Low Temperature Sciences

Temperature is one of the few physical properties of matter that we quantitatively measure as part of our daily lives. In the morning, we check the temperature outside to decide what clothes to wear and how many layers to put on. When cooking a meal, we may preheat the oven to a certain temperature or check if the meat is done with a thermometer. Upon feeling sick, we can monitor our body temperature to see if a fever is present.

But what is temperature in a scientific sense? In physics, temperature indicates the direction in which heat energy will spontaneously flow. When two objects are in thermal contact — meaning that heat transfer can occur between them — energy will always flow from the object at a higher temperature to the one at a colder temperature. Absolute zero, the lowest possible theoretical temperature, is the point at which no more thermal energy can be extracted from an object. Quantitatively, absolute zero corresponds to -273,15° C or zero kelvins (K).

In the early 1700s, the concept of a limit to the degree of coldness first came about during experiments by French physicist Guillaume Amontons [1]. When studying the air-thermometer, an instrument that measures temperature by the variation in the volume of a gas, he realised there would be a point at which the volume of air was reduced to nothing. Amazingly, the zero estimated by Amontons’ method (-270° C or 3.15 K) all those centuries ago, wasn’t too far off from the modern value we know today [2].

Today, the low temperatures achieved by humans in the lab hover just a hair above absolute zero, far exceeding anything found in nature. In 2003, a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology cooled a sodium gas to half-a-billionth of a degree above absolute zero, the lowest temperature ever recorded [3]. At such temperatures, atoms behave very differently, strange properties of materials begin to emerge, and the effects of interactions at the quantum-mechanical level can be observed. The quest to reach the coldest temperatures ever recorded has led to several Nobel Prize-winning discoveries in superconductivity, superfluidity, and Bose-Einstein condensation.

At the closing of his 2019 public talk in Lindau, Nobel Laureate William D. Phillips talked about the scientific odyssey of ever-colder temperatures and the applications of ultracold atoms to society.

 The complete video is available here.


 From Gas to Liquid: Early Work in Low Temperatures

At the end of the 18th century, scientists took on the challenge of liquefying the three most common gases: oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen [4]. They became known as the “permanent gases” during this time because of their resistance to liquefaction, even after compression with pressures of hundreds of times greater than Earth’s atmospheric pressure at sea level.

In 1869, Irish chemist Thomas Andrews discovered through experiments with carbon dioxide that every gas has a critical temperature above which it cannot be liquified by pressure alone [5]. Dutch physicist Johannes Diderik van der Waals, who received the 1910 Nobel Prize in Physics, later described an equation of state that explained and predicted the critical temperatures of different gases. His Law of Corresponding States, published in 1880, served as a guide during future experiments that led to the liquefaction of hydrogen and helium [6].

Once the concept of critical temperature had been established, the research focus turned to creating lower temperatures instead of higher pressures. One by one, the permanent gases succumbed to liquefaction. Cooling techniques included the cascade process, which uses a series of gases with progressively lower critical temperatures, and the Joule-Thomson cooling effect. The latter is a thermodynamic process that occurs when a gas expands from high pressure to low pressure at constant enthalpy, such as when a compressed gas flows through a small nozzle.

Hydrogen was the last of the permanent gases to liquify, due to its low critical temperature of 33 degrees Kelvin. However, soon scientists realised that helium had an even lower critical temperature, a mere 5 K (-268,15° C). In 1908, Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes first liquified helium with the Joule-Thomson cooling effect, achieving the coldest temperature witnessed on Earth at the time: 0,9 K (-272,25° C) [7]. Afterwards, his experiments with liquid helium led to the 1911 discovery of superconductivity, a property of certain materials where electrical resistance drops to zero at low temperatures [8]. He was awarded the 1913 Nobel Prize in Physics for reaching these major milestones [9].

Douglas D. Osheroff, winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physics, provides a brief overview of Onnes’s major results in the beginning of his 2008 Lindau lecture on scientific advances.

Douglas Osheroff (2008) - How Advances in Science are Made

Well, I hope this talk will give some good advice to the students in the audience but I think it has advice which is probably useful for all of us. I illustrate my talk with some of my own photographs, this of course is San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge. The first of 3 messages that I want to discuss is that those discoveries that most changed the way we think about nature cannot be anticipated, how then are such discoveries made and are there research strategies that can substantially increase one’s chances of making such a discovery. And this is part of the Grand Canyon at sun set. So I will illustrate this idea with a link chain of discoveries and inventions starting with this man here, Heike Kamerlingh Onnes, Kamerlingh Onnes was in a competition with Dewar to see who would first liquefy the lightest and most inert of the atmosphere gases. And it looked like Dewar had won near the turn of the last century, 1890 something when he succeeded in liquefying hydrogen. But eventually Kamerlingh Onnes was able to acquire enough helium, I believe it was the gas that would fill a small party balloon, that he could attempt to liquefy it and succeeded in doing so in 1908. And then he did with the liquid helium exactly what Dewar had done with the hydrogen, he pumped on the vapour above the liquid, causing the liquid to further cool, looking for the temperature where helium solidified. And this was a fairly simple task for Dewar. He started at 21 Kelvin at 1 atmosphere and found that hydrogen solidified at 14 Kelvin under its own vapour pressure. But Kamerlingh Onnes after 2 years was unable to make helium solidify. Now I indeed have cooled liquid helium to 1/10,000 of a Kelvin and it still remains very happily in a liquid state. The reason has to do with quantum mechanics and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which I won’t describe but in fact it’s something that I think all of you understand but at that time quantum mechanics was just being developed. So after failing in what he felt was his main mission over a 2 year period, Kamerlingh Onnes didn’t give up, he instead looked around for some interesting question of the day that he could perhaps answer with his new refrigeration device. And there was an argument as to what would happen to the conductivity of metals as they were cooled towards absolute zero. One argument was that if the metal was very pure that as you cooled it you eliminated the lattice vibrations. And keep in mind this is really happening not very many years after the discovery of the electron. So it’s quite a remarkable thing that these arguments were even possible to be made. Anyway the idea was then that the electrical resistance would go slowly to zero as you eliminated these thermal vibrations of the lattice. But the other school of thought was that the conduction electrons in the metal would re-condense on the ions from which they had come. The system would become completely neutral and electrical conductivity would cease. So Kamerlingh Onnes acquired a very pure sample of mercury and gave it to his graduate student and asked him to measure the electrical resistance to very low temperatures. I put the students name up here, Gilles Holst, I dare say back in those days Kamerlingh Onnes for instance was not of a mind to put his student’s names on the papers. So I’m very lucky that I was not born during this time. The data shown here as the green dots and this is the resistance as a function of temperature and you can see that in fact the resistance was dropping slowly towards zero as the temperature cooled. But then there was a discontinuous drop in the resistance, to a value which was less than 10 to the minus 5 Ohms. That being the resolution of their instrument. So it took Gilles Holst a while to convince his mentor that this wasn’t simply due to an electrical lead falling off of the sample but ultimately of course these were reproducible measurements and this was the first evidence for super conductivity which I would guess has been studied every year since that time. But for the next 15 years if you wanted to study super conductivity you had to come to Leiden, to Kamerlingh Onnes’s laboratory, he was the only one that could reach these very low temperatures. So for 15 years he probably cooled his liquid cryogenic helium 4 down through the temperature of 2.17 Kelvin, probably hundreds of times. Never noticing, never realising that the liquid helium itself was undergoing a phase transition to a super fluid state which is almost as remarkable as the super conducting state itself. By the way his Nobel lecture was on super conductivity or at least these very unusual measurements that they had made. So in fact Kamerlingh Onnes had written in his lab book at some point that the helium appeared to stop boiling at 2 Kelvin but he never actually tried to figure out why this was the case. But let’s look at the research strategies that allowed this discovery to occur. First of all use the best instrumentation available, in this case I’m really talking about the liquefaction facilities that Kamerlingh Onnes developed which really allowed him to look at, into an unexplored part of the physical landscape. He didn’t reinvent those technologies that he could borrow however and Dewar had invented the Dewar flask and Kamerlingh Onnes was very happy to borrow that even though these 2 were rather staunch competitors with one another. Now this is a really useful one I think, that after trying for 2 years to determine where helium solidified, Kamerlingh Onnes gave up on that experiment but he did not give up, as Dewar had done, in studies at low temperatures. So he looked around for something new and I would say that in general failure may well be an invitation to try something new, do not think of it as an invitation to get out of the field. And finally beware of subtle unexplained behaviour, don’t dismiss it. I mean frequently nature does not knock with a very loud sound but rather a very soft whisper and you have to be aware of subtle behaviour which may be in fact a sign that there’s interesting physics to be had. Well no one received the Nobel Prize for discovering the super fluid transition of helium 4. The person that came close was this person here, the transition was known about, one didn’t really understand what was going on. Pyotr Kapitsa in the bleak winter of 1957, in 1937, pardon me, in Moscow determined that the viscosity of liquid helium 4 below this temperature was less than 1 nano poise and for that he shared the 1978 Nobel prize for physics with 2 people whose research field had really very little to do with his own and those were Penzias and Wilson. Arnold Penzias having been my boss’s, boss’s boss for many years at AT and T Bell Laboratories. So Penzias and Wilson were the benefactors of the fact that AT and T had been doing experiments on satellite telecommunications. And they were given a piece of very high tech equipment by AT and T and allowed to use that to study radio noise in astrophysics. This is that very high tech piece of equipment now. This is a hornet antenna which actually has many advantages, it doesn’t see signals coming from the ground. But what was really interesting was what was inside here, there was in fact a very special, very low noise amplifier. Thanks to this gentleman here, this is Charles Townes who invented the maser, this is actually maser number 2, ammonia maser number 2 actually at Columbia University, in order to do very high resolution molecular spectroscopy. But very soon after that in fact Charles Townes realised that one could use this maser action to amplify weak microwave signals. And inside that shed was in fact a ruby rod which was cooled to a temperature of 4.2 Kelvin that would amplify microwave signals without adding substantial amounts of noise to it, in fact this entire system, the antenna plus the amplifiers had an integrated noise signal of 19 Kelvin. So that was actually very good value at that time. This is the first data, now I have to explain what this is. This is called a strip chart recorder paper. I don’t think students know what that is anymore. So the idea is that the paper moves past the pen which moves horizontally back and forth and here they’re recording the signal coming from the antenna. And then they actually put in a switch, a microwave switch which allowed them to then compare that signal to the signal coming from a black body radiating at a temperature of 4.2 Kelvin. So that’s the signal here. And then they do some calibrations and their conclusion was that there was excess noise in the system, apparently coming in from the antenna, although the point of the antenna in a position in space where there were known to be no radio sources. The excess noise was about 3 Kelvin. So they then went back and looked at their apparatus. And what they found was in fact that the pigeons had been roosting inside the antenna. So they said ah, so they cleaned out the pigeon nests and mopped up the pigeon droppings and soldered a few corroded copper plates back in place but nothing that they could do would make this excess noise go away and moreover the noise wasn’t just in this particular place in the sky but in fact wherever they moved their antenna they saw the same noise. So particular Arnold Penzias was very vexed by this and one day he was having a conversation with a Professor Burke up at MIT and Burke suggested that Penzias should call up Professor Robert Dicke at Princeton because Dicke had someone in his group, a Professor Peoples, who had a theory that suggested that as the universe expanded after the big bang that the radiation present would separate from the matter once the matter became neutral. That is when electrons and protons combine to form neutral hydrogen. And so they were in fact looking for this remnant magnetisation. Now I of course at this time, this was 1964, I was a freshman at Caltech but later I was fortunate to be on, serve on a committee with David Wilkinson who was one of the members of Dicke’s group and he was present when that phone call came through. And he described it to me, how Dicke kept asking if Penzias and Wilson had tried this and tried that and what were the circumstances. And eventually he agreed that his group would go up to Crawford Hill to look at Penzias and Wilson’s data. Then he hung up the phone and turned to a few members of his group that were in his office and said: "Gentlemen, we have been scooped." Because in fact Dicke was looking for this but Dicke’s receiver system was based on conventional tube amplifiers and it had an integrated noise temperature of 2,000 Kelvin. So let’s look at the research strategies that allowed this serendipitous discovery as far as Penzias and Wilson were concerned to occur. First use the best technology available and most of that was provided by AT and T so in fact they borrowed a lot of the equipment that they needed. However they added this one key feature which allowed them to make absolute noise measurement, the first absolute radio noise measurements coming from extra terrestrial sources that had ever been seen. Looking at the region of parameter space that is unexplored and again they were the first people to make such absolute measurements. And finally, and this is very important for experimentalists, understand what your instrumentation is measuring. If you do not have confidence in what your instrumentation is measuring and you see some subtle variation from what you expected, you will probably attribute it to your ignorance in understanding your equipment. And you are very likely to miss something, again nature doesn’t knock loudly, she whispers very softly. So since that time of course we’ve had the Kobe Satellite project and this, the intensity of that radiation is the function of wave length, establishing its temperature at 2.725 Kelvin. I think more interestingly perhaps is the fact that if you look at the variation in temperature of that radiation over the sky, these again are plotted in galactic coordinates. You find that in one direction, the direction that you are moving through the local universe, that that radiation is Doppler shifted to a higher temperature and in the opposite direction to a lower temperature. So it’s easy to remove that dipolar effect and then what you see is the plain of the Milky Way galaxy. And I think it’s harder to remove that but if you do that you’re still left with these fluctuations which I think are typically a few millionth’s of a degree, they’re very small things. but in fact the people that had designed this project and looked at these, realised that these signals which were reproducible even when they were very, very small, were evidence for fluctuations in the temperature which was really due to fluctuations in the density of the universe at the point where matter and radiation decouple from one another. So this in fact is a very active area of research and it allows us to study the nature of the universe just 400,000 years after the big bang. A more recent satellite was WMAP, the W is for David Wilkinson who regrettably died before this project got in orbit, that’s one of the problems with doing a project that has a long time line. But now you see very detailed structure in that radiation and one can do a multiple moment expansion of that positional spectrum and find that in fact those, the fluctuations actually agree very well with models including inflation. So for that work, that is the Kobe Satellite work, John Mather and George Smoot who of course you’ve already heard talk here, shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for physics. Well now comes the second of my 3 messages and that is the process of advancing science often leads to inventions or technologies that directly benefit mankind, however it is impossible to tell from where an advance will come that might solve the problem facing mankind. That is the inverse problem. That is to say you may have a technology and not know where it goes but in fact if you have a need it’s very difficult to tell where the technology will come from. Consider just one example NMR which is quite a remarkable, this by the way is part of the Iguazu Falls which is also a remarkable thing to visit if you have the chance, its at the border between Brazil and Paraguay, Argentina, sorry. So in fact NMR was invented in 1946 by these 2 gentlemen, Felix Bloch who was at Stanford University and Ed Purcell who was at Harvard. Ironically I knew Ed Purcell but I did not ever know Felix Bloch. Well when they got the prize they went to Stockholm, 6 years after the invention of NMR, I am sure that they were asked what is NMR going to be good for, because people ask me what super fluid helium 3 was likely to be good for, some 20 years after it was discovered. And from people that I’ve talked to at Stanford, they claim that when asked what NMR might be good for, Felix Bloch replied damn little. To Felix what they had done was they were studying the distribution of charge in atomic nuclei that had nothing to do with solving problems for mankind. Ed Purcell being a bit more thoughtful said perhaps you could use NMR to calibrate magnetic fields. So lets see what's happened to NMR, eventually people could make very uniform magnetic fields and then when they looked at protons in some organic solvent for instance they found that the protons didn’t all resonate at the same frequencies, there were triplets and quadruplets. And these were due to chemical and spin shifts in these molecules. And at this point, once this was realised NMR became an essential tool of organic chemists all over the world. Richard Ernst ported Fourier transform spectroscopy which I think had been developed by Erwin Hahn at UC Berkeley to NMR. And he working with Kurt Wüthrich were able to actually do what they called 2 dimensional NMR but these are frequency dimensions where they would tip one spin and then see how that changed the frequency of another spin. That allows you to determine something about the bond length. And as a result of that work Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize, not in physics but in chemistry in 1991. Kurt Wüthrich continued working however and ultimately he was able to determine the 3 dimensional conformation of even small proteins in aqueous solution, this is the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor which is regarded as the protein structure is best known. And in 2002 Kurt Wüthrich was awarded his own Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work. However we’re not done because back starting in the early ‘70’s people began to realise that if you applied not a very uniform magnetic field but one with a gradient, that is to say that it was larger lets say at the bottom than the top or something like that, one would encrypt information about the position of the various nuclei that were contributing to the NMR signal and if you do that in 3 dimensions you can get these beautiful medical images showing MRI. Now I personally have had both of my knees MRI’d and this is a very healthy knee but mine are not. And for that work Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield shared the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine just one year after Kurt Wüthrich was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry. I should tell you, well I’ll tell you about that later. I think it’s a possibility that there will be a fifth Nobel prize for NMR because in the early ‘90’s Seiji Ogawa working in the biophysics department at AT and T Bell laboratories, and this was a serendipitous discovery, he was looking at rat brains and finding that if he had pulse sequences that were sensitive to the rate, that the protons returned along the magnetic field, that you could image those places in the brain that were processing information because they were sensitive to the oxygenation state of the haemoglobin. And FMRI as its called, functional MRI is really taking psychology and making it from a social science into a natural science which is quite an amazing thing. I want to talk the rest of the time about my own discovery because I think I understand a little bit better and I can make it look like as it was, a completely serendipitous discovery, one in which we hadn’t a clue what it was that we had discovered when we discovered it. And I think that’s frequently the way these things go. The history of helium 3 is rather interesting, it doesn’t exist in sufficient abundance for one to actually create a pure sample, however it was in 1948, working at Los Alamos National Laboratory that Ed Hammel first liquefied helium 3 and measured vapour pressure above the liquid. Now Ed Hammel was in a group that was working on the hydrogen bomb they had lots of tritium around and of course the tritium decays into helium 3. So throughout the 1950’s and even ‘60’s low temperature physicists all over the world studied the properties of liquid helium 3. The reason it’s interesting is helium 3 atoms have a net spin of one ½, so they are Fermi particles like conduction electrons and metals. And you see a lot of the same behaviour. In 1957 Bardeen Cooper and Schrieffer published their theory of super conductivity and very soon it became clear to some theorists such as Philip Anderson, a good friend of mine that this theory might be modified to suggest that other very, fluids of Fermi particles at low temperatures might exhibit similar behaviour. And the first paper was published in 1959 suggested a transition temperature to a super fluid state of 80 mili degrees. Within about 2/3 of a decade people had reached temperatures as low as 2,000th of a degree, did not see any super fluidity. I became a graduate student in 1967 and at that time the conventional wisdom was that BCS super fluidity in helium 3 was a pipe dream by the theorists. Now I don’t know if you guys know what a pipe dream means but that means you’re smoking something that you shouldn’t be smoking. So however when I came to Cornel in fact there were new refrigeration technologies being developed such as the helium 3, helium 4 dilution refrigerator and I felt that would give me a promise of being able to look at nature in a new and very different realm. And that is why I became a member of the low temperature group. But the thing that really sealed it for me was the talk by Bob Richardson who may or may not be in this audience right now, Bob, ok, and that was based on a speculation by Isaac Pomeranchuk who was a member of the Landau school. Made in 1950 just one year after the publication of the results by Ed Hammel’s group. He realised that in the solid, the nuclear spins would be very weakly interacting and so in fact that system would have an entropy of r log 2, just 2 states available to very low temperatures. Whereas the liquid entropy would drop much more rapidly if it were a degenerate Fermi fluid, it would drop linearly as we know it does in metals for the conduction electrons. And below the temperature where these 2 curves crossed, the liquid would be more highly ordered and solid, it’s a very unusual system. So one could then actually calculate very easily that the latent heat of solification was negative. And so if you started with liquid helium 3 and increased the pressure by decreasing the volume, you’d reach the melting curve and then you’d travel along the melting curve to lower and lower temperatures, eventually coming off at some very low temperature. The cooling you get is about 1 mili degree for every percent of the liquid that you convert to solid. So this is in fact what really hooked me on doing low temperature physics and it was actually in my second year graduate study, actually while I was still in the hospital bed recovering from knee surgery on my right knee that I developed this cell, which is the Pomeranchuk cell that I used in the discovery of super fluidity in helium 3. Helium 3 is kind of expensive so I show it as gold here. And the idea is to solidify it you must decrease the volume of this container so we push a metal bellows in side. We measure the temperature by looking at the polarisation of platinum nuclei along the weak magnetic field using NMR and then we measure the melting pressure independently of that. So this is the data that I obtained, I was actually doing an experiment that was completely, it would never have worked. I won’t explain that here, we don’t have the time but this is, I'm plotting now capacitance but the pressure is increasing vertically and the time is increasing to the right. So in fact the system is cooling because of the negli slope melting curve. I rebalanced the bridge and it keeps cooling and then at this point that I later labelled as A, we saw a very dramatic decrease in the rate of cooling. I was not very happy to see that, I assumed that the metal bellows had started pushing on solid helium 3 causing irreversible processes. But I had started this at 22 mili degrees and I realised that if I pre-cooled the liquid helium 3 sample over this long weekend, it was the Thanksgiving weekend, that I could start the next Monday at 15 mili degrees, the base temperature of my helium 3, helium 4 dilution refrigerator. And so here I tried that experiment again and you see exactly the same curve. But the starting conditions were very different, it seemed to me extremely unlikely that this pressure which had reproduced itself to about a part in a 100,000 could in fact possibly be a random heating event, it was far more likely it was the signature of some completely unexpected phase transition inside this mixture of liquid and solid helium 3. Then I continued letting this thing cool at a temperature which we now know is about 1.6 mili Kelvin, in fact I saw a very tiny drop in pressure. And this in fact was the signature of a second transition. So the question is were these transitions in the liquid or the solid. Eventually I developed a very early form of magnetic resonance imaging. Here I apply a magnetic field gradient, so the field was larger at the bottom than the top. And then if applied a single RF frequency to my NMR coil, in fact I would only get a thin resonant layer where the magnetic field had the right value for the frequency. And then if I swept the frequency upward this resonant layer would move downward etc. So this is a CW version of one dimensional MRI. I asked Paul Lauterbur when he visited Bell laboratories if he’d read my paper and he said yes, indeed he read it in 1972, the year it came out. Now I didn’t ask him the obvious question, did this have any effect on his decision to pursue MRI but in fact he started doing his work in 1973. Unfortunately he’s dead now so I can’t ask him. Here’s some of the data that we got out, so now everything is different, time is increasing to the left and pressure is increasing downward, because I’ve actually turned the data upside down. You like to think of NMR as resonances that go up but they actually go down. So this is low frequency to high frequency, high frequency to low frequency, low frequency to high frequency. And you can see these big peaks or solid peaks but there was a liquid signal in between these. So we could differentiate these 2 signals. Now at the B transition which is shown here, all the solid peaks would drop by a couple of percent, 1 to 2 percent. And it wasn’t for several days, this was taken at April 17th, it was April 20th when I was re-analysing this data that I noticed in fact that the liquid signal had dropped, not by 2% but by 50%. And so it was at that moment that I wrote in my lab book, you notice the time, 2.40 a.m., it’s a wonderful time to do physics. Very quiet, there are no distractions, less electrical noise, less vibrations, it’s a wonderful time. Have discovered the BCS transition in liquid helium 3. Now in fact I only reached that conclusion because I didn’t understand the BCS theory very well. These are really very unconventional BCS states, the first that had ever been seen. That was in April 20th, in early June in fact Dave Lee, we still thought that the A transition was in the solid, the B transition was clearly in the liquid. So we felt that we removed this magnetic field gradient and now we’re plotting things as a function of frequency. Trying to see if the solid signal shifted as we cooled down. But what we found instead was that the liquid signal shifted. This was completely unexpected. And really not understood at all. When we published the paper, we published the results but we did not call it a BCS state. It wasn’t until Tony Legget did his work which actually happened remarkably fast, Tony then shared the Nobel Prize in 2003. So I think you’re telling me I have 5 minute left. Ok we’re just about done, strategies, view nature from a new perspective or a different realm. Its really a way to find interesting physics and you know I told you that I’d been doing this completely hopeless experiment, failure may be an invitation to try something new, and I did, spent a little time doing something different. Curiosity driven research is fun and it can be rewarding and generally it doesn’t take all that much time. And this is if you’re a graduate student, avoid too many commitments, if I had been taking ballroom dancing, actually more likely I would have been taking a course in conversational Chinese since my wife is Chinese, I would guess when they took away the equipment that forced me to do the experiment that I hadn’t planned on doing, I would have probably been behind and I would have been catching up on my Chinese (speaking in Chinese) or something like that. But the point is in fact the demands of good research do not adhere to a schedule and if you’re a graduate student, this is the opportunity of a lifetime for you, don’t blow it. And finally and this is for everyone, I think back off from what you’re doing occasionally to gain a better perspective on the task at hand. We become myopic and often we focus too tightly on our work. Just about done, here I am getting the Nobel Prize, I have a problem with Nobel Prizes, you look at that and you say Osheroff did it, well actually to be more technically correct, it was Osheroff, Richardson and Lee did that, but in fact that’s really not correct at all. Because I now show the cell of mine again and I put the names of those people who contributed insights or technologies that were essential for our making this discovery and there are about 14 up there but I could probably put up 24 just as likely. Advances in science are not made by individuals alone, they result from progress of the scientific community world wide asking questions, developing new technologies to answer those questions and sharing their results and their ideas with others. To have rapid progress and I want the DOE and NSF people to listen to this, one must support scientific research broadly and encourage scientists to interact with one another and to spend a bit of their time satisfying their own curiosities. This is how advances in science are made. Thank you.

Ich hoffe, dieser Vortrag enthält interessante Anregungen für die Studenten im Publikum, glaube aber, dass er nützliche Informationen für uns alle bietet. Ich werde während meines Vortrags einige Fotos zur Veranschaulichung heranziehen – hier sehen Sie zum Beispiel die Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Zunächst möchte ich die erste meiner drei Thesen erörtern: Die Entdeckungen, die unsere Sichtweise auf die Natur am deutlichsten verändert haben, sind nicht vorhersehbar. Wie werden diese Entdeckungen überhaupt gemacht und gibt es geeignete Forschungsstrategien, die die Chancen auf eine Entdeckung wesentlich erhöhen? Und hier sehen Sie einen Teil des Grand Canyons bei Sonnenuntergang. Diese These werde ich anhand einer Reihe miteinander verbundener Entdeckungen und Erfindungen erläutern und beginne mit diesem Herrn: Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Kamerlingh Onnes wetteiferte mit Dewar darum, wer als erster das leichteste und trägste Gas der atmosphärischen Gase verflüssigt. Vor Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts, d.h. so um 1890 schien Dewar mit der Verflüssigung von Wasserstoff diesen Wettkampf gewonnen zu haben. Schließlich aber gelang es Kamerlingh Onnes, eine ausreichende Menge von Helium – so ungefähr einen kleinen Luftballon voll – zu erlangen und diese 1908 zu verflüssigen. Anschließend ging er mit dem flüssigen Helium genauso vor wie Dewar zuvor mit dem Wasserstoff, er pumpte den Dampf über der Flüssigkeit ab, die dadurch noch weiter abkühlte und untersuchte, bei welcher Temperatur sich Helium verfestigt. Bei Dewar war diese Aufgabe noch recht einfach. Er begann bei 21 Grad Kelvin und einem Druck von einer Atmosphäre und stellte fest, dass Wasserstoff sich bei 14 Kelvin unter dem eigenen Dampfdruck verfestigt. Kamerlingh Onnes hingegen war auch nach zwei Jahren noch nicht in der Lage, Helium zu verfestigen. Ich selbst habe Flüssighelium auf 1/10.000 Kelvin abgekühlt und es befand sich nach wie vor in einem recht flüssigen Aggregatzustand. Der Grund hierfür ist in der Quantenmechanik und der Heisenbergschen Unschärferelation zu finden. Hierauf will ich jetzt nicht näher eingehen, da Ihnen allen die Zusammenhänge sicherlich bekannt sind – nur damals befand sich die Quantenphysik gerade in ihren Anfängen. Nachdem es Kamerlingh Onnes nun über zwei Jahre nicht gelungen war, die für ihn wichtigste Aufgabe umzusetzen, gab er aber nicht auf. Vielmehr hielt er nun Ausschau nach einem interessanten aktuellen Problem, für das er mit seinem neuen Tiefkühlsystem eine Lösung finden könnte. Es wurde zu der Zeit debattiert, inwieweit die Leitfähigkeit von Metallen verändert wird, wenn diese auf Temperaturen nahe dem absoluten Nullpunkt heruntergekühlt werden. Zum einen wurde argumentiert, dass bei sehr reinem Metall beim Kühlen die Gitterschwingungen eliminiert werden. Und dabei muss man sich vor Augen führen, dass dies nur wenige Jahre nach der Entdeckung der Elektronen war. Es ist schon erstaunlich, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt solche Diskussionen überhaupt möglich waren. Nun hatte man die Vorstellung, dass der elektrische Widerstand durch die Aufhebung der thermischen Gitterschwankungen langsam gegen Null gehen würde. Es gab jedoch auch eine andere Denkrichtung, nach der die Leitungselektronen im Metall wieder auf den Ionen kondensieren, von denen sie abgegeben wurden. Das System würde somit komplett neutralisiert und die elektrische Leitfähigkeit wäre aufgehoben. Kamerlingh Onnes gab nun seinem Doktoranden eine sehr reine Quecksilberprobe und forderte ihn auf, deren elektrischen Widerstand bei sehr tiefen Temperaturen zu messen. Ich habe hier an dieser Stelle auch den Namen des betreffenden Studenten aufgeführt, er hieß Gilles Holst. Ich könnte mir denken, dass es zu den Zeiten von Kamerlingh Onnes nicht unbedingt die Regel war, den Namen seiner Studenten in seinen Schriften zu nennen. Vor dem Hintergrund bin ich froh, dass ich nicht in dieser Zeit geboren wurde. Die hier als grüne Punkte dargestellten Werte entsprechen dem Widerstand in Abhängigkeit von der Temperatur. Wie Sie sehen, verringerte sich der Widerstand bei sinkender Temperatur langsam gegen Null. Dann aber gab es ein plötzliches Absinken des Widerstands auf einen Wert von unter 10 hoch -5 Ohm. Hierbei handelte es sich um die Auflösung ihres Instruments. Gilles Holst war eine Weile damit beschäftigt, seinen Mentor davon zu überzeugen, dass dies nicht einfach auf ein gelöstes Kabel zurückzuführen war. Natürlich wurden die Messungen wiederholt und dies war dann letztendlich der erste Nachweis der Supraleitung, die seit dieser Zeit wohl in jedem Jahr weiter untersucht wurde. In den darauffolgenden 15 Jahren jedoch musste jeder, der die Supraleitung erforschen wollte, das Labor von Kamerlingh Onnes in Leiden aufsuchen, da nur dort diese außerordentlich niedrigen Temperaturen erreicht werden konnten. sein flüssiges kryogenes Helium 4 auf eine Temperatur von 2,17 Kelvin, ohne zu erkennen bzw. zu realisieren, dass das flüssige Helium selbst eine Übergangsphase in den suprafluiden Zustand durchlief, die ebenso außergewöhnlich war wie der supraleitende Zustand an sich. Übrigens war das Thema seines Nobelvortrags die Supraleitung oder zumindest die außerordentlich ungewöhnlichen Messungen, die sie durchgeführt hatten. Kamerlingh Onnes hatte in seinem Laborberichten zwar erwähnt, dass das Helium an einem bestimmten Punkt bei 2 Kelvin aufhörte zu sieden, tatsächlich hat er aber niemals untersucht, woran das eigentlich lag. Schauen wir uns aber einmal an, welche Forschungsstrategien diese Entdeckung überhaupt ermöglicht haben. Da war zunächst der Einsatz der besten verfügbaren technischen Ausrüstung. In diesem Fall also die von Kamerlingh Onnes entwickelte Verflüssigungsanlage, die es ihm ermöglichte, einen bisher unerforschten Bereich der Physik näher zu untersuchen. Die bereits verfügbaren technischen Einrichtungen erfand er aber nicht neu, sondern lieh sich das von Dewar erfundene Dewargefäß für diesen Zweck aus. Kamerlingh Onnes konnte sich glücklich schätzen, dass er dies Gefäß leihen konnte, obwohl er mit Dewar in intensivem Wettbewerb stand. Für mich ist der wirklich entscheidende Punkt, dass Kamerlingh Onnes zwar nach zwei Jahren seinen Versuch, die Verfestigungstemperatur von Helium zu bestimmen, aufgab, sich aber anders als Dewar weiterhin mit Untersuchungen im Tieftemperaturbereich beschäftigte. Er suchte einfach nach einer neuen Aufgabenstellung – und ich bin überzeugt, dass Niederlagen allgemein sehr wohl als Aufforderung zu verstehen sind, einen neuen Ansatz zu finden. Lassen Sie sich von Niederlagen also auf keinem Fall ganz und gar vom Weg abbringen. Und achten Sie besonders auf die feinen und ungeklärten Reaktionen, nehmen Sie diese ernst. Denn häufig klopft die Natur nicht laut und vernehmlich an, sondern flüstert vielmehr ganz leise. Und wenn Sie diese zarten Zeichen entdecken, dann können sich dahinter interessante physikalische Phänomene verbergen. Nun, keiner erhielt den Nobelpreis für die Entdeckung des Phasenübergangs von Helium 4 in den suprafluiden Zustand. Man wusste bereits um den Phasenübergang an sich, konnte aber nicht genau nachvollziehen, wie dieser eigentlich vor sich ging. Der Lösung am nächsten kam dieser Herr – Pjotr Kapiza, der im rauen Winter Moskaus im Jahr 1957, Verzeihung es war 1937, feststellte, dass die Viskosität von flüssigem Helium 4 unterhalb dieser Temperatur weniger als 1 Nanopoise betrugt. Hierfür erhielt er gemeinsam mit zwei Wissenschaftlern, deren Forschungsgebiet wirklich nur wenig mit seinem zu tun hatte – und zwar Penzias und Wilson – 1978 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Arnold Penzias war übrigens über viele Jahre der Chef vom Chef meines Chefs bei AT and T Bell Laboratories. Penzias und Wilson profitierten von der Tatsache, dass AT and T im Bereich der Nachrichtensatelliten Experimente durchführte. Dadurch erhielten sie von AT and T ein High-Tech-System, das sie dafür einsetzten, Radiosignale aus dem All zu untersuchen. Und hier sehen Sie dieses High-Tech-System. Es handelt sich um eine Hornantenne, die tatsächlich viele Vorteile bietet. Sie erfasst keine Signale, die vom Boden kommen. Wirklich interessant jedoch war der darin befindliche, ganz spezielle rauscharme Verstärker. Diesen haben wir folgendem Herrn zu verdanken – Charles Townes, dem Erfinder des Masers. Dies hier ist der zweite Maser, genauer gesagt eine Ammoniak-Maser für hochauflösende molekulare Spektroskopie in der Columbia University. Nur kurze Zeit später entdeckte Charles Townes dann, dass die Wirkung dieses Masers auch zum Verstärken von schwachen Mikrowellensignalen eingesetzt werden kann. In diesem Schuppen hier befand sich ein Rubinstab, der auf eine Temperatur von 4,2 Kelvin gekühlt wurde und die Mikrowellensignale verstärkte, ohne dadurch in wesentlichem Maße zusätzliche Geräusche zu erzeugen. Das gesamte System, d. h. die Antenne mit den Verstärkern wies ein integriertes Rauschsignal von 19 Kelvin auf. Dies war zur damaligen Zeit ein ausgezeichneter Wert. Hier sind die ersten Daten, die ich Ihnen erst einmal genauer erläutern muss. Es handelt sich hierbei um einen Papierstreifen von einem Streifenschreiber. Die heutigen Studenten kennen diesen wahrscheinlich gar nicht mehr. Nun, beim Streifenschreiber läuft der Papierstreifen unter einem Stift entlang, der sich in horizontaler Richtung hin und her bewegt und somit in diesem Fall die von der Antenne ausgehenden Signale aufzeichnet. Dann bauten sie einen Schalter ein, und zwar einen Mikrowellenschalter, der es ihnen ermöglichte, dieses Signal mit dem Signal der Strahlung eines schwarzen Körpers bei einer Temperatur von 4,2 Kelvin zu vergleichen. Das entspricht dann diesem Signal hier. Sie nahmen dann noch einige Einstellungen vor und kamen zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass das System noch Rauschsignale aufwies, die offensichtlich von der Antenne kamen – und dies obwohl die Antennenspitze sich in einer Position im All befand, in der es bekanntermaßen keine Radioquellen gab. Das Rauschen lag bei 3 Kelvin. Daraufhin gingen sie noch einmal zurück, untersuchten ihre Apparatur und fanden heraus, dass innerhalb der Antenne Tauben nisteten. Nun schien für sie alles klar, sie entfernten das Taubennest und den Vogelmist und tauschten einige korrodierte Kupferplatten aus, die sie wieder in ihrer ursprünglichen Position festlöteten. Aber der gewünschte Erfolg blieb aus, das Rauschen war immer noch vorhanden. Darüber hinaus war es nicht auf besondere Positionen im All beschränkt – wie auch immer sie die Antenne ausrichteten, die Rauschsignale blieben unverändert. Dies irritierte insbesondere Arnold Penzias und in einem Gespräch mit Professor Burke am MIT schlug dieser ihm vor, Kontakt mit Professor Robert Dicke an der Princeton University aufzunehmen. Zu dessen Team gehörte ein gewisser Professor Peebles, der eine Theorie aufgestellt hatte, nach der sich bei der Expansion des Universums in Folge des Urknalls die Strahlung von der Materie trennt, sobald diese neutralisiert ist, d.h. wenn die Elektronen und Protonen sich zu neutralem Wasserstoff verbinden. So suchten sie nach genau dieser magnetischen Remanenz. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt, d.h. 1964 war ich ein Neuling bei Caltech. Später jedoch hatte ich das Glück, mit im Boot zu sein, d.h. mit David Wilkinson im Ausschuss. David Wilkinson war Mitglied des Teams um Dicke und er war anwesend, als der Anruf von Penzias durchgestellt wurde. Später beschrieb er mir dann, wie Dicke nachfragte, ob Penzias und Wilson dieses und jenes versucht hätten und wie die genauen Bedingungen aussahen. Schließlich erklärte er, dass seine Gruppe nach Crawford Hill kommen würde, um sich die Daten von Penzias und Dicke anzusehen. Dann legte er auf, wandte sich an einige Mitglieder seines Teams, die sich in seinem Büro aufhielten, und sagte zu Ihnen „meine Herren, da ist uns jemand zuvorgekommen“. Dicke forschte nämlich genau in derselben Richtung, nur basierte sein Empfängersystem auf einer konventionellen Verstärkerröhre und wies eine integrierte Rauschtemperatur von 2.000 Kelvin auf. Schauen wir uns nun einmal die Forschungsstrategien an, die zu dieser für Penzias und Wilson zufälligen Entdeckung führten. Da ist zunächst wieder der Einsatz der besten verfügbaren Technik, die von AT and T zur Verfügung gestellt wurde, d.h. ein wesentlicher Teil der erforderlichen Ausrüstung war geliehen. Dann aber kombinierten sie diese Ausrüstung mit einer entscheidenden Komponente, die es ihnen ermöglichte, absolute Rauschmessungen durchzuführen, die ersten absoluten Messungen von Radiosignalen überhaupt, die von einer außerirdischen Quelle stammten. Betrachtet man nun den Bereich des unerforschten Parameterraums, so waren sie auch hier die ersten, die derartige absolute Messungen durchführten. Schließlich – und das ist für Wissenschaftler in der Forschung von entscheidender Bedeutung – muss man verstehen, was genau die Messgeräte messen. Wenn Sie kein Vertrauen in die Messergebnisse ihrer Ausrüstung haben und eine noch so geringe Abweichung von dem erwarteten Ergebnis beobachten, dann werden Sie diese vermutlich darauf zurückführen, dass Sie Ihre Messgeräte nicht richtig verstanden haben. In diesem Fall ist die Gefahr groß, dass Ihnen etwas entgeht – wie gesagt, die Natur klopft nicht laut an, sie flüstert nur ganz leise. Nun, in der Zwischenzeit gab es natürlich das Satellitenprojekt COBE – das zu diesen Daten führte, d.h. die Intensität der Strahlung in Abhängigkeit von der Wellenlänge bei einer Temperatur von 2,725 Kelvin. Noch interessanter sind meiner Meinung nach die Temperaturvariationen der Strahlung in Abhängigkeit von der Position am Himmel, die hier über galaktische Koordinaten eingetragen sind. In der einen Richtung, d.h. in der Bewegungsrichtung durch das lokale Universum ist eine Dopplerverschiebung der Strahlung zu einer höheren Temperatur und in entgegengesetzter Richtung zu einer niedrigeren Temperatur zu beobachten. Diesen bipolaren Effekt kann man einfach eliminieren und dann sieht man die Ebene der Milchstraßengalaxie. Die ist etwas schwerer zu eliminieren, danach aber bleiben diese Schwankungen, die typischerweise in einer Größenordnung von ein paar millionstel Grad liegen, d.h. es sind sehr niedrige Werte. Die Menschen, die dieses Projekt entwickelt haben und diese Schwankungen betrachteten, erkannten, dass diese reproduzierbaren Signale – so winzig sie auch sein mochten – ein Beweis für Temperaturschwankungen waren. Diese wiederum waren zurückzuführen auf Dichteschwankungen im Universum an dem Punkt, an dem sich Materie und Strahlung voneinander trennen. Dies ist also in der Tat ein äußerst aktives Forschungsgebiet, das es uns ermöglicht, die Natur des Universums 400.000 Jahre nach dem Urknall zu untersuchen. Es folgte dann der WMAP-Satellit, wobei das W für David Wilkinson steht, der bedauerlicherweise verstarb, bevor der Satellit in den Orbit geschickt wurde. Dies ist eines der vielen Probleme bei solch langfristig angelegten Projekten. Diese Strahlung weist eine sehr detaillierte Struktur auf und über eine Multipolentwicklung des Positionsspektrums ist dann festzustellen, dass die Fluktuationen mit vielen Modellen, einschließlich des Inflationsmodells, übereinstimmen. Für diese Arbeit im Rahmen des COBE-Satellitenprojekts erhielten John Mather und George Smoot, deren Beiträge Sie ja hier bereits hören konnten, 2006 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Und nun kommen wir zur zweiten meiner drei Thesen, d.h. dass der Fortschritt in der Wissenschaft häufig zu Erfindungen oder Technologien führt, die einen direkten Nutzen für die Menschheit haben. Es ist jedoch unmöglich vorauszusehen, wo genau ein Fortschritt zu einer Lösung von Problemen, mit denen die Menschheit konfrontiert ist, zu erwarten ist. Das ist das umgekehrte Problem. Man kann z.B. eine Technologie entwickelt haben und nicht wissen, wohin diese führt. Wenn man aber spezifische Anforderungen hat, ist es außerordentlich schwer zu sagen, woraus diese Technologie hervorgehen wird. Nimmt man einmal das sehr bemerkenswerte Beispiel der Kernspinresonanz (NMR) – hier sehen Sie übrigens die Iguazú-Wasserfälle, die sich an der Grenze zwischen Brasilien und Paraguay – nein Verzeihung – zwischen Brasilien und Argentinien befinden, die sind ebenfalls sehr bemerkenswert. Die sollten Sie sich unbedingt ansehen, wenn Sie die Gelegenheit dazu haben. Also die NMR wurde 1946 durch diese beiden Herren erfunden: Felix Bloch von der Stanford University und Ed Purcell von der Harvard University. Während ich Ed Purcell persönlich kannte, habe ich Felix Bloch nie gesehen. Nun, als die beiden sechs Jahre nach der Erfindung von NMR für die Preisverleihung nach Stockholm gereist sind, hat man sie sicherlich gefragt, wofür die NMR nützlich sein wird – ich selbst bin nämlich gut 20 Jahre nach der Entdeckung von suprafluidem Helium 3 ebenfalls von vielen gefragt worden, wozu dieses denn gut sei. Ich habe in Stanford mit Menschen gesprochen, die mir versichert haben, dass Felix Bloch auf die Frage, wozu NMR gut sei, geantwortet habe „für herzlich wenig“. Für Felix hatten die von ihnen durchgeführten Untersuchungen zur Ladungsverteilung in Atomkernen überhaupt nichts mit der Lösung von Problemen der Menschheit zu tun. Ed Purcell war da etwas überlegter und meinte, man könne die NMR vielleicht zur Kalibrierung von Magnetfeldern verwenden. Schauen wir uns einmal an, wie es mit der NMR weiterging – schließlich konnte man damit sehr homogene Magnetfelder erzeugen. Bei der Untersuchung der Protonen in einem organischen Lösungsmittel stellte man dann fest, dass die Protonen nicht alle mit derselben Frequenz schwangen, es gab Tripletts und Quartetts. Diese waren auf chemische Verschiebungen und Spinverschiebungen in den Molekülen zurückzuführen. Die NMR wurde somit zu einem wichtigen Werkzeug für organische Chemiker in der ganzen Welt. Richard Ernst kombinierte die von Erwin Hahn an der University of California, Berkeley entwickelte Fourier-Transform-Infrarotspektrographie mit der NMR. In Zusammenarbeit mit Kurt Wüthrich war er dann in der Lage, die sogenannte zweidimensionale NMR durchzuführen. Hier ging es dann aber um Frequenzdimensionen, d.h. man kippte einen Spin und untersuchte dann, wie dieser die Frequenz eines anderen Spins beeinflusste. Somit erhält man Informationen über die Bindungslänge. Für diese Arbeit wurde Richard Ernst 1991 der Nobelpreis verliehen– und zwar nicht für Physik sondern für Chemie. Kurt Wüthrich setzt diese Forschungsarbeiten fort und konnte dann schließlich die dreidimensionale Konformation selbst der kleinsten Proteine in einer wässrigen Lösung nachweisen. Hier sehen Sie den Trypsin-Inhibitor aus der Bauchspeicheldrüse des Rindes – die wohl bekannteste Proteinstruktur. Für sein Werk erhielt Kurt Wüthrich 2002 den Nobelpreis für Chemie. Aber wir sind noch lange nicht am Ende – in den frühen 70ern stellten Wissenschaftler fest, dass man Informationen zu der Position der einzelnen Kerne, die zum NMR-Signal beitragen, erhält, wenn man kein sehr homogenes Magnetfeld, sondern eines mit einem Gradienten anlegt, d.h. das Magnetfeld ist beispielsweise unten breiter als oben. Wenn man dies nun über drei Dimensionen durchführt, erhält man solche schönen MRT-Aufnahmen. Nun, ich selbst habe MRT-Aufnahmen von meinen beiden Knien machen lassen – meine sehen aber nicht so gut aus wie dieses gesunde Knie hier. Hierfür teilten sich Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin nur ein Jahr nachdem Kurt Wüthrich mit dem Nobelpreis in Chemie ausgezeichnet worden war. Ich sollte Ihnen noch erzählen – aber nein, dazu kommen wir später. Ich halte es für möglich, dass noch ein fünfter Nobelpreis für die NMR verliehen wird – in den frühen 90ern hat der in der Abteilung für Biophysik bei AT and T Bell Laboratories tätige Seiji Ogawa nämlich eine völlig unerwartete Entdeckung gemacht. Bei der Untersuchung des Gehirns von Ratten stellte er fest, dass bei Impulsfolgen, die von der Geschwindigkeit der Protonen bei der Bewegung entlang des magnetischen Felds abhängig sind, die Hirnareale, in denen Informationen verarbeitet werden, abgebildet werden können, da diese vom Blutsauerstoffgehalt beeinflusst werden. Diese funktionelle MRT – auch fMRT genannt – gewinnt zunehmende Bedeutung in der Psychologie und wandelt somit eine Sozialwissenschaft in eine Naturwissenschaft – ein wirklich erstaunliches Phänomen. Ich möchte mich jetzt in der verbleibenden Zeit auf meine eigenen Entdeckungen konzentrieren, da ich davon etwas mehr verstehe. Ich möchte aufzeigen, wie es wirklich war, dass wir keinen blassen Schimmer hatten, was wir überhaupt entdeckten, als wir es entdeckten. Und ich glaube, dass es häufig genau nach diesem Schema abläuft. Die Geschichte von Helium 3 ist sehr interessant, es liegt nicht ausreichenden Mengen vor, um eine reine Probe zu erhalten. Im Jahr 1948 verflüssigte der im Los Alamos National Laboratory tätige Ed Hammel als erster Helium 3 und maß den Dampfdruck über der Flüssigkeit. Ed Hammel gehörte einem Team an, das an der Wasserstoffbombe arbeitete und somit über Mengen an Tritium verfügte. Tritium zerfällt bekanntlich zu Helium 3. In den 1950ern und auch noch in den 1960er Jahren untersuchten dann die Tieftemperaturphysiker weltweit die Eigenschaften von flüssigem Helium 3. Das Thema war deshalb interessant, weil die Helium-3-Atome einen Nettospin von ½ haben, d.h. sie sind Fermi-Teilchen wie Leitungselektronen in Metallen. Das Verhalten ist weitgehend identisch. Im Jahr 1957 veröffentlichten Bardeen, Cooper und Schrieffer ihre Supraleitungstheorie und schon bald erkannten einige Theoretiker, wie z.B. Philip Anderson – ein guter Freund von mir – dass diese Theorie dahingehend modifiziert werden müsse, dass andere Fermi-Flüssigkeiten bei niedrigen Temperaturen ein ähnliches Verhalten aufweisen können. In der 1959 als erste veröffentlichten Studie wurde eine Übergangstemperatur in den suprafluiden Zustand von 80 Milligrad angegeben. Innerhalb von sechs bis sieben Jahren hatten Wissenschaftler niedrige Temperaturen von bis zu 1/2000 Grad erreicht und konnten keine Suprafluidität erkennen. laut Lehrmeinung als reine Fata Morgana – wie Erscheinungen nach dem Rauchen von Stoffen, die man lieber nicht rauchen sollte. Nun, als ich dann nach Cornel kam, wurden dort neue Tiefkühltechnologien entwickelt wie z.B. die 3He/4He-Mischungskühlung, die ich als vielversprechende Grundlage für einen neuen Ansatz zur Betrachtung der Natur in einem anderen Kontext ansah. Aus diesem Grund schloss ich mich der Gruppe der Tieftemperaturphysiker an. Diese Entscheidung wurde dann besiegelt durch einen Vortrag von Bob Richardson, der vielleicht sogar hier im Publikum sitzt…? Also der Vortrag ging um eine These von Isaac Pomeranchuk, einem Mitglied der Landau School, die er 1950 aufstellte, d.h. ein Jahr nach der Veröffentlichung der Ergebnisse von Ed Hammels Team. Er hatte eine geringe Wechselwirkung zwischen Kernspins in der festen Phase beobachtet und festgestellt, dass das System eine Entropie von r log 2 aufwies, d.h. nur 2 verfügbare Zustände bis zu einer sehr tiefen Temperatur. Im flüssigen Zustand würde die Entropie schneller sinken, bei einer zerfallenden Fermi-Flüssigkeit verliefe die Abnahme dann wie bei den Leitungselektronen in Metallen linear. Unterhalb einer Temperatur, bei der sich diese beiden Kurven schneiden, würde die Flüssigkeit dann eine geordnete Struktur aufweisen und fest sein – das war ein sehr ungewöhnliches System. Man konnte somit einfach berechnen, dass die latente Erstarrungswärme negativ sein musste. Wenn man nun mit flüssigem Helium 3 begann und den Druck durch Verringerung des Volumens erhöhte, kam an die Schmelzkurve und verringerte entlang der Schmelzkurve schrittweise die Temperatur auf immer niedrigere Werte, bis man schließlich eine sehr tiefe Temperatur erreichte. Hierbei ergibt sich eine Kühlung von 1 Milligrad für jedes Prozent an Flüssigkeit, das in die feste Phase überführt wurde. Genau das hat mich an der Tieftemperaturphysik fasziniert – und im zweiten Jahr meines Aufbaustudiums habe ich dann nach meiner Operation am rechten Knie während der Rekonvaleszenz im Krankenhaus die folgende Zelle entwickelt – das ist die Pomeranchuk-Zelle, die ich bei der Entdeckung der Suprafluidität von Helium 3 verwendet habe. Da Helium 3 sehr teuer ist, habe ich es hier in Gold dargestellt. Um eine Verfestigung zu erreichen, muss man nun das Volumen dieses Behälters reduzieren, zu diesem Zweck wird der Metallfaltenbalg im Innern verschoben. Zur Messung der Temperatur beobachteten wir die Polarisation von Platinkernen entlang des schwachen Magnetfelds mit Hilfe der NMR und maßen gleichzeitig unabhängig davon den Schmelzdruck. Das hier sind die Daten, die ich erhielt – es handelte sich um ein Experiment, das komplett – also, das eigentlich gar nicht funktionieren konnte. Das kann ich an dieser Stelle leider nicht näher erläutern, da es den Zeitrahmen sprengen würde. Hier ist die Kapazität dargestellt, der Druckanstieg wird in vertikaler Richtung entlang der y-Achse abgebildet, während die Zeit nach rechts entlang der x-Achse verläuft. Tatsächlich kühlt das System, da die Schmelzkurve eine negative Steigung aufweist. Ich habe das System dann ausgeglichen und die Kühlung blieb – an dem Punkt, den ich später mit A bezeichnet habe, erkannte man dann einen drastischen Rückgang in der Abkühlgeschwindigkeit. Darüber war ich nicht sehr glücklich und vermutete, dass der Metallfaltenbalg gegen festes Helium 3 drückte und somit irreversible Prozesse auslöste. Ich hatte den Versuch bei 22 Milligrad begonnen und mir wurde klar, dass, wenn ich die flüssige Helium-3-Probe über das lange Wochenende vorkühlte – es war Thanksgiving – ich am darauffolgenden Montag bei 15 Milligrad starten konnte. Dies entsprach der Basistemperatur meines 3He/4He-Mischungskühlers. Ich führte das Experiment dann noch einmal durch und erhielt eine völlig identische Kurve. Angesichts der unterschiedlichen Ausgangsbedingungen erschien es mir sehr unwahrscheinlich, dass der sich zu 1/100.000 wieder einstellende Druck das Ergebnis zufälliger Erwärmung war, sondern vielmehr, dass er ein Anzeichen für einen völlig unerwarteten Phasenübergang innerhalb der Mischung von Helium 3 in flüssiger und fester Form war. Ich ließ die Probe dann weiter abkühlen bis auf eine Temperatur von 1,6 Millikelvin – das wissen wir heute – und beobachtete dabei in der Tat einen winzigen Druckabfall. Dieser wiederum deutete auf einen zweiten Übergang hin. Es stellte sich nun die Frage, ob der Übergang in der flüssigen oder der festen Phase erfolgte. Schließlich entwickelte ich eine sehr frühe Version der Kernspinresonanztomographie. Hier habe ich einen Magnetfeldgradienten angelegt, d.h. das Feld war unten breiter als oben. Als ich dann eine einfache Radiofrequenz an die NMR-Folie anlegte, erhielt ich nur eine dünne Resonanzschicht mit einem Magnetfeld, das den zur Frequenz passenden Wert aufwies. Erhöhte ich dann die Frequenz, bewegte sich die Resonanzschicht nach unten, usw. Dies ist eine CW-Version eines eindimensionalen MRTs. Ich habe Paul Lauterbur bei seinem Besuch in den Bell Laboratories gefragt, ob er meine Studien gelesen hat. Er bestätigte, dass er sie 1972, d.h. in dem Jahr, als sie veröffentlich wurden, gelesen hatte. Nun, ich habe ihm dann nicht die naheliegende Frage gestellt, ob dieser Umstand seine Entscheidung, die Arbeit im Bereich MRT fortzusetzen, beeinflusst hat. Tatsächlich hat er sie aber 1973 wieder aufgenommen. Leider ist er in der Zwischenzeit verstorben, sodass ich ihn nicht mehr fragen kann. Hier sind einige Daten, die wir erfasst haben – in diesem Fall ist der Zeitverlauf auf der x-Achse nach links dargestellt und der Druckanstieg auf der y-Achse nach unten, da ich die Daten umgedreht habe. Man kann sich NMR als Resonanzen nach oben vorstellen, eigentlich aber gehen sie nach unten. Hier geht es also von der Niederfrequenz zur Hochfrequenz, von der Hochfrequenz zur Niederfrequenz und von der Niederfrequenz zur Hochfrequenz. Und da sehen Sie auch die großen Spitzen, d.h. Festphasenspitzen, aber dazwischen erscheint auch ein Flüssigsignal. Wir konnten also diese beiden Signale unterscheiden. Am Übergangspunkt B, der hier dargestellt ist, fielen alle Festphasenspitzen um ein paar Prozent ab, d.h. um 1 bis 2 Prozent. Erst einige Tage später – die Daten wurden am 17. April erfasst – analysierte ich diese dann am 20. April noch einmal und stellte fest, dass das Flüssigsignal nicht um 2% sondern um 50% gefallen war. Zu dem Zeitpunkt, d.h. nachts um 2.40 Uhr, habe ich dann in meinem Laborberichtsbuch vermerkt, dass es eine wundervolle Zeit für Physik sei. Sehr ruhig, keinerlei Ablenkung, weniger Elektrorauschen, weniger Vibrationen – also einfach eine wundervolle Zeit. Habe den BCS-Übergang im flüssigen Helium 3 entdeckt. Nun, eigentlich war ich nur zu dieser Schlussfolgerung gekommen, weil ich die BCS-Theorie nicht so richtig verstanden hatte. Dies hier sind außerordentlich unübliche BCS-Zustände, die ersten, die je erkannt wurden. Das war am 20. April – im frühen Juni, da dachten Dave Lee und ich noch immer, dass der A-Übergang in der Festphase und der B-Übergang eindeutig in der Flüssigphase erfolgte. Wir haben dann den Magnetfeldgradienten eliminiert und die Daten in Abhängigkeit von der Frequenz abgebildet. Wir wollten sehen, ob das Festphasensignal sich beim Abkühlen verschiebt. Wir stellten aber fest, dass sich das Flüssigsignal verschob, was für uns völlig unerwartet und nicht nachvollziehbar war. Bei der Veröffentlichung der Studie veröffentlichten wir dann die Ergebnisse, bezeichneten diese aber nicht als einen BCS-Zustand. Erst als Tony Leggett seine Arbeiten durchgeführt hatte, was in der Tat bemerkenswert schnell ging – Tony teilte sich dann mit anderen den Nobelpreis im Jahr 2003. Nun, Sie wollen mir sicherlich sagen, dass ich nur noch fünf Minuten habe. Wir sind auch fast durch – Strategien – Natur aus einer anderen Perspektive oder in einem anderen Kontext betrachten. Da ist wirklich ein Weg, um interessante physikalische Phänomene zu entdecken. Und Sie erinnern sich, dass ich eines meiner Experimente als vollständig hoffnungslos bezeichnet habe – aber gerade Niederlagen können eine Aufforderung dazu sein, etwas Neues zu versuchen. Und genau das habe ich getan, ich habe ein wenig Zeit auf andere Arbeiten verwendet. Forschung, die aus Neugier betrieben wird, macht Spaß, sie zahlt sich aus und erfordert nicht einmal so furchtbar viel Zeit. Und wenn Sie sich noch im Studium befinden, gehen Sie nicht zu viele Verpflichtungen ein. Hätte ich Kurse in Gesellschaftstanz genommen, – obwohl ich eher chinesische Konversation gewählt hätte, da meine Frau Chinesin ist – dann wäre ich ohne die Ausrüstung, die mich dazu zwang, Experimente durchzuführen, die ich nie geplant hatte, ins Hintertreffen geraten. Dann wäre ich mit meinen chinesischen Sprachkenntnissen aber sicherlich weiter gekommen. Entscheidend ist, dass erfolgreiche Forschung nicht einem bestimmten Zeitplan folgt Zu guter Letzt – und das gilt für alle – nehmen Sie von Zeit zu Zeit etwas Abstand von Ihrer Arbeit, um die zu lösende Aufgabe aus einer anderen Perspektive zu betrachten. Man wird betriebsblind und häufig fokussiert man die Arbeit zu stark. So, jetzt sind wir am Ende. Auf diesem Bild erhalte ich den Nobelpreis – ich habe ein Problem mit Nobelpreisen. Man schaut sie an und denkt „das war Osheroff“. Um korrekt zu sein, müsste man sagen es waren Osheroff, Richardson und Lee – und auch das stimmt nicht. Hier sehen Sie noch einmal unseren Zirkel mit den Namen aller Beteiligten, d.h. der Menschen, die mit entscheidenden Informationen oder Technologien unsere Entdeckung überhaupt möglich gemacht haben – es handelt sich hier um 14 Personen und ich hätte auch genauso gut 24 nennen können. Fortschritte in der Wissenschaft werden nicht durch den Einzelnen erreicht, sondern sind das Ergebnis von Entwicklungen der Wissenschaftsgemeinde in der ganzen Welt, die Fragen stellt und neue Technologien erarbeitet, um diese Fragen zu beantworten und ihre Ergebnisse und Vorstellungen mit anderen teilt. Um einen schnellen Fortschritt zu ermöglichen muss die Forschung auf breiter Ebene gefördert werden und Wissenschaftler müssen dazu aufgefordert werden, sich miteinander auszutauschen und etwas Zeit zusammen zu verbringen, um ihre Neugier zu befriedigen. Und das ist genau der Weg zum Fortschritt in der Wissenschaft! Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Douglas Osheroff (2008) - How Advances in Science are Made
(00:00:46 - 00:06:05)

 The complete video is available here.


Getting Closer to Absolute Zero

For almost thirty years, Onnes’s accomplishment held the throne for lowest temperature ever recorded. Then, in 1937, American physical chemist William F. Giauque invented a method called adiabatic demagnetisation that produced even colder temperatures [10]. It can cool a paramagnetic material — one with magnetic dipoles that align parallel to an external magnetic field — down to 1 millikelvin or lower. Adiabatic demagnetisation applies a strong magnetic field to a sample in contact with a cold reservoir. When the cold reservoir is removed and the magnetic field lowered, the temperature of the sample drops.

Giauque received the 1949 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for obtaining a temperature within one-tenth of a degree of absolute zero (−273,15° C) [11]. His experiments also validated the third law of thermodynamics, which states that the entropy in a perfect crystal is zero at the absolute zero of temperature.

Fast forward to the 1980s, when the next major breakthrough in cooling techniques was invented, one that paradoxically used lasers to create “optical molasses.” In 1985, American physicist Steven Chu and his colleagues at Bell Laboratories fired lasers from six directions at a cluster of neutral sodium atoms, which reduced their random motion and thus their temperature. With this method, called Doppler cooling, the researchers achieved an incredibly low temperature of 240 µK [12].

Chu explained the basics of Doppler cooling during his autobiographical 2015 Lindau lecture, titled “A Random Walk in Science,” which highlighted the many projects he worked on before stumbling upon laser cooling and trapping.

Steven Chu (2015) - A Random Walk in Science

Thank you very much. I just want to proceed. I first want to start, this is not going to be a usual talk. It'll be more a quasi-autobiography to emphasise the fact that life in general is a random walk. I want to show a picture of my parents - a very handsome couple, getting married in 1945. They came from China to go to graduate school here in the United States at MIT. You'd think that a couple like this, how could they have a child like that. (Laughter) That's me. It's a regression to the norm I think. In any case, I went to the University of California Berkeley and I spent eight years there as a graduate student and a postdoc. I want to tell you a little bit about the things I worked on. For example the first project assigned to me by my thesis advisor was a theoretical project. I was a mathematician and a physicist when I was an undergraduate and thought I was going to do theoretical physics. They said that was fine, I could do theoretical physics, and that was the project. I worked on it for three months and decided I enjoyed going in the laboratories, so this is an incomplete. I'm giving myself grades. The next thing was, I love music and I'd listen to a violin play music very rapidly, a passage. If the violin has missed a note you could pick it out. I did a little calculation and said, the uncertainty in frequency and the uncertainty in time has to be at least equal to one or greater than one." I set up a little experiment and had my subjects, fellow graduate students. I would tune a frequency, they would tell me by tuning another dial what frequency it was. The good people could violate this uncertainty by about twenty-fold, twenty times less than delta ny delta t = 1. I spent a week on that, it was a success and that convinced me; it wasn't published but it convinced me I really should be an experimentalist. Then I worked beta-decay of weak interactions, I spent a year on that. My advisors and I both said, "Let's look for something more interesting." So I got another incomplete. I worked on using lasers to excite highly ionized hydrogen atoms in an accelerator to measure the Lamb Shift. I spent a year on that, another incomplete. You have to understand, by this time I was a graduate student, I was three and a half years into my graduate studies. I have a list on incompletes, one success - never published - and about to begin another thesis experiment. This is really an auspicious beginning. What happened next? What happened next is both my advisor and I felt that there was a potential using atomic physics to test a theory that unified weak and electromagnetic interactions. I said, "I want to do this experiment". He says, "I agree." We stopped what we were doing and we started to do this work. I worked on it my final two and half years as a postdoc. I give myself a C on this because we didn't measure what we wanted to measure. It was much harder than we thought, so my first scientific paper was published a year after my graduate studies. It said, "What we observed is highly forbidden transition, but we didn't observe the parity nonconservation effect." I told my advisor, "I've suffered enough as a graduate student, why don't you give me a PhD? I'll stay and work on the project." And he said, "Fine." So I stayed another two years and that lead to this paper, a preliminary observation of parity nonconservation. You'll notice something: this is my thesis project, this was my postdoc project and I'm one, two, I'm third author on this. I didn't really care about the authorship. Why didn't I care about it? Because by six months before this paper came out, the Berkeley Physics Department made me an offer to become an assistant professor even though I only published one scientific paper. I accepted and I took their startup money and that was that. Having one scientific publication and a C minus or a C scientific publication, they actually offered me a job at what then was the best physics department in the country. Somewhat unusual, so unusual that they said, They didn't know my failures. They said, "You can take the job, start your group now or you can go somewhere else, anywhere you want, but the job is yours." They put me on the catalogue and I went to Bell Labs. That's me, with more hair and looking a little younger, adjusting a laser I designed and built that we use to do this work. It's a dye laser. With my start-up money, I used it to buy a CW dye laser. That CW dye laser is over here. This is a much better laser for a future follow-on experiment. The first year graduate student working with me on this project was Persis Drell. We machined the transition stages and things like that all in the machine shop. It was a wonderful experience for both of us. She then became the director of SLAC, Stanford Linear Accelerator, and is now Dean of Engineering at Stanford. In any case let me continue, I took my two year leave of absence to go to Bell Laboratories. It was a truly wonderful place. I bought a house right here, and would hop over the fence and walk to work and spend a lot of time there. Hop over the fence and go home. In Bell Laboratories - I have to also point out, that it was a remarkable place, they hired all their scientists very, very young. Fresh out of PhD or just completed postdoc like I just did. Of those, fifteen of them went on to earn Nobel prizes. My life at Bell Laboratories had ups and downs. The very first experiment I worked on was an experiment in energy transfer in a substance called Ruby, Al2O3. You excite a chromium ion, it transfers energy to another one and another one and another one. It was used to test a theory called Anderson Localization. Anderson Localization was this prominent theory invented by Phil Anderson. He had gotten a Nobel Prize one year before that and he said, in his speech that the studies of energy transfer in Ruby were the only clear demonstration of Anderson Localization in physics. I thought with Hyatt Gibbs and Sam McCall, that was done with a Ruby laser that can only tune to one side of the absorption line. We can do a better experiment with a dye laser and really nail down that this is in fact a clear demonstration of Anderson Localization. What we found instead was we couldn't reproduce the results, went on to measure how the mechanism of energy transfer actually occurred in Ruby and found it was a long range dipole-dipole interaction and Anderson Localization didn't even apply. That was what you would call a failure. It's a non-result but it actually led to my first tenure offer, amazingly. Then later, or concurrently, I did some spectroscopy on an atom, an electron and its antiparticle, clearly in the business centre of AT&T, with Allen Mills and Jan Hall. We did a series of experiments with successively better and better spectroscopy but ultimately we measured the 1S to 2S level in this atom to four parts in a billion, but it didn't lead to anything new. It was considered a technical achievement but it really led to no new discoveries. There were a few other experiments I did, a couple of incompletes. But I started to work on laser cooling and trapping of atoms and that actually worked better than I expected. Let me briefly explain what this is about. This is a charged rod. It's charged positively. If you hold it next to a piece of paper the electric field induces the charges on that piece of paper to move around. And so you see that the negative charge is a little bit closer on average than the positive charges. And since the electric field is higher in the region of the negative charge, the field is higher here than it is here, the attractive force pulling this to the rod is stronger than the repulsive force trying to push this away. In any case, let's say you rub this glass rod with dog's fur, you have a positive charge. You do the next obvious thing, you rub it with cat's fur and you get a negative charge. It's very early and anyway, this is a negative charge; you notice that when I won't go from positive to negative, let me do this again. That's positive, look at the piece of paper and where the charges are, I change the polarity, I go to negative, the charges move. The particle is still attracted to a region of highest electric field. This is the basic principle of how to hold on to a neutral particle. If you then say in space, absent any material how can you get a high electric field? It turns out you can get it by focusing a laser beam. You cannot get it with a static field, but you can get it with an oscillating field. At the centre of a focused laser beam you have a region of highest electric field, but the trouble is in order for this trap to hold on to atoms, the atoms have to be moving very slowly. Suppose you have an atom moving very quickly. If you surround it two sides with laser beams and you tune the laser beams so that the atom going towards the right, preferentially scatters more light from the right hand beam the left hand beam, because it's tuning itself into the resonance and it's tuning itself out of the resonance due to a Doppler shift. Art Schawlow explained Doppler shift very well, he says, "When I'm walking towards you there's a Doppler shift in higher frequency. And walking away from you, you get a lower Doppler shift." Anyway, that's the Doppler shift. When you preferentially scatter photons from the right hand side you slow up the atom. If the atom happens to be going in the opposite direction, the same thing happens: you scatter more photons from the left-hand beam pushing it to the right. That's the essential thing, no matter which way the atom was going it is slowed down. If the atom happens to be going in a different direction you put in these two beams, it's different. This is a great idea, I got very excited about it, rushed. I told my director, I'd like to drop what I'm doing and do this - another incomplete. He had shut down this work several years before at Bell Laboratories, he said, It turned out that this wonderful idea was stolen from me ten years before I got the idea. Actually Ted Hänsch and Art Schawlow had proposed this idea in 1975, it was a two and a half page/two page paper. Thank you Ted for not doing it. Anyway, I didn't invent the idea but I did invent the name, we called it optical molasses. This is what the experiment looked like, it was a pretty elaborate vacuum chamber, UHV chamber. You see the yellow beams, those are the beams used to make the optical molasses. That green dotted beam is a pulsed laser that evaporated bits of sodium off into the chamber. The way you make these pictures, you just take a white card, the room's dark and you just move it. That's why the pulsed laser looks like a pulsed laser. To you students year, I have to tell you the time scale of this experiment. The time I got the idea I did not have this vacuum chamber. Ten months later I sat down to write the first draft of the optical molasses paper. Whole thing in less than ten months. Okay? I don't know why it took me so long to get a PhD. This is a picture of the optical molasses. When you stick a camera inside the vacuum chamber you see this orange glow of atoms going about 200 Micro-Kelvin. The following year we were able to use an optical tweezers to hold on to the atoms. The year after that we were able to generate a hybrid trap that could trap 10^6, 10^7, 10^8 and even 10^9 a billion atoms. That magneto-optic trap became the workhorse trap of all the people that followed. I should say I also blew it in this experiment. There were early indications that the temperature was much lower than theoretically expected. I sort of fluffed it off, didn't take it seriously. And then a few years later Bill Phillips and his colleagues discovered our mistake, that the atoms were indeed much colder than what theory really told us to expect. Not a little bit colder, maybe five to eight times colder. Again, lots of failure. I moved to Stanford University in the fall of 1987. That's what I looked like when I was thirty nine, I used to be younger. In any case, one of the first early experiments we did was making an atomic fountain. This is where you cool the atoms, you toss them up, they turn around due to gravity. And while they're in free fall going around the gravity, you can actually do very, very good spectroscopy, microwave spectroscopy on these atoms. This so-called atomic fountain led me and a number of other people to develop better and better atomic clocks. Since then there have been other advances in atomic clocks. It's either you hold them with ions. But the biggest advance besides holding, trapping atoms or neutral atoms with laser techniques is the ability to count optical frequencies, something that Ted Hänsch and Jan Hall got a Nobel prize for recently. The progress is remarkable, they're soon to achieve relative fractional frequency uncertainty of eighteen decimal places, 10^-18. If you started one of these clocks when the universe was born - and it didn't get fried - and said, What time is it today?, your uncertainty would be about one half of one second. Why would you want that many decimal places? Isn't this crazy? It's not, we actually want three or four more decimal places because with these exquisite clocks you can do all sorts of things. Indeed you can look at the relative change of the nuclear forces with the electromagnetic forces, and perhaps see changes in fundamental constants in a laboratory time scale rather than a universe time scale. We also introduced what are called atomic fountain interferometers, where in a few years we demonstrated we can measure the acceleration due to gravity with a precision of eleven decimal places. The student who started this Mark Kasevich is pushing this onto greater heights and is improving that by about five orders of magnitude. Overall ten orders of magnitude from the first experiment we did at Stanford on this. Now, when I got to Stanford I thought, we can hold on to atoms. Art Ashton showed that you can hold on to single cell organisms like bacteria. I said, "Can we hold on to individual molecules with light by gluing little plastic spheres onto the ends of DNA." This is the setup where you introduce the laser in the optical microscope, this is what it really looked like. I started working on this in 1989 with a MD PhD student who told me enough biochemistry so I could glue on these polystyrene spheres onto DNA. This is what it looks like. This is a single strand of DNA, looking in an optical microscope. You control a mirror with a joystick and it's like a video game. In fact for three days they played this video game. (Laughter) I'd walk in the lab and say, "I think we really should do some science." (Laughter) Actually the first person after Steve Kron who actually did this was ... He did it as undergraduate student, Steve Quake, who then returned back to my lab his last year of graduate school and stayed three more years as a postdoc before going to Caltech, but we got him to Stanford. These are some of the early people, Doug Smith, Tom Perkins on the polymer work, Xiaowei Zhuang, Taekjip Ha - a host of others on the biology. I don't have time to talk about that, but there are a whole host of very good people. Here's a few more. That's me, also when I was younger. The one on the far left Cheng Chin, he's now a professor of physics at Chicago. Vladan Vuletic at MIT. Hazen Babcock, a brilliant student but shy, married Xiaowei Zhuang. Xiaowei Zhuang was a not so shy person, Hazen was shy. But he is the technical heart of a lot of what she does at Harvard, very gifted scientist. And then Jamie Kerman who's now at Lincoln Laboratory. So these are a smattering of my group. In 2004 I was asked to direct Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and did what every self respecting scientist would say, "I'm not interested." They asked me again, I said, "No, I'm very happy at Stanford." Then finally they asked me a third time and the person, my former director at Bell laboratories who was then director of BL said, I came, I visited, they offered me a job; I took it this time because I thought, if I could get really spectacular scientists at Lawrence Berkeley Lab interested in energy it would be worth it. This was a very distinguished laboratory, thirteen scientists who worked at LBNL have earned Nobel prizes, but the thing I'm most proud of is that over thirty young scientists, PhD, post-doctors starting careers as scientists, worked at LBNL, later got Nobel prizes, including me, Saul Perlmutter, George Smoot. We were all graduate students at LBNL when we were at Berkeley, and we're all here at this conference. It's an outstanding national laboratory. I was there for nearly five years and they did get more interested in renewable energy. I'm very happy about that. November 2008, the then president elect, Obama, I got a phone call, said he would like to meet me in Chicago to talk about a job. I said again, "I don't think I'm interested." I was thinking of stepping down from directorship going back into the laboratory. He said, "No, no, no, this is a very important job." I said, "How important?" He said, "Secretary of Energy." Anyway, I flew to Chicago, met him for about an hour just one on one. After that interview or chat I came back and told my wife, "If he's going to offer me the job I will accept it." He did, I did and I spent the next four and a third years in the Department of Energy. I introduced a few things. A new founding programme called Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy, ARPA-E, it's short time, high risk. I wanted to group enough scientists and engineers in a critical mass that can take a problem for maybe the fundamental needs of the problem to engineering technology, we call them Energy Innovation Hubs. We took the photo-voltaic and photo-thermal programmes and tried to re-energize it. Let me give you an example, what were we doing at ARPA-E? Suppose there's an existing technology, the horse and buggy, and as time goes on it gets better and better for the effective cost of this. Then something comes along like a steam powered car but it doesn't really make it. Another car comes along, the Benz Motorwagen, but it doesn't make it. Not because it didn't work, it worked very well, but because it was too expensive, kind of like a Tesla S1. Works very well but it costs a hundred thousand dollars. The car that transformed the technology was the Model T, it was a good car and a lot of Americans could afford it. We call this a disruptive technology. ARPA-E was designed to invest in disruptive technologies, knowing full well that nine out of ten would fail. That was a different funding programme than we had. We weren't looking for safe investments, we were looking for homerun investments. SunShot, we looked at the price of solar for utility scale solar in 2004. The whole system cost 8 dollars, by 2010 it's 3.80 We said, "Where could the price really be?" We set this crazy target by 2020 that the whole system, the modules, the electronics, the land use - everything would be a dollar per watt. That's a dollar per watt of generation based on a certain irradiance of solar energy. They thought we're smoking something - industry - and said, "You are crazy, we may get to 2.50 but not a dollar." We said, "No here's a business plan, here are the things that we can do this." A year and a half later one of the real gurus of solar technology gave a speech and he said - sorry, I'm destroying your podium. (Laughter) Will you invite me back? (Laughter) Anyway, a year and a half later they said, "You know, you're right. We can achieve this. We've redone our business models." So that was very good. In starting ARPA-E and SunShot and a few other places, the idea was we would get very, very good people. As good or better than the scientists or engineers they were funding and work in the department. ARPA-E showed that it really could be in a federal bureaucracy. SunShot, which was an existing programme, if you import three or four people at the top and they're good at leading people into a new vision, you can actually transform an existing bureaucracy. Our motto then was something I say to my students all the time which is, "The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short, but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark." That was said by Michelangelo, but it's a good motto for scientists as well. I was tasked by the President to help BP stop this oil leak. We didn't have any jurisdiction but I had made a suggestion to the BP engineers that they eventually, after laughing at it for two days, eventually took the suggestion. At the end of a cabinet meeting shortly after that he goes to me, he says, "Chu, go down there and help them stop that leak." I and a team of five or six scientists spent the better half of that summer down in Houston really getting into nitty-gritty, I don't have time to talk about it but that was something. In hindsight, my most important role at the department of energy was to really identify great people, call them up and say, Once they're there, don't leave them alone, but block and tackle for them because the overwhelming government bureaucracy could drag them down. As one veteran of the Department of Energy said, "How can you help stop the mind numbing, soul sucking BS?" He didn't say BS but that's an acronym. The part I hated worst about politics was the newspapers. They were there waiting, trying to catch you to make a slip, that you would disagree with the President - something like this. Six days after it was made public that I was going to be stepping down, then the Onion ran this story: I read you a part of the byline: awoke Thursday morning to find himself sleeping next to a giant solar panel he had met the previous evening. According to sources, Chu's encounter with this crystalline silicone solar receptor was his most regrettable dalliance since 2009 when an extended fling with a 90 foot wind turbine nearly ended his marriage." We normally don't answer scurrilous reports but I walked in that morning and said, "We have to answer this one." That noon I issued the following press release, "I just want everyone to know my decision not to serve a second term as Energy Secretary has absolutely nothing to do with the allegations made in this week's edition of the Onion. While I'm not going to confirm or deny the changes specifically, I will say that clean, renewable solar power is a growing source of US jobs and is becoming more and more affordable, so it's no surprise that lots of Americans are falling in love with solar." That was fun. After the end of April 2013 I decided to go back to Stanford, I just wanted to be a professor. When I got there I was getting interested in neuroscience. A couple of us got together and said, "There's a number of things we could do." I remember in September 2013, I got an idea. I was talking to a long-term collaborator, Axel Brunger, worked with him for fourteen years on neuro-vesicle fusion. I said, "Axel, this might really be a neat idea, it might work. Let's go talk to Tom about it." That's Tom Sudhof, we got him in his office and I explained the idea and he said, "It might work, it might not work." And I said, "Tom, don't you understand? If this works we might become famous." Two weeks later he gets a Nobel Prize, too late. But he's a very serious scientist and he's now back in the lab. And so we want to study the brain, an operating live tissue of whole brains, and Liqun Luo also. Here's one example of some of the things we want to do, it's a technical thing. In following the footsteps of Neher and Sakmann who invented the patch clamp technology, they really revolutionized neuro-physiology. We wanted to say, "Can we make fluorescent probes that could be exquisitely sensitive, like a patch clamp, in time but where you can look at 1,000 or 10,000 neurons in real time in a live brain, a live interacting brain?" The particle we were investigating, there was a number of particles, this is one. It's a nano diamond grown from molecules of diamond. We're developing this process which is a plasma growth starting with essentially molecules. On the picture on the left is a large diamond, one micron in diameter, where you see the facets. The picture on the right is a smaller diamond, maybe seven nanometers in diameter where those lines are and you can see the facets. The one on the right is a perfect diamond. It's something you would want to put on your finger and wear proudly, if you can see it. We've learned how to dope them with independent control using silane gas, again in a CVD process. That particular diamond emits10,000,000 counts a second. We think we're now learning how to 'mass-produce' these in large quantities: We're also trying to figure out if we can make these photosensitive. So that if we can embed another nano-particle in a neuron, in the membrane of the neuron, and there's an actionpotential spike, the fluorescence of this will change. But since they are photostable and give out so many counts we can see individual actionpotentials and they should last ... We want them to last as least as long as the graduate student. We're learning how to functionalize them, this is non trivial. This is some work now only one week old, where we can put SiO2 coating on these nano-diamonds, only 1 nm thick. That's the first step in functionalization and then we're going to have to make them hydrophilic and go and and go forth. Stay tuned, it's stuff. I'm running out of time, I'm not going to really have time to talk about a different class of particles, rare earths. You can dope in a single particle different ratios of colours, so that in one particle can be this colour, in another particle could be these two colours. And in another particles could be this colour and another particle could be this colour, and another particle can be this colour. If you consider all the colour combination that we've already synthesized, in principle you can have 39 colours. Then what you can do is you can take the image, you can split one off to do 3D-localization and the other one you put in a prism to disperse the colours, so the array detector begins to be your spectrometer. And by looking at the ratio colours you can in one frame grab many different colours. Then you can go very rapidly in doing this. Of course, this means that these have to specially dispersed. Let me end by saying why I went for ten years into something I cared deeply about. If you look at this image, this is taken by an astronaut December 24, Christmas eve 1968. He said, "We came all this way to explore the moon and the most important thing is we discovered the Earth." Since 1968 we've discovered that the climate's changing, in large part due to humans. If you look at this picture, you don't have to be a rocket scientist to realize the moon is not a good place to live. From this vantage point the Earth looks pretty good and there's nowhere else to go. Thank you.

Vielen Dank. Ich möchte gleich fortsetzen und... Das ist kein gewöhnlicher Vortrag. Es ist eher eine Art Quasi-Autobiographie. Um die Tatsache zu betonen, dass das Leben im Allgemeinen ein zufälliger Weg ist. Ich möchte ein Foto meiner Eltern zeigen, ein sehr schönes Paar, das 1945 heiratete. Sie kamen aus China, um zur Hochschule zu gehen, hier, in den Vereinigten Staaten, an das M.I.T., und man würde kaum glauben, dass so ein Paar ein solches Kind haben konnte. Das bin ich. Ein Rückschritt von der Norm, glaube ich, aber ich ging an die University of California, Berkeley, und verbrachte dort 8 Jahre als Absolvent und Post-Doc, und wollte Ihnen ein wenig über meine Arbeiten erzählen. Mein erstes Projekt z.B. von meinem Doktorvater war ein theoretisches Projekt. Ich war Mathematiker und Physiker mit Bachelor-Abschluss und dachte, ich werde theoretische Physik machen. Man sagte mir, das wäre gut, ich konnte theoretische Physik studieren, und das war das Projekt, an dem ich 3 Monate arbeitete, und entschied, mir gefällt es im Labor. Und ich schloss nicht. Ich benote mich selbst. Der nächste Punkt war, dass ich Musik liebe und mir Violinmusik-Passagen sehr schnell anhörte, und wenn der Violinist eine Note ausließ, konnte man es hören. Ich machte eine Kalkulation und sagte, wie kann ich eine nicht gespielte Note hören, wenn die Zeit, in der ich die Note höre, kürzer als die Unschärferelation ist. Die Unschärfe bezüglich der Frequenz und Zeit muss zumindest gleich 1 oder größer als 1 sein. Also begann ich ein kleines Experiment, und hatte meine Teilnehmer und einen Kollegen, ich stellte die Frequenz ein, und sie sagten mir, welche Frequenz es war. Die guten Leute konnten die Unschärferelation etwa 20-fach übertreffen, 20 Mal weniger als Delta Ny * Delta t ist 1. Nach einer Woche, es war ein Erfolg, war ich überzeugt, es wird nicht veröffentlicht, aber ich wusste, ich will Experimentalphysiker werden. Dann arbeitete ich 1 Jahr lang am Beta-Zerfall mit schwacher Wechselwirkung. Mein Doktorvater und ich dachten, ich sollte etwas Interessanteres finden, also hatte ich noch etwas nicht abgeschlossen. Ich arbeitete mit Lasern, um hoch ionisierte Wasserstoffatome anzuregen, und maß die Lamb-Verschiebung in einem Beschleuniger. Ich arbeitete 1 Jahr daran, wieder ohne Abschluss. Sie müssen verstehen, dass ich damals ein Absolvent war, seit 3,5 Jahren im Graduiertenstudium, einiges unvollständig, ein nicht veröffentlichter Erfolg, und wollte mit einer neuen Arbeit beginnen. Das ist wirklich ein vielversprechender Anfang. Was passierte dann? Dann dachten mein Doktorvater und ich, dass es ein Potenzial gäbe, mit Atomphysik eine Theorie zu testen, die die schwachen und elektromagnetischen Wechselwirkungen vereinheitlicht. Ich wollte das Experiment machen, er stimmte zu. Wir beendeten, was wir gerade machten, und begannen mit dieser Arbeit, und ich arbeitete 2,5 Jahre als Post-Doc daran. Ich gebe mir ein „C" dafür, weil wir nicht messen konnten, was wir wollten. Es war viel schwieriger als wir dachten. Meine 1. wissenschaftliche Arbeit wurde 1 Jahr nach meinem Graduiertenstudium veröffentlicht, wir beobachteten diesen hoch verbotenen Übergang, aber keine Nichterhaltung der Parität-Effekte. Ich sagte meinem Doktorvater, ich hab genug gelitten als Absolvent, warum er mir nicht den PhD gibt, ich werde weiterarbeiten, und er sagte ja. Also blieb ich 2 weitere Jahre (lacht), und das führte zu dieser Arbeit: Ihnen wird etwas auffallen. Das war meine Dissertation und Post-Doc-Projekt, und ich bin der erste, zweite, dritte Autor. Die Autorschaft war mir nicht wirklich wichtig. Warum war sie mir nicht wichtig? Weil 6 Monate, bevor die Arbeit herauskam, bot mir das Berkeley Physics Department eine Assistenzprofessur an, obwohl ich nur eine Arbeit veröffentlicht hatte, ich nahm an und erhielt finanzielle Unterstützung, und das war es. Ich hatte 1 wissenschaftliche Veröffentlichung, und eine „C-" oder „C" wissenschaftliche Veröffentlichung, und sie boten mir eine Stelle an, am damals besten Physik-Institut des Landes. Irgendwie ungewöhnlich, sodass sie sagten: Sie kannten meine Misserfolge nicht (lacht). Man sagte, ich kann den Job haben, meine Gruppe starten, oder ich kann 2 Jahre woandershin gehen, wo ich will, aber der Job gehöre mir. Also ging ich zu den Bell Labs. Das bin ich mit mehr Haaren, etwas jünger, beim Anpassen eines von mir gebauten Lasers, mit dem wir arbeiteten, ein Farbstofflaser. Mit dem Geld kaufte ich einen CW Farbstofflaser. Der CW Farbstofflaser ist da drüben, und es ist ein viel besserer Laser für zukünftige Experimente. Der junge Absolvent, der mit mir am Projekt arbeitete, war Persis Drell, wir erarbeiteten die Übersetzungsphasen und solche Dinge in der Werkstatt. Es war eine gute Erfahrung für uns beide, und sie wurde Direktorin des SLAC, dem Stanford Linear Accelerator, und ist heute Dekan der Ingenieurwissenschaften in Stanford. Aber ich möchte weitererzählen. Ich nutzte meine 2-jährige Freistellung um zu den Bell Laboratories zu gehen. Es war wirklich ein wunderbarer Ort. Ich kaufte nebenan ein Haus, hüpfte über den Zaun und ging zur Arbeit, und verbrachte viel Zeit dort, und hüpfte über den Zaun wieder nach Hause. Bei den Bell Laboratories muss ich auch sagen, dass es ein bemerkenswerter Ort war. Sie stellten sehr, sehr junge Wissenschaftler ein, die soeben einen PhD oder Post-Doc abschlossen, genauso wie ich. Unter ihnen sollten 15 einen Nobelpreis erhalten. Mein Leben damals hatte Höhen und Tiefen. Das 1. Experiment, an dem ich arbeitete, war ein Energieübertragungsexperiment in einer so genannten Rubin (Al2 O3) Substanz. Man regt ein Chromion an, es leitet Energie an das nächste und das nächste weiter. Ich prüfte die Theorie der Anderson-Lokalisierung. Sie war eine bekannte Theorie, die von Phil Anderson erfunden wurde. Er erhielt 1 Jahr zuvor den Nobelpreis und sagte in seiner Rede, dass die Studien zur Rubin-Energieübertragung die einzigen waren, die diese Theorie in der Physik klar demonstrierten. Ich dachte, ich könnte das Sam mitteilen. Es wurde mit einem Rubinlaser gemacht, der sich nur an einer Seite der Absorptionslinie nähern kann. Mit einem Farbstofflaser können wir besser experimentieren und eine klare Demonstration der Anderson-Lokalisierung zeigen. Wir fanden stattdessen heraus, dass die Ergebnisse nicht reproduzierbar waren, und führten Messungen durch, wie der Mechanismus des Energietransfers in Rubin stattfindet, und fanden eine Dipol-Dipol-Wechselwirkung und dass die Anderson-Lokalisierung nicht zutraf. Das nennt man einen Misserfolg, indem es kein Ergebnis ist, aber es führte zu meinem 1. Stellenangebot, erstaunlicherweise, und in der Folge führte ich Spektroskopien an einem Atom durch, einem Elektron und seinen Antiteilchen, die klar das Kerngeschäft von AT&T sind, und mit Alan Mills und Jan Hall führten wir eine Reihe von Experimenten durch, mit immer besseren Spektroskopien, aber letztendlich führten wir eine Messung der S-Ebene dieses Atoms bis zu 4 Teilen pro Mrd. durch, aber es führte zu nichts Neuem. Es wurde als technische Leistung anerkannt, aber führte zu keinen neuen Entdeckungen. Ich führte noch andere Experimente durch, ein paar unvollständige, aber ich begann mit Laserkühlung und Atome zu fangen. Es funktionierte besser als ich dachte. Ich will kurz erklären, worum es geht. Das ist ein positiv geladener Stab. Wenn Sie ihn an ein Stück Papier halten, bewirkt das elektrische Feld, dass sich die Ladungen auf diesem Blatt Papier bewegen, daher sieht man, dass die negativen Ladungen durchschnittlich näher als die positiven sind. Da die elektrische Feldstärke höher im Bereich der negativen Ladung ist, ist die Feldstärke hier höher als hier, die Anziehungskraft des Stabs ist größer als die Abstoßungskraft, die abzustoßen versucht. Wenn Sie den Glasstab z.B. an Hundehaar reiben, haben Sie eine positive Ladung, dann reiben Sie ihn natürlich auch an Katzenhaar, und Sie erhalten eine negative Ladung. Es ist sehr früh. (lacht) Das ist jedenfalls eine negative Ladung. Wenn ich nicht von positiv zu negativ gehe, ich fange nochmals an, das ist positiv, sehen Sie sich das Papier an, und wo die Ladung ist, ich änderte die Polarität, ich gehe zu negativ, die Ladungen bewegen sich. Das Teilchen wird noch immer im Bereich der höchsten Feldstärke angezogen. Das ist das Grundprinzip, wie man ein neutrales Teilchen festhält. Wie kann man im Weltall, wo Material fehlt, eine hohe elektrische Feldstärke haben, und es stellt sich heraus, es geht, indem man einen Laserstrahl fokussiert. Es geht nicht mit einem statischen Feld, aber mit einem oszillierenden Feld. Also im Zentrum eines fokussierten Laserstrahls liegt der Bereich mit der höchsten Feldstärke, aber das Problem ist, um mit dieser Falle Atome zu fangen, dürfen sich die Atome nur sehr langsam bewegen. Nehmen wir an, ein Ion bewegt sich sehr schnell. Wenn es an 2 Seiten von Laserstrahlen umgeben ist, und die Laserstrahlen eingestellt werden, sodass das Atom, das sich nach rechts bewegt vorzugsweise mehr Licht vom rechten zum linken Strahl abgibt, weil es sich selbst in Resonanz bringt, und sich selbst außer Resonanz bringt, aufgrund der Doppler-Verschiebung. Art Schawlow erklärte Doppler-Verschiebungen gut. Er sagte: „Wenn ich auf Sie zugehe, gibt es eine Doppler-Verschiebung höherer Frequenz (hohe Stimme) und wenn ich von Ihnen weggehe haben Sie eine niedrigere Doppler-Verschiebung." (tiefe Stimme) Das ist die Doppler-Verschiebung. Werden die verstreuten Photonen rechts präferenziert, wird das Atom abgebremst, wenn das Atom in die andere Richtung geht, passiert dasselbe. Wenn Sie mehr Photonen vom linken Strahl streuen, werden sie nach rechts gedrückt. Das ist das Wesentliche. Ganz gleich, wohin das Atom sich bewegt, es wird abgebremst, und wenn es die Richtung ändert, und Sie beide Strahlen nehmen, ist es anders. Das ist eine großartige Idee. Ich freute mich sehr darüber, sagte meinem Direktor, ich möchte aufhören, und das machen, noch was Unvollständiges. Er sagte, er musste seine Arbeit einige Jahre vor den Bell Laboratories niederlegen. Er sagte ok, mach das, aber versuch niemanden zu überzeugen. Es zeigte sich, dass mir diese gute Idee, zehn Jahre, bevor ich sie hatte, gestohlen wurde.... (Publikum lacht) Ted Haensch und Art Schawlow stellten diese Idee 1975 vor, es war eine 2,5 Seiten lange Arbeit, und danke, Ted, dass du es nicht gemacht hast. Ich erfand nicht die Idee, aber den Namen. Wir nennen es optische Molasse. Und so sah das Experiment aus. Eine recht moderne Vakuumkammer, UHV-Kammer. Sie sehen die gelben Strahlen, die die optische Molasse herstellen. Der grün gepunktete Strahl ist ein gepulster Laser, wodurch das Natrium in der Kammer verdampft, und dieses Foto können Sie machen, indem Sie ein weißes Blatt Papier nehmen, im abgedunkelten Raum, und es bewegen, und aus diesem Grund sieht der gepulste Laser wie ein gepulster Laser aus. Den Studierenden hier möchte ich den Zeitraum für das Experiment mitteilen. Als ich die Idee hatte, gab es keine Vakuumkammer. Zehn Monate später schrieb ich den ersten Entwurf für die Arbeit über optische Molasse. Die ganze Arbeit dauerte weniger als 10 Monate. Also ich weiß nicht, warum ich so lange für den PhD benötigte. (lacht). Das ist ein Foto der optischen Molasse, wenn man eine Kamera in der Vakuumkammer hat, sieht man dieses orangefarbene Glühen der Atome bei ungefähr 200 Mikrokelvin. Im folgenden Jahr konnten wir die Atome mit einer optischen Pinzette festhalten, und 1 Jahr später konnten wir eine hybride Falle erzeugen, die 10^6, 10^7, 10^8 und sogar 10^9, eine Mrd. Atome fangen konnte. Diese magneto-optische Falle diente allen, die nachher kamen, als wichtige Arbeitsmethode. Ich muss sagen, ich versagte auch in diesem Experiment. Es gab Anzeichen, frühe Anzeichen, dass die Temperatur viel niedriger war als theoretisch angenommen wurde. Ich beachtete es nicht und nahm es nicht ernst. Einige Jahre später entdeckten Bill Phillips und seine Kollegen unseren Fehler, dass die Atome viel kühler waren als die Theorie erwarten ließ. Nicht ein wenig kühler, vielleicht 5 - 8 Mal kühler. Also wieder ein großer Misserfolg. Im Herbst 1987 ging ich an die Stanford University. So sah ich mit 40 oder 39 aus. Ich war jünger. (lacht) Eines der ersten Experimente von uns war, eine Atomfontäne zu erzeugen. Damit kühlt man die Atome, man wirft sie rauf, sie drehen aufgrund der Schwerkraft um, und während sie im freien Fall sind, können Sie eine sehr gute Spektroskopie machen, eine Mikrowellen-Spektroskopie dieser Atome. Diese sogenannte Atomfontäne führte dazu, dass wir und einige andere Leute immer bessere Atomuhren entwickelten. Seit damals gab es weitere Fortschritte bei Atomuhren, sie werden mit Ionen stabilisiert, aber der größte Fortschritt neben dem Fangen von neutralen Atomen mit Lasertechnik ist die Fähigkeit, optische Frequenzen zu zählen, wofür Ted Haensch und Jan Hall unlängst den Nobelpreis erhielten. Der Fortschritt ist bemerkenswert. Sie werden bald die relative Teilfrequenzunschärfe mit 18 Dezimalstellen, 10^-18 erreichen. Hätte man eine dieser Uhren mit dem Beginn des Universums eingeschaltet, hätte sie immer funktioniert, und würde heute die Zeit angeben, würde die Unschärfe ca. 1/2 Sekunde betragen. Warum will man so viele Dezimalstellen haben? Ist das nicht verrückt? Ist es nicht, wir wollen eigentlich drei oder vier weitere Dezimalstellen, weil mit diesen exquisiten Uhren kann man alles Mögliche machen. Man kann die relative Veränderung von nuklearen und elektromagnetischen Kräften beobachten, und Änderungen grundlegender Konstanten eher in einem Labor-Zeitmaßstab als einem universellen Zeitmaßstab sehen. Wir führten auch die sogenannten Atomfontänen-Interferometer ein, wobei wir in wenigen Jahren zeigten, dass wir die Beschleunigung aufgrund der Schwerkraft auf 11 Dezimalstellen genau messen können. Der Student, der damit begann, Mark Kasevich, führt dies noch in größerem Rahmen weiter, und verbesserte es um 5 Größenordnungen. Insgesamt 10 Größenordnungen seit dem ersten Experiment in Stanford. Als ich nach Stanford ging, dachte ich, wir können Atome festhalten, Art Ashton zeigte, dass man einzellige Organismen wie Bakterien aufhalten kann, also sagte Art, wir können individuelle Moleküle mit Licht halten, wenn wir kleine Plastikkugeln an die DNA-Enden kleben. In dieses Szenario leitete man den Laser in das optische Mikroskop. So sah das wirklich aus. Wir begannen 1989 daran zu arbeiten, mit einem MD PhD-Studenten, der mir genug Biochemie lehrte, um die Kugeln an die DNA zu kleben. So sah es aus. Das ist ein einzelner DNA-Strang in einem optischen Mikroskop, und man steuert mittels Joystick einen Spiegel, und es ist wie ein Videospiel. Drei Tage lang spielten sie dieses Videospiel, (Publikum lacht) bis ich ins Labor kam und sagte, ich glaube, wir sollen Wissenschaft betreiben. Die erste Person nach Steve Kron, die damit arbeitete, er arbeitete mit einem Bachelor-Studenten, Steve Quake, der in seinem letzten Jahr der Graduiertenschule wieder zu mir kam und 3 Jahre lang als Post-Doc blieb, bevor er zu Cal-Tech ging, aber wir holten ihn wieder nach Stanford. Das sind einige der frühen Leute, Doug Smith, Tom Perkins bei Palmer-Arbeit, Xiaowei Zhuang, Taekjip Ha und viele andere in der Biologie. Ich habe nicht viel Zeit, darüber zu sprechen, aber es sind sehr gute Leute. Hier sind noch ein paar. Das bin ich, als ich jünger war. Ganz links ist Chang Chin, er ist jetzt Physikprofessor in Chicago, Vladan Vuletic am M.I.T., Hazen Babcock, eine hervorragende Studentin, aber schüchtern, heiratete Xiaowei Zhuang, Xiaowei Zhuang war nicht so schüchtern, Hazen war schüchtern. Aber er ist der Herzschlag, bei vielen Dingen, die sie in Harvard macht, eine sehr begnadete Wissenschaftlerin, und Jamie Kerman, der jetzt bei Lincoln Laboratory ist. Das sind einige aus meiner Gruppe. Im Jahr 2004 wurde ich gefragt, das Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory zu führen, und sagte, was jeder anständige Wissenschaftler tun würde: Sie fragten mich nochmals, und ich sagte: und mein ehemaliger Direktor bei den Bell Labs, der damals Direktor bei LBNL war, sagte: Wenn es weniger als 59 % sind, lass es sein." Ich kam und sie boten mir eine Stelle an, ich nahm diesmal an, weil ich dachte, dass wenn ich wirklich großartige Leute ins Lawrence Berkeley Lab hole, zahlt es sich aus. Es ist ein sehr exquisites Labor, 13 Wissenschaftler vom LBNL erhielten Nobelpreise. Worauf ich aber besonders stolz bin, ist, dass mehr als 30 junge Wissenschaftler, PhDs, Post-Docs oder Jungwissenschaftler, die im LBNL arbeiteten, später Nobelpreisträger wurden. Einschließlich mir, Saul Perlmutter, George Smoot, waren wir alles Absolventen im LBNL als wir in Berkeley waren, und wir sind alle hier bei dieser Konferenz. Es ist ein hervorragendes nationales Labor, und ich war beinahe 5 Jahre dort, und erneuerbare Energien wurden interessanter. Darüber freue ich mich sehr. Im November 2008 rief mich der designierte Präsident Obama an, und bat mich um ein Treffen in Chicago, wegen einer Stelle, und ich sagte wieder: Ich wollte als Direktor zurücktreten, und zurück ins Labor, und er sagte: Also fragte ich, wie wichtig er wäre. nur unter uns, und nach diesem Interview oder Gespräch, kam ich zurück und sagte zu meiner Frau: So war es, und ich verbrachte die nächsten 4 1/3 Jahre im Department of Energy. Ich führte einige Dinge ein, ein neues Förderprogramm namens Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy, ARPA-E, es ist kurzfristig und sehr risikoreich. Ich wollte genug Wissenschaftler und Ingenieure um mich haben, die sich mit einem Problem möglicherweise von Grund auf ingenieurwissenschaftlich befassen konnten, wir nannten sie Energy Innovation Hubs. Die photovoltaischen und photothermalen Programme versuchten wir neu zu laden. Nun ein Beispiel für unsere Arbeit im ARPA-E. Die bestehende Technologie ist z.B. Pferd und Wagen, und mit der Zeit verbessern sich die effektiven Kosten dafür. Dann kommt ein dampfbetriebenes Fahrzeug, aber etabliert sich nicht wirklich. Dann kommt der Benz Motorwagen, etabliert sich nicht, nicht, weil er nicht funktioniert, er funktionierte sehr gut, war aber zu teuer. Ein Fahrzeug wie der Tesla S-1 funktioniert sehr gut, kostet aber $100.000. Das Fahrzeug, das die Technologie veränderte, war das Ford Model T, ein gutes Auto, das leistbar war. Wir nennen das eine disruptive Technologie, und ARPA-E sollte in disruptive Technologien investieren, wobei wir wussten, dass es 9 von 10 Mal fehlschlug. Das war ein anderes Förderprogramm als wir hatten. Wir suchten keine sicheren Investitionen, sondern erfolgreiche Investitionen. SunShot, wir sahen uns den Preis von Solarenergie für Versorgungsunternehmen 2004 an, das gesamte System kostete $ 8. Im Jahr 2010 waren es $ 3,80 und wir sagten, wo könnte der Preis wirklich liegen, und setzten uns bis 2020 das verrückte Ziel, dass das gesamte System, die Module, Elektronik, die Landnutzung $ 1 pro Watt kostet. Das ist $ 1 pro erzeugtem Watt, basierend auf einer bestimmten Solarenergie-Bestrahlungsstärke. Man glaubte, wir hätten etwas geraucht. Die Industrie sagte, wir wären verrückt. Wir könnten $ 2,50 schaffen, aber nicht $ 1. Und wir sagten, wir haben einen Geschäftsplan, darum geht es, wir können das machen." Und dann, 1,5 Jahre später, hielt einer der Gurus der Solartechnologie eine Rede und sagte... (etwas fällt runter) Verzeihung, ich zerstöre Ihr Podium. Jedenfalls... Werden Sie mich wieder einladen? (lacht) Jedenfalls sagten sie 1,5 Jahre später: Das war sehr gut. Mit dem Beginn bei APRA-E und SunShot und einigen anderen, gab es die Idee, sehr, sehr gute Leute zu bekommen, so gut oder besser als die Wissenschaftler und Ingenieure, die sie finanzierten, um im Department zu arbeiten und ARPA-E bewies, dass es wirklich machbar ist, in einer bundesstaatlichen Bürokratie, und SunShot, das ein bestehendes Programm war, wenn man 3 oder 4 Leute an der Spitze einstellte, die die Leute gut zu einer neuen Vision führen können, kann man eine bestehende Bürokratie verändern. Unser Motto war etwas, was ich meinen Studierenden immer sagte: sondern das Ziel zu niedrig zu setzen, und es zu erreichen." Das hat Michelangelo gesagt, aber eignet sich auch gut für Wissenschaftler. Der Präsident beauftragte mich, beim BP-Öllaustritt zu helfen. Es gab keine Zuständigkeit, aber ich unterbreitete den BP-Technikern einen Vorschlag, den sie annahmen, nachdem sie 2 Tage darüber gelacht hatten. Kurz danach, am Ende einer Kabinettssitzung, kam er zu mir und sagte:„ Chu, fahren Sie dort hin, und helfen Sie, den Ölaustritt zu stoppen." Ein Team aus 5 oder 6 Experten verbrachte mit mir die meiste Zeit des Sommers in Houston, und wir kamen wirklich zur Sache. Ich habe keine Zeit, darüber zu sprechen, aber das war etwas. Rückblickend war meine wichtigste Rolle im Department of Energy, dass ich großartige Leute identifizierte, sie anrief und sagte: Wir sind hier, um die Welt zu retten." Wenn sie einmal da sind, lassen Sie sie nicht allein, sondern setzten Sie sich für sie ein, weil die überwältigende Regierungsbürokratie sie hinunterziehen könnte. Ein langjähriger Mitarbeiter des Departments sagte: Er sagte nicht BS, das ist ein Akronym. (lacht) Das schlimmste an der Politik waren die Zeitungen. Sie warteten nur darauf, dich zu erwischen, bei einem Ausrutscher, dass man uneinig mit dem Präsidenten war oder so etwas. Sechs Tage nach dem Bekanntwerden, dass ich zurücktreten werde, brachte „The Onion" einen Artikel: Ich lese Ihnen einen Auszug vor. der Energy Secretary Steven Chu Donnerstag früh neben einem riesigen Solarpanel aufwachte, das er in der vorigen Nacht kennenlernte. Quellen zufolge ist Chu's Begegnung mit diesem kristallinen Silikonsolarempfänger seine bedauernswertester Seitensprung seit 2009, als eine längere Affäre mit einer 27m-Windturbine beinahe seine Ehe beendete." Normalerweise reagieren wir nicht auf skurrile Artikel, aber als ich am nächsten Morgen kam, sagte ich: Mittags gab ich die folgende Pressemitteilung heraus: absolut nichts mit den Behauptungen zu tun hat, die in dieser Woche im The Onion gemacht wurden. Ich bestätige oder leugne die Anschuldigungen nicht, und möchte betonen, dass saubere, erneuerbare Solarenergie zunehmend eine Quelle von Jobs in den USA ist und immer günstiger wird, daher ist es nicht überraschend, dass sich viele Amerikaner in Solarenergie verlieben." Das machte Spaß. Ende April 2013 beschloss ich, zurück nach Stanford zu gehen. Ich wollte nur Professor sein, und „nur" soll nichts anderes heißen, als dass es die höchste Position ist, in der ich mich je sah. Hier begann mein Interesse für Neurowissenschaften. Einige von uns taten sich zusammen und sagten, es gäbe einige Dinge, die wir tun könnten. Ich erinnere mich im September 2013 an eine Idee im Gespräch mit einem langjährigen Kollegen, Axel Brunger, wir arbeiteten 14 Jahre gemeinsam an der neuronalen Vesikelfusion, und ich sagte, Das ist Tom Sudhof, wir fanden ihn im Büro und ich erklärte die Idee und er sagte: Und ich sagte: „Tom, verstehst du nicht, wenn es funktioniert, werden wir berühmt." Zwei Wochen später erhielt er den Nobelpreis. Aber er ist ein sehr seriöser Wissenschaftler, und ist jetzt wieder zurück im Labor, und daher wollen wir das Gehirn erforschen, und an Lebendgewebe, einem ganzen Gehirn, arbeiten, auch Liqun Luo, und hier ist ein Beispiel für eines der Dinge, der technischen Dinge, die wir machen wollen. Wir folgen den Fußstapfen von Neher und Sakmann, die die Patch Clamp Technology erfanden, und damit die Neurophysiologie revolutionierten. Wir wollten fluoreszierende Proben machen, die äußerst sensibel sein konnten, wie ein Patch Clamp im Lauf der Zeit, aber wo kann man 1000 oder 10.000 Neuronen in Echtzeit an einem Lebendgehirn beobachten? Also waren die von uns untersuchten Teilchen ein paar Teilchen, das ist eins, ein Nanodiamant, der aus Diamantmolekülen entstand. Wir entwickeln diesen Prozess des Plasmawachstums und beginnen praktisch nur mit Molekülen. Im Bild links ist ein riesiger Diamant, ein Mikron im Durchmesser, wo Sie die Facetten sehen. Im Bild rechts ist ein kleinerer Diamant, etwa 7 Nanometer im Durchmesser, wo die Linien sind und Sie können die Facetten sehen. Rechts ist ein perfekter Diamant. So etwas möchten Sie sich an den Finger stecken, und stolz tragen. (lacht) Wenn Sie es sehen können. Wir lernten, wie wir sie mit unabhängiger Steuerung dotieren können, mit Silangas, und wieder in einem CVD-Prozess, und dieser besondere Diamant strahlt 10 Millionen Counts per Second aus. Wir glauben, wir lernen gerade wie wir sie in „Massenproduktion" herstellen, 5 Nanometer groß, etwa 5 Millionen Counts per Second. Sie sind fotostabil und chemisch inert. Wir versuchen auch herauszufinden, falls wir sie fotosensitiv machen können, ob wir noch einen Nanopartikel in die Membran eines Neurons einbetten können, und hier gibt es einen potenziellen Aktionsgipfel, die Fluoreszenz wird sich verändern, aber da sie fotostabil sind und so viele Impulse geben, können wir individuelle Aktionspotenziale sehen und die sollten andauern, und wir wollen, dass sie zumindest so lange bleiben wie die Absolventen. Wir lernen, wie wir sie funktionalisieren. Das ist nicht einfach, sondern eine ziemliche Arbeit, erst seit einer Woche gelingt es uns, Silikondioxidbeschichtungen anzubringen, und Nanodiamanten sind nur einen Nanometer groß. Das ist der erste Schritt der Funktionalisierung und dann werden wir sie hydrophil machen, und so weiter und so fort. Also bleiben Sie dran. Mir geht die Zeit aus, und ich habe nicht wirklich Zeit, über eine andere Partikelklasse, Seltene Erden zu sprechen. Sie können einen Partikel mit verschiedenen Farbquoten dotieren, sodass ein Partikel diese Farbe, und der nächste zwei andere Farben hat, und der nächste könnte diese Farbe, und der nächste jene Farbe, und der nächste diese Farbe haben. Wenn Sie alle Farbkombinationen berücksichtigen, die wir schon synthetisiert haben, kann man im Prinzip 39 Farben haben. Dann können Sie das Bild nehmen, und eines für die 3-D-Lokalisierung nehmen, und das andere in ein Prisma geben, die Farben zerlegen, sodass Sie den Array-Detektor als Spektrometer nutzen können, und indem Sie sich die Farbquoten ansehen, können Sie in einem Rahmen viele Farben wählen. Dann können Sie sehr schnell weitermachen. Natürlich bedeutet das, dass sie speziell zerlegt worden sein müssen. Abschließend will ich sagen, warum ich mich 10 Jahre lang etwas widmete, das mir sehr wichtig ist. Wenn Sie sich dieses Foto ansehen, ein Astronaut nahm es am 24. Dezember 1968 auf, und er sagte: Seit 1968 wissen wir, dass sich das Klima wandelt, größtenteils aufgrund der Menschen, und wenn Sie dieses Bild ansehen, müssen Sie kein Wissenschaftler sein, um zu sehen, dass sich der Mond nicht zum Leben eignet. Von diesem Blickwinkel aus sieht die Erde gut aus, und wir können nirgendwo anders hin. Danke.

Steven Chu (2015) - A Random Walk in Science
(00:09:34 - 00:14:10)

 The complete video is available here.


A mere three years later, that record temperature was shattered — somewhat accidentally — by American physicist William D. Phillips, who built upon Chu’s Doppler cooling work. Calculations had pointed to a theoretical temperature limit of Doppler cooling that matched Chu’s experimental value of 240 µK. But Phillips started measuring temperatures as low as 40 µK, six times lower than the supposed limit [13].

Here, in a public lecture at Lindau in 2019, Phillips recalls the happy accident of creating a temperature colder than what scientists thought was theoretically possible with Doppler cooling.

 The complete video is available here.


French physicist Claude Cohen-Tannoudji refined the theory to explain the unexpected results and went a step further with laser cooling. He broke what was called the recoil limit, which originates from the fact that even the slowest atoms are forced to absorb and emit photons. Instead of staying as still as possible, they must take on a small velocity and temperature. Between 1988 and 1995, Cohen-Tannoudji and his colleagues invented a method that converts the slowest atoms to a dark state that does not absorb photons. With six opposing laser beams, they slowed down helium atoms to a corresponding temperature of only 0,18 µK [14].

This flurry of discoveries led to a 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics shared by Chu, Phillips, and Cohen-Tannoudji “for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light." [15] The cooling processes perfected by the three scientists and their colleagues, opened the doors for other innovations, including more accurate atomic clocks and a new state of matter called Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) — another Nobel Prize-winning discovery, which will be described in detail below.

The following video clip from the 2015 Lindau meeting shows Cohen-Tannoudji talking about some applications of ultracold atoms, including how they are used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks.

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (2015) - The Adventure of Cold Atoms. From Optical Pumping to Quantum Gases

So what I would like to do in this lecture, is to briefly describe these effects and show you how they can be used for giving rise to very interesting applications. So let me now give you the outline of the talk. First, I will discuss optical pumping and light shifts. With principles, the important features of optical pumping. And I would like to give you a dressed atom interpretation of light shifts. Then, in the second part, I would like to describe laser cooling and trapping. The cooling mechanisms and the possibility to trap atoms between laser light and to get atomic mirrors or optical lattices. And then, in the third part, I would like to give applications of ultracold atoms, ultraprecise atomic clocks, measuring times at a high accuracy and quantum degenerate gases. And finally, in the last part, I would like to describe light shifts in cavity quantum electrodynamics and the possibility to get a single photon without destroying it. OK. So let me start with polarization of atoms by optical pumping and let me come back to two important papers, which appeared in 1949 and 1950, by my two physicist brothers, Alfred Kastler and Jean Brossel, who introduced the basic idea of mixtures of angular momentum between atoms and photons. Let me describe optical pumping. Suppose that you have a beam of light, with a circular polarization, propagating along the z-axis. And suppose that this light beam excites atoms having ground state g and an excited state. We have two sublevels, very simple case, with two spin states, minus one-half and plus one-half in the ground state, and minus on-half and plus one-half in the excited state. And these quantum numbers represents angular momentum in units of each bar. Each bar is equal to h over two pi. Sigma+ polarized photons have an angular momentum +1 along the z-axis. An atom can aborb these photons only by going from -1/2 to +1/2, because it is only on this transition that the quantum number varies by +1. By choosing the polarization of light, you excite selectively this transition, and very easy to understand, you have an angular momentum of +1 and by absorbing this photon the atom must gain an angular momentum +1. So it goes from this state to this state. Once it is in excited state, it falls back in the ground state, either in this way, or in this way. If it's falling back in this way, then it falls back into +1/2 state which is the ground state, and from this it can no longer absorb sigma+ photons, because there is no +3/2 state in the upper state. By this cycle you transfer atoms from the -1/2 state to the +1/2 state. You have transferred to the atom the angular momentum of light. It's some sort of a pump which takes atom from -1/2 and puts them in +1/2. This is why it's called "optical pumping." Once you have concentrated all atoms in this state, you can detect any transition between the two sub-levels in the ground state. Because if you have a transition between these two states, and used by magnetic resonance or by collision, then the absorption of sigma+ light starts again. By looking at the absorption of light, you can detect any transition between the two ground states of levels, to have an optical detection of magnetic resonance. And it's more sensitive than the usual detection. So you have a lot of fundamental and practical applications. Let me first give you an application which was not found at the beginning. It appeared only 30 years after the discovery of optical pumping. People realized that if you have a person breathing a mixture of air and polarized gas, polarized helium, then you can fill the lungs with the polarized gas. Helium gas. Which is not bad for the body because helium is a noble gas. You can detect magnetic resonance in the lungs and you can make I-R-M in the empty parts of the body in the lungs. And that's an example of an I-R-M picture, MRI, excuse me, in French it's I-R-M, in English it's MRI. MRI by proton, the usual MRI, we detect the protons of the water molecules. And MRI with helium-3, where you detect the cavity of the lungs and also you can detect some diseases like asthma or heavy smoker. That was a practical application of optical pumping which was not considered at the beginning. Let me now show you that light also can change the internal energy of the atoms. By what is called "light-shifts." A non-resonant light, which is slightly detuned from resonance, can shift the ground state by an amount, it is called the light shift, Delta E(g), which is proportional to the light intensity. If it's double the intensity, then it's double the light shift. And which has a sign which depends on the detuning between the light frequency Omega(L), and the atomic frequency, Omega(A). If Omega(L) is larger than Omega(A), the detuning, the shift is positive. If Omega(L) is smaller than Omega(A) the shift is negative. So you have a possibility to displace an atomic ground state by an amount that you can control and with a science that you can control. In fact, when you have two Zeeman sublevels in the ground state, in general the two ground states of levels have different light shifts and the magnetic resonance in the ground state is shifted by light. And this is the way, when I was able in my Ph.D. work, to demonstrate the existence and to measure the light shifts. And in fact, these effects can be considered from two different points of view. First, it's a perturbation, because light perturbs the energy you want to measure. And if you want to measure the real energy, you have to extrapolate where the real light energy is. But it appeared 30 years after that this effect is also very useful, because it can be the basis of important applications in laser cooling and in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Let me now show you how light shifts were first discovered. Let me come back to this transition between two sublevels, two states with 1/2 angular momentum. This is a sigma+ light, this is sigma- light. You see that depending on the polarization of the light, you can shift this level, or this level, by an amount which is the light shift. And you see that the two sublevels have shifted by the same amount, and you reduce the splitting between these two states by sigma- excitation and you increase it by a sigma+ excitation. To displace the magnetic resonance in different directions depending the light is sigma+ or sigma- polarized. This is the way how we have first observed that magnetic light shift. You had atoms here, atomic vapours, excited by optical pumping lights, it is resonant, and shifted by a second perturbing beam which is sigma+ or sigma- polarized. And you see that the magnetic resonance in the ground state, is shifted in opposite direction, depending the light is sigma plus or sigma minus polarized. At that time, we had no lasers, it was in 1961, we had ordinary lamps and light shift was extremely small on the order of one hertz. Now with laser beams, you can have light shift that can be gigahertz, much, much larger. Let me now go to the second example of manipulation, laser cooling. Let me first try to explain to you what that effect is. Let me take a simple example of a target C, which is bombarded by a beam of projectiles P coming all from the same direction. These projectiles bomb on the target, and go in any direction, and as a result of this bombardment, the target is pushed. The same effect exists if you replace the target by an atom and the projectile by photons. Photons are absorbed by the atoms and remitted in all possible directions, and photons have a momentum, and a result of this bombardment, the atom is pushed. This is what is called "radiation pressure." This effect actually is known, it's part of the explanation of the tails of the comet. The comet is the astrophysical object, and the light coming from the sun pushes this dust and gives rise to the tail of the comet. Which is along the direction of the sun and not along the direction of the trajectory of the comet. And that was explained by Keppler a long time ago. Of course, with laser beams, the radiation pressure can be much more important because the photons are all coming from the same direction, very clearly. And if we have enough power, a few tenths of milliwatts, you can get huge radiation pressure forces. And you can communicate through the atom an acceleration which is 10^5 of acceleration due to gravity. So it's a huge force that you can exert on atoms. And using this force, you can stop an atomic beam. To pause an atomic beam coming in that direction, we use a counterpropagating laser beam so the laser beam slows down the atom. But of course when the atom starts to be slowed down, because of the Doppler effects, they no longer are in resonance with the laser beam. So if you put the atomic beam in a magnetic field gradient by a tapered solenoid, as it was suggested by my colleague William Phillips, then you can maintain the resonance condition for the whole trajectory, and you can stop the atom in about half a meter. And I show you a picture. The atomic beam coming out of the solenoid, that's a straight light from the solenoid, and you can see that the atoms are stopped and come back to the oven from which they are emitted. So that's a very easy way to get a sample of atoms that are stopped. Of course, now with laser diodes, you can also sweep the laser frequency and maintain the resonance condition without any magnetic field. Once the atoms are stopped, they still have velocity dispersion around the mean value which is zero. You can try to reduce this zero velocity spread, which is cooling, because cooling, the temperature is not related to the mean velocity, but to the dispersion of velocity around the mean value. And the first thing that was proposed by Ted Haensch, and by other people, was to use the Doppler effect. Suppose you have a beam, you have an atom here, moving with the velocity V. And instead of taking this single-laser beam, you can take two opposite laser beams with the same frequency, and the same intensity, and the frequency is slightly detuned below the atomic frequency. First, if the atom is at rest, you have no Doppler effect, the two radiation pressure forces are equal and opposite, the net force is equal to zero. If the velocity is non-zero, and if the atom is moving to the right, because of the Doppler effect, the frequency of this beam appears to be slightly higher, so it gets closer to resonance because if Ny(L) is smaller than Ny(A), if Ny(L) increases it gets closer to Ny(A). And in this beam, Ny(L), the Doppler shift is opposite, it gets farther from Ny(A), so the two radiaton pressure forces no longer cancel out, and the net force is opposite to the velocity, and the force will dampen the velocity. This is why this scheme has been called "optical molasses." It looks like an atom was moving in a pot of honey, except that the honey is now replaced by light. Light exerts a friction mechanism. With this, when you make the theory of this effect, you predict that you can reach temperatures on the order of 200 microkelvin, which is already very, very low. But when measurement by time and the right techniques became available, it turned out that the temperature was much lower than expected. It was one, two, three microkelvin. That's not usual when you do experiments especially if it's less good than predicted by theory. It was much lower. In fact, that was an application of optical pumping and light shift. And this is, what we called with my young colleague Jean Dalibard "Sisyphus cooling," for the following reason: You remember that in the ground state you can have atoms having two spin-states, spin up and spin down. And these two spin-states are shifted by light differently. Not the same way. And seems like this non-resonance, slightly between below the atomic frequency, the light shift is non-zero. And you can have the two spin-states displaced periodically in space. And altough the light is not different too far from resonance, so you can have atoms absorbing light from one sublevel and going to the other one. So you can be optically pumped from one state to the other. And you can reach a situation where you have the two beam states shifted by light. Like that. And the atom, going to the right, climbs a potential hill and when it is at the top of the hill, it has a probability to be optically pumped to the other state, as if to say to the bottom of a valley, and again climbing a potential hill, optically pumped to the bottom of the valley, and so on. It the same situation as the era of the Greek mythology, Sisyphus, was condemned to roll up rocks to the top of a mountain and once it was on top, the gods was putting him on the bottom of the valley, had to do the job again and again. And it was exhausting, and the same thing occurs with the atoms. And when you make the theories of this effect you can explain the result and you can explain why you get a temperature in the microkelvin range. Now, you have even more when the atoms are very cold. And if they are dense enough, if they are trapped in a potential well, they can undergo elastic collisions like that, and two atoms with energy E1 and E2 can collide. And reach energy E3 and E4 with of course, E1 plus E2 equals E3 plus E4. Conservation of energy. If E4 is larger than the depth of the potential, the atom with E4 leaves the trap and the remaining atoms of the much lower energy held by colliding with other atoms, the whole sample cools down. That's exactly what is called evaporation. This is exactly what you do when you blow above your cup of coffee, to eliminate the hot molecules and the remaining liquid becomes colder. And with this technique, starting from Sisyphus cooling using evaporative cooling, you can reach nanokelvin. Which is extremely cold. And this gives you an idea of the progress that has been achieve. You know the temperature of the sun, the interior of the sun is several million kelvin. The surface of the sun several thousand kelvin, the temperature of the Earth, 27 Celsius is 300 kelvin. The cosmic microwave background radiation, after the Big Bang, a few hundred centuries after the Big Bang, is 2.7 kelvin. The cryogenic techniques is a few millikelvin. With laser cooling, one microkelvin, with evaporation, one nanokelvin. So you have a huge step in the temperature scale which had been achieved. And with these ultracold atoms, you have a lot of new applications which have emerged. In fact I'll explain briefly how you can trap atoms. Here again is an application of light shift because when you have a focused laser beam, like that, the light shift of the atomic state, which is proportional to the light intensity is maximum at the focus where the ligh tintensity is maximum. And if the tuning of the laser beam is negative, the shift is negative. So you have a potential well here in which you can trap atoms if they are cold enough. And this is what is called a "laser trap." You cannot slow, and that's fascinating,... if you have... First observed by Steve Chu, a Nobel Laureate in1997. And of course all those types of traps have been developed, we have no time to explain. I would like just to tell you something which is quite interesting. If you have a standing wave, instead of a propagating wave, the standing wave you have periodic array of maxima and minima of the light intensity. One dimension, two dimensions, three dimensions. With negative light shift, you can produce a periodic array of potential wells in which you can trap atoms like eggs, in a box for eggs. You can have what is called an "optical lattice", when you get a periodic array of trapped atoms. And this trapped atoms have properties which are quite similar to the properties of electrons in periodic potential produced by a periodic array of ions. And that's a very good model for establishing connection between atomic physics and solid state physics. Now, let me return to the applications of these cold atoms. And the first of use application is to have long interaction times. Because atoms are moving slowly, you can observe them for a very long time. And in principle, the longer the observation time, the higher the precision. So you can make very precise measurements, and in particular very precise atomic clocks. Second application, you remember that Louis de Broglie introduced the idea that any matter particle is associated with a wave, which is called a de Broglie wave, and which have a wavelength inversely proportional to the atomic velocity. With cold atoms, having a very low velocity, you can have large de Broglie wavelengths, and you can make use of the wave properties of matter. So, how do you improve atomic clocks? Usually atomic clocks use atomic beams of caesium because the second is defined from the caesium atom's condition, crossing two cavities where you have current microwave fields exciting the caesium atoms. And the two cavities are separated by about half a meter. And you observe resonance lines with the fringes which are called "Ramsey fringes," which is determined by the time of life of atoms from one cavity to the other, with a velocity of a hundred meter per second. And we're just pacing 0.5 metre, so the time of life is about five milliseconds. What you can do now, with cold atoms, you can have a cloud of cold atoms, and with a laser pulse, you can push atoms upwards, and they go upwards, like that. And they cross the cavity, a single cavity now, once on their way up, and once on their way down. It's some sort of fountain, the water molecules are replaced by atoms. Pushed by a laser pulse. And the time it takes for the atom to cross a cavity once on the way up, once on the way down, can be hundred times longer than this time. They can be 5 seconds. And then by increasing the jumping time, you can get now precision. You can switch from time 0.005 second to 0.5 seconds, you can improve the accuracy by two orders of magnitude of the clock. And actually, atomic fountains have been achieved in Paris by my colleague Christophe Salomon and Andre Clairon at the Observatory of Paris. And you have here examples of Ramsey fringes, with a very high signal-to-noise ratio, and with this concept, you can measure time with a relative accuracy which reaches 10^-16. And relative accuracy of 10^-16 for an interaction time of about 10,000 seconds means that you can measure time with an accuracy so that, shift of time, the error in time, is only one second in 300 million years. So that give you an idea of the accuracy we can reach. Now new clocks have been achieved using optical transition instead of microwave transition in caesium, reaching 10^-17. Which is an accuracy of one second in the age of the universe. And in fact, what we are planning to do now, because you know in Earth we are always bothered by gravity, we have the atom falling, and accelerating, because they fall. So the best thing is to go to space, where the atom are no longer submitted to the gravity. And to make an experiment in microgravity. And there's a campaign which has been developed, putting this clock in a Zero-G flight, a flight doing zero free flight like that, during 20 second, and then again, a second parabola, and so on, and you see the people in the plane, here, different people working in physics, chemistry, biology, and now it's planned to put this clock in the space station. And Thursday, I will go with Ted Haensch to the Airbus space station in Germany, not far from here, to visit the clock which has been developed in Paris, and which will be put in the space station. Hopefully, the space station will get the clock, in 2017, in two years from now. Then we hope to be able to reach a very high accuracy. Of course we have lots of applications by measuring the difference of the time between in the clock in the space station and the clock on earth, you can test the theory of general relativity because Einstein predicted that two clocks in different gravitational fields do not oscillate at the same frequency. Here is the progress in the accuracy of the clocks during six decades, and reaching now 10^-17. Let me just briefly outline the other application of cold atoms: the long de Broglie wavelengths. When you have many atoms in a trap, separated by distances smaller than the de Broglie wavelengths they are predicted to condense in a single quantum space; that was predicted by Einstein in 1924, and this is called "Bose Einstein condensation." And this effect has been observed recently about 20 years ago by several groups, Carl Wieman, Wolfgang Ketterle, and Eric Cornell and now you have a billion of atoms all in the same macroscopic quantum wave function. That's a very fascinating story. I have a lot of pictures, we just have no time to discuss. Let me say that just by having this macroscopic quantum waves open the way to a lot of new phenomena: Like superfluidity of matter waves, like atom lasers. You have two condensates, you let them overlap, and you get interference between macroscopic matter waves. So I switch now to the last point of my talk. Suppose that you have an atom, with two states, a ground state and an excited state, sent though a cavity, high Q cavity, very good quality cavity. So the two states undergo light shifts if the cavity is not resonant. And the two shifts are not the same, so the frequency splitting between the two states is non-zero, and is a value which depends on the number of photons in the cavity. If you measure this phase shift of the transition where the atom cross the cavity by a second pulse, here, you get the phase shift which depends on the number of photon in the cavity which is not the same depending the cavities are empty, or contain a single photon. And you don't destroy the photon, because the photon is not absorbed. So you have a non-destructive detection of photons in the cavity. And that has been researched by my colleague Serge Haroche and other people and this is why they obtained a Noble Prize three years ago in 2012. So you see the light shifts have had a lot of applications: cooling, the atomic clocks, cavity QED. So let me finish by showing a photo of the group of Professor Kastler, who's here. In 1966, Alfred Kastler got the Noble Prize for optical pumping. He's here, Brossel was here, Jean Brossel. I was here. Some time ago, in 1966, I had just finished my Ph.D. work two years ago, and I was starting a new research group, and my first student was Serge Haroche, who is here. So you see, in this picture, in the same lab you have three generations of Nobel Prize winners, Alfred Kastler, myself, and Serge Haroche. This is where we'll conclude, I think. I hope to have shown you all a better understanding, fundamental research, trying to understand the properties of atom-photon interaction has allowed several important advances, like the invention of new light sources, like the laser, which has completely transformed optics. New mechanisms, like optical pumping, laser cooling, for manipulating atoms. These advances are opening new research fields and allow us to ask new questions, to investigate new systems, new states of matter, like macroscopic matter waves. I think that I give this example because I think that shows clearly, the importance of long-term research. Basic research is long-term. You need the long-term to build the group and to get a deep physical understanding of the physical mechanisms you are studying. And that you increase the background of knowledge, which can be at the origin of new fruitful ideas. And finally, I think it's important to keep talented and experienced young people a long time enough to allow them to get good knowledge, and to contribute themselves to the advances of science. And this is why it is important to have here, in Lindau, a lot of new young students coming from all over the world to listen to lectures and try to be motivated. Because to do research, you have to be passionate about what you are doing. Thank you very much. Thank you! Merci beaucoup. Merci beaucoup.

Ich möchte in diesem Vortrag kurz diese Wirkungen beschreiben und Ihnen zeigen, wie sie verwendet werden können für sehr interessante Anwendungen. Ich zeige Ihnen eine Skizze zum Verlauf dieses Vortrags. Zuerst werde ich über optisches Pumpen und Lichtverschiebungen sprechen. Mit Grundsätzen, den wichtigen Eigenschaften des optischen Pumpens. Ich möchte Ihnen auch eine Dressed-Atom Interpretation von Lichtverschiebungen geben. Dann, im zweiten Teil, möchte ich Laserkühlung und –speicherung beschreiben. Der Kühlungsmechanismus und die Möglichkeit Atome zwischen Laserlicht einzufangen und Atomspiegel oder optische Gitter zu erhalten. Dann möchte ich im dritten Teil Anwendungen von ultrakalten Atomen, ultrapräzisen Atomuhren, Zeitmessungen in hoher Genauigkeit und quantenentarteten Gasen nennen. Schließlich, im letzten Teil, möchte ich Lichtverschiebungen bei der Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik beschreiben und die Möglichkeit ein einzelnes Photon zu erhalten, ohne es zu zerstören. Gut, lassen Sie mich mit der Polarisierung von Atomen durch optisches Pumpen beginnen, und lassen Sie mich auf zwei wichtige Papers zurückgreifen, die 1949 und 1950 veröffentlicht wurden, von meinen beiden Physikerkollegen Alfred Kastler und Jean Brossel, die als Grundgedanken den Austausch von Drehmoment zwischen Atomen und Photonen eingeführt haben. Lassen Sie mich optisches Pumpen beschreiben. Angenommen, man hat einen Lichtstrahl mit einer kreisförmigen Polarisation, der sich entlang der Z-Achse ausbreitet. Und angenommen, dieser Lichtstrahl regt Atome zum Grundzustand g und einem Anregungszustand an. Wir haben zwei Unterniveaus, sehr einfacher Fall, mit zwei Spinzuständen, -1/2 und +1/2 im Grundzustand, und -1/2 und +1/2 im Anregungszustand. Und diese Quantenzahlen repräsentieren den Drehimpuls in Einheiten h(Strich). Jeder Balke entspricht h/2*Pi. Sigma+ polarisierte Photonen haben ein Drehmoment +1 längs der Z-Achse. Ein Atom kann diese Photonen nur aufnehmen wenn es von -1/2 nach +1/2 geht, da nur in diesem Übergang die Quantenzahl um +1 variiert. Durch Wahl der Polarisation des Lichts, kann man diesen Übergang selektiv anregen und leicht zu verstehen ist, man hat ein Drehmoment von +1 und durch Absorption dieses Photons muss das Atom ein Drehmoment von +1 erlangen. Es gelangt aus diesem Zustand in diesen Zustand. Sobald es sich im Anregungszustand befindet, fällt es in den Grundzustand zurück, entweder auf diese Art, oder auf diese. Fällt es auf diese Art zurück, fällt es in den +1/2 Zustand, welches der Grundzustand ist, und von hier können Sigma+ Photonen nicht mehr absorbiert werden, denn es gibt im oberen Zustand keinen +3/2 Zustand. In diesem Zyklus werden Atome vom -1/2 Zustand in den +1/2 Zustand übertragen. Sie haben dem Atom das Drehmoment des Lichts übertragen. Es ist eine Art Pumpe, die Atome von -1/2 holen und nach +1/2 bringen. Daher wird es „optisches Pumpen“ genannt. Sobald man alle Atome in diesem Zustand konzentriert hat, kann man einen Übergang zwischen den beiden Unterniveaus im Grundzustand erkennen. Denn, wenn Sie einen Übergang zwischen diesen beiden Zuständen haben, der mit magnetischer Resonanz oder durch Stoß verwendet wird, beginnt die Absorption von Sigma+ Licht erneut. Sieht man sich die Lichtabsorption an, kann man jeden Übergang zwischen den zwei Grundzuständen von Niveaus erfassen, um eine optische Erfassung magnetischer Resonanz zu haben. Es ist auch empfindlicher als die gewöhnliche Erfassung. Man hat also eine Menge grundlegender und praktischer Applikationen Lassen Sie mich eine Anwendung nennen, die zu Beginn nicht entdeckt wurde. Sie tauchte erst 30 Jahre nach der Entdeckung des optischen Pumpens auf. Man erkannten bei einer atmenden Person eine Mischung aus Luft und polarisiertem Gas, polarisiertes Helium, man kann dann die Lungen mit polarisiertem Gas füllen, Helium. Das ist für den Körper nicht schädlich, Helium ist ein edles Gas. Man kann in den Lungen Magnetresonanz erkennen und in den leeren Teilen des Körpers in den Lungen ein I-R-M vornehmen. Dies ist das Beispiel eines I-R-M-Bildes, MRI, Entschuldigung, auf Französisch heißt es ein I-R-M, auf Englisch MRI. MRI nach Proton, das gewöhnliche MRI, wir erkennen die Protonen der Wassermoleküle. Und MRI mit Helium-3, hier erkennt man die Lungenhöhle und man erkennt auch einige Krankheiten wie Asthma oder den schweren Raucher. Das war eine praktische Anwendung des optischen Pumpens, an die man zu Beginn nicht gedacht hatte. Lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie auch Licht die interne Energie des Atoms verändern kann. Durch das, was man “Lichtverschiebungen“ nennt. Ein nicht-resonantes Licht, dass durch Resonanz leicht verstimmt ist, kann den Grundzustand um einen Betrag verschieben, das wird Lichtverschiebung, Delta E(g), genannt, die proportional zur Lichtintensität ist. Es ist die doppelte Intensität, da es das Doppelte der Lichtverschiebung ist. Es hat ein Zeichen, das von der Verstimmung zwischen er Lichtfrequenz Omega(L), und der Atomfrequenz Omega(A) abhängt. Ist Omega(L) größer als Omega(A), die Verstimmung, ist die Verschiebung positiv. Ist Omega(L) kleiner als Omega(A) ist die Verschiebung negativ. Sie haben die Möglichkeit einen atomaren Grundzustand entsprechend einem Betrag zu verlagern, den Sie steuern können, mit einer Wissenschaft, die Sie steuern können. Wenn Sie zwei Zeeman-Unterniveaus im Grundzustand haben, haben die zwei Grundzustände der Niveaus im Allgemeinen verschiedene Lichtverschiebungen und die Magnetresonanz im Grundzustand wird durch Licht verschoben. Auf diese Weise war es mir in meiner Doktorarbeit möglich, die Existenz der Lichtverschiebungen aufzuzeigen und zu messen. Diese Wirkungen lassen sich unter zwei Gesichtspunkten betrachten. Erstens, es ist eine Störung, da das Licht die Energie, die man messen will, stört. Wenn man die wirkliche Energie messen will, muss man ableiten, wo die wirkliche Lichtenergie ist. Es zeigte sich 30 Jahre später, dass auch diese Wirkung sehr nützlich ist, da sie die Grundlage wichtiger Anwendungen bei Laserkühlung und der Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik sein kann. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie Lichtverschiebungen zuerst entdeckt wurden. Ich gehe nochmals zurück zu diesem Übergang zwischen zwei Unterniveaus, zwei Zustände mit 1/2 Drehmoment. Dies ist ein Sigma+ Licht, dies ist Sigma Licht. Sie sehen, je nach Polarisation des Lichts kann man dieses Niveau oder dieses Niveau durch den Betrag der Lichtverschiebung verschieben. Sie sehen, die beiden Unterniveaus haben sich um den gleichen Betrag verschoben, und Sie reduzieren die Spaltung zwischen diesen beiden Zuständen durch Sigma- Anregung und vergrößern sie durch Sigma+ Anregung. Verschieben der Magnetresonanz in verschiedene Richtungen, sofern das Licht Sigma+ oder Sigma- polarisiert ist. Auf diese Weise haben wir zuerst die magnetische Lichtverschiebung beobachtet. Sie haben hier alle Atome, atomare Dämpfe, angeregt durch Licht optischen Pumpens, es ist resonant und verschob sich um einen zweiten störenden Strahl, der Sigma+ oder Sigma- polarisiert ist. Sie sehen, die Magnetresonanz im Grundzustand verschob sich in die entgegengesetzte Richtung, je nachdem, ob das Licht Sigma plus oder Sigma minus polarisiert ist. Damals hatten wir kein Laser, das war 1961, wir hatten gewöhnliche Lampen und die Lichtverschiebung war außergewöhnlich gering, in der Größenordnung von einem Hertz. Heute kann man mit Laserstrahlen Lichtverschiebungen in Gigahertz haben, viel, viel größer. Lassen Sie mich nun das zweite Beispiel der Manipulation nenne, Laserkühlung. Ich möchte zuerst die Wirkung davon erklären. Ich nehme das einfache Beispiel eines Ziels C, das mit einem Strahl von P-Partikeln bombardiert wird, die alle aus der gleichen Richtung kommen. Diese Partikel bombardieren das Ziel und gehen in alle Richtungen, und Ergebnis dieses Bombardements ist, das Ziel wird geschoben. Die gleiche Wirkung besteht, wenn man das Ziel durch ein Atom ersetzt und die Partikel durch Photonen. Photonen werden durch die Atome absorbiert und in alle möglichen Richtungen weitergeleitet. Und Photonen haben ein Moment und als Ergebnis dieses Bombardements, wird das Atom geschoben. Das nennt man “Strahlungsdruck”. Diese Wirkung ist bekannt, es ist Teil der Erklärung für den Schweif eines Kometen. Der Komet ist ein astrophysikalisches Objekt und das Licht der Sonne drückt diesen Staub und lässt den Kometenschweif entstehen. Dieser befindet sich entlang der Richtung der Sonne und nicht entlang der Flugbahn des Kometen. Das wurde von Keppler vor langer Zeit erklärt. Natürlich kann mit den Laserstrahlen der Strahlungsdruck wegen der Photonen sehr viel bedeutender sein, da sie alle sehr klar aus der gleichen Richtung kommen. Wenn wir über genügende Leistung verfügen, ein paar Zehntel Milliwatt, kann man riesige Strahlungsdruckkräfte erhalten. Und man kann über das Atom eine Beschleunigung von 10^5 der Schwerkraftbeschleunigung aufbringen. Es ist also eine riesige Kraft, die man auf Atome ausüben kann. Und wenn man diese Kraft verwendet, kann man einen Atomstrahl stoppen. Um einen Atomstrahl zu unterbrechen, der aus dieser Richtung kommt, verwenden wir einen Counterpropagating-Laserstrahl, damit der Laserstrahl das Atom verlangsamt. Wenn Atome sich aber aufgrund des Dopplereffekts verlangsamen, befinden sie sich nicht länger in Resonanz mit dem Laserstrahl. Wenn man also den Atomstrahl durch eine konische Spule in einen Magnetfeldgradienten gibt, wie mein Kollege William Phillips dies vorgeschlagen hat, kann man die Resonanzbedingung des gesamten Bahnverlaufs beibehalten und man kann das Atom etwa innerhalb eines halben Meters stoppen. Ich zeige Ihnen ein Bild. Der Atomstrahl kommt aus der Spule, das ist direktes Licht aus der Spule, Und Sie sehen, die Atome werden angehalten und kehren zum Ofen zurück, von dem sie ausgegangen sind. Dies ist ein sehr einfacher Weg, um Atome zu erhalten, die gestoppt wurden. Natürlich lässt sich mit den Laserdioden auch die Laserfrequenz ändern und die Resonanzbedingung ohne irgendein Magnetfeld beibehalten. Sobald die Atome gestoppt sind, haben sie noch immer eine Geschwindigkeitsdispersion um den Mittelwert, welcher Null ist. Man kann versuchen, die Null-Geschwindigkeitsverbreitung zu reduzieren, was durch Kühlen geschieht, denn die Temperatur hat keine Beziehung zum Mittelwert der Geschwindigkeit, aber zur Geschwindigkeitsdispersion um den Mittelwert. Als erstes haben Ted Hänsch und andere vorgeschlagen, den Dopplereffekt zu verwenden. Angenommen, Sie haben einen Strahl, Sie haben hier ein Atom, das sich mit der Geschwindigkeit V bewegt. Und statt diesen einzelnen Laserstrahl zu nehmen, nehmen Sie zwei entgegengesetzte Laserstrahlen mit der gleichen Frequenz und Intensität und die Frequenz wird leicht unter der Atomfrequenz verstimmt. Zuerst, ist das Atom im Ruhezustand, gibt es keinen Dopplereffekt; die beiden Kräfte des Strahlungsdrucks sind gleich und entgegengesetzt, die resultierende Kraft ist gleich Null. Ist die Geschwindigkeit nicht Null, und falls das Atom sich wegen des Dopplereffekts nach rechts bewegt, scheint die Frequenz des Strahles leicht höher zu sein, sie kommt der Resonanz also näher, denn Ny(L) ist kleiner als Ny(A), nimmt Ny(L) zu, kommt sie Ny(A) näher. Und in diesem Strahl, Ny(L), ist die Dopplerverschiebung entgegengesetzt, entfernt sich von Ny(A), die beiden Strahlungsdruck-Kräfte heben sich nicht länger auf und die resultierende Kraft ist entgegengesetzt der Geschwindigkeit und die Kraft wird die Geschwindigkeit abschwächen. Aus diesem Grund wurde diese Anordnung „optische Melasse“ genannt. Es sieht so aus, als würde ein Atom sich in einem Honigtopf bewegen, außer dass der Honig jetzt durch Licht ersetzt ist. Licht übt einen Reibungsmechanismus aus. Damit, leitet man aus dieser Wirkung eine Theorie ab, sagt man voraus, man kann Temperaturen in der Größenordnung von 200 Mikrokelvin erreichen, was sehr, sehr niedrig ist. Als mit der Zeit aber Messungen und die richtigen Techniken verfügbar waren, zeigt es sich, dass die Temperatur sehr viel niedriger als erwartet war. Sie lag bei eins, zwei, drei Mikrokelvin. Das ist nicht üblich, wenn man Experimente vornimmt, besonders wenn das Ergebnis nicht so gut ist, wie in der Theorie vorausgesagt. Es lag sehr viel niedriger. Tatsächlich war dies eine Anwendung des optischen Pumpens und der Lichtverschiebung. Das nenne ich mit meinem jungen Kollegen Dalibard "Sisyphuskühlung", und das aus folgendem Grund: Sie erinnern sich, im Grundzustand können Sie Atome mit zwei Spinzuständen haben, nach oben und nach unten gedreht. Und diese zwei Spinzustände werden durch Licht unterschiedlich verschoben. Nicht auf die gleichen Art. Es scheint wie dieses nicht-resonant, leicht unter der Atomfrequenz, die Lichtverschiebung ist nicht Null. Und man kann diese zwei Spinzustände im Raum periodisch verschoben haben. Und auch wenn das Licht sich nicht zu sehr von der Resonanz unterscheidet, kann man Atome bekommen, die Licht aus einem Unterniveau absorbieren und zum nächsten gehen. Man kann also optisch von einem Zustand zum anderen pumpen. Und man erhält eine Situation, bei dem die zwei Strahlenzustände durch Licht verschoben werden. Wie hier. Und das Atom, das nach rechts geht, erklimmt einen Potentialberg, und wenn es oben angekommen ist, hat es eine Wahrscheinlichkeit zum anderen Zustand optisch gepumpt zu werden, sozusagen zur Talsohle, und wieder wird ein Potentialberg erklommen, optisch gepumpt in die Talsohle, und so weiter. Es ist die gleiche Situation wie in der griechischen Mythologie, Sisyphus war verflucht, Felsen auf die Bergspitze zu rollen und wenn er oben war, versetzten ihn die Götter nach unten ins Tal und er musste die ganze Arbeit erneut vollbringen. Und es war anstrengend und das Gleiche geschieht mit den Atomen. Und wenn man die Theorien dieser Wirkung aufstellt, kann man das Ergebnis erklären und man kann erklären, weshalb man eine Temperatur im Mikrokelvin Bereich erhält. Nun verstärkt sich das noch, wenn die Atome sehr kalt sind. Und wenn sie dicht genug sind, wenn sie in einer Potentialmulde gefangen sind, können sie sich solchen elastischen Stößen unterziehen, und zwei Atome mit der Energie E1 und E2 können zusammenstoßen, und erreichen Energie E3 und E4, natürlich mit E1 plus E3 gleich E3 plus E4. Energieerhaltung. Ist E4 größer als die Tiefe des Potentials, verlässt E4 die Falle und die verbleibenden Atome mit viel geringerer Energie, gehalten durch den Zusammenstoß mit anderen Atomen, diese ganze Probe kühlt ab. Genau das nennt man Verdunstung. Genau das machen Sie, wenn Sie über ihre Tasse Kaffee blasen, um die heißen Moleküle zu eliminieren und die verbleibende Flüssigkeit wird kühler. Und mit dieser Technik, beginnend bei der Sisyphuskühlung, unter Verwendung von Verdunstungskühlung, kann man Nanokelvin erreichen. Das ist extrem kalt. Das gibt Ihnen eine Vorstellung des Vorgangs, der erreicht werden muss. Sie wissen, die Temperatur der Sonne, das Innere der Sonne, beträgt mehrere Millionen Kelvin. Die Oberfläche der Sonne beträgt mehrere Tausend Kelvin, die Temperatur der Erde, 27 Celsius ist 300 Kelvin. Die kosmische Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung, nach dem Urknall, wenige Jahrhunderte nach dem Urknall ist 2,7 Kelvin. Die Kryotechnik ist wenige Millikelvin, mit Laserkühlung ein Mikrokelvin, mit Verdunstung ein Nanokelvin. Sie haben einen riesigen Schritt auf der Temperaturskala, der erreicht wurde. Mit diesen ultrakalten Atomen gibt es eine Menge neuer Anwendungen, die sich entwickelt haben. Ich werde kurz erklären, wie man ein Atom einfangen kann. Hier ist wieder eine Anwendung der Lichtverschiebung, wenn Sie einen fokussierten Laserstrahl haben, wie diesen hier, die Lichtverschiebung des Atomzustands, proportional zu der Lichtintensität ist das Maximum im Mittelpunkt, in dem die Lichtintensität maximal ist. Ist die Abstimmung des Laserstrahles negativ, ist die Verschiebung negativ. Sie haben eine Potentialmulde, in der Sie Atome einfangen können, sofern sie kalt genug sind. Das nennt man „Laserfalle“. Man kann nicht verlangsamen, und das ist faszinierend,… wenn Sie… Zuerst von Steve Chu, einem Nobelpreisträger im Jahre 1997 beobachtet. Natürlich wurden alle diese Arten von Fallen entwickelt, wir haben nicht die Zeit, das zu erläutern. Ich möchte Ihnen nur etwas erzählen, was recht interessant ist. Wenn Sie eine stehende Welle haben, an Stelle einer sich ausbreitenden Welle, wird die stehende Welle eine periodische Anordnung von Maxima und Minima der Lichtintensität haben. Eine Dimension, zwei Dimensionen, drei Dimensionen. Mit negativer Lichtverschiebung, können Sie eine periodische Anordnung der Potentialmulde erzeugen, in der Sie Atome wie Eier fangen können, in einer Eierschachtel. Sie können das, was ein „optisches Gitter“ genannt wird erhalten, wenn Sie eine periodische Anordnung gefangener Atome haben. Und diese gefangenen Atome haben Eigenschaften, die den Eigenschaften der Elektronen in einem periodischen Potential, erzeugt durch eine periodische Anordnung von Ionen, ziemlich ähnlich ist. Und das ist ein sehr gutes Modell für das Zustandekommen einer Verbindung zwischen Atomphysik und Festkörperphysik. Lassen Sie mich wieder zu den Anwendungen dieser kalten Atome zurückkehren. Der erste Nutzen der Anwendung ist, man hat eine große Interaktionszeit. Da Atome sich langsam bewegen, kann man sie lange beobachten. Im Prinzip, je länger die Beobachtungszeit, desto größer die Präzision. Man kann also sehr präzise Messungen vornehmen und insbesondere sehr präzise Atomuhren. Zweite Anwendung, Sie erinnern sich, Louis de Broglie stellte das Konzept vor, dass jedes Stoffteilchen einer Welle zugeordnet ist, was man dann eine De-Broglie-Wellenlänge nennt und welche eine Wellenlänge umgekehrt proportional zur Atomgeschwindigkeit hat. Bei kalten Atomen, mit einer sehr niedrigen Geschwindigkeit, kann man große De-Broglie-Wellenlängen haben, Und man kann die Welleneigenschaften der Materie nutzen. Wie optimiert man Atomuhren? Gewöhnlich verwenden Atomuhren Atomstrahlen von Cäsium, da die Sekunde durch den Zustand des Cäsium-Atoms definiert ist, das zwei Kavitäten durchquert, wo aktuelle Mikrowellenfelder vorhanden sind, die die Cäsium-Atome anregen. Die zwei Kavitäten sind etwa einen halben Meter voneinander getrennt. Und man beobachtet Resonanzlinien mit Streifen, die „Ramsey-Streifen“ genannt werden, die durch die Lebenszeit der Atome von einer Kavität zur anderen bestimmt sind, mit einer Geschwindigkeit von hundert Meter pro Sekunde. Wir durchschreiten 0,5 Meter, die Lebenszeit ist also etwas fünf Millisekunden. Was man nun mit kalten Atomen tun kann: man kann eine Wolke kalter Atome haben und mit einem Laserimpuls lassen sich die Atome hochdrücken und sie gehen hoch, wie hier. Und sie durchqueren die Kavität, jetzt eine einzelne, einmal auf ihrem Weg nach oben, einmal auf ihrem Weg nach unten. Es ist eine Art Fontäne, die Wassermoleküle werden durch Atome ersetzt. Angetrieben durch einen Laserimpuls. Und die Zeit, die das Atom braucht, die Kavität einmal nach oben zu durchqueren, einmal den Weg nach unten, kann hundert Mal länger sein, als diese Zeit. Sie kann 5 Sekunden betragen. Und indem man die Zeitsprünge erhöht, erhält man jetzt Präzision. Man kann von 0,005 Sekunden auf 0,5 Sekunden umschalten, man kann die Genauigkeit um zwei Größenordnungen der Uhr optimieren. Und in der Tat, Atomfontänen wurden in Paris von meinen Kollegen Christophe Salomon und Andre Clairon am Pariser Observatorium erzielt. Sie haben hier Beispiele der Ramsey-Streifen mit einem sehr hohen Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis, und mit diesem Konzept lässt sich Zeit mit relativer Genauigkeit bis zu 10^-16 messen. Und relative Genauigkeit von 10^-16 für eine Wechselwirkungszeit von etwa 10.000 Sekunden bedeutet, man kann Zeit mit einer Genauigkeit messen, so dass Zeitverschiebung, Fehler bei Zeit, nur eine Sekunde in 300 Millionen Jahren beträgt. Damit haben sie eine Idee von der Genauigkeit, die wir erreichen können. Neue Uhren haben nun, durch Verwendung des optischen Übergangs statt des Mikrowellenübergangs in Cäsium, Damit haben wir eine Genauigkeit von einer Sekunde während des Weltalters. Was wir jetzt vorhaben ist, Sie wissen, auf der Erde werden wir immer durch die Schwerkraft behindert, hier fallen die Atome und beschleunigen sich, weil sie fallen. Man begibt sich also am Besten in den Weltraum, in dem Atome nicht länger der Schwerkraft unterliegen. Und dort soll ein Experiment in der Schwerelosigkeit vorgenommen werden. Es wurde eine Kampagne entwickelt, diese Uhr einem Zero-G Flug beizugeben, ein Flug, der Zero-G Flug wie dieser, während 20 Sekunden, und dann wieder, ein zweiter Parabelflug und so weiter, und Sie sehen, die Leute im Flugzeug, hier, verschiedene Leute, arbeiten in der Physik, Chemie, Biologie und jetzt hat man vor, diese Uhr in die Raumstation zu bringen. Am Donnerstag werde ich mit Ted Hänsch zu Airbus-Deutschland fahren, nicht weit von hier, um die Uhr zu besuchen, die in Paris entwickelt wurden und die in der Raumstation aufgestellt werden wird. Hoffentlich erhält die Raumstation die Uhr im Jahre 2017, also in zwei Jahren. Dann, so hoffen wir, sind wir in der Lage eine sehr hohe Genauigkeit zu erreichen. Natürlich gibt es viele Anwendungen durch das Messen des Zeitunterschieds zwischen der Uhr in der Raumstation und der Uhr auf der Erde, man kann die allgemeine Relativitätstheorie testen, denn Einstein sagte voraus, dass zwei Uhren in verschiedenen Gravitationsfeldern nicht in der gleichen Frequenz schwingen. Hier ist der Verlauf bei der Genauigkeit der Uhr während sechs Jahrzenten, und jetzt ist 10^-17 erreicht. Lassen Sie mich kurz die andere Anwendung kühler Atome skizzieren: Die lange De-Broglie-Wellenlänge. Wenn Sie viele Atome in einer Falle haben, getrennt durch Entfernungen die kleiner als die De-Broglie-Wellenlängen sind, wird vorausgesagt, dass sie sich in einem einzigen Quantenraum verdichten. Das wurde von Einstein 1924 vorausgesagt und wird “Bose-Einstein-Kondensation“ genannt. Dieser Effekt wurde kürzlich, etwa vor 20 Jahren, von verschiedenen Gruppen beobachtet, Carl Wieman, Wolfgang Ketterle und Eric Cornell, und jetzt hat man eine Milliarde Atome alle in der gleichen makroskopischen, quantenmechanischen Wellenfunktion. Das ist eine sehr faszinierende Geschichte. Ich habe viele Bilder, wir haben nur keine Zeit zum Besprechen. Lassen Sie mich sagen, alleine durch diese makroskopischen, quantenmechanischen Wellen öffnen sich Wege zu einer Menge neuer Phänomene. Wie Supraflüssigkeit von Materiewellen, wie Atomlaser. Man hat zwei Kondensate, lässt sie sich überlappen, und man erhält eine Wechselwirkung zwischen makroskopischen Materiewellen. Ich gehe zum letzten Punkt meiner Rede über. Angenommen, Sie haben ein Atom, mit zwei Zuständen, ein Grundzustand und ein Anregungszustand, sie werden durch eine Kavität geschickt, hohe Q Kavität, sehr gute Qualität der Kavität. Die zwei Zustände erfahren Lichtverschiebungen, falls die Kavität nicht resonant ist. Und die beiden Verschiebungen sind nicht dieselben, das Frequenzsplitting zwischen den beiden Zuständen ist nicht Null und ein Wert, der von der Anzahl der Photonen in der Kavität abhängt. Wenn man diese Phasenverschiebung des Übergangs misst, bei dem das Atom die Kavität in einem Sekundenimpuls durchquert, hier, erhalten Sie die Phasenverschiebung, die von der Anzahl der Phontonen in der Kavität abhängt, welche nicht dieselbe ist, abhängig davon, ob die Kavitäten leer sind oder ein einziges Photon enthalten. Und man zerstört das Photon nicht, da es nicht absorbiert ist. Man hat also einen zerstörungsfreien Nachweis von Photonen in der Kavität. Dies wurde von meinem Kollegen Serge Haroche und anderen erforscht, weshalb ihnen vor drei Jahren, 2012, der Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Sie sehen, die Lichtverschiebungen haben sehr viele Anwendungen: Kühlung, die Atomuhren, Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik (QED). Ich möchte damit enden, Ihnen ein Foto der Gruppe von Professor Kastler zu zeigen, hier. Er ist hier, Brossel war hier, Jean Brossel. Ich war da. Vor geraumer Zeit, im Jahre 1966, ich hatte gerade zwei Jahre zuvor meine Doktorarbeit beendet, ich begann mit einer neuen Forschungsgruppe, und mein erster Student war Serge Haroche, der hier ist. Sie sehen in diesem Bild, im gleichen Labor haben Sie drei Generationen von Nobelpreisträgern. Alfred Kastler, ich und Serge Haroche Ich denke, hier schließen wir. Ich hoffe, ich habe Ihnen allen ein besseres Verständnis von der Grundlagenforschung geben können, der Versuch die Eigenschaften der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkung zu verstehen, hat verschiedene bedeutende Fortschritte ermöglicht, wie die Erfindung neuer Lichtquellen, wie den Laser, der die Optik vollständig verändert hat. Neue Mechanismen, wie das optische Pumpen, Laserkühlung zur Manipulation von Atomen. Diese Fortschritte eröffnen neue Forschungsfelder und erlauben es uns, neue Fragen zu stellen, neue Systeme zu erforschen, neue Zustände der Materie, wie makroskopische Materiewellen. Ich zeige diese Beispiele, denn ich denke, sie verdeutlichen die Bedeutung langfristiger Forschung. Grundlagenforschung ist langfristig. Man braucht viel Zeit die Gruppe aufzubauen und ein tieferes physikalisches Verständnis der physikalischen Mechanismen, die man untersucht, zu erlangen. Und dass man das Hintergrundwissen erweitert, was der Beginn neuer fruchtbarer Ideen sein kann. Und schließlich denke ich, ist es wichtig, begabte und erfahrene junge Menschen lange genug halten zu können, damit sie ein solides Wissen erlangen und selbst zu den Fortschritten der Wissenschaft beitragen. Aus diesem Grunde ist es so wichtig, dass hier nach Lindau, von überall aus der Welt, eine Menge junger Studenten kommen, die sich die Vorträge anhören und vielleicht motiviert werden. Denn für Forschung braucht man eine Leidenschaft für das, was man tut. Ich danke Ihnen. Danke! Merci beaucoup Merci beaucoup

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (2015) - The Adventure of Cold Atoms
(00:21:14 - 00:26:21)

 The complete video is available here.


In his 2019 Lindau lecture, Wolfgang Ketterle gives the audience a window into his experimental setup, where atoms are cooled down to temperatures a billion times lower than that of interstellar space. The German physicist, who won the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics for creating BEC in the lab, uses laser cooling and other methods developed by Chu, Phillips, and Cohen-Tannoudji.

Wolfgang Ketterle (2019) - New Forms of Matter Near Absolute Zero Temperature
(00:07:48 - 00:09:41)

 The complete video is available here.


The Rise of Superconductivity

One of the most significant results of low temperature sciences is superconductivity, or the phenomenon seen in certain materials to exhibit zero electrical resistance below a certain temperature. After successfully liquefying helium, Onnes sought to use the substance to cool down other materials and record their behavior at low temperatures. At that point, some scientists thought the resistivity of a metal would increase again or even rise to infinity at absolute zero.

In 1911, Onnes and his colleagues tested the resistivity of mercury at 3 K, finding that it was less than 10^-7 of its value at room temperature. In particular, there seemed to be a sharp drop in resistance at 4,2 K [16]. A few years later, this “super-conducting state” was also found in lead and tin, but not gold and platinum.

The underlying mechanism for superconductivity remained a mystery until the 1950s, when theoretical physicists began working on the problem again after World War II. Russian scientists Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg and Lev Landau collaborated on a macroscopic theory of type-I superconductors, which cancel all interior magnetic fields when cooled below its critical temperature [17]. Shortly after, another Russian scientist, Alexei Abrikosov, used the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity to explain the behavior of type-II superconductors. This second group of materials — which are much more practical for technological use — allow both superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time.

The 1962 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Landau for a theory on superfluidity [18], another low temperature phenomenon which will be described below, while Abrikosov and Ginzburg shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physics for their respective theories on superconductivity [19].

In 1957, three American physicists built on previous theoretical work to develop the first microscopic theory that explained superconductivity. John Bardeen, Leon N. Cooper, and John R. Schrieffer discovered that electrons in a superconductor are grouped into strongly coupled pairs that have a slightly lower energy compared to single electrons [20]. The energy gap above them inhibits collision interactions and leads to zero resistivity below a characteristic temperature.

The so-called BCS (Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer) theory successfully explained the strange properties of superconductors and made predictions that were confirmed by later experiments. The three scientists shared the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physics for their efforts [21].

Several more Nobel Prizes followed in the field of superconductivity, including one given the following year to Leo Esaki, Ivar Giaever, and Brian D. Josephson [22]. In the 1950s, Esaki worked on tunneling — a quantum mechanical phenomenon where the wavelike behavior of electrons allows them to pass through classically impenetrable barriers — in semiconductors.

Here is Esaki at the 1997 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting speaking about the exciting time in which he completed his Nobel Prize-winning research and the difference between one’s “judicial mind” and “creative mind.”

Leo Esaki (1997) - Quantum Mechanics and Semiconductor Science
(00:09:35 - 00:13:22)

 The complete video is available here.


Giaever, inspired by Esaki’s research, demonstrated the tunneling effect in 1960 with an experiment that validated the energy gap in superconductors predicted by BCS theory. Over the past several decades, he has been a frequent guest at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings.

In the following clip from the 2008 Lindau meeting, Giaever describes his famous experiment using electron tunneling to measure the energy gap in superconductors.

Ivar Giaever (2008) - Discovery of Superconducting Tunneling

Hallo, da sind wir also. Worüber ich sprechen will, ist die Entdeckung des supraleitenden Tunneleffekts. Tatsächlich jährt sich dieses Jahr die Entwicklung der Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-Theorie zum 50. Mal und meine Arbeit ist eng damit verknüpft. Daher habe ich mich entschieden, etwas darüber zu erzählen. Ich habe diesen Vortrag bei einer Veranstaltung an der Universität Illinois zu Ehren der BCS-Theorie gehalten, aber die meisten von Ihnen waren hoffentlich nicht dort, so dass ich ihn hier nochmals wiederholen kann. Nun also... (Lachen). Nun, lassen Sie mich mit dem Anfang beginnen. Wenn ich einen Vortrag halte, beginne ich gerne mit dem Anfang. Geboren wurde ich in Norwegen. Ich kam in einer kleinen Stadt namens Bergen zur Welt und besuchte hier die Schule und die Universität, Und es gab nur diese beiden Gebäude. Ich absolvierte eine Ausbildung als Maschinenbauingenieur. Damals gab es an dieser Universität nur 100 Studenten im Jahr. Zu meiner Zeit waren es 100 Männer, im Jahr nach meinem Abgang waren es 99 Männer und 1 Frau. Sie können sich vorstellen, dass das Studium dort für einen Mann nicht sehr aufregend war, denn es gab zu wenige Frauen. Jetzt will ich Ihnen erzählen, wie ein Maschinenbauingenieur aus Norwegen den Nobelpreis gewinnen konnte. Glück ist dabei eine ganz wichtige Voraussetzung. In Norwegen ist 1.0 die beste Note, die man erhalten kann, 4.0 ist gerade noch passabel und mit 6.0 ist man durchgefallen. In den USA ist 4.0 die bestmögliche Note. Ich war kein guter Student und hatte in Mathematik und Physik eine 4.0. Ich bekam ein Stellenangebot im Forschungslabor von General Electric in Niskayuna, New York. Ich stellte mich beim Personalchef von GE vor, er betrachtete mein Zeugnis und sagte… Ja genau das! Er sagte, ich müsse ja sehr gut in Physik und Mathematik sein. Normalerweise bin ich ein sehr ehrlicher Mensch - glaube ich wenigstens. Aber ich dachte damals, das sei nicht der richtige Ort und Zeitpunkt, um ihm das norwegische Notensystem zu erklären. Ich erhielt also die Stelle und hatte einen sehr guten Mentor namens John Fisher, der mir alles über den Tunneleffekt erklärte. Aber bedenken Sie, ich war ja Maschinenbauingenieur und mit Quantenmechanik überhaupt nicht vertraut; ich glaubte kein Wort von dem, was er sagte. Und was er sagte, war wie folgt: Nach den Gesetzen der Physik“, sagte er, „kann der Tennisball aber manchmal den Zaun durchdringen, ohne ein Loch zu hinterlassen, der Tennisball sieht genauso aus, ist aber auf der anderen Seite, er hat den Zaun praktisch ‚durchtunnelt’“. Aber John sagte auch, dass dies natürlich mit einem Tennisball nie passieren wird, sehr wohl aber mit den kleinsten Teilchen, die wir kennen, nämlich Elektronen. Man hat also hier zwei durch ein Vakuum getrennte Metalle, hier sind keine Elektronen vorhanden, daher können diese Elektronen durch einen Tunneleffekt von einer Seite zur anderen wandern. Ich glaubte das nicht, aber wissen Sie, ich brauchte den Job und sagte mir, ich kann ja wenigstens versuchen, dem alten Mann eine Freude zu machen. Die Frage, die sich dann stellt, ist die der räumlichen Anordnung. Um einen Tunneleffekt zu erhalten, müssen die Metalle sehr dicht beisammen sein. Wie soll man aber einen Abstand von 5 Nanometern realisieren? Das ist nicht einfach. Wir versuchten es mit verschiedenen Mitteln, zum Beispiel einem Langmuir-Film, mit Quecksilberelektroden und allen möglichen Dingen, aber keine Anordnung war reproduzierbar, es funktionierte einfach nicht. Und mein Freund John Fisher nannte meine Versuche „Wunder“, denn anders als in der Wissenschaft geschehen auch Wunder immer nur einmal… Das ist also keine wirklich wissenschaftliche Arbeit. Aber um die Forschung wirklich voranzubringen, sollte man seine eigenen Geräte bauen und das ist auch oft erforderlich, denn wenn man ein fremdes Gerät kauft, dann wurde damit der Versuch ja bereits ausgeführt. Wenn man also eine eigene Forschungsarbeit verfolgen will, sollte man seine Geräte selbst herstellen, das ist wichtig, wenn man sinnvoll forschen will. Unser Durchbruch kam, als ich feststellte, dass man eine Oxidschicht verwenden konnte und ich daraufhin einen Vakuumverdampfer kaufte. Damit es funktioniert, brauchen wir jetzt zum Beispiel hier ein kleines Stückchen Tantal und ein Aluminiumkügelchen, dann wird ein Strom hindurchgeschickt und das Aluminium schmilzt, es verdampft und kondensiert hier oben auf einem Glasträger als Maske. Das Aluminiumoxid ist dann wie eine isolierende Schicht. Dann wird hier ein Glasträger eingelegt und ein Aluminiumstreifen verdampft und der Träger herausgenommen, das Aluminium oxidiert an der Luft; dann wird es wieder hineingelegt, Querstreifen hier und hier angebracht und ein Ampèremeter und ein Voltmeter angeschlossen. Das ist der grundsätzliche Aufbau. Man hat damit einen kleinen Kondensator hergestellt, der zwei Aluminiumstücke voneinander trennt. Wird der Gleichstrom dann hier angelegt, würde man erwarten, dass der Kondensator sich auflädt und dies geschieht. Wenn aber die Aluminiumoxidschicht dünn genug ist, fließt der Strom einfach durch die Schicht. Dies war der Versuch, den mich John Fisher zuerst ausführen ließ. Hier sind einige Beispiele, dies war der Tunnelübergang, hier sind die fünf Bereiche und der Strom war proportional zu den Bereichen, was sehr gut ist. Außerdem war der Strom weitgehend unabhängig von der Temperatur und der Tunnelstrom ist auch fast temperaturunabhängig. Das sah also ganz gut aus. Hier kommt jetzt mein Verdampfer ins Spiel, ich dachte immer, dass ich ein reiner Theoretiker sein würde. Aber nachdem ich diesen Verdampfer erworben hatte, stellte ich fest, dass praktische Versuche viel aufregender sind, denn sie liefern handfeste Ergebnisse. Ich liebte diesen Verdampfer, Sie sehen, wie glücklich ich hier aussehe. Aber dieses Bild wurde aufgenommen, als ich den Nobelpreis erhielt, deswegen sehe ich so glücklich aus. Ich hatte dann diese Arbeit nach etwa einem Jahr abgeschlossen und musste ein Seminar bei General Electric leiten. Natürlich war ich dabei sehr nervös, nicht nur weil es das erste Seminar für mich war, sondern auch weil das Publikum zwar nicht ganz so zahlreich wie hier war, aber größtenteils aus promovierten Leuten bestand. Ich hatte damals noch keinen Doktortitel und hielt nun diesen Vortrag und man stellte mir Fragen. Das Publikum war sehr höflich und ich hoffe, dass Sie dies auch sein werden, wenn ich meinen Beitrag beendet habe. Aber trotzdem tauchten Fragen auf. Ob ich wusste, dass ein Tunnelstrom vorhanden war, was war mit dem Halbleiterstrom, warum verwendete ich keine Metallbrücken und so weiter. Natürlich wusste ich das alles nicht. Aber bei neuen Forschungsarbeiten ist es sehr wichtig, öffentliche Vorträge zu halten, weil man dann auch Kritik erfährt und erkennt, wo die Probleme liegen und was man ändern muss. Daher sind Vorträge über unsere Arbeit überaus wichtig. Als nun all diese Fragen gestellt wurden, war das für mich eine Herausforderung, denn ich erkannte, dass sie zwar höflich waren, aber ich sah ihnen an, dass sie nicht glaubten, dass ich das Tunneln wirklich beobachtet hatte. Ich ging daher im RPI wieder zur Schule und lernte mehr über Quantenmechanik, denn ich musste selbst an das Tunneln glauben. Wie konnte ich all diese Skeptiker überzeugen, dass ich das Tunneln wirklich beobachtet habe. Genau das wollte ich herausfinden. Ich belegte also Kurse am RPI und einen Kurs in Festkörperphysik, das ist mein Professor Phil Huntington, sie sehen, wie er sich freut, er ist 80 Jahre alt und ich bin leider auch nicht mehr so weit davon entfernt. Er lacht auf diesem Bild, weil dies sein Geburtstag war und er ein Glas Rotwein in der Hand hält, das Leben ist schön mit einem Glas Rotwein. Ich belegte also bei ihm einen Kurs in Festkörperphysik und er sprach über Supraleitfähigkeit. In diesem Kurs kam mir die Idee, den Energiespalt im Supraleiter durch Tunneln zu messen. Bedenken Sie, bevor ich diesen Kurs besuchte, hatte ich etwa sechs Monate lang überlegt, wie ich diesen Versuch erfolgreich ausführen könnte, um zu beweisen, dass mein Experiment auf dem Tunneleffekt beruhte. Ideen kommen nicht plötzlich, man muss geistig für sie bereit sein. Mein Geist war bereit, alles Mögliche zu untersuchen und ich habe vielleicht 50 Versuche durchgeführt, um zu beweisen, dass ich tatsächlich einen Tunneleffekt erzielt hatte. Und jetzt kam mir plötzlich die Idee, dass ich mit Hilfe der Supraleitfähigkeit die Tunnelwirkung nachweisen konnte. Ich rate Studenten immer, sich weiter zu bilden, denn man weiß nie, was kommt, der Lohn für das ständige Lernen kann enorm sein. Wäre ich an diesem Tag nicht im Unterricht gewesen, dann wäre ich höchstwahrscheinlich heute auch nicht hier, denn ich hätte nichts über den Energiespalt in Supraleitern erfahren. Niemand bei GE hatte mir etwas von einem Energiespalt in Supraleitern erzählt und ich wäre heute nicht hier. Es ist daher extrem wichtig, weiter zu lernen, vor allem natürlich, wenn ich der Lehrer bin. Die große Idee war nun also wie folgt: Hier sind die beiden Metalle mit der Fermikante und ein Elektron kann von einer Seite zur anderen in die freien Zustände hier „tunneln“. Wenn sich auf einer Seite ein Supraleiter befindet und eine Spannung angelegt wird, sind keine Elektronenzustände im Energiespalt, daher die Bezeichnung als Energiespalt. Keines dieser Elektronen kann hier hineingelangen, solange sie nicht anfangen, den Spalt zu überspringen. Sie sehen hier also Folgendes: bei zwei normalen Metallen sollte man diesen Strom erhalten, wenn ein Metall aber supraleitend ist, sollte man erst dann einen Strom erhalten, wenn die Mitte des Energiespalts erreicht ist, dann muss der Strom fließen. Das war meine Idee. Aber natürlich ist der Weg von der Idee bis zur Umsetzung sehr weit und ich hatte keine Vorstellung, wie groß der Energiespalt ist; ich fragte Professor Huntington und er wusste es auch nicht. Glücklicherweise arbeitete ich aber damals bei General Electric, wo viele gute Wissenschaftler beschäftigt waren und ich fragte meinen Freund Walter Harrison, der jetzt Professor an der Universität Stanford ist. Nach einigem Zögern und Hin und Her nannte er mir dann schließlich eine Größenordnung von einigen Millivolt für den Energiespalt. Das war genau das, was mir möglich war, es war also perfekt. Dies ist der erste Tunnelversuch mit supraleitendem Material, bei dem man hier den Übergang hat; ich verwendete Aluminium und Blei (Blei ist ein Supraleiter) in flüssigem Helium und hängte das Ganze so auf. Bedenken Sie, ich hatte nie einen Versuch mit niedrigen Temperaturen ausgeführt, ich wusste nicht, was Supraleiter sind, bis Professor Huntington darüber sprach. Er sagte, der Widerstand wäre Null, aber ich bin ein skeptischer Mensch, ich glaubte das nicht; ich dachte, der Widerstand sei gering, aber nicht Null. Und so hatte ich binnen einer Woche bei GE diesen Versuch ausgeführt. Möglich war dies, weil seinerzeit bei GE 800 Wissenschaftler beschäftigt waren, die immer bereit waren, einen zu unterstützen. Sie ließen mich ihre Geräte benutzen oder dies oder jenes tun. Ich verwendete also eine fremde Anlage und hatte den Versuch nach einer Woche abgeschlossen. Ich hatte von vielem sehr wenig Ahnung und dass ich Kupferdrähte benutzte, um meine Probe aufzuhängen, war besonders ungewöhnlich. Jeder, der die Anordnung sah, sagte mir „Das geht nicht“ und ich fragte „Warum nicht?“ Man sagte mir „Mit dem Helium geht damit zu viel Wärme verloren“. Aber ich hörte nicht darauf, ich benutzte meinen Kupferdraht, andere Forscher verwenden Mangan oder andere aufwändige Materialien. Ich ignorierte alle Ratschläge, blieb bei Kupferdraht und später verwendete jedermann Kupferdraht, weil das perfekt und viel einfacher war. Durch ein gewisses Maß an Ignoranz habe ich also einen kleinen Fortschritt in der Forschung erzielt. Und das hier habe ich festgestellt: hier ist das normale Metall, zwei normale Metalle und wenn eines der Metalle supraleitend ist, nämlich das Blei, das bei 4,2 Grad supraleitend wird, dann sehen Sie hier, was geschieht, man legt ein Feld an und erhält eine niedrigere Temperatur; kommt man bis auf Null, endet dieser Strom genau hier. Interessant an dieser Kurve war, dass sie mit Hilfe von Punkten erstellt wurde. Da ich keinen X-Y-Recorder hatte, musste ich ein Voltmeter und ein Ampèremeter verwenden, die Spannung verändern und Punkt für Punkt aufzeichnen. Sie sehen, die Wissenschaft hat sich in wenigen Jahren stark weiter entwickelt. Hier ist also mein guter Freund Charlie Bean, der mir eine große Hilfe war. In diesem speziellen Fall lief er ganz aufgeregt durch die Flure von GE und versicherte mir immer wieder, wie toll mein Experiment war. Ich war aber nervös, denn jemand anderes - ich glaube es war Tinkham - hatte zwar nicht das gleiche Experiment durchgeführt, aber den Energiespalt in Supraleitern gemessen. Und ihre Ergebnisse wichen von meinen leider etwas ab. Ich sagte also zu Charlie: Charlie sah mich an und sagte: In diesem Moment fühlte ich mich zum ersten Mal als Physiker. Eine andere Sache, die sehr wichtig ist, wenn man Experimente durchführt, ist die ständige Kontrolle der eigenen Arbeit, man muss immer wieder versuchen, sich selbst Fehler nachzuweisen. Viele Forscher, zum Beispiel bei der kalten Fusion, glauben, dass sie etwas entdeckt haben und veröffentlichen ihre Ergebnisse sofort, das ist nicht gut. Man muss sich seiner Ergebnisse sicher sein und aus allen Richtungen betrachten, ob man nicht irgendwo einen Fehler gemacht haben könnte. Das ist extrem wichtig. Mit Supraleitern hat mein eine perfekte Kontrolle, denn sie sind bei hohen magnetischen Feldern nicht supraleitend. Wenn man also diesen Versuch durchführt und dann das Feld schrittweise erhöht, in diesem Fall auf 2.400 Gauss, wird das Blei normal leitend und man erhält wieder die gerade Linie. Nimmt man das Magnetfeld weg, wird es supraleitend und man erhält diese Kurven. Das ist sehr wichtig. Hier ist ein Bild aus dieser Zeit, meine drei guten Freunde Harrison, Bean und Fisher, sie waren richtige Physiker, im Gegensatz zu mir. Und das ist ein gestelltes Bild von General Electric. Sie wussten, dass das Experiment wichtig war und wollten etwas vorweisen. Dass es sich um eine Inszenierung handelt, sieht man daran, dass ich mit einer Kreide an der Tafel stehe. Der Physiker mit der Kreide an der Tafel leitet das Gespräch, das durfte ich sonst nie, nur in diesem speziellen Fall erlaubte man es mir, weil es für das Bild war. Betrachten wir jetzt zwei Supraleiter, wie konnte das funktionieren? Wenn Sie dies hier anschauen, ist es einfach zu verstehen. Hier ist ein kleiner und ein großer Spalt und hier haben wir zwei Supraleiter, kein Feld. Wird das Feld eingeschaltet, beginnen die erregten Elektronen zu fließen und erreichen diesen Punkt. Erhöht man die Feldstärke weiter, dann sind natürlich keine Elektronen hier drinnen und die Zustandsdichte sinkt. Der Strom sinkt also ab und wenn man schließlich diesen Punkt erreicht, kann eine große Strommenge fließen. Man hat hier dann einen negativen Widerstand. Und dieser negative Widerstand ist sehr wichtig, denn dann hat man ein aktives Gerät. Man kann damit einen Transistor herstellen, einen Verstärker oder etwas anderes. Bei GE war man damals sehr aufgeregt, man glaubte, dass dies eine große Entdeckung wäre, denn Transistoren waren damals so groß wie ein Zuckerwürfel und mit diesem neuen Verfahren konnte man wesentlich kleinere Transistoren bauen. Der Nachteil ist jedoch, dass man dafür niedrige Temperaturen benötigt. Hier haben wir also genau das, was wir wollten, einen schönen negativen Widerstand und wir waren sehr zufrieden. Hier sehen Sie ein Bild von damals, John Bardeen war Berater bei General Electric und diese Aufnahme wurde gemacht, als ich den Nobelpreis erhalten hatte. Und das ist Roland Schmitt, der damals der leitende Direktor war, mein guter Freund Charlie Bean und John Bardeen. Als ich den Nobelpreis erhielt, schrieb ich einen Brief an John Bardeen und fragte ihn: Ich erhielt eine sehr nette Antwort von John Bardeen, er schrieb: Er bekam den Nobelpreis also zweimal und beim ersten Mal kam er ohne seine Familie und meinte, das sei ein großer Fehler gewesen; ich brachte daher meine Familie mit. Nun ist es aber nicht der Traum eines Experimentalforschers, eine Theorie zu belegen, sondern eine berühmte Theorie zu widerlegen. Als wir dieses Tunnelexperiment durchführten - ohne weiter in die Details zu gehen -, sollte die Ableitung einer Strom-Spannungs-Kurve theoretisch hier exponentiell zu Null glatt abfallen. Wir erhielten jedoch eine Kurve mit Sprüngen und Physiker lieben Sprünge, vor allem in Kurven, weil das immer etwas bedeutet. Und in diesem speziellen Fall war die Theorie auf meiner Seite, denn die Sprünge, die wir sahen, wurden durch das Phonon im Supraleiter verursacht und genau die Phononen bilden die Elektronenpaare. Das Phonon sorgt dafür, dass die Elektronenpaare intakt bleiben und dies ist mehr als alles andere der Nachweis für die BCS-Theorie. Mir war aber dennoch etwas entgangen, hier sehen Sie ein Experiment, und immer entgeht einem etwas. Wenn Sie diese Kurve betrachten, ohne Magnetfeld, hat man hier den kleinen Nullwiderstand, der überspringt und man erhält hier den negativen Widerstand, der hier zurückkommt. Man kann das wiederholen und er springt wieder darüber. Man sieht, dass auch beim kleinsten Magnetfeld der erste negative Widerstand ein Paar bildet, aber auch diese Hystereseschleife verschwindet. Ich habe darüber schon lange, bevor Josephson seine Arbeit durchführte, geschrieben, aber ich erkannte nicht den Josephson-Effekt, ich dachte, es hinge vielleicht mit Metallbrücken durch die Barriere oder ähnlichen Phänomenen zusammen. Wir waren so damit beschäftigt, etwas zu untersuchen, was später als Josephson-Effekt berühmt wurde, dass ich das übersehen habe. Ich werde manchmal gefragt: Ich sage dann: „Warum, ich habe doch den Nobelpreis, nicht wahr?“... Was ist also der Josephson-Effekt? Nun, Brian sitzt in der ersten Reihe, Sie können ihn direkt fragen, wenn ich meinen Vortrag beendet habe. Tatsächlich gibt es aber zwei Effekte, hier den Gleichstromeffekt, dieser Suprastrom kann widerstandslos durch eine Isolationsschicht fließen. Und hier der Wechselstromeffekt: bei einem Wechselstromfeld strahlt der Übergang mit einer Frequenz von 2eV/h, es entsteht also ein Strahlungseffekt. Hier also der Gleichstromeffekt, hier der Strahlungseffekt. Der Gleichstromeffekt war mir entgangen, aber der Wechselstromeffekt sollte mir nicht entgehen, denn Josephson hatte damals bereits darüber geschrieben und ich wusste schon etwas Bescheid. Wir taten also Folgendes: wenn man einen Tunnelübergang hat und ein elektrisches Feld daran anlegt, kann man ein Elektron so anheben, dass es tunneln kann. Oder man kann ein phonon-gestütztes Tunneln erzielen, ganz direkt. Und genau das tat ich. Ich stellte einen dreifachen Übergang her, also einen Übergang hier, der sehr dünn ist, das ist der Generator, der den Wechselstrom-Josephson-Effekt erzeugen wird. Er koppelt in den Detektor, das ist dieser Übergang. Dass es so schwierig war, den Wechselstrom-Josephson-Effekt zu entdecken, lag an der Tatsache, dass bei nur einem Tunnelübergang die Kopplung mit dem Vakuum schwierig ist. Viel einfacher ist es mit diesem Aufbau, bei dem mit Generator und Detektor eine gute Kopplung entsteht. Das ist der dünne Oxidgenerator, das ist der Detektor. Und Sie sehen hier, wenn keine Spannung durch den Generator fließt, erhält man eine regelmäßige Tunnelkurve. Legt man eine kleine Spannung am Generator an, beginnt er zu strahlen und die Kurve verändert sich. Dies ist dann die Strahlungsfrequenz, die doppelt so hoch wie diese hier ist. Und erhöht man die Spannung, dann erhält man diese Kurve und so weiter. Ich habe Ihnen nun ausführlich berichtet, wie es einem norwegischen Maschinenbauingenieur gelungen ist, den Nobelpreis für Physik zu erhalten. Ich weiß nicht, wie hoch die Wahrscheinlichkeit dafür ist, aber ich kann berechnen, mit welcher Wahrscheinlichkeit man einen Nobelpreis erhält, wenn man in den USA lebt. Sehen Sie hier: Sie sind Physiker in den USA, wo es insgesamt 40.000 Physiker gibt, das steht fest. Im Durchschnitt wird jedes Jahr ein Preis für Physik in die USA vergeben, wobei nicht immer jeder einen Preis erhält, manchmal wird er auch durch 3 geteilt, zum Beispiel in dem Jahr, als ich ihn erhielt. Durchschnittlich geht also jedes Jahr ein Preis in die USA. Die Chance, keinen Preis zu erhalten, sehen Sie hier, beträgt 1-1/40.000, das ist diese Zahl. Da Sie aber - sagen wir - 40 Jahre lang arbeiten, müssen wir diese Zahl nehmen und 40 Mal mit sich selbst multiplizieren, dann erhält man 999 und das ist die Chance, den Preis nicht zu erhalten. Die Chance, das Sie den Preis erhalten, liegt dann bei 1 minus diesem, also 1 zu 1000. Das ist ziemlich hoch. Ich weiß nicht, ob Sie in Deutschland Lotto spielen, aber die Chance hier ist viel höher als im Lotto. Und da hier etwa 500 Studenten sitzen... Da hier etwa 500 Studenten sitzen und wenn diese alle in die USA auswandern, haben Sie echt gute Chancen. Wie dem auch sei, ich glaube, ich bin jetzt alt genug, um Ihnen einige Ratschläge geben zu können. Also hören Sie zu: Um den Nobelpreis zu gewinnen, muss man vor allem neugierig sein, nur mit Neugier kann man etwas erreichen. Man muss wettbewerbsfähig sein und - ob Sie es glauben oder nicht - Wissenschaftler sind sehr wettbewerbsfähig. Sie glauben vielleicht, dass das Fußballspiel gestern zwischen Deutschland und Spanien ein echter Wettbewerb war, aber wir sind wesentlich wettbewerbsorientierter. Meine Frau mag es nicht, wenn ich das sage, aber Physiker sind keine netten Leute. Man muss kreativ sein, man muss etwas tun, was bisher keiner getan hat. Man muss hartnäckig sein und das ist das Schwierigste von allem, denn auch wenn jemand sagt, dass das was Du tust, unsinnig ist, muss man hartnäckig bleiben und sagen: Nein, sagen Sie das nicht, ich glaube, dass es richtig ist und warum soll ich es nicht versuchen. Aber manchmal ist man wirklich auf dem falschen Weg und ist gezwungen, aufzugeben. Manchmal hat man einfach den falschen Ansatz. Einerseits muss man hartnäckig sein und seine Idee verteidigen, aber wenn es nicht funktioniert, muss man auch dazu stehen, dass man sich getäuscht hat, das ist wirklich ein schwieriger Balanceakt. Und schließlich muss man Selbstvertrauen haben und man muss skeptisch sein, das ist eine sehr wichtige Voraussetzung. Glauben Sie nicht alles, was man Ihnen erzählt. Wenn ein Professor etwas sagt, glauben Sie es nicht, versuchen Sie, sich den Sachverhalt vorzustellen: Passt dieses neue Puzzleteilchen zu dem, was ich bereits weiß? Meine Kinder macht es verrückt, dass ich so skeptisch bin. Immer wenn sie mir etwas erzählen, sage ich „Nein, nein, das ist nicht möglich, das kann nicht sein, denk noch mal darüber nach“. Das ist ein ganz wichtiger Punkt. Man muss geduldig sein, Dinge geschehen nicht über Nacht. Und vor allem - und dabei kann ich Ihnen auch nicht wirklich helfen - braucht man einfach Glück. Vielen Dank.

Ivar Giaever (2008) - Discovery of Superconducting Tunneling
(00:09:53 - 00:15:45)

 The complete video is available here.


Lastly, Josephson took a theoretical approach to Giaever’s findings and predicted new effects in superconductors [23]. As a young graduate student in 1962, he proposed that tunneling between two superconductors would occur across an insulting layer even without applying a voltage. When a constant voltage is applied across the barrier, the current oscillates at a high frequency in the microwave range. Josephson’s results were experimentally confirmed shortly after publication. Today, Josephson junctions — two superconductors coupled by a weak link — form the basis for superconducting quantum computers, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), and other devices.

Karl Alex Müller, who received the 1987 Nobel Prize in Physics, gives a quick overview of superconductivity and SQUIDs during his 2004 Lindau lecture.

Karl Müller (2004) - Some Remarks on the Symmetry of the Superconducting Wavefunction in the Cuprates

So I’ll try to make a more or less normal seminar. So I do make an introduction and then I’ll tell you a bit about surface sensitive experiments, just essentially one on the cuprates, saying for many of them. Then on bulk sensitive experiments and finish with a conclusion discussion. Now, I try to do it a bit in tutorial way. To remind you that superconductivity is a microscopic quantum phenomenon size. You describe the superconductivity with microscopic wave function, this is the square root of the density times an exponential. And it’s about that which I'm going to talk to you. This is a real quantity and the phase here is also a real quantity. What I describe to you is this conventional superconductivity, this has been mentioned earlier, where you have this gap here, this is now a cut near the fermi energy, so there is this gap and the density of states follows such a curve. There are no carriers here in between. What I describe to you is this conventional superconductivity, this has been mentioned earlier, where you have this gap here, this is now a cut near the fermi energy, so there is this gap and the density of states follows such a curve. There are no carriers here in between. However, you can have other types of dependencies on the energy, for instance, and I show you here, these are, for instance, D-ray functions. In an atom, you know you can have L=0, L=1, L=2, L=2 means 5 orbitals. And in the plain one can determine that in these cuprate superconductors it looks like, and I'm coming to that, such a D-way function, where you have say phase positive and negative here. If you have this it looks this way here. It’s now a picture for D-wave superconductor. So you have, if you go along this direction, the X direction, you have a gap plus, if you go the Y direction, you have a gap minus, if you go here, you have no gap. And this means that if you go along this direction, you have the same thing like here. However, if you go 45°, you have no gap, and it looks like if you have something like a funny metal where the density of state goes down. If you have impurities, it even stays finite. So how can you determine that? There have been propositions and a number of experiments which I'm not going into, I just want to show you the latest result. These are so called DC squits. Now, this looks awfully complicated I'm going now to try to bring you to this point here. Namely, now you can do a similar thing with a superconductor. I show you here a so called superconductive quantum interference device. I took this picture out of the Feynman lectures number 3, the last chapter, in which he describes rather as a seminar on superconductivity than a normal lecture. And those of you who are interested to start a bit learning superconductivity, I highly recommend you to read this chapter 21, 17 pages. He assumes normal quantum mechanics and brings you through the physics of the superconductor. Now, you can do a similar thing with a superconductor. I show you here a so called superconductive quantum interference device. I took this picture out of the Feynman lectures number 3, the last chapter, in which he describes rather as a seminar on superconductivity than a normal lecture. And those of you who are interested to start a bit learning superconductivity, I highly recommend you to read this chapter 21, 17 pages. He assumes normal quantum mechanics and brings you through the physics of the superconductor. Here what is used are two so called Josephson junctions after the discovery of Brian Josephson, so basically my experimental review was published in 2001 and his, too, the following. If you have a potential which is interacting between two nuclei and you have here the surface, then at the surface you should have D, also in the symmetry of the superconductor and then, depending on the depth of this potential, you may get S and D and if the point is not very deep, you stay S and D and if it’s very deep you get S symmetry.

Karl Müller (2004) - Some Remarks on the Symmetry of the Superconducting Wavefunction in the Cuprates
(00:00:47 - 00:07:43)

 The complete video is available here.


The next major leap forward in the field came with the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity more than twenty years later. The dream of electric currents flowing without resistance proved very difficult to implement in practice, since at that point, all superconducting materials had to be cooled down with liquid helium.

In 1986, Swiss physicists J. Georg Bednorz and Karl Alex Müller stunned the scientific world when they uncovered a new class of materials that displayed superconductivity at temperatures far higher than previously observed [24]. After testing several newly developed ceramic materials called oxides, they struck scientific gold with a barium-lanthanum-copper oxide, which had a critical temperature of 35 K (-238° C).

During his 2013 Lindau lecture, Müller outlines the method that he and Bednorz used to combine three different oxides — materials that were considered “dirty” at the time — and the much faster synthesis technique that has replaced it.

Karl Müller (2013) - Model Synthesis for Ceramics: Superconductors, Magnets and Others

First of all I should like to thank the organising committee headed by Countess Bettina for getting me here as a physicist and the second physicist this morning. But I should like to say that the discovery of this superconductivity in the cuprate is a bit borderline case between physics and inorganic chemistry. And the motivation was the Polaron Concept. And just as a precursor to my talk which I am going to give I show you 2 transparencies to illustrate that now the concept which we had to find that the polarons are really there. So now I sit down before I fall down. One of the experiments which supported this polaron motion is the isotope effect. What is the isotope effect? It is if you replace the oxygen 16 by oxygen 18. You shift the transition temperature, TC here. And this TC is proportional to the mass of your ions in your samples time the exponent alpha. This is this coefficient. That is isotope exponent which is the logarithmic derivative of the observed temperature against the mass which you can measure. Now BCS theory tells you it must be a half. What has been recently been published looks like this. This was a collaboration with a young, Stephen Weyeneth. And what you see on this graph is the following. Here is the reduced temperature. So this is maximum temperature. And you go down by reducing the doping of the sample. And these are data on many of these cuprates from several groups. And this curve here is not a curve just to fit the data, but this is the theory of Kresin and Wolf. Kresin is at Berkeley and Vladimir Kresin... And Stuart Wolf is in Washington. Which they published in 1994. And people did not take much attention but you see that these measurements fit this curve very well. And you see up here this is the coefficient of 1. I told you before the coefficient of... In BCS there is a half, should be here. This has been measured in Switzerland by Rustem Khasanov and his group at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. So many theories started because at optimum doping here the effect disappears, is zero. To assume if there are... The cause is electronic but this is one example which show you that it’s really polaronic. Now it is not the scope of my talk and therefore I think in the afternoon, 5 or half past 5, there is a half an hour and those among you who may be interested in that can... we can discuss that. Now let me get to my talk. The title is slightly changed a bit. It is “Photostimulated Solid State Synthesis of Oxide Materials”. And it was a collaboration between the Tbilisi State University with the people shown there. And I was also involved, the University of Zurich. I have to say that Alexander Shengelaya who is the head of this group by now is head of the physics department down there. Has been there for 5 years. Before he was 9 years in Zurich Switzerland running how the science is done in Switzerland. And this collaboration continued. Here you see the photograph. This is the entrance of the physics institute in Tbilisi in Georgia, Georgia which is as you know between Turkey and Russia. Here are 2 of us. This is Alexander Shengelaya at a time when I visited Tbilisi a bit more than a year ago. Now, what I am going to talk about is related to perhaps some of the interest here of inorganic chemists. And by now oxide is becoming quite important. At the time I was here the first time it was just when Count Bernadotte gave his responsibility over to Countess Silvia which is unfortunately not anymore among us and I am very sorry about that. She was very lively and having this meeting really in hand and developed it. So normally these oxides at a time when we found the superconductivity, the oxides were considered as dirty. And in fact the samples which Georg Bednorz and myself first did, we had 3 different oxides in it. And only one of them was superconducting. By now the standard of oxide chemistry has come practically up to the level which at the time silicon had and this for various application reasons. So what you generally do is to produce oxides which are complex -the superconductor ones are complex ones- by the direct reaction of a mixing of starting reagents at high temperature depending when the oxide melts of course. High temperature provides the necessary energy for the reactions. This is shown down here for the compounds lanthanum copper O4. This is the compound Georg Bednorz and myself found a quarter of a century ago. This is the oldest and simplest method to mix together the powdered reactants. In part you use carbonates of course, press the pellets and heat them for a period of time. Now, the new thing is the following. No, before that here you see a typical reaction. A diagram, this is for the YBCO compound where you heat it up. This is hours. You see these are hours. And I hope you see it even on the panel side. You heat it up say to 900 degrees and you keep it there for several hours. Then you keep it at this temperature and you cool it down. So the whole process for such a reaction takes of the order of 1.5 days, 38 hours. This is quite long. And this is the way you produce these oxides. Now, the new thing is the following. In Tbilisi they have such an oven which had halogen lamps here which you can irradiate, here is your sample. This is quartz tube. And here you can heat it. And colour temperature of your lamp is 3,200 degrees K. And what you are doing, you pulse with these halogen lamps this sample. And if you do that what happens? So this is synthesis of the original compound, lanthanum oxide. You put in some strontium on the place of the lanthanum because it is 2-valent and 3-valent. So this compound lacks charge. So it’s whole doped. And this is the size of the sample. And what happens is here. This is a typical measurement which you do. After the reaction here is the temperature. You cool it down and here is the magnetic moment which you measure. So here something starts, it’s becoming more negative. What does this mean? It means that the sample expels the magnetic field. This is known as the Meissner-Ochsenfeld effect, found in Germany in 1933. And this is without an outside magnetic field. These are 2 one time pulses at this temperature. And if you apply a magnetic field the susceptibility is smaller. The reason is that you trap some magnetic flux in the sample. However, from this susceptibility, this negative susceptibility, you can compute how much superconducting you got. And here for this sample you got 50%. Fine. Now you can do that in a systematic way. And what comes out is the following. So this was done in 20 seconds, before we had 1.5 days. And here is the x-rays. You are all familiar with x-rays, you see that the reflections and these stars are external phase. If you heat it just to 900 degrees you have more of this external phase. If you go to 1050 degrees you have less. So this is what the x-ray tells you. And now we compare what you can do with this new method to light irradiate the crystal without it. And here you see the results. This is for a time of 2 minutes. If you put the sample just in the oven you get practically no superconductivity. If at this various temperature you pulse with the light you see that you get 20% or 30% of susceptibility in your sample. So this was quite... we were quite happy about that. And the whole research was submitted in June. And I was very happy that last Monday, this Monday, I got from the publisher the agreement to publish our article which we have submitted. So it’s really new. This will be published in the Journal of Superconductivity and Magnetism. And by the acceptance Springer will put it in the internet. But so far you are the first to see these results. Now in the YBCO compound it was different that it didn’t work so well and because of that in addition to the illumination by this infrared light was added ultraviolet light. And you see that here. So you had the halogen lamps, I discussed before, here there are only 3. Here again the sample. And here you have the ultraviolet lamp which is indicated here, what it is. And by doing so applied to the YBCO compound which is most used for application. This is what was gotten in Tbilisi. Namely just furnace, you barely see any magnetism, any superconductivity. If you irradiate just with halogen there is an effect, this green thing. And if in addition you irradiate with ultraviolet light. You get here really a substantial superconducting compound of it. Now, oxides become more and more important in various ways. For instance there are compounds which show magnetic and electric effects. At the same time you can apply an electric field modulated magnetically and vice versa. This is one of these compounds, bismuth iron O3. And these are the x-rays of it. This is synthesised at 870 Kelvin for 5 minutes. So it works also there. Now the conclusions of this finding is, I read it down: The new method was found for photostimulated solid state reaction called PSSR of oxide materials. This method involves the irradiation of the mixture of starting oxides with light in a broad spectral range from infrared to ultraviolet with intensity sufficient to starting the solid state reaction. So using this method you can produce polycrystalline high temperature superconductors. You can produce magneto-electric effects. The outlook: I think there is a broad application because you can shorten the process of fabrication quite importantly like in magnets, in fuel cells, in solar cells, in catalysts. And what is the mechanism? We don’t know. Maybe somebody here of you find sufficient interest, try to find out why this functions. And of course you can apply it to thin films. And as an outlook I show you the cut of the films which are now produced, superconducting wires. This is shown here. You have on the bottom a textured tungsten alloy. This is to have stability in the whole thing. And then you have 1, 2, 3 buffer layers. These buffer layers are there to have a right orientation of the crystalline because here then the next layer, this is the YBCO compound layer. Because in order to have best current transport, the crystallines have to be aligned relatively well. In the moment the crystalline are rotated a bit, say 2, 3 degrees, the current transport capability is an order of 2 magnitude down. And then comes at the end here a silver layer. Here on top. Why silver? You have to adjust the oxide here in this YBCO compound, in the superconducting compound quite accurately. And silver is the only metal which transfers oxygen. And this makes it expensive. If somebody here finds another metal or alloy who transfers silver, he becomes very wealthy I tell you. So this is the layer. This is a second generation of these cuprates for cables. And with these wires they are now able in at least 2 or 3 factories to draw 1 kilometre long wires. And you can wind them up. Here is such a cable which you see down here. This is... you have electrical shielding. You have here electrical thermal insulation. Then here are these wires which I just showed you a cut. And through in the middle you send nitrogen because YBCO has a transition temperature of 90 Kelvin. And nitrogen is lower so with that you can cool it. And this appears to have some relevance. These cables will probably be used as DC cables. Why? Because you want to carry the electrical energy over long distances. Examples are: In China they are planning to have their solar panels, factories in the Gobi desert. And they want to use it in the region of Shanghai which is 3,500 kilometre away. And they have decided this technology. They come with DC and then they have to chop it. And this is not just plans. I have seen photographs of buildings where these choppers are already installed and are working. Furthermore, because these copper oxides contain rare earths, China has a large amount of rare earths so for them this is cheap. Another possibility is the Sahara. In Algeria they have been planning also large factories of solar cells. And again this is some 3 to 4,000 kilometres away from here, central Europe where it has to be used. So you have to transport it. There are various possibilities to transport this electric energy to here. And similar situation starts occurring in the United States where some of you who have been gambling in Las Vegas know that around it there is desert. And there you can install also solar thing. So in a way it looks to me like we are kind of having a transition between... at the beginning we had mills near rivers which were mechanically driven. Then came the invention of the dynamo by Werner von Siemens. And then you could produce your electrical power some place and use it a few hundred kilometres someplace else. And now, at least to me -I don’t know whether Doctor Chu would agree with me or not- there comes an era where this solar electric energy are produced some 3 or 4,000 kilometres away and has to be transported. Of course, this will have to be competed with other sources like oil or methane which you have also lines who come say from central Asia and here to Europe or from Azerbaijan with methane. But this perspective is a bit the same. It’s that you produce it or you bring it from some completely different area to some other ones. And I think, Mr. Chairman, I stop here and I wish everybody a nice day, thank you. Applause.

Zunächst einmal möchte ich mich bei dem von Gräfin Bettina geleiteten Organisationskomitee dafür bedanken, dass es mich als Physiker hierher eingeladen hat, als zweiten Physiker heute Vormittag. Aber vielleicht sollte ich sagen, dass es sich bei der Entdeckung dieser Supraleitung im Kuprat ein bisschen um einen Grenzfall zwischen Physik und anorganischer Chemie handelt. Und die Anregung kam vom Polaron-Konzept. Im Vorgriff auf meinen Vortrag zeige ich Ihnen zwei Folien, die Ihnen verdeutlichen sollen, dass das Konzept, das wir zu finden hatten, dass die Polaronen wirklich da sind. Ich setze mich jetzt lieber, bevor ich umfalle. Eines der Experimente, die diese Polaron-Bewegung stützten, war der Isotopeneffekt. Was ist der Isotopeneffekt? Es geht darum: Wenn man Sauerstoff-16 durch Sauerstoff-18 ersetzt, verschiebt man die Übergangstemperatur TC. Diese TC ist proportional zur Masse des Ions in den Proben mal dem Exponenten Alpha. Das ist dieser Koeffizient. Das ist der Isotopenexponent, bei dem es sich um die logarithmische Ableitung der beobachteten Temperatur im Vergleich zur Masse handelt, die man messen kann. Nun, die BCS-Theorie sagt uns, dass es ein halb sein muss. Die jüngsten Veröffentlichungen sehen so aus. Das war eine Zusammenarbeit mit dem jungen Stephen Weyeneth. Auf dieser Grafik sehen Sie Folgendes: Hier ist die reduzierte Temperatur. Das ist die Maximaltemperatur, die man verringert, indem man die Dotierung der Probe reduziert. Das sind Daten von verschiedenen Gruppen für viele dieser Kuprate. Diese Kurve hier passt nicht einfach nur zu den Daten; es handelt sich vielmehr um die Theorie von Kresin und Wolf. Kresin ist in Berkeley und Vladimir Kresin... Und Stuart Wolf ist in Washington. Sie veröffentlichten die Theorie im Jahr 1994. Man schenkte ihr keine große Aufmerksamkeit, aber Sie sehen, dass diese Messungen hervorragend in diese Kurve passen. Und hier oben sehen Sie den Koeffizienten von 1. Ich habe schon gesagt, dass der Koeffizient von... In der BCS ist es ein halb, das sollte hier sein. Das wurde von Rustem Khasanov und seiner Gruppe am Paul-Scherrer-Institut in der Schweiz gemessen. Viele Theorien hatten ihren Ursprung darin, dass der Effekt bei einer optimalen Dotierung verschwindet, er ist Null. Unter der Annahme... Die Ursache hierfür ist elektronisch, doch das ist ein Beispiel, aus dem klar wird, dass sie in Wahrheit polaronischer Natur ist. Das gehört zu meinem Vortrag, aber ich glaube, um fünf Uhr oder um fünf Uhr dreißig gibt es dafür eine halbe Stunde. Diejenigen unter Ihnen, die sich vielleicht dafür interessieren, können das... Wir können das erörtern. Nun zu meinem Vortrag. Der Titel hat sich geringfügig geändert; er lautet: „Photostimulierte Festkörpersynthese oxidischer Materialien.“ Es war eine Zusammenarbeit zwischen der staatlichen Universität Tiflis und den Personen, die Sie hier sehen. Ich war auch beteiligt, Universität Zürich. Alexander Shengelaya, der diese Gruppe leitet, leitet mittlerweile dort unten den Fachbereich Physik. Er war fünf Jahre dort. Zuvor war er neun Jahre lang in Zürich, um zu sehen, wie die Wissenschaft in der Schweiz betrieben wird. Und diese Zusammenarbeit wird fortgesetzt. Hier sehen Sie die Fotografie; das ist der Eingang zum physikalischen Institut in Tiflis, Georgien. Georgien liegt, wie Sie wissen, zwischen der Türkei und Russland. Hier sind zwei von uns. Das ist Alexander Shengelaya vor etwas mehr als einem halben Jahr, als ich Tiflis besuchte. Das, worüber ich sprechen werde, weist Beziehungen auf zu... Ist vielleicht für einige der anorganischen Chemiker hier interessant. Oxid wird mittlerweile sehr wichtig. Als ich zum ersten Mal hier war, übertrug Graf Bernadotte gerade seine Aufgaben an Gräfin Silvia, die leider nicht mehr unter uns ist, was mir sehr leid tut. Sie war voller Tatendrang, hatte dieses Treffen in der Hand und entwickelte es weiter. Zu jener Zeit, als wir die Supraleitung fanden, galten die Oxide als schmutzig. Tatsächlich wiesen die Proben, die Georg Bednorz und ich zuerst behandelten, drei verschiedene Oxide auf. Und nur eines davon war supraleitfähig. Mittlerweile befindet sich der Standard der Oxidchemie auf praktisch demselben Niveau, auf dem sich damals Silikon befand, was auf verschiedene Anwendungen zurückzuführen ist. Im Allgemeinen produziert man komplexe Oxide – und die supraleitfähigen sind komplex – durch die direkte Reaktion einer Mischung von Ausgangsreagenzien bei hoher Temperatur, die natürlich davon abhängt, wann das Oxid schmilzt. Die hohe Temperatur liefert die für die Reaktionen erforderliche Energie. Hier unten wird das für das für die Verbindung Lanthan-Kupfer-O4 gezeigt. Das ist die Verbindung, die Georg Bednorz und ich vor einem Vierteljahrhundert fanden. Es ist die älteste und einfachste Methode, die pulverisierten Reagenzien zusammenzumischen. Teilweise verwendet man natürlich Karbonate; man presst das Granulat zusammen und erwärmt es für einen längeren Zeitraum. Das Folgende ist neu. Nein, vorher sehen Sie eine typische Reaktion. Ein Diagramm, hier für die Verbindung YBCO, während sie erwärmt wird. Das sind Stunden. Sie sehen, das sind Stunden. Ich hoffe, an den Seiten sieht man das auch. Man erhitzt die Verbindung, sagen wir auf 900 Grad, und hält sie mehrere Stunden bei dieser Temperatur. Dann kühlt man sie wieder ab. Der ganze Prozess für eine derartige Reaktion dauert etwa eineinhalb Tage, 38 Stunden. Das ist ziemlich lang. So stellt man diese Oxide her. Nun – jetzt kommt das, was neu ist. In Tiflis haben sie einen Ofen mit Halogenlampen, die man bestrahlen kann. Hier ist die Probe; das ist eine Quarzröhre. Und hier kann man das Ganze erwärmen. Die Farbtemperatur der Lampe liegt bei 3.200 Grad K. Und man pulst die Probe mit diesen Halogenlampen. Wenn man das tut, was geschieht dann? Das ist eine Synthese der ursprünglichen Verbindung, Lanthanoxid. An die Stelle des Lanthans gibt man etwas Strontium, da es 2-wertig und 3-wertig ist. Diese Verbindung weist also keine Ladung auf; sie ist vollständig dotiert. Das ist die Größe der Probe. Und was geschieht, sehen Sie hier. Das ist eine typische Messung, die man nach der Reaktion vornimmt. Hier ist die Temperatur; man kühlt das Ganze ab, und hier ist das magnetische Moment, das gemessen wird. Hier fängt etwas an, es wird stärker negativ. Was bedeutet das? Es bedeutet, dass die Probe das Magnetfeld verdrängt. Das ist der sogenannte Meißner-Ochsenfeld-Effekt, der 1933 in Deutschland entdeckt wurde. Hier gibt es kein äußeres Magnetfeld. Das sind zwei einmalige Impulse bei dieser Temperatur. Und wenn man ein Magnetfeld anlegt, ist die Empfindlichkeit geringer. Der Grund hierfür liegt darin, dass man etwas Magnetfluss in der Probe einfängt. Anhand dieser Empfindlichkeit, dieser negativen Empfindlichkeit kann man berechnen, wie viel Supraleitung man hat. Für diese Probe hier haben wir 50 %. Gut. Jetzt kann man das systematisch machen. Folgendes kommt dabei heraus: Das schaffte man in 20 Sekunden; vorher brauchte man eineinhalb Tage. Hier sind die Röntgenstrahlen. Sie alle kennen sich mit Röntgenstrahlen aus, Sie sehen, dass die Reflexionen und diese Sternchen in der äußeren Phase sind. Wenn man das Ganze auf 900 Grad erwärmt, hat man mehr von dieser externen Phase. Wenn man auf 1050 Grad geht, hat man weniger. Das erzählen uns die Röntgenstrahlen. Und jetzt vergleichen wir das, was man mit dieser neuen Methode anstellen kann, mit der Lichtbestrahlung des Kristalls ohne diese Methode. Hier sehen Sie die Ergebnisse. Das steht für zwei Minuten. Wenn man die Probe in den Ofen gibt, erhält man praktisch keinerlei Supraleitung. Wenn man bei diesen unterschiedlichen Temperaturen mit dem Licht pulst, sieht man, dass man in der Probe eine Empfindlichkeit von 20 oder 30 Prozent erhält. Das war ziemlich... Wir waren ziemlich glücklich darüber. Die ganze Forschungsarbeit wurde im Juni eingereicht. Und ich habe mich sehr darüber gefreut, dass ich am letzten Montag, an diesem Montag die Zustimmung des Verlegers zur Veröffentlichung des von uns eingereichten Artikels erhalten habe. Das ist also wirklich neu. Veröffentlicht wird der Artikel im Journal of Superconductivity and Magnetism. Und da er angenommen wurde, wird er von Springer ins Internet gestellt. Bis jetzt aber sind Sie die ersten, die diese Resultate gesehen haben. Bei der YBCO-Verbindung war es anders. Es funktionierte nicht so gut, und deshalb wurde der Beleuchtung durch Infrarotlicht ultraviolettes Licht hinzugefügt. Sie sehen das hier. Man hatte die Halogenlampen; ich hatte sie vorhin erläutert – hier sind nur drei. Hier ist wieder die Probe. Und hier haben Sie die Ultraviolett-Leuchte; hier ist angegeben, was das ist. Und die Anwendung auf die YBCO-Verbindung, die am häufigsten herangezogen wird... Das kam in Tiflis heraus. Nämlich nur der Ofen; man sieht kaum Magnetismus oder Supraleitung. Wenn man nur mit Halogen bestrahlt, gibt es einen Effekt, diese grüne Linie. Und wenn man daneben mit Ultraviolettlicht bestrahlt, erhält man daraus eine ganz erheblich supraleitfähige Verbindung. Oxide werden in verschiedener Hinsicht immer wichtiger. Zum Beispiel gibt es Verbindungen, die magnetische und elektrische Effekte zeigen. Gleichzeitig kann man ein magnetisch moduliertes elektrisches Feld anlegen und umgekehrt. Das ist eine dieser Verbindungen, Wismut-Eisen-O3. Das sind Röntgenstrahlen davon. Das wurde bei 870 Kelvin fünf Minuten lang synthetisiert. Also funktioniert das dort auch. Die Schlussfolgerungen aus diesen Erkenntnissen lauten wie folgt – ich lese vor: Die neue Methode wurde für die photostimulierte Festkörperreaktion namens PSSR von oxidischen Materialien entwickelt. Diese Methode beinhaltet die Bestrahlung der Mischung von Ausgangsoxiden mit Licht eines breiten Spektralbereichs von infrarot bis ultraviolett in einer für die Auslösung der Festkörperreaktion ausreichenden Intensität. Durch diese Methode kann man also polykristalline Supraleiter von hoher Temperatur herstellen. Man kann magnoelektrische Effekte hervorrufen. Der Ausblick: Ich glaube, die Bandbreite von Anwendungen ist. Man verkürzt den Prozess der Herstellung, vor allem bei Magneten, Brennstoffzellen, Solarzellen, Katalysatoren. Und wie sieht der Mechanismus aus? Das wissen wir nicht. Vielleicht ist jemand von Ihnen interessiert genug und versucht herauszufinden, warum das funktioniert. Und natürlich kann man das für dünne Schichten verwenden. Als Ausblick zeige ich Ihnen einen Schnitt durch die Filme, die jetzt hergestellt werden – supraleitende Drähte. Sie sehen das hier. Unten ist eine strukturierte Wolframlegierung; sie dient der Stabilisierung des Ganzen. Dann kommen eins, zwei, drei Pufferschichten. Diese Pufferschichten dienen der richtigen Orientierung des Kristallins, denn die nächste Schicht hier, das ist die Schicht der YBCO-Verbindung. Wenn man den besten Stromtransport haben will, müssen die Kristalline relativ gut ausgerichtet sein. In dem Moment, in dem die Kristalline ein bisschen gedreht werden, sagen wir um zwei, drei Grad, verringert sich die Stromtransportfähigkeit um die Größenordnung 2. Und hier am Ende kommt eine Silberschicht. Hier, ganz oben. Warum Silber? Man muss das Oxid hier in dieser YBCO-Verbindung, in der supraleitenden Verbindung, sehr genau einstellen. Und Silber ist das einzige Metall, das Sauerstoff überträgt. Das macht es natürlich teuer. Wenn jemand von Ihnen ein anderes Metall oder eine andere Legierung findet, die Silber überträgt, wird er sehr reich, das sage ich Ihnen. Das ist also die Schicht. Das ist eine zweite Generation dieser Kuprate für Kabel. Mit diesen Drähten ist man jetzt in mindestens zwei oder drei Fabriken in der Lage, Drähte von einem Kilometer Länge zu ziehen, und man kann sie aufwickeln. Hier ist so ein Kabel; sie sehen es dort unten. Das ist... Es hat eine elektrische Abschirmung; hier ist die elektrische Wärmedämmung. Hier sind diese Drähte, die ich Ihnen gerade im Schnitt gezeigt habe. Und durch die Mitte wird Stickstoff geleitet, denn YBCO hat eine Übergangstemperatur von 90 Kelvin. Die von Stickstoff ist geringer; man kann es also damit kühlen. Das scheint von einiger Bedeutung zu sein. Diese Kabel werden wahrscheinlich als Gleichstromkabel verwendet. Warum? Weil man die elektrische Energie über große Entfernungen transportieren möchte. Beispiele: In China plant man Solarzellenkraftwerke in der Wüste Gobi. Der Strom soll in der Gegend von Shanghai genutzt werden, 3.500 Kilometer entfernt. Man hat sich für diese Technik entschieden: Der ankommende Gleichstrom wird zerhackt. Das sind nicht nur Pläne. Ich habe Fotos von Gebäuden gesehen, in denen diese Gleichstrom-Zerhacker bereist installiert sind und ihren Dienst verrichten. Außerdem enthalten diese Kupferoxide seltene Erden. China hat seltene Erden in großen Mengen; für sie ist es also billig. Eine weitere Möglichkeit ist die Sahara. In Algerien wurden ebenfalls große Solarzellenkraftwerke geplant. Auch das ist etwa drei- bis viertausend Kilometer entfernt von hier, von Mitteleuropa, wo der Strom genutzt wird. Man muss ihn also transportieren. Es gibt verschiedene Möglichkeiten, den Strom hierher zu transportieren. Eine ähnliche Situation zeichnet sich gerade in den Vereinigten Staaten ab. Einige von Ihnen haben vielleicht schon einmal ihr Glück in Las Vegas versucht und wissen, dass das mitten in der Wüste liegt. Auch hier kann man Solarzellen installieren. In gewisser Weise kommt mir das vor, als befänden wir uns in einer Übergangsphase... Am Anfang hatten wir Mühlen an Flüssen, die mechanisch angetrieben wurden. Dann erfand Werner von Siemens den Dynamo. Danach konnte man den elektrischen Strom an einem Ort erzeugen und ihn einige hundert Kilometer entfernt an einem anderen Ort nutzen. Und jetzt kommt eine Ära – jedenfalls in meinen Augen, ich weiß nicht, ob Doktor Chu mir da zustimmen würde –, in der Sonnenenergie drei- oder viertausend Kilometer vom Einsatzort entfernt erzeugt wird und transportiert werden muss. Natürlich muss sich das dem Wettbewerb mit anderen Quellen wie Öl oder Methan stellen; auch hier hat man Leitungen, die aus Zentralasien oder – mit Methan- aus Aserbaidschan nach Europa führen. Doch der Blickwinkel ist ziemlich der gleiche. Man produziert die Energie oder bringt sie weit entfernten Regionen in andere Gebiete. Herr Sitzungsleiter, ich denke, ich mache hier Schluss. Ich wünsche allen noch einen schönen Tag, vielen Dank. Beifall

Karl Müller (2013) - Model Synthesis for Ceramics: Superconductors, Magnets and Others
(00:07:33 - 00:14:23)

 The complete video is available here.


The finding sent a shockwave throughout the field, and laboratories around the world began to investigate oxides on their own. In early 1987, materials were found with critical temperatures greater than 90 K above absolute zero. That same year, only a year after their discovery, Bednorz and Müller were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics [25].

In his 2019 agora talk, Bednorz traces the winding path he took from a high school student interested in science to a Nobel Laureate. The following clip highlights his biggest breakthrough, the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity.

Johannes G. Bednorz (2019) Career Planning in Science – Dreaming Allowed?
(00:15:37 - 00:23:52)

 The complete video is available here.


Theoretical physicists sought to explain the nature of high-temperature superconductivity, which fell outside the bounds of BCS theory, but a full understanding of these unexpected materials remains elusive even today. And while applications of high-temperature superconductors have been hindered by practical difficulties — materials are very brittle and tend to have impurities that affect performance — researchers are actively working to overcome them [26]. SQUIDs made with high-temperature superconductors can detect magnetic fields 100 billion times smaller than the Earth’s field. In addition, superconducting magnets are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, mass spectrometers, and particle accelerators.


Fluids with Zero Viscosity

After the liquefaction of helium by Onnes, researchers worldwide began to study its unique properties. Onnes’s successor as director of the physical laboratories in Leiden, Willem Keesom, found a notable discontinuity in the specific heat of liquid helium at 2,186 K [27]. He called this transition the “lambda-point,” due to the shape of the specific heat curve and its similarity to the Greek letter. Liquid helium above the lambda-point was “Helium I,” according to Keesom, while liquid helium below was known as “Helium II.”

A year later in 1937, Soviet physicist Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa explored whether a small viscosity could be responsible for Helium II’s large thermal conductivity [28]. He measured its viscosity and was shocked to observe it was at least 1.500 times smaller than that of Helium I at normal pressure. Since the abrupt change of state reminded him of superconductivity, Kapitsa called Helium II a “superfluid” — the first use of such a term. He won the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physics for his discovery [29].

Superfluidity is widely regarded as one of the most dramatic examples of quantum mechanics in the visible world. The most obvious aspect, as Kapitsa noticed, is the ability of liquid helium in the superfluid state to flow without friction. However, other odd aspects include the ability to crawl up the walls of a container and sustain persistent currents in a ring-shaped container.

A 2016 Lindau lecture by Phillips outlines an experimental setup in his lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology that encompasses the latter scenario.

William Phillips (2016) - Superfluid Atomic Gas in a Ring:  A New Kind of Closed Circuit

Superfluid atoms in a ring. The title that I gave for this was a new kind of closed circuit, but I think a better title might be some first steps toward atomtronics. I want to mention that I’m going to be talking about some recent work in my laboratory that’s mainly been done by Gretchen Campbell, and we’re part of the NIST laser cooling and trapping group in the physical measurement laboratory of NIST. We’re also part of the Joint Quantum Institute that is joined between NIST and the University of Maryland I can’t resist doing a little bit of shameless advertising. Especially with so many young people here. We have lots of opportunities for study and research at the Joint Quantum Institute. And if you’re at a stage in your career when you’re thinking about where to go next, you might think about us. And you might end up joining a group like ours or one of the many other groups that are at the Joint Quantum Institute, studying all sorts of wonderful things about quantum mechanics. And the other thing I want to say before I really start is: If you see me around, ask me questions! Because if you ask me a question, I will give you a prize. So coffee breaks, lunches, dinners, whatever. If I don’t have something else to do, I’m eager to talk with you. And this afternoon we’ve got a discussion session. Tomorrow there’s a master class. And the next speaker Klaus von Klitzing will be giving you the same prize which is the 2014 Codata wallet card of the fundamental constants. Now, at NIST we own the fundamental constants of nature. And so that’s why I’m giving them out. And I’m going to give a whole bunch to Klaus, and he’s going to give them out as well. You heard all about Codata in Ted’s talk, and ok, sometimes Codata gets it wrong but it’s the best we got. And how can you be a physicist and not have this in your wallet! Ok, so I want to talk about superfluid atoms in a ring, but I need to give you a little bit of background. So let’s go a little more than 20 years ago. It was announced in Science Magazine that the molecule of the year was the Bose-Einstein condensate. Now, it wasn’t a molecule at all. And it wasn’t really a new form of matter either. It’s a gas, for crying out loud, but it’s a really, really cool gas because it realised a dream that had begun with Einstein 70 years earlier. When Einstein predicted that, if you had a gas of bosons and you got it cold enough and dense enough, that something weird and wonderful would happen, namely that there would be a phase transition. And think about this, this is a phase transition in an ideal gas where phase transitions aren’t supposed to happen. But because of the quantum statistics of the bosons in this gas, it would undergo a phase transition. And the nature of the phase transition according to Einstein was that a large fraction of the atoms would stop moving. Now, remember this is just before the Heisenberg uncertainty principle came along. So with that we knew that the atoms wouldn’t actually stop moving. They would just go to the lowest possible state of motion allowed by Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, that is by the zero point motion. So just how cold and how dense would you be. Well, this isn’t the way Einstein thought about it, but it’s a lovely way to think about it, based on de Broglie’s idea of matter having a wave-like character. And so if you have a hot dilute gas, the wavelength of those atoms is short and the distance between the atoms is long and the wavelength simply doesn’t matter. But when the gas is dense and cold then the wavelength is long and the distance between the atoms is short. And you can get to the point where the wavelength is comparable to the distance between the atoms. And that’s when the magic happens. And a large fraction of the atoms become a single wave, that is all the atoms having the same wave function, and they become a single wave that occupies the entire container. Now, just how cold and how dense do you need to get? Well, in a typical experiment it might be a few hundred nanokelvin, a few hundred billions of a degree above absolute zero, with a density on the order of 10^13 atoms per cubic centimetre. Now, some people think that a density of 10^13 atoms per cubic centimetre is a vacuum, but the fact is we think this is a really dense gas. And how do you get that dense? Well, the first step is laser cooling. Now, you’ve heard a talk from Dave Wineland and you’ve heard a talk from Ted Hänsch, but neither of them mentioned, out of modesty of course, that they were the ones who invented laser cooling. So, along with Dehmelt and Schawlow, a picture of whom you saw in Ted’s talk, these were the inventors of laser cooling. Each one of these people, by the way, has gotten a Nobel Prize for something else besides laser cooling. I think that says something about how clever these people are. But here’s the basic idea: Imagine a gas of atoms and simplify the problem as we always do, as Einstein told us. Everything should be as simple as possible but no simpler. And so in the simplification we’ve got a one dimensional gas. So some of the atoms are heading that way and some of the atoms are heading that way, and you shine in light from both sides and you tune the light so that it is a little bit below the resonance frequency of the atoms Now, these atoms moving in this way see the Doppler shift of this laser beam as putting its frequency closer to the resonance frequency of the atom. So these atoms preferentially absorb from this laser beam and slow down. These atoms, on the other hand, see these laser beams as being the ones that have the right frequency to be absorbed. And so this atom preferentially absorbs from this laser beam and slows down. Now, you can generalise this to three dimensions and have laser beams coming in backwards and forwards and up and down. And now the atom, no matter which way it moves, sees the laser beams that oppose its motion as being the ones that are closer to resonance and it will slow down. And this was first realised in the laboratory by Steve Chu. You don’t need these pictures but just to remind you of what Dave Wineland and Ted Hänsch look like. If you want to ask them about laser cooling. And if you find Steve Chu you can ask him as well. But one of the things I want to point out is that one of the reasons why these characters got the Nobel Prize for laser cooling was that laser cooling worked even better than those original researchers thought. In fact, we eventually got 100 times colder, over 100 times colder than we were supposed to get using laser cooling. And I’m not going to tell you that story. It’s a wonderful story but we can talk about it later. But even that wasn’t cold enough or dense enough to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation. So what could you do? The answer was rather simple. Evaporative cooling. You know that when you blow on your coffee to make it cold, what’s happening is that you are allowing the most energetic of the water molecules to escape from the surface, and what is left behind is colder. Well, we do exactly the same thing by trapping our atoms in a magnetic trap or a laser trap, allowing the most energetic atoms to escape, and what’s left behind is colder. And using evaporative cooling in the early days in a magnetic trap, what I call the heroes of Bose-Einstein condensation, were able to reach temperatures colder than was possible by laser cooling, down into the nanokelvin regime, and were able to realise Einstein’s strange and wonderful prediction. So, who were these heroes? Well, one of them is Dan Kleppner who is often called the godfather of Bose-Einstein Condensation. I’m glad to see you recognised that logo from the movie. And the reason he’s called the godfather is because he taught us about the techniques that were needed to make Bose condensation. But these were the ones, the heroes who actually achieved it: Eric Cornell and Carl Wieman at Boulder. Wolfgang Ketterle at MIT. And what we’re looking at here is a velocity distribution of a gas of atoms as it’s cooled from a temperature of 400 nanokelvin, too hot for this phase transition to occur. And so you see this broad featureless distribution as you would in any thermal gas. And then when the temperature goes down to 200 nanokelvin you get this huge peak of atoms around zero velocity. And that’s the condensate. That got these guys the 2001 Nobel Prize in physics. Carl Wieman is supposed to be here. I haven’t seen him yet either. But if you see him ask him about this. So what is a Bose-Einstein condensate? It’s a macroscopic quantum state. It’s thousands to millions, sometimes even billions of atoms all in the same state. It is laser-like in its coherence in the wave nature of these atoms. So, just as a laser has many, many photons in the same state a Bose-Einstein condensate has many, many atoms in the same state. And very often it’s big, hundreds of micrometres across, or even larger, like a millimetre. You young people can see something that small. I can’t. But if you can see it with the naked eye, it’s macroscopic. Ok, so what do we do? We put this gas which, did I mention it’s superfluid. No it doesn’t have that. Oh it is, yes ok. I did mention it – here. This is a superfluid. So, this is a new kind of superfluid. We’ve had liquid helium. Superfluid helium. We’ve had super conductors which are a superfluid, electric superfluid. And now we have a gaseous superfluid. And what we do is we put it into a ring. Now, it turns out that if you have a laser beam tuned red of the resonant frequency of an atomic transition then the atoms will be attracted to the most intense part of that laser beam. So, what we do is we focus down a ring of laser light. So, that it’s focused down to a ring that’s about 50 microns in diameter. And then we focus using a cylindrical lens. We focus another laser beam down to make a sheet of light. And the inner section of this ring of light and this sheet of light makes a torus in which we can trap our atoms. And we can get a persistent current of atoms going around this ring that lasts for as long as the atoms do. The only thing that stops this persistence of current is the fact that we have an imperfect vacuum. And eventually the atoms are scattered out of this ring by the room temperature residual atoms. Mostly hydrogen that are inside our imperfect vacuum. And you might say, well, why don’t you make your vacuum better? We made it as good as we could. And that’s what we get. But 60 seconds, in our business 60 seconds is forever. So this is fantastic. So, now I want to emphasise that this is the work of Gretchen Campbell. And, of course, we call the group that works on this “The Fellowship of The Ring”, and you can see the former and current members as well as our theory collaborators. Here’s a group picture of Gretchen. So, there’s Gretchen leading the fellowship. And here you know you have the graduate students and the postdocs. And the theorists. And, of course, there are people all over the world doing wonderful experiments using rings. And these are some of them, and probably I forgot some. And I’ll be very grateful if you tell me if I did. But then what’s the next thing? Now, we’ve got a ring and this is the simplest circuit you can imagine. It’s the atom equivalent of a loop of wire, but we want to do something more interesting. And if I had a superconducting circuit what would I do with that superconducting circuit? I would put a Josephson junction in it. And the way we make a Josephson junction is we shine in a beam of light on one end of this ring and that beam of light is now tuned to the blue, that is to the high frequency side of the atomic resonance. This kind of a laser beam repels the atoms. And so you see that there’s a depletion in the atom number here. And the atoms have to go up over this barrier to go around the ring. So, this creates a weak link or a Josephson junction. And I want to emphasise that, well, if you’ve studied the Josephson effect and Josephson junctions, you may have been thinking of the kind of Josephson junction where you have a very thin layer of dielectric and the electron pairs tunnel through that dielectric. And that is indeed a kind of Josephson junction, the sort of ideal sort of Josephson junction, that I think that Brian Josephson – who is sitting right here, isn’t this fantastic? – was thinking about when he came up with this. Now, you young people, by the way, Josephson, how old were you, 20? No probably 22. And Brian came up with something that changed our whole way of thinking about superconductors and the possibility of making superconducting circuits. So, how is that for a challenge for you young people? Anyway, the point is, so you know, seek out Brian Josephson, the point is that that’s not the only way of making a Josephson junction. And even in superconductors there are things called Dayem bridges which are a kind of Josephson junction where you’ve just thinned out the superconductor here. And that’s what we’ve done in our Josephson junction. You can see that the superfluid atomic density, it’s almost all superfluid, has been thinned out there. Ok, that’s how we make a Josephson junction. How do we control the current? The way we control the current is by taking that Josephson junction and rotating it around the ring. Now, why is this a good thing? Well, if we were in a reference frame that is rotating with the junction then we would see a Coriolis force in that rotating frame, in addition to the centrifugal force, but the important thing here is the Coriolis force. That Coriolis force is a term in omega xv, the rotation vector crossed into the velocity. Well, the Lorentz force on a charge particle in a magnetic field is vxB. So it’s got the same functional form. So, it turns out that going into a rotating frame for neutral atoms is just like applying a magnetic field for charged electrons that you would have in a superconducting ring. And so you have an analogy. Now, what happens when you apply a magnetic field to a ring of superconductor that has a Josephson junction in it. The current in the ring increases so as to shield out the magnetic flux, until you reach the critical current for the Josephson junction and then it allows a flux quantum in. We expect exactly the same sort of thing to happen here. In the rotating frame as you rotate more, which is equivalent to more magnetic field, you get more current, obviously because in the rotating frame you see the atoms passing through the junction in the opposite direction. So there’s an increase current the faster you rotate. But at some point you reach the critical current that is allowed to go through the junction and then it will allow in a quantum not of magnetic flux, but a quantum of circulation. And then we will look at the ring to see whether it’s rotating. How do we tell it’s rotating? We release it and after a time of flight. If it’s not rotating, the hole that was in the middle of the ring fills in. But if it’s rotating, the hole can’t fill in and we see this, we see a hole in the centre of the cloud because, of course, if it has angle momentum the atoms can’t be at the centre. And just by looking at the size of the hole, we can tell what the circulation is, and the circulation is quantised because this is a single wave function, and the phase of the wave function going around here which tells you what the gradient of that phase, tells you the velocity, that has to integrate up to a multiple of 2 pi. And so we can have 1 unit of circulation, 2 or 3 or as many as we want and we can tell just by looking at the hole how many we have. So here’s the results of one of those experiments. Here what we did was we rotated the barrier around the ring at different velocities. And when we did it at low velocities and then turned it off and looked at the released condensate we saw no circulation. But when we did it at a high velocity then we always got circulation. And somewhere in between there was a transition. And that was for a barrier of a certain height. When the barrier was just a little bit higher that transition occurred earlier. Just as you would expect. You would expect that when the barrier is higher the critical velocity is lower, the velocity that you would need to flow in order to break the superfluidity and get an excitation. So, we developed a toy model of that excitation that involved creating some vortexes here and then the vortexes repel each other and head to the outside. And that toy model seemed to agree reasonably well with theory. And the toy model agreed with experiment. But it didn’t agree at all with making the critical velocity the speed of sound. And this was a clue to the idea that it wasn’t phonons that were the excitations that were arising when we exceed the critical velocity. But instead it was something like vortexes. Now, I want to emphasise that this isn’t the first time someone has done this kind of an experiment with a fluid. Richard Packard and his group at Berkeley have used superfluid, both Helium 3 and Helium 4 to make this kind of a device and sensitive enough to detect the earth’s rotation. We’re doing the same thing but with a gas. Now, we’re not as good as they are yet. We’re not detecting the earth’s rotation but we are doing some interesting things and having some fun. So, let me tell you about one of the fun things that we’re doing with these superfluid gases. Hysteresis, why is there hysteresis in this system? Well, remember the story that I told you about rotating the barrier around the ring. So, in the rotating frame you see flow in the opposite direction at about the velocity that the barrier is rotating until you finally reach that velocity that’s high enough that it will create an excitation. That is it’s no longer superfluid, it creates an excitation, and that excitation brings into the ring a quantum of circulation. So, now all of the fluid in the ring is circulating around like that with some velocity. Now, let’s say that the critical velocity, just for the sake of argument, imagine that the critical velocity was almost as big as the velocity when you had a quantum of circulation in here. By the way, that velocity for a 50 micron ring is about 1 turn per second. So it’s a really quite manageable velocity. You could almost do it by twiddling the mirror mounts by hand but we in fact use a spatial light modulator to do it. But the point is that once you allow a vortex to go through here and come into the inside, so that you now have circulation around here, that circulation is almost at the same velocity at which the barrier is rotating around. So that means the relative velocity between the barrier and the fluid is nearly zero. If you’re going to go back and make the flow stop, you’re going to have to make the relative velocity between the barrier and the fluid be large, close to the velocity of one unit of circulation. And so you expect to have a different result coming back down as you did going up which is what we call hysteresis. So here are a number of transition curves for different barrier heights. So this is the lowest barrier and this is the higher barriers. Now, I want to emphasise these are not tunnelling barriers in the way that Brian Josephson originally imagined the Josephson effect. The height of these barriers is lower than the energy of the atoms. So what is happening is the atoms are just going over the barrier classically but as a result of the barrier being there the superfluid density is lower and that’s all that’s needed in order to see the kinds of effects that we’re interested in. So here with a low barrier you have to go to a high enough velocity and then you see this transition to a state of rotation. And when the barrier is lower you make that transition at a lower velocity. Now, what happens when we go back the other way? So going back the other way you see you have to go until you’re at a quite low velocity because the fluid is already circulating. And you make the barrier rotate at a much lower velocity, and then finally when the relative velocity is big enough you make the transition. And when the barrier is higher you don’t have to make that relative velocity as big and it occurs at a higher velocity. And now, if we put the two curves together, you see you have this classic hysteresis loop that you expect to see in so many kinds of systems. And here we’ve seen it in this superfluid atomic gas. So hysteretic behaviour is central to a lot of electronic devices and processes, things like memory and noise tolerant switching, like Schmitt triggers, that you may be familiar with from electronic design, and now we’ve added that feature of hysteresis to our tool box for superfluid gases. So let me just come to a close by showing pictures of the people who were part of the team who have recently done these things. There’s Gretchen, the leader of this team. We’ve been very happy to have the collaboration of Chris Lobb who is a real SQuID guy, that is electronic SQuIDs, and Avinash and Steve and Fred and Erin have all been part of that. And the more recent team has added a few more young people and they’re doing wonderful things right now. So, besides the things I’ve told you, by using interference we can actually see interference fringes between a non-rotating gas and a rotating gas. And this is something you’re never going to do with a liquid or with a superconductor. We can visually see these interference fringes and measure the phase around the ring. Gretchen and her team are making DC SQuIDs, that is things that have two junctions. They’re generating sound waves by modulating the Josephson junction to create sound waves going around this ring, studying thermal effects, other things I didn’t even put on here were watching a standing wave of sound being dragged around the ring by the superfluid rotation. So this is the end of my talk, but it’s certainly not the end of this research. We’re doing such incredibly exciting things, but I want to remind you, ask me questions, because you want to get this card. And let me tell you why. And Klaus von Klitzing is going to tell you more about this. This is the last card on which Planck’s constant will have any uncertainty. The next time this card comes out Planck’s constant will be exact. And so will the charge on the electron. And so will the Boltzmann constant. And so will Avogadro’s number. And Klaus von Klitzing will tell you why. Thanks very much.

Suprafluide Atome in einem Ring. Ich habe dem Vortrag diesen Titel gegeben, eine neue Art geschlossener Kreislauf, aber ich denke, ein besserer Titel wäre gewesen: ein paar erste Schritte zur Atomtronik. Ich möchte erwähnen, dass ich über jüngste Arbeiten in meinem Labor erzählen werde, die hauptsächlich von Gretchen Campbell durchgeführt wurden, und wir sind Teil der NIST Laserkühlungs- und Fallengruppe im Laboratorium für physikalische Messungen des NIST. Und wir sind ebenfalls Teil des Joint Quantum Institute, das das NIST und die Universität Maryland gemeinsam betreiben. Ich kann nicht widerstehen, ein wenig schamlose Werbung zu machen. Zumal so viele junge Leute hier sind. Es gibt viele Gelegenheiten zum Studium und zur Forschung am Joint Quantum Institute. Und wenn Sie auf der Stufe Ihrer Karriere sind, auf der Sie darüber nachdenken, wohin Sie als Nächstes gehen, denken Sie vielleicht auch an uns. Sie könnten in eine Gruppe wie unsere kommen oder in eine der vielen anderen Gruppen, die es am Joint Quantum Institute gibt, zum Studium aller möglichen wunderbaren Dinge im Feld der Quantenmechanik. Und das andere, was ich sagen möchte, bevor ich richtig beginne: Wenn Sie mich treffen, stellen Sie mir Fragen! Wenn Sie mir Fragen stellen, dann gebe ich Ihnen einen Gewinn. Also während Kaffeepausen, Mittagessen, Abendessen, wo auch immer. Wenn ich nichts anderes zu tun habe, bin ich versessen darauf, mit Ihnen zu sprechen. Heute Nachmittag haben wir eine Diskussionssitzung. Morgen gibt es eine Masterclass. Und der nächste Sprecher, Klaus von Klitzing, wird Ihnen denselben Gewinn geben, es ist die 2014 CODATA-Taschenkarte der fundamentalen Naturkonstanten. Nun, bei NIST, besitzen wir die fundamentalen Naturkonstanten. Und deshalb verteile ich sie hier. Ich werde Klaus auch ein großes Bündel geben und er wird sie auch ausgeben. In Teds Vortrag haben Sie von CODATA gehört, und ok, CODATA macht manchmal Fehler, aber es ist das Beste, was wir haben. Wie können Sie ein Physiker sein, wenn sie dies nicht in Ihrer Brieftasche haben! Ok, ich möchte über suprafluide Atome in einem Ring sprechen, aber ich muss Ihnen zunächst ein bisschen Hintergrund vermitteln. Lassen Sie uns daher ein wenig mehr als 20 Jahre zurückgehen. Es wurde damals im Science Magazine bekannt gegeben, dass das Molekül des Jahres das Bose-Einstein-Kondensat war. Nun, es war überhaupt kein Molekül. Und es war auch keine neue Form der Materie. Es ist ein Gas, verdammt noch mal, aber es ist ein wirklich, wirklich cooles Gas, weil es einen Traum realisierte, der mit Einstein 70 Jahre früher anfing. Als Einstein vorhersagte, dass etwas Komisches und Wunderbares passieren würde, wenn man ein Bosonengas hätte und man es kalt und dicht genug bekäme, es gäbe nämlich einen Phasenübergang. Und denken Sie darüber nach, dies ist ein Phasenübergang in einem idealen Gas, wo es überhaupt keine Phasenübergänge geben dürfte. Aber wegen der Quantenstatistik der Bosonen in diesem Gas würde es einen Phasenübergang geben. Die Natur dieses Phasenübergangs laut Einstein war, dass ein großer Teil der Atome aufhören würde, sich zu bewegen. Denken Sie daran, dies war kurz bevor Heisenbergs Unschärferelation erschien. Damit wussten wir, dass die Atome nicht tatsächlich aufhören würden, sich zu bewegen. Sie würden nur zum niedrigst möglichen Bewegungszustand übergehen, der durch Heisenbergs Unschärferelation möglich ist, d. h. der Nullpunktbewegung. Wie kalt und dicht wäre das? Dies ist nicht so, wie Einstein sich das vorgestellt hat, aber es ist ein schöner Weg, es sich vorzustellen, basierend auf de Broglies Idee, dass Materie einen wellenähnlichen Charakter hat. Wenn man also ein heißes, verdünntes Gas hat, ist die Wellenlänge dieser Atome kurz und der Abstand zwischen den Atomen ist groß und die Wellenlänge spielt einfach keine Rolle. Aber wenn das Gas dicht und kalt ist, dann ist die Wellenlänge lang und der Abstand zwischen den Atomen ist klein. Und man kann an dem Punkt ankommen, wo die Wellenlänge vergleichbar mit dem Atomabstand wird. Dann passiert hier der Zauber. Ein großer Teil der Atome wird eine einzelne Welle, d. h. die Atome haben dieselbe Wellenfunktion, und sie werden zu einer einzigen Welle, die den gesamten Behälter füllt. Wie kalt und dicht muss man dafür werden? In einem typischen Experiment kann es ein paar hundert Nanokelvin sein, ein paar hundert milliardstel Grad über dem absoluten Nullpunkt, mit einer Dichte von der Größenordnung 10^13 Atome pro Kubikzentimeter. Nun, einige Leute denken, dass eine Dichte von 10^13 Atome pro Kubikzentimeter ein Vakuum sind, aber tatsächlich denken wir, dass es ein ziemlich dichtes Gas ist. Und wie bekommt man es so dicht? Der erste Schritt ist die Laserkühlung. Sie haben einen Vortrag von Dave Wineland gehört und Sie haben einen Vortrag von Ted Hänsch gehört, aber keiner der beiden erwähnte, natürlich aus Bescheidenheit, dass Sie diejenigen waren, die die Laserkühlung erfanden. Zusammen mit Dehmelt und Schawlow, von denen Sie in Teds Vortrag ein Bild sahen, waren sie die Erfinder der Laserkühlung. Jeder von ihnen hat übrigens einen Nobelpreis für etwas anderes bekommen, neben der Laserkühlung. Ich denke, das sagt etwas darüber aus, wie schlau diese Leute sind. Aber hier ist die Grundidee: Stellen Sie sich ein Gas aus Atomen vor und vereinfachen wir das Problem, wie wir das immer tun, wie Einstein es uns erklärt hat: Alles sollte so einfach wie möglich sein, aber nicht einfacher. Und daher nehmen wir in der Vereinfachung ein eindimensionales Gas. Also bewegen sich einige der Atome in diese Richtung, und einige der Atome bewegen sich in die andere Richtung und man scheint Licht von beiden Seiten herein, und man stimmt das Licht so ab, dass es ein wenig unter der Resonanzfrequenz der Atome ist. Diese Atome bewegen sich in diese Richtung und sehen, dass die Dopplerverschiebung dieses Laserstrahls dessen Frequenz näher an die Resonanzfrequenz des Atoms bringt. Diese Atome absorbieren bevorzugt von diesem Laserstrahl und werden langsamer. Diese Atome andererseits sehen diesen Laserstrahl als denjenigen, der die richtige Frequenz für Absorption hat. Dieses Atom absorbiert von diesem Laserstrahl und wird langsamer. Man kann das auf drei Dimensionen verallgemeinern und Laserstrahlen haben, die rückwärts und vorwärts und nach oben und nach unten gehen. Und nun wird das Atom, egal wohin es sich bewegt, die Laserstrahlen, die seiner Bewegung entgegenstehen, als die sehen, die näher an der Resonanz sind und es wird sich verlangsamen. Und dies wurde zuerst im Labor von Steve Chu realisiert. Sie benötigen diese Bilder nicht, es ist nur um Sie zu erinnern, wie Dave Wineland und Ted Hänsch aussehen. Wenn Sie sie über Laserkühlung ausfragen wollen. Und wenn sie Steve Chu finden, können Sie auch ihn fragen. Aber eine Sache, die ich herausstellen möchte, ist, dass einer der Gründe, warum diese Typen den Nobelpreis für Laserkühlung erhielten, war, dass die Laserkühlung sogar besser funktionierte als die ursprünglichen Forscher dachten. Tatsächlich wurden wir hundertmal kälter, über hundertmal kälter als wir mit der Laserkühlung werden sollten. Und ich werde Ihnen diese Geschichte nicht erzählen. Es ist eine wunderbare Geschichte, aber wir können später darüber sprechen. Aber selbst das war nicht kalt genug oder dicht genug, um eine Bose-Einstein-Kondensation zu erreichen. Was konnten wir also machen? Die Antwort war ziemlich einfach. Kühlung durch Verdampfen. Sie wissen, was passiert, wenn man auf seinen Kaffee bläst, damit er kälter wird. Man lässt die Wassermoleküle mit der höchsten Energie von der Oberfläche entkommen und die Zurückbleibenden sind kälter. Wir machen genau dasselbe, indem wir unsere Atome in einer Magnetfalle oder Laserfalle einfangen, erlauben wir den energiereichsten Atomen zu entkommen, und die Zurückbleibenden sind kälter. Mit der Benutzung von Verdampfungskühlung in einer Magnetfalle in den frühen Tagen konnten diejenigen, die ich die Helden der Bose-Einstein-Kondensation nenne, Temperaturen erzielen, die viel kälter waren als mit der Laserkühlung möglich, bis zum Nanokelvin-Regime hinunter. Sie waren in der Lage, Einsteins merkwürdige und wunderbare Vorhersage zu realisieren. Wer waren also diese Helden? Einer davon ist Dan Kleppner, der oft auch der Pate der Bose-Einstein-Kondensation genannt wird. Ich bin froh, dass Sie das Logo aus dem Movie erkannt haben. Der Grund, warum er Pate genannt wird, ist, weil er uns alles über die Techniken gelehrt hat, die wir benötigen, um eine Bose-Kondensation herzustellen. Aber dies waren diejenigen, die Helden, die es tatsächlich erreicht haben: Eric Cornell und Carl Wieman in Boulder. Wolfgang Ketterle am MIT. Wir schauen uns hier die Geschwindigkeitsverteilung eines atomaren Gases an, während es von einer Temperatur von 400 Nanokelvin heruntergekühlt wird, zu heiß für das Auftreten dieses Phasenübergangs. Sie sehen diese breite Verteilung ohne Merkmale, wie man sie bei jedem thermischen Gas erhalten würde. Und wenn dann die Temperatur auf 200 Nanokelvin heruntergeht, bekommt man diesen riesigen Peak Atome mit der Geschwindigkeit Null. Und das ist das Kondensat. Das hat diesen Burschen im Jahr 2001 den Nobelpreis in Physik eingebracht. Carl Wieman soll hier sein. Ich habe ihn auch noch nicht gesehen. Aber wenn Sie ihn sehen, fragen Sie ihn danach. Was ist also ein Bose-Einstein-Kondensat? Es ist ein makroskopischer Quantenzustand. Es sind tausende bis millionen, manchmal sogar milliarden Atome alle in demselben Zustand. In seiner Kohärenz in der Wellennatur dieser Atome ist es wie ein Laser. Wie ein Laser viele, viele Photonen im selben Zustand hat, hat ein Bose-Einstein-Kondensat viele, viele Atome in demselben Zustand. Und oft ist es groß, hunderte von Mikrometer Durchmesser, oder sogar größer, beispielsweise ein Millimeter. Sie jungen Leute können etwas so Kleines sehen. Ich kann das nicht. Aber wenn man es mit dem nackten Auge sehen kann, dann ist es makroskopisch. Also was machen wir? Wir tun das Gas, hatte ich erwähnt, dass es suprafluid ist? Nein, das ist hier nicht drauf. Oh, hier ist es, ok. Ich habe es erwähnt – hier. Dies ist eine Supraflüssigkeit. Dies ist eine neue Art der Supraflüssigkeit. Wir hatten flüssiges Helium. Suprafluides Helium. Wir hatten Supraleiter, die eine Supraflüssigkeit sind, elektrische Supraflüssigkeit. Jetzt haben wir eine gasförmige Supraflüssigkeit. Und dann geben wir es in einen Ring. Es stellt sich heraus, wenn man einen Laserstrahl auf die rote Seite der Resonanzfrequenz eines Atomübergangs abgestimmt hat, dann werden die Atome vom intensivsten Teil des Laserstrahls angezogen. Wir fokussieren einen Ring aus Laserlicht kleiner. Dies ist in einen Ring herunter fokussiert, der etwa 50 Mikrometer Durchmesser hat. Und dann fokussieren wir mit einer Zylinderlinse einen anderen Laserstrahl herunter, um eine Lichtplatte zu erzeugen. Und der innere Bereich dieses Lichtrings und dieser Lichtplatte erzeugt einen Torus, in dem wir Ionen einfangen können. Und wir können einen anhaltenden Strom von Atomen bekommen, die diesen Ring umkreisen, der solange andauert wie die Atome leben. Das einzige, was dieses Erhalten des Stroms stoppt, ist die Tatsache, dass wir ein unvollkommenes Vakuum haben. Und schließlich werden die Atome durch die übrigen Atome bei Raumtemperatur aus diesem Ring herausgestreut. Meistens Wasserstoff in unserem unvollkommenen Vakuum. Sie könnten jetzt sagen, warum haben Sie kein besseres Vakuum erzeugt? Wir machten dies so gut wir konnten. Und das bekamen wir. Aber 60 Sekunden, in unserem Geschäft sind 60 Sekunden wie eine Ewigkeit. Das ist also fantastisch. Jetzt möchte ich betonen, dass diese Arbeit durch Gretchen Campbell durchgeführt wurde. Natürlich nennen wir diese Gruppe die „Gefährten des Rings“, und sie können die früheren und derzeitigen Mitglieder sowie unsere Theoriekollegen sehen. Hier ist ein Gruppenbild von Gretchens Gruppe. Hier ist daher Gretchen, die die Gefährten leitet. Und hier sind die Doktoranden und die Postdocs. Und die Theoretiker. Natürlich gibt es überall auf der Welt Leute, die wunderbare Experimente mit Ringen durchführen. Hier sind einige davon und vermutlich habe ich einige vergessen. Ich wäre dankbar, wenn Sie mir sagen, falls das zutrifft. Aber was ist dann das Nächste? Nun, wir haben einen Ring, und das ist der einfachste Schaltkreis, den man sich vorstellen kann. Es ist das atomare Äquivalent einer Leiterschleife, aber wir wollen etwas Interessanteres machen. Aber wenn man einen supraleitenden Schaltkreis hätte, was würde ich mit dem supraleitenden Schaltkreis machen? Ich würde einen Josephson-Kontakt einbauen. Wir stellen einen Josephson-Kontakt her, indem wir einen Lichtstrahl an einer Stelle des Rings hineinstrahlen, und der Lichtstrahl ist jetzt auf die blaue Seite abgestimmt, d. h. zur hochfrequenten Seite der Atomresonanz. Diese Art Laserstrahl stößt die Atome ab. Daher kann man eine Verringerung der Atomanzahl hier sehen. Die Atome müssen diese Barriere überwinden, um den Ring zu umkreisen. Dies erzeugt eine schwache Verbindung oder einen Josephson-Kontakt. Und ich möchte betonen, wenn sie den Josephson-Effekt und Josephson-Kontakte studiert haben, haben Sie vielleicht an die Art Josephson-Kontakt gedacht, wo man eine sehr dünne Schicht eines Dielektrikums hat und die Elektronenpaare durch das Dielektrikum hindurchtunneln. Und das ist in der Tat eine Art des Josephson-Kontakts, der idealen Sorte des Josephson-Kontakts, an die, denke ich, Brian Josephson – der genau hier sitzt, ist das nicht fantastisch? – dachte, als ihm dies einfiel. Nun Sie junge Menschen, übrigens, Josephson, wie alt waren Sie damals, 20? Nein, vermutlich 22. Und Brian fiel etwas ein, das unsere gesamte Denkweise über Supraleiter und die Möglichkeit, supraleitende Schaltungen herzustellen, veränderte. Nun, wie ist das als Herausforderung für Sie junge Menschen? Also der Punkt ist, damit Sie es wissen, suchen Sie Brian Josephson, der Punkt ist, dass dies nicht der einzige Weg ist, einen Josephson-Kontakt herzustellen. Und sogar in Supraleitern gibt es Dinge, die Dayem-Brücken genannt werden, die eine Art Josephson-Kontakt sind, wo man den Supraleiter hier ausgedünnt hat. Das haben wir in unserem Josephson-Kontakt gemacht. Man kann sehen, die suprafluide Atomdichte, sie ist fast überall suprafluid, wurde hier ausgedünnt. Ok, so machen wir einen Josephson-Kontakt. Wie kontrollieren wir den Strom? Wir kontrollieren den Strom, indem wir den Josephson-Kontakt nehmen und ihn um den Ring rotieren lassen. Nun, warum ist das gut? Wenn wir in einem Bezugsrahmen wären, der mit dem Kontakt rotiert, dann sähen wir eine Corioliskraft in diesem rotierende Rahmen, zusätzlich zur Zentrifugalkraft, aber das Wichtige hier ist die Corioliskraft. Diese Corioliskraft ist ein Term in omega x v, dem Rotationsvektor gekreuzt mit der Geschwindigkeit. Die Lorentzkraft auf ein geladenes Teilchen in einem Magnetfeld ist vxB. Sie hat dieselbe funktionale Form. Es stellt sich heraus, dass der Übergang zu einem rotierenden Bezugssystem für neutrale Atome genau dasselbe ist wie ein magnetisches Feld auf geladene Elektronen anzuwenden, die man in einem supraleitenden Ring hätte. Damit haben Sie eine Analogie. Was passiert jetzt, wenn man ein Magnetfeld auf einen supraleitenden Ring einwirken lässt, der einen Josephson-Kontakt enthält. Der Strom im Ring wächst, um den magnetischen Fluss herauszudrängen, bis man den kritischen Strom für den Josephson-Kontakt erreicht, und dann erlaubt es ein Flussquant hinein. Wir erwarten, dass genau dasselbe hier passiert. Im rotierenden Bezugsrahmen, wenn man stärker rotiert, was einem stärkeren magnetischen Feld äquivalent ist, erhält man offensichtlich einen höheren Strom, weil man im rotierenden Rahmen die Atome sieht, wie sie in der anderen Richtung durch den Kontakt gehen. Man hat also einen höheren Strom, je schneller man rotiert. Aber irgendwann erreicht man den kritischen Strom, der durch den Kontakt fließen darf, und dann wird ein Quant nicht des magnetische Flusses, sondern ein Quant der Zirkulation möglich. Und wir schauen uns den Ring an, um zu sehen, ob er rotiert. Wie können wir unterscheiden, ob er rotiert? Wir geben ihn frei und nach einer Flugzeit, wenn er nicht rotiert, füllt sich das Loch in der Mitte des Rings. Aber wenn er rotiert, dann kann das Loch sich nicht füllen und wir sehen das, wir sehen ein Loch in der Mitte der Wolke, weil die Atome nicht im Zentrum sein können, wenn er einen Drehimpuls hat. Und nur durch Betrachten der Lochgröße können wir feststellen, was die Zirkulation ist. Die Zirkulation ist quantisiert, weil dies eine einzelne Wellenfunktion ist. Und die Phase der Wellenfunktion, die hier herum geht, die Ihnen sagt, der Gradient dieser Phase gibt Ihnen die Geschwindigkeit, das muss sich auf ein Vielfaches von 2 Pi aufsummieren. Und so kann man eine Zirkulationseinheit haben, oder zwei oder drei oder so viele wir wollen, und nur durch Betrachten des Lochs können wir sehen, wie viele wir haben. Hier sind die Ergebnisse eines unserer Experimente. Was wir hier machten, war, dass wir die Barriere durch den Ring mit verschiedenen Geschwindigkeiten rotieren ließen. Und als wir das dann bei niedriger Geschwindigkeit durchführten und es dann abschalteten und uns das freigesetzte Kondensat ansahen, sahen wir keine Zirkulation. Aber als wir dies bei hoher Geschwindigkeit machten, bekamen wir immer eine Zirkulation. Und irgendwo dazwischen gab es einen Übergang. Und das war für eine Barriere mit einer bestimmten Höhe. Wenn die Barriere nur ein wenig höher war, erhielten wir den Übergang früher. Genau wie man das erwarten würde. Man würde erwarten, dass die Geschwindigkeit, die man zum Fließen benötigt, um die Suprafluidität zu brechen und eine Anregung zu erhalten, die kritische Geschwindigkeit, niedriger ist, wenn die Barriere höher ist. Wir entwickelten daher ein Spielzeugmodell dieser Anregung, die die Erzeugung einiger Wirbel hier beinhaltete, und dann stoßen sich die Wirbel ab und gehen nach außen. Das Spielzeugmodell schien einigermaßen mit der Theorie übereinzustimmen. Und das Spielzeugmodell stimmt mit dem Experiment überein. Aber es stimmte überhaupt nicht überein damit, die Schallgeschwindigkeit zur kritischen Geschwindigkeit zu machen. Dies war der Hinweis zur Idee, dass nicht Phononen die auftretenden Anregungen waren, wenn wir die kritische Geschwindigkeit übertreten. Sondern dass es so etwas wie Wirbel waren. Ich möchte betonen, dass dies nicht das erste Mal war, dass jemand diese Art Experiment mit einer Flüssigkeit durchgeführt hat. Richard Packard und seine Gruppe in Berkeley haben Supraflüssigkeiten benutzt, Helium-3 und Helium-4, um diese Art Vorrichtung herzustellen und empfindlich genug zu machen, um die Erdrotation nachzuweisen. Wir machen dasselbe wie sie, aber mit einem Gas. Wir sind noch nicht so gut wie sie. Wir können nicht die Erdrotation messen, aber wir machen einige interessante Dinge und haben einigen Spaß. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen etwas über die spaßigen Dinge sagen, die wir mit diesen suprafluiden Gasen machen. Hysterese, warum gibt es in dem System eine Hysterese? Erinnern Sie sich an die Geschichte, die ich Ihnen über die Rotation der Barriere entlang des Rings erzählt habe? Im rotierenden Bezugssystem sehen Sie einen Fluss in die entgegengesetzte Richtung mit etwa der Geschwindigkeit, mit der die Barriere rotiert, bis man schließlich diese Geschwindigkeit erreicht, die hoch genug ist, um eine Anregung zu erreichen. D. h., es ist keine Supraflüssigkeit mehr, es erzeugt eine Anregung, und diese Anregung bringt ein Zirkulationsquant in den Ring. Die gesamte Flüssigkeit in dem Ring zirkuliert jetzt so herum mit einer Geschwindigkeit. Lassen Sie uns annehmen, dass die kritische Geschwindigkeit, nur für die Argumentation, stellen Sie sich vor, die kritische Geschwindigkeit wäre fast so hoch wie die Geschwindigkeit, wenn man hier ein Zirkulationsquant drin hat. Übrigens, die Geschwindigkeit ist für einen 50 Mikrometer Ring etwa eine Umdrehung pro Sekunde. Es ist eine wirklich recht handhabbare Geschwindigkeit. Man kann das fast machen, indem man die Spiegelaufhängungen von Hand dreht, aber wir benutzen einen räumlichen Lichtmodulator, um es zu machen. Aber der Punkt ist, wenn man einem Wirbel erst einmal erlaubt, hier durchzugehen und ins Innere zu gelangen, sodass man jetzt eine Zirkulation hier herum hat, hat diese Zirkulation fast dieselbe Geschwindigkeit, in der die Barriere herumrotiert. Das heißt, die relative Geschwindigkeit zwischen der Barriere und der Flüssigkeit ist fast Null. Und wenn man zurückgeht und den Fluss beendet, muss man die relative Geschwindigkeit zwischen der Barriere und der Flüssigkeit groß machen, nahe der Geschwindigkeit einer Zirkulationseinheit. Daher erwartet man, ein unterschiedliches Ergebnis zu erhalten, wenn man zurück herunterkommt, als wenn man hinaufgeht, das nennen wir Hysterese. Hier ist eine Anzahl Übergangskurven für unterschiedliche Barrierehöhen. Dies ist die niedrigste Barriere und dies sind die höheren Barrieren. Nun, ich möchte betonen, dies sind keine Tunnelbarrieren in der Art, wie Brian Josephson sich ursprünglich den Tunneleffekt vorstellte. Die Höhe dieser Barrieren ist niedriger als die Energie der Atome. Die Atome gehen einfach klassisch über diese Barriere, aber als ein Ergebnis der Existenz dieser Barriere ist die Supraflüssigkeitsdichte niedriger und das ist alles, was benötigt wird, um die Art von Effekte zu sehen, die uns interessiert. Hier mit der niedrigen Barriere muss man zu einer ausreichend hohen Geschwindigkeit gehen, und dann sieht man diesen Übergang in den Rotationszustand. Und wenn die Barriere niedriger ist, findet der Übergang bei einer niedrigeren Geschwindigkeit statt. Was passiert nun, wenn wir den Weg zurück andersherum gehen? Wenn wir den anderen Weg zurückgehen, sehen wir, dass man zu einer sehr niedrigen Geschwindigkeit kommen muss, weil die Flüssigkeit bereits zirkuliert. Und dann lassen Sie die Barriere bei einer viel niedrigeren Geschwindigkeit rotieren, und dann schließlich, wenn die relative Geschwindigkeit hoch genug ist, erfolgt der Übergang. Und wenn die Barriere höher ist, muss man die relative Geschwindigkeit nicht so hoch machen und der Übergang findet bei einer höheren Geschwindigkeit statt. Wenn wir jetzt die zwei Kurven vereinigen, sehen Sie die klassische Hystereseschleife, die man in so vielen Arten von Systemen zu sehen erwartet. Und hier haben wir sie bei diesem suprafluiden atomaren Gas gesehen. Das Hystereseverhalten ist der Schlüssel für viele elektronische Geräte und Prozesse, Dinge wie Speicher und rauschtolerantes Schalten, wie Schmitt-Trigger, den Sie vielleicht vom Elektronikdesign kennen, und jetzt haben wir dieses Hysteresemerkmal unserem Werkzeugkasten für suprafluide Gase hinzugefügt. Lassen Sie mich zum Schluss kommen, indem ich Ihnen Bilder der Leute zeige, die Teil des Teams sind, die diese Dinge vor Kurzem gemacht haben. Da ist Gretchen, die Teamleiterin. Wir waren über die Zusammenarbeit mit Chris Lobb sehr glücklich, der ein echter SQUID-Kerl ist, das heißt elektronische SQUIDs, und Avinash und Steve und Fred und Erin waren Teil des Teams. Das jüngste Team hat ein paar junge Leute zusätzlich, sie machen gerade jetzt wunderbare Dinge. Neben all den Dingen, über die ich gesprochen habe, können wir tatsächlich Interferenzstreifen zwischen einem nichtrotierenden und rotierenden Gas sehen, wenn wir Interferenz benutzen. Das ist etwas, das man nie mit einer Flüssigkeit oder einem Supraleiter machen kann. Wir können visuell diese Interferenzstreifen sehen und die Phase um den Ring herum messen. Gretchen und ihr Team machen Gleichstrom-SQUIDs, das sind Dinge die zwei Kontakte haben. Sie erzeugen Schallwellen, indem sie den Josephson-Kontakt modulieren, um Schallwellen, die um diesen Ring herumwandern, zu erzeugen. Sie untersuchen thermale Effekte, andere Dinge, die ich noch nicht einmal hier aufgeführt habe, wir beobachten eine stehende Schallwelle, die durch die suprafluide Rotation hier durch den Ring geschleppt wird. Das ist jetzt das Ende meines Vortrags, aber sicher noch nicht das Ende dieser Forschung. Wir machen solch unglaublich aufregende Dinge, aber ich möchte Sie daran erinnern, stellen Sie mir Fragen, weil Sie diese Karte bekommen möchten! Lassen Sie mich den Grund erzählen. Klaus von Klitzing wird Ihnen mehr davon erzählen. Dies ist die letzte Karte, auf der das plancksche Wirkungsquantum irgendeinen Fehler angegeben hat. Und das nächste Mal, wenn diese Karte erscheint, wird das plancksche Wirkungsquantum eine exakte Zahl sein. Und auch die Ladung des Elektrons. Und auch die Boltzmann-Konstante. Und auch die Avogadrozahl. Klaus von Klitzing wird Ihnen den Grund erzählen. Vielen Dank!

William Phillips (2016) - Superfluid Atomic Gas in a Ring: A New Kind of Closed Circuit
(00:11:03 - 00:12:53)

 The complete video is available here


But what is the connection to quantum mechanics? The theoretical explanation for superfluidity came shortly after Kapitsa’s experiments in pioneering work by Landau, who also later came up with the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity. Landau, the house theoretician at the Institute of Physical Problems in Moscow, had been arrested in 1938 for anti-Stalinist discussion with colleagues. Kapitsa, the Institute’s director, had him released from jail by writing to the prime minister, insisting that he needed Landau to work on a theory of the newly discovered phenomenon of superfluidity [30].

In 1941, Landau published his results [31]. He proposed a two-fluid hydrodynamical model that separated a superfluid into two parts: a classical part that follows the usual rules of fluid dynamics and a quantum superfluid component. The percentage of each part in liquid helium varies with temperature, and as the temperature gets close to absolute zero, the quantum portion takes over. Although his work covered all branches of theoretical physics, Landau won the Nobel Prize twenty years later specifically for his explanation of superfluidity.

During the 1976 Lindau meeting, Felix Bloch — whose own research was quite far from the topic at hand — spoke about the problem of a superfluid rotating in a ring container.

Felix Bloch (1976) - Some Remarks on Superfluidity

I'm glad that I was able at long last to come to this Lindau conference after having heard so much about it from my friends who have been here before. And I would like to express my thanks for the wonderful reception that my wife and I have received here. Now, from my obvious accent and the fact that most of the audience is certainly more fluent in German than in English, I might be expected to give this lecture in German. But having spent most of my life now teaching English, I think it would not be advisable for me to go back to my early habits and speak in German. Besides, Niels Bohr said a long time ago that by now like the Latin in the middle ages, the broken English is really the international language of physics. And so I will try to speak in a sufficiently broken way so that everybody can understand me. Now, the properties of helium at low temperatures have been a puzzle for the theorists for a long time. The fact that of all the gases it requires the lowest temperature of about 4 degree kelvin to liquefy was not so difficult to understand in view of the small fundamental forces between atoms. But that there was something peculiar about it was already evident from the fact that if you went to still lower temperatures it refused, unlike any other decent substance, to solidify. Instead, at a temperature of 2.2 degree Kelvin, so called lambda point it even exaggerated its nature as a liquid in becoming super fluid which means that it was able at this point to pass even through very narrow channels without any difference pressure gradient whatsoever, rather similar to the transition of a metal into superconductive state. The first who attempted to explain this behaviour was Fritz London who suggested that it might somehow relate to the Einstein-Bose condensation of an ideal gas. But it took still many years, this was before the war but it was several years after the war until the problem really became clarified primarily through the work of Landau. Now, I want to say that I have nothing whatsoever new to say about this. In fact, the only qualification which I have to speak about this topic at all is that I am far from being an expert. And this has of course a very great advantage because that means that the few things which I know about super fluidity have to be so simple that even I can understand them and that means then that everybody else in the audience can certainly likewise understand. Applause. So those among you who are really sophisticated in this subject I can only offer my apologies and hope that you will derive some amusement from hearing things which you know very well perhaps in a somewhat different light. Now, to make things as simple as possible I will take the geometry of a thin circular tube, so you have to imagine helium to flow around in a thin tube. And then I try to explain to you why it is that in an analogy to a persistent current in a wire loop that we have reasons to expect a persistent flow. The method which I am using is somewhat similar to one which I have used a few years ago, likewise to superconductors. It is based on basic principles rather than on microscopic models. This of course has the disadvantage that I will not be able to give you any numerical results or to derive any numerical results. And that the reason has to be of more qualitative nature but it has the advantage that unlike a microscopic theory which necessarily must be approximate, it can claim a certain amount of rigour. Unfortunately I didn't have the clever computer that Professor Lamb has at his disposal and therefore my presentation will not be very elegant, I have only some transparencies here which I have drawn with my own hand. And I hope that nevertheless I will be able to show what I want to show. Now I have to learn how to operate this instrument, that looks like the right one. Alright, so here I have schematically indicated a thin circular tube, these are the walls of the tube. Please imagine liquid helium being put in here and I will characterise the position of any atom within that tube, well, naturally by 3 coordinates. As to the sideways dimensions I will, how does one focus this thing, yeah, as to the side ways dimension, I'm using 2 corners Y and Z, Y this way and Z that way. And the more important coordinate is the one around the ring, around this tube. Well, of course it would be reasonable then to say that one can use an angle phi but in order to emphasise the analogy to linear motion, direct linear motion, I'd rather use a coordinate X counted from some arbitrary point around here. Alright now, then what we would like to know are the energy values, the whole spectrum of energy levels of this system here. And that will be given as you know by the Schrödinger equation where the Hamiltonian H shall contain not only the kinetic energy of the atoms but also an arbitrary interaction which of course in fact is quite strong. Now, the function psi I shall use in a representation which I make it depend on the coordinates in the usual Schrödinger way. And so there would be an atom 1 and an atom 2 as a general and an atom S, atom N with XYZ. Since the X and Y coordinates are not terribly important I will mention them, I will simply omit them for brevity sake and write this only as a function of the X coordinate, the one around the ring. And then I might occasionally go even further and write only one of them, so all these 3 rotations are equivalent. Very good. And I indicated here this is the thickness of the ring and for simplicity let's assume that's small compared to the radius, although that's not a terribly important feature. Now, then the Hamiltonian should of course in reality also contain the interaction between the atoms and the wall, this I will omit for the time being. Of course I will come back to it, you may say well, so I will assume the wall to be perfectly smooth and perfectly rigid. And you might of course say no wonder that a liquid runs around in a perfectly smooth and perfectly rigid wall forever. However I will not stick to this idealisation to the bitter end but mention it of course later. So, for the time being we'll assume that and then the problem is treated in the usual way, that is to say in that case the total momentum in the X direction is a constant of motion, is given by the sum of a momentum of the individual atoms. And of course PR is the angle of momentum which will also be a constant of motion. I introduce the coordinate of the centre of gravity which is 1/the total number of atoms x the sum of all of them. And now I proceed just the way you have learned it in kindergarten, about how one separates off the centre of gravity, one writes psi as a function of you might say a plain wave regarding the X, the centre of gravity, call it capital X, that's the total momentum, times the function chi or more explicitly written here, psi(X), in a notation I used before, equal to this, times the function chi now which depends only on the relative coordinates and I wrote simply as it depends on the differences between two any arbitrary corners X and Y. And then you have a separate equation for this quantity, the chi here, I'll write it H(chi), which simply means that in H prime everything is still there except the centre of gravity motion that has been separated off. And then, as you well know, the energy is simply additive, P^2/2m is the total kinetic energy of a system. And then energy which I call little E, it is not little at all, it's as big or bigger than the other one, but it includes only the relative, the energy of relative motion. Normally, as you do for example if you use the hydrogen atom of the Schrödinger equation, you will find that this relative energy E, is totally independent of the total energy. That is to say to any value of the momentum there belongs an arbitrary value even that has nothing to do with the momentum whatever. And that has of course immediately the following consequence, that if you ask now what is the minimum of this energy, irrespective in its dependence on the total momentum I mean. Then irrespective of this quantity it is clearly at P=0. Now I come to the difference between this normal treatment of the addition considerations which one has to make if one wants to learn something about superfluidity. In this equation which I just removed, H(chi) = E chi, that is the equation which is supposed to give you the relative energy. The operator H prime is well defined as I said before, it contains everything except the centre of gravity. But of course the eigenvalue is little E, which you get from that equation, will not only depend upon the operator on the left side, it also depends upon the boundary value, which you impose upon the function chi. Now, as far as the coordinates X and Y are concerned, this is trivial, if you think you have a rigid wall, well, it would mean that for any particle as it comes to the wall the function psi and also the function chi simply has to vanish, that's a trivial boundary condition which we will not further consider. The important boundary condition comes from the coordinate X and that's where the novelty comes. And the point that I'm making here is a statement which is accepted I suppose as one of the axioms of quantum mechanics is that the total function psi must be single value. That is for each particle, for any one particle S, be it particle 1 or 2 or N, it must be true that as you take one particle around the whole ring, that is to say you augment its X coordinate by 2 pi R which is the circumference of the tube. It ought to return to its original value. Now, if you remember before the separation of off the centre of gravity, I've simply written it down here once more, the XS occurs here, XS+2piR, it occurs here too. And that must be equal to that. This is identically the same equation except the centre of gravity has been separated off. And now you see that this implies now a condition on that function chi because this factor will grow out on both sides and in order that this factor here, the exponential E^IP/NHbar x 2piR x f(chi) gives the function itself, means that the function chiS as you increase it by 2piR must be multiplied by the inverse of that factor, call it Alpha, where this is given by E^-2piPR/NH. This has one well known and trivial consequence. What I said here for particle, any particle S, you can do for particle 1 and particle 2 and particle 3 all the way up to N. And if you do that every time you get another factor alpha and the condition here then says simply that the N^alpha must be =1, well, then you see the N goes out and as you see that means simply that the angle of momentum which appears here must be an integer multiple of hbar which is the usual quantisation of the angular momentum or for the momentum itself, it means it must be HR/R. And here I would like to say that since we consider R to be a rather large quantity, I will not say how large but certainly a microscopic quantity, not metres but maybe millimetres or 10's of millimetres that you can consider P as effectively as a continuous quantity, the more so certainly the bigger the rings. Alright, now then, since alpha thus depend on P as you see, that means, and since it determines the boundary condition on chi, you have to expect in general that the eigenvalues of the equation for chi will likewise depend upon P. Contrary to what we said before in the normal situation. Now it has however a very important property, namely if you increase now P by the amount NH/R then you see it will return to its old value because you're simply multiplying E^-2pi. And that means therefore that the boundary condition returns to its old value whenever P has increased by this amount. And therefore the eigenvalues will likewise return to their old values because again the same sort of boundary condition that I've implied before. Alright, what does that mean, that means that E is a periodic function of P, in general does depend on P but not in an arbitrary way but in a periodic way in the sense that it comes back to its old value whenever you have increased the momentum by this amount. Furthermore it doesn't matter really, this you might say is only a question of a convention of sense of rotation, whether you talk about P or -P or if you want a little bit high brow you can say we believe in this case in time invariance and therefore it means that the function P does not change either if you reverse P into -P. And so we come to the conclusion then that in general EP is an even periodic function of P with period NH/R. Now, I said a function, of course in reality the energy E has a discrete set of eigenvalues. And what it really means is that to each eigenvalue which you find for a certain momentum you will find the same value once again if you increase the momentum by this amount, NH/R. And I have tried to indicate that in this little schematic plot here. Suppose we plot here P and for P=0 you have a certain set of states. And then, as P increase, you have another set of states. The same for -P and then it repeats here and again -P, -P, so the blue ones, the blue things correspond to a momentum P=0 or 1 x NH or 2 x NH and the red ones. And then of course there's a whole lot of other sets of eigenvalues in between with possibly quite a different arrangement. Alright, now let's see what further conclusions one can draw from this. Now let me first say something else. As I pointed out to you this is not the normal behaviour that you have in general. You will find that really this energy, E(P), little energy, the relative energy is independent of the momentum. And that in fact is the normal behaviour. I have not said anything so far as you may have noticed about any special property of helium or even less of helium at low temperatures. So certainly a normal liquid is totally false, totally within the range of my present discussion. And now I'd like to point out to you what one ought to understand, but what I said is perfectly true and I will not revoke it in the case of a normal substance. But I will tell you what the special property or rather the rather general property of a normal liquid is in contrast to that of a superfluid. Well, the point here is that normally, well, if you talk about the hydrogen atom, you surely assume that the centre of gravity that you can localise, the centre of gravity of the atom well within the distance in which you are working, let's say within the dimensions of the gas container in which your atoms buzz around or something like that. And it is this property of localizability which characterises a normal liquid from a superfluid liquid. And I have tried to indicate that schematically here. I am talking here about the function chi. Well, as you remember psi and chi differ only by a phase factor. So if psi is localisable, so is chi. By 'localisable' I mean of course that you can build a wave packet. So I have here schematically indicated the way how in the localisable case chi will look, this will be how this is 2piR, rather microscopic this circumference of the circle. And then there is certain deltaX, the spread of that wave packet. And if deltaX is very small compared to 2piR which is the normal situation, well, then you can have, this is once, suppose you have a solution here but then that means again as you go 2piR you come back to the same place, you have another solution here, you have another solution here. And as you well know all belonging to the same eigenvalue and as you well know any linear combination of them will likewise be a solution belonging to the same eigenvalue. And if you want to, and you can if it pleases you, you can in fact write this way, where this was our factor alpha. And this thing here has indeed the proper periodic times because every time you go forward by 2piR you change my by my+1, so you have multiplied by alpha. Everything is alright. However it turns out to be irrelevant because in that case no matter, this is a special linear combination but you can choose any other linear combination, you will still come to the same value. In other words this is a situation where indeed the relative energy is independent of the momentum. If you want to have a dependence, then you need a rather extraordinary behaviour. After all superfluid is a rather extraordinary substance. And the extraordinarity that I refer to is indicated by this dotted curve very schematically that really these wave packets ought to overlap. You can express that in many ways. You can say you ought to have a phase coherence going around the whole microscopic tube. Or if you want a little bit more highbrow, you can say that you have to have off-diagonal long-range order of the reduced density matrix, whatever that may mean. Okay fine, now alright, so let's now take a big act of faith and believe that indeed in the case of helium this strange substance does exist, that we have indeed a periodic dependence of the relative energy on P and in fact perhaps a very pronounced dependence. And that I have schematically indicated in this figure here. Oh yeah, well, I should say one more thing, one more simplification. I make everything as simple as I can. Let's put ourselves at the absolute 0 and not worry that this is rather hard to do. I will, if I have time, I will later mention something about the modification at finite temperatures. But let's assume or put it that way, if a substance did not become superfluid at the absolute 0, well, then it probably never will. So it is a necessary but maybe not sufficient condition. So let's assume only the lowest, to each given momentum we consider only the lowest value of relative energy which I indicate by E0. On my previous diagram if you tick for the blue and the red and so on, you always take the lowest one. And since P is practically continued, you can plot it as a function of P. And I plotted it indeed as a periodic function with a rather pronounced amplitude. It need not be a sine curve although it could be, I should say a cosine curve because it has to be even. The fact that I have said it is a minimum at 0, well, that sounds rather reasonable. That the absolutely lowest state of the system is the one where the liquid is nicely at rest and doesn't move. But then of course if it has a minimum at 0 because of what I said before, it will also have a minimum at 1, a minimum at 2 and so forth. But that's only the relative energy. And now let's go back again to the lowest value of our total energy for given P, that P^2, well, what that means is you have to put this wriggly curve here on top of the parabola P^2/2M and you see that if these minima are deep enough, you'll still have minima, certainly a minimum at 0, then one around 1 x NH/2R, 2 x NHbar/R and so forth. That now leads us to immediately a conclusion which is rather interesting, namely the following. That in that case as I have indicated here, you get minima here approximately I set integer multiples of NHbar/2R for the momentum. Now let's go for the momentum to the drift velocity, which is the average velocity reference which you get of course by dividing by the total mass, I call it V. That is the definition and that this velocity necessarily, all you have done is divide that by capital M which is little mass in it, so you get a discrete set of drift velocities. That is not so interesting yet but now you want to go to a concept which is well known to the hydrodynamicists which is called the circulation, which is the line integral of the velocity around a closed curve as you well know that in the case of a liquid without friction, this circulation is a conservative motion. It does not mean conservation angular momentum but that's what it is. Well anyway, well, in our simplified case our DS, all you do is you go around your circular tube and V is a constant so you get 2piR x V and therefore if you insert for V this value, you will find that the circulation, again as approximately discrete spectrum, integer multiple of N x H. That's now the real Planck's H, not the H-bar, not Dirac's H but Planck's H divided by the mass of a single atom. This quantisation of circulation as we may properly call it, has indeed been observed as one of the really interesting facts. One of the very nice experiments, it was done several years ago by Reif who shot alpha particles into superfluid helium and this way produced vortexes in the form of a smoke ring and then he accelerated them. The charge sits on the smoke ring, he accelerates them in an electric field. And from that can calculate simply by applying classical hydrodynamics the amount of circulation. And found that indeed very close to that value and ratio H/M derived from his experiments, agrees with the well-known ratios, to a few percent. And in fact there are some reasons why you might possibly use that some time to make an even more accurate determination. But it's not a precision instrument but I just wanted to say that this is not sheer fantasy but has something to do with reality. Alright, now there is something else you can learn from this simple minded consideration. Now I have here again drawn my dotted P^2/M curve. It is here, this time I've plotted it in terms of velocity because the 2 are very closely related instead of momentum and in a somewhat smaller scale so you put these wiggles on the top of a parabola and you keep on going and going. But now something happens, because as you go higher and higher up of course the slope of your parabola becomes steeper and steeper and except for very singular curves, periodic curves like that there comes a point where there is no minimum anymore. I have called that critical velocity, I have tried to indicate it here. You see how here is still a minimum, here it becomes kind of flat and there is no minimum anymore. And from then on it stops. So that means therefore that, okay, I'll come back to that, so therefore it means that these minima really exist only up to a certain velocity which one might well call a critical velocity or perhaps even the critical velocity because it is well known. It is a known fact that you cannot maintain a superflow beyond a certain velocity, oh at liquid helium, Beyond that it just won't tolerate it anymore. Now, I should have said something before and I'm sorry, I apologise, about the significance of these minima. As I said before, so far I have totally neglected the walls or rather I have assumed the wall to be perfectly smooth and rigid. And if that were the case anything would flow indefinitely. Now we have to ask ourselves, what would the wall do? Now, as I told you before I consider the situation at absolute 0 and that means that I want to have a wall at absolute 0 but now a certain amount of interaction between the wall and the helium atoms. Now, if I sit in a minimum like that and the wall and somehow by interaction of the wall, the liquid would like to go to a lower momentum as a normal liquid would do dying out, the wall would say sorry, can't do it, I have no energy to give you because the energy has to go up as you see. Well, you might say, but listen dear wall, why can't you be a little bit more generous. Suppose I sit here and you give me enough momentum to jump directly here, then I have lowered my energy from here to here. Well, this is a well-known situation also in the case of persistent curves and superconductors, one does not deal with absolute minima and deals with relative minima. And in a certain sense you may say that also superconductive current in a loop does not run forever. But it runs several hours or several months or maybe a year or so. In other words, I have never calculated it, there is certainly a finite probability of a jump. Oh yes, well, one more thing I would like to say, this is completely analogous to the case of a superconductor. In the superconductor what corresponds to quantisation of the circulation, corresponds to the quantisation of a flux and there is quite an analogous argument. Well, alright, like in a superconductor it could happen in principle but presumably will take a rather long time. As I say I haven't calculated, maybe the age of the universe, for a rather large ring. The point is there that although you can go from here to here, it is a very improbable, a highly improbable transition. What it would mean is namely that each atom simultaneously would have to lose the exact amount, H/R of one unit of angular momentum. Well, that all the atoms should so nicely cooperate and make the jump together, I think with a little hand waving it will be understandable. That is a rather unlikely process and accounts for the really extremely long stability of persistent flow or persistent currents. Alright, and now I mention already the critical velocity and you can give it in an expression here, you can say it occurs when the absolute magnitude of the derivative dE by dP. Well, it is defined by the maximum value of that because if this becomes, well, the smaller this is, the earlier this cessation of minima will occur and no more superfluid flow. Well, yeah, I try to make up for the sins of my predecessors and be short but I just want, how long have I really talked, half an hour? Alright, I think I'll finish in the next 15 minutes, then at least I haven't made up for their sins but at least I have not added to them. Okay, now you will justly ask yourself now alright fine and good, we have assumed, we have been very nice. We did our act of faith and believed these minima to exist and that seems to have something to do with reality. It explains quantisation of circulation, it explains critical velocity. But now under what conditions can one reasonably expect this really to happen? Now I am going, at this point I am going to a certain extent into models. That is to say the general part is finished, what can be generally said, I have said. But now it would be interesting to ask yourself, what kind of more microscopic assumptions would you have to make in order to get indeed this strong or reasonably strong periodic dependence? And as the first case I want to discuss with you just what London suggested originally, namely let us forget about the interaction between the atoms, it's certainly an abominably approximation. But let's assume that we deal indeed with the Einstein-Bose gas and ask ourselves what happens to such a system at absolute 0. Of course, as you well know, long before the absolute 0 there occurs this phenomenon of Einstein-Bose condensation. But let's go even to the extreme and to the bitter end where in the ground state of the system all the atoms would have 0 momentum. Now, that we will not assume now but let's see what happens in the case of the ideal Bose gas. Well, alright, here I have written down now the energy of a single atom which is simply its kinetic energy. And now I will try to construct the lowest energy for a given momentum. How do you do that? Well, you take each atom and you give it a kick in the X direction. But each only in the X direction, don't waste any momentum sideways because that will only cost you energy without gaining you circular momentum. So, suppose you take then new atoms and for the time being they better be less than N because you don't have anymore, new atoms, an arbitrary number of atoms, each of them you give its minimum momentum, H/R and that means that the total momentum is this much. That is the cheapest way, at the lowest energy expense of getting a given amount of the momentum. So we have new particles with momentum P=H/R and the other ones we'll leave in their momentum state 0, right. Well, alright, then we can very easily calculate the total energy simply my x the kinetic energy P^2/2M and that you can also add in this form if you use this form P. And now let's calculate the corresponding relative energy as I would call it. Which you will get by subtracting now P^2/2M and this is the form which you get. That holds between 0 and N. And as you notice, this is a parabola and I have plotted it here. It starts with 0 and very nicely as it should, it comes again to 0 when P=NH/R. But now of course you can go on from here. Suppose you have brought all your atoms from 0 to N, then you are again here and now you start all over again, leave most of the atoms in the state 1 and start the same again. In other words, and in fact this is a general statement as I said before, this is a parabola will have to repeat periodically. So, that's at least an illustration, a very simple illustration of this case of the periodic function E, not of P. But the trouble is that when you do superimpose that function on P^2/M to get the total energy, what you get is what I indicated here. You see of course the energy increases simply linearly with the momentum, here it is. And so, instead of these nice minima which I indicated before, you simply get the, you take this point in a straight line, and another straight line and another straight line, where are the minima, well there's one, the one at 0 but nothing else. And this is true, unfortunately and here I am talking about my friend, Fritz London, it is not true that the Einstein, the ideal Einstein-Bose gas leads to superfluidity. This is a fact which has been recognised quite some time ago. In fact Bogoliubov has gone so far as to calculate the effect of weak binding and found that it is quite essential to have superconductivity, superfluidity. And this is what I'd like to explain now. Now I'm referring to Bogoliubov's paper which is mathematically a very beautiful paper but has not terribly much to do with reality because the coupling of helium is far from being weak, it's very strong. Instead of that I will use the terminology of Landau, I think that was in fact, one may say the essential contribution of Landau to postulate that rather than having to consider individual non-interacting atoms in helium as would be in the case of an ideal gas, you should think of what he called quasi-particles. Now, these quasi-particles are really the result, the final product of a very complicated game of interactions. And again it needs a certain amount of faith to believe in those but it doesn't need too much faith if you restrict yourself to particles of rather low momentum which means rather long De Broglie wavelengths. If this De Broglie wavelengths is long compared to the interparticle distance, then it is rather clear that these quasi-particles are nothing else but the quanta of sound waves, so called phonons. In that case, just like if this, you as a sound velocity, if it were a light velocity, you would have the energy of a light quantum, velocity of light x momentum. Here it's velocity of sound x the absolute magnitude of the momentum. This would be the energy of a phonon or of a quasi-particle of Landau, at least at low momentum. And since we are interested in low energies, we might perhaps be satisfied with that. To give the, that is to say the dependence of epsilon, P is no more quadratic but at least for low momenta is linear and has a factor discontinuated at P=0, discontinued of a slope. Alright, now, you want to build up a certain amount of energy, again in the cheapest way, how do you do it, you excite phonons only in the direction, phonons travel in only around the thing and don't bother of exciting sideways sound waves because that's a waste of energy. And that has a very simple consequence because it means that the total energy is simply U x the total momentum. And the relative energy is then given by that. Well, alright, this shall be, I want to hold for relatively small momenta in this range and I have tried to indicate it on this plot here. You see here this typical discontinuity here, P absolute. And of course these things somehow may continue, you may go on getting higher momentum for higher excitations. But we do know that it is periodic. So this same sharp point here occurs again, must occur again here and here and here and so forth. Superimpose that on the parabola and now you get a nice result, in that case namely the minima are exactly at the values NH/R. Also, as you go higher up, of course again there will be a critical velocity in that case, since the slope here is likely to decrease, the maximum slope is in fact the velocity of light, you would come out with a result that the critical velocity is equal to the sound velocity. This is not quite true, actually it's somewhat lower, or a factor 2 or 3 lower. This comes from the fact that this approximation or the idealisation of keeping the linear law really holds only for the smallest momentum and if you go a bit higher you have to make corrections. People have studied this function, epsilon(P), it can be done by neutron diffraction, inelastic scattering of neutrons in liquid helium. And it is indeed of course through it starts linear the way I said but then it has some kinks. And therefore there are qualitative changes. And as I said, this statement that the critical velocity is equal to the sound velocity is not true. But it is of the same order of magnitude and more than that we cannot hope. And the circulation is exact. Consequently it is a warning to people who want to determine H/M in contrast to the people who have determined E/H with very great accuracy from flux quantisation. That if they want to do with great accuracy, they better go to very, very low temperatures because this statement holds only as long as I have stuck to the lowest energy. Now, I think my time is almost over, I would like to go only briefly then, mention to you what happens at finite temperature. Of course this continuity that we have here is just an idealisation and is the same idealisation as assuming that we are at the absolute 0. If you are not at the absolute 0, then rather than the energy itself you have to consider the free energy. But it has rather similar properties. Alright now, here F, the centre of gravity still comes up, little F now corresponds to the free energy to correspond to the energy levels of little E, what we had before. And that is, as you know, well know, obtained by taking a logarithm of this partitian function of this sum here. And what it does in effect and you can calculate it easily, it means of course that at high energies you are not so economical anymore, you do excite phonons also in directions not parallel to the X direction. And what it does is it makes a rounding off here. I have indicated here for T=0, F= equal to . I drew it here only near one of the minima. Equal to this continuous curve, then it becomes rounded off more and more and more. You can characterise that by a factor alpha here, that's not all alpha, the same quantity which depends on T, which is the smaller, the lower the velocity. In fact you can calculate it and find that it goes like here, like T/T*^4 so it does decrease rather rapidly. When you go through the whole arithmetic, you find that there is a correction in the quantised value of the circulation. It is N x H/M, which it would be at the absolute 0 x 1 + alpha. So it gets reduced and you may in a certain sense assume that alpha maybe goes to infinity at a critical temperature, so that this value goes to 0. Anyhow it's reduced. This is a formula which holds for low temperatures, T small compared to a certain temperature T* which is given by this exact expression here, simple phonon calculation. And that temperature T* is about 4 times, about 90 degrees kelvin. If you insert here the measure of velocity over density of helium and the sound velocity, you come out with 90 degree kelvin, about 4 times the critical temperature. Just why these two temperatures are of the same order of magnitude may or may not be an accident and I think it is not an accident. Anyway, this is what it is. Now just very briefly, this can be used in other ways because people will say oh no, no, no that's not true, the circulation is still rigorously H/M and only you shouldn't talk about the whole helium, you should talk about the superfluid fraction. There is often very useful model, two-fluid model where one says that only at absolute 0 is all of the helium superfluid and at finite temperature is a fraction and then of course at the lambda point all is normal. You can express it that way, I never quite understood what that mean, if you ask a helium atom are you normal or are you superfluid, the poor fellow certainly won't know what they are to say, it's only part of a total system. But it can be interpreted that way, that's not my discovery either, this is discussed in London's book on superfluid. And you can in fact say that with that definition of ratio of normal to superfluid you can in fact say that the circulation is at H/M multiplied in a ration of superfluid to normal and therefore is 1 at the absolute 0, this factor goes to 0 presumably at the lambda point. As I say, I don't want to take your time anymore, you're probably hungry and so am I and we want to hear Doctor Esaki. There are some interesting other points I should have liked to make about helium 3 because that's of course quite a different story. All I talked about is helium 4 because we are talking about boson systems, whereas helium 3 is a family system. In that case, well, it was a matter of long debate whether helium 3 would at all become superfluid, certainly doesn't become superfluid at 2.2 degree kelvin. But recently in the neighbourhood of millidegrees, a whole lot of interesting transitions has been found. And one of them is I think pretty well established now to be indeed superfluid. Now, if you want to explain that you have of course to take the same kind of reasoning that Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer took in the explanation of superfluidity, I am sorry, I mean superconductivity, namely, and the essential point there is the formation of Cooper pairs. That is to say, you have to assume and introduce some mechanism by means of which roughly speaking 2 helium 3 atoms form a unit and then that can become effectively a Bose–Einstein condensate. I talk in a way that Doctor Cooper will be horrified about but he's a nice man and will forgive me. It's a very complicated calculation, theorists have wondered for a long time, the estimates have fluctuated I think between 10^-6 and 10^-1 degree absolute. The truth is somewhere in the neighbourhood of 10^-3. But it's a very much more complicated thing. One thing I would like to say however and that I do not know whether it has been mentioned but surely the quantum of circulation will have to be half of what it is in the case of liquid helium, simply because you have 2 atoms to contribute, H/M, you must add H/2M. That does not exclude my very general statement, although I drew you your curve pedagogically with minima only at 1 and 2 and integer parts of this characteristic momentum. Of course a periodic function can also have periodic repeating minima in between. And that is exactly what one would have to assume in the case of superfluid helium. Well, as I say, my time is over and thank you for your attention. Applause.

Ich bin glücklich, dass ich nun endlich einmal zu dieser Lindaukonferenz gekommen bin, nachdem ich schon von meinen Freunden, die schon hier gewesen sind, so viel über sie gehört habe. Ich möchte mich herzlich für den wunderbaren Empfang bedanken, den meine Frau und ich hier genießen durften. Nun, vom meinem offensichtlichen Akzent her und der Tatsache, dass der größte Teil des Publikums Deutsch flüssiger versteht als Englisch, könnte man von mir erwarten, dass ich diesen Vortrag in Deutsch halte. Aber wenn man den größten Teil seines Lebens damit verbracht hat, auf Englisch zu lehren, denke ich, wäre es nicht ratsam für mich, zu meinen früheren Gewohnheiten zurück zu gehen und Deutsch zu sprechen. Außerdem sagte Niels Bohr vor langer Zeit, dass jetzt, wie Latein im Mittelalter, gebrochenes Englisch wirklich die internationale Sprache der Physik ist. Und so werde ich versuchen, in einer hinreichend gebrochenen Weise zu reden, so dass mich jeder verstehen kann. Nun, die Eigenschaften von Helium bei niedrigen Temperaturen waren eine lange Zeit ein Rätsel für Theoretiker. Die Tatsache, dass es von allen Gasen die niedrigste Temperatur von 4 Grad Kelvin benötigt, um flüssig zu werden, war angesichts der niedrigen Van-der-Waals-Kräfte zwischen Atomen nicht so schwierig zu verstehen. Aber es gab etwas, das beim Helium sonderbar war; das wurde schon offensichtlich durch die Tatsache, dass es sich weigerte, fest zu werden, wenn man zu immer tieferen Temperaturen ging, ganz anders als alle anderen "vernünftigen" Substanzen. Dafür übertrieb es, bei einer Temperatur von 2,2 Grad Kelvin, dem sogenannten Lambdapunkt, sogar seine Natur als eine Flüssigkeit, indem es suprafluid wird, das bedeutet, dass es an diesem Punkt in der Lage war, sogar sehr enge Kanäle ohne überhaupt irgendeinen Differenz... Druckgradienten zu passieren, recht ähnlich dem Übergang eines Metalls in den supraleitenden Zustand. Der erste, der versuchte dieses Verhalten zu erklären, war Fritz London, der vorschlug, dass es irgendwie in Verbindung stand mit der Einstein-Bose-Kondensation eines idealen Gases. Aber es dauerte noch viele Jahre, dies war vor dem Krieg, aber es war viele Jahre nach dem Krieg, bis das Problem wirklich geklärt wurde, primär durch die Landaus Arbeit. Nun, ich möchte sagen, dass ich darüber überhaupt nichts Neues sagen kann. Tatsächlich ist die einzige Qualifikation, die ich habe, um über dieses Thema zu sprechen, die, dass ich sehr weit davon entfernt bin, ein Experte zu sein. Und das hat natürlich einen großen Vorteil, weil es bedeutet, dass die wenigen Dinge, die ich über die Suprafluidität weiß, so einfach sein müssen, dass sogar ich sie verstehen kann, und das bedeutet, dass jeder andere im Publikum sie genauso verstehen kann. Applaus. Bei denjenigen unter Ihnen, die auf diesem Gebiet wirklich sehr fortgeschritten sind, kann ich mich nur entschuldigen und hoffe, dass Sie ein wenig dadurch unterhalten werden, dass Sie Dinge hören, die Sie sehr gut kennen, vielleicht betrachtet unter einem etwas anderen Blickwinkel. Nun, um die Dinge so einfach wie möglich zu gestalten, werde ich die Geometrie einer dünnen kreisförmigen Röhre nehmen. Sie müssen sich also vorstellen, dass das Helium in einer dünnen Röhre herum fließt. Und dann werde ich versuchen Ihnen zu erklären, warum man Gründe hat, einen anhaltenden Fluss zu erwarten, in Analogie zu einem anhaltenden Strom in einer Drahtschleife. Die Methode, die ich benutze, ähnelt ein wenig der Methode, die ich vor eine paar Jahren benutzt habe, genauso für Supraleiter. Sie basiert auf grundsätzlichen Prinzipien, nicht auf mikroskopischen Modellen. Das hat natürlich den Nachteil, dass ich Ihnen keine numerische Resultate geben oder irgendwelche numerische Resultate ableiten kann. Und dass der Grund von einer stärker qualitativen Natur sein muss, aber das hat den Vorteil, dass es eine gewisse Menge an Exaktheit hat, im Gegensatz zu einer mikroskopischen Theorie, die notwendigerweise eine Näherung sein muss. Unglücklicherweise hatte ich nicht den schlauen Computer zur Verfügung, den Professor Lamb zur Verfügung hatte, und daher wird meine Präsentation nicht sehr elegant sein, ich habe nur einige Folien, die ich eigenhändig gezeichnet habe. Und ich hoffe, dass ich trotzdem in der Lage sein werde, das zu zeigen, was ich zeigen möchte. Nun, ich muss lernen, dieses Instrument zu bedienen, dass sieht richtig aus. Gut, so ich habe hier schematisch eine dünne, kreisförmige Röhre angedeutet, dies sind die Rohrwände. Stellen Sie sich bitte vor, dass flüssiges Helium hier hinein getan wird, und ich werde die Position jedes Atoms innerhalb dieses Rohrs charakterisieren, nun natürlich durch drei Koordinaten. Was die seitlichen Dimensionen betrifft, werde ich, wie fokussiert man dieses Ding, so, was die seitlichen Dimensionen betrifft, benutze ich zwei Koordinaten Y und Z, Y in diese Richtung und Z in dieser. Und die wichtigste Koordinate ist diejenige um den Ring herum, um dieses Rohr herum. Nun, es wäre dann sicher vernünftig zu sagen, dass man einen Winkel phi benutzen kann, aber um die Analogie zur linearen Bewegung zu betonen, direkte lineare Bewegung, benutze ich lieber eine Koordinate X, gezählt von irgendeinem Punkt ungefähr hier. Gut, was wir nun kennen möchten, sind die Energiewerte, das gesamte Spektrum der Energiezustände dieses Systems hier. Und sie werden, wie Sie wissen, durch die Schrödingergleichung gegeben, wo der Hamiltonoperator H nicht nur die kinetische Energie der Atome enthält, sondern auch eine willkürliche Wechselwirkung, die tatsächlich recht stark ist. Nun, die Funktion psi, die ich in dem Vortrag, den ich halte, benutzen werde, hängt in der üblichen Schrödingerweise von den Koordinaten ab. Da wären also ein Atom 1 und ein Atom 2 und generell ein Atom S, Atom N mit XYZ. Da die X- und Y-Koordinaten nicht richtig wichtig sind, werde ich sie erwähnen, ich werde sie einfach auslassen, der Kürze wegen, und dies nur also Funktion der X-Koordinate schreiben, der um den Ring herum. Und dann könnte ich manchmal sogar weiter gehen und nur eine von ihnen schreiben, so alle diese 3 Rotationen sind gleichwertig. Sehr gut und ich habe hier angedeutet, dies ist die Ringdicke, und zur Vereinfachung lassen Sie uns annehmen, dass sie klein ist verglichen mit dem Radius, obwohl das kein wirklich wichtiges Merkmal ist. Nun, dann sollte der Hamiltonoperator natürlich auch die Wechselwirkung zwischen Atomen und der Wand enthalten, ich vernachlässige dies zunächst einmal. Natürlich komme ich darauf zurück, Sie könnten sage, nun, so werde ich annehmen, dass die Wand perfekt glatt und perfekt starr ist. Und Sie könnten natürlich sagen, es ist kein Wunder, dass eine Flüssigkeit an einer perfekt glatten und perfekt starren Wand für ewig herumläuft. Aber ich werde nicht bis zum bitteren Ende an dieser Idealisierung festhalten, aber erwähne es natürlich später. So, zunächst werden wir das annehmen, und dann wird das Problem in der üblichen Weise behandelt, i.e. in dem Fall ist der Gesamtimpuls in der X-Richtung eine Bewegungskonstante, und wird gegeben durch die Summe der Impulse der einzelnen Atome. Und PR ist natürlich der Winkel des Impulses, der auch eine Bewegungskonstante ist. Ich führe die Schwerpunktkoordinate ein, die der Kehrwert der gesamten Zahl der Atome ist multipliziert mit der Summe von allen Koordinaten. Und nun mache ich weiter in genau der Art, wie Sie es im Kindergarten gelernt haben, wie man den Schwerpunkt abtrennt, man schreibt psi als eine Funktion von, man könnte sagen, einer ebenen Welle in Bezug auf X, dem Schwerpunkt, wir nennen es groß X, das ist der Gesamtimpuls, multipliziert mit der Funktion chi, oder expliziter geschrieben hier, psi(X), in einer Notation, die ich schon vorher benutzt habe, ist gleich diesem, multipliziert die Funktion chi nun, die nur von den relativen Koordinaten abhängt, und ich schrieb einfach wie sie von den Unterschieden zwischen zwei willkürlichen Koordinaten X und Y abhängt. Und dann hat man eine unabhängige Gleichung für diese Größe, das chi hier, ich werde es H‘(chi) schreiben, was einfach bedeutet, dass in H‘ noch alles da ist, außer der Schwerpunktbewegung, die wurde absepariert. Und dann, wie Sie gut wissen, ist die Energie einfach additiv, P^2/2m ist die kinetische Gesamtenergie des Systems. Und dann die Energie, die ich klein E nenne, sie ist überhaupt nicht klein, sie ist so groß oder größer als die andere, aber es schließt nur die relative, die Energie der relativen Bewegung ein. Normalerweise, wie man das macht, zum Beispiel wenn man das Wasserstoffatom mit der Schrödingergleichung behandelt, wird man finden, dass diese relative Energie E total unabhängig von der Gesamtenergie ist. Das heißt, zu jedem Wert des Impulses dort gehört ein willkürlicher Wert, der sogar überhaupt nichts mit dem Impuls zu tun hat. Und das hat natürlich sofort die folgende Konsequenz, dass, wenn Sie jetzt fragen, was das Minimum dieser Energie ist, ungeachtet seiner Abhängigkeit vom Gesamtimpuls, meine ich, dann ist unabhängig von dieser Größe es klar dass P=0. Nun komme ich zum Unterschied zwischen dieser normalen Behandlung zu den zusätzlichen Überlegungen, die man machen muss, wenn man etwas über die Suprafluidität lernen möchte. In dieser Gleichung, die ich gerade entfernt habe, H‘(chi) = E chi, das ist die Gleichung, die Ihnen die relative Energie geben soll. Der Operator H‘ ist gut definiert, es enthält alles, außer dem Schwerpunkt. Aber der Eigenwert ist natürlich klein E, den man von dieser Gleichung bekommt, und hängt nicht nur vom Operator auf der linken Seite ab, sondern er hängt auch von dem Randwert ab, den man der Funktion chi unterwirft. Nun, soweit die Koordinaten X und Y betroffen sind, das ist trivial, wenn man denkt, man hat eine starre Wand, nun, es würde bedeuten, dass für irgendein Teilchen, wenn es zur Wand kommt, die Funktion psi und auch die Funktion chi einfach verschwinden müssen, das ist eine trivial Randbedingung, die wir nicht weiter betrachten werden. Die wichtige Randbedingung stammt von der Koordinate X und das ist es, wo etwas Neues hereinkommt. Und der Punkt, den ich hier mache, ist eine Aussage, die als eine der Axiome der Quantenmechanik akzeptiert ist, denke ich, dass die Gesamtfunktion psi nur einen eindeutigen Wert haben kann, d.h. für jedes Teilchen, für jedes Teilchen S, sei es Teilchen 1 oder 2 oder N, muss es wahr sein, dass die Funktion zu dem Ausgangswert zurückkehren muss, wenn man das Teilchen sich um den gesamten Ring herum bewegt, i.e. wenn man 2 pi R zu seiner X-Koordinate addiert, das entspricht dem Umfang des Rohrs. Nun, wenn Sie sich erinnert, vor der Abtrennung des Schwerpunkts, ich habe es hier einfach noch einmal hin geschrieben, das XS findet hier statt, XS+2piR, es findet auch hier statt. Und das muss gleich dem sein. Das ist genau dieselbe Gleichung, nur dass der Schwerpunkt absepariert wurde. Und jetzt sieht man, dass dies nun eine Bedingung an diese Funktion chi impliziert, weil dieser Faktor auf beiden Seiten wachsen wird, und damit dieser Faktor hier, das Exponential E^IP/N h quer x 2piR x f(chi) die Funktion selbst gibt, was bedeutet, dass die Funktion chiS, wenn man es um 2piR erhöht, mit dem Kehrwert dieses Faktors multipliziert werden muss, nennen wir ihn Alpha, wo dieser gegeben ist durch E^-2piPR/Nh. Das hat eine sehr bekannte und triviale Konsequenz. Was ich hier für Teilchen gesagt habe, irgendein Teilchen S, kann man für Teilchen 1 und Teilchen 2 machen, bis zu Teilchen N. Und wenn man das macht, bekommt man einen weiteren Faktor alpha und die Bedingung hier sagt einfach, das alpha^N =1 sein muss. Nun, Sie sehen, dass N verschwindet und, wie man sieht, bedeutet das einfach, dass das Drehimpuls, der hier erscheint, ein ganzzahliges Vielfaches von h quer sein muss, was die übliche Quantisierung des Drehimpulses ist, oder für den Impuls selbst bedeutet das, er muss hR/R sein. Und hier möchte ich sage, da wir R als eine ziemlich große Größe betrachten, ich werde nicht sagen, wie groß, aber sicherlich eine makroskopische Größe, keinen Meter, aber vielleicht Millimeter oder einige zehn Millimeter, dass man P effektiv als eine kontinuierliche Größe betrachten kann, sicherlich umso mehr, je größer der Ring ist. Gut, nun da alpha daher von P abhängt, wie man sieht, heißt das, und da es die Randbedingung für chi bestimmt, muss man generell erwarten, dass die Eigenwerte der Gleichung für chi auch von P abhängen. Im Gegensatz zu dem, was wir vorher in der normalen Situation gesagt haben. Nun, sie hat aber eine sehr wichtige Eigenschaft, i.e. wenn man nun P um den Wert Nh/R erhöht, dann sieht man, dass sie zu ihrem alten Wert zurückkehrt, weil man sie einfach mit E^-2pi multipliziert. Und das bedeutet, dass die Randbedingung jedes Mal zu ihrem alten Wert zurückkehrt, wenn P um diesen Wert gewachsen ist. Und daher werden die Eigenwerte genauso zu ihren alten Werten zurückkehren, wieder dieselbe Art von Randbedingung, die ich schon vorher angedeutet habe. Nun, was heißt das; es bedeutet dass E eine periodische Funktion von P ist, sie hängt ganz allgemein von P ab, aber nicht in einer willkürlichen Art, sondern in einer periodischen Art, in dem Sinn, dass sie immer zu seinem alten Wert zurückkehrt, wenn man den Impuls um diesen Wert erhöht. Zudem kommt es wirklich nicht darauf an, dies ist, könnte man sagen, nur eine Konvention über den Drehsinn, ob man über P spricht oder über -P, oder, wenn Sie es etwas vornehmer sagen wollen, können Sie sagen, wir glauben in diesem Fall in die Zeitinvarianz, und das bedeutet daher, dass die Funktion P sich auch nicht ändert, wenn man P zu -P umkehrt. Und so kommen wir dann zu dem Schluss, dass generell EP eine gerade, periodische Funktion von P ist mit einer Periode von Nh/R. Nun, ich sagte eine Funktion, aber natürlich hat die Energie E in der Realität einen diskreten Satz von Eigenwerten. Und was es tatsächlich bedeutet ist, dass man für jeden Eigenwert, den man für einen bestimmten Impuls findet, denselben Wert wieder findet, wenn man den Impuls um diesen Wert vergrößert, Nh/R. Und ich habe versucht, dies in diesem kleinen schematischen Bild hier anzudeuten. Nehmen wir an, wir zeichnen hier P und für P=0 hat man einen bestimmten Satz an Zuständen. Und dann, wenn P größer wird, hat man einen anderen Satz von Zuständen. Dasselbe für -P, und dann wiederholt es sich hier und wieder -P, -P so die blauen, die blauen Dinger entsprechen einem Impuls P=0 oder 1 x Nh oder 2 x NH und die roten. Und dann gibt es natürlich eine ganze Menge anderer Sätze von Eigenwerten dazwischen mit einer möglicherweise ganz anderen Anordnung. Gut, nun lassen Sie uns sehen, welche weiteren Schlüsse wir daraus ziehen können. Nun, lassen Sie mich zuerst etwas anderes sagen. Wie ich Ihnen schon aufgezeigt habe, ist das nicht das normale Verhalten, dass man generell hat. Man findet, dass wirklich diese Energie, E(P), die kleine Energie, die relative Energie unabhängig ist vom Impuls. Und das ist tatsächlich das normale Verhalten. Wie Sie vielleicht bemerkt haben, habe ich bis jetzt irgendetwas über irgendwelche speziellen Eigenschaften des Heliums gesagt, oder und noch weniger von Helium bei tiefen Temperaturen. So, eine normale Flüssigkeit ist total falsch, total innerhalb des derzeitigen Diskussionsbereichs. Und nun möchte ich Ihnen aufzeigen, was man verstehen sollte, aber was ich gesagt habe, ist wirklich richtig und ich werde es nicht für den Fall einer normalen Substanz zurücknehmen. Aber ich werde Ihnen sagen, was die spezielle Eigenschaft, oder vielmehr die ziemlich generelle Eigenschaft einer normalen Flüssigkeit ist im Gegensatz zu der einer supraflüssigen Flüssigkeit. Nun, der Punkt hier ist, dass normallerweise, wenn man von dem Wasserstoffatom spricht, man sicherlich annimmt, dass der Schwerpunkt, dass man den Schwerpunkt des Atoms innerhalb der Entfernung, in der man arbeitet, lokalisieren kann, sagen wir innerhalb der Dimensionen des Gasbehälters, in dem Ihre Atome herumschwirren oder so etwas. Und es ist die Eigenschaft der Lokalisierbarkeit, die eine normale Flüssigkeit von einer supraflüssigen Flüssigkeit unterscheidet. Und ich habe versucht, dies schematisch hier anzudeuten. Ich spreche hier über die Funktion chi. Nun, wie Sie sich erinnern, unterscheiden sich psi und chi nur durch einen Phasenfaktor. Wenn also psi lokalisierbar ist, ist es auch chi. Mit ‚lokalisierbar‘ meine ich natürlich, dass man ein Wellenpaket konstruieren kann. So, ich habe hier schematisch angedeutet, wie chi im lokalisierbaren Fall aussehen wird, hier ist wie; das ist 2piR, ziemlich mikroskopisch, dieser Kreisumfang. Und dann gibt es ein bestimmtes deltaX, die Ausdehnung dieses Wellenpakets. Und wenn deltaX sehr klein verglichen mit 2piR ist, was die normale Situation ist, dann kann man haben, das ist eine; nehmen wir an, man hat eine Lösung hier, aber das bedeutet wieder, wenn man 2piR weitergeht, kommt man wieder an derselben Stelle an, wir haben eine andere Lösung hier, wir haben eine andere Lösung hier. Und wie Sie wissen, gehören alle zu demselben Eigenwert, und wie Sie wissen, wird jede lineare Kombination von ihnen auch eine Lösung sein, die zu demselben Eigenwert gehört. Und wenn Sie wollen, und Sie können es, wenn es Ihnen gefällt, Sie können es so schreiben, wo dies unser Faktor alpha war. Und dieses Ding hier hat in der Tat die richtigen periodische Abhängigkeit, weil man jedes Mal, wenn man um 2piR weitergeht, mü zu mü+1 ändert, man hat also mit alpha multipliziert. Alles ist gut. Aber es stellt sich heraus, dass das irrelevant ist, weil in diesem Fall egal was, das ist eine spezielle lineare Kombination, aber man kann irgendeine lineare Kombination wählen, man kommt immer beim selben Wert an. Anders gesagt, dies ist eine Situation, wo tatsächlich die relative Energie unabhängig vom Impuls ist. Wenn man eine Abhängigkeit haben möchte, dann benötigt man ein ziemlich außergewöhnliches Verhalten. Alles in allem ist eine Supraflüssigkeit eine ziemlich außergewöhnliche Substanz. Und die Ungewöhnlichkeit, auf die ich mich beziehe, ist sehr schematisch durch diese gestrichelte Kurve angezeigt, dass eigentlich diese Wellenpakete sich überlappen müssten. Das kann man auf vielfältige Weise ausdrücken. Man kann sagen, man sollte eine Phasenkohärenz haben, wenn man die ganze makroskopische Röhre herumgeht. Oder, wenn man ein wenig vornehmer sein möchte, kann man sagen, man muss eine Fernordnung außerhalb der Diagonale der reduzierten Dichtematrix haben, was auch immer das bedeuten mag. Ok, gut, lassen Sie uns nun einen großen Glaubensakt begehen und glauben, dass im Fall des Heliums diese seltsame Flüssigkeit tatsächlich existiert, dass wir tatsächlich eine periodische Abhängigkeit der relativen Energie von P und in der Tat vielleicht eine sehr ausgeprägte Abhängigkeit haben. Und das habe ich schematisch hier in diesem Bild angezeigt. Oh ja, ich sollte noch eine Sache erwähnen, eine weitere Vereinfachung. Ich mache alles so einfach wie möglich. Wir setzen uns einfach auf den absoluten Nullpunkt, und sorgen uns nicht darüber, dass das sehr schwer zu tun ist. Ich werde, wenn ich Zeit habe, ich werde später noch etwas über die Modifikation bei endlichen Temperaturen sagen. Aber lassen Sie es uns annehmen, oder anders gesagt, wenn eine Substanz nicht am absoluten Nullpunkt suprafluid wird, nun, dann wird sie es vermutlich nie werden. Es ist also eine notwendige, aber vielleicht nicht ausreichende Bedingung. So, lassen Sie uns nur den niedrigsten, zu jedem gegebenen Impuls betrachten wir nur den niedrigsten Wert der relativen Energie, die ich mit E0 andeute. Auf meinem früheren Diagramm, wenn man blau und rot und so weiter nimmt, nimmt man immer den tiefsten. Und da P praktisch kontinuierlich ist, kann man sie als eine Funktion von P zeichnen, es ist tatsächlich eine periodische Funktion mit einer ziemlich ausgeprägten Amplitude. Es muss keine Sinuskurve sein, obwohl sie eine sein kann, ich sollte sagen Kosinuskurve, da sie gerade sein muss. Die Tatsache, dass ich gesagt habe, sie hat ein Minimum bei null, nun, das klingt recht vernünftig. Das der absolut tiefste Zustand des Systems derjenige ist, bei dem die Flüssigkeit in Ruhe ist und sich nicht bewegt. Aber dann hat es natürlich, wenn sie ein Minimum bei null hat, wegen der Tatsache, dich ich zuvor gesagt habe, wird sie auch ein Minimum bei 1 haben, eine Minimum bei 2 und so weiter. Aber das ist nur die relative Energie. Und nun lassen Sie uns zum niedrigsten Wert unserer totalen Energie für ein gegebenes P zurückkehren, nun, was das heißt ist, dass man diese sich schlängelnde Kurve hier der die Parabel P^2/2M überlagern muss, und Sie sehen, wenn diese Minima tief genug sind, hat man immer noch Minima, sicherlich ein Minimum bei 0, dann eins bei ungefähr 1 x Nh/2R, 2 x Nh quer/R und so weiter. Das führt uns sofort zu dem Schluss, der ziemlich interessant ist, d.h. dem folgenden: dass man in diesem Fall, wie ich hier angedeutet habe, ein Minimum ungefähr hier, ich setze ganzzahlige Vielfache von Nh quer/2R für den Impuls. Nun lassen Sie uns vom Impuls zur Driftgeschwindigkeit gehen, deren Referenz die durchschnittlichen Geschwindigkeit ist, die man natürlich durch Division mit der Gesamtmasse bekommt, ich nenne sie V. Dies ist die Definition und dies ist notwendigerweise die Geschwindigkeit, alles, was man tun muss, ist dies durch groß M zu teilen, das die kleinen Massen enthält, so bekommt man einen diskreten Satz von Driftgeschwindigkeiten. Das ist noch nicht so interessant, aber nun will man zu einem Konzept gehen, die den Hydrodynamikern gut bekannt ist und die Zirkulation genannt wird, die das Linienintegral der Geschwindigkeit um eine geschlossene Kurve herum ist; wie Sie wissen, ist diese Zirkulation im Fall einer Flüssigkeit ohne Reibung eine Bewegungskonstante. Es bedeutet nicht die Erhaltung vom Drehimpuls, aber das ist, was es ist. Nun, in unserem vereinfachten Fall unser DS, alles was man macht, ist, dass man in dem kreisförmigem Rohr herumgeht, und V ist eine Konstante, dann bekommt man 2piR x V und wenn man daher diesen Wert für V einsetzt, dann findet man, dass die Zirkulation, wieder als ungefähres diskretes Spektrum, ein ganzzahliges Vielfaches von N x h ist. Dies ist nun die wirkliche Plancksche Konstante h, nicht h quer, nicht Diracs h, sondern Plancks h, geteilt durch die Masse eines einzelnen Atoms. Diese Quantisierung der Zirkulation, wie wir sie richtig nennen können, wurde tatsächlich als einer der richtig interessanten Fakten beobachtet. Eines der sehr schönen Experimente, es wurde von mehreren Jahren durch Reif durchgeführt, der Alphateilchen in suprafluides Helium schoss und so Wirbel in Form eines Rauchkringels produzierte und sie dann beschleunigte. Die Ladung sitzt auf dem Rauchkringel, er beschleunigt ihn in einem elektrischen Feld. Und davon berechnet er durch Anwendung der klassischen Hydrodynamik einfach den Wert der Zirkulation. Und er fand tatsächlich einen Wert sehr nah an diesem und dem h/M Verhältnis, das von seinen Experimenten stammt, und der stimmt mit den gut-bekannten Verhältnissen überein, bis auf ein paar Prozent. Und es gibt tatsächlich einige Gründe, warum man mehr Zeit benutzen sollte, eine genauere Bestimmung durchzuführen. Aber es ist kein Präzisionsinstrument, aber ich wollte nur sagen, dass es keine reine Phantasie ist, sondern etwas mit der Realität zu tun hat. Gut, nun gibt es noch etwas anderes, dass man von dieser einfach gestrickten Betrachtung lernen kann. Nun, ich habe hier wieder meine gestrichelte P^2/M Kurve gezeichnet. Sie ist hier, dieses Mal habe ich sie als Funktion der Geschwindigkeit anstelle des Impulses gezeichnet, weil die zwei eng verwandt sind, und auf einer etwas kleineren Skala, so setzt man diese Schlangen auf die Parabel auf und man macht weiter und weiter. Aber jetzt passiert etwas, weil die Steigung der Parabel steiler und steiler wird wenn man Ihre Parabel höher und höher hinauf geht, und mit der Ausnahme von sehr singulären Kurven, periodische Kurven wie das dort, da kommt ein Punkt, wo es kein Minimum mehr gibt. Ich habe dies kritische Geschwindigkeit genannt, ich habe versucht, sie hier anzudeuten. Und Sie sehen, hier gibt es noch ein Minimum, hier wird es ziemlich flach, und dort gibt es kein Minimum mehr. Und ab dann hört es auf. So, das bedeutet daher, dass.., ok, ich komme hierauf zurück, es bedeutet daher, dass diese Minima nur bis zu einer bestimmten Geschwindigkeit wirklich existieren, die man eine kritische Geschwindigkeit, sogar die kritische Geschwindigkeit nennen kann, weil sie sehr bekannt ist. Es ist eine bekannte Tatsache, dass man jenseits einer bestimmten Geschwindigkeit keinen Suprafluss aufrechterhalten kann, bei flüssigem Helium, 1 Grad Kelvin oder so, von der Ordnung vielleicht 20, 30 Meter pro Sekunde. Darüber wird es nicht mehr toleriert. Nun sollte ich etwas schon vorher gesagt haben, und ich entschuldige mich dafür, über die Signifikanz dieser Minima. Und ich habe schon vorher gesagt, bis jetzt habe ich die Wand total vernachlässigt, oder ich habe angenommen, dass die Wand perfekt glatt und starr ist. Und wenn das der Fall wäre, würde alles unendlich lang fließen. Nun müssen wir uns fragen, was würde die Wand tun? Nun, wie ich schon vorher gesagt habe, zuvor habe ich die Situation beim absoluten Nullpunkt betrachtet, und das bedeutet, dass ich eine Wand bei absolute Null haben will, aber nun erlaube ich eine bestimmte Menge an Wechselwirkung zwischen der Wand und den Heliumatomen. Nun, wenn ich in einem Minimum wie hier sitze und die Wand und mit irgendeiner Wechselwirkung der Wand, würde die Flüssigkeit zu einem niedrigeren Impuls gehen wollen als es eine normale Flüssigkeit tun würde, wenn sie austrocknet, dann würde die Wand sagen, leider kann ich das nicht tun, ich kann dir keine Energie geben, weil die Energie steigen muss, wie man sieht. Nun, man könnte sagen, liebe Wand, warum kannst Du nicht ein wenig generöser sein. Nehmen wir an, ich sitze hier und Du gibst mir einen ausreichenden Impuls, um direkt hierhin zu springen, dann habe ich meine Energie von hier zu hier erniedrigt. Nun, das ist eine gut bekannt Situation, auch im Fall von anhaltenden Strömen und Supraleitern, man behandelt keine absoluten Minima, sondern behandelt relative Minima. Und in einem bestimmten Sinn kann man sagen, dass auch supraleitender Strom in einem Kreis nicht ewig anhält. Aber er hält für mehrere Stunden an, oder mehrere Monate oder vielleicht ein Jahr oder so. Anders gesagt, ich habe es nie berechnet, es besteht eine endliche Wahrscheinlichkeit eines Sprungs. Oh ja, nun, eines will ich noch sagen, das ist vollständig analog zum Fall eines Supraleiters. Die Quantisierung der Zirkulation entspricht der Quantisierung eines Flusses in dem Supraleiter, und das ist ein sehr analoges Argument. Nun gut, wie in einem Supraleiter, es könnte im Prinzip passieren, aber es wird vermutlich eine ziemlich lange Zeit benötigen. Wie ich sagte, habe ich es nicht berechnet, aber vielleicht das Alter des Universums für einen ziemlich großen Ring. Der Punkt hier ist, dass es sehr unwahrscheinlich ist, obwohl man von hier zu hier gehen kann, ein sehr unwahrscheinlicher Übergang. Was es nämlich bedeutet, ist, dass jedes Atom gleichzeitig exakt dieselbe Menge h/R von einer Drehmomenteinheit verlieren muss. Nun, dass alle die Atome so nett kooperieren sollten und den Sprung zusammen machen, ich denke mit ein wenig Händewedeln wird es verständlich, das ist ein reichlich unwahrscheinlicher Prozess und ist für die wirklich extrem lange Stabilität von andauernden Flüssen oder andauernden Strömen verantwortlich. Gut, und nun habe ich die kritische Geschwindigkeit schon erwähnt und man kann es ausdrücken, man kann sagen, es passiert, wenn der absolute Wert der Ableitung dE nach dP, nun, es ist durch den absoluten Wert von dem hier definiert, weil, wenn dies kleiner wird, je kleiner dies ist, umso früher werden die Minima aufhören und es gibt keinen suprafluiden Fluss mehr. Nun ja, ich versuche, die Sünden meiner Vorgänger gut zu machen und kurz zu sein, aber ich will nur, wie lange habe ich wirklich geredet, eine halbe Stunde? Gut, ich denke, ich werde in den nächsten 15 Minuten fertig, dann habe ich zwar nicht ihre Sünden wieder gut gemacht, aber auch nicht dazu beigetragen. Ok, nun Sie haben sich mit Recht gefragt nun, schön und gut, wir haben angenommen, wir waren wirklich sehr gut. Wir haben unseren Glaubensakt begangen und geglaubt, dass diese Minima existieren, und dass das etwas mit der Realität zu tun hat. Es erklärt die Quantisierung der Zirkulation, es erklärt die kritische Geschwindigkeit. Aber unter welchen Bedingungen kann man nun vernünftigerweise erwarten, dass dies wirklich passiert? Nun werde ich, an diesem Punkt werde ich ein wenig auf Modelle eingehen. Das heißt, der generelle Teil ist beendet, was man generell sagen kann, habe ich gesagt. Aber jetzt wäre es interessant sich zu fragen, welche Art von mikroskopischen Annahmen müsste man machen, um tatsächlich diese starke oder einigermaßen starke periodische Abhängigkeit zu bekommen. Und als ersten Fall will ich mit Ihnen das diskutieren, was London ursprünglich vorschlug, i.e. lassen Sie uns die Wechselwirkung zwischen Atomen vergessen, es ist sicherlich eine fürchterliche Näherung. Aber nehmen wir an, wir würden tatsächlich mit dem Bose-Einstein-Gas zu tun haben und fragen uns, was mit einem solchen System beim absoluten Nullpunkt passiert. Wie Sie natürlich gut wissen, lange vor dem absoluten Nullpunkt tritt dieses Phänomen der Einstein-Bose-Kondensation auf. Aber lassen Sie uns sogar zu diesem Extrem gehen und bis zum bitteren Ende gehen, wo im Grundzustand des Systems alle Atome den Impuls Null haben. Nun, das werden wir jetzt nicht annehmen, aber lassen Sie uns sehen, was im Fall des idealen Bosegases passiert. Gut, hier habe ich nun die Energie eines einzelnen Atoms aufgeschrieben, die einfach seine kinetische Energie ist. Und nun werde ich versuchen, die niedrigste Energie für einen gegebenen Impuls zu konstruieren. Und wie macht man das? Nun, man nimmt jedes Atom und gibt ihm einen Stoß in die X-Richtung. Aber jedes nur in die X-Richtung, vergeuden Sie keine Zeit für irgendeinen seitlichen Impuls, der wird Sie nur Energie kosten, ohne Ihnen einen Kreisimpuls zu geben. So, nehmen wir an, Sie nehmen nun neue Atome und derzeit wären es besser weniger als N, weil Sie keine mehr haben, neue Atome, eine beliebige Zahl von Atomen, man gibt jedem davon seinen minimalen Impuls, h/R und das bedeutet, dass der Gesamtimpuls das hier ist. Das ist der billigste Weg, der mit dem niedrigsten Energieaufwand, einen gegebene Menge an Impuls zu bekommen. So, wir haben neue Teilchen mit Impuls P=h/R und die anderen, wir lassen sie in ihrem Impulszustand 0, gut. Nun gut, dann können wir sehr einfach die Gesamtenergie berechnen, mü x der kinetischen Energie P^2/2M und das können Sie auch in dieser Form addieren, wenn Sie diese Form P benutzen. Und nun lassen Sie uns die entsprechende relative Energie, wie ich sie nennen würde, berechnen. Die bekommt man, indem man jetzt P^2/2M subtrahiert und dann ist dies die Form, die man bekommt. Das ist zwischen 0 und N gültig. Und wie Sie bemerken, dies ist eine Parabel und ich habe sie hier gezeichnet. Sie startet mit 0 und sehr schön, wie es sollte, kommt sie wieder zu 0, wenn P=Nh/R. Aber jetzt kann man hier natürlich weitermachen. Nehmen Sie an, Sie haben alle Ihre Atome von 0 zu N gebracht, dann sind Sie wieder hier und Sie fangen wieder an, lassen die meisten der Atome im Zustand 1 und fangen dasselbe wieder an. Mit anderen Worten, und dies ist, wie ich schon vorher sagte, eine generelle Aussage, dies ist eine Parabel, die sich periodisch wiederholen muss. So, das ist endlich ein Bild, ein sehr einfaches Bild dieses Falls der periodischen Funktion E0 von P. Aber der Ärger ist, dass Sie dies hier bekommen, was ich hier angedeutet habe, wenn Sie diese Funktion P^2/M überlagern, um die Gesamtenergie zu erhalten. Sie sehen, dass die Energie natürlich einfach linear mit dem Impuls ansteigt, hier ist es. Und so anstelle diese netten Minima zu sehen, die ich vorher gezeigt habe, bekommt man einfach, man nimmt diesen Punkt, eine geraden Linie, und noch eine gerade Linie und noch eine, wo sind die Minima, nun, hier ist eins, das bei 0, aber sonst nichts. Und das stimmt, unglücklicherweise, und ich spreche jetzt über meinen Freund, Fritz London, es ist nicht richtig, dass das Einstein..., das ideale Einstein-Bose-Gas zur Suprafluidität führt. Dies ist eine Tatsache, die schon vor einer ganzen Weile erkannt wurde. Tatsächlich ist Bogoliubov so weit gegangen, den Effekt einer schwachen Bindung zu berechnen, und er fand, dass sie richtig wichtig ist, um Supraleitung, Suprafluidität zu haben. Und das möchte ich jetzt erklären. Ich beziehe mich jetzt auf Bogoliubovs Veröffentlichung, die mathematisch eine ganz wunderbare Veröffentlichung ist, aber sie hat nicht sehr viel mit der Wirklichkeit zu tun, weil die Kopplung des Heliums ganz weit entfernt ist schwach zu sein, sie ist sehr stark. Stattdessen werde ich die Landausche Terminologie benutzen, ich denke, das war tatsächlich der wichtige Beitrag von Landau, zu postulieren, dass man, statt individuelle nicht-wechselwirkende Atome im Helium zu betrachten, wie es bei einem idealen Gas der Fall wäre, sollte man an das denken, was er Quasipartikel nennt. Nun, diese Quasipartikel sind wirklich das Resultat, das Endprodukt eines sehr komplizierten Spiels von Wechselwirkungen. Und es benötigt wieder ein gewisses Maß an Glauben, um in sie zu glauben, aber man benötigt nicht zu viel Glauben, wenn man sich auf Partikel mit einem ziemlich niedrigen Impuls beschränken, das bedeutet ziemlich lange De Broglie-Wellenlängen. Wenn diese De Broglie-Wellenlänge lang ist verglichen mit der Distanz zwischen den Teilchen, dann ist es ziemlich klar, dass diese Quasipartikel nichts anderes sind als die Quanten der akustischen Wellen, sogenannte Phononen. In diesem Fall hat man die Schallgeschwindigkeit, wenn es die Lichtgeschwindigkeit wäre, hätte man die Energie eines Lichtquants, Lichtgeschwindigkeit x Impuls. Hier ist die Schallgeschwindigkeit x der absolute Betrag des Impulses. Dies wäre die Energie eines Phonons oder eines Quasiteilchens von Landau, wenigstens bei niedrigem Impuls. Und da wir in niedrige Energien interessiert sind, sind wir vielleicht damit zufrieden. Um die Abhängigkeit von epsilon zu geben, P ist nicht länger quadratisch, sondern, wenigstens für niedrige Impulse, ist es linear und hat einen Faktor, eine Diskontinuität bei P=0, Diskontinuität der Steigung. Gut, nun will man eine bestimmte Menge an Energie aufbauen, wieder auf dem billigsten Weg, wie man das macht, man regt Phononen nur in die Richtung an, Phononen, die sich nur um das Ding herum bewegen und denkt nicht daran, seitliche Schallwellen anzuregen, das ist eine Energieverschwendung. Und das hat eine einfache Konsequenz, weil das bedeutet, dass die Gesamtenergie einfach U x dem Gesamtimpuls ist. Und die relative Energie ist dann durch dies gegeben. Nun gut, dies soll sein, ich will bei relativ kleinen Impulsen in diesem Bereich bleiben und ich habe versucht, dieses auf dieser Zeichnung hier anzudeuten. Und sie sehen hier diese typische Diskontinuität, P absolut. Und natürlich können diese Dinge sich irgendwie fortsetzen, man kann weiter machen und erhält größere Impulse für höhere Anregungen. Aber wir wissen, dass sie periodisch ist. So derselbe scharfe Punkt hier ist wieder da, muss hier wieder da sein und hier und hier und so weiter. Wenn man das der Parabel überlagert, bekommt man jetzt ein nettes Resultat, das heißt in diesem Fall, dass die Minima genau bei den Werten Nh/R sind. Also wenn man höher geht, wird da natürlich wieder die kritische Geschwindigkeit sein; in diesem Fall, da die Steigung hier wahrscheinlich kleiner wird, ist die größte Steigung tatsächlich die Lichtgeschwindigkeit, man bekäme das Resultat, dass die kritische Geschwindigkeit gleich der Schallgeschwindigkeit ist. Das ist nicht die ganze Wahrheit, sie ist ein wenig niedriger, oder einen Faktor 2 oder 3 niedriger. Das kommt von der Tatsache, dass diese Näherung oder die Idealisierung, dieses lineare Gesetz zu behalten, wirklich nur für die kleinsten Impulse gültig ist und wenn man ein wenig höher geht, muss man Korrekturen anwenden. Wissenschaftler haben diese Funktion untersucht, epsilon(P), man kann es mit Neutronenstreuung machen, unelastische Streuung von Neutronen in flüssigen Helium. Und es ist tatsächlich so, obwohl sie, so wie ich sagte, linear beginnt, aber dann hat sie einige Knicke. Und daher gibt es qualitative Änderungen. Und wie ich sagte, diese Äußerung, dass die kritische Geschwindigkeit gleich der Schallgeschwindigkeit ist, ist nicht richtig. Aber sie ist von derselben Größenordnung, und wir können nicht auf mehr als das hoffen. Und die Zirkulation ist exakt. Daher ist das eine Warnung für Leute, die h/M bestimmen wollen, im Unterschied zu den Leuten, die E/h mit sehr großer Genauigkeit über die Flussquantisierung bestimmt haben. Wenn man es mit großer Genauigkeit tun will, müssen Sie besser zu sehr, sehr niedrigen Temperaturen gehen, weil diese Aussage nur gilt, solange ich bei der niedrigsten Energie bleibe. Nun, ich denke, meine Zeit ist fast vorbei, ich möchte nur kurz weitergehen, Ihnen mitteilen, was bei endlichen Temperaturen passiert. Natürlich ist diese Kontinuität, die wir hier haben, nur eine Idealisierung und es ist dieselbe Idealisierung, wie die Annahme, dass wir am absoluten Nullpunkt sind. Wenn Sie nicht am absoluten Nullpunkt sind, dann muss man, statt der Energie selbst, die freie Energie betrachten. Aber sie hat ziemlich ähnliche Eigenschaften. Gut, nun kommt hier F, der Schwerpunkt, wieder auf, klein F entspricht nun der freien Energie, die den Energieniveaus von klein E entspricht, die wir vorher hatten. Und dann, wie Sie wissen, wurde es erhalten, indem wir den Logarithmus von dieser Partitionsfunktion dieser Summe hier nehmen. Und was das effektiv macht, und man kann das leicht berechnen, es bedeutet natürlich, dass man bei hohen Energien nicht mehr so sparsam ist, man regt Phononen auch in Richtungen an, die nicht parallel zur X-Richtung sind. Und was das macht ist, dass es dies hier runder macht. Ich habe dies hier für T=0 angezeigt, F= ist gleich ..... gleich dieser diskontinuierlichen Kurve, dann wird es runder und runder. Das kann man durch den Faktor alpha hier charakterisieren, dies ist nicht ganz alpha, eine Größe, die von T abhängt, die kleiner wird, je kleiner die Geschwindigkeit. Tatsächlich kann man sie berechnen und herausfinden, dass sie so aussieht, wie T/T*^4 so sie nimmt ziemlich schnell ab. Wenn man die ganze Rechnung durchgeht, findet man, dass es eine Korrektur für den quantisierten Wert der Zirkulation gibt. Es ist N x h/M, wie er am absoluten Nullpunkt wäre, x 1 + alpha. Er wird also reduziert und man kann in einem gewissen Sinn annehmen, dass alpha vielleicht bei der kritischen Temperatur unendlich wird, so dass dieser Wert auf null zugeht. Wie auch immer, er ist reduziert. Dies ist eine Formel, die für niedrige Temperaturen gilt, T klein verglichen mit einer gewissen Temperatur T*, die durch diesen genauen Ausdruck hier gegeben wird, eine einfache Phononenrechnung. Und diese Temperatur T* ist ungefähr 4-mal, ungefähr 90 Grad Kelvin. Wenn Sie hier das Maß der Geschwindigkeit über der Dichte von Helium und der Schallgeschwindigkeit einsetzen, kommen 90 Grad Kelvin heraus, ungefähr 4-mal die kritische Temperatur. Warum genau diese zwei Temperaturen von derselben Größenordnung sind, es mag oder mag kein Zufall sein, und ich denke, es ist kein Zufall. Wie auch immer, es ist, was es ist. Nun, nur sehr kurz: das kann auch anders benutzt werden, weil Leute sagen werden, oh nein, nein, nein, das ist nicht wahr, die Zirkulation ist immer noch streng h/M und man sollte nur nicht über das ganze Helium sprechen, sondern man sollte über den suprafluiden Teil sprechen. Es gibt ein oft nützliches Modell, ein zwei-Flüssigkeits-Modell, bei dem man sagt, dass nur am absoluten Nullpunkt alles Helium suprafluid ist, und bei endlichen Temperaturen ist es das teilweise, und dann ist am Lambda-Punkt natürlich alles normal. Und man kann das so ausdrücken, ich habe nie ganz verstanden, was das bedeutet; wenn man ein Heliumatom fragt: Bist Du normal oder bist Du suprafluid?, der arme Kerl wird sicherlich nicht wissen, was er sagen soll, er ist nur Teil einen Gesamtsystems. Aber es kann so interpretiert werden, das ist auch nicht meine Entdeckung, es wurde in Londons Buch über Suprafluidität diskutiert. Und man kann tatsächlich sagen, dass mit dieser Definition von normal zu suprafluid die Zirkulation h/M ist, multipliziert mit dem Verhältnis von suprafluid zu normal und daher beim absoluten Nullpunkt 1 ist, dieser Faktor wird wahrscheinlich Null am Lambdapunkt. Wie ich sagte, ich will Ihre Zeit nicht länger in Anspruch nehmen, Sie sind wahrscheinlich hungrig und ich bin das auch, und wir wollen Doktor Esaki hören. Da gibt es einige andere interessante Punkte, die ich gerne über Helium-3 gemacht hätte, weil das natürlich eine ganz andere Geschichte ist. Ich habe nur über Helium-4 gesprochen, weil wir über Bosonen-Systeme gesprochen haben, wohingegen Helium-3 ein Fermionen-System ist. In diesem Fall, nun, es war eine Sache von einer langen Debatte, ob Helium-3 überhaupt suprafluid werden würde, es wird sicherlich nicht suprafluid bei 2,2 Grad Kelvin. Aber kürzlich, in der Nähe von einigen Milligrad, wurden einen Menge interessanter Übergänge gefunden. Und einer davon ist, denke ich, nun ziemlich gut etabliert, ist tatsächlich Suprafluidität. Wenn man das erklären will, müssen Sie natürlich dieselbe Art von Argumentation verwenden wie Bardeen, Cooper und Schrieffer es bei der Erklärung der Suprafluidität, Entschuldigung, ich meine Supraleitung taten, und der entscheidende Punkt dort ist die Bildung von Cooperpaaren. Das heißt, man muss einen Mechanismus annehmen und einführen, durch den ungefähr 2 Helium-3 Atome eine Einheit bilden, und dann kann das effektiv ein Bose-Einstein-Kondensat werden. Ich rede in einer Art und Weise, die Doktor Cooper entsetzen wird, aber er ist ein netter Mann und wird mir vergeben. Es ist eine sehr komplizierte Berechnung, die Theoretiker sind eine lange Zeit herumgeirrt, die Schätzungen haben zwischen 10^-6 und 10^-1 Grad absolut fluktuiert, denke ich. Die Wahrheit ist irgendwo in der Nähe von 10^-3. Aber es ist noch sehr viel komplizierter. Aber eine Sache möchte ich sagen, und ich weiß nicht, ob es gemessen wurde, aber das Quant der Zirkulation muss sicherlich die Hälfte vom dem Quant im Fall von flüssigen Helium sein, einfach weil man 2 Atome hat, die beitragen, h/M, man muss h/2M schreiben. Das schließt meine sehr generelle Aussage nicht aus, obwohl ich Ihnen Ihre Kurve pädagogisch nur mit Minima bei 1 und 2 und ganzen Teilen dieses charakteristischen Impulses gezeichnet habe. Eine periodische Funktion kann natürlich auch sich periodisch wiederholende Minima dazwischen haben. Und das ist genau das, was man im Fall des suprafluiden Heliums annehmen müsste. Nun, wie ich sagte, meine Zeit ist vorbei und vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit. Applaus.

Felix Bloch (1976) - Some Remarks on Superfluidity
(00:01:19 - 00:03:38)

 The complete video is available here.


Research on superfluidity continued after World War II, and scientists in the U.S. found themselves with large quantities of the light isotope of helium, helium-3, leftover from hydrogen bomb production. They wondered whether helium-3 could also be cooled into a superfluid state. In the early 1970s, American physicists David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff, and Robert C. Richardson succeeded in making superfluid helium-3 at a temperature only about two thousandths of a degree above absolute zero. They won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physics for their endeavor [32].

During the latter part of his 2008 Lindau lecture, Osheroff recalled his time as a graduate student, working late nights to pursue evidence of superfluidity in helium-3. By “BCS transition,” he refers to the point where the normal state of atoms — instead of electrons, as in superconductors — moving independently gives way to a BCS state where pairs of atoms are bound together.

Douglas Osheroff (2008) - How Advances in Science are Made

Well, I hope this talk will give some good advice to the students in the audience but I think it has advice which is probably useful for all of us. I illustrate my talk with some of my own photographs, this of course is San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge. The first of 3 messages that I want to discuss is that those discoveries that most changed the way we think about nature cannot be anticipated, how then are such discoveries made and are there research strategies that can substantially increase one’s chances of making such a discovery. And this is part of the Grand Canyon at sun set. So I will illustrate this idea with a link chain of discoveries and inventions starting with this man here, Heike Kamerlingh Onnes, Kamerlingh Onnes was in a competition with Dewar to see who would first liquefy the lightest and most inert of the atmosphere gases. And it looked like Dewar had won near the turn of the last century, 1890 something when he succeeded in liquefying hydrogen. But eventually Kamerlingh Onnes was able to acquire enough helium, I believe it was the gas that would fill a small party balloon, that he could attempt to liquefy it and succeeded in doing so in 1908. And then he did with the liquid helium exactly what Dewar had done with the hydrogen, he pumped on the vapour above the liquid, causing the liquid to further cool, looking for the temperature where helium solidified. And this was a fairly simple task for Dewar. He started at 21 Kelvin at 1 atmosphere and found that hydrogen solidified at 14 Kelvin under its own vapour pressure. But Kamerlingh Onnes after 2 years was unable to make helium solidify. Now I indeed have cooled liquid helium to 1/10,000 of a Kelvin and it still remains very happily in a liquid state. The reason has to do with quantum mechanics and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which I won’t describe but in fact it’s something that I think all of you understand but at that time quantum mechanics was just being developed. So after failing in what he felt was his main mission over a 2 year period, Kamerlingh Onnes didn’t give up, he instead looked around for some interesting question of the day that he could perhaps answer with his new refrigeration device. And there was an argument as to what would happen to the conductivity of metals as they were cooled towards absolute zero. One argument was that if the metal was very pure that as you cooled it you eliminated the lattice vibrations. And keep in mind this is really happening not very many years after the discovery of the electron. So it’s quite a remarkable thing that these arguments were even possible to be made. Anyway the idea was then that the electrical resistance would go slowly to zero as you eliminated these thermal vibrations of the lattice. But the other school of thought was that the conduction electrons in the metal would re-condense on the ions from which they had come. The system would become completely neutral and electrical conductivity would cease. So Kamerlingh Onnes acquired a very pure sample of mercury and gave it to his graduate student and asked him to measure the electrical resistance to very low temperatures. I put the students name up here, Gilles Holst, I dare say back in those days Kamerlingh Onnes for instance was not of a mind to put his student’s names on the papers. So I’m very lucky that I was not born during this time. The data shown here as the green dots and this is the resistance as a function of temperature and you can see that in fact the resistance was dropping slowly towards zero as the temperature cooled. But then there was a discontinuous drop in the resistance, to a value which was less than 10 to the minus 5 Ohms. That being the resolution of their instrument. So it took Gilles Holst a while to convince his mentor that this wasn’t simply due to an electrical lead falling off of the sample but ultimately of course these were reproducible measurements and this was the first evidence for super conductivity which I would guess has been studied every year since that time. But for the next 15 years if you wanted to study super conductivity you had to come to Leiden, to Kamerlingh Onnes’s laboratory, he was the only one that could reach these very low temperatures. So for 15 years he probably cooled his liquid cryogenic helium 4 down through the temperature of 2.17 Kelvin, probably hundreds of times. Never noticing, never realising that the liquid helium itself was undergoing a phase transition to a super fluid state which is almost as remarkable as the super conducting state itself. By the way his Nobel lecture was on super conductivity or at least these very unusual measurements that they had made. So in fact Kamerlingh Onnes had written in his lab book at some point that the helium appeared to stop boiling at 2 Kelvin but he never actually tried to figure out why this was the case. But let’s look at the research strategies that allowed this discovery to occur. First of all use the best instrumentation available, in this case I’m really talking about the liquefaction facilities that Kamerlingh Onnes developed which really allowed him to look at, into an unexplored part of the physical landscape. He didn’t reinvent those technologies that he could borrow however and Dewar had invented the Dewar flask and Kamerlingh Onnes was very happy to borrow that even though these 2 were rather staunch competitors with one another. Now this is a really useful one I think, that after trying for 2 years to determine where helium solidified, Kamerlingh Onnes gave up on that experiment but he did not give up, as Dewar had done, in studies at low temperatures. So he looked around for something new and I would say that in general failure may well be an invitation to try something new, do not think of it as an invitation to get out of the field. And finally beware of subtle unexplained behaviour, don’t dismiss it. I mean frequently nature does not knock with a very loud sound but rather a very soft whisper and you have to be aware of subtle behaviour which may be in fact a sign that there’s interesting physics to be had. Well no one received the Nobel Prize for discovering the super fluid transition of helium 4. The person that came close was this person here, the transition was known about, one didn’t really understand what was going on. Pyotr Kapitsa in the bleak winter of 1957, in 1937, pardon me, in Moscow determined that the viscosity of liquid helium 4 below this temperature was less than 1 nano poise and for that he shared the 1978 Nobel prize for physics with 2 people whose research field had really very little to do with his own and those were Penzias and Wilson. Arnold Penzias having been my boss’s, boss’s boss for many years at AT and T Bell Laboratories. So Penzias and Wilson were the benefactors of the fact that AT and T had been doing experiments on satellite telecommunications. And they were given a piece of very high tech equipment by AT and T and allowed to use that to study radio noise in astrophysics. This is that very high tech piece of equipment now. This is a hornet antenna which actually has many advantages, it doesn’t see signals coming from the ground. But what was really interesting was what was inside here, there was in fact a very special, very low noise amplifier. Thanks to this gentleman here, this is Charles Townes who invented the maser, this is actually maser number 2, ammonia maser number 2 actually at Columbia University, in order to do very high resolution molecular spectroscopy. But very soon after that in fact Charles Townes realised that one could use this maser action to amplify weak microwave signals. And inside that shed was in fact a ruby rod which was cooled to a temperature of 4.2 Kelvin that would amplify microwave signals without adding substantial amounts of noise to it, in fact this entire system, the antenna plus the amplifiers had an integrated noise signal of 19 Kelvin. So that was actually very good value at that time. This is the first data, now I have to explain what this is. This is called a strip chart recorder paper. I don’t think students know what that is anymore. So the idea is that the paper moves past the pen which moves horizontally back and forth and here they’re recording the signal coming from the antenna. And then they actually put in a switch, a microwave switch which allowed them to then compare that signal to the signal coming from a black body radiating at a temperature of 4.2 Kelvin. So that’s the signal here. And then they do some calibrations and their conclusion was that there was excess noise in the system, apparently coming in from the antenna, although the point of the antenna in a position in space where there were known to be no radio sources. The excess noise was about 3 Kelvin. So they then went back and looked at their apparatus. And what they found was in fact that the pigeons had been roosting inside the antenna. So they said ah, so they cleaned out the pigeon nests and mopped up the pigeon droppings and soldered a few corroded copper plates back in place but nothing that they could do would make this excess noise go away and moreover the noise wasn’t just in this particular place in the sky but in fact wherever they moved their antenna they saw the same noise. So particular Arnold Penzias was very vexed by this and one day he was having a conversation with a Professor Burke up at MIT and Burke suggested that Penzias should call up Professor Robert Dicke at Princeton because Dicke had someone in his group, a Professor Peoples, who had a theory that suggested that as the universe expanded after the big bang that the radiation present would separate from the matter once the matter became neutral. That is when electrons and protons combine to form neutral hydrogen. And so they were in fact looking for this remnant magnetisation. Now I of course at this time, this was 1964, I was a freshman at Caltech but later I was fortunate to be on, serve on a committee with David Wilkinson who was one of the members of Dicke’s group and he was present when that phone call came through. And he described it to me, how Dicke kept asking if Penzias and Wilson had tried this and tried that and what were the circumstances. And eventually he agreed that his group would go up to Crawford Hill to look at Penzias and Wilson’s data. Then he hung up the phone and turned to a few members of his group that were in his office and said: "Gentlemen, we have been scooped." Because in fact Dicke was looking for this but Dicke’s receiver system was based on conventional tube amplifiers and it had an integrated noise temperature of 2,000 Kelvin. So let’s look at the research strategies that allowed this serendipitous discovery as far as Penzias and Wilson were concerned to occur. First use the best technology available and most of that was provided by AT and T so in fact they borrowed a lot of the equipment that they needed. However they added this one key feature which allowed them to make absolute noise measurement, the first absolute radio noise measurements coming from extra terrestrial sources that had ever been seen. Looking at the region of parameter space that is unexplored and again they were the first people to make such absolute measurements. And finally, and this is very important for experimentalists, understand what your instrumentation is measuring. If you do not have confidence in what your instrumentation is measuring and you see some subtle variation from what you expected, you will probably attribute it to your ignorance in understanding your equipment. And you are very likely to miss something, again nature doesn’t knock loudly, she whispers very softly. So since that time of course we’ve had the Kobe Satellite project and this, the intensity of that radiation is the function of wave length, establishing its temperature at 2.725 Kelvin. I think more interestingly perhaps is the fact that if you look at the variation in temperature of that radiation over the sky, these again are plotted in galactic coordinates. You find that in one direction, the direction that you are moving through the local universe, that that radiation is Doppler shifted to a higher temperature and in the opposite direction to a lower temperature. So it’s easy to remove that dipolar effect and then what you see is the plain of the Milky Way galaxy. And I think it’s harder to remove that but if you do that you’re still left with these fluctuations which I think are typically a few millionth’s of a degree, they’re very small things. but in fact the people that had designed this project and looked at these, realised that these signals which were reproducible even when they were very, very small, were evidence for fluctuations in the temperature which was really due to fluctuations in the density of the universe at the point where matter and radiation decouple from one another. So this in fact is a very active area of research and it allows us to study the nature of the universe just 400,000 years after the big bang. A more recent satellite was WMAP, the W is for David Wilkinson who regrettably died before this project got in orbit, that’s one of the problems with doing a project that has a long time line. But now you see very detailed structure in that radiation and one can do a multiple moment expansion of that positional spectrum and find that in fact those, the fluctuations actually agree very well with models including inflation. So for that work, that is the Kobe Satellite work, John Mather and George Smoot who of course you’ve already heard talk here, shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for physics. Well now comes the second of my 3 messages and that is the process of advancing science often leads to inventions or technologies that directly benefit mankind, however it is impossible to tell from where an advance will come that might solve the problem facing mankind. That is the inverse problem. That is to say you may have a technology and not know where it goes but in fact if you have a need it’s very difficult to tell where the technology will come from. Consider just one example NMR which is quite a remarkable, this by the way is part of the Iguazu Falls which is also a remarkable thing to visit if you have the chance, its at the border between Brazil and Paraguay, Argentina, sorry. So in fact NMR was invented in 1946 by these 2 gentlemen, Felix Bloch who was at Stanford University and Ed Purcell who was at Harvard. Ironically I knew Ed Purcell but I did not ever know Felix Bloch. Well when they got the prize they went to Stockholm, 6 years after the invention of NMR, I am sure that they were asked what is NMR going to be good for, because people ask me what super fluid helium 3 was likely to be good for, some 20 years after it was discovered. And from people that I’ve talked to at Stanford, they claim that when asked what NMR might be good for, Felix Bloch replied damn little. To Felix what they had done was they were studying the distribution of charge in atomic nuclei that had nothing to do with solving problems for mankind. Ed Purcell being a bit more thoughtful said perhaps you could use NMR to calibrate magnetic fields. So lets see what's happened to NMR, eventually people could make very uniform magnetic fields and then when they looked at protons in some organic solvent for instance they found that the protons didn’t all resonate at the same frequencies, there were triplets and quadruplets. And these were due to chemical and spin shifts in these molecules. And at this point, once this was realised NMR became an essential tool of organic chemists all over the world. Richard Ernst ported Fourier transform spectroscopy which I think had been developed by Erwin Hahn at UC Berkeley to NMR. And he working with Kurt Wüthrich were able to actually do what they called 2 dimensional NMR but these are frequency dimensions where they would tip one spin and then see how that changed the frequency of another spin. That allows you to determine something about the bond length. And as a result of that work Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize, not in physics but in chemistry in 1991. Kurt Wüthrich continued working however and ultimately he was able to determine the 3 dimensional conformation of even small proteins in aqueous solution, this is the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor which is regarded as the protein structure is best known. And in 2002 Kurt Wüthrich was awarded his own Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work. However we’re not done because back starting in the early ‘70’s people began to realise that if you applied not a very uniform magnetic field but one with a gradient, that is to say that it was larger lets say at the bottom than the top or something like that, one would encrypt information about the position of the various nuclei that were contributing to the NMR signal and if you do that in 3 dimensions you can get these beautiful medical images showing MRI. Now I personally have had both of my knees MRI’d and this is a very healthy knee but mine are not. And for that work Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield shared the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine just one year after Kurt Wüthrich was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry. I should tell you, well I’ll tell you about that later. I think it’s a possibility that there will be a fifth Nobel prize for NMR because in the early ‘90’s Seiji Ogawa working in the biophysics department at AT and T Bell laboratories, and this was a serendipitous discovery, he was looking at rat brains and finding that if he had pulse sequences that were sensitive to the rate, that the protons returned along the magnetic field, that you could image those places in the brain that were processing information because they were sensitive to the oxygenation state of the haemoglobin. And FMRI as its called, functional MRI is really taking psychology and making it from a social science into a natural science which is quite an amazing thing. I want to talk the rest of the time about my own discovery because I think I understand a little bit better and I can make it look like as it was, a completely serendipitous discovery, one in which we hadn’t a clue what it was that we had discovered when we discovered it. And I think that’s frequently the way these things go. The history of helium 3 is rather interesting, it doesn’t exist in sufficient abundance for one to actually create a pure sample, however it was in 1948, working at Los Alamos National Laboratory that Ed Hammel first liquefied helium 3 and measured vapour pressure above the liquid. Now Ed Hammel was in a group that was working on the hydrogen bomb they had lots of tritium around and of course the tritium decays into helium 3. So throughout the 1950’s and even ‘60’s low temperature physicists all over the world studied the properties of liquid helium 3. The reason it’s interesting is helium 3 atoms have a net spin of one ½, so they are Fermi particles like conduction electrons and metals. And you see a lot of the same behaviour. In 1957 Bardeen Cooper and Schrieffer published their theory of super conductivity and very soon it became clear to some theorists such as Philip Anderson, a good friend of mine that this theory might be modified to suggest that other very, fluids of Fermi particles at low temperatures might exhibit similar behaviour. And the first paper was published in 1959 suggested a transition temperature to a super fluid state of 80 mili degrees. Within about 2/3 of a decade people had reached temperatures as low as 2,000th of a degree, did not see any super fluidity. I became a graduate student in 1967 and at that time the conventional wisdom was that BCS super fluidity in helium 3 was a pipe dream by the theorists. Now I don’t know if you guys know what a pipe dream means but that means you’re smoking something that you shouldn’t be smoking. So however when I came to Cornel in fact there were new refrigeration technologies being developed such as the helium 3, helium 4 dilution refrigerator and I felt that would give me a promise of being able to look at nature in a new and very different realm. And that is why I became a member of the low temperature group. But the thing that really sealed it for me was the talk by Bob Richardson who may or may not be in this audience right now, Bob, ok, and that was based on a speculation by Isaac Pomeranchuk who was a member of the Landau school. Made in 1950 just one year after the publication of the results by Ed Hammel’s group. He realised that in the solid, the nuclear spins would be very weakly interacting and so in fact that system would have an entropy of r log 2, just 2 states available to very low temperatures. Whereas the liquid entropy would drop much more rapidly if it were a degenerate Fermi fluid, it would drop linearly as we know it does in metals for the conduction electrons. And below the temperature where these 2 curves crossed, the liquid would be more highly ordered and solid, it’s a very unusual system. So one could then actually calculate very easily that the latent heat of solification was negative. And so if you started with liquid helium 3 and increased the pressure by decreasing the volume, you’d reach the melting curve and then you’d travel along the melting curve to lower and lower temperatures, eventually coming off at some very low temperature. The cooling you get is about 1 mili degree for every percent of the liquid that you convert to solid. So this is in fact what really hooked me on doing low temperature physics and it was actually in my second year graduate study, actually while I was still in the hospital bed recovering from knee surgery on my right knee that I developed this cell, which is the Pomeranchuk cell that I used in the discovery of super fluidity in helium 3. Helium 3 is kind of expensive so I show it as gold here. And the idea is to solidify it you must decrease the volume of this container so we push a metal bellows in side. We measure the temperature by looking at the polarisation of platinum nuclei along the weak magnetic field using NMR and then we measure the melting pressure independently of that. So this is the data that I obtained, I was actually doing an experiment that was completely, it would never have worked. I won’t explain that here, we don’t have the time but this is, I'm plotting now capacitance but the pressure is increasing vertically and the time is increasing to the right. So in fact the system is cooling because of the negli slope melting curve. I rebalanced the bridge and it keeps cooling and then at this point that I later labelled as A, we saw a very dramatic decrease in the rate of cooling. I was not very happy to see that, I assumed that the metal bellows had started pushing on solid helium 3 causing irreversible processes. But I had started this at 22 mili degrees and I realised that if I pre-cooled the liquid helium 3 sample over this long weekend, it was the Thanksgiving weekend, that I could start the next Monday at 15 mili degrees, the base temperature of my helium 3, helium 4 dilution refrigerator. And so here I tried that experiment again and you see exactly the same curve. But the starting conditions were very different, it seemed to me extremely unlikely that this pressure which had reproduced itself to about a part in a 100,000 could in fact possibly be a random heating event, it was far more likely it was the signature of some completely unexpected phase transition inside this mixture of liquid and solid helium 3. Then I continued letting this thing cool at a temperature which we now know is about 1.6 mili Kelvin, in fact I saw a very tiny drop in pressure. And this in fact was the signature of a second transition. So the question is were these transitions in the liquid or the solid. Eventually I developed a very early form of magnetic resonance imaging. Here I apply a magnetic field gradient, so the field was larger at the bottom than the top. And then if applied a single RF frequency to my NMR coil, in fact I would only get a thin resonant layer where the magnetic field had the right value for the frequency. And then if I swept the frequency upward this resonant layer would move downward etc. So this is a CW version of one dimensional MRI. I asked Paul Lauterbur when he visited Bell laboratories if he’d read my paper and he said yes, indeed he read it in 1972, the year it came out. Now I didn’t ask him the obvious question, did this have any effect on his decision to pursue MRI but in fact he started doing his work in 1973. Unfortunately he’s dead now so I can’t ask him. Here’s some of the data that we got out, so now everything is different, time is increasing to the left and pressure is increasing downward, because I’ve actually turned the data upside down. You like to think of NMR as resonances that go up but they actually go down. So this is low frequency to high frequency, high frequency to low frequency, low frequency to high frequency. And you can see these big peaks or solid peaks but there was a liquid signal in between these. So we could differentiate these 2 signals. Now at the B transition which is shown here, all the solid peaks would drop by a couple of percent, 1 to 2 percent. And it wasn’t for several days, this was taken at April 17th, it was April 20th when I was re-analysing this data that I noticed in fact that the liquid signal had dropped, not by 2% but by 50%. And so it was at that moment that I wrote in my lab book, you notice the time, 2.40 a.m., it’s a wonderful time to do physics. Very quiet, there are no distractions, less electrical noise, less vibrations, it’s a wonderful time. Have discovered the BCS transition in liquid helium 3. Now in fact I only reached that conclusion because I didn’t understand the BCS theory very well. These are really very unconventional BCS states, the first that had ever been seen. That was in April 20th, in early June in fact Dave Lee, we still thought that the A transition was in the solid, the B transition was clearly in the liquid. So we felt that we removed this magnetic field gradient and now we’re plotting things as a function of frequency. Trying to see if the solid signal shifted as we cooled down. But what we found instead was that the liquid signal shifted. This was completely unexpected. And really not understood at all. When we published the paper, we published the results but we did not call it a BCS state. It wasn’t until Tony Legget did his work which actually happened remarkably fast, Tony then shared the Nobel Prize in 2003. So I think you’re telling me I have 5 minute left. Ok we’re just about done, strategies, view nature from a new perspective or a different realm. Its really a way to find interesting physics and you know I told you that I’d been doing this completely hopeless experiment, failure may be an invitation to try something new, and I did, spent a little time doing something different. Curiosity driven research is fun and it can be rewarding and generally it doesn’t take all that much time. And this is if you’re a graduate student, avoid too many commitments, if I had been taking ballroom dancing, actually more likely I would have been taking a course in conversational Chinese since my wife is Chinese, I would guess when they took away the equipment that forced me to do the experiment that I hadn’t planned on doing, I would have probably been behind and I would have been catching up on my Chinese (speaking in Chinese) or something like that. But the point is in fact the demands of good research do not adhere to a schedule and if you’re a graduate student, this is the opportunity of a lifetime for you, don’t blow it. And finally and this is for everyone, I think back off from what you’re doing occasionally to gain a better perspective on the task at hand. We become myopic and often we focus too tightly on our work. Just about done, here I am getting the Nobel Prize, I have a problem with Nobel Prizes, you look at that and you say Osheroff did it, well actually to be more technically correct, it was Osheroff, Richardson and Lee did that, but in fact that’s really not correct at all. Because I now show the cell of mine again and I put the names of those people who contributed insights or technologies that were essential for our making this discovery and there are about 14 up there but I could probably put up 24 just as likely. Advances in science are not made by individuals alone, they result from progress of the scientific community world wide asking questions, developing new technologies to answer those questions and sharing their results and their ideas with others. To have rapid progress and I want the DOE and NSF people to listen to this, one must support scientific research broadly and encourage scientists to interact with one another and to spend a bit of their time satisfying their own curiosities. This is how advances in science are made. Thank you.

Ich hoffe, dieser Vortrag enthält interessante Anregungen für die Studenten im Publikum, glaube aber, dass er nützliche Informationen für uns alle bietet. Ich werde während meines Vortrags einige Fotos zur Veranschaulichung heranziehen – hier sehen Sie zum Beispiel die Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Zunächst möchte ich die erste meiner drei Thesen erörtern: Die Entdeckungen, die unsere Sichtweise auf die Natur am deutlichsten verändert haben, sind nicht vorhersehbar. Wie werden diese Entdeckungen überhaupt gemacht und gibt es geeignete Forschungsstrategien, die die Chancen auf eine Entdeckung wesentlich erhöhen? Und hier sehen Sie einen Teil des Grand Canyons bei Sonnenuntergang. Diese These werde ich anhand einer Reihe miteinander verbundener Entdeckungen und Erfindungen erläutern und beginne mit diesem Herrn: Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Kamerlingh Onnes wetteiferte mit Dewar darum, wer als erster das leichteste und trägste Gas der atmosphärischen Gase verflüssigt. Vor Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts, d.h. so um 1890 schien Dewar mit der Verflüssigung von Wasserstoff diesen Wettkampf gewonnen zu haben. Schließlich aber gelang es Kamerlingh Onnes, eine ausreichende Menge von Helium – so ungefähr einen kleinen Luftballon voll – zu erlangen und diese 1908 zu verflüssigen. Anschließend ging er mit dem flüssigen Helium genauso vor wie Dewar zuvor mit dem Wasserstoff, er pumpte den Dampf über der Flüssigkeit ab, die dadurch noch weiter abkühlte und untersuchte, bei welcher Temperatur sich Helium verfestigt. Bei Dewar war diese Aufgabe noch recht einfach. Er begann bei 21 Grad Kelvin und einem Druck von einer Atmosphäre und stellte fest, dass Wasserstoff sich bei 14 Kelvin unter dem eigenen Dampfdruck verfestigt. Kamerlingh Onnes hingegen war auch nach zwei Jahren noch nicht in der Lage, Helium zu verfestigen. Ich selbst habe Flüssighelium auf 1/10.000 Kelvin abgekühlt und es befand sich nach wie vor in einem recht flüssigen Aggregatzustand. Der Grund hierfür ist in der Quantenmechanik und der Heisenbergschen Unschärferelation zu finden. Hierauf will ich jetzt nicht näher eingehen, da Ihnen allen die Zusammenhänge sicherlich bekannt sind – nur damals befand sich die Quantenphysik gerade in ihren Anfängen. Nachdem es Kamerlingh Onnes nun über zwei Jahre nicht gelungen war, die für ihn wichtigste Aufgabe umzusetzen, gab er aber nicht auf. Vielmehr hielt er nun Ausschau nach einem interessanten aktuellen Problem, für das er mit seinem neuen Tiefkühlsystem eine Lösung finden könnte. Es wurde zu der Zeit debattiert, inwieweit die Leitfähigkeit von Metallen verändert wird, wenn diese auf Temperaturen nahe dem absoluten Nullpunkt heruntergekühlt werden. Zum einen wurde argumentiert, dass bei sehr reinem Metall beim Kühlen die Gitterschwingungen eliminiert werden. Und dabei muss man sich vor Augen führen, dass dies nur wenige Jahre nach der Entdeckung der Elektronen war. Es ist schon erstaunlich, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt solche Diskussionen überhaupt möglich waren. Nun hatte man die Vorstellung, dass der elektrische Widerstand durch die Aufhebung der thermischen Gitterschwankungen langsam gegen Null gehen würde. Es gab jedoch auch eine andere Denkrichtung, nach der die Leitungselektronen im Metall wieder auf den Ionen kondensieren, von denen sie abgegeben wurden. Das System würde somit komplett neutralisiert und die elektrische Leitfähigkeit wäre aufgehoben. Kamerlingh Onnes gab nun seinem Doktoranden eine sehr reine Quecksilberprobe und forderte ihn auf, deren elektrischen Widerstand bei sehr tiefen Temperaturen zu messen. Ich habe hier an dieser Stelle auch den Namen des betreffenden Studenten aufgeführt, er hieß Gilles Holst. Ich könnte mir denken, dass es zu den Zeiten von Kamerlingh Onnes nicht unbedingt die Regel war, den Namen seiner Studenten in seinen Schriften zu nennen. Vor dem Hintergrund bin ich froh, dass ich nicht in dieser Zeit geboren wurde. Die hier als grüne Punkte dargestellten Werte entsprechen dem Widerstand in Abhängigkeit von der Temperatur. Wie Sie sehen, verringerte sich der Widerstand bei sinkender Temperatur langsam gegen Null. Dann aber gab es ein plötzliches Absinken des Widerstands auf einen Wert von unter 10 hoch -5 Ohm. Hierbei handelte es sich um die Auflösung ihres Instruments. Gilles Holst war eine Weile damit beschäftigt, seinen Mentor davon zu überzeugen, dass dies nicht einfach auf ein gelöstes Kabel zurückzuführen war. Natürlich wurden die Messungen wiederholt und dies war dann letztendlich der erste Nachweis der Supraleitung, die seit dieser Zeit wohl in jedem Jahr weiter untersucht wurde. In den darauffolgenden 15 Jahren jedoch musste jeder, der die Supraleitung erforschen wollte, das Labor von Kamerlingh Onnes in Leiden aufsuchen, da nur dort diese außerordentlich niedrigen Temperaturen erreicht werden konnten. sein flüssiges kryogenes Helium 4 auf eine Temperatur von 2,17 Kelvin, ohne zu erkennen bzw. zu realisieren, dass das flüssige Helium selbst eine Übergangsphase in den suprafluiden Zustand durchlief, die ebenso außergewöhnlich war wie der supraleitende Zustand an sich. Übrigens war das Thema seines Nobelvortrags die Supraleitung oder zumindest die außerordentlich ungewöhnlichen Messungen, die sie durchgeführt hatten. Kamerlingh Onnes hatte in seinem Laborberichten zwar erwähnt, dass das Helium an einem bestimmten Punkt bei 2 Kelvin aufhörte zu sieden, tatsächlich hat er aber niemals untersucht, woran das eigentlich lag. Schauen wir uns aber einmal an, welche Forschungsstrategien diese Entdeckung überhaupt ermöglicht haben. Da war zunächst der Einsatz der besten verfügbaren technischen Ausrüstung. In diesem Fall also die von Kamerlingh Onnes entwickelte Verflüssigungsanlage, die es ihm ermöglichte, einen bisher unerforschten Bereich der Physik näher zu untersuchen. Die bereits verfügbaren technischen Einrichtungen erfand er aber nicht neu, sondern lieh sich das von Dewar erfundene Dewargefäß für diesen Zweck aus. Kamerlingh Onnes konnte sich glücklich schätzen, dass er dies Gefäß leihen konnte, obwohl er mit Dewar in intensivem Wettbewerb stand. Für mich ist der wirklich entscheidende Punkt, dass Kamerlingh Onnes zwar nach zwei Jahren seinen Versuch, die Verfestigungstemperatur von Helium zu bestimmen, aufgab, sich aber anders als Dewar weiterhin mit Untersuchungen im Tieftemperaturbereich beschäftigte. Er suchte einfach nach einer neuen Aufgabenstellung – und ich bin überzeugt, dass Niederlagen allgemein sehr wohl als Aufforderung zu verstehen sind, einen neuen Ansatz zu finden. Lassen Sie sich von Niederlagen also auf keinem Fall ganz und gar vom Weg abbringen. Und achten Sie besonders auf die feinen und ungeklärten Reaktionen, nehmen Sie diese ernst. Denn häufig klopft die Natur nicht laut und vernehmlich an, sondern flüstert vielmehr ganz leise. Und wenn Sie diese zarten Zeichen entdecken, dann können sich dahinter interessante physikalische Phänomene verbergen. Nun, keiner erhielt den Nobelpreis für die Entdeckung des Phasenübergangs von Helium 4 in den suprafluiden Zustand. Man wusste bereits um den Phasenübergang an sich, konnte aber nicht genau nachvollziehen, wie dieser eigentlich vor sich ging. Der Lösung am nächsten kam dieser Herr – Pjotr Kapiza, der im rauen Winter Moskaus im Jahr 1957, Verzeihung es war 1937, feststellte, dass die Viskosität von flüssigem Helium 4 unterhalb dieser Temperatur weniger als 1 Nanopoise betrugt. Hierfür erhielt er gemeinsam mit zwei Wissenschaftlern, deren Forschungsgebiet wirklich nur wenig mit seinem zu tun hatte – und zwar Penzias und Wilson – 1978 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Arnold Penzias war übrigens über viele Jahre der Chef vom Chef meines Chefs bei AT and T Bell Laboratories. Penzias und Wilson profitierten von der Tatsache, dass AT and T im Bereich der Nachrichtensatelliten Experimente durchführte. Dadurch erhielten sie von AT and T ein High-Tech-System, das sie dafür einsetzten, Radiosignale aus dem All zu untersuchen. Und hier sehen Sie dieses High-Tech-System. Es handelt sich um eine Hornantenne, die tatsächlich viele Vorteile bietet. Sie erfasst keine Signale, die vom Boden kommen. Wirklich interessant jedoch war der darin befindliche, ganz spezielle rauscharme Verstärker. Diesen haben wir folgendem Herrn zu verdanken – Charles Townes, dem Erfinder des Masers. Dies hier ist der zweite Maser, genauer gesagt eine Ammoniak-Maser für hochauflösende molekulare Spektroskopie in der Columbia University. Nur kurze Zeit später entdeckte Charles Townes dann, dass die Wirkung dieses Masers auch zum Verstärken von schwachen Mikrowellensignalen eingesetzt werden kann. In diesem Schuppen hier befand sich ein Rubinstab, der auf eine Temperatur von 4,2 Kelvin gekühlt wurde und die Mikrowellensignale verstärkte, ohne dadurch in wesentlichem Maße zusätzliche Geräusche zu erzeugen. Das gesamte System, d. h. die Antenne mit den Verstärkern wies ein integriertes Rauschsignal von 19 Kelvin auf. Dies war zur damaligen Zeit ein ausgezeichneter Wert. Hier sind die ersten Daten, die ich Ihnen erst einmal genauer erläutern muss. Es handelt sich hierbei um einen Papierstreifen von einem Streifenschreiber. Die heutigen Studenten kennen diesen wahrscheinlich gar nicht mehr. Nun, beim Streifenschreiber läuft der Papierstreifen unter einem Stift entlang, der sich in horizontaler Richtung hin und her bewegt und somit in diesem Fall die von der Antenne ausgehenden Signale aufzeichnet. Dann bauten sie einen Schalter ein, und zwar einen Mikrowellenschalter, der es ihnen ermöglichte, dieses Signal mit dem Signal der Strahlung eines schwarzen Körpers bei einer Temperatur von 4,2 Kelvin zu vergleichen. Das entspricht dann diesem Signal hier. Sie nahmen dann noch einige Einstellungen vor und kamen zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass das System noch Rauschsignale aufwies, die offensichtlich von der Antenne kamen – und dies obwohl die Antennenspitze sich in einer Position im All befand, in der es bekanntermaßen keine Radioquellen gab. Das Rauschen lag bei 3 Kelvin. Daraufhin gingen sie noch einmal zurück, untersuchten ihre Apparatur und fanden heraus, dass innerhalb der Antenne Tauben nisteten. Nun schien für sie alles klar, sie entfernten das Taubennest und den Vogelmist und tauschten einige korrodierte Kupferplatten aus, die sie wieder in ihrer ursprünglichen Position festlöteten. Aber der gewünschte Erfolg blieb aus, das Rauschen war immer noch vorhanden. Darüber hinaus war es nicht auf besondere Positionen im All beschränkt – wie auch immer sie die Antenne ausrichteten, die Rauschsignale blieben unverändert. Dies irritierte insbesondere Arnold Penzias und in einem Gespräch mit Professor Burke am MIT schlug dieser ihm vor, Kontakt mit Professor Robert Dicke an der Princeton University aufzunehmen. Zu dessen Team gehörte ein gewisser Professor Peebles, der eine Theorie aufgestellt hatte, nach der sich bei der Expansion des Universums in Folge des Urknalls die Strahlung von der Materie trennt, sobald diese neutralisiert ist, d.h. wenn die Elektronen und Protonen sich zu neutralem Wasserstoff verbinden. So suchten sie nach genau dieser magnetischen Remanenz. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt, d.h. 1964 war ich ein Neuling bei Caltech. Später jedoch hatte ich das Glück, mit im Boot zu sein, d.h. mit David Wilkinson im Ausschuss. David Wilkinson war Mitglied des Teams um Dicke und er war anwesend, als der Anruf von Penzias durchgestellt wurde. Später beschrieb er mir dann, wie Dicke nachfragte, ob Penzias und Wilson dieses und jenes versucht hätten und wie die genauen Bedingungen aussahen. Schließlich erklärte er, dass seine Gruppe nach Crawford Hill kommen würde, um sich die Daten von Penzias und Dicke anzusehen. Dann legte er auf, wandte sich an einige Mitglieder seines Teams, die sich in seinem Büro aufhielten, und sagte zu Ihnen „meine Herren, da ist uns jemand zuvorgekommen“. Dicke forschte nämlich genau in derselben Richtung, nur basierte sein Empfängersystem auf einer konventionellen Verstärkerröhre und wies eine integrierte Rauschtemperatur von 2.000 Kelvin auf. Schauen wir uns nun einmal die Forschungsstrategien an, die zu dieser für Penzias und Wilson zufälligen Entdeckung führten. Da ist zunächst wieder der Einsatz der besten verfügbaren Technik, die von AT and T zur Verfügung gestellt wurde, d.h. ein wesentlicher Teil der erforderlichen Ausrüstung war geliehen. Dann aber kombinierten sie diese Ausrüstung mit einer entscheidenden Komponente, die es ihnen ermöglichte, absolute Rauschmessungen durchzuführen, die ersten absoluten Messungen von Radiosignalen überhaupt, die von einer außerirdischen Quelle stammten. Betrachtet man nun den Bereich des unerforschten Parameterraums, so waren sie auch hier die ersten, die derartige absolute Messungen durchführten. Schließlich – und das ist für Wissenschaftler in der Forschung von entscheidender Bedeutung – muss man verstehen, was genau die Messgeräte messen. Wenn Sie kein Vertrauen in die Messergebnisse ihrer Ausrüstung haben und eine noch so geringe Abweichung von dem erwarteten Ergebnis beobachten, dann werden Sie diese vermutlich darauf zurückführen, dass Sie Ihre Messgeräte nicht richtig verstanden haben. In diesem Fall ist die Gefahr groß, dass Ihnen etwas entgeht – wie gesagt, die Natur klopft nicht laut an, sie flüstert nur ganz leise. Nun, in der Zwischenzeit gab es natürlich das Satellitenprojekt COBE – das zu diesen Daten führte, d.h. die Intensität der Strahlung in Abhängigkeit von der Wellenlänge bei einer Temperatur von 2,725 Kelvin. Noch interessanter sind meiner Meinung nach die Temperaturvariationen der Strahlung in Abhängigkeit von der Position am Himmel, die hier über galaktische Koordinaten eingetragen sind. In der einen Richtung, d.h. in der Bewegungsrichtung durch das lokale Universum ist eine Dopplerverschiebung der Strahlung zu einer höheren Temperatur und in entgegengesetzter Richtung zu einer niedrigeren Temperatur zu beobachten. Diesen bipolaren Effekt kann man einfach eliminieren und dann sieht man die Ebene der Milchstraßengalaxie. Die ist etwas schwerer zu eliminieren, danach aber bleiben diese Schwankungen, die typischerweise in einer Größenordnung von ein paar millionstel Grad liegen, d.h. es sind sehr niedrige Werte. Die Menschen, die dieses Projekt entwickelt haben und diese Schwankungen betrachteten, erkannten, dass diese reproduzierbaren Signale – so winzig sie auch sein mochten – ein Beweis für Temperaturschwankungen waren. Diese wiederum waren zurückzuführen auf Dichteschwankungen im Universum an dem Punkt, an dem sich Materie und Strahlung voneinander trennen. Dies ist also in der Tat ein äußerst aktives Forschungsgebiet, das es uns ermöglicht, die Natur des Universums 400.000 Jahre nach dem Urknall zu untersuchen. Es folgte dann der WMAP-Satellit, wobei das W für David Wilkinson steht, der bedauerlicherweise verstarb, bevor der Satellit in den Orbit geschickt wurde. Dies ist eines der vielen Probleme bei solch langfristig angelegten Projekten. Diese Strahlung weist eine sehr detaillierte Struktur auf und über eine Multipolentwicklung des Positionsspektrums ist dann festzustellen, dass die Fluktuationen mit vielen Modellen, einschließlich des Inflationsmodells, übereinstimmen. Für diese Arbeit im Rahmen des COBE-Satellitenprojekts erhielten John Mather und George Smoot, deren Beiträge Sie ja hier bereits hören konnten, 2006 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Und nun kommen wir zur zweiten meiner drei Thesen, d.h. dass der Fortschritt in der Wissenschaft häufig zu Erfindungen oder Technologien führt, die einen direkten Nutzen für die Menschheit haben. Es ist jedoch unmöglich vorauszusehen, wo genau ein Fortschritt zu einer Lösung von Problemen, mit denen die Menschheit konfrontiert ist, zu erwarten ist. Das ist das umgekehrte Problem. Man kann z.B. eine Technologie entwickelt haben und nicht wissen, wohin diese führt. Wenn man aber spezifische Anforderungen hat, ist es außerordentlich schwer zu sagen, woraus diese Technologie hervorgehen wird. Nimmt man einmal das sehr bemerkenswerte Beispiel der Kernspinresonanz (NMR) – hier sehen Sie übrigens die Iguazú-Wasserfälle, die sich an der Grenze zwischen Brasilien und Paraguay – nein Verzeihung – zwischen Brasilien und Argentinien befinden, die sind ebenfalls sehr bemerkenswert. Die sollten Sie sich unbedingt ansehen, wenn Sie die Gelegenheit dazu haben. Also die NMR wurde 1946 durch diese beiden Herren erfunden: Felix Bloch von der Stanford University und Ed Purcell von der Harvard University. Während ich Ed Purcell persönlich kannte, habe ich Felix Bloch nie gesehen. Nun, als die beiden sechs Jahre nach der Erfindung von NMR für die Preisverleihung nach Stockholm gereist sind, hat man sie sicherlich gefragt, wofür die NMR nützlich sein wird – ich selbst bin nämlich gut 20 Jahre nach der Entdeckung von suprafluidem Helium 3 ebenfalls von vielen gefragt worden, wozu dieses denn gut sei. Ich habe in Stanford mit Menschen gesprochen, die mir versichert haben, dass Felix Bloch auf die Frage, wozu NMR gut sei, geantwortet habe „für herzlich wenig“. Für Felix hatten die von ihnen durchgeführten Untersuchungen zur Ladungsverteilung in Atomkernen überhaupt nichts mit der Lösung von Problemen der Menschheit zu tun. Ed Purcell war da etwas überlegter und meinte, man könne die NMR vielleicht zur Kalibrierung von Magnetfeldern verwenden. Schauen wir uns einmal an, wie es mit der NMR weiterging – schließlich konnte man damit sehr homogene Magnetfelder erzeugen. Bei der Untersuchung der Protonen in einem organischen Lösungsmittel stellte man dann fest, dass die Protonen nicht alle mit derselben Frequenz schwangen, es gab Tripletts und Quartetts. Diese waren auf chemische Verschiebungen und Spinverschiebungen in den Molekülen zurückzuführen. Die NMR wurde somit zu einem wichtigen Werkzeug für organische Chemiker in der ganzen Welt. Richard Ernst kombinierte die von Erwin Hahn an der University of California, Berkeley entwickelte Fourier-Transform-Infrarotspektrographie mit der NMR. In Zusammenarbeit mit Kurt Wüthrich war er dann in der Lage, die sogenannte zweidimensionale NMR durchzuführen. Hier ging es dann aber um Frequenzdimensionen, d.h. man kippte einen Spin und untersuchte dann, wie dieser die Frequenz eines anderen Spins beeinflusste. Somit erhält man Informationen über die Bindungslänge. Für diese Arbeit wurde Richard Ernst 1991 der Nobelpreis verliehen– und zwar nicht für Physik sondern für Chemie. Kurt Wüthrich setzt diese Forschungsarbeiten fort und konnte dann schließlich die dreidimensionale Konformation selbst der kleinsten Proteine in einer wässrigen Lösung nachweisen. Hier sehen Sie den Trypsin-Inhibitor aus der Bauchspeicheldrüse des Rindes – die wohl bekannteste Proteinstruktur. Für sein Werk erhielt Kurt Wüthrich 2002 den Nobelpreis für Chemie. Aber wir sind noch lange nicht am Ende – in den frühen 70ern stellten Wissenschaftler fest, dass man Informationen zu der Position der einzelnen Kerne, die zum NMR-Signal beitragen, erhält, wenn man kein sehr homogenes Magnetfeld, sondern eines mit einem Gradienten anlegt, d.h. das Magnetfeld ist beispielsweise unten breiter als oben. Wenn man dies nun über drei Dimensionen durchführt, erhält man solche schönen MRT-Aufnahmen. Nun, ich selbst habe MRT-Aufnahmen von meinen beiden Knien machen lassen – meine sehen aber nicht so gut aus wie dieses gesunde Knie hier. Hierfür teilten sich Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin nur ein Jahr nachdem Kurt Wüthrich mit dem Nobelpreis in Chemie ausgezeichnet worden war. Ich sollte Ihnen noch erzählen – aber nein, dazu kommen wir später. Ich halte es für möglich, dass noch ein fünfter Nobelpreis für die NMR verliehen wird – in den frühen 90ern hat der in der Abteilung für Biophysik bei AT and T Bell Laboratories tätige Seiji Ogawa nämlich eine völlig unerwartete Entdeckung gemacht. Bei der Untersuchung des Gehirns von Ratten stellte er fest, dass bei Impulsfolgen, die von der Geschwindigkeit der Protonen bei der Bewegung entlang des magnetischen Felds abhängig sind, die Hirnareale, in denen Informationen verarbeitet werden, abgebildet werden können, da diese vom Blutsauerstoffgehalt beeinflusst werden. Diese funktionelle MRT – auch fMRT genannt – gewinnt zunehmende Bedeutung in der Psychologie und wandelt somit eine Sozialwissenschaft in eine Naturwissenschaft – ein wirklich erstaunliches Phänomen. Ich möchte mich jetzt in der verbleibenden Zeit auf meine eigenen Entdeckungen konzentrieren, da ich davon etwas mehr verstehe. Ich möchte aufzeigen, wie es wirklich war, dass wir keinen blassen Schimmer hatten, was wir überhaupt entdeckten, als wir es entdeckten. Und ich glaube, dass es häufig genau nach diesem Schema abläuft. Die Geschichte von Helium 3 ist sehr interessant, es liegt nicht ausreichenden Mengen vor, um eine reine Probe zu erhalten. Im Jahr 1948 verflüssigte der im Los Alamos National Laboratory tätige Ed Hammel als erster Helium 3 und maß den Dampfdruck über der Flüssigkeit. Ed Hammel gehörte einem Team an, das an der Wasserstoffbombe arbeitete und somit über Mengen an Tritium verfügte. Tritium zerfällt bekanntlich zu Helium 3. In den 1950ern und auch noch in den 1960er Jahren untersuchten dann die Tieftemperaturphysiker weltweit die Eigenschaften von flüssigem Helium 3. Das Thema war deshalb interessant, weil die Helium-3-Atome einen Nettospin von ½ haben, d.h. sie sind Fermi-Teilchen wie Leitungselektronen in Metallen. Das Verhalten ist weitgehend identisch. Im Jahr 1957 veröffentlichten Bardeen, Cooper und Schrieffer ihre Supraleitungstheorie und schon bald erkannten einige Theoretiker, wie z.B. Philip Anderson – ein guter Freund von mir – dass diese Theorie dahingehend modifiziert werden müsse, dass andere Fermi-Flüssigkeiten bei niedrigen Temperaturen ein ähnliches Verhalten aufweisen können. In der 1959 als erste veröffentlichten Studie wurde eine Übergangstemperatur in den suprafluiden Zustand von 80 Milligrad angegeben. Innerhalb von sechs bis sieben Jahren hatten Wissenschaftler niedrige Temperaturen von bis zu 1/2000 Grad erreicht und konnten keine Suprafluidität erkennen. laut Lehrmeinung als reine Fata Morgana – wie Erscheinungen nach dem Rauchen von Stoffen, die man lieber nicht rauchen sollte. Nun, als ich dann nach Cornel kam, wurden dort neue Tiefkühltechnologien entwickelt wie z.B. die 3He/4He-Mischungskühlung, die ich als vielversprechende Grundlage für einen neuen Ansatz zur Betrachtung der Natur in einem anderen Kontext ansah. Aus diesem Grund schloss ich mich der Gruppe der Tieftemperaturphysiker an. Diese Entscheidung wurde dann besiegelt durch einen Vortrag von Bob Richardson, der vielleicht sogar hier im Publikum sitzt…? Also der Vortrag ging um eine These von Isaac Pomeranchuk, einem Mitglied der Landau School, die er 1950 aufstellte, d.h. ein Jahr nach der Veröffentlichung der Ergebnisse von Ed Hammels Team. Er hatte eine geringe Wechselwirkung zwischen Kernspins in der festen Phase beobachtet und festgestellt, dass das System eine Entropie von r log 2 aufwies, d.h. nur 2 verfügbare Zustände bis zu einer sehr tiefen Temperatur. Im flüssigen Zustand würde die Entropie schneller sinken, bei einer zerfallenden Fermi-Flüssigkeit verliefe die Abnahme dann wie bei den Leitungselektronen in Metallen linear. Unterhalb einer Temperatur, bei der sich diese beiden Kurven schneiden, würde die Flüssigkeit dann eine geordnete Struktur aufweisen und fest sein – das war ein sehr ungewöhnliches System. Man konnte somit einfach berechnen, dass die latente Erstarrungswärme negativ sein musste. Wenn man nun mit flüssigem Helium 3 begann und den Druck durch Verringerung des Volumens erhöhte, kam an die Schmelzkurve und verringerte entlang der Schmelzkurve schrittweise die Temperatur auf immer niedrigere Werte, bis man schließlich eine sehr tiefe Temperatur erreichte. Hierbei ergibt sich eine Kühlung von 1 Milligrad für jedes Prozent an Flüssigkeit, das in die feste Phase überführt wurde. Genau das hat mich an der Tieftemperaturphysik fasziniert – und im zweiten Jahr meines Aufbaustudiums habe ich dann nach meiner Operation am rechten Knie während der Rekonvaleszenz im Krankenhaus die folgende Zelle entwickelt – das ist die Pomeranchuk-Zelle, die ich bei der Entdeckung der Suprafluidität von Helium 3 verwendet habe. Da Helium 3 sehr teuer ist, habe ich es hier in Gold dargestellt. Um eine Verfestigung zu erreichen, muss man nun das Volumen dieses Behälters reduzieren, zu diesem Zweck wird der Metallfaltenbalg im Innern verschoben. Zur Messung der Temperatur beobachteten wir die Polarisation von Platinkernen entlang des schwachen Magnetfelds mit Hilfe der NMR und maßen gleichzeitig unabhängig davon den Schmelzdruck. Das hier sind die Daten, die ich erhielt – es handelte sich um ein Experiment, das komplett – also, das eigentlich gar nicht funktionieren konnte. Das kann ich an dieser Stelle leider nicht näher erläutern, da es den Zeitrahmen sprengen würde. Hier ist die Kapazität dargestellt, der Druckanstieg wird in vertikaler Richtung entlang der y-Achse abgebildet, während die Zeit nach rechts entlang der x-Achse verläuft. Tatsächlich kühlt das System, da die Schmelzkurve eine negative Steigung aufweist. Ich habe das System dann ausgeglichen und die Kühlung blieb – an dem Punkt, den ich später mit A bezeichnet habe, erkannte man dann einen drastischen Rückgang in der Abkühlgeschwindigkeit. Darüber war ich nicht sehr glücklich und vermutete, dass der Metallfaltenbalg gegen festes Helium 3 drückte und somit irreversible Prozesse auslöste. Ich hatte den Versuch bei 22 Milligrad begonnen und mir wurde klar, dass, wenn ich die flüssige Helium-3-Probe über das lange Wochenende vorkühlte – es war Thanksgiving – ich am darauffolgenden Montag bei 15 Milligrad starten konnte. Dies entsprach der Basistemperatur meines 3He/4He-Mischungskühlers. Ich führte das Experiment dann noch einmal durch und erhielt eine völlig identische Kurve. Angesichts der unterschiedlichen Ausgangsbedingungen erschien es mir sehr unwahrscheinlich, dass der sich zu 1/100.000 wieder einstellende Druck das Ergebnis zufälliger Erwärmung war, sondern vielmehr, dass er ein Anzeichen für einen völlig unerwarteten Phasenübergang innerhalb der Mischung von Helium 3 in flüssiger und fester Form war. Ich ließ die Probe dann weiter abkühlen bis auf eine Temperatur von 1,6 Millikelvin – das wissen wir heute – und beobachtete dabei in der Tat einen winzigen Druckabfall. Dieser wiederum deutete auf einen zweiten Übergang hin. Es stellte sich nun die Frage, ob der Übergang in der flüssigen oder der festen Phase erfolgte. Schließlich entwickelte ich eine sehr frühe Version der Kernspinresonanztomographie. Hier habe ich einen Magnetfeldgradienten angelegt, d.h. das Feld war unten breiter als oben. Als ich dann eine einfache Radiofrequenz an die NMR-Folie anlegte, erhielt ich nur eine dünne Resonanzschicht mit einem Magnetfeld, das den zur Frequenz passenden Wert aufwies. Erhöhte ich dann die Frequenz, bewegte sich die Resonanzschicht nach unten, usw. Dies ist eine CW-Version eines eindimensionalen MRTs. Ich habe Paul Lauterbur bei seinem Besuch in den Bell Laboratories gefragt, ob er meine Studien gelesen hat. Er bestätigte, dass er sie 1972, d.h. in dem Jahr, als sie veröffentlich wurden, gelesen hatte. Nun, ich habe ihm dann nicht die naheliegende Frage gestellt, ob dieser Umstand seine Entscheidung, die Arbeit im Bereich MRT fortzusetzen, beeinflusst hat. Tatsächlich hat er sie aber 1973 wieder aufgenommen. Leider ist er in der Zwischenzeit verstorben, sodass ich ihn nicht mehr fragen kann. Hier sind einige Daten, die wir erfasst haben – in diesem Fall ist der Zeitverlauf auf der x-Achse nach links dargestellt und der Druckanstieg auf der y-Achse nach unten, da ich die Daten umgedreht habe. Man kann sich NMR als Resonanzen nach oben vorstellen, eigentlich aber gehen sie nach unten. Hier geht es also von der Niederfrequenz zur Hochfrequenz, von der Hochfrequenz zur Niederfrequenz und von der Niederfrequenz zur Hochfrequenz. Und da sehen Sie auch die großen Spitzen, d.h. Festphasenspitzen, aber dazwischen erscheint auch ein Flüssigsignal. Wir konnten also diese beiden Signale unterscheiden. Am Übergangspunkt B, der hier dargestellt ist, fielen alle Festphasenspitzen um ein paar Prozent ab, d.h. um 1 bis 2 Prozent. Erst einige Tage später – die Daten wurden am 17. April erfasst – analysierte ich diese dann am 20. April noch einmal und stellte fest, dass das Flüssigsignal nicht um 2% sondern um 50% gefallen war. Zu dem Zeitpunkt, d.h. nachts um 2.40 Uhr, habe ich dann in meinem Laborberichtsbuch vermerkt, dass es eine wundervolle Zeit für Physik sei. Sehr ruhig, keinerlei Ablenkung, weniger Elektrorauschen, weniger Vibrationen – also einfach eine wundervolle Zeit. Habe den BCS-Übergang im flüssigen Helium 3 entdeckt. Nun, eigentlich war ich nur zu dieser Schlussfolgerung gekommen, weil ich die BCS-Theorie nicht so richtig verstanden hatte. Dies hier sind außerordentlich unübliche BCS-Zustände, die ersten, die je erkannt wurden. Das war am 20. April – im frühen Juni, da dachten Dave Lee und ich noch immer, dass der A-Übergang in der Festphase und der B-Übergang eindeutig in der Flüssigphase erfolgte. Wir haben dann den Magnetfeldgradienten eliminiert und die Daten in Abhängigkeit von der Frequenz abgebildet. Wir wollten sehen, ob das Festphasensignal sich beim Abkühlen verschiebt. Wir stellten aber fest, dass sich das Flüssigsignal verschob, was für uns völlig unerwartet und nicht nachvollziehbar war. Bei der Veröffentlichung der Studie veröffentlichten wir dann die Ergebnisse, bezeichneten diese aber nicht als einen BCS-Zustand. Erst als Tony Leggett seine Arbeiten durchgeführt hatte, was in der Tat bemerkenswert schnell ging – Tony teilte sich dann mit anderen den Nobelpreis im Jahr 2003. Nun, Sie wollen mir sicherlich sagen, dass ich nur noch fünf Minuten habe. Wir sind auch fast durch – Strategien – Natur aus einer anderen Perspektive oder in einem anderen Kontext betrachten. Da ist wirklich ein Weg, um interessante physikalische Phänomene zu entdecken. Und Sie erinnern sich, dass ich eines meiner Experimente als vollständig hoffnungslos bezeichnet habe – aber gerade Niederlagen können eine Aufforderung dazu sein, etwas Neues zu versuchen. Und genau das habe ich getan, ich habe ein wenig Zeit auf andere Arbeiten verwendet. Forschung, die aus Neugier betrieben wird, macht Spaß, sie zahlt sich aus und erfordert nicht einmal so furchtbar viel Zeit. Und wenn Sie sich noch im Studium befinden, gehen Sie nicht zu viele Verpflichtungen ein. Hätte ich Kurse in Gesellschaftstanz genommen, – obwohl ich eher chinesische Konversation gewählt hätte, da meine Frau Chinesin ist – dann wäre ich ohne die Ausrüstung, die mich dazu zwang, Experimente durchzuführen, die ich nie geplant hatte, ins Hintertreffen geraten. Dann wäre ich mit meinen chinesischen Sprachkenntnissen aber sicherlich weiter gekommen. Entscheidend ist, dass erfolgreiche Forschung nicht einem bestimmten Zeitplan folgt Zu guter Letzt – und das gilt für alle – nehmen Sie von Zeit zu Zeit etwas Abstand von Ihrer Arbeit, um die zu lösende Aufgabe aus einer anderen Perspektive zu betrachten. Man wird betriebsblind und häufig fokussiert man die Arbeit zu stark. So, jetzt sind wir am Ende. Auf diesem Bild erhalte ich den Nobelpreis – ich habe ein Problem mit Nobelpreisen. Man schaut sie an und denkt „das war Osheroff“. Um korrekt zu sein, müsste man sagen es waren Osheroff, Richardson und Lee – und auch das stimmt nicht. Hier sehen Sie noch einmal unseren Zirkel mit den Namen aller Beteiligten, d.h. der Menschen, die mit entscheidenden Informationen oder Technologien unsere Entdeckung überhaupt möglich gemacht haben – es handelt sich hier um 14 Personen und ich hätte auch genauso gut 24 nennen können. Fortschritte in der Wissenschaft werden nicht durch den Einzelnen erreicht, sondern sind das Ergebnis von Entwicklungen der Wissenschaftsgemeinde in der ganzen Welt, die Fragen stellt und neue Technologien erarbeitet, um diese Fragen zu beantworten und ihre Ergebnisse und Vorstellungen mit anderen teilt. Um einen schnellen Fortschritt zu ermöglichen muss die Forschung auf breiter Ebene gefördert werden und Wissenschaftler müssen dazu aufgefordert werden, sich miteinander auszutauschen und etwas Zeit zusammen zu verbringen, um ihre Neugier zu befriedigen. Und das ist genau der Weg zum Fortschritt in der Wissenschaft! Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Douglas Osheroff (2008) - How Advances in Science are Made
(00:26:40 - 00:31:20)

 The complete video is available here.


A New State of Matter

From the moment Kapitsa first discovered superfluidity, theoreticians began to wonder about the mechanism behind liquid helium’s paradoxical behavior. Landau’s two-fluid hydrodynamical theory, while rewarding in a big-picture sense, did not provide a microscopic view of superfluids.

German physicist Fritz London postulated back in 1938 that the Helium II was undergoing some kind of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at the lambda-point [33]. BEC is a state of matter first predicted by Albert Einstein that occurs in atoms cooled to near absolute zero. At this stage, the individual atoms collapse into a single, shared quantum state at the lowest available energy.

In his Nobel Lab 360°, Ketterle explains the concept of BEC as a new form of matter.

Wolfgang Ketterle – Nobel Lab 360°, clip titled “What is a Bose Einstein Condensate?

London’s colleague, Laszlo Tisza, took the idea a step further by introducing a two-fluid model where the superfluid component was analogous to BEC. The lack of friction or viscosity in a superfluid originated from the coherent motion of atoms in the same single-particle quantum state. Further work in the period 1957 to 1964 brought together the theories of London, Tisza, and Landau to show that BEC is indeed the microscopic basis for superfluidity in liquid helium.

It would be three more decades before the creation of a BEC for the first time in a lab. In June 1995, a BEC comprised of roughly 2.000 rubidium atoms was produced by American physicists Eric A. Cornell and Carl E. Wieman at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) [34]. A few months later, Ketterle did the same at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with even more sodium atoms. These massive achievements represented a culmination of decades of innovative research in the low-temperature sciences.

In his 2008 Lindau lecture, Phillips gives a brief overview of what BEC is, and how to create it in the lab.

William Phillips (2008) - Cold Atomic Gases: the Intersection of Condensed Matter and Atomic Physics

Ok well it’s a great pleasure to be here and it’s particularly an honour to be speaking to so many wonderful young researchers and I’m looking forward to this afternoon when we have a chance to have some more detailed discussions. And for some reason I’ve gone off the first slide. Ok so I’m going to talk about cold atomic gasses, the intersection of condensed matter and atomic physics. And I think everyone realises that in 30 minutes it’s essentially impossible to cover this topic to any extent at all. And so the only thing that I hope to do is to give you a little bit of the flavour of this topic. And if you find that you like the taste of it then perhaps you may want to continue the discussions a little bit more in the afternoon. Now many people in my research group at the Joint Quantum Institute which is a joint operation of the National Institute of Standards in Technology in the University of Maryland. A great many people have contributed to that work. And here are some of the ones who have contributed to the things that I’m going to be talking about today. But I don’t have time even to tell you a little bit about all of those people. But let me show you a photograph of some of them and let me particularly point out the leaders of the group, Ian Spielman and Trey Porto, Kris Helmerson and Paul Lett but if this projector could project red you would see that there’s a red circle around 2 of these people, that’s Eduardo Gomez and this is Pierre Cladé and I’ve circled them in red because they are in the audience. And they know an awful lot about cold atoms and if you find either of these 2 young researchers you can learn a lot about cold atoms from them. So what do cold atomic gasses have to do with condensed matter, well you’ve already gotten a little bit of a taste of this from Ted Haensch’s talk. The thing that they have to do with is that we take a very cold atomic gas, a Bose-Einstein condensate and we put it into a periodic potential, an optical lattice and we observe behaviour that is analogous to the behaviour of electrons in the periodic potential of a crystal lattice. And these things, the cold gas, the Bose-Einstein condensate and the optical lattice are the key components of the experiments that we do and I’ll now try to explain a little bit more about what these are. So what is a Bose condensate? Well in 1923 Einstein figured out based on the new quantum statistics that Satyendra Bose had come up with, he figured out that if you had a gas of particles that were bosons and it turns out that many atoms are bosons. Sodium 23 and Rubidium 87, 2 of my favourite atoms are both bosons. And if you make the gas of these atoms cold enough, typically 100’s of nano Kelvin and dense enough, typically in the order of 10 to the 14 atoms per cubic centimetre, then there’s a phase transition. And the nature of that phase transition is that a large fraction of the atoms in the gas go into the lowest possible energy state. So if you imagine a gas held in some sort of a trap and I’ve represented that here by this potential well and the gas is a normal gas, then various energy levels in this trap are occupied and generally these energy levels are sparsely occupied. But if you achieve the conditions for Bose-Einstein condensation then a large fraction of the atoms will be in the ground state of this potential. And a few of the atoms will be in excited states of that potential. And having all the atoms in the ground state potential gives you this marvellous new state of matter as some people have called it, this Bose-Einstein condensate which is very much as Ted Haensch pointed out, very much for atoms in the same way that a laser or that laser light is for photons. The reason that a laser has the properties that it has is that you have many, many photons occupying the same mode in electromagnetic field. And the thing that gives a Bose-Einstein condensate its wonderful properties is that many, many atoms occupy the same quantum state. So that’s our Bose-Einstein condensate and in many respects we can think of it as being a gas at zero temperature and that’s our starting point for doing many of the experiments. So how do we get there, well I can’t tell you that, we have not enough time. But tricks like laser cooling and magnetic trapping and other tricks allow us to get cold enough and dense enough. And finally the situation is that a typical gas, at least in our laboratory may have millions of atoms, more than 90% of the total are in the same quantum state. The same quantum state of both internal quantum state and centre of mass motion. And the physical size of this gas is quite large. On the order of 100 microns, macroscopic in many senses. Many optical wavelengths in particular. But it’s a gas, the atom-atom interactions can be quite small or depending on the circumstances in the experiments they may become significant. So that’s a Bose-Einstein condensate. What is an optical lattice? Well, let me talk first about the light shift. Let’s say I have an atom and let’s simplify the atom for a moment and think of it as having 2 energy levels, a ground state and an excited state. If I shine light on to that atom and the light is tuned so that the energy of the photons is slightly less than the energy separation between ground and excited state, then there will be a perturbative change of the energy of these states. And the ground state will go down. It’s very much like the start effect when you apply an electric field to an atom in its ground state the energy is lowered. Here you have an oscillating electric field and below resonance it acts very much like a static field, the energy goes down. Now imagine 2 laser fields counter propagating against each other, they will form a standing wave and that means there are, because of the interference between the 2 waves, there are places where the intensity of the light is very high. And in places where the intensity of the light is very low and where the intensity of the light is high the energy of the atoms is shifted down and where the intensity of the light is zero the energy is not shifted at all. So that means that you have a periodic change of the energy shift of the atoms which means you have a periodic potential in which the atoms move. So that periodic potential in which the atoms move is analogous to the periodic potential in which electrons may move in a crystal and solid. So that’s the optical lattice. Now I’ve indicated that we want to think of the optical lattice as being analogous to the periodic potential for atoms in a solid but there are many differences. And of course I’m going to emphasise the differences that make an optical lattice better than a solid. So one of those is that the optical lattice is essentially free of dislocations and defects. The laser light that makes the optical lattice can be extremely pure, highly coherent and the lattice is almost perfect. The atoms that move in this lattice can be either bosons or fermions. I’ve talked so far only about bosons but it's possible to do similar experiments with fermions and then you get to choose what kind of quantum statistics you want to use in your periodic structure. There are no phonon, a phonon is an excitation of the lattice itself. In our case the lattice is imposed externally, so that the finite temperature that you may have in the system does not result in real phonons. So that is one thing that we are completely free of. The potential is exactly known, it’s very difficult to know exactly what the potential is in which electrons move in a solid and people make all sorts of wonderful approximations. We can calculate what our potential is and not only that, we can turn it on and off, we can move it, we can modulate it, so we can do many things that it is very difficult to do in a solid system. And there are other features that are important for these optical lattices as well. Now how do we put these things together, how do we put a Bose condensate into an optical lattice. Typically we make a Bose condensate in some sort of a magnetic trap. And that’s what I’ve illustrated here. The blue part is the Bose condensate and we have some sort of potential that’s a magnetic trap. And then what we do is we simply turn on the laser field that creates this optical lattice and we can then if we want turn off the magnetic trap and we have transferred the atoms from the magnetic trap into the optical lattice. And if we do this carefully the atoms will still be in the lowest energy state, in the ground state. And we will have split this Bose condensate into a bunch of little tiny Bose condensates. And if I do this with a one dimensional laser field, then I will make a series of pancakes. And typically I’ll have a few hundred pancakes in this one dimensional optical lattice. And we can also make 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional lattices, space lattices, things that really look like crystals. And we can make systems that are 1, 2 or 3 dimensional as well. This 1 dimensional lattice in a sense divides the Bose condensate into a number of 2 dimensional systems. Now here is an important slide, so you have to pay attention to this, because this has to do with how we learn what is going on with our atoms in this optical lattice. If I have atoms in an optical lattice then what I’ve done is I’ve taken the Bose condensate and I’ve divided it into a bunch of little mini condensates and that means that the wave function that describes the Bose condensate is periodic. At least periodic over a few hundred lattice sites. Now if you take the Fourier transform of a periodic function which is to say if you find what the momentum wave function is, when you take the Fourier transform of a periodic function you find that it has components at momentum values that are themselves periodic. It’s just the nature of the Fourier transform. And if I then turn off the lattice, I don’t change the momentum of the atoms, it is whatever the momentum was when the lattice was on. And now the different momentum components which are spaced periodically in momentum space, separate. And after a certain time I take a picture of where the atoms are and the atoms that have lots of momentum have moved a long way and the atoms that have zero momentum have not moved at all. And here is a picture of the atoms released from this optical lattice after a certain time. So this is a picture of the momentum distribution. This is the momentum wave function or the square of the momentum wave function of the atoms. And you see that there are a lot of atoms that have zero momentum, these are the ones that didn’t move and there are some atoms that have plus a certain amount of momentum and minus a certain amount of momentum. And the amount of momentum that they have is what we call the reciprocal lattice momentum and is equal to 2 times the photon momentum. Because the way the atoms get this momentum is they absorb and emit the momentum of the photons. And this is in other context called diffraction, if you have a periodic structure and you shine light on it, like a diffraction grading it breaks up into these pieces and that’s exactly what's happening with our atoms. And analysing the momentum of the atoms in this way is one of the major tools that we use to determine what's going on with our atoms. Ok now since we have a periodic structure as is the case in a crystal and lattice, we’re going to use the same mathematical tools that are used to study crystal lattices, namely Bloch states and band structure. So if you turn to the beginning of most books on condensed matter physics you’ll see that the eigenfunctions of a particle moving in a periodic potential are called Bloch states and the Bloch states have this form, the Bloch state psi(x) is the product of a function U, times an exponential factor E to the IQ X over H bar. Now U is periodic in space as you might imagine for a periodic function but it's multiplied by this phase factor which if you only had just this term, it would look like an eigenstate of momentum in free space. And the momentum would be Q. And so we call Q the quasi momentum, it’s not really the momentum but it’s very much like the momentum and it has properties very much like momentum. But we multiply this momentum eigenfunction in free space times a periodic function and what we get are the eigenfunctions for a periodic potential. And this is a picture of what the eigenvalues look like as a function of this quasi momentum Q and you see that there are energy gaps. And these are the famous energy gaps that occur in condensed matter physics. And this is a picture of what it would look like if the lattice potential is quite weak. If we increase the strength of the lattice potential here is what the band structure looks like, you can sort of see the traces of the parabolic shape. You see if the particles are in free space then of course the energy as a function of momentum is just P squared over 2 M, a parabola. But these energy gaps open up because it’s periodic. And here in this calculation for a deeper lattice, you can sort of see the traces of the parabolic nature. But one of the things that happens is that the ground stage is starting to become flat, that is the ground band. And as the depth of the lattice increases this ground band becomes increasingly flatter. And we will soon see why it is important that the ground band is flat for a deep lattice. But first let me say something about what happens when I put a condensate, a Bose condensate into an optical lattice, what is its quasi momentum. When its momentum is zero because the atoms are hardly moving, I put it into an optical lattice and the momentum is still zero or the quasi momentum is zero. It has other momentum components but its quasi momentum is zero. The phase from one lattice site to the next is essentially unchanged. How do I get to other quasi momentum? Well, the way I do is I move the lattice and I go into the moving frame of the lattice. And from the moving frame of the lattice it looks as if the condensate is moving. And so the condensate has a non zero quasi momentum in the moving frame. How do I move the lattice, it's easy, if I have 2 counterpropagating laser beams of the same frequency, it makes a standing wave and we call it a standing wave because it’s not moving. But if I use 2 different frequencies it’s a moving standing wave or sometimes people call it a walking wave, so that I have, the wave is moving along like this. And it's easy to do that and I can make the lattice move at whatever velocity I want and from the point of view of the lattice the atoms now have a non zero quasi momentum. Now how do the atoms behave in that lattice frame. Well one of the things that determines how they behave is their group velocity. The group velocity is just the velocity at which a wave packet would move if it has the momentum or the quasi momentum that is centred on the quasi momentum that we’re describing. And the group velocity is given by the derivative of the energy as a function of the quasi momentum with respect to that momentum. Now for a free particle that’s easy to calculate because the energy is just P squared over 2 M and if I take the derivative of that with respect to P I get P over M which is V, the ordinary velocity. But if it’s in a lattice and the lattice is very strong, we saw that the band structure of a lattice is such that the band is flat, that means the derivative of the energy with respect to quasi momentum is nearly zero. And that means that the group velocity in a very deep lattice is nearly zero. So the atoms are frozen in the lattice. Well that’s not surprising if the lattice is very deep, the atoms are trapped very strongly, they’re frozen, in the frame of a lattice. So that means that if I go into the laboratory frame and the lattice is moving along, what that means is the atoms are being dragged by the lattice. So that’s what we expect to happen, that the atoms will be dragged by a lattice that is very deep. So now I want to give you a kind of mechanical analogue of making an optical lattice and then moving it. So my optical lattice, my moving optical lattice I think of as being a conveyor belt and it’s a very special sort of conveyor belt that allows me to create on it corrugations in which the atoms may sit and be dragged along. So I imagine that I’ve got some atoms and they’re sitting on top of the conveyor belt and the conveyor belt is at rest so the atoms are at rest with respect to the conveyor belt. Then I turn on the modulation of this conveyor belt and the atoms become trapped in these valleys of the conveyor belt. And then I start the wheels going on the conveyor belt and the atoms start to move. Now if the lattice is deep then it means that the atoms will be dragged along by the lattice. And we should be able to tell that by turning the lattice off and looking at the momentum of the atoms. So here’s the experiment that we’re going to do. We’re going to turn on the lattice, this is the depth of the lattice. Now when the lattice has achieved a certain depth, deep enough to drag the atoms, then we start to increase the Q, that is increase the velocity of the lattice. And then we’re going to reach some final velocity, stay at that velocity and then suddenly turn off the lattice and then look at what the momentum of the atoms is. So here is a picture of the distribution of atoms when the lattice velocity is zero. This is just a fraction, we’ve already seen this before, most of the atoms are at zero momentum, some are at plus and minus 2 photon recoils. And the average momentum is zero, which is what you would expect because the lattice is not moving. And measuring the momentum of the atoms in the lab frame, but in the lattice frame the quasi momentum of the atoms is equal to the negative of the velocity of the lattice in the lab frame. And then if I ask how this changes as the velocity of the lattice changes, you see that the average momentum of the atom increases exactly as the velocity of the lattice does. So the lattice is indeed dragging the atoms along. And here’s the confirmation, that the average velocity of the atoms is equal, if you figure it out, we’ve done this carefully and the average velocity of the atoms is equal to the velocity of the lattice. Now let’s do a different experiment, almost the same thing. We’re going to put the atoms on to the conveyor belt, we’re going to turn on the modulations, the corrugations, so the atoms are trapped. We’re going to start the conveyor belt moving and we know that the atoms are dragged and now instead of turning the laser off suddenly, I’m going to turn the laser off slowly. And I’m going to ask you what do you think the velocity of the atoms is going to be, and let me emphasise what the experiment is. Here are some atoms, I turn on the optical lattice represented by my fingers and the atoms are now trapped in between my fingers and now I move the lattice along like this at some velocity and the atoms are dragged because we know, because we’ve already measured them. And now instead of turning the lattice off suddenly, the way I did in the last experiment, I’m going to slowly turn the lattice off and then ask what will the velocity of the atoms be. And it’s a multiple choice question, so how many vote that the velocity of the atoms will be the velocity of the lattice. As it was in the previous experiment, well we have a few brave souls who are willing to express an opinion. How many think that the velocity of the atoms will be zero, oh a few people, ok. How many think that it will be something in between the velocity of the lattice and zero, ah a lot of people believe it will be somewhere in between. How many don’t know, ah ok good. How many believe that it is none of the above. Ok well let’s find out. The way you do things in physics is you do the experiment. Ok so here’s, oh gee the colours look horrible here. So what's going on here, this just shows what the sequence of events in the experiment is. We turn the lattice on, once it’s on to a fairly deep value, then we start to accelerate the lattice. We reach some final value and then we slowly turn the lattice off. Now here’s the result, first I’m going to show you the result when the velocity is zero, here I’ve returned the lattice on slowly, I’ve turned it off slowly and I’m right back where I started because if I do everything adiabatically, I finish where I began. And there are the atoms sitting at zero velocity. There’s no diffraction pattern because I turned it off slowly and I re-collapsed all those momentum components that existed in the lattice because I adiabatically returned to where I was. So I’ve just got one component right here. And everybody expected that when the atoms are not moving, they’re not moving. Now what happens as I start to accelerate the lattice? The velocity stays zero. Now let me emphasise how odd this is. So those of you who said zero, you were partly right. So remember the atoms are being dragged along like this at a constant velocity and then you slowly turn off the light and the atoms are at rest. How can that be, what happened to the law of inertia. Well these atoms are quantum mechanical, they remember what their phase is. And their phase is constant and constant phase means no velocity. How do they go from moving to not moving, well they exchange momentum with the lattice. So up until the velocity of the lattice is equal to one recoil velocity, that is the momentum of a photon in an atom which for sodium atoms is about 3 centimetres per second, it’s the edge of the Brillouin zone for those of you who are condensed matter physicists. Until you get to the edge of the Brillouin zone the velocity atoms is zero. And then when you get to the Brillouin zone the velocity jumps to twice the velocity of the lattice. And continues to be that until you go to 3 times the photon recoil which is another 2 Brillouin zones further and then the velocity jumps again. So the velocity is never anything in between the reciprocal lattice vectors, it keeps jumping by reciprocal lattice vector. And so the answer was none of the above, the velocity depends on the situation and it’s never, well except accidentally, equal to the velocity of the lattice. And almost never equal to the velocity of the lattice and it has this rather odd behaviour. This whole procedure, this whole thing is an extremely simple application of band structure and Bloch functions. And in another context is called Bloch oscillations. And if you want to understand more in detail about this come to the discussion this afternoon. So far I’ve told you about experiments that do not involve the interactions of the atoms, the atoms are non interacting particles, an ideal gas and we’ve seen that sort of rather interesting behaviour even for an interaction free system. But now I want to talk about what happens when I have interactions. Some experiments where the interactions play a role. Well one of these was already spoken of by Ted Haensch in his talk, the MOTT insulator transition. This is a quantum phase transition. Now quantum phase transitions are odd things. We typically think of them as happening at zero temperature, they occur not because I changed some thermodynamic variable like the temperature, they happen because I change some other thing having to do for example with the Hamiltonian of the system but not a thermodynamic variable. So that’s what distinguishes quantum phase transitions from thermodynamic phase transitions. The ones we are usually familiar with. And what it does is it changes something from being, if it’s an electron system, from being a conductor to being an insulator or in the case of the atoms, from being a super fluid to being a kind of an insulator. It’s something that’s very difficult to see in condensed matter physics but it’s responsible for determining the insulator or conductor properties of many materials. So with atoms we would like to see this transition. So here is a model that can exhibit the MOTT insulator transition, it’s called the Bose Hubbard model. We imagine a periodic potential here and we just think of 2 things about this periodic potential. How easy it is for atoms to tunnel from one side to the other and how much energy cost there is if 2 atoms occupy the same site. Because if I have 2 atoms on the same site and they repel each other, there’s a certain energy cost for having 2 atoms be on the same site. So there’s a certain energy U and there’s a certain tunnelling rate T between the sites and that’s all that goes into this Hamiltonian. And that’s all you need in order to see the MOTT insulator transition. So when the tunnelling is very big and the atoms can easily move between lattice sites, then you have the super fluid phase and the atoms, every atom is in every site and freely moves between the sites, it's very much like a Bose condensate. On the other hand if you reduce the tunnelling so the tunnelling is smaller, then the energy when 2 atoms occupy the same site and I certainly didn’t mean this colour to be yellow so that you couldn’t see it, but the projector isn’t projecting red I guess, so these things are really green on my screen, but anyway. So there’s supposed to be one atom per lattice site. When the tunnelling is small enough then you get one atom per lattice site. And we can tell the difference between these systems because when the atoms are everywhere, then you turn the lattice off you will get diffraction, just as we saw before. But when you have one atom per lattice site, because of the number phase uncertainly relationship you know exactly what the number is per site which means you have no idea what the phase is. And that means you won’t get any diffraction because you don’t have the right phase relationship to see diffraction. So the disappearance of diffraction will be an indicator of having gone into the MOTT state. Now the first experiments of these were done in Ted Haensch’s laboratory a few years ago, we’ve recently done experiments in a very nice 2 dimensional system and here as we increase the depth of the lattice you can see that the diffraction pattern goes away. So it’s doing the right thing. But we want it to do more, we want it to nail down exactly where the phase transition was occurring. So by looking in detail at the diffraction pattern and extracting from the diffraction pattern the part that is sharp and the part that is broad and fuzzy. And plotting that sharp part, which is the part that still maintains its phase, as a function of lattice depth, we have this very nice behaviour where it comes down sharply to zero and then continues to be zero, that is no condensate, no long range phase for deeper and deeper lattices. And we compared the place where this thing went to zero with a quantum Monte Carlo calculation and essentially have perfect agreement. A few years ago that quantum Monte Carlo calculation was too difficult to be done. So what we have here in a sense is a simulation of the Bose Hubbard model. A model that until a few years ago was too difficult to calculate in detail at the level necessary to see this kind of quantum phase transition. And we have made that model a reality in the laboratory and gotten a very good agreement with the theoretical calculation. Well there are many other places where people are doing the theory and the experiments of these kinds of systems, atoms and optical lattices including Ted Haensch’s laboratory in Munich. And let me just draw a few conclusions now about this kind of work. So the obvious thing that I started with is the cold atoms in optical lattices are a simplified analogue to electrons and crystals. Now whenever you want to study electrons and crystals, theoretically you always make certain simplifying assumptions. What we do here with our atoms and optical lattices is we realise those simplified assumptions in a real experiment. So it’s not a mathematical version of the simplified optical lattice, it’s an experimental version, of the simplified condensed matter lattice, it’s an experimental version of the simplified condensed matter lattice. And because of the unique features of control and measurement we can see things that are very difficult or sometimes impossible to see in a condensed matter system, like the Bloch oscillations which are very hard to see, like the MOTT insulator transition which is very difficult to actually undergo the transition in a solid state system. But more importantly these simple condensed matter models that one thinks of are actually realised in the optical lattice. And so the cold atoms are a kind of analogue quantum computer where we can compute these simplified models. Not that we’re computing what's happening in the solid, we’re computing what the simplified model of the solid predicts. Very often under circumstances that are very difficult to compute with real computers, we can do it with our cold atoms. And my final point is that this intersection of cold atoms and condensed matter is a wonderfully exciting and growing field in which the opportunities are very, very strong for each of the disciplines, condensed matter and atomic physics to learn from each other. And so if you’re interested in knowing more about that come this afternoon. Now let me just end my talk with a few comments about Ivar Giaever’s talk this morning. He gave you lots and lots of advice about how you should do science and that advice was excellent advice. And I certainly agree that you should follow it. And if you follow it you might have a 1/10th% change of getting a Nobel Prize. The reason why you should follow that advice is not because you want to win a Nobel Prize, the reason you should follow that advice is because you want to do exciting physics. And that is an excellent prescription for doing exciting physics, is following that kind of advice. But I do want to take issue with one thing that he said, he said that physicists are really competitive and that’s true and then he said that physicists are not very nice people, now you know everything I know about him, he’s a pretty nice person. There are a lot of physicists who are really nice people, there are a lot of physicists who are not very nice people. I don’t believe that getting a Nobel Prize has anything to do with whether you’re a nice person or not. And I don’t think doing exciting physics and having a lot of fun doing physics, well actually it does have something to do with being a nice person. And so since winning a Nobel prize I don’t think has anything to do with being a nice person and since getting exciting results out of your physics, I don’t think has anything to do with whether or not you’re a nice person – why not be a nice person anyway? Thank you very much.

Gut, nun ich bin sehr erfreut hier zu sein und es ist eine besondere Ehre, hier zu so vielen wunderbaren Nachwuchswissenschaftlern zu sprechen und ich freue mich auf heute Nachmittag, wenn wir die Gelegenheit zu detaillierteren Diskussionen haben werden. Und aus irgendeinem Grund bin ich nicht mehr auf der ersten Folie. Gut, ich werde also über kalte, atomare Gase sprechen, die Überschneidung von Festkörper- und Atomphysik. Ich denke, hier realisiert jeder, dass es unmöglich ist, dieses Thema in 30 Minuten auch nur annähernd abzudecken. Das einzige, was ich hoffe machen zu können, ist, Ihnen ein bisschen den Geschmack dieses Themas zu vermitteln. Und wenn Sie finden, dass Sie den Geschmack mögen, dann können wir vielleicht die Diskussionen heute Nachmittag ein wenig fortführen. Nun, da gibt es viele Menschen in meiner Forschungsgruppe am Joint Quantum Institute, das gemeinsam vom National Institute of Standards in Technology und der Universität von Maryland betrieben wird. Eine große Zahl von Leuten hat zu dieser Arbeit beigetragen. Und hier sind einige derjenigen, die Beträge zu dem geliefert haben, worüber ich heute sprechen werde. Ich habe aber noch nicht einmal Zeit, Ihnen ein wenig über diese Personen zu erzählen. Aber ich möchte Ihnen ein Foto von einigen von Ihnen zeigen, und lassen Sie mich die Gruppenleiter zeigen, Ian Spielman und Trey Porto, Kris Helmerson und Paul Lett, aber wenn dieser Projektor rot projizieren könnte, würden Sie sehen, dass es da einen roten Kreis um zwei der Personen gibt, das ist Eduardo Gomez und das ist Pierre Cladé, sie sind rot eingekreist, weil sie im Publikum sind. Sie wissen eine ganze Menge über kalte Atome, und wenn Sie irgendeinen dieser zwei Nachwuchswissenschaftler finden können, können Sie von ihnen eine Menge über kalte Atome lernen. Was haben also kalte atomare Gase mit Festkörpern zu tun. Nun, Sie haben schon einen kleinen Vorgeschmack darauf in Ted Hänschs Vortrag bekommen. Das, was sie damit zu tun haben, ist: wenn man ein kaltes atomares Gas nimmt, ein Bose-Einstein-Kondensat, und es in ein periodisches Potential gibt, ein optisches Gitter, dass man dann ein Verhalten analog zu dem Verhalten von Elektronen in dem periodischen Potential eines Kristallgitters beobachtet. Und diese Dinge, das kalte Gas, das Bose-Einstein-Kondensat und das optische Gitter, sind die Schlüsselkomponenten der Experimente, die wir durchführen, und ich werde nun versuchen, ein wenig näher zu erklären, was diese Dinge sind. Was ist also ein Bose-Kondensat? Im Jahr 1923 fand Einstein heraus, basierend auf der neuen Quantenstatistik, die Satyendra Bose gefunden hat, er fand heraus, dass, wenn man ein Gas von Teilchen hat, die Bosonen sind, und es stellt sich heraus, dass viele Atome Bosonen sind, Natrium 23 und Rubidium 87, zwei meiner Lieblingsatome sind beides Bosonen, und wenn man das Gas dieser Atome kalt genug macht, typischerweise einige hundert nano-Kelvin, und dicht genug, typischerweise von der Größenordnung 10 hoch 14 Atome pro Kubikzentimeter, dann gibt es einen Phasenübergang. Und es liegt in der Natur dieses Phasenübergangs, dass ein großer Teil der Atome in dem Gas in den niedrigsten möglichen Energiezustand übergeht. Wenn Sie sich ein Gas vorstellen, dass in einer Art Falle gehalten wird, und ich habe dies hier durch eine Potentialmulde dargestellt, und wenn das Gas ein normales Gas ist, dann sind verschiedene Energiezustände in dieser Falle besetzt und diese Energiezustände sind spärlich besetzt. Aber wenn man die Bedingungen für eine Bose-Einstein-Kondensation erreicht, dann wird ein großer Teil der Atome im Grundzustand dieses Potentials sein. Und ein paar Atome werden in angeregten Zuständen dieses Potentials sein. Und wenn man all die Atome im Grundzustand des Potentials hat, bekommt man diesen tollen neuen Zustand der Materie, wie einige Leute es genannt haben, dieses Bose-Einstein-Kondensat, das für Atome genau dasselbe ist, wie Ted Hänsch aufgezeigt hat, wie ein Laser oder Laserlicht für Photonen. Der Grund, dass ein Laser die Eigenschaften hat, die er hat, ist dass viele, viele Photonen dieselbe Mode des elektromagnetischen Felds bevölkern. Und das, was einem Bose-Einstein-Kondensat seine wunderbaren Eigenschaften verleiht, ist, dass viele, viele Atome denselben Quantenzustand bevölkern. So, das ist unser Bose-Einstein-Kondensat, und in vielfacher Hinsicht können wir es uns als ein Gas bei null Grad Temperatur vorstellen, und das ist unser Ausgangspunkt, um viele der Experimente durchzuführen. Aber wie kommen wir dort hin, nun, das kann ich Ihnen nicht sagen, wir haben nicht genügend Zeit. Aber Tricks wie Laserkühlung und magnetische Fallen und andere Kniffe erlauben es uns, kalt und dicht genug zu werden. Und schließlich ist die Situation die eines typischen Gases, wenigstens in unserem Labor kann es einige Millionen Atome haben, mehr als 90% davon sind in demselben Quantenzustand. Demselben Quantenzustand von sowohl dem internen Quantenzustand wie auch der Schwerpunktbewegung. Und die physikalische Größe dieses Gases ist sehr groß. Von der Größenordnung 100 Mikrometer, makroskopisch, in vielfacher Hinsicht. Insbesondere viele optische Wellenlängen. Aber es ist ein Gas, die intra-atomaren Wechselwirkungen können recht klein sein, oder, je nach den Umständen in dem Experiment, können sie signifikant werden. So, das ist ein Bose-Einstein-Kondensat. Was ist ein optisches Gitter? Nun, lassen Sie mich erst über die Lichtverschiebung reden. Sagen wir einmal, ich habe ein Atom, und lassen Sie uns dieses Atom vereinfachen und denken, es habe zwei Energieniveaus, einen Grundzustand und einen angeregten Zustand. Wenn ich Licht auf dieses Atome werfe und das Licht ist so abgestimmt, dass die Energie des Photons etwas weniger ist als der Energieabstand zwischen Grundzustand und angeregtem Zustand, dann wird es eine Änderung der Energie dieser Zustände durch eine Störung geben. Und der Grundzustand wird niedriger werden. Das ist dem Stark-Effekt sehr ähnlich, wenn man ein elektrisches Feld an ein Atom im Grundzustand anlegt, wird die Energie niedriger. Hier haben wir ein elektrisches Wechselfeld, und unterhalb der Resonanz wird es sich wie ein statisches Feld verhalten, die Energie wird niedriger. Nun, stellen Sie sich zwei Laserfelder vor, die sich gegeneinander bewegen, sie werden eine stehende Welle erzeugen, und das bedeutet, dass es wegen der Interferenz zwischen den zwei Wellen Stellen gibt, wo die Intensität des Lichts sehr hoch ist. Und an den Stellen, wo die Lichtintensität sehr niedrig ist, und wo die Lichtintensität sehr hoch ist, wird die Energie des Atoms verringert, und wo die Lichtintensität Null ist, wird die Energie überhaupt nicht verschoben. Das bedeutet, dass man eine periodische Veränderung der Energieverschiebung der Atome hat, das bedeutet, dass man ein periodisches Potential hat, in dem sich die Atome bewegen. Das periodische Potential, in dem sich die Atome bewegen, ist analog zu dem periodischen Potential, in dem sich Elektronen in einem Kristall und einem Festkörper bewegen. So, das ist das optische Gitter. Nun habe ich angedeutet, dass wir uns das optische Gitter analog zu dem periodischen Potential für Atome in einem Festkörper vorstellen wollen, aber es gibt viele Unterschiede. Und ich werde natürlich die Unterschiede herausheben, die das optische Gitter besser machen als einen Festkörper. Einer davon ist es, dass das optische Gitter keine Versetzungen hat und keine Fehlstellen. Das Laserlicht, das das optische Gitter produziert, kann sehr rein sein, hochkohärent, und das Gitter ist fast perfekt. Die Atome, die sich in diesem Gitter bewegen, können entweder Bosonen sein oder Fermionen. Bis jetzt habe ich nur über Bosonen gesprochen, aber es ist möglich, ähnliche Experimente mit Fermionen durchzuführen, und dann kann man wählen, welche Art von Quantenstatistik man in den periodischen Strukturen benutzen will. Da gibt es keine Phononen, ein Phonon ist eine Anregung des Gitters selbst. In unserem Fall ist das Gitter extern aufgeprägt, so dass die endliche Temperatur, die man in dem System haben kann, nicht echte Phononen als Resultat haben kann. Das ist also eine Sache, die wir überhaupt nicht haben. Das Potential ist genau bekannt, es ist sehr schwer, genau zu wissen, was das Potential ist, in dem sich Elektronen in einem Festkörper bewegen, und man macht alle möglichen, wundervollen Näherungen. Wir können berechnen, was das Potenzial ist, und nicht nur das, wir können es an- und ausschalten, wir können es bewegen, wir können es modulieren, wir können also viele Sachen machen, die in einem Festkörpersystem nur schwierig machbar sind. Und da gibt es noch andere Eigenarten, die für diese optischen Gitter auch wichtig sind. Nun, wie fügen wir diese Dinge zusammen, wie bringen wir ein Bose-Kondensat in ein optisches Gitter hinein? Typischerweise stellen wir ein Bose-Kondensat in einer Art magnetischer Falle her. Und das ist es, was hier dargestellt ist. Der blaue Teil ist das Bose-Kondensat und wir haben eine Art von Potential, das ist die magnetische Falle. Und was wir dann einfach machen, ist, dass wir das Laserfeld, das das optische Gitter produziert, einschalten und wir können dann, wenn wir wollen, das magnetische Feld ausschalten, und haben dann die Atome von der magnetischen Falle in das optische Gitter transferiert. Wenn wir dies sorgfältig machen, sind die Atome noch im niedrigsten Energiezustand, dem Grundzustand. Und wir haben dieses Bose-Kondensat in ein Bündel von kleinen, winzigen Bose-Kondensaten aufgespalten. Wenn ich das mit einem eindimensionalen Laserfeld mache, dann erzeuge ich eine Serie von Pfannkuchen. Und typischerweise werde ich in diesem eindimensionalen optischen Gitter eine paar hundert Pfannkuchen haben. Und wir können zweidimensionale und dreidimensionale Gitter herstellen, Raumgitter, Dinge die wirklich wie Kristalle aussehen. Und wir können auch Systeme herstellen, die 1, 2 oder 3 Dimensionen haben. In gewisser Hinsicht teilt dieses eindimensionale Gitter das Bose-Kondensat in eine Anzahl von zweidimensionalen Systemen. Nun, hier ist eine wichtige Folie, dies müssen Sie sich genau anschauen, weil dies damit zu tun hat, wie wir erfahren, was mit unseren Atomen in diesem optischen Gitter passiert. Wenn ich Atome in einem optischen Gitter habe, dann habe ich das Folgende gemacht: Ich habe ein Bose-Kondensat genommen und es in ein Bündel von kleinen Minikondensaten aufgeteilt, und das bedeutet, dass die Wellenfunktion, die das Bose-Kondensat beschreibt, periodisch ist. Wenigstens periodisch über ein paar hundert Gitterplätze. Nun, wenn man die Fouriertransformation einer periodischen Funktion nimmt, das heißt, wenn man herausfindet, was die Impulswellenfunktion ist, wenn man die Fouriertransformation einer periodischen Funktion nimmt, dann findet man, dass sie Komponenten bei Impulswerten hat, die selbst periodisch sind. Das ist einfach die Natur der Fouriertransformation. Und wenn ich das Gitter abschalte, ändere ich den Impuls der Atome nicht, der bleibt, was immer auch der Impuls war, als das Gitter angeschaltet war. Und nun trennen sich die unterschiedlichen Impulskomponenten, die im Impulsraum periodisch angeordnet waren. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit nehme ich ein Bild auf, wo die Atome sind, und die Atome, die einen großen Impuls haben, haben sich eine weite Strecke wegbewegt, und die Atome mit Impuls null haben sich überhaupt nicht bewegt. Und hier ist ein Bild der Atome, die nach einer gewissen Zeit aus diesem optischen Gitter freigesetzt wurden. So, dies ist ein Bild der Impulsverteilung. Dies ist die Impulswellenfunktion oder das Quadrat der Impulswellenfunktion der Atome. Und man sieht, da gibt es eine Menge Atome, die den Impuls null haben, dies sind diejenigen, die sich nicht bewegt haben und da gibt es einige Atome, die plus eine bestimmte Impulsmenge haben und minus eine bestimmte Impulsmenge. Und die Impulsmenge, die sie haben, nennen wir den reziproken Gitterimpuls, und er ist gleich dem zweifachen des Photonenimpulses. Denn die Atome erhalten diesen Impuls, indem sie den Impuls der Photonen absorbieren und emittieren. Dies wird in einem anderen Zusammenhang Beugung genannt, wenn man eine periodische Struktur hat und man sie mit Licht beleuchtet, wie in einem Beugungsgitter, dann spaltet es sich in diese Teile, und das ist genau das, was mit unseren Atomen passiert. Und die Analyse des Atomimpulses auf diesem Weg ist eins der wichtigsten Werkzeuge, die wir benutzen, um zu bestimmen, was mit unseren Atomen passiert. Gut, da wir eine periodische Struktur haben wie im Fall von Kristallen und Gittern, benutzten wir dieselben mathematischen Werkzeuge, die wir benutzen, um Kristallgitter zu studieren, nämlich Blochzustände und Bandstrukturen. Wenn man sich den Anfang der meisten Bücher über Festkörperphysik ansieht, dann sieht man, dass die Eigenfunktion eines Teilchens, das sich in einem periodischen Potential bewegt, Blochzustand genannt wird und Blochzustände haben diese Form, der Blochzustand psi(x) ist das Produkt einer Funktion U, multipliziert mit einem Exponentialfaktor e hoch iq x geteilt durch h quer. Nun, U ist periodisch im Raum, wie man sich das für eine periodische Funktion vorstellt, aber es ist mit diesem Phasenfaktor multipliziert, der, wenn man nur diesen Term hat, wie ein Eigenzustand eines Impulses im freien Raum aussehen würde. Und der Impulse wäre q. Daher nennen wir q den Quasiimpuls, es ist eigentlich kein Impuls, aber es ist genau wie ein Impuls und hat Eigenschaften genau wie ein Impuls. Aber wir multiplizieren diese Impulseigenfunktion im freien Raum mit einer periodischen Funktion und heraus kommen die Eigenfunktionen für ein periodisches Potential. Und dies ist ein Bild, wie die Eigenwerte als Funktion dieses Quasiimpulses q aussehen, und man sieht, dass es da Energielücken gibt. Und das sind die berühmten Energielücken, die in der Festkörperphysik auftreten. Dies ist ein Bild, wie es aussähe, wenn das Gitterpotential recht schwach ist. Wenn wir die Stärke des Gitterpotentials erhöhen, dann sieht die Bandstruktur so aus, man kann sehen, dass es parabelförmig verläuft. Man sieht, wenn die Teilchen im freien Raum sind, dann ist die Energie als Funktion des Impulses natürlich nur p zum Quadrat geteilt durch 2m, eine Parabel. Aber diese Energielücken entstehen, weil es periodisch ist. Und hier ist die Rechnung für ein tieferes Gitter, man kann sehen, dass es parabolisch verläuft. Aber eine Sache, die passiert, ist, dass der Grundzustand anfängt, flach zu werden, das ist das niedrigste Band. Und wenn die Tiefe des Gitters sich vergrößert, wird dieses niedrigste Band flacher und flacher. Und wir werden gleich sehen, warum es wichtig ist, dass das niedrigste Band für tiefe Gitter flach ist. Aber lassen Sie mich zunächst etwas sagen über das, was passiert, wenn ich ein Kondensat, ein Bose-Kondensat, in ein optisches Gitter hineingebe, was dann sein Quasiimpuls ist. Wenn sein Impuls null ist, weil die Atome sich kaum bewegen, setze ich es in ein optisches Gitter und der Impuls ist immer noch null, oder der Quasiimpuls ist null. Es hat andere Impulskomponenten, aber sein Quasiimpuls ist null. Die Phase ist von einem Gitterplatz zum nächsten praktisch unverändert. Wie komme ich dann zu anderen Quasiimpulsen? Nun, um dies zu tun, bewege ich das Gitter, und ich gehe in ein bewegtes Koordinatensystem des Gitters. Und von dem bewegten System des Gitters ausgehend sieht es aus, als ob sich das Kondensat bewegt. Und so hat das Kondensat einen Impuls im bewegten System, der von Null verschieden ist. Wie bewege ich das Gitter – das ist einfach, ich habe zwei Laserstrahlen derselben Frequenz, die sich auf einander zu bewegen, wir nennen dies eine stehende Welle, weil sie sich nicht bewegt. Aber wenn ich zwei verschiedene Frequenzen benutze, dann ist es eine sich bewegende stehende Welle, oder manchmal wird es wandernde Welle genannt, das habe ich also, die Welle bewegt sich so wie hier. Das kann man leicht machen, ich kann das Gitter mit jeder Geschwindigkeit bewegen lassen, und aus der Sichtweise des Gitters haben die Atome nun einen Quasiimpuls, der von null verschieden ist. Nun, wie verhalten sich die Atome in diesem Gitterbezugsrahmen? Eins der Dinge, die das Verhalten bestimmen, ist ihre Gruppengeschwindigkeit. Die Gruppengeschwindigkeit ist genau die Geschwindigkeit, mit der ein Wellenpaket sich bewegen würde, wenn es den Impuls oder den Quasiimpuls hätte, der auf dem Quasiimpuls basiert, den wir gerade beschreiben. Und die Gruppengeschwindigkeit ist bestimmt durch die Ableitung der Energie als Funktion des Quasiimpulses nach diesem Impuls. Nun, für ein freies Teilchen ist das einfach zu berechnen, weil die Energie gerade p Quadrat geteilt durch 2m ist, und wenn ich das nach p ableite, erhalte ich p geteilt durch m, das ist v, die gewöhnliche Geschwindigkeit. Aber wenn das in einem Gitter ist, und das Gitter ist sehr stark, haben wir gesehen, dass die Bandstruktur eines Gitters so ist, dass das Band flach ist, das bedeutet, die Ableitung der Energie nach dem Quasiimpuls ist nahezu null. Und das bedeutet, dass die Gruppengeschwindigkeit in einem sehr tiefen Gitter nahezu null ist. Die Atome sind daher im Gitter eingefroren. Nun, das ist nicht überraschend. Wenn das Gitter sehr tief ist, sind die Atome sehr stark eingefangen, sie sind gefroren, im Bezugsrahmen eines Gitters. Das bedeutet, dass wenn ich in den Bezugsrahmen des Labors gehe und das Gitter sich bewegt, was das heißt ist, dass die Atome durch das Gitter mitgenommen werden. Was wir erwarten, ist, dass die Atome durch ein sehr tiefes Gitter mitgenommen werden. Nun möchte ich Ihnen eine Art von mechanischem Analogon liefern, um ein optisches Gitter zu produzieren und es dann zu bewegen. Ich denke mir mein optisches Gitter, mein sich bewegendes optische Gitter, als ein Förderband, und es ist eine besondere Art von Förderband, das es mir erlaubt auf ihm Furchen zu schaffen, in denen die Atome sitzen und mitgenommen werden. Ich stelle mir vor, dass ich einige Atome habe, und dass sie auf dem Förderband sitzen und dass das Förderband ruht, so dass die Atome bezogen auf das Förderband ruhen. Dann schalte ich die Modulation dieses Förderbands ein und die Atome werden in diesen Vertiefungen des Förderbands gefangen. Und dann bringe ich die Räder an dem Förderband zum Laufen und die Atome beginnen sich zu bewegen. Wenn nun das Gitter tief ist, dann bedeutet das, dass die Atome mit dem Gitter mitgenommen werden. Und wir sollten in der Lage sein, dies zu bestimmen, indem wir das Gitter abschalten und uns den Impuls der Atome ansehen. So, hier ist das Experiment, das wir durchführen werden. Wir schalten das Gitter an, das ist die Tiefe des Gitters. Nun, wenn das Gitter eine bestimmte Tiefe hat, tief genug, um die Atome mitzuziehen, dann beginnen wir q zu erhöhen, d.h. wir erhöhen die Geschwindigkeit des Gitters. Und dann erreichen wir irgendeine Endgeschwindigkeit, bleiben bei der Geschwindigkeit, und schalten dann das Gitter plötzlich ab und schauen dann, was der Impuls der Atome ist. Hier ist ein Bild der Verteilung der Atome, wenn die Gittergeschwindigkeit null ist. Dies ist nur ein Bruchteil, wir haben schon vorhin gesehen, die meisten der Atome befinden sich beim Impuls null, einige sind bei plus oder minus 2 Photonenrückstößen. Und der durchschnittliche Impuls ist null, was man erwarten würde, weil das Gitter sich nicht bewegt. Und wenn man die Geschwindigkeit der Atome im Laborbezugsrahmen misst, aber im dem Gitterbezugsrahmen ist der Quasiimpuls der Atome gleich dem negativen der Geschwindigkeit des Gitters im Laborbezugsrahmen. Und wenn ich frage, wie sich das ändert, wenn sich die Gittergeschwindigkeit ändert, dann sieht man, dass der durchschnittliche Impuls der Atome sich genau so erhöht wie die Gittergeschwindigkeit. Also nimmt das Gitter in der Tat die Atome mit sich mit. Und hier ist die Bestätigung, dass die durchschnittliche Geschwindigkeit der Atome gleich ist, wenn Sie es ausarbeiten, wir haben dies sehr sorgfältig gemacht, und die durchschnittliche Geschwindigkeit der Atome ist gleich der Geschwindigkeit des Gitters. Lassen Sie uns ein anderes Experiment machen, fast dasselbe. Wir geben die Atome auf das Förderband, wir schalten die Modulationen, die Vertiefungen, an, so dass die Atome gefangen sind. Wir schalten die Bewegung des Förderbandes ein und wir wissen, dass die Atome mitgenommen werden, und nun, anstelle den Laser schnell abzuschalten, schalte ich den Laser langsam ab. Und ich werde Sie fragen, was Sie denken, was die Geschwindigkeit der Atome sein wird, und lassen Sie mich betonen, was das Experiment ist. Hier sind einige Atome, ich schalte das optische Gitter ein, dargestellt durch meine Finger, und die Atome sind nun zwischen meinen Fingern gefangen, und nun bewege ich das Gitter weiter, wo wie hier, mit einer gewissen Geschwindigkeit und die Atome werden mitgenommen, weil wir es wissen, weil wir sie schon gemessen haben. Und nun, anstatt das Gitter plötzlich abzuschalten, so wie ich es beim letzten Experiment getan habe, werde ich das Gitter langsam abschalten und dann fragen, was die Geschwindigkeit der Atome sein wird. Es ist eine Auswahlfrage, also, wie viele sagen, dass die Geschwindigkeit der Atome gleich der Geschwindigkeit des Gitters sein wird? Wie beim vorherigen Experiment, nun, wir haben ein paar tapfere Leute hier, die bereit sind, eine Meinung zu vertreten. Wie viele denken, dass die Geschwindigkeit der Atome null sein wird, oh, ein paar Leute, ok. Wie viele denken, es wird irgendetwas zwischen der Geschwindigkeit des Gitters und null sein, aha, eine Menge Leute glauben, es wird etwas dazwischen sein. Wie viele wissen nichts, aha, ok, gut. Wie viele glauben, es ist keins von den obigen Antworten? Ok, also finden wir es heraus. In der Physik macht man es so, dass man ein Experiment durchführt. Ok, also hier ist...., oh, die Farben sehen hier fürchterlich aus. So, was geht hier vor, dies zeigt nur, was die Abfolge von Ereignissen im Experiment ist. Wir schalten das Gitter ein, wenn es an ist, auf einem recht tiefen Wert, dann beginnen wir, das Gitter zu bewegen. Wir erreichen irgendeinen Endwert und dann schalten wir das Gitter langsam wieder aus. Nun, hier ist das Resultat, erst werde ich Ihnen das Resultat zeigen, wenn die Geschwindigkeit null ist, hier habe ich das Gitter langsam eingeschaltet, ich habe es langsam abgeschaltet und ich bin zurück, wo ich begonnen habe; wenn ich es adiabatisch tue, bin ich wieder da, wo ich begonnen habe. Und hier sitzen die Atome bei der Geschwindigkeit null. Es gibt kein Beugungsmuster, weil ich es langsam ausgeschaltet habe, und ich kollabiere all diese Impulskomponenten, die in dem Gitter existierten, weil ich adiabatisch dorthin zurückgekehrt bin, wo ich vorher war. Ich habe also nur eine Komponente genau hier. Und alle haben erwartet, dasssich die Atome nicht bewegen, wenn sie sich nicht bewegen. Was passiert, wenn ich beginne, das Gitter zu beschleunigen? Die Geschwindigkeit bleibt null. Lassen Sie mich betonen, wie merkwürdig dies ist. Diejenigen, die null gesagt haben, haben teilweise recht. Denken Sie daran, die Atome werden so wie hier mitgenommen mit einer konstanten Geschwindigkeit, und dann schaltet man das Licht langsam aus und die Atome sind im Ruhezustand. Wie kann das sein, was passiert mit dem Gesetz der Trägheit? Nun, diese Atome sind quantenmechanisch, sie erinnern sich, was ihre Phase ist. Und ihre Phase ist konstant, und konstante Phase bedeutet: keine Geschwindigkeit. Wie kommen sie nun von bewegt zu nicht bewegt. Nun, sie tauschen einen Impuls mit dem Gitter aus. So, bis die Geschwindigkeit des Gitters gleich einer Rückstoßgeschwindigkeit ist, das ist der Impuls eines Photons in einem Atom, was für Natrium ungefähr drei Zentimeter pro Sekunde bedeutet, es ist die Kante der Brillouinzone, für diejenigen von Ihnen, die Festkörperphysiker sind. Bis man an die Kante der Brillouinzone kommt, ist die Geschwindigkeit der Atome null. Und wenn man dann zur Brillouinzone kommt, springt die Geschwindigkeit auf das Zweifache der Gittergeschwindigkeit. Das bleibt weiter so, bis man zum Dreifachen des Photonenrückstoßes kommt, was wiederum zwei Brillouinzonen weiter ist, und dann springt die Geschwindigkeit wieder. Die Geschwindigkeit ist niemals irgendetwas zwischen den reziproken Gittervektoren, sie springt immer wieder um den reziproken Wert des Gittervektors. Und so war die Antwort: nichts von alldem, die Geschwindigkeit hängt von der Situation ab, und sie ist nie, nun ausgenommen durch Zufall, gleich der Gittergeschwindigkeit. Und fast nie gleich der Gittergeschwindigkeit, und sie hat dieses sehr merkwürdige Verhalten. Diese ganze Prozedur, diese ganze Sache, ist eine extrem einfache Anwendung der Bandstruktur und Blochfunktionen. Und werden in einem anderen Zusammenhang Blochoszillationen genannt. Wenn Sie mehr Einzelheiten verstehen wollen, kommen Sie zur Diskussion heute Nachmittag. Bis jetzt habe ich Ihnen von Experimenten erzählt, die keine Wechselwirkung zwischen Atomen beinhalten, die Atome sind keine wechselwirkenden Partikel, ein ideales Gas, und wir haben dieses sehr interessante Verhalten sogar für ein wechselwirkungsfreies System gesehen. Aber jetzt will ich erzählen was passiert, wenn man Wechselwirkungen hat. Einige Experimente, in denen Wechselwirkungen eine Rolle spielen. Ted Hänsch hat in seinem Vortrag über eine von diesen schon gesprochen, den Mott-Isolatorübergang. Dies ist ein Quantenphasenübergang. Quantenphasenübergänge sind merkwürdige Dinge. Wir denken typischerweise, dass sie bei null Grad stattfinden, sie finden nicht statt, weil ich einige thermodynamische Variablen geändert habe, wie die Temperatur, sie finden statt, weil ich irgendetwas anderes geändert habe, das zum Beispiel mit dem Hamiltonoperator des Systems zu tun hat, aber nicht mit einer thermodynamischen Variablen. Das unterscheidet also Quantenphasenübergänge von thermodynamischen Phasenübergängen. Das sind die, mit denen wir normalerweise vertraut sind. Wenn es ein Elektronensystem ist, wechselt es von Leiter zu Nichtleiter, oder im Fall der Atome von einer Superflüssigkeit zu einer Art Isolator. Es ist etwas, was in der Festkörperphysik schwer zu sehen ist, aber es ist verantwortlich dafür, die Isolator- oder Leitereigenschaften von vielen Materialien zu bestimmen. Wir möchten diesen Übergang bei Atomen sehen. Hier ist ein Modell, das Mott-Isolatorübergänge zeigen kann, es wird das Bose-Hubbard-Modell genannt. Wir stellen uns hier ein periodisches Potential vor und wir denken an zwei Aspekte dieses periodischen Potentials. Wie leicht ist es für die Atome, von einer Seite zur anderen zu tunneln und wie viel Energie kostet es, wenn zwei Atome dieselbe Stelle besetzen. Denn wenn man zwei Atome an derselben Stelle hat und sie sich abstoßen, dann kostet es eine bestimmte Energie um zwei Atome an derselben Stelle zu haben. Da ist eine bestimmte Energie U und da ist eine bestimmte Tunnelrate T zwischen den Stellen und das ist alles, was in diesen Hamiltonoperator hineinkommt. Das ist alles, was man benötigt, um den Mott-Isolatorübergang zu sehen. Wenn das Tunneln sehr häufig ist und die Atome können sich leicht zwischen Gitterstellen bewegen, dann hat man die superfluide Phase und die Atome, jedes Atom ist an jeder Stelle und bewegt sich frei zwischen den Stellen, es ist ziemlich so wie ein Bosekondensat. Andererseits, wenn man das Tunneln reduziert, so dass das Tunneln kleiner ist, dann ist die Energie, wenn zwei Atome dieselbe Stelle besetzen,... und ich wollte wirklich nicht, dass diese Farbe Gelb ist, so dass man sie nicht sehen kann, aber der Projektor scheint rot nicht zu projizieren, also diese Dinge sind auf meinem Monitor grün, aber dennoch. Also, da sollte ein Atom pro Gitterstelle sein. Wenn das Tunneln klein genug ist, dann bekommt man ein Atom pro Gitterstelle. Wir können diese Systeme auseinanderhalten, denn, wenn die Atome überall sind, dann schaltet man das Gitter ab und man bekommt eine Beugung, so wie wir es vorher gesehen haben. Aber wenn man ein Atom pro Gitterplatz hat, weil man wegen der Zahl- und Phasen-Unschärferelation genau weiß, was die Anzahl pro Platz ist, dann heißt das, man weiß nicht, was die Phase ist. Und das bedeutet, dass man keine Beugung bekommt, weil man nicht die richtige Phasenbeziehung hat, um Beugung zu sehen. Also ist das Verschwinden der Beugung ein Indikator dafür, dass man in den Mott-Zustand übergegangen ist. Die ersten dieser Experimente wurden vor ein paar Jahren in Ted Hänschs Labor durchgeführt, wir haben kürzlich Experimente in einem schönen 2-dimensionalen System durchgeführt, und hier kann man sehen, dass die Beugungsmuster verschwinden, wenn man die Tiefe des Gitters vergrößert. Also, es macht das Richtige. Aber wir wollen, dass es mehr macht, wir wollen, dass es genau zeigt, wo der Phasenübergang stattfindet. Wenn man sich detailliert die Beugungsmuster ansieht und von dem Beugungsmuster den Teil extrahiert, der scharf ist und den Teil, der breit und unscharf ist. Und dann den scharfen Teil zeichnet, das ist der Teil, der noch seine Phase behält, als Funktion der Gittertiefe, wir haben dieses nette Verhalten, wo es sehr scharf zu null abfällt, und dann null bleibt, das ist kein Kondensat, keine langreichweitige Phase für immer tiefere Gitter. Und wir vergleichen die Stelle, wo dieses Ding durch Null geht, mit einer Quanten-Monte-Carlo-Rechnung und haben im Wesentlichen eine perfekte Übereinstimmung. Vor ein paar Jahren war es zu schwierig, diese Quanten-Monte-Carlo-Rechnung auszuführen. Was wir hier haben ist in gewisser Hinsicht eine Simulation des Bose-Hubbard-Modells. Ein Modell, das vor ein paar Jahren noch zu schwierig war, um es detailliert in einem Grad zu berechnen, der notwendig ist, um diese Art von Quantenphasenübergang zu sehen. Und wir haben dieses Modell in unserem Labor in die Realität umgesetzt und bekamen eine sehr gute Übereinstimmung mit den theoretischen Berechnungen. Nun, es gibt viele andere Orte, wo Forscher die Theorie und die Experimente an dieser Art von System durchführen, Atome und optische Gitter, inklusive Ted Hänschs Labor in München. Und lassen Sie mich nur ein paar Schlussfolgerungen über diese Art von Arbeit ziehen. Die offensichtliche Sache, mit der ich begann, ist, dass kalte Atome in optischen Gittern ein vereinfachtes Analogon zu Elektronen in einem Kristall sind. Nun, wenn sie Elektronen und Kristalle studieren wollen, macht man in der Theorie immer bestimmte, vereinfachende Annahmen. Was wir hier machen mit unseren Atomen und optischen Gittern, ist, dass wir solche vereinfachten Annahmen in realen Experimenten realisieren. Es ist also keine mathematische Version eines vereinfachten optischen Gitters, es ist eine experimentelle Version des vereinfachten Festkörpergitters, es ist eine experimentelle Version des vereinfachten Festkörpergitters. Und wegen der außergewöhnlichen Eigenarten von Kontrolle und Messung, können wir Dinge sehen, die entweder in einem Festkörpersystem sehr schwierig zu sehen sind oder manchmal unmöglich, wie die Blochoszillationen, die sehr schwierig zu sehen sind, wie der Mott-Isolatorübergang, wo der Übergang in einem Festkörpersystem nur sehr schwer stattfindet. Aber noch viel wichtiger, diese einfachen Festkörpermodelle, die man sich ausdenkt, sind in dem optischen Gitter wirklich realisiert. Und so sind die kalten Atome eine Art von analogem Quantencomputer, auf dem wir diese vereinfachten Modelle berechnen können. Nicht dass wir berechnen, was im Festkörper passiert, wir berechnen, was das vereinfachte Modell eines Festkörpers vorhersagt. Sehr oft, unter Umständen, die mit realen Computern sehr schwierig zu berechnen sind, können wir dies mit unseren kalten Atomen machen. Und mein letzter Punkt ist, dass diese Überschneidung von kalten Atomen und Festkörpern ein wunderbar aufregendes und wachsendes Feld ist, wo die Möglichkeiten voneinander zu lernen für jede der Disziplinen, Festkörper- und Atomphysik, sehr groß sind. Wenn Sie also mehr darüber wissen wollen, dann kommen Sie heute Nachmittag. Nun, lassen Sie mich meinen Vortrag mit ein paar Kommentaren über Ivar Giaevers Vortrag abschließen. Er hat Ihnen eine Menge Ratschläge gegeben, wie man Forschung durchführen sollte, und der Rat war sehr gut. Und ich stimme ihm sicherlich zu, dass Sie dem folgen sollten. Und wenn man dem folgt, hat man vielleicht eine 0,1%- Chance den Nobelpreis zu bekommen. Der Grund, warum man diesem Ratschlag folgen sollte, ist nicht, dass man einen Nobelpreis bekommen möchte, der Grund, warum man diesem Ratschlag folgen sollte, ist, dass man aufregende Physik machen möchte. Dieser Art von Rat zu folgen ist ein hervorragendes Rezept, um aufregende Physik zu machen. Aber ich will eine Sache aufgreifen, die er gesagt hat. Er sagte, Physiker sind wirklich wettbewerbsorientiert und das ist wahr, und dann sagte er, dass Physiker keine sehr netten Menschen sind. Nun, wenn Sie all das über ihn wissen, was ich weiß, dann ist er ein richtig netter Mensch. Es gibt eine Menge Physiker, die nette Menschen sind, und es gibt eine Menge Physiker, die keine sehr netten Menschen sind. Ich glaube nicht, dass einen Nobelpreis zu bekommen irgendetwas damit zu tun hat, ob man ein netter Mensch ist oder nicht. Und ich denke nicht, dass aufregende Physik zu machen und viel Spaß dabei zu haben, Physik zu machen, nun, es hat wirklich etwas damit zu tun, dass man ein netter Mensch ist. Und da, wenn man einen Nobelpreis bekommt, es nichts damit zu tun hat, ob man ein netter Mensch ist, und da, wenn man aufregende Resultate von seiner Physik bekommt, glaube ich nichts damit zu tun hat, ob man ein netter Mensch ist oder nicht - warum sollte man nicht trotzdem ein netter Mensch sein. Vielen Dank.

William Phillips (2008) - Cold Atomic Gases: the Intersection of Condensed Matter and Atomic Physics
(00:02:32 - 00:05:20)

 The complete video is available here.


After other groups failed to create BEC with hydrogen atoms, Cornell and Wieman turned to alkali atoms because of the ability to use laser cooling, which couldn’t be easily employed in the case of hydrogen. They first laser-cooled rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap, which prevents them from falling down due to gravity. The atoms were then transferred into a purely magnetic trap, and a process called evaporative cooling allowed the most energetic atoms to escape the trap. The ones left behind had an extremely low temperature of 20 nK, and a measurement of the velocity distribution of the atoms confirmed that they had condensed into a unified BEC.

Ketterle and his colleagues chose to work with sodium atoms instead and published their results only four months later [35]. The sodium BEC created by his lab contained many more atoms — by a factor of more than two orders of magnitude — and he also invented a non-destructive imaging method to study the new state of matter [36]. Cornell, Wieman, and Ketterle shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics for their accomplishments [37].

In his 2019 Lindau lecture, Ketterle speaks about how his lab regularly creates a million atoms at nanokelvin temperatures.

Wolfgang Ketterle (2019) - New Forms of Matter Near Absolute Zero Temperature
(00:09:49 - 00:11:52)

 The complete video is available here.



Interestingly, Wieman now devotes his intellectual efforts toward bettering science — and particularly, physics — education. Here he is at the 2016 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting during the beginning of his lecture, titled “A Scientific Approach to Learning Physics,” explaining how and why he switched his research focus.

Carl Wieman (2016) - A Scientific Approach to Learning Physics

It's always a real pain to be at the end of a session with a bunch of Nobel-prize-winners speakers, because they always run over time and the session chairs never have the nerve to cut them off. But anyway, I’ll try and keep this on time. So I wanted to just go over, it’s a completely different topic here, of how you can – you, I'm really aiming this for anybody whose post-doc level and below – how you can learn to think like a good scientist, physicist, as quickly and effectively as possible. Now, the way I got into this actually was about 25 years ago: looking at the graduate students coming in my atomic physics lab and seeing how they can go through these many years of great success in courses but really not being able to do physics. And yet, after a few years they would learn quite quickly how to become physicists, although the very best students in courses never turned out all that great. I started to notice this as so consistent I wanted to just figure it out. So I tackled this really as a science question, looked at what we knew about learning. What we knew about, particularly, how to think scientifically, learning science. (Interruption, microphone gets adjusted) What we knew about learning science. And I found there was quite a lot. In fact, that one could really go beyond opinions, of which in teaching and learning there’s countless numbers of, and really approach this as a science. And by that I mean doing controlled experiments, measuring the learning that takes place, and having data and real fundamental principles that come out of those, just like in physics, that you can use to make sense of. And this kind of research and learning to think scientifically, it started in physics several decades ago, but now it's spread throughout undergraduate sciences and engineering. I’ve been doing research in this area myself for now almost 3 decades and have quite a few publications. So I'm going to start to give you an example of some of the kind of things one can find out doing these sorts of experiments. And so in this experiment they had 3 groups of students tested to be equivalent. They ran them and sort them into these 3. The first group goes to lecture, they take notes, and they try and learn as much as possible while they are doing it. The second group goes to lecture, doesn’t take any notes but tries to focus on learning as much as they can. And the third group doesn’t go to lecture, they just stay home or in a side room. They get the instructors' notes for the lecture, and they spend the same equivalent amount of time, trying to learn as much as they can from them. And then all these groups are given the same test on the material covered in this lecture. And so now you are going to have to make a prediction, on how these 3 treatments rank in terms of the amount of learning. And so the choices, I'm going to have you vote on by raising your hand here, are a) means that the "going to lecture and taking notes" learnt the most and "staying home" learnt the least. b) Those are flipped, etc. So I'm going to give you a few seconds to think about these and then I'm going to call on you to make your vote. Okay, everybody ready to vote? So raise your hand if you think a). A bunch of people think a). b) A bunch of people think b). c) Lots of people think c). d) Lots of people think d). Finally e) A lot of people think e). (Incomprehensible heckling) Okay, so it's pretty - (Incomprehensible heckling) you're not supposed to interrupt me. (Laughter). The correct answer is the one that the fewest people actually chose. Interestingly enough, a lot more of you choose this than I usually get with a group of students. It's almost never chosen, but it's still obvious the minority here. That, actually, people who learn the least are the ones going to lecture and taking notes. As I say, students normally, when I pose this to them, don’t choose that. But when I give them the chance to talk to each other and see this answer, they very quickly come to the deeper reasons, principles of learning, that tell you why those actually work. That says that these aren’t that hard and non-intuitive. It's basically that they have been brainwashed by the teachers to believe that going to lecture and taking notes is supposed to be more effective. Now, you might wonder why that actually can happen. The reality, I think, is that going to lecture and taking notes - the original design happened for a very good reason and it served a very clear purpose. That purpose became obsolete with modern technology; in this case the modern technology was the invention of the printing press. But professors are slow to adapt to using the technology, they are kind of lazy. So it's just easier to keep doing the same thing and tell students that must be good for them. Moving on to exactly why - so you can understand what we do know about learning and why the results are the way they can. The reason, 'not taking notes' is better than 'taking notes' is because the brain has very limited capacity to pay attention and process different things. And so the more it's called upon to do at the same time, the less effective it can be. So aiming to take notes just adds these extra demands or distraction to the learner over just listening as carefully as they can. And so that’s why 2) is better than 1). The reason that 3) is better than 2) is just that if they are sitting at home, looking at these lecture notes, there are several advantages to that. First, they can go through them at their own pace. So they can stop and ponder things and think about it and not lose complete track because it's being controlled by the speakers pace. When things are laid out like that, the organisation and the structure are much clearer when it's on paper than when you are trying to just follow a verbal lecture. And all of these things allow the learner to have more processing of the material and that’s always what turns into more learning. I'm going to give you a second experiment here. Now, this is much closer to and more quantitative, looking directly at physics and learning of physics. Here one has - in an experiment I was involved in - 2 large sections of introductory physics, carefully measured, that student populations are very nearly identical. And both of these sections are trying to learn exactly the same set of learning objectives, covering an exact same amount of class time in one week of lectures. And then they are given a pop quiz, right at the end of the last lecture, to test how much they learnt from those lectures. The 2 sections, the comparison is, one of them is taught by somebody who’s is a very experienced teacher, with material of a fairly traditional lecture, but has very high student ratings at giving these lectures, this material, to students. And then the second section is taught by somebody who is a post-doc who had been trained in these methods of scientific teaching and learning. So the question is, How do you think the results come out for how these two sections compare? Well, probably you are going to have some guess as to what I just showed you before. But here’s the histogram of the number of students here versus their score in the test, with the experienced traditional lecturer in red and the scientific teaching in white. So you can see that distributions are dramatically shifted. But, in fact, the differences are bigger than what you might think at first impression here, because this was actually a carefully developed multiple choice test to keep it objective. And so, on average, just by guessing, you would get 3 on this. So you really have to look at how much better than 3 the students are as a measure of their learning. Then you realise, how dramatically different really the amount of learning was between these 2 sections. I want to emphasise - and you can see the whole distribution shifted up. So, basically, the top students and the bottom students, all learnt much more in this teaching here. And the amount of learning from the traditional lecturer is then a very tiny fraction, here about 16%. Just to make a snarky comment: if you compare that actually with something like the format of these Nobel Prize lectures, there are several reasons I would confidently predict these would be a lot worse than that. At this point in my talk I either have somebody leap up and interrupt me or, at least, a lot of people are thinking this. I'm always asked to comment on something to the effect of: "But these lectures can’t be as bad as what you are claiming. Look at all these Nobel Prize winners who were taught by going to traditional lectures and how well they turned out." But this is where you need to think about approaching this as a science. Because, in fact, it's exactly this same argument, same reasoning, that was responsible for the fact that bloodletting remained the medical treatment of choice for about 2,000 years. Somebody gets sick, you let out a bunch of their blood, most of the time they recovered – so, gee, obviously bloodletting was effective. But, what we learnt in medicine a 150 years ago is really what we've now been doing in teaching and learning. Which is if you want to do this scientifically, you have to do a proper comparison group. So what I would argue, if we could do a proper comparison group, we'd probably find, if these Nobel Prize winners had actually had a better education, they would have been more successful, more prizes, younger ages etc. Now, there’s a quick caveat, getting into the technical details: people actually can learn from lectures under very special circumstances, which aren’t usually adopted. I can talk more about that later today. So, there are actually thousands of studies on learning and about 1,000 that look quite specifically at the university level and sciences and engineering, comparing the standard lecture method with these scientific teaching principles. These show always consistent differences in the amount students learn. And the effects are particularly big if you measure, how well the students are starting to think like experts in the field, physicists, chemists etc. And so I'm just going to rush through a few examples – not to show you anything to convince you, except that I’ve lots of data I could show. Here’s an example looking at introductory physics, testing how well the students are able to look at novel situations and apply, correctly apply, like a physicist would, the concepts of force and motion. And they measured this with all these different instructors were lecturing, they were down around 0.3. Then they all switched to a version of scientific teaching. And, basically, across the board there was a doubling of the amount students learn. How much they could think properly about these concepts. Just to show it’s not all introductory physics, this is a fourth year modern optics course for physics majors. Here they switched. And in particularly challenging final exam problems there was about a 1 standard deviation improvement. Different ways of having students learn this. This is from computer science just looking at the drop & failure rates. Again a bunch of different instructors converted how they teach. And across the board big decreases in the drop & failure rates down to about a third. That's just to give you a sample that we have lots of data. But you don’t care so much about that, what I want to focus on is something be useful. So I hopefully convinced you that I know something what I'm talking about. And now I'm going to give you some principles and methods that we see coming out of these kinds of studies, on how you can better learn to think like expert physicists. And so the rest of my talk is going to start with really the nature of expert thinking and how it's learnt. And then how this applies to physics in particular and how you can use it in your own learning. Cognitive psychologists have studied a lot about how experts think and develop their expertise, across all these different fields, musicians, chess players etc. And they find that there are certain basic components of expertise and a certain basic process for how that expertise is learnt. And so the first component of expertise is one everybody could guess: Experts know a whole lot about their subject. The second and third aren’t nearly as obvious. The second is that experts have, unique to their subject area, a particular mental framework by which they organise all that information. And it's that particular organisational framework that allows them to be very efficient and effective at finding and applying the appropriate knowledge to solve a problem. That means looking for and recognising certain patterns and complicated relationships. Most of what we talk about as scientific concepts, is really just the way scientists in a particular field have taken a whole bunch of different pieces of information and seen how they can organise that into sort of one piece. And then quickly decide if that piece is going to be helpful or not in solving a problem. The third general feature of expertise is ability to monitor one's thinking. And so by that I mean, as an expert, working through a problem in their subject, they are able to actually keep asking themselves: Do I understand this? Is this a sensible way of me solving this problem? And actually test that and then change what they are doing accordingly as they are working. Now what the research shows is, these are fundamentally new ways of thinking. And to develop them, everyone requires many hours of intense practice to develop these capabilities. And very recently it's becoming clear that – well, first I should say 'many hours'. But to reach a high level of expertise, sort of university professor level, it's many thousands of hours of intense practice. And what we are realising now is, that this is basically a biological determination, or limit. That, as a result of this 'many hours in intense practice', the brain is actually changing in substantial ways the wiring and so on. So it's actually within this rewired brain that the expertise lies. It's really a very close analogy to what’s involved in building up a muscle. If you want to build up a muscle you've got to use it very strenuously over a long period of time, and the body responds by making it bigger and stronger. In the case of the brain it says, "Oh, it's going to keep making me do that hard physics problem. I'm going to make the connections and the neurons stronger to make that easier." Now, the research says that, okay it's many hours in intense practice, but it's also a very specific kind of practice that’s required. It has to be hard problems exercising the brain, but they also have to be giving it practice in exactly the kind of expert thinking that you want the brain to learn. That’s what the neurons have to be reinforcing. But, of course, it's not enough to just practice hard, you have to know that what you are doing is successful. And so you also need to have feedback on that practice, to guide you what you are doing and see how to improve it. And then when you’ve got this, you just keep doing this enough hours and you become an expert. So that’s a very general thing. Now I'm going to get a little more specific about what are some of these basic thinking components of expertise? And I’ll just start here with some that are quite generic across the sciences and engineering. For example, every area has a set of concepts and mental models that it uses. And more importantly, expertise lies in a very sophisticated selection criteria for identifying which of those models or concepts apply, and don’t apply, in any specific situation. There’s recognising what information is relevant to solve a problem and what is irrelevant. When experts have come up with an answer in every field, they have very specific-to-that-field criteria by which they know how to check, if that answer makes sense. Or if there might be a better way to solve this problem. And then, finally, an extremely common one is, experts in every science and engineering area, there are very specialised ways to represent information. And experts can move very fluently between these different representations and get new insights as they do for problem solving. So there’s a bunch of others, but these give you the basic ideas of some components that need to be practiced. Now, when people are talking about learning to be a physicist or a chemist and so on, those discussions are almost always in terms of 'oh, we need to have them cover all these sets of topics', but it's really essential to realise that, okay, that topic, that knowledge, that’s important. But it's really only important if it's really embedded in these broader aspects of expertise, of expert thinking, that really govern the understanding about when and how to use that knowledge. The research shows lots of examples, where students can pass tests, saying they know something. But then, when given a real problem, they can never use that effectively. So getting down to more specific things you can do: If I summarise the research on learning, there are 5 basic components that are really important in this. But the other things then I think you can get some help on. The first is connecting with prior thinking. As I said, you are rewiring the brain, but you got to - the brain doesn’t start blank, it's got a lot of wring in there. So you need to connect and build on what you already know and think. There are some basic things about how the memory works in terms of initially processing information and then how to retain it long-term. And then there’s this idea of practicing authentic expert thinking and getting feedback on it. So the things I'm going to talk about are a bunch of examples that give you things you can be doing on your own to practice these to learn better. By the way, if you are going to be teaching, these are the things you need to have your students doing as well, for them to learn. Now, I want to emphasise what it’s not - and this is a good test. If you think about the way most people study: they read over the text book and at the lecture notes and go over the problem solutions, or passively sit and listen to a lecture. And one of the immediate ways you can test that it isn’t very effective is, it's too easy. It's not pressing the brain to work hard and that basically means the brain doesn’t squirt the chemicals in there to make the effects. Okay, what are some hard things you can do that will be effective? The first is, you need to really study intensively and focused, where you really are putting full attention into it. Or just don’t brother, it's just not, you don’t really get anything out of paying half attention to studying. When you get some new material, a topic here, you need to sit and think and reconcile that with your past knowledge. Think how the topics, how this is connected with things you’ve already learned, situations in the world you know about and so on. And do that in a very active, deliberate way. When you learn about some new concept, sit down and write down the criteria: when this is going to apply, in what kind of situations, and, very importantly, when and why it won’t be useful. You always want to be looking at ways to test your thinking and catch where you might have weaknesses. And so there’s a whole bunch of different ways to do that: seeing how your ideas would apply in a variety of different situations; checking, arguing with other students, talking to them, professors etc. One particularly effective way is to try teaching this to somebody else – we in our instruction do this with our generic 'grade 10 sibling'. It requires taking university material, thinking how to process that so you could explain it to your 10th grade brother or sister. Actually, it makes you process it in a very special and effective way for learning. And it turns out in these studies, you don’t actually have to teach it to anybody, you just have to imagine you are teaching it to somebody and you get most of the benefits. There’s solution planning. This is something experts spend a lot more time on than beginners. And so be very explicit when you have a new problem, trying to work out what the solution is, as to how it's broken down into pieces and so on, before you ever start diving into it. When you solve a problem, think of alternative ways you might be able to solve it - experts do this all the time. And, very importantly, when there are simplifying assumptions, try and ask yourself, what would happen if those assumptions weren’t right? Or are there other possibilities of assumptions you could make? And, getting close to the end here, if you have something wrong, don’t just look at what the right answer is. This is a big mistake most teachers make, that they see a student get something wrong and say, It turns out that doesn’t accomplish much learning. The learning really takes place when the learner not just knows they are wrong but understands why they are wrong and how they need to change their thinking in the future to be right. And that’s where almost all the effective learning happens. Getting back to long-term retention. It turns out if you want to remember things for a long time, you have to test yourself on them repeatedly and spaced in time. And so by testing, it's not a formal test, you just retrieve and apply those ideas. And it's really true that you either use that thinking process or you lose it; the brain takes those neurons to do other things with them. Finally one, I really wish I’d known better when I was a student: it's really important to sleep. There are 2 reasons for that. One is that you get stupider if you don’t get as much sleep. But, less obvious than that, when you are learning something, it's during the sleep process that the brain actually consolidates a lot of that learning and makes a bunch of the necessary wiring changes more permanent. So it's really an essential part of learning to sleep. Okay, so I'm going to just finish up quickly here another way how you can quite specifically improve your learning-from-homework problems. First, you have to think about: what is the expertise practiced and given feedback on from the typical text book problem or exam problem, if you look at the list of components of expert thinking I talked about earlier, and then you think about what’s in the normal problem. First, it gives all the information needed and only that information tells you what assumptions, things to neglect. So right away you’ve lost practicing those parts of expertise. Didn’t ask for any answer, just get an answer, you don’t have to justify why it's reasonable - that goes away. Usually it only calls for one representation, whatever they put into that problem - that goes away. And, more often than not, it's possible to solve the problem just by looking and using the concepts or procedures that were just covered in the text book or class - and so that means those go away. So with your normal homework problems, you are actually left with very little practice of expert thinking. You are really predominantly just learning facts and procedures, but not the more useful expert thinking. I'm not going to go into details for this, you can get copies of my slides and think about it. But these are just ways you can take your standard homework problem and rewrite it yourself into a problem that really then gives you the practice of expert thinking, that helps you actually learn much more effectively from working through those problems. Okay, so I'm just about on time here. I realise that this talk - I realise better than almost anyone because I study this - there’s too much stuff here, it's gone too fast for you to really process it. But I’ll make sure you can get copies of my slides and so you can ponder those and that will allow you to learn something. And coming to the afternoon session today where we will discuss these in more details, that will be useful. And just when you do look at the slides I have a few references. If you want to learn more about this effective learning and learning to think expertly there are references there. Thank you.

Es ist immer wieder mühsam, den Vortrag am Ende der Sitzung mit Nobelpreisträgern als Vortragende zu haben, weil sie ihre Zeit immer überziehen, und die Sitzungsleiter sich nie trauen zu unterbrechen. Aber trotzdem versuche ich, in der Zeit zu bleiben. Ich wollte darüber sprechen, es ist ein komplett anderes Thema hier, wie können Sie – Sie, ich ziele dies wirklich auf jeden ab, der auf dem Postdoc-Niveau ist oder darunter. Wie können Sie lernen, wie ein guter Wissenschaftler, Physiker zu denken, so schnell und effektiv wie möglich. Nun, ich kam tatsächlich vor etwa 25 Jahren dazu, als ich mir die graduierten Studenten ansah, die in mein Atomphysiklabor kamen, und gesehen habe, wie sie über diese vielen Jahre mit großem Erfolg in den Kursen durchkommen, aber nicht wirklich fähig waren, Physik zu betreiben. Und trotzdem würden sie nach ein paar Jahren recht schnell lernen, Physiker zu werden, obwohl genau die besten Studenten in den Kursen sich nie als so großartig herausgestellt haben. Ich begann, dies als so konsistent wahrzunehmen, dass ich es einfach verstehen musste. Ich ging dies daher wirklich wie eine wissenschaftliche Frage an, habe geschaut, was wir über das Lernen wissen. Was wir speziell darüber wussten, wie man wissenschaftlich denkt, Wissenschaft lernt. Was wussten wir darüber, wie man Wissenschaft lernt? Ich fand heraus, dass es eine Menge gab. Dass man tatsächlich über Meinungen hinausgehen kann, von denen es in der Lehre und dem Lernen unzählige gibt, und dies wirklich als Wissenschaft angehen kann. Und damit meine ich, kontrollierte Experimente durchzuführen, um das Lernen, das stattfindet, zu messen, sowie Daten und wirkliche grundlegende Prinzipien zu haben, die von ihnen resultieren, genau wie in der Physik, die man benutzen kann, um es zu verstehen. Diese Art der Forschung und des Lernens, wie man wissenschaftlich denkt, hatte ihren Anfang in der Physik vor vielen Jahrzehnten, aber sie hat sich jetzt im Wissenschafts- und Ingenieurstudium ausgebreitet. Ich selber habe in diesem Bereich jetzt schon fast 3 Jahrzehnte lang Untersuchungen durchgeführt und habe eine ganze Reihe von Veröffentlichungen. Ich beginne damit, Ihnen ein Beispiel der Dinge zu geben, die man mit dieser Art Experiment herausfinden kann. Und so gab es in diesem Experiment 3 Gruppen Studenten, die als gleichwertig getestet wurden. Sie führten die Tests durch und sortierten sie in diese 3 Gruppen. Die erste Gruppe besucht Vorlesungen; sie machen sich Notizen und versuchen, so viel wie möglich zu lernen, während sie dies machen. Die zweite Gruppe geht zu Vorlesungen, aber schreiben nichts auf, sondern versuchen sich darauf zu fokussieren, so viel wie möglich zu lernen. Dann die dritte Gruppe, die nicht zu Vorlesungen geht, sie bleiben zu Hause oder in einem Nebenraum. Sie bekommen das Script des Dozenten für die Vorlesung, und sie verbringen dieselbe äquivalente Menge an Zeit, so viel wie möglich daraus zu lernen. Und dann bekommen all diese Gruppen denselben Test über das Material, das in dieser Vorlesung behandelt wurde. Und so müssen Sie jetzt vorhersagen, wie sich diese 3 Vorgehensweisen in Bezug auf die gelernte Menge einstufen lassen. Und hier die Auswahl, ich möchte, dass Sie hier durch Heben der Hand abstimmen, a) bedeutet, dass diejenigen, die zu den Vorlesungen gehen und Notizen machen am meisten gelernt haben und die, die zu Hause geblieben sind am wenigsten. B) Diese sind umgekehrt, usw. Ich gebe Ihnen jetzt ein paar Sekunden, darüber nachzudenken, und dann bitte ich Sie, abzustimmen. Ok, alle fertig für die Abstimmung? Also heben Sie die Hand, wenn Sie für A) sind. Eine Reihe von Leuten sind für A). B)? Eine Reihe Leute sind für B). C)? Viele Leute sind für C). D)? Viele sind für D). Am Schluss E)? Eine Menge sind für E). (unverständlicher Zwischenruf) OK, schön – (unverständlicher Zwischenruf) Sie sollten mich nicht unterbrechen. (Lachen) Die richtige Antwort ist diejenige, die die wenigsten tatsächlich gewählt haben. Interessanterweise, wählten viel mehr von Ihnen das aus, als es sonst bei einer Gruppe Studenten der Fall ist. Es wird fast nie ausgewählt, aber es ist noch offensichtlich die Minderheit hier. Die Leute, die am wenigsten lernen, sind die, die zu den Vorlesungen gehen und sich Notizen machen. Wie ich sagte: Studenten, denen ich diese Frage stellen, wählen das normalerweise nicht aus. Aber wenn ich Ihnen die Gelegenheit gebe, sich dazu zu besprechen, und diese Antwort zu sehen, kommen sie sehr schnell auf die tatsächlich tieferen Gründe - Lernprinzipien, die aussagen, warum diese tatsächlich funktionieren. Das sagt aus, dass diese nicht so schwierig und nicht intuitiv sind. Ihre Lehrer hatten Ihnen eine Gehirnwäsche gegeben, damit Sie glauben, dass zu den Vorlesungen zu gehen und sich Notizen zu machen effektiver sein soll. Nun, vielleicht wundern Sie sich, warum das tatsächlich passieren kann. Die Realität, denke ich, ist so, dass zu den Vorlesungen zu gehen und Notizen zu machen – die ursprüngliche Form gab es aus einen sehr guten Grund und diente einem sehr klaren Zweck. Dieser Zweck wurde durch moderne Technologie überflüssig; in diesem Fall war moderne Technologie die Erfindung der Druckpresse. Aber Professoren gewöhnen sich nur langsam daran, die Technologie zu nutzen, sie sind ein bisschen bequem. Es ist daher einfacher, immer wieder dasselbe zu machen und den Studenten zu erzählen, es wäre gut für sie. Weiter zu warum genau - damit Sie verstehen können, was wir über das Lernen wissen und warum die Resultate so sind, wie sie sein können. Der Grund, warum ‚keine Notizen machen‘ besser ist als ‚Notizen machen‘ ist, dass das Gehirn eine sehr begrenzte Fähigkeit hat, aufmerksam zu sein und unterschiedliche Dinge zu verarbeiten. Und je mehr es gleichzeitig tun muss, umso weniger effektiv kann es sein. Daher stellt der Versuch, Notizen zu machen, zusätzliche Anforderungen oder Ablenkung an den Lernenden, verglichen mit dem 'so sorgfältig wie möglich zuhören'. Und das ist daher der Grund, warum 2) besser als 1) ist. Der Grund, dass 3) besser ist als 2) ist nur, dass, wenn man zu Hause sitzt und sich das Vorlesungsskript ansieht, dann hat das mehrere Vorteile. Erstens kann man sie in der eigenen Geschwindigkeit durcharbeiten. Man kann unterbrechen und über Dinge grübeln und darüber nachdenken und nicht komplett den Faden verlieren, weil die Geschwindigkeit des Vortragenden den Fortschritt bestimmt. Wenn Dinge so dargestellt werden, sind die Organisation und die Struktur viel klarer, wenn es auf dem Papier steht, als wenn man versucht, nur einem mündlichen Vortrag zu folgen. Und alle diese Dinge erlauben es dem Lernenden, das Material besser zu verarbeiten, und das ist immer etwas, was zu verbessertem Lernen führt. Ich zeige Ihnen jetzt ein zweites Experiment. Dieses ist näher und quantitativer, befasst sich direkt mit der Physik und dem Lernen der Physik. So, hier haben wir - in einem Experiment, an dem ich beteiligt war – Und diese beiden Gruppen versuchen, genau die gleichen Lernziele zu erreichen, indem sie genau die gleiche Zeit während einer Vorlesungswoche in der Klasse verbringen. Und dann erhielten sie einen Auswahltest, genau am Ende der letzten Vorlesung, um zu ermitteln, wie viel sie aus den Vorlesungen gelernt hatten. Die 2 Gruppen - der Vergleich ist, eine der Gruppen wird von einem sehr erfahrenen Lehrer unterrichtet, mit dem Material einer ziemlich traditionellen Verlesung, aber sehr hohen Bewertungen durch Studenten für das Halten der Vorlesungen und die Weitergabe des Stoffs. Und die zweite Gruppe wurde von einem Postdoc unterrichtet, der in dieser Methode des wissenschaftlichen Unterrichtens und Lernens ausgebildet ist. Nun ist die Frage: Was, meinen Sie, kommt heraus, wenn wir die beiden Gruppen vergleichen? Nun, wahrscheinlich haben Sie eine Vermutung in Bezug auf das, was ich Ihnen gerade gezeigt habe. Aber hier ist das Histogramm der Studentenzahl aufgetragen gegen ihr Testergebnis, mit dem erfahrenen Dozent in Rot und die wissenschaftliche Lehrmethode in Weiß. Sie können sehen, dass die Verteilungen dramatisch verschoben sind. Aber eigentlich sind die Unterschiede größer, als man beim ersten Eindruck glauben könnte, weil dies tatsächlich ein sorgfältig entwickelter Multiple-Choice-Test war, um es objektiv zu gestalten. Und man würde im Durchschnitt allein durch Raten eine 3 erhalten. Also muss man wirklich schauen, wie viel besser als 3 die Studenten sind, als ein Maß ihres Lernens. Dann erkennt man, wie dramatisch unterschiedlich das gelernte Pensum zwischen diesen 2 Gruppen war. Ich möchte betonen - und hier sieht man, dass die ganze Verteilung nach oben geschoben ist. Also im Grunde, die besten Studenten und die schlechtesten Studenten, alle lernten viel mehr in diesem Unterricht hier. Und die gelernte Menge von einem traditionellen Dozenten ist dann ein sehr kleiner Bruchteil, hier etwa 16 %. Dazu einen etwas bissigen Kommentar: Wenn man das mit etwas wie dem Format dieser Nobelpreisvorträge vergleicht, würde ich aus verschiedenen Gründen zuversichtlich vorhersagen, dass diese bei weitem schlechter als das wären. An diesem Punkt meines Vortrags angelangt, springt entweder jemand auf oder unterbricht mich, oder zumindest denken eine Menge Leute darüber nach. Ich werde immer wieder gefragt, Erklärungen abzugeben zu etwas wie: Schauen Sie sich all diese Nobelpreisträger an, die durch den Besuch traditioneller Vorlesungen gelehrt wurden, und als wie gut sie sich gemacht haben.“ Aber das ist der Punkt, wo man daran denken muss, dies als Wissenschaft anzugehen. Weil es eigentlich dasselbe Argument ist, dieselbe Argumentationsweise, die dafür verantwortlich war, dass der Aderlass ungefähr 2000 Jahre lang die medizinische Behandlung der Wahl blieb. Jemand wird krank, man zapft ihm eine Menge Blut ab, meistens erholt er sich davon – also, offensichtlich ist der Aderlass wirksam. Aber was wir in der Medizin vor 150 Jahren lernten, ist wirklich das, was wir nun in der Lehre und dem Lernen machen. Was also, wenn man dies wissenschaftlich durchführen würde, benötigt man eine passende Vergleichsgruppe. Ich meine damit, wenn wir eine passende Vergleichsgruppe hätten, fänden wir vermutlich heraus, wenn diese Nobelpreisträger wirklich eine bessere Bildung gehabt hätten, wären sie erfolgreicher gewesen, mehr Preise in jüngeren Jahren usw. Hier ein schneller Einspruch, der in die technischen Details geht: Menschen können tatsächlich von Vorlesungen unter sehr speziellen Umständen lernen, die normalerweise nicht eingeführt werden. Darüber kann ich später etwas mehr sagen. Es gibt wirklich tausende Studien über das Lernen und etwa tausend, die sich ganz spezifisch mit dem Universitätsniveau und Wissenschaft und Ingenieurwissenschaft beschäftigen, die die normale Vorlesungsmethode mit diesen wissenschaftlichen Lehrprinzipien vergleichen. Sie zeigen konsistent immer Unterschiede in der Menge, die Studenten lernen. Und die Effekte sind besonders groß, wenn man misst, wie gut die Studenten wie Experten auf dem Gebiet, Physiker, Chemiker usw. zu denken beginnen. Und so gehe ich schnell durch ein paar Beispiele – nicht um irgendetwas zu zeigen, um Sie zu überzeugen, außer dass ich viele Daten habe, die ich zeigen könnte. Hier ist ein Beispiel, das sich die Einführung in die Physik anschaut und testet, wie gut die Studenten sich neuartige Situationen anschauen und die Konzepte der Kraft und Bewegung korrekt anwenden können, so wie ein Physiker das machen würde. Und sie haben das mit all diesen unterschiedlichen Dozenten, die die Vorlesungen gehalten haben, gemessen. Sie waren niedriger, bei etwa 0,3. Dann wechselten sie zu einer Version der wissenschaftlichen Lehre. Und grundsätzlich, ganz generell verdoppelte sich die Lernmenge der Studenten, wie viel sie korrekt über diese Konzepte denken konnten. Nur um zu zeigen, dass nicht alles Einführung in die Physik ist: Dies ist ein Kurs in moderner Optik für Physiker im Hauptfach im vierten Jahr. Hier wechselten sie. Und in besonders herausfordernden Aufgaben der Abschlussklausur gab es eine Verbesserung um ungefähr eine Standardabweichung. Unterschiedliche Art und Weisen für Studenten, das zu lernen. Das ist aus der Informatik, wo man sich einfach die Abbruch- und Ausfallraten ansieht. Wieder wechselte eine Anzahl unterschiedlicher Dozenten die Art, wie sie lehren. Und generell große Abnahmen in den Abbruch- und Ausfallraten, ungefähr ein Drittel niedriger. Das ist nur, um Ihnen ein Beispiel zu geben, dass wir viele Daten haben. Aber das ist vielleicht nicht so wichtig für Sie. Worauf ich mich konzentrieren möchte, ist etwas Nützliches. So, ich habe Sie hoffentlich davon überzeugt, dass ich etwas von dem verstehe, über das ich rede. Und nun gebe ich Ihnen ein paar Prinzipien und Methoden, die sich aus unserer Sicht aus diesen Studien ergeben, wie man besser lernen kann, wie ein fachkundiger Physiker zu denken. Und so wird der Rest meines Vortrags mit der tatsächlichen Natur des Expertendenkens anfangen und wie man es lernt. Und dann, wie dies auf die Physik im Besonderen zutrifft, und wie man es in seinem eigenen Lernen benutzen kann. Kognitive Psychologen haben eine Menge Untersuchungen angestellt, wie Experten denken und ihre Expertise entwickeln, auf all diesen unterschiedlichen Gebieten, Musiker, Schachspieler usw. Und sie haben herausgefunden, dass es bestimmte Grundkomponenten der Expertise gibt und einen bestimmten grundlegenden Prozess, wie diese Expertise gelernt wird. Und das ist der erste Bestandteil der Expertise, den jeder erraten kann: Experten wissen sehr viel über ihr Fachgebiet. Der zweite und dritte sind überhaupt nicht so offensichtlich. Die zweite ist, dass Experten, speziell für ihr Fachgebiet ein bestimmtes mentales System haben, wie sie all diese Information organisieren. Und es ist dieses spezielle organisatorische System, das ihnen ermöglicht, sehr effizient und effektiv in der Suche und Anwendung des angemessenen Wissens zu sein, um ein Problem zu lösen. Das bedeutet, die Suche nach und das Erkennen bestimmter Muster und komplexer Zusammenhänge. Die meisten wissenschaftlichen Konzepte, über die wir reden, sind nur die Art und Weise, wie Wissenschaftler in einem bestimmten Gebiet eine Menge verschiedener Informationen in gewissermaßen ein Ganzes zusammenfügen konnten. Und dann schnell entscheiden, ob das Ganze für die Problemlösung hilfreich sein wird oder nicht. Das dritte Merkmal von Expertise ist die Fähigkeit, sein Denken zu beobachten. Und damit meine ich als Experte, wenn sie sich durch ein Problem auf ihrem Gebiet arbeiten, sind sie tatsächlich in der Lage, sich selbst immer wieder zu fragen: Verstehe ich das? Ist das eine vernünftige Art und Weise für mich, dieses Problem zu lösen? Und tatsächlich das zu prüfen und dann entsprechend zu ändern, was sie tun, während sie arbeiten. Nun, was die Forschung zeigt, ist, dass dies grundsätzlich neue Denkwege sind. Und um sie zu entwickeln, benötigt jeder viele Stunden intensiver Übung, um diese Fähigkeiten zu entwickeln. Und es wird seit Kurzem klar, dass – nun, zunächst sollte ich sagen, ‚viele Stunden‘. Aber um einen hohen Grad an Expertise zu erreichen, etwa das Niveau eines Universitätsprofessors, benötigt man viele tausend Stunden intensiver Übung. Und wir erkennen jetzt, dass dies grundlegend biologisch bestimmt ist. Dass das Gehirn sich, als Ergebnis der ‚vielen Stunden intensiver Übung‘, beträchtlich ändert, die Verschaltung usw. So liegt die Expertise tatsächlich in diesem neu verschalteten Gehirn. Es ist wirklich sehr analog zu dem, was beim Aufbauen eines Muskels involviert ist. Wenn man einen Muskel aufbauen möchte, muss man ihn sehr mühsam über eine lange Zeit benutzen, und der Körper antwortet, indem er ihn größer und stärker macht. Im Fall des Gehirns, sagt es: „Oh, ich muss immer wieder dieses schwierige Physikproblem lösen. Ich stelle die Verbindungen her und mache die Neuronen stärker, um das einfacher zu gestalten.“ Nun, die Forschung sagt, dass es viele Stunden intensiver Übung sein mögen, aber es ist auch eine sehr spezifische Art der Übung, die notwendig ist. Es müssen schwierige Probleme sein, um das Gehirn zu trainieren, aber sie müssen das Gehirn auch in genau der richtigen Art von Expertendenken trainieren, die man dem Gehirn beibringen möchte. Das ist es, was die Neuronen verstärken müssen. Aber natürlich ist es nicht genug, hart zu üben, man muss auch wissen, dass das, was man macht, erfolgreich ist. Und daher benötigt man auch eine Rückkopplung zu dieser Übung, um zu lenken, was man tut, und zu sehen, wie man es verbessert. Und wenn man das dann hat, führt man es über genügend viele Stunden durch und man wird Experte. Das ist also sehr allgemein. Nun werde ich ein wenig spezifischer, was einige dieser grundsätzlichen Denkkomponenten der Expertise sind. Und ich beginne hier mit einigen, die recht generisch über alle Naturwissenschaften und Ingenieurwissenschaften hinweg sind. Zum Beispiel hat jedes Gebiet einen Satz von Konzepten und mentalen Modellen, die benutzt werden. Und noch wichtiger, Expertise liegt an einem sehr komplizierten Entscheidungskriterium für die Identifizierung, welche dieser Modelle oder Konzepte zutreffen, oder nicht zutreffen, in jeder spezifischen Situation. Man muss erkennen, welche Information relevant ist, um ein Problem zu lösen, und welche irrelevant. Wenn Experten eine Antwort gefunden haben, haben sie sehr spezfische Kriterien in jedem Gebiet durch die sie wissen, wie sie überprüfen, ob die Antwort Sinn macht. Oder ob es einen besseren Weg gibt, das Problem zu lösen. Und dann, schlussendlich, etwas, das sehr häufig vorkommt: Experten in allen Wissenschaften und im Technikbereich haben ganz spezielle Arten, Informationen darzustellen. Und Experten können diese unterschiedlichen Darstellungsweisen gewandt nutzen und neue Einsichten gewinnen, wie sie es für Problemlösungen machen. Es gibt noch andere Punkte, aber diese geben Ihnen die grundlegenden Ideen für einige Komponenten, die man üben muss. Wenn Menschen über das Lernen reden, wie man ein Physiker wird oder ein Chemiker und so weiter, diese Diskussionen drehen sich nahezu immer darum: "Oh, wir müssen sie all diese unterschiedlichen Themen lernen lassen." Dabei wäre es wirklich wichtig, folgendes zu erkennen: OK, dieses Thema, das Wissen, das ist wichtig. Aber es ist nur dann wichtig, wenn es in diesem weiteren Aspekt der Expertise, des Expertendenkens, eingebettet ist, dass wirklich das Verständnis leitet, wann und wie das Wissen benutzt werden muss. In der Forschung gibt es viele Beispiele, wo Studenten Prüfungen bestehen, die aussagen, dass sie etwas wissen. Aber dann, wenn sie vor einem echten Problem stehen, können sie das Wissen nicht effektiv nutzen. Also, um zu den spezifischen Dingen zu kommen, die Sie tun können: Wenn ich die Forschung zum Lernen zusammenfasse, gibt es fünf grundsätzliche Komponenten, die hier wirklich wichtig sind. Über ‚Motivation‘ gehe ich hinweg, weil jeder, der an diesem Treffen teilnimmt, vermutlich nicht motiviert werden muss, um zu lernen. Aber ich denke, die anderen Dinge könnten Ihnen dann helfen. Das erste hat mit früheren Denken zu tun. Wie ich sagte, man verschaltet das Gehirn neu, aber man muss – das Gehirn beginnt nicht bei Null, es gibt bereits viele Verschaltungen dort. Man muss daher verbinden und aufbauen auf das, was man bereits weiß und denkt. Und es gibt eine Menge grundsätzlicher Dinge darüber wie das Gedächtnis arbeitet, um anfangs Informationen zu verarbeiten und sie dann langfristig zu behalten. Und dann gibt es diese Idee, authentisches Expertendenken zu üben und Feedback dafür zu bekommen. So, ich werde über eine Reihe von Beispielen reden, die Ihnen Dinge an die Hand geben, die Sie selbst tun können, um diese zu üben, um besser zu lernen. Und, übrigens, wenn Sie lehren, sind das die Dinge, die Sie auch Ihren Studenten nahebringen sollten, damit sie besser lernen. Nun, ich möchte unterstreichen, was es nicht ist - und dies ist ein guter Test. Wenn Sie darüber nachdenken: Wie studieren die meisten Menschen? Sie lesen ein Lehrbuch und die Vorlesungsnotizen und arbeiten durch die Lösungen der Aufgaben, oder sitzen passiv in einer Vorlesung und hören zu. Und eine Art und Weise, wie man sofort testen kann, dass das nicht sehr effektiv ist: es ist zu leicht. Es zwingt das Gehirn nicht, hart zu arbeiten, und das bedeutet im Grunde, dass das Gehirn da drin nicht die Chemikalien ausschüttet, um den Effekt hervorzurufen. Also, was sind einige schwierige Dinge, die man tun kann, die effektiv sind? Das erste ist, dass man wirklich intensiv und fokussiert studieren muss und dem wirklich die volle Aufmerksamkeit widmet. Oder es gleich bleiben zu lassen. Man hat einfach nichts davon, wenn man nur mit halber Aufmerksamkeit beim Studium ist. Wenn man neues Material bekommt, ein Thema hier, muss man sich hinsetzen und nachdenken und es mit Ihrem alten Wissen in Einklang bringen. Denken Sie daran, wie die Themen, wie das mit Dingen verknüpft ist, die Sie schon gelernt haben, mit Situationen in der Welt, die Sie kennen, usw. Und machen Sie das auf eine sehr aktive, bewusste Art und Weise. Wenn Sie etwas über ein neues Konzept lernen, setzen Sie sich hin und schreiben Sie die Kriterien auf: Wann wird das zutreffen, in welchen Situationen. Und, sehr wichtig: wann und warum wird es nicht nützlich sein. Sie sollten immer nach Wegen suchen, Ihr Denken zu überprüfen und feststellen, wo Sie Schwachstellen haben. Und daher gibt es viele Möglichkeiten, dies zu tun: Schauen, wie Ihre Ideen in unterschiedlichen Situationen anwendbar sind; überprüfen, diskutieren, mit anderen Studenten sprechen und argumentieren, auch mit Professoren usw. Eine besonders effektive Weise ist der Versuch, es jemand anderem beizubringen. Wir machen dies in unserer Ausbildung mit unserem generischen ‚Bruder oder Schwester in der 10. Klasse‘. Dafür benötigt man Universitätsmaterial, und denkt darüber nach, wie man es aufbereitet, dass man es seinem Bruder oder seiner Schwester in der 10. Klasse erklären kann. Es zwingt Sie, dies wirklich in einem sehr speziellen und effektiven Lernweg zu verarbeiten. Und in diesen Studien stellte sich heraus, dass man es gar nicht wirklich jemandem beibringen muss; man muss sich nur vorstellen, es jemandem beizubringen und hat dadurch schon die meisten Vorteile. Da gibt es die Lösungsplanung. Das ist etwas, mit dem Experten viel mehr Zeit verbringen als Anfänger. Und seien Sie daher sehr explizit, wenn Sie ein neues Problem haben; beim Versuch auszuarbeiten, was die Lösung ist, wie das Problem in Teile aufgeteilt wird, usw., bevor man sich in es vertieft. Wenn Sie ein Problem lösen, stellen Sie sich alternative Wege vor, auf denen man das Problem lösen könnte – Experten machen das immer. Und, sehr wichtig, wenn es vereinfachende Annahmen gibt, versuchen Sie sich zu fragen, was passieren würde, wenn die Annahmen nicht richtig wären. Oder gibt es andere mögliche Annahmen, die man machen könnte? Und jetzt, wo wir dem Ende zugehen: Wenn Sie einen Fehler gemacht haben, schauen Sie nicht gleich nach, was die richtige Antwort ist. Die meisten Lehrer machen den großen Fehler, dass sie sagen, wenn sie sehen, dass ein Student etwas falsch macht: Es erweist sich, dass man dadurch nicht viel lernt. Lernen findet wirklich statt, wenn die Lernenden nicht nur wissen, dass sie etwas falsch gemacht haben, sondern auch verstehen, warum sie den Fehler gemacht haben und wie sie ihr Denken in der Zukunft ändern müssen, um es richtig zu machen. Und dabei findest fast das ganze effektive Lernen statt. Zurück zu langfristiger Speicherung: Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, wenn man Dinge lange behalten will, muss man sich immer wieder abfragen und sie anwenden. Und durchs Abfragen und Anwenden - es ist kein formaler Test, man erinnert sich an die Ideen und wendet sie an. Und es ist wirklich wahr, entweder benutzt man diesen Denkprozess oder er geht wieder weg; das Gehirn nimmt diese Neuronen, um andere Dinge mit ihnen zu machen. Und am Ende etwas, von dem ich mir gewünscht hätte, es während meiner Studentenzeit besser gewusst zu haben: Schlaf ist wirklich wichtig und dafür gibt es 2 Gründe. Einer ist, dass man dümmer wird, wenn man nicht genug Schlaf bekommt. Aber weniger offensichtlich ist, dass beim Lernen das Gehirn während des Schlafprozesses tatsächlich vieles von dem Gelernten konsolidiert und viele der notwendigen Verdrahtungsänderungen dauerhafter macht. Schlafen ist also ein wichtiger Bestandteil des Lernens. Ok, ich werde jetzt schnell zum Ende kommen. Hier ist noch ein Weg, wie man recht spezifisch Ihre Wie-man-von-Hausaufgaben-lernt-Probleme verbessert. Zunächst muss man darüber nachdenken, was die Fachkenntnis ist, die eingesetzt wird, und das Feedback dazu aus typischen Lehrbüchern oder Prüfungsaufgaben, wenn man sich die Liste der Komponenten des Expertendenkens, über die ich vorhin gesprochen habe, ansieht, und dann darüber nachdenkt, was in der normalen Aufgabe steckt. Zunächst gibt es alle benötigten Informationen, und nur diese Information sagt Ihnen, welche Annahmen, Dinge man vernachlässigen kann. Also hat man gleich am Anfang ausgelassen, diese Teile der Expertise zu üben. Nicht nach irgendeiner Antwort gefragt, nur eine Antwort zu bekommen, man muss nicht rechtfertigen, warum sie vernünftig ist - das fällt weg. Üblicherweise wird nur eine Darstellung verlangt, was auch immer sie in die Aufgabe gesteckt haben - das fällt weg. Und recht oft ist es möglich, das Problem zu lösen, wenn man sich die Konzepte und Prozeduren anschaut, die das Lehrbuch oder die Stunde gerade abgedeckt hat. Und das bedeutet, das fällt auch weg. Bei Ihren normalen Hausaufgaben bleibt sehr wenig an praktischer Übung des Expertendenkens übrig. Man lernt wirklich vorwiegend Fakten und Vorgehensweisen, aber nicht das nützlichere Expertendenken. Ich werde hier nicht auf Einzelheiten eingehen; Sie können Kopien meiner Folien bekommen und sich Gedanken machen. Aber es gibt Wege, wie Sie Ihre normalen Hausaufgaben nehmen und sie selbst in eine Aufgabe umschreiben, die Ihnen dann wirklich eine Übung im Expertendenken aufgibt. Das hilft Ihnen tatsächlich, viel effektiver durch das Erarbeiten dieser Aufgaben zu lernen. Ok, ich bin gerade noch in der Zeit hier. Mir ist bewusst, dass dieser Vortrag - mir ist es bewusster als fast jedem anderen, weil ich dies studiert habe – dass es zuviel Material gab, es zu schnell gegangen ist, als dass Sie es wirklich hätten verarbeiten können. Aber ich sorge dafür, dass Sie Kopien des Vortrags bekommen. Und Sie können sich über sie Gedanken machen und etwas daraus lernen. Und wenn Sie heute zur Nachmittagssitzung kommen, wo wir das ausführlicher diskutieren können, wird das hilfreich sein. Und wenn Sie sich die Folien anschauen, es gibt ein paar Literaturhinweise. Wenn Sie mehr über dieses effektive Lernen wissen möchten und lernen, wie ein Experte zu denken, dort gibt es Literaturangaben. Danke sehr.

Carl Wieman (2016) - A Scientific Approach to Learning Physics
(00:00:52 - 00:02:42)

 The complete video is available here.


The Future of the Low-Temperature Sciences

Advances in the fields of low-temperature physics, superconductivity, superfluidity, and BECs continue to occur at a rapid pace. Since 1995, many laboratories worldwide regularly reach nanokelvin temperatures. In fact, Ketterle led the team at MIT who reached 500 pK, the lowest temperature ever recorded. Some of the biggest tech companies in the world creating their own superconducting quantum computers, which use quantum mechanical phenomena to outperform classical computers in certain areas. Superfluids have been recently applied to spectroscopic techniques as a quantum solvent to dissolve other chemicals. BECs have been produced for a number of different isotopes, made up of hundreds of thousands of atoms. Scientists have even created a condensate from pairs of fermionic atoms in the 2000s.

During his 2019 Lindau lecture, Ketterle spoke about the importance of studying ultracold atoms, as well as how the field contributes to materials science and the rest of physics.

Wolfgang Ketterle (2019) - New Forms of Matter Near Absolute Zero Temperature
(00:05:42 - 00:07:40)

 The complete video is available here.


Time will only tell how much closer humankind will get to absolute zero, and what kinds of new physics will reveal itself in the process. But if history is any indication of the future, then the continued exploration of the coldest places in the universe should be surprising, exhilarating, and probably quite strange.


Bibliografy

 [1] Wisniak, J. (2004) Guillaume Amontons. Revista CENIC. Ciencias Químicas, vol. 36 (3), pp. 187-195
[2] Encyclopædia Britannica. (2019) “Absolute zero.” https://www.britannica.com/science/absolute-zero
[3] https://news.mit.edu/2003/cooling
[4] Ford, P. J. (1981) “Towards the Absolute Zero: The Early History of Low Temperatures.” South African Journal of Science, vol. 77, pp. 244-248
[5] Andrews, T. (1869) "The Bakerian Lecture: On the Continuity of the Gaseous and Liquid States of Matter", Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, vol. 159, pp. 575–590
[6] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1910/waals/biographical/
[7] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1913/onnes/biographical/
[8] Dahl, P. F. (1984) “Kamerlingh Onnes and the Discovery of Superconductivity: The Leyden Years, 1911-1914.” Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences, vol. 15 (1), pp. 1-37
[9] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1913/summary/
[10] Giauque, W. F. and MacDougall, D. P. (1935) “The production of temperatures below one degree absolute by adiabatic demagnetization of gadolinium sulfate.” Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 57 (7), pp. 1175-1185
[11] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1949/summary/
[12] Chu, S., Hollberg, L., Bjorkholm, J. E., Cable, A., and Ashkin, A. (1985) Three-dimensional viscous confinement and cooling of atoms by resonance radiation pressure.“ Physics Review Letters, vol. 55 (1), pp. 48-51
[13] Lett, P. D., Watts, R. N., Westbrooks, C. I., Phillips, W. D., Gould, P. L., and Metcalf, H. J. (1988) “Observation of Atoms Laser Cooled below the Doppler Limit.” Physics Review Letters, vol. 61 (2), pp. 169-172
[14] Lawall, J., Kulin, S., Saubamea, B., Bigelow, N., Leduc, M., and Cohen-Tannoudji, C. (1995) “Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling of Helium Beyond the Single-Photon Recoil Limit.” Physics Review Letters, vol. 75 (23), pp. 4194-4197
[15] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1997/summary/
[16] Goodstein, D. and Goodstein, J. (2000) “Richard Feynman and the History of Superconductivity.” Physics in Perspective, vol. 2, pp. 30-47
[17] Ginzburg, V. L. and Landau, L. D., Zh. (1950) “On the theory of superconductivity.” Eksp. Teor. Fiz., vol. 20, p. 1064
[18] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1962/summary/
[19] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2003/press-release/
[20] Bardeen, J., Cooper, L. N., and Schrieffer, J. R. (1957). "Microscopic Theory of Superconductivity." Physical Review, vol. 106 (1), pp. 162-164
[21] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1972/summary/
[22] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1973/press-release/
[23] Josephson, B.D. (1962). "Possible new effects in superconductive tunnelling". Physics Letters, vol. 1 (7), pp. 251–253
[24] Bednorz, J. G. and Müller, K. A. (1986) “Possible high Tc superconductivity in the Ba-La-Cu-O system.” Zeitschrift fur Physik B Condensed Matter, vol. 64, pp. 189-193
[25] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1987/press-release/
[26] Silver, T. M., Dou, S. X., and Jin, J. X. (2001) “Applications of high temperature superconductors.” Europhysics News, pp. 82-86
[27] Ford, P. J. (1981) “Towards the Absolute Zero: The Early History of Low Temperatures.” South African Journal of Science, vol. 77, pp. 244-248
[28] Kapitza, P. (1938) “Viscosity of Liquid Helium below the λ-Point.” Nature, vol. 141, p. 74
[29] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1978/press-release/
[30] https://www.britannica.com/biography/Lev-Landau
[31] Landau, L. (1941) “Theory of the Superfluidity of Helium II.” Physical Review, vol. 60, p. 356
[32] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/1996/summary/
[33] Griffin, A. (2009) “New light on the intriguing history of superfluidity in liquid 4He.” Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, vol. 21, pp. 1-9
[34] Anderson, M. H., Ensher, J. R., Matthews, M. R., Wieman, C. E., and Cornell, E. A. (1995) Science, vol. 269, p. 198
[35] Davis, K. B., Mewes, M.-O., Andrews, M. R., van Druten, N. J., Durfee, D. S., Kurn, D. M., and Ketterle, W. (1995) Physical Review Letters, vol. 75, p. 3969
[36] https://www.nobelprize.org/uploads/2018/06/advanced-physicsprize2001.pdf
[37] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2001/summary/