Light & Optics

A brief history of optics

While the earliest beliefs about light revolved around religion, ancient Greek philosophers were the first who sought to explain the true scientific nature of this phenomenon. Pythagoras thought that rays emanated from the eye and struck objects to create vision, whereas Epicurus proposed that light comes from sources other than the eye, reflects off objects, and enters the eye [1]. Later work by Euclid and Ptolemy revealed the basis for the field now referred to as geometrical optics, which describes light propagation in terms of rays [2].

The further understanding of light's properties such as straight-line propagation, reflection, and refraction led to new applications of lenses for things other than burning or magnifying glasses. In the centuries that followed, inventors produced the first vision-correcting glasses, compound microscopes, and telescopes [1].

In the 17th century, two competing models of light emerged. On one side, René Descartes and Christiaan Huygens described light as a propagating wave, while on the other side, Isaac Newton argued for a particle theory of light. In his seminal 1704 work Opticks, Newton postulated that light consists of a stream of corpuscles or particles, with particles from different colors of light having different masses. His model remained dominant until the 19th century, when studies confirmed that light is actually an electromagnetic wave.

But of course, the story doesn't end there. The dawn of quantum mechanics in the beginning of the 20th century overturned well-established notions about the nature of light once again. Quantum mechanics, a theory on the behavior of matter and light on the atomic and subatomic scale, was developed independently by Werner Heisenberg and Erwin Schrödinger. Paul Dirac, who was a regular guest at the Lindau Physics meetings, spoke about the early foundations of quantum mechanics in his 1965 lecture.

 

Paul Dirac on the early foundations of quantum mechanics
(00:00:20 - 00:01:20)

 

During his lecture at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2016, Theodor W. Hänsch spoke about how the work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein contributed to the discovery of a paradoxical wave-particle duality.

 

Theodor W. Hänsch (2016) - Changing Concepts of Light and Matter

Good morning. It’s always a pleasure to be here in Lindau. And you know that I am an experimental physicist working with lasers and light and with a passion for precise measurements which have taught us much about light and matter in the past and which might teach us more in the future. So today I thought I would talk about how our concepts of light and matter have evolved over time and how they are still changing. Light and matter are, of course, intertwined with the concepts of space and time. And these are central not just to physics, but to life. They’re essential for survival. And so evolution has hard-wired very strong intuitive concepts in our brain which are so compelling that they can actually hinder scientific progress. Let’s look at what was discovered in the scientific exploration of light which started probably when Sir Isaac Newton sent a ray of sunlight through a prism and he saw how light is dispersed into a rainbow of colours. And he argued that these different colours must correspond to different kinds of light particles. Then came Thomas Young who showed that light is a wave. Just like water waves going through a double-slit you can observe interference fringes, Fresnel came up with the mathematical formulation of this kind of wave theory, even though at the time it was not known what kind of wave light is. But from interference experiments Young was able to measure the wavelength of light. And so he determined that in the visible spectrum the wavelength ranges between 700 nanometres in the red and 400 nanometres in the violet. And once you know the wavelength and the speed of light, of course you can calculate the frequency of light. So in the middle of the spectrum we are talking about something like 5 times 10^14 oscillations per second. Nowadays, of course, we know that light is an electromagnetic wave. There is a huge spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays and these interferences can be used as a tool for very precise measurements. One important such measurement was made by Abraham Michelson in the late 19th century using his famous Michelson interferometer. He could show that the speed of light does not change with the motion of earth. Of course, Einstein was the one who came up with his brilliant special theory of relativity to explain this, at least to model it. And then, as we heard yesterday, of course, also with general relativity that thoroughly changed our understanding of space and time. And David Gross yesterday has, of course, already pointed out the latest triumph of this kind of interferometry is the detection of gravitational waves from 2 coalescing black holes using essentially a giant and sophisticated Michelson interferometer at the LIGO observatory. So much for waves. And so people were happy that they understood what light is. But there were some worries, some observations in the late 19th century. People in Germany at the PTB – it was at that time not yet called PTB – in Berlin, they carefully measured the spectrum emitted by black hot bodies because they wanted to understand how to make more efficient electric light sources. And this spectrum measured could not be explained in any classical model. Planck was the one who showed that if you make the assumption that light is emitted only in packet, emitted and absorbed in light packets of quantity, Planck’s constant times frequency, then one can model this type of black body spectrum very well. And Einstein then postulated in 1905 that it’s not just the absorption and emission but the nature of light itself is quantised. The term photon was coined much later, in the 1920s. But today we have position-sensitive photon detectors where you can watch how an interference pattern builds up photon by photon in the double-slit experiment. So we know that light can act as if it were made of particles. It can act as if it was electromagnetic wave. It can act as if it were made of particles, not classical particles but particles that show these strange correlations over a distance called entanglement which indicate that you cannot assume that a photon that you detect already has its properties before detection. This has become a tool for applications such as quantum cryptography, quantum information processing, quantum computing. And the pioneers were John Clauser and Alain Aspect. An even more momentous discovery or invention was that of the laser, that you can make a source of coherent light waves that acts much like a classical radio frequency oscillator. The race to build the first laser was trigged by Arthur Schawlow and Charlie Townes with a seminal paper published in 1958. The very first laser was realised by Ted Maiman in 1960. Here are the parts of his original laser what are right now in our Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching thanks to Kathleen Maiman, the widow of Ted Maiman. And what I find charming is that it’s really very simple. It’s a simple device that could have been realised much earlier. And it also shows that the largest impact is not always from big and sophisticated instruments. It can be simple instruments that are game changers. Other examples, of course, are the transistor, the scanning tunnelling microscope. And so this is the kind of invention that I am really very excited about. And, of course, the impact in science is illustrated by the fact that there are now 26 Nobel Prizes around the laser, not counting yet the detection of gravitational waves that surely will be included in the future. Ok, so much for light. What about matter? The question what is matter, of course, is a natural question to ask. The ancient philosophers speculated that maybe there are small indivisible building blocks of matter – atoms. These ideas were soon forgotten but were revived in the 18th and 19th century by a chemist, Dalton, who showed that if you make this assumption that matter consists of atoms then one can naturally understand the proportion in which elements react to form molecules. And one can even determine relative molecular weights. And, of course, with the Loschmidt number even absolute atomic weights, but nobody had any idea how these atoms are composed. There were some hints that they must be complex. Fraunhofer with his spectrographs looking at the solar spectrum discovered the dark absorption lines due to atoms or ions in the solar atmosphere or our earth atmosphere. And this kind of spectroscopy soon became a tool to chemists, like Bunsen or Kirchhoff who used it to identify atoms by their spectrum, like a finger print. But how these spectrum lines came about remained obscure. The very simplest atom and the very simplest of the spectra in the end provided the Rosetta stone for having a deeper look into how atoms work. There is the visible Balmer spectrum that was first observed in astronomy in the light of distant stars. And we know that Johann Jakob Balmer was the first to come up with an empirical formula for the wavelengths of this very simple line spectrum that was later generalised by Rydberg who introduced the empirical Rydberg constant. But still one didn’t know how these lines could come about. One had even no idea what is going on inside an atom until radioactivity was discovered and until Rutherford used scattering of radioactive alpha rays from a gold foil to discover that all the mass of an atom must be confined to very small heavy nucleus. And the light electrons are surrounding this nucleus, like a cloud. So with this insight Bohr tried to model the hydrogen atom, the simplest atom with just a single electron, some sort of planetary system. He tried to see what could give the Balmer spectrum. And he realised that no classical model would work. He had to make some radical assumptions, like Planck, that only certain stationary orbits which are allowed. And that radiation is emitted in transitions, in jumps, between these orbits. These early quantum postulates were hard to swallow. But they allowed Bohr to calculate the Rydberg constant in terms of the electron mass, electron charge, Planck’s constant and the speed of light and to fairly high accuracy. So people realised there must be something to it, even though it made no sense. Louis de Broglie showed that if you make the assumption that electrons, particles can also have wave properties and if you wonder what would be the orbits where you have resonant waves, an integer number of wavelengths fits, that you could reproduce the Balmer spectrum. Schrödinger came up with a wave equation for these matter waves which is perhaps one of the most successful and best tested equations in physics. As the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom could be solved in closed form one can draw pictures of orbitals. Still it’s a question that has not been definitely answered until today. What is it that this Schrödinger equation or the Schrödinger wave function describes? There is infinite room for speculation, for philosophy. But if we want to stay on the solid ground of science I think all we can say for sure is that this equation describes our information about the probabilities of clicks and meter readings. It doesn’t say anything about the true microscopic world. This is the essence, the spirit of the Copenhagen interpretation which has been sharpened and made more consistent with the interpretation of QBism, a minimal interpretation that interprets probabilities. In the Bayesian spirit as we have heard from Serge Haroche. So in particular different physicists can assign different probabilities, dependent on the information they have. So this is still some frontier where we hope one of you maybe will have some insights how we can go beyond this phenomenological description. Nonetheless it works very well. Dirac, 2 years later, was able to generalise the Schrodinger equation to include relativistic effects. And this Dirac equation was miraculous because it not only contained relativistic effects, it also predicted the existence of anti-electrons or positrons. And it was so beautiful that people felt this must now be the ultimate truth. There were nagging uncertainties whether Dirac could really describe the fine structure of hydrogen lines very well. And since the Second World War we know that the Dirac equation is not complete. It is not able to describe the fine structure of hydrogen lines because there are effects that were not included, particularly the effect of the vacuum - vacuum fluctuations and vacuum polarization. Lamb with his discovery of the Lamb shift, of the effect that there are 2 energy levels in hydrogen, the 2s-state where the electron comes close to the nucleus and the 2p-state where it stays away, but in reality they are split by about 1,000 megahertz. And this was the beginning of quantum electrodynamics and modern quantum field theories in ’65. The Nobel Prize for the developments in quantum electrodynamics was given to Tomonaga, Schwinger and Feynman. Of course, since then we have, thanks to Gell-Mann, found that there is a scheme how we can classify the building blocks of all matter in terms of quarks and leptons and bosons. And we believe that this is a complete description of matter as we understand it today. Of course, one is eager to look beyond the standard model. And we see new accelerator experiments at CERN Maybe one will discover new things. So this is considered a very successful model of matter and its interactions. According to the standard model the proton, the nucleus of the hydrogen atom, is a composite system made up of quarks and gluons. And there is the theory of quantum chromodynamics that attempts to model this. But it’s still at an early stage. We cannot, for instance, predict the size of the proton. And this question, how small is a proton, is something that has become important experimentally, partly because of lasers and precision spectroscopy. So my own encounter with hydrogen started in the early 1970s when I was a postdoc at Stanford University. Arthur Schawlow, co-inventor of the laser, was my host and mentor. And he gave good advice to young people. He said, if you like to discover something new, try to look where no one has looked before. And actually we had a tool where we could do this very nicely in the early ‘70s because we had the first tunable dye laser that was at the same time highly monochromatic. So one could use it to study spectral lines free of Doppler broadening using non-linear spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy. And so we succeeded to, for the first time, resolve individual fine structure components of the red Balmer alpha line, whereas before spectroscopists were dealing with a blend of unresolved lines due to the very large Doppler broadening of the light hydrogen atom. And this has been the start of a long adventure, studying hydrogen with ever higher resolution and ever higher precision in the hope that if we look closely enough maybe one day we will find a surprise. And only if we find a disagreement with existing theory can we hope to make progress. And so over the years this adventure is continuing. Today we have advanced the fractional frequency uncertainty with which we can study transitions in hydrogen from something like 6 or 7 decimal digits in classical spectroscopy to 15 digits today. And to make progress beyond 10 digits, we had to learn how to measure the frequency of light. So the motivation for doing this kind of work is we want to test bond-state QED, look for possible discrepancies. But we can also measure fundamental constants, in particular the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius. One can ask the question, are constants really constant or might they be slowly changing with time? There are anti-hydrogens so one can hope to compare matter and antimatter and altogether maybe discover some new physics. So this quest has motivated inventions. In the 1970s techniques of Doppler free laser spectroscopy, also the idea of laser cooling of atomic gases was inspired by this quest for higher resolution and accuracy in hydrogen. And in the 1990s finally a tool, the femtosecond frequency comb, that makes it now easy what had been impossible or extremely difficult before, namely to count the ripples of a light wave. So at the turn of the millennium various newspapers and journals reported on these frequency combs because they had been cited when the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2005 to John Hall and myself. And so the frequency comb, it was the first time a simple tool for measuring optical frequencies of 100s or even 1,000s of terahertz, it provides the phase coherent link between the optical and the radio frequency region, and it’s a clockwork mechanism, a counter for optical atomic clocks. So how does a frequency comb work? Typically you have a laser or some kind of source that emits very short pulses with a broad spectrum. If you have a single such pulse you get a broad spectrum. If you have not a single pulse but 2 pulses in succession they interfere in the spectrum. So it’s similar to the Young’s double-slit experiment but now interference in the spectrum or in the spectrograph and you get a fringe pattern. So in essence you have already a frequency comb. A comb of lines, not very sharp. The more distant the pulses are the more comb lines you get. And the frequency spacing between these comb lines is just precisely the inversed time interval between the 2 pulses. So if I have not 2 pulses but many pulses then they can interfere like we get interference in a defraction grating. We have multi-wave interference and we can build up sharp lines. The longer we wait the sharper the lines. And they can be as sharp as any continuous wave laser but only if we have precisely controlled timing. Otherwise, of course, this doesn’t work. So these are extremely elementary principles according to Fourier. Still most people didn’t expect that this could actually work to measure the frequency of light. They didn’t anticipate how far these principles could be pushed, that you could take a mode-locked titanium sapphire laser, send its light through a non-linear fibre to broaden it by self-phase modulation to a rainbow of colours and still have a frequency comb. So we can get 100,000 or a 1,000,000 sharp spectra lines, very equally spaced by precisely the pulse repetition frequency. The only thing that was still a problem was that we don’t know the absolute position of these lines. We know the spacing but the absolute positons depend on the slippage of the phase, of the carrier wave, relative to the pulse envelope, the so-called carrier envelope of that frequency. But once you have an octave-spanning comb it’s extremely simple to measure this of such frequency. You can take comb lines from the red end and send them through a non-linear crystal to frequency double, get the comb lines at the blue end and look at the collective beat note and you can measure it. And if you measure it you can use several controls to make it go away or simply take it into account. And so now you can buy an instrument, optical frequency meters, and there are 100s of these in use in different laboratories. They are being miniaturised so one can have an instrument that was my dream 30 years ago. Something that you put on a desktop and you have an input for laser light and on a digital display you can measure the frequency. You can read out the frequency to as many digits as you like. There is work going on in miniaturised comb sources based on micro-toroids fabricated by lithography. And one of the reasons for growing interest in these combs is that there is an evolution in the tree of applications. But we have no time, I am looking at the clock and I see that I really need to speed up. But let’s look at the original purpose, at frequency measurement. So there is this extremely sharp transition in atomic hydrogen, the 2 photon transition from the ground state to the metastable 2s-state which has a natural linewidth of only 1 hertz or so. You can excite it with ultraviolet light. The earliest experiments were done in 1975 with Carl Wieman who is actually here at this meeting. I haven’t seen him yet but I think he will arrive on Wednesday. Now, we are able to measure the frequency of this transition to something like 15 decimal digits. For the measurement you need a comparison, our comparison was the national caesium fountain clock time standard at the PTB. And we had the fibre link, linking laboratories about 1,000 kilometres or so away. So if I have that frequency can I determine the Rydberg constant? Yes, in comparison with theory but there is one problem, we don’t know the proton size very well. And so that’s why the frequency is known to 15 digits but the Rydberg constant only to 12 digits. So to make progress we need a better value of the proton charge radius. How is the proton charge radius measured? There are electron scattering experiments at accelerators and there is also the possibility to measure it by comparing different transitions in hydrogen. If we look at the energies of s-level, they scale with Rydberg constant over principle quantum number square, plus Lamp shift of the ground state, divided by the cube of the principle number. And this Lamp shift traditionally includes a term that scales with the root-mean square charge radius of the proton. So by comparing 2 different transitions you can measure the proton size, you can do it much better by looking at artificial man-made atoms of muonic hydrogen instead of the electron, a negative muon, 200 times heavier, that comes 200 times closer to the nucleus. In this case the Lamp shift is actually in the mid infrared at 6 micron. But you can, by capturing muons in hydrogen gas, you can populate the metastable to s-state and induce transitions with a laser and look for Lyman-alpha which in this case is a 2-kilo-electron volt in the soft X-ray region. So this kind of experiment was done, was finally successful here. You see part of the international team in front of the laboratory at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. And so in 2010 and 2013 they could publish results with Randolf Pohl as the leader of the team, observing such resonances, Lamb shift resonances in muonic hydrogen. And the big surprise was that it wasn’t where it was expected to be, and where it should be according to accelerator experiment. So it wasn’t there. And if we look at the error graph we see that the proton size determined from the muonic hydrogen is almost 8 sigma away from the size determined by scattering electrons or looking at electronic hydrogen. This is known as the proton size puzzle. It has not been completely resolved. Our suspicion is that the muonic hydrogen experiments are right and maybe the hydrogen spectroscopy wasn’t right. This has to do with the fact that we have one very sharp transition, the 1s, 2s but there are auxiliary transitions, that are not so sharp and that are more easily perturbed by electric fields and other effects. So if one looks at all the hydrogen spectroscopic data that flow into the value of the proton radius one sees that each individual one has a big error bar. And only if we average all of them do we get the small error. But maybe one is not allowed to do that. There are some new experiments carried out in our laboratory with Axel Beyer, studying one-photon-transition in a cold beam of metastable 2s-atoms, from 2s to 4p. This is essentially Balmer beta and he went to great pains to eliminate any conceivable systematic error. So he now has some result which is on the other side actually of the proton radius, determined from muonic hydrogen. I don’t know if this is really conclusive but it suggests that maybe that would be the solution. That we are not discovering new physics but we are discovering old errors in spectroscopy of hydrogen. Nonetheless, so if we for a moment assume that the muonic hydrogen gives us the right proton size then we can see how this will affect the Rydberg constant. And so here we have the official value of the Rydberg constant according to the most recent CODATA adjustment of the fundamental constant. And if we take the muonic hydrogen radius we see that the error bars shrink quite a bit, almost an order of magnitude which is a major step for a fundamental constant. But we also move the Rydberg constant which has, of course, consequences in our kinds of precise predictions. I have to come to an end. Let me just briefly mention very soon, maybe even this year, I expect to see the first results of laser spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen. And, of course, the question whether hydrogen and anti-hydrogen are precisely the same or if there is a tiny difference is very monumental for our understanding of nature. And even the tiniest difference would be important. Therefore the more digits you can get in measurements the better. Also in astronomy frequency combs are now being installed in large observatories, highly resolving spectrographs, and there are a number of areas where maybe one can discover more about light and matter. So first you can use it to search for earth-like planets around sun-like stars. But, of course, you can test for general relativity. You can maybe get observational evidence for possible changes in fundamental constants. There is also the question, these cosmic red shifts that we observe, are they shifting, are they changing with time? Can we get earthbound observation evidence for the continuing accelerated expansion of the universe? And it looks like this might be possible. And how little we know about the universe is illustrated here, where we assume that 68% is totally unknown dark energy and 26.8% are dark matter of unknown composition. So there is still a lot to be discovered. And the progress that we have made in our own lab was really not so much motivated by these important questions but more by curiosity and by having fun in the laboratory.

Guten Morgen. Es ist immer wieder ein Vergnügen, hier in Lindau sein zu dürfen. Wie Sie wissen, bin ich ein Experimentalphysiker, der mit Lasern und Licht arbeitet und eine Passion für präzise Messungen hat, die uns in der Vergangenheit viel über Licht und Materie gelehrt haben und uns vielleicht mehr in der Zukunft lehren werden. Ich dachte daher, dass ich darüber spreche, wie sich unsere Konzepte für Licht und Materie im Laufe der Zeit entwickelt haben und immer noch entwickeln. Licht und Materie sind natürlich verflochten mit den Konzepten von Raum und Zeit. Und diese sind nicht nur von zentraler Bedeutung für die Physik, sondern auch für das Leben. Sie sind wesentlich für das Überleben. Und so hat die Evolution sehr starke, intuitive Konzepte in unserem Gehirn fest verschaltet, die so triftig sind, dass sie tatsächlich den wissenschaftlichen Fortschritt behindern können. Lassen Sie uns auf die Entdeckungen in der wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung von Licht schauen, die vermutlich begannen, als Sir Isaac Newton einen Strahl Sonnenlicht durch ein Prisma schickte und sah, wie Licht sich in einen Regenbogen an Farben zerlegte. Und er argumentierte, dass diese unterschiedlichen Farben unterschiedlichen Arten der Lichtteilchen entsprechen müssten. Dann kam Thomas Young, der zeigte, dass Licht eine Welle ist. Genau wie bei Wasserwellen, wenn sie durch einen Doppelschlitz treten, kann man Interferenzmuster beobachten: Fresnel erstellte eine mathematische Formulierung dieser Art der Wellentheorie, obwohl man zu der Zeit nicht wusste, welche Art Welle Licht ist. Aber mit Interferenzexperimenten konnte Young die Wellenlänge des Lichts messen. Und daher bestimmte er, dass sich im sichtbaren Spektrum die Wellenlänge von 700 Nanometer bei rot, bis 400 Nanometer bei violett erstreckt. Wenn man erst einmal die Wellenlänge und die Lichtgeschwindigkeit kennt, kann man natürlich die Lichtfrequenz berechnen. Wir sprechen daher in der Spektrenmitte über etwa 5 mal 10^14 Schwingungen pro Sekunde. Heute wissen wir natürlich, dass Licht eine elektromagnetische Welle ist. Es gibt ein riesiges Spektrum von Radiowellen bis zur Gammastrahlung, und diese Interferenzen kann man als Werkzeug für sehr präzise Messungen verwenden. Eine wichtige dieser Messungen wurde im späten 19. Jahrhundert durch Abraham Michelson unter Benutzung seines berühmten Michelson-Interferometers durchgeführt. Er war in der Lage zu zeigen, dass sich die Lichtgeschwindigkeit nicht mit der Erdbewegung ändert. Und es war natürlich Einstein, der diese brillante spezielle Relativitätstheorie aufstellte, um dies zu erklären und es wenigstens zu modellieren. Und dann war es natürlich, wie wir gestern hörten, die allgemeine Relativitätstheorie, die unser Verständnis von Raum und Zeit gründlich änderte. David Gross hat gestern schon darauf hingewiesen, dass der jüngste Triumph dieser Art der Interferometrie der Nachweis der Gravitationswellen von 2 verschmelzenden schwarzen Löchern ist, der im Wesentlichen ein gigantisches und komplexes Michelson-Interferometer, das LIGO-Observatorium, benutzt. So viel zu Wellen. Und die Wissenschaftler waren daher glücklich, dass sie verstanden, was Licht ist. Aber es gab ein paar Sorgen, einige Beobachtungen im späten 19. Jahrhundert. Wissenschaftler an der PTB in Deutschland – zu der Zeit hieß sie noch nicht PTB – in Berlin haben sorgfältig das Spektrum gemessen, das durch heiße schwarze Körper emittiert wurde, weil sie verstehen wollten, wie man effizientere elektrische Lichtquellen herstellt. Und dieses gemessene Spektrum konnte nicht durch irgendein klassisches Modell erklärt werden. Planck zeigte dann, wenn man annimmt, dass Licht nur in einem Paket emittiert wird, emittiert und absorbiert in Lichtpaketen des Werts Planck-Konstante multipliziert mit der Frequenz, dann kann man diese Art von Schwarzkörperstrahlung sehr gut modellieren. Einstein postulierte dann im Jahr 1905, dass es nicht nur die Absorption und Emission ist, sondern die Natur des Lichts an sich, die quantisiert ist. Der Begriff Photon wurde viel später geprägt, in den 1920er-Jahren. Aber inzwischen haben wir positionsabhängige Photonendetektoren, mit denen man beobachten kann, wie sich im Doppelspaltexperiment ein Interferenzmuster ein Photon nach dem anderen formiert. Daher wissen wir, dass Licht sich so verhalten kann, als bestünde es aus Teilchen. Es kann sich so verhalten, als wäre es eine elektromagnetische Welle. Es kann sich so verhalten, als bestünde es aus Teilchen, keinen klassischen Teilchen, sondern Teilchen, die diese merkwürdigen Korrelationen über eine Entfernung aufweisen, die Verschränkung genannt werden. Und die darauf hinweisen, dass man nicht annehmen kann, ein Proton, das man nachweist, hätte seine Eigenschaften schon vor dem Nachweis. Dies wurde ein Werkzeug für Anwendungen wie Quantenkryptografie, Quanteninformationsverarbeitung, Quantencomputer. Und die Pioniere waren John Clauser und Alain Aspect. Eine noch bedeutsamere Entdeckung oder Erfindung war die des Lasers: dass man eine Quelle kohärenter Lichtwellen bauen kann, die wie ein klassischer Radiofrequenzschwingkreis arbeitet. Das Wettrennen, den ersten Laser zu bauen, wurde durch eine zukunftsweisende Veröffentlichung von Arthur Schawlow und Charlie Townes ausgelöst, die 1958 publiziert wurde. Der allererste Laser wurde im Jahr 1960 durch Ted Maiman realisiert. Hier sind Teile seines ursprünglichen Lasers, die sich derzeit dank Kathleen Maiman, der Witwe Ted Maimans, im Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik in Garching befinden. Und ich finde es bezaubernd, das es wirklich so einfach ist. Es ist eine einfache Vorrichtung, die schon viel früher hätte realisiert werden können. Und es zeigt auch, dass die größten Wirkungen nicht immer von großen und komplexen Instrumenten herrühren. Es können einfache Instrumente sein, die das Spiel verändern. Andere Beispiele sind natürlich der Transistor, das Rastertunnelmikroskop. Das sind die Arten von Erfindungen, die mich am meisten begeistern. Und die Wirkung in der Wissenschaft ist illustriert durch die Tatsache, dass es inzwischen 26 Nobelpreise gibt, die durch den Laser ermöglicht wurden. Der Nachweis der Gravitationswellen ist hier noch nicht mitgezählt und wird sicher in Zukunft hier eingeschlossen werden. Ok, so viel zu Licht. Was ist mit der Materie? Die Frage, was Materie ist, ist selbstverständlich eine natürlich zu stellende Frage. Die Philosophen der Antike spekulierten, dass es vielleicht kleine, unteilbare Bausteine der Materie gibt – Atome. Diese Ideen waren schon bald vergessen, aber wurden durch einen Chemiker, Dalton, im 18. und 19. Jahrhundert wiederbelebt. Er zeigte, wenn man diese Annahme macht, dass Materie aus Atomen besteht, dann kann man die Verhältnisse, mit denen Elemente zur Molekülbildung reagieren, ganz selbstverständlich verstehen. Und man kann selbst relative Molekulargewichte bestimmen. Und natürlich, wir sehen die Loschmidt-Zahl, sogar absolute Atomgewichte, aber niemand wusste, wie diese Atome zusammengesetzt sind. Es gab einige Hinweise, dass sie komplex sein mussten. Fraunhofer beobachtete mit seinem Spektrograph das Sonnenspektrum und entdeckte die dunklen Absorptionslinien, verursacht durch Atome oder Ionen in der Sonnen- oder Erdatmosphäre. Und diese Art der Spektroskopie wurde schon bald ein Werkzeug für Chemiker, wie beispielsweise Bunsen oder Kirchhoff, die sie zur Identifizierung der Atome durch ihr Spektrum benutzten wie einen Fingerabdruck. Aber wie diese Spektrallinien entstanden blieb im Dunklen. Am Ende lieferte das einfachste Atom und das einfachste der Spektren den Stein von Rosetta, um eine tiefere Einsicht in die Funktion der Atome zu haben. Dies ist das sichtbare Balmerspektrum, das zuerst in der Astronomie im Licht entfernter Sterne beobachtet wurde. Und wir wissen, dass Johann Jakob Balmer der Erste war, der einen empirischen Ausdruck für die Wellenlängen dieses sehr einfachen Spektrums einführte, der später durch Rydberg verallgemeinert wurde, der die empirische Rydbergkonstante einführte. Aber man wusste immer noch nicht, wie diese Linien entstehen konnten. Man hatte selbst überhaupt keine Idee, was innerhalb des Atoms vorging, bis die Radioaktivität entdeckt wurde. Und bis Rutherford die Streuung radioaktiver Alphastrahlen an einer Goldfolie nutzte, um zu entdecken, dass die gesamte Masse des Atoms auf einen sehr kleinen, schweren Kern beschränkt sein muss. Und die leichten Elektronen diesen Kern umgeben, wie eine Wolke. Mit dieser Einsicht versuchte Bohr, ein Modell des Wasserstoffatoms zu erstellen, dem einfachsten Atom mit nur einem einzigen Elektron, eine Art Planetensystem. Und er versuchte zu sehen, was das Balmerspektrum erzeugen könnte. Er realisierte dann, dass kein klassisches Modell funktionieren würde. Er stellte wie Planck einige radikale Annahmen auf: dass nur bestimmte stationäre Umlaufbahnen erlaubt waren. Und dass die Strahlung in Übergängen abgegeben wird, in Sprüngen zwischen diesen Umlaufbahnen. Die frühen Quantenpostulate waren nur schwer zu schlucken. Aber sie erlaubten es Bohr, die Rydbergkonstante als Produkt der Elektronenmasse, Elektronenladung, dem Planckschen Wirkungsquantum und der Lichtgeschwindigkeit auszudrücken, und zwar mit einer ziemlich hohen Genauigkeit. Die Wissenschaftler realisierten dann, dass irgendein wahrer Kern darin steckte, auch wenn es keinen Sinn machte. Louis de Broglie zeigte, wenn man annahm, dass Elektronen, Teilchen, auch Welleneigenschaften haben können und man sich fragte, was die Umlaufbahnen wären, bei denen man resonante Wellen hat, bei denen eine ganze Zahl von Wellenlängen passt, dass man dann das Balmerspektrum reproduzieren kann. Schrödinger stellte eine Wellengleichung für diese Materiewellen auf, die vielleicht eine der erfolgreichsten und am besten überprüften Gleichungen in der Physik ist. Da die Schrödingergleichung für das Wasserstoffatom eine geschlossene Lösung hat, kann man Bilder der Orbitale zeichnen. Da ist aber immer noch eine Frage, für die bis heute keine finale Antwort gibt: Was beschreibt diese Schrödingergleichung oder die Schrödingerwellenfunktion? Es gibt hier unendlichen Raum für Spekulation, für Philosophie. Aber wenn wir den festen Boden der Wissenschaft nicht verlassen wollen, denke ich, alles was wir sicher sagen können ist, dass diese Gleichung unsere Information über die Wahrscheinlichkeiten von Klicks und Messwerten beschreibt. Sie sagt nichts aus über die wahre mikroskopische Welt. Dies ist der Kern, der Geist der Kopenhagen-Interpretation, die durch die Interpretation des QBism verschärft und konsistenter gemacht wurde, eine Minimalinterpretation, die Wahrscheinlichkeiten interpretiert. Im Bayesschen Sinn, wie wir von Serge Haroche gehört haben. So können insbesondere verschiedene Physiker unterschiedliche Wahrscheinlichkeiten zuweisen, je nachdem, wie viel Information sie haben. Dies ist also noch Neuland, wo wir hoffen, dass vielleicht jemand unter Ihnen Einsichten haben wird, wie wir über diese phänomenologische Beschreibung hinausgehen können. Trotzdem funktioniert sie gut. Und diese Diracgleichung war wunderbar, weil sie nicht nur relativistische Effekte enthielt, sondern auch die Existenz der Antielektronen oder Positronen vorhersagte. Und das war so wunderschön, dass die Leute glaubten, dies müsse nun die endgültige Wahrheit sein. Aber es gab eine bohrende Ungewissheit, ob Dirac wirklich die Feinstruktur der Wasserstofflinien sehr gut beschreiben konnte. Und seit dem zweiten Weltkrieg wissen wir, dass die Diracgleichung nicht vollständig ist. Sie kann die Feinstruktur der Wasserstofflinien nicht beschreiben, weil es Effekte gibt, die nicht eingeschlossen waren, insbesondere die Wirkung des Vakuums - Vakuumfluktuationen und Vakuumpolarisation. Lamb mit seiner Entdeckung der Lamb-Verschiebung, d. h. des Effekts, dass es zwei Energieniveaus im Wasserstoff gibt, dem 2s-Zustand, wo das Elektron dem Kern sehr nahe kommt, und dem 2p-Zustand, wo es vom Kern wegbleibt - aber in Wahrheit eine Aufspaltung von etwa 1.000 Megahertz zeigen. Dies war der Beginn der Quantenelektrodynamik und modernen Quantenfeldtheorien im Jahr 1965. Der Nobelpreis für die Entwicklungen in der Quantenelektrodynamik wurde an Tomonaga, Schwinger und Feynman vergeben. Natürlich haben wie seit damals, dank Gell-Mann, gefunden, dass es ein Schema gibt, wie wir die Bausteine der gesamten Materie durch Quarks, Leptonen und Bosonen klassifizieren können. Und wir glauben, dass dies eine vollständige Beschreibung der Materie ist, wie wir sie heute verstehen. Natürlich wollen wir sehnlichst über des Standardmodells hinausgehen. Und wir sehen neue Beschleunigerexperimente am CERN - vielleicht wir werden neue Dinge entdecken. Dies wird daher als ein sehr erfolgreiches Modell der Materie und ihrer Wechselwirkungen betrachtet. Nach dem Standardmodell ist das Proton, der Kern des Wasserstoffatoms, ein zusammengesetztes System, das aus Quarks und Gluonen besteht. Und es existiert die Theorie der Quantenchromodynamik, die versucht, dies zu modellieren. Aber sie ist noch in einer Frühphase. Wir können beispielsweise die Größe des Protons nicht vorhersagen. Und diese Frage, wie klein ein Proton ist, wurde experimentell wichtig, teilweise wegen der Laser und der Präzisionsspektroskopie. Ich selbst begegnete Wasserstoff zuerst in den frühen 70er-Jahren, als ich Postdoc an der Stanford-Universität war. Arthur Schawlow, Miterfinder des Lasers, war mein Gastgeber und Mentor. Und er gab jungen Menschen einen guten Rat. Er sagte, wenn Du etwas Neues entdecken möchtest, versuche dorthin zu schauen, wohin noch niemand vorher geschaut hat. Tatsächlich hatten wir damals in den frühen 70er-Jahren ein Werkzeug, mit dem wir dies sehr gut machen konnten, weil wir den ersten durchstimmbaren Farbstofflaser hatten, der gleichzeitig auch extrem monochromatisch war. Also konnte man ihn benutzen, um spektrale Linien ohne Dopplerverbreiterung mithilfe der nichtlinearen Spektroskopie, Sättigungsspektroskopie zu untersuchen. Und wir lösten zum ersten Mal erfolgreich einzelne Feinstrukturbestandteile der roten Balmer-Alphalinie auf, wohingegen die Spektroskopie wegen der großen Dopplerverbreiterung des leichten Wasserstoffatoms mit einer Mischung unaufgelöster Linien zu kämpfen hatte. Dies war der Beginn eines langen Abenteuers, Wasserstoff mit immer höherer Auflösung und immer höherer Präzision zu untersuchen, in der Hoffnung, wenn man nur genau genug hinsähe, fände man eines Tages eine Überraschung. Und nur wenn wir eine Unstimmigkeit mit der existierenden Theorie fänden, können wir auf Fortschritt hoffen. Und so dauert das Abenteuer noch immer an. Heute haben wir die relative Frequenzunsicherheit, mit der wir Übergänge im Wasserstoff untersuchen können, von etwa 6 bis 7 Dezimalstellen in der klassischen Spektroskopie auf 15 Dezimalstellen heute verbessert. Und um einen Fortschritt über 10 Stellen hinaus zu erzielen, mussten wir lernen, die Lichtfrequenz zu messen. Die Motivation hinter dieser Art der Arbeit ist, dass wir die QED des gebundenen Zustands untersuchen wollen, um nach möglichen Unstimmigkeiten zu suchen. Aber wir können auch Fundamentalkonstanten messen, insbesondere die Rydbergkonstante und den Ladungsradius des Protons. Man kann die Frage stellen: Sind Konstanten wirklich konstant oder kann es sein, dass sie sich langsam im Lauf der Zeit ändern? Es gibt den Antiwasserstoff, also kann man darauf hoffen, Materie und Antimaterie zu vergleichen und insgesamt vielleicht eine neue Physik entdecken. Diese Suche hat die Motivation für Erfindungen geliefert. In den 1970er-Jahren wurden die Techniken der dopplerfreien Laserspektroskopie, auch die Idee der Laserkühlung eines atomaren Gases, durch diese Suche nach höherer Auflösung und Genauigkeit im Wasserstoff angeregt. Und in den 1990er Jahren schließlich ein Werkzeug, der Femtosekunden-Frequenzkamm, der nun einfach macht, was vorher unmöglich oder extrem schwierig war, nämlich die Wellenberge einer Lichtwelle zu zählen. Am Beginn des Jahrtausends berichteten mehrere Zeitungen und Zeitschriften über diese Frequenzkämme, weil auf sie Bezug genommen wurde, als im Jahr 2005 der Nobelpreis an John Hall und mich vergeben wurde. Und zum Frequenzkamm: Er war erstmalig ein einfaches Werkzeug für die Messung der optischen Frequenzen von hunderten oder sogar tausenden von Terahertz. Er liefert eine phasenkohärente Verbindung zwischen dem sichtbaren und Radiofrequenzbereich, und es ist ein Uhrwerkmechanismus, ein Zähler für optische Atomuhren. Wie also funktioniert ein Frequenzkamm? Typischerweise hat man einen Laser oder irgendeine Quelle, die sehr kurze Pulse mit einem breiten Spektrum aussendet. Wenn man einen solchen Einzelpuls hat, erhält man ein breites Spektrum. Wenn man keinen Einzelpuls nimmt, sondern 2 Pulse hintereinander, dann gibt es eine Interferenz im Spektrum. Es ist also ähnlich dem youngschen Doppelspaltexperiment, aber jetzt hat man eine Interferenz im Spektrum oder dem Spektrograph und man erhält ein Streifenmuster. Im Grunde hat man schon einen Frequenzkamm, einen Linienkamm, aber nicht sehr scharf. Je weiter die Pulse voneinander entfernt sind, umso mehr Kammlinien erhält man. Und der Frequenzabstand zwischen diesen Kammlinien entspricht präzise dem Kehrwert des Zeitintervalls zwischen 2 Pulsen. Wenn ich also keine 2 Pulse habe, sondern viele Pulse, dann können sie interferieren und wir erhalten eine Interferenz wie mit einem Beugungsgitter. Wir bekommen eine Multiwelleninterferenz und können scharfe Linien erzielen. Je länger wir warten, desto schärfer werden die Linien. Und sie können so scharf sein wie beim jedem Dauerstrichlaser, aber nur, wenn wir die Zeitabläufe präzise kontrollieren. Sonst funktioniert dies natürlich nicht. Dies sind daher extrem grundlegende Prinzipien nach Fourier. Trotzdem erwarteten die meisten nicht, dass es tatsächlich funktionieren könnte, um die Frequenz des Lichts zu messen. Sie ahnten nicht, wie weit man diese Prinzipien ausdehnen konnte: dass man einen phasengekoppelten Titansaphirlaser nehmen, sein Licht durch eine nichtlineare Faser schicken konnte, um es durch Eigenphasenmodulation zu einem Regenbogen an Farben zu verbreitern, und man immer noch einen Frequenzkamm hat. Wir können daher 100.000 oder 1.000.000 scharfe Spektrallinien erzeugen, die sehr gleichmäßig verteilt sind in einem Abstand von präzise der Pulswiederholfrequenz. Das einzige Problem war noch, dass wir nicht die absolute Position dieser Linien kannten. Wir kennen die Abstände, aber nicht die absoluten Positionen, die vom Phasenschlupf der Trägerwelle relativ zur Pulshüllkurve abhängen, der sogenannten Trägerhüllkurve dieser Frequenz. Aber wenn man einen eine Oktave umspannenden Kamm hat, dann ist es extrem einfach, diese einer solchen Frequenz zu messen. Man nimmt Kammlinien vom roten Ende und schickt sie für eine Frequenzverdopplung durch ein nichtlineares Kristall, bekommt Kammlinien am blauen Ende und schaut sich das gemeinsame Schwebungssignal an und kann das messen. Und wenn man es messen kann, dann kann man mehrere Kontrollmethoden benutzen, um es zu entfernen oder einfach zu berücksichtigen. Und daher kann man ein Instrument kaufen, optische Frequenzmesser, und hunderte dieser werden in verschiedenen Laboratorien genutzt. Sie werden miniaturisiert, und daher kann man ein Instrument besitzen, von dem ich vor 30 Jahren geträumt habe. Etwas, das man auf den Tisch stellen kann, und man einen Eingang für das Laserlicht und eine digitale Anzeige hat, um die Frequenz zu messen. Man kann die Frequenz auslesen mit so vielen Stellen, wie man möchte. Es gibt Arbeiten für miniaturisierte Kammquellen, die auf Mikroringkernen basieren, hergestellt durch Lithografie. Und einer der Gründe für das wachsende Interesse an diesen Kämmen ist, dass der Strauss der Anwendungen ständig wächst. Aber wir haben keine Zeit, ich schaue auf die Uhr und ich sehe, dass ich mich wirklich beeilen muss. Aber lassen Sie uns auf den Ursprungszweck schauen, auf Frequenzmessungen. Es gibt also diesen extrem scharfen Übergang im atomaren Wasserstoff, den 2-Photonenübergang vom Grundzustand zum metastabilen 2s-Zustand, der eine natürliche Linienbreite von nur etwa 1 Hertz hat. Und man kann ihn durch ultraviolettes Licht anregen. Die frühesten Experimente wurden zusammen mit Carl Wieman im Jahr 1975 durchgeführt, der sogar hier an dem Treffen teilnimmt. Ich habe ihn noch nicht gesehen, aber ich denke, er wird am Mittwoch ankommen. Wir sind nun in der Lage, die Frequenz dieses Übergangs auf etwa 15 Dezimalstellen genau zu messen. Für die Messung benötigt man einen Vergleich, unser Vergleich war der nationale Zeitstandard der Cäsiumfontänen-Uhr an der PTB. Und wir hatten ein Glasfaserkabel, das Laboratorien über eine Entfernung von etwa 1.000 Kilometer verbindet. Wenn ich daher diese Frequenz habe, kann ich dann die Rydbergkonstante bestimmen? Ja, im Vergleich zur Theorie - aber es gibt ein Problem, wir kennen die Protonengröße nicht sehr genau. Und daher kennen wir die Frequenz auf 15 Kommastellen genau, aber die Rydbergkonstante nur auf 12 Kommastellen. Um daher einen Fortschritt zu erzielen, müssten wir einen besseren Wert für den Ladungsradius des Protons haben. Wie wird der Ladungsradius des Protons gemessen? Durch Elektronenstreuexperimente an Beschleunigern, und es gibt auch die Möglichkeit, ihn durch Vergleich unterschiedlicher Übergänge im Wasserstoff zu messen. Wenn wir uns die Energien der s-Niveaus anschauen, dann sie skalieren mit der Rybergkonstante geteilt durch die Hauptquantenzahl zum Quadrat, plus der Lamb-Verschiebung des Grundzustands, geteilt durch die Hauptquantenzahl hoch drei. Und diese Lamb-Verschiebung beinhaltet traditionell einen Term, der mit dem quadratischen Mittel des Protonladungsradius skaliert. Man kann also die Protonengröße durch Vergleich zweier unterschiedlicher Übergänge messen. Man kann das noch viel besser machen, wenn man sich künstliche Atome des myonischen Wasserstoff anstelle des elektronischen ansieht. Ein negatives Myon ist 200-mal schwerer und kommt 200-mal näher an den Kern heran. In diesem Fall ist die Lamb-Verschiebung tatsächlich im mittleren Infrarot bei 6 Mikrometer. Aber wenn man Myonen im Wasserstoffgas einfängt, kann man den metastabilen 2s-Zustand bevölkern, Übergänge mit einem Laser herbeiführen, und sich die Lyman-Alphalinie anschauen, die in diesem Fall 2 Kiloelektronenvolt im weichen Röntgenbereich beträgt. Diese Art des Experiments wurde durchgeführt, und war endlich erfolgreich. Hier sehen Sie einen Teil des internationalen Teams vor dem Labor des Paul-Scherrer-Instituts in der Schweiz. Und so konnten sie mit Randolf Pohl als Teamleiter in den Jahren 2010 und 2013 Resultate veröffentlichen, die solche Resonanzen beobachteten, Lamb-Verschiebungsresonanzen im myonischen Wasserstoff. Die große Überraschung war, dass sie nicht dort waren, wo sie erwartet wurden – Sie war also nicht dort. Wenn wir uns das Diagramm ansehen, sehen wir, dass die Protonengröße bestimmt vom myonischen Wasserstoff fast 8 Sigma entfernt ist von der Größe, die durch gestreute Elektronen oder elektronischen Wasserstoff bestimmt wurde. Dies wird das Rätsel der Protonengröße genannt. Es ist noch nicht vollständig gelöst. Wir haben den Verdacht, dass die myonischen Wasserstoffexperimente richtig sind und vielleicht die Wasserstoffspektroskopie nicht. Das hat damit zu tun, dass wir einen sehr scharfen Übergang haben, der 1s-2s-Übergang, aber es gibt zusätzliche Übergänge, die nicht so scharf sind und leichter durch elektrische Felder und andere Effekte gestört werden. Wenn wir uns also all die spektroskopischen Wasserstoffdaten ansehen, die in den Wert des Protonenradius einfließen, dann sieht man, dass jeder einzelne Wert einen großen Fehlerbalken hat. Und nur nach Mittelung über alle Werte erhalten wir den kleinen Fehler. Aber vielleicht darf man das nicht machen. Es gibt einige neue Experimente, die Axel Beyer in unserem Labor durchführt, der die Ein-Photonen-Übergänge in einem kalten Strahl metastabiler 2s-Atomen untersucht, vom 2s- zum 4p-Zustand. Das ist im Wesentlichen ein Balmer-Betaübergang, und er hat sich größte Mühe gegeben, alle erdenkbaren systematischen Fehler auszuschalten. Er hat jetzt einige Ergebnisse, die tatsächlich auf der anderen Seite des Protonenradius bestimmt durch myonischen Wasserstoff sind. Ich weiß nicht, ob das wirklich schlüssig ist, aber es legt nahe, dass dies vielleicht die Lösung wäre. Dass wir keine neue Physik entdecken, sondern vergangene Fehler in der Wasserstoffspektroskopie. Trotzdem, wenn wir für den Moment annehmen, dass der myonische Wasserstoff uns die richtige Protonengröße liefert, dann können wir nachsehen, wie dies die Rydbergkonstante beeinflusst. Und hier haben wir den offiziellen Wert der Rydbergkonstante laut den jüngsten CODATA-Anpassungen der Fundamentalkonstante. Und wenn wir den myonischen Wasserstoffradius nehmen, dann sehen wir, dass die Fehlerbalken gehörig schrumpfen, fast eine Größenordnung, das ist ein großer Schritt für eine Fundamentalkonstante. Aber wir verschieben auch die Rydbergkonstante, das hat natürlich Konsequenzen für verschiedene präzise Voraussagen. Ich bin am Ende angekommen. Lassen Sie mich kurz erwähnen: Bald, vielleicht sogar noch in diesem Jahr, erwarte ich die ersten Ergebnisse der Laserspektroskopie an Antiwasserstoff zu sehen. Und natürlich ist die Frage, ob Wasserstoff und Antiwasserstoff genau das gleiche sind, oder ob es einen winzigen Unterschied gibt, kolossal wichtig für unser Verständnis der Natur. Und selbst der winzigste Unterschied wäre wichtig. Daher: Je mehr Kommastellen man in der Messung bekommt, umso besser. Frequenzkämme werden inzwischen auch in der Astronomie in hochauflösenden Spektrographen der großen Laboratorien installiert, und es gibt eine Anzahl von Bereichen, wo man vielleicht mehr über Licht und Materie entdecken kann. Erstens kann man ihn benutzen, um nach erdähnlichen Planeten in der Umlaufbahn um sonnenähnliche Sterne zu suchen. Aber man kann natürlich auch die allgemeine Relativitätstheorie überprüfen. Man kann vielleicht Hinweise für mögliche Änderungen der Fundamentalkonstanten aus Beobachtungen erhalten. Es existiert auch die Frage, ob diese kosmischen Rotverschiebungen, die wir beobachten, sich im Laufe der Zeit ändern? Können wir Hinweise für die andauernde Expansion des Universums von Beobachtungen von der Erde aus erhalten? Und es sieht so aus, als ob das möglich wäre. Wie wenig wir über das Universum wissen, wird hier illustriert, wo wir annehmen, dass 68 % komplett unbekannte dunkle Energie ist und 26.8 % sind dunkle Materie unbekannter Zusammensetzung. Es gibt also noch viel zu entdecken. Der Fortschritt, den wir in unserem eigenen Labor erzielt haben, war übrigens nicht so sehr motiviert durch diese wichtigen Fragen, sondern mehr durch Neugier und um in unserem Labor Spaß zu haben.

Theodor Hänsch on Max Planck's and Albert Einstein's contributions to the discovery of a paradoxical wave-particle duality
(00:04:22 - 00:05:59)

 

In particular, the photoelectric effect was a phenomenon discovered in 1887 that represented an interaction between light and matter that could not be explained by classical physics. The effect occurs when electrically charged particles are ejected from a material’s surface when it is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation. The maximum kinetic energy of the released particles was proportional to the frequency, not the intensity, of the light. Eventually, Einstein formulated a new corpuscular theory of light in 1905 that defined each particle of light, or photon, as containing a fixed amount of energy that depends on the light’s frequency. During his first Lindau meeting in 1962 – and his very last public lecture before passing away the same year – Niels Bohr discusses Einstein’s explanation of the photoelectric effect.

 

Niels  Bohr (1962) - Atomic Physics and Human Knowledge

Ladies and gentlemen, It is a wonderful opportunity to a scientist who have had the good fortune to be occupied with studies and have moderately succeeded in giving some contributions to the common human inheritance of knowledge,to be able to come together with, and especially to meet, young people who helped to bring new blood into the work. Now I will say that everything in science, every contribution, is a large one. We live on the contributions of previous generations, and the work is to be compared with the bringing together of stones. But the interest, the pleasure, is to see how the whole edifice rises by the common contributions. Now, it seems, for the talk I have to give, that there is nothing new to most of you, but we will only assume there's some line in what we have learned in atomic physics and what helped the field to look into other things. I shall like to just say a few words about what of course everybody knows, that the idea of the limited divisibility of matter goes back to Antiquity. It was introduced by the atomists in order to try to the order that exists in nature, in spite of the very varied, immense variability of the physical phenomena. To take the very simple example of conservation, we think of a substance like water and the wonderful experience that the state of this system can be changed. By heating it up, the water may evaporate ? form steam or gas. And if it is cooled, it may form a rigid property, may form ice, which even, as we know, will form beautiful snow crystals on a beautiful summer day at the lake here. But the point is, that without any superstition, like witchcraft, it would be still more difficult to understand that the steam can be condensed, and like the ice that made it, form exactly the same water with the old properties. But, of course, if we assume that the water molecules just remain unaltered during the process, then we can explain these very properties by the ever-present particles being removed from each other, and with ice there is a possibility due to the smaller motions of the more regular order and that is then again changed by the melting of the ice. Now these are only too simple matters to speak about. The interesting thing is that for a long time people thought that the coarseness of our senses was too great to allow the actual observations of the individual atoms. Now we know that that was underrating our possibilities, that by the marvelous development of the technique or the art of experimentation, especially of wonderful quantification devices, it is possible to see effects of individual atoms. But this very fact we must admire: the caution which the old wisdom held and applied with regard to ideas and pictures used for the communication of all the experience in the new field, based on the experience. We also know that in this new field there are other laws ? it is not possible to keep to the older physical laws, which we call classical physics, and we have actually to go very much further. Now this is getting too long, but the point is that in the development of classical physics, there it was possible. The development of mechanics after the work of Galilei was completed with this wonderful genius of Newton, to describe the working even of the planets around our sun. A continuous chain of events described the state of the system by its position and power and the motion of its parts, and it was assumed that these different chains were uniquely connected in a so-called ? not a precise description ? relation method through the laws of conservation of energy and momentum. Now it was found that the same kind of description was possible also in the field of the electric and magnetic phenomena. We know how Maxwell was able, on the basis of the discovery of Faraday, to develop a description of such a kind. It was necessary, though, not only to describe an electromagnetic system ? the position of the electrified and magnetized bodies ? but also to keep account of the duration and tendency of the magnetic and electric fields at any point of space. Now I have come to something which has also become known to everybody. I might just say a few words about the development in the theory of relativity, which developed by the observation that it was impossible to find any change in the velocity of light dependent on the motion of the earth around the sun. That led, as we all know, Einstein to recognise not only that different observers moving relative to each other use different velocities, but in the arrangements of the phenomena it was even so that one had to use a different time, that two events which for one observer seemed to happen simultaneously might for another happen before and after each other. Or, to speak about relativity, or to say a few remarks. As we all know, then it was possible for Einstein not to introduce this as a complication, but as a way to find general laws of physics, common to all observers, and one is, of course, the relationship between energy and mass. To do this one has to introduce – one way to do it ? is to introduce mathematical abstractions as fundamental non-Euclidean geometry. But now it is essential, and that also applies to all the other things I'm speaking about, that mathematics is not something similar to science to be developed by getting new evidence by experimentation. Mathematics is a development of language and it is even so that these mathematical abstractions ? the mathematical definitions and their operations ? have to be described in the common language. Otherwise nobody could learn it, for it is a very practical tendency of language which makes it possible simply to describe relations in ordinary language. Now it is very drastic, that as regard the description in relativity theory, every observer distinguishes sharply between space and time. If that was not connected with the formalism, then, of course, it was not possible to speak about and say anything. Another point in relativity theory is that it assumes that the number of atoms in the world is very large, so large that we can make instruments that allow us to measure. Unless it was for those two reasons, of course, there was not the slightest physical content in the theory of relativity. Further it is the simplicity that, just like in the classical mechanics, we can order the phenomena in a prescription in which we reckon with cause and effect in the ordinary way. In all these ways, then, the theory of relativity is a wonderful generalization of classical physics. But now, the great change that we have been leading up to came with the discovery of the universal quantum of action in the first year of this century by Planck. This discovery revealed a feature of wholeness, of a duality in the atomic processes, which went far beyond the old doctrine of the limited divisibility of matter. It meant that the ordinary theories of classical physics were generalisations, which could only be applied in cases of phenomena on such a scale that the action involved in all points was so large compared with the quantum that it can be neglected. This was outside the ordinary experience. But when it comes to atomic forces we have new regulations, of a kind for which we cannot give simple pictures, but which, nevertheless, are responsible for the stability of atomic systems, on which the properties of all matter ? and of which our tools and all the bodies are made ? depend. Now just let me say that the difficulties of picturing such phenomena were brought, in a very serious way, to the forefront by Einstein, who really, at the time of the discovery, tried to explain the individual photoeffect by assuming that actually we had to do with what we call a transfer of a light quantum. But that was a very odd situation because there could be no question after returning to the corpuscular description of light, that the great picture of electromagnetic theory accounted for all the interference phenomena. And thereby we had two features which had to be used in what we will now call a complementary manner. That was the first time that such things came to the knowledge of physics. Now I shall not go on in that way. It was found to be possible ? by leaning on the ideas of Einstein and making use of the knowledge we got from the discovery of the atomic nucleus ? to account for their bringing order in certain fields of experience. But that was of a very unsatisfactory nature, because one could not get logical consistency before one had a harmonius generalisation of classical physics in such a way that all our definitions of the world we take from classical physics, and unless we have a harmonious generalisation, we cannot apply that in a consistent manner. I shall not try to speak about how this came about. You see here many of those people who contributed most decisively to this thinking ? Heisenberg, Born, Dirac and the others. I think I will only say that, had they gathered like this, we would have missed Schrödinger, whose death a few years ago was such a loss to science. Now, but the point is that the development has taught us something about what we may call objective description of atomic physics. Now what do we mean by objective description? That is all so philosophical. We simply mean to describe in a way which do not depend on subjective judgement. And now if you speak quite simply about it, it means that the answers to the questions we encounter in our experience must be given in ordinary human English, just refined by the terminology of classical physics. Now that is actually what we do in all experimentation, in all human experimentation, in all the fields. Then how do we go about it? We use in measurements bodies that are large enough and heavy enough so that we actually can tell their relative positions, relative motions, without taking into account any common feature which is involved in their constitution and their stability. Now, the observations, they are just recordings, permanent recordings, of such measurements. Measurements are of many kinds ? diagrams, sensors and photographic plates. The marks put on these ? like just this spot which can be developed on a photographic plate and set by an electron. Now there is a point that these recordings involve complicated irreversible processes. But that is no difficulty whatsoever in interpreting the research, because it just reminds us and stresses the irreversibility which is in the concept of observation itself. That's a point which is only spoken about in the classical theory, but actually it is what one learns. We say that the moon goes around the earth, and we see it sometimes and so on. But can we purely for psychological reasons – philosophical reasons ? say it has been there between that times that we have observed it? But the point is that surely classical mechanics is so to be understood. So that actually, the very steps in a phenomenon are really carried out and completed, but now in quantum physics, there we have just this limited divisibility of the phenomena. Therefore, now in the classical physics we just assume that generally in observations we can account for the interaction of the instruments and the objects in the observations or at any rate compensate for them. But in quantum phenomena this interaction forms an integral part of the phenomena for which no separate account is possible ? it is logically impossible ? if the instrument shall serve the purpose of defining the experimental arrangement. Now let me remind you of a few main points. When we specify conditions, then we may observe in quantum physics under one and the same fine experimental arrangement, as far as we can define it at all ? we have to define it ? different attributes corresponding to different individual quantum processes. Therefore, a statistical account is simply imperative, is indispensible. Another point is, that if you have a phenomenon observed under different experimental arrangements, it cannot be brought together in one and the same classical picture. Then we say that however much at first sight such phenomena contrast with each other, they have to be adapted as complementary in the sense that they together exhaust all the information which can be obtained and defined about the objects. Now the great thing in the development of the mathematical methods of quantum physics is that such simple considerations can never involve any logical contradiction, just due to the mathematical consistency of the quantum mechanical formalism. This formalism serves to predict or to develop the statistical laws holding for the observations at given experimental conditions. Actually, over a very large part of all our experience, nothing is finished; we will have to learn of the problem which Heisenberg spoke of the last day, about the kind of further departures from pictorial description, if it comes to phenomena where we may say that they take place within very small extensions of space. But that doesn’t mean that the description we have in the other fields can ever be changed. But new further things have a possibility to come in just because of the way of defining the things, by experimental arrangements just to use if we can make something very much smaller than in atomic physics. Now I do not feel how well I've done it ? I have tried to be as free as possible. But I would like to say that this complementary description to which we are referred in quantum physics means first of all that in order to really define what we understand, it will help to be reminded of the essential part of the experimental arrangement ? that it has to do with conditions of experimenting and the definition of research. Now such a situation is new in physics, but not in other fields of human interest, where in a very familiar way, we use language which implicitly or explicitly refer to the situations under which experience is obtained. Now I will just add something about these problems, as regards our attitude to various fields. First of all I would say a few words about the psychical experience, psychological experience. That is certainly very, very far from physics, and it is a field where it is not so simple to speak about objective description. That is, in the description of such experience ? communication of such experience ? we use words like thought and sentiment which refer to mutually exclusive situations, like the different experimental arrangement in atomic physics. For we cannot at the same time have a feeling of volition and ponder about the motives for our actions. Such words are used in a typical complementary manner since the very origin of human language. Now we say that that is how it is with objective description. In the objective description in physics, or atomic physics, we never refer to the observing subject. Sometimes one speaks as we do, but that is absolutely not necessary and disturb the actual meaning, because we need not say who has put up the instruments, and the actual observations are absolutely independent of how many, or how few, look at them. The actual effective content is never to be referred to the subject. When we speak about the scientific sphere, we say ‘I’ ? ‘I think’ or ‘I mean’ or so, and now, how does that actually correspond? It corresponds in the way that we in atomic physics must tell how and under what condition experience is obtained. Now this seems all so philosophical, maybe so unclear. I want just to refer to a story in Danish literature, very briefly. Poul Møller a hundred years ago wrote a book which is very much beloved among Danish students today, called ‘Adventures of a Danish Student’. The writer speaks about connections between young people, discussions among them and so on, and of different situations. And what I want to refer to is especially a talk between two cousins, one a very practical one, very efficient, one of those who students in Denmark used to call philistines. I don’t know what the word is in Germany ? ‘Spitzburgher’? And the other was a man who was very apt to philosophical meditation, but to a great disturbance for his form of life. Now the situation is that the former ? this is very funny ? tries to help the latter get his things better arranged so he can get some sensible occupation, to have a job as one especially say in America. And he arranges all things for him, but he does not respond at all. Then he says how can that be, and then this poor Licenciate ? he is called Licenciate ? says, It is very easy for you to speak of me, but I must think of that ‘I’, which controls what you call ‘me’. But as soon as I start thinking, it’s getting much worse. Because then it is clear that I am really thinking of an ‘I’, which think of that ‘I’ which control what you call ‘me’, and then I get a whole series of ‘I’s, in between one another who shall determine, and then they say that they try very hard to get order in my ‘I’s, but I must give it up and get a terrible headache.” Now this is told with very fine humour, which I have not been able to produce with these short words. But the point is, that’s a very true description of the position of every one of us. It is a position which we are in, where children learn from their parents, or from playing with each other, how to use the language in a way which is not too impractical. It also helps us learn that one has to get a good deal of humour into it, as there also is in children’s play. The point is that it is the possibility of so to say changing the separation between subject and object that gives the possibility for describing the rich conscious life. Similarly, the new widened framework of complementarity allows us in physics to account for regularities of very much finer character in a very much more varied way than anything that could at all be defined within the framework of classical physics. It also forms the view when one speaks about mysticism and pragmatism and so on ? they are all parts of what normally one can be interested in, and gives room for the art, poetry, pictorial art, or music, to play on all strings of our sentiments. But, I should like to say a few more words, maybe about the social relations. There we come to the so-called ethical problems. And now it is a new point I want to make, how we speak about it nowadays; we then ask, what are the words we use? The words in such fields are essentially “justice” and “charity”. And all societies try to combine these two things. To be clearer, you can not have some orderly society without some kind of fair play, regulated by judiciary rules. But it’s also clear that life would be very poor if we cannot use words like friendship or love. But the point is, in a situation where we have unambiguous applicability of judiciary rules, then what do to? Then there is no room for applied world charity. But conversely ? the great poets in Greece wrote on the subject ? compassion and goodwill can bring any one of us in absolute conflict with any judiciary rule. So there we have two words again which are used in a complementary manner. It’s very interesting that just such simple matters can be described in analogy with space and time description, conservation of energy?momentum, yet that these things have to be treated differently if you go to the fine details. So it is also that the finer issues of human life strongly present in the old Chinese philosophy, a long time ago, thousand years ago, looking for harmony in life, involved that we are ourselves both the actors as well as the spectators. When we compare different cultures, compare the behaviour in different societies, everything is often very different. One might say this is analogous to the theory of relativity because there we know how differently different observers may describe one and the same experience. But the situation is very different from that, because in relativity theory it is possible by means of a common principle, common terminology, for each observer to know how any other in a different frame of reference will arrange descriptions; that is what gives the value to the theory's general laws. But the traditions on which nations are based are of a very historical origin, and it is not such a simple thing to appreciate traditions of that kind on the basis of tradition alone. You may even say that it is hardly possible to appreciate the prejudices of one nation in terms of the prejudices of another. So therefore we might sometimes say that these cultures are complementary to each other, but that is very, very rough, because the complementary description in atomic physics and in psychology is simply unavoidable, but nations can by contact exchange, to a certain degree, traditions, and there can arise new cultures which contain valuable elements of the cultures of others. Now, this is all so very simple, and I only want to say that it is most essential actually to be aware of the common human basis in life. And this is especially so now, due to the development of atomic physics, which is meant for no other thing than augmenting knowledge of that nature of which we are part. Then, of course, at the same time, the human position is bound up with the means of destruction which have come into human hands. And unless we get some kind of cooperation between the nations, it may threaten human survival. Now this is a new situation. It has no precedence in history, and it is therefore something which must occupy everyone. And it’s a very, very difficult situation. But one must try to see how can one increase confidence between nations. And I would just end by saying that one of the greatest elements of having taken part in scientific cooperation is the possibility, in the common service for truth, to establish friendship and understanding between scientists of different nations, quite independently of traditions of other kinds. And I think that that is one ? we hope it works quickly ? of the ways by which some basis for confidence can be created, I think especially when we are together with the young people who will have to see that such a development is promoted and realised in the future. There is therefore hope that such a kind of cooperation, which I told of today ? which we have learnt just from pure science? will evolve in many kinds of human relationships, and I hope that it may contribute something to the great task now before us. Applause

Niels Bohr discusses Einstein’s explanation of the photoelectric effect
(00:18:43 - 00:20:15)

 

Is light a particle or a wave?

Ultimately, neither a classical wave model nor a classical particle model could hold up to experimental findings in the end, and both were found to be incorrect. For instance, take the case of Thomas Young's double-slit experiment in 1801, which initially served as evidence of light as a wave [3]. When monochromatic light passing through two narrow slits illuminates a dark screen, an interference pattern is observed due to the two overlapping light waves. But when the screen is replaced by a single-photon detector, each photon arrives whole and intact at one point — but over time, many photons create the interference pattern seen in Young's original experiment.

Quantum mechanics solved this paradox by interpreting the magnitude of the interference pattern at any one point as the probability of a photon arriving at that point. From there, the field of quantum optics was born, which studies the interactions between light and matter that depend on the superposition of quantum states according to the general rules of quantum mechanics. Roy Glauber, in a lecture and discussion at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2010, describes how quantum optics came about from Paul Dirac's quantum electrodynamics, the relativistic quantum field theory of electrodynamics.

 

Roy Glauber (2010) - What is Quantum Optics? (Lecture + Discussion)

I just want to show you some of the things that have been done in the last few years and some of the things that are being thought about now. I thought a good place to begin, I don’t know whether this thing is going to change, yeah there we are, I thought I would begin by saying what quantum optics is not. Many of you are familiar with a good many optical instruments and I’ll try to persuade you that these have reached in their own terms a kind of perfection which has absolutely nothing to do with quantum optics. And then go on from there. Now let me just say that optics has evolved in several stages. It begins of course with drawing straight lines to represent light rays and sometime around the beginning of the 19th century it was determined that these straight line diagrams are actually describing the progress of waves. And toward the late 19th century it was discovered specifically that these are electromagnetic waves. And when you add up these elements of theory you have an essentially perfect description of what we want in all of our elementary optical instruments. Those that I had in the picture a moment ago. We are ultimately talking about the electromagnetic theory and there are certain normal modes of oscillation of the electromagnetic field. Some of them are progressive waves, others are standing waves, we’ll talk a bit about those but let me go on from here. This is a rather imaginative picture of what happens in the double slit experiment which goes back to about the year 1803. Light going through a pair of parallel slits is spread out into a succession of diffraction lobes we call them. This is very old stuff and not quantum optics. From there we go, well let me, I seem to have skipped a slide, go back again. This is the diagram, the wave diagram of what happens in that double slit experiment. All of this is familiar to elementary students in physical optics. Now in the next stage we have a ray diagram, well here is how an image is produced by a lens, well this is very primitive optics and has again nothing at all to do with quantum optics. Hey I keep getting back to this thing, now here we are already in the late 19th century. Maxwell has discovered electromagnetic waves which he did of course as an exercise in theory, putting together the familiar electromagnetic laws and trying to find the microscopic description in terms of oscillations. He found that whenever he constructed a mechanical model that would underlie his electromagnetic waves, a kind of mechanical analogue and a very strange one which is completely forgotten. He discovered always that there was an additional term which wasn’t suspected before and it was that additional term in his equations, the so-called displacement current, many of you have heard of it. which explains the oscillations of the electromagnetic fields that take place in a vacuum. And those oscillations are electromagnetic waves. And he discovered immediately that they travelled with the known speed of light. He had in other words in hand, in about the 1870, the explanation of what light is and in a sense we’ve never had a better explanation. We have a vastly more detailed explanation and that will be the talk I’ll have to give to you, but there’s a kind of perfection to the Maxwell theory and it’s all one needs to deal with the kind of optics that you saw on those earlier slides. His fields oscillate, for example for visible light, with enormous frequencies, And these waves spread around obstacles, that is the diffraction phenomenon that we already saw in an earlier slide. There is not in the Maxwell theory any suggestion at all of discontinuity of quantisation as we call it of electromagnetic waves. It’s a theory which is really quite perfect on to itself. There is one of Maxwell’s electromagnetic waves. Now I have to tell you that what I have done is to clip from the internet all of the picturesque material I can find that will illustrate any of the things I have to say. But none of the art work is original and many of you will recognise it from other sites. Ok there is an electromagnetic wave. This is a rather poor representation of standing waves, this are standing waves on a string or an elastic cord, it’s much harder to make a good picture of standing electromagnetic waves. But the normal modes of an electromagnetic field in a box that has reflecting surfaces are these standing waves. They’re standing electromagnetic waves, not elastic waves on a string, sad to say. Now we have arrived at the turn of the 20th century and all of a sudden the quantum theory begins. It begins in a rather strange way. With an empirical formula discovered by Max Planck and it continues the work of Einstein and then a succession of puzzles and mysteries which lasted until 1925, ’26 I say here. Ok here we go, we continue now with the spectrum of heat radiation at 3 different temperatures. And I would have been much happier if the artists who produced this had made a graph of intensity against frequency but instead historically they make them as graphs of intensity against wavelength. So short wavelengths are down here in this part of the picture and you see that at low temperature which is this graph, there is almost no short wave radiation. Short wave meaning ultraviolet and x-rays. You raise the temperature and you begin to get a little in that region and you raise the temperature still higher, let’s say the temperature of a hot star and you have quite a bit in the ultraviolet and even going down close to the x-rays. Now the visible spectrum of course are these colours that you see in the middle. The shape of that spectrum is fairly smooth at the long wavelengths and there was a formula that was known on the basis of classical kinetic theory, classical statistical mechanics. It took rather some sophistication to put that formula together. But that polynomial, that inverse polynomial which fits this particular part of the curve here, here and here was known. Planck surmised that there was an exponential formula which governed this short wavelength part of the spectrum. And what he did was to put together ad hoc a formula which fit both halves of the spectrum. And it did more than that. It fit the spectrum as it was measured, at several temperatures, this is in 1900, October 19th 1900 it turns out. It fit the formula at several different temperatures and as a complete function of frequency. The formula had one adjustable parameter in it which Planck had never seen before, there was one number he had to choose in order for his formula to fit. But it was such a wonderful fit at all temperatures that he decided that there must be something fundamental to it. And he worked for the next couple of months, exactly 2 months, you can see trying to see whether with his sophisticated knowledge… Question. How could somebody come up with a formula out of nothing, I mean… Well as I said at the long wavelengths there was a good formula which really worked. But which didn’t work at all by the time you got up to the visible part of the spectrum. Now there was a guess and no more than that for another formula which worked at the short wavelengths. Now any theorist can put together a fraction which has something of the one formula in it and something of the other formula and the one will dominate in one area and the other will dominate in the other area. That is pretty much what Planck did but he did it with a very sophisticated understanding of thermodynamics, I should say thermal physics more generally because there was the beginnings then of what we later called statistical mechanics, kinetic theory was in a reasonably mature state then. It involved guess work. And literally an ad hoc guess but it was an extraordinary guess because it is precisely the formula that we still use to describe the thermal spectrum of radiation. I can’t explain it, certainly not briefly (laugh) any better than that. He decided since the charged elements interacting with the electromagnetic field that were best understood were harmonic oscillators, he would try to construct a model of matter, the matter that’s doing the radiating. Now in those days one thought of the walls around the hollow volume and it was the walls that were radiating light into the enclosure. And light seems to have just vanished for us (laugh). If the microphone is still working I’ll just go on talking (laugh) we can make out pretty well in the dark. Planck felt that he understood best harmonic oscillators, harmonic oscillators, a charge on a spring is a harmonic oscillator. And the way in which such a system radiated, he understood so he had formulas for the rate of radiation of harmonic oscillators. What he assumed was that the walls of his cavity, he did not know the structure of matter very well in those days, he assumed that the walls of his cavity were made out of harmonic oscillators. He knew how they radiated into the space and how they absorbed radiation from that space. And he could discuss the equilibrium then of the radiation within that volume with the walls at a given temperature. And he found that he couldn’t derive his formula from anything. Unless he made a radical assumption which made literally no sense to him. And that was that the energy in a harmonic oscillator can only increase in steps. And that when the oscillator had a frequency nu, here it is, the energy of that oscillator had to be an integer, 0123, any integer times a certain constant, times that frequency. Now that constant which we have known as Planck’s constant ever since was the number which he had to adjust in order to fit all of those radiation, heat radiation spectra. So Planck had in effect discovered that you can only have the thermal radiation formula if harmonic oscillators have energies which increase in discontinuous steps but equal steps. Now that was not yet the discovery of light quanta. It was a remarkable discovery and it puzzled every one of course and the mysteries and dilemmas then grew over the next 25 years. Question. That equation means there is sort of light could be energy and absorbed over space, could be equal to the energy. What that is saying is that he imagined, he only imagined that the walls of a cavity surrounding any volume were made out of harmonic oscillators, that was an assumption which he could treat mathematically but it was not known to be true and in fact it was known to be false (laugh). He assumed that his harmonic oscillators could only increase in energy in units of a certain constant times the frequency of oscillation of that oscillator. Question (inaudible 16.43). That was the beginning of the quantum theory but it was a very shaky beginning. Ok the next contribution you will begin to recognise. Albert Einstein in a remarkable year 1905 in which he did 2 other things that were at least as important, found that he could explain, he could interpret the expression for the entropy of the electromagnetic field. Now I’m not going to go into that but he found that that suggested to him that the electromagnetic energy was in particles because he got the same analytic expression for the entropy as he found for gas, of particles with these particular energies, H times nu. The more important thing that Einstein did was to interpret the photoelectric effect, it had been discovered 26 years earlier that when light shines on charged matter, electric charges can be sent off and they are sent off according to a set of rules which could be beautifully interpreted by saying that the light consists of bundles of energy, each one of which liberates a single electron and sends it off with a kinetic energy which increases with the frequency of the light. So it was Einstein who really began the quantum theory of light. And this was remarkable of course, given that we had an essentially perfect theory of light, as continuous electromagnetic waves. This was a statement that light behaves like particles, particles which are little packets of energy. And at a later point 1909 talking about plane waves in which the energy is all travelling in one direction because Einstein knew that electromagnetic waves have momentum. It would be necessarily true if light consists of these particles, that these particles have momentum. And the momentum would be their energy, H nu divided by the velocity of light. Well then he even found a new derivation and a rather more logical one than Planck found, this was in 1916, talking about the thermal equilibrium really of the photoelectric effect with matter. There were 2 varieties of emission probabilities he needed, one of which was easy to understand when you have an oscillating field present that shakes charges. And those charges then radiate more or absorb this so called B coefficient was easily understood by Einstein. But the A coefficient was something new. It was a statement that a charged oscillating system will radiate quanta spontaneously. One phenomenon of that sort had been observed earlier, it was radio active emission, in fact there is a considerable analogy. But that was again rather a puzzle in Einstein’s day. Well where do we go from there, we go to the quantum theory of light, well this is really just repeating what I said but it raises the question do light quanta behave like particles. Now that may not seem like a burning question to you but all of the things that were discovered in the 19th century said that light has a kind of continuous behaviour. And for example when you had diffraction it meant that energy was flowing through 2 slits as you saw to produce a diffraction pattern. Well here are some puzzles. This laser pointer is producing approximately 10 to the 17 light quanta every second that I have it on. What effect does the granularity of light have? Well one interesting question immediately is how we see light, do we see light because it’s a wave exciting the retinas of our eyes, or do we see particles falling into our eyes. Well a professor at Columbia, Selig Hecht did some research on that and that involved getting a lot of students used to seeing in the dark, putting them in a dark room and trying to find the faintest thing that would objectively give them the sensation of seeing a bit of light. He found that that happened with as few as 100 quanta. Now that's very few quanta and very little energy. The curious thing is because of the way our eyes are constructed, our eyes waste most of the light and ultimately we see light which is really detected by, represents the detection of only something like 5 to 7 quanta. We are capable of seeing in that sense very few quanta. Question. Quanta per second? No, no, this is in a flash, I couldn’t tell you how short a flash, it probably lasted much less than a second but it could have been a 10th of a second or something, history does not record that time I’m afraid (laugh). So now we have the question how can quanta, if they are particles, generate interference fringes? Interference fringes come from the continuity of these waves going through different slits. Do particles generate interference fringes, can light consisting of particles generate interference fringes? Does interference depend on how many quanta you have? Do you have to have an awful lot of them before you see interference fringes? What happens if you have so few quanta that there is only one quantum present at a time? Is that a conceivable situation? Well an Englishman I met many years ago, a wise experimenter, Geoffrey, Sir Geoffrey Taylor did an experiment while he was still an undergraduate in 1909. He wanted to look for a diffraction pattern but he didn’t want to waste any light because he was going to use an exceedingly faint light, it was so faint a light that he would have to make a photographic exposure that would last for months. But it was only in that situation that he found he could be sure that there was never more than one quantum present in his equipment at a time. And so the question is did he or did he not see a diffraction pattern? He looked at the diffraction pattern produced by a needle and the answer is he photographed a diffraction pattern. And it was exactly the same diffraction pattern he would see when the light was of normal intensity. Now how can that be if there is only one at most, usually there’s no particle present, but if there is only one quantum present at a time, how can that be? That was a marvellous puzzle for that year and for the years that followed. This is the report of his experiment as an undergraduate. Now I think we are not having a failure of the lights, we are having a failure of the sound…(having problem with sound)… well this was Taylor’s undergraduate thesis. This is a real diffraction pattern, you’ve all seen these. And if G.I. Taylor were alive today, he would take exactly that picture but one quantum at a time. That remains a puzzle, at least prior to 1925 it remained a puzzle. So this raises the question, what happens for example in the double pin hole or the 2 slit experiment. If these are particles that are going through the slits, a particle can only go through one slit at a time, a particle is not going to break up and go partly through one and party through the other. At least according to the classic image of particles. Well here we go, that particle goes one way or the other. But how does it produce a diffraction pattern, well we’ll leave that as a puzzle for the moment. Now here’s another beautiful dilemma. So here is one more dilemma, I’m talking about the time before 1925, before everything broke loose. An atom radiating spherical waves will naturally never recoil. Parts of the wave may carry off momentum but the momentum goes in all directions and so the atom will just stand still and never recoil. On the other hand we know that light progresses along rays. Here is an atom emitting a light wave along a ray. That certainly conveys momentum. And if momentum is going to be conserved, the atom must recoil in the other direction, which is right. How can it happen that an atom radiates in all directions but nonetheless gets a recoil momentum? Well we’ll come back to this in a moment or 2. Meanwhile here is where the roof fell in and this is a long story which I will not be able to tell you in any length. A young student, well not so, somewhat older student, already in his 30’s, Louis de Broglie in Paris wrote a thesis in which he suggested, on very poor grounds but nonetheless it was a marvellous piece of intuition, suggested maybe the answer is that particles are not what you think they are. Maybe particles also behave as waves, just as we were having dilemmas with waves behaving like particles, maybe particles are every bit as puzzling in the inverse sense. And we’ll describe a number of the consequences of this in the development really of the resolution of the puzzles we’ve been talking about, the fact that particles behave differently as well. That the whole world behaves differently. And then what we will have to discuss and that is the real substance of the talk, what we will have to discuss is the fact that we are dealing with a probabilistic world and the entire mechanistic picture of how physics produces causal results is going to have to change. So I’m talking about the biggest revolution that has taken place in physical thought in 100’s of years. Here is a marvellous verification of the guess that Louis de Broglie made. It’s a succession of photographs taken by a Japanese scientist Tonomura, doing the 2 slit experiment. This is the 2 slit experiment that you saw in optics which produced diffraction images. Here you have electrons which are being recorded photographically and in several increasing intensities this is with very few electrons, now with a certain number of electrons it’s very hard to see the diffraction pattern in this but there is one. And as the intensity grows you see more and more clearly a diffraction pattern. This is a diffraction pattern of electrons, electrons falling on a sensitive surface. And this in one sense was the resolution of the mysteries we are talking about but in another sense it produced a whole succession of new mysteries which we can talk about. Question. It sounds like many is different from, I mean if the one particle shows sort of a failure… something which fits with standard…if there are many particles it seems that that makes the pattern… ??? It’s not the fact that there are many, every electron that is recorded by this device is doing its own thing. No one electron knows anything about the other electrons. What happens is that the electron, the progress of the electron, the propagation of the electron takes place in probabilistic terms by means of a wave. And in this case each electron wave is going through the 2 slits. And those 2 slits then produce a diffraction pattern. And the diffraction pattern is the same diffraction pattern you saw for light. The difference is that we had other evidences that light consists of particles. Here suddenly we have real particles, electrons which don’t break in half. They are choosing on a random basis which slit to go through. But because the thing that goes through the slits is not the electron, it’s a probability amplitude for finding the electron, that is what produces these diffraction patterns. Now let’s talk a little about the interpretation of this. So now we have arrived at quantum mechanics which is the wave theory of particles. And it simply cannot ever mean that each particle goes through both slits, the particles always go through the one slit or the other. But they have a special random way of deciding which one to go through. And the critical observation of Niels Bohr was that you see these interference fringes when and only when it is completely impossible to distinguish which of the slits the particle went through. When you set up an experiment you do it with certain equipment in place. And that equipment cannot answer certain questions. And you must need, if you want to answer more questions you need more equipment. But what Bohr found by theoretical arguments, that when you add more equipment to determine which of the 2 slits the electron went through that then you changed the picture so that the diffraction pattern and the interference is gone. Question. How did he know that the equipment is emitting one electron at a time, how did he confirm that? Well they don’t control the individual emissions, they just make a very weak source. If the source is weak enough you will never even have 2 electrons emitted in comparable times. Question. But you still have to confirm that. Well I assume that the electron takes a fraction of a millisecond to go from emission to detection. Now that’s a fraction of a millisecond, suppose you use a source which emits only 10 electrons per second. You will very rarely have a situation in which there are 2 electrons present at the same time. These electrons are behaving quite individually. Well this is Bohr’s understanding and this by the way is a philosophy which is called complementarity, it includes the fact that whenever you make observations you change the observations. You are intervening in the situation. Let me go to another example of this. I want to come back to the recoil dilemma we had before. It’s as simple as this. An atom which emits a spherical wave has no recoil at all, it just sits there. Classically this is what you would expect. In actual fact we observe a light quantum which is going in a particular direction and if we are to conserve momentum then the atom must have an equal recoil in the opposite direction. How do you explain, how do you reconcile this picture with this one. Well now I have to use a diagram that I made that I hope is not going to confuse anyone (laugh). Look at all the things that happen here. Every time a photon, every time a light quantum goes in one direction, the atom has to go in the opposite direction. But there are all of these different possibilities and I have only put in, how many of them, 5, there’s an infinite number. How do you reconcile this picture with this? The answer is you make a measurement by putting in a counter. Now you have intervened, when you make this measurement you have changed the physical situation. This counter in fact has something even dissipative about it, it changes the world when you detect this light quantum and the result is this. That measurement process wipes out all of those other possibilities. And says finally that there is only one. So when you make this measurement all of those other possibilities cease to be part of the physical world. And we can describe this by means of interactions, it’s a very complicated calculation to do but we know how to describe this picture these days, it’s taken us a long time to learn to use the analytic tricks that are necessary. But that is what happens. The literal process of measurement wipes out all of this other stuff. Question. You mean you must add all the possibilities. Yes, those possibilities are gone. Question. Where to? They represented possibilities but we have made a measurement which says they are no longer possible. You thought you were not going to see an atom recoiling in this direction anymore because we have made a measurement which says which way the light quantum went. Now that’s an interesting element in quantum mechanics which we call entanglement. When we make measurements on one part of a physical system that throws the rest of the physical system into a definite quantum state, even if we had never touched it. And there are some very dramatic examples of that these days and those are the things I want to talk about. That’s where quantum optics really begins. Question. Couldn’t it be that you could make the atom travel in one direction by simply putting a counter somewhere? You’ve got to detect, the fact that you have put a counter there, if you don’t detect the light quantum it doesn’t do you any good, you must detect the light quantum, that detection of the light quantum is what changes the world. Question. Sir, in case there is a countless number of detector. Let’s suppose you had many detectors around you, how many do you think are going to register? Question. I don’t know. Only one, because only one quantum is being given off, if you had 100 counters around there. Question. Millions of counters. If you had many of them but only one, only one will register because we are only emitting one light quantum. Question. Does this mean that we can obtain the information about…(inaudible 44.18) the system without measurement (inaudible) still apply. That’s an interesting point, that is the question of entanglement. You can change the state of something without touching it and I will show you that in a minute. So this is just saying what I said before. This is just repeating what I said a moment ago. You cast the atom into a particular momentum state by detecting the photon but you have never touched the atom. Now that is an expression of something we have learned to call entanglement. And entanglement is one of those things in quantum mechanics that has no classical analogue at all. If you want to know what is the real puzzle in quantum mechanics it is not the uncertainty principle, it’s not even the fact that particles behave like waves, it’s the fact that you can determine the state of a system, a distant system without ever having any contact with it. And that let me tell you, I’m going to have to cut this talk short because thanks to your questions I have not gotten anywhere near where I wanted to go (laugh). That is an essential point, let me put it in these terms which you may find more interesting. Einstein as I told you was one of the early revolutionaries. And around 1900 to 1920 perhaps he understood the quantum theory better than anyone of his generation. But in 1925 he began to become very unhappy with quantum mechanics because it ceased to be a mechanistic picture. Einstein’s deepest belief was that everything had an identifiable origin and that there was no intrinsic randomness in nature. He became very unhappy and began engaging in a kind of dialogue with Niels Bohr and as Bohr developed what we call the uncertainty principle, Einstein began trying to find contradictions and in fact did not succeed. But in 1935 while he was at the institute in Princeton he did figure out one marvellous paradox which he felt represented the end of quantum mechanics. And it turns out that it was not the end and from the standpoint of some people it’s really a new beginning. But it makes for a wonderful story. Einstein and his 2 graduate students Podolsky and Rosen published a paper in 1935 in which they asked the following sort of question, they asked it in slightly different terms and they were trying to show that there was a certain sense in which they could disobey Bohr’s uncertainty principle. I’ll use slightly different language. Here is their paradox, suppose you have a diatomic molecule with 2 equal mass atoms which for one reason or another part company from one another and one goes to the left and the other goes to the right and of course momentum will be conserved. Now how can we make measurements on these 2 particles which are now separated from one another. One thing you can do is wait for a certain length of time and measure the position of one of the particles, say the blue one. So you determine with fair certainty what it’s position is after let’s say 1 millisecond. That tells you what the position of the second particle must be. You measure this particle and you know the position of this particle, that shouldn’t surprise anyone. But now suppose you do a different sort of measurement. Suppose you measure after one millisecond the momentum of particle number 1. That then tells you, because of conservation of momentum, that tells you what the momentum of particle 2 is here. So the particle 1 becomes a wave with a particular momentum, particle 2 becomes a wave with a particular momentum. Now these are completely different situations. Here we have a particle with a determined position and here we have a particle with a determined momentum. These are 2 different states for particle number 2 but we have never touched particle number 2. We have made all of our measurements on particle number 1. This is a sort of situation which Einstein very colourful described, not only as action at a distance but spooky action at a distance, as if there were some sort of spiritual element to it, because it could not be explained. These are different states of particle number 2 and they are brought about simply by measurements made on particle number 1. This phenomenon, I’ve referred to it earlier, you make a measurement on one particle and find out something about the other is what we call entanglement these days. And if I were to have a chance to go on at this rate for another 2 hours I would get to the discussion of the present day uses of entanglement which is to entangle light quanta. I can give you 1 or 2 simple examples of that. But where we are going these days is entangling light quanta to produce very complicated quantum states which can be used, I’m afraid some people insist they are wonderful for cryptography, for sending secret messages. They are being used in various connections which are still very primitive but a lot of the work is being directed toward entanglement these days. That's where quantum optics is, entangling light quanta. I’ll show you a couple of entangled light quanta, this is the EPA paradox. This experiment by the way has been done. Einstein might have been very unhappy about the results but this phenomenon exists, it’s real physics that we’re talking about. And Einstein at this stage beginning in about 1935, I’m afraid dismissed quantum mechanics as a subject that was in the hands of magicians. So quantum optics, what is it, well everything that depends on the super position of quantum states. And all kinds of interesting things result. I’ll show you some examples. First of all we’re talking, the subject we’re talking about is quantum electrodynamics. And these are some of the things that result and I’ll show you a couple of them at least. Now what is quantum electrodynamics, it’s the quantum theory of the electromagnetic field. And it’s literally Maxwell’s field, nobody has tossed out the Maxwell equations, they are still there in tact. The question is about the amplitudes of the fields obeying the Maxwell equations. The amplitudes of those fields are not ordinary complex numbers, they have to be regarded as quantum variables and you have to apply the quantum theory to them. And so there is Dirac, the remarkable man who did this. And this is what he did, here are our Maxwell waves, they are still there but they are the modes of the solutions of the electromagnetic equations. But the amplitudes of these waves that we’re talking about are not ordinary numbers. The amplitudes are quantum variables, one way of talking about them is to represent them as a kind of abstract numbers in which A times B is not the same as B times A. There’s a kind of higher algebra you have to go through in order to deal with the amplitudes of these waves. There was a question, is this the correct theory, well there was a good deal of calculation required. It was done at enormous length until the middle 1950’s, calculations were made using quantum electrodynamics. For example of the magnetic moment of the electron and the magnetic moment of the muon as well, these are numbers which are now understood in electrodynamic terms to something like 8 or 10 significant figures. It has turned out the theory of quantum electrodynamics has turned out to be enormously accurate. We can certainly trust it quantitatively. But all of these elaborate calculations and there are certain diagrams invented by Richard Feynman which symbolise the calculations. Those complicated calculations never involve more than 1 or 2 light quanta at a time. So another of the things that represents quantum optics is dealing with many light quanta at once. And there new sources of light began to enter. And the maser or the laser was the most important of them and it gave us the possibility of generating altogether new quantum states of much greater variety than we ever had before. And all of that required again expansion of our mathematical techniques. And there again is where my own work began to enter. Now I’ve taken up too much time so I’m going to try and run through some of these things very rapidly. One of the first surprising evidences that there might be something new involved was in experiments done in the mid ‘50’s by Hanbury Brown who is one person and R.Q. Twiss the other. What they found was that ordinary light consists not just of individual quanta but there is a certain tendency for these quanta to appear in pairs. And a way of observing that was to use a half silvered mirror and 2 counters, one here and one here and discover that sometimes they went off in coincidence and that was rather more than the accidental rate that you would discover. So it meant that there was a kind of non trivial statistics in the arrival of light quanta, they don’t arrive as ideally as you might imagine rain drops do, completely statistically independent of one another. There is a tendency for light quanta to arrive in pairs. That was one of the first surprises which required, we need a few more sound quanta. Question. Excuse me, what the light source. The light source in this case was as monochromatic a source as they could produce. It was essentially the most monochromatic source of the time, a particular low pressure discharge tube. I think it was a mercury line. But there was a certain tendency, there is inevitably a certain accidental background rate and it rose above the accidental background rate. And in fact because the electronic resolving time was rather long compared with the reciprocal of the bandwidth, that tended to spread out the correlation over time. When this experiment was done ideally it would turn out that the coincidence rate is twice the accidental background rate. Well let me go on. That was one of the surprises, here is another interesting story of entanglement. I’m going to describe here the entanglement of pairs of light quanta. Light quantum you know has an angular momentum, one unit, a Bohr magneton. So here is a representation of the angular momentum of a light quantum, it’s this vector S. The light quantum has an angular momentum measured in units of H divided by 2 pi, that’s what this H cross is. Let’s assume that a light quantum is going in a direction given by this unit vector. The scale or product of the angular momentum with that unit vector can then be either plus or minus 1. Those are called the 2 helicity states of a light quantum. And those are the 2 circular polarisation states. Now let’s imagine we have an atom which has angular momentum zero. And it goes down to a state in 2 stages with angular momentum zero. These 2 different light quanta will have to have altogether no angular momentum, the 2 angular momenta will have to add up to zero because we go from zero to zero. So there we have it, the 2 angular momenta of the light quanta will always sum up to zero. Now there’s a little algebra involved here and if you want to, if you don’t like algebra and want to doze off for a moment that’s alright. Here are 2 helicities, plus or minus 1 for these 2 light quanta which are going in opposite directions. So they are the 2 circular polarisation states, the plus state or the minus state for the first photon, the plus state or the minus state for the second photon. And what is the total state of the field then for those 2 light quanta, well you don’t know whether they have both gone off with positive helicity or both gone off with negative helicity. That’s all they can do because they must add up to zero. And in fact this plus sign is required by parity conservation. So here is a wave function for the 2 photons. Now we can express those 2 wave functions in terms of plane linier polarisations in a familiar way. Each circular polarisation is a complex sum of the x polarisation and the y polarisation. And the same is true in the negative direction. And when you put all this together, just put in the circular polarisations and express them in terms of plane polarisations. The statement is that if one photon has x polarisation, that's transverse polarisation the other one must also have an x polarisation. If the one has a y polarisation the other one must have a y polarisation. This is just algebra which is very familiar to the people who played with these things for an afternoon. But now how does that look when you do the experiment. First of all when these 2 beams come off in opposite directions they’re both on polarised beams. We put in polarisation filters, you know what a polarisation filter is, a sheet of Polaroid screen. And if you put in 2 polarisation filters and think of all these random polarisations going to them, well if you treat these photons independently of one another, you would say there’s a chance one half, that one of them is going to go through its polariser and be detected, one half that it won’t. But you have 2 such things, you want to detect coincidences. So you would say only one time in 4 will you get both light quanta going through. Now here’s another way of doing this calculation. And this is a famous mistake which many of my colleagues have made. We say that there is a chance that one of the light quanta goes through the filter, which is proportional to the cos2 of that angle. And likewise since the other one going in the other direction has the same polarisation the chance is cos2 , that it goes through its polariser. So you must average the 4th power of the cos, that gives you 3/8th, so not 1/4 but 3/8th as the probability and that is wrong. The reason it’s wrong is that when one light quantum goes through its filter that performs a kind of projection which says that the other photon is in the state which will carry it through its polarisation filter. And so the probability that you see both photons, that you record them both is not 1/4, it’s not 3/8th, it’s 1/2 that is one of the strange results of entanglement. And let me tell you a lot of famous people have made mistakes in that calculation. So here is what goes on, here is an atom which is going to give out its 2 light quanta. Here we have 2 Polaroid filters, there’s one, there is the other and here we have one counter and here we have another counter. Now let the 2 light quanta go, neither one got through. No coincidences detected. Now let’s try it again, they both got through, if one of them gets through the other one has to get through. That is the meaning of entanglement. And that is the puzzle, because these are not independent interactions with these filters. If one of them gets through that changes the quantum state of the other one. If one of them gets through it means that this one is in a state with polarisation in this direction, that means that this one also is and then they must both get through. That is the mystery of entanglement. I can tell you it sometimes happens that something is discovered in one area of physics long before it’s discovered in another. In this case you have the decay of positronium which gives off 2 half million volt gamma rays. These gamma rays have the same state, well they are actually in perpendicular polarisation states. But an experiment was done in which here is the electron positron pair which gives off the 2 gamma rays, one here and one here. And two Compton scatterings were performed and each of these Compton scatterings defines a plane of scattering. The angular distribution of those planes relative to one another was found and it too corresponds exactly to this rule of entanglement. That was done before, that was done 4 or 5 years before the other experiment and very little connection was made between them. Well here we can talk about the numbers of quanta present in the field and in any mode you have a certain number of quanta integer, number of quanta present, you have a certain amplitude for that. So here is the way you describe the number of quanta present in a mode. The number of, the sum of the squares of the absolutely values of those coefficients must be 1 altogether. When you square any one you get the probability of the presence of n-quanta. Now there’s a very important sort of quantum state which is in fact the quantum state radiated by a laser. I called it the coherent state. And the coefficient Cn take this particular form as formulas and when you square those amplitudes you get a Poisson distribution of quanta present in any mode of the field. That’s characteristic of the laser beam. Here is the way a laser beam is in fact radiated. I showed, this was part of my thesis. That whenever you have a classical current distribution and a classical current distribution is not necessarily one that’s strong, it’s one which does not recoil, it does not change by the process of light emission. That’s an idealisation of course. But such a process can be described easily mathematically and you can show that that kind of strong current will always radiate coherent states. Now here is a picture of a laser, it’s a long tube, usually it has a second mirror here and some of the light shines through that mirror and it comes out as a very intense beam. Where is the current in this thing, is there a strong current, the answer is the field builds up, the rapidly oscillating field builds up reflected back and forth between the mirrors. And that polarises the atoms and you have a polarisation current within the device. And it is that very intense polarisation current which is radiating what I call the coherent states. These are some Poisson distributions, this is a Poisson distribution for a lot of photons, 35 or so. This is a Poisson distribution for somewhat fewer. These are different distributions. Let me show you something funny here. These are experiments done in Paris by the group of Serge Haroche who is talking now about microwave radiation. The frequency is 51 GHz. He has developed a fantastic instrument in effect for detecting these light quanta. The instrument is so sensitive that it detects the light quanta without absorbing them. In all prior measurements light quanta had to be absorbed to be detected. Well what is his instrument, it consists of what we call Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms are atoms in which the outer electron is so far away from the central part of the atom that the radius of its orbit may be 1000 times or more larger than the radius, the normal radius of an atom. These Rydberg atoms are fantastically sensitive to the presence of electromagnetic fields. And here is the work of Haroche and company. These are circular Rydberg atoms, the quantum number of his electrons is something of the order of 50. He sends them through 2 devices, one of which puts those Rydberg atoms in a particular quantum state, then they move on through the field which he is measuring. This is the field which he is measuring and because he wants to detect only 1 or 2 quanta, he must go down to extremely low temperatures. The temperatures in this case are within, are liquid helium temperatures, they’re within a degree or so of zero, absolute zero. Here he examines the Rydberg atoms on the way out and in effect asks the question did you see a quantum. Did you detect the presence of a quantum without absorbing it. And the way that’s done is really to break up the Rydberg atom which is very easy to do because the electron is so loosely bound. So now let’s see what he does. Here is his super conducing cavity. He has just a few photons of very low frequency in the box. It has super conducting walls so the photons last an appreciable fraction of a second. Here because there are thermal fluctuations present, even at less than 1 degree absolute, here is a succession of answers to the questions did you or did you not see a light quantum. These are different answers, the red lines say I did see a light quantum but the blue ones say I did not. And so there is a thermal fluctuation that took place. And you see the spontaneous birth and death of a single light quantum at a temperature very close to absolute zero. This shows when you have 5 quanta present, the successive decays of light quanta, one after another. Here is the distribution of light quanta which he found, it’s a Poisson distribution. This is a thermal Poisson distribution with an average number of 3 ½ of the light quanta. Now there are other topics and I think I will perhaps stop at this point, because we’ve already had enough examples, but we have not gotten anywhere near… Thank you very much.

Ich möchte Ihnen einige der Dinge zeigen, die in den letzten Jahren durchgeführt worden sind und einige der Dinge, die jetzt angedacht werden. Ich dachte, eine gute Stelle für den Anfang, ich weiß nicht, ob sich dieses Ding ändert, aha, da sind wir, ich dachte, ich fange an, indem ich sage, was die Quantenoptik nicht ist. Viele von Ihnen sind mit einer großen Anzahl von optischen Instrumenten vertraut und ich werde versuchen, Sie zu überzeugen, dass diese auf ihre eigene Weise einen Perfektionsgrad erreicht haben, der absolut nichts mit der Quantenoptik zu tun hat. Und von da aus gehe ich dann weiter. Nun, lassen Sie mich nur sagen, dass sich die Optik in mehreren Stufen entwickelt hat. Es fängt natürlich damit an, dass man gerade Linien zeichnet, die Lichtstrahlen repräsentieren, und irgendwann am Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts stellte man fest, dass diese Diagramme mit geraden Linien in Wirklichkeit die Fortbewegung von Wellen beschreiben. Und gegen Ende des späten 19. Jahrhunderts entdeckte man ganz spezifisch, dass dies elektromagnetische Wellen sind. Und wenn man diese Theorieelemente aufsummiert, erhält man eine grundsätzlich perfekte Beschreibung von dem, was man in all den grundlegenden optischen Instrumenten benötigt. Denjenigen, die ich kürzlich noch im Bild gezeigt hatte. Letztendlich reden wir über die Theorie des Elektromagnetismus und da gibt es bestimmte Eigenschwingungsmoden des elektromagnetischen Feldes. Einige Wellen breiten sich aus, andere sind stehende Wellen, wir werden ein wenig über diese reden, aber lassen Sie mich weitergehen. Dies ist ein ziemlich phantasievolles Bild von dem, was in dem Doppelspalt-Experiment passiert; das geht auf das Jahr 1803 zurück. Licht fällt durch ein Paar paralleler Spalten und ist auf eine Abfolge von Beugungsmaxima verteilt, wie wir sie nennen. Das ist sehr altes Zeug und keine Quantenoptik. Von da gehen wir, nun, lassen Sie mich, ich habe, glaube ich, ein Dia übersprungen, noch einmal zurück. Das ist das Diagramm, das Wellendiagramm dieses Geschehens in diesem Doppelspaltexperiment. All das ist beginnenden Studenten der physikalischen Optik vertraut. Nun, auf der nächsten Stufe haben wir ein Strahlendiagramm, so wird ein Bild durch eine Linse erzeugt, das ist sehr primitive Optik und hat wieder überhaupt nichts mit der Quantenoptik zu tun. Hallo, ich bekomme immer wieder dieses Ding, nun sind wir schon im späten 19. Jahrhundert. Maxwell hat die elektromagnetischen Wellen entdeckt, was er natürlich als eine Theorieübung getan hat, indem er die bekannten elektromagnetischen Gesetze zusammengestellt hat und versucht hat, eine mikroskopische Beschreibung als Funktion der Schwingungen zu finden. Er fand heraus, immer wenn er ein mechanisches Modell konstruierte, auf dem seine elektromagnetischen Wellen basieren würden, eine Art von mechanischem Analogon, und zwar ein ziemlich merkwürdiges, das komplett in Vergessenheit geraten ist. Er fand heraus, dass es immer ein zusätzliches Glied gab, das vorher nicht vermutet wurde, und es war dieses zusätzliche Glied in seinen Gleichungen, der sogenannte Verschiebungsstrom, viele von Ihnen haben davon gehört, der die Schwingungen des elektromagnetisches Felds erklärt, die im Vakuum stattfinden. Und diese Schwingungen sind elektromagnetische Wellen. Und er fand sofort heraus, dass sie sich mit der bekannten Lichtgeschwindigkeit ausbreiteten. Ungefähr im Jahr 1870 hatte er mit anderen Worten die Erklärung, was Licht ist, und in gewisser Hinsicht hatten wir nie eine bessere Erklärung. Wir haben eine sehr viel detailliertere Erklärung und das wird der Vortrag sein, den ich für Sie halten muss, aber es gibt eine Art von Perfektion in Maxwells Theorie, und das ist alles, was man benötigt, um die Art der Optiken zu behandeln, die Sie auf den vorherigen Dias sahen. Ihre Felder schwingen, beispielsweise für sichtbares Licht, mit enormen Frequenzen, Und diese Wellen breiten sich um Hindernisse herum aus, das ist der Beugungsprozess, den wir schon auf einem früheren Dia gesehen haben. In Maxwells Theorie gibt es überhaupt keine Andeutung einer Diskontinuität durch die Quantelung, wie wir das nennen, für elektromagnetische Wellen. Es ist eine Theorie, die in sich wirklich ganz perfekt ist. Hier ist eine der Maxwellschen elektromagnetischen Wellen. Nun, ich muss Ihnen gestehen, was ich gemacht habe, ist, all das anschauliche Material, das ich finden konnte, aus dem Internet zu kopieren und das alles, worüber ich sprechen möchte, darstellt. Aber keines der Grafiken ist ein Original und viele unter Ihnen werden es von anderen Webseiten wiedererkennen. OK, hier ist eine elektromagnetische Welle. Dies ist eine richtig schlechte Darstellung von stehenden Wellen, es sind stehende Wellen auf einer Schnur oder einem elastischen Band, es ist viel schwerer, ein gutes Bild einer stehenden elektromagnetischen Welle zu erzeugen. Aber die Eigenschwingungen eines elektromagnetischen Feldes in einem Kasten, der reflektierende Oberflächen hat, sind diese stehenden Wellen. Es sind stehende elektromagnetische Wellen, keine elastischen Wellen auf einer Schnur, leider. Nun sind wir bei der Jahrhundertwende des 20. Jahrhunderts angekommen, und plötzlich fängt die Quantentheorie an. Es beginnt richtig merkwürdig. Mit einer empirischen Formel, die Max Planck entdeckte, und es setzt sich mit der Arbeit Einsteins fort, und dann eine Abfolge von Rätseln und Geheimnissen, die bis 1925/26 dauerte, sage ich hier mal. Ok, weiter, wir machen weiter mit dem Spektrum der Wärmestrahlung bei drei verschiedenen Temperaturen. Und ich wäre viel glücklicher, wenn der Künstler, der diese Darstellung erstellt hat, eine Kurve der Intensität als Funktion der Frequenz dargestellt hätte, aber stattdessen haben sie aus historischen Gründen die Intensität als Kurve der Intensität als Funktion der Wellenlänge dargestellt. Also, kurze Wellenlängen sind hier unten in diesem Teil des Bildes und man kann sehen, dass es bei tiefen Temperaturen, das ist diese Kurve, fast keine Strahlung kurzer Wellenlänge gibt. Kurze Wellenlänge bedeutet Ultraviolett und Röntgenstrahlung. Man erhöht die Temperatur und man beginnt, in dieser Region ein wenig Intensität zu bekommen, und man erhöht die Temperatur weiter, sagen wir zur Temperatur eines heißen Sterns, und man hat recht viel im Ultravioletten und sogar nahe der Röntgenstrahlung. Nun, das sichtbare Spektrum sind natürlich diese Farben, die Sie in der Mitte sehen. Bei den langen Wellenlängen ist die Kurve des Spektrums richtig glatt und es gab da eine Formel, die auf der Grundlage der klassischen kinetischen Theorie bekannt war, klassische statistische Mechanik. Man musste schon sehr schlau sein, um diese Formel aufzustellen. Aber das Polynom, das umgekehrte Polynom, das sich diesem Teil der Kurve hier, hier und hier anpasst, war bekannt. Planck vermutete, dass es eine exponentielle Kurve ist, die den kurzwelligen Teil des Spektrums bestimmt. Und was er tat, war es, spontan eine Formel zu erstellen, die zu beiden Hälften des Spektrums passt. Und es machte noch mehr. Es passte zum Spektrum, wie es gemessen wurde, bei verschiedenen Temperaturen, und das im Jahr 1900, am 19. Oktober 1900, wie sich herausstellt. Es passt zur Formel bei mehreren unterschiedlichen Temperaturen, und über den kompletten Frequenzbereich. Die Formel enthielt einen einstellbaren Parameter, den Planck noch nie vorher gesehen hatte, es gab eine Zahl, die er wählen musste, damit die Formel passte. Aber sie passte so wunderbar bei allen Temperaturen, dass er entschied, dass etwas daran fundamental sein müsse. Und er arbeitete die nächsten paar Monate, genau 2 Monate, man kann es sehen, um zu versuchen, ob mit seinem intellektuellem Wissen ... Frage: Wie konnte jemand aus dem Nichts eine solche Formel erfinden, ich meine ... Nun, wie ich sagte, bei den langen Wellenlängen gab es eine gute Formel, die wirklich funktionierte. Aber sie funktionierte überhaupt nicht, wenn man zum sichtbaren Teil des Spektrums kam. Nun, es war eine Vermutung, und nicht mehr als das, für eine andere Formel, die bei kurzen Wellenlängen funktionierte. Nun, jeder Theoretiker kann einen Bruchteil zusammenstellen, die etwas von der einen Formel enthält und etwas von der anderen, und die eine dominiert in einem Bereich, und die andere in dem anderen Bereich. Das ist ziemlich genau, was Planck machte, aber er machte es mit einem sehr komplexen Verständnis der Thermodynamik, ich sollte genereller sagen thermischer Physik, weil dies der Beginn war von etwas, was wir später statistische Mechanik genannt haben, die kinetische Theorie war damals in einem einigermaßen reifen Zustand. Es beinhaltete eine Vermutung. Und wortwörtlich eine spontane Vermutung, aber es war eine außergewöhnliche Vermutung, weil es ganz genau die Formel ist, die wir noch heute benutzen, um das Wärmestrahlungsspektrum zu beschreiben. Ich kann es nicht besser als so erklären, sicherlich nicht in der Kürze (lacht). Er entschied, da die geladenen Elemente, die mit dem elektromagnetisches Feld wechselwirken und die am besten verstanden waren, harmonische Oszillatoren waren, würde er ein Materiemodel konstruieren; der Materie, die strahlt. Nun, damals dachte man an die Wände um ein leeres Volumen herum, und es waren die Wände, die Licht in das Gehäuse abstrahlten. Und für uns scheint das Licht gerade verschwunden zu sein (lacht). Wenn das Mikrofon noch arbeitet, werde ich einfach weiterreden (lacht) wir können recht gut im Dunklen weitermachen. Planck glaubte, dass er harmonische Oszillatoren am besten verstand, harmonische Oszillatoren, eine Ladung an einer Feder ist ein harmonischer Oszillator. Und die Art und Weise, wie ein solches System strahlte, verstand er, also hatte er die Formeln für die Strahlungsrate von harmonischen Oszillatoren. Er nahm an, dass die Wände seines Hohlraums, er kannte die Struktur der Materie damals nicht sehr gut, er nahm an, dass die Wände des Hohlraums aus harmonischen Oszillatoren bestanden. Er wusste, wie sie in den Raum ausstrahlten, und wie sie Strahlung aus diesem Raum absorbierten. Und er konnte das Gleichgewicht dieser Strahlung mit den Wänden innerhalb des Volumens bei einer gegebenen Temperatur diskutieren. Und er fand heraus, dass er seine Formel von nichts ableiten konnte. Es sei denn, er machte eine radikale Annahme, die ganz buchstäblich für ihn keinen Sinn machte. Und das war, dass sich die Energie in einem harmonischen Oszillator nur schrittweise erhöhen kann. Und dass, wenn der Oszillator die Frequenz Nü hat, hier ist sie, die Energie dieses Oszillators eine ganze Zahl, 0 1 2 3, irgendeine ganze Zahl multipliziert mit einer gewissen Konstante, multipliziert mit dieser Frequenz sein musste. Nun, diese Konstante, die wir seitdem als Planck-Konstante kennen, war die Zahl, die er anpassen musste, damit die Kurven zu all diese Strahlungs-, Wärmestrahlungsspektren passte. Planck hat also entdeckt, dass man nur dann eine Wärmestrahlungsformel haben kann, wenn harmonische Oszillatoren Energien haben, die sich in diskontinuierlichen, aber gleichen Schritten erhöhen. Nun, das war noch nicht die Entdeckung der Lichtquanten. Es war eine erstaunliche Entdeckung und es verwirrte natürlich jeden, und die Rätsel und Dilemmas wuchsen dann über die nächsten 25 Jahre. Frage: Diese Gleichung sagt aus, dass Licht eine Art von Energie sein könnte und über den Raum absorbiert werden kann, könnte gleich der Energie sein. Was das heißt ist, dass er sich vorstellte, er stellte sich nur vor, dass die Hohlraumwände, die irgendein Volumen umgeben, aus harmonischen Oszillatoren bestehen, das war eine Annahme, die er mathematisch behandeln konnte, aber sie war nicht als wahr bekannt, und tatsächlich war bekannt, dass sie falsch ist (lacht). Er nahm an, dass sein harmonischer Oszillator seine Energie nur in Einheiten einer gewissen Konstante multipliziert mit der Oszillatorfrequenz dieses Oszillators erhöhen kann. Frage: (unverständlich 16:43). Das war der Anfang der Quantentheorie, aber es war ein sehr holpriger Start. Ok, den nächsten Beitrag werden Sie anfangen wiederzuerkennen. In einem bemerkenswerten Jahr 1905, in dem Albert Einstein zwei andere Dinge tat, die wenigstens genauso wichtig waren, fand er heraus, dass er erklären konnte, er konnte den Ausdruck für die Entropie des elektromagnetischen Felds interpretieren. Nun, ich werde das nicht weiter erklären, aber er fand heraus, dass dies ihm nahelegte, dass die elektromagnetische Energie in Teilchen war, weil er denselben analytischen Ausdruck für die Entropie erhielt wie für ein Gas von Teilchen mit diesen bestimmten Energien, h multipliziert mit Nü. Das Wichtigere, was Einstein tat, war, den photoelektrischen Effekt zu interpretieren – er wurde 26 Jahre vorher entdeckt – dass, wenn Licht auf geladene Materie scheint, elektrische Ladungen abgesondert werden können, und sie werden nach einem Satz von Regeln abgesondert, die wunderbar interpretiert werden können, indem man sagt, dass Licht aus Energiebündeln besteht, jedes davon ein einzelnes Elektron befreit und es mit einer kinetischen Energie aussendet, die sich mit der Frequenz des Lichts erhöht. Es war also Einstein, der wirklich die Quantentheorie des Lichts startete. Und das war natürlich erstaunlich, da wir eine im Wesentlichen perfekte Theorie des Lichts hatten, als kontinuierliche elektromagnetische Wellen. Dies war eine Feststellung, dass Licht sich wie Teilchen verhält, Teilchen, die kleine Energiepakete sind. Und zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt, 1909, sprach er über ebene Wellen, in denen sich die Energie komplett in eine Richtung bewegt, weil Einstein wusste, dass elektromagnetische Wellen einen Impuls haben. Es wäre notwendigerweise richtig, wenn Licht aus diesen Teilchen bestünde, dass diese Teilchen einen Impuls haben. Und dieser Impuls wäre ihre Energie, h Nü geteilt durch die Lichtgeschwindigkeit. Nun, dann fand er sogar eine neue Ableitung dafür, und zwar eine noch logischere als die, die Planck gefunden hatte, das war im Jahr 1916, wo er eigentlich über das thermische Gleichgewicht des Photoeffekts mit Materie sprach. Er brauchte zwei Arten von Emissionswahrscheinlichkeiten, eine, die man leicht verstehen kann, wenn man ein oszillierendes Feld hat, das an Ladungen wackelt. Und diese Ladungen strahlen dann mehr, oder absorbieren, dieser sogenannten B-Koeffizient wurde von Einstein leicht verstanden. Aber der A-Koeffizient war etwas Neues. Es war die Aussage, dass ein geladenes oszillierendes System spontan Quanten emittieren wird. Ein derartiges Phänomen wurde schon früher beobachtet, es war die radioaktive Emission, da gibt es tatsächlich eine beträchtliche Analogie. Aber das war zur Zeit Einsteins wieder ein ziemliches Rätsel. Nun, wo machen wir von hier aus weiter, wir gehen zur Quantentheorie des Lichts, die ist eigentlich nur eine Wiederholung dessen, was ich gesagt habe, aber es wirft die Frage auf, ob Lichtquanten sich wie Teilchen verhalten. Nun, für Sie sieht das vielleicht nicht wie ein brennendes Problem aus, aber alles, was im 19. Jahrhundert entdeckt worden ist, besagte, dass Licht eine Art von kontinuierlichem Verhalten hat. Und beispielsweise, wenn man eine Beugung hat, bedeutet das, dass die Energie durch zwei Spalten fließt, wie Sie sahen, um ein Beugungsmuster zu erzeugen. Hier sind einige Rätsel. Dieser Laserpointer produziert ungefähr 10^17 Lichtquanten jede Sekunde, die ich ihn eingeschaltet habe. Welchen Effekt hat die Körnigkeit des Lichts? Nun, eine interessante Frage ist sofort, wie wir Licht sehen; sehen wir Licht, weil es eine Welle ist, die die Retina unserer Augen anregt, oder sehen wir Teilchen, die in unsere Augen einfallen? Ein Professor an der Columbia University, Selig Hecht führte darüber Forschungen durch, und das involvierte eine große Anzahl von Studenten, die gewohnt waren, im Dunkeln zu sehen. Er setzte sie in einen dunklen Raum und sie sollten herausfinden, was das lichtschwächste Ding ist, das ihnen objektiv die Wahrnehmung gibt, ein wenig Licht zu sehen. Er fand heraus, dass das mit nur 100 Quanten passiert. Nun, das sind sehr wenige Quanten und sehr wenig Energie. Das merkwürdige Ding ist, weil unsere Augen so konstruiert sind, dass unsere Augen das meiste Licht vergeuden, und am Ende sehen wir Licht, das wirklich nachgewiesen wird durch, repräsentiert die Wahrnehmung von nur 5 oder 7 Quanten oder so. In diesem Sinne sind wir in der Lage, sehr wenige Quanten zu sehen. Frage: Quanten pro Sekunde? Nein, nein, das ist in einem Blitz, ich könnte Ihnen nicht sagen, wie kurz der Blitz ist, es dauerte wahrscheinlich viel weniger als eine Sekunde, aber es könnte eine zehntel Sekunde sein oder so, die Geschichte hat die Zeit nicht überliefert, unglücklicherweise (lacht). So, jetzt haben wir die Frage, wie die Quanten, wenn sie Teilchen sind, Interferenzstreifen erzeugen können. Interferenzstreifen kommen durch die Kontinuität dieser Wellen zustande, die durch unterschiedliche Spalten gehen. Erzeugen Teilchen Interferenzstreifen, kann Licht, das aus Teilchen besteht, Interferenzstreifen erzeugen? Hängt eine Interferenz davon ab, wie viele Quanten man hat? Muss man eine große Anzahl von ihnen haben, bevor man Interferenzstreifen sieht? Was passiert, wenn man so wenige Quanten hat, dass zu einem Zeitpunkt nur eins da ist? Ist das eine mögliche Situation? Nun, ein Engländer, den ich vor vielen Jahren traf, ein kluger Experimentator, Geoffrey, Sir Geoffrey Taylor führte ein Experiment in 1909 durch, vor seinem Studienabschluss. Er wollte nach einem Beugungsmuster suchen, aber er wollte kein Licht verschwenden, weil er ein sehr, sehr schwaches Licht benutzen würde, das Licht war so schwach, dass es Monate dauern würde, eine fotografische Belichtung durchzuführen. Aber er fand heraus, dass es nur in dieser Situation so war, dass er sicher sein konnte, zu einem gegebenen Zeitpunkt nie mehr als ein Quant in seiner Apparatur zu haben. Und so ist die Frage also, sah er ein Beugungsmuster oder nicht. Er betrachtete das Beugungsmuster einer Nadel und die Antwort ist, er nahm ein Beugungsmuster auf. Und es war genau dasselbe Beugungsmuster, das er sehen würde, wenn das Licht eine normale Intensität hätte. Nun, wie kann das sein, wenn es dort höchstens ein, normalerweise kein Teilchen gibt, aber wenn da nur ein Quant ist zu einem Zeitpunkt, wie kann das sein? Das war in diesem Jahr ein tolles Rätsel und auch in den darauffolgenden Jahren. Dies ist der Bericht über sein Experiment als Diplomand. Nun, denke ich, haben wir keinen Ausfall des Lichts, wir haben einen Ausfall des Tons ....(haben ein Problem mit dem Ton) ... es scheint nur ein Tonquant gleichzeitig zu existieren. Dies ist ein echtes Beugungsmuster, Sie haben alle solche schon gesehen. Und wenn G. I. Taylor heute noch lebte, würde er ganz genau dasselbe Bild aufnehmen, nur ein Quant zu einem Zeitpunkt. Das blieb ein Rätsel, wenigstens vor 1925 blieb das ein Rätsel. Das wirft die Frage auf, was passiert beispielsweise im Doppellochblenden- oder dem Doppelspaltexperiment. Wenn das Teilchen sind, die durch die Spalte gehen, ein Partikel kann zu einem Zeitpunkt nur durch einen Spalt gehen, ein Teilchen spaltet sich nicht auf und geht teilweise durch einen Spalt und teilweise durch den anderen. Wenigstens nicht nach dem klassischen Teilchenbild. Nun also, dieses Teilchen geht entweder den einen Weg oder den anderen. Aber wie produziert es ein Beugungsmuster, nun, wir lassen das für einen Moment als Rätsel stehen. Hier ist ein anderes schönes Dilemma…………….. So, hier ist ein weiteres Dilemma, ich spreche über die Zeit vor 1925, bevor alles los ging. Ein Atom, das Kugelwellen ausstrahlt, hat natürlich keinen Rückstoß. Teile der Welle können einen Impuls wegtragen, aber der Impuls geht in alle Richtungen, und so wird das Atom einfach nur stehen bleiben und keinen Rückstoß erleiden. Auf der anderen Seite wissen wir, dass Licht sich entlang von Strahlen ausbreitet. Hier ist ein Atom, das eine Lichtwelle entlang eines Strahls aussendet. Das transportiert sicherlich einen Impuls. Und wenn der Impuls erhalten bleibt, muss das Atom einen Rückstoß in die andere Richtung haben, was ist richtig? Wie kann es passieren, dass ein Atom in alle Richtungen emittiert, aber trotzdem einen Rückstoßimpuls bekommt? Nun, wir kommen gleich darauf zurück. Mittlerweile kommen wir zu dem Punkt, wo das Gebäude zusammenbrach, und es ist eine lange Geschichte, die ich Ihnen nicht im Detail erzählen kann. Ein junger Student, naja nicht so jung, ein bisschen älterer Student, schon über 30, Louis de Broglie schrieb in Paris eine Arbeit, in der er vorschlug, aus sehr schlechten Gründen, aber es war trotzdem eine tolle Inspiration, er schlug vor, dass vielleicht die Antwort ist, dass Teilchen nicht das sind, was man denkt, sie seien. Vielleicht verhalten sich Teilchen auch wie Wellen, genauso wie wir das Dilemma mit Wellen haben, die sich wie Teilchen verhalten, vielleicht sind Teilchen genau so verwirrend im umgekehrten Sinn. Und wir werden eine Anzahl der Konsequenzen daraus wirklich in der Entwicklung der Lösung der Rätsel beschreiben, über die wir gesprochen haben, die Tatsache, dass Teilchen sich auch anders verhalten. Und die ganze Welt verhält sich anders. Und was wir dann diskutieren müssen, und das ist der eigentliche Inhalt meines Vortrags, was wir diskutieren müssen, ist die Tatsache, dass wir eine statistische Welt haben, und das ganze mechanistische Bild, wie die Physik kausale Resultate erzielt, muss sich ändern. So, ich spreche also über die größte Revolution, die sich im physikalischen Denken in hunderten von Jahren vollzogen hat. Hier ist die wunderbare Bestätigung der Vermutung, die Louis de Broglie aufstellte. Es ist eine Abfolge von Fotos, die durch den Japanischen Wissenschaftler Tonomura aufgenommen wurden, während er das Doppelspaltexperiment durchführte. Dies ist das Doppelspaltexperiment, das Sie in der Optik sahen, das Beugungsbilder erzeugte. Hier hat man Elektronen, die fotografisch aufgezeichnet werden, und bei mehreren immer höheren Intensitäten; dies ist mit sehr wenigen Elektronen, nun mit einer bestimmten Anzahl von Elektronen ist es schwer das Beugungsmuster zu sehen, aber es gibt eins. Und, wie Sie sehen, wenn die Intensität weiter und weiter wächst, sieht man da klarer und klarer ein Beugungsmuster. Das ist ein Elektronenbeugungsmuster, Elektronen, die auf eine empfindliche Oberfläche fallen. Und das war auf der einen Seite die Lösung der Rätsel, über die wir sprechen, aber andererseits produzierte es eine ganze Reihe von neuen Rätseln, über die wir sprechen können. Frage: Es klingt so, als wären viele verschieden von..., ich meine, wenn ein Teilchen eine Art von Versagen zeigt ... etwas, was mit dem Standard ...wenn es viele Teilchen gibt, sieht es so aus, als wenn es das Muster erzeugt ....??? Es ist nicht die Tatsache, dass es viele sind; jedes Elektron, das durch dieses Gerät registriert wird, macht sein eigenes Ding. Kein Elektron weiß irgendetwas von den anderen Elektronen. Was passiert ist, dass das Elektron, das Fortschreiten des Elektrons, die Ausbreitung des Elektrons im Sinne der Wahrscheinlichkeit durch eine Welle stattfindet. Und in diesem Fall geht jede Elektronenwelle durch die zwei Spalten. Und diese zwei Spalten produzieren dann ein Beugungsmuster. Und das Beugungsmuster ist dasselbe Beugungsmuster, wie das, das Sie für Licht sahen. Der Unterschied ist, dass es auch andere Hinweise gab, dass Licht aus Teilchen besteht. Hier haben wir plötzlich echte Teilchen, Elektronen, die sich nicht in zwei Hälften teilen. Sie wählen zufällig aus, durch welchen Spalt sie hindurch gehen. Aber weil das Ding, das durch die Spalte geht, nicht das Elektron ist, sondern es ist eine Wahrscheinlichkeitsamplitude, dass man das Elektron findet, das ist es, was diese Beugungsmuster generiert. Nun, lassen Sie uns ein wenig über die Interpretation dessen sprechen. So, jetzt sind wir bei der Quantenmechanik angekommen, die die Wellentheorie der Teilchen ist. Und es kann einfach niemals bedeuten, dass jedes Teilchen durch beide Spalten geht, die Teilchen gehen immer durch den einen Spalt oder den anderen. Aber sie haben eine spezielle, zufällige Art zu entscheiden, durch welchen sie gehen. Und die entscheidende Beobachtung von Niels Bohr war, dass man diese Interferenzstreifen sieht, wenn und nur wenn es komplett unmöglich ist zu unterscheiden, durch welchen Spalt das Teilchen durchging. Wenn man ein Experiment aufbaut, macht man das mit einer bestimmten Vorrichtung. Und diese Vorrichtung kann bestimmte Fragen nicht beantworten. Und man benötigt, wenn man Antworten auf weitere Fragen haben möchte, benötigt man weitere Geräte. Aber was Bohr durch theoretische Argumente herausfand, ist dass, wenn man weitere Geräte benutzt, um zu bestimmen, durch welchen der zwei Spalte das Elektron hindurch ging, dass man dann das Bild ändert, so dass das Beugungsmuster und die Interferenz verschwunden sind. Frage: Wie wusste er, dass die Vorrichtung zu einem Zeitpunkt ein Elektron emittiert, wie bestätigte er das? Nun, sie kontrollieren nicht die einzelnen Emissionen, sie produzieren nur eine schwache Quelle. Wenn die Quelle schwach genug ist, wird man sogar nie zwei Elektronen haben, die zu vergleichbaren Zeiten emittiert werden. Frage: Aber man muss das immer noch bestätigen. Nun, ich nehme an, das Elektron benötigt einen Bruchteil einer Millisekunde von der Emission bis zum Nachweis. Das ist also ein Bruchteil einer Millisekunde, nehmen wir an, man benutzt eine Quelle, die nur 10 Elektronen pro Sekunde emittiert. Dann hat man sehr selten die Situation, dass zwei Elektronen gleichzeitig da sind. Diese Elektronen verhalten sich sehr individuell. Nun, das ist Bohrs Verständnis, und das ist übrigens eine Philosophie, die komplementär genannt wird, es beinhaltet die Tatsache, dass man das, was man beobachtet, ändert, sobald man es beobachtet. Man greift in die Situation ein. Lassen Sie mich zu einem anderen Beispiel dafür gehen. Ich möchte zu dem Rückstoßdilemma zurückkehren, das wir vorhin hatten. Es ist so einfach: Ein Atom, das eine Kugelwelle ausstrahlt, erfährt überhaupt keinen Rückstoß, es sitzt nur da. Das ist das, was man klassisch erwarten würde. Tatsächlich beobachten wir ein Lichtquant, das in eine bestimmte Richtung geht, und wenn wir den Impuls erhalten wollten, dann muss das Atom einen Rückstoß in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bekommen. Wie erklärt man das, wie bringen wir dieses Bild hiermit in Einklang? Nun, ich muss ein Diagramm benutzen, das ich gemacht habe, das hoffentlich niemanden verwirrt (lacht). Schauen Sie, was hier alles passiert. Jedes Mal, wenn ein Photon, jedes Mal, wenn ein Lichtquant in eine Richtung geht, muss das Atom in die entgegengesetzte Richtung gehen. Aber es gibt all diese unterschiedlichen Möglichkeiten und ich habe nur, wie viele davon, 5 angezeigt, da gibt es eine unendliche Anzahl. Wie bringen wir dieses Bild hiermit in Einklang? Die Antwort ist, man macht eine Messung mit einem Zähler. Nun haben Sie eingegriffen, als Sie diese Messung gemacht haben, Sie haben die physikalische Situation geändert. Dieser Zähler hat irgendetwas, sogar Zerstörerisches an sich, er ändert die Welt, wenn man dieses Lichtquant erfasst und dies ist das Resultat. Dieser Messprozess lässt alle diese anderen Möglichkeiten verschwinden. Und sagt am Ende, dass es nur noch eine gibt. Als Sie also diese Messung gemacht haben, hörten all diese anderen Möglichkeiten auf, Teil der physikalischen Welt zu sein. Und wir können das durch Wechselwirkungen beschreiben; es ist sehr kompliziert, diese Berechnung durchzuführen, aber heutzutage wissen wir, wie wir dieses Bild beschreiben können, es hat eine lange Zeit gedauert, bis wir gelernt hatten, die notwendigen analytischen Tricks zu benutzen. Aber das ist es, was passiert. Der Messprozess selbst lässt all dieses andere Zeug verschwinden. Frage: Sie meinen, man muss alle Möglichkeiten addieren. Ja, diese Möglichkeiten sind weg. Frage: Wohin? Sie haben die Möglichkeiten dargestellt, aber wir haben eine Messung gemacht, die besagt, dass sie nicht länger möglich sind. Sie dachten, Sie würden kein Atom mehr mit Rückstoß in diese Richtung sehen, weil wir eine Messung durchgeführt haben, die aussagt, in welche Richtung das Lichtquant ging. Nun, das ist ein interessantes Element in der Quantenmechanik, das wir Verschränkung nennen. Wenn wir Messungen an einem Teil eines physikalischen Systems durchführen, dann bringt dies den Rest des physikalischen Systems in einen definierten Quantenstatus, sogar, wenn wir es nie angefasst hätten. Und es gibt heutzutage einige sehr dramatische Beispiele davon, und das sind die Dinge, über die ich reden möchte. Das ist, wo die Quantenoptik wirklich anfängt. Frage: Könnte es nicht sein, dass man das Atom veranlassen kann, sich in eine Richtung zu bewegen, indem man einfach irgendwo einen Zähler hinstellt? Sie müssen nachweisen, die Tatsache, dass Sie dort einen Zähler hingestellt haben, wenn Sie das Lichtquant nicht nachweisen, hilft es Ihnen nicht, Sie müssen das Lichtquant nachweisen; es ist der Nachweis des Lichtquants, der die Welt verändert. Frage: Und im Fall, dass es eine riesige Zahl von Detektoren ist. Nehmen wir an, sie hätten da viele Detektoren, wie viele, glauben Sie, werden es registrieren. Frage: Ich weiß nicht. Nur einer, weil nur ein Quant emittiert wird, wenn sie 100 Zähler dort hätten. Frage: Millionen von Zählern. Wenn Sie viele davon hätten, würde aber nur einer, nur einer wird es registrieren, weil wir nur ein Lichtquant emittieren. Frage: Bedeutet das, dass wir Informationen erhalten können über ...(unverständlich 44.18) das System, ohne Messung (unverständlich ) trifft noch zu. Das ist ein interessanter Punkt, das ist die Frage der Verschränkung. Man kann den Zustand von etwas ändern, ohne es zu berühren, und ich werde das Ihnen in einer Minute zeigen. So, das ist dasselbe, was ich schon vorhin gesagt habe. Dies ist eine Wiederholung von dem, was ich schon vorhin gesagt habe. Sie bringen das Atom in einen speziellen Impulszustand, indem Sie das Photon nachweisen, aber Sie haben das Atom niemals angefasst. Nun, das ist ein Ausdruck von etwas, das wir gelernt haben, Verschränkung zu nennen. Und Verschränkung ist eins dieser Dinge in der Quantenmechanik, das überhaupt keine klassische Entsprechung hat. Wenn Sie wissen wollen, was das richtige Rätsel in der Quantenmechanik ist, ist es nicht die Unschärferelation, es ist noch nicht einmal die Tatsache, dass Teilchen sich wie Wellen verhalten, es ist die Tatsache, dass man den Zustand eines Systems bestimmen kann, eines entfernten Systems, ohne jemals irgendeinen Kontakt mit ihm gehabt zu haben. Und lasse Sie mich erwähnen, dass ich den Vortrag kürzen muss, weil .. dank Ihrer Fragen, ich bin nicht einmal in der Nähe von dem, wo ich hin wollte (lacht). Das ist ein wichtiger Punkt, lassen Sie es mich in den Worten ausdrücken, die Sie vielleicht interessanter finden. Wie ich Ihnen sagte, war Einstein einer dieser frühen Revolutionäre. Und zwischen circa 1900 und vielleicht 1920 verstand er die Quantentheorie besser als irgendjemand sonst aus seiner Generation. Aber im Jahr 1925 wurde er mit der Quantenmechanik sehr unzufrieden, weil sie aufhörte, ein mechanistisches Bild zu sein. Einsteins tiefste Überzeugung war, dass alles einen identifizierbaren Ursprung hat und dass es in der Natur keinen intrinsischen Zufall gibt. Er wurde zunehmend sehr unzufrieden und begann eine Art Dialog mit Niels Bohr einzugehen, und als Bohr das entwickelte, was wir die Unschärferelation nennen, fing Einstein an, nach Widersprüchen zu suchen, und tatsächlich war er nicht erfolgreich. Aber im Jahr 1935, während er am Institut in Princeton war, ersann er ein wundervolles Paradox, von dem er glaubte, dass es das Ende der Quantenmechanik bedeutet. Und es stellt sich heraus, dass es nicht das Ende war, und vom Blickwinkel einiger Leute war es eigentlich ein neuer Anfang. Aber es gibt eine wundervolle Geschichte. Einstein und seine zwei graduierten Studenten veröffentlichten in 1935 eine Arbeit, in der Sie die folgenden Arten von Fragen stellten, sie fragten sie in leicht anderen Worten und sie versuchten zu zeigen, dass es einen gewissen Sinn gibt, in dem es möglich ist, Bohrs Unschärferelation nicht zu befolgen. Ich werde eine etwas andere Sprache verwenden. Hier ist ihr Paradox: Nehmen wir an, Sie haben ein zweiatomiges Molekül mit 2 Atomen gleicher Masse, die sich aus irgendeinem Grund trennen, und eins geht nach links und das andere nach rechts, und natürlich wird der Impuls erhalten. Nun wie können wir an diesen zwei Teilchen, die jetzt voneinander getrennt sind, Messungen durchführen? Was man machen kann, ist, eine bestimmte Zeit zu warten und die Position eines dieser Teilchen zu messen, sagen wir die des blauen. So bestimmt man einigermaßen genau seine Position nach, sagen wir, einer Millisekunde. Das sagt Ihnen, was die Position des zweiten Teilchens sein muss. Sie messen also dieses Teilchen hier, und Sie wissen die Position dieses Teilchens dort, das sollte niemanden überraschen. Aber nun nehmen wir an, Sie führen eine andere Art von Messung durch. Angenommen, Sie messen nach einer Millisekunde den Impuls des Teilchens Nummer 1. Das sagt Ihnen dann, wegen der Impulserhaltung, das sagt Ihnen, was der Impuls des Teilchens 2 hier ist. So, Teilchen 1 wird zu einer Welle mit einem bestimmten Impuls, Teilchen 2 wird zu einer Welle mit einem bestimmten Impuls. Nun, das sind komplett unterschiedliche Situationen. Hier haben wir ein Teilchen mit einer bestimmten Position, und hier haben wir ein Teilchen mit einem bestimmten Impuls. Da gibt es zwei unterschiedliche Zustände für Teilchen Nummer 2, aber wir haben Teilchen 2 nie angerührt. Wir haben all unsere Messungen an Teilchen Nummer 1 durchgeführt. Dies ist die Art von Situation, die Einstein sehr farbig ausmalte, nicht nur als Fernwirkung, sondern als eine unheimliche Fernwirkung, als ob es eine Art von spirituellem Element dabei gäbe, weil es nicht erklärt werden konnte. Dies sind unterschiedliche Zustände des Teilchens Nummer 2, und sie werden einfach durch Messungen verursacht, die an Teilchen Nummer 1 gemacht wurden. Dieses Phänomen, das ich vorhin erwähnt habe, Sie machen eine Messung an einem Teilchen, und finden etwas über das andere Teilchen heraus, das ist, was wir heute Verschränkung nennen. Und wenn ich eine Möglichkeit hätte, in dieser Geschwindigkeit zwei Stunden weiter zu machen, würde ich zur Diskussion der heutigen Benutzung von Verschränkung kommen, die darin besteht, Lichtquanten zu verschränken. Ich kann Ihnen ein oder zwei einfache Beispiele nennen. Aber wir gehen derzeit dazu über, Lichtquanten zu verschränken, um sehr komplizierte Quantenzustände zu produzieren, die benutzt werden können, ich fürchte, einige Leute bestehen darauf, sie sind wunderbar für die Kryptographie, um geheime Nachrichten zu senden. Sie werden in verschiedenen Zusammenhängen benutzt, die noch primitiv sind, aber viel Arbeit wird dieser Tage in die Verschränkung gesteckt. Das ist es, wo die Quantenoptik ist, das Verschränken von Lichtquanten. Ich werde Ihnen ein Paar dieser verschränkten Lichtquanten zeigen, das ist das EPR Paradox. Übrigens wurde dieses Experiment schon durchgeführt. Einstein mag sehr unglücklich über die Resultate gewesen sein, aber dieses Phänomen existiert, wir reden über echte Physik. Und Einstein hat an dieser Stelle, beginnend ungefähr im Jahr 1935, fürchte ich, Quantenmechanik als ein Subjekt aufgegeben, das in der Hand von Zauberern war. Quantenoptik also, was ist das, nun alles was auf der Überlagerung von Quantenzuständen beruht. Und viele interessante Dinge resultieren daraus. Ich werde Ihnen einige Beispiele zeigen. Zunächst sprechen wir, das Thema, über das wir sprechen, ist Quantenelektrodynamik. Und das sind einige der Dinge, die resultieren, und ich zeige Ihnen wenigstens ein paar von ihnen. Nun, was ist Quantenelektrodynamik, es ist die Quantentheorie des elektromagnetischen Feldes. Und es ist wörtlich ein Maxwellsches Feld, niemand hat die Maxwell-Gleichungen weggeworfen, sie sind noch unbeschädigt da. Die Frage ist die nach den Amplituden der Felder, die den Maxwell-Gleichungen gehorchen. Die Amplituden dieser Felder sind keine gewöhnlichen komplexen Zahlen, sie müssen als Quantenvariablen betrachtet werden und man muss die Quantentheorie auf sie anwenden. Und nun ist da Dirac, der bemerkenswerte Mann, der dies tat. Und das ist, was er tat: hier sind unsere Maxwellschen Wellen, sie sind immer noch da, aber sie sind die Moden der Lösungen der elektromagnetischen Gleichungen. Aber die Amplituden dieser Wellen, über die wir reden, sind keine gewöhnlichen Zahlen. Die Amplituden sind Quantenvariablen, ein Weg über sie zu reden ist es, sie als eine Art von abstrakten Zahlen darzustellen, wo A multipliziert mit B nicht dasselbe ist wie B multipliziert mit A. Es ist eine Art von höherer Algebra, durch die man hindurch muss, um mit den Amplituden dieser Wellen umzugehen. Es gab eine Frage, ist dies die richtige Theorie, nun, es erforderte eine Menge an Berechnungen. Es wurde mit enormem Aufwand bis in die Mitte der 1950er Jahre durchgeführt, Berechnungen wurden unter Zuhilfenahme der Quantenelektrodynamik gemacht. Beispielsweise von dem magnetischen Moment des Elektrons und auch dem magnetischen Moment des Myons, dies sind Zahlen, die elektrodynamisch bis auf 8 oder 10 signifikante Stellen verstanden werden. Es wird deutlich, dass sich die Theorie der Quantenelektrodynamik als enorm genau herausgestellt hat. Wir können ihr sicher quantitativ vertrauen. Aber alle diese aufwändigen Berechnungen, es gibt bestimmte Diagramme, die Richard Feynman erfunden hat und die die Berechnungen symbolisieren. Diese komplizierten Berechnungen beinhalten nie mehr als ein oder zwei Lichtquanten zur gleichen Zeit. Also, etwas anderes, das die Quantenoptik repräsentiert, ist es, dass man mit vielen Lichtquanten zur gleichen Zeit umgeht. Und da beginnen neue Lichtquellen hinzuzukommen. Und der Maser oder der Laser waren die wichtigsten, und sie gaben uns die Möglichkeit, ganz neue Quantenzustände zu erzeugen, die eine viel größere Vielfältigkeit haben, als wir je zuvor gehabt haben. Und all dies erfordert wiederum eine Ausweitung unserer mathematischen Techniken. Und das ist dann wiederum die Stelle, an der meine eigene Arbeit zum Tragen kommt. Nun, ich habe zu viel Zeit gebraucht, also versuche ich, durch einige dieser Dinge sehr schnell durchzugehen. Einen der ersten überraschenden Hinweise, dass es da etwas Neues gibt, kam in den Experimenten, die Mitte der 50er Jahre durch Hanbury Brown, das ist die eine Person, und R. Q. Twiss, die andere, durchgeführt wurden. Was sie fanden war, dass normales Licht nicht nur aus individuellen Quanten besteht, sondern dass es eine gewisse Tendenz für diese Quanten gibt, in Paaren zu erscheinen. Und ein Weg, das zu beobachten, war es, einen halbverspiegelten Spiegel zu nehmen, und zwei Zähler, einen hier und einen hier, und zu entdecken, dass sie manchmal in Koinzidenz ansprachen, und das war mehr als die zufällige Rate, die man entdecken würde. Das bedeutet also, es gab für die Ankunft der Lichtquanten eine Art von nichttrivialer Wahrscheinlichkeit, sie kommen nicht so ideal an, wie man sich das bei Regentropfen vorstellt, komplett statistisch unabhängig voneinander. Es gibt eine Tendenz für die Lichtquanten in Paaren anzukommen. Das war eine der ersten Überraschungen, die benötigte .., wir brauchen weitere Tonquanten. Frage: Entschuldigen Sie bitte, was war die Lichtquelle? Die Lichtquelle in diesem Fall war eine Quelle, die so monochromatisch war, wie sie sie nur herstellen konnten. Es war im Grunde die monochromatischste Quelle der damaligen Zeit, eine spezielle Niederdruckgasentladungslampe. Ich denke, es war eine Quecksilberlinie. Aber es gab eine gewisse Tendenz, es gibt unausweichlich eine gewisse zufällige Hintergrundrate und es erhob sich über die zufällige Hintergrundrate. Und tatsächlich, weil die elektronische Auflösungszeit sehr lang war, im Vergleich mit dem Kehrwert der Bandbreite, das hat die Tendenz, die Korrelation zeitlich auszudehnen. Als dieses Experiment in idealer Weise gemacht wurde, stellte es sich heraus, dass die Koinzidenzrate das Zweifache der zufälligen Hintergrundrate ist. Nun, lassen Sie mich weitermachen. Das war eine der Überraschungen, hier ist eine andere interessante Geschichte einer Verschränkung. Ich werde die Verschränkung von Lichtquanten-Paaren hier beschreiben. Ein Lichtquant hat, wie Sie wissen, einen Drehimpuls, eine Einheit, ein Bohrsches Magnetron. So, hier ist eine Darstellung des Drehmoments eines Lichtquants, es ist dieser Vektor S. Das Lichtquant hat ein Drehmoment, das in Einheiten von h geteilt durch 2 Pi gemessen wird, das ist es, was h quer ist. Nehmen wir an, dass ein Lichtquant in eine Richtung fliegt, die durch diesen Einheitsvektor gegeben ist. Das skalare Produkt des Drehmoments mit dem Einheitsvektor kann entweder plus oder minus eins sein. Diese werden die zwei Helizitätszustände des Lichtquants genannt. Und das sind die zwei Zustände der Zirkularpolarisation. Nun, nehmen wir an, wir haben ein Atom, das den Drehimpuls null hat. Und es geht in zwei Stufen herunter auf einen Zustand mit Drehimpuls null. Diese zwei unterschiedlichen Lichtquanten haben zusammen keinen Drehimpuls, die zwei Drehimpulse müssen die Summe null ergeben, weil wir von null zu null gehen. So, da haben wir es, die zwei Drehimpulse der Lichtquanten ergeben immer die Summe null. Nun, hier ist ein wenig Algebra involviert, und wenn Sie wollen, wenn Sie Algebra nicht mögen und ein wenig schlummern wollen, das ist in Ordnung. Hier sind zwei Helizitäten, plus oder minus 1 für diese zwei Lichtquanten, die in die entgegengesetzte Richtung fliegen. So, dies sind die zwei Zustände mit Zirkularpolarisation, der Plus- oder der Minus-Zustand für das erste Photon, der Plus- oder der Minus-Zustand für das zweite Photon. Und was ist dann der komplette Zustand des Feldes für diese zwei Lichtquanten, nun, man weiß nicht, ob sie beide mit einer positiven Helizität weggeflogen sind oder beide mit einer negativen Helizität weggeflogen sind. Das ist alles, was sie tun können, weil die Summe null ergeben muss. Und tatsächlich ist dieses plus-Zeichen durch die Paritätserhaltung gefordert. So, hier haben wir eine Wellenfunktion für die zwei Photonen. Nun können wir in gewohnter Weise diese zwei Wellenfunktionen als ebene, lineare Polarisation ausdrücken. Jede Zirkularpolarisation ist eine komplexe Summe aus der x-Polarisation und der y-Polarisation. Und das Gleiche gilt für die negative Richtung. Und wenn man dies alles zusammensetzt, man setzt die Zirkularpolarisation ein und drückt sie als ebene Polarisation aus. Die Aussage ist, wenn ein Photon eine x-Polarisation hat, das ist die senkrechte Polarisation, muss das andere auch eine x-Polarisation haben. Wenn das eine y-Polarisation hat, muss das andere y-Polarisation haben. Das ist nur Algebra, die den Leuten sehr vertraut ist, die sich einen Nachmittag mit diesen Dingen beschäftigt haben. Aber wie sieht das nun aus, wenn man das Experiment durchführt. Zunächst, wenn diese zwei Strahlen in entgegengesetzte Richtung fliegen, sind beide unpolarisierte Strahlen. Wir setzen Polarisationsfilter ein, Sie wissen, was ein Polarisationsfilter ist, ein Blatt Polaroidfolie. Und wenn man zwei Polarisationsfilter einsetzt und an all diese zufälligen Polarisationen denken, die hindurch gehen, nun, wenn man diese zwei Photonen unabhängig voneinander behandelt, würde man sagen, da gibt es eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von ein halb, dass eines von ihnen durch seinen Polarisator durchgeht, und ein halb, dass nicht. Aber man hat zwei solcher Dinge, man will Koinzidenzen erfassen. Also würde man sagen, die Wahrscheinlichkeit ist nur eins in vier, dass beide Lichtquanten durchkommen. Nun, hier ist ein weiterer Weg, diese Berechnung durchzuführen. Und dies ist ein berühmter Fehler, den viele meiner Kollegen gemacht haben. Wir sagen, es gibt die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass eines der Lichtquanten durch den Filter geht, die proportional zum Quadrat des Cosinus dieses Winkels ist. Und genauso, da das andere in die andere Richtung fliegt, hat es dieselbe Polarisation, die Wahrscheinlichkeit ist das Quadrat des Cosinus, dass es durch den Polarisator fliegt. Also muss man die vierte Potenz des Cosinus mitteln, das ergibt 3/8, also nicht 1/4 sondern 3/8 ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, und das ist falsch. Es ist falsch, weil, wenn ein Lichtquant durch seinen Filter hindurchgeht, es dann eine Art von Projektion durchführt, die besagt, dass das andere Photon in dem Zustand ist, der es durch seinen Polarisationsfilter hindurch trägt. Und so ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass man beide Photonen sieht, dass man sie beide nachweist, ist nicht 1/4, es ist nicht 3/8, es ist 1/2, das ist eines der merkwürdigsten Resultate der Verschränkung. Und lassen Sie mich sagen, viele berühmte Menschen haben in dieser Berechnung Fehler gemacht. So, das passiert also, hier ist ein Atom, das seine zwei Lichtquanten emittiert. Hier haben wir zwei Polaroidfilter, hier ist einer, hier ist der andere, und hier haben wir einen Zähler, und hier haben wir einen weiteren Zähler. Nun lassen wir die zwei Lichtquanten los, keins kommt durch. Keine Koinzidenz erfasst. Nun, lassen Sie es uns noch einmal versuchten, sie gehen beide durch, wenn eines von ihnen durchkommt, muss das andere durchkommen. Das ist die Bedeutung von Verschränkung. Und das ist das Rätsel, weil diese Wechselwirkungen mit diesen Filtern nicht unabhängig sind. Wenn eines von ihnen durchkommt, ändert das den Quantenzustand des anderen. Wenn eines von ihnen durchkommt, bedeutet das, dass dieses eine in einem Zustand mit Polarisation in diese Richtung ist, das bedeutet, dass dieses auch so ist, und dann müssen beide durchkommen. Das ist das Rätsel der Verschränkung. Ich kann Ihnen sagen, es passiert manchmal, dass etwas auf einem Gebiet der Physik entdeckt wird, lange bevor es auf einem anderen entdeckt wird. In diesem Fall hat man den Zerfall von Positronium, das 2 eine halbe Millionen Volt Gammastrahlung abgibt. Diese Gammastrahlen haben denselben Zustand, nun, sie sind tatsächlich in senkrechten Polarisationszuständen. Aber ein Experiment wurde durchgeführt, in dem hier ein Positroniumpaar ist, das zwei Gammastrahlen abgibt, eins hier und eins hier. Und es wurden zwei Comptonstreuungen durchgeführt, und jede dieser Comptonstreuungen definiert eine Streuebene. Die Winkelverteilung dieser Ebenen relativ zueinander wurde gefunden und es entspricht genau dieser Verschränkungsregel. Dies wurde durchgeführt bevor.., das war 4 oder 5 Jahre vor dem anderen Experiment, und man hat die beiden sehr wenig miteinander verbunden. Nun, hier können wir über die Anzahl der Quanten in dem Feld sprechen und in jedem Modus hat man eine bestimmte Zahl von Quanten, man hat dafür eine bestimmte Amplitude. So, hier ist die Art, wie man die Zahl der Quanten in einem Modus beschreibt. Die Zahl von.., die Summe der Quadrate der absoluten Werte dieser Koeffizienten muss zusammen 1 ergeben. Wenn man irgendeins quadriert, bekommt man die Wahrscheinlichkeit der Anwesenheit von n Quanten. Es gibt eine wichtige Art von Quantenzustand, der tatsächlich der Quantenzustand ist, der durch einen Laser ausgestrahlt wird. Ich nenne es den kohärenten Zustand. Und die Cn Koeffizienten haben diese spezielle Form als Formel, und wenn man diese Amplituden quadriert, bekommt man eine Poissonverteilung der Quanten in jedem Modus des Feldes. Das ist charakteristisch für den Laserstrahl. Hier die Art und Weise, wie ein Laserstrahl tatsächlich ausgestrahlt wird. Ich zeige es, dies war Teil meiner Doktorarbeit. Sobald man eine klassische Stromverteilung hat, und eine klassische Stromverteilung ist nicht notwendigerweise eine, die stark ist, es ist eine, die keinen Rückstoß durch den Prozess der Lichtemission beinhaltet. Das ist natürlich eine Idealisierung. Aber ein solcher Prozess kann leicht mathematisch beschrieben werden, und man kann zeigen, dass diese Art von starkem Strom immer kohärente Zustände ausstrahlen wird. Nun, hier ist ein Bild eines Lasers, es ist ein langes Rohr, üblicherweise hat er einen zweiten Spiegel hier und eine kleine Menge des Lichts scheint durch diesen Spiegel und kommt als sehr intensiver Lichtstrahl heraus. Wo ist in diesem Ding der Strom, ist es ein starker Strom, die Antwort ist, das Feld baut sich auf, das schnell oszillierende Feld baut sich auf, während es zwischen den Spiegeln hin und her reflektiert wird. Und das polarisiert die Atome und es gibt einen Polarisationsstrom innerhalb des Instruments. Und es ist dieser sehr intensive Polarisationsstrom, der ausstrahlt, was ich kohärente Zustände nenne. Hier sind einige Poissonverteilungen, dies ist eine Poissonverteilung einer große Anzahl von Photonen, 35 oder so. Dies ist eine Poissonverteilung für ein paar weniger. Dies sind andere Verteilungen. Lassen Sie mich hier etwas Lustiges zeigen. Dies sind Experimente, die die Gruppe von Serge Haroche in Paris durchgeführt hat, der jetzt über Mikrowellenstrahlung spricht. Die Frequenz ist 51 GHz. Er hat ein phantastisches Instrument entwickelt, um diese Lichtquanten zu erfassen. Das Instrument ist so empfindlich, dass es die Lichtquanten erfasst, ohne sie zu absorbieren. In allen früheren Messungen mussten Lichtquanten absorbiert werden, um erfasst zu werden. Nun, was ist sein Instrument, es besteht aus dem, was wir Rydberg-Atome nennen. Rydberg-Atome sind Atome, bei denen das äußere Elektron so weit weg ist vom zentralen Teil des Atoms, dass der Radius seines Orbits vielleicht größer ist als das 1000-fache oder mehr als der Radius, der normale Radius eines Atoms. Diese Rydberg-Atome haben eine phantastische Empfindlichkeit für die Anwesenheit von elektromagnetischen Feldern. Und hier ist die Arbeit von Haroche und seiner Gruppe. Dies sind kreisförmige Rydberg-Atome, die Quantenzahl ihres Elektrons ist von der Größenordnung 50. Er schickt sie durch zwei Geräte, eines, das die Rydberg-Atome in einen speziellen Quantenzustand versetzt, dann bewegen sie sich durch das Feld, das er misst. Dies ist das Feld, das er misst, und weil er nur ein oder zwei Quanten erfassen will, muss er auf extreme niedrige Temperaturen herunter gehen. Die Temperaturen in diesem Fall sind innerhalb..., ist die Temperatur des flüssigen Heliums, sie sind innerhalb eines Grads oder so am absoluten Nullpunkt. Hier untersucht er die Rydberg-Atome am Ausgang und fragt praktisch: Hast er ein Quant gesehen? Hat er die Anwesenheit eines Quants erfasst, ohne es zu absorbieren? Und die Art und Weise dies zu tun, ist, das Rydberg-Atom zu zerstören, was sehr leicht zu machen ist, da das Elektron so lose gebunden ist. Lassen Sie uns sehen, was er tut. Hier ist sein supraleitender Resonator. Er hat nur ein paar Photonen einer sehr niedrigen Frequenz in dem Kasten. Er hat supraleitende Wände, damit die Photonen einen größeren Bruchteil einer Sekunde überleben. Hier, weil es thermische Fluktuationen gibt, sogar bei weniger als 1 Grad absolute Temperatur, hier gibt es eine Reihe von Antworten auf die Fragen, hat er ein Lichtquant gesehen oder nicht. Da gibt es unterschiedliche Antworten, die roten Linien sagen, er hat ein Lichtquant gesehen, die blauen sagen, er hat keins gesehen. Uns da gab es eine thermische Fluktuation, die stattgefunden hat. Und Sie sehen die spontane Geburt und Tod eines einzelnen Lichtquants bei einer Temperatur sehr nahe am absoluten Nullpunkt. Dies zeigt, wenn zwei Quanten anwesend sind, das aufeinanderfolgende Zerfallen von Lichtquanten, eins nach dem anderen. Hier ist die Verteilung der Lichtquanten, die er gefunden hat, es ist eine Poissonverteilung. Dies ist eine thermische Poissonverteilung mit einer durchschnittlichen Anzahl von 3,5 Lichtquanten. Nun, da gibt es andere Themen, und ich denke, ich werde hier vielleicht aufhören, weil wir schon genug Beispiele hatten, aber wir sind nicht annähernd da, ....... Vielen Dank. Ende.

Roy Glauber describes how quantum optics came about from Paul Dirac's quantum electrodynamics
(00:52:45 - 00:56:35)

 


Applications of light: Invention of the blue LED

These fundamental discoveries about light have enabled the creation of countless new technologies. Photonic applications impact just about every industry imaginable: consumer equipment, medical, military, industrial manufacturing, telecommunications, computing, and so on. Most of these devices use semiconductor light sources like light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. For instance, LEDs serve as indicator lights for consumer electronics, transmit signals from remote controls, light up traffic signals, and send data through telecom fibers [4].

Leo Esaki, who won the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physics for experimental discoveries regarding tunneling phenomena in semiconductors, spoke during his 1997 lecture about the importance of fundamental discoveries by scientists that contributed to the information technology revolution.

 

Leo Esaki on the importance of fundamental discoveries by scientists that contributed to the information technology revolution
(00:07:07 - 00:08:35)

 

Twenty-four scientists have received a Nobel Prize for their achievements in laser- or LED-related research and development since 1964. One of the more recent Nobel-worthy achievements was made by Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, and Shuji Nakamura for their invention of energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly blue LEDs [5]. Because an LED lamp requires less power to emit light as compared to incandescent bulbs, it has the potential to improve the quality of life for over 1.5 billion people around the world who lack access to electricity grids.

In his 2016 talk at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Amano tells the audience how he initially thought blue LEDs would only be useful for electronics displays, and how new technology can lead to new applications.

 

Hiroshi Amano (2016) - Lighting the Earth by LEDs

Good morning everyone. I am so honoured to get this opportunity, so I’d like to thank the members of the Council of Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. First of all, I’d like to mention that I am not a physicist. I belong to the engineering department. Today I’d like to emphasise the importance of not only the science but also the engineering, that’s one point. And the second point is, maybe my field is not the major one in this meeting. I’d like to mention that the importance of the minority research is very important. So I’d like to point out 2 things in this presentation. According to the Nobel Foundation, the LED lamp holds great promise for increasing the quality of life for over 1.5 billion people around the world. So first, I’d like to start by saying how I encountered the blue LEDs. From primary school to high school I was not a good student. My impression at that time was, that studying in Japan was only to enter a good high school or a good university. But I couldn’t understand the reason why I should study so hard only to enter high school or only to enter university. But when I entered university, in the first class introduction to engineering the old professor explained the meaning of the Japanese, or Chinese, Kanji character, we call it Kô. Kô is engineering, this character means 'the people'. So this character meaning the engineering is connecting people to people, meaning engineers should support the people. Then, suddenly, I understood why I should study. (Laughter) For me studying is for the people, not to enter university. Then I was able change my mind and study hard, very hard, at university. This here summarises the overview of the development of LEDs. The first commercial LED were the red LEDs, composed of gallium arsenide or gallium arsenide phosphide compound materials, which was invented by Professor Holonyak’s group at the University of Illinois, in 1962. In 1974, George Craford, the Hewlett Packard engineer, developed gallium-phosphide-based green LEDs. At that time the many researchers, not only the researchers, but the person who studied the periodic table of elements, all the people could imagine what’s next. Next should be the gallium-nitride-based blue LEDs. This material, gallium nitride, the seed of the gallium nitride came from this country. The German physicist Professor Grimmeiss found the importance of this material as the blue light emitting diodes in 1960, 56 years earlier. So in the 1970s, many, many researchers around the world tried to commercialise the blue LEDs based on gallium nitride. For example, Stanford University and RCA, in the United States, Philips. Or in Japan Oki Electric, Hitachi or Matsushita, now Panasonic. But unfortunately, all the efforts in the 1970s failed. So it was a too early try, no good crystal, no p-type or no indium gallium nitride. So many, many researchers abandoned these materials and started the new material research such as zinc selenide. But only one person could not abandon this material: my supervisor Professor Isamu Akasaki. He couldn’t abandon this material. But unfortunately, his company decided to quit the project. So he had to move from the company to Nagoya University in 1981. And I joined his group as an undergraduate student in 1982. When I saw the subject of the research for the nitride based blue LEDs, I was so excited. The reason was, from the first year to the third year as a university student, I was interested in the microcomputer system, now PC, personal computer system. Because 1975, Bill Gates and Paul Allen developed Microsoft. And one year later Apple one was realised by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. From this success, the development of personalisation of microcomputer systems was so enormous. I wanted to contribute to the further development of the microcomputer system. And the display was one of them. At that time, in all the displays the Braun tube was used which was so big and energy consuming. So if I could achieve the blue LED, I could change the world. That was the reason why I started to devote myself on gallium nitride research. When Professor Akasaki moved from the company to the university, a very big or very important decision was made. That is the change of the crystal growth method from the conventional hydride vapour phase, HVP, to metalorganic or organometallic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The reason is the HVP was very, very complicated. And the beginning student like me could not control the growth system. But MOVPE was a new growth system which was rather easy to control. Then Professor Akasaki decided to use the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy, MOVPE in short. That was a very good decision. But the problem was, if we wanted to buy the MOVPE system we needed at least €1 million. The research fund at that time in Japan, at the university, was €25,000. So we couldn’t buy it. So we students decided to develop our own crystal growth system by ourselves. Now this is "the only one", our original MOVPE reactor for €25,000. The beer bottle - the beer bottle is very important to fabricate the rf coil. By heating it and winding it around the beer bottle we could fabricate a very good rf coil. In such a way we have developed our original MOVPE reactor. and could start to do the experiments for crystal growth of the gallium nitride on a sapphire substrate. That’s the good old days. In the laboratory nobody knew about the new growth process, MOVPE. So even a beginning student like me could very, very freely discuss with the professor, the associate professor, with no hierarchical relationship. So the student could independently proceed with the experiments. Then the students tend to feel the responsibility for their research results. So I enjoyed very much to do the experiments but, of course, it was very, very difficult to grow high-quality gallium nitride crystals. So 3 years passed without any improvement. But just at the end of the master courses, I decided to change the growth procedure and to use the buffer layer. The idea came from the discussion with a young professor, Professor Sawaki. He always mentioned, that in case of BP - BP is boron phosphide, boron phosphide on silicon substrate – the predisposition of the buffer that is phosphorus improves the lateral crystal growth of boron phosphide. Then high-quality boron phosphide could be grown on silicon substrate. Then I imagined, if I used the aluminium nitride, the different materials as a buffer layer, maybe I could improve the quality. Then, suddenly, I succeeded in growing the world’s highest quality gallium nitride on a sapphire substrate, using the low temperature buffer. So I wrote the paper and submitted to the Applied Physics Letters. But this paper did not take notice of other researchers. The age changed from the nitride to the zinc selenide. There was zinc selenide booming all over the world. So, young researchers, I’d like to ask you, which would you choose as the research task? The majority field: Many researchers, hot competition. You can write many, many journal papers. High possibility to get the academic position. The minority: Very limited researchers, moderate competition. It may be difficult to write the journal papers. Few possibilities to get the academic position. In my case I chose the minority. Also I tried to write a patent – a patent in engineering field is very important. So I investigated the previous papers. I found 2 important papers: the gallium arsenide on silicone and the gallium nitride on the sapphire. In the case of the gallium arsenide, low temperature gallium arsenide was used, which is the same material. So in my case, I used aluminium nitride - it’s different, ok. And in the case of gallium nitride on sapphire. It was grown by molecular beam epitaxy and the single crystalline gallium nitride was used. In my case I used not a single crystalline but amorphous aluminium nitride or polycrystalline aluminium nitride. So that was also different. So I focused on claiming only the low temperature aluminium nitride, and submitted the patent in 1985. But 6 years later, in 1991, one of the Japanese companies - maybe you know Nichia Corporation, led by professor Nakamura. His team submitted a patent claiming that low temperature gallium aluminium nitride, except only for aluminium nitride. You understand what this meant? I couldn’t believe it. But this patent was accepted - so I learned a lot about the patent. Anyway, for us the next target was, of course, the p-type gallium nitride. So during my doctor courses, for 3 years, I concentrated on growing p-type gallium nitride - but without any success. But I found some interesting phenomenon. I visited NTT as an internship and found that the blue luminescence of zinc-doped gallium nitride was irreversibly enhanced by electron beam irradiation. So I was so excited and tried to write the journal papers to get the PhD. But when I went back to the Nagoya University and investigated the previous papers, I found, that Moscow University, Doctor Saparin, already found just the same phenomenon as I found in 1983 - 4 years before my findings. So I was so depressed and abandoned to get the PhD. But I was very lucky that I could continue research on seeking p-type gallium nitride as a research associate under the support of Professor Akasaki. One year after the graduation of PhD post I found this graph. This graph really shows what Phillips mentioned in "Bonds and Bands in Semiconductors" that in the case of gallium phosphide magnesium is much, much better than zinc in terms of the activation. So I found my mistake. I should use the magnesium. Then, in combination with the electron beam treatment, we realised the p-type gallium nitride, the p-n junction LED, for the first time in the world in 1989. And as for the mechanism of a p-type convergent, the first impression is it should be related to the thermal effect. But for me the thermal effect was not so exciting, it was very, very easy. So I tried to find another mechanism. I searched for the laser beam irradiation or microwave irradiation, any other kind of irradiation. But all the efforts failed. that p-type convergent could be realised only by thermal annealing. In this case also I studied a lot about physics. Then, next target is the true blue luminescence, indium gallium nitride. Of course, we started at the very initial stage, in 1986. But in our case, we only realised the indium amount of 6% which is insufficient for the blue luminescence. For the blue luminescence we need at least 15%. The reason is very simple: we used hydrogen as the carrier gas. But in 1989, NTT group, Professor Matsuoka, succeeded in growing high-indium-content indium gallium nitride. The reason why they succeeded is they used nitrogen as the carrier gas – the only difference is hydrogen or nitrogen. In 1993 was the first commercialisation of indium-gallium-nitride-based blue LEDs, that has been achieved by Professor Nakamura’s team of Nichia Corporation. So I’d like to emphasise, how blue LED changed our lives - or your lives. The reason why you can enjoy the Game Boys, smart phone, cell phone with the full colour display is because of the emergence of blue LED. But some people complain about the increase of smart phone addiction. But when I was a student I considered the application, only I imagined the displays. But one of the engineers in Nichia Corporation, Doctor Bandoh, found that this mechanism – this is the blue LED and by adding this yellow film we can easyly realise white LED. Then the applications of blue LEDs have been expanded - not only to the display but also the general lighting system. So I can say that this is a good example that new technology leads to new applications. Today the efficiency of the LED lighting is 8 times higher than that of the incandescent one. And 2 times higher than that of the fluorescent one. Then we can expect a decrease of the electricity consumption by using, or by replacing, the conventional lighting system with LED lighting system. So this graph shows the electricity generation and the CO2 emission in Japan. Before the year 2011, about 30% of the electricity was generated by nuclear power plants. But in Japan we have to stop the nuclear power plants. So the ratio of thermal power increases drastically, almost 90%. So CO2 emission increase drastically. The government target by the year 2030 is this level. Maybe the reduction of economy activity leads to it much faster, but anyway. In Japan, by the year 2020, we can reduce the total electricity consumption by about 7%, by replacing our lighting system with LED lamps - which corresponds to 1 trillion Japanese Yen. More importantly, this LED lighting system not only changes our life, but it also keeps our traditional life, for example in Mongolia. For Mongolia people, the nomad life is the traditional life. But because of the insufficient lighting in the night, the young people want to move to the urban areas, and they want to get fixed housing. But with the emergence of LEDs the young people go back to the nomad life. And I visited this man in the Ger and found that the LED lamp is really used in the Ger house. So I was so pleased to see. Next is the Deep UV LEDs for water purification. UNICEF reported that still more than 600 million people lack access to improved drinking water. And 2.4 million people do not use an improved sanitation facility. And global warming causes increase of bacterium in drinking water, even in the northern part. So water purification is very important. So we developped our new original crystal growth system. And, with the support of the government, we succeeded in fabricating the Deep UV LEDs. This is one example. It’s not so bright, but it can excite the blue phosphor. This is an example of the sterilisation of bacterium. And the water purification system has been already commercialised. And this is also used for steriliser, resin cure, printing, paper money discrimination, photolithography, and also in medicine, in dermatology. So our next target is the power device. For example, the solar cell is DC, but we use AC in our house. The electric vehicle, the battery is DC, but the motor is AC. So we have to change from DC to AC, and the inverter is used. In a conventional inverter system the efficiency is 95% on average. But by replacing it to the new materials, we can further reduce the efficiency to over 99%. So by using this system, we can realise a carbon neutral society in the very near future, like COP 21. Finally, I’d like to emphasise, once again, to the young generation. I do believe that the engineer can solve the global issues. For example, there is a relationship between terrorism and the Gini coefficient, in the difference of rich and poor. It's an important critical point in 1980. And also there is the relationship between the hunger map and the population growth rate. This is the example of the global issues, and I believe that in future you will solve these problems. Finally, I’d like to mention: young researchers, you are very lucky, because we are facing many, many global issues to resolve. And I am praying for all of your success in the future. Thank you so much for you’re kind attention.

Guten Morgen. Ich fühle mich so geehrt, diese Gelegenheit zu bekommen und danke daher den Mitgliedern des Kuratoriums der Nobelpreisträgertagungen in Lindau dafür. Zunächst sollten Sie wissen, dass ich kein Physiker bin. Ich gehöre der Fakultät der Ingenieurwissenschaften an. Heute möchte ich daher betonen, wie wichtig nicht nur die Naturwissenschaft ist, sondern auch die Ingenieurwissenschaften, das ist ein Punkt. Und der zweite ist, dass mein Gebiet vielleicht nicht das Hauptgebiet dieses Treffens ist, dass Forschung auf Nebengebieten aber auch sehr wichtig ist. Ich würde daher gerne in dieser Präsentation 2 Dinge aufzeigen. Gemäß der Nobel Stiftung birgt die LED-Lampe die große Hoffnung, die Lebensqualität von über 1,5 Milliarden Menschen in der ganzen Welt zu verbessern. Zunächst beginne ich, indem ich erzähle, wie ich den blauen LEDs begegnete. Ich war kein guter Schüler in der Grundschule oder Highschool. Mein Eindruck damals war, dass die Schulzeit in Japan nur dazu diente, an eine gute Highschool oder gute Universität zu kommen. Ich konnte jedoch den Grund nicht verstehen, warum ich so viel lernen sollte, nur um an die Highschool oder an die Universität zu kommen. Aber als ich das Studium begann, erklärte der alte Professor in der ersten Vorlesung zur Einführung in die Ingenieurwissenschaften die Bedeutung des japanischen oder chinesischen Kanji-Zeichens; wir nennen es Kô. Kô bedeutet Ingenieurwissenschaft, der obere Querstrich bedeutet ‚die Menschen‘. Dieses Zeichen, das Ingenieurwissenschaft bedeutet, verbindet Menschen mit Menschen, was bedeutet, dass Ingenieure die Menschen unterstützen sollen. Dann, plötzlich, verstand ich, warum ich studieren sollte. Für mich bedeutet studieren, dass man es für die Menschen tut, nicht um an die Universität zu gelangen. Damit war ich in der Lage, meine Einstellung zu ändern, und ich studierte fleißig an der Universität, sehr fleißig. Dies hier fasst die Entwicklung der LEDs zusammen. Die ersten kommerziell erhältlichen LEDs waren die roten LEDs, die aus einer Galliumarsenid- oder Galliumarsenidphosphid-Verbindung bestanden, und im Jahr 1962 von Professor Holonyaks Gruppe an der Universität von Illinois erfunden wurden. Im Jahr 1974 entwickelte der Hewlett Packard-Ingenieur George Craford grüne LEDs auf Galliumphospidbasis. Zu der Zeit konnten sich viele Forscher, aber nicht nur Forscher, sondern die Wissenschaftler, die das Periodensystem der Elemente studierten, all diese Leute konnten sich vorstellen, was das nächste wäre. Das nächste sollten galliumnitrid-basierte blaue LEDs sein. Dieses Material, Galliumnitrid, der Ursprung des Galliumnitrids war in diesem Land. Der deutsche Physiker Professor Grimmeiss fand, wie wichtig dieses Material für blaues Licht emittierende Dioden war, im Jahr 1960, vor 56 Jahren. In den 1970er Jahren machten sich daher viele Forscher in der gesamten Welt daran zu versuchen, die blauen LEDs basierend auf Galliumnitrid zu kommerzialisieren. Beispielsweise die Universität von Stanford und RCA in den Vereinigten Staaten, Philips. Oder in Japan Oki Electric, Hitachi oder Matsushita, jetzt Panasonic. Aber unglücklicherweise waren alle Bemühungen in den 1970ern nicht erfolgreich. Der Versuch kam zu früh, es gab keine guten Kristalle, keine p-Leiter, kein Indiumgalliumnitrid. Viele Forscher gaben daher diese Werkstoffe auf und begannen neue Materialien zu erforschen, wie Zinkselenid. Es gab nur eine Person, die dieses Material nicht aufgeben konnte: mein Doktorvater Professor Isamu Akasaki. Er konnte dieses Material nicht aufgeben. Aber unglücklicherweise entschied sich seine Firma, aus dem Projekt auszusteigen. Also musste er im Jahr 1981 von der Firma weggehen zur Universität von Nagoya. Und ich trat seiner Gruppe als Diplomand in Jahr 1982 bei. Als ich das Thema der Forschung für die nitridbasierten blauen LEDs sah, war ich sehr aufgeregt. Der Grund war, dass ich mich als Universitätsstudent vom 1. Jahr bis zum 3. Jahr für Mikrocomputersysteme interessierte, die nun PCs heißen, Personal-Computer-System. Weil im Jahr 1975 Bill Gates und Paul Allen Microsoft gründeten. Und ein Jahr später realisierten Steve Jobs und Steve Wozniak den Apple 1. Durch diesen Erfolg wurde die Entwicklung der Personalisierung der Mikrocomputersysteme so erfolgreich. Ich wollte zur Weiterentwicklung der Mikrocomputersysteme beitragen. Und der Bildschirm war ein Teil davon. Die ganze Zeit, in all den Bildschirmen, wurde die braunsche Röhre verwendet, die so groß und so ein Energiefresser war. Wenn ich also die blaue LED schaffen könnte, würde ich die Welt ändern. Das war der Grund, warum ich begann, meine Arbeit der Galliumnitridforschung zu widmen. Als Professor Akasaki von der Firma zur Universität wechselte, wurde eine sehr wichtige Entscheidung getroffen: Das war, die Kristallwachstumsmethode vom üblichen Hydridaufdampfverfahren (HVP) zur metallorganischen Gasphasenepitaxie (MOVPE) zu ändern. Der Grund war, HVP war sehr, sehr kompliziert und Studienanfänger wie ich konnten das Wachstumssystem nicht kontrollieren. Aber MOVPE war ein neues Wachstumssystem, das man ziemlich leicht kontrollieren konnte. Dann entschied Professor Akasaki, die metallorganische Gasphasenepitaxie, abgekürzt MOVPE, zu benutzen. Das war eine sehr gute Entscheidung. Es gab aber ein Problem: Wenn wir das MOVPE-System kaufen wollten, benötigten wir mindestens 1 Million €. Das Forschungsbudget in Japan an der Universität betrug seinerzeit 25.000 €. Wir konnten es also nicht kaufen. Daher entschieden wir Studenten, dass wir unser eigenes Kristallwachstumssystem entwickeln würden. Nun, dies ist „the only one“ (Der Einzige), unser Original-MOVPE-Reaktor für 25.000 €. Die Bierflasche - die Bierflasche ist sehr wichtig, um die Hochfrequenzspule herzustellen. (Gelächter) Indem wir sie erhitzten und um die Bierflasche wickelten, konnten wir eine sehr gute Hochfrequenzspule herstellen. Auf diese Weise haben wir unseren original MOVPE-Reaktor entwickelt und waren in der Lage, die Experimente für das Kristallwachstum des Galliumnitrids auf einem Saphirsubstrat durchzuführen. Das sind die guten alten Zeiten. Im Labor kannte niemand den neuen Wachstumsprozess MOVPE. Daher konnte auch ein Studienanfänger wie ich sehr, sehr ungezwungen mit dem außerordentlichen Professor diskutieren, es gab keine Hierarchie. Und der Student konnte auf eigene Faust mit dem Experiment weitermachen. Dann neigen die Studenten dazu, sich für ihre Forschungsergebnisse verantwortlich zu fühlen. Ich habe es sehr genossen, die Experimente durchzuführen, aber es war sehr, sehr schwierig, Galliumnitrid-Kristalle sehr hoher Qualität zu züchten. So vergingen 3 Jahre ohne jegliche Verbesserung. Aber gerade am Ende des Masterstudiums entschied ich mich, die Zuchtprozedur zu ändern und eine Pufferschicht zu benutzen. Die Idee rührte aus einer Diskussion mit einem jungen Professor her, Professor Sawaki. Er erwähnte immer wieder, dass bei BP - BP ist Borphospid, Borphosphid auf einem Siliziumsubstrat – die vorherige Abscheidung des phosphorenthaltenden Puffers das laterale Wachstum des Borphosphids verbessert. Dann kann Borphosphid einer hohen Qualität auf einem Siliziumsubstrat gezüchtet werden. Dann stellte ich mir vor, wenn ich Aluminiumnitrid, die unterschiedlichen Materialien, als eine Pufferschicht verwendete, könnte ich vielleicht die Qualität verbessern. Dann gelang es mir plötzlich, Galliumnitrid der weltbesten Qualität auf einem Saphirsubstrat zu züchten, indem ich den Niedertemperaturpuffer verwendete. Also schrieb ich die Veröffentlichung und reichte sie bei Applied Physics Letters ein. Aber diese Veröffentlichung wurde nicht von anderen Forschern wahrgenommen. Die Ära hatte von Nitrid zu Zinkselenid gewechselt. Überall auf der Welt boomte Zinkselenid. Ich möchte Sie junge Forscher daher fragen, was würden Sie als Forschungsaufgabe wählen? Das Hauptgebiet: Viele Forscher, harter Wettbewerb. Sie können viele, viele Veröffentlichungen in wissenschaftlichen Zeitschriften schreiben und mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit eine akademische Stellung erhalten. Das Nebengebiet: geringe Anzahl an Forschern, bescheidener Wettbewerb. Es kann schwierig sein, Veröffentlichungen in Zeitschriften zu schreiben. Geringe Wahrscheinlichkeit, eine akademische Stellung zu erhalten. In meinem Fall entschied ich mich für das Nebengebiet. Ich versuchte auch, ein Patent zu schreiben - ein Patent ist auf dem Gebiet der Ingenieurwissenschaften sehr wichtig. Ich untersuchte daher die vorherigen Veröffentlichungen und fand 2 wichtige Veröffentlichungen: Galliumarsenid auf Silizium und Galliumnitrid auf Saphir. Im Falle des Galliumarsenids wurde Niedertemperaturgalliumarsenid verwendet, was dasselbe Material ist. Also in meinem Fall verwendete ich Aluminiumnitrid - das war also anders. Und im Fall von Galliumnitrid auf Saphir. Es wurde mithilfe der Molekularstrahl-Epitaxie gezüchtet, und ein Galliumnitrideinkristall wurde verwendet. Ich selbst verwendete keinen Einkristall, sondern amorphes Aluminiumnitrid oder polykristallines Aluminiumnitrid. So, das war auch anders. Ich fokussierte mich darauf, nur das Niedertemperaturaluminiumnitrid zu beanspruchen, und reichte das Patent im Jahr 1985 ein. Aber 6 Jahre später, im Jahr 1991, reichte eine japanische Firma – vielleicht kennen Sie Nichia Corporation, geführt von Professor Nakamura - sein Team reichte ein Patent auf dieses Niedertemperatur-Galliumaluminiumnitrid ein, mit der Ausnahme von Aluminiumnitrid. Verstehen Sie, was das heißt? Ich konnte es nicht glauben, aber das Patent wurde gewährt - ich lernte so viel über das Patent. Wie auch immer, das nächste Ziel für uns war natürlich das p-leitendes Galliumnitrid. Also konzentrierte ich mich während der 3 Jahre meiner Doktorarbeit darauf, p-leitendes Galliumnitrid zu züchten - ohne Erfolg. Aber ich entdeckte ein interessantes Phänomen. Ich besuchte NTT als Praktikant und fand heraus, dass die blaue Lumineszenz des zinkgedopten Galliumnitrids durch Elektronenstrahlbestrahlung unumkehrbar erhöht wurde. Ich war so aufgeregt und versuchte, die Zeitschriftveröffentlichungen zu schreiben, um den Doktorgrad zu erlangen. Aber als ich zur Universität von Nagoya zurückkehrte und die alten Veröffentlichungen untersuchte, da fand ich, dass Dr. Saparin an der Universität von Moskau dasselbe Phänomen schon 1983 entdeckt hatte - 4 Jahre vor meinen Ergebnissen. Ich war so niedergeschlagen und gab auf, damit den Doktorgrad zu erreichen. Aber ich hatte das Glück, meine Forschung über die Suche nach p-leitendem Galliumnitrid als Forschungsassistent mit der Unterstützung von Professor Akasaki fortsetzen zu können. Ein Jahr nach der Verleihung meines Doktortitels fand ich dieses Diagramm. Dieses Diagramm zeigt, was Phillips im Buch „Bonds and Band in Semiconductors (Bindungen und Bänder in Halbleitern)“ erwähnte, dass bei Galliumphosphid, Magnesium viel, viel besser für die Aktivierung ist als Zink. Also fand ich meinen Fehler: Ich sollte Magnesium verwenden. Dann, in Verbindung mit der Elektronenstrahlbehandlung, realisierten wir p-leitendes Galliumnitrid, das p-n Übergangs-LED, weltweit zum ersten Mal im Jahr 1989. Und der Mechanismus der p-Leiterkonvergenz sollte nach dem ersten Eindruck mit dem thermischen Effekt verknüpft sein. Aber für mich war der thermische Effekt nicht so aufregend, es war sehr, sehr leicht. Ich versuchte daher, einen anderen Mechanismus zu finden. Ich untersuchte die Laserstrahlbestrahlung oder die Mikrowellenbestrahlung, alle andere Arten der Bestrahlung. Aber all die Mühen waren vergebens. Im Jahr 1991, 2 Jahre später, fand eine dieser Gruppen der japanischen Firma, Professor Nakamuras Gruppe, heraus, dass Konvergenz im p-ten Mittel nur durch thermisches Glühen realisiert werden kann. In diesem Fall studierte ich auch viel Physik. Dann war das nächste Ziel die wahre blaue Lumineszenz, Indiumgalliumnitrid. Im Jahr 1986 standen wir natürlich ganz am Anfang. Aber in unserem Fall konnten wir nur einen Indiumgehalt von 6 % realisieren, der für die blaue Lumineszenz unzureichend war. Für die blaue Lumineszenz benötigen wir mindestens 15 %. Der Grund ist ganz einfach: Wir benutzten Wasserstoff als Trägergas. Aber im Jahr 1989 gelang es der NTT-Gruppe, Professor Matsuoka, Indiumgalliumnitrid mit hohem Indiumgehalt zu züchten. Der Grund ihres Erfolgs war, dass sie Stickstoff als Trägergas benutzten – der einzige Unterschied ist Wasserstoff oder Stickstoff. Im Jahr 1993 wurde die erste Kommerzialisierung der blauen LEDs auf Indium-Gallium-Nitridbasis durch Professor Nakamuras Team bei Nichia Corporation erzielt. Ich möchte daher betonen, wie blaue LEDs unser Leben verändert haben - oder Ihre Leben. Der Grund, warum Sie sich an Game-Boys, Smartphones, mobile Telefone mit voller Farbdarstellung erfreuen können, ist die Entwicklung der blauen LEDs. Aber einige Menschen beschweren sich über die Zunahme der Abhängigkeit von den Smartphones. Als ich Student war, überlegte ich mir die Anwendung, nur stellte ich mir die Bildschirme vor. Aber einer der Ingenieure bei Nichia Corporation, Dr. Bandoh, fand heraus, dass dieser Mechanismus – dies ist die blaue LED, und wenn man diesen gelben Film dazunimmt, kann man einfach eine weiße LED realisieren. Die Anwendungen der blauen LEDs waren dann erweitert – nicht nur für Bildschirme, sondern auch für Beleuchtungssysteme im Allgemeinen. Ich kann daher sagen, dass dies ein gutes Beispiel für die Tatsache ist, dass neue Technologie zu neuen Anwendungen führt. Heute ist die Effizienz der LED-Beleuchtung achtmal höher als die der Glühlampe und doppelt so hoch wie die der Leuchtstoffröhre. Dann können wir eine Reduzierung des Stromverbrauchs durch die Nutzung oder den Ersatz der konventionellen Beleuchtungssysteme durch LED-Beleuchtungssysteme erwarten. Dieses Diagramm zeigt die Stromerzeugung und die CO2-Emissionen in Japan. Vor 2011 wurden circa 30 % unseres Stroms durch Atomkraftwerke erzeugt. Aber in Japan müssen wir aufhören, Atomkraftwerke zu nutzen. Daher steigt der Anteil der Wärmekraftwerke drastisch, fast 90 %. Und daher steigen die CO2-Emissionen drastisch. Das Regierungsziel bis zum Jahr 2030 ist dieses Niveau. Vielleicht führt die schrumpfende Wirtschaftsaktivität viel schneller dazu, aber trotzdem. In Japan können wir den gesamten Stromverbrauch bis zum Jahr 2020 um ungefähr 7 % reduzieren, wenn wir unsere Beleuchtungssysteme durch LED-Lampen ersetzen - das entspricht 1 Billion Japanischer Yen. Noch wichtiger, dieses LED-Beleuchtungssystem ändert nicht nur unser Leben, sondern hält auch unser traditionelles Leben aufrecht, beispielsweise in der Mongolei. Für Mongolen ist das nomadische Leben Tradition. Aber durch die unzureichende Beleuchtung bei Nacht wollen die jungen Menschen in die Stadtgebiete ziehen, und sie wollen permanente Wohnungen haben. Jedoch zieht es mit dem Aufkommen der LEDs die jungen Leute zurück zum nomadischen Leben. Ich besuchte diesen Mann in seiner Jurte und fand, dass die LED-Lampe tatsächlich in der Jurte benutzt wird. Ich war daher sehr glücklich, das zu sehen. Das Nächste sind die LEDs im tiefen UV für die Wasseraufbereitung. UNICEF hat berichtet, dass immer noch mehr als 600 Millionen Menschen keinen Zugang zu verbessertem Trinkwasser haben. Und 2,4 Millionen Menschen nutzen keine verbesserten sanitären Anlagen. Die globale Erwärmung verursacht zusätzlich einen Anstieg der Bakterien im Trinkwasser, sogar in den nördlichen Regionen. Wasseraufbereitung ist daher sehr wichtig. Daher entwickelten wir unser neues, ursprüngliches Kristallzuchtsystem. Und mit der Unterstützung der Regierung waren wir bei der Herstellung von LEDs im tiefen UV erfolgreich. Das ist ein Beispiel - es ist nicht so hell, aber es kann den blauen Phosphor anregen. Dies ist ein Beispiel einer Abtötung der Bakterien. Das Wasseraufbereitungssystem wurde bereits kommerzialisiert. Und es wird auch benutzt für die Sterilisierung, Härtung von Harzen, das Drucken, Unterscheidung von Geldscheinen, Fotolithografie, und auch in der Medizin, in der Dermatologie. Unser nächstes Ziel ist daher ein Hochleistungsgerät. Die Solarzelle basiert beispielsweise auf Gleichstrom, aber wir benutzen in unseren Häusern Wechselstrom. Das elektrische Auto, die Batterie ist Gleichstrom, aber der Motor ist Wechselstrom. Also müssen wir von Gleich- zu Wechselstrom wechseln; dazu wird ein Wechselrichter verwendet. In einem normalen Wechselrichtersystem ist die Effizienz im Mittel 95 %. Aber wenn wir ihn mit neuen Materialien ersetzen, können wir die Effizienz noch weiter auf über 99 % steigern. Und indem wir dieses System benutzen, können wir eine kohlenstoffneutrale Gesellschaft in der nahen Zukunft realisieren, wie etwa COP21. Schließlich möchte ich noch einmal für die junge Generation betonen: Ich glaube, dass Ingenieure die globalen Probleme lösen können. Beispielsweise gibt es eine Beziehung zwischen Terrorismus und dem Gini-Koeffizienten, dem Unterschied zwischen Reich und Arm. Es ist im Jahr 1980 ein wichtiger kritischer Punkt. Und es gibt auch die Beziehung zwischen der Hungerkarte und der Bevölkerungswachstumsrate. Das ist das Beispiel der globalen Probleme, und ich glaube, Sie werden diese Probleme in der Zukunft lösen. Schlussendlich möchte ich etwas erwähnen: Sie jungen Wissenschafter, Sie haben Glück, weil wir so vielen zu lösenden globalen Probleme gegenüberstehen. (Gelächter) Und ich hoffe inständig, dass Sie alle erfolgreich sein werden. Vielen Dank für Ihre geschätzte Aufmerksamkeit.

Amano tells how he initially thought blue LEDs would only be useful for electronics displays
(00:20:49 - 00:22:44)

 

Previous to their work, only red and green diodes existed — and without the addition of blue diodes, white light could not be created. In 1907, the first report of light being emitted from a semiconductor came a publication by Henry J. Round, an assistant of Nobel Laureate Guglielmo Marconi [4]. The significance of this finding wasn't realized until decades later, and in 1962, the first red LED was developed by Nick Holonyak, Jr. while working at General Electric. The first green LED followed several years later in 1974.

Naturally, several groups in the 1970s embarked on a quest to create a blue LED next. All their efforts failed, and the projects were subsequently abandoned. But Akasaki, Amano, and Nakamura kept working on the problem, and after many years of research, they created a high-quality gallium nitride crystal that finally enabled the invention of the coveted blue LED [5]. Akasaki and Amano showed off their bright blue diode in 1992, while Nakamura found success a year later in 1993.

Blue LEDs represent the long-missing puzzle piece that today allows for generation of white light in combination with red and green LEDs. The invention made a large number of new applications possible, with the most important being the efficient production of white light. A modern white LED lightbulb converts more than 50 percent of the electricity it uses into light, compared to only 4 percent for incandescent bulbs. LEDs can last up to 100,000 hours – ten times longer than fluorescent lights and 100 times longer than incandescent lights. Power-efficient lighting goes a long way in terms of economic and environmental impact, and the same benefits extend to any electronic device with a LED display such as smartphones, TVs, and computers.

Applications of light: Invention of the laser

The first laser was built in 1960 by Theodore Maiman at Hughes Research Laboratories based on theoretical work by Nobel Laureates Charles H. Townes and Arthur Leonard Schawlow [6]. Less than a decade earlier, Townes suggested that stimulated emission at microwave frequencies could oscillate in a resonant cavity and produce coherent output. In 1954, his laboratory demonstrated the first maser, an acronym that stands for "microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.” Serge Haroche described this accomplishment in more detail during his Lindau lecture in 2015.

 

Serge Haroche (2015) - The International Year of Light: Celebrating Fifty Years of Laser Revolution in Physics

It is a great pleasure to be here. As we have already heard about, we are celebrating in 2015 the International Year of Light. I thought it was a good opportunity to reflect on the revolutions that lasers have brought about in physics and in chemistry over the last 50 years. In fact, I have been very lucky to start my research career in the sixties, at the time the laser was invented. I was also lucky to be accepted in the laboratory of Kastler and Brossel at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. Kastler had invented the method of optical pumping. How you can use polarized light to interact with atoms to bring these atoms into very special states to manipulate their quantum state, and to achieve states out of equilibrium. In fact, at that time optical pumping was achieved with classical lamps. But when the laser came on the stage the optical pumping was refined using lasers. In fact, the method of optical pumping is still used in cold atom physics, in iron trap physics, in atomic clocks, and so it's a very, very general method. I was just a graduate student at that time and this picture was taken in the lab on the day Kastler got his Nobel Prize for the method of optical pumping. So, you see, I am sitting between Kastler and Brossel. I am very happy, and more than happy, very proud to be part of a lab that got such world-wide attention. You see on the left, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, who was my thesis advisor. He was a former student of Kastler and Brossel. He is here at this meeting, unfortunately in a parallel session. It's very nice to remind us of these memories. At that time, we were all aware that the laser was announcing exciting times for atomic physics. We knew that the laser would be very useful, but we could not imagine the magnitude of the progresses that the lasers would bring. In fact, I would like to show you today that ten orders of magnitude have been gained in many domains, leading not only to this kind of quantitative change - it leads to qualitative changes too, and leading to very unexpected physics. The story started, of course, a few years earlier when, in 1954, Townes and his student, Gordon, developed the first coherent emitter of radiation based on atomic physics. It was the ammonia beam maser. Maser, of course, stands as an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. It was an atomic beam machine. I think it's also interesting to remind ourselves that it's not just by chance that this happened at Columbia. In fact, Rabi developed a school at Columbia University before the war. He developed the method of molecular beams. These molecular beams have announced not only the maser and the laser, but also atomic clocks, nuclear magnetic resonance, MRI, and so on. All this physics originated from Rabi's molecular beam method. This is a good example of the fact that blue sky research leads to application in unexpected ways. Of course, when the maser was developed the question which arose immediately was to extend it into the optical domain, what was then called the optical maser. Charles Townes and his brother-in-law, Art Schawlow, wrote the first theoretical paper explaining how an optical laser would work. In fact, Townes thought that maybe the optical pumping technique would be useful to invert the populations in an atomic medium. I was told that he came to Paris in 1958 to discuss these ideas with Kastler. But in fact, the first lasers were according to other processes. The first laser was the solid state laser, the Ruby laser, which operated in pulses. It was invented by Theodor Maiman in 1960. A few months later, the first gas laser operating with a mixture of helium and neon operated continuously and it was discovered by Ali Javan and Bennett. So starting from this time, this laser source has been developed into new kinds of lasers with very interesting and fascinating properties. I just want to summarize on this slide some of the properties of the laser. In fact, these properties are somewhat contradictory. The laser can do one thing, and the opposite. I think this is an example of Bohr‘s complementarity idea. Depending upon the way you use it, the development can do one thing or its contrary. For instance, lasers can bring matter to the highest possible temperature. They can lead to the fusion of matter, to the evaporation of matter, and they can also lead to such high temperature, millions, billions of degrees - temperatures at which nuclear effects could happen. For example, a nuclear fusion can be triggered by exceedingly high intensities. At the same time, under other conditions, lasers can achieve the lowest possible temperatures. They can be used by exchange of momentum with matter to bring atoms almost to become motionless. And to produce the coldest objects in the universe, leading to new phases of quantum matter called Bose–Einstein condensates or degenerate quantum gasses. In another direction, you can think of lasers as being ultra-stable light beams. You can build lasers who correspond to light waves extending over millions of kilometres without skipping a beat. These extra stable lasers can be used to build atomic clocks which have an extremely high precision. At the same time, you can pack the energy of light beams into very, very short pulses, which extend over a few nanometres, which have only a few cycle of oscillation, and which last a few attoseconds, billionths of a billionth of a second. These very short pulses can be used to probe, to perform spectroscopic holography of matter at the extreme limit. So, it's a very flexible tool for fundamental research in physics, in chemistry, in biology of course, and, as we all know, for applications to metrology, to medicine, to communication and so on. To come back to history, I think you can more or less arbitrarily divide this half-century in decades. The first decade, the1960s, was the birth of the laser, the mature years of optical pumping starting to use lasers to perform more and more refined optical pumping experiments and getting the first non-linear optics experiments with lasers. The 1970s saw the burst of tuneable lasers, lasers which can be adjusted to excite specific energy levels in atoms, and achieve ultra-high resolution spectroscopy. The 1980s was the decade of laser cooling. How to use laser light to bring atoms to rest. It was also the time where atom-photon interaction was studied in details in Cavity QED and the beginning of ion trap physics. The 1990s was the decade where quantum information came into play, where people understood that one can use the manipulations of atoms to perform logic operations in which quantum effects were important. And this was the beginning of quantum information. It was also the decade where Bose Einstein Condensation was achieved and where processes to get ultra-fast laser pulses were developed. In the year 2000 up to now, it has developed into a very broad field of manipulation of real or artificial atoms. Real atoms have been replaced by artificial circuits, for example Josephson Junctions and Circuits which imitate atoms, and which are much more practical for quantum information, for example. It's also the decade where AMO physics meets condensed matter physics because we can simulate with cold matter phenomena which occur in real material at higher temperature with different orders of magnitude. And this is very useful to understand the properties of some condensed matter systems. In term of orders of magnitude, I want to just to show you on this slide what we have gained since then in different directions. As I said a ten order of magnitude improvement has been achieved in many fields and a ten order of magnitude improvement means a factor of ten every five years on average. For instance, in 1960 the precision of clocks, before the atomic clocks, was 10^-8. That is about one second per year. And in quartz clocks operating like that were considered as being very, very good. Now, we can achieve 10^-18, which is one second over the age of the universe, so it's a ten order magnitude of improvement. If you look at the sensitivity of measurements, when I did my Ph.D., we had cells which contain ten hundred billions of atoms and we got signals from this macroscopic sample. It was considered to be very dilute because 10^10 atoms is nothing, is a very small speck of matter of solid media, but it was huge number of atoms. Now we can work with one atom or one photon, and operate on them. Temperatures, I already alluded to that. In 1960, at spectroscopy we were working at room temperature, or liquid nitrogen temperature when we wanted to narrow Doppler lines. And if you're very sophisticated, you were working at helium temperature. But the range was between 100 and 300 K. With cold atom physics we're getting in the range of ten minus ten Kelvin, so it's a huge step. In speed and time resolution in the 1960s, a nanosecond was considered to be very short. Now we're talking about attoseconds. Let's look at this in more detail. This is a log scale of temperatures which shows the difference in the order of magnitude of temperature of physical phenomena. Inside the stars, you have temperatures of millions of degrees. At the sun's surface, 6000 degrees. Room temperature is about 300K, for which the atomic velocities are in the range of 500 meter per second. You have colder systems in nature, for instance, the cosmologic background, which is bathing all the universe, corresponds to a temperature of 2.7 Kelvin. In the lab, it is possible to achieve cryogenic temperature in the range 1 to 10 Millikelvin using liquid helium. When the lasers have come into play, by laser cooling, immediately the temperature has been brought down to a few hundred microkelvin by using the technique of Doppler cooling. I am a little bit embarrassed to talk about that in front of Steve Chu who developed this method in the 1980s. But the temperature achieved then was in the hundred microkelvin, corresponding to velocities in the order of one meter per second. Then a more refined technique, sub-Doppler cooling, in which you play at the same time with the Doppler Effect and with optical pumping, allowed to bring this temperature even down to the microkelvin range, with velocities in the range of ten centimetres per second. Then, by adding to that evaporative cooling, the temperature could be brought down to the nanokelvin range in which Bose-Einstein Condensates appear. You see that 11 orders of magnitude have been gained towards low temperature. Of course, five to six orders of magnitude towards low atomic velocities since the 1960s. Steve Chu, Bill Phillips, and Claude Cohen-Tannoudji who are here at this Lindau meeting. A few words about this cooling. If you put atoms in a structure of counter-propagating light beams, you can arrange a situation where the atoms moving against the light beam are interacting more than if they move in the same direction. This provides an imbalance which, by exchange of momentum, tends to cool the atoms as if they were bathing in a viscous medium. This brings the temperature down to the ranges I was indicating. Once you have these cold atoms, you can switch off these atomic beams, and switch on a magnetic trap. These atoms have small magnetic moment attached to the electron or to the nuclei. By performing gradients of magnetic field you can build the bottle which keeps the atom at a well-defined position within space. These atoms are moving within the potential well, which you can simplify as a parabolic well. You can manage, so that the atoms which have the highest energy, which go at the boundary of this well, are expelled by being put in another magnetic moment, a magnetic moment which is not trapped. It is a radiofrequency method, which consists of applying an RF field which will make the fastest atoms escape from the trap. This is called evaporative cooling. Once the fastest atoms have escaped by collisions, the rest of the atoms renormalize at the lower temperature. This is exactly what happens when you blow on a cup of coffee, expelling the fastest molecules, and bringing the temperature down. If you lower the temperature, it means that the wavelength of the matter, the DeBroglie wavelength, increases. At the point where the DeBroglie wavelengths become of the order of the distance between the particles, if these particles are bosons, if they lie together in the same quantum state, they should condensate. Bose and Einstein had predicted this effect in the 1920s. This kind of experiment has enabled us to observe it. I show you here a movie which comes from the group of Cornel and Weiman, realised the first BEC in 1995 and got the Nobel Prize in 2001 for that. Once these cold atoms are at the bottom of this magnetic trap, the trick is to switch off the trap, so the atoms fall in the gravitational field of the Earth. They escape with the velocity which is the velocity they had in the trap just before the trap was switched off. So if you do that for lower and lower temperature, you see this kind of movie. As the temperature goes down, you see that the distribution of velocity becomes narrower and narrower, and at some point, a very narrow peak emerges. There is a phase transition which brings all the atoms into the ground state of the potential which was applied to the atoms. You see this here also, in a picture which has been the cover of Science 1995. A broad distribution above this special temperature which narrows suddenly and leads to this new quantum phase of matter, which has been studied by hundreds of thousands of groups in the world since then. If you release the atoms from the trap by, in one way or another, making a hole in the trap, you get a coherent beam of matter. The equivalent of a laser in which the photons are replaced by atoms. You have several kinds of this atomic lasers, so to speak, which are very coherent, and with which you can do interferometry. These are systems which have been used to build interferometer measuring the gravitational field, gravitometer measuring rotations, gyrometers, and so on. So there is a whole range of metrology which has been developed with this system. What I have been talking about are Bose gases, gases which like to go in the same quantum state. But you have also atoms which belong to Fermi statistics. If they have an odd number of elementary particles in them, then they cannot go in the same state. So if you have a parabolic well, you must have one atom per quantum state, which means that the size of this degenerate quantum gas expands if you get more and more atoms into it. This can be seen in a very dramatic way when you perform an experiment. You see lithium has two isotopes, a boson and a fermium isotope. And if you cool the bosonic isotope, as you can see on the left part, you see that the gas shrinks and shrinks more and more as you get more and more atoms the ground state of the potential well. If you try to do that with fermiums, you see there is a limit to the shrinking. It is the Fermi or the Pauli pressure that is due to the Pauli Exclusion Principle which forces these atoms to stay in larger systems. Of course, this was known, and had been indirectly deduced from condensed matter experiments. But here, with atoms, you can display this effect in a textbook manner. Another kind of experiment which has been developed in many labs is to study the superfluidity of these quantum gases. As liquid helium, but in a much cleaner way, these gases exhibit superfluidity, which means if you send a particle or a small piece of matter in it, it will move without any friction, without viscosity in it. It means also that if you start to rotate it back at a field with this superfluid material, it will not rotate as classically with the external part of the system moving faster. The angular momentums that you try to fit into the system will break up in vortices in which the velocity will be highest the closest you are to the centre of the vortex. This has been observed with bosons. You see here experiments which have been performed by Jean Dalibard in Paris. It has also been observed with degenerate Fermi gases. In this case, you have a couple of fermions which associate to make composite bosons, like what happens in superconductivity in solids, where electrons pair into Cooper pairs. These pairs behave as bosons, and they give rise to superfluidity and to this kind of situation. But in condensed matter physics, what you observe, these vortices are not due to rotation. They are due to the attempt to put a magnetic field into the system. The magnetic field enters into these materials according to these lines, these vortices of superconducting currents. So cold atom physicists simulate condensed matter situations. Rotating a neutral atom condensate is equivalent to applying a magnetic field to an electron gas. This is a very interesting domain where you can use these kinds of systems that you can manipulate in the lab using laser beams, to simulate situations which occur with different orders of magnitude in solids. So, different than in solids, the system is as it is: you cannot change the conductivity, you cannot change the distance between particles. Here you manipulate all these parameters. This has developed into a very important field of AMO physics which is a simulation of many-body problems. For instance, you can use an array of laser beams to realize periodic structures in which atoms are confined as eggs in an egg box. The size of this structure is microns, as compared to the angstrom size in condensed matter physics. You can also tune the interaction between the particles, tune the distance of the particles. And you can try to study what happens in real materials by simulating it with this system. This simulation is very important because as soon as you have more than a few tens of particles, you cannot simulate it on a classical computer. The Schrödinger equation explodes, and the only way to do it is to try to realize a system and to look at what happens. The hope is that by doing these kinds of experiments, we will learn more about phenomena occurring in real materials. This might help to build artificial materials which would have interesting properties like superconductivity at high temperatures, and things like that. Now, I have a few minutes to talk about another domain, which is the precision of measurements. For that I just record briefly the history of the measurement of time, just to make you feel the huge progresses which have been made during the last 50 years. The real measurement of time with man-made machines has started in the 14th century with tower clocks. You have a thread and you have a kind of lever which oscillates due to the torsion of the thread, and you count the oscillation with a wheel which has teeth like that. This system has been greatly improved by the pendulum when you replace this torsion motion by the oscillation of a pendulum. You have an escape mechanism which counts the periods and transfers it into the motion of a hand. Then in the 18th century, the pendulum oscillation has been replaced by the oscillation of a spring in the watch. This watch has been developed in particular by Harrisson to gain a precision such that you can carry the watch from one part of the world to another one and keep the time, which is essential for measuring the longitudes. Then in the 20th century, the oscillations of a quartz rod have been used. Because due to the piezoelectric effect the oscillation can be transferred to an electric current oscillation, and the method of electronics can be used to count the number of oscillation. You see that the principle is always the same. You need an oscillator, and you need to couple it to an escape device which counts the periods and also restores the energy into the system. What is the uncertainty? The tower clock has an uncertainty of one part in a hundred. If you could keep the time within a quarter of an hour per day, that was good. The pendulum was about a few seconds per day. The Harrisson chronometer was about a few seconds per month, which was required for navigation. And, the quartz was about one second per year. You see that this improvement comes from the fact that we go to higher and higher frequencies. Because if you can pack more and more periods during a second, of course, you increase the precision. But on a log scale, you see that you have had a 10^6 improvement in six centuries. During the last 50 years, the improvement has been 10 orders of magnitude more. I don't have time to retell the story, but I'll just give you the latest developments. Now the clocks are based on the oscillation of an optical transitions in atoms. These atoms can be either single ions in an ion trap, or an array of cold atoms into a cold atom lattice. What is the escape mechanism? What you do is that you send a very, very stable laser which is blocked to the top of this very, very narrow transition. But then you have to count the period. And the way to count the period is to compare this laser to what is known as a frequency comb, which is a laser system which emits a spectrum of light which is made of equally spaced frequencies. The frequency comb technique has been developed by Haensch and Hall, who are here too. This is really the escape mechanism which has opened to optical clocks, the atomic clock technology. The uncertainty now is between one part in 10^17 and one part in 10^18. This means that the time can be kept within one second in the age of the universe. What it means is not very clear. It means if you want to compare two clocks, you have to give the altitude within a few centimetre. This has been checked experimentally in the group of Dave Wineland. You see here two clocks which are on two tables and you move one with respect to the other, and you see that you are able to see the difference in the time given by the clock when they are moved by 33 centimetres. This was a few years ago. Now it can be reduced to about one centimetre. There are many things you can do with that. I will say a few words about detection sensitivity. As I said, at the time of optical pumping, you needed about 10^10 atoms interacting, of course, with zillions of photons, radio-frequency photons or optical photons. In 1978, when ion traps had been developed and the lasers exciting the trap, it has become possible to see a single ion, just by the fluorescence of this ion in the centre of the trap. This is a historical picture which was made in Peter Toschek's group in 1978. Again, we have ten orders of magnitude in sensitivity. So what can you do with that? Of course, you can do single atom physics and quantum information. A single atom emits non-classical light, for a simple reason. If you have just one atom, you need to re-excite it before it emits a new photon, so there is a time window during which a second photon cannot be emitted. It is called antibunching and it was observed for the first time in 1978, and then in 1985 with a single ion. You can observe single quantum jumps of a single trapped ion. If you look at a single ion, and if it leaves a level which is sensitive to light, you see a sudden drop of the light occurring at a random time. These quantum jumps were, in fact, very controversial in the 1980s. Some people decided that quantum jumps would never occur. They think Schrödinger wrote about this kind of story, and now they are observed. Not only are they observed, but they are tools which are used in all experiments in quantum information. If you have many ions, you can entangle them through the common motion in the trap, and you can play a lot of quantum information games, process ion strings and use these ion strings as kind of abacus for quantum logic operation. In our lab, we did the opposite. In this slide I am trying to compare what ion trappers are doing, for example, in Dave Wineland's group and what we are doing in Paris. In the ion group in Boulder you trap ions with the configuration of electrodes, and you use laser beams to cool them down and to interrogate the ion. In Paris, we do the opposite. We trap the photons, and we keep them for a long time. We use a beam of atoms which are excited by lasers, special atoms, Rydberg atoms, to interrogate the photon field inside the cavity. So these experiments are two sides of the same coin. We manipulate non-destructively single atoms with photons or single photons with atoms. It requires an adjustment of light-matter interaction at the most fundamental level where a single atom interacts with a single photon. I just retell on this slide what we have been doing in Paris. With this technique we have been able to observe not the quantum jumps of matter, but the quantum jumps of light. How light escapes photon by photon from a cavity. We have been able to prepare quantum states of light which are superposition states of fields having different phases or amplitudes. This is a representation of these fields, what is known as a Wigner function. It's a kind of radiography of the field in the phase space. And you see you have two peaks, which correspond to the two states: dead and alive cat. In between you have fringes, which give the proof that this superposition is quantum coherent. You see as time goes on, how the quantum coherence vanishes. I want just to stress, since Roy Glauber talked about the gedankenexperiment of Bohr and Einstein discussion, that there was a discussion of Bohr and Einstein about this problem. They imagined a photon box which was able to keep photons for a long time. To count the photons without destroying them by just weighing the box in the gravitational field of the Earth. In our case, we don't weigh the box in the field of the Earth. We weigh it by having it interacting with atoms which do not absorb radiation. So we can see the quantum jumps which in the photon box experiment would be sudden jumps of the box in the gravitational field of the Earth. These experiments were supposed to be "impossible forever", as Schrödinger said. In fact, the main reason why we did that was to challenge this kind of statement, that these experiments are ridiculous, have ridiculous consequences, and will never be made. In fact, they have become possible because of the development of technology. The last example I want to show is the improvement in the study of ultrafast phenomena. You see here how the duration of light pulses have evolved. From about 10 picoseconds in the 1960s, it has gone down to a few femtoseconds in the 1990s. Then there was a plateau. Then again an improvement starting in the year 2000 because of the development of a new method called Chirped Pulse Amplification. Basically what is done is to excite, with a very intense burst of light, a beam of rare gas atoms. You see here, you have a gas jet crossed by the laser beam. And by a highly nonlinear process an x-ray beam of XUV radiation is emitted. What happens is that during the pulse, during the light pulse, there is a time at the crest of the electric field where the electrons from the atom are ejected. They are accelerated in the laser beam. And when the laser beam reverses, they come back at the atom. There is a re-collision, which is highly nonlinear process akin to a Bremsstrahlung effect, which emits a very, very intense and very short pulse. You see the pulse which is emitted then is a few nano-meters long and a few attoseconds long pulse. In fact, these two pulses, the original pulse and the attosecond pulse, propagate together. You can scan the time of one with respect to the other and do a kind of stroboscopy. For instance, here you see how the stroboscopy allows us to reconstruct the optical lightwaves itself and to get a resolution in the sub-femtosecond range. I don’t' have time to discuss that. But attosecond pulses are powerful probes to study ultrafast electronic processes in atoms and molecules. So, I would like to conclude that just to say that AMO physics has really exploded and made connections with a lot of fields. With condensed matter physics, with astrophysics because, for instance, cold Fermi gases simulate situations of nuclei in neutron stars. Also connections with particle physics. You can study symmetry variation, you can also see with very precise clocks whether fundamental constants are evolving in time or not. Of course with chemistry and biology, with attosecond physics, and of course, with information science. It's always the same thing. The permanent dialogue between blue sky research and innovation. The observation of nature showed that at the turn of the 19th and 20th century, as Roy Glauber showed in his talk, that light has strange properties which could not be explained, and needed new theoretical models, which was quantum theory. Quantum theory in turn has predicted new effects related to the atom-photon interactions and the laser. The laser has led to new technology, laser interferometer very precise clocks. Which allows us now to probe again nature and to see whether nature obeys or not to these rules. For example, if we find that fundamental constants are changing, it will tell us a lot of things about the interplay of quantum physics with cosmology. Just to conclude, because we are here in Lindau Meeting, I want just to say that a lot of Nobel Prizes have been given in physics and chemistry for works using lasers in AMO science. I think this is not complete. I apologize, I forgot some people. But I think there will be other prizes in this field in the future. And for the young audience here, I'm sure you have plenty of areas in which you can work using lasers - not with the hope to get a Nobel Prize, because this is the kind of hope which is not very constructive in a scientific area, but to do very exciting physics in the future. I apologize for having been too long. Thank you.

Es ist mir eine große Freude heute hier sein zu dürfen. Wie den meisten von Ihnen bereits bekannt ist, feiern wir in diesem Jahr das Internationale Jahr des Lichts. Aus gegebenen Anlass dachte ich mir, es wäre eine gute Gelegenheit, über die Revolutionen zu sprechen, die Laser in der Physik und in der Chemie in den letzten 50 Jahre mit sich gebracht hat. Ich hatte das Glück, meine wissenschaftliche Laufbahn in den 60er Jahren zu beginnen, zur gleichen Zeit, als der Laser erfunden wurde. Ich hatte auch das Glück, im Labor von Kastler und Brossel an der École Normale Supérieure in Paris angenommen zu werden. Kastler hatte die Methode des optischen Pumpens erfunden. Wie man mittels polarisiertem Licht Atome so anregen kann, dass diese in einen ganz besonderen Zustand gebracht werden können, um ihren Quantenzustand zu manipulieren und ein Gleichgewicht zu erreichen. Zu jener Zeit wurde das optische Pumpen mit klassischen Lampen erzielt. Als aber der Laser seinen Auftritt hatte, wurde das optische Pumpen mit Hilfe von Lasern verfeinert. Das Verfahren des optischen Pumpens wird immer noch in der kalten Atomphysik verwendet, in der Physik zum Auffangen von Ionen, in Atomuhren; es handelt sich hier also um eine sehr, sehr allgemeine Methode. Ich war ein Student zu dieser Zeit und dieses Bild wurde im Labor am Tag gemacht, an dem Kastler seinen Nobelpreis für die Methode des optischen Pumpen erhielt. Ich sitze hier zwischen Kastler und Brossel. Ich bin sehr froh, und sehr stolz darauf, Teil eines Labors zu sein, das solche weltweite Aufmerksamkeit auf sich gezogen hat. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, meinen Doktorvater. Er war ein ehemaliger Student von Kastler und Brossel. Er ist ebenfalls hier bei dieser Tagung, leider in einem Vortrag, der zum selben Zeitpunkt stattfindet. Es ist schön, sich diese Erinnerungen ins Gedächtnis zu rufen. Zu jener Zeit war es uns allen bewusst, dass der Laser aufregende Zeiten für die Atomphysik mit sich bringen würde. Wir wussten, dass der Laser sehr nützlich wäre, aber wir konnten uns das Ausmaß dieser Fortschritte, die der Laser mit sich bringen würde, nicht vorstellen. Ich möchte Ihnen heute zeigen, dass zehn Größenordnungen in vielen Bereichen gewonnen werden konnten, was nicht nur zu dieser Art der quantitativen Veränderung, sondern auch zu qualitativen Veränderungen und sehr unerwarteter Physik führte. Das Ganze begann natürlich ein paar Jahre früher, als 1954 Townes und sein Student Gordon, den ersten kohärenten Strahlungsemitter auf der Basis der Atomphysik entwickelten. Es war der Ammoniakstrahlmaser. Maser steht natürlich als Akronym für Also eine Atomstrahlmaschine. Es ist sicher interessant daran zu erinnern, dass dies an der Columbia University entwickelt wurde. Rabi gründete einen Forschungsbereich an der Columbia University vor dem Krieg. Er entwickelte die Methode der Molekularstrahlen. Diese Molekularstrahlen führten nicht nur zum Maser und Laser, sondern auch zu Atomuhren, magnetische Kernresonanz, MRI, und so weiter. All diese Bereiche in der Physik stammten aus Rabis Molekularstrahlmethode. Dies ist ein gutes Beispiel für die Tatsache, dass Grundlagenforschung zu unerwarteten Anwendungen führen kann. Natürlich, als der Maser entwickelt wurde, führte dies unmittelbar zum nächsten Schritt, es in den optischen Bereich zu erweitern, was damals dann der optische Maser genannt wurde. Charles Townes und sein Schwager, Art Schawlow, schrieben die erste theoretische Arbeit zur Funktion eines optischen Lasers. Townes dachte, dass vielleicht die optische Pumpen-Technik sinnvoll wäre um die Zustände in einem atomaren Medium umzukehren. Mir wurde gesagt, dass er 1958 nach Paris kam, um diese Ideen mit Kastler zu besprechen. Tatsächlich aber wurden die ersten Laser aus anderen Verfahren generiert. Beim ersten Laser handelte es sich um einen Festkörperlaser, dem Rubinlaser, der mit Pulsen betrieben wurde. Es wurde von Theodor Maiman 1960 erfunden. Einige Monate später wurde der erste Gaslaser, der mit einer Mischung aus Helium und Neon betrieben wurde, eingesetzt und er wurde von Ali Javan und Bennett entdeckt. Ab diesem Zeitpunkt wurden aus dieser Laserquelle neue Arten von Lasern entwickelt, die sehr interessante und faszinierende Eigenschaften hatten. Ich möchte auf dieser Folie nur einige der Eigenschaften des Lasers zusammenfassen. Diese Eigenschaften sind etwas widersprüchlich. Der Laser kann eine Sache, und das Gegenteil davon, tun. Ich glaube dies ist ein Beispiel für Bohrs Komplementaritätsidee. Abhängig davon, wie man es verwendet, kann sein Einsatz eine Sache oder genau das Gegenteil davon bewirken. Beispielsweise können Laser Materie auf die höchstmögliche Temperatur bringen. Sie können zur Fusion von Materie, zur Verdampfung von Materie, und auch zu sehr hohen Temperaturen, Millionen, Milliarden von Graden, führen - Temperaturen, bei denen Kerneffekte auftreten können. Zum Beispiel kann eine Kernfusion durch außerordentlich hohe Intensitäten ausgelöst werden. Zur gleichen Zeit, unter anderen Bedingungen, können Laser die geringstmöglichen Temperaturen erreichen. Sie können durch Impulsaustausch mit Materie verwendet werden, um Atome dazu zu bringen, fast bewegungslos zu werden. Und um die kältesten Objekte im Universum zu produzieren, was zu neuen Phasen der Quantenmaterie, siehe Bose-Einstein-Kondensate oder degenerierte Quantengase. Andererseits kann man sich Laser als ultrastabile Lichtstrahlen vorstellen. Man kann Laser entwickeln, die Lichtwellen entsprechen, die sich über Millionen von Kilometern ohne Leistungsverlust bewegen. Diese extra stabilen Laser können verwendet werden, um Atomuhren, die eine extrem hohe Genauigkeit brauchen, zu entwickeln. Gleichzeitig können Sie die Energie der Lichtstrahlen in sehr, sehr kurze Impulse packen, die sich über einige wenige Nanometer erstrecken, die nur aus wenigen Schwingungszyklen bestehen und die nur einige Attosekunden, Milliardstel eines Milliardstel einer Sekunde, andauern. Diese sehr kurzen Impulse können verwendet werden, um spektroskopische Holographie der Materie im Grenzbereich durchzuführen. Es ist also ein sehr flexibles Werkzeug für die Grundlagenforschung in der Physik, der Chemie, der Biologie natürlich, und soweit wir wissen, auch für Anwendungen in der Metrologie, in der Medizin, um zu kommunizieren, usw. Kehren wir zurück zur Geschichte; ich denke man kann dieses halbe Jahrhundert mehr oder weniger willkürlich in Jahrzehnte aufteilen. Das erste Jahrzehnt, die 1960er Jahre, war die Geburtsstunde des Lasers, die reifen Jahre des optischen Pumpens, während denen man begann, Laser zu verwenden, um mehr und mehr die Experimente mit dem optischen Pumpen zu verfeinern, und während denen man die ersten nicht-linearen Optik- Experimente mit Lasern machte. In den 1970er Jahren sah man eine Häufung von einstellbaren Lasern. Laser, die eingestellt werden konnten, um spezifische Energieniveaus in Atomen zu erregen und um ultra-hochauflösende Spektroskopie zu erreichen. Die 1980er Jahre waren das Jahrzehnt der Laserkühlung. Wie man Laserlicht verwenden kann, um Atome dazu zu bringen, zu ruhen. Es war auch die Zeit, während der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkungen mithilfe der Resonator-QED detailliert studiert wurden und dem Beginn der Physik der Ionenfalle. Die 1990er Jahre waren das Jahrzehnt, in dem Quanteninformation zur Geltung kamen, in dem man begann zu verstehen, dass man die Manipulationen von Atomen nutzen kann, um logische Operationen, bei denen Quanteneffekte wichtig waren, durchzuführen. Und das war der Beginn der Quanteninformation. Es war auch das Jahrzehnt, in dem das Bose-Einstein-Kondensat erreicht wurde und in dem Prozesse für ultraschnelle Laserpulse entwickelt wurden. Zwischen 2000 und jetzt hat es sich zu einem sehr weiten Bereich der Manipulation von echten oder künstlichen Atomen entwickelt. Echte Atome wurden durch künstliche Schaltungen ersetzt, zum Beispiel durch Josephson-Kontakte und Schaltkreise, die Atome imitieren, und die beispielsweise viel praktischer für die Quanteninformation waren. Es ist auch das Jahrzehnt, wo AMO-Physik auf kondensierte Materie trifft, denn wir können Kaltmaterie-Phänomene simulieren, die in Echtmaterial bei höheren Temperaturen mit unterschiedlichen Größenordnungen auftreten. Dies ist sehr nützlich, um die Eigenschaften einiger kondensierter Materiesysteme zu verstehen. In Bezug auf die Größenordnungen, möchte ich Ihnen auf dieser Folie schnell zeigen, was wir seitdem in verschiedenen Bereichen erreicht haben. Wie gesagt, Verbesserungen um zehn Größenordnung wurden in vielen Bereichen erreicht, und Verbesserungen um zehn Größenordnungen entsprechen einem durchschnittlichen Faktor von zehn alle fünf Jahre. So waren beispielsweise 1960 Uhren – also vor den Atomuhren – im Bereich von 10^-8 präzise. Das ist etwa eine Sekunde pro Jahr. Quarzuhren, die so funktionierten, wurden als sehr, sehr gut eingestuft. Jetzt können wir eine Präzision von 10^-18 erreichen: eine Sekunde seit Entstehung des Universums, also eine Verbesserung von zehn 10er-Potenzen. Wenn man sich die Empfindlichkeit der Messungen anschaut: als ich meinen Doktor machte, hatten wir Zellen, die 1000 Milliarden von Atomen enthielten, und wir haben Signale dieser makroskopischen Menge verarbeitet. Es galt als sehr verdünnt, weil 10^10 Atome nichts ist, einem sehr kleinen Fleck Materie fester Medien entspricht, aber es war eine sehr große Anzahl von Atomen. Jetzt können wir mit einem Atom oder einem Photon arbeiten und diese bearbeiten. Temperaturen - darauf habe ich bereits angespielt. wenn wir Doppler-Linien eingrenzen wollten. Und wenn man sehr fortschrittlich war, arbeitete man bei Heliumtemperaturen. Aber der Bereich variierte zwischen 100 und 300K. Bei der kalten Atomphysik erreichen wir einen Bereich von 10^-10 Kelvin, also ein riesiger Schritt. Im Bereich Geschwindigkeit und Zeitauflösung in den 1960er Jahren wurde eine Nanosekunde als sehr kurz betrachtet. Jetzt sprechen wir von Attosekunden. Schauen wir uns dies noch detaillierter an. Dies ist eine logarithmische Skala von Temperaturen, die die Differenz in der Größenordnung der Temperatur der physikalischen Phänomene anzeigt. Innerhalb der Sterne findet man Temperaturen von Millionen Grad. An der Oberfläche der Sonne, 6000 Grad. Raumtemperatur ist etwa 300 K, und die Atomgeschwindigkeiten liegen etwa im Bereich von 500 Metern pro Sekunde. Man hat kältere Systeme in der Natur, zum Beispiel den kosmischen Hintergrund, was das ganze Universum umgibt und einer Temperatur von -2,7 Kelvin entspricht. Im Labor ist es möglich, eine kryogene Temperatur im Bereich von 1 bis 10 Millikelvin unter Verwendung von flüssigem Helium zu erzielen. Als die Laser mithilfe von Laserkühlung an Bedeutung gewannen, wurde die Temperatur sofort auf bis zu einige hundert Mikrokelvin durch Verwendung der Technik der Doppler-Kühlung reduziert. Es ist mir ein wenig peinlich, darüber vor Steve Chu zu sprechen, der dieses Verfahren in den 1980er Jahren entwickelt hat. Aber die erreichte Temperatur, die man damals erreichte, befand sich im 100-Mikrokelvin-Bereich, was den Geschwindigkeiten in der Größenordnung von einem Meter pro Sekunde entsprach. Eine verfeinerte Technik, Sub-Doppler-Kühlung, bei der man zur gleichen Zeit mit dem Doppler-Effekt und dem optischen Pumpen spielt, erlaubte die Reduzierung sogar bis auf den 1-Mikrokelvin Bereich, mit Geschwindigkeiten im Bereich von zehn Zentimetern pro Sekunde. Indem man anschließend die Verdampfungskühlung erhöht, konnte die Temperatur bis in den Nanokelvin-Bereich reduziert werden, in denen Bose-Einstein-Kondensate auftauchen. Sie sehen, dass 11 Größenordnungen hin zu niedrigeren Temperaturen gewonnen wurden. Seit den 1960er Jahren, also fünf bis sechs Größenordnungen gegenüber niedrigen Atomgeschwindigkeiten. Steve Chu, Bill Phillips und Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, die hier an dieser Tagung in Lindau teilnehmen. Ein paar Worte über diese Kühlung. Wenn man Atome in eine Struktur von sich gegenläufig ausbreitenden Lichtstrahlen legt, kann man eine Situation hervorrufen, wo die Atome, die sich entgegen den Lichtstrahl bewegen, mehr Wechselwirkung erzeugen, als wenn sie sich in die gleiche Richtung bewegen. Dies erzeugt ein Ungleichgewicht, was, durch den Impulsaustausch, dazu neigt, die Atome zu kühlen, als ob sie in einem viskosen Medium baden. So wird die Temperatur auf die Bereiche reduziert, auf die ich zuvor hingewiesen hatte. Sobald man diese kalten Atome hat, kann man die Atomstrahlen aus-, und eine Magnetfalle einschalten. Diese Atome haben kleine magnetische Momente, die an das Elektron oder den Kern befestigt sind. Indem man Gradienten des magnetischen Feldes durchführt, kann man die Flasche bauen, die das Atom in einer gut definierten Position im Raum festhält. Diese Atome bewegen sich innerhalb eines Potentialtopfs, den man als Paraboltopf vereinfachen kann. Man kann sie so lenken, dass die Atome mit der höchsten Energie, die sich am Rand dieses Topfes bewegen, durch Eintauchen in einen anderes magnetisches Moment herausbefördert werden, ein magnetisches Moment, das nicht eingeschlossen ist. Es handelt sich um ein Hochfrequenzverfahren, das aus dem Aufbringen eines RF-Felds besteht, was es den schnellsten Atomen erlaubt, aus der Falle zu entkommen. Dies nennt man Verdampfungskühlung. Sobald die schnellsten Atome durch Kollisionen entronnen sind, normalisiert sich der Rest der Atome bei niedrigeren Temperaturen. Genau das passiert, wenn man auf einen heißen Kaffee pustet - die schnellsten Moleküle werden herausbefördert, und die Temperatur sinkt. Wenn man die Temperatur senkt, bedeutet dies, dass die Wellenlänge der Materie, die DeBroglie- Wellenlänge, zunimmt. An dem Punkt, an dem die DeBroglie-Wellenlängen die Größenordnung des Abstandes zwischen den Partikeln einnehmen, und wenn diese Teilchen Bosonen sind und im gleichen Quantenzustand beieinander liegen, sollten sie kondensieren. Bose und Einstein sagten diesen Effekt in den 1920er Jahren voraus. Diese Art des Experiments hat es uns ermöglicht, dies zu beobachten. Ich zeige Ihnen hier einen Film, der aus der Gruppe von Cornel und Weiman stammt, die die ersten Bose-Einstein-Kondensate 1995 entwickelten und dafür einen Nobelpreis im Jahre 2001 erhielten. Sobald diese kalten Atome an der Unterseite der Magnetfalle angekommen sind, ist der Trick, die Falle auszuschalten, damit die Atome in das Schwerefeld der Erde fallen. Sie entrinnen mit der gleichen Geschwindigkeit, die sie zuvor in der Falle hatten, bevor diese abgeschaltet wurde. Wenn Sie das also bei tiefen und noch tieferen Temperatur tun, dann sieht man diese Art von Film. Wenn die Temperatur sinkt, dann sehen Sie, dass die Verteilung der Geschwindigkeit immer gestauchter wird, und irgendwann taucht eine sehr schmale Spitze auf. Es gibt einen Phasenübergang, der alle Atome in den Grundzustand des Potentials, das den Atomen aufgetragen wurde, bringt. Sie sehen dies auch hier, in einem Bild, das war das Titelblatt von Science 1995. Eine weite Verteilung über dieser speziellen Temperatur, die sich plötzlich verengt und zu einer neuen Quantenphase der Materie führt, die seitdem durch Hunderttausende von Gruppen weltweit untersucht wurde. Wenn man die Atome aus der Falle entkommen lässt, indem man ein Loch in die Falle macht, erhält man einen kohärenten Strahl aus Materie. Das Äquivalent zu einem Laser, bei dem die Photonen durch Atome ersetzt werden. Sie haben sozusagen mehrere Arten dieser Atomlaser, die sehr kohärent sind, und mit denen Sie Interferometrie durchführen können. Dies sind Systeme, die verwendet wurden, um Interferometer zu bauen, die das Gravitationsfeld messen. Gravitometer, die die Rotationen messen, Gyrometer, und so weiter. Es gibt also eine ganze Reihe von Messtechniken, die mit diesem System entwickelt wurden. Ich sprach von Bose-Gasen, die es mögen, sich im gleichen Quantenzustand zu befinden. Man hat aber auch Atome, die zu der Fermi-Statistik gehören. Wenn Sie also einen Paraboltopf haben, dann braucht man ein Atom pro Quantenzustand, was bedeutet, dass die Größe dieses degenerierten Quantengases expandiert, je mehr Atome es enthält. Dies kann man auf sehr dramatische Art und Weise sehen, wenn man ein Experiment durchführt. Lithium hat zwei Isotope, ein Boson und ein Fermium Isotop. Wenn man das bosonische Isotop kühlt, wie Sie auf der linken Seite sehen können, sehen Sie, dass das Gas schrumpft und immer mehr schrumpft, je mehr Atome sich im Grundzustand des Potentialtopfes ansammeln. Wenn man versucht, dies mit Fermium zu tun, sehen Sie, dass es hier eine Grenze beim Schrumpfen gibt. Es ist der Fermi- oder Pauli-Druck, der aufgrund des Pauli-Prinzips zustande kommt, was diese Atome dazu zwingt, in den größeren Systemen zu bleiben. Natürlich war dies bekannt und wurde indirekt aus kondensierten Materie-Experimenten abgeleitet. Aber hier, mit Atomen, können Sie diesen Effekt lehrbuchmäßig anzeigen. Eine andere Art von Experiment, das in vielen Labors entwickelt wurde, besteht darin, die Suprafluidität dieser Quantengase zu untersuchen. Genau wie flüssiges Helium, aber auf eine sehr viel sauberere Weise, weisen diese Gase Suprafluidität auf, was bedeutet, wenn man ein Teilchen oder ein kleines Stück Materie in die Gase sendet, bewegt es sich ohne Reibung, ohne Viskosität. Es bedeutet auch, dass, wenn man beginnt, es zurück zu einem Feld mit diesem superfluiden Material zu drehen, dass es sich nicht so klassisch mit dem externen Teil des Systems, das sich schneller bewegt, dreht. Die Drehimpulse, die man versucht, in das System zu integrieren, brechen in Wirbel zusammen, in denen die Geschwindigkeit am höchsten ist, je näher man am Zentrum des Wirbels ist. Dies wurde mit Bosonen beobachtet. Sie sehen hier Experimente, die von Jean Dalibard in Paris durchgeführt wurden. Es wurde auch mit degenerierten Fermigasen beobachtet. In diesem Fall haben Sie ein paar Fermionen, die wechselwirken, um Verbund-Bosonen zu produzieren, ähnlich zu dem, was in der Supraleitung in Festkörpern passiert, bei denen Elektronen sich in Cooper-Paaren koppeln. Diese Paare verhalten sich wie Bosonen, und sie verursachen Suprafluidität und diese Art der Situation. Aber was man in der Physik kondensierter Materie beobachtet, ist, dass diese Wirbel nicht aufgrund der Rotation entstehen. Sie entstehen aufgrund des Versuchs, ein magnetisches Feld in das System zu integrieren. Das Magnetfeld tritt in diese Materialien mithilfe dieser Linien, diesen Wirbeln aus supraleitenden Strömen. Kalt-Atomphysiker simulieren also kondensierte Materie-Situationen. Ein neutrales Atom-Kondensat zu drehen entspricht dem Anlegen eines Magnetfeldes an ein Elektronengas. Dies ist eine sehr interessante Domäne, in der Sie diese Arten von Systemen verwenden können, und die Sie im Labor unter Verwendung von Laserstrahlen manipulieren können, um Situationen zu simulieren, die mit unterschiedlichen Größenordnungen in Festkörpern auftreten. Anders als bei Feststoffen ist das System, wie es ist: man kann die Leitfähigkeit nicht ändert, man kann den Abstand zwischen den Teilchen nicht ändern. Hier manipuliert man alle diese Parameter. Dies hat sich zu einem sehr wichtigen Bereich der AMO-Physik entwickelt, die eine Simulation der Vielteilchen-Probleme ist. Zum Beispiel können Sie ein Mehrzahl von Laserstrahlen verwenden, um periodische Strukturen zu realisieren, in denen Atome wie Eier im Eierkarton liegenbleiben. Die Größe dieser Struktur entspricht Mikrometern; im Vergleich dazu sind wir in der Physik kondensierter Materie im Angström-Bereich. Sie können auch die Wechselwirkung zwischen den Teilchen abstimmen, den Abstand der Partikel abstimmen. Und Sie können versuchen, zu untersuchen, was in realen Materialien durch Simulation mit diesem System passiert. Diese Simulation ist sehr wichtig, denn sobald man mehr als ein paar Dutzend Teilchen hat, kann man es nicht mehr auf einem klassischen Computer simulieren. Die Schrödinger-Gleichung explodiert, und der einzige Weg, es zu tun ist, zu versuchen, ein passendes System umzusetzen und zu schauen, was passiert. Die Hoffnung ist, dass, indem man diese Arten von Experimenten macht, wir mehr über Phänomene in Echt-Materialien lernen. Dies könnte helfen, künstliche Materialien zu bauen, welche interessante Eigenschaften, wie die Supraleitung bei hohen Temperaturen, usw. aufweisen würden. Jetzt habe ich ein paar Minuten, um über einen anderen Bereich zu sprechen, bei dem es um die Genauigkeit von Messungen geht. Dafür gehe ich nur kurz auf die Geschichte der Zeitmessung ein, nur damit Sie die großen Fortschritte, die in den letzten 50 Jahren gemacht worden sind, besser nachvollziehen können. Die eigentliche Messung der Zeit mit künstlichen Maschinen begann im 14. Jahrhundert mit Turmuhren. Hier hat man ein Gewinde und eine Art Hebel, der durch die Drehung des Gewindes schwingt, und man zählt die Schwingungen mit einem Rad, das Zähne wie diese hat. Dieses System wurde stark durch das Pendel verbessert als man diese Drehbewegung durch die Pendelschwingung ersetzte. Es gibt eine Hemmung, die die Zeiten zählt und sie in die Bewegung eines Zeigers überträgt. Dann im 18. Jahrhundert wurden die die Pendelschwingung durch die Schwingung einer Feder in den Uhren ersetzt. Diese Uhr wurde insbesondere durch Harrisson entwickelt, um eine Präzision zu erzielen, sodass man die Uhr von einem Teil der Welt zu einem anderen tragen konnte und die Zeit weiter lief, was wesentlich für die Messung der Längengrade war. Dann im 20. Jahrhundert wurden die Schwingungen eines Quarzstabes verwendet. Denn aufgrund des piezoelektrischen Effekts können die Schwingung in elektrische Stromschwingung übertragen werden, und per Elektronik kann die Anzahl der Schwingungen gezählt werden. Sie sehen, dass das Prinzip immer das Gleiche ist. Sie benötigen einen Oszillator, und man muss es an eine Zählmechanismus koppeln, der Perioden zählt und auch wieder die Energie im System herstellt. Was ist die Messunsicherheit? Die Turmuhr hat eine Messunsicherheit von einem Hundertstel. Wenn man die Zeit auf eine Viertelstunde pro Tag genau messen konnte, dann war das gut. Das Pendel variierte um etwa ein paar Sekunden pro Tag. Der Harrisson Chronometer ging um etwa ein paar Sekunden pro Monat falsch, was für die Navigation ausreichend genau war. Und Quarz variierte etwa eine Sekunde pro Jahr. Sie sehen, dass diese Verbesserung aus der Tatsache stammt, dass wir zu immer höheren Frequenzen gelangen. Denn wenn man mehr und mehr Zeiträume in eine Sekunde packen kann, dann erhöht man natürlich die Genauigkeit. Aber auf einer logarithmischen Skala, sehen Sie, dass es eine 10^6 Verbesserung innerhalb von sechs Jahrhunderten gab. In den letzten 50 Jahren betrug die Verbesserung 10 Größenordnungen mehr. Ich habe keine Zeit, um darauf detaillierter einzugehen, aber ich nenne Ihnen kurz die neuesten Entwicklungen. Jetzt basiert die Genauigkeit der Uhren auf der Schwingung optischer Übergänge in Atomen. Diese Atome sind entweder einzelne Ionen in einer Ionenfalle, oder eine Anordnung von kalten Atomen in einem kalten Atomgitter. Was ist der Zählmechanismus? Man sendet einen sehr, sehr stabilen Laser, der an der Spitze dieses sehr, sehr schmalen Übergangs blockiert wird. Aber dann muss man die Perioden zählen. Und die Art und Weise, um die Perioden zu zählen, ist, diesen Laser mit dem, was als Frequenzkamm bekannt ist, zu vergleichen, was ein Lasersystem ist, das ein Spektrum des Lichts emittiert, das aus Frequenzen mit dem gleichen Abstand besteht. Die Frequenzkammtechnik wurde von Hänsch und Hall entwickelt, die auch hier sind. Hierbei handelt es sich wirklich um einen Zählmechanismus, der den optischen Uhren die Atomuhr-Technologie eröffnet hat. Die Messunsicherheit liegt nun zwischen 10^-17 und einem 10^-18. Dies bedeutet, dass die Zeit innerhalb des Zeitraums seit der Entstehung des Universums auf eine Sekunde genau gemessen werden kann. Was dies bedeutet, ist nicht ganz klar. Es bedeutet, wenn Sie zwei Uhren vergleichen wollen, müssen Sie die Höhe innerhalb von ein paar Zentimetern angeben. Dies wurde experimentell in der Gruppe von Dave Weinland geprüft. Sie sehen hier zwei Uhren, die sich auf zwei Tischen befinden und Sie bewegen eine in Bezug auf die andere, und Sie sehen, dass Sie in der Lage sind, den Unterschied in der Zeit, der von der Uhr angegeben wird, zu sehen, wenn sie um 33 Zentimeter verschoben werden. Das war vor ein paar Jahren. Nun kann es auf etwa einen Zentimeter reduziert werden. Es gibt viele Dinge, die Sie damit tun können. Ich werde ein wenig auf die Nachweisempfindlichkeit eingehen. Wie gesagt, zur Zeit des optischen Pumpen brauchte man etwa 10^10 Atome, die natürlich mit Abermillionen von Photonen, Hochfrequenz-Photonen oder optische Photonen interagierten. war es möglich geworden, ein einzelnes Ion nur durch die Fluoreszenz dieses Ions in der Mitte der Falle zu sehen. Dies ist eine historische Bild, das in der Peter Toschek Gruppe im Jahr 1978 gemacht wurde. Auch hier haben wir zehn Größenordnungen in der Empfindlichkeit. Was können wir also damit machen? Natürlich können Sie einzelne Fälle in der Atomphysik und Quanteninformation damit bearbeiten. Ein einzelnes Atom emittiert nichtklassisches Licht aus einem einfachen Grund. Wenn man nur ein Atom hat, muss man es erneut in einen angeregten Zustand versetzen, bevor es ein neues Photon emittiert, somit gibt es ein Zeitfenster, während dem ein zweites Photon nicht emittiert werden kann. Dies wird Antibunching genannt und es wurde zum ersten Mal 1978, und dann 1985 mit einem einzelnen Ion beobachtet. Sie können einzelne Quantensprünge eines einzelnen gefangenen Ions beobachten. Wenn man sich ein einzelnes Ion anschaut, und wenn es ein Niveau hinterlässt, das lichtempfindlich ist, dann sehen Sie einen plötzlichen Abfall des Lichts zu einem zufälligen Zeitpunkt. Diese Quantensprünge waren in der Tat in den 1980er Jahren sehr umstritten. Einige Leute entschieden, dass Quantensprünge nie auftreten würden. Schrödinger schrieb darüber, und jetzt werden sie beobachtet. Sie werden nicht nur beobachtet, sondern sie sind Werkzeuge, die in allen Experimenten in der Quanteninformation verwendet werden. Wenn man viele Ionen hat, kann man sie durch die gemeinsame Bewegung in der Falle verschränken, und Sie können eine Menge Quanteninformationsspiele spielen, Ionenketten entwickeln und diese als eine Art Abakus für Quantenlogikoperationen verwenden. In unserem Labor taten wir das Gegenteil. Auf dieser Folie versuche ich, zu vergleichen, was Ionenfallen tun, zum Beispiel in Dave Weinlands Gruppe mit dem, was wir in Paris taten. In der Ionengruppe in Boulder fing man Ionen mit der Konfiguration von Elektroden auf, und man verwendete Laserstrahlen, um sie abzukühlen und um die Ionen zu untersuchen. In Paris, tun wir das Gegenteil. Wir fangen die Photonen ein, und wir halten sie für eine lange Zeit. Wir verwenden einen Strahl von Atomen, der durch Laser, spezielle Atome und Rydberg-Atome angeregt wird, um das Photonenfeld im Inneren des Hohlraums zu untersuchen. Diese Experimente sind also zwei Seiten derselben Medaille. Wir manipulieren nicht zerstörbare einzelne Atomen mit Photonen oder einzelne Photonen mit Atomen. Es erfordert eine Anpassung der Wechselwirkung von Licht und Materie auf der grundlegendsten Ebene, wobei ein einzelnes Atom in Wechselwirkung mit einem einzelnen Photon steht. Auf dieser Folie zeige ich, was wir in Paris getan haben. Mit dieser Technik ist es uns gelungen, nicht die Quantensprünge von Materie, sondern die Quantensprünge des Lichts zu beobachten. Wie Licht Photon nach Photon aus einem Hohlraum entweicht. Es ist uns gelungen, die Quantenzustände des Lichts vorzubereiten, die Überlagerungszuständen von Feldern mit unterschiedlichen Phasen oder Amplituden entsprechen. Hier haben wir eine Darstellung dieser Felder, was wir als Wignerfunktion kennen. Es ist eine Art von Röntgenaufnahme des Feldes im Phasenraum. Und Sie sehen zwei Spitzen, die den beiden Zuständen entsprechen: tote und lebendige Katze. Dazwischen gibt es Fransen, die den Beweis liefern, dass diese Überlagerung quantenkohärent ist. Sie sehen, wie die Quantenkohärenz verschwindet je mehr Zeit vergeht. Ich will einfach nur betonen, da Roy Glauber über das Gedankenexperiment von Bohr und Einstein sprach, dass es eine Diskussion zu diesem Problem zwischen Bohr und Einstein gab. Sie stellten sich eine Photon-Box vor, die in der Lage war, Photonen, für eine lange Zeit zu halten. Sie stellten sich vor die Photonen zählen zu können, ohne sie zu zerstören, indem die Box im Gravitationsfeld gewogen wird. In unserem Fall haben wir die Box nicht im Gravitationsfeld der Erde gewogen. Wir wogen sie, indem es mit Atomen wechselwirkte, die keine Strahlung absorbieren. So können wir also die Quantensprünge sehen, die beim Photon-Box-Experiment plötzliche Sprünge der Box im Schwerefeld der Erde verursachen würden. Diese Experimente wären laut Schrödinger „für immer unmöglich" gewesen. Tatsächlich lag der Hauptgrund, warum wir das gemacht haben, darin, die Aussage anzufechten, dass diese Experimente lächerlich seien und lächerliche Ergebnisse brächten und nie durchgeführt würden. Tatsächlich wurden sie aber aufgrund der Entwicklung der Technik möglich. Das letzte Beispiel, was ich Ihnen zeigen möchte, ist die Verbesserung bei der Forschung der ultraschnellen Phänomene. Sie sehen hier, wie die Dauer der Lichtimpulse sich weiterentwickelt hat. Von etwa 10 Pikosekunden in den 1960er Jahren wurde es bis auf wenige Femtosekunden in den 1990er Jahren reduziert. Dann gab es eine Pause. aufgrund der Entwicklung einer neuen Methode namens Chirped Pulse Amplification. Was man im Grunde gemacht hat, ist einen Strahl von seltenen Edelgasatomen mit einem sehr intensiven Lichtblitz in den angeregten Zustand zu versetzen. Hier sehen sie wie ein Gasstrahl von einem Laserstrahl durchquert wird. Durch einen hoch-nonlinearen Prozess wird ein Röntgenstrahl aus XUV Strahlung emittiert. Während des Impulses, während des Lichtimpulses, gibt es einen Zeitpunkt am Kamm des elektrischen Feldes, wenn die Elektronen aus dem Atom heraus befördert werden. Sie werden im Laserstrahl beschleunigt. Und wenn der Laserstrahl sich dreht, kommt er wieder zurück zum Atom. Es kommt zu einer erneuten Kollision, die stark einem nichtlinearen Prozess ähnelt, ähnlich eines Bremsstrahlungseffekts, der sehr, sehr intensive und sehr kurze Impulse emittiert. Sie sehen den Impuls, der emittiert wird: ein wenige Nanometer und wenige Attosekunden langer Impuls. In der Tat propagieren diese beiden Impulse, der ursprüngliche Impuls und der Attosekundenimpuls, zusammen. Sie können die Zeit von einem Impuls in Bezug auf den anderen Impuls scannen und eine Art Stroboskopie durchführen. Zum Beispiel, hier sehen Sie, wie die Stroboskopie es uns ermöglicht, die optischen Lichtwellen selbst zu rekonstruieren und eine Auflösung im Sub-Femtosekundenbereich zu bekommen. Ich habe keine Zeit darauf näher einzugehen. Aber Attosekunden-Impulse sind leistungsfähige Sonden, um ultraschnelle elektronische Prozesse in Atomen und Molekülen zu untersuchen. Ich würde gerne mit den Worten zum Abschluss kommen, dass AMO-Physik einen wirklichen Boom erlebt hat und in eine Menge Bereiche beeinflusst hat. Etwa die Bereiche der Physik kondensierter Materie oder die Astrophysik, wo beispielsweise kalte Fermigase die Situationen der Atomkerne in Neutronensternen simulieren. Auch Verbindungen mit Teilchenphysik gibt es. Sie können Symmetrievariation studieren, man kann auch anhand von sehr präzisen Uhren sehen, ob Fundamentalkonstanten sich im Laufe der Zeit ändern oder nicht. Natürlich mit der Chemie und Biologie, mit Attosekunden-Physik und natürlich mit der Informatik. Es ist immer dasselbe. Der permanente Dialog zwischen der Grundlagenforschung und der Innovation. Die Beobachtung der Natur zeigte, dass an der Wende vom 19. zum 20. Jahrhundert, wie Roy Glauber in seinem Vortrag darstellt, Licht seltsame Eigenschaften hat, die nicht erklärt werden konnten, und daher neue theoretische Modelle, wie die Quantentheorie, benötigt wurden. Die Quantentheorie hatte wiederum bisher unbekannte Effekte der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkung und den Laser vorhergesagt. Der Laser führte zu einer neuen Technologie: Laserinterferometrie und sehr genauen Uhren. Was uns jetzt erlaubt, die Natur erneut auf die Probe zu stellen und zu sehen, ob die Natur sich an diese Regeln hält oder nicht. Zum Beispiel, wenn wir feststellen, dass sich Naturkonstanten ändern, sagt uns das viel über das Zusammenspiel der Quantenphysik mit der Kosmologie. Zum Schluss möchte ich noch sagen, weil wir uns hier bei der Tagung in Lindau befinden, dass viele Nobelpreise in der Physik und Chemie für die Arbeiten mit Hilfe von Lasern in der AMO- Wissenschaft vergeben wurden. Ich denke, die Liste ist hier noch nicht vollständig. Entschuldigen Sie, ich habe ein paar Leute vergessen. Ich denke, es wird weitere Preise in diesem Bereich in der Zukunft geben. Ich bin mir sicher, dass das junge Publikum hier viele Bereiche hat, in denen Sie mit Hilfe von Lasern arbeiten können - nicht mit der Hoffnung, einen Nobelpreis zu bekommen, denn dies Art der Hoffnung, ist in einem wissenschaftlichen Bereich nicht sehr konstruktiv, aber um sehr spannende Physik in der Zukunft zu betreiben. Entschuldigen Sie, dass ich zu lange gesprochen habe. Vielen Dank

Serge Haroche describing the accomplishment of maser technology
(00:02:39 - 00:03:46)

 

Almost immediately, physicists wanted to extend the maser principle to higher frequencies. In particular, the interest was focused on amplifying stimulated emission to create coherent light with an optical oscillator. In 1958, Townes teamed up with his former colleague Schawlow to publish a detailed proposal in the journal Physical Review for what they called an “optical maser.” [7] The term laser — an acronym for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation” — was coined by physicist Gordon Gould, who independently came up with the design for an optical resonator.

Several groups began to work on building the first laser, but questions remained about how to excite a population inversion and what to use as an active medium. Maiman had previously made a compact microwave maser using ruby crystals and decided to work with the material again for his laser pursuits. In 1960, he tested his ruby laser design, which consisted of a ruby rod inside the coil of a photographic flash lamp enclosed in a reflective cylinder. It worked, and one of the most groundbreaking inventions of the modern age was born.

From there, continuous developments in laser technology led to more and better devices. Ali Javan and his colleagues at Bell Laboratories invented the first continuous-wave laser and the first gas laser at the end of 1960 [6]. Two years later, Robert N. Hall created the first semiconductor laser at the General Electric R&D Laboratory. At the same time, the number of laser applications grew exponentially in such wide-ranging industries such as manufacturing, telecommunications, medicine, and basic scientific research.

The earliest medical applications for lasers were in ophthalmology and dermatology. Only a year after its inventions, researchers demonstrated how the ruby laser could remove dark birthmarks and melanomas from the skin. Today, lasers remove tumors, tattoos, hair, and birthmarks in regular dermatology practice. Ophthalmologists originally used argon lasers to treat detached retinas, and later employed excimer lasers to reshape corneas and correct eyesight in LASIK procedure. A very focused laser can also cut and cauterize tissue during surgery.

In manufacturing, lasers are widely used for cutting, drilling, welding, cladding, lithography, engraving, etc. They have several advantages over traditional mechanical approaches, such as higher quality of work, high processing speed, and a longer lifetime of tools.

In the same 2015 lecture, Haroche expanded on the versatile abilities of lasers.

 

Serge Haroche (2015) - The International Year of Light: Celebrating Fifty Years of Laser Revolution in Physics

It is a great pleasure to be here. As we have already heard about, we are celebrating in 2015 the International Year of Light. I thought it was a good opportunity to reflect on the revolutions that lasers have brought about in physics and in chemistry over the last 50 years. In fact, I have been very lucky to start my research career in the sixties, at the time the laser was invented. I was also lucky to be accepted in the laboratory of Kastler and Brossel at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. Kastler had invented the method of optical pumping. How you can use polarized light to interact with atoms to bring these atoms into very special states to manipulate their quantum state, and to achieve states out of equilibrium. In fact, at that time optical pumping was achieved with classical lamps. But when the laser came on the stage the optical pumping was refined using lasers. In fact, the method of optical pumping is still used in cold atom physics, in iron trap physics, in atomic clocks, and so it's a very, very general method. I was just a graduate student at that time and this picture was taken in the lab on the day Kastler got his Nobel Prize for the method of optical pumping. So, you see, I am sitting between Kastler and Brossel. I am very happy, and more than happy, very proud to be part of a lab that got such world-wide attention. You see on the left, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, who was my thesis advisor. He was a former student of Kastler and Brossel. He is here at this meeting, unfortunately in a parallel session. It's very nice to remind us of these memories. At that time, we were all aware that the laser was announcing exciting times for atomic physics. We knew that the laser would be very useful, but we could not imagine the magnitude of the progresses that the lasers would bring. In fact, I would like to show you today that ten orders of magnitude have been gained in many domains, leading not only to this kind of quantitative change - it leads to qualitative changes too, and leading to very unexpected physics. The story started, of course, a few years earlier when, in 1954, Townes and his student, Gordon, developed the first coherent emitter of radiation based on atomic physics. It was the ammonia beam maser. Maser, of course, stands as an acronym for microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. It was an atomic beam machine. I think it's also interesting to remind ourselves that it's not just by chance that this happened at Columbia. In fact, Rabi developed a school at Columbia University before the war. He developed the method of molecular beams. These molecular beams have announced not only the maser and the laser, but also atomic clocks, nuclear magnetic resonance, MRI, and so on. All this physics originated from Rabi's molecular beam method. This is a good example of the fact that blue sky research leads to application in unexpected ways. Of course, when the maser was developed the question which arose immediately was to extend it into the optical domain, what was then called the optical maser. Charles Townes and his brother-in-law, Art Schawlow, wrote the first theoretical paper explaining how an optical laser would work. In fact, Townes thought that maybe the optical pumping technique would be useful to invert the populations in an atomic medium. I was told that he came to Paris in 1958 to discuss these ideas with Kastler. But in fact, the first lasers were according to other processes. The first laser was the solid state laser, the Ruby laser, which operated in pulses. It was invented by Theodor Maiman in 1960. A few months later, the first gas laser operating with a mixture of helium and neon operated continuously and it was discovered by Ali Javan and Bennett. So starting from this time, this laser source has been developed into new kinds of lasers with very interesting and fascinating properties. I just want to summarize on this slide some of the properties of the laser. In fact, these properties are somewhat contradictory. The laser can do one thing, and the opposite. I think this is an example of Bohr‘s complementarity idea. Depending upon the way you use it, the development can do one thing or its contrary. For instance, lasers can bring matter to the highest possible temperature. They can lead to the fusion of matter, to the evaporation of matter, and they can also lead to such high temperature, millions, billions of degrees - temperatures at which nuclear effects could happen. For example, a nuclear fusion can be triggered by exceedingly high intensities. At the same time, under other conditions, lasers can achieve the lowest possible temperatures. They can be used by exchange of momentum with matter to bring atoms almost to become motionless. And to produce the coldest objects in the universe, leading to new phases of quantum matter called Bose–Einstein condensates or degenerate quantum gasses. In another direction, you can think of lasers as being ultra-stable light beams. You can build lasers who correspond to light waves extending over millions of kilometres without skipping a beat. These extra stable lasers can be used to build atomic clocks which have an extremely high precision. At the same time, you can pack the energy of light beams into very, very short pulses, which extend over a few nanometres, which have only a few cycle of oscillation, and which last a few attoseconds, billionths of a billionth of a second. These very short pulses can be used to probe, to perform spectroscopic holography of matter at the extreme limit. So, it's a very flexible tool for fundamental research in physics, in chemistry, in biology of course, and, as we all know, for applications to metrology, to medicine, to communication and so on. To come back to history, I think you can more or less arbitrarily divide this half-century in decades. The first decade, the1960s, was the birth of the laser, the mature years of optical pumping starting to use lasers to perform more and more refined optical pumping experiments and getting the first non-linear optics experiments with lasers. The 1970s saw the burst of tuneable lasers, lasers which can be adjusted to excite specific energy levels in atoms, and achieve ultra-high resolution spectroscopy. The 1980s was the decade of laser cooling. How to use laser light to bring atoms to rest. It was also the time where atom-photon interaction was studied in details in Cavity QED and the beginning of ion trap physics. The 1990s was the decade where quantum information came into play, where people understood that one can use the manipulations of atoms to perform logic operations in which quantum effects were important. And this was the beginning of quantum information. It was also the decade where Bose Einstein Condensation was achieved and where processes to get ultra-fast laser pulses were developed. In the year 2000 up to now, it has developed into a very broad field of manipulation of real or artificial atoms. Real atoms have been replaced by artificial circuits, for example Josephson Junctions and Circuits which imitate atoms, and which are much more practical for quantum information, for example. It's also the decade where AMO physics meets condensed matter physics because we can simulate with cold matter phenomena which occur in real material at higher temperature with different orders of magnitude. And this is very useful to understand the properties of some condensed matter systems. In term of orders of magnitude, I want to just to show you on this slide what we have gained since then in different directions. As I said a ten order of magnitude improvement has been achieved in many fields and a ten order of magnitude improvement means a factor of ten every five years on average. For instance, in 1960 the precision of clocks, before the atomic clocks, was 10^-8. That is about one second per year. And in quartz clocks operating like that were considered as being very, very good. Now, we can achieve 10^-18, which is one second over the age of the universe, so it's a ten order magnitude of improvement. If you look at the sensitivity of measurements, when I did my Ph.D., we had cells which contain ten hundred billions of atoms and we got signals from this macroscopic sample. It was considered to be very dilute because 10^10 atoms is nothing, is a very small speck of matter of solid media, but it was huge number of atoms. Now we can work with one atom or one photon, and operate on them. Temperatures, I already alluded to that. In 1960, at spectroscopy we were working at room temperature, or liquid nitrogen temperature when we wanted to narrow Doppler lines. And if you're very sophisticated, you were working at helium temperature. But the range was between 100 and 300 K. With cold atom physics we're getting in the range of ten minus ten Kelvin, so it's a huge step. In speed and time resolution in the 1960s, a nanosecond was considered to be very short. Now we're talking about attoseconds. Let's look at this in more detail. This is a log scale of temperatures which shows the difference in the order of magnitude of temperature of physical phenomena. Inside the stars, you have temperatures of millions of degrees. At the sun's surface, 6000 degrees. Room temperature is about 300K, for which the atomic velocities are in the range of 500 meter per second. You have colder systems in nature, for instance, the cosmologic background, which is bathing all the universe, corresponds to a temperature of 2.7 Kelvin. In the lab, it is possible to achieve cryogenic temperature in the range 1 to 10 Millikelvin using liquid helium. When the lasers have come into play, by laser cooling, immediately the temperature has been brought down to a few hundred microkelvin by using the technique of Doppler cooling. I am a little bit embarrassed to talk about that in front of Steve Chu who developed this method in the 1980s. But the temperature achieved then was in the hundred microkelvin, corresponding to velocities in the order of one meter per second. Then a more refined technique, sub-Doppler cooling, in which you play at the same time with the Doppler Effect and with optical pumping, allowed to bring this temperature even down to the microkelvin range, with velocities in the range of ten centimetres per second. Then, by adding to that evaporative cooling, the temperature could be brought down to the nanokelvin range in which Bose-Einstein Condensates appear. You see that 11 orders of magnitude have been gained towards low temperature. Of course, five to six orders of magnitude towards low atomic velocities since the 1960s. Steve Chu, Bill Phillips, and Claude Cohen-Tannoudji who are here at this Lindau meeting. A few words about this cooling. If you put atoms in a structure of counter-propagating light beams, you can arrange a situation where the atoms moving against the light beam are interacting more than if they move in the same direction. This provides an imbalance which, by exchange of momentum, tends to cool the atoms as if they were bathing in a viscous medium. This brings the temperature down to the ranges I was indicating. Once you have these cold atoms, you can switch off these atomic beams, and switch on a magnetic trap. These atoms have small magnetic moment attached to the electron or to the nuclei. By performing gradients of magnetic field you can build the bottle which keeps the atom at a well-defined position within space. These atoms are moving within the potential well, which you can simplify as a parabolic well. You can manage, so that the atoms which have the highest energy, which go at the boundary of this well, are expelled by being put in another magnetic moment, a magnetic moment which is not trapped. It is a radiofrequency method, which consists of applying an RF field which will make the fastest atoms escape from the trap. This is called evaporative cooling. Once the fastest atoms have escaped by collisions, the rest of the atoms renormalize at the lower temperature. This is exactly what happens when you blow on a cup of coffee, expelling the fastest molecules, and bringing the temperature down. If you lower the temperature, it means that the wavelength of the matter, the DeBroglie wavelength, increases. At the point where the DeBroglie wavelengths become of the order of the distance between the particles, if these particles are bosons, if they lie together in the same quantum state, they should condensate. Bose and Einstein had predicted this effect in the 1920s. This kind of experiment has enabled us to observe it. I show you here a movie which comes from the group of Cornel and Weiman, realised the first BEC in 1995 and got the Nobel Prize in 2001 for that. Once these cold atoms are at the bottom of this magnetic trap, the trick is to switch off the trap, so the atoms fall in the gravitational field of the Earth. They escape with the velocity which is the velocity they had in the trap just before the trap was switched off. So if you do that for lower and lower temperature, you see this kind of movie. As the temperature goes down, you see that the distribution of velocity becomes narrower and narrower, and at some point, a very narrow peak emerges. There is a phase transition which brings all the atoms into the ground state of the potential which was applied to the atoms. You see this here also, in a picture which has been the cover of Science 1995. A broad distribution above this special temperature which narrows suddenly and leads to this new quantum phase of matter, which has been studied by hundreds of thousands of groups in the world since then. If you release the atoms from the trap by, in one way or another, making a hole in the trap, you get a coherent beam of matter. The equivalent of a laser in which the photons are replaced by atoms. You have several kinds of this atomic lasers, so to speak, which are very coherent, and with which you can do interferometry. These are systems which have been used to build interferometer measuring the gravitational field, gravitometer measuring rotations, gyrometers, and so on. So there is a whole range of metrology which has been developed with this system. What I have been talking about are Bose gases, gases which like to go in the same quantum state. But you have also atoms which belong to Fermi statistics. If they have an odd number of elementary particles in them, then they cannot go in the same state. So if you have a parabolic well, you must have one atom per quantum state, which means that the size of this degenerate quantum gas expands if you get more and more atoms into it. This can be seen in a very dramatic way when you perform an experiment. You see lithium has two isotopes, a boson and a fermium isotope. And if you cool the bosonic isotope, as you can see on the left part, you see that the gas shrinks and shrinks more and more as you get more and more atoms the ground state of the potential well. If you try to do that with fermiums, you see there is a limit to the shrinking. It is the Fermi or the Pauli pressure that is due to the Pauli Exclusion Principle which forces these atoms to stay in larger systems. Of course, this was known, and had been indirectly deduced from condensed matter experiments. But here, with atoms, you can display this effect in a textbook manner. Another kind of experiment which has been developed in many labs is to study the superfluidity of these quantum gases. As liquid helium, but in a much cleaner way, these gases exhibit superfluidity, which means if you send a particle or a small piece of matter in it, it will move without any friction, without viscosity in it. It means also that if you start to rotate it back at a field with this superfluid material, it will not rotate as classically with the external part of the system moving faster. The angular momentums that you try to fit into the system will break up in vortices in which the velocity will be highest the closest you are to the centre of the vortex. This has been observed with bosons. You see here experiments which have been performed by Jean Dalibard in Paris. It has also been observed with degenerate Fermi gases. In this case, you have a couple of fermions which associate to make composite bosons, like what happens in superconductivity in solids, where electrons pair into Cooper pairs. These pairs behave as bosons, and they give rise to superfluidity and to this kind of situation. But in condensed matter physics, what you observe, these vortices are not due to rotation. They are due to the attempt to put a magnetic field into the system. The magnetic field enters into these materials according to these lines, these vortices of superconducting currents. So cold atom physicists simulate condensed matter situations. Rotating a neutral atom condensate is equivalent to applying a magnetic field to an electron gas. This is a very interesting domain where you can use these kinds of systems that you can manipulate in the lab using laser beams, to simulate situations which occur with different orders of magnitude in solids. So, different than in solids, the system is as it is: you cannot change the conductivity, you cannot change the distance between particles. Here you manipulate all these parameters. This has developed into a very important field of AMO physics which is a simulation of many-body problems. For instance, you can use an array of laser beams to realize periodic structures in which atoms are confined as eggs in an egg box. The size of this structure is microns, as compared to the angstrom size in condensed matter physics. You can also tune the interaction between the particles, tune the distance of the particles. And you can try to study what happens in real materials by simulating it with this system. This simulation is very important because as soon as you have more than a few tens of particles, you cannot simulate it on a classical computer. The Schrödinger equation explodes, and the only way to do it is to try to realize a system and to look at what happens. The hope is that by doing these kinds of experiments, we will learn more about phenomena occurring in real materials. This might help to build artificial materials which would have interesting properties like superconductivity at high temperatures, and things like that. Now, I have a few minutes to talk about another domain, which is the precision of measurements. For that I just record briefly the history of the measurement of time, just to make you feel the huge progresses which have been made during the last 50 years. The real measurement of time with man-made machines has started in the 14th century with tower clocks. You have a thread and you have a kind of lever which oscillates due to the torsion of the thread, and you count the oscillation with a wheel which has teeth like that. This system has been greatly improved by the pendulum when you replace this torsion motion by the oscillation of a pendulum. You have an escape mechanism which counts the periods and transfers it into the motion of a hand. Then in the 18th century, the pendulum oscillation has been replaced by the oscillation of a spring in the watch. This watch has been developed in particular by Harrisson to gain a precision such that you can carry the watch from one part of the world to another one and keep the time, which is essential for measuring the longitudes. Then in the 20th century, the oscillations of a quartz rod have been used. Because due to the piezoelectric effect the oscillation can be transferred to an electric current oscillation, and the method of electronics can be used to count the number of oscillation. You see that the principle is always the same. You need an oscillator, and you need to couple it to an escape device which counts the periods and also restores the energy into the system. What is the uncertainty? The tower clock has an uncertainty of one part in a hundred. If you could keep the time within a quarter of an hour per day, that was good. The pendulum was about a few seconds per day. The Harrisson chronometer was about a few seconds per month, which was required for navigation. And, the quartz was about one second per year. You see that this improvement comes from the fact that we go to higher and higher frequencies. Because if you can pack more and more periods during a second, of course, you increase the precision. But on a log scale, you see that you have had a 10^6 improvement in six centuries. During the last 50 years, the improvement has been 10 orders of magnitude more. I don't have time to retell the story, but I'll just give you the latest developments. Now the clocks are based on the oscillation of an optical transitions in atoms. These atoms can be either single ions in an ion trap, or an array of cold atoms into a cold atom lattice. What is the escape mechanism? What you do is that you send a very, very stable laser which is blocked to the top of this very, very narrow transition. But then you have to count the period. And the way to count the period is to compare this laser to what is known as a frequency comb, which is a laser system which emits a spectrum of light which is made of equally spaced frequencies. The frequency comb technique has been developed by Haensch and Hall, who are here too. This is really the escape mechanism which has opened to optical clocks, the atomic clock technology. The uncertainty now is between one part in 10^17 and one part in 10^18. This means that the time can be kept within one second in the age of the universe. What it means is not very clear. It means if you want to compare two clocks, you have to give the altitude within a few centimetre. This has been checked experimentally in the group of Dave Wineland. You see here two clocks which are on two tables and you move one with respect to the other, and you see that you are able to see the difference in the time given by the clock when they are moved by 33 centimetres. This was a few years ago. Now it can be reduced to about one centimetre. There are many things you can do with that. I will say a few words about detection sensitivity. As I said, at the time of optical pumping, you needed about 10^10 atoms interacting, of course, with zillions of photons, radio-frequency photons or optical photons. In 1978, when ion traps had been developed and the lasers exciting the trap, it has become possible to see a single ion, just by the fluorescence of this ion in the centre of the trap. This is a historical picture which was made in Peter Toschek's group in 1978. Again, we have ten orders of magnitude in sensitivity. So what can you do with that? Of course, you can do single atom physics and quantum information. A single atom emits non-classical light, for a simple reason. If you have just one atom, you need to re-excite it before it emits a new photon, so there is a time window during which a second photon cannot be emitted. It is called antibunching and it was observed for the first time in 1978, and then in 1985 with a single ion. You can observe single quantum jumps of a single trapped ion. If you look at a single ion, and if it leaves a level which is sensitive to light, you see a sudden drop of the light occurring at a random time. These quantum jumps were, in fact, very controversial in the 1980s. Some people decided that quantum jumps would never occur. They think Schrödinger wrote about this kind of story, and now they are observed. Not only are they observed, but they are tools which are used in all experiments in quantum information. If you have many ions, you can entangle them through the common motion in the trap, and you can play a lot of quantum information games, process ion strings and use these ion strings as kind of abacus for quantum logic operation. In our lab, we did the opposite. In this slide I am trying to compare what ion trappers are doing, for example, in Dave Wineland's group and what we are doing in Paris. In the ion group in Boulder you trap ions with the configuration of electrodes, and you use laser beams to cool them down and to interrogate the ion. In Paris, we do the opposite. We trap the photons, and we keep them for a long time. We use a beam of atoms which are excited by lasers, special atoms, Rydberg atoms, to interrogate the photon field inside the cavity. So these experiments are two sides of the same coin. We manipulate non-destructively single atoms with photons or single photons with atoms. It requires an adjustment of light-matter interaction at the most fundamental level where a single atom interacts with a single photon. I just retell on this slide what we have been doing in Paris. With this technique we have been able to observe not the quantum jumps of matter, but the quantum jumps of light. How light escapes photon by photon from a cavity. We have been able to prepare quantum states of light which are superposition states of fields having different phases or amplitudes. This is a representation of these fields, what is known as a Wigner function. It's a kind of radiography of the field in the phase space. And you see you have two peaks, which correspond to the two states: dead and alive cat. In between you have fringes, which give the proof that this superposition is quantum coherent. You see as time goes on, how the quantum coherence vanishes. I want just to stress, since Roy Glauber talked about the gedankenexperiment of Bohr and Einstein discussion, that there was a discussion of Bohr and Einstein about this problem. They imagined a photon box which was able to keep photons for a long time. To count the photons without destroying them by just weighing the box in the gravitational field of the Earth. In our case, we don't weigh the box in the field of the Earth. We weigh it by having it interacting with atoms which do not absorb radiation. So we can see the quantum jumps which in the photon box experiment would be sudden jumps of the box in the gravitational field of the Earth. These experiments were supposed to be "impossible forever", as Schrödinger said. In fact, the main reason why we did that was to challenge this kind of statement, that these experiments are ridiculous, have ridiculous consequences, and will never be made. In fact, they have become possible because of the development of technology. The last example I want to show is the improvement in the study of ultrafast phenomena. You see here how the duration of light pulses have evolved. From about 10 picoseconds in the 1960s, it has gone down to a few femtoseconds in the 1990s. Then there was a plateau. Then again an improvement starting in the year 2000 because of the development of a new method called Chirped Pulse Amplification. Basically what is done is to excite, with a very intense burst of light, a beam of rare gas atoms. You see here, you have a gas jet crossed by the laser beam. And by a highly nonlinear process an x-ray beam of XUV radiation is emitted. What happens is that during the pulse, during the light pulse, there is a time at the crest of the electric field where the electrons from the atom are ejected. They are accelerated in the laser beam. And when the laser beam reverses, they come back at the atom. There is a re-collision, which is highly nonlinear process akin to a Bremsstrahlung effect, which emits a very, very intense and very short pulse. You see the pulse which is emitted then is a few nano-meters long and a few attoseconds long pulse. In fact, these two pulses, the original pulse and the attosecond pulse, propagate together. You can scan the time of one with respect to the other and do a kind of stroboscopy. For instance, here you see how the stroboscopy allows us to reconstruct the optical lightwaves itself and to get a resolution in the sub-femtosecond range. I don’t' have time to discuss that. But attosecond pulses are powerful probes to study ultrafast electronic processes in atoms and molecules. So, I would like to conclude that just to say that AMO physics has really exploded and made connections with a lot of fields. With condensed matter physics, with astrophysics because, for instance, cold Fermi gases simulate situations of nuclei in neutron stars. Also connections with particle physics. You can study symmetry variation, you can also see with very precise clocks whether fundamental constants are evolving in time or not. Of course with chemistry and biology, with attosecond physics, and of course, with information science. It's always the same thing. The permanent dialogue between blue sky research and innovation. The observation of nature showed that at the turn of the 19th and 20th century, as Roy Glauber showed in his talk, that light has strange properties which could not be explained, and needed new theoretical models, which was quantum theory. Quantum theory in turn has predicted new effects related to the atom-photon interactions and the laser. The laser has led to new technology, laser interferometer very precise clocks. Which allows us now to probe again nature and to see whether nature obeys or not to these rules. For example, if we find that fundamental constants are changing, it will tell us a lot of things about the interplay of quantum physics with cosmology. Just to conclude, because we are here in Lindau Meeting, I want just to say that a lot of Nobel Prizes have been given in physics and chemistry for works using lasers in AMO science. I think this is not complete. I apologize, I forgot some people. But I think there will be other prizes in this field in the future. And for the young audience here, I'm sure you have plenty of areas in which you can work using lasers - not with the hope to get a Nobel Prize, because this is the kind of hope which is not very constructive in a scientific area, but to do very exciting physics in the future. I apologize for having been too long. Thank you.

Es ist mir eine große Freude heute hier sein zu dürfen. Wie den meisten von Ihnen bereits bekannt ist, feiern wir in diesem Jahr das Internationale Jahr des Lichts. Aus gegebenen Anlass dachte ich mir, es wäre eine gute Gelegenheit, über die Revolutionen zu sprechen, die Laser in der Physik und in der Chemie in den letzten 50 Jahre mit sich gebracht hat. Ich hatte das Glück, meine wissenschaftliche Laufbahn in den 60er Jahren zu beginnen, zur gleichen Zeit, als der Laser erfunden wurde. Ich hatte auch das Glück, im Labor von Kastler und Brossel an der École Normale Supérieure in Paris angenommen zu werden. Kastler hatte die Methode des optischen Pumpens erfunden. Wie man mittels polarisiertem Licht Atome so anregen kann, dass diese in einen ganz besonderen Zustand gebracht werden können, um ihren Quantenzustand zu manipulieren und ein Gleichgewicht zu erreichen. Zu jener Zeit wurde das optische Pumpen mit klassischen Lampen erzielt. Als aber der Laser seinen Auftritt hatte, wurde das optische Pumpen mit Hilfe von Lasern verfeinert. Das Verfahren des optischen Pumpens wird immer noch in der kalten Atomphysik verwendet, in der Physik zum Auffangen von Ionen, in Atomuhren; es handelt sich hier also um eine sehr, sehr allgemeine Methode. Ich war ein Student zu dieser Zeit und dieses Bild wurde im Labor am Tag gemacht, an dem Kastler seinen Nobelpreis für die Methode des optischen Pumpen erhielt. Ich sitze hier zwischen Kastler und Brossel. Ich bin sehr froh, und sehr stolz darauf, Teil eines Labors zu sein, das solche weltweite Aufmerksamkeit auf sich gezogen hat. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, meinen Doktorvater. Er war ein ehemaliger Student von Kastler und Brossel. Er ist ebenfalls hier bei dieser Tagung, leider in einem Vortrag, der zum selben Zeitpunkt stattfindet. Es ist schön, sich diese Erinnerungen ins Gedächtnis zu rufen. Zu jener Zeit war es uns allen bewusst, dass der Laser aufregende Zeiten für die Atomphysik mit sich bringen würde. Wir wussten, dass der Laser sehr nützlich wäre, aber wir konnten uns das Ausmaß dieser Fortschritte, die der Laser mit sich bringen würde, nicht vorstellen. Ich möchte Ihnen heute zeigen, dass zehn Größenordnungen in vielen Bereichen gewonnen werden konnten, was nicht nur zu dieser Art der quantitativen Veränderung, sondern auch zu qualitativen Veränderungen und sehr unerwarteter Physik führte. Das Ganze begann natürlich ein paar Jahre früher, als 1954 Townes und sein Student Gordon, den ersten kohärenten Strahlungsemitter auf der Basis der Atomphysik entwickelten. Es war der Ammoniakstrahlmaser. Maser steht natürlich als Akronym für Also eine Atomstrahlmaschine. Es ist sicher interessant daran zu erinnern, dass dies an der Columbia University entwickelt wurde. Rabi gründete einen Forschungsbereich an der Columbia University vor dem Krieg. Er entwickelte die Methode der Molekularstrahlen. Diese Molekularstrahlen führten nicht nur zum Maser und Laser, sondern auch zu Atomuhren, magnetische Kernresonanz, MRI, und so weiter. All diese Bereiche in der Physik stammten aus Rabis Molekularstrahlmethode. Dies ist ein gutes Beispiel für die Tatsache, dass Grundlagenforschung zu unerwarteten Anwendungen führen kann. Natürlich, als der Maser entwickelt wurde, führte dies unmittelbar zum nächsten Schritt, es in den optischen Bereich zu erweitern, was damals dann der optische Maser genannt wurde. Charles Townes und sein Schwager, Art Schawlow, schrieben die erste theoretische Arbeit zur Funktion eines optischen Lasers. Townes dachte, dass vielleicht die optische Pumpen-Technik sinnvoll wäre um die Zustände in einem atomaren Medium umzukehren. Mir wurde gesagt, dass er 1958 nach Paris kam, um diese Ideen mit Kastler zu besprechen. Tatsächlich aber wurden die ersten Laser aus anderen Verfahren generiert. Beim ersten Laser handelte es sich um einen Festkörperlaser, dem Rubinlaser, der mit Pulsen betrieben wurde. Es wurde von Theodor Maiman 1960 erfunden. Einige Monate später wurde der erste Gaslaser, der mit einer Mischung aus Helium und Neon betrieben wurde, eingesetzt und er wurde von Ali Javan und Bennett entdeckt. Ab diesem Zeitpunkt wurden aus dieser Laserquelle neue Arten von Lasern entwickelt, die sehr interessante und faszinierende Eigenschaften hatten. Ich möchte auf dieser Folie nur einige der Eigenschaften des Lasers zusammenfassen. Diese Eigenschaften sind etwas widersprüchlich. Der Laser kann eine Sache, und das Gegenteil davon, tun. Ich glaube dies ist ein Beispiel für Bohrs Komplementaritätsidee. Abhängig davon, wie man es verwendet, kann sein Einsatz eine Sache oder genau das Gegenteil davon bewirken. Beispielsweise können Laser Materie auf die höchstmögliche Temperatur bringen. Sie können zur Fusion von Materie, zur Verdampfung von Materie, und auch zu sehr hohen Temperaturen, Millionen, Milliarden von Graden, führen - Temperaturen, bei denen Kerneffekte auftreten können. Zum Beispiel kann eine Kernfusion durch außerordentlich hohe Intensitäten ausgelöst werden. Zur gleichen Zeit, unter anderen Bedingungen, können Laser die geringstmöglichen Temperaturen erreichen. Sie können durch Impulsaustausch mit Materie verwendet werden, um Atome dazu zu bringen, fast bewegungslos zu werden. Und um die kältesten Objekte im Universum zu produzieren, was zu neuen Phasen der Quantenmaterie, siehe Bose-Einstein-Kondensate oder degenerierte Quantengase. Andererseits kann man sich Laser als ultrastabile Lichtstrahlen vorstellen. Man kann Laser entwickeln, die Lichtwellen entsprechen, die sich über Millionen von Kilometern ohne Leistungsverlust bewegen. Diese extra stabilen Laser können verwendet werden, um Atomuhren, die eine extrem hohe Genauigkeit brauchen, zu entwickeln. Gleichzeitig können Sie die Energie der Lichtstrahlen in sehr, sehr kurze Impulse packen, die sich über einige wenige Nanometer erstrecken, die nur aus wenigen Schwingungszyklen bestehen und die nur einige Attosekunden, Milliardstel eines Milliardstel einer Sekunde, andauern. Diese sehr kurzen Impulse können verwendet werden, um spektroskopische Holographie der Materie im Grenzbereich durchzuführen. Es ist also ein sehr flexibles Werkzeug für die Grundlagenforschung in der Physik, der Chemie, der Biologie natürlich, und soweit wir wissen, auch für Anwendungen in der Metrologie, in der Medizin, um zu kommunizieren, usw. Kehren wir zurück zur Geschichte; ich denke man kann dieses halbe Jahrhundert mehr oder weniger willkürlich in Jahrzehnte aufteilen. Das erste Jahrzehnt, die 1960er Jahre, war die Geburtsstunde des Lasers, die reifen Jahre des optischen Pumpens, während denen man begann, Laser zu verwenden, um mehr und mehr die Experimente mit dem optischen Pumpen zu verfeinern, und während denen man die ersten nicht-linearen Optik- Experimente mit Lasern machte. In den 1970er Jahren sah man eine Häufung von einstellbaren Lasern. Laser, die eingestellt werden konnten, um spezifische Energieniveaus in Atomen zu erregen und um ultra-hochauflösende Spektroskopie zu erreichen. Die 1980er Jahre waren das Jahrzehnt der Laserkühlung. Wie man Laserlicht verwenden kann, um Atome dazu zu bringen, zu ruhen. Es war auch die Zeit, während der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkungen mithilfe der Resonator-QED detailliert studiert wurden und dem Beginn der Physik der Ionenfalle. Die 1990er Jahre waren das Jahrzehnt, in dem Quanteninformation zur Geltung kamen, in dem man begann zu verstehen, dass man die Manipulationen von Atomen nutzen kann, um logische Operationen, bei denen Quanteneffekte wichtig waren, durchzuführen. Und das war der Beginn der Quanteninformation. Es war auch das Jahrzehnt, in dem das Bose-Einstein-Kondensat erreicht wurde und in dem Prozesse für ultraschnelle Laserpulse entwickelt wurden. Zwischen 2000 und jetzt hat es sich zu einem sehr weiten Bereich der Manipulation von echten oder künstlichen Atomen entwickelt. Echte Atome wurden durch künstliche Schaltungen ersetzt, zum Beispiel durch Josephson-Kontakte und Schaltkreise, die Atome imitieren, und die beispielsweise viel praktischer für die Quanteninformation waren. Es ist auch das Jahrzehnt, wo AMO-Physik auf kondensierte Materie trifft, denn wir können Kaltmaterie-Phänomene simulieren, die in Echtmaterial bei höheren Temperaturen mit unterschiedlichen Größenordnungen auftreten. Dies ist sehr nützlich, um die Eigenschaften einiger kondensierter Materiesysteme zu verstehen. In Bezug auf die Größenordnungen, möchte ich Ihnen auf dieser Folie schnell zeigen, was wir seitdem in verschiedenen Bereichen erreicht haben. Wie gesagt, Verbesserungen um zehn Größenordnung wurden in vielen Bereichen erreicht, und Verbesserungen um zehn Größenordnungen entsprechen einem durchschnittlichen Faktor von zehn alle fünf Jahre. So waren beispielsweise 1960 Uhren – also vor den Atomuhren – im Bereich von 10^-8 präzise. Das ist etwa eine Sekunde pro Jahr. Quarzuhren, die so funktionierten, wurden als sehr, sehr gut eingestuft. Jetzt können wir eine Präzision von 10^-18 erreichen: eine Sekunde seit Entstehung des Universums, also eine Verbesserung von zehn 10er-Potenzen. Wenn man sich die Empfindlichkeit der Messungen anschaut: als ich meinen Doktor machte, hatten wir Zellen, die 1000 Milliarden von Atomen enthielten, und wir haben Signale dieser makroskopischen Menge verarbeitet. Es galt als sehr verdünnt, weil 10^10 Atome nichts ist, einem sehr kleinen Fleck Materie fester Medien entspricht, aber es war eine sehr große Anzahl von Atomen. Jetzt können wir mit einem Atom oder einem Photon arbeiten und diese bearbeiten. Temperaturen - darauf habe ich bereits angespielt. wenn wir Doppler-Linien eingrenzen wollten. Und wenn man sehr fortschrittlich war, arbeitete man bei Heliumtemperaturen. Aber der Bereich variierte zwischen 100 und 300K. Bei der kalten Atomphysik erreichen wir einen Bereich von 10^-10 Kelvin, also ein riesiger Schritt. Im Bereich Geschwindigkeit und Zeitauflösung in den 1960er Jahren wurde eine Nanosekunde als sehr kurz betrachtet. Jetzt sprechen wir von Attosekunden. Schauen wir uns dies noch detaillierter an. Dies ist eine logarithmische Skala von Temperaturen, die die Differenz in der Größenordnung der Temperatur der physikalischen Phänomene anzeigt. Innerhalb der Sterne findet man Temperaturen von Millionen Grad. An der Oberfläche der Sonne, 6000 Grad. Raumtemperatur ist etwa 300 K, und die Atomgeschwindigkeiten liegen etwa im Bereich von 500 Metern pro Sekunde. Man hat kältere Systeme in der Natur, zum Beispiel den kosmischen Hintergrund, was das ganze Universum umgibt und einer Temperatur von -2,7 Kelvin entspricht. Im Labor ist es möglich, eine kryogene Temperatur im Bereich von 1 bis 10 Millikelvin unter Verwendung von flüssigem Helium zu erzielen. Als die Laser mithilfe von Laserkühlung an Bedeutung gewannen, wurde die Temperatur sofort auf bis zu einige hundert Mikrokelvin durch Verwendung der Technik der Doppler-Kühlung reduziert. Es ist mir ein wenig peinlich, darüber vor Steve Chu zu sprechen, der dieses Verfahren in den 1980er Jahren entwickelt hat. Aber die erreichte Temperatur, die man damals erreichte, befand sich im 100-Mikrokelvin-Bereich, was den Geschwindigkeiten in der Größenordnung von einem Meter pro Sekunde entsprach. Eine verfeinerte Technik, Sub-Doppler-Kühlung, bei der man zur gleichen Zeit mit dem Doppler-Effekt und dem optischen Pumpen spielt, erlaubte die Reduzierung sogar bis auf den 1-Mikrokelvin Bereich, mit Geschwindigkeiten im Bereich von zehn Zentimetern pro Sekunde. Indem man anschließend die Verdampfungskühlung erhöht, konnte die Temperatur bis in den Nanokelvin-Bereich reduziert werden, in denen Bose-Einstein-Kondensate auftauchen. Sie sehen, dass 11 Größenordnungen hin zu niedrigeren Temperaturen gewonnen wurden. Seit den 1960er Jahren, also fünf bis sechs Größenordnungen gegenüber niedrigen Atomgeschwindigkeiten. Steve Chu, Bill Phillips und Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, die hier an dieser Tagung in Lindau teilnehmen. Ein paar Worte über diese Kühlung. Wenn man Atome in eine Struktur von sich gegenläufig ausbreitenden Lichtstrahlen legt, kann man eine Situation hervorrufen, wo die Atome, die sich entgegen den Lichtstrahl bewegen, mehr Wechselwirkung erzeugen, als wenn sie sich in die gleiche Richtung bewegen. Dies erzeugt ein Ungleichgewicht, was, durch den Impulsaustausch, dazu neigt, die Atome zu kühlen, als ob sie in einem viskosen Medium baden. So wird die Temperatur auf die Bereiche reduziert, auf die ich zuvor hingewiesen hatte. Sobald man diese kalten Atome hat, kann man die Atomstrahlen aus-, und eine Magnetfalle einschalten. Diese Atome haben kleine magnetische Momente, die an das Elektron oder den Kern befestigt sind. Indem man Gradienten des magnetischen Feldes durchführt, kann man die Flasche bauen, die das Atom in einer gut definierten Position im Raum festhält. Diese Atome bewegen sich innerhalb eines Potentialtopfs, den man als Paraboltopf vereinfachen kann. Man kann sie so lenken, dass die Atome mit der höchsten Energie, die sich am Rand dieses Topfes bewegen, durch Eintauchen in einen anderes magnetisches Moment herausbefördert werden, ein magnetisches Moment, das nicht eingeschlossen ist. Es handelt sich um ein Hochfrequenzverfahren, das aus dem Aufbringen eines RF-Felds besteht, was es den schnellsten Atomen erlaubt, aus der Falle zu entkommen. Dies nennt man Verdampfungskühlung. Sobald die schnellsten Atome durch Kollisionen entronnen sind, normalisiert sich der Rest der Atome bei niedrigeren Temperaturen. Genau das passiert, wenn man auf einen heißen Kaffee pustet - die schnellsten Moleküle werden herausbefördert, und die Temperatur sinkt. Wenn man die Temperatur senkt, bedeutet dies, dass die Wellenlänge der Materie, die DeBroglie- Wellenlänge, zunimmt. An dem Punkt, an dem die DeBroglie-Wellenlängen die Größenordnung des Abstandes zwischen den Partikeln einnehmen, und wenn diese Teilchen Bosonen sind und im gleichen Quantenzustand beieinander liegen, sollten sie kondensieren. Bose und Einstein sagten diesen Effekt in den 1920er Jahren voraus. Diese Art des Experiments hat es uns ermöglicht, dies zu beobachten. Ich zeige Ihnen hier einen Film, der aus der Gruppe von Cornel und Weiman stammt, die die ersten Bose-Einstein-Kondensate 1995 entwickelten und dafür einen Nobelpreis im Jahre 2001 erhielten. Sobald diese kalten Atome an der Unterseite der Magnetfalle angekommen sind, ist der Trick, die Falle auszuschalten, damit die Atome in das Schwerefeld der Erde fallen. Sie entrinnen mit der gleichen Geschwindigkeit, die sie zuvor in der Falle hatten, bevor diese abgeschaltet wurde. Wenn Sie das also bei tiefen und noch tieferen Temperatur tun, dann sieht man diese Art von Film. Wenn die Temperatur sinkt, dann sehen Sie, dass die Verteilung der Geschwindigkeit immer gestauchter wird, und irgendwann taucht eine sehr schmale Spitze auf. Es gibt einen Phasenübergang, der alle Atome in den Grundzustand des Potentials, das den Atomen aufgetragen wurde, bringt. Sie sehen dies auch hier, in einem Bild, das war das Titelblatt von Science 1995. Eine weite Verteilung über dieser speziellen Temperatur, die sich plötzlich verengt und zu einer neuen Quantenphase der Materie führt, die seitdem durch Hunderttausende von Gruppen weltweit untersucht wurde. Wenn man die Atome aus der Falle entkommen lässt, indem man ein Loch in die Falle macht, erhält man einen kohärenten Strahl aus Materie. Das Äquivalent zu einem Laser, bei dem die Photonen durch Atome ersetzt werden. Sie haben sozusagen mehrere Arten dieser Atomlaser, die sehr kohärent sind, und mit denen Sie Interferometrie durchführen können. Dies sind Systeme, die verwendet wurden, um Interferometer zu bauen, die das Gravitationsfeld messen. Gravitometer, die die Rotationen messen, Gyrometer, und so weiter. Es gibt also eine ganze Reihe von Messtechniken, die mit diesem System entwickelt wurden. Ich sprach von Bose-Gasen, die es mögen, sich im gleichen Quantenzustand zu befinden. Man hat aber auch Atome, die zu der Fermi-Statistik gehören. Wenn Sie also einen Paraboltopf haben, dann braucht man ein Atom pro Quantenzustand, was bedeutet, dass die Größe dieses degenerierten Quantengases expandiert, je mehr Atome es enthält. Dies kann man auf sehr dramatische Art und Weise sehen, wenn man ein Experiment durchführt. Lithium hat zwei Isotope, ein Boson und ein Fermium Isotop. Wenn man das bosonische Isotop kühlt, wie Sie auf der linken Seite sehen können, sehen Sie, dass das Gas schrumpft und immer mehr schrumpft, je mehr Atome sich im Grundzustand des Potentialtopfes ansammeln. Wenn man versucht, dies mit Fermium zu tun, sehen Sie, dass es hier eine Grenze beim Schrumpfen gibt. Es ist der Fermi- oder Pauli-Druck, der aufgrund des Pauli-Prinzips zustande kommt, was diese Atome dazu zwingt, in den größeren Systemen zu bleiben. Natürlich war dies bekannt und wurde indirekt aus kondensierten Materie-Experimenten abgeleitet. Aber hier, mit Atomen, können Sie diesen Effekt lehrbuchmäßig anzeigen. Eine andere Art von Experiment, das in vielen Labors entwickelt wurde, besteht darin, die Suprafluidität dieser Quantengase zu untersuchen. Genau wie flüssiges Helium, aber auf eine sehr viel sauberere Weise, weisen diese Gase Suprafluidität auf, was bedeutet, wenn man ein Teilchen oder ein kleines Stück Materie in die Gase sendet, bewegt es sich ohne Reibung, ohne Viskosität. Es bedeutet auch, dass, wenn man beginnt, es zurück zu einem Feld mit diesem superfluiden Material zu drehen, dass es sich nicht so klassisch mit dem externen Teil des Systems, das sich schneller bewegt, dreht. Die Drehimpulse, die man versucht, in das System zu integrieren, brechen in Wirbel zusammen, in denen die Geschwindigkeit am höchsten ist, je näher man am Zentrum des Wirbels ist. Dies wurde mit Bosonen beobachtet. Sie sehen hier Experimente, die von Jean Dalibard in Paris durchgeführt wurden. Es wurde auch mit degenerierten Fermigasen beobachtet. In diesem Fall haben Sie ein paar Fermionen, die wechselwirken, um Verbund-Bosonen zu produzieren, ähnlich zu dem, was in der Supraleitung in Festkörpern passiert, bei denen Elektronen sich in Cooper-Paaren koppeln. Diese Paare verhalten sich wie Bosonen, und sie verursachen Suprafluidität und diese Art der Situation. Aber was man in der Physik kondensierter Materie beobachtet, ist, dass diese Wirbel nicht aufgrund der Rotation entstehen. Sie entstehen aufgrund des Versuchs, ein magnetisches Feld in das System zu integrieren. Das Magnetfeld tritt in diese Materialien mithilfe dieser Linien, diesen Wirbeln aus supraleitenden Strömen. Kalt-Atomphysiker simulieren also kondensierte Materie-Situationen. Ein neutrales Atom-Kondensat zu drehen entspricht dem Anlegen eines Magnetfeldes an ein Elektronengas. Dies ist eine sehr interessante Domäne, in der Sie diese Arten von Systemen verwenden können, und die Sie im Labor unter Verwendung von Laserstrahlen manipulieren können, um Situationen zu simulieren, die mit unterschiedlichen Größenordnungen in Festkörpern auftreten. Anders als bei Feststoffen ist das System, wie es ist: man kann die Leitfähigkeit nicht ändert, man kann den Abstand zwischen den Teilchen nicht ändern. Hier manipuliert man alle diese Parameter. Dies hat sich zu einem sehr wichtigen Bereich der AMO-Physik entwickelt, die eine Simulation der Vielteilchen-Probleme ist. Zum Beispiel können Sie ein Mehrzahl von Laserstrahlen verwenden, um periodische Strukturen zu realisieren, in denen Atome wie Eier im Eierkarton liegenbleiben. Die Größe dieser Struktur entspricht Mikrometern; im Vergleich dazu sind wir in der Physik kondensierter Materie im Angström-Bereich. Sie können auch die Wechselwirkung zwischen den Teilchen abstimmen, den Abstand der Partikel abstimmen. Und Sie können versuchen, zu untersuchen, was in realen Materialien durch Simulation mit diesem System passiert. Diese Simulation ist sehr wichtig, denn sobald man mehr als ein paar Dutzend Teilchen hat, kann man es nicht mehr auf einem klassischen Computer simulieren. Die Schrödinger-Gleichung explodiert, und der einzige Weg, es zu tun ist, zu versuchen, ein passendes System umzusetzen und zu schauen, was passiert. Die Hoffnung ist, dass, indem man diese Arten von Experimenten macht, wir mehr über Phänomene in Echt-Materialien lernen. Dies könnte helfen, künstliche Materialien zu bauen, welche interessante Eigenschaften, wie die Supraleitung bei hohen Temperaturen, usw. aufweisen würden. Jetzt habe ich ein paar Minuten, um über einen anderen Bereich zu sprechen, bei dem es um die Genauigkeit von Messungen geht. Dafür gehe ich nur kurz auf die Geschichte der Zeitmessung ein, nur damit Sie die großen Fortschritte, die in den letzten 50 Jahren gemacht worden sind, besser nachvollziehen können. Die eigentliche Messung der Zeit mit künstlichen Maschinen begann im 14. Jahrhundert mit Turmuhren. Hier hat man ein Gewinde und eine Art Hebel, der durch die Drehung des Gewindes schwingt, und man zählt die Schwingungen mit einem Rad, das Zähne wie diese hat. Dieses System wurde stark durch das Pendel verbessert als man diese Drehbewegung durch die Pendelschwingung ersetzte. Es gibt eine Hemmung, die die Zeiten zählt und sie in die Bewegung eines Zeigers überträgt. Dann im 18. Jahrhundert wurden die die Pendelschwingung durch die Schwingung einer Feder in den Uhren ersetzt. Diese Uhr wurde insbesondere durch Harrisson entwickelt, um eine Präzision zu erzielen, sodass man die Uhr von einem Teil der Welt zu einem anderen tragen konnte und die Zeit weiter lief, was wesentlich für die Messung der Längengrade war. Dann im 20. Jahrhundert wurden die Schwingungen eines Quarzstabes verwendet. Denn aufgrund des piezoelektrischen Effekts können die Schwingung in elektrische Stromschwingung übertragen werden, und per Elektronik kann die Anzahl der Schwingungen gezählt werden. Sie sehen, dass das Prinzip immer das Gleiche ist. Sie benötigen einen Oszillator, und man muss es an eine Zählmechanismus koppeln, der Perioden zählt und auch wieder die Energie im System herstellt. Was ist die Messunsicherheit? Die Turmuhr hat eine Messunsicherheit von einem Hundertstel. Wenn man die Zeit auf eine Viertelstunde pro Tag genau messen konnte, dann war das gut. Das Pendel variierte um etwa ein paar Sekunden pro Tag. Der Harrisson Chronometer ging um etwa ein paar Sekunden pro Monat falsch, was für die Navigation ausreichend genau war. Und Quarz variierte etwa eine Sekunde pro Jahr. Sie sehen, dass diese Verbesserung aus der Tatsache stammt, dass wir zu immer höheren Frequenzen gelangen. Denn wenn man mehr und mehr Zeiträume in eine Sekunde packen kann, dann erhöht man natürlich die Genauigkeit. Aber auf einer logarithmischen Skala, sehen Sie, dass es eine 10^6 Verbesserung innerhalb von sechs Jahrhunderten gab. In den letzten 50 Jahren betrug die Verbesserung 10 Größenordnungen mehr. Ich habe keine Zeit, um darauf detaillierter einzugehen, aber ich nenne Ihnen kurz die neuesten Entwicklungen. Jetzt basiert die Genauigkeit der Uhren auf der Schwingung optischer Übergänge in Atomen. Diese Atome sind entweder einzelne Ionen in einer Ionenfalle, oder eine Anordnung von kalten Atomen in einem kalten Atomgitter. Was ist der Zählmechanismus? Man sendet einen sehr, sehr stabilen Laser, der an der Spitze dieses sehr, sehr schmalen Übergangs blockiert wird. Aber dann muss man die Perioden zählen. Und die Art und Weise, um die Perioden zu zählen, ist, diesen Laser mit dem, was als Frequenzkamm bekannt ist, zu vergleichen, was ein Lasersystem ist, das ein Spektrum des Lichts emittiert, das aus Frequenzen mit dem gleichen Abstand besteht. Die Frequenzkammtechnik wurde von Hänsch und Hall entwickelt, die auch hier sind. Hierbei handelt es sich wirklich um einen Zählmechanismus, der den optischen Uhren die Atomuhr-Technologie eröffnet hat. Die Messunsicherheit liegt nun zwischen 10^-17 und einem 10^-18. Dies bedeutet, dass die Zeit innerhalb des Zeitraums seit der Entstehung des Universums auf eine Sekunde genau gemessen werden kann. Was dies bedeutet, ist nicht ganz klar. Es bedeutet, wenn Sie zwei Uhren vergleichen wollen, müssen Sie die Höhe innerhalb von ein paar Zentimetern angeben. Dies wurde experimentell in der Gruppe von Dave Weinland geprüft. Sie sehen hier zwei Uhren, die sich auf zwei Tischen befinden und Sie bewegen eine in Bezug auf die andere, und Sie sehen, dass Sie in der Lage sind, den Unterschied in der Zeit, der von der Uhr angegeben wird, zu sehen, wenn sie um 33 Zentimeter verschoben werden. Das war vor ein paar Jahren. Nun kann es auf etwa einen Zentimeter reduziert werden. Es gibt viele Dinge, die Sie damit tun können. Ich werde ein wenig auf die Nachweisempfindlichkeit eingehen. Wie gesagt, zur Zeit des optischen Pumpen brauchte man etwa 10^10 Atome, die natürlich mit Abermillionen von Photonen, Hochfrequenz-Photonen oder optische Photonen interagierten. war es möglich geworden, ein einzelnes Ion nur durch die Fluoreszenz dieses Ions in der Mitte der Falle zu sehen. Dies ist eine historische Bild, das in der Peter Toschek Gruppe im Jahr 1978 gemacht wurde. Auch hier haben wir zehn Größenordnungen in der Empfindlichkeit. Was können wir also damit machen? Natürlich können Sie einzelne Fälle in der Atomphysik und Quanteninformation damit bearbeiten. Ein einzelnes Atom emittiert nichtklassisches Licht aus einem einfachen Grund. Wenn man nur ein Atom hat, muss man es erneut in einen angeregten Zustand versetzen, bevor es ein neues Photon emittiert, somit gibt es ein Zeitfenster, während dem ein zweites Photon nicht emittiert werden kann. Dies wird Antibunching genannt und es wurde zum ersten Mal 1978, und dann 1985 mit einem einzelnen Ion beobachtet. Sie können einzelne Quantensprünge eines einzelnen gefangenen Ions beobachten. Wenn man sich ein einzelnes Ion anschaut, und wenn es ein Niveau hinterlässt, das lichtempfindlich ist, dann sehen Sie einen plötzlichen Abfall des Lichts zu einem zufälligen Zeitpunkt. Diese Quantensprünge waren in der Tat in den 1980er Jahren sehr umstritten. Einige Leute entschieden, dass Quantensprünge nie auftreten würden. Schrödinger schrieb darüber, und jetzt werden sie beobachtet. Sie werden nicht nur beobachtet, sondern sie sind Werkzeuge, die in allen Experimenten in der Quanteninformation verwendet werden. Wenn man viele Ionen hat, kann man sie durch die gemeinsame Bewegung in der Falle verschränken, und Sie können eine Menge Quanteninformationsspiele spielen, Ionenketten entwickeln und diese als eine Art Abakus für Quantenlogikoperationen verwenden. In unserem Labor taten wir das Gegenteil. Auf dieser Folie versuche ich, zu vergleichen, was Ionenfallen tun, zum Beispiel in Dave Weinlands Gruppe mit dem, was wir in Paris taten. In der Ionengruppe in Boulder fing man Ionen mit der Konfiguration von Elektroden auf, und man verwendete Laserstrahlen, um sie abzukühlen und um die Ionen zu untersuchen. In Paris, tun wir das Gegenteil. Wir fangen die Photonen ein, und wir halten sie für eine lange Zeit. Wir verwenden einen Strahl von Atomen, der durch Laser, spezielle Atome und Rydberg-Atome angeregt wird, um das Photonenfeld im Inneren des Hohlraums zu untersuchen. Diese Experimente sind also zwei Seiten derselben Medaille. Wir manipulieren nicht zerstörbare einzelne Atomen mit Photonen oder einzelne Photonen mit Atomen. Es erfordert eine Anpassung der Wechselwirkung von Licht und Materie auf der grundlegendsten Ebene, wobei ein einzelnes Atom in Wechselwirkung mit einem einzelnen Photon steht. Auf dieser Folie zeige ich, was wir in Paris getan haben. Mit dieser Technik ist es uns gelungen, nicht die Quantensprünge von Materie, sondern die Quantensprünge des Lichts zu beobachten. Wie Licht Photon nach Photon aus einem Hohlraum entweicht. Es ist uns gelungen, die Quantenzustände des Lichts vorzubereiten, die Überlagerungszuständen von Feldern mit unterschiedlichen Phasen oder Amplituden entsprechen. Hier haben wir eine Darstellung dieser Felder, was wir als Wignerfunktion kennen. Es ist eine Art von Röntgenaufnahme des Feldes im Phasenraum. Und Sie sehen zwei Spitzen, die den beiden Zuständen entsprechen: tote und lebendige Katze. Dazwischen gibt es Fransen, die den Beweis liefern, dass diese Überlagerung quantenkohärent ist. Sie sehen, wie die Quantenkohärenz verschwindet je mehr Zeit vergeht. Ich will einfach nur betonen, da Roy Glauber über das Gedankenexperiment von Bohr und Einstein sprach, dass es eine Diskussion zu diesem Problem zwischen Bohr und Einstein gab. Sie stellten sich eine Photon-Box vor, die in der Lage war, Photonen, für eine lange Zeit zu halten. Sie stellten sich vor die Photonen zählen zu können, ohne sie zu zerstören, indem die Box im Gravitationsfeld gewogen wird. In unserem Fall haben wir die Box nicht im Gravitationsfeld der Erde gewogen. Wir wogen sie, indem es mit Atomen wechselwirkte, die keine Strahlung absorbieren. So können wir also die Quantensprünge sehen, die beim Photon-Box-Experiment plötzliche Sprünge der Box im Schwerefeld der Erde verursachen würden. Diese Experimente wären laut Schrödinger „für immer unmöglich" gewesen. Tatsächlich lag der Hauptgrund, warum wir das gemacht haben, darin, die Aussage anzufechten, dass diese Experimente lächerlich seien und lächerliche Ergebnisse brächten und nie durchgeführt würden. Tatsächlich wurden sie aber aufgrund der Entwicklung der Technik möglich. Das letzte Beispiel, was ich Ihnen zeigen möchte, ist die Verbesserung bei der Forschung der ultraschnellen Phänomene. Sie sehen hier, wie die Dauer der Lichtimpulse sich weiterentwickelt hat. Von etwa 10 Pikosekunden in den 1960er Jahren wurde es bis auf wenige Femtosekunden in den 1990er Jahren reduziert. Dann gab es eine Pause. aufgrund der Entwicklung einer neuen Methode namens Chirped Pulse Amplification. Was man im Grunde gemacht hat, ist einen Strahl von seltenen Edelgasatomen mit einem sehr intensiven Lichtblitz in den angeregten Zustand zu versetzen. Hier sehen sie wie ein Gasstrahl von einem Laserstrahl durchquert wird. Durch einen hoch-nonlinearen Prozess wird ein Röntgenstrahl aus XUV Strahlung emittiert. Während des Impulses, während des Lichtimpulses, gibt es einen Zeitpunkt am Kamm des elektrischen Feldes, wenn die Elektronen aus dem Atom heraus befördert werden. Sie werden im Laserstrahl beschleunigt. Und wenn der Laserstrahl sich dreht, kommt er wieder zurück zum Atom. Es kommt zu einer erneuten Kollision, die stark einem nichtlinearen Prozess ähnelt, ähnlich eines Bremsstrahlungseffekts, der sehr, sehr intensive und sehr kurze Impulse emittiert. Sie sehen den Impuls, der emittiert wird: ein wenige Nanometer und wenige Attosekunden langer Impuls. In der Tat propagieren diese beiden Impulse, der ursprüngliche Impuls und der Attosekundenimpuls, zusammen. Sie können die Zeit von einem Impuls in Bezug auf den anderen Impuls scannen und eine Art Stroboskopie durchführen. Zum Beispiel, hier sehen Sie, wie die Stroboskopie es uns ermöglicht, die optischen Lichtwellen selbst zu rekonstruieren und eine Auflösung im Sub-Femtosekundenbereich zu bekommen. Ich habe keine Zeit darauf näher einzugehen. Aber Attosekunden-Impulse sind leistungsfähige Sonden, um ultraschnelle elektronische Prozesse in Atomen und Molekülen zu untersuchen. Ich würde gerne mit den Worten zum Abschluss kommen, dass AMO-Physik einen wirklichen Boom erlebt hat und in eine Menge Bereiche beeinflusst hat. Etwa die Bereiche der Physik kondensierter Materie oder die Astrophysik, wo beispielsweise kalte Fermigase die Situationen der Atomkerne in Neutronensternen simulieren. Auch Verbindungen mit Teilchenphysik gibt es. Sie können Symmetrievariation studieren, man kann auch anhand von sehr präzisen Uhren sehen, ob Fundamentalkonstanten sich im Laufe der Zeit ändern oder nicht. Natürlich mit der Chemie und Biologie, mit Attosekunden-Physik und natürlich mit der Informatik. Es ist immer dasselbe. Der permanente Dialog zwischen der Grundlagenforschung und der Innovation. Die Beobachtung der Natur zeigte, dass an der Wende vom 19. zum 20. Jahrhundert, wie Roy Glauber in seinem Vortrag darstellt, Licht seltsame Eigenschaften hat, die nicht erklärt werden konnten, und daher neue theoretische Modelle, wie die Quantentheorie, benötigt wurden. Die Quantentheorie hatte wiederum bisher unbekannte Effekte der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkung und den Laser vorhergesagt. Der Laser führte zu einer neuen Technologie: Laserinterferometrie und sehr genauen Uhren. Was uns jetzt erlaubt, die Natur erneut auf die Probe zu stellen und zu sehen, ob die Natur sich an diese Regeln hält oder nicht. Zum Beispiel, wenn wir feststellen, dass sich Naturkonstanten ändern, sagt uns das viel über das Zusammenspiel der Quantenphysik mit der Kosmologie. Zum Schluss möchte ich noch sagen, weil wir uns hier bei der Tagung in Lindau befinden, dass viele Nobelpreise in der Physik und Chemie für die Arbeiten mit Hilfe von Lasern in der AMO- Wissenschaft vergeben wurden. Ich denke, die Liste ist hier noch nicht vollständig. Entschuldigen Sie, ich habe ein paar Leute vergessen. Ich denke, es wird weitere Preise in diesem Bereich in der Zukunft geben. Ich bin mir sicher, dass das junge Publikum hier viele Bereiche hat, in denen Sie mit Hilfe von Lasern arbeiten können - nicht mit der Hoffnung, einen Nobelpreis zu bekommen, denn dies Art der Hoffnung, ist in einem wissenschaftlichen Bereich nicht sehr konstruktiv, aber um sehr spannende Physik in der Zukunft zu betreiben. Entschuldigen Sie, dass ich zu lange gesprochen habe. Vielen Dank

Haroche expanding on the versatile abilities of lasers
(00:05:20 - 00:07:16)

 

Laser research continues to dominate the domain of Nobel Prize achievements to this day. The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics went to Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou, and Donna Strickland for their groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics. Ashkin invented optical tweezers that can grab tiny objects such as particles, molecules, and even atoms with a laser beam. By using a strong lens to focus the laser light, the objects would be drawn to the point with the greatest light intensity due to radiation pressure. Optical tweezers have become the standard method for studying many biological processes – for instance, individual proteins, molecular motors, DNA, and the insides of cells.

Strickland and Mourou discovered a new technique for creating extremely short and intense laser pulses that revolutionized laser physics. Chirped pulse amplification (CPA) stretched a short laser pulse in time, amplified it, and squeezed it together again. Their invention is used in many applications, including the rapid illumination of interactions between molecules or atoms, drilling tiny holes for more efficient data storage, and manufacturing surgical stents.


Probing cells with light

In the 1970s, an early application for lasers was spectroscopy. Tunable dye lasers for spectroscopy had significant advantages over conventional sources, such as a narrow linewidth and concentrated high power in a narrow band. In 1989, Nobel Laureate William E. Moerner and German physicist Lothar Kador were the first to observe light being absorbed by a single molecule [8]. The method they invented, single-molecule spectroscopy, enables the study of what individual molecules are doing instead of millions.

A few years later, Moerner began working with variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP), a naturally occurring protein made by a jellyfish. When GFP is linked to other proteins, it can act as a visible marker, highlighting those proteins inside living cells. The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien for their discovery and development of GFP, which has become one of the most important tools in contemporary biology and medicine [9].

In his 2015 Lindau lecture, Moerner gave the audience an entertaining demonstration of fluorescence using a highlighter marker and a laser pointer.

 

William Moerner (2015) - Fun with Light and Single Molecules

Well good morning everybody. It's a great pleasure to be here and I'm very happy to have this opportunity to talk to the young scientists. Let me first give you a quick road map of what's going to happen. I want to start out by telling you about the historical overview to give you the feeling of what happened in the very first days of detecting single molecules. It's a beautiful story of spectroscopy but also statistics so I hope you're awake now. We're going to talk a little bit about mathematics in a few moments. Then in the middle, I'm going to give you some things that you can use. That you students and young scientists can use to tell your friends about molecules and show them about molecular fluorescents. Then I'll talk about the super resolution idea and how it works and give you a few examples to wind up. So first of all, back to the history. Let's go back to the middle of the 1980's and at that time, many amazing things were happening produced by many of the Nobel Laureates who are here actually. People were looking at individual ions in a vacuum trap and looking at single quantum systems in various ways and the question that arose, why not molecules? Shouldn't we be able to look at a single molecule as well as these single ions? Of course, there was a bit of a problem. This great physicist, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, Erwin Schrödinger, wrote in 1952 that we never experiment with just one electron atom or molecule. He had this feeling of course but it's sort of one of the dangers of saying, "What can not be done," if you like. (laughs) But there were plenty of other people who felt that detecting a single molecule optically might be very difficult. So what I have to do first is to explain how we got to the point to believe that is was possible. That requires talking a little bit about spectroscopy. So think about this kind of a molecule, this is a terrylene molecule. It has conjugated pi systems so it has absorption in the visible and at room temperature you could measure a UV-vis spectrum of it, you would see absorption bands. But let's cool it to low temperatures, in a solid, in a transparent host of para-Terphenyl. What happens when you cool down, you get rid of all the phonons, of course, and the absorption lines get very, very narrow, so narrow that I'm now showing those absorption lines here, this is the first electronic transition, there's not really four of them, there are four different sites inside the crystal, so think of this as the lowest electronic transition of the molecule and it's gotten very narrow. We can't even see the width very well. Let's expand the scale a little bit to try to do a more high resolution spectrum and here these lines appear to be resolved. But they have this big width, this I've now switched to pentacene, it's another molecule that's similar to terrylene and it has four sites but I'm only showing to of them. The question is, is that all there is? Well it shouldn't be of course. This molecule with all the phonones turned off and all vibrations turned off at this low temperature, ought to have it's first transition to be narrow, really on the order of 10 MHz because of the excited state lifetime should be the only thing limiting the width of the spectral line. So what's going on? Well what's going on here is something that is called Inhomogeneous Broadening. It's really like this picture shown on the right. There are very narrow absorption lines for the molecules because of what I just said but there is a distribution of central frequencies coming from the different environments in the solid that have slightly different stresses and strains. These absorption lines have gotten so narrow that now you can see the perturbations or the shifts produced by these individual, or different local environments. Inhomogeneous Broadening prevents you from seeing the homogeneous widths underneath it. So there were a number of techniques invented to measure the homogeneous width such as photon echoes. Another one is spectral-hole burning. A way of marking this inhomogeneous line or making a dip in the inhomogeneous line to see the homogeneous width. There was a lot of beautiful research being done on these topics in the 70's and 80's. I was at IBM research at this time where we were trying to use this spectral-hole burning idea as an optical storage scheme. Well the beauty of that particular research lab and those environments in those days is that we also could ask fundamental questions about this particular idea. I was intrigued by the following question, is there some sort of a spectral roughness on this inhomogeneous line that might represent some limit to signal-to-noise of writing data in this inhomogeneously broadened line that might be coming from statistical number fluctuations? So remember, this picture that had been measured of the inhomogeneous line, it sort of looked like a smooth Gaussian and so we're sort of asking the question, is this a smooth Gaussian or not? Now to understand what's going on here, I want to give a quick probability exercise for you this morning okay? Suppose we have these 10 boxes and we're going to throw 50 balls at these 10 boxes and all of the boxes are going to be equally likely for the balls to fall into the boxes. Here's one possibility, what do you think? Do you think this is a probable situation or not? How many think this is a probable situation? How many think this in an improbable situation? Ah good, okay, you know, that in this kind of an experiment, what is more likely to happen even though, they all have equal probability that you'll get different numbers in those different bins. Basically, scattering according to the square root of N around the mean. That's what I mean by number fluctuations. It's the well known number fluctuation effect. Who's amplitude is about the square root of N. It rises from the fact that the molecules are independent when they enter these boxes. So now, think of this horizontal axis here as a frequency axis or this spectral axis that I was just showing you a few moments ago and everyone of these bins is a homogeneous width in size and so now you'll see that the number of molecules that might fall into different regions of frequency space if they're going to spread all over like this, should vary with frequency. There should be some spectral roughness on the inhomogeneous line. Here's a quick simulation. Now I'm using a Gaussian shape probability which is smooth but in this simulation, you'd still see that there's this roughness on this inhomogeneously broadened line. In the mid 80's, no one had ever observed this roughness directly. So we set out to measure it. My postdoc Tom Carter and I, for pentacene in para-terphenyl at low temperatures and now you want to think of this inhomogeneously broadened line as being spread out tremendously so it's essentially horizontal on the scale of the stage and we used a laser technique, a powerful laser, high resolution technique to ask whether there is any such spectral structure and here's what we saw. It's amazing, there's this unbelievable structure that is, in fact, not noise. See, I'm not calling it noise, it's a roughness. If you measure it once, you see that shape. If you measure it again, you see exactly the same shape. That's because at low temperatures, this is static inhomogeneous broadening and this is coming from the effect I just described, that every spectral window, even though the probability of molecules landing at different frequencies is uniform, we see the number fluctuations. So we call this Statistical Fine Structure, where the average absorption, of course, scales as N, in fact, essentially everything you measure in experiments normally scales as N or if there's no linear effects maybe N squared or others. But having a spectral feature who's RMS size scales as the square root of N is pretty different, pretty interesting, something to wake you up okay on a Thursday morning early. Now, let me say that this was detected by using a special technique called FM spectroscopy. I won't describe all the details of that but it is uniquely suited to measuring the deviations of the absorption from the average value, that's what we needed here, admitted by Gary Bjorklund, 1980 and also in this area was developed a lot by Jan Hall and his collaborators. I want to emphasize one key thing here. I'm scanning a tunable single frequency laser to measure this and the laser line width is about 1 MHz, notice the scale here 400 MHz here. Every feature here is fully resolved. There is no limit produced by the measuring device. The measuring device is narrower than every spectral feature. These widths or the shapes, the ultimate narrowness of these things is being produced by the width of the molecules absorption. So everything in resolved here. Remember that because we're going to talk about resolution later in the spatial domain. So this was interesting to observe and it also had another effect for me. It made it clear that the single molecule limit was obtainable. Why is that? Well if the average absorption scales is N and let's say N is 1,000 in this case, then that means that the RMS amplitude of these features is about square root of 1,000 or 32 which means that once you see this, you only have to work 32 times harder to get to the single molecule limit. Only 32 times harder. Not 1,000 times harder. Believe me, that's a lot better. So we decided to push on with this method. That sort of came out of the blue, out of right field or something at this research that was going on on an optical storage scheme at this industrial lab. Can we push it to the N equal to one limit? Indeed, in 1989, Lothar Kador, my postdoc at the time, and I did push it to the single molecule limit and measured single molecule absorption by detecting these tiny changes in the transmitted light. For pentacene molecules as dopants in para-terphenyl. Now, this was an important advance because we showed that it could be done and a useful model system we had found. That method can be quantum limited and can be very, very sensitive but you can't get a lot of power on the detector in these measurements. Otherwise you'll broaden the absorption's and then you won't have as much sensitivity. A year later, a very important advance occurred, Michel Orrit, in France at that time, decided to detect the single molecule absorption also for pentacene in para-Terphenyl but by detecting the emitted light, the fluorescents from the molecules. This method, of course, could be difficult to do if you have backgrounds or scattered light. You have to detect this tiny signal from the individual molecules but they showed it could be done as very important advance in the field. You got better signal-to-noise by this method so everyone switched to fluorescents detection afterwards. So immediately the surprises started to occur. Here's some examples of where we're scanning the laser and detecting the molecules. You can see the molecular absorption's there. But look what's going on. There's something crazy. These molecules are moving around in frequency space, they're moving back and forth in a digital sort of fashion. When my postdoc Pat Ambrose saw this, he came running in and said, "The molecules "are jumping around." (laughs) We go, "Wow, that's really interesting." This is a surprise for us. We're at low temperatures, liquid helium in a crystal and so forth for a very stable molecule why would this be happening? Well, some theorists like Jim Skinner and others helped us to understand that this is coming from some dynamics in the host crystal that are changing at that low temperature to shift the molecules back and forth. Anyway, if I set the laser at one fixed frequency here some times the molecule will be in resonance and you'll see a signal. Other times it will be off, on, off, on and so you could also see blinking effects with these molecules at this early time, in 1991. Another surprise, Thomas Bass, now we've change to perylene in polyethylene, another host and look what happens here. You scan a molecule, scan it again, scan it again, nothing's changing and then if you go into resonance and just sit on top of the molecule for a little bit then you see the fluorescence drop down and if you quickly scan again, you see it's gone. It's moved somewhere, it's moved somewhere way off the screen to another wave length very far away. You've changed something in the nearby host. You've flipped a two level system that's made the molecule's absorption move. Amazingly, after another moment, the molecule comes exactly back. You scan it again and you see it again and again and again with no change. Go into resonance with it, you can drive it away. So, we were excited about this too because we could switch the molecule back and forth with laser light. These two effects, blinking and optical control are useful for things that are going to happen later. So now I want to, just for a moment, ask this question, why should we study single molecules? Of course you know that we've removed ensemble averaging and we can watch the individuals and see whether they are behaving differently or not. I just gave you some great examples of when they do behave differently. Now for your pedagogical interest, I just want to give you a way of explaining this issue to your friends. Why study single molecules? Let's think about baseball for a moment. If you think back to 2004, there was this team in The United States, the Red Sox, who were the Series champs and here are the rankings of the various teams and their team batting averages. So here's the team batting averages here and this is the ensemble measurement of course but if you measure the batting average player-by-player and then make a distribution like I'm showing here, then you see something interesting beyond the average. On the left, now you see that there's a distribution but there's also some outliers here. What are the outliers? Anybody know? (laughs) Pitchers, exactly, so here they are. (laughs) So basically, what we're doing is translating this idea from baseball to the molecular scale. Are the molecules marching to different drummers or not and maybe that is something else you might use. Another thing to explain to your friends is well, what is this business of molecular fluorescents? What is it really? Well you know it's like their day glow... ways of having socks or whatever but there's another cool way to demonstrate fluorescents to your friends and I'm going to show you that in a moment. But first you have to explain to them that first molecules start in a ground state and after absorbing the proper photon they go to an excited state of course. But then, there's some molecular relaxation, some vibrations are emitted etcetera and when the photon is emitted, it's shifted to a longer wavelength okay? It has lower energy. Well, I want to show you a neat way to demonstrate that. There's a very easy, simple demo that I'd like to describe. So what you need to do to demonstrate this is get one of these orange highlighters that you can buy. Make sure you get the cheap one. Don't get the no smudge variety, the no smudge variety doesn't dissolve as well in water. The cheap ones dissolve in water much better. And then you've got a little vial with water in it, that's what I've go here. All I have to do is open this highlighter and stick it into the water just for a few seconds, twirl it around a little bit, that's all I had to do. That's the highlighter done. Close the vial and we're going to just shake it a little bit, that's all we'll do. And then, of course the next thing you need is your green laser pointer which you have. You don't need a fancy one. You don't need high power. You don't need anything like that just five milliwatts is plenty. Now if you're prepared to turn off the lights, I'll show you what you can do with this. And I'll get this off as well. Well, it's not completely dark but maybe you'll see it. I hope you can. So it's really cool okay? (laughs) Now what's cool about this is that it's a little light saber right? And it's got that color. Remember the laser's green and this light coming out of the sample is more like orange and you can demonstrate that even though when the light goes through this, it emits green when it's going through but look, it's orange when it goes through but look, the transmitted light is still green. You haven't used up all of the light from the laser, the transmitted light is green. And that's a good example of, we only needed a few molecules to get this light coming out and to see it clearly. So what we're doing in our experiments of course, is reducing the concentration in that sample down to an unbelievably low level. Down to the single molecule limit. Also reducing the volume and detecting that light from the individual molecules. Well it turns out, you can even do that with your own eyes. In the experiments that are done at room temperature these days now, here let me just remind you how we are doing them at room temperature. We're not using FM spectroscopy but we're pumping from the ground state to the excited state and detecting this fluorescent shift into long wave lengths. Typically, we look at these little, small molecules which are about a nanometre in size or two. Aequorea green fluorescent protein and attach that to the molecule of interest and then here is, let's say a cell for example, where you have these molecules inside but in order to detect single molecules then, we focus the laser down to the smallest spot possible and that size is limited by diffraction to lend over two times the numberical aperture. So to get to the single molecule limit, you have to dilute the molecules. You have to have them farther apart then the width of this small focal spot. That's how we detect single molecules at room temperature and work at room temperature of course, even started back with the work of Keller and many others beginning even in 1990 but the near-field techniques and confocal techniques and wide-field techniques were demonstrated all along the way. So to show you some real data on a real system just see what it's like. This is the system composed of a cell where the transmembrane protein, which is called MHCII is in the cell membrane and it's been labeled by labeling an antigen that has a Fluor-4 on it. So each one of these spots in this image is coming from the light from individual MHCII complex. By the way, as I said, you can see this light with your very own eyes. You can look into our microscopes, get dark adapted, you could see the light from single molecules with your own eyes. They're very wonderful detectors. If you now watch this movie as a function of time, that's where the excitement comes. We're able to do this in living cells and this is room temperature. You can see that they're diffusing around. They're moving all over the cell membrane having this dance on the surface of the cell. They also turn off, that's some of the photo bleaching processes. There maybe some blinking in this experiment too that we'll talk about in a moment. That's an example of what can be done with single molecules at room temperature. We're still in, this happens to be from 2002 but there's one thing that happened in the 1990's that I want to mention. We decided to look at single copies of these fluorescent proteins that were being developed by Robert Tsien and others that you've already met and heard about at this wonderful meeting. I was at UC San Diego at that time, where Roger was and I asked him for some protein and Andy Cubitt gave us something that was called, at that time, a yellow fluorescent protein which had a few mutations to stabilize the longer wavelength absorption of GFP and we wanted to see, can we detect them and image them at room temperature and here's some examples. Yes, Rob Dickson was able to do that. This had not been done before at that time and so immediately new surprises appeared. We saw blinking, that is we saw the molecules emit, emit, emit, frame after frame but then turn off for a long time and then turn back on again and turn off and turn on and so forth in a stochastic sort of way. In other words, we were pumping and collecting photons but after some time period, the system went into a dark state, probably some isomerization of the chromophore from which it could return thermally and start emitting again. Another surprise is that after a longer radiation, we saw that these molecules went into a long lived dark state. We thought they might have been photo bleached but Rob used a little bit of shorter wave length blue light and he could restore those molecules back that had been turned off. You could then have them emit again for a long time and then if they finished, you could restore them back with 405 nanometers. So it was both blinking and light induced photo recovery that we observed in these experiments. This work and others, led to a huge increase in development of switchable fluorescent proteins. The photo activatable GFP was generated later DRONPA for switching by Miyawaki and others. The basic idea though is that the sort of dynamics that we had seen at low temperatures was also available at room temperature. Note by the way, here's this patent that Roger and I got for this particular process (laughs) at that time but what was in our mind? We weren't thinking about a super resolution. We were thinking about optical storage. We were thinking about using these molecules to store individual bits in the days. Remember I came from IBM and that was in our minds at the time. Now let's talk about the super resolution. Circumventing the optical diffraction limit. To illustrate this in a simple way for everyone. Here is a bacterial cell, only a couple of microns long and maybe 500 nanometers across and a particular protein has been labeled with yellow fluorescent protein in this case and you might think that all you have to do is buy one of those really, really expensive microscopes, the best microscope you can buy. Really expensive and here it is. Here's that expensive microscope but the problem is, you don't see any more detail, you want to see the shapes and the positions that those molecules might have and you're thwarted, you're thwarted by all these diffraction limit. Even though the emitters are really small, just a few nanometres in size, they appear to be a few hundred nanometres in size due to this particular important physical effect that's coming from the wavelength of light and numerical aperture that you're using. So, the reason that super resolution is exciting to many people today is that you can go from this kind of an image to that kind of an image. Tremendous increase in detail. Tremendous increase in what can be measured and quantified about what's going on inside the cell. In order to explain this, even though you heard beautiful explanations earlier in week from both Stefan and Eric. Let me just describe it in a very general way that I like to use. I like to say that first you need to detect single molecules and then you need two essential ingredients. Please note, I'm only going to describe the super resolution based on single molecules. Stefan already did a wonderful job talking about STED and the other methods that depend upon a patterned light beam to turn molecules on and off. First you have to super localize the individual molecules. A neat way to think about that. Here's a cinder cone inside a volcanic lake at Crater Lake Oregon and if you get a chance to go there, you should go. It's really a beautiful lake and here's a cinder cone inside that lake and of course, I have my obligatory scale bar. Now you know very well that if you just walk up to the top of this mountain with your cell phone, you can read out the GPS coordinates of the peak of the mountain. That's basically what we're doing. Here's one of our single molecule images. Now this is a molecule YFP, Yellow Fluorescent Protein, in a bacterium and I've now turned it into a 3-D picture just to show you the brightness here on the Z-axis. You see that that single molecule has a width that is coming from diffraction. What we do is we spread out the spot on a pixilated detector and we get multiple samples of the shape of that spot. By having those samples, you can fit the shape and get a very good estimate of the position that's much better then the diffraction limit, then the width of the mountain. The other key idea, I like to think of it as active control of the emitting concentration. This is something the experimenter has to do, has to actively choose a mechanism that controls the emitting concentration. So why is that at all useful? Well first of all, here's the structure. Suppose that we want to observe that structure and you decorate it with those fluorescent labels that I've been talking about. Now if you just turn on the laser then all of them will emit at the same time and that of course, is the problem. You see that all of the spots from the individual molecules overlap and that's the low resolution situation. What we do then is we use an on/off process. We use some way of having the molecules be in either an admissive state or in a dark state and use that to control the concentration at a low level. Then, you only turned a few on and then localize them. Do that again and do it again and ultimately, you can use a pointillist technique, connection to art here, a pointillist technique to reconstruct the underlying structure. This idea I heard about first in 2006 from Eric Betzig calling it PALM. Later we heard about STORM from Zhuang, F-PALM and then a whole variety of acronyms appeared showing different mechanisms for doing this. We started to use, at that time then, our YFP reactivation that I just showed you and we didn't give it an acronym so, of course, that's been forgotten right? So here's an acronym to add something back to the pile just for fun, that's mechanism independent, Single-Molecule Active Control Microscopy or SMACM. How does this work in a real system? Here's an image with many single molecules. There are these spots appearing on the right that are coming from localizing the molecules and when you do this many times, then you can build up the data required to reconstruct this high resolution image of the underlying structure. It also works in bacteria but I want to show you in bacteria how yellow fluorescent protein does this for you. YFP, that I was showing you earlier, blinks beautifully. Here's some bacterial cells and here's the fluorescents from those cells where there's something labeled in the cells. It's this that we're really using in our data taking. This beautiful blinking of the individual fluorescent proteins gives us information about where those molecules are located. And that approach then allows us to go from these kinds of diffraction limited images of several different proteins to these kinds of super resolution images of all those proteins. It's really a wonderful way to see the structure that was not observable before. These are actually our live cells. This is a fixed cell. We have this both in fixed and live situations. To show you that you can get more information that's a little bit of time dependence from this scheme, I want to mention the paint idea that came from Robin Hochstrasser. The way that paint works is that you have a structure that you want to observe and you bring fluorophores in from the outside, from the solution, fluorophores are zooming around while they're in the solution and you can't detect them easily but when they bind to something, they sit there and give you all that light and then you localize the ones that have bound. So we use that idea based on now a fluorescently labeled ligand, fluorescently labeled saxitoxin, to light up voltage gated sodium channels in a neuronal model cell, a PC12 cell. That's what this picture's showing you. This is one of the axonal projections outside of a differentiated PC12 cell and the beauty, of course, is in the movie. This is a movie where we're essentially averaging on the 500 millisecond time scale. All localization's we see within the 500 millisecond time and then playing that back as a sort of a sliding box car and you see all of these structures that grow and disappear over time as the cell is continuously growing. Time is very short so I'm going to have to skip a few things. I'll skip the applications of this to Huntington's disease. Here's some beautiful aggregates that we can observe by super resolution that are aggregates of the Huntington protein. I'm going to skip another example and end up with a few lessons that I would like to sort of give you that you can go tell your friends to end up today. You've all seen this beautiful Nobel medal. You can see, of course, Alred Noble's picture on this side of the medal. But I bet you haven't seen the back of the medal. Here's the back of the Nobel medal. It's really very, very beautiful. It's a beautiful, beautiful rendition. Here on the left is nature. Nature's holding a cornucopia and on the right is science. And science is lifting the veil off of nature. It's just amazing. So you want to communicate that science is fun. Help lift this veil of nature in our world. But there's more that you want to think about and communicate to those younger. Basically, the undergraduates and those who are getting interested in science. It's always important to find your passion. That's incredibly essential because it can be hard work to work through the problems that we do in our very methodical way. You have to be determined, persistent and methodical but having fun along the way is really important. It's all based on asking how things work. There's too many people that take their cell phone for granted, take some of the technology in our world so much for granted. We really ought to be asking more about how things actually work on the deep fundamental level all the way down to single molecules. So that means pushing beyond conventional wisdom and questioning assumptions. So, of course, we believe that science provides a rational and predictive way to understand our world and that's why we do it. So I want to thank my past students, postdocs and collaborators and of course, the current Guacamole team. Here they are being very serious as you can see. It's right before Halloween. Thanking our agencies as well. Here's a little fun, it's our No Ensemble Averaging logo. Which stands for single molecule spectroscopy. I forgot to say, why are we called the Guacamole team? Well, you know, one molecule is one guacamole right? One over avocado's number of moles. So with that, thank you very much for your attention.

Guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist mir eine besondere Freude, hier zu sein, und ich freue mich sehr über diese Möglichkeit, zu jungen Wissenschaftlern zu sprechen. Zunächst ein kleiner Überblick über den folgenden Vortrag. Ich beginne mit einem geschichtlichen Überblick, damit Sie ein Gefühl für die Geschehnisse in den Anfangstagen der Entdeckung einzelner Moleküle erhalten. Dabei handelt es sich um eine schöne Geschichte der Spektroskopie sowie der Statistik, hoffentlich sind Sie jetzt wach. Wir werden in Kürze auch ein wenig über Mathematik sprechen. Etwa in der Mitte werde ich über einige Dinge sprechen, die Sie selbst nutzen können. Die Sie als Studenten und junge Wissenschaftler nutzen können, um Freunden Moleküle und molekulare Fluoreszenz zu zeigen. Dann spreche ich über die Idee der Super-Resolution und wie sie funktioniert und gebe zum Schluss einige Beispiele. Zunächst einmal zurück zur Geschichte. Gehen wir zurück in die Mitte der 1980er-Jahre und in eine Zeit, in der viele erstaunlich Dinge passierten, übrigens hervorgebracht von vielen Nobelpreisträger, die ebenfalls hier sind. Leute schauten sich einzelne Ionen in einer Vakuumkammer an und betrachteten einzelne Quantensysteme auf verschiedene Weisen. Und die Frage kam auf, warum nicht auch Moleküle? Sollte es nicht möglich sein, so wie diese einzelnen Ionen auch ein einzelnes Molekül zu betrachten? Natürlich gab es da gewisse Probleme. Der großartige Physiker und Mitbegründer der Quantenmechanik, Erwin Schrödinger, schrieb 1952, dass wir nie mit einem einzelnen Atom, Elektron oder Molekül experimentieren. Er hatte so ein Gefühl, aber hierin steckt auch die Gefahr: zu sagen, was nicht möglich ist, wenn Sie so wollen (lacht). Es gab aber viele andere Leute, die meinten, dass die optische Entdeckung eines einzelnen Moleküls sehr schwierig wäre. Ich muss Ihnen also zunächst erklären, wie es dazu kam, dass man es überhaupt für möglich hielt. Dazu muss ich ein wenig über Spektroskopie sprechen. Denken Sie also an diese Art von Molekül, es handelt es um ein Terylen-Molekül. Es besitzt konjugierte Pi-Systeme, absorbiert also im Lichtspektrum und unter Raumtemperatur könnte man sein UV-VIS-Spektrum messen und würde Absorptionsbanden sehen. Aber lassen Sie es uns auf niedrige Temperatur herunterkühlen, zu einer festen, transparenten Masse aus para-Terphenyl. Durch das Herunterkühlen beseitigt man natürlich alle Phonone und die Absorptionslinien werden sehr, sehr schmal. So schmal, dass ich Ihnen nun diese Absorptionslinien hier zeige, dies ist der erste elektronische Übergang, es gibt nicht wirklich vier davon, es gibt innerhalb des Kristalls vier verschiedene Ansichten, also stellen Sie es sich als niedrigsten elektronischen Übergang des Moleküls vor und dass es sehr schmal geworden ist. Selbst die Breite können wir nicht sehr gut sehen. Dehnen wir also den Maßstab ein wenig, um mehr hochauflösendes Spektrum zu erhalten und diese Linien scheinen hier behoben zu sein. Sie haben aber diese große Breite. Ich habe hier auf Pentacen gewechselt, ein weiteres Terylen-ähnliches Molekül, das vier Ansichten besitzt, von denen ich aber nur zwei zeige. Dieser niedrigste elektronische Übergang entspricht eher einer Wellenzahl oder 30 GHz in der Breite. Nun stellt sich die Frage: Ist das wirklich alles? Natürlich sollte dem nicht so sein. Bei diesem Molekül, bei dem unter dieser niedrigen Temperatur alle Phonons und Vibrationen abgestellt wurden, sollte der erste Übergang schmal sein, eher im Bereich von 10 MHz aufgrund der Lebensdauer im angeregten Zustand. Dies sollte als Einziges die Breite der Spektrallinie einschränken. Was ist da also los? Nun, hier findet etwas statt, was als inhomogene Verbreitung bezeichnet wird. Auf dem rechten Bild kann man es gut sehen. Aufgrund des eben Gesagten gibt es für die Moleküle sehr schmale Absorptionslinien, es gibt aber eine Verteilung von zentralen Frequenzen, die aus den verschiedenen Umgebungen des Festkörpers kommen, die unter leicht anderen Belastungen und Spannungen stehen. Diese Absorptionslinien sind so dünn geworden, dass man nun die von diesen einzelnen oder unterschiedlichen lokalen Umgebungen produzierten Störungen oder Verlagerungen beobachten kann. Inhomogene Verbreitung verhindert die Betrachtung der darunterliegenden homogenen Breiten. Es wurden also verschiedene Techniken zur Messung der homogenen Breite wie etwa Photonechos erfunden. Bei einer weiteren handelt es um spektrales Lochbrennen. Eine Methode zur Markierung dieser inhomogenen Linie oder zu deren Senkung, um die homogene Breite sichtbar zu machen. In den 70er- und 80er-Jahren gab es zu diesen Themen viele schöne Untersuchungen. Zu dieser Zeit arbeitete ich bei IBM Research, wo wir versuchten, die Idee des spektralen Lochbrennens als System zur optischen Speicherung zu nutzen. Das Schöne an diesem Untersuchungslabor und dessen Umgebungen damals war, dass wir uns auch fundamentale Fragen zu dieser speziellen Idee stellen konnten. Eine Frage faszinierte mich besonders: Gibt es eine Art spektrale Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogenen Linie, die vielleicht eine Grenze zum Störabstand bei Schreiben von Daten in dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie repräsentierte, die eventuell durch Fluktuation statischer Zahlen erzeugt wurde? Erinnern Sie sich, dieses Bild, das aus der inhomogenen Linie gemessen worden war, sah in etwa wie eine glatte Gaußsche aus, und wir stellen uns also im Prinzip die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich darum handelte oder nicht? Für ein besseres Verständnis möchte ich Ihnen jetzt eine kurze Wahrscheinlichkeitsaufgabe stellen. Nehmen wir an, wir haben diese 10 Kisten und werfen 50 Bälle auf diese 10 Kisten, und alle Kisten haben dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Bälle in diese Kisten fallen. Hier ist eine Möglichkeit, was halten Sie davon? Halten Sie dies für eine wahrscheinliche Situation oder nicht? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine wahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine unwahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Ah, gut, okay, Sie wissen, dass es bei dieser Art von Experiment, obwohl alle dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit haben, wahrscheinlicher ist, eine unterschiedliche Anzahl in den verschiedenen Kisten zu erhalten. Im Prinzip Streuung gemäß der Quadratwurzel von N um den Durchschnitt. Das meine ich mit Zahlenfluktuation. Es handelt sich um den wohlbekannten Effekt von Zahlenfluktuation, dessen Größe in etwa die Quadratwurzel von N beträgt. Er steigt aufgrund der Tatsache, dass die Moleküle beim Eintritt in diese Kisten unabhängig sind. Stellen Sie sich nun diese horizontale Achse als Frequenzachse oder spektrale Achse, die ich Ihnen kurz zuvor gezeigt hatte, vor, und jede dieser Kisten hat eine homogene Breite. Und nun werden Sie sehen, dass die Anzahl der Moleküle, die in verschiedene Regionen des Frequenzraumes fallen könnten, falls sie sich so gleichmäßig verteilen, in der Häufigkeit variieren sollten. Auf der inhomogenen Linie sollte sich eine gewisse spektrale Rauigkeit befinden. Hier haben wir eine kurze Simulation. Jetzt benutze ich eine Gauß-förmige Wahrscheinlichkeit, die glatt ist, aber in dieser Simulation sieht man trotzdem noch, dass es diese Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie gibt. Aber Mitte der 80er-Jahre hatte noch niemand diese Rauigkeit jemals direkt beobachtet. Wir machten uns also daran, sie zu messen, mein Postdoc Tom Carter und ich, anhand von Pentacen und para-Terphenyl in niedrigen Temperaturen. Und nun müssen Sie sich diese inhomogen verbreitete Line als extrem ausgedehnt vorstellen, so dass sie im Prinzip horizontal ist, und wir benutzen dafür Lasertechnik, eine leistungsstarke Laser-High-Resolution-Technik um zu schauen, ob eine solche spektrale Struktur existierte, und haben das hier gesehen. Es ist erstaunlich, es gibt eine unglaubliche Struktur, bei der es sich in der Tat nicht um Störung handelt. Ich nenne es nicht Störung, es handelt sich um eine Rauigkeit. Wenn man sie einmal misst, sieht man diese Form. Wenn man sie erneut misst, sieht man die exakt gleiche Form. Weil es sich hier bei niedrigen Temperaturen - hier handelt es sich um statische inhomogene Verbreitung, was von dem eben beschriebenen Effekt kommt: dass wir bei jedem Spektralfenster die Zahlenfluktuation sehen, selbst wenn die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Moleküle bei verschiedenen Frequenzen landen, konstant ist. Wir bezeichnen dies als statistische Feinstruktur, in der die durchschnittliche Absorption natürlich den Maßstab N hat, wobei bei jeder Messung in Experimenten normalerweise N der Maßstab ist, oder N zum Quadrat oder ähnliches, wenn es keine linearen Effekte gibt. Aber ein Spektralmerkmal, dessen RMS-Größe den Maßstab Quadratwurzel von N hat, ist ziemlich anders, ziemlich interessant, und lässt einen an einem frühen Donnerstagmorgen recht gut wach werden. Dies wurde mithilfe einer speziellen Technik namens FM Spektroskopie entdeckt. Ich werde nicht alle Details dessen beschreiben, aber es ist besonders zur Messung der Abweichungen der Absorption vom Durchschnittswert geeignet, also genau, was wir hier brauchten. Es wurde 1980 von Gary Bjorklund entwickelt, wobei auf diesem Gebiet auch viel Entwicklung von Jan Hall und dessen Mitarbeitern beigetragen wurde. Ich möchte hier eine Schlüsselkomponente hervorheben. Ich scanne für diese Messung einen einstellbaren Einzelfrequenzlaser und die Breite der Laserlinie beträgt in etwa 1 MHz - bitte beachten Sie den Maßstab hier von 400 MHz. Jedes Merkmal ist hier also vollauf aufgelöst. Es gibt keine vom Messgerät erzeugte Einschränkung. Das Messgerät ist schmaler als jedes Spektralmerkmal. Diese Formen, die endgültige Enge dieser Dinge wird durch die Breite der Molekülabsorption erzeugt. Somit ist hier alles aufgelöst. Behalten Sie dies im Hinterkopf, da wir später noch über Auflösung im Raumbereich sprechen werden. Dies war also eine interessante Beobachtung, die für mich einen weiteren Effekt hatte. Sie machte deutlich, dass die Grenze des einzelnen Moleküls erreichbar war. Warum dem so ist? Wenn der durchschnittliche Absorptionsmaßstab N ist und sagen wir N in diesem Fall 1.000 beträgt, dann bedeutet dies, dass die RMS-Amplitude dieser Merkmale etwa die Quadratwurzel von 1.000, also 32 beträgt, was bedeutet, dass es, sobald man an diesem Punkt ist, Nur 32-mal mehr anstrengen. Nicht 1.000-mal anstrengen. Glauben Sie mir, dass ist sehr viel besser. Wir entschlossen uns also, diese Methode voranzutreiben. Das kam ein wenig aus dem Nichts oder aus heiterem Himmel: Können wir diese Untersuchungen zum System optischer Speicherung in jenem Industrielaboratorium, können wir sie bis zur Grenze von N gleich Eins bringen? Tatsächlich schafften Lothar Kador, mein damaliger Postdoc, und ich es 1989 an die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und maßen die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls anhand dieser winzigen Veränderungen im übertragenden Licht. Für Pentacen-Moleküle als Dopanten in para-Terphenyl. Hierbei handelte es sich um einen wichtigen Vorstoß, da wir gezeigt hatten, dass es ging, und dabei ein nützliches Modellsystem gefunden hatten. Jene Methode kann quantenbegrenzt und sehr, sehr empfindlich sein, aber man bekommt in diesen Messungen nicht viel Energie auf den Detektor. Sonst verbreitert man die Absorptionen und hat dadurch weniger Sensitivität. Ein Jahr später fand ein sehr wichtiger Vorstoß statt, diesmal in Frankreich, wo Michel Orrit die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls auch für Pentacen in para-Terphenyl entdeckte, allerdings indem er das abgestrahlte Licht entdeckte, die Fluoreszenzen der Moleküle. Diese Methode konnte natürlich schwierig in der Ausführung sein, falls es zu Störungen oder Lichtstreuung kam. Man muss dieses winzige Signal der Einzelmoleküle finden, aber sie zeigten, dass es funktionierte, was einem sehr wichtigen Schritt in dem Gebiet gleichkam. Mit dieser Methode erhielt man ein besseres Signal-Stör-Verhältnis, weshalb danach alle zum Fluoreszenz-Detektor wechselten. Und sofort ging es mit Überraschungen los. Hier sehen Sie einige Beispiele, wo wir den Laser scannen und die Moleküle entdecken. Die molekulare Absorption können Sie dort sehen. Aber schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Da ist etwas Verrücktes. Diese Moleküle bewegen sich im Frequenzraum umher, sie bewegen sich in digitaler Art und Weise hin und her. Als mein Postdoc Pat Ambrose dies sah, kam er reingerannt und meinte: "Die Moleküle hüpfen umher!" (lacht) Und wir sagten: "Prima, das ist echt interessant." Weil das war für uns eine Überraschung. Wir befinden uns in niedrigen Temperaturen, flüssiges Helium in einem Kristall und so weiter, warum sollte dies also bei einem sehr stabilen Molekül passieren? Nun, einige Theoretiker wie Jim Skinner und andere halfen uns dabei zu verstehen, dass dies von einigen Kräftespielen im Wirtskristall kam, die sich bei dieser niedrigen Temperatur verändern und die Moleküle hin und her bewegen. Wenn ich den Laser hier auf eine feste Frequenz stelle, schwingt das Molekül manchmal mit und man sieht ein Signal. Manchmal aber ist es aus; an, aus, an und daher konnte man in den Anfangszeiten, 1991, auch Blinkeffekte bei diesen Molekülen sehen. Eine weitere Überraschung durch Thomas Basché: Jetzt wurde zu Perylen in Polyethylen als anderen Wirt gewechselt und schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Man scannt das Molekül, scannt es wieder und wieder, nichts verändert sich, und wenn man dann in Resonanz geht und für eine kleine Weile nur auf dem Molekül sitzt, dann sieht man wie die Fluoreszenz sinkt. Und wenn man schnell wieder scannt, dann sieht man, dass er verschwunden ist. Er ist woandershin gewandert, irgendwo weit abseits des Bildschirms auf eine andere, weit entfernte Wellenlänge. Man hat etwas beim nahegelegenen Wirt verändert. Man hat ein zweistufiges System gedreht, was zur Bewegung der Molekülabsorption geführt hat. Erstaunlicherweise kehrt das Molekül einen Moment später genau an seinen Platz zurück. Man scannt wieder und man sieht es wieder und wieder und wieder ohne Veränderung. Geht man mit ihm in Resonanz, so kann man es wegtreiben. Davon waren wir ebenfalls begeistert, weil wir das Molekül mit Laserlicht hin und her schalten konnten. Diese beiden Effekte, Blinken und optische Kontrolle, sind für die Dinge, die später passieren, nützlich. Jetzt will ich Ihnen kurz folgende Frage stellen: Warum sollten wir Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Sie wissen natürlich, dass wir den Ensemblemittelwert entfernt haben und die Individuen beobachten und dabei sehen können, inwiefern sie sich anders verhalten. Für ein unterschiedliches Verhalten habe ich Ihnen gerade einige gute Beispiele genannt. Im Sinn Ihres pädagogischen Interesses möchte ich Ihnen eine Weise zeigen, wie Sie diese Thematik Ihren Freunden erklären können. Warum Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Denken wir für einen Moment an Baseball. Wenn wir uns an das Jahr 2004 zurückerinnern, gab es da dieses Team in den USA, die Red Sox, die die Meisterschaft gewonnen hatten. Und hier sehen Sie die Rangliste der verschiedenen Teams und deren Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen. Hier also die teamübergreifenden Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen, und wie Sie wissen, entspricht dies dem Ensemblemittelwert. Wenn man jedoch die Schläger-Durchschnittsleistung von Spieler zu Spieler misst und dann eine solche Aufteilung wie hier erstellt, dann sieht man etwas Interessantes. Über die Durchschnittverteilung auf der linken Seite hinaus gibt es daneben auch eine Verteilung, aber mit einigen Ausreißern. Was sind die Ausreißer? Weiß das jemand? (lacht) Werfer, genau, die haben wir hier. (lacht) Im Prinzip übersetzen wir diese Idee aus dem Baseball in den molekularen Maßstab. Tanzen die Moleküle aus der Reihe oder nicht? Das ist vielleicht eine weitere Analogie, die Sie nutzen können. Was Sie Ihren Freunden ebenfalls erklären können, ist, worum es in der molekularen Fluoreszenz geht. Was ist das eigentlich? Sie kennen vielleicht diese Socken oder sowas, die bei Tageslicht leuchten. Es gibt aber eine weitere lässige Art und Weise, wie man seinen Freunden Fluoreszenz zeigen kann, und die zeige ich Ihnen gleich. Aber zunächst müssen Sie ihnen erklären, dass Moleküle in einem Grundzustand beginnen, und nach der Absorption des richtigen Photons gehen Sie natürlich in einen angeregten Zustand über. Dann gibt es eine gewisse molekulare Entspannung, einige Vibrationen werden ausgestoßen usw. Und wenn das Photon abgestoßen wird, hat es sich zu einer längeren Wellenlänge verschoben, okay? Es hat niedrigere Energie. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie sie das auf ziemlich geschickte Art und Weise zeigen können. Es gibt eine sehr leichte, einfache Vorführung, die ich beschreiben möchte. Um dies zu demonstrieren, müssen Sie sich einen dieser orangen Textmarker besorgen, die man überall kaufen kann. Nehmen Sie auf jeden Fall einen von den billigen. Nehmen Sie keinen von denen, die nicht verschmieren, die lösen sich in Wasser nicht so gut auf. Die billigen lösen sich in Wasser viel besser auf. Dann brauchen Sie ein kleines Fläschchen mit Wasser, wie ich es hier habe. Und ich muss lediglich diesen Textmarker öffnen und ihn für einige Sekunden ins Wasser stecken, ein bisschen herumdrehen, mehr brauche ich gar nicht machen. Mit dem Textmarker sind wir dann fertig. Das Fläschchen verschließen und ein bisschen schütteln, mehr braucht man nicht machen. Und als Nächstes braucht man einen grünen Laserpointer, den die meisten von uns haben. Es braucht kein besonders toller zu sein. Man braucht keine hohe Kraft. All das braucht man nicht, fünf Milliwatt sind vollkommend ausreichend. Wenn jetzt das Licht ausgemacht wird, zeige ich Ihnen, was Sie hiermit machen können. Das schalte ich auch aus. Es ist nicht komplett dunkel, aber vielleicht können Sie es trotzdem sehen. Das hoffe ich zumindest. Das ist doch echt lässig, oder? (Iacht) Das Lässige daran ist, dass es ein kleines extra Licht ist. Und es diese Farbe hat. Wie Sie wissen, ist der Laser grün, und das Licht aus dieser Probe ist eher orange, und Sie können zeigen, dass obwohl das Licht orange abstrahlt, wenn es hier durch geht, das übertragene Licht immer noch grün ist. Man hat nicht das gesamte Licht des Lasers aufgebraucht, das übertragene Licht ist grün. Und dies ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür, dass wir nur ein paar Moleküle brauchten, um dieses Licht herauszuholen und es deutlich zu sehen. Was wir also in unseren Experimenten machen, ist natürlich, dass wir die Konzentration in der Probe auf ein unglaublich niedriges Niveau reduzieren, bis auf die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und dabei auch das Volumen reduzieren und das Licht der einzelnen Moleküle feststellen. Wie man sieht, kann man das sogar mit den eigenen Augen machen. Bei den Experimenten, die heutzutage bei Raumtemperatur durchgeführt werden, lassen Sie mich Sie kurz erinnern, wie wir sie bei Raumtemperatur durchführen. Wir nutzen keine FM-Spektroskopie, sondern pumpen vom Ausgangszustand zum angeregten Zustand und stellen dabei diese Fluoreszenzverlagerung in langen Wellenlängen fest. Normalerweise betrachten wir diese kleinen, winzigen Moleküle, die etwa ein bis zwei Nanometer groß sind, oder ein grünes Fluoreszenzprotein, und verbinden das mit einem Molekül, das uns interessiert, beispielsweise eine Zelle, wo man diese Moleküle innen hat. Aber um einzelne Moleküle festzustellen, konzentrieren wir den Laser auf den kleinstmöglichen Punkt herunter und diese Größe wird durch Beugung eingeschränkt, um über zwei Mal der numerischen Blende zu landen. Um also zur Grenze des Einzelmoleküls zu gelangen, muss man die Moleküle verdünnen. Man braucht sie weiter auseinander als die Breite dieses kleinen Brennflecks. So stellen wir Einzelmoleküle bei Raumtemperatur fest. Und die Arbeit bei Raumtemperatur begann natürlich mit der Arbeit Kellers und vielen anderen Anfang 1990, aber die Nahfeld-Techniken und konfokalen Techniken und Weitfeld-Techniken wurden alle schon währenddessen gezeigt. Um Ihnen einige echte Daten über ein echtes System zu zeigen, damit Sie sehen, wie das aussieht: Hier ist das aus einer Zelle gebildete System, bei der sich das transmembrane Protein namens MHCII in der Zellmembran befindet, und das durch Markierung eines Antigens, das Fluor-4 an sich hat, markiert wird. Jeder der Punkte auf diesem Bild kommt also von dem Licht vom individuellen MHCII-Komplex. Übrigens, wie ich bereits sagte, kann man dieses Licht mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Man kann in unsere Mikroskope schauen, sich ans Dunkel anpassen, und das Licht einzelner Moleküle mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Deshalb lohnt es sich, die Augen zu schützen. Sie sind großartige Detektoren. Schaut man sich diesen Film als zeitabhängige Funktion an, dann wird es wirklich spannend. Wir können das mit lebendigen Zellen und bei Raumtemperatur machen. Man sieht, dass sie sich ausbreiten. Sie bewegen sie über die ganze Zellmembran und tanzen regelrecht auf der Oberfläche der Zelle. Sie gehen auch aus, das ist ein Teil der Fotobleichungsprozesse. Es kann in diesem Experiment auch zu Blinken kommen, worüber wir gleich sprechen werden. Das ist ein Beispiel dafür, was mit Einzelmolekülen bei Raumtemperatur gemacht werden kann. Das war aus dem Jahr 2002, aber es gibt noch ein Ereignis aus den 1990er-Jahren, das ich erwähnen möchte. Wir hatten uns entschlossen, uns einzelne Abzüge dieser fluoreszierenden Proteine anzuschauen, die von Roger Tsien und anderen, die Sie bereits bei diesem wunderbaren Meeting getroffen oder von denen Sie gehört haben, entwickelt wurden. Ich war zu der Zeit an der UC San Diego, wo auch Roger war, und bat ihn um ein Protein. Und Andy Cubitt gab uns etwas, was zu der Zeit als gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) bezeichnet wurde und das einige Mutationen besaß, und die längere Wellenlängenabsorption von YFP zu stabilisieren- Und wir wollten schauen, ob wir diese bei Raumtemperatur feststellen und abbilden konnten. Und hier sind einige Beispiele. Ja, Rob Dickson ist das gelungen. Das hatte zu dem Zeitpunkt noch niemand gemacht und gleich traten neue Überraschungen auf. Wir sahen Blinken, das heißt wie die Moleküle Bild für Bild ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten und dann für lange Zeit abschalteten und dann wieder angingen und ausgingen und angingen und so weiter auf sozusagen zufällige Art und Weise. Anders gesagt pumpten wir und sammelten Photonen, aber nach einer gewissen Zeitspanne ging das System in einen Dunkelzustand, wahrscheinlich eine Isomerisierung des Chromophors, von dem aus es thermisch zurückkehren und wieder ausstrahlen konnte. Eine weitere Überraschung bestand darin, dass wir nach einer langen Bestrahlung sahen, wie diese Moleküle in einen langlebigen Dunkelzustand übergingen. Wir dachten, dass sie vielleicht fotogebleicht wurden, aber Rob benutzte ein klein wenig blaues Licht mit kürzerer Wellenlänge und konnte so die zuvor ausgeschalteten Moleküle wiederherstellen. Man konnte sie dann wieder für eine lange Zeit ausstrahlen lassen und wenn sie dann aufhörten, konnte man sie mit 405 Nanometern wieder herstellen. Bei diesen Experimenten beobachteten wir also sowohl Blinken als auch lichtinduzierte Fotowiederherstellung. Diese und andere Arbeiten führten zu einem hohen Anstieg der Entwicklung von schaltbaren fluoreszierender Proteine. Das fotoaktivierbare YFP wurde später entwickelt, DRONPA zum Schalten von Miyawaki und anderen. Die Grundidee bestand jedoch darin, dass das Kräftespiel, das wir bei niedrigen Temperaturen gesehen hatten, auch bei Raumtemperatur verfügbar war. Hier ist übrigens das Patent, das Roger und ich für diesen speziellen Prozess damals erhalten haben (lacht). Aber was hatten wir im Sinn? An Super-Resolution dachten wir gar nicht. Wir dachten an optische Speicher. Wir dachten damals daran, diese Moleküle zur Speicherung einzelner Stücke zu nutzen. Wie gesagt kam ich von IBM und an solche Dinge dachten wir damals. Lassen sie uns nun über die Super-Resolution sprechen. Umgehung der optischen Auflösungsgrenze. Um dies für alle auf einfache Weise darzustellen, haben wir hier eine Bakterienzelle, gerade mal ein paar Mikrometer lang und vielleicht 500 Nanometer breit. Und ein bestimmtes Protein wurde in diesem Fall mit gelb fluoreszierendem Protein markiert. Und man könnte denken, dass man lediglich eins dieser richtig, richtig teuren Mikroskope kaufen braucht, das beste Mikroskop, das es zu kaufen gibt, richtig teuer. Hier haben wir es. Hier ist das teure Mikroskop. Aber das Problem ist, dass man keine weiteren Einzelheiten sieht. Man möchte die möglichen Formen und Positionen dieser Moleküle sehen, und das wird durch die offensichtliche Auflösungsgrenze vereitelt. Obwohl die Emitter sehr klein sind, gerade mal ein paar Nanometer groß, sehen sie aus, als wären sie mehrere hundert Nanometer groß, was an diesem speziellen wichtigen physikalischen Effekt liegt, der von der Wellenlänge von Licht und der numerischen Apertur, die man benutzt, stammt. Der Grund dafür, warum Super-Resolution für viele Menschen heute aufregend ist, besteht darin, dass man von dieser Art Bild zu dieser Art Bild gelangt. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg im Detail. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg dessen, was darüber, was in der Zelle passiert, gemessen und quantifiziert werden kann. Um dies zu erklären, obwohl Sie zu Beginn der Woche bereits wunderschöne Erklärungen von Stefan und Eric gehört haben, möchte ich es auf eine sehr allgemeine Art und Weise beschreiben. Ich sage gerne, dass man zunächst Einzelmoleküle erfassen muss und dann zwei wesentliche Zutaten benötigt. Wohlgemerkt beschreibe ich die Super-Resolution nur auf der Basis von Einzelmolekülen. Stefan hat bereits wunderbare Arbeit bei der Besprechung von STED und anderen Methoden, die auf einem gemusterten Lichtstrahl beruhen, um Moleküle ein- und auszuschalten, geleistet. Zunächst muss man die Einzelmoleküle super-lokalisieren. So kann man sich das auf hübsche Art und Weise vorstellen: Hier haben wir einen Aschekegel in einem vulkanischen See am Crater Lake in Oregon. Falls Sie mal die Möglichkeit haben, dorthin zu reisen, sollten Sie sie nutzen. Es ist wirklich ein schöner See und es gibt einen Aschekegel in diesem See. Und selbstverständliche habe ich meinen obligatorischen Kartenmaßstab: 120 mal 10 hoch 9 Nanometer. Jetzt wissen Sie natürlich ganz genau, dass man, wenn man mit dem Handy auf die Spitze des Berges geht, die GPS-Koordinaten des Berggipfels auslesen kann. Das ist es im Prinzip, was wir machen. Hier ist eins unserer Einzelmolekül-Bilder. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein YFP-Molekül, gelb fluoreszierendes Protein, in einer Bakterie, und ich habe es in ein 3D-Bild umgewandelt, um Ihnen diese Helligkeit hier auf der Z-Achse zu zeigen. Wie Sie sehen besitzt das Einzelmolekül eine Breite, die von Beugung hervorgerufen wird. Wir verbreitern also diese Stelle auf einem verpixelten Detektor und nehmen mehrere Proben der Form dieser Stelle. Anhand dieser Proben kann man die Form zusammensetzen und ein sehr gutes Aufmaß der Position erhalten, welches viel besser als die Auflösungsgrenze, als die Breite des Berges ist. Die andere Schlüsselidee bezeichne ich gerne als aktive Kontrolle der abgestrahlten Konzentration. Ein Forscher muss sich aktiv für einen Mechanismus entscheiden, der die abgestrahlte Konzentration kontrolliert. Warum das überhaupt nützlich ist? Hier haben wir zunächst die Struktur. Stellen Sie sich vor, dass wir diese Struktur beobachten wollen und sie dafür mit den fluoreszierenden Markern versehen, von denen ich vorhin gesprochen habe. Wenn man jetzt einfach den Laser einschaltet, dann strahlen alle von ihnen gleichzeitig ab, worin selbstverständlich das Problem besteht. Wie man sieht, überlappen sich alle Punkte der Einzelmoleküle, so sieht die Situation bei niedriger Auflösung aus. Wir nutzen dann einen Ein-/Aus-Prozess. Wir nutzen eine Methode, um die Moleküle entweder in einen Grundzustand oder einen Dunkelzustand zu versetzen, und nutzen dies zur Kontrolle der Konzentration auf einem niedrigen Niveau. Dann schaltet man nur einige an und ortet diese. Das macht man wieder und wieder und kann schließlich eine pointillistische Technik, ein Begriff aus der Kunst, eine pointillistische Technik zur Rekonstruktion der zugrunde liegenden Struktur verwenden. Von dieser Idee hörte ich 2006 zum ersten Mal von Eric Betzig, der dies als PALM bezeichnete. Später hörte man von STORM von Zhuang, F-PALM und dann erschien eine ganze Reihe von Akronymen, die für verschiedene Mechanismen mit dieser Funktion standen. Wir begannen damals mit der Nutzung unserer YFP-Reaktivierung, die ich Ihnen gerade zeigte, und gaben dem kein Akronym, was natürlich der Grund dafür ist, dass es in Vergessenheit geriet. Hier also ein Akronym, um dem Stapel spaßeshalber ein weiteres hinzuzufügen, Single Molecule Active Control Microscopy (Einzelmolekül-Aktivsteuerungs-Mikroskopie), kurz SMACM. Wie funktioniert diese Arbeit in einem echten System? Hier ein Bild mit vielen Einzelmolekülen. Diese rechts erscheinenden Punkte entstehen durch die Lokalisierung von Molekülen, und wenn man dies viele Male tut, dann kann man die Daten aufbauen, die man braucht, um dieses hochauflösende Bild der zugrunde liegenden Struktur zu rekonstruieren. Das funktioniert auch in Bakterien, aber ich will Ihnen zeigen, wie gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) in Bakterien funktioniert. YFP, das ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt hatte, blinkt wunderschön. Hier sind einige Bakterienzellen und hier die Fluoreszenzen dieser Zellen, in denen etwas markiert ist. Genau dies verwenden wir in unserer Datenaufnahme. Das schöne Blinken der einzelnen fluoreszierenden Proteine gibt uns Aufschluss darüber, wo sich diese Moleküle befinden. Und dieser Ansatz half uns, von diesen Arten von auflösungsbegrenzten Bildern mehrerer verschiedener Proteine zu diesen hochauflösenden Bildern all jener Proteine zu gelangen. Es handelt sich um eine wirklich wunderbare Art, um die Struktur zu sehen, die vorher nicht beobachtbar war. Hierbei handelt es um Live-Zellen. Hier eine fixierte Zelle. Wir haben es also sowohl in fixierten als auch in Live-Situationen. Um Ihnen zu zeigen, dass man weitere Informationen erlangen kann, die von diesem Schema etwas zeitabhängig sind, möchte ich die von Robin Hochstrasser entwickelte PAINT-Idee erwähnen. Bei PAINT nimmt man die Struktur, die man beobachten möchte, und bringt Luminophore von außen hinein, von außerhalb der Lösung. Luminophore schwirren herum, wenn sie sich in der Lösung befinden, und lassen sich nicht einfach auffinden, wenn sie sich aber mit etwas verbinden, dann sitzen sie dort und geben einem all das Licht, mit dem man dann die Verbundenen ortet. Also nutzen wir diese Idee auf der Basis eines nun mit Fluoreszenz markierten Liganden, mit Fluoreszenz markierten Saxitoxinen, um spannungsversperrte Natriumkanäle in einer neuronalen Modellzelle, einer PC12-Zelle, zu beleuchten. Dies wird auf diesem Bild gezeigt. Dies ist eine der axonalen Projektionen außerhalb einer abgegrenzten PC12-Zelle, und die Schönheit steckt selbstverständlich im Film. Bei diesem Film beträgt der Durchschnitt rund 500 Millisekunden. Wir sehen alle Ortungen während des Zeitfensters von 500 Millisekunden und spielen dies wie bei einem Daumenkino ab, und man sieht, wie all diese Strukturen mit der Zeit wachsen und verschwinden, während die Zelle fortlaufend wächst. Die Zeit rennt mir davon, weshalb ich einige Dinge überspringen muss. Ich überspringe diese Anwendungen bei der Huntington-Krankheit. Hier einige schöne Gesamtsummen, die wir mit Super-Resolution bei Aggregaten des Huntington-Proteins beobachten können. Ich werde ein weiteres Beispiel überspringen und mit einigen Lehren abschließen, die ich Ihnen gerne mitgeben möchte, damit Sie diese mit Ihren Freunden teilen können. Sie alle kennen diese schöne Nobel-Medaille. Selbstverständlich sieht man Alfred Nobels Abbild auf dieser Medaillenseite. Ich würde aber wetten, dass Sie die Rückseite der Medaille noch nie gesehen haben. Hier die Rückseite der Nobel-Medaille. Sie ist wirklich sehr, sehr schön. Eine schöne, bewundernswerte Darbietung. Hier auf der linken Seite ist die Natur, die Natur, die ein Füllhorn hält, und auf der rechten Seite ist die Wissenschaft. Und die Wissenschaft lüftet den Schleier der Natur. Es ist ganz erstaunlich. Ihr Ziel sollte es sein zu kommunizieren, dass Wissenschaft Spaß macht. Helfen Sie mit, den Schleier der Natur in unserer Welt zu lüften. Es gibt aber mehr, über das Sie nachdenken und das Sie an die Jüngeren kommunizieren sollten, hauptsächlich an die Studenten im Vorstudium und jene, die sich für Wissenschaft zu interessieren beginnen. Es ist immer wichtig, seine Passion zu finden. Das ist unerlässlich, weil es schwere Arbeit sein kann, sich durch die Aufgabenstellungen zu arbeiten, die wir auf unsere eigene methodische Art stellen. Man muss dafür entschlossen, hartnäckig und methodisch sein, aber es ist von großer Wichtigkeit, dabei auch Spaß zu haben. Alles basiert auf der Frage, wie Dinge funktionieren. Zu viele Menschen betrachten ihr Handy für selbstverständlich, betrachten einige der Technologien in unserer Welt für zu selbstverständlich. Wir sollten wirklich öfter hinterfragen, wie Dinge auf einer tiefen, fundamentalen Ebene wirklich funktionieren, bis hin zu einzelnen Molekülen. Mit der Konsequenz, dass man über konventionelles Wissen hinausgeht und Annahmen hinterfragt. Natürlich glauben wir, dass uns Wissenschaft eine rationale und voraussehende Methode bietet, unsere Welt zu verstehen, und aus diesem Grund üben wir sie aus. Deshalb möchte ich meinen ehemaligen Studenten, Postdoktoranten und Mitarbeitern und natürlich dem jetzigen Guacamole-Team danken. Hier können Sie sehen, wie ernst sie sein können. Das ist kurz vor Halloween. Danke auch an unsere Agenturen. Und hier noch etwas zum Spaß, unser Kein-Ensemblemittelwert-Logo, das für Einzelmolekül-Spektroskopie steht. Ich vergaß zu sagen, warum wir Guacamole-Team heißen. Nun, Sie wissen ja, ein Molekül entspricht einer Guacamole. Eins hoch die Anzahl der Mole in der Avocado. In diesem Sinn, vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

William Moerner's demonstration of fluorescence using a highlighter marker and a laser pointer
(00:14:39 - 00:16:30)

 

Moerner built upon the initial work by discovering that the fluorescence of one variant of GFP could be turned on and off at will with two different wavelengths of light. He dispersed the excitable proteins in a gel so they were sparsely scattered, and a regular optical microscope could discern individual molecules by their glow [10]. Moerner explained details of the discovery and its relevance in his 2015 talk at Lindau.

 

William Moerner (2015) - Fun with Light and Single Molecules

Well good morning everybody. It's a great pleasure to be here and I'm very happy to have this opportunity to talk to the young scientists. Let me first give you a quick road map of what's going to happen. I want to start out by telling you about the historical overview to give you the feeling of what happened in the very first days of detecting single molecules. It's a beautiful story of spectroscopy but also statistics so I hope you're awake now. We're going to talk a little bit about mathematics in a few moments. Then in the middle, I'm going to give you some things that you can use. That you students and young scientists can use to tell your friends about molecules and show them about molecular fluorescents. Then I'll talk about the super resolution idea and how it works and give you a few examples to wind up. So first of all, back to the history. Let's go back to the middle of the 1980's and at that time, many amazing things were happening produced by many of the Nobel Laureates who are here actually. People were looking at individual ions in a vacuum trap and looking at single quantum systems in various ways and the question that arose, why not molecules? Shouldn't we be able to look at a single molecule as well as these single ions? Of course, there was a bit of a problem. This great physicist, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, Erwin Schrödinger, wrote in 1952 that we never experiment with just one electron atom or molecule. He had this feeling of course but it's sort of one of the dangers of saying, "What can not be done," if you like. (laughs) But there were plenty of other people who felt that detecting a single molecule optically might be very difficult. So what I have to do first is to explain how we got to the point to believe that is was possible. That requires talking a little bit about spectroscopy. So think about this kind of a molecule, this is a terrylene molecule. It has conjugated pi systems so it has absorption in the visible and at room temperature you could measure a UV-vis spectrum of it, you would see absorption bands. But let's cool it to low temperatures, in a solid, in a transparent host of para-Terphenyl. What happens when you cool down, you get rid of all the phonons, of course, and the absorption lines get very, very narrow, so narrow that I'm now showing those absorption lines here, this is the first electronic transition, there's not really four of them, there are four different sites inside the crystal, so think of this as the lowest electronic transition of the molecule and it's gotten very narrow. We can't even see the width very well. Let's expand the scale a little bit to try to do a more high resolution spectrum and here these lines appear to be resolved. But they have this big width, this I've now switched to pentacene, it's another molecule that's similar to terrylene and it has four sites but I'm only showing to of them. The question is, is that all there is? Well it shouldn't be of course. This molecule with all the phonones turned off and all vibrations turned off at this low temperature, ought to have it's first transition to be narrow, really on the order of 10 MHz because of the excited state lifetime should be the only thing limiting the width of the spectral line. So what's going on? Well what's going on here is something that is called Inhomogeneous Broadening. It's really like this picture shown on the right. There are very narrow absorption lines for the molecules because of what I just said but there is a distribution of central frequencies coming from the different environments in the solid that have slightly different stresses and strains. These absorption lines have gotten so narrow that now you can see the perturbations or the shifts produced by these individual, or different local environments. Inhomogeneous Broadening prevents you from seeing the homogeneous widths underneath it. So there were a number of techniques invented to measure the homogeneous width such as photon echoes. Another one is spectral-hole burning. A way of marking this inhomogeneous line or making a dip in the inhomogeneous line to see the homogeneous width. There was a lot of beautiful research being done on these topics in the 70's and 80's. I was at IBM research at this time where we were trying to use this spectral-hole burning idea as an optical storage scheme. Well the beauty of that particular research lab and those environments in those days is that we also could ask fundamental questions about this particular idea. I was intrigued by the following question, is there some sort of a spectral roughness on this inhomogeneous line that might represent some limit to signal-to-noise of writing data in this inhomogeneously broadened line that might be coming from statistical number fluctuations? So remember, this picture that had been measured of the inhomogeneous line, it sort of looked like a smooth Gaussian and so we're sort of asking the question, is this a smooth Gaussian or not? Now to understand what's going on here, I want to give a quick probability exercise for you this morning okay? Suppose we have these 10 boxes and we're going to throw 50 balls at these 10 boxes and all of the boxes are going to be equally likely for the balls to fall into the boxes. Here's one possibility, what do you think? Do you think this is a probable situation or not? How many think this is a probable situation? How many think this in an improbable situation? Ah good, okay, you know, that in this kind of an experiment, what is more likely to happen even though, they all have equal probability that you'll get different numbers in those different bins. Basically, scattering according to the square root of N around the mean. That's what I mean by number fluctuations. It's the well known number fluctuation effect. Who's amplitude is about the square root of N. It rises from the fact that the molecules are independent when they enter these boxes. So now, think of this horizontal axis here as a frequency axis or this spectral axis that I was just showing you a few moments ago and everyone of these bins is a homogeneous width in size and so now you'll see that the number of molecules that might fall into different regions of frequency space if they're going to spread all over like this, should vary with frequency. There should be some spectral roughness on the inhomogeneous line. Here's a quick simulation. Now I'm using a Gaussian shape probability which is smooth but in this simulation, you'd still see that there's this roughness on this inhomogeneously broadened line. In the mid 80's, no one had ever observed this roughness directly. So we set out to measure it. My postdoc Tom Carter and I, for pentacene in para-terphenyl at low temperatures and now you want to think of this inhomogeneously broadened line as being spread out tremendously so it's essentially horizontal on the scale of the stage and we used a laser technique, a powerful laser, high resolution technique to ask whether there is any such spectral structure and here's what we saw. It's amazing, there's this unbelievable structure that is, in fact, not noise. See, I'm not calling it noise, it's a roughness. If you measure it once, you see that shape. If you measure it again, you see exactly the same shape. That's because at low temperatures, this is static inhomogeneous broadening and this is coming from the effect I just described, that every spectral window, even though the probability of molecules landing at different frequencies is uniform, we see the number fluctuations. So we call this Statistical Fine Structure, where the average absorption, of course, scales as N, in fact, essentially everything you measure in experiments normally scales as N or if there's no linear effects maybe N squared or others. But having a spectral feature who's RMS size scales as the square root of N is pretty different, pretty interesting, something to wake you up okay on a Thursday morning early. Now, let me say that this was detected by using a special technique called FM spectroscopy. I won't describe all the details of that but it is uniquely suited to measuring the deviations of the absorption from the average value, that's what we needed here, admitted by Gary Bjorklund, 1980 and also in this area was developed a lot by Jan Hall and his collaborators. I want to emphasize one key thing here. I'm scanning a tunable single frequency laser to measure this and the laser line width is about 1 MHz, notice the scale here 400 MHz here. Every feature here is fully resolved. There is no limit produced by the measuring device. The measuring device is narrower than every spectral feature. These widths or the shapes, the ultimate narrowness of these things is being produced by the width of the molecules absorption. So everything in resolved here. Remember that because we're going to talk about resolution later in the spatial domain. So this was interesting to observe and it also had another effect for me. It made it clear that the single molecule limit was obtainable. Why is that? Well if the average absorption scales is N and let's say N is 1,000 in this case, then that means that the RMS amplitude of these features is about square root of 1,000 or 32 which means that once you see this, you only have to work 32 times harder to get to the single molecule limit. Only 32 times harder. Not 1,000 times harder. Believe me, that's a lot better. So we decided to push on with this method. That sort of came out of the blue, out of right field or something at this research that was going on on an optical storage scheme at this industrial lab. Can we push it to the N equal to one limit? Indeed, in 1989, Lothar Kador, my postdoc at the time, and I did push it to the single molecule limit and measured single molecule absorption by detecting these tiny changes in the transmitted light. For pentacene molecules as dopants in para-terphenyl. Now, this was an important advance because we showed that it could be done and a useful model system we had found. That method can be quantum limited and can be very, very sensitive but you can't get a lot of power on the detector in these measurements. Otherwise you'll broaden the absorption's and then you won't have as much sensitivity. A year later, a very important advance occurred, Michel Orrit, in France at that time, decided to detect the single molecule absorption also for pentacene in para-Terphenyl but by detecting the emitted light, the fluorescents from the molecules. This method, of course, could be difficult to do if you have backgrounds or scattered light. You have to detect this tiny signal from the individual molecules but they showed it could be done as very important advance in the field. You got better signal-to-noise by this method so everyone switched to fluorescents detection afterwards. So immediately the surprises started to occur. Here's some examples of where we're scanning the laser and detecting the molecules. You can see the molecular absorption's there. But look what's going on. There's something crazy. These molecules are moving around in frequency space, they're moving back and forth in a digital sort of fashion. When my postdoc Pat Ambrose saw this, he came running in and said, "The molecules "are jumping around." (laughs) We go, "Wow, that's really interesting." This is a surprise for us. We're at low temperatures, liquid helium in a crystal and so forth for a very stable molecule why would this be happening? Well, some theorists like Jim Skinner and others helped us to understand that this is coming from some dynamics in the host crystal that are changing at that low temperature to shift the molecules back and forth. Anyway, if I set the laser at one fixed frequency here some times the molecule will be in resonance and you'll see a signal. Other times it will be off, on, off, on and so you could also see blinking effects with these molecules at this early time, in 1991. Another surprise, Thomas Bass, now we've change to perylene in polyethylene, another host and look what happens here. You scan a molecule, scan it again, scan it again, nothing's changing and then if you go into resonance and just sit on top of the molecule for a little bit then you see the fluorescence drop down and if you quickly scan again, you see it's gone. It's moved somewhere, it's moved somewhere way off the screen to another wave length very far away. You've changed something in the nearby host. You've flipped a two level system that's made the molecule's absorption move. Amazingly, after another moment, the molecule comes exactly back. You scan it again and you see it again and again and again with no change. Go into resonance with it, you can drive it away. So, we were excited about this too because we could switch the molecule back and forth with laser light. These two effects, blinking and optical control are useful for things that are going to happen later. So now I want to, just for a moment, ask this question, why should we study single molecules? Of course you know that we've removed ensemble averaging and we can watch the individuals and see whether they are behaving differently or not. I just gave you some great examples of when they do behave differently. Now for your pedagogical interest, I just want to give you a way of explaining this issue to your friends. Why study single molecules? Let's think about baseball for a moment. If you think back to 2004, there was this team in The United States, the Red Sox, who were the Series champs and here are the rankings of the various teams and their team batting averages. So here's the team batting averages here and this is the ensemble measurement of course but if you measure the batting average player-by-player and then make a distribution like I'm showing here, then you see something interesting beyond the average. On the left, now you see that there's a distribution but there's also some outliers here. What are the outliers? Anybody know? (laughs) Pitchers, exactly, so here they are. (laughs) So basically, what we're doing is translating this idea from baseball to the molecular scale. Are the molecules marching to different drummers or not and maybe that is something else you might use. Another thing to explain to your friends is well, what is this business of molecular fluorescents? What is it really? Well you know it's like their day glow... ways of having socks or whatever but there's another cool way to demonstrate fluorescents to your friends and I'm going to show you that in a moment. But first you have to explain to them that first molecules start in a ground state and after absorbing the proper photon they go to an excited state of course. But then, there's some molecular relaxation, some vibrations are emitted etcetera and when the photon is emitted, it's shifted to a longer wavelength okay? It has lower energy. Well, I want to show you a neat way to demonstrate that. There's a very easy, simple demo that I'd like to describe. So what you need to do to demonstrate this is get one of these orange highlighters that you can buy. Make sure you get the cheap one. Don't get the no smudge variety, the no smudge variety doesn't dissolve as well in water. The cheap ones dissolve in water much better. And then you've got a little vial with water in it, that's what I've go here. All I have to do is open this highlighter and stick it into the water just for a few seconds, twirl it around a little bit, that's all I had to do. That's the highlighter done. Close the vial and we're going to just shake it a little bit, that's all we'll do. And then, of course the next thing you need is your green laser pointer which you have. You don't need a fancy one. You don't need high power. You don't need anything like that just five milliwatts is plenty. Now if you're prepared to turn off the lights, I'll show you what you can do with this. And I'll get this off as well. Well, it's not completely dark but maybe you'll see it. I hope you can. So it's really cool okay? (laughs) Now what's cool about this is that it's a little light saber right? And it's got that color. Remember the laser's green and this light coming out of the sample is more like orange and you can demonstrate that even though when the light goes through this, it emits green when it's going through but look, it's orange when it goes through but look, the transmitted light is still green. You haven't used up all of the light from the laser, the transmitted light is green. And that's a good example of, we only needed a few molecules to get this light coming out and to see it clearly. So what we're doing in our experiments of course, is reducing the concentration in that sample down to an unbelievably low level. Down to the single molecule limit. Also reducing the volume and detecting that light from the individual molecules. Well it turns out, you can even do that with your own eyes. In the experiments that are done at room temperature these days now, here let me just remind you how we are doing them at room temperature. We're not using FM spectroscopy but we're pumping from the ground state to the excited state and detecting this fluorescent shift into long wave lengths. Typically, we look at these little, small molecules which are about a nanometre in size or two. Aequorea green fluorescent protein and attach that to the molecule of interest and then here is, let's say a cell for example, where you have these molecules inside but in order to detect single molecules then, we focus the laser down to the smallest spot possible and that size is limited by diffraction to lend over two times the numberical aperture. So to get to the single molecule limit, you have to dilute the molecules. You have to have them farther apart then the width of this small focal spot. That's how we detect single molecules at room temperature and work at room temperature of course, even started back with the work of Keller and many others beginning even in 1990 but the near-field techniques and confocal techniques and wide-field techniques were demonstrated all along the way. So to show you some real data on a real system just see what it's like. This is the system composed of a cell where the transmembrane protein, which is called MHCII is in the cell membrane and it's been labeled by labeling an antigen that has a Fluor-4 on it. So each one of these spots in this image is coming from the light from individual MHCII complex. By the way, as I said, you can see this light with your very own eyes. You can look into our microscopes, get dark adapted, you could see the light from single molecules with your own eyes. They're very wonderful detectors. If you now watch this movie as a function of time, that's where the excitement comes. We're able to do this in living cells and this is room temperature. You can see that they're diffusing around. They're moving all over the cell membrane having this dance on the surface of the cell. They also turn off, that's some of the photo bleaching processes. There maybe some blinking in this experiment too that we'll talk about in a moment. That's an example of what can be done with single molecules at room temperature. We're still in, this happens to be from 2002 but there's one thing that happened in the 1990's that I want to mention. We decided to look at single copies of these fluorescent proteins that were being developed by Robert Tsien and others that you've already met and heard about at this wonderful meeting. I was at UC San Diego at that time, where Roger was and I asked him for some protein and Andy Cubitt gave us something that was called, at that time, a yellow fluorescent protein which had a few mutations to stabilize the longer wavelength absorption of GFP and we wanted to see, can we detect them and image them at room temperature and here's some examples. Yes, Rob Dickson was able to do that. This had not been done before at that time and so immediately new surprises appeared. We saw blinking, that is we saw the molecules emit, emit, emit, frame after frame but then turn off for a long time and then turn back on again and turn off and turn on and so forth in a stochastic sort of way. In other words, we were pumping and collecting photons but after some time period, the system went into a dark state, probably some isomerization of the chromophore from which it could return thermally and start emitting again. Another surprise is that after a longer radiation, we saw that these molecules went into a long lived dark state. We thought they might have been photo bleached but Rob used a little bit of shorter wave length blue light and he could restore those molecules back that had been turned off. You could then have them emit again for a long time and then if they finished, you could restore them back with 405 nanometers. So it was both blinking and light induced photo recovery that we observed in these experiments. This work and others, led to a huge increase in development of switchable fluorescent proteins. The photo activatable GFP was generated later DRONPA for switching by Miyawaki and others. The basic idea though is that the sort of dynamics that we had seen at low temperatures was also available at room temperature. Note by the way, here's this patent that Roger and I got for this particular process (laughs) at that time but what was in our mind? We weren't thinking about a super resolution. We were thinking about optical storage. We were thinking about using these molecules to store individual bits in the days. Remember I came from IBM and that was in our minds at the time. Now let's talk about the super resolution. Circumventing the optical diffraction limit. To illustrate this in a simple way for everyone. Here is a bacterial cell, only a couple of microns long and maybe 500 nanometers across and a particular protein has been labeled with yellow fluorescent protein in this case and you might think that all you have to do is buy one of those really, really expensive microscopes, the best microscope you can buy. Really expensive and here it is. Here's that expensive microscope but the problem is, you don't see any more detail, you want to see the shapes and the positions that those molecules might have and you're thwarted, you're thwarted by all these diffraction limit. Even though the emitters are really small, just a few nanometres in size, they appear to be a few hundred nanometres in size due to this particular important physical effect that's coming from the wavelength of light and numerical aperture that you're using. So, the reason that super resolution is exciting to many people today is that you can go from this kind of an image to that kind of an image. Tremendous increase in detail. Tremendous increase in what can be measured and quantified about what's going on inside the cell. In order to explain this, even though you heard beautiful explanations earlier in week from both Stefan and Eric. Let me just describe it in a very general way that I like to use. I like to say that first you need to detect single molecules and then you need two essential ingredients. Please note, I'm only going to describe the super resolution based on single molecules. Stefan already did a wonderful job talking about STED and the other methods that depend upon a patterned light beam to turn molecules on and off. First you have to super localize the individual molecules. A neat way to think about that. Here's a cinder cone inside a volcanic lake at Crater Lake Oregon and if you get a chance to go there, you should go. It's really a beautiful lake and here's a cinder cone inside that lake and of course, I have my obligatory scale bar. Now you know very well that if you just walk up to the top of this mountain with your cell phone, you can read out the GPS coordinates of the peak of the mountain. That's basically what we're doing. Here's one of our single molecule images. Now this is a molecule YFP, Yellow Fluorescent Protein, in a bacterium and I've now turned it into a 3-D picture just to show you the brightness here on the Z-axis. You see that that single molecule has a width that is coming from diffraction. What we do is we spread out the spot on a pixilated detector and we get multiple samples of the shape of that spot. By having those samples, you can fit the shape and get a very good estimate of the position that's much better then the diffraction limit, then the width of the mountain. The other key idea, I like to think of it as active control of the emitting concentration. This is something the experimenter has to do, has to actively choose a mechanism that controls the emitting concentration. So why is that at all useful? Well first of all, here's the structure. Suppose that we want to observe that structure and you decorate it with those fluorescent labels that I've been talking about. Now if you just turn on the laser then all of them will emit at the same time and that of course, is the problem. You see that all of the spots from the individual molecules overlap and that's the low resolution situation. What we do then is we use an on/off process. We use some way of having the molecules be in either an admissive state or in a dark state and use that to control the concentration at a low level. Then, you only turned a few on and then localize them. Do that again and do it again and ultimately, you can use a pointillist technique, connection to art here, a pointillist technique to reconstruct the underlying structure. This idea I heard about first in 2006 from Eric Betzig calling it PALM. Later we heard about STORM from Zhuang, F-PALM and then a whole variety of acronyms appeared showing different mechanisms for doing this. We started to use, at that time then, our YFP reactivation that I just showed you and we didn't give it an acronym so, of course, that's been forgotten right? So here's an acronym to add something back to the pile just for fun, that's mechanism independent, Single-Molecule Active Control Microscopy or SMACM. How does this work in a real system? Here's an image with many single molecules. There are these spots appearing on the right that are coming from localizing the molecules and when you do this many times, then you can build up the data required to reconstruct this high resolution image of the underlying structure. It also works in bacteria but I want to show you in bacteria how yellow fluorescent protein does this for you. YFP, that I was showing you earlier, blinks beautifully. Here's some bacterial cells and here's the fluorescents from those cells where there's something labeled in the cells. It's this that we're really using in our data taking. This beautiful blinking of the individual fluorescent proteins gives us information about where those molecules are located. And that approach then allows us to go from these kinds of diffraction limited images of several different proteins to these kinds of super resolution images of all those proteins. It's really a wonderful way to see the structure that was not observable before. These are actually our live cells. This is a fixed cell. We have this both in fixed and live situations. To show you that you can get more information that's a little bit of time dependence from this scheme, I want to mention the paint idea that came from Robin Hochstrasser. The way that paint works is that you have a structure that you want to observe and you bring fluorophores in from the outside, from the solution, fluorophores are zooming around while they're in the solution and you can't detect them easily but when they bind to something, they sit there and give you all that light and then you localize the ones that have bound. So we use that idea based on now a fluorescently labeled ligand, fluorescently labeled saxitoxin, to light up voltage gated sodium channels in a neuronal model cell, a PC12 cell. That's what this picture's showing you. This is one of the axonal projections outside of a differentiated PC12 cell and the beauty, of course, is in the movie. This is a movie where we're essentially averaging on the 500 millisecond time scale. All localization's we see within the 500 millisecond time and then playing that back as a sort of a sliding box car and you see all of these structures that grow and disappear over time as the cell is continuously growing. Time is very short so I'm going to have to skip a few things. I'll skip the applications of this to Huntington's disease. Here's some beautiful aggregates that we can observe by super resolution that are aggregates of the Huntington protein. I'm going to skip another example and end up with a few lessons that I would like to sort of give you that you can go tell your friends to end up today. You've all seen this beautiful Nobel medal. You can see, of course, Alred Noble's picture on this side of the medal. But I bet you haven't seen the back of the medal. Here's the back of the Nobel medal. It's really very, very beautiful. It's a beautiful, beautiful rendition. Here on the left is nature. Nature's holding a cornucopia and on the right is science. And science is lifting the veil off of nature. It's just amazing. So you want to communicate that science is fun. Help lift this veil of nature in our world. But there's more that you want to think about and communicate to those younger. Basically, the undergraduates and those who are getting interested in science. It's always important to find your passion. That's incredibly essential because it can be hard work to work through the problems that we do in our very methodical way. You have to be determined, persistent and methodical but having fun along the way is really important. It's all based on asking how things work. There's too many people that take their cell phone for granted, take some of the technology in our world so much for granted. We really ought to be asking more about how things actually work on the deep fundamental level all the way down to single molecules. So that means pushing beyond conventional wisdom and questioning assumptions. So, of course, we believe that science provides a rational and predictive way to understand our world and that's why we do it. So I want to thank my past students, postdocs and collaborators and of course, the current Guacamole team. Here they are being very serious as you can see. It's right before Halloween. Thanking our agencies as well. Here's a little fun, it's our No Ensemble Averaging logo. Which stands for single molecule spectroscopy. I forgot to say, why are we called the Guacamole team? Well, you know, one molecule is one guacamole right? One over avocado's number of moles. So with that, thank you very much for your attention.

Guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist mir eine besondere Freude, hier zu sein, und ich freue mich sehr über diese Möglichkeit, zu jungen Wissenschaftlern zu sprechen. Zunächst ein kleiner Überblick über den folgenden Vortrag. Ich beginne mit einem geschichtlichen Überblick, damit Sie ein Gefühl für die Geschehnisse in den Anfangstagen der Entdeckung einzelner Moleküle erhalten. Dabei handelt es sich um eine schöne Geschichte der Spektroskopie sowie der Statistik, hoffentlich sind Sie jetzt wach. Wir werden in Kürze auch ein wenig über Mathematik sprechen. Etwa in der Mitte werde ich über einige Dinge sprechen, die Sie selbst nutzen können. Die Sie als Studenten und junge Wissenschaftler nutzen können, um Freunden Moleküle und molekulare Fluoreszenz zu zeigen. Dann spreche ich über die Idee der Super-Resolution und wie sie funktioniert und gebe zum Schluss einige Beispiele. Zunächst einmal zurück zur Geschichte. Gehen wir zurück in die Mitte der 1980er-Jahre und in eine Zeit, in der viele erstaunlich Dinge passierten, übrigens hervorgebracht von vielen Nobelpreisträger, die ebenfalls hier sind. Leute schauten sich einzelne Ionen in einer Vakuumkammer an und betrachteten einzelne Quantensysteme auf verschiedene Weisen. Und die Frage kam auf, warum nicht auch Moleküle? Sollte es nicht möglich sein, so wie diese einzelnen Ionen auch ein einzelnes Molekül zu betrachten? Natürlich gab es da gewisse Probleme. Der großartige Physiker und Mitbegründer der Quantenmechanik, Erwin Schrödinger, schrieb 1952, dass wir nie mit einem einzelnen Atom, Elektron oder Molekül experimentieren. Er hatte so ein Gefühl, aber hierin steckt auch die Gefahr: zu sagen, was nicht möglich ist, wenn Sie so wollen (lacht). Es gab aber viele andere Leute, die meinten, dass die optische Entdeckung eines einzelnen Moleküls sehr schwierig wäre. Ich muss Ihnen also zunächst erklären, wie es dazu kam, dass man es überhaupt für möglich hielt. Dazu muss ich ein wenig über Spektroskopie sprechen. Denken Sie also an diese Art von Molekül, es handelt es um ein Terylen-Molekül. Es besitzt konjugierte Pi-Systeme, absorbiert also im Lichtspektrum und unter Raumtemperatur könnte man sein UV-VIS-Spektrum messen und würde Absorptionsbanden sehen. Aber lassen Sie es uns auf niedrige Temperatur herunterkühlen, zu einer festen, transparenten Masse aus para-Terphenyl. Durch das Herunterkühlen beseitigt man natürlich alle Phonone und die Absorptionslinien werden sehr, sehr schmal. So schmal, dass ich Ihnen nun diese Absorptionslinien hier zeige, dies ist der erste elektronische Übergang, es gibt nicht wirklich vier davon, es gibt innerhalb des Kristalls vier verschiedene Ansichten, also stellen Sie es sich als niedrigsten elektronischen Übergang des Moleküls vor und dass es sehr schmal geworden ist. Selbst die Breite können wir nicht sehr gut sehen. Dehnen wir also den Maßstab ein wenig, um mehr hochauflösendes Spektrum zu erhalten und diese Linien scheinen hier behoben zu sein. Sie haben aber diese große Breite. Ich habe hier auf Pentacen gewechselt, ein weiteres Terylen-ähnliches Molekül, das vier Ansichten besitzt, von denen ich aber nur zwei zeige. Dieser niedrigste elektronische Übergang entspricht eher einer Wellenzahl oder 30 GHz in der Breite. Nun stellt sich die Frage: Ist das wirklich alles? Natürlich sollte dem nicht so sein. Bei diesem Molekül, bei dem unter dieser niedrigen Temperatur alle Phonons und Vibrationen abgestellt wurden, sollte der erste Übergang schmal sein, eher im Bereich von 10 MHz aufgrund der Lebensdauer im angeregten Zustand. Dies sollte als Einziges die Breite der Spektrallinie einschränken. Was ist da also los? Nun, hier findet etwas statt, was als inhomogene Verbreitung bezeichnet wird. Auf dem rechten Bild kann man es gut sehen. Aufgrund des eben Gesagten gibt es für die Moleküle sehr schmale Absorptionslinien, es gibt aber eine Verteilung von zentralen Frequenzen, die aus den verschiedenen Umgebungen des Festkörpers kommen, die unter leicht anderen Belastungen und Spannungen stehen. Diese Absorptionslinien sind so dünn geworden, dass man nun die von diesen einzelnen oder unterschiedlichen lokalen Umgebungen produzierten Störungen oder Verlagerungen beobachten kann. Inhomogene Verbreitung verhindert die Betrachtung der darunterliegenden homogenen Breiten. Es wurden also verschiedene Techniken zur Messung der homogenen Breite wie etwa Photonechos erfunden. Bei einer weiteren handelt es um spektrales Lochbrennen. Eine Methode zur Markierung dieser inhomogenen Linie oder zu deren Senkung, um die homogene Breite sichtbar zu machen. In den 70er- und 80er-Jahren gab es zu diesen Themen viele schöne Untersuchungen. Zu dieser Zeit arbeitete ich bei IBM Research, wo wir versuchten, die Idee des spektralen Lochbrennens als System zur optischen Speicherung zu nutzen. Das Schöne an diesem Untersuchungslabor und dessen Umgebungen damals war, dass wir uns auch fundamentale Fragen zu dieser speziellen Idee stellen konnten. Eine Frage faszinierte mich besonders: Gibt es eine Art spektrale Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogenen Linie, die vielleicht eine Grenze zum Störabstand bei Schreiben von Daten in dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie repräsentierte, die eventuell durch Fluktuation statischer Zahlen erzeugt wurde? Erinnern Sie sich, dieses Bild, das aus der inhomogenen Linie gemessen worden war, sah in etwa wie eine glatte Gaußsche aus, und wir stellen uns also im Prinzip die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich darum handelte oder nicht? Für ein besseres Verständnis möchte ich Ihnen jetzt eine kurze Wahrscheinlichkeitsaufgabe stellen. Nehmen wir an, wir haben diese 10 Kisten und werfen 50 Bälle auf diese 10 Kisten, und alle Kisten haben dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Bälle in diese Kisten fallen. Hier ist eine Möglichkeit, was halten Sie davon? Halten Sie dies für eine wahrscheinliche Situation oder nicht? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine wahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine unwahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Ah, gut, okay, Sie wissen, dass es bei dieser Art von Experiment, obwohl alle dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit haben, wahrscheinlicher ist, eine unterschiedliche Anzahl in den verschiedenen Kisten zu erhalten. Im Prinzip Streuung gemäß der Quadratwurzel von N um den Durchschnitt. Das meine ich mit Zahlenfluktuation. Es handelt sich um den wohlbekannten Effekt von Zahlenfluktuation, dessen Größe in etwa die Quadratwurzel von N beträgt. Er steigt aufgrund der Tatsache, dass die Moleküle beim Eintritt in diese Kisten unabhängig sind. Stellen Sie sich nun diese horizontale Achse als Frequenzachse oder spektrale Achse, die ich Ihnen kurz zuvor gezeigt hatte, vor, und jede dieser Kisten hat eine homogene Breite. Und nun werden Sie sehen, dass die Anzahl der Moleküle, die in verschiedene Regionen des Frequenzraumes fallen könnten, falls sie sich so gleichmäßig verteilen, in der Häufigkeit variieren sollten. Auf der inhomogenen Linie sollte sich eine gewisse spektrale Rauigkeit befinden. Hier haben wir eine kurze Simulation. Jetzt benutze ich eine Gauß-förmige Wahrscheinlichkeit, die glatt ist, aber in dieser Simulation sieht man trotzdem noch, dass es diese Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie gibt. Aber Mitte der 80er-Jahre hatte noch niemand diese Rauigkeit jemals direkt beobachtet. Wir machten uns also daran, sie zu messen, mein Postdoc Tom Carter und ich, anhand von Pentacen und para-Terphenyl in niedrigen Temperaturen. Und nun müssen Sie sich diese inhomogen verbreitete Line als extrem ausgedehnt vorstellen, so dass sie im Prinzip horizontal ist, und wir benutzen dafür Lasertechnik, eine leistungsstarke Laser-High-Resolution-Technik um zu schauen, ob eine solche spektrale Struktur existierte, und haben das hier gesehen. Es ist erstaunlich, es gibt eine unglaubliche Struktur, bei der es sich in der Tat nicht um Störung handelt. Ich nenne es nicht Störung, es handelt sich um eine Rauigkeit. Wenn man sie einmal misst, sieht man diese Form. Wenn man sie erneut misst, sieht man die exakt gleiche Form. Weil es sich hier bei niedrigen Temperaturen - hier handelt es sich um statische inhomogene Verbreitung, was von dem eben beschriebenen Effekt kommt: dass wir bei jedem Spektralfenster die Zahlenfluktuation sehen, selbst wenn die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Moleküle bei verschiedenen Frequenzen landen, konstant ist. Wir bezeichnen dies als statistische Feinstruktur, in der die durchschnittliche Absorption natürlich den Maßstab N hat, wobei bei jeder Messung in Experimenten normalerweise N der Maßstab ist, oder N zum Quadrat oder ähnliches, wenn es keine linearen Effekte gibt. Aber ein Spektralmerkmal, dessen RMS-Größe den Maßstab Quadratwurzel von N hat, ist ziemlich anders, ziemlich interessant, und lässt einen an einem frühen Donnerstagmorgen recht gut wach werden. Dies wurde mithilfe einer speziellen Technik namens FM Spektroskopie entdeckt. Ich werde nicht alle Details dessen beschreiben, aber es ist besonders zur Messung der Abweichungen der Absorption vom Durchschnittswert geeignet, also genau, was wir hier brauchten. Es wurde 1980 von Gary Bjorklund entwickelt, wobei auf diesem Gebiet auch viel Entwicklung von Jan Hall und dessen Mitarbeitern beigetragen wurde. Ich möchte hier eine Schlüsselkomponente hervorheben. Ich scanne für diese Messung einen einstellbaren Einzelfrequenzlaser und die Breite der Laserlinie beträgt in etwa 1 MHz - bitte beachten Sie den Maßstab hier von 400 MHz. Jedes Merkmal ist hier also vollauf aufgelöst. Es gibt keine vom Messgerät erzeugte Einschränkung. Das Messgerät ist schmaler als jedes Spektralmerkmal. Diese Formen, die endgültige Enge dieser Dinge wird durch die Breite der Molekülabsorption erzeugt. Somit ist hier alles aufgelöst. Behalten Sie dies im Hinterkopf, da wir später noch über Auflösung im Raumbereich sprechen werden. Dies war also eine interessante Beobachtung, die für mich einen weiteren Effekt hatte. Sie machte deutlich, dass die Grenze des einzelnen Moleküls erreichbar war. Warum dem so ist? Wenn der durchschnittliche Absorptionsmaßstab N ist und sagen wir N in diesem Fall 1.000 beträgt, dann bedeutet dies, dass die RMS-Amplitude dieser Merkmale etwa die Quadratwurzel von 1.000, also 32 beträgt, was bedeutet, dass es, sobald man an diesem Punkt ist, Nur 32-mal mehr anstrengen. Nicht 1.000-mal anstrengen. Glauben Sie mir, dass ist sehr viel besser. Wir entschlossen uns also, diese Methode voranzutreiben. Das kam ein wenig aus dem Nichts oder aus heiterem Himmel: Können wir diese Untersuchungen zum System optischer Speicherung in jenem Industrielaboratorium, können wir sie bis zur Grenze von N gleich Eins bringen? Tatsächlich schafften Lothar Kador, mein damaliger Postdoc, und ich es 1989 an die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und maßen die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls anhand dieser winzigen Veränderungen im übertragenden Licht. Für Pentacen-Moleküle als Dopanten in para-Terphenyl. Hierbei handelte es sich um einen wichtigen Vorstoß, da wir gezeigt hatten, dass es ging, und dabei ein nützliches Modellsystem gefunden hatten. Jene Methode kann quantenbegrenzt und sehr, sehr empfindlich sein, aber man bekommt in diesen Messungen nicht viel Energie auf den Detektor. Sonst verbreitert man die Absorptionen und hat dadurch weniger Sensitivität. Ein Jahr später fand ein sehr wichtiger Vorstoß statt, diesmal in Frankreich, wo Michel Orrit die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls auch für Pentacen in para-Terphenyl entdeckte, allerdings indem er das abgestrahlte Licht entdeckte, die Fluoreszenzen der Moleküle. Diese Methode konnte natürlich schwierig in der Ausführung sein, falls es zu Störungen oder Lichtstreuung kam. Man muss dieses winzige Signal der Einzelmoleküle finden, aber sie zeigten, dass es funktionierte, was einem sehr wichtigen Schritt in dem Gebiet gleichkam. Mit dieser Methode erhielt man ein besseres Signal-Stör-Verhältnis, weshalb danach alle zum Fluoreszenz-Detektor wechselten. Und sofort ging es mit Überraschungen los. Hier sehen Sie einige Beispiele, wo wir den Laser scannen und die Moleküle entdecken. Die molekulare Absorption können Sie dort sehen. Aber schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Da ist etwas Verrücktes. Diese Moleküle bewegen sich im Frequenzraum umher, sie bewegen sich in digitaler Art und Weise hin und her. Als mein Postdoc Pat Ambrose dies sah, kam er reingerannt und meinte: "Die Moleküle hüpfen umher!" (lacht) Und wir sagten: "Prima, das ist echt interessant." Weil das war für uns eine Überraschung. Wir befinden uns in niedrigen Temperaturen, flüssiges Helium in einem Kristall und so weiter, warum sollte dies also bei einem sehr stabilen Molekül passieren? Nun, einige Theoretiker wie Jim Skinner und andere halfen uns dabei zu verstehen, dass dies von einigen Kräftespielen im Wirtskristall kam, die sich bei dieser niedrigen Temperatur verändern und die Moleküle hin und her bewegen. Wenn ich den Laser hier auf eine feste Frequenz stelle, schwingt das Molekül manchmal mit und man sieht ein Signal. Manchmal aber ist es aus; an, aus, an und daher konnte man in den Anfangszeiten, 1991, auch Blinkeffekte bei diesen Molekülen sehen. Eine weitere Überraschung durch Thomas Basché: Jetzt wurde zu Perylen in Polyethylen als anderen Wirt gewechselt und schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Man scannt das Molekül, scannt es wieder und wieder, nichts verändert sich, und wenn man dann in Resonanz geht und für eine kleine Weile nur auf dem Molekül sitzt, dann sieht man wie die Fluoreszenz sinkt. Und wenn man schnell wieder scannt, dann sieht man, dass er verschwunden ist. Er ist woandershin gewandert, irgendwo weit abseits des Bildschirms auf eine andere, weit entfernte Wellenlänge. Man hat etwas beim nahegelegenen Wirt verändert. Man hat ein zweistufiges System gedreht, was zur Bewegung der Molekülabsorption geführt hat. Erstaunlicherweise kehrt das Molekül einen Moment später genau an seinen Platz zurück. Man scannt wieder und man sieht es wieder und wieder und wieder ohne Veränderung. Geht man mit ihm in Resonanz, so kann man es wegtreiben. Davon waren wir ebenfalls begeistert, weil wir das Molekül mit Laserlicht hin und her schalten konnten. Diese beiden Effekte, Blinken und optische Kontrolle, sind für die Dinge, die später passieren, nützlich. Jetzt will ich Ihnen kurz folgende Frage stellen: Warum sollten wir Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Sie wissen natürlich, dass wir den Ensemblemittelwert entfernt haben und die Individuen beobachten und dabei sehen können, inwiefern sie sich anders verhalten. Für ein unterschiedliches Verhalten habe ich Ihnen gerade einige gute Beispiele genannt. Im Sinn Ihres pädagogischen Interesses möchte ich Ihnen eine Weise zeigen, wie Sie diese Thematik Ihren Freunden erklären können. Warum Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Denken wir für einen Moment an Baseball. Wenn wir uns an das Jahr 2004 zurückerinnern, gab es da dieses Team in den USA, die Red Sox, die die Meisterschaft gewonnen hatten. Und hier sehen Sie die Rangliste der verschiedenen Teams und deren Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen. Hier also die teamübergreifenden Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen, und wie Sie wissen, entspricht dies dem Ensemblemittelwert. Wenn man jedoch die Schläger-Durchschnittsleistung von Spieler zu Spieler misst und dann eine solche Aufteilung wie hier erstellt, dann sieht man etwas Interessantes. Über die Durchschnittverteilung auf der linken Seite hinaus gibt es daneben auch eine Verteilung, aber mit einigen Ausreißern. Was sind die Ausreißer? Weiß das jemand? (lacht) Werfer, genau, die haben wir hier. (lacht) Im Prinzip übersetzen wir diese Idee aus dem Baseball in den molekularen Maßstab. Tanzen die Moleküle aus der Reihe oder nicht? Das ist vielleicht eine weitere Analogie, die Sie nutzen können. Was Sie Ihren Freunden ebenfalls erklären können, ist, worum es in der molekularen Fluoreszenz geht. Was ist das eigentlich? Sie kennen vielleicht diese Socken oder sowas, die bei Tageslicht leuchten. Es gibt aber eine weitere lässige Art und Weise, wie man seinen Freunden Fluoreszenz zeigen kann, und die zeige ich Ihnen gleich. Aber zunächst müssen Sie ihnen erklären, dass Moleküle in einem Grundzustand beginnen, und nach der Absorption des richtigen Photons gehen Sie natürlich in einen angeregten Zustand über. Dann gibt es eine gewisse molekulare Entspannung, einige Vibrationen werden ausgestoßen usw. Und wenn das Photon abgestoßen wird, hat es sich zu einer längeren Wellenlänge verschoben, okay? Es hat niedrigere Energie. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie sie das auf ziemlich geschickte Art und Weise zeigen können. Es gibt eine sehr leichte, einfache Vorführung, die ich beschreiben möchte. Um dies zu demonstrieren, müssen Sie sich einen dieser orangen Textmarker besorgen, die man überall kaufen kann. Nehmen Sie auf jeden Fall einen von den billigen. Nehmen Sie keinen von denen, die nicht verschmieren, die lösen sich in Wasser nicht so gut auf. Die billigen lösen sich in Wasser viel besser auf. Dann brauchen Sie ein kleines Fläschchen mit Wasser, wie ich es hier habe. Und ich muss lediglich diesen Textmarker öffnen und ihn für einige Sekunden ins Wasser stecken, ein bisschen herumdrehen, mehr brauche ich gar nicht machen. Mit dem Textmarker sind wir dann fertig. Das Fläschchen verschließen und ein bisschen schütteln, mehr braucht man nicht machen. Und als Nächstes braucht man einen grünen Laserpointer, den die meisten von uns haben. Es braucht kein besonders toller zu sein. Man braucht keine hohe Kraft. All das braucht man nicht, fünf Milliwatt sind vollkommend ausreichend. Wenn jetzt das Licht ausgemacht wird, zeige ich Ihnen, was Sie hiermit machen können. Das schalte ich auch aus. Es ist nicht komplett dunkel, aber vielleicht können Sie es trotzdem sehen. Das hoffe ich zumindest. Das ist doch echt lässig, oder? (Iacht) Das Lässige daran ist, dass es ein kleines extra Licht ist. Und es diese Farbe hat. Wie Sie wissen, ist der Laser grün, und das Licht aus dieser Probe ist eher orange, und Sie können zeigen, dass obwohl das Licht orange abstrahlt, wenn es hier durch geht, das übertragene Licht immer noch grün ist. Man hat nicht das gesamte Licht des Lasers aufgebraucht, das übertragene Licht ist grün. Und dies ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür, dass wir nur ein paar Moleküle brauchten, um dieses Licht herauszuholen und es deutlich zu sehen. Was wir also in unseren Experimenten machen, ist natürlich, dass wir die Konzentration in der Probe auf ein unglaublich niedriges Niveau reduzieren, bis auf die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und dabei auch das Volumen reduzieren und das Licht der einzelnen Moleküle feststellen. Wie man sieht, kann man das sogar mit den eigenen Augen machen. Bei den Experimenten, die heutzutage bei Raumtemperatur durchgeführt werden, lassen Sie mich Sie kurz erinnern, wie wir sie bei Raumtemperatur durchführen. Wir nutzen keine FM-Spektroskopie, sondern pumpen vom Ausgangszustand zum angeregten Zustand und stellen dabei diese Fluoreszenzverlagerung in langen Wellenlängen fest. Normalerweise betrachten wir diese kleinen, winzigen Moleküle, die etwa ein bis zwei Nanometer groß sind, oder ein grünes Fluoreszenzprotein, und verbinden das mit einem Molekül, das uns interessiert, beispielsweise eine Zelle, wo man diese Moleküle innen hat. Aber um einzelne Moleküle festzustellen, konzentrieren wir den Laser auf den kleinstmöglichen Punkt herunter und diese Größe wird durch Beugung eingeschränkt, um über zwei Mal der numerischen Blende zu landen. Um also zur Grenze des Einzelmoleküls zu gelangen, muss man die Moleküle verdünnen. Man braucht sie weiter auseinander als die Breite dieses kleinen Brennflecks. So stellen wir Einzelmoleküle bei Raumtemperatur fest. Und die Arbeit bei Raumtemperatur begann natürlich mit der Arbeit Kellers und vielen anderen Anfang 1990, aber die Nahfeld-Techniken und konfokalen Techniken und Weitfeld-Techniken wurden alle schon währenddessen gezeigt. Um Ihnen einige echte Daten über ein echtes System zu zeigen, damit Sie sehen, wie das aussieht: Hier ist das aus einer Zelle gebildete System, bei der sich das transmembrane Protein namens MHCII in der Zellmembran befindet, und das durch Markierung eines Antigens, das Fluor-4 an sich hat, markiert wird. Jeder der Punkte auf diesem Bild kommt also von dem Licht vom individuellen MHCII-Komplex. Übrigens, wie ich bereits sagte, kann man dieses Licht mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Man kann in unsere Mikroskope schauen, sich ans Dunkel anpassen, und das Licht einzelner Moleküle mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Deshalb lohnt es sich, die Augen zu schützen. Sie sind großartige Detektoren. Schaut man sich diesen Film als zeitabhängige Funktion an, dann wird es wirklich spannend. Wir können das mit lebendigen Zellen und bei Raumtemperatur machen. Man sieht, dass sie sich ausbreiten. Sie bewegen sie über die ganze Zellmembran und tanzen regelrecht auf der Oberfläche der Zelle. Sie gehen auch aus, das ist ein Teil der Fotobleichungsprozesse. Es kann in diesem Experiment auch zu Blinken kommen, worüber wir gleich sprechen werden. Das ist ein Beispiel dafür, was mit Einzelmolekülen bei Raumtemperatur gemacht werden kann. Das war aus dem Jahr 2002, aber es gibt noch ein Ereignis aus den 1990er-Jahren, das ich erwähnen möchte. Wir hatten uns entschlossen, uns einzelne Abzüge dieser fluoreszierenden Proteine anzuschauen, die von Roger Tsien und anderen, die Sie bereits bei diesem wunderbaren Meeting getroffen oder von denen Sie gehört haben, entwickelt wurden. Ich war zu der Zeit an der UC San Diego, wo auch Roger war, und bat ihn um ein Protein. Und Andy Cubitt gab uns etwas, was zu der Zeit als gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) bezeichnet wurde und das einige Mutationen besaß, und die längere Wellenlängenabsorption von YFP zu stabilisieren- Und wir wollten schauen, ob wir diese bei Raumtemperatur feststellen und abbilden konnten. Und hier sind einige Beispiele. Ja, Rob Dickson ist das gelungen. Das hatte zu dem Zeitpunkt noch niemand gemacht und gleich traten neue Überraschungen auf. Wir sahen Blinken, das heißt wie die Moleküle Bild für Bild ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten und dann für lange Zeit abschalteten und dann wieder angingen und ausgingen und angingen und so weiter auf sozusagen zufällige Art und Weise. Anders gesagt pumpten wir und sammelten Photonen, aber nach einer gewissen Zeitspanne ging das System in einen Dunkelzustand, wahrscheinlich eine Isomerisierung des Chromophors, von dem aus es thermisch zurückkehren und wieder ausstrahlen konnte. Eine weitere Überraschung bestand darin, dass wir nach einer langen Bestrahlung sahen, wie diese Moleküle in einen langlebigen Dunkelzustand übergingen. Wir dachten, dass sie vielleicht fotogebleicht wurden, aber Rob benutzte ein klein wenig blaues Licht mit kürzerer Wellenlänge und konnte so die zuvor ausgeschalteten Moleküle wiederherstellen. Man konnte sie dann wieder für eine lange Zeit ausstrahlen lassen und wenn sie dann aufhörten, konnte man sie mit 405 Nanometern wieder herstellen. Bei diesen Experimenten beobachteten wir also sowohl Blinken als auch lichtinduzierte Fotowiederherstellung. Diese und andere Arbeiten führten zu einem hohen Anstieg der Entwicklung von schaltbaren fluoreszierender Proteine. Das fotoaktivierbare YFP wurde später entwickelt, DRONPA zum Schalten von Miyawaki und anderen. Die Grundidee bestand jedoch darin, dass das Kräftespiel, das wir bei niedrigen Temperaturen gesehen hatten, auch bei Raumtemperatur verfügbar war. Hier ist übrigens das Patent, das Roger und ich für diesen speziellen Prozess damals erhalten haben (lacht). Aber was hatten wir im Sinn? An Super-Resolution dachten wir gar nicht. Wir dachten an optische Speicher. Wir dachten damals daran, diese Moleküle zur Speicherung einzelner Stücke zu nutzen. Wie gesagt kam ich von IBM und an solche Dinge dachten wir damals. Lassen sie uns nun über die Super-Resolution sprechen. Umgehung der optischen Auflösungsgrenze. Um dies für alle auf einfache Weise darzustellen, haben wir hier eine Bakterienzelle, gerade mal ein paar Mikrometer lang und vielleicht 500 Nanometer breit. Und ein bestimmtes Protein wurde in diesem Fall mit gelb fluoreszierendem Protein markiert. Und man könnte denken, dass man lediglich eins dieser richtig, richtig teuren Mikroskope kaufen braucht, das beste Mikroskop, das es zu kaufen gibt, richtig teuer. Hier haben wir es. Hier ist das teure Mikroskop. Aber das Problem ist, dass man keine weiteren Einzelheiten sieht. Man möchte die möglichen Formen und Positionen dieser Moleküle sehen, und das wird durch die offensichtliche Auflösungsgrenze vereitelt. Obwohl die Emitter sehr klein sind, gerade mal ein paar Nanometer groß, sehen sie aus, als wären sie mehrere hundert Nanometer groß, was an diesem speziellen wichtigen physikalischen Effekt liegt, der von der Wellenlänge von Licht und der numerischen Apertur, die man benutzt, stammt. Der Grund dafür, warum Super-Resolution für viele Menschen heute aufregend ist, besteht darin, dass man von dieser Art Bild zu dieser Art Bild gelangt. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg im Detail. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg dessen, was darüber, was in der Zelle passiert, gemessen und quantifiziert werden kann. Um dies zu erklären, obwohl Sie zu Beginn der Woche bereits wunderschöne Erklärungen von Stefan und Eric gehört haben, möchte ich es auf eine sehr allgemeine Art und Weise beschreiben. Ich sage gerne, dass man zunächst Einzelmoleküle erfassen muss und dann zwei wesentliche Zutaten benötigt. Wohlgemerkt beschreibe ich die Super-Resolution nur auf der Basis von Einzelmolekülen. Stefan hat bereits wunderbare Arbeit bei der Besprechung von STED und anderen Methoden, die auf einem gemusterten Lichtstrahl beruhen, um Moleküle ein- und auszuschalten, geleistet. Zunächst muss man die Einzelmoleküle super-lokalisieren. So kann man sich das auf hübsche Art und Weise vorstellen: Hier haben wir einen Aschekegel in einem vulkanischen See am Crater Lake in Oregon. Falls Sie mal die Möglichkeit haben, dorthin zu reisen, sollten Sie sie nutzen. Es ist wirklich ein schöner See und es gibt einen Aschekegel in diesem See. Und selbstverständliche habe ich meinen obligatorischen Kartenmaßstab: 120 mal 10 hoch 9 Nanometer. Jetzt wissen Sie natürlich ganz genau, dass man, wenn man mit dem Handy auf die Spitze des Berges geht, die GPS-Koordinaten des Berggipfels auslesen kann. Das ist es im Prinzip, was wir machen. Hier ist eins unserer Einzelmolekül-Bilder. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein YFP-Molekül, gelb fluoreszierendes Protein, in einer Bakterie, und ich habe es in ein 3D-Bild umgewandelt, um Ihnen diese Helligkeit hier auf der Z-Achse zu zeigen. Wie Sie sehen besitzt das Einzelmolekül eine Breite, die von Beugung hervorgerufen wird. Wir verbreitern also diese Stelle auf einem verpixelten Detektor und nehmen mehrere Proben der Form dieser Stelle. Anhand dieser Proben kann man die Form zusammensetzen und ein sehr gutes Aufmaß der Position erhalten, welches viel besser als die Auflösungsgrenze, als die Breite des Berges ist. Die andere Schlüsselidee bezeichne ich gerne als aktive Kontrolle der abgestrahlten Konzentration. Ein Forscher muss sich aktiv für einen Mechanismus entscheiden, der die abgestrahlte Konzentration kontrolliert. Warum das überhaupt nützlich ist? Hier haben wir zunächst die Struktur. Stellen Sie sich vor, dass wir diese Struktur beobachten wollen und sie dafür mit den fluoreszierenden Markern versehen, von denen ich vorhin gesprochen habe. Wenn man jetzt einfach den Laser einschaltet, dann strahlen alle von ihnen gleichzeitig ab, worin selbstverständlich das Problem besteht. Wie man sieht, überlappen sich alle Punkte der Einzelmoleküle, so sieht die Situation bei niedriger Auflösung aus. Wir nutzen dann einen Ein-/Aus-Prozess. Wir nutzen eine Methode, um die Moleküle entweder in einen Grundzustand oder einen Dunkelzustand zu versetzen, und nutzen dies zur Kontrolle der Konzentration auf einem niedrigen Niveau. Dann schaltet man nur einige an und ortet diese. Das macht man wieder und wieder und kann schließlich eine pointillistische Technik, ein Begriff aus der Kunst, eine pointillistische Technik zur Rekonstruktion der zugrunde liegenden Struktur verwenden. Von dieser Idee hörte ich 2006 zum ersten Mal von Eric Betzig, der dies als PALM bezeichnete. Später hörte man von STORM von Zhuang, F-PALM und dann erschien eine ganze Reihe von Akronymen, die für verschiedene Mechanismen mit dieser Funktion standen. Wir begannen damals mit der Nutzung unserer YFP-Reaktivierung, die ich Ihnen gerade zeigte, und gaben dem kein Akronym, was natürlich der Grund dafür ist, dass es in Vergessenheit geriet. Hier also ein Akronym, um dem Stapel spaßeshalber ein weiteres hinzuzufügen, Single Molecule Active Control Microscopy (Einzelmolekül-Aktivsteuerungs-Mikroskopie), kurz SMACM. Wie funktioniert diese Arbeit in einem echten System? Hier ein Bild mit vielen Einzelmolekülen. Diese rechts erscheinenden Punkte entstehen durch die Lokalisierung von Molekülen, und wenn man dies viele Male tut, dann kann man die Daten aufbauen, die man braucht, um dieses hochauflösende Bild der zugrunde liegenden Struktur zu rekonstruieren. Das funktioniert auch in Bakterien, aber ich will Ihnen zeigen, wie gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) in Bakterien funktioniert. YFP, das ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt hatte, blinkt wunderschön. Hier sind einige Bakterienzellen und hier die Fluoreszenzen dieser Zellen, in denen etwas markiert ist. Genau dies verwenden wir in unserer Datenaufnahme. Das schöne Blinken der einzelnen fluoreszierenden Proteine gibt uns Aufschluss darüber, wo sich diese Moleküle befinden. Und dieser Ansatz half uns, von diesen Arten von auflösungsbegrenzten Bildern mehrerer verschiedener Proteine zu diesen hochauflösenden Bildern all jener Proteine zu gelangen. Es handelt sich um eine wirklich wunderbare Art, um die Struktur zu sehen, die vorher nicht beobachtbar war. Hierbei handelt es um Live-Zellen. Hier eine fixierte Zelle. Wir haben es also sowohl in fixierten als auch in Live-Situationen. Um Ihnen zu zeigen, dass man weitere Informationen erlangen kann, die von diesem Schema etwas zeitabhängig sind, möchte ich die von Robin Hochstrasser entwickelte PAINT-Idee erwähnen. Bei PAINT nimmt man die Struktur, die man beobachten möchte, und bringt Luminophore von außen hinein, von außerhalb der Lösung. Luminophore schwirren herum, wenn sie sich in der Lösung befinden, und lassen sich nicht einfach auffinden, wenn sie sich aber mit etwas verbinden, dann sitzen sie dort und geben einem all das Licht, mit dem man dann die Verbundenen ortet. Also nutzen wir diese Idee auf der Basis eines nun mit Fluoreszenz markierten Liganden, mit Fluoreszenz markierten Saxitoxinen, um spannungsversperrte Natriumkanäle in einer neuronalen Modellzelle, einer PC12-Zelle, zu beleuchten. Dies wird auf diesem Bild gezeigt. Dies ist eine der axonalen Projektionen außerhalb einer abgegrenzten PC12-Zelle, und die Schönheit steckt selbstverständlich im Film. Bei diesem Film beträgt der Durchschnitt rund 500 Millisekunden. Wir sehen alle Ortungen während des Zeitfensters von 500 Millisekunden und spielen dies wie bei einem Daumenkino ab, und man sieht, wie all diese Strukturen mit der Zeit wachsen und verschwinden, während die Zelle fortlaufend wächst. Die Zeit rennt mir davon, weshalb ich einige Dinge überspringen muss. Ich überspringe diese Anwendungen bei der Huntington-Krankheit. Hier einige schöne Gesamtsummen, die wir mit Super-Resolution bei Aggregaten des Huntington-Proteins beobachten können. Ich werde ein weiteres Beispiel überspringen und mit einigen Lehren abschließen, die ich Ihnen gerne mitgeben möchte, damit Sie diese mit Ihren Freunden teilen können. Sie alle kennen diese schöne Nobel-Medaille. Selbstverständlich sieht man Alfred Nobels Abbild auf dieser Medaillenseite. Ich würde aber wetten, dass Sie die Rückseite der Medaille noch nie gesehen haben. Hier die Rückseite der Nobel-Medaille. Sie ist wirklich sehr, sehr schön. Eine schöne, bewundernswerte Darbietung. Hier auf der linken Seite ist die Natur, die Natur, die ein Füllhorn hält, und auf der rechten Seite ist die Wissenschaft. Und die Wissenschaft lüftet den Schleier der Natur. Es ist ganz erstaunlich. Ihr Ziel sollte es sein zu kommunizieren, dass Wissenschaft Spaß macht. Helfen Sie mit, den Schleier der Natur in unserer Welt zu lüften. Es gibt aber mehr, über das Sie nachdenken und das Sie an die Jüngeren kommunizieren sollten, hauptsächlich an die Studenten im Vorstudium und jene, die sich für Wissenschaft zu interessieren beginnen. Es ist immer wichtig, seine Passion zu finden. Das ist unerlässlich, weil es schwere Arbeit sein kann, sich durch die Aufgabenstellungen zu arbeiten, die wir auf unsere eigene methodische Art stellen. Man muss dafür entschlossen, hartnäckig und methodisch sein, aber es ist von großer Wichtigkeit, dabei auch Spaß zu haben. Alles basiert auf der Frage, wie Dinge funktionieren. Zu viele Menschen betrachten ihr Handy für selbstverständlich, betrachten einige der Technologien in unserer Welt für zu selbstverständlich. Wir sollten wirklich öfter hinterfragen, wie Dinge auf einer tiefen, fundamentalen Ebene wirklich funktionieren, bis hin zu einzelnen Molekülen. Mit der Konsequenz, dass man über konventionelles Wissen hinausgeht und Annahmen hinterfragt. Natürlich glauben wir, dass uns Wissenschaft eine rationale und voraussehende Methode bietet, unsere Welt zu verstehen, und aus diesem Grund üben wir sie aus. Deshalb möchte ich meinen ehemaligen Studenten, Postdoktoranten und Mitarbeitern und natürlich dem jetzigen Guacamole-Team danken. Hier können Sie sehen, wie ernst sie sein können. Das ist kurz vor Halloween. Danke auch an unsere Agenturen. Und hier noch etwas zum Spaß, unser Kein-Ensemblemittelwert-Logo, das für Einzelmolekül-Spektroskopie steht. Ich vergaß zu sagen, warum wir Guacamole-Team heißen. Nun, Sie wissen ja, ein Molekül entspricht einer Guacamole. Eins hoch die Anzahl der Mole in der Avocado. In diesem Sinn, vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

William Moerner on the fluorescence of GFP
(00:19:53 - 00:21:56)

 

However, the resolution of optical microscopy remained restricted by Abbe's diffraction limit — or so most researchers thought [11]. In 1873, German physicist Ernest Abbe found that the smallest distance that could be resolved under an optical microscope was roughly half the wavelength of visible light, or 0.2 micrometers. This meant that defined features of cells and microorganisms would be impossible to observe with an optical microscope and instead appear blurry.

So why not simply switch to electron microscopy, which can achieve a much higher resolution? First of all, other methods including electron microscopy involve preparation methods which kill cells and microorganisms. Optical microscopy is the only method that allows researchers to peek inside a living cell. Second, as Stefan Hell discusses in his 2016 Lindau lecture, fluorescent labeling of proteins of interest is a fairly easy and incredibly useful technique for the life sciences with optical microscopy.

 

Stefan W. Hell (2016) - Optical Microscopy: the Resolution Revolution

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Stefan Hell discussing fluorescent labeling of proteins being a useful technique for the life sciences with optical microscopy
(00:00:45 - 00:02:33)

 


Taking optical microscopy beyond the Abbe limit

Hell received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in overcoming the Abbe limit through a modified form of fluorescence microscopy, called stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy [10]. He had been working on the problem since 1990 and had a breakthrough after reading about stimulated emission in a book about quantum optics. In STED, one light pulse excites fluorescent molecules, while another light pulse quenches fluorescence from all molecules except those in a nanometer-sized volume in the middle. By sweeping along the sample, a full image is built up, piece by piece. The resolution of the final image will depend on the size of the volume in the middle allowed to fluoresce.

A decade later, Hell and his colleagues published a landmark paper where they announced that that Abbe's diffraction limit had been fundamentally broken [12]. They built a working STED microscope and imaged yeast cells and E. coli bacteria with a resolution of about 100 nm. In the same 2016 Lindau talk, Hell compares the before-and-after images of cellular structures with traditional optical microscopy versus STED.

 

Stefan W. Hell (2016) - Optical Microscopy: the Resolution Revolution

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Stefan Hell comparing the before-and-after images of cellular structures with traditional optical microscopy versus STED
(00:18:30 - 00:19:59)

 

Hell shared his Nobel Prize with Moerner and Eric Betzig, an American physicist who discovered a different approach to bypass the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. He initially studied near-field microscopy, which uses light emitted from an extremely thin tip placed only a few nanometers from the sample [13]. While it can obtain images of higher resolution than traditional optical microscopy, this method has a very short range and cannot visualize structures below the cell surface.

In 1995, Betzig thought of another method whereby the Abbe limit could be surpassed. If different molecules fluoresced with different colors, and all molecules of one type were dispersed and never closer to each other than 0.2 micrometers, then a microscope could register one image per color. The images put together would then result in a single, super-resolution image. Betzig spoke about his early theoretical ideas on this method — and why he abandoned them — in a 2015 Lindau lecture.

 

Eric Betzig (2015) - Working Where Others Aren't

I'd just like to thank the Foundation for their hospitality and all of you for being here today. I'm a tool builder by instinct and inclination. I got my start as a tool builder as a graduate student at Cornell when my advisers were working on an idea to basically shine light through a hole that's much smaller than a wavelength of light and use that as a little nano-flashlight to drive across the sample point by point and beat that diffraction limit that you heard about from Stefan and get a super-resolution image. I worked on that technology for six years in graduate school and was fortunate enough to kind of get it sort of working to the point where I got my foot in the door at Bell Labs and then had my own lab at Bell Labs, and proceeded to work on it for another six years. During that time, we did a number of applications eventually as the technology slowly improved. We could use polarization contrast to look at magneto-optic materials or use fluorescence to be able to look at phase transitions and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers, do super-resolution lithography, histology, and low temperature cryogenic spectroscopy of quantum wells. So the technique started to take off, but the reason I got into near field was two-fold. I wanted to get into science not to do incremental things, but to do really impactful big things, and it seemed like near field was a possible way of doing that kind of thing. But the other thing I really liked about it was, at the time we started we didn't know anybody doing this. And I really liked the idea of going in a field from its birth and not having a bunch of elbows to bang up against while I'm trying to do my work. It turned out there were a couple of other groups working on it, and the idea goes all the way back to the twenties, but still it was pretty wide open territory at that time, and that felt a lot of fun. As it continued to develop, though, and as we started to have successes the field got more and more crowded. Particularly with two applications that we demonstrated. In '92, we were able to basically have the world record of data storage density by writing bits with near field as small as 60 nanometres. This started a whole big area with people jumping into this. I was under a little gentle pressure to start a commercialization programme based on this, but I didn't really want to go and do that. I didn't want to lead a big group. I wanted to still just explore where near field might go. Fortunately, my bosses at Bell were conducive to that and so I was able to do that. And it paid off because very quickly we were able to do what I dreamed of doing which was biology, which was, in this case, to be able to look at the actin cytoskeleton at about 50 nanometre resolution back in 1993. The problem is this was a fixed cell, and the dream really was to be able to have an optical microscope that could look at living cells with the resolution of an electron microscope, and we still weren't there. There was one thing about this experiment, which is that these single actin filaments had high enough signal-to-noise that it suggested that we could even see single molecules. And so, this was pretty much in the air in this era because a few years earlier W. E. Moerner had seen at cryogenic temperatures the spectral signature of single molecules. And you'll hear about that in a few days. And it turned out to be actually very easy to see single molecules with near field because the focus is so small that you reduce the background to near zero, and then it becomes very easy to see these single molecules, but there were surprises like their shapes were different and so forth. It turned out this was due to the orientations of the molecules, so we could measure the orientations and even determine their positions down to about a 40th of the wavelength of light. So at this time, this takes us up to '94, many people jumped into the field because of the spectroscopy applications, the data storage applications, the potential biology and single molecule applications, and I was basically really, really sick of doing near field at this time, and part of it was because of the fundamental limitations of the technology. The worst of them is that the light that comes out of that sub-wavelength hole spreads extremely rapidly. And if you're even about ten molecules away, you get a significant loss of resolution. Well, if the dream is to look at living cells, a cell is a lot rougher than that. But it had many other limitations, but at the same time so many people were jumping in the field and saying that, you know, it would cure cancer or that the moon was made of green cheese, or whatever. And what I basically learned in a career in science is that science has all of these fads, where there are these booms and busts, and so forth. And near field became one of these fads. And technologies basically go like this, and this is where I like to get in. This is where it's really fun, where it starts to pay off on the investment, and this is the time I found where you want to bail because this is where basically, you know, people go crazy, you know, with these things. This is where you'd like to believe it will go, but every new technology to me is like a new-born baby, and you think that it's going to become president or that it's going to cure cancer, win a Nobel prize, but usually you're happy if it just stays out of jail in the end. (laughing) So this is basically where most technologies end up, with some level that's above zero so it was a net gain, but not so much. And with near field, I felt like every good paper I was doing was just providing the justification for a hundred pieces of crap that followed. And I really felt like, what I was doing was a net negative to society because it was a waste of time and a waste of taxpayer's money. So basically I up and quit, and I quit not just Bell, I quit science. And so, I didn't have any idea what I wanted to do so I became a house husband. And a few months later while I was pushing my daughter around in a stroller, I realized that there was a way of taking some of the experiments I had done previously to come up with a different way of beating the diffraction limit. So the idea is if we care about fluorescence, which Stefan told you, why fluorescence is so important, the problem is that each of the molecules makes a little fuzzy ball, and those fuzzy balls overlap, and you got nothing but a mush. But if those molecules were different from one another in some way, say that they glowed in different colours, then I could look at them by their different colours in a higher dimensional space of XY and wavelength in that axis. Once they were isolated from one another, then I can just find the centroid, find the centre of those fuzzy blobs to much better precision than the diameter of the fuzzy blob and hence get with near molecular precision the coordinate of every molecule in the sample. So that was the basic idea. I was really excited about that for a month, but then I realized the catch is that even with the best focus you can create with a conventional microscope, there might be hundreds or thousands of molecules in that diffraction limited spot. And so you need ridiculously good discrimination be it wavelength or whatever in that third dimension to be able to turn on and see one molecule on top of hundreds or thousands of others. So I didn't really know how to do that, so I just published that while unemployed and left it at that. And so in the end, I fell back on my backup plan which was: my dad had started a machine tool company in '85 which by '94 had grown to about 50 million in sales. What they did is, they would make these very customized very large machines to make in very high volume a single part, customized for that part, for the auto industry. And so, this was a successful technology, but I had so much ego and still do, and so much naivety and still do, that I believe that if a single physicist when to the Rust Belt he could save it from the Japanese. So I went there and tried to see if I could do something to improve upon this technology. So I developed this machine which used an old technology called hydraulics, married it to energy storage principles you have in hybrid cars and also nonlinear control algorithms, and was able to make a machine that would take something the size of the width of this auditorium and collapse it to something the size of a compact car. And it would move four tons at eight g's of acceleration and position it to five micron precision. It was an amazing thing that I was very proud of. I spent four years developing it, three years trying to sell it, and in that time I sold two of them. And so, I learned that while I may not be an academic scientist, I'm a really horrible business man. And so, after blowing through over a million dollars of my dad's money, I went to him and I apologized, and I said, "I'm sorry, I gave this everything I had, but I just can't sell this thing." And so, I quit again. So then, it's the blackest time in my life because not only had I pissed away my academic career, I had also thrown away my backup plan of working for my family. And so, I needed to find something, and so I reconnected with my best friend at Bell, Harald Hess, who had also left Bell as Bell continued to shrink in the 90s and went to work in industry. And he was suffering the same sort of midlife crisis I was. He was more successful in business than I was, but still unsatisfied. That we really wanted to go back and do curiosity driven research and be able to work with our own hands and not be managers or anything like that, which typically is what starts to happen to you when you're in your 40s. We wanted to live like graduate students basically, okay. So we started to meet at various national parks and start to plan out what could we do in order to get back into a lab. And so, I started reading the scientific literature for the first time in a decade, and the first thing I ran across that just knocked me out was green florescent protein. The idea that you could snip some DNA out of a glowing jellyfish, and get that any organism you want to express any protein you want in a live organism, and have that fluorescence specific, 100% specificity, to the protein, was magic to me because it was so difficult in that actin experiment I showed, to get the labelling in there well enough to be able to see the actin without seeing a whole bunch of nonspecific crap besides. And so, I said, "Damn it. I guess I got to be a microscopist again." But I had a problem in that in ten years of not doing any physics, all my physics knowledge had flown straight out of my head. I couldn't remember anything. Well, I would take the kids to school. I would then go down to the cottage that we had nearby and sit out on the lake, and just start relearning physics from freshman textbooks onward, but within three months, it pretty much all fell back into place. I hadn't really forgotten it. It was just kind of blocked. And I started trying to figure out how I could use light in order to make a better microscope. Not a super-resolution microscope at this time but a better microscope that would exploit the advantages of live cell imaging of GFP. So I started thinking in fundamental terms from initially two wave vectors creating a standing wave. I added more wave vectors, got these weird periodic patterns, looked in the literature and heard about these things called optical lattices, which are used in quantum optics to trap and cool atoms. And I eventually came up with new classes of optical lattices that would actually be really good as a 3D multifocal excitation field to do massively parallel imaging at high speed of live cells. So I called that optical lattice microscopy, and that was the idea I wanted to pitch to get back into science. So Harald was helping me in this task of getting back in, and one of the places we went to visit to sell this idea was Florida State University where we met Mike Davidson. And Mike told us about not just fluorescent proteins but there was a very new type of fluorescent protein on the scene, which initially if you shine blue light on it, nothing happens. But if you shine purple light on it first, you activate the molecules, and then blue light causes it to turn green or to emit green light. And so, basically, it's a fluorescent molecule that you can turn on and off. So Harald and I were sitting in the airport in Tallahassee, and it struck us that this the missing link to make that idea that I had pitched in my first round of unemployment ten years earlier to work. So the idea is you turn the violet light down so low that only a few molecules come on at a time. And statistically they're likely to be separated by more than the diffraction limit so then you can find the centres of those fuzzy balls. Those molecules either turn off or bleach. You turn on the violet again to turn on another subset and round and round and round you go until you bleed out every molecule from the sample. So it was the idea I had in '95 except with time as the discriminating dimension, and that violet light is the knob by which we could get higher and higher resolution across that time axis. So obviously we had another problem in that I had convinced Harald on the basis of the lattice microscope, although he wasn't convinced to do it with me, to quit his job so now you got to unemployed guys. So how are we going to implement this idea because we think it's too ridiculously simple and a lot of people have to be thinking of it, and we were right. There were a lot of people just right on our heels. The good news is that Harald is a lot smarter than I am. So when I left Bell, I told them to go to hell, but when Harald left Bell, he was able to take all of his equipment with him. So we pulled that out of the storage shed, and then normally you do this type of work in the garage, but we were able to do it in his living room because he wasn't married, and it was a lot more comfortable there. In a couple of months, we had the scope built, and then I was scheduled to give a talk at NIH about about my lattice microscope, and I begged Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz and George Patterson, who invented this photoactivated protein to come to my talk. Took them to lunch, swore them to secrecy, told them the idea, and that's the last missing link that needed to be filled, because Harald and I knew zip about biology. But Jennifer is one of the best cell biologist in the world and so she said just bring it here. So we packed up the scope, went to Jennifer's dark room, and within another couple months after that, we went from this sort of... This is looking at a slice through a cell at two lysosomes, little protein degradation bags, and then this is the diffraction limit and that's the photoactivated localization microscope or PALM image, and the resolution went from this to this. So two things, one Harald and I went from the concept of this idea to having the data in our science paper in six months, and we were able to do that because everybody left us alone. We were able to work just by ourselves. The second thing is that this type of work really requires that sort of solitude that you get in that sort of situation. That ability to focus 100%, and that's again and again I have found in my career critical, is to not be in academia for me has been key. Because whether I was at Bell, working for my father or working there, or working where I work now, it's the idea of just being left alone and focused with 100% attention on a problem is what allows me to get things done. So that's all the good news about super-resolution, but every new stage of my career has been influenced by the limitations of the thing I was doing before. And super-resolution has a crap-load of limitations. The first is that again we're looking at fluorescence, and if you don't decorate your fluorescence molecules densely enough, then you can completely miss a feature if you're at less than half a period in the spacing. And so, this is called the Nyquist criterion. You can see here that if you want to sample this image it doesn't matter what the intrinsic resolution of the microscope is, you don't have enough information. The bad news is that if you relate this to super-resolution if you don't have on the order of 500 molecules to get 20 nanometre resolution, you're done. It turns out that's a very high standard of labelling density compared to what most biologist had done previously for doing diffraction limited work. And what it means is that the ownness in making these technologies work is not on the tool developer it's, unfortunately, all on the biologist to figure out sample prep procedures that will work properly for this. And so now, you can also ask what is the big deal about super-resolution. I mean we've had EM for a long time, and its' pretty damn good. Well, there's two main reasons which Stefan hit upon. First is to do protein specific contrast, usually that's done by structural imaging on fixed cells. But the problem is that 95% of what we think we learned by super-resolution has been from chemically fixed cells, and their purpose is to cross-link proteins so they screw up the ultrastructure, and so it means we have to put an asterisk next to almost everything we learn when we look at fixed cells. The other more exciting application would be to do live cell imaging, but the problem is you can think if I want even just a factor of two resolution improvement in each of three dimensions, it means my voxels are eight times smaller. It means I have one eighth as many molecules in each voxel. If I want to get the same number of photons to get the same signal and noise as in a diffraction limited experiment, I either need to bang my cell with eight times as much light which it's not going to like, or else I'm going to have to wait eight times as long for those photons to come out. And the whole damn image will get smeared by motion artefacts. So there's claims in the literature of resolution for live cell imaging that require just by this back of the envelope calculation of a thousand to over ten thousand times as many photons from the cell as in a diffraction limited experiment. This is almost fantasy again. So I'm basically sometimes, with super-resolution, I felt like I was living the same bad nightmare all over again that I was in the near field era. By 2008, there were all sorts of crazy claims in terms of what could be done with super-resolution. And I knew just from my experience that this was not possible. And so, other problems are the intensities that are required for STED or for PALM are anywhere from kilowatts to gigawatts per square centimetre. But life evolved at a tenth of a watt per square centimetre. So we have to ask ourselves if we're doing live cell imaging, are we looking at a live cell or are we looking at a dead cell or a dying cell from the application of all this light. And these methods take a long time to create an image, and the cell is moving, and so you end up getting motion artefacts. So the moral of the story is I don't care what method you want to use, if you want higher spacial resolution you need more pixels. More pixels means more measurements. That takes more time. It means throwing more potentially damaging light at the specimen, and so if you're going to be honest your always playing with trade-offs between spatial resolution toxicity, temporal resolution, and imaging depth. The guy who really understood these trade-offs better than all of us, earlier than all of us, was Swedish native Mats Gustafsson who developed a third method of far field super-resolution, called structured illumination microscopy. And this technique you use a standing wave of excitation rather than uniform illumination of the sample which creates these Moiré fringes against the information in the sample to create lower spatial frequencies that the microscope can detect. One of the arguments in the Nobel committee's report as to why this did not share the Nobel prize, is it's limited to a factor of two in resolution gain, whereas STED's localization is diffraction unlimited. But in my opinion, this weakness of SIM is actually its strength. Because, first off, you need much lower labelling densities to achieve that which is much more compatible with current technology. And second, it requires orders of magnitude less light, and is orders of magnitude faster than the other methods. So here are a couple of examples. Here you're looking at the endoplasmic reticulum in a live cell, and yes the resolution is only you have because you're able to look at this cell for 1800 rounds of imaging at subsecond intervals. You get this dynamic aspect that you can't get with the other methods. Here is another example of showing the dynamics of actin in a T-cell after it's provoked the immunological synapse. So the good news is we were able to recruit Mats from UCSF to Janelia in 2008, but he was diagnosed with... Oops, that was interesting. So he was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2009, and he ended up dying in 2011. So I ended up inheriting much of his group and his technology, and we've been trying to extend his legacy with this tool, too. Key to that is, if the argument is that SIM doesn't deserve to be spoken of in the same breath with STED and PALM because it doesn't have the same resolution, how can we get past that 100 nanometre barrier? Well, the simple and stupid way is to just increase the numerical aperture of your lens. So recently a 1.7 NA lens came onto the market which allows you with the GFP channel to push to 80 nanometre resolution. And then you can study for dozens or hundreds of time points in multiple colours because it doesn't require specialised labels. Dynamics in this case looking at clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and its interaction with the cortical actin, and how that helps to pull in these pits to bring cargoes inside of the cell. We've also developed recently another technique, a nonlinear structured illumination technique, that uses again this photo switching principle to put on a standing wave to generate the activation light in a spatially patterned way and read out the detection the same way to go from twice beyond the diffraction limit to three times beyond the diffraction limit. And then, that has gotten us to 60 nanometre resolution. Not as many time points and not quite as fast, but still allows us to look at live cells. So if, again, the knock has been that it doesn't have the resolution of other methods: Here we've compared this nonlinear SIM to RESOLFT and to localization microscopy, and basically we have resolution every bit as good, if not better with SIM now than we have with these other tools, but with hundreds of times less light and hundreds of times faster than these other methods. So I really think for live imaging between 60 and 200 nanometres SIM is going to be the go-to tool, and for structural imaging below 60 nanometres, PALM will be the tool. So the moral of the story is that while, again, everybody is crowding up against this goal of getting the highest spatial resolution, Mats wanted a space for himself working where others aren't and by pulling a little bit back, he had this whole play area where he could develop this tool. So it begs the question of, what if we go back all the way to the diffraction limit. Is there something we can do as physicists to make microscopes better for biologist and particularly, is there a way that we can increase the speed and noninvasiveness of imaging and live cell imaging to improve it by that same order of magnitude that PALM does in spatial aspect? And so, why do you want to do that? Well, the hallmark of life is that it's animate. And every living thing is a complex thermodynamic pocket of reduced entropy through which matter and energy is flowing continuously. So while structural imaging like super-resolution or electron microscopy will always be important, the only way we're going to understand how inanimate molecules self-assemble to create the animate cell is by studying it across all four dimensions of space time at the same time. So when I got as sick of super-resolution in 2008 as I was of near field in 1994, that's what I set out as my goal. The good news is that there was a new tool on the market that we could exploit which is the light sheet microscope. So what it does is it shoots a plane of illumination through a 3D sample to only illuminate one plane at once, so there's no damage to the regions above and below, and you can take a very quick picture cause the whole plane is illuminated then go plane by plane through the specimen. It's been transformative for understanding embryogenesis at single cell resolution, but it has a limitation in that the light sheets are pretty darn thick on the single cell level. We were able, basically, to then bring some physics tricks called nondiffracting beams. First these were Bessel beams, and eventually I was able to dust off my old ten-year-old lattice theory because two dimensional optical lattices are nondiffracting beams and create a light sheet that's much thinner, to then be able to look at the dynamics inside of single cells. So here are a bunch of examples of this. We've had about 50 different groups come to our lab to use this microscope and almost everyone has left with big smiles and ten terabytes of data. We never hear from them after that because they don't know what to do with ten terabytes of data. But in any case, I'm very proud of what we've done with PALM, but I'm morally convinced at this point that this will be the high water technique of my career. So one of the other things that that light sheet turned up, the lattice light sheet as we called it, turned out to be good for is that single molecule techniques in general have been limited to very thin samples because out of focus molecules obscure the signatures of the ones in focus. But the lattice light sheet is so thin that only in focus molecules are illuminated. And so that allowed us to apply another method of localization microscopy, developed by Robin Hochstrasser's group in the same year we developed PALM, where instead of prelabelling your cell and having a fixed number of molecules. Remember I said the basic problem is getting enough molecules in there to get the resolution you want. Well with PAINT, instead of prelabelling, the whole media around the cell is labelled with fluorophores. They're whizzing usually too fast to see, but when they stick they glow as a spot and then you localize those. So the advantage to this is there's an infinite army of molecules that can keep coming and coming and coming and decorate your cell. The disadvantage is because the media is glowing the SNR normally is too poor to do much single molecule imaging. So lattice light sheet with this PAINT technology is a marriage made in heaven. So here you're seeing 3D imaging over large volumes by using this method, and we're able to basically see. Now, basically, take localization microscopy to much thicker specimens at orders of magnitude higher density, and basically make something so we don't need to use EM to do sort of global contrast to combine with a local contrast we get from PALM. So the last thing Astrid, and then I'll be then off. I got two minutes and 22 seconds it says. You're early. Okay, is that we still have to deal with taking cells away from the cover slip. So much of what we've learned have been from immortalized cells, and all of these methods, if you take them from single cells and try to put them in organisms, they're incredibly sensitive to the refractive index variations that scramble the light as you go in and out with the fluorescent photons. So with STED, you have to have that perfect node in that doughnut. That's very sensitive to aberrations. With SIM, that standing wave gets corrupted. With confocal, your focus gets corrupted. With localization, your PSF, you have to have knowledge of the shape of that spot in order to find its centroid properly. And all of those things get screwed up by aberrations. Light sheet this is not showing, but as you go into an embryo. Right now, light sheet is in that same bullshit phase that other techniques are in, where people are saying: by using light sheet", but it just isn't so because the aberrations make the resolution so poor, you can't resolve single somas in certain areas of the brain. So what we've also been working on, is stealing from astronomers and using the tools of adaptive optics to allow us then to be able to look deep into live organisms. So this is an example here of looking in the brain of a developing zebrafish. In this case we had to develop a very fast AO technique because as you move from place to place the aberration is different so this represents 20,000 different adaptive optic corrections to cover this large volume. And as we go deep into the midbrain of the zebrafish, about 200 microns deep, we'll turn the adaptive optics off. That's what you would see with a state of the art microscope today, and then you turn the AO on and you get back to recovering the diffraction limit and recovering the signal. So for my group, what I really believe at this point is that we are on the cusp of a revolution in cell biology, because we still have not studied cells as cells really are. We need to study the cell on its own terms, and there's three parts of that puzzle. While GFP is great, it's largely been uncontrolled in its expression. So in the last couple years, these genome editing techniques have come on the scene to allow these proteins to be expressed at endogenous levels. These end up to be typically low levels so now confocal microscopy and these other techniques are far too perturbative to study dynamics, and you need things like lattice light sheet to be able to do that. But again, you can't look at cells in isolation and really see the whole story. You need to see all the cell-cell interactions, all the signalling that happens inside, where they actually evolved, and that's where the adaptive optics plays a part. So the future of my group is to develop adaptive optics to get that to work, to combine it with the lattice light sheet so we have a fast and noninvasive tool to look at dynamics. And then scroll in the super-resolution methods like SIM and PALM to add the high resolution on top of that. And with that, I thank you for your time.

Mein Dank geht an die Stiftung für ihre Gastfreundschaft und an Sie alle für Ihre Anwesenheit hier. Ich bin Maschinenbauer aus Instinkt und Neigung. Ich begann mit dem Maschinenbau als Doktorand in Cornell, als meine Betreuer an einer Idee arbeiteten, Licht durch ein Loch zu senden, das sehr viel kleiner als die Lichtwellenlänge war, und dies als ein kleine Nanolampe zu verwenden, um Punkt für Punkt durch die Probe zu fahren. Die Beugungsgrenze sollte überwunden werden, von der Stefan sprach, um ein Höchstauflösungsbild zu erreichen. Ich arbeitete an der Hochschule für Aufbaustudien sechs Jahre lang an dieser Technologie und hatte das Glück, sie solange weiterzuentwickeln bis zum Tage, an dem ich meinen Fuß in die Tür der Bell Labs bekam, dort schließlich mein eigenes Labor erhielt und weitere sechs Jahre an dieser Technologie arbeitete. In dieser Zeit entwickelten wir, während die Technologie langsam verbessert wurde, einige Anwendungen. Wir konnten Polarisationskontraste verwenden, zum Betrachten magneto-optischer Materialien, oder wir verwendeten Fluoreszenz, um Phasenübergänge und Langmuir-Blodgett Monoschichten sehen zu können, und Höchstauflösungslithografie, Histologie und kryogene Spektroskopie von Quantentöpfen vorzunehmen. Die Technologie gewann zunehmend an Bedeutung, aber zweierlei Gründe brachten mich zum Nahfeld. Ich wollte mich in der Wissenschaft nicht mit inkrementellen Dingen sondern mit wirklich Großem und Wirkungsvollem befassen und dafür schien Nahfeld eine Möglichkeit zu bieten. Das andere, was ich daran mochte war, als wir damit begannen, war uns keiner bekannt, der daran arbeitete. Ich mochte den Gedanken, ein noch unerforschtes Feld zu betreten, in dem es nicht jede Menge Ellbogen gab, die mir in die Seite stießen, während ich versuchte meine Arbeit zu tun. Es zeigte sich, dass ein paar andere Gruppen bereits daran arbeiteten. Die Idee reicht bis in die zwanziger Jahre zurück, damals war es dennoch ein ziemlich offenes Territorium und es fühlte sich faszinierend an. Allerdings, im Laufe der Entwicklung und mit dem Beginn unsers Erfolgs drängten immer mehr in das Feld. Besonders mit zwei Anwendungen, die wir im Jahr 1992 vorstellten, erreichten wir den Weltrekord bei der Datenspeicherdichte durch das Schreiben von Bits mit Nahfeld im 60-Nanometer-Bereich. Damit eröffnete sich ein großer Bereich, auf den sich die Leute stürzten. Ich stand unter dem Druck auf dieser Basis ein Programm zur späteren Vermarktung zu starten, was ich aber nicht wirklich wollte. Ich wollte keine große Gruppe leiten. Ich wollte noch immer einfach erkunden, wohin das Nahfeld führen könnte. Zum Glück hatten meine Vorgesetzten bei Bell Verständnis dafür und so konnte ich dies verfolgen. Es zahlte sich aus: Wir waren nämlich sehr schnell zu dem in der Lage, von dem ich geträumt hatte, nämlich im Bereich Biologie im Jahre 1993 das Aktinzytoskelett in einer etwa 50-Nanometer-Auflösung anzusehen. Das Problem war, es handelte sich um eine fixierte Zelle; der Traum war aber ein optisches Mikroskop, mit dem man sich lebenden Zellen mit der Auflösung eines elektronischen Mikroskops ansehen kann, und da waren wir noch nicht. Es gab eine Sache bei diesem Experiment: diese einzelnen Aktinfilamente hatten einen ausreichend großen Signal-Rausch-Abstand, der nahelegte, wir könnten sogar einzelne Moleküle sehen. Zu dieser Zeit war das noch ziemlich ungewiss, einige Jahre zuvor hatte nämlich W. E. Moerner bei kryogenen Temperaturen die spektrale Signatur einzelner Moleküle gesehen. Sie werden davon in wenigen Tagen hören. Es zeigte sich, dass es in der Tat sehr leicht war, einzelne Moleküle mit Nahfeld zu sehen, da der Brennpunkt so klein ist, dass man den Hintergrund nahezu auf Null reduziert und danach ist es sehr leicht, die einzelnen Moleküle zu sehen. Doch gab es Überraschungen, etwa dass die Formen unterschiedlich waren und so weiter. Als Ursache dafür stellte sich die Ausrichtung der Moleküle heraus, wir konnten also die Ausrichtungen messen und sogar ihre Positionen bis hinunter auf ein Vierzigstel der Lichtwellenlänge bestimmen. Damals, das führt uns ins Jahr ’94, stürzten sich viele Leute wegen der Spektroskopie-Anwendungen, der Datenspeicheranwendungen, der potentiellen biologischen und einzelmolekularen Anwendungen auf diesen Bereich und ich war es damals wirklich überdrüssig, mich mit Nahfeld zu befassen und das zum Teil auch wegen den fundamentalen Grenzen der Technologie. Das Schlimmste daran ist, dass das Licht, das aus dem Sub-Wellenlängen-Loch tritt, sich extrem schnell ausbreitet. Selbst wenn man nur zehn Moleküle entfernt ist, erhält man einen signifikanten Auflösungsverlust. Wenn man davon träumt, lebende Zellen zu sehen, so ist eine Zelle sehr viel gröber. Doch es gibt sehr viele andere Grenzen, zudem stürzten sich so viele Leute auf diesen Bereich und meinten, sie könnten Krebs heilen oder der Mond sei aus grünem Käse, oder was auch immer. Ich lernte in meiner wissenschaftlichen Laufbahn, dass es in der Wissenschaft alle diese Modeerscheinungen gibt, mit ihrem Auf und Ab und so weiter. Und Nahfeld wurde zu einer dieser Modeerscheinungen. Technologien entwickeln sich in etwa so, und hier möchte ich ansetzen. Hier macht es wirklich Freude und der Einsatz beginnt sich auszuzahlen und das ist die Zeit, in der man abspringen möchte, weil die Leute bei diesen Dingen ausflippen. Man möchte dann gerne glauben, es würde aufhören. Aber für mich ist jede neue Technologie wie ein Neugeborenes, man glaubt, es wird Präsident werden, oder den Krebs heilen, einen Nobelpreis gewinne, doch meist ist man nur froh, wenn es schließlich nicht im Gefängnis landet. So ist es im Grunde, wie die meisten Technologien enden, mit einem Niveau, das etwas über Null liegt, es gab also einen Nettogewinn, aber eben doch nicht allzu viel. Beim Nahfeld hatte ich das Gefühl, jedes gute Paper, das ich schrieb, war nur eine Rechtfertigung für hunderte Paper sinnlosen Quatsches, die dann folgten. Ich hatte wirklich das Gefühl, was ich tat war ein Negativbeitrag für die Gesellschaft, weil es Zeitverschwendung und eine Vergeudung von Steuergeldern war. Also stieg ich aus, und ich stieg nicht nur bei Bell aus, ich gab auch die Wissenschaft auf. Und da ich keine Ahnung hatte, was ich wollte, wurde ich Hausmann. Ein paar Monate später, ich fuhr gerade meine Tochter in ihrem Kinderwagen spazieren, erkannte ich, es gab eine Möglichkeit sich bei einige Experimente, die ich kürzlich durchgeführt hatte, einen anderen Weg einfallen zu lassen, um die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Der Gedanke war, ob wir uns um Fluoreszenz kümmern. Stefan hat davon gesprochen, weshalb Fluoreszenz so wichtig ist. Das Problem ist, jedes Molekül ist eine kleine unscharfe Kugel und diese unscharfen Kugeln überlagern sich und man erhält nur einen Brei. Würden sich diese Moleküle irgendwie voneinander unterscheiden, zum Beispiel in unterschiedlichen Farben leuchten, könnte ich sie auf ihre unterschiedlichen Farben hin in einem höher-dimensionalen Raum von XY und der Wellenlänge in dieser Achse ansehen. Sobald sie voneinander isoliert sind, kann ich den Zentroid, das Zentrum dieser unscharfen Kugeln, sehr viel präziser finden, anstelle des Durchmessers der unscharfen Kugel, und erhalte so mit beinahe molekularer Präzision die Koordinate jedes Moleküls in der Probe. Das war also die Grundidee. Ich war etwa einen Monat ganz begeistert davon, erkannte dann aber, der Haken ist, selbst mit dem besten Brennpunkt, den man bei einem konventionellen Mikroskop erhalten kann, kann es in diesem beugungsbegrenzten Punkt Hunderte oder Tausende von Molekülen geben. Daher braucht es eine absurd gute Auflösung, sei es bei der Wellenlänge, oder was auch immer es in dieser dritten Dimension ist, um einschalten zu können und ein Molekül auf innerhalb von Hunderten oder Tausenden zu sehen. Ich wusste nicht wirklich, wie das erzeugt werden kann. Ich publizierte das einfach während meiner Arbeitslosigkeit und beließ es dabei. Am Ende griff ich auf meinen Absicherungsplan zurück. Mein Vater hatte im Jahre 1985 ein Unternehmen für Werkzeugmaschinen gegründet, das bereits 1994 einen Umsatz von 50 Millionen erzielte. Das Unternehmen stellte sehr kundenspezifische, sehr große Maschinen für sehr große Losgrößen eines einzelnen Teils her. Die Maschinen werden für die Automobilindustrie genau für ein Teil kundenspezifisch hergestellt. Es handelte sich um eine erfolgreiche Technologie. Ich hatte aber ein so großes Ego und hab es immer noch, und sehr viel Naivität, die ich auch immer noch habe, dass ich der Meinung war, wenn ein einzelner Physiker in die alte Industrieregion der USA ginge, könnte er sie vor den Japanern retten. Also ging ich dorthin, um zu sehen, ob ich etwas zur Optimierung dieser Technologie tun könnte. Ich entwickelte diese Maschine, die eine alte Technologie nutzte, Hydraulik genannt, verband diese mit Prinzipien der Energiespeicherung, wie sie bei Hybridautos verwendet werden, sowie mit nichtlinearen Regelalgorithmen und war damit in der Lage eine Maschine herzustellen, die erst in etwa die Breite dieses Hörsaals hatte, und die ich dann in etwa auf die Größe eines Kleinwagens reduzierte. Dazu würde sie vier Tonnen bei 8 G Beschleunigung bewegen und auf 5 Mikrometer genau positionieren. Es war ein erstaunliches Ding, auf das ich sehr stolz war. Ich verbrachte vier Jahre damit, sie zu entwickeln, drei Jahre damit, sie zu verkaufen, und in dieser Zeit habe ich zwei davon verkauft. Ich lernte also, dass ich vielleicht kein Wissenschaftler bin aber sicher ein miserabler Geschäftsmann. Nachdem ich also mehr als eine Million Dollar meines Vaters in den Sand gesetzt hatte, ging ich zu ihm und entschuldigte mich. Ich sagte: “Es tut mir leid, ich habe alles was mir möglich ist gegeben, ich kann das Teil aber einfach nicht verkaufen.“ Und so kündigte ich wieder. Das war die dunkelste Zeit meines Lebens, ich hatte nicht nur meine akademische Laufbahn hingeschmissen sondern auch die Idee in den Sand gesetzt, im Familienbetrieb zu arbeiten. Ich musste also etwas finden und nahm daher wieder Kontakt mit einem Freund, Harald Hess, bei Bell auf. Auch er hatte Bell verlassen, als diese in den 90er Jahren schrumpften, und war in die Industrie gegangen. Er litt an der gleichen Art Midlife-Krise, an der auch ich litt. Im Geschäftsleben war er erfolgreicher als ich, aber eben doch unzufrieden. Wir wünschten uns wieder neugierige Forschung zu betreiben und mit den eigenen Händen zu arbeiten. Wir wollten keine Manager sein, was einem gewöhnlich passiert, wenn man in den 40ern ist. Wir wollten im Grunde wie Doktoranden leben. Wir begannen uns in verschiedenen Nationalparks zu treffen und schmiedeten Pläne, wie wir wieder zurück ins Labor gelangen könnten. Und ich begann nach einem Jahrzehnt wieder damit, wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu lesen. Das Erste, was mir da begegnete haute mich um. Es war das grüne fluoreszierende Protein. Der Gedanke, man könne etwas DNA aus einer leuchtenden Qualle schneiden und damit jedes Protein in einem gewünschten lebende Organismus spezifisch fluoreszieren lassen, mit 100% Bestimmtheit, das faszinierte mich, da es in dem Aktin-Experiment, das ich gezeigt hatte, so schwierig gewesen war, eine ausreichende gute Markierung zur Betrachtung des Aktins zu erhalten, ohne dass daneben eine Menge unspezifischen Mists auftauchte. Und da meinte ich: “Verdammt, ich glaube, ich werde wieder ein Mikroskopierer.“ Ich hatte aber ein Problem, da ich zehn Jahren lang aus der Physik heraus war, war mir mein ganzes physikalisches Wissen abhanden gekommen. Ich konnte mich an nichts erinnern. Nun, ich brachte die Kinder zur Schule. Danach ging ich zu dem Häuschen, das wir in der Nähe hatten, setzte mich am See hin und begann Physik neu zu lernen, ab den Lehrbüchern der Erstsemester und dann weiter. Innerhalb von drei Monaten fügte sich alles wieder zusammen. Ich hatte es nicht wirklich vergessen. Ich war nur irgendwie blockiert. Und ich versuchte herauszufinden, wie ich das Licht dazu verwenden könnte, um ein besseres Mikroskop zu erhalten. Damals ging es nicht um ein super-auflösendes Mikroskop, sondern um ein besseres Mikroskop, welches die Vorteile des Live Cell Imaging von GFP nutzen würde. Ich begann in grundlegenden Begriffen zu denken, von anfänglich zwei Wellenvektoren, die eine stehende Welle erzeugen. Ich fügte weitere Wellenvektoren hinzu und erhielt diese merkwürdig periodischen Muster, sah in der Literatur nach und hörte von etwas, das optische Gitter genannt wurde, die in der Quantenoptik dazu verwendet werden, Atome einzufangen und zu kühlen. Schließlich dachte ich mir die neuen Arten optischer Gitter aus, die sich wirklich gut als ein 3D multifokales Erregerfeld eignen würden, um bei lebenden Zellen eine sehr leistungsfähige Bildgebung in hoher Geschwindigkeit zu erhalten. Ich nannte dies optische Gitter-Mikroskopie und wollte es mit dieser Idee schaffen, wieder zur Wissenschaft zurückzukehren. Harald half mir bei der Aufgabe mich wieder hineinzuarbeiten und ein Ort, den wir aufsuchten, um diese Idee vorzustellen war die Florida State University, wo wir auf Mike Davidson trafen. Mike erzählte uns nicht nur von fluoreszierendem Protein, sondern von einer ganz neuen Art fluoreszierenden Proteins, bei dem, wenn man es zuerst mit blauem Licht anstrahlt, nichts geschieht. Wenn man es aber zuerst mit violettem Licht anstrahlt, die Moleküle aktiviert werden und blaues Licht daraufhin verursacht, dass es grün wird oder grünes Licht ausstrahlt. Im Grunde ist es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül, das man ein- und ausschalten kann. Da saßen Harald und ich also im Flughafen von Tallahassee, und uns wurde klar, dass dies das fehlende Glied war, um jene Idee, die ich während meiner ersten Arbeitslosigkeit zehn Jahren zuvor umrissen hatte, zu realisieren. Der Gedanke war, das violette Licht so niedrig zu fahren, dass sich jeweils nur wenige Moleküle einschalten. Rein statistisch werden sie wahrscheinlich durch mehr als die Beugungsgrenze getrennt, sodass man die Zentren der unscharfen Kugeln finden kann. Diese Moleküle schalten sich entweder aus oder verblassen. Man fährt das Violett wieder hoch, um eine andere Teilmenge anzuschalten und so geht es in einem fort weiter, bis man aus der Probe alle Moleküle extrahiert hat (Bleed-Out). Das war die Idee, die ich 1995 hatte, ausgenommen der Zeit als kritischer Dimension und dem violetten Licht als Knopf, mittels dessen wir immer höhere Auflösungen entlang dieser Zeitachse erhielten. Wir hatten ein weiteres Problem, da ich Harald auf der Grundlage des Gittermikroskops überzeugt hatte, obgleich er nicht davon überzeugt war, es mit mir zu versuchen, und er hatte seine Arbeit gekündigt und da gab es jetzt zwei arbeitslose Typen. Wie also setzen wir diese Idee um, denn wir waren der Meinung, dass es so lächerlich einfach ist und bereits eine Menge Leute darüber nachgedacht haben, und darin hatten wir recht. Es gab eine Menge Leute, die uns unmittelbar auf den Fersen waren. Die gute Nachricht ist: Harald ist sehr viel klüger als ich. Als ich Bell verließ, sagte ich ihnen, sie sollten sich zum Teufel scheren. Als Harald Bell verließ, konnte er seine gesamte Ausrüstung mitnehmen. Wir holten sie also aus dem Lagerschuppen und normalerweise macht man solche Arbeiten in der Garage, aber wir konnten es in seinem Wohnzimmer tun, denn er war nicht verheiratet und dort war es sehr viel gemütlicher. In wenigen Monaten hatten wir das Mikroskop gebaut und dann hatte ich einen Termin bei NIH, bei dem ich über mein Gittermikroskop berichtete und ich bat Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz und George Patterson, die das photoaktivierte Protein erfunden hatten, auf ein Gespräch ein. Wir aßen zusammen zu Mittag, verpflichtete sie zum Stillschweigen und ich erzählte ihnen von meiner Idee, und dass dies das letzte fehlende Glied sei, Harald und ich hatten nämlich keine Ahnung von Biologie. Jennifer ist jedoch eine der besten Zellbiologen der Welt und meinte, ich solle es eben mal mitbringen. Wir packten unser Mikroskop ein und gingen in Jennifers Dunkelkammer und danach, innerhalb von zwei Monaten, kamen wir von dieser Art von… Hier sieht man auf eine Scheibe durch eine Zelle auf zwei Lysosome, kleine Beutel mit Proteinabbau, dann ist da die Beugungsgrenze und das ist das photoaktivierte Lokalisierungsmikroskop oder PALM Image und die Auflösung verlief von hier nach hier. Also zwei Dinge, einmal, Harald und ich wollten vom Konzept dieser Idee ausgehend, die Daten innerhalb von sechs Monaten in unserer wissenschaftlichen Schrift vorlegen, und wir konnten es, weil uns alle ließen. Wir konnten einfach für uns arbeiten. Das Zweite ist, diese Art Arbeit erfordert diese Abgeschiedenheit, die man in einer solchen Situation nun mal hat. Die Fähigkeit sich 100% zu konzentrieren, und das immer wieder, habe ich in meiner Laufbahn als essentiell erfahren; nicht im akademischen Betrieb zu sein, das war für mich der Schlüssel. Denn ob es bei Bell war, bei der Arbeit für meinen Vater, oder da, wo ich jetzt arbeite, es ist der Gedanke alleine zu sein und sich mit Das sind also alle guten Nachrichten über die Superauflösung, doch jedes neue Stadium meiner Laufbahn wurde durch die Einschränkungen der Dinge beeinflusst, an denen ich zuvor gearbeitet hatte. Superauflösung war ein Haufen voller Einschränkungen. Zuerst schauen wir uns wieder Fluoreszenz an, und wenn man seine fluoreszierenden Moleküle nicht dicht genug umkleidet, kann man eine Eigenschaft völlig übersehen, wenn man nicht weniger als eine Halbwertzeit in den Abständen ist. Das also nennt man das Nyquist-Kriterium. Sie sehen, will man von diesem Bild eine Stichprobe nehmen, ist die intrinsische Auflösung des Mikroskops unwesentlich; Sie haben nicht genug Informationen. Die schlechte Nachricht ist, wenn man dies auf die Superauflösung bezieht, sofern man nicht den Auftrag hat, von 500 Molekülen eine 20-Nanometer-Auflösung zu erhalten, ist man erledigt. Es zeigte sich, dies ist ein sehr hoher Standard für Dichte ist, verglichen mit dem was die meisten Biologen zuvor an beugungsbegrenzter Arbeit getan haben. Dies bedeutet, die Realisierung dieser Technologien liegt nicht beim Werkzeugentwickler, leider, sondern beim Biologen, der Vorbereitungsverfahren für Proben finden muss, die dafür funktionieren. Sie können jetzt natürlich fragen, was das Besondere an der Superauflösung ist. Wir verwendeten lange Zeit EM, und das war verdammt gut. Es gibt zwei Hauptgründe, auf die Stefan bereits hingewiesen hat. Der erste ist der proteinspezifische Kontrast, der gewöhnlich mit struktureller Bildgebung an fixierten Zellen eingestellt wird. Das Problem jedoch ist, 95% von dem, was wir glauben durch Superauflösung gelernt zu haben, geschah mit chemisch fixierten Zellen, deren Zweck ist das Vernetzen von Proteinen, wodurch die Ultrastruktur vermasselt wird. Das bedeutet, wir müssen fast alles, was wir beim Ansehen von fixierten Zellen erfahren, mit einem Sternchen versehen. Aufregender wäre es, Live Cell Imaging vorzunehmen. Das Problem ist, wie Sie sich denken können, selbst wenn ich nur einen Faktor von zwei Auflösungsverbesserungen möchte in jeder der drei Dimensionen, bedeutet dies meine Voxel sind acht Mal kleiner. Also habe ich in jedem Voxel ein Achtel so viele Moleküle. Wenn ich die gleiche Anzahl Photonen möchte, um das gleiche Signal und Geräusch wie in einem beugungsbegrenzten Experiment zu erhalten, muss ich auf meine Zelle entweder acht Mal so viel Licht geben, was dieser nicht gefallen wird, oder aber ich muss acht Mal länger darauf warten, dass diese Photonen zum Vorschein kommen und das ganze Bild wird durch Bewegungsartefakte verwischt. Man braucht laut Literatur zur Auflösung von Live Cell Imaging Das wiederum ist beinahe ein Hirngespinst. Manchmal empfinde ich, als würde ich bei der Superauflösung den gleichen Albtraum, den ich beim Nahfeld-Bereich hatte, wieder aufs Neue erleben. Ich weiß aus meiner Erfahrung, dies war nicht möglich. Weitere Probleme sind die Intensität, die für STED oder für PALM irgendwo zwischen Kilowatt bis Gigawatt pro Quadratzentimeter beträgt. Doch Leben entwickelt sich bei einem Zehntel eines Watts pro Quadratzentimeter. Wir müssen uns also fragen, wenn wir Live Cell Imaging vornehmen, schauen wir uns dann eine lebende Zelle an oder eine tote oder eine sterbende, aufgrund der Anwendung all dieses Lichts. Und diese Methoden erfordern viel Zeit, um ein Bild zu erzeugen und die Zelle ist in Bewegung und am Ende erhält man Bewegungsartefakte. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, mich kümmert es nicht, welche Methode Sie anwenden. Will man eine höhere räumliche Auflösung, braucht man mehr Pixel. Mehr Pixel bedeutet mehr Messungen. Das dauert länger. Es bedeutet, die Probe mehr potentiell schädigendem Licht auszusetzen und wenn Sie ehrlich sind, man hat es immer mit Abwägungen zwischen räumlicher Auflösung, zeitlicher Auflösung und Abbildungstiefe zu tun. Jemand, der diese Abwägungen besser und früher als wir alle wirklich verstanden hatte war der gebürtige Schwede Mats Gustafsson, der eine dritte Methode der Fernfeld-Superauflösung entwickelte, genannt "strukturierte Beleuchtung". Bei dieser Technik verwendet man eine Anregung per stehender Welle statt einer einheitlichen Beleuchtung der Probe, wodurch diese Moiré-Effekte aus den Informationen in der Probe entstehen, die wiederum niedrigere Frequenzen bewirken und so vom Mikroskop erkennbar werden. Ein Argument im Bericht des Nobelpreis-Komitees, weshalb dies keinen Nobelpreis erhielt war, dies sei auf einen Faktor zwei beim Auflösungsgewinn begrenzt, wohingegen die Lokalisation von STED beugungsunbegrenzt sei. Doch ich meine, diese Schwäche von SIM ist eigentlich eine Stärke. Denn erstens, man benötigt sehr viel niedrigere Kennzeichnungsdichten, was mit der derzeitigen Technologie sehr viel kompatibler ist. Und zweitens erfordert es um Größenordnungen weniger Licht und ist um Größenordnungen schneller als andere Methoden. Hier sind ein paar Beispiele. Sie sehen hier das endoplasmatische Retikulum einer lebenden Zelle und ja, die Auflösung beträgt nur 100 Nanometer, Sie sehen aber die Detailfülle an Informationen, die man erhält, weil man in der Lage ist, diese Zelle 1800 Umläufe lang bei der Bildverarbeitung in Subsekunden-Intervallen anzusehen. Man erhält diesen dynamischen Aspekt, den man mit den anderen Methoden nicht bekommt. Hier ist ein weiteres Beispiel, das Verhalten von Aktin in einer T-Zelle, nachdem sie die immunologische Synapse ausgelöst hat. Die gute Nachricht ist, wir konnten 2008 Mats von der UCSF für Janelia anwerben, aber es wurde diagnostiziert… Ich übernahm viel aus seiner Gruppe und seiner Technologie und wir versuchen auch, mit diesem Instrument sein Vermächtnis weiterzuführen. Der Schlüssel dazu ist: Wenn der Einwand, weshalb man SIM nicht im gleichen Atemzug mit STED und PALM nennt, der ist, dass es nicht die gleiche Auflösung hat, wie können wir dann diese 100 Nanometer-Barriere überwinden? Der einfache und dumme Weg ist, einfach die numerische Apertur des Objektivs zu erhöhen. Vor kurzem kam ein 1,7 NA Objektiv auf den Markt, mit dem man mittels des GFP-Kanals bis zur 80 Nanometer-Auflösung klettern kann. Dann kann man dutzende oder hunderte Zeitpunkte mehrfarbig studieren, da keine speziellen Markierungen notwendig sind. Bewegung heißt hier, sich die clathrin-vermittelte Endozytose und seine Interaktion mit dem Cortactin anzusehen, und wie dies dazu beiträgt, diese Vertiefungen hineinzuziehen, um Material in die Zelle zu bekommen Kürzlich haben wir eine weitere Technik entwickelt. Eine nichtlineare strukturierte Beleuchtungstechnik, die wieder dieses Photo-Schaltprinzip verwendet, um eine stehende Welle aufzustellen, um das Aktivierungslicht auf eine räumlich gestaltete Art zu generieren und auf die gleiche Art die Erkennung vorzunehmen. Hier hebt man die Auflösung von der doppelten Beugungsgrenze zur dreifachen Beugungsgrenze. Das brachte uns zu einer 60-Nanometer-Auflösung. Nicht so viel Zeitpunkte und nicht ganz so schnell, aber man kann damit lebende Zellen sehen. Nochmal, wenn es das war, dass es nicht die Auflösung anderer Methoden hatte: Wir haben dieses nichtlineare SIM mit RESOLFT und Lokalisationsmikroskopie verglichen. Im Grunde haben wir jetzt mit SIM eine ebenso gute Auflösung, wenn nicht sogar eine bessere, als wir dies mit den anderen Instrumenten haben, doch mit hunderte Male weniger Licht und hunderte Male schneller als mit diesen anderen Methoden. Ich glaube wirklich, für die Lebendzellenbeobachtung zwischen 60 und 200 Nanometer wird SIM das Go-to-Instrument und für die strukturelle Bildgebung unter 60 Nanometer wird es PALM sein. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, während jedermann sich um dieses Ziel drängte, um die höchste räumliche Auflösung zu erhalten, wünschte sich Mats einen eigenen Raum zum Arbeiten, da wo andere es nicht tun. Und indem er sich etwas zurücknahm, hatte er diese ganze Spielwiese, auf der er sein Instrument entwickeln konnte. Es stellt sich also die Frage, was ist, wenn wir den ganzen Weg zur Beugungsgrenze zurückgehen. Gibt es da etwas, was wir als Physiker tun können, um für Biologen bessere Mikroskope zu entwickeln und insbesondere, gibt es eine Möglichkeit die Geschwindigkeit zu erhöhen und Nichtinvasivität bei der Bildgebung und dem Live Cell Imaging zu haben, um es in der gleichen Größenordnung zu optimieren, wie PALM dies hinsichtlich räumlicher Auflösung leistet? Und warum würde man dies tun wollen? Nun, das Kennzeichen von Leben ist: es ist lebendig. Und alles Lebendige ist eine komplexe thermodynamische Melange verringerter Entropie, durch welche fortlaufend Materie und Energie strömen. Auch wenn strukturelle Bildgebung wie Superauflösung oder Elektronenmikroskopie immer wichtig bleiben werden, die einzige Möglichkeit, wie wir verstehen können, wie sich leblose Moleküle miteinander verbinden, um eine lebendige Zelle zu schaffen ist, dies quer über alle vier Dimensionen von Raum-Zeit gleichzeitig zu studieren. Als mir 2008 Superauflösung ebenso zuwider wurde wie das Nahfeld 1994, habe ich mir dies zum Ziel gesetzt. Die gute Nachricht ist, es gab auf dem Markt ein neues Instrument, das wir nutzen konnten, das Lichtscheibenmikroskop. Es schießt eine Beleuchtungsebene durch eine 3D Probe, damit nur eine Ebene auf einmal beleuchtet wird. Es werden also keine Bereiche darüber und darunter beschädigt und man kann ein sehr schnelles Bild aufnehmen, denn die gesamte Ebene ist beleuchtet, dann führt man das Ebene für Ebene durch die Probe fort. Dies war für das Verständnis der Embryogenese bei einer einzelnen Zellenauflösung sehr wichtig, hatte aber eine Einschränkung dadurch, dass die Lichtscheiben auf dem Einzel-Zell-Level ziemlich dick sind. Wir konnten dann einige Physik-Tricks einsetzen, nämlich sogenannt nicht-brechende Strahlen. Zuerst waren es Bessel-Strahlen und schließlich konnte ich meine zehn Jahre alte Gittertheorie aus der Versenkung holen, denn die zweidimensionalen optischen Gitter sind nicht-brechende Strahlen, die eine Lichtscheibe erzeugen, die viel dünner ist, und man kann sich dann die Bewegungen innerhalb einzelner Zellen ansehen. Hier sind einige Beispiele dafür. In unser Labor kamen etwa 50 verschiedene Gruppen, um dieses Mikroskop zu nutzen und fast jeder verließ das Labor mit einem breiten Lächeln und zehn Terabytes an Daten. Danach hören wir nichts mehr von ihnen, denn sie wissen nicht, was man mit zehn Terabytes an Daten anfangen soll. Ich bin aber auf jeden Fall sehr stolz darauf, was wir mit PALM zuwege gebracht haben, an diesem Punkt bin ich aber überzeugt, dass dies die Spitzentechnik meiner Laufbahn sein wird. Eine weitere Sache, die Klarheit brachte, tauchte auf, die Gitter-Lichtscheibe, wie wir sie nannten, erwies sich als für Einzelmolekül-Techniken geeignet, da sich diese allgemein auf sehr dünne Proben beschränken, da unscharfe Moleküle die Signatur der scharf eingestellten Moleküle verdunkeln. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe ist aber so dünn, dass nur die scharf eingestellten Moleküle beleuchtet werden. Dadurch konnten wir eine andere Methode der Lokalisationsmikroskopie anwenden, die die Gruppe Robin Hochstrassers im gleichen Jahr entwickelt hatte in dem wir PALM entwickelten, statt der Vormarkierung der Zelle und einer festgelegten Anzahl von Molekülen... Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, das Grundproblem ist, ausreichend Moleküle zu erhalten, um die gewünschte Auflösung zu bekommen. Bei PAINT wird statt der Vormarkierung das ganze Medium um die Zelle mit Fluoreszenz-Farbstoffen markiert. Gewöhnlich schwirren die Farbstoffe zu schnell herum, als dass man sie sehen könnte, wenn sie aber haften, leuchten sie wie ein Fleck und man kann sie dann lokalisieren. Der Vorteil hiervon ist, es gibt eine unendliche Armee an Molekülen, die ständig hinzukommen und Ihre Zelle umkleiden. Der Nachteil ist, da das Medium leuchtet, ist SNR normalerweise zu schwach, um viel an Einzel-Molekül-Imaging vorzunehmen. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe zusammen mit dieser PAINT-Technologie ist eine höchst wundervolle Kombination. Sie sehen hier den Einsatz dieser Methode die 3D-Bilderfassung bei großen Volumina, und prinzipiell können wir das sehen. Nehmen Sie Lokalisierungsmikroskopie für viel dickere Proben in der Größenordnung hoher Dichte und wir haben etwas, damit wir kein EM für den allgemeinen Kontrast benötigen, um es mit einem lokalen Kontrast zu kombinieren, den wir von PALM erhalten. Noch eine letzte Sache, Astrid, und dann mache ich Schluss. Ich habe noch zwei Minuten und 22 Sekunden zum Reden. Sie sind früh dran. Es geht darum, wir müssen immer noch die Zellen vom Deckglas nehmen. Vieles was wir gelernt haben, haben wir durch immortalisierte Zellen gelernt und alle diese Methoden, versucht man sie von der Einzelzelle auf den Organismus anzuwenden, sind unglaublich empfindlich hinsichtlich der Variationen des Brechungsindexes, die das Licht beim Hinein- und Hinausgehen der fluoreszierenden Photonen verwischen. Bei STED haben Sie diesen perfekten Knoten im Doughnut. Der ist bei Abweichungen sehr empfindlich. Bei SIM wird die stehende Welle beschädigt. Bei konfokal wird der Brennpunkt beschädigt. Bei Lokalisierung, ihrer PFS, benötigt man die Kenntnis über die Form jenes Flecks, damit man seinen Zentroid genau findet. Alles das wird durch Abweichungen vermasselt. Lichtscheibe wird nicht gezeigt, aber wenn man es mit einem Embryo zu tun hat... Die Lichtscheibe ist in der gleichen miserablen Phase, in der sich andere Techniken befinden, bei denen die Leute sagen: wenn wir die Lichtscheibe verwenden“, doch dem ist nicht so, da durch die Abweichungen die Auflösung so schlecht wird. Man kann einzelne Zellsoma in bestimmten Bereichen des Gehirns nicht auflösen. An was wir gearbeitet haben war, Anleihen bei Astronomen zu machen und die Instrumente der adaptiven Optik zu verwenden, damit wir tiefer in die leben Organismen hineinsehen können. Dies ist das Beispiel für den Blick in das Gehirn eines sich entwickelnden Zebrafisches. In diesem Falle mussten wir eine sehr schnelle AO-Technik entwickeln, da beim Wechsel von einem Ort zum andern die Abweichung sich ändert. Das hier repräsentiert 20.000 verschiedene adaptive optische Berichtigungen, damit dieses große Volumen abgedeckt wird. Wenn wir tiefer in das Mittelgehirn des Zebrafisches gehen, etwa 200 Mikrometer tief, schalten wir die adaptive Optik aus. Das würden Sie mit einem modernen Mikroskop sehen und dann schalten Sie die AO ein und man ist wieder da, wo man die Beugungsgrenze erhält und das Signal erhält. Was meine Gruppe betrifft und an was ich derzeit wirklich glaube ist, wir stehen am Scheitelpunkt zu einer Revolution in der Zellbiologie, denn wir haben Zellen noch immer nicht so untersucht, wie sie in Wirklichkeit sind. Wir müssen die Zelle unter ihren eigenen Bedingungen studieren und bei diesem Rätsel gibt es drei Teile. GFP ist großartig, seine Rohdaten sind aber weitgehend ungeordnet. In den letzten zwei Jahren traten diese Bearbeitungstechniken des Erbguts hervor, mit denen man mit diesen Proteinen auf endogenen Leveln experimentieren kann. Es zeigte sich, dass es typischerweise niedrige Stufen waren, konfokale Mikroskopie und diese anderen Techniken sind viel zu pertubative, um Dynamiken zu untersuchen und man braucht dazu so etwas wie Gitter-Lichtscheiben. Nochmals, man kann Zellen nicht isoliert betrachten und dabei den Gesamtzusammenhang sehen. Man muss alle Zell-Zell-Interaktionen sehen, alle Nachrichtenübermittlungen, die im Innern stattfinden, da, wo sie sich entwickeln, und hier spielt die adaptive Optik eine Rolle. Die Zukunft meiner Gruppe wird sein, adaptive Optik zu entwickeln, damit dies funktioniert, dies mit der Gitter-Lichtscheibe zu kombinieren, damit wir ein nichtinvasives Instrument haben, um Dynamiken anzusehen. Und dann schieben wir die Superauflösungsmethoden wie SIM und PALM mit hinein, um darüber hinaus die höhere Auflösung hinzuzufügen. Damit danke ich Ihnen für ‘s Zuhören.

Eric Betzig speaking about his early theoretical ideas on a method of how the Abbe limit could be surpassed
(00:06:32 - 00:08:02)

 

 

A few years later, he heard about fluorescent proteins that could be turned on and off at will and eventually realized that this was the missing link to make super-resolution microscopy a reality. Betzig and his colleagues demonstrated the technique, which they called photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), on lysosomes and mitochondria in 2006 [14]. Since the birth of STED and PALM, super-resolution techniques have continued to improve and distinguish smaller cellular structures.

In conclusion, humanity's understanding of light and optics has grown significantly over the last 2,500 odd years — and our knowledge continues to expand at a rapid pace. Studies of the basic nature of light have led to technological advances that no one could have predicted. Medicine has taken leaps forward because of Nobel Prize winning discoveries in fluorescence and microscopy. And what will the future hold for the science of light and optics? Only time can tell, but it will undoubtedly involve more groundbreaking research by scientists in search of answers to the fundamental questions of life.

Footnotes:

[1] Stark, G. (2018). Light. In Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com
[2] Vohnsen, B. (2004). A Short History of Optics. Physica Scripta. Vol. T109, 75–79
[3] Narayanan, A. (1999). Quantum Computing For Beginners. Proceedings of the 1999 Congress on Evolutionary Computation-CEC99 (Cat. No. 99TH8406)
[4] Zheludev, N. (2007). The life and times of the LED — a 100-year history. Nature Photonics. Vol. 1, 189–192
[5] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/physics/2014/press-release/
[6] Hecht, J. (2010). Short history of laser development. Optical Engineering. Vol. 49, F100-F122.
[7] Schawlow, A. L. and Townes, C. H. (1958) Infrared and Optical Masers. Physical Review. Vol. 112, 1940-1949
[8] Moerner, W. E. and Kador, L. (1989) Optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in a solid. Physical Review Letters. Vol. 62, 2535–2538
[9] https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2008/summary/
[10] https://assets.nobelprize.org/uploads/2018/06/popular-chemistryprize2014.pdf
[11] Stelzer, E. H. K. (2002) Light microscopy: Beyond the diffraction limit? Nature. Vol. 417, 806-807
[12] Klar, T. A., Jakobs, S., Dyba, M., Egner, A. and Hell, S. W. (2000) Fluorescence microscopy with diffraction resolution barrier broken by stimulated emission. PNAS. Vol. 97, 8206-8210
[13] Betzig, E. and Trautman, J. K. (1992) Near-Field Optics: Microscopy, Spectroscopy, and Surface Modification Beyond the Diffraction Limit. Science. Vol. 257, 189-195
[14] Betzig, E. et al. (2006) Imaging Intracellular Fluorescent Proteins at Nanometer Resolution. Science. Vol. 313, 1642-1645