Model Organisms

by Neysan Donnelly


As the term suggests, model organisms are used to study processes, diseases and phenomena that cannot be easily examined in other, usually more complex, organisms. The logic behind the use of model organisms rests on the acceptance that all life on earth has evolved from one single source and shares one single ancestor. This means that genetic, cellular and biochemical mechanisms are shared across living beings, from bacteria to humans. Many important molecules and processes evolved relatively early in history and were then “expanded on” and refined in more complex organisms. Thus, for example, insights gleaned by studying molecules and processes in very simple organisms can have important implications for human disease. 

While the use of model organisms has really taken off in the last 100 years, important scientific discoveries were made using model organisms already in the 19th century. Perhaps the most striking example was Mendel’s use of peas to elucidate the principles behind the genetics of heredity. 

One of the most commonly employed model organisms is the humble baker’s yeast, the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although humans and yeast are separated by millions of years of evolutionary history, as eukaryotes, organisms that encase their nuclei within membranes, we still share many genes and mechanisms. The much simpler biology of S. cerevisiae as well as the ease with which yeast can be manipulated and altered means that the fundamental characteristics of many cellular processes can more easily studied in this organism than in humans or more complex multicellular organisms. Günter Blobel won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1999 for discoveries related to intracellular protein traffic. In his lecture at the 53rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2003, he talks about his studies on the nuclear pore complex, a massive protein conglomerate consisting of hundreds of individual proteins that acts as the gate regulating the transport of substances in and out of the nucleus. In the following excerpt, Blobel explains why it makes sense to study such massive and complex structures in baker’s yeast. 

 

Günter Blobel explaining why it makes sense to study such massive and complex structures in baker’s yeast
(00:08:31 - 00:10:10)

 


A huge amount of Nobel Prize-winning research was performed in model organisms. In fact, according to the reckoning of the Foundation for Biomedical Research, 96 of the 108 recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine used model organisms in their research (https://fbresearch.org/medical-advances/nobel-prizes/). In the context of Nobel Prize-winning research, some of these organisms have been employed only by one or a very few laureates due to their very specific characteristics, while others such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as well as mice, have yielded many Nobel Prize-winning insights.

An example of the former is Tetrahymena thermophila, a free-living, unicellular organism commonly found in freshwater ponds. T. thermophila possesses many attributes that make it an excellent model organism. For example, its large numbers of cilia and complex cytoskeleton make it very suitable for studying these structures. Nobel Laureate Elizabeth Blackburn was drawn to the organism for other reasons, however: namely, because it contains large numbers of chromosomes and because it can be easily grown in large quantities to provide huge amounts of biological material. In the following excerpts from her lecture at the 61st Lindau Meeting in 2011, she talks about how she employed Tetrahymena to study telomeres, then collaborated with fellow future laureate Jack Szostak to study telomeres in another model organism, baker’s yeast, and subsequently used Tetrahymena again to demonstrate that the telomerase enzyme is essential.

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2011) - Telomeres and Telomerase in Human Health and Disease

Thank you very much and good morning everybody, it's wonderful to see so many faces here this morning. I feel as if I'm looking out at the future hope of much of what we'll see I think in biomedical research and medical research and biological research in the future. So welcome, I'm very glad to be here and giving this talk today. So my talk is going to be telling you something about the science which has been my journey from basic science and which has led us more recently into issues of human health and disease. And so I'm going to tell you just a very little bit about the early part of our work and then go into the aspect which is the human health and disease related part of it. And tell you a little bit about how I started that and then take you into how we're looking at, more recently we're looking at the interesting ramifications of all of this. So telomeres, they're the ends of chromosomes. And this kind of blobby picture where you sort of see the telomere lit up in pink here, that was pretty much what we knew about telomeres from about, you know from the stage when cytogeneticists looked at chromosomes under microscopes and could see that telomeres were, you know something at the end of chromosomes. And when I say something they were more defined by what they weren't. They didn't behave like DNA breaks, they didn't you know try to heal themselves when a break appeared, they're the end but they were not a broken end. And so it was conceptualised that they were really very different from breaks, but what were they. There was an absence of things that they did that more defined a telomere than what it actually was. So I was fortunate to be able to approach this question because. So first of all cast your minds back to the possibility that imagine a world in which you couldn't sequence DNA. Ok so that was the world in which I started my project in Cambridge in England in the lab of Fred Sanger who subsequently developed methods of DNA. But we didn't know how to sequence DNA. So there was this wonderful mystery of what on earth was the DNA like at the ends of the chromosome. And so being in Fred Sanger's lab I got very, you know well-acquainted with the then nascent methods of trying to sequence DNA, which was to try and piece together nucleotides in little patches by using a variety of chemical and biological methods. It doesn't matter but in other words you couldn't believe how impossible it was to sequence DNA in those days. But at least it seemed as if the ends might be a way of accessibility. And so I turned to a system by going to Yale University and the lab of Joe Gall where you could actually get at the ends of chromosomal DNA's, that is the DNA's of eukaryotes and their chromosomes which of course is linear. And this was because Joe Gall and others had discovered that there are very short chromosomes and large numbers of them. And one particular kind in this beast, shown in the slide here, which is the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena. Now this is not a famous organism in the sense that it doesn't cause diseases and it's not one of the favourite model systems although it's very well used now for certain questions relating to telomeres but it was just an obscure pond organism. But it had these large numbers of linear short chromosomes and that allowed me to biochemically if you will, using molecular techniques to get my hands on these, purify them out and analyse what might be going on at the ends of these chromosomes. And in fact I found that they ended up with these repeated sequences, very strange, you know there was no president for why they would do this. And they ended with short repeated sequences and that's the repeat unit shown there. And so they were the chromosomes in tetrahymena and then ending with short repeats. And then in collaboration with Jack Szostak who was in a different institution, we found the same thing was going on in yeast. And I should say that this was an example of where it's marvellous to go to meetings and have conversations because Jack and I struck up a conversation. I had just been talking about the telomeres of tetrahymena and we talked about how would you make, how would you use this information and see if you could get at telomeres in yeast, to cut a long story short. And so we did and we were able to see somewhat similar kinds of repeated sequences. Now a little bit irregular as you see from the formula on the slides. But the same kind of thing, at the end of yeast chromosomes. So this wasn't a peculiarity of this strange little beast that lived in pond scum, this was something that was more general. And indeed it had been found by others, starting to show up in slide moulds and you know, so these kinds of things were showing up at the end of chromosomes. So it looked as if it would be pretty general. And in fact, you know we did know from molecular biology, even back then, before we could sequence DNA properly, we did know that underlying principles of course of life were very similar as you look right across the living world. And so it wasn't too surprising to find some generalities here. But still it was good to find. So basically that then let us address a question which had been asked by others and which arose from the mechanism of DNA replication which as you recall occurs by a very beautiful complicated DNA replication enzymes, beautiful set of these enzymes which beautifully copy all the internal regions of chromosomal DNA. That is any linear DNA but they're just terrible at copying the very ends, because of the mechanistic aspects of how DNA replication occurs. And I won't go into the details, it's all in every text book, but the point is that the beautifully complicated sophisticated DNA replication machinery that so successfully and faithfully copies the genetic information inside chromosomes is terrible at copying the ends. So the ends can't get replicated. So every time a DNA replicated, if it's linear and unless something happened, it would just get shorter and shorter and shorter and shorter. So this was a mystery, well recognised from the early 1970's onwards and explicated by Olovnikov and Watson for example. This was a mystery. And now we knew what was at the ends of chromosomes. So there was the problem and there was a whole lot of interesting pieces of information. And I'm going to list them here because sometimes it sounds as though, when you say well you discovered telomeres, it sounds as though it just sort of fell out of the sky or something or we stumbled on it. Didn't work that way and I think this is more typical of real science, how real science works. What happened was that there were pieces of evidence, not all from one system, there were pieces of evidence in tetrahymena that the numbers of repeats at the ends of the chromosomes differed in the population of molecules. You could find that during the development of new chromosomes in this organism, has a very complicated lifestyle but it makes new telomeres and they got added on to non-telomeres. How did that happen? There was an interesting observation in the organism that causes sleeping sickness, these organisms when propagated, you could see the end DNA getting longer and longer. How did that happen? And Jack Szostak and I found that when you put a tetrahymena and a telomere into yeast, yeast telomere repeats, it got joined on to the tetrahymena repeats. So that was mysterious. And I was intrigued by another observation from the geneticist, the cytogeneticist who really conceptualised and named the features of telomeres, although not the name of telomeres, that is important, Barbara McClintock, maize geneticist and she had conceptualised telomeres and had even found a mutant that failed to heal broken ends which can normally happen if ends are broken at certain stages in development. Now when you've got a mutant that fails to do something, that says ah ha, there must be a normal process here. So all these pieces of the puzzle were there. Was there something going on in cells that could extend telomere DNA. So now as my little advice for the young moving into their careers here, ok so this was the question, we had a lot of interesting hints here that there may be something going on. Now you can't sit and write a grant application and say well I think I might find a new enzyme. Doesn't go down well with the review sections, ok. But you can, you can have wonderful funding which opens up the possibility which says let's look at how telomeres work. And I'm so grateful to a funding agency like the NIH that said you have a grant that's called structure and function of telomerics and within that I could run with the question. But I also want to tell you another very important thing that matter to me and that helped. Now I was studying the telomeric DNA, I was studying proteins associated with telomeric DNA. And what I then did was I got tenure and I had my grant and so I felt really brave, I thought ah I can do anything I like, I've got tenure, I've got a grant, right. So there's a very empowering feeling, even though of course I realised, you know later that that's not always true, that you can't do everything you like. But I felt very empowered because I had tenure and I had a grant, so I thought I'm just going to start looking for this enzyme activity. Now we kept the normal sort of things in our lab going, right, things that were on the grant application, things that were, you know things that were producing steady results. But I thought well I'll just try and do these experiments. And started to get hints that it was working. And then another important thing happened was that I would present this to people as they decided to join the lab and I'd say I've got this project, so one of my very sober post doctoral fellows said I think, when he came, he said I think Liz I don't think I'll work on this rather risky project. But Carol Greider, my graduate student who joined the lab, Carol was happy to do that and she thought it was the most interesting project in the lab and so I think that's very important, you know to find PhD students who want to go for what they think is the most interesting projects in the lab, even though it mightn't be the one that generates results. But in this case it did and so what in the end we were able to do was to have a synthetic DNA and I'd been doing this with restriction enzymes and pieces of DNA and seeing bits of DNA added on that looked like telomeric DNA was being added. But we refined it down to putting in a DNA oligonucleotide. And we were just able to get them, again grab the technology when it becomes available because synthetic DNA, oligonucleotides were just becoming available to the research community, so we grabbed this opportunity, had a synthetic DNA made and then we found that it could get elongated after a lot of painful work with cell extracts. We could find an enzymatic activity that made that DNA longer by adding more repeats. And so the important point was that here I had a student who was willing to take on a project that was risky but this person thought, Carol thought this was the most interesting of the projects in the lab. And then as I said we could take advantage of technologies, there was terrific biochemical technologies in terms of enzymologist out there, we could use the precedence that people had from DNA replication studies to make our cell extracts and so forth and incubate and make reactions. And as I said along came the technology which happened to be DNA oligo synthesis. So what we found was this enzyme telomerase, so now I'm depicting the end of a chromosome in the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena which being a rich source of short DNAs, I reasoned would probably be a rich source of any enzyme that might be making these DNAs. And so sure enough if you look at a chromosome end in tetrahymena very simplified, just showing the DNA here, what it does is it gets elongated by the enzyme telomerase which is a truly fascinating enzyme because it's made up of both RNA and DNA. They both help the reaction work, although the catalytic, sorry it's made of RNA and protein, the catalytic site is actually the protein, it's not the RNA. But the RNA plays crucial roles in making that protein catalytic site work. It's a fascinating collaboration of protein and RNA. In that RNA and the crucial thing that I've shown you on the slide here is a short RNA sequence that's copied into DNA, just by adding nucleotides and so the DNA gets elongated. So here was in the test tube the wherewithal for overcoming that DNA replication problem, the end replication problem that I alluded to. So here it was in the test tube, did it actually work this way in cells. And so we used tetrahymena and my student Guo-Liang Yu developed a technology for introducing genes back into tetrahymena. So we had to sort of build it up from the roots so to speak. But we could get the first evidence that you needed telomerase in cells. Now in tetrahymena, I didn't tell you but these organisms are mortal, they just keep growing, if you feed them and talk to them nicely they'll keep on multiplying, right, forever, they're immortal, right. So they must have very good DNA repair systems by the way. And they had plenty, so to speak of telomerase. Now were those 2 facts related, right. So what do you do, well you experimentally interfere with the telomerase and genetically make it not work anymore. So that's what we did. And so then we found that now in the next 20 or so generations the telomeres progressively shortened and shortened and the cells ceased to divide. Now when I say genetically kill telomerase, I'll make a confession to you. This sounds all very deliberate, right, like we set out to kill it. Actually we were doing a different experiment at the time. We were looking at the RNA and asking about its templating ability. But we were very lucky because one of the mutations turned out not to be copied into the DNA and we were very frustrated by it but then we noticed oh look the telomeres are getting shorter and the cells are dying. And then we found that the enzyme was no longer active in the cells. And so then ah this was a very useful mutant. But we hadn't actually set out to ask that immediate question. But again what the take home from this was, always look at what the organism is telling you, right, we hadn't designed that particular experiment with that in mind but it turned out to be absolutely the perfect experiment to answer the question of do you need telomerase because we inadvertently made a mutation that ablated or ruined, spoiled, killed the activity of the enzyme in cells. And so that enabled us to ask the question, that I now put up here and looks as though I planned to say this and do this, planned to do this experiment but we actually just lucked into it. We probably would have tried this experiment next but we were lucky and got a mutant that worked. And so what it did was we struck at the heart of the activity of the ability of these cells to multiple, so this was really, you know these cells all died, right. The telomeres ran down and they died. So the important message was an immortal organism, all you had to do was mutate the component of telomerase. It was the RNA, we knew what it was, very, very exactly and the cells became mortal. So that told us that telomerase was maintaining telomeres. Ok so now we knew something about telomere structure which has repeated DNA, these DNA sequences are made by telomerase and they're maintained by telomerase in a very complex highly regulated process. And what that accomplishes for the cells is to make a platform, a platform of DNA binding sites upon which bind a great many very interesting, interactive proteins that bind the DNA sequence specifically. They have protein partners and they very dynamically associating and disassociating with the telomere. But the point is they make a sheath and that protective sheath is the whole point for the telomeres and that's the cap, that's the protective cap, ok. And we always liked it, you know it's like the aglet at the end of your shoe lace, right. But as I said there's this inherent problem and that is that telomeres because of their inherent replication properties and because now we know nuclease activities, telomeres have a propensity to shorten. So it's like the shoe lace end frayed away, right, the tip got lost and now you have a frayed shoe lace. And this is a very bad situation, the cell responds very clearly to this. And what happens is that that very shortened telomere sends a signal to the cells and the cells will not multiple. And in fact they can undergo genomic instabilities. So this frayed end if you will, which is just a metaphor is very literally a shortened telomere or telomeres and that prevents cells from multiplying. So bottom line is that if you have too much erosion the cells will not live, ok. Now let's got to human situations. Ok so now we're going to switch to well how does this all work out in humans. So now we have a very different situation from say tetrahymenas or yeasts and things like that, that just keep multiplying. We have now us and you know in developed societies for example where conditions are good, you know we can expect life expectances of something like 80 degrees, 80 years, sorry, thinking of the warm weather we're having in Lindau today. We have in life expectancy around 80 years. And you know maximum life span is what, somewhere around 120, that kind of thing, right. So now our lives are lived out over many, many decades. Well we certainly know that the underlying molecular machineries are going to be similar, you know across all the eukaryotes that's been amply seen. You know we have telomerase just as do tetrahymenas and yeast and so forth. But the important point is that the kinetics of all of this is now going to be played out over very long, you know decades of life. So how does it all play out? So that's been the subject of research for many, many different labs in the last few decades. So a simple observation, very broad brush and there will be exceptions, is that in a general way telomerase is often limiting in adult human cells. And so they do in fact undergo some shortening and various systems in the body one can see evidence that this is likely to be occurring, that the telomeres are progressively shortening and senescence is occurring. And one can see evidence for that in vivo, in people. Now the question was does that cellular phenomenon play out in our lifetimes, you know does the candle burning down for the telomeres so to speak, does that actually get reflected in human life courses or not. So that was the question that many, many labs had been collecting evidence for. And so I'm going to tell you first of all just a very brief overview of what's been seen and then I want to take you into some aspects of what might influence this process. Ok so back to the basics, what would first influence this process would be whether you have telomerase or not. And so many analysis have been done on where do we find telomerase in human cells. First of all normal cells, well in normal cells, in cells that are going to have to be effectively immortal or have very long replicated life spans you find actually plenty of telomerase. Like in stem cells, in germ cells, germ lineage cells, you know we're all here today, that's because our germ lineages have telomerase. Keeps the telomeres going from generation to generation. And in certain stem cells that will have long proliferative properties throughout life, notably the immune system. But you also find telomerase in other cells and we found that actually quite instructive, to look at other cells and particularly cells of the immune system and particularly cells in peripheral blood where you can take a sample from somebody with a pretty non-invasive blood draw. And healthy people will give you blood and you can study telomeres and how they're being maintained using the white blood cells, the immune system cells from a blood draw as a kind of a window into the cells. And now we can even find, as I'll show you later, we can even do it with saliva as well because there's a lot of cells that leak out into your saliva and it gives you a nice source of genomic DNA as well. And so we can quantify the telomerase in blood cells and so you might expect, you know more or less telomerase will be influencing how short the telomeres get, how quickly. And we also can measure telomere length, obviously in such cells. Now another thing that's important is that we do find that telomerase is very highly activated in cancer cells. And cancer cells as you know have among their many undesirable properties, the property of too much replication. The cells proliferate too much because they've undergone mutations and epigenetic changes that have now made them ignore signals to cease multiplying and to go to the right places in the body and so forth. And so cancer cells are rogue cells, they're out of control and telomerase allows those out of control cells to maintain their telomeres and keep on multiplying. So in the context of cancer cells, telomerase is actually very bad news. But the cancer cells have undergone a great many other changes. And in fact the high telomerase often doesn't appear in the common cancers until they're pretty advanced. I'm actually not going to talk about telomerase in cancer cells today, it's a fascinating question, there are interesting questions of can you inhibit it or monkey around with it to kill cancer cells but I want to focus today on the normal cells, ok. So let's just imagine what situations we might expect to play out over the decades of you know of human life. So imagine in germ cells, well we'll have the cells stay maintained, you know just like tetrahymena or yeast and so you know we expect a balance between shortening and lengthening because the telomeres over all are maintained. And there's a great deal of genetic and non-genetic control of these processes as I'll talk about in a moment. But you can also imagine the balance goes in the other direction and this has been seen for certain immune cells as they go through certain multiplicative stages in the body, telomeres actually get longer in normal differentiated cells. So that generality I showed you, they don't always have to get shorter but they often do get shorter. And so if you have some telomerase, you could imagine that they would be getting shorter by those natural processes shortening but telomerase might try and keep them up and so you know it might be able to stave off the, you know terrible moments when the telomeres get too short, for quite a while but senescence would eventually come. And that would be later than everything else being equal if there were less telomerase. And then it would, you know not be able to stave off senescence for so long. So how would all these things work and we know even from a yeast cell which has 350 genes, at least and counting which influence telomere lengths and length distributions. So we know this process is going to be under many, many elaborate genetic controls. So we expect genetic controls and we expect non-genetic controls because everything is influenced by non-genetic effects too. That will be the main topic that I'll get to but I just wanted to tell you that the reason that we got very interested in this is that over the years many groups have seen that many of the common diseases of aging and including cancers but many of these diseases that characterise aging humans have been linked to shorter telomeres in the normal cells. This is just a sampling of the kinds of diseases in which you see this association and the list of the authors on the right is extremely incomplete, it's just a little sampling. On the left is the common diseases and if you look at these diseases you can see that they include some of the big killers and the big serious medical problems in populations, cancer, pulmonary fibroses, cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia, degenerative conditions, diabetes, in fact risk factors for some of these. This has been seen in associative studies. And so let's just think about it, let's think about this means. And we are interested in this symposium, in this wonderful meeting on big questions of global health. And this just shows the graph for, I think this is the US numbers and it's going to be true in different degrees around the world, that we have a situation where there's an aging population first of all and I just pulled something from an article that was published on the 25th of June just a couple of days ago, nearly 10% of the world's adults have diabetes. The prevalence is rising and the point is that it's not just in developed countries, this is arising in developing countries, this is really a world-wide problem, 10% almost of the world's adults in all countries across the world have diabetes. And the prevalence is only going up. So we've got some big health issue and we heard about several of them yesterday. But I think we really have to think about these ones as well. And today I bring up these ones because our research has tied what we are understanding about telomere maintenance in humans to this kind of disease, of which diabetes is one example. Ok so it's a rising problem. Ok so what have I just said, I've just said that telomere shortness in the general population, that's people overall, in mini cohorts around the world, has been associated with common diseases of aging, ok. And so what's going on. Well is it telomere maintenance that's causing the shortness. So what you do is of course, you turn to human genetics and you look at rare Mendelian mutations and you say what can you learn from those. They've been very instructive in humans and people have deliberately using mouse models removed telomerase from mice and it's very clear that in humans the rare telomerase mutations that occur in people, that are known to cause telomere shortness, because they make telomerase work less well. They interrupt the enzymatic activity of telomerase or its ability to add telomeres, ok. So mutated telomerase genes which is just, you know the luck of the draw, right, the roulette wheel you know spins and your parents give you some combination of genes, right. So that's the luck of the genes. And in this case the bad luck of the genes. And that leads to telomere shortness. And it's very clear that there's a disease impact of this, both in people and in the mouse models where it's been done experimentally. And these sorts of diseases, their prevalence goes way up, they become very prone to these diseases. And look at that list, it starts to remind you of the list that I showed you before, these common diseases of aging in the general population. Which are associated with telomere shortness. Here in these rare mutations we've got causality so now of course the interesting question is well what about the common snips, the common variations in the genome that cause telomeres to be shorter, do they also lead to disease. Those studies which are much more complex epidemiologically and people have only just started posing them, are already suggesting yes. And there's a beautiful case, case of cancer where a certain cancer, it's bladder cancer, quite a common one, you can see that a snip that causes telomere shortness also causes bladder cancer. And part of that effect is mediated through the telomere shortening, ok. So that genetically speaking we know is the case. Now I'm going to turn to what's been very interesting to us and that is non-genetics. And do know when you think about future challenges, you know genetics, I'd say we've got genetics, if you will well in hand. Now I mean that's a trivial statement in some ways because of course there's huge complexities still, but we get it, we get it with genetics. We understand yes genes have effects, yes the genes interact, yes we know they're important to varying degrees. You know there's a lot of ways we can study this. And it's being done very activity and very productively. Let's do something harder. You know let's have some fun here, right let's choose something that's more difficult, non-genetic things. And this was, my next sort of point is that when somebody comes to you with a really interesting question that just grabs you and you think that person is good at that kind of research, go for it. So we started a collaboration. And this was wonderful because our friends in the UCSF department of psychiatry were very interested in chronic stress and we found low and behold that we could interact with them and show that people in which chronic stress by the way is a known risk factor for common diseases such as cardiovascular, that telomere shortness was associated with chronic stress. And my timing is up and so what I'm going to do is, that was the message, the important thing was that we found that it causes telomere shortening. Things that happen to you in childhood such as multiple trauma exposures influence your telomeres when you're an adult. And that's what this graph here is showing. And so we've become very, very fascinated by this question. And so now we've realised when I'm just going to zoom through all this, I had much too much to say to you, I knew I'd be so excited. And we're really trying to understand the interactions between chronic stress, telomere shortening which we know it causes and diseases. And how these all interact. So the bottom line was that we look over time and we see effects but my wonderful technician decided he would set up a machine for analysing 100,000 telomere lengths, he built a very complicated robot and here it is in action here, ok. So we were able to get, you know tones of telomeric DNA information out. And so now I'm going to end with this because this is going to be my plea to all of you who are really interested in huge complicated data sets and how you analyse those. Because what we did was we generated, as my marvellous technician said, more telomere length data than ever before, right. So here it is, you know this is the just the raw data right, tones, 100,000 people but the beauty is that it's tied in with a wonderful project of genome wide association, 675,000 different snips on these 100,000 people. And 20 years of clinical information all longitudinal electronic health records, data. So this is going to be so exciting to use all of this marvellous information and start relating all these things together. Because the end is that we really want to understand this road of life, we want to understand telomere loss on the one hand, telomere gain on the other hand, telomere maintenance. We know there's genetic components and what I didn't tell you but it's published, is we know adverse childhood events and chronic psychological stress are putting you on the telomere shortness and disease risk side of things. Education I'm very happy to tell you is clearly related to longer telomeres as is exercise and stress reduction. So on this happy note I want to finish and just tell you why we think this is important because I think there's so much more to be learned. And these are the folks in my lab and our collaborators with whom we have so much fun addressing what I think are important questions when we think about the question of human health, we're seeing very common sorts of disease situations which are growing world-wide. So I want to throw the challenge out to you, once we've solved these acute problems, these severe problems of infectious diseases and the major health problems in the world, why don't you look ahead to the next decades and say what are we left with, we're left with these other chronic diseases and these other diseases and I think we should think about how do we deal with the very complex problem of preventing these diseases. We want to treat the acute ones, let's think about how we prevent the other diseases that we're going to be left with now we survive all of the acute infectious and other diseases. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank und guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist wunderbar an diesem Morgen so viele Gesichter hier zu sehen. Ich habe das Gefühl, als schaute ich auf die Zukunftshoffnung von so vielem, was wir, denke ich, in der biomedizinischen, medizinischen und biologischen Forschung in Zukunft sehen werden. Seien Sie also alle willkommen. Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier sein und diesen Vortrag halten zu können. Mein Vortrag wird Ihnen etwas über die Wissenschaft erzählen, über meine Reise, die mit der Grundlagenforschung begann und mich in letzter Zeit zu Fragen geführt hat, die mit menschlicher Gesundheit und menschlichen Erkrankungen in Zusammenhang stehen. Ich werde Ihnen ein wenig über die Anfangsphase meiner Arbeit erzählen und dann zu demjenigen Aspekt übergehen, der mit der menschlichen Gesundheit und mit Krankheiten zu tun hat. Und ich werde Ihnen ein bisschen davon erzählen, wie ich damit angefangen habe. Dann werde ich Ihnen berichten, wie wir in letzter Zeit angefangen haben, die interessanten Implikationen all dieser Dinge zu untersuchen. Also Telomere sind die Enden von Chromosomen. Und dieser Art von unscharfem Bild, auf dem Sie die Telomere hier in rosa aufleuchten sehen: Das war so ziemlich alles, was man über Telomere wusste, in dem Stadium, in dem die Zytogenetiker Chromosomen unter dem Mikroskop betrachteten und sehen konnten, dass Telomere etwas am Ende von Chromosomen sind. Und wenn ich sage "etwas", dann meine ich, Sie waren mehr durch das definiert, was sie nicht sind. Sie verhielten sich nicht wie Brüche des DNA-Strangs, sie versuchten sich nicht selbst zu reparieren, wenn es zu einem Bruch kam. Sie waren zwar das Ende der DNA, aber kein "abgebrochenes" Ende. Und so entwickelte man die Vorstellung, dass sie sich von DNA-Brüchen deutlich unterschieden. Doch was waren sie dann? Ein Telomer wurde mehr durch das definiert, was er nicht tat, als durch das, was er in Wirklichkeit war. Ich hatte also das Glück, mich mit dieser Frage zu beschäftigen. Denken Sie also zunächst an die Möglichkeit zurück, denken Sie an eine Welt, in der sich die DNA nicht sequenzieren lässt, ok. Das war die Welt, in der ich in Cambridge in England im Labor von Fred Sanger, der später selbst Methoden der DNA-Sequenzierung entwickelte, die Arbeit an meinem Projekt begann. Doch wir wussten nicht, wie man die DNA-Sequenz analysiert. Und da gab es dieses wundervolle Rätsel: Wie war die DNA an den Enden der Chromosomen nur beschaffen? Und da ich im Labor von Fred Sanger war, wurde ich mit den damals aufkommenden Methoden sehr vertraut, die man bei dem Versuch, die DNA Sequenz zu analysieren, entwickelt hatte. Sie bestanden darin, dass man mithilfe einer Vielzahl chemischer und biologischer Methoden versuchte, Nukleotide in kleinen Abschnitten zusammenzufügen. Auf die Einzelheiten kommt es nicht an, doch ich will damit sagen, dass Sie sich nicht vorstellen können, wie unmöglich es damals war, die Sequenz der DNA zu analysieren. Doch zumindest schien es so, als seien die Enden ein Zugangsweg zur DNA. Und so wendete ich mich, indem ich an die Yale Universität und das Labor von Joe Gall ging, einem System zu, mit dem man tatsächlich an die Enden der chromosomalen DNA herankam, d.h. an die DNA von Eukaryoten und ihre Chromosomen, die natürlich linear sind. Der Grund hierfür war, dass Joe Gall und andere entdeckt hatten, dass es sehr kurze Chromosomen gibt, und zwar in sehr großer Zahl. Und eine bestimmte Art von ihnen fand man in diesem Tier, das auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um das mit Cilien besetzte Urtierchen Tetrahymena. Und dies ist insofern kein berühmter Organismus in dem Sinne, als er keine Krankheiten verursacht und es ist keines der beliebten Modellsysteme. Er wird allerdings heute für bestimmte Fragen, die mit Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen, sehr häufig verwendet. Es war lediglich ein unbekannter Organismus, der in Teichen lebt. Doch er verfügte über diese große Anzahl linearer, kurzer Chromosomen, und das erlaubte mir - wenn Sie so wollen auf biochemische Weise - molekulare Techniken zu verwenden, mit denen ich an diese herankommen, sie isolieren und so analysieren konnte, was sich an den Enden dieser Chromosomen abspielte. Tatsächlich fand ich heraus, dass sie mit sich wiederholenden Sequenzen endeten. Es war sehr seltsam, wissen Sie. Es gab keinen vergleichbaren Fälle, die hätten erklären können, warum sie dies tun sollten. Sie endeten mit kurzen sich wiederholenden Sequenzen. In dieser Abbildung hier sehen Sie die Wiederholungseinheit. Dies also waren die Chromosomen in Tetrahymena, und sie endeten in kurzen Wiederholungssequenzen. Zusammen mit Jack Szostak, der an einem anderen Institut arbeitete, fanden wir dann heraus, dass dasselbe bei der Hefe geschieht. Und ich sollte Ihnen sagen, dass dies ein Beispiel dafür ist, wie wunderbar es sein kann, zu Treffen zu gehen und Gespräche zu führen. Denn Jack und ich kamen ins Gespräch. Ich hatte gerade über die Telomere von Tetrahymena gesprochen, und wir sprachen darüber - um eine lange Geschichte kurzzufassen - wie man diese Information nutzen könnte, um an die Telomere der Hefe heranzukommen. Wir verfolgten die Sache und wir konnten am Ende der Hefechromosomen in etwa ähnliche Formen von Wiederholungssequenzen beobachten. Nun, ein bisschen unregelmäßig, wie Sie anhand der Formeln auf diesen Dias sehen können, doch von derselben Art. Dies war also keine Besonderheit dieses merkwürdigen kleinen Tieres, das im Oberflächenfilm von Tümpeln lebte. Dies war etwas wesentlich Allgemeineres. Und in der Tat wurde dies auch von anderen gefunden. Man fand es in kriechenden Schimmelpilzen, und diese Art von Sequenzen zeigten sich an den Enden von Chromosomen. Es sah also so aus, als sei dies ein recht allgemeingültiges Phänomen. Und wissen Sie, aus der Molekularbiologie wussten wir tatsächlich - selbst damals schon, bevor wir die DNA-Sequenz korrekt analysieren konnten -, dass die grundlegenden Prinzipen des Lebens, wenn man es sich in seiner Breite anschaut, natürlich sehr ähnlich waren. Es war also nicht weiter erstaunlich, dass man hier einige allgemein gültige Entdeckungen machte. Dennoch war es gut, dies herausgefunden zu haben. Dies erlaubte es uns also im Prinzip eine Frage zu stellen, die schon von anderen gestellt worden war und die aus dem Mechanismus der DNA-Replikation hervorging, der - wie Sie sich erinnern - mit Hilfe wunderschöner, komplizierter DNA-Replikationsenzyme abläuft, eines wunderschönen Satzes dieser Enzyme, die auf wunderbare Weise alle internen Regionen der chromosomalen DNA kopiert, d.h. sämtliche lineare DNA. Doch wenn es um das Kopieren dieser Enden geht, sind sie einfach hoffnungslos überfordert, und zwar aufgrund der mechanischen Aspekte der DNA-Replikation. Ich werde die Einzelheiten nicht erläutern. Man findet sie in jedem Lehrbuch. Worum es mir geht, ist jedoch Folgendes: Der wunderbar komplizierte, intelligente DNA-Replikationsmechanismus, der die genetische Information im Inneren der Chromosomen so erfolgreich und originalgetreu kopiert, versagt an den Enden der Chromosomen. Die Enden können also nicht repliziert werden. Jedes Mal, wenn eine DNA repliziert wird, wenn sie linear ist und sofern nicht etwas anderes passiert, wird sie kürzer und kürzer und immer kürzer. Dies war also ein Rätsel, das seit den frühen 1970er Jahren wohl bekannt war, und zum Beispiel von Olovnikov und Watson als solches auch klar formuliert worden war. Dies war ein Rätsel. Und nun wussten wir, was sich am Ende der Chromosomen befindet. Es gab also dieses Problem, und zusätzlich gab es eine ganze Menge interessanter Teilinformationen. Ich werde sie hier auflisten. Denn manchmal klingt es so - wenn man sagt, dass man Telomere entdeckt hat - als seien sie aus dem Himmel gefallen oder als sei man darüber gestolpert. So war es nicht. Ich glaube, dies ist typischer für die tatsächliche Wissenschaft, dafür wie, die wirkliche Wissenschaft voranschreitet. Was geschah, war Folgendes: Es gab verschiedene Hinweise, die nicht alle aus einem System stammten. Es gab in Tetrahymena Hinweise darauf, dass die Zahl der Wiederholungen an den Chromosomenenden in der Molekülpopulation unterschiedlich war. Man konnte feststellen, dass während der Entwicklung neuer Chromosomen in diesem Organismus - er hat einen sehr komplizierten Lebensstil - neue Telomere erzeugt werden, und sie werden an Nicht-Telomere angefügt. Wie ging das vor sich? Es gab eine interessante Beobachtung in dem Organismus, der die Schlafkrankheit verursacht: Wenn diese Organismen sich vermehrten, konnte man beobachten, wie die Enden der DNA länger und immer länger wurden. Wie kam es dazu? Und Jack Szostak und ich fanden heraus, dass - wenn man ein Tetrahymena-Telomer in Hefe bringt - dass dieses Telomer wiederholt wird: Es wurde an die Wiederholungssequenzen von Tetrahymena angefügt. Dies war höchst geheimnisvoll. Und ich war von einer anderen Beobachtung der Genetiker, der Zytogenetiker fasziniert, die die Eigenschaften der Telomere auf den Begriff gebracht und benannt hatten, obwohl sie den Begriff Telomere nicht erfunden hatten, das ist wichtig. Barbara McClintock, eine Genetikerin, die sich mit Mais befasste, hat Telomere theoretisch beschrieben. Sie fand sogar eine Mutante, der es nicht gelang, gebrochene Enden zu reparieren. Diese treten in der Regel in bestimmten Stadien der Entwicklung auf. Wenn man also eine Mutante gefunden hat, die etwas Bestimmtes nicht tun kann, kommt es zu einem Aha-Erlebnis: Es muss hier einen normalen Prozess geben. Alle Teile des Puzzles lagen vor uns: Fand in den Zellen etwas statt, wodurch die Telomer-DNA verlängert werden konnte? Nun möchte ich den Jungen, die am Beginn ihrer Karriere stehen, einen kleinen Ratschlag geben, ok. Dies war also die Frage. Wir verfügten über eine Fülle interessanter Hinweise, dass hier möglicherweise etwas geschah. Nun kann man sich nicht hinsetzen und einen Antrag für Forschungsgelder schreiben und sagen: Das kommt bei den Leuten, die diese Anträge durchsehen, nicht gut an, ok. Doch man kann, man kann wunderbare finanzielle Unterstützung kommen, die einem die Forschungsmöglichkeit eröffnet, indem man sagt: "Lasst uns untersuchen, wie Telomere funktionieren." Ich bin einem Geldgeber wie dem NIH so dankbar, der sagte: Sie haben ein Stipendium mit dem Titel: "Struktur und Funktion der Telomerik". Unter dieser Überschrift kann ich der Frage nachgehen. Doch ich möchte Ihnen außerdem noch eine andere äußerst wichtige Sachen erzählen, die mir wichtig ist und die mir geholfen hat. Ich untersuchte nun also die DNA der Telomere. Ich studierte Proteine, die mit der DNA der Telomere in Zusammenhang standen, und dann geschah Folgendes: Ich erhielt eine feste Stelle und meine Forschungsgelder. Dadurch fühlte ich mich sehr mutig. Ich dachte mir: "Ah, ich kann tun, was ich will! Ich habe eine feste Stelle, ich habe Forschungsgelder, oder etwa nicht?" Dies war ein sehr bestärkendes Gefühl, obwohl ich natürlich später erkannte, dass das nicht immer wahr ist, dass man nicht alles tun kann, was man möchte. Doch ich fühlte mich sehr dadurch bestärkt, dass ich eine feste Stelle und Forschungsgelder hatte, und so dachte ich mir: Wir ließen also die normalen Arbeiten in unserem Labor weiterlaufen, ok, Arbeiten, die in dem Forschungsantrag beschrieben waren und die stetige Ergebnisse lieferten. Doch ich dachte mir: "Ok, ich werde einfach versuchen, diese Experimente durchzuführen", und ich erhielt Hinweise darauf, dass dies tatsächlich funktionierte. Dann geschah noch etwas Wichtiges: Ich stellte dies Leuten vor, als sie sich dem Labor anschlossen, und ich sagte ihnen: Einer meiner sehr nüchternen PostDoc-Fellows sagte, glaube ich, als er ankam: Doch Carol Greider, eine Doktorandin von mir, die in unser Labor kam, war bereit dies zu tun. Sie meinte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig, wissen Sie, Doktoranden zu finden, die sich auf das einlassen, was sie für das interessanteste Projekt am Labor halten, selbst wenn es nicht dasjenige ist, das Ergebnisse liefert. Doch in diesem Fall lieferte es Ergebnisse, und was uns schließlich gelang, war die Herstellung synthetischer DNA. Ich hatte dies bereits mit Restriktionsenzymen und DNA-Bruchstücken getan, und es zeigte sich dabei, dass DNA-Bruchstücke, die wie Telomer-DNA aussahen, angefügt wurden. Doch wir entwickelten die Sache zur Einfügung eines DNA-Oligonukleotids weiter. Und wir waren in der Lage davon zu profitieren, dass wir DNA-Oligonukleotids bekommen konnten. Wieder konnten wir Technologie nutzen, als sie soeben erst verfügbar geworden war, da synthetische DNA, Oligonukleotide, der Forschergemeinschaft gerade erst verfügbar geworden waren. Also griffen wir diese Gelegenheit beim Schopf und ließen eine synthetische DNA herstellen. Dann stellten wir fest, dass sie nach langer, mühevoller Arbeit mit Zellextrakten verlängert werden konnte. Wir konnten eine Enzymaktivität finden, die die DNA dadurch verlängerte, dass sie weitere Wiederholungssequenzen anfügte. Der wichtigste Aspekt war also, dass ich da eine Studentin hatte, die bereit war, ein riskantes Projekt zu übernehmen, aber diese Person, Carol, dachte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Und dann konnten wir, wie gesagt, die Vorteile von Technologien nutzen. Es gab fantastische biochemische Technologien in der Enzymologie. Wir konnten, um unsere Zellextrakte herzustellen usw. und um Inkubationen und Reaktionen durchzuführen, die früheren Erfahrungen nutzen, die Leute in DNA-Replikationsstudien gesammelt hatten. Wie ich bereits erwähnte, lief uns die Technologie über den Weg, bei der es sich zufällig um die DNA-Oligosynthese handelte. Was wir fanden, war dieses Enzym Telomerase. Jetzt zeige ich Ihnen das Ende eines Chromosoms im cilienbesetzten Urtierchen Tetrahymena, bei dem es sich um eine reiche Quelle kurzer DNAs handelt. Ich ging davon aus, dass dieser Organismus wahrscheinlich auch eine reiche Quelle für jegliche Enzyme sein würde, die diese DNAs herstellen würden. Und tatsächlich: Wenn man sich ein Chromosomende in Tetrahymena sehr vereinfacht anschaut, nur die DNA hier betrachtet, so geschieht hier Folgendes: Es wird durch das Enzym Telomerase verlängert. Dies ist ein wahrhaft faszinierendes Enzym, weil es sowohl aus RNA als auch aus DNA besteht. Beide Teile tragen zum Erfolg der Reaktion bei, obwohl der katalytische - Entschuldigung, es besteht aus RNA und Protein. Die katalytische Stelle ist tatsächlich das Protein. Es ist nicht die RNA. Doch die RNA spielt eine entscheidende Rolle dabei, diesen Ort der Proteinkatalyse funktionsfähig zu machen. Es ist eine faszinierende Zusammenarbeit zwischen einem Protein und der RNA. Und die entscheidende Sache, die ich Ihnen auf dem Dia hier gezeigt habe, ist eine kurze RNA-Sequenz, die in die DNA kopiert wird, einfach indem Nukleotide hinzugefügt werden, und auf diese Weise wird die DNA verlängert. In diesem Reagenzglas hatten wir also, was man brauchte, um das Problem der DNA-Replikation zu lösen, das Problem der Replikation der Enden, auf das ich angespielt habe. Hier war es also im Reagenzglas. Funktionierte es auch auf diese Weise in Zellen? Also verwendeten wir Tetrahymena und mein Student Guo-Liang Yu entwickelte eine Technologie, mit der man die Gene wieder in Tetrahymena zurückbringen konnte. Wir mussten die Sache sozusagen "von den Wurzeln her" wieder aufbauen. Doch wir erhielten die ersten Hinweise darauf, dass man Telomerase in Zellen benötigt. Nun, die Tetrahymena, ich habe Ihnen dies nicht gesagt, aber diese Organismen sind unsterblich. Sie vermehren sich einfach immer weiter. Wenn man sie füttert und freundlich mit ihnen spricht, vermehren sie sich endlos weiter. Sie sind unsterblich. Sie müssen also, nebenbei bemerkt, über sehr gute DNA-Reparatursysteme verfügen. Und sie besaßen jede Menge Telomerasen, sozusagen. Hingen diese beiden Tatsachen zusammen? Was tut man also? Nun, man manipuliert die Telomerase experimentell, und sorgt mit genetischen Methoden dafür, dass sie nicht mehr funktioniert. Das also taten wir. Dann stellten wir fest, dass in den nächsten 20 Generationen oder so, die Telomere nach und nach immer kürzer und kürzer wurden, und die Zellen hörten auf sich zu teilen. Wenn ich nun davon rede, dass wir die Telomerase genetisch zerstört haben, mache ich Ihnen ein Geständnis. Dies klingt alles sehr absichtlich nicht wahr, als hätten wir den Plan gehabt, sie zu zerstören. Tatsächlich führten wir damals ein anderes Experiment durch. Wir betrachteten die RNA und fragten uns nach ihrer Fähigkeit, als Schablone zu dienen. Doch wir hatten sehr großes Glück, weil es sich herausstellte, dass einige der Mutationen nicht in die DNA kopiert wurde, was uns sehr frustrierte. Doch dann bemerkten wir: "Oh, seht mal. Die Telomere werden kürzer und die Zellen sterben". Und dann stellten wir fest, dass das Enzym in den Zellen nicht mehr aktiv war. Und dies war nun also eine sehr nützliche Mutante. Doch wir hatten nicht damit begonnen, diese unmittelbare Frage zu stellen. Wieder war die Lektion dieser Sache: Schau immer nach dem, was der Organismus dir sagt. Wir hatten dieses besondere Experiment nicht mit dieser Frage im Hinterkopf entworfen. Doch es erwies sich als das absolut perfekte Experiment zur Beantwortung der Frage: "Braucht man Telomerase?" Denn wir hatten zufällig eine Mutation erzeugt, die die Aktivität der Enzyme in den Zellen beeinträchtigt oder ruiniert, verdirbt, zerstört. Und dies versetzte uns also in die Lage, die Frage zu stellen, die ich jetzt hier oben hinstelle. Und es sieht so aus, als ob ich die Absicht gehabt hätte, dies zu sagen und zu tun, als ob ich geplant hätte, dieses Experiment durchzuführen. Doch wir sind einfach durch einen glücklichen Zufall darüber gestolpert. Wahrscheinlich hätten wir dieses Experiment als nächstes durchzuführen versucht. Doch wir hatten Glück und erhielten eine Mutante, die funktioniert. Und was dies für uns bedeutete, war: Wir hatten das Zentrum der Fähigkeit dieser Zellen gefunden, sich zu vermehren. Dies war also wirklich.... Wissen Sie, alle diese Zellen starben. Die Telomere wurden immer kürzer und sie starben. Die wichtige Lektion war also ein unsterblicher Organismus: Wir mussten lediglich die Komponente der Telomerase mutieren. Es war die RNA. Wir wussten, was es war, sehr, sehr genau. Und die Zellen wurden sterblich. Das sagte uns, dass die Telomerase die Telomere erhielt. Nun gut, wir wussten nun also etwas über die Telomerstruktur, bei der es sich um sich wiederholende DNA handelt. Diese DNA-Sequenzen werden durch Telomerase hergestellt, und sie bleiben durch einen sehr komplizierten, hochgradig gesteuerten Prozess erhalten. Und was leistet das für die Zellen? Es erstellt eine Plattform, eine Plattform von DNA-Bindungsstellen, an die sich sehr viele sehr interessante interaktive Proteine binden, die speziell die DNA-Sequenz binden. Sie haben Proteinpartner und gehen auf dynamische Weise mit dem Telomer Verbindungen ein und lösen sie wieder auf. Doch das Wichtige ist: Sie erstellen eine Hülle, und diese Schutzhülle ist der ganze Zweck der Telomere. Und das ist diese Kappe. Das ist die Schutzkappe, ok. Ich vergleiche sie immer mit der Hülse am Ende von Schnürsenkeln. Doch wie ich sagte, gibt es dieses inhärente Problem, dass Telomere - aufgrund der ihnen wesentlichen Replikationseigenschaften und weil wir mittlerweile Nuklease-Aktivitäten kennen - dass Telomere die Tendenz haben, kürzer zu werden. Es ist also so, wie das verschlissene Ende eines Schnürsenkels: Sie haben die schützende Hülse verloren, und nun dröselt sich der Schnürsenkel auf. Und dies ist eine sehr schlechte Situation. Die Zelle reagiert eindeutig darauf. Was passiert, ist Folgendes: Dieses sehr verkürzte Telomer sendet ein Signal an die Zellen, und die Zellen stellen ihre Teilung ein. Tatsächlich können sie Instabilitäten ihres Genoms durchmachen. Und dieses "verschlissene Ende" - bei dem es sich lediglich um eine Metapher handelt - ist im wahrsten Sinne ein verkürztes Telomer oder es sind verkürzte Telomere, und das hindert Zellen an der weiteren Teilung. Zusammenfassend lässt sich also sagen: Wenn man zu viel Abnutzung hat, leben die Zellen nicht weiter, ok? Schauen wir uns nun also Situation beim Menschen an. Wir kommen nun zu der Frage: "Wie funktioniert all dies beim Menschen?" Wir haben jetzt eine deutlich andere Situation vor uns, als bei Tetrahymena oder Hefen und solchen Organismen, die sich einfach endlos weiter teilen. Wir haben es jetzt mit uns selbst zu tun. Und Sie wissen, dass wir in den Industriegesellschaften, in denen die Lebensbedingungen gut sind, zum Beispiel eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Grad haben, Entschuldigung, von 80 Jahren - ich denke an das warme Wetter, das wir heute in Lindau haben. Wir haben eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Jahren. Und die maximale Lebensdauer beträgt etwa 120 Jahre. Sie entspricht in etwa diesem Wert. Unser Leben erstreckt sich heute über viele Jahrzehnte. Nun, wir wissen mit Sicherheit, dass die dem zugrundeliegenden molekularen Prozesse bei allen Eukaryoten ähnlich sein werden. Das hat man umfassend beobachtet. Wissen Sie, wir haben Telomerase ebenso wie Tetrahymena und Hefen usw. Doch der wichtige Aspekt hieran ist, dass die Genetik all dieser Dinge sich nun über einen sehr langen Zeitraum manifestiert, über Jahrzehnte des Lebens. Wie also spielt sich das alles ab? Das war in vielen, vielen verschiedenen Labors in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten das Forschungsthema. Eine einfache Beobachtung also - grob umrissen, und es wird Ausnahmen geben - lautet, dass die Telomerase durch einen allgemeinen Vorgang häufig die erwachsenen menschlichen Zellen an weiteren Teilungen hindert. Sie werden also tatsächlich kürzer, und in vielen Systemen des Körpers findet man Hinweise darauf, dass wahrscheinlich Folgendes geschieht: dass die Telomere immer kürzer werden und der Alterungsprozess voranschreitet. Man kann Hinweise darauf in vivo, bei Menschen beobachten. Nun, die Frage lautete: Spielt sich dieses zelluläre Phänomen im Laufe unseres Lebens ab? Brennt die Kerze sozusagen für die Telomere ab? Zeigt sich das tatsächlich im Lauf des menschlichen Lebens, oder nicht? Das war die Frage, zu deren Beantwortung viele, viele Labors Beweismaterial zusammengetragen haben. Und so werde ich Ihnen also als erstes einen sehr kurzen Überblick über das geben, was man beobachtet hat. Anschließend möchte ich mit Ihnen einige Aspekte dessen bedenken, was diesen Prozess beeinflussen könnte. Ok, gehen wir also zurück zum Grundsätzlichen! Was diesen Prozess als erstes beeinflussen würde, wäre die Tatsache, ob man über Telomerase verfügt oder nicht. Es wurden so viele Analysen dazu durchgeführt, wo wir in menschlichen Zellen Telomerase finden. Zunächst die normalen Zellen: Nun, in normalen Zellen, in Zellen, die tatsächlich unsterblich sein müssen oder die eine sehr lange Replikationslebensspanne haben, findet man sehr viel Telomerase, zum Beispiel in Stammzellen, Keimzellen, Keimbahnzellen. Wissen Sie, wir alle sind heute hier, weil die Zellen unserer Keimbahnen Telomerase enthalten. Sie erhalten die Telomere von Generation zu Generation. Und in bestimmten Stammzellen, die während ihres ganzen Lebens über lange andauernde proliferative Eigenschaften verfügen, besonders im Immunsystem. Doch man findet Telomerase auch in anderen Zellen, und wir fanden das eigentlich sehr instruktiv, andere Zellen anzuschauen und besonders Zellen des Immunsystems und Zellen des peripheren Blutes, wo sie jemandem mit einer ziemlich nicht-invasiven Blutentnahme eine Probe entnehmen können. Gesunde Leute geben einem Blut, und man kann anhand der weißen Blutkörperchen, der Zellen des Immunsystems aus einer Blutprobe, die Telomere untersuchen und wie sie erhalten werden, als eine Art Fenster in die Zellen. Heute können wir dies sogar, wie ich Ihnen später zeigen werde, anhand von Speichel untersuchen, denn es gibt viele Zellen, die in Ihren Speichel gelangen, und er gibt einem auch eine gute Quelle genomischer DNA. Und so können wir die Telomerase in Blutzellen quantifizieren, und so könnte man erwarten, dass die Telomerase mehr oder weniger beeinflussen wird, wie kurz die Telomere werden, und in welcher Zeit. In solchen Zellen können wir natürlich auch die Länge der Telomere bestimmen. Eine weitere wichtige Entdeckung war, dass die Telomerase in Krebszellen stark aktiviert ist. Und Krebszellen haben, wie Sie wissen, außer ihren vielen anderen unerwünschten Eigenschaften, die Eigenschaft, zu viel zu wachsen. Die Zellen wachsen zu viel, weil sie mutiert sind und epigenetischen Änderungen unterlagen, die dazu geführt haben, dass sie die Signale ignorieren, die ihnen zeigen, dass sie die Vermehrung einstellen und sich an die richtige Stelle im Körper bewegen sollen usw. Krebszellen sind also bösartige Zellen, die keiner Kontrolle unterliegen, und die Telomerase erlaubt diesen unkontrollierten Zellen, ihre Telomere zu erhalten und sich weiter zu vermehren. Im Zusammenhang mit Krebszellen ist die Telomerase wirklich eine schlechte Sache. Doch die Krebszellen haben zahlreiche andere Änderungen durchgemacht. Tatsächlich erscheint in gewöhnlichen Krebszellen eine erhöhte Telomerase-Konzentration erst, wenn sie sich in einem ziemlich fortgeschrittenen Stadium befinden. Über die Telomerase in Krebszellen werde ich heute nicht sprechen. Es ist eine faszinierende Frage. Es gibt interessante Fragen darüber, ob man sie hemmen oder manipulieren kann, um die Krebszellen zu zerstören. Doch für heute werde ich mich auf die normalen Zellen konzentrieren, ok? Stellen wir uns also einfach vor, von welchen Situationen wir erwarten könnten, dass sie sich in den nächsten Jahrzehnten im menschlichen Leben ereignen werden. Stellen Sie sich die Situation in Keimzellen vor. Nun, die Zellen werden erhalten bleiben, genau wie bei Tetrahymena oder der Hefe. Und daher wissen wir, dass wir eine Balance zwischen der Verkürzung und Verlängerung erwarten, da die Telomere im Großen und Ganzen erhalten bleiben. Es gibt eine Menge genetischer und nicht-genetischer Steuerungen dieser Prozesse, wie ich Ihnen sogleich erklären werden. Doch Sie können sich auch vorstellen, dass die Balance in die andere Richtung geht, und dies hat man bei bestimmten Immunzellen beobachtet, während sie verschiedene multiplikative Stadien im Körper durchlaufen. In normalen differenzierten Zellen werden Telomere tatsächlich länger. Also diese Allgemeingültigkeit, die ich Ihnen gezeigt habe: Sie müssen nicht immer kürzer werden, doch häufig werden sie kürzer. Und wenn die Zellen über etwas Telomerase verfügen, könnten Sie sich vorstellen, dass sie durch diese natürlichen Prozesse kürzer werden, doch die Telomerase könnte versuchen, ihre Länge zu erhalten. Sie könnte in der Lage sein, den furchtbaren Moment, in dem die Telomere zu kurz werden, eine ganze Zeit lang aufzuschieben. Doch der Alterungsprozess würde schließlich doch weitergehen. Und das wäre - wenn alles andere gleich bliebe - später als alles andere, wenn es weniger Telomerase gäbe. Und könnte sie die Alterung nicht so lange aufschieben. Wie würden alle diese Dinge funktionieren? Wir wissen sogar aus einer Hefezelle, dass sie 350 Gene hat - mindestens, wir zählen noch -, die die Länge der Telomere und die Längenverteilungen beeinflussen. Wir wissen also, dass dieser Prozess sehr vielen genetischen Steuerungen unterliegt. Wir erwarten demnach genetische Steuerungen und wir erwarten nicht-genetische Steuerungen, da alles auch von nicht-genetischen Einflüssen mitbestimmt wird. Das wird das Hauptthema sein, dem ich mich zuwende. Doch ich wollte Ihnen noch kurz sagen, dass der Grund dafür, warum wir hieran so ein großes Interesse entwickelten, der ist, dass viele Arbeitsgruppen erkannt hatten, dass viele übliche Erkrankungen des Alterns - einschließlich der Krebsleiden, aber auch viele Krankheiten, die für alternde Menschen charakteristisch sind - mit kürzeren Telomeren in den normalen Zellen in Zusammenhang gebracht worden sind. Dies ist nur eine kleine Auswahl der Krankheiten, bei denen Sie diese Zuordnung finden, und die Liste des Autors auf der rechten Seite ist äußerst unvollständig, es ist nur eine kleine Auswahl. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie die üblichen Krankheiten. Wenn Sie sich diese Krankheiten ansehen, werden Sie erkennen, dass sich darunter einige der Krankheiten wiederfinden, die zu den häufigsten Todesursachen gehören, und die in den Bevölkerungen zu den ernsten medizinischen Problemen führen: Krebs, pulmonale Fibrosen, Herzkranzgefäßerkrankungen, vaskuläre Demenz, degenerative Zustände, Diabetes, sogar Risikofaktoren für einige von ihnen. Dies hat man in verwandten Studien erkannt. Lassen Sie uns einfach darüber nachdenken. Denken wir darüber nach, was dies bedeutet. Wir sind an diesem Symposium interessiert, an diesem wunderbaren Treffen zu den großen Fragen der globalen Gesundheit. Und dies zeigt das Diagramm für.... Ich glaube dies sind die Zahlen für die USA. Es wir in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß überall auf der Welt zutreffen: dass wir zunächst die Situation haben, in der die Bevölkerung überaltert. Ich haben soeben erst etwas aus einem Aufsatz entnommen, der am 25. Juni veröffentlicht wurde, vor nur wenigen Tagen. Fast 10 % der Erwachsenen haben Diabetes. Die Häufigkeit nimmt zu, und das Wichtige ist, dass dies nicht nur für die Industrienationen gilt. Sie steigt in den Entwicklungsländern. Dies ist ein wahrhaft globales Problem: 10 % der Erwachsenen weltweit, in allen Ländern, leiden an Diabetes. Und die Häufigkeit nimmt nur zu. Wir haben also einige große Gesundheitsfragen. Über mehrere von ihnen haben wir heute bereits etwas gehört. Doch ich denke, dass wir auch über diese Fragen nachdenken müssen. Ich spreche diese Fragen heute an, weil unsere Forschung das, was wir über die Erhaltung von Telomeren beim Menschen verstehen, mit dieser Art von Krankheiten, von denen Diabetes ein Beispiel ist, in Verbindung gebracht hat. Ok, es ist also ein wachsendes Problem. Ok, was habe ich soeben gesagt? Ich habe gesagt, dass die Kürze von Telomeren in der allgemeinen Bevölkerung, d.h. bei der Mehrzahl der Menschen, in kleinen Gruppen weltweit, mit häufigen Alterserkrankungen in Verbindung gebracht worden ist. Ok. Was geht also vor? Nun, sind es die "Wartungsarbeiten" an den Telomeren, was zu dieser Verkürzung führt? Was man in dieser Situation tut, ist natürlich, dass man sich der Humangenetik zuwendet und sich seltene Mendel'sche Mutationen anschaut, und man stellt fest, was man davon lernen kann. Sie sind beim Menschen sehr instruktiv gewesen. Und Forscher haben in Versuchen mit Mäusen absichtlich Telomerase entfernt. Außerdem ist es eindeutig, dass die seltenen Telomerase-Mutationen, die beim Menschen auftreten, die Enzymaktivität der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit beeinträchtigen, Telomere hinzuzufügen. Sie unterbrechen die enzymatische Funktion der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit, Telomere hinzuzufügen, ok. Mutierte Telomerasegene sind einfach reine Glückssache. Das Rouletterad dreht sich und Ihre Eltern geben Ihnen irgendeine Kombination von Genen. Es ist das Glück der Gene, und in diesem Fall das Unglück der Gene. Das führt zur Kürze der Telomere. Es ist sehr deutlich, dass dies eine Krankheitsfolge hat, sowohl beim Menschen als auch im Mausmodell, wo dies in Experimenten durchgeführt worden ist. Diese Art von Krankheiten, ihre Häufigkeit nimmt stark zu. Die betroffenen Organismen werden für diese Krankheiten sehr anfällig. Schauen Sie sich diese Liste an. Sie beginnt sie an die Liste zu erinnern, die ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, diese generellen Erkrankungen, die in der allgemein Bevölkerung mit dem Alterungsprozess und mit der Kürze von Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen. Hier, bei diesen seltenen Mutationen, haben wir es mit einer Kausalkette zu tun. Die interessante Frage lautet nun: Wie verhält es sich mit den gewöhnlichen Verkürzungen, den allgemeinen Variationen im Genom, die zur Folge haben, dass Telomere kürzer sind. Führen auch sie zu Krankheiten? Diese Untersuchungen, die epidemiologisch wesentlich komplexer sind - man hat soeben erst begonnen, diese Frage zu stellen - legen bereits eine positive Antwort nahe. Und es gibt einen wunderbaren Fall, einen Fall von Krebs, bei dem man bei einem bestimmten Krebs - dem Blasenkrebs, einer ziemlich häufigen Form von Krebs - sehen kann, dass eine Verkürzung, die zu kürzeren Telomeren führt, auch Blasenkrebs verursacht. Ein Teil dieser Wirkung wird durch die Kürzung der Telomere vermittelt. Genetisch gesehen wissen wir, dass dies der Fall ist. Nun wende ich mich einem Thema zu, dass sehr interessant für uns gewesen ist: den nicht-genetischen Faktoren. Wissen Sie, wenn man über künftige Herausforderungen nachdenkt, die Genetik... Ich denke, wir haben die Genetik, wenn man so will, fest in der Hand. Nun, ich meine, dass das in mancher Hinsicht eine triviale Feststellung ist, denn natürlich gibt es nach wie vor ungeheur komplexe Zusammenhänge. Doch wir verstehen es, wir kommen mit der Genetik klar. Wir verstehen, dass Gene Auswirkungen haben. Ja, Gene wirken wechselseitig aufeinander ein. Ja, wir wissen, dass sie unterschiedlich wichtig sind. Es gibt viele verschiedene Wege, auf denen wir dies untersuchen können, und dies geschieht mit großer Intensität auf äußerst produktive Weise. Lassen Sie uns etwas Schwierigeres tun. Lassen Sie uns etwas Spaß haben, ok? Wählen wir etwas aus, was schwieriger ist: nicht-genetische Faktoren. Und mein nächster Punkt ist, wenn jemand mit einer wirklich interessanten Frage zu Ihnen kommt, die Sie einfach ergreift, und wenn Sie denken, dass diese Person für diese Art von Forschung gut geeignet ist, dann greifen Sie zu! Wir begannen also eine Zusammenarbeit. Und das war wunderbar, denn unsere Freunde in der Abteilung für Psychiatrie am UCSF waren sehr an chronischem Stress interessiert. Wir fanden - man höre und staune -, dass wir mit Ihnen zusammenarbeiten und zeigen konnten, dass Patienten, bei denen, nebenbei bemerkt, chronischer Stress ein bekannter Risikofaktor für allgemeine Erkrankungen war, etwa der Herzkranzgefäße, dass die Kürze von Telomeren mit chronischem Stress assoziiert war. Meine Zeit ist zu Ende, und was ich tun werde ist.... Das war die Botschaft. Das Wichtige war, dass wir herausfanden, dass Stress eine Verkürzung der Telomere bewirkt. Dinge, die einem in der Kindheit zustoßen, wie zum Beispiel mehreren Traumata ausgesetzt zu sein, haben einen Einfluss auf die Telomere, wenn man erwachsen ist. Das ist es, was aus diesem Diagramm hier hervorgeht. Daher hat uns diese Frage sehr, sehr fasziniert. Nun haben wir also erkannt... Wenn ich in einem Schritt durch alle diese Dinge gehe, ich hatte Ihnen viel zu viel zu sagen. Ich wusste, dass ich so aufgeregt sein würde. Wir versuchen wirklich die Interaktion zwischen chronischem Stress und der Verkürzung der Telomere zu verstehen, von der wir wissen, dass sie zu Krankheiten führt. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, wie alle diese Dinge miteinander zusammenhängen. Das Fazit war also, dass wir uns die Sachen in der zeitlichen Entwicklung anschauen, und wir sehen Auswirkungen. Doch mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent entschied, dass er eine Maschine zur Analyse der Länge von 100.000 Telomeren einrichten würde. Er baute einen sehr komplizierten Roboter, und hier sieht man ihn in Aktion, ok. Wir konnten also massenweise Informationen über die DNA der Telomere bekommen. Und nun werde ich hiermit enden, denn es ist meine Bitte an Sie alle, die sie an wirklich komplizierten Datensätzen interessiert sind und daran, wie man sie analysiert. Denn was wir taten, war, wir erstellten - wie mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent sagte - mehr Daten über Telomerlängen als jemals zuvor. Hier sind sie also. Dies sind einfach die rohen Daten, ok, tonnenweise, 100.000 Leute. Doch das Schöne ist, dass sie mit einem wunderbaren Projekt der genomweiten Assoziation verbunden sind: mit 675.000 Verkürzungen bei diesen 100.000 Leuten. Und 20 Jahren klinischer Daten, alles longitudinale, elektronische Gesundheitsdaten. Dies wird so faszinierend sein, diese wunderbaren Informationen zu verwenden und damit zu beginnen, sie miteinander in Beziehung zu setzen. Denn das eigentliche Ziel ist, dass wir diesen Lebensweg wirklich verstehen wollen. Wir möchten den Verlust der Telomere auf der einen Seite, den Gewinn von Telomeren auf der anderen verstehen, die Erhaltung der Telomere. Wir wissen, dass es genetische Komponenten gibt. Und was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe - es ist jedoch publiziert - wir wissen, dass negative Ereignisse in der Kindheit und chronischer psychischer Stress zu einer Verkürzung der Telomere und damit zu einem erhöhten Krankheitsrisiko führen. Bildung, das freue ich mich Ihnen sagen zu können, ist eindeutig mit längeren Telomeren assoziiert, ebenso wie körperliche Betätigung und Stressreduktion. Mit diesem erfreulichen Hinweis möchte ich schließen und Ihnen lediglich sagen, warum ich denke, dass dies so wichtig ist: Weil ich denke, dass es so viel mehr zu lernen gibt. Und dies sind die Leute in meinem Labor und unsere Mitarbeiter, mit denen wir so viel Spaß haben bei der Konfrontation mit Fragen, die meines Erachtens wichtig sind, wenn wir über Fragen menschlicher Gesundheit nachdenken. Wir sehen sehr allgemein verbreitete Krankheitssituationen, die weltweit zunehmen. Ich möchte Sie zur Annahme dieser Herausforderung einladen, nachdem wir die akuten Probleme, diese schweren Probleme der ansteckenden Krankheiten und der größten globalen Gesundheitsprobleme gelöst haben werden. Warum schauen Sie nicht in die Zukunft der nächsten Jahrzehnte und sagen, was uns noch bleibt. Uns bleiben diese anderen chronischen Erkrankungen und diese anderen Krankheiten, und ich denke, wir sollten uns um das sehr komplexe Problem kümmern, wie wir diese Krankheiten verhindern. Wir wollen die akuten Krankheiten behandeln. Lassen Sie uns darüber nachdenken, wie wir die anderen, die übrig bleiben werden, verhindern können, jetzt, da wir die akuten Infektionen und anderen Krankheiten überleben. Haben Sie vielen Dank.

Elizabeth Blackburn on the employment of model organisms to study telomeres
(00:09:04 - 00:11:16)

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2011) - Telomeres and Telomerase in Human Health and Disease

Thank you very much and good morning everybody, it's wonderful to see so many faces here this morning. I feel as if I'm looking out at the future hope of much of what we'll see I think in biomedical research and medical research and biological research in the future. So welcome, I'm very glad to be here and giving this talk today. So my talk is going to be telling you something about the science which has been my journey from basic science and which has led us more recently into issues of human health and disease. And so I'm going to tell you just a very little bit about the early part of our work and then go into the aspect which is the human health and disease related part of it. And tell you a little bit about how I started that and then take you into how we're looking at, more recently we're looking at the interesting ramifications of all of this. So telomeres, they're the ends of chromosomes. And this kind of blobby picture where you sort of see the telomere lit up in pink here, that was pretty much what we knew about telomeres from about, you know from the stage when cytogeneticists looked at chromosomes under microscopes and could see that telomeres were, you know something at the end of chromosomes. And when I say something they were more defined by what they weren't. They didn't behave like DNA breaks, they didn't you know try to heal themselves when a break appeared, they're the end but they were not a broken end. And so it was conceptualised that they were really very different from breaks, but what were they. There was an absence of things that they did that more defined a telomere than what it actually was. So I was fortunate to be able to approach this question because. So first of all cast your minds back to the possibility that imagine a world in which you couldn't sequence DNA. Ok so that was the world in which I started my project in Cambridge in England in the lab of Fred Sanger who subsequently developed methods of DNA. But we didn't know how to sequence DNA. So there was this wonderful mystery of what on earth was the DNA like at the ends of the chromosome. And so being in Fred Sanger's lab I got very, you know well-acquainted with the then nascent methods of trying to sequence DNA, which was to try and piece together nucleotides in little patches by using a variety of chemical and biological methods. It doesn't matter but in other words you couldn't believe how impossible it was to sequence DNA in those days. But at least it seemed as if the ends might be a way of accessibility. And so I turned to a system by going to Yale University and the lab of Joe Gall where you could actually get at the ends of chromosomal DNA's, that is the DNA's of eukaryotes and their chromosomes which of course is linear. And this was because Joe Gall and others had discovered that there are very short chromosomes and large numbers of them. And one particular kind in this beast, shown in the slide here, which is the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena. Now this is not a famous organism in the sense that it doesn't cause diseases and it's not one of the favourite model systems although it's very well used now for certain questions relating to telomeres but it was just an obscure pond organism. But it had these large numbers of linear short chromosomes and that allowed me to biochemically if you will, using molecular techniques to get my hands on these, purify them out and analyse what might be going on at the ends of these chromosomes. And in fact I found that they ended up with these repeated sequences, very strange, you know there was no president for why they would do this. And they ended with short repeated sequences and that's the repeat unit shown there. And so they were the chromosomes in tetrahymena and then ending with short repeats. And then in collaboration with Jack Szostak who was in a different institution, we found the same thing was going on in yeast. And I should say that this was an example of where it's marvellous to go to meetings and have conversations because Jack and I struck up a conversation. I had just been talking about the telomeres of tetrahymena and we talked about how would you make, how would you use this information and see if you could get at telomeres in yeast, to cut a long story short. And so we did and we were able to see somewhat similar kinds of repeated sequences. Now a little bit irregular as you see from the formula on the slides. But the same kind of thing, at the end of yeast chromosomes. So this wasn't a peculiarity of this strange little beast that lived in pond scum, this was something that was more general. And indeed it had been found by others, starting to show up in slide moulds and you know, so these kinds of things were showing up at the end of chromosomes. So it looked as if it would be pretty general. And in fact, you know we did know from molecular biology, even back then, before we could sequence DNA properly, we did know that underlying principles of course of life were very similar as you look right across the living world. And so it wasn't too surprising to find some generalities here. But still it was good to find. So basically that then let us address a question which had been asked by others and which arose from the mechanism of DNA replication which as you recall occurs by a very beautiful complicated DNA replication enzymes, beautiful set of these enzymes which beautifully copy all the internal regions of chromosomal DNA. That is any linear DNA but they're just terrible at copying the very ends, because of the mechanistic aspects of how DNA replication occurs. And I won't go into the details, it's all in every text book, but the point is that the beautifully complicated sophisticated DNA replication machinery that so successfully and faithfully copies the genetic information inside chromosomes is terrible at copying the ends. So the ends can't get replicated. So every time a DNA replicated, if it's linear and unless something happened, it would just get shorter and shorter and shorter and shorter. So this was a mystery, well recognised from the early 1970's onwards and explicated by Olovnikov and Watson for example. This was a mystery. And now we knew what was at the ends of chromosomes. So there was the problem and there was a whole lot of interesting pieces of information. And I'm going to list them here because sometimes it sounds as though, when you say well you discovered telomeres, it sounds as though it just sort of fell out of the sky or something or we stumbled on it. Didn't work that way and I think this is more typical of real science, how real science works. What happened was that there were pieces of evidence, not all from one system, there were pieces of evidence in tetrahymena that the numbers of repeats at the ends of the chromosomes differed in the population of molecules. You could find that during the development of new chromosomes in this organism, has a very complicated lifestyle but it makes new telomeres and they got added on to non-telomeres. How did that happen? There was an interesting observation in the organism that causes sleeping sickness, these organisms when propagated, you could see the end DNA getting longer and longer. How did that happen? And Jack Szostak and I found that when you put a tetrahymena and a telomere into yeast, yeast telomere repeats, it got joined on to the tetrahymena repeats. So that was mysterious. And I was intrigued by another observation from the geneticist, the cytogeneticist who really conceptualised and named the features of telomeres, although not the name of telomeres, that is important, Barbara McClintock, maize geneticist and she had conceptualised telomeres and had even found a mutant that failed to heal broken ends which can normally happen if ends are broken at certain stages in development. Now when you've got a mutant that fails to do something, that says ah ha, there must be a normal process here. So all these pieces of the puzzle were there. Was there something going on in cells that could extend telomere DNA. So now as my little advice for the young moving into their careers here, ok so this was the question, we had a lot of interesting hints here that there may be something going on. Now you can't sit and write a grant application and say well I think I might find a new enzyme. Doesn't go down well with the review sections, ok. But you can, you can have wonderful funding which opens up the possibility which says let's look at how telomeres work. And I'm so grateful to a funding agency like the NIH that said you have a grant that's called structure and function of telomerics and within that I could run with the question. But I also want to tell you another very important thing that matter to me and that helped. Now I was studying the telomeric DNA, I was studying proteins associated with telomeric DNA. And what I then did was I got tenure and I had my grant and so I felt really brave, I thought ah I can do anything I like, I've got tenure, I've got a grant, right. So there's a very empowering feeling, even though of course I realised, you know later that that's not always true, that you can't do everything you like. But I felt very empowered because I had tenure and I had a grant, so I thought I'm just going to start looking for this enzyme activity. Now we kept the normal sort of things in our lab going, right, things that were on the grant application, things that were, you know things that were producing steady results. But I thought well I'll just try and do these experiments. And started to get hints that it was working. And then another important thing happened was that I would present this to people as they decided to join the lab and I'd say I've got this project, so one of my very sober post doctoral fellows said I think, when he came, he said I think Liz I don't think I'll work on this rather risky project. But Carol Greider, my graduate student who joined the lab, Carol was happy to do that and she thought it was the most interesting project in the lab and so I think that's very important, you know to find PhD students who want to go for what they think is the most interesting projects in the lab, even though it mightn't be the one that generates results. But in this case it did and so what in the end we were able to do was to have a synthetic DNA and I'd been doing this with restriction enzymes and pieces of DNA and seeing bits of DNA added on that looked like telomeric DNA was being added. But we refined it down to putting in a DNA oligonucleotide. And we were just able to get them, again grab the technology when it becomes available because synthetic DNA, oligonucleotides were just becoming available to the research community, so we grabbed this opportunity, had a synthetic DNA made and then we found that it could get elongated after a lot of painful work with cell extracts. We could find an enzymatic activity that made that DNA longer by adding more repeats. And so the important point was that here I had a student who was willing to take on a project that was risky but this person thought, Carol thought this was the most interesting of the projects in the lab. And then as I said we could take advantage of technologies, there was terrific biochemical technologies in terms of enzymologist out there, we could use the precedence that people had from DNA replication studies to make our cell extracts and so forth and incubate and make reactions. And as I said along came the technology which happened to be DNA oligo synthesis. So what we found was this enzyme telomerase, so now I'm depicting the end of a chromosome in the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena which being a rich source of short DNAs, I reasoned would probably be a rich source of any enzyme that might be making these DNAs. And so sure enough if you look at a chromosome end in tetrahymena very simplified, just showing the DNA here, what it does is it gets elongated by the enzyme telomerase which is a truly fascinating enzyme because it's made up of both RNA and DNA. They both help the reaction work, although the catalytic, sorry it's made of RNA and protein, the catalytic site is actually the protein, it's not the RNA. But the RNA plays crucial roles in making that protein catalytic site work. It's a fascinating collaboration of protein and RNA. In that RNA and the crucial thing that I've shown you on the slide here is a short RNA sequence that's copied into DNA, just by adding nucleotides and so the DNA gets elongated. So here was in the test tube the wherewithal for overcoming that DNA replication problem, the end replication problem that I alluded to. So here it was in the test tube, did it actually work this way in cells. And so we used tetrahymena and my student Guo-Liang Yu developed a technology for introducing genes back into tetrahymena. So we had to sort of build it up from the roots so to speak. But we could get the first evidence that you needed telomerase in cells. Now in tetrahymena, I didn't tell you but these organisms are mortal, they just keep growing, if you feed them and talk to them nicely they'll keep on multiplying, right, forever, they're immortal, right. So they must have very good DNA repair systems by the way. And they had plenty, so to speak of telomerase. Now were those 2 facts related, right. So what do you do, well you experimentally interfere with the telomerase and genetically make it not work anymore. So that's what we did. And so then we found that now in the next 20 or so generations the telomeres progressively shortened and shortened and the cells ceased to divide. Now when I say genetically kill telomerase, I'll make a confession to you. This sounds all very deliberate, right, like we set out to kill it. Actually we were doing a different experiment at the time. We were looking at the RNA and asking about its templating ability. But we were very lucky because one of the mutations turned out not to be copied into the DNA and we were very frustrated by it but then we noticed oh look the telomeres are getting shorter and the cells are dying. And then we found that the enzyme was no longer active in the cells. And so then ah this was a very useful mutant. But we hadn't actually set out to ask that immediate question. But again what the take home from this was, always look at what the organism is telling you, right, we hadn't designed that particular experiment with that in mind but it turned out to be absolutely the perfect experiment to answer the question of do you need telomerase because we inadvertently made a mutation that ablated or ruined, spoiled, killed the activity of the enzyme in cells. And so that enabled us to ask the question, that I now put up here and looks as though I planned to say this and do this, planned to do this experiment but we actually just lucked into it. We probably would have tried this experiment next but we were lucky and got a mutant that worked. And so what it did was we struck at the heart of the activity of the ability of these cells to multiple, so this was really, you know these cells all died, right. The telomeres ran down and they died. So the important message was an immortal organism, all you had to do was mutate the component of telomerase. It was the RNA, we knew what it was, very, very exactly and the cells became mortal. So that told us that telomerase was maintaining telomeres. Ok so now we knew something about telomere structure which has repeated DNA, these DNA sequences are made by telomerase and they're maintained by telomerase in a very complex highly regulated process. And what that accomplishes for the cells is to make a platform, a platform of DNA binding sites upon which bind a great many very interesting, interactive proteins that bind the DNA sequence specifically. They have protein partners and they very dynamically associating and disassociating with the telomere. But the point is they make a sheath and that protective sheath is the whole point for the telomeres and that's the cap, that's the protective cap, ok. And we always liked it, you know it's like the aglet at the end of your shoe lace, right. But as I said there's this inherent problem and that is that telomeres because of their inherent replication properties and because now we know nuclease activities, telomeres have a propensity to shorten. So it's like the shoe lace end frayed away, right, the tip got lost and now you have a frayed shoe lace. And this is a very bad situation, the cell responds very clearly to this. And what happens is that that very shortened telomere sends a signal to the cells and the cells will not multiple. And in fact they can undergo genomic instabilities. So this frayed end if you will, which is just a metaphor is very literally a shortened telomere or telomeres and that prevents cells from multiplying. So bottom line is that if you have too much erosion the cells will not live, ok. Now let's got to human situations. Ok so now we're going to switch to well how does this all work out in humans. So now we have a very different situation from say tetrahymenas or yeasts and things like that, that just keep multiplying. We have now us and you know in developed societies for example where conditions are good, you know we can expect life expectances of something like 80 degrees, 80 years, sorry, thinking of the warm weather we're having in Lindau today. We have in life expectancy around 80 years. And you know maximum life span is what, somewhere around 120, that kind of thing, right. So now our lives are lived out over many, many decades. Well we certainly know that the underlying molecular machineries are going to be similar, you know across all the eukaryotes that's been amply seen. You know we have telomerase just as do tetrahymenas and yeast and so forth. But the important point is that the kinetics of all of this is now going to be played out over very long, you know decades of life. So how does it all play out? So that's been the subject of research for many, many different labs in the last few decades. So a simple observation, very broad brush and there will be exceptions, is that in a general way telomerase is often limiting in adult human cells. And so they do in fact undergo some shortening and various systems in the body one can see evidence that this is likely to be occurring, that the telomeres are progressively shortening and senescence is occurring. And one can see evidence for that in vivo, in people. Now the question was does that cellular phenomenon play out in our lifetimes, you know does the candle burning down for the telomeres so to speak, does that actually get reflected in human life courses or not. So that was the question that many, many labs had been collecting evidence for. And so I'm going to tell you first of all just a very brief overview of what's been seen and then I want to take you into some aspects of what might influence this process. Ok so back to the basics, what would first influence this process would be whether you have telomerase or not. And so many analysis have been done on where do we find telomerase in human cells. First of all normal cells, well in normal cells, in cells that are going to have to be effectively immortal or have very long replicated life spans you find actually plenty of telomerase. Like in stem cells, in germ cells, germ lineage cells, you know we're all here today, that's because our germ lineages have telomerase. Keeps the telomeres going from generation to generation. And in certain stem cells that will have long proliferative properties throughout life, notably the immune system. But you also find telomerase in other cells and we found that actually quite instructive, to look at other cells and particularly cells of the immune system and particularly cells in peripheral blood where you can take a sample from somebody with a pretty non-invasive blood draw. And healthy people will give you blood and you can study telomeres and how they're being maintained using the white blood cells, the immune system cells from a blood draw as a kind of a window into the cells. And now we can even find, as I'll show you later, we can even do it with saliva as well because there's a lot of cells that leak out into your saliva and it gives you a nice source of genomic DNA as well. And so we can quantify the telomerase in blood cells and so you might expect, you know more or less telomerase will be influencing how short the telomeres get, how quickly. And we also can measure telomere length, obviously in such cells. Now another thing that's important is that we do find that telomerase is very highly activated in cancer cells. And cancer cells as you know have among their many undesirable properties, the property of too much replication. The cells proliferate too much because they've undergone mutations and epigenetic changes that have now made them ignore signals to cease multiplying and to go to the right places in the body and so forth. And so cancer cells are rogue cells, they're out of control and telomerase allows those out of control cells to maintain their telomeres and keep on multiplying. So in the context of cancer cells, telomerase is actually very bad news. But the cancer cells have undergone a great many other changes. And in fact the high telomerase often doesn't appear in the common cancers until they're pretty advanced. I'm actually not going to talk about telomerase in cancer cells today, it's a fascinating question, there are interesting questions of can you inhibit it or monkey around with it to kill cancer cells but I want to focus today on the normal cells, ok. So let's just imagine what situations we might expect to play out over the decades of you know of human life. So imagine in germ cells, well we'll have the cells stay maintained, you know just like tetrahymena or yeast and so you know we expect a balance between shortening and lengthening because the telomeres over all are maintained. And there's a great deal of genetic and non-genetic control of these processes as I'll talk about in a moment. But you can also imagine the balance goes in the other direction and this has been seen for certain immune cells as they go through certain multiplicative stages in the body, telomeres actually get longer in normal differentiated cells. So that generality I showed you, they don't always have to get shorter but they often do get shorter. And so if you have some telomerase, you could imagine that they would be getting shorter by those natural processes shortening but telomerase might try and keep them up and so you know it might be able to stave off the, you know terrible moments when the telomeres get too short, for quite a while but senescence would eventually come. And that would be later than everything else being equal if there were less telomerase. And then it would, you know not be able to stave off senescence for so long. So how would all these things work and we know even from a yeast cell which has 350 genes, at least and counting which influence telomere lengths and length distributions. So we know this process is going to be under many, many elaborate genetic controls. So we expect genetic controls and we expect non-genetic controls because everything is influenced by non-genetic effects too. That will be the main topic that I'll get to but I just wanted to tell you that the reason that we got very interested in this is that over the years many groups have seen that many of the common diseases of aging and including cancers but many of these diseases that characterise aging humans have been linked to shorter telomeres in the normal cells. This is just a sampling of the kinds of diseases in which you see this association and the list of the authors on the right is extremely incomplete, it's just a little sampling. On the left is the common diseases and if you look at these diseases you can see that they include some of the big killers and the big serious medical problems in populations, cancer, pulmonary fibroses, cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia, degenerative conditions, diabetes, in fact risk factors for some of these. This has been seen in associative studies. And so let's just think about it, let's think about this means. And we are interested in this symposium, in this wonderful meeting on big questions of global health. And this just shows the graph for, I think this is the US numbers and it's going to be true in different degrees around the world, that we have a situation where there's an aging population first of all and I just pulled something from an article that was published on the 25th of June just a couple of days ago, nearly 10% of the world's adults have diabetes. The prevalence is rising and the point is that it's not just in developed countries, this is arising in developing countries, this is really a world-wide problem, 10% almost of the world's adults in all countries across the world have diabetes. And the prevalence is only going up. So we've got some big health issue and we heard about several of them yesterday. But I think we really have to think about these ones as well. And today I bring up these ones because our research has tied what we are understanding about telomere maintenance in humans to this kind of disease, of which diabetes is one example. Ok so it's a rising problem. Ok so what have I just said, I've just said that telomere shortness in the general population, that's people overall, in mini cohorts around the world, has been associated with common diseases of aging, ok. And so what's going on. Well is it telomere maintenance that's causing the shortness. So what you do is of course, you turn to human genetics and you look at rare Mendelian mutations and you say what can you learn from those. They've been very instructive in humans and people have deliberately using mouse models removed telomerase from mice and it's very clear that in humans the rare telomerase mutations that occur in people, that are known to cause telomere shortness, because they make telomerase work less well. They interrupt the enzymatic activity of telomerase or its ability to add telomeres, ok. So mutated telomerase genes which is just, you know the luck of the draw, right, the roulette wheel you know spins and your parents give you some combination of genes, right. So that's the luck of the genes. And in this case the bad luck of the genes. And that leads to telomere shortness. And it's very clear that there's a disease impact of this, both in people and in the mouse models where it's been done experimentally. And these sorts of diseases, their prevalence goes way up, they become very prone to these diseases. And look at that list, it starts to remind you of the list that I showed you before, these common diseases of aging in the general population. Which are associated with telomere shortness. Here in these rare mutations we've got causality so now of course the interesting question is well what about the common snips, the common variations in the genome that cause telomeres to be shorter, do they also lead to disease. Those studies which are much more complex epidemiologically and people have only just started posing them, are already suggesting yes. And there's a beautiful case, case of cancer where a certain cancer, it's bladder cancer, quite a common one, you can see that a snip that causes telomere shortness also causes bladder cancer. And part of that effect is mediated through the telomere shortening, ok. So that genetically speaking we know is the case. Now I'm going to turn to what's been very interesting to us and that is non-genetics. And do know when you think about future challenges, you know genetics, I'd say we've got genetics, if you will well in hand. Now I mean that's a trivial statement in some ways because of course there's huge complexities still, but we get it, we get it with genetics. We understand yes genes have effects, yes the genes interact, yes we know they're important to varying degrees. You know there's a lot of ways we can study this. And it's being done very activity and very productively. Let's do something harder. You know let's have some fun here, right let's choose something that's more difficult, non-genetic things. And this was, my next sort of point is that when somebody comes to you with a really interesting question that just grabs you and you think that person is good at that kind of research, go for it. So we started a collaboration. And this was wonderful because our friends in the UCSF department of psychiatry were very interested in chronic stress and we found low and behold that we could interact with them and show that people in which chronic stress by the way is a known risk factor for common diseases such as cardiovascular, that telomere shortness was associated with chronic stress. And my timing is up and so what I'm going to do is, that was the message, the important thing was that we found that it causes telomere shortening. Things that happen to you in childhood such as multiple trauma exposures influence your telomeres when you're an adult. And that's what this graph here is showing. And so we've become very, very fascinated by this question. And so now we've realised when I'm just going to zoom through all this, I had much too much to say to you, I knew I'd be so excited. And we're really trying to understand the interactions between chronic stress, telomere shortening which we know it causes and diseases. And how these all interact. So the bottom line was that we look over time and we see effects but my wonderful technician decided he would set up a machine for analysing 100,000 telomere lengths, he built a very complicated robot and here it is in action here, ok. So we were able to get, you know tones of telomeric DNA information out. And so now I'm going to end with this because this is going to be my plea to all of you who are really interested in huge complicated data sets and how you analyse those. Because what we did was we generated, as my marvellous technician said, more telomere length data than ever before, right. So here it is, you know this is the just the raw data right, tones, 100,000 people but the beauty is that it's tied in with a wonderful project of genome wide association, 675,000 different snips on these 100,000 people. And 20 years of clinical information all longitudinal electronic health records, data. So this is going to be so exciting to use all of this marvellous information and start relating all these things together. Because the end is that we really want to understand this road of life, we want to understand telomere loss on the one hand, telomere gain on the other hand, telomere maintenance. We know there's genetic components and what I didn't tell you but it's published, is we know adverse childhood events and chronic psychological stress are putting you on the telomere shortness and disease risk side of things. Education I'm very happy to tell you is clearly related to longer telomeres as is exercise and stress reduction. So on this happy note I want to finish and just tell you why we think this is important because I think there's so much more to be learned. And these are the folks in my lab and our collaborators with whom we have so much fun addressing what I think are important questions when we think about the question of human health, we're seeing very common sorts of disease situations which are growing world-wide. So I want to throw the challenge out to you, once we've solved these acute problems, these severe problems of infectious diseases and the major health problems in the world, why don't you look ahead to the next decades and say what are we left with, we're left with these other chronic diseases and these other diseases and I think we should think about how do we deal with the very complex problem of preventing these diseases. We want to treat the acute ones, let's think about how we prevent the other diseases that we're going to be left with now we survive all of the acute infectious and other diseases. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank und guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist wunderbar an diesem Morgen so viele Gesichter hier zu sehen. Ich habe das Gefühl, als schaute ich auf die Zukunftshoffnung von so vielem, was wir, denke ich, in der biomedizinischen, medizinischen und biologischen Forschung in Zukunft sehen werden. Seien Sie also alle willkommen. Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier sein und diesen Vortrag halten zu können. Mein Vortrag wird Ihnen etwas über die Wissenschaft erzählen, über meine Reise, die mit der Grundlagenforschung begann und mich in letzter Zeit zu Fragen geführt hat, die mit menschlicher Gesundheit und menschlichen Erkrankungen in Zusammenhang stehen. Ich werde Ihnen ein wenig über die Anfangsphase meiner Arbeit erzählen und dann zu demjenigen Aspekt übergehen, der mit der menschlichen Gesundheit und mit Krankheiten zu tun hat. Und ich werde Ihnen ein bisschen davon erzählen, wie ich damit angefangen habe. Dann werde ich Ihnen berichten, wie wir in letzter Zeit angefangen haben, die interessanten Implikationen all dieser Dinge zu untersuchen. Also Telomere sind die Enden von Chromosomen. Und dieser Art von unscharfem Bild, auf dem Sie die Telomere hier in rosa aufleuchten sehen: Das war so ziemlich alles, was man über Telomere wusste, in dem Stadium, in dem die Zytogenetiker Chromosomen unter dem Mikroskop betrachteten und sehen konnten, dass Telomere etwas am Ende von Chromosomen sind. Und wenn ich sage "etwas", dann meine ich, Sie waren mehr durch das definiert, was sie nicht sind. Sie verhielten sich nicht wie Brüche des DNA-Strangs, sie versuchten sich nicht selbst zu reparieren, wenn es zu einem Bruch kam. Sie waren zwar das Ende der DNA, aber kein "abgebrochenes" Ende. Und so entwickelte man die Vorstellung, dass sie sich von DNA-Brüchen deutlich unterschieden. Doch was waren sie dann? Ein Telomer wurde mehr durch das definiert, was er nicht tat, als durch das, was er in Wirklichkeit war. Ich hatte also das Glück, mich mit dieser Frage zu beschäftigen. Denken Sie also zunächst an die Möglichkeit zurück, denken Sie an eine Welt, in der sich die DNA nicht sequenzieren lässt, ok. Das war die Welt, in der ich in Cambridge in England im Labor von Fred Sanger, der später selbst Methoden der DNA-Sequenzierung entwickelte, die Arbeit an meinem Projekt begann. Doch wir wussten nicht, wie man die DNA-Sequenz analysiert. Und da gab es dieses wundervolle Rätsel: Wie war die DNA an den Enden der Chromosomen nur beschaffen? Und da ich im Labor von Fred Sanger war, wurde ich mit den damals aufkommenden Methoden sehr vertraut, die man bei dem Versuch, die DNA Sequenz zu analysieren, entwickelt hatte. Sie bestanden darin, dass man mithilfe einer Vielzahl chemischer und biologischer Methoden versuchte, Nukleotide in kleinen Abschnitten zusammenzufügen. Auf die Einzelheiten kommt es nicht an, doch ich will damit sagen, dass Sie sich nicht vorstellen können, wie unmöglich es damals war, die Sequenz der DNA zu analysieren. Doch zumindest schien es so, als seien die Enden ein Zugangsweg zur DNA. Und so wendete ich mich, indem ich an die Yale Universität und das Labor von Joe Gall ging, einem System zu, mit dem man tatsächlich an die Enden der chromosomalen DNA herankam, d.h. an die DNA von Eukaryoten und ihre Chromosomen, die natürlich linear sind. Der Grund hierfür war, dass Joe Gall und andere entdeckt hatten, dass es sehr kurze Chromosomen gibt, und zwar in sehr großer Zahl. Und eine bestimmte Art von ihnen fand man in diesem Tier, das auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um das mit Cilien besetzte Urtierchen Tetrahymena. Und dies ist insofern kein berühmter Organismus in dem Sinne, als er keine Krankheiten verursacht und es ist keines der beliebten Modellsysteme. Er wird allerdings heute für bestimmte Fragen, die mit Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen, sehr häufig verwendet. Es war lediglich ein unbekannter Organismus, der in Teichen lebt. Doch er verfügte über diese große Anzahl linearer, kurzer Chromosomen, und das erlaubte mir - wenn Sie so wollen auf biochemische Weise - molekulare Techniken zu verwenden, mit denen ich an diese herankommen, sie isolieren und so analysieren konnte, was sich an den Enden dieser Chromosomen abspielte. Tatsächlich fand ich heraus, dass sie mit sich wiederholenden Sequenzen endeten. Es war sehr seltsam, wissen Sie. Es gab keinen vergleichbaren Fälle, die hätten erklären können, warum sie dies tun sollten. Sie endeten mit kurzen sich wiederholenden Sequenzen. In dieser Abbildung hier sehen Sie die Wiederholungseinheit. Dies also waren die Chromosomen in Tetrahymena, und sie endeten in kurzen Wiederholungssequenzen. Zusammen mit Jack Szostak, der an einem anderen Institut arbeitete, fanden wir dann heraus, dass dasselbe bei der Hefe geschieht. Und ich sollte Ihnen sagen, dass dies ein Beispiel dafür ist, wie wunderbar es sein kann, zu Treffen zu gehen und Gespräche zu führen. Denn Jack und ich kamen ins Gespräch. Ich hatte gerade über die Telomere von Tetrahymena gesprochen, und wir sprachen darüber - um eine lange Geschichte kurzzufassen - wie man diese Information nutzen könnte, um an die Telomere der Hefe heranzukommen. Wir verfolgten die Sache und wir konnten am Ende der Hefechromosomen in etwa ähnliche Formen von Wiederholungssequenzen beobachten. Nun, ein bisschen unregelmäßig, wie Sie anhand der Formeln auf diesen Dias sehen können, doch von derselben Art. Dies war also keine Besonderheit dieses merkwürdigen kleinen Tieres, das im Oberflächenfilm von Tümpeln lebte. Dies war etwas wesentlich Allgemeineres. Und in der Tat wurde dies auch von anderen gefunden. Man fand es in kriechenden Schimmelpilzen, und diese Art von Sequenzen zeigten sich an den Enden von Chromosomen. Es sah also so aus, als sei dies ein recht allgemeingültiges Phänomen. Und wissen Sie, aus der Molekularbiologie wussten wir tatsächlich - selbst damals schon, bevor wir die DNA-Sequenz korrekt analysieren konnten -, dass die grundlegenden Prinzipen des Lebens, wenn man es sich in seiner Breite anschaut, natürlich sehr ähnlich waren. Es war also nicht weiter erstaunlich, dass man hier einige allgemein gültige Entdeckungen machte. Dennoch war es gut, dies herausgefunden zu haben. Dies erlaubte es uns also im Prinzip eine Frage zu stellen, die schon von anderen gestellt worden war und die aus dem Mechanismus der DNA-Replikation hervorging, der - wie Sie sich erinnern - mit Hilfe wunderschöner, komplizierter DNA-Replikationsenzyme abläuft, eines wunderschönen Satzes dieser Enzyme, die auf wunderbare Weise alle internen Regionen der chromosomalen DNA kopiert, d.h. sämtliche lineare DNA. Doch wenn es um das Kopieren dieser Enden geht, sind sie einfach hoffnungslos überfordert, und zwar aufgrund der mechanischen Aspekte der DNA-Replikation. Ich werde die Einzelheiten nicht erläutern. Man findet sie in jedem Lehrbuch. Worum es mir geht, ist jedoch Folgendes: Der wunderbar komplizierte, intelligente DNA-Replikationsmechanismus, der die genetische Information im Inneren der Chromosomen so erfolgreich und originalgetreu kopiert, versagt an den Enden der Chromosomen. Die Enden können also nicht repliziert werden. Jedes Mal, wenn eine DNA repliziert wird, wenn sie linear ist und sofern nicht etwas anderes passiert, wird sie kürzer und kürzer und immer kürzer. Dies war also ein Rätsel, das seit den frühen 1970er Jahren wohl bekannt war, und zum Beispiel von Olovnikov und Watson als solches auch klar formuliert worden war. Dies war ein Rätsel. Und nun wussten wir, was sich am Ende der Chromosomen befindet. Es gab also dieses Problem, und zusätzlich gab es eine ganze Menge interessanter Teilinformationen. Ich werde sie hier auflisten. Denn manchmal klingt es so - wenn man sagt, dass man Telomere entdeckt hat - als seien sie aus dem Himmel gefallen oder als sei man darüber gestolpert. So war es nicht. Ich glaube, dies ist typischer für die tatsächliche Wissenschaft, dafür wie, die wirkliche Wissenschaft voranschreitet. Was geschah, war Folgendes: Es gab verschiedene Hinweise, die nicht alle aus einem System stammten. Es gab in Tetrahymena Hinweise darauf, dass die Zahl der Wiederholungen an den Chromosomenenden in der Molekülpopulation unterschiedlich war. Man konnte feststellen, dass während der Entwicklung neuer Chromosomen in diesem Organismus - er hat einen sehr komplizierten Lebensstil - neue Telomere erzeugt werden, und sie werden an Nicht-Telomere angefügt. Wie ging das vor sich? Es gab eine interessante Beobachtung in dem Organismus, der die Schlafkrankheit verursacht: Wenn diese Organismen sich vermehrten, konnte man beobachten, wie die Enden der DNA länger und immer länger wurden. Wie kam es dazu? Und Jack Szostak und ich fanden heraus, dass - wenn man ein Tetrahymena-Telomer in Hefe bringt - dass dieses Telomer wiederholt wird: Es wurde an die Wiederholungssequenzen von Tetrahymena angefügt. Dies war höchst geheimnisvoll. Und ich war von einer anderen Beobachtung der Genetiker, der Zytogenetiker fasziniert, die die Eigenschaften der Telomere auf den Begriff gebracht und benannt hatten, obwohl sie den Begriff Telomere nicht erfunden hatten, das ist wichtig. Barbara McClintock, eine Genetikerin, die sich mit Mais befasste, hat Telomere theoretisch beschrieben. Sie fand sogar eine Mutante, der es nicht gelang, gebrochene Enden zu reparieren. Diese treten in der Regel in bestimmten Stadien der Entwicklung auf. Wenn man also eine Mutante gefunden hat, die etwas Bestimmtes nicht tun kann, kommt es zu einem Aha-Erlebnis: Es muss hier einen normalen Prozess geben. Alle Teile des Puzzles lagen vor uns: Fand in den Zellen etwas statt, wodurch die Telomer-DNA verlängert werden konnte? Nun möchte ich den Jungen, die am Beginn ihrer Karriere stehen, einen kleinen Ratschlag geben, ok. Dies war also die Frage. Wir verfügten über eine Fülle interessanter Hinweise, dass hier möglicherweise etwas geschah. Nun kann man sich nicht hinsetzen und einen Antrag für Forschungsgelder schreiben und sagen: Das kommt bei den Leuten, die diese Anträge durchsehen, nicht gut an, ok. Doch man kann, man kann wunderbare finanzielle Unterstützung kommen, die einem die Forschungsmöglichkeit eröffnet, indem man sagt: "Lasst uns untersuchen, wie Telomere funktionieren." Ich bin einem Geldgeber wie dem NIH so dankbar, der sagte: Sie haben ein Stipendium mit dem Titel: "Struktur und Funktion der Telomerik". Unter dieser Überschrift kann ich der Frage nachgehen. Doch ich möchte Ihnen außerdem noch eine andere äußerst wichtige Sachen erzählen, die mir wichtig ist und die mir geholfen hat. Ich untersuchte nun also die DNA der Telomere. Ich studierte Proteine, die mit der DNA der Telomere in Zusammenhang standen, und dann geschah Folgendes: Ich erhielt eine feste Stelle und meine Forschungsgelder. Dadurch fühlte ich mich sehr mutig. Ich dachte mir: "Ah, ich kann tun, was ich will! Ich habe eine feste Stelle, ich habe Forschungsgelder, oder etwa nicht?" Dies war ein sehr bestärkendes Gefühl, obwohl ich natürlich später erkannte, dass das nicht immer wahr ist, dass man nicht alles tun kann, was man möchte. Doch ich fühlte mich sehr dadurch bestärkt, dass ich eine feste Stelle und Forschungsgelder hatte, und so dachte ich mir: Wir ließen also die normalen Arbeiten in unserem Labor weiterlaufen, ok, Arbeiten, die in dem Forschungsantrag beschrieben waren und die stetige Ergebnisse lieferten. Doch ich dachte mir: "Ok, ich werde einfach versuchen, diese Experimente durchzuführen", und ich erhielt Hinweise darauf, dass dies tatsächlich funktionierte. Dann geschah noch etwas Wichtiges: Ich stellte dies Leuten vor, als sie sich dem Labor anschlossen, und ich sagte ihnen: Einer meiner sehr nüchternen PostDoc-Fellows sagte, glaube ich, als er ankam: Doch Carol Greider, eine Doktorandin von mir, die in unser Labor kam, war bereit dies zu tun. Sie meinte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig, wissen Sie, Doktoranden zu finden, die sich auf das einlassen, was sie für das interessanteste Projekt am Labor halten, selbst wenn es nicht dasjenige ist, das Ergebnisse liefert. Doch in diesem Fall lieferte es Ergebnisse, und was uns schließlich gelang, war die Herstellung synthetischer DNA. Ich hatte dies bereits mit Restriktionsenzymen und DNA-Bruchstücken getan, und es zeigte sich dabei, dass DNA-Bruchstücke, die wie Telomer-DNA aussahen, angefügt wurden. Doch wir entwickelten die Sache zur Einfügung eines DNA-Oligonukleotids weiter. Und wir waren in der Lage davon zu profitieren, dass wir DNA-Oligonukleotids bekommen konnten. Wieder konnten wir Technologie nutzen, als sie soeben erst verfügbar geworden war, da synthetische DNA, Oligonukleotide, der Forschergemeinschaft gerade erst verfügbar geworden waren. Also griffen wir diese Gelegenheit beim Schopf und ließen eine synthetische DNA herstellen. Dann stellten wir fest, dass sie nach langer, mühevoller Arbeit mit Zellextrakten verlängert werden konnte. Wir konnten eine Enzymaktivität finden, die die DNA dadurch verlängerte, dass sie weitere Wiederholungssequenzen anfügte. Der wichtigste Aspekt war also, dass ich da eine Studentin hatte, die bereit war, ein riskantes Projekt zu übernehmen, aber diese Person, Carol, dachte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Und dann konnten wir, wie gesagt, die Vorteile von Technologien nutzen. Es gab fantastische biochemische Technologien in der Enzymologie. Wir konnten, um unsere Zellextrakte herzustellen usw. und um Inkubationen und Reaktionen durchzuführen, die früheren Erfahrungen nutzen, die Leute in DNA-Replikationsstudien gesammelt hatten. Wie ich bereits erwähnte, lief uns die Technologie über den Weg, bei der es sich zufällig um die DNA-Oligosynthese handelte. Was wir fanden, war dieses Enzym Telomerase. Jetzt zeige ich Ihnen das Ende eines Chromosoms im cilienbesetzten Urtierchen Tetrahymena, bei dem es sich um eine reiche Quelle kurzer DNAs handelt. Ich ging davon aus, dass dieser Organismus wahrscheinlich auch eine reiche Quelle für jegliche Enzyme sein würde, die diese DNAs herstellen würden. Und tatsächlich: Wenn man sich ein Chromosomende in Tetrahymena sehr vereinfacht anschaut, nur die DNA hier betrachtet, so geschieht hier Folgendes: Es wird durch das Enzym Telomerase verlängert. Dies ist ein wahrhaft faszinierendes Enzym, weil es sowohl aus RNA als auch aus DNA besteht. Beide Teile tragen zum Erfolg der Reaktion bei, obwohl der katalytische - Entschuldigung, es besteht aus RNA und Protein. Die katalytische Stelle ist tatsächlich das Protein. Es ist nicht die RNA. Doch die RNA spielt eine entscheidende Rolle dabei, diesen Ort der Proteinkatalyse funktionsfähig zu machen. Es ist eine faszinierende Zusammenarbeit zwischen einem Protein und der RNA. Und die entscheidende Sache, die ich Ihnen auf dem Dia hier gezeigt habe, ist eine kurze RNA-Sequenz, die in die DNA kopiert wird, einfach indem Nukleotide hinzugefügt werden, und auf diese Weise wird die DNA verlängert. In diesem Reagenzglas hatten wir also, was man brauchte, um das Problem der DNA-Replikation zu lösen, das Problem der Replikation der Enden, auf das ich angespielt habe. Hier war es also im Reagenzglas. Funktionierte es auch auf diese Weise in Zellen? Also verwendeten wir Tetrahymena und mein Student Guo-Liang Yu entwickelte eine Technologie, mit der man die Gene wieder in Tetrahymena zurückbringen konnte. Wir mussten die Sache sozusagen "von den Wurzeln her" wieder aufbauen. Doch wir erhielten die ersten Hinweise darauf, dass man Telomerase in Zellen benötigt. Nun, die Tetrahymena, ich habe Ihnen dies nicht gesagt, aber diese Organismen sind unsterblich. Sie vermehren sich einfach immer weiter. Wenn man sie füttert und freundlich mit ihnen spricht, vermehren sie sich endlos weiter. Sie sind unsterblich. Sie müssen also, nebenbei bemerkt, über sehr gute DNA-Reparatursysteme verfügen. Und sie besaßen jede Menge Telomerasen, sozusagen. Hingen diese beiden Tatsachen zusammen? Was tut man also? Nun, man manipuliert die Telomerase experimentell, und sorgt mit genetischen Methoden dafür, dass sie nicht mehr funktioniert. Das also taten wir. Dann stellten wir fest, dass in den nächsten 20 Generationen oder so, die Telomere nach und nach immer kürzer und kürzer wurden, und die Zellen hörten auf sich zu teilen. Wenn ich nun davon rede, dass wir die Telomerase genetisch zerstört haben, mache ich Ihnen ein Geständnis. Dies klingt alles sehr absichtlich nicht wahr, als hätten wir den Plan gehabt, sie zu zerstören. Tatsächlich führten wir damals ein anderes Experiment durch. Wir betrachteten die RNA und fragten uns nach ihrer Fähigkeit, als Schablone zu dienen. Doch wir hatten sehr großes Glück, weil es sich herausstellte, dass einige der Mutationen nicht in die DNA kopiert wurde, was uns sehr frustrierte. Doch dann bemerkten wir: "Oh, seht mal. Die Telomere werden kürzer und die Zellen sterben". Und dann stellten wir fest, dass das Enzym in den Zellen nicht mehr aktiv war. Und dies war nun also eine sehr nützliche Mutante. Doch wir hatten nicht damit begonnen, diese unmittelbare Frage zu stellen. Wieder war die Lektion dieser Sache: Schau immer nach dem, was der Organismus dir sagt. Wir hatten dieses besondere Experiment nicht mit dieser Frage im Hinterkopf entworfen. Doch es erwies sich als das absolut perfekte Experiment zur Beantwortung der Frage: "Braucht man Telomerase?" Denn wir hatten zufällig eine Mutation erzeugt, die die Aktivität der Enzyme in den Zellen beeinträchtigt oder ruiniert, verdirbt, zerstört. Und dies versetzte uns also in die Lage, die Frage zu stellen, die ich jetzt hier oben hinstelle. Und es sieht so aus, als ob ich die Absicht gehabt hätte, dies zu sagen und zu tun, als ob ich geplant hätte, dieses Experiment durchzuführen. Doch wir sind einfach durch einen glücklichen Zufall darüber gestolpert. Wahrscheinlich hätten wir dieses Experiment als nächstes durchzuführen versucht. Doch wir hatten Glück und erhielten eine Mutante, die funktioniert. Und was dies für uns bedeutete, war: Wir hatten das Zentrum der Fähigkeit dieser Zellen gefunden, sich zu vermehren. Dies war also wirklich.... Wissen Sie, alle diese Zellen starben. Die Telomere wurden immer kürzer und sie starben. Die wichtige Lektion war also ein unsterblicher Organismus: Wir mussten lediglich die Komponente der Telomerase mutieren. Es war die RNA. Wir wussten, was es war, sehr, sehr genau. Und die Zellen wurden sterblich. Das sagte uns, dass die Telomerase die Telomere erhielt. Nun gut, wir wussten nun also etwas über die Telomerstruktur, bei der es sich um sich wiederholende DNA handelt. Diese DNA-Sequenzen werden durch Telomerase hergestellt, und sie bleiben durch einen sehr komplizierten, hochgradig gesteuerten Prozess erhalten. Und was leistet das für die Zellen? Es erstellt eine Plattform, eine Plattform von DNA-Bindungsstellen, an die sich sehr viele sehr interessante interaktive Proteine binden, die speziell die DNA-Sequenz binden. Sie haben Proteinpartner und gehen auf dynamische Weise mit dem Telomer Verbindungen ein und lösen sie wieder auf. Doch das Wichtige ist: Sie erstellen eine Hülle, und diese Schutzhülle ist der ganze Zweck der Telomere. Und das ist diese Kappe. Das ist die Schutzkappe, ok. Ich vergleiche sie immer mit der Hülse am Ende von Schnürsenkeln. Doch wie ich sagte, gibt es dieses inhärente Problem, dass Telomere - aufgrund der ihnen wesentlichen Replikationseigenschaften und weil wir mittlerweile Nuklease-Aktivitäten kennen - dass Telomere die Tendenz haben, kürzer zu werden. Es ist also so, wie das verschlissene Ende eines Schnürsenkels: Sie haben die schützende Hülse verloren, und nun dröselt sich der Schnürsenkel auf. Und dies ist eine sehr schlechte Situation. Die Zelle reagiert eindeutig darauf. Was passiert, ist Folgendes: Dieses sehr verkürzte Telomer sendet ein Signal an die Zellen, und die Zellen stellen ihre Teilung ein. Tatsächlich können sie Instabilitäten ihres Genoms durchmachen. Und dieses "verschlissene Ende" - bei dem es sich lediglich um eine Metapher handelt - ist im wahrsten Sinne ein verkürztes Telomer oder es sind verkürzte Telomere, und das hindert Zellen an der weiteren Teilung. Zusammenfassend lässt sich also sagen: Wenn man zu viel Abnutzung hat, leben die Zellen nicht weiter, ok? Schauen wir uns nun also Situation beim Menschen an. Wir kommen nun zu der Frage: "Wie funktioniert all dies beim Menschen?" Wir haben jetzt eine deutlich andere Situation vor uns, als bei Tetrahymena oder Hefen und solchen Organismen, die sich einfach endlos weiter teilen. Wir haben es jetzt mit uns selbst zu tun. Und Sie wissen, dass wir in den Industriegesellschaften, in denen die Lebensbedingungen gut sind, zum Beispiel eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Grad haben, Entschuldigung, von 80 Jahren - ich denke an das warme Wetter, das wir heute in Lindau haben. Wir haben eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Jahren. Und die maximale Lebensdauer beträgt etwa 120 Jahre. Sie entspricht in etwa diesem Wert. Unser Leben erstreckt sich heute über viele Jahrzehnte. Nun, wir wissen mit Sicherheit, dass die dem zugrundeliegenden molekularen Prozesse bei allen Eukaryoten ähnlich sein werden. Das hat man umfassend beobachtet. Wissen Sie, wir haben Telomerase ebenso wie Tetrahymena und Hefen usw. Doch der wichtige Aspekt hieran ist, dass die Genetik all dieser Dinge sich nun über einen sehr langen Zeitraum manifestiert, über Jahrzehnte des Lebens. Wie also spielt sich das alles ab? Das war in vielen, vielen verschiedenen Labors in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten das Forschungsthema. Eine einfache Beobachtung also - grob umrissen, und es wird Ausnahmen geben - lautet, dass die Telomerase durch einen allgemeinen Vorgang häufig die erwachsenen menschlichen Zellen an weiteren Teilungen hindert. Sie werden also tatsächlich kürzer, und in vielen Systemen des Körpers findet man Hinweise darauf, dass wahrscheinlich Folgendes geschieht: dass die Telomere immer kürzer werden und der Alterungsprozess voranschreitet. Man kann Hinweise darauf in vivo, bei Menschen beobachten. Nun, die Frage lautete: Spielt sich dieses zelluläre Phänomen im Laufe unseres Lebens ab? Brennt die Kerze sozusagen für die Telomere ab? Zeigt sich das tatsächlich im Lauf des menschlichen Lebens, oder nicht? Das war die Frage, zu deren Beantwortung viele, viele Labors Beweismaterial zusammengetragen haben. Und so werde ich Ihnen also als erstes einen sehr kurzen Überblick über das geben, was man beobachtet hat. Anschließend möchte ich mit Ihnen einige Aspekte dessen bedenken, was diesen Prozess beeinflussen könnte. Ok, gehen wir also zurück zum Grundsätzlichen! Was diesen Prozess als erstes beeinflussen würde, wäre die Tatsache, ob man über Telomerase verfügt oder nicht. Es wurden so viele Analysen dazu durchgeführt, wo wir in menschlichen Zellen Telomerase finden. Zunächst die normalen Zellen: Nun, in normalen Zellen, in Zellen, die tatsächlich unsterblich sein müssen oder die eine sehr lange Replikationslebensspanne haben, findet man sehr viel Telomerase, zum Beispiel in Stammzellen, Keimzellen, Keimbahnzellen. Wissen Sie, wir alle sind heute hier, weil die Zellen unserer Keimbahnen Telomerase enthalten. Sie erhalten die Telomere von Generation zu Generation. Und in bestimmten Stammzellen, die während ihres ganzen Lebens über lange andauernde proliferative Eigenschaften verfügen, besonders im Immunsystem. Doch man findet Telomerase auch in anderen Zellen, und wir fanden das eigentlich sehr instruktiv, andere Zellen anzuschauen und besonders Zellen des Immunsystems und Zellen des peripheren Blutes, wo sie jemandem mit einer ziemlich nicht-invasiven Blutentnahme eine Probe entnehmen können. Gesunde Leute geben einem Blut, und man kann anhand der weißen Blutkörperchen, der Zellen des Immunsystems aus einer Blutprobe, die Telomere untersuchen und wie sie erhalten werden, als eine Art Fenster in die Zellen. Heute können wir dies sogar, wie ich Ihnen später zeigen werde, anhand von Speichel untersuchen, denn es gibt viele Zellen, die in Ihren Speichel gelangen, und er gibt einem auch eine gute Quelle genomischer DNA. Und so können wir die Telomerase in Blutzellen quantifizieren, und so könnte man erwarten, dass die Telomerase mehr oder weniger beeinflussen wird, wie kurz die Telomere werden, und in welcher Zeit. In solchen Zellen können wir natürlich auch die Länge der Telomere bestimmen. Eine weitere wichtige Entdeckung war, dass die Telomerase in Krebszellen stark aktiviert ist. Und Krebszellen haben, wie Sie wissen, außer ihren vielen anderen unerwünschten Eigenschaften, die Eigenschaft, zu viel zu wachsen. Die Zellen wachsen zu viel, weil sie mutiert sind und epigenetischen Änderungen unterlagen, die dazu geführt haben, dass sie die Signale ignorieren, die ihnen zeigen, dass sie die Vermehrung einstellen und sich an die richtige Stelle im Körper bewegen sollen usw. Krebszellen sind also bösartige Zellen, die keiner Kontrolle unterliegen, und die Telomerase erlaubt diesen unkontrollierten Zellen, ihre Telomere zu erhalten und sich weiter zu vermehren. Im Zusammenhang mit Krebszellen ist die Telomerase wirklich eine schlechte Sache. Doch die Krebszellen haben zahlreiche andere Änderungen durchgemacht. Tatsächlich erscheint in gewöhnlichen Krebszellen eine erhöhte Telomerase-Konzentration erst, wenn sie sich in einem ziemlich fortgeschrittenen Stadium befinden. Über die Telomerase in Krebszellen werde ich heute nicht sprechen. Es ist eine faszinierende Frage. Es gibt interessante Fragen darüber, ob man sie hemmen oder manipulieren kann, um die Krebszellen zu zerstören. Doch für heute werde ich mich auf die normalen Zellen konzentrieren, ok? Stellen wir uns also einfach vor, von welchen Situationen wir erwarten könnten, dass sie sich in den nächsten Jahrzehnten im menschlichen Leben ereignen werden. Stellen Sie sich die Situation in Keimzellen vor. Nun, die Zellen werden erhalten bleiben, genau wie bei Tetrahymena oder der Hefe. Und daher wissen wir, dass wir eine Balance zwischen der Verkürzung und Verlängerung erwarten, da die Telomere im Großen und Ganzen erhalten bleiben. Es gibt eine Menge genetischer und nicht-genetischer Steuerungen dieser Prozesse, wie ich Ihnen sogleich erklären werden. Doch Sie können sich auch vorstellen, dass die Balance in die andere Richtung geht, und dies hat man bei bestimmten Immunzellen beobachtet, während sie verschiedene multiplikative Stadien im Körper durchlaufen. In normalen differenzierten Zellen werden Telomere tatsächlich länger. Also diese Allgemeingültigkeit, die ich Ihnen gezeigt habe: Sie müssen nicht immer kürzer werden, doch häufig werden sie kürzer. Und wenn die Zellen über etwas Telomerase verfügen, könnten Sie sich vorstellen, dass sie durch diese natürlichen Prozesse kürzer werden, doch die Telomerase könnte versuchen, ihre Länge zu erhalten. Sie könnte in der Lage sein, den furchtbaren Moment, in dem die Telomere zu kurz werden, eine ganze Zeit lang aufzuschieben. Doch der Alterungsprozess würde schließlich doch weitergehen. Und das wäre - wenn alles andere gleich bliebe - später als alles andere, wenn es weniger Telomerase gäbe. Und könnte sie die Alterung nicht so lange aufschieben. Wie würden alle diese Dinge funktionieren? Wir wissen sogar aus einer Hefezelle, dass sie 350 Gene hat - mindestens, wir zählen noch -, die die Länge der Telomere und die Längenverteilungen beeinflussen. Wir wissen also, dass dieser Prozess sehr vielen genetischen Steuerungen unterliegt. Wir erwarten demnach genetische Steuerungen und wir erwarten nicht-genetische Steuerungen, da alles auch von nicht-genetischen Einflüssen mitbestimmt wird. Das wird das Hauptthema sein, dem ich mich zuwende. Doch ich wollte Ihnen noch kurz sagen, dass der Grund dafür, warum wir hieran so ein großes Interesse entwickelten, der ist, dass viele Arbeitsgruppen erkannt hatten, dass viele übliche Erkrankungen des Alterns - einschließlich der Krebsleiden, aber auch viele Krankheiten, die für alternde Menschen charakteristisch sind - mit kürzeren Telomeren in den normalen Zellen in Zusammenhang gebracht worden sind. Dies ist nur eine kleine Auswahl der Krankheiten, bei denen Sie diese Zuordnung finden, und die Liste des Autors auf der rechten Seite ist äußerst unvollständig, es ist nur eine kleine Auswahl. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie die üblichen Krankheiten. Wenn Sie sich diese Krankheiten ansehen, werden Sie erkennen, dass sich darunter einige der Krankheiten wiederfinden, die zu den häufigsten Todesursachen gehören, und die in den Bevölkerungen zu den ernsten medizinischen Problemen führen: Krebs, pulmonale Fibrosen, Herzkranzgefäßerkrankungen, vaskuläre Demenz, degenerative Zustände, Diabetes, sogar Risikofaktoren für einige von ihnen. Dies hat man in verwandten Studien erkannt. Lassen Sie uns einfach darüber nachdenken. Denken wir darüber nach, was dies bedeutet. Wir sind an diesem Symposium interessiert, an diesem wunderbaren Treffen zu den großen Fragen der globalen Gesundheit. Und dies zeigt das Diagramm für.... Ich glaube dies sind die Zahlen für die USA. Es wir in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß überall auf der Welt zutreffen: dass wir zunächst die Situation haben, in der die Bevölkerung überaltert. Ich haben soeben erst etwas aus einem Aufsatz entnommen, der am 25. Juni veröffentlicht wurde, vor nur wenigen Tagen. Fast 10 % der Erwachsenen haben Diabetes. Die Häufigkeit nimmt zu, und das Wichtige ist, dass dies nicht nur für die Industrienationen gilt. Sie steigt in den Entwicklungsländern. Dies ist ein wahrhaft globales Problem: 10 % der Erwachsenen weltweit, in allen Ländern, leiden an Diabetes. Und die Häufigkeit nimmt nur zu. Wir haben also einige große Gesundheitsfragen. Über mehrere von ihnen haben wir heute bereits etwas gehört. Doch ich denke, dass wir auch über diese Fragen nachdenken müssen. Ich spreche diese Fragen heute an, weil unsere Forschung das, was wir über die Erhaltung von Telomeren beim Menschen verstehen, mit dieser Art von Krankheiten, von denen Diabetes ein Beispiel ist, in Verbindung gebracht hat. Ok, es ist also ein wachsendes Problem. Ok, was habe ich soeben gesagt? Ich habe gesagt, dass die Kürze von Telomeren in der allgemeinen Bevölkerung, d.h. bei der Mehrzahl der Menschen, in kleinen Gruppen weltweit, mit häufigen Alterserkrankungen in Verbindung gebracht worden ist. Ok. Was geht also vor? Nun, sind es die "Wartungsarbeiten" an den Telomeren, was zu dieser Verkürzung führt? Was man in dieser Situation tut, ist natürlich, dass man sich der Humangenetik zuwendet und sich seltene Mendel'sche Mutationen anschaut, und man stellt fest, was man davon lernen kann. Sie sind beim Menschen sehr instruktiv gewesen. Und Forscher haben in Versuchen mit Mäusen absichtlich Telomerase entfernt. Außerdem ist es eindeutig, dass die seltenen Telomerase-Mutationen, die beim Menschen auftreten, die Enzymaktivität der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit beeinträchtigen, Telomere hinzuzufügen. Sie unterbrechen die enzymatische Funktion der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit, Telomere hinzuzufügen, ok. Mutierte Telomerasegene sind einfach reine Glückssache. Das Rouletterad dreht sich und Ihre Eltern geben Ihnen irgendeine Kombination von Genen. Es ist das Glück der Gene, und in diesem Fall das Unglück der Gene. Das führt zur Kürze der Telomere. Es ist sehr deutlich, dass dies eine Krankheitsfolge hat, sowohl beim Menschen als auch im Mausmodell, wo dies in Experimenten durchgeführt worden ist. Diese Art von Krankheiten, ihre Häufigkeit nimmt stark zu. Die betroffenen Organismen werden für diese Krankheiten sehr anfällig. Schauen Sie sich diese Liste an. Sie beginnt sie an die Liste zu erinnern, die ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, diese generellen Erkrankungen, die in der allgemein Bevölkerung mit dem Alterungsprozess und mit der Kürze von Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen. Hier, bei diesen seltenen Mutationen, haben wir es mit einer Kausalkette zu tun. Die interessante Frage lautet nun: Wie verhält es sich mit den gewöhnlichen Verkürzungen, den allgemeinen Variationen im Genom, die zur Folge haben, dass Telomere kürzer sind. Führen auch sie zu Krankheiten? Diese Untersuchungen, die epidemiologisch wesentlich komplexer sind - man hat soeben erst begonnen, diese Frage zu stellen - legen bereits eine positive Antwort nahe. Und es gibt einen wunderbaren Fall, einen Fall von Krebs, bei dem man bei einem bestimmten Krebs - dem Blasenkrebs, einer ziemlich häufigen Form von Krebs - sehen kann, dass eine Verkürzung, die zu kürzeren Telomeren führt, auch Blasenkrebs verursacht. Ein Teil dieser Wirkung wird durch die Kürzung der Telomere vermittelt. Genetisch gesehen wissen wir, dass dies der Fall ist. Nun wende ich mich einem Thema zu, dass sehr interessant für uns gewesen ist: den nicht-genetischen Faktoren. Wissen Sie, wenn man über künftige Herausforderungen nachdenkt, die Genetik... Ich denke, wir haben die Genetik, wenn man so will, fest in der Hand. Nun, ich meine, dass das in mancher Hinsicht eine triviale Feststellung ist, denn natürlich gibt es nach wie vor ungeheur komplexe Zusammenhänge. Doch wir verstehen es, wir kommen mit der Genetik klar. Wir verstehen, dass Gene Auswirkungen haben. Ja, Gene wirken wechselseitig aufeinander ein. Ja, wir wissen, dass sie unterschiedlich wichtig sind. Es gibt viele verschiedene Wege, auf denen wir dies untersuchen können, und dies geschieht mit großer Intensität auf äußerst produktive Weise. Lassen Sie uns etwas Schwierigeres tun. Lassen Sie uns etwas Spaß haben, ok? Wählen wir etwas aus, was schwieriger ist: nicht-genetische Faktoren. Und mein nächster Punkt ist, wenn jemand mit einer wirklich interessanten Frage zu Ihnen kommt, die Sie einfach ergreift, und wenn Sie denken, dass diese Person für diese Art von Forschung gut geeignet ist, dann greifen Sie zu! Wir begannen also eine Zusammenarbeit. Und das war wunderbar, denn unsere Freunde in der Abteilung für Psychiatrie am UCSF waren sehr an chronischem Stress interessiert. Wir fanden - man höre und staune -, dass wir mit Ihnen zusammenarbeiten und zeigen konnten, dass Patienten, bei denen, nebenbei bemerkt, chronischer Stress ein bekannter Risikofaktor für allgemeine Erkrankungen war, etwa der Herzkranzgefäße, dass die Kürze von Telomeren mit chronischem Stress assoziiert war. Meine Zeit ist zu Ende, und was ich tun werde ist.... Das war die Botschaft. Das Wichtige war, dass wir herausfanden, dass Stress eine Verkürzung der Telomere bewirkt. Dinge, die einem in der Kindheit zustoßen, wie zum Beispiel mehreren Traumata ausgesetzt zu sein, haben einen Einfluss auf die Telomere, wenn man erwachsen ist. Das ist es, was aus diesem Diagramm hier hervorgeht. Daher hat uns diese Frage sehr, sehr fasziniert. Nun haben wir also erkannt... Wenn ich in einem Schritt durch alle diese Dinge gehe, ich hatte Ihnen viel zu viel zu sagen. Ich wusste, dass ich so aufgeregt sein würde. Wir versuchen wirklich die Interaktion zwischen chronischem Stress und der Verkürzung der Telomere zu verstehen, von der wir wissen, dass sie zu Krankheiten führt. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, wie alle diese Dinge miteinander zusammenhängen. Das Fazit war also, dass wir uns die Sachen in der zeitlichen Entwicklung anschauen, und wir sehen Auswirkungen. Doch mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent entschied, dass er eine Maschine zur Analyse der Länge von 100.000 Telomeren einrichten würde. Er baute einen sehr komplizierten Roboter, und hier sieht man ihn in Aktion, ok. Wir konnten also massenweise Informationen über die DNA der Telomere bekommen. Und nun werde ich hiermit enden, denn es ist meine Bitte an Sie alle, die sie an wirklich komplizierten Datensätzen interessiert sind und daran, wie man sie analysiert. Denn was wir taten, war, wir erstellten - wie mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent sagte - mehr Daten über Telomerlängen als jemals zuvor. Hier sind sie also. Dies sind einfach die rohen Daten, ok, tonnenweise, 100.000 Leute. Doch das Schöne ist, dass sie mit einem wunderbaren Projekt der genomweiten Assoziation verbunden sind: mit 675.000 Verkürzungen bei diesen 100.000 Leuten. Und 20 Jahren klinischer Daten, alles longitudinale, elektronische Gesundheitsdaten. Dies wird so faszinierend sein, diese wunderbaren Informationen zu verwenden und damit zu beginnen, sie miteinander in Beziehung zu setzen. Denn das eigentliche Ziel ist, dass wir diesen Lebensweg wirklich verstehen wollen. Wir möchten den Verlust der Telomere auf der einen Seite, den Gewinn von Telomeren auf der anderen verstehen, die Erhaltung der Telomere. Wir wissen, dass es genetische Komponenten gibt. Und was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe - es ist jedoch publiziert - wir wissen, dass negative Ereignisse in der Kindheit und chronischer psychischer Stress zu einer Verkürzung der Telomere und damit zu einem erhöhten Krankheitsrisiko führen. Bildung, das freue ich mich Ihnen sagen zu können, ist eindeutig mit längeren Telomeren assoziiert, ebenso wie körperliche Betätigung und Stressreduktion. Mit diesem erfreulichen Hinweis möchte ich schließen und Ihnen lediglich sagen, warum ich denke, dass dies so wichtig ist: Weil ich denke, dass es so viel mehr zu lernen gibt. Und dies sind die Leute in meinem Labor und unsere Mitarbeiter, mit denen wir so viel Spaß haben bei der Konfrontation mit Fragen, die meines Erachtens wichtig sind, wenn wir über Fragen menschlicher Gesundheit nachdenken. Wir sehen sehr allgemein verbreitete Krankheitssituationen, die weltweit zunehmen. Ich möchte Sie zur Annahme dieser Herausforderung einladen, nachdem wir die akuten Probleme, diese schweren Probleme der ansteckenden Krankheiten und der größten globalen Gesundheitsprobleme gelöst haben werden. Warum schauen Sie nicht in die Zukunft der nächsten Jahrzehnte und sagen, was uns noch bleibt. Uns bleiben diese anderen chronischen Erkrankungen und diese anderen Krankheiten, und ich denke, wir sollten uns um das sehr komplexe Problem kümmern, wie wir diese Krankheiten verhindern. Wir wollen die akuten Krankheiten behandeln. Lassen Sie uns darüber nachdenken, wie wir die anderen, die übrig bleiben werden, verhindern können, jetzt, da wir die akuten Infektionen und anderen Krankheiten überleben. Haben Sie vielen Dank.

Elizabeth Blackburn on the employment of model organisms to study telomeres
(00:19:28 - 00:22:11)

 

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a soil-living worm of about 1 mm in length and has played pivotal roles in the discovery and elucidation of two fundamental cellular processes: programmed cell death and RNA interference (RNAi). These organisms have a very simple anatomy (only about 1000 cells) and are even transparent; yet, they still share many important cellular processes with humans. Further, they can be easily grown in large quantities, stored in the freezer and are amenable to genetic modification. They also have very short lifespans, which means that they are excellent models in which to study lifespan within a feasible timeframe. In his lecture at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2007, Craig Mello, who shared the 2006 Nobel Prize with Andrew Fire for discovering RNAi, discusses the usefulness of the worm as a model organism, offers a somewhat cosmic explanation for how RNAi can be linked with the Big Bang (!) and underlines the importance of model organisms in general.

 

Craig Mello (2007) - RNAi and development in C. elegans

I think we should try to start, it is nine o’clock and I wish you all welcome to the start of the lectures for this year. The first session has already an alteration because Sir John who was supposed to be the third speaker could not come. For that reason we have made the following decision. The three remaining lectures will each one be extended by about five minutes. In addition after the first lecture we will try an experiment and do questions from the audience. And with these questions and the elongations of each of the talks we will be back in normal time again. We don’t have questions after all talks but since the first talk is by the freshest Nobel laureate, from last year, we decided that we do it after the first talk. And then also the coffee break will be after the first talk and this question round. So we will have coffee between 10.05 and 10.40. And we therefore restart ten minutes early to allow for the extension also to the second and third speaker. With these words we are then ready to start. The first speaker is Professor Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, the Medical School in Worcester, USA. And he got the award, as I just said, last year. He got it “for their discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by double-stranded RNA”. Please, Professor Mello. Thank you. Thank you, thank you Hans. So it’s a pleasure and a real great honor to be here. I look forward to having an opportunity to have many conversations and discussions with everyone here during the course of the next few days. So let me go ahead and I’ll get started. I’ve sort of retitled my talk. RNAi, rethinking gene regulation, evolution and medicine, or how a worm won five Nobel Prizes in medicine. I’m going to go ahead and start my talk with a sort of an unusual first slide here. I don’t know if you—can we have the lights down a little bit. This is Dick Cheney and I at the White House. When you win a prize like this one of the special benefits is you get to go meet leaders of your country or people around the world who have important roles in politics. Can I have the lights down on the stage. I think it’s too light. Can you see that alright. You can see I’m not standing too close to him. His approval rating right now in the US is about 7%, he’s the Vice President, but a lot of people think he’s the smart one. But the important thing and one of the reasons I show this is, it’s very important to vote and get involved in politics, you know, no matter whether you voted for him or not. Now if you can’t vote in your country and some of you probably can’t, it’s certainly important to educate everyone that you talk to, educate people about what’s going on in the world, talk to people, it’s very important. And one of the issues that I think is important for us to discuss here is whether it might be wise in the future to always have the Lindau meetings be interdisciplinary. Because I think one of the things that’s happening to science is, it is already very interdisciplinary. Biomedicine for example is very dependent on physics and chemistry, I think. But also political issues are very important. So I think it’s important to have a very interdisciplinary focus at the university as well as in settings like this to try to get that dialogue going. I went to Washington DC, hoping to be able to tell the Bush administration how important RNA interference is as a technology and how well it fits with the genome sequencing project, which together are really changing, along with other great technologies, the way that we do and practice medicine. And opening many opportunities for new types of medicine, linking human disease with genetics. Unfortunately all we did was have a very brief meeting in the White House and shake hands. I wanted to tell them that RNAi was discovered under their administration, that the genome sequence was finished under this administration. And I think I will still go back and talk to them again if they’ll listen. But you know, fortunately we had a change in the Senate, in the House recently in the US and things politically are definitely changing. This is Ed Kennedy and I together at a congressional visit that we had recently. There’s a lot of hope I think that the US will turn things around in the near future. And begin investing in science more broadly again. Right now, if you don’t know, the US is really very tight with funding for medical research. Now I’d like to show this slide, this is Andrew Fire and I, for several reasons. First of all, if it wasn’t for Andy, I wouldn’t be here today. He’s a tremendous colleague and a great friend and we worked together on our science, we didn’t compete. In fact, our collaboration began back in the late ‘80s. We focused at that time on delivering DNA into the organism, that we both love and work on, a very tiny worm. I’ll show you a picture of it in the next slide. But the worm is so small, it’s about the size of a comma on a printed page. And so, to inject the DNA into the animal, Andy and I had to work out ways of inserting the needle into this tiny animal under the microscope. And it was something that had never been done, of course. So working together—actually we worked independently at first—but once we got to know each other we began sharing ideas. Because it was very difficult breaking in this new technology and figuring out how to handle this very tiny animal and inject efficiently into the animal. Together we described a transformation procedure for delivering DNA that worked very, very well. And really, it was a lot of fun to work with Andy. And the other reason I like this slide is because we’re not—what we’re doing here of course is, we’re on the stage—we’re not talking. You can see Andy’s mouth is closed and so is mine. But what we really won the prize for was for talking to each other, for sharing our ideas. And for not being afraid, for trusting each other and not being afraid of being scooped. And I think that’s something that we really need a lot more of, a lot more openness and willingness to share ideas. Thank you. Now here’s C. elegans swimming back and forth in the laboratory on a culture dish. These animals are extremely beautiful. As Sydney Brenner noted when he chose this organism to study, they’re essentially transparent. So you can look right through the animal and see all the cells inside and see all kinds of detail. The other thing that’s incredible about these animals is, they’re so simple in terms of their cellular complexity. They have only about 1000 cells compared to a human where we have 10 trillion cells. So they’re a really elegant system. But when you talk about worms to people, like let’s say my neighbors in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts where I live, they would always, you know, they’d be very polite at first. Oh, you work at a medical school, that’s nice. What do you work on. Worms. And then their eyes would sort of glaze over. Why would anyone work on a worm at a medical school. They just couldn’t get it. And then, thanks to Hans’ phone call, all of a sudden my neighbors, when I tell them I work on a worm, they actually listen to me. And I think that, if anything, that has been the most satisfying thing since October 2nd, is to be able to actually tell my neighbors about worms and evolution and have them actually listen. So why is it that worms have turned out to be so important. And yeast for that matter, have turned out to be so important to human biology and medicine. And this is something that the general public does not appreciate, especially in America. I think it’s less of a problem in Europe and Asia. So to answer that question I’m going to go all the way back to the Big Bang. And I took this slide from John Mather, who I’ve gotten to know quite well, he also shared the physics prize with George Smoot in 2006. And so when we were in Stockholm together the press was always asking us. What does your discovery have in common with your discovery. You know, they discovered the Big Bang, we discovered RNA interference. How do you connect those two. It’s quite a challenge. But what they did is, they used a satellite called COBE to map the cosmic background radiation that’s just everywhere in outer space. And this is the map that they put together. And what they noticed is that everywhere you look in outer space there’s a little bit of left over radiation. They measured the temperature in the spectrum and from that they calculated an age of 13.7 billion years ago for the Big Bang. And so the connection that we came up with, or that I think is really interesting to think about, is that life exists on a cosmic scale. Life on this planet arose about close to 4, 3.5- 3.8 billion years ago. During the time that life has been evolving on this planet, actually just since the common ancestor of plants and animals, the galaxy that we’re in has rotated about four times around its axis. Life itself is remarkable in its durability and the fact that it really does exist on a cosmic scale. So, let’s look at a little bit of the history of life. Here’s the common ancestor of worms and humans. Now on this side I’m showing the planet earth going through what’s called a snowball Earth event. And there’s geological evidence in the rocks, in the earth’s crust for glaciation events of this type where the earth was completely covered with ice all the way to the equator. And I think this is a very interesting concept from a biological standpoint because of what these kinds of events would do to the common ancestor of worms and humans. So here we are, the common ancestor, a sophisticated, really good, little organism capable of doing all kinds of things. It has Hox patterning, it has all kinds of fascinating things going on inside of it like RNA interference, working just great. But it has got a big problem. The earth itself doesn’t have any land. So, where is this little guy going to live. Either thermal vents or perhaps little cracks in the ice, in the ocean. So this kind of event actually happened twice and both times there were massive extinctions. So there was evidence for an extinction here and an extinction here. And then, right after that event, we have the biologic equivalent of the Big Bang. We have the Cambrian explosion. And there has never been an adequate explanation I don’t think from the biological side for the Cambrian explosion. But I think from the geologic side these glaciation events may provide a real compelling possible explanation where, what happened here was finally the ice melted, the earth became habitable, the land masses and the shallow seas around the land became habitable and you had this real amazing diversification of life. The rapid appearance of different animal groups including the group that gave rise to humans and the groups that gave rise to the nematodes. And in fact if you go back further, the origin of plants and animals would be down off the bottom of this page. But plants and animals all have RNAi and that is the thing that I think, I feel like even my neighbors get it. You know, even the people who don’t know anything about biology, they’re afraid that. Oh, we can’t be really related to monkeys. They actually get it. And I think that it’s partly because of the President we’ve had in the US that now people are accepting of this. But the fact is that we really are—you know, as Nietzsche said, we’ve made our way from worm to man but much within us really is still worm. And I think that’s a really important aspect of what I can do as a biologist to sort of get across that message of our common ancestry. Not only are we related to worms but everyone in this room is closely, closely related to each other. So mankind has to get over these nationalistic barriers and start thinking about each other as brothers and sisters. Now here’s what the little worms encounter sometimes in their real environment. There turns out there are hundreds of little fungi that live in the soil that will feed on worms. And they’ve even devised these little traps, like this one here in which you can see this poor nematode has been lassoed. And I’m going to show you this little movie where you can actually see this happen. These are worms that have already been captured. But watch this one here. It’s going to swim through there and it just closes right on his tail. Here, watch this one too, there’ll be another worm coming in here. This is what they’re exposed to naturally in the environment. These animals encounter all kinds of predators. And watch, they’re just closed. I don’t really know how the fungus can sense the nematode. But it has a trigger mechanism that senses the motion. And when that happens the worm gets trapped. And then the fungus sends hyphae into the animal’s body and digests it from the inside, a terrible fate. And this drama plays out every day as you’re walking to work. There are 10 to the 9 worms per cubic yard of soil. And you don’t even realize that they’re struggling to survive as every day. A lot of you have seen this movie. In fact I was talking to several of the students from China, I think everyone in China has now seen my talk. So this is my—supposed to be— my funny slide. I have to wait for CBS News to do another documentary or something on RNAi because they provide such great material. This is the CBS News 15 second explanation of how RNAi works. Watch carefully. Here’s the double-stranded RNA. Now here are the defective genes. I can see some of you didn’t see this already, I’ve shown this so many times, I love it. Many people didn’t know that defective genes look like cheese puffs. And probably you didn’t know that the RNA can actually chew. But this is why Andrew Fire and I knew that we had to work on this mechanism. It was such an exciting problem. I’ll come back to this at the end, there are some elements of this that are actually correct. And in fact, the thing that I think is really interesting is that—even though, of course the genes don’t actually look like cheese puffs—RNA can, RNAi can direct the chromosomal elimination of DNA. If you look at the Tetrahymena as an example where the RNA is guiding chromatin modifications that then are recognized by enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of the DNA and the elimination of the DNA during the process of macro nuclear formation in the Tetrahymena. The other thing about this of course is that they’ve illustrated it as an active mechanism. And I’ll come back to that in a moment. This is another movie from NOVA. So, in this case another nice little movie. This is from NOVA scienceNOW and the movie itself is 15 minutes long, so quite a bit longer than the CBS segment. It’s actually a fairly nice movie because it gets across, even for children the concept of RNA interference as a surveillance mechanism that can silence viral genes in this case. And there’s clearly some evidence that in multiple different organisms RNAi can serve that kind of function. But even my seven year old daughter doesn’t believe that there’s a cop inside of every cell, so I think this is a safe analogy or metaphor if you will. Whereas the CBS metaphor I think is a little pseudo scientific and people might actually believe that RNA can chew and that could be bad. But this one I like a lot. Now, here’s one more movie and this is from nature. This is just like the Star Wars version. We’re flying into the nucleus of the cell here and now we’re flying along the DNA. The DNA is all super coiled there. And now it’s opened up and the polymerase is going to get on here and start making a message. This is transcription occurring. This is a movie that is very useful for high school kids and lay people who aren’t familiar with basic biology. That’s the capping of the message. This is the RNA getting spliced here. Now it’s going to be transported out of the nucleus, that’s polyadenylation. And the message is going to go out, here it comes. Now, a scientist is about to inject the RNA into the cell. If you watch, you’ll see. Oh, here’s the ribosome making protein from the message. Here’s the scientist injecting the double-stranded RNA, it should be an A form helix, not that. It’s getting cut, that’s Dicer which cuts as… Now, here’s the slicer enzyme or argonaute and this will go away, it won’t chew, don’t worry. The beauty of this is it can use—this protein complex can use the sequence information here to find perfect matches. And it can do that catalytically, so it can go on and on and on and silence thousands of transcripts. It really is remarkable. But one way that I like to describe RNAi to the lay audience is. Imagine having the internet, but no way to search it, you have no search engine, no Google, no way to find anything. That’s really the way I figure your genome would be if it wasn’t for a mechanism like RNAi. RNAi uses a little search sequence, small sequence, just like you would type into the window of your Google browser to find genes or sequences, messenger RNAs or even DNA in the cell and regulate it. And the beauty of that type of mechanism is it can coordinate related—the regulation of related genes that are separated in multiple places in the genome. So, the reason we wanted to study RNAi is we noticed that it was remarkably potent. And in fact, when you inject RNA into the worm, the first thing we noticed is that the silencing effect could be inherited. So it could be transmitted via progeny that were carrying the silencing effect producing effective progeny after a full generation. And it could even be transmitted via the sperm and effect progeny after a subsequent generation. And if you keep selecting for effected progeny this silencing effect can be inherited, apparently indefinitely in C. elegans. And this is something that we’re still very interested in understanding because this long term inheritance must reflect some sort of change at the chromatin level, most likely. It’s also systemic in that the injected RNA can spread throughout the animal. So you can put RNA into the intestine for example and the silencing effect can be observed inside the germ line. So there’s a way that these RNA molecules can move from cell to cell. And that’s something we need to learn a lot more about. When we noticed these phenomena we realized that there was an active response in the animal. As I said, the movies I showed you all have some active process. Either the cop or the RNA chewing, there’s some response in the animal to the double-stranded RNA. And for example there appears to be a transport mechanism, the silencing mechanism itself and then the amplification mechanism or the inheritance mechanism. And we still don’t understand many of these steps. But when we began working on this in C. elegans, there was an obvious approach to take to try to understand these mechanisms. And that is to use genetics. The first person to do RNA interference genetics was Hiroaki Tabara in my lab. And he set up a very elegant screen back in 1997, early 1998 in which he mutagenized animals and then placed them on bacteria expressing an essential worm gene. Now the worms are so sensitive to double-stranded RNA that they can eat it in their food and experience silencing as a result. Silencing that’s so potent that if you target a worm gene that’s essential, it will kill every egg in the wild type worm. So a gene for example required for embryogenesis can be targeted by feeding this animal bacteria that expressed the double-stranded RNA. They eat the bacteria, they silence the gene, all the eggs fail to hatch. So Hiroaki set up a very simple screen where he just looks for animals after two generations where the progeny are viable and by doing so he found lots of interesting genes involved in the RNAi mechanism. And I’ll just skip way ahead because I know I don’t have a lot of time today and tell you about the cop. The cop gene was—just so happens—was the first gene that Hiroaki identified. He named it RNA deficient gene number 1 or rde-1. And it’s now called after the first plant gene that had been identified in this family as a developmental defect in plants. The enzyme is shown here in grey in its protein structure, crystal structure that was done by Leemor Joshua-Tor and Ji-Joon Song in 2004. What you can see here is the guide RNA, the silencing RNA and the messenger RNA base pairing inside this groove in the enzyme. The base pairing event that occurs here pushes the messenger RNA up against the catalytic centre. This domain encodes an RNase H related fold that then cleaves the messenger RNA. And this is then discarded and the siRNA is allowed to then go on and silence more genes. We call these short interfering RNAs or siRNAs. They can catalyze multiple reactions like this. The thing that is funny about the RNAi field is the people who work in it obviously watch too much TV, especially the late night TV. Probably when they come home from lab the only thing on late at night are those shows that have lots of commercials for things like the Ginsu knife. Because we named the enzyme that’s upstream, is called Dicer and this one is called Slicer, so it dices and it slices. And if you’re from America, you’ve seen these commercials where they’re selling you this knife that will cut all kinds of different ways. But the thing that’s funny about those commercials is they always end—when you’re about to buy the knife, they always say there’s more, then they try to sell you the steak knives that go with it. And that’s the way it’s been working on RNAi. Every time you think it can’t get any cooler than this, something really, really interesting comes along and that’s what it’s been like. So we cloned rde-1 back in 1999. And for Andy and I that was like the eureka moment for us. Before that the fact that double-stranded RNA could trigger silencing was just phenomenology. It was interesting, but we didn’t know for sure that it was conserved or if it was just a worm thing or whether other animals would have the same kind of response. But when we cloned rde-1 we found that it was a highly conserved gene with multiple homologues. And this is just the family tree of rde-1 related proteins in the different animals. So, these are worm homologues here in red, these are other worm homologues over here and more worm homologues over here. Now it turns out humans have eight copies of the rde-1 gene, there’s four here and there’s four human genes over here. So, if you look at this, what you see is the black group of argonautes are the oldest branch of the family. These even have plant homologues in this area over here. But there are animals—almost all metazoan animals have two families. this one over here and this one over here which we call the Pee-wee family of argonautes. So the common ancestor of worms and humans already had at least two argonaute genes. When we cloned rde-1, because of the genome sequences we got all of this other information. And this is the beauty and the power of this genomic era that we’re in. You clone one gene in a model system like C. elegans and all of a sudden you have all the genes in all the organisms that have ever been sequenced. But this allowed us to ask the question. What did these highly conserved genes do. And so Alla Grishok in the lab knocked out these two genes and then analyzed the phenotype. To give you an idea of how exciting her discovery was, I have to tell you a little bit about Victor Ambros’ work. In 1993 Victor published a paper describing a little gene lin-4. The lin-4 gene had this very interesting nature in that it folds into a hairpin-like structure. And Victor described two forms of the lin-4 product. One is a 70 nucleotide precursor form that’s in this hairpin shape and the other is a 21 nucleotide RNA. So this is a naturally occurring worm gene, identified as a gene that regulates another worm gene called lin-14 that was analyzed by Gary Ruvkun’s group. Together Victor and Gary’s groups, together they worked out that lin-4 is a negative regulator of a gene, lin-14 that has complementary sites in its three prime UTR. This was the first gene which we now refer to as microRNAs, this was the first microRNA. In 1993 it was just another one of these weird things worms do. And in fact in 1994 I think Victor was denied tenure at Harvard, despite making this really exciting discovery just the year before. Everyone was very surprised. But the fact is that there was a strong bias that this was just an unusual thing that worms did and maybe it’s not relevant to humans. But something happened between then and 2000. In the year 2000 Gary Ruvkun’s group cloned the let-7 gene. And what had happened between ’93 and 2000 is we had enough human DNA sequence by that time, that you could look—Gary’s group looked and he found a perfect homologue of let-7 in the human genome sequence. So the entire 21 nucleotides in the human is identical to the 21 nucleotides in the worm. And in fact what they found is that every metazoan animal has a let-7 gene. And again let-7 seems to regulate targets by interacting with the three prime UTR. But the thing that was missing still, despite the fact that these are about the same size as siRNAs, the question remained. How are these pathways really related. Is the RNAi pathway related to the microRNA pathway or not. And Alla’s result suggested for the first time that the two pathways are related. And what she showed is that mutations in Dicer and mutations in those conserved argonautes have defects in the processing. Here’s the wild type, but in the absence of Dicer or this argonaute there’s a defect in the processing of this precursor and there’s less of this mature form accumulating in the animal. So the RNA interference mechanism which is involved in silencing genes - we use it experimentally, but it has a role also in transposon silencing and so on - has a conserved role in gene regulation, in which the worm makes double-stranded RNA by encoding it with just regular genes that then are processed into these siRNAs and can go on to regulate their targets. That was extremely exciting. And now it’s even getting more exciting in that these microRNAs are turning out to have really important roles developmentally, including some very important links to cancer biology in humans, including links in which the microRNAs are involved in preventing cell division and in suppressing cancer, sort of a tumor suppressor role for the microRNA genes or are chimiric genes, genes that promote cell division. This is a figure from Carlo Croce’s lab. It turns out that these are different patient samples and these are a set of about 100 microRNAs from the human. What they’re doing here is looking at the gene expression profile in different patient samples on this axis. You can see that certain microRNAs are up regulated in some tumors and down regulated in others. By looking at these profiles it’s actually turning out to be possible to make predictions about how a particular tumor will respond to treatment. In addition some of the microRNAs that are identified as correlated with an oncogenic state are turning out to be potential targets for suppressing tumor growth. Here’s where there’s even more. And I think that this is where the lab is still working. I’m just going to show a few slides from the work of Wai Fong who has been a new post doc in the lab. What you see here is a gel where these are tRNAs. We’re looking at RNAs. And if you look way down on the bottom of the gel there are RNA species that are here that everyone always thought was just junk. But it turns out that this is where the microRNAs run, right down here, there’s a band here that Wai Fong noticed was missing in these mutants. These are mutants that are deficient in RNAi. This is Dicer here which is required for the microRNA pathway. And you can see this band here is present in Dicer, it’s present in wild type but it’s missing in these mutants here. These are all mutations in a gene called DRH-3, Dicer-related helicase 3. Now it turns out these siRNAs are triphosphorylated, whereas Dicer, when it cleaves it, makes a monophosphate at the end because of its enzymatic action. Triphosphates would be put on by a polymerase and we believe these siRNAs are the products of a polymerase. This species here, the microRNAs are here but there’s also some other species of small RNA that’s got a 3 prime modification of some kind and we’re still analyzing those. Here’s an example of one of those, these are what we call natural endogenous small RNAs. They’re different from microRNAs in that they’re not encoded by a hairpin-like structure. This is a gene called K02. In wild type the messenger RNA for this gene is present at a low level and there’s a lot of siRNA present in the wild type animal. In the mutants that Wai Fong analyzed, the messenger RNA is now expressed at a higher level and the siRNAs are gone. So, these are naturally occurring silencing RNAs that are targeting one of the worms own genes and we don’t know why. So Wai Fong devised a strategy for sequencing these. This is just an example of how these siRNAs map from some of Wai Fong’s sequencing data. We’re just starting to sequence on a very high throughput level. Small RNAs from throughout the worm’s genome to try to find out what genes are targeted by these natural silencing RNAs. You can see this particular gene which has this long name here, has hundreds probably— or thousands of siRNAs in every cell that target the whole gene. And we don’t know how these are generated or why they exist and how they function in the animal. But we do know that out of some 6000 siRNAs that we’ve analyzed of this type we’ve identified already 3000 different genes. So most genes have just a few siRNAs targeting them in the samples that we’ve analyzed so far. So we think that this may turn out to be a very important regulatory mechanism for genes in the worm. So is it just another worm thing or not. Well, this is a mouse and this is based—we just did this experiment ourselves in our lab. But last year there were three or four papers on something called the piRNAs. These are extremely abundant in the mouse and the piRNAs are actually siRNAs that are 30 nucleotides, they’re bigger than the 21. They are 30 nucleotides long. They are so abundant that they are a blazing signal on ethidium stain gel. And it’s amazing that no one ever noticed these before. But they turn out to be interacting with the Pee-wee class, argonautes. That’s why they call them the piRNAs. And their functions are still being worked out. They appear to have a role in transposon suppression but they may have a more general role in gene regulation as well. You can probably barely see it, but here’s the band that Wai Fong has been analyzing. And there are bands here in the mouse that are similar in intensity. So there’s a lot out there still to be worked out in terms of how these small RNAs are regulating development. I’m going to come back now at the end of my talk to this concept of how the RNAs interact with the DNA. Here’s the double stranded DNA. The reason I show that slide is with the discovery of DNA I think molecular biologists sort of became overconfident. We thought we had figured out how life works, we thought we understood how information is stored inside of ourselves. The DNA explains a lot, it can explain Mendelian segregation of traits. And it can explain how the genetic material is replicated and how mutations could arise. So it’s a very powerful paradigm but I think it sort of made us overconfident. And I think RNAi is sort of bringing us back to reality a little bit. DNA doesn’t really look like that in the cell, it’s wrapped up and bundled into these higher order structures. This is a 30–nm fiber, these are the nucleosomes and here’s a crystal structure model showing the histone proteins inside and the DNA wrapping around. This is another picture here where the DNA goes around just about two times. And these little tails stick out from the histones and these tails, as you may know, are targets for multiple types of regulation. They can have a role in activating or repressing the transcription of the DNA that’s wrapped around those nucleosomes. And this information that’s put here by proteins that modify these tails is very interesting to me because it seems that siRNAs can guide these modifications by bringing to the chromatin remodeling complexes and proteins that recognize these histone tail modifications. So with that type of interaction between the chromatin and the RNA you can imagine that the DNA is more like the hardware in a computer. And that the proteins and the RNA that regulate, that interact with these histone tails are like the software. The analogy I like to make is that we think of ourselves as differentiated, right. We all have the same genome in every cell but the cells do different things. Well, why do they do different things. They do different things because the DNA, different genes are on and different genes are off and they’re on and they’re off very stably. And that’s how we remain stably differentiated creatures. The thing that I’m very interested in right now is a concept that we’re just trying to figure out how to test in the lab, that the germ line itself can differentiate and that that differentiation process allows the germ line to evolve without any changes in the underlying nucleotide sequence. So you could imagine heritable changes at this level that are maintained through the interactions with siRNAs over multiple generations. If you look back at the history of thinking on evolution prior to DNA—and this is actually going back to the turn of the century— Weismann’s theory of inheritance, he named the genes biophores. Unfortunately we all like jargon a little too much, so his word for genes was biophores. But he envisioned genes that could be replicated many, many times per cell division, not just once. And they could be segregated unequally between cells. He thought this could explain differentiation and development. And he came up with this concept of biophores which was cast aside after Mendel’s discoveries. But when you read Weismann’s theory, if you put instead of biophore the word siRNA, everywhere he used the word biophore. His theory works beautifully. So, I think we have to go back and think about evolution again and development. Darwin went even further than Weismann and came up with a word gemmules. And these were able to exit the somatic cells and enter the germ line and cause heritable changes that were… I see Hans standing up, that’s a bad sign. So I’m going to cut it short. But RNA could be, RNAi, maybe we should rename it RNA information because the RNA can guide the regulation of the DNA. Now, here’s Hans. I’m asking him to call me any time. He’s the one who makes the phone call by the way. So be nice to him. Here’s Andy and his wife Rachel. This is the class of 2006, there’s John Mather and George Smoot over there, Orhan Pamuk, Rodger Kornberg, Ed Phelps, Muhammad Yunus and a representative from the Grameen Bank. This is just a family photo with my daughter Melisa and Victoria who are here at the meeting. Here’s my wife getting some advice on economics at the banquet. And here she’s giving some advice. During the banquet Ed called my wife a communist—she grew up in Hungary. And here’s George explaining the Big Bang to me. And you can see I have this glazed look on my face because you know I think it’s a nice story but believe me there’s a lot of mysteries still in that story. And here is Victoria collecting some gold medals, these are very nice gold medals because they have chocolate inside. And here is Vickie dancing with me, it was a wonderful time there. This is the danger of one of these prizes, you can see I’m signing a chair at the Nobel Museum and you can see what's happened to my body, my head is huge and my body has gotten very small. So that’s one of the dangers. But, and I’ll tell you there is a real antidote for that and I’ll just end with this slide, this is Tara Bean, in 1998, this is her picture. She was diagnosed with a brain tumor because of vision problems that she developed in third grade. She grew up in my home town, we know her family and she was seen at the hospital where I work. And she unfortunately lost her battle with cancer. And since her death we’ve learned a lot about the basic mechanisms of cancer. We have a lot more to learn. There’s a lot of tremendous exciting work going on and a day doesn’t go by now, even here at this meeting when I don’t get an email of some kind from somebody who has got a sick loved one, someone who thinks that maybe RNAi could help them. And unfortunately the answer is still that those cures are perhaps years away and it’s very hard. So we got to get back to work, as soon as the meeting is over everybody get back to work and try to come up with some new cures. And I think I’ll end there. Sorry, I always go long. Thank you very much Craig, it was a wonderful lecture and we now learn also about the future. I felt like a bad boy walking up and interrupting you. But since we said we should have some questions and further extension, I thought we should do so. So, now this lecture is open to questions. I saw your hand first. I was promised that we have a microphone. Yes, she has one. My name is … (inaudible 50.05). I’m a medical doctor from Pakistan. You mentioned that RNAi can cause chromosomal elimination of DNA. So, is it therapeutically possible by injecting bacteria or viruses expressing double-stranded RNA to silence genes involved in the pathophysiology of cells in tumors or cancers in humans or mouse models. Well, potentially. But those silencing approaches that are being attempted now in the human are not designed to eliminate the DNA corresponding to the target gene. You can achieve knock down reduction in gene expression of a gene in a human cell using RNAi. And that is being developed as a therapeutic strategy now in multiple different companies around the world. And it’s even in human trials right now for several different indications. So it looks like it’s going to be a viable approach, whether or not you’ll ever be able to actually target the elimination of a gene effectively in a patient, I don’t know, and you may not even want to do that in most cases. So that’s probably not possible. Questions. I saw another hand very closed by and one hand over here. This is really amazing and I’m really sensitized. But in the beginning of your lecture you mentioned the importance of politics in science and I want to agree with you absolutely. I also noticed that this is a long journey what you are presenting today. And what I’d love you to mention is how much this costs, because I’m really interested in economy and this must have cost a lot of a fortune. And I know that the Bush administration has put a lot of limitation on Africa research because he felt we should not waste money on research, we should face poverty. And some of us felt research is another way out of poverty. From your experience, what would you say to this comment. Well, I’m not sure I understood your question completely. But let me just say that the kinds of drugs that you can make with RNAi, using RNAi as a drug, are going to be so expensive and so tailored to individuals that they have a lot of potential. But I really doubt they’ll penetrate to more than a few percent of the world’s population. The easy to deliver drugs are pills. And if you can develop orally available small molecule, then you can really get drugs inexpensively into patients. RNAi is being used to help discover pathways and so on, to find new druggable targets. But RNAi as a drug I think is going to be very hard to get into the Third World as a therapy because it’s an injectable. So it’s somewhat more difficult. I think that’s actually one of the things that we really need to fix. We can spend a lot of time trying to cure diseases that have never been cured. But in a lot of the world the diseases—it’s just malnutrition and diarrhea that are killing most of the people, or malaria or some well known disease that’s treatable. And the medicines are not there because of political instability or infrastructure problems. These are the kinds of things that I think require an interdisciplinary effort to try to solve medicine. We can continue to go along these paths towards more and more complex, more and more specialized medicine without benefiting mankind. Nearly as much as we could if we invested some time in helping to bring—really to reinvent economies that work for the Third World and we’re not doing that. So I think that sort of answers your question. Thank you. And then it was you, yes. Hi, I’m Shawn from … (inaudible 54.16) UK. So, I had a question, looking at the system biology aspect. I always used to think about this problem, like how the cell in terms of system biology decides which part for small RNA you should take. Like if you have viral response you have mRNAs or you have saRNA mechanism. So in terms of the wall cell concept, how would cell choose the mechanism for RNA defense. I have no idea. It’s a very interesting question. But you know, the regulation of these mechanisms is something that really just hasn’t been worked out yet. We don’t know how microRNAs really work and how they regulate their targets. We don’t even know how they—probably because they have multiple ways of silencing—we don’t know which one they—how they choose, how to either cleave the gene or just silence it or send it to a storage place. You know there are a lot of possibilities. One of the things though that's very exciting about RNAi is for the eukaryotic cell. I think it provides a mechanism for linking transcription and translation so that the cell can, while its transcribing a message, mark that message for storage and use later. A concept that would allow the cell, despite the existence of the nuclear envelope to export a message that’s been marked for use later. And that’s a really interesting concept. So there are all kinds of interesting possibilities about regulation. I think it’s going to take years to sort it all out. Any more questions. I saw your hand and then yours. I don’t think Hans can see further than … Well, thank you.(laughter) My name is Matthew Albert from INSERM in France. I’m curious to know about double-stranded RNA and single-stranded RNA with 5-prime-triphosphates. They’re known as immune adjuvants, signaling through pattern recognition molecules like toll-like receptors and intercellular helicases. I was curious to know whether or not worms have a similar mechanism for immune activation. And how you imagine sort of cell versus viral RNA could be recognized in different ways that would avoid aberrant immune responses. That’s a great question. And in fact the Dicer-related helicase that I was referring to is a homologue of RIG-I, MDA-5 and LGP-2, which all are members of the Dicer family of helicases. That's our name for it, Dicer-related helicases. But the fascinating thing about that is that those are all involved in the human innate immune response in anti-viral response. And recently the Dicer-related helicase, human versions have been linked to recognition of triphosphorylated, not siRNAs but viral products that are triphosphorylated. So there’s a homology really between the anti-viral mechanism in humans and the RNAi mechanism in worms. The worms have retained a very potent sequence specific response. The human has either lost that response or it’s much less important or it’s only in certain cell types, we don’t know which. The human cell when it recognizes a viral process will commit suicide and these same receptors are involved in recognizing the viral replication products and then activating an apoptotic pathway. So, a very efficient way to get rid of a virus if you have 10 trillion cells but if you’ve only got 1000 you better not kill the cells. So the worms may be very good at the sequence specific aspect of anti-viral or silencing. So the homology and the similarities between those mechanisms are fascinating and in fact it turns out that those LGP-2 of the three human members of this family interacts with Dicer and with another protein that we’ve identified in the worm called pure 1. It’s a phosphatase that recognizes triphosphates and removes two to make a monophosphate. There is a complex in the human that appears to have at least those three proteins. So we think that the human cell may have this mechanism as well. And we’re still trying to sort out how the human does the sequence specific silencing. Then I promised you. And after that we go further away. My name is . (inaudible 59.16). I’m from India. What I wanted to ask you was if you’re using RNA interference in the cure of cancer or the battle against cancer. Is there a mechanism or is there a method to make RNA cell-specific to suppress mitosis in the cancer cells. Is there a specific way to just target the cells in there. Because the mitotic mechanisms are the same in normal cells as well as cancerous cells. Right, cancer is a very challenging target for an RNAi therapeutic. And getting it delivered to the tumor specifically would obviously be a very important aspect because if you’re trying to interfere, say with mitosis, you’d kill the healthy cells as well. The same problem with many cancer therapies. So, it’s a problem again that hasn’t been solved. But one that people are working on. There are possible solutions but I don’t have any for you at the moment. Could we possibly get the microphone over here. Worms are extraordinarily sensitive to RNAi. I mean, they’re sensitive to it in their food. What do you think the evolutionary advantages of evolving such a sensitivity would have been. I mean, considering you don’t have this in other organisms. Why are they so sensitive that they can actually transmit it in their food. It’s very interesting. You know, these worms are hermaphroditic, they’re also capable of fertilization, cross fertilization by males. But they colonize food in the soil, quite often an individual worm will find the food and have to populate the food source without a mate. So they’ll self fertilize and make thousands and millions of progeny. When they begin to starve they do something very interesting. These mothers are very altruistic, they actually hold on to their eggs when they’re starving and they allow the eggs to hatch internally. That way the progeny hatch in the presence of an abundant food source, the mother. And then they consume the mother, they reach an age that’s old enough to become a dower larva which is a very resistant form and then they can go off in the soil to find new sources of food. The interesting thing there though is that if an animal is starving and allows the progeny to eat itself, it might have developed immunity against viruses during its lifetime that could then be transmitted to the progeny via feeding. That’s one explanation that I’ve just sort of back of an envelope idea. But I think it’s possible that—because of the way they live, they want to be able to transmit these silencing activities to their progeny. The sort of embarrassing aspect of this is that C. elegans researchers So we don’t know of any viruses that we can use to sort of test this model. There are no viral, existing viral examples from nematodes. Maybe they’re so good at silencing them. Probably it’s just not a stable interaction in the laboratory. So we lose them very quickly. Thank you very much. I’ve just thought, I should say we stop. But a final question to you. You can shout it out. I’ll hear it. Concerning the use of siRNA and therapy. Isn’t there a problem between the high specificity of siRNA and the allele variation of defective genes. For instance by using shRNA to fight against AIDS, there are a lot of HIV mutants. So, how would you imagine. Well, you could target cellular genes which are less apt to mutate, that’s one strategy. And of course you can design an siRNA against the region of the genome that for some reason can’t mutate very often. And those strategies are being tried. I think there’s an HIV trial now using gene therapy to deliver the silencing RNA. That’s either approved or will be shortly in the US. So they’re trying that approach even for HIV. But normally there’s not that much allele variation so you can choose a region. That’s not for normal genes. For viral genes—yes, there are. But for normal cellular genes there is less variability. So you can choose an siRNA that will target a conserved region. Interestingly, in the case of a dominant mutation for example that’s causing a phenotype, you can even design your siRNA so that it will only target the mutant allele. And that’s with some degree of selectivity, you can get silencing specifically of the mutant allele by designing the siRNA. So that it won’t cleave the wild type allele but only the mutant. So there’s a lot of possibilities still for using RNAi as a therapeutic. Thank you very much.

HANS JÖRNVALL. Ich glaube, wir sollten versuchen, anzufangen. Es ist 9:00 Uhr und ich heiße Sie alle zum Beginn der diesjährigen Vorträge herzlich Willkommen. Es gibt bereits bei unserem ersten Vortrag eine kleine Änderung, denn Sir John, der als dritter Redner hier bei uns sein sollte, konnte nicht kommen. Daher haben wir die folgende Entscheidung getroffen: Die drei übrigen Vorträge werden um jeweils etwa 5 Minuten verlängert. Außerdem werden wir nach dem ersten Vortrag ein Experiment wagen und eine Fragerunde mit dem Publikum anschließen. Und mit diesen Fragen und der Verlängerung der Reden werden wir zu unserem normalen Zeitplan zurückkehren. Wir werden nicht alle Vorträge mit einer Fragerunde beschließen, aber da der erste Vortrag von unserem jüngsten Nobelpreisträger vom letzten Jahr gehalten wird, haben wir uns entschieden, die Runde nach dem ersten Vortrag zu machen. Und nach dem ersten Vortrag und dieser Fragerunde gibt es außerdem eine Kaffeepause. Wir machen also Kaffeepause zwischen 10:05 Uhr und 10:40 Uhr. Wir machen dann anschließend 10 Minuten früher weiter, damit auch der zweite und dritte Sprecher zu ihrer Verlängerung kommen. Damit sind wir dann auch bereit anzufangen. Der erste Sprecher ist Professor Craig Mello von der University of Massachusetts, der Medical School in Worcester, USA. Er bekam den Preis, wie ich gerade sagte, letztes Jahr. Er bekam ihn für die „Entdeckung der RNA-Interferenz – Gensilencing durch Doppelstrang-RNA“. Bitte, Professor Mello. Danke. CRAIG MELLO. Danke, danke Hans. Es ist eine Freude und eine wirklich große Ehre hier zu sein. Ich freue mich schon auf die Gelegenheit, viele Gespräche und Diskussionen mit allen Anwesenden hier im Laufe der nächsten paar Tage zu führen. So, lassen Sie mich fortfahren und mit meinem Vortrag beginnen. Ich habe meinen Vortrag ein wenig umbenannt: Ich fahre also fort und beginne meinen Vortrag mit einer etwas ungewöhnlichen ersten Folie hier. Ich weiß nicht, ob Sie – könnten wir etwas weniger Licht haben? Das sind Dick Cheney und ich im Weißen Haus. Wenn Sie einen Preis wie diesen verliehen bekommen, besteht einer der besonderen Vorteile darin, dass man Führungspersonen des Landes oder Leute auf der ganzen Welt trifft, die eine wichtige Rolle in der Politik spielen. Könnten Sie die Bühne ein wenig abdunkeln? Ich glaube, es ist zu hell. Können Sie das gut erkennen? Sie sehen, dass ich nicht sehr dicht bei ihm stehe. Seine Wählergunst in den USA liegt zurzeit bei etwa 7 %, er ist der Vizepräsident, aber Viele denken, er ist der kluge Kopf. Wichtig jedoch, und der Grund, warum ich dies zeige, ist, es ist sehr wichtig, zu wählen und sich in die Politik einzubringen, wissen Sie, egal, ob Sie ihn gewählt haben oder nicht. Nun, wenn Sie in Ihrem Land nicht wählen können, und einige können das wahrscheinlich nicht, dann ist es sicherlich wichtig, jeden aufzuklären, mit dem man spricht, Leute darüber aufzuklären, was in der Welt vor sich geht. Sprechen Sie mit Leuten, das ist sehr wichtig. Und eines der Themen, die ich für wichtig halte, und das wir hier diskutieren sollten, ist, ob es vielleicht klug ist, die Treffen in Lindau zukünftig immer interdisziplinär abzuhalten. Denn ich glaube, eines der Dinge, die in der Wissenschaft gerade vor sich gehen, ist, dass sie bereits sehr interdisziplinär ist. Biomedizin zum Beispiel hängt stark von Physik und Chemie ab, glaube ich. Aber auch politische Themen sind sehr wichtig. Daher halte ich es für sehr wichtig, an der Universität und auch bei Veranstaltungen wie dieser einen sehr interdisziplinären Fokus zu haben, um zu versuchen, den Dialog in Gang zu bringen. Ich ging nach Washington DC in der Hoffnung, der Bush-Regierung mitteilen zu können, wie wichtig RNA-Interferenz als Technologie ist und wie gut es zum Genomsequenzierungsprojekt passt, und wie beides zusammen, gemeinsam mit anderen großartigen Technologien, eine wirkliche Veränderung in der Art und Weise herbeiführen, wie wir Medizin handhaben und praktizieren. Und wie sich dadurch viele Gelegenheiten für neue Arten von Medizin ergeben, die Verknüpfung von menschlichen Krankheiten mit der Genetik. Leider kam es nur zu einer sehr kurzen Zusammenkunft und einem Händeschütteln im Weißen Haus. Ich wollte ihnen mitteilen, dass die RNAi unter ihrer Regierung entdeckt wurde, dass die Genomsequenzierung unter ihrer Regierung fertiggestellt wurde. Und ich glaube, ich werde trotzdem noch einmal hingehen und erneut mit ihnen reden, falls sie zuhören. Aber wie Sie wissen, hatten wir glücklicherweise einen Wechsel im Senat, im Haus kürzlich in den USA und politisch ändern sich die Dinge definitiv. Dies sind Ed Kennedy und ich zusammen bei einem Besuch des Kongresses, der kürzlich stattfand. Es gibt eine Menge Hoffnung, glaube ich, dass sich die Dinge in den USA in naher Zukunft ändern werden und das Land anfängt, wieder mehr in die Wissenschaft zu investieren. Im Moment, was Sie vielleicht nicht wissen, gibt es in den USA kaum finanzielle Unterstützung für medizinische Forschung. Nun möchte ich Ihnen diese Folie, das sind Andrew Fire und ich, aus mehreren Gründen zeigen. Erstens, wenn es Andy nicht gäbe, wäre ich heute nicht hier. Er ist ein toller Kollege und ein großartiger Freund. Wir haben zusammen gearbeitet an unserer Wissenschaft und haben nicht miteinander konkurriert. In der Tat begann unsere Zusammenarbeit Ende der achtziger Jahre. Damals konzentrierten wir uns darauf, DNA in den Organismus einzuschleusen, den wir beide lieben und mit dem wir arbeiten, ein winziger Wurm. In der nächsten Folie zeige ich Ihnen ein Bild. Aber der Wurm ist so klein, ungefähr von der Größe eines Kommas auf einer Druckseite. Um die DNA in dieses Tier zu injizieren, mussten Andy und ich uns Wege ausdenken, die Nadel unter dem Mikroskop in dieses winzige Tier einzuführen. Und natürlich war das etwas, was noch nie zuvor getan worden war. Wir arbeiteten also zusammen – eigentlich arbeiteten wir zuerst unabhängig voneinander – aber nachdem wir uns besser kennengelernt hatten, begannen wir, Ideen auszutauschen. Denn es war sehr schwierig, sich in diese neue Technik einzuarbeiten und herauszufinden, wie man mit diesem sehr kleinen Tier umgehen und effizient eine Injektion in dieses Tier durchführen könnte. Zusammen beschrieben wir einen Umwandlungsprozess zum Einschleusen der DNA, der sehr, sehr gut funktionierte. Und es machte wirklich eine Menge Spaß, mit Andy zu arbeiten. Und der andere Grund, warum ich diese Folie mag ist, weil wir nicht – was wir hier machen ist, natürlich sind wir auf der Bühne – weil wir nicht sprechen. Sie können erkennen, dass Andys Mund geschlossen ist, genau wie meiner. Wofür wir den Preis aber wirklich verliehen bekamen, war dafür, dass wir miteinander redeten, dafür, dass wir unsere Ideen austauschten. Und dafür, dass wir keine Angst hatten, dafür, dass wir uns vertrauten und keine Angst davor hatten, ausgenutzt zu werden. Und ich glaube, das ist etwas, das wir häufiger brauchen, viel mehr Offenheit und Bereitschaft, Ideen auszutauschen. Danke. Nun, hier sehen Sie C.elegans, wie er im Labor in einer Kulturschale hin und her schwimmt. Diese Tiere sind äußerst schön. Wie Sydney Benner bemerkte, als er diesen Organismus für seine Studien auswählte, sie sind im Wesentlichen durchsichtig. Man kann also gerade durch dieses Tier hindurchsehen und alle Zellen darin erkennen und alle möglichen Details. Und was bei diesen Tieren noch so unglaublich ist, ist die Tatsache, dass sie in Bezug auf ihre zelluläre Komplexität so einfach sind. Sie bestehen aus lediglich 1.000 Zellen im Vergleich zum Menschen mit seinen 10 Billionen Zellen. Sie bilden also ein sehr elegantes System. Aber wenn Sie mit Leuten über Würmer sprechen, wie etwa, sagen wir, mit meinen Nachbarn in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, wo ich wohne, sind sie immer, wissen Sie, sie sind immer sehr nett zu Anfang: Oh, Sie arbeiten an einer Medical School, wie nett. Woran arbeiten Sie? Würmer? Und dann werden ihre Augen, na sagen wir glasig. Warum sollte sich jemand an einer Medical School mit Würmern beschäftigen? Sie konnten es einfach nicht begreifen. Und dann, dank des Telefonanrufs von Hans, hören plötzlich meine Nachbarn, wenn ich Ihnen erzähle, dass ich an einem Wurm arbeite, sie hören mir tatsächlich zu. Und ich glaube, das war, wenn überhaupt etwas, das Befriedigendste seit dem 2. Oktober, nämlich meinen Nachbarn tatsächlich etwas über Würmer und Evolution erzählen zu können und sie hören zu. Warum also haben sich Würmer als so wichtig erwiesen? Und Hefe, was das betrifft, hat sich als so wichtig für die menschliche Biologie und Medizin erwiesen. Und genau das ist etwas, das die Allgemeinheit nicht zu schätzen weiß, insbesondere in Amerika. Ich glaube, in Europa und Asien ist das kein so großes Problem. Und um diese Frage nun zu beantworten, gehe ich ganz weit zurück bis zum Urknall. Ich habe diese Folie von John Mather geborgt, den ich ganz gut kennengelernt habe, auch er bekam 2006 den Preis für Physik zusammen mit George Smoot. Als wir zusammen in Stockholm waren, fragte uns die Presse dauernd: Was hat Ihre Entdeckung mit Ihrer Entdeckung gemeinsam? Sie wissen, sie haben den Urknall entdeckt, wir die RNA-Interferenz. Wie bringt man diese beiden Dinge in Zusammenhang? Das ist eine ziemliche Herausforderung. Aber was sie taten war, sie verwendeten einen Satelliten mit Namen COBE, um die kosmische Hintergrundstrahlung zu kartieren, die im Weltraum überall zu finden ist. Und das ist die Karte, die sie erstellt haben. Sie erkannten, dass, egal, wohin man im Weltraum schaut, es ein bisschen übrig gebliebene Strahlung gibt. Sie bestimmten die Temperatur in diesem Spektrum und berechneten daraus, dass der Urknall vor 13,7 Milliarden Jahren stattgefunden haben muss. Und daher fiel uns der Zusammenhang ein, oder das ist, glaube ich, etwas, worüber es sich nachzudenken lohnt, dass Leben auf kosmischer Ebene existiert. Das Leben auf diesem Planeten entstand vor ungefähr 4 oder 3,5 bis 3,8 Milliarden Jahren. Während der Zeit, in der sich das Leben auf diesem Planeten entwickelte, in der Tat gerade seit den gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Pflanzen und Tieren, hat sich die Galaxie, in der wir uns befinden, etwa vier Mal um die eigene Achse gedreht. Das Leben selbst ist bemerkenswert aufgrund seiner Dauerhaftigkeit und der Tatsache, dass es wirklich auf kosmischer Ebene existiert. Lassen Sie uns daher einen kleinen Ausschnitt aus der Geschichte des Lebens betrachten. Hier sehen Sie den gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen. Auf dieser Folie zeige ich den Planeten Erde während eines so genannten „Schneeball Erde“-Ereignisses. Es gibt geologische Anzeichen in den Felsen, in der Erdkruste, für Vereisungen dieses Ausmaßes, bei der die Erde bis hinunter zum Äquator vollständig mit Eis bedeckt war. Und aus biologischer Sicht ist das, glaube ich, ein sehr interessantes Konzept, aufgrund der Frage, welche Auswirkungen diese Art von Ereignissen auf die gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen hätte. Hier haben wir also den gemeinsamen Vorfahren, ein anspruchsvoller, wirklich guter, kleiner Organismus mit allen möglichen Fähigkeiten. Es gibt Hox-Muster, es passieren alle möglichen faszinierenden Dinge da drinnen, wie RNA-Interferenz, funktioniert einfach prima. Aber er hat ein großes Problem: Auf der Erde selbst gibt es kein Land. Wo also soll der kleine Kerl leben? Entweder Hydrothermalquellen oder vielleicht kleine Risse im Eis, im Meer. Diese Art von Ereignis fand tatsächlich zwei Mal statt und beide Male kam es zu massivem Aussterben. Es gab also Hinweise auf ein Aussterben hier und ein Aussterben hier. Und dann, direkt nach dem Ereignis, gab es das biologische Pendant zum Urknall. Es gab die kambrische Artenexplosion. Und ich glaube nicht, dass es von biologischer Seite je eine adäquate Erklärung für die kambrische Explosion gab. Aber ich glaube aus geologischer Sicht stellen diese Eiszeitereignisse vielleicht eine sehr verlockende mögliche Erklärung dar, bei der…, was hier geschah, war letztlich, das Eis schmolz, die Erde wurde wieder bewohnbar, die Landmassen und die flachen Meere um das Land herum wurden bewohnbar und es gab diese wirklich erstaunliche Vervielfältigung des Lebens. Das rasche Auftauchen verschiedener Tiergruppen, darunter auch die Gruppe, aus der der Mensch hervorging, und die Gruppen, aus denen die Nematoden hervorgingen. Und wenn Sie weiter zurückgingen, befände sich der Ursprung der Pflanzen und Tiere in der Tat dort unten am unteren Rand der Seite. Aber Pflanzen und Tiere verfügen alle über RNAi und das ist die Sache, die, glaube ich, sogar meine Nachbarn begreifen. Wissen Sie, sogar die Leute, die keine Ahnung von Biologie haben, sie haben Angst, dass: Oh, wir sind doch nicht wirklich mit den Affen verwandt. Sie begreifen es tatsächlich. Und ich glaube, das liegt auch zum Teil an dem Präsidenten, den wir in den USA gehabt haben, dass die Leute das nun akzeptieren. Aber tatsächlich sind wir immer noch – wissen Sie, wie Nietzsche sagte, wir haben uns vom Wurm zum Menschen entwickelt, aber Vieles in uns ist eigentlich immer noch Wurm. Und ich glaube, das ist ein wirklich wichtiger Aspekt dessen, was ich als Biologe tun kann, um die Botschaft unserer gemeinsamen Abstammung rüberzubringen. Wir sind nicht nur mit Würmern verwandt, sondern jeder in diesem Saal ist eng, eng mit jedem anderen hier verwandt. Daher muss die Menschheit diese nationalistischen Schranken überwinden und anfangen, einander als Brüder und Schwestern zu betrachten. Nun, hier sehen Sie, womit sich die kleinen Würmer manchmal in ihrer richtigen Umgebung auseinandersetzen müssen. Es stellt sich heraus, dass es Hunderte von kleinen Pilzen gibt, die im Boden leben und sich von Würmern ernähren. Und sie haben sogar diese kleinen Fallen ersonnen, wie diese hier, in der Sie diese arme Nematode erkennen können, die hier eingefangen wurde. Ich werde Ihnen diesen kleinen Film zeigen, in dem Sie den tatsächlichen Vorgang sehen können. Dies sind bereits gefangene Würmer. Aber beobachten Sie diesen hier. Er schwimmt hier durch und sie schließt sich einfach um seinen Schwanz. Hier, sehen Sie sich auch diesen an, da kommt gerade ein anderer Wurm heran. Das sind die Gefahren, denen sie in der Umwelt natürlicherweise ausgesetzt sind. Diese Tiere begegnen allen möglichen Räubern. Und hier, sie hat sich gerade geschlossen. Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Pilz die Nematode wahrnimmt. Aber er hat einen Auslösemechanismus, der auf Bewegung anspricht. Und wenn das geschieht, wird der Wurm gefangen. Und dann sendet der Pilz Hyphen in den Körper des Tieres und verdaut es von innen heraus, ein schreckliches Schicksal. Und dieses Drama wiederholt sich jeden Tag, während Sie zur Arbeit laufen. Es gibt 10 hoch 9 Würmer pro Kubikmeter Boden. Und wir nehmen nicht einmal wahr, dass sie jeden Tag ums Überleben kämpfen. Viele von Ihnen haben diesen Film gesehen. Tatsächlich habe ich mit mehreren Studenten aus China gesprochen, ich glaube, jeder in China hat jetzt meine Rede gesehen. Das also ist – sollte sie sein – meine lustige Folie. Ich muss warten, bis CBS News eine weitere Dokumentation oder so etwas über RNAi dreht, denn sie liefern solch großartiges Material. Das ist die 15-Sekunden-Erklärung von CBS News darüber, wie RNAi funktioniert. Schauen Sie genau hin. Hier ist die Doppelstrang-RNA. Hier sind die schadhaften Gene. Ich sehe, dass manche von Ihnen das noch nicht gesehen haben, ich habe das schon so oft gezeigt, ich liebe es einfach. Viele Leute wussten nicht, dass schadhafte Gene wie Käse-Flips aussehen. Und wahrscheinlich haben Sie auch nicht gewusst, dass RNA tatsächlich kauen kann. Aber das ist der Grund, warum Andrew Fire und ich wussten, dass wir diesen Mechanismus entschlüsseln mussten. Es war so ein spannendes Problem. Ich komme am Ende darauf zurück, es gibt ein paar Elemente hieraus, die tatsächlich stimmen. Und ich glaube, was tatsächlich interessant ist, ist, dass – auch wenn die Gene natürlich nicht wirklich wie Käse-Flips aussehen – dass RNA, RNAi die chromosomale Ausschaltung von DNA lenken kann. Wenn man Tetrahymena als Beispiel betrachtet, bei denen die RNA Chromatinänderungen steuert, die dann von Enzymen erkannt werden, die die Spaltung der DNA und die Eliminierung der DNA während der Entstehung des Makronukleus in Tetrahymena katalysieren. Die weitere Besonderheit ist natürlich, dass sie dies als aktiven Mechanismus dargelegt haben. Darauf komme ich gleich zurück. Das ist ein anderer Film von NOVA. In diesem Fall ein weiterer, netter kleiner Film. Er stammt von NOVA scienceNOW und der Film selbst dauert 15 Minuten, also ein ganzes Stück länger als der CBS-Ausschnitt. Es ist tatsächlich ein ziemlich netter Film, denn er vermittelt sogar Kindern das Konzept der RNA-Interferenz als Überwachungsmechanismus, der in diesem Fall virale Gene ausschalten kann. Und es gibt deutliche Hinweise, dass in vielen verschiedenen Organismen RNAi diese Funktion erfüllen kann. Aber selbst meine sieben Jahre alte Tochter glaubt nicht, dass es in jeder Zelle einen Polizisten gibt, daher glaube ich, dass dies eine sichere Analogie oder Metapher ist, wenn Sie so wollen. Die CBS-Metapher dagegen ist, glaube ich, ein bisschen pseudo-wissenschaftlich und es könnten Leute tatsächlich glauben, dass die RNA kauen kann, und das könnte schlecht sein. Aber diese mag ich sehr. Nun, hier ist ein weiterer Film, er ist von Nature. Dieser ist wie die Star-Wars-Version. Wir fliegen in den Kern der Zelle hier und jetzt fliegen wir die DNA entlang. Die DNA liegt hier ganz als supercoiled DNA vor. Und nun wird sie geöffnet und die Polymerase kommt hinzu und fängt an, eine Boten-RNA zu erstellen. Dies ist der Vorgang der Transkription. Dieser Film ist sehr hilfreich für Gymnasiasten oder Laien, die sich mit den Grundlagen der Biologie nicht auskennen. Das ist das Capping der Boten-RNA. Dies hier ist die RNA während des Spleißens. Jetzt wird sie aus dem Kern herausgebracht, das ist Polyadenylierung. Und die mRNA verlässt den Kern, hier kommt sie. Jetzt ist ein Wissenschaftler dabei, die RNA in die Zelle zu injizieren. Wenn Sie zuschauen, werden sie es sehen. Oh, hier ist das Ribosom, das mithilfe der Boten-RNA das Protein herstellt. Hier sehen Sie den Wissenschaftler, der die Doppelstrang-RNA injiziert, das sollte eine A-Helix sein, nicht das. Sie wird geschnitten, das ist Dicer, die schneidet wie... Jetzt, hier ist das Slicer-Enzym oder Argonaut und das verschwindet wieder, es kaut nicht, keine Angst. Und das Tolle daran ist, es kann – dieser Proteinkomplex findet mithilfe der Sequenzinformation hier die perfekten Übereinstimmungen. Und das geschieht katalytisch, er kann also weiter und weiter und weiter machen und Tausende von Transkripten stilllegen. Das ist wirklich bemerkenswert. Eine Möglichkeit, wie ich RNAi den nicht mit der Materie Vertrauten gerne beschreibe, ist: Stellen Sie sich vor, es gäbe das Internet, aber keine Möglichkeit darin zu suchen, keine Suchmaschinen, kein Google, keine Möglichkeit, etwas zu finden. Genau so stelle ich mir Ihr Genom vor, wenn es keinen Mechanismus wie RNAi hätte. RNAi verwendet eine kleine Suchsequenz, eine kleine Sequenz, genau wie das, was sie in das Fenster Ihres Google-Browsers eingeben würden, um Gene oder Sequenzen, mRNA oder sogar DNA in der Zelle zu finden und zu regulieren. Und das Wunderbare an diesem Mechanismus ist, er kann verwandte koordinieren – die Regulation verwandter Gene, die über mehrere Orte im Genom verteilt sind. Der Grund, warum wir RNAi untersuchen wollten, war der, dass wir feststellten, dass es bemerkenswert wirksam war. Und wirklich, wenn man dem Wurm RNA injiziert, war das Erste, was wir bemerkten, dass der Silencing-Effekt vererbt werden kann. Er konnte mittels einer Nachkommenschaft weitergegeben werden, die den Silencing-Effekt trug, und nach einer ganzen Generation Nachkommen mit diesem Effekt erzeugte. Und er konnte sogar über den Samen weitergegeben werden und Nachkommenschaft auch nach einer weiteren Folgegeneration mit diesem Effekt ausstatten. Und wenn man die entsprechenden Nachkommen selektiert, kann dieser Silencing-Effekt in C.elegans anscheinend endlos vererbt werden. Dies zu verstehen interessiert uns weiterhin sehr, denn diese langfristige Vererbung muss, aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach, eine Art Veränderung auf Chromatinebene widerspiegeln. Es ist außerdem systemisch, da sich nämlich die injizierte RNA im gesamten Tier verbreiten kann. So kann man RNA zum Beispiel in den Darm einbringen und der Silencing-Effekt kann in der Keimbahn beobachtet werden. Es gibt also eine Möglichkeit, wie sich diese RNA-Moleküle von Zelle zu Zelle bewegen können. Und darüber müssen wir noch eine ganze Menge lernen. Als wir diese Phänomene bemerkten, stellten wir fest, dass es in dem Tier eine aktive Reaktion gab. Wie schon gesagt, die Filme, die ich gezeigt habe, enthalten alle einen aktiven Prozess. Entweder der Polizist oder die kauende RNA, es gibt eine Reaktion in dem Tier auf die Doppelstrang-RNA. Und da scheint es zum Beispiel einen Transportmechanismus zu geben, den Silencing-Effekt selbst und dann den Amplifikationsmechanismus oder den Vererbungsmechanismus. Und viele dieser Schritte verstehen wir noch nicht. Aber als wir anfingen, uns damit in C.elegans zu beschäftigen, gab es einen offensichtlichen Ansatz, mit dem man versuchen könnte, diese Mechanismen zu verstehen. Nämlich die Verwendung von Genetik. Der Erste, der sich mit der Genetik der RNA-Interferenz beschäftigte, war der Japaner Hiroaki Tabara in meinem Labor. und sie dann auf eine Bakterienkultur aufbrachte, die ein essenzielles Wurmgen exprimierte. Nun reagieren die Würmer so empfindlich auf Doppelstrang-RNA, dass sie sie mit dem Futter aufnehmen können und es in der Folge zur Stilllegung kommt. Eine Stilllegung, die so wirksam ist, dass man jedes Ei im Wildtyp des Wurms abtötet, wenn man ein essenzielles Wurmgen als Target nimmt. Man kann zum Beispiel ein für die Embryogenese erforderliches Gen ausschalten, indem man dieses Tier mit Bakterien füttert, die die Doppelstrang-RNA exprimierten. Sie fressen die Bakterien, sie schalten das Gen aus, keines der Eier wird reif. Also überlegte sich Hiroaki eine sehr einfache Untersuchung, bei der er einfach nach Tieren Ausschau hielt, die nach zwei Generationen lebensfähige Nachkommen hatten, und dadurch fand er jede Menge interessanter Gene, die am RNAi-Mechanismus beteiligt sind. Ich mache jetzt einen großen Sprung, denn ich weiß, ich habe heute nicht so viel Zeit, und erzähle Ihnen von dem Polizisten. Das Polizistengen war – zufällig – das erste Gen, das Hiroaki identifizierte. Er nannte es RNA Deficient Gen Nr. 1 oder RDE-1. Und es wird jetzt Argonaut genannt, nach dem ersten Pflanzengen aus dieser Familie, das als Entwicklungsdefekt in Pflanzen identifiziert wurde. Das Enzym wird hier in seiner Proteinstruktur, Kristallstruktur, die 2004 von Leemor Joshua-Tor und Ji-Joon Song hergestellt wurde, in grau dargestellt. Was Sie hier sehen, ist die Guide-RNA, die Silencing-RNA und die Messenger-RNA-Basenpaarung innerhalb dieser Einbuchtung des Enzyms. Der Vorgang der Basenpaarung, der hier stattfindet, drückt die mRNA gegen das katalytische Zentrum. Diese Domäne kodiert eine der RNase H verwandte Falte, die dann die mRNA abspaltet. Diese wird dann entsorgt und die siRNA darf weitermachen und weitere Gene stilllegen. Wir nennen diese short interfering RNA oder siRNA. Sie kann mehrere Reaktionen wie diese katalysieren. Das Lustige an diesem RNAi-Bereich ist, dass die Leute, die sich damit beschäftigen, offensichtlich zu viel fernsehen, insbesondere das Spätabendprogramm. Wahrscheinlich laufen spät abends, wenn sie vom Labor nach Hause kommen, nur diese Sendungen mit viel Werbung für so Dinge wie das Ginsu-Messer. Denn wir haben das vorgeschaltete Enzym Dicer genannt und dieser hier Slicer, es schneidet also in Würfel und Scheibchen. Und wenn Sie aus Amerika sind, dann haben Sie diese Werbung gesehen, in der man Ihnen dieses Messer verkauft, das auf alle erdenklichen Arten schneidet. Komisch an dieser Werbung ist aber, dass sie immer endet – wenn Sie gerade vorhaben, das Messer zu kaufen, sagen sie immer, dass dazu noch mehr gehört, dann versuchen sie, Ihnen die Steakmesser zu verkaufen, die dazu gehören. Und so in etwa ist das auch mit der RNAi. Immer, wenn Sie denken, dass es nicht noch toller werden kann, geschieht etwas sehr, sehr Interessantes und so in der Art war es. Wir klonten RDE-1 1999. Und für Andy und mich war das ein euphorischer Moment. Davor war die Tatsache, dass Doppelstrang-RNA Gensilencing auslösen könnte nur Phänomenologie. Sie war interessant, aber wir waren nicht sicher, ob es konserviert sein würde oder einfach nur eine Wurmgeschichte war oder ob andere Tiere dieselbe Art von Reaktion zeigen würden. Aber als wir RDE-1 klonten, fanden wir heraus, dass es ein stark konserviertes Gen mit vielen Homologen war. Und das ist einfach die Ahnentafel der RDE-1-verwandten Proteine in den verschiedenen Tieren. Das sind also Wurm-Homologe hier in rot, das sind andere Wurm-Homologe da drüben und weitere Wurm-Homologe dort. Nun, es stellte sich heraus, dass Menschen acht Kopien des RDE-1-Gens haben, hier sind vier und dort drüben sind vier menschliche Gene. Wenn Sie das hier betrachten, sehen Sie, dass die schwarze Gruppe der Argonautenproteine der älteste Zweig der Familie ist. Diese weisen sogar Pflanzen-Homologe in dieser Region dort drüben auf. Aber es gibt Tiere – beinahe alle vielzelligen Tiere haben zwei Familien: diese hier und diese hier, die wir als die Piwi-Familie der Argonautenproteine bezeichnen. Die gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen hatten also zumindest bereits zwei Argonautengene. Als wir RDE-1 klonten erhielten wir aufgrund der Genomsequenzen all diese anderen Informationen. Und das ist das Wunderbare und die Macht dieses genomischen Zeitalters, in dem wir uns befinden. Man klont ein Gen in einem Modellorganismus wie C.elegans und plötzlich hat man alle Gene in allen Organismen, die jemals sequenziert wurden. Aber dies erlaubte es uns, die Frage zu stellen: Was machten alle diese stark konservierten Gene? Und daher schaltete Alla Grishok diese beiden Gene im Labor aus und analysierte den Phänotyp. Um Ihnen einen Eindruck zu vermitteln, wie spannend ihre Entdeckung war, muss ich Ihnen ein bisschen was über die Arbeit von Victor Ambros erzählen. Das lin-4-Gen hat diese sehr interessante Eigenschaft, sich zu einer haarnadelartigen Struktur zu falten. Und Victor beschrieb zwei Formen des lin-4-Produkts. Eines ist eine aus 70 Nukleotiden bestehende Vorläuferform, das diese Haarnadelform annimmt, und das andere eine aus 21 Nukleotiden bestehende RNA. Das ist also ein natürlich vorkommendes Wurmgen, von dem man herausfand, dass es ein anderes Wurmgen, lin-14 genannt, reguliert, das von Gary Ruvkuns Gruppe analysiert wurde. Zusammen fanden Victors und Garys Gruppen…, zusammen fanden Sie heraus, dass lin-4 als negativer Regulator für ein Gen, lin-14, fungiert, das komplementäre Sequenzen in seiner 3’-UTR besitzt. Das war das erste Gen, das wir jetzt als microRNAs bezeichnen, dies war die erste microRNA. Und tatsächlich bekam Victor 1994 keine Anstellung in Harvard, obwohl er das Jahr zuvor gerade diese spannende Entdeckung gemacht hatte. Alle waren überrascht. Tatsache aber ist, dass es eine starke Voreingenommenheit gab, dass dies einfach eine ungewöhnliche Sache war, die bei Würmern vorkommt, aber mit dem Menschen vielleicht gar nichts zu tun hat. Aber zwischen damals und 2000 geschah etwas. Und zwischen 1993 und 2000 hatten wir genügend menschliche DNA sequenziert, dass man – Garys Gruppe suchte und fand ein perfektes Homolog des let-7 in der Sequenz des Humangenoms. Die gesamten 21 Nukleotide im Menschen sind also identisch mit den 21 Nukleotiden im Wurm. Und tatsächlich fanden sie heraus, dass jedes vielzellige Tier ein let-7-Gen besitzt. Und auch hier scheint let-7 Ziele durch Interaktion mit der 3’-UTR zu regulieren. Aber was uns noch fehlte…, trotz der Tatsache, dass diese ungefähr dieselbe Länge aufweisen wie siRNAs, blieb die Frage: Wie hängen die Synthesewege wirklich zusammen? Ist der Syntheseweg der RNAi mit dem der microRNA verwandt oder nicht? Und Allas Ergebnis ließ zum ersten Mal vermuten, dass die beiden Synthesewege verwandt sind. Und sie konnte zeigen, dass Mutationen in Dicer und Mutationen in diesen konservierten Argonauten zu Defekten in der Synthese führen. Hier ist der Wildtyp, aber wenn Dicer oder dieser Argonaut fehlen, gibt es einen Defekt in der Synthese dieses Vorläufers und es sammelt sich weniger von dieser reifen Form im Tier an. Der RNA-Interferenzmechanismus also, der an der Genstilllegung beteiligt ist, spielt eine konservierte Rolle bei der Genregulation, bei der der Wurm doppelsträngige RNA herstellt, indem er sie einfach durch reguläre Gene kodiert, die dann in diese siRNAs umgewandelt werden und fortfahren können, ihre Ziele zu regulieren. Das war sehr spannend. Und jetzt wird es noch spannender, weil sich herausstellt, dass diese microRNAs eine wichtige, entwicklungsbezogene Rolle spielen, darunter gibt es auch einige sehr wichtige Zusammenhänge mit der Krebsbiologie beim Menschen, darunter auch Zusammenhänge, bei denen die microRNAs an der Verhinderung der Zellteilung und dem Unterdrücken von Krebs beteiligt sind, also eine Art tumorunterdrückende Rolle für die microRNA-Gene, oder es sind „chimäre“ Gene, Gene, die die Zellteilung fördern. Dies ist eine Abbildung aus dem Labor von Carlo Croce. Es stellt sich heraus, dass dies verschiedene Patientenproben sind und dies ist ein Satz von etwa 100 microRNAs des Menschen. Hier schauen sie sich das Genexpressionsprofil in verschiedenen Patientenproben auf dieser Achse an. Und sie können erkennen, dass bestimmte microRNAs in manchen Tumoren hoch reguliert und in anderen runter reguliert sind. Wie sich herausstellt, ist es durch Betrachtung dieser Profile tatsächlich möglich, Voraussagen darüber zu machen, wie ein bestimmter Tumor auf eine Behandlung ansprechen wird. Außerdem erweisen sich einige der microRNAs, bei denen man erkannt hat, dass sie mit einem onkogenen Zustand korrelieren, als potenzielle Ziele, um das Tumorwachstum zu unterdrücken. Und hier gibt es noch viel mehr. Und ich glaube, daran arbeitet das Labor noch. Ich zeige Ihnen ein paar Folien der Arbeit von Wai Fong, einem neuen Postdoc im Labor. Was Sie hier sehen ist ein Gel, und dies sind tRNAs. Wir sehen RNAs. Und wenn Sie ganz nach unten, auf den Grund des Gels schauen, dort gibt es RNA-Spezies, was alle bisher einfach für Abfall hielten. Aber wie sich herausstellt, ist das genau die Stelle, an die die microRNAs wandern, ganz hier unten, hier gibt es eine Bande, die bei diesen Mutanten fehlte, wie Wai Fong bemerkte. Das sind die RNAi-Mangelmutanten. Das hier ist Dicer, die für den Syntheseweg der microRNA erforderlich ist. Und Sie erkennen, dass diese Bande hier vorhanden ist in Dicer…, sie ist im Wildtyp vorhanden, aber sie fehlt in diesen Mutanten hier. Das sind alles Mutationen eines Gens namens DRH-3, Dicer-Related Helikase 3. Und es stellt sich heraus, dass diese siRNAs triphosphoryliert sind, wohingegen Dicer, wenn sie diese RNA schneidet, aufgrund ihrer enzymatischen Wirkung ein Monophosphat am Ende erzeugt. Triphosphate würden von einer Polymerase hinterlassen und wir glauben, dass diese siRNAs die Produkte einer Polymerase sind. Diese Spezies hier, die microRNAs sind da, aber es gibt auch eine andere Spezies kleiner RNA mit irgendeiner 3'-Modifikation und wir sind noch dabei, diese zu analysieren. Hier sehen Sie ein Beispiel dafür, das sind was wir natürliche endogene kleine RNAs nennen. Sie unterscheiden sich von microRNAs dahingehend, dass sie nicht durch eine haarnadelartige Struktur codiert sind. Das ist ein Gen namens K02. Im Wildtyp ist die mRNA für dieses Gen in geringer Konzentration vorhanden und es gibt eine Menge siRNA in Tieren des Wildtyps. In den von Wai Fong analysierten Mutanten wird die Messenger-RNA jetzt in höherer Konzentration exprimiert und die siRNA ist verschwunden. Das sind also natürlich vorkommende Silencing-RNAs, die auf eines der wurmeigenen Gene abzielen, und wir wissen nicht warum. Also hat Wai Fong eine Strategie entwickelt, um diese zu sequenzieren. Das ist nur ein Beispiel dafür, aus Wai Fongs Sequenzierungsdaten, wie eine Karte dieser siRNAs aussieht. Wir beginnen gerade damit, mit einem sehr hohen Durchsatz zu sequenzieren. Kleine RNAs aus dem gesamten Genom des Wurms, um zu versuchen herauszufinden, auf welche Gene diese natürlichen Silencing-RNAs abzielen. Sie sehen, dass dieses bestimmte Gen mit diesem langen Namen hier wahrscheinlich Hunderte – oder Tausende siRNAs in jeder Zelle hat, die auf das ganze Gen abzielen. Und wir wissen nicht, wie diese generiert werden oder warum es sie gibt und wie sie im Tier funktionieren. Wir wissen jedoch, dass aus den rund 6.000 siRNAs dieses Typs, die wir analysiert haben, wir bereits 3.000 verschiedene Gene ausmachen konnten. In den Proben, die wir bisher analysiert haben, bilden die meisten Gene nur für wenige siRNAs ein Ziel. Daher glauben wir, dass sich dies als sehr wichtiger Regulationsmechanismus für die Gene im Wurm erweisen wird. Ist das also eine weitere Wurmsache oder nicht? Nun, das ist eine Maus und dies basiert – wir haben dieses Experiment gerade selbst in unserem Labor durchgeführt. Aber letztes Jahr gab es drei oder vier Artikel über etwas, das als piRNAs bezeichnet wird. Diese gibt es zuhauf in der Maus und die piRNAs sind eigentlich siRNAs mit 30 Nukleotiden, sie sind also länger als 21. Sie sind 30 Nukleotide lang. Sie kommen so häufig vor, dass sie ein leuchtendes Signal in mit Ethydiumbromid gefärbtem Gel bilden. Es ist erstaunlich, dass niemand sie je zuvor bemerkt hat. Wie sich herausstellt, interagieren sie jedoch mit der Piwi-Klasse, Argonauten. Darum werden sie piRNAs genannt. Und ihre Funktionen werden noch erforscht. Sie scheinen eine Rolle bei der Transposon-Suppression zu spielen, aber sie können auch noch eine grundlegendere Rolle bei der Genregulation spielen. Sie können sie wahrscheinlich kaum erkennen, aber das ist die Bande, die Wai Fong analysiert hat. Und es gibt Banden hier in der Maus, die eine ähnliche Intensität aufweisen. Es gibt also noch jede Menge zu erforschen darüber, wie diese kleinen RNAs die Entwicklung regulieren. Und ich komme jetzt am Ende meines Vortrags zurück auf dieses Konzept, wie die RNAs mit der DNA interagieren. Hier ist die Doppelstrang-DNA. Der Grund, warum ich diese Folie zeige, ist, mit der Entdeckung der DNA wurden die Molekularbiologen, glaube ich, ein wenig übermütig. Wir dachten, wir hätten herausgefunden, wie das Leben funktioniert, wir dachten, wir würden verstehen, wie Informationen in uns selbst gespeichert werden. Die DNA erklärt eine Menge, sie kann die mendelsche Aufteilung von Merkmalen erklären. Und sie kann erklären, wie genetisches Material repliziert wird und wie Mutationen entstehen können. Sie ist also ein sehr mächtiges Paradebeispiel, aber ich glaube, sie hat uns zu zuversichtlich gemacht. Und ich glaube, RNAi bringt uns ein bisschen zurück auf den Boden der Tatsachen. DNA sieht in der Zelle gar nicht so aus wie hier, sie ist eingehüllt und in diese Strukturen höherer Ordnung gefaltet. Das ist eine 30-nm-Faser, dies sind die Nukleosome und hier sehen Sie ein Kristallstrukturmodell, das die Histonproteine innen drinnen und die darum gewickelte DNA zeigt. Das hier ist eine andere Abbildung, in der die DNA ungefähr zwei Mal herumgeht. Und diese kleinen Schwänze ragen aus den Histonen hervor, und diese Schwänze, wie Sie vielleicht wissen, bilden die Ziele für viele Arten der Regulation. Sie können eine Rolle bei der Aktivierung oder Unterdrückung der Transkription der um diese Nukleosomen gewickelten DNA spielen. Und diese Information, die aus Proteinen stammt, die diese Schwänze modifizieren, ist für mich sehr interessant, denn es sieht so aus, als könnten siRNAs diese Modifikationen steuern, indem Sie remodellierende Komplexe und Proteine zum Chromatin bringen, die diese Änderungen am Histonschwanz erkennen. Aufgrund dieser Art der Interaktion zwischen dem Chromatin und der RNA kann man sich die DNA mehr wie die Hardware eines Computers vorstellen. Und die Proteine und die RNA, die regulieren, die mit diesen Histonschwänzen interagieren, sind wie die Software. Die Analogie, auf die ich gerne hinweise, ist die, dass wir uns für differenziert halten, richtig? Wir alle haben dasselbe Genom in jeder Zelle, aber Zellen verhalten sich unterschiedlich. Nun, warum verhalten sie sich unterschiedlich? Sie verhalten sich unterschiedlich, weil die DNA…, verschiedene Gene sind angeschaltet und andere Gene sind abgeschaltet und sie sind sehr stabil an- und abgeschaltet. Und das ist der Grund warum wir stabil differenzierte Lebewesen sind. Etwas, woran ich im Moment sehr interessiert bin, ist ein Konzept, für das wir gerade überlegen, wie es ich im Labor testen lässt, nämlich dass die Keimbahn selbst differenzieren kann, und dass dieser Differenzierungsprozess es der Keimbahn gestattet, sich ohne Änderung der zugrundeliegenden Nukleotidsequenz zu entwickeln. Man könnte sich also vererbbare Änderungen auf dieser Ebene vorstellen, die durch die Interaktionen mit siRNAs über viele Generationen beibehalten werden. Wenn Sie zurückschauen auf die Geschichte, wie man vor der DNA über die Evolution gedacht hat Leider haben wir alle ein zu großes Faible für Jargon, daher war sein Wort für Gene Biophoren. Aber er stellte sich Gene vor, die viele, viele Male pro Zellteilung repliziert werden konnten, nicht nur ein Mal. Und sie konnten ungleichmäßig auf die Zellen aufgeteilt werden. Er dachte, so ließen sich Differenzierung und Entwicklung erklären. Und er brachte dieses Konzept der Biophoren auf, das nach Mendels Entdeckungen verworfen wurde. Wenn Sie aber Weismanns Theorie lesen und überall dort, wo er das Wort Biophore verwendete, Biophore durch siRNA ersetzen, funktioniert seine Theorie wunderbar. Daher glaube ich, wir müssen einen Schritt zurückgehen und erneut über Evolution und Entwicklung nachdenken. Darwin ging noch weiter als Weismann und brachte das Wort „Gemmules“ in Umlauf. Und diese waren in der Lage, die somatischen Zellen zu verlassen und in die Keimbahn einzudringen und dort erbliche Änderungen hervorzurufen, die… ich sehe Hans aufstehen, das ist ein schlechtes Zeichen. Daher fasse ich mich kurz. Aber RNA könnte sein, RNAi, vielleicht sollten wir diese in RNA-Information umbenennen, denn die RNA kann die Regulation der DNA steuern. Nun, hier ist Hans. Ich bitte ihn, mich jederzeit anzurufen. Er ist übrigens derjenige, der den Anruf macht. Also seien Sie nett zu ihm. Hier sind Andy und seine Frau Rachel. Das ist die Klasse von 2006, das sind John Mather und George Smoot dort drüben, Orhan Pamuk, Rodger Kornberg, Ed Phelps, Muhammad Yunus und ein Vertreter der Grameen Bank. Das ist nur ein Familienfoto mit meiner Tochter Melissa und Victoria, die auch hier auf der Veranstaltung sind. Hier ist meine Frau, und sie erhält ein paar Ratschläge über Ökonomie auf dem Bankett. Und hier gibt sie selbst ein paar Ratschläge. Während des Banketts nannte Ed meine Frau eine Kommunistin – sie wuchs in Ungarn auf. Und hier ist George, der mir den Urknall erklärt. Und Sie erkennen, dass ich diesen glasigen Ausdruck im Gesicht habe, denn, wissen Sie, ich denke, das ist eine nette Geschichte, aber glauben Sie mir, es gibt in dieser Geschichte noch eine Menge Geheimnisse. Und hier ist Victoria, die ein paar Goldmedaillen einsammelt, das sind sehr nette Goldmedaillen, denn da drinnen ist Schokolade. Und hier ist Vickie, wie sie mit mir tanzt, es war eine tolle Zeit dort. Das ist die Gefahr einer dieser Preise, Sie können sehen, wie ich für einen Vorsitz am Nobelmuseum unterzeichne, und Sie können erkennen, was mit meinem Körper geschehen ist, mein Kopf ist riesig und mein Körper ist sehr klein ausgefallen. Das ist also eine der Gefahren. Aber, und ich sage Ihnen, es gibt ein echtes Gegenmittel dagegen, und ich ende einfach mit dieser Folie, das ist Tara Bean, 1998, das ist ihr Bild. Bei ihr wurde ein Gehirntumor im dritten Stadium festgestellt aufgrund der Sehstörungen, die sie entwickelte. Sie wuchs in meiner Heimatstadt auf, wir kennen ihre Familie, und sie wurde in dem Krankenhaus untersucht, in dem ich arbeite. Leider verlor sie ihren Kampf gegen den Krebs. Seit ihrem Tod haben wir eine Menge über die grundlegenden Mechanismen von Krebs gelernt. Wir müssen noch sehr viel mehr lernen. Wir arbeiten an einer Menge äußerst spannender Themen und es vergeht nicht ein Tag, sogar hier auf dieser Veranstaltung, an dem ich nicht irgendeine E-Mail von jemandem bekomme, der sich um einen kranken Angehörigen sorgt, jemand, der glaubt, dass ihm RNAi vielleicht helfen könnte. Und leider lautet die Antwort immer noch, dass solche Heilbehandlungen vielleicht noch Jahre brauchen und sehr schwierig sind. Daher müssen wir zurück an die Arbeit, sobald die Veranstaltung vorbei ist, jeder muss zurück an die Arbeit und versuchen, neue Wege der Heilbehandlung zu finden. Und ich glaube, ich mache hier Schluss. Tut mir leid, ich brauche immer länger. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank, Craig, das war ein wunderbarer Vortrag und wir lernen auch noch für die Zukunft. Ich fühlte mich wie ein schlechter Junge, hier hochzukommen und Dich zu unterbrechen. Aber da wir gesagt haben, wir wollten einige Fragen zulassen und andere Vorträge verlängern, dachte ich, das sollten wir auch tun. So, dieser Vortrag ist jetzt für Fragen geöffnet. Ich habe Ihre Hand zuerst gesehen. Mir wurde ein Mikrophon versprochen. Ja, sie hat eines. FRAGE. Ich heiße … (inaudible 50:05). Ich bin ein Arzt aus Pakistan. Sie sagten, dass RNAi die chromosomale Eliminierung von DNA bewirken kann. Ist es daher eine mögliche Therapie, Bakterien oder Viren, die doppelsträngige RNA exprimieren, zu injizieren, um die an der Pathophysiologie von Zellen in Tumoren oder Krebs beim Menschen oder bei Mausmodellen beteiligten Gene stillzulegen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, potenziell. Aber diese Silencing-Versuche, die beim Menschen jetzt gerade durchgeführt werden, zielen nicht darauf ab, die dem Zielgen entsprechende DNA zu eliminieren. Man kann mithilfe der RNAi ein teilweises Abschalten der Genexpression eines Gens in einer menschlichen Zelle erreichen. Und das wird gerade als therapeutische Strategie von vielen verschiedenen Firmen auf der Welt entwickelt. Und es werden sogar gerade einige klinische Studien am Menschen für mehrere verschiedene Indikationen durchgeführt. Es sieht daher so aus, als könne das ein zukunftsfähiger Ansatz sein, aber ob man je in der Lage sein wird, tatsächlich die Eliminierung eines Gens bei einem Patienten zu bewirken, weiß ich nicht, und in vielen Fällen möchte man das sicher auch gar nicht. Das ist also wahrscheinlich nicht möglich. Fragen? HANS JÖRNVALL. Ich habe eine andere Hand ganz in der Nähe gesehen und eine Hand dort drüben. FRAGE. Das ist wirklich erstaunlich und ich bin wirklich sensibilisiert. Aber zu Beginn Ihres Vortrags haben Sie auf die Bedeutung der Politik in der Wissenschaft hingewiesen und ich möchte Ihnen da vollkommen zustimmen. Ich habe auch festgestellt, dass es ein langer Weg bis zu dem war, was Sie heute vorgestellt haben. Und ich würde gerne von Ihnen hören, wie viel das kostet, denn ich interessiere mich sehr für die wirtschaftlichen Aspekte und dies alles muss ein Vermögen gekostet haben. Und ich weiß, dass die Bush-Regierung die Afrika-Forschung stark eingeschränkt hat, weil sie fand, wir sollten keine Geld für die Forschung verschwenden, sondern uns um die Armut kümmern. Und einige von uns haben das Gefühl, dass Forschung ein anderer Weg aus der Armut ist. Aus Ihrer Erfahrung, was würden Sie zu dieser Bemerkung sagen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, ich bin nicht sicher, ob ich Ihre Frage ganz verstanden habe. Aber lassen Sie mich einfach sagen, dass die Arzneimittel, die Sie aus RNAi gewinnen können, unter Verwendung von RNAi als Arzneimittel, so teuer und so stark auf den Einzelnen zugeschnitten sein werden, dass sie eine Menge Potenzial haben. Aber ich bezweifle sehr, dass sie zu mehr als einem paar Prozent der Weltbevölkerung durchdringen werden. Die leicht zu liefernden Arzneimittel sind Pillen. Und wenn man oral zu verabreichende kleine Moleküle entwickeln kann, dann kann man die Arznei wirklich kostengünstig in den Patienten bringen. RNAi dient dazu, neue Synthesewege erkennen zu helfen usw., um neue behandelbare Ziele zu finden. Aber RNAi als Arzneimittel wird sehr schwer als Therapie in die Dritte Welt zu bringen sein, denn sie muss injiziert werden. Das ist also ein wenig schwieriger. Ich glaube, das ist tatsächlich eines der Dinge, die wir lösen müssen. Wir können eine Menge Zeit damit verbringen, Krankheiten zu heilen, die nie zuvor geheilt wurden. Aber in großen Teilen der Welt sind die Krankheiten – da geht es einfach um Mangelernährung und Durchfall, wodurch viele Menschen sterben, oder Malaria oder eine andere bekannte Krankheit, die behandelbar wäre. Und die Medikamente fehlen dort aufgrund von politischer Instabilität oder Infrastrukturproblemen. Das sind die Dinge, für die, wie ich glaube, eine interdisziplinäre Anstrengung erforderlich ist, um zu versuchen sie zu lösen. Medizin…, wir können diesen Weg hin zu immer komplexerer, immer spezialisierterer Medizin weitergehen, ohne die Menschheit soweit voranzubringen wie wir könnten, wenn wir etwas Zeit investieren würden, um zu helfen,.. Ich glaube, das beantwortet in etwa Ihre Frage. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank. Und dann waren Sie dran, ja. FRAGE. Hi, ich bin Shawn aus … (inaudible 54:16) UK. Ich habe eine Frage zum Aspekt der Systembiologie. Ich habe viel über dieses Problem nachgedacht, wie die Zelle in Bezeug auf die Systembiologie entscheidet, welchen Teil der kleinen RNA man nehmen sollte. Bei einer viralen Antwort etwa gibt es mRNAs oder saRNA-Mechanismen. In Bezug auf das Wandzellkonzept, wie würde die Zelle den Mechanismus für die RNA-Abwehr auswählen? CRAIG MELLO. Ich habe keine Ahnung. Das ist eine sehr interessante Frage. Aber wissen Sie, die Regulation dieser Mechanismen ist etwas, das einfach noch nicht vollständig erforscht wurde. Wir wissen nicht, wie microRNAs wirklich funktionieren und wie sie ihre Ziele regulieren. Wir wissen nicht einmal, wie sie – vermutlich, weil sie verschiedene Methoden der Stilllegung haben – wissen wir nicht, welche sie – wie sie auswählen, wie, um das Gen entweder zu spalten oder um es einfach abzuschalten oder um es auf einen Lagerplatz zu senden. Es gibt eine Menge Möglichkeiten, wissen Sie. Eines der spannenden Dinge in Bezug auf RNAi jedoch betrifft die eukaryotische Zelle. Ich glaube, sie bildet einen Mechanismus, um Transkription und Translation zu verbinden, sodass die Zelle, während sie eine Botschaft transkribiert, diese zum Lagern und zur späteren Verwendung markieren kann. Ein Konzept, dass es der Zelle erlauben würde, eine zur späteren Verwendung gekennzeichnete Botschaft trotz vorhandener Kernmembran zu exportieren. Und das ist ein wirklich interessantes Konzept. Es gibt also jede Menge interessanter Möglichkeiten zur Regulation. Ich glaube, es wird Jahre dauern, die alle im Einzelnen zu erforschen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Weitere Fragen? Ich habe Ihre Hand gesehen und dann Ihre Hand. CRAIG MELLO. Ich glaube, Hans kann nicht weiter sehen als bis zu… HANS JÖRNVALL. Na danke. Ich habe nicht Deinen Weitblick. FRAGE. Ich heiße Matthew Albert und bin von INSERM in Frankreich. Ich interessiere mich für doppelsträngige RNA und Einzelstrang-RNA mit 5'-Triphosphaten. Sie sind als Adjuvantien in der Immunologie bekannt und senden ihre Signale durch Pattern-Recognition-Moleküle wie Toll-like Rezeptoren und interzelluläre Helikasen. Ich war neugierig zu erfahren, ob Würmer ähnliche Mechanismen für die Aktivierung des Immunsystems besitzen. Und wie Sie sich vorstellen, wie auf verschiedene Weise zwischen Zell- und Virus-RNA unterschieden werden kann, um anomale Immunreaktionen zu verhindern. Das ist eine großartige Frage. Und wirklich ist die Dicer-Related-Helikase, die ich genannt hatte, ein Homolog von RIG-I, MDA-5 und LGP-2, die alle zur Dicer-Familie der Helikasen gehören. Das ist unsere Bezeichnung für sie, Dicer-Related-Helikasen. Das Faszinierende daran aber ist, dass diese alle an der angeborenen Immunantwort des Menschen, der anti-viralen Antwort, beteiligt sind. Und kürzlich wurde die Dicer-Related-Helikase, menschliche Versionen davon, mit der Erkennung von triphosphorylierter, nicht siRNAs, sondern der viralen Produkte, die triphosphoryliert sind, in Zusammenhang gebracht. Es gibt also wirklich eine Homologie zwischen den anti-viralen Mechanismen beim Menschen und den RNAi-Mechanismen beim Wurm. Die Würmer haben sich eine sehr wirksame sequenzspezifische Antwort erhalten. Der Mensch hat diese Antwort entweder verloren oder sie ist sehr viel weniger wichtig oder es gibt sie nur bei bestimmten Zelltypen, wir wissen nicht, was davon zutrifft. Wenn die menschliche Zelle einen viralen Vorgang erkennt, begeht sie Selbstmord, und ein- und dieselben Rezeptoren sind sowohl an der Erkennung der viralen Replikationsprodukte als auch an der Aktivierung eines apoptotischen Signalwegs beteiligt. Das ist ein sehr effizienter Weg, einen Virus loszuwerden, wenn man über 10 Billionen Zellen verfügt, aber wenn man nur 1.000 hat, bringt man die Zellen besser nicht um. Daher sind die Würmer vielleicht sehr gut in Bezug auf den sequenzspezifischen Aspekt von antiviral oder Stilllegen. Die Homologie und die Ähnlichkeiten zwischen diesen Mechanismen sind faszinierend, und tatsächlich stellt sich heraus, dass LGP-2 der drei menschlichen Mitglieder dieser Familie mit Dicer und einem anderen Protein interagiert, das wir beim Wurm gefunden und pure 1 genannt haben. Es ist eine Phosphatase, die Triphosphate erkennt und zwei davon entfernt, um ein Monophosphat zu erzeugen. Es gibt einen Komplex beim Menschen, der anscheinend aus zumindest diesen drei Proteinen besteht. Daher glauben wir, dass die menschliche Zelle diesen Mechanismus auch haben könnte. Und wir sind noch dabei, herauszufinden, wie der Mensch das mit der sequenzspezifischen Stilllegung anstellt. HANS JÖRNVALL. Dann habe ich es Ihnen versprochen. Und danach gehen wir weiter weg. FRAGE. Ich heiße…(inaudible 59:16). Ich komme aus Indien. Was ich wissen wollte ist, ob Sie RNA-Interferenz bei der Heilung von Krebs oder dem Kampf gegen den Krebs verwenden. Gibt es einen Mechanismus oder gibt es eine Methode, RNA zellspezifisch zu machen, um die Mitose bei Krebszellen zu unterdrücken? Gibt es eine Möglichkeit, nur die Zellen dort drinnen anzusteuern? Denn der Mechanismus der Mitose ist bei normalen Zellen und bei Krebszellen der gleiche. CRAIG MELLO. Richtig, Krebs ist eine große Herausforderung für ein RNAi-Therapeutikum. Und ein sehr wichtiger Aspekt wäre offensichtlich, es spezifisch in den Tumor einzubringen, denn wenn man versucht, einzugreifen, sagen wir bei der Mitose, würde man die gesunden Zellen ebenfalls töten. Es ist das gleiche Problem wie bei vielen Krebstherapien. Das ist also auch ein Problem, das noch nicht gelöst wurde. Aber eines, an dem Leute arbeiten. Es gibt mögliche Lösungen, aber ich kann Ihnen im Moment keine nennen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Könnten wir das Mikrofon vielleicht hier rüber bekommen? FRAGE. Würmer reagieren außerordentlich sensibel auf RNAi. Ich meine, sie nehmen sie sogar über ihre Nahrung auf. Welche evolutionären Vorteile hat die Entwicklung einer solchen Sensitivität Ihrer Meinung nach? Ich meine, wenn man bedenkt, dass es diese bei anderen Organismen nicht gibt. CRAIG MELLO. Warum sind sie so empfindlich, dass sie sie sogar über ihr Nahrung übertragen können? Das ist sehr interessant. Wissen Sie, diese Würmer sind Hermaphroditen, sie sind auch zur Befruchtung in der Lage, Fremdbefruchtung durch männliche Tiere. Aber sie kolonisieren Nahrung im Boden, sehr häufig findet ein einzelner Wurm die Nahrung und muss dann die Nahrungsquelle ohne einen Partner besiedeln. Daher befruchten sie sich selbst und erzeugen Tausende und Millionen von Nachkommen. Wenn Sie anfangen zu hungern, machen sie etwas sehr Interessantes: Diese Mütter sind sehr altruistisch, sie behalten ihre Eier auch, wenn sie hungern und sie gestatten den Eiern, in ihnen drinnen zu reifen. Auf diese Art reifen die Nachkommen in der Gegenwart einer reichen Nahrungsquelle heran, der Mutter. Und dann fressen sie die Mutter, sie erreichen ein Alter, in dem sie alt genug sind, zu einer Dauer-Larve zu werden, einer sehr resistenten Form, und sie können im Boden davon wandern, um neue Nahrungsquellen zu finden. Das interessante daran ist, dass, wenn ein Tier hungert und seinen Nachkommen gestattet, es selbst zu fressen…, es hat vielleicht zu Lebzeiten Immunität gegen Viren entwickelt, die dann über die Nahrungsaufnahme an die Nachkommen weitergegeben werden kann. Das ist eine Erklärung, die mir jetzt einfach so einfällt, so eine Art umfassende Idee. Aber ich glaube, es ist möglich, dass – aufgrund der Art, wie sie leben, möchten sie bestimmt in der Lage sein, diese Silencing-Aktivitäten an ihre Nachkommen weiterzugeben. Ein etwas peinlicher Aspekt des Ganzen ist, dass Forscher, die sich mit C.elegans beschäftigen noch nicht einen einzigen Virus aus ihnen isoliert haben. Daher kennen wir keinen Virus, den wir verwenden könnten, um dieses Modell, na sagen wir, zu testen. Es gibt keine viralen, existierenden viralen Beispiele von Nematoden. Vielleicht sind sie einfach so gut darin, sie auszuschalten. Wahrscheinlich ist es einfach keine stabile Interaktion im Labor. Daher verlieren wir sie sehr schnell. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank. Ich dachte gerade, ich sollte sagen, dass wir hier aufhören. Aber noch eine letzte Frage für Sie. CRAIG MELLO. Sie können sie rufen. Ich werde sie hören. FRAGE. Sie betrifft die Verwendung von siRNA und Therapie: Gibt es kein Problem zwischen der hohen Spezifizität von siRNA und den Abweichungen in den Allelen bei defekten Genen? Zum Beispiel bei der Verwendung von shRNA zur Bekämpfung von AIDS, es gibt eine Menge HIV-Mutanten. So, wie könnten Sie sich das vorstellen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, man könnte zelluläre Gene als Target verwenden, die weniger zu Mutationen neigen, das ist eine Strategie. Und natürlich könnte man eine siRNA konstruieren, die an der Region des Genoms ansetzt, die aus irgendwelchen Gründen nicht sehr häufig mutiert. Und diese Strategien werden versucht. Ich glaube, es läuft gerade eine HIV-Studie, bei der Silencing-RNA mittels Gentherapie eingebracht wird. In den USA ist das entweder schon genehmigt oder wird es in Kürze werden. Man versucht es also mit diesem Ansatz sogar bei HIV. Aber normalerweise gibt es nicht so viele Abweichungen bei den Allelen, daher kann man sich eine Region aussuchen. Jedenfalls nicht bei normalen Genen. Bei viralen Genen – ja, da schon. Aber bei den normalen zellulären Genen gibt es weniger Variabilität. Daher kann man eine siRNA wählen, die auf eine konservierte Region abzielt. Interessanterweise kann man, im Falle einer dominanten Mutation zum Beispiel, die zu einem veränderten Phänotyp führt, seine siRNA sogar so konstruieren, dass sie nur auf das mutierte Allel abzielt. Und das geschieht mit einiger Selektivität, man kann spezifisch das mutierte Allel ausschalten, indem man die siRNA entsprechend konstruiert. So dass sie das Wildtyp-Allel nicht spaltet, nur das mutierte. Es gibt also noch jede Menge Möglichkeiten, RNAi als Therapeutikum einzusetzen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank.

Craig Mello on the usefulness of the worm as a model organism
(00:09:01 - 00:15:57)

 

Later in his lecture, he talks more specifically about how C. elegans was used to study RNAi and to discover genes encoding the RNAi machinery:

 

Craig Mello (2007) - RNAi and development in C. elegans

I think we should try to start, it is nine o’clock and I wish you all welcome to the start of the lectures for this year. The first session has already an alteration because Sir John who was supposed to be the third speaker could not come. For that reason we have made the following decision. The three remaining lectures will each one be extended by about five minutes. In addition after the first lecture we will try an experiment and do questions from the audience. And with these questions and the elongations of each of the talks we will be back in normal time again. We don’t have questions after all talks but since the first talk is by the freshest Nobel laureate, from last year, we decided that we do it after the first talk. And then also the coffee break will be after the first talk and this question round. So we will have coffee between 10.05 and 10.40. And we therefore restart ten minutes early to allow for the extension also to the second and third speaker. With these words we are then ready to start. The first speaker is Professor Craig Mello from the University of Massachusetts, the Medical School in Worcester, USA. And he got the award, as I just said, last year. He got it “for their discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by double-stranded RNA”. Please, Professor Mello. Thank you. Thank you, thank you Hans. So it’s a pleasure and a real great honor to be here. I look forward to having an opportunity to have many conversations and discussions with everyone here during the course of the next few days. So let me go ahead and I’ll get started. I’ve sort of retitled my talk. RNAi, rethinking gene regulation, evolution and medicine, or how a worm won five Nobel Prizes in medicine. I’m going to go ahead and start my talk with a sort of an unusual first slide here. I don’t know if you—can we have the lights down a little bit. This is Dick Cheney and I at the White House. When you win a prize like this one of the special benefits is you get to go meet leaders of your country or people around the world who have important roles in politics. Can I have the lights down on the stage. I think it’s too light. Can you see that alright. You can see I’m not standing too close to him. His approval rating right now in the US is about 7%, he’s the Vice President, but a lot of people think he’s the smart one. But the important thing and one of the reasons I show this is, it’s very important to vote and get involved in politics, you know, no matter whether you voted for him or not. Now if you can’t vote in your country and some of you probably can’t, it’s certainly important to educate everyone that you talk to, educate people about what’s going on in the world, talk to people, it’s very important. And one of the issues that I think is important for us to discuss here is whether it might be wise in the future to always have the Lindau meetings be interdisciplinary. Because I think one of the things that’s happening to science is, it is already very interdisciplinary. Biomedicine for example is very dependent on physics and chemistry, I think. But also political issues are very important. So I think it’s important to have a very interdisciplinary focus at the university as well as in settings like this to try to get that dialogue going. I went to Washington DC, hoping to be able to tell the Bush administration how important RNA interference is as a technology and how well it fits with the genome sequencing project, which together are really changing, along with other great technologies, the way that we do and practice medicine. And opening many opportunities for new types of medicine, linking human disease with genetics. Unfortunately all we did was have a very brief meeting in the White House and shake hands. I wanted to tell them that RNAi was discovered under their administration, that the genome sequence was finished under this administration. And I think I will still go back and talk to them again if they’ll listen. But you know, fortunately we had a change in the Senate, in the House recently in the US and things politically are definitely changing. This is Ed Kennedy and I together at a congressional visit that we had recently. There’s a lot of hope I think that the US will turn things around in the near future. And begin investing in science more broadly again. Right now, if you don’t know, the US is really very tight with funding for medical research. Now I’d like to show this slide, this is Andrew Fire and I, for several reasons. First of all, if it wasn’t for Andy, I wouldn’t be here today. He’s a tremendous colleague and a great friend and we worked together on our science, we didn’t compete. In fact, our collaboration began back in the late ‘80s. We focused at that time on delivering DNA into the organism, that we both love and work on, a very tiny worm. I’ll show you a picture of it in the next slide. But the worm is so small, it’s about the size of a comma on a printed page. And so, to inject the DNA into the animal, Andy and I had to work out ways of inserting the needle into this tiny animal under the microscope. And it was something that had never been done, of course. So working together—actually we worked independently at first—but once we got to know each other we began sharing ideas. Because it was very difficult breaking in this new technology and figuring out how to handle this very tiny animal and inject efficiently into the animal. Together we described a transformation procedure for delivering DNA that worked very, very well. And really, it was a lot of fun to work with Andy. And the other reason I like this slide is because we’re not—what we’re doing here of course is, we’re on the stage—we’re not talking. You can see Andy’s mouth is closed and so is mine. But what we really won the prize for was for talking to each other, for sharing our ideas. And for not being afraid, for trusting each other and not being afraid of being scooped. And I think that’s something that we really need a lot more of, a lot more openness and willingness to share ideas. Thank you. Now here’s C. elegans swimming back and forth in the laboratory on a culture dish. These animals are extremely beautiful. As Sydney Brenner noted when he chose this organism to study, they’re essentially transparent. So you can look right through the animal and see all the cells inside and see all kinds of detail. The other thing that’s incredible about these animals is, they’re so simple in terms of their cellular complexity. They have only about 1000 cells compared to a human where we have 10 trillion cells. So they’re a really elegant system. But when you talk about worms to people, like let’s say my neighbors in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts where I live, they would always, you know, they’d be very polite at first. Oh, you work at a medical school, that’s nice. What do you work on. Worms. And then their eyes would sort of glaze over. Why would anyone work on a worm at a medical school. They just couldn’t get it. And then, thanks to Hans’ phone call, all of a sudden my neighbors, when I tell them I work on a worm, they actually listen to me. And I think that, if anything, that has been the most satisfying thing since October 2nd, is to be able to actually tell my neighbors about worms and evolution and have them actually listen. So why is it that worms have turned out to be so important. And yeast for that matter, have turned out to be so important to human biology and medicine. And this is something that the general public does not appreciate, especially in America. I think it’s less of a problem in Europe and Asia. So to answer that question I’m going to go all the way back to the Big Bang. And I took this slide from John Mather, who I’ve gotten to know quite well, he also shared the physics prize with George Smoot in 2006. And so when we were in Stockholm together the press was always asking us. What does your discovery have in common with your discovery. You know, they discovered the Big Bang, we discovered RNA interference. How do you connect those two. It’s quite a challenge. But what they did is, they used a satellite called COBE to map the cosmic background radiation that’s just everywhere in outer space. And this is the map that they put together. And what they noticed is that everywhere you look in outer space there’s a little bit of left over radiation. They measured the temperature in the spectrum and from that they calculated an age of 13.7 billion years ago for the Big Bang. And so the connection that we came up with, or that I think is really interesting to think about, is that life exists on a cosmic scale. Life on this planet arose about close to 4, 3.5- 3.8 billion years ago. During the time that life has been evolving on this planet, actually just since the common ancestor of plants and animals, the galaxy that we’re in has rotated about four times around its axis. Life itself is remarkable in its durability and the fact that it really does exist on a cosmic scale. So, let’s look at a little bit of the history of life. Here’s the common ancestor of worms and humans. Now on this side I’m showing the planet earth going through what’s called a snowball Earth event. And there’s geological evidence in the rocks, in the earth’s crust for glaciation events of this type where the earth was completely covered with ice all the way to the equator. And I think this is a very interesting concept from a biological standpoint because of what these kinds of events would do to the common ancestor of worms and humans. So here we are, the common ancestor, a sophisticated, really good, little organism capable of doing all kinds of things. It has Hox patterning, it has all kinds of fascinating things going on inside of it like RNA interference, working just great. But it has got a big problem. The earth itself doesn’t have any land. So, where is this little guy going to live. Either thermal vents or perhaps little cracks in the ice, in the ocean. So this kind of event actually happened twice and both times there were massive extinctions. So there was evidence for an extinction here and an extinction here. And then, right after that event, we have the biologic equivalent of the Big Bang. We have the Cambrian explosion. And there has never been an adequate explanation I don’t think from the biological side for the Cambrian explosion. But I think from the geologic side these glaciation events may provide a real compelling possible explanation where, what happened here was finally the ice melted, the earth became habitable, the land masses and the shallow seas around the land became habitable and you had this real amazing diversification of life. The rapid appearance of different animal groups including the group that gave rise to humans and the groups that gave rise to the nematodes. And in fact if you go back further, the origin of plants and animals would be down off the bottom of this page. But plants and animals all have RNAi and that is the thing that I think, I feel like even my neighbors get it. You know, even the people who don’t know anything about biology, they’re afraid that. Oh, we can’t be really related to monkeys. They actually get it. And I think that it’s partly because of the President we’ve had in the US that now people are accepting of this. But the fact is that we really are—you know, as Nietzsche said, we’ve made our way from worm to man but much within us really is still worm. And I think that’s a really important aspect of what I can do as a biologist to sort of get across that message of our common ancestry. Not only are we related to worms but everyone in this room is closely, closely related to each other. So mankind has to get over these nationalistic barriers and start thinking about each other as brothers and sisters. Now here’s what the little worms encounter sometimes in their real environment. There turns out there are hundreds of little fungi that live in the soil that will feed on worms. And they’ve even devised these little traps, like this one here in which you can see this poor nematode has been lassoed. And I’m going to show you this little movie where you can actually see this happen. These are worms that have already been captured. But watch this one here. It’s going to swim through there and it just closes right on his tail. Here, watch this one too, there’ll be another worm coming in here. This is what they’re exposed to naturally in the environment. These animals encounter all kinds of predators. And watch, they’re just closed. I don’t really know how the fungus can sense the nematode. But it has a trigger mechanism that senses the motion. And when that happens the worm gets trapped. And then the fungus sends hyphae into the animal’s body and digests it from the inside, a terrible fate. And this drama plays out every day as you’re walking to work. There are 10 to the 9 worms per cubic yard of soil. And you don’t even realize that they’re struggling to survive as every day. A lot of you have seen this movie. In fact I was talking to several of the students from China, I think everyone in China has now seen my talk. So this is my—supposed to be— my funny slide. I have to wait for CBS News to do another documentary or something on RNAi because they provide such great material. This is the CBS News 15 second explanation of how RNAi works. Watch carefully. Here’s the double-stranded RNA. Now here are the defective genes. I can see some of you didn’t see this already, I’ve shown this so many times, I love it. Many people didn’t know that defective genes look like cheese puffs. And probably you didn’t know that the RNA can actually chew. But this is why Andrew Fire and I knew that we had to work on this mechanism. It was such an exciting problem. I’ll come back to this at the end, there are some elements of this that are actually correct. And in fact, the thing that I think is really interesting is that—even though, of course the genes don’t actually look like cheese puffs—RNA can, RNAi can direct the chromosomal elimination of DNA. If you look at the Tetrahymena as an example where the RNA is guiding chromatin modifications that then are recognized by enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of the DNA and the elimination of the DNA during the process of macro nuclear formation in the Tetrahymena. The other thing about this of course is that they’ve illustrated it as an active mechanism. And I’ll come back to that in a moment. This is another movie from NOVA. So, in this case another nice little movie. This is from NOVA scienceNOW and the movie itself is 15 minutes long, so quite a bit longer than the CBS segment. It’s actually a fairly nice movie because it gets across, even for children the concept of RNA interference as a surveillance mechanism that can silence viral genes in this case. And there’s clearly some evidence that in multiple different organisms RNAi can serve that kind of function. But even my seven year old daughter doesn’t believe that there’s a cop inside of every cell, so I think this is a safe analogy or metaphor if you will. Whereas the CBS metaphor I think is a little pseudo scientific and people might actually believe that RNA can chew and that could be bad. But this one I like a lot. Now, here’s one more movie and this is from nature. This is just like the Star Wars version. We’re flying into the nucleus of the cell here and now we’re flying along the DNA. The DNA is all super coiled there. And now it’s opened up and the polymerase is going to get on here and start making a message. This is transcription occurring. This is a movie that is very useful for high school kids and lay people who aren’t familiar with basic biology. That’s the capping of the message. This is the RNA getting spliced here. Now it’s going to be transported out of the nucleus, that’s polyadenylation. And the message is going to go out, here it comes. Now, a scientist is about to inject the RNA into the cell. If you watch, you’ll see. Oh, here’s the ribosome making protein from the message. Here’s the scientist injecting the double-stranded RNA, it should be an A form helix, not that. It’s getting cut, that’s Dicer which cuts as… Now, here’s the slicer enzyme or argonaute and this will go away, it won’t chew, don’t worry. The beauty of this is it can use—this protein complex can use the sequence information here to find perfect matches. And it can do that catalytically, so it can go on and on and on and silence thousands of transcripts. It really is remarkable. But one way that I like to describe RNAi to the lay audience is. Imagine having the internet, but no way to search it, you have no search engine, no Google, no way to find anything. That’s really the way I figure your genome would be if it wasn’t for a mechanism like RNAi. RNAi uses a little search sequence, small sequence, just like you would type into the window of your Google browser to find genes or sequences, messenger RNAs or even DNA in the cell and regulate it. And the beauty of that type of mechanism is it can coordinate related—the regulation of related genes that are separated in multiple places in the genome. So, the reason we wanted to study RNAi is we noticed that it was remarkably potent. And in fact, when you inject RNA into the worm, the first thing we noticed is that the silencing effect could be inherited. So it could be transmitted via progeny that were carrying the silencing effect producing effective progeny after a full generation. And it could even be transmitted via the sperm and effect progeny after a subsequent generation. And if you keep selecting for effected progeny this silencing effect can be inherited, apparently indefinitely in C. elegans. And this is something that we’re still very interested in understanding because this long term inheritance must reflect some sort of change at the chromatin level, most likely. It’s also systemic in that the injected RNA can spread throughout the animal. So you can put RNA into the intestine for example and the silencing effect can be observed inside the germ line. So there’s a way that these RNA molecules can move from cell to cell. And that’s something we need to learn a lot more about. When we noticed these phenomena we realized that there was an active response in the animal. As I said, the movies I showed you all have some active process. Either the cop or the RNA chewing, there’s some response in the animal to the double-stranded RNA. And for example there appears to be a transport mechanism, the silencing mechanism itself and then the amplification mechanism or the inheritance mechanism. And we still don’t understand many of these steps. But when we began working on this in C. elegans, there was an obvious approach to take to try to understand these mechanisms. And that is to use genetics. The first person to do RNA interference genetics was Hiroaki Tabara in my lab. And he set up a very elegant screen back in 1997, early 1998 in which he mutagenized animals and then placed them on bacteria expressing an essential worm gene. Now the worms are so sensitive to double-stranded RNA that they can eat it in their food and experience silencing as a result. Silencing that’s so potent that if you target a worm gene that’s essential, it will kill every egg in the wild type worm. So a gene for example required for embryogenesis can be targeted by feeding this animal bacteria that expressed the double-stranded RNA. They eat the bacteria, they silence the gene, all the eggs fail to hatch. So Hiroaki set up a very simple screen where he just looks for animals after two generations where the progeny are viable and by doing so he found lots of interesting genes involved in the RNAi mechanism. And I’ll just skip way ahead because I know I don’t have a lot of time today and tell you about the cop. The cop gene was—just so happens—was the first gene that Hiroaki identified. He named it RNA deficient gene number 1 or rde-1. And it’s now called after the first plant gene that had been identified in this family as a developmental defect in plants. The enzyme is shown here in grey in its protein structure, crystal structure that was done by Leemor Joshua-Tor and Ji-Joon Song in 2004. What you can see here is the guide RNA, the silencing RNA and the messenger RNA base pairing inside this groove in the enzyme. The base pairing event that occurs here pushes the messenger RNA up against the catalytic centre. This domain encodes an RNase H related fold that then cleaves the messenger RNA. And this is then discarded and the siRNA is allowed to then go on and silence more genes. We call these short interfering RNAs or siRNAs. They can catalyze multiple reactions like this. The thing that is funny about the RNAi field is the people who work in it obviously watch too much TV, especially the late night TV. Probably when they come home from lab the only thing on late at night are those shows that have lots of commercials for things like the Ginsu knife. Because we named the enzyme that’s upstream, is called Dicer and this one is called Slicer, so it dices and it slices. And if you’re from America, you’ve seen these commercials where they’re selling you this knife that will cut all kinds of different ways. But the thing that’s funny about those commercials is they always end—when you’re about to buy the knife, they always say there’s more, then they try to sell you the steak knives that go with it. And that’s the way it’s been working on RNAi. Every time you think it can’t get any cooler than this, something really, really interesting comes along and that’s what it’s been like. So we cloned rde-1 back in 1999. And for Andy and I that was like the eureka moment for us. Before that the fact that double-stranded RNA could trigger silencing was just phenomenology. It was interesting, but we didn’t know for sure that it was conserved or if it was just a worm thing or whether other animals would have the same kind of response. But when we cloned rde-1 we found that it was a highly conserved gene with multiple homologues. And this is just the family tree of rde-1 related proteins in the different animals. So, these are worm homologues here in red, these are other worm homologues over here and more worm homologues over here. Now it turns out humans have eight copies of the rde-1 gene, there’s four here and there’s four human genes over here. So, if you look at this, what you see is the black group of argonautes are the oldest branch of the family. These even have plant homologues in this area over here. But there are animals—almost all metazoan animals have two families. this one over here and this one over here which we call the Pee-wee family of argonautes. So the common ancestor of worms and humans already had at least two argonaute genes. When we cloned rde-1, because of the genome sequences we got all of this other information. And this is the beauty and the power of this genomic era that we’re in. You clone one gene in a model system like C. elegans and all of a sudden you have all the genes in all the organisms that have ever been sequenced. But this allowed us to ask the question. What did these highly conserved genes do. And so Alla Grishok in the lab knocked out these two genes and then analyzed the phenotype. To give you an idea of how exciting her discovery was, I have to tell you a little bit about Victor Ambros’ work. In 1993 Victor published a paper describing a little gene lin-4. The lin-4 gene had this very interesting nature in that it folds into a hairpin-like structure. And Victor described two forms of the lin-4 product. One is a 70 nucleotide precursor form that’s in this hairpin shape and the other is a 21 nucleotide RNA. So this is a naturally occurring worm gene, identified as a gene that regulates another worm gene called lin-14 that was analyzed by Gary Ruvkun’s group. Together Victor and Gary’s groups, together they worked out that lin-4 is a negative regulator of a gene, lin-14 that has complementary sites in its three prime UTR. This was the first gene which we now refer to as microRNAs, this was the first microRNA. In 1993 it was just another one of these weird things worms do. And in fact in 1994 I think Victor was denied tenure at Harvard, despite making this really exciting discovery just the year before. Everyone was very surprised. But the fact is that there was a strong bias that this was just an unusual thing that worms did and maybe it’s not relevant to humans. But something happened between then and 2000. In the year 2000 Gary Ruvkun’s group cloned the let-7 gene. And what had happened between ’93 and 2000 is we had enough human DNA sequence by that time, that you could look—Gary’s group looked and he found a perfect homologue of let-7 in the human genome sequence. So the entire 21 nucleotides in the human is identical to the 21 nucleotides in the worm. And in fact what they found is that every metazoan animal has a let-7 gene. And again let-7 seems to regulate targets by interacting with the three prime UTR. But the thing that was missing still, despite the fact that these are about the same size as siRNAs, the question remained. How are these pathways really related. Is the RNAi pathway related to the microRNA pathway or not. And Alla’s result suggested for the first time that the two pathways are related. And what she showed is that mutations in Dicer and mutations in those conserved argonautes have defects in the processing. Here’s the wild type, but in the absence of Dicer or this argonaute there’s a defect in the processing of this precursor and there’s less of this mature form accumulating in the animal. So the RNA interference mechanism which is involved in silencing genes - we use it experimentally, but it has a role also in transposon silencing and so on - has a conserved role in gene regulation, in which the worm makes double-stranded RNA by encoding it with just regular genes that then are processed into these siRNAs and can go on to regulate their targets. That was extremely exciting. And now it’s even getting more exciting in that these microRNAs are turning out to have really important roles developmentally, including some very important links to cancer biology in humans, including links in which the microRNAs are involved in preventing cell division and in suppressing cancer, sort of a tumor suppressor role for the microRNA genes or are chimiric genes, genes that promote cell division. This is a figure from Carlo Croce’s lab. It turns out that these are different patient samples and these are a set of about 100 microRNAs from the human. What they’re doing here is looking at the gene expression profile in different patient samples on this axis. You can see that certain microRNAs are up regulated in some tumors and down regulated in others. By looking at these profiles it’s actually turning out to be possible to make predictions about how a particular tumor will respond to treatment. In addition some of the microRNAs that are identified as correlated with an oncogenic state are turning out to be potential targets for suppressing tumor growth. Here’s where there’s even more. And I think that this is where the lab is still working. I’m just going to show a few slides from the work of Wai Fong who has been a new post doc in the lab. What you see here is a gel where these are tRNAs. We’re looking at RNAs. And if you look way down on the bottom of the gel there are RNA species that are here that everyone always thought was just junk. But it turns out that this is where the microRNAs run, right down here, there’s a band here that Wai Fong noticed was missing in these mutants. These are mutants that are deficient in RNAi. This is Dicer here which is required for the microRNA pathway. And you can see this band here is present in Dicer, it’s present in wild type but it’s missing in these mutants here. These are all mutations in a gene called DRH-3, Dicer-related helicase 3. Now it turns out these siRNAs are triphosphorylated, whereas Dicer, when it cleaves it, makes a monophosphate at the end because of its enzymatic action. Triphosphates would be put on by a polymerase and we believe these siRNAs are the products of a polymerase. This species here, the microRNAs are here but there’s also some other species of small RNA that’s got a 3 prime modification of some kind and we’re still analyzing those. Here’s an example of one of those, these are what we call natural endogenous small RNAs. They’re different from microRNAs in that they’re not encoded by a hairpin-like structure. This is a gene called K02. In wild type the messenger RNA for this gene is present at a low level and there’s a lot of siRNA present in the wild type animal. In the mutants that Wai Fong analyzed, the messenger RNA is now expressed at a higher level and the siRNAs are gone. So, these are naturally occurring silencing RNAs that are targeting one of the worms own genes and we don’t know why. So Wai Fong devised a strategy for sequencing these. This is just an example of how these siRNAs map from some of Wai Fong’s sequencing data. We’re just starting to sequence on a very high throughput level. Small RNAs from throughout the worm’s genome to try to find out what genes are targeted by these natural silencing RNAs. You can see this particular gene which has this long name here, has hundreds probably— or thousands of siRNAs in every cell that target the whole gene. And we don’t know how these are generated or why they exist and how they function in the animal. But we do know that out of some 6000 siRNAs that we’ve analyzed of this type we’ve identified already 3000 different genes. So most genes have just a few siRNAs targeting them in the samples that we’ve analyzed so far. So we think that this may turn out to be a very important regulatory mechanism for genes in the worm. So is it just another worm thing or not. Well, this is a mouse and this is based—we just did this experiment ourselves in our lab. But last year there were three or four papers on something called the piRNAs. These are extremely abundant in the mouse and the piRNAs are actually siRNAs that are 30 nucleotides, they’re bigger than the 21. They are 30 nucleotides long. They are so abundant that they are a blazing signal on ethidium stain gel. And it’s amazing that no one ever noticed these before. But they turn out to be interacting with the Pee-wee class, argonautes. That’s why they call them the piRNAs. And their functions are still being worked out. They appear to have a role in transposon suppression but they may have a more general role in gene regulation as well. You can probably barely see it, but here’s the band that Wai Fong has been analyzing. And there are bands here in the mouse that are similar in intensity. So there’s a lot out there still to be worked out in terms of how these small RNAs are regulating development. I’m going to come back now at the end of my talk to this concept of how the RNAs interact with the DNA. Here’s the double stranded DNA. The reason I show that slide is with the discovery of DNA I think molecular biologists sort of became overconfident. We thought we had figured out how life works, we thought we understood how information is stored inside of ourselves. The DNA explains a lot, it can explain Mendelian segregation of traits. And it can explain how the genetic material is replicated and how mutations could arise. So it’s a very powerful paradigm but I think it sort of made us overconfident. And I think RNAi is sort of bringing us back to reality a little bit. DNA doesn’t really look like that in the cell, it’s wrapped up and bundled into these higher order structures. This is a 30–nm fiber, these are the nucleosomes and here’s a crystal structure model showing the histone proteins inside and the DNA wrapping around. This is another picture here where the DNA goes around just about two times. And these little tails stick out from the histones and these tails, as you may know, are targets for multiple types of regulation. They can have a role in activating or repressing the transcription of the DNA that’s wrapped around those nucleosomes. And this information that’s put here by proteins that modify these tails is very interesting to me because it seems that siRNAs can guide these modifications by bringing to the chromatin remodeling complexes and proteins that recognize these histone tail modifications. So with that type of interaction between the chromatin and the RNA you can imagine that the DNA is more like the hardware in a computer. And that the proteins and the RNA that regulate, that interact with these histone tails are like the software. The analogy I like to make is that we think of ourselves as differentiated, right. We all have the same genome in every cell but the cells do different things. Well, why do they do different things. They do different things because the DNA, different genes are on and different genes are off and they’re on and they’re off very stably. And that’s how we remain stably differentiated creatures. The thing that I’m very interested in right now is a concept that we’re just trying to figure out how to test in the lab, that the germ line itself can differentiate and that that differentiation process allows the germ line to evolve without any changes in the underlying nucleotide sequence. So you could imagine heritable changes at this level that are maintained through the interactions with siRNAs over multiple generations. If you look back at the history of thinking on evolution prior to DNA—and this is actually going back to the turn of the century— Weismann’s theory of inheritance, he named the genes biophores. Unfortunately we all like jargon a little too much, so his word for genes was biophores. But he envisioned genes that could be replicated many, many times per cell division, not just once. And they could be segregated unequally between cells. He thought this could explain differentiation and development. And he came up with this concept of biophores which was cast aside after Mendel’s discoveries. But when you read Weismann’s theory, if you put instead of biophore the word siRNA, everywhere he used the word biophore. His theory works beautifully. So, I think we have to go back and think about evolution again and development. Darwin went even further than Weismann and came up with a word gemmules. And these were able to exit the somatic cells and enter the germ line and cause heritable changes that were… I see Hans standing up, that’s a bad sign. So I’m going to cut it short. But RNA could be, RNAi, maybe we should rename it RNA information because the RNA can guide the regulation of the DNA. Now, here’s Hans. I’m asking him to call me any time. He’s the one who makes the phone call by the way. So be nice to him. Here’s Andy and his wife Rachel. This is the class of 2006, there’s John Mather and George Smoot over there, Orhan Pamuk, Rodger Kornberg, Ed Phelps, Muhammad Yunus and a representative from the Grameen Bank. This is just a family photo with my daughter Melisa and Victoria who are here at the meeting. Here’s my wife getting some advice on economics at the banquet. And here she’s giving some advice. During the banquet Ed called my wife a communist—she grew up in Hungary. And here’s George explaining the Big Bang to me. And you can see I have this glazed look on my face because you know I think it’s a nice story but believe me there’s a lot of mysteries still in that story. And here is Victoria collecting some gold medals, these are very nice gold medals because they have chocolate inside. And here is Vickie dancing with me, it was a wonderful time there. This is the danger of one of these prizes, you can see I’m signing a chair at the Nobel Museum and you can see what's happened to my body, my head is huge and my body has gotten very small. So that’s one of the dangers. But, and I’ll tell you there is a real antidote for that and I’ll just end with this slide, this is Tara Bean, in 1998, this is her picture. She was diagnosed with a brain tumor because of vision problems that she developed in third grade. She grew up in my home town, we know her family and she was seen at the hospital where I work. And she unfortunately lost her battle with cancer. And since her death we’ve learned a lot about the basic mechanisms of cancer. We have a lot more to learn. There’s a lot of tremendous exciting work going on and a day doesn’t go by now, even here at this meeting when I don’t get an email of some kind from somebody who has got a sick loved one, someone who thinks that maybe RNAi could help them. And unfortunately the answer is still that those cures are perhaps years away and it’s very hard. So we got to get back to work, as soon as the meeting is over everybody get back to work and try to come up with some new cures. And I think I’ll end there. Sorry, I always go long. Thank you very much Craig, it was a wonderful lecture and we now learn also about the future. I felt like a bad boy walking up and interrupting you. But since we said we should have some questions and further extension, I thought we should do so. So, now this lecture is open to questions. I saw your hand first. I was promised that we have a microphone. Yes, she has one. My name is … (inaudible 50.05). I’m a medical doctor from Pakistan. You mentioned that RNAi can cause chromosomal elimination of DNA. So, is it therapeutically possible by injecting bacteria or viruses expressing double-stranded RNA to silence genes involved in the pathophysiology of cells in tumors or cancers in humans or mouse models. Well, potentially. But those silencing approaches that are being attempted now in the human are not designed to eliminate the DNA corresponding to the target gene. You can achieve knock down reduction in gene expression of a gene in a human cell using RNAi. And that is being developed as a therapeutic strategy now in multiple different companies around the world. And it’s even in human trials right now for several different indications. So it looks like it’s going to be a viable approach, whether or not you’ll ever be able to actually target the elimination of a gene effectively in a patient, I don’t know, and you may not even want to do that in most cases. So that’s probably not possible. Questions. I saw another hand very closed by and one hand over here. This is really amazing and I’m really sensitized. But in the beginning of your lecture you mentioned the importance of politics in science and I want to agree with you absolutely. I also noticed that this is a long journey what you are presenting today. And what I’d love you to mention is how much this costs, because I’m really interested in economy and this must have cost a lot of a fortune. And I know that the Bush administration has put a lot of limitation on Africa research because he felt we should not waste money on research, we should face poverty. And some of us felt research is another way out of poverty. From your experience, what would you say to this comment. Well, I’m not sure I understood your question completely. But let me just say that the kinds of drugs that you can make with RNAi, using RNAi as a drug, are going to be so expensive and so tailored to individuals that they have a lot of potential. But I really doubt they’ll penetrate to more than a few percent of the world’s population. The easy to deliver drugs are pills. And if you can develop orally available small molecule, then you can really get drugs inexpensively into patients. RNAi is being used to help discover pathways and so on, to find new druggable targets. But RNAi as a drug I think is going to be very hard to get into the Third World as a therapy because it’s an injectable. So it’s somewhat more difficult. I think that’s actually one of the things that we really need to fix. We can spend a lot of time trying to cure diseases that have never been cured. But in a lot of the world the diseases—it’s just malnutrition and diarrhea that are killing most of the people, or malaria or some well known disease that’s treatable. And the medicines are not there because of political instability or infrastructure problems. These are the kinds of things that I think require an interdisciplinary effort to try to solve medicine. We can continue to go along these paths towards more and more complex, more and more specialized medicine without benefiting mankind. Nearly as much as we could if we invested some time in helping to bring—really to reinvent economies that work for the Third World and we’re not doing that. So I think that sort of answers your question. Thank you. And then it was you, yes. Hi, I’m Shawn from … (inaudible 54.16) UK. So, I had a question, looking at the system biology aspect. I always used to think about this problem, like how the cell in terms of system biology decides which part for small RNA you should take. Like if you have viral response you have mRNAs or you have saRNA mechanism. So in terms of the wall cell concept, how would cell choose the mechanism for RNA defense. I have no idea. It’s a very interesting question. But you know, the regulation of these mechanisms is something that really just hasn’t been worked out yet. We don’t know how microRNAs really work and how they regulate their targets. We don’t even know how they—probably because they have multiple ways of silencing—we don’t know which one they—how they choose, how to either cleave the gene or just silence it or send it to a storage place. You know there are a lot of possibilities. One of the things though that's very exciting about RNAi is for the eukaryotic cell. I think it provides a mechanism for linking transcription and translation so that the cell can, while its transcribing a message, mark that message for storage and use later. A concept that would allow the cell, despite the existence of the nuclear envelope to export a message that’s been marked for use later. And that’s a really interesting concept. So there are all kinds of interesting possibilities about regulation. I think it’s going to take years to sort it all out. Any more questions. I saw your hand and then yours. I don’t think Hans can see further than … Well, thank you.(laughter) My name is Matthew Albert from INSERM in France. I’m curious to know about double-stranded RNA and single-stranded RNA with 5-prime-triphosphates. They’re known as immune adjuvants, signaling through pattern recognition molecules like toll-like receptors and intercellular helicases. I was curious to know whether or not worms have a similar mechanism for immune activation. And how you imagine sort of cell versus viral RNA could be recognized in different ways that would avoid aberrant immune responses. That’s a great question. And in fact the Dicer-related helicase that I was referring to is a homologue of RIG-I, MDA-5 and LGP-2, which all are members of the Dicer family of helicases. That's our name for it, Dicer-related helicases. But the fascinating thing about that is that those are all involved in the human innate immune response in anti-viral response. And recently the Dicer-related helicase, human versions have been linked to recognition of triphosphorylated, not siRNAs but viral products that are triphosphorylated. So there’s a homology really between the anti-viral mechanism in humans and the RNAi mechanism in worms. The worms have retained a very potent sequence specific response. The human has either lost that response or it’s much less important or it’s only in certain cell types, we don’t know which. The human cell when it recognizes a viral process will commit suicide and these same receptors are involved in recognizing the viral replication products and then activating an apoptotic pathway. So, a very efficient way to get rid of a virus if you have 10 trillion cells but if you’ve only got 1000 you better not kill the cells. So the worms may be very good at the sequence specific aspect of anti-viral or silencing. So the homology and the similarities between those mechanisms are fascinating and in fact it turns out that those LGP-2 of the three human members of this family interacts with Dicer and with another protein that we’ve identified in the worm called pure 1. It’s a phosphatase that recognizes triphosphates and removes two to make a monophosphate. There is a complex in the human that appears to have at least those three proteins. So we think that the human cell may have this mechanism as well. And we’re still trying to sort out how the human does the sequence specific silencing. Then I promised you. And after that we go further away. My name is . (inaudible 59.16). I’m from India. What I wanted to ask you was if you’re using RNA interference in the cure of cancer or the battle against cancer. Is there a mechanism or is there a method to make RNA cell-specific to suppress mitosis in the cancer cells. Is there a specific way to just target the cells in there. Because the mitotic mechanisms are the same in normal cells as well as cancerous cells. Right, cancer is a very challenging target for an RNAi therapeutic. And getting it delivered to the tumor specifically would obviously be a very important aspect because if you’re trying to interfere, say with mitosis, you’d kill the healthy cells as well. The same problem with many cancer therapies. So, it’s a problem again that hasn’t been solved. But one that people are working on. There are possible solutions but I don’t have any for you at the moment. Could we possibly get the microphone over here. Worms are extraordinarily sensitive to RNAi. I mean, they’re sensitive to it in their food. What do you think the evolutionary advantages of evolving such a sensitivity would have been. I mean, considering you don’t have this in other organisms. Why are they so sensitive that they can actually transmit it in their food. It’s very interesting. You know, these worms are hermaphroditic, they’re also capable of fertilization, cross fertilization by males. But they colonize food in the soil, quite often an individual worm will find the food and have to populate the food source without a mate. So they’ll self fertilize and make thousands and millions of progeny. When they begin to starve they do something very interesting. These mothers are very altruistic, they actually hold on to their eggs when they’re starving and they allow the eggs to hatch internally. That way the progeny hatch in the presence of an abundant food source, the mother. And then they consume the mother, they reach an age that’s old enough to become a dower larva which is a very resistant form and then they can go off in the soil to find new sources of food. The interesting thing there though is that if an animal is starving and allows the progeny to eat itself, it might have developed immunity against viruses during its lifetime that could then be transmitted to the progeny via feeding. That’s one explanation that I’ve just sort of back of an envelope idea. But I think it’s possible that—because of the way they live, they want to be able to transmit these silencing activities to their progeny. The sort of embarrassing aspect of this is that C. elegans researchers So we don’t know of any viruses that we can use to sort of test this model. There are no viral, existing viral examples from nematodes. Maybe they’re so good at silencing them. Probably it’s just not a stable interaction in the laboratory. So we lose them very quickly. Thank you very much. I’ve just thought, I should say we stop. But a final question to you. You can shout it out. I’ll hear it. Concerning the use of siRNA and therapy. Isn’t there a problem between the high specificity of siRNA and the allele variation of defective genes. For instance by using shRNA to fight against AIDS, there are a lot of HIV mutants. So, how would you imagine. Well, you could target cellular genes which are less apt to mutate, that’s one strategy. And of course you can design an siRNA against the region of the genome that for some reason can’t mutate very often. And those strategies are being tried. I think there’s an HIV trial now using gene therapy to deliver the silencing RNA. That’s either approved or will be shortly in the US. So they’re trying that approach even for HIV. But normally there’s not that much allele variation so you can choose a region. That’s not for normal genes. For viral genes—yes, there are. But for normal cellular genes there is less variability. So you can choose an siRNA that will target a conserved region. Interestingly, in the case of a dominant mutation for example that’s causing a phenotype, you can even design your siRNA so that it will only target the mutant allele. And that’s with some degree of selectivity, you can get silencing specifically of the mutant allele by designing the siRNA. So that it won’t cleave the wild type allele but only the mutant. So there’s a lot of possibilities still for using RNAi as a therapeutic. Thank you very much.

HANS JÖRNVALL. Ich glaube, wir sollten versuchen, anzufangen. Es ist 9:00 Uhr und ich heiße Sie alle zum Beginn der diesjährigen Vorträge herzlich Willkommen. Es gibt bereits bei unserem ersten Vortrag eine kleine Änderung, denn Sir John, der als dritter Redner hier bei uns sein sollte, konnte nicht kommen. Daher haben wir die folgende Entscheidung getroffen: Die drei übrigen Vorträge werden um jeweils etwa 5 Minuten verlängert. Außerdem werden wir nach dem ersten Vortrag ein Experiment wagen und eine Fragerunde mit dem Publikum anschließen. Und mit diesen Fragen und der Verlängerung der Reden werden wir zu unserem normalen Zeitplan zurückkehren. Wir werden nicht alle Vorträge mit einer Fragerunde beschließen, aber da der erste Vortrag von unserem jüngsten Nobelpreisträger vom letzten Jahr gehalten wird, haben wir uns entschieden, die Runde nach dem ersten Vortrag zu machen. Und nach dem ersten Vortrag und dieser Fragerunde gibt es außerdem eine Kaffeepause. Wir machen also Kaffeepause zwischen 10:05 Uhr und 10:40 Uhr. Wir machen dann anschließend 10 Minuten früher weiter, damit auch der zweite und dritte Sprecher zu ihrer Verlängerung kommen. Damit sind wir dann auch bereit anzufangen. Der erste Sprecher ist Professor Craig Mello von der University of Massachusetts, der Medical School in Worcester, USA. Er bekam den Preis, wie ich gerade sagte, letztes Jahr. Er bekam ihn für die „Entdeckung der RNA-Interferenz – Gensilencing durch Doppelstrang-RNA“. Bitte, Professor Mello. Danke. CRAIG MELLO. Danke, danke Hans. Es ist eine Freude und eine wirklich große Ehre hier zu sein. Ich freue mich schon auf die Gelegenheit, viele Gespräche und Diskussionen mit allen Anwesenden hier im Laufe der nächsten paar Tage zu führen. So, lassen Sie mich fortfahren und mit meinem Vortrag beginnen. Ich habe meinen Vortrag ein wenig umbenannt: Ich fahre also fort und beginne meinen Vortrag mit einer etwas ungewöhnlichen ersten Folie hier. Ich weiß nicht, ob Sie – könnten wir etwas weniger Licht haben? Das sind Dick Cheney und ich im Weißen Haus. Wenn Sie einen Preis wie diesen verliehen bekommen, besteht einer der besonderen Vorteile darin, dass man Führungspersonen des Landes oder Leute auf der ganzen Welt trifft, die eine wichtige Rolle in der Politik spielen. Könnten Sie die Bühne ein wenig abdunkeln? Ich glaube, es ist zu hell. Können Sie das gut erkennen? Sie sehen, dass ich nicht sehr dicht bei ihm stehe. Seine Wählergunst in den USA liegt zurzeit bei etwa 7 %, er ist der Vizepräsident, aber Viele denken, er ist der kluge Kopf. Wichtig jedoch, und der Grund, warum ich dies zeige, ist, es ist sehr wichtig, zu wählen und sich in die Politik einzubringen, wissen Sie, egal, ob Sie ihn gewählt haben oder nicht. Nun, wenn Sie in Ihrem Land nicht wählen können, und einige können das wahrscheinlich nicht, dann ist es sicherlich wichtig, jeden aufzuklären, mit dem man spricht, Leute darüber aufzuklären, was in der Welt vor sich geht. Sprechen Sie mit Leuten, das ist sehr wichtig. Und eines der Themen, die ich für wichtig halte, und das wir hier diskutieren sollten, ist, ob es vielleicht klug ist, die Treffen in Lindau zukünftig immer interdisziplinär abzuhalten. Denn ich glaube, eines der Dinge, die in der Wissenschaft gerade vor sich gehen, ist, dass sie bereits sehr interdisziplinär ist. Biomedizin zum Beispiel hängt stark von Physik und Chemie ab, glaube ich. Aber auch politische Themen sind sehr wichtig. Daher halte ich es für sehr wichtig, an der Universität und auch bei Veranstaltungen wie dieser einen sehr interdisziplinären Fokus zu haben, um zu versuchen, den Dialog in Gang zu bringen. Ich ging nach Washington DC in der Hoffnung, der Bush-Regierung mitteilen zu können, wie wichtig RNA-Interferenz als Technologie ist und wie gut es zum Genomsequenzierungsprojekt passt, und wie beides zusammen, gemeinsam mit anderen großartigen Technologien, eine wirkliche Veränderung in der Art und Weise herbeiführen, wie wir Medizin handhaben und praktizieren. Und wie sich dadurch viele Gelegenheiten für neue Arten von Medizin ergeben, die Verknüpfung von menschlichen Krankheiten mit der Genetik. Leider kam es nur zu einer sehr kurzen Zusammenkunft und einem Händeschütteln im Weißen Haus. Ich wollte ihnen mitteilen, dass die RNAi unter ihrer Regierung entdeckt wurde, dass die Genomsequenzierung unter ihrer Regierung fertiggestellt wurde. Und ich glaube, ich werde trotzdem noch einmal hingehen und erneut mit ihnen reden, falls sie zuhören. Aber wie Sie wissen, hatten wir glücklicherweise einen Wechsel im Senat, im Haus kürzlich in den USA und politisch ändern sich die Dinge definitiv. Dies sind Ed Kennedy und ich zusammen bei einem Besuch des Kongresses, der kürzlich stattfand. Es gibt eine Menge Hoffnung, glaube ich, dass sich die Dinge in den USA in naher Zukunft ändern werden und das Land anfängt, wieder mehr in die Wissenschaft zu investieren. Im Moment, was Sie vielleicht nicht wissen, gibt es in den USA kaum finanzielle Unterstützung für medizinische Forschung. Nun möchte ich Ihnen diese Folie, das sind Andrew Fire und ich, aus mehreren Gründen zeigen. Erstens, wenn es Andy nicht gäbe, wäre ich heute nicht hier. Er ist ein toller Kollege und ein großartiger Freund. Wir haben zusammen gearbeitet an unserer Wissenschaft und haben nicht miteinander konkurriert. In der Tat begann unsere Zusammenarbeit Ende der achtziger Jahre. Damals konzentrierten wir uns darauf, DNA in den Organismus einzuschleusen, den wir beide lieben und mit dem wir arbeiten, ein winziger Wurm. In der nächsten Folie zeige ich Ihnen ein Bild. Aber der Wurm ist so klein, ungefähr von der Größe eines Kommas auf einer Druckseite. Um die DNA in dieses Tier zu injizieren, mussten Andy und ich uns Wege ausdenken, die Nadel unter dem Mikroskop in dieses winzige Tier einzuführen. Und natürlich war das etwas, was noch nie zuvor getan worden war. Wir arbeiteten also zusammen – eigentlich arbeiteten wir zuerst unabhängig voneinander – aber nachdem wir uns besser kennengelernt hatten, begannen wir, Ideen auszutauschen. Denn es war sehr schwierig, sich in diese neue Technik einzuarbeiten und herauszufinden, wie man mit diesem sehr kleinen Tier umgehen und effizient eine Injektion in dieses Tier durchführen könnte. Zusammen beschrieben wir einen Umwandlungsprozess zum Einschleusen der DNA, der sehr, sehr gut funktionierte. Und es machte wirklich eine Menge Spaß, mit Andy zu arbeiten. Und der andere Grund, warum ich diese Folie mag ist, weil wir nicht – was wir hier machen ist, natürlich sind wir auf der Bühne – weil wir nicht sprechen. Sie können erkennen, dass Andys Mund geschlossen ist, genau wie meiner. Wofür wir den Preis aber wirklich verliehen bekamen, war dafür, dass wir miteinander redeten, dafür, dass wir unsere Ideen austauschten. Und dafür, dass wir keine Angst hatten, dafür, dass wir uns vertrauten und keine Angst davor hatten, ausgenutzt zu werden. Und ich glaube, das ist etwas, das wir häufiger brauchen, viel mehr Offenheit und Bereitschaft, Ideen auszutauschen. Danke. Nun, hier sehen Sie C.elegans, wie er im Labor in einer Kulturschale hin und her schwimmt. Diese Tiere sind äußerst schön. Wie Sydney Benner bemerkte, als er diesen Organismus für seine Studien auswählte, sie sind im Wesentlichen durchsichtig. Man kann also gerade durch dieses Tier hindurchsehen und alle Zellen darin erkennen und alle möglichen Details. Und was bei diesen Tieren noch so unglaublich ist, ist die Tatsache, dass sie in Bezug auf ihre zelluläre Komplexität so einfach sind. Sie bestehen aus lediglich 1.000 Zellen im Vergleich zum Menschen mit seinen 10 Billionen Zellen. Sie bilden also ein sehr elegantes System. Aber wenn Sie mit Leuten über Würmer sprechen, wie etwa, sagen wir, mit meinen Nachbarn in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, wo ich wohne, sind sie immer, wissen Sie, sie sind immer sehr nett zu Anfang: Oh, Sie arbeiten an einer Medical School, wie nett. Woran arbeiten Sie? Würmer? Und dann werden ihre Augen, na sagen wir glasig. Warum sollte sich jemand an einer Medical School mit Würmern beschäftigen? Sie konnten es einfach nicht begreifen. Und dann, dank des Telefonanrufs von Hans, hören plötzlich meine Nachbarn, wenn ich Ihnen erzähle, dass ich an einem Wurm arbeite, sie hören mir tatsächlich zu. Und ich glaube, das war, wenn überhaupt etwas, das Befriedigendste seit dem 2. Oktober, nämlich meinen Nachbarn tatsächlich etwas über Würmer und Evolution erzählen zu können und sie hören zu. Warum also haben sich Würmer als so wichtig erwiesen? Und Hefe, was das betrifft, hat sich als so wichtig für die menschliche Biologie und Medizin erwiesen. Und genau das ist etwas, das die Allgemeinheit nicht zu schätzen weiß, insbesondere in Amerika. Ich glaube, in Europa und Asien ist das kein so großes Problem. Und um diese Frage nun zu beantworten, gehe ich ganz weit zurück bis zum Urknall. Ich habe diese Folie von John Mather geborgt, den ich ganz gut kennengelernt habe, auch er bekam 2006 den Preis für Physik zusammen mit George Smoot. Als wir zusammen in Stockholm waren, fragte uns die Presse dauernd: Was hat Ihre Entdeckung mit Ihrer Entdeckung gemeinsam? Sie wissen, sie haben den Urknall entdeckt, wir die RNA-Interferenz. Wie bringt man diese beiden Dinge in Zusammenhang? Das ist eine ziemliche Herausforderung. Aber was sie taten war, sie verwendeten einen Satelliten mit Namen COBE, um die kosmische Hintergrundstrahlung zu kartieren, die im Weltraum überall zu finden ist. Und das ist die Karte, die sie erstellt haben. Sie erkannten, dass, egal, wohin man im Weltraum schaut, es ein bisschen übrig gebliebene Strahlung gibt. Sie bestimmten die Temperatur in diesem Spektrum und berechneten daraus, dass der Urknall vor 13,7 Milliarden Jahren stattgefunden haben muss. Und daher fiel uns der Zusammenhang ein, oder das ist, glaube ich, etwas, worüber es sich nachzudenken lohnt, dass Leben auf kosmischer Ebene existiert. Das Leben auf diesem Planeten entstand vor ungefähr 4 oder 3,5 bis 3,8 Milliarden Jahren. Während der Zeit, in der sich das Leben auf diesem Planeten entwickelte, in der Tat gerade seit den gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Pflanzen und Tieren, hat sich die Galaxie, in der wir uns befinden, etwa vier Mal um die eigene Achse gedreht. Das Leben selbst ist bemerkenswert aufgrund seiner Dauerhaftigkeit und der Tatsache, dass es wirklich auf kosmischer Ebene existiert. Lassen Sie uns daher einen kleinen Ausschnitt aus der Geschichte des Lebens betrachten. Hier sehen Sie den gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen. Auf dieser Folie zeige ich den Planeten Erde während eines so genannten „Schneeball Erde“-Ereignisses. Es gibt geologische Anzeichen in den Felsen, in der Erdkruste, für Vereisungen dieses Ausmaßes, bei der die Erde bis hinunter zum Äquator vollständig mit Eis bedeckt war. Und aus biologischer Sicht ist das, glaube ich, ein sehr interessantes Konzept, aufgrund der Frage, welche Auswirkungen diese Art von Ereignissen auf die gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen hätte. Hier haben wir also den gemeinsamen Vorfahren, ein anspruchsvoller, wirklich guter, kleiner Organismus mit allen möglichen Fähigkeiten. Es gibt Hox-Muster, es passieren alle möglichen faszinierenden Dinge da drinnen, wie RNA-Interferenz, funktioniert einfach prima. Aber er hat ein großes Problem: Auf der Erde selbst gibt es kein Land. Wo also soll der kleine Kerl leben? Entweder Hydrothermalquellen oder vielleicht kleine Risse im Eis, im Meer. Diese Art von Ereignis fand tatsächlich zwei Mal statt und beide Male kam es zu massivem Aussterben. Es gab also Hinweise auf ein Aussterben hier und ein Aussterben hier. Und dann, direkt nach dem Ereignis, gab es das biologische Pendant zum Urknall. Es gab die kambrische Artenexplosion. Und ich glaube nicht, dass es von biologischer Seite je eine adäquate Erklärung für die kambrische Explosion gab. Aber ich glaube aus geologischer Sicht stellen diese Eiszeitereignisse vielleicht eine sehr verlockende mögliche Erklärung dar, bei der…, was hier geschah, war letztlich, das Eis schmolz, die Erde wurde wieder bewohnbar, die Landmassen und die flachen Meere um das Land herum wurden bewohnbar und es gab diese wirklich erstaunliche Vervielfältigung des Lebens. Das rasche Auftauchen verschiedener Tiergruppen, darunter auch die Gruppe, aus der der Mensch hervorging, und die Gruppen, aus denen die Nematoden hervorgingen. Und wenn Sie weiter zurückgingen, befände sich der Ursprung der Pflanzen und Tiere in der Tat dort unten am unteren Rand der Seite. Aber Pflanzen und Tiere verfügen alle über RNAi und das ist die Sache, die, glaube ich, sogar meine Nachbarn begreifen. Wissen Sie, sogar die Leute, die keine Ahnung von Biologie haben, sie haben Angst, dass: Oh, wir sind doch nicht wirklich mit den Affen verwandt. Sie begreifen es tatsächlich. Und ich glaube, das liegt auch zum Teil an dem Präsidenten, den wir in den USA gehabt haben, dass die Leute das nun akzeptieren. Aber tatsächlich sind wir immer noch – wissen Sie, wie Nietzsche sagte, wir haben uns vom Wurm zum Menschen entwickelt, aber Vieles in uns ist eigentlich immer noch Wurm. Und ich glaube, das ist ein wirklich wichtiger Aspekt dessen, was ich als Biologe tun kann, um die Botschaft unserer gemeinsamen Abstammung rüberzubringen. Wir sind nicht nur mit Würmern verwandt, sondern jeder in diesem Saal ist eng, eng mit jedem anderen hier verwandt. Daher muss die Menschheit diese nationalistischen Schranken überwinden und anfangen, einander als Brüder und Schwestern zu betrachten. Nun, hier sehen Sie, womit sich die kleinen Würmer manchmal in ihrer richtigen Umgebung auseinandersetzen müssen. Es stellt sich heraus, dass es Hunderte von kleinen Pilzen gibt, die im Boden leben und sich von Würmern ernähren. Und sie haben sogar diese kleinen Fallen ersonnen, wie diese hier, in der Sie diese arme Nematode erkennen können, die hier eingefangen wurde. Ich werde Ihnen diesen kleinen Film zeigen, in dem Sie den tatsächlichen Vorgang sehen können. Dies sind bereits gefangene Würmer. Aber beobachten Sie diesen hier. Er schwimmt hier durch und sie schließt sich einfach um seinen Schwanz. Hier, sehen Sie sich auch diesen an, da kommt gerade ein anderer Wurm heran. Das sind die Gefahren, denen sie in der Umwelt natürlicherweise ausgesetzt sind. Diese Tiere begegnen allen möglichen Räubern. Und hier, sie hat sich gerade geschlossen. Ich weiß nicht genau, wie der Pilz die Nematode wahrnimmt. Aber er hat einen Auslösemechanismus, der auf Bewegung anspricht. Und wenn das geschieht, wird der Wurm gefangen. Und dann sendet der Pilz Hyphen in den Körper des Tieres und verdaut es von innen heraus, ein schreckliches Schicksal. Und dieses Drama wiederholt sich jeden Tag, während Sie zur Arbeit laufen. Es gibt 10 hoch 9 Würmer pro Kubikmeter Boden. Und wir nehmen nicht einmal wahr, dass sie jeden Tag ums Überleben kämpfen. Viele von Ihnen haben diesen Film gesehen. Tatsächlich habe ich mit mehreren Studenten aus China gesprochen, ich glaube, jeder in China hat jetzt meine Rede gesehen. Das also ist – sollte sie sein – meine lustige Folie. Ich muss warten, bis CBS News eine weitere Dokumentation oder so etwas über RNAi dreht, denn sie liefern solch großartiges Material. Das ist die 15-Sekunden-Erklärung von CBS News darüber, wie RNAi funktioniert. Schauen Sie genau hin. Hier ist die Doppelstrang-RNA. Hier sind die schadhaften Gene. Ich sehe, dass manche von Ihnen das noch nicht gesehen haben, ich habe das schon so oft gezeigt, ich liebe es einfach. Viele Leute wussten nicht, dass schadhafte Gene wie Käse-Flips aussehen. Und wahrscheinlich haben Sie auch nicht gewusst, dass RNA tatsächlich kauen kann. Aber das ist der Grund, warum Andrew Fire und ich wussten, dass wir diesen Mechanismus entschlüsseln mussten. Es war so ein spannendes Problem. Ich komme am Ende darauf zurück, es gibt ein paar Elemente hieraus, die tatsächlich stimmen. Und ich glaube, was tatsächlich interessant ist, ist, dass – auch wenn die Gene natürlich nicht wirklich wie Käse-Flips aussehen – dass RNA, RNAi die chromosomale Ausschaltung von DNA lenken kann. Wenn man Tetrahymena als Beispiel betrachtet, bei denen die RNA Chromatinänderungen steuert, die dann von Enzymen erkannt werden, die die Spaltung der DNA und die Eliminierung der DNA während der Entstehung des Makronukleus in Tetrahymena katalysieren. Die weitere Besonderheit ist natürlich, dass sie dies als aktiven Mechanismus dargelegt haben. Darauf komme ich gleich zurück. Das ist ein anderer Film von NOVA. In diesem Fall ein weiterer, netter kleiner Film. Er stammt von NOVA scienceNOW und der Film selbst dauert 15 Minuten, also ein ganzes Stück länger als der CBS-Ausschnitt. Es ist tatsächlich ein ziemlich netter Film, denn er vermittelt sogar Kindern das Konzept der RNA-Interferenz als Überwachungsmechanismus, der in diesem Fall virale Gene ausschalten kann. Und es gibt deutliche Hinweise, dass in vielen verschiedenen Organismen RNAi diese Funktion erfüllen kann. Aber selbst meine sieben Jahre alte Tochter glaubt nicht, dass es in jeder Zelle einen Polizisten gibt, daher glaube ich, dass dies eine sichere Analogie oder Metapher ist, wenn Sie so wollen. Die CBS-Metapher dagegen ist, glaube ich, ein bisschen pseudo-wissenschaftlich und es könnten Leute tatsächlich glauben, dass die RNA kauen kann, und das könnte schlecht sein. Aber diese mag ich sehr. Nun, hier ist ein weiterer Film, er ist von Nature. Dieser ist wie die Star-Wars-Version. Wir fliegen in den Kern der Zelle hier und jetzt fliegen wir die DNA entlang. Die DNA liegt hier ganz als supercoiled DNA vor. Und nun wird sie geöffnet und die Polymerase kommt hinzu und fängt an, eine Boten-RNA zu erstellen. Dies ist der Vorgang der Transkription. Dieser Film ist sehr hilfreich für Gymnasiasten oder Laien, die sich mit den Grundlagen der Biologie nicht auskennen. Das ist das Capping der Boten-RNA. Dies hier ist die RNA während des Spleißens. Jetzt wird sie aus dem Kern herausgebracht, das ist Polyadenylierung. Und die mRNA verlässt den Kern, hier kommt sie. Jetzt ist ein Wissenschaftler dabei, die RNA in die Zelle zu injizieren. Wenn Sie zuschauen, werden sie es sehen. Oh, hier ist das Ribosom, das mithilfe der Boten-RNA das Protein herstellt. Hier sehen Sie den Wissenschaftler, der die Doppelstrang-RNA injiziert, das sollte eine A-Helix sein, nicht das. Sie wird geschnitten, das ist Dicer, die schneidet wie... Jetzt, hier ist das Slicer-Enzym oder Argonaut und das verschwindet wieder, es kaut nicht, keine Angst. Und das Tolle daran ist, es kann – dieser Proteinkomplex findet mithilfe der Sequenzinformation hier die perfekten Übereinstimmungen. Und das geschieht katalytisch, er kann also weiter und weiter und weiter machen und Tausende von Transkripten stilllegen. Das ist wirklich bemerkenswert. Eine Möglichkeit, wie ich RNAi den nicht mit der Materie Vertrauten gerne beschreibe, ist: Stellen Sie sich vor, es gäbe das Internet, aber keine Möglichkeit darin zu suchen, keine Suchmaschinen, kein Google, keine Möglichkeit, etwas zu finden. Genau so stelle ich mir Ihr Genom vor, wenn es keinen Mechanismus wie RNAi hätte. RNAi verwendet eine kleine Suchsequenz, eine kleine Sequenz, genau wie das, was sie in das Fenster Ihres Google-Browsers eingeben würden, um Gene oder Sequenzen, mRNA oder sogar DNA in der Zelle zu finden und zu regulieren. Und das Wunderbare an diesem Mechanismus ist, er kann verwandte koordinieren – die Regulation verwandter Gene, die über mehrere Orte im Genom verteilt sind. Der Grund, warum wir RNAi untersuchen wollten, war der, dass wir feststellten, dass es bemerkenswert wirksam war. Und wirklich, wenn man dem Wurm RNA injiziert, war das Erste, was wir bemerkten, dass der Silencing-Effekt vererbt werden kann. Er konnte mittels einer Nachkommenschaft weitergegeben werden, die den Silencing-Effekt trug, und nach einer ganzen Generation Nachkommen mit diesem Effekt erzeugte. Und er konnte sogar über den Samen weitergegeben werden und Nachkommenschaft auch nach einer weiteren Folgegeneration mit diesem Effekt ausstatten. Und wenn man die entsprechenden Nachkommen selektiert, kann dieser Silencing-Effekt in C.elegans anscheinend endlos vererbt werden. Dies zu verstehen interessiert uns weiterhin sehr, denn diese langfristige Vererbung muss, aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach, eine Art Veränderung auf Chromatinebene widerspiegeln. Es ist außerdem systemisch, da sich nämlich die injizierte RNA im gesamten Tier verbreiten kann. So kann man RNA zum Beispiel in den Darm einbringen und der Silencing-Effekt kann in der Keimbahn beobachtet werden. Es gibt also eine Möglichkeit, wie sich diese RNA-Moleküle von Zelle zu Zelle bewegen können. Und darüber müssen wir noch eine ganze Menge lernen. Als wir diese Phänomene bemerkten, stellten wir fest, dass es in dem Tier eine aktive Reaktion gab. Wie schon gesagt, die Filme, die ich gezeigt habe, enthalten alle einen aktiven Prozess. Entweder der Polizist oder die kauende RNA, es gibt eine Reaktion in dem Tier auf die Doppelstrang-RNA. Und da scheint es zum Beispiel einen Transportmechanismus zu geben, den Silencing-Effekt selbst und dann den Amplifikationsmechanismus oder den Vererbungsmechanismus. Und viele dieser Schritte verstehen wir noch nicht. Aber als wir anfingen, uns damit in C.elegans zu beschäftigen, gab es einen offensichtlichen Ansatz, mit dem man versuchen könnte, diese Mechanismen zu verstehen. Nämlich die Verwendung von Genetik. Der Erste, der sich mit der Genetik der RNA-Interferenz beschäftigte, war der Japaner Hiroaki Tabara in meinem Labor. und sie dann auf eine Bakterienkultur aufbrachte, die ein essenzielles Wurmgen exprimierte. Nun reagieren die Würmer so empfindlich auf Doppelstrang-RNA, dass sie sie mit dem Futter aufnehmen können und es in der Folge zur Stilllegung kommt. Eine Stilllegung, die so wirksam ist, dass man jedes Ei im Wildtyp des Wurms abtötet, wenn man ein essenzielles Wurmgen als Target nimmt. Man kann zum Beispiel ein für die Embryogenese erforderliches Gen ausschalten, indem man dieses Tier mit Bakterien füttert, die die Doppelstrang-RNA exprimierten. Sie fressen die Bakterien, sie schalten das Gen aus, keines der Eier wird reif. Also überlegte sich Hiroaki eine sehr einfache Untersuchung, bei der er einfach nach Tieren Ausschau hielt, die nach zwei Generationen lebensfähige Nachkommen hatten, und dadurch fand er jede Menge interessanter Gene, die am RNAi-Mechanismus beteiligt sind. Ich mache jetzt einen großen Sprung, denn ich weiß, ich habe heute nicht so viel Zeit, und erzähle Ihnen von dem Polizisten. Das Polizistengen war – zufällig – das erste Gen, das Hiroaki identifizierte. Er nannte es RNA Deficient Gen Nr. 1 oder RDE-1. Und es wird jetzt Argonaut genannt, nach dem ersten Pflanzengen aus dieser Familie, das als Entwicklungsdefekt in Pflanzen identifiziert wurde. Das Enzym wird hier in seiner Proteinstruktur, Kristallstruktur, die 2004 von Leemor Joshua-Tor und Ji-Joon Song hergestellt wurde, in grau dargestellt. Was Sie hier sehen, ist die Guide-RNA, die Silencing-RNA und die Messenger-RNA-Basenpaarung innerhalb dieser Einbuchtung des Enzyms. Der Vorgang der Basenpaarung, der hier stattfindet, drückt die mRNA gegen das katalytische Zentrum. Diese Domäne kodiert eine der RNase H verwandte Falte, die dann die mRNA abspaltet. Diese wird dann entsorgt und die siRNA darf weitermachen und weitere Gene stilllegen. Wir nennen diese short interfering RNA oder siRNA. Sie kann mehrere Reaktionen wie diese katalysieren. Das Lustige an diesem RNAi-Bereich ist, dass die Leute, die sich damit beschäftigen, offensichtlich zu viel fernsehen, insbesondere das Spätabendprogramm. Wahrscheinlich laufen spät abends, wenn sie vom Labor nach Hause kommen, nur diese Sendungen mit viel Werbung für so Dinge wie das Ginsu-Messer. Denn wir haben das vorgeschaltete Enzym Dicer genannt und dieser hier Slicer, es schneidet also in Würfel und Scheibchen. Und wenn Sie aus Amerika sind, dann haben Sie diese Werbung gesehen, in der man Ihnen dieses Messer verkauft, das auf alle erdenklichen Arten schneidet. Komisch an dieser Werbung ist aber, dass sie immer endet – wenn Sie gerade vorhaben, das Messer zu kaufen, sagen sie immer, dass dazu noch mehr gehört, dann versuchen sie, Ihnen die Steakmesser zu verkaufen, die dazu gehören. Und so in etwa ist das auch mit der RNAi. Immer, wenn Sie denken, dass es nicht noch toller werden kann, geschieht etwas sehr, sehr Interessantes und so in der Art war es. Wir klonten RDE-1 1999. Und für Andy und mich war das ein euphorischer Moment. Davor war die Tatsache, dass Doppelstrang-RNA Gensilencing auslösen könnte nur Phänomenologie. Sie war interessant, aber wir waren nicht sicher, ob es konserviert sein würde oder einfach nur eine Wurmgeschichte war oder ob andere Tiere dieselbe Art von Reaktion zeigen würden. Aber als wir RDE-1 klonten, fanden wir heraus, dass es ein stark konserviertes Gen mit vielen Homologen war. Und das ist einfach die Ahnentafel der RDE-1-verwandten Proteine in den verschiedenen Tieren. Das sind also Wurm-Homologe hier in rot, das sind andere Wurm-Homologe da drüben und weitere Wurm-Homologe dort. Nun, es stellte sich heraus, dass Menschen acht Kopien des RDE-1-Gens haben, hier sind vier und dort drüben sind vier menschliche Gene. Wenn Sie das hier betrachten, sehen Sie, dass die schwarze Gruppe der Argonautenproteine der älteste Zweig der Familie ist. Diese weisen sogar Pflanzen-Homologe in dieser Region dort drüben auf. Aber es gibt Tiere – beinahe alle vielzelligen Tiere haben zwei Familien: diese hier und diese hier, die wir als die Piwi-Familie der Argonautenproteine bezeichnen. Die gemeinsamen Vorfahren von Würmern und Menschen hatten also zumindest bereits zwei Argonautengene. Als wir RDE-1 klonten erhielten wir aufgrund der Genomsequenzen all diese anderen Informationen. Und das ist das Wunderbare und die Macht dieses genomischen Zeitalters, in dem wir uns befinden. Man klont ein Gen in einem Modellorganismus wie C.elegans und plötzlich hat man alle Gene in allen Organismen, die jemals sequenziert wurden. Aber dies erlaubte es uns, die Frage zu stellen: Was machten alle diese stark konservierten Gene? Und daher schaltete Alla Grishok diese beiden Gene im Labor aus und analysierte den Phänotyp. Um Ihnen einen Eindruck zu vermitteln, wie spannend ihre Entdeckung war, muss ich Ihnen ein bisschen was über die Arbeit von Victor Ambros erzählen. Das lin-4-Gen hat diese sehr interessante Eigenschaft, sich zu einer haarnadelartigen Struktur zu falten. Und Victor beschrieb zwei Formen des lin-4-Produkts. Eines ist eine aus 70 Nukleotiden bestehende Vorläuferform, das diese Haarnadelform annimmt, und das andere eine aus 21 Nukleotiden bestehende RNA. Das ist also ein natürlich vorkommendes Wurmgen, von dem man herausfand, dass es ein anderes Wurmgen, lin-14 genannt, reguliert, das von Gary Ruvkuns Gruppe analysiert wurde. Zusammen fanden Victors und Garys Gruppen…, zusammen fanden Sie heraus, dass lin-4 als negativer Regulator für ein Gen, lin-14, fungiert, das komplementäre Sequenzen in seiner 3’-UTR besitzt. Das war das erste Gen, das wir jetzt als microRNAs bezeichnen, dies war die erste microRNA. Und tatsächlich bekam Victor 1994 keine Anstellung in Harvard, obwohl er das Jahr zuvor gerade diese spannende Entdeckung gemacht hatte. Alle waren überrascht. Tatsache aber ist, dass es eine starke Voreingenommenheit gab, dass dies einfach eine ungewöhnliche Sache war, die bei Würmern vorkommt, aber mit dem Menschen vielleicht gar nichts zu tun hat. Aber zwischen damals und 2000 geschah etwas. Und zwischen 1993 und 2000 hatten wir genügend menschliche DNA sequenziert, dass man – Garys Gruppe suchte und fand ein perfektes Homolog des let-7 in der Sequenz des Humangenoms. Die gesamten 21 Nukleotide im Menschen sind also identisch mit den 21 Nukleotiden im Wurm. Und tatsächlich fanden sie heraus, dass jedes vielzellige Tier ein let-7-Gen besitzt. Und auch hier scheint let-7 Ziele durch Interaktion mit der 3’-UTR zu regulieren. Aber was uns noch fehlte…, trotz der Tatsache, dass diese ungefähr dieselbe Länge aufweisen wie siRNAs, blieb die Frage: Wie hängen die Synthesewege wirklich zusammen? Ist der Syntheseweg der RNAi mit dem der microRNA verwandt oder nicht? Und Allas Ergebnis ließ zum ersten Mal vermuten, dass die beiden Synthesewege verwandt sind. Und sie konnte zeigen, dass Mutationen in Dicer und Mutationen in diesen konservierten Argonauten zu Defekten in der Synthese führen. Hier ist der Wildtyp, aber wenn Dicer oder dieser Argonaut fehlen, gibt es einen Defekt in der Synthese dieses Vorläufers und es sammelt sich weniger von dieser reifen Form im Tier an. Der RNA-Interferenzmechanismus also, der an der Genstilllegung beteiligt ist, spielt eine konservierte Rolle bei der Genregulation, bei der der Wurm doppelsträngige RNA herstellt, indem er sie einfach durch reguläre Gene kodiert, die dann in diese siRNAs umgewandelt werden und fortfahren können, ihre Ziele zu regulieren. Das war sehr spannend. Und jetzt wird es noch spannender, weil sich herausstellt, dass diese microRNAs eine wichtige, entwicklungsbezogene Rolle spielen, darunter gibt es auch einige sehr wichtige Zusammenhänge mit der Krebsbiologie beim Menschen, darunter auch Zusammenhänge, bei denen die microRNAs an der Verhinderung der Zellteilung und dem Unterdrücken von Krebs beteiligt sind, also eine Art tumorunterdrückende Rolle für die microRNA-Gene, oder es sind „chimäre“ Gene, Gene, die die Zellteilung fördern. Dies ist eine Abbildung aus dem Labor von Carlo Croce. Es stellt sich heraus, dass dies verschiedene Patientenproben sind und dies ist ein Satz von etwa 100 microRNAs des Menschen. Hier schauen sie sich das Genexpressionsprofil in verschiedenen Patientenproben auf dieser Achse an. Und sie können erkennen, dass bestimmte microRNAs in manchen Tumoren hoch reguliert und in anderen runter reguliert sind. Wie sich herausstellt, ist es durch Betrachtung dieser Profile tatsächlich möglich, Voraussagen darüber zu machen, wie ein bestimmter Tumor auf eine Behandlung ansprechen wird. Außerdem erweisen sich einige der microRNAs, bei denen man erkannt hat, dass sie mit einem onkogenen Zustand korrelieren, als potenzielle Ziele, um das Tumorwachstum zu unterdrücken. Und hier gibt es noch viel mehr. Und ich glaube, daran arbeitet das Labor noch. Ich zeige Ihnen ein paar Folien der Arbeit von Wai Fong, einem neuen Postdoc im Labor. Was Sie hier sehen ist ein Gel, und dies sind tRNAs. Wir sehen RNAs. Und wenn Sie ganz nach unten, auf den Grund des Gels schauen, dort gibt es RNA-Spezies, was alle bisher einfach für Abfall hielten. Aber wie sich herausstellt, ist das genau die Stelle, an die die microRNAs wandern, ganz hier unten, hier gibt es eine Bande, die bei diesen Mutanten fehlte, wie Wai Fong bemerkte. Das sind die RNAi-Mangelmutanten. Das hier ist Dicer, die für den Syntheseweg der microRNA erforderlich ist. Und Sie erkennen, dass diese Bande hier vorhanden ist in Dicer…, sie ist im Wildtyp vorhanden, aber sie fehlt in diesen Mutanten hier. Das sind alles Mutationen eines Gens namens DRH-3, Dicer-Related Helikase 3. Und es stellt sich heraus, dass diese siRNAs triphosphoryliert sind, wohingegen Dicer, wenn sie diese RNA schneidet, aufgrund ihrer enzymatischen Wirkung ein Monophosphat am Ende erzeugt. Triphosphate würden von einer Polymerase hinterlassen und wir glauben, dass diese siRNAs die Produkte einer Polymerase sind. Diese Spezies hier, die microRNAs sind da, aber es gibt auch eine andere Spezies kleiner RNA mit irgendeiner 3'-Modifikation und wir sind noch dabei, diese zu analysieren. Hier sehen Sie ein Beispiel dafür, das sind was wir natürliche endogene kleine RNAs nennen. Sie unterscheiden sich von microRNAs dahingehend, dass sie nicht durch eine haarnadelartige Struktur codiert sind. Das ist ein Gen namens K02. Im Wildtyp ist die mRNA für dieses Gen in geringer Konzentration vorhanden und es gibt eine Menge siRNA in Tieren des Wildtyps. In den von Wai Fong analysierten Mutanten wird die Messenger-RNA jetzt in höherer Konzentration exprimiert und die siRNA ist verschwunden. Das sind also natürlich vorkommende Silencing-RNAs, die auf eines der wurmeigenen Gene abzielen, und wir wissen nicht warum. Also hat Wai Fong eine Strategie entwickelt, um diese zu sequenzieren. Das ist nur ein Beispiel dafür, aus Wai Fongs Sequenzierungsdaten, wie eine Karte dieser siRNAs aussieht. Wir beginnen gerade damit, mit einem sehr hohen Durchsatz zu sequenzieren. Kleine RNAs aus dem gesamten Genom des Wurms, um zu versuchen herauszufinden, auf welche Gene diese natürlichen Silencing-RNAs abzielen. Sie sehen, dass dieses bestimmte Gen mit diesem langen Namen hier wahrscheinlich Hunderte – oder Tausende siRNAs in jeder Zelle hat, die auf das ganze Gen abzielen. Und wir wissen nicht, wie diese generiert werden oder warum es sie gibt und wie sie im Tier funktionieren. Wir wissen jedoch, dass aus den rund 6.000 siRNAs dieses Typs, die wir analysiert haben, wir bereits 3.000 verschiedene Gene ausmachen konnten. In den Proben, die wir bisher analysiert haben, bilden die meisten Gene nur für wenige siRNAs ein Ziel. Daher glauben wir, dass sich dies als sehr wichtiger Regulationsmechanismus für die Gene im Wurm erweisen wird. Ist das also eine weitere Wurmsache oder nicht? Nun, das ist eine Maus und dies basiert – wir haben dieses Experiment gerade selbst in unserem Labor durchgeführt. Aber letztes Jahr gab es drei oder vier Artikel über etwas, das als piRNAs bezeichnet wird. Diese gibt es zuhauf in der Maus und die piRNAs sind eigentlich siRNAs mit 30 Nukleotiden, sie sind also länger als 21. Sie sind 30 Nukleotide lang. Sie kommen so häufig vor, dass sie ein leuchtendes Signal in mit Ethydiumbromid gefärbtem Gel bilden. Es ist erstaunlich, dass niemand sie je zuvor bemerkt hat. Wie sich herausstellt, interagieren sie jedoch mit der Piwi-Klasse, Argonauten. Darum werden sie piRNAs genannt. Und ihre Funktionen werden noch erforscht. Sie scheinen eine Rolle bei der Transposon-Suppression zu spielen, aber sie können auch noch eine grundlegendere Rolle bei der Genregulation spielen. Sie können sie wahrscheinlich kaum erkennen, aber das ist die Bande, die Wai Fong analysiert hat. Und es gibt Banden hier in der Maus, die eine ähnliche Intensität aufweisen. Es gibt also noch jede Menge zu erforschen darüber, wie diese kleinen RNAs die Entwicklung regulieren. Und ich komme jetzt am Ende meines Vortrags zurück auf dieses Konzept, wie die RNAs mit der DNA interagieren. Hier ist die Doppelstrang-DNA. Der Grund, warum ich diese Folie zeige, ist, mit der Entdeckung der DNA wurden die Molekularbiologen, glaube ich, ein wenig übermütig. Wir dachten, wir hätten herausgefunden, wie das Leben funktioniert, wir dachten, wir würden verstehen, wie Informationen in uns selbst gespeichert werden. Die DNA erklärt eine Menge, sie kann die mendelsche Aufteilung von Merkmalen erklären. Und sie kann erklären, wie genetisches Material repliziert wird und wie Mutationen entstehen können. Sie ist also ein sehr mächtiges Paradebeispiel, aber ich glaube, sie hat uns zu zuversichtlich gemacht. Und ich glaube, RNAi bringt uns ein bisschen zurück auf den Boden der Tatsachen. DNA sieht in der Zelle gar nicht so aus wie hier, sie ist eingehüllt und in diese Strukturen höherer Ordnung gefaltet. Das ist eine 30-nm-Faser, dies sind die Nukleosome und hier sehen Sie ein Kristallstrukturmodell, das die Histonproteine innen drinnen und die darum gewickelte DNA zeigt. Das hier ist eine andere Abbildung, in der die DNA ungefähr zwei Mal herumgeht. Und diese kleinen Schwänze ragen aus den Histonen hervor, und diese Schwänze, wie Sie vielleicht wissen, bilden die Ziele für viele Arten der Regulation. Sie können eine Rolle bei der Aktivierung oder Unterdrückung der Transkription der um diese Nukleosomen gewickelten DNA spielen. Und diese Information, die aus Proteinen stammt, die diese Schwänze modifizieren, ist für mich sehr interessant, denn es sieht so aus, als könnten siRNAs diese Modifikationen steuern, indem Sie remodellierende Komplexe und Proteine zum Chromatin bringen, die diese Änderungen am Histonschwanz erkennen. Aufgrund dieser Art der Interaktion zwischen dem Chromatin und der RNA kann man sich die DNA mehr wie die Hardware eines Computers vorstellen. Und die Proteine und die RNA, die regulieren, die mit diesen Histonschwänzen interagieren, sind wie die Software. Die Analogie, auf die ich gerne hinweise, ist die, dass wir uns für differenziert halten, richtig? Wir alle haben dasselbe Genom in jeder Zelle, aber Zellen verhalten sich unterschiedlich. Nun, warum verhalten sie sich unterschiedlich? Sie verhalten sich unterschiedlich, weil die DNA…, verschiedene Gene sind angeschaltet und andere Gene sind abgeschaltet und sie sind sehr stabil an- und abgeschaltet. Und das ist der Grund warum wir stabil differenzierte Lebewesen sind. Etwas, woran ich im Moment sehr interessiert bin, ist ein Konzept, für das wir gerade überlegen, wie es ich im Labor testen lässt, nämlich dass die Keimbahn selbst differenzieren kann, und dass dieser Differenzierungsprozess es der Keimbahn gestattet, sich ohne Änderung der zugrundeliegenden Nukleotidsequenz zu entwickeln. Man könnte sich also vererbbare Änderungen auf dieser Ebene vorstellen, die durch die Interaktionen mit siRNAs über viele Generationen beibehalten werden. Wenn Sie zurückschauen auf die Geschichte, wie man vor der DNA über die Evolution gedacht hat Leider haben wir alle ein zu großes Faible für Jargon, daher war sein Wort für Gene Biophoren. Aber er stellte sich Gene vor, die viele, viele Male pro Zellteilung repliziert werden konnten, nicht nur ein Mal. Und sie konnten ungleichmäßig auf die Zellen aufgeteilt werden. Er dachte, so ließen sich Differenzierung und Entwicklung erklären. Und er brachte dieses Konzept der Biophoren auf, das nach Mendels Entdeckungen verworfen wurde. Wenn Sie aber Weismanns Theorie lesen und überall dort, wo er das Wort Biophore verwendete, Biophore durch siRNA ersetzen, funktioniert seine Theorie wunderbar. Daher glaube ich, wir müssen einen Schritt zurückgehen und erneut über Evolution und Entwicklung nachdenken. Darwin ging noch weiter als Weismann und brachte das Wort „Gemmules“ in Umlauf. Und diese waren in der Lage, die somatischen Zellen zu verlassen und in die Keimbahn einzudringen und dort erbliche Änderungen hervorzurufen, die… ich sehe Hans aufstehen, das ist ein schlechtes Zeichen. Daher fasse ich mich kurz. Aber RNA könnte sein, RNAi, vielleicht sollten wir diese in RNA-Information umbenennen, denn die RNA kann die Regulation der DNA steuern. Nun, hier ist Hans. Ich bitte ihn, mich jederzeit anzurufen. Er ist übrigens derjenige, der den Anruf macht. Also seien Sie nett zu ihm. Hier sind Andy und seine Frau Rachel. Das ist die Klasse von 2006, das sind John Mather und George Smoot dort drüben, Orhan Pamuk, Rodger Kornberg, Ed Phelps, Muhammad Yunus und ein Vertreter der Grameen Bank. Das ist nur ein Familienfoto mit meiner Tochter Melissa und Victoria, die auch hier auf der Veranstaltung sind. Hier ist meine Frau, und sie erhält ein paar Ratschläge über Ökonomie auf dem Bankett. Und hier gibt sie selbst ein paar Ratschläge. Während des Banketts nannte Ed meine Frau eine Kommunistin – sie wuchs in Ungarn auf. Und hier ist George, der mir den Urknall erklärt. Und Sie erkennen, dass ich diesen glasigen Ausdruck im Gesicht habe, denn, wissen Sie, ich denke, das ist eine nette Geschichte, aber glauben Sie mir, es gibt in dieser Geschichte noch eine Menge Geheimnisse. Und hier ist Victoria, die ein paar Goldmedaillen einsammelt, das sind sehr nette Goldmedaillen, denn da drinnen ist Schokolade. Und hier ist Vickie, wie sie mit mir tanzt, es war eine tolle Zeit dort. Das ist die Gefahr einer dieser Preise, Sie können sehen, wie ich für einen Vorsitz am Nobelmuseum unterzeichne, und Sie können erkennen, was mit meinem Körper geschehen ist, mein Kopf ist riesig und mein Körper ist sehr klein ausgefallen. Das ist also eine der Gefahren. Aber, und ich sage Ihnen, es gibt ein echtes Gegenmittel dagegen, und ich ende einfach mit dieser Folie, das ist Tara Bean, 1998, das ist ihr Bild. Bei ihr wurde ein Gehirntumor im dritten Stadium festgestellt aufgrund der Sehstörungen, die sie entwickelte. Sie wuchs in meiner Heimatstadt auf, wir kennen ihre Familie, und sie wurde in dem Krankenhaus untersucht, in dem ich arbeite. Leider verlor sie ihren Kampf gegen den Krebs. Seit ihrem Tod haben wir eine Menge über die grundlegenden Mechanismen von Krebs gelernt. Wir müssen noch sehr viel mehr lernen. Wir arbeiten an einer Menge äußerst spannender Themen und es vergeht nicht ein Tag, sogar hier auf dieser Veranstaltung, an dem ich nicht irgendeine E-Mail von jemandem bekomme, der sich um einen kranken Angehörigen sorgt, jemand, der glaubt, dass ihm RNAi vielleicht helfen könnte. Und leider lautet die Antwort immer noch, dass solche Heilbehandlungen vielleicht noch Jahre brauchen und sehr schwierig sind. Daher müssen wir zurück an die Arbeit, sobald die Veranstaltung vorbei ist, jeder muss zurück an die Arbeit und versuchen, neue Wege der Heilbehandlung zu finden. Und ich glaube, ich mache hier Schluss. Tut mir leid, ich brauche immer länger. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank, Craig, das war ein wunderbarer Vortrag und wir lernen auch noch für die Zukunft. Ich fühlte mich wie ein schlechter Junge, hier hochzukommen und Dich zu unterbrechen. Aber da wir gesagt haben, wir wollten einige Fragen zulassen und andere Vorträge verlängern, dachte ich, das sollten wir auch tun. So, dieser Vortrag ist jetzt für Fragen geöffnet. Ich habe Ihre Hand zuerst gesehen. Mir wurde ein Mikrophon versprochen. Ja, sie hat eines. FRAGE. Ich heiße … (inaudible 50:05). Ich bin ein Arzt aus Pakistan. Sie sagten, dass RNAi die chromosomale Eliminierung von DNA bewirken kann. Ist es daher eine mögliche Therapie, Bakterien oder Viren, die doppelsträngige RNA exprimieren, zu injizieren, um die an der Pathophysiologie von Zellen in Tumoren oder Krebs beim Menschen oder bei Mausmodellen beteiligten Gene stillzulegen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, potenziell. Aber diese Silencing-Versuche, die beim Menschen jetzt gerade durchgeführt werden, zielen nicht darauf ab, die dem Zielgen entsprechende DNA zu eliminieren. Man kann mithilfe der RNAi ein teilweises Abschalten der Genexpression eines Gens in einer menschlichen Zelle erreichen. Und das wird gerade als therapeutische Strategie von vielen verschiedenen Firmen auf der Welt entwickelt. Und es werden sogar gerade einige klinische Studien am Menschen für mehrere verschiedene Indikationen durchgeführt. Es sieht daher so aus, als könne das ein zukunftsfähiger Ansatz sein, aber ob man je in der Lage sein wird, tatsächlich die Eliminierung eines Gens bei einem Patienten zu bewirken, weiß ich nicht, und in vielen Fällen möchte man das sicher auch gar nicht. Das ist also wahrscheinlich nicht möglich. Fragen? HANS JÖRNVALL. Ich habe eine andere Hand ganz in der Nähe gesehen und eine Hand dort drüben. FRAGE. Das ist wirklich erstaunlich und ich bin wirklich sensibilisiert. Aber zu Beginn Ihres Vortrags haben Sie auf die Bedeutung der Politik in der Wissenschaft hingewiesen und ich möchte Ihnen da vollkommen zustimmen. Ich habe auch festgestellt, dass es ein langer Weg bis zu dem war, was Sie heute vorgestellt haben. Und ich würde gerne von Ihnen hören, wie viel das kostet, denn ich interessiere mich sehr für die wirtschaftlichen Aspekte und dies alles muss ein Vermögen gekostet haben. Und ich weiß, dass die Bush-Regierung die Afrika-Forschung stark eingeschränkt hat, weil sie fand, wir sollten keine Geld für die Forschung verschwenden, sondern uns um die Armut kümmern. Und einige von uns haben das Gefühl, dass Forschung ein anderer Weg aus der Armut ist. Aus Ihrer Erfahrung, was würden Sie zu dieser Bemerkung sagen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, ich bin nicht sicher, ob ich Ihre Frage ganz verstanden habe. Aber lassen Sie mich einfach sagen, dass die Arzneimittel, die Sie aus RNAi gewinnen können, unter Verwendung von RNAi als Arzneimittel, so teuer und so stark auf den Einzelnen zugeschnitten sein werden, dass sie eine Menge Potenzial haben. Aber ich bezweifle sehr, dass sie zu mehr als einem paar Prozent der Weltbevölkerung durchdringen werden. Die leicht zu liefernden Arzneimittel sind Pillen. Und wenn man oral zu verabreichende kleine Moleküle entwickeln kann, dann kann man die Arznei wirklich kostengünstig in den Patienten bringen. RNAi dient dazu, neue Synthesewege erkennen zu helfen usw., um neue behandelbare Ziele zu finden. Aber RNAi als Arzneimittel wird sehr schwer als Therapie in die Dritte Welt zu bringen sein, denn sie muss injiziert werden. Das ist also ein wenig schwieriger. Ich glaube, das ist tatsächlich eines der Dinge, die wir lösen müssen. Wir können eine Menge Zeit damit verbringen, Krankheiten zu heilen, die nie zuvor geheilt wurden. Aber in großen Teilen der Welt sind die Krankheiten – da geht es einfach um Mangelernährung und Durchfall, wodurch viele Menschen sterben, oder Malaria oder eine andere bekannte Krankheit, die behandelbar wäre. Und die Medikamente fehlen dort aufgrund von politischer Instabilität oder Infrastrukturproblemen. Das sind die Dinge, für die, wie ich glaube, eine interdisziplinäre Anstrengung erforderlich ist, um zu versuchen sie zu lösen. Medizin…, wir können diesen Weg hin zu immer komplexerer, immer spezialisierterer Medizin weitergehen, ohne die Menschheit soweit voranzubringen wie wir könnten, wenn wir etwas Zeit investieren würden, um zu helfen,.. Ich glaube, das beantwortet in etwa Ihre Frage. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank. Und dann waren Sie dran, ja. FRAGE. Hi, ich bin Shawn aus … (inaudible 54:16) UK. Ich habe eine Frage zum Aspekt der Systembiologie. Ich habe viel über dieses Problem nachgedacht, wie die Zelle in Bezeug auf die Systembiologie entscheidet, welchen Teil der kleinen RNA man nehmen sollte. Bei einer viralen Antwort etwa gibt es mRNAs oder saRNA-Mechanismen. In Bezug auf das Wandzellkonzept, wie würde die Zelle den Mechanismus für die RNA-Abwehr auswählen? CRAIG MELLO. Ich habe keine Ahnung. Das ist eine sehr interessante Frage. Aber wissen Sie, die Regulation dieser Mechanismen ist etwas, das einfach noch nicht vollständig erforscht wurde. Wir wissen nicht, wie microRNAs wirklich funktionieren und wie sie ihre Ziele regulieren. Wir wissen nicht einmal, wie sie – vermutlich, weil sie verschiedene Methoden der Stilllegung haben – wissen wir nicht, welche sie – wie sie auswählen, wie, um das Gen entweder zu spalten oder um es einfach abzuschalten oder um es auf einen Lagerplatz zu senden. Es gibt eine Menge Möglichkeiten, wissen Sie. Eines der spannenden Dinge in Bezug auf RNAi jedoch betrifft die eukaryotische Zelle. Ich glaube, sie bildet einen Mechanismus, um Transkription und Translation zu verbinden, sodass die Zelle, während sie eine Botschaft transkribiert, diese zum Lagern und zur späteren Verwendung markieren kann. Ein Konzept, dass es der Zelle erlauben würde, eine zur späteren Verwendung gekennzeichnete Botschaft trotz vorhandener Kernmembran zu exportieren. Und das ist ein wirklich interessantes Konzept. Es gibt also jede Menge interessanter Möglichkeiten zur Regulation. Ich glaube, es wird Jahre dauern, die alle im Einzelnen zu erforschen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Weitere Fragen? Ich habe Ihre Hand gesehen und dann Ihre Hand. CRAIG MELLO. Ich glaube, Hans kann nicht weiter sehen als bis zu… HANS JÖRNVALL. Na danke. Ich habe nicht Deinen Weitblick. FRAGE. Ich heiße Matthew Albert und bin von INSERM in Frankreich. Ich interessiere mich für doppelsträngige RNA und Einzelstrang-RNA mit 5'-Triphosphaten. Sie sind als Adjuvantien in der Immunologie bekannt und senden ihre Signale durch Pattern-Recognition-Moleküle wie Toll-like Rezeptoren und interzelluläre Helikasen. Ich war neugierig zu erfahren, ob Würmer ähnliche Mechanismen für die Aktivierung des Immunsystems besitzen. Und wie Sie sich vorstellen, wie auf verschiedene Weise zwischen Zell- und Virus-RNA unterschieden werden kann, um anomale Immunreaktionen zu verhindern. Das ist eine großartige Frage. Und wirklich ist die Dicer-Related-Helikase, die ich genannt hatte, ein Homolog von RIG-I, MDA-5 und LGP-2, die alle zur Dicer-Familie der Helikasen gehören. Das ist unsere Bezeichnung für sie, Dicer-Related-Helikasen. Das Faszinierende daran aber ist, dass diese alle an der angeborenen Immunantwort des Menschen, der anti-viralen Antwort, beteiligt sind. Und kürzlich wurde die Dicer-Related-Helikase, menschliche Versionen davon, mit der Erkennung von triphosphorylierter, nicht siRNAs, sondern der viralen Produkte, die triphosphoryliert sind, in Zusammenhang gebracht. Es gibt also wirklich eine Homologie zwischen den anti-viralen Mechanismen beim Menschen und den RNAi-Mechanismen beim Wurm. Die Würmer haben sich eine sehr wirksame sequenzspezifische Antwort erhalten. Der Mensch hat diese Antwort entweder verloren oder sie ist sehr viel weniger wichtig oder es gibt sie nur bei bestimmten Zelltypen, wir wissen nicht, was davon zutrifft. Wenn die menschliche Zelle einen viralen Vorgang erkennt, begeht sie Selbstmord, und ein- und dieselben Rezeptoren sind sowohl an der Erkennung der viralen Replikationsprodukte als auch an der Aktivierung eines apoptotischen Signalwegs beteiligt. Das ist ein sehr effizienter Weg, einen Virus loszuwerden, wenn man über 10 Billionen Zellen verfügt, aber wenn man nur 1.000 hat, bringt man die Zellen besser nicht um. Daher sind die Würmer vielleicht sehr gut in Bezug auf den sequenzspezifischen Aspekt von antiviral oder Stilllegen. Die Homologie und die Ähnlichkeiten zwischen diesen Mechanismen sind faszinierend, und tatsächlich stellt sich heraus, dass LGP-2 der drei menschlichen Mitglieder dieser Familie mit Dicer und einem anderen Protein interagiert, das wir beim Wurm gefunden und pure 1 genannt haben. Es ist eine Phosphatase, die Triphosphate erkennt und zwei davon entfernt, um ein Monophosphat zu erzeugen. Es gibt einen Komplex beim Menschen, der anscheinend aus zumindest diesen drei Proteinen besteht. Daher glauben wir, dass die menschliche Zelle diesen Mechanismus auch haben könnte. Und wir sind noch dabei, herauszufinden, wie der Mensch das mit der sequenzspezifischen Stilllegung anstellt. HANS JÖRNVALL. Dann habe ich es Ihnen versprochen. Und danach gehen wir weiter weg. FRAGE. Ich heiße…(inaudible 59:16). Ich komme aus Indien. Was ich wissen wollte ist, ob Sie RNA-Interferenz bei der Heilung von Krebs oder dem Kampf gegen den Krebs verwenden. Gibt es einen Mechanismus oder gibt es eine Methode, RNA zellspezifisch zu machen, um die Mitose bei Krebszellen zu unterdrücken? Gibt es eine Möglichkeit, nur die Zellen dort drinnen anzusteuern? Denn der Mechanismus der Mitose ist bei normalen Zellen und bei Krebszellen der gleiche. CRAIG MELLO. Richtig, Krebs ist eine große Herausforderung für ein RNAi-Therapeutikum. Und ein sehr wichtiger Aspekt wäre offensichtlich, es spezifisch in den Tumor einzubringen, denn wenn man versucht, einzugreifen, sagen wir bei der Mitose, würde man die gesunden Zellen ebenfalls töten. Es ist das gleiche Problem wie bei vielen Krebstherapien. Das ist also auch ein Problem, das noch nicht gelöst wurde. Aber eines, an dem Leute arbeiten. Es gibt mögliche Lösungen, aber ich kann Ihnen im Moment keine nennen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Könnten wir das Mikrofon vielleicht hier rüber bekommen? FRAGE. Würmer reagieren außerordentlich sensibel auf RNAi. Ich meine, sie nehmen sie sogar über ihre Nahrung auf. Welche evolutionären Vorteile hat die Entwicklung einer solchen Sensitivität Ihrer Meinung nach? Ich meine, wenn man bedenkt, dass es diese bei anderen Organismen nicht gibt. CRAIG MELLO. Warum sind sie so empfindlich, dass sie sie sogar über ihr Nahrung übertragen können? Das ist sehr interessant. Wissen Sie, diese Würmer sind Hermaphroditen, sie sind auch zur Befruchtung in der Lage, Fremdbefruchtung durch männliche Tiere. Aber sie kolonisieren Nahrung im Boden, sehr häufig findet ein einzelner Wurm die Nahrung und muss dann die Nahrungsquelle ohne einen Partner besiedeln. Daher befruchten sie sich selbst und erzeugen Tausende und Millionen von Nachkommen. Wenn Sie anfangen zu hungern, machen sie etwas sehr Interessantes: Diese Mütter sind sehr altruistisch, sie behalten ihre Eier auch, wenn sie hungern und sie gestatten den Eiern, in ihnen drinnen zu reifen. Auf diese Art reifen die Nachkommen in der Gegenwart einer reichen Nahrungsquelle heran, der Mutter. Und dann fressen sie die Mutter, sie erreichen ein Alter, in dem sie alt genug sind, zu einer Dauer-Larve zu werden, einer sehr resistenten Form, und sie können im Boden davon wandern, um neue Nahrungsquellen zu finden. Das interessante daran ist, dass, wenn ein Tier hungert und seinen Nachkommen gestattet, es selbst zu fressen…, es hat vielleicht zu Lebzeiten Immunität gegen Viren entwickelt, die dann über die Nahrungsaufnahme an die Nachkommen weitergegeben werden kann. Das ist eine Erklärung, die mir jetzt einfach so einfällt, so eine Art umfassende Idee. Aber ich glaube, es ist möglich, dass – aufgrund der Art, wie sie leben, möchten sie bestimmt in der Lage sein, diese Silencing-Aktivitäten an ihre Nachkommen weiterzugeben. Ein etwas peinlicher Aspekt des Ganzen ist, dass Forscher, die sich mit C.elegans beschäftigen noch nicht einen einzigen Virus aus ihnen isoliert haben. Daher kennen wir keinen Virus, den wir verwenden könnten, um dieses Modell, na sagen wir, zu testen. Es gibt keine viralen, existierenden viralen Beispiele von Nematoden. Vielleicht sind sie einfach so gut darin, sie auszuschalten. Wahrscheinlich ist es einfach keine stabile Interaktion im Labor. Daher verlieren wir sie sehr schnell. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank. Ich dachte gerade, ich sollte sagen, dass wir hier aufhören. Aber noch eine letzte Frage für Sie. CRAIG MELLO. Sie können sie rufen. Ich werde sie hören. FRAGE. Sie betrifft die Verwendung von siRNA und Therapie: Gibt es kein Problem zwischen der hohen Spezifizität von siRNA und den Abweichungen in den Allelen bei defekten Genen? Zum Beispiel bei der Verwendung von shRNA zur Bekämpfung von AIDS, es gibt eine Menge HIV-Mutanten. So, wie könnten Sie sich das vorstellen? CRAIG MELLO. Nun, man könnte zelluläre Gene als Target verwenden, die weniger zu Mutationen neigen, das ist eine Strategie. Und natürlich könnte man eine siRNA konstruieren, die an der Region des Genoms ansetzt, die aus irgendwelchen Gründen nicht sehr häufig mutiert. Und diese Strategien werden versucht. Ich glaube, es läuft gerade eine HIV-Studie, bei der Silencing-RNA mittels Gentherapie eingebracht wird. In den USA ist das entweder schon genehmigt oder wird es in Kürze werden. Man versucht es also mit diesem Ansatz sogar bei HIV. Aber normalerweise gibt es nicht so viele Abweichungen bei den Allelen, daher kann man sich eine Region aussuchen. Jedenfalls nicht bei normalen Genen. Bei viralen Genen – ja, da schon. Aber bei den normalen zellulären Genen gibt es weniger Variabilität. Daher kann man eine siRNA wählen, die auf eine konservierte Region abzielt. Interessanterweise kann man, im Falle einer dominanten Mutation zum Beispiel, die zu einem veränderten Phänotyp führt, seine siRNA sogar so konstruieren, dass sie nur auf das mutierte Allel abzielt. Und das geschieht mit einiger Selektivität, man kann spezifisch das mutierte Allel ausschalten, indem man die siRNA entsprechend konstruiert. So dass sie das Wildtyp-Allel nicht spaltet, nur das mutierte. Es gibt also noch jede Menge Möglichkeiten, RNAi als Therapeutikum einzusetzen. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank.

Craig Mello on the use of C. elegans to study RNAi and to discover genes encoding the RNAi machinery
(00:26:19 - 00:27:37)

 

<strong>Caenorhabditis elegans</strong><p>Picture/Credit: HeitiPaves/istockphoto.com</p>
Caenorhabditis elegans

Picture/Credit: HeitiPaves/istockphoto.com

 

C. elegans was also instrumental in elucidating the details behind the genetic programme that sets in motion programmed cell death. In his lecture at the 60th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2010, Robert Horvitz, who shared the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Sydney Brenner and John Sulston, introduces C. elegans as a model organism, describes its characteristics and outlines how it was used to unravel the blueprint governing programmed cell death.

 

Robert Horvitz (2010) - Programmed Cell Death in Development and Disease

Hans, thank you for the introduction, and to the Countess and Count, I’d like to thank you very much for inviting me to join this wonderful celebration and for inviting all of us who are here. I must say that I’m very delighted to have had the opportunity and I look forward to the continuing times of interacting with the truly outstanding and interesting students who are gathered at this meeting. Now, in the context of advice and thinking a little about what Roger Tsien talked about earlier today, I think I very briefly will cite the advice I was given when I was a graduate student by my PhD advisor, Jim Watson, who is known for the Watson Crick double helix. And Jim basically said: In choosing a problem to think primarily about two things. First, the problem should be important, because it’s no harder to work on an important problem than on a non-important problem. And secondly, the problem must be tractable, because no matter how important the problem, if you can’t make headway it won’t help. Now, that’s not to say that the problem has to be easily tractable and you may have to innovate to make it tractable, but if you can’t make it tractable, nothing is likely to come of it. So what I’m going to do this morning is tell you a little about a problem called programmed cell death. And I’ll focus on findings from our research lab. Talking mostly about some historical findings, but also trying to at the end bring you up to date with a message that basically says “science doesn’t end”. Discoveries lead to progress, but always I think to incomplete stories. And inform us better about what questions to ask going forward. So let me make some introductory comments about programmed cell death. Programmed cell death refers to the cell death that occurs as a normal aspect of the development of animals. And also to other cell deaths that use the same mechanisms as used in those naturally occurring cell deaths. And there are many examples of programmed cell death in biology. For example, if you think about the metamorphosis of a tadpole into a frog. The tail of the tadpole is lost, that tail consists of cells, the fundamental units of life, and those cells die. If you think about the development for example of a human embryo and a baby, in utero, between our digits, between fingers and toes there are cellular regents that make for webs and those cells die so that our fingers and toes become separate. This regulation can be controlled among species, so that if you think for example about ducks, some have webbed feet, very useful for swimming, some do not, and the difference is a difference in the regulation of programmed cell death. In the development of our brains, programmed cell death is very important. As many as 85% of the nerve cells that are generated as the human brain forms, die. In our immune systems, as we sit here today, as many as 95% of certain of the blood cells involved in our immune responses we generate, as many as 95% die by programmed cell death. Programmed cell death is pervasive in biology. And yet I think it’s not so many years ago when biologists thought about cell death, and I probably should say, if biologists thought about cell death, the basic thinking was cell death is not interesting, rather it’s a phenomenon to be avoided because what does a biologist do? Study cells that are alive, if cells die you can’t do your work. That's a problem, but it’s not an interesting problem. What we know today is this is not the way to think about cell death in many cases. Cell death can be an active process on the part of cells that die and particular genes can act in cells to make those cells die. So there is a biology of cell death, every bit as much as there is a biology of other fundamental processes like cell division, cell migration and cell differentiation. Now, where there is a biology there also can be a pathology. Any normal biological process, if it goes wrong in us, can lead to disease and program cell death is no exception to this. There are many diseases now, and this is just a short and somewhat old list, diseases that are known to be associated with abnormalities in cell death. In some cases cells that should live, die, for example neural degenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, heart attacks, congestive heart failure, liver diseases, kidney diseases. We can go on and on with disorders in which cells die. And in at least some of these disorders, but not necessarily all, it has been shown that what is going on is an unleashing of the normal developmental program for cell death in the wrong cell types or at the wrong time. Conversely there are disorders in which cells that should die instead live. For example autoimmune disorders. In our immune system we generate cells that have the capacity to recognise cells in our own body. And normally these cells die by program cell death. If they do not autoimmune disease results. Cancer people often think about, as uncontrolled cell division, cells divide and divide and divide leading to too many cells. Well, in fact the number of cells in our tissues is defined by two opposing processes, the process of cell division, which adds cells, and the process of programmed cell death, which removes cells. And the number of cells can be too high, either because of too much cell division or too little cell death. And certain cancers are fundamentally cancers that are caused by too little cell death and it appears today that most if not all cancers involve too little cell death. Furthermore, some of the classic remedies, some of the treatments for cancer, radiation, chemotherapy they act by activating the endogenous process of programmed cell death. So what this says is that an understanding of the biology and the biologic mechanisms that are involved in programmed cell death is very important both to understanding biology and also to understanding and approaching treatments for a broad variety of diseases. So what I’m going to tell you about now is the discovery and characterisation of genes that function in this process of programmed cell death based upon work primarily from my laboratory over the years. And I want to say that we made these discoveries not focused on a human disease and even not focused on studies of a mammal, but rather using a very simple animal, a microscopic nematode or roundworm, known as caenorhabditis elegans. Now, this animal was introduced to modern biology by my friend, colleague and mentor Sydney Brenner, with whom I shared the Nobel Prize. And it was studied in detail by another friend, colleague and mentor, John Sulston. And one thing that John did was to analyse the development of this very simple animal. It turns out this animal contains as an adult only about 1,000 cells, this is to contrast with us, where in our brains alone we have more than 10 to the 11 cells. And what John did was to study the cell lineage. Starting as all organisms do from a single cell, C. elegans divide from 1 cell to 2 to 4 and so on. And this diagram depicts the developmental origin of every cell in the animal. The Y axis here is time and each vertical line terminates in a cell. If you count quickly going across, you will see that there are 959 cells generated in the adult animal and an additional 131 cells that are generated but are not found in the adult animal. These 131 die developmentally by programmed cell death. And this is one thing that John Sulston established. Now, what we did was to seek genes involved in this process, we did this by looking for genetic variance, mutants, abnormal and the patterns of programmed cell death, cells that should live, die or cells that should die live. And in this way we identified four steps in the process of programmed cell death. First, every cell in the animal must decide: I will live or I will die by programmed cell death. Second, for those cells that decide to die, they must literally execute that decision. Thirdly, dying cells, the corpses must be engulfed by neighbouring cells to remove those dying cells from the body of the animal. And fourthly, the macro molecular debris of the cell corps must be degraded. Another way to remember these steps is very simply indicated here. Identify the victim, kill, get rid of the body and destroy the evidence. So that’s the essence of programmed cell death. How did we get there? Well, again we began with genetic studies. This is the nose of an animal and in essence what we did, and by we I mean a graduate student, Hilary Ellis, and all of the story that I will tell you about today was carried out experimentally by young students, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the lab. Hilary Ellis is a graduate student. Basically looked for mutants in which those cells that die normally by programmed cell death do not. And what you can see here, depicted with these arrows, are cells that are in the process of undergoing programmed cell death. And here is a mutant in which those cell deaths cannot be seen. This mutant defined a gene which we called CED-3 for cell death abnormal gene number 3. And it turned out that the mutation that perturbed this gene eliminates the function of the gene. So without CED-3 function, cells that should die instead live, this very simply tells us what CED-3 does, CED-3 kills. Without CED-3 function programmed cell death does not occur. In further studies, this finding, let me back up for a moment, this finding lead to a very important conclusion because it said since programmed cell death requires the function of a specific gene, this means that programmed cell death is an active biologic process. Cells are not dying by default, something biologic is going on to cause them to die. We continued our studies, identified a second gene called CED-4 which behaves very similarly to CED-3, it too is required for killing. Then another graduate student, Junying Yuan, asked where do these killer genes function. Do they function essentially as suicide genes within the cells that are about to die or do they function elsewhere in the body, perhaps sending some signal throughout the body, telling certain cells to die. And what she found was the answer is the former, both of these genes act within cells that are going to die, saying that to at least this extent programmed cell death is a process of cellular suicide. Junying Yuan and another graduate student, Shai Shaham, then characterised the CED-3 gene molecularly and discovered that the CED-3 protein looks like a protein just discovered, actually we had to wait for its discovery, by two pharmaceutical companies interested in human inflammatory diseases. The CED-3 protein is similar to a protein known as ICE, interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme. This is a protease, we heard a little about proteases from Roger earlier this morning. And this finding told us that CED-3 likely acts as a protease cutting up other proteins to drive the process of programmed cell death and post doctoral researcher Ding Xue who had previously been trained by Marty Chalfie, from whom we’re going to hear from next, demonstrated that in fact this is the case. It turned out that CED-3 and ICE are the founding members of a family of proteases, today known as caspases and many studies from many laboratories have shown that caspases drive programmed cell death, not only in C. elegans but also probably in all animals, certainly including ourselves. Now, meanwhile we kept looking for genes. CED-4 we characterised molecularly. Four years later, Xiaodong Wang, working in Dallas, Texas, in the US, found the human counterpart of CED-4. It looks similar and like CED-4, it can drive the process of programmed cell death, which I should say often is referred to by a word that has four syllables, beings with A, and is pronounced in at least seven different ways. I’ll leave it to you to choose how you would like to pronounce this. The Greek speakers in the room have probably the right answer, which none of the rest of us ever use. Then Ron Ellis, a graduate student in the lab, found another cell death gene. And this one was different from CED-3 and CED-4, instead of being a killer, it is a protector, it protects cells against programmed cell death. Graduate student Michael Hengartner cloned this gene CED-9 and discovered it looks like a human cancer gene. A gene called Bcl-2, Bcl stands for B-cell lymphoma and this is a cancer gene that causes cancer by causing B-cells in our immune systems to not die. And that survival of these cells leads to their proliferation and the cancer is state and Bcl-2 like CED-9 protects against cell death. Now, people sometimes have asked me if you ever had an ah-ha moment, eureka, discovery, you know you’re on to something that’s important. And the answer here is that on February 12th 1992 I was attending a conference and graduate student Michael Hengartner was doing something worthwhile. He was working in the lab, he had identified the CED-9 sequence, he did a computer search at this relatively early data base and he sent me this fax at the meeting which says, ‘guess what ends up at the top of the search, the answer human Bcl-2’. And this was the moment that we knew we not only were discovering a fundamental biological pathway in C.elegans that had some counterparts but also that this pathway we were working on was going to be very important in the context of human disease and at this point in particular in the context of cancer. Now, the similarity between CED-9 and Bcl-2, both had similar sequence information, both protected against cell death, led us to ask the question how close are these genes really. And we were able to show that the human Bcl-2 gene, if expressed in C. elegans, would work and furthermore if expressed in a C. elegans mutant defective in CED-9 function, Bcl-2 would substitute for the worm gene. The fact that the human gene could substitute for the worm gene said not only are these genes piecemeal similar, but also there must be similar pathways. And we then worked out the basic pathway and this core pathway looks as indicated here. CED-3 caspase kills, CED-4 kills by promoting the activity of CED-3 and CED-9 protects by preventing CED-4 from promoting the activity of CED-3. We kept looking. Next we found in work from post doc Barbara Conradt, a third killer gene called egl-1. And what Barbara discovered was that egl-1 acts in the pathway at a different point than the other 2 killer genes, before rather than after CED-9. So egl-1 kills by preventing CED-9 from preventing CED-4 from activating CED-3. And this then proved to be the core molecular genetic pathway for programmed cell death and subsequent experiments by a variety of labs showed that these proteins each interact physically sequentially. Egl-1 with CED-9, CED-9 with CED-4, CED-4 to CED-3. And so this is both a biochemical and a genetic pathway for this core component of programmed cell death. Now, with this information one can begin to think about applications to medicine. And the biotechnologies in pharmaceutical industries took note, in fact the day we published our paper about CED-3 is a caspase. I received telephone calls from five pharmaceutical companies, including one from an old friend who said: Since then, a variety of companies have pursued the human counterparts of these players in attempts to discover and develop therapies. For example caspases are killers, so that if you could inhibit a caspase, you could prevent diseases that have too much programmed cell death. The clinical efforts that have gone furthest, are actually in the context of liver diseases in programs that are active today. Conversely, if you could inhibit a CED-9 Bcl-2-like protective protein, you could activate cell death in cells that were otherwise being protected, inhibition of Bcl-2 family members is an active area of interest for cancer and there are a number of anti Bcl-2 programs that are currently in what to my eye look very promising clinical trials for certain specific cancers. Ok, now let’s go on beyond this core pathway. Very succinctly, this is just the beginning, the next step, that of engulfment of phagocytosis of the cell corps, we also have worked out in some detail, we have studied what happens upstream of this core pathway and it turns out that that first step of egl-1 driving the pathway is regulated by cell type in a very specific way. At the level of gene expression with specific transcription factors controlling this process. Different cells are controlled by different transcription factors. We have worked out many cases in C. elegans. In each of these cases we find human counterparts and many of these cases the human counterparts are shown to also act in cell death and apoptosis and human disease. Most of the ones that we’ve characterised are players in cancer, here’s one set of cells, here’s a second set of cells, but that’s not always the case and without going through the details, here is a picture of how this first killer gene in the killing pathway is regulated by different transcription factors in different cell types. We go on to another story, to ask if the generalisation, specific control of this gene egl-1 and cancer is generalisable and the answer is not always. There are always, as we have heard this morning already, surprises and I won’t go through the details. But in fact here is a case where we studied a particular kind of nerve cell death, a neuron in the head of the male that he uses to chemically sense the presence of the opposite sex. And in the other sex, which is not female but hermaphrodite, these cells are generated but die, so this is sexually dimorphic programmed cell death. And the primary regulation of this cell death is not the control of the egl-1 killer gene, but rather down stream the control of the gene CED-3. And this is work both done by Hillel Schwartz, a graduate student in my lab, and Barbara Conradt, who had been a post doc in my lab, working independently. And interestingly, when we ask about human counterparts now and human disease, there are counterparts, but the disorder at least from what's been seen in studies of mice, is not cancer, but rather a neurologic disorder, deafness. If the counterpart in mice is inactivated, the mouse is deaf, the reason is that the hair cells in the ear die and what it looks like, but this is still a work in progress, not by us but by the people who are interested in mice and deafness. What it looks like is that these hair cells are dying because the process of programmed cell death is activated and that leads to the deafness. And this story comes again, the understanding of this story comes from the study of a sexually dimorphic programmed cell death in C. elegans. Now, to go from there, many more genes, much pathway, human counterparts, various diseases, big picture and then is this it. And the fundamental answer and what I said at the beginning is discovery leads to exception, leads to new discovery. As we look very carefully, we find that even in the absence of the CED-3 caspase there is some programmed cell death. Furthermore, the entire pathway that I’ve told you about is not needed for these few programmed cell deaths. There are other caspases encoded by the C. elegans genome and we have eliminated all of them and there is still programmed cell death. So no caspase, no core pathway, still a little bit of programmed cell death. What do these cell deaths look like, there are various criteria for defining the landmark morphological set of changes associated with programmed cell death apoptosis, these are apoptotic deaths by every criterion we can test. And yet this core fundamental pathway is not needed, there is some other way to get there. We have some hints about how this pathway is activated, but the mechanism we do not know and that means we’re not out of business yet, there’s still more things to discover. So with that I want to make one over reaching statement. The studies that we did were fundamentally basic research. We did not target any disease, we worked on an organism that at the point I started was not only obscure but people thought irrelevant. The studies we did were fundamentally genetic in nature at the beginning, genetic studies are often abstract and formalisms. I didn’t know if what we found would be relevant to any organism other than C. elegans and yet our findings have established mechanisms that appear to be universal amongst animals and that are providing the basis for a variety of explorations into new treatments for a very broad variety of human diseases. And I think there is a very fundamental message here and one I hope that every one in the audience, students and the rest of us, will always keep in mind, be it for defining our own research programs or in following the advice we heard at dinner last night, and talking to funding agencies and the public. Basic research is the driver, I wrote here of biomedical knowledge, but for this audience I would say of scientific knowledge. Basic research, curiosity based research is the future of all that we can and will know and it is crucially important for intellectual reasons and for pragmatic socioeconomic reasons that basic research be supported appropriately from those sources that are best suited to do this and that in my view is national governments. So with that little bit what I want to do is to end by showing you a celebratory reunion from 2002, thank you Hans for helping in making that party possible and also I list here those people currently in and previously in the lab, whose work I alluded to day, our studies for programmed cell death have been but one of a variety of adventures we’ve had and certainly one of the ones that has been most rewarding and most existing. And I’ll stop with that and thank you very much.

Hans, vielen Dank für die Einleitung. Ihnen, Frau Gräfin, Herr Graf, möchte ich ganz herzlich dafür danken, dass Sie mich eingeladen haben, an dieser wunderbaren Feier teilzunehmen, und dass Sie uns alle, die wir hier sind, eingeladen haben. Ich muss sagen, ich bin überglücklich, dass ich die Chance hatte, mit den wirklich brillanten und interessanten Studenten zu diskutieren, die bei dieser Zusammenkunft versammelt sind, und ich freue mich auf die weiteren Gelegenheiten. Aufgrund von entsprechenden Hinweisen und in Gedanken an das, wovon Roger Tsien heute bereits gesprochen hat, werde ich ganz kurz den Ratschlag zitieren, den ich als Doktorand von meinem Doktorvater Jim Watson bekam, der für die Watson-Crick-Doppelhelix bekannt ist. Im Wesentlichen sagte Jim, dass man bei der Wahl eines Problems vor allem zwei Dinge bedenken sollte: Erstens sollte das Problem von Bedeutung sein, denn es ist nicht schwieriger, an der Lösung eines wichtigen Problems zu arbeiten als an der Lösung eines unwichtigen Problems. Und zweitens muss das Problem lösbar sein. Denn wenn man nicht vorankommt, hilft alles nichts, egal, wie groß die Bedeutung des Problems ist. Das heißt nun nicht, dass das Problem einfach und leicht zu lösen sein muss. Möglicherweise muss man neue Wege gehen, um es lösbar zu machen. Wenn einem das jedoch nicht gelingt, wird man vermutlich zu keinem Ergebnis kommen. Ich werde Ihnen also heute Vormittag ein wenig über ein Problem erzählen, das als programmierter Zelltod bezeichnet wird. Dabei werde ich mich auf Forschungsergebnisse unseres Labors konzentrieren. Hauptsächlich werde ich von historischen Forschungsergebnissen berichten, aber ich werde auch versuchen, Sie am Ende auf den neuesten Stand zu bringen, und zwar mit einer Botschaft, die im Wesentlichen besagt, dass die Wissenschaft nie an ein Ende kommt. Entdeckungen führen zu Fortschritt, aber, meiner Ansicht nach, immer zu unvollständigen Beschreibungen: Sie verschaffen uns ein besseres Wissen darüber, welche Fragen wir stellen sollten, wenn wir weiter voranschreiten. Lassen Sie mich also zunächst einige einleitende Bemerkungen zum Thema des programmierten Zelltods machen. Als "programmierten Zelltod" bezeichnet man denjenigen Zelltod, der als ein normaler Aspekt der Entwicklung von Tieren vorkommt, sowie auch andere Zelltode, die sich derselben Mechanismen bedienen, die in jenen sich natürlich ereignenden Zelltoden eingesetzt werden. In der Biologie gibt es viele, viele Beispiele für programmierte Zelltode. Denken Sie zum Beispiel an die Metamorphose von einer Kaulquappe zu einem Frosch. Dabei verschwindet der Schwanz der Kaulquappe. Dieser Schwanz besteht aus Zellen, den grundlegenden Einheiten des Lebens, und diese Zellen sterben. Oder denken Sie beispielsweise an die Entwicklung eines menschlichen Embryos und eines Babys im Uterus. Zwischen unseren Digiti, den Fingern und Zehen, gibt es Zellregionen, die sich zu einer Schwimmhaut entwickeln, und jene Zellen sterben, so dass unsere Finger und Zehen voneinander getrennt werden. Diese Regulierung kann bei den verschiedenen Arten unterschiedlich gesteuert werden. Wenn Sie zum Beispiel an Enten denken, so haben einige Schwimmhäute, die beim Schwimmen sehr nützlich sind, und andere haben keine. Der Unterschied ist ein Unterschied in der Regulierung des programmierten Zelltods. Bei der Entwicklung unseres Gehirns ist der programmierte Zelltod von großer Bedeutung. Bis zu 85 % der Nervenzellen, die bei der Entstehung des menschlichen Gehirns gebildet werden, sterben. In unserem Immunsystem, so, wie wir heute hier sitzen, sterben bis zu 95 % von bestimmten Blutzellen, die an unseren Immunreaktionen beteiligt sind und die wir bilden, durch programmierten Zelltod. Programmierter Zelltod ist in der Biologie allgegenwärtig. Dennoch ist es, wie ich glaube, noch nicht so lange her, dass, wenn Biologen sich mit Zelltod beschäftigten - und wahrscheinlich sollte ich sagen: falls Biologen sich mit Zelltod beschäftigten -, der Grundgedanke war, dass Zelltod nicht interessant sei. Vielmehr handle es sich dabei um ein Phänomen, das man meiden sollte, denn was tut ein Biologe? Er untersucht lebende Zellen, und wenn Zellen sterben, kann er seine Arbeit nicht machen - das ist ein Problem, aber kein spannendes Problem. Heute wissen wir, dass dies in vielen Fällen nicht die richtige Herangehensweise für eine Beschäftigung mit dem Tod von Zellen ist. Zelltod kann ein von den sterbenden Zellen selbst aktiv betriebener Prozess sein. Bestimmte Gene können in den Zellen wirksam werden, um die Zelle sterben zu lassen. Folglich gibt es ebenso eine Biologie des Zelltods wie es eine Biologie anderer grundlegender Vorgänge wie Zellteilung, Zellmigration und Zelldifferenzierung gibt. Nun: Wo es eine Biologie gibt, da kann es auch eine Pathologie geben. Jeder normale biologische Vorgang kann, wenn er fehlschlägt, bei uns zu einer Erkrankung führen, und programmierter Zelltod stellt hiervon keine Ausnahme dar. Es gibt viele Krankheiten, wobei das Folgende nur eine kurze und etwas veraltete Liste ist, von denen man weiß, dass sie mit Abnormalitäten in Bezug auf den Tod von Zellen in Verbindung stehen. In einigen Fällen sterben Zellen, die leben sollten. Dies ist der Fall bei degenerativen Erkrankungen des Nervensystems: bei der Alzheimer-Krankheit, Chorea Huntington, Parkinson-Krankheit, Amyotrophe Lateralsklerose, Herzinfarkt, Herzinsuffizienz, Erkrankungen der Leber und der Nieren. Wir haben eine nicht enden wollende Liste von Krankheiten, bei denen Zellen absterben. Und zumindest für einige dieser Erkrankungen, jedoch nicht notwendigerweise für alle, hat man nachgewiesen, dass das normale Entwicklungsprogramm für den Zelltod in den falschen Zellen oder zur falschen Zeit ausgelöst wird. Umgekehrt gibt es Krankheiten, bei denen Zellen, die sterben sollten, stattdessen weiterleben. Ein Beispiel sind Autoimmunerkrankungen. Wir erzeugen in unserem Immunsystem Zellen, die über die Fähigkeit verfügen, Zellen in unserem eigenen Körper zu erkennen. Im Normalfall sterben diesen Zellen durch programmierten Zelltod. Tun sie dies nicht, führt dies zu Erkrankungen des Autoimmunsystems. Was Krebs betrifft, so halten viele Leute diese Krankheit für unkontrollierte Zellteilung - Zellen teilen und teilen und teilen sich, und dies führt dazu, dass zu viele Zellen entstehen. Tatsächlich wird die Anzahl der Zellen in unseren Geweben durch zwei entgegengesetzte Prozesse bestimmt: durch den Prozess der Zellteilung, durch den Zellen hinzugefügt werden, und durch den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods, durch den Zellen entfernt werden. Und die Anzahl der Zellen kann zu groß sein, weil entweder zu viele Zellteilungen stattfinden oder weil zu wenige programmierte Zelltode eintreten. Bestimmte Krebsarten sind im Grunde Krebsarten, die sich als Folge von zu wenigen Zelltoden ergeben. Heute scheint es so, dass die meisten, wenn nicht sogar alle Krebsarten etwas damit zu tun haben, dass zu wenige Zelltode eintreten. Darüber hinaus entfalten einige der klassischen Heilmittel, einige der Behandlungsformen bei Krebs - Bestrahlung, Chemotherapie - ihre Wirkung, indem sie den endogenen Prozess des programmierten Zelltods aktivieren. Das heißt, dass ein Verständnis der Biologie des programmierten Zelltods und der daran beteiligten biologischen Mechanismen sehr wichtig ist: sowohl für das Verständnis der Biologie als auch, um Behandlungsmethoden für die unterschiedlichsten Krankheiten zu erkennen und anzugehen. Ich werde Ihnen also nun, in erster Linie basierend auf der über Jahre in meinem Labor durchgeführten Forschungsarbeiten, von der Entdeckung der Gene berichten, die in diesem Prozess des programmierten Zelltods eine Rolle spielen, und sie beschreiben. Ich möchte dazu sagen, dass wir uns nicht auf eine Erkrankung des Menschen und noch nicht einmal auf Studien eines Säugetiers konzentrierten, als wir diese Entdeckungen machten. Vielmehr beschäftigten wir uns in unseren Untersuchungen mit einem sehr einfachen Tier, einem mikroskopisch kleinen Nematoden oder Spulwurm mit dem Namen Caenorhabditis elegans. Dieses Tier wurde von meinem Freund, Kollegen und Mentor Sydney Brenner, mit dem ich den Nobelpreis teilte, in die moderne Biologie eingeführt. Und es wurde von einem anderen Freund, Kollegen und Mentor, John Sulston, ausführlich studiert. Unter anderem analysierte John die Entwicklung dieses sehr einfachen Tiers. Es stellte sich heraus, dass es im adulten Stadium nur ungefähr 1000 Zellen besitzt. Im Gegensatz dazu besitzen wir allein in unserem Gehirn mehr als 1011 Zellen. Und John studierte die Zelllinie. Wie alle Organismen nimmt C. elegans in einer einzigen Zelle seinen Anfang und teilt sich dann von einer Zelle in zwei, dann in vier und so fort. Dieses Schaubild stellt den Ursprung der Entwicklung einer jeden Zelle des Tieres dar. Die Y-Achse hier ist die Zeit, und jede vertikale Linie endet in einer Zelle. Wenn Sie rasch nachzählen, werden Sie feststellen, dass es im adulten Tier 959 Zellen gibt, die gebildet wurden, und weitere 131 Zellen, die zwar gebildet wurden, aber nicht in dem adulten Tier zu finden sind. Diese 131 sterben im Laufe der Entwicklung durch programmierten Zelltod. Dies wurde von John Sulston bewiesen. Was wir nun taten, war, nach den an diesem Prozess beteiligten Genen zu suchen, indem wir nach genetischen Abweichungen, Mutationen und Abnormalitäten und den Mustern des programmierten Zelltods Ausschau hielten. Zellen, die leben sollen, sterben, und Zellen, die sterben sollen, leben. Auf diese Weise identifizierten wir vier Schritte im Prozess des programmierten Zelltods. Als erstes muss jede Zelle dieses Tieres entscheiden: "Ich werde leben" oder "Ich werde durch programmierten Zelltod sterben". Als zweites müssen jene Zellen, die sich entscheiden zu sterben, diese Entscheidung buchstäblich vollstrecken. Drittens müssen die Leichen der sterbenden Zellen von den benachbarten Zellen umflossen und verschlungen werden, um jene sterbenden Zellen aus dem Körper des Tiers zu entfernen. Und viertens müssen die makromolekularen Trümmer der Zellleichen abgebaut werden. Eine andere Methode, um sich diese Schritte zu merken, ist hier auf ganz einfache Art und Weise angegeben: Man identifiziere das Opfer, töte es, beseitige die Leiche und vernichte die Beweise. Dies sind die wesentlichen Schritte des programmierten Zelltods. Wie gelangten wir dorthin? Nun, wiederum begannen wir mit genetischen Studien. Dies ist die Nase eines Tiers. Wir taten im Wesentlichen Folgendes - und mit "wir" meine ich hier eine Doktorandin, Hilary Ellis, denn alles, wovon ich Ihnen heute berichte, wurde experimentell von jungen Studenten, Doktoranden und Postdoktoranden im Labor durchgeführt. Hilary Ellis ist eine Doktorandin. Wir suchten vor allem nach Mutanten, bei denen die Zellen, die normalerweise durch programmierten Zelltod sterben, dies nicht tun. Was Sie hier, mit diesen Pfeilen bildlich dargestellt, sehen können, sind Zellen, die im Begriff sind, ihren programmierten Zelltod zu erleiden. Hier ist ein Mutant, in dem diese Zelltode nicht zu sehen sind. Dieser Mutant definierte ein Gen, das wir ced-3 nannten: Zelltod-Abnormalitäts-Gen ("cell death abnormal gene") Nummer 3. Es stellte sich heraus, dass die Mutation, die dieses Gen störte, die Funktion des Gens eliminiert. Ohne ced-3-Funktion leben Zellen, die eigentlich sterben sollen. Dies sagt uns auf einfache Weise, was ced-3 tut: ced-3 tötet. Ohne ced-3-Funktion findet der programmierte Zelltod nicht statt. In weiteren Studien führte dieses Forschungsergebnis - lassen Sie mich für einen Augenblick zurückgehen - zu einer sehr bedeutsamen Schlussfolgerung, denn es besagte, dass programmierter Zelltod die Funktion eines bestimmten Gens voraussetzt. Das bedeutet, dass programmierter Zelltod ein aktiver biologischer Prozess ist. Zellen sterben nicht automatisch. Ein biologischer Prozess läuft ab, um ihren Tod zu bewirken. Wir setzten unsere Studien fort und identifizierten ein zweites Gen, das als ced-4 bezeichnet wird und sich ganz ähnlich wie ced-3 verhält. Auch dieses Gen ist für das Töten [von Zellen] erforderlich. Dann stellte eine andere Doktorandin, Junying Yuan, die Frage, wo diese Killergene wirken. Wirken sie im Wesentlichen als Selbstmord-Gene im Inneren der Zellen, die sterben werden, oder wirken sie an einem anderen Ort im Körper und senden vielleicht irgendein Signal durch den Körper, das bestimmte Zellen auffordert zu sterben? Wie sie herausfand, ist Ersteres die Antwort. Beide Gene agieren in den Zellen, die im Begriff sind zu sterben. Dies zeigt, dass zumindest insoweit programmierter Zelltod ein Prozess des Selbstmords einer Zelle ist. Junying Yuan und ein anderer Doktorand, Shai Shaham, beschrieben dann die ced-3-Gene auf Molekularebene und stellten fest, dass das ced-3-Protein einem soeben entdeckten Protein ähnlich sah. Tatsächlich mussten wir darauf warten, dass es von zwei Pharmakonzernen entdeckt wurde, die sich für entzündliche Erkrankungen des Menschen interessierten. Das ced-3-Protein ähnelt einem als ICE (= "Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme", Interleukin-1 beta umwandelndes Enzym) bekannten Protein. Dabei handelt es sich um eine Protease - wir haben heute Morgen von Roger etwas über Proteasen erfahren. Dieses Ergebnis verriet uns, dass ced-3 wahrscheinlich wie eine Protease funktioniert und andere Proteine aufspaltet, um den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods voranzutreiben. Ding Xue, ein Postdoktorand, der zuvor von Martin Chalfie, der als nächster zu uns sprechen wird, ausgebildet worden war, wies nach, dass dies tatsächlich der Fall ist. Es stellte sich heraus, dass ced-3 und ICE die Gründungsmitglieder einer Familie von Proteasen sind, die heute als Caspasen bekannt sind. Viele Studien vieler Labore haben gezeigt, dass Caspasen programmierten Zelltod vorantreiben - nicht nur bei C. elegans, sondern wahrscheinlich bei allen Tieren, uns eingeschlossen. In der Zwischenzeit suchten wir weiterhin nach Genen. ced-4 beschrieben wir auf der Molekularebene. Vier Jahre später entdeckte Xiaodong Wang, der in Dallas (Texas, USA) arbeitete, das Gegenstück zu ced-4 beim Menschen. Das Protein sieht ähnlich aus und kann wie ced-4 den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods vorantreiben, der, wie ich erwähnen sollte, häufig mit einem Wort bezeichnet wird, das vier Silben umfasst, mit dem Buchstaben A beginnt und auf wenigstens sieben verschiedene Arten ausgesprochen wird. Ich überlasse es Ihnen, sich auszusuchen, wie Sie es aussprechen möchten. Jene in diesem Raum, die Griechisch sprechen, kennen wahrscheinlich die richtige Aussprache, die keiner der Restlichen von uns jemals verwendet. Dann entdeckte Ron Ellis, ein Doktorand in unserem Labor, ein weiteres Zelltod-Gen. Dieses unterscheidet sich von ced-3 und ced-4. Es ist kein Killer, sondern ein Beschützer. Es schützt Zellen vor programmiertem Zelltod. Der Doktorand Michael Hengartner klonte dieses Gen ced-9 und stellte fest, dass es wie ein Krebs-Gen beim Menschen aussieht - wie ein Bcl-2 (= "B-cell lymphoma 2", B-Zellen-Lymphom-2) genanntes Gen. Bcl steht für B-Zellen-Lymphom. Es ist ein Krebs-Gen, das Krebs auslöst, indem es dafür sorgt, dass B-Zellen in unserem Immunsystem nicht sterben. Das Überleben dieser Zellen führt zur Wucherung dieser Zellen und zu einem Krebsgeschwür, und das Bcl-ähnliche ced-9 schützt Zellen vor dem Zelltod. Nun hat man mich manchmal gefragt, ob ich jemals einen Aha-Moment, ein Heureka!, eine Entdeckung erlebte - das Wissen, dass man etwas Wichtigem auf der Spur ist. Die Antwort darauf lautet, dass ich am 12. Februar 1992 eine Konferenz besuchte und der Doktorand Michael Hengartner etwas tat, das den Aufwand wert war. Er arbeitete im Labor, er hatte die ced-9-Sequenz identifiziert, er führte eine computergestützte Suche in dieser relativ frühen Datenbank durch und er sandte mir in das Meeting dieses Fax mit dem Wortlaut: Und dies war der Augenblick, in dem wir erkannten, dass wir nicht nur im Begriff waren, einen grundlegenden biologischen Mechanismus bei C. elegans zu entdecken, zu dem es einige Gegenstücke gab, sondern dass dieser Mechanismus, an dem wir forschten, auch sehr wichtig im Zusammenhang mit Erkrankungen des Menschen sein würde, an diesem Punkt insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit Krebs. Die Ähnlichkeit zwischen ced-9 und Bcl-2 - beide verfügten über eine ähnliche Sequenzinformation, beide schützten vor Zelltod - veranlasste uns, die Frage zu stellen, wie eng diese beiden Gene tatsächlich miteinander verwandt waren. Und wir konnten zeigen, dass das menschliche Bcl-2-Gen, wenn es in C. elegans exprimiert wurde, wirksam war. Darüber hinaus konnten wir nachweisen, dass Bcl-2, wenn es in einem Mutanten von C. elegans, dem die ced-9-Funktion fehlte, exprimiert wurde, das Wurmgen ersetzte. Die Tatsache, dass das menschliche Gen das Wurmgen ersetzen konnte, besagte nicht nur, dass diese Gene sich Stück für Stück ähnelten, sondern auch, dass es hier ähnliche Mechanismen geben musste. Danach erarbeiteten wir den grundlegenden Mechanismus, und dieser zentrale Mechanismus sieht aus, wie es hier dargestellt ist. Ced-3-Caspase tötet, ced-4 tötet, indem es die Aktivität von ced-3 fördert, und ced-9 schützt, indem es ced-4 daran hindert, die Aktivität von ced-3 zu fördern. Wir suchten weiter. Als nächstes entdeckten wir, durch die Forschungsarbeit der Postdoktorandin Barbara Conradt, ein drittes Killergen - egl-1. Barbara fand heraus, dass egl-1 in diesem Mechanismus an einem anderen Punkt wirkt als die beiden anderen Killergene, nämlich vor statt nach ced-9. Egl-1 tötet also, indem es ced-9 daran hindert, ced-4 daran zu hindern, ced-3 zu aktivieren. Und dies erwies sich als der zentrale molekulargenetische Mechanismus für programmierten Zelltod. Anschließende Experimente einer Vielzahl von Laboren zeigten, dass diese Proteine der Reihe nach jeweils physikalisch miteinander interagieren: egl-1 mit ced-9, ced-9 mit ced-4, ced-4 mit ced-3. Somit handelt es sich hier um einen sowohl biochemischen als auch genetischen Mechanismus für diese zentrale Komponente des programmierten Zelltods. Mit diesen Informationen kann man nun anfangen, über die Bedeutung für die Medizin nachzudenken. Und die biotechnologischen Abteilungen der Pharma-Industrien nahmen Notiz von unseren Ergebnissen. In der Tat erhielt ich an dem Tag, als wir unseren Aufsatz darüber, dass ced-3 eine Caspase ist, veröffentlichten, Anrufe von fünf Pharma-Unternehmen, darunter einen von einem alten Freund, welcher mir sagte: "Bob, ich habe hier 100 Leute, die an dieser Caspase ICE forschen - bitte sag' mir, was wir untersuchen." Seitdem sind verschiedene Unternehmen bei ihren Versuchen, Therapien zu entdecken und zu entwickeln, den menschlichen Gegenstücken dieser Akteure nachgegangen. Beispielsweise sind Caspasen Killer - wenn Sie also eine Caspase hemmen könnten, könnten Sie Erkrankungen vorbeugen, bei denen sich zu viele Zelltode ereignen. Die klinischen Aktivitäten, die am weitesten fortgeschritten sind, finden tatsächlich in heute aktiven Programmen im Zusammenhang mit Lebererkrankungen statt. Umgekehrt könnten Sie, wenn Sie ein dem ced-9-Bcl-2 ähnliches, schützendes Protein blockieren könnten, Zelltod in solchen Zellen aktivieren, die andernfalls geschützt wären. Die Hemmung von Mitgliedern der Bcl-Familie ist ein Bereich von regem Interesse für Krebserkrankungen, und eine Reihe von Anti-Bcl-2-Programmen werden zur Zeit in meiner Ansicht nach vielversprechenden klinischen Studien zur Behandlung bestimmter Krebsarten durchgeführt. Okay - lassen Sie uns nun über diesen zentralen Mechanismus hinausgehen. Lapidar gesagt: Dies ist nur der Anfang. Der nächste Schritt besteht in dem Umfließen, der Phagozytose der Zellleiche. Auch dies haben wir ziemlich detailliert erarbeitet. Wir haben untersucht, was im Vorfeld dieses zentralen Mechanismus geschieht, und es stellt sich heraus, dass der erste Schritt, in dem egl-1 den Mechanismus vorantreibt, auf eine sehr spezifische Art und Weise durch den Zelltyp reguliert wird. Dies geschieht auf der Ebene der Genexpression durch bestimmte Transkriptionsfaktoren, die diesen Prozess steuern. Verschiedene Zellen werden durch verschiedene Transkriptionsfaktoren gesteuert. Wir haben viele Fälle bei C. elegans erforscht. In jedem dieser Fälle entdeckten wir Gegenstücke beim Menschen, und in vielen dieser Fälle wurde nachgewiesen, dass diese Gegenstücke beim Menschen ebenfalls eine Rolle bei Zelltod und Apoptose und bei Erkrankungen des Menschen spielen. Von den Akteuren, die wir beschrieben haben, sind die meisten Akteure bei Krebs. Hier haben wir eine solche Reihe von Zellen, hier eine zweite Reihe von Zellen. Das ist jedoch nicht immer der Fall. Ohne dies detailliert zu erläutern, haben wir hier eine Abbildung, wie das erste Killergen im Mechanismus des Tötens durch verschiedene Transkriptionsfaktoren in verschiedenen Zelltypen reguliert wird. Fahren wir mit einer anderen Geschichte fort und stellen wir die Frage, ob eine Verallgemeinerung möglich ist, ob die spezifische Steuerung dieses Gens egl-1 und von Krebs verallgemeinert werden kann. Die Antwort lautet, dass dies nicht immer möglich ist. Wie wir heute Morgen schon gehört haben, gibt es immer Überraschungen, und ich werde hier nicht ins Detail gehen. Aber hier haben wir sogar einen Fall, bei dem wir eine bestimmte Form des Tods von Nervenzellen untersuchten. Es geht um eine Nervenzelle im Kopf eines Männchens, mit deren Hilfe es die Gegenwart des anderen Geschlechts chemisch wahrnimmt. In dem anderen Geschlecht, das nicht weiblich, sondern hermaphroditisch ist, werden diese Zellen zwar gebildet, sie sterben jedoch ab. Folglich handelt es sich um einen geschlechtsdimorph programmierten Zelltod. Die primäre Regulierung dieses Zelltods erfolgt nicht über die Steuerung des egl-1-Killergens, sondern vielmehr über die nachgelagerte Steuerung des Gens ced-3. Diese Forschungsarbeit wird sowohl von Hillel Schwartz, einem Doktoranden in meinem Labor, und Barbara Conradt, die Postdoktorandin in meinem Labor war und nun selbstständig forscht, betrieben. Interessanterweise gibt es, in Bezug auf die Frage nach Gegenstücken und Erkrankungen beim Menschen, zwar diese Gegenstücke, aber die Krankheit ist, zumindest nach dem, was Untersuchungen bei Mäusen gezeigt haben, keine Krebserkrankung, sondern eine neurologische Störung, Taubheit. Wird das Gegenstück bei Mäusen inaktiviert, ist die Maus taub. Grund dafür ist, dass die Haarzellen im Ohr sterben. Diese Forschungen sind noch nicht abgeschlossen. Sie werden nicht von uns, sondern von Wissenschaftlern durchgeführt, die sich für Mäuse und Taubheit interessieren. Es sieht danach aus, dass diese Haarzellen absterben, weil der Prozess des programmierten Zelltods aktiviert wird, und dies führt zu Taubheit. Und auch diese Geschichte, das Verständnis für diese Geschichte, ergibt sich aus der Untersuchung eines geschlechtsdimorph programmierten Zelltods bei C. elegans. Wenn wir nun von dort aus weitergehen, dann haben wir viele weitere Gene, viele Mechanismen, Gegenstücke beim Menschen, verschiedene Krankheiten, das große Ganze und dann die Frage: Ist es das? Und die grundsätzliche Antwort, die sich mit dem deckt, was ich eingangs sagte, besteht darin, dass eine Entdeckung zu einer Ausnahme und zu einer neuen Entdeckung führt. Wenn wir genau hinschauen, stellen wir fest, dass sich selbst bei fehlender ced-3-Caspase ein gewisses Maß an programmiertem Zelltod ereignet. Darüber hinaus wird der gesamte Mechanismus, von dem ich Ihnen erzählt habe, für diese wenigen programmierten Zelltode nicht benötigt. Es gibt andere, durch das Genom von C. elegans codierte Caspasen, und selbst, nachdem wir alle von ihnen eliminiert hatten, fand immer noch programmierter Zelltod statt. Also: keine Caspase, kein Hauptmechanismus, trotzdem noch programmierte Zelltode in begrenztem Umfang. Wie sehen diese Zelltode aus? Es existieren verschiedene Kriterien, um das als Erkennungszeichen dienende morphologische Set der Veränderungen zu definieren, die mit programmiertem Zelltod/Apoptose einhergehen. Diese sind nach jedem Kriterium, auf das wir testen können, apoptische Zelltode. Dennoch wird hier dieser grundlegende zentrale Mechanismus nicht benötigt. Es gibt irgendeinen anderen Weg, der dazu führt. Wir haben einige Hinweise darauf, wie dieser Mechanismus aktiviert wird, den genauen Mechanismus kennen wir jedoch nicht, und dies bedeutet, dass wir immer noch im Geschäft sind: Es gibt noch viele weitere Dinge zu entdecken! An dieser Stelle möchte ich eine diesen speziellen Kontext übergreifende Feststellung machen. In den von uns durchgeführten Studien betrieben wir im Wesentlichen Grundlagenforschung. Wir nahmen keine Krankheit ins Visier, wir forschten an einem Organismus, der zu dem Zeitpunkt, als ich damit begann, nicht nur obskur war, sondern von den Leuten für irrelevant gehalten wurde. Unsere Studien waren zu Beginn im Grunde genetischer Natur. Genetische Studien sind häufig abstrakt und formalistisch. Ich hatte keine Ahnung, ob das, was wir fanden, für irgendeinen anderen Organismus als C. elegans von Bedeutung sein würde. Dennoch haben unsere Ergebnisse Mechanismen nachgewiesen, die anscheinend bei Tieren allgemein gültig sind und die Grundlage für zahlreiche Erforschungen neuer Behandlungsmethoden für eine große Vielfalt menschlicher Krankheiten liefern. Ich glaube, dies ist eine höchst grundlegende Botschaft, die, wie ich hoffe, jeder einzelne im Publikum, die Studenten und der Rest von uns, immer im Gedächtnis behalten wird, ob wir nun unsere eigenen Forschungsprogramme festlegen oder dem Rat folgen, den wir gestern beim Abendessen zu hören bekamen, und mit Leistungsträgern und der Öffentlichkeit sprechen. Grundlagenforschung ist die treibende Kraft - nicht nur biomedizinischer Erkenntnisse, wie ich hier geschrieben habe, sondern, wie ich es für dieses Publikum formulieren würde, wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnis. Grundlagenforschung, auf Neugier basierende Forschung ist die Zukunft all dessen, was wir wissen können und werden. Aus Verstandesgründen und aus pragmatischen, sozioökonomischen Gründen ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, dass Grundlagenforschung angemessen aus jenen Quellen unterstützt und gefördert wird, die dafür am besten geeignet sind. Meiner Meinung nach sind dies nationale Regierungen. Mit dieser kleinen Anmerkung möchte ich zum Ende kommen und Ihnen eine Feier aus dem Jahr 2002 zeigen. Vielen Dank, Hans, dass du mitgeholfen hast, diese Party möglich zu machen. Hier liste ich all jene auf, die derzeit oder zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt in dem Labor tätig sind oder waren. Die Arbeiten dieses Labors, auf die ich mich heute bezog, die Studien zum programmierten Zelltod, waren nur eines von vielen Abenteuern, die wir erlebten, und mit Sicherheit eines der lohnendsten und aufregendsten. Und damit werde ich enden und danke Ihnen ganz herzlich.

Robert Horvitz on the characteristics of C. elegans
(00:08:59 - 00:12:08)

 

Later in his talk, he describes the eureka moment when it became clear that the genes and processes that they were studying were not only important in worms but were also significant for human biology.

 

Robert Horvitz (2010) - Programmed Cell Death in Development and Disease

Hans, thank you for the introduction, and to the Countess and Count, I’d like to thank you very much for inviting me to join this wonderful celebration and for inviting all of us who are here. I must say that I’m very delighted to have had the opportunity and I look forward to the continuing times of interacting with the truly outstanding and interesting students who are gathered at this meeting. Now, in the context of advice and thinking a little about what Roger Tsien talked about earlier today, I think I very briefly will cite the advice I was given when I was a graduate student by my PhD advisor, Jim Watson, who is known for the Watson Crick double helix. And Jim basically said: In choosing a problem to think primarily about two things. First, the problem should be important, because it’s no harder to work on an important problem than on a non-important problem. And secondly, the problem must be tractable, because no matter how important the problem, if you can’t make headway it won’t help. Now, that’s not to say that the problem has to be easily tractable and you may have to innovate to make it tractable, but if you can’t make it tractable, nothing is likely to come of it. So what I’m going to do this morning is tell you a little about a problem called programmed cell death. And I’ll focus on findings from our research lab. Talking mostly about some historical findings, but also trying to at the end bring you up to date with a message that basically says “science doesn’t end”. Discoveries lead to progress, but always I think to incomplete stories. And inform us better about what questions to ask going forward. So let me make some introductory comments about programmed cell death. Programmed cell death refers to the cell death that occurs as a normal aspect of the development of animals. And also to other cell deaths that use the same mechanisms as used in those naturally occurring cell deaths. And there are many examples of programmed cell death in biology. For example, if you think about the metamorphosis of a tadpole into a frog. The tail of the tadpole is lost, that tail consists of cells, the fundamental units of life, and those cells die. If you think about the development for example of a human embryo and a baby, in utero, between our digits, between fingers and toes there are cellular regents that make for webs and those cells die so that our fingers and toes become separate. This regulation can be controlled among species, so that if you think for example about ducks, some have webbed feet, very useful for swimming, some do not, and the difference is a difference in the regulation of programmed cell death. In the development of our brains, programmed cell death is very important. As many as 85% of the nerve cells that are generated as the human brain forms, die. In our immune systems, as we sit here today, as many as 95% of certain of the blood cells involved in our immune responses we generate, as many as 95% die by programmed cell death. Programmed cell death is pervasive in biology. And yet I think it’s not so many years ago when biologists thought about cell death, and I probably should say, if biologists thought about cell death, the basic thinking was cell death is not interesting, rather it’s a phenomenon to be avoided because what does a biologist do? Study cells that are alive, if cells die you can’t do your work. That's a problem, but it’s not an interesting problem. What we know today is this is not the way to think about cell death in many cases. Cell death can be an active process on the part of cells that die and particular genes can act in cells to make those cells die. So there is a biology of cell death, every bit as much as there is a biology of other fundamental processes like cell division, cell migration and cell differentiation. Now, where there is a biology there also can be a pathology. Any normal biological process, if it goes wrong in us, can lead to disease and program cell death is no exception to this. There are many diseases now, and this is just a short and somewhat old list, diseases that are known to be associated with abnormalities in cell death. In some cases cells that should live, die, for example neural degenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, heart attacks, congestive heart failure, liver diseases, kidney diseases. We can go on and on with disorders in which cells die. And in at least some of these disorders, but not necessarily all, it has been shown that what is going on is an unleashing of the normal developmental program for cell death in the wrong cell types or at the wrong time. Conversely there are disorders in which cells that should die instead live. For example autoimmune disorders. In our immune system we generate cells that have the capacity to recognise cells in our own body. And normally these cells die by program cell death. If they do not autoimmune disease results. Cancer people often think about, as uncontrolled cell division, cells divide and divide and divide leading to too many cells. Well, in fact the number of cells in our tissues is defined by two opposing processes, the process of cell division, which adds cells, and the process of programmed cell death, which removes cells. And the number of cells can be too high, either because of too much cell division or too little cell death. And certain cancers are fundamentally cancers that are caused by too little cell death and it appears today that most if not all cancers involve too little cell death. Furthermore, some of the classic remedies, some of the treatments for cancer, radiation, chemotherapy they act by activating the endogenous process of programmed cell death. So what this says is that an understanding of the biology and the biologic mechanisms that are involved in programmed cell death is very important both to understanding biology and also to understanding and approaching treatments for a broad variety of diseases. So what I’m going to tell you about now is the discovery and characterisation of genes that function in this process of programmed cell death based upon work primarily from my laboratory over the years. And I want to say that we made these discoveries not focused on a human disease and even not focused on studies of a mammal, but rather using a very simple animal, a microscopic nematode or roundworm, known as caenorhabditis elegans. Now, this animal was introduced to modern biology by my friend, colleague and mentor Sydney Brenner, with whom I shared the Nobel Prize. And it was studied in detail by another friend, colleague and mentor, John Sulston. And one thing that John did was to analyse the development of this very simple animal. It turns out this animal contains as an adult only about 1,000 cells, this is to contrast with us, where in our brains alone we have more than 10 to the 11 cells. And what John did was to study the cell lineage. Starting as all organisms do from a single cell, C. elegans divide from 1 cell to 2 to 4 and so on. And this diagram depicts the developmental origin of every cell in the animal. The Y axis here is time and each vertical line terminates in a cell. If you count quickly going across, you will see that there are 959 cells generated in the adult animal and an additional 131 cells that are generated but are not found in the adult animal. These 131 die developmentally by programmed cell death. And this is one thing that John Sulston established. Now, what we did was to seek genes involved in this process, we did this by looking for genetic variance, mutants, abnormal and the patterns of programmed cell death, cells that should live, die or cells that should die live. And in this way we identified four steps in the process of programmed cell death. First, every cell in the animal must decide: I will live or I will die by programmed cell death. Second, for those cells that decide to die, they must literally execute that decision. Thirdly, dying cells, the corpses must be engulfed by neighbouring cells to remove those dying cells from the body of the animal. And fourthly, the macro molecular debris of the cell corps must be degraded. Another way to remember these steps is very simply indicated here. Identify the victim, kill, get rid of the body and destroy the evidence. So that’s the essence of programmed cell death. How did we get there? Well, again we began with genetic studies. This is the nose of an animal and in essence what we did, and by we I mean a graduate student, Hilary Ellis, and all of the story that I will tell you about today was carried out experimentally by young students, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the lab. Hilary Ellis is a graduate student. Basically looked for mutants in which those cells that die normally by programmed cell death do not. And what you can see here, depicted with these arrows, are cells that are in the process of undergoing programmed cell death. And here is a mutant in which those cell deaths cannot be seen. This mutant defined a gene which we called CED-3 for cell death abnormal gene number 3. And it turned out that the mutation that perturbed this gene eliminates the function of the gene. So without CED-3 function, cells that should die instead live, this very simply tells us what CED-3 does, CED-3 kills. Without CED-3 function programmed cell death does not occur. In further studies, this finding, let me back up for a moment, this finding lead to a very important conclusion because it said since programmed cell death requires the function of a specific gene, this means that programmed cell death is an active biologic process. Cells are not dying by default, something biologic is going on to cause them to die. We continued our studies, identified a second gene called CED-4 which behaves very similarly to CED-3, it too is required for killing. Then another graduate student, Junying Yuan, asked where do these killer genes function. Do they function essentially as suicide genes within the cells that are about to die or do they function elsewhere in the body, perhaps sending some signal throughout the body, telling certain cells to die. And what she found was the answer is the former, both of these genes act within cells that are going to die, saying that to at least this extent programmed cell death is a process of cellular suicide. Junying Yuan and another graduate student, Shai Shaham, then characterised the CED-3 gene molecularly and discovered that the CED-3 protein looks like a protein just discovered, actually we had to wait for its discovery, by two pharmaceutical companies interested in human inflammatory diseases. The CED-3 protein is similar to a protein known as ICE, interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme. This is a protease, we heard a little about proteases from Roger earlier this morning. And this finding told us that CED-3 likely acts as a protease cutting up other proteins to drive the process of programmed cell death and post doctoral researcher Ding Xue who had previously been trained by Marty Chalfie, from whom we’re going to hear from next, demonstrated that in fact this is the case. It turned out that CED-3 and ICE are the founding members of a family of proteases, today known as caspases and many studies from many laboratories have shown that caspases drive programmed cell death, not only in C. elegans but also probably in all animals, certainly including ourselves. Now, meanwhile we kept looking for genes. CED-4 we characterised molecularly. Four years later, Xiaodong Wang, working in Dallas, Texas, in the US, found the human counterpart of CED-4. It looks similar and like CED-4, it can drive the process of programmed cell death, which I should say often is referred to by a word that has four syllables, beings with A, and is pronounced in at least seven different ways. I’ll leave it to you to choose how you would like to pronounce this. The Greek speakers in the room have probably the right answer, which none of the rest of us ever use. Then Ron Ellis, a graduate student in the lab, found another cell death gene. And this one was different from CED-3 and CED-4, instead of being a killer, it is a protector, it protects cells against programmed cell death. Graduate student Michael Hengartner cloned this gene CED-9 and discovered it looks like a human cancer gene. A gene called Bcl-2, Bcl stands for B-cell lymphoma and this is a cancer gene that causes cancer by causing B-cells in our immune systems to not die. And that survival of these cells leads to their proliferation and the cancer is state and Bcl-2 like CED-9 protects against cell death. Now, people sometimes have asked me if you ever had an ah-ha moment, eureka, discovery, you know you’re on to something that’s important. And the answer here is that on February 12th 1992 I was attending a conference and graduate student Michael Hengartner was doing something worthwhile. He was working in the lab, he had identified the CED-9 sequence, he did a computer search at this relatively early data base and he sent me this fax at the meeting which says, ‘guess what ends up at the top of the search, the answer human Bcl-2’. And this was the moment that we knew we not only were discovering a fundamental biological pathway in C.elegans that had some counterparts but also that this pathway we were working on was going to be very important in the context of human disease and at this point in particular in the context of cancer. Now, the similarity between CED-9 and Bcl-2, both had similar sequence information, both protected against cell death, led us to ask the question how close are these genes really. And we were able to show that the human Bcl-2 gene, if expressed in C. elegans, would work and furthermore if expressed in a C. elegans mutant defective in CED-9 function, Bcl-2 would substitute for the worm gene. The fact that the human gene could substitute for the worm gene said not only are these genes piecemeal similar, but also there must be similar pathways. And we then worked out the basic pathway and this core pathway looks as indicated here. CED-3 caspase kills, CED-4 kills by promoting the activity of CED-3 and CED-9 protects by preventing CED-4 from promoting the activity of CED-3. We kept looking. Next we found in work from post doc Barbara Conradt, a third killer gene called egl-1. And what Barbara discovered was that egl-1 acts in the pathway at a different point than the other 2 killer genes, before rather than after CED-9. So egl-1 kills by preventing CED-9 from preventing CED-4 from activating CED-3. And this then proved to be the core molecular genetic pathway for programmed cell death and subsequent experiments by a variety of labs showed that these proteins each interact physically sequentially. Egl-1 with CED-9, CED-9 with CED-4, CED-4 to CED-3. And so this is both a biochemical and a genetic pathway for this core component of programmed cell death. Now, with this information one can begin to think about applications to medicine. And the biotechnologies in pharmaceutical industries took note, in fact the day we published our paper about CED-3 is a caspase. I received telephone calls from five pharmaceutical companies, including one from an old friend who said: Since then, a variety of companies have pursued the human counterparts of these players in attempts to discover and develop therapies. For example caspases are killers, so that if you could inhibit a caspase, you could prevent diseases that have too much programmed cell death. The clinical efforts that have gone furthest, are actually in the context of liver diseases in programs that are active today. Conversely, if you could inhibit a CED-9 Bcl-2-like protective protein, you could activate cell death in cells that were otherwise being protected, inhibition of Bcl-2 family members is an active area of interest for cancer and there are a number of anti Bcl-2 programs that are currently in what to my eye look very promising clinical trials for certain specific cancers. Ok, now let’s go on beyond this core pathway. Very succinctly, this is just the beginning, the next step, that of engulfment of phagocytosis of the cell corps, we also have worked out in some detail, we have studied what happens upstream of this core pathway and it turns out that that first step of egl-1 driving the pathway is regulated by cell type in a very specific way. At the level of gene expression with specific transcription factors controlling this process. Different cells are controlled by different transcription factors. We have worked out many cases in C. elegans. In each of these cases we find human counterparts and many of these cases the human counterparts are shown to also act in cell death and apoptosis and human disease. Most of the ones that we’ve characterised are players in cancer, here’s one set of cells, here’s a second set of cells, but that’s not always the case and without going through the details, here is a picture of how this first killer gene in the killing pathway is regulated by different transcription factors in different cell types. We go on to another story, to ask if the generalisation, specific control of this gene egl-1 and cancer is generalisable and the answer is not always. There are always, as we have heard this morning already, surprises and I won’t go through the details. But in fact here is a case where we studied a particular kind of nerve cell death, a neuron in the head of the male that he uses to chemically sense the presence of the opposite sex. And in the other sex, which is not female but hermaphrodite, these cells are generated but die, so this is sexually dimorphic programmed cell death. And the primary regulation of this cell death is not the control of the egl-1 killer gene, but rather down stream the control of the gene CED-3. And this is work both done by Hillel Schwartz, a graduate student in my lab, and Barbara Conradt, who had been a post doc in my lab, working independently. And interestingly, when we ask about human counterparts now and human disease, there are counterparts, but the disorder at least from what's been seen in studies of mice, is not cancer, but rather a neurologic disorder, deafness. If the counterpart in mice is inactivated, the mouse is deaf, the reason is that the hair cells in the ear die and what it looks like, but this is still a work in progress, not by us but by the people who are interested in mice and deafness. What it looks like is that these hair cells are dying because the process of programmed cell death is activated and that leads to the deafness. And this story comes again, the understanding of this story comes from the study of a sexually dimorphic programmed cell death in C. elegans. Now, to go from there, many more genes, much pathway, human counterparts, various diseases, big picture and then is this it. And the fundamental answer and what I said at the beginning is discovery leads to exception, leads to new discovery. As we look very carefully, we find that even in the absence of the CED-3 caspase there is some programmed cell death. Furthermore, the entire pathway that I’ve told you about is not needed for these few programmed cell deaths. There are other caspases encoded by the C. elegans genome and we have eliminated all of them and there is still programmed cell death. So no caspase, no core pathway, still a little bit of programmed cell death. What do these cell deaths look like, there are various criteria for defining the landmark morphological set of changes associated with programmed cell death apoptosis, these are apoptotic deaths by every criterion we can test. And yet this core fundamental pathway is not needed, there is some other way to get there. We have some hints about how this pathway is activated, but the mechanism we do not know and that means we’re not out of business yet, there’s still more things to discover. So with that I want to make one over reaching statement. The studies that we did were fundamentally basic research. We did not target any disease, we worked on an organism that at the point I started was not only obscure but people thought irrelevant. The studies we did were fundamentally genetic in nature at the beginning, genetic studies are often abstract and formalisms. I didn’t know if what we found would be relevant to any organism other than C. elegans and yet our findings have established mechanisms that appear to be universal amongst animals and that are providing the basis for a variety of explorations into new treatments for a very broad variety of human diseases. And I think there is a very fundamental message here and one I hope that every one in the audience, students and the rest of us, will always keep in mind, be it for defining our own research programs or in following the advice we heard at dinner last night, and talking to funding agencies and the public. Basic research is the driver, I wrote here of biomedical knowledge, but for this audience I would say of scientific knowledge. Basic research, curiosity based research is the future of all that we can and will know and it is crucially important for intellectual reasons and for pragmatic socioeconomic reasons that basic research be supported appropriately from those sources that are best suited to do this and that in my view is national governments. So with that little bit what I want to do is to end by showing you a celebratory reunion from 2002, thank you Hans for helping in making that party possible and also I list here those people currently in and previously in the lab, whose work I alluded to day, our studies for programmed cell death have been but one of a variety of adventures we’ve had and certainly one of the ones that has been most rewarding and most existing. And I’ll stop with that and thank you very much.

Hans, vielen Dank für die Einleitung. Ihnen, Frau Gräfin, Herr Graf, möchte ich ganz herzlich dafür danken, dass Sie mich eingeladen haben, an dieser wunderbaren Feier teilzunehmen, und dass Sie uns alle, die wir hier sind, eingeladen haben. Ich muss sagen, ich bin überglücklich, dass ich die Chance hatte, mit den wirklich brillanten und interessanten Studenten zu diskutieren, die bei dieser Zusammenkunft versammelt sind, und ich freue mich auf die weiteren Gelegenheiten. Aufgrund von entsprechenden Hinweisen und in Gedanken an das, wovon Roger Tsien heute bereits gesprochen hat, werde ich ganz kurz den Ratschlag zitieren, den ich als Doktorand von meinem Doktorvater Jim Watson bekam, der für die Watson-Crick-Doppelhelix bekannt ist. Im Wesentlichen sagte Jim, dass man bei der Wahl eines Problems vor allem zwei Dinge bedenken sollte: Erstens sollte das Problem von Bedeutung sein, denn es ist nicht schwieriger, an der Lösung eines wichtigen Problems zu arbeiten als an der Lösung eines unwichtigen Problems. Und zweitens muss das Problem lösbar sein. Denn wenn man nicht vorankommt, hilft alles nichts, egal, wie groß die Bedeutung des Problems ist. Das heißt nun nicht, dass das Problem einfach und leicht zu lösen sein muss. Möglicherweise muss man neue Wege gehen, um es lösbar zu machen. Wenn einem das jedoch nicht gelingt, wird man vermutlich zu keinem Ergebnis kommen. Ich werde Ihnen also heute Vormittag ein wenig über ein Problem erzählen, das als programmierter Zelltod bezeichnet wird. Dabei werde ich mich auf Forschungsergebnisse unseres Labors konzentrieren. Hauptsächlich werde ich von historischen Forschungsergebnissen berichten, aber ich werde auch versuchen, Sie am Ende auf den neuesten Stand zu bringen, und zwar mit einer Botschaft, die im Wesentlichen besagt, dass die Wissenschaft nie an ein Ende kommt. Entdeckungen führen zu Fortschritt, aber, meiner Ansicht nach, immer zu unvollständigen Beschreibungen: Sie verschaffen uns ein besseres Wissen darüber, welche Fragen wir stellen sollten, wenn wir weiter voranschreiten. Lassen Sie mich also zunächst einige einleitende Bemerkungen zum Thema des programmierten Zelltods machen. Als "programmierten Zelltod" bezeichnet man denjenigen Zelltod, der als ein normaler Aspekt der Entwicklung von Tieren vorkommt, sowie auch andere Zelltode, die sich derselben Mechanismen bedienen, die in jenen sich natürlich ereignenden Zelltoden eingesetzt werden. In der Biologie gibt es viele, viele Beispiele für programmierte Zelltode. Denken Sie zum Beispiel an die Metamorphose von einer Kaulquappe zu einem Frosch. Dabei verschwindet der Schwanz der Kaulquappe. Dieser Schwanz besteht aus Zellen, den grundlegenden Einheiten des Lebens, und diese Zellen sterben. Oder denken Sie beispielsweise an die Entwicklung eines menschlichen Embryos und eines Babys im Uterus. Zwischen unseren Digiti, den Fingern und Zehen, gibt es Zellregionen, die sich zu einer Schwimmhaut entwickeln, und jene Zellen sterben, so dass unsere Finger und Zehen voneinander getrennt werden. Diese Regulierung kann bei den verschiedenen Arten unterschiedlich gesteuert werden. Wenn Sie zum Beispiel an Enten denken, so haben einige Schwimmhäute, die beim Schwimmen sehr nützlich sind, und andere haben keine. Der Unterschied ist ein Unterschied in der Regulierung des programmierten Zelltods. Bei der Entwicklung unseres Gehirns ist der programmierte Zelltod von großer Bedeutung. Bis zu 85 % der Nervenzellen, die bei der Entstehung des menschlichen Gehirns gebildet werden, sterben. In unserem Immunsystem, so, wie wir heute hier sitzen, sterben bis zu 95 % von bestimmten Blutzellen, die an unseren Immunreaktionen beteiligt sind und die wir bilden, durch programmierten Zelltod. Programmierter Zelltod ist in der Biologie allgegenwärtig. Dennoch ist es, wie ich glaube, noch nicht so lange her, dass, wenn Biologen sich mit Zelltod beschäftigten - und wahrscheinlich sollte ich sagen: falls Biologen sich mit Zelltod beschäftigten -, der Grundgedanke war, dass Zelltod nicht interessant sei. Vielmehr handle es sich dabei um ein Phänomen, das man meiden sollte, denn was tut ein Biologe? Er untersucht lebende Zellen, und wenn Zellen sterben, kann er seine Arbeit nicht machen - das ist ein Problem, aber kein spannendes Problem. Heute wissen wir, dass dies in vielen Fällen nicht die richtige Herangehensweise für eine Beschäftigung mit dem Tod von Zellen ist. Zelltod kann ein von den sterbenden Zellen selbst aktiv betriebener Prozess sein. Bestimmte Gene können in den Zellen wirksam werden, um die Zelle sterben zu lassen. Folglich gibt es ebenso eine Biologie des Zelltods wie es eine Biologie anderer grundlegender Vorgänge wie Zellteilung, Zellmigration und Zelldifferenzierung gibt. Nun: Wo es eine Biologie gibt, da kann es auch eine Pathologie geben. Jeder normale biologische Vorgang kann, wenn er fehlschlägt, bei uns zu einer Erkrankung führen, und programmierter Zelltod stellt hiervon keine Ausnahme dar. Es gibt viele Krankheiten, wobei das Folgende nur eine kurze und etwas veraltete Liste ist, von denen man weiß, dass sie mit Abnormalitäten in Bezug auf den Tod von Zellen in Verbindung stehen. In einigen Fällen sterben Zellen, die leben sollten. Dies ist der Fall bei degenerativen Erkrankungen des Nervensystems: bei der Alzheimer-Krankheit, Chorea Huntington, Parkinson-Krankheit, Amyotrophe Lateralsklerose, Herzinfarkt, Herzinsuffizienz, Erkrankungen der Leber und der Nieren. Wir haben eine nicht enden wollende Liste von Krankheiten, bei denen Zellen absterben. Und zumindest für einige dieser Erkrankungen, jedoch nicht notwendigerweise für alle, hat man nachgewiesen, dass das normale Entwicklungsprogramm für den Zelltod in den falschen Zellen oder zur falschen Zeit ausgelöst wird. Umgekehrt gibt es Krankheiten, bei denen Zellen, die sterben sollten, stattdessen weiterleben. Ein Beispiel sind Autoimmunerkrankungen. Wir erzeugen in unserem Immunsystem Zellen, die über die Fähigkeit verfügen, Zellen in unserem eigenen Körper zu erkennen. Im Normalfall sterben diesen Zellen durch programmierten Zelltod. Tun sie dies nicht, führt dies zu Erkrankungen des Autoimmunsystems. Was Krebs betrifft, so halten viele Leute diese Krankheit für unkontrollierte Zellteilung - Zellen teilen und teilen und teilen sich, und dies führt dazu, dass zu viele Zellen entstehen. Tatsächlich wird die Anzahl der Zellen in unseren Geweben durch zwei entgegengesetzte Prozesse bestimmt: durch den Prozess der Zellteilung, durch den Zellen hinzugefügt werden, und durch den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods, durch den Zellen entfernt werden. Und die Anzahl der Zellen kann zu groß sein, weil entweder zu viele Zellteilungen stattfinden oder weil zu wenige programmierte Zelltode eintreten. Bestimmte Krebsarten sind im Grunde Krebsarten, die sich als Folge von zu wenigen Zelltoden ergeben. Heute scheint es so, dass die meisten, wenn nicht sogar alle Krebsarten etwas damit zu tun haben, dass zu wenige Zelltode eintreten. Darüber hinaus entfalten einige der klassischen Heilmittel, einige der Behandlungsformen bei Krebs - Bestrahlung, Chemotherapie - ihre Wirkung, indem sie den endogenen Prozess des programmierten Zelltods aktivieren. Das heißt, dass ein Verständnis der Biologie des programmierten Zelltods und der daran beteiligten biologischen Mechanismen sehr wichtig ist: sowohl für das Verständnis der Biologie als auch, um Behandlungsmethoden für die unterschiedlichsten Krankheiten zu erkennen und anzugehen. Ich werde Ihnen also nun, in erster Linie basierend auf der über Jahre in meinem Labor durchgeführten Forschungsarbeiten, von der Entdeckung der Gene berichten, die in diesem Prozess des programmierten Zelltods eine Rolle spielen, und sie beschreiben. Ich möchte dazu sagen, dass wir uns nicht auf eine Erkrankung des Menschen und noch nicht einmal auf Studien eines Säugetiers konzentrierten, als wir diese Entdeckungen machten. Vielmehr beschäftigten wir uns in unseren Untersuchungen mit einem sehr einfachen Tier, einem mikroskopisch kleinen Nematoden oder Spulwurm mit dem Namen Caenorhabditis elegans. Dieses Tier wurde von meinem Freund, Kollegen und Mentor Sydney Brenner, mit dem ich den Nobelpreis teilte, in die moderne Biologie eingeführt. Und es wurde von einem anderen Freund, Kollegen und Mentor, John Sulston, ausführlich studiert. Unter anderem analysierte John die Entwicklung dieses sehr einfachen Tiers. Es stellte sich heraus, dass es im adulten Stadium nur ungefähr 1000 Zellen besitzt. Im Gegensatz dazu besitzen wir allein in unserem Gehirn mehr als 1011 Zellen. Und John studierte die Zelllinie. Wie alle Organismen nimmt C. elegans in einer einzigen Zelle seinen Anfang und teilt sich dann von einer Zelle in zwei, dann in vier und so fort. Dieses Schaubild stellt den Ursprung der Entwicklung einer jeden Zelle des Tieres dar. Die Y-Achse hier ist die Zeit, und jede vertikale Linie endet in einer Zelle. Wenn Sie rasch nachzählen, werden Sie feststellen, dass es im adulten Tier 959 Zellen gibt, die gebildet wurden, und weitere 131 Zellen, die zwar gebildet wurden, aber nicht in dem adulten Tier zu finden sind. Diese 131 sterben im Laufe der Entwicklung durch programmierten Zelltod. Dies wurde von John Sulston bewiesen. Was wir nun taten, war, nach den an diesem Prozess beteiligten Genen zu suchen, indem wir nach genetischen Abweichungen, Mutationen und Abnormalitäten und den Mustern des programmierten Zelltods Ausschau hielten. Zellen, die leben sollen, sterben, und Zellen, die sterben sollen, leben. Auf diese Weise identifizierten wir vier Schritte im Prozess des programmierten Zelltods. Als erstes muss jede Zelle dieses Tieres entscheiden: "Ich werde leben" oder "Ich werde durch programmierten Zelltod sterben". Als zweites müssen jene Zellen, die sich entscheiden zu sterben, diese Entscheidung buchstäblich vollstrecken. Drittens müssen die Leichen der sterbenden Zellen von den benachbarten Zellen umflossen und verschlungen werden, um jene sterbenden Zellen aus dem Körper des Tiers zu entfernen. Und viertens müssen die makromolekularen Trümmer der Zellleichen abgebaut werden. Eine andere Methode, um sich diese Schritte zu merken, ist hier auf ganz einfache Art und Weise angegeben: Man identifiziere das Opfer, töte es, beseitige die Leiche und vernichte die Beweise. Dies sind die wesentlichen Schritte des programmierten Zelltods. Wie gelangten wir dorthin? Nun, wiederum begannen wir mit genetischen Studien. Dies ist die Nase eines Tiers. Wir taten im Wesentlichen Folgendes - und mit "wir" meine ich hier eine Doktorandin, Hilary Ellis, denn alles, wovon ich Ihnen heute berichte, wurde experimentell von jungen Studenten, Doktoranden und Postdoktoranden im Labor durchgeführt. Hilary Ellis ist eine Doktorandin. Wir suchten vor allem nach Mutanten, bei denen die Zellen, die normalerweise durch programmierten Zelltod sterben, dies nicht tun. Was Sie hier, mit diesen Pfeilen bildlich dargestellt, sehen können, sind Zellen, die im Begriff sind, ihren programmierten Zelltod zu erleiden. Hier ist ein Mutant, in dem diese Zelltode nicht zu sehen sind. Dieser Mutant definierte ein Gen, das wir ced-3 nannten: Zelltod-Abnormalitäts-Gen ("cell death abnormal gene") Nummer 3. Es stellte sich heraus, dass die Mutation, die dieses Gen störte, die Funktion des Gens eliminiert. Ohne ced-3-Funktion leben Zellen, die eigentlich sterben sollen. Dies sagt uns auf einfache Weise, was ced-3 tut: ced-3 tötet. Ohne ced-3-Funktion findet der programmierte Zelltod nicht statt. In weiteren Studien führte dieses Forschungsergebnis - lassen Sie mich für einen Augenblick zurückgehen - zu einer sehr bedeutsamen Schlussfolgerung, denn es besagte, dass programmierter Zelltod die Funktion eines bestimmten Gens voraussetzt. Das bedeutet, dass programmierter Zelltod ein aktiver biologischer Prozess ist. Zellen sterben nicht automatisch. Ein biologischer Prozess läuft ab, um ihren Tod zu bewirken. Wir setzten unsere Studien fort und identifizierten ein zweites Gen, das als ced-4 bezeichnet wird und sich ganz ähnlich wie ced-3 verhält. Auch dieses Gen ist für das Töten [von Zellen] erforderlich. Dann stellte eine andere Doktorandin, Junying Yuan, die Frage, wo diese Killergene wirken. Wirken sie im Wesentlichen als Selbstmord-Gene im Inneren der Zellen, die sterben werden, oder wirken sie an einem anderen Ort im Körper und senden vielleicht irgendein Signal durch den Körper, das bestimmte Zellen auffordert zu sterben? Wie sie herausfand, ist Ersteres die Antwort. Beide Gene agieren in den Zellen, die im Begriff sind zu sterben. Dies zeigt, dass zumindest insoweit programmierter Zelltod ein Prozess des Selbstmords einer Zelle ist. Junying Yuan und ein anderer Doktorand, Shai Shaham, beschrieben dann die ced-3-Gene auf Molekularebene und stellten fest, dass das ced-3-Protein einem soeben entdeckten Protein ähnlich sah. Tatsächlich mussten wir darauf warten, dass es von zwei Pharmakonzernen entdeckt wurde, die sich für entzündliche Erkrankungen des Menschen interessierten. Das ced-3-Protein ähnelt einem als ICE (= "Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme", Interleukin-1 beta umwandelndes Enzym) bekannten Protein. Dabei handelt es sich um eine Protease - wir haben heute Morgen von Roger etwas über Proteasen erfahren. Dieses Ergebnis verriet uns, dass ced-3 wahrscheinlich wie eine Protease funktioniert und andere Proteine aufspaltet, um den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods voranzutreiben. Ding Xue, ein Postdoktorand, der zuvor von Martin Chalfie, der als nächster zu uns sprechen wird, ausgebildet worden war, wies nach, dass dies tatsächlich der Fall ist. Es stellte sich heraus, dass ced-3 und ICE die Gründungsmitglieder einer Familie von Proteasen sind, die heute als Caspasen bekannt sind. Viele Studien vieler Labore haben gezeigt, dass Caspasen programmierten Zelltod vorantreiben - nicht nur bei C. elegans, sondern wahrscheinlich bei allen Tieren, uns eingeschlossen. In der Zwischenzeit suchten wir weiterhin nach Genen. ced-4 beschrieben wir auf der Molekularebene. Vier Jahre später entdeckte Xiaodong Wang, der in Dallas (Texas, USA) arbeitete, das Gegenstück zu ced-4 beim Menschen. Das Protein sieht ähnlich aus und kann wie ced-4 den Prozess des programmierten Zelltods vorantreiben, der, wie ich erwähnen sollte, häufig mit einem Wort bezeichnet wird, das vier Silben umfasst, mit dem Buchstaben A beginnt und auf wenigstens sieben verschiedene Arten ausgesprochen wird. Ich überlasse es Ihnen, sich auszusuchen, wie Sie es aussprechen möchten. Jene in diesem Raum, die Griechisch sprechen, kennen wahrscheinlich die richtige Aussprache, die keiner der Restlichen von uns jemals verwendet. Dann entdeckte Ron Ellis, ein Doktorand in unserem Labor, ein weiteres Zelltod-Gen. Dieses unterscheidet sich von ced-3 und ced-4. Es ist kein Killer, sondern ein Beschützer. Es schützt Zellen vor programmiertem Zelltod. Der Doktorand Michael Hengartner klonte dieses Gen ced-9 und stellte fest, dass es wie ein Krebs-Gen beim Menschen aussieht - wie ein Bcl-2 (= "B-cell lymphoma 2", B-Zellen-Lymphom-2) genanntes Gen. Bcl steht für B-Zellen-Lymphom. Es ist ein Krebs-Gen, das Krebs auslöst, indem es dafür sorgt, dass B-Zellen in unserem Immunsystem nicht sterben. Das Überleben dieser Zellen führt zur Wucherung dieser Zellen und zu einem Krebsgeschwür, und das Bcl-ähnliche ced-9 schützt Zellen vor dem Zelltod. Nun hat man mich manchmal gefragt, ob ich jemals einen Aha-Moment, ein Heureka!, eine Entdeckung erlebte - das Wissen, dass man etwas Wichtigem auf der Spur ist. Die Antwort darauf lautet, dass ich am 12. Februar 1992 eine Konferenz besuchte und der Doktorand Michael Hengartner etwas tat, das den Aufwand wert war. Er arbeitete im Labor, er hatte die ced-9-Sequenz identifiziert, er führte eine computergestützte Suche in dieser relativ frühen Datenbank durch und er sandte mir in das Meeting dieses Fax mit dem Wortlaut: Und dies war der Augenblick, in dem wir erkannten, dass wir nicht nur im Begriff waren, einen grundlegenden biologischen Mechanismus bei C. elegans zu entdecken, zu dem es einige Gegenstücke gab, sondern dass dieser Mechanismus, an dem wir forschten, auch sehr wichtig im Zusammenhang mit Erkrankungen des Menschen sein würde, an diesem Punkt insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit Krebs. Die Ähnlichkeit zwischen ced-9 und Bcl-2 - beide verfügten über eine ähnliche Sequenzinformation, beide schützten vor Zelltod - veranlasste uns, die Frage zu stellen, wie eng diese beiden Gene tatsächlich miteinander verwandt waren. Und wir konnten zeigen, dass das menschliche Bcl-2-Gen, wenn es in C. elegans exprimiert wurde, wirksam war. Darüber hinaus konnten wir nachweisen, dass Bcl-2, wenn es in einem Mutanten von C. elegans, dem die ced-9-Funktion fehlte, exprimiert wurde, das Wurmgen ersetzte. Die Tatsache, dass das menschliche Gen das Wurmgen ersetzen konnte, besagte nicht nur, dass diese Gene sich Stück für Stück ähnelten, sondern auch, dass es hier ähnliche Mechanismen geben musste. Danach erarbeiteten wir den grundlegenden Mechanismus, und dieser zentrale Mechanismus sieht aus, wie es hier dargestellt ist. Ced-3-Caspase tötet, ced-4 tötet, indem es die Aktivität von ced-3 fördert, und ced-9 schützt, indem es ced-4 daran hindert, die Aktivität von ced-3 zu fördern. Wir suchten weiter. Als nächstes entdeckten wir, durch die Forschungsarbeit der Postdoktorandin Barbara Conradt, ein drittes Killergen - egl-1. Barbara fand heraus, dass egl-1 in diesem Mechanismus an einem anderen Punkt wirkt als die beiden anderen Killergene, nämlich vor statt nach ced-9. Egl-1 tötet also, indem es ced-9 daran hindert, ced-4 daran zu hindern, ced-3 zu aktivieren. Und dies erwies sich als der zentrale molekulargenetische Mechanismus für programmierten Zelltod. Anschließende Experimente einer Vielzahl von Laboren zeigten, dass diese Proteine der Reihe nach jeweils physikalisch miteinander interagieren: egl-1 mit ced-9, ced-9 mit ced-4, ced-4 mit ced-3. Somit handelt es sich hier um einen sowohl biochemischen als auch genetischen Mechanismus für diese zentrale Komponente des programmierten Zelltods. Mit diesen Informationen kann man nun anfangen, über die Bedeutung für die Medizin nachzudenken. Und die biotechnologischen Abteilungen der Pharma-Industrien nahmen Notiz von unseren Ergebnissen. In der Tat erhielt ich an dem Tag, als wir unseren Aufsatz darüber, dass ced-3 eine Caspase ist, veröffentlichten, Anrufe von fünf Pharma-Unternehmen, darunter einen von einem alten Freund, welcher mir sagte: "Bob, ich habe hier 100 Leute, die an dieser Caspase ICE forschen - bitte sag' mir, was wir untersuchen." Seitdem sind verschiedene Unternehmen bei ihren Versuchen, Therapien zu entdecken und zu entwickeln, den menschlichen Gegenstücken dieser Akteure nachgegangen. Beispielsweise sind Caspasen Killer - wenn Sie also eine Caspase hemmen könnten, könnten Sie Erkrankungen vorbeugen, bei denen sich zu viele Zelltode ereignen. Die klinischen Aktivitäten, die am weitesten fortgeschritten sind, finden tatsächlich in heute aktiven Programmen im Zusammenhang mit Lebererkrankungen statt. Umgekehrt könnten Sie, wenn Sie ein dem ced-9-Bcl-2 ähnliches, schützendes Protein blockieren könnten, Zelltod in solchen Zellen aktivieren, die andernfalls geschützt wären. Die Hemmung von Mitgliedern der Bcl-Familie ist ein Bereich von regem Interesse für Krebserkrankungen, und eine Reihe von Anti-Bcl-2-Programmen werden zur Zeit in meiner Ansicht nach vielversprechenden klinischen Studien zur Behandlung bestimmter Krebsarten durchgeführt. Okay - lassen Sie uns nun über diesen zentralen Mechanismus hinausgehen. Lapidar gesagt: Dies ist nur der Anfang. Der nächste Schritt besteht in dem Umfließen, der Phagozytose der Zellleiche. Auch dies haben wir ziemlich detailliert erarbeitet. Wir haben untersucht, was im Vorfeld dieses zentralen Mechanismus geschieht, und es stellt sich heraus, dass der erste Schritt, in dem egl-1 den Mechanismus vorantreibt, auf eine sehr spezifische Art und Weise durch den Zelltyp reguliert wird. Dies geschieht auf der Ebene der Genexpression durch bestimmte Transkriptionsfaktoren, die diesen Prozess steuern. Verschiedene Zellen werden durch verschiedene Transkriptionsfaktoren gesteuert. Wir haben viele Fälle bei C. elegans erforscht. In jedem dieser Fälle entdeckten wir Gegenstücke beim Menschen, und in vielen dieser Fälle wurde nachgewiesen, dass diese Gegenstücke beim Menschen ebenfalls eine Rolle bei Zelltod und Apoptose und bei Erkrankungen des Menschen spielen. Von den Akteuren, die wir beschrieben haben, sind die meisten Akteure bei Krebs. Hier haben wir eine solche Reihe von Zellen, hier eine zweite Reihe von Zellen. Das ist jedoch nicht immer der Fall. Ohne dies detailliert zu erläutern, haben wir hier eine Abbildung, wie das erste Killergen im Mechanismus des Tötens durch verschiedene Transkriptionsfaktoren in verschiedenen Zelltypen reguliert wird. Fahren wir mit einer anderen Geschichte fort und stellen wir die Frage, ob eine Verallgemeinerung möglich ist, ob die spezifische Steuerung dieses Gens egl-1 und von Krebs verallgemeinert werden kann. Die Antwort lautet, dass dies nicht immer möglich ist. Wie wir heute Morgen schon gehört haben, gibt es immer Überraschungen, und ich werde hier nicht ins Detail gehen. Aber hier haben wir sogar einen Fall, bei dem wir eine bestimmte Form des Tods von Nervenzellen untersuchten. Es geht um eine Nervenzelle im Kopf eines Männchens, mit deren Hilfe es die Gegenwart des anderen Geschlechts chemisch wahrnimmt. In dem anderen Geschlecht, das nicht weiblich, sondern hermaphroditisch ist, werden diese Zellen zwar gebildet, sie sterben jedoch ab. Folglich handelt es sich um einen geschlechtsdimorph programmierten Zelltod. Die primäre Regulierung dieses Zelltods erfolgt nicht über die Steuerung des egl-1-Killergens, sondern vielmehr über die nachgelagerte Steuerung des Gens ced-3. Diese Forschungsarbeit wird sowohl von Hillel Schwartz, einem Doktoranden in meinem Labor, und Barbara Conradt, die Postdoktorandin in meinem Labor war und nun selbstständig forscht, betrieben. Interessanterweise gibt es, in Bezug auf die Frage nach Gegenstücken und Erkrankungen beim Menschen, zwar diese Gegenstücke, aber die Krankheit ist, zumindest nach dem, was Untersuchungen bei Mäusen gezeigt haben, keine Krebserkrankung, sondern eine neurologische Störung, Taubheit. Wird das Gegenstück bei Mäusen inaktiviert, ist die Maus taub. Grund dafür ist, dass die Haarzellen im Ohr sterben. Diese Forschungen sind noch nicht abgeschlossen. Sie werden nicht von uns, sondern von Wissenschaftlern durchgeführt, die sich für Mäuse und Taubheit interessieren. Es sieht danach aus, dass diese Haarzellen absterben, weil der Prozess des programmierten Zelltods aktiviert wird, und dies führt zu Taubheit. Und auch diese Geschichte, das Verständnis für diese Geschichte, ergibt sich aus der Untersuchung eines geschlechtsdimorph programmierten Zelltods bei C. elegans. Wenn wir nun von dort aus weitergehen, dann haben wir viele weitere Gene, viele Mechanismen, Gegenstücke beim Menschen, verschiedene Krankheiten, das große Ganze und dann die Frage: Ist es das? Und die grundsätzliche Antwort, die sich mit dem deckt, was ich eingangs sagte, besteht darin, dass eine Entdeckung zu einer Ausnahme und zu einer neuen Entdeckung führt. Wenn wir genau hinschauen, stellen wir fest, dass sich selbst bei fehlender ced-3-Caspase ein gewisses Maß an programmiertem Zelltod ereignet. Darüber hinaus wird der gesamte Mechanismus, von dem ich Ihnen erzählt habe, für diese wenigen programmierten Zelltode nicht benötigt. Es gibt andere, durch das Genom von C. elegans codierte Caspasen, und selbst, nachdem wir alle von ihnen eliminiert hatten, fand immer noch programmierter Zelltod statt. Also: keine Caspase, kein Hauptmechanismus, trotzdem noch programmierte Zelltode in begrenztem Umfang. Wie sehen diese Zelltode aus? Es existieren verschiedene Kriterien, um das als Erkennungszeichen dienende morphologische Set der Veränderungen zu definieren, die mit programmiertem Zelltod/Apoptose einhergehen. Diese sind nach jedem Kriterium, auf das wir testen können, apoptische Zelltode. Dennoch wird hier dieser grundlegende zentrale Mechanismus nicht benötigt. Es gibt irgendeinen anderen Weg, der dazu führt. Wir haben einige Hinweise darauf, wie dieser Mechanismus aktiviert wird, den genauen Mechanismus kennen wir jedoch nicht, und dies bedeutet, dass wir immer noch im Geschäft sind: Es gibt noch viele weitere Dinge zu entdecken! An dieser Stelle möchte ich eine diesen speziellen Kontext übergreifende Feststellung machen. In den von uns durchgeführten Studien betrieben wir im Wesentlichen Grundlagenforschung. Wir nahmen keine Krankheit ins Visier, wir forschten an einem Organismus, der zu dem Zeitpunkt, als ich damit begann, nicht nur obskur war, sondern von den Leuten für irrelevant gehalten wurde. Unsere Studien waren zu Beginn im Grunde genetischer Natur. Genetische Studien sind häufig abstrakt und formalistisch. Ich hatte keine Ahnung, ob das, was wir fanden, für irgendeinen anderen Organismus als C. elegans von Bedeutung sein würde. Dennoch haben unsere Ergebnisse Mechanismen nachgewiesen, die anscheinend bei Tieren allgemein gültig sind und die Grundlage für zahlreiche Erforschungen neuer Behandlungsmethoden für eine große Vielfalt menschlicher Krankheiten liefern. Ich glaube, dies ist eine höchst grundlegende Botschaft, die, wie ich hoffe, jeder einzelne im Publikum, die Studenten und der Rest von uns, immer im Gedächtnis behalten wird, ob wir nun unsere eigenen Forschungsprogramme festlegen oder dem Rat folgen, den wir gestern beim Abendessen zu hören bekamen, und mit Leistungsträgern und der Öffentlichkeit sprechen. Grundlagenforschung ist die treibende Kraft - nicht nur biomedizinischer Erkenntnisse, wie ich hier geschrieben habe, sondern, wie ich es für dieses Publikum formulieren würde, wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnis. Grundlagenforschung, auf Neugier basierende Forschung ist die Zukunft all dessen, was wir wissen können und werden. Aus Verstandesgründen und aus pragmatischen, sozioökonomischen Gründen ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, dass Grundlagenforschung angemessen aus jenen Quellen unterstützt und gefördert wird, die dafür am besten geeignet sind. Meiner Meinung nach sind dies nationale Regierungen. Mit dieser kleinen Anmerkung möchte ich zum Ende kommen und Ihnen eine Feier aus dem Jahr 2002 zeigen. Vielen Dank, Hans, dass du mitgeholfen hast, diese Party möglich zu machen. Hier liste ich all jene auf, die derzeit oder zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt in dem Labor tätig sind oder waren. Die Arbeiten dieses Labors, auf die ich mich heute bezog, die Studien zum programmierten Zelltod, waren nur eines von vielen Abenteuern, die wir erlebten, und mit Sicherheit eines der lohnendsten und aufregendsten. Und damit werde ich enden und danke Ihnen ganz herzlich.

Robert Horvitz on the significance of C. elegans for human biology
(00:18:45 - 00:20:43)

 

The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis boasts many characteristics that make it an excellent model organism. One important advantage is that, as a vertebrate, X. laevis is much more similar to humans than many other commonly used model organisms. Also, manipulating these organisms is relatively straightforward, and this, together with the fact that female frogs can be easily induced to lay eggs means that X. laevis are excellent models in which to study development. Further facilitating research using this organism is the fact that as of 2016, the genome of X. laevis has been fully sequenced.

Peter Agre discovered the aquaporin water channels, work for which he shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The critical breakthrough was made in experiments performed in frog eggs, as Agre describes in his 2011 lecture in Lindau.

 

Peter Agre (2011) - Aquaporin Water Channels: From Atomic Structure to Malaria

Good morning, it seems like we were here dancing not very long ago. So those of us who live here on planet earth are keenly aware of the ubiquity of water. Water of course is essential for life, it's also necessary for commerce and a source of great recreational enjoyment. But in this equilibrium water can be quite hazardous. This tranquil artic stream which I was paddling with my son, turned into a torrent by dropping a metre in altitude. In our bodies water is also ubiquitous, all of our tissues are mostly water. The release of fluids such as spinal fluid, tears, sweat, saliva, the concentration of urine are all examples of fluids were water release or water uptake is essential. And a disorder of this causes problems such as brain edema, glaucoma, cataracts, cystic fibroses, renal failure and other problems. So I'll talk about the issue of water in biology but I thought I would start, since we're surrounded here by our young people, by pointing out that as laureates we didn't start in our dotage, we started as young scientists, like yourselves. I know it's the ravages of time but that was me when I started my scientific career, about your age, seeking adventure by travelling through Asia. Experiencing for the first time the third world. And looking for an opportunity to create something in the laboratory that might be useful for the wellbeing of others. So our laboratory, not a very photogenic group at Johns Hopkins, included people from pretty unusual backgrounds. A Spanish anarchist, an Italian playboy, a big wave surfer from Hawaii. I'm the one with the little eye patch, I thought that was so clever at the time, it looks ridiculous. My project in this laboratory was to identify and isolate the toxin causing travellers' diarrhoea. A horrific problem and a problem of the natives in the developing world where 10's of thousands of small children and infants will die every year because of diarrhoeal diseases. So really it was this project that made me think about water and biology for the first time. And gave me a purpose in the laboratory. And I re-purposed my life as a physician to become a physician scientists studying the basis of disease with the hope that we could prevent or cure horrible diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea. So when I began my academic career in the faculty after haematology training, we were studying red blood cell proteins and one of the unsolved, one of the many unsolved problems in red cells is the nature of the rhesus blood group antigen, the Rh antigen being very well recognised for the importance in maternal foetal incompatibility. Surprising that despite the clinical understanding it was not understood at a molecular level. And we isolated it for the first time, the core Rh polypeptide and by serendip, co-purified a second polypeptide which we thought was a photolytic fragment. So the Rh being 32kDa in size, the second protein being slightly smaller 28k. And we found these not only in human red cells but in red cells of other mammalian species. So we dismissed the notion that this 28k protein would be even interesting, till we discovered it was totally unrelated to Rh and had some features which just provoked my curiosity. No glimmers that this would lead to anything interesting but curiosity is a powerful force in science. And we discovered this protein while it stained very poorly with traditional methods was exceedingly abundant in red cells, one of the foremost abundant proteins in the cells. Never before seen. Be a little bit like paddling down the Bodensee here and coming to a metropolis of a million people that is not on the map. It gets your attention. So we decided the best way to figure out what this new 28k protein is, is to clone it out, which we did. The predicted sequence indicated it would be a membrane spanning protein, 6 bilayer spans. We knew it was tetrameric, something like a channel. But what kind of a channel and we looked at the genetics data base at this time, this is now 20 years ago. The genetics data base was much smaller but still had a lot of entries. And there were some homologues that were clearly recognisable from diverse species, from bovine lens, from drosophila brain, from bacteria, from plants. But none of them had been functionally defined. So we really were at a loss, what does this new protein do. And a protein without a function is a protein with no future, you will not get funded to work on things just because you found them, you have to have an important purpose. But fortunately like many, science was an important part of my life, but I was also a member of a family. My wife Mary and I have 4 children, here's Mary and our son Clark when he was a toddler. Here are the 4 kids growing up. And the issue of work life balance comes into play. And sometimes it's really the life part, the family part that drives the work. Every year we would take the children camping, it's the vacation you can afford when you're a basic scientist. The kids loved it, we went to all the national parks, not all of them but many of the national parks, Yosemite, Yellow Stone, Glacier, the Great Smokies. And after doing this the kids loved it so much we said next year children you get to pick the national park and they immediately said: Disney World. Well Disney World is not a national park but we compromised, we went to the Everglades and then we went to Disney World. And at times I would be sitting quietly drinking my coffee in the morning thinking about this protein but having a lot of fun with the kids. And it was on a camping trip to the Everglades and Disney World we stopped in Chapel Hill North Carolina, a wonderful place, Oliver mentioned it yesterday in his talk. And a home to many wonderful academics and friends. And so Mary spent some time chatting with her friends, the kids played with some playmates and I talked to my friend John Parker at the University of North Carolina and told him about this new protein that I was stymied with. We thought it would have an important function, we didn't know what. And this is an example I think of where the breadth of the scientific information that our colleagues bear can help us so much, because we were stuck. And John thought for a while and he leaned over, he was quite exhausted, he'd been up all night working in the clinic. He said, "Peter, red cells, renal tubules, plant tissues, all highly permeable to water, have you considered that this might be the long sought water channel, the channel that physiologists have been searching for, for a century to explain how osmosis occurs in biological tissues?" It had never occurred to me, it was John's suggestion. But it was a good one. And when we returned to Baltimore I teamed up with Bill Guggino in the physiology laboratory of John's Hopkins to test the hypothesis. So these are frog eggs, xenopus laevis oocytes. And on the left is a control oocyte and on the right is an oocyte injected with 2 nanograms of the complementary RNA for our new protein. So the idea is if this is a channel the RNA will encode a protein, it will be inserted into the membrane and the test cell should now be osmotically active and that's exactly what we found. Here in isotonic culture medium there's no difference. When transfer to hypotonic medium the test oocyte is rapidly swelled and exploded. This caused much jubilation in the laboratory. I think as every scientist knows, if you discover something this is the source of joy, this is what drives us. I have to tell you the truth, this is a picture of Greg Preston, a post doc who did some of these early studies. And I took this picture of Greg actually 3 years after our first report, he was still celebrating. So I know we're not like other people. Our rewards are not financial. They're many times intellectual, but they're intense and that's what we really should be striving for. This produced a lot of more interest in our lab than we'd ever received before. We had requests from around the country, around the planet for our plasmid. Others had sought to identify the water channel and we had it. So we had to pick our way very carefully. As a small lab how do you compete with the big labs. And the answer is by collaborating with intelligent, well meaning colleagues. And this brought great, great success. We teamed first with this group to solve the structure. On the left is Yoshinori Fujiyoshi from Kyoto University and on the right is Andres Engel from the University of Basel who were pioneers in the technique of membrane crystallography. And together we solved the structure in 3 dimensions. Showing that the channel as shown in the left panel has a single pore, top to bottom and on the right panel and cross section you can see that there are key residues lining the pore. And these key residues explain the function of the protein. Just briefly in the top vestibule of this channel and we refer to it as the hour glass because there's an adverse symmetry, we have water in bulk solution at the top, hydrogen bonding between these molecules causes water to become illiquid. Water in bulk solution in the intercellular vestibule but notice a 20 angstrom span in the centre. Where water travels in single file, meeting barriers it blocks the movement of protons, charged solutes and other larger solutes. So it's a water selective channel allowing rapid movement of water and this has been solved by membrane dynamics simulations. Here in Germany by Helmut Grubmüller and Bert de Groot. In the United States by Claus Shilton and his group. So all of the investigators largely agree, this channel explains how water crosses membranes. And really gives us some insight into the generation and re-absorption of biological fluids. This model was prepared by David Kozono when he was a student with us. Now genes often times exist in families and the aquaporins as we've termed them, have 13 different homologues in the human genome but 100's of different homologues when you include the other life forms because every life form has at least one aquaporin. And the human repertoire contains aquaporin 1, you can see in the upper right which was the subject of our first discovery and several others. Each expressed in different tissues providing water transport with a specific biological function. In the bottom are some highly related channel proteins which we termed the aquaglyceroporins which allow the movement of water post glycerol. And I've highlighted in this human repertoire the 2 members from E-coli, AQPZ on the left and GlipF on the lower right following water and glycerol transport in E-coli. So you can see these are distinct from one another but highly related. So I'll tell you a little bit about AQP1 and I think you've already figured out, part of my story is not just the science but the facebook of science, my friends, my colleagues and I'll introduce each one briefly. To localise the protein in kidney we teamed up with Søren Nielsen from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, anybody here from Aarhus? Yes, good at least one. Look for Søren. So Søren is a pioneer, he was a young man when we did these studies, he was 29 years old. He localised with great precision the protein in the proximal nephron. So in the model on the left you can see the individual nephron of the kidney, each kidney having a million nephrons. At the glomerulus, at that point where filtration occurs, the primary urine passes through the proximal nephron which is highly water permeable. In the presence as shown here in this thin section stained with a specific antibody to AQP1, the gold colour represents specific presence of the aquaporin in the lumen surrounding the space with a P on it. As well as in the lateral and the basil membranes. It's not present in the collecting duct overlaid with the C, I'll talk about that in a moment. So this explains how water is transferred from the primary urine in the tubules to the apical surface and out through the lateral or basal surface, going from urine to cytoplasm to interstitium. And every day our kidneys will rapidly filter 180 litres of plasma, of course it's the same plasma again and again and again. So this 180 litres is concentrated down to about 1 litre of urine by the re-absorption of water through aquaporins. Now defects in the aquaporins have clinical problems and I'll just tell you briefly about some of them. Shown in the snapshot on the left in the centre, with permission I should point out is a photograph of a retired school teacher from the south of France, who we identified has a genetic defect making it impossible for her to synthesis the AQP1 protein. And we were able to identify her because the surface of AQP1 has a rare blood group antigen. So by collaborating with the blood group investigators we identified these rare people and were able to study them. And we brought them to John's Hopkins where these 2 other people, the tall gentleman, that's Landon King, a lung physician at Hopkins and Melanie Bonefare a French speaking post doc, established the clinical significance of AQP1. And in short it turns out to be very important in the final concentration of urine. So on the panel to the right you see the urine concentration of 15 normal controls after overnight thirsting. We go to bed at night, if we're fortunate we sleep through the night and we wake in the morning and we've had no water for 7 or 8 hours. And our bodies respond by concentrating the urine, so we don't release dilute urine when we're thirsted. That's how we prevent ourselves from becoming dehydrated. So normal individuals can concentrate their urine up to about 1000 milliosmolars, but notice the 2 AQP1 null individuals from different families with different genetic lesions are stuck, they can concentrate a little bit from the 280 isotonic to about 400 milliosmolar, they can concentrate that far but no farther. If indeed these people are thirsted beyond that and we did with very careful testing, show that they can go no further than 400 milliosmolar. So of course if they were in a water restricted environment, in a desert, in a nursing home where the aids are not paying attention, they would become dehydrated by releasing dilute urine in the face of dehydration. So it's a significant phenotype and we refer to this as mild nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Because on basal levels free access to water, they can compensate. Now a race ensued with the discovery of a new protein of some significance and this is often the case in biology. A race because of the interest of other scientists and this is what really makes science exciting, things can develop so rapidly. And by homology Fushimi and his colleagues cloned a homologue of the AQP1 protein from renal collecting duct. And as you can see in the diagram the collecting duct is the terminal part of the kidney where the vasopressin regulated water transport is known to occur. And in short the AQP2 protein is shown in the upper left by immuno gold staining resides normally an intracellular vesicles. But in response to vasopressin, a neural hormone released from the pituitary in response to thirsting, the protein is translocated to the cell surface. So if you look at the upper left panel, intracellular, the lower left panel with vasopressin it's now at the surface of the cell. Explaining how water can be regulated. And this happens often in our lives. If you should be out jogging a long distance in the afternoon in the warm sun, you'll become water deprived, you'll concentrate your urine maximally. This occurs because of the release of vasopressin. So this is the anti-diuretic stage. And if you were to look at your kidneys they would look like the panel on the upper left. If on the other hand after an evening of resting, drinking some fluids, maybe a litre of beer, you're in the diuretic state, your kidneys would look like, excuse me I misspoke, the anti-diuretic state would be at the bottom and the diuretic state would be at the top. In this case water re-absorption cannot occur and so we release dilute urine, forgive me for misspeaking. Now there are inherited defects in this pathway. And the defects in the gene encoding AQP2 lead to a profound and severe form of renal concentration defect referred to as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. These children are unable to concentrate their urine and will release at least 20 litres of urine a day, so it's quite severe but fortunately it's quite rare. But acquired defects in the AQP2 pathway are very common. Excess synthesis of the protein occurs in congestive heart failure where the patients retain too much fluid. Defects in the expression are found in common states such as bed wetting. So the small children who wet their beds, causing much distress to their parents, they do so because they temporarily as children underexpress their AQP2, they can't concentrate their urine. They outgrow it but nevertheless it shows the ubiquity and the importance of this protein. Now there are other members of the family and I'll just briefly talk about these. The brain aquaporin, AQP4 which we worked on with our friends in Oslo, Ole Petter Ottersen and his team, is present in a very interesting distribution in the brain because our neurons in the brain are very sensitive to osmotic disequilibrium. And they're protected by astroglial cells. So if capillarian brain and I'm just pointing behind me, is surrounded by astroglial end-feet. This is the site of the so-called blood brain barrier, the movement of fluid from blood to brain goes through the astroglial end-feet and shown here immuno decoration shows the abundance of the AQP4 protein at the blood vein barrier. And this of course turns out to be very important in clinical problems such as brain edema. Stroke is the second leading cause of death in Western Europe and in the United States and individuals often succumb not to the primary stroke itself but to the brain swelling that occurs thereafter. So management of brain edema is critical for the outcome of neurosurgical procedures after stroke and after close head injuries. The presence of this protein explains it. And in a study undertaken by Mahmood Amiry at the University of Oslo and in collaboration with our team in Hopkins shows that in fact normal mice are vulnerable to brain injury. If you look at the staining of a cross section, the normal mouse brain has a significant amount of pale, which represents demitus and infarcted tissue. Compared to the mutant mouse, the mutant mouse having a defect in the location of the AQP4 protein. So it's curious isn't it, somewhat paradoxical. A mutation is protective. Why don't all mice have that mutation and the answer is the presence of this protein is also important in brain fluid homeostasis and so the mutant mice while protected against brain injury do sustain epileptic seizures. So we're trading things off. Nevertheless the presence or the protection provided by inhibition of this protein gives us hope that we could develop pharmacological inhibitors to prevent or ameliorate the consequence of brain edema. Now I'm going to quickly step through some of the other members of the family, AQP5 from secretory glands, these are present in sweat glands, saliva glands, pulmonary, fluid secretory glands and important in generations of these fluids. Shown here panels from a study of wild type mouse on the left and each blue dot represents a functional sweat gland. And in the mutant mouse on the right, this mouse was engineered by Anil Menon and his team in Cincinnati. And the mutant mouse on the right has sweat glands but they're hypo-functional. The mouse is vulnerable to hypothermia from this. And of course mice are relatively resistant because they live in the cool shadows. But humans require degeneration of sweat to maintain body temperature in hypothermic environments. So briefly I'll talk about the aquaglyceroporins. Closely related to the aquaporins and this is the slide I borrowed from Bing Yap from the University of California, who aligned the pore lining residues of a water channel and these are shaded in dark and a glycerol channel. And you notice some residues are perfectly retained, this argenine at the top. Whereas a cysteine here is present in the water channel, replaced by a phenylalanine in the glycerol channel. And the difference in the mass of the c-chain in the water channel are histidine, compared to the glycine in the glycerol channel, explains how the glycerol channel can open up the pore to permit the passage of the larger 3 carbon-polyol. So there are structural explanations for how these things work. Now I was a physician for a number of years and never had once considered the process of glycerol transport to be important but it turns out to be quite important in the maintenance of skin. And this slide prepared by Johan Agren from Uppsala when he was a sabbatical worker with this, shows the strong expression of AQP3 aquaglyceroporin 3 in the basal levels of skin in pre-natal mouse and post-natal mouse. It did not take long for the beauty industry to get interested in this. A few years back, a few summers back I was visited by 3 executives from the Christian Dior company. Now I don't usually have visitors from the Christian Dior company and I was a little suspicious and in fact they have a product that they'd like you to buy, you can get it at the duty free shops, it's really expensive, it's hydro action skin cream, costs about €50 for a 50 gram jar. And I should point out I have no financial ties to Christian Dior, I would love to have financial ties to Christian Dior. But none were offered under terms I could accept them. Nevertheless this is the beauty industry, this is not drug development and their chemists have identified some small molecules which lead to subtle increase in the expression of aquaglyceroporin 3 in skin. The implication is that if you use enough of this you'll look like that, I'm not sure that constitutes proof. But let the buyer beware. Now I actually purloined this, this is the back cover of the Marie Clare Beauty magazine which I borrowed from the business lounge in Paris. And those of you who read French will see that it has some bold statements, profound hydration, spectacular results and the very bottom where it says the Nobel prize I chemistry, I show this to my mother back in Minnesota, she smiles, said Peter you're finally doing something useful. Thank you, when I see my mother next I'll tell her you liked that. I think she was kidding but you never know, our mothers know us better than we know ourselves. There is some useful information though from the aquaglyceroporin 3 studies and this is because glycerol transport into red cells is of probably minor physiological significance but it's the pathway for glycerol imported into red cells during a pathogenesis of malaria. And I won't go into malaria in depth this morning since I talked about it last night. But this intercellular parasite can rapidly synthesis glycerol lipids. Glycerol come through aquaglyceroporins and the parasite then divides, digests the haemoglobin and in the far right you can see a single parasite can in 2 days turn into a multitude of parasites. And this amplification of course causes the horrific malarial fevers which kills hundreds of thousands of children every year. Inhibitors to the aquaglyceroporins may have a therapeutic role, we're not sure but we're investigating that. And of course the mosquitoes themselves have a problem with water transport. When the anopheles bite us they do so because the fluid, the haemoglobin from blood is needed for egg development. But when taking in this vast volume they have to release fluid in order to fly and they do so out of the malpighian tubules at the back end of the mosquitoes. It's taking in blood at this end and shooting out fluid at that end and aquaporins are involved, trust me. There are 2 others I'll mention briefly, aquaglyceroporin 7 in fat, the release of glycerol from fat in response to starvation. The aquaglyceroporin 9 in liver, the uptake of glycerol by liver to convert glycerol back to glucose in a setting of starvation. This is the work of Jenn Carbrey. And it has an unforeseen and important implication because this is also the pathway for the release of arsenite and I won't go into the chemistry of it. Neutral Ph arsenite, arsenic trioxide is uncharged, must resemble glycerol. And the ability to release arsenic from our bodies is conferred by aquaglyceroporin 9. And I'll skip through that. Plants have aquaporins, on the right is a wild type Arabidopsis, on the left is Arabidopsis engineered to under express rootlet aquaporins. And by over-manufacturing of rootlets it can compensate. So I'll end with this, there's a list I could share with you if you're interested of all the clinical disorders and there'll be more where aquaporins are involved. I would like to show a picture of the laboratory on the morning I got a call from some very nice people in Sweden informing me that I would share the Nobel Prize in chemistry. My wife Mary when hearing this early in the morning called my mother back in Minnesota, awakened her to inform her that I would share the Nobel Prize in chemistry. Mother thought for a moment and she said, "Mary, tell Peter that's very nice but don't let this go to his head." I don't think that was sarcasm, I think she meant prizes are nice but doing something useful is more important. But there was a lot of celebration going on, even the local liquor store got into this. The implication that I was their best customer is a great exaggeration. But here we are on the stage in Stockholm and I'd just like to point out for the young people here there are 2 prizes here. The Nobel which is a nice medal and any resemblance I had to Alfred Nobel ended when I took off the moustache. The other prize is the people with me, my family and all of us have a cheering section, our friends, our families, the people we love and care about, who drive us forward and encourage us in our work. we can't forget to thank them for what they've done. So in closing let me just wish the young people well in their careers. I hope when you reach my stage, I'm 62, and it will come sooner than you're ready, you look back and think that the career was fun, I had a great time. And I wish you the best. Thank you.

Guten Morgen. Es scheint, als hätten wir hier vor nicht allzu langer Zeit noch getanzt. Diejenigen unter uns, die hier auf dem Planeten Erde leben, sind sich der Allgegenwart von Wasser deutlich bewusst. Natürlich ist Wasser lebensnotwendig. Außerdem ist es [als Transportweg] für den Handel wichtig, und es ist eine Quelle großer Freizeitvergnügen. Allerdings kann Wasser im Ungleichgewicht auch ziemlich gefährlich sein. Dieser ruhige arktische Fluss, in dem ich mit meinem Sohn paddelte, verwandelte sich in einen reißenden Strom, als er einen Meter tief herabstürzte. Auch in unseren Körpern ist Wasser allgegenwärtig. Alle unsere Gewebe bestehen zum größten Teil aus Wasser. Die Abgabe von Flüssigkeiten wie der Flüssigkeit des Rückenmarks, von Tränen, Schweiß und Speichel, die Konzentration des Harns – dies sind Beispiele für Flüssigkeiten, bei denen die Abgabe oder Aufnahme von Wasser wesentlich ist. Störungen können Probleme wie Gehirnödeme, Glaukome, Katarakte, Mukoviszidose, Niereninsuffizienz und andere Probleme verursachen. Ich werde also über das Thema Wasser in der Biologie sprechen. Doch ich habe mir überlegt, dass ich, da wir hier von unseren jungen Leuten umgeben sind, mit der Bemerkung beginnen möchte, dass wir als Preisträger nicht im hohen Alter, sondern, wie Sie selbst, als junge Wissenschaftler angefangen haben. Der Zahn der Zeit, ich weiß – aber das hier war ich zu Beginn meiner wissenschaftlichen Karriere, ungefähr in Ihrem Alter und auf der Suche nach Abenteuern während einer Asienreise. Dort begegnete ich zum ersten Mal der Dritten Welt. Und ich suchte nach einer Möglichkeit, im Labor etwas zu herzustellen, das dem Wohlergehen anderer dienen könnte. In unserem Labor – keine sonderlich fotogene Gruppe an der Johns Hopkins University – waren Leute aus ziemlich ungewöhnlichen Verhältnissen vertreten: ein spanischer Anarchist, ein italienischer Playboy, ein Big Wave Surfer aus Hawaii. Ich bin derjenige mit der kleinen Augenklappe, die ich damals für eine sehr clevere Idee hielt: Sie sieht lächerlich aus. Meine Aufgabe in diesem Labor bestand darin, das für die Reisediarrhöe verantwortliche Toxin zu identifizieren und zu isolieren. Ein schreckliches Problem und ein Problem der Einheimischen in den Entwicklungsländern, wo Zehntausende von Kleinkindern und Säuglingen jedes Jahr an Durchfallerkrankungen sterben. Es war also in der Tat dieses Projekt, das mich zum ersten Mal dazu brachte, über Wasser und Biologie nachzudenken. Es gab meiner Arbeit im Labor ein Ziel. Ich steckte mir ein neues Ziel für mein Leben als Arzt: Ich würde ein Arzt und Wissenschaftler werden, der die Grundlagen einer Erkrankung untersuchen würde, in der Hoffnung, dass wir solche entsetzlichen Krankheiten wie Reisediarrhöe verhindern oder heilen könnten. Als ich nun nach meiner Ausbildung in der Hämatologie meine akademische Karriere an der Fakultät begann, untersuchten wir die Proteine roter Blutkörperchen. Eines der ungelösten, eines der vielen ungelösten Probleme in Bezug auf rote Blutkörperchen ist die Beschaffenheit des Rhesus-Blutgruppen-Antigens. Die Bedeutung des Rh-Antigens in Hinblick auf die Rhesus-Inkompatibilität zwischen Mutter und Fötus ist allgemein bekannt. Überraschenderweise gab es trotz des klinischen Wissens kein Verständnis auf molekularer Ebene. Wir isolierten zum ersten Mal das wichtigste Rh-Polypeptid und erhielten gleichzeitig durch einen glücklichen Zufall ein zweites Polypeptid in einer reinen Form, das wir für ein protolytisches Fragment hielten. Rh hat eine Größe von 32 u [atomare Masseneinheiten], und das zweite Protein ist mit 28 u etwas kleiner. Wir fanden diese Proteine nicht nur in menschlichen roten Blutkörperchen, sondern auch in den roten Blutkörperchen anderer Säugetierarten. Wir verwarfen also jeden Gedanken, dass dieses 28 u-Protein von irgendeinem Interesse sein könnte, bis wir feststellten, dass es in keiner Weise mit Rh verwandt war und einige Eigenschaften aufwies, die meine Neugier weckten. Ich hatte nicht die geringste Ahnung, dass dies zu irgendetwas Interessantem führen würde, aber in der Wissenschaft ist Neugier eine starke Motivationskraft. Wir fanden heraus, dass dieses Protein, während es sich mit herkömmlichen Methoden kaum färben ließ, in roten Blutkörperchen in außerordentlich großen Mengen vorlag. Man hatte es nie zuvor gesehen. Es war ein bisschen so, als würde man den Bodensee hier hinunterpaddeln und auf einmal auf eine Großstadt mit einer Million Menschen stoßen, die auf keiner Karte verzeichnet ist. So etwas erregt unsere Aufmerksamkeit. Wir beschlossen, dass der beste Weg, um herauszufinden, was dieses neue 28 u-Protein war, darin bestand, es zu klonen, und dies taten wir. Die vorhergesagte Sequenz deutete darauf hin, dass es sich um ein Membran-überspannendes Protein handelte, das sechs Doppelschichten überspannte. Wir wussten, dass es ein Tetramer war, so etwas wie ein Kanal. Aber was für ein Kanal? Damals, vor nunmehr 20 Jahren, befragten wir die Genetik-Datenbank. Die Genetik-Datenbank war damals zwar sehr viel kleiner, umfasste aber trotzdem eine große Anzahl von Einträgen. Bei unterschiedlichen Arten gab es einige deutlich erkennbare Homologe: bei der Augenlinse des Rinds, dem Gehirn von Drosophila, bei Bakterien, bei Pflanzen. Allerdings war keins von diesen hinsichtlich seiner Funktion definiert worden. Demnach waren wir wirklich ratlos, was dieses neue Protein für eine Funktion hatte. Ein Protein ohne Funktion ist ein Protein ohne Zukunft. Man bekommt keine Gelder, um Dinge zu erforschen, nur weil man sie entdeckt hat, man muss eine wichtige Zielsetzung verfolgen. Glücklicherweise stellte zwar, wie bei vielen, die Wissenschaft einen bedeutenden Teil meines Lebens dar, aber ich war darüber hinaus auch Mitglied einer Familie. Meine Frau Mary und ich haben vier Kinder. Hier ist Mary mit unserem Sohn Clark als Kleinkind. Hier sind die vier Kinder im Jugendalter. Und an dieser Stelle kommt das Thema des Gleichgewichts zwischen Arbeitsleben und Privatleben ins Spiel. Manchmal ist es tatsächlich das Privatleben, das Familienleben, was die Arbeit vorantreibt. Jedes Jahr machten wir mit den Kindern Camping-Urlaube: die Art von Urlaub, den man sich als Grundlagenforscher leisten kann. Die Kinder fanden es toll. Wir besuchten alle Nationalparks – nein, nicht alle, aber viele: den Yosemite-Nationalpark, den Yellowstone-Nationalpark, den Glacier-Nationalpark und den Great-Smoky-Mountains-Nationalpark. Da es den Kindern so gut gefiel, sagten wir ihnen, dass sie im nächsten Jahr den Nationalpark aussuchen dürften, und sie sagten sofort: Disney World. Nun ist Disney World kein Nationalpark, aber wir gingen einen Kompromiss ein und fuhren in die Everglades und dann nach Disney World. Manchmal dachte ich, wenn ich morgens in Ruhe dasaß und meinen Kaffee trank, über dieses Protein nach, hatte aber auch viel Spaß mit den Kindern. Und bei einem Campingausflug zu den Everglades und nach Disney World legten wir einen Zwischenstopp in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, ein. Das ist ein wunderschöner Ort. Oliver erwähnte ihn gestern in seinem Vortrag. Außerdem ist er die Heimat vieler wunderbarer Akademiker und Freunde. Mary verbrachte einige Zeit mit ihren Freundinnen und plauderte mit ihnen, die Kinder spielten mit ein paar Spielkameraden, und ich unterhielt mich mit meinem Freund John Parker von der University of North Carolina und erzählte ihm von diesem neuen Protein, mit dem ich nicht vorankam. Wir glaubten, es müsse eine wichtige Funktion haben, aber wir wussten nicht, welche. Das ist meiner Ansicht nach ein Beispiel dafür, wie uns die Bandbreite der wissenschaftlichen Kenntnisse, über die unsere Kollegen verfügen, sehr, sehr helfen kann, weil wir selbst nicht weiterkommen. John dachte eine Weile nach und beugte sich dann zu mir vor. Er war ziemlich erschöpft, denn er hatte die ganze Nacht über in der Klinik gearbeitet. Er sagte: Hast du daran gedacht, dass dies der seit langer Zeit gesuchte Wasserkanal sein könnte, der Kanal, den Physiologen seit einem Jahrhundert suchen, um zu erklären, auf welche Art und Weise in biologischen Geweben Osmose stattfindet?“ Dies war mir nie in den Sinn gekommen. Es war Johns Vorschlag – aber es war ein guter Vorschlag. Als wir nach Baltimore zurückkehrten, arbeitete ich mit Bill Guggino im physiologischen Labor der Johns Hopkins University zusammen, um die Hypothese zu testen. Hier haben wir Froscheier, Eizellen des Krallenfroschs Xenopus laevis. Links befindet sich eine Kontroll-Eizelle, und rechts befindet sich eine Eizelle, der zwei Nanogramm der komplementären RNA für unser neues Protein injiziert wurden. Die Idee besteht darin, dass die RNA, wenn es sich um einen Kanal handelt, ein Protein kodieren wird, das in die Membran integriert wird, und dass dann die Testzelle osmotisch aktiv sein sollte – und genau das stellten wir fest. Hier in einem isotonischen Nährmedium gibt es keinen Unterschied. Wenn die Test-Eizelle in ein hypotonisches Medium überführt wird, schwillt sie sehr schnell an und explodiert. Dies bewirkte großen Jubel im Labor. Ich glaube – und jeder Wissenschaftler weiß es –, dass etwas Neues zu entdecken, die Quelle unserer Freude ist und dasjenige, was uns antreibt. Ich muss Ihnen die Wahrheit sagen. Das ist ein Foto von Greg Preston, einem Postdoktoranden, der einige dieser frühen Untersuchungen durchführte. Ich nahm dieses Foto von Greg drei Jahre nach unserem ersten Bericht auf, und er feierte immer noch. Daher weiß ich, dass wir nicht wie andere Menschen sind. Unsere Belohnungen sind nicht finanzieller Natur. Sie sind häufig intellektueller Natur, aber sie sind intensiv, und das ist es, wonach wir wirklich streben sollten. Dieses Ergebnis rief sehr viel mehr Interesse an unserem Labor hervor, als uns jemals zuvor entgegengebracht wurde. Aus dem gesamten Land, aus der ganzen Welt erhielten wir Nachfragen nach unserem Plasmid. Andere hatten versucht, den Wasserkanal zu identifizieren, und wir hatten ihn. Daher mussten wir uns unseren Weg sehr vorsichtig und sorgfältig suchen. Wie kann man als kleines Labor mit den großen Laboren wetteifern? Die Antwort lautet: indem man mit intelligenten, wohlmeinenden Kollegen zusammenarbeitet. Dies verhalf uns zu großem, sehr großem Erfolg. Zuerst schlossen wir uns mit dieser Gruppe zusammen, um die Struktur aufzuklären. Links ist Yoshinori Fujiyoshi von der Universität Kyoto, und rechts ist Andreas Engel von der Universität Basel. Sie sind Pioniere in der Technik der Kristallografie von Membranen. Zusammen lösten wir die Struktur in drei Dimensionen. Wir zeigten, dass der Kanal, wie im linken Feld dargestellt, eine einzelne Pore besitzt, von oben nach unten, und im rechten Feld und im Querschnitt kann man erkennen, dass es einige wesentliche Stoffreste gibt, die die Pore auskleiden. Diese Stoffreste erklären die Funktion des Proteins. Nur ganz kurz: Im oberen Vorraum dieses Kanals, den wir aufgrund der entgegengesetzten Symmetrie als Sanduhr bezeichnen, haben wir oben eine „water in bulk“-Lösung. Die Wasserstoffbindungen zwischen diesen Molekülen bewirken, dass das Wasser nicht mehr flüssig ist. Eine „water in bulk“-Lösung im interzellularen Vorraum – aber beachten Sie eine Spanne von 20 Å im Zentrum. Dort wird das Wasser im Gänsemarsch weitertransportiert, trifft auf Barrieren und blockiert dadurch die Bewegung von Protonen, geladenen gelösten Stoffen und anderen gelösten Stoffen. Es handelt sich folglich um einen wasser-selektiven Kanal, der eine schnelle Fortbewegung des Wassers erlaubt. Dies wurde durch Simulationen der Membrandynamiken aufgeklärt, die hier in Deutschland von Helmut Grubmüller und Bert de Groot und in den USA von Claus Shilton und seiner Gruppe durchgeführt wurden. Alle Forscher stimmen im Großen und Ganzen darin überein, dass dieser Kanal erklärt, wie das Wasser die Membranen passiert. Damit erhalten wir einen Einblick in die Bildung und Reabsorption biologischer Flüssigkeiten. Dieses Modell wurde von David Kozono während seiner Studienzeit bei uns erarbeitet. Gene kommen häufig in Genfamilien vor. Die Aquaporine, wie wir sie genannt haben, haben 13 verschiedene Homologe im menschlichen Genom, aber Hunderte verschiedener Homologe, wenn man die anderen Lebensformen mit einbezieht, da jede Lebensform mindestens ein Aquaporin besitzt. Das menschliche Repertoire enthält Aquaporin 1, das Sie oben rechts sehen können und das Gegenstand unserer ersten Entdeckung war, und einige andere, die in verschiedenen Geweben exprimiert werden und für einen Wassertransport mit einer bestimmten biologischen Funktion sorgen. Unten sind einige eng verwandte Kanalproteine dargestellt, die von uns als Aquaglyceroporine bezeichnet werden und die Bewegung von Wasser durch Glycerol ermöglichen. In diesem menschlichen Repertoire habe ich die zwei Mitglieder von E. coli hervorgehoben: AqpZ links und GlpF unten rechts, die den Transport von Wasser und Glycerol in E. coli möglich machen. Wie Sie sehen können, unterscheiden sie sich zwar voneinander, sie sind jedoch eng miteinander verwandt. Ich werde Ihnen also ein bisschen über AQP1 erzählen und ich denke, Sie haben bereits erkannt, dass sich ein Teil meiner Geschichte nicht nur um die Wissenschaft, sondern auch um das Facebook der Wissenschaft, meine Freunde und Kollegen, dreht. Ich werde jeden kurz vorstellen. Um das Protein in der Niere zu lokalisieren, arbeiteten wir mit Sören Nielsen von der Universität Aarhus zusammen. Ist hier irgend jemand aus Aarhus? Ja, sehr schön, zumindest einer. Halten Sie nach Sören Ausschau. Sören ist ein Pionier. Als er diese Untersuchungen durchführte, war er ein junger Mann – 29 Jahre alt. Mit großer Präzision lokalisierte er das Protein im proximalen Nephron. In dem Modell links können Sie ein individuelles Nephron der Niere sehen, wobei jede Niere über Millionen Nephrone verfügt. Im Glomerulus, an der Stelle, an der die Filtration stattfindet, passiert der Primärharn das proximale Nephron, das in hohem Maße wasserdurchlässig ist. Wie hier in dieser dünnen Schicht gezeigt ist, die mit einem bestimmten Antikörper für AQP1 gefärbt wurde, stellt die goldene Farbe die spezifische Anwesenheit des Aquaporins sowohl im Lumen, das diesen mit P markierten Raum umgibt, als auch in den lateralen und basalen Membranen dar. In dem mit C bezeichneten Sammelrohr ist es nicht präsent. Dazu werde ich gleich etwas sagen. Dies erklärt also, auf welche Art und Weise Wasser aus dem Primärharn in den Tubuli auf die apikale Seite und dann durch die laterale oder basale Seite heraustransportiert wird und sich dabei vom Harn durch Zytoplasma und Interstitium bewegt. Jeden Tag filtern unsere Nieren in schneller Abfolge 180 Liter Plasma, wobei dies selbstverständlich immer und immer wieder dasselbe Plasma ist. Diese 180 Liter werden durch die Reabsorption des Wassers durch die Aquaporine auf einen Liter Harn konzentriert. Defekte in den Aquaporinen führen zu klinischen Problemen, von denen ich Ihnen kurz einige nennen werde. Auf diesem Schnappschuss – den ich Ihnen, wie ich betonen möchte, mit ihrer Erlaubnis zeige – sehen Sie links in der Mitte eine pensionierte Schullehrerin aus Südfrankreich, bei der wir einen genetischen Defekt identifizierten, der es ihr unmöglich machte, das AQP1-Protein zu synthetisieren. Wir konnten sie identifizieren, da die Oberfläche des AQP1 ein seltenes Blutgruppen-Antigen aufweist. Indem wir mit den Wissenschaftlern, die Blutgruppen erforschten, zusammenarbeiteten, konnten wir diese seltenen Fälle identifizieren und untersuchen. Wir brachten sie an die Johns Hopkins University, wo diese beiden anderen, der hochgewachsene Herr hier namens Landon King, ein Lungenarzt an dieser Universität, und Melanie Bonhivers, eine französischsprachige Postdoktorandin, die klinische Bedeutung von AQP1 nachwiesen. Kurz gesagt: Es stellte sich heraus, dass AQP1 sehr wichtig für die abschließenden Konzentration des Harns ist. Auf dem Bild rechts sehen Sie die Harnkonzentration von 15 normalen Kontrollpersonen, nachdem diese über die Nacht nichts getrunken hatten. Wir gehen abends ins Bett, schlafen, wenn wir Glück haben, die Nacht über durch und wachen morgens auf. Dann haben wir über sieben oder acht Stunden kein Wasser zu uns genommen. Unsere Körper reagieren darauf, indem sie den Harn konzentrieren. Folglich geben wir keinen verdünnten Harn ab, wenn wir nichts getrunken haben. Auf diese Art und Weise verhindern wir, dass wir dehydrieren. Normale Individuen können also ihren Harn bis zu einer Osmolarität von 1000 mOsm konzentrieren. Sie werden jedoch feststellen, dass diese beiden Individuen, die kein AQP1 bilden können und aus unterschiedlichen Familien mit unterschiedlichen genetischen Läsionen stammen, hier nicht weiterkommen. Sie können ein bisschen weiter als die isotonischen 280 mOsm bis zu ungefähr 400 mOsm konzentrieren, aber nur bis zu diesem Punkt und nicht weiter. Wenn wir diesen Leuten weiterhin nichts zu trinken geben, und wir haben dies in sehr vorsichtigen Versuchen getan, zeigt sich, dass sie nicht über 400 mOsm hinausgehen können. Wenn diese Menschen sich also in einem Umfeld befinden, in dem Wasser nur eingeschränkt zur Verfügung steht, in einer Wüste oder in einem Pflegeheim, wo das Personal nicht aufmerksam ist, dann werden sie natürlich dehydrieren, da sie trotz einer drohender Dehydrierung verdünnten Harn abgeben. Es handelt sich also um einen signifikanten Phänotyp. Wir bezeichnen dies als milden nephrogenen Diabetes insipidus, da die Betroffenen ihn bei uneingeschränkter Versorgung mit Wasser ausgleichen können. Auf diese Entdeckung eines neuen Proteins von ziemlicher Bedeutung folgte nun ein Wettrennen, wie dies in der Biologie aufgrund des Interesses anderer Wissenschaftler häufig der Fall ist. Das macht Wissenschaft wirklich spannend – die Dinge können sich so schnell weiterentwickeln. Durch Homologie klonten Fushimi und seine Kollegen ein Homolog aus dem renalen Sammelrohr. Wie Sie auf der Abbildung erkennen können, stellt das Sammelrohr den letzten Teil der Niere dar, wo, wie man weiß, der durch Vasopressin regulierte Wassertransport stattfindet. Kurz gesagt, das AQP2-Protein, das oben links durch eine Immun-Gold-Färbung angezeigt wird, befindet sich normalerweise in den intrazellulären Vesikeln. In Reaktion auf Vasopressin – ein Nervenhormon, das bei Durst von der Hypophyse freigesetzt wird – wird das Protein jedoch auf die Zelloberfläche versetzt. Wenn Sie einen Blick auf das Bild links oben werfen, sehen Sie das AQP2 im intrazellulären Bereich, und wenn Sie sich das Bild unten links anschauen, bei dem Vasopressin präsent ist, dann sehen Sie, dass sich das AQP2 nun auf der Zelloberfläche befindet. Damit lässt sich die Wasserregulierung erklären. In unserem Leben passiert dies häufig. Wenn Sie nachmittags in der warmen Sonne eine lange Strecke joggen, dann wird Ihnen Wasser entzogen und Sie konzentrieren Ihren Harn bis zur maximalen Konzentration. Das geschieht, weil Vasopressin freigesetzt wird. Hier haben wir also den antidiuretischen Zustand. Wenn Sie sich in diesem Fall Ihre Nieren anschauen könnten, dann würden sie dem Bild oben links entsprechen. Wenn Sie sich hingegen vorstellen, dass Sie einen ruhigen Abend verbracht und einiges an Flüssigkeit, vielleicht einen Liter Bier, zu sich genommen haben, dann befinden Sie sich im diuretischen Zustand und Ihre Nieren würden dem folgenden Bild entsprechen – bitte entschuldigen Sie, ich habe mich versprochen, der antidiuretische Zustand ist unten und der diuretische Zustand ist oben dargestellt. In diesem Fall kann es nicht zur Reabsorption von Wasser kommen, folglich geben wir verdünnten Harn ab. Bitte entschuldigen Sie meinen Versprecher. Nun gibt es in diesem Mechanismus erbliche Defekte. Die Defekte in dem Gen, das AQP2 kodiert, führen zu einer tiefgreifenden und schweren Form eines Defekts der Harnkonzentration in den Nieren, der als nephrogener Diabetes insipidus bezeichnet wird. Diese Kinder können ihren Harn nicht konzentrieren und geben mindestens 20 Liter Harn pro Tag ab, Sie müssen mindestens diese Menge trinken, um den Flüssigkeitsstatus ihres Körpers aufrechtzuerhalten. Dieser Defekt ist demnach ziemlich schwerwiegend, glücklicherweise jedoch recht selten. Erworbene Defekte des AQP2-Mechanismus sind hingegen sehr häufig. Eine überhöhte Synthese dieses Proteins tritt bei Herzinsuffizienz auf, bei der die Patienten zuviel Flüssigkeit speichern. Defekte bei der Expression finden sich bei verbreiteten Zuständen wie etwa dem Bettnässen. Jene Kleinkinder, die in ihr Bett nässen und ihren Eltern dadurch viel Kummer bereiten, tun dies, weil sie im Kindesalter vorübergehend ihr AQP2 nicht ausreichend exprimieren und daher ihren Harn nicht konzentrieren können. Sie entwachsen diesem Zustand, aber dennoch unterstreichen diese Probleme die Allgegenwärtigkeit und die Bedeutung dieses Proteins. Es gibt noch weitere Mitglieder dieser Familie, über die ich hier kurz sprechen werde. Das Gehirn-Aquaporin, AQP4, an dem wir mit unserem Freund in Oslo, Ole Petter Ottersen, und seinem Team forschten, liegt im Gehirn in einer sehr interessanten Verteilung vor, denn unsere Neuronen im Gehirn reagieren sehr empfindlich auf Änderungen das osmotische Ungleichgewicht. Sie werden von Astroglia-Zellen geschützt. Somit sind die Kapillargefäße des Gehirns – ich zeige einfach nur hinter mich – von Astroglia-Endfüßchen umgeben. An dieser Stelle befindet sich die sogenannte Blut-Hirn-Schranke. Auf dem Weg vom Blut zum Hirn bewegt sich die Flüssigkeit durch die Astroglia-Endfüßchen. Die Immun-Gold-Färbung zeigt die große Menge an AQP4-Protein an der Blut-Hirn-Schranke an. Dies erweist sich natürlich bei klinischen Problemen wie beispielsweise Ödemen als sehr wichtig. Ein Schlaganfall ist die zweithäufigste Todesursache in Westeuropa und in den USA, und häufig erliegen viele nicht dem primären Schlaganfall selbst, sondern der darauf folgenden Hirnschwellung. Folglich ist die Behandlung von Gehirnödemen von entscheidender Bedeutung für den Erfolg neurochirurgischer Verfahren nach Schlaganfällen und geschlossenen Kopfverletzungen. Die Anwesenheit dieses Proteins erklärt dies. Eine Studie, die von Mahmood Amiry an der Universität von Oslo und in Zusammenarbeit mit unserem Team an der Johns Hopkins University durchgeführt wurde, zeigt, dass normale Mäuse tatsächlich anfällig für Gehirnverletzungen sind. Wenn man sich die Färbung eines Querschnitts ansieht, sieht man, dass im Gehirn einer normalen Maus, im Vergleich zu einer mutierten Maus mit einem Defekt an der Stelle des AQP4-Proteins, ein signifikanter Anteil sehr hell ist, was auf abgestorbenes und durch Infarkt zerstörtes Gewebe hinweist. Das ist seltsam, finden Sie nicht auch? Eine Mutation wirkt als Schutz. Warum haben nicht alle Mäuse diese Mutation? Die Antwort lautet, dass das Vorhandensein dieses Proteins auch für die Homöostase der Gehirnflüssigkeit wichtig ist. Während mutierte Mäuse vor Kopfverletzungen geschützt sind, leiden sie andererseits an epileptischen Anfällen. Es wird also nur das eine gegen das andere ausgetauscht. Dennoch lässt uns der Schutz, den die Hemmung dieses Proteins gewährt, hoffen, dass pharmakologische Hemmstoffe entwickelt werden können, um die Folgen von Gehirnödemen zu verhindern oder zu lindern. Ich werde nun noch schnell einige andere Mitglieder der Familie durchgehen. AQP5-Proteine aus den sekretorischen Drüsen finden sich in den Schweißdrüsen, den Speicheldrüsen, den sekretorischen Drüsen der Lungenflüssigkeit und sind wichtig für die Bildung dieser Flüssigkeiten. Hier rechts haben wir Bilder aus einer Studie zur Wildform einer Maus. Jeder blaue Punkt stellt eine funktionelle Schweißdrüse dar. Rechts sehen wir eine mutierte Maus, die von Anil Menom und seinem Team in Cincinnati gezüchtet wurde. Diese mutierte Maus besitzt Schweißdrüsen, aber sie zeigen eine Unterfunktion. Aufgrund dessen ist die Maus anfällig für Unterkühlung. Natürlich sind Mäuse ziemlich resistent, da sie im kühlen Schatten leben. Menschen jedoch benötigen eine Verminderung der Schweißproduktion, um ihre Körpertemperatur in hypothermischen Umgebungen aufrechtzuerhalten. Ich werde Ihnen rasch etwas über die Aquaglyceroporine erzählen. Sie sind eng mit den Aquaporinen verwandt. Dieses Dia habe ich von Bing Yap von der University of California ausgeliehen, der die Stoffreste, die die Auskleidung der Pore eines Wasserkanals bilden und die hier dunkel schattiert sind, und jene in einem Glycerol-Kanal miteinander abglich. Wie Sie sehen, sind einige Reste perfekt erhalten, wie das Arginin oben, wohingegen im Wasserkanal ein Cystein vorliegt, das in dem Glycerol-Kanal durch ein Phenylalanin ersetzt wird. Der Unterschied in der Masse der C-Kette, die verglichen mit dem Glycin im Glycerol-Kanal im Wasserkanal vorliegt, ist das Histidin. Dies erklärt, wie der Glycerol-Kanal die Pore öffnen kann, um das größere 3-Kohlenstoff-Polyol passieren zu lassen. Folglich gibt es strukturelle Erklärungen für die Art und Weise, wie diese Dinge funktionieren. Ich habe einige Jahre lang als Arzt gearbeitet und hatte nicht ein einziges Mal in Erwägung gezogen, dass der Prozess des Glycerol-Transports von Bedeutung sein könnte. Wie sich herausstellte, ist dieser Prozess jedoch ziemlich wichtig für die Versorgung der Haut. Dieses Dia, das von Johan Agren aus Uppsala während seines Sabbatjahrs bei uns angefertigt wurde, zeigt die starke Exprimierung von AQP3, Aquaglyceroporin 3, in der Basalschicht der Haut von Mäusen vor und nach der Geburt. Es dauerte nicht lange, bis die Kosmetikindustrie sich dafür interessierte. Vor ein paar Jahren, ein paar Sommern, erhielt ich Besuch von drei Führungskräften des Christian Dior-Konzerns. Üblicherweise bekomme ich keinen Besuch vom Christian Dior-Konzern und war daher ein wenig misstrauisch. Tatsächlich hat diese Firma ein Produkt auf dem Markt, das sie Ihnen verkaufen möchte. Sie können dieses Produkt im Duty Free-Shop bekommen, es ist sehr teuer, eine Hydro-Action-Hautcreme. Ein Tiegel mit 50 Gramm kostet 50 EUR. Ich sollte erwähnen, dass ich keinerlei Finanzbeziehungen zu Christian Dior unterhalte. Ich hätte sehr gerne Finanzbeziehungen zu Christian Dior – aber zu Bedingungen, die ich hätte akzeptieren können, wurden mir keine angeboten. Dennoch handelt es sich hier um die Kosmetikindustrie und nicht um die Arzneimittelentwicklung. Ihre Chemiker haben einige kleine Moleküle identifiziert, die zu einem geringfügigen Anstieg der Expression des Aquaglyceroporin 3 in der Haut führen. Dies bedeutet, dass man – verwendet man genug davon – so aussehen wird. Ich weiß nicht, ob das einen Beweis darstellt. Aber der Käufer möge vorsichtig sein. Das hier habe ich tatsächlich mitgehen lassen. Es ist die Rückseite des Beauty-Magazins Marie Claire, das ich mir in Paris in der Business Lounge ausgeliehen habe. Diejenigen von Ihnen, die Französisch lesen können, werden sehen, dass hier einige kühne Behauptungen aufgestellt werden: umfassende Hydration, spektakuläre Ergebnisse, und hier, ganz unten, steht „Nobelpreis für Chemie“. Ich zeigte es meiner Mutter, und sie lächelte und sagte: Vielen Dank – wenn ich meine Mutter das nächste Mal sehe, werde ich ihr erzählen, dass Ihnen das gefallen hat. Ich dachte, sie scherze, aber man weiß nie – unsere Mütter kennen uns besser, als wir uns selbst kennen. Durch die Aquaglyceroporin 3-Studien haben wir jedoch einige nützliche Informationen erhalten. Dies liegt daran, dass der Transport von Glycerol in rote Blutkörperchen zwar von wahrscheinlich untergeordneter physiologischer Bedeutung ist, aber auch den Mechanismus des Glyceroltransports in rote Blutkörperchen bei der Pathogenese der Malaria darstellt. Das Thema Malaria werde ich hier nicht ausführlich erörtern, da ich davon bereits gestern Abend gesprochen habe. Jedoch kann dieser interzelluläre Parasit sehr schnell Glycolipide synthetisieren. Durch die Aquaglyceroporine tritt Glycerol ein, und der Parasit teilt sich und verdaut das Hämoglobin. Wie ganz rechts zu sehen ist, kann innerhalb von zwei Tagen aus einem Parasit eine Vielzahl von Parasiten werden. Diese Vermehrung ist selbstverständlich die Ursache für die furchtbaren Fieberanfälle der Malaria, die jährlich das Leben mehrerer Hunderttausend Kinder fordern. Stoffe, die die Aquaglyceroporine hemmen, könnten bei der Therapie eine Rolle spielen. Wir sind uns nicht sicher, aber wir forschen daran. Und natürlich haben die Moskitos selbst ein Problem mit dem Wassertransport. Wenn die Anopheles-Mücken uns stechen, dann tun sie das deshalb, weil die Flüssigkeit, das Hämoglobin aus dem Blut für die Entwicklung der Eier benötigt wird. Wenn sie jedoch eine solch große Menge aufnehmen, müssen sie Flüssigkeit abgeben, um fliegen zu können, und diese geben sie über die Malpighischen Gefäße am hinteren Ende der Mücke ab. Am einen Ende wird Blut aufgenommen, am anderen Ende wird Flüssigkeit abgegeben, und daran sind Aquaglyceroporine beteiligt – glauben Sie mir. Es gibt zwei weitere, die ich kurz erwähnen werde. Aquaglyceroporin 7 findet sich im Fett und ist beteiligt an der Freisetzung von Glycerol aus Fett, die in Reaktion auf eine Aushungerung des Körpers stattfindet. Aquaglyceroporin 9 liegt in der Leber vor und ist an der Aufnahme von Glycerol durch die Leber beteiligt, um in Hungerszeiten das Glycerol wieder zu Glucose umzuwandeln. Dies ist die Forschungsarbeit von Jenn Carbrey. Diese Ergebnisse haben eine unvorhergesehene und wichtige Implikation, denn dieser Mechanismus ist auch der Mechanismus für die Abgabe von Arsenolith, wobei ich auf dessen Chemie nicht näher eingehen werde. Ph-neutrales Arsenolith, Arsen(III)-oxid, ist ungeladen und muss Glycerol ähnlich sein. Die Fähigkeit unseres Körpers, Arsen abzugeben, ist Aquaglyceroporin 9 zu verdanken. Darauf werde ich hier jedoch nicht eingehen. Auch Pflanzen besitzen Aquaporine. Rechts sehen Sie Schaumkresse im Wildtyp, links eine Schaumkresse, die so manipuliert wurde, dass sie Aquaporine in den kleinen Wurzeln unterexprimiert. Sie kann dies kompensieren, indem sie übermäßig viele kleine Wurzeln wachsen lässt. Damit werde ich zum Schluss kommen. Es gibt eine Liste, die ich Ihnen, wenn Sie interessiert sind, zeigen könnte, und die alle klinischen Krankheitsbilder umfasst, bei denen Aquaporine eine Rolle spielen – und es wird noch mehr geben. Ich möchte Ihnen ein Bild meines Labors zeigen, das an dem Morgen aufgenommen wurde, als ich einen Anruf von einigen sehr netten Menschen aus Schweden erhielt, die mich darüber informierten, dass ich mir den Nobelpreis teilen würde. Als meine Frau Mary dies am frühen Morgen hörte, rief sie meine Mutter in Minnesota an und weckte sie, um ihr mitzuteilen, dass ich mir den Nobelpreis für Chemie teilen würde. Meine Mutter dachte einen Moment lang nach und sagte dann: aber dass es wichtiger ist, etwas Sinnvolles zu tun. Aber es gab eine große Feier, an der selbst die örtliche Wein- und Spirituosenhandlung beteiligt war. Daraus zu schließen, dass ich ihr bester Kunde war, ist eine Riesenübertreibung. Hier aber sind wir auf der Bühne in Stockholm, und den jungen Leuten hier möchte ich klarmachen, dass es um zwei Preise geht. Einmal geht es um den Nobelpreis, eine schöne Medaille, und mit jeder möglichen Ähnlichkeit, die ich einmal mit Alfred Nobel gehabt hatte, war es vorbei, als ich mir den Schnurrbart abschneiden ließ. Der andere Preis sind die Menschen um mich herum, meine Familie. Wir alle haben Menschen, die uns anfeuern, unsere Freunde, unsere Familien, die Menschen, die wir lieben und die uns etwas bedeuten, die uns bei unserer Arbeit antreiben und ermutigen. Wir dürfen nicht vergessen, ihnen für das zu danken, was sie für uns getan haben. Lassen Sie mich also zum Schluss den jungen Leuten Glück für ihre Karriere wünschen. Ich hoffe, dass Sie, wenn Sie mein Alter erreichen – ich bin 62, und diese Zeit wird früher kommen, als Sie darauf vorbereitet sind –, zurückblicken und sich sagen werden, meine Laufbahn hat mir Spaß gemacht. Ich hatte eine großartige Zeit. Ich wünsche Ihnen alles Gute. Vielen Dank.

Peter Agre on his breakthrough he made with experiments performed in frog eggs
(00:06:25 - 00:07:53)

 

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discoveries related to the genetic programme behind embryonic development. This work was carried out in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, an organism which is particularly amenable to genetic studies and resulted in the identification of many genes involved in building the basic body plans of embryos. However, while the early stages of embryonic development exhibit remarkable similarities even among very distantly related species, subsequent development is of course vastly different. Thus, for her studies on the next steps in organismal development, Nüsslein-Volhard turned to another model organism: the zebrafish Danio rerio.

 

<strong>Zebrafish Danio rerio</strong><p>Picture/Credit: Mirko_Rosenau/istockphoto.com</p>
Zebrafish Danio rerio

Picture/Credit: Mirko_Rosenau/istockphoto.com

 

In common with X. laevis, the zebrafish is also a vertebrate, and, in fact, 70% of human genes are found in this organism. This means that many physiological processes can be well modelled in zebrafish. Further, the organisms are also easy to maintain and modify. At her lecture at the 60th Lindau Meeting, Nüsslein-Volhard described some of the other advantages of using zebrafish as a model organism and talks about the research questions she addresses studying these organisms.

 

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (2010) - On the Genetic Basis of Morphological Evolution (Lecture + Discussion)

Sie sind also mit der Evolutionstheorie vertraut, und wir werden mit Darwins Reise um die Welt anfangen. Diese große Reise unternahm Darwin als junger Mann auf der "Beagle". Dies ist die Route, die er nahm. Er startete in Plymouth, in England und reiste dann nach Südamerika, weiter zu den Galapagos-Inseln, dann nach Neuseeland, Tasmanien und Australien und über Afrika zurück nach England. Während seiner Reisen sammelte er viele Pflanzen und Tiere und alle möglichen Arten von Lebewesen und schickte sie nach Hause, wo sie beschrieben wurden. Er besaß ein enormes Wissen über alle diese Pflanzen und Tiere. Das ist etwas wirklich Außergewöhnliches. Ich glaube, heutzutage hat keiner von uns zeitgenössischen Biologen ein so umfangreiches Wissen. Und das ist vielleicht der Grund, warum er seine Evolutionstheorie entwickeln konnte. Und er bemerkte viel. Kurze Zeit, nachdem er nach England zurückgekommen war, zeichnete er die ersten Skizzen der Stammbäume. Er stellte fest, dass man Ähnlichkeiten bei Pflanzen und Tieren sehen konnte, die sehr deutlich waren, so dass man nicht sagen konnte, dass sie von Gott in einer voneinander völlig unabhängigen Art und Weise erfunden wurden. Er bemerkte Regelmäßigkeiten und Ähnlichkeiten und daraus schloss er, dass es einen gemeinsamen Ursprung dieser Tiere und Pflanzen geben müsse und dass sie gemeinsame Organisationsprinzipien hatten. Und dann schrieb er dieses überaus wichtige Buch, das Sie vermutlich nicht gelesen haben,... aber unbedingt lesen sollten. Es wurde vor 150 Jahren im Jahr 1859 veröffentlicht und trägt den Titel "The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection". In diesem Buch beschrieb er, dass die Ähnlichkeit von Pflanzen, von Tieren auf einen gemeinsamen Ursprung zurückgeht, was bedeutet, dass sie tatsächlich von denselben Vorfahren abstammen. Eines der wichtigsten Argumente für diese Theorie war in der Tat die Klassifikation, etwas, das die Biologen lange vor ihm bemerkt hatten, dass es möglich war, ein natürliches System der Pflanzen und Tiere aufzustellen und sie entsprechend ihrer Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschiede zu ordnen. Sie wissen, dass Linnaeus bereits im 18. Jahrhundert dieses natürliche System aufgestellt hatte, in dem er Pflanzen, bestimmte Pflanzen, aber auch Tiere klassifizierte und sie entsprechend der Ähnlichkeiten in ihrem Körperbau und ihrer Organisation in Gruppen anordnete. Und in Schritt 13 ging es immer und immer wieder darum, dass der Umstand, dass man klassifizieren kann, bereits ein Hinweis darauf ist, dass es einen gemeinsamen Ursprung, eine gemeinsame Abstammung gibt. Er zog dann daraus den Schluss, und dies ist ein Satz, den ich aus seinem Buch zitiere, dass dass sie sich in absteigenden Graden ähneln, so dass sie in Gruppen unter Gruppen klassifiziert werden können. Naturforscher versuchen, die allgemeine Art und die Familien in jeder Klasse in einem sogenannten natürlichen System anzuordnen. Und das ist es, was die Wissenschaftler wussten, dass es wahrheitsgemäß sein sollte, und wenn wir nicht genau wissen, was wahrheitsgemäß ist, dann deshalb, weil es viele Reorganisationen dieser Klassifikationen gab, weil es nicht so einfach ist, genau zu sagen, welche Arten näher verwandt sind als andere. Jede wahrheitsgemäße Klassifikation ist die genealogische Gemeinschaft der Abstammung, die unsichtbare Verbindung, welche die Naturforscher unbewusst gesucht haben, und nicht irgendein unbekannter Schöpfungsplan und das reine Zusammensetzen und Trennen von Objekten, die mehr oder weniger ähnlich sind. Er leitete also diese genealogische Abstammung der Tiere und Pflanzen von ihren Ähnlichkeiten ab und postulierte, dass sie einen gemeinsamen Ursprung hatten. Und dann hat er diese eine Abbildung in seinem Buch mit diesem Stammbaum. Dies ist der Endpunkt des Baumes. Leider kann ich Ihnen dies nicht zeigen. Dies sind also nun die neuen Arten, die heute existieren. Sie können sie irgendwie nach Ähnlichkeiten gruppieren, aber Sie wissen nicht genau, wie sie miteinander verwandt sind. Und dann hat er diesen wunderbaren Satz, "wenn jede Form, die jemals auf dieser Erde lebte, plötzlich wieder zum Vorschein käme, wäre eine natürliche Klassifikation möglich". Ich werde Ihnen das vollständige Diagramm zeigen, und dort haben Sie diese visionäre Idee, dass alles auf einen gemeinsamen Urahnen zurückgeht. Damals war diese Idee der Evolution natürlich höchst umstritten, aber in der Zwischenzeit hat sie weithin Anerkennung gefunden. Er stellte jedoch außerdem etwas fest, was in dem Kapitel, das ich Ihnen zuvor zeigte, angesprochen wurde, und das auch von anderen Biologen festgestellt wurde. Allerdings interpretierten sie es nicht richtig und wussten nicht, was es bedeutet, aber sie machten die Beobachtung, dass Tiere umso enger miteinander verwandt aussehen, wenn sie sich in einem möglichst frühen Stadium ihres Lebens befinden. Das klassische Beispiel kam von Karl Ernst von Baer bereits im Jahr 1823 oder so. Er beobachtete bei in Formalin eingelegten Embryos, dass man bei einem Embryo einen Hund nicht wirklich von einem Pferd unterscheiden konnte, da sie sich so ähnlich sahen. Darwin schloss aus dieser Ähnlichkeit bei den Embryonen, dass man sie in diesem Stadium am besten klassifizieren konnte. Man kann sagen, dass all jene, die sich sehr ähnlich sehen, miteinander verwandt sein müssen. Später jedoch, im späteren Verlauf der Entwicklung, sehen sie sehr unterschiedlich aus. Beispielsweise sieht eine Fledermaus ganz anders aus als ein Hund, aber ein Fledermaus-Embryo sieht einem Hunde-Embryo sehr ähnlich. In seinem nächsten Buch "The Descent of Man" zeigte er diese Abbildung, in der ein menschlicher Embryo mit einem Hunde-Embryo verglichen wurde und wies darauf hin, dass sie sich sehr ähnlich sahen. Das ist das, was wir gewissermaßen schon angeschnitten haben: Es gibt große Ähnlichkeiten in der frühen Entwicklung, aber ziemlich große Unterschiede in späteren Stadien des Lebens. Wenn Sie sich die Evolution anschauen, dann können Sie diese Ähnlichkeiten in der Embryonalentwicklung für die Klassifizierung nutzen, aber die Diversifikation ereignet sich in den späteren Stadien. Und die Selektion, die Darwin postulierte, war die treibende Kraft der Evolution. Die Selektion wirkt auf die adulten Tiere, nicht auf die Embryonen. Die Embryonen sehen sich ähnlich, da sich keine Selektion auf sie auswirkt. Sie müssen sich nicht selbst verteidigen, sie müssen nicht essen, sie müssen nicht kämpfen, die Mutter beschützt sie, sie müssen sich nicht viel verändern. Aber dann werden sie geboren, und nach der Geburt oder dem Schlüpfen aus dem Ei gibt es sehr viel Selektion, denn sie müssen alleine heranwachsen und überleben. Dieses Mittel der Variation und Selektion hat dann zu dieser immensen Ausbreitung der Diversifikation der Tierstämme geführt. Dies ist ein neuer (Stamm-)Baum, den ich Ihnen erläutere bzw. nicht wirklich erläutere, aber auf den ich angespielt habe und der bereits die Antwort auf Ihre Frage nach dieser gemeinsamen Entstehung der vielzelligen Tiere ist. Er teilt sich auf und Sie haben die Insekten auf einer und die Wirbeltiere, die Chordaten, auf der anderen Seite. Und Sie sehen auch sehr deutlich, dass der letzte gemeinsame Vorfahr der Insekten und der Wirbeltiere sehr grundlegend ist. Sie erwarten also einige grundsätzliche Ähnlichkeiten, aber auch große Unterschiede. Darauf werde ich zurückkommen. Morphologische Evolution basiert also auf der Variation, der Veränderung der Morphologie, der Veränderung der Morphologie durch die Mutation von Genen, welche die Gestalt und Funktion des Tieres bestimmen. Die Selektion bringt dann Individuen hervor, die irgendwie besser an die Umweltbedingungen angepasst sind. Im Durchschnitt haben sie häufig mehr Nachkommen, was langfristig zu der Veränderung der Form führen wird, und diese Mutationen, die vorteilhaft sind und ihnen helfen zu überleben, werden dann weitergeführt und andere werden eliminiert. Das Ziel der Selektion sind die adulten Formen. Die Embryo- und Larvenformen sind stärker konserviert. In der Entwicklungsbiologie und in dem, was ich während meiner Karriere studiert habe, nämlich der Entwicklung der genetischen Basis der Entwicklung von Drosophila, konzentrierten wir uns auf die frühen Stadien der Entwicklung. Viele Gene, die an den frühen Entwicklungsstadien und am Aufbau der grundlegenden Körperbaupläne von Insekten, Nematoden und Wirbeltieren beteiligt sind, kennen wir nun ziemlich genau. Diese Gene sagen uns jedoch nicht notwendigerweise viel darüber, warum später in der Entwicklung die Variation in der Form auftritt. Wenn Sie nämlich genetische Untersuchungen durchführen und die Gene bereits zu einem frühen Zeitpunkt in der Embryogenese aktiv sind, können Sie keine Mutation erhalten, die Sie auf Ihre Funktion bei den adulten Tieren hinweist. Sie bleiben daher im Wesentlichen unentdeckt. Daher sind die Gene, die für die Diversifikation der Formen der adulten Tiere erforderlich sind, nicht besonders gut bekannt und nicht besonders gut erforscht, und man kann vorhersagen, dass Fliegen nicht so viele haben, weil Wirbeltiere von ihnen in der Evolution so weit entfernt sind, dass vielleicht die Divergenz so groß ist, dass wir Fliegen nicht als Modell für die Morphologie adulter Wirbeltiere verwenden können. Wir müssen daher Wirbeltiere und die Genetik der adulten Strukturen bei Wirbeltieren direkt untersuchen. Das ist es, was wir taten, und zwar bei Fischen, im Wesentlichen tun wir es bei einer Art. Ich zeige Ihnen einfach dieses Bild, um es zu veranschaulichen - leider haben wir hier zu viel Licht, so dass Sie jetzt gewissermaßen ein wenig raten müssen. Aber Sie sehen diese enorme Vielfalt, die enormen Unterschiede zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Fischen. Es gibt heutzutage 40.000 Arten von Wirbeltieren, und die Hälfte davon sind Fische. Bei ihnen ist die Variation am größten - Sie sehen die Gestalt der Flossen und das Pigmentmuster und die enormen Unterschiede der Kiefer und Punkte und Streifen, und Sie sehen, dass es bei diesen morphologischen Mustern eine enorme Vielfalt gibt. Wenn Sie darüber nachdenken, ist eigentlich wirklich sehr wenig darüber bekannt, was die treibenden Kräfte sind, die diese Musterunterschiede verursachen. Und wenn Sie wissen möchten, was der Unterschied ist, müssen Sie zuerst lernen, wie das Muster selbst entsteht. Das ist es, was sich unser Labor zur Aufgabe gemacht hat, und wir konzentrieren uns nun auf zwei Dinge: Wir konzentrieren uns auf die Flossen und die Schuppen und auch auf das Pigmentmuster. Heute möchte ich meinen Vortrag darauf beschränken, was wir in Bezug auf die Pigmentmuster bei Fischen untersuchen. Dies ist ein sehr interessantes Gebiet, denn dasjenige, worauf dies letztendlich hinausläuft, ist das Verständnis der Evolution von Schönheit, weil es sich wirklich um sehr schöne Fische handelt. Wir wissen, dass sie nicht für uns, sondern für sich selbst, für die Erkennung von Verwandten, für die sexuelle Selektion schön sind, und natürlich auch für die Tarnung und um Beutetieren zu entkommen. Aber ein Großteil der Muster existiert tatsächlich, um andere Individuen derselben Art anzuziehen, und das ist es, was wir als Schönheit bezeichnen. Ich habe bereits erwähnt, dass der gemeinsame Ursprung der Wirbeltiere sehr weit unten ist, bei den Bilateria, den ersten Tieren, in deren Bauplan es ein Oben und Unten sowie vorne und hinten gab. Die Wirbeltiere gehen zurück auf die Chordaten, die vielleicht auf diesen Zweig auf der rechten Seite des Bildes zurückgehen. Die Spaltung ereignete sich hier, sehr weit unten, zwischen den Urmündern und den Neumündern. Übrigens beziehen sich alle diese verschiedenen Zweige, die Sie hier sehen, auf embryonale Strukturen. Lophotrochozoen haben zum Beispiel einen bestimmten Typus von Larvenform. Den Ringelwürmern und den Mollusken und den Häutungstieren ist gemeinsam, dass sie sich häuten müssen, um zu wachsen. Die Neumünder haben ein kontinuierliches Wachstum, und es gibt relativ spät in der Evolution eine Verzweigung, die sich in Stachelhäuter und Chordatiere aufspaltet. Die primitiven Chordaten traten, zusammen mit fast allen anderen Stämmen, den Tieren der grundlegenden Körperbaupläne der bestehenden Stämme, bereits in der kambrischen Revolution auf. Anfangs waren die Chordatiere ziemlich primitive Tiere und teilten den Körperbauplan der Chorda, der aus einem starren inneren Skelett besteht, um das sich der weiche Körper bildet. Dann haben Sie diese fünf neuen Klassen, Fische, Amphibien, Reptilien, Vögel und Säugetiere, und sie werden zunehmend komplexer hinsichtlich ihres Körperbaus. Sie erwerben all diese sehr unterschiedlichen Strukturen. Dieser Erwerb vollzog sich in der Evolution mit Hilfe einer Art Erfindung einiger embryologischer Prinzipien, und zwar erwarben sie die Neuralleiste und Placoid-Schuppen. Hierbei handelt es sich um embryologische Strukturen oder Organe, die bei wirbellosen Tieren nicht existieren. Sie rufen all diese Unterschiede, die enorme Vielfalt der äußeren Strukturen hervor, die Sie bei den neuen Klassen von Tieren sehen. Beispielsweise stammen alle Pigmentzellen aus der Neuralleiste. Die Schuppen stammen von Placoid-Schuppen ab, die Haare stammen von Placoid-Schuppen ab, dies sind Hautspezialisierungen. Diese Diversifikation, der Erwerb dieser reichen Formen, hängt von der Entwicklung der Neuralleiste ab, die sich ungefähr an folgender Stelle ereignete - ich glaube, ich habe - ja, dies ist das primitivste Chordatier. Es sind sehr einfache Tiere, aber in der späteren Evolution erwarben sie zuerst den Kopf mit dem Kiefer und dem Schädel, dann die Beine, Flügel und Arme und dann die äußeren Dekorationen wie Federn, Haare und Schuppen. Die Neuralleiste ist also - gibt es unter Ihnen Wirbeltier-Embryologen? Vielleicht nicht, vielleicht zwei oder drei. Wie auch immer - Sie kennen die Neuralleiste nicht, o.k. Es ist eine Struktur, die aus einer Population pluripotenter Zellen besteht, die höchst migratorisch sind. Sie entstehen an der Position zwischen der Epidermis und dem sich einrollenden Neuralrohr. Dann beginnen diese Zellen, aus dieser Region wegzuwandern. Sie bevölkern den Körper und rufen all diese verschiedenen Strukturen hervor, wie das periphere Nervensystem oder Pigmentzellen, den Kiefer, die Zähne, den Schädel, einige der Schädelknochen, Schnäbel und Hörner usw. usw. Und ohne diese Strukturen würden die Tiere sehr, sehr, sehr viel einfacher aussehen als sie heute aussehen. Wir müssen also auf die Entwicklung dieser Neuralleiste achten. Sie enthält gewissermaßen das Geheimnis der Diversifikation der Formen und der Morphologie der Wirbeltiere. Wie ich sagte, entstand sie vor ungefähr 450 Millionen Jahren, übrigens wahrscheinlich zur selben Zeit, als sich das adaptive Immunsystem herausbildete. Das könnte ein Zufall sein. Andererseits müssen Sie sehen, dass im Gegensatz dazu der Körperbauplan, wenn ich zu diesem primitiven Chordatier zurückgehe, das nur ein Innenskelett besitzt, einen Stab und dann einen weichen Körper, sich irgendwie selbst schützen musste. Die meisten Strukturen der Neuralleiste, auch die Haut, tragen dazu bei, das Äußere zu schützen, und machen die Haut und auch die Schuppen und die Pigmentzellen und damit die äußere Dekoration aller Wirbeltiere aus. Der Ursprung der Neuralleiste liegt also, wie ich sagte, in der Embryogenese, und dies ist nun ein frühes Stadium eines Zebrafisches (Zebrabärblings). Die frühen Stadien von Fischen sehen, wie Sie sich denken können, sehr ähnlich aus, und da ist nun der Zebrafisch. Sie sehen, dass hier der Kopf ist, und die gepunktete Struktur ist das zentrale Nervensystem und die dunkle Struktur ist die chorda dorsalis, das Notochord, das den Chordatieren den Namen gibt, der Stab, der die Körperachse stabilisiert. Dann haben Sie diese V-förmigen Somiten (Urwirbel/Ursegmente), welche die Vorläufer der Muskeln sind. Das kennen Sie, wenn Sie Fisch essen, Sie können es erkennen, wenn Sie eine Forelle essen. Wenn Sie Rücken- und Bauchseite trennen, gibt es eine horizontale Linie, die als horizontales Myoseptum bezeichnet wird und beide Seiten trennt. Dies ist eine wichtige Struktur, auf die ich zurückkommen werde. Die Neuralleiste entsteht an der Spitze des zentralen Nervensystems. Wenn man sich einen Querschnitt ansieht, kann man diese roten Zellen sehen. Dies sind Zellen aus der Neuralleiste. Die gepunkteten Zellen werden sich einstülpen, um das zentrale Nervensystem zu bilden. Die dunkle Struktur darunter ist das Notochord. Dies ist das zentrale Nervensystem. Die Zellen der Neuralleiste lösen sich dann sozusagen von ihrem Ursprung ab und wandern durch den Körper. Sie wandern auf zwei verschiedenen Pfaden. Der eine ist extern, unterhalb der Haut, und der andere ist intern, um das Notochord und die Gedärme herum. Sie lassen hauptsächlich Sinnesorgane, das periphere Nervensystem, Pigmentzellen - alle Pigmentzellen des Körpers - und Ganglien des Nervensystems entstehen. Die Fische sind möglicherweise die einfachste Form der Wirbeltiere, die wir untersuchen können, und sie haben eine Neuralleiste und der Neuralleiste entstammende Organe. Deshalb sind sie sehr gut geeignet, um das zu untersuchen. Sie haben noch andere Vorteile. Wir verwenden Zebrafische. Sie haben den Vorteil, dass sie einfach zu züchten sind und große Eier legen. Die Eier werden abgestreift und außerhalb des Körpers befruchtet. Sie sehen hier, dass die Eier ziemlich groß sind, hier sehen Sie zwei. Man kann die Entwicklung im lebenden Embryo mit sehr einfachen optischen Geräten beobachten. Einige von Ihnen arbeiten vielleicht mit Zebrafischen. Es ist leicht, Videoaufnahmen zu machen, und man kann mit Hilfe von Live-Videoaufnahmen über einen langen Zeitraum hinweg die Wanderung der Zellen durch den Körper verfolgen und beobachten, insbesondere dann, wenn man - dies wird morgen ausführlicher besprochen werden - sie mit fluoreszierenden Farben markiert, kann man einzelne Zellen verfolgen. Ich werde Ihnen dazu einige Bilder zeigen. Dies war nun die Einführung, die Gliederung meines Vortrags. Ich habe Ihnen erzählt, dass wir uns vornehmen, die Gene zu bestimmen, die erforderlich sind, um die Unterschiede im Pigmentmuster des adulten Körpers wie auch der Schuppen und Flossen zu bewirken. Wir machen also genetische Untersuchungen direkt für die adulte Morphologie und hoffen, dass wir Gene identifizieren können, die exakt für diese Strukturen erforderlich sind. Das ist der eine Aspekt, über den ich nicht viel spreche. Ich möchte Ihnen nur einen Überblick geben, es geht für Sie zu sehr ins Detail. Dann werde ich aufgrund der begrenzten Zeit überspringen, was wir bezüglich der Hautknochen, nämlich der Schuppen, des Schädels und der Flossen untersuchen, und ich werde Ihnen ein wenig darüber erzählen, wie die Farbmuster bei den Zebrafischen entstehen. Farbmuster bei Fischen sind etwas, was man überaus faszinierend finden kann. Ich zumindest gehe gerne zu den Aquarien und studiere sie. Und man sieht, dass es einen sehr, sehr großen Reichtum an Farben und auch an Mustern gibt, obwohl man bei genauerem Hinsehen erkennt, dass die am weitesten verbreiteten Muster Streifen und Punkte sind. Die Streifen können entweder wie bei diesem Zebrafisch horizontal oder wie bei den meisten Fischen, die Sie hier sehen, vertikal sein. Aber dies ist eine zufällige Auswahl, wobei ich nicht weiß, ob sie zufällig ist, es ist einfach eine Auswahl. Dies hier ist ein Hecht - haben Sie schon einmal Hecht gegessen? Sie schwimmen im Bodensee und haben auch diese Streifen und wenn Sie Hecht essen, sehen Sie die Streifen auf der Haut. Und das ist eine Forelle. Sie könnten hier auch Forellen aus dem Bodensee essen. Aber Sie sehen, dass die Süßwasserfische aus dieser Gegend nicht besonders farbenfroh sind. Die farbenfreudigsten Fische stammen selbstverständlich aus den tropischen Ozeanen. Der Zebrafisch stammt nicht aus einem tropischen Ozean, sondern aus dem Ganges. Er ist ein Süßwasserfisch und nicht so farbenfroh, aber farbenfroh genug, und er hat hübsche Streifen. Er ist gleichmäßig gestreift. Die Streifen sind typisch für das adulte Muster, die Larven haben diese Streifen noch nicht. Sie sind gestreift, aber nicht im selben Muster. Dies gibt Ihnen einen Überblick über den Lebenszyklus, der Fische zu einem attraktiven Modell macht, um daran auch viele verschiedene Aspekte der Entwicklung zu untersuchen. Die Eier werden gelegt, und innerhalb von zwei Tagen ist die Entwicklung des Embryos abgeschlossen und die kleine Larve schlüpft, die im Großen und Ganzen einem Fisch wirklich sehr ähnlich sieht. Sie schwimmt und kann essen und hat Streifen. Allerdings hat sie nur sehr primitive Streifen, nämlich einen Rückenstreifen, einen seitlichen Streifen und einen Bauchstreifen. Während einer Phase im Alter von ungefähr drei bis vier Wochen erwerben die Fische in einem Prozess, den wir als Metamorphose bezeichnen, obwohl er bei Weitem nicht so dramatisch ist wie die Metamorphose bei Insekten, das adulte Muster. Danach bleibt das Streifenmuster unverändert und der Fisch wächst einfach weiter. Der adulte Fisch ist wunderhübsch gestreift und hat zwei verschiedene Streifen. Das, was hier blau erscheint, sind in Wirklichkeit schwarze Pigmentzellen, welche die Streifen bilden. Dazwischen sind gelbe Zellen, die gelbe Streifen bilden, und sie scheinen blau und weiß zu sein, da sich darunter eine Schicht von silbrigen Zellen befindet, die das Licht reflektieren. Deshalb wirkt dies hier blau und nicht schwarz. Die Larven haben also diese drei schwarzen Streifen, welche offensichtlich morphologischen Orientierungspunkten folgen, wohingegen die adulten Fische solche Streifen haben, die keinen morphologischen Orientierungspunkten folgen. Sie sind einfach regelmäßig gestreift. Sie richten sich vielleicht entlang des horizontalen Myoseptums aus, aber davon abgesehen, sind sie sehr regelmäßig hinsichtlich des Abstands. Es ist interessant, nachzuvollziehen, warum und wie diese Streifen entstehen. Wir haben nun diese Untersuchung durchgeführt. Diese Untersuchung galt der Genetik. Ich möchte nicht ins Detail gehen, denn ich denke, dass nicht alle von Ihnen Biologen oder Genetiker sind. Mutanten zu erzeugen, bedeutet, dass die Tiere mit Mutagenen behandelt werden, die ein verstärktes Auftreten von Mutationen in ihrem Genom zur Folge haben. Man behandelt die Männchen. Die Spermien werden nun refertilisiert und man schafft dann Inzucht-Familien und kreuzt sie miteinander, Bruder-Schwester-Paarungen. Nach ungefähr drei Generationen kann man homozygote Individuen erhalten, die homozygote Träger für eine bestimmte Mutation sind, und dann untersucht man die Phänotypen. In unserem Fall haben wir bei früheren Untersuchungen die Embryos überprüft und konnten 25 % als Mutanten identifizieren, wenn sie eine bestimmte Eigenschaft aufwiesen. Daraus leitete man dann ab, dass die Eltern heterozygot für diese bestimmte Mutation waren. Man kann sie auch heranwachsen lassen und sehen, ob man adulte Fische findet, die zu 25 % einen bestimmten Phänotyp aufweisen, und das taten wir. Wir isolierten eine recht große Anzahl adulter, erkennbarer Mutanten, bei denen die Fische überlebten und Änderungen ihrer Morphologie aufwiesen. Dies sind die Leute, die bei diesem Projekt involviert waren. Da Sie niemanden davon kennen, werde ich sie Ihnen jetzt nicht vorlesen. Hier haben wir nun wieder ein Bild von adulten Fischen. Weibchen und Männchen sind sich in hinsichtlich des Musters ziemlich ähnlich. Die Männchen sind ein wenig gelblicher. Die gelben Zellen haben eine gelbe Pigmentierung, aber der größte Unterschied ist tatsächlich die Körperform, die bei den Weibchen rundlicher als bei den Männchen ist. Sie sehen also, dass in diesem Fall das Pigmentmuster kein Ziel der sexuellen Selektion ist. Zwar haben wir es noch nicht getestet, aber es ist eindeutig, dass diese Fische Schulen bilden. Sie schwimmen gemeinsam, sie erkennen einander und sie bilden diese wirklich sehr großen Schulen. Und eng miteinander verwandte Fische - nun, ich habe Ihnen bereits erzählt, wie das Muster gebildet wird. Es ist sehr ungünstig, dass wir hier zu viel Licht haben, aber Sie sehen hier, dass es von diesen drei verschiedenen Typen von Pigmentzellen gebildet wird, und zwar von den schwarzen Melanophoren, den gelben Xanthophoren, die sich zwischen diesen schwarzen Streifen befinden, und den silbernen Iridophoren, die darunter liegen und den gesamten Körper bedecken. Leider können wir das hier nicht sehen. Es ist jedoch interessant, dass es hier eine ziemlich große Anzahl von Danios (Danio choprae, Rubinbärblinge) gibt. Zebrafische sind als Art relativ eng mit Danios verwandt, die anders als die Zebrafische nicht gestreift sind. Sie sehen völlig anders aus und besitzen dieselben Zelltypen, aber der Danio choprae hat Quer- und keine Längsstreifen. Diese Fische zwei verschiedener Arten paaren sich und bringen Hybriden hervor. Sie sind also ziemlich eng verwandt, aber sie haben ein ganz anderes Streifenmuster. Die grundlegende Frage, die wir uns stellen, lautet, wie man von hier nach dort gelangt und wie diese Streifenmuster entstehen. Diese Untersuchungen ergaben also eine große Anzahl von Mutationen. Die meisten davon untersuchten wir als beim Embryo sichtbare Mutationen, die also auch Auswirkungen auf das Farbmuster der Larven hatten. Einige sind allerdings auch spezifisch für das Streifenmuster der adulten Fische, einschließlich Sternchen, Obelisken und Leopard, die Sie hier unten sehen. Ich werde Ihnen die Phänotypen später zeigen. Ein Beispiel für eine einfache Farbmutation, eine Mutation der Pigmentierung ist der Albino, der einer der ersten Mutanten war, die für Zebrafische beschrieben wurden. Diese Mutation hat zur Folge, dass die Melanophoren ohne Pigmente bleiben. Dadurch sehen die Fische gelb aus, da nur die Xanthophoren pigmentiert sind und die Melanophoren unpigmentiert sind. Aber sie sind gestreift, Sie sehen, dass die schwarzen Streifen hier als weiße Streifen erscheinen. Können Sie das hier sehen? Man kann es kaum erkennen. Kürzlich klonte Chris Dooley im Labor dieses Gen und fand heraus, dass es einen SLC-Transporter kodiert, der Teil einer überaus großen Familie von Proteinen ist, die für den Transport in Vesikel benötigt werden. Wir wissen nicht, was er transportiert, aber für unsere Zielsetzung ist das auch nicht besonders interessant. Die Mutation bewirkt jedoch, dass die Melanosomen, welche die Organellen sind, die das schwarze Pigment, das Melanin, tragen, beinahe leer sind. Sie haben nur winzig kleine Flecken von Melanin, sind aber nicht gefüllt. Und es gibt eine andere Mutation, die "golden" genannt wird und bei der einfach weniger Melanin in diesen Melanosomen vorhanden ist. In diesem Fall sind die Fische einfach blasser als mein Typ. Dabei wird auch ein SLC-Transporter kodiert. Interessant ist daran, dass genau diese zwei Gene für den SLC-Transporter in einer Untersuchung der Varianz in der menschlichen Population identifiziert wurden, bei der es darum ging, welche Gene variieren oder wo man eine bestimmte Selektion eines bestimmten Allels in bestimmten menschlichen Populationen findet. In diesem Fall, dem Fall der Albinos, hat das menschliche Homolog dieses Gens zwei Allele, und Sie sehen, dass eines davon, nämlich das schwarz markierte Allel, hauptsächlich bei europäischen und vorderasiatischen Populationen ausgeprägt ist, während andere Stämme auf der Welt das anzestrale Allel haben. Zufälligerweise gibt es nur drei solcher Gene, bei denen die Präferenz eines bestimmten Allels in bestimmten Gebieten der menschlichen Population nachgewiesen wurde. Das eine ist "Albino", das andere ist "golden" - dies nannte ich Ihnen bereits - und das dritte ist "EDAR" (Ectodysplasin-A-Rezeptor). Das ist ein Rezeptor, der an der Haarbildung und bei Fischen an der Bildung von Schuppen beteiligt ist. Genau genommen, haben wir ihn in unserer Untersuchung identifiziert. Dies ist ziemlich interessant, denn es sagt uns, dass in diesem Fall der Zebrafisch vielleicht einige Elemente für die menschliche Evolution besitzt. Und es ist irgendwie verblüffend, dass von den wenigen Genen, die bei der menschlichen Evolution eine Rolle gespielt haben, sie auch für die Fische relevant sind. Somit komme ich nun zurück zu Ursprung und Entwicklung des Pigmentmusters. Ich erwähnte bereits, dass unsere Pigmentzellen von der Neuralleiste stammen, und ich habe Ihnen schon dieses Bild gezeigt, auf dem die Zellen der Neuralleiste sich an dieser bestimmten Stelle, an der die Epidermis und die sich einstülpende Neuralplatte nebeneinander liegen, ablösen und durch den Körper wandern. Für das Muster der Larven haben wir nun Mutationen, bei denen einige der Pigmentzellen fehlen. Sie haben Auswirkungen auf die Zellen der Neuralleiste. Dies ist eine der klassischen Mutationen, farblos, sie kodiert einen Transkriptionsfaktor namens SOX-10. Bei dieser Mutation fehlen alle von der Neuralleiste stammenden Pigmentzellen, und diese Fische sind vollkommen weiß, mit Ausnahme der Augen, die zwar Pigmentzellen besitzen, jedoch nicht aus der Neuralleiste stammen. Es handelt sich also um eine Art von pan-Neuralleisten-Marker. Ich habe keine Zeit, Ihnen das zu erklären, aber wenn Sie den Promotor von SOX-10 nehmen und einen Marker, ein Reporter-Gen für GFP (grün fluoreszierendes Protein) unter die Kontrolle dieses Promotors des SOX-10-Gens stellen, dann können Sie alle Zellen, die SOX-10 exprimieren, grün markieren. Und dann sehen Sie hier - oh, das tut mir so leid, es ist schwierig zu erkennen - aber Sie können sehen, dass die grünen Zellen die Zellen sind, die SOX-10 exprimieren, und Sie sehen diese Ströme, segmentären Ströme, wo sie gewissermaßen durch den Körper wandern. In einem Transfer-Abschnitt sehen Sie, dass einige nach außen und einige nach innen wandern. Und das nächste Dia sollte Ihnen hoffentlich zeigen, dass Sie, wenn Sie den Embryo herumdrehen, diese Ströme von wandernden, frühen Neuralleisten-Zellen sehen können. Einige bleiben an der Spitze. Die weißen Zellen sind zufällig für ein Gen markiert, das das zentrale Nervensystem markiert. Auf dem Dia ist es viel schöner, aber diejenigen unter Ihnen, die ein sehr großes Interesse haben, können kommen und es sich ansehen. Ein anderer Marker ist dieses Gen, das in der Tat in allen Melanophoren exprimiert wird, es wird MITF genannt und ist ebenfalls ein Transkriptionsfaktor. Hier sehen Sie sehr schön diese Ströme von Zellen der Neuralleiste, die von der dorsalen Erhöhung des Nervensystems durch den ganzen Körper wandern. Und Sie sehen ein Muster, Sie sehen, dass sie in jedem Segment so etwas wie Zellgruppen bilden, und diese Zellen werden vermutlich später zu Stammzellen für das Pigmentmuster des adulten Tieres. Sie sehen außerdem etwas sehr Schönes. Sie sehen einen Nerv mit seinen Gliazellen, welche die Seitenlinie bedecken und nun von hier kommen, hier entlang wandern. Und dies ist der Nerv des Seitenlinienorgans, der die Gliazellen entlang zieht und später das Nervengewebe, das Sinnesorgan für die Mechanorezeptoren bilden wird, mit der Fische beim Schwimmen die Druckwellen wahrnehmen. Ein anderes Gen, von dem wir festgestellt haben, das es an der Bildung des Pigmentmusters beteiligt ist, ist pUC 7. Es markiert für uns die Xanthophoren, diese gelben Zellen, und in diesem Fall wandern die Vorstufen der Xanthophoren nur entlang der äußeren Route und nicht entlang der inneren Route. Sie können wiederum mit Hilfe eines Zeitrafferfilms diesen wandernden Pigmentzellen folgen. Die Streifen der Larven entstehen also anscheinend aus den verschiedenen Zellen der Neuralleiste, die einfach zu ihrem Ziel wandern und diese Streifen bilden, den seitlichen und den Bauchstreifen, und sich an den morphologischen "Landmarken" sammeln. Entweder bleiben sie bei der Neuralleiste oder sie sammeln sich entlang des Seitenstreifens oder wandern zur Bauchseite. Die adulten Streifen entwickeln sich hingegen auf andere Art und Weise. Den exakten Zeitrahmen und auch die Herkunft kennen wir noch nicht, aber wir wissen, dass zur Zeit der Metamorphose neue Melanophoren erscheinen, die irgendwie aus dem Inneren des Fischs auftauchen und sich längs zwischen diesen Streifen ausrichten. Nach ungefähr fünf Wochen zeigen sich die Xanthophoren-Streifen und trennen die schwarzen Streifen entlang des horizontalen Myoseptums. Später habe ich ein besseres Foto. Es tut mir so leid, dass Sie es bei der Beleuchtung nicht so schön sehen können, wie es dargestellt ist. Es gibt also einige grundlegende Fragen. Wir sind nun ziemlich gut darüber informiert, wie die frühen Streifen entstehen, aber wir wissen nicht, wo die Zellen für die adulten Streifen herkommen. Es muss irgendwelche Stammzellen geben, denn die Neuralleiste ist längst verschwunden, wenn diese Streifen, die adulten Steifen sich bilden. Die Neuralleiste ist eine Übergangsstruktur, sie existiert nicht mehr. Daher müssen wir die Frage stellen, wo die Stammzellen sind, woher diese späteren Pigmentzellen kommen und wie sie wandern, und wie sie sich in diesem artspezifischen Muster unter der Haut anordnen, in Streifen bei Zebrafischen, bei Danio-Arten in Punkten oder in Querstreifen. Ich möchte Ihnen nur erzählen, was unserer Meinung nach passiert, denn ich kann nicht die ganzen Beweise durchgehen, dafür ist die Zeit zu knapp. Wir glauben, dass die Stammzellen für die Chromatophoren sich sammeln und mit den Strukturen des peripheren Nervensystems, das ebenfalls eine von der Neuralleiste stammende Struktur ist, verbinden. Diese werden pro Segment zugewiesen, und Sie haben bereits in diesen Filmen gesehen, dass es da diese Punkte gibt, für jedes Segment und dann entlang der Seitenlinie, und das ist eine Art Gitter für die verschiedenen Orientierungspunkte entlang der Achse des Fischkörpers. Wahrscheinlich ist dies bei allen Fischen so, zumindest, soweit wir sagen können, bei den Karpfenfischen, die mit mehreren Fischen verwandt sind. Die letztendliche Bildung der Streifen hängt wahrscheinlich von der subtilen Interaktion der Zellen untereinander ab, sobald sie einmal an der Oberfläche sind. Der Beweis dafür sind diese Pfade, auf die ich bereits hinwies. Die grünen Punkte sind die Vorstufen für die Melanophoren und die roten Punkte sind die Vorstufen für das periphere Nervensystem. Wir finden eine enge Verbindung zwischen diesen Zelltypen. Daher glauben wir, dass dies der Ort ist, wo sich die Stammzellen am peripheren Nervensystem befinden. Ich werde das überspringen, denn ich kann es nicht wirklich gut veranschaulichen. Dies zeigt Ihnen wiederum, wie sich während der Metamorphose der gelbe Streifen am horizontalen Myoseptum bildet und den Dorsalstreifen und eventuelle schwarze Streifen trennt - das ist also der Nachweis für den ersten Streifen, für das Streifenmuster hier. Wir glauben, dass die Seitenlinie tatsächlich den Orientierungspunkt für diese erste Streifenbildung durch die Xanthophoren darstellt. Die Beweise sind wiederum schwierig zu erläutern und ich möchte Ihnen einfach noch einmal die Seitenlinie veranschaulichen. In diesem ersten Film des MITF haben Sie gesehen, wie die grünen Zellen an dieser Seitenlinie entlang wanderten. Das ist wieder eine weitere Färbung der Seitenlinienglia entlang des horizontalen Myoseptums, und dann führt dies schließlich zu diesen Sinnesorganen, die sich an der Seite des Fisches befinden und in diesen Haarbündeln, die Sie aus der Haut herausragen sehen, mechanische Stimuli wahrnehmen. Wir denken, dass diese Seitenlinie eine Markierung, eine morphologische Landmarke für die Herkunft der Pigmentzellen ist. Ich zeige Ihnen jetzt zum Spaß einen Film, in dem die rotgefärbten Flecken die Axone, die Nerven sind, die entlang der Seitenlinie wachsen, und die Gliazellen sind die grünen Zellen, die diesem Nerv folgen. Dieser Film wurde von Darren Gilmour gedreht, während er als Postdoc in meinem Labor arbeitete. Das soll nur verdeutlichen, dass es entlang des Fischs eine sehr auffällige Struktur gibt, die vielleicht auch mit der Herkunft des Pigmentmusters zu tun hat. Wir haben also eine Anzahl von adulten lebensfähigen Mutationen, welche die Streifenbildung beeinflussen. Hier sehen Sie wieder den Y-Typ, oben links, dann haben wir einen Mutanten, der "spärlich" genannt wird und bei dem eine ziemlich starke Reduktion der Melanophoren vorliegt, und eine "Pfeffer" genannte Mutation, bei der es keinerlei Xanthophoren gibt und welche bewirkt, dass die Melanophoren sich in ein Pfeffer-und-Salz-Muster auflösen. Dann haben wir eine Mutation "schattig", bei der es keine Iridophoren gibt und die Fische außerdem keine Streifen haben. Eine andere Mutation ist "Leopard": die Streifen werden zu Punkten, aber wir haben beide Zelltypen, die Xanthophoren und die Melanophoren. Wir haben noch weitere Mutationen, wie zum Beispiel "Perlmutt", wo alle Melanophoren fehlen, es gibt nur gelbe Zellen und keine sehr regelmäßigen Streifen. Dies sind Vergrößerungen, die ich Ihnen erspare, weil Sie die Details nicht wirklich sehen können. Trotzdem: Der wichtige Punkt ist, dass, wann immer einer der Zelltypen fehlt, die anderen keine Streifen bilden können. Im Fall von "Perlmutt" haben wir nur Xanthophoren - sie können keine richtigen Streifen bilden. Im Fall von "Pfeffer" haben wir nur Melanophoren - und auch diese können nicht die richtigen Streifen bilden. Wir können ein Experiment durchführen, was man bei Zebrafischen sehr einfach vornehmen kann. Man transplantiert Zellen aus einem Y-Typ in einen Mutanten oder von einem Mutanten A zu einem Mutanten B und erschafft Chimären, bei denen manche der Zellen einen anderen Genotyp haben. Man bekommt ein interessantes Ergebnis, nämlich, dass die Streifen wieder gebildet werden können. Dies hier soll nur zeigen, was passiert, wenn man Y-Typ-Zellen in einen Albino-Fisch transplantiert. Man bekommt diese Querstreifen, was bedeutet, dass die Spenderzellen schwarze Zellen herstellen, die sich wie erwartet in das Streifenmuster einfügen. Und wenn Sie jemals Zellen eines "Perlmutt"-Embryos, der keine schwarzen Zellen hat, in ein Empfänger-Embryo verpflanzen, der keine gelben Zellen hat, dann können beide nicht richtige ... bilden - nein, Verzeihung, wenn Sie Zellen eines Y-Typs transplantieren - in diesem Fall sind die Melanophoren farblos, denn es ist ein Albino - und dies in einen Rezipienten transplantieren, der keine Xanthophoren hat, dann können die Albino-Xanthophoren in diesem Hintergrund normale Streifen bilden. Das heißt, dass es eine Interaktion zwischen den Melanophoren und den Xanthophoren gibt, um Streifen entstehen zu lassen. Wir können das mit allen möglichen Zellkombinationen durchführen und Rückschlüsse ziehen. Dies ist der Fall, bei dem man Melanophoren in einen Fisch transplantiert, der keine Xanthophoren hat, und auch hier bilden sie in dieser Region, wo die transplantierten Zellen hingelangen, richtige Streifen. Das deutet darauf hin, dass eine enge Interaktion zwischen den verschiedenen Zelltypen erforderlich ist, um diese Streifen zu bilden. Wir kennen die molekulare Natur dieser Interaktion noch nicht, aber das ist sozusagen die "große Frage", die sich uns momentan stellt. Und das ist das Experiment für die Iridophoren, was hier schwierig zu sehen ist, aber wenn es keine Iridophoren gibt, können die anderen Zellen auch keine Streifen bilden. Und Sie können das Muster durch Transplantation wiederherstellen. Die Schlussfolgerung lautet also, dass die Bildung des Musters eine Interaktion aller drei Zelltypen verlangt und dass es eine Kurzstrecken-Interaktion zwischen diesen Zellen bedeutet. Wir wissen nicht, welche Gene beteiligt sind. Wir haben Mutationen, bei denen diese Streifen nicht regelmäßig gebildet werden. Ich habe Ihnen eine gezeigt, die Flecken zur Folge hat. Wir wissen auch, und das ist das Interessanteste, dass es andere Mutationen gibt, bei denen das Muster auf verschiedene Arten und Weisen mehr oder weniger unregelmäßig ist. Und wir analysieren jene nun auf der molekularen Ebene, um herauszufinden, welche Gene und Proteine an dieser Interaktion zwischen diesen Zelltypen beteiligt sind. Dies hier sind noch einmal Zebrafische, zwei eng verwandte Arten: eine mit einem sehr unregelmäßigen Streifenmuster und diese andere mit dem Querstreifenmuster. Um zum Schluss zu kommen - die grundlegende Frage, die wir beantworten möchten, ist folgende: Wir möchten wissen, welche Gene an diesen Unterschieden beteiligt sind. Und ich glaube, dass an dieser Stelle die genetische Grundlage der morphologischen Evolution ihre Antworten, einige Antworten finden wird. Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard describing some of the other advantages of using zebrafish as a model organism
(00:19:28 - 00:21:05)

 

 

<strong>Fruit fly</strong><p>Picture/Credit: Antagain/istockphoto.com</p>
Fruit fly

Picture/Credit: Antagain/istockphoto.com

 

One of the very first model organisms introduced into the laboratory was the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and this was largely due to the efforts of one man: Nobel Laureate Thomas Hunt Morgan. In fact, his work in fruit flies can be said to have ushered in the modern science of genetics by showing that genes are encoded on chromosomes. D. melanogaster are now one of the most common model organisms in laboratories the world over and are used to study everything from how DNA is packaged to neurodegenerative conditions. Insects are also excellent model organisms in which to study infection and immunity. In his lecture at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2014, Jules Hoffman, who shared one half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2011 for discovering the function of Toll receptors in innate immunity, talks about how and why he used Drosophila in his research and what questions he has aimed to answer using these organisms.

 

Jules Hoffmann (2014) - Innate Immunity: From Flies to Humans

Dear colleagues and friends, I would like to start also thanking the organisers for the invitation and for this wonderful meeting which I really do enjoy. So in the first slide the question which I got most often over the last 3 years by journalists and by varied people, many people in society: Why do you work on insects? So let me say, just in this slide is shown, insects they account for 80% of all living species on earth. They annually destroy one third of human crops and they put one third of humanity and livestock at risk of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections via the bacteria roles. And, what we knew when I started my PhD, they are particularly resistant to infections. So here we were in the presence of a very large important group on earth, of animals on earth, and knowing that they were resistant to infections but we didn't understand the mechanisms. Except for the role of phagocytosis. So I'll go rapidly with you through the steps which we took over the last 20 years. And first of all that part of our work was done on drosophila which has of course great advantages, as all of you are aware of, in terms of genetics. And in this slide we show that when we prick a fly at times zero and then take off the blood we see that we induce a very strong potent antimicrobial activity. This is a very simple growth inhibition assay. So we started out asking 3 questions. Number 1: What is the identity of the affected molecules? We knew from work from Hans Boman in Stockholm in the early '80s that in butterflies antimicrobial peptide was induced which he named cecropin. Second question was: What is - this is Hans Boman - what is the control of gene expression if we find that the molecules in the fly are also peptides like in the butterfly? And a third question: What is the identity of the receptors of those microbial infections, and is the fly able to distinguish between various types of infecting molecules? Now, it took us several years to go through chemical analytical chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to find that drosophila, the flies, in response to the challenge I've shown you on the previous slide, produce several families of strongly...of powerful antimicrobial peptides which are shown in these slides. They are produced in the fat body, in what is now a classical way, as pro-molecules and then matured, secreted into the blood where the concentrations reach very high values in the order of 0.5 millimolar. Important among those molecules - they are certainly unimportant for the fly but important for us -was diptericin, which was the first molecule which we found which is anti-active against gram-negative bacteria. Attacins and cecropins are homologous through the molecules identified in butterflies by Hans Boman. And then we found drosomycin which is a potently antifungal peptide, and metchnikowin, defensin and so on. So this sort of solved the first question about the identity of the inducible molecules which in the circulating blood accounted for the protection, at least for large particle protection. Now the second question is, how are the genes and cloning of those peptides controlled? And as shown on this slide, when we cloned still the Diptericin gene at that time, the one which is antibacterial, anti-Gram-negative bacterial, we found in the promoters of the Diptericin gene kappaB response elements. That is to say nucleotides sequences which had been reported in mammalian systems by David Baltimore and his colleagues to be responsive to the NF-kappaB transactivator which is the central transactivator of immune and distress responses. Now when we mutated these sites and report the flies we abolished the inducibility showing that their presence is mandatory for an immune response. Now in the fly at the time it was known that there were at least one homologue of NF-kappaB, which is presented here, which was named Dorsal by the inventor Nüsslein-Volhard, I'll show that in the slide, and was retained in the cytoplasm binding to an inhibitor which she named Cactus. Now as I explained or as I will explain now, when you do this type of work in the fly or in other systems - at that time it was done through mutagenesis, unbiased mutagenesis. And you were screening for phenotypes and you could give for phenotypes... you could give a name and this was in the context of screening for abnormally developing embryos. Now just to illustrate this and this is not work from any of these groups but from whole groups in the community to explain to you what NF-kappaB is like. This is NF-kappaB and it is linked to the inhibitor which goes by the name of I-kappaB. So the whole story and the immune response here, and in development occasionally, is via kinase which is named IKK here to phosphorylate I-kappaB which will change its confirmation, disassociate from NF-kappaB and then free NF-kappaB which then is able to translocate into the nucleus and bind to DNA as shown. This is the nice butterfly figure where NF-kappaB dimer instead of NF-kappaB binds to DNA. So the question was, would this system which had been discovered in the dorso-ventral axis formation by Nüsslein-Volhard, would this system also be used in immune response? And as illustrated here and the work of Nüsslein-Volhard and a certain number of other scientists including Eric Wieschaus. Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were awarded the Nobel Prize in the '90s for their work on the determination of dorso-ventral and antro-posterior axis and other aspects of development in the fly. So here we have in the cytoplasm NF-kappaB bound to the inhibitor I-kappaB. This association is brought about when a signal comes from a transmembrane receptor. And that transmembrane receptor was dubbed by Nüsslein-Volhard 'Toll' for the bizarre appearance of the mutated embryo. Again I repeat, adults are at the time of reproduction fed mutagens and then the embryos are screened for those which do not normally develop and they are given a phenotype then. And Toll becomes activated by a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in the cleavage of a cytokine which was named Spätzle by Nüsslein-Volhard. I suppose in this audience I don't have to explain the phenotype of the Spätzle embryo. And so what we did and now I'm going to summarise the work which took really several years, about 5 years in the laboratory for a whole group, prominent among whom were Jean-Marc Reichhart and Bruno Lemaitre and the chemists identifying additional inducable antimicrobial molecules. So our initial idea that Toll might be involved in the expression, in the control of the genes, and coding these antimicrobial peptides was blocked by the fact that we used diptericin; diptericin was the first peptide which we had in our hands. Now diptericin turned out not to be dependent on Toll pathway, and it took us again as I said quite a lot of time to identify other inducible molecules and namely antifungal peptide drosomycin which appeared to really depend on the Toll pathway. So as you see in this slide fungi and as we later learnt, quite a few years later, Gram-positive bacteria activate via Toll NF-kappaB and lead to the production of antifungal and antibacterial peptides. Now this didn't help us for diptericin. And again it took several years for us to find that there was an additional pathway, unsuspected pathway in the system here which we referred to IMD for immune deficiency. And this pathway controlled the expression in response to Gram-negative bacteria of NF-kappaB and led to the production, to the expression of the genes and coding of antibacterial peptides and namely that of diptericin. So we were now, by '96, and in a position where we thought we understood that the defence molecules that they were dependent on two distinct pathways, Toll pathway, a partial reuse of the embryonic regulatory cascade for dorsoventral development, and another pathway of which we did not know anything at that time. We were not even sure that it was a pathway. But things evolved and before going into that let me just show you experiments which were done by Bruno Lemaitre, 2 postdoctoral students, and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory. Here we are looking at Aspergillus fungal infection in wild-type versus Toll mutant flies, and you see that there's a very marked difference. The Toll mutant flies have died, 50% have died after two days already in this experiment. Now on the other side of the slide you see that in the case of IMD mutants which control the expression of peptides active against Gram-negative bacteria, we see that E. coli infection is very well survived by wild-type fly. But in IMD mutants there's a very rapid dying off of the flies. So this then led us to propose in '96 that the dorsoventral regulatory gene cassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus controls the potent antifungal response in Drosophila adults. This is a Toll deficient fly. You see that the fungi have developed in the dying fly and covered everything of the body. Now this was sort of an important time in the work in the communities, because - I'll explain to you - because innate immunity not much was known about it. Innate immunity was not a very popular field at the time. It was essentially defective immunity which was the objective of the community of immunologists. And there were few receptors known in innate immunity and there was none known which would single to NF-kappaB. And as we have seen in the previous slide the hallmark of the activation both of the IMD pathway and the Toll pathway was the activation of NF-kappaB and then control of gene expression. And this was now the case for all electins which were known at that time in the system of innate immunity. There's also a belief that innate immunity was required to activate the production of cytokines, which would activate adaptive immunity and induce increased synthesis of MHC molecules and so on. I'm not going into this because what happened after this, after the publication of this paper, was that many people of the immunology community in adaptive system went into looking for homologous molecules of Toll in mammalian systems, and within a few years about 12 of these molecules were found. Paramount about that was of course the discovery that the LPS receptor was a member of the Toll family which Bruce Beutler is going to present to you in a few minutes. So taken together, the results in the fly and in the mammalian systems suggested that these Toll receptors would play an important role in innate immunity and possibly also in adaptive immunity via activating NF-kappaB. As shown in this slide, this is Shizuo Akira who is to be credited for having done a lot of work on identifying the ligands of the Toll-like receptors. This is the mammalian system. And here we see Toll-like receptors on the cytoplasmic membrane. The activators are lipopolysaccharide as has been conclusively shown by genetic approach by Bruce Beutler. And various other lipopeptides, even Flagellin, and in the endosome we have various nucleotides sequences either double-stranded RNA, single-stranded RNA or CpG DNA. Now in response to the activation via adaptive molecules, mammals will activate NF-kappaB as flies do in their special system. And also mammals will activate IRFs, interferon regulatory factors, which are absent; there is no interference system in flies. And this will lead on one side to the production of antimicrobial peptides and many other molecules. We know now there are hundreds of molecules which are activated in the innate immune response downstream of NF-kappaB. And also the activation of adaptive immune responses as I've already mentioned. Now taken together, I'm told - I've not made the check but I'm told - that about 20,000 papers of clinical interest have been published over the last 20 years now on the role of TLRs and the implication in defence reactions. And again, I mentioned, we have only worked on insects and we continue to work on insects. So this is from the community and not from our laboratory. So the primary role of course of TLRs we would say is fighting infectious diseases, which was the way they were discovered. And also we now know they play an important role in inflammation and this is becoming really one of the most central areas of research within the TLR field. They play a role in vaccination as they recognise some adjuvants - they are not the only molecules working on adjuvants but they do play a role in this field. They play a role in autoimmunity; they play a role in allergy; and importantly they are now accredited of playing a role in the new avenue of research of immunotherapy including cancer immunotherapy. But let me come back to my field and that is flies. And in flies they play a role in infections as I've pointed out a few minutes ago. And in the case of Gram-positive bacterial infection and fungal infection. We also have found, and others that over the last few years, that they also seem to play a role in inflammation. This is again a new field; it's a very interesting new field and there is aspects - I have no time to go into that, but maybe with the students this week to show what is coming up in this field. That will be certainly also very nice, very nice parallels to draw with inflammation in mammalian systems, which as you are aware of is now one of the central problems in human disease. Then essentially, and I insist on that, Toll receptors play a role in development in the fly. So the fly has 9 Toll receptors, they are activated by Spätzle or Spätzle-like molecules. So there are 6 Spätzle-like molecules in the fly which are, believe it or not, neurotrophins including Spätzle. So we have a set of regular developmental regulatory molecules, 6 neurotrophins and 9 Tolls - they all play a role in development, particularly of the nervous system, in the embryo and later in the larvae. And of these molecules, of this 6 + 9, nature has selected, for reasons we do not understand, So this is still a very important intellectual philosophical question, which is unsolved till today. So coming back to the fly. I was just mentioning now the story of non-Toll receptors, of Spätzle. So Spätzle becomes activated in this system, like in the embryonic system, by proteolytic cascade. This cascade is different from the one which is found in the embryos so it's an immune proteolytic cascade. But what are the receptors then? The receptors are not Toll and this is in contrast to what is known now in the mammalian system where Toll receptors directly interact with microbial inducers. In the fly Toll is not a receptor, but it is on the pathway of activation of the immune response. And the real, the actual receptors were found around 2000: We did work, we did unbiased mutagenesis which was the first genetic demonstration of the role of these receptors; and PGRP stands here which was one which we found at that time. It was Julian Royet in the laboratory who found that. Gram-positive bacteria interact with peptidoglycan recognition receptors activate the proteolytic cascade. The members of this cascade have been identified by now. Then dedicated protein, which is a Gram-negative binding protein also in the blood, reacts to beta-glucan of fungal origin, activates a cascade. And very interestingly Dominique Ferrandon and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory have found that microbial proteases activated dedicated protease in zymogen in the hemolymph. Most of the pathogens when they invade, or most of the microbes, when they invade their host will secrete proteases. And to our surprise we found that - and this is a very precise model of Beauveria bassiana fungus where you can do all the genetics and you can do the genetics on the fly. And so we were able to show, they were able to show, that microprotease interacts with and activates this zymogen which will then feed into the same proteolytic cascade. This is interesting because it really is a virus factor and as time goes on we see that this is valid for many other pathogens and also in other systems. Finally Gram-negative bacteria will activate through a transmembrane receptor again peptidoglycan recognition protein, will activate the other pathway, the IMD pathway, which will lead to effector genes which fight against Gram-negative bacteria. Now, I want to summarise this to make it very clear. The microbial inducers and their cognate receptors in the innate immune response of Drosophila: Bacterial peptidoglycans are recognised by dedicated circulating or transmembrane proteins referred to as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have evolutionarily derived from amidases. And we also point out that we humans product 4 families of PGRPs every day, as we produce many, many antimicrobial peptides every day, up to 10 grams on our skin per day. And so these are very highly conserved molecules. And in the case of humans they are not recognition proteins, PGRPs, but they are directly antibacterial. And fungal beta-glucans are recognised by circulating proteins referred to as glucan binding proteins. Now we have now understood some aspects about the affected molecules, we have understood some aspects about the receptors. Now let me shortly concentrate just in one example on the signalling cascades which link the recognition to the control of gene transcription. I've selected this antibody pathway which is also involved, as we have seen, in these inflammatory-like reactions. Now the receptor PGRP is shown here, it interacts with IMD and the first surprise came when we cloned the IMD gene - it was 2001 - was to see that it has a DEF domain which is very similar to mammalian RIP1. Now RIP stands for TNF receptor interacting protein. Second surprise: IMD binds to fat which is DEF domain protein conserved in the TNF receptor pathway in mammals. Then this system will activate TAK1, which is a MAP3 kinase, also highly conserved in the mammalian system, linking to TAK2, also conserved in the mammalian TNF3 receptor pathway. Then TAK1 will activate an IKK complex which has an IKK-beta and IKK-gamma component, which are highly conserved in mouse and humans. And then the reactivation, the phosphorylation of Relish which is the NF-kappaB family member in this pathway. And that will be cleaved by a caspase, and that caspase goes by the name of Dredd in the fly and is homologous to mammalian caspase-8. And then the active part of Relish, that is to say the real homologous domain, will go into nucleus and control expression of diptericin and hundreds of other genes. I put a note here about existence of negative regulation but we have no time to go into that. Now this was extremely striking to us. Remember we started off in a time of...when I started my PhD work with Professor Joly we started off thinking we would find something different from mammalian immune response, which was at the time essentially considered, as I mentioned already, in terms of adaptive immunity. And here we found many, many players in innate immune response which were similar to the ones which were present in mammals. Now I'm putting here a slide where I compare the Toll pathway and the IMD pathway of the fly to the TLR4 pathway and TNF pathway. So these are innate immune pathways - of course in the fly which has no adaptive immunity and in mammals which have adaptive immunity, but these pathways here are of the innate immune response. Now just looking at the colours - I have no time unfortunately to go into the details - but we have membrane receptors, which either react to a cleaved cytokine, as in the case of Spätzle or TNF-alpha, or directly interacts with the microbial ligand, this is the case of lipopolysaccharides or peptidoglycan in the fly or mouse system. We have adaptive proteins which are either identical, like MyD88 between Toll and TLR4, or very similar like IMD and RIP in systems of the IMD pathway and TNF pathway. Then we activate, we - that is to say the system - will activate central kinases like the TAK1 kinase which will also in turn activate the adjunct kinase pathway; it's not relevant this time. And then we have an IKK complex which is nearly identical in TLR4, IMD and TNF. It's a little bit simplified in the pathway of Toll in the fly. The end product will be activation of NF-kappaB and control of gene expression. So this is really something which, again I insist, was totally unexpected by us and in the community: to find that we have a system which is so highly conserved between mammals and flies. Now this raises the question, when did this system appear? Of course, flies do not derive from mice and mice do not derive from flies. So we did data mining and there's about 6,000 sequences of genomes are available now. And in this summarising slide, to our large surprise all the molecules which we found in Drosophila are already present in sea anemones and mostly also in sponges, that's to say really at the beginning of the differentiation of the eukaryotes. They are present in worms, with the exception of C. elegans, which is a special worm. And they are present in crustaceans, the fly, in cephalochordates, and they are all present in vertebrates. A striking aspect of this comparison is that the members of the innate immune response in vertebrates are closer to those of the sea anemones than to the flies - because flies have highly evolved systems, it's not a primitive flying thing out there. It has simplified its immune defence, namely remember that there are only 2 inducers: the highly conserved peptidoglycan and the highly conserved beta-glucan. These are the only inducers in addition to violence factors which depend on the aggressing system. Now, all this leads us to believe that innate immunity in the way we understand it now has appeared, probably, with multi-similarity that is to say roughly one billion years ago. And that sort of tool box of innate immunity is nearly fully present in sea anemones at the beginning of this evolution. And then over evolution various groups have either simplified or a little bit diversified and this is the case namely as I've mentioned. I could mention here that sea urchins for instance have 220 Toll-like receptors. And you could say that's because they live in the sea they filter the sea. But ciona which lives close to the sea urchins has only 3. So that's not really going to help us, that sort of calculation will not help us. Now the important thing here on which everyone seems to agree is that a full adaptive immunity in mammals requires the input from a boost from innate immunity, be it via cytokines of other aspects. And so again I insist on the fact that the innate immune cascade in vertebrates has all the elements which we found in the fly plus some additionals which are absent from fly today but present in sea anemones. So, I was going - but time here in Lindau runs so quickly - I was going to say a few words on the antiviral defences. Let me just point out I should have a summarising slide here which will, yes. I have 1 minute and that will be enough to summarise. So in the fly, like in C elegans, like in plants, RNA interference plays an essential role - this is not the case in the antiviral defences in mammals. And in addition to RNA interference, hallmark of the antiviral defences in this group, there's an induction of genes which will restrict the viral infection on which we are working on now. Receptors are largely unknown as are the pathways. Now in the mammalian system the innate response is essentially based on interferon, the interferon arm. The TLR receptors and other receptors which are absent from invertebrates like NLRs, RLRs...or I should say from the fly. Activate expression of interferon genes and of ISG interference simulative genes, the active natural killer cells which kill infected cells. And the adaptive immune response here which is stimulated by the immune response. B lymphocytes produce neutralising antibodies. And T lymphocytes kill infected cells. Now, I would like to acknowledge the contribution of many senior scientists and their groups. Let me just mention here over the years: Daniele Hoffmann, who started with me; she did the work on diptericin gene. She's my wife, she's with me in Lindau and she is taking the excursion today. Charles Hetru a chemist, Jean-Luc Dirmarcq the biochemist. Jean-Marc Reichhart, development geneticist and also now Drosophila geneticist. Bruno Lemaitre was the first Drosophila geneticist whom we hired in our group, he is now in Lausanne. Dominique Ferrandon did his PhD work interestingly with Nüsslein-Volhard before joining our group, and he is working on certain aspects now of recognition, of gut immunity, resilience and so on. Julien Royet, now in Marseille, has worked a lot on the PGRP receptors, peptidoglycan recognition receptors. Jean-Luc Imler is working on the antiviral field, he will be very upset that I was so quick on his data. But that will be at the next meeting if you still invite me, I will speak essentially about...or he will speak about his data. Elena Levashina works on the defences against parasites, against plasmodium in anopheles, and she has done really stellar work identifying a complement-like molecule in the mosquito in a complex system fighting off the infection. Philippe Bulet has also done work on the antimicrobial peptide. Just putting on the names of people in other laboratories in other countries who have contributed to this field in recent years. Thank you very much for your attention.

Sehr geehrte Kollegen und Freunde, ich möchte mich zunächst bei den Veranstaltern für die Einladung zu dieser wunderbaren Tagung bedanken, dir mir wirklich großes Vergnügen bereitet. Meine erste Folie formuliert die Frage, die mir Journalisten und viele andere Leute in den letzten drei Jahren am häufigsten gestellt haben: Warum arbeiten Sie an Insekten? Wie auf der Folie dargestellt machen Insekten 80% aller aktuell auf der Erde lebenden Arten aus. Sie zerstören jährlich ein Drittel der Ernten und setzen einen ebenso großen Prozentsatz der Menschheit und des Viehbestandes dem Risiko bakterieller, mykotischer, viraler und parasitärer Infektionen aus, infolge ihrer Funktion als Vektoren. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit begann, wusste man bereits, dass sie gegenüber Infektionen besonders resistent sind. Wir sahen uns also der Situation gegenüber, dass auf der Erde eine sehr große und bedeutsame Tiergruppe existiert, die gegenüber Infektionen resistent ist, wir aber mit Ausnahme der Rolle der Phagozytose die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen nicht verstanden. Ich gehe mit Ihnen rasch die Schritte, die wir in den letzten 20 Jahren durchlaufen haben, durch. Wir arbeiteten hauptsächlich mit Drosophila, was, wie Sie alle wissen, vom genetischen Standpunkt aus sehr vorteilhaft ist. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie, was geschieht, wenn wir einer Fliege zum Zeitpunkt Null Bakterien injizieren und ihr dann in bestimmten Zeitabständen Blut abnehmen: Es wird eine sehr starke antimikrobielle Aktivität ausgelöst. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen ganz einfachen Wachstumsinhibititonstest. Zu Beginn hatten wir drei Fragen. Erstens: Was sind die Effektormoleküle? Wir wussten aus Arbeiten von Hans Boman in Stockholm Anfang der 80er Jahre, dass in Schmetterlingen ein von ihm Cecropin getauftes antimikrobielles Peptid induziert wird. Zweitens fragten wir uns - das ist übrigens Hans Boman - wie die Genexpression gesteuert wird, wenn sich herausstellt, dass es sich, wie beim Schmetterling, bei den Molekülen in der Fliege um Peptide handelt. Und schließlich wollten wir wissen, welche Rezeptoren an diesen mikrobiellen Infektionen beteiligt sind und ob die Fliege zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Infektionsmolekülen unterscheiden kann. Wir benötigten mehrere Jahre, bis wir mit Hilfe chemisch-analytischer, biochemischen und molekulargenetischen Untersuchungen herausfanden, dass Drosophila als Reaktion auf die in der vorherigen Folie dargestellten Infektionen verschiedene Familien wirksamer antimikrobieller Peptide erzeugt - zu sehen hier auf dieser Folie. Sie entstehen auf klassische Weise in den Fettkörperzellen in Form von Promolekülen, reifen dann heran und werden ins Blut ausgeschüttet, wo sie sehr hohe Konzentrationen einer Größenordnung von 0,5 Millimol erreichen. Ein wichtiges Molekül - d.h. wichtig für uns, nicht für die Fliege - war Diptericin. Es war das erste Molekül, das wir fanden, das gegen gramnegativ Bakterien wirksam ist. Attacine und Cecropine sind homolog zu den von Hans Boman in Schmetterlingen identifizierten Molekülen. Weiterhin fanden wir Drosomycin, ein stark antimykotisch wirkendes Peptid, Metchnikowin, Defensin etc. Damit war die erste Frage bezüglich der Identität der induzierbaren Moleküle, die im Blutkreislauf vor Infektionen schützen, mehr oder weniger geklärt. Nun fragten wir uns, wie diese Gene bzw. die Klonierung der Peptide gesteuert werden. Wie auf dieser Folie dargestellt fanden wir bei der Klonierung des Gens, das für die Erzeugung des gegen gramnegative Bakterien wirksamen Moleküls Diptericin zuständig ist - so genannte KappaB-Response-Elemente in der Promotorregion. Dabei handelt es sich um Nukleotidsequenzen, die nach Angaben von David Baltimore und Kollegen in Säugetiersystemen verantwortlich für den NF-KappaB-Transaktivator sind welcher der zentralen Transaktivator bei Immun- und Belastungsreaktionen ist. Durch Mutation dieser Genstellen in Schmetterlingen hoben wir die Induzierbarkeit auf und zeigten, dass sie für eine Immunreaktion zwingend notwendig sind. Bei der Fliege war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt bekannt, dass sie zumindest ein Homolog von NF-KappaB besitzt. Dieses von seiner Entdeckerin Nüsslein-Volhard Dorsal getaufte Protein - ich zeige Ihnen das auf der Folie - wird durch Bindung an einen Inhibitor namens Cactus, ebenfalls eine Wortschöpfung von Nüsslein-Volhard, im Zytoplasma gehalten. Sie müssen wissen, dass bei derartigen Untersuchungen an Fliegen oder anderen Systemen so geschehen z.B. im Zusammenhang mit der Suche nach embryonalen Entwicklungsstörungen. Ich möchte Ihnen veranschaulichen und erläutern, worum es sich bei NF-KappaB handelt. Hier sehen Sie NF-KappaB; es ist an einen Inhibitor namens IKappaB gebunden. Bei der Immunreaktion, und gelegentlich auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung, wird IKappaB von der Kinase IKK phosphoryliert, so dass es seine Konfirmation ändert, von NF-KappaB dissoziiert und dieses schließlich freisetzt, so dass es in den Nukleus translozieren und sich dort wie dargestellt an die DNA binden kann. Dabei entsteht diese hübsche Schmetterlingsform, in der sich das NF-KappaB-Dimer anstelle von NF-KappaB an die DNA bindet. Die Frage war, ob dieses von Nüsslein-Volhard entdeckte, an der Entwicklung der dorsoventralen Achse beteiligte System auch bei der Immunreaktion eine Rolle spielt. Hier sehen Sie die Arbeit von Nüsslein-Volhard und weiteren Wissenschaftlern wie Eric Wieschaus. In den 90er Jahren erhielten Nüsslein-Volhard und Wieschaus den Nobelpreis für die Erforschung der dorsoventralen und anteroposterioren Achse und anderer Aspekte der Embryonalentwicklung bei der Fliege. NF-KappaB bindet sich infolge eines von einem Transmembranrezeptor ausgesendeten Signals im Zytoplasma an den Inhibitor IKappaB. Diesen Transmembranrezeptor taufte Nüsslein-Volhard aufgrund des bizarren Aussehens des mutierten Embryos 'Toll'. Um es noch einmal zu wiederholen: Zum Zeitpunkt der Fortpflanzung werden die adulten Tiere FADD-mutagenisiert; anschließend werden die Embryos nach Exemplaren untersucht, die sich nicht normal entwickeln, und die jeweiligen Phänotypen erhalten Namen. diese Bezeichnung stammt ebenfalls von Nüsslein-Volhard. Ich gehe davon aus, dass ich diesem Publikum den Phänotyp des Spätzle-Embryos nicht erläutern muss. Ich möchte unsere langwierige, sich über etwa 5 Jahre hinziehende Arbeit im Labor kurz zusammenfassen. An ihr war eine ganze Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern beteiligt; hervorzuheben sind insbesondere Jean-Marc Reichhart und Bruno Lemaitre sowie die Chemiker, die weitere induzierbare antimikrobielle Moleküle identifizierten. Unserer ursprünglichen Idee, dass Toll möglicherweise an der Expression bzw. Steuerung der Gene sowie an der Kodierung der antimikrobiellen Peptide beteiligt ist, konnten wir aufgrund der Tatsache, dass wir mit Diptericin, dem ersten Peptid, das uns zur Verfügung stand, arbeiteten, nicht nachgehen, da sich herausstellte, dass Diptericin nicht vom Toll-Signalweg abhängt. Es dauerte wie gesagt ziemlich lange, bis wir andere induzierbare Moleküle identifiziert hatten, u.a. ein antimykotisches Peptid namens Drosomycin, das, so schien es, eindeutig von diesem Signalweg abhing. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie sehen, führen Pilze und, wie wir einige Jahre später feststellten, grampositive Bakterien mittels Aktivierung von Toll-NF-KappaB zur Entstehung antimykotischer und antibakterieller Peptide. Das nützte uns bei Diptericin allerdings wenig. Es dauerte wieder mehrere Jahre, bis sich herausstellte, dass es in diesem System einen weiteren unvermuteten Signalweg gab, den wir als Immundefizienz (IMD)-Signalweg bezeichneten. Und dieser Signalweg steuert die Expression von NF-KappaB als Reaktion auf gramnegative Bakterien und führt zur Expression der Gene und somit zur Kodierung der antibakteriellen Peptide, in unserem Fall Diptericin. von zwei bestimmten Signalwegen abhängen, dem Toll-Signalweg, einem Teil der embryonalen Steuerkaskade für die dorsoventrale Entwicklung, und einem anderen Signalweg, über den wir bis dato nichts wussten, ja bei dem wir noch nicht einmal sicher waren, dass es sich dabei überhaupt um einen Signalweg handelt. Doch die Dinge gerieten ins Rollen - bevor ich Ihnen jedoch davon berichte, möchte ich Ihnen ein paar Experimente vorstellen, die Bruno Lemaitre und Jean-Marc Reichhart zusammen mit zwei Postdocs im Labor durchführten. Das hier ist eine Aspergillus-Pilzinfektion bei Wildtyp-Fliegen und Toll-mutierten Fliegen; Sie sehen, es besteht ein ganz deutlicher Unterschied. Nach nur zwei Tagen starben 50% der Toll-mutierten Fliegen in diesem Experiment. Auf der rechten Seite der Folie sehen Sie, dass Wildtyp-Fliegen eine Infektion mit E. coli problemlos überleben. IMD-Mutanten sterben dagegen sehr rasch ab. Dies führte dazu, dass wir 1996 zu dem Schluss kamen, dass die dorsoventrale regulatorische Genkassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus die wirksame antimykotische Reaktion bei adulten Drosophila-Fliegen steuert. Dieser Fliege fehlt das Toll-Gen. Sie sehen, dass die Pilze den gesamten Körper der sterbenden Fliege bedecken. Das war eine wichtige Zeit für die Forschung in unserem Fachgebiet - ich werde Ihnen das erläutern - weil man über die angeborene Immunität damals nicht viel wusste. Außerdem war dieses Thema nicht sonderlich populär, die Immunologen befassten sich lieber mit Immundefekten. Man kannte damals nur wenige an der angeborenen Immunität beteiligte Rezeptoren, von denen keiner für NF-KappaB signalisiert. Wie auf der vorherigen Folie dargestellt waren für die Aktivierung sowohl des IMD-Signalweges als auch des Toll-Signalweges die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB sowie die anschließende Steuerung der Genexpression besonders bezeichnend. Dies galt für sämtliche Lektine, die zum damaligen Zeitpunkt beim System der angeborenen Immunität bekannt waren. Man nahm an, dass die angeborene Immunität für die Aktivierung der Zytokinherstellung erforderlich ist, was wiederum die adaptive Immunität aktiviert und eine verstärkte Synthese von MHC-Molekülen etc. auslöst. Ich werde darauf aber nicht näher eingehen. Nach Veröffentlichung dieses Papers begannen viele Immunologen, die sich mit adaptiven Systemen beschäftigten, nach homologen Toll-Molekülen in Säugetiersystemen zu suchen und fanden innerhalb weniger Jahre etwa 12 dieser Moleküle. Am vorrangigsten war natürlich die Entdeckung, dass der LPS-Rezeptor ein Mitglied der Toll-Familie ist - Bruce Beutler wird Ihnen in ein paar Minuten mehr darüber erzählen. In der Zusammenschau legten die Ergebnisse der Fliegen- und Säugetiersysteme also nahe, dass die Toll-Rezeptoren eine wichtige Rolle bei der angeborenen Immunität und möglicherweise auch bei der adaptiven Immunität spielen über die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie Shizuo Akira, dem für die Identifizierung die Liganden der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren in mühevoller Arbeit große Anerkennung gebührt. Das hier ist das Säugetiersystem; hier sehen Sie Toll-artige Rezeptoren auf der Zytoplasma-Membran. Es handelt sich bei den Aktivatoren um Lipopolysaccharide, wie Bruce Beutler anhand eines genetischen Ansatzes schlüssig beweisen konnte, aber auch verschiedene andere Lipopeptide wie Flagellin. Im Endosom finden sich verschiedene Nukleotidsequenzen, entweder Doppelstrang-RNA, Einzelstrang-RNA oder CpG-DNA. Als Antwort auf die Aktivierung mittels adaptiver Moleküle aktivieren Säugetiere NF-KappaB, ebenso wie Fliegen dies in ihrem speziellen System tun. Säugetiere aktivieren zudem Interferon regulierende Faktoren (IRF), Fliegen dagegen verfügen nicht über dieses Interferonsystem. Dies führt zur Entstehung antimikrobieller Peptide und zahlreicher anderer Moleküle. Wir wissen, dass es Hunderte von Molekülen gibt, die - NF-KappaB nachgeschaltet - bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion aktiviert werden. Die gilt auch für die Aktivierung adaptiver Immunreaktionen, wie zuvor erwähnt. Ich habe das zwar nicht überprüft, aber mir wurde gesagt, dass in den letzten 20 Jahren etwa 20.000 Paper von klinischem Interesse zur Rolle der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren (TLR) bei Abwehrreaktionen veröffentlicht worden sind. Wie ich bereits sagte, haben wir ausschließlich an Insekten gearbeitet und werden dies auch weiterhin tun. Diese Angaben stammen also nicht aus unserem Labor, sondern aus der Gesamtheit unseres Fachbereichs. Die wichtigste Aufgabe der TLR ist natürlich die Bekämpfung von Infektionskrankheiten - auf diesem Wege wurden sie schließlich auch entdeckt. Zudem wissen wir heute, dass sie eine wichtige Rolle bei Entzündungen spielen, was immer mehr zu einem der zentralen Forschungsbereiche auf diesem Gebiet wird. Von Bedeutung sind sie auch bei Impfungen, da sie einige Wirkverstärker erkennen; zwar sind sie nicht die einzigen Moleküle, die dies tun, dennoch spielen sie auf diesem Gebiet eine Rolle. Das Gleiche gilt für die Autoimmunität und Allergien. Außerdem geht man heute davon aus, dass sie auch für den neuen Forschungszweig der Immuntherapie, z.B. bei Krebs von Bedeutung sind. Doch lassen Sie mich zu meinem Fachgebiet zurückkehren, den Fliegen. In Fliegen, wie ich vor einigen Minuten erwähnt habe, spielen TLR hier im Falle von grampositiven bakteriellen und mykotischen Infektionen eine Rolle. In den letzten Jahren stellten wir und andere fest, dass sie vermutlich auch im Zusammenhang mit Entzündungen von Bedeutung sind. Dieses Gebiet ist ganz neu und sehr interessant. Leider habe ich nicht die Zeit näher darauf einzugehen, aber vielleicht kann ich ja den Studenten diese Woche noch ein bisschen erzählen, was sich in diesem Bereich so tut. Sicherlich lassen sich auch hier sehr schöne Parallelen zu Entzündungen in Säugetiersystemen ziehen, die, wie Sie wissen, heute eines der zentralen Probleme bei Humanerkrankungen darstellen. Ich möchte betonen, dass Toll-Rezeptoren zudem auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung der Fliege eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Die Fliege besitzt 9 Toll-Rezeptoren, die durch Spätzle bzw. Spätzle-artige Moleküle aktiviert werden. Es gibt 6 Spätzle-artige Moleküle in der Fliege, bei denen es sich, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, um Neurotrophine handelt. Es existiert also ein Gruppe von Molekülen zur Entwicklungsregulation bestehend aus 6 Neurotrophinen und 9 Toll-artigen Rezeptoren, und sie alle sind bei der Entwicklung, insbesondere der des Nervensystems im Embryo und später in der Larve von Bedeutung. Von diesen 6 + 9 Molekülen hat die Natur aus Gründen, die wir nicht verstehen, einen Toll-Rezeptor und ein Spätzle-Molekül, d.h. ein Drosophila-Neurotrophin ausgewählt, diese so entscheidende Abwehr gegen eindringende Mikroorganismen zu aktivieren. Das ist eine sehr bedeutsame intellektuelle und philosophische Frage, die bislang ungelöst ist. Doch kehren wir zu den Fliegen zurück. Ich wollte Ihnen gerade etwas über die Nicht-Toll-Rezeptoren erzählen, die Spätzle. Spätzle werden auch in diesem System ebenso wie im Embryonalsystem durch eine proteolytische Kaskade aktiviert. Diese Kaskade unterscheidet sich jedoch insofern von derjenigen im Embryo, als es sich um eine immunproteolytische Kaskade handelt. Doch wie sehen deren Rezeptoren aus? Bei den Rezeptoren handelt es sich nicht um Toll, im Gegensatz zum Säugetiersystem, bei dem Toll-Rezeptoren direkt mit den mikrobiellen Induktoren interagieren. Toll ist bei der Fliege kein Rezeptor, sondern Teil der Aktivierungssignalweges der Immunreaktion. Auf die eigentlichen Rezeptoren stießen wir im Jahr 2000: Wir arbeiteten mit ergebnisoffener Mutagenese, wodurch wir die Rolle dieser Rezeptoren erstmals genetisch belegen konnten. Damals entdeckte Julian Royet im Labor die Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP), die mit grampositiven Bakterien in Wechselwirkungen treten und so die proteolytische Kaskade aktivieren, deren Mitglieder übrigens inzwischen bekannt sind. Dann reagiert ein spezielles Protein, ein gramnegatives Bindungsprotein im Blut, zu Beta-Glucan mykotischen Ursprungs und aktiviert eine Kaskade. Interessanterweise stellten Dominique Ferrandon und Jean-Marc Reichhart im Labor fest, dass mikrobielle Proteasen eine spezielle Protease im Zymogen der Hämolymphe aktivieren. Beim Eindringen von Erregern schüttet der Wirt für gewöhnlich Proteasen aus. Zu unserer Überraschung konnten sie zeigen, dass mit dessen Hilfe sich alle genetischen Experimente an der Fliege durchführen lassen - Sie konnten zeigen, dass Mikroproteasen mit dem Zymogen interagieren und es aktivieren, so dass es in die proteolytische Kaskade einfließt. Das ist interessant, denn es handelt sich tatsächlich um einen Virusfaktor. Mit der Zeit stellten wir fest, dass dies auch für viele andere Erreger und andere Systeme gilt. Schließlich aktivieren gramnegative Bakterien über den Transmembranrezeptor - das Peptidoglycan erkennende Protein - den IMD-Signalpfad, wodurch Effektorgene entstehen, die gramnegative Bakterien bekämpfen. Ich fasse zur Veranschaulichung jetzt noch einmal die mikrobiellen Induktoren und verwandten Rezeptoren der angeborenen Immunantwort von Drosophila zusammen: Bakterielle Peptidoglycane werden von speziellen zirkulierenden oder Transmembranproteinen, den so genannten Peptidoglycan erkennenden Proteinen (PGRP), die evolutionär von Amidasen abstammen, erkannt. Ich möchte anmerken, dass wir Menschen täglich vier PGRP-Familien, also enorm viele antimikrobielle Peptide produzieren - auf der Haut finden sich bis zu 10 g. Es handelt sich also um sehr stark konservierte Moleküle. Beim Menschen sind PGRP keine Erkennungsproteine, sondern direkt antibakteriell wirksame Moleküle. Die mykotischen Beta-Glucane werden von zirkulierenden Proteinen, den so genannten Glucan bindenden Proteinen erkannt. Wir haben jetzt einige Aspekte der entsprechenden Moleküle und ihrer Rezeptoren verstanden. Ich möchte mich nun kurz anhand eines Beispiels auf die Signalkaskaden konzentrieren, die die Erkennung mit der Steuerung der Gentranskription verknüpfen. Ich habe dafür diesen Antikörpersignalweg ausgesucht, der, wie wir gesehen haben, auch an Entzündungsreaktionen beteiligt ist. Das hier ist der Rezeptor PGRP; er interagiert mit IMD. Die erste Überraschung war, dass sich bei Klonierung des IMD-Gens im Jahr 2001 eine Todesdomäne zeigte, die dem TNF receptor interacting protein (RIP)bei Säugetieren (RIP1) stark ähnelt. Die zweite Überraschung bestand darin, dass sich IMD an FADD, ein im TNF-Rezeptor-Signalweg in Säugetieren konserviertes Todesdomänenprotein bindet. Dieses System aktiviert nun TAK1, eine im Säugetiersystem ebenfalls stark konservierte MAP3-Kinase und verknüpft sie mit TAK2, einer weiteren Kinase, die im Säugetier-TNF3-Rezeptorsignalweg konserviert ist. Nun aktiviert TAK1 einen IKK-Komplex aus einer IKK-Beta- und einer IKK-Gamma-Komponente, der in Mäusen und Menschen stark konserviert ist. Anschließend erfolgen die Reaktivierung, d.h. Phosphorylierung von Relish, einem Mitglied der NF-KappaB-Familie in diesem Signalpfad, sowie die Spaltung durch eine Caspase, die bei der Fliege als DREDD bezeichnet wird und zur Säugetier-Caspase-8 homolog ist. Jetzt dringt der aktive Teil von Relish, d.h. die eigentliche homologe Domäne in den Nukleus ein und steuert dort die Expression von Diptericin und hunderter anderer Gene. Ich habe hier eine Anmerkung bezüglich der Existenz einer Negativsteuerung gemacht, aber dafür haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wir fanden das sehr auffällig. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit bei Professor Joly begann, waren wir der Ansicht, wir würden etwas finden, das sich von der Immunreaktion von Säugetieren unterscheidet, unter der man, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, im Wesentlichen die adaptive Immunität verstand. Und dann fanden wir bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion so viele Akteure, die denen der Säugetiere ähnelten. Hier sehen Sie eine Folie, die den Toll-Signalweg und den IMD-Signalweg der Fliege mit dem TLR4- und dem TNF-Signalweg vergleicht. Es handelt sich hier sowohl bei der Fliege, die natürlich über keine adaptive Immunität verfügt, als auch bei Säugetieren, die eine solche Immunität besitzen, ausschließlich um die Signalwege der angeborenen Immunreaktion. Schauen wir uns die Farben an - ich habe leider keine Zeit mehr, Ihnen die Details zu erläutern. Wir haben Membranrezeptoren, die entweder wie im Falle von Spätzle oder TNF-Alpha zu einem gespaltenen Zytokin reagieren oder wie im Falle von Lipopolysacchariden oder Peptidoglycan im Fliegen- oder Maussystem mit dem mikrobiellen Liganden direkt interagieren. Wir haben adaptive Proteine, die entweder identisch sind, z.B. MyD88 in Toll und TLR4, oder sehr ähnlich, z.B. IMD und RIP in den Systemen des IMD- bzw. TNF-Signalweges. Dann aktiviert das System die zentralen Kinasen wie z.B. die TAK1-Kinase, die wiederum den JNK-Signalweg aktiviert; das ist aber jetzt nicht relevant. Dann haben wir einen IKK-Komplex, der in TLR4, IMD und TNF praktisch identisch ist; im Toll-Signalweg der Fliege ist er ein bisschen simpler. Am Ende stehen die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB und die Steuerung der Genexpression. Ich möchte noch einmal betonen, dass die Entdeckung für uns und die Wissenschaftler in unserem Fachgebiet völlig unerwartet kam: ein zwischen Säugetieren und Fliegen so stark konservierten Systems. Jetzt stellte sich die Frage, wann sich dieses System erstmals entwickelte. Natürlich stammen Fliegen nicht von Mäusen ab oder umgekehrt. Wir sammelten also Daten. Heute stehen etwa 6000 Genomsequenzen zur Verfügung. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie, die unsere Arbeit zusammenfasst, sehen, stellten wir zu unserer großen Überraschung fest, dass alle Moleküle, die wir in Drosophila entdeckt hatten, bereits in Seeanemonen und vor allem Schwämmen existieren, d.h. seit Beginn der Differenzierung der Eukaryonten. Es gibt sie in Würmern - mit Ausnahme von C. elegans, das ist ein Spezialfall - in Krustentieren, in Fliegen und Cephalochordaten und in sämtlichen Wirbeltieren. Auffällig ist bei diesem Vergleich, dass die an der angeborenen Immunreaktion bei Wirbeltieren beteiligten Moleküle denen der Seeanemonen ähnlicher sind als denen der Fliegen. Fliegen verfügen über hochentwickelte Systeme, sie sind keineswegs primitive Lebewesen. Sie haben ihre Immunabwehr auf nur zwei Induktoren vereinfacht: das hochkonservierte Peptidoglycan und das hochkonservierte Beta-Glucan. Das sind die einzihen Induktoren die sie neben Virulenzfaktoren, die vom jeweiligen Erregersystem abhängen, besitzen. All dies ließ uns vermuten, dass sich die angeborene Immunität so wie wir sie heute verstehen mit der Vielzelligkeit wahrscheinlich vor etwa einer Milliarde Jahren entwickelt hat. Bereits zu Beginn der Evolution findet sich bei den Seeanemonen fast der gesamte Werkzeugkasten der angeborenen Immunität. Im Verlauf der Evolution wurde er teilweise vereinfacht bzw. diversifiziert. Seeigel beispielsweise besitzen 220 Toll-artige Rezeptoren. Man könnte annehmen, dies läge daran, dass sie Meerwasser filtern, doch Cionen, die in enger Nachbarschaft zu Seeigeln leben, verfügen nur über 3 TLR. Diese Erklärungsversuche helfen uns also nicht weiter. Eine wichtige Erkenntnis, über die man sich einig zu sein scheint, ist, dass die adaptive Immunität bei Säugetieren durch die angeborene Immunität, z.B. Zytokine oder andere Faktoren unterstützt werden muss. Ich möchte also noch einmal betonen, dass die angeborene Immunitätskaskade bei Wirbeltieren neben all den Elementen, die wir bei der Fliege gefunden haben, noch weitere Elemente besitzt, über die Fliegen heute nicht mehr verfügen, wohl aber Seeanemonen. Ich wollte noch etwas zu den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen sagen, aber die Zeit hier in Lindau vergeht immer so schnell. Ich müsste eigentlich eine Folie mit der Zusammenfassung haben - hier ist sie. Ich habe noch eine Minute; das reicht. Bei Fliegen, ebenso wie bei C. elegans und Pflanzen, spielt die RNA-Interferenz eine wichtige Rolle; bei den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in Säugetieren ist sie dagegen nicht von Bedeutung. Neben der RNA-Interferenz, einem Kennzeichen der antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in dieser Gruppe, werden Gene angeregt, die die Virusinfektion eindämmen. Daran arbeiten wir momentan. Die Rezeptoren sowie die Signalwege sind aber noch weitgehend unbekannt. Im System der Säugetiere basieren die angeborenen Immunreaktionen im Wesentlichen auf dem Interferon-Arm. Die TLR-Rezeptoren sowie weitere Rezeptoren, die sich bei der Fliege nicht finden, z.B. NLR oder RLR aktivieren die Expression von Interferon- und Interferon-stimulierten Genen. Diese aktivieren natürliche Killerzellen, die wiederum infizierte Zellen abtöten. Die adaptive Immunantwort wird durch die angeborene Immunreaktion stimuliert, d.h. B-Lymphozyten erzeugen neutralisierende Antikörper und T-Lymphozyten töten infizierte Zellen ab. Ich möchte gerne den Beitrag, den zahlreiche hochrangige Wissenschaftler und ihre Arbeitsgruppen im Laufe der Jahre geleistet haben, würdigen. Da ist einmal meine Frau Daniele Hoffmann, die von Anfang an dabei war und am Diptericin-Gen arbeitete. Sie ist ebenfalls diese Woche in Lindau und leitet heute die Exkursion. Weiterhin haben wir den Chemiker Charles Hetru, den Biochemiker Jean-Luc Dirmarcq sowie den Entwicklungs- und inzwischen auch Drosophila-Genetiker Jean-Marc Reichhart. Der erste Drosophila-Genetiker, den wir in unsere Arbeitsgruppe aufnahmen, war Bruno Lemaitre; er ist heute in Lausanne tätig. Dominique Ferrandon - bevor er zu unserer Gruppe stieß, verfasste er seine Doktorarbeit interessanterweise bei Frau Nüsslein-Volhard - beschäftigt sich mittlerweile mit bestimmten Aspekten der Erkennung, intestinalen Immunität, Resilienz etc. Julien Royet, der heute in Marseille arbeitet, beschäftigte sich eingehend mit den Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP). Jean-Luc Imler erforschte die antiviralen Mechanismen und wird sehr aufgebracht sein, dass ich auf seine Daten nicht im Detail eingegangen bin. Bei der nächsten Tagung - sofern man mich noch einmal einlädt - werde ich mich diesem Thema ausführlich widmen bzw. er wird Ihnen seine Daten erläutern. Elena Levashina arbeitete an den Abwehrmechanismen gegen parasitäre Erreger wie das durch Anophelesmücken übertragene Plasmodium und hat herausragende Arbeit geleistet mit der Identifizierung eines komplement-artigen Moleküls in einem komplexen, die Infektion bekämpfenden System bei Moskitos. Philippe Bulet beschäftigte sich ebenfalls mit antimikrobiellen Peptiden. Hier sehen Sie eine Liste all der Leute aus anderen Labors und anderen Ländern, die in den letzten Jahren in diesem Forschungsbereich gearbeitet haben. Ich bedanke mich für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Jules Hoffmann explaining the reasons of using Drosophila in his research
(00:00:28 - 00:02:45)

 

 

He goes on to describe the landmark work in Drosophila that implicated Toll as playing a critical role in antifungal responses and how this paved the way for the discovery and characterisation of Toll receptors in mammals.

 

Jules Hoffmann (2014) - Innate Immunity: From Flies to Humans

Dear colleagues and friends, I would like to start also thanking the organisers for the invitation and for this wonderful meeting which I really do enjoy. So in the first slide the question which I got most often over the last 3 years by journalists and by varied people, many people in society: Why do you work on insects? So let me say, just in this slide is shown, insects they account for 80% of all living species on earth. They annually destroy one third of human crops and they put one third of humanity and livestock at risk of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections via the bacteria roles. And, what we knew when I started my PhD, they are particularly resistant to infections. So here we were in the presence of a very large important group on earth, of animals on earth, and knowing that they were resistant to infections but we didn't understand the mechanisms. Except for the role of phagocytosis. So I'll go rapidly with you through the steps which we took over the last 20 years. And first of all that part of our work was done on drosophila which has of course great advantages, as all of you are aware of, in terms of genetics. And in this slide we show that when we prick a fly at times zero and then take off the blood we see that we induce a very strong potent antimicrobial activity. This is a very simple growth inhibition assay. So we started out asking 3 questions. Number 1: What is the identity of the affected molecules? We knew from work from Hans Boman in Stockholm in the early '80s that in butterflies antimicrobial peptide was induced which he named cecropin. Second question was: What is - this is Hans Boman - what is the control of gene expression if we find that the molecules in the fly are also peptides like in the butterfly? And a third question: What is the identity of the receptors of those microbial infections, and is the fly able to distinguish between various types of infecting molecules? Now, it took us several years to go through chemical analytical chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to find that drosophila, the flies, in response to the challenge I've shown you on the previous slide, produce several families of strongly...of powerful antimicrobial peptides which are shown in these slides. They are produced in the fat body, in what is now a classical way, as pro-molecules and then matured, secreted into the blood where the concentrations reach very high values in the order of 0.5 millimolar. Important among those molecules - they are certainly unimportant for the fly but important for us -was diptericin, which was the first molecule which we found which is anti-active against gram-negative bacteria. Attacins and cecropins are homologous through the molecules identified in butterflies by Hans Boman. And then we found drosomycin which is a potently antifungal peptide, and metchnikowin, defensin and so on. So this sort of solved the first question about the identity of the inducible molecules which in the circulating blood accounted for the protection, at least for large particle protection. Now the second question is, how are the genes and cloning of those peptides controlled? And as shown on this slide, when we cloned still the Diptericin gene at that time, the one which is antibacterial, anti-Gram-negative bacterial, we found in the promoters of the Diptericin gene kappaB response elements. That is to say nucleotides sequences which had been reported in mammalian systems by David Baltimore and his colleagues to be responsive to the NF-kappaB transactivator which is the central transactivator of immune and distress responses. Now when we mutated these sites and report the flies we abolished the inducibility showing that their presence is mandatory for an immune response. Now in the fly at the time it was known that there were at least one homologue of NF-kappaB, which is presented here, which was named Dorsal by the inventor Nüsslein-Volhard, I'll show that in the slide, and was retained in the cytoplasm binding to an inhibitor which she named Cactus. Now as I explained or as I will explain now, when you do this type of work in the fly or in other systems - at that time it was done through mutagenesis, unbiased mutagenesis. And you were screening for phenotypes and you could give for phenotypes... you could give a name and this was in the context of screening for abnormally developing embryos. Now just to illustrate this and this is not work from any of these groups but from whole groups in the community to explain to you what NF-kappaB is like. This is NF-kappaB and it is linked to the inhibitor which goes by the name of I-kappaB. So the whole story and the immune response here, and in development occasionally, is via kinase which is named IKK here to phosphorylate I-kappaB which will change its confirmation, disassociate from NF-kappaB and then free NF-kappaB which then is able to translocate into the nucleus and bind to DNA as shown. This is the nice butterfly figure where NF-kappaB dimer instead of NF-kappaB binds to DNA. So the question was, would this system which had been discovered in the dorso-ventral axis formation by Nüsslein-Volhard, would this system also be used in immune response? And as illustrated here and the work of Nüsslein-Volhard and a certain number of other scientists including Eric Wieschaus. Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were awarded the Nobel Prize in the '90s for their work on the determination of dorso-ventral and antro-posterior axis and other aspects of development in the fly. So here we have in the cytoplasm NF-kappaB bound to the inhibitor I-kappaB. This association is brought about when a signal comes from a transmembrane receptor. And that transmembrane receptor was dubbed by Nüsslein-Volhard 'Toll' for the bizarre appearance of the mutated embryo. Again I repeat, adults are at the time of reproduction fed mutagens and then the embryos are screened for those which do not normally develop and they are given a phenotype then. And Toll becomes activated by a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in the cleavage of a cytokine which was named Spätzle by Nüsslein-Volhard. I suppose in this audience I don't have to explain the phenotype of the Spätzle embryo. And so what we did and now I'm going to summarise the work which took really several years, about 5 years in the laboratory for a whole group, prominent among whom were Jean-Marc Reichhart and Bruno Lemaitre and the chemists identifying additional inducable antimicrobial molecules. So our initial idea that Toll might be involved in the expression, in the control of the genes, and coding these antimicrobial peptides was blocked by the fact that we used diptericin; diptericin was the first peptide which we had in our hands. Now diptericin turned out not to be dependent on Toll pathway, and it took us again as I said quite a lot of time to identify other inducible molecules and namely antifungal peptide drosomycin which appeared to really depend on the Toll pathway. So as you see in this slide fungi and as we later learnt, quite a few years later, Gram-positive bacteria activate via Toll NF-kappaB and lead to the production of antifungal and antibacterial peptides. Now this didn't help us for diptericin. And again it took several years for us to find that there was an additional pathway, unsuspected pathway in the system here which we referred to IMD for immune deficiency. And this pathway controlled the expression in response to Gram-negative bacteria of NF-kappaB and led to the production, to the expression of the genes and coding of antibacterial peptides and namely that of diptericin. So we were now, by '96, and in a position where we thought we understood that the defence molecules that they were dependent on two distinct pathways, Toll pathway, a partial reuse of the embryonic regulatory cascade for dorsoventral development, and another pathway of which we did not know anything at that time. We were not even sure that it was a pathway. But things evolved and before going into that let me just show you experiments which were done by Bruno Lemaitre, 2 postdoctoral students, and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory. Here we are looking at Aspergillus fungal infection in wild-type versus Toll mutant flies, and you see that there's a very marked difference. The Toll mutant flies have died, 50% have died after two days already in this experiment. Now on the other side of the slide you see that in the case of IMD mutants which control the expression of peptides active against Gram-negative bacteria, we see that E. coli infection is very well survived by wild-type fly. But in IMD mutants there's a very rapid dying off of the flies. So this then led us to propose in '96 that the dorsoventral regulatory gene cassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus controls the potent antifungal response in Drosophila adults. This is a Toll deficient fly. You see that the fungi have developed in the dying fly and covered everything of the body. Now this was sort of an important time in the work in the communities, because - I'll explain to you - because innate immunity not much was known about it. Innate immunity was not a very popular field at the time. It was essentially defective immunity which was the objective of the community of immunologists. And there were few receptors known in innate immunity and there was none known which would single to NF-kappaB. And as we have seen in the previous slide the hallmark of the activation both of the IMD pathway and the Toll pathway was the activation of NF-kappaB and then control of gene expression. And this was now the case for all electins which were known at that time in the system of innate immunity. There's also a belief that innate immunity was required to activate the production of cytokines, which would activate adaptive immunity and induce increased synthesis of MHC molecules and so on. I'm not going into this because what happened after this, after the publication of this paper, was that many people of the immunology community in adaptive system went into looking for homologous molecules of Toll in mammalian systems, and within a few years about 12 of these molecules were found. Paramount about that was of course the discovery that the LPS receptor was a member of the Toll family which Bruce Beutler is going to present to you in a few minutes. So taken together, the results in the fly and in the mammalian systems suggested that these Toll receptors would play an important role in innate immunity and possibly also in adaptive immunity via activating NF-kappaB. As shown in this slide, this is Shizuo Akira who is to be credited for having done a lot of work on identifying the ligands of the Toll-like receptors. This is the mammalian system. And here we see Toll-like receptors on the cytoplasmic membrane. The activators are lipopolysaccharide as has been conclusively shown by genetic approach by Bruce Beutler. And various other lipopeptides, even Flagellin, and in the endosome we have various nucleotides sequences either double-stranded RNA, single-stranded RNA or CpG DNA. Now in response to the activation via adaptive molecules, mammals will activate NF-kappaB as flies do in their special system. And also mammals will activate IRFs, interferon regulatory factors, which are absent; there is no interference system in flies. And this will lead on one side to the production of antimicrobial peptides and many other molecules. We know now there are hundreds of molecules which are activated in the innate immune response downstream of NF-kappaB. And also the activation of adaptive immune responses as I've already mentioned. Now taken together, I'm told - I've not made the check but I'm told - that about 20,000 papers of clinical interest have been published over the last 20 years now on the role of TLRs and the implication in defence reactions. And again, I mentioned, we have only worked on insects and we continue to work on insects. So this is from the community and not from our laboratory. So the primary role of course of TLRs we would say is fighting infectious diseases, which was the way they were discovered. And also we now know they play an important role in inflammation and this is becoming really one of the most central areas of research within the TLR field. They play a role in vaccination as they recognise some adjuvants - they are not the only molecules working on adjuvants but they do play a role in this field. They play a role in autoimmunity; they play a role in allergy; and importantly they are now accredited of playing a role in the new avenue of research of immunotherapy including cancer immunotherapy. But let me come back to my field and that is flies. And in flies they play a role in infections as I've pointed out a few minutes ago. And in the case of Gram-positive bacterial infection and fungal infection. We also have found, and others that over the last few years, that they also seem to play a role in inflammation. This is again a new field; it's a very interesting new field and there is aspects - I have no time to go into that, but maybe with the students this week to show what is coming up in this field. That will be certainly also very nice, very nice parallels to draw with inflammation in mammalian systems, which as you are aware of is now one of the central problems in human disease. Then essentially, and I insist on that, Toll receptors play a role in development in the fly. So the fly has 9 Toll receptors, they are activated by Spätzle or Spätzle-like molecules. So there are 6 Spätzle-like molecules in the fly which are, believe it or not, neurotrophins including Spätzle. So we have a set of regular developmental regulatory molecules, 6 neurotrophins and 9 Tolls - they all play a role in development, particularly of the nervous system, in the embryo and later in the larvae. And of these molecules, of this 6 + 9, nature has selected, for reasons we do not understand, So this is still a very important intellectual philosophical question, which is unsolved till today. So coming back to the fly. I was just mentioning now the story of non-Toll receptors, of Spätzle. So Spätzle becomes activated in this system, like in the embryonic system, by proteolytic cascade. This cascade is different from the one which is found in the embryos so it's an immune proteolytic cascade. But what are the receptors then? The receptors are not Toll and this is in contrast to what is known now in the mammalian system where Toll receptors directly interact with microbial inducers. In the fly Toll is not a receptor, but it is on the pathway of activation of the immune response. And the real, the actual receptors were found around 2000: We did work, we did unbiased mutagenesis which was the first genetic demonstration of the role of these receptors; and PGRP stands here which was one which we found at that time. It was Julian Royet in the laboratory who found that. Gram-positive bacteria interact with peptidoglycan recognition receptors activate the proteolytic cascade. The members of this cascade have been identified by now. Then dedicated protein, which is a Gram-negative binding protein also in the blood, reacts to beta-glucan of fungal origin, activates a cascade. And very interestingly Dominique Ferrandon and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory have found that microbial proteases activated dedicated protease in zymogen in the hemolymph. Most of the pathogens when they invade, or most of the microbes, when they invade their host will secrete proteases. And to our surprise we found that - and this is a very precise model of Beauveria bassiana fungus where you can do all the genetics and you can do the genetics on the fly. And so we were able to show, they were able to show, that microprotease interacts with and activates this zymogen which will then feed into the same proteolytic cascade. This is interesting because it really is a virus factor and as time goes on we see that this is valid for many other pathogens and also in other systems. Finally Gram-negative bacteria will activate through a transmembrane receptor again peptidoglycan recognition protein, will activate the other pathway, the IMD pathway, which will lead to effector genes which fight against Gram-negative bacteria. Now, I want to summarise this to make it very clear. The microbial inducers and their cognate receptors in the innate immune response of Drosophila: Bacterial peptidoglycans are recognised by dedicated circulating or transmembrane proteins referred to as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have evolutionarily derived from amidases. And we also point out that we humans product 4 families of PGRPs every day, as we produce many, many antimicrobial peptides every day, up to 10 grams on our skin per day. And so these are very highly conserved molecules. And in the case of humans they are not recognition proteins, PGRPs, but they are directly antibacterial. And fungal beta-glucans are recognised by circulating proteins referred to as glucan binding proteins. Now we have now understood some aspects about the affected molecules, we have understood some aspects about the receptors. Now let me shortly concentrate just in one example on the signalling cascades which link the recognition to the control of gene transcription. I've selected this antibody pathway which is also involved, as we have seen, in these inflammatory-like reactions. Now the receptor PGRP is shown here, it interacts with IMD and the first surprise came when we cloned the IMD gene - it was 2001 - was to see that it has a DEF domain which is very similar to mammalian RIP1. Now RIP stands for TNF receptor interacting protein. Second surprise: IMD binds to fat which is DEF domain protein conserved in the TNF receptor pathway in mammals. Then this system will activate TAK1, which is a MAP3 kinase, also highly conserved in the mammalian system, linking to TAK2, also conserved in the mammalian TNF3 receptor pathway. Then TAK1 will activate an IKK complex which has an IKK-beta and IKK-gamma component, which are highly conserved in mouse and humans. And then the reactivation, the phosphorylation of Relish which is the NF-kappaB family member in this pathway. And that will be cleaved by a caspase, and that caspase goes by the name of Dredd in the fly and is homologous to mammalian caspase-8. And then the active part of Relish, that is to say the real homologous domain, will go into nucleus and control expression of diptericin and hundreds of other genes. I put a note here about existence of negative regulation but we have no time to go into that. Now this was extremely striking to us. Remember we started off in a time of...when I started my PhD work with Professor Joly we started off thinking we would find something different from mammalian immune response, which was at the time essentially considered, as I mentioned already, in terms of adaptive immunity. And here we found many, many players in innate immune response which were similar to the ones which were present in mammals. Now I'm putting here a slide where I compare the Toll pathway and the IMD pathway of the fly to the TLR4 pathway and TNF pathway. So these are innate immune pathways - of course in the fly which has no adaptive immunity and in mammals which have adaptive immunity, but these pathways here are of the innate immune response. Now just looking at the colours - I have no time unfortunately to go into the details - but we have membrane receptors, which either react to a cleaved cytokine, as in the case of Spätzle or TNF-alpha, or directly interacts with the microbial ligand, this is the case of lipopolysaccharides or peptidoglycan in the fly or mouse system. We have adaptive proteins which are either identical, like MyD88 between Toll and TLR4, or very similar like IMD and RIP in systems of the IMD pathway and TNF pathway. Then we activate, we - that is to say the system - will activate central kinases like the TAK1 kinase which will also in turn activate the adjunct kinase pathway; it's not relevant this time. And then we have an IKK complex which is nearly identical in TLR4, IMD and TNF. It's a little bit simplified in the pathway of Toll in the fly. The end product will be activation of NF-kappaB and control of gene expression. So this is really something which, again I insist, was totally unexpected by us and in the community: to find that we have a system which is so highly conserved between mammals and flies. Now this raises the question, when did this system appear? Of course, flies do not derive from mice and mice do not derive from flies. So we did data mining and there's about 6,000 sequences of genomes are available now. And in this summarising slide, to our large surprise all the molecules which we found in Drosophila are already present in sea anemones and mostly also in sponges, that's to say really at the beginning of the differentiation of the eukaryotes. They are present in worms, with the exception of C. elegans, which is a special worm. And they are present in crustaceans, the fly, in cephalochordates, and they are all present in vertebrates. A striking aspect of this comparison is that the members of the innate immune response in vertebrates are closer to those of the sea anemones than to the flies - because flies have highly evolved systems, it's not a primitive flying thing out there. It has simplified its immune defence, namely remember that there are only 2 inducers: the highly conserved peptidoglycan and the highly conserved beta-glucan. These are the only inducers in addition to violence factors which depend on the aggressing system. Now, all this leads us to believe that innate immunity in the way we understand it now has appeared, probably, with multi-similarity that is to say roughly one billion years ago. And that sort of tool box of innate immunity is nearly fully present in sea anemones at the beginning of this evolution. And then over evolution various groups have either simplified or a little bit diversified and this is the case namely as I've mentioned. I could mention here that sea urchins for instance have 220 Toll-like receptors. And you could say that's because they live in the sea they filter the sea. But ciona which lives close to the sea urchins has only 3. So that's not really going to help us, that sort of calculation will not help us. Now the important thing here on which everyone seems to agree is that a full adaptive immunity in mammals requires the input from a boost from innate immunity, be it via cytokines of other aspects. And so again I insist on the fact that the innate immune cascade in vertebrates has all the elements which we found in the fly plus some additionals which are absent from fly today but present in sea anemones. So, I was going - but time here in Lindau runs so quickly - I was going to say a few words on the antiviral defences. Let me just point out I should have a summarising slide here which will, yes. I have 1 minute and that will be enough to summarise. So in the fly, like in C elegans, like in plants, RNA interference plays an essential role - this is not the case in the antiviral defences in mammals. And in addition to RNA interference, hallmark of the antiviral defences in this group, there's an induction of genes which will restrict the viral infection on which we are working on now. Receptors are largely unknown as are the pathways. Now in the mammalian system the innate response is essentially based on interferon, the interferon arm. The TLR receptors and other receptors which are absent from invertebrates like NLRs, RLRs...or I should say from the fly. Activate expression of interferon genes and of ISG interference simulative genes, the active natural killer cells which kill infected cells. And the adaptive immune response here which is stimulated by the immune response. B lymphocytes produce neutralising antibodies. And T lymphocytes kill infected cells. Now, I would like to acknowledge the contribution of many senior scientists and their groups. Let me just mention here over the years: Daniele Hoffmann, who started with me; she did the work on diptericin gene. She's my wife, she's with me in Lindau and she is taking the excursion today. Charles Hetru a chemist, Jean-Luc Dirmarcq the biochemist. Jean-Marc Reichhart, development geneticist and also now Drosophila geneticist. Bruno Lemaitre was the first Drosophila geneticist whom we hired in our group, he is now in Lausanne. Dominique Ferrandon did his PhD work interestingly with Nüsslein-Volhard before joining our group, and he is working on certain aspects now of recognition, of gut immunity, resilience and so on. Julien Royet, now in Marseille, has worked a lot on the PGRP receptors, peptidoglycan recognition receptors. Jean-Luc Imler is working on the antiviral field, he will be very upset that I was so quick on his data. But that will be at the next meeting if you still invite me, I will speak essentially about...or he will speak about his data. Elena Levashina works on the defences against parasites, against plasmodium in anopheles, and she has done really stellar work identifying a complement-like molecule in the mosquito in a complex system fighting off the infection. Philippe Bulet has also done work on the antimicrobial peptide. Just putting on the names of people in other laboratories in other countries who have contributed to this field in recent years. Thank you very much for your attention.

Sehr geehrte Kollegen und Freunde, ich möchte mich zunächst bei den Veranstaltern für die Einladung zu dieser wunderbaren Tagung bedanken, dir mir wirklich großes Vergnügen bereitet. Meine erste Folie formuliert die Frage, die mir Journalisten und viele andere Leute in den letzten drei Jahren am häufigsten gestellt haben: Warum arbeiten Sie an Insekten? Wie auf der Folie dargestellt machen Insekten 80% aller aktuell auf der Erde lebenden Arten aus. Sie zerstören jährlich ein Drittel der Ernten und setzen einen ebenso großen Prozentsatz der Menschheit und des Viehbestandes dem Risiko bakterieller, mykotischer, viraler und parasitärer Infektionen aus, infolge ihrer Funktion als Vektoren. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit begann, wusste man bereits, dass sie gegenüber Infektionen besonders resistent sind. Wir sahen uns also der Situation gegenüber, dass auf der Erde eine sehr große und bedeutsame Tiergruppe existiert, die gegenüber Infektionen resistent ist, wir aber mit Ausnahme der Rolle der Phagozytose die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen nicht verstanden. Ich gehe mit Ihnen rasch die Schritte, die wir in den letzten 20 Jahren durchlaufen haben, durch. Wir arbeiteten hauptsächlich mit Drosophila, was, wie Sie alle wissen, vom genetischen Standpunkt aus sehr vorteilhaft ist. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie, was geschieht, wenn wir einer Fliege zum Zeitpunkt Null Bakterien injizieren und ihr dann in bestimmten Zeitabständen Blut abnehmen: Es wird eine sehr starke antimikrobielle Aktivität ausgelöst. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen ganz einfachen Wachstumsinhibititonstest. Zu Beginn hatten wir drei Fragen. Erstens: Was sind die Effektormoleküle? Wir wussten aus Arbeiten von Hans Boman in Stockholm Anfang der 80er Jahre, dass in Schmetterlingen ein von ihm Cecropin getauftes antimikrobielles Peptid induziert wird. Zweitens fragten wir uns - das ist übrigens Hans Boman - wie die Genexpression gesteuert wird, wenn sich herausstellt, dass es sich, wie beim Schmetterling, bei den Molekülen in der Fliege um Peptide handelt. Und schließlich wollten wir wissen, welche Rezeptoren an diesen mikrobiellen Infektionen beteiligt sind und ob die Fliege zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Infektionsmolekülen unterscheiden kann. Wir benötigten mehrere Jahre, bis wir mit Hilfe chemisch-analytischer, biochemischen und molekulargenetischen Untersuchungen herausfanden, dass Drosophila als Reaktion auf die in der vorherigen Folie dargestellten Infektionen verschiedene Familien wirksamer antimikrobieller Peptide erzeugt - zu sehen hier auf dieser Folie. Sie entstehen auf klassische Weise in den Fettkörperzellen in Form von Promolekülen, reifen dann heran und werden ins Blut ausgeschüttet, wo sie sehr hohe Konzentrationen einer Größenordnung von 0,5 Millimol erreichen. Ein wichtiges Molekül - d.h. wichtig für uns, nicht für die Fliege - war Diptericin. Es war das erste Molekül, das wir fanden, das gegen gramnegativ Bakterien wirksam ist. Attacine und Cecropine sind homolog zu den von Hans Boman in Schmetterlingen identifizierten Molekülen. Weiterhin fanden wir Drosomycin, ein stark antimykotisch wirkendes Peptid, Metchnikowin, Defensin etc. Damit war die erste Frage bezüglich der Identität der induzierbaren Moleküle, die im Blutkreislauf vor Infektionen schützen, mehr oder weniger geklärt. Nun fragten wir uns, wie diese Gene bzw. die Klonierung der Peptide gesteuert werden. Wie auf dieser Folie dargestellt fanden wir bei der Klonierung des Gens, das für die Erzeugung des gegen gramnegative Bakterien wirksamen Moleküls Diptericin zuständig ist - so genannte KappaB-Response-Elemente in der Promotorregion. Dabei handelt es sich um Nukleotidsequenzen, die nach Angaben von David Baltimore und Kollegen in Säugetiersystemen verantwortlich für den NF-KappaB-Transaktivator sind welcher der zentralen Transaktivator bei Immun- und Belastungsreaktionen ist. Durch Mutation dieser Genstellen in Schmetterlingen hoben wir die Induzierbarkeit auf und zeigten, dass sie für eine Immunreaktion zwingend notwendig sind. Bei der Fliege war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt bekannt, dass sie zumindest ein Homolog von NF-KappaB besitzt. Dieses von seiner Entdeckerin Nüsslein-Volhard Dorsal getaufte Protein - ich zeige Ihnen das auf der Folie - wird durch Bindung an einen Inhibitor namens Cactus, ebenfalls eine Wortschöpfung von Nüsslein-Volhard, im Zytoplasma gehalten. Sie müssen wissen, dass bei derartigen Untersuchungen an Fliegen oder anderen Systemen so geschehen z.B. im Zusammenhang mit der Suche nach embryonalen Entwicklungsstörungen. Ich möchte Ihnen veranschaulichen und erläutern, worum es sich bei NF-KappaB handelt. Hier sehen Sie NF-KappaB; es ist an einen Inhibitor namens IKappaB gebunden. Bei der Immunreaktion, und gelegentlich auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung, wird IKappaB von der Kinase IKK phosphoryliert, so dass es seine Konfirmation ändert, von NF-KappaB dissoziiert und dieses schließlich freisetzt, so dass es in den Nukleus translozieren und sich dort wie dargestellt an die DNA binden kann. Dabei entsteht diese hübsche Schmetterlingsform, in der sich das NF-KappaB-Dimer anstelle von NF-KappaB an die DNA bindet. Die Frage war, ob dieses von Nüsslein-Volhard entdeckte, an der Entwicklung der dorsoventralen Achse beteiligte System auch bei der Immunreaktion eine Rolle spielt. Hier sehen Sie die Arbeit von Nüsslein-Volhard und weiteren Wissenschaftlern wie Eric Wieschaus. In den 90er Jahren erhielten Nüsslein-Volhard und Wieschaus den Nobelpreis für die Erforschung der dorsoventralen und anteroposterioren Achse und anderer Aspekte der Embryonalentwicklung bei der Fliege. NF-KappaB bindet sich infolge eines von einem Transmembranrezeptor ausgesendeten Signals im Zytoplasma an den Inhibitor IKappaB. Diesen Transmembranrezeptor taufte Nüsslein-Volhard aufgrund des bizarren Aussehens des mutierten Embryos 'Toll'. Um es noch einmal zu wiederholen: Zum Zeitpunkt der Fortpflanzung werden die adulten Tiere FADD-mutagenisiert; anschließend werden die Embryos nach Exemplaren untersucht, die sich nicht normal entwickeln, und die jeweiligen Phänotypen erhalten Namen. diese Bezeichnung stammt ebenfalls von Nüsslein-Volhard. Ich gehe davon aus, dass ich diesem Publikum den Phänotyp des Spätzle-Embryos nicht erläutern muss. Ich möchte unsere langwierige, sich über etwa 5 Jahre hinziehende Arbeit im Labor kurz zusammenfassen. An ihr war eine ganze Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern beteiligt; hervorzuheben sind insbesondere Jean-Marc Reichhart und Bruno Lemaitre sowie die Chemiker, die weitere induzierbare antimikrobielle Moleküle identifizierten. Unserer ursprünglichen Idee, dass Toll möglicherweise an der Expression bzw. Steuerung der Gene sowie an der Kodierung der antimikrobiellen Peptide beteiligt ist, konnten wir aufgrund der Tatsache, dass wir mit Diptericin, dem ersten Peptid, das uns zur Verfügung stand, arbeiteten, nicht nachgehen, da sich herausstellte, dass Diptericin nicht vom Toll-Signalweg abhängt. Es dauerte wie gesagt ziemlich lange, bis wir andere induzierbare Moleküle identifiziert hatten, u.a. ein antimykotisches Peptid namens Drosomycin, das, so schien es, eindeutig von diesem Signalweg abhing. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie sehen, führen Pilze und, wie wir einige Jahre später feststellten, grampositive Bakterien mittels Aktivierung von Toll-NF-KappaB zur Entstehung antimykotischer und antibakterieller Peptide. Das nützte uns bei Diptericin allerdings wenig. Es dauerte wieder mehrere Jahre, bis sich herausstellte, dass es in diesem System einen weiteren unvermuteten Signalweg gab, den wir als Immundefizienz (IMD)-Signalweg bezeichneten. Und dieser Signalweg steuert die Expression von NF-KappaB als Reaktion auf gramnegative Bakterien und führt zur Expression der Gene und somit zur Kodierung der antibakteriellen Peptide, in unserem Fall Diptericin. von zwei bestimmten Signalwegen abhängen, dem Toll-Signalweg, einem Teil der embryonalen Steuerkaskade für die dorsoventrale Entwicklung, und einem anderen Signalweg, über den wir bis dato nichts wussten, ja bei dem wir noch nicht einmal sicher waren, dass es sich dabei überhaupt um einen Signalweg handelt. Doch die Dinge gerieten ins Rollen - bevor ich Ihnen jedoch davon berichte, möchte ich Ihnen ein paar Experimente vorstellen, die Bruno Lemaitre und Jean-Marc Reichhart zusammen mit zwei Postdocs im Labor durchführten. Das hier ist eine Aspergillus-Pilzinfektion bei Wildtyp-Fliegen und Toll-mutierten Fliegen; Sie sehen, es besteht ein ganz deutlicher Unterschied. Nach nur zwei Tagen starben 50% der Toll-mutierten Fliegen in diesem Experiment. Auf der rechten Seite der Folie sehen Sie, dass Wildtyp-Fliegen eine Infektion mit E. coli problemlos überleben. IMD-Mutanten sterben dagegen sehr rasch ab. Dies führte dazu, dass wir 1996 zu dem Schluss kamen, dass die dorsoventrale regulatorische Genkassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus die wirksame antimykotische Reaktion bei adulten Drosophila-Fliegen steuert. Dieser Fliege fehlt das Toll-Gen. Sie sehen, dass die Pilze den gesamten Körper der sterbenden Fliege bedecken. Das war eine wichtige Zeit für die Forschung in unserem Fachgebiet - ich werde Ihnen das erläutern - weil man über die angeborene Immunität damals nicht viel wusste. Außerdem war dieses Thema nicht sonderlich populär, die Immunologen befassten sich lieber mit Immundefekten. Man kannte damals nur wenige an der angeborenen Immunität beteiligte Rezeptoren, von denen keiner für NF-KappaB signalisiert. Wie auf der vorherigen Folie dargestellt waren für die Aktivierung sowohl des IMD-Signalweges als auch des Toll-Signalweges die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB sowie die anschließende Steuerung der Genexpression besonders bezeichnend. Dies galt für sämtliche Lektine, die zum damaligen Zeitpunkt beim System der angeborenen Immunität bekannt waren. Man nahm an, dass die angeborene Immunität für die Aktivierung der Zytokinherstellung erforderlich ist, was wiederum die adaptive Immunität aktiviert und eine verstärkte Synthese von MHC-Molekülen etc. auslöst. Ich werde darauf aber nicht näher eingehen. Nach Veröffentlichung dieses Papers begannen viele Immunologen, die sich mit adaptiven Systemen beschäftigten, nach homologen Toll-Molekülen in Säugetiersystemen zu suchen und fanden innerhalb weniger Jahre etwa 12 dieser Moleküle. Am vorrangigsten war natürlich die Entdeckung, dass der LPS-Rezeptor ein Mitglied der Toll-Familie ist - Bruce Beutler wird Ihnen in ein paar Minuten mehr darüber erzählen. In der Zusammenschau legten die Ergebnisse der Fliegen- und Säugetiersysteme also nahe, dass die Toll-Rezeptoren eine wichtige Rolle bei der angeborenen Immunität und möglicherweise auch bei der adaptiven Immunität spielen über die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie Shizuo Akira, dem für die Identifizierung die Liganden der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren in mühevoller Arbeit große Anerkennung gebührt. Das hier ist das Säugetiersystem; hier sehen Sie Toll-artige Rezeptoren auf der Zytoplasma-Membran. Es handelt sich bei den Aktivatoren um Lipopolysaccharide, wie Bruce Beutler anhand eines genetischen Ansatzes schlüssig beweisen konnte, aber auch verschiedene andere Lipopeptide wie Flagellin. Im Endosom finden sich verschiedene Nukleotidsequenzen, entweder Doppelstrang-RNA, Einzelstrang-RNA oder CpG-DNA. Als Antwort auf die Aktivierung mittels adaptiver Moleküle aktivieren Säugetiere NF-KappaB, ebenso wie Fliegen dies in ihrem speziellen System tun. Säugetiere aktivieren zudem Interferon regulierende Faktoren (IRF), Fliegen dagegen verfügen nicht über dieses Interferonsystem. Dies führt zur Entstehung antimikrobieller Peptide und zahlreicher anderer Moleküle. Wir wissen, dass es Hunderte von Molekülen gibt, die - NF-KappaB nachgeschaltet - bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion aktiviert werden. Die gilt auch für die Aktivierung adaptiver Immunreaktionen, wie zuvor erwähnt. Ich habe das zwar nicht überprüft, aber mir wurde gesagt, dass in den letzten 20 Jahren etwa 20.000 Paper von klinischem Interesse zur Rolle der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren (TLR) bei Abwehrreaktionen veröffentlicht worden sind. Wie ich bereits sagte, haben wir ausschließlich an Insekten gearbeitet und werden dies auch weiterhin tun. Diese Angaben stammen also nicht aus unserem Labor, sondern aus der Gesamtheit unseres Fachbereichs. Die wichtigste Aufgabe der TLR ist natürlich die Bekämpfung von Infektionskrankheiten - auf diesem Wege wurden sie schließlich auch entdeckt. Zudem wissen wir heute, dass sie eine wichtige Rolle bei Entzündungen spielen, was immer mehr zu einem der zentralen Forschungsbereiche auf diesem Gebiet wird. Von Bedeutung sind sie auch bei Impfungen, da sie einige Wirkverstärker erkennen; zwar sind sie nicht die einzigen Moleküle, die dies tun, dennoch spielen sie auf diesem Gebiet eine Rolle. Das Gleiche gilt für die Autoimmunität und Allergien. Außerdem geht man heute davon aus, dass sie auch für den neuen Forschungszweig der Immuntherapie, z.B. bei Krebs von Bedeutung sind. Doch lassen Sie mich zu meinem Fachgebiet zurückkehren, den Fliegen. In Fliegen, wie ich vor einigen Minuten erwähnt habe, spielen TLR hier im Falle von grampositiven bakteriellen und mykotischen Infektionen eine Rolle. In den letzten Jahren stellten wir und andere fest, dass sie vermutlich auch im Zusammenhang mit Entzündungen von Bedeutung sind. Dieses Gebiet ist ganz neu und sehr interessant. Leider habe ich nicht die Zeit näher darauf einzugehen, aber vielleicht kann ich ja den Studenten diese Woche noch ein bisschen erzählen, was sich in diesem Bereich so tut. Sicherlich lassen sich auch hier sehr schöne Parallelen zu Entzündungen in Säugetiersystemen ziehen, die, wie Sie wissen, heute eines der zentralen Probleme bei Humanerkrankungen darstellen. Ich möchte betonen, dass Toll-Rezeptoren zudem auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung der Fliege eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Die Fliege besitzt 9 Toll-Rezeptoren, die durch Spätzle bzw. Spätzle-artige Moleküle aktiviert werden. Es gibt 6 Spätzle-artige Moleküle in der Fliege, bei denen es sich, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, um Neurotrophine handelt. Es existiert also ein Gruppe von Molekülen zur Entwicklungsregulation bestehend aus 6 Neurotrophinen und 9 Toll-artigen Rezeptoren, und sie alle sind bei der Entwicklung, insbesondere der des Nervensystems im Embryo und später in der Larve von Bedeutung. Von diesen 6 + 9 Molekülen hat die Natur aus Gründen, die wir nicht verstehen, einen Toll-Rezeptor und ein Spätzle-Molekül, d.h. ein Drosophila-Neurotrophin ausgewählt, diese so entscheidende Abwehr gegen eindringende Mikroorganismen zu aktivieren. Das ist eine sehr bedeutsame intellektuelle und philosophische Frage, die bislang ungelöst ist. Doch kehren wir zu den Fliegen zurück. Ich wollte Ihnen gerade etwas über die Nicht-Toll-Rezeptoren erzählen, die Spätzle. Spätzle werden auch in diesem System ebenso wie im Embryonalsystem durch eine proteolytische Kaskade aktiviert. Diese Kaskade unterscheidet sich jedoch insofern von derjenigen im Embryo, als es sich um eine immunproteolytische Kaskade handelt. Doch wie sehen deren Rezeptoren aus? Bei den Rezeptoren handelt es sich nicht um Toll, im Gegensatz zum Säugetiersystem, bei dem Toll-Rezeptoren direkt mit den mikrobiellen Induktoren interagieren. Toll ist bei der Fliege kein Rezeptor, sondern Teil der Aktivierungssignalweges der Immunreaktion. Auf die eigentlichen Rezeptoren stießen wir im Jahr 2000: Wir arbeiteten mit ergebnisoffener Mutagenese, wodurch wir die Rolle dieser Rezeptoren erstmals genetisch belegen konnten. Damals entdeckte Julian Royet im Labor die Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP), die mit grampositiven Bakterien in Wechselwirkungen treten und so die proteolytische Kaskade aktivieren, deren Mitglieder übrigens inzwischen bekannt sind. Dann reagiert ein spezielles Protein, ein gramnegatives Bindungsprotein im Blut, zu Beta-Glucan mykotischen Ursprungs und aktiviert eine Kaskade. Interessanterweise stellten Dominique Ferrandon und Jean-Marc Reichhart im Labor fest, dass mikrobielle Proteasen eine spezielle Protease im Zymogen der Hämolymphe aktivieren. Beim Eindringen von Erregern schüttet der Wirt für gewöhnlich Proteasen aus. Zu unserer Überraschung konnten sie zeigen, dass mit dessen Hilfe sich alle genetischen Experimente an der Fliege durchführen lassen - Sie konnten zeigen, dass Mikroproteasen mit dem Zymogen interagieren und es aktivieren, so dass es in die proteolytische Kaskade einfließt. Das ist interessant, denn es handelt sich tatsächlich um einen Virusfaktor. Mit der Zeit stellten wir fest, dass dies auch für viele andere Erreger und andere Systeme gilt. Schließlich aktivieren gramnegative Bakterien über den Transmembranrezeptor - das Peptidoglycan erkennende Protein - den IMD-Signalpfad, wodurch Effektorgene entstehen, die gramnegative Bakterien bekämpfen. Ich fasse zur Veranschaulichung jetzt noch einmal die mikrobiellen Induktoren und verwandten Rezeptoren der angeborenen Immunantwort von Drosophila zusammen: Bakterielle Peptidoglycane werden von speziellen zirkulierenden oder Transmembranproteinen, den so genannten Peptidoglycan erkennenden Proteinen (PGRP), die evolutionär von Amidasen abstammen, erkannt. Ich möchte anmerken, dass wir Menschen täglich vier PGRP-Familien, also enorm viele antimikrobielle Peptide produzieren - auf der Haut finden sich bis zu 10 g. Es handelt sich also um sehr stark konservierte Moleküle. Beim Menschen sind PGRP keine Erkennungsproteine, sondern direkt antibakteriell wirksame Moleküle. Die mykotischen Beta-Glucane werden von zirkulierenden Proteinen, den so genannten Glucan bindenden Proteinen erkannt. Wir haben jetzt einige Aspekte der entsprechenden Moleküle und ihrer Rezeptoren verstanden. Ich möchte mich nun kurz anhand eines Beispiels auf die Signalkaskaden konzentrieren, die die Erkennung mit der Steuerung der Gentranskription verknüpfen. Ich habe dafür diesen Antikörpersignalweg ausgesucht, der, wie wir gesehen haben, auch an Entzündungsreaktionen beteiligt ist. Das hier ist der Rezeptor PGRP; er interagiert mit IMD. Die erste Überraschung war, dass sich bei Klonierung des IMD-Gens im Jahr 2001 eine Todesdomäne zeigte, die dem TNF receptor interacting protein (RIP)bei Säugetieren (RIP1) stark ähnelt. Die zweite Überraschung bestand darin, dass sich IMD an FADD, ein im TNF-Rezeptor-Signalweg in Säugetieren konserviertes Todesdomänenprotein bindet. Dieses System aktiviert nun TAK1, eine im Säugetiersystem ebenfalls stark konservierte MAP3-Kinase und verknüpft sie mit TAK2, einer weiteren Kinase, die im Säugetier-TNF3-Rezeptorsignalweg konserviert ist. Nun aktiviert TAK1 einen IKK-Komplex aus einer IKK-Beta- und einer IKK-Gamma-Komponente, der in Mäusen und Menschen stark konserviert ist. Anschließend erfolgen die Reaktivierung, d.h. Phosphorylierung von Relish, einem Mitglied der NF-KappaB-Familie in diesem Signalpfad, sowie die Spaltung durch eine Caspase, die bei der Fliege als DREDD bezeichnet wird und zur Säugetier-Caspase-8 homolog ist. Jetzt dringt der aktive Teil von Relish, d.h. die eigentliche homologe Domäne in den Nukleus ein und steuert dort die Expression von Diptericin und hunderter anderer Gene. Ich habe hier eine Anmerkung bezüglich der Existenz einer Negativsteuerung gemacht, aber dafür haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wir fanden das sehr auffällig. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit bei Professor Joly begann, waren wir der Ansicht, wir würden etwas finden, das sich von der Immunreaktion von Säugetieren unterscheidet, unter der man, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, im Wesentlichen die adaptive Immunität verstand. Und dann fanden wir bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion so viele Akteure, die denen der Säugetiere ähnelten. Hier sehen Sie eine Folie, die den Toll-Signalweg und den IMD-Signalweg der Fliege mit dem TLR4- und dem TNF-Signalweg vergleicht. Es handelt sich hier sowohl bei der Fliege, die natürlich über keine adaptive Immunität verfügt, als auch bei Säugetieren, die eine solche Immunität besitzen, ausschließlich um die Signalwege der angeborenen Immunreaktion. Schauen wir uns die Farben an - ich habe leider keine Zeit mehr, Ihnen die Details zu erläutern. Wir haben Membranrezeptoren, die entweder wie im Falle von Spätzle oder TNF-Alpha zu einem gespaltenen Zytokin reagieren oder wie im Falle von Lipopolysacchariden oder Peptidoglycan im Fliegen- oder Maussystem mit dem mikrobiellen Liganden direkt interagieren. Wir haben adaptive Proteine, die entweder identisch sind, z.B. MyD88 in Toll und TLR4, oder sehr ähnlich, z.B. IMD und RIP in den Systemen des IMD- bzw. TNF-Signalweges. Dann aktiviert das System die zentralen Kinasen wie z.B. die TAK1-Kinase, die wiederum den JNK-Signalweg aktiviert; das ist aber jetzt nicht relevant. Dann haben wir einen IKK-Komplex, der in TLR4, IMD und TNF praktisch identisch ist; im Toll-Signalweg der Fliege ist er ein bisschen simpler. Am Ende stehen die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB und die Steuerung der Genexpression. Ich möchte noch einmal betonen, dass die Entdeckung für uns und die Wissenschaftler in unserem Fachgebiet völlig unerwartet kam: ein zwischen Säugetieren und Fliegen so stark konservierten Systems. Jetzt stellte sich die Frage, wann sich dieses System erstmals entwickelte. Natürlich stammen Fliegen nicht von Mäusen ab oder umgekehrt. Wir sammelten also Daten. Heute stehen etwa 6000 Genomsequenzen zur Verfügung. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie, die unsere Arbeit zusammenfasst, sehen, stellten wir zu unserer großen Überraschung fest, dass alle Moleküle, die wir in Drosophila entdeckt hatten, bereits in Seeanemonen und vor allem Schwämmen existieren, d.h. seit Beginn der Differenzierung der Eukaryonten. Es gibt sie in Würmern - mit Ausnahme von C. elegans, das ist ein Spezialfall - in Krustentieren, in Fliegen und Cephalochordaten und in sämtlichen Wirbeltieren. Auffällig ist bei diesem Vergleich, dass die an der angeborenen Immunreaktion bei Wirbeltieren beteiligten Moleküle denen der Seeanemonen ähnlicher sind als denen der Fliegen. Fliegen verfügen über hochentwickelte Systeme, sie sind keineswegs primitive Lebewesen. Sie haben ihre Immunabwehr auf nur zwei Induktoren vereinfacht: das hochkonservierte Peptidoglycan und das hochkonservierte Beta-Glucan. Das sind die einzihen Induktoren die sie neben Virulenzfaktoren, die vom jeweiligen Erregersystem abhängen, besitzen. All dies ließ uns vermuten, dass sich die angeborene Immunität so wie wir sie heute verstehen mit der Vielzelligkeit wahrscheinlich vor etwa einer Milliarde Jahren entwickelt hat. Bereits zu Beginn der Evolution findet sich bei den Seeanemonen fast der gesamte Werkzeugkasten der angeborenen Immunität. Im Verlauf der Evolution wurde er teilweise vereinfacht bzw. diversifiziert. Seeigel beispielsweise besitzen 220 Toll-artige Rezeptoren. Man könnte annehmen, dies läge daran, dass sie Meerwasser filtern, doch Cionen, die in enger Nachbarschaft zu Seeigeln leben, verfügen nur über 3 TLR. Diese Erklärungsversuche helfen uns also nicht weiter. Eine wichtige Erkenntnis, über die man sich einig zu sein scheint, ist, dass die adaptive Immunität bei Säugetieren durch die angeborene Immunität, z.B. Zytokine oder andere Faktoren unterstützt werden muss. Ich möchte also noch einmal betonen, dass die angeborene Immunitätskaskade bei Wirbeltieren neben all den Elementen, die wir bei der Fliege gefunden haben, noch weitere Elemente besitzt, über die Fliegen heute nicht mehr verfügen, wohl aber Seeanemonen. Ich wollte noch etwas zu den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen sagen, aber die Zeit hier in Lindau vergeht immer so schnell. Ich müsste eigentlich eine Folie mit der Zusammenfassung haben - hier ist sie. Ich habe noch eine Minute; das reicht. Bei Fliegen, ebenso wie bei C. elegans und Pflanzen, spielt die RNA-Interferenz eine wichtige Rolle; bei den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in Säugetieren ist sie dagegen nicht von Bedeutung. Neben der RNA-Interferenz, einem Kennzeichen der antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in dieser Gruppe, werden Gene angeregt, die die Virusinfektion eindämmen. Daran arbeiten wir momentan. Die Rezeptoren sowie die Signalwege sind aber noch weitgehend unbekannt. Im System der Säugetiere basieren die angeborenen Immunreaktionen im Wesentlichen auf dem Interferon-Arm. Die TLR-Rezeptoren sowie weitere Rezeptoren, die sich bei der Fliege nicht finden, z.B. NLR oder RLR aktivieren die Expression von Interferon- und Interferon-stimulierten Genen. Diese aktivieren natürliche Killerzellen, die wiederum infizierte Zellen abtöten. Die adaptive Immunantwort wird durch die angeborene Immunreaktion stimuliert, d.h. B-Lymphozyten erzeugen neutralisierende Antikörper und T-Lymphozyten töten infizierte Zellen ab. Ich möchte gerne den Beitrag, den zahlreiche hochrangige Wissenschaftler und ihre Arbeitsgruppen im Laufe der Jahre geleistet haben, würdigen. Da ist einmal meine Frau Daniele Hoffmann, die von Anfang an dabei war und am Diptericin-Gen arbeitete. Sie ist ebenfalls diese Woche in Lindau und leitet heute die Exkursion. Weiterhin haben wir den Chemiker Charles Hetru, den Biochemiker Jean-Luc Dirmarcq sowie den Entwicklungs- und inzwischen auch Drosophila-Genetiker Jean-Marc Reichhart. Der erste Drosophila-Genetiker, den wir in unsere Arbeitsgruppe aufnahmen, war Bruno Lemaitre; er ist heute in Lausanne tätig. Dominique Ferrandon - bevor er zu unserer Gruppe stieß, verfasste er seine Doktorarbeit interessanterweise bei Frau Nüsslein-Volhard - beschäftigt sich mittlerweile mit bestimmten Aspekten der Erkennung, intestinalen Immunität, Resilienz etc. Julien Royet, der heute in Marseille arbeitet, beschäftigte sich eingehend mit den Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP). Jean-Luc Imler erforschte die antiviralen Mechanismen und wird sehr aufgebracht sein, dass ich auf seine Daten nicht im Detail eingegangen bin. Bei der nächsten Tagung - sofern man mich noch einmal einlädt - werde ich mich diesem Thema ausführlich widmen bzw. er wird Ihnen seine Daten erläutern. Elena Levashina arbeitete an den Abwehrmechanismen gegen parasitäre Erreger wie das durch Anophelesmücken übertragene Plasmodium und hat herausragende Arbeit geleistet mit der Identifizierung eines komplement-artigen Moleküls in einem komplexen, die Infektion bekämpfenden System bei Moskitos. Philippe Bulet beschäftigte sich ebenfalls mit antimikrobiellen Peptiden. Hier sehen Sie eine Liste all der Leute aus anderen Labors und anderen Ländern, die in den letzten Jahren in diesem Forschungsbereich gearbeitet haben. Ich bedanke mich für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Jules Hoffmann on his landmark work in Drosophila
(00:10:10 - 00:12:59)

 

The mouse is broadly applied as a model in many areas of biological research and boasts many advantages, which include physiological similarity to humans, comparative ease of handling and the existence of a large number of inbred strains. Bruce Beutler performed his Nobel Prize-winning work in these organisms and by particularly focusing on mice found to be resistant to lipopolysaccharides, large, highly toxic molecules composed of both lipid and sugar, he discovered one of the Toll receptors in mammals.

 

Bruce  Beutler (2014) - Deciphering Immunity by Making It Fail

I'd like to talk to you today mostly about the whole process of genetics in the mouse. The mouse is a model organism, and about the great progress that’s occurred just during the last several months in fact. Specifically how we can find mutations now in real time starting with phenotype. I’ll touch briefly on the past. I won’t go over most of the story that Jules just told you but I’ll say that we were motivated in our work for many years by the problem that infectious disease represents in human beings. About sixty million people die each year and about one quarter of those people die of infection, even today. Though it’s must less apparent in what we call the developed world, nonetheless it’s a huge problem everywhere and specifically in places where there isn’t ready access to antibiotics and where the likelihood of infection is greater. There’s something special about the kind of death that infectious disease represents. It’s disproportionately occurring in young people, in people of pre-reproductive age. And because of that fact it’s certainly the greatest selective pressure that’s operated on our species in recent times. We don’t know how many genes are required for the sum total of resistance mechanisms to infection that we have but it could be in the hundreds or in the thousands. Probably infection has been a potent selective pressure for a very long time. Because the whole of the immune system came into existence under the influence of that pressure in it all its complexity. And infection exists notwithstanding the fact that the immune system is dangerous by itself. Once you have an immune system you run the risk of autoimmune or auto inflammatory diseases. In fact about twelve percent of all people will have problems with one kind of autoimmunity or another during their lifetimes. A lot of what we know about the immune system was revealed by naturally occurring mutations. Which taught us what has to happen in order to have a strong immune response. One naturally occurring infection that attracted me from many years ago was a rather subtle one. It was embodied in the C3H/HeJ sub-strain of C3H mice and it was noticed in 1965 that these mice were very selectively resistance to lipopolysaccharide or endotoxin. Something which had been known for nearly a 100 years in terms simply of its existence. It was known that endotoxin was made by gram negative bacteria, was a structural component of gram negative bacteria, and would cause basil motor collapse in human patients who had severe gram negative infections. That’s what every medical student learnt. But it wasn’t well understood how this molecule worked and specifically nobody had identified a receptor for LPS. We took a genetic approach to find that receptor, as everyone believed that the C3H/HeJ mouse had a receptor defect. Every experiment that one could perform supported that view. And after a long tough five years slog we positionly cloned the molecule that was defective in those mice. And found that it was a toll-like receptor, toll-like receptor 4. There being at that time 4 toll-like receptors known by homology with the fly toll protein. Now that was a very difficult effort. In those days positional cloning proceeded through a genetic mapping phase, then physical mapping and then one would identify genes within the critical region. And finally one would look for the mutation within one of those candidate genes. It wasn’t unusual that 5 years or even longer were required to crack a problem like that. Today we know from crystallographic work, and this is from a paper by Jeung Lee from year 2009 that LPS or endotoxin is in fact directly in contact with toll-like receptor 4, and also with a small sub-unit that was identified in 1999 by Kensuke Miyake called MD2. And it fits neatly into a kind of basket made by these molecules. That triggers a conformational change. That in turn triggers all of the derangements that one sees in endotoxic shock. And it also initiates a protective response. So that animals exposed to LPS develop resistance, innate resistance, to the bacteria that are infecting them. It was very lucky that the C3H/HeJ mouse was ever noticed to be phenotypically abnormal. And that was something that occurred just by chance. Natural mutations like that are very rare, very precious and usually they are missed. In fact there may be many of them in all the common mouse strains used but we don’t know just what screens to apply to detect them. It’s possible of course to plan for discovery, to be proactive and create mutations rather than simply waiting for them to occur. And such mutations can be detected by phenotypic screening using a screen that’s of interest to you to probe a phenomenon that’s of interest to you. And this of course is what forward genetics is. It’s making mutations at random to create phenotype, then finding the mutations that cause the phenotype. The huge advantage of forward genetics is that it’s unbiased and so it can create enormous surprises. It yields genuine discovery, it can even introduce you to new phenomenon that you weren’t aware of before all by creating exceptions to the norm at random. But historically in mice it was quite slow, as I’ve pointed out, expensive and just very difficult. In our laboratory for the last 13 years or so we’ve taken this approach. We’ve used a chemical mutagen, ethylnitrosourea, an alkylating agent and we administered it to male mice. Where upon it induces about 70 coding changes per sperm in each sperm produced by that male. And usually the concentrate mutations achieving more than a hundred coding variants per genome in the G1 progeny we mutagenized two separate male mice as shown here. We know from experience that almost all phenotype emanates from coding change when one uses this point mutagen. The G1 mice are crossed to black six females to make a large number of G2 animals and then a total of fifty G3 animals are produced from this G1. These grandchildren of the G1 are what are screened for phenotype and one can detect recessive phenotype in that generation. All of these mice have single mutation problems that lead to pheno-variance. And all of them were tracked down and solved in a more or less arduous fashion. But you can see that all of them look different or act different than the wild type. Yet of course we are mainly interested in immunologic phenotypes. These are the immune phenotypes that we’ve addressed over the years. We’ve looked at toll-like receptors signalling and found many variance there that I won’t talk about today. We’ve looked at the adaptive immune response and asked just what's necessary for an antibody response after all. We’ve asked what's necessary for a mouse to clear normally harmless viral infection by mouse cytomegalovirus. We find exceptional mice that are susceptible and die, and we’ve also looked at the problem of gut homeostasis following epithelial injury. In other words resistance to inflammatory colitis. That I’ll talk about just briefly because I will discuss it more in detail in a moment. This screen is carried out by giving 1.4% dextran sodium sulphate to mice in their drinking water over a period of ten days. This is a cytotoxin that will injure epithelial cells and in normal mice the injury is well tolerated, no weight loss occurs at that dose. But in exceptional mice diarrhoea, weight loss and death followed DSS administration. And the question we are addressing here is what's required to repair injury, contain infection and restore normal physiology? Technology began to help us along the way here. Things weren’t as difficult as between 1993 and 1998 when we worked on the LPS locus, after we began using ENU. In the year 2002 the draft sequence of the mouse genome was published and it was no longer necessary to look for the gene content of a critical region, nor to make context at all. But high resolution mapping was still needed for a time. In 2009 that became unnecessary because massively parallel sequencing platforms came on the scene and it became possible to tackle whole mouse genomes. By 2011, there were means of targeting the mouse exome for sequencing. That was only about 2% of the total genome content of DNA and so it was about fifty times as fast as sequence and fifty times as cheap. And we began at that point to sequence every G1 mouse to find all of the candidate mutations upfront. And that we continue to do to the present day. Furthermore we could begin to archive mutations. At present we’ve collected a total of 146,000 mutations that create coding change. And these reside within about 90% of all the protein encoding genes in the mouse and they are retrievable any time we should need them. In this collection there are 11,217 mutations that create putative null alleles, that is premature stop codons or critical splice junction errors. And these affect about 31% of all genes. So we’ve destroyed more than 30% of all genes outright. The fact is that most phenotype comes from misssensed errors which are much more abundant than these null errors that I talked about. And so it’s very likely that we’ve mutated more than half of all genes to a state of pheno-variance. But I don’t want to leave you with the impression that we’ve covered half the genome in all of our screens. Because it’s not true that all of those mutations were transmitted to homozygosity or studied phenotypically. They are merely the mutations we’ve archived. We could at that point begin to measure the saturation that we'd achieved. And this was always a question, before we were preceding quite blindly. We didn’t know how much damage we had done to the genome. But using computational methods knowing the exact structure of every pedigree, we could calculate the likelihood that every G1 mutation was transmitted to homozygosity in at least one mouse. And we could do this for null alleles as shown by the pink curve or for alleles that were probably creating injury, probably damaging or for a combination of the two, or for all of the mutations. If we stick to the question of how many of the null alleles were likely transmitted to homozygosity, in this case looking at about 13,750 G3 mice in a particular screen, we could say that taking the area under the curve, 1,613 genes were altered in homozygous form, so that would be 7% saturation. But we knew already at that time that this was certainly an overestimate because many null alleles are lethal on the homozygous state. Many non-overt null alleles are as well, and can’t be transmitted to homozygosity under any circumstances, and we would never see them in the wild population of mice. Mapping remained the bottleneck in our work and as we began to mutagenize and screen on a larger and larger scale we did get lots of phenotypes. But there got to be a kind of a gap in reverse. We used to speak of the phenotype gap as meaning there weren’t enough phenotypes. We felt finally that there were too many phenotypes, and they began to exceed the number of mutations that we'd actually found. Which numbered in the hundreds but still we were falling behind. The standard procedure remained that we would outcross a homozygous mutant to a marker strain, back-cross it. And then phenotype the F2 animals and genotype them at markers across the genome to limit the mutation to a critical region. That became the bottleneck in the whole process. Furthermore we were aware that we were simply ignoring most of the mutations. We would find one mutation the causative one but we didn’t have the potential to exonerate genes as we felt we ought to. The dream of positional cloners for the last 10 years has been something akin to google glasses. You’d like to have a box of mice, like this one, let’s say they are all from a single pedigree. Here I’ve made the mutant phenotype rather obvious but it might not be, it might be an immunologic phenotype. In any case you’d like to be able to put on these magical glasses and there on it would point out which mice are variant and which are not. And it would do much more than that, of course. It would automatically and immediately tell you what the mutation was. In this case a mutation in SOX10 it would tell you exactly the base pair change, the amino acid change. It would tell you what motive it was in and what the human ortholog was, if any. Perhaps even give you structural data. Now that was the challenge and we rose to that challenge and we actually have solved it and we can do exactly this. I’ll show you exactly how it works. But I’ll say at present in our laboratory, when a phenotype is recorded, the cause is known within one hour. Or the phenotype is rejected as non-genetic. Also within an hour. Not out of frustration; the computer says to reject it! This applies to all phenotypes whether they are visible or immunological. Whether they are qualitative or binomial or whether they are quantitative. The cost of doing this is independent of the number of phenotypes observed in a pedigree and it’s very common that multiple phenotypes emanated from one pedigree. Our new approach also permits actual exact measurements of saturation rather than any probabilistic estimation. And it permits the exoneration of genes as well as the implication of genes in any biological process to a level of certainty that you specify. So how do we do this? First of all, as we have done for a long time, all the G1 mice are sequenced before breeding and their sperm are archived. But the new point is that at that time Ampliseq panels are ordered to genotype all of the descendants of the G1 at all mutant sites. We can’t quite afford to exome-sequence fifty mice in a pedigree but we can genotype them at 70 to 100 different mutant sites. The G1 males are breed to make these G3, and all the G2 and G3 mice are genotyped using an instrument called Ion Torrent sequencer. And all of this is done before the mice are distributed for screening. When phenotypic data finally arrived they are uploaded to the computer which immediately calculates a linkage score using dominant additive and recessive models of linkage. And the computer rather than a person determines whether there’s significant phenovariance ascribable to a given mutation. The data are retrievable from a database that continues growing larger and larger and they can be searched according to a number of different parameters. Let me give you a quick example of how this works. We had a certain pedigree which is named for the G1 ear-tag number R0491. And in this pedigree some of the mice were small and some were of normal size. The small ones were named “Teeny” and there were 9 designated as affected and there were 39 designated as unaffected. In that pedigree there were 68 candidate mutations. The Ion Torrent sequencer is used to genotype all of the mice of the pedigree, and it was used up front in this case as I described. The output of data from the Ion Torrent are red where you might have different mice across the top and you would have all the different mutations going up and down along the y-axis. So I'm only showing you a part of the table. What we are looking at here is the number of variant cause, of a reference cause. So these would be homozygous variant of a particular mutation. This mouse would be at that same mutation site homozygous reference alleles and this would be a heterozygous. The extended table I’ll show you in a moment. But just so you don’t have any doubt about the accuracy of the cause. We get very clear separation between reference homozygous, heterozygous and variant homozygous cause. There’s practically no ambiguity in a pedigree like that. The computer arrays all the data using the same colour coding I'm showing you here. So across the top we have all of the mice in the pedigree in this orientation. We have all the mutations and you can see all the three colours of variant reference and heterozygous cause. And more or less in the blink of an eye the computer plots three curves. These are Manhattan plots for those of you who aren’t familiar with them. The negative log of the probability of linkage is shown along this axis. It’s a log scale of linkage, much like a log score, though not exactly the same definition. And we see very quickly that by an additive model we get the very highest score by recessive, the same peak shows up. And even using a dominant model we show some effect, although much weaker than with the recessive. So this is an additive phenotype, the mutation on chromosome 6 protein called Kbtbd2 appears to be responsible for the diminutive phenotype of these mice. This is a gene about which nothing had ever been published and it codes for a ubiquitin ligase. It’s still not clear to use exactly why it’s required for the mice to grow normally but clearly it is. Now we have only had this new system for a rather short time. And I'm going to show you some statistics that are based only on a few months of screening. As of last week, as I was preparing this talk, we had a collection of 12,852 allelic variants that fell into 8,112 genes. And those were created and tested in phenotypic screening of 9,848 mice from 212 pedigrees. Among the allelic variance were a 1,007 probable null alleles that fell into 950 genes. The null alleles were tested once in the homozygous form for 616 of the genes. Twice for 502 of the genes and three times for 421 genes. Now we generally consider that having assayed the phenotype three times for a particular mutation is quite robust. We have 40 screens in our repertoire but not every mouse was subjected to all 40 screens. On average 31 phenotypic assays were performed per mouse. And so we are looking at 311,701 assays that were performed in all on this collection of mice. A total of 256,754 individual tests of linkage were performed on the 8,112 genes. And a total of 2,829,932 records result from those tests of linkage, and I’ll make it a little clearer what are record is. Essentially it involves a single Manhattan plot on one set of data from a pedigree. But that can be done according to many different models. Now all of this has to be organised in a computer of course and it has to be queried. And we’ve devised a console that you can see here, whereby we can investigate using no specific criteria. Or we can look by gene, or by screen, or by pedigree, or by the phenotype name that we assign on seeing a particular phenotype. We can filter by the allele, be it a non-sense, miss-sense, make sense, critical splicing or non-critical splicing, or by the predicted effect of any mutation. We can also specify the number of times that we see a particular mutation in the homozygous state or heterozygous state. And we can set the P-value cutoff for linkage so we ignore things that are weakly linked and we can apply or not apply a Bonferroni correction. We can also look at lethals, we can also insist that we see both raw and normalised assay data, agreeing in order to look at the mutation of interest. Let’s look at the DSS screen and see how that turned out. Not all of those mice were screened with DSS. But some of them were and they were screened both at day 7 and at day 10. So we can enter those. We look at three mice that were homozygous for the variant alleles. We set a very stringent P-value cutoff of 0.002 with Bonferroni correction and don’t consider anything other than that. And we only display results if we see both raw and normalised data. And then we click, I guess, submit it says. Here are the data that come back to us. We have a list of pedigrees by G1 number and within pedigrees genes that scored positively. We know that a total of 14 genes are implicated but they have been implicated in many different tests and that’s why you see them over and over. This is only one page of the display. These genes are represented in 15 different alleles and they come from 7 pedigrees that contained a total of 168 mice. So you can look down the list and you see which genes were implicated. Hr is one of them stands for Hairless. Htr2a is another that’s closely linked and you would see perhaps others down the list. You see in additive and recessive and dominant models what the linkage score is. And you might peruse the list and you find one that looks very strong. If you click on it you immediately get a Manhattan plot and there you see the linkage. You see that there are two closely linked genes that qualify by this criterion as being candidates that cause the phenotype. If you left click on one of them then you immediately see what the mutation is, it’s all been pre-calculated. You see also a lot of other information about the gene, its domain structure, where the mutation is what it score is in a polythane assessment of damage. If you left click on that same site you immediately see the raw data that went into the assessment. You find that variant homozygotes for this particular mutation perform in this way. In the phenotypic assessment they lose more weight than heterozygotes or wild types at that locus. And this is a collection of wild type mice random controls in parallel. So this is a very robust mutation, in fact we know that its true from having looked at multiple alleles, the hairless gene does cause susceptibility to dextra and sodium sulphate. There were seven linkage assignments made, and here I simply show you the others. Largo is a mutation in Degs2 which is an enzyme that makes phytoceramide that may have immunologic activity in the gut. Myo1d is an unconventional myosin that was found in two different pedigrees and was named Horton and Whisper in those two. Gilberto is a mutation in Hsd11b2 which is an enzyme needed for glucocorticoid synthesis. Nlrp4d was implicated by the Snoop phenotype. And Stromberg is a peculiar example of increased resistance which is also picked up by the computer. It scores there as you see and all of these actually turn out to be correct. Now the question might be how much damage did we do to the genome here? We know that there were, without any stringency applied, exactly 3,628 mutant alleles of 3,037 genes tested among 1,447 G3 mice that were subjected to the screen. And there were 79 probably null alleles in 79 genes. If we want to be a little bit more relaxed about what damage it might be we could say that there were 581 probably null or probably damaging alleles of 558 genes. We know that looking only at null alleles and saying that that’s the only damage that occurred is too stringent. We know that looking at probably null or probably damaging is too relaxed a criterion. And the true amount of damage falls somewhere between those two points. So I would say that we damage between 0.35% and 2.45% of all the genes in the genome in this small sample. We found 5 genes that scored in DSS sensitivity and that could be taken to mean that there are between 200 and 1,400 target genes in all for that screen. Of course this is subject to quite a bit of error but if we screen a few thousand more mice that will be very much diminished. And all those ambiguities have to be resolved by multiple alleles. Part of our pipeline is to knockout candidate genes using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and at present we make about one knockout every day in the lab. So we are able to keep up with this. Increasingly though we find multiple alleles. For example I showed you we already have two alleles of Myo1d and this will go on more and more as we mutagenize more. We tend to hit things over and over and these are automatically combined by the programme into what we call super pedigrees. These reveal even very weak phenotypic effects as we have more and more mice to use in the analysis. With time most genes will be damaged repeatedly in screening and will have stronger and stronger linkage to go on. If the super pedigree mutations clearly, surely have, truly have a phenotypic effect. I see I'm running short of time here. I want just to point out to you that already with this very limited set of mice and with a few others that we found, a few other mutations found using the blood and guts approach that we used in the old days, we can say that there are mutations that fall into the category of differentiation and development, vesicle trafficking needs, immune sensing and signalling unfolded protein response, water and electrolyte homeostasis and all the others that I’ve written here. So clearly this is a very broad screen, it takes many different aspects of cell biology in order to prevent you from getting colitis if you have damage to the epithelium in that way. I'm going to conclude now because I'm about out of time. I want to thank Emre Turer who is a post-doc in the laboratory for actually running this screen. I want to say also that members of the bio-infra medics team in my lab were crucial in putting the program together. And they’ve made a tool that’s kind of akin to a new sort of microscope. That seems really quite miraculous to me that one can see a phenotype in the morning and within an hour or so know its molecular cause. Thanks very much.

Ich möchte heute in erster Linie über die genetischen Vorgänge bei der Maus sprechen sowie über die großen Fortschritte, die wir gerade in den letzten Monaten erzielt haben, insbesondere wie man Mutationen in Echtzeit ausgehend vom Phänotyp identifizieren kann. Ich werde kurz die bisherige Entwicklung anreißen, die Einzelheiten, die Jules Ihnen gerade eben erläutert hat, jedoch weitestgehend überspringen. Ich möchte aber anmerken, dass das Problem, das Infektionskrankheiten für den Menschen darstellen, seit vielen Jahren die Motivation für unsere Arbeit ist. Jedes Jahr sterben etwa 60 Millionen Menschen, ein Viertel davon an Infektionskrankheiten – auch heute noch. Zwar treten diese Erkrankungen in den sogenannten Industrieländern erheblich seltener auf, dennoch stellen sie überall ein großes Problem dar, insbesondere dort, wo die Menschen keinen freien Zugang zu Antibiotika haben und das Infektionsrisiko höher ist. Eine Besonderheit von Infektionserkrankungen ist, dass unverhältnismäßig häufig junge Menschen daran sterben Aus diesem Grund stellen diese Krankheiten sicherlich den größten Selektionsdruck auf unsere Spezies in jüngster Zeit dar. Wir wissen nicht, wie viele Gene für alle Resistenzmechanismen gegen Infektionen, über die wir verfügen, erforderlich sind, es könnten aber Hunderte oder Tausende sein. Infektionen stellen wahrscheinlich schon seit sehr langer Zeit einen starken Selektionsdruck dar, da sich das gesamte Immunsystem in seiner ganzen Komplexität unter dem Einfluss dieses Drucks entwickelte. Infektionen existieren ungeachtet der Tatsache, dass das Immunsystem selbst eine Gefahr darstellt. Sobald Sie nämlich über ein Immunsystem verfügen, laufen Sie Gefahr, eine Autoimmun- oder chronisch-entzündliche Erkrankung zu entwickeln. De facto tritt bei ca. 12% aller Menschen im Laufe ihres Lebens das eine oder andere Autoimmunproblem auf. Vieles von dem, was wir über das Immunsystem wissen, haben wir anhand natürlich vorkommender Mutationen gelernt Vor vielen Jahren begann ich mich für eine eher unauffällige in der Natur auftretende Infektion zu interessieren, die im C3H/HeJ-Unterstamm von C3H-Mäusen auftrat. Die Existenz dieser Substanz war seit gut 100 Jahren bekannt. Man wusste, dass Endotoxin von gram-negativen Bakterien erzeugt wird, d. h. eine Strukturkomponente dieser Bakterien ist und bei Patienten mit schweren gram-negativen Infektionen zu einer Schädigung der Basalganglien und damit einem Versagen der Motorik führt. Das lernt jeder Medizinstudent. Wir verstanden aber nicht wirklich, wie dieses Molekül funktioniert, und vor allem war bislang kein LPS-Rezeptor identifiziert worden. Um diesen Rezeptor zu finden, näherten wir uns dem Problem auf der genetischen Ebene, da man gemeinhin annahm, dass die C3H/HeJ-Maus einen Rezeptordefekt aufwies. Sämtliche durchgeführten Experimente untermauerten diese These. Nach 5 langen Jahren der Plackerei gelang uns die positionelle Klonierung des defekten Moleküls. Dabei stellten wir fest, dass es sich bei dem Rezeptor um den Toll-ähnlichen Rezeptor TLR 4 handelt. Zum damaligen Zeitpunkt waren in Homologie zum Toll-Protein der Fliege 4 Toll-ähnliche Rezeptoren bekannt. Das positionelle Klonieren war damals sehr schwierig. Zunächst erfolgte eine genetische, dann eine physikalische Kartierung; anschließend wurden die Gene in der entsprechenden Region identifiziert und in diesen Kandidatengenen nach einer Mutation gesucht. Nicht selten benötigte man für die Lösung eines solchen Problems 5 Jahre oder länger. Heute wissen wir aus kristallographischen Arbeiten – das hier stammt aus einem Paper von Jeung Lee aus dem Jahr 2009 – dass LPS bzw. Endotoxin de facto mit TLR 4 sowie einer kleinen, 1999 von Kensuke Miyake entdeckten Untereinheit namens MD2 in direktem Kontakt steht und exakt in eine Art Korb passt, der von diesen Molekülen gebildet wird. Die Folge ist eine Konformationsänderung, die wiederum zu all den Störungen führt, die bei einem endotoxischen Schock auftreten. Darüber hinaus wird eine Schutzreaktion ausgelöst, so dass Tiere, die LPS ausgesetzt sind, eine angeborene Resistenz gegen die sie befallenden Bakterien entwickeln. Man kann von Glück sagen, dass die phänotypische Anomalie der C3H/HeJ-Maus überhaupt entdeckt wurde; das war reiner Zufall. Natürliche Mutationen sind äußerst selten und für die Wissenschaft von großem Wert, werden für gewöhnlich aber nicht bemerkt. Vermutlich enthalten alle üblicherweise verwendeten Mausstämme viele solcher Mutationen, wir wissen nur einfach nicht, welche Raster wir für ihren Nachweis einsetzen könnten. Natürlich kann man eine solche Entdeckung planen, die Initiative ergreifen und Mutationen erzeugen anstatt einfach auf ihr Auftreten zu warten. Solche Mutationen lassen sich anhand phänotypischer Tests nachweisen; dabei untersuchen Sie ein Phänomen, das Sie interessiert, mit Hilfe eines Tests, der Sie interessiert. Genau darin geht es bei Forward Genetics: Man erzeugt nach dem Zufallsprinzip Mutationen, so dass ein Phänotyp entsteht, und sucht dann nach den Mutationen, die zu diesem Phänotyp führen. Der entscheidende Vorteil der Forward Genetics liegt darin, dass sie ergebnisoffen ist und daher oftmals große Überraschungen birgt. Sie hält echte Entdeckungen bereit und stößt einen häufig sogar auf neue Phänomene, derer man sich zuvor gar nicht bewusst war, indem sie nach dem Zufallsprinzip Ausnahmen von der Regel erzeugt. Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, war dieser Weg bei Mäusen historisch gesehen jedoch langsam, kostspielig und äußerst schwierig. Wir haben diesen Ansatz in unserem Labor die letzten 13 Jahre verfolgt. Dabei verwendeten wir das chemische Mutagen Ethylnitrosoharnstoff (ENU), ein Alkylierungsmittel, und verabreichten es männlichen Mäusen; dort löste es in den erzeugten Spermien etwa 70 Codierungsänderungen pro Spermium aus. Zur Konzentrierung von Mutationen, die bei den G1-Nachkommen zu mehr als 100 Codierungsvarianten pro Genom führen, mutagenisierten wir für gewöhnlich, wie hier dargestellt, 2 separate männliche Mäuse. Wir wissen aus Erfahrung, dass bei Verwendung dieses Punktmutagens beinahe alle Phänotypen aus der veränderten Codierung entstehen. Die G1-Mäuse werden mit 6 schwarzen Weibchen gekreuzt, so dass eine große Anzahl von G2-Tieren entsteht und aus der G1-Generation schließlich insgesamt 50 G3-Tiere hervorgehen. Diese Enkel der G1-Mäuse werden bezüglich ihres Phänotyps gescreent; dabei kann der rezessive Phänotyp in dieser Generation nachgewiesen werden. Sämtliche Mäuse weisen Einzelmutationen auf, die zu einer Phänovarianz führen. All diese Einzelmutationen wurden untersucht und mehr oder weniger mühsam aufgeklärt. Sie sehen, dass sich diese Mutationen sowohl vom Aussehen als auch vom Verhalten her vom Wildtyp unterscheiden. Dennoch sind wir natürlich vor allem an den immunologischen Phänotypen interessiert. Hier sehen Sie die Immunphänotypen, die wir im Laufe der Jahre untersucht haben. Wir haben nach der Signalgebung Toll-ähnlicher Rezeptoren gesucht und zahlreiche Varianten gefunden, über die ich heute aber nicht referieren werde. Wir haben uns die adaptive Immunantwort angesehen und uns gefragt, welche Voraussetzungen für eine solche Antikörperreaktion überhaupt gegeben sein müssen. Welche Bedingungen müssen herrschen, damit eine Maus mit einer normalerweise harmlosen Infektion mit dem Mäuse-Zytomegalievirus zurechtkommt? Wir stellten fest, dass manche Mäuse für das Virus anfällig sind und sterben; wir befassten uns aber auch mit dem Problem der Darmhomöostase nach einer Epithelverletzung oder anders ausgedrückt mit der Resistenz gegen entzündliche Kolitis. Diesen Punkt schneide ich jetzt nur kurz an, Sie werden gleich mehr darüber erfahren. Bei diesem Test wird den Mäusen 10 Tage lang über das Trinkwasser 1,4%-iges Dextrannatriumsulfat verabreicht. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein Zellgift, das die Epithelzellen schädigt, was von normalen Mäusen jedoch gut vertragen wird, ohne dass es bei dieser Dosis zu einem Gewichtsverlust kommt. Manche Mäuse leiden jedoch nach Verabreichung von DDS an Durchfall und Gewichtsverlust und sterben. Die Frage, die uns hier interessiert, lautet: Wie lassen sich Verletzungen reparieren, Infektionen eindämmen und die normale Physiologie wiederherstellen? Bei der Beantwortung dieser Frage half uns immer mehr die Technik. Nachdem wir ENU einsetzten, waren die Dinge nicht mehr so schwierig wie zwischen 1993 und 1998, als wir am LPS-Genort arbeiteten. Im Jahr 2002 wurde die Entwurfssequenz des Mäusegenoms veröffentlicht, und es war nicht länger notwendig, nach dem Geninhalt einer bestimmten Region zu suchen oder überhaupt einen Zusammenhang herzustellen. Die hochauflösende Genkartierung war jedoch noch eine Weile lang notwendig. nachdem massiv-parallele Sequenzierungsplattformen zur Untersuchung ganzer Mausgenome entwickelt worden waren. Da dieses nur etwa 2% des gesamten Genominhalts der DNA ausmacht, war die Sequenzierung etwa 50 Mal schneller und 50 Mal kostengünstiger. Wir begannen zu diesem Zeitpunkt sämtliche G1-Mäuse zu sequenzieren, um alle Kandidatenmutationen im Voraus zu ermitteln. So verfahren wir bis zum heutigen Tag. Darüber hinaus konnten wir mit der Archivierung der Mutationen beginnen. Derzeit speichern wir insgesamt 146.000 Mutationen, die eine Veränderung der Codierung zur Folge haben. Sie liegen in etwa 90% aller protein-codierenden Gene der Maus vor und sind bei Bedarf jederzeit abrufbar. Diese Sammlung enthält 11.217 Mutationen, die mutmaßliche Nullallele erzeugen, d. h. vorzeitige Stoppkodone oder Fehler bei wichtigen Spleißnahtstellen (Splice Junctions). Da diese etwa 31% aller Gene betreffen, waren mehr als 30% der Gene sofort unbrauchbar. Die meisten Phänotypen entstehen durch Missense-Fehler, die weitaus häufiger vorkommen als die eben erwähnten Nullfehler. Es ist also sehr wahrscheinlich, dass wir mehr als die Hälfte aller Gene so mutiert haben, dass ein Zustand der Phänovarianz eingetreten ist. Ich möchte bei Ihnen jedoch nicht den Eindruck erwecken, dass wir in unseren Tests das halbe Genom abgedeckt haben; es stimmt nicht, dass alle Mutationen in die homozygote Form überführt oder phänotypisch untersucht wurden, sondern lediglich die von uns archivierten. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt konnten wir damit beginnen, die erzielte Sättigung zu messen – ein entscheidender Schritt. Früher mussten wir fast blind vorgehen; wir wussten nicht, welchen Schaden wir am Genom anrichten würden. Mit Hilfe computergestützter Verfahren, anhand derer sich die genaue Struktur der einzelnen Stammbäume bestimmen lässt, konnten wir berechnen, wie wahrscheinlich es ist, dass die einzelnen G1-Mutationen in zumindest einer Maus homozygot werden. Das Gleiche war für Nullallele möglich, wie die rosafarbene Kurve zeigt, oder für Allele, die wahrscheinlich Schäden verursachen, oder für eine Kombination daraus oder für alle Mutationen. Wenn wir bei der Frage bleiben, wie viele Nullallele wahrscheinlich in die homozygote Form übergegangen sind was einer Sättigung von 7% entspricht. Wir wussten jedoch bereits damals, dass dieser Schätzwert sicherlich zu hoch ist, da viele Nullallele im homozygoten Zustand letal sind. Dies gilt auch für zahlreiche nicht offenkundige Nullallele; sie lassen sich unter keinen Umständen in die homozygote Form überführen und man würde sie bei Wildtyp-Mäusen niemals beobachten. Die Kartierung stellte nach wie vor das Nadelöhr bei unserer Arbeit dar, und als wir damit begannen, in immer größerem Umfang Mutationen zu erzeugen und zu testen, erhielten wir zahlreiche Phänotypen. Umgekehrt musste es aber auch eine Art Lücke geben. Man sprach damals von der Phänotyp-Lücke, was bedeutete, dass nicht genug Phänotypen existierten. Schlussendlich hatten wir aber eher das Gefühl, dass es zu viele Phänoptypen gab und sie die Anzahl der Mutationen, die wir tatsächlich gefunden hatten – das waren Hunderte, aber wir gerieten trotzdem ins Hintertreffen – langsam überstiegen. Das Standardverfahren sah weiterhin so aus, dass wir eine homozygote Mutante mit einem Markerstamm auskreuzten und sie wieder zurückkreuzten. Anschließend phänotypisierten wir die F2-Tiere und genotypisierten sie an verschiedenen Markern im Genom, um die Mutation auf eine bestimmte Region einzugrenzen. Das wurde zum Nadelöhr des gesamten Prozesses. Weiterhin waren wir uns bewusst, dass wir die meisten Mutationen einfach ignorierten. Wir würden die kausative Mutation finden, doch wir verfügten einfach nicht über die Möglichkeiten, Gene soweit auszuschließen, wie wir es für notwendig erachteten. Wer in den letzten 10 Jahren mit positionellem Klonieren beschäftigt war, träumte eher von so etwas wie Google Glasses. Man hätte gerne eine Box mit Mäusen, so wie diese hier, die alle denselben Stammbaum haben. Hier ist der Mutanten-Phänotyp recht offensichtlich – es könnte sich aber auch um einen immunologischen Phänotyp handeln. In jedem Fall würde man gerne diese magische Datenbrille aufsetzen, um zu sehen, welche Mäuse eine Variante sind und welche nicht. Die Brille müsste natürlich noch sehr viel mehr können: Sie müsste uns automatisch und unmittelbar die Art der Mutation anzeigen. Im Falle einer Mutation in SOX10 müsste sie genau erkennen, welches Basenpaar vertauscht bzw. welche Aminosäure verändert ist, in welchem Motiv die Mutation lag und wie sich ggf. die Orthologie beim Menschen darstellt. Vielleicht könnte sie auch noch Strukturdaten liefern. So sah also die Herausforderung aus – wir stellten uns ihr und lösten das Problem schließlich. Ich werde Ihnen zeigen, wie die Sache genau funktioniert. Bei der Ermittlung eines Phänotyps in unserem Labor können wir seinen Ursprung innerhalb einer Stunde ermitteln oder den Phänotyp, ebenfalls innerhalb einer Stunde, als nicht-genetisch verwerfen. Letzteres geschieht nicht aus Frust, sondern weil der Computer uns dazu auffordert! Dies gilt für alle Phänotypen, seien sie sichtbar oder immunologisch, qualitativ, binomisch oder quantitativ. Der Aufwand hierfür hängt nicht von der Anzahl der beobachteten Phänotypen in einem Stammbaum ab; sehr häufig entstehen verschiedene Phänotypen aus einem Stammbaum. Unser neuer Ansatz erlaubt zudem im Vergleich zur Wahrscheinlichkeitsschätzung eine exakte Messung der Sättigung sowie den Ausschluss von Genen und ihre Einbindung in biologische Prozesse auf einem von Ihnen festgelegten Sicherheitsniveau. Wie gehen wir dabei vor? Zunächst einmal werden, wie bereits seit langem praktiziert, alle G1-Mäuse vor der Vermehrung sequenziert und ihr Sperma archiviert. Neu ist, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt Ampliseq Panels nach dem Genotyp sämtlicher Nachkommen der G1-Tiere an allen Mutantenstellen geordnet werden. Wir können es uns nicht leisten, das Exom von 50 Mäusen eines Stammbaums zu sequenzieren, doch wir können an 70 bis 100 verschiedenen Mutantenstellen eine Genotypisierung vornehmen. Die männlichen G1-Tiere werden so gezüchtet, dass diese G3-Generation entsteht, und sämtliche G2- und G3-Mäuse werden mittels eines sogenannten Ion-Torrent-Sequenzierers genotypisiert. All dies geschieht, bevor die Mäuse auf die Tests verteilt werden. Nach Erhalt der phänotypischen Daten werden diese auf den Computer geladen, der mittels additiver, dominanter und rezessiver Verknüpfungsmodelle umgehend einen Verknüpfungsscore berechnet. Es ist also der Computer und nicht der Mensch, der bestimmt, ob eine auf eine bestimmte Mutation zurückführbare signifikante Phänovarianz vorliegt. Die Daten können von einer stets wachsenden Datenbank abgerufen werden und die Suche kann nach einer Reihe verschiedener Parameter erfolgen. Ich möchte Ihnen ein kurzes Beispiel hierfür geben. Wir hatten einen Stammbaum, der nach der G1-Ohrmarkennummer R0491 genannt wurde. In diesem Stammbaum waren manche Mäuse klein, manche normal groß. Die kleinen wurden “Teeny” getauft; 9 von ihnen waren von Mutationen betroffen, bei 39 war dies nicht der Fall. In diesem Stammbaum fanden sich 68 Kandidatenmutationen. Mit dem Ion-Torrent-Sequenzierer lassen sich alle Mäuse eines Stammbaums genotypisieren; auch in diesem Fall wurde er, wie zuvor beschrieben, vorab eingesetzt. Nach Auslesen der vom Sequenzierer ermittelten Daten finden sich im oberen Teil verschiedene Mäuse und Sie sehen die unterschiedlichen Mutationen entlang der y-Achse. Das ist nur ein Teil der Tabelle, und zwar die Anzahl der Mutationen mit Varianten- bzw. Referenz-Ursprung. Das hier sind die homozygoten Varianten bei einer bestimmten Mutation. Diese Maus besitzt an derselben Mutationsstelle ein homozygotes Referenz-Allel, diese hier ein heterozygotes. Die erweiterte Tabelle zeige ich Ihnen gleich. Nur damit Sie die Richtigkeit des Ursprungs nicht bezweifeln In einem solchen Stammbaum gibt es praktisch keine Mehrdeutigkeit. Der Computer sortiert die Daten anhand der hier dargestellten Farbcodierung. Oben sehen Sie sämtliche Mäuse im Stammbaum in dieser Ausrichtung. Wir haben alle Mutationen und Sie können alle drei Farben des Varianten-, Referenz- und heterozygoten Ursprungs erkennen. Es dauert mehr oder weniger nur einen Wimpernschlag, bis der Computer die 3 Kurven anzeigt. Hierbei handelt es sich um Manhattan-Diagramme. Für diejenigen von Ihnen, die damit nicht vertraut sind: Bei diesen Diagrammen ist der negative Logarithmus der Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Verknüpfung entlang dieser Achse dargestellt. Es handelt sich um eine logarithmische Verknüpfungsskala, ähnlich wie ein LOD-Score, wenngleich auch von der Definition etwas abweichend. Es wird schnell deutlich, dass wir im Falle eines additiven Modells den höchsten Score erzielen. Beim rezessiven Modell zeigt sich fast derselbe Peak und selbst bei einem dominanten Modell lässt sich ein Effekt nachweisen, der jedoch erheblich schwächer ist als beim rezessiven Modell. Es handelt sich also um einen additiven Phänotyp; die Mutation auf Chromosom 6, ein Gen namens Kbtbd2, scheint für den geringfügig veränderten Phänotyp dieser Mäuse verantwortlich zu sein. Dieses Gen, zu dem bislang noch keine Publikationen vorliegen, codiert eine Ubiquitinligase. Es ist nach wie vor nicht klar, warum genau das Gen für ein normales Wachstum der Maus notwendig ist; dass es notwendig ist, steht jedoch fest. Wir arbeiteten mit diesem neue System jedoch nur kurze Zeit. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich eine Statistik, die auf den Ergebnissen nur wenige Monate dauernder Tests beruht. Letzte Woche, als ich diesen Vortrag vorbereitet habe, enthielt unsere Sammlung 12.852 Allelvarianten in 8.112 Genen, die nach ihrer Erzeugung anhand eines phänotypischen Screenings bei 9.848 Mäusen aus 212 Stammbäumen getestet wurden. Unter den Allelvarianten befanden sich 1.007 mutmaßliche Nullallele in 950 Genen. Die Nullallele wurden in homozygoter Form einmal für 616, zweimal für 502 und dreimal für 421 dieser Gene getestet. Die dreimalige Untersuchung des Phänotyps für eine spezielle Mutation ist unserer Ansicht nach gut fundiert. Wir verfügen zwar über 40 Tests, doch nicht jede Maus wurde allen 40 Tests unterzogen. Im Schnitt wurden pro Maus 31 Phänotyp-Tests durchgeführt, in dieser Mauspopulation also insgesamt 311.701 Analysen. An den 8.112 Genen erfolgten insgesamt 256.754 einzelne Verknüpfungstests; daraus entstanden insgesamt 2.829.932 Datenprotokolle. Bei diesen Protokollen handelt sich im Wesentlichen um ein einzelnes Manhattan-Diagramm in einem Datensatz eines Stammbaums; es können jedoch auch verschiedene andere Modelle zur Anwendung kommen. All dies erfolgt natürlich mit Hilfe des Computers und muss mit einem Fragezeichen versehen werden. Wir haben eine Konsole entwickelt, die Sie hier sehen können, mit der wir Untersuchungen ohne spezielle Kriterien durchführen können. Wir können auch nach Gen, Raster oder Stammbaum suchen oder nach dem Phänotypnamen, den wir bei Auftreten eines bestimmten Phänotyps vergeben. Wir können nach Allel – Non-Sense, Miss-Sense, Make-Sense, kritischem oder nicht-kritischem Splicing – oder vorhergesagter Auswirkung einer Mutation suchen. Weiterhin können wir bestimmen, wie oft wir eine bestimmte Mutation im homozygoten bzw. heterozygoten Zustand sehen. Außerdem können wir den Cutoff-P-Wert für die Verknüpfung festlegen und auf diese Weise schwache Verknüpfungen ignorieren, und wir können uns für oder gegen die Anwendung einer Bonferroni-Korrektur entscheiden. Wir können uns auch mit den letalen Fällen beschäftigen oder als Voraussetzung festlegen, dass die Rohdaten und normalisierten Daten der Tests übereinstimmen, um uns die fragliche Mutation anzusehen. Werfen wir einen Blick auf den DSS-Tests und schauen wir, wie er ausgefallen ist. Zwar wurden nicht all diese Mäuse mit DSS gescreent, jedoch ein Teil davon (an Tag 7 und Tag 10). Wir können sie also eingeben. Wir sehen hier 3 Mäuse, die bezüglich der Variantenallele homozygot sind. Wir legen einen sehr stringenten Cutoff-P-Wert von 0,002 mit einer Bonferroni-Korrektur fest und lassen alles andere außer Betracht. Wir zeigen auch nur Ergebnisse an, wenn wir sowohl Rohdaten als auch normalisierte Daten sehen. Dann gehen wir auf “Ausführen”. Das sind die Daten, die wir erhalten. Wir haben eine Liste nach G1-Zahl geordneter Stammbäume, und innerhalb der Stammbäume Gene mit positivem Score. Wir wissen, dass insgesamt 14 Gene betroffen sind; sie wurden in viele verschiedene Tests einbezogen, daher tauchen sie immer wieder auf. Das ist nur eine Seite des Displays. Die Gene treten in Form 15 verschiedener Allele auf und stammen aus 7 Stammbäumen mit insgesamt 168 Mäusen. Wenn Sie die Liste von oben nach unten durchgehen, erkennen Sie, welche Gene betroffen sind. Eines davon ist Hr, das steht für 'haarlos'. Ein weiteres Gen ist Htr2a; hier besteht eine enge Verknüpfung. Weiter unten in der Liste finden sich eventuell noch weitere. Man erkennt den Verknüpfungsscore in den additiven, rezessiven und dominanten Modellen. Wenn man bei Durchsicht der Liste einen besonders starken Score findet und ihn anklickt, erscheint sofort ein Manhattan-Diagramm und die Verknüpfung wird sichtbar. Es handelt sich um 2 eng verknüpfte Gene, die entsprechend diesem Kriterium als Kandidaten für die Erzeugung des Phänotyps in Frage kommen. Klickt man eines der beiden Gene mit der linken Maustaste an, erkennt man sofort, um welche Art Mutation es sich handelt; der Computer hat dies bereits berechnet. Es erscheinen darüber hinaus viele weitere Informationen über das Gen, seine Domänenstruktur, den Ort der Mutation und ihren Score in der PolyPhen-Schadensbewertung. Klickt man mit der linken Maustaste auf diese Mutationsstelle, erscheinen sofort die in die Bewertung eingegangenen Rohdaten, und man stellt fest, dass sich homozygote Varianten dieser speziellen Mutation bei der Phänotyp-Bewertung an diesem Genort anders verhalten, d. h. mehr Gewicht verlieren als heterozygote Varianten oder Wildtypen. Hier sehen Sie parallel die Kontrollmäuse vom Wildtyp. Es handelt sich also um eine sehr deutliche Mutation; dies bestätigte sich bei der Untersuchung verschiedener Allele: das Haarlos-Gen bewirkt eine Empfindlichkeit für Dextrannatriumsulfat. Es erfolgten 7 Verknüpfungstests; hier sehen Sie die anderen. Bei Largo handelt es sich um eine Mutation in Degs2, einem Enzym zur Erzeugung von Phytoceramid, das möglicherweise eine immunologische Wirkung im Darm ausübt. Bei Myo1d handelt es sich um ein unkonventionelles Myosin, das sich in 2 unterschiedlichen Stammbäumen findet und dort Horton bzw. Whisper getauft wurde. Gilberto ist eine Mutation in dem für die Glucocorticoidsynthese benötigten Enzym Hsd11b2. Nlrp4d ist am Snoop-Phänotyp beteiligt und bei Stromberg handelt es sich ein typisches Beispiel für eine verstärkte Resistenz; sie wurden ebenfalls vom Computer „entdeckt“. Hier sehen Sie den jeweiligen Score; die Daten wurden später bestätigt. Die Frage ist, welchen Schaden haben wir am Genom angerichtet? Wir wissen – keine Stringenz anwendend –, dass es bei 1.447 G3-Mäusen, die wir dem Test unterzogen haben, bei 3.037 getesteten Genen genau 3.628 Mutantenallele gibt. Bei 79 Genen fanden sich 79 mutmaßliche Nullallele. Wendet man bezüglich des entstehenden Schadens etwas weniger Stringenz an, könnte man sagen, dass bei 558 Genen 581 mutmaßliche Null- bzw. schädigende Allele vorlagen. Wir wissen, dass die Aussage, das Auftreten der Nullallele sei der einzige entstandene Schaden, zu stringent, mutmaßlich null oder mutmaßlich schädigend wiederum als Kriterium nicht ausreichend stringent ist. Das wahre Ausmaß der Schädigung liegt irgendwo dazwischen. Ich würde also sagen, dass 0,35% bis 2,45% aller Gene im Genom dieser kleinen Probe beschädigt sind. Wir fanden 5 Gene mit einem Score bei der DSS-Empfindlichkeit, was bedeuten könnte, dass es insgesamt bei diesem Test 200 bis 1.400 Zielgene gibt. Natürlich besteht hier ein gewisser Fehlerspielraum, testet man jedoch ein paar tausend Mäuse mehr, wird dieser erheblich kleiner. Wie Ihnen vielleicht aufgefallen ist, weisen 4 der 7 Stammbäume mehr als ein Kandidatengen in den Verknüpfungspeaks auf. Diese Mehrdeutigkeiten müssen allesamt anhand multipler Allele gelöst werden. Wir planen daher unter anderem, mit Hilfe des CRISPR/Cas9-Systems Knockout-Kandidatengene zu erzeugen. Aktuell wird in unserem Labor täglich etwa ein solches Gen hergestellt; wir sind also an der Sache dran. Wir finden jedoch immer mehr multiple Allele. Wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, kennen wir bereits 2 Myo1d-Allele, und mit fortschreitender Mutagenisierung werden es immer mehr. Wir erzielen einen Treffer nach dem anderen; sie werden von dem Programm automatisch zu sogenannten Superstammbäumen kombiniert, in denen man auch die schwächsten phänotypischen Auswirkungen erkennt, da wir immer mehr Mäuse testen. Mit der Zeit werden in den Tests die meisten Gene wiederholt geschädigt und müssen daher eine immer stärkere Verknüpfung entwickeln, wenn die Mutationen in den Superstammbäumen tatsächlich eine phänotypische Auswirkung haben. Ich sehe gerade, dass die Zeit knapp wird. Ich möchte nur noch anmerken, dass bereits bei dieser sehr begrenzten Mauspopulation die mit Hilfe unseres früheren Blut/Darm-Ansatzes entdeckten Mutationen in verschiedene Kategorien fallen: Differenzierung und Entwicklung, Vesikeltransport, Immunsensorik und -signalgebung, Reaktion nicht gefalteter Proteine, Wasser- und Elektrolythomöostase und all die anderen, die Sie hier sehen. Es handelt sich also um ein sehr breites Raster, das viele verschiedene Aspekte der Zellbiologie einbezieht und so verhindert, dass Sie im Falle einer derartigen Epithelschädigung eine Colitis entwickeln. Ich möchte nun schließen, da die Zeit fast abgelaufen ist. Ich danke meinem Postdoc Emre Turer für die Durchführung dieses Tests in unserem Labor. Auch die Mitglieder unseres Bio-Inframedics-Teams waren für die Entwicklung des Programms von großer Bedeutung; das von ihnen entworfene Tool ist eine Art neuartiges Mikroskop. Für mich ist das wie ein kleines Wunder: Morgens sieht man einen Phänotyp und eine Stunde später kennt man seinen molekularen Ursprung. Vielen Dank.

Bruce Beutler on his discovery of one of the Toll receptors in mammals
(00:02:17 - 00:03:57)

 

Beutler goes on to talk about current approaches in his laboratory using mice as model organisms, and in particular describes the power of forward genetics, i.e., randomly inducing mutations and then identifying the genes responsible and strategies to examine gut homeostasis in the mouse following injury to the epithelium.

 

Bruce  Beutler (2014) - Deciphering Immunity by Making It Fail

I'd like to talk to you today mostly about the whole process of genetics in the mouse. The mouse is a model organism, and about the great progress that’s occurred just during the last several months in fact. Specifically how we can find mutations now in real time starting with phenotype. I’ll touch briefly on the past. I won’t go over most of the story that Jules just told you but I’ll say that we were motivated in our work for many years by the problem that infectious disease represents in human beings. About sixty million people die each year and about one quarter of those people die of infection, even today. Though it’s must less apparent in what we call the developed world, nonetheless it’s a huge problem everywhere and specifically in places where there isn’t ready access to antibiotics and where the likelihood of infection is greater. There’s something special about the kind of death that infectious disease represents. It’s disproportionately occurring in young people, in people of pre-reproductive age. And because of that fact it’s certainly the greatest selective pressure that’s operated on our species in recent times. We don’t know how many genes are required for the sum total of resistance mechanisms to infection that we have but it could be in the hundreds or in the thousands. Probably infection has been a potent selective pressure for a very long time. Because the whole of the immune system came into existence under the influence of that pressure in it all its complexity. And infection exists notwithstanding the fact that the immune system is dangerous by itself. Once you have an immune system you run the risk of autoimmune or auto inflammatory diseases. In fact about twelve percent of all people will have problems with one kind of autoimmunity or another during their lifetimes. A lot of what we know about the immune system was revealed by naturally occurring mutations. Which taught us what has to happen in order to have a strong immune response. One naturally occurring infection that attracted me from many years ago was a rather subtle one. It was embodied in the C3H/HeJ sub-strain of C3H mice and it was noticed in 1965 that these mice were very selectively resistance to lipopolysaccharide or endotoxin. Something which had been known for nearly a 100 years in terms simply of its existence. It was known that endotoxin was made by gram negative bacteria, was a structural component of gram negative bacteria, and would cause basil motor collapse in human patients who had severe gram negative infections. That’s what every medical student learnt. But it wasn’t well understood how this molecule worked and specifically nobody had identified a receptor for LPS. We took a genetic approach to find that receptor, as everyone believed that the C3H/HeJ mouse had a receptor defect. Every experiment that one could perform supported that view. And after a long tough five years slog we positionly cloned the molecule that was defective in those mice. And found that it was a toll-like receptor, toll-like receptor 4. There being at that time 4 toll-like receptors known by homology with the fly toll protein. Now that was a very difficult effort. In those days positional cloning proceeded through a genetic mapping phase, then physical mapping and then one would identify genes within the critical region. And finally one would look for the mutation within one of those candidate genes. It wasn’t unusual that 5 years or even longer were required to crack a problem like that. Today we know from crystallographic work, and this is from a paper by Jeung Lee from year 2009 that LPS or endotoxin is in fact directly in contact with toll-like receptor 4, and also with a small sub-unit that was identified in 1999 by Kensuke Miyake called MD2. And it fits neatly into a kind of basket made by these molecules. That triggers a conformational change. That in turn triggers all of the derangements that one sees in endotoxic shock. And it also initiates a protective response. So that animals exposed to LPS develop resistance, innate resistance, to the bacteria that are infecting them. It was very lucky that the C3H/HeJ mouse was ever noticed to be phenotypically abnormal. And that was something that occurred just by chance. Natural mutations like that are very rare, very precious and usually they are missed. In fact there may be many of them in all the common mouse strains used but we don’t know just what screens to apply to detect them. It’s possible of course to plan for discovery, to be proactive and create mutations rather than simply waiting for them to occur. And such mutations can be detected by phenotypic screening using a screen that’s of interest to you to probe a phenomenon that’s of interest to you. And this of course is what forward genetics is. It’s making mutations at random to create phenotype, then finding the mutations that cause the phenotype. The huge advantage of forward genetics is that it’s unbiased and so it can create enormous surprises. It yields genuine discovery, it can even introduce you to new phenomenon that you weren’t aware of before all by creating exceptions to the norm at random. But historically in mice it was quite slow, as I’ve pointed out, expensive and just very difficult. In our laboratory for the last 13 years or so we’ve taken this approach. We’ve used a chemical mutagen, ethylnitrosourea, an alkylating agent and we administered it to male mice. Where upon it induces about 70 coding changes per sperm in each sperm produced by that male. And usually the concentrate mutations achieving more than a hundred coding variants per genome in the G1 progeny we mutagenized two separate male mice as shown here. We know from experience that almost all phenotype emanates from coding change when one uses this point mutagen. The G1 mice are crossed to black six females to make a large number of G2 animals and then a total of fifty G3 animals are produced from this G1. These grandchildren of the G1 are what are screened for phenotype and one can detect recessive phenotype in that generation. All of these mice have single mutation problems that lead to pheno-variance. And all of them were tracked down and solved in a more or less arduous fashion. But you can see that all of them look different or act different than the wild type. Yet of course we are mainly interested in immunologic phenotypes. These are the immune phenotypes that we’ve addressed over the years. We’ve looked at toll-like receptors signalling and found many variance there that I won’t talk about today. We’ve looked at the adaptive immune response and asked just what's necessary for an antibody response after all. We’ve asked what's necessary for a mouse to clear normally harmless viral infection by mouse cytomegalovirus. We find exceptional mice that are susceptible and die, and we’ve also looked at the problem of gut homeostasis following epithelial injury. In other words resistance to inflammatory colitis. That I’ll talk about just briefly because I will discuss it more in detail in a moment. This screen is carried out by giving 1.4% dextran sodium sulphate to mice in their drinking water over a period of ten days. This is a cytotoxin that will injure epithelial cells and in normal mice the injury is well tolerated, no weight loss occurs at that dose. But in exceptional mice diarrhoea, weight loss and death followed DSS administration. And the question we are addressing here is what's required to repair injury, contain infection and restore normal physiology? Technology began to help us along the way here. Things weren’t as difficult as between 1993 and 1998 when we worked on the LPS locus, after we began using ENU. In the year 2002 the draft sequence of the mouse genome was published and it was no longer necessary to look for the gene content of a critical region, nor to make context at all. But high resolution mapping was still needed for a time. In 2009 that became unnecessary because massively parallel sequencing platforms came on the scene and it became possible to tackle whole mouse genomes. By 2011, there were means of targeting the mouse exome for sequencing. That was only about 2% of the total genome content of DNA and so it was about fifty times as fast as sequence and fifty times as cheap. And we began at that point to sequence every G1 mouse to find all of the candidate mutations upfront. And that we continue to do to the present day. Furthermore we could begin to archive mutations. At present we’ve collected a total of 146,000 mutations that create coding change. And these reside within about 90% of all the protein encoding genes in the mouse and they are retrievable any time we should need them. In this collection there are 11,217 mutations that create putative null alleles, that is premature stop codons or critical splice junction errors. And these affect about 31% of all genes. So we’ve destroyed more than 30% of all genes outright. The fact is that most phenotype comes from misssensed errors which are much more abundant than these null errors that I talked about. And so it’s very likely that we’ve mutated more than half of all genes to a state of pheno-variance. But I don’t want to leave you with the impression that we’ve covered half the genome in all of our screens. Because it’s not true that all of those mutations were transmitted to homozygosity or studied phenotypically. They are merely the mutations we’ve archived. We could at that point begin to measure the saturation that we'd achieved. And this was always a question, before we were preceding quite blindly. We didn’t know how much damage we had done to the genome. But using computational methods knowing the exact structure of every pedigree, we could calculate the likelihood that every G1 mutation was transmitted to homozygosity in at least one mouse. And we could do this for null alleles as shown by the pink curve or for alleles that were probably creating injury, probably damaging or for a combination of the two, or for all of the mutations. If we stick to the question of how many of the null alleles were likely transmitted to homozygosity, in this case looking at about 13,750 G3 mice in a particular screen, we could say that taking the area under the curve, 1,613 genes were altered in homozygous form, so that would be 7% saturation. But we knew already at that time that this was certainly an overestimate because many null alleles are lethal on the homozygous state. Many non-overt null alleles are as well, and can’t be transmitted to homozygosity under any circumstances, and we would never see them in the wild population of mice. Mapping remained the bottleneck in our work and as we began to mutagenize and screen on a larger and larger scale we did get lots of phenotypes. But there got to be a kind of a gap in reverse. We used to speak of the phenotype gap as meaning there weren’t enough phenotypes. We felt finally that there were too many phenotypes, and they began to exceed the number of mutations that we'd actually found. Which numbered in the hundreds but still we were falling behind. The standard procedure remained that we would outcross a homozygous mutant to a marker strain, back-cross it. And then phenotype the F2 animals and genotype them at markers across the genome to limit the mutation to a critical region. That became the bottleneck in the whole process. Furthermore we were aware that we were simply ignoring most of the mutations. We would find one mutation the causative one but we didn’t have the potential to exonerate genes as we felt we ought to. The dream of positional cloners for the last 10 years has been something akin to google glasses. You’d like to have a box of mice, like this one, let’s say they are all from a single pedigree. Here I’ve made the mutant phenotype rather obvious but it might not be, it might be an immunologic phenotype. In any case you’d like to be able to put on these magical glasses and there on it would point out which mice are variant and which are not. And it would do much more than that, of course. It would automatically and immediately tell you what the mutation was. In this case a mutation in SOX10 it would tell you exactly the base pair change, the amino acid change. It would tell you what motive it was in and what the human ortholog was, if any. Perhaps even give you structural data. Now that was the challenge and we rose to that challenge and we actually have solved it and we can do exactly this. I’ll show you exactly how it works. But I’ll say at present in our laboratory, when a phenotype is recorded, the cause is known within one hour. Or the phenotype is rejected as non-genetic. Also within an hour. Not out of frustration; the computer says to reject it! This applies to all phenotypes whether they are visible or immunological. Whether they are qualitative or binomial or whether they are quantitative. The cost of doing this is independent of the number of phenotypes observed in a pedigree and it’s very common that multiple phenotypes emanated from one pedigree. Our new approach also permits actual exact measurements of saturation rather than any probabilistic estimation. And it permits the exoneration of genes as well as the implication of genes in any biological process to a level of certainty that you specify. So how do we do this? First of all, as we have done for a long time, all the G1 mice are sequenced before breeding and their sperm are archived. But the new point is that at that time Ampliseq panels are ordered to genotype all of the descendants of the G1 at all mutant sites. We can’t quite afford to exome-sequence fifty mice in a pedigree but we can genotype them at 70 to 100 different mutant sites. The G1 males are breed to make these G3, and all the G2 and G3 mice are genotyped using an instrument called Ion Torrent sequencer. And all of this is done before the mice are distributed for screening. When phenotypic data finally arrived they are uploaded to the computer which immediately calculates a linkage score using dominant additive and recessive models of linkage. And the computer rather than a person determines whether there’s significant phenovariance ascribable to a given mutation. The data are retrievable from a database that continues growing larger and larger and they can be searched according to a number of different parameters. Let me give you a quick example of how this works. We had a certain pedigree which is named for the G1 ear-tag number R0491. And in this pedigree some of the mice were small and some were of normal size. The small ones were named “Teeny” and there were 9 designated as affected and there were 39 designated as unaffected. In that pedigree there were 68 candidate mutations. The Ion Torrent sequencer is used to genotype all of the mice of the pedigree, and it was used up front in this case as I described. The output of data from the Ion Torrent are red where you might have different mice across the top and you would have all the different mutations going up and down along the y-axis. So I'm only showing you a part of the table. What we are looking at here is the number of variant cause, of a reference cause. So these would be homozygous variant of a particular mutation. This mouse would be at that same mutation site homozygous reference alleles and this would be a heterozygous. The extended table I’ll show you in a moment. But just so you don’t have any doubt about the accuracy of the cause. We get very clear separation between reference homozygous, heterozygous and variant homozygous cause. There’s practically no ambiguity in a pedigree like that. The computer arrays all the data using the same colour coding I'm showing you here. So across the top we have all of the mice in the pedigree in this orientation. We have all the mutations and you can see all the three colours of variant reference and heterozygous cause. And more or less in the blink of an eye the computer plots three curves. These are Manhattan plots for those of you who aren’t familiar with them. The negative log of the probability of linkage is shown along this axis. It’s a log scale of linkage, much like a log score, though not exactly the same definition. And we see very quickly that by an additive model we get the very highest score by recessive, the same peak shows up. And even using a dominant model we show some effect, although much weaker than with the recessive. So this is an additive phenotype, the mutation on chromosome 6 protein called Kbtbd2 appears to be responsible for the diminutive phenotype of these mice. This is a gene about which nothing had ever been published and it codes for a ubiquitin ligase. It’s still not clear to use exactly why it’s required for the mice to grow normally but clearly it is. Now we have only had this new system for a rather short time. And I'm going to show you some statistics that are based only on a few months of screening. As of last week, as I was preparing this talk, we had a collection of 12,852 allelic variants that fell into 8,112 genes. And those were created and tested in phenotypic screening of 9,848 mice from 212 pedigrees. Among the allelic variance were a 1,007 probable null alleles that fell into 950 genes. The null alleles were tested once in the homozygous form for 616 of the genes. Twice for 502 of the genes and three times for 421 genes. Now we generally consider that having assayed the phenotype three times for a particular mutation is quite robust. We have 40 screens in our repertoire but not every mouse was subjected to all 40 screens. On average 31 phenotypic assays were performed per mouse. And so we are looking at 311,701 assays that were performed in all on this collection of mice. A total of 256,754 individual tests of linkage were performed on the 8,112 genes. And a total of 2,829,932 records result from those tests of linkage, and I’ll make it a little clearer what are record is. Essentially it involves a single Manhattan plot on one set of data from a pedigree. But that can be done according to many different models. Now all of this has to be organised in a computer of course and it has to be queried. And we’ve devised a console that you can see here, whereby we can investigate using no specific criteria. Or we can look by gene, or by screen, or by pedigree, or by the phenotype name that we assign on seeing a particular phenotype. We can filter by the allele, be it a non-sense, miss-sense, make sense, critical splicing or non-critical splicing, or by the predicted effect of any mutation. We can also specify the number of times that we see a particular mutation in the homozygous state or heterozygous state. And we can set the P-value cutoff for linkage so we ignore things that are weakly linked and we can apply or not apply a Bonferroni correction. We can also look at lethals, we can also insist that we see both raw and normalised assay data, agreeing in order to look at the mutation of interest. Let’s look at the DSS screen and see how that turned out. Not all of those mice were screened with DSS. But some of them were and they were screened both at day 7 and at day 10. So we can enter those. We look at three mice that were homozygous for the variant alleles. We set a very stringent P-value cutoff of 0.002 with Bonferroni correction and don’t consider anything other than that. And we only display results if we see both raw and normalised data. And then we click, I guess, submit it says. Here are the data that come back to us. We have a list of pedigrees by G1 number and within pedigrees genes that scored positively. We know that a total of 14 genes are implicated but they have been implicated in many different tests and that’s why you see them over and over. This is only one page of the display. These genes are represented in 15 different alleles and they come from 7 pedigrees that contained a total of 168 mice. So you can look down the list and you see which genes were implicated. Hr is one of them stands for Hairless. Htr2a is another that’s closely linked and you would see perhaps others down the list. You see in additive and recessive and dominant models what the linkage score is. And you might peruse the list and you find one that looks very strong. If you click on it you immediately get a Manhattan plot and there you see the linkage. You see that there are two closely linked genes that qualify by this criterion as being candidates that cause the phenotype. If you left click on one of them then you immediately see what the mutation is, it’s all been pre-calculated. You see also a lot of other information about the gene, its domain structure, where the mutation is what it score is in a polythane assessment of damage. If you left click on that same site you immediately see the raw data that went into the assessment. You find that variant homozygotes for this particular mutation perform in this way. In the phenotypic assessment they lose more weight than heterozygotes or wild types at that locus. And this is a collection of wild type mice random controls in parallel. So this is a very robust mutation, in fact we know that its true from having looked at multiple alleles, the hairless gene does cause susceptibility to dextra and sodium sulphate. There were seven linkage assignments made, and here I simply show you the others. Largo is a mutation in Degs2 which is an enzyme that makes phytoceramide that may have immunologic activity in the gut. Myo1d is an unconventional myosin that was found in two different pedigrees and was named Horton and Whisper in those two. Gilberto is a mutation in Hsd11b2 which is an enzyme needed for glucocorticoid synthesis. Nlrp4d was implicated by the Snoop phenotype. And Stromberg is a peculiar example of increased resistance which is also picked up by the computer. It scores there as you see and all of these actually turn out to be correct. Now the question might be how much damage did we do to the genome here? We know that there were, without any stringency applied, exactly 3,628 mutant alleles of 3,037 genes tested among 1,447 G3 mice that were subjected to the screen. And there were 79 probably null alleles in 79 genes. If we want to be a little bit more relaxed about what damage it might be we could say that there were 581 probably null or probably damaging alleles of 558 genes. We know that looking only at null alleles and saying that that’s the only damage that occurred is too stringent. We know that looking at probably null or probably damaging is too relaxed a criterion. And the true amount of damage falls somewhere between those two points. So I would say that we damage between 0.35% and 2.45% of all the genes in the genome in this small sample. We found 5 genes that scored in DSS sensitivity and that could be taken to mean that there are between 200 and 1,400 target genes in all for that screen. Of course this is subject to quite a bit of error but if we screen a few thousand more mice that will be very much diminished. And all those ambiguities have to be resolved by multiple alleles. Part of our pipeline is to knockout candidate genes using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and at present we make about one knockout every day in the lab. So we are able to keep up with this. Increasingly though we find multiple alleles. For example I showed you we already have two alleles of Myo1d and this will go on more and more as we mutagenize more. We tend to hit things over and over and these are automatically combined by the programme into what we call super pedigrees. These reveal even very weak phenotypic effects as we have more and more mice to use in the analysis. With time most genes will be damaged repeatedly in screening and will have stronger and stronger linkage to go on. If the super pedigree mutations clearly, surely have, truly have a phenotypic effect. I see I'm running short of time here. I want just to point out to you that already with this very limited set of mice and with a few others that we found, a few other mutations found using the blood and guts approach that we used in the old days, we can say that there are mutations that fall into the category of differentiation and development, vesicle trafficking needs, immune sensing and signalling unfolded protein response, water and electrolyte homeostasis and all the others that I’ve written here. So clearly this is a very broad screen, it takes many different aspects of cell biology in order to prevent you from getting colitis if you have damage to the epithelium in that way. I'm going to conclude now because I'm about out of time. I want to thank Emre Turer who is a post-doc in the laboratory for actually running this screen. I want to say also that members of the bio-infra medics team in my lab were crucial in putting the program together. And they’ve made a tool that’s kind of akin to a new sort of microscope. That seems really quite miraculous to me that one can see a phenotype in the morning and within an hour or so know its molecular cause. Thanks very much.

Ich möchte heute in erster Linie über die genetischen Vorgänge bei der Maus sprechen sowie über die großen Fortschritte, die wir gerade in den letzten Monaten erzielt haben, insbesondere wie man Mutationen in Echtzeit ausgehend vom Phänotyp identifizieren kann. Ich werde kurz die bisherige Entwicklung anreißen, die Einzelheiten, die Jules Ihnen gerade eben erläutert hat, jedoch weitestgehend überspringen. Ich möchte aber anmerken, dass das Problem, das Infektionskrankheiten für den Menschen darstellen, seit vielen Jahren die Motivation für unsere Arbeit ist. Jedes Jahr sterben etwa 60 Millionen Menschen, ein Viertel davon an Infektionskrankheiten – auch heute noch. Zwar treten diese Erkrankungen in den sogenannten Industrieländern erheblich seltener auf, dennoch stellen sie überall ein großes Problem dar, insbesondere dort, wo die Menschen keinen freien Zugang zu Antibiotika haben und das Infektionsrisiko höher ist. Eine Besonderheit von Infektionserkrankungen ist, dass unverhältnismäßig häufig junge Menschen daran sterben Aus diesem Grund stellen diese Krankheiten sicherlich den größten Selektionsdruck auf unsere Spezies in jüngster Zeit dar. Wir wissen nicht, wie viele Gene für alle Resistenzmechanismen gegen Infektionen, über die wir verfügen, erforderlich sind, es könnten aber Hunderte oder Tausende sein. Infektionen stellen wahrscheinlich schon seit sehr langer Zeit einen starken Selektionsdruck dar, da sich das gesamte Immunsystem in seiner ganzen Komplexität unter dem Einfluss dieses Drucks entwickelte. Infektionen existieren ungeachtet der Tatsache, dass das Immunsystem selbst eine Gefahr darstellt. Sobald Sie nämlich über ein Immunsystem verfügen, laufen Sie Gefahr, eine Autoimmun- oder chronisch-entzündliche Erkrankung zu entwickeln. De facto tritt bei ca. 12% aller Menschen im Laufe ihres Lebens das eine oder andere Autoimmunproblem auf. Vieles von dem, was wir über das Immunsystem wissen, haben wir anhand natürlich vorkommender Mutationen gelernt Vor vielen Jahren begann ich mich für eine eher unauffällige in der Natur auftretende Infektion zu interessieren, die im C3H/HeJ-Unterstamm von C3H-Mäusen auftrat. Die Existenz dieser Substanz war seit gut 100 Jahren bekannt. Man wusste, dass Endotoxin von gram-negativen Bakterien erzeugt wird, d. h. eine Strukturkomponente dieser Bakterien ist und bei Patienten mit schweren gram-negativen Infektionen zu einer Schädigung der Basalganglien und damit einem Versagen der Motorik führt. Das lernt jeder Medizinstudent. Wir verstanden aber nicht wirklich, wie dieses Molekül funktioniert, und vor allem war bislang kein LPS-Rezeptor identifiziert worden. Um diesen Rezeptor zu finden, näherten wir uns dem Problem auf der genetischen Ebene, da man gemeinhin annahm, dass die C3H/HeJ-Maus einen Rezeptordefekt aufwies. Sämtliche durchgeführten Experimente untermauerten diese These. Nach 5 langen Jahren der Plackerei gelang uns die positionelle Klonierung des defekten Moleküls. Dabei stellten wir fest, dass es sich bei dem Rezeptor um den Toll-ähnlichen Rezeptor TLR 4 handelt. Zum damaligen Zeitpunkt waren in Homologie zum Toll-Protein der Fliege 4 Toll-ähnliche Rezeptoren bekannt. Das positionelle Klonieren war damals sehr schwierig. Zunächst erfolgte eine genetische, dann eine physikalische Kartierung; anschließend wurden die Gene in der entsprechenden Region identifiziert und in diesen Kandidatengenen nach einer Mutation gesucht. Nicht selten benötigte man für die Lösung eines solchen Problems 5 Jahre oder länger. Heute wissen wir aus kristallographischen Arbeiten – das hier stammt aus einem Paper von Jeung Lee aus dem Jahr 2009 – dass LPS bzw. Endotoxin de facto mit TLR 4 sowie einer kleinen, 1999 von Kensuke Miyake entdeckten Untereinheit namens MD2 in direktem Kontakt steht und exakt in eine Art Korb passt, der von diesen Molekülen gebildet wird. Die Folge ist eine Konformationsänderung, die wiederum zu all den Störungen führt, die bei einem endotoxischen Schock auftreten. Darüber hinaus wird eine Schutzreaktion ausgelöst, so dass Tiere, die LPS ausgesetzt sind, eine angeborene Resistenz gegen die sie befallenden Bakterien entwickeln. Man kann von Glück sagen, dass die phänotypische Anomalie der C3H/HeJ-Maus überhaupt entdeckt wurde; das war reiner Zufall. Natürliche Mutationen sind äußerst selten und für die Wissenschaft von großem Wert, werden für gewöhnlich aber nicht bemerkt. Vermutlich enthalten alle üblicherweise verwendeten Mausstämme viele solcher Mutationen, wir wissen nur einfach nicht, welche Raster wir für ihren Nachweis einsetzen könnten. Natürlich kann man eine solche Entdeckung planen, die Initiative ergreifen und Mutationen erzeugen anstatt einfach auf ihr Auftreten zu warten. Solche Mutationen lassen sich anhand phänotypischer Tests nachweisen; dabei untersuchen Sie ein Phänomen, das Sie interessiert, mit Hilfe eines Tests, der Sie interessiert. Genau darin geht es bei Forward Genetics: Man erzeugt nach dem Zufallsprinzip Mutationen, so dass ein Phänotyp entsteht, und sucht dann nach den Mutationen, die zu diesem Phänotyp führen. Der entscheidende Vorteil der Forward Genetics liegt darin, dass sie ergebnisoffen ist und daher oftmals große Überraschungen birgt. Sie hält echte Entdeckungen bereit und stößt einen häufig sogar auf neue Phänomene, derer man sich zuvor gar nicht bewusst war, indem sie nach dem Zufallsprinzip Ausnahmen von der Regel erzeugt. Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, war dieser Weg bei Mäusen historisch gesehen jedoch langsam, kostspielig und äußerst schwierig. Wir haben diesen Ansatz in unserem Labor die letzten 13 Jahre verfolgt. Dabei verwendeten wir das chemische Mutagen Ethylnitrosoharnstoff (ENU), ein Alkylierungsmittel, und verabreichten es männlichen Mäusen; dort löste es in den erzeugten Spermien etwa 70 Codierungsänderungen pro Spermium aus. Zur Konzentrierung von Mutationen, die bei den G1-Nachkommen zu mehr als 100 Codierungsvarianten pro Genom führen, mutagenisierten wir für gewöhnlich, wie hier dargestellt, 2 separate männliche Mäuse. Wir wissen aus Erfahrung, dass bei Verwendung dieses Punktmutagens beinahe alle Phänotypen aus der veränderten Codierung entstehen. Die G1-Mäuse werden mit 6 schwarzen Weibchen gekreuzt, so dass eine große Anzahl von G2-Tieren entsteht und aus der G1-Generation schließlich insgesamt 50 G3-Tiere hervorgehen. Diese Enkel der G1-Mäuse werden bezüglich ihres Phänotyps gescreent; dabei kann der rezessive Phänotyp in dieser Generation nachgewiesen werden. Sämtliche Mäuse weisen Einzelmutationen auf, die zu einer Phänovarianz führen. All diese Einzelmutationen wurden untersucht und mehr oder weniger mühsam aufgeklärt. Sie sehen, dass sich diese Mutationen sowohl vom Aussehen als auch vom Verhalten her vom Wildtyp unterscheiden. Dennoch sind wir natürlich vor allem an den immunologischen Phänotypen interessiert. Hier sehen Sie die Immunphänotypen, die wir im Laufe der Jahre untersucht haben. Wir haben nach der Signalgebung Toll-ähnlicher Rezeptoren gesucht und zahlreiche Varianten gefunden, über die ich heute aber nicht referieren werde. Wir haben uns die adaptive Immunantwort angesehen und uns gefragt, welche Voraussetzungen für eine solche Antikörperreaktion überhaupt gegeben sein müssen. Welche Bedingungen müssen herrschen, damit eine Maus mit einer normalerweise harmlosen Infektion mit dem Mäuse-Zytomegalievirus zurechtkommt? Wir stellten fest, dass manche Mäuse für das Virus anfällig sind und sterben; wir befassten uns aber auch mit dem Problem der Darmhomöostase nach einer Epithelverletzung oder anders ausgedrückt mit der Resistenz gegen entzündliche Kolitis. Diesen Punkt schneide ich jetzt nur kurz an, Sie werden gleich mehr darüber erfahren. Bei diesem Test wird den Mäusen 10 Tage lang über das Trinkwasser 1,4%-iges Dextrannatriumsulfat verabreicht. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein Zellgift, das die Epithelzellen schädigt, was von normalen Mäusen jedoch gut vertragen wird, ohne dass es bei dieser Dosis zu einem Gewichtsverlust kommt. Manche Mäuse leiden jedoch nach Verabreichung von DDS an Durchfall und Gewichtsverlust und sterben. Die Frage, die uns hier interessiert, lautet: Wie lassen sich Verletzungen reparieren, Infektionen eindämmen und die normale Physiologie wiederherstellen? Bei der Beantwortung dieser Frage half uns immer mehr die Technik. Nachdem wir ENU einsetzten, waren die Dinge nicht mehr so schwierig wie zwischen 1993 und 1998, als wir am LPS-Genort arbeiteten. Im Jahr 2002 wurde die Entwurfssequenz des Mäusegenoms veröffentlicht, und es war nicht länger notwendig, nach dem Geninhalt einer bestimmten Region zu suchen oder überhaupt einen Zusammenhang herzustellen. Die hochauflösende Genkartierung war jedoch noch eine Weile lang notwendig. nachdem massiv-parallele Sequenzierungsplattformen zur Untersuchung ganzer Mausgenome entwickelt worden waren. Da dieses nur etwa 2% des gesamten Genominhalts der DNA ausmacht, war die Sequenzierung etwa 50 Mal schneller und 50 Mal kostengünstiger. Wir begannen zu diesem Zeitpunkt sämtliche G1-Mäuse zu sequenzieren, um alle Kandidatenmutationen im Voraus zu ermitteln. So verfahren wir bis zum heutigen Tag. Darüber hinaus konnten wir mit der Archivierung der Mutationen beginnen. Derzeit speichern wir insgesamt 146.000 Mutationen, die eine Veränderung der Codierung zur Folge haben. Sie liegen in etwa 90% aller protein-codierenden Gene der Maus vor und sind bei Bedarf jederzeit abrufbar. Diese Sammlung enthält 11.217 Mutationen, die mutmaßliche Nullallele erzeugen, d. h. vorzeitige Stoppkodone oder Fehler bei wichtigen Spleißnahtstellen (Splice Junctions). Da diese etwa 31% aller Gene betreffen, waren mehr als 30% der Gene sofort unbrauchbar. Die meisten Phänotypen entstehen durch Missense-Fehler, die weitaus häufiger vorkommen als die eben erwähnten Nullfehler. Es ist also sehr wahrscheinlich, dass wir mehr als die Hälfte aller Gene so mutiert haben, dass ein Zustand der Phänovarianz eingetreten ist. Ich möchte bei Ihnen jedoch nicht den Eindruck erwecken, dass wir in unseren Tests das halbe Genom abgedeckt haben; es stimmt nicht, dass alle Mutationen in die homozygote Form überführt oder phänotypisch untersucht wurden, sondern lediglich die von uns archivierten. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt konnten wir damit beginnen, die erzielte Sättigung zu messen – ein entscheidender Schritt. Früher mussten wir fast blind vorgehen; wir wussten nicht, welchen Schaden wir am Genom anrichten würden. Mit Hilfe computergestützter Verfahren, anhand derer sich die genaue Struktur der einzelnen Stammbäume bestimmen lässt, konnten wir berechnen, wie wahrscheinlich es ist, dass die einzelnen G1-Mutationen in zumindest einer Maus homozygot werden. Das Gleiche war für Nullallele möglich, wie die rosafarbene Kurve zeigt, oder für Allele, die wahrscheinlich Schäden verursachen, oder für eine Kombination daraus oder für alle Mutationen. Wenn wir bei der Frage bleiben, wie viele Nullallele wahrscheinlich in die homozygote Form übergegangen sind was einer Sättigung von 7% entspricht. Wir wussten jedoch bereits damals, dass dieser Schätzwert sicherlich zu hoch ist, da viele Nullallele im homozygoten Zustand letal sind. Dies gilt auch für zahlreiche nicht offenkundige Nullallele; sie lassen sich unter keinen Umständen in die homozygote Form überführen und man würde sie bei Wildtyp-Mäusen niemals beobachten. Die Kartierung stellte nach wie vor das Nadelöhr bei unserer Arbeit dar, und als wir damit begannen, in immer größerem Umfang Mutationen zu erzeugen und zu testen, erhielten wir zahlreiche Phänotypen. Umgekehrt musste es aber auch eine Art Lücke geben. Man sprach damals von der Phänotyp-Lücke, was bedeutete, dass nicht genug Phänotypen existierten. Schlussendlich hatten wir aber eher das Gefühl, dass es zu viele Phänoptypen gab und sie die Anzahl der Mutationen, die wir tatsächlich gefunden hatten – das waren Hunderte, aber wir gerieten trotzdem ins Hintertreffen – langsam überstiegen. Das Standardverfahren sah weiterhin so aus, dass wir eine homozygote Mutante mit einem Markerstamm auskreuzten und sie wieder zurückkreuzten. Anschließend phänotypisierten wir die F2-Tiere und genotypisierten sie an verschiedenen Markern im Genom, um die Mutation auf eine bestimmte Region einzugrenzen. Das wurde zum Nadelöhr des gesamten Prozesses. Weiterhin waren wir uns bewusst, dass wir die meisten Mutationen einfach ignorierten. Wir würden die kausative Mutation finden, doch wir verfügten einfach nicht über die Möglichkeiten, Gene soweit auszuschließen, wie wir es für notwendig erachteten. Wer in den letzten 10 Jahren mit positionellem Klonieren beschäftigt war, träumte eher von so etwas wie Google Glasses. Man hätte gerne eine Box mit Mäusen, so wie diese hier, die alle denselben Stammbaum haben. Hier ist der Mutanten-Phänotyp recht offensichtlich – es könnte sich aber auch um einen immunologischen Phänotyp handeln. In jedem Fall würde man gerne diese magische Datenbrille aufsetzen, um zu sehen, welche Mäuse eine Variante sind und welche nicht. Die Brille müsste natürlich noch sehr viel mehr können: Sie müsste uns automatisch und unmittelbar die Art der Mutation anzeigen. Im Falle einer Mutation in SOX10 müsste sie genau erkennen, welches Basenpaar vertauscht bzw. welche Aminosäure verändert ist, in welchem Motiv die Mutation lag und wie sich ggf. die Orthologie beim Menschen darstellt. Vielleicht könnte sie auch noch Strukturdaten liefern. So sah also die Herausforderung aus – wir stellten uns ihr und lösten das Problem schließlich. Ich werde Ihnen zeigen, wie die Sache genau funktioniert. Bei der Ermittlung eines Phänotyps in unserem Labor können wir seinen Ursprung innerhalb einer Stunde ermitteln oder den Phänotyp, ebenfalls innerhalb einer Stunde, als nicht-genetisch verwerfen. Letzteres geschieht nicht aus Frust, sondern weil der Computer uns dazu auffordert! Dies gilt für alle Phänotypen, seien sie sichtbar oder immunologisch, qualitativ, binomisch oder quantitativ. Der Aufwand hierfür hängt nicht von der Anzahl der beobachteten Phänotypen in einem Stammbaum ab; sehr häufig entstehen verschiedene Phänotypen aus einem Stammbaum. Unser neuer Ansatz erlaubt zudem im Vergleich zur Wahrscheinlichkeitsschätzung eine exakte Messung der Sättigung sowie den Ausschluss von Genen und ihre Einbindung in biologische Prozesse auf einem von Ihnen festgelegten Sicherheitsniveau. Wie gehen wir dabei vor? Zunächst einmal werden, wie bereits seit langem praktiziert, alle G1-Mäuse vor der Vermehrung sequenziert und ihr Sperma archiviert. Neu ist, dass zu diesem Zeitpunkt Ampliseq Panels nach dem Genotyp sämtlicher Nachkommen der G1-Tiere an allen Mutantenstellen geordnet werden. Wir können es uns nicht leisten, das Exom von 50 Mäusen eines Stammbaums zu sequenzieren, doch wir können an 70 bis 100 verschiedenen Mutantenstellen eine Genotypisierung vornehmen. Die männlichen G1-Tiere werden so gezüchtet, dass diese G3-Generation entsteht, und sämtliche G2- und G3-Mäuse werden mittels eines sogenannten Ion-Torrent-Sequenzierers genotypisiert. All dies geschieht, bevor die Mäuse auf die Tests verteilt werden. Nach Erhalt der phänotypischen Daten werden diese auf den Computer geladen, der mittels additiver, dominanter und rezessiver Verknüpfungsmodelle umgehend einen Verknüpfungsscore berechnet. Es ist also der Computer und nicht der Mensch, der bestimmt, ob eine auf eine bestimmte Mutation zurückführbare signifikante Phänovarianz vorliegt. Die Daten können von einer stets wachsenden Datenbank abgerufen werden und die Suche kann nach einer Reihe verschiedener Parameter erfolgen. Ich möchte Ihnen ein kurzes Beispiel hierfür geben. Wir hatten einen Stammbaum, der nach der G1-Ohrmarkennummer R0491 genannt wurde. In diesem Stammbaum waren manche Mäuse klein, manche normal groß. Die kleinen wurden “Teeny” getauft; 9 von ihnen waren von Mutationen betroffen, bei 39 war dies nicht der Fall. In diesem Stammbaum fanden sich 68 Kandidatenmutationen. Mit dem Ion-Torrent-Sequenzierer lassen sich alle Mäuse eines Stammbaums genotypisieren; auch in diesem Fall wurde er, wie zuvor beschrieben, vorab eingesetzt. Nach Auslesen der vom Sequenzierer ermittelten Daten finden sich im oberen Teil verschiedene Mäuse und Sie sehen die unterschiedlichen Mutationen entlang der y-Achse. Das ist nur ein Teil der Tabelle, und zwar die Anzahl der Mutationen mit Varianten- bzw. Referenz-Ursprung. Das hier sind die homozygoten Varianten bei einer bestimmten Mutation. Diese Maus besitzt an derselben Mutationsstelle ein homozygotes Referenz-Allel, diese hier ein heterozygotes. Die erweiterte Tabelle zeige ich Ihnen gleich. Nur damit Sie die Richtigkeit des Ursprungs nicht bezweifeln In einem solchen Stammbaum gibt es praktisch keine Mehrdeutigkeit. Der Computer sortiert die Daten anhand der hier dargestellten Farbcodierung. Oben sehen Sie sämtliche Mäuse im Stammbaum in dieser Ausrichtung. Wir haben alle Mutationen und Sie können alle drei Farben des Varianten-, Referenz- und heterozygoten Ursprungs erkennen. Es dauert mehr oder weniger nur einen Wimpernschlag, bis der Computer die 3 Kurven anzeigt. Hierbei handelt es sich um Manhattan-Diagramme. Für diejenigen von Ihnen, die damit nicht vertraut sind: Bei diesen Diagrammen ist der negative Logarithmus der Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Verknüpfung entlang dieser Achse dargestellt. Es handelt sich um eine logarithmische Verknüpfungsskala, ähnlich wie ein LOD-Score, wenngleich auch von der Definition etwas abweichend. Es wird schnell deutlich, dass wir im Falle eines additiven Modells den höchsten Score erzielen. Beim rezessiven Modell zeigt sich fast derselbe Peak und selbst bei einem dominanten Modell lässt sich ein Effekt nachweisen, der jedoch erheblich schwächer ist als beim rezessiven Modell. Es handelt sich also um einen additiven Phänotyp; die Mutation auf Chromosom 6, ein Gen namens Kbtbd2, scheint für den geringfügig veränderten Phänotyp dieser Mäuse verantwortlich zu sein. Dieses Gen, zu dem bislang noch keine Publikationen vorliegen, codiert eine Ubiquitinligase. Es ist nach wie vor nicht klar, warum genau das Gen für ein normales Wachstum der Maus notwendig ist; dass es notwendig ist, steht jedoch fest. Wir arbeiteten mit diesem neue System jedoch nur kurze Zeit. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich eine Statistik, die auf den Ergebnissen nur wenige Monate dauernder Tests beruht. Letzte Woche, als ich diesen Vortrag vorbereitet habe, enthielt unsere Sammlung 12.852 Allelvarianten in 8.112 Genen, die nach ihrer Erzeugung anhand eines phänotypischen Screenings bei 9.848 Mäusen aus 212 Stammbäumen getestet wurden. Unter den Allelvarianten befanden sich 1.007 mutmaßliche Nullallele in 950 Genen. Die Nullallele wurden in homozygoter Form einmal für 616, zweimal für 502 und dreimal für 421 dieser Gene getestet. Die dreimalige Untersuchung des Phänotyps für eine spezielle Mutation ist unserer Ansicht nach gut fundiert. Wir verfügen zwar über 40 Tests, doch nicht jede Maus wurde allen 40 Tests unterzogen. Im Schnitt wurden pro Maus 31 Phänotyp-Tests durchgeführt, in dieser Mauspopulation also insgesamt 311.701 Analysen. An den 8.112 Genen erfolgten insgesamt 256.754 einzelne Verknüpfungstests; daraus entstanden insgesamt 2.829.932 Datenprotokolle. Bei diesen Protokollen handelt sich im Wesentlichen um ein einzelnes Manhattan-Diagramm in einem Datensatz eines Stammbaums; es können jedoch auch verschiedene andere Modelle zur Anwendung kommen. All dies erfolgt natürlich mit Hilfe des Computers und muss mit einem Fragezeichen versehen werden. Wir haben eine Konsole entwickelt, die Sie hier sehen können, mit der wir Untersuchungen ohne spezielle Kriterien durchführen können. Wir können auch nach Gen, Raster oder Stammbaum suchen oder nach dem Phänotypnamen, den wir bei Auftreten eines bestimmten Phänotyps vergeben. Wir können nach Allel – Non-Sense, Miss-Sense, Make-Sense, kritischem oder nicht-kritischem Splicing – oder vorhergesagter Auswirkung einer Mutation suchen. Weiterhin können wir bestimmen, wie oft wir eine bestimmte Mutation im homozygoten bzw. heterozygoten Zustand sehen. Außerdem können wir den Cutoff-P-Wert für die Verknüpfung festlegen und auf diese Weise schwache Verknüpfungen ignorieren, und wir können uns für oder gegen die Anwendung einer Bonferroni-Korrektur entscheiden. Wir können uns auch mit den letalen Fällen beschäftigen oder als Voraussetzung festlegen, dass die Rohdaten und normalisierten Daten der Tests übereinstimmen, um uns die fragliche Mutation anzusehen. Werfen wir einen Blick auf den DSS-Tests und schauen wir, wie er ausgefallen ist. Zwar wurden nicht all diese Mäuse mit DSS gescreent, jedoch ein Teil davon (an Tag 7 und Tag 10). Wir können sie also eingeben. Wir sehen hier 3 Mäuse, die bezüglich der Variantenallele homozygot sind. Wir legen einen sehr stringenten Cutoff-P-Wert von 0,002 mit einer Bonferroni-Korrektur fest und lassen alles andere außer Betracht. Wir zeigen auch nur Ergebnisse an, wenn wir sowohl Rohdaten als auch normalisierte Daten sehen. Dann gehen wir auf “Ausführen”. Das sind die Daten, die wir erhalten. Wir haben eine Liste nach G1-Zahl geordneter Stammbäume, und innerhalb der Stammbäume Gene mit positivem Score. Wir wissen, dass insgesamt 14 Gene betroffen sind; sie wurden in viele verschiedene Tests einbezogen, daher tauchen sie immer wieder auf. Das ist nur eine Seite des Displays. Die Gene treten in Form 15 verschiedener Allele auf und stammen aus 7 Stammbäumen mit insgesamt 168 Mäusen. Wenn Sie die Liste von oben nach unten durchgehen, erkennen Sie, welche Gene betroffen sind. Eines davon ist Hr, das steht für 'haarlos'. Ein weiteres Gen ist Htr2a; hier besteht eine enge Verknüpfung. Weiter unten in der Liste finden sich eventuell noch weitere. Man erkennt den Verknüpfungsscore in den additiven, rezessiven und dominanten Modellen. Wenn man bei Durchsicht der Liste einen besonders starken Score findet und ihn anklickt, erscheint sofort ein Manhattan-Diagramm und die Verknüpfung wird sichtbar. Es handelt sich um 2 eng verknüpfte Gene, die entsprechend diesem Kriterium als Kandidaten für die Erzeugung des Phänotyps in Frage kommen. Klickt man eines der beiden Gene mit der linken Maustaste an, erkennt man sofort, um welche Art Mutation es sich handelt; der Computer hat dies bereits berechnet. Es erscheinen darüber hinaus viele weitere Informationen über das Gen, seine Domänenstruktur, den Ort der Mutation und ihren Score in der PolyPhen-Schadensbewertung. Klickt man mit der linken Maustaste auf diese Mutationsstelle, erscheinen sofort die in die Bewertung eingegangenen Rohdaten, und man stellt fest, dass sich homozygote Varianten dieser speziellen Mutation bei der Phänotyp-Bewertung an diesem Genort anders verhalten, d. h. mehr Gewicht verlieren als heterozygote Varianten oder Wildtypen. Hier sehen Sie parallel die Kontrollmäuse vom Wildtyp. Es handelt sich also um eine sehr deutliche Mutation; dies bestätigte sich bei der Untersuchung verschiedener Allele: das Haarlos-Gen bewirkt eine Empfindlichkeit für Dextrannatriumsulfat. Es erfolgten 7 Verknüpfungstests; hier sehen Sie die anderen. Bei Largo handelt es sich um eine Mutation in Degs2, einem Enzym zur Erzeugung von Phytoceramid, das möglicherweise eine immunologische Wirkung im Darm ausübt. Bei Myo1d handelt es sich um ein unkonventionelles Myosin, das sich in 2 unterschiedlichen Stammbäumen findet und dort Horton bzw. Whisper getauft wurde. Gilberto ist eine Mutation in dem für die Glucocorticoidsynthese benötigten Enzym Hsd11b2. Nlrp4d ist am Snoop-Phänotyp beteiligt und bei Stromberg handelt es sich ein typisches Beispiel für eine verstärkte Resistenz; sie wurden ebenfalls vom Computer „entdeckt“. Hier sehen Sie den jeweiligen Score; die Daten wurden später bestätigt. Die Frage ist, welchen Schaden haben wir am Genom angerichtet? Wir wissen – keine Stringenz anwendend –, dass es bei 1.447 G3-Mäusen, die wir dem Test unterzogen haben, bei 3.037 getesteten Genen genau 3.628 Mutantenallele gibt. Bei 79 Genen fanden sich 79 mutmaßliche Nullallele. Wendet man bezüglich des entstehenden Schadens etwas weniger Stringenz an, könnte man sagen, dass bei 558 Genen 581 mutmaßliche Null- bzw. schädigende Allele vorlagen. Wir wissen, dass die Aussage, das Auftreten der Nullallele sei der einzige entstandene Schaden, zu stringent, mutmaßlich null oder mutmaßlich schädigend wiederum als Kriterium nicht ausreichend stringent ist. Das wahre Ausmaß der Schädigung liegt irgendwo dazwischen. Ich würde also sagen, dass 0,35% bis 2,45% aller Gene im Genom dieser kleinen Probe beschädigt sind. Wir fanden 5 Gene mit einem Score bei der DSS-Empfindlichkeit, was bedeuten könnte, dass es insgesamt bei diesem Test 200 bis 1.400 Zielgene gibt. Natürlich besteht hier ein gewisser Fehlerspielraum, testet man jedoch ein paar tausend Mäuse mehr, wird dieser erheblich kleiner. Wie Ihnen vielleicht aufgefallen ist, weisen 4 der 7 Stammbäume mehr als ein Kandidatengen in den Verknüpfungspeaks auf. Diese Mehrdeutigkeiten müssen allesamt anhand multipler Allele gelöst werden. Wir planen daher unter anderem, mit Hilfe des CRISPR/Cas9-Systems Knockout-Kandidatengene zu erzeugen. Aktuell wird in unserem Labor täglich etwa ein solches Gen hergestellt; wir sind also an der Sache dran. Wir finden jedoch immer mehr multiple Allele. Wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, kennen wir bereits 2 Myo1d-Allele, und mit fortschreitender Mutagenisierung werden es immer mehr. Wir erzielen einen Treffer nach dem anderen; sie werden von dem Programm automatisch zu sogenannten Superstammbäumen kombiniert, in denen man auch die schwächsten phänotypischen Auswirkungen erkennt, da wir immer mehr Mäuse testen. Mit der Zeit werden in den Tests die meisten Gene wiederholt geschädigt und müssen daher eine immer stärkere Verknüpfung entwickeln, wenn die Mutationen in den Superstammbäumen tatsächlich eine phänotypische Auswirkung haben. Ich sehe gerade, dass die Zeit knapp wird. Ich möchte nur noch anmerken, dass bereits bei dieser sehr begrenzten Mauspopulation die mit Hilfe unseres früheren Blut/Darm-Ansatzes entdeckten Mutationen in verschiedene Kategorien fallen: Differenzierung und Entwicklung, Vesikeltransport, Immunsensorik und -signalgebung, Reaktion nicht gefalteter Proteine, Wasser- und Elektrolythomöostase und all die anderen, die Sie hier sehen. Es handelt sich also um ein sehr breites Raster, das viele verschiedene Aspekte der Zellbiologie einbezieht und so verhindert, dass Sie im Falle einer derartigen Epithelschädigung eine Colitis entwickeln. Ich möchte nun schließen, da die Zeit fast abgelaufen ist. Ich danke meinem Postdoc Emre Turer für die Durchführung dieses Tests in unserem Labor. Auch die Mitglieder unseres Bio-Inframedics-Teams waren für die Entwicklung des Programms von großer Bedeutung; das von ihnen entworfene Tool ist eine Art neuartiges Mikroskop. Für mich ist das wie ein kleines Wunder: Morgens sieht man einen Phänotyp und eine Stunde später kennt man seinen molekularen Ursprung. Vielen Dank.

Bruce Beutler on current approaches in his laboratory using mice as model organisms
(00:06:26 - 00:10:07)

 

 Laureate Martin J. Evans, whose Nobel Prize was awarded for work in establishing genetically modified mice as model organisms, points out how large and lucrative the market for mice models is:

 

Sir Martin J.  Evans  (2014) - Inheritance from Teratomas

I'm going to talk to you about the work that has arisen from our studies with teratocarcinomas. Teratocarcinomas are rather peculiar tumours, we’ve just been hearing about tumours but they are very special. Most tumours are a sort of caricature of the tissue they came from. Teratocarcinomas have got lots of different mixed tissues in them, and actually are a caricature of embryonic development. So there, basically there is a developmental system going on in the tumour. So my title embraces three topics, it's really the actual inheritance we can get from them, but really the way that the ideas that came out have provided us with an inheritance. First of all isolation of cell differentiating systems into tissue culture. Embryonal carcinoma cells, the cells directly from the tumour. These cells as I’ll show you will differentiate very nicely and really set everything up for the second discovery which was the embryonic stem cells. Really effectively the same cells but of a much purer origin and therefore usually kariotypically and genomically normal. These cells can after growth in culture go through a chimeric mouse to the germline and breed from them and we can therefore use them as a route to genomic modification in the mouse, experimental mammalian genetics And then finally I want to go on to talk about ideas that are still emerging but emerging very strongly, that because we have new understandings of developmental cells biology we can start to apply this to therapeutic effects. Start to use cells as a means of therapy in human patients. Now I usually rate science by its contributions to our understanding of our world. Actually I was just introduced as from Cardiff. I think I should have dodged that question and said I'm from the biosphere, from that exceedingly thin part of the world which is our home. We are understanding it more and more and it is also more and more threatened. Anyhow, I think that science should be understanding this world. I don’t rate the commercial applications nearly as highly. But last week I had in my inbox an unsolicited email pointing out that there is a huge market in mice models now. Now I think that this is largely arisen from the work with teratocarcinomas. Because when I started out, really, mice were not the preferred model for physiology, for pharmacy. They were too small, rats were the preferred model. Mice had the better genetics but only by a whisker or two, not very good genetics. And the other part of this slide I put up is a second similar promotion that’s going on, suggesting that the global stem cell therapy market is getting up to 330 million. I was actually surprised that that’s quite a bit less than the predicted mouse market at the moment. But you know these things obviously come through and of course these may be completely false predictions, I don’t know. When I started in the late ‘60s, I wanted to do work on developmental biology and experimental embryology. At that time we knew about embryonic induction, the famous Spemann experiments. We had a strong idea that most of the development was a series of interactions. And we knew that after those interactions there was a fairly stable state of cell commitment which we called determination. We distinguished this to some extent from differentiation, you know, over muscle cells and things like that. Because we thought that maybe there was a specific pre-differentiation state but it was still this fixed pathway. Now we knew from the famous experiments of John Gurdon with his cloning of frogs from the nuclei of fully differentiated cells that the nuclei themselves, the nucleic content, was not altered as you got this differential readout. So it was differential readout of m-RNA. m-RNA when I started had been shown in bacterial systems but actually had not yet been isolated or shown in vertebrate cells. And if you like to cast your mind back to an impossible situation: there was no DNA cloning, no sequence, very little genetics, just a few. Mouse was the best, as I said, but there were just a few low sites scattered around the genome that had been put together by careful linkage. And there was of course somatics, L-genetics where you could look at the chromosomes in cell culture. The mouse started to be a good model for developmental biology really from the efforts of these people, particular Andrzej Tarkowski who first of all showed that you could get a whole mouse out of half an embryo, same thing as you can do in frogs. He then showed that, he proposed that the fate of blastomeres, the way that they were able to go into different lineages, was to do with their positional condition in the early embryo, so called inside-outside hypothesis. Beatrix Mintz who’s down on the bottom right here also was working on this and she called it a micro-environmental. And of course they both went on to produce chimaeric mice, mice that were formed from putting together two different embryos. Richard Gardner who we’ll come onto later was at that time very importantly showing that there were numbers of cells in the early mouse embryo that could have complete developmental potential. So the cells, we thought of it like this and there are places where there were clearly dividing. Now that would suggest that there must be populations at some stage in development where the cells still have the capability of going in any direction. But it's not self-evident that those cells will be a proliferating population or indeed a population that we could get into tissue culture. And the way this came about, the way the ideas came, is that this man Leroy Stevens, who was a mouse geneticist dealing with inbred lines of mice, found a particular inbred line where teratocarcinomas, the tumour I mentioned just now, formed spontaneously in the testis. And he did a lot of work showing that these came from germ cells. But they could also come from ectopically transplanted embryos. And he went on to say, in one of his papers following repeated serial transplantations, these tumours have retained their pleomorphic character. Pluripotent embryonic stem cells appear to give rise to both rapidly differentiating cells and others which, like themselves, remain undifferentiated. In other words he said there was a stem cell population that was responsible for all the tissues in the tumour. Here is a section of a teratocarcinoma. Those of you who have ever looked at sections could see this is cartilage, this is bone, that’s a bit of skin, when looked at carefully there’s a bit of virtually everything there. Possibly a few exceptions. Here’s a bit of muscle you can see. But there was also these cells. These cells are recognisable really by analogy with the human teratocarcinomas and the human pathologists had noted that these cells, when seen, was a good index that this was a highly malignant tumour. These are the growing cells and these were called embryonal carcinoma from the human pathologists. Here is Barry Pierce who was the outstanding human pathologist looking at the system. And he did with a student of his a particularly important experiment. He showed that you could clone these tumours from single cells, thus completely proving that there was a pluripotential cell population in them. Now that’s about when I came in, Leroy Stevens kindly sent me stocks of mice bearing tumours which would produce the tumours. And I in my, now I want to point out that I was early post-doc, just like I imagine most of you are. And here I was going for this ambitious project. I in my innocence said, "Well these are tumours, you can grow tumour cells in culture no problem. So I ought to be able to grow them in tissue culture." And indeed I did. Here they are. That’s the paper and here is a little colony of such cells and that’s a teratoma that you can form, that's the test of course, put them back in the mouse and there they are. However, about the same time two very famous scientists were known to have embarked on the same project. This is one of the points I want to make to you: don’t be scared of famous old scientists! This is Boris Ephrussi and Gordon Sato. Also, a little later, two other rather famous scientists both of these Nobel Prize winners, Salvador Luria and François Jacob came into the field. In particular François Jacob came in and set up a huge project using teratocarcinoma cells very much in direct competition with what our little lab was trying to do. Don’t be frightened of Nobel laureates! Now these cells I had in culture, what could they do? They are meant to be developmental, they are going to differentiate, aren’t they. Well how do they differentiate? Well first of all in a tumour we inject them in a mouse, you get a teratocarcinoma, lots of different tissues. No problem. Okay, the other really interesting experiment was done together with Richard Gardner and Julie Papaioannou here. We injected cells from the cultures I was making into the blastocyst of a mouse. This is Richard’s experiment. And when we did that we got chimaeric mice. In other words mice that are made up of cells which are the progeny both of the early embryo and of the tissue culture cells we put in. And here you can see very simply there’s a black coat colour there that’s come from the cells in culture, there are other markers you can see visually in the eye and there’s a number of different coat colour markers you can see, but basically you can’t see very much in the living mouse. But what we did was we used glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme which is present in a number of electrophoretic variants and we could take the mouse, dissect it, or take the mouse embryo, dissect it, run Gpi starch gels and find which variant was there. And that would show us whether it came from our tissue culture cells or whether it came from the mouse. Now we wanted a tissue culture differentiation system. So really the thing to do was to put it, get it working in culture, not in a tumour or in a mouse. And first of all that was a bit resistant but then we discovered, this was with Gail Martin, that either a mass culture allowed to grow up and then plate out onto a solid tissue culture surface, as a plastic plate, would differentiate marvellously. So too if we looked at the individual colonies that would grow with feeder cells, grow them for a long time, the feeder cells, these are inactivated, radiation inactivated, they would die off. And then this little colony would start to differentiate because it was the feeder cells that were preventing it, which were inhibiting the differentiation and indeed allowing the growth. This was really quite a surprise to us. Because up until then we thought that these were tumour cells. Okay they are behaving like embryo cells but they were tumour cells, a bit abnormal, when they went into a teratocarcinoma there were sort of environmental affects to popping off into a cartilage or something else, stochastic odd effects. But suddenly we realised that these cells were behaving just as though they were cells from an early embryo. If you take in my rather bad drawing here this is the edge of a mouse blastocyst. If you cut out the inner cell mass you get a thing like this which is called an embryonic body with cells in the middle and differentiated, I should say undifferentiated cells on the middle, differentiated cells on the outside. And of course that’s exactly what's happening with our tissue culture. Undifferentiated going to a clump and then work like that. They think they are embryo cells. They are of course embryo cells. And here’s actually the section showing it. This is the edge of one of those colonies which is now differentiated, floating embryoid body. On the outside that’s staining for alphafoetoprotein. Here’s an EM, those are the cells with the staining here. So we then knew we could get tumours by transplanting an embryo into a mouse. From those teratocarcinomas we could get cultures. The cells in those cultures would differentiate just like a mouse embryo. They could be put into a mouse embryo, become part of a mouse. The one bit that was missing was, well if these are mouse embryo cells and if we can grow these cells in culture then surely we ought to be able to just grow them from an embryo. That red line was the missing link. It was a missing link for about five years. And numbers of people were trying to get it to work. I wrote a paper saying why doesn’t it work? I won’t go through that in detail now. But the real things that were worrying us - Was there a very short time window? No. Would they differentiate much too fast if we got them? Probably yes. Are they very small in number, have we got to get very good cloning efficiencies? Yes. But it wasn’t until I met Matt Kaufman that we were able to do it. He was very interested in haploid embryos. There were genetic tricks, you can get a mouse embryo to grow for the first four days or so, four or five days, in a haploid condition, in other words only one set of chromosomes. I mentioned earlier that the genetics of the mouse, although coming on was really, it wasn’t there. And one of the ways of going was somatic cell genetics. If we could have cells in culture with only one copy of the chromosomes they would immediately become like yeast, we could just mutate them and see what was happening. So it would have been a lovely thing to do. Now I had been trying to grow cells from these embryos for some time and I couldn't grow the propotent cells or hadn’t until that time. But I was growing other cell types. So I said to Matt, "Yes of course we can do that. You make me the haploid embryo and I’ll grow you some cells from it and we’ll see if we can get haploid cells out." But he didn’t trust me. He was a cautious man and it took him some time. Quite a bit of manipulation to get these embryos growing. And he thought, "Well I’ll give Martin normal diploid embryos to start with as a control. Make sure he really can grow these cells before I entrust my very valuable haploid embryos." So he gave me diploid embryos. He had a technique that he was using in order to get the haploids to grow, to last longer and that was to make large delayed blastocysts, bigger than normal therefore more source cells in them. And lo and behold, it worked. We got cells out almost immediately that were quite recognisable. And remember there had been years and years of growing these embryonic carcinoma cells. I knew exactly what they should look like. I knew exactly what I could stain them with. I knew what cell surface markers they should have etc, etc. It was very clear, once we got them we'd got them. So, I hope this works, this is a complex slide I’ve used often and I’ve been practicing for you and it wasn’t working so well. What about injection into mice? They produced teratomas? Yes. What about the teratomas, they were multiply differentiated? Yes. What about the karyotype, are these now normal? Yes they were. And that’s must better than the embryonic carcinoma cells. Could we single cell clone them? That’s no problem. Did they differentiate in-vitro? Yes they did, very well and very fast. What about trying to make chimaeras? That’s doing it not only with Richard Gardner originally, but now with Liz Robertson and Allan Bradley. Here they are these cells being injected into an early mouse embryo, a blastocyst. And you make a mouse out of it. And the mouse in that case you can see has got quite a few markers. He’s got his eyes, he’s got brown hair which shows the agouti locus, you’ve got the black hair and of course internally, using Gpi markers, it's everywhere. So not only, now those should also be animated, oh hallo, come on then, it should be the same videos, I think it doesn’t like that! These mice, hello mate! These mice, when the males, you can breed from them and here’s an example of a proud father with his litter, all of which have come from sperm that arose from the cells in culture. So we can go through the germline. Now that makes a huge difference. We can now not only have a dozen or so cells in the embryo that could go through into the germ line, but we can grow probably 10^7 in a culture dish quite easily. Any one of which we can clone out and which can go through and go into the germline. That means that we now have the opportunity for mutagenesis, gene targeting whatever. And for genetic selection and selecting out the particular variant that we want. So this then has introduced us to a real genetics, what happens if you change it? I'm running short of time, I notice, I guess, okay, possibly the best method is gene targeting. And I'm hoping that Oliver Smithies here is going to tell you more about that technique. But it's he and Mario Capecchi who, we all share the Nobel prize, and they were the two people who perfected the method of being able to target genes by matching pieces of DNA. And of course I produced the cells. Here’s a bit of genetic code, it actually is brca2. What does it do? We don’t know but if we knock it out it makes mutant mice. Now I want to spend, sorry I'm running short of time I know, but I want to just show you somebody else’s experiment, which really shows that this is genetics, it's not just gene jockeying. Fascinating example, there’s a locus called CD22 which is involved in modulating the effect, inhibiting binding to the B-cell receptor. And therefore it was thought to prevent immune attack on the red cells. And therefore cause, prevent haemolysis. So therefore if it was knocked out you’d expect haemolysis. Here the cells were labelled and this is the life time of their survival in the blood. Those are the wild type, these are the knock out ones. And there’s a positive control. Yes, they are produced. However, the immune system didn’t seem to be up-regulated at all. And, moreover, if you put this back into mice with no B cells or no immunoglobulins exactly the same loss occurred. So it's not immune mediated. How is it mediated? Well if you put the red blood cells and transplant them you can find that here they are, exactly the same - more rapid loss. But that occurs both in a wild type host or in a CD22 mutant host, it's identical. Now, it might suggest that it's cell autonomous and maybe nothing to do with the immune system. And the authors looked at another mutation, another knock-out mouse, and found that that didn’t seem to show the same spleen anomalies, suggesting there’s a more rapid turnover. So they looked at the genetics. Now these mice had been backcrossed onto C57. And so they were now looking, the mutation had been made in the 129 background, so they looked to find the 129 DNA which they thought there would probably be some adventitious mutation in there. There’s the bit of the 129 DNA, but then as they looked at it there was an unknown piece of DNA, neither C57 nor 129. It turns out that this is the bit of DNA which comes from the wild type mouse that’s carrying the Gpi1C locus. I’ve mentioned Gpi to you as our universal marker. The 1C is one which has got more rapid electrotactic mobility and is a very nice general marker because none of our mice or other cells have it in. And so that must be of course the trouble. And in fact Gpi is here and Cd22 is here, only 5 Mbp apart. What they did then was to sequence this unknown piece of DNA, and they found locus, they found there was indeed a point mutation leading to a glycine to arginine change. That of course nicely explains the electrotactic change at the charge. And they also showed that it was only, it was a hypermorph, it's only about 25% active. That’s the reason for their red cell problem. Now, I have just about four minutes left. What about the possibility of gene therapy? We can now, these cells will make any cell you like in culture. Can they be used for regenerative medicine? Can we deliver it? If you have a patient and they need something, can we put it in? Now first thing to think of, what sort of cells would you like stuck into you? Well, you’d want cells that would work, but you’d also want cells that wouldn't have adverse effects, wouldn't be bringing in other infection, and, preferably, that wouldn't be rejected. So you want autologous cells from your own body preferably. Now, that a few years ago looked like a dream scenario. But the advances in cell biology mean that it is absolutely a possible scenario, because we can control cell fates. Yamanaka has shown that he can make IPS cells. Other people have shown that indeed you don’t have to consider just going from an adult cell right back to the embryonic cell. You can actually do trans-differentiation across lineages. So this stability of the differentiated state is now shown, as we always knew it was, to be really a metastable stability. And it can be modulated, so for instance you can also make, that’s another interesting paper, you can make cardiomyosites, beating heart muscle cells from fibroblasts. So it’s a cellular therapeutics, it’s a transplantation. You have to watch the immune rejection and I think that what I call here 'ad hominem' but autologous is our best way forward. Does this now provide us with a fountain of eternal youth? ES cells, human ES cells, made from human embryos have been contentious however IPS cells made from adult less contentious. But both probably allogeneic for any individual patient. But it would be possible to have a whole panel of possible cells prepared, pretested etc, specific precursors. You could equally well go autologous or indeed directly trans-differentiate adult cells. Is it going to be logistically and economically practical? I think it is. I think if you look at the likely cost which is high at the moment, it will still fall within the sort of range of extremely expensive drug treatments. And it will probably be a one-off treatment as opposed to a lifelong treatment. Once again as Barry Marshall said "not liked by drug companies". So we have seen two spin-offs from teratomas at least if not three. I think what the harvest of this is the fundamental knowledge and biological understanding and that the practical applications at the moment are probably early day naive. But we are getting the knowledge which is going to take us forward. It’s up to you people here to do the next generation, please. Good. Thank you very much.

Ich möchte Ihnen heute etwas über die Ergebnisse unserer Teratokarzinom-Studien erzählen. Teratokarzinome sind ziemlich ungewöhnliche Tumore; wir haben vorhin schon etwas über Tumore erfahren, doch diese hier sind sehr speziell. Die meisten Tumore sind eine Art Zerrbild des Gewebes, aus dem sie stammen. Teratokarzinome dagegen bestehen aus vielen unterschiedlichen Geweben und spiegeln damit in gewisser Weise die embryonale Entwicklung wider. Der Tumor beinhaltet also im Grund genommen ein Entwicklungssystem. Der Titel meines Vortrags bezieht sich auf 3 Themenbereiche. Es geht darum, was uns diese Tumore selbst lehren, ab auch welche Schlüsse wir aus unseren Erkenntnissen ziehen können. Da ist zunächst einmal die Isolierung von Zelldifferenzierungssystemen in Gewebekulturen. Embryonale Karzinomzellen, d. h. direkt aus dem Tumor stammende Zellen. Wie Sie nachher sehen werden, differenzieren sich diese Zellen sehr schön und ebneten den Weg für die zweite Entdeckung – embryonale Stammzellen. Hierbei handelt es sich im Prinzip um dieselben Zellen, die jedoch reineren Ursprungs und daher für gewöhnlich karyotypisch und genomisch normal sind. Diese Zellen können nach Züchtung in Kultur in die Keimbahn einer chimären Maus eingebracht werden, die sich dann fortpflanzt. Auf diese Weise lässt sich das Genom der Maus verändern; experimentelle Säugetiergenetik. Schließlich möchte ich Ihnen von unseren sich immer stärker herauskristallisierenden Ideen berichten. Jetzt, wo wir über ein neues Verständnis für die Entwicklungsbiologie der Zellen verfügen, können wir dieses für therapeutische Zwecke nutzen und Zellen als eine Form der Therapie beim Menschen anwenden. Ich bewerte Wissenschaft normalerweise nach dem, was sie zum Verständnis unserer Welt beiträgt. Als ich eben vorgestellt wurde, haben Sie gehört, dass ich aus Cardiff stamme. Ich hätte die Frage besser anders beantwortet und gesagt, dass meine Heimat die Biosphäre ist, diese unglaublich dünne Schicht, in der Leben gedeiht. Wir entwickeln ein stets wachsendes Verständnis für sie, sie ist aber auch immer stärker gefährdet. Jedenfalls bin ich der Ansicht, dass die Wissenschaft zum Verständnis der Welt beitragen sollte. Die kommerzielle Anwendbarkeit halte ich für weitaus weniger wichtig. Letzte Woche fand ich jedoch in meinem Posteingang eine E-Mail, in der mich jemand unaufgefordert darauf hinwies, dass es inzwischen einen riesigen Markt für Mausmodelle gäbe. Dies ist meiner Meinung nach in erster Linie die Folge der Teratokarzinom-Studien, denn zu Beginn meiner Arbeit stellten Mäuse keineswegs das bevorzugte Modell für die Physiologie bzw. Pharmazie dar. Sie waren zu klein, daher wurden Ratten bevorzugt. Die Genetik der Mäuse war zwar ein wenig besser, jedoch nur marginal. Weiter unten auf der Folie sehen Sie, wie ein zweites ähnliches Feld expandiert, nämlich der Markt der globalen Stammzelltherapie, der voraussichtlich auf 330 Millionen wächst. Ich war allerdings überrascht, dass er doch um einiges kleiner ist als der aktuell erwartete Mausmarkt. Aber diese Dinge entwickeln sich offensichtlich so, und natürlich können sich auch die Vorhersagen als völlig falsch erweisen. Als ich Ende der 60er Jahren mit meiner Arbeit begann, wollte ich mich mit Entwicklungsbiologie und experimenteller Embryologie beschäftigen. Damals kannten wir die embryonale Induktion, die berühmten Spemann-Experimente. Wir waren uns ziemlich sicher, dass es sich bei den meisten dieser Entwicklungsprozesse um Wechselwirkungen handelt, und wir wussten, dass die Zelle nach diesen Interaktionen einen relativ stabilen Zustand erreicht, den wir als Determination bezeichneten. Wir unterschieden bis zu einem gewissen Grad zwischen Determination und Differenzierung in Muskelzellen etc., da wir dachten, es könnte noch ein spezieller Vordifferenzierungszustand existieren; der Ablauf war jedenfalls festgelegt. Wir wissen aus den berühmten Experimenten von John Gurdon, der Frösche aus den Zellkernen ausdifferenzierter Zellen klonierte, dass die Zellkerne selbst, ihr Inhalt, durch das differentielle Auslesen nicht verändert werden. Das bedeutet, dass die mRNA ausgelesen wird. Zu Beginn meiner Arbeit war mRNA zwar in Bakteriensystemen bereits identifiziert, in Wirbeltierzellen jedoch noch nicht isoliert bzw. nachgewiesen worden. Stellen Sie sich die unmögliche Situation damals vor: Es existierte keine DNA-Klonierung, keine Sequenz, es gab nur sehr wenig Erkenntnisse bezüglich der Genetik – wie gesagt, die Maus war die beste Möglichkeit – und nur wenige kleine, im Genom verstreute mRNA-Abschnitte waren durch sorgfältige Verknüpfung zusammengefügt worden. Allerdings gab es natürlich die somatische Zellgenetik, mit deren Hilfe man die Chromosomen in einer Zellkultur untersuchen konnte. Die Maus erwies sich, ausgehend von den Bemühungen dieser Leute, insbesondere Andrzej Tarkowski, der als Erster zeigte, dass – genau wie beim Frosch – aus einem halben Embryo eine ganze Maus entstehen kann, als gutes Modell für die Entwicklungsbiologie. Tarkowski war der Ansicht, dass das Schicksal der Blastomere, die Art, wie sie verschiedene Zelllinien ausbilden können, etwas mit ihrer Position im frühen Embryo zu tun hat – die sogenannte Innen-Außen-Hypothese. Beatrix Mintz, die Sie hier unten sehen, arbeitete ebenfalls an diesem Thema; von ihr stammt die Bezeichnung 'Mikroumgebung'. Natürlich erzeugten die beiden auch chimäre Mäuse, d. h. Mäuse aus zwei verschiedenen Embryos. Richard Gardner, auf den ich später noch zurückkommen werde, hatte damals gezeigt, dass das frühe Mausembryo viele Zellen enthält, die das Entwicklungspotential vervollständigen könnten – eine Entdeckung von großer Bedeutung. Die Zellen teilten sich ganz eindeutig an bestimmten Stellen. Das bedeutete, dass es in einem gewissen Entwicklungsstadium Populationen geben muss, in denen die Zellen nach wie vor in der Lage sind, jede erdenkliche Richtung einzuschlagen. Nicht selbstverständlich ist, dass sich diese Zellpopulation vermehrt oder tatsächlich in einer Gewebekultur gezüchtet werden kann. Zu dieser Erkenntnis gelangte man, als dieser Mann, Leroy Stevens, der als Mausgenetiker mit Mäusen aus Inzuchtlinien arbeitete, eine bestimmte Inzuchtlinie entdeckte, bei der sich in den Hoden spontan die zuvor erwähnten Teratokarzinome bildeten. Er wies in aufwendigen Studien nach, dass diese Tumore aus Keimzellen entstehen, aber auch aus ektopisch transplantierten Embryos stammen können. Zudem vertrat er nach wiederholter Durchführung von Transplantationen in einem seiner Artikel die Auffassung, dass diese Tumore ihren pleomorphen Charakter behalten hätten. Aus pluripotenten embryonalen Stammzellen entwickelten sich anscheinend Zellen, die sich rasch differenzierten, und solche, die wie sie selbst undifferenziert blieben. Mit anderen Worten, es existierte nach seiner Aussage eine Stammzellenpopulation, die für all die verschiedenen Gewebe in dem Tumor verantwortlich war. Das hier ist ein Schnitt durch ein Teratokarzinom. Wer von Ihnen schon einmal einen Gewebeschnitt gesehen hat, kann hier Knorpel, hier Knochen und hier ein wenig Haut erkennen. Bei genauem Hinschauen erkennt man, bis auf einige wenige Ausnahmen, von allem etwas. Hier haben wir ein Stück Muskel. Doch da waren auch diese Zellen. Man erkennt sie analog zu den Teratokarzinomen beim Menschen, und die Humanpathologen hatten festgestellt, dass das Vorliegen dieser Zellen ein guter Indikator für einen hochmalignen Tumor ist. Das hier sind die wachsenden Zellen; die Humanpathologen bezeichneten sie als Embryonalkarzinom. Hier sehen Sie Barry Pierce, den herausragenden Humanpathologen, der sich mit dem System beschäftigte. Gemeinsam mit einem seiner Studenten führte er ein besonders bedeutsames Experiment durch. Er zeigte, dass sich diese Tumore aus einzelnen Zellen klonieren lassen, und bewies damit endgültig, dass sie eine pluripotente Zellpopulation enthielten. Jetzt komme ich ins Spiel. Leroy Stevens schickte mir freundlicherweise tumorproduzierende Mäusestämme. Ich war damals erst seit kurzem Postdoc, wie wahrscheinlich die meisten von Ihnen, und sollte nun dieses ambitionierte Projekt verfolgen. In meiner Unschuld sagte ich: "Das sind Tumorzellen, die lassen sich problemlos in Kulturen züchten. Ich sollte in der Lage sein, sie in einer Gewebekultur zu züchten." Und genau das tat ich. Hier sind sie. Das ist das Paper. Sie erkennen eine kleine Kolonie dieser Zellen und das Teratom, das man erzeugen kann. Das hier ist der Test, die Zellen gehen zurück in die Maus, und da sind sie. Es war bekannt, dass sich etwa zur gleichen Zeit zwei sehr renommierte Wissenschaftler anfingen, sich mit demselben Projekt zu befassen. Ich möchte Ihnen eines nahelegen: Haben Sie keine Angst vor berühmten alten Wissenschaftlern! Das hier sind Boris Ephrussi und Gordon Sato. Ein wenig später begannen zwei weitere ziemlich berühmte Wissenschaftler Insbesondere François Jacob startete im direkten Wettbewerb zu dem, was unser kleines Labor zu erreichen versuchte, ein großangelegtes Projekt mit Teratokarzinomzellen. Haben Sie also keine Angst vor Nobelpreisgewinnern! Was konnten nun diese Zellen, die ich in Kultur hatte? Sie sollten sich entwickeln, differenzieren, nicht wahr? Doch wie sieht diese Differenzierung aus? Um einen Tumor zu erzeugen, injizierten wir die Zellen zunächst in eine Maus, so dass ein Teratokarzinom aus vielen verschiedenen Geweben entstand. Kein Problem. Das andere wirklich interessante Experiment führten wir gemeinsam mit Richard Gardner und Julie Papaioannou durch. Wir injizierten Zellen aus den Kulturen, die ich gezüchtet hatte, in die Blastozysten einer Maus. Hier sehen Sie Richards Experiment. Dabei entstanden chimäre Mäuse, d. h. Mäuse, deren Zellen sowohl vom frühen Embryo und als auch den injizierten Gewebekulturzellen abstammen. Hier sehen Sie die schwarze Fellfarbe, die von den Kulturzellen stammt; es existieren noch weitere visuelle Marker in den Augen sowie verschiedene Fellfarbenmarker, doch im Grunde genommen weist die lebende Maus nur wenige Auffälligkeiten auf. Wir arbeiteten mit dem Enzym Glucosephosphatisomerase (GPI), das in einer Reihe elektrophoretischer Varianten vorkommt. Wir sezierten das Mausembryo, führten eine GPI-Stärkegelelektrophorese durch und bestimmten, welche Variante vorlag. Auf diese Weise wussten wir, ob sie von den Gewebekulturzellen oder der Maus stammte. Da unser Ziel ein Differenzierungssystem für Gewebekulturzellen war, mussten wir dafür sorgen, dass dieses System in der Kultur funktionierte, nicht im Tumor oder der Maus. Zunächst erwies sich das Vorhaben als etwas sperrig, doch dann stellten wir – gemeinsam mit Gail Martin – fest, dass man die Zellen einerseits in einer Massenkultur züchten und sie anschließend auf eine feste Gewebekulturunterlage, z. B. eine Kunststoffplatte übertragen kann, wo sie sich wunderbar differenzieren. Man kann aber auch mittels Fütterzellen über längere Zeit einzelne Kulturen züchten und die Fütterzellen dann durch Strahlung inaktivieren, so dass sie absterben. Da es die Fütterzellen sind, die die Differenzierung inhibieren und de facto das Wachstum ermöglichen, kann diese kleine Kolonie erst nach deren Absterben mit der Differenzierung beginnen. Das war eine ziemliche Überraschung für uns, da wir bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt dachten, dass es sich um Tumorzellen handelt. Okay, sie verhalten sich wie Embryonalzellen, doch es waren Tumorzellen, wenn auch ein bisschen ungewöhnliche. Ihre Entwicklung zum Teratokarzinom hatte stochastische Effekte auf die Umgebung, es entstand Knorpel oder anderes Gewebe. Doch plötzlich wurde uns klar, dass sich diese Zellen wie die Zellen eines frühen Embryos verhielten. In dieser etwas simplen Zeichnung von mir sehen Sie hier den Rand eines Mausblastozysten. Schneidet man die innere Zellmasse heraus, erhält man den sogenannten Embryonalkörper mit undifferenzierten Zellen in der Mitte und differenzierten Zellen an der Außenseite. Und genau das geschieht natürlich in unserer Gewebekultur. Undifferenzierte Zellen verklumpen und zeigen dann diese Reaktion. Sie halten sich für Embryozellen. Und sie sind natürlich Embryozellen. Dieser Schnitt zeigt das. Sie sehen hier den Rand einer dieser Kolonien, die zu einem differenzierten, fließenden Embryonalkörper geworden ist. An der Außenseite ist das Alpha-Fetoprotein angefärbt. Das ist eine elektronenmikroskopische Darstellung, Sie sehen hier die Zellen mit der Anfärbung. Wir wussten nun also, dass wir durch Transplantation eines Embryos in eine Maus Tumore erzeugen und aus den Teratokarzinomen Kulturen züchten können. Die Zellen in diesen Kulturen würden sich wie das Mausembryo differenzieren. Sie könnten in ein Mausembryo eingeschleust und so Teil der Maus werden. Eine Kleinigkeit fehlte jedoch noch. Wenn es sich um Mausembryozellen handelt und wir diese Zellen in Kultur züchten können, sollten wir eigentlich in der Lage sein, sie auch direkt aus einem Embryo zu züchten. Die rote Linie war das fehlende Glied. Sie war seit ca. 5 Jahren das fehlende Glied, und zahlreiche Leute versuchten sich daran. Warum scheitern wir an diesem Problem? Ich habe zu diesem Thema ein Paper verfasst, auf das ich an dieser Stelle aber nicht näher eingehen möchte. Uns beschäftigten ganz andere Fragen. Gibt es nur ein sehr kurzes Zeitfenster? Nein. Würden die Zellen nach ihrer Generierung zu rasch differenzieren? Vermutlich ja. Liegen sie nur in einer geringen Anzahl vor, müssen wir daher sehr gute Klonierungseffizienzen erreichen? Ja. Mir gelang die Züchtung der Zellen erst, nachdem ich Matt Kaufman getroffen hatte. Er interessierte sich sehr für haploide Embryos. Es gibt genetische Tricks; man kann ein Mausembryo die ersten 4 oder 5 Tage im haploiden Zustand, d. h. mit nur einem Chromosomensatz züchten. Ich habe vorhin bereits erwähnt, dass man die genetischen Eigenschaften der Maus damals zwar allmählich zu entschlüsseln begann, sie jedoch noch weitgehend unbekannt waren. Eine Möglichkeit war die somatische Zellgenetik. Wenn wir Kulturzellen mit nur einem Chromosomensatz hätten, würden sie umgehend zu Hefezellen werden, und wir könnten sie mutieren und sehen, was passiert. Das wäre eine feine Sache gewesen. Ich hatte seit einer geraumen Weile versucht, Zellen aus diesen Embryos zu züchten, jedoch bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt noch keine präpotenten Zellen gewonnen. Ich züchtete jedoch andere Zelltypen. Also sagte ich zu Matt: "Natürlich können wir das machen. Du lieferst mir das haploide Embryo und ich züchte daraus Zellen. Dann schauen wir, ob sich auf diesem Wege haploide Zellen gewinnen lassen." Doch er traute mir nicht. Er war ein vorsichtiger Mann, und ich brauchte eine Weile, um ihn dazu zu bewegen, diese Embryos zu züchten. Er dachte wohl: "Ich gebe Martin erst einmal normale diploide Embryos als Kontrollen, um sicherzugehen, dass er diese Zellen auch wirklich züchten kann, bevor ich ihm meine wertvollen haploiden Embryos anvertraue." Ich erhielt also diploide Embryos von ihm. Er verfügte über eine bestimmte Technik für ihre Züchtung und die Verlängerung ihrer Lebensdauer; er stellte große zweilagige Blastozysten her, die größer waren als normale Blastozysten und daher mehr Quellzellen beinhalteten. Und siehe da, es funktionierte. Wir erhielten praktisch sofort gut erkennbare Zellen. Vergessen Sie nicht, es hatte Jahre um Jahre gedauert, diese embryonalen Karzinomzellen zu züchten. Ich wusste genau, wie sie aussehen sollten. Ich wusste genau, wie ich sie anfärben konnte. Ich wusste, welche Zellmarker sie aufweisen würden usw. Es war ganz klar: sobald wir sie hatten, hatten wir sie. Ich hoffe, das klappt jetzt. Die Folie ist ziemlich komplex, ich habe sie schon häufiger verwendet. Ich habe sozusagen für Sie geübt, aber sie funktioniert nicht so richtig. Wie steht es mit der Injektion in Mäuse? Entstanden Teratome? Ja. Erfolgte eine Differenzierung in verschiedene Gewebe? Ja. War der Karyotyp jetzt normal? Ja, sogar viel besser als die embryonalen Karzinomzellen. Konnten wir einzelne Zellen klonieren? Kein Problem. Differenzierten sie sich in vitro? Ja, sehr gut und sehr schnell. Wie sieht es mit der Erzeugung von Chimären aus? Ursprünglich hatten wir das mit Richard Gardner gemacht, jetzt stellten wir sie mit Liz Robertson und Allan Bradley her. Hier sehen Sie die in einen frühen Mausembryo, einen Blastozysten injizierten Zellen, aus denen eine Maus entsteht. In diesem Fall weist die Maus einige Marker auf; die Augen, braunes Fell, das auf den Agouti-Locus deutet, schwarzes Fell, und natürlich Merkmale im Körperinneren aufgrund der GPI-Marker. Die hier sollten eigentlich auch animiert sein – hey, los! Das ist eigentlich dasselbe Video…ich glaube, das mag er nicht! Diese Mäuse….hallo Jungs! Züchtet man mit diesen männlichen Mäusen – hier sehen Sie einen stolzen Vater mit seinem Wurf – stammen alle Jungen vom Sperma aus den Kulturzellen ab. Wir durchlaufen also die Keimbahn. Das macht einen großen Unterschied. Heute haben wir nicht nur ein Dutzend Zellen im Embryo, die in die Keimbahn übergehen, sondern können problemlos 10^7 Zellen in einer Petrischale züchten und klonieren, so dass sie in die Keimbahn gelangen. Das bedeutet, dass heute Mutagenese, gezielte Genmodifikation, genetische Selektion usw. möglich sind und wir genau die gewünschte Variante auswählen können. Damit wurden wir also in die echte Genetik eingeführt. Was geschieht, wenn man hier Veränderungen vornimmt? Ich stelle gerade fest, dass die Zeit knapp wird. Also die beste Methode ist das Gene Targeting. Ich hoffe, dass Oliver Smithies Ihnen noch mehr darüber erzählen wird. Er und Mario Capecchi, die mit mir zusammen den Nobelpreis erhalten haben, haben das Verfahren, bei dem Gene anhand passender DNA-Stücke gezielt modifiziert werden können, perfektioniert. Ich habe die Zellen hergestellt. Hier sehen Sie ein Stück vom genetischen Code, brca2. Was ist seine Aufgabe? Wir wissen es nicht; schalten wir das Gen jedoch aus, entstehen Mutantenmäuse. Ich weiß, mir rennt die Zeit davon, aber ich möchte Ihnen noch ein Experiment eines anderen Wissenschaftlers zeigen, das belegt, dass es sich tatsächlich um Genetik und nicht um „Gene Jockeying“ handelt. Ein faszinierendes Beispiel ist ein Genort namens CD22, der den Effekt moduliert, d. h. die Bindung an den B-Zell-Rezeptor inhibiert und auf diese Weise, so die Annahme, einen Immunangriff auf die roten Blutkörperchen und damit eine Hämolyse verhindert. Nach Ausschalten des Gens sollte es zu einer Hämolyse kommen. Die Zellen wurden also markiert; hier sehen Sie die Überlebensdauer im Blut. Das hier ist der Wildtyp, das der Knock-out-Typ, das die Positivkontrolle. Ja, sie werden erzeugt. Das Immunsystem schien jedoch überhaupt nicht heraufgeregelt zu sein. Nach erneutem Einschleusen der Zellen in Mäuse ohne B-Zellen bzw. Immunglobuline trat genau derselbe Verlust auf; er ist also nicht immunvermittelt. Wodurch wird er aber dann vermittelt? Transplantiert man die roten Blutkörperchen – hier sind sie – war der Verlust auch hier beschleunigt; dies ist allerdings sowohl beim Wildtyp-Wirt als auch beim CD22-Mutantenwirt der Fall. Das könnte darauf hindeuten, dass der Vorgang zellautonom ist und unter Umständen nichts mit dem Immunsystem zu tun hat. Die Autoren untersuchten noch eine weitere Knock-out-Maus und stellten fest, dass diese anscheinend nicht dieselben Milzanomalitäten aufwies, was einen schnelleren Turnover nahelegt. Daraufhin wurde die Genetik untersucht. Diese Mäuse waren auf c57 zurückgekreuzt worden, die Mutation befand sich im 129-Hintergrund. Die Autoren versuchten, die 129-DNA zu bestimmen, in der sie eine Zufallsmutation vermuteten. Hier sehen Sie dieses DNA-Stück. Bei der Untersuchung wurde jedoch ein unbekannter DNA-Abschnitt entdeckt, bei dem es sich weder um c57 noch um 129 handelte. Wie sich herausstellte, stammte er von der Wildtyp-Maus mit dem Gpi1C-Locus. Bei GPI handelt es sich ja bekanntermaßen um unseren universellen Marker. da er weder in unseren Mäusen noch in anderen Zellen vorliegt. Hier muss die Ursache des Problems liegen. GPI und CD22 sind lediglich 5 Megabasenpaare voneinander entfernt. Die Autoren sequenzierten das unbekannte DNA-Stück und stellten fest, dass tatsächlich eine Punktmutation Die Autoren zeigten außerdem, dass es sich um ein nur zu etwa 25% aktives hypomorphes Allel handelt. Hierin lag das Problem mit den roten Blutkörperchen begründet. Mir bleiben nur noch rund 4 Minuten. Welche Möglichkeiten bietet die Gentherapie? Mit Hilfe dieser Zellen lassen sich heute alle nur denkbaren Zellen in Kultur erzeugen. Können sie in der regenerativen Medizin eingesetzt werden? Können wir sie zur Verfügung stellen? Können wir Patienten, die eine Behandlung benötigen, solche Zellen transplantieren? Zunächst einmal müssen wir uns überlegen, wie Zellen beschaffen sein sollten, die uns verabreicht werden. Wir möchten natürlich Zellen, die funktionieren, aber auch Zellen, die keine Nebenwirkungen haben oder andere Infektionen auslösen. Da sie vorzugsweise auch nicht abgestoßen werden sollten, sind autologe körpereigene Zellen die beste Wahl. Vor ein paar Jahren wäre das noch ein Traum gewesen, doch aufgrund der Fortschritte in der Zellbiologie, die uns die Kontrolle des Zellschicksals ermöglichen, ist dieses Szenario heute absolut real. Yamanaka gelang es, iPS-Zellen zu erzeugen. Andere Leute haben gezeigt, dass der Weg nicht immer direkt von der adulten zurück zur embryonalen Zelle führen muss, sondern eine Transdifferenzierung über verschiedene Zelllinien hinweg erfolgen kann. Heute ist belegt, was wir immer schon wussten, dass nämlich der differenzierte Zustand tatsächlich metastabil ist und moduliert werden kann. Aus Fibroblasten lassen sich beispielsweise Kardiomyozyten, d. h. aktive Herzmuskelzellen herstellen; das ist ein weiteres interessantes Paper. Es handelt sich also um eine Zelltherapie, eine Transplantation; man muss die Immunabstoßung beobachten. Die autologe Behandlung – 'ad hominem', wie ich zu sagen pflege – ist aber der beste Ansatz. Haben wir damit die Quelle der ewigen Jugend gefunden? Humane ES-Zellen aus menschlichen Embryos sind umstritten, iPS-Zellen aus adulten Zellen dagegen weniger. Die transplantierten Stammzellen sind jedoch in beiden Fällen wahrscheinlich allogen. Dennoch würde man damit über eine ganze Palette an bereits hergestellten bzw. getesteten Zellen, d. h. spezifischen Vorläuferzellen verfügen. Man könnte auch autologe Zellen verwenden oder adulte Zellen direkt transdifferenzieren. Ist das logistisch und ökonomisch machbar? Ich denke schon. Die voraussichtlichen Kosten bewegen sich im Bereich äußerst kostspieliger medikamentöser Behandlungen; im Gegensatz zu einer lebenslangen Therapie handelt es sich dabei jedoch um einen einmaligen Eingriff, was laut Barry Marshall natürlich den Pharmaunternehmen nicht gefällt. Wir haben 2 oder sogar 3 Teratom-Varianten untersucht und dadurch fundamentale Erkenntnisse erlangt und unser biologisches Verständnis vertieft. Wir wissen auch, dass die praktische Anwendung dieses Wissens aktuell noch in den Kinderschuhen steckt. Dennoch erfahren wir immer mehr, was uns vorwärts bringt. Jetzt liegt es an Ihnen, an der nächsten Generation. Vielen Dank.

Martin J. Evans on the lucrative the market for mice models
(00:03:06 - 00:03:50)

 

Man’s best friend, the dog, also holds many advantages as a model organism, not least because they contract many of the same diseases as humans. Harald zur Hausen received his Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2008 for his seminal work on cancer-causing viral infections, and in particular, papilloma viruses. In his lecture at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in 2011, zur Hausen talks about how outbreaks of papilloma in dog kennels in the US led him and his colleagues to develop the first successful vaccination against these viruses.

 

Harald  zur Hausen (2011) - Infections in the Etiology of Human Cancers

Thank you very much it's indeed a great pleasure for me to be here. What I'm planning to do today is neither to talk about something which happens at the beginning of life, nor about something that happens at end of the life but what is happening in between namely acquiring infections. I will talk about a specific set of infections namely those which are linked to cancer. I very briefly review those aspects which are presently known today. And subsequently I plan to talk about a subject in which I never received a formal training, namely epidemiology. Some hints, why and where we suspect that some additional kinds of human cancers might be linked to infections. So let me start out with a summary table, which just says to which extent we presently can deal with infections as a cause of the global picture of cancer development. We can roughly calculate at about twenty-one percent of cancers are linked to infections. Quite a variety of different infections. On parasitic infections like bilharziosis, liver fluke which play an important role in some countries. In fact in Egypt bladder cancer which is due to Schistosoma infections is one of THE major cancers at all. And it's interesting to note that on the global scale it accounts for approximately 1% of those cancers which are linked to infections. And they can be cured relatively, readily, not the cancer but the infections by chemotherapy. But, and this is one of the problems, immediately after clearing, eliminating the parasites it becomes possible subsequently to re-infect the respective patients again with the same agents. That is also true for another very important human carcinogen, a bacterium namely helicobacter pylori which is presently THE major cause of gastric cancer. Where you can cure the patients of helicobacter pylori infection by antibiotics but again soon thereafter re-infection becomes possible. And quite a number of those patients which have had the bacteria eliminated become re-infected subsequently. There's a different category of agents, viruses which account for about two/thirds of the infections linked to cancer. And there are two of them where we presently know that they can be, that you can protect against these types of infections by vaccination. And the major difference here is that we deal here with long lasting protection against re-infection and as we at least in one case know quite clearly and the other case it's highly likely that we can protect against respective forms of cancer. I'll come back to these a little bit later once again. There are a couple of other agents, but we also know that they are linked to cancers. Epstein-Barr virus already discovered in 1965 by Epstein and his colleagues at that time in Bristol. The longest known human tumour virus being responsible for b-cell lymphomas and a couple of other types of tumours, I will not dwell on them in detail. Human herpes virus type 8 which is the agent causing Kaposi's sarcomas, vascular tumours, which occur mainly in AIDs patients or in organ transplant recipients. Merkel cell polyoma virus, a virus which has been only discovered close to three years ago which is an interesting agent. It causes again a condition which of course mainly on the immunosuppression, and which shows a very peculiar mode of interaction with the cancer cells. I may come back to this later on. And a couple of others Hepatitis C an important carcinogen, liver carcinogen in particular here in this region, in Europe and also in the United States, it's an important liver carcinogen. HTLV-1 which is interesting in terms of prevention because the virus is usually acquired from persistently infected mothers who infect their babies via breastfeeding. So if the mothers are known to carry the virus and if they avoid breastfeeding it really limits the spread of the infection and might be really a way in the long run to eradicate this infection which plays a major role in the coastal regions of southern Japan for instance. Human immunodeficiency viruses clearly acting as indirect carcinogens because they induce immunosuppression. And under those conditions of immunosuppression other types of persisting tumour viruses usually arise and may lead to tumours like Epstein-Barr, like human herpes virus type 8 and also the Merkel cell Polyomaviruses. They are in fact then those which we call the direct carcinogens whereas HIV act as indirect carcinogens. This is a slide which I like to show in order to demonstrate a little bit about the mechanisms by which these agents contribute to cancer. It's important to understand it because we've very long latency periods. In some instances up to sixty years after primary infection before cancer develops. For a long time this was one of the obstacles, why it was so difficult to pinpoint an infection to a specific form of cancer. And one aspect which clarified at least to some degree the picture is an Epstein-Barr virus linked to a condition with a complicated name of x-chromosome linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this case the children acquire via the germ line and modification within the x-chromosome and in males, male progeny here, they may develop this syndrome and upon infection by EBV, by Epstein-Barr virus they acquire a rather deadly form of lymphoma which kills them after a couple of months in these cases. The reasons that we have here genetic modification, which regulates specific t-cell response against Epstein-Barr virus the gene has been identified and also functionally clarified. Under those conditions of this inherited change the boys acquire the disease. Now this tells us an important aspect because in all of these cases where we have these long latency periods the infection per se by itself is never sufficient for the malignant transformation. It is necessary in many of these incidents, but not sufficient. And the infected cell has to acquire additional modifications which eventually lead then to cancer development. For instance in the case of cervical cancer we can define at least three types of modifications which have to occur prior to the development of the respective form of cancer. Unless those are occurring there's virus persistence but not the development of cancer there may be more than three but three have been identified by now. The length of the latency period is an indication for the number of additional modifications within the respective cells prior to the development of that form of cancer. Let me very quickly look to the two types of cancers which you can prevent by vaccination. Hepatitis B virus infection responsible for about 80% of the liver cancers in East Asia, Africa. The virus is mainly transmitted similar to the HTLV from persistently infected mothers to the newborn babies. And about 80% of these children become carriers for lifetime. Those are the ones who are at risk, who after 30, 40, 50 or 60 years eventually develop liver cancer. A vaccination against the virus has been developed already in the 1960s. Initially not intended, or 70s, initially not intended to protect against cancer but to protect against the acute consequences of the infection. But interestingly it turned out to be a cancer, effective cancer vaccine. Because in Taiwan for instance since 1984 every newborn child was vaccinated against Hepatitis B virus in order to protect them against the persistent infection, which turned out to be highly successful. About 80% of those children did not develop a chronic Hepatitis B virus infection and now after about slightly more than twenty years in the meantime the first reports which clearly demonstrated the statistically significant protective effect against the development of liver cancer after this kind of vaccination. In a way the first vaccine which prevents cancer, we can clearly state it prevents cancer. What about cancer of the cervix? It was the main topic for us for much more than thirty years by now. Well we know it is the second most frequent cancer in females globally. And the majority of these types of cancers occur in resource-constrained countries. The precursors of this type of cancer also occurred high frequency worldwide, at any other places. But they usually remove, this removal means that there's a large reduction in the incidents of the respective form of cancers. A couple of cancers linked to the same types of infections. These are so-called high risk human papillomavirus infections mainly HPV 16 but also 18 and a couple of others. Cervical cancer is linked to about 100%. Interestingly these types of cancers vulval and penile cancers are only linked to the infection to the more limited degree. It's interesting because these two types of cancers increase dramatically after immunosuppression quite in contrast to cervical cancer which is only marginally increased. And we don't know yet whether these are the HPV negative cases or the positive ones. I think clearly this requires further investigation. Now cancers of the tonsils, of the oropharynx to one-quarter, to one-third are linked to same types of infection as cervical cancer, anal cancers, vaginal cancers and the rare nailbed cancers they are also highly linked to this type of infection. We know that the infection usually persists in an infected woman for instance for about ten months and then 70% of them are able to clear the infection by the new mechanisms. And after two years about 90% clear the infection. But still close to 10% positive. And those are the ones who are at risk for cervical cancer development. I've shown this slide at many other occasions, this was the first model to demonstrate that the vaccine works very well. In the case of papillomavirus infections because kennels in the United States producing Beagles for experimental purposes on a large scale. They had the problem that virtually all of the young puppies developed these ugly papillomas, they persisted for six months and they couldn't sell these dogs during this period of time. We got hold of this DNA of these papillomavirus here, we provided information to the George Town University Group and they prepared a vaccine by expressing the capsid proteins, the major protein of the virus particle in experimental systems. And this was injected into more than fourteen thousand puppies of Beagles. None of them developed papilloma subsequently, whereas all non-vaccinated dogs did. It was a remarkable success story which eventually showed clearly it would work in humans as well, where this major structure protein is expressed either in insect cells or in yeast. And also conditions forming capsomers and also capsid structures. Under those conditions which are really empty shells of the virus produced here and they can be purified and as a basis for the vaccine which is presently available. This is just a summary of the clinical studies which have been conducted, which clearly demonstrates that the vaccines produce high antibody titers. That they persist for prolonged periods of times. We know it now for eight or nine years right now. And in spite of opposing press reports there are no significant side effects observed. In fact from an Australian study we can calculate that there is one allergy against the viral proteins among one hundred thousand vaccines doses which is clearly better result than obtained for many of the vaccines which are presently applied to small children. Now in addition we know today already that we prevent the infection by these types of vaccines against those types which are in the vaccine. And we also prevent the development of cervical, respective cervical precursor lesions. We do not know yet whether it prevents really cancer because it takes as I pointed out before something like 15 to 25 years before cancer develops after infection. And the first vaccine applied about 8 or 9 years ago. Do we have a chance to eradicate these types of infections? Yes, because this infection is restricted to humans. And we can achieve this if we vaccinate globally girls at an age prior to onset of sexual activity. And if you wish to really achieve this we have to vaccinate boys as well if we wish to achieve it in the foreseeable period of time. Indeed if we would only vaccinate boys we probably would have at least the same but probably even better result in preventing cervical cancer than only vaccinating girls. Because of course transmit infection which is virtually exclusively transmitted via sexual contacts. Now let me finish this chapter which although it involved us for a long period of time. And dwell at the end of my talk about some questions which are interesting us presently even more so, where is it worthwhile to look for an infectious etiology. And what I am trying to do now is to go and spoil your appetite for juicy steak or roast beef. Hopefully it will not be too bad for you. Now there are a couple of points which you can raise here. Cancers which are occurring at increased frequency under immunosuppression. We know that in many of these incidents latent tumour virus infections become activated and in those conditions produce cancer. But there are still cancers where we don't know whether they have an infectious etiology. Take thyroid cancer, take renal cancers they are clearly increased under immunosuppression but have not been found yet to be linked to infections. Cancers with reduced incidents of infection, human breast cancer is a best example really because AIDs patients. Patients who receive organ transplants and under immunosuppression they usually have a 15% reduced risk for developing breast cancer in a way contra-intuitive as one may say. But we know in animal examples where the same happens, namely that mouse mammary tumour infections, which are acquired through the milk of the feeding mothers. They infect the lymphocytes and the pyres patches and those lymphocytes start to proliferate very actively. They explode so to speak and produce large quantities of virus, which are released with the activated lymphocytes into the peripheral blood. And the load of the virus apparently is a major risk factor for reaching the mammary gland and leading to the mammary gland cancers. Now if you immunosuppress those mice there's a reduction of the load and under those conditions also reduction of the risk because the lymphocytes are no longer persisting in these patients. What I want to discuss with you briefly are just nutritional cancer risk factors possibly linked to infections and cancer influenced basically be non-tumourogenic infections. And I show you a picture which I've shown at many other occasions but it triggered our interest into this question. Because we do know quite a number of human pathogenic viruses like Polyomaviruses BK and JC which are wildly spread in human populations usually as lifetime infections. EBV and high risk HPV although occasionally carcinogenic in humans it's relatively rare. Adenoviruses which are not carcinogenic in humans, all these viruses cannot replicate in animals. But if you inoculate them into animal systems where they cannot replicate, where they are replication incompetent they are able to cause cancer. And this is an interesting point which of course leads to the converse question namely are some of the domestic animals with which we live in close proximity which are replicating here persisting and in part for lifetime, if they are transmitting to a host where they cannot replicate. They become replication incompetent are they carcinogenic under those conditions? And here is a rather interesting example of cancer of the colon or colorectal cancer because here these cancers have been epidemiologically linked to red meat consumption. There are really a remarkably consistent number of epidemiological reports describing that about 20 ~ 30% of these cancers are linked to the consumption of red meat, particularly beef. Countries with a high rate of consumption, Europe belongs to the same category, they usually have a high rate of colorectal cancer. There are even recent reports that breast cancer is linked to red meat consumption, endometrial and ovarian cancer which shows a similar epidemiology as breast cancer also linked. And even to some degree lung cancer particularly in non-smokers it's much more difficult to evaluate this in smokers. And there are also a couple of reports which are much less consistent in some other kinds of cancers. Let's quickly look at the geographic, at the epidemiology of colorectal cancer here in red sea areas there's a very high risk. Here for breast cancer in dark green the colours don't correspond, but clearly there's a rather remarkable overlap of those regions which show a high risk for breast cancer and a high risk for colorectal cancer. There's the same picture again compared for instance to pancreatic cancer and lung cancer. And there are clearly some areas where there is discordances, at least with these two types of cancers. But relatively concordance between the other two types of cancers. But since 1977 it was suspected that the reasons are known for this effect. Because if you broil, barbecue, roast, grill meat you get a number of chemical compounds in the cooking, in the preparation process formed, which are clearly carcinogenic when inoculated into rodents. And this was obviously a good explanation for the high risk of red meat after consumption for long periods of times. A couple of them are listed here. Now the problem which arose here was already basically visible in the very first publication in 1977 from Sugimura and his colleagues. Because if you roast, grill fish, prepare fish in a similar way the same kinds of carcinogens arise. If you do it with poultry the same kinds of carcinogens occur. Even in some instances at higher concentration than red meat. And this requires some kind of an explanation. Now it's even more specific because if you look into countries where red meat is consumed to a larger degree, let's take say Arabic countries where mainly mutton and lamb and goat meat is consumed the rate is amazingly low of this type of cancer. Pork in China, China doesn't eat, the Chinese don't eat only exclusively pork but it's a major source. The red is more intermediate here and it's most interesting to see, look into the situation in India where basically no beef is being consumed. India is a global leader, the lowest rate of colorectal cancer. And I saw in Calcutta in the pathology department there was one case for the year 2008 of colorectal cancer occurring. Quite amazing for the European pathology departments, what are the explanations? There must be a reason behind it. So it seems to be a specific beef factor. And of course there exists a chance that there might be still undiscovered chemical carcinogens in beef which are not present in white meat. But the other explanation at least for biologists as I am there's a more tempting one, namely that there exists an infectious agents which is relatively thermo-resistant persisting in beef and the beef factor which can be transmitted to humans and may lead to cancer under those developments. If you measure the temperatures in these nicely prepared roast beefs it's about something like 30 ~ 50° C usually. Only in temperatures which quite a number of potentially carcinogenic agents survive very happily without any loss of infectivity as for instance papillomavirus, polyoma type viruses are most likely also slightly more difficult to test also single stranded DNA viruses under these conditions. Polyomaviruses are particularly attractive as well as these ones here because they survive temperatures very easily of 80°C for long periods of time. And we know only one type in cattle but we know of already nine types in humans and it's very likely that others exist. Let me come onto one other point which even seems to stress the situation if you compare Japan and India under those conditions. Japan amazingly enough has a high rate of colorectal cancer. And it's interesting to look into the epidemiology of what happened in Japan in comparison to India. You see some statistics which in Japan have been collected since about 1975, 1980 and you see there's an enormous bias in this cancer. During this period of time you can interpolate that it probably started around '65 or so. In Korea the statistics started later but you see exactly the same thing. What happened in these countries? Well one of the major aspects which happened really was the introduction of large amounts of beef particularly from the United States. The increasing custom and it's a very popular way of eating Shabu-shabu it's a meat fondue in Japan where you dip briefly thin slices of meat into boiling water very quickly if you take it out, they usually take it out after less than one minute and you unfold it and it's still very raw. It's happily consumed. These are correlations, they do not prove anything but it's an interesting point. And they raise the question indeed whether there exists a bovine infectious factor for colorectal cancer which needs to be resolved in the future. Now I have hopefully still a few more minutes, I will finish by talking another aspect because it's quite as interesting, the childhood malignancy leukaemia's. Very briefly only, by pointing out that we have here also an extremely interesting epidemiological situation namely that multiple infections in the first year of life are protective against the development of childhood leukaemias. And under privileged social state, crowded households, many siblings, inverse risk of birth orders, a first born child has a higher risk than subsequent children and so on. Breastfeeding is a protective factor. And conversely here you have a number of risk factors, rare infections, high socioeconomic state, prenatal chromosomal translocations clearly an important factor for the leukaemia development. Yet the same types of locations occur also at a low rate in healthy individuals. So per se they are not sufficient for cancer development. A couple of other points which I will skip for time reasons. If you look into some countries with high level of good well going economy the risk is high whereas in poor populations it's comparatively very low for these types of leukaemias. We tried to develop a kind of speculation what might be the reason for this peculiar phenomenon and suggested that a prenatal infection occurring prior to the time of delivery would lead to infected cells which are propagating after delivery. The number of those cells is increased dramatically and that there is an infectious agent in these cells and it's a load here, might be THE major risk factor for the subsequent development of the leukaemias. Where subsequent infections in the postnatal phase due to the effect that these are mainly respiratory infections which lead to interferon production and antiviral cytokine and under those conditions you get a reduction of the load and a reduction of the risk concomitantly. So if you postulate something like this you have to search for infections first of all which may occur prenatally which probably replicate in the cells from which leukaemias arise. Specific childhood leukaemias arise. And subsequently there should be also quite susceptible to interferon other such infections. The answer is yes. There exists at least one which is fulfilling all these types of criteria and these are so-called TT viruses, anellovirusus as they are called, a mix up with names really. But the interesting aspect is that we are all infected with those agents, carry them in our peripheral blood at this stage. And they replicate in lymphatic and bone marrow cells quite clearly so. It has been shown that patients who are treated with interferon because they are persistently infected with Hepatitis C viruses at the same time reduce drastically the levels of TT viruses and they are acquired as prenatal infections. They occur prenatally at least to a certain percentage they are acquired under those conditions. This is just a summary of what we know about there are more than 100, probably far more than one hundred, genotypes of these viruses they are widely spread in all human populations. Vertical transmission I mentioned. The most interesting aspect here that we mostly frequently, very frequently rearrange the genome in part resulting in autonomously replicated sub-genomic molecules with novel open reading frames. I think this would serve another talk in order to discuss it in more details. And yet a relatively poorly characterised there, episomally persisting single stranded DNA viruses which contain only one region which is highly preserved among all these different genotypes. And in fact we did a large number of studies along these lines which demonstrate first of all that there is some chimeric molecules in tumour cells as well, which show a linkage between this region here and specific cellular sequences which turned out to be extremely interesting. I forgot to mention that there are about 3,800, although there are smaller molecules as well, 2,800 basis here available. And this is now chapter which we do find in leukemic cells in Hodgkin lymphoma cells and also in colorectal cells lines specifically. The persistence of many of these chimeric types of molecules which are present in a large number of them almost uniformly present so far, as far as our experiments tell us right now. But we still do not know the cause of these types of conditions and this requires further investigation and further studies. But these are the people, the team really working mainly on the TT viruses. Ethel-Michele de Villiers who is here in this audience as well, who happens also to be my wife. And a couple others of these ladies here and I think Sylvia Barkosky is also here at this meeting so you may approach her also for some questions which you have. But I feel right now is that we really need to look more carefully also for novel types of mechanisms, by which infectious agents may contribute to human cancer. And you know if we presently can already identify the global burden, 21% of human cancers to these types of infections if it would be true that the malignancies of some hematopoietic system or blood building system and if gastric, sorry not gastric, if colon cancer would be also linked to infections it would immediately jump up to 35% of global cancer burden. And even here gastric cancer counts for something like, sorry colon cancer accounts for something like 20% of the total cancer incidents. So it's an important problem and particularly and I join in with Prof. Blackburn who said it before, if I see all the young students who are working on these issues it's really important to keep your eyes open. It's not a field which has been finished so far, I think it's a field which deserves much more attention. For about thirty years it was difficult to find any kind of interest for these types of agents, right now it's changing fortunately but we need to do more. So thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Dr. Jerwall. Es ist mir in der Tat eine große Freude, hier sein zu können. Dasjenige, worüber ich heute sprechen möchte, hat weder mit dem zu tun, was am Anfang des Lebens, noch mit demjenigen, was an seinem Ende geschieht, sondern handelt von etwas, das in der Zeit dazwischen passiert: von der Tatsache, dass wir uns infizieren. Ich werde über eine bestimmte Gruppe von Infektionen sprechen, nämlich über solche, die mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Ich werde die heute bekannten Aspekte kurz erläutern. Anschließend möchte ich dann über ein Fachgebiet sprechen, in dem ich nie eine formale Ausbildung erhalten habe, nämlich über die Epidemiologie. Ich möchte einige Hinweise darauf geben, warum und in welchen Fällen wir vermuten, dass einige Formen von Krebserkrankungen des Menschen, von denen dies zur Zeit nicht bekannt ist, mit Infektionen zusammenhängen. Lassen Sie mich mit einer tabellarischen Übersicht beginnen, aus der lediglich hervorgeht, in welchem Maße wir gegenwärtig von Infektionen als einer der Ursachen im globalen Bild der Krebsentwicklung ausgehen. Wir können errechnen, dass etwa 21 % der Krebsformen mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen. Eine ziemliche Vielzahl verschiedener Infektionen. Parasitische Infektionen wie die Bilharziose, durch den Leberegel, die in einigen Ländern eine Rolle spielen. Tatsächlich ist in Ägypten Blasenkrebs, der durch Schistosoma-Infektionen verursacht wird, der häufigste Krebs überhaupt. Und es ist interessant darauf hinzuweisen, dass er im globalen Maßstab für 1 % aller mit Krebs in Zusammenhang gebrachten Krebsformen verantwortlich ist. Sie können relativ einfach durch Chemotherapie geheilt werden; nicht die Krebserkrankungen, sondern die Infektionen. Allerdings - und dies ist eines der Probleme - ist es möglich, dass sich die betroffenen Patienten unmittelbar nach der Beseitigung der Parasiten mit denselben Erregern erneut infizieren. Dasselbe gilt auch für einen anderen, sehr wichtigen Krebserreger des Menschen, nämlich für das Bakterium helicobacter pylori, bei dem es sich gegenwärtig um die hauptsächliche Ursache von Magenkrebs handelt: Man kann zwar eine Infektion mit helicobacter pylori mit Antibiotika beseitigen, doch eine Neuinfektion ist kurz darauf wieder möglich. Und eine ziemlich große Anzahl derjenigen Patienten, bei denen man die Bakterien eliminiert hat, infiziert sich anschließend erneut. Es gibt eine andere Kategorie von Erregern, und zwar Viren. Sie sind für zwei Drittel der mit Infektionen verbundenen Krebsformen verantwortlich. Und es gibt zwei von ihnen, von denen wir heute wissen, dass man sich gegen diese Infektionsarten durch Impfungen schützen kann. Der Hauptunterschied besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einem lange anhaltenden Schutz vor einer Neuinfektion zu tun haben, wie wir zumindest in einem Fall ziemlich genau wissen. In dem anderen Fall ist es höchst wahrscheinlich, dass wir uns gegen entsprechende Formen von Krebs schützen können. Ich werde darauf ein wenig später noch zu sprechen kommen. Es gibt noch eine Reihe anderer Erreger, von denen wir ebenfalls wissen, dass sie mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Das Epstein-Barr-Virus wurde bereits 1965 von Epstein und seinen damaligen Kollegen in Bristol entdeckt. Dabei handelt es sich um das am längsten bekannte menschliche Tumorvirus. Es ist für B-Zellen-Lymphome und eine Reihe anderer Tumore verantwortlich. Ich werde nicht im Detail darauf eingehen. Der menschliche Herpesvirus Typ 8 ist der Erreger des Kaposi-Sarkoms, eines vaskulären Tumors, der hauptsächlich bei AIDS-Patienten und bei Empfängern transplantierter Organe auftritt. Das Merkelzell-Polyomavirus wurde im Januar 2008 entdeckt. Es ist ein interessanter Erreger. Auch dieses Virus verursacht einen Zustand, bei dem es sich in der Hauptsache um eine Unterdrückung des Immunsystems handelt. Dabei zeigt sich eine sehr merkwürdige Art der Wechselwirkung mit den Krebszellen. Ich werde darauf später vielleicht noch zurückkommen. Außerdem gibt es noch einige andere. Hepatitis C ist ein wichtiger Krebsfaktor, ein Karzinogen der Leber, besonders in dieser Region, in Europa und auch in den USA. Es ist ein wichtiger Faktor bei der Entstehung von Leberkrebs. HTLV-1 ist bezüglich der Prävention von Interesse, denn das Virus wird in der Regel von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern übertragen, die ihre Kinder durch das Stillen anstecken. Wenn also von Müttern bekannt ist, dass sie Trägerinnen des Virus sind, und wenn sie es unterlassen ihre Kinder zu stillen, lässt sich hierdurch die Verbreitung der Infektion tatsächlich eindämmen. Längerfristig könnte es sogar möglich sein, diese Infektion, die zum Beispiel in den Küstenregionen von Südjapan eine große Rolle spielt, völlig zu beseitigen. HIV-Viren wirken offensichtlich als indirekte Karzinogene, da sie zu einer Schwächung des Immunsystems führen. Und in diesem Zustand eines geschwächten Immunsystems treten in der Regel andere Arten persistierender Tumorviren auf, und sie können zu Tumoren führen, die beispielsweise durch das Epstein-Barr-Virus, das menschliche Herpesvirus Typ III und auch durch Merkelzell-Polyomaviren verursacht werden. Tatsächlich handelt es sich bei ihnen dann um diejenigen Karzinogene, die wir als direkte Karzinogene bezeichnen, während HIV als indirektes Karzinogen wirkt. Dies ist ein Dia, das ich gerne zeige, um den Mechanismus, durch den diese Erreger zur Entstehung von Krebs beitragen, etwas zu verdeutlichen. Es ist wichtig ihn zu verstehen, weil wir es hier mit sehr langen Latenzzeiten zu tun haben. In manchen Fällen dauert die Entwicklung von Krebs nach der ursprünglichen Infektion bis zu 60 Jahre. Für lange Zeit war dies eines der Hindernisse, die es erschwert haben, eine Infektion einer bestimmten Krebsart als Ursache zuzuordnen. Und ein Aspekt, der das Bild zumindest in gewissem Umfang aufgeklärt hat, ist ein Epstein-Barr-Virus, das mit einem Leiden zusammenhängt, das den komplizierten Namen In diesem Fall erhalten die Kinder über die Keimbahn eine Modifikation des X-Chromosoms, und bei männlichen Nachkommen entwickelt sich dieses Syndrom nach der Infektion durch EBV, das Epstein-Barr-Virus. Sie entwickeln eine sehr virulente Form eines Lymphoms, an dem sie innerhalb weniger Monate sterben. Der Grund besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einer genetischen Änderung [des Mechanismus] zu tun haben, der die spezifische T-Zellen-Reaktion gegen das Epstein-Barr-Virus steuert. Das Gen wurde identifiziert und seiner Funktion aufgeklärt. Unter diesen Bedingungen und aufgrund dieser erblichen Änderung, entwickeln diese Jungen diese Krankheit. Nun, dies gibt uns einen wichtigen Aspekt zu erkennen, denn in allen diesen Fällen, in denen wir diese langen Latenzzeiten haben, reicht die Infektion an sich niemals aus, eine maligne Veränderung herbeizuführen. Sie ist in vielen dieser Fälle zwar notwendig, reicht aber dazu nicht aus. Die infizierte Zelle muss weitere Veränderungen durchmachen, die dann schließlich zur Entwicklung von Krebs führen. So können wir beispielsweise im Falle von Gebärmutterhalskrebs mindestens drei Typen von Veränderungen angeben, die vor der Entwicklung dieser Krebsformen stattgefunden haben müssen. Wenn diese Veränderungen nicht auftreten, besteht der Virus zwar fort, doch es kommt zu keiner Entwicklung von Krebs. Es mag mehr als drei Typen der Veränderung geben, doch bis heute hat man drei erkannt. Die Länge der Latenzzeit ist ein Hinweis auf die Anzahl der zusätzlichen Modifikationen innerhalb der entsprechenden Zellen, bevor es zu Entwicklung der jeweiligen Krebsform kommt. Lassen Sie mich kurz auf die beiden Krebsarten eingehen, die durch Impfung verhindert werden können. Eine Infektion mit dem Hepatitis-B-Virus ist in Ostasien und Afrika für etwa 80 % der Leberkrebsleiden verantwortlich. Das Virus wird hauptsächlich - ähnlich wie das HTLV-Virus - von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern auf ihre neugeborenen Kinder übertragen. Und etwa 80 % dieser Kinder werden zu lebenslangen Trägern dieses Virus. Diese Kinder leben mit einem Krebsrisiko, da sie den Leberkrebs schließlich nach 30, 40, 50 oder 60 Jahren entwickeln. Eine Impfung gegen das Virus wurde bereits in den 1960er - oder den 1970er - Jahren entwickelt. Ursprünglich sollte die Impfung nicht vor Krebs schützen, sondern vor den akuten Folgen der Infektion. Doch interessanterweise erwies sie sich als eine gegen Krebs wirksamer Impfung. In Taiwan wurde beispielsweise seit 1984 jedes neugeborene Kind gegen das Hepatitis-B-Virus geimpft, um es gegen die dauerhafte Infektion zu schützen, und diese Impfung erwies sich als äußerst erfolgreich. Etwa 80 % dieser Kinder entwickelten keine chronische Hepatitis-B-Virusinfektion. Und nun, etwas mehr als 20 Jahre nach dem Beginn der Impfungen, zeigen die ersten Berichte eindeutig einen statistisch signifikanten Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leberkrebs nach dieser Art der Impfung. In gewisser Weise handelt es sich hierbei um den ersten Impfstoff, der Krebs verhindert. Wir können eindeutig feststellen, dass er Krebs verhindert. Wie steht es um den Gebärmutterhalskrebs? Es ist seit mehr als 30 Jahren ein Hauptgebiet meines Interesses. Wir wissen, dass es sich hierbei weltweit um den zweithäufigsten Krebs der Frauen handelt. Und die Mehrzahl dieser Krebsarten treten in Ländern auf, in denen eine Ressourcenknappheit besteht. Die Vorläufer dieser Krebsart traten weltweit ebenfalls mit großer Häufigkeit auf, an allen anderen Orten der Welt. Diese Vorstufen gehen jedoch normalerweise wieder zurück, was zur Folge hat, dass es zu einem umfangreichen Rückgang der Fälle dieser speziellen Krebsarten kommt. Eine Reihe von Krebsformen steht mit denselben Infektionsarten in Zusammenhang. Dies sind die sogenannten Papillomavirus-Infektionen mit hohem Risiko, hauptsächlich HPV 16, jedoch auch 18, sowie eine Reihe anderer. Sie korrelieren zu fast 100 % mit Gebärmutterhalskrebs. Interessanterweise stehen diese Krebsraten, die die Vulva und den Penis betreffen, nur zu einem geringeren Grad mit dieser Infektion in Zusammenhang. Dies ist deshalb interessant, weil diese beiden Krebsarten nach einer Unterdrückung des Immunsystems dramatisch zunehmen, ganz im Gegensatz zum Gebärmutterhalskrebs, der nur in geringem Umfang zunimmt. Und wir wissen noch nicht, ob es sich hierbei um die HPV-negativen Fälle oder um die positiven handelt. Ich denke, dies erfordert offensichtlich weitere Nachforschungen. Nun, die Krebserkrankungen der Mandeln, des Mund- und Rachenraums, stehen zu einem Viertel oder sogar Drittel mit derselben Art von Infektion in Verbindung, wie die Krebse des Gebärmutterhalses, des Analbereichs, der Vagina und die seltenen Nagelbettkrebse. Sie korrelieren ebenfalls eng mit dieser Art von Infektion. Wir wissen, dass die Infektion bei einer infizierten Frau normalerweise etwa 10 Monate lang andauert. Anschließend kann sie bei etwa 70 % durch die neuen Mechanismen beseitigt werden. Nach ungefähr 2 Jahren sind etwa 90 % ohne Infektion, doch fast 10 % weisen nach wie vor eine Infektion auf. Dies sind die Frauen, die das Risiko tragen, dass es bei Ihnen zur Entwicklung eines Gebärmutterhalskrebses kommt. Ich habe dieses Dia bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt. Dies war das erste Modell, mit dem sich demonstrieren ließ, dass der Impfstoff sehr gut wirkt: im Falle der Papillomavirus-Infektionen. In einigen Hundezuchtstationen in den USA werden für experimentelle Zwecke Beagles in großer Zahl gezüchtet. Sie hatten das Problem, dass fast alle Jungtiere diese hässlichen Warzengeschwülste entwickelten. Die Infektion hielt sechs Monate an, und sie konnten die Hunde in diesem Zeitraum nicht verkaufen. Wir besorgten uns Proben der DNA dieses Papillomavirus hier und stellten der Arbeitsgruppe an der George Town University Informationen zur Verfügung, mit deren Hilfe sie einen Impfstoff herstellte. Sie taten dies durch die Expression der Kapsid-Proteine, des wichtigsten Proteins dieses Viruspartikels, in experimentellen Systemen. Dieser Impfstoff wurde mehr als 14.000 jungen Beagles injiziert. Anschließend entwickelte kein einziger von ihnen ein Papillom, während alle nichtgeimpften Hunde weiterhin davon befallen waren. Dies war eine bemerkenswerte Erfolgsgeschichte, die schließlich eindeutig bewies, dass es auch beim Menschen funktionieren würde, wo dieses wichtige Strukturprotein entweder in Insektenzellen oder in Hefe exprimiert wird. Es gibt auch Bedingungen, unter denen sich Kapsomere und auch Kapsidstrukturen bilden. Unter diesen Bedingungen, bei denen es sich tatsächlich um leere Gehäuse des Virus handelt, die hierbei entstehen. Sie können gereinigt und als Grundlage für den Impfstoff verwendet werden, der gegenwärtig verfügbar ist. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung der klinischen Studien, die durchgeführt worden sind und die eindeutig beweisen, dass die Impfstoffe zu sehr hohen Konzentrationen von Antikörpern führen und dass sie für längere Zeiten erhalten und wirksam bleiben. Wir wissen dies jetzt seit acht oder neun Jahren. Und trotz gegenteiliger Presseberichte sind keine signifikanten Nebeneffekte beobachtet worden. Tatsächlich können wir einer australischen Studie entnehmen, dass es pro 100.000 Impfdosierungen nur eine Allergie gegen die Virusproteine gibt. Dies ist offensichtlich ein besseres Ergebnis als es diejenigen für Impfstoffe sind, mit denen zurzeit Kleinkindern behandelt werden. Nun, zusätzlich wissen wir heute bereits, dass wir durch diese Impfstoffarten die Infektion durch diejenigen Arten von Viren verhindern, die sich in dem Impfstoff finden. Außerdem verhindern wir die Entwicklung von zervikalen Läsionen beziehungsweise ihrer Vorstufen. Wir wissen noch nicht, ob sich damit tatsächlich Krebserkrankungen vorbeugen lassen, denn es dauert - wie ich bereits erwähnt habe - etwa 15-25 Jahre, bis sich eine Krebserkrankung nach einer Infektion entwickelt. Und der erste Impfstoff wurde vor acht oder neun Jahren verabreicht. Haben wir die Chance, diese Art von Infektionen vollständig zu eliminieren? Ja, denn diese Infektion ist auf den Menschen eingeschränkt. Wir können dies erreichen, indem wir weltweit Mädchen vor dem Beginn ihrer sexuellen Aktivität impfen. Und wenn man dies wirklich erreichen will, müssen wir die Jungen ebenfalls impfen, wenn wir dies in absehbarer Zukunft erzielen wollen. Tatsächlich würden wir zumindest dasselbe, wahrscheinlich aber sogar ein besseres Ergebnis bei der Vorbeugung gegen Gebärmutterhalskrebs erzielen, wenn wir nur die Jungen impfen würden statt nur die Mädchen, da die Übertragung der Infektion fast ausschließlich durch sexuelle Kontakte zu Stande kommt. Lassen Sie mich nun dieses Kapitel zum Abschluss bringen, obwohl ich mich damit für lange Zeit beschäftigt habe. Gegen Ende meines Vortrags möchte ich auf einige Fragen eingehen, die uns gegenwärtig noch mehr interessieren, da es sich lohnt, nach der Ursache der Infektion zu suchen. Was ich nun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen den Appetit auf ein saftiges Steak oder Roastbeef zu verderben. Ich hoffe, das wird für Sie nicht so schlimm sein. Man kann an dieser Stelle eine Reihe von Bemerkungen machen. Krebserkrankungen treten mit größerer Häufigkeit auf, wenn das Immunsystem unterdrückt ist. Wir wissen, dass in vielen dieser Fälle latente Infektionen mit Tumorviren aktiviert werden und dass es unter solchen Umständen zur Entstehung von Krebs kommt. Es gibt jedoch weiterhin Krebsarten, von denen wir nicht wissen, ob sie durch Infektionen verursacht werden können. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel Schilddrüsenkrebs, oder Nierenkrebsleiden. Sie treten bei einem unterdrückten Immunsystem eindeutig häufiger auf, man hat jedoch noch nicht zeigen können, dass sie mit Infektion in Zusammenhang stehen. Es gibt Krebsarten, die mit einer verringerten Infektionshäufigkeit korrelieren. Aufgrund von AIDS-Patienten wissen wir, dass Brustkrebs das beste Beispiel hierfür ist. Patienten, die transplantierte Organe erhalten haben und deren Immunsystem unterdrückt wurde, haben normalerweise ein um 15 % geringeres Risiko an Brustkrebs zu erkranken. Dies entspricht in gewisser Weise dem Gegenteil von dem, was man erwarten würde. Doch wir kennen Tierexperimentbeispiele, in denen das Gleiche geschieht, nämlich bei Tumoren nach Infektionen der Brustdrüsen bei Mäusen. Hier wird das Virus durch die Milch von den Muttertieren übertragen. Sie infizieren die Lymphozyten und die Peyer-Plaques und diese Lymphozyten beginnen sich sehr schnell aktiv zu vermehren. Sie explodieren gewissermaßen und erzeugen riesige Mengen des Virus. Die Viren werden dann mit den aktivierten Lymphozyten in das periphere Blut abgegeben, und die Belastung des Blutes mit den Viren ist scheinbar ein wesentlicher Faktor für das Risiko, die Milchdrüsen zu erreichen und zur Entwicklung von Brustkrebs zu führen. Wenn man das Immunsystem dieser Mäuse unterdrückt, kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Virusbelastung und unter diesen Bedingungen auch zu einer Verringerung des Krebsrisikos, da die Lymphozyten in diesen Tieren nicht länger fortbestehen. Was ich nun noch kurz mit Ihnen besprechen möchte, sind diejenigen nahrungsbedingten Faktoren eines Krebsrisikos, die möglicherweise mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen sowie von Krebsleiden beeinflusste Infektionen, die nicht zu Tumorleiden führen. Ich werde Ihnen ein Bild zeigt, das ich schon bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt habe. Doch es hat unser Interesse an dieser Frage geweckt, denn wir kennen eine ziemliche Anzahl von krankheitserregenden Viren des Menschen, wie die Polyomaviren BK und JC, die in menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind und bei denen es sich in der Regel um lebenslange Infektion handelt. EBV und das hochriskante HPV, obwohl sie beim Menschen manchmal zu Krebs führen, sind relativ selten. Außerdem gibt es beim Menschen Adenoviren, die nicht zu Krebs führen. Alle diese Viren können sich in Tieren nicht vermehren. Wenn man sie jedoch in tierische Organismen, in denen sie sich nicht fortpflanzen können, einimpft, können Sie dort Krebs verursachen. Und dies ist ein interessanter Punkt, der natürlich zu der entgegengesetzten Frage führt, nämlich: Übertragen einige der Haustiere, mit denen wir eng zusammenleben und in denen sich die Viren vermehren und zum Teil lebenslang vorhanden sind, die Viren auf einen Host, in dem sie sich nicht vermehren können? Sie verlieren die Fähigkeit der Vermehrung. Sind sie unter diesen Umständen karzinogen? Und hier ist ein ziemlich interessantes Beispiel von Krebs des Dickdarms oder des Dickdarms und Rektums, denn diese Krebsarten wurden epidemiologisch mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch in Verbindung gebracht. Es gibt wirklich bemerkenswert konsistente Zahlen in epidemiologischen Berichten, die beschreiben, dass etwa 20-30 % dieser Krebsarten mit dem Genuss von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängen, in der Hauptsache von Rindfleisch. In Ländern, in denen sehr viel Rindfleisch verzehrt wird - Europa gehört in diese Kategorie - liegt normalerweise ein hoher Anteil von Krebsarten des Kolons und Rektums vor. Es gibt sogar neuere Berichte darüber, dass Brustkrebs mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängt. Krebserkrankungen des Endometriums und der Eierstöcke zeigen eine ähnliche Epidemiologie wie Brustkrebs und werden ebenfalls damit in Zusammenhang gebracht, ja - zu einem gewissen Grad - sogar auch Lungenkrebs, insbesondere bei Nichtrauchern. Es ist sehr viel komplizierter, dies bei Rauchern zu bewerten. Außerdem gibt es noch eine Reihe von Berichten über einige andere Arten von Krebsleiden, die sehr viel weniger konsistent sind. Schauen wir uns kurz die geographische Verteilung an, die Epidemiologie der Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums. Hier im Bereich des Toten Meeres sieht man ein sehr hohes Risiko. Hier das Risiko für Brustkrebs in Dunkelgrün. Die Farben entsprechen einander nicht. Doch offensichtlich gibt es eine bemerkenswerte Überlappung dieser Bereiche, woraus hervorgeht, dass hier ein hohes Risiko für Brustkrebs und für Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums besteht. Dasselbe Bild ergibt sich, wenn man beispielsweise die Bereiche für Krebserkrankungen der Bauchspeicheldrüse und der Lunge vergleicht. Schließlich gibt es offensichtlich einige Bereiche, in denen es zu Diskrepanzen kommt, zumindest bei diesen beiden Krebsformen, jedoch eine relative Übereinstimmung zwischen den anderen beiden Krebsarten. Doch seit 1977 wurde vermutet, dass wir die Gründe für diese Wirkung erkannt haben, denn wenn man Fleisch grillt, brät oder röstet, erhält man eine Reihe chemischer Verbindungen während der Zubereitung, die eindeutig karzinogen sind, wenn man sie Nagetieren einimpft. Und dies war offensichtlich eine gute Erklärung für das hohe Risiko des Verzehrs von rotem Fleisch über längere Zeiträume. Eine Reihe von ihnen sind hier aufgelistet. Nun, das Problem, das sich hier ergab, war im Prinzip bereits in der ersten Veröffentlichung von Sugimura und seinen Kollegen aus dem Jahre 1977 sichtbar. Denn wenn man Fisch brät oder grillt, Fisch auf ähnliche Weise zubereitet, entstehen dieselben Karzinogene. Wenn man Geflügel auf gleiche Weise zubereitet, entstehen diese Arten von Karzinogenen ebenfalls - in manchen Fällen sogar in höheren Konzentrationen als bei der Zubereitung von rotem Fleisch. Und dies erfordert eine Erklärung. Die Sache ist sogar noch spezifischer, denn wenn man sich Länder anschaut, in denen rotes Fleisch in größerem Umfang konsumiert wird - sagen wir in arabischen Ländern, wo hauptsächlich Schaf-, Lamb- und Ziegenfleisch gegessen wird -, dort ist die Häufigkeit dieser Krebsarten erstaunlich gering. Schweinefleisch in China. Die Chinesen essen zwar nicht ausschließlich Schweinefleisch, aber es ist eine Hauptquelle von rotem Fleisch. Das Rot ist hier eher intermediär, und es ist sehr interessant, dies zu sehen. Schauen Sie sich die Situation in Indien an, wo praktisch kein Rindfleisch verzehrt wird. Indien ist weltweit führend: Die Häufigkeit von Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und Rektums ist hier weltweit am geringsten. In einem pathologischen Institut in Kalkutta sah ich im Jahr 2008 einen einzigen Fall von kolorektalem Krebs. Im Vergleich zu den europäischen pathologischen Instituten ist das ziemlich erstaunlich. Was sind die Erklärungen hierfür? Es muss einen Grund hierfür geben. Es scheint also ein speziell mit Rindfleisch zusammenhängender Faktor zu sein. Natürlich besteht die Möglichkeit, dass es in Rindfleisch noch unentdeckte chemische Karzinogene gibt, die in weißem Fleisch nicht vorhanden sind. Doch die andere Erklärung - zumindest für einen Biologen wie mich - ist attraktiver: Nämlich dass es in Rindfleisch einen ansteckenden Erreger gibt, der relativ hitzebeständig ist und dass dieser Rindfleischfaktor auf Menschen übertragen werden und unter diesen Bedingungen zur Entstehung von Krebs führen kann. Wenn Sie die Temperatur in diesen schmackhaft zubereiteten Roastbeefs messen, so entspricht sie normalerweise etwa 30-50° C. Dies sind Temperaturen, die eine ganze Reihe von potentiellen Krebserregern problemlos überstehen, ohne ihre Infektiosität einzubüßen, wie zum Beispiel das Papillomavirus. Viren vom Polyomatyp sind sehr wahrscheinlich auch etwas schwerer zu testen. Auch Viren mit einzelnen DNA-Strängen können diese Bedingungen überleben. Polyomaviren kommen hier ebenfalls besonders in Frage, ebenso wie diese hier, da sie Temperaturen von 80°C problemlos für längere Zeit überstehen. Wir kennen nur eine Art bei Rindern, doch bereits neun Arten bei Menschen, und es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass es sie gibt. Lassen Sie mich noch auf einen anderen Punkt eingehen, der die Situation sogar noch hervorzuheben scheint, wenn man Japan und Indien unter diesen Bedingungen vergleicht. Erstaunlicherweise hat Japan eine sehr hohe Häufigkeit von Krebserkrankungen des Dickdarms und Rektums, und es ist interessant, sich die Epidemiologie dessen anzusehen, was in Japan im Vergleich zu Indien geschehen ist. Sie sehen hier einige statistische Daten, die in Japan seit etwa 1975, 1980 gesammelt wurden, und Sie sehen, dass diese Krebsart enorm angestiegen ist. Man kann aus diesem Zeitabschnitt zurückrechnen, dass der Anstieg etwa um 1965 begann. In Korea begannen die Aufzeichnungen später, doch man sieht genau dieselbe Entwicklung. Was ist in diesen Ländern geschehen? Nun, einer der Hauptaspekte dessen, was sich hier ereignete, war die Einführung von großen Mengen von Rindfleisch, besonders aus den USA. Die zunehmende Essgewohnheit - und es ist eine sehr beliebte Art Shabu-Shabu zu essen, ein japanisches Fleischfondue - besteht darin, dünne Fleischscheiben in kochendes Wasser zu tauchen und dann schnell wieder herauszunehmen. Normalerweise wird es nach weniger als einer Minute wieder herausgenommen. Man breitet es aus und es ist noch sehr roh. Es wird sehr gern gegessen. Dies sind Korrelationen, sie beweisen nichts. Doch es ist eine interessante Beobachtung, die tatsächlich die Frage aufwirft, ob es im Rindfleisch einen Infektionsfaktor für Krebserkrankungen von Dickdarm und Rektum gibt, der künftig noch gefunden werden muss. Nun, hoffentlich bleiben mir noch einige Minuten. Ich werde abschließend noch über einen anderen Aspekt sprechen, da er sehr interessant ist: die Krebserkrankungen im Kindesalter, Leukämie in der Kindheit. Ich werde nur kurz darauf eingehen, indem ich darauf hinweise, dass wir es hier ebenfalls mit einer äußerst interessanten epidemiologischen Situation zu tun haben, dass nämlich mehrere Infektionen im ersten Lebensjahr einen Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leukämie in der Kindheit bieten. Ein unterprivilegierter sozialer Status, gedrängte Wohnverhältnisse, viele Geschwister. Das Risiko ist umgekehrt proportional zur Geburtsreihenfolge, d.h. ein erstgeborenes Kind hat ein höheres Risiko als die nachgeborenen Kinder, usw. Stillen ist ein Schutzfaktor. Und im umgekehrten Fall haben Sie hier eine Reihe von Risikofaktoren: seltene Infektionen, ein hoher sozioökonomischer Status und pränatale chromosomale Translokationen sind offensichtlich wichtige Faktoren bei der Entstehung von Leukämie. Dieselben Translokationsarten treten jedoch auch bei gesunden Individuen in geringer Häufigkeit auf. Daher sind sie an sich für die Entwicklung von Krebs nicht ausreichend. Ein paar andere Punkte werde ich aus Zeitgründen übergehen. Wenn man sich einige Länder mit erfolgreichen Volkswirtschaften anschaut, so ist das Risiko in ihnen höher, während es in ärmeren Bevölkerungen für diese Arten von Leukämie vergleichsweise geringer ist. Wir haben versucht, darüber zu spekulieren, was der Grund für dieses seltsame Phänomen sein könnte, und haben den Vorschlag gemacht, dass eine pränatale Infektion, eine Infektion vor der Geburt zu infizierten Zellen führen könnte, die sich nach der Geburt vermehren. Die Anzahl dieser Zellen nimmt drastisch zu, und es befindet sich ein ansteckender Erreger in diesen Zellen. Es liegt hier eine Belastung vor, die möglicherweise der Hauptfaktor für die anschließende Entwicklung der Leukämien ist. Durch anschließende Infektionen nach der Geburt kommt es dann - da es sich hierbei hauptsächlich um Infektionen der Atemwege handelt - zur Produktion von Interferon und antiviralem Zytokin, und unter diesen Bedingungen kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Belastung und des damit einhergehenden Risikos. Wenn man also so etwas postuliert, muss man zunächst nach Infektionen suchen, zu denen es vor der Geburt kommt, die wahrscheinlich zu Vermehrungen in den Zellen führen, aus denen die Leukämien hervorgehen, die speziellen Leukämien der Kindheit. Und anschließend sollte sie auch ziemlich empfindlich für Interferon sein. Gibt es solche Infektionen? Die Antwort lautet: ja. Es gibt mindestens eine Infektion, die alle diese Kriterien erfüllt, und dies sind die sogenannten TT-Viren, Anelloviren, wie man sie nennt - eigentlich eine Namensverwechslung. Doch der interessante Aspekt ist, dass wir alle mit diesen Erregern infiziert sind, dass wir sie in diesem Alter in unserem peripheren Blut tragen. Sie vermehren sich offensichtlich in lymphatischen und Knochenmarkszellen. Man hat zeigen können, dass es bei Patienten, die mit Interferon behandelt werden, weil sie dauerhaft mit Hepatitis-C-Viren infiziert sind, ebenfalls zu einer drastischen Verringerung der Anzahl der TT-Viren kommt, die durch pränatale Infektion erworben werden. Sie werden vor der Geburt erworben, oder zumindest geschieht die Ansteckung zu einem bestimmten Prozentsatz unter dieser Bedingung. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung dessen, was wir über diese mehr als hundert, wahrscheinlich weit mehr als hundert Genotypen dieser Viren wissen, die in allen menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind. Die vertikale Übertragung habe ich erwähnt. Der interessanteste Aspekt ist in diesem Zusammenhang, dass es meistens, sehr häufig, dazu kommt, dass das Genom sich neu anordnet, was teilweise zu sich eigenständig replizierenden, sub-genomischen Molekülen mit neuen offenen Leserahmen führt. Ich denke, dies würde einen weiteren Vortrag verdienen, um es im Detail besprechen zu können. Dennoch möchte ich sagen, dass es sich hierbei um relativ unzureichend beschriebene, episomal persistierende Viren mit DNA-Einzelsträngen handelt, die nur einen Bereich enthalten, der in all diesen verschiedenen Genotypen äußerst gut erhalten bleibt. Tatsächlich haben wir in dieser Richtung zahlreiche Untersuchungen durchgeführt, die zunächst beweisen, dass es auch in Tumorzellen einige chimäre Moleküle gibt, die eine Verbindung zwischen diesem Bereich hier und spezifischen zellulären Sequenzen beweisen, die sich als äußerst interessant herausgestellt hat. Ich habe vergessen zu erwähnen, dass hier etwa 3800 Basen zur Verfügung stehen, obwohl es auch kleinere Moleküle mit 2800 Basen gibt. Und dies ist nun ein Kapitel, dem wir bei Leukämiezellen, bei Zellen des Hodgkin-Lymphoms und insbesondere in Zelllinien von kolorektalen Tumoren begegnen. Die Persistenz vieler dieser chimären Molekültypen, die in einer großen Zahl von Ihnen vorhanden sind, hat sich bislang fast überall gezeigt, soweit unsere Experimente uns dies zu erkennen geben. Doch die Ursachen dieser Arten von Zuständen sind uns noch unbekannt. Hierzu sind weitere Untersuchungen und Studien erforderlich. Dies sind die Personen, das Team, das hauptsächlich über TT-Viren arbeitet: Ethel-Michele de Villiers, die ebenfalls im Auditorium sitzt, ist zufälligerweise auch meine Frau. Auch einige andere dieser Damen hier sind Zuhörer, und ich glaube, dass Sylvia Barkosky ebenfalls an diesem Treffen teilnimmt. Fragen, die Sie zu diesem Thema haben, können Sie auch ihr stellen. Was ich momentan denke, ist, dass wir wirklich sorgfältiger nach neuen Arten von Mechanismen suchen müssen, durch die Infektionserreger zur Entwicklung von Krebs beim Menschen beitragen können. Und wissen Sie: Wenn wir gegenwärtig bereits 21 % der menschlichen Krebserkrankungen auf diese Art von Infektionen zurückführen können und wenn es zutrifft, dass die Bösartigkeit einiger blutbildender Systeme und der Magenkrebs - nein, nicht der Magenkrebs - der Dickdarmkrebs ebenfalls mit Infektionen zusammenhängt, dann würde dieser Prozentsatz auf weltweit 35 % aller Krebsleiden ansteigen. Und selbst hier ist Magenkrebs - Entschuldigung - Dickdarmkrebs für etwa 20 % aller Krebserkrankungen verantwortlich. Es ist also ein wichtiges Problem, und ich schließe mich insbesondere Prof. Blackburn an, die dies bereits gesagt hat: Wenn man all diese jungen Studenten sieht, die an diesen Problemen arbeiten, ist es wirklich wichtig, dass meine seine Augen offenhält. Dies ist kein Arbeitsgebiet, das abgeschlossen ist. Ich glaube, es ist ein Arbeitsgebiet, das wesentlich mehr Aufmerksamkeit verdient. Dreißig Jahre lang war es sehr schwer, irgendein Interesse für diese Art von Erregern zu finden. Zurzeit ändert sich das glücklicherweise, doch wir müssen noch mehr darüber forschen. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Harald zur Hausen on the development of the first successful vaccination against papilloma in dog kennels
(00:11:31 - 00:12:37)

 

The advantage of using non-human primates as models of human disease is obvious: their high similarity to humans means that any findings made in such species are also very likely to be relevant for humans. Of course, this high degree of similarity also means that questions of ethics assume critical importance. One way in which this issue can be side-stepped is by using natural models. For example, certain species of primates naturally exhibit very high rates of infection with SIV, a virus which is very similar to HIV and which can cause an AIDS-like disease. However, due to adaptation to the virus, these primates do not generally develop disease. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2008 for the discovery of HIV. In this excerpt from her lecture at the Lindau Meeting in 2010, she underlines how useful such primates are for research into fighting AIDS.

 

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2010) - HIV, a Discovery Highlighting the Global Benefit of Translational Research

Thank you very much for these very nice words of introduction. What I’d like to do in the next 20 minutes or so, it’s a short talk so I’m not going to go into details but I like to give the example of HIV to show the young researcher how it’s important to make multidisciplinary and translational research. For HIV everything started really by observation, observation of our colleagues, epidemiologists and clinicians who reported the few cases of young homosexuals that were all presenting with severe immune deficiency. It is also based on those observations that we had the idea that probably a virus was the cause of this newly recognised epidemic. First cases were found in haemophilic patients indicating that probably a virus was the cause of this new emerging disease. And it is by our colleagues, the clinicians that we have been mobilised at the Pasteur Institute. They came to us because some of them were following training and virology course at the Pasteur Institute and they remember that Luc Montagnier and Chermann and myself were giving courses on retroviruses. So this story really started like a good opportunity at the point that it was an evolution of technology and evolution of research on retroviruses, everything start from opportunities and to be there at the right moment with the good technology. They recognise in France the first cases of AIDS in 1982, but at that time the first human retrovirus was identified in the United States by Robert Gallo’s group and these human retroviruses was causing T cell leukaemia. The virus was infecting T cells so our colleagues and clinicians came to us at Pasteur and asked whether we thought that HTLV could be the cause of AIDS. And our first reaction if I remember correctly was to say this is curious because HTLV is transforming the T lymphocyte. And you are just explaining to us that the cells are dying in the patient. So to remember that in other retroviruses like for example feline leukaemia virus, the cats were dying of immune deficiency before dying of leukaemia. Progress in technology turn out that few years before it was also the identification of what was called T cell growth factor, now known under the name of interleukin 2, that means we were able to grow in the laboratory T lymphocyte using these cellular factors. So it's really this collective adventure started in the early ‘80’s ... the clinician and we had a very decisive meeting at the Pasteur Institute when we had very simple question when, where and how to look for which virus. I’m showing you this slide for the young researchers, it’s also to keep in mind that we have to be careful about dogma. If we had started with the idea that HTLV could be the cause of the disease certainly the approach that we have used will not have been successful. So it’s how the virus was identified in 1983, it was called at that time lymphadenopathy-associated virus because where we decide to look for the virus was in the lymph node of the patients. And another important decision was to decide to follow in the culture of the cell derived from the left node, to follow in the culture every 3, 4 days in culture to find out a reverse transitive activity with the enzyme which is specific of this family of retroviruses. And that was also an important decision, when to look. A few days after the culture we had the first sign of disease virus in our supernatant. So immediately after this first identification of the virus we of course had in mind to go to application as fast as possible. First of all we had an emergency, the emergency was to prevent blood transmission and transmission of HIV, this new virus in haemophiliacs. So that means that we had to develop diagnoses tests and that was done very rapidly and in parallel these tests were used to make very large epidemiological survey in order to make the link between the virus and the disease itself. Of course, these diagnoses tests were available to test, to prevent mother-to-child transmission and through information, counselling and so on, to try also to have some impact on the prevention of sexual transmission. We’re rapidly after the isolation of the virus, also we together, we mobilised our colleagues immunologists to work with us and to try to identify the tropism of the virus and we very rapidly showed that the virus was infecting preferential ECD4 lymphocyte, but also that the CD4 molecule itself was a receptor of the virus, that was the basis of monitoring CD4 cells in the patients, and it’s still in use today. We started very rapidly, after mobilisation of our colleagues and molecular biologists at Pasteur to characterise HIV genome and to start to characterise a repetition cycle of the virus into target cells. With another colleague we start to characterise a reverse phosphatase of the virus with the idea that individuals of the reverse phosphatase maybe important to develop therapies. Indeed, the first antiretroviral drug that has been shown with some efficiency was AZT, AZT was not sufficient as a therapy, but AZT was the first drug showing that we can prevent mother-to-child transmission. And you just heard from Professor Montagnier that today, since 1996, we have a very efficient combined 3 therapy, also named as highly active antiretroviral therapy. We characterise the genome of the virus and very rapidly we found out that it was a very complex organisation. You just saw on the slide of Professor Montagnier, the organisation of the virus and very rapidly, as soon as 1984, we knew that we had a very viable virus. But the identification of the genome of HIV was certainly the basis to develop later on a monitoring test for measuring the viral load in the patient and also to follow resistance to antiretroviral treatment as well. Since then, since the beginning of 1983 it has been a lot of progress of course in acknowledge and in changing biology and pathogenesis, I am not going into the detail of all this progress that are reported on this slide, I just let you know that of course we know that HIV originated from a transmission of the virus from monkey to humans although the intermissions were very rare. And of course we have made a lot of progress in our knowledge of the interaction of the virus and the host and leading to the development of progress in the knowledge of disease outcome. It has been a lot of progress in diagnoses and therapy but as you know regarding the vaccine it has not been very successful. Vaccine research started as soon as 1985/86 and still today we don’t have any efficient vaccine. Another discovery at least for me was the fact that we will have to face a global scale epidemic. And I had the chance personally to go as soon as 1985 in Central African Republic and to realise the situation over there in those countries. So the theory started from the discovery of the disease in the United States in 1981, followed by the discovery of the virus in France, but indeed we have to face a global epidemic and we had really to learn how to work all together. I mentioned Central African Republic, but soon after in 1988 I also started to go in South East Asia and it was there before the identification of the first case of HIV in Vietnam in 1990. So it’s how really another story start, the story how much is important and it’s our responsibility as a scientist to provide scientific evidences to convince the political leaders and authorities to make intervention in their countries. It’s important for providing scientific evidences to make multidisciplinary research and to work also together with HIV communities, their participation I think is an example in the field of HIV. We have learned to work altogether, scientists, doctors and activists. In the developing world it’s very important to provide scientific evidences directly on site and to make multidisciplinary research directly on site to provide this scientific evidence locally in order to develop intervention through convincing the political leaders. So as I heard yesterday students and young researchers are asking when they are from poor resource limited countries, whether they can provide contribution, of course they can contribute and they will contribute and there is a lot of progress regarding science in resource limited countries in the field of HIV, I’m sure in other fields. Those contribution from the country itself are very important for the decision, for the benefit of the public health in their own country. Regarding HIV it has been progressive to access antiretroviral treatment in those resource limited countries. This is a report of UNAIDS WHO last year, in 2009 showing that we improve the access of treatment by 10 between the end of 2003 and the end of 2008 as you can see on this slide. That means that around 40% of patients that are in need for antiretroviral treatment are treated. This is bad and previous WHO recommendation to treat patients when they are 200 CD4 cells or less. We know today that the recommendation is to treat patients when there are more CD4 cells. So that means that all therefore that has been done its already wonderful but its not sufficient at all. We know today that for 2 patients starting treatment there is 5 new cases of infection and still there is 2.7 million new cases of infection per year. Today we have more about 30 million of people living with HIV all over the world and still 2.5 million of deaths per year. So the effort should continue, the effort should continue, in particular we need to have future strategy to reduce the incidence of HIV-1 globally in the world. And of course it will be combined approaches. One approach is based on behavioural changes, and for that information, education is very important, of course. And as researcher we have to participate to this information education program as well. We have biomedical strategies like condoms use, like circumcision that was proved to reduce the incidence, the risk of infection by 50/60% and we have the antiretroviral treatment. We have that already showing that treatment as prevention is a nice approach to reduce the risk of infection, that are indicating that around 90% reduction of the risk of transmitting the virus when someone is on treatment. One also, part of the approach to reduce the incidence of infection is certainly to improve everywhere in the world social justice and respect of human rights because if we want to treat earlier we need to improve testing. And to improve testing we have to fight against discrimination and stigmatisation of patients that are HIV positive. Because this is one very important obstacle today for someone to go for the test is afraid about the eyes of the others. So this is a combination of those approach, broad based and biochemical approach and those other issues that we need to work for the future. Of course another component for the strategy will be the vaccine. But still today we don’t have it. So we need to think about the new therapeutic prevention strategy for tomorrow. On that slide you have 2 pictures, the picture of the situation, to be brief I mention the north, today we are not speaking any more about AIDS mortality, we are speaking about chronic HIV infection, patients are living with HIV. In the poor countries still we have AIDS mortality, you can see on this slide that in our countries in Europe, United States, after 5 years after infection the mortality rate is indeed exactly the same in the general population as in patients infected. In other countries still we have 8 to 26% of patient mortality during the first year of treatment initiation even. So that means that we have to improve the access of treatment as I said, we have to improve also the access of pregnant women to antiretroviral treatment, only 45% of them have access to treatment. But we have also on this slide some other challenges that we have to face for the future. Professor Montagnier just mentioned the viral latency in HIV reservoir, this is one critical issue because we cannot stop the treatment and we have to have new therapeutic approach at least to reduce the size of the reservoir in the future. Another critical issue in HIV research is to understand better the mechanism by which the virus or viral component are inducing very rapidly inflammation activation and we know that there is insufficient immune restoration even on antiretroviral treatment. We have in our countries, in Europe and United States new complication, new complication associated to long term HAART, for example you can see on this slide that 8% of patients that are on long term HAART are developing cardiovascular disease. Some of them are developing cancers as mentioned before, lymphoma mostly but other cancer as well, 15% of them. Some of them are developing liver disease, around 7% and we are seeing more and more neurological disorders in HIV patient on long term HAART, aging disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer like disease. So we have to improve the situation regarding, acknowledge also why, why there is such complication, what is the role of the virus or viral component, what is the role of HAART together with viral components. So we still need further research today. We certainly have learned as I said before from HIV pathogenesis but we need to learn much more, much more in particular during this very early phase of infection which is in grey on my slide. As you can see during the very first, lets say week, I was ready to say first hours after infection. We have already data indicating that everything is decided, during let’s say the first 96 hours after exposure to the virus. When I say everything is decided in the HIV infection outcome, that means that very rapidly after exposure to the virus you have the infection itself, the dissemination of the virus in the body and the establishment as you can see on the red part in the bottom of the slide, the establishment of HIV latency and HIV reservoir. We have also to learn better what are the mechanics, like to explain the chronic immune activation and how to control chronic immune activation, how to control the establishment of the reservoir. We know all of us here that we have a very complex interplay between the virus, viral components and the host itself, of course we have learned about HIV diversity, we know about the tropism of the virus, and variation in the tropism of the virus and the capacity of the virus and also we know that some of the variation are due to the virus, some of the variation are due also to host cell factors, involving in virus life cycle. We know that the cells have intrinsic cellular defence with restriction factors. It has been discovered like APOBEC TRIM5 and Tetherin, the last one. And we know also that the virus and components of the virus have immune suppressive capacity, they’re capable to induce abnormal activation signal. Some of the viral components that are capable to induce abnormalities are the envelope, the nef protein, vpr and so on. And of course they will influence the immune response, the alternating immune response as well as the adaptive immunity. And of course the genetic of the host is important for the host immune response as well. So we have to consider both the genetic diversity of the host and the genetic diversity of the virus itself. There is distinct, innate and inflammatory response to HIV, SIV infection in the host and we know that indeed this distinct responses is depending of the dialogue, the dialogue between different actors of our immune defence. We have to consider the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, you know that are defence, several actors are playing a key role, like the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, like natural killer cells, T-cells and so on, of course B-cells for the production of antibodies. But you have to consider that the virus is coming, HIV and viral protein that recognise, that can be recognised by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. But the response of the plasmacytoid dendritic cells through receptors, receptors like TLR’s but even maybe through other receptors for example a paper will come soon showing that one restriction factor TRIM5alpha might be one receptor. So we have to consider the interaction between receptors and ligands. And according to the diversity of both the receptor and the ligands you may have diverse innate response. Innate response involving pDC’s, NK cells and of course involving as a consequence different recruitment that activation of those cells, that are critical for B-cells and T-cell response in lymph node tissue, like lymph node as shown on this slide. But we have to consider the diversity as I said to the host receptors or ligands. Like for example the NK receptors which are important, the KIR , we know the genetic polymorphism of the KIR is influencing HIV infection. We know that HLADR is influencing of course HIV infection and we know that nef is down regulating HLA, class 1 molecules. So we have to take together both the host and the virus diversity in the distinct innate and inflammatory response that makes then distinct HIV, SIV disease outcome. And we can learn from this diverse spectrum of response. Indeed it is different models that can be used to try to understand better the protection against HIV or against AIDS, let’s show very rapidly on this slide 2 of the model on which we are working in my lab and others are working as well. We have first HIV controllers or SIV controllers in the monkeys. Those are very interesting because they control naturally the reservoir, they have low level of reservoir. And no detection of viral load in the monkey, natural control of the repetition of the virus. The other model is the African primate, that are infected by SIV, 40/50% of them in Africa but they do not develop the disease, why, because they do not have abnormal immune activation of the immune system, do not have abnormal inflammation. So we can understand from both model and we are starting to understand from both model. For example HIV controllers, we know already that they are, most of them are HLA, B57, B27, we know that about half of them have very strong CD8 response but so 50% of them we cannot explain by a strong CD8 response but maybe by innate immunity or viral components. And also we are learning from the monkey. So to finish I would say that we are learning on HIV, but I am convinced and I like to believe that we can learn beyond HIV AIDS, HIV is a retrovirus and I just mentioned that of course we have new challenges with cancer, with aging disorders and HIV disease. We know that retrovirus in animals, we were very much studying at the end of the ‘60’s as potential agent for causing cancer and leukaemia. But today HIV might be also a tool to understand better cancer and lymphoma. HIV may also be a tool to understand better aging disorder, HIV may certainly be a tool to understand better immune defect and inflammatory and autoimmune malignancy. And the last slide says that HIV AIDS since the beginning has been a wonderful scientific and human adventure but it’s still continuing. We have new challenges, new technology, new concept to say and a new generation of players. They will be responsible for the new discovery but they would have to keep in mind, they have to work with connection, connection with others as shown on my slide, basic science together with clinical and operational research, basis science and different discipline and also one discipline that I mention on my slide which is not represented at Lindau is a social economy called science which is an important part also. And to work together, all together with the patients themselves. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank für diese sehr freundlichen Einführungsworte. Was ich in den nächsten 20 Minuten oder so - es ist ein kurzer Vortrag, so dass ich nicht auf Einzelheiten eingehen werde - tun möchte, ist Folgendes: Ich möchte Ihnen das Beispiel von HIV vorstellen, um den jungen Forschern zu demonstrieren, wie wichtig es ist, dass sie ihre Forschung multidisziplinär und translational durchführen. Für HIV begann alles eigentlich mit der Beobachtung, mit der Beobachtung unserer Kollegen, Epidemiologen und Kliniker, die über einige Fälle von jungen Homosexuellen berichteten, die alle ein stark geschwächtes Immunsystem hatten. Auf diesen Beobachtungen basierte auch unsere Vorstellung, dass es sich bei der Ursache dieser neuerkannten Epidemie wahrscheinlich um ein Virus handelte. Die ersten Fälle wurden bei Blutern festgestellt, was darauf hinwies, dass wahrscheinlich ein Virus die Ursache dieser neu auftauchenden Krankheit war. Und es geschah durch unsere Kollegen, die Kliniker, dass wir am Pasteur-Institut "mobilisiert" wurden. Sie kamen zu uns, weil einige von ihnen Ausbildungs- und Virologiekurse bei uns am Pasteur-Institut belegten, und sie erinnerten sich daran, dass Luc Montagnier und Chermann und ich Kurse über Retroviren abhielten. Diese Geschichte begann also tatsächlich wie eine gute Gelegenheit an dem Punkt, der die Entwicklung einer Technologie mit der Entwicklung der Forschung über Retroviren zusammenbrachte. Alles beginnt mit Möglichkeiten, damit, dass man sich mit guter Technologie zur richtigen Zeit am richtigen Ort befindet. Doch zu dieser Zeit wurde der erste menschliche Retrovirus in den USA von der Gruppe von Robert Gallo identifiziert, und dieser menschliche Retrovirus verursachte die T-Zellen-Leukämie. Der Virus infizierte T-Zellen. Also kamen unsere Kollegen und die Kliniker zu uns an das Pasteur-Institut und fragten uns, ob wir der Meinung seien, dass HTLV die Ursache von AIDS sein könnte. Und unsere erste Reaktion - wenn ich mich recht erinnere - bestand darin, dass wir sagten, dies sei merkwürdig, weil HTLV die T-Lymphozyten verändert, und sie erklären uns soeben, dass die Zellen in den Patienten absterben. Wir sollten uns daran erinnern, dass bei anderen Retroviren, wie zum Beispiel dem Leukämievirus der Katzen, die Katzen an Immunschwäche sterben, bevor sie an Leukämie sterben. Durch einen technologischen Fortschritt, der ein paar Jahre vorher erzielt worden war, gelang die Bestimmung des sogenannten T-Zellenwachstumsfaktors, der jetzt unter dem Namen Interleukin 2 bekannt ist. Und dies bedeutete, dass wir mithilfe dieser Zellfaktoren in der Lage waren, die Lymphozyten im Labor wachsen zu lassen. So ist es tatsächlich dieses kollektive Abenteuer, das in den frühen 1980er Jahren begann, eine wirkliche Mobilisation unserer Kollegen, der Kliniker. Wir hatten ein sehr entscheidendes Treffen im Pasteur-Institut, bei dem wir sehr einfache Fragen stellten: wann, wo und wie wir nach welchem Virus suchen sollten. Ich zeige dieses Dia für die jungen Forscher. Es soll auch dazu dienen, dass wir uns bewusst bleiben, dass man mit dogmatischen Behauptungen vorsichtig sein muss. Wenn wir mit der Vorstellung begonnen hätten, dass HTLV die Ursache der Krankheit sein könnte, wäre die Vorgehensweise, die wir verwendet hätten, mit Sicherheit ohne Erfolg gewesen. So wurde also das Virus im Jahre 1983 erkannt. Es wurde damals als mit "Lymphadenopathie assoziiertes Virus" bezeichnet, denn wir entschieden uns, in den Lymphknoten der Patienten nach dem Virus zu suchen. Und eine weitere wichtige Entscheidung bestand darin, die Zellkultur, die von den linken Lymphknoten entnommen war, alle drei oder vier Tage daraufhin zu untersuchen, ob darin eine umgekehrt-transitive Aktivität bei den Enzymen festzustellen war, die für die Familie der Retroviren spezifisch ist. Und dies war ebenfalls eine wichtige Entscheidung: der Zeitpunkt, zu dem wir danach suchten. Einige Tage nach [dem Ansatz] der Zellkultur stellten wir die ersten Anzeichen des Krankheitsvirus in unserem Überstand fest. Unmittelbar nach dieser ersten Identifizierung des Virus dachten wir natürlich daran, so schnell wie möglich zur Anwendung überzugehen. Zunächst hatten wir es mit einem Notfall zu tun, der darin bestand, zu verhindern, dass bei Blutübertragungen der HIV-Virus mitübertragen wurde, dieser neue Virus der Bluter. Dies bedeutete, dass wir Diagnosetests entwickeln mussten. Das geschah sehr schnell, und diese Tests wurden parallel dazu verwendet, sehr groß angelegte epidemiologische Studien durchzuführen, um die Verbindung zwischen dem Virus und der Krankheit selbst herzustellen. Natürlich standen diese Diagnose-Kits für Tests zur Verfügung, um die Übertragung von Müttern auf ihre Kinder zu verhindern und um durch Informationen, Beratung usw. zu versuchen, eine Verhinderung der sexuellen Übertragung zu bewirken. Gemeinsam bemühten wir uns um eine schnelle Isolierung des Virus. Wir mobilisierten unsere Kollegen in der Immunologie zur Zusammenarbeit mit uns, um die Tropismen des Virus zu erforschen. Wir konnten sehr bald zeigen, dass der Virus vorzugsweise ECD4-Lymphozyten infizierte, doch auch, dass das CD4-Molekül selbst ein Rezeptor des Virus war. Das war der Ausgangspunkt für die Beobachtung der CD4-Zellen in den Patienten, und sie wird auch heute noch eingesetzt. Nach der Mobilisierung unserer Kollegen und der Molekularbiologen am Pasteur-Institut begannen wir sehr schnell, das Genom des HIV-Virus zu charakterisieren und einen Repetitionszyklus des Virus in Target-Zellen zu beschreiben. Mit einem anderen Kollegen begannen wir, eine reverse Transkriptase des Virus zu charakterisieren, dass Einzelmoleküle der reversen Transkriptase für die Entwicklung von Therapien wichtig sein könnten. Tatsächlich war das erste Medikament gegen Retroviren, das eine Wirkung zeigte, AZT. AZT war zwar als Therapie nicht ausreichend, doch AZT war das erste Medikament, das bewies, dass man die Übertragung von der Mutter auf ihr Kind verhindern kann. Und sie haben soeben von Professor Montagnier gehört, dass wir heute, seit 1996, über eine sehr effektive, aus drei Komponenten bestehende Therapie verfügen, die auch als "hochaktive antiretrovirale Therapie" (HAART) bezeichnet wird. Wir charakterisierten das Genom des Virus und stellten sehr schnell fest, dass es eine sehr komplexe Struktur aufweist. Die Struktur des Virus haben Sie soeben auf dem Dia von Professor Montagnier gesehen, und schon sehr bald - bereits 1984 - wussten wir, dass wir es mit einen sehr widerstandsfähigen Virus zu tun hatten. Die Bestimmung des Genoms des HIV-Virus war jedoch mit Sicherheit die Grundlage für die spätere Entwicklung eines Überwachungstests zur Messung der Virusbelastung des Patienten und außerdem zur Beobachtung der Resistenz gegen die antiretrovirale Behandlung. In der Zwischenzeit, seit Beginn des Jahres 1983, hat es natürlich beachtliche Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis [des Virus] sowie in der Veränderung seiner Biologie und Pathogenese gegeben. Auf sämtliche Einzelheiten dieser Fortschritte, die in diesem Dia wiedergegeben sind, werde ich nicht eingehen. Ich wollte Ihnen lediglich sagen, dass wir natürlich wissen, dass der HIV-Virus aus einer Übertragung des Virus von Affen auf den Menschen hervorgegangen ist, obwohl die Übertragungen nur selten gewesen sind. Und selbstverständlich haben wir große Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis der Wechselwirkung des Virus mit dem Host gemacht, und dies hat zur Erweiterung unseres Wissens über den Ausgang der Krankheit geführt. Es hat große Fortschritte bei der Diagnose und Behandlung gegeben, doch wie sie wissen, war die Suche nach einem Impfstoff bislang nicht sehr erfolgreich. Diese Suche begann bereits 1985/86, und bis heute verfügen wir noch über keinen wirksamen Impfstoff. Eine weitere Entdeckung - zumindest für mich - war die Tatsache, dass wir mit einer globalen Epidemie konfrontiert sein werden. Bereits 1985 hatte ich persönlich die Gelegenheit, in die Zentralafrikanische Republik zu reisen und die Situation dort und in anderen Ländern kennen zu lernen. Die Geschichte begann also mit der Entdeckung der Krankheit in den USA im Jahre 1981, gefolgt von der Entdeckung des Virus in Frankreich, doch tatsächlich müssen wir uns auf eine globale Epidemie gefasst machen, und wir sollten wirklich lernen, wie wir alle zusammenarbeiten können. Ich erwähnte die Zentralafrikanische Republik. Kurz darauf ging ich jedoch im Jahre 1988 nach Südostasien, und ich war dort, bevor 1990 in Vietnam der erste Fall einer HIV-Infektion erkannt wurde. Dies ist tatsächlich der Beginn einer anderen Geschichte, der Geschichte darüber, wie wichtig es ist, dass wir in unserer Verantwortung als Wissenschaftler den politisch Verantwortlichen und Machthabern wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial liefern und davon zu überzeugen, in ihren Ländern zu intervenieren. Es ist für die Bereitstellung von wissenschaftlichem Beweismaterial wichtig, eine multidisziplinäre Forschung durchzuführen und mit den von HIV Betroffenen zusammenzuarbeiten. Ihre Teilnahme ist meiner Meinung nach beispielhaft auf dem Gebiet der HIV-Forschung. Wir alle - Wissenschaftler, Ärzte und Aktivisten - haben gelernt zusammenzuarbeiten. In den Entwicklungsländern ist es sehr wichtig, wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial direkt vor Ort zu liefern und multidisziplinäre Forschungen an Ort und Stelle durchzuführen, um dieses wissenschaftliche Material lokal verfügbar zu machen. So lässt sich durch die Überzeugung der politisch Verantwortlichen eine Intervention in Gang bringen. Wie ich gestern gehört habe, fragen Studenten und junge Forscher, die aus Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen stammen, ob sie einen Beitrag leisten können. Natürlich können Sie einen Beitrag leisten, und sie werden einen Beitrag leisten. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV - und sicherlich auch auf anderen Gebieten - gibt es in Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen große Fortschritte in der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. Diese Beiträge aus dem Lande selbst sind für [politische] Entscheidungen sehr wichtig, zum Wohl der öffentlichen Gesundheit in ihrem eigenen Land. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV hat es Fortschritte beim Zugang zu antiretroviralen Behandlungen gegeben. Dies ist ein Bericht von UNAIDS WHO vom letzten Jahr (2009). Er zeigt, dass wir den Zugang zu Behandlungen zwischen Ende des Jahres 2003 und Ende des Jahres 2008, wie Sie auf diesem Dia sehen können, um das Zehnfache verbessert haben. Dies bedeutet, dass etwa 40 % der Patienten, die eine antiretrovirale Behandlung benötigen, eine solche Behandlung auch bekommen. Dies ist ein schlechtes Ergebnis und bleibt hinter den WHO-Empfehlungen zurück, die besagen, dass Patienten behandelt werden sollten, wenn sie 200 CD4-Zellen haben oder weniger. Wir wissen heute, dass die Empfehlung lautet, Patienten zu behandeln, wenn es mehr CD4-Zellen gibt: 350. Wir wissen, dass die Reaktion auf eine antiretrovirale Behandlung dann wesentlich besser ausfällt. Das bedeutet also, dass alles, was bisher getan worden ist, bereits wunderbar ist, doch es reicht längst nicht aus. Wir wissen heute, dass auf zwei Patienten, die eine Behandlung beginnen, fünf neuinfizierte Fälle kommen. Und es gibt jährlich immer noch 2,7 Millionen Fälle von Neuinfektionen. Heute leben weltweit mehr als 30 Millionen Menschen mit HIV, und jährlich kommt es zu 2,5 Millionen Todesfällen. Die Bemühungen sollten also fortgesetzt werden. Die Bemühungen sollten besonders dort fortgesetzt werden, wo eine zukünftige Strategie erforderlich ist, um die Häufigkeit von HIV-1 weltweit zu verringern. Und natürlich wird dies durch eine Kombination von Vorgehensweisen geschehen. Eine Vorgehensweise basiert auf der Verhaltensänderung, und dafür ist natürlich Information, Wissensvermittlung sehr wichtig. Und als Forscher müssen wir an diesen Programmen der Wissensvermittlung ebenfalls teilnehmen. Es gibt biomedizinische Strategien, wie beispielsweise die Verwendung von Kondomen, wie die Beschneidung. Man hat bewiesen, dass sie das Risiko einer Ansteckung um 50-60 % verringert. Und außerdem steht uns die antiretrovirale Behandlung zur Verfügung. Dies zeigt uns bereits, dass eine Behandlung in Form einer Prävention eine sehr gute Vorgehensweise ist, um das Ansteckungsrisiko zu verringern. Es zeigt sich, dass es zu einer 90%igen Verringerung des Übertragungsrisikos kommt, wenn sich jemand in Behandlung befindet. Ein Teil der Vorgehensweise zur Verringerung der Ansteckungshäufigkeit ist sicherlich auch die globale Verbesserung der sozialen Gerechtigkeit und des Respekts für Menschenrechte, denn wenn wir die Behandlung früher beginnen wollen, müssen wir die Testmethoden verbessern. Und zur Verbesserung der Tests müssen wir gegen die Diskriminierung und Stigmatisierung der HIV-positiven Patienten kämpfen. Denn dies ist heute eines der wichtigen Hindernisse für jemanden, wenn es darum geht, sich testen zu lassen: Sie haben Angst vor dem Blick der anderen. Dies ist also eine Kombination dieser Vorgehensweisen: eine breit angelegte biochemische Vorgehensweise und die anderen Aspekte, an denen wir in Zukunft arbeiten müssen. Eine weitere Komponente der Strategie wird natürlich der Impfstoff sein. Doch wir haben immer noch keinen Impfstoff gefunden. Wir müssen also über die neuen therapeutischen Präventionsstrategien für morgen nachdenken. Auf diesem Dia sehen Sie zwei Bilder, eine Darstellung der Situation. Um mich kurz zu fassen, spreche ich über die nördliche Hemisphäre. Heute sprechen wir nicht mehr über AIDS-Sterblichkeit, sondern über chronische HIV-Infektion. Patienten leben mit AIDS. In den armen Ländern haben wir nach wie vor eine AIDS-Sterblichkeit. Auf diesem Dia können Sie hier sehen, dass in unseren Ländern in Europa, in den USA, die Sterblichkeit von HIV-infizierten Menschen tatsächlich identisch ist mit derjenigen der Restbevölkerung. In anderen Ländern haben wir noch immer eine Sterblichkeit von 8 - 26 %, sogar noch im ersten Jahr nach Beginn der Behandlung. Dies bedeutet also, dass wir den Zugang zur Therapie verbessern müssen, wie ich gesagt habe. Außerdem müssen wir den Zugang schwangerer Frauen zu einer antiretroviralen Behandlung verbessern. Nur 45 % von ihnen haben Zugang zu einer Behandlung. Wir können diesem Dia jedoch auch noch einige andere Herausforderungen entnehmen, mit denen wir in Zukunft konfrontiert sein werden. Professor Montagnier erwähnte vorhin die virale Latenz im HIV-Reservoir. Dies ist ein kritischer Punkt, denn wir können die Behandlung nicht abbrechen, und wir brauchen neue Behandlungsmethoden, zumindest um die Größe des Reservoirs zukünftig zu verringern. Ein weiterer kritischer Punkt der HIV-Forschung betrifft das bessere Verständnis des Mechanismus, durch den das Virus oder die virale Komponente sehr schnell zur Aktivierung von Entzündungen führt. Wir wissen, dass es nach einer anti-retroviralen Behandlung nur zu einer unzureichenden Wiederherstellung des Immunsystems kommt. In unseren Ländern, in Europa und in den USA, haben wir es mit einer neuen Komplikation zu tun, die mit der längerfristigen HAART-Therapie zusammenhängt. Diesem Dia können Sie beispielsweise entnehmen, dass 8 % der Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, eine Erkrankung der Herzkranzgefäße entwickeln. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zur Entstehung von Krebs, wie ich bereits erwähnte. Sie erkranken hauptsächlich an Lymphomen, jedoch auch an anderen Krebsarten, 15 % von ihnen. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zu Erkrankungen der Leber, bei etwa 7 %. Und wir sehen bei immer mehr Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, nun neurologische Erkrankungen, Alterskrankheiten wie Osteoporose und Alzheimer-ähnliche Erkrankungen. Wir müssen demnach die entsprechende Situation verbessern und die Gründe erkennen, warum es zu solchen Komplikationen kommt. und welches die Rolle von HAART in Verbindung mit der viralen Komponente ist. Wir brauchen also heute noch weitere Forschungen. Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, haben wir gewiss vieles über die HIV-Pathogenese gelernt, doch wir müssen noch wesentlich mehr lernen, insbesondere sehr viel mehr über diese erste frühe Phase der Infektion, die auf meinem Dia grau dargestellt ist. Wie Sie sehen, der Phase der ersten, sagen wir Woche, ich wollte schon sagen: der ersten Stunden nach der Infektion. Es stehen uns bereits Daten zur Verfügung, die darauf hinweisen, dass sich schon innerhalb der ersten 96 Stunden nach der Infektion durch das Virus alles entscheidet. Wenn ich sage, dass sich alles über den Ausgang der HIV-Infektion entscheidet, so bedeutet das, dass jemand sehr schnell, nachdem er dem Virus ausgesetzt ist, die Infektion selbst bekommt, dass sich das Virus im Körper verteilt. Es etabliert sich im Körper, wie sie auf dem roten Teil am unteren Rand des Dias sehen können, das die Etablierung der HIV-Latenz und das HIV-Reservoir zeigt. Wir müssen auch die Mechanismen besser verstehen, mit denen sich beispielsweise die chronische Immunaktivierung erklären lässt und wie wir die chronische Immunaktivierung steuern können, wie wir die Etablierung des Reservoirs steuern können. Wir alle hier wissen, dass wir es mit einer komplexen Wechselwirkung zwischen dem Virus, den viralen Komponenten und dem Host selbst zu tun haben. Selbstverständlich haben wir einiges über die Vielfalt des HIV-Virus gelernt, wir kennen den Tropismus des Virus und die Variationen seines Tropismus und die Kapazität des Virus. Außerdem kennen wir einige der Variationen, die auf das Virus zurückzuführen sind. Einige der Variationen sind auch auf Faktoren in der Host-Zelle zurückzuführen. Sie haben mit dem Lebenszyklus des Virus zu tun. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen über eine intrinsische Zellabwehr mit Restriktionsfaktoren verfügen. Sie wurden entdeckt, wie zum Beispiel APOBEC, TRIM5 Alpha und Tetherin, der zuletzt entdeckte Faktor. Des Weiteren wissen wir, dass das Virus und Komponenten des Virus über die Fähigkeit verfügen, das Immunsystem zu schwächen. Sie können ein abnormales Aktivierungssignal induzieren. Einige der viralen Komponenten, die Abnormalitäten induzieren können, sind die Hülle des Virus, das nef-Protein, vpr usw. Und natürlich wirken sie sich auf die Immunreaktion aus, sowohl auf die alternierende als auch auf die adaptive Immunreaktion. Natürlich ist auch die Genetik des Hosts für seine Immunreaktion ebenfalls wichtig. Wir müssen demzufolge sowohl die genetische Vielfalt des Hosts als auch die genetische Vielfalt des Virus selbst in Betracht ziehen. Es gibt eine distinkte, angeborene Entzündungsreaktion auf eine HIV-, SIV-Infektion des Hosts, und wir wissen, dass diese distinkte Reaktion tatsächlich von dem Dialog abhängt, vom Dialog zwischen den verschiedenen Akteuren unserer Immunverteidigung. Wir müssen die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen betrachten. Sie wissen, dass es sich hierbei um eine Abwehr handelt. Verschiedene Akteure spielen eine Schlüsselrolle, wie etwa die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen, wie natürliche Killerzellen, T-Zellen usw. Natürlich B-Zellen für die Produktion von Antikörpern. Doch sie müssen bedenken, dass das Virus kommt, HIV und virales Protein, das von plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen erkannt werden kann. Doch die Reaktion der plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen durch Rezeptoren, Rezeptoren wie TLRs, doch vielleicht sogar durch andere Rezeptoren. In Kürze wird beispielsweise ein Aufsatz erscheinen, der beweist, dass ein Restriktionsfaktor von TRIM5 alpha ein Rezeptor sein könnte. Wir müssen also die Wechselwirkung zwischen Rezeptoren und Liganden betrachten. Und gemäß der Vielfalt sowohl der Rezeptoren als auch der Liganden kann man es mit verschiedenen angeborenen Reaktionen zu tun haben: angeborene Reaktionen im Zusammenhang mit pDCs, NK-Zellen und selbstverständlich solche, bei denen sich als Konsequenz ein unterschiedlicher Einsatz der Aktivierung derjenigen Zellen ergibt, die für die B-Zellen- und T-Zellen-Reaktion in lymphatischem Gewebe kritisch sind, wie zum Beispiel in Lymphknoten, wie es auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Doch wir müssen, wie ich gesagt habe, die Vielfalt der Host-Rezeptoren oder Liganden betrachten. Wie beispielsweise die NK-Rezeptoren, die wichtig sind, und KIR. Wir wissen, dass der genetische Polymorphismus von KIR die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst. Wir wissen, dass HLADR selbstverständlich die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst, und wir wissen, dass nef HLA herunterreguliert, zu Molekülen der Klasse 1. Wir müssen also bei der distinkten angeborenen Entzündungsreaktion, die zum Ergebnis der distinkten HIV-, SIV-Erkrankung führt, sowohl die Vielfalt des Hosts als auch des Virus berücksichtigen. Und wir können aus diesem mannigfaltigen Reaktionsspektrum manches lernen. Tatsächlich sind es verschiedene Modelle, die verwendet werden können, um den Schutz vor HIV oder vor AIDS besser zu verstehen. Ich will Ihnen kurz auf diesem Dia zwei der Modelle zeigen, über die wir zur Zeit in meinem Labor und über die auch andere arbeiten. Zuerst haben wir HIV-Controller oder SIV-Controller in den Affen. Diese sind sehr interessant, da sie das Reservoir auf natürliche Weise kontrollieren. Sie haben ein Reservoir auf niedriger Ebene. In den Affen lässt sich keine Virusbelastung nachweisen, die Vermehrung des Virus wird auf natürliche Weise kontrolliert. Das andere Modell sind die afrikanischen Primaten. Sie sind zu 40-50 % durch SIV infiziert, doch sie entwickeln die Krankheit nicht. Warum? Da sie über keine abnormale Immunaktivierung des Immunsystems verfügen. Sie haben daher keine abnormale Entzündung. Wir können also beiden Modellen Einsichten entnehmen, und wir beginnen durch beide Modelle unser Verständnis zu vertiefen. Wir wissen bereits, dass die meisten von ihnen HLA, B57, B27 sind. Wir wissen, dass etwa die Hälfte von ihnen eine sehr starke CD8-Reaktion hat. vielleicht jedoch durch eine angeborene Immunität oder durch eine virale Komponente. Und wir lernen also auch von den Affen. Abschließend würde ich demnach sagen, dass wir über HIV etwas lernen, doch ich bin davon überzeugt und ich möchte glauben, dass wir etwas über HIV AIDS hinaus lernen können. HIV ist ein Retrovirus, und wie ich soeben erwähnte, haben wir es natürlich mit neuen Herausforderungen zu tun, mit Krebs, mit Alterskrankheiten und der HIV-Krankheit. Wir wissen, dass Retroviren in Tieren vorkommen. Wir haben sie am Ende der sechziger Jahre als mögliche Erreger von Krebs und Leukämie intensiv studiert. Doch heute könnte auch HIV ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Krebs und Lymphome besser zu verstehen. HIV könnte sicherlich auch ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Immundefekte und Tumoren zu verstehen, die auf Entzündungen und Autoimmunphänomene zurückzuführen sind. Und das letzte Dia besagt, dass HIV AIDS von Anfang an ein wunderbares wissenschaftliches und menschliches Abenteuer gewesen ist, das noch andauert. Wir haben neue Herausforderungen, eine neue Technologie und neue Konzepte und - um auch dies zu erwähnen - eine neue Generation von Akteuren. Sie werden für die neuen Entdeckungen verantwortlich sein. Sie müssen jedoch Folgendes berücksichtigen: Sie müssen zusammenarbeiten, in Verbindung mit anderen, wie es auf meinen Dia dargestellt ist. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit klinischer und operationaler Forschung. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit verschiedenen Disziplinen und auch mit einer Disziplin, die ich auf meinen Dia erwähne, die aber in Lindau nicht repräsentiert ist: mit der Wissenschaft der Sozialökonomie, die ebenfalls ein wichtiger Teil ist. Und zusammen arbeiten, alle zusammen mit den Patienten selbst. Ich danke Ihnen sehr für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi on the advantage of using non-human primates for research into fighting AIDS
(00:27:43 - 00:28:11)

 

Even better than non-human primates, of course, are humans themselves. If we are interested in human disease and human biology, would it not better to simply to study these processes in human subjects? For instance, even though mice are widely used to study cancer, findings can only be extrapolated to a certain extent. Mice remain significantly different from us in terms of the environments in which they have evolved and in many aspects of physiology. 

One way in which human material can be used as a model is to use human cell lines. These are cells that have been isolated from human tissues and have generally been immortalised; i.e., they can continue to divide indefinitely. Even though the use of such cell lines to study the complex pathogenesis of human disease is limited, they do represent excellent models in which to probe cell biology and biochemistry. One of the most commonly used immortalised human cell line is called HeLa after Henrietta Lacks, the woman from whom the cells were isolated in 1951. Lacks died of cervical cancer and the cells were derived and expanded from her tumour without her knowledge or consent or that of her family’s. HeLa cells have been directly involved in many ground-breaking discoveries, such as the discovery of the polio vaccine and the development of the human papilloma virus vaccine by Harald zur Hausen. Why exactly did zur Hausen use Hela cells? It turns out these cells have in fact been immortalised by a virus called HPV-18.

 

Harald  zur Hausen (2014) - Infections Linked to Human Cancers: Mechanisms and Synergisms

It is really a great pleasure for me as well to be here today. Let me start out with a more general remark in the beginning. The interpretation that human cancer is linked to an imbalance between oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes really found enormous fascination in the scientific public and also among, of course, those people who invented this. The involvement of infectious agents in human cancer are basically a disturbing factor in this beautiful picture. And in a way to such an extent that even some of the protagonists in this field don’t even like so much to discuss this aspect. This in spite of the fact that today we know that about slightly more than 20% of human cancers are linked to infections, not only virus infections but also bacteria and parasitic infections. That we are presently able to prevent or are in the process of preventing 2 major human cancers, hepatitis B linked liver cancer and cervical cancer by vaccination. And that even the 20 tons of HeLa cells which have been, supposedly, been produced during a long period of cultivation, of decades of cultivation. That they as a result of a continued expression of 2 specific viral oncogenes namely A6, A7 genes of human papillomavirus type 18, so far - if you switch them off, the HeLa cells wouldn’t be any more malignant cells. Now what I try to do today is just to very briefly go into some aspects of mechanism of carcinogenesis. But since each of these topics would require probably another lecture, I’ll just leave it as that what it indicated here. We can basically differentiate between 2 types of interactions of infectious agents in carcinogenesis. Namely what we call 'direct carcinogenesis' where the presence and, in many instances, expression of specific viral components is required for the tumorigenic growth of the respective types of cells. Frequently accompanied by the integration of viral DNA to chromosomal DNA. There may be not a human example but clearly an animal one. An insertional gene activation or suppression of specific cellular genes. And even this is a novel and quite interesting aspect which probably deserves much more attention, namely the continued episomal presence of viral nucleic acid. And the suppression and activation of cellular genes, for instance by viral micro RNase, under those circumstances. Now besides this we have a number of indirect interactions. Where a number of agents are able, either by the induction of immunosuppression. In this case, Francoise Barre-Sinoussi discussed it very intensively with you, by immunosuppression leading to the activation of latent tumour virus genomes. For instance resulting in Kaposi sarcomas due to the human herpes virus type 8. Or B cell lymphomas due to Epstein-Barr virus. The induction of oxygen and nitrogen radicals by some of the infectious events, linked really to inflammatory events. Another interesting and very poorly investigated aspect is the amplification of other latent tumour virus DNA by co-infecting the same cell by other agents like herpes viruses, adenoviruses, vaccine viruses, pox viruses. The induction of mutations and/or translocations, also of epigenetic modifications. And the prevention of apoptosis, the self-programmed cell death. Well I initially had planned to discuss this in more detail today. But I decided in the end to change my topic a little bit and to come mainly to perspectives which came up, particularly in recent periods of times. Now we can at the beginning state that none of the infectious agents is inducing cancer as a direct consequence of infection. Wherever this is happening, and there is a rare exception: This person inherited already some genetic modifications prior to the development of the infection and subsequently of the tumour. So even some of these infectious agents emerged as necessary factors for the respective form of cancer. As for instance indicated in the case of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. They uniformly require additional epigenetic modifications, commonly in host cell genes. And really this requirement of additional modifications is an explanation for the varying latency periods between individual agents, between primary infection and cancer development. And in host cell genes these modifications are either inherited or most frequently acquired during lifetime. They may, however, also occur as in the rare case of a specific human polyomavirus, a merkel polyomavirus, within in the genome of the infecting agent. So there are a number of varieties possible here. And this really brings me directly to a topic which maybe is a slightly unorthodox and probably also somewhat anti-dogmatic view of some of the developments in human cancer and in chronic diseases. I have shown this slide at a couple of different times, I think initially even in Stockholm just for the first time, as epidemiological evidences that still some cancers exist which have not yet been linked to infections, but where the epidemiology may point to an infectious event in the background of this type of cancer. Now cancers occurring at increased frequency under immunosuppression, I am not going to dwell on this anymore. There are still a couple of cancers like kidney cancer, thyroid cancer which are increased under immunosuppression. They have not yet been linked to infectious events but clearly others are, which are highly increased under those conditions. Cancers with reduced incidence under immunosuppression, an extremely interesting topic. And I will come, if the time permits it, at the end back to this question. Cancers influenced by other basically nontumorigenic infections. This concerns mainly childhood cancers occurring in the first years of life. Again I will quit this today, although it is an extremely interesting topic. And I will mainly concentrate on nutritional risk factors possibly linked to infection. And here cancer of the colon sticks out since quite a long time. There are a large number of reports. Prospective epidemiological studies which very uniformly, with maybe 2 or 3 exceptions only, ascribe a higher incidence rate of approximately 20 to 30% mainly of colon cancer. It’s usually in epidemiological studies combined with rectal cancer, although this may not be fully justified. Linking it to the higher rate of consumption of red or processed meat, air dried, smoked meat and so on, in particular of beef. I am coming to this point specifically. Countries with the highest rate of red meat consumption are listed here, commonly reveal a very high rate of colon cancer and colorectal cancer. If you look into the incident data for this type of cancer, established in the world cancer report, you can see that here for instance in 4 European countries - and it accounts probably, it's true for most other European countries as well In other parts of the world it’s slightly different. Specifically in the United States, the rate is going down right now. Probably due to effective screening procedures, colonoscopies which are being conducted, leading to the discovery of precursor lesions and the removal of the precursor lesions. And thus to the reduction in the cancer rate. In Japan and Korea the rate is rapidly increasing, 20 years after the Second World War and 20 years after the Korean War. India, a very interesting example as well, has a very low rate of this type of cancer. Now since more than 30 years ago, when Sugimura in Tokyo discovered that broiling, roasting, grilling, frying of meat leads to the formation of chemical carcinogens in the preparatory process of consumption, forming heterocyclic amines, heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and so on, a couple of others. And this seemed to explain fully the story that here are chemical carcinogens being produced which at least in animal models are also carcinogenic, but specifically for the colon. And they’re usually applied in concentrations 1,000 to 10,000 or higher than under these natural conditions of preparing this food. But clearly they are carcinogens and this would very well fit into the story. And I believe that the large majority of epidemiologists is even up to today deeply convinced that this is a major factor in the so called western diet as one of the risk factors for the development of this type of cancer. The story would fit very nicely if there wouldn't be some exceptions from this rule. First of all the production of, the preparation of poultry and fish by the same types of procedure, grilling, barbecue and frying and so on leads to the formation of the same chemical carcinogens. Sometimes even at higher concentrations than in a well broiled or barbecued steak under those conditions. And for fish even it has been claimed that it has a somewhat protective effect for colon cancer. But there are a few other points which are quite interesting because if you look into the global epidemiology of colon cancer, colorectal cancer. You can see that there are parts of the world, northern America, Europe, this part of Russia with very high incidence. Australia by the way belongs to them, particularly the white population in South Africa is effected to a large degree, Argentina - those are the so called high risk countries for this type of cancer. But there are a few which are quite unusual because Mongolia for instance, India and Bolivia because the rates there consistently has been shown to be very low, of this type of cancer. Now Mongolia is a particularly striking and interesting example. This is shown here. There are a couple of studies which are very well conducted, demonstrating that the rate of colon cancer is very low, the mortality is very low. There are a few other parts in south East Asia, a few islands in particular, with low rate. But if you take Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Brunei, Singapore, they have very high rates again of the same types of cancer. So if it's red meat in particular, what is the red meat consumption in Mongolia? Well, Mongolia is supposed to have the highest red meat consumption in the world in comparison to all other countries. Particularly barbecued, grilled meat and also air dried meat. So that is an interesting point. So what kind of meat is being consumed in Mongolia? And I found this type of statistics here to say it’s mainly Yak meat. It’s a different species of cattle. It’s not our common dairy cattle. It's mutton and goat, camel meat, horse meat and so on. As I said before it’s mainly consumed this way. And it’s interesting, in recent years there’s an introduction also of dairy products from the west to Mongolia. And also to some degree some dairy meat is being, dairy cattle meat is being introduced in the same country. So there are some differences. And this made me into a kind of a specialist in cattle by now. Because these are the common, the ox or the common ancestor of those types of cattle which we call basically now 'the dairy cattle' globally. The Zebus are clearly a different species, very distantly related. Also they are still able to cross breed with those here. Water buffalos don’t seem to play a role in this whole discussion. But Yaks are clearly important in this respect. They are mainly kept in the mountainous areas and also in the plains of Mongolia, and also of Tibet and parts of China. In Africa for instance it is interesting. Watusi cattle with these enormously long horns which have, obviously, as it has been shown by genetic studies and the dark area here indicates this, a very high mixture of Zebu blood in them, cross breeding with Zebu. Here in Asia the Zebu play a significant role. In Bolivia, and this is Bolivia here, indeed there is mainly Zebu being maintained at the same time. So what it led us to suspect is that really the risk factor in red meat seems to be particularly our dairy cattle, our common dairy cattle. And if you look into the geographic distribution - this is another type of showing this picture. By the way, in China we have also high mixture of Zebu cattle, the so called yellow cattle in China, which is mainly maintained. But of course also pork meat is mainly consumed. It has an intermediate rate in comparison to some of the other high risk areas. By the way Bolivia is indicated in the wrong place but it is clearly Bolivia. Now again I have shown this slide a couple of years ago, probably the first time in Stockholm. And this is really intriguing us since quite a long time. Namely that we do know a couple of human pathogenic viruses. Well in many incidences they are pathogenic in humans but consistently, persistently maintained and even excreted, like the polyomavirus BK and JC, some adenoviruses, to a limited degree also Epstein-Barr virus and high-risk human papillomavirus. But they clearly produce tumours under certain circumstances. But let’s say if you transfer those agents to other species in which they cannot replicate. where they are replication-deficient, they are very actively producing tumours under those conditions. And there’s in all monkeys even by the JC virus, gliomas have been induced. Now this really triggered the consideration: Is it possible that some of the animals with which we live in our close proximity, that they do have similar agents? Not pathogenic, in those animals in which they can replicate, but potentially pathogenic in other species, in humans, where they cannot replicate. Is it possible that the transmission occurs either by consumption of the product or by close contact that this is happening? Let’s go back for a moment to the situation in Japan and Korea because it’s particularly striking, this enormous increase. If you take these 2 curves away, 20 years after the Second World War, 20 years after the Korean War, they overlap completely. Virtually overlapping. Within this period of time enormous quantities of beef and dairy products, but also to some degree pork products, have been imported. But in particular from the United States to those countries. And the dietary customs changed a lot. Many of you have been in Japan I am sure and have experienced it yourself. That previously, in previous years the sashimi was a rare fish. Now you frequently get it offered as rare beef. And the sukiyaki also rare beef. The Shabu Shabu meat fondue, where you dip briefly rare slices of beef into boiling water and after a minute or so, when you take it out, the outside is well done, the inner side is still rare. As my host told me, this is the delicious part of this really. In Korea the Yuk Hwe became quite popular tartar, nicely decorated with egg yolk and vegetables. But anyway these types of customs are not only spreading in these 2 countries. But they are also spreading at present to Vietnam, to Thailand and to some of the other south East Asian countries which still have a relatively low rate of colon cancer. It will be interesting to see what is going to happen there in the future. Now for virologists air dried beef or air dried meat is the best preservative for keeping viruses in an infectious state. The Bünderfleisch in Switzerland, the Bresaola in Italy, the Kobe beef in Japan and the Biltong in South Africa are particularly interesting because it was in the past mainly consumed by the white population, the pieces of raw beef, air dried, but now recently became also very popular amongst the black population in South Africa as well. So this lead at our place to suspicions that there might exist a species-specific bovine factor causally involved in human colorectal cancer. And according to our interpretation this factor might represent a relatively thermo-resistant virus, not necessarily thermo-resistant but possibly, present in meals of raw and undercooked beef. It may lead to latent infections in the intestinal tract of those hosts. Its potential carcinogenic function, as we know it from most of the other tumorigenic agents in humans for instance, is suppressed by specific cellular proteins, cellular factors. And that preceding concomitant or subsequent mutation events, specifically those mediated by the chemical carcinogens arising in the preparatory steps for beef consumption. Or also chronic inflammatory events. In recent years specifically streptococcus bovis, streptococcus infantium as it is also called. Fusobacterium nucleatum have been relatively often reported that they may play a role here. But these are clearly involved in inflammatory events. They lead to the induction of oxygen radicals under those conditions and may act synergistically in the development of colon cancer. This is basically was the model. These are the 2 types of bacteria, the fusobacteria and the streptococci which I show here. But let me just come to the model which came up from these types of studies. Namely if you take this as the lifespan of humans, of let’s say 80 years. That we have arbitrarily an exposure to these putative infectious agents due to the consumption of raw or undercooked red meat, beef specifically apparently. This leads to transient or latent infection by putative carcinogenic viruses. But that on the other hand the consumption of cooked and cured red meat, due to the induction of mutations in host cell DNA by the chemical or the biological carcinogens like fusobacterium and streptococci, would lead to acquired genetic modifications. Again the arrows here arbitrarily introduced. Inherited genetic modifications would play quite a similar role here. Leading eventually to the formation of polyps and to subsequent development of tumours. Now can we approach this question experimentally? Yes I think we can and we did. Because we analysed a total of 120 sera from healthy cattle. All 5 year old healthy cows from the veterinary faculty of the University of Leipzig. We purified virus-like particles by initially purifying DNase- and RNase-resistant particles, extracted subsequently the sequence of DNA from these preparations. And thus far we came up with 18 novel agents which are present in the blood of these healthy cattle. All of them apparently single-stranded circular DNase, belonging to 4 different groups of so far only episomally persistent genomes. And isolation of some of these DNase also originated from milk samples. Obviously the presence in the blood also leads to the excretion into milk and probably also into dairy products. Similar to most other known single-stranded DNA viruses, we anticipate these agents will be relatively heat resistant. Although we do not have a direct proof of this because we don’t have really a working infectivity system so far established. This shows 5 of these isolates for instance with quite a number of variation in the size between here something like 1,000 nucleotides up to 2,900 nucleotides here on the upper right side. So there is a substantial variation among them, a wide variability. Now the analysis of one of these isolates. We have only done it with one of these isolates so far, for the presence of its DNA in several colon cancer cell lines yielded only negative results. But, and this is the surprising result of this whole story, we found evidence first of all for transmission of these agents to human cells, at least the kind of abortive cycle in human cells, and also links to non-malignant chronic neurological disorder. I am not willing to talk at this moment about this because it’s really in the process of intensive investigation at our place. But clearly there is some kind of a very interesting relationship becoming apparent which for us was clearly unexpected. We can conclude at this stage, for this part, that the blood of healthy dairy cattle contains infections with several specific single-stranded circular DNA molecules. Obviously encapsidated in a DNase and RNase resistant protein code. The DNA of at least of some of these agents can be demonstrated in commercially available pasteurised milk, an interesting point here, but we don’t know whether it’s still infectious or not. Those which may be human pathogenic are probably species-specific, persisting in European/Asian dairy cattle, probably not, although we have no proof of this either, not in Yak and Zebu cattle. It’s only derived from the epidemiological studies. And at least some of these newly isolated agents can be successfully transmitted to human cells. And are occasionally found in specific human sera and to specific human disorders. Now preliminary evidence points to the potential role of these agents in neurological diseases. Somewhat surprising was that under those conditions. These are the people who work on this aspect. Ethel-Michelle de Villiers who is here, who is really the main driver of the analysis and also of the DNA sequencing. The studies which have been conducted here. And Hermann Muller who provided us with the cattle sera and a couple of other devoted people who collaborate in the studies. And here are our involuntary collaborators. The cattle from Leipzig. Exactly the cows from which the blood has been obtained. Now let me just conclude by making a few additional statements. And that is interesting in terms of other types of cancers which have been linked to an increased risk after red meat consumption, and that is in particular breast cancer. There are a number of interesting studies which come up. And this morning even I discovered, there are more recently which came up along the same line: that red meat consumption is also a risk factor for breast cancer. There are some studies implying also for lung cancer and even for a couple of other cancers. But particular here the data are much more controversial. Now if you look into breast cancer, we have an interesting model. Breast cancer in humans is one of the few cancers where immunosuppression exerts a protective effect. In Aids patients and in renal or organ allograft recipients, the breast cancer incidence is reduced by about 15% in comparison to non-immunosuppressed controls. Now we have an animal model here, discovered originally by John Bittner in 1938 in the United States, the mouse mammary tumour virus. Because this virus is transmitted from the mothers feeding the new born babies via the milk of the respective mothers. And it passes through the intestines and settles down in the lymphocytes of the Peyer's patches, where it infects B and T cells leading to what is called super antigen induction. The cells virtually swell, diluted into the blood stream, produce large quantities of the virus. And infact the quantity of the virus is the responsible factor for reaching sufficient concentrations in the mammary gland. And here settling down in these regulating very specific pathways within, mainly within the wnt pathway under those circumstances, and to become activated by female hormones, particularly in the course of lactation and producing again virus particles to a large degree. Now if you immunosuppress these mice, the tumour incidence is reduced because the superantigen-producing cells are suppressed under those conditions. So the viral production is going down. And this lowers the risk for the subsequent events. Is the same happening in human breast cancer cells? We clearly don’t know at this stage, at this point. It deserves attention. Probably it might be much more worthwhile to look into potential carriers of the lymphatic system for such agents than looking specifically, only or exclusively into breast tissue itself. Now if you compare the geographic incidence of breast cancer and colon cancer: it is basically quite similar. It’s not absolutely identical but quite similar in many countries. Again here for instance Mongolia, Bolivia and also to some degree India stick out with a comparatively low rate of this type of cancer. But there are also some other interesting differences obvious. Bolivia for instance, where the Zebu cattle are quite prevalent is one of the countries where the rate of milk consumption is supposed to be the lowest one in the world. I have no chance to test this, I took it from this publication here. But if you look into the rate for colon cancer again which I showed before for Japan, Korea and India, there are some differences because colon cancer rose rapidly in this period of time. On the other hand breast cancer in Japan, also in Korea. rose only slightly during this period of time. In India it’s going up as well. Whereas colon cancer is basically remaining low under those circumstances. So if there is a factor involved, a similar factor as in colon cancer, we would suspect that it is not an identical factor but probably something which may occur from similar sources as colon cancer as well. Now it’s also interesting and these are my last 3 slides, I still have one minute, to look into the rate of breast cancer in the urban areas of Mongolia and in the rural areas of the same country. Here the rate of this type of cancer remained practically constant, in the urban areas it’s gradually increasing. I mentioned before that dairy products and some meat of dairy cattle have been introduced recently. They do not sustain very well in Mongolia due to the cold temperatures and they cannot be maintained there, because winter temperatures of minus 50 degrees are not tolerated by these animals. This is my very last slide. It shows that more than 20 epidemiological studies also point to an increased risk in butchers, slaughter house workers for lung and oropharyngeal cancer. This occupation group is regularly exposed to aerosols originating from handling slaughtered animals. The oropharynx and the lung should be the prime organs of exposure. Although initially suspected to originate from the heavy smoking habits of this group, even controlling for this, it didn’t modify the picture. So in a way that’s a new area emerging at least in our view. An area which points to potential role of episomally persisting agents which in most cases escape the deep sequencing essays of individual tumours. First of all in the process of isolating chromosomal DNA, and secondly in the bioinformatics filtering process subsequently which have in most cases, only very recently a few people pay more attention to it, have not been identified under those circumstances. Although we find for instance in colon cancer in almost 100% positivity for TT virus, another group of single-stranded agents which are quite common in humans. But we need to be open for those types of developments. They are different from our conventional models which we established for interaction of infections with cancer. But they may be even more worthwhile to study them intensively. Thank you very much for your attention. Applause.

Auch ich freue mich sehr, heute hier zu sein. Lassen Sie mich mit einer eher allgemeinen Anmerkung beginnen. Die Auslegung, dass Krebs beim Menschen mit einem Ungleichgewicht zwischen Onkogenen und Tumorsuppressorgenen zusammenhängt, erwies sich als großes Faszinosum in Wissenschaftskreisen, aber natürlich auch bei denjenigen, die diese Hypothese aufgestellt hatten. Die Tatsache, dass Krankheitserreger an der Entstehung von Krebs beim Menschen beteiligt sind, trübt dieses schöne Bild jedoch. Und zwar teilweise so erheblich, dass sogar einige der Vorkämpfer in diesem Bereich darüber nicht gerne diskutieren. Und das, obwohl wir heutzutage wissen, dass etwas mehr als 20% aller Krebserkrankungen beim Menschen mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen – Virusinfektionen, aber auch bakterielle Infektionen und Infektionen durch Parasiten. Und wir aktuell in der Lage sind, zwei der wichtigsten Krebsarten, nämlich mit Hepatitis B assoziierten Leberkrebs und Gebärmutterhalskrebs mittels Impfung vorzubeugen. Und dass HeLa-Zellen, von denen im Laufe der Jahrzehnte angeblich 20 Tonnen kultiviert wurden, ihre Malignität verlieren, wenn man die kontinuierliche Expression zweier spezifischer viraler Onkogene namens A6 und A7 Ich möchte heute versuchen, Ihnen in aller Kürze einige Aspekte des Karzinogenese-Mechanismus zu erläutern. Da für jeden dieser Aspekte wahrscheinlich ein eigener Vortrag nötig wäre, beschränke ich mich auf das, was Sie auf dieser Folie sehen. Es lassen sich im Wesentlichen 2 Arten von Wechselwirkungen dieser Krankheitserreger bei der Karzinogenese unterscheiden. Da ist einmal die 'direkte Karzinogenese', bei der für das tumorigene Wachstum der entsprechenden Zelltypen das Vorliegen und oftmals auch die Expression spezieller Viruskomponenten erforderlich ist, häufig begleitet vom Einbau der viralen DNA in die chromosomale DNA. Hierfür gibt es beim Menschen möglicherweise kein Beispiel, wohl aber beim Tier. Es kommt dabei zu einer insertionalen Genaktivierung bzw. Ein neuartiger und recht interessanter Aspekt, der wahrscheinlich erheblich mehr Aufmerksamkeit verdient, ist auch das durchgängige episomale Vorliegen viraler Nukleinsäuren sowie die unter diesen Umständen erfolgende Suppression und Aktivierung von Zellgenen, z. B. durch virale Mikro-RNase. Daneben gibt es eine Reihe indirekter Wechselwirkungen, bei denen einige Erreger durch Auslösung einer Immunsuppression latente Tumorvirusgenome aktivieren können Das humane Herpesvirus Typ 8 kann beispielsweise ein Kaposi-Sarkom hervorrufen und B-Zell-Lymphome können durch das Epstein-Barr-Virus entstehen. Die Bildung von Sauerstoff- und Stickstoffradikalen als Folge von Infektionen steht in der Tat mit Entzündungsreaktionen in Zusammenhang. Ein weiterer interessanter und nicht sehr genau erforschter Aspekt ist die Amplifizierung latenter Tumor-DNA anderer Viren durch Koinfektion derselben Zelle mit anderen Erregern wie z. B. Herpesviren, Adenoviren, Impfstoffviren oder Pockenviren, aber auch die Auslösung von Mutationen und/oder Translokationen oder sogar epigenetischen Modifikationen sowie die Verhinderung der Apoptose, des vorprogrammierten Zelltods. Ich hatte eigentlich vor, diesen Punkt heute etwas genauer zu diskutieren, habe mich aber schlussendlich entschieden, mein Thema ein wenig abzuändern und mich in erster Linie den Perspektiven zu widmen, die sich vor allem im jüngster Zeit ergeben haben. Wir können zu Beginn festhalten, dass durch keinen der Erreger, die aktuell mit Krebs beim Menschen assoziiert werden, seien es Viren, Bakterien oder Parasiten, als unmittelbare Folge der Infektion Krebs ausgelöst wird. Ist dies dennoch der Fall, handelt es sich um eine seltene Ausnahme, d. h. bei der Person lagen bereits vor dem Auftreten der Infektion und der anschließenden Entwicklung des Tumors vererbte genetische Modifikationen vor. Einige dieser Erreger erwiesen sich sogar als notwendige Voraussetzung für die jeweilige Krebsform, wie z. B. im Falle des humanen Papillomavirus beim Gebärmutterhalskrebs. Sie benötigen jedoch durchweg weitere epigenetische Modifikationen, für gewöhnlich in den Genen der Wirtszelle, was die zwischen den einzelnen Erregern variierenden Latenzzeiten von der Primärinfektion bis zur Krebsentwicklung erklärt. In den Genen der Wirtszelle haben sich diese Modifikationen entweder vererbt oder wurden, was häufiger der Fall ist, im Laufe des Lebens erworben. Sie können jedoch in seltenen Fällen, z. B. beim Merkelzell-Polyomavirus, einem spezifischen humanen Polyomavirus, auch im Genom des Erregers auftreten. Es gibt also eine Reihe von Möglichkeiten hier. Das führt mich direkt zu einem Thema, das vielleicht eine etwas unorthodoxe und wahrscheinlich auch antidogmatische Sicht auf die Entstehung von Krebs und chronischen Erkrankungen beim Menschen darstellt. Ich habe diese Folie bereits zu verschiedenen Gelegenheiten – ich denke, zum ersten Mal sogar in Stockholm – zum epidemiologischen Beweis dafür gezeigt, dass zwar Krebsarten existieren, bei denen noch kein Zusammenhang mit Infektionen nachgewiesen wurde, deren Epidemiologie jedoch auf eine im Hintergrund der Krebserkrankung ablaufende Infektion deuten könnte. Es gibt einige Krebsarten wie z.B. Nieren- oder Schilddrüsenkrebs, die unter Immunsuppression verstärkt auftreten; ich möchte darauf aber momentan nicht weiter eingehen. Bei diesen beiden Krebserkrankungen wurde bislang kein Zusammenhang mit Infektionen nachgewiesen, wohl aber bei anderen, deren Rate unter diesen Bedingungen stark erhöht ist. Krebsarten mit reduzierter Inzidenz unter Immunsuppression sind ein extrem spannendes Thema; ich werde am Ende noch einmal darauf zurückkommen, wenn es die Zeit erlaubt. Krebs wird auch durch andere, im Prinzip nicht-tumorigene Infektionen beeinflusst. Dies betrifft hauptsächlich in den ersten Lebensjahren auftretende Krebsformen bei Kindern. Auch diesen Aspekt werde ich heute auslassen, obwohl dieses Thema ausnehmend interessant ist. Ich möchte mich vielmehr auf die ernährungstechnischen Risikofaktoren konzentrieren, die möglicherweise mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen. Hier sticht seit langem der Darmkrebs hervor; diesbezüglich liegen zahlreiche Berichte und prospektive epidemiologische Studien vor, die bis auf lediglich 2 oder 3 Ausnahmen durchgehend die höhere Inzidenzrate von etwa 20 bis 30% hauptsächlich bei Darmkrebs obwohl dies vielleicht nicht ganz gerechtfertigt ist – dem erhöhten Verzehr von rotem, verarbeitetem, luftgetrocknetem oder geräuchertem Fleisch, insbesondere Rindfleisch zuschreiben Ich werde diesen Punkt noch gesondert diskutieren. Die hier aufgelisteten Länder mit dem höchsten Verzehr von rotem Fleisch weisen für gewöhnlich auch eine sehr hohe Rate an Kolon- und Kolorektalkarzinomen auf. Beim Blick auf die im Weltkrebsbericht erhobenen Inzidenzdaten für diese Krebsart stellt man fest, dass es z. B. in 4 europäischen Ländern – und das gilt inzwischen wahrscheinlich auch für das restliche Europa – zwischen 1975 und 2010 zu einer stetigen Zunahme der Darmkrebshäufigkeit gekommen ist. In anderen Teilen der Welt sieht die Lage etwas anders aus. Insbesondere in den Vereinigten Staaten sinkt die Rate derzeit, vermutlich aufgrund wirksamer Vorsorgemaßnahmen wie der Koloskopie, bei der Vorläuferläsionen entdeckt und entfernt werden können. Aus diesem Grund ist Darmkrebs dort rückläufig. In Japan und Korea steigt die Häufigkeit dagegen 20 Jahre nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg bzw. Indien – ein sehr interessantes Beispiel – weist wiederum eine sehr geringe Darmkrebsrate auf. Vor mehr als 30 Jahren entdeckte Sugimura in Tokyo, dass sich bei der Zubereitung von Fleisch mittels Grillen, Braten oder Frittieren chemische Karzinogene wie z. B. heterozyklische Amine, heterozyklische aromatische Kohlenwasserstoffe und andere Verbindungen bilden. Das schien die Erklärung zu sein; die Entstehung chemischer Verbindungen, die zumindest im Tiermodell karzinogen sind, insbesondere für den Darm. Sie treten für gewöhnlich in Konzentrationen auf, die 1.000 bis 10.000 Mal höher liegen als bei natürlichen Formen der Nahrungsmittelzubereitung. Es handelt sich dabei jedoch eindeutig um Karzinogene, was die Hypothese bestätigen würde. Ich glaube, dass der überwiegende Großteil der Epidemiologen selbst heute noch zutiefst davon überzeugt ist, dass dies einer der Hauptrisikofaktoren der sogenannten westlichen Ernährungsweise für die Entwicklung dieser Krebsart ist. Die Geschichte wäre gut und schön, gäbe es da nicht einige Ausnahmen von der Regel. Zunächst einmal führt die Zubereitung von Geflügel und Fisch mittels Frittieren, Grillen oder Braten zur Bildung derselben chemischen Karzinogene, deren Konzentrationen sogar teilweise höher liegen als bei einem sorgfältig gegrillten Steak. Bei Fisch heißt es sogar, dass er bis zu einem gewissen Grad vor Darmkrebs schützt. Es gibt aber noch ein paar weitere recht interessante Punkte. Betrachtet man die globale Epidemiologie des Kolorektalkarzinoms, fällt auf, dass diese Krebsart in bestimmten Teilen der Welt – Nordamerika, Europa, dieser Teil von Russland – sehr häufig ist. Auch Australien gehört dazu, die weiße Bevölkerung in Südafrika, Argentinien Es gibt aber auch Länder wie z. B. die Mongolei, Indien und Bolivien, in denen die Darmkrebsrate nachweislich durchweg sehr gering ist. Die Mongolei ist ein besonders bemerkenswertes und interessantes Beispiel - Sie sehen das hier. Einige sehr sorgfältig durchgeführte Studien belegen, dass die Darmkrebshäufigkeit, die Mortalität sehr niedrig ist. In anderen Teilen von Südostasien, vor allem auf einigen Inseln, ist die Rate ebenfalls sehr gering. In Taiwan, Japan, Südkorea, Brunei oder Singapur tritt diese Krebsart wiederum sehr häufig auf. Wie sieht es also in der Mongolei mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch aus? Im Vergleich zu allen anderen Ländern ist die Menge an rotem Fleisch, gegrillt oder luftgetrocknet, die die Bevölkerung zu sich nimmt, in der Mongolei angeblich am höchsten. Das ist ein interessanter Punkt. Aber welche Art von Fleisch verzehren die Mongolen? Ich bin auf diese Statistik gestoßen, nach der es hauptsächlich Yakfleisch ist. Beim Yak handelt es sich um eine Rinderart, die aber nicht der europäischen Milchkuh entspricht. Außerdem essen die Menschen dort Hammel und Ziege, Kamelfleisch, Pferdefleisch usw., wie gesagt hauptsächlich gegrillt oder luftgetrocknet. Interessanterweise gelangten in den letzten Jahren zunehmend Milchprodukte aus dem Westen in die Mongolei, darunter auch Fleisch von europäischen Rindern. Es bestehen also Unterschiede, wodurch ich mittlerweile zu einer Art Rinderexperten geworden bin. Hier sehen Sie die gemeinsamen Vorfahren der Rinderart, die wir heute weltweit als 'Milchvieh' kennen, z. B. den Auerochsen. Die Zebus unterscheiden sich deutlich, bei ihnen handelt es sich nur um entfernte Verwandte, die aber mit den anderen Arten gekreuzt werden können. Wasserbüffel scheinen in der ganzen Diskussion keine Rolle zu spielen, Yaks sind jedoch in diesem Zusammenhang von Bedeutung. Sie werden vor allem in den Bergregionen und Steppen der Mongolei sowie in Tibet und Teilen Chinas gehalten. In Afrika gibt es zum Beispiel das Watussi-Rind mit den enorm langen Hörnern; hierbei handelt es sich um eine Kreuzung mit dem Zebu, wie genetische Blutuntersuchungen gezeigt haben und Sie hier an der dunklen Färbung erkennen. In Asien spielt das Zebu-Rind eine große Rolle. Auch in Bolivien – das hier ist Bolivien – werden neben Milchrindern hauptsächlich Zebus gehalten. Das legte die Vermutung nahe, dass unsere Milchkühe der eigentliche Risikofaktor bei rotem Fleisch sind. Wirft man einen Blick auf die geographische Verteilung – diese Abbildung stellt sie in etwas abgewandelter Form dar – sieht man, dass auch in China viele Zebu-Rinder, das sogenannte Höhenvieh gehalten wird. Natürlich verzehrt man dort aber auch viel Schweinefleisch. Die Darmkrebsrate in China liegt im Vergleich zu den Hochrisikoländern im mittleren Bereich. Bolivien ist hier übrigens falsch angegeben, es handelt sich aber eindeutig um Bolivien. Auch diese Folie habe ich bereits vor einigen Jahren, vermutlich erstmals in Stockholm gezeigt; sie beschäftigt uns seit langem. Wir kennen eine Reihe im menschlichen Körper vorkommender pathogener Viren, die dort dauerhaft angesiedelt sind und sogar ausgeschieden werden, z. B. das Polyomavirus BK und JC, bestimmte Adenoviren, bis zu einem bestimmten Grad auch das Epstein-Barr-Virus und das High-Risk-HPV (HPV = humanes Papillomavirus). Unter bestimmten Umständen führen sie ohne Zweifel zur Tumorentstehung. Überträgt man diese Erreger auf andere Arten, in denen sie sich nicht vermehren können, also replikationsdefizient sind, erzeugen sie unter diesen Bedingungen aktiv Tumore. In Affen konnte durch das JC-Virus die Bildung von Gliomen ausgelöst werden. Dies führte zu folgender Überlegung: Kann es sein, dass Tiere, mit denen wir eng zusammenleben, ähnliche Erreger aufweisen? Dass diese zwar in den Tieren, in denen sie sich vermehren können, nicht pathogen sind, möglicherweise aber in einer anderen Spezies wie beispielsweise dem Menschen, in dem sie sich nicht vermehren können? Findet die Übertragung unter Umständen durch den Verzehr des Produktes oder durch engen Kontakt damit statt? Sehen wir uns noch einmal kurz die Situation in Japan und Korea an, da der Anstieg der Darmkrebserkrankungen dort besonders auffällig ist. Sie sehen, dass sich diese beiden Kurven – 20 Jahre nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, 20 Jahren nach dem Koreakrieg – praktisch decken. In diesem Zeitraum importierten beide Länder insbesondere aus den USA enorme Mengen an Rindfleisch und Milchprodukten, aber auch Schweinefleisch. Zudem änderten sich die Ernährungsgewohnheiten stark. Ich bin sicher, dass viele von Ihnen schon einmal in Japan gewesen sind und das selbst erlebt haben. Früher wurde Sashimi aus rohem Fisch hergestellt, heute ist es aus rohem Rindfleisch. Auch Sukiyaki besteht aus rohem Rindfleisch. Beim Shabu Shabu-Fleischfondue tauchen Sie kleine Stückchen rohen Rindfleisches etwa 1 Minute in kochendes Wasser; danach ist es außen gut durchgegart, innen aber noch roh. Wie mir mein Gastgeber erzählte, ist das der eigentliche Clou an diesem Gericht. In Korea ist Yuk Hwe, hübsch mit Eigelb und Gemüse dekoriertes rohes Tartar, inzwischen sehr beliebt. Diese Essgewohnheiten finden sich aber nicht nur zunehmend in diesen beiden Ländern, sondern auch in Vietnam, Thailand und anderen Teilen Südostasiens, in denen die Darmkrebsrate noch relativ niedrig ist. Es wird interessant sein, die zukünftige Entwicklung in diesen Ländern zu beobachten. Nun für die Virologen: Fleisch an der Luft zu trocknen ist die beste Möglichkeit, Viren in einem infektiösen Zustand zu konservieren. Das Schweizer Bündnerfleisch, die italienische Bresaola, das Kobe-Rind in Japan und das Biltong in Südafrika sind dabei besonders interessant. Bislang wurde Biltong hauptsächlich von der weißen Bevölkerung verzehrt, seit neuestem ist es aber auch bei den Schwarzen in Südafrika sehr beliebt. Das ließ uns vermuten, dass ein artspezifischer boviner Faktor am humanen Kolorektalkarzinom beteiligt sein könnte. Entsprechend unserer Interpretation könnte dieser Faktor ein nicht notwendigerweise, aber möglicherweise relativ hitzebeständiges Virus sein, das in rohem oder halbgarem Rindfleisch vorliegt. Dieses Virus könnte in seinem Wirt zu latenten Darminfektionen führen. Wie wir von den meisten anderen tumorigenen Erregern beim Menschen wissen, wird seine potentiell karzinogene Wirkung durch spezielle Zellproteine oder Zellfaktoren unterdrückt. Es wurde relativ häufig berichtet, dass bereits erfolgte, aktuell auftretende oder später stattfindende Mutationen, insbesondere diejenigen, die durch bei der Zubereitung von Rindfleisch entstehende chemische Karzinogene vermittelt werden, oder chronisch-entzündliche Prozesse – in den letzten Jahren insbesondere durch Streptococcus bovis, auch als Streptococcus infantium bezeichnet, und Fusobacterium nucleatum hervorgerufen – hier eine Rolle spielen könnten. Die genannten Bakterien sind definitiv an entzündlichen Prozessen beteiligt; sie führen unter diesen Bedingungen zur Bildung von Sauerstoffradikalen und können bei der Entwicklung von Darmkrebs synergistisch wirken. Soweit das Modell mit den beiden Bakterienarten, den Fusobakterien und den Streptokokken. Studien zu diesem Thema ergaben folgendes Bild: Bei einer angenommenen Lebensspanne des Menschen von sagen wir 80 Jahren, in denen wir infolge des Verzehrs von rohem oder halbgarem rotem Fleisch, insbesondere Rindfleisch diesen mutmaßlich infektiösen Erregern beliebig ausgesetzt sind, kommt es zu vorübergehenden oder latenten Infektionen mit diesen mutmaßlich karzinogenen Erregern. Andererseits führt der Verzehr von gegartem oder geräuchertem rotem Fleisch infolge der Auslösung von Mutationen in der DNA der Wirtszelle durch die chemischen oder biologischen Karzinogene wie Fusobakterien und Streptokokken zu erworbenen genetischen Modifikationen. Die Pfeile sind wieder nur willkürlich eingefügt. Vererbte genetische Modifikationen spielen hier eine ähnliche Rolle und führen letztendlich zur Entstehung von Polypen und nachfolgend zur Entwicklung von Tumoren. Können wir uns dieser Frage experimentell nähern? Ja, das können wir und das haben wir auch getan. Wir analysierten insgesamt 120 Seren gesunder 5-jähriger Kühe der veterinärmedizinischen Fakultät der Universität Leipzig. Dabei reinigten wir zunächst die DNase- und RNase-resistenten virusähnlichen Partikel; anschließend sequenzierten und extrahierten wir die DNA aus diesen Präparaten. Wir erhielten aus dem Blut dieser gesunden Kühe bis zu 18 neuartige DNA-Moleküle, bei denen es sich anscheinend um zirkuläre Einzelstrang-DNA handelt, die zu 4 verschiedenen Gruppen bislang nur episomal persistierender Genome gehört. Die Isolate aus diesen DNasen stammten ebenfalls aus Milchproben. Anscheinend führt das Vorliegen im Blut auch zu einem Übergang in die Milch und damit wahrscheinlich auch in Milchprodukte. Ähnlich wie bei den meisten anderen bekannten Einzelstrang-DNA-Viren gehen wir davon aus, dass auch diese Viren relativ hitzebeständig sind, auch wenn wir dies noch nicht direkt beweisen können, da wir bislang noch kein wirklich funktionierendes Modellsystem zur Infektiosität entwickelt haben. Hier sehen Sie 5 der Isolate, deren Größe zwischen etwa 1.000 Nukleotiden hier und 2.900 Nukleotiden hier oben rechts variiert. Sie unterscheiden sich also erheblich. Die Analyse eines dieser Isolate – wir analysierten bislang nur dieses eine – bezüglich des Vorliegens von DNA in verschiedenen Darmkrebs-Zellinien ergab nur negative Ergebnisse. Wir fanden jedoch - und das ist das überraschende Resultat dieser ganzen Geschichte sowie einen Zusammenhang mit nicht-malignen chronischen neurologischen Erkrankungen. Ich möchte dies im Moment nicht näher ausführen, da wir uns derzeit intensiv mit der Erforschung dieser Thematik beschäftigen. Es kristallisiert sich jedoch allmählich eine sehr interessante Beziehung heraus, die wir so nicht erwartet hatten. Wir können zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt schlussfolgern, dass das Blut gesunder Milchkühe mit verschiedenen spezifischen zirkulären Einzelstrang-DNA-Molekülen infiziert ist, die anscheinend in einer DNase- und RNase-resistenten Proteinhülle eingeschlossen sind. Die DNA zumindest einiger dieser Moleküle lässt sich in handelsüblicher pasteurisierter Milch nachweisen, ein interessanter Punkt, doch wir wissen nicht, ob sie noch infektiös ist oder nicht. Die für den Menschen gefährlichen Erreger sind wahrscheinlich artspezifisch und treten bei Milchkühen in Europa und Asien, nicht aber bei Yaks und Zebus auf. Zwar deuten epidemiologischen Studien darauf hin, wir können das bislang aber noch nicht beweisen. Zumindest einige dieser neu isolierten Moleküle lassen sich erfolgreich auf menschliche Zellen übertragen und finden sich gelegentlich in bestimmten Humanseren und bei gewissen Erkrankungen des Menschen. Vorläufige Ergebnisse deuten jetzt auf die mögliche Rolle dieser DNA bei neurologischen Krankheiten hin, was unter diesen Umständen in gewisser Weise überraschend war. Das sind die Leute, die an diesem Thema arbeiten. Ethel-Michelle de Villiers, die Hauptverantwortliche für die hier durchgeführten Untersuchungen, d. h. die Analyse und Sequenzierung der DNA; Hermann Muller, der uns die Rinderseren zur Verfügung gestellt hat, und andere engagierte Kollegen, die an den Studien beteiligt waren. Das hier sind unsere unfreiwilligen Mitarbeiter, die Kühe aus Leipzig – genau die Kühe übrigens, von denen das Blut stammt. Zum Schluss möchte ich noch ein paar Anmerkungen machen, die im Zusammenhang mit anderen Krebsarten von Interesse sind, für die nach dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch ein erhöhtes Risiko besteht, insbesondere Brustkrebs. Aktuell wird eine Reihe interessanter Studien zu diesem Thema durchgeführt. Heute Morgen habe ich festgestellt, dass in letzter Zeit einige Studien sogar genau diese Hypothese verfolgen, dass nämlich der Verzehr von rotem Fleisch auch einen Risikofaktor für Brustkrebs darstellt. Manche Studien fanden sogar Hinweise auf eine Beteiligung an Lungenkrebs und einer Reihe anderer Krebsarten. Hier sind die Daten jedoch erheblich widersprüchlicher. Beim Brustkrebs haben wir ein interessantes Modell. Brustkrebs ist eine der wenigen Krebsarten beim Menschen, bei denen die Immunsuppression eine Schutzwirkung ausübt. Bei AIDS-Patienten oder Allotransplantat-Empfängern liegt die Zahl der Brustkrebsfälle im Vergleich zu nicht immunsupprimierten Kontrollen um etwa 15% niedriger. Bei diesem ursprünglich 1938 von dem Amerikaner John Bittner entdeckten Tiermodell handelt es sich um ein Mammakarzinom-Virus der Maus. Dieses Virus wird von der die neugeborenen Jungen säugenden Mutter über die Milch übertragen und gelangt durch den Darm in die Lymphozyten der Peyer-Plaques, wo es B- und T-Zellen infiziert, was zur Entstehung sogenannter Superantigene führt. Die Zellen schwellen regelrecht an und lösen sich in der Blutbahn auf, wobei große Mengen an Viren freigesetzt werden. Tatsächlich ist die Virusmenge für das Erreichen ausreichender Konzentrationen in der Brustdrüse verantwortlich. Die Viren regulieren unter diesen Umständen ganz spezielle Signalpfade, hauptsächlich den wnt-Signalpfad, und werden vor allem während des Säugens durch weibliche Hormone aktiviert; dabei entstehen erneut große Mengen an Viruspartikeln. Immunsupprimiert man diese Mäuse, sinkt die Tumorinzidenz aufgrund der jetzt stattfindenden Suppression der Superantigene erzeugenden Zellen, so dass die Virusproduktion nachlässt, wodurch das Risiko für das Ablaufen der nachfolgenden Prozesse reduziert wird. Geschieht dasselbe in menschlichen Brustkrebszellen? Wir wissen es zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt nicht genau, die Frage verdient aber unsere Aufmerksamkeit. Wahrscheinlich lohnt es sich erheblich mehr, in den potentiellen Trägersubstanzen des lymphatischen Systems nach den Erregern zu suchen als ausschließlich im Brustgewebe selbst. Vergleicht man die geographische Häufigkeit von Brust- und Darmkrebs, so stellt man fest, dass diese in vielen Ländern zwar nicht absolut identisch, aber doch grundsätzlich sehr ähnlich ist. Auch hier stechen die Mongolei, Bolivien und auch bis zu einem gewissen Grad Indien mit einer vergleichsweise niedrigen Inzidenzrate dieser Krebsarten hervor. Es fallen jedoch auch andere interessante Unterschiede auf. Bolivien beispielsweise, wo Zebu-Rinder vorherrschen, ist eines der Länder, in denen der Verzehr von Milch angeblich weltweit am niedrigsten ist. Ich kann das nicht nachprüfen; ich habe die Information aus dieser Publikation hier. Betrachtet man aber die Darmkrebsrate in Japan, Korea und Indien, die ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, stellt man einige Unterschiede fest. Einerseits nahm die Zahl der Darmkrebsfälle dort in diesem Zeitraum rasch zu, andererseits stieg die Brustkrebsrate im gleichen Zeitraum nur leicht an. Auch in Indien steigt sie an, wohingegen die Zahl der Darmkrebsfälle nach wie vor gering ist. Wir gehen davon aus, dass, wenn ein ähnlicher Faktor wie beim Darmkrebs dabei eine Rolle spielt, dieser Faktor zwar nicht derselbe ist, aber aus einer ähnlichen Quelle stammen könnte. Jetzt kommen die letzten 3 Folien, ich habe noch 1 Minute Zeit. Interessant ist auch der Vergleich der Brustkrebsrate in den Ballungsgebieten und den ländlichen Gegenden der Mongolei. Hier ist die Zahl der Brustkrebsfälle praktisch konstant, in den Städten dagegen nimmt sie allmählich zu. Ich habe bereits erwähnt, dass dort in letzter Zeit Milchprodukte und Fleisch von europäischen Milchrindern eingeführt wurden. Aufgrund der Kälte in der Mongolei ist die Haltung unserer Kühe dort schwierig; die Tiere vertragen die im Winter herrschenden Temperaturen von minus 50 Grad nicht. Das ist meine letzte Folie. Sie zeigt, dass mehr als 20 epidemiologische Studien auch von einem erhöhten Risiko für Lungen- und Oropharynxkarzinome bei Metzgern und Schlachthofmitarbeitern ausgehen. Diese Berufsgruppe ist regelmäßig den aus dem Umgang mit Schlachttieren entstammenden Aerosolen ausgesetzt, wobei der Mund- und Rachenraum sowie die Lunge am stärksten exponiert sind. Auch die Tatsache, dass das erhöhte Risiko zunächst darauf zurückgeführt wurde, dass sich in dieser Berufsgruppe zahlreiche starke Raucher finden, und dies auch mit Kontrollen überprüft wurde, änderte nichts an diesem Bild. Hier kristallisiert sich also - zumindest aus unserer Sicht - ein ganz neues Gebiet heraus, das auf die potentielle Rolle episomal persistierender Vertreter deutet, die den Deep Sequencing-Tests individueller Tumore zumeist entgehen. Sie wurden unter diesen Umständen bislang weder bei der Isolierung der chromosomalen DNA noch im anschließenden bioinformatischen Filterungsprozess identifiziert obwohl die Tests beispielsweise bei Darmkrebs in praktisch 100% der Fälle positiv für das TT-Virus, eine andere Gruppe von Viren mit Einzelstrang-DNA, die beim Menschen relativ häufig vorkommen, sind. Dennoch müssen wir für diese Entwicklungen offen sein. Sie m