeziehen. Und sobald wir das erreicht haben, werden wir uns über den Rest unterhalten. Es war ziemlich offensichtlich, dass wir diese Technologien in Zusammenhang mit den von Ihnen aufgeworfenen Fragen diskutieren müssen, denn es handelt sich um eine globale Herausforderung, der wir nur entgegentreten können, wenn wir den verschiedenen Herausforderungen entgegentreten und uns ihnen stellen. Und ich stimme zu, dass es sogar noch komplizierter ist. Aber es ist sicherlich nicht ausreichend, nur einen genauen Blick auf die grünen Technologien in Europa zu werfen. Vielen Dank. Ich komme aus Äthiopien und forsche an Solarmaterialien für konzentrierende Solarenergiesysteme in Südafrika. Meine Frage lautet: Ein entscheidender Bestandteil von konzentrierenden Solarenergiesystemen ist die absorbierende Oberfläche. Viele Materialien wurden für das System entwickelt, aber sie zerfallen bei hoher Temperatur. Was denken Sie darüber? In Ordnung - maximal drei Minuten, wenn möglich 90 Sekunden. O.k. Ja, konzentrierende Solarenergie. Wir haben eine Arbeitsgruppe, die am IASS an konzentrierender Solarenergie arbeitet. Solarenergie ist in der Tat eine sehr spannende Alternative zu photovoltaischer Energie, da sie eine sehr ökonomische Methode zur Verfügung stellt, um aus der Sonne eine große Energiemenge zu gewinnen. Sie besitzt einen Speicher. Sie erzeugt Elektrizität mit einer günstigen Standardmethode der Elektrizitätsproduktion. Wir haben also heute alle Elemente, die darauf hindeuten, dass in zukünftigen Jahren konzentrierende Solarenergie ein erstzunehmender Konkurrent für Solarenergie werden könnte. Bei der Präsentation für Solarenergie in der Sahara richten viele Leute ihr Augenmerk auf die Möglichkeit der Nutzung von konzentrierender Solarenergie. Konzentrierende Solarenergie ist ein System, in dem Spiegel Licht in Form von Wärme sammeln. Die Wärme beträgt etwa 550 °, was der Temperatur in einem Natrium-gekühlten Kernreaktor entspricht - mit dem Unterschied, dass es kein Natrium und keinen Reaktor gibt. Aber es ist die Temperatur. Und diese Temperatur wird dann in einer Umwandlung dazu genutzt, Elektrizität zu erzeugen. Das alles macht einen sehr attraktiven Eindruck, und die eigentliche Frage ist die der Kosten. Woran arbeiten wir nun im Wesentlichen, um es günstiger zu machen? Wir glauben, dass bei der Solarenergie eine Kostenreduzierung um den Faktor 2 bis 3 im Bereich des Möglichen liegt. Falls das so ist, dann wird Solarenergie in dieser speziellen Form im Vergleich zu anderen Quellen wie Erdgas oder Kohle vollauf wettbewerbsfähig werden. Das ist das Ziel, hinter dem ich stehe, und wir arbeiten daran. Und ich glaube, es gibt eine interessante Chance, dass sich so etwas in Zukunft entwickeln wird. Perfekt, danke. Und Sie haben das Privileg der letzten Frage. Meine Frage besteht nur aus zehn Wörtern. Ich komme aus Japan und mein Name ist Takami. Und meine Frage ist: Was denken Sie über den emotionalen Standpunkt? Zurzeit herrscht die Meinung, dass Kernenergie effektiv ist, jeder weiß das. Aber ich arbeite tatsächlich mit Freiwilligen an dem Ort, der von dem Tsunami und dem Erdbeben getroffen wurde. An diesem Ort sind die Menschen am Boden zerstört und verunsichert, denn immer, wenn man an diesen Ort geht, ist der Boden durch dieses Material kontaminiert. Auf welche Art und Weise berücksichtigen Sie den emotionalen Aspekt, wenn Sie sich mit dieser Art von Problemen auseinandersetzen? Ich würde mich freuen, darauf zu antworten, wenn ich darf. Als ich von dem Tsunami hörte, dachte ich sofort an alle meine Freunde in Sendai. Ich war schon oft dort gewesen und in jenem Teil der Stadt herumgelaufen, der von dem Tsunami ausradiert wurde, der natürlich viel schlimmer war als der Atomunfall. Wie fühlt man sich, wenn Menschen, die man kennt, schwer verletzt werden? Unser Herz ist bei ihnen und wir fühlen uns elend. Und das tat ich. Es gibt keine Antwort, die ich geben könnte. Ich finde, Sie bringen hier ein wichtiges Argument, das die Leute ebenfalls vergessen, nämlich, dass Tausende von Menschen in diesem Tsunami ums Leben kamen und ... Zehntausende. Ja, Zehntausende, und ich glaube nicht ... Ich denke, ich habe Recht, wenn ich sage, dass niemand oder höchstens eine Handvoll Menschen tatsächlich als direkte Folge des Atomunfalls gestorben sind. Manchmal ist ein gewisses Augenmaß erforderlich. Dinge wie diesen Tsunami bezeichnen wir als Akt Gottes, als höhere Gewalt und akzeptieren sie irgendwie, obwohl sie katastrophal sind. Wir denken, wir haben Kontrolle über die Technologie, aber das ist nicht so. Wir haben ein wenig Kontrolle über die Technologie, aber manchmal wird es schiefgehen. Wir sollten Dinge nicht aufgeben, nur weil sie manchmal schiefgehen, genau so wenig, wie wir damit aufhören sollten, Städte in Erdbebengebieten zu bauen, weil sie manchmal von Tsunamis niedergewalzt werden. Meiner Meinung nach ist es eine Frage, ob man hoffnungsvoll in die Zukunft schaut oder nicht. Und danke, das war eine großartige Frage, um damit zum Ende zu kommen. Vielen Dank, danke. Ich würde gerne zum Schluss allen Diskussionsteilnehmern danken, Dr. Schütte, Dr. Laughlin, Dr. Keilhacker und natürlich Dr. Rubbia. Und am allermeisten möchte ich Ihnen für Ihre wunderbaren Fragen denken. Ich hoffe, die Veranstaltung hat Ihnen gefallen - mir hat sie auf jeden Fall gefallen. Danke Ihnen, Graf und Gräfin, dass Sie wieder das Ganze organisiert haben. Sie sind alle zum Mittagessen eingeladen, und man erwartet uns außerdem um 15:30 im Schloss zur Abschlussfeier. Herzlichen Dank Ihnen allen.

Panel Discussion
Panel Discussion on Mainau Island on the topic of the future of energy supply and storage.
(01:23:53 - 01:26:00)


Whatever the true potential of superconducting cables might be, it appears to be accepted amongst most Laureates that the major energy challenges of the future have to do with the conversion and storage of energy obtained from renewable sources. In this respect, a tangible and economically plausible vision for the future of residential energy supply was given by Steven Chu in 2013. Chu argued for a decentralization of energy storage, giving every home a battery:


Steven Chu (2013) - The Energy and Climate Change Challenges and Opportunities

I’m going to start right into the talk. Very briefly the outline of the talk is to first show that technical innovations based on science have truly changed the world. That if necessity is the mother of all inventions, then we have the "mother of all necessities", namely how to deal with climate change. And finally, science and innovation again is needed to transform the world as it has in the past. So let me remind you very quickly: the invention of the steam engine, the improvement of the steam engine really issued in a new era. And here you see an iconic warship Temeraire being towed by a steam belching tug boat to its final berth where it’s going to be chopped up for scrap. It’s really the setting of an era and the opening of a new age. There are other transformative technologies. For example in an institution I worked at for 9 years, AT&T Bell Laboratories, they were developing vacuum tubes in the ‘20s and ‘30s and ‘40s because they needed vacuum tubes for long distance communication. For those of you in the audience who are under the age of 60: That’s what a vacuum tube looks like. But these things burned out. They were heated up to red hot and eventually they burned out after 1, 2, 3, 4 years. And this is not good for transcontinental undersea cables. So they wanted to develop a solid state vacuum tube. And they set out on a programme that lasted 9, 10 years; a concerted programme to say let’s use our understanding of quantum mechanics and see if we can develop a solid state vacuum tube. The inventors Shockley, Brattain, Bardeen were awarded the Nobel Prize for this work. That was the first transistor. It looks pretty ugly, something only a mother could love. (laughter) However, they knew it would lead to other things. This is the first integrated circuit - even uglier - with only 4 components. And yet over a period of several decades, constant improvements, constant innovation went from a 4-device circuit like this to devices that have 10 billion or more transistors in a single chip, perhaps a centimetre square. In addition to that innovations in optical fibres, lasers, innovations in wireless technology really transformed the world. So out of this I want to emphasise, as you’ve heard before, that fundamental research is the foundation for the development of this technology. However, mission-driven R&D was also necessary, and it occurred over several decades. So let me now explain innovations in agriculture. In 1898 Sir William Crookes, who invented the Crookes tube, a precursor to actually an electron tube, delivers an inaugural address as president of the BritishAassociation for the Advancement of Science. But he doesn’t deliver a normal ordinary address, thank you for being here, I’m so glad to be part of this, blah; he gets up there and opens the lecture by saying, 'England and all civilised countries are in deadly peril.' And he explains that the artificial fertilisers that were being imported from Chile, Chilean saltpetre, based on the rate of mining that saltpetre and shipping it to Europe, would be depleted within a few decades. That would no longer sustain the soils of Europe, and he predicted mass starvation. However, he said, 'It is the chemist who must come to the rescue ... before we’re in the actual grip of actual death, the chemist will step in and postpone the day of famine.' - I thought that would go well with the Lindau conference and chemists. This set off an incredible race, believe it or not. Starting with Wilhelm Ostwald, the chemist in those days, who thought he developed a way of taking nitrogen and making it into ammonia. And that was the first step in making nitrogen-based fertiliser. And indeed he convinced the German company BASF to hire a chemist to prove that what he saw glimmers of in the laboratory was indeed true. And it turned out not to be true. And it was this man, Fritz Haber, who succeeded and got the Nobel Prize in 1918, collaborating with this man, Carl Bosch, who was hired by Ostwald to see if his original idea worked. In fact, I should say Haber was driven also by a competition. He wasn’t really going to do this but he was driven by a very deep conversation with another chemist, Nernst. Now this development, the synthesis of ammonia, was deemed so important they gave a Nobel Prize to Haber in 1918. They gave a second one to Bosch in 1931. And indeed when Gerhard Ertl got his Nobel Prize for understanding catalysis it was mentioned in the Nobel Prize announcement, I should also say that Ostwald and Nernst also got Nobel Prizes in chemistry. So sometimes you can get a Nobel Prize and lose a scientific race. Anyway, the Haber-Bosch process enabled the world to feed itself, even though the population doubled. But the population more than doubled, it soon tripled. And in the late 1960s a Stanford professor, Paul Ehrlich said that, in a popular book, The Population Bomb. And he wrote, ‘The battle to feed all of humanity is over. In the 1970s and 1980s despite crash programmes hundreds of millions of people will starve to death – in spite of these crash programmes.' And so the question is, what actually happened? What happened actually was quite not what he expected. that had very, very thick kernels and very short stems, because the kernels were so thick and heavy that with normal wheat they would collapse under its own weight. And these strains of wheat could actually withstand artificial fertilisers and a sudden growth spurt. And so this had a profound impact on agriculture. And to show you how profound an impact: When we go from 1960 to 2005, the population more than doubled, 3 billion to 6.5 billion people. This was the grain production in the world. This was the land put under agricultural cultivation for grains, for human feed. And so the population doubled and yet we'd use the same amount of land. But we now know even despite this incredible advance that we really need a second green revolution in order to go further. We might have to go to perennial crops, much less tillage or no tillage, drought resistance for sure, and perhaps nitrogen fixation. Now, you’re probably thinking, well there’s technological fixes. We’re now 7 billion people. By 2025 we estimate to grow to 8 billion people, by 2050 9 billion people. And so what’s the point? We get a technological fix. Our population grows. We get into another mess. Where do we go from here? Ah, there’s light at the end of the tunnel. This is the projection of the population growth depending on 3 estimated fertility rates around the world. And what it really is saying is the following: By the end of this century it may be probable or possible that the population will actually peak and decline. Why is this? It’s because we’ve been noticing over the last 2 decades across all cultures, all religions, everything: The richer you get, the more you go into middle class life, you have fewer children. There may be many reasons for this: Education of women, infant mortality goes away or is greatly reduced, late night TV - choose your favourite.(laughter) But in any case for the first time we see that if you get past this century, there is light at the end of the tunnel. But you could possibly get to a sustainable world, because the population will stabilise, and indeed it may even shrink. Which puts us into another paradigm because in a growing population it’s a sort of a mild Ponzi scheme: more young people taking care of fewer old people - good. You can be somewhat inefficient. Fewer younger people taking care of older people, harder. So we have to think about that again with sustainability. So let’s talk about this necessity. The reason why I chose to leave Stanford to become a bureaucrat, shudder (laugh), and even to go to Washington, is the following. These are direct temperature measurements of the land surface of the Earth. These are several groups. The latest group went in with the eye that all the groups did the wrong thing. There was data selection; they didn’t analyse the data right. But in the end they found that indeed they may have analysed the data right. So this is 1800 to 2010, the mean average surface temperature. And you notice over this time period a few things. First, we don’t understand this plateau, or possibly even dipping. There’s another recent plateau that many people made a lot of noise about. And so we cannot predict why there are these plateaus and perhaps dips. We certainly can predict the little bumps. But we can see over a 200 year period that the temperature seems to have been rising. And in that period over the last 30 or so years, maybe ¾ of the temperature increase has occurred. And so what are the consequences of this? Well, the sea level is rising. It has gone in past millennia with hardly any change in average sea level height, it's now going above 3 millimetres per year. And there’s been a lot of toing and froing about what’s this due to? Are the glaciers really melting? And the most compelling evidence is now coming from satellite measurements. This is a GRACE satellite measurement. This is an artist’s conception of 2 satellites co-orbiting the earth, where the distance between the 2 satellites is very precisely measured. And little changes in gravity perturb these orbits and hence the distance between them. And by monitoring the distance between these 2 satellites you can actually measure the local changes in gravitational traction of the earth. And what they do when they fly over Greenland is they find: yes indeed, the ice sheet in Greenland is declining. And this is the period 2002 to 2012. The sensitivity is so good you can see summer, winter, summer, winter. But it’s not only declining, it's accelerating. It's real. They can monitor parts of Antarctica. They can monitor the Himalayan plateau. But they found the Himalayan plateau is not yet declining, right. And in parts of Antarctica it is and other parts it’s increasing. But the point here is that improved sensitivity, improved measurements, will really tell you what’s going on. Now there have been heat waves. There was a heat wave in Europe in 2003; over 50,000 people died in that single heat wave. There was a heat wave in Russia in 2010; 10 to 15,000 people died in that heat wave. But you say, well you can’t really tell a single event, whether this is a real change. It just could be an extreme single event. And so that is a valid point. So this is data from a reinsurance company - a reinsurance company is a company that insures insurance companies. Now what does that mean? If you’re an insurance company and there’s a massive flood, a massive earthquake, a massive hurricane, you don’t have the assets to pay the premiums. So you take out insurance to ensure that you can actually pay out the premiums. And so re-insurance companies are concerned about major weather events and other catastrophes. So this is Munich Re, a reinsurance company. The brown is earthquakes over a 30 year period: 1980 to 2010 and beginning of 2011. The green are meteorological events, storms. The blue are floods. The yellow are extreme heat waves, cold waves, droughts, forest fires. And this is just the number in the United States, not losses, just the number. And the United States is a well-reported country - we have lots of monitors. But what you see is the number of events seems to be climbing. In that same period, that 30 year period, with a temperature climb. In terms of insurance losses, well there were a lot. This dark blue is insured losses, the light blue is uninsured losses. If you look at this dotted line, the trend line: in the United States we went from $40 billion a year to over $170 billion a year. So this is beginning to be real money - even by Washington standards. So anyway, this is happening. And what I feel very strongly about this is... I feel we don’t understand a lot of the climate miles. We will be able to understand the climate miles in the current years and decades. But I prefer to take a very epidemiological point of view towards climate change. The way we took that view when there was a suspicion that cancer was caused by smoking – not all cancers but if you smoked you had a higher probability of cancer. And after 10 or 20 years it became very clear smoking increased the probability of getting cancer. Even though we did not have a biological molecular view of how it happened. We may not have a detailed climate model view of what’s happening, but we know something is happening if it’s correlated with the increasing temperature. So now you can say and you might have heard that the temperature has increased in previous eras, epochs. This is a long time, this right here is the present time and you’re going backward in time, this is 600,000 years ago. This is a proxy for a measurement of temperature. It is actually the amount of deuterium you’ll find in ice core samples in Greenland and in Antarctica. Why are you measuring deuterium, the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen? Deuterium weighs more than hydrogen, therefore it evaporates less quickly. And so if it evaporates and is transported over Antarctica and it comes down in snow, you’ll have depleted deuterium. And so by using this proxy, it’s a rough measure of temperature. So here we are in a very warm period relative to the last 600,000 years. You go back, this is in the ice ages. And you go back to here where you’re in another warm period with slightly higher temperatures. It’s estimated it's about 2 degrees centigrade average higher. And it's estimated, based on other evidence that I don’t have time go to into, that the sea level was at least 6.6 metres higher in this little warm period. You also can measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth. You can measure, that’s been trapped in these glaciers, the amount of nitrogen oxide, methane. And you notice at this very tail endpiece, you see these very sharp vertical lines – that’s the change in greenhouse gases in the last 200 years. And I want you to notice that we are off the scale of what has happened in the last 600,000 years. Indeed, we’re off the scale of what happened in the last 2 million years. And so that’s why there’s nervousness. Because when you have greenhouse gases, you’re trapping more heat - you don’t really know what’s going to happen. The technique is very much like geology. In this stratified rock that you look at in the geological record you have stratified layers of ice. And you go deeper and deeper into the ice cores. And then you have a time record of what’s been deposited in terms of these isotopic elements. And that’s how we get the data. There’s a lot of cross correlation with other methods to validate that this indeed is giving you the right answer. The carbon dioxide has increased, but it might have been due to natural causes. And what’s the signature that it has to do with humans? Well, the first suspicion is that this is the amount of CO2, going back a few thousand years, 5,000 years, and this is the start of the industrial revolution. So you say, um that’s a little suspicious. Also this is the population increase of the world, streaming up, starting about at the industrial revolution. But it’s just more than that. Because we have a rough idea of how much fossil fuel we put up since the start of the industrial revolution. And the numbers roughly match. So this CO2 by counting seems to be consistent with the industrial revolution. But it’s even better than that. You can look at isotopes of carbon. Carbon 14 is produced in the upper atmosphere due to cosmic rays. And then this carbon 14, which is radioactive, diffuses down into the lower biosphere, it gets mixed with all things living or inorganic. You and I have carbon 14 in our bodies. When we die - imagine you were put in a very exclusively good mausoleum, good for 10 million years. What will happen? Well, carbon 14 has a half-life of 5,700 years. When you exhume the body a million years later, it has no more carbon 14; you just got carbon 12. Now you take us and put us in a power plant. And up goes our carbon, recycled into the atmosphere. And what happens is, if there’s a significant amount of fossil fuel release, you’re adding carbon 12, not carbon 14 – remember that carbon 14 is made in the upper atmosphere. And at a steady state you would just have a steady ratio of carbon 14. So here’s the ratio of carbon 14 in the green, going down, down, down as the amount of carbon dioxide goes up, up, up. Wait a minute: data runs out in 1950. What happened in 1950? Well, what happened in the 1950s is, the first thing I’d say, it’s followed soon by Russia, the Soviet Union, were doing atmospheric testing of hydrogen bombs. Those things made a lot of carbon 14. And so the carbon 14 went sky rocketing up. And this is in the northern hemisphere, in the light green. And this is fascinating: those oscillations are the mixing of the upper stratosphere with the lower atmosphere, the yearly mixing. This time delay is the time it takes the northern hemisphere to mix with the southern hemisphere and so you have a measure of that. You see the ocean mixing, picking up of the radioactive carbon made by hydrogen bombs, first in the northern hemisphere, then in the southern hemisphere. And things seem to be going back to an equilibrium. However, it’s going down too fast. And if you look at the numbers it turns out, within 25% uncertainty - that’s the carbon 14 – that dilution of carbon 14 is consistent with the fossil fuel we burned. So it has got finger prints on it, that indeed seem to be due to humans. It’s been at least fossilised carbon that has been exhumed. Alright let’s talk briefly about science and innovation. This is why I became a director of a national lab and became Secretary of Energy, because I believe that science and technology can give us better solutions. So I’m going to very briefly talk about energy efficiency and clean energy sources. Refrigerators are wonderful, they keep your food cold. But as features got incorporated into refrigerators, for example frost free where you blow hot air into a refrigerator so you don’t have frozen ice in your freezer section, that means you had to re-cool it and your efficiency was plunging. So in 1975, starting with the State of California, we introduced refrigerator standards that insisted that the refrigerators that could be sold had to be above a certain efficiency. And of course the efficiency went up. Compared to 1975 today’s refrigerators are about 22% bigger - the average American refrigerator is enormous, it's 22 cubic feet - but it costs 3 times less to own and operate than in 1975. By the way, the size of American refrigerators is beginning to plateau. Not because of the size of the American appetite - it has to do with the size of the kitchen door. But when you’re improving the efficiency of refrigerators it was always assumed that refrigerators would then cost more. And first cost in the United States matter. Maybe you couldn’t afford the extra couple of hundred dollars to buy an efficient refrigerator. So I and a team of people said, well let’s look at the data, is that really true? And so here are refrigerators: before standards, the first Californian standards, second Californian standards, third Californian standards, federal standards - there are 6 of them in here. This is when standards start. This is the purchase price and the cost of operation. This is on a log graph. So that if you didn’t have standards you might assume that perhaps the cost of operation would be here, about $4,000 or $4,500; instead it's $1,500. A big deal. This is the purchase price of the refrigerator. It didn’t have an influence on the purchase price. We looked at other appliances. Clothes washers - ooops, standards made the purchase price go down. What’s happening? And indeed it’s not only clothes washers; in room air conditioners, in central air conditioners, the same thing happened. The introduction of standards made the first price go down. Maybe because it forced manufacturers to retool and they got more efficient. We don’t know the real reason, we’re data collectors, we’re physicists. But in any case, let me go to something else. Electric vehicles. Our goal is to produce an electric vehicle by 2022 that would cost... a 4 or 5 passenger car that would cost about $20,000/$25,000. And we call this 'EV Everywhere'. We got the president to announce this. So this was a good coup for us. You could say, well, you know electric cars, who wants to buy electric car, not a very exciting tiny thing. But let me tell you, I have a friend who owns one of these babies. This is a Tesla S - a very, very exciting car. You know - I don’t know why, who wants to go to 0-60 in 4½ seconds, but that’s what it does. And it goes 300 miles on a single charge. And if you look on the inside, that big thing in there is an LED display touch screen that is like a humongous iPhone. And you can touch it and it’s as intuitive as an iPhone. My friend, I’ve ridden in this a couple of times, and he just raves about it. He loves this car. But this car costs nearly $80,000. And so you’ve got to get the price of the car down. The performance is there, it has more luggage space than a normal car; it has a front and a back trunk, because the battery is underneath. So in 2008 the cost of manufacturing batteries was about $1,000 a kilowatt hour. And 2012 it was cut in half. Tesla claims its cost of its batteries is about $300 a kilowatt hour. Our target in the Department of Energy was: by 2022, can you get this down to maybe $150 a kilowatt hour? But it’s not only the cost. You also have to have durability; it’s got to last 8,000, 10,000, moderately deep discharges. It has to be temperature tolerant so that it can work at high temperatures, it can work at low temperatures. But if you have these qualities, at this cost or even somewhere between this cost and that cost, you have your $25,000 car that can go 300 miles, maybe 0 to 60 in 7 seconds. But that’s what we’re trying to push. Let me talk about clean energy sources. The first thing, I’m going to focus on renewables. You might ask, is there enough energy heating the Earth to even come close? And the answer is 'maybe'. There is 174 PW - peta is 10^12 - of energy heating the earth. A lot of it gets reflected back by clouds, by the atmosphere, reflected by land, but 89 petawatts are absorbed. How does that compare to what we use? Well, this is how much in kilowatt hours we use a year. This is how much is absorbed a year. And this is how much we use. So we have... it's 2 times 10^-4 of what is absorbed. So there is a little room to improve what we can do. And so it’s not clear whether - of course we can’t capture anything close to even 1/10th of this energy – but can we capture 1/10th of 1% of the energy is the issue. Now let me talk about transportation fuel. Batteries - 300 miles. Well, you can’t go 500 miles, there’s limitations in charging, but that’s actually improving dramatically. But let me tell you how good liquid transportation fuel is. And I don’t see in the foreseeable future a battery-powered plane, a commercially battery-powered plane. If you look over energy density - the amount of energy per volume, amount of energy per weight – what you find up near the top are these chemical fuels: diesel fuel, gasoline, body fat. Kerosene, ethanol - much lower energy density. Methanol, still much lower energy density. Where are lithium ion batteries? They’re so close to zero it’s hard to see. So the lithium ion batteries of today are 1½ orders of magnitude worse. But they don’t need to get an order of magnitude better. They can get a factor of 4 better. And now you’re in 300/400 miles, because the motor is so much smaller, the motor is so much more efficient. Ok so it doesn’t have this big a gap. But again for airplanes you need this stuff. I just want to take a little aside and, since I’m a professor and you’re students, I’m going to give you a quiz. What does a Boeing 777 have in common with a Bar-tailed Godwit? What’s a Bar-tailed Godwit? It’s a bird; it’s a bird about this big. This is a strange bird: it spends, 'summers' in Alaska and then it decides to fly to New Zealand, you know, in the seasonal change. Most of the time it does a fuelling stop in China but some of them actually fly nonstop from Alaska to New Zealand. Once they start flying they’re on more or less autopilot. No food, no nothing. And so when this bird takes off and when a 777 takes off, they can both fly non-stop for 11,000 kilometres. They both take off with half of their weight in fuel. And when you land: one skinny bird. But it is that high energy density of body fat, as long as the airplane... which is comparable to airplane fuel, which makes a body fat so good - unless you don’t want body fat. I’m going to skip this on terpene, because I’m running out. It has to do with unusual biofuels. It turns out that pine trees create a compound that is very, very close in oxidation states of carbon to gasoline – much better than methane, much better than carbohydrates. And so what you have here is an idea that we’re funding through an innovative funding agency RPE, which actually taps these pine trees the way you tap it for maple sugar, and you genetically modify it to get up the production of this terpene up by an order of magnitude, and we’re going to pilot this. And perhaps by just having trees already grown for lumber, you can tap them and continuously extract a compound that is very, very close to a fuel that you would want to use in an airplane or a car. And so just as a way of using land in a novel way that perhaps would work. We also are working very hard on transmission systems and energy storage. These transmission systems especially need new electronics that can up the voltage very much more efficiently, so you can get the voltage up to a million volts DC. You can send that DC power over lines: 1,000 miles with 5% loss in energy already has happened in China. So that means you can port renewable energy over 1,000’s of miles without that much loss in energy. But it costs a lot of money to get DC line voltages up and down. And so we want to develop electronics, higher frequency electronics. So instead of working at 50 hertz or 60 hertz, you work at 50 or 60 kilohertz. And you think this is a dream, but in actual fact in the RPE’s last conference a small company brought in a prototype of this converter that replaced a 70,000 pound transformer. He could pick it up by himself, in the trunk of a car, put it down in a suitcase, and it does the same thing. And so if this becomes commercially available this will be a very big deal. Also batteries. Solar energy. Solar energy has dramatically come down from $8 for a fully installed utility scale in 2004 to less than $4 in 2010. The Department of Energy goal was to get it to $1 a watt - a watt is a certain illumination power – where you think the solar module, instead of being $1.70 in 2004 could it be 40 cents? Now that is not completely a pipe dream; right now the spot price is 70 cents. And so it turns out that all the other things in the solar thing are becoming the real issue. The solar module itself, and now soon the electronics, will be less than half the cost of solar farms. But there’s still a lot of technological headroom. Normally what you do is you take very purified silicon, you cast it in ingot, you saw it up into bricks and then take a very fine diamond string saw and chop it into wafers maybe .15 millimetres thick. And you dope it and make it into a solar cell. RPE and the Department of Energy are funding an innovative approach to a new start-up company. And their approach is the following: you take a strawberry, you dip it into white chocolate, you pull it out and you can control the amount of white chocolate on the strawberry. Similarly you take a carbon substrate, you dip it in molten silicon, you hold it up, it dribbles off. And maybe instead of 150 microns you can make a 30 micron piece of silicon. Why do you want to do that? Half the cost of the solar module is the cost of silicon, and this stuff is non-recoverable. And so then you drop... at first glance you could drop the cost by ¼. And they’re getting solar conversion efficiencies now comparable with this method. So the quality of these cells is actually comparable. So that would be exciting. Here is another thing: if you live in Germany the cost of installing on your roof top solar panels is about $2.50 a watt. In the United States it costs $6 a watt. What’s going on here? Is it the cost of labour? I think not, it’s the cost of other things, especially other, what we call soft costs: licencing costs, inspection costs, things like that. And so, 'Unlike physics, where we can fundamentally figure out the upper limit for efficiency of solar cells, there’s no such upper limit to bureaucracy.' And so we have now been focusing more on actually getting the soft costs of bureaucracy down in various towns and cities across the United States. I’m going to skip this, but there’s a thing coming along which says: With very inexpensive energy storage in solar, you can put this stuff on your roof top, you can put a battery in your home, and all of a sudden you can be 80% off the grid. And this could be very disruptive. In fact, it could be so disruptive that utility companies will lose their customers. And so they are beginning to get nervous and are beginning to fight solar installations, at least in the United States. And so here’s a solution. Let the utility companies own the equipment. They maintain the equipment, they install the equipment, the module and the battery. And this is not new, that’s the way the old telephone system worked: they owned the phone; they took care of the phone, you just got phone service. So you just get electricity service for less than the cost of normal electricity. Why can it be less? It’s because... well, what do you get? You get a battery in your home that makes you immune to blackouts, for at least a few days. What does the company get? The company gets a battery in your home, which is away from the elements. So it’s a much more benign environment. And they would love to distribute batteries at the end of their distribution systems. And they get standardised equipment. And they own it. So they’re a piece of the investment, which is a growth industry. So in these things we started in the Department of Energy - they are very, very ambitious. And I tell you, as I told my students and postdocs over the last 25 years: but in setting our aim too low and achieving our mark.’ That was said by Michelangelo. So, you students, remember that. Fail, fail fast, move on - but set your aim high. Now you know as I was in politics and there were some parts of politics I really didn’t like. There was very unfair press coverage, and sometimes you get slammed. And then 7 days, 6 days after I announced I was stepping down from Secretary of Energy, I see this newspaper article, where... (laughter, applause) Let me read you some of the lines. Energy Secretary Steven Chu awoke Thursday morning to find himself sleeping next to a giant solar panel he met the previous evening - didn’t even remember the manufacturer’s name. According to sources, Chu’s encounter with the crystalline-silicon solar receptor was his most regrettable dalliance since 2009, when an extended fling with a 90-foot wind turbine nearly ended his marriage.’ I walked into work that morning. My public affairs person says, we’ve got to respond to this. So I said ok. Rolled up my sleeves, licking my chops, and out we came with a press release about noon. with the allegations made in this week’s edition of the Onion. While I’m not going to confirm or deny the charges specifically, I will say that clean renewable solar power is a growing source of U.S. jobs and is becoming more and more affordable; so it’s no surprise that lots of Americans are falling in love with solar.’ And they would not let me put in ‘despite your sexual preferences’. So you’re looking very nervous. Rather than ask for permission I’m going to ask for forgiveness. I think we have a moral responsibility to deal with this climate change issue, because it’s going to affect the most innocent victims of society: it’s the poorest people of the world, which contributed nothing to this, and those yet to be born. And there is an ancient Native American saying that says And I really need his forgiveness, but I’m not going to look at him, because I’m going to show a little movie. This is a movie of Voyager 1 that’s now finally leaving the outer reaches of the solar wind. But it was designed to look at the planets and fly by the planets; and it was launched in the 1970s. So when it was leaving the orbit of Pluto, Carl Sagan asked the NASA people, Turn the cameras backward and see if you can find Earth. And what does Earth look like at a distance, the distance of Pluto?' And this is what he found. From this distance the earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it is everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilisation, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every superstar, every supreme leader, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors, so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner – how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely spec in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known so far to harbour life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot - the only home we’ve ever known. Thank you.

Ich werde gleich mit meinem Vortrag beginnen. Um Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick zu geben: Zunächst möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie wissenschaftsbasierte technische Innovationen die Welt grundlegend verändert haben. Zweitens ist zwar die Not die Mutter der Erfindung, die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels dagegen die Mutter der Notwendigkeit. Und schließlich waren und sind Wissenschaft und Innovation die Voraussetzung für die Umgestaltung der Welt. Denken Sie nur daran, wie die Erfindung bzw. Weiterentwicklung der Dampfmaschine eine ganz neue Ära einleitete. Hier sehen Sie, wie das legendäre Kriegsschiff Temeraire von einem dampfbetriebenen Schlepper zur Verschrottung an seinen letzten Liegeplatz gebracht wird. Es ist der Untergang einer Ära und der Beginn einer neuen. Auch andere Technologien veränderten die Welt. AT+T Bell Laboratories, wo ich neun Jahre lang tätig war, entwickelte beispielsweise in den 20er, 30er und 40er Jahren Vakuumröhren, weil diese für die Fernkommunikation benötigt wurden. Für alle unter 60-Jährigen im Publikum: So sieht eine Vakuumröhre aus. Da sie jedoch glühend heiß wurde, brannte sie nach ein, zwei, drei, vier Jahren durch, was für transkontinentale Seekabel nicht gut ist. Man wollte also eine Festkörper-Vakuumröhre entwickeln. Zu diesem Zweck wurde ein konzertiertes Programm ausgearbeitet, das insgesamt neun oder zehn Jahre lief. Dabei sollte unser Verständnis der Quantenmechanik zur Anwendung kommen. Die Erfinder Shockley, Brattain und Bardeen erhielten für diese Arbeit den Nobelpreis. Hier sehen Sie den ersten Transistor. Er ist ziemlich hässlich, etwas, das nur eine Mutter lieben kann. Doch sie wussten, dass dieser Transistor nur der Anfang war. Das hier ist die erste integrierte Schaltung, noch hässlicher, die aus nur vier Bauteilen besteht. Doch im Verlauf der nächsten Jahrzehnte entstanden aus diesem vierteiligen Schaltkreis durch konstante Verbesserung und Innovation Geräte mit vielleicht einen Quadratzentimeter großen Chips, auf denen sich jeweils zehn Milliarden Mal mehr Transistoren befinden. Die Welt wandelte sich aber auch aufgrund von Innovationen in den Bereichen Lichtwellenleiter, Laser- und Funktechnologie. Wie Sie bereits gehört haben, ist Grundlagenforschung die Basis für die Entwicklung dieser Technologien. Auch ich möchte das noch einmal betonen. Dennoch war auch aufgabenorientierte F+E notwendig. Sie erfolgte über viele Jahrzehnte. Ich möchte Ihnen etwas über Innovationen in der Landwirtschaft erzählen. seine Antrittsrede als Präsident der British Association for the Advancement of Science. Dabei handelte es sich jedoch nicht um eine normale Rede – vielen Dank, dass Sie alle gekommen sind, ich freue mich heute hier sein zu dürfen, blabla. Vielmehr begann sie mit dem Satz: 'England und alle zivilisierten Länder befinden sich in tödlicher Gefahr.' Dann erläuterte Crookes, dass die Vorkommen des aus Chile importierten Salpeters für Kunstdünger in einigen Jahrzehnten erschöpft sein würden, wenn der Salpeter weiterhin in diesem Tempo abgebaut und nach Europa geliefert wird. Die Böden bei uns würden auszehren, was eine große Hungersnot zur Folge hätte. und den Tag der Hungersnot hinausschieben.' Ich dachte mir, dieser Satz würde auf der Lindauer Tagung bei den Chemikern gut ankommen. Ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, diese Rede löste ein unglaubliches Rennen aus. Da war zunächst einmal Wilhelm Ostwald, der Chemiker seiner Zeit, der glaubte einen Weg gefunden zu haben, wie man aus Stickstoff Ammoniak machen kann. Das war der erste Schritt hin zur Entwicklung von Kunstdüngern auf Stickstoffbasis. Er überzeugte die deutsche Firma BASF, einen Chemiker damit zu beauftragen, die Richtigkeit seiner Beobachtungen im Labor zu belegen. Die Ergebnisse zeigten jedoch, dass er falsch lag. Diesem Mann, Fritz Haber, gelang schließlich die Herstellung eines solchen Düngers; er erhielt dafür 1918 den Nobelpreis. Er arbeitete mit Carl Bosch, den Sie hier sehen, zusammen; Bosch war von Ostwald beauftragt worden herauszufinden, ob seine ursprüngliche Idee funktionierte. Doch auch Haber wurde von der Konkurrenz angetrieben. Er wollte sich eigentlich gar nicht mit dem Thema beschäftigen, doch eine äußerst anregende Diskussion mit einem anderen Chemiker namens Nernst weckte seinen Ehrgeiz. Diese Entdeckung, die so genannte Ammoniaksynthese, wurde für so bedeutsam erachtet, dass Haber dafür 1918 der Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Als Gerhard Ertl 2007 für seine Forschung zur Katalyse mit dem Nobelpreis ausgezeichnet wurde, hieß es bei der Bekanntgabe des Preisträgers: 'Endlich beginnen wir den Haber-Bosch-Prozess zu verstehen.' Zweieinhalb Nobelpreise für eine große Sache. Ich möchte noch erwähnen, dass Ostwald und Nernst ebenfalls den Chemie-Nobelpreis erhielten. Man kann also diese Auszeichnung verliehen bekommen und gleichzeitig ein wissenschaftliches Rennen verlieren. Infolge des Haber-Bosch-Prozesses konnte sich jedenfalls die Welt ernähren, obwohl sich ihre Bevölkerung verdoppelte. Doch bald hatte sie sich nicht nur verdoppelt, sondern verdreifacht. Ende der 60er Jahre schrieb Paul Ehrlich, Professor an der Standford University in seinem bekannten Buch "Die Bevölkerungsbombe": In den 70er und 80er Jahren werden trotz Sofortprogrammen hunderte Millionen Menschen verhungern'. Doch wie kam es wirklich? Keineswegs so, wie Ehrlich es erwartet hatte. Zwei Jahre später erhielt ein Mann namens Norman Borlaug den Friedensnobelpreis für die Hybdridentwicklung von kurzstieligen Weizensorten mit sehr dicken Körnern. Die Körner waren so schwer, dass normale Weizenpflanzen unter ihrem Gewicht zusammengebrochen wären. Die neuen Weizensorten konnten Kunstdüngern und plötzlichen Wachstumsschüben standhalten. Seine Forschungsarbeit hatte also tiefgreifende Auswirkungen auf die Landwirtschaft. Wie tiefgreifend, belegen diese Zahlen: Zwischen 1960 und 2005 stieg die Bevölkerungszahl um mehr als das Doppelte, von 3 auf 6,5 Milliarden Menschen. Hier sehen Sie die weltweite Getreideproduktion, hier die für den Anbau von Getreide als Nahrungsmittel genutzten landwirtschaftlichen Flächen. Obwohl sich die Bevölkerung verdoppelt hat, benötigen wir heute nicht mehr Boden als früher. Dennoch wissen wir, dass trotz dieses unglaublichen Fortschrittes eine zweite grüne Revolution notwendig ist, um das Problem zu lösen. Wir brauchen winterharte Getreidesorten, eine Reduktion bzw. den Wegfall der Bodenbearbeitung, natürlich Dürreresistenz und möglicherweise eine Stickstofffixierung. Nun, Sie denken wahrscheinlich, dass es hierfür technische Lösungen gibt. Auf der Erde leben mittlerweile 7 Milliarden Menschen. Bis 2025 werden es schätzungsweise 8 Milliarden, bis 2050 9 Milliarden sein. Worum geht es also? Wir lösen das Problem technologisch. Unsere Bevölkerung wächst. Der nächste Schlamassel ist da. Was dann? Ah, da ist Licht am Ende des Tunnels. Diese Folie stellt eine Hochrechnung des weltweiten Bevölkerungswachstums für drei unterschiedliche Geburtenziffern dar. Die Zahlen sagen vor allem Eines aus: Bis zum Ende dieses Jahrhundert ist es wahrscheinlich bzw. möglich, dass die Bevölkerungszahlen zunächst einen Höchststand erreichen, dann aber sinken. Warum? Weil wir im Verlauf der letzten 20 Jahre in allen Kulturen, Religionen usw. festgestellt haben, dass die Leute umso weniger Kinder haben, je wohlhabender und stärker verankert im Mittelstand sie sind. Die Gründe hierfür sind vielfältig: Frauenbildung, starker Rückgang der Säuglingssterblichkeit, Late Night-Shows – suchen Sie es sich aus. Jedenfalls sehen wir für das nächste Jahrhundert zum ersten Mal Licht am Ende des Tunnels. Demnach wäre eine nachhaltige Welt möglich, weil sich die Bevölkerungszahlen stabilisieren und de facto möglicherweise sogar sinken. Das wäre jedoch ein Paradigmenwechsel. Bei einer wachsenden Bevölkerung entwickelt sich eine Art Schneeballsystem: Mehr Junge kümmern sich um weniger Alte – gut. Effizienz ist nicht so wichtig. Weniger Junge kümmern sich um mehr Alte? Schwierig. Wir müssen also die Sache mit der Nachhaltigkeit noch einmal überdenken. Lassen Sie uns über die Notwendigkeit reden. Der Grund, warum ich mich entschlossen habe Stanford zu verlassen und Bürokrat zu werden, schauder (lacht), und sogar nach Washington zu gehen, ist folgender. Sie sehen hier die direkt auf der Landoberfläche gemessene Jahresdurchschnittstemperatur. Diese Messungen wurden von verschiedenen Arbeitsgruppen durchgeführt. Die letzte war der Ansicht, dass alle anderen Gruppen die Sache falsch angegangen seien; sie hätten nicht die richtigen Daten analysiert. Am Ende stellte sich jedoch heraus, dass doch die richtigen Daten analysiert worden waren. Das ist also die durchschnittliche Oberflächentemperatur zwischen 1800 und 2010. Hier fallen verschiedene Dinge auf. Zunächst einmal verstehen wir diese Plateauphase, die möglichweise sogar einen Temperaturrückgang darstellt, nicht. In jüngerer Zeit gab es noch eine weitere solche Plateauphase, um die viele Leute großes Aufheben gemacht haben. Die Voraussetzungen für diese Plateauphasen bzw. einen möglichen Rückgang der Temperatur lassen sich derzeit noch nicht vorhersagen, obwohl wir natürlich diese kleinen Ausschläge prognostizieren können. Es wird aber deutlich, dass die Temperatur über einen Zeitraum von 200 Jahren offensichtlich gestiegen und Dreiviertel dieses Anstiegs in den letzten 30 Jahren erfolgt ist. Welche Konsequenzen hat das? Nun, der Meeresspiegel steigt. In den letzten Jahrtausenden hat sich die durchschnittliche Höhe des Meeresspiegels kaum verändert, jetzt sind es mehr als 3 Millimeter pro Jahr. Über die Gründe hierfür gehen die Meinungen auseinander. Schmelzen die Gletscher wirklich ab? Die schlüssigsten Beweise liefern heute Satellitenmessungen. Das ist eine künstlerische Darstellung des GRACE-Satelliten. Er besteht aus zwei die Erde umkreisenden Satelliten, deren Abstand zueinander präzise gemessen wird. Ihre Umlaufbahnen und damit auch ihr Abstand zueinander werden durch kleinste Abweichungen der Schwerkraft gestört. Durch Überwachung dieses Abstandes lassen sich die lokalen Veränderungen der Erdanziehungskraft messen. Als die Satelliten über Grönland flogen, stellte man fest, dass der grönländische Eisschild zwischen 2002 und 2012 tatsächlich kleiner geworden war. Die Messempfindlichkeit ist so gut, dass man sogar Sommer und Winter unterscheiden kann. Doch das Eis wird nicht nur weniger, es schmilzt auch schneller. Das ist eine Tatsache. Die Satelliten können auch Teile der Antarktis und die Himalaya-Hochebene überwachen. Im Himalaya schmilzt das Eis noch nicht, in der Antarktis nur in manchen Gebieten, in anderen dagegen nimmt es zu. Der Punkt ist, dass wir aufgrund der verbesserten Messempfindlichkeit die Lage besser beurteilen können. Es gab auch Hitzewellen. In einer solchen Hitzewelle starben 2003 in Europa mehr als 50.000 Menschen. In einer anderen Hitzewelle in Russland starben 2010 10.000 bis 15.000 Menschen. Von einem einzelnen Geschehnis lässt sich natürlich nicht auf eine grundlegende Veränderung schließen. Es könnte sich einfach um ein einmaliges extremes Ereignis handeln. Das ist also ein berechtigter Punkt. Hier sehen Sie Daten eines Rückversicherers, d.h. einer Versicherung, die Versicherungsunternehmen versichert. Was bedeutet das? Stellen Sie sich vor, Sie sind eine Versicherung und haben nach einem Hochwasser, einem Erdbeben oder einem Hurrikan kein Geld mehr, um die Prämien auszubezahlen. Also schließen Sie eine Versicherung ab, um diese Prämienzahlung zu gewährleisten. Der Rückversicherer ist also von größeren Wetterereignissen und anderen Katastrophen indirekt betroffen. Das ist ein solches Rückversicherungsunternehmen, die Münchner Rück. Erdbeben sind braun dargestellt, über einen Zeitraum von 30 Jahren, 1980 bis 2010 bzw. Anfang 2011. Grün bedeutet meteorologische Ereignisse, Stürme. Hochwasser sind blau dargestellt. Gelb steht für extreme Hitze- oder Kältewellen, Dürre, Waldbrände. Das hier sind die Zahlen für die Vereinigten Staaten; wohlgemerkt die Zahlen, nicht die Verluste. Die Datenlage für die USA ist sehr gut, es gibt zahlreiche Messpunkte. Sie sehen, dass die Zahl solcher Ereignisse in den letzten 30 Jahren während des Temperaturanstieges immer weiter zugenommen hat. Die Versicherungsverluste waren erheblich; versicherte Verluste sind hier dunkelblau, unversicherte hellblau dargestellt. Diese gepunktete Linie ist der Trend: In den Vereinigten Staaten stiegen die Verluste von jährlich 40 Milliarden Dollar auf mehr als 170 Milliarden Dollar pro Jahr. Wir haben es hier also selbst für Washingtoner Verhältnisse nicht mehr mit Peanuts zu tun. Das ist also die Lage. Meiner Ansicht nach verstehen wir die Klimameilen noch viel zu wenig. Das wird sich aber in den nächsten Jahren bzw. Jahrzehnten ändern. Ich bevorzuge jedoch eine epidemiologische Betrachtungsweise des Klimawandels, ähnlich wie damals, als man vermutete, dass Krebs durch Rauchen versursacht wird – nicht jeder Krebs, aber bei Rauchern war die Krebsgefahr höher. auch wenn wir den Zusammenhang molekularbiologisch nicht erklären konnten. Wir mögen heute noch nicht über ein detailliertes Modell der Klimasituation verfügen, doch wir wissen, dass sich im Zusammenhang mit dem Temperaturanstieg etwas verändert. Sie haben vielleicht schon einmal gehört, dass es auch in früheren Erdzeitaltern zu Temperaturanstiegen gekommen ist. Das ist ein sehr langer Zeitraum. Sie sehen hier die Gegenwart, die Daten gehen 600.000 Jahre zurück. Anstelle der Temperatur wurde in diesen Eisbohrkernen aus Grönland und der Antarktis die Menge an Deuterium gemessen. Warum misst man das Verhältnis von Deuterium zu Wasserstoff? Da Deuterium schwerer ist als Wasserstoff, verdunstet es langsamer. Geht das verdunstete und über die Antarktis geleitete Wasser als Schnee nieder, enthält es weniger Deuterium. Die Messung des Deuteriumgehaltes ermöglicht also eine ungefähre Temperaturbestimmung. Wir befinden uns gerade in einer im Vergleich zu den letzten 600.000 Jahren sehr warmen Periode. Weiter zurück haben wir die Eiszeiten. Noch weiter zurück erkennt man eine weitere Warmperiode mit leicht erhöhten Temperaturen. Die Durchschnittstemperatur lag damals schätzungsweise um etwa 2 °C höher. Daten, die ich heute aus Zeitgründen nicht näher erläutern kann, deuten darauf hin, dass auch der Meeresspiegel in dieser kurzen Warmzeit anstieg, und zwar um mindestens 6,6 Meter. Weiterhin lässt sich der Kohlendioxidgehalt bestimmen, ebenso wie die Menge an Stickoxid oder Methan. All diese Verbindungen sind im Gletschereis eingeschlossen. Hier ganz am Ende erkennen Sie diese scharfen senkrechten Linien Auf dieser Skala entsprechen 200 Jahre einer vertikalen Linie. Bitte beachten Sie, dass die heutigen Werte außerhalb dessen liegen, was in den letzten 600.000 Jahren, ja sogar den letzten zwei Millionen Jahren stattgefunden hat. Deswegen sind wir so nervös. Schließlich wird durch die Treibhausgase mehr Wärme gespeichert, und man weiß einfach nicht, welche Folgen das hat. Die Analyse der Eisbohrkerne ähnelt der geologischen Untersuchung von Schichtgesteinen im geologischen Inventar. Der Bohrkern besteht aus verschiedenen Eisschichten, in die man immer tiefer eindringt. Anhand der darin enthaltenen Isotope lässt sich eine Zeitskala aufstellen. Auf diese Weise erhalten wir die Daten. Um sicherzustellen, dass sie auch tatsächlich stimmen, sind verschiedene Kreuzkorrelationen mit anderen Verfahren möglich. Der Kohlendioxidgehalt ist also gestiegen, was jedoch auch natürliche Ursachen haben könnte. Doch woran erkennt man, dass dieser Anstieg menschengemacht ist? Sie sehen hier die CO2-Menge vor etwa 5000 Jahren; das ist der Beginn der industriellen Revolution. Schon ein wenig verdächtig, nicht wahr? Gleichzeitig nahm auch die Weltbevölkerung ab diesem Zeitpunkt zu. Doch das ist noch nicht alles. Wir kennen die ungefähre Menge an fossilen Brennstoffen, die wir seit Beginn des industriellen Zeitalters verbraucht haben. Diese Zahlen stimmen mit dem heutigen CO2-Gehalt in etwa überein. Der CO2-Anstieg scheint also mit der industriellen Revolution begonnen zu haben. Doch es kommt noch besser. Schauen wir uns einmal die Kohlenstoffisotope an. In der oberen Atmosphäre wird infolge von kosmischer Strahlung radioaktiver Kohlenstoff 14 gebildet, der dann in die untere Biosphäre diffundiert und sich dort mit allen organischen und anorganischen Verbindungen mischt. Sie und ich haben also Kohlenstoff 14 in unserem Körper. Stellen Sie sich vor, man würde uns nach unserem Tod in einem exklusiven Mausoleum bestatten, das noch in 10 Millionen Jahren existiert. Was würde passieren? Kohlenstoff 14 hat eine Halbwertszeit von 5700 Jahren. Würde man uns also in einer Million Jahren exhumieren, enthielte unser Körper keinen Kohlenstoff 14 mehr, nur noch Kohlenstoff 12. Würde man uns dann in einem Kraftwerk verbrennen, würde der Kohlenstoff aus unserem Körper wieder in die Atmosphäre gelangen. Bei Freisetzung größerer Mengen an fossilen Brennstoffen sammelt sich Kohlenstoff 12 an, nicht Kohlenstoff 14 Im stabilen Zustand bestünde ein ausgeglichenes Verhältnis zwischen Kohlenstoff 12 und Kohlenstoff 14. So aber sinkt der Kohlenstoff 14-Gehalt, hier grün dargestellt, zunehmend, während der Kohlendioxidgehalt immer weiter steigt. Doch einen Moment – für die 50er Jahren fehlen die Daten. Was ist in dieser Zeit geschehen? Die USA, kurz darauf auch die Sowjetunion, führten Atombombentests in der Atmosphäre durch. Dabei entstand sehr viel Kohlenstoff 14, das weit in die Höhe getragen wurde. Das ist die Nordhalbkugel, hier hellgrün dargestellt. Diese Oszillationen stellen die jährliche Vermischung der oberen Stratosphäre mit der unteren Atmosphäre dar. Faszinierend. Da diese Verzögerung der Zeitspanne entspricht, die bis zur Vermischung der nördlichen mit der südlichen Hemisphäre vergeht, steht uns ein Zeitmaß zur Verfügung. Sie erkennen die Vermischung der Ozeane, die Aufnahme des durch die Wasserstoffbomben entstandenen radioaktiven Kohlenstoffs zunächst auf der Nordhalbkugel, dann auf der Südhalbkugel. Danach scheint sich wieder ein Gleichgewicht einzustellen. Dennoch sinkt der Kohlenstoff 14-Gehalt zu schnell. Schaut man sich die Zahlen an, stellt man fest, dass die Verdünnung von Kohlenstoff 14, wie Sie hier sehen, innerhalb eines Unsicherheitsbereiches von 25% unserem Verbrauch an fossilen Brennstoffen entspricht. Diese Entwicklung trägt also in der Tat den Fingerabdruck des Menschen. Durch uns wurde zumindest der fossile Kohlenstoff wieder ans Tageslicht befördert. Ich möchte nun kurz das Thema Wissenschaft und Innovationen ansprechen. Ich wurde Leiter eines nationalen Labors und Energieminister, weil ich der Ansicht bin, dass Wissenschaft und Technologie bessere Lösungen ermöglichen. Deshalb schnell ein paar Worte zur Energieeffizienz und sauberen Energiequellen. Kühlschränke sind etwas Wunderbares, sie halten unsere Lebensmittel frisch. Bei No-Frost-Kühlschränken wird jedoch heiße Luft eingeblasen, um ein Vereisen des Gefrierfaches zu verhindern. Das bedeutet aber, dass der Kühlschrank erneut gekühlt werden muss, wodurch die Energieeffizienz sinkt. Deshalb führten wir 1975 zunächst im Bundesstaat Kalifornien Standards für Kühlschränke ein, gemäß denen neue Kühlschränke eine gewisse Mindestenergieeffizienz aufweisen mussten. Und natürlich stieg die Effizienz. Im Vergleich zu 1975 sind die heutigen Kühlschränke, was Anschaffung und Betrieb angeht, dreimal so günstig, und das, obwohl sie inzwischen um etwa 22% größer sind – ein durchschnittlicher amerikanischer Kühlschrank ist riesig, er fasst 623 Liter. Mittlerweile stagniert die Kühlschrankgröße übrigens – nicht weil die Amerikaner weniger Appetit haben, sondern wegen der Größe der Küchentür. Man nahm stets an, dass die Kosten eines Kühlschranks bei einer Verbesserung seiner Energieeffizienz steigen würden. Die Anschaffungskosten sind aber in den USA wichtig, da sich nicht jeder den Kauf eines energieeffizienten Kühlschranks, der ein paar hundert Dollar mehr kostet, leisten kann. Aus diesem Grund schaute ich mir mit meiner Arbeitsgruppe die Daten an, um herauszufinden, ob diese Annahme richtig ist. Hier sehen Sie die Kühlschränke vor Einführung der Standards, nach den unterschiedlichen Einführungszeitpunkten in Kalifornien, nach Einführung der landesweiten Standards, insgesamt sechs Kurven. Hier wurden die Standards erstmals eingeführt; das sind Kaufpreis und Betriebskosten, als Graph der Logarithmusfunktion dargestellt. Man könnte annehmen, dass die Betriebskosten nach Einführung der Standards vielleicht bei etwa 4000 oder 4500 Dollar lagen; stattdessen betrugen sie nur 1500 Dollar. Nicht schlecht. Das ist der Kaufpreis des Kühlschranks. Auch hierauf hatten die Standards keinen Einfluss. Daraufhin untersuchten wir andere Haushaltsgeräte. Waschmaschinen – sieh an, durch die Standards sank der Kaufpreis. Wie kam das? Dasselbe Phänomen trat bei Raumklimageräten und zentralen Klimaanlagen auf. Die Einführung der Standards führte zu einer Senkung der Erstkosten, möglicherweise weil die Hersteller zur Umrüstung ihrer Maschinen gezwungen waren, wodurch sie wirtschaftlicher produzieren konnten. Wir kennen den eigentlichen Grund nicht, wir sammeln nur Daten, wir sind Physiker. Doch jetzt zu einem anderen Thema. Elektroautos. Unser Ziel ist die Entwicklung eines Elektroautos für vier oder fünf Personen zu einem Kaufpreis von etwa 20.000 bis 25.000 Dollar bis 2022. Wir tauften es 'EV Everywhere'. Präsident Obama kündigte dieses Projekt an, womit er einen echten Coup für uns landete. Doch wer möchte schon ein Elektroauto kaufen, so ein winziges Ding, das ist nicht gerade spannend. Doch Sie müssen wissen, ich habe einen Freund, der so ein Baby besitzt. Es handelt sich um einen Tesla S – ein ungemein aufregendes Auto. Ich weiß zwar nicht, wer in 4,5 Sekunden von 0 auf 60 beschleunigen möchte, doch mit diesem Auto ist das möglich. Außerdem bewältigt es mit einer einzigen Batterieladung eine Strecke von 480 Kilometern. Im Inneren sehen Sie einen großen Touchscreen mit LED-Anzeige, der wie ein riesiges iPhone, d.h. intuitiv funktioniert und auf Berührung reagiert. Ich bin ein paar Mal mit diesem Auto gefahren. Mein Freund schwärmt davon, er liebt diesen Wagen. Aber er kostet fast 80.000 Dollar. Man muss also den Preis senken. Von der Ausstattung her schneidet er gut ab; er verfügt über mehr Stauraum als ein normales Auto, da er aufgrund dessen, dass sich die Batterie auf der Unterseite befindet, vorne und hinten einen Kofferraum besitzt. Nach Angaben von Tesla kostet die Kilowattstunde bei ihren Batterien etwa 300 Dollar. Unser Ziel im Energieministerium war eine Senkung des Kilowattstundenpreises auf ca. Die Batterien müssen bei mäßig starker Entladung 8000 bis 10.000 Stunden halten. Zudem müssen sie temperaturtolerant sein, damit sie bei hohen und niedrigen Temperaturen einsatzfähig sind. Wenn die Batterien die genannten Merkmale aufweisen und zu diesem Preis hergestellt werden können, die Produktionskosten vielleicht sogar hier dazwischen liegen, dann haben wir unser 25.000 Dollar-Auto mit einer Reichweite von 480 Kilometern, das in sieben Sekunden von 0 auf 60 beschleunigen kann. Diese Entwicklung möchten wir forcieren. Kommen wir nun zum Thema saubere Energiequellen. Zunächst möchte ich mich schwerpunktmäßig mit den erneuerbaren Energien beschäftigen. Sie fragen sich vielleicht, ob überhaupt genügend Energie vorhanden ist, um die Erde so stark aufzuheizen. Die Antwort lautet 'vielleicht'. Derzeit wird die Erde mit einer Energie von 174 Petawatt, also 10^12 Watt erwärmt. Ein Großteil davon wird von den Wolken, der Atmosphäre und dem Boden reflektiert, doch 89 Petawatt werden absorbiert. Wieviel ist das im Vergleich zu dem, was wir verbrauchen? Hier sehen Sie unseren Kilowattstundenverbrauch pro Jahr. Das ist die Energiemenge, die jährlich absorbiert wird, das ist unser Verbrauch. Wir verbrauchen also nur das 2x10^-4-Fache der absorbierten Menge. Daher verfügen wir über einen gewissen Handlungsspielraum für die Verbesserung der Situation. Natürlich können wir noch nicht einmal annähernd ein Zehntel dieser Energie nutzen, die Frage ist vielmehr, ob wir ein Zehntel von 1% der Energie nutzen können. Wie sieht es mit Kraftstoffen aus? Batterien – 480 Kilometer. aber die Reichweite verbessert sich aktuell spektakulär. Ich möchte auch eine Lanze für den Flüssigkraftstoff brechen. Ein mit herkömmlichen Batterien betriebenes Flugzeug sehe ich nämlich in absehbarer Zukunft nicht. Schaut man sich die Energiedichte an, d.h. die Energiemenge pro Volumen bzw. Gewicht stehen diese chemischen Kraftstoffe ganz oben: Diesel, Benzin und Körperfett. Kerosin und Ethanol weisen eine erheblich niedrigere Energiedichte auf; die von Methanol ist sogar noch geringer. Und die Lithiumionenbatterien? Sie liegen so nahe bei Null, dass man sie kaum sieht. Die Energiedichte der heutigen Lithiumionenbatterien ist also um die anderthalbfache Größenordnung geringer. Die Batterien müssen aber gar nicht um eine ganze Größenordnung effizienter werden, sondern nur um den Faktor vier. Dann hat man eine Reichweite von 480/640 Kilometern, weil der Motor sehr viel kleiner und damit erheblich leistungsstärker ist. Der Abstand ist nicht so groß. Für Flugzeuge braucht man aber diese Kraftstoffe. Ich möchte kurz ein wenig abschweifen, und da ich der Professor bin und Sie die Studenten, gebe ich Ihnen ein Rätsel auf. Was haben eine Boeing 777 und eine Pfuhlschnepfe gemeinsam? Was ist eine Pfuhlschnepfe? Ein Vogel, etwa so groß. Er ist ein wenig seltsam: Er verbringt den 'Sommer' in Alaska und fliegt dann zum Jahreszeitenwechsel nach Neuseeland. Meistens macht er in China Pause, um aufzutanken, doch manchmal fliegt er auch nonstop von Alaska nach Neuseeland. Sobald er erst einmal losgeflogen ist, schaltet er mehr oder weniger auf Autopilot. Er frisst nicht, er tut nichts dergleichen. Sowohl dieser Vogel als auch die Boeing 777 können also nach dem Start nonstop 11.000 Kilometer fliegen. Zu Beginn ihres Fluges macht der Treibstoff die Hälfte ihres Gewichts aus. Bei der Landung ist der Vogel dann natürlich abgemagert. Die Energiedichte von Körperfett entspricht also der von Flugzeugkraftstoff. Eine tolle Energiequelle – außer man möchte kein Körperfett. Ich überspringe diese Terpen-Geschichte, weil mir die Zeit davonläuft. Es geht dabei um ungewöhnliche Biokraftstoffe. Kiefern erzeugen eine Verbindung namens Terpen, die bezüglich der Oxidationsstadien von Kohlenstoff sehr stark dem Benzin ähnelt und damit Methan und Kohlenwasserstoffen weit überlegen ist. Unsere Idee war es, diese Kiefern ähnlich wie Ahornbäume anzuzapfen und sie genetisch so zu modifizieren, dass die Terpenproduktion um bis zu einer Größenordnung zunimmt. Dieses Pilotprojekt wird von der innovativen Förderorganisation RPE finanziert. Die aus bereits zum Zwecke der Holzgewinnung angepflanzten Bäumen kontinuierlich extrahierte benzinähnliche Verbindung könnte als Kraftstoff für Flugzeuge und Autos dienen. Auf diese Weise ließe sich der Boden auf neuartige Weise nutzen. Darüber hinaus arbeiten wir intensiv an Systemen zur Übertragung und Speicherung von Energie. Insbesondere bei der Energieübertragung sind für einen wesentlich effizienteren Betrieb neue elektronische Systeme erforderlich, um die Spannung auf eine Million V DC zu erhöhen. Diese DC-Leistung lässt sich mit einem Energieverlust von 5% über 1600 Kilometer durch Starkstromleitungen übertragen. In China ist dies bereits Realität. Das bedeutet also, dass man erneuerbare Energie ohne wesentlichen Energieverlust über 1600 Kilometer transportieren kann. Das Herauf- und Herunterregeln der Spannung in diesen DC-Leitungen ist jedoch sehr teuer. Wir wollten daher elektronische Systeme mit höheren Frequenzen als den heute üblichen 50 oder 60 Kilohertz entwickeln. Sie halten das vielleicht für einen Traum, doch auf der letzten RPE-Tagung stellte eine kleine Firma einen Prototyp dieses Stromwandlers vor, der einen über 30.000 Kilogramm schweren Transformator ersetzt. Er kann von einer Person hochgehoben und in den Kofferraum eines Wagens gelegt oder in einem Koffer transportiert werden. Die Leistung ist dabei die gleiche. Wenn dieses elektronische Bauteil auf den Markt kommt, wird das eine große Sache, genau wie die Batterien. Solarenergie. Die Kosten für Solarenergie sind drastisch gefallen, von 8 Dollar für eine komplett installierte gewerbliche Solaranlage im Jahr 2004 auf weniger als 4 Dollar im Jahr 2010. Das Ziel des Energieministeriums war eine Senkung auf 1 Dollar pro Watt – die Lichtleistung wird unter anderem in Watt gemessen. Könnte das Solarmodul statt 1,70 Dollar im Jahr 2004 in Zukunft vielleicht nur noch 40 Cent kosten? Das ist keineswegs völlig aus der Luft gegriffen, aktuell liegt der Spotpreis bereits bei 70 Cent. Problematisch sind bei der Solarenergie also die anderen Aspekte. Das Solarmodul selbst und bald auch die Elektronik machen nur die Hälfte der Kosten eines Solarparks aus. Technologisch ist hier noch viel Platz nach oben. Normalerweise gießt man hochgereinigtes Silizium zu Barren, sägt diese in Blöcke und danach mittels einer sehr feinen Diamantseilsäge in Wafer einer Stärke von vielleicht 0,15 Millimeter. Anschließend werden diese Wafer durch Dotierung in Solarzellen umgewandelt. RPE und das Energieministerium finanzieren aktuell den innovativen Ansatz eines neuen Start-up-Unternehmens. Er sieht folgendermaßen aus: Wenn Sie eine Erdbeere in weiße Schokolade tauchen, können Sie nach dem Herausziehen entscheiden, wie viel Schokolade an der Erdbeere hängenbleiben soll. Entsprechend kann man ein Kohlenstoffsubstrat in geschmolzenes Silizium tauchen; nimmt man das Substrat heraus, tropft das Silizium ab. Auf diese Weise lassen sich Siliziumstücke einer Stärke von 30 Mikrometer anstelle von 150 Mikrometer herstellen. Warum wollen wir das? Die Hälfte der Kosten des Solarmoduls gehen auf das Konto des Siliziums; diese Kosten sind uneinbringlich verloren. Auf den ersten Blick könnte dieses Verfahren die Kosten um ein Viertel senken. Außerdem ließe sich damit die Effizienz der Solarenergieumwandlung, d.h. die Qualität dieser Zellen vergleichen. Das wäre eine spannende Sache. Und noch etwas: In Deutschland kostet die Installation eines Sonnenkollektors auf dem Dach etwa 2,50 Dollar, in den USA 6 Dollar pro Watt. Was ist der Grund für diesen Unterschied? Hängt er mit den Lohnkosten zusammen? Ich vermute, es geht eher um andere Aufwendungen, vor allem um die so genannten weichen Kosten, d.h. Lizenz- und Prüfgebühren etc. existiert eine solche Obergrenze für die Bürokratie nicht.' Unsere Bemühungen konzentrieren sich daher aktuell in erster Linie auf die Senkung der im Zusammenhang mit der Bürokratie anfallenden weichen Kosten in verschiedenen amerikanischen Städten und Bundesstaaten. Ich werde auf diesen Aspekt nicht näher eingehen, doch eine Entwicklung zeichnet sich jetzt bereits ab: Wenn Sie infolge der enorm kostengünstigen Speicherung von Solarenergie Sonnenkollektoren auf Ihrem Dach installieren und sich eine Batterie für zuhause anschaffen, könnten Sie urplötzlich zu 80% vom Stromnetz unabhängig sein. Das wäre ziemlich revolutionär. Es wäre möglicherweise sogar so revolutionär, dass Energieversorger ihre Kunden verlieren könnten. Aus diesem Grund werden sie langsam nervös und fangen an, diese Technik zu bekämpfen, zumindest in den USA. Doch es gibt eine Lösung. Die Energieversorger werden Eigentümer der Solarmodule und Batterien und sind für ihre Installation zuständig. Diese Idee ist nicht neu; das alte Telefonsystem funktionierte so. Der Telefongesellschaft gehörte das Telefon, sie stellte seine Funktionstüchtigkeit sicher und war für den Service verantwortlich. Auf diese Weise wäre eine Stromversorgung zu einem erheblich günstigeren Preis möglich. Wie kann das sein? Nun, schauen wir uns an, welchen Nutzen Sie davon haben. Mit der Batterie in Ihrem Haus sind Sie zumindest für ein paar Tage gegen Stromausfälle gefeit. Was hat der Energieversorger davon? Er installiert eine Batterie bei Ihnen zuhause in einem geschützten Umfeld, wo sie nicht der Witterung ausgesetzt ist. Außerdem möchte er schlussendlich seine Batterien verkaufen. Und er verfügt über standardisierte Bauteile. Sie gehören ihm, stellen also in einer solchen Wachstumsbranche eine Investition dar. Alle diese wirklich ambitionierten Projekte brachten wir im Energieministerium auf den Weg. Ich möchte gerne einen Satz von Michelangelo zitieren, den ich auch meinen Studenten und Postdocs in den letzten 25 Jahren immer wieder gesagt habe: sondern darin, dass wir sie zu niedrig stecken und nicht über sie hinauswachsen.’ Denken Sie daran: Scheitern, schnell scheitern, weitermachen – aber sich immer hohe Ziele stecken. Während meiner Tätigkeit als Energieminister fand ich bestimmte Dinge in der Politik äußerst unangenehm. Die Berichterstattung war zuweilen sehr unfair, wir wurden oftmals heftig kritisiert. Dann, sechs oder sieben Tage nachdem ich meinen Rücktritt als Energieminister bekanntgegeben hatte, stieß ich auf diesen Zeitungsartikel. Ich möchte Ihnen einige Zeilen daraus vorlesen: den er am Abend zuvor während einer ausgelassenen Kneipentour in D.C. kennengelernt hatte. Nicht einmal der Name des Herstellers war ihm erinnerlich. Wie bekannt wurde, bezeichnete Chu seine Begegnung mit dem Solarrezeptor aus kristallinem Silizium als denjenigen Seitensprung, den er am meisten bereue, seit 2009 eine längere Affäre mit einer 27 Meter hohen Windkraftanlage beinahe seine Ehe beendet hatte.’ Als ich am nächsten Morgen zur Arbeit ging, meinte mein Berater in öffentlichen Angelegenheiten, dass wir darauf reagieren sollten. Ich sagte ok, krempelte die Ärmel hoch, machte mich ans Werk und arbeitete bis Mittag eine Pressemitteilung aus. dass meine Entscheidung gegen eine zweite Legislaturperiode als Energieminister in keinerlei Zusammenhang mit den in der dieswöchigen Ausgabe des Onion erhobenen Anschuldigungen steht. Ich möchte die Vorwürfe im Einzelnen weder bestätigen noch dementieren, betone aber, dass saubere erneuerbare Solarenergie zunehmend Arbeitsplätze in den USA schafft und immer kostengünstiger wird. Es ist also keine Überraschung, dass sich viele Amerikaner in diese Technologie verlieben.’ Den Satzteil ‘ungeachtet ihrer sexuellen Vorlieben’ musste ich leider streichen. Sie sehen ziemlich nervös aus. Ich bitte, wenn auch nicht um Erlaubnis, so doch um Verzeihung. Meiner Ansicht nach sind wir moralisch dafür verantwortlich, uns mit dem Klimawandel auseinanderzusetzen, denn seine Opfer werden diejenigen sein, die völlig unschuldig an diesem Problem sind, nämlich die Ärmsten der Welt und die, die noch nicht geboren worden sind. Es gibt ein altes Indianersprichwort: ‘Wir erben das Land nicht von unseren Vorfahren, sondern borgen es von unseren Kindern.’ Hoffentlich verzeiht er mir – ich schaue ihn nicht an – denn ich werde noch einen kleinen Film zeigen. Er wurde von der Voyager 1 aufgenommen, die jetzt endgültig den Einflussbereich des Sonnenwindes verlässt. Die in den 70er Jahren gestartete Raumsonde sollte an den Planeten vorbeifliegen und sie erforschen. Als sie die Umlaufbahn des Pluto verließ, bat Carl Sagan die NASA-Mitarbeiter, die Kameras nach hinten auf die Erde zu richten. Er wollte wissen, wie die Erde aus der Entfernung von Pluto aussieht. Hier ist sein Kommentar: Aus dieser Entfernung betrachtet scheint die Erde nicht von besonderem Interesse zu sein. Für uns Menschen ist das jedoch anders. Denken wir doch einmal über diesen Punkt nach. Das ist hier, unser Zuhause, das sind wir. Jeder Mensch, den wir lieben, den wir kennen, von dem wir jemals gehört haben, jeder Mensch, den es je gegeben hat, lebte hier, auf diesem Punkt. All unsere Freude und unser Leid, tausende von überzeugten Religionen, Ideologien und Wirtschaftstheorien, jeder Jäger und Sammler, jeder Held oder Feigling, jeder Schöpfer oder Zerstörer einer Zivilisation, jeder König und Bauer, jedes junge Liebespaar, jede Mutter und jeder Vater, jedes erwartungsfrohe Kind, jeder Erfinder und Entdecker, jeder Moralapostel, jeder korrupte Politiker, jeder Superstar, jeder Staatsführer, jeder Heilige und jeder Sünder in der Geschichte der Menschheit lebte hier Die Erde ist eine sehr kleine Bühne in einer riesigen kosmischen Arena. Denken wir nur an die Ströme von Blut, die all die Generäle und Herrscher vergossen haben, um für kurze Zeit ruhmvoll und triumphierend herrschen zu können – über einen Bruchteil eines Punktes im All. Denken wir an die endlosen Grausamkeiten, welche die Bewohner einer Region dieses Pixels den kaum von ihnen zu unterscheidenden Bewohnern einer anderen Region angetan haben. Wie oft sie sich missverstehen, wie sehr sie darauf aus sind, einander zu töten, wie leidenschaftlich sie einander hassen! Unser eitles Gehabe, unsere eingebildete Wichtigkeit, der Wahn, dass wir im Universum einen besonderen Platz einnehmen Unser Planet ist ein einsamer Fleck in der großen ihn umhüllenden kosmischen Dunkelheit. Wir sind unbedeutend in dieser unermesslichen Weite, und nichts weist darauf hin, dass irgendjemand oder irgendetwas von irgendwoher kommen wird, um uns vor uns selbst zu schützen. Nach allem, was wir bisher wissen, ist die Erde die einzige Welt, auf der es Leben gibt. Zumindest in der näheren Zukunft existiert kein anderer Ort im Universum, wohin die Menschheit auswandern könnte. Ihn besuchen, ja. Sich dort niederlassen, noch nicht. Die Erde ist der Ort, an dem wir uns bewähren müssen – ob wir wollen oder nicht. Es heißt, dass die Beschäftigung mit der Astronomie demütig macht und den Charakter formt. Dieses von weit her aufgenommene Bild unserer winzigen Welt ist vielleicht das beste Beispiel dafür, wie töricht unsere Selbstgefälligkeit ist. Für mich unterstreicht es unsere Verantwortung, freundlicher miteinander umzugehen und diesen blassblauen Punkt im All zu bewahren und wertzuschätzen Vielen Dank.

Steven Chu
The Energy and Climate Change Challenges and Opportunities
(00:33:25 - 00:35:03)

 

Besides solar energy, other virtually inexhaustible energy sources, such as wind or water, biofuels made from agricultural commodities as well as nuclear fission (and in the future maybe fusion) are available to us, each with their individual advantages or disadvantages. Robert Laughlin presented the 2012 Lindau audience with a surprisingly simple method to predict which energy sources will turn out to be most economically viable: a good look at Japan. Lacking own fossil resources, Japan is, to a certain degree anticipating a global shortage of fossil fuels, so Laughlin:


Panel Discussion (2012) - Panel Discussion on Mainau Island on the topic of the future of energy supply and storage.

Introduction: Dear Nobel laureates and young researchers, Minister Bauer, ladies and gentlemen, dear panellists. Welcome to the castle’s garden. After a week of discussions about science, your life and the laureate’s lives within science, among cultures and among generations we will today connect science with society even more than we have under the last week. So, today we will hear a discussion about energy, which without doubt is a very important issue to all of us within science and society. It will be a very interesting discussion and I can only invite you and Geoffrey will probably repeat that to engage yourself in the discussion. So after that discussion the next thing will be the lunch break. Geoffrey will also remind you of that later on. And I am very looking forward to seeing all of you at 3.30 in the castle’s court yard for the official farewell ceremony. So now I hand over the role to Geoffrey Carr who is moderator for today’s panel discussion. And I wish us all a very interesting coming 90 minutes. Welcome. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you Count, thank you Countess. Good morning everyone, good morning laureates, panellists, princes, potentates, minsters, ladies and gentleman. Welcome to Mainau. I am Geoffrey Carr; I’m science editor of the Economist which is a weekly news magazine for those of you who have never come across it if there are such people. It’s my pleasure to be the moderator of this panel discussion of the 62nd Nobel Laureate Meeting. They have been kind enough to invite me back for 4 years now. I don’t know how much longer I can keep going but I will do it as long as they keep inviting me, it’s a great time, it’s great fun. And it’s exciting times to be a physicist as well. So it’s a wonderful coincidence, maybe not entirely a coincidence from what I hear that this meeting on physics coincided with the announcement of the Higgs boson. Or at least that a particle which might possibly, may be a little bit be the Higgs boson when we finish doing the measurements. I normally come to the whole meeting but my day job kept me in London unfortunately because I had to persuade our editor, who is in many ways estimable man, but doesn’t know much about physics that this was important enough to put on the cover of our magazine. Which we have done. So we have a nice big juicy science story this week, which is good. And it’s unfortunate that it meant that I’ve missed the meeting and missed all the excitement here. I’ve also missed the energy discussions. So if I repeat anything that’s been said before my apologies. It could be argued that energy is the most pressing problem that’s facing mankind at the moment. Because if you have enough energy and it’s cheap enough every other problem is tractable. Food is tractable, water is tractable, transport is tractable, manufacturing is tractable, dealing with pollution is tractable. All of these things can be done with enough cheap energy. If we don’t have enough cheap energy it’s back to the caves for a lot of us I’m afraid. We won’t be able to keep the industrial civilisation going. So it is a crucial, crucial issue. At the moment we rely on fossil fuels. There’s a lot of fossil fuel around. So we’re not in immediate danger of running out. But it’s not a great position to be to rely on one energy source. And it’s not a great position for 2 reasons. One is the problem of carbon dioxide and climate change, which I’ve been asked to steer clear of at this meeting, because we want to discuss the technology of alternative energies. But it is an important issue nevertheless. And so it probably will come up in the discussions later. The other thing is that fossil fuels will eventually run out. They won’t run out immediately but we should be thinking about replacing them. And also if you can get the technology right, I mean we’re always looking for cheaper energy sources, the cost of fossil fuel is not going to go down. It’s most unlikely. I mean we’ve seen some new reserves brought on in the form of shale gas which has brought the price of methane down in the short term. But that won’t last forever. The extraction costs are unlikely to go... We should be looking for new technologies that can generate power, extract power from the environment, generate power more and more efficiently and more cheaply. And more stably for the environment as well. There is no shortage of energy around though even apart from fossil fuels. The sums, I did the sums last night. I think they’re right even though I was a bit tired. I reckon that the sun delivers to earth in just over an hour as much energy as the human race consumes every year. So if you wanted to use solar power there’s a plentiful supply of it. For those who distrust solar energy for various reasons there’s a lot of fissionable material in the earth’s crust that can be mined. There’s uranium and there’s also, as I'm sure we’ll hear later, thorium which is in greater abundance although we don’t have yet seriously working technology to use it. There’s a lot of heat in the earth as well and this could be tapped using geothermal power. And for the really brave or possibly foolhardy there’s the idea of fusion, which we’ll also come to later. I did a quick count. There’s about a dozen alternative technologies to providing, to burning fossil fuels to generate electricity and transport. The problem is they all have disadvantages because if they didn’t have disadvantages we’d use them already. I mean they would have just been brought in by economics. So we’re here to discuss the alternatives, debate which of them should be adopted. And we have 4 eminent people in the field to do it. 2 of them are old lags. At least they’re old lags as far as I’m concerned. I’ve had them on the panel before. One of them is Carlo Rubbia here. He is a laureate, 1984 physics. He was director-general of CERN. He was responsible for discovering the W and Z bosons, which transmit the weak nuclear force, which is sort of relevant to this week’s news. We have Georg Schütte; he is state secretary in the Ministry of Education and Research here in Germany. His ministry is responsible for, partly responsible for implementing Germany’s energy strategy, which, I read, has the modest goal of eliminating nuclear power by 2022, 10 years’ time, and doubling the use of renewable energy from 17% to 35% of the total by the end of this decade. Is that correct? Yes, so that should be easy. And the other 2 are newcomers as far as I know. One of them is Robert Laughlin, who was laureate in 1998, physics again. Published a book called “Power in the Future” with the inevitable subtitle which is longer than the title: So perhaps we don’t need the discussion after all. It’s all in the book. He’s backing a mixture of nuclear, I believe, a mixture of nuclear power and solar thermal generation, which is a form of solar power that’s less familiar perhaps. It doesn’t use the solar cells that you put on your roof but uses the sun’s heat directly to heat up fluids so it makes steam and drives turbines. But it also means you can store the heat over night which deals with part of the problem of the sun going down every evening. And he’s also interested in using waste materials and algae to produce bio fuels. And our last member is Martin Keilhacker. He is head of the working group on energy at the German Physical Society. And he was once director of the Joint European Torus, which was the first European attempt to do nuclear fusion. So as I understand it he sees fusion power as the ultimate solution. So the plan is this. I’ll give all the panellists about 10 minutes to ramble on about what they’d like to do. Much more than 10 minutes and I shall stop them and call the next person because the main point of this morning’s festivities is that you should join the discussion. There are 2 microphones. Start lining up towards the end of the panel discussion if you have questions to ask and I hope you do. And we will keep going either until the questions run out or until it’s lunch time. Thank you very much. Applause. Sorry, I should just say Dr. Schütte will be the first of the discussants. I’d like him to explain how he’s going to plug this gap that will be introduced when they take all the nuclear power stations away. Whether he will, we’ll find out. Georg Schütte: So, if what we internationally now call energiewende... It’s a German term that made inroads into international parlour now if you want to change our energy system, So we have to face a tremendous challenge. It is a challenge which was triggered through a continuous change of public opinion in the past 30 to 40 years in Germany, one has to admit. And we had to face a new reality after the tragic events in Japan. And so politicians and various groups of society got together to discuss for a longer period of time how we were going to organise our energy system in the future. And we decided to phase out nuclear energy in the next 10 years. We decided to increase the use or take advantage of opportunities to use renewable energies so that by 2050 80% of the German electricity consumption will come from renewable sources. And we tried to do this while at the same time taking into account that we have to do it in a climate neutral way. As a matter of fact we want to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 also by 80% as compared to the early 1990’s. So, that is an ambitious goal and we have made several steps in between. We want to increase the use of renewable energies and we have already reached a level of 20%. So we already use more renewable energies than we take advantage of nuclear energy at this point in time. And I am fairly optimistic that we will be able to increase the use of renewables. Nuclear energy already before Fukushima was labelled in Germany as an interim technology on a way to a more renewable future. Since it was an interim technology, we now have to replace nuclear energy to some extent by fossil energy and to a large extent this will be gas. So we face a formidable challenge.We have to increase the use of renewable energy. We have to build the right distribution networks in Germany to do this. We have to build new power plants substituting nuclear power plants by other sources of power. And we have to increase storage capacity because renewable energy sources do require a large amount of storage capacity. And this is the challenge. A further challenge is that one has to take all these factors into account. So we talk about a systemic approach to rebuilding the energy system in Germany. And that we cannot do without the support of the technicians and scientists and researchers. What we learned however in the past 30 years as well is that scientific ideas which are standing alone face the risk of not getting the type of societal support that is necessary to build such an infrastructure which affects everybody in a given country. So a systemic approach also has to take into account that one has to find acceptance for technologies in a broad population. And this is what we do in Germany. Do we have a blueprint for this? No. This is a longer term process. We talk about a process of 4 decades at least. And we do this step by step. And this means that one needs experts group. That one needs advice from the research community. We need advice from the engineering communities. And we have to talk to the people, who as a matter of fact also use and take advantage of renewable energy technology and who have to agree that distribution networks go through their back yard. They have to agree that storage capacities will be built in their vicinity. And that is the challenge we face in Germany. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. I would have one question. One can debate... Well, it’s sensible to build nuclear power stations, absolutely. There are arguments on both sides. Once you’ve built it, once it’s a piece of operating plant, they’re relatively cheap to run. Your power stations, you know some of them have got a bit elderly but there’s still quite a lot that have got decades of life in them. Retiring a piece of plant that is useful is quite an expensive thing to do. Germany is not an earth quake zone. Japan is not going to happen here. Is it actually a sensible...? It may be perfectly sensible to say we will build no more nuclear power stations. Is it actually sensible to retire the existing ones? Georg Schütte: From the point of view of a given plant and the economic basis of running that plant it might not be economically sensible. Then the next step of deliberation is: What kind of cost do we take into account? Is it just the operating cost of the plant? Do we take into account dismantling? Do we take into account how we treat nuclear waste? So we might get a different type of bill at the very end. The overall question is: Do we find public acceptance for a technology of this sort? And in Germany the reality is no. And this is a reality and we have to take that type of reality into account. Geoffrey Carr: That's fair enough but you can accept public opinion, I don’t know, I’m not an expert on German politics obviously. I’ve got enough difficulty with Britain’s. But sometimes there are things up with which the people will not put. Sometimes there are things which they might think they wouldn’t put up with but when you actually explain the reality they’ll change their mind. And I wonder... As you said I think the short term alternative to using nuclear power, at least partly, is to plug the gap with fossil fuels. Okay, you can use gas which is the least damaging of them but, yeah, nevertheless you are pumping more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere if you do that. It’s not... A nuclear power station in an earthquake free zone is not a source of pollution. It is perhaps a source of fear but fear can be overcome. Georg Schütte: Right, we have had more than 50 years since the late 1960’s in order to explain this and we have not been so successful. Look at Austria. They built a nuclear power plant and they didn’t even start to run it. So they seem to have a similar problem and it cannot be... My opinion is that this is a sort of social reality which we also have to take into account. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. Carlo, I think you can be next. Carlo Rubbia: Yes, let me start with some general considerations. I’d like to discuss a little bit about possible developments for the future on which we are working. I shouldn’t forget this is a physics meeting and physics is our subject. Now, let me first of all say one thing: that we are entering a new epoch. Man generated epoch called Anthropocene. I learned the word Anthropocene from Paul Crutzen for the first time. I don’t know whether he’s the one invented the name but certainly I learned from him. And these are very remarkable situations. We are in front of a situation which every year 90 million new people are coming on this earth. There is a real population explosion. Now 7 billion people which we’ve just reached are an incredible number. Let me simply tell you that it corresponds to a continuous line of individuals every 20 metres. And if you put one after the other, all of us, we reach the distance from earth to the sun. And let me remind you also that the sun... The light of the sun takes 8 minutes to travel from the sun to the earth. We have over the history of earth, over the few hundred thousand years in which mankind existed, 100 billion humans. We are on the threshold of a future with unprecedented environmental risks. The combined effect of climate change, resource scarcity and also biodiversity and ecosystem resilience, the time of increased demand poses a real threat to humanity welfare. Such a future generates an unacceptable risk that will undermine the resilience of the planet and its inhabitants. In this epoch there is an unacceptable risk that human pressure on the planet should it continue on a business as usual trajectory will trigger abrupt and irreversible changes with catastrophic outcomes for human society and life as we know it. A transition to a safe and prosperous future is possible but we are running out of time. And to succeed would require the full use of humanities extraordinary capacity for innovation and creativity within new economic development pathways that are fully integrated with the precepts of global sustainability. Worldwide cooperation will be necessary engaging science and society, guided by the principle of responsibly and equity. Real political leadership is required in order to tackle the systemic issues. The expanding population demands more and more food, water and energy, requires a greater consumption of mineral resources and exerts increasing pressure on the environment. In order to be ultimately successful, in order to avoid irreversible changes with possible catastrophic outcome for humanity, all human capacities for innovation and creativity will have to be created, integrated within the framework, a new framework of global sustainability. So far the earth has a remarkable capacity to buffer the expansion of human activities allowing for continuing economic growth in spite of serious ecological decline. However, the growing impact of unsustainable pattern and production consumption combined with a growing population mean that business as usual trajectory or activity would no longer yield the historic pattern of economic growth. To this effect, I would like to spend a few examples on how science and technology can in fact help us in making an acceptable and better future. These alternative studies are studies that we are performing, together with my colleagues... I perform them together with my colleagues at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam Germany, we are now presently working. And I would like to spend a few minutes on 2 subjects which seem to me of considerable importance. One as to the question of how can you get fossils without Co2 emissions. The current worldwide energy supply is based mainly on availability of fossil fuels. Although there is much talk of the exhaustibility of resources, they will remain indispensible in the decades to come. But in addition to the development of renewable energy sources in consideration of climatic changes, a more efficient and more friendly utilisation of fossil fuels has become an urgent necessity. The transformation of exiting energy technology into low emission innovative solution of fossils will contribute to a significant reduction of Co2, is one of the most important scientific and technological challenges of our time. Amongst the various fossils, natural gas is the one with the smallest Co2 emissions. When investigated with IASS and with KIT, the scientific and technical aspect of a different and highly innovative method which has the remarkable alternative of producing the combustion with zero Co2 emissions. It’s called the spontaneous internal dissociation of natural gas, CH4, into hydrogen and black carbon. It is so called methane cracking or methane decarbonisation. And it’s based on the splitting of the methane molecule into its atomic components. Hydrogen becomes the final source with about 80% of the energy. The released solid carbon in the form of carbon black can be removed mechanically and eventually used in the manufacture of tyres, batteries and even of fuel. The practical implementation of a Co2 free technology for the production of hydrogen from methane, if successful, will have a significant impact in many different sectors. Producing fossil hydrogen without Co2 emissions will also open the way to recombine the vast amount already accumulated of Co2 waste with hydrogen in order to produce a natural gas based liquid fuel in replace with oil. Co2 and hydrogen can combine to produce methanol and water, a liquid substitute to gasoline in all distant transport application. If in the concentrated source, it could be indefinitely recycled and transform the Co2 from a liability to an asset. Methanol is a commercial chemical. Methanol is an excellent fuel in its own right. It can be blended with gasoline or used in a methanol fuel cell producing electricity directly combined with air. Methanol can be converted into ethylene, the key material to provide hydrocarbon fuels and their products. Therefore it would be able to replace oil, both as a fuel and as a chemical raw material, without costly new infrastructure and without Co2 emissions. It would provide a feasible and safe way to store energy. Making available a convenient liquid fuel and provide mankind with unlimited source of hydrocarbon mitigating the danger of global warming. Especially in the second phase when it may become possible to produce hydrogen from solar energy. A second problem which I would like to mention is a new interesting development. It’s the question of transporting electricity at very long distances as was already pointed out by my previous speaker. And on the planet there are plenty of potential energy sources for renewable energy. For instance solar energy is about 100,000 times today’s primary energy. Wind and hydro are also vastly available. But renewable energies are generally situated in suitably chosen areas of substantial size which are often located far away from densely populated area. In the North Sea there is the opportunity of building offshore turbines on a 60,000 square kilometre area which can provide electric energy for the entire European Union. In the Sun Belt the electric energy produced by a concentrated solar power system with the size like Lake Nasser equals the total Middle East oil production. However, all this renewable energy primary use electricity with respect to the one of heat from fossils. An additional reason for connecting to great distance is very high power electricity is related to the intrinsic variability of wind and solar which will also be discussed. The worldwide deployment to this new form of energy like wind, geothermal and solar cannot occur without renewed investment in the transmission infrastructures. New connection should be built to link areas with vast potential to generate clean energy to the areas which have a convenient demand of electric power. Superconductors, because of the absent ohmic resistance, have the property of exactly zero electric losses. The dominant losses are then the only static thermal losses to the cryostat while they’re independent of the amount of current transported. In 1986 the biggest breakthrough has been the discovery of high temperature superconductivity by Nobel laureate Bednorz and Müller. Because of their critical temperature well above the one of cheap, readily available liquid helium cooling, this new material has changed impact of superconductivity. In January 2001 the committee has been again astonished by the sudden announcement of Akimitsu and a report on superconductivity at 40 Kelvin by magnesium diboride. This surprisingly simple and cheap compound can be readily manufactured into wires and it is based on precursors which are very abundant and cheaper than any other competing superconductor. Magnesium diboride is therefore a major new step in the development in these applications. Transporting electricity a distance of over several thousand kilometres compared to the one of existing pipelines of natural gas or oil may become possible with very modest cryogenic losses and for very high electric powers. These cables are in the form of very narrow tubes buried underground in a very modest, about 30 centimetre diameters. The practicalisation of superconducting line has several elements in common with established practice to natural gas pipelines. The cable is under the ground and periodic cooling installations located on the surface at every several hundred kilometres. They are both cross country transmission systems with many features associated with change in elevation, temperature variation and other similar situation. In the case of natural gas pipeline this problem has been successfully solved and they are also expected to be solved also for the superconducting lines. The longest natural gas pipeline is between Russia and China and is about 5,200 miles, 8,400 kilometres. Similar distance may become possible for the energy transport of comparable energy powers. To conclude I believe there are a lot of very beautiful new ideas which the scientific community is developing. And these are absolutely necessary in order to make sure that we have in front of us a future which is acceptable and possible and satisfactory for all of us in this beautiful world. Thank you very much. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Robert Laughlin, give us your pearls of wisdom. Robert Laughlin: Well Carlo, you took all my time. This is a joke of course. We have talked about this meeting before we went on the air here. And one of the things we want is to encourage questions out of the audience. So I’ll do my best to be short and also to be a little provocative. One of the things that’s come out already is that we have an imminent problem, not just with climate but with the actual energy supplies. And this is the thing I prefer myself to focus on because I think it’s a more immediate problem. Now the idea has also come out in these discussions that the technical means, technical means for really attacking the problem certainly exist. We know for sure that the sun is ample for solving the problem. And we know that all physicists tend to like the sun for this reason. Now, and we also know about the tradeoffs with nuclear energy. Now, I want to throw a couple of controversial matters out with the hope that we’ll get attacked and then we can talk about them. So first the sun. Just before I came to this meeting I checked the BP statistical review of energy for this year to check that sure enough in the world the total fraction of alternate energy, meaning wind and sun, wind, sun and bio, is 1.6% of the total energy budget. Of that 1.6% almost all of it is wind. The sun is a negligible fraction of the world energy budget now. So how is this possible when the sun is so ample? Well, there’s a cost reality. And if we are going to be technical people that really solve the problem, we have to attack not only the possibilities of technical means but also the costs. So the sun has a cost problem we know. And one of our tasks is to get that cost problem under control before disaster hits. Now the other... So it’s cost, so I want to bring up the issue of costs even though I’m a scientist. Now the second thing has to do with the famous vote in Germany to disassemble nuclear power. Now I have given talks in this country since the spring on this subject. And I bring up a very controversial idea that I want to plant in your heads right now. At this present time in history jewels are cheap. So if we get desperate for energy, both fossil coal and fossil natural gas are plentiful. And the price is extremely low especially given the new advances in fracking. So giving up nuclear energy now means as a practical matter burning more fuel. Now we want to supplant the nuclear energy with wind and sun. But there’s a cost issue there and also a supply sustainability issue there which we probably need to talk about. Because industries can’t tolerate those high costs and be internationally competitive. And customers will not stand having the power cut off. So the alternatives that we talk about usually have a fossil backup and that fossil backup is the dark little secret of alternate energy. Something that we ought to talk about more because that’s the weak, that’s the Achilles heel of alternate energy. Now I have asked people in thinking through this problem, to skip over the politics and do a science fiction experiment where we imagine a time roughly 2 centuries from now, when nobody burns fossil fuel out of the ground anymore. Either because it’s gone or because they voted to keep it in the ground. And I want to ask people what is life like. And in particular how did those people of the past make the transition from fossil dependence to whatever one has now. Now, one of the things on the table is the political need to have cheap electricity. We’ve talked about this a lot. And now I ask people to think what will happen when your great, great, great, great grandchildren have to make a choice between no lights and nuclear energy. Will they vote for much higher energy costs or will they invent reasons why nuclear energy was the right thing to have all along and bring it back. Now, if you think this is a ludicrous thought experiment. I call your attention to events taking place in Japan at the moment. Where Japan just suffered the second worst nuclear accident known in history, nonetheless the people of Japan, this government are struggling with the question of what we do if we turn off our nuclear reactors. And last I looked 2 of them came back on, ok. So the events in Japan are highly relevant to the question of whether you can pass laws to demand alternate energy in the face of very hard realities such as market demand for power on the one hand and frankly national security on the other. Now with luck I’ve stimulated everybody so you’ll ask a bunch of embarrassing questions that we can’t answer and I’m going to stop. Geoffrey Carr: Right thanks very much. On to Dr. Keilhacker. Applause. Martin Keilhacker: The theme of today is supply and storage. So let me spend a few minutes about 2 novel ideas or techniques on which some of my colleagues are working. I would like to remind you that at the moment the volatile or fluctuating energy from wind and sun contributes about 10% to the electricity in Germany. Together with biomass and so on it’s 20%. But recent studies have shown if this increases a little and we are still capable of keeping the net stable. But recent studies have shown that if we increase it to the goal which we have for 2020 which is 30% renewable energies fluctuating, most of them, then one will need quite much more storage than we have at the moment. And as you know the most effective storage is hydropower. But we cannot increase that very much. So one idea, one technique which has already been demonstrated... I also want to point out we need something very quickly, as has been pointed out by 2 of my colleague speakers before. So one technique is to use the electricity from wind or sun, photovoltaic, to produce in the end methane in 2 steps, to produce a gas. In the first step you use the electricity to produce from water hydrogen by electrolysis. And here you can already use the hydrogen if you want in fuel cells for mobility for example. But the real idea is to go one step further and to combine the hydrogen with Co2 and you form in a chemical reaction, you form methane. And this methane, which is equivalent to natural gas, you can then transport in the already existing network of Germany or Europe. And this, the gas network, which will surprise some people I guess, transports at least twice as much energy as the electric grid in Germany. So twice as much energy is transported in gas pipelines than by the grid. So this is a very, very efficient, already existing transport system and also the storage system is very good. We keep store in Germany of gasses and this is about 1/3 of the annual electricity consumption of Germany, This is a completely different, many orders of magnitude different. So of course the efficiency, the efficiency to get hydrogen is about 70% and the efficiency then to get methane, the total efficiency is 55% or something like that. Of course this is... Still you have gas and you produce Co2. You could also then go back to electricity and then of course you have your energy efficiency goes down further to 30%. So it’s not very efficient. But still it is a possibility which can be... which we could have in the short term. So this is being discussed and researched in Germany quite a lot. The other idea is a bit more... Let’s say more an idea but nevertheless some, This is to produce so to speak artificial hydroelectric power stations by using the deep sea. To have the pressure difference between the surface of the water and let’s say 2,000 metre down which is 200 bars. And you dump a hollow concrete spheres or some other bodies down and then to save the energy you pump out the water and create some atmospheric pressure. And if you want the energy back, you let the water go through the turbine again and you produce electricity. So, I’m not so sure whether this... I mean it is according to first calculations with industry, this is just about as much... costs as much as other means like building a new hydropower station and so on. But it would be a possibility to have with every wind power station perhaps such a reservoir which also if it’s not as deep, it can be used as a socket for placing the wind turbine on it. So anyway these are new ideas. In general I want to say that the problems of renewables and then of transport and storage can, to our knowledge, only be solved on... not on a national scale but on at least a European scale. We need very urgently a European network to extend the European network. The electricity grid with high voltage lines which is possible. And the same with storage. And also of course if we consider the cost, then it really doesn’t make sense to have photovoltaic in Germany. One should have it in the Sahara or in the south of Spain or in Sicily. And then we come again to the problem how do you transport the energy. But there are possibilities, the high voltage lines already exist and they are only a small contribution in cost to the total cost. So this is possible. And then of course you get much more efficient. Thank you. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you Dr. Keilhacker. Could I encourage people to go to the mics and ask a few questions. And while all that is going on I have one of my own. You talk about a European grid which strikes me as a very sensible idea. And you talk about pump storage in the oceans. I would have thought the answer to pump storage if you’ve got a European gird is one word, Norway. Can you not persuade the Norwegians to act as the battery of Europe? Martin Keilhacker: Well, Norway is discussed as the Holy Grail by many German scenario makers but the reality is quite different. I mean the present reservoirs are just sufficient to cover the needs of the Norwegians. And there is the possibility to increase this by 5 or 10 gigawatt or something like this. And Germany has just only a few weeks ago, has signed a contract with Norway for a high voltage under the sea transmission line which will have 1.2 gigajoules. This is about what one nuclear reactor, one block of nuclear reactor has or some other big power stations. And this is certainly very useful but it will in the end not really solve the problem if we want to go to 80% renewables. I mean I have my doubts whether this is possible, much more than 50%. But if we want, certainly the storage and this will not be solved by going to Norway because the Norwegians, the British as far as I know want... Geoffrey Carr: Yes we would like a slice of Norway as well. Martin Keilhacker: And the Netherlands have already a line in that market and Sweden and so on and so on. Geoffrey Carr: Sorry about the bells. Question: I’m from the US and I work on fusion research. And thank you to all the panel members. We’ve heard a lot of really good things about how we can make more energy in the future. But I would just like to pose a question sort of down the other pathway. Earlier in the week we heard a talk by Doctor Fert about, you know, a very novel way of having computers use so much less energy. And just do you think that that can actually be significant? Or those sort of energy saving matters is that just so small compared to how much energy we need that it hardly matters? Geoffrey Carr: Who would like to take that one? Ah, Carlo. Carlo Rubbia: I could try to give the answers to the question. First of all we are not talking only about electric energy. We’re talking about total energy. Electricity is only 1/3 of it. But our largest consumption is coming from other activities, roughly home and industries producing various materials. It would seem to me that the right direction which one should go is to try to reduce... especially in our countries saving of the other aspect of the energy, namely buildings, houses, energy transport, cars etc. And electricity it’s of course...it’s a very delicate issue and the question which you raise is certainly important. Now in that respect it would seem to me 1 or 2 things. I think our energy supply will depend very much for instance on the fact that we decide to have an electric car instead of having an oil driven car with all the possible advantages. And therefore it would seem to me that electricity per se is a problem quite independently of the specific use of it. Now in this respect I want to add 2 important points. One point is: One way is extending the network. We already said that the present networks are not sufficient. You mentioned very clearly the necessity of a European network. It seems to me that we have to reconstruct transport of energy from the beginning. We have to be able to transport large amounts of electricity over big distances. Now the average distance of an electric line is a few hundred kilometres. The longest distance of a natural gas line as you mentioned is 8,000 kilometres. We’ve got to follow that line. If you get a much wider surface and much wider cooperation in the utilisation of the energy, I think we will be able to compensate problems in a much more effective way. The second point is there is one form of electric energy which storage is very successful, which was not mentioned by any previous speaker, which is what's called... It’s associated with solar energy. All the Spanish concentrating solar power systems use storage in the form of heat storage. You take sunlight and you heat it to 500 degrees centigrade and then you store the liquid, hot liquid in a very efficient way. And that can last for days. In fact, this is now presently used in most of the applications of concentrating solar energy in the future. This seems to be a very promising technology. Because it is about a factor 1,000 more efficient than carrying water up and down, keeping hot liquid. And hot liquid is naturally there if there is sunlight, you see. If we want to one day have a system to transport energy from Sahara to Europe, there is no doubt that storage will have to be associated. And the method of storage in terms of liquid, hot liquid is there. And it will become a practical solution. Robert Laughlin: We have a long line here but I can’t resist. I run a course on energy at Stanford that I run in the fall. And one of the students who is from Saudi Arabia wrote a piece on this which you can go read. And he pointed out that at present the computer industry including the internet uses about as much energy as the commercial airline industry. And also it’s growing exponentially. And so we calculated how long before the computer industry was the entire energy cost of the world. And of course it’s a silly thing but it’s not so silly. It’s a small number of decades. Now, the point is that the computer used right now is not limited by energy cost. Your phone, your cell phone could be much more efficient but you’re buying that, the little gadgets in there. So, we’ve now discussed the fact that this is not a stupid question and in fact the internet is taking a lot of energy and it’s getting... you know like this. And second of all that you are responsible because you people like all those little gizmos on your phones. Georg Schütte: Measures to increase energy efficiency are the low hanging fruits of the German energiewende. So we want to increase efficiency and reduce electricity consumption by 50% in the next 4 decades. The problem is the rebound effects which we saw in the past. And you mentioned just one of them, introduction of IT and new technologies that overcompensate the efficiency gains which we have made before. So green IT is a big issue. Geoffrey Carr: I’m going to take chairman’s privilege and just make one other point which is: Every discussion about energy efficiency, the discussion is in the context of the 1 billion people who are in the developed world. There are 6 times as many, soon to be 8 times as many people out there who want to be like us. Energy efficiency, efficient technology is obvious but you're not going to be able to conserve your way out of the problem by conserving something that doesn’t even exist anymore which is their demand. So energy efficiency is a good idea but it can’t possibly be the answer to the question. Thanks very much for the question. Question: I am from the University of California. And we here live right by the dessert and our faculty uniformly agree that solar cells in the dessert is completely impractical. The cost of transporting the energy from the dessert back into the LA area is simply not going to work. And they’ve explored a large range of possibilities on that. This plot of humanity, the way I see it, is that we found places on our planet which were too hot so we invented air conditioning. We find that the sun is not always up so we should bring it to us. And the way to do that is to use nuclear energy. And I feel that there is no other solution other than nuclear energy. The question is: If you look at the disaster in Japan you will note that the reactors were built on old fission designs from the 1970s. So isn’t it true that we could, while we wait for fusion to become practical, focus our efforts on safe fission like pebble bed reactors and devices of this nature. Geoffrey Carr: I hesitate to say: Carlo, can you address the question of nuclear technologies? You have 2 minutes. Carlo Rubbia: Well, let me say I don’t think there is much more uranium around than there is oil or natural gas if we are using it at present level. Today about 6% of the total primary energy is nuclear. The rest is coming from elsewhere. So it would seem to me that if you wish to go nuclear and sooner or later there will be people which will realise that nuclear resources are there to be exploited, you have to depend on a different nuclear. And you have mentioned the fusion as one example. The other examples are some exotic materials which really do solve this problem on a longer time base. It seems to me that if you were going to say nuclear is the main solution for the future of energy in the near term, we would like to multiply the amount of nuclear energy by a substantial factor, maybe a factor of 5 or the factor 10, 50% nuclear. This is certainly possible but it will give us a few problems like Yucca Mountain in your country. What are you going to do with the waste? And other questions. And I don’t know that there is enough enrichment or other things available to do this. So this seems to me that the only way out of it, to get nuclear on the road again is by very strong, massive effort on innovative. The present day nuclear seems to me to fill up the gap. They know what it is. There’s the good factors, the bad factors. We know that is a debate at question. Some people think one way; some people think a different way. But it seems to me the only way out of that is innovation, innovation, innovation. Geoffrey Carr: I’ll take another question actually. The lady at the front. Question: Hi, I am…?(inaudible 55.57) also from the United States and my question in regards... So, my question is how are we going to put in infrastructure for all these great, wonderful new technologies? Is it going to be a global effort where we put in methane pumps everywhere or, you know, to transport electricity back from the Sahara back to Germany? I mean how are we going to actually put the infrastructure and motivate society to support us in these... in implementing the newer technologies? Geoffrey Carr: That’s a political question. Georg Schütte: There is no master plan which says that one has to build this here, this there. It’s an evolutionary process with a lot of players involved. So you have to provide business incentives for those who build distribution networks to create those networks. We have to provide incentives to build wind mills out, off shore wind mills. We currently in Germany had a problem in that we do have the off shore wind mills but we don’t have the connection to the mainland. And what happens if the connections fails or breaks down for a certain while? Or if the power produced off shore cannot be distributed in land? So you have to provide also for regulations that make sure that the investment of those... that the off shore investment pays off in a given time. So, it is a huge regulatory effort. It is a huge infrastructure planning effort and it works, as I said, evolutionary and stepwise. If we are good, we will be able to coordinate it on a European level. How to do this on a worldwide level? Probably not. There is no global master plan. It will evolve from various regions and it will have to take into account the specificities of a given region. We heard about Southern California for example with a given environment there. And it will be different from what you have in northern Europe for example. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you very much. Question: My name is Rico Friedrich from Freiberg in Germany and I would like to know the opinion from the panel on what they think how heat, so how to heat up rooms in the winter maybe in future time can be provided renewable. Because as to my knowledge 40 to 50% of the primary energy use in Germany goes into heating up rooms. And therefore this is a kind of critical issue and I would like to know your opinion how to do that in the future in a renewable way. Thank you. Martin Keilhacker: Well, as you have rightly said this is a large contribution to the energy, in efficiency so to speak. And it has already been mentioned before that this is a field where certainly something has to be done and will pay off. So incentives again have to be given to insulate the houses better. This of course is mainly possibly by new houses. And then if a house is well insulated, then it is easy to heat it by, for example, electrically driven heat pumps or something like this which take the energy out of the air or water or whatever. And even perhaps, if there is enough electricity, by direct electric heating. So I think this will be done heating at lower temperatures. So like you install in your room heating in the floor or in the walls and so this technology exists. And I think this can be done. The only, as has already been pointed out, there is... It’s difficult to start the momentum, you have to give incentives. This should be done much more I think. Geoffrey Carr: Anybody else? Thank you very much. Yes. Question: Hello and thanks for considering my question. With energy usage expected to rise drastically as middle classes emerge in the BRIC nations, it’s my opinion that fission and eventually fusion must play a critical role. My question is: Can and maybe more importantly should scientists and engineers attempt to restrict this source so as to leverage the promotion of responsible energy conservation techniques? Geoffrey Carr: That sounds like one for you actually. Robert Laughlin: Well, it isn’t but I’ll answer it anyway. I don’t know how to do that, do you? Question: No. Robert Laughlin: Well, I can’t tell somebody what kind of energy they can use and what they can’t. My government tries to do it and sometimes in a very heavy handed way. But they’re not always successful. So I think the answer is: No, it is not possible. Geoffrey Carr: And I would also, again taking chairman’s privilege. If I understood your question correctly, you’re saying that scientists and engineers should take this upon themselves to do that. That’s a political decision to do this sort of thing. What you’re proposing is almost ultra vires from what is the proper role of the scientist, isn’t it? Question: Right, but I believe we all have a responsibility to do what we think is right. And I think conservation and trying to cut down on the amount of energy used. The amount of energy wasted, that that’s our responsibility. To have some type of power to be able… Geoffrey Carr: How does that connect with what technology is used to generate the electricity that we do use? I don’t see the connection. Or you’re saying people who work in nuclear power should make these decisions? I mean... Question: As we get more and more fusion reactors and fission reactors, we’ll have the power to operate them and I guess we could... Robert Laughlin: You look at the history of nuclear reactor building and you’ll see it’s very complicated. In the States for example we’re not building any more of them even though the present administration wanted to. So in some countries there’s powerful opposition to nuclear energy and other nations such as India there’s powerful support. Now, the fact of the matter is that we as technology work for voters. I’m sorry. I mean you can have this fantasy that scientists are the most powerful people in the world but they’re not. We are not at the mercy but we’re actually the servants of the people who get elected. And so the question you’re asking is quintessentially political. I’m just not qualified... none of us is actually qualified to answer. Carlo Rubbia: I would like to believe that it’s certainly true that developed country can run with much less energy consumption. And reductions, massive reduction in the amount of energy we need is something we can and we should do. But we should not forget there is also another very large group of people in developing countries. And they represent the quasi totality of the population. And they are running on a much smaller amount of energy per person as we do. And clearly it’s perfectly normal for them and correct and right that they should get more energy per person in order to be able to maintain a balance between what they do and what we do. And I believe the real energy problem is not so much the fact that we have to reduce our consumption. Because I think, this is something which one way or the other we’ll have to do. But the real problem is what to do with the demanding energy consumption which is in the developing countries very rapidly growing. If you go for instance to China, you find that in China today every week there is a new coal fuelled power station being constructed. This is the problem of the Co2 emissions. This is the problem of the future of the planet. Because it’s there that this action will be decided. So we have to find a way in which they could get a reasonable amount of energy with a reasonable amount of acceptability of the situations. And certainly the solution of burning coal massively is not a solution. And I think this is something which only science can solve. And we being the people which have the highest amount of scientific knowledge we have the responsibility of solving the problem. Not only for us but also for them. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you very much for your perspective. Person at the back. Question: Hello, my name is Nick Chancellor. I’m from the University of Southern California. And my question is about a related use for coal and oil and that’s: How do you think renewable energy will effect for example petrochemicals and the chemicals that we get from coal that we use to make plastics and things like this? Do you believe that in a renewable future we’ll have to figure out some way to get these from carbon dioxide and water in the atmosphere or plants or something like that? Or do you think fossil substances will be reserved for petrochemical uses while we continue to use renewable sources for energy? Geoffrey Carr: Personally I thought it was an entirely economic question, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t continue to use them. Robert Laughlin: There’s an interesting number that may help you parse this. At present just little under 5% of the oil, the kilograms of oil that come out of the ground are used in all the petro chemistry. That includes all pesticides, all plastics, the works. And so it’s actually a very small fraction of the total oil budget. The rest of it is used for transport. Now that number is small enough that it’s perfectly obvious you could supplant the carbon use of petrochemicals with plants. For better or worse I think we’re stuck with the plastic industry forever even after the oil runs out. Geoffrey Carr: Thanks for the question, anyone else, lady there. Question: My name is…?(inaudible 67.32). I’m a postdoc in theoretical physics at MIT. I am also from the USA originally. And a question that has really been bugging me for the last several years in fact is that we’re working on all of these sustainable technologies. You see lots of people driving around Cambridge Massachusetts with their nice Prius. But we need rare earth metals. We need metals that there are limited amounts on earth for these sustainable technologies, for the motors that go into the windmills that we’re putting off shore. We need these metals that are also in...behind borders (inaudible 68.07) that are not always easy for us to access. So my question I guess is a little bit political but also scientific. Which is that we have to figure out how do we make our sustainable energy development sustainable. And so I wonder kind of where things are with that. And also there’s an economic question in there too, or political question. Geoffrey Carr: A sustainability question here. Who would like to take that one on? Georg Schütte: Thank you for the question and it’s a good question. What can one do? One has to take a look at the life cycle of material and take a much closer look at the reuse of materials. If we would use all the precious metals which are in our cell phones, it could be on a sustainable basis already by reusing those materials. And we have to do that not only with cell phones but in other instances as well. But yet there is nothing for free. You always have to pay a price and one has to take into account the external costs. If we do that with nuclear power plants, we also have to do it with solar panels and other renewable energy technologies. But cycling effects are just one solution which is the one of choice I would say. Robert Laughlin: There are lots of people worrying about the rare earth supply. And of course the Chinese are really happy because they have most of the rare earths. However, remember the rare earth magnets for example gain you mainly... They lower the cost because they’re small magnets. It’s perfectly possible to make motors without rare earths. Ok, so don’t worry. It’s going to be fine. If the rare earths aren’t enough we’ll make it another way. Geoffrey Carr: Maybe they should open up the old mine in Ytterby, where they were all discovered in the first place. At the back. Question: Hi, Jan Fiete from CERN. First of all I would like to say that I like this discussion because we’re discussing much more than nuclear and I think we are much more creative than nuclear. So it’s good that we go ahead in this sense. In any case as it came up, Fukushima came up of course. I would like to say that Fukushima should be more for us than interpreting or checking if other nuclear power plants are sitting in an earthquake zones or not. I mean we have seen the high standard industrial nation was not able to build a plant that sustained the incident that happened. It was not able to sustain everything they thought of. And I think this is essentially an engineering problem. I mean probably it can be made safer and things have to be worked on and all the ideas we could have, all the potential things that could happen could be addressed engineeringly. But then the question is to be asked how expensive does it get. And I think this is the fair price to which one should compare other sources of energies: How expensive does nuclear power get if you include all the potential dangers that apparently are neglected up to now? Carlo Rubbia: I would like to comment more generally what you said in the following sentence. It is certainly true that the cheapest energy today is probably burning coal. It’s also clear however that this is only estimated direct cost. There is a very interesting paper for instance given by an MIT team which has shown that if you add all the indirect costs to the consumptions of coal, you find out that the renewable energy would be much cheaper than burning coal. And therefore it seems to me that the real problem there is the one of estimating not only the cost per se of just taking a piece of coal and burning it but all the consequences of it. And the most important one of course is the fact, as I said, with the creation of greenhouse gases. And this kind of situation... When you look at this, you realise that this situation is completely distorted with respect to what we’re accustomed to do now, that the first step therefore should be to give to coal the right costs. And start from there in order to decide which way to go for the future energies. Geoffrey Carr: So, how would you do that, carbon tax? How do you factor the external costs of fossil fuels? Carlo Rubbia: We all know that the costs are there. I mean you can estimate them. The question is whether you should charge them or not. Martin Keilhacker: There are several studies which look for the external costs and compare the different systems, yes. Carlo Rubbia: It’s a fact that they are very a distorting image. Geoffrey Carr: You can identify them but you have to build them into the price, otherwise they won’t be meaningful. Martin Keilhacker: But you also... Some people are also surprised how much the renewables, how much is in them in the external costs because the material used and so on. Geoffrey Carr: We’ve got several people in the queue. It would probably help if nobody else came up now. We’ll probably just about get through all the questions that we’ve got there before lunch. So, if you haven’t got into the queue already, tough. You'll have to come and talk to the panellists after lunch. Question: So did I understand the answer correctly that for nuclear power it would be similar if you would include all the indirect costs? Then it would be much more expensive than outlined in the initial speeches? Carlo Rubbia: Correct, I agree with you. Robert Laughlin: Please, the nuclear power we’re talking about is not our nuclear power, it’s Japanese nuclear power. And the people of Japan are in the process of doing this cost calculus right now. So what you need to do is be quiet and watch what they do because they have no coal. They have no backup. All of their alternate comes from the sea, it’s imported. So costing things is of course extremely hard to do. The only way I know how to do it is let people do it, ok? So there’s a costing exercise that’s happening right before your eyes. And at this point I’d say the right thing to do is stop theorising and watch the experiment. Applause. Question: Well, I’m a student from Hamburg in Germany and my question goes to Georg Schütte. And it’s actually related to what we were talking about now. So you put forwards that Germany wants to get 80% of its energy from renewable sources in a very short time now. And I understand from Professor Laughlin, he says you cannot do that unless you get the costs down of that renewable power sources to the level where it is now. I would like to know: What is the strategy of the German government to achieve that? Or do you think Professor Laughlin is wrong with this argument? Georg Schütte: The first one is to be precise. I spoke about 80% of electricity from renewable sources. So we do not talk about total energy consumption. That’s a major difference. Whether we will be able to achieve it or not, I don’t know. But it is the objective and we try to stepwise reach it. We have to see by 2015 where we will be. But what I do know is that there was a very strong public sentiment in Germany that wanted that choice. And so we have to face the challenge. Do you have an alternative? Question. No, but my question is: How do you think politics can contribute to actually really, like do it at this speed and get costs down? What are the main means politics have? Martin Keilhacker He is asking for a master plan more or less which you correctly said we don’t have a real a long term master plan. Georg Schütte: Well, it’s a matter of incentives and of policy approaches. You can provide assistance to businesses and incentives to businesses to do the work which is necessary. What do we do as a ministry, as science and research ministry? We got together with other sponsors and started a research program, funding for a major research program on energy storage. We put out €200 million now for research on energy storage capacities. We will invest a similar amount of money into research on networks and distribution networks and smart grids. So we provide support for basic research and applied research. We do provide money that goes into alliances of research institutes and enterprises so they combine forces. So, the public Euro which is being invested is matched by double or 3 times the amount of private funding for joint research endeavours. That we can do. Competition, we contribute to improvement of technologies and yet you also need regulation. And the political fight is about what degree of regulation do you need in order to create a market and to what extent can a market create solutions by an in itself. Question: My name is Daniel Brunner. I’m from Palma de Mallorca in Spain. And I’m afraid this is rather an economical question. But we have seen how the price drops dramatically in the computer industry just by mass production and the basically very professional way of producing. So is something similar not possible for solar cells or almost logical? Geoffrey Carr: Well the short answer is yes. As you look at the... We were discussing this earlier that you see precisely that phenomena happening. Anybody want to take that one on? I claim that we see it. Robert Laughlin: Geoffrey has seen some reports that I haven’t seen. So I have to answer cautiously. My guess would be no. And it has to do with the basics of the semiconductor manufacture, how it works, the nature of the problem and so forth. I think myself that the dramatic changes in pricing we’ve seen in photovoltaic cells recently is extremely complicated by the exchange rate between western currencies and the Yuan. And I think part of the effect is mirrors. That will become clearer over time. And it’s possible I’m wrong, that the real price did come down. But my understanding of how the semiconductor works is that Moore’s law will not repeat itself in photocells. Geoffrey Carr: My understanding from what I have seen is that you’re absolutely right in the short term if we’re just talking about the last 18 months, 2 years. The Chinese are clearly trying to manipulate the market. But if you’re looking over a scale of 15 or 20 years you’ve seen a 3 order of magnitude fall in the price. I can’t remember the exact figures but from something like a 1,000 to... Robert Laughlin: By the way I just don’t believe it. Geoffrey Carr: You don’t believe it. Well, I’ll dig out the data and discover that I’m wrong. But we’ll agree to disagree on this one. I think you’re right on this. Carlo Rubbia: May I simply comment on that? It seems to me the one thing is the cost of the solar panel. Per se the cost of the solar panel is reduced and is coming down. The second problem is the system, the system is complicated. Now at the present moment the major cost of generating electricity is not so much the panel itself but the whole system. It takes the DC voltage, 1 volt into something which can be used in the network, the transport and this, that or the other. And those values are much more difficult to reduce in cost than the single component which is the solar panel. So even if the solar panel were to come down quite substantially, the overall cost of the photovoltaic system will be not that much affected by it because of the complexity of the overall problem. So, I would share what he says that the in fact photovoltaic is an expensive program. And there are no obviously evident factors that miracles may occur in such a way that you can squash it down similar to the cost of burning coal or things like that. Geoffrey Carr: Thanks very much, lady there. Question: Hello again. So this question is especially for Dr. Rubbia but maybe some of the rest of the panel will also have input. Just in your opening statement you mentioned both a liquid fuel and then the superconducting way of turning supporting power. And both of those sounded amazing and almost too good to be true. So I guess I’m wondering: What is the drawback there? Is it just a cost issue or why aren’t we already doing that? Carlo Rubbia: There’s 2 points, you said 2 important things. One is can I produce fossils like natural gas without a single drop Co2. This is an absolutely fantastic possibility and is in my view is within reach. And the reason is as follows. That CH4 is 4 hydrogen and 1 carbon. The hydrogen is carrying most of the energy and the carbon is only about 20% of it. The rest being hydrogen. So if you can transform natural gas into hydrogen plus black carbon, black carbon is a well-known material for instance to create tyres or to create all kind of carbon fibres and things like this, if that happens, then you solve the problem because there is no counter indication about using all the methane which there is around, there is plenty of it. There are also clathrates and other possible future for energy coming from methane. Methane is a very abundant things in nature. Not only in the depths but also all over the place. And if you have that, then you solve the problem as an intermediate step waiting for the time and the effort to transform in a truly, if you like renewable system, for the future of mankind. Now, we have done some experiments. We are doing some experiments and we succeeded now to reach about even up to 70% of transformation of methane into hydrogen at a very reasonable temperature of 800 degrees centigrade. So you take gas and it will naturally split very quickly into black carbon which is a dust which goes around. And you get the black cloud of it and hydrogen which comes out. 70% in 900 degrees is a result which we have. Now there are 2 directions which are working together with the specialist. One of them is catalysers. There catalysers exist which can reduce the temperature even further. We have a team in Rostock which is working on that. And the second possibility is to do some kind of a device in which the bubbles of natural methane are producing very small bubbles so there is a lot of surface and little volume and therefore the transformation occurs more successfully. Both methods look promising. And it seems to me if such a thing comes as you correctly say that could be a good way of solving the problem. The second question you mentioned is superconductivity. Superconductivity is a booming field. We received yesterday the presentation from LHC; it’s a superconductor, a system of unprecedented size. Superconductivity would be able to give us a possibility of transforming the electric energy system into a system which is comparable, as I mentioned some time ago... This is very close to being a reality. We have now a model; we’re developing, which looks quite... Somebody is laughing there, I don’t know why, but anyway. Geoffrey Carr: I caused it. Sorry. Carlo Rubbia: But anyway the conclusion is... Those are... Let me say all those ideas are not necessarily true. I mean even during the period of the time of the Silicon Valley situation only 1 out of 3 or 4 ideas were actually successful. But you have to try and that is what we are doing. We are trying and this is possibly hope, thank you. Robert Laughlin: Mr. Moderator, I cannot let him get away with that. I’ll be very short. A fact: 1,000 kilometre high tension line at the reaches we have now has about a little under... It’s about a kilovolt, about a megavolt, ok. It has about a little less than 7% ohmic loss, it’s nothing. And it could easily be made less simply by making the wires bigger. Why don’t we do that? Simply because the line is expensive. It costs a billion dollars to make a line that big. And the interest on the billion dollars at this point begins to equal the market value of the power you’re stuffing down the line. So using superconductivity to transport electricity is stupid, stupid. Geoffrey Carr: Next question please. Question: …(inaudible 86.11) science from Japan. My question is quite different from the future energy problem. So many people discuss about the nuclear power plant problem in Fukushima This problem, what do you think, we face that, it’s a current problem of Fukushima, what is the future for a blueprint to deal with the aftermath of the Fukushima, the nuclear power problem, what do you think? Robert Laughlin: May I ask a question? The sound is not good. So I don’t completely understand. Geoffrey Carr: Can you summarise your question in about 10 words. Question: What do you think is Fukushima power plant problem was over, or not? Robert Laughlin: May I answer that? Geoffrey Carr: Yes please do. Robert Laughlin: Once when I was taking off in an airplane from New Orleans, we hit a bird. A bird came in the engine and it made a loud bang and gas began coming out of the engine. And we all began praying for our lives at this point. And I was sitting next to an airplane engineer and he said: He said: “Well it’s something people learn the hard way. There was a plane taking off from Gander, Newfoundland. And they threw a blade and the blade went through a hydraulic line, lost control of the plane and the plane went down and everybody died.” And he explained that with these powerful technologies now and then a terrible accident happens. And that’s just the way powerful technologies are. If you send a man to the moon, it’s risky and you should not be surprised when someone loses their life. Now in this case he said: “What happened is people analysed the problem, understood that throwing the blade is bad. And they instituted a regulation that the jet engine should have a big steel can around it so that if it throws a blade there’s no problem.” Now, nuclear accidents are like this. They’re great big terrible things. And every time one happens people retrench and try new designs. So I personally don’t think it’s the end, no. Geoffrey Carr: I think this might have to be the last question because people are getting hungry. Sorry for the other 2. What's your question? Actually good idea. We’ll take all 3 questions. Question: My name is Ibrahim…?(inaudible 89.21), I’m a postdoctoral researcher in biophysics at the École normale supérieure in Paris. I’m from Niger. And it’s the world fourth producer of uranium, I believe. It’s a country that is 2½ times the size of France and about 70% of that is the Sahara Desert. So, as I sit here as a young researchers I feel... privileged I feel to be able to be part of this discussion. But then I think that there are probably a bunch of kids in Niger who could be geographically at the centre and geographically in the position to come up with the next solution. But the problem is that probably the university is not well funded so they’re not at the same level as the American students and Japanese students that have paraded here with well directed questions. So as you think about finding a solution, what are we thinking about in terms of those developing countries where the solution could actually come from? Applause Geoffrey Carr: Thank you, we’ll answer that question and we’ll take the other 2 questions afterwards. Georg Schütte: About a week ago we sat together here with the science minister and science counsellors from the G8 plus 5 countries. And we discussed the whole issue of green economy. You know the new buzz word about the future. And we all agreed about that we know something about the set of green technologies. And we started to argue whether nuclear, just like we do here, is a green technology or not. But other than that there was a lot of common agreement. And once we started to discuss about a green economy colleagues for example from South Africa said that the major challenge for South Africa is how to fight poverty. The second major challenge is how to be inclusive. And the third challenge related to that is how to include the major part of the population into an education system. And once we have achieved that then we’ll discuss the rest. What was fairly obvious is that we have to discuss those technologies combined with the issues which you raised because it is a global challenge and we can only face it if we face and meet the different challenges. And it’s even more complicated, I agree. But to take a close look on green technologies in Europe certainly does not suffice. Geoffrey Carr: Thank you. Question: I’m from Ethiopia and I’m working on solar materials for concentrating solar power systems in South Africa. So, my question is as a critical part of the concentrating solar power systems is an absorbing surface, lots of materials have been developed for the systems. But they degrade at high temperature so what do you think about it? Geoffrey Carr: Alright, 3 minutes maximum, possibly 90 seconds. Carlo Rubbia: Ok. Well, concentrating solar power. We have a team of people working at IASS on concentrating solar power. And indeed solar power is a very exciting alternative to the photovoltaic in the sense that it provides with a very economical way to produce large amount of energy from the sun. It has a storage in it. It is producing electricity with a... a generation of electricity with a standard method of producing electricity which is cheap. So there are all the elements today which indicate that in the future years concentrating solar power may become a very serious contender for solar energy. Indeed, in the presentation for the solar in the Sahara Desert a lot of people are concentrating in the possibility of using concentrating solar. Concentrating solar is a system which mirrors collect light in terms of heat. The heat is about 550 degrees, which is the same temperature that you have in the sodium nuclear reactor, except there is no sodium and there is no reactor. But it is the temperature. And that temperature then is used into a conversion, into generate electricity with it. All that looks quite attractive and the real question is the cost. Now, what we are working on essentially in making cheaper? We believe that a factor 2 to 3 in the reduction of the cost of solar is potentially available. If that would be so, then the solar energy in this particular form will become entirely competitive with other sources like natural gas or if you like coal. And this is the goal which I’m behind and we’re working on it. And I believe there is an interesting chance that such a thing will develop itself in the future. Geoffrey Carr: Perfect, thanks. And you have the privilege of the last question. Question: My question is just 10 words. I’m from Japan and my name is Takami. And my question is: How do you think about the emotional point of views? I mean the current thinking the nuclear power is effective, everybody knows. But I actually work with volunteers at the place being hit by the tsunami and the earthquake. In this place people are so devastated and feel uneasy because whenever you go in front of the place the ground is so contaminated by that material. How do you take the emotional point into account to tackle these kind of issues? Robert Laughlin: I’d be happy to answer that if you like. When I heard about the tsunami, I immediately thought of all my friends in Sendai. I’d been there many times and I’ve walked around the town that got... part of the town that got wiped out by the tsunami which of course was vastly worse than the nuclear accident. So how do you feel when people you know are badly hurt? Your heart goes out to them and you feel terrible. And I did. There’s no answer I can give. Geoffrey Carr: I think you make an important point there that people also forget which is that 1,000’s of people were killed in that tsunami and... Robert Laughlin: 10’s of 1,000’s. Geoffrey Carr: 10’s of 1,000’s yeah and I don’t think... I think I’m right in saying that no one has actually died as a direct result of the nuclear accident or if they have it’s a hand full. And a sense of proportion is sometimes necessary. We ascribe things like the tsunami as acts of god, they’re acts of nature and somehow accept that, even though they’re disastrous, we think we have control over technology but we don’t. You know, we have a little control over technology but it will occasionally go wrong. We shouldn’t give up on things just because they go wrong occasionally any more than we should give up on building cities in earth quake zones because they sometimes get flattened by tsunamis. And I think, you know, it’s a question of whether you have a hopeful view of the future or not. And thank you, that was a great question to end with. Thank you very much, thank you. Applause. Geoffrey Carr: So if I could just end by thanking all the panellists, Dr. Schütte, Dr. Laughlin, Dr. Keilhacker and of course Dr. Rubbia. And most of all thanking you for your wonderful questions. I hope you’ve enjoyed the session, I certainly have. Thank you to Count and Countess again for organising the whole thing. You're all invited to lunch and we’re also invited to the castle at 3.30 for the closing ceremony. Thank you all very much. Applause.

Liebe Nobelpreisträger und Nachwuchswissenschaftler, lieber Herr Minister Bauer, meine Damen und Herren, liebe Diskussionsteilnehmer. Willkommen im Schlossgarten. Nach einer Woche der Diskussionen über die Wissenschaft, Ihr Leben und das Leben der Nobelpreisträger innerhalb der Wissenschaft, zwischen Kulturen und zwischen Generationen, werden wir heute die Wissenschaft und die Gesellschaft in einem noch höheren Maß miteinander verbinden, als wir dies in der letzten Woche getan haben. Heute werden wir eine Diskussion über das Thema Energie hören, das zweifellos für uns alle in der Wissenschaft und der Gesellschaft sehr wichtig ist. Es wird eine sehr interessante Diskussion sein, und ich lade Sie herzlich ein - und Geoffrey wird das wahrscheinlich wiederholen - sich an der Diskussion zu beteiligen. Im Anschluss an diese Diskussion folgt als nächstes die Mittagspause. Auch daran wird Geoffrey Sie später erinnern. Und ich freue mich sehr darauf, Sie alle um 15:30 Uhr im Vorhof des Schlosses bei der offiziellen Abschiedszeremonie wiederzusehen. Ich übergebe nun an Geoffrey Carr, der die heutige Podiumsdiskussion moderieren wird, und wünsche uns allen sehr interessante 90 Minuten. Willkommen. Vielen Dank, Herr Graf, vielen Dank, Frau Gräfin. Ihnen allen einen guten Morgen - guten Morgen, liebe Nobelpreisträger, Diskussionsteilnehmer, Fürsten, Machthaber, Minister, meine Damen und Herren. Willkommen in Mainau. Mein Name ist Geoffrey Carr, ich bin Wissenschaftsredakteur bei "The Economist", einem wöchentlich erscheinenden Nachrichtenmagazin - für jene von Ihnen, welche die Zeitschrift nicht kennen, falls es solche Leute gibt. Ich freue mich, der Moderator dieser Podiumsdiskussion der 62. Tagung der Nobelpreisträger in Lindau zu sein. Man ist so freundlich, mich seit vier Jahren immer wieder einzuladen. Ich weiß nicht, wie lange ich das aufrechterhalten kann, aber ich werde es weiterhin tun, solange man mich weiter einlädt, es ist großartig, es macht viel Spaß. Außerdem sind es aufregende Zeiten für Physiker. Somit ist es ein wunderbarer Zufall - vielleicht nicht ganz und gar ein Zufall -, wenn ich höre, dass dieses Treffen zum Thema Physik mit der Bekanntmachung des Higgs-Bosons oder zumindest eines Teilchens zusammenfällt, das vielleicht ein kleines bisschen das Higgs-Boson sein könnte, wenn wir mit den Messungen fertig sind. Normalerweise komme ich für das ganze Treffen, aber leider hielt mich mein Hauptberuf in London fest, da ich unseren Herausgeber, der in vielerlei Hinsicht ein schätzenswerter Mensch ist, aber nicht viel über Physik weiß, davon überzeugen musste, dass diese Neuigkeit wichtig genug sei, um sie auf dem Titelblatt unserer Zeitschrift unterzubringen. Was wir getan haben. Wir haben also in dieser Woche eine schöne, große, knackige Wissenschaftsgeschichte, und das ist gut. Leider bedeutete dies, dass ich das Treffen und den ganzen Trubel hier verpasst habe. Außerdem habe ich die Energie-Diskussionen verpasst. Ich bitte also um Entschuldigung, falls ich etwas wiederhole, was bereits gesagt wurde. Man könnte die These vertreten, dass Energie das dringendste Problem ist, mit dem die Menschheit im Augenblick konfrontiert ist. Wenn man genug Energie zur Verfügung hat und sie billig genug ist, dann kann man jedes andere Problem in den Griff bekommen. Das Ernährungsproblem kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem der Wasserversorgung kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem des Transports kann man in den Griff bekommen, das Problem der Produktion kann man in den Griff bekommen, die Umweltverschmutzung kann man in den Griff bekommen. All diese Probleme können mit einer ausreichenden Menge preiswerter Energie gelöst werden. Wenn wir nicht genügend preiswerte Energie zur Verfügung haben, befürchte ich, dass das für viele von uns bedeutet: "Zurück in die Höhlen". Wir werden nicht in der Lage sein, die industrielle Zivilisation aufrechtzuerhalten. Somit ist dies ein entscheidendes, ein ganz entscheidendes Thema. Im Moment sind wir auf fossile Brennstoffe angewiesen. Es gibt eine Menge fossiler Brennstoffe. Also besteht keine unmittelbare Gefahr, dass sie uns ausgehen. Allerdings ist es keine gute Situation, wenn man auf eine einzelne Energiequelle angewiesen ist, und zwar aus zwei Gründen. Ein Grund ist das Problem des Kohlendioxids und des Klimawandels. Man hat mich gebeten, dieses Thema bei diesem Treffen zu vermeiden, da wir die Technologie alternativer Energien diskutieren möchten. Dennoch ist es ein wichtiges Thema und wird wahrscheinlich später in der Diskussion noch einmal aufkommen. Der andere Punkt ist, dass die fossilen Brennstoffe irgendwann zu Ende gehen werden. Sie werden nicht sofort erschöpft sein, aber wir sollten uns Gedanken darüber machen, wie wir sie ersetzen. Und auch darüber, wie man die Technologie richtig handhabt. Wir sind immer auf der Suche nach günstigeren Energiequellen. Die Kosten für fossile Brennstoffe werden nicht sinken. Das ist höchst unwahrscheinlich. Wir haben einige neue Reserven in Form von Schiefergas erlebt, das kurzfristig zu einer Preissenkung bei Methan geführt hat. Aber das wird nicht ewig anhalten. Es ist unwahrscheinlich, dass die Förderkosten sinken werden. Wir sollten nach neuen Technologien Ausschau halten, die Energie erzeugen, Energie aus der Umwelt gewinnen. Die immer effizienter und günstiger werden und außerdem weniger belastend für die Umwelt Energie erzeugen können. Selbst wenn man die fossilen Brennstoffe unberücksichtigt lässt, herrscht kein Mangel an Energie. Ich habe das gestern Abend ausgerechnet und ich denke, dass ich richtig gerechnet habe, obwohl ich ein bisschen müde war. Ich schätze, dass die Sonne der Erde in etwas mehr als einer Stunde ebenso viel Energie liefert, wie die Menschheit jedes Jahr verbraucht. Wenn man Solarenergie nutzen wollte - sie ist im Überfluss vorhanden. Für jene, die aus unterschiedlichen Gründen nicht auf Solarenergie vertrauen, gibt es eine Menge an spaltbarem Material in der Erdkruste, das abgebaut werden kann. Da gibt es Uran und auch, wie wir bestimmt später hören werden, Thorium, das in größeren Mengen vorliegt, obwohl wir zur Zeit noch über keine wirklich funktionierende Technologie verfügen, um es zu nutzen. Außerdem gibt es sehr viel Wärme in der Erde, die man erschließen könnte, indem man geothermische Energie nutzt. Und für die wirklich Mutigen - oder vielleicht Törichten - ist da die Idee der Kernfusion, auf die wir ebenfalls später noch eingehen werden. Ich habe kurz nachgezählt: Es gibt ungefähr ein Dutzend alternativer Technologien, Alternativen zum Verbrennen fossiler Brennstoffe, um Elektrizität zu erzeugen und den Energiebedarf für die die verschiedenen Arten des Transports zu decken. Das Problem ist, dass sie alle Nachteile haben - denn wenn sie keine Nachteile hätten, würden wir sie bereits nutzen. Dann hätte man aus Gründen der Wirtschaftlichkeit bereits auf sie zugegriffen. Wir sind also hier, um die Alternativen zu diskutieren und zu erörtern, welche man einführen und einsetzen sollte. Dafür haben wir vier Personen eingeladen, die auf diesem Gebiet hervorragende Kenntnisse besitzen. Zwei von ihnen sind alte Bekannte, zumindest sind sie alte Bekannte, was mich betrifft. Ich hatte sie bereits einmal auf dem Podium. Einer von ihnen ist Carlo Rubbia hier. Er ist ein Nobelpreisträger, Nobelpreis für Physik 1984. Er war Generaldirektor des CERN. Er war verantwortlich für die Entdeckung der W- und Z-Bosonen, welche die schwache Kernkraft übertragen, die für die Neuigkeiten dieser Woche mehr oder weniger relevant ist. Wir haben Georg Schütte; er ist Staatssekretär im Ministerium für Bildung und Forschung hier in Deutschland. Sein Ministerium ist verantwortlich, teilweise verantwortlich, für die Implementierung der deutschen Energiestrategie, die, wie ich lese, das bescheidene Ziel verfolgt, bis 2022, in zehn Jahren, die Kernenergie abzuschaffen, und bis zum Ende des Jahrzehnts den Einsatz erneuerbarer Energie von 17 % des Gesamtverbrauchs auf 35 % zu verdoppeln. Ist das korrekt? Ja, somit sollte das einfach sein. Und die beiden anderen sind Newcomer, soweit ich weiß. Einer von ihnen ist Robert Laughlin, der 1998 den Nobelpreis erhielt, wiederum für Physik. Er hat ein Buch mit dem Titel "Power in the Future" veröffentlicht, das den unvermeidlichen Untertitel trägt, der länger als der Titel ist: "How we will eventually solve the energy crisis and fuel the civilisation of tomorrow" Es steht alles in dem Buch. Er befürwortet eine Mischung von Kernenergie und solarthermischer Energieerzeugung. Dies ist eine Form von Solarenergie, die vielleicht weniger bekannt ist. Sie bedient sich nicht der Solarzellen, die man sich aufs Dach setzt, sondern nutzt die Wärme der Sonne direkt, um Flüssigkeiten aufzuheizen, sodass Dampf produziert und Turbinen angetrieben werden. Das bedeutet aber auch, dass man die Wärme über Nacht speichern kann, womit das Problem, dass die Sonne jeden Abend untergeht, teilweise gelöst wird. Außerdem interessiert er sich für den Einsatz von Abfallstoffen und Algen für die Produktion von Biotreibstoffen. Und unser letzter Teilnehmer ist Martin Keilhacker. Er ist Vorsitzender des Arbeitskreises Energie der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft. Und er war Direktor des Joint European Torus - des ersten europäischen Versuchs, eine Kernfusion herbeizuführen. So wie ich ihn verstanden habe, sieht er Fusionsenergie als die ultimative Lösung an. Wir werden folgendermaßen vorgehen. Ich werde allen Diskussionsteilnehmern ungefähr zehn Minuten geben, um sich darüber auszulassen, was sie gerne tun würden. Wenn es sehr viel länger als zehn Minuten dauert, werde ich sie unterbrechen und an den nächsten übergeben, denn der Schwerpunkt der Festlichkeiten heute Morgen liegt darauf, dass Sie sich an der Diskussion beteiligen sollen. Es gibt zwei Mikrofone. Stellen Sie sich gegen Ende der Podiumsdiskussion an, wenn Sie Fragen haben - und ich hoffe, dass Sie welche haben werden. Wir werden weitermachen, bis uns entweder die Fragen ausgehen oder es Zeit zum Mittagessen ist. Vielen Dank. Entschuldigen Sie - ich sollte noch sagen, dass Dr. Schütte der erste der Diskutanten sein wird. Ich möchte ihn bitten zu erklären, wie er diese Lücke stopfen möchte, die entstehen wird, wenn alle Kernkraftwerke stillgelegt sein werden. Ob er es uns erklären wird, werden wir herausfinden. Wenn das, was wir nun international "Energiewende" nennen - ein deutscher Begriff, der sich in die internationale Ausdrucksweise gedrängt hat, wenn es um die Veränderung des Energiesystems geht, die Art und Weise, auf die wir das tun - einfach wäre, dann hätten es andere schon vorher getan. Wir werden uns einer gewaltigen Herausforderung stellen müssen. Man muss zugeben, dass diese Herausforderung durch einen kontinuierlichen Wandel der öffentlichen Meinung in Deutschland im Lauf der letzten 30 bis 40 Jahre ausgelöst wurde. Und wir sahen uns nach den tragischen Ereignissen in Japan mit einer neuen Realität konfrontiert. Also setzten sich Politiker und verschiedene gesellschaftliche Gruppen zusammen, um über einen längeren Zeitraum zu erörtern, wie wir unser Energiesystem künftig organisieren werden. Und wir beschlossen, in den nächsten zehn Jahren aus der Kernenergie auszusteigen. Wir beschlossen, die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien zu verstärken oder Möglichkeiten der Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien wahrzunehmen, damit bis zum Jahr 2050 der Strombedarf in Deutschland zu 80 % aus erneuerbaren Quellen gedeckt werden kann. Wir versuchten, dies umzusetzen und dabei gleichzeitig zu berücksichtigen, dass wir es auf eine klimaneutrale Art und Weise tun müssen. Tatsächlich wollen wir die Treibhausgasemissionen bis 2050 im Vergleich zu den frühen 90er Jahren ebenfalls um 80 % verringern. Dies ist also ein ehrgeiziges Ziel und wir haben zwischendurch verschiedene Schritte realisiert. Wir wollen die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken und wir haben bereits einen Stand von 20 % erreicht. Wir nutzen also gegenwärtig bereits mehr erneuerbare Energien, als wir Kernenergie nutzen. Und ich bin ziemlich optimistisch, dass wir die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken können. Schon vor Fukushima galt Kernenergie in Deutschland als eine Übergangstechnologie auf dem Weg zu einer stärker von erneuerbaren Energien geprägten Zukunft. Da sie eine Übergangstechnologie war, müssen wir Kernenergie nun bis zu einem gewissen Umfang durch fossile Brennstoffe ersetzen. Zu einem großen Teil wird das Gas sein. Wir stehen also vor einer gewaltigen Herausforderung. Wir müssen die Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien verstärken. Um das tun zu können, müssen wir die richtigen Verteilnetze in Deutschland aufbauen. Wir müssen neue Kraftwerke bauen, um Kernkraftwerke durch andere Energiequellen zu ersetzen. Und wir müssen die Speicherkapazität erhöhen, denn erneuerbare Energiequellen erfordern viel Speicherkapazität. Und das ist die Herausforderung. Eine weitere Herausforderung besteht darin, dass man alle diese Faktoren berücksichtigen muss. Wir sprechen also von einem systemischen Ansatz, um das Energiesystem in Deutschland umzuorganisieren. Und das können wir ohne die Unterstützung von Technikern, Wissenschaftlern und Forschern nicht tun. Allerdings haben wir in den letzten 30 Jahren auch gelernt, dass wissenschaftliche Ideen, die isoliert dastehen, Gefahr laufen, nicht die Art von gesellschaftlicher Unterstützung zu erhalten, die erforderlich ist, um solch eine Infrastruktur zu schaffen, die einen jeden in dem jeweiligen Land betrifft. Ein systemischer Ansatz muss also auch berücksichtigen, dass man in der breiten Bevölkerung Akzeptanz für Technologien finden muss. Das ist es, was wir in Deutschland tun. Haben wir dafür einen Plan? Nein. Dies ist ein längerfristiger Prozess. Wir sprechen von einem Prozess, der mindestens über vier Jahrzehnte dauern wird. Und wir tun das Schritt für Schritt. Und das bedeutet, dass man Expertengruppen braucht. Das man Rat aus der Forschungsgemeinschaft benötigt. Wir brauchen den Rat der Ingenieursverbände. Und wir müssen mit den Menschen sprechen, die tatsächlich auch die Technologie der erneuerbaren Energien nutzen und davon Vorteile haben und die zustimmen müssen, dass Verteilnetze über ihre Grundstücke verlaufen. Sie müssen zustimmen, dass in ihrer Nähe Speicherkapazitäten errichtet werden. Und das ist die Herausforderung, mit der wir in Deutschland konfrontiert sind. Vielen Dank. Ich hätte eine Frage. Man kann darüber streiten ... Nun ja, es ist sinnvoll, Kernkraftwerke zu bauen, absolut. Auf beiden Seiten gibt es Argumente. Sobald Sie es gebaut haben, sobald es in Betrieb ist, sind sie relativ günstig, was den Unterhalt angeht. Wissen Sie, einige Ihrer Kraftwerke sind ein bisschen betagt, aber es gibt immer noch ziemlich viele, die noch Jahrzehnte Lebenszeit vor sich haben. Ein funktionstüchtiges Kraftwerk stillzulegen ist eine ziemlich teure Angelegenheit. Deutschland ist kein Erdbebengebiet. Japan wird hier nicht passieren. Ist es wirklich sinnvoll ...? Es mag absolut sinnvoll sein zu sagen, dass wir keine neuen Kernkraftwerke bauen werden. Ist es tatsächlich sinnvoll, die bestehenden stillzulegen? Vom Standpunkt des jeweiligen Kraftwerks und der wirtschaftlichen Basis des Betriebs dieses Kraftwerks aus betrachtet mag es vielleicht nicht wirtschaftlich sinnvoll sein. Dann ist der nächste Schritt der Überlegung: Welche Art von Kosten kalkulieren wir ein? Sind es nur die Betriebskosten des Kraftwerks? Rechnen wir den Abbau mit ein? Kalkulieren wir mit ein, wie wir mit dem radioaktiven Müll umgehen? Damit könnten wir letztendlich eine andere Art von Rechnung bekommen. Die zentrale Frage lautet: Finden wir öffentliche Anerkennung für eine Technologie dieser Art? Und in Deutschland ist die Realität: nein. Und das ist eine Realität, und wir müssen diese Art von Realität in die Überlegungen miteinbeziehen. So weit, so gut - aber können Sie die öffentliche Meinung akzeptieren? Ich weiß nicht. Selbstverständlich bin ich kein Experte, was deutsche Politik angeht. Ich tue mich mit der britischen schwer genug. Aber manchmal gibt es Dinge, mit denen sich die Leute nicht abfinden werden. Manchmal gibt es Dinge, bei denen sie vielleicht denken, dass sie sich damit nicht abfinden würden, aber wenn Sie Ihnen die Realität erklären, werden sie ihre Meinung ändern. Und ich frage mich ... Wie Sie sagten, glaube ich, dass die kurzfristige Alternative zum Einsatz von Kernkraft darin besteht, zumindest teilweise die Lücke mit fossilen Brennstoffen zu überbrücken. Okay, man kann Gas verwenden, was davon der am wenigsten schädliche ist, aber trotzdem pumpen Sie mehr Treibhausgase in die Atmosphäre, wenn Sie das tun. Es ist nicht ... Ein Kernkraftwerk in einer erdbebenfreien Zone ist keine Quelle von Umweltverschmutzung. Es ist vielleicht eine Quelle der Angst, aber Angst kann überwunden werden. Also, wir hatten seit den späten 60er Jahren mehr als 50 Jahre Zeit, um das zu erklären, und wir waren damit nicht so erfolgreich. Schauen Sie sich Österreich an. Sie haben ein Kernkraftwerk gebaut und es noch nicht einmal in Betrieb genommen. Es scheint also so zu sein, dass sie ein ähnliches Problem haben, und es kann nicht ... Aus meiner Sicht ist dies eine Art von sozialer Realität ist, die wir mit berücksichtigen müssen. Vielen Dank. Carlo, ich glaube, Sie können der nächste sein. Ja, lassen Sie mich mit einigen allgemeinen Erklärungen beginnen. Ich würde gern ein wenig über mögliche künftige Entwicklungen, an denen wir arbeiten, diskutieren. Ich sollte nicht vergessen, dass dies ein Physikertreffen und Physik unser Thema ist. Lassen Sie mich zunächst eines sagen: dass wir in ein neues Zeitalter eintreten, ein vom Menschen hervorgebrachtes Zeitalter, das Anthropozän genannt wird. Ich lernte den Begriff Anthropozän zum ersten Mal von Paul Crutzen. Ich weiß nicht, ob er der Erfinder des Worts ist, aber auf jeden Fall habe ich es von ihm gelernt. Und dies sind sehr außergewöhnliche Situationen. Wir stehen vor der Situation, dass jedes Jahr 90 Millionen neue Menschen auf diese Welt kommen. Es gibt eine echte Bevölkerungsexplosion. Die Zahl von sieben Milliarden Menschen, die wir gerade erreicht haben, ist eine unglaubliche Zahl. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen einfach sagen, dass sie einer ununterbrochenen Linie von Menschen alle 20 Meter entspricht. Wenn Sie einen nach dem anderen der Reihe nach aufstellen, überbrücken wir die Entfernung von der Erde zur Sonne. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen auch in Erinnerung rufen, dass die Sonne ... Das Sonnenlicht benötigt acht Minuten, um von der Sonne zur Erde zu gelangen. Im Verlaufe der Geschichte der Erde, der wenigen Hunderttausend Jahre, seit denen die Menschheit existiert, Wir stehen an der Schwelle zu einer Zukunft mit noch nie dagewesenen Umweltgefahren: der kombinierte Effekt des Klimawandels und der Ressourcenknappheit. Außerdem geht es um Biodiversität und die Widerstandsfähigkeit der Ökosysteme. Die Zeit der erhöhten Nachfrage stellt eine wirkliche Gefahr für das Wohlergehen der Menschheit dar. Eine solche Zukunft führt zu einem inakzeptablen Risiko, das die Widerstandsfähigkeit des Planeten und seiner Bewohner schwächen wird. In diesem Zeitalter gibt es ein inakzeptables Risiko, dass die vom Menschen verursachte Belastung des Planeten, sollten wir weitermachen wie bisher, unerwartete und unwiderrufliche Veränderungen mit katastrophalen Folgen für die menschliche Gesellschaft und das Leben, wie wir es kennen, auslösen wird. Ein Übergang in eine sichere und von jeglicher Not befreite Zukunft ist möglich, aber uns läuft die Zeit davon. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, wäre es erforderlich, die außergewöhnliche Kapazität der Menschheit für Innovation und Kreativität auf den Pfaden einer neuen wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, die vollständig mit den Grundsätzen globaler Nachhaltigkeit integriert sind, in vollem Umfang auszuschöpfen. Eine weltweite Kooperation wird notwendig sein, die Wissenschaft und Gesellschaft verpflichtet und vom Grundsatz der Verantwortlichkeit und Gleichheit geleitet ist. Es erfordert echte politische Führung, um die systemischen Probleme anzugehen. Die expandierende Bevölkerung verlangt mehr und mehr Nahrung, Wasser und Energie. Sie erfordert einen höheren Verbrauch von Bodenschätzen und übt einen wachsenden Druck auf die Umwelt aus. Um letztendlich erfolgreich zu sein und nicht wieder rückgängig zu machende Veränderungen mit möglicherweise katastrophalen Folgen von der Menschheit abzuwenden, werden wir die gesamte mensch