Life of Proteins

by Joachim Pietzsch

Back to Proteins
Proteins carry their importance within their name. It is derived from the Greek word “proteios”, which means “standing in front” or “in the lead”, and has been given to them by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius, then “the elder statesman of the world of chemistry”, on July 10th, 1838. In a letter to his young Dutch colleague Gerrit Mulder he wrote on that day: “Le nom protéine que je vous propose pour l’oxyde organique de la fibrine et de l’albumine, je voulais le deriver de πρωτεῖος, parce qu’il parait etre la substance primitive ou principale de la nutrition animale.“[1]

The research on proteins made great progress during the next hundred years. Their nature as macromolecules, composed by amino acids that are tied together by peptide bonds, was revealed, and many of their physiological functions, which went far beyond the nutritional aspects Berzelius mentioned, were discovered. Proteins proved to possess an extraordinary structural complexity and variety. Most scientists were therefore convinced that only proteins would be able to carry the hereditary information of genes. It came as a great surprise when Oswald T. Avery found out in 1943 that genes were not made up of proteins but of the nucleic acid DNA – and thus opened the race for the structural determination of genes.

For almost half a century then, from the elucidation of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick and the publication of their seminal paper in Nature on April 25, 1953, until the publication of the working draft of the human genome in Nature and Science on February 15 and 16, 2001, respectively, genes seemed to be the most important molecules of life, at least in the public perception. In fact, they never were, as scientists always knew even if they tended to overemphasize the importance of genes themselves. After the human genome had been deciphered, the attention of science shifted „Back to proteins“, as Johann Deisenhofer (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1988) titled his talk at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2002, in which he clearly stated:
„Obviously proteins are an essential ingredient of cells. Genes alone can do nothing. Life comes with proteins.“

Johann Deisenhofer (2002) - Back to Proteins

Alright now, thank you very much for the introduction. I am here for the 7th time, so it is clear that I’m a fan of the Lindau meetings. And it is a great pleasure to talk to you about this topic and it is related to what Jerome Karle just told you, in a way that should become obvious. Why back to Proteins? In recent years there has been a change in the focus of biological science. And one can say without doubt that the 1990’s were the age of recombinant DNA, where the techniques to handle DNA had become mature. And actually big science entered biology. By the end of the 1990’s we could see in the top journals articles that had 100’s of authors. And that reminds me of course of high energy physics where this happened a long time ago. And it was an interesting experience to see that coming because biologists traditionally used to work individually in small groups. And cook their problems for a long time by themselves and then come out with some sensational discovery. This is really a new thing for biology. And needless to say we all know the determination of genome sequences, among them our own, was an overwhelming success contrary to some people’s expectations and scepticism. And so now the question is what do we do next? And this is by the way a contribution to introducing the round table discussion later this morning. One question is: can we repeat this approach, the big science approach with proteins? Obviously proteins are an essential ingredient of cells. And genes alone can do nothing. Life comes with proteins. So we can look at protein-protein interactions. We can look at how the expression of proteins from the genomic information changes over time in development, with disease and so on. One idea that came up about 4 or 5 years ago is: can you apply this approach, the approach of large scale focused research on protein structures? And the fact that people were even thinking about this shows you how far we have come from the days of Jerome Karle where people doubted that he could ever solve a crystal structure from a diffraction pattern. Now we are thinking of doing this to thousands of proteins. And the complication here is, and the difference here is that we don’t, with protein crystals we don’t have usually 150 data points per atom. We more like have 2 or so. And that creates some difficulty with that. So the name that evolved very quickly for this, for the concerted approach to determine many, the structures of as many proteins as possible was structural genomics. And here I just mention a few points. It was certainly stimulated by the success of genome sequencing projects. It means that instead of working on one protein at a time, trying to figure out its structure, many proteins are in the works at the same time. So massively parallel determination or handling of proteins and determination of structure. And this involves a large degree of automation because you cannot have, at least not in the type of laboratory I work in, you cannot have 100’s of people sitting at desks and performing identical operations. This is what robots can and should do. And the objectives are, among others, create a dense covering of fold space that will allow structure prediction and homology models for most proteins. What I mean by that is, it has been the consensus among structural biologists that there are not an infinite number of different ways a protein chain, let’s say of 100 or 200 amino acids, can fold. There is certainly a limited number. And that notion came from observations like how many new types of folding are discovered per year. If you look at the deposits in the protein data bank where all the structural information is collected, the percentage of new structures is decreasing steadily. And that means it has to approach zero over time. It is not quite clear at what number of different folds it will reach zero but the guesses are between 1 and 5,000 or so. And we are pretty close to 1,000 already. So the other objective of course is more practical. Many pathogenic microorganisms have been selected as targets for structural genomics. And this undoubtedly will open new opportunities for drug design where we can selectively or hope to selectively inhibit proteins that are essential for the pathogens. But that are not essential for the host. And in that way approach a solution to the problem of infectious diseases that are on the rise now again in the world. And there are many more objectives. I don’t want to dwell on these. Possible as I already said, possible, the possibility of thinking about such projects came up because of the advent of many new powerful methods for determination of protein structures. I will not mention at all NMR or only in passing. But in the field of protein crystallography alone where you have to crystallise your protein, do the x-ray diffraction experiment, there have been so many steps that by themselves look small but in combination created nothing less than a revolution in the field. And so this makes it possible and it is to be expected that these projects will further improve the methods because people now are forced to think about each step in the making and purification and handling of proteins to make that as efficient as possible. And this would undoubtedly lead to progress. And this is obvious. All protein structures that are easily accessible with these methods will be determined. We don’t know yet how many this will be. And currently there are 21 structure genomic centres world wide. At least that is the number that’s given by the protein data bank. North America has the most with 15 and 4 in Europe and 2 in Asia. All these started working very recently. So we don’t have real good data yet on how the progress is in each of them. I personally became convinced that this approach is possible when Mischa Machius determined the structure, which is a part of a DNA repair system in this thermophilic bacterium, protein of 650 amino acids, when Mischa determined this structure in much less than 6 weeks and after 6 weeks came up with the first draft of a manuscript. So that showed me that there is really no reason to assume that protein structures need to take years as they did when I was a graduate student and post doc and so on. So what can we expect from this? On the average the determination of protein structure would take only days or weeks. And that is really a revolutionary statement because many of us who have experienced the beginning of this field would have been really sceptical about the possibility of such a speed up maybe only 10 years ago. And the availability of many structures in many different types of folds of proteins will make reliable structure prediction quite a real possibility. And this in turn can aid the prediction of function. As of now a substantial part of the genes that were tentatively identified in the human genomes have no function associated with it. Essentially it’s a sequence with no idea what the associate protein is going to do in our bodies. And so this should help in predicting function. However I want to spend a few minutes putting in a few words of caution. And one of them is of course that many proteins will not cooperate. And the success rate of the structural genomics programs is still unknown. We don’t know how many proteins that are chosen as targets will actually be accessible for the automated approach to structure determination. And even if you get structure, it may not reveal the function of the protein. I will show an example. And sometimes evolution may have gone unexpected ways so that one, lets say a version of a protein from a bacterium does not allow you to make conclusions on the version of the same protein occurring in let’s say a eukaryotic cell. And modelling is certainly not yet precise enough to explain chemistry. So even if we can do homology modelling of a protein, so far we cannot come close enough to the real structure to explain the chemistry let’s say of an enzymatic reaction. Now I want to present examples for each of these. The first one is the cytochrome BC1 complex, that was mentioned in Hartmut Michel’s talk already. And he explained the function of this. This here is, represents the structure of the BC1 complex from cows. And this is a complex of 11 subunits that are put together in this very complicated way. This is a dimer so you have 2 copies of each of the proteins. And this protein sits in a membrane, so membrane proteins are not yet really part of the structural genomics project. Some of the centres express intent to work on membrane proteins but there is a lot of work to do to make this kind of protein accessible for automatic methods. And consequently it took 8 years from crystal to manuscript as compared to 6 weeks for the previous structure. And this is not because the post doc who worked on this did not understand his business. It’s really that proteins of this kind are very difficult. So the next note of caution is the synapsin C domain. Now synapsins are very abundant proteins in our nerves. About 1% of the neuro-proteins are synapsins. And they have been known for a long time but nobody knows their exact function yet. What do they do in our bodies? And if they are, if the genes for synapsin are knocked out as we say, they are silenced, they don’t express proteins, mice develop normally. The only difference to normal mice is that mice lacking synapsins have more frequently seizures, epilepsy type phenomena. But it is along way from a molecule to epilepsy. And so we have no clue about the real function of synapsin. Now but when we got the structure of this part of synapsin, this is the C domain. Synapsin, the full length proteins have about 100 amino acids. Previous to this point here, where the N terminals of our structures start and about 200 amino acids more following the C terminal residue in the structure. But this part is the most conserved part if you compare synapsins in different species. And when we saw the structure as we usually do or always do, we send it to a server at the EMBL using a program that was developed by Chris Sander and co-workers which identifies proteins of similar structures that are already known. And there was a big hit in glutathione synthetase and related proteins. This is a protein which makes a non-standard peptide bond using ATP and phosphorylation of one of the substrates and then followed by a peptide bond formation. So there is ATP bound, there are two other substrates bound in this region. And readily we could show that this protein also binds ATP but we have to this day no clue whether it is an enzyme at all, whether its function in the body is enzymatic. Nor if so do we have a clue what its substrates could be. So structure alone doesn’t do it. This was the work of Lothar Esser. The next example is human HMG-CoA reductase. And this HMG-CoA reductase is an example of the unpredictable ways evolution may take from time to time. Here is an overview of the function of this enzyme. This here is one of the substrates, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A. And the enzyme consumes two molecules of NADPH that give a total of four electrons to split this bond and reduce this carbon here. So the starting point is this HMG-CoA and the outcome is mevalonate which in turn is the necessary compound to form all kinds of essential compounds like hem, ubiquinone and then more steps later cholesterol. That is why this enzyme is very interesting because it performs the committed step in the body’s own production of cholesterol. Which is about 2/3 of the cholesterol that we have is formed in this pathway. And that is more than enough to explain our interest. So we knew that there are two classes of HMG-CoA reductases: one in mammals, yeast, plants and archaeabacteria, the other one in eubacteria. And here you see the structural organisation. In mammals for example there is a membrane bound part and a catalytic part. And this catalytic part is common to all these types of organisms. And the catalytic part in bacteria is about 20% identical in sequence to the catalytic part in these organisms whereas the identity across these organisms is more like 40%. So there are clearly two classes. And this gave us the courage to work on this structure assuming that perhaps there were important differences between these two classes of proteins. And the concern was that of course when we started, this structure was already known from the group of Cynthia Stauffacher which is a bacterial pseudomonas HMG-CoA reductase. And this here is the human, the structure of the human enzyme contrary to the bacterial enzyme, it’s a tetramer, four different subunits here shown in different colours. And it has four active sites which are at the interface of two monomers. So the purple monomer and the yellow monomer form this active site and again on the other side of the dimer. So each dimer has two active sites. And in the human enzyme two dimers are related by a 2 fold symmetry axis. Ok so, sure, the quaternary structure is different but looking at the dimer alone, the shape of these two dimers, the pseudomonas and the human is very similar, each one has two active sites. There are some differences in the sense that structure parts in the dimer seem to have been switched between the two monomers. So for example this red part of the molecule here should actually be green if the organisation of the dimer were the same as in the human enzyme. So if we superimpose the monomers, the alpha carbon trace, we see that most of the molecule is superimposing very, very well. And the peripheral parts, the N and C terminal parts are different. But does that, is that really important? We certainly would expect that the active site would be the most conserved part between the two structures. And we were extremely surprised to see this result. Here the active site of the pseudomonas enzyme and that of the human enzyme. Remember, they are formed at the interface of two monomers, the yellow and the blue monomer. And clearly there is a lot more blue here than is here. That means essential parts of the active site of the enzyme are formed here by the blue subunit and here by the yellow subunit which seems to invade the active site. Still the substrate HMG-CoA binds roughly in the same way, the NAD or NADP binds in a different orientation. But I think the most surprising part is that there is a real dramatic difference between the active site that would make it impossible to predict any, let’s say mutants one would make to further test the enzymatic activity of the human enzyme by just looking at the bacteria enzyme. So that kind of thing may, also has to be kept in mind when we use the results that come out of the structural genomics project. And the last case which may be a difficult case for modelling: the binding of inhibitors to HMH-CoA reductase. And these inhibitors are very, extremely popular and profitable drugs that are used by people who, mainly in the civilised world, who suffer from too much food as compared to the rest of the world who has the opposite problem. And these are inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase which as I told you is the key enzyme for the body’s own production of cholesterol. And so if we shut down or slow down that enzyme, we diminish our own cholesterol production. Therefore the cells are likely to take up more from the blood and that is the desired effect. So we looked at how these things bind to the enzyme, here’s a gallery of six structures that was done by Eva Istvan as also the structure that I showed previously with the natural substrate. And you see that these inhibitors are all binding with an HMG-like moiety bound in the active site and a more or less hydrophobic moiety occupying this shallow depression at the surface. So all these different compounds, basically no matter what the size and shape of these ring systems is, bind in the same way. But a closer look at the binding of the substrate and NADP in this case and the inhibitor shows that in this structure part of the enzyme is missing, namely this helix and a turn of this helix here. That means the inhibitor binding actually does more than just occupying the active site with this part. But also it prevents the formation of the complete active site by preventing or disturbing the folding of this helix here. And I think this type of binding with today’s method is very, very hard to predict. Most of us would have said the inhibitor will bind, sure this here is too similar to the natural substrate for any other hypothesis to be made, that it binds here. But most of us would have thought that this part here will bind in a place where the NADP is. But the reality is different and that shows that modelling is still in need of a lot of improvement. So coming to the end, it is obvious that we still have a lot to learn. I did not mention these four examples to discourage structural genomics. It just shows that there are problems that need to be solved. And these problems are not simple at all to solve. But I am confident that they can be solved over time. It is also clear that we will be inundated with a flood of data. All these 21 groups alone produce data at a mind boggling rate every day. And they have to learn how to, and the rest of us have to learn how to handle this data and how to retrieve them or prepare them in a way that they are retrievable by people who are interested. And clearly the most pressing need is the development of more computational tools, data bases, modelling methods and simulation methods. And the ultimate goal of course in my view is the simulation of whole cells and maybe even organisms. And this is probably many decades away but I think biology as a discipline can only be called successful after we have achieved this goal. Thank you very much. Applause.

Gut, vielen Dank Ihre einführenden Worte. Ich bin zum siebten Mal hier, also eindeutig ein Fan der Lindau-Treffen. Es ist mir eine große Freude, hier über dieses Thema sprechen zu können. Und wie bald deutlich werden dürfte, hat es auch etwas mit dem zu tun, was Ihnen Jerome Karle gerade erzählt hat. Warum zurück zu den Proteinen? In den letzten Jahren gab es eine Schwerpunktverlagerung bei den biologischen Wissenschaften. Und man kann zweifelsohne behaupten, dass die 1990er Jahre zum Zeitalter der rekombinanten DNA-Technologie wurden, in dem die Techniken im Umgang mit DNA eine gewisse Reife erreicht haben. Und in der Tat hielt die Großforschung Einzug in die Biologie. Bis zum Ende der 1990er Jahre konnten wir in den führenden Fachzeitschriften Artikel mit Hunderten von Autoren finden. Und das erinnert mich natürlich an die Hochenergiephysik, wo dies vor langer Zeit ebenfalls der Fall war. Und es war eine interessante Erfahrung, dieses Phänomen entstehen zu sehen, weil Biologen traditionell die Gewohnheit hatten, individuell in kleinen Gruppen zu arbeiten und ihre Probleme lange Zeit im eigenen Saft zu garen, um dann mit sensationellen Entdeckungen an die Öffentlichkeit zu gehen. Das ist wirklich eine neue Sache für die Biologie. Und natürlich wissen wir alle, dass die Entschlüsselung der Genomsequenzen, auch unsere eigene, ein überragender Erfolg war, der den Erwartungen und der Skepsis einiger Menschen entgegenstand. Und deshalb stellt sich jetzt die Frage, was wir als nächstes angehen? Und dies ist übrigens ein Beitrag zur Vorbereitung des Rundtischgespräches, das später am heutigen Vormittag stattfinden soll. Eine Frage lautet: Können wir diesen Ansatz, den Großforschungsansatz, mit Proteinen wiederholen? Offensichtlich sind Proteine ein wesentlicher Bestandteil von Zellen. Und Gene allein können nichts bewirken. Leben entsteht mit Proteinen. Deshalb können wir Protein-Protein-Interaktionen untersuchen. Wir können untersuchen, wie sich die Expression von Proteinen aus den genomischen Informationen im Laufe der Entwicklung, bei Krankheiten usw. mit der Zeit verändert. Eine Idee, die vor circa vier oder fünf Jahren entstand, ist die Frage: Kann man diesen Ansatz, den Ansatz der groß angelegten Forschung, auf Proteinstrukturen übertragen? Und die Tatsache, dass überhaupt darüber nachgedacht wurde, zeigt, wie weit wir seit den Tagen von Jerome Karle gekommen sind, in denen daran gezweifelt wurde, dass er jemals in der Lage sein würde, eine Kristallstruktur mit Hilfe eines Beugungsmusters aufzuklären. Und heute denken wir darüber nach, dies an Tausenden von Proteinen durchzuführen. Das Komplizierte daran ist, dass wir im Unterschied dazu bei den Proteinkristallen üblicherweise nicht 150 Datenpunkte pro Atom haben, sondern eher zwei oder so. Und das sorgt für Schwierigkeiten. Die Disziplin, die sich deshalb sehr schnell für diesen konzertierten Ansatz zur Ermittlung der Strukturen möglichst vieler Proteine entwickelte, war die strukturelle Genomik. Und ich erwähne hier nur einige Punkte. Dieser Ansatz wurde sicherlich durch den Erfolg der Genomsequenzierungsprojekte beflügelt. Bei diesem Ansatz wird die Struktur des Proteins statt in einem Protein gleichzeitig in vielen Proteinen erforscht. So kommt es zu einer enorm umfangreichen, parallelen Entschlüsselung oder Handhabung von Proteinen und der Aufklärung ihrer Struktur. Und das bedeutet ein hohes Maß an Automatisierung, weil man – zumindest in der Art von Labor, in der ich tätig bin – nicht Hunderte von Menschen an Laborarbeitsplätzen damit beschäftigen kann, identische Abläufe durchzuführen. Solche Abläufe können und sollten von Robotern durchgeführt werden. Und zu den Zielen zählt unter anderem, eine dichte Abdeckung von gefaltetem Raum, der eine Strukturvorhersage und Homologie-Modelle für die meisten Proteine ermöglicht. Damit möchte ich andeuten, dass unter Strukturbiologen Einigkeit darüber besteht, dass keine unendliche Anzahl von unterschiedlichen Möglichkeiten besteht, in denen sich eine Proteinkette, beispielsweise mit 100 oder 200 Aminosäuren, falten kann. Die Anzahl der Möglichkeiten ist mit Sicherheit begrenzt. Und diese Ansicht basiert auf Beobachtungen wie beispielsweise der, wie viele neue Faltungsarten pro Jahr entdeckt werden. Wenn man sich die Bestände in der Proteindatenbank anschaut, in der alle strukturellen Informationen gesammelt werden, nimmt der Prozentsatz neuer Strukturen kontinuierlich ab. Und das bedeutet, dass sich der Wert im Laufe der Zeit dem Nullpunkt nähern wird. Es ist nicht ganz klar, bei welcher Anzahl von unterschiedlichen Faltungen der Nullpunkt erreicht werden wird. Aber die Schätzungen liegen zwischen etwa 1.000 und 5.000. Und wir sind bereits kurz vor 1.000. Deshalb ist das andere Ziel natürlich zweckmäßiger. Viele pathogene Mikroorganismen wurden als Zielstrukturen der strukturellen Genomik ausgewählt. Und dies wird zweifelsohne neue Möglichkeiten für die Arzneimittelentwicklung eröffnen, bei der wir selektiv Proteine inhibieren oder hoffentlich inhibieren können, die essentiell für die Pathogene, aber nicht für den Wirt sind. Und in dieser Art und Weise können wir uns einer Lösung des Problems von Infektionskrankheiten nähern, die heute weltweit wieder im Zunehmen begriffen sind. Und es gibt viele weitere Ziele, auch die ich hier nicht weiter eingehen möchte. Wie ich bereits sagte, entstand die Möglichkeit, überhaupt über solche Projekte nachzudenken, durch das Aufkommen vieler neuer leistungsstarker Methoden der Aufklärung von Proteinstrukturen. Ich will gar nicht groß auf die NMR-Spektroskopie eingehen oder sie nur kurz streifen. Aber allein auf dem Gebiet der Proteinkristallografie, bei der Proteine mit Hilfe von Röntgenbeugungsexperimenten kristallisiert werden, wurden viele Schritte realisiert, die für sich genommen gering erscheinen, aber in Kombination nicht weniger als eine Revolution auf diesem Gebiet ausgelöst haben. Und deshalb entstehen hier Möglichkeiten. Es ist zu erwarten, dass diese Projekte in Zukunft zu weiteren Methodenverbesserungen führen werden, weil man heute gezwungen ist, jeden Schritt in der Herstellung, Reinigung und Behandlung von Proteinen so effizient wie möglich zu gestalten. Und das wird zweifelsohne zu weiteren Fortschritten führen. Und es liegt auf der Hand, dass sich alle Proteinstrukturen, die über diese Methoden leicht zugänglich sind, aufklären lassen werden. Wir wissen natürlich heute noch nicht, wie viele das sein werden. Es gibt derzeit 21 Strukturgenomik-Zentren weltweit. Zumindest ist das die Zahl, die von der Proteindatenbank genannt wird. Die meisten dieser Zentren befinden sich in Nordamerika, nämlich 15, vier in Europa und zwei in Asien. Alle Zentren haben ihre Arbeiten vor kurzer Zeit aufgenommen, sodass wir derzeit noch keine wirklich aussagekräftigen Daten darüber haben, welche Fortschritte in den einzelnen Zentren gemacht werden. Ich persönlich bin von der Realisierbarkeit dieses Ansatzes überzeugt, seit Mischa Machius die Struktur in diesem thermophilen Bakterium, diesem Protein aus 650 Aminosäuren, identifizierte, die Teil eines DNA-Reparatursystems ist. Mischa klärte diese Struktur in weniger als sechs Wochen auf und veröffentlichte nach sechs Wochen den ersten Entwurf eines Manuskripts. Das zeigte mir, dass wirklich kein Grund zu der Annahme besteht, dass Proteinstrukturen Jahre in Anspruch nehmen müssen, wie dies zu meiner Doktoranden- und Postdoc-Zeit noch der Fall war. Was können wir von diesen Entwicklungen erwarten? Durchschnittlich dürfte die Entschlüsselung einer Proteinstruktur nur Tage oder Wochen benötigen. Und das ist tatsächlich eine revolutionäre Aussage, weil viele von uns, die die Anfänge auf diesem Gebiet miterlebt haben, die Möglichkeit einer solchen Beschleunigung noch vor vielleicht zehn Jahren wirklich sehr skeptisch beurteilt hätten. Die Verfügbarkeit vieler Strukturen in vielen verschiedenen Protein-Faltungsarten macht die zuverlässige Strukturvorhersage zu einer realen Möglichkeit. Und dies kann wiederum die Vorhersage der Funktion unterstützen. Bis heute konnte einem erheblichen Teil der Gene, die in den Humangenomen vorläufig identifiziert wurden, keine Funktion zugeordnet werden. Im Wesentlichen ist es eine Sequenz, ohne dass man eine Vorstellung davon hat, was das assoziierte Protein in unseren Körpern anrichtet. Und deshalb dürfte dieser Ansatz bei der Vorhersage der Funktion hilfreich sein. Allerdings möchte ich an dieser Stelle auch einige Worte der Warnung formulieren. Und ein Aspekt ist sicherlich der, dass viele Proteine nicht kooperieren werden. Die Erfolgsquote der Strukturgenomikprogramme ist noch unbekannt. Wir wissen nicht, wie viele der als Targets ausgewählten Proteine tatsächlich über den automatisierten Ansatz der Strukturaufklärung zugänglich sind. Und selbst wenn man die Struktur aufklärt, kann möglicherweise die Funktion des Proteins nicht entschlüsselt werden. Ich werde das anhand eines Beispiels erläutern. Und zuweilen geht auch die Evolution unerwartete Wege, sodass uns beispielsweise die Version eines Proteins von einem Bakterium keine Schlussfolgerungen auf die Version desselben Proteins in einer eukaryotischen Zelle ermöglicht. Modellierungen sind sicherlich nicht präzise genug, um die Chemie zu erklären. Selbst, wenn wir also Homologiemodelle eines Proteins erstellen können, kommen wir bis heute nicht nah genug an die tatsächliche Struktur heran, um die Chemie, beispielsweise einer enzymatischen Reaktion, zu erklären. Ich möchte Ihnen jetzt Beispiele für diese einzelnen Aspekte aufzeigen. Das erste betrifft den Cytochrom-BC1-Komplex, der heute bereits im Vortrag von Hartmut Michel erwähnt wurde. Und er erläuterte dessen Funktion. Das hier repräsentiert die Struktur des BC1-Komplexes von Kühen. Und dies hier ist ein Komplex aus elf Untereinheiten, die auf diese sehr komplizierte Art und Weise zusammengesetzt sind. Das hier ist ein Dimer, sodass man zwei Kopien von jedem Protein hat. Und dieses Protein hier befindet sich in einer Membran. Membranproteine sind bisher nicht wirklich Bestandteil des Strukturgenomikprojekts. Einige der Zentren haben ausdrücklich ihre Absicht bekundet, über Membranproteinen zu arbeiten. Aber es gibt noch eine Menge zu tun, um diese Art von Proteinen für automatische Methoden zugänglich zu machen. Und konsequenterweise brauchte es acht Jahre vom Kristall bis zum Manuskript im Vergleich zu sechs Wochen für die frühere Struktur. Und das hat nichts damit zu tun, dass der Postdoc, der darüber arbeitete, sein "Geschäft" nicht verstanden hat, sondern Proteine dieser Art tatsächlich sehr komplex sind. Deshalb gilt die nächste Vorsichtswarnung der Synapsin-C-Domäne. Synapsine sind in unseren Nerven reichlich vorhandene Proteine. Rund 1% der Neuroproteine sind Synapsine. Und sie sind bereits seit langer Zeit bekannt. Aber keiner kennt bis heute ihre genaue Funktion. Was machen sie in unserem Körper? Und wenn die Gene für Synapsin deaktiviert oder – wie wir sagen – ruhig gestellt werden, sie keine Proteine exprimieren, entwickeln sich Mäuse normal. Der einzige Unterschied zu normalen Mäusen ist der, dass Mäuse mit einem Mangel an Synapsin häufiger Krampfanfälle, epilepsieartige Phänomene, aufweisen. Aber es ist ein weiter Weg von einem Molekül zur Epilepsie. Und deshalb haben wir keine Ahnung, was die tatsächliche Funktion von Synapsin sind. Betrachten wir aber jetzt die Struktur dieses Teils des Synapsins. Das hier ist das C-Domäne-Synapsin. Die Volllängenproteine haben rund 100 Aminosäuren vor diesem Punkt hier, wo die N-terminalen Teile unserer Strukturen beginnen, und rund 200 Aminosäuren mehr nach dem C-terminalen Rest in der Struktur. Wenn man Synapsine verschiedener Spezies miteinander vergleicht, ist aber dieser Teil der am stärksten konservierte Teil. Und als wir diese Struktur beobachteten – wir schickten sie, wie üblicherweise bzw. immer, an einen Server am EMBL zur Analyse mit Hilfe eines Programms, das von Chris Sander und Kollegen entwickelt wurde und bereits bekannte Proteine ähnlicher Strukturen identifiziert – war das ein großer Wurf in Bezug auf Glutathion-Synthetase und verwandte Proteine. Dies ist ein Protein, das mit Hilfe von ATP und Phosphorylierung eines der Substrate eine Nicht-Standard-Peptidbindung herstellt, der sich dann die Bildung einer Peptidbindung anschließt. Und dort besteht also eine ATP-Bindung, dort sind zwei andere Substrate in dieser Region gebunden. Und wir konnten leicht nachweisen, dass dieses Protein ebenfalls ATP bindet. Aber wir wissen bis heute nicht, ob es überhaupt ein Enzym ist und ob seine Funktion im Körper enzymatisch ist. Und selbst wenn dies so sein sollte, haben wir keine Ahnung, welcher Art seine Substrate sein könnten. Die Struktur allein reicht also nicht aus. Das hier war die Arbeit von Lothar Esser Das nächste Beispiel betrifft die humane HMG-CoA-Reduktase. Und diese HMG-CoA-Reduktase ist ein Beispiel für die unvorhersehbaren Wege, die die Evolution von Zeit zu Zeit nimmt. Hier sehen Sie eine Übersicht über die Funktion dieses Enzyms. Das hier ist eines der Substrate, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-Coenzym A. Und das Enzym verbraucht zwei Moleküle von NADPH, die insgesamt vier Elektronen beisteuern, um diese Verbindung zu trennen und diesen Kohlenstoff hier zu reduzieren. Der Ausgangspunkt ist also dieses HMG-CoA und das Ergebnis ist Mevalonat, das wiederum die erforderliche Verbindung für die Bildung aller Arten von essentiellen Verbindungen wie Hem, Ubiquinon und dann einige Schritte später Cholesterin ist. Aus diesem Grund ist dieses Enzym sehr interessant, da es den bedeutenden Schritt in der körpereigenen Produktion von Cholesterin durchführt. Rund zwei Drittel unseres Cholesterins wird auf diesem Wege gebildet. Und das ist wohl mehr als ausreichend, um unser Interesse zu begründen. Wir wussten also, dass es zwei Kategorien der HMG-CoA-Reduktase gibt: Eine in Säugetieren, Hefen, Pflanzen und Archaeabakterien, die andere in Eubakterien. Und hier sieht man die strukturelle Organisation. Bei Säugetieren gibt es beispielsweise einen Membranbindungsteil und einen katalytischen Teil. Und dieser katalytische Teil ist in all diesen Organismusarten gleich. Und der katalytische Teil in Bakterien ist in der Sequenz zu rund 20% identisch mit dem katalytischen Teil in diesen Organismen, während die organismusübergreifende Identität eher bei 40% liegt. Es gibt also eindeutig zwei Kategorien. Vor dem Hintergrund der Annahme, dass möglicherweise bedeutende Unterschiede zwischen diesen beiden Kategorien von Proteinen bestehen, hat uns das ermutigt, an dieser Struktur zu arbeiten. Und das Interesse bezog sich natürlich darauf, dass diese Struktur zu dem Zeitpunkt, als wir begannen, bereits aus der Gruppe von Cynthia Stauffacher bekannt war, und zwar als bakterielle Pseudomona-HMG-CoA-Reduktase. Und hier ist die Struktur des menschlichen Enzyms im Unterschied zum bakteriellen Enzym zu sehen. Es ist ein Tetramer. Hier sind vier verschiedene Untereinheiten in unterschiedlichen Farben zu sehen. Und es hat vier aktive Stellen, die sich an der Schnittstelle von zwei Monomeren befinden. Das violette Monomer und das gelbe Monomer bilden also die aktive Stelle – ebenfalls auf der anderen Seite des Dimers. Jedes Dimer besitzt also zwei aktive Stellen. Und im menschlichen Enzym sind zwei Dimere durch eine zweizählige Symmetrieachse verbunden. Ok, natürlich ist die quaternäre Struktur unterschiedlich, aber bei ausschließlicher Betrachtung des Dimers, der Form dieser beiden Dimere, sind sich Pseudomonas- und humanes Enzym sehr ähnlich. Sie weisen beide jeweils zwei aktive Stellen auf. Einige Unterschiede gibt es dahingehend, dass Strukturteile im Dimer zwischen den beiden Monomeren ausgetauscht worden zu sein scheinen. So sollte beispielsweise dieser rote Teil des Moleküls hier eigentlich grün sein, wenn die Organisation des Dimers mit der eines humanen Enzyms vergleichbar wäre. Wenn wir die Monomere, die Alpha-Kohlenstoffspur, überlagern, sehen wir, dass sich ein Großteil des Moleküls, sehr, sehr gut überlagert. Und die peripheren Teile, die N- und C-terminalen Teile sind unterschiedlich. Aber ist das wirklich wichtig? Wir würden sicherlich erwarten, dass die aktive Stelle der zwischen diesen beiden Strukturen am stärksten konservierte Teil ist. Und wir waren deshalb extrem überrascht, dieses Ergebnis zu sehen. Hier ist die aktive Stelle des Pseudomonas-Enzyms und des Humanenzyms. Bedenken Sie, dass sie sich an der Schnittstelle der beiden Monomere bilden, des gelben und des blauen Monomers. Und hier ist deutlich mehr blau als hier. Das bedeutet, dass wesentliche Teile der aktiven Stelle des Enzyms hier von der blauen Untereinheit gebildet werden und hier von der gelben Untereinheit, die in die aktive Stelle einzudringen scheint. Das HMG-CoA-Substrat bindet sich dennoch ungefähr genauso, das NAD oder das NADP bindet in anderer Ausrichtung. Das Überraschendste ist aus meiner Sicht, dass ein wirklich dramatischer Unterschied zwischen der aktiven Stelle besteht, was es unmöglich macht, beispielsweise Mutanten vorherzusagen, um die enzymatische Aktivität des Humanenzyms weiter zu untersuchen, indem man nur das Bakterienenzym betrachtet. Deshalb müssen auch diese Aspekte berücksichtigt werden, wenn wir die aus dem Projekt der strukturellen Genomik stammenden Ergebnisse verwenden. Und ein letzter Fall, der schwierig für die Modellbildung sein könnte, ist der Folgende: die Bindung von Inhibitoren an die HMH-CoA-Reduktase. Und diese Inhibitoren sind extrem beliebte und profitable Arzneimittel, die – hauptsächlich in der zivilisierten Welt – von Menschen genommen werden, die unter den Folgen von übermäßigem Essen leiden – im Vergleich zum Rest der Welt, der das gegenteilige Problem hat. Und das hier sind Inhibitoren der HMG-Co-A-Reduktase, die, wie ich bereits erwähnte, das Schlüsselenzym für die körpereigene Produktion von Cholesterin ist. Wenn wir also dieses Enzym deaktivieren oder verlangsamen, verringern wir unsere körpereigene Cholesterinproduktion. Deshalb nehmen die Zellen wahrscheinlich mehr aus dem Blut auf, und das ist der gewünschte Effekt. Wir haben also betrachtet, wie sich diese Dinge an das Enzym binden. Hier ist eine Galerie mit sechs Strukturen zu sehen. Sie wurde von Eva Istvan erstellt, die übrigens auch die Struktur erstellt hat, die ich vorher mit dem natürlichen Substrat gezeigt habe. Und Sie sehen, dass diese Inhibitoren alle mit einer HMG-artigen Teilbindung an der aktiven Stelle und einem mehr oder weniger hydrophoben Teil binden, der diese flache Vertiefung an der Oberfläche besetzt. All diese verschiedenen Verbindungen binden also grundsätzlich unabhängig von Größe und Form dieser Ringsysteme in derselben Weise. Aber ein genauerer Blick auf die Bindung des Substrats, in diesem Fall NADP, und den Inhibitor zeigt, dass in dieser Struktur ein Teil des Enzyms fehlt, nämlich diese Helix und eine Umdrehung der Helix hier. Das bedeutet, dass die Inhibitorbindung für mehr als lediglich die Besetzung der aktiven Stelle mit diesem Teil zuständig ist. Sie verhindert darüber hinaus die Bildung der vollständigen aktiven Stelle, indem sie die Faltung dieser Helix hier verhindert oder stört. Und ich glaube, dass diese Art der Bindung mit heutigen Methoden sehr, sehr schwer vorherzusagen ist. Die meisten von uns würden gedacht haben, dass der Inhibitor bindet. Das hier ähnelt dem natürlichen Substrat zu sehr, um eine andere Hypothese darüber aufzustellen, dass die Bindung hier erfolgt. Aber die meisten von uns hätten gedacht, dass dieser Teil hier an eine Stelle bindet, an der sich NADP befindet. Aber in der Realität ist es anders und das zeigt, dass die Modellbildung nach wie vor verbesserungsbedürftig ist. Damit komme ich langsam zum Ende. Es ist wohl offensichtlich geworden, dass wir noch eine Menge zu lernen haben. Ich habe diese vier Beispiele nicht gewählt, um die strukturelle Genomik zu diskreditieren. Sie zeigen lediglich auf, dass Probleme bestehen, die es zu lösen gilt. Und die Lösung dieser Probleme ist überhaupt nicht leicht. Aber ich bin zuversichtlich, dass sie sich im Laufe der Zeit lösen lassen werden. Ebenfalls klar ist, dass wir mit einer Flut von Daten überschwemmt werden. Allein diese 21 Gruppen produzieren Tag für Tag Daten in unüberschaubaren Mengen. Und sie und wir alle werden lernen müssen, mit diesen Daten so umzugehen und sie so auszuwerten oder aufzubereiten, dass sie von interessierten Menschen abrufbar sind. Und der dringendste Bedarf besteht eindeutig darin, weitere Rechenwerkzeuge, Datenbanken, Modellierungsmethoden und Simulationskonzepte zu entwickeln. Und das letztendliche Ziel muss meiner Ansicht nach selbstverständlich die Simulation von ganzen Zellen und möglicherweise sogar Organismen sein. Und das liegt wahrscheinlich noch viele Jahrzehnte entfernt. Aber ich glaube, dass die Biologie als Disziplin nur dann erfolgreich genannt werden kann, wenn wir dieses Ziel erreicht haben. Vielen Dank. Applaus.

Johann Deisenhofer Emphasizes the Importance of Proteins
(00:03:02 - 00:03:18)

“Proteins can do Almost Everything”
Every modern textbook of biology acknowledges the importance of proteins. „When we look at a cell through a microscope (...) we are, in essence, observing proteins. Proteins constitute most of a cell’s dry mass. They are not only the cell’s building blocks; they also execute nearly all the cell’s functions (...) Before we can hope to understand how genes work, how muscles contract, how nerves conduct electricity, how embryos develop, or how our bodies function, we must attain a deep understanding of proteins.“[2] Far-sighted as he was, Francis Crick (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1962) had formulated similar thoughts already in 1958 in his paper „On Protein Synthesis“[3]: „It is an essential feature of my argument that in biology proteins are uniquely important (…) Watson said to me, a few years ago, ‘The most significant thing about the nucleic acids is that we don’t know what they do.’ By contrast the most significant thing about proteins is that they can do almost everything (…) Once the unique role of proteins is admitted there seems little point in genes doing anything else (…) In the protein molecule Nature has devised a unique instrument in which an underlying simplicity is used to express great subtlety and versatility; it is impossible to see molecular biology in proper perspective until this peculiar combination of virtues has been clearly grasped.“ „On Protein Synthesis“ is still worth reading, although it was published some years before Crick and others deciphered the genetic code. It also contains the first version of what became known as the „central dogma of molecular biology“, popularly spelt: DNA makes RNA makes proteins. What a pity that Francis Crick never lectured in Lindau! In fact, he visited the Nobel Laureate Meeting once, together with James Watson in 1981, but did not give a talk on this occasion. Many other laureates, however, who have substantially contributed to protein research, lectured in Lindau during the last decades. Their talks allow us to a have a closer look at the cellular life of proteins, from their birth in the ribosome to their death in the proteasome.

Born in the Ribosome
While the doors to the structural elucidation of genes and proteins were opened in Cambridge in England by means of X-ray crystallography, the door to the cell was opened at the Rockefeller Institute in New York by means of electron microscopy by Albert Claude, Christian de Duve and George Palade who jointly received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1974 for their discoveries concerning "the structural and functional organization of the cell". In the mid-50s Palade had discovered the birthplace of proteins, small granular components in the cytosol that he initially dubbed microsomes and that we know today as ribosomes (a name RB Roberts suggested in 1958). While Palade (in whose lab Günter Blobel, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1999, worked as a post-doc) never came to Lindau, his two Co-Laureates did, de Duve six times and Albert Claude once in 1975. He repeated his Nobel lecture, and gave a personal account of his life in research and an appraisal of cell biology:

Albert Claude (1975) - The Coming Age of the Cell

I hope, I'm always warning people that they probably are not going to understand me because I have a low voice. As you know, it has been mentioned that I am going to give this lecture in English. You will recognise that I have a very good accent reminding of Europe but that won’t disturb you. First, at the last minute I made the mistake of writing a last, or a little introduction. And that, I'm afraid, is going to be in my way, because you know, when you think about the script, I wanted to give you some principle, however. I will begin in mentioning the man that many of you know and have heard of, it is Blaise Pascal. The man who claimed or said that man was sitting in the middle between two infinites. However, the infinites of Pascal were very much unbalanced. In one side he had all the space, the billion of light years of the stars shining on one hand. And on the other hand he had a tiny little space which occupied the distance between himself and a little insect which he could barely see with a hand lens. So that was very unfortunate. But we have to accept it as a fact and I can mention in this relation that if he had had a microscope, a very good microscope at his disposal, instead of a hand lens, it would have not mattered very much either. Because at that time the power of the microscope was not very great. And this, I have to say something not very nice about Newton, because you remember, in the 17th century Leeuwenhoek was making microscopes and a very slight improvement would have made a gain of 125 years. If we had been able at that time to compensate the operations of the lens, which was very small, we might even have seen bacteria. As a matter of fact, Leeuwenhoek saw bacteria but there were, the resolving power was insufficient. Now, Newton tried to compensate, and he made an error, he chose the medium to work with in order to determine the ratio between refraction and reflection. He used what they called sugar of lead, actually it’s simply a lead acetate. And with this medium it was zero. So with the prestige of Newton nobody thought of going back and look whether Newton was right or not. And that has been a very great price for biology, because imagine the theory of cell would have been written by Leeuwenhoek or somebody of that period. Pasteur would not have been able to discover the disease and bacteria, because somebody else had written 25 years and have done it. What enormous gain for cell biology. Of course, maybe just as well as it was, you know. Maybe we would have no job anymore ourselves if things had been done so soon. So this introduction, as I told you, I was meant to be disturbed, the text I’ve written, this is true. I hope you forgive me. I'd like, before I start on my formal lecture, to mention a few principles. My introduction is not foreign to that; it has some relation, you will see later. The first principle based on experimentation is that the discovery that we make always was at the measure of our tools. And if we have better tools, supposing that today we increased - and that’s possible, technically possible – the resolving power of a telescope of today by two. That would be, the infinite would be twice as great. The infinite is elastic, it depends on our tools. That is very important to remember when you do experimental work, because if we have some difficulty, you know that the technique always precedes the discovery. So you don’t have to try to repeat indefinitely your experiments, you have to try to invent a new technique. Or else you stop working and do something else. The second one, this refers to Newton, is that when we work in science we should never trust anybody, even Newton and even yourself, especially. When I was at the Rockefeller Institute - I mentioned I had been working at the Rockefeller institute for 15 years – I did everything myself. I was there in the department with Dr. Murphy, he was a very kind man, and I never used my lab boy. At that time you had no technicians, just laboratory boys. And I was giving him detective stories to leave me alone. So one day the boss came - and I don’t know why I had not been thrown out, I was a little embarrassed - and said “Why aren’t you using your helper?”. And I said “Well, I’ve not come here to keep the lab boy busy.” And it was really necessary because I was working at that time with the chicken tumors and I didn’t know how labile it was and I wanted to get to an extremely high titer. Because the technique I wanted to do was to isolate the virus and analyse it chemically. In the course of my talk I will use the word ‘magic’, don’t believe that I'm a magician. What I have said is if there’s a man, 50 years ago or even 100 years ago, if we would bring it here, now, everything is magic. But I don’t believe in magic, I don’t believe that. I also will speak of myself, because I think it’s nice, we are all human beings and we like to watch people around us, not to spy on them but to see, I have been watching human beings all my life. Not spying on them but try to learn something and also sometimes I discovered that there are some that would inspire me to be a little better. I don’t believe I have ever changed, so that has been a failure but it’s my own fault. So now I'm beginning to read and I think that will make a little more sense to you, I may have mislead you and I apologise, but if you think about it, you will find out that it’s not really silly. Now, I’ve chosen for my lecture not to recite simply what I’ve done, because that I hope that you know it by now. And I imagine that’s why I got the Nobel Prize. So I would like to use that in order to draw some conclusion on the impact of the discoveries of the past 30 or 35 years on ourself and on the world around us. Until 1930 or about, biologists were in a situation of astronomers and astrophysicists, as they had been in the time of Leeuwenhoek. We were permitted to see the object of our interest but not to touch them. The cell was as distant from us as they were from their stars in the galaxies. More dramatic, however, and frustrating was that we knew that the instruments were at our disposal. The only instrument of investigation at that time, the microscope, that had been so efficient in the 19th century, but ceased to be of any use having reached immeasurably the theoretical limits of its resolving power. I remember vividly my student days, spending hours at the light microscope, turning endlessly the micrometric screw of the microscope, and gazing at the blurred boundary which concealed the mysterious ground substance where the secret mechanisms of life might be found. Until I remembered an old saying, inherited from the Greeks - that the same causes, always produce the same effects. And I realized that I should stop that futile game, and should try something else. In the meantime, I had fallen in love with the shape and the color of the eosinophilic granules of leucocytes and attempted to isolate them. I failed - and consoled myself later on in thinking that this attempt was technically premature, especially for a premedical student, and that the eosinophilic granules were not pink, anyway. It was only postponed. That Friday, the 13th of September 1929, when I sailed from Antwerp on the fast liner "Arabic" for an eleven-day voyage to the United States, I knew exactly what I was going to do. I had mailed beforehand to Dr. Simon Flexner, Director of the Rockefeller Institute, my own research program, hand-written, in poor English, and it had been accepted. Later on I would have never dared to do what I did, because Dr. Flexner never accepted those kinds of things, he never accepted somebody to come and work on his own work. But probably he had found some virtue in my proposition, which had been to isolate and determine by chemical and biochemical means the constitution of the Rous virus, the first discovered cancer tumour agent, at that time still controversial in its nature and not yet recognized as a bonafide Virus. This task occupied me for about five years. Two short years later the microsomes, basophilic components of the cell ground substance, that blurred boundary that I was seeing in the microscope, had settled in one of my test tubes, still structureless but captive in our hands. In the following ten years, the general method of cell fractionation by differential centrifugation was tested and improved, and the basic principles codified in two papers in 1946. This attempt to isolate cell constituents might have been a failure if they had been destroyed by the relative brutality of the technique employed. But this did not happen. The subcellular fragments obtained by rubbing cells in a mortar, and further subjected to the multiple cycles of sedimentations, washings and resuspensions, in an appropriate medium of course, continued to function in our test tube, as they would have in their original cellular environment. That was great, is it not? The strict application of the balance sheet-quantitative analysis method permitted to trace their respective distribution among the various cellular compartments and thus, determine the specific role they performed in the life of the cell. We had that, I mentioned the balancing, it is like an accountant, we always had to refer to the 100% in determinant, like it is in a respiratory pigment, and finally we found that that fraction that had been dispersing all the cell, localised only in one, and we knew we had it. Small bodies, about half a micron in diameter, and referred to later under the name of "mitochondria" were detected under the light microscope as early as 1894 by Altman. Although they continued to be extensively investigated by microscopy in the course of the following 50 years, leaving behind an enormous and controversial literature, no progress was achieved, and the chemical constitution and biochemical functions of mitochondria remained unknown, to the end of that period. In the early 1940s, I began to make plans for an investigation on the distribution of respiratory pigments in cells. Considering the complexity of the problem, I realized that I should no longer do everything myself, because I wanted to keep the mastery of the isolation of the fraction in the distribution in the cell, which I could not do it and still reasonably isolate the pigments. I realised then it should be a collaborative undertaking. A year or so before, I had collaborated with Dean Burk and Winsler in providing them a material of interest to them, Chicken Tumor 10, which they used in their studies of the respiratory function in cancer cells. We started experimenting, although they were but mildly impressed by the scientific value of my project, they didn’t believe it was really good. But they told me that only years later. Their laboratory was conveniently located at the corner of York and 68th, at street level with the Cornell University Department of Vincent du Vignaud. I remember running across the street, handing them through the open window each fraction, as they were isolated, my share was to return, as I said, in order to analyse the distribution in the constitution of the fraction. One day, Rollin D. Hotchkiss appeared, returning from a one-year fellowship spent in Cambridge, England, who was delighted to find on arrival, quote, “the golden fruit on his doorstep”. We were soon rejoined by Hogeboom, and later by W. C. Schneider as regards the distribution of cytochrome c in the Cell, and its participation in respiratory processes. Together, the observations provided conclusive evidence to support the view that most, if not all, of cytochrome oxidase, succinoxidase and cytochrome c, three important members of the respiratory system responsible for most of the oxygen uptake, were segregated in mitochondria. In parallel with these biochemical studies, evidence was also obtained, by tests carried out with characteristic dyes, both under the microscope and in vitro, showing that the respiratory organelles and the mitochondria seen under the microscope were one and the same, a morphological information which would have remained meaningless, however, if we had not secured beforehand, the knowledge that the power of respiration exists in a discrete state in the cytoplasma. A fact which led me to suggest in my Harvey lecture, that the mitochondria may be considered “as the real power plant of the cell”. At about the same time, with the help of a microscope, this time the microsomes became the endoplasmic reticulum. Looking back 25 years later, what I may say is that the facts have been far better than the dreams. In the long course of cell life on this earth it remained, for our age for our generation, to receive the full ownership of our inheritance. We have entered the cell, the Mansion of our birth, and started the inventory of our acquired wealth. For over two billion years, through the apparent fancy of her endless differentiations and metamorphosis the Cell, as regards its basic physiological mechanisms, has remained one and the same. It is life itself, and our true and distant ancestor. It is hardly more than a century since we first learned of the existence of the cell: this autonomous and all-contained unit of living matter, which has acquired the knowledge and the power to reproduce; the capacity to store, transform and utilize energy, and the capacity to accomplish physical works and to manufacture practically unlimited kinds of products. We know that the cell has possessed these attributes and biological devices and has continued to use them for billions of cell generations and years. In the course of the past 30 or 40 years, we have learned to appreciate the complexity and perfection of the cellular mechanisms, miniaturized to the utmost at the molecular level, which reveal within the cell an unparalleled knowledge of the laws of physics and chemistry. If we examine the accomplishments of man in his most advanced endeavors, in theory and in practice, we find that the cell has done all this long before him, with greater resourcefulness and much greater efficiency. In addition, we also know that the cell has a memory of its past, certainly in the case of the egg cell, and foresight of the future, together with precise and detailed patterns for differentiations and growth, a knowledge which is materialized in the process of reproduction and the development of all beings from bacteria to plants, beasts, or men. It is this cell which plans and composes all organisms, and which transmits to them its defects and potentialities. Man, like other organisms, is so perfectly coordinated that he may easily forget, whether awake or asleep, that he is a colony of cells in action, and that it is the cells which achieve, through him, what he has the illusion of accomplishing himself. It is the cells which create and maintain in us, during the span of our lives, our will to live and survive, to search and experiment, and to struggle. That has some relation with the experiments of Dr. Weller the other day, we want to live for them. The cell, is as I described it, over the billions of years of her life, has covered the earth many times with her substance, found ways to control herself and her environment - you know that the cells are responsible for the atmosphere as it exists now. Man has now become an adjunct to perfect and carry forward these conquests. Is it absurd to imagine that our social behavior, from amoeba to man, is also planned and dictated, from stored information, by the cells? And that the time has come for men to be entrusted with the task, through heroic efforts, of bringing life to other worlds? I am afraid that in this description of the cell, based strictly on experimental facts, I may be accused of reintroducing a vitalistic and teleological concept which the rationalism and the scientific materialism of the 19th and early 20th centuries had banished from our literature and from our scientific thinking. Of course, we know the laws of trial and error, of large numbers and probabilities. We know that these laws are part of the mathematical and mechanical fabric of the universe, and that they are also at play in biological processes. But, in the name of the experimental method and out of our poor knowledge as it is really narrow in the universe, spread out, it’s really observed to be claimed that we take definite conclusions. To the exclusion and claim that everything happens by chance to the exclusion of all probabilities. About a year ago, I was invited to an official party by the Governor of a State. As the guests were beginning to leave, the Governor took me aside in a room nearby. He looked concerned and somewhat embarrassed. The question was unexpected, but I was not unprepared. I told him that for a modern scientist, practicing experimental research, the least that we could say, is that we do not know. But I felt that such a negative answer was only part of the truth. I told him that in this universe in which we live, unbounded in space, infinite in stored energy and, who knows, unlimited in time, the adequate and positive answer, according to my belief, is that this universe may, also, possess infinite potentialities. By that time the wife had joined us. Hearing this, she seized her husband by the arm and said, "You see, I always told you so." I was mentioning that to the credit of the feminine naivety of inconsequence. But actually I believe that she is the one to be right. Life, this anti-entropy, ceaselessly reloaded with energy, is a climbing force, towards order amidst chaos, towards light, among the darkness of the indefinite, towards the mystic dream of Love, between the fire which eats itself and the silence of the Cold. Such in nature does not accept a dictation nor scepticism. No doubt man will continue to weigh and to measure, watch himself grow, and his Universe around him and with him, according to the ever growing powers of his tools. For the resolving powers of our scientific instruments decide, at a given moment, of the size and the vision of our Universe, and of the image we then make of ourselves. Once Ptolemy and Plato, yesterday Newton, today Einstein and Maxwell, and tomorrow new faiths, new beliefs, and new dimensions. As a result of the scientific revolution of the present century we are finding ourselves living in a magic world, unbelievable about hundred years ago-magic our telephone, radio, television by multichannel satellites, magic our conversations with the moon, with Mars and Venus, with Jupiter - magic these means which transform our former solitude into a permanent simultaneity of presence, among the members of the Solar System. And here, at home, thanks to these new media, and the ever increasing speed of transports, we are witnessing a vast mutation of mankind taking place. no longer local, but at the dimensions of the Globe: the birth of a new biological organism, in which all Continents, and all the human races participate and recognise themselves as borders. For this equilibrium now in sight, let us trust that mankind, as it has occurred in the greatest periods of its past, will find for itself a new code of ethics, common to all, made of tolerance, of courage, and of faith in the Spirit of men. I may add some other things, but maybe it is not necessary. Thank you very much.

Ich warne meine Zuhörer immer davor, dass sie mich wahrscheinlich nicht verstehen werden, weil ich eine leise Stimme habe. Wie Sie wissen, ist gesagt worden, dass ich diesen Vortrag auf Englisch halten werde. Sie werden erkennen, dass ich einen sehr starken Akzent habe, der an den europäischen Kontinent erinnert, doch das wird Sie nicht stören. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen zunächst sagen, dass ich in letzter Minute den Fehler begangen habe, eine kleine Einführung zu schreiben. Und das, fürchte ich, wird mir im Wege sein, denn wenn man an das Skript denkt, wollte ich Ihnen ein Prinzip vorstellen. Nun gut. Ich möchte damit beginnen, den Mann zu erwähnen, den viele von Ihnen kennen und von dem sie gehört haben: Es ist Blaise Pascal, der Mann der behauptete oder sagte, dass sich der Mensch in der Mitte zwischen zwei Unendlichkeiten befindet. Die Unendlichkeiten Pascals befanden sich jedoch sehr im Ungleichgewicht. Auf der einen Seite hatte er den gesamten Raum, die Milliarden von Lichtjahre leuchtender Sterne. Und auf der anderen Seite hatte er einen winzigen kleinen Raum, den Abstand zwischen sich und einem kleinen Insekt, das er kaum mit einer Lupe sehen konnte. Das war sehr bedauerlich, doch wir müssen es als eine Tatsache akzeptieren. Ich kann in diesem Zusammenhang erwähnen, dass es - wenn ihm statt einer Lupe ein Mikroskop, ein sehr gutes Mikroskop zur Verfügung gestanden hätte – kaum ein Unterschied ausgemacht hätte, da die Leistungsfähigkeit der Mikroskope sich damals noch in Grenzen hielt. Und nun muss ich etwas wenig Schmeichelhaftes über Newton sagen, denn wie Sie sich erinnern, fertigte Leeuwenhoek im 17. Jahrhundert Mikroskope an, und eine geringfügige Verbesserung würde einen Gewinn von 125 Jahren bedeutet haben. Wenn wir damals in der Lage gewesen wären, die Abweichung der Linse, die sehr klein war, zu kompensieren, hätten wir vielleicht sogar Bakterien sehen können. Tatsächlich sah Leeuwenhoek Bakterien, doch die Auflösungen waren noch sehr unzureichend. Nun, Newton bemühte sich zu kompensieren, und er machte einen Fehler. Er wählte das Medium, mit dem er arbeiten wollte, um das Verhältnis zwischen der Brechung und der Reflexion zu bestimmen. Er verwendete was man damals als Bleizucker bezeichnete, wobei es sich einfach um Bleiazetat handelt, und bei diesem Medium war das Verhältnis null. Da Newton so ein großes Prestige hatte, dachte niemand daran, nachzuschauen, ob Newton Recht hatte oder nicht. Und das war ein großer Preis für die Biologie, denn stellen Sie sich vor, die Theorie der Zelle wäre von Leeuwenhoek oder irgendjemand anderem aus der damaligen Zeit geschrieben worden. Pasteur hätte die Krankheit und Bakterien nicht entdecken können, weil ein anderer es 25 Jahre früher geschrieben hätte und es eine Sache der Vergangenheit gewesen wäre. Was für ein enormer Gewinn für die Zellbiologie. Doch wissen Sie: Vielleicht war es gut, wie es gekommen ist. Wenn die Dinge so früh entdeckt worden wären, hätten wir vielleicht selbst keine Arbeit mehr. Soviel zu dieser Einführung. Ich wurde dadurch gestört, den Text, den ich geschrieben habe, das ist wahr. Ich hoffe sie vergeben mir. Bevor ich meinen formalen Vortrag beginne, möchte ich einige Prinzipien erwähnen. Meine Einführung steht dem nicht entgegen. Sie hat eine Beziehung dazu, wie sie später noch sehen werden. Das erste auf Experimenten beruhende Prinzip besagt, dass die Entdeckung, die wir machen, immer dem Maßstab unserer Instrumente entspricht. Und wenn wir bessere Hilfsmittel haben - angenommen wir würden heute, was technisch möglich ist, die Auflösungskraft eines Teleskops auf das Doppelte erhöhen, so wäre das Unendliche zweimal so groß. Das Unendliche ist elastisch: Es hängt von unseren Instrumenten ab. Bei experimentellen Arbeiten ist es sehr wichtig, sich daran zu erinnern, denn wenn wir irgendwelche Schwierigkeiten haben, wissen wir, dass die Technik immer der Entdeckung vorausgeht. Man muss also nicht versuchen, seine Experimente unendlich oft zu wiederholen. Man muss eine neue Technik erfinden, oder man hört auf zu arbeiten und macht etwas anderes. Das zweite Prinzip – dies bezieht sich auf Newton – besagt, dass wir bei der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit niemandem trauen sollten, auch Newton nicht und besonders nicht uns selbst. Als ich am Rockefeller Institut war – ich erwähnte, dass ich 15 Jahre am Rockefeller Institut gearbeitet habe – machte ich alles selbst. Ich war dort in der Abteilung von Dr. Murphy, der ein sehr freundlicher Herr war, und ich setzte niemals meinen Laborjungen ein. Damals hatte man noch keine Assistenten, nur Laborjungen. Ich gab ihm Detektivgeschichten zu lesen, damit er mich in Ruhe ließ. Eines Tages kam der Boss – und ich weiß nicht, warum man mich nicht herausgeworfen hatte, ich war ein wenig verlegen – und er fragte: Ich sagte: Und dies war wirklich erforderlich, denn ich arbeitete damals gerade mit den Hühnertumoren und ich wusste nicht, wie labil sie waren, und ich wollte eine äußerst hohe Konzentration erreichen. Denn die Technik, die ich verwenden wollte, bestand darin, den Virus zu isolieren und chemisch zu analysieren. Im Laufe meines Vortrags werde ich das Wort „Zauberei“ verwenden. Glauben Sie jedoch nicht, dass ich ein Zauberer bin. Was ich gesagt habe ist, dass für einen Mann, der aus der Zeit vor 50 oder 100 Jahren in die Gegenwart gebracht würde, alles Zauberei wäre. Ich glaube jedoch nicht an Zauberei, ich glaube das nicht. Ich werde auch über mich selbst reden, weil ich das für gut halte: Wir alle sind menschliche Wesen, und es gefällt uns, die Menschen um uns zu beobachten, nicht um sie auszuspionieren, sondern um sie zu sehen. Ich habe mein Leben lang andere Menschen beobachtet, ihnen nicht nachspioniert, sondern versucht etwas von ihnen zu lernen – und manchmal auch, um zu entdecken, dass es einige Menschen gibt, die mich dazu inspirieren, etwas besser zu werden. Ich glaube nicht, dass ich mich je verändert habe. Das ist missglückt, aber es ist meine eigene Schuld. So, nun werde ich zu lesen beginnen, und ich denke, dass Sie das etwas verständlicher finden werden. Ich habe sie vielleicht irrgeleitet und bitte um Verzeihung, doch wenn Sie darüber nachdenken, wenn Sie feststellen, dass es nicht wirklich albern ist. Ich habe mich entschlossen, in meinem Vortrag nicht lediglich wiederzugeben, was ich gemacht habe, denn das, so hoffe ich, wissen Sie mittlerweile. Ich vermute, dass das der Grund ist, warum ich den Nobelpreis erhalten habe. Ich möchte das dazu nutzen, einige Schlussfolgerungen über die Auswirkungen der Entdeckungen der letzten 30 oder 35 Jahre auf uns selbst und auf die uns umgebende Welt zu ziehen. Bis etwa zum Jahre 1930 befanden sich Biologen in der Situation von Astronomen und Astrophysiker, wie es zurzeit von Leeuwenhoek der Fall war: Wir durften die Gegenstände unseres Interesses sehen, sie jedoch nicht berühren. Die Zellen waren so weit von uns entfernt, wie die Sterne und Galaxien von den Astronomen. Dramatischer und frustrierender war jedoch, dass wir wussten, dass uns die Instrumente zur Verfügung standen. Das einzige Untersuchungsinstrument der damaligen Zeit, das Mikroskop, das im 19. Jahrhundert so effektiv gewesen war, war nicht mehr nützlich, da es die theoretischen Grenzen seiner Auflösungskraft schon längst erreicht hatte. Ich erinnere mich noch lebhaft an meine Studentenzeit, wie ich Stunden damit verbrachte, durch das Lichtmikroskop zu schauen und endlos die Mikrometerschraube des Mikroskops zu drehen, und wie ich auf die verschwommene Grenze starrte, die die mysteriöse, zermahlene Substanz verbarg, in der vielleicht das Geheimnis des Lebensmechanismus gefunden werden konnte. Bis ich mich an einen alten Ausspruch erinnerte, der uns von den Griechen überliefert ist, dass dieselben Ursachen immer dieselben Wirkungen hervorrufen. Und ich erkannte, dass ich dieses vergebliche Spiel aufgeben und etwas anderes versuchen sollte. In der Zwischenzeit hatte ich mich in die Form und die Farbe der eosinophilen Körner der Leukozyten verliebt und versuchte sie zu isolieren. Es misslang mir. Später tröstete ich mich mit dem Gedanken, dass dieser Versuch technisch verfrüht war, insbesondere für einen Medizinstudenten in den ersten Semestern, und dass die eosinophilen Körner sowieso nicht rosa waren. Das Unternehmen war nur aufgeschoben. An diesem Freitag, dem 13. September 1929, als ich auf dem schnellen Passagierschiff „Arabic“ mich von Antwerpen auf die 11-tägige Reise nach Amerika aufmachte, wusste ich genau, was ich dort tun würde. Ich hatte Dr. Simon Flexner, dem Direktor des Rockefeller Instituts, mein Forschungsprogramm vorher – in schlechtem Englisch – schriftlich mitgeteilt, und er hatte es akzeptiert. Später würde ich nie gewagt haben, das zu tun, was ich damals tat, denn Dr. Flexner akzeptierte solche Dinge nie. Er akzeptierte es nie, dass jemand kam und über seine eigenen Themen arbeitete. Doch wahrscheinlich hatte er irgendetwas Wertvolles in meinem Forschungsvorschlag gefunden, der darin bestanden hatte, den Rous-Virus zu isolieren und durch chemische und biochemische Mittel seinen Aufbau zu erforschen. Der Rous-Virus war der erste Krebserreger, den man gefunden hatte. Der Aufbau und das Wesen dieses Virus waren zum damaligen Zeitpunkt noch sehr umstritten, und er war als Virus noch nicht anerkannt. Diese Aufgabe beschäftigte mich etwa fünf Jahre lang. Zwei kurze Jahre später hatten sich die Mikrosomen, basophile Komponenten der zermahlen Zellsubstanz, diese verschwommene Grenze, die ich im Mikroskop sah, am Boden eines meiner Reagenzgläser abgesetzt, noch immer ohne Struktur, doch in unseren Händen gefangen. In den nächsten zehn Jahren wurde die allgemeine Methode der Zellzertrümmerung durch die Differenzialzentrifuge erprobt und verbessert. Die grundsätzlichen Prinzipien wurden 1946 in zwei Aufsätzen schriftlich fixiert. Dieser Versuch, Zellkomponenten zu isolieren, hätte misslingen können, wenn sie durch die relative Brutalität der verwendeten Technik zerstört worden wären. Doch dies geschah nicht. Die Zellfragmente, die wir durch das Zerstoßen von Zellen in einem Mörser erhielten und dann mehrfachen Sedimentationszyklen, Waschungen und Resuspensionen – natürlich in einem geeigneten Medium – unterwarfen, behielten in unseren Reagenzgläsern ihre Funktion, die sie auch in ihrer ursprünglichen Umgebung in der Zelle gehabt hatten, bei. Das war fantastisch, oder etwa nicht? Die strenge Anwendung der Methode der bilanzierenden, quantitativen Analyse erlaubte es, ihre jeweilige Verteilung über die verschiedenen Zellkompartimente zu verfolgen und auf diese Weise die spezifische Rolle zu erforschen, die sie im Leben der Zelle spielten. Das taten wir. Ich erwähnte die Bilanzierung. Es ist wie bei einem Buchhalter: Wir mussten uns ständig auf die 100% in der Bestimmung beziehen, wie es bei einem Atmungspigment der Fall ist. Und schließlich fanden wir heraus, dass dieser Bruchteil, der sich über die gesamte Zelle verteilte, nur in einem lokalisiert war, und wir wussten, dass wir es gefunden hatten. Kleine Körperchen mit einem Durchmesser von etwa einem halben Mikron, die man später als „Mitochondrien“ bezeichnete, wurden bereits 1894 von Altman unter dem Lichtmikroskop entdeckt. Obwohl sie für die nächsten 50 Jahre unter dem Mikroskop ständig intensiv untersucht wurden gab es keinerlei Fortschritte, und der chemische Aufbau und die biochemischen Funktionen der Mitochondrien blieben bis zum Ende dieses Zeitraums unbekannt. In den frühen 1940er Jahren begann ich Pläne für die Untersuchung der Verteilung der Atmungspigmente in der Zelle zu machen. Angesichts der Komplexität dieses Problems erkannte ich, dass ich nicht länger alles allein machen sollte, um die Meisterschaft in der Isolierung der Bruchstücke in der Verteilung der Zelle zu behalten. Dies zu tun und dennoch die Pigmente vernünftig isolieren, war mir nicht möglich. Ich erkannte damals, dass dies ein kollaboratives Unternehmen sein sollte. Etwa ein Jahr vorher hatte ich mit Dean Burk und Winsler zusammengearbeitet, da ich ihnen ein Material zur Verfügung stellte, das sie interessierte: den Hühnertumor 10, den sie für ihre Untersuchungen der Atmungsfunktionen in Krebszellen verwendeten. Wir begannen mit den Experimenten, obwohl sie vom wissenschaftlichen Wert meines Projekts nur wenig beeindruckt waren. Sie glaubten nicht, dass es ein wirklich lohnendes Projekt sei. Sie sagten mir das jedoch erst Jahre später. Ihr Labor befand sich praktischerweise auf Straßenhöhe an der Ecke der York Street und der 68. Straße, gegenüber der Abteilung von Vincent du Vignaud von der Cornell Universität. Ich erinnere mich noch daran, wie ich über die Straße lief und ihnen die einzelnen Fraktionen, sobald sie isoliert waren, durch das offene Fenster reichte. Meine Aufgabe bestand darin, wie ich bereits sagte, zurückzukehren, und die Verteilung in der Konstitution der Fraktion zu analysieren. Eines Tages tauchte Rollin D. Hotchkiss auf, der von einem einjährigen Fellowship in Cambridge in England zurückkehrte. Er war überglücklich bei seiner Rückkehr, um ihn zu zitieren, „die goldene Frucht auf seiner Schwelle“ zu finden. Sehr bald schloss sich uns Hogeboom und später W. C. Schneider an, mit denen wir die Verteilung von Cytochrom C in der Zelle und seine Beteiligung an den Abläufen der Zellatmung untersuchten. Zusammengenommen ergaben die Beobachtungen schlüssige Beweise für die Unterstützung der Ansicht, dass die meisten, wenn nicht alle – Cytochromoxidase, Succinoxidase und Cytochrom C, drei wichtige Teile des Atmungssystems, das für den Großteil der Sauerstoffaufnahme verantwortlich ist – in Mitochondrien abgesondert waren. Parallel zu diesen biochemischen Untersuchungen erhielt man außerdem Beweise dafür, dass die Atmungsorganellen und die Mitochondrien, die man unter dem Mikroskop gesehen hatte, identisch waren. Dies war eine morphologische Information, die ohne Bedeutung geblieben wäre, wenn wir nicht vorher das Wissen sichergestellt hätten, dass die Atmungsfähigkeit in einem diskreten Zustand im Cytoplasma existiert. Diese Tatsache ließ mich in meinem Harvey-Vortrag die Vermutung aussprechen, dass die Mitochondrien als „das eigentliche Kraftwerk der Zelle“ anzusehen sind. Etwa gleichzeitig wurde, mithilfe des Mikroskops, diesmal aus den Mikrosomen das endoplasmatische Retikulum. Rückblickend kann ich nach 25 Jahren sagen, dass die Tatsachen wesentlich besser waren als die Träume. Im langen Verlauf des Lebens der Zelle auf dieser Erde blieb es unserem Zeitalter, unserer Generation vorbehalten, den Besitz unseres Erbes vollständig anzutreten. Wir haben die Zelle betreten, das herrschaftliche Haus unserer Geburt, und damit begonnen unseren erworbenen Reichtum zu inventarisieren. Seit über 2 Milliarden Jahren, durch ihre scheinbar launenhaften, endlosen Differenzierungen und Metamorphosen, ist die Zelle hinsichtlich ihrer grundlegenden physiologischen Mechanismen, ein und dieselbe geblieben. Sie ist das Leben selbst, unser wahrer, weit entfernter Urahne. Wir wissen erst seit kaum mehr als einem Jahrhundert von der Existenz der Zelle: dieser autonomen und alles umfassenden Einheit der lebenden Materie, die das Wissen und die Macht der Reproduktion erworben hat, die Fähigkeit Energie zu speichern, umzuwandeln und zu nutzen sowie die Fähigkeit, physische Arbeiten zu verrichten und fast unbegrenzt viele Arten von Produkten herzustellen. Wir wissen, dass die Zelle diese Attribute und biologischen Instrumente besitzt und dass sie sie seit Milliarden von Zellgenerationen und Jahren fortwährend verwendet. Im Laufe der letzten 30 oder 40 Jahre haben wir die Komplexität und Perfektion der Mechanismen in der Zelle, die auf molekularer Ebene bis zum äußersten miniaturisiert sind, schätzen gelernt. Sie enthüllen in der Zelle ein beispielloses Wissen um die Gesetze der Physik und Chemie. Wenn wir die Errungenschaften des Menschen in seinen fortgeschrittensten – theoretischen und praktischen – Bemühungen untersuchen, so stellen wir fest, dass die Zelle all dies schon lange vor ihm geschafft hat, mit größerem Einfallsreichtum und wesentlich größerer Effizienz. Außerdem wissen wir, dass die Zelle eine Erinnerung an ihre Vergangenheit hat (mit Sicherheit gilt dies für die Eizelle) und dass sie in die Zukunft sehen kann. Außerdem verfügt sie über präzise, detaillierte Differenzierungs- und Wachstumsmuster: ein Wissen, das im Fortpflanzungs- und Entwicklungsprozess aller Lebewesen – von den Bakterien und Pflanzen über die Tiere bis zum Menschen – Gestalt annimmt. Es ist diese Zelle, die alle Organismen plant und zusammensetzt und an sie ihre Defekte und Möglichkeiten weitergibt. Der Mensch ist, wie andere Organismen, so perfekt koordiniert, dass er leicht vergessen kann, dass er – ob er schläft oder wacht – eine Zellkolonie in Aktion ist und dass es die Zellen sind, die durch ihn erreichen, was er irrigerweise für seine eigene Leistung hält. Es sind die Zellen, die während unserer Lebensspanne in uns den Willen zu leben und zu überleben, zu forschen und zu experimentieren und zu kämpfen in uns erschaffen und erhalten. Das steht in Beziehung zu den Experimenten, die von Dr. Weller neulich beschrieben wurden: Wir wollen für sie leben. Die Zelle, wie ich sie beschrieben habe, hat die Erde seit den Milliarden von Jahren ihres Lebens mehrfach mit ihrer Substanz bedeckt, sie hat Wege gefunden, sich selbst und ihre Umwelt zu steuern: Sie wissen, dass die Zelle für die Atmosphäre in ihrer jetzigen Zusammensetzung verantwortlich ist. Aus dem Menschen ist jetzt ein Anhängsel geworden, das diese Eroberungen vervollkommnet und weiterträgt. Ist es absurd, wenn man sich vorstellt, dass unser Sozialverhalten, von der Amöbe bis zum Menschen, ebenfalls durch die von den Zellen gespeicherten Informationen geplant und diktiert wird und dass die Zeit gekommen ist, in der dem Menschen die Aufgabe anvertraut ist, durch heldenhafte Bemühungen Leben in andere Welten zu tragen? Ich fürchte, dass man mir vorwerfen könnte, ich hätte mit dieser Beschreibung der Zelle, die ausschließlich auf experimentellen Fakten basiert, erneut ein vitalistisches und teleologisches Konzept eingeführt, das der Rationalismus und der wissenschaftliche Materialismus des 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts aus unserer Literatur und aus dem wissenschaftlichen Denken verbannt hatten. Natürlich kennen wir die Gesetze von Versuch und Irrtum, der großen Zahlen und der Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Wir wissen, dass diese Gesetze ein Teil der mathematischen und mechanischen Struktur des Universums sind und dass sie auch in den biologischen Prozessen eine Rolle spielen. Doch – im Namen der experimentellen Methode und aufgrund unseres lückenhaften Wissens angesichts unseres Wissen von der Existenz der Zelle und des Lebens, das im riesigen Universum wirklich nur einen geringen Raum einnimmt, ist es wirklich absurd zu behaupten, dass wir definitive Schlussfolgerungen ziehen: dass wir Dinge ausschließen und behaupten könnten, alles geschieht zufällig, zum Ausschluss aller Wahrscheinlichkeiten. Vor einem Jahr war ich auf eine offizielle Feier beim Gouverneur eines Staates eingeladen. Als die Gäste anfingen, die Feier zu verlassen, nahm er mich in ein Nebenzimmer zur Seite. Er sah etwas besorgt und ein wenig verlegen aus. Bitte sagen Sie mir: Wie denken Sie über die Existenz Gottes?“. Die Frage war unerwartet, doch ich war nicht unvorbereitet. Ich sagte ihm, das Mindeste, was ein moderner Wissenschaftler, ein praktizierender Experimentalforscher, sagen könne, sei, dass wir darüber kein Wissen haben. Doch ich hatte das Gefühl, dass eine solche negative Antwort nur ein Teil der Wahrheit war. Ich sagte ihm, dass in diesem Universum, in dem wir leben, das unbegrenzt im Raum ist, unendlich viel gespeicherte Energie enthält und – wer weiß – zeitlich unbegrenzt ist, die angemessene und positive Antwort, nach meiner Überzeugung, darin besteht zu sagen, dass dieses Universum auch unbegrenzte Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten enthalten mag. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war seine Frau hinzugekommen. Als sie dies hörte, griff sie ihren Mann fest am Arm und sagte: Ich erwähne das, um der weiblichen Naivität der Inkonsequenz Anerkennung zu zollen. Doch ich glaube tatsächlich, dass sie diejenige ist, die Recht hat. Das Leben, diese Anti-Entropie, ständig mit Energie neu beladen, ist eine Kraft, die inmitten von Chaos nach Ordnung strebt, im Dunkel des unbestimmten nach dem Licht, dem mystischen Traum der Liebe, zwischen dem Feuer, das sich selbst verzehrt, und dem Schweigen der Kälte. Da es ein solches Wesen hat, akzeptiert es kein Diktat und keinen Skeptizismus. Zweifellos wird der Mensch auch weiterhin wiegen und messen, sich selbst und das Universum um ihn herum wachsen sehen, gemäß den ständig wachsenden Kräften seiner Instrumente. Denn die Auflösungskräfte unserer wissenschaftlichen Instrumente entscheiden in einem gegebenen Augenblick über die Größe und Division unseres Universums und über das Selbstbild, das wir uns daraufhin machen. Einst Ptolemäus und Plato, gestern Newton, heute Einstein und Maxwell, und morgen neuer Glauben, neue Überzeugungen, und neue Dimensionen. Als Ergebnis der wissenschaftlichen Revolution des gegenwärtigen Jahrhunderts finden wir uns als Lebewesen in einer zauberhaften Welt wieder, die vor ca. 100 Jahren unvorstellbar war: Zauberei sind unser Telefon, Radio, das Fernsehen mit Hilfe von Satelliten mit zahlreichen Kanälen, Zauberei sind unsere Gespräche mit dem Mond, mit dem Mars und der Venus, mit Jupiter. Zauberei sind diese Mittel, die unsere frühere Einsamkeit in eine permanente Gleichzeitigkeit der Präsenz unter den Mitgliedern des Sonnensystems verwandeln. Und hier, auf unserem Heimatplaneten, werden wir dank dieser neuen Medien und der ständig zunehmenden Geschwindigkeit des Transports Zeugen einer ungeheuren Wandlung der Menschheit, nicht mehr lokal, sondern in den Dimensionen des Planeten: der Geburt eines neuen biologischen Organismus, an dem alle Kontinente und alle Teile der Menschheit teilnehmen und sich gegenseitig als Grenzen anerkennen. Mit diesem Gleichgewicht vor Augen, lassen Sie uns jetzt darauf vertrauen, dass die Menschheit, wie es in den bedeutendsten Epochen der Vergangenheit der Fall gewesen ist, einen neuen, allen gemeinsamen ethischen Verhaltenskodex für sich finden wird, der aus Toleranz, Mut und dem Glauben an den Geist des Menschen besteht. Ich könnte dem noch anderes hinzufügen, aber das ist vielleicht nicht notwendig. Ich danke Ihnen.

„We Have Entered the Mansion of Our Birth”, Albert Claude Recalls
(00:25:18 - 00:27:19)

„At about the same time, with the help of electron microscopy, the microsomes became the endoplasmic reticulum. Looking back 25 years later, what I may say is that the facts have been far better than the dreams. In the long course of cell life on this earth it remained, for our age for our generation, to receive the full ownership of our inheritance. We have entered the cell, the Mansion of our birth, and started the inventory of our acquired wealth. For over two billion years, through the apparent fancy of her endless differentiations and metamorphosis the Cell, as regards its basic physiological mechanisms, has remained one and the same. It is life itself, and our true and distant ancestor. It is hardly more than a century since we first learned of the existence of the cell: this autonomous and all-contained unit of living matter, which has acquired the knowledge and the power to reproduce; the capacity to store, transform and utilize energy, and the capacity to accomplish physical works and to manufacture practically unlimited kinds of products.”

All of these tasks Claude mentions are primarily conducted by proteins. The microsomes, located alongside the endoplasmatic reticulum, turned out to be „the universal factories that produce proteins continuously“ as Ada Yonath (Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2009) reminded her audience with an illustration from a children’ book in her Lindau lecture „The Amazing Ribosome“ in 2010.

Ada E.  Yonath (2010) - The Amazing Ribosome

It’s a great pleasure for me to be invited to this well-known annual meeting. Especially as a laureate and I’m so happy to see so many young people that want to listen. What I want to ask is to put off this light, as it as before, please. So I want to tell you all about the amazing ribosome and I have 25 minutes so I won’t be able to say all what I want and all what is worth saying. I’ll try to highlight several points. Ok, DNA is the mechanism of all cells to store and protect the genetic code. It’s a very good storage place because the genetic code which are the combinations of this basis is now protected by the external sort of walls, backbone of the DNA, and the DNA itself can be packed very closely, so very compactly so the information doesn’t or cannot leak out. The gene products, the genes is what the DNA has in it, are called proteins. And proteins can do, or are doing almost everything in the cell. Here is a picture from a children’s book, but I like it and I have some more children’s books, pictures. You can see what proteins can do, they can be structural, like hair or skin or connective tissues, there can be signalling, they can be involved in regulation, they can be transporting things from the transporting proteins. You surely, you surely know about haemoglobin that transports oxygen from the lung to the cell and CO2. They can be enzymes that I think that even high school students now study about them. They are the chopping, the connecting, the workers that do the chemistry and they also can be receptors like eyes and ears and so on. The proteins in the eyes, ears and so on. The fold of the proteins is carefully designed to facilitate the proteins function so it’s not just that every protein can do everything, each protein has its role. And this is decided, the role is decided by the fold and the fold is decided by the sequence of the building blocks. The building blocks of proteins are called amino acids and there are 20 types of them. So just let’s look again at the children’s book, actually I recommend very much this children’s book, it’s called Biokit and it was written in the ‘80’s, last century, still very correct except for the ribosome. There are 20 types of amino acids and they all have the same backbone, I just drew it here in different colours but the same structure. And they have side chains that may be tools and that when it becomes longer which is polymerisation this is the meaning of making the proteins from the amino acids. The tools are hanging out and they must be folded correctly in order that the tools can do the work. So they cannot be just something long, they have to be correctly folded. And I want to show you 1 or 2 possibilities of correct folding, like the lock and the key model for protein and its substrate. For instance here should be a match, total full perfect match between the lock and the key, in order that the key can work, the same is here. Protein is a structure, things will happen here in the active site. Let’s have a look at it closer, here is an active site of a protein. I’m sure that you know the names of the atoms, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, plus hydrogen and sulphur that you don’t see, sorry, the yellow. And the active site is just here. You see the cavity, here things happen and have a look at it closer, this is where things happen. Now there is a substrate that will be chopped here and the fit, the matching between the substrate and the protein has to be correct, otherwise there will not be chopping or adding or whatever the protein has to do. So as I said the sequence of the protein determines its fold and the sequence itself, it is determined by the sequence of the gene that codes for it. So what really happens is that there is DNA as we saw earlier. It is transcribed into a molecule that can be living, can function as a single chain, not a double chain like DNA, it’s called RNA. And in this particular case messenger RNA. RNA is very similar to DNA in terms of the basis but different a little bit in the main chain and therefore it can be existing and functioning as a single strand. This is being translated into proteins by the ribosome. From the same children’s book, this is what happens, there is a gene, the gene is being opened by an enzyme or actually enzyme couples that’s called opener and being copied by another complex that is called copier in this slide and now we have messenger RNA. That is dictated, the sequence of its basis is dictated by the sequence of the DNA because they make the same type of what's on correct base pairs. The ribosome is now the factory that gets the information, the instruction from the gene through the messenger as a papal tape that comes in, being read. Drugs are bringing the amino acids, these drugs are called tRNA and each amino acid has its own tRNA in every cell. Sometimes there is more than one tRNA for each amino acid. Here they are shown in different colours to distinguish between them but actually they are chemically different. Protein is being made here and comes out as a chain here. The drugs can go out, tRNA can go out, look for more work, also the suctions can go out, look for more ribosomes and the whole process is a consuming 2 GTP molecules. So the ribosome is actually a factory. And it builds the newly born protein by adding amino acids one at a time. Let’s have a look at it in a minute. Each cell contains a huge number of ribosomes, highly active mammalian cells can reach 6 millions for instance in the liver. Even bacteria can reach about 80 to 100,000 ribosomes working together when the bacteria grows. The ribosomes act continuously, they form 20 bonds, about 20 bonds in a second. And how do you make mistakes, fidelity rate of 99.99999%, it means one mistake in a million. I was a good student, I studied chemistry and I was a good student, I had a very good inorganic chemistry, I had to make a peptide bond as my second year exercise, took me a day, I needed 100 degrees, I needed high acidity like more than a lemon and I made mistakes and I was expected to make mistakes. I just told you this in order that you appreciate how amazing is the ribosome, it makes 20 in a second under the conditions of the cell where it is in. So let’s see, firstly what the ribosome has to do. Here comes messenger RNA, it has 4 bases like DNA. And I made them here in 4 different colours to distinguish between them. Each 3 of them, each triplet is coding for one amino acid, where are the triplets, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, have a look, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, there will be completely different protein if I start somewhere else. Or if I skip one, or if I don’t know where the first one is. So the ribosome knows to select the right framework and the right position. When the triplets are defined the first one to be translated has to be identified and it happens on the ribosome, like here. So we can see now there are triplets. And the first triplet has been already associated with the tRNA, remember the drug, that associates with this in one end of it which is called anti-codon loop, that can make Watson Crick base builds with the triplet and carries the cognate amino acid to it, far away actually from the anti-codon loop. And it all happens on the ribosome and I really want to show you how we visualise it and the first structures came out, back 8 years ago, this movie was made by art students together with us and it’s interpolation between our results and some others. So the messenger comes to the small sub unit, detects it, please forgive me, let’s go back for a minute. There are 2 subunits in the ribosome, I didn’t say this, sorry. First small subunit that is also initiating, this is the clever part of the ribosome, the small subunit, it knows to think or at least to select, select the frame, select the first one. It cannot make mistakes. The large one is where the peptide bond is being made. So now you can see the movie. So please pay attention to the movie. In the beginning when the messenger reaches the ribosome, the ribosome, the small subunit makes a motion to get it. If the movie doesn’t come I will tell you all about what you could have seen. Ah now you see. Usually this is what happens when I say it doesn’t come, it comes. So the messenger comes and it takes it, now it wraps around it and the RNA factor is non ribosomal factors, for instance the initiation factors that are associated to the initiation complex but we leave. The first tRNA is being brought by another factor, now all the factors leave. The large subunit can come and makes bridges by conformational changes. Now we have an active ribosome. That can continue peptide bond formation and protein production. So the ribosome helps the tRNA’s to come in, they are brought by factors, they can come out, peptide bond is being made in the large subunit. We take it away now so that you can see how the motion happens, tRNA moves, the lower part rotates, moves and moves together with the messenger and the protein goes out through a tunnel in the large sub unit. Now you see again the whole ribosome, protein will come here, it has to fold, either alone or mainly by chaperons or through the membrane if it goes through a membrane. And the whole process continues until stop codon is being recognised and then factors like recycling factors, release factors are replacing the tRNA. The 2 subunits can dissociate, protein comes out, tRNA’s can go and look for more jobs. In the movie you didn’t see structures, here you can see small subunit in bacteria is of the molecular rate of about .85 million Daltons. It’s made many of RNA, like the whole ribosome, RNA here is in silver and many proteins, So that’s a small subunit, you see it looks like a duck, here is a duck, so it’s called a duck. And the large subunit is called a crown and now it looks like a crown. So again RNA is in silver, many proteins, 34 proteins in bacteria, makes the peptide bond and make sure there is elongation and protection. These are ribosomal proteins, I won’t talk about them. What you saw actually in the movie was small subunit, large subunit, 3 positions for tRNA. A, P and E, A and P are above the active site, it’s called peptidyl transfer is centre. A for amino oscillated tRNA. The one that comes with amino acid. P for the peptidyl tRNA. Where the newly protein will grow. And E is the exiting one. So when one looks at the surfaces of the small, the duck and the crown get together, one sees that the surfaces are rich in RNA, almost no protein around. Here there will be the A, P and E and if you see here is the tRNA that combines them. This part will meet here and this part will meet here so what you see coming together means doing this, like my hands. Protein will be made here where the star is by the amino acids. What we found in the structures is the ribosome is not a protein enzyme, it’s an RNA enzyme, almost all its functions are made by RNA. So all what I told you in the beginning that proteins are very important, they themselves are made by RNA, RNA machine. Most of the ribosomes are made from 2 to 1 ribosomal RNA to ribosomal proteins except for mitochondrial that has more proteins. But still the active centres are made of RNA. And this is in a code with what Francis Crick promised us back in 1968. We found in the ribosomal region that accommodates the A and the P sites tRNA, it’s in all ribosomes and I have no time now to tell you about all what's known today. I show you 5 but there are about 30 structures today, all have this region that has symmetrical relation between the A and the P sites, where the A and the P tRNA bind. And we think that the motion between the A and the P is as we see here, the A blue goes into the P green, this is a snap shot, a computer snap shot of the motion where the ribosome is in red and the blinking part are those that help confine and make sure that the motion is correctly. At the end of the motion the stereochemistry is fit for making the A protein bond, peptide bond. And this is what we think the ribosome A provides, the frame for that. What is needed geometrically that this frame works and this reaction works, is that the A-site, tRNA sits exactly in place so it can rotate and the P-site tRNA, the first one goes to its position in the right orientation flipped. Now think about yourself, you're go into an empty room and it’s the same in both sides, which side will you take, this or that. You don’t know, correct. tRNA also doesn’t know but we have no time in the cell to wait until the tRNA thinks it’s better here, it’s better there, I stay here, I stay there. So the ribosome makes provision for that, it provides 2 potential base pairs on the P-site and only one on the A-site, so the first tRNA will go and take the 2, of course 100% more. And therefore the reaction can start. It was also found that when these 2 and this 1, base pairs are formed, the tRNA itself can be the catalyst of this reaction, catalyst of its own reaction, this is a very ancient way of catalysis. So this is what we studied until now, I just want to show you this region that I talked about, it does everything. It’s connected to the 2 hands that move when tRNA come in and out and also to the tunnel and this is where peptide bond is being made. You can see it here in a little bit more detail, tRNA would come here, you remember in the movie, these ends were moving. So we think that it can transmit messages, you can see it here, how beautiful it is, within the ribosome, in the large subunit but connected to the small one. From top you have seen it before, from the side it looks like a pocket. And this gave us the feeling that, you can see it now larger, that there is something in it. We looked into the conservation and we found out that this region is 98% conserved in all known sequences of ribosomes, from bacteria to elephants if you want, everywhere. We also thought because of it that the high conservation of the symmetrical region indicated existence beyond environmental conditions. This suggests that the proto ribosome which was a simple dimeric RNA enzyme, so there was a proto ribosome, is still embedded in the core of the contemporary ribosome, like here. So we think that we identify how the first peptide bonds were made and consequently proteins. We call it proto-ribosome this region and we are trying now to construct it. And this is our hypothesis, there were 2 pieces or many pieces of RNA that could dimerise and make this type of pocket that can do chemistry. So we found to our surprise that there is preferred selection of those that like to dimerise and those that do not. It means we see Darwin before Darwinism, we see selection that is usually given to animals or to cells, here functioning on molecules. So let’s forget this, what we think, this was the pocket, pocket opens and grows and so on and so on. It is in agreement with several studies done independently showing that looking at how the ribosome is built, it’s clear that it was made from a centre which is the symmetrical centre, this is from Steinberg’s group in Montreal. Or by peeling it, showing again that the centre is the most important one. So this gave us the feeling that we can start to think what was the first amino acid, was it an alanine and glycine because they are simple, or lysine and arginine or histidine because histidine can be made from left overs of RNA pieces. And the most important question is what was first, the genetic code or its products. According to our idea the products showed how genetic code will go because when small peptides were made those that existed indicated how to make new ones. The question, the more human type question is why should RNA make enzymes that are better than him, in the beginning all enzymes were RNA enzymes and they were not so successful as proteins. Why should it make a competitor that is better than him? We don’t think it happened like this, we think that it just, that there wasn’t just a machine that was there, that was taken over by the amino acid. I want to show you that the ribosome protects the newly born protein in this tunnel. And at the end of it there is a chaperone that helps it fold. In new bacteria the chaperone is called trigger factor, it’s made of 3 regions. The red one is the one that binds and when it binds it opens up. And when the trigger factor opens up it exposes the hydrophobic region that can help the newly born protein not to make mistakes in folding. When the protein comes out it’s still not full, it’s still not folded and it has to have a helper. And the helper here is the trigger factor that provides an environment that the newly born protein can like. For instance have a look here at the end of the tunnel, here is trigger factor bound in gold and if protein, newly born protein comes out and is protected by it so it will not make too many wrong foldings. You can see it even more beautifully from this side. Here is the protein coming out and the trigger factor helping it. So in the very little time left I want to talk a few minutes about antibiotics because this is the implication of our work. Because of the fundamental role played by the ribosome meant that antibiotics target it. The natural antibiotics are the ammunitions that bacteria from one type is making in order to eliminate another type when they have their fights, their microorganism fights. About 40% of the useful antibiotics target the ribosome and we like to compare it between David and Goliath. David had the small stone, had to kill big Goliath, small stone antibiotic, less than 1000 Dalton, about 800 Dalton, has to paralyse 2½ million Dalton. David hit the head of Goliath here because it’s exposed and because it’s important. It’s not the only exposed region but the most important for life functionally. The same are the antibiotics, they hit the ribosome in the important parts. Here there are 3 of them, one in the active site, the other where bond is being made and the third, the erythromycin in the tunnel. Have a look, this is the tunnel, so this is the large ribosomal subunit to tRNA’s. The tunnel is shown by polyalanine and goes through it. A zoom into it is shown here. And you pay attention, there is a very narrow region here where antibiotics from the family macrolides, the most abundant family bind. Like that, so here is the tRNA, the protein would go here, peptide bond is being here but if there is erythromycin on the site from the macrolide family it will stop it. What you see here is a cut through the ribosome where the large subunit is shown here in beige and the other parts I already show, talked about. From top you can see it like that, the whole ribosome, you look into the tunnel and it is now blocked by erythromycin. All antibiotics bind to the ribosome functional site, I just said it, this is the way they function, this is the way they kill the pathogenic bacteria. But the ribosomal functional sites are highly conserved. So how do the antibiotics differentiate between the pathogen and the patient? They do it by subtle differences. You want to see a subtle difference, here it is. So here is the tunnel wall, there are many, many antibiotics here, all structures determined by us in complex with the ribosome. All bind to one position, number 2058 in the RNA sequence. So you see here the tunnel and this is this particular nucleotide which is very important in the tunnel wall for binding macrolides. It’s an adenine in new bacteria. But it’s not an adenine in us, have a look here, adenine and erythromycin, this is the type of interactions, quite nice ones. Please concentrate here, this is now guanin so that’s pathogen and this is us. Eubacteria in human, that's the only difference. But this is already dictating too short contact and the erythromycin is rejected. So that’s the way they bind. But we do know that antibiotics have resistance and prominent mechanism of resistance is to modify the attachment part, the anchors. What do I mean, you remember earlier 2058, adenine and erythromycin here, this becomes larger, either by mutation or by ERM modification I want to show you. So what's here is antibiotic selectivity, A in eubacteria, G in eukaryotes, all what I had to do is to change the word here from selectivity to resistance. Exactly the same place. So either the bacteria do A to G mutation or post translational ERM modification which metylation making this larger. So this is the way antibiotics, clever antibiotics know to resist, clever bacteria knows to resist antibiotics. The way to combat this, either to make new compounds with additional anchors or minimise the need for the original anchors or make drugs from 2 components. So I want to show you first how companies try to make compounds that can bind without A2058. And I was really terrified because I thought if they bind to resistant bacteria they will also bind to the patient. I was wrong and I want to show you how we know that I was wrong. For this we want to talk about bacteria, human and in the middle there is an archaea. In the dead sea in Israel there is a bacteria that is an archaea. You can see the dead sea from top, from the side, you see it’s very salty, you can see the bacteria still going even on the salt and even in the summer after the water went down, it still grows there. This bacteria was crystallised by us and the structure was determined at Yale and the same antibiotics that bind to resistant bacteria binds to it, it has a G, instead of A. So I was really happy that I was wrong in my prediction. When we look at the patient’s model, that was done at Yale and pathogens that were done by us, one next to the other, we see that the antibiotic binds across the tunnel in the pathogens and along the tunnel in human or in human model. The other type that, so let me go back for a second, this shows that it’s not enough to bind, it has to be bind correctly. So those guys that want here to do drug design. The other type is to make antibiotics from 2 components, here they are again, the tunnel wall, one component, second component, each component is not so good but together they are the winning couple. They made my face from here to here when the first one came to the market called Synercid and we are now making one of our own on this. All antibiotics bind to important functional positions. I showed you here in the active site and in the tunnel, they also bind where messenger RNA goes. So few words, how did we do our studies because I think it’s good for young people. Crystallography is important to see very small distances between atoms. Crystals are made of unit cells that have to be the same. Crystallographers crystallise it, collect data by shining x-rays because there are no lenses that can look at such small distances as we need, atomic positions. And we get at the end many, many spots that we have to combine together to make electron density map that we may or may not be able to interpret. Crystallising salt is no problem, crystallising lysozyme is no problem but crystallising ribosome that is so complicated, so unstable, so deteriorating and so flexible, so heterogeneous, it was not really expected. But I write a paper about hibernating bears that when they sleep the ribosomes are packed on the inside of their cells, on the inside of the membranes and I understood that ribosomes can be orderly packed. I thought that this is the way nature preserve active ribosome’s for the whole winter. And I used for this very robust ribosomes as I said earlier. And at the end we got crystals, I don’t want to go into all details but the beginning was this and I will not talk about so much on the structure, just on what happened to these crystals when we measure them at synchrotrons. So synchrotrons are based on having particles running fast and on the tangentials we measure. Ribosomal crystals deteriorated within .1 of a second. Can you imagine 8 years to get good crystals and then losing them in .1 of a second. We found, we thought that we can fight it and I can explain later how, this is the day of the experiment, look how worried I looked. Within one night we found that by cryocrystallography we can preserve crystals. We got out patterns and the whole world got patterns. Now there are so many structures compared to what was before that. And other things happened the same time so I’m still happy 20 years later. And this is the machine, it’s more important the machine than me. I want to thank the Weizmann Institute that kept me and Max Planck, the NIH, the Weizmann Kimmelman Centre for financing what was called my dream, that was based on the bears. My groups in the Weizmann and at Max Planck for their enthusiasm in good and bad times. Dr. Wittmann that we started with. I want to show you the German group, the Hamburg group that went to the Dead Sea to look for bacteria themselves. And the Israeli group that is run by Annette Bashan when I am here. And Tamara that had birthday, she came for 10 weeks 12 years ago, she is still with us. She had birthday, she had a cake, this is her cake, which shows that ribosomes are sweet in my group. And my family, especially my granddaughter. Why do I say it, I say it for the young women that sit here, it’s possible to be scientist and be loved family member, look what she wrote here. There is no year, I asked her why there is no year, she said every year you have to reprove yourself. So they love me but they are also very demanding. Please young ladies go into science it’s a lot of fun, even without prizes. And that’s what happened to me, thank you very much for a very stimulating and I think a very good advice at the end of it.

Es ist mir eine große Freude, zu diesem bekannten jährlichen Treffen eingeladen worden zu sein, insbesondere als Preisträgerin, und ich bin sehr glücklich, so viele junge Leute zu sehen, die zuhören möchten. Die IT-Leute möchte ich bitten, dieses Licht auszumachen, so, wie es vorher war, bitte. Ich möchte Ihnen nun alles über das erstaunliche Ribosom erzählen, und da ich nur 25 Minuten zur Verfügung habe, werde ich nicht alles sagen können, was ich sagen möchte und was es Wert wäre, gesagt zu werden. Ich werde versuchen, mehrere Punkte hervorzuheben. DNA ist der in allen Zellen vorliegende Mechanismus, um den genetischen Code zu speichern und zu schützen. Sie ist ein sehr guter Speicherort, denn der genetische Code, der aus Kombinationen dieser Basen besteht, wird nun von einer Art externer Mauer geschützt, dem Rückgrat der DNA, und die DNA selbst kann ganz dicht gepackt werden, so kompakt, dass die Information nicht austreten kann. Die Genprodukte – die Gene sind das, was die DNA beinhaltet – werden als Proteine bezeichnet. Und Proteine können so ziemlich alles in der Zelle tun. Hier ist ein Bild aus einem Kinderbuch, aber mir gefällt es und ich habe noch weitere Kinderbücher, Bilder. Sie können sehen, was Gene tun können: Sie können Strukturen bilden, wie Haar oder Haut oder Bindegewebe, sie können Signale senden, sie können an der Regulierung beteiligt sein, sie können Dinge transportieren. Von den Transportproteinen ist Ihnen bestimmt das Hämoglobin bekannt, das Sauerstoff von den Lungen zur Zelle und CO2 zurück transportiert. Sie können Enzyme sein, und ich glaube, dass selbst Oberstufenschüler diese heutzutage untersuchen. Sie sind verantwortlich für die Prozesse der Aufspaltung und des Verbindens, sie sind die Arbeiter, die die Chemie erledigen, und sie können außerdem Rezeptoren sein, wie Augen, Ohren usw. Die Faltung der Proteine ist sorgfältig konzipiert, um die jeweilige Funktion der Proteine zu ermöglichen. Folglich kann nicht jedes Protein alles tun, sondern jedes einzelne Protein hat seine bestimmte Rolle. Diese Rolle wird durch die Faltung bestimmt, und die Faltung wird durch die Sequenz der Bausteine festgelegt. Die Bausteine der Proteine werden als Aminosäuren bezeichnet, von denen es 20 verschiedene Arten gibt. Lassen Sie uns nun wieder einen Blick in das Kinderbuch werfen. Tatsächlich kann ich dieses Kinderbuch sehr empfehlen. Es trägt den Titel Biokit, wurde in den 80er Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts geschrieben und ist noch immer sehr zutreffend – mit Ausnahme der Aussagen über das Ribosom.(Lachen.) Es gibt 20 Arten von Aminosäuren, und alle haben dasselbe Rückgrat. Ich habe das hier einfach in verschiedenen Farben aufgezeichnet, aber es ist dieselbe Struktur. Sie besitzen Seitenketten, die Werkzeuge sein können. Wenn das Protein durch Polymerisierung – Polymerisierung bedeutet die Bildung der Proteine aus Aminosäuren – länger wird, hängen die Werkzeuge heraus und müssen korrekt gefaltet werden, damit sie ihre Arbeit tun können. Sie dürfen also nicht einfach nur lang sein, sondern sie müssen korrekt gefaltet sein. Ich möchte Ihnen ein oder zwei Möglichkeiten einer korrekten Faltung vorstellen, wie das Schlüssel-Schloss-Prinzip für ein Protein und sein Substrat. Hier muss zum Beispiel eine Übereinstimmung, eine vollständige und perfekte Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Schloss und dem Schlüssel vorliegen, damit der Schlüssel funktionieren kann, und das Gleiche gilt hier. Ein Protein ist eine Struktur, die Dinge werden sich hier im aktiven Bereich ereignen. Lassen Sie uns genauer hinschauen – hier ist der aktive Bereich eines Proteins. Sicherlich kennen Sie die Namen der Atome: Sauerstoff, Stickstoff, Kohlenstoff, plus Wasserstoff und Schwefel, das gelbe Atom, das Sie hier leider nicht sehen. Der aktive Bereich befindet sich genau hier. Sie sehen die Aushöhlung, hier laufen die Prozesse ab. Schauen Sie näher hin, dort passiert es. Hier ist nun ein Substrat, das hier zerlegt werden wird. Die Passung, die Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Substrat und dem Protein muss stimmen. Sonst wird nichts zerlegt oder hinzugefügt werden oder das geschehen, was immer das Protein tun muss. Wie ich sagte, bestimmt also die Sequenz des Proteins seine Faltung. Die Sequenz selbst wird von der Sequenz des Gens bestimmt, das sie codiert. Was nun tatsächlich passiert, ist Folgendes: Wir haben hier DNA, wie wir zuvor gesehen haben,die DNA wird in ein Molekül transkribiert, das als eine einzelne Kette, nicht als eine Doppelkette wie die DNA, leben und funktionieren kann. Dieses Molekül wird als RNA bezeichnet. In diesem speziellen Fall handelt es sich um mRNA (Messanger- RNA, Boten-RNA). Hinsichtlich der Basen ist die RNA der DNA sehr ähnlich, aber sie unterscheidet sich in der Hauptkette ein bisschen von ihr, und sie kann daher als einzelner Strang existieren und funktionieren. Sie wird durch das Ribosom in Proteine übersetzt. Hier haben wir, aus demselben Kinderbuch, das, was passiert: Hier ist ein Gen, es wird von einem Enzym bzw. eigentlich von einem Enzymkomplex, der als Öffner bezeichnet wird, geöffnet und, auf diesem Dia, von einem anderen, Kopierer genannten Komplex, kopiert. Nun haben wir die mRNA. Die Sequenz ihrer Basen wird von der Sequenz der DNA vorgeschrieben. Bei beiden kommt es auf korrekte Basenpaare an. Das Ribosom stellt nun die Fabrik dar, welche die Information und damit vom Gen die Bauanweisung erhält, und zwar über einen Boten in Form eines eingehenden „Lochstreifens“, der ausgelesen wird. Lastwagen bringen die Aminosäuren herbei. Diese Lastwagen werden als tRNA bezeichnet, und in jeder Zelle hat jede Aminosäure ihre eigene tRNA. Manchmal gibt es für eine Aminosäure mehr als eine tRNA. Sie sind hier in unterschiedlichen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann, aber sie unterscheiden sich tatsächlich hinsichtlich ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung. Hier wird das Protein hergestellt, und hier kommt es als Kette heraus. Die Lastwagen können den Ort wieder verlassen, die RNA kann herausgehen und sich nach weiterer Arbeit umsehen. Auch die Bauanleitungen können herausgehen und weitere Ribosomen suchen. Der gesamte Prozess verbraucht zwei GTP-Moleküle. Das Ribosom ist also tatsächlich eine Fabrik und stellt die neuen Proteine her, indem es stückweise Aminosäuren hinzufügt. Schauen wir uns das in einer Minute einmal an. Jede Zelle enthält eine große Anzahl von Ribosomen. Bei hochaktiven Säugetierzellen, zum Beispiel in der Leber, können es bis zu sechs Millionen Ribosomen sein. Selbst bei Bakterien arbeiten ungefähr 80.000 bis 100.000 Ribosomen zusammen, wenn das Bakterium wächst. Die Ribosomen sind pausenlos in Aktion. Sie bilden 20 Bindungen, um die 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde. Unterlaufen ihnen dabei Fehler? Die Quote der Genauigkeit beträgt 99, 99999 % – das heißt ein Fehler in einer Million. Ich war eine gute Studentin. Ich studierte Chemie, und ich war eine gute Studentin, ich war sehr gut in anorganischer Chemie. Als Übungsaufgabe im zweiten Jahr musste ich eine Peptidbindung herstellen. Dafür benötigte ich einen Tag. Ich brauchte 100 Grad, ich brauchte einen Säuregehalt, der höher als der einer Zitrone war. Ich machte Fehler, und es wurde erwartet, dass ich Fehler machte. Das erzähle ich Ihnen nur deshalb, damit Sie zu würdigen wissen, wie erstaunlich das Ribosom ist. Unter den Bedingungen der Zelle, in der es sich befindet, stellt es 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde her. Schauen wir uns nun als erstes an, was das Ribosom zu tun hat. Hier kommt mRNA an, die wie DNA vier Basen besitzt. Ich habe sie hier in vier verschiedenen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann. Jeweils drei von ihnen, jedes Triplett, kodiert eine Aminosäure. Wo sind die Tripletts, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, schauen Sie, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, es wird ein ganz anderes Protein werden, wenn ich an einer anderen Stelle beginne. Oder wenn ich eine überspringe oder wenn ich nicht weiß, wo die erste Stelle ist. Das Ribosom kann also das richtige System und die richtige Position heraussuchen. Wenn die Tripletts definiert sind, muss dasjenige, das als erstes übersetzt werden soll, identifiziert werden, und dies geschieht am Ribosom, so wie hier. Wir können also sehen, dass es nun Tripletts gibt. Das erste Triplett ist bereits mit der tRNA verbunden worden – erinnern Sie sich an den Lastwagen – die sich mit ihm an einem seiner Enden, das als Anticodon-Schleife bezeichnet wird, verbindet. Sie kann Watson-Crick-Basenverbindungen mit dem Triplett aufbauen und transportiert die verwandte Aminosäure dorthin, also tatsächlich weit entfernt von der Anticodon-Schleife. Das alles passiert am Ribosom. Ich möchte Ihnen sehr gerne zeigen, wie wir dies visualisieren. Die ersten Strukturen kamen vor acht Jahren zum Vorschein. Dieser Film wurde von Kunststudenten und uns gemeinsam gemacht und stellt eine Interpolation unserer Ergebnisse und einiger anderer Ergebnissen dar. Der Bote kommt an der kleinen Untereinheit an, entdeckt sie – ich bitte um Verzeihung, lassen Sie uns für eine Minute zurückgehen. Das Ribosom hat zwei Untereinheiten, dies sagte ich noch nicht, Entschuldigung. Als erstes ist da die kleine Untereinheit, die auch den Vorgang einleitet. Sie ist der intelligente Teil des Ribosoms, die kleine Untereinheit, sie kann denken oder zumindest selektieren, den Rahmen und das erste Triplett aussuchen. Sie kann keine Fehler machen. Die große Untereinheit befindet sich dort, wo die Peptidbindung stattfindet. Jetzt können Sie sich den Film anschauen. Bitte achten Sie auf den Film. Zu Beginn, wenn der Bote das Ribosom erreicht, vollführt das Ribosom, die kleine Untereinheit, eine Bewegung, um ihn zu ergreifen. Wenn der Film nicht startet, werde ich Ihnen alles das erklären, was Sie hätten sehen können. Ah – jetzt können Sie es sehen. Das ist das, was normalerweise passiert, wenn ich sage, er startet nicht – dann startet er. Der Bote kommt also an, und die kleine Untereinheit ergreift ihn, wickelt sich jetzt um ihn herum, und der RNA-Faktor ist ein nicht-ribosomaler Faktor, wie zum Beispiel die Initiationsfaktoren, die mit dem Initiationskomplex verbunden sind, aber nun verlassen wir das. Die erste tRNA wird von einem anderen Faktor herbeigebracht. Nun gehen alle Faktoren. Die große Untereinheit kann kommen und baut Brücken durch Konformationsänderungen. Nun haben wir ein aktives Ribosom, das mit der Bildung der Peptidbindungen und der Proteinsynthese fortfahren kann. Das Ribosom hilft also den tRNAs beim Hereinkommen, sie werden von Faktoren herbeigebracht, sie können herauskommen, die Peptidbindung wird in der großen Untereinheit gebildet. Wir entfernen sie jetzt, damit Sie erkennen können, wie die Bewegung vonstatten geht. Die tRNA bewegt sich, der untere Teil rotiert und bewegt sich zusammen mit dem Boten, und das Protein tritt durch einen Tunnel in der großen Untereinheit aus. Nun sehen Sie wieder das gesamte Ribosom. Das Protein wird hier ankommen, es muss gefaltet werden, entweder durch sich selbst oder, in den meisten Fällen, durch Chaperon-Proteine oder durch die Membran, wenn es durch eine Membran hindurchtritt. Der ganze Prozess setzt sich fort, bis ein Stopp-Codon erkannt wird. Dann ersetzen Faktoren wie Recycling- oder Freigabefaktoren die tRNA. Die zwei Untereinheiten können sich voneinander lösen, die Proteine kommen heraus, die tRNAs können weiterziehen und nach neuer Arbeit Ausschau halten. In dem Film sahen Sie keine Strukturen. Hier können Sie erkennen, dass die kleine Untereinheit bei Bakterien eine molekulare Größe von ungefähr 0,85 Millionen Dalton hat. Sie besteht, wie das gesamte Ribosom, aus zahlreichen RNAs – die RNA ist hier silberfarben dargestellt – und vielen Proteinen, hier aus 20 Proteinen, von denen jedes in einer anderen Farbe dargestellt ist. Die Farben haben keine Bedeutung. Das also ist eine kleine Untereinheit. Sie sehen, dass sie einer Ente ähnelt, daher wird sie als Ente bezeichnet. Die große Untereinheit wird als Krone bezeichnet und sieht auch wie eine Krone aus. Die RNA ist wiederum silberfarben dargestellt. Viele Proteine – bei Bakterien 34 Proteine – bilden die Peptidbindung und stellen Elongation und Schutz sicher. Bei diesen handelt es sich um ribosomale Proteine, auf die ich nicht eingehen werde. Was Sie eigentlich in dem Film sahen, waren die kleine Untereinheit, die große Untereinheit und drei Positionen für die tRNA: A, P und E. A und P befinden sich über dem aktiven Bereich. Dies wird als Peptidyltransferase-Zentrum bezeichnet. A steht für Aminoacyl-tRNA, also für die tRNA, die mit der Aminosäure kommt. P steht für die Peptidyl-tRNA, wo das neue Protein wachsen wird, und E steht für die Exit-Position. Wenn man sich also die Oberflächen der kleinen Untereinheit, der Ente, und der Krone zusammen anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die Oberflächen reich an RNA sind und dass sich dort fast keine Proteine befinden. Hier werden die A-, die P- und die E-Position sein, und wenn Sie dort hinschauen, sehen Sie die sie kombinierende tRNA. Dieser Teil wird sich hier und dieser Teil wird sich dort treffen. Was Sie dort zusammentreffen sehen, bedeutet, dass dies hier getan wird, was meine Hände tun. Das Protein wird hier, wo sich der Stern befindet, aus den Aminosäuren gebildet. Was wir in den Strukturen feststellten, zeigt, dass es sich bei dem Ribosom nicht um ein Proteinenzym, sondern um ein RNA-Enzym handelt. Nahezu alle seine Funktionen werden durch RNA ausgeführt. Anfangs erzählte ich Ihnen vieles über die große Bedeutung der Proteine, doch die Proteine selbst werden von der RNA, der RNA-Maschine, erzeugt. Die meisten Ribosomen bestehen aus ribosomaler RNA und ribosomalem Protein im Verhältnis 2:1, mit Ausnahme der mitochondrialen Ribosome, die mehr Proteine enthalten. Aber auch hier bestehen die aktiven Zentren aus RNA. Dies ist in einem Code, den uns Francis Crick damals, 1968, versprochen hat. Die ribosomale Region, die die A- und P-Positionen-tRNA aufnimmt, findet sich in allen Ribosomen. Hier habe ich nicht die Zeit, um Ihnen all das zu erzählen, was heutzutage darüber bekannt ist. Ich zeige Ihnen fünf Strukturen, aber es gibt heute ungefähr 30. Alle verfügen über diese Region, die ein symmetrisches Verhältnis zwischen den A- und P-Positionen aufweist und wo sich die A- und P-tRNA verbinden. Wir sind der Ansicht, dass die Bewegung zwischen A und P so abläuft, wie wir hier sehen. A (blau) bewegt sich in P (grün) hinein. Es handelt sich hier um eine Momentaufnahme, eine Computer-Momentaufnahme der Bewegung, bei der das Ribosom in Rot dargestellt ist. Die blinkenden Teile sind jene, die bei der Bewegung helfen, die sie begrenzen und dafür sorgen, dass sie korrekt ausgeführt wird. Am Ende der Bewegung ist die räumliche Anordnung bereit für die Bildung der A-Protein-Bindung, der Peptidbindung. Das ist es, was unserer Meinung nach das Ribosom bereitstellt, den Rahmen dafür. Was in geometrischer Hinsicht für das Funktionieren dieses Rahmens und dieser Reaktion erforderlich ist, ist Folgendes: dass sich die tRNA an der A-Position genau an ihrem Platz befindet, damit sie rotieren kann, und dass sich die erste tRNA der P-Position in der richtigen Ausrichtung, nämlich umgedreht, auf ihre Position zubewegt. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, dass Sie selbst einen leeren Raum betreten. Beide Seiten sehen gleich aus – welche Seite werden Sie wählen, diese oder jene? Genau – Sie wissen es nicht. Die tRNA weiß es auch nicht, aber in der Zelle haben wir keine Zeit, um zu warten, bis die tRNA denkt: „Hier ist es besser, dort ist es besser, ich bleibe hier, ich bleibe dort.“ Deshalb trifft das Ribosom entsprechende Vorkehrungen und stellt auf der P-Position zwei potenzielle Basenpaare und auf der A-Position nur ein Basenpaar bereit. Folglich wird die erste tRNA die beiden Paare nehmen, natürlich die 100 % mehr. Und somit kann die Reaktion beginnen. Man hat auch herausgefunden, dass die tRNA, wenn diese zwei Basenpaare und dieses eine Basenpaar gebildet werden, selbst der Katalysator für diese Reaktion sein kann. Sie kann also der Katalysator ihrer eigenen Reaktion sein, was eine sehr alte Möglichkeit der Katalyse ist. Das also ist es, was wir bis heute untersucht haben. Ich möchte Ihnen diese Region zeigen, über die ich sprach. Sie tut alles. Sie ist mit den beiden Händen, die sich bewegen, wenn tRNA hinein- und herauskommt, und auch mit dem Tunnel verbunden, wo die Peptidbindung gebildet wird. Hier können Sie das Ganze etwas detaillierter betrachten. An diese Stelle würde die tRNA kommen – Sie erinnern sich an den Film, diese Enden bewegten sich. Wir glauben also, dass sie Botschaften übermitteln kann. Sie können sie hier sehen, wie schön sie ist, innerhalb des Ribosoms, in der großen Untereinheit, aber mit der kleinen Untereinheit verbunden. Von oben haben Sie sie vorhin gesehen, von der Seite betrachtet, sieht sie wie eine Tasche aus. Dies vermittelte uns den Eindruck, dass sich darin – jetzt können Sie es größer sehen – etwas befindet. Wir sahen uns die Konservierung an und stellten fest, dass diese Region in allen bekannten Sequenzen von Ribosomen zu 98 % konserviert ist, von den Bakterien bis zu den Elefanten, überall. Wir hatten außerdem den Gedanken, dass die hohe Konservierung dieser symmetrischen Region auf eine Existenz unabhängig von Umweltbedingungen hinwies. Dies legt nahe, dass das Proto-Ribosom, das ein einfaches Dimer-RNA-Enzym war, immer noch im Kern dieses gegenwärtigen Ribosoms, wie hier, eingebettet ist. Daher denken wir, dass wir herausgefunden haben, wie die ersten Peptidbindungen und folglich die ersten Proteine gebildet wurden. Wir bezeichnen diese Region als Proto-Ribosom und versuchen nun, sie zu konstruieren. Unsere Hypothese besagt, dass es zwei oder mehr RNA-Stücke gab, die dimerisieren konnten und diese Art von Tasche bildeten, die Chemie betreiben kann. Wir stellten zu unserer Überraschung fest, dass es eine bevorzugte Selektion jener, die gerne dimerisieren, und jener, die dies nicht tun, gibt. Das bedeutet, dass wir hier Darwin vor dem Darwinismus sehen, wir sehen, dass Selektion, die normalerweise bei Tieren oder bei Zellen zum Tragen kommt, auf Moleküle einwirkt. Vergessen wir das jetzt. Wir denken, dass dies die Tasche war, sie öffnete sich und wuchs und so weiter und so fort. Diese Überlegung stimmt mit verschiedenen unabhängig voneinander durchgeführten Untersuchungen überein, die nachweisen, dass, wenn man sich anschaut, wie das Ribosom aufgebaut ist, klar ist, dass es aus einem Zentrum gebildet wurde, das dem symmetrischen Zentrum entspricht. Dies stammt von Steinbergs Gruppe aus Montreal. Auch wenn man es auseinander wickelt, zeigt sich wieder, dass das Zentrum der wichtigste Bestandteil ist. Dies ließ uns daran denken, Überlegungen darüber anzustellen, welches die erste Aminosäure war oder um Lysin oder Arginin oder Histidin, weil Histidin aus Überresten von RNA-Stücken gebildet werden kann. Die wichtigste Frage ist, was zuerst da war: der genetische Code oder seine Produkte? Nach unserer Vorstellung zeigten die Produkte, wie der genetische Code funktioniert, denn als neue Peptide gebildet wurden, gaben die bereits existierenden Peptide Hinweise darauf, wie die neuen herzustellen seien. Die Frage, die eher eine typisch menschliche Frage ist, lautet: Warum sollte die RNA Enzyme herstellen sollte, die besser sind als sie. Anfangs waren alle Enzyme RNA-Enzyme, und diese waren nicht so erfolgreich wie Proteine. Warum sollte sie einen Konkurrenten erschaffen, der besser war als sie? Wir glauben nicht, dass es auf diese Art und Weise passiert ist. Wir nehmen an, dass es nicht einfach einen Mechanismus gab, der von der Aminosäure übernommen wurde. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, dass das Ribosom das neugeborene Protein in diesem Tunnel beschützt. Am Ende des Tunnels befindet sich ein Chaperon-Protein, das dem neuen Protein bei der Faltung hilft. Bei neuen Bakterien wird das Chaperon-Protein als Trigger-Faktor bezeichnet. Dieser Faktor besteht aus drei Regionen. Die rote ist diejenige, die bindet, und wenn sie bindet, öffnet sie sich. Und wenn sich der Trigger-Faktor öffnet, legt er die hydrophobe Region bloß, die dem neugeborenen Protein dabei helfen kann, Fehler bei der Faltung zu vermeiden. Wenn das Protein herauskommt, ist es immer noch nicht vollständig, immer noch nicht gefaltet und braucht einen Helfer. Der Helfer hier ist der Trigger-Faktor, der für eine Umgebung sorgt, in der das neugeborene Protein sich wohlfühlen kann. Schauen Sie zum Beispiel hier auf das Ende des Tunnels, hier ist ein Trigger-Faktor in einer goldfarben dargestellten Bindung. Wenn ein Protein, ein neugeborenes Protein, herauskommt, wird es von dem Trigger-Faktor beschützt, damit es nicht zu viele Fehlfaltungen macht. Von dieser Seite aus können Sie dies sogar noch schöner sehen. Hier kommt das Protein heraus, und der Trigger-Faktor hilft ihm. In der sehr kurzen Zeit, die wir noch haben, möchte ich über Antibiotika sprechen, denn diese sind die Folge unserer Arbeit. Die zentrale Rolle, die das Ribosom spielt, bedeutet, dass es zielgerichtet von Antibiotika angegriffen wird. Natürliche Antibiotika sind die Munition, die von den Bakterien der einen Art produziert wird, um Bakterien einer anderen Art bei ihren Kämpfen, ihren Kämpfen auf der Ebene der Mikroorganismen, zu eliminieren. Ungefähr 40 % der wirkungsvollen Antibiotika greifen das Ribosom an. Wir vergleichen dies gerne mit David und Goliath. David hatte den kleinen Stein zur Verfügung und musste den großen Goliath töten. Der kleine Stein ist das Antibiotikum, weniger als 1000 Dalton, ungefähr 800 Dalton, und muss zweieinhalb Millionen Dalton paralysieren. David traf Goliath hier am Kopf, da dieser ungeschützt und wichtig war. Der Kopf ist nicht der einzige ungeschützte Körperteil, aber der in funktionaler Hinsicht lebenswichtigste. Antibiotika verhalten sich ebenso. Sie treffen das Ribosom an den wichtigen Stellen. Hier sind drei von ihnen, eins im aktiven Bereich, ein zweites dort, wo die Bindung entsteht, und ein drittes, Erythromycin, im Tunnel. Werfen Sie einen Blick darauf – das ist der Tunnel, dies sind die große ribosomale Untereinheit und zwei tRNAs. Der Tunnel wird durch das Polyalanin gezeigt und geht hindurch. Hier haben wir eine Zoom-Aufnahme in den Tunnel. Sehen Sie genau hin: Hier gibt es eine sehr schmale Region, wo sich Antibiotika der Makrolid-Familie, der größten Familie, eine Bindung eingehen. Ungefähr so: Hier ist die tRNA, das Protein würde hierhin gehen, die Peptidbindung würde hier erfolgen. Befindet sich jedoch Erythromycin aus der Makrolid-Familie in diesem Bereich, wird es dies stoppen. Was Sie hier sehen, ist ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom, bei dem die große Untereinheit hier beige dargestellt ist. Außerdem sehen Sie die anderen Teile, die ich bereits gezeigt und von denen ich gesprochen hatte. Von oben können Sie es so sehen, das gesamte Ribosom, Sie schauen in den Tunnel hinein, und er wird nun durch das Erythromycin blockiert. Alle Antibiotika binden sich an die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms. Ich sagte dies soeben. Dies ist die Art und Weise, auf die sie wirken und auf die sie die pathogenen Bakterien töten. Jedoch sind die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms in hohem Maße konserviert. Wie unterscheiden also die Antibiotika zwischen Pathogen und Patient? Sie tun dies anhand feiner Unterschiede. Sie möchten einen feinen Unterschied sehen? Hier ist die Tunnelwand, mit vielen, vielen Antibiotika. Alle Strukturen wurden von uns in einem Komplex mit dem Ribosom bestimmt. Alle binden an eine Position, die Nummer 2058 in der RNA-Sequenz. Sie sehen hier also den Tunnel, und das ist das spezielle Nucleotid, das in der Tunnelwand für die Bindung von Makroliden sehr wichtig ist. Bei neu gebildeten Bakterien ist es ein Adenin. Aber bei uns ist es kein Adenin. Schauen Sie hierhin – Adenin und Erythromycin, das ist die Art von Interaktionen, ziemlich nette Interaktionen. Konzentrieren Sie sich bitte hierauf – das ist jetzt Guanin. Das also ist ein Pathogen, und das sind wir. Eubakterien im Menschen, das ist der einzige Unterschied. Aber das schreibt bereits einen zu kurzen Kontakt vor, und das Erythromycin wird abgewiesen. Das ist also die Art und Weise, auf die sie binden. Wir wissen jedoch, dass Antibiotika Resistenzen besitzen. Ein sehr wichtiger Resistenz-Mechanismus besteht in einer Modifizierung des Befestigungsteils, des Ankers. Was heißt das? Sie erinnern sich, vorhin sprachen wir über die Position 2058, Adenin und Erythromycin hier. Dies wird größer, entweder durch Mutation oder durch ERM-Modifizierung, wie ich Ihnen zeigen möchte. Hier haben wir antibiotische Selektivität: A bei Eubakterien, G bei Eukaryoten. Alles, was ich zu tun hatte, war, das Wort hier von „Selektivität“ zu „Resistenz“ zu ändern. Genau der gleiche Ort. Die Bakterien durchlaufen also entweder eine Mutation (von A zu G) oder eine post-translationale ERM-Modifizierung, bei der Methylierung dies hier vergrößert. Auf diese Art und Weise können demnach intelligente Bakterien den Antibiotika Widerstand leisten. Um Resistenzen zu bekämpfen, kann man entweder neue Präparate mit zusätzlichen Ankern herstellen oder den Bedarf an den ursprünglichen Ankern minimieren oder Medikamente aus zwei Komponenten herstellen. Als erstes möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie Firmen versuchen, Präparate herzustellen, die ohne eine 2058-Position binden können. Ich hatte wirklich Angst, denn ich dachte, dass diese Antibiotika, wenn sie sich an resistente Bakterien anheften können, sich auch an den Patienten anheften werden. Ich irrte mich, und ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, woher wir wissen, dass ich mich im Irrtum befand. Dafür wollen wir über Bakterien sprechen, über Menschen, und in der Mitte befinden sich die Archaeen. Im Toten Meer in Israel existiert ein Bakterium, das ein Archaeon ist. Sie können das Tote Meer von oben sehen, von der Seite, es ist sehr salzig, und sie sehen, dass die Bakterien selbst im Salz weiterleben. Sie wachsen sogar im Sommer, nachdem der Wasserstand gefallen ist. Dieses Bakterium wurde von uns kristallisiert und seine Struktur in Yale bestimmt. Dieselben Antibiotika, die sich an resistente Bakterien binden, binden sich auch an dieses Bakterium. Es hat ein G anstelle eines A. Ich war sehr glücklich, dass ich mit meiner Voraussage falsch lag. Wenn wir uns das Modell des Patienten anschauen, das in Yale erstellt wurde, und die Pathogene, mit denen wir uns dort nebenan beschäftigten, sehen wir, dass das Antibiotikum bei den Pathogenen durch den Tunnel und bei dem menschlichen Modell entlang des Tunnels bindet. Das zeigt, dass es nicht ausreicht, dass eine Bindung stattfindet, sondern es muss eine korrekte Bindung erfolgen. Für diejenigen hier, die in der Medikamentenentwicklung arbeiten möchten. Die zweite Möglichkeit besteht darin, Antibiotika aus zwei Komponenten herzustellen. Hier sind sie wieder – die Tunnelwand, eine Komponente, die zweite Komponente, jede Komponente für sich reicht nicht aus, zusammen sind sie jedoch ein Gewinnerpaar. Es sorgte für ein breites Lächeln auf meinem Gesicht, als das erste Medikament dieser Art unter dem Namen Synercid auf den Markt kam. Heute stellen wir ein eigenes Medikament dieser Art her. Alle Antibiotika binden an funktional bedeutenden Positionen, wie ich Ihnen zeigte, hier im aktiven Bereich und im Tunnel. Sie binden auch dort, wohin sich die mRNA bewegt. Noch einige wenige Worte dazu, wie wir unsere Untersuchungen vornahmen, denn ich denke, dies ist hilfreich für junge Menschen. Die Kristallografie ist wichtig, um sehr kleine Unterschiede zwischen den Atomen erkennen zu können. Kristalle sind aus Elementarzellen aufgebaut, die gleich sein müssen. Kristallografen kristallisieren sie und erheben Daten, indem sie Röntgenstrahlen einsetzen, da es keine Linsen gibt, mit deren Hilfe man solch kleine Entfernungen betrachten kann, wie wir sie benötigen, die Positionen von Atomen. Letztendlich brauchen wir viele, viele Punkte, die wir miteinander kombinieren müssen, um eine Karte der Elektronendichte zu erstellen, die wir dann interpretieren können – oder auch nicht. Salz zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, ein Lysozym zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, aber ein Ribosom zu kristallisieren, das so komplex, so instabil, so schnell verfallend und so dynamisch, so heterogen ist Aber ich schrieb an einem Artikel über Bären im Winterschlaf, deren Ribosomen, während sie schlafen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Zellen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Membranen gebündelt werden, und ich nahm an, dass Ribosomen ordentlich verstaut werden können. Ich ging davon aus, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Natur aktive Ribosomen den gesamten Winter über bewahrt und beschützt, und ich verwendete dafür, wie bereits gesagt, besonders robuste Ribosomen. Am Ende bekamen wir Kristalle. Ich möchte nicht auf sämtliche Details eingehen, aber das war der Anfang. Ich werde nicht so viel über die Struktur erzählen, sondern nur darüber, was mit diesen Kristallen geschah, als wir an ihnen Messungen in Synchrotronen vornahmen. Synchrotrone basieren auf der Beschleunigung von Teilchen und den Tangentialen, die wir messen. Ribosomale Kristalle zerfielen innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde. Können Sie sich vorstellen, acht Jahre damit zu verbringen, gute Kristalle zu bekommen und diese dann innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde zu verlieren? Wir dachten, wir könnten etwas dagegen tun, und ich kann später erklären, auf welche Art und Weise. Das ist am Tag des Experiments – schauen Sie nur, wie besorgt ich aussah. Innerhalb einer Nacht stellten wir fest, dass wir mit Hilfe der Kristallografie Kristalle am Zerfall hindern konnten. Wir erhielten unsere Muster, und die ganze Welt bekam Muster. Heutzutage gibt es, im Vergleich zu dem, was davor da war, so viele Strukturen. Zur selben Zeit geschahen noch andere Dinge, so dass ich 20 Jahre später immer noch glücklich bin. Und das ist die Maschine – sie ist wichtiger als ich. Danken möchte ich dem Weizmann-Institut für Wissenschaften, das zu mir hielt, und dem Max Planck-Institut, dem NIH (National Institute of Health) und dem Weizmann-Kimmelman-Zentrum, die finanzierten, was ich meinen Traum nannte, der auf Bären basierte. Ich danke meinen Forschungsgruppen am Weizmann-Institut und am Max Planck-Institut für ihren Enthusiasmus in guten wie in schlechten Zeiten. Ich danke Dr. Wittmann, bei dem wir anfingen. Ich möchte Ihnen die deutsche Forschungsgruppe zeigen, die Hamburger Gruppe, die selbst am Toten Meer nach Bakterien suchte, und die israelische Gruppe, die von Annette Bashan geleitet wird, wenn ich hier bin. Und ich danke Tamara, die vor zwölf Jahren für zehn Wochen zu uns kam und noch immer bei uns ist. Sie hatte Geburtstag, sie bekam einen Kuchen, das ist ihr Kuchen, und das zeigt, dass die Ribosomen in meiner Gruppe süß sind. Und ich danke meiner Familie, insbesondere meiner Enkelin. Warum ich das sage? Ich sage es wegen der jungen Frauen, die hier sitzen. Man kann eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein geliebtes Familienmitglied sein – schauen Sie, was sie hier schrieb. ich fragte sie, warum kein Jahr angegeben ist, und sie sagte, jedes Jahr musst du dich neu beweisen. (Lachen.) Sie lieben mich, aber sie sind auch sehr fordernd. Bitte, meine jungen Damen, gehen Sie in die Wissenschaft – es macht Spaß, auch ohne Auszeichnungen. Und das ist das, was mir passiert ist. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für einen sehr stimulierenden Vortrag und einen, wie ich denke, sehr guten Rat am Ende. (Applaus.)

Ada Yonath Likes Children' Books...
(00:07:22 - 00:08:01)

Yonath has been the pioneer in the scientific adventure of elucidating the structure of the ribosome. She embarked on it already at the end of the seventies when the scientific community assumed this to be impossible because of the sheer size and complexity of the ribosome molecule. Yet after more than two decades of intense research, Yonath succeeded and in 2000 published, in parallel with and independently from her co-laureates Ramakrishnan and Steitz, the structure of the ribosome in atomic resolution. This lead to a precise understanding of its function and of the birth of proteins, as Yonath nicely explained and visualized in her 2010 lecture:

Ada E.  Yonath (2010) - The Amazing Ribosome

It’s a great pleasure for me to be invited to this well-known annual meeting. Especially as a laureate and I’m so happy to see so many young people that want to listen. What I want to ask is to put off this light, as it as before, please. So I want to tell you all about the amazing ribosome and I have 25 minutes so I won’t be able to say all what I want and all what is worth saying. I’ll try to highlight several points. Ok, DNA is the mechanism of all cells to store and protect the genetic code. It’s a very good storage place because the genetic code which are the combinations of this basis is now protected by the external sort of walls, backbone of the DNA, and the DNA itself can be packed very closely, so very compactly so the information doesn’t or cannot leak out. The gene products, the genes is what the DNA has in it, are called proteins. And proteins can do, or are doing almost everything in the cell. Here is a picture from a children’s book, but I like it and I have some more children’s books, pictures. You can see what proteins can do, they can be structural, like hair or skin or connective tissues, there can be signalling, they can be involved in regulation, they can be transporting things from the transporting proteins. You surely, you surely know about haemoglobin that transports oxygen from the lung to the cell and CO2. They can be enzymes that I think that even high school students now study about them. They are the chopping, the connecting, the workers that do the chemistry and they also can be receptors like eyes and ears and so on. The proteins in the eyes, ears and so on. The fold of the proteins is carefully designed to facilitate the proteins function so it’s not just that every protein can do everything, each protein has its role. And this is decided, the role is decided by the fold and the fold is decided by the sequence of the building blocks. The building blocks of proteins are called amino acids and there are 20 types of them. So just let’s look again at the children’s book, actually I recommend very much this children’s book, it’s called Biokit and it was written in the ‘80’s, last century, still very correct except for the ribosome. There are 20 types of amino acids and they all have the same backbone, I just drew it here in different colours but the same structure. And they have side chains that may be tools and that when it becomes longer which is polymerisation this is the meaning of making the proteins from the amino acids. The tools are hanging out and they must be folded correctly in order that the tools can do the work. So they cannot be just something long, they have to be correctly folded. And I want to show you 1 or 2 possibilities of correct folding, like the lock and the key model for protein and its substrate. For instance here should be a match, total full perfect match between the lock and the key, in order that the key can work, the same is here. Protein is a structure, things will happen here in the active site. Let’s have a look at it closer, here is an active site of a protein. I’m sure that you know the names of the atoms, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, plus hydrogen and sulphur that you don’t see, sorry, the yellow. And the active site is just here. You see the cavity, here things happen and have a look at it closer, this is where things happen. Now there is a substrate that will be chopped here and the fit, the matching between the substrate and the protein has to be correct, otherwise there will not be chopping or adding or whatever the protein has to do. So as I said the sequence of the protein determines its fold and the sequence itself, it is determined by the sequence of the gene that codes for it. So what really happens is that there is DNA as we saw earlier. It is transcribed into a molecule that can be living, can function as a single chain, not a double chain like DNA, it’s called RNA. And in this particular case messenger RNA. RNA is very similar to DNA in terms of the basis but different a little bit in the main chain and therefore it can be existing and functioning as a single strand. This is being translated into proteins by the ribosome. From the same children’s book, this is what happens, there is a gene, the gene is being opened by an enzyme or actually enzyme couples that’s called opener and being copied by another complex that is called copier in this slide and now we have messenger RNA. That is dictated, the sequence of its basis is dictated by the sequence of the DNA because they make the same type of what's on correct base pairs. The ribosome is now the factory that gets the information, the instruction from the gene through the messenger as a papal tape that comes in, being read. Drugs are bringing the amino acids, these drugs are called tRNA and each amino acid has its own tRNA in every cell. Sometimes there is more than one tRNA for each amino acid. Here they are shown in different colours to distinguish between them but actually they are chemically different. Protein is being made here and comes out as a chain here. The drugs can go out, tRNA can go out, look for more work, also the suctions can go out, look for more ribosomes and the whole process is a consuming 2 GTP molecules. So the ribosome is actually a factory. And it builds the newly born protein by adding amino acids one at a time. Let’s have a look at it in a minute. Each cell contains a huge number of ribosomes, highly active mammalian cells can reach 6 millions for instance in the liver. Even bacteria can reach about 80 to 100,000 ribosomes working together when the bacteria grows. The ribosomes act continuously, they form 20 bonds, about 20 bonds in a second. And how do you make mistakes, fidelity rate of 99.99999%, it means one mistake in a million. I was a good student, I studied chemistry and I was a good student, I had a very good inorganic chemistry, I had to make a peptide bond as my second year exercise, took me a day, I needed 100 degrees, I needed high acidity like more than a lemon and I made mistakes and I was expected to make mistakes. I just told you this in order that you appreciate how amazing is the ribosome, it makes 20 in a second under the conditions of the cell where it is in. So let’s see, firstly what the ribosome has to do. Here comes messenger RNA, it has 4 bases like DNA. And I made them here in 4 different colours to distinguish between them. Each 3 of them, each triplet is coding for one amino acid, where are the triplets, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, have a look, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, there will be completely different protein if I start somewhere else. Or if I skip one, or if I don’t know where the first one is. So the ribosome knows to select the right framework and the right position. When the triplets are defined the first one to be translated has to be identified and it happens on the ribosome, like here. So we can see now there are triplets. And the first triplet has been already associated with the tRNA, remember the drug, that associates with this in one end of it which is called anti-codon loop, that can make Watson Crick base builds with the triplet and carries the cognate amino acid to it, far away actually from the anti-codon loop. And it all happens on the ribosome and I really want to show you how we visualise it and the first structures came out, back 8 years ago, this movie was made by art students together with us and it’s interpolation between our results and some others. So the messenger comes to the small sub unit, detects it, please forgive me, let’s go back for a minute. There are 2 subunits in the ribosome, I didn’t say this, sorry. First small subunit that is also initiating, this is the clever part of the ribosome, the small subunit, it knows to think or at least to select, select the frame, select the first one. It cannot make mistakes. The large one is where the peptide bond is being made. So now you can see the movie. So please pay attention to the movie. In the beginning when the messenger reaches the ribosome, the ribosome, the small subunit makes a motion to get it. If the movie doesn’t come I will tell you all about what you could have seen. Ah now you see. Usually this is what happens when I say it doesn’t come, it comes. So the messenger comes and it takes it, now it wraps around it and the RNA factor is non ribosomal factors, for instance the initiation factors that are associated to the initiation complex but we leave. The first tRNA is being brought by another factor, now all the factors leave. The large subunit can come and makes bridges by conformational changes. Now we have an active ribosome. That can continue peptide bond formation and protein production. So the ribosome helps the tRNA’s to come in, they are brought by factors, they can come out, peptide bond is being made in the large subunit. We take it away now so that you can see how the motion happens, tRNA moves, the lower part rotates, moves and moves together with the messenger and the protein goes out through a tunnel in the large sub unit. Now you see again the whole ribosome, protein will come here, it has to fold, either alone or mainly by chaperons or through the membrane if it goes through a membrane. And the whole process continues until stop codon is being recognised and then factors like recycling factors, release factors are replacing the tRNA. The 2 subunits can dissociate, protein comes out, tRNA’s can go and look for more jobs. In the movie you didn’t see structures, here you can see small subunit in bacteria is of the molecular rate of about .85 million Daltons. It’s made many of RNA, like the whole ribosome, RNA here is in silver and many proteins, So that’s a small subunit, you see it looks like a duck, here is a duck, so it’s called a duck. And the large subunit is called a crown and now it looks like a crown. So again RNA is in silver, many proteins, 34 proteins in bacteria, makes the peptide bond and make sure there is elongation and protection. These are ribosomal proteins, I won’t talk about them. What you saw actually in the movie was small subunit, large subunit, 3 positions for tRNA. A, P and E, A and P are above the active site, it’s called peptidyl transfer is centre. A for amino oscillated tRNA. The one that comes with amino acid. P for the peptidyl tRNA. Where the newly protein will grow. And E is the exiting one. So when one looks at the surfaces of the small, the duck and the crown get together, one sees that the surfaces are rich in RNA, almost no protein around. Here there will be the A, P and E and if you see here is the tRNA that combines them. This part will meet here and this part will meet here so what you see coming together means doing this, like my hands. Protein will be made here where the star is by the amino acids. What we found in the structures is the ribosome is not a protein enzyme, it’s an RNA enzyme, almost all its functions are made by RNA. So all what I told you in the beginning that proteins are very important, they themselves are made by RNA, RNA machine. Most of the ribosomes are made from 2 to 1 ribosomal RNA to ribosomal proteins except for mitochondrial that has more proteins. But still the active centres are made of RNA. And this is in a code with what Francis Crick promised us back in 1968. We found in the ribosomal region that accommodates the A and the P sites tRNA, it’s in all ribosomes and I have no time now to tell you about all what's known today. I show you 5 but there are about 30 structures today, all have this region that has symmetrical relation between the A and the P sites, where the A and the P tRNA bind. And we think that the motion between the A and the P is as we see here, the A blue goes into the P green, this is a snap shot, a computer snap shot of the motion where the ribosome is in red and the blinking part are those that help confine and make sure that the motion is correctly. At the end of the motion the stereochemistry is fit for making the A protein bond, peptide bond. And this is what we think the ribosome A provides, the frame for that. What is needed geometrically that this frame works and this reaction works, is that the A-site, tRNA sits exactly in place so it can rotate and the P-site tRNA, the first one goes to its position in the right orientation flipped. Now think about yourself, you're go into an empty room and it’s the same in both sides, which side will you take, this or that. You don’t know, correct. tRNA also doesn’t know but we have no time in the cell to wait until the tRNA thinks it’s better here, it’s better there, I stay here, I stay there. So the ribosome makes provision for that, it provides 2 potential base pairs on the P-site and only one on the A-site, so the first tRNA will go and take the 2, of course 100% more. And therefore the reaction can start. It was also found that when these 2 and this 1, base pairs are formed, the tRNA itself can be the catalyst of this reaction, catalyst of its own reaction, this is a very ancient way of catalysis. So this is what we studied until now, I just want to show you this region that I talked about, it does everything. It’s connected to the 2 hands that move when tRNA come in and out and also to the tunnel and this is where peptide bond is being made. You can see it here in a little bit more detail, tRNA would come here, you remember in the movie, these ends were moving. So we think that it can transmit messages, you can see it here, how beautiful it is, within the ribosome, in the large subunit but connected to the small one. From top you have seen it before, from the side it looks like a pocket. And this gave us the feeling that, you can see it now larger, that there is something in it. We looked into the conservation and we found out that this region is 98% conserved in all known sequences of ribosomes, from bacteria to elephants if you want, everywhere. We also thought because of it that the high conservation of the symmetrical region indicated existence beyond environmental conditions. This suggests that the proto ribosome which was a simple dimeric RNA enzyme, so there was a proto ribosome, is still embedded in the core of the contemporary ribosome, like here. So we think that we identify how the first peptide bonds were made and consequently proteins. We call it proto-ribosome this region and we are trying now to construct it. And this is our hypothesis, there were 2 pieces or many pieces of RNA that could dimerise and make this type of pocket that can do chemistry. So we found to our surprise that there is preferred selection of those that like to dimerise and those that do not. It means we see Darwin before Darwinism, we see selection that is usually given to animals or to cells, here functioning on molecules. So let’s forget this, what we think, this was the pocket, pocket opens and grows and so on and so on. It is in agreement with several studies done independently showing that looking at how the ribosome is built, it’s clear that it was made from a centre which is the symmetrical centre, this is from Steinberg’s group in Montreal. Or by peeling it, showing again that the centre is the most important one. So this gave us the feeling that we can start to think what was the first amino acid, was it an alanine and glycine because they are simple, or lysine and arginine or histidine because histidine can be made from left overs of RNA pieces. And the most important question is what was first, the genetic code or its products. According to our idea the products showed how genetic code will go because when small peptides were made those that existed indicated how to make new ones. The question, the more human type question is why should RNA make enzymes that are better than him, in the beginning all enzymes were RNA enzymes and they were not so successful as proteins. Why should it make a competitor that is better than him? We don’t think it happened like this, we think that it just, that there wasn’t just a machine that was there, that was taken over by the amino acid. I want to show you that the ribosome protects the newly born protein in this tunnel. And at the end of it there is a chaperone that helps it fold. In new bacteria the chaperone is called trigger factor, it’s made of 3 regions. The red one is the one that binds and when it binds it opens up. And when the trigger factor opens up it exposes the hydrophobic region that can help the newly born protein not to make mistakes in folding. When the protein comes out it’s still not full, it’s still not folded and it has to have a helper. And the helper here is the trigger factor that provides an environment that the newly born protein can like. For instance have a look here at the end of the tunnel, here is trigger factor bound in gold and if protein, newly born protein comes out and is protected by it so it will not make too many wrong foldings. You can see it even more beautifully from this side. Here is the protein coming out and the trigger factor helping it. So in the very little time left I want to talk a few minutes about antibiotics because this is the implication of our work. Because of the fundamental role played by the ribosome meant that antibiotics target it. The natural antibiotics are the ammunitions that bacteria from one type is making in order to eliminate another type when they have their fights, their microorganism fights. About 40% of the useful antibiotics target the ribosome and we like to compare it between David and Goliath. David had the small stone, had to kill big Goliath, small stone antibiotic, less than 1000 Dalton, about 800 Dalton, has to paralyse 2½ million Dalton. David hit the head of Goliath here because it’s exposed and because it’s important. It’s not the only exposed region but the most important for life functionally. The same are the antibiotics, they hit the ribosome in the important parts. Here there are 3 of them, one in the active site, the other where bond is being made and the third, the erythromycin in the tunnel. Have a look, this is the tunnel, so this is the large ribosomal subunit to tRNA’s. The tunnel is shown by polyalanine and goes through it. A zoom into it is shown here. And you pay attention, there is a very narrow region here where antibiotics from the family macrolides, the most abundant family bind. Like that, so here is the tRNA, the protein would go here, peptide bond is being here but if there is erythromycin on the site from the macrolide family it will stop it. What you see here is a cut through the ribosome where the large subunit is shown here in beige and the other parts I already show, talked about. From top you can see it like that, the whole ribosome, you look into the tunnel and it is now blocked by erythromycin. All antibiotics bind to the ribosome functional site, I just said it, this is the way they function, this is the way they kill the pathogenic bacteria. But the ribosomal functional sites are highly conserved. So how do the antibiotics differentiate between the pathogen and the patient? They do it by subtle differences. You want to see a subtle difference, here it is. So here is the tunnel wall, there are many, many antibiotics here, all structures determined by us in complex with the ribosome. All bind to one position, number 2058 in the RNA sequence. So you see here the tunnel and this is this particular nucleotide which is very important in the tunnel wall for binding macrolides. It’s an adenine in new bacteria. But it’s not an adenine in us, have a look here, adenine and erythromycin, this is the type of interactions, quite nice ones. Please concentrate here, this is now guanin so that’s pathogen and this is us. Eubacteria in human, that's the only difference. But this is already dictating too short contact and the erythromycin is rejected. So that’s the way they bind. But we do know that antibiotics have resistance and prominent mechanism of resistance is to modify the attachment part, the anchors. What do I mean, you remember earlier 2058, adenine and erythromycin here, this becomes larger, either by mutation or by ERM modification I want to show you. So what's here is antibiotic selectivity, A in eubacteria, G in eukaryotes, all what I had to do is to change the word here from selectivity to resistance. Exactly the same place. So either the bacteria do A to G mutation or post translational ERM modification which metylation making this larger. So this is the way antibiotics, clever antibiotics know to resist, clever bacteria knows to resist antibiotics. The way to combat this, either to make new compounds with additional anchors or minimise the need for the original anchors or make drugs from 2 components. So I want to show you first how companies try to make compounds that can bind without A2058. And I was really terrified because I thought if they bind to resistant bacteria they will also bind to the patient. I was wrong and I want to show you how we know that I was wrong. For this we want to talk about bacteria, human and in the middle there is an archaea. In the dead sea in Israel there is a bacteria that is an archaea. You can see the dead sea from top, from the side, you see it’s very salty, you can see the bacteria still going even on the salt and even in the summer after the water went down, it still grows there. This bacteria was crystallised by us and the structure was determined at Yale and the same antibiotics that bind to resistant bacteria binds to it, it has a G, instead of A. So I was really happy that I was wrong in my prediction. When we look at the patient’s model, that was done at Yale and pathogens that were done by us, one next to the other, we see that the antibiotic binds across the tunnel in the pathogens and along the tunnel in human or in human model. The other type that, so let me go back for a second, this shows that it’s not enough to bind, it has to be bind correctly. So those guys that want here to do drug design. The other type is to make antibiotics from 2 components, here they are again, the tunnel wall, one component, second component, each component is not so good but together they are the winning couple. They made my face from here to here when the first one came to the market called Synercid and we are now making one of our own on this. All antibiotics bind to important functional positions. I showed you here in the active site and in the tunnel, they also bind where messenger RNA goes. So few words, how did we do our studies because I think it’s good for young people. Crystallography is important to see very small distances between atoms. Crystals are made of unit cells that have to be the same. Crystallographers crystallise it, collect data by shining x-rays because there are no lenses that can look at such small distances as we need, atomic positions. And we get at the end many, many spots that we have to combine together to make electron density map that we may or may not be able to interpret. Crystallising salt is no problem, crystallising lysozyme is no problem but crystallising ribosome that is so complicated, so unstable, so deteriorating and so flexible, so heterogeneous, it was not really expected. But I write a paper about hibernating bears that when they sleep the ribosomes are packed on the inside of their cells, on the inside of the membranes and I understood that ribosomes can be orderly packed. I thought that this is the way nature preserve active ribosome’s for the whole winter. And I used for this very robust ribosomes as I said earlier. And at the end we got crystals, I don’t want to go into all details but the beginning was this and I will not talk about so much on the structure, just on what happened to these crystals when we measure them at synchrotrons. So synchrotrons are based on having particles running fast and on the tangentials we measure. Ribosomal crystals deteriorated within .1 of a second. Can you imagine 8 years to get good crystals and then losing them in .1 of a second. We found, we thought that we can fight it and I can explain later how, this is the day of the experiment, look how worried I looked. Within one night we found that by cryocrystallography we can preserve crystals. We got out patterns and the whole world got patterns. Now there are so many structures compared to what was before that. And other things happened the same time so I’m still happy 20 years later. And this is the machine, it’s more important the machine than me. I want to thank the Weizmann Institute that kept me and Max Planck, the NIH, the Weizmann Kimmelman Centre for financing what was called my dream, that was based on the bears. My groups in the Weizmann and at Max Planck for their enthusiasm in good and bad times. Dr. Wittmann that we started with. I want to show you the German group, the Hamburg group that went to the Dead Sea to look for bacteria themselves. And the Israeli group that is run by Annette Bashan when I am here. And Tamara that had birthday, she came for 10 weeks 12 years ago, she is still with us. She had birthday, she had a cake, this is her cake, which shows that ribosomes are sweet in my group. And my family, especially my granddaughter. Why do I say it, I say it for the young women that sit here, it’s possible to be scientist and be loved family member, look what she wrote here. There is no year, I asked her why there is no year, she said every year you have to reprove yourself. So they love me but they are also very demanding. Please young ladies go into science it’s a lot of fun, even without prizes. And that’s what happened to me, thank you very much for a very stimulating and I think a very good advice at the end of it.

Es ist mir eine große Freude, zu diesem bekannten jährlichen Treffen eingeladen worden zu sein, insbesondere als Preisträgerin, und ich bin sehr glücklich, so viele junge Leute zu sehen, die zuhören möchten. Die IT-Leute möchte ich bitten, dieses Licht auszumachen, so, wie es vorher war, bitte. Ich möchte Ihnen nun alles über das erstaunliche Ribosom erzählen, und da ich nur 25 Minuten zur Verfügung habe, werde ich nicht alles sagen können, was ich sagen möchte und was es Wert wäre, gesagt zu werden. Ich werde versuchen, mehrere Punkte hervorzuheben. DNA ist der in allen Zellen vorliegende Mechanismus, um den genetischen Code zu speichern und zu schützen. Sie ist ein sehr guter Speicherort, denn der genetische Code, der aus Kombinationen dieser Basen besteht, wird nun von einer Art externer Mauer geschützt, dem Rückgrat der DNA, und die DNA selbst kann ganz dicht gepackt werden, so kompakt, dass die Information nicht austreten kann. Die Genprodukte – die Gene sind das, was die DNA beinhaltet – werden als Proteine bezeichnet. Und Proteine können so ziemlich alles in der Zelle tun. Hier ist ein Bild aus einem Kinderbuch, aber mir gefällt es und ich habe noch weitere Kinderbücher, Bilder. Sie können sehen, was Gene tun können: Sie können Strukturen bilden, wie Haar oder Haut oder Bindegewebe, sie können Signale senden, sie können an der Regulierung beteiligt sein, sie können Dinge transportieren. Von den Transportproteinen ist Ihnen bestimmt das Hämoglobin bekannt, das Sauerstoff von den Lungen zur Zelle und CO2 zurück transportiert. Sie können Enzyme sein, und ich glaube, dass selbst Oberstufenschüler diese heutzutage untersuchen. Sie sind verantwortlich für die Prozesse der Aufspaltung und des Verbindens, sie sind die Arbeiter, die die Chemie erledigen, und sie können außerdem Rezeptoren sein, wie Augen, Ohren usw. Die Faltung der Proteine ist sorgfältig konzipiert, um die jeweilige Funktion der Proteine zu ermöglichen. Folglich kann nicht jedes Protein alles tun, sondern jedes einzelne Protein hat seine bestimmte Rolle. Diese Rolle wird durch die Faltung bestimmt, und die Faltung wird durch die Sequenz der Bausteine festgelegt. Die Bausteine der Proteine werden als Aminosäuren bezeichnet, von denen es 20 verschiedene Arten gibt. Lassen Sie uns nun wieder einen Blick in das Kinderbuch werfen. Tatsächlich kann ich dieses Kinderbuch sehr empfehlen. Es trägt den Titel Biokit, wurde in den 80er Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts geschrieben und ist noch immer sehr zutreffend – mit Ausnahme der Aussagen über das Ribosom.(Lachen.) Es gibt 20 Arten von Aminosäuren, und alle haben dasselbe Rückgrat. Ich habe das hier einfach in verschiedenen Farben aufgezeichnet, aber es ist dieselbe Struktur. Sie besitzen Seitenketten, die Werkzeuge sein können. Wenn das Protein durch Polymerisierung – Polymerisierung bedeutet die Bildung der Proteine aus Aminosäuren – länger wird, hängen die Werkzeuge heraus und müssen korrekt gefaltet werden, damit sie ihre Arbeit tun können. Sie dürfen also nicht einfach nur lang sein, sondern sie müssen korrekt gefaltet sein. Ich möchte Ihnen ein oder zwei Möglichkeiten einer korrekten Faltung vorstellen, wie das Schlüssel-Schloss-Prinzip für ein Protein und sein Substrat. Hier muss zum Beispiel eine Übereinstimmung, eine vollständige und perfekte Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Schloss und dem Schlüssel vorliegen, damit der Schlüssel funktionieren kann, und das Gleiche gilt hier. Ein Protein ist eine Struktur, die Dinge werden sich hier im aktiven Bereich ereignen. Lassen Sie uns genauer hinschauen – hier ist der aktive Bereich eines Proteins. Sicherlich kennen Sie die Namen der Atome: Sauerstoff, Stickstoff, Kohlenstoff, plus Wasserstoff und Schwefel, das gelbe Atom, das Sie hier leider nicht sehen. Der aktive Bereich befindet sich genau hier. Sie sehen die Aushöhlung, hier laufen die Prozesse ab. Schauen Sie näher hin, dort passiert es. Hier ist nun ein Substrat, das hier zerlegt werden wird. Die Passung, die Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Substrat und dem Protein muss stimmen. Sonst wird nichts zerlegt oder hinzugefügt werden oder das geschehen, was immer das Protein tun muss. Wie ich sagte, bestimmt also die Sequenz des Proteins seine Faltung. Die Sequenz selbst wird von der Sequenz des Gens bestimmt, das sie codiert. Was nun tatsächlich passiert, ist Folgendes: Wir haben hier DNA, wie wir zuvor gesehen haben,die DNA wird in ein Molekül transkribiert, das als eine einzelne Kette, nicht als eine Doppelkette wie die DNA, leben und funktionieren kann. Dieses Molekül wird als RNA bezeichnet. In diesem speziellen Fall handelt es sich um mRNA (Messanger- RNA, Boten-RNA). Hinsichtlich der Basen ist die RNA der DNA sehr ähnlich, aber sie unterscheidet sich in der Hauptkette ein bisschen von ihr, und sie kann daher als einzelner Strang existieren und funktionieren. Sie wird durch das Ribosom in Proteine übersetzt. Hier haben wir, aus demselben Kinderbuch, das, was passiert: Hier ist ein Gen, es wird von einem Enzym bzw. eigentlich von einem Enzymkomplex, der als Öffner bezeichnet wird, geöffnet und, auf diesem Dia, von einem anderen, Kopierer genannten Komplex, kopiert. Nun haben wir die mRNA. Die Sequenz ihrer Basen wird von der Sequenz der DNA vorgeschrieben. Bei beiden kommt es auf korrekte Basenpaare an. Das Ribosom stellt nun die Fabrik dar, welche die Information und damit vom Gen die Bauanweisung erhält, und zwar über einen Boten in Form eines eingehenden „Lochstreifens“, der ausgelesen wird. Lastwagen bringen die Aminosäuren herbei. Diese Lastwagen werden als tRNA bezeichnet, und in jeder Zelle hat jede Aminosäure ihre eigene tRNA. Manchmal gibt es für eine Aminosäure mehr als eine tRNA. Sie sind hier in unterschiedlichen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann, aber sie unterscheiden sich tatsächlich hinsichtlich ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung. Hier wird das Protein hergestellt, und hier kommt es als Kette heraus. Die Lastwagen können den Ort wieder verlassen, die RNA kann herausgehen und sich nach weiterer Arbeit umsehen. Auch die Bauanleitungen können herausgehen und weitere Ribosomen suchen. Der gesamte Prozess verbraucht zwei GTP-Moleküle. Das Ribosom ist also tatsächlich eine Fabrik und stellt die neuen Proteine her, indem es stückweise Aminosäuren hinzufügt. Schauen wir uns das in einer Minute einmal an. Jede Zelle enthält eine große Anzahl von Ribosomen. Bei hochaktiven Säugetierzellen, zum Beispiel in der Leber, können es bis zu sechs Millionen Ribosomen sein. Selbst bei Bakterien arbeiten ungefähr 80.000 bis 100.000 Ribosomen zusammen, wenn das Bakterium wächst. Die Ribosomen sind pausenlos in Aktion. Sie bilden 20 Bindungen, um die 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde. Unterlaufen ihnen dabei Fehler? Die Quote der Genauigkeit beträgt 99, 99999 % – das heißt ein Fehler in einer Million. Ich war eine gute Studentin. Ich studierte Chemie, und ich war eine gute Studentin, ich war sehr gut in anorganischer Chemie. Als Übungsaufgabe im zweiten Jahr musste ich eine Peptidbindung herstellen. Dafür benötigte ich einen Tag. Ich brauchte 100 Grad, ich brauchte einen Säuregehalt, der höher als der einer Zitrone war. Ich machte Fehler, und es wurde erwartet, dass ich Fehler machte. Das erzähle ich Ihnen nur deshalb, damit Sie zu würdigen wissen, wie erstaunlich das Ribosom ist. Unter den Bedingungen der Zelle, in der es sich befindet, stellt es 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde her. Schauen wir uns nun als erstes an, was das Ribosom zu tun hat. Hier kommt mRNA an, die wie DNA vier Basen besitzt. Ich habe sie hier in vier verschiedenen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann. Jeweils drei von ihnen, jedes Triplett, kodiert eine Aminosäure. Wo sind die Tripletts, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, schauen Sie, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, es wird ein ganz anderes Protein werden, wenn ich an einer anderen Stelle beginne. Oder wenn ich eine überspringe oder wenn ich nicht weiß, wo die erste Stelle ist. Das Ribosom kann also das richtige System und die richtige Position heraussuchen. Wenn die Tripletts definiert sind, muss dasjenige, das als erstes übersetzt werden soll, identifiziert werden, und dies geschieht am Ribosom, so wie hier. Wir können also sehen, dass es nun Tripletts gibt. Das erste Triplett ist bereits mit der tRNA verbunden worden – erinnern Sie sich an den Lastwagen – die sich mit ihm an einem seiner Enden, das als Anticodon-Schleife bezeichnet wird, verbindet. Sie kann Watson-Crick-Basenverbindungen mit dem Triplett aufbauen und transportiert die verwandte Aminosäure dorthin, also tatsächlich weit entfernt von der Anticodon-Schleife. Das alles passiert am Ribosom. Ich möchte Ihnen sehr gerne zeigen, wie wir dies visualisieren. Die ersten Strukturen kamen vor acht Jahren zum Vorschein. Dieser Film wurde von Kunststudenten und uns gemeinsam gemacht und stellt eine Interpolation unserer Ergebnisse und einiger anderer Ergebnissen dar. Der Bote kommt an der kleinen Untereinheit an, entdeckt sie – ich bitte um Verzeihung, lassen Sie uns für eine Minute zurückgehen. Das Ribosom hat zwei Untereinheiten, dies sagte ich noch nicht, Entschuldigung. Als erstes ist da die kleine Untereinheit, die auch den Vorgang einleitet. Sie ist der intelligente Teil des Ribosoms, die kleine Untereinheit, sie kann denken oder zumindest selektieren, den Rahmen und das erste Triplett aussuchen. Sie kann keine Fehler machen. Die große Untereinheit befindet sich dort, wo die Peptidbindung stattfindet. Jetzt können Sie sich den Film anschauen. Bitte achten Sie auf den Film. Zu Beginn, wenn der Bote das Ribosom erreicht, vollführt das Ribosom, die kleine Untereinheit, eine Bewegung, um ihn zu ergreifen. Wenn der Film nicht startet, werde ich Ihnen alles das erklären, was Sie hätten sehen können. Ah – jetzt können Sie es sehen. Das ist das, was normalerweise passiert, wenn ich sage, er startet nicht – dann startet er. Der Bote kommt also an, und die kleine Untereinheit ergreift ihn, wickelt sich jetzt um ihn herum, und der RNA-Faktor ist ein nicht-ribosomaler Faktor, wie zum Beispiel die Initiationsfaktoren, die mit dem Initiationskomplex verbunden sind, aber nun verlassen wir das. Die erste tRNA wird von einem anderen Faktor herbeigebracht. Nun gehen alle Faktoren. Die große Untereinheit kann kommen und baut Brücken durch Konformationsänderungen. Nun haben wir ein aktives Ribosom, das mit der Bildung der Peptidbindungen und der Proteinsynthese fortfahren kann. Das Ribosom hilft also den tRNAs beim Hereinkommen, sie werden von Faktoren herbeigebracht, sie können herauskommen, die Peptidbindung wird in der großen Untereinheit gebildet. Wir entfernen sie jetzt, damit Sie erkennen können, wie die Bewegung vonstatten geht. Die tRNA bewegt sich, der untere Teil rotiert und bewegt sich zusammen mit dem Boten, und das Protein tritt durch einen Tunnel in der großen Untereinheit aus. Nun sehen Sie wieder das gesamte Ribosom. Das Protein wird hier ankommen, es muss gefaltet werden, entweder durch sich selbst oder, in den meisten Fällen, durch Chaperon-Proteine oder durch die Membran, wenn es durch eine Membran hindurchtritt. Der ganze Prozess setzt sich fort, bis ein Stopp-Codon erkannt wird. Dann ersetzen Faktoren wie Recycling- oder Freigabefaktoren die tRNA. Die zwei Untereinheiten können sich voneinander lösen, die Proteine kommen heraus, die tRNAs können weiterziehen und nach neuer Arbeit Ausschau halten. In dem Film sahen Sie keine Strukturen. Hier können Sie erkennen, dass die kleine Untereinheit bei Bakterien eine molekulare Größe von ungefähr 0,85 Millionen Dalton hat. Sie besteht, wie das gesamte Ribosom, aus zahlreichen RNAs – die RNA ist hier silberfarben dargestellt – und vielen Proteinen, hier aus 20 Proteinen, von denen jedes in einer anderen Farbe dargestellt ist. Die Farben haben keine Bedeutung. Das also ist eine kleine Untereinheit. Sie sehen, dass sie einer Ente ähnelt, daher wird sie als Ente bezeichnet. Die große Untereinheit wird als Krone bezeichnet und sieht auch wie eine Krone aus. Die RNA ist wiederum silberfarben dargestellt. Viele Proteine – bei Bakterien 34 Proteine – bilden die Peptidbindung und stellen Elongation und Schutz sicher. Bei diesen handelt es sich um ribosomale Proteine, auf die ich nicht eingehen werde. Was Sie eigentlich in dem Film sahen, waren die kleine Untereinheit, die große Untereinheit und drei Positionen für die tRNA: A, P und E. A und P befinden sich über dem aktiven Bereich. Dies wird als Peptidyltransferase-Zentrum bezeichnet. A steht für Aminoacyl-tRNA, also für die tRNA, die mit der Aminosäure kommt. P steht für die Peptidyl-tRNA, wo das neue Protein wachsen wird, und E steht für die Exit-Position. Wenn man sich also die Oberflächen der kleinen Untereinheit, der Ente, und der Krone zusammen anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die Oberflächen reich an RNA sind und dass sich dort fast keine Proteine befinden. Hier werden die A-, die P- und die E-Position sein, und wenn Sie dort hinschauen, sehen Sie die sie kombinierende tRNA. Dieser Teil wird sich hier und dieser Teil wird sich dort treffen. Was Sie dort zusammentreffen sehen, bedeutet, dass dies hier getan wird, was meine Hände tun. Das Protein wird hier, wo sich der Stern befindet, aus den Aminosäuren gebildet. Was wir in den Strukturen feststellten, zeigt, dass es sich bei dem Ribosom nicht um ein Proteinenzym, sondern um ein RNA-Enzym handelt. Nahezu alle seine Funktionen werden durch RNA ausgeführt. Anfangs erzählte ich Ihnen vieles über die große Bedeutung der Proteine, doch die Proteine selbst werden von der RNA, der RNA-Maschine, erzeugt. Die meisten Ribosomen bestehen aus ribosomaler RNA und ribosomalem Protein im Verhältnis 2:1, mit Ausnahme der mitochondrialen Ribosome, die mehr Proteine enthalten. Aber auch hier bestehen die aktiven Zentren aus RNA. Dies ist in einem Code, den uns Francis Crick damals, 1968, versprochen hat. Die ribosomale Region, die die A- und P-Positionen-tRNA aufnimmt, findet sich in allen Ribosomen. Hier habe ich nicht die Zeit, um Ihnen all das zu erzählen, was heutzutage darüber bekannt ist. Ich zeige Ihnen fünf Strukturen, aber es gibt heute ungefähr 30. Alle verfügen über diese Region, die ein symmetrisches Verhältnis zwischen den A- und P-Positionen aufweist und wo sich die A- und P-tRNA verbinden. Wir sind der Ansicht, dass die Bewegung zwischen A und P so abläuft, wie wir hier sehen. A (blau) bewegt sich in P (grün) hinein. Es handelt sich hier um eine Momentaufnahme, eine Computer-Momentaufnahme der Bewegung, bei der das Ribosom in Rot dargestellt ist. Die blinkenden Teile sind jene, die bei der Bewegung helfen, die sie begrenzen und dafür sorgen, dass sie korrekt ausgeführt wird. Am Ende der Bewegung ist die räumliche Anordnung bereit für die Bildung der A-Protein-Bindung, der Peptidbindung. Das ist es, was unserer Meinung nach das Ribosom bereitstellt, den Rahmen dafür. Was in geometrischer Hinsicht für das Funktionieren dieses Rahmens und dieser Reaktion erforderlich ist, ist Folgendes: dass sich die tRNA an der A-Position genau an ihrem Platz befindet, damit sie rotieren kann, und dass sich die erste tRNA der P-Position in der richtigen Ausrichtung, nämlich umgedreht, auf ihre Position zubewegt. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, dass Sie selbst einen leeren Raum betreten. Beide Seiten sehen gleich aus – welche Seite werden Sie wählen, diese oder jene? Genau – Sie wissen es nicht. Die tRNA weiß es auch nicht, aber in der Zelle haben wir keine Zeit, um zu warten, bis die tRNA denkt: „Hier ist es besser, dort ist es besser, ich bleibe hier, ich bleibe dort.“ Deshalb trifft das Ribosom entsprechende Vorkehrungen und stellt auf der P-Position zwei potenzielle Basenpaare und auf der A-Position nur ein Basenpaar bereit. Folglich wird die erste tRNA die beiden Paare nehmen, natürlich die 100 % mehr. Und somit kann die Reaktion beginnen. Man hat auch herausgefunden, dass die tRNA, wenn diese zwei Basenpaare und dieses eine Basenpaar gebildet werden, selbst der Katalysator für diese Reaktion sein kann. Sie kann also der Katalysator ihrer eigenen Reaktion sein, was eine sehr alte Möglichkeit der Katalyse ist. Das also ist es, was wir bis heute untersucht haben. Ich möchte Ihnen diese Region zeigen, über die ich sprach. Sie tut alles. Sie ist mit den beiden Händen, die sich bewegen, wenn tRNA hinein- und herauskommt, und auch mit dem Tunnel verbunden, wo die Peptidbindung gebildet wird. Hier können Sie das Ganze etwas detaillierter betrachten. An diese Stelle würde die tRNA kommen – Sie erinnern sich an den Film, diese Enden bewegten sich. Wir glauben also, dass sie Botschaften übermitteln kann. Sie können sie hier sehen, wie schön sie ist, innerhalb des Ribosoms, in der großen Untereinheit, aber mit der kleinen Untereinheit verbunden. Von oben haben Sie sie vorhin gesehen, von der Seite betrachtet, sieht sie wie eine Tasche aus. Dies vermittelte uns den Eindruck, dass sich darin – jetzt können Sie es größer sehen – etwas befindet. Wir sahen uns die Konservierung an und stellten fest, dass diese Region in allen bekannten Sequenzen von Ribosomen zu 98 % konserviert ist, von den Bakterien bis zu den Elefanten, überall. Wir hatten außerdem den Gedanken, dass die hohe Konservierung dieser symmetrischen Region auf eine Existenz unabhängig von Umweltbedingungen hinwies. Dies legt nahe, dass das Proto-Ribosom, das ein einfaches Dimer-RNA-Enzym war, immer noch im Kern dieses gegenwärtigen Ribosoms, wie hier, eingebettet ist. Daher denken wir, dass wir herausgefunden haben, wie die ersten Peptidbindungen und folglich die ersten Proteine gebildet wurden. Wir bezeichnen diese Region als Proto-Ribosom und versuchen nun, sie zu konstruieren. Unsere Hypothese besagt, dass es zwei oder mehr RNA-Stücke gab, die dimerisieren konnten und diese Art von Tasche bildeten, die Chemie betreiben kann. Wir stellten zu unserer Überraschung fest, dass es eine bevorzugte Selektion jener, die gerne dimerisieren, und jener, die dies nicht tun, gibt. Das bedeutet, dass wir hier Darwin vor dem Darwinismus sehen, wir sehen, dass Selektion, die normalerweise bei Tieren oder bei Zellen zum Tragen kommt, auf Moleküle einwirkt. Vergessen wir das jetzt. Wir denken, dass dies die Tasche war, sie öffnete sich und wuchs und so weiter und so fort. Diese Überlegung stimmt mit verschiedenen unabhängig voneinander durchgeführten Untersuchungen überein, die nachweisen, dass, wenn man sich anschaut, wie das Ribosom aufgebaut ist, klar ist, dass es aus einem Zentrum gebildet wurde, das dem symmetrischen Zentrum entspricht. Dies stammt von Steinbergs Gruppe aus Montreal. Auch wenn man es auseinander wickelt, zeigt sich wieder, dass das Zentrum der wichtigste Bestandteil ist. Dies ließ uns daran denken, Überlegungen darüber anzustellen, welches die erste Aminosäure war oder um Lysin oder Arginin oder Histidin, weil Histidin aus Überresten von RNA-Stücken gebildet werden kann. Die wichtigste Frage ist, was zuerst da war: der genetische Code oder seine Produkte? Nach unserer Vorstellung zeigten die Produkte, wie der genetische Code funktioniert, denn als neue Peptide gebildet wurden, gaben die bereits existierenden Peptide Hinweise darauf, wie die neuen herzustellen seien. Die Frage, die eher eine typisch menschliche Frage ist, lautet: Warum sollte die RNA Enzyme herstellen sollte, die besser sind als sie. Anfangs waren alle Enzyme RNA-Enzyme, und diese waren nicht so erfolgreich wie Proteine. Warum sollte sie einen Konkurrenten erschaffen, der besser war als sie? Wir glauben nicht, dass es auf diese Art und Weise passiert ist. Wir nehmen an, dass es nicht einfach einen Mechanismus gab, der von der Aminosäure übernommen wurde. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, dass das Ribosom das neugeborene Protein in diesem Tunnel beschützt. Am Ende des Tunnels befindet sich ein Chaperon-Protein, das dem neuen Protein bei der Faltung hilft. Bei neuen Bakterien wird das Chaperon-Protein als Trigger-Faktor bezeichnet. Dieser Faktor besteht aus drei Regionen. Die rote ist diejenige, die bindet, und wenn sie bindet, öffnet sie sich. Und wenn sich der Trigger-Faktor öffnet, legt er die hydrophobe Region bloß, die dem neugeborenen Protein dabei helfen kann, Fehler bei der Faltung zu vermeiden. Wenn das Protein herauskommt, ist es immer noch nicht vollständig, immer noch nicht gefaltet und braucht einen Helfer. Der Helfer hier ist der Trigger-Faktor, der für eine Umgebung sorgt, in der das neugeborene Protein sich wohlfühlen kann. Schauen Sie zum Beispiel hier auf das Ende des Tunnels, hier ist ein Trigger-Faktor in einer goldfarben dargestellten Bindung. Wenn ein Protein, ein neugeborenes Protein, herauskommt, wird es von dem Trigger-Faktor beschützt, damit es nicht zu viele Fehlfaltungen macht. Von dieser Seite aus können Sie dies sogar noch schöner sehen. Hier kommt das Protein heraus, und der Trigger-Faktor hilft ihm. In der sehr kurzen Zeit, die wir noch haben, möchte ich über Antibiotika sprechen, denn diese sind die Folge unserer Arbeit. Die zentrale Rolle, die das Ribosom spielt, bedeutet, dass es zielgerichtet von Antibiotika angegriffen wird. Natürliche Antibiotika sind die Munition, die von den Bakterien der einen Art produziert wird, um Bakterien einer anderen Art bei ihren Kämpfen, ihren Kämpfen auf der Ebene der Mikroorganismen, zu eliminieren. Ungefähr 40 % der wirkungsvollen Antibiotika greifen das Ribosom an. Wir vergleichen dies gerne mit David und Goliath. David hatte den kleinen Stein zur Verfügung und musste den großen Goliath töten. Der kleine Stein ist das Antibiotikum, weniger als 1000 Dalton, ungefähr 800 Dalton, und muss zweieinhalb Millionen Dalton paralysieren. David traf Goliath hier am Kopf, da dieser ungeschützt und wichtig war. Der Kopf ist nicht der einzige ungeschützte Körperteil, aber der in funktionaler Hinsicht lebenswichtigste. Antibiotika verhalten sich ebenso. Sie treffen das Ribosom an den wichtigen Stellen. Hier sind drei von ihnen, eins im aktiven Bereich, ein zweites dort, wo die Bindung entsteht, und ein drittes, Erythromycin, im Tunnel. Werfen Sie einen Blick darauf – das ist der Tunnel, dies sind die große ribosomale Untereinheit und zwei tRNAs. Der Tunnel wird durch das Polyalanin gezeigt und geht hindurch. Hier haben wir eine Zoom-Aufnahme in den Tunnel. Sehen Sie genau hin: Hier gibt es eine sehr schmale Region, wo sich Antibiotika der Makrolid-Familie, der größten Familie, eine Bindung eingehen. Ungefähr so: Hier ist die tRNA, das Protein würde hierhin gehen, die Peptidbindung würde hier erfolgen. Befindet sich jedoch Erythromycin aus der Makrolid-Familie in diesem Bereich, wird es dies stoppen. Was Sie hier sehen, ist ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom, bei dem die große Untereinheit hier beige dargestellt ist. Außerdem sehen Sie die anderen Teile, die ich bereits gezeigt und von denen ich gesprochen hatte. Von oben können Sie es so sehen, das gesamte Ribosom, Sie schauen in den Tunnel hinein, und er wird nun durch das Erythromycin blockiert. Alle Antibiotika binden sich an die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms. Ich sagte dies soeben. Dies ist die Art und Weise, auf die sie wirken und auf die sie die pathogenen Bakterien töten. Jedoch sind die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms in hohem Maße konserviert. Wie unterscheiden also die Antibiotika zwischen Pathogen und Patient? Sie tun dies anhand feiner Unterschiede. Sie möchten einen feinen Unterschied sehen? Hier ist die Tunnelwand, mit vielen, vielen Antibiotika. Alle Strukturen wurden von uns in einem Komplex mit dem Ribosom bestimmt. Alle binden an eine Position, die Nummer 2058 in der RNA-Sequenz. Sie sehen hier also den Tunnel, und das ist das spezielle Nucleotid, das in der Tunnelwand für die Bindung von Makroliden sehr wichtig ist. Bei neu gebildeten Bakterien ist es ein Adenin. Aber bei uns ist es kein Adenin. Schauen Sie hierhin – Adenin und Erythromycin, das ist die Art von Interaktionen, ziemlich nette Interaktionen. Konzentrieren Sie sich bitte hierauf – das ist jetzt Guanin. Das also ist ein Pathogen, und das sind wir. Eubakterien im Menschen, das ist der einzige Unterschied. Aber das schreibt bereits einen zu kurzen Kontakt vor, und das Erythromycin wird abgewiesen. Das ist also die Art und Weise, auf die sie binden. Wir wissen jedoch, dass Antibiotika Resistenzen besitzen. Ein sehr wichtiger Resistenz-Mechanismus besteht in einer Modifizierung des Befestigungsteils, des Ankers. Was heißt das? Sie erinnern sich, vorhin sprachen wir über die Position 2058, Adenin und Erythromycin hier. Dies wird größer, entweder durch Mutation oder durch ERM-Modifizierung, wie ich Ihnen zeigen möchte. Hier haben wir antibiotische Selektivität: A bei Eubakterien, G bei Eukaryoten. Alles, was ich zu tun hatte, war, das Wort hier von „Selektivität“ zu „Resistenz“ zu ändern. Genau der gleiche Ort. Die Bakterien durchlaufen also entweder eine Mutation (von A zu G) oder eine post-translationale ERM-Modifizierung, bei der Methylierung dies hier vergrößert. Auf diese Art und Weise können demnach intelligente Bakterien den Antibiotika Widerstand leisten. Um Resistenzen zu bekämpfen, kann man entweder neue Präparate mit zusätzlichen Ankern herstellen oder den Bedarf an den ursprünglichen Ankern minimieren oder Medikamente aus zwei Komponenten herstellen. Als erstes möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie Firmen versuchen, Präparate herzustellen, die ohne eine 2058-Position binden können. Ich hatte wirklich Angst, denn ich dachte, dass diese Antibiotika, wenn sie sich an resistente Bakterien anheften können, sich auch an den Patienten anheften werden. Ich irrte mich, und ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, woher wir wissen, dass ich mich im Irrtum befand. Dafür wollen wir über Bakterien sprechen, über Menschen, und in der Mitte befinden sich die Archaeen. Im Toten Meer in Israel existiert ein Bakterium, das ein Archaeon ist. Sie können das Tote Meer von oben sehen, von der Seite, es ist sehr salzig, und sie sehen, dass die Bakterien selbst im Salz weiterleben. Sie wachsen sogar im Sommer, nachdem der Wasserstand gefallen ist. Dieses Bakterium wurde von uns kristallisiert und seine Struktur in Yale bestimmt. Dieselben Antibiotika, die sich an resistente Bakterien binden, binden sich auch an dieses Bakterium. Es hat ein G anstelle eines A. Ich war sehr glücklich, dass ich mit meiner Voraussage falsch lag. Wenn wir uns das Modell des Patienten anschauen, das in Yale erstellt wurde, und die Pathogene, mit denen wir uns dort nebenan beschäftigten, sehen wir, dass das Antibiotikum bei den Pathogenen durch den Tunnel und bei dem menschlichen Modell entlang des Tunnels bindet. Das zeigt, dass es nicht ausreicht, dass eine Bindung stattfindet, sondern es muss eine korrekte Bindung erfolgen. Für diejenigen hier, die in der Medikamentenentwicklung arbeiten möchten. Die zweite Möglichkeit besteht darin, Antibiotika aus zwei Komponenten herzustellen. Hier sind sie wieder – die Tunnelwand, eine Komponente, die zweite Komponente, jede Komponente für sich reicht nicht aus, zusammen sind sie jedoch ein Gewinnerpaar. Es sorgte für ein breites Lächeln auf meinem Gesicht, als das erste Medikament dieser Art unter dem Namen Synercid auf den Markt kam. Heute stellen wir ein eigenes Medikament dieser Art her. Alle Antibiotika binden an funktional bedeutenden Positionen, wie ich Ihnen zeigte, hier im aktiven Bereich und im Tunnel. Sie binden auch dort, wohin sich die mRNA bewegt. Noch einige wenige Worte dazu, wie wir unsere Untersuchungen vornahmen, denn ich denke, dies ist hilfreich für junge Menschen. Die Kristallografie ist wichtig, um sehr kleine Unterschiede zwischen den Atomen erkennen zu können. Kristalle sind aus Elementarzellen aufgebaut, die gleich sein müssen. Kristallografen kristallisieren sie und erheben Daten, indem sie Röntgenstrahlen einsetzen, da es keine Linsen gibt, mit deren Hilfe man solch kleine Entfernungen betrachten kann, wie wir sie benötigen, die Positionen von Atomen. Letztendlich brauchen wir viele, viele Punkte, die wir miteinander kombinieren müssen, um eine Karte der Elektronendichte zu erstellen, die wir dann interpretieren können – oder auch nicht. Salz zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, ein Lysozym zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, aber ein Ribosom zu kristallisieren, das so komplex, so instabil, so schnell verfallend und so dynamisch, so heterogen ist Aber ich schrieb an einem Artikel über Bären im Winterschlaf, deren Ribosomen, während sie schlafen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Zellen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Membranen gebündelt werden, und ich nahm an, dass Ribosomen ordentlich verstaut werden können. Ich ging davon aus, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Natur aktive Ribosomen den gesamten Winter über bewahrt und beschützt, und ich verwendete dafür, wie bereits gesagt, besonders robuste Ribosomen. Am Ende bekamen wir Kristalle. Ich möchte nicht auf sämtliche Details eingehen, aber das war der Anfang. Ich werde nicht so viel über die Struktur erzählen, sondern nur darüber, was mit diesen Kristallen geschah, als wir an ihnen Messungen in Synchrotronen vornahmen. Synchrotrone basieren auf der Beschleunigung von Teilchen und den Tangentialen, die wir messen. Ribosomale Kristalle zerfielen innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde. Können Sie sich vorstellen, acht Jahre damit zu verbringen, gute Kristalle zu bekommen und diese dann innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde zu verlieren? Wir dachten, wir könnten etwas dagegen tun, und ich kann später erklären, auf welche Art und Weise. Das ist am Tag des Experiments – schauen Sie nur, wie besorgt ich aussah. Innerhalb einer Nacht stellten wir fest, dass wir mit Hilfe der Kristallografie Kristalle am Zerfall hindern konnten. Wir erhielten unsere Muster, und die ganze Welt bekam Muster. Heutzutage gibt es, im Vergleich zu dem, was davor da war, so viele Strukturen. Zur selben Zeit geschahen noch andere Dinge, so dass ich 20 Jahre später immer noch glücklich bin. Und das ist die Maschine – sie ist wichtiger als ich. Danken möchte ich dem Weizmann-Institut für Wissenschaften, das zu mir hielt, und dem Max Planck-Institut, dem NIH (National Institute of Health) und dem Weizmann-Kimmelman-Zentrum, die finanzierten, was ich meinen Traum nannte, der auf Bären basierte. Ich danke meinen Forschungsgruppen am Weizmann-Institut und am Max Planck-Institut für ihren Enthusiasmus in guten wie in schlechten Zeiten. Ich danke Dr. Wittmann, bei dem wir anfingen. Ich möchte Ihnen die deutsche Forschungsgruppe zeigen, die Hamburger Gruppe, die selbst am Toten Meer nach Bakterien suchte, und die israelische Gruppe, die von Annette Bashan geleitet wird, wenn ich hier bin. Und ich danke Tamara, die vor zwölf Jahren für zehn Wochen zu uns kam und noch immer bei uns ist. Sie hatte Geburtstag, sie bekam einen Kuchen, das ist ihr Kuchen, und das zeigt, dass die Ribosomen in meiner Gruppe süß sind. Und ich danke meiner Familie, insbesondere meiner Enkelin. Warum ich das sage? Ich sage es wegen der jungen Frauen, die hier sitzen. Man kann eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein geliebtes Familienmitglied sein – schauen Sie, was sie hier schrieb. ich fragte sie, warum kein Jahr angegeben ist, und sie sagte, jedes Jahr musst du dich neu beweisen. (Lachen.) Sie lieben mich, aber sie sind auch sehr fordernd. Bitte, meine jungen Damen, gehen Sie in die Wissenschaft – es macht Spaß, auch ohne Auszeichnungen. Und das ist das, was mir passiert ist. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für einen sehr stimulierenden Vortrag und einen, wie ich denke, sehr guten Rat am Ende. (Applaus.)

...And Shares Impressions From the „Delivery Room“ of Proteins
(00:11:15 - 00:16:24)

From Chain to Function
Proteins are born in the ribosome as a one-dimensional chain. To become functional, they have to fold up into a three-dimensional structure. The first three-dimensional structure of a protein was determined with the help of X-ray crystallography by John Kendrew in 1958. This protein was myoglobin, the molecule that stores and releases oxygen in the muscle. It contains about 2,600 atoms, and Kendrew had to analyze about 250,000 X-ray diffractions from 110 myoglobin crystals to reach his goal. In January 1946, Kendrew had joined the group of Max Perutz at the Cavendish laboratory in Cambridge. Inspired by J.D. Bernal and under the leadership of Sir Lawrence Bragg, Perutz had begun to tackle a more difficult problem already in 1937: To solve the structure of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrier of the blood and four times as large as myoglobin. As a pioneer in his field who dealt with a huge molecule and had to overcome many methodological problems, it took Perutz more than two decades to succeed, and so he became the runner-up to Kendrew. Both shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1962. While Max Perutz participated in the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings three times between 1986 and 1999, John Kendrew attended the meeting once, already two years after he had received the Nobel Prize. He gave a brilliant state-of-the-art lecture on „Recent Studies of the Structure of Proteins“. After modestly stating that he “had been studying a simpler protein” than Perutz, he shared insights on both the myoglobin and the hemoglobin structure with his audience, expressed his hope that both structures would help to better understand the function of proteins and then extensively discussed the relationship between the sequence and the three-dimensional structure of proteins.

John Kendrew (1964) - Recent Studies of the Structure of Proteins

Ladies and gentlemen I feel very happy that even if I was late for all the other lectures, at least I arrived in time for my own. And I am happy also to be here in Lindau, I feel like what we call in Cambridge, a freshman, a first year student of Lindau and this is a very pleasant experience. Now I want today to talk a little bit about the structure of proteins. Those of us who read the Scientific American and other publications of this kind are very familiar nowadays with the work which has gone on in the last few years on this other very important biological molecule, DNA, which means deoxyribonucleic acid. Or if one is writing in German one should say DNS, desoxyribonukleinsäure and that this molecule in the chromosome of the living cell and the nucleus carries the hereditary information which comes out from the nucleus in the form of another related molecule which is called messenger RNA or ribonucleic acid. And this molecule attaches itself to the so called ribosomes. And there it makes protein. Now we can look at some details of this process. The first slide please. Here is a picture of a chromosome and in the chromosome is the DNA and you can see where in the chromosome there is a swelling here and the swelling is a part of the chromosome which is at this moment active. That part of the chromosome is making the messenger RNA. The next slide please. Here we have the DNA in the nucleus making the messenger. The messenger comes out and attaches itself to a ribosome and in the next slide we can see here the messenger RNA. And here are the ribosomes attached to it. Now what is all this for. The messenger RNA ribosome complex is making a protein molecule. The protein molecule is a long chain of amino acids. And the sequence, the order of the amino acids along the chain is determined by the so called code. The code of the nucleic acid transferred from DNA to RNA and then converted into protein. Now this has been the important advance in our knowledge in the last few years of the way in which the DNA, the hereditary material controls the activity of living cells. And I want to talk to you from this point on, what happens next. The apparatus here makes this long chain and later this long chain is folded up into a more spherical shape. The lights please. We have the long protein chain. The polypeptide chain, it is made of these single units. The single units are called amino acids. And there are about 20 types of amino acids. The whole chain might be 100 or 200 of them. Now this is how the polypeptide chain is built, but when the protein is in action in the cell it is not like this, it is folded up into some kind of nearly spherical shape. And we know that the most important kinds of proteins in the cell are the enzymes, the enzymes which have the function of carrying out the chemical reactions of the living cell of converting some substance A into another substance B. This is a specific catalytic reaction of the enzymes. And what we shall be interested in today is what is the relation between this polypeptide chain which in some way folds itself up and converts itself into the enzyme or other protein molecule. And then how it performs its function in the cell. Now this spherical structure of the protein molecule in the cell is a highly specific one. You can take a long chain like this, if you fold it up there are many different ways in which such a folding would be possible. But in the living cell only one way is chosen, the folding is a highly specific one. We can see this from the fact that each enzyme performs just one specific function. It has a special arrangement of the amino acids in the chain, especially designed to perform that function alone. And this demands a highly specific arrangement. Another piece of evidence we have of this specific arrangement of the protein is the fact that many proteins will form crystals. The next slide please. In the next slide I have some crystals of a protein molecule, this is the protein myoglobin. And the fact that the protein makes crystals like this means that every molecule must be the same as every other molecule. You can only form regular crystals which of course are regular arrangements of molecules, you can only do this if the molecules are very similar to one another. Now the fact that we get crystals from some protein molecules gives us an opportunity to study their structure using the methods of x-ray crystallography. And in fact this is the technique with which I and my colleagues have been studying these structures. Today I shall not discuss at all the x-ray methods, I think perhaps you will be more interested, not so much in the methods themselves as in the results. Now we want to study from these crystals, to study what is the structure of a protein molecule. We would like to know this, first of all because simply of the intrinsic interest of examining a very complicated molecule, seeing what it is like. And I must remind you that a protein molecule may have in its chain several hundred amino acids. This means that the whole molecule contains several thousand atoms and some proteins are very much bigger than that. So they are extremely complicated things. If we understand about the structure of the molecule this may help us to get some information about the other problems I’ve already mentioned. First of all the problem how is this molecule made, how is it manufactured? In other words how does this process of folding up the long chain into the spherical molecule, how does this happen? And secondly if we understand the structure we can perhaps learn something about the specific action of the protein molecule, its function as an enzyme. Or used for other purposes, we can understand that if we know something about the structure. And I shall talk entirely today about 2 proteins with which I have been particularly associated, the protein haemoglobin and myoglobin. Now just to say a little bit about, to tell you a little bit about these molecules. Haemoglobin is the protein in the red blood cells, the protein which has the function of carrying oxygen from the lungs to the tissues in the bodies of animals. It’s an oxygen carrier. And it is a fairly middle sized protein, it has got something like 10,000 atoms in it and those 10,000 atoms are composed of 4 polypeptide chains. And each chain carries a haem group. Now we can look in the next slide at a picture of the haem group. This is a flat group of atoms with an iron atom in the centre and it is this iron atom which carries an oxygen molecule. And haemoglobin has 4 haem groups so it contains 4 iron atoms, carries 4 oxygen molecules. That is one of the 2 proteins that I shall be concerned with and this is the protein which my colleague Max Perutz has been studying for many years. I myself have studied a simpler protein, one which is perhaps less familiar to you, the protein myoglobin which is also an oxygen carrying molecule but it is not in the blood, it is contained in the cells of the muscles of the tissues of the body. And the way it works is that the haemoglobin brings the oxygen to the tissues and passes it on to the myoglobin. And the myoglobin acts as a store of oxygen until the oxygen is needed in the cell. Now I chose myoglobin because it is a simpler protein, it is one of the simplest proteins we know, still you see rather complicated 2,500 atoms but less complicated than haemoglobin. And whereas haemoglobin has 4 polypeptide chains, myoglobin has one chain. It has one haem group and so it can carry one oxygen molecule. And this is the protein I have been studying for a number of years and I want to try to tell you something about its structure. So that from this basis we can hope to understand a little about some of the other problems. Now I told you that I have no intention of talking to you about x-ray crystallography. But let us look in the next slide at an x-ray photograph, this is an x-ray photograph of the crystals which I showed you a few minutes ago. And the problem of the x-ray crystallographer is to study photographs like this and from these to deduce what is the structure of the molecules in the crystals which produces this pattern of spots. Now you see that it is very complicated. Indeed it is much more complicated than this because here we do not have the whole x-ray pattern of a protein crystal, only part of it. In fact the x-ray pattern of myoglobin crystals has perhaps 25,000 spots in it. One studies a structure like this in stages. It turns out one can begin with the spots near the middle of the pattern. One gets what we call a low resolution picture of the molecule. One then brings more and more reflections into the calculations and so the pattern becomes sharper and sharper. The next slide please. It is as if we are looking at a molecule like this. You see this is a ring of atoms and here we are looking at it rather sharp. But supposing at the beginning we had a very bad pair of spectacles, we would see just a solid piece of density here. And as we gradually improve we put on better and better spectacles, we get a sharper and sharper picture. And in the protein work we begin with a low resolution picture taking only a few reflections into account and by degrees we try and make the picture sharper and sharper until eventually we hope to see every atom in the structure. Now in the next slide is a picture of our first map of the myoglobin molecule. The way we make a model like this, you have to imagine here is this molecule, it is in 3 dimensions. It is rather difficult to represent this because our screen is only 2 dimensions. So what we do is we take the molecule and we cut a number of parallel sections through it and we put the density of atoms in each section onto a set of transparent sheets and we pile them on top of one another and so we get a 3 dimensional representation. And here the spectacles with which we look at the molecule are not very good ones. The most that we can see here is some indication of this long polypeptide chain going around through the molecule. You can see a little bit of it there. We can also see the iron atom, I told you that myoglobin contains a single iron atom. The iron atom is very dense, much more dense than any other atom in the molecule. So we can see that iron atom as a very dense peak. And by looking at a map like this we can arrive at a model of the myoglobin molecule. The next slide please. Here is a model of the myoglobin molecule. Again looked at not sharply, we do not see the individual atoms but we could see the way in which this polypeptide chain goes around the molecule. And here is the iron atom and the haem group. You will see it is a very irregular, a very complicated object and it was quite surprising when we first saw this to think that this thing could be so irregular in its arrangement. Well, later we put more x-ray reflections into our calculations and got a better map of the structure. At this resolution we see the polypeptide chain simply as a solid cylindrical arrangement. We do not see its individual atoms, we cannot tell how the atoms in the chain are arranged. The next slide. Here we have the next map of the myoglobin molecule and we were very happy when we saw this map, because what had been in the old map a solid cylinder of density for the polypeptide chain. We now saw that this cylinder, here we are looking at the cylinder end on, we saw that it is hollow, there is a hole down the middle. And this made us realise that as in so many things our colleague Doctor Pauling had been right, when 10 years before we obtained this map or nearly 10 years before he had proposed a structure for the polypeptide chain. The next slide please. The so called Alpha helix, a spiral arrangement of the chain and you see being a spiral like a spring it means that if you look down the middle you can see a hole. We were able to see this hole in the map. And by looking at this map we began to be able to construct models of the molecule putting in some of the individual atoms. The next. In the next slide is one of our more recent maps of the myoglobin molecule and here you can see this is where all the individual atoms are. And with this kind of map one can really begin to understand the chemistry of the molecule. Those of you who are biochemists will perhaps recognise here we have the haem group and the iron atom. The haem group edge on and it is attached to the rest of the molecule by a group here which you can see has got 5 atoms in a ring. And the biochemists will immediately recognise this as the amino acid which is called histidine. And of course many years before we saw this histidine in the model, the biochemists had imagined for various reasons which I have no time to discuss, they had imagined that this connection was histidine. And this turns out to be correct. So we have many maps like this and we try from these maps to construct a model of the molecule in which we put in all the atoms. There are 2,500 atoms, the model is rather complicated. Here is a model of the myoglobin molecule. I can assure you there are 2,500 atoms there. The white ones are hydrogen, the black ones are carbon, the red ones are oxygen and so on. And the only difficulty about this model is that you can learn nothing about how this molecule is constructed. It is a solid thing, you cannot see what is inside it. And even if I had the actual model here instead of simply a photograph, it would still be very difficult for you to understand the construction of the molecule. Here is another model of the molecule in which we have so to speak taken the flesh from the bones, we have stripped away the atoms, we have simply left the connections between them. And the polypeptide chain has been marked here with a white string and you can follow it all the way around the molecule. And every time the string goes straight like this, one has got an Alpha helix. One has got one of these spiral arrangements of the chain. It turns out that something like 70% or 75% of the polypeptide chain in the molecule is made up of these straight segments of helix. Here is a still more simplified version of the same model. We start here at the end of the chain and you see here we have a spiral arrangement for a time and then we get a little bit irregular at the corner and another spiral and so on. One can follow it all the way around and there is the iron atom, the iron atom which attaches the oxygen molecule and the haem group which is attached to the rest of the protein by means of this histidine residue here. Well, as I told you, my difficulty is that this molecule is a very complicated one. It is three-dimensional and unfortunately our screen here is only two-dimensional. It is quite difficult to give you a good idea of the way in which it is constructed. But one might ask first of all, what are the forces which hold together this molecule into a spherical shape or nearly spherical shape? How does this piece of chain, how is it attached to its neighbours? Now there are no, in some proteins, there are actual chemical bonds between one piece of chain and another piece of chain. This is not the case in myoglobin, there are no chemical bonds between neighbouring pieces of chain. So we ask, what are the forces responsible for maintaining the integrity of the structure? For a number of years before any precise picture of a protein molecule had been obtained, for a number of years, the physical chemists have been thinking about these problems and they noticed that if you take the different amino acids of a protein, I mentioned that there are 20 different kinds, that these 20 kinds of amino acid can be classified in various ways. And one way of classifying them is to say that some of these polypeptide chains are non-polar and the others are polar. If we have a polypeptide chain here like this then we have some side chains like this one, which is called phenylalanine or we have ones like this called valine in which all the groups are hydrocarbon groups. These are the so called non-polar residues. This means this kind of group of atoms does not like to be in water. Molecules of this kind are insoluble in water, they are non-polar or sometimes called hydrophobic. There are other kinds of side chain in which there is an electrically charged group which can be negative or it can be positive. And groups of this kind are polar ones, hydrophilic, they like dissolving in water. So in a protein we have a mixture, we have some non-polar groups, some polar ones. These ones do not like water, these ones do like water. And the physical chemists suggested many years ago that perhaps in the protein molecule the non-polar residues are inside and the polar residues are outside sticking towards the water. It is exactly the same kind of situation they suggested as you have in a soap where we have molecules which are non-polar at one end and have a polar group, a charge group, positive or negative and in the soap micelle, one has these groups sitting in such a way that the charged groups are out towards the liquid and the non-polar groups are away in the middle. And the force which holds this object together is essentially a consequence of these non-polar groups which do not like water, they try to escape, they try to get away, find the water, so they hide themselves inside the complex leaving the polar groups on the outside. It turned out when we had our model of myoglobin here we were able of course to look at each amino acid along the chain and see where the polar groups and the non-polar groups were. And indeed it turns out as one would expect on this theory, it turns out that the polar groups are almost all on the outside of the molecule. The non-polar groups are on the inside. So it seems that the physical chemists were correct. That indeed the force which holds the whole thing together, the forces are similar to the forces holding together a soap micelle. In other words it is a case of the non-polar groups escaping from the liquid, the water environment which they do not like, in which they are insoluble. But it is not sufficient only to ask, what is the overall force which determines this structure? We have to ask also, what are the specific forces which determine that it folds up just in this way and not in some other way? And obviously here when we have our model we start studying the model and try to understand what it is that causes particular arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We notice for example that the polypeptide chain begins as a helix or spiral. At a certain point the spiral is broken, the direction of the chain alters. There is a small length of chain which is irregular, non helical. After that another helix begins. And one might suggest that one should look at the point at which the helix terminates at the break in the helix to see if there is something special about the arrangement of amino acids at that point which could account for this particular change in direction or change in the angle of the chain. And it’s been disappointing to us to find that it’s really difficult or impossible by looking at that model to guess what are the forces responsible. The polypeptide chain in myoglobin consists of 8 lengths of helix and in-between the 8 lengths of helix there are 7 non-helical regions. Unfortunately they are all different. If you found that, say, one type of non-helical region was repeated several times in the myoglobin molecule you might say well perhaps this is a standard method for turning the corner in a protein. And we would expect to find this in other proteins too. Unfortunately, all the 7 corners are different and it is extremely difficult from looking at these corners to form any impression of the forces responsible. Another way of looking at this would be to say if we had a very good computer, could we put into that computer all the information simply about the sequence of the amino acids along the chain. And could we predict what its three-dimensional arrangement would be. Well, I think this will be possible in the future but certainly at the present time it is too difficult to solve it. And this brings us back to the problem with which I began, the problem of genetics. We have seen how the genetic apparatus, the DNA determines the sequence of amino acids in the protein molecule. The question is, does the genetic apparatus also determine the three-dimensional arrangement? The geneticists believe that it does not do so, that the genetic apparatus only determines the sequence of amino acids that the messenger RNA, the ribosomes, they make simply a sequence of amino acids and that after this the chain folds itself up. In other words, they suggest that all the information required to determine the three-dimensional structure must be contained in that sequence. This is simply a hypothesis. There is no proof of this. Indeed the hypothesis was invented in the first place simply because it would make life too difficult to understand, one could not understand at all how it could be done in any other way. If you wish to determine the three-dimensional structure by some direct mechanism it would be like mass production in a factory, you would have to have a kind of mould or three-dimensional template on which to fold the molecule. And I think you can easily see from the complexity of the structures I’ve indicated, it’s very hard to imagine how such a three-dimensional mould could exist. So the hypothesis that the folding is spontaneous, this hypothesis was made simply because any other system seems very hard to believe. And indeed some evidence has recently come from the biochemists that the information in the sequence certainly is sufficient to allow the polypeptide chain to fold itself up. You can take an enzyme which has a specific biological function which catalyses a particular chemical reaction. You can take that enzyme, you can test its activity on the specific reaction it catalyses. And you can then destroy its three-dimensional structure. This is the process known to the biochemists as denaturation of the protein. And you can show that after the denaturation the specific structure has been lost. The activity, the enzyme activity has also been lost. Now in the last few years it has been shown I think conclusively that this process certainly can be reversed in the laboratory. You can take an unfolded, denatured protein and by suitable experimental arrangements outside the living cell you can allow that protein to refold itself. And you then recover the 100% in one case at least of its original activity, its original biological activity and by all the tests the molecule is as good as new. This shows I think that indeed the polypeptide chain, the sequence of amino acids must contain enough information to allow the folding to take place spontaneously. Outside the living cell it is not so efficient as it is in the living cell. The living cell takes a matter of seconds or the order of seconds to manufacture a complete protein molecule. In the laboratory the refolding process takes perhaps 10 or 20 minutes, it is not as efficient as in the living cell. Nevertheless, it does work. The suggestion in other words is that the three-dimensional structure which we study, the active, biologically active structure of the molecule is indeed the most stable structure from the thermodynamic point of view. I think we can take it that indeed the folding process is spontaneous but we still cannot understand how it takes place because looking at the myoglobin structure we find it is too complicated to discover which particular interactions are important in determining the structure. And at this point of course we would like to have models in atomic detail of many other proteins available so that we could compare them, so that could deduce some general principles on this about the construction of the molecule. Unfortunately at the present time we still have no other proteins whose structures are known in atomic detail. We cannot carry out this comparison. But one thing we can do is to look at this other molecule I mentioned earlier at haemoglobin, here is my colleague Max Perutz’s model of the haemoglobin molecule. Now haemoglobin as I said is more complicated than myoglobin, it has 4 times as many atoms in it approximately. And so the model which Max Perutz has obtained of haemoglobin is not yet so detailed as that of myoglobin, he is looking at the molecule with a rather bad pair of spectacles. Here is the model he has. It is so complicated it is difficult for you to understand what is happening here but haemoglobin is made up of 2 different kinds of polypeptide chain. The so called Alpha chain and the Beta chain, there are 2 Alpha chains, they are white here. There are 2 Beta chains, they are black and then we have the 4 haem groups. You can see a haem group there and oxygen marked on it. There is another haem group and the other 2 you cannot see, they are behind. Now when Max Perutz first obtained this model, he so to speak took it to pieces in order to see what each individual chain looked like. And here is that model taken apart. You see here are the 2 white chains, the 2 Alpha chains, here are the 2 black chains and you can put it together and make the whole molecule. And the next thing was to look at the individual Alpha and Beta chains. The next slide please. Here are the 2 chains of haemoglobin, the Alpha chain and the Beta chain and for comparison we have put on this picture, the chain of myoglobin at the same kind or resolution. And the interesting thing, the very remarkable thing which Max Perutz discovered at this point was that if you arrange these 3 chains in the proper manner then they are exactly the same. You can easily see, we can start here and you go around in this complicated arrangement that is the Alpha chain of haemoglobin. But if we go in myoglobin we have exactly the same arrangement. This is very remarkable, this strange irregular shape is evidently not accidental because we find it here in 2 quite distinct proteins, one protein from the blood, one from muscle cells and furthermore these proteins came from very different animal species. The haemoglobin was horse haemoglobin, the myoglobin came from the muscle of a whale. So it looks as if the shape is in some way important, it is a common arrangement for different proteins in different animal species. Now we still do not have a detailed atomic structure for the haemoglobin chains. But because these arrangements are so similar it means we ought to be able to compare the amino acid sequences of the myoglobin chain and of the 2 kinds of haemoglobin chain. We ought to be able to lay these sequences along side one another and see where the same amino acid appears in all 3 chains. Because if it is true that certain amino acids are responsible for determining this structure and since the structure is the same or almost the same in all 3 chains, then those amino acids which are important should be identical in all 3 chains. Now the strange thing is when you come to do this is to find how very few correspondences there are. The next slide please. Each chain has about 150 amino acids in it. Only 15% of these amino acids are the same or homologous in the myoglobin and in haemoglobin chains. This is a very surprising result. It is surprising that so few of the amino acids correspond and yet the whole structure of the 3 chains, the whole structures are so similar and of course we have been trying to look at the structure of the molecules and understand why it is that these 15% are important. Certainly you would guess that the important amino acids would not be the ones outside the molecule. The ones which simply stick out into the liquid, you could make alterations in those amino acids without upsetting the internal structure. You would expect that it would be some of these internal non polar residues which would determine the way the chains would pack in to one other. And you would expect that these would be the ones which would be homologous. And indeed it turns out that if you look at the internal amino acid residues, the ones inside the molecule, you find that the proportion of those which are homologous is much higher. But even so it is only 1 in 3. And I must say that for me this is still quite a mysterious thing, this is part of the problem which we absolutely do not yet understand. I do not understand myself how it can be that these chains are so similar when only 33% of the amino acid residues inside the molecules are identical. Of course the resemblances between these chains of haemoglobins and myoglobins, these resemblances are interesting, not only from the structural point of view but also from the point of view of the systematic zoologist. In the past of course the zoologist had to make classifications of animal species on the basis of external characteristics. Now that we begin to see the detailed chemical structure of the important molecules in living cells we can begin to think about a better method of classification, a kind of chemical taxonomy. And we can see whether the relationships between animal species in some way correspond to the relationships between the amino acid sequences of the proteins of which they are made up. And indeed it turns out that if you look at the haemoglobins of 2 very closely related species you’ll find there are very few differences between them. I think it was in Dr. Pauling’s laboratory, it was shown a year or 2 ago that there are only 1 or 2 differences between the amino acid sequence of human haemoglobin and the sequence of gorilla haemoglobin. Human beings are very closely related to gorillas. On the other hand if you compare a human haemoglobin with the haemoglobin from a horse you find there are something like, I think 18 differences between them. And you can on this basis as indeed Dr. Pauling has done, you can construct a kind of molecular evolutionary tree. You can relate the changes which have taken place in the amino acid sequences of the protein, you can relate that to the evolutionary tree of the system of animals you are considering. You can suppose in other words that there was in the beginning a kind of primitive haemoglobin from which divergence has occurred in parallel with the general evolutionary divergence of the species. Well so far I have only talked about the molecules of haemoglobin and myoglobin as representative protein molecules. We must not forget that these molecules also have a special function, namely to carry oxygen. And we might ask how is this oxygen carried in these molecules. Well I mentioned that the oxygen is carried on the iron atom of the haem group. And I think one can see something of the central problem that we are trying to solve here for now we are beginning to discuss the function of the protein molecule. The central problem is how this can be exemplified in this case by asking how is this oxygen carried. You see you can separate the haem group from the protein. You can take the molecule apart, separate the polypeptide chain from the haem group. The haem group alone is a well known chemical compound. And what you find is that if the haem group is separated it will not perform this trick of combining reversibly with oxygen. But you can push it back into the protein and then its properties are in some way changed so that now it does reversibly combine with oxygen. And the question is, how is this done? And this of course is another reason for determining the structure of a molecule like myoglobin because with this structure, the theoretical chemists have something concrete with which they can try to understand this process of oxygen combination. Indeed you can perhaps try to construct a model system. Some years ago before we had this myoglobin structure available, some years ago Dr. Wang in the United States decided to try to make an artificial haemoglobin, a kind of “Ersatz”- haemoglobin. And what he did was to take no protein at all, he took the haem groups alone, he associated those haem groups with these amino acids called histidine. I mentioned earlier that the haem group is attached to the protein in haemoglobin by histadeine. So he took haem group and histidine and he embedded this complex of haem group and histidine in a matrix of polystyrene. That is to say a synthetic polymer. He chose this because for various theoretical reasons we needn’t consider, he thought that the secret might be to put the haem group in a medium of low dielectric constant. So he put the haem groups into polystyrene. He found that once they were there they would indeed combine reversibly with oxygen. He had in fact constructed a kind of artificial haemoglobin. The next slide please. Here is part of the myoglobin structure, here is the haem group and you see it now turns out that Dr. Wang’s model was a very good one. Because in myoglobin and haemoglobin, the haem group is associated with one histidine here. Another histidine there, this corresponds to the Wang model and furthermore the haem group is surrounded on all sides by a large number of non-polar residues. Here is a phenylalanine, another phenylalanine and here is I think a valine and that looks to me like a leucine. And so on, one can go all around. You find it is in a non-polar environment, in other words speaking electrically it is in a medium of low dielectric constant. So the Wang model was a good one and it worked. But of course now what we must do or what the theoretical chemists must do is to take this structure in detail and understand how it is that when this haem group is put into this complicated environment, how precisely it does succeed in reversibly combining with oxygen. And indeed the story is a little bit more complicated than I have told you because in fact the way in which haemoglobin and myoglobin combine with oxygen are rather different. If you make a curve in which you plot the amount of oxygen taken up by the protein against the pressure of oxygen, you find for myoglobin you get a curve of this kind, a hyperbola, this is what you would expect in a molecule containing a single haem group, a single iron atom combining with one oxygen molecule. So this is what you get for myoglobin but for haemoglobin you get a different curve, the curve is now shaped like an S. And from the point of view of the physical chemists this means that this curve is different from this one. And it means you notice that at any given pressure of oxygen there is less oxygen on the haemoglobin molecule than there is on the myoglobin molecule per haem group. It means that there is some kind of interaction between the different haem groups on the haemoglobin molecule. It is as if the first oxygen going into the haemoglobin molecule in some way makes it more easy for the other 3 oxygens to go on later. Number 1 attaching to haemoglobin makes it easier for numbers 2, 3 and 4 to go on. And we might ask how is this interaction achieved, it is not at all obvious by looking at Max Perutz’s model how it’s achieved. You may remember that the haem groups are in little pockets on the outside of the haemoglobin molecule, they are very far apart from one another. And quite recently Perutz has been able at least to show something of the way this happens. Because he has compared the structure of haemoglobin with oxygen and the structure of haemoglobin without oxygen. And he finds that they are a little different from one another. What happens is that the molecule actually changes size when the oxygen goes on. You might expect perhaps that when the oxygen went there, the molecule would get bigger because we now have the protein plus 4 oxygen molecules. In fact the reverse takes place, the oxygen goes into haemoglobin, the molecule becomes smaller. It is a kind of breathing of the molecule in reverse, breathing is when we take oxygen into our lungs and our chest becomes bigger, you might expect, it seems perhaps appropriate that the breathing molecule should breathe like a human being. But it does it in reverse when the oxygen goes in, the molecule gets smaller. And the way this happens, we have these 4 chains arranged, Perutz has shown that as the oxygen goes in these chains move relative to one another in a special way. So that when the oxygen is there they are a little closer to one another. And clearly the in interaction between the 4 chains which produces this change in the oxygen uptake curve, this interaction must in some way be connected with the breathing of the molecule, the way in which the chains move relative to one another. And here again is an opportunity for the theoreticians to understand the process. Now I have tried to tell you in this lecture something about the structures of these molecules and in particular I have tried to tell you that understanding the structure has not given us the answer to all the questions we would like to understand. In fact in some ways knowing what the structure is like has made the questions seem more difficult. We have this problem, how does the molecule fold itself up, how is the specific structure determined? We do now know. We have this question for how are the properties of the haem group modified when they go into the protein molecule modified in such a way that the oxygen combination happens, reversible combination happens at all. We do not know except in very general terms. And finally we have this question about the particular arrangement in haemoglobin. How is it that the shape of that curve is determined by the fact that when the oxygen goes into the molecule, the molecule changes its shape? So that this field of protein structure is by no means a closed one, in fact we are really just at the beginning. I think the situation can be summarised by saying we are now for the first time in a position to be able to make a serious attempt to answer some of the questions which are interesting to the geneticists, to the biochemists. We are in a position to answer those questions but in fact none of the questions have been answered yet. Thank you.

Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, ich freue mich, dass ich wenigstens zu meinem eigenen Vortrag pünktlich erschienen bin, wenn ich schon bei all den anderen Vorträgen zu spät war. Und ich freue mich ebenfalls darüber, dass ich hier in Lindau bin; ich fühle mich wie ein ‚freshman‘, wie wir das in Cambridge nennen, ein Lindauer Erstsemester, und das ist eine sehr angenehme Erfahrung. Heute will ich ein wenig über die Struktur der Proteine reden. Diejenigen unter uns, die den Scientific American und andere derartige Publikationen lesen, sind heutzutage sehr vertraut mit der Arbeit, die in den zurückliegenden paar Jahren über dieses andere, sehr wichtige biologische Molekül, DNA, das heißt Desoxyribonucleic Acid, geleistet worden ist. Oder, wenn wir auf Deutsch schreiben, sollte man DNS sagen, Desoxyribonukleinsäure, und, dass dieses Molekül im Chromosom der lebenden Zelle und des Zellkerns die Erbinformationen trägt, die aus dem Kern in der Form eines anderen verwandten Moleküls herauskommt, die Boten-RNA oder -Ribonukleinsäure genannt wird. Und dieses Molekül bindet sich an die sogenannten Ribosome an. Und dort produziert es Protein. Jetzt können wir uns einige Details dieses Prozesses ansehen. Das erste Dia, bitte. Hier ist ein Bild eines Chromosoms; in dem Chromosom ist die DNA und man kann sehen, wo in dem Chromosom; hier ist eine Verdickung und die Verdickung ist ein Teil des Chromosoms, das in diesem Moment aktiv ist. Dieser Teil des Chromosoms produziert die Boten-RNA. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Hier haben wir die DNA im Zellkern, die den Boten herstellt. Der Bote kommt heraus und bindet sich an ein Ribosom, und im nächsten Dia können wir hier die Boten-RNA sehen. Und hier sind die Ribosome, die an sie gebunden sind. Nun, wozu dient das? Der Boten-RNA-Ribosom-Komplex ist dabei, ein Proteinmolekül zu erzeugen. Das Proteinmolekül ist eine lange Kette aus Aminosäuren. Und die Sequenz, die Reihenfolge der Aminosäuren entlang der Kette, wird durch den sogenannten Code bestimmt. Der Code der Nukleinsäure wird von der DNA zur RNA übertragen und wird dann in Protein umgewandelt. Nun, dies war während der vergangenen paar Jahre der wichtige Fortschritt in unserem Wissen, nämlich die Art und Weise, wie die DNA, das Erbgut, die Aktivität von lebenden Zellen kontrolliert. Und von jetzt an will ich darüber reden, was als nächstes passiert. Dieser Apparat hier produziert diese lange Kette und später faltet sich diese lange Kette in eine eher kugelförmige Form. Licht, bitte. Wir haben die lange Proteinkette. Die Polypeptidkette, sie ist aus diesen einzelnen Einheiten gemacht. Die einzelnen Einheiten werden Aminosäuren genannt. Und es gibt ca. 20 Typen von Aminosäuren. Die ganze Kette könnte 100 oder 200 von ihnen enthalten. Nun, so wird die Polypeptidkette gebaut, aber wenn das Protein in der Zelle aktiv ist, sieht es nicht so aus, es ist fast kugelförmig zusammengefaltet. Und wir wissen, dass die wichtigsten Proteine in der Zelle die Enzyme sind; die Enzyme, deren Funktion es ist, chemische Reaktionen der lebenden Zelle auszuführen, indem sie eine Substanz A in eine andere Substanz B umwandeln. Dies ist eine spezifische katalytische Reaktion der Enzyme. Und heute interessiert uns, was die Verwandtschaft zwischen dieser Polypeptidkette, die sich irgendwie zusammenfaltet und in das Enzym verwandelt oder andere Proteinmoleküle, ist. Und dann, wie es ihre Funktion in der Zelle ausübt. Nun, diese kugelförmige Struktur des Proteinmoleküls in der Zelle ist eine sehr spezifische Struktur. Man kann eine lange Kette wie diese nehmen, wenn man sie faltet, gibt es viele unterschiedlichen Weisen, wie man sie falten könnte. Aber in der lebenden Zelle ist nur eine Art gewählt, die Faltung ist sehr spezifisch. Wir können das daraus ersehen, dass jedes Enzym nur eine einzige spezifische Funktion ausübt. In der Kette gibt es eine spezielle Anordnung der Aminosäuren, besonders entworfen, um nur diese eine Funktion auszuüben. Und das verlangt eine sehr spezifische Anordnung. Wir haben noch einen anderen Beweis dieser sehr spezifischen Anordnung des Proteins: die Tatsache, dass viele Proteine Kristalle bilden. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Im nächsten Dia habe ich einige Kristalle eines Proteinmoleküls, dies ist das Protein Myoglobin. Und die Tatsache, dass das Protein solche Kristalle produziert, bedeutet, dass ein Molekül genauso aussehen muss wie alle anderen. Man kann regelmäßige Kristalle, die natürlich regelmäßige Anordnungen von Molekülen sind, nur bilden, man kann das nur machen, wenn die Moleküle sich sehr ähnlich sehen. Nun, die Tatsache, dass wir von einigen Proteinmolekülen Kristalle erhalten, gibt uns die Möglichkeit, ihre Struktur mithilfe der Methoden der Röntgenkristallographie zu studieren. Und das ist in der Tat die Technik, mit der ich und meine Kollegen diese Strukturen untersucht haben. Heute werde ich die Röntgenmethoden überhaupt nicht diskutieren, ich denke, das Interessante für Sie sind nicht so sehr die Methoden selbst, sondern die Ergebnisse. Nun wollen wir diese Kristalle darauf untersuchen, was die Struktur eines Proteinmoleküls ist. Das wollen wir wissen, vor allem einfach aus dem intrinsischen Interesse, ein sehr kompliziertes Molekül zu untersuchen, zu sehen, wie es aussieht. Und ich muss in Erinnerung rufen, dass ein Proteinmolekül mehrere hundert Aminosäuren in seiner Kette haben kann. Das bedeutet, dass das gesamte Molekül mehrere tausend Atome enthält, und einige Proteine sind noch sehr viel größer. Sie sind daher extrem komplex. Wenn wir die Struktur der Moleküle verstehen, kann das uns helfen, einige Informationen über die anderen Probleme, die ich bereits erwähnt habe, zu bekommen. Zunächst einmal das Problem, wie dieses Molekül gemacht wird, wie wird es hergestellt? Mit anderen Worten, wie findet dieser Prozess, wobei die langen Ketten in ein kugelförmiges Molekül gefaltet werden, wie findet er statt? Und zweitens, wenn wir diese Struktur verstehen, können wir vielleicht etwas über die spezifische Aktion des Proteinmoleküls lernen, über seine Funktion als Enzym. Oder sein Nutzen für andere Zwecke, wir können das verstehen, wenn wir etwas über die Struktur wissen. Und ich werden heute nur über zwei Proteine sprechen, mit denen ich besonders verbunden bin, die Proteine Hämoglobin und Myoglobin. Nun, um nur etwas zu sagen.., Ihnen ein wenig über diese Moleküle zu erzählen. Hämoglobin ist das Protein in den roten Blutzellen, das Protein, das die Funktion hat, Sauerstoff von den Lungen zu den Geweben in den Tierkörpern zu tragen. Es ist ein Sauerstoffträger. Und es ist ein Protein etwa mittlerer Größe, es hat ca. 10.000 Atome und diese 10.000 Atome sind in vier Polypeptidketten enthalten. Und jede Kette trägt eine Hämgruppe. Nun können wir uns im nächsten Dia ein Bild einer Hämgruppe ansehen. Dies ist eine flache Atomgruppe mit einem Eisenatom in der Mitte und es ist dieses Atom, das ein Sauerstoffmolekül trägt. Und Hämoglobin hat vier Hämgruppen, also enthält es vier Eisenatome, trägt vier Sauerstoffmoleküle. Das ist eines der zwei Proteine, mit denen ich mich beschäftigen werde, und es ist das Molekül, das mein Kollege Max Perutz viele Jahre lang untersucht hat. Ich selbst habe ein einfacheres Protein untersucht, eines, das Ihnen vielleicht weniger vertraut ist, das Protein Myoglobin, das auch ein Sauerstoffträger ist, aber es ist nicht im Blut, sondern in den Muskelzellen des Körpergewebes. Und es funktioniert so, dass das Hämoglobin den Sauerstoff zu den Geweben bringt und es dem Myoglobin übergibt. Und das Myoglobin agiert wie ein Lager für Sauerstoff, bis der Sauerstoff in der Zelle benötigt wird. Nun, ich wählte Myoglobin, weil es ein einfacheres Molekül ist, es ist eines der einfachsten Moleküle, die wir kennen, und doch, sieht man, recht komplizierte 2.500 Atome, aber unkomplizierter als Hämoglobin. Und während Hämoglobin vier Polypeptidketten hat, hat Myoglobin eine Kette. Es hat eine Hämgruppe und kann daher ein Sauerstoffmolekül tragen. Und das ist das Protein, das ich jahrelang untersucht habe und ich will versuchen, Ihnen etwas über seine Struktur zu erzählen. Damit wir von diesem Fundament aus hoffen können, ein wenig über einige der anderen Probleme zu verstehen. Nun, ich habe Ihnen gesagt, dass ich nicht beabsichtige, mit Ihnen über Röntgenkristallographie zu reden. Aber lassen Sie uns ein Röntgenfoto im nächsten Dia ansehen, dies ist ein Röntgenfoto der Kristalle, die ich Ihnen vor ein paar Minuten gezeigt habe. Und die Problematik der Röntgenkristallographen ist es, Fotos wie dieses zu untersuchen, und von ihnen darauf zu schließen, was die Molekülstruktur in den Kristallen ist, die dieses Punktmuster produziert. Nun sehen Sie, dass es sehr kompliziert ist. In der Tat ist es sehr viel komplizierter als das, weil wir hier nicht das gesamte Röntgenmuster eines Proteinkristalls haben, sondern nur einen Teil. In Wirklichkeit enthält das Röntgenmuster der Myoglobinkristalle vielleicht 25.000 Punkte. Man untersucht eine solche Struktur in Stufen. Es stellt sich heraus, dass man mit den Punkten nahe dem Zentrum des Musters anfangen kann. Man bekommt das, was wir ein Bild des Moleküls mit niedriger Auflösung nennen. Man bringt dann immer mehr Reflektionen in die Berechnungen ein und so wird das Muster immer schärfer. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Es ist so, als ob wir uns so das Molekül ansehen. Sie sehen, das ist ein Ring aus Atomen und hier schauen wir es uns ziemlich fokussiert an. Aber nehmen wir an, am Anfang hätten wir eine sehr schlechte Brille, dann sehen wir nur eine kompakte, undurchsichtige Fläche. Und wenn wir uns schrittweise verbessern, wir benutzen immer bessere Brillen, dann bekommen wir ein immer schärferes Bild. Und bei der Arbeit mit dem Protein fangen wir mit einem niedrig aufgelösten Bild an, indem wir nur wenige Reflektionen berücksichtigen, und schrittweise versuchen wir das Bild immer schärfer zu machen, bis wir am Ende hoffen, jedes Atom in der Struktur zu sehen. Nun, im nächsten Dia gibt es ein Bild unserer ersten Karte eines Myoglobinmoleküls. Wir machen ein solches Model, indem wir uns vorstellen, hier ist dieses Molekül, es ist dreidimensional. Es ist sehr schwierig, dies darzustellen, weil unsere Leinwand nur zweidimensional ist. Also, was wir machen ist, wir nehmen das Molekül und schneiden eine Anzahl von Parallelschnitten durch es hindurch und wir tragen die Dichte der Atome in jedem Schnitt auf einen Satz von durchsichtigen Folien auf und stapeln diese übereinander, und so bekommen wir eine dreidimensionale Darstellung. Und hier die Brille, durch die wir uns das Molekül ansehen, ist nicht sehr gut. Wir können hier höchstens sehen, dass es hier eine Andeutung dieser langen Polypeptidkette gibt, wie sie sich um und durch das Molekül windet. Man kann das hier ein wenig sehen. Wir können auch das Eisenatom sehen, ich habe Ihnen gesagt, dass Myoglobin ein einzelnes Eisenatom enthält. Das Eisenatom ist sehr dicht, sehr viel dichter als jedes andere Atom in dem Molekül. So können wir das Eisenatom als einen sehr dichten Peak sehen. Und indem wir auf eine solche Karte schauen, können wir ein Model des Myoglobinmoleküls erhalten. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Hier ist ein Modell des Myoglobinmoleküls. Wenn wir wieder nicht fokussiert hinsehen, sehen wir nicht die einzelnen Atome, aber wir können sehen, wie diese Polypeptidkette um das Molekül herumgeht. Und hier ist das Eisenatom und die Hämgruppe. Sie werden sehen, es ist ein sehr unregelmäßiges, sehr komplexes Objekt und als wir es zum ersten Mal sahen, war es sehr überraschend zu glauben, dass dieses Ding in seiner Anordnung so unregelmäßig sein könnte. Nun, später gaben wir zusätzliche Röntgenreflektionen in unsere Berechnungen ein und bekamen eine bessere Karte der Struktur. Bei dieser Auflösung sehen wir die Polypeptidkette einfach als eine kompakte, zylindrische Anordnung. Wir sehen ihre einzelnen Atome nicht, wir können nicht sagen, wie die Atome in der Kette angeordnet sind. Das nächste Dia. Hier haben wir die nächste Karte des Myoglobinmoleküls und wir waren sehr glücklich, als wir diese Karte sahen, weil das, was in der alten Karte ein kompakter, dichter Zylinder für die Polypeptidkette war, nun sahen wir, dass dieser Zylinder, hier sehen wir den Zylinder vom Ende her, wir sahen, dass er hohl ist, da ist ein Loch entlang der Mitte. Und das veranlasste uns zu realisieren, dass unser Kollege Dr. Pauling wie in so vielen Dingen Recht gehabt hat, als er, 10 Jahre bevor wir diese Karte bekommen hatten, oder nahezu 10 Jahre vorher, eine Struktur für die Polypeptidkette vorgeschlagen hatte. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Die sogenannte Alphahelix, eine spiralförmige Anordnung der Kette, und wie Sie sehen, da sie eine Spirale wie eine Feder ist, bedeutet es, man kann ein Loch sehen, wenn man entlang der Mitte durchschaut. Wir können dieses Loch auf der Karte sehen. Und indem wir auf die Karte schauen, begannen wir in der Lage zu sein, Modelle des Moleküls zu konstruieren, indem wir einige der individuellen Atome hineingaben. Das nächste, bitte. Auf dem nächsten Dia ist eine unserer neueren Karten des Myoglobinmoleküls und hier kann man sehen, wo alle einzelnen Atome sind. Und mit dieser Art Karte kann man wirklich anfangen, die Chemie des Moleküls zu verstehen. Die Biochemiker unter Ihnen erkennen vielleicht, dass wir hier die Hämgruppe und das Eisenatom haben. Die Hämgruppe von der Seite und sie ist mit dem übrigen Molekül durch eine Gruppe hier verbunden, die, wie man sehen kann, 5 Atome in einem Ring besitzt. Und die Biochemiker werden sofort erkennen, dass dies die Aminosäure Histidin ist. Und natürlich hatten die Biochemiker, viele Jahre bevor wir dieses Histidin in dem Model sahen, sich vorgestellt, aus verschiedenen Gründen, auf die ich nicht eingehen kann, dass diese Verbindung Histidin war. Und das stellt sich als richtig heraus. Wir haben also Karten wie diese, und wir versuchen aus diesen Karten ein Model des Moleküls zu konstruieren, in das wir alle Atome einfügen. Da gibt es 2,500 Atome, das Modell ist recht kompliziert. Das nächste, bitte. Hier ist ein Modell des Myoglobinmoleküls. Hier kann Ihnen versichern, das sind 2.500 Atome. Die weißen sind Wasserstoff, die schwarzen Kohlenstoff, die roten Sauerstoff und so weiter. Und die einzige Schwierigkeit mit diesem Modell ist, dass man nichts darüber lernen kann, wie dieses Molekül gebaut ist. Es ist ein kompaktes Gebilde, man kann nicht sehen, was innen ist. Und sogar wenn wir das Modell selbst hier hätten und nicht nur das Foto, es wäre immer noch sehr schwierig für Sie, die Konstruktion des Moleküls zu verstehen. Das nächste, bitte. Hier ist ein weiteres Modell des Moleküls, wo wir sozusagen das Fleisch von den Knochen gelöst haben, wir haben die Atome entfernt und einfach die Verbindungen zwischen ihnen übrig gelassen. Und die Polypeptidkette ist hier mit einer weißen Linie gekennzeichnet und man kann es den ganzen Weg um das Molekül herum verfolgen. Und jedes Mal, wenn die Linie gerade wird, so wie hier, hat man eine Alphahelix. Man hat eine dieser spiralförmigen Anordnungen der Kette. Es stellt sich heraus, dass diese geraden Helixsegmente ungefähr 70% oder 75% der Polypeptidkette in dem Molekül bilden. Hier ist eine noch weiter vereinfachte Version des gleichen Modells. Wir beginnen hier am Ende der Kette und Sie können sehen, dass wir hier eine Weile eine spiralförmige Anordnung haben, und dann wird es ein wenig unregelmäßig an der Ecke, und dann eine weitere Spirale usw. Man kann sie den ganzen Weg herum verfolgen, und hier ist das Eisenatom, das Eisenatom, das den Sauerstoff bindet, und die Hämgruppe, die hier mit dem übrigen Protein mit Hilfe des Histidinrests verbunden ist. Nun, wie schon gesagt, meine Schwierigkeit ist, dass dieses Molekül sehr kompliziert ist. Es ist dreidimensional und unglücklicherweise ist unsere Leinwand nur zweidimensional. Es ist recht schwierig, Ihnen eine gute Vorstellung zu vermitteln, wie es aufgebaut ist. Aber man könnte zunächst fragen, welche Kräfte halten dieses Molekül zusammen in einer Kugelform oder nahezu Kugelform? Wie ist dieses Kettensegment, wie ist es mit seinen Nachbarn verbunden? Nun, es gibt keine .., in einigen Proteinen gibt es richtige chemische Bindungen zwischen einem Teil der Kette und einem anderen Teil. In Myoglobin ist das nicht der Fall, es gibt keine chemischen Bindungen zwischen benachbarten Kettenteilen. Daher fragen wir uns, welche Kräfte sind dafür verantwortlich, die Integrität der Struktur aufrecht zu erhalten? Jahrelang, bevor es irgendwelche genauen Bilder eines Proteinmoleküls gab, jahrelang hatten Physikochemiker über dieses Problem nachgedacht und hatten bemerkt, dass, wenn man die unterschiedlichen Aminosäuren eines Proteins nimmt, dass diese 20 Arten von Aminosäuren auf unterschiedliche Weise klassifiziert werden können. Und eine Möglichkeit, sie zu klassifizieren ist zu sagen, dass einige dieser Polypeptidketten unpolar sind und die anderen polar. Wenn wir eine Polypeptidkette, wie diese hier, haben, dann haben wir Seitenketten wie diese, die Phenylalanin genannt wird, oder wir haben solche wie diese, die Valin heißt, in der alle Gruppen Kohlenwasserstoffgruppen sind. Dies sind die sogenannten unpolaren Reste. Das bedeutet, dass diese Art von Atomgruppe es nicht mag, in Wasser zu sein. Diese Art von Molekül ist in Wasser unlöslich, sie ist unpolar oder wird manchmal hydrophob genannt. Es gibt andere Arten von Seitenketten, die eine elektrisch geladene Gruppe enthält, die negativ oder positiv sein kann. Und diese Art von Gruppen ist polar, hydrophil, sie lieben es, sich in Wasser zu lösen. Also, in einem Protein haben wir eine Mischung, wir haben einige unpolare Gruppen, und einige polare. Diese mögen kein Wasser, diese hier mögen Wasser. Und vor vielen Jahren haben Physikochemiker vorgeschlagen, dass vielleicht die unpolaren Gruppen innen im Proteinmolekül sind, und die polaren außen, dem Wasser zugewandt. Was sie vorgeschlagen haben, ist genau dieselbe Art von Situation, wie in einer Seife, wo man unpolare Moleküle an einem Ende und am anderen eine polare Gruppe, eine Ladungsgruppe hat, positiv oder negativ, und in der Seifenmicelle sitzen diese Gruppen so, dass die geladenen Gruppen außen, der Flüssigkeit zugewandt sind, und die unpolaren Gruppen nach innen. Und die Kraft, die diese Objekte zusammenhält, ist im Grunde eine Folge dieser unpolaren Gruppen, die Wasser nicht lieben, sie versuchen zu entkommen, versuchen zu fliehen, fliehen vor dem Wasser, und so verstecken sie sich innerhalb des Komplexes, und lassen die polaren Gruppen an der Außenseite. Als wir unser Modell des Myoglobins hier hatten, waren wir natürlich in der Lage, uns jede Aminosäure entlang der Kette anzusehen und zu sehen, wo die polaren und die unpolaren Gruppen waren. Und in der Tat stellte sich heraus, wie man von dieser Theorie erwarten würde, es stellt sich heraus, dass sich die polaren Gruppen fast alle an der Molekülaußenseite befinden. Die unpolaren Gruppen sind auf der Innenseite. Es scheint daher, als ob die Physikochemiker Recht hatten, dass in der Tat die Kräfte, die das Ganze zusammenhalten, die Kräfte sind ähnlich den Kräften, die eine Seifenmicelle zusammenhalten. Mit anderen Worten, die unpolaren Gruppen entkommen der Flüssigkeit, der wässrigen Umgebung, die sie nicht mögen, in der sie unlöslich sind. Aber es reicht nicht, nur zu fragen, was die Gesamtkraft ist, die diese Struktur bestimmt. Wir müssen auch fragen: Was sind die speziellen Kräfte, die bestimmen, dass es sich so faltet, und nicht irgendwie anders? Und offensichtlich, wenn wir hier unser Modell haben, beginnen wir damit, das Modell zu studieren und versuchen zu verstehen, was es ist, was eine spezielle Anordnung der Polypeptidkette verursacht. Beispielsweise bemerken wir, dass die Polypeptidkette wie eine Helix oder Spirale anfängt. An einem bestimmten Punkt ist die Spirale gebrochen, die Richtung der Kette ändert sich. Da gibt es ein kurzes Kettensegment, das unregelmäßig ist, nicht schraubenförmig. Danach beginnt eine neue Helix. Und man könnte vorschlagen, dass man an dem Punkt, wo die Helix endet, am Bruch in der Helix, danach sucht, ob irgendetwas an der Anordnung von Aminosäuren an diesem Punkt speziell ist, was für diesen besonderen Richtungswechsel oder Wechsel in dem Winkel der Kette verantwortlich sein könnte. Und es war für uns enttäuschend zu finden, dass es richtig schwierig oder unmöglich ist, aus der Betrachtung des Modells zu erraten, was die verantwortlichen Kräfte sind. Die Polypeptidkette im Myoglobin besteht aus 8 Helixabschnitten und zwischen den 8 Helixabschnitten sind 7 nichtschraubenförmige Regionen. Unglücklicherweise sind sie alle unterschiedlich. Wenn man finden würde, dass, sagen wir, im Myoglobinmolekül eine Art von nichtschraubenförmiger Region mehrere Male wiederholt ist, könnte man sagen, vielleicht ist das die Standardmethode, um in einem Protein die Richtung zu wechseln. Und wir würden erwarten, es auch in anderen Proteinen zu finden. Unglücklicherweise sind alle sieben Ecken anders, und es ist sehr schwierig, durch Betrachten dieser Ecken irgendeinen Eindruck von den verantwortlichen Kräften zu bekommen. Eine andere Weise, es zu betrachten, wäre zu sagen, wenn wir einen sehr guten Computer hätten, könnten wir einfach all die Informationen über die Sequenz von Aminosäuren entlang der Kette in den Computer geben. Und könnten wir vorhersagen, was ihre dreidimensionale Anordnung wäre? Nun, ich denke, das wird in Zukunft möglich sein, aber zur jetzigen Zeit ist es zu schwierig zu lösen. Und das bringt uns zu dem Problem zurück, mit dem ich begonnen habe, dem Problem der Genetik. Wir haben gesehen, wie der genetische Apparat, die DNA, die Abfolge der Aminosäuren im Proteinmolekül bestimmt. Die Frage ist, bestimmt der genetische Apparat auch die dreidimensionale Anordnung? Die Genetiker glauben, dass das nicht so ist, dass der genetische Apparat nur die Reihenfolge der Aminosäuren bestimmt, dass das Boten-RNA, die Ribosome, einfach eine Sequenz aus Aminosäuren herstellen, und danach faltet sich die Kette zusammen. Mit anderen Worten, sie legen nahe, dass all die Informationen, die benötigt werden, um die dreidimensionale Struktur zu bestimmen, in dieser Sequenz enthalten sein muss. Dies ist einfach eine Hypothese. Es gibt dafür keinen Beweis. Tatsächlich wurde die Hypothese zunächst einmal einfach erfunden, weil es das Leben zu schwierig machen würde, zu verstehen, man konnte überhaupt nicht verstehen, wie es irgendwie anders sein könnte. Wenn man die dreidimensionale Struktur über einen direkten Mechanismus bestimmen möchte, wäre es wie eine Massenproduktion in einer Fabrik, man benötigte eine Art von Form oder dreidimensionaler Vorlage, auf der das Molekül gefaltet wird. Und ich denke, man kann leicht aus der Komplexität der Strukturen, die ich aufgezeigt habe, sehen, dass es schwierig ist, sich vorzustellen, wie solch eine dreidimensionale Form existieren könnte. Die Hypothese ist daher, dass die Faltung spontan ist, diese Hypothese wurde einfach gemacht, weil irgendein anderes System sehr schwer zu glauben ist. Und wirklich kamen kürzlich von den Biochemikern einige Hinweise, dass die Information in der Sequenz sicherlich ausreicht, damit die Polypeptidkette sich zusammenfalten kann. Man kann ein Enzym nehmen, das eine spezifische biologische Funktion hat, das eine besondere chemische Reaktion katalysiert. Man kann das Enzym nehmen, man kann seine Aktivität auf die spezifische Reaktion, die es katalysiert, testen. Und man kann dann seine dreidimensionale Struktur zerstören. Die Biochemiker kennen diesen Prozess als Denaturierung des Proteins. Und man kann zeigen, dass nach der Denaturierung die spezifische Struktur verloren gegangen ist. Die Aktivität, die Enzymaktivität, ist ebenfalls verloren gegangen. In den letzten paar Jahren wurde – ich denke schlüssig – gezeigt, dass dieser Prozess definitiv im Labor umgekehrt werden kann. Man kann ein entfaltetes, denaturiertes Protein nehmen und mit einem geeigneten experimentellen Aufbau außerhalb der lebenden Zelle kann man dem Protein erlauben, sich wieder zu falten. Und dann kann man, in einem Fall wenigstens, 100% der ursprünglichen biologischen Aktivität zurück erhalten, und gemäß allen Tests ist das Molekül so gut wie neu. Das zeigt, denke ich, dass tatsächlich die Polypeptidkette, die Abfolge von Aminosäuren, genug Information enthalten muss, dass die Faltung spontan stattfinden kann. Außerhalb der lebenden Zelle ist das nicht so effizient wie in der lebenden Zelle. Die lebende Zelle benötigt nur Sekunden oder von der Größenordnung von Sekunden, um ein komplettes Protein herzustellen. Im Labor dauert der Faltungsprozess vielleicht 10 oder 20 Minuten, nicht so effizient wie in der lebenden Zelle. Trotzdem funktioniert es. Der Vorschlag ist, mit anderen Worten, dass die dreidimensionale Struktur, die wir untersuchen, die aktive, biologisch aktive Struktur des Moleküls tatsächlich die stabilste Struktur ist vom thermodynamischen Standpunkt. Ich denke, wir können daher annehmen, dass der Faltungsprozess tatsächlich spontan ist, aber wir können immer noch nicht verstehen, wie er stattfindet, weil wir finden, dass nur durch Betrachten der Myoglobinstruktur es zu kompliziert ist zu entdecken, welche besonderen Wechselwirkungen für die Bestimmung der Struktur wichtig sind. Und an diesem Punkt hätten wir natürlich gerne Modelle von vielen anderen Proteinen mit atomarem Detail zur Verfügung, so dass wir sie vergleichen könnten, so dass man einige generelle Prinzipien über den Aufbau des Moleküls ableiten könnte. Unglücklicherweise haben wir zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt immer noch keine anderen Proteine, deren Strukturen in atomarem Detail bekannt sind. Wir können diesen Vergleich nicht durchführen. Etwas können wir aber tun, nämlich uns dieses andere Molekül anzuschauen, das ich vorhin erwähnt habe, hier ist das Modell des Hämoglobinmoleküls meines Kollegen Max Perutz. Nun, Hämoglobin ist, wie ich sagte, komplizierter als Myoglobin, es hat ungefähr die vierfache Zahl an Atomen. Und daher ist das Model, das Max Perutz vom Hämoglobin bekommen hat, noch nicht so detailliert wie das vom Myoglobin, er schaut sich das Molekül mit einer sehr schlechten Brille an. Hier ist sein Modell. Es ist so kompliziert, es ist für Sie schwierig zu verstehen, was hier passiert, aber Hämoglobin besteht aus zwei unterschiedlichen Arten von Polypeptidketten. Die sogenannte Alphakette und die Betakette, da sind zwei Alphaketten, die sind hier weiß. Da gibt es zwei Betaketten, sie sind schwarz, und dann haben wir die 4 Hämgruppen. Hier kann man die Hämgruppe sehen, und Sauerstoff darauf markiert. Da ist eine weitere Hämgruppe und die anderen zwei kann man nicht sehen, die sind dahinter. Nun, als Max Perutz dieses Modell zum ersten Mal erhielt, hat er es, sozusagen, auseinandergenommen, um zu sehen, wie jede einzelne Kette aussah. Das nächste bitte. Und hier ist das Modell auseinandergenommen. Man kann hier zwei weiße Ketten sehen, die zwei Alphaketten, hier sind die zwei schwarzen Ketten, und man kann es zusammensetzen und das ganze Molekül erhalten. Und das nächste war, sich die einzelnen Alpha- und Betaketten anzusehen. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Hier sind die zwei Hämoglobinketten, die Alphakette und die Betakette, und zum Vergleich haben wir die Myoglobinkette mit derselben Auflösung dem Bild hinzugefügt. Und das Interessante, das sehr Interessante, was Max Perutz an dieser Stelle entdeckte, war, dass diese drei Ketten genau gleich sind, wenn man sie richtig anordnet. Und man kann leicht sehen, wir können hier anfangen und man kann in dieser komplizierten Anordnung, die die Alphakette des Hämoglobins ist, herumgehen. Aber wenn wir ins Myoglobin gehen, haben wir genau dieselbe Anordnung. Das ist sehr bemerkenswert, diese merkwürdige unregelmäßige Form ist offensichtlich nicht zufällig, wir finden sie hier in zwei sehr verschiedenen Proteinen, ein Protein vom Blut, eins von Muskelzellen, und zudem kamen diese Proteine von sehr verschiedenen Tierarten. Das Hämoglobin war Pferdehämoglobin, das Myoglobin kam vom Muskel eines Wals. Es sieht also so aus, als ob die Form irgendwie wichtig ist, es ist eine gemeinsame Anordnung für unterschiedliche Proteine in unterschiedlichen Tierarten. Heute haben wir noch keine detaillierte Atomstruktur für die Hämoglobinketten. Aber weil diese Anordnungen so ähnlich sind, bedeutet das, dass wir in der Lage sein sollten, die Aminosäuresequenzen der Myoglobinkette und der zwei Arten von Myoglobinketten miteinander zu vergleichen. Wir sollten diese Sequenzen nebeneinander legen können und sehen, wo dieselben Aminosäuren in allen drei Ketten auftauchen. Der Grund ist: wenn es stimmt, dass bestimmte Aminosäuren dafür verantwortlich sind, diese Struktur festzulegen, und weil die Struktur in allen drei Ketten dieselbe oder fast dieselbe ist, dann sollten diese Aminosäuren, die wichtig sind, in allen drei Ketten identisch sein. Nun, das merkwürdige ist, wenn man das macht, findet man heraus, wie wenige Entsprechungen es gibt. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Jede Kette enthält ungefähr 150 Aminosäuren. In Myoglobin- oder Hämoglobinketten sind nur 15% dieser Aminosäuren dieselben oder homolog. Das ist ein sehr überraschendes Resultat. Es ist überraschend, dass so wenige Aminosäuren sich entsprechen, und die gesamte Struktur der drei Ketten trotzdem …, die gesamten Strukturen so ähnlich sind, und wir haben natürlich versucht, uns die Molekülstrukturen anzusehen und zu verstehen, warum diese 15% wichtig sind. Man würde sicherlich vermuten, dass die wichtigen Aminosäuren nicht diejenigen sind, die außerhalb des Moleküls sitzen. Diejenigen, die einfach in die Flüssigkeit hineinragen, man könnte in diesen Aminosäuren Änderungen durchführen, ohne die interne Struktur durcheinander zu bringen. Man würde erwarten, dass es einige dieser inneren, unpolaren Reste sind, die bestimmen würden, wie die Ketten sich ineinander verpacken. Und man würde erwarten, dass es diese wären, die homolog wären. Und tatsächlich stellt sich heraus, wenn man sich die inneren Aminosäuren anschaut, diejenigen innerhalb des Moleküls, findet man, dass der Anteil derjenigen, die homolog sind, viel größer ist. Aber trotzdem ist es nur ein Teil von drei. Und ich muss sagen, dass dies für mich noch eine geheimnisvolle Geschichte ist, das ist Teil des Problems, das wir überhaupt noch nicht verstehen. Ich selbst verstehe nicht, wie es sein kann, dass diese Ketten so ähnlich sind, wenn nur 33% der Aminosäurereste innerhalb des Moleküls identisch sind. Die Ähnlichkeiten zwischen diesen Hämoglobin- und Myoglobinketten, diese Ähnlichkeiten sind sicher interessant, nur nicht vom strukturellen Gesichtspunkt aus, sondern auch vom Gesichtspunkt des klassifizierenden Zoologen. In der Vergangenheit musste der Zoologe natürlich die Klassifizierung von Tierarten auf der Basis von äußerlichen Eigenschaften durchführen. Jetzt, wo wir anfangen, die detaillierte chemische Struktur der wichtigen Moleküle in lebenden Zellen zu sehen, können wir anfangen, über eine bessere Klassifizierungsmethode nachzudenken, eine Art chemische Taxonomie. Und dann können wir sehen, ob die Verwandtschaft zwischen Tierarten in irgendeiner Weise mit der Verwandtschaft zwischen den Aminosäuresequenzen der Proteine, aus denen sie bestehen, übereinstimmt. Und tatsächlich stellt sich heraus, dass man, wenn man sich das Hämoglobin von zwei sehr nahe verwandten Arten anschaut, findet, dass es sehr wenige Unterschiede zwischen ihnen gibt. Ich denke, es war in Dr. Paulings Labor, da wurde vor ein oder zwei Jahren gezeigt, dass es nur ein oder zwei Unterschiede zwischen der Aminosäuresequenz von menschlichem Hämoglobin und der Sequenz von Gorillahämoglobin gibt. Menschen sind sehr nah verwandt mit Gorillas. Wenn man andererseits menschliches Hämoglobin mit Hämoglobin eines Pferdes vergleicht, dann findet man, dass es ungefähr 18 Unterschiede, glaube ich, zwischen ihnen gibt. Und auf dieser Basis, so wie es tatsächlich Dr. Pauling getan hat, kann man eine Art von molekularem Evolutionsstammbaum konstruieren. Man kann die Änderungen, die in der Aminosäuresequenz des Proteins stattgefunden haben, in Beziehung setzen .., man kann das mit dem Evolutionsstammbaum des Tiersystems, das man betrachtet, in Beziehung setzen. Mit anderen Worten kann man annehmen, dass es am Anfang eine Art von primitivem Hämoglobin gab, von dem es Abweichungen gleichzeitig mit der generellen evolutionären Verzweigung der Arten gegeben hat. Nun, soweit habe ich nur über die Moleküle des Hämoglobins und Myoglobins als repräsentative Proteinmoleküle gesprochen. Wir dürfen nicht vergessen, dass diese Moleküle auch eine spezielle Funktion haben, nämlich Sauerstoff zu tragen. Und wir könnten fragen, wie dieser Sauerstoff in diesen Molekülen transportiert wird. Nun, ich erwähnte, dass der Sauerstoff auf dem Eisenatom der Hämgruppe getragen wird. Und ich denke, man kann etwas von dem zentralen Problem sehen, das wir hier zu lösen versuchen, da wir jetzt anfangen, die Funktion des Proteinmoleküls zu diskutieren. Das zentrale Problem ist, wie das in diesem Fall veranschaulicht werden kann, indem wir fragen, wie dieser Sauerstoff transportiert wird. Man sieht, dass man die Hämgruppe vom Protein entfernen kann. Man kann das Molekül auseinander nehmen, die Polypeptidkette von der Hämgruppe entfernen. Die Hämgruppe an sich ist eine gut bekannte chemische Verbindung. Und was man findet ist, dass es, wenn die Hämgruppe getrennt ist, nicht diesen Trick des reversiblen Verbindens mit Sauerstoff durchführt. Aber man kann es in das Protein zurückbringen, und dann sind seine Eigenschaften irgendwie geändert, so dass es sich jetzt reversibel mit Sauerstoff verbindet. Und die Frage ist, wie passiert das? Und das ist natürlich ein weiterer Grund, um die Struktur eines Moleküls wie Myoglobin zu bestimmen, weil mit dieser Struktur die theoretischen Chemiker etwas Konkretes haben, mit dem sie versuchen können, diesen Prozess der Sauerstoffanlagerung zu verstehen. Tatsächlich kann man vielleicht versuchen, ein Modellsystem zu konstruieren. Vor einigen Jahren, bevor wir diese Myoglobinstruktur zur Verfügung hatten, vor einigen Jahren entschied Dr. Wang in den Vereinigten Staaten zu versuchen, künstliches Hämoglobin herzustellen, eine Art Ersatzhämoglobin. Und was er tat, war, gar kein Protein zu nehmen, er nahm nur die Hämgruppen, er gliederte diese Hämgruppen an diese Aminosäuren an, die Histidine genannt werden. Ich erwähnte früher, dass die Hämgruppe durch Histidin an dem Protein in Hämoglobin befestigt ist. Er nahm also die Hämgruppe und Histidin und bettete diesen Komplex aus Hämgruppe und Histidin in eine Matrix aus Polystyrol ein. Das heißt, ein synthetisches Polymer. Er wählte dies, weil er aus verschiedenen theoretischen Gründen, die wir nicht betrachten müssen, dachte, dass das Geheimnis sein könnte, die Hämgruppe in ein Medium niedriger Dielektrizitätskonstante zu bringen. So brachte er die Hämgruppen in Polystyrol ein. Er fand heraus, dass, wenn sie dort einmal waren, würden sie sich tatsächlich reversibel mit Sauerstoff verbinden. Er hatte tatsächlich eine Art von künstlichem Hämoglobin gebaut. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Hier ist ein Teil der Myoglobinstruktur, hier ist die Hämgruppe, und sie sehen, es stellt sich nun heraus, dass Dr. Wangs Modell sehr gut war, weil die Hämgruppe in Myoglobin und Hämoglobin mit einem Histidin hier angebunden ist. Ein weiteres Histidin dort, dieses entspricht dem Wangmodell und außerdem ist die Hämgruppe auf allen Seiten von einer großen Zahl unpolarer Reste umgeben. Hier ist ein Phenylalanin, hier ein weiteres Phenylalanin und hier ist, denke ich, ein Valin und das sieht für mich wie ein Leucin aus. Und so weiter, man kann ganz herum gehen. Man findet, dass es eine unpolare Umgebung ist, mit anderen Worten, elektrisch gesprochen ist es ein Medium mit niedriger Dielektrizitätskonstante. Wangs Modell war daher ein gutes Modell und es funktioniert. Was wir natürlich nun tun müssen, oder was die theoretischen Chemiker tun müssen, ist, diese Struktur im Detail zu nehmen und zu verstehen, warum, wenn man diese Hämgruppe in diese komplizierte Umgebung gibt, wie genau sie sich erfolgreich und reversibel mit Sauerstoff vereinigt. Und tatsächlich ist die Geschichte ein wenig komplizierter als ich Ihnen erzählt habe, weil die Art, wie sich Hämoglobin und Myoglobin mit Sauerstoff vereinigen, ziemlich unterschiedlich ist. Wenn man eine Kurve zeichnet, wo man die Sauerstoffmenge, die aufgenommen wird, gegen den Sauerstoffdruck aufträgt, dann findet man für Myoglobin solch eine Kurve, eine Hyperbel, das würde man für ein Molekül mit einer einzelnen Hämgruppe erwarten, ein einzelnes Eisenatom, das sich mit einem Sauerstoffmolekül vereinigt. Das ist also, was man für Myoglobin bekommt, aber für Hämoglobin bekommt man eine andere Kurve, die Kurve hat jetzt eine S-Form. Und vom Standpunkt des Physikochemikers bedeutet das, dass diese Kurve sich von jener unterscheidet. Wie Sie sehen, bedeutet dies, dass sich für jeden angenommenen Sauerstoffdruck an dem Hämoglobinmolekül pro Hämgruppe weniger Sauerstoff befindet als an dem Myoglobinmolekül. Das bedeutet, dass es irgendeine Wechselwirkung zwischen den verschiedenen Hämgruppen an dem Hämoglobinmolekül gibt. Es ist, als ob der erste Sauerstoff, der in das Hämoglobinmolekül geht, es irgendwie einfacher für die anderen 3 Sauerstoffmoleküle macht, sich später anzuhängen. Nummer 1, das sich am Hämoglobin anhängt, macht es einfacher für die Nummern 2, 3 und 4 sich anzuhängen. Und wir könnten uns fragen, wie diese Wechselwirkung erzielt wird, es ist überhaupt nicht offensichtlich, wie das erreicht wird, wenn wir uns Max Perutz Modell anschauen. Sie erinnern sich vielleicht, dass die Hämgruppen sich in kleinen Taschen außen am Hämoglobinmolekül befinden, sie sind sehr weit voneinander entfernt. Und vor kurzem konnte Perutz wenigstens ein wenig davon zu zeigen, wie dies passiert, weil er die Struktur des Hämoglobins mit Sauerstoff und die Struktur des Hämoglobins ohne Sauerstoff verglichen hat. Und er fand, dass sie sich ein wenig voneinander unterscheiden. Was passiert ist, dass das Molekül wirklich seine Größe ändert, wenn der Sauerstoff dazu kommt. Man könnte vielleicht erwarten, dass das Molekül größer wird, wenn der Sauerstoff dazu kommt, weil man jetzt das Protein plus vier Sauerstoffmoleküle hat. In Wirklichkeit ist es gerade umgekehrt: der Sauerstoff geht ins Hämoglobin, das Molekül wird kleiner. Es ist eine Art Atmen des Moleküls, aber rückwärts; Atmen ist, wenn wir Sauerstoff in unsere Lungen aufnehmen und unser Brustkorb größer wird; man könnte also erwarten, dass es passend wäre, wenn das atmende Molekül wie ein Mensch atmet. Aber das Molekül macht es umgekehrt, wenn der Sauerstoff hineingeht, wird das Molekül kleiner. Und so passiert es: wir haben diese 4 Ketten angeordnet, Perutz hat gezeigt, dass während der Sauerstoff hineingeht, diese Ketten sich relativ zu einander in einer speziellen Weise bewegen. So dass sie, wenn der Sauerstoff da ist, ein wenig näher beieinander sind. Und offensichtlich, die Wechselwirkung zwischen den 4 Ketten, die diese Änderung der Sauerstoffaufnahmekurve produziert, diese Wechselwirkung muss irgendwie mit dem Atmen des Moleküls zusammenhängen, die Art und Weise, wie die Ketten sich relativ zu einander bewegen. Und hier gibt es wieder eine Gelegenheit für die Theoretiker, den Prozess zu verstehen. Nun, ich habe versucht, Ihnen in diesem Vortrag etwas über die Struktur dieser Moleküle zu erklären, und ich habe insbesondere versucht, Ihnen zu erzählen, dass das Verständnis der Struktur uns nicht die Antworten auf alle Fragen gegeben hat, die wir verstehen wollen. Auf eine Weise hat das Wissen, wie die Struktur aussieht, die Fragen schwieriger erscheinen lassen. Wir hatten dieses Problem, wie das Molekül sich zusammenfaltet, wie wird diese spezifische Struktur bestimmt. Wir wissen es nicht. Wir haben diese Frage, wie die Eigenschaften der Hämgruppe sich ändern, wenn sie in ein Proteinmolekül gehen, ändern, so dass die Sauerstoffvereinigung, die reversible Vereinigung, überhaupt stattfindet. Und wir wissen es nicht, außer sehr allgemein. Und schließlich haben wir diese Frage über die besondere Anordnung im Hämoglobin. Wie kommt es, dass die Form jener Kurve durch die Tatsache bestimmt wird, dass das Molekül, wenn der Sauerstoff ins Molekül geht, seine Form ändert? Damit ist das Gebiet der Proteinstruktur keineswegs ein abgeschlossenes Kapitel, tatsächlich sind wir eigentlich erst am Anfang. Ich denke, man kann die Situation zusammenfassen, indem man sagt, wir sind jetzt zum ersten Mal in der Lage, einen ernsthaften Versuch zu unternehmen, einige der Fragen zu beantworten, die für die Genetiker, die Biochemiker von Interesse sind. Wir sind in der Lage, diese Fragen zu beantworten, aber in der Realität sind diese Fragen bis jetzt nicht beantwortet worden. Danke. Applaus.

John Kendrew in Search of the Road From Sequence to Structure
(00:31:48 - 00:37:31)

The hypothesis Kendrew refers to at the end of this cutting, stems from the work of Christian Anfinsen. In investigations on the enzyme ribonuclease in the 1950s, Anfinsen demonstrated that all information needed to fold up a protein is encoded within its amino acid sequence. No further genetic information than that found in DNA is needed to form a three-dimensional protein. The driving force of correct protein folding is the tendency of each system to assume a state of minimum energy. The native state of a protein represents the thermodynamically most stable conformation in the intracellular environment, and it reaches this state via a funnel of decreasing energy. Nevertheless, it remains a remarkable paradox, as Cyrus Levinthal noted in 1969, that a protein folds within less than a second while it theoretically would need many billion years to try out all its conformational possibilities. A relatively small protein with 100 amino acids and one rotatable bond per residue with two favored orientations, for example, has two to the power of 100 possibilities to fold. Even if it checked 100 billion different conformations per second, it would need 100 billion years to probe all of them. While a lot of progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of protein folding and the connections between incorrect folding and disease, it is still not possible today to predict the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence. The situation appears to be even more complicated because we know today a multitude of post-translational modifications, which can influence the structure of proteins and thereby modulate their activity considerably.

Christian Anfinsen participated in the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings six times. In his talk „Peptide Synthesis - a Useful Tool in the Study of Protein Structures and Function“ he briefly looked back on the work that had earned him a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1972:

Christian Anfinsen on the Problem of Protein Folding
(00:03:06 - 00:04:38)

A Decisive Molecular Switch
The interaction of folded proteins needs to be constantly controlled and regulated to ensure that a cell functions properly. The activity of proteins can be switched on or off by adding or subtracting phosphate. This reversible protein phosphorylation arguably is the most important mechanism of cellular regulation. It was discovered by Edmond Fischer and Edwin Krebs, when they studied glycogen phosphorylase. The role of this enzyme had been identified by Carl and Gerti Cori (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1947) in the 1930s: It catalyzes the first step in the degradation of glycogen in the muscle and the liver, a reaction that needs to be turned on very quickly if energy is needed. Krebs had been a student of the Cori’s in St. Louis, and Fischer had been a student of Kurt H. Meyer, a European pioneer of enzymology, in Geneva. Both met at the University of Washington in Seattle in the mid-50s, shared a lab, and decided to have a crack at a problem the Coris had raised but later abandoned: Does glycogen phosphorylase need adenosine monophosphate (AMP) as a co-factor to get activated? While the general role of AMP in the allosteric regulation of enzymes was elucidated some years later by Jacques Monod (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1965), Fischer and Krebs discovered the covalent regulation of enzymes. Glycogen phosphorylase gets activated when covalently binding a phosphate, with the catalytic help of a specialized enzyme, a kinase. The fundamental importance of this discovery was not immediately apparent, so that Fischer and Krebs had to wait some decades before they received their well deserved Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1992. In the meantime, it had become clear that phosphorylating kinases and dephosphorylating phosphates are abundant in living cells to steer intricate networks of intracellular communication by amplifying, fine-tuning and integrating signals, influencing many aspects of cellular behavior from glucose mobilization to oncogenesis. More than one third of the many thousands different proteins, which are active in an average mammalian cell, are phosphorylated at any given time.[4] Edmond Fischer has been an almost regular participant of the Lindau Meetings since he received the Nobel Prize. He first came to Lindau in 1993 and gave a detailed account of his discovery in his lecture „Cellular Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation“. In 2003, he presented his field of research in the broader context of „How Proteins Communicate with one Another to Integrate Cellular Signals”, emphasizing the importance of understanding the proteome:

Edmond Fischer (2003) - How Proteins Communicate with One Another to Integrate Intracellular Signals

Our paths seem to merge at many, many times and I know Hans for many, many years. My only objection is he called me Doctor or Professor Fischer, why don’t you call me Eddie like anybody else. Well yesterday at our round table, several of us mentioned signalling. And this will be the subject of my talk today. By signalling we understand the very complex series of reactions that induce a cell to grow, to develop different shapes and eventually to die, in answer to many external and internal signals. A cell in the body is exposed to a multitude of signals that it has to integrate into a coherent response. And to do that pathways have to speak with one another, to communicate with one another, to coordinate, to synchronise all the reactions that take place and so that the pathways can carry out their specific functions. Now this subject belongs to the field of proteomics which so to speak represents the other side of the coin of genomics. And you all have heard a lot about genomics in connection with the human genome project. And there is no question that the essential completion of the human genome. And the unravelling of the genetic make-up of many dozen organisms now represents an achievement of enormous proportion. One that will change biology by changing the way we are thinking about various problems. And that will affect the future of biomedicine and medicine in general. Nonetheless it is also clear that the accumulation of these huge amounts of DNA-based information can only take us so far. The genome can predict the entire set of proteins that an organism can potentially produce. But it cannot take into consideration the enormous diversification of structure, of gene structure such as gene insertion or switching or recombination. Other kind of rearrangements as seen for instance in the immune system where less than 1,000 genes, V(D)J genes can potentially give rise to more than 500 million proteins. It cannot account for the co-transcriptional or transcriptional modification such as alternative splicing, the epigenetic changes such as mutations following exposure to radioactivity or chemical carcinogen or processing by limited proteolysis, the 100’s of chemical modifications, glycosylation, methylation, isoprenylation, …, 100’s of these. And therefore even if one disregards totally the immune system that has evolved precisely to produce structural diversity, there are far more proteins in the proteome than there are genes in the genome, contrary to the genome which represents a sort of a fixed entity. A problem with a finite end point more or less. The proteome is constantly in a state of flux, changing constantly with the stage of development, the growth of the cell and even with environmental factors. And finally the genome cannot tell us how proteins interact with one another through adaptor proteins, through scaffolding proteins, anchoring proteins, to produce those huge complexes that actually characterise their function. They can’t tell us the signals that will send a protein to the membrane or the ER or the Golgi. To transport in and out of the nucleus which I'm sure Günter Blobel will discuss later, or the signals that will target a protein for destruction at the appropriate time. And of course it won’t tell us anything about the mechanism by which enzymes are regulated. And this is what I want to focus on, regulation by protein phosphorylation. Because we know today that this is probably the most prevalent mechanism by which cellular events are affected. And indeed protein phosphorylation is involved at just about any aspect of cell behaviour, control of metabolism, transcription, translation, immune response, transformation and so forth. Now most of these phosphorylation reactions at least quantitatively occur on serine and threonine. But one of the great excitements in this area was the discovery just 25 years ago that phosphorylation on tyrosine was intimately implicated in transformation and oncogenicity, bringing into play a variety of tyrosine kinases, of cellular and viral origin, or linked to receptor for mitogenic hormones and growth factors. And since the latter represents some of the important molecules by which external signals are received, let me tell you a little bit about these. We know now I think to date about 59 different growth factor receptors. That can be divided in about, oh I think 20 subcategories. They all have the same architecture, a single trans-membrane segment that separates the catalytic activity inside tyrosine kinase, and then on the outside a great variety of structural motifs. That will allow specific binding of the ligand, cysteine rich domains that you find on the EGF or everywhere, those immunoglobulin-like domains, EGF-like, cadherin-like, factor 8, kringles, leucine protein rich - A great variety of domains that would give the specific character to those receptors. Most of the ligands are circulating hormones even though the FGF requires a protein such as heparin to bind. And then except for the F family, this is the largest family of receptors that recognise membrane bound ligands and they are concentrated on, if not exclusively found in the neuronal system where they play an important role in communication by regulating cell migration and axonal path finding and so forth. We begin to understand now how signal is transduced down from those receptors. In the resting state they are separated from one another and inactive. Upon binding of a ligand, for instance EGF, they dimerise and immediately undergo transphosphorylation. And then a signal is transduced by virtue of the fact that those tyrosine phosphate groups can recognise small modules, in this case called SH2, that stands for Src-homology 2 domain, that have a high affinity for tyrosine phosphate group. Not any but within a specific sequence. So before that those adaptor molecules are let’s say free in the cytoplast and they are recruited upon phosphorylation of the receptor. And then the change in conformation in that adaptor, that stands for growth factor receptor bound, described by Joseph Schlessinger. The change in conformation allow other modules, now the SH3 module, to bind to the next elements because it recognises prolene rich region. And then this binds to the next element and then triggers now a cascade of reaction. So this system now would allow a receptor to communicate with a protein far away, under conditions where it would have no other way to communicate. As you see communication is practically mechanical. Proteins interlock with one another like if one were dealing with a tinker toy or Lego type of assemblage. And this interlocking of protein guarantees that only the right protein will be drawn into a particular pathway and guarantees the fidelity of the transcription system. And today 100’s of those kind of modules have been identified by comparative sequence analysis. And they are found on a plethora of adaptor proteins, regulatory proteins, transcription factors and so forth. And I just want to mention, bring up a few of them. You have the SH2, Src-homology 2, I just mentioned that recognises tyrosine phosphate. SH3 that recognises prolene rich region. WW, it’s a domain sandwiched between 2 tryptophan, approximately 27, 30 residue long. That also recognise prolene blobs but of a different sequence and also recognise serine phosphate. The PH domain for pleckstrin homology domain, its principle role is not protein-protein interaction but it recognises anionic head groups on phospholipid, on phosphoinositide such as PIP2, PIP3. And it also recognises G protein and in this case plays an important role in chemotaxis. The PTB domain for phosphotyrosine bound also recognises phosphotyrosine bound but in a totally different way than the SH2. And it recognises particularly this NPXY module. And it has a very high affinity for upstream sequences. So it will bind even when the tyrosine is not phosphorylated. And then the PDZ domain is probably one of the most important domains for protein-protein interaction. And it recognises hydrophobic C termini, hydrophobic C termini, usually valine or isoleucine and also some very, some beta fingers, very sharp beta fingers that mimic in fact the C terminal segment. And those motifs can either be in different proteins or in the same protein so that PDZ can undergo head to tail oligomerisation. And that is its main characters. I will come back to that. The possibility of forming strings of PDZ domain to cluster, to organise receptors and ion channels. So let me now rapidly give you some schematic examples how some of those modules function. The SH2 domain has been found now in more than 100 proteins and they are usually found in adaptor proteins like RAB 2, this is an analogue. And they usually bind to activated receptor. And in most of these you have several SH3 domains which would allow those adaptors to latch on to different proteins in a signalling pathway. But the SH2 domain can play another and very important role. It can serve as a conformational switch. Many enzymes and this is the case of all the Src kinases, contain a tyrosine phosphate that serves as a negative determinant. So the SH2 domain can bind with it and therefore shield the catalytic site. Or in other cases the SH2 domain can bind to an inhibitory domain that again serve as a negative determinant. So in this form those enzymes are inactive, this is the case of the SIP enzyme and some tyrosine phosphatases. In this case, activation occurs when a specific tyrosine phosphatase knocks out this phosphate group and therefore the molecule opens, frees the catalytic site, or when that enzyme comes into contact of another molecule that has a higher affinity for the SH2 domain. So the SH2 domain switches its allegiance from the enzyme, let’s say to the receptor, in this case. So you see the SH2 is, can be considered as an internal conformational switch, just like the phosphate group can function as an external molecular switch to activate or inhibit the enzymes. The main function of the PH domain and this has been found now in about 500 different protein is to bind the molecules to the membrane and to serve the same function as a myristoyl or as a palmitoyl group. And you find these in substrates, for instance for the fibroblast growth factor or the insulin substrate IRS1234. Those molecules have usually a large string of tyrosine residue. And they serve as annex binding, anchoring, annex docking sites for molecules that have SH2 domain. So the way it works, when you activate for instance the insulin receptor, it recruits its substrate to the membrane. The PTB domain slaps it against the receptor and the receptor immediately phosphorylates many of the tyrosine residue and triggers signalling, down signalling. The importance of the PH domain in this reaction can be seen in a kinase, the bruton kinase, BTK, that plays an important role in B cell development and signalling. A single point mutation in the PH domain, argenine to cysteine mutation, interferes with its binding to the membrane and causes gross functional aberrations resulting in X-linked agammaglobulinemia simply by not being able to recruit that kinase to the membrane. The PDZ domain, as I said, owes its characteristic to the fact that it can form chains, multiple copies on a chain, MAGUK stands for membrane associated protein with one elate kinase-like. They don’t have any quanylate kinase activity. But here is the post-synaptic density protein PSD95 from which PDZ gets its name, InaD protein that I’ll discuss, so, a large number of proteins that all have the sort of a modular structure. And let me show you, taken from the literature, some schematic examples, how these function. PSD95, its two PDZ domains combine to subunits of the NMDA receptor for instance and dimerise the channel. And another PDZ domain, I think it’s the second one as a matter of fact, can also form a heterodimeric liaison with a PDZ domain of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase. It’s an enzyme that requires calcium calmodulin for activity. So localisation now of the synthase with a channel and the synthase is as I said a calcium calmodulin requiring enzyme. Localisation of the two together will bring about the very efficient production of nitric oxide, following calcium entry. InaD has a 5 PDZ domain, no catalytic activity and its main function again is to cluster many enzymes in the phototransducing, the drosophila phototransducing system. The human homologue has eight of those PDZ domains. So upon activation of the system by a photon through the G protein, there’s an activation at PLC beta. And this produces diacylglycerol and calcium that will now activate this tranchant receptor potential calcium channel and bring about calcium entry and cell depolarisation. And the reverse reaction, the deactivation process, is a calcium dependent reaction that involves PKC, an I-specific protein kinase C, calmodulin, arrestin, a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. But by clustering all those proteins together, you have a huge amplification of the system. To such an extent that activation of rhodopsin by a single photon will bring about the activation of about 100 calcium channels in a millisecond time scale. So this is the importance of putting all those proteins together. Finally PKZ can participate or can serve as a localisation machinery of the cell, in c-elegans for instance three proteins, 2, 7 and 10. Each with its PDZ domain can participate in the transports of receptors, particularly lets 23A tyrosine kinase receptor. So this unit together with some of its targets or some of its additional protein can serve as a cargo to transport proteins inside the cell. The complexity of the regulation of signalling is well demonstrated by P95VAV and this looks like one of those Swiss army knives that can do anything. With all of its domains it can interact with a number of systems. I don’t describe, it is an enzyme, it is a GEF, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor which is always linked with a PH domain. But importantly it has a very hydrophobic region at the N terminus analogous to calponin. Calponin are proteins that regulate smooth muscle contraction. And that calponin like region serves a very negative function because when part of it is deleted, if you chop off the N terminus then VAV becomes oncogenic. And VAV becomes phosphorylated upon receptor activation. It becomes phosphorylated by the fusion protein BCR-Abl, that is implicated in chronic myelogenous leukaemia. Ok so, our chairman tells me that I am exceeding my time. What I wanted to say is that the big problem for the cell is how now does it select among all the things it can do. Because a protein like VAV serves like those roundabouts that you find in traffic that can send cars in every direction. And this is a big difficulty for the cell. And it can only do that when it receives a signal from the outside, when many receptors collaborate together, speak with one another, generating a combinatorial type of response. So this is some of the things that we know about signalling but where do we go from there? I mean what are the important problems that we have to solve? We know several of the important signalling pathways. We have characterised the elements of those pathways. We know their structure, we know their function. But these molecules are only the words that a cell uses to bring about, to modify its behaviour. We know some of those words, we know bits and pieces of sentences they use but we don’t know the language a cell has to use to synchronise, to coordinate all the reactions that take place. Furthermore through 3½ billions of evolution the cells have had all the time in the world to establish some secondary pathways, parallel pathways, a chance, feedback reactions to regulate their growth, to protect them against adversity or to plan their death. And much more importantly, we don’t know the language cells speak with cells. And this has been absolutely crucial in the establishment of those very complex networks of information as you see during embryonic morphogenesis. That you see in the immune system. And the infinitely more complex central nervous system where 1,000million cells speak with one another through something like a million billion synapses to finally establish the generation of memory and thought and consciousness. And as Erwin Neher said yesterday, this will be one of the main challenges that the biologists will have to solve in the years to come. Thank you for your attention. Applause.

Unsere Wege scheinen sich immer wieder zu kreuzen und ich kenne Hans seit vielen, vielen Jahren. Ich habe nur einen Einwand: Warum nennt er mich Doktor oder Professor Fischer? Nenn mich doch einfach Eddie, wie es jeder hier tut. Gestern an unserem Runden Tisch haben mehrere das Thema Signalübertragung angesprochen. Und das ist auch das Thema meines heutigen Vortrags. Unter Signalübertragung verstehen wir die sehr komplexe Abfolge von Reaktionen, die eine Zelle veranlasst, als Antwort auf die vielen externen und internen Signale zu wachsen, unterschiedliche Formen zu entwickeln und schließlich zu sterben. Jede Körperzelle ist einer Vielzahl von Signalen ausgesetzt, die sie in Form einer kohärenten Antwort integrieren muss. Und dazu muss zwischen den einzelnen Signalwegen eine Kommunikation erfolgen und müssen alle stattfindenden Reaktionen so koordiniert und synchronisiert werden, dass die Signalpfade ihre jeweils spezifischen Funktionen ausüben können. Dieses Thema ist in das Gebiet der Proteomik einzuordnen, das sozusagen die andere Seite der Medaille der Genomik repräsentiert. Und Sie alle haben in Verbindung mit dem Humangenom-Projekt schon viel von der Genomik gehört. Und zweifelsohne stellt die wesentliche Entschlüsselung des menschlichen Genoms und des Erbguts vieler Dutzender von Organismen heute eine Leistung in enormer Dimension dar - eine Leistung, die die Biologie verändern wird, indem sie die Art und Weise wandeln wird, wie wir über verschiedene Probleme denken. Und das wirkt sich dann auf die Zukunft der Biomedizin und der Medizin grundsätzlich aus. Dennoch ist wohl auch klar, dass die Akkumulation dieser riesigen Mengen von DNA-basierten Informationen uns nur insoweit voranbringt, als genom-basierte Vorhersagen der gesamten potenziellen Protein-Ausstattung möglich sind, die von einem Organismus produziert werden kann. Nicht berücksichtigt wird dabei aber die enorme Diversifizierung der Struktur, der Genstruktur, wie beispielsweise der Gen-Einbau oder das An- und Abschalten von Genen oder die Gen-Rekombination oder andere Arten von Gen-Umlagerungen, wie sie beispielsweise im Immunsystem vorkommen, wo weniger als 1.000 Gene, V(D)J-Gene, mehr als 500 Millionen Proteine initiieren können. Nicht berücksichtigt werden ko-transkriptionale oder transkriptionale Modifikationen, wie beispielsweise das so genannte alternative Splicen, epigenetische Veränderungen - etwa Mutationen nach Belastung durch Radioaktivität oder chemikalische Karzinogene - oder eine Verarbeitung durch limitierte Proteolyse, mehrere Hundert chemische Modifikationen, Glykosylierung, Methylierung, Isoprenylierung ... Hunderte solcher Vorgänge. Selbst wenn man das Immunsystem, das sich akribisch entwickelt hat, um strukturelle Diversität zu erzeugen, vollkommen außer Acht lässt, gibt es wesentlich mehr Proteine im Proteom als Gene im Genom, das im Gegensatz dazu eine Art feststehende Einheit darstellt - mehr oder weniger ein Problem des finiten Endes. Das Proteom ist kontinuierlich im Wandel begriffen, verändert sich mit dem Stadium der Entwicklung, dem Wachstum der Zelle und sogar durch den Einfluss von Umweltfaktoren laufend. Und schließlich kann uns das Genom nicht verraten, wie Proteine über Adapterproteine, über Netzwerkproteine, über Ankerproteine miteinander interagieren, um diese riesigen Komplexe zu erzeugen, die faktisch ihre Funktionsweise charakterisieren. Es kann uns nichts über die Signale verraten, die ein Protein an die Membran oder das endoplasmatische Retikulum (ER) oder den Golgi-Apparat für den Transport in den Kern und aus dem Kern heraus versendet, worüber - da bin ich sicher - Günter Blobel später berichten wird, oder über die Signale, die sich auf ein Protein richten, um es zum richtigen Zeitpunkt zu zerstören. Und natürlich sagt uns das Genom auch nichts über den Mechanismus, durch den Enzyme reguliert werden. Und das ist das, worauf ich mich konzentrieren möchte: die Regulierung durch Proteinphosphorylierung. Denn wir wissen heute, dass dies der wahrscheinlich am häufigsten vorkommende Mechanismus ist, der für zelluläre Vorgänge verantwortlich ist. Und tatsächlich spielt die Proteinphosphorylierung bei fast jedem Aspekt im Zellverhalten eine Rolle, bei der Stoffwechselsteuerung, Transkription, Translation, Immunreaktion, Transformation usw. Und die meisten dieser Phosphorylierungsreaktionen basieren zumindest quantitativ auf Serin und Threonin. Aber eine der größten Überraschungen auf diesem Gebiet war die vor gerade einmal 25 Jahren gemachte Entdeckung, dass die Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin eng mit Transformationsprozessen und Onkogenität verknüpft ist, wobei eine Vielzahl von Tyrosinkinasen ins Spiel kommt, die zellulären und viralen Ursprungs sind oder mit dem Rezeptor für mitogene Hormone und Wachstumsfaktoren verbunden sind. Und weil Letzterer einige der bedeutenden Moleküle repräsentiert, über die externe Signale empfangen werden, möchte ich ein paar Worte dazu sagen. Wir kennen heute ungefähr 59 verschiedene Wachstumsfaktorrezeptoren, die sich in ungefähr 20 Unterkategorien unterteilen lassen. Und sie haben alle die gleiche Architektur, ein Einzeltransmembran-Segment, das die katalytische Aktivität innen, Tyrosinkinase, separiert und dann gibt es außen eine große Vielzahl von strukturellen Bindungsmotiven. Das ermöglicht die spezielle Liganden-Bindung, cysteinreiche Domänen, die man auf dem EGF oder anderswo findet, diese immunoglobulin-ähnlichen Domänen, EGF-artig, Cadherin-artig, Faktor 8, Kringel, leucin-reiches Protein - eine große Vielzahl von Domänen, die diesen Rezeptoren einen speziellen Charakter verleihen. Die meisten Liganden sind zirkulierende Hormone, wenn auch der FGF ein Protein wie Heparin zur Bindung benötigt. Und mit Ausnahme der F-Familie ist dies die größte Rezeptorenfamilie, die membrangebundene Liganden erkennt. Und sie konzentrieren sich auf das neuronale System, wenn sie nicht sogar ausschließlich dort anzutreffen sind, wo sie durch Regulierung der Zellwanderung und der axonalen Signalpfadfindung usw. eine bedeutende Rolle in der Kommunikation spielen. Sie können sich jetzt vielleicht vorstellen, wie Signale von diesen Rezeptoren abwärts übertragen werden. Im Ruhezustand sind sie voneinander getrennt und inaktiv. Bei Bindung eines Liganden, beispielsweise EGF, vereinigen sie sich und durchlaufen sofort eine Transphosphorylierung. Und dann wird quasi aufgrund der Tatsache, dass diese Tyrosinphosphatgruppen kleine Module erkennen können, ein Signal übertragen, in diesem Fall als SH2 bezeichnet, was für src-homology 2-Domäne steht, die eine hohe Affinität zur Tyrosinphosphatgruppe aufweisen. Das gilt innerhalb einer spezifischen Sequenz. Vorher sind diese Adaptermoleküle sozusagen frei im Zytoplast und werden über die Phosphorylierung des Rezeptors rekrutiert. Die Konformationsänderung in dem Adapter, der für die Wachstumsfaktorrezeptorenbindung steht, wie von Joseph Schlessinger beschrieben, ermöglicht es dann anderen Modulen, in diesem Fall dem SH3-Modul, sich an die nächsten Elemente anzudocken, weil es eine prolen-reiche Region erkennt. Und dieses bindet sich dann an das nächste Element und löst eine Reaktionskaskade aus. Dieses System würde nun einem Rezeptor die Kommunikation mit einem weit entfernten Protein unter Verhältnissen ermöglichen, unter denen es keine anderen Kommunikationsmöglichkeiten gibt. Wie Sie sehen, verläuft die Kommunikation praktisch mechanisch. Die Proteine verzahnen sich miteinander, als ob man es mit dem Zusammenbau von Tinkertoy-Elementen oder lego-artigen Bausteinen zu tun hätte. Und diese Verzahnung des Proteins gewährleistet, dass nur das richtige Protein in einen speziellen Signalpfad gezogen wird. Dadurch wird die Fidelität des Übertragungssystems gewährleistet. Und bis heute wurden durch die vergleichende Sequenzanalyse Hunderte solcher Modularten identifiziert. Und sie sind in einer Fülle von Adapterproteinen, regulierenden Proteinen, Transkriptionsfaktoren usw. zu finden. Ich möchte hier nur einige erwähnen. Es gibt die SH2-Domäne (src-homology 2), von der ich gerade gesprochen habe, die das Tyrosinphosphat erkennt, die SH3-Domäne, die die prolen-reiche Region erkennt, WW, eine Domäne zwischen zwei Tryptophanen, ungefähr 27, 30 Distanzen lang, die ebenfalls Prolen-Blobs, aber mit einer anderen Sequenz, und außerdem Serin-Phosphat erkennt. Die Hauptfunktion der PH-Domäne (Pleckstrin-Homologie-Domäne), ist nicht die Protein-Protein-Interaktion, sondern das Erkennen von anionischen Kopfgruppen auf Phosphorlipid, auf Phosphorinositid, wie PIP2, PIP3. Sie erkennt auch das G-Protein und spielt diesbezüglich eine wichtige Rolle in der Chemotaxis. Die PTB-Domäne (Phosphotyrosin-Bindung) erkennt die Phosphotyrosin-Bindung, aber auf eine komplett andere Weise als die SH2-Domäne. Sie erkennt speziell dieses NPXY-Modul und hat eine sehr starke Affinität zu Upstream-Sequenzen. Es kommt also auch zur Bindung, wenn das Tyrosin nicht phosphoryliert ist. Und die PDZ-Domäne ist wahrscheinlich eine der wichtigsten Domänen für die Protein-Protein-Interaktion. Sie erkennt hydrophobe C-Termini, üblicherweise Valin oder Isoleucin und auch einige Beta-Finger, sehr scharfe Beta-Finger, die faktisch das C-Endsegment nachahmen. Und diese Bindungsmotive können sich entweder in verschiedenen Proteinen oder im selben Protein befinden, sodass die PDZ-Domäne einer Kopf-Fuß-Oligomerisierung unterliegen kann. Und das ist ihr Hauptcharakter. Ich werde auf diese Möglichkeit, Stränge von PDZ-Domänen zu Gruppen zu formieren, um Rezeptoren und Ionenkanäle zu organisieren, noch zurückkommen. Ich möchte Ihnen jetzt rasch anhand von Beispielen veranschaulichen, wie einige dieser Module funktionieren. Die SH2-Domäne wurde inzwischen in über 100 Proteinen gefunden, und zwar üblicherweise in Adapterproteinen wie RAB 2, das ist ein Analogon. Und sie binden üblicherweise an aktivierte Rezeptoren. Und bei den meisten sind mehrere SH3-Domänen vorhanden, die es solchen Adaptern ermöglichen, sich in einem Signalpfad bei verschiedenen Proteinen einzuklinken. Die SH2-Domäne kann aber auch noch eine andere, sehr wichtige Rolle übernehmen, nämlich als Konformationsschalter dienen. Viele Enzyme (und alle Src-Kinasen) enthalten ein Tyrosin-Phosphat, das als negative Determinante dient. Die SH2-Domäne kann sich damit verbinden und deshalb die katalytische Bindungsstelle abschirmen. Oder die SH2-Domäne kann in anderen Fällen an eine inhibitorische Domäne binden, die wiederum als negative Determinante dient. In dieser Form sind diese Enzyme also inaktiv. Dies ist der Fall beim SIP-Enzym und einigen Tyrosin-Phosphatasen. Eine Aktivierung erfolgt dann, wenn ein spezielles Tyrosin-Phosphat diese Phosphatgruppe lahmlegt und sich deshalb das Molekül öffnet, die katalytische Bindungsstelle frei macht oder dieses Enzym dann in Kontakt mit einem anderen Molekül kommt, das eine höhere Affinität für diese SH2-Domäne aufweist. Die SH2-Domäne richtet also sozusagen ihre Loyalität in diesem Fall statt auf das Enzym auf den Rezeptor. Man kann das SH2 also als internen Konformationsschalter betrachten, so wie die Phosphatgruppe als externer molekularer Schalter fungieren kann, um die Enzyme zu aktivieren oder zu hemmen. Die Hauptfunktion der PH-Domäne - und dies hat sich jetzt in über 500 verschiedenen Proteinen bestätigt - besteht darin, die Moleküle an die Membran zu binden und die gleiche Funktion wie eine Myristoyl- oder Palmitoyl-Gruppe zu erfüllen. Und diese findet man in Substraten, beispielsweise dem Fibroplast-Wachstumsfaktor oder dem Insulinsubstrat IRS1234. Diese Moleküle haben üblicherweise einen großen Tyrosinrest-Strang. Und sie dienen als Anhangsbindungs-, Verankerungs-, Anhangsandockstellen für Moleküle, die eine SH2-Domäne aufweisen. Wenn man also beispielsweise den Insulinrezeptor aktiviert, führt er sein Substrat an die Membran heran. Die PTB-Domäne "klatscht" es an den Rezeptor und der Rezeptor phosphoryliert sofort einen Großteil des Tyrosinrests und löst eine Signalübertragung nach unten aus. Die Bedeutung der PH-Domäne bei dieser Reaktion wird an einer Kinase deutlich, der Bruton-Kinase, BTK, die eine bedeutende Rolle in der B-Zellen-Entwicklung und Signalübertragung spielt. Eine Einzelpunktmutation in der PH-Domäne, die Arginin-zu-Cystein-Mutation, beeinträchtigt deren Bindung an die Membran und verursacht Wachstumsfunktionsaberrationen, die zu einer X-verbundenen Agammaglobulinämie führen, weil diese Kinase einfach nicht an die Membran hergeführt werden kann. Wie ich bereits sagte, verdankt die PDZ-Domäne ihre Charakteristik der Tatsache, dass sie Ketten bilden kann, Mehrfachkopien einer Kette. MAGUK steht für membran-assoziiertes Protein mit Guanylatkinase-artiger Domäne. Diese Proteine weisen keine Guanylatkinaseaktivität auf. Aber hier ist das postsynaptische Dichteprotein PSD95, von dem das PDZ seine Bezeichnung erhalten hat, das InaD-Protein, das ich noch besprechen werde, also eine Vielzahl von Proteinen, die alle eine modulare Struktur aufweisen. Und lassen Sie mich noch die Funktionsweise von einigen schematischen Beispielen aus der Literatur aufzeigen. PSD95, seine beiden PDZ-Domänen schließen sich zu Untereinheiten des NMDA-Rezeptors zusammen und dimerisieren den Kanal. Und eine weitere PDZ-Domäne, ich glaube das ist faktisch die zweite, kann zudem eine heterodimere Verbindung mit einer PDZ-Domäne der neuronalen Stickoxid-Synthase eingehen. Dabei handelt es sich um ein Enzym, das für seine Aktivität Calcium-Calmodulin benötigt. Die Lokalisierung der Synthase mit einem Kanal und der Synthase (die wie ich bereits sagte, ein Enzym ist, das Calcium-Calmodulin benötigt), also die Lokalisierung der beiden zusammen führt nach dem Calciumeintritt zu der sehr effizienten Produktion von Stickoxid. InaD hat eine PDZ5-Domäne, keine katalytische Aktivität. Und auch hier besteht die Hauptfunktion im Clustern vieler Enzyme in der Phototransduktion, dem Drosophila-Phototransduktionssystem. Das menschliche Homolog hat acht solcher PDZ-Domänen. Bei Aktivierung des Systems durch ein Photon über das G-Protein erfolgt also eine Aktivierung bei PLC Beta. Und das führt zur Produktion von Diacylglycerin und Calcium, was wiederum diesen prägnanten Rezeptorpotenzial-Calciumkanal aktiviert und den Calciumeintritt sowie die Zelldepolarisierung auslöst. Und die umgekehrte Reaktion, der Deaktivierungsprozess, ist eine calciumabhängige Reaktion unter Beteiligung von PKC, einer I-spezifische Proteinkinase C, Calmodulin, Arrestin, eine calmodulin-abhängige Proteinkinase. Aber durch das Clustern dieser Proteine wird eine riesige Verstärkung des Systems bewirkt, und zwar in einem solchen Ausmaß, dass die Aktivierung von Rhodopsin durch ein einziges Photon in einem Zeitraum von einer Millisekunde zur Aktivierung von rund 100 Calciumkanälen führt. Das ist also die Bedeutung des Clusterns all dieser Proteine. Und schließlich kann PKZ als Lokalisierungsmaschine der Zelle wirken oder dienen. In C-elegans beispielsweise können drei Proteine, 2, 7 und 10, jeweils mit ihrer PDZ-Domäne an den Rezeptortransporten beteiligt sein, insbesondere beim 23A Tyrosinkinase-Rezeptor. Diese Einheit kann also gemeinsam mit einigen ihrer Ziele oder einem Teil ihres zusätzlichen Proteins als Fracht für den Transport von Proteinen innerhalb der Zelle dienen. Die Komplexität der Regulierung der Signalübertragung lässt sich gut an P95VAV demonstrieren. Das sieht aus wie eines dieser Schweizer Taschenmesser, das für fast alle Funktionen geeignet ist. Mit all seinen Domänen kann es mit einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Systeme interagieren. Ich werde es hier nicht beschreiben, es ist ein Enzym. Es ist ein GEF, ein Guanin-Nukleotid-Austauschfaktor, der immer mit einer PH-Domäne verbunden ist. Aber bedeutenderweise weist es analog zu Calponin eine stark hydrophobe Region am N-Ende auf. Calponine sind Proteine, die die Kontraktion der glatten Muskulatur steuern. Und diese Calponin-artige Region übernimmt eine sehr negative Funktion, weil Vav-Proteine bei Eliminierung eines Teils durch Abtrennung des N-Endes onkogenetisch werden. Und das Vav-Protein wird bei Rezeptoraktivierung phosphoryliert. Es wird durch das Fusionsprotein BCR-Abl phosphoryliert, das man mit der chronischen myeloischen Leukämie (CML) in Verbindung bringt. Ok, gerade gibt mir der Vorsitzende ein Zeichen, dass ich meine Zeit überschreite. Was ich sagen will, ist, dass das große Problem für die Zelle darin besteht, eine Auswahl unter all den Möglichkeiten zu treffen, die sie realisieren könnte, weil ein Protein wie das Vav-Protein ähnlich funktioniert wie diese Kreisverkehre, die Fahrzeuge in jede Richtung weiterleiten können. Und das ist eine große Schwierigkeit für die Zelle. Und sie kann das nur bewältigen, wenn sie von außen ein Signal erhält und wenn viele Rezeptoren zusammenarbeiten, miteinander kommunizieren, eine kombinatorische Art von Reaktion erzeugen. Das sind also einige Aspekte, die wir über die Signalübertragung wissen. Aber wie geht es von da aus weiter? Was sind die wichtigsten Probleme, die wir zu lösen haben? Wir kennen mehrere der bedeutenden Signalwege. Wir haben die Elemente dieser Signalwege charakterisiert. Wir kennen ihre Struktur, wir kennen ihre Funktion. Aber diese Moleküle sind nur die Wörter, die eine Zelle üblicherweise hervorbringt, um ihr Verhalten zu modifizieren. Wir kennen einige dieser Wörter, wir kennen Fragmente und Teile der verwendeten Sätze, aber wir kennen nicht die Sprache, die eine Zelle verwenden muss, um alle erfolgenden Reaktionen zu synchronisieren und zu koordinieren. Und darüber hinaus hatten die Zellen in 3,5 Milliarden Jahren der Evolution alle Zeit der Welt, sekundäre Signalwege, parallele Signalwege, Möglichkeiten und Feedback-Reaktionen zur Regulierung ihres Wachstums, zum Schutz in Notzeiten oder zur Planung ihres Todes zu etablieren. Und noch wichtiger ist vielleicht, dass wir die Sprache nicht kennen, die die Zellen mit anderen Zellen sprechen. Und diese war absolut entscheidend für den Aufbau dieser sehr komplexen Informationsnetzwerke, wie man sie in der embryonalen Morphogenese sieht, wie man sie im Immunsystem sieht - und in dem unendlich komplexeren zentralen Nervensystem, wo 1.000 Millionen Zellen über ungefähr 1.000.000 Milliarden Synapsen miteinander kommunizieren, um letztendlich die Erzeugung des Gedächtnisses und der Gedanken und des Bewusstseins zu bewältigen. Und wie Erwin Neher gestern schon sagte, wird dies eine der wesentlichen Herausforderungen sein, die die Biologen in den kommenden Jahren zu lösen haben. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Edmond Fischer on Regulation by Protein Phosphory- lation
(00:04:10 - 00:06:10)

The Protein Universe
Not all proteins fulfill their tasks within the cytoplasma. Many proteins involved in vital biological functions, such as the transport of nutrients into cells or nerve impulses, span the fatty membranes that surround every cell. Buried within the membrane as they are, these important proteins were long thought to be impossible to access and crystallize for structural studies.
The seemingly impossible was at last achieved by Johann Deisenhofer, Robert Huber and Hartmut Michel in 1986, for which they received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1988. Their breakthrough was all the more important as their target had been the photosynthetic reaction center of a bacterium, and photosynthesis surely is the most important chemical reaction on earth, being the prerequisite of life.
All three Laureates are faithful participants of the Lindau Meetings, where they regularly teach hundreds of young scientists from all over the world to appreciate the achievements and possibilities of protein research. It is interesting to watch Robert Huber explain to the younger generation why it is worth studying proteins in his 2008 lecture on the „Beauty and Usefulness of the Building Blocks of Life: The Architecture of Proteins“, where he also mentions the three major techniques applied in structural studies: electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

Robert Huber (2008) - Beauty and Usefulness of the Building Blocks of Life: The Architecture of Proteins

Good morning. As a chemist in the Lindau physics meeting I decided to speak about basic properties of proteins. Of course, with some apologies to the chemists in the audience. So my focus is different from Hans Deisenhofer's talk but there is a useful overlap and I'm grateful for the arrangement of these 2 lectures in sequence because we both study proteins and mainly use x-ray crystallography. Well the title of my lecture which you see in the program maybe seem problematic because fitness for purpose is objective but beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder and the early protein models which we construct in the late '60's, early 70's, made from wire and screws are barely regarded, can barely be regarded as beautiful. But today we use computer graphics and tricks offered by this technology. But we must be aware of the fact that these models are metaphors yet still they are useful to derive molecular properties and plan new experiments. And if you want then be pleased by their beauty. Now why do we study proteins. Now proteins are the product of a complex series of transcription and translation with enormous increase in complexity. The genome is simple, the proteome complex. Yet the proteome decides about life phenomena. A beautiful illustration of that you see here, the mature butterfly and its larva share the same genome but they are as different as you can imagine. So what are proteins. A few basic facts about their chemistry. They have a defined amino acid sequence. There are 20 natural amino acids of different stereochemistry and electrostatic properties. They are linked by amide peptide linkages. Now despite their construction from often ten thousands of atoms, they have defined structures. They are synthesised as unfolded structure-less chains and then in a sequence of hierarchical events of structure formation they form via secondary structures, tertiary structures, the final quarternary structure which is the functional protein. We now talk about models, then it is quite obvious that the structures became transparent only after very substantial simplification, this is an all atom model of a large protein with about 70,000 atoms, totally in-transparent. So we have to simplify it by just drawing out the polypeptide chain indicating the secondary structures, the helixes, the beta strands. So we can have surface representations to explore the binding potential of the protein and this is the most simplified representation of this 28 sub unit aggregate. Just indicating the arrangement of the sub unit, the architecture. Now we use metaphors as I said already to describe protein structures, so these are propeller structures, there are 6 bladed or 5 bladed propellers. There are barrels with a remarkable similarity to the Castel del Monte in Apulia which share both the molecule and the architect shares the 8 fold rotational symmetry. Strict of course in the case of the human construction and somewhat distorted in the real molecule. Now how do we know, Hans mentioned already there are 3 major techniques, crystallography, the working horse of structural biology. There is electron microscopy which is able to provide views usually at low resolution of very large molecular aggregates. Now what we often do now is disassemble these aggregates, separate the components, crystallise them, look at them at high resolution and then model back the large complex structure, the atomic resolution by fitting the atomic structures into the envelop given by electron microscopy and that is NMR which has the advantage of analysing protein structure resolution, all be it usually of small or medium sized proteins. Now Hans mentioned the major breakthroughs in structural biology but of course it began, crystallography began earlier with Rankin, with Van Laue, with Bragg, with Perutz, all of them Nobel laureates as you know. Now let me just briefly show these, illustrate these major break throughs which led to modern structural biology, crystallography. This is a museum Rankin's x-ray generator. And of course our modern in house machines look different but they use the same physical principle and generate relatively weak x-rays. The breakthrough came with the discovery of synchrotron radiation for use by crystallography, you know the principle of these x-rays are several orders of magnitude stronger than the in house apparatus. And they have different properties, so you can select variant and select wavelengths you are working with. We use recombinant proteins, so molecular biology essentially contributed to structural biology by making recombinant proteins in bacteria and in transformed higher cells and we use crystallisation robots. This is a real time representation of an experiment with a protein crystal on a strong synchrotron x-ray source. So we are able to collect x-rays of complete data set of a protein crystal within a few minutes. It took us when we started protein crystal, when I started protein crystallography in the late '60's, early '70's, months or even a year, now we have a data set in a few minutes. Let me show that again. So we rotate the crystal in front of this x-ray beam and have very fast and efficient detectors to evaluate within fractions of a second these diffraction patterns. We have fast computer algorithms, fast computers to store the processed data. And last, not least the development of graphic system in the middle '70's. You saw the first metal wire model, now we use computer graphics and even can make an automatic interpretation if the electron density is very good. This is clearly a tyrosyl residue side chain. So we know usually the sequence and then let the computer and the algorithm fit the modelling the electron density. Now back to proteins and how are they synthesised. So there is messenger RNA transcribed from the DNA, transferred into the cytosol and then bound at the ribosome which is the machinery which assembles the amino acids to the polypeptide chain. The protein folds up but if damaged or incorrectly synthesised has to be removed and there are proteases around, which degrade this incorrectly folded proteins down to amino acids which are then reused for synthesis. This is a great EM picture which I found in literature, unfortunately I forgot the reference, with ribosome's sitting on the messenger RNA and synthesising the polypeptide chain. So the analogy, the similarity to an assembly line of a car factory is really astonishing. Now this team of workers of course has to move, they have to assemble the parts and also proteins have to move. Now this is a protein as an example from a degradation machine, not a synthesis machine and you see how extensive these movements may be of a protein. So this protein is made up from domains joined by linkers which allow extensive movement, how can we do that. Now what we do is we stabilise certain conformations of the proteins and make snap shots and then make a movie. Now new born proteins are sometimes rather sensitive and they need protection. They are not yet completely folded, they are sticky and they need protection. And for that purpose there are so called Chaperonin and Chaperonines. These Chaperonines are big protein containers which in their interior take up this freshly born protein so that it has some time to find its proper fold. This is a eukaryotic version, this is a bacterial version, they have similarity in the sub unit structure, if you compare this with this, but the architecture is rather different, this is made up of 16 sub units, now this is made up of 14 sub units. So nature plays around with symmetry properties. Now proteins that are not properly folded and cannot be rescued in these chaperonines have to be removed and for that purpose we have intercellular proteases. This is one example, it's a big protein, a hexameric protein, the sub units of size 1,200 amino acids, about and it acts like a bread slicer. So we can make a movie again by taking snap shots of certain stages of this degradation process carried out by this protease and we see that an unfolded peptide then moves into the centre of the protein to the scissors, it has to be completely unfolded because this is just a narrow tunnel when dipeptides are cleaved off and leave the protein through the other side. When we learn from protein structures about evolution, you are quite familiar with the fact that we use skeletons to compare species. This is a quite funny example, I took a photograph in Monterey in Mexico in the museum where they showed the skeleton of a dead 200 times enlarged, really quite similar to a human skeleton. Now using protein structures we can look much further back in time. This is an oxygen storage protein from an insect and this from a sperm whale and they obviously have the same structure. So this again is protein structure from the early times, 1968 or so, where we cut electron densities from woods and glued them together but it's quite clear that these two molecules are closely related. Another example, protein degradation again an essential process in bacteria and in eukaryotes, this is the bacterial version, the human or the eukaryotic version, except with the same architecture but more simple chemistry consisting of just 2 different sub units while there are 14 different sub units in the eukaryotic version. Clearly again showing at the molecular level evolution. Well time rushes and I would like, I think just a few words about basic physical processes about which we learn from protein structures. This is photosynthesis. The only biological process that we can observe from space when we look down on earth in winter and in summer, this is the colour of chlorophyll, a sign of intense photosynthesis going on. Now as in a technical process, you have to collect, in photosynthesis one has to collect the light and then convert light into an electrical current. So you have no lenses or mirrors in biology, you have proteins and cofactors. This is one example of a quite efficient light collecting element and sign of bacteria, these are called phycobilisomes, huge organils sitting on the photosynthetic membrane, close to the photocell, the photosys, the 2 erection centre. This is derived from an EM photograph at low resolution. So we can dissect, isolate these components, crystallise them and look at their crystal structures. We can calculate spectral properties from the arrangement of the protein and the chromophores. And also the energy, the excitation energy transfer properties from here to here but I think that you immediately see is that we have 15 chromophores in the outer components, Now this is the reaction centre, the bacterial reaction centre, here in comparison with a sino-bacterial, a plant-like photosystem too. Again showing evolution because the heart of the reaction centre, this is where charge separation occurs, is identical in both, in bacteria and in plants. I would like to bring forward one example of an interesting chemistry going on in biology, now unusual chemistry, namely a chemistry on carbon monoxide. Now you know carbon monoxide is a poison for higher organisms because it binds to heme groups, to cytochrome. Now bacteria can use carbon monoxide for their energy needs and they use carbon monoxide as a carbon source. There are many sources of carbon monoxide in technology and by natural processes. But these bacteria are able to make use of them. Now the process that is carried out in this bacteria is of enormous importance in technology, it's the so called water gas shift reaction, the major source of technical hydrogen. So it needs big plants, high pressure, high temperature, it needs metal catalysts to carry out the reaction. Now bacteria do it at room temperature and ambient pressure. You find one kind of these bacteria in crater lakes, they live under anaerobic conditions, have a big protein to carry out the reaction and the protein alone can't do it, you need metal cofactors. This is a rather complex metal cofactor consisting of Ni-4Fe-5S. Nature makes this with ease, spontaneously. Now inorganic biochemists were yet unable to synthesise this. This is an anaerobic species carrying out the same reaction, totally different protein, you find this bacteria in charcoal piles, they use quite exotic copper, sulphur, moliptinum cluster for this reaction, you see here at high resolution. Well at the end a few words about application of protein structures. So far I spoke about the basic science for an understanding of chemistry and physics, of life functions but protein structures also allow rational design and development of drugs for medicine and of new compounds for plant protection. So of course begins with a diagnoses, now obviously there is a problem with blood coagulation with this patient. We know the molecular components involved in the coagulation cascade very well. They have been analysed by (inaudible 21.07) sequence function. Now at the end of this cascade there is a component called thrombin, now thrombin cleaves fibrinogen and the resulting product, fibrin polymerises and forms the meshwork, matrix for the thrombus. So if we want to interfere with this process, like we would like to do with this patient, we may inhibit thrombin and this was actually the first structure in this system of components that we had been determining. Now how do we do this ligand planning, this design, we follow 100 year old hypothesis of Emil Fischer, the Schlüssel Schloss principle. So this is the empty enzyme, this is the designed ligand and this is the ligand protein structure. And this is the real example, this was a designed, the first designed lead structure for thrombin. It fits quite nicely but not perfectly and then was developed further to fit these individual pockets perfectly with an improvement in binding constants of several orders of magnitude. This is another example. Highlighting different problems in drug design and development. Now this furin is an enzyme which is essential for activating hormones from their pro forms by cleaving off n-terminal segments. But it is misused by toxic, lethal toxic bacteria and viruses which also need furin for processing their toxins or their code proteins. So is there a therapeutic window where we can kill viruses or the bacteria without killing the patient. Now what we can do is design a ligand to the active cite of the enzyme inhibiting it. And then in fact there are already mouse experiments with the simple compound that protected mice from pseudomonas exotoxin which otherwise die within 2 days. Well time is running out and I skip this third example of using structures for understanding a genetic disease variegate porphyria causing skin lesions due to mutations in an enzyme protoporphyrinogenoxidase involved in heme and in plants and chlorophyll biosynthesis. So in plant that same enzyme is a target for an important class of herbicides. So structures help us to understand the cause of this disease, we can't help, but here we can help by helping to design better herbicides and this is actually quite important because there is the appearance of a resistance to this class of herbicides in an agronomically important wheat in the United States, there is a mutation in the structure. We do understand that the herbicides no longer can bind to these mutant enzymes while it is still enzymatically active but as we know the mutation, we can model the structure and design variant or different, changes in these herbicides. Now basic research of protein structures in function and structure based rational design, development of ligands of target proteins, has found its way to application and even led to the foundation of medium sized companies with intensive research activities, I can't resist to show that, this is a spin off from my department 10 years ago which flourishes. And what they do is offering in a very professional way the techniques which I described. So protein expression from genes, protein structure determination and then protein ligand structure determination for which the customers pay. So this is what they offer, protein production, structure analysis and protein ligand structure information. Now back to the beginnings of protein crystallography which was of course driven by scientific curiosity, how life functions at the molecular level and protein crystallography was founded and developed as a science at the interface of chemistry, physics and biology. So it was purely basic science at the beginning and it is still an essential technique for understanding biological phenomena. Protein structures have become an important aid now in the development of new strategies in medicine, for developing novel drugs and for efficient plant protection. Clearly a mature field within not more than perhaps 50 years of development. Thank you.

„The Genome is Simple, the Proteome Complex“, Says Robert Huber
(00:01:32 - 00:05:36)

NMR is a technique based on discoveries by Otto Stern and Isidor Isaac Rabi (Nobel Prize in Physics in 1943 and 1944, respectively). As an analytical tool it was in principle developed by Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell (Nobel Prize in Physics 1952) and subsequently brought to fruition as a high resolution methodology by Richard Ernst (Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1991). The application of NMR to proteins and other biological macromolecules was first put into practice by Kurt Wüthrich, an achievement that earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2002. In contrast to X-ray crystallography, NMR allows to study proteins in solution, in an enviroment, which is similar to that in a living cell – an advantage of considerable importance. With deep knowledge and a good sense of humor, Kurt Wüthrich reminded his audience in Lindau in 2012 of the importance of proteins – in his lecture „Structural Genomics – Exploring the protein universe“.

Kurt Wüthrich (2012) - Structural Genomics - Exploring the Protein Universe

Good morning, I'm using the word universe which is a dangerous thing to do within the overall program of this meeting. So, in a couple of minutes I will try to explain to you what I mean with the word universe. But first I would give in to the encouragement that regards to provide our young colleagues with some glimpse of the sort of impact that has influenced our careers. In my case it was the fact that I studied sports at the university. And the transition from sports to science meant that I was immediately giving up the feeling of instant gratification. When you are in the discipline of high-jumping, you know instantly whether or not you have been successful. If you are in scientific research, it may take twenty years until your peers have acknowledged that you have made an advance. Though research is a great experience it has been a great experience for me for many decades. Every day there is something new but if I needed instant gratification I go out and play soccer. For this purpose I actually bought a house next to the soccer stadium near Zürich and so I can still have my instant gratification without investing too much time. Let me try to explain to you what I mean with the word ‘protein universe’. To make this understandable I have to remind you of some high school knowledge about biology. There are two main classes of biological macromolecules. On the one hand nucleic acids, on the other hand proteins. Now, I only need to talk about DNA, deoxyribonucleic acids and proteins today. And there is this simple drawing which goes back to Francis Crick in the late 1950s. We refer to it as the central dogma of molecular biology. And it simply says that we have three types of biological macromolecules. DNA contains the information. Proteins express the information in terms of function. And RNA has now joint proteins in being functional but it has long been thought to just be an intermediary stage between transfer of information from the DNA to the functional proteo. Now, about fifteen years ago a major revolution has happened. And this revolution is due to the fact that it has become possible to sequence DNA very efficiently, which now means that the information on which our functioning is based consists of about 1.8 metres of DNA. That’s it. We know the sequence of the DNA. And it is simply a linear chain. That’s the chemistry of DNA. And this chemistry of DNA is translated into the chemistry of proteins. And proteins again are linear chains. So, here you now have a very simple picture of what I referred to as the protein universe. This red circle represents the number of protein sequences that are known today. A year ago it was about 14 million, today it is about 17 million. Now what does this mean? This means that we know the genomic sequences. We know the complete sequence of the DNA in humans, in the mouse, in the cow and in about 1,400 additional higher and lower organisms. But knowledge on the level of the DNA has its limitations. And what happens? We have these 1.8 metres of DNA from human beings. Some bioinformatics specialists will now go and identify pieces of that DNA of which by past experience we suppose that they encode for a protein. But as long as we are working with these genomic sequences, genomic meaning sequence on the level of the DNA, we don’t know whether these proteins can exist. We don’t know whether they are ever expressed. We are not even always sure that the identification of the genes by so-called annotation is correct. Very often it is not very precise. So, in order to really work with the protein universe we should be able to cover this space of now about 17 million sequences with additional information. This additional information is the three dimensional structures of the protein. Because only when we know about the three dimensional structures, can we understand what is happening on the level of the proteo. Proteo meaning the ensemble of all proteins in a living being. And that’s what we do in structural genomics. We try to fill this rather large sequence base with three dimensional structures. So, from genomic sequences we want to go to three dimensional structures. That is we want to find out how these linear chains of the proteins are arranged in space. And why do we want to know? Why do we need to know about this? I gave you just two examples. You have here a few selected protein functions. Now remember all of these proteins are linear chains built of the same building blocks separated only by the arrangement of some chemical groups that hang onto the linear chain. Nonetheless functions performed by proteins extend from protective functions to catalysis, to regulation, to transport and so on and so forth. Now just think of the following. Our hair is protein, our skin is protein. In our stomach we have enzymes that help to digest our food. Enzymes must be soluble in water. Otherwise they don’t function. Now, if you only have a linear sequence it’s difficult to understand why protein on our head should be resistant to being dissolved in water whereas enzymes must be dissolved in water. Just imagine if we didn’t have different forms of these chains, you would not walk into this room after the next rain, you would be gone. Let me get a little bit more specific as to showing you why we want to have three dimensional structures. I take an example from some biomedical research that we preformed two decades ago on the drug cyclosporin A. This was the drug that opened the door to transplantation in human medicine because it suppresses the immune response to the foreign tissue. The receptor for this drug... Here you have the drug molecule in functional colours. In light blue you have the receptor. Fortunate for us it’s a relatively small protein so the structure could dissolve. Now once you have such a three dimensional structure you can take the drug out of its binding site, study the binding site, go back to the chemistry and start thinking rationally about how you might modify... This is the chemical structure of that drug. So you might find that when you inspect the binding site for the drug you might decide I better cut this part of the molecule off. Now get the type to fit, I may be able to reduce dosage of the medication. I may reduce side effects that are unwanted. And that’s the sort of thinking that can be based on knowledge of the three dimensional structure. And if your knowledge is reduced to linear knowledge on the level of the genome then you have no possibility to think in such rational terms about correlations between the structure of the protein and its function and possibly influencing its function in drug development, in other applications, agriculture or to improve the quality of soaps to wash clothes and so on and so forth. Next topic. How do we obtain three dimensional structures? There are two key methods that provide atomic resolution structures of large molecules. One is X-ray diffraction with protein crystals; the other is NMR with protein solutions. NMR does not stand for No Meaningful Results. It stands for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The important thing is that this technique can be used with protein solutions. Just remember, many proteins are found in body fluids and body fluids are solutions of proteins. So we can look at these proteins and the conditions that can be very close to the conditions in body fluids. Now, how did structural biologists historically approach the protein universe? I'm now talking about the situation in around 1935/1940. There was no idea what the protein universe was. So Max Perutz started to work with haemoglobin in 1936. You see, Max Perutz he’s an Austrian scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1962 jointly research on Kendrew for having solved the first three dimensional protein structure. Now how did Max Perutz choose the object for his studies? He chose haemoglobin because haemoglobin was plentiful and it is red. There were no great methods to purify proteins at that time so it was important that the protein was red. Because if you lost it, the colour was gone and you knew you were in trouble. You could also get one litre of blood from a horse and make a gram of haemoglobin relatively easily. And that’s how the early targets for structural biology were chosen. Prior to haemoglobin hair, especially wool from sheep was studied, by X-ray crystallography. It actually gave the first information on the structure of polypeptide chains. Then came haemoglobin and this is the state of the art of X-ray crystallography at the time the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1962. And you see, even my career started with haemoglobin. This is a very old slide. That’s why I have not had it remade to impress on you. It’s very old, almost as old as I am. And it’s my own haemoglobin. And I recorded this spectrum in 1968 and it meant immediate career success for me. It made my scientific career. And then you see, then you’ll need an artist to make drawings of haemoglobin and to show it to a larger community what is behind such strange peaks that you can see in this case by NMR. Now, today the selection of the targets is done very differently. You see over the years starting with the work by Max Perutz in 1936, over the years, one would take a few proteins without knowing about this big red circle because they were of interest. For example one day we had mad cow disease so we solved the protein that’s involved in the onset of mad cow disease. Or you know there is trypsin in your stomach, all kind of trypsin, so these were available in relatively large quantities so these structures were solved. And by about 1990 two-hundred such structures had been chosen at random. Now today, all of a sudden we know what should be there. We know that the human genome contains approximately 25,000 genes that encode proteins. But that of course would never make up for these 17 million protein sequences that we have in the database today. What this comes from, the incredible rapid growth of this protein universe is due to in the last few years is that the sequence apparatus, the sequencing methods have been applied to microorganisms. If we start to study the genomic information that is contained in the microbes that live in our gut then we have a million times as much genetic information there as we have in the human genome. So if people start to talk about personalised medicine based on knowledge of the human genome and dismiss all the genetic information that’s contained in the microbes that live in our body, in the mouth, all human body openings, they are just kidding themselves and ourselves if you believe them. And this is the sequencing of these microbiomes, not only in the human body but the microbiome in the sea. Craig Venter went out with his boat, caught microbes in the sea, in the Pacific, sequenced those that added another 2 million proteins to this genomic data bank. And then you take one kilogram of soil and you have another 2 million sequences of microbes if you go at these two pounds of earth. That’s how the universe of protein sequences has for our sake... To talk about explosion and large numbers here is not so easy, but for us this is a real explosion. And so today we now select our proteins very differently. They never have been seen, we can just take... Let’s say it’s a human proteo, cut it up into genes and get these genes into e-coli, express those proteins and get the structures. And then all of a sudden we have hundreds, it’s actually thousands of structures that are now in a data bank of proteins which we know nothing. We just have the structure and we are now searching for new functions. That means we are now moving out into the red circle. And instead of being limited to for example looking for targets for drug design in a very limited selection of proteins that are for one reason or other the obvious choices in structural biology, we now all of a sudden move somewhere into that red circle and find new targets for drug design. These may be targets that are not around in the adult human body. It may be targets that are around only before birth or they are only around in a particular state of disease or in very old age. Targets for which we do not have mouse models and simulate. And so we are expanding very much the scope of the landscape within which we can go to lots of applications in biomedical research, in agriculture and so on and so forth. So we are now working out here, we are making excursions into that red territory and find new possibilities to apply the knowledge about the proteo. And it is not a static feature. It is expanding very fast. I gave you one example which is possibly the biggest success at this point of the whole Structural Genomics Initiative and that is the fact that cheap protein coupled receptors are now here. Until five years ago there was no structure around of a cheap protein coupled receptor. On the other hand, it was known that at least 40% of all approved drugs target GPCRs. Now thanks to the efforts of this Structural Genomics Initiative we now know how GPCRs look. And for example it is a very exciting part of the story. This is the structure of a GPCR. It’s about 40 angstroms in length. You bind any one of these drugs on the extra cellular end and over a distance of about 35 angstroms a signal is transmitted through the protein and given up to additional downstream proteins on the inter-cellular side, So it’s highly exciting now to know that as of today 14 different structures of GPCRs. And that is one of these very important far reaching excursions into the red space of genomic protein sequences. Well, the last topic I want to address is: How do we solve structures? I see I'm very limited in time, therefore I go very fast. Okay, we need a magnet, we need a glass tube to put the protein in, we get a spectrum. Because proteins are big there are lots of spins so there’s a lot of overlap. So you have to develop two dimensional NMR. Then you spread out the lines into two dimensions. If you make a block you see that there’s a lot of information. Today we use seven dimensional experiments. That means we artificially generate six time dimensions in addition to the ongoing time dimension. And then we have to develop some, well, distance geometry algorithms and things. All that work was done by physicists although it has to do with biology. And then you calculate three dimensional structures. Now, to be respectable here one has to mention Einstein. I would look very bad if I didn’t mention Einstein. Now Einstein is very important for solution NMR. The one thing I can say is that the important work that Einstein has done was done 30 km from the place where I grew up. That’s one thing. Then physicists always talk about relativity theory and such things. But Einstein also did important work. You see, in 1905 when he was working in the patent office in Bern 30 km from my birth place he published four papers. One is on the relativity, one is of the photo-electric effect but the two really important papers are on the Brownian motion. At the start of statistical mechanics. There is one paper on translational Brownian motion and there is another that was in May 1905 and there is another paper on rotational Brownian motion that was published in December 1905. What does this have to do with our work of using NMR with biological macromolecules? Well, if you have a relatively large particle that’s subjected to the thermal motion of the solvent, the water, it has a large inertia and it responds at low frequency to the onslaught of the thermal motions of the solvent. And you get low frequency stochastic motions. If you have a smaller protein, then the inertia is smaller and you have higher frequency stochastic motion. Depending on the coefficient of the radio frequency that we use in our NMR experiments and the frequency of those stochastic motions we are in completely different ranges of spin physics. And so Einstein treated the Brownian motion. If we take his theory and put it into the description of single transition bases operators that describe the behaviour of multi-spin systems in these moving particles, then you get TROSY - Transverse Relaxation Optimised Spectroscopy. And this enabled us to go from smallish proteins... That is one regime of spin physics of rotating and translating objects in solution which goes up to molecule rate of about 20,000. Here we are approaching a molecular size of one million and you see this is quite a fantastic spectrum that we can now obtain using these... I mean what we really do is that we uncouple the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrum from the Brownian motion. This costs a bit of money because we need a magnet that is at least 900 or 800 megahertz in the proton frequency. But this is what happens when you read the old papers by Einstein and then apply them to the daily work. Now why is this so important? We have solved some 75,000 structures as of today trying to cover that red circle that protein sequence universe with three dimensional structures. But today we have to go one step further. We have to understand the interactions between two or multiple ones of these macromolecules. I show you here an example, a piece of DNA and the protein that bind into a so called complex. And all these complexes tend to be big and therefore if we didn’t use this TROSY experiment based on Einstein’s work on the statistical mechanics of the Brownian motion, we wouldn't be there. Thank you for your attention.

Guten Morgen. Ich benutze das Wort Universum, was im Rahmen des Gesamtprogramms dieser Veranstaltung eine heikle Sache ist. In einigen Minuten werde ich versuchen Ihnen zu erklären, was ich mit dem Begriff Universum meine. Zunächst möchte ich aber einige aufmunternde Worte an unsere jungen Kollegen richten und ihnen einen Eindruck davon vermitteln, was unsere Laufbahn beeinflusst hat. In meinem Fall war es die Tatsache, dass ich Sport studiert habe. Der Übergang vom Sport zur Wissenschaft bedeutete, dass ich urplötzlich auf das Gefühl der sofortigen Belohnung verzichten musste. Wenn Sie Hochsprung betreiben, wissen Sie sofort, ob Sie erfolgreich waren oder nicht. In der wissenschaftlichen Forschung kann es zwanzig Jahre dauern, bis Ihre Fachkollegen anerkennen, dass Sie etwas geleistet haben. Auch wenn die Forschung für mich seit vielen Jahrzehnten eine großartige Erfahrung darstellt und jeder Tag etwas Neues bringt - wenn mir der Sinn nach unmittelbarer Befriedigung steht, gehe ich raus und spiele Fußball. Aus diesem Grund habe ich ein Haus in der Nähe des Züricher Fußballstadiums gekauft - auf diese Weise ist die augenblickliche Belohnung ohne allzu viel Zeitaufwand möglich. Ich möchte Ihnen erklären, was ich mit dem Begriff "Proteinuniversum" meine. Zum Verständnis ist es notwendig, das gymnasiale Biologiewissen etwas aufzufrischen. Es gibt zwei Hauptklassen biologischer Makromoleküle, Nukleinsäuren und Proteine. Ich spreche heute nur über die DNA, also Desoxyribonukleinsäure, und Proteine. Sie sehen hier eine einfache Darstellung aus den späten 50er Jahren, die auf Francis Crick zurückgeht. Wir bezeichnen sie als zentrales Dogma der Molekularbiologie. Dieses Dogma besagt schlichtweg, dass es drei Arten biologischer Makromoleküle gibt. Die DNA enthält die Information, die Proteine exprimieren die Information entsprechend der Funktion und die RNA fügt die Proteine funktionell zusammen. Lange Zeit dachte man allerdings, dass es sich bei der RNA nur um eine Zwischenstufe bei der Übertragung der Information von der DNA auf das funktionelle Proteom handelt. Vor etwa fünfzehn Jahren fand aufgrund der Tatsache, dass sich DNA inzwischen sehr effizient sequenzieren ließ, eine Revolution statt. Es stellte sich heraus, dass die der Funktionalität zugrunde liegende Information aus etwa 1,8 Metern DNA besteht. Das war's. Wir kennen die DNA-Sequenz, es handelt sich dabei einfach um eine lineare Kette. Das ist die Chemie der DNA. Sie wird in die Chemie der Proteine übersetzt; Proteine sind ebenfalls lineare Ketten. Hier sehen Sie eine ganz einfache Abbildung des von mir so bezeichneten Proteinuniversums. Dieser rote Kreis stellt die Anzahl der heute bekannten Proteinsequenzen dar. Vor einem Jahr waren es etwa 14 Millionen, heute sind es ca. 17 Millionen. Was bedeutet das nun? Es bedeutet, dass wir die Genomsequenzen kennen, d.h. die gesamte DNA-Sequenz des Menschen, der Maus, der Kuh und etwa 1400 anderer höherer und niederer Organismen. Die Erkenntnisse auf der Ebene der DNA haben jedoch ihre Grenzen. Was geschieht also? Wir haben hier diese 1,8 Meter lange menschliche DNA. Bioinformatiker identifizieren Stücke dieser DNA, von denen wir basierend auf früheren Erfahrungen annehmen, dass sie ein Protein codieren. Solange wir mit diesen Genomsequenzen, d.h. Sequenzen auf der DNA-Ebene arbeiten, wissen wir nicht, ob diese Proteine überhaupt existieren. Wir wissen auch nicht, ob sie jemals exprimiert werden. Wir sind uns noch nicht einmal sicher, dass die Identifizierung der Gene anhand der so genannten Annonation korrekt ist - sehr häufig ist das nämlich nicht der Fall. Um also wirklich mit dem Proteinuniversum arbeiten zu können, müssen wir diese Lücke von etwa 17 Millionen Sequenzen mit weiteren Informationen, nämlich den dreidimensionalen Proteinstrukturen füllen, denn nur wenn wir die dreidimensionalen Strukturen kennen, können wir verstehen, was auf der Proteomebene geschieht. Das Proteom ist die Gesamtheit aller Proteine in einem Lebewesen. Und genau das tun wir in der Strukturgenomik. Wir versuchen diese relativ große Sequenzlücke mit dreidimensionalen Strukturen zu füllen, gehen also von Genomsequenzen zu dreidimensionalen Strukturen, weil wir herausfinden möchten, wie diese linearen Proteinketten räumlich angeordnet sind. Warum wollen wir das wissen? Warum müssen wir das wissen? Ich gebe Ihnen zwei Beispiele. Sie sehen hier einige ausgewählte Proteinfunktionen. Zur Erinnerung: All diese Proteine sind lineare Ketten aus denselben Bausteinen, die sich nur durch die Anordnung an der linearen Kette hängender chemischer Gruppen unterscheiden. Gleichwohl können Proteine die verschiedensten Funktionen innehaben: Schutz, Katalyse, Regulierung, Transport usw. Denken Sie z.B. daran, dass unsere Haare und unsere Haut aus Proteinen bestehen. In unserem Magen befinden sich Enzyme, die bei der Verdauung der Nahrung helfen. Enzyme müssen wasserlöslich sein, ansonsten verlieren sie ihre Funktion. Wenn es wirklich nur eine lineare Sequenz gäbe, wäre kaum verständlich, warum ein Protein auf unserem Kopf wasserunlöslich ist, Enzyme dagegen wasserlöslich. Stellen Sie sich vor, diese Ketten lägen nicht in unterschiedlichen Formen vor - Sie würden nach dem nächsten Regenspaziergang diesen Raum nicht mehr betreten, Sie hätten sich aufgelöst. Ich möchte Ihnen noch ein bisschen genauer erklären, warum wir dreidimensionale Strukturen benötigen. Nehmen wir ein Beispiel aus einem biomedizinischen Forschungsprojekt, das wir vor 20 Jahren mit dem Wirkstoff Cyclosporin A durchgeführt haben. Dieses Medikament ebnete der Transplantation in der Humanmedizin den Weg, denn es unterdrückt die Immunreaktion auf fremdes Gewebe. Der Rezeptor für diesen Wirkstoff... Hier sehen Sie das Wirkstoffmolekül in funktionellen Farben, der Rezeptor ist hellblau. Glücklicherweise handelt es sich um ein relativ kleines Protein, so dass wir die Struktur aufklären konnten. Sobald Ihnen eine solche dreidimensionale Struktur vorliegt, können Sie den Wirkstoff aus seiner Bindungsstelle lösen, die Bindungsstelle untersuchen, zu den chemischen Eigenschaften zurückkehren und rational überlegen, welche Modifikation... Das ist die chemische Struktur des Wirkstoffs. Unter Umständen entscheiden Sie sich bei der Untersuchung der Bindungsstelle des Wirkstoffs, diesen Teil des Moleküls abzutrennen, denn durch Formschlüssigkeit lassen sich die Dosis des Medikaments und damit unerwünschte Nebenwirkungen reduzieren. Basierend auf dem Wissen über die dreidimensionale Struktur sind derlei Überlegungen möglich. Wenn Ihre Kenntnisse auf die lineare Genomebene beschränkt sind, haben Sie keine Möglichkeit, über Korrelationen zwischen der Struktur des Proteins und seiner Funktion und die mögliche Beeinflussung seiner Funktion bei der Arzneimittelentwicklung oder anderen Anwendungszwecken, z.B. in der Landwirtschaft oder zur Verbesserung der Qualität von Seifen zum Waschen von Kleidung usw. rational nachzudenken. Nächstes Thema. Wie erhält man dreidimensionale Strukturen? Es gibt zwei zentrale Verfahren, die die Strukturen großer Moleküle in atomarer Auflösung liefern, Röntgenbeugung (von Proteinkristallen) und NMR (von Proteinlösungen). NMR steht keineswegs für No Meaningful Results (keine sinnvollen Ergebnisse), sondern für Nuklearmagnetresonanz. Das Entscheidende an dieser Technik ist, dass man mit Proteinlösungen arbeiten kann. Sie erinnern sich, viele Proteine finden sich in Körperflüssigkeiten und diese sind wässrige Proteinlösungen. Wir können uns also diese Proteine und die Bedingungen, die denen in Körperflüssigkeiten oftmals sehr ähneln, anschauen. Wie haben sich Strukturbiologen früher, also in der Zeit um 1935/1940, dem Proteinuniversum genähert? Damals hatte man keine Ahnung, worum es sich dabei handelt. 1936 begann Max Perutz mit Hämoglobin zu arbeiten. Max Perutz war ein österreichischer Wissenschaftler, der 1962 zusammen mit John Kendrew den Nobelpreis für Chemie für die Aufklärung der ersten dreidimensionalen Proteinstruktur erhielt. Wonach wählte Max Perutz das Objekt seiner Studien aus? Er entschied sich für Hämoglobin, da dieses in großen Mengen verfügbar und rot ist. Da damals noch keine ausgefeilten Methoden zur Proteinreinigung existierten, war es wichtig, dass das Protein rot war, denn wenn es verschwand, verschwand auch die Farbe und man wusste, dass man ein Problem hatte. Sie können außerdem aus einem Liter Pferdeblut relativ einfach ein Gramm Hämoglobin gewinnen. Nach diesen Kriterien wurden die ersten Targets für die Strukturbiologie ausgewählt. Vor dem Hämoglobin wurden Haare, vor allem Schafwolle, mittels Röntgenkristallographie untersucht. Sie lieferten die ersten Informationen über die Struktur von Polypeptidketten. Dann kam das Hämoglobin. Das ist der Stand der Technik in der Röntgenkristallographie zum Zeitpunkt der Verleihung des Nobelpreises 1962. Sie sehen, sogar meine Laufbahn begann mit Hämoglobin. Das hier ist eine sehr alte Aufnahme. Ich habe sie nicht bearbeiten lassen, weil ich Sie beeindrucken wollte; sie ist sehr alt, fast so alt wie ich. Es handelt sich um mein eigenes Hämoglobin. Ich habe dieses Spektrum 1968 aufgezeichnet; es führte mich über Nacht zum beruflichen Erfolg und leitete meine wissenschaftliche Karriere ein. Anschließend brauchen Sie einen Künstler, der Zeichnungen des Hämoglobins anfertigt, mit deren Hilfe Sie Außenstehenden dann erklären können, was es mit den seltsamen Peaks, in diesem Fall in der NMR, auf sich hat. Heute erfolgt die Auswahl der Targets ganz anders. Angefangen mit der Arbeit von Max Perutz 1936 wählte man im Laufe der Jahre bestimmte Proteine einfach aus Interesse aus, ohne diesen großen roten Kreis zu kennen. Eines Tages grassierte z.B. der Rinderwahnsinn; also enträtselten wir das am Ausbruch dieser Krankheit beteiligte Protein. Ein anderes Beispiel ist Trypsin. In unserem Magen finden sich alle Arten von Trypsinen. Da sie in relativ großen Mengen verfügbar waren, klärten wir ihre Strukturen auf. Bis etwa 1990 waren 200 Strukturen nach dem Zufallsprinzip ausgewählt worden. Heute wissen wir auf einmal, was sich hier befinden sollte. Wir wissen, dass das Humangenom etwa 25.000 Proteine codierende Gene enthält. Das erklärt natürlich keineswegs die 17 Millionen Proteinsequenzen, die wir heute in der Datenbank haben. Der Grund für das unglaublich schnelle Wachstum dieses Proteinuniversums in den letzten Jahren ist die Anwendung der Sequenziermethoden auf Mikroorganismen. Bei der Untersuchung der Genominformation von Mikroben in unserem Darm haben wir es mit dem Millionenfachen der genetischen Information des Humangenoms zu tun. Wenn jemand also von personalisierter Medizin basierend auf dem Wissen über das Humangenom spricht, ohne die genetischen Informationen der Mikroben, die in unserem Körper, unserem Mund, sämtlichen Körperöffnungen leben, zu berücksichtigen, macht er sich und uns etwas vor. Hier sehen Sie die Sequenzierung solcher Mikrobiome, die allerdings nicht aus dem menschlichen Körper, sondern aus dem Meer stammen. Craig Venter fuhr mit seinem Boot auf den Pazifik hinaus, sammelte Mikroben aus dem Wasser und sequenzierte sie. Damit befinden sich jetzt weitere zwei Millionen Proteine in der Genomdatenbank. Wenn Sie ein Kilogramm Erde nehmen, haben sie noch einmal zwei Millionen mikrobielle Sequenzen. Auf diese Weise ist das Universum der Proteinsequenzen regelrecht explodiert, auch wenn man mit solchen Begriffen vielleicht vorsichtig sein muss. Heute also selektieren wir unsere Proteine auf ganz andere Weise. Niemand bekommt sie je zu Gesicht, wir nehmen einfach... z.B. ein Humanproteom, trennen es in die Gene auf und schleusen diese Gene in E. coli ein. Dort werden die Proteine exprimiert und wir erhalten eine Struktur. Plötzlich haben wir hunderte, ja sogar tausende von Strukturen in einer Proteindatenbank. Über die Proteine wissen wir nichts, wir kennen nur ihre Struktur und suchen anschließend nach neuen Funktionen. Das heißt, wir bewegen uns nun in den roten Kreis hinein. Statt z.B. in einem äußerst beschränkten Proteinsortiment, das aus irgendeinem Grund die erste Wahl in der Strukturbiologie darstellt, nach Targets für das Drug Design suchen zu müssen, bewegen wir uns plötzlich in diesen roten Kreis hinein und finden neue Targets für das Drug Design. Diese Targets liegen möglicherweise im Körper von Erwachsenen gar nicht vor, sondern existieren nur vor der Geburt, in einem bestimmten Krankheitsstadium oder im hohen Alter. Es handelt sich also um Targets, für die wir keine Mausmodelle haben und die wir nicht simulieren können. Daher weiten wir das Gebiet, innerhalb dessen sich zahlreiche Anwendungsmöglichkeiten in der biomedizinischen Forschung, der Landwirtschaft usw. finden, derzeit stark aus. Wir machen also von hier aus Ausflüge in die rote Zone und finden neue Möglichkeiten, unser Wissen über das Proteom anzuwenden. Das ist kein statischer Prozess, er weitet sich rasch aus. Ich gebe Ihnen ein Beispiel, das möglicherweise den größten Erfolg der gesamten Strukturgenomik-Initiative zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt darstellt, nämlich die Tatsache, dass es heute G-Protein-gekoppelte Rezeptoren (GPCR) gibt. Bis vor 5 Jahren kannte man die Struktur dieser Rezeptoren nicht. Andererseits war bekannt, dass GPCR Targets für mindestens 40% aller zugelassenen Arzneimittel darstellen. Dank der Bemühungen der Strukturgenomik-Initiative wissen wir heute, wie GPCR aussehen. Das ist eine wirklich spannende Sache. Sie sehen hier die Struktur eines GPCR mit einer Länge von ca. 40 Ångstrom. Bindet sich einer dieser Wirkstoffe an das extrazelluläre Ende, wird über eine Entfernung von etwa 35 Ångstrom durch das Protein ein Signal an andere nachgeschaltete Proteine auf der intrazellulären Seite übermittelt Zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt sind 14 unterschiedliche Strukturen der GPCR bekannt. Es handelt sich also um einen wichtigen und tiefgreifenden Ausflug in die rote Zone der Genomproteinsequenzen. Das letzte Thema, das ich ansprechen möchte, lautet: Wie klären wir Strukturen auf? Ich sehe, dass ich nicht mehr viel Zeit habe, deswegen werde ich mich beeilen. Wir brauchen einen Magneten und ein Glasröhrchen, in das wir das Protein tun. Dann erhalten wir ein Spektrum. Aufgrund der Größe der Proteine gibt es zahlreiche Spins und damit eine starke Überlappung. Daher muss eine zweidimensionale NMR entwickelt werden. Anschließend werden die Linien in zwei Dimensionen auseinandergezogen. Erzeugt man einen Block, erkennt man, wie Sie sehen, eine große Menge an Informationen. Heute führen wir 7-dimensionale Experimente durch, d.h. wir erzeugen zusätzlich zu der aktuellen Zeitdimension künstlich sechs weitere Zeitdimensionen. Anschließend müssen Distanzgeometriealgorithmen und dergleichen entwickelt werden. Diese Aufgabe wurde von Physikern übernommen, obwohl sie mit Biologie zu tun hat. Dann werden dreidimensionale Strukturen berechnet. An dieser Stelle muss man Einstein die Ehre erweisen und ihn erwähnen. Ich sähe schlecht aus, würde ich Einstein nicht erwähnen. Einstein ist für die Lösungs-NMR sehr bedeutend. Das Einzige, was ich sagen kann, ist, dass Einstein seine wichtigen Werke 30 km von meinem Heimatort entfernt geschrieben hat. Das ist das eine. Außerdem sprechen Physiker viel über die Relativitätstheorie und dergleichen. Aber Einstein hat sich auch mit Wichtigem beschäftigt. Während seiner Tätigkeit im Berner Patentamt 30 km von meinem Geburtsort entfernt veröffentlichte er vier Artikel: einen zur Relativitätstheorie, einen zum photoelektrischen Effekt und zwei wirklich wichtige über die Brownsche Bewegung zu Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Es gibt einen Artikel über die Brownsche Translationsbewegung vom Mai 1905 und einen anderen, im Dezember 1905 veröffentlichen über die Brownsche Rotationsbewegung. Was hat das nun mit der Anwendung der NMR im Rahmen unserer Arbeit mit biologischen Makromolekülen zu tun? Nun, ein relativ großes Teilchen, das der thermischen Bewegung des Lösungsmittels (Wasser) unterliegt, besitzt eine starke Trägheit und reagiert nur niederfrequent auf den Ansturm dieser thermischen Bewegungen. Es entstehen niederfrequente stochastische Bewegungen. Bei einem kleineren Protein ist auch die Trägheit geringer und es entstehen höherfrequente stochastische Bewegungen. Je nach dem Koeffizienten der Hochfrequenz, die wir bei unseren NMR-Experimenten benutzen, und der Frequenz dieser stochastischen Bewegungen befinden wir uns in völlig unterschiedlichen Bereichen der Spin-Physik. Einstein beschäftigte sich also mit der Brownschen Bewegung. Greift man seine Theorie auf und baut sie in die Beschreibung einzelner Übergangsbasisoperatoren, die das Verhalten von Multi-Spin-Systemen in diesen sich bewegenden Teilchen beschreiben, ein, erhält man TROSY - Transverse Relaxation Optimised Spectroscopy. Damit konnten wir beginnend mit kleinen Proteinen - das ist ein Bereich der Spin-Physik rotierender und translatierender Objekte in Lösung, der bis zu einem Molekulargewicht von etwa 20.000 reicht - zur Entnahme und Exploration von Membranproteinen übergehen und sogar Teilchen in der Größenordnung von GroEL untersuchen. Hier nähern wir uns einer Molekülgröße von einer Million. Sie sehen, wir können heute ein ziemlich fantastisches Spektrum erhalten, indem wir... Also eigentlich entkoppeln wir das Nuklearmagnetresonanz-Spektrum von der Brownschen Bewegung. Das kostet ein bisschen Geld, denn wir benötigen einen Magneten mit einer Protonenfrequenz von mindestens 900 oder 800 Megahertz. Das kommt davon, wenn man die alten Artikel von Einstein liest und sie auf die tägliche Arbeit anwendet. Warum ist diese Arbeit nun so wichtig? Wir haben bislang 75.000 Strukturen aufgeklärt und versucht, diesen roten Kreis, dieses Proteinsequenzuniversum mit dreidimensionalen Strukturen zu füllen. Heute müssen wir einen Schritt weiter gehen und die Wechselwirkungen zwischen zwei oder mehreren dieser Makromoleküle verstehen. Ich gebe Ihnen ein Beispiel, ein Stück DNA und ein Protein, die sich zu einem so genannten Komplex verbinden. Diese Komplexe sind oftmals sehr groß - ohne das TROSY-Experiment auf der Grundlage von Einsteins Arbeit über die statistische Mechanik der Brownschen Bewegung wären wir also nicht hier. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Kurt Wüthrich Invites His Audience to Further Explore the Protein Universe
(00:03:52 - 00:09:55)

Vital Degradation
None of our proteins lives as long as we do. Today, this seems to be a trivial remark. The notion that proteins are subject to a constant turnover, however, is hardly more than 70 years old. Before that time, structural and functional proteins were regarded as relatively stable constituents of our body, endangered solely by minor “wear and tear” forces, with the exception of dietary proteins whose task was seen in serving as an energy-providing fuel. This “combustion engine concept” was first challenged by Rudolf Schönheimer in 1941 when he suggested in his Edward K. Dunham Lecture at Harvard University that „not only the fuel, but the structural materials are in a steady state of flux. The classical picture must thus be replaced by one which takes account of the dynamic state of body structure“.[5]
Yet even between the “1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area”, Aaron Ciechanover stated in his Nobel Lecture in 2004. Together with his doctoral father Avram Hershko and with Irwin Rose he earned the Nobel Prize in Chemistry because they had discovered the central mechanism of protein degradation in the cell: the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Since 2005, Ciechanover has participated in almost every Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau.

In clear words he explains, why protein degradation is so important

Aaron Ciechanover (2010) - Why our Proteins Have to Die so We Shall Live

Just two comments to start, one is less related to my talk, one is more related. We were talking in the first evening about inspiration which is a very hard term to define and to sense and I think that one way to look at inspiration is just to look at the simple stories of evolvement of different discoveries in nature and to follow them and to see, as I told you in the first evening how simple they were. And how possible they were and this will tell you again as I stressed in the first evening that each and every one of you can do it because otherwise much of what you'll hear as an advice of how to succeed in science is what I call cynically wisdom in retrospect. There are no real secrets that you can follow. Obviously there is mentorship and being passionate and love what you do and serendipity and luck which are very important. But I think that looking at the real discoveries, how people really evolved, how experiments evolved and how fields develop, I think is a very useful lesson. The other one is about evolvement of science in general. If you listen carefully to Bob Horvitz talk yesterday and to mine today you will see that science really is very conservative and evolves slowly and in very logical way. People initially wanted to know how proteins are synthesised so it started with Watson and Crick understanding the information and then the central dogma in biology, the flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins and very few cared about destruction, the idea of destruction. Apoptosis wasn't known at all, why protein should commit suicide, what's the purpose of it. And protein degradation was known vaguely but people didn't attribute any importance to it, it was kind of an end process, non-specific, well we're enjoying the proteins that are around us, they fulfil all the functions and then we somehow dispose of them. But nobody really, people cared how but people didn't attribute too much importance to it. And then time came and all of a sudden this process, apoptosis which is also in many ways a destructive process and now if you follow the field you'll see how autophagy which is another destructive process are really coming into light as major regulatory processes. So I think that it's very interesting also to follow the evolvement from construction to destruction along the, a long time and it has much to say about the development and the logic behind the development of science. So proteins as you know are all chains of amino acids, that's the simple way to put them. And the amino acids are connected by peptide bonds and peptide bonds are, the chemistry is relatively simple, we take amino acids and the arrow, the black arrow is protein synthesis, with all the machinery that's behind it, the DNA, the RNA and then the regulation by a transcription factor when we are extracting a molecule of water from 2 amino acids and align them, put them together and the destructive process, the chemistry is the opposite, it's a hydrolytic reaction where we introduce a molecule of water and take the 2 amino acids apart. Obviously this is the chemistry but not the biology because the 2 arrows are completely separated from one another in nature and the processes are extremely cumbersome and carried out by completely different mechanisms. So when we talk about the chemistry of proteolysis in the body we have recognised proteolysis for decades and it's carrying at different levels of specificity and selectivity and complexity, the simplest one obviously occurs in the gastro intestinal tract where every protein that is coming in is digested in a non-discriminatory manner. First in order not to challenge the immune system, second to use proteins as a source of energy. Once we are crossing into the body, the gastro intestinal tract is actually outside the body, topologically it's a tube crossing the body. Once we are crossing the gastrointestinal lining, we are coming into the circulation so we are inside the body but still extracellular and we encounter already regulated proteolytic systems like the blood coagulation system which is a cascade of proteolytic event that at the end lead to conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin and to formation of the blood clot. This already must be regulated process, we cannot have the blood clotting in the circulation in an uncontrolled manner, it will be fatal. Like we encounter frequently in one of the most common diseases, myocardial infarction or heart attack as it is better known to the public. And Avram and I, Avram actually my mentor with whom I did my PhD work was not interested in those 2, he was interested in intracellular protein degradation, in how the proteins of the cells are degraded and I join him in '76 as a graduate student when he had already some initial findings. And we started the journey, the journey after the mechanism from that point. Now the question is at all why proteins are degraded. And I think that the introductory words, I will pay tribute to the milestone that were already known because nobody really starts from zero, you don't, in biology these days you don't start from scratch, there is always milestones. And people that were behind you, that started the work and I want to point out to these wonderful people but first of all lets go for the principle, why at all we are degrading our proteins, why proteins are not rock stable. First quality control, we are living at 37 degrees, 21% oxygen, many good reasons why to denature and misfold proteins, quality control has also to do with biosynthesis of non-stoichiometric molar base equipment of quantity of different sub units of complex protein then we have to get rid of the excess. So quality control has really become a major problem in pathogenesis of diseases and a major reason why we have to dispose proteins that are misfolded, denatured, not necessary anymore. Then controlling of processes, you heard yesterday from Roger Tsien about, he showed you the beautiful division of cells, the discovery of Tim and Lee Hartwell, Tim Hunt, Lee Hartwell, Paul Nurse. Cell cycle, from time to time many processes. We need to remove proteins that are functional, healthy, but we don't need them anymore. And this is one way that nature controls processes, transcriptional regulators, p53, Meek, NF KappaB, Fos, Jun, all these proteins that we don't need them anymore, nature disposes them. We can obviously think why nature chose such an expensive way to remove a protein, why not to sequester it now, why not to phosphorylate or dephosphorylate it because we know already on other regulatory mechanisms and you are going to hear from Eddie Fischer on other regulatory mechanisms but think about it and we may discuss it this afternoon, why to choose such an expensive way of disposing a healthy protein rather than regulating its activity via another route. And obviously in order to maintain the differentiated and morphogenetic state of tissues, we need to remove proteins permanently and unfortunately some of them come back during malignant transformations. So the founding father of the field, again it's very difficult to define the beginning of the field was Rudolf Schoenheimer, a Jewish German scientist that worked in Freiburg in the '20's and the '30's and then escaped to the United States among, during the rise of Nazis to power and his name among the names of many other Jewish scientists that escaped is now inscribed in history, you see here, Albert Einstein and many people name it and there are many books and reviews on the name, under this title which is called "Hitler's Gift". And people, the authors of these books meant the gift that Hitler gave to the United States basically which started really the conversion of American science from descriptive to more mechanistic as we know it these days. And it's not only in physics but it's also in biology, this is a review written by Eugene Kennedy at Harvard Medical School and you can see here some of them, like Fritz Lipmann, probably one of the greatest biochemists that ever walked on the face of earth. And here is Rudolf Schoenheimer that I'm going to talk about and Konrad Bloch, the discovery of the biosynthetic pathway of cholesterol. And Rudolf Schoenheimer used a very simple technique, he used labelled amino acids, heavy isotope labelled amino acid, he did a pulse chase experiment, he fed the amino acids into rats, the amino acids labelled the proteins and then he found that the label is phasing out. And he concluded that proteins are in a dynamic state. And this is taken from his obituary, he committed suicide in '41 and the New York Times said that his work had established that the living body is a chemical laboratory where varied and complex transformations of matter are taking place incessantly. He summarised his lectures, actually his successor summarised his lecture in a small book called "The Dynamic State of Body Constituents". But the idea was not easily accepted and here came 20 years later a paper by David Hogness, probably the founding father of modern genetics or fly genetics, Mel Cohan, Jacques Monod that you heard so much about him. And they challenged the idea and again I'm not going to tell you about all the experiments, just to read you part of their discussion saying there seems to be at present no conclusive evidence that the protein molecules within the cells of mammalian tissues are in a dynamic state. Remember Rudolf Schoenheimer called his book "The Dynamic State of Body Constituents". And they are not shying out and they are using his very words. Moreover our experiments have shown that proteins of growing E-coli are static. They stay like stones, they don't move, they don't wear and tear. Therefore it seems necessary to conclude that the synthesis and maintenance of proteins within growing cells is not necessarily or inherently associated with a dynamic state, again dynamic state. The 2 words that were used by Schoenheimer are repeated twice in the discussion within 4 lines. So if these big scientist, great scientists, tell you that proteins don't degrade, you should better believe them and stop working on it. And again I am not cynical about this because these were very serious scientists, I just show you the spirit of the attitude at the time of the discovery of the double helix. But things started to move, Mel Simpson at Yale showed that protein degradation paradoxically requires metabolic energy. So this is protein degradation, normal, doesn't matter what he measured, the release of radioactivity to the medium. And once he changed the atmosphere in the incubator from oxygen to nitrogen, protein degradation ceased which didn't make any sense thermodynamically because proteins are high energy macro molecules and they should release energy during the degradation rather than digest and combust energy during their degradation. Which was thermodynamically paradoxical but it hinted that the process is controlled and specific. Whenever there is specificity and control nature pays with a coin called energy, chemically the molecule of ATP. And then came this wonderful scientist Christian de Duve, that was supposed to be here I understand and he discovered this wonderful organelle, the lysosome. And the lysosome is an intercellular organelle that contains proteases inside, it's surrounded by a membrane which protects the sharks. The protease is from the environment and the problem was how the cellular proteins are getting into the lysosomes to be degraded. And extracellular protease during, along the work of many wonderful scientists, among them Mike Brown, Joe Goldstein but many others found that proteins from the outside of the cell coming in to the cell via receptor mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis or pinocytosis. And then they are delivered via a series of vesicles that fuse with the lysosome and they pour their contents into the lysosome to be degraded. And how about intracellular proteins. Intracellular proteins, if you see here the arrow, are pinched off by micro autophagic vesicles from the cytosol, these micro autophagic vesicles become vacuoles and these vacuoles pour their contents into the lysosome to be degraded. So here people already know that proteins are degraded, both extra cellular proteins that the cells digest in the lysosome and Christian de Duve wanted to believe it also. Intracellular proteins and the problem was also always crossing the membrane, how to get into the active proteins that remember are always destructive. But then doubt started to arise whether indeed the lysosome is the organelle that degrades intracellular proteins and I will not take you through all the discussions, I just show you one table taken from a review written by Fred Goldberg, one of the pioneers in the field, in Harvard medical school showing that different proteins have different half-life times. Varying from few minutes to many hours. So how could it be that if you are engulfed in a micro autophagic vesicle that has all the cytosolic proteins in it and you're exposed to the hostile environment in the lysosome, some proteins can survive it forever while others are destroyed? This didn't sound right. And then many other discoveries were found, some of them, obviously the discovery again of Tim Hunt, the beautiful gel that he shows and probably will show here, that the same protein can change its stability. You take cyclin, it's stable all along the cell cycle and here come mitosis and bang within few minutes it's degraded. And people realise that also certain proteins change their stability so this couldn't be explained at all based on the lysosomal hypothesis. So people started to look for other explanations and just again I'm just giving you snap shots into the history, into the milestones that probably guided Avram when he started to work in the field and one of them came from Brian Poole, that was an associate of Christian de Duve at the Rockefeller University. And Brian did a brilliant experiment that I will not go into the details, what he did, he monitored the degradation of intra and extracellular proteins in the same cells. So he labelled cells to monitor their degradation but he also fed cells from the outside with otherwise labelled proteins, with proteins that were labelled with another isotope. And he monitored the degradation under controlled conditions but also under conditions in which he drugged the cell, he treated the cell with chloroquine and chloroquine inhibits the lysosome by dissipating the low intra lysosomal pH, I am sorry, I fail to tell you that the intra lysosomal pH is low, is around 5, which is optimal for the activity of the intra lysosomal proteases. And once you are incubating the cells with chloroquine which is a base like sodium hydroxide but we don't treat cells with sodium hydroxide. It dissipates the intra lysosomal pH, raises it up by 2 logs. And the lysosome is shut down. And what Brian showed, that while the intracellular degradation is not effected by the treatment with chloroquine, you see only mild effect of 17% going down from 4 to 3.3 or from 2.4 to 2.3. The extracellular degradation, the degradation of extra cellular proteins is heavily effected. So he concluded that the lysosome is involved only in the degradation of extra cellular protein because this is inhibitable by shutting down the lysosome but has nothing to do with the degradation of intracellular proteins and probably some other mysterious system is involved in their degradation. And I need to read for you and you'll read yourself the very poetic way in which he put his findings. Let's just read from the middle, not the entire experiment. The exogenous protein, the extracellular proteins will be broken down in the lysosome, why, because we could inhibit the degradation by shutting down the lysosome, while the endogenous proteins will be broken down wherever it is that endogenous proteins are broken down, somewhere, go and find it. This is really very poetic way to put things, not typical to scientists I would say but this was kind of a green light and Brian obviously started to look for this system, he died unfortunately early on, tragically. And then Avram got interested in this problem, did his post doc with Gordon Tompkins, corroborated the findings that protein degradation requires ATP on a very specific protein, that he studied at the time tyrosine amino transfer and then I joined him. In '76 then we started to look after the mechanism. Now when you start to look into a biological system obviously, into a biological problem you need a system. So the system that we picked up is the reticulocyte which is a terminally differentiating cell that doesn't have lysosome, lysosome it already expelled them out during its maturation in the bone marrow. And we started to look into the system in reticulocytes where nature provided us with a cell that doesn't have a background. At that time there was not shRNA or siRNA or knocking down or knocking in, we had to rely on nature and nature trust me always provides you with unbelievable systems. And the first paper we published in '78, and the paper was really illuminating, it was illuminating because it already took us out of paradigm. In a very simple experiment, we took high speed supernate and just the lysate, the extract of the cell and in the extract we already found an ATP dependent proteolytic activity, like here, you can see. And we used just a model substrate. But then like biochemists you want to purify the protease so you put it on a column and you start to split the system and to follow and already the first step, once we put it on an ionic change column, we split the extract into 2 crude fractions, none of the fractions had the activity. Neither fraction 1, nor fraction 1 that was the breakthrough, nor fraction 2 that came at high salt, none of them had the ATP dependent activity but we had to recombine the 2, to reconstitute the 2. Now why would this experiment, was in my opinion probably the most critical experiment we ever done. And therefore I am again taking you to the simplicity of the system. Because the paradigm in the proteolysis field was that for this Tango we need only 2 always. We need a protease and a substrate, you take trypsin, you digest proteins, you take chymotrypsin you digest proteins. Here we needed 3, we needed fraction 1, fraction 2 and the substrate. Now don't forget that fraction 1 and fraction 2 are crude fractions so who told us that fraction 1 has only 1 component, maybe it has 2, maybe it has 20, maybe it has 200. So using this thinking we made the biochemical patch clamping experiment, like Erwin Neyer and Bert Sakmann did. We took one fraction, fraction 1 and we fixed it, we kept it constant and then we took fraction 2, we put it on a column and then again we lost the activity, the complementary activity. So we went back to the column and we found fraction 2A and 2B. Then we said ok let's take 2B and fix it and go to 2A, we went to 2A and we put it on another column and now it went to 2A prime and 2M2 primes. And then we fixed the other one and so on and so forth. At the end we were very lucky and we were able to get all the principle activities of the system, not all the system and to establish the proteolytic activity but mostly to understand the action of the different components, what they are doing and I am going to show it to you in a minute. So at the end of the day we came up with about 8 or 9 factors that were all needed to be present in the test tube. And it took more than 20 years to unravel the human genome, to get the real number of the components of the ubiquitin system, which is close to 2,000. So the ubiquitin system now with all the tributaries and the kinases and the modifying enzyme is almost 7 or 8% of the totally human genome which is about 22,000 plus proteins, not taking genes, not taking into consideration obviously antibodies, spliced genes and products and so on and so forth. So it's a huge system but I think that the hint was already in this very primitive and simple, primitive code by code and simple experiment that we carried out in the late '70's. So we took one of the components, that we purified and we labelled it and we called it at that time APF1 or ATP dependent proteolysis factor 1 and we incubated it with the other factors and we found that once we are adding ATP into the system, if there is no ATP in lane 1, this iodinated labelled protein doesn't attach at all, it may appear to you now as a mystery but in a minute it will be clear. But once we are adding ATP this component, this labelled protein attaches covalently to numerous proteins in the extract. And you can see here in lane 2 that you get radio activity along the lane. And once we added into the system exogenous protein, a known bone fide substrate of the system, we started to see distinct band. So we realised already that there must be probably labelling of the substrate for degradation by the system, it cannot be that this component out of the many components, this APF1 really activates an enzyme. Because if it activates an enzyme it will probably attach to 1 or to 2 components but not to numerous ones. So I'll take you now to the ubiquitin system as we currently know it and you will see that things really get clear. So here is the substrate, the target substrate to be degraded, this is the victim, this is our protein that we want to degrade. In this case the protein is getting phosphorylated. Once it gets phosphorylated it is bound to an enzyme called E3 or ubiquitin ligase. This is the enzyme that binds ubiquitin covalently to the substrate and takes it for degradation. In the data base there are close to 1,000 ligases. So the family of ligases is the family that endow the system with a high specificity and selectivity towards its numerous substrate. And this is again one of the secretes of the system that we were after, what makes the system specific, how is it that one single protein out of many thousand in the cell is selected for degradation at one particular minute. The secret is the selective and specific recognition by the ubiquitin ligase and there are thousands of them that will recognise each a small subset of proteins. Meanwhile a small protein called ubiquitin that turned out to be our APF1, the protein that gets conjugated, that initially we didn't know what it is, gets activated by ATP, by an enzyme called E1, there is a single E1 in the data base. Transferred to another enzyme called E2, there are about 30 E2's in the data base and then bound to the substrate. And is bound covalently, it doesn't bound once, it bounds several times, the first ubiquitin to the substrate, the second ubiquitin to the first ubiquitin and the third to the second and so on and so forth. And we are building a poly ubiquitin chain which is a downstream signal for the substrate to be recognised by a protease. So here is the protease, the protease is the 26S proteasome and the structure of the 26S proteasome was resolved by Wolfgang Baumeister and Robert Huber in the Max Planck institute in Martinsried, in a beautiful study but the prediction that this protein is the one that degrades ubiquitinated proteins came by the work of Marty Rechsteiner. And ubiquitin is a bridge, it's a recognition element in trans, it binds to the substrate, to the protease and leads to unfolding of the substrate. Its injection into the proteolytic chamber which is here, it's a 2 megadalton protease, it's a huge protease, unlike any other protease that we know, it's a regulated protease and degraded into small peptides. So this is the ubiquitin system, I will not go through the chemistry, and meanwhile the ubiquitin system grew up, the data base revealed to us other ubiquitin like proteins and ubiquitin, one of them is SUMO, this is the SUMO warrior but SUMO is not the Japanese sumo warrior, it's the small ubiquitin modifier, that's the name of the protein. And you see that it's very similar to ubiquitin when you align it. Meanwhile other ubiquitin like proteins were discovered. And if we have to define the ubiquitin modifying system this day, it's not a proteolytic system anymore, but it's rather a post translational modifying system in which the modified substrate are being targeted to different purposes. Some of them are being targeted for degradation, some of them are targeted to the nuclear pore complex to be part of the nuclear pore complex, some of them are stabilised by the modification and so on and so forth. So the language of the ubiquitin system became much more rich. Let me just jump now to the very last 2 minutes, to show you the translation of the system into drugs. So again I don't have the time but I'll just give you in 2 minutes a taste why to target at all the ubiquitin system. On the left side you can imagine that the system of 2,000 proteins, if a protein is dis-regulated, either it's excessively degraded and goes below its steady state or it's not degraded and is accumulated, it will lead to disease. And one disease is obviously malignant transformation, again I'm doing a huge injustice to a complex disease but again you can imagine it very simply. On the left hand if an oncogenic protein or a growth promoting protein will not be degraded, it will signal to the cell nonstop, like beta catenin or a mutated EGF receptor and it will cause malignant transformation. And on the other hand if a tumour suppressor like B53 will be excessively degraded and this is the part of the work of Harald zur Hausen about the human papillomavirus that targets B53 for degradation, then again we shall face malignant transformation. So here you can understand why any aberration and it depends on the protein affected, will and can lead to malignant transformation and there are many other reasons for that. So now where to target the ubiquitin system, obviously the best place to target the ubiquitin system will be at the recognition plane between the substrate and the ligases because this is the broadest plane where we expect the least side effects. But the first drug was a proteasome inhibitor, still very successful drug and it's an active inhibitor, it's an inhibitor of the active site of the tryonine residue in the active site inside the proteasome. And I'll show you, this is the drug, it's called Velcade or Bortezomib, it's already in the market and I'll show you just the disease and the disease is multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a type of a blood leukaemia where b cells expand, one clone of b cell expands, monoclonal expansion of a b cell, they push away all the other normal progenitors of the bone marrow and it's a deadly disease because we are losing all other elements of the bone marrow, pathologic fractures of the vertebra, of the long bones. And here you can see these cells secret an immunoglobulin so you see that the immunoglobulin is riding, then there is a little drop here when chemotherapy started but then the patient relapses and here is treatment with a proteasome inhibitor is started and you see that the immunoglobulin go down to signify the shrinkage of the tumour. And 2 last slides, here you can see the bone marrow, just to give you an idea without being histo hematopathologist, you see on the left side the malignant bone marrow, that is homogeneous, 41% of the cell of malignant and following treatment you can see that the mass of the malignant cells went down to 1% and the bone marrow is occupied again, repopulated again with the normal progenitors. And the last one, a cousin disease which is called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and you can see here a tumour, this is a computerised tomography, a CAT scan of the chest, a section, cut section, you see here the lungs, the ribs, the sternum, the vertebra and you can see here a tumour that sits at the gate of the right lung. And you can see here that the tumour resist. So I tried in 30 minutes to take you through a huge marathon from an idea that wasn't that well accepted at the '70's and now became a major regulatory platform, not only for biological processes but also drug development. And I think that there is much to learn from this simple approach and I think that at the end of this meeting if you'll take all those simple stories that you heard from Bob and from Roger and from many others, you will see that nature is complex but the beginnings of the discoveries are always, as I said on Sunday, embarrassingly simply. So thank you very much.

Nur zwei Bemerkungen zu Beginn, von denen die eine weniger und die andere mehr mit meinem Vortrag zu tun hat. Am ersten Abend sprachen wir über Inspiration. Dieser Begriff ist sehr schwer zu definieren und zu erfassen, und ich bin der Meinung, dass eine Möglichkeit, Inspiration zu betrachten, darin besteht, sich die einfachen Geschichten der Entwicklung verschiedener Entdeckungen in der Natur anzuschauen und diesen nachzugehen und, wie ich Ihnen am ersten Abend erzählte, zu erkennen, wie einfach sie waren. Dies wird Ihnen wieder zeigen, dass, wie ich am ersten Abend betonte, jeder einzelne von Ihnen es schaffen kann, denn andernfalls ist Vieles von dem, was Sie als Ratschlag dazu zu hören bekommen, wie man in der Wissenschaft Erfolg hat, etwas, das ich zynisch als „Weisheit im Nachhinein“ bezeichne. Es gibt keine wirklichen Erfolgsgeheimnisse, an die Sie sich halten können. Natürlich spielt Mentorschaft eine Rolle, und selbstverständlich ist es wichtig, mit Leidenschaft an die Arbeit zu gehen und seine Arbeit zu lieben, und Glück und Zufall sind ebenso von Bedeutung. Dennoch glaube ich, dass es eine sehr nützliche Lektion ist, sich die tatsächlichen Entdeckungen anzuschauen und sich die Forschungsgebiete herausbildeten. Die andere Vorbemerkung bezieht sich auf die Entwicklung der Wissenschaft im Allgemeinen. Wenn Sie dem Vortrag von Bob Horvitz gestern und meinem Vortrag heute aufmerksam zugehört haben und zuhören, werden Sie feststellen, dass Wissenschaft tatsächlich sehr konservativ ist und sich langsam und auf sehr logische Art und Weise weiterentwickelt. Anfangs wollten die Menschen wissen, wie Proteine synthetisiert werden, und so begann es mit Watson und Crick, die die Information und dann das zentrale Dogma der Biologie, den Informationsfluss von der DNA zur RNA zu den Proteinen erkannten, und nur sehr wenige interessierten sich für die Zerstörung, die Idee der Zerstörung. Apoptose war überhaupt nicht bekannt. Warum sollten Proteine Selbstmord begehen, welchen Sinn hat das? Vom Proteinabbau hatte man eine vage Ahnung, aber man schrieb ihm keine Bedeutung zu. Er war eine Art von abschließendem Prozess, unspezifisch – wir freuen uns über die Proteine um uns herum, sie erfüllen all die Funktionen und dann entledigen wir uns ihrer irgendwie. Man interessierte sich für das Wie, aber maß dem Vorgang keine allzu große Bedeutung bei. Zeit verging, und auf einmal bekam dieser Prozess, die Apoptose, die in vielerlei Hinsicht ein destruktiver Prozess ist, Bedeutung, und wenn Sie jetzt diesen Forschungsbereich verfolgen, dann werden Sie sehen, dass die Apoptose und die Autophagie, die ein anderer destruktiver Prozess ist, als wichtige Regulierungsprozesse ans Licht kommen. Ich finde es sehr interessant, auch die Entwicklung von Bildung und Aufbau zu Zerstörung und Abbau über eine lange Zeit hinweg zu verfolgen. Diese Entwicklung sagt viel über die Entwicklung der Wissenschaft und die dieser Entwicklung zu Grunde liegende Logik aus. Wie Sie wissen, sind alle Proteine Aminosäureketten – das ist die einfache Art und Weise, sie zu beschreiben. Die Aminosäuren sind durch Peptidbindungen verbunden. Die Chemie ist verhältnismäßig einfach. Wir nehmen Aminosäuren, und der Pfeil, der schwarze Pfeil ist die Proteinsynthese, mit dem gesamten Mechanismus, der dahinter steht, der DNA, der RNA und dann der Regulierung mittels eines Transkriptionsfaktors, wenn wir ein Wassermolekül aus zwei Aminosäuren extrahieren und sie aneinander ausrichten, sie zusammensetzen. Die Chemie des destruktiven Prozesses ist das Gegenteil. Es handelt sich um eine hydrolytische Reaktion, bei der wir ein Wassermolekül einbringen und die beiden Aminosäuren zerlegen. Offensichtlich ist dies die Chemie, aber nicht die Biologie, denn in der Natur sind die zwei Pfeile vollständig voneinander getrennt und die Prozesse sind sehr umständlich und werden von völlig unterschiedlichen Mechanismen durchgeführt. Wenn wir also von der Chemie der Proteolyse im Körper sprechen, dann haben wir die Proteolyse schon seit Jahrzehnten erkannt, und sie vollzieht sich auf verschiedenen Ebenen der Spezifität, Selektivität und Komplexität. Die einfachste Form der Proteolyse findet offensichtlich im Magendarmkanal statt, wo jedes eintreffende Protein auf unspezifische Art und Weise verdaut wird, damit erstens das Immunsystem nicht angegriffen wird und zweitens die Proteine als Energiequelle verwendet werden können. Wenn wir uns in den Körper begeben und die Auskleidung des Magendarmkanals überqueren und stellt, topologisch betrachtet, eine Röhre dar, die den Körper durchzieht), gelangen wir in den Blutkreislauf und befinden uns somit innerhalb des Körpers, aber immer noch außerhalb der Zellen, und treffen bereits auf regulierte proteolytische Systeme wie das System der Blutgerinnung, das aus einer Kaskade proteolytischer Ereignisse besteht, die letztendlich zur Umwandlung von Fibrinogen zu Fibrin und zur Bildung des Blutkoagulums führen. Dies muss bereits ein regulierter Prozess sein. Die Blutgerinnung darf innerhalb des Blutkreislaufs nicht auf unkontrollierte Art und Weise stattfinden, dies wäre fatal und tritt häufig bei einer der am weitesten verbreiteten Krankheiten auf, dem Myokardinfarkt oder Herzinfarkt, wie er allgemein besser bekannt ist. Avram, der eigentlich mein Mentor war, bei dem ich an meiner Dissertation arbeitete, interessierte sich nicht für diese zwei Prozesse, er interessierte sich für den intrazellulären Proteinabbau, dafür, wie die Proteine der Zelle abgebaut werden. Ich schloss mich ihm 1976 als Doktorand an, als er bereits einige erste Ergebnisse gefunden hatte. Und wir begannen die Reise, die Suche nach dem Mechanismus ab diesem Punkt. Die Frage ist nun, warum Proteine überhaupt abgebaut werden. Und ich denke, mit Bezug auf die einleitenden Bemerkungen werde ich den Meilensteinen, die bereits bekannt waren, Tribut zollen, denn niemand beginnt wirklich bei Null. Heutzutage fängt man in der Biologie nicht ganz von vorne an, es gibt immer Meilensteine. Und es gibt Leute, die schon vor einem die Arbeit begannen, und ich möchte diese wunderbaren Leute hervorheben. Aber als allererstes sollten wir uns um die grundlegende Frage kümmern, warum wir überhaupt Proteine abbauen, warum Proteine nicht völlig stabil sind. Der erste Grund ist die Qualitätskontrolle. Wir leben bei 37 ° C Körpertemperatur, 21 % Sauerstoff – viele gute Gründe, warum Proteine denaturieren oder fehlerhaft gefaltet werden. Die Qualitätskontrolle hat auch mit der Biosynthese von nicht-stöchiometrischer molarer Menge von verschiedenen Untereinheiten komplexer Proteine zu tun. Dann müssen wir den Überschuss loswerden. Qualitätskontrolle ist in der Tat zu einer wichtigen Problematik der Pathogenese von Krankheiten geworden und ist ein Hauptgrund dafür, dass wir uns der Proteine entledigen müssen, die fehlerhaft gefaltet, denaturiert und nicht länger erforderlich sind. Dann haben wir die Steuerung von Prozessen. Darüber haben Sie gestern etwas von Roger Tsien gehört. Er zeigte Ihnen die schöne Teilung von Zellen, die Entdeckung von Tim und von Lee Hartwell, Tim Hunt, Lee Hartwell, Paul Nurse. Der Zellzyklus, mit vielen Prozessen zu jedem Zeitpunkt. Wir müssen Proteine entfernen, die funktionsfähig und gesund sind, aber die wir nicht mehr benötigen. Und dies ist ein Weg, auf dem die Natur Prozesse steuert, Transkriptionsregulatoren, p53, Meek, NF-kappaB, FOS, JUN Wir können uns natürlich vorstellen, warum die Natur solch einen aufwändigen Weg wählte, um ein Protein zu beseitigen, warum sie es nicht bindet, es phosphoryliert oder dephosphoryliert, denn wir kennen bereits andere Regulierungsmechanismen, und Sie werden von Eddie Fischer etwas über diese anderen Regulierungsmechanismen erfahren. Aber denken Sie darüber nach, und vielleicht werden wir heute Nachmittag darüber diskutieren, warum man eher einen solch aufwändigen Weg wählen sollte, um ein gesundes Protein zu entsorgen, anstatt seine Aktivität auf einem anderen Weg zu regulieren. Und offensichtlich müssen wir, um den differenzierten und morphogenetischen Zustand der Gewebe aufrechtzuerhalten, Proteine dauerhaft beseitigen, und unglücklicherweise kehren einige von ihnen bei bösartigen Veränderungen zurück. Der Gründervater dieses Fachgebiets – wobei es wiederum sehr schwierig ist, den Beginn des Fachgebiets zu bestimmen – war Rudolf Schönheimer, ein deutscher jüdischer Wissenschaftler, der in den 1920er und 1930er Jahren in Freiburg arbeitete und dann in die Vereinigten Staaten flüchtete, als die Nazis an die Macht kamen. Zusammen mit den Namen vieler anderer jüdischer Wissenschaftler, die damals flohen, ist sein Name nun in die Geschichte eingeschrieben. Zu diesen gehören Albert Einstein und viele andere, und es gibt viele Bücher und Aufsätze zu diesem Thema, das als “Hitlers Geschenk” bekannt ist. Die Autoren dieser Bücher möchten damit sagen, dass Hitler den Vereinigten Staaten ein Geschenk machte, welches im Wesentlichen dazu führte, dass sich die amerikanische Naturwissenschaft von einer deskriptiven zu einer mehr mechanistischen Wissenschaft wandelte, wie wir sie heute kennen. Dies betrifft nicht nur die Physik, sondern auch die Biologie. Hier haben wir einen Aufsatz, der von Eugene Kennedy an der Harvard Medical School verfasst wurde, und Sie können hier einige von diesen Wissenschaftlern sehen, wie Fritz Lipmann, wahrscheinlich einer der bedeutendsten Biochemiker, die je geboren wurden. Hier sind Rudolf Schönheimer, von dem ich gleich sprechen werde, und Konrad Bloch, denen wir die Entdeckung der Einzelschritte der Biosynthese von Cholesterol verdanken. Rudolf Schönheimer bediente sich eines sehr einfachen Verfahrens. Er verwendete markierte Aminosäuren, mit schweren Isotopen markierte Aminosäuren, führte ein Pulse-Chase-Experiment durch, verfütterte die Aminosäuren an Ratten, die Aminosäuren markierten die Proteine, und dann stellte er fest, dass die Markierung allmählich verschwand. Er schlussfolgerte, dass Proteine sich in einem dynamischen Zustand befinden. Dies hier stammt aus seinem Nachruf – er beging 1941 Selbstmord –, und die New York Times schrieb, dass seine Arbeit nachgewiesen habe, dass der lebende Körper ein chemisches Labor ist, in dem unaufhörlich verschiedene komplexe Umwandlungen von Stoffen stattfinden. Er – oder vielmehr sein Nachfolger – fasste seine Vorträge in einem kleinen Buch mit dem Titel „The Dynamic State of Body Constituents“ zusammen. Dieses Konzept wurde jedoch nicht ohne weiteres akzeptiert. oder der Genetik der Fliegen ist, Mel Cohan und Jacques Monod, über den Sie schon viel gehört haben. Sie hinterfragten dieses Konzept – wieder werde ich Ihnen nicht alles über die Experimente erzählen, sondern Ihnen nur einen Auszug aus ihrer Diskussion vorlesen, in der gesagt wird, dass es derzeit kein stichhaltiges Beweismaterial dafür gebe, dass sich die Moleküle in den Zellen der Gewebe von Säugetieren in einem dynamischen Zustand befinden. Erinnern Sie sich daran, dass Rudolf Schönheimer seinem Buch den Titel „The Dynamic State of Body Constituents“ gab. Sie scheuen nicht vor der Konfrontation zurück, und sie verwenden seine eigenen Worte. Darüber hinaus haben unsere Experimente gezeigt, dass die Proteine von wachsenden E.coli-Bakterien statisch sind. Sie sind wie Steine, sie bewegen sich nicht, sie verschleißen nicht. Daher scheint die Schlussfolgerung unumgänglich, dass die Synthese und Aufrechterhaltung von Proteinen in wachsenden Zellen nicht notwendigerweise oder von Natur aus mit einem dynamischen Zustand in Zusammenhang steht Die beiden von Schönheimer verwendeten Worte werden in dieser Diskussion innerhalb von vier Zeilen zweimal wiederholt. Wenn Ihnen also diese bedeutenden Wissenschaftler, diese großen Wissenschaftler sagen, dass Proteine nicht abgebaut werden, dann sollten Sie Ihnen besser Glauben schenken und nicht weiter daran forschen. Ich meine dies wiederum nicht zynisch, denn es handelte sich wirklich um sehr ernstzunehmende Wissenschaftler Aber allmählich veränderten sich die Dinge. Mel Simpson an der Yale University wies nach, dass der Proteinabbau paradoxerweise Stoffwechselenergie erforderte. Dies also ist der Proteinabbau, normal, es spielt keine Rolle, was er gemessen hatte, die Freisetzung von Radioaktivität in das Medium. Sobald er die Atmosphäre innerhalb des Inkubators von Sauerstoff zu Stickstoff veränderte, wurde der Proteinabbau angehalten. Aus thermodynamischer Sicht ergab das keinen Sinn, da Proteine energiereiche Makromoleküle sind und während des Abbaus Energie freisetzen sollten, anstatt Energie aufzunehmen und zu verbrennen. Thermodynamisch betrachtet war das paradox, aber es deutete darauf hin, dass der Prozess gesteuert und spezifisch ist. Wo immer es Spezifität und Steuerung gibt, bezahlt die Natur mit einer Münze namens Energie, chemisch gesehen mit dem ATP-Molekül. Und dann kam dieser wunderbare Wissenschaftler Christian de Duve dazu, der, wie ich höre, hier sein sollte, und er entdeckte dieses wunderbare Organell, das Lysosom. Das Lysosom ist ein interzelluläres Organell, das Proteasen enthält und von einer Membran umgeben ist, die die Haie, die Proteasen, vor der Umwelt schützt. Die Frage war, wie die zellulären Proteine in die Lysosome hineingelangen, um abgebaut zu werden. Durch die Arbeit vieler wunderbarer Wissenschaftler, darunter Mike Brown, Joe Goldstein und viele andere, fand man heraus, dass die extrazelluläre Protease die Endozytose oder Phagozytose oder Pinozytose der Proteine bewirkt, die von außerhalb der Zelle mittels eines Rezeptors in die Zelle hineingelangen. Dann werden die Proteine durch eine Folge von Vesikeln, die sich mit dem Lysosom zusammenschließen, weiter transportiert, und sie geben ihren Inhalt in das Lysosom ab, damit er dort abgebaut wird. Wie verhält es sich mit intrazellulären Proteinen? Intrazelluläre Proteine werden, wenn Sie den Pfeil hier betrachten, von autophagischen Mikro-Vesikeln vom Zytosol abgeschnürt. Diese autophagischen Mikro-Vesikel werden zu Vakuolen, und diese Vakuolen geben ihren Inhalt in das Lysosom ab, damit er dort abgebaut wird. Man weiß hier also bereits, dass Proteine abgebaut werden, sowohl die extrazellulären Proteine, die von den Zellen im Lysosom verdaut werden, und, wie Christian de Duve glauben wollte, auch die intrazellulären Proteine. Problematisch war hier immer auch das Überqueren der Membran Doch dann erhoben sich erste Zweifel, ob das Lysosom tatsächlich das Organell ist, das die intrazellulären Proteine abbaut. Ich will Sie nicht durch all die Diskussionen führen, sondern zeige Ihnen nur eine Aufstellung aus einem Artikel, der von Fred Goldberg, einem der Pioniere dieses Fachgebiets, an der Harvard Medical School verfasst wurde. Sie zeigt, dass unterschiedliche Proteine unterschiedliche Halbwertszeiten haben, die von wenigen Minuten bis zu mehreren Stunden variieren können. Wie konnte es möglich sein, dass, umflossen von einem autophagischen Mikro-Vesikel und der feindlichen Umgebung im Lysosom ausgesetzt, einige Proteine ewig überleben konnten, während andere zerstört wurden? Dies klang nicht richtig. Dann wurden viele weitere Entdeckungen gemacht, darunter natürlich wiederum die Entdeckung von Tim Hunt, das wunderschöne Gel, das er [immer] vorführt und wahrscheinlich auch hier vorführen wird, die Entdeckung, dass dasselbe Protein seine Stabilität verändern kann. Nehmen Sie den Zellzyklus – das Protein ist während des gesamten Zellzyklus stabil, dann findet die Mitose statt, und auf einmal wird es innerhalb weniger Minuten abgebaut. Man erkannte, dass auch bestimmte andere Proteine ihre Stabilität verändern können, und das konnte auf der Grundlage der Lysosom-Hypothese überhaupt nicht erklärt werden. Man begann daher, nach anderen Erklärungen zu suchen. Wieder gebe ich Ihnen nur Momentaufnahmen aus der Geschichte, Schnappschüsse von den Meilensteinen, die Avram wahrscheinlich leiteten, als er in diesem Gebiet zu arbeiten begann. Einer dieser Meilensteine ist Brian Poole zu verdanken, einem Kollegen von Christian de Duve an der Rockefeller University. Brian führte ein brillantes Experiment durch – ich werde nicht auf die Details eingehen – und beobachtete den Abbau intra- und extrazellulärer Proteine in denselben Zellen. Er markierte die Zellen, um den Abbau zu verfolgen, aber er verfütterte auch Zellen von außerhalb mit anders markierten Proteinen, mit Proteinen, die mit einem anderen Isotop markiert waren. Er beobachtete den Abbau unter kontrollierten Bedingungen, aber auch unter Bedingungen, bei denen er die Zellen mit Medikamenten behandelte. Er führte ihnen Chloroquin zu. Chloroquin hemmt das Lysosom, indem es den niedrigen intra-lysosomalen pH-Wert zerstört. Ich bitte um Entschuldigung – ich hatte Ihnen noch nicht gesagt, dass im Inneren des Lysosoms ein niedriger pH-Wert von ungefähr 5 herrscht, der für die Aktivität der intra-lysosomalen Proteasen optimal ist. Chloroquin ist eine Base, ähnlich wie Natriumhydroxid. Allerdings behandelt man Zellen nicht mit Natriumhydroxid. Wenn Sie die Zellen mit Chloroquin inkubieren, ändert dies den intra-lysosomalen pH-Wert und erhöht ihn um zwei Logarithmen, und das Lysosom stellt seine Aktivität ein. Brian wies nach, dass der extrazelluläre Abbau, der Abbau extrazellulärer Proteine, in hohem Maße beeinträchtigt wird, während der intrazelluläre Abbau durch die Behandlung mit Chloroquin kaum beeinflusst wird. Man erkennt nur eine leichte Auswirkung, der Abbau reduziert sich um 17 % von 4 auf 3,3 oder von 2,4 auf 2,3. Somit gelangte er zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass das Lysosom nur am Abbau extrazellulären Proteins beteiligt ist, denn dieser Abbau kann gehemmt werden, wenn man das Lysosom stilllegt, dass es aber nichts mit dem Abbau intrazellulärer Proteine zu tun hat und dass wahrscheinlich ein anderes geheimnisvolles System am Abbau dieser Proteine beteiligt ist. Ich muss Ihnen vorlesen, auf welche sehr poetische Art und Weise er seine Erkenntnisse in Worte fasste, und Sie werden es selbst lesen. Lassen Sie uns etwas aus dem Mittelteil lesen, nicht das gesamte Experiment. indem wir das Lysosom stilllegten – „wohingegen die endogenen Proteine dort zerlegt werden, wo auch immer endogene Proteine zerlegt werden.“ Irgendwo – gehen Sie hin und finden Sie heraus, wo. Das ist wirklich sehr poetisch ausgedrückt und, wie ich finde, nicht typisch für Naturwissenschaftler. Es war eine Art von grünem Licht, und natürlich begann Brian, nach diesem System Ausschau zu halten. Leider starb er schon früh auf tragische Weise. Dann begann Avram, sich für diese Fragestellung zu interessieren. Er promovierte bei Gordon Tompkins, bestätigte die Erkenntnis, dass für den Proteinabbau ATP bei einem sehr spezifischen Protein erforderlich ist, das er zu diesem Zeitpunkt untersuchte Wenn man beginnt, ein biologisches System, eine biologische Fragestellung zu untersuchen, dann braucht man selbstverständlich ein System. Das System, das wir uns aussuchten, war der Retikulozyt. Dabei handelt es sich um eine begrenzt differenzierende Zelle, die nicht über ein Lysosom verfügt, da sie während ihres Heranreifens im Knochenmark das Lysosom bereits ausgestoßen hat. Wir fingen an, das System in den Retikulozyten zu untersuchen, mit denen uns die Natur eine Zelle zur Verfügung stellte, die keinen Hintergrund hat. Damals gab es weder shRNA noch siRNA, keine An- und Abschaltung, wir mussten uns auf die Natur verlassen Sie war aufschlussreich, denn sie führte uns bereits über das Paradigma hinaus. In einem sehr einfachen Experiment verwendeten wir ein Hochgeschwindigkeits-Supernat und nur das Lysat, den Zellextrakt. In dem Extrakt stellten wir schon eine ATP-abhängige proteolytische Aktivität fest, wie Sie hier sehen können. Wir verwendeten einfach ein Modell-Substrat. Doch dann möchte man wie Biochemiker die Protease jedoch in reiner Form gewinnen. Also bedienten wir uns einer Trennsäule und begannen, das System aufzuspalten. Nachdem wir das Extrakt in einen Ionenaustauscher gegeben hatten, spalteten wir es bereits im ersten Schritt in zwei grobe Teile auf. Keiner dieser beiden wies die Aktivität auf. Weder Teil 1, was den Durchbruch bedeutete, noch Teil 2, der sich bei hohem Salzgehalt ergab, zeigte die ATP-abhängige Aktivität. Wir mussten die beiden Teile wieder miteinander kombinieren, wir mussten die Kombination der beiden wiederherstellen. Dieses Experiment war meiner Ansicht nach das wichtigste Experiment, das wir je durchgeführt hatten. Daher nehme ich Sie wieder mit zu der Einfachheit des Systems. Das Paradigma auf dem Gebiet der Proteolyse besagte, dass für diesen Tango immer nur zwei Partner erforderlich waren. Wir benötigen eine Protease und ein Substrat. Wenn man Trypsin einsetzt, werden Proteine verdaut, wenn man Chymotrypsin einsetzt, werden Proteine verdaut. Hier benötigten wir drei Teile, wir benötigten Teil 1, Teil 2 und das Substrat. Vergessen Sie nicht, dass Teil 1 und Teil 2 grobe Teile sind. Wer sagt uns, dass Teil 1 nur eine Komponente enthält – vielleicht enthält er 2 Komponenten, vielleicht 20, vielleicht 200. Mit Hilfe dieser Überlegungen führten wir das biochemische Patch-Clamp-Experiment durch, wie Erwin Neher und Bert Sakmann dies taten. Wir nahmen einen Teil, Teil 1, und fixierten ihn, hielten ihn konstant, und dann nahmen wir Teil 2, brachten ihn in eine Trennsäule ein und verloren wieder die Aktivität, die komplementäre Aktivität. Wir gingen also zur Trennsäule zurück und entdeckten die Teile 2A und 2B. Dann sagten wir uns: Gut, wir nehmen 2B und fixieren diesen Teil und gehen dann zu 2A über. Dann gingen wird zu 2A und brachten diesen Teil in eine weitere Trennsäule, und nun ging es weiter zu 2A’ und 2M’’. Dann fixierten wir den anderen Teil und so weiter und so fort. Letztendlich hatten wir sehr viel Glück und konnten alle grundlegenden Aktivitäten des Systems feststellen, nicht das gesamte System, und die proteolytische Aktivität nachweisen. Vor allem konnten wir die Aktivitäten der verschiedenen Komponenten verstehen, was sie jeweils taten. Das werde ich Ihnen gleich zeigen. Im Endeffekt hatten wir schließlich acht oder neun Faktoren, die alle im Reagenzglas vorliegen mussten. Es dauerte mehr als 20 Jahre, um das menschliche Genom zu enträtseln und die tatsächliche Anzahl der Komponenten des Ubiquitin-Systems zu bestimmen, die nahe bei 2000 liegt. Das Ubiquitin-System mit allen Zubringern, den Kinasen und den modifizierenden Enzymen macht fast 7 oder 8 % des gesamten menschlichen Genoms aus, das ungefähr 22.000 und mehr Proteine umfasst, wobei hier natürlich Antikörper, gespleißte Gene und Produkte etc. nicht berücksichtigt sind. Es handelt sich also um ein umfangreiches System. Doch ich glaube, dass bereits dieses sehr "primitive" und einfache Experiment, das wir in den späten 1970er Jahren durchführten, einen Hinweis auf dieses System darstellte. Wir nahmen also eine der Komponenten, die wir in einer reinen Form gewonnen hatten, und markierten sie. Damals bezeichneten wir diese Komponente als APF1 oder ATP-abhängigen Proteolyse-Faktor 1. Wir inkubierten diesen Faktor mit den anderen Faktoren und stellten bei Zugabe von ATP in das System fest, dass dieses mit Jod markierte Protein sich überhaupt nicht anheftet, wenn sich kein ATP in Bahn 1 befindet. Das mag Ihnen jetzt noch rätselhaft erscheinen, aber in einer Minute wird es klar werden. Sobald wir ATP hinzufügen, heftet sich diese Komponente, dieses markierte Protein kovalent an zahlreiche Proteine in dem Extrakt. Hier in Bahn 2 können Sie sehen, dass man entlang dieser Bahn Radioaktivität bekommt. Als wir dem System exogenes Protein hinzufügten, ein bekanntes angemessenes Substrat des Systems, begannen wir, ein deutliches Band zu sehen. Somit erkannten wir bereits, dass es wahrscheinlich eine Markierung des Substrats für den Abbau durch das System geben muss. Es ist unmöglich, dass diese Komponente von den vielen Komponenten, dieses APF 1 tatsächlich ein Enzym aktiviert. Denn wenn es ein Enzym aktiviert, dann wird es sich wahrscheinlich an eine oder zwei Komponenten anheften, aber nicht an zahlreiche. Ich gehe mit Ihnen jetzt zum Ubiquitin-System, wie wir es zur Zeit kennen, und Sie werden sehen, dass die Dinge jetzt wirklich klar werden. Hier ist also das Substrat, das Ziel-Substrat, das abgebaut werden soll. Dies ist das Opfer, das ist unser Protein, das wir abbauen möchten. In diesem Fall wird das Protein phosphoryliert. Sobald es phosphoryliert wird, wird es an ein E3 oder Ubiquitin-Ligase genanntes Enzym gebunden. Das ist das Enzym, das Ubiquitin kovalent an das Substrat bindet und dem Abbau zuführt. In der Datenbank befinden sich nahezu 1.000 Ligasen. Die Familie der Ligasen ist die Familie, die das System mit einem hohen Maß an Spezifität und Selektivität in Bezug auf die zahlreichen Substrate ausstattet. Das ist wieder eines der Geheimnisse des Systems, denen wir auf der Spur waren: Was macht das System spezifisch? Wie kommt es dazu, dass ein einziges Protein von den vielen Tausend Proteinen in der Zelle zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt zum Abbau ausgewählt wird? Das Geheimnis besteht in der selektiven und spezifischen Erkennung durch die Ubiquitin-Ligase. Von diesen gibt es Tausende, von denen eine jede eine kleine Untereinheit von Proteinen erkennt. Währenddessen wird ein kleines Protein namens Ubiquitin, das sich als unser APF1 erwies, das Protein, das konjugiert wird und von dem wir anfangs nicht wussten, was es war, durch ATP aktiviert, und zwar von einem als E1 bezeichneten Enzym. In der Datenbank gibt es ein einziges E1. Dann wird es auf ein anderes Enzym namens E2 übertragen. Es liegen ungefähr 30 E2 in der Datenbank vor. Anschließend wird es an das Substrat gebunden. Es wird kovalent gebunden, nicht einfach, sondern mehrfach. Das erste Ubiquitin wird an das Substrat gebunden, das zweite Ubiquitin wird an das erste Ubiquitin und das dritte an das zweite gebunden und so weiter und so fort. Es bildet sich eine Poly-Ubiquitin-Kette, die ein nachgeschaltetes Signal darstellt, damit das Substrat von einer Protease erkannt wird. Hier ist also die Protease, die Protease ist das 26S-Proteasom. Die Struktur des 26S-Proteasoms wurde von Wolfgang Baumeister und Robert Huber am Max Planck-Institut in Martinsried in einer sehr schönen Studie aufgeklärt. Die Vorhersage, dass dieses Protein dasjenige ist, welches ubiquitinierte Proteine abbaut, stammt jedoch aus der Arbeit von Marty Rechsteiner. Ubiquitin ist eine Brücke, ein Erkennungselement, ein Eingang. Es bindet sich an das Substrat, an die Protease und führt zur Auffaltung des Substrats. Hier ist die Injektion in die proteolytische Kammer dargestellt. Es handelt sich um eine 2 Megadalton-Protease, eine sehr große Protease, im Gegensatz zu allen anderen uns bekannten Proteasen. Es ist eine regulierte Protease, und das Protein wird zu kleinen Peptiden abgebaut. Das ist also das Ubiquitin-System – ich werde nicht die Chemie durchexerzieren –, und das Ubiquitin-System wuchs, und die Datenbank enthüllte uns andere Ubiquitin-ähnliche Proteine. Eines davon ist SUMO, das ist der SUMO-Krieger, aber es handelt sich nicht um den japanischen Sumo-Kämpfer, sondern um den kleinen Ubiquitin-Modifizierer (small ubiquitin modifier) – das ist der Name des Proteins. Sie sehen, dass es dem Ubiquitin sehr ähnlich ist, wenn man es daran ausrichtet. Inzwischen wurden weitere Ubiquitin-ähnliche Proteine entdeckt. Und wenn wir heute das System der Ubiquitin-Modifizierung definieren sollen, so handelt es sich nicht länger um ein proteolytisches System, sondern eher um ein post-translationales Modifizierungs-System, in dem auf die modifizierten Substrate zu unterschiedlichen Zwecken abgezielt wird. Einige werden gezielt abgebaut, einige werden ausgewählt, um Teil des Kernporen-Komplexes zu werden, andere werden durch die Modifizierung stabilisiert und so weiter und so fort. Die Sprache des Ubiquitin-Systems wurde sehr viel reicher. Lassen Sie mich nun zu den letzten zwei Minuten meines Vortrags springen und Ihnen die Umsetzung dieses Systems in Medikamente zeigen. Wieder habe ich nicht die Zeit, aber ich werde Ihnen in zwei Minuten einen Vorgeschmack darauf geben, warum man sich auf das Ubiquitin-System konzentrieren sollte. Wenn in diesem System von 2.000 Proteinen ein Protein fehlreguliert ist, verursacht es Krankheiten. Entweder wird es im Übermaß abgebaut und unterschreitet seinen Gleichgewichtszustand, oder es wird nicht abgebaut und reichert sich an. Maligne Transformationen sind eine solche Krankheit – ich tue einer komplexen Erkrankung hiermit massives Unrecht, aber Sie können sich das sehr einfach vorstellen. Links sehen Sie, dass ein onkogenes Protein oder ein Wachstum förderndes Protein, wenn es nicht abgebaut wird, der Zelle ein Nonstop-Wachstum signalisiert. Dies ist der Fall bei beta-Catenin oder einem mutierten EGF-Rezeptor und wird zu malignen Transformationen führen. Wenn andererseits ein Tumorsuppressor wie B53 im Übermaß abgebaut wird, dann sind wir ebenfalls mit malignen Transformationen konfrontiert. Mit diesem Thema hat sich Harald zur Hausen in seiner Arbeit zum Papillomvirus des Menschen, das für den gezielten Abbau von B53 verantwortlich ist, beschäftigt. Sie können also nachvollziehen, warum jede mögliche Abweichung, abhängig von dem betroffenen Protein, zu malignen Transformationen führen kann und wird. Dafür gibt es noch viele andere Ursachen. Doch worauf sollte man nun am Ubiquitin-System konkret abzielen? Offensichtlich ist die beste Stelle, die man im Ubiquitin-System gezielt untersuchen sollte, die Ebene der Erkennung zwischen dem Substrat und den Ligasen, da sie die breiteste Ebene ist, auf der die geringsten Nebenwirkungen zu erwarten sind. Das erste Medikament war jedoch ein Proteasom-Inhibitor und ist immer noch ein sehr erfolgreiches Medikament. Es handelt sich um einen aktiven Inhibitor, um einen Inhibitor auf der aktiven Seite des Threoninrests im aktiven Bereich im Inneren des Proteasoms. Dies ist das Medikament. Es ist unter dem Namen Velcade oder Bortezomib bekannt und befindet sich bereits auf dem Markt. Ich zeige Ihnen hier die entsprechende Krankheit, das multiple Myelom. Das multiple Myelom ist eine Form der Leukämie, bei der die B-Zellen sich im Übermaß vermehren. Der Klon einer B-Zelle vermehrt sich, eine monoklonale Vermehrung einer B-Zelle, und die Klone verdrängen die anderen normalen Vorläuferzellen des Knochenmarks. Die Krankheit ist tödlich, denn man verliert alle anderen Elemente des Knochenmarks und es kommt zu krankheitsbedingten Brüchen der Wirbel und der langen Knochen. Wie Sie hier sehen können, sondern diese Zellen ein Immunoglobulin ab. Der Immunoglobulinspiegel steigt an, dann kommt es zu Beginn der Chemotherapie zu einem geringfügigen Abfall, doch dann erleidet der Patient einen Rückfall. Hier beginnt die Behandlung mit einem Proteasom-Inhibitor, und Sie sehen, dass das Immunoglobulin abnimmt, was auf das Schrumpfen des Tumors hinweist. Zwei letzte Dias: Hier können Sie das Knochenmark sehen, damit Sie sich, ohne ein Hämatopathologe zu sein, eine Vorstellung machen können. Links sehen Sie das maligne Knochenmark, das homogen ist, 41 % der Zellen sind maligne Zellen, und nach der Behandlung ist die Menge der malignen Zellen auf 1 % gesunken und das Knochenmark wird wieder von normalen Vorläuferzellen besiedelt. Das letzte Dia zeigt eine verwandte Krankheit namens Non-Hodgkin-Lymphom. Hier können Sie einen Tumor erkennen, es ist eine Computertomografie des Brustkorbs, ein Teil des Brustkorbs. Man sieht hier die Lunge, die Rippen, das Sternum, die Wirbel und einen Tumor, der am Eingang des rechten Lungenflügels sitzt. Wie Sie hier sehen können, bleibt der Tumor bestehen. Ich habe versucht, Sie in 30 Minuten auf einen langen Marathon mitzunehmen – beginnend mit einer Idee, die in den 1970er Jahren noch nicht allgemein akzeptiert war, und nun zu einer bedeutenden Regulierungsplattform nicht nur für biologische Prozesse, sondern auch für die Entwicklung von Medikamenten geworden ist. Und ich bin der Ansicht, dass man von diesem einfachen Ansatz viel lernen kann und dass Sie am Ende dieses Treffens, wenn Sie all die einfachen Geschichten, die Sie von Bob und Roger und vielen anderen gehört haben, mitnehmen, erkennen werden, dass die Natur zwar komplex ist, aber die Anfänge von Entdeckungen immer, wie ich am Sonntag sagte, beschämend einfach sind. Vielen Dank. (Applaus)

Aaron Ciechanover Explains Why Proteins are not Rock Stable...
(00:05:24 - 00:07:41)


and elegantly illustrates how the ubiquitin system functions

Aaron Ciechanover (2010) - Why our Proteins Have to Die so We Shall Live

Just two comments to start, one is less related to my talk, one is more related. We were talking in the first evening about inspiration which is a very hard term to define and to sense and I think that one way to look at inspiration is just to look at the simple stories of evolvement of different discoveries in nature and to follow them and to see, as I told you in the first evening how simple they were. And how possible they were and this will tell you again as I stressed in the first evening that each and every one of you can do it because otherwise much of what you'll hear as an advice of how to succeed in science is what I call cynically wisdom in retrospect. There are no real secrets that you can follow. Obviously there is mentorship and being passionate and love what you do and serendipity and luck which are very important. But I think that looking at the real discoveries, how people really evolved, how experiments evolved and how fields develop, I think is a very useful lesson. The other one is about evolvement of science in general. If you listen carefully to Bob Horvitz talk yesterday and to mine today you will see that science really is very conservative and evolves slowly and in very logical way. People initially wanted to know how proteins are synthesised so it started with Watson and Crick understanding the information and then the central dogma in biology, the flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins and very few cared about destruction, the idea of destruction. Apoptosis wasn't known at all, why protein should commit suicide, what's the purpose of it. And protein degradation was known vaguely but people didn't attribute any importance to it, it was kind of an end process, non-specific, well we're enjoying the proteins that are around us, they fulfil all the functions and then we somehow dispose of them. But nobody really, people cared how but people didn't attribute too much importance to it. And then time came and all of a sudden this process, apoptosis which is also in many ways a destructive process and now if you follow the field you'll see how autophagy which is another destructive process are really coming into light as major regulatory processes. So I think that it's very interesting also to follow the evolvement from construction to destruction along the, a long time and it has much to say about the development and the logic behind the development of science. So proteins as you know are all chains of amino acids, that's the simple way to put them. And the amino acids are connected by peptide bonds and peptide bonds are, the chemistry is relatively simple, we take amino acids and the arrow, the black arrow is protein synthesis, with all the machinery that's behind it, the DNA, the RNA and then the regulation by a transcription factor when we are extracting a molecule of water from 2 amino acids and align them, put them together and the destructive process, the chemistry is the opposite, it's a hydrolytic reaction where we introduce a molecule of water and take the 2 amino acids apart. Obviously this is the chemistry but not the biology because the 2 arrows are completely separated from one another in nature and the processes are extremely cumbersome and carried out by completely different mechanisms. So when we talk about the chemistry of proteolysis in the body we have recognised proteolysis for decades and it's carrying at different levels of specificity and selectivity and complexity, the simplest one obviously occurs in the gastro intestinal tract where every protein that is coming in is digested in a non-discriminatory manner. First in order not to challenge the immune system, second to use proteins as a source of energy. Once we are crossing into the body, the gastro intestinal tract is actually outside the body, topologically it's a tube crossing the body. Once we are crossing the gastrointestinal lining, we are coming into the circulation so we are inside the body but still extracellular and we encounter already regulated proteolytic systems like the blood coagulation system which is a cascade of proteolytic event that at the end lead to conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin and to formation of the blood clot. This already must be regulated process, we cannot have the blood clotting in the circulation in an uncontrolled manner, it will be fatal. Like we encounter frequently in one of the most common diseases, myocardial infarction or heart attack as it is better known to the public. And Avram and I, Avram actually my mentor with whom I did my PhD work was not interested in those 2, he was interested in intracellular protein degradation, in how the proteins of the cells are degraded and I join him in '76 as a graduate student when he had already some initial findings. And we started the journey, the journey after the mechanism from that point. Now the question is at all why proteins are degraded. And I think that the introductory words, I will pay tribute to the milestone that were already known because nobody really starts from zero, you don't, in biology these days you don't start from scratch, there is always milestones. And people that were behind you, that started the work and I want to point out to these wonderful people but first of all lets go for the principle, why at all we are degrading our proteins, why proteins are not rock stable. First quality control, we are living at 37 degrees, 21% oxygen, many good reasons why to denature and misfold proteins, quality control has also to do with biosynthesis of non-stoichiometric molar base equipment of quantity of different sub units of complex protein then we have to get rid of the excess. So quality control has really become a major problem in pathogenesis of diseases and a major reason why we have to dispose proteins that are misfolded, denatured, not necessary anymore. Then controlling of processes, you heard yesterday from Roger Tsien about, he showed you the beautiful division of cells, the discovery of Tim and Lee Hartwell, Tim Hunt, Lee Hartwell, Paul Nurse. Cell cycle, from time to time many processes. We need to remove proteins that are functional, healthy, but we don't need them anymore. And this is one way that nature controls processes, transcriptional regulators, p53, Meek, NF KappaB, Fos, Jun, all these proteins that we don't need them anymore, nature disposes them. We can obviously think why nature chose such an expensive way to remove a protein, why not to sequester it now, why not to phosphorylate or dephosphorylate it because we know already on other regulatory mechanisms and you are going to hear from Eddie Fischer on other regulatory mechanisms but think about it and we may discuss it this afternoon, why to choose such an expensive way of disposing a healthy protein rather than regulating its activity via another route. And obviously in order to maintain the differentiated and morphogenetic state of tissues, we need to remove proteins permanently and unfortunately some of them come back during malignant transformations. So the founding father of the field, again it's very difficult to define the beginning of the field was Rudolf Schoenheimer, a Jewish German scientist that worked in Freiburg in the '20's and the '30's and then escaped to the United States among, during the rise of Nazis to power and his name among the names of many other Jewish scientists that escaped is now inscribed in history, you see here, Albert Einstein and many people name it and there are many books and reviews on the name, under this title which is called "Hitler's Gift". And people, the authors of these books meant the gift that Hitler gave to the United States basically which started really the conversion of American science from descriptive to more mechanistic as we know it these days. And it's not only in physics but it's also in biology, this is a review written by Eugene Kennedy at Harvard Medical School and you can see here some of them, like Fritz Lipmann, probably one of the greatest biochemists that ever walked on the face of earth. And here is Rudolf Schoenheimer that I'm going to talk about and Konrad Bloch, the discovery of the biosynthetic pathway of cholesterol. And Rudolf Schoenheimer used a very simple technique, he used labelled amino acids, heavy isotope labelled amino acid, he did a pulse chase experiment, he fed the amino acids into rats, the amino acids labelled the proteins and then he found that the label is phasing out. And he concluded that proteins are in a dynamic state. And this is taken from his obituary, he committed suicide in '41 and the New York Times said that his work had established that the living body is a chemical laboratory where varied and complex transformations of matter are taking place incessantly. He summarised his lectures, actually his successor summarised his lecture in a small book called "The Dynamic State of Body Constituents". But the idea was not easily accepted and here came 20 years later a paper by David Hogness, probably the founding father of modern genetics or fly genetics, Mel Cohan, Jacques Monod that you heard so much about him. And they challenged the idea and again I'm not going to tell you about all the experiments, just to read you part of their discussion saying there seems to be at present no conclusive evidence that the protein molecules within the cells of mammalian tissues are in a dynamic state. Remember Rudolf Schoenheimer called his book "The Dynamic State of Body Constituents". And they are not shying out and they are using his very words. Moreover our experiments have shown that proteins of growing E-coli are static. They stay like stones, they don't move, they don't wear and tear. Therefore it seems necessary to conclude that the synthesis and maintenance of proteins within growing cells is not necessarily or inherently associated with a dynamic state, again dynamic state. The 2 words that were used by Schoenheimer are repeated twice in the discussion within 4 lines. So if these big scientist, great scientists, tell you that proteins don't degrade, you should better believe them and stop working on it. And again I am not cynical about this because these were very serious scientists, I just show you the spirit of the attitude at the time of the discovery of the double helix. But things started to move, Mel Simpson at Yale showed that protein degradation paradoxically requires metabolic energy. So this is protein degradation, normal, doesn't matter what he measured, the release of radioactivity to the medium. And once he changed the atmosphere in the incubator from oxygen to nitrogen, protein degradation ceased which didn't make any sense thermodynamically because proteins are high energy macro molecules and they should release energy during the degradation rather than digest and combust energy during their degradation. Which was thermodynamically paradoxical but it hinted that the process is controlled and specific. Whenever there is specificity and control nature pays with a coin called energy, chemically the molecule of ATP. And then came this wonderful scientist Christian de Duve, that was supposed to be here I understand and he discovered this wonderful organelle, the lysosome. And the lysosome is an intercellular organelle that contains proteases inside, it's surrounded by a membrane which protects the sharks. The protease is from the environment and the problem was how the cellular proteins are getting into the lysosomes to be degraded. And extracellular protease during, along the work of many wonderful scientists, among them Mike Brown, Joe Goldstein but many others found that proteins from the outside of the cell coming in to the cell via receptor mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis or pinocytosis. And then they are delivered via a series of vesicles that fuse with the lysosome and they pour their contents into the lysosome to be degraded. And how about intracellular proteins. Intracellular proteins, if you see here the arrow, are pinched off by micro autophagic vesicles from the cytosol, these micro autophagic vesicles become vacuoles and these vacuoles pour their contents into the lysosome to be degraded. So here people already know that proteins are degraded, both extra cellular proteins that the cells digest in the lysosome and Christian de Duve wanted to believe it also. Intracellular proteins and the problem was also always crossing the membrane, how to get into the active proteins that remember are always destructive. But then doubt started to arise whether indeed the lysosome is the organelle that degrades intracellular proteins and I will not take you through all the discussions, I just show you one table taken from a review written by Fred Goldberg, one of the pioneers in the field, in Harvard medical school showing that different proteins have different half-life times. Varying from few minutes to many hours. So how could it be that if you are engulfed in a micro autophagic vesicle that has all the cytosolic proteins in it and you're exposed to the hostile environment in the lysosome, some proteins can survive it forever while others are destroyed? This didn't sound right. And then many other discoveries were found, some of them, obviously the discovery again of Tim Hunt, the beautiful gel that he shows and probably will show here, that the same protein can change its stability. You take cyclin, it's stable all along the cell cycle and here come mitosis and bang within few minutes it's degraded. And people realise that also certain proteins change their stability so this couldn't be explained at all based on the lysosomal hypothesis. So people started to look for other explanations and just again I'm just giving you snap shots into the history, into the milestones that probably guided Avram when he started to work in the field and one of them came from Brian Poole, that was an associate of Christian de Duve at the Rockefeller University. And Brian did a brilliant experiment that I will not go into the details, what he did, he monitored the degradation of intra and extracellular proteins in the same cells. So he labelled cells to monitor their degradation but he also fed cells from the outside with otherwise labelled proteins, with proteins that were labelled with another isotope. And he monitored the degradation under controlled conditions but also under conditions in which he drugged the cell, he treated the cell with chloroquine and chloroquine inhibits the lysosome by dissipating the low intra lysosomal pH, I am sorry, I fail to tell you that the intra lysosomal pH is low, is around 5, which is optimal for the activity of the intra lysosomal proteases. And once you are incubating the cells with chloroquine which is a base like sodium hydroxide but we don't treat cells with sodium hydroxide. It dissipates the intra lysosomal pH, raises it up by 2 logs. And the lysosome is shut down. And what Brian showed, that while the intracellular degradation is not effected by the treatment with chloroquine, you see only mild effect of 17% going down from 4 to 3.3 or from 2.4 to 2.3. The extracellular degradation, the degradation of extra cellular proteins is heavily effected. So he concluded that the lysosome is involved only in the degradation of extra cellular protein because this is inhibitable by shutting down the lysosome but has nothing to do with the degradation of intracellular proteins and probably some other mysterious system is involved in their degradation. And I need to read for you and you'll read yourself the very poetic way in which he put his findings. Let's just read from the middle, not the entire experiment. The exogenous protein, the extracellular proteins will be broken down in the lysosome, why, because we could inhibit the degradation by shutting down the lysosome, while the endogenous proteins will be broken down wherever it is that endogenous proteins are broken down, somewhere, go and find it. This is really very poetic way to put things, not typical to scientists I would say but this was kind of a green light and Brian obviously started to look for this system, he died unfortunately early on, tragically. And then Avram got interested in this problem, did his post doc with Gordon Tompkins, corroborated the findings that protein degradation requires ATP on a very specific protein, that he studied at the time tyrosine amino transfer and then I joined him. In '76 then we started to look after the mechanism. Now when you start to look into a biological system obviously, into a biological problem you need a system. So the system that we picked up is the reticulocyte which is a terminally differentiating cell that doesn't have lysosome, lysosome it already expelled them out during its maturation in the bone marrow. And we started to look into the system in reticulocytes where nature provided us with a cell that doesn't have a background. At that time there was not shRNA or siRNA or knocking down or knocking in, we had to rely on nature and nature trust me always provides you with unbelievable systems. And the first paper we published in '78, and the paper was really illuminating, it was illuminating because it already took us out of paradigm. In a very simple experiment, we took high speed supernate and just the lysate, the extract of the cell and in the extract we already found an ATP dependent proteolytic activity, like here, you can see. And we used just a model substrate. But then like biochemists you want to purify the protease so you put it on a column and you start to split the system and to follow and already the first step, once we put it on an ionic change column, we split the extract into 2 crude fractions, none of the fractions had the activity. Neither fraction 1, nor fraction 1 that was the breakthrough, nor fraction 2 that came at high salt, none of them had the ATP dependent activity but we had to recombine the 2, to reconstitute the 2. Now why would this experiment, was in my opinion probably the most critical experiment we ever done. And therefore I am again taking you to the simplicity of the system. Because the paradigm in the proteolysis field was that for this Tango we need only 2 always. We need a protease and a substrate, you take trypsin, you digest proteins, you take chymotrypsin you digest proteins. Here we needed 3, we needed fraction 1, fraction 2 and the substrate. Now don't forget that fraction 1 and fraction 2 are crude fractions so who told us that fraction 1 has only 1 component, maybe it has 2, maybe it has 20, maybe it has 200. So using this thinking we made the biochemical patch clamping experiment, like Erwin Neyer and Bert Sakmann did. We took one fraction, fraction 1 and we fixed it, we kept it constant and then we took fraction 2, we put it on a column and then again we lost the activity, the complementary activity. So we went back to the column and we found fraction 2A and 2B. Then we said ok let's take 2B and fix it and go to 2A, we went to 2A and we put it on another column and now it went to 2A prime and 2M2 primes. And then we fixed the other one and so on and so forth. At the end we were very lucky and we were able to get all the principle activities of the system, not all the system and to establish the proteolytic activity but mostly to understand the action of the different components, what they are doing and I am going to show it to you in a minute. So at the end of the day we came up with about 8 or 9 factors that were all needed to be present in the test tube. And it took more than 20 years to unravel the human genome, to get the real number of the components of the ubiquitin system, which is close to 2,000. So the ubiquitin system now with all the tributaries and the kinases and the modifying enzyme is almost 7 or 8% of the totally human genome which is about 22,000 plus proteins, not taking genes, not taking into consideration obviously antibodies, spliced genes and products and so on and so forth. So it's a huge system but I think that the hint was already in this very primitive and simple, primitive code by code and simple experiment that we carried out in the late '70's. So we took one of the components, that we purified and we labelled it and we called it at that time APF1 or ATP dependent proteolysis factor 1 and we incubated it with the other factors and we found that once we are adding ATP into the system, if there is no ATP in lane 1, this iodinated labelled protein doesn't attach at all, it may appear to you now as a mystery but in a minute it will be clear. But once we are adding ATP this component, this labelled protein attaches covalently to numerous proteins in the extract. And you can see here in lane 2 that you get radio activity along the lane. And once we added into the system exogenous protein, a known bone fide substrate of the system, we started to see distinct band. So we realised already that there must be probably labelling of the substrate for degradation by the system, it cannot be that this component out of the many components, this APF1 really activates an enzyme. Because if it activates an enzyme it will probably attach to 1 or to 2 components but not to numerous ones. So I'll take you now to the ubiquitin system as we currently know it and you will see that things really get clear. So here is the substrate, the target substrate to be degraded, this is the victim, this is our protein that we want to degrade. In this case the protein is getting phosphorylated. Once it gets phosphorylated it is bound to an enzyme called E3 or ubiquitin ligase. This is the enzyme that binds ubiquitin covalently to the substrate and takes it for degradation. In the data base there are close to 1,000 ligases. So the family of ligases is the family that endow the system with a high specificity and selectivity towards its numerous substrate. And this is again one of the secretes of the system that we were after, what makes the system specific, how is it that one single protein out of many thousand in the cell is selected for degradation at one particular minute. The secret is the selective and specific recognition by the ubiquitin ligase and there are thousands of them that will recognise each a small subset of proteins. Meanwhile a small protein called ubiquitin that turned out to be our APF1, the protein that gets conjugated, that initially we didn't know what it is, gets activated by ATP, by an enzyme called E1, there is a single E1 in the data base. Transferred to another enzyme called E2, there are about 30 E2's in the data base and then bound to the substrate. And is bound covalently, it doesn't bound once, it bounds several times, the first ubiquitin to the substrate, the second ubiquitin to the first ubiquitin and the third to the second and so on and so forth. And we are building a poly ubiquitin chain which is a downstream signal for the substrate to be recognised by a protease. So here is the protease, the protease is the 26S proteasome and the structure of the 26S proteasome was resolved by Wolfgang Baumeister and Robert Huber in the Max Planck institute in Martinsried, in a beautiful study but the prediction that this protein is the one that degrades ubiquitinated proteins came by the work of Marty Rechsteiner. And ubiquitin is a bridge, it's a recognition element in trans, it binds to the substrate, to the protease and leads to unfolding of the substrate. Its injection into the proteolytic chamber which is here, it's a 2 megadalton protease, it's a huge protease, unlike any other protease that we know, it's a regulated protease and degraded into small peptides. So this is the ubiquitin system, I will not go through the chemistry, and meanwhile the ubiquitin system grew up, the data base revealed to us other ubiquitin like proteins and ubiquitin, one of them is SUMO, this is the SUMO warrior but SUMO is not the Japanese sumo warrior, it's the small ubiquitin modifier, that's the name of the protein. And you see that it's very similar to ubiquitin when you align it. Meanwhile other ubiquitin like proteins were discovered. And if we have to define the ubiquitin modifying system this day, it's not a proteolytic system anymore, but it's rather a post translational modifying system in which the modified substrate are being targeted to different purposes. Some of them are being targeted for degradation, some of them are targeted to the nuclear pore complex to be part of the nuclear pore complex, some of them are stabilised by the modification and so on and so forth. So the language of the ubiquitin system became much more rich. Let me just jump now to the very last 2 minutes, to show you the translation of the system into drugs. So again I don't have the time but I'll just give you in 2 minutes a taste why to target at all the ubiquitin system. On the left side you can imagine that the system of 2,000 proteins, if a protein is dis-regulated, either it's excessively degraded and goes below its steady state or it's not degraded and is accumulated, it will lead to disease. And one disease is obviously malignant transformation, again I'm doing a huge injustice to a complex disease but again you can imagine it very simply. On the left hand if an oncogenic protein or a growth promoting protein will not be degraded, it will signal to the cell nonstop, like beta catenin or a mutated EGF receptor and it will cause malignant transformation. And on the other hand if a tumour suppressor like B53 will be excessively degraded and this is the part of the work of Harald zur Hausen about the human papillomavirus that targets B53 for degradation, then again we shall face malignant transformation. So here you can understand why any aberration and it depends on the protein affected, will and can lead to malignant transformation and there are many other reasons for that. So now where to target the ubiquitin system, obviously the best place to target the ubiquitin system will be at the recognition plane between the substrate and the ligases because this is the broadest plane where we expect the least side effects. But the first drug was a proteasome inhibitor, still very successful drug and it's an active inhibitor, it's an inhibitor of the active site of the tryonine residue in the active site inside the proteasome. And I'll show you, this is the drug, it's called Velcade or Bortezomib, it's already in the market and I'll show you just the disease and the disease is multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a type of a blood leukaemia where b cells expand, one clone of b cell expands, monoclonal expansion of a b cell, they push away all the other normal progenitors of the bone marrow and it's a deadly disease because we are losing all other elements of the bone marrow, pathologic fractures of the vertebra, of the long bones. And here you can see these cells secret an immunoglobulin so you see that the immunoglobulin is riding, then there is a little drop here when chemotherapy started but then the patient relapses and here is treatment with a proteasome inhibitor is started and you see that the immunoglobulin go down to signify the shrinkage of the tumour. And 2 last slides, here you can see the bone marrow, just to give you an idea without being histo hematopathologist, you see on the left side the malignant bone marrow, that is homogeneous, 41% of the cell of malignant and following treatment you can see that the mass of the malignant cells went down to 1% and the bone marrow is occupied again, repopulated again with the normal progenitors. And the last one, a cousin disease which is called non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, and you can see here a tumour, this is a computerised tomography, a CAT scan of the chest, a section, cut section, you see here the lungs, the ribs, the sternum, the vertebra and you can see here a tumour that sits at the gate of the right lung. And you can see here that the tumour resist. So I tried in 30 minutes to take you through a huge marathon from an idea that wasn't that well accepted at the '70's and now became a major regulatory platform, not only for biological processes but also drug development. And I think that there is much to learn from this simple approach and I think that at the end of this meeting if you'll take all those simple stories that you heard from Bob and from Roger and from many others, you will see that nature is complex but the beginnings of the discoveries are always, as I said on Sunday, embarrassingly simply. So thank you very much.

Nur zwei Bemerkungen zu Beginn, von denen die eine weniger und die andere mehr mit meinem Vortrag zu tun hat. Am ersten Abend sprachen wir über Inspiration. Dieser Begriff ist sehr schwer zu definieren und zu erfassen, und ich bin der Meinung, dass eine Möglichkeit, Inspiration zu betrachten, darin besteht, sich die einfachen Geschichten der Entwicklung verschiedener Entdeckungen in der Natur anzuschauen und diesen nachzugehen und, wie ich Ihnen am ersten Abend erzählte, zu erkennen, wie einfach sie waren. Dies wird Ihnen wieder zeigen, dass, wie ich am ersten Abend betonte, jeder einzelne von Ihnen es schaffen kann, denn andernfalls ist Vieles von dem, was Sie als Ratschlag dazu zu hören bekommen, wie man in der Wissenschaft Erfolg hat, etwas, das ich zynisch als „Weisheit im Nachhinein“ bezeichne. Es gibt keine wirklichen Erfolgsgeheimnisse, an die Sie sich halten können. Natürlich spielt Mentorschaft eine Rolle, und selbstverständlich ist es wichtig, mit Leidenschaft an die Arbeit zu gehen und seine Arbeit zu lieben, und Glück und Zufall sind ebenso von Bedeutung. Dennoch glaube ich, dass es eine sehr nützliche Lektion ist, sich die tatsächlichen Entdeckungen anzuschauen und sich die Forschungsgebiete herausbildeten. Die andere Vorbemerkung bezieht sich auf die Entwicklung der Wissenschaft im Allgemeinen. Wenn Sie dem Vortrag von Bob Horvitz gestern und meinem Vortrag heute aufmerksam zugehört haben und zuhören, werden Sie feststellen, dass Wissenschaft tatsächlich sehr konservativ ist und sich langsam und auf sehr logische Art und Weise weiterentwickelt. Anfangs wollten die Menschen wissen, wie Proteine synthetisiert werden, und so begann es mit Watson und Crick, die die Information und dann das zentrale Dogma der Biologie, den Informationsfluss von der DNA zur RNA zu den Proteinen erkannten, und nur sehr wenige interessierten sich für die Zerstörung, die Idee der Zerstörung. Apoptose war überhaupt nicht bekannt. Warum sollten Proteine Selbstmord begehen, welchen Sinn hat das? Vom Proteinabbau hatte man eine vage Ahnung, aber man schrieb ihm keine Bedeutung zu. Er war eine Art von abschließendem Prozess, unspezifisch – wir freuen uns über die Proteine um uns herum, sie erfüllen all die Funktionen und dann entledigen wir uns ihrer irgendwie. Man interessierte sich für das Wie, aber maß dem Vorgang keine allzu große Bedeutung bei. Zeit verging, und auf einmal bekam dieser Prozess, die Apoptose, die in vielerlei Hinsicht ein destruktiver Prozess ist, Bedeutung, und wenn Sie jetzt diesen Forschungsbereich verfolgen, dann werden Sie sehen, dass die Apoptose und die Autophagie, die ein anderer destruktiver Prozess ist, als wichtige Regulierungsprozesse ans Licht kommen. Ich finde es sehr interessant, auch die Entwicklung von Bildung und Aufbau zu Zerstörung und Abbau über eine lange Zeit hinweg zu verfolgen. Diese Entwicklung sagt viel über die Entwicklung der Wissenschaft und die dieser Entwicklung zu Grunde liegende Logik aus. Wie Sie wissen, sind alle Proteine Aminosäureketten – das ist die einfache Art und Weise, sie zu beschreiben. Die Aminosäuren sind durch Peptidbindungen verbunden. Die Chemie ist verhältnismäßig einfach. Wir nehmen Aminosäuren, und der Pfeil, der schwarze Pfeil ist die Proteinsynthese, mit dem gesamten Mechanismus, der dahinter steht, der DNA, der RNA und dann der Regulierung mittels eines Transkriptionsfaktors, wenn wir ein Wassermolekül aus zwei Aminosäuren extrahieren und sie aneinander ausrichten, sie zusammensetzen. Die Chemie des destruktiven Prozesses ist das Gegenteil. Es handelt sich um eine hydrolytische Reaktion, bei der wir ein Wassermolekül einbringen und die beiden Aminosäuren zerlegen. Offensichtlich ist dies die Chemie, aber nicht die Biologie, denn in der Natur sind die zwei Pfeile vollständig voneinander getrennt und die Prozesse sind sehr umständlich und werden von völlig unterschiedlichen Mechanismen durchgeführt. Wenn wir also von der Chemie der Proteolyse im Körper sprechen, dann haben wir die Proteolyse schon seit Jahrzehnten erkannt, und sie vollzieht sich auf verschiedenen Ebenen der Spezifität, Selektivität und Komplexität. Die einfachste Form der Proteolyse findet offensichtlich im Magendarmkanal statt, wo jedes eintreffende Protein auf unspezifische Art und Weise verdaut wird, damit erstens das Immunsystem nicht angegriffen wird und zweitens die Proteine als Energiequelle verwendet werden können. Wenn wir uns in den Körper begeben und die Auskleidung des Magendarmkanals überqueren und stellt, topologisch betrachtet, eine Röhre dar, die den Körper durchzieht), gelangen wir in den Blutkreislauf und befinden uns somit innerhalb des Körpers, aber immer noch außerhalb der Zellen, und treffen bereits auf regulierte proteolytische Systeme wie das System der Blutgerinnung, das aus einer Kaskade proteolytischer Ereignisse besteht, die letztendlich zur Umwandlung von Fibrinogen zu Fibrin und zur Bildung des Blutkoagulums führen. Dies muss bereits ein regulierter Prozess sein. Die Blutgerinnung darf innerhalb des Blutkreislaufs nicht auf unkontrollierte Art und Weise stattfinden, dies wäre fatal und tritt häufig bei einer der am weitesten verbreiteten Krankheiten auf, dem Myokardinfarkt oder Herzinfarkt, wie er allgemein besser bekannt ist. Avram, der eigentlich mein Mentor war, bei dem ich an meiner Dissertation arbeitete, interessierte sich nicht für diese zwei Prozesse, er interessierte sich für den intrazellulären Proteinabbau, dafür, wie die Proteine der Zelle abgebaut werden. Ich schloss mich ihm 1976 als Doktorand an, als er bereits einige erste Ergebnisse gefunden hatte. Und wir begannen die Reise, die Suche nach dem Mechanismus ab diesem Punkt. Die Frage ist nun, warum Proteine überhaupt abgebaut werden. Und ich denke, mit Bezug auf die einleitenden Bemerkungen werde ich den Meilensteinen, die bereits bekannt waren, Tribut zollen, denn niemand beginnt wirklich bei Null. Heutzutage fängt man in der Biologie nicht ganz von vorne an, es gibt immer Meilensteine. Und es gibt Leute, die schon vor einem die Arbeit begannen, und ich möchte diese wunderbaren Leute hervorheben. Aber als allererstes sollten wir uns um die grundlegende Frage kümmern, warum wir überhaupt Proteine abbauen, warum Proteine nicht völlig stabil sind. Der erste Grund ist die Qualitätskontrolle. Wir leben bei 37 ° C Körpertemperatur, 21 % Sauerstoff – viele gute Gründe, warum Proteine denaturieren oder fehlerhaft gefaltet werden. Die Qualitätskontrolle hat auch mit der Biosynthese von nicht-stöchiometrischer molarer Menge von verschiedenen Untereinheiten komplexer Proteine zu tun. Dann müssen wir den Überschuss loswerden. Qualitätskontrolle ist in der Tat zu einer wichtigen Problematik der Pathogenese von Krankheiten geworden und ist ein Hauptgrund dafür, dass wir uns der Proteine entledigen müssen, die fehlerhaft gefaltet, denaturiert und nicht länger erforderlich sind. Dann haben wir die Steuerung von Prozessen. Darüber haben Sie gestern etwas von Roger Tsien gehört. Er zeigte Ihnen die schöne Teilung von Zellen, die Entdeckung von Tim und von Lee Hartwell, Tim Hunt, Lee Hartwell, Paul Nurse. Der Zellzyklus, mit vielen Prozessen zu jedem Zeitpunkt. Wir müssen Proteine entfernen, die funktionsfähig und gesund sind, aber die wir nicht mehr benötigen. Und dies ist ein Weg, auf dem die Natur Prozesse steuert, Transkriptionsregulatoren, p53, Meek, NF-kappaB, FOS, JUN Wir können uns natürlich vorstellen, warum die Natur solch einen aufwändigen Weg wählte, um ein Protein zu beseitigen, warum sie es nicht bindet, es phosphoryliert oder dephosphoryliert, denn wir kennen bereits andere Regulierungsmechanismen, und Sie werden von Eddie Fischer etwas über diese anderen Regulierungsmechanismen erfahren. Aber denken Sie darüber nach, und vielleicht werden wir heute Nachmittag darüber diskutieren, warum man eher einen solch aufwändigen Weg wählen sollte, um ein gesundes Protein zu entsorgen, anstatt seine Aktivität auf einem anderen Weg zu regulieren. Und offensichtlich müssen wir, um den differenzierten und morphogenetischen Zustand der Gewebe aufrechtzuerhalten, Proteine dauerhaft beseitigen, und unglücklicherweise kehren einige von ihnen bei bösartigen Veränderungen zurück. Der Gründervater dieses Fachgebiets – wobei es wiederum sehr schwierig ist, den Beginn des Fachgebiets zu bestimmen – war Rudolf Schönheimer, ein deutscher jüdischer Wissenschaftler, der in den 1920er und 1930er Jahren in Freiburg arbeitete und dann in die Vereinigten Staaten flüchtete, als die Nazis an die Macht kamen. Zusammen mit den Namen vieler anderer jüdischer Wissenschaftler, die damals flohen, ist sein Name nun in die Geschichte eingeschrieben. Zu diesen gehören Albert Einstein und viele andere, und es gibt viele Bücher und Aufsätze zu diesem Thema, das als “Hitlers Geschenk” bekannt ist. Die Autoren dieser Bücher möchten damit sagen, dass Hitler den Vereinigten Staaten ein Geschenk machte, welches im Wesentlichen dazu führte, dass sich die amerikanische Naturwissenschaft von einer deskriptiven zu einer mehr mechanistischen Wissenschaft wandelte, wie wir sie heute kennen. Dies betrifft nicht nur die Physik, sondern auch die Biologie. Hier haben wir einen Aufsatz, der von Eugene Kennedy an der Harvard Medical School verfasst wurde, und Sie können hier einige von diesen Wissenschaftlern sehen, wie Fritz Lipmann, wahrscheinlich einer der bedeutendsten Biochemiker, die je geboren wurden. Hier sind Rudolf Schönheimer, von dem ich gleich sprechen werde, und Konrad Bloch, denen wir die Entdeckung der Einzelschritte der Biosynthese von Cholesterol verdanken. Rudolf Schönheimer bediente sich eines sehr einfachen Verfahrens. Er verwendete markierte Aminosäuren, mit schweren Isotopen markierte Aminosäuren, führte ein Pulse-Chase-Experiment durch, verfütterte die Aminosäuren an Ratten, die Aminosäuren markierten die Proteine, und dann stellte er fest, dass die Markierung allmählich verschwand. Er schlussfolgerte, dass Proteine sich in einem dynamischen Zustand befinden. Dies hier stammt aus seinem Nachruf – er beging 1941 Selbstmord –, und die New York Times schrieb, dass seine Arbeit nachgewiesen habe, dass der lebende Körper ein chemisches Labor ist, in dem unaufhörlich verschiedene komplexe Umwandlungen von Stoffen stattfinden. Er – oder vielmehr sein Nachfolger – fasste seine Vorträge in einem kleinen Buch mit dem Titel „The Dynamic State of Body Constituents“ zusammen. Dieses Konzept wurde jedoch nicht ohne weiteres akzeptiert. oder der Genetik der Fliegen ist, Mel Cohan und Jacques Monod, über den Sie schon viel gehört haben. Sie hinterfragten dieses Konzept – wieder werde ich Ihnen nicht alles über die Experimente erzählen, sondern Ihnen nur einen Auszug aus ihrer Diskussion vorlesen, in der gesagt wird, dass es derzeit kein stichhaltiges Beweismaterial dafür gebe, dass sich die Moleküle in den Zellen der Gewebe von Säugetieren in einem dynamischen Zustand befinden. Erinnern Sie sich daran, dass Rudolf Schönheimer seinem Buch den Titel „The Dynamic State of Body Constituents“ gab. Sie scheuen nicht vor der Konfrontation zurück, und sie verwenden seine eigenen Worte. Darüber hinaus haben unsere Experimente gezeigt, dass die Proteine von wachsenden E.coli-Bakterien statisch sind. Sie sind wie Steine, sie bewegen sich nicht, sie verschleißen nicht. Daher scheint die Schlussfolgerung unumgänglich, dass die Synthese und Aufrechterhaltung von Proteinen in wachsenden Zellen nicht notwendigerweise oder von Natur aus mit einem dynamischen Zustand in Zusammenhang steht Die beiden von Schönheimer verwendeten Worte werden in dieser Diskussion innerhalb von vier Zeilen zweimal wiederholt. Wenn Ihnen also diese bedeutenden Wissenschaftler, diese großen Wissenschaftler sagen, dass Proteine nicht abgebaut werden, dann sollten Sie Ihnen besser Glauben schenken und nicht weiter daran forschen. Ich meine dies wiederum nicht zynisch, denn es handelte sich wirklich um sehr ernstzunehmende Wissenschaftler Aber allmählich veränderten sich die Dinge. Mel Simpson an der Yale University wies nach, dass der Proteinabbau paradoxerweise Stoffwechselenergie erforderte. Dies also ist der Proteinabbau, normal, es spielt keine Rolle, was er gemessen hatte, die Freisetzung von Radioaktivität in das Medium. Sobald er die Atmosphäre innerhalb des Inkubators von Sauerstoff zu Stickstoff veränderte, wurde der Proteinabbau angehalten. Aus thermodynamischer Sicht ergab das keinen Sinn, da Proteine energiereiche Makromoleküle sind und während des Abbaus Energie freisetzen sollten, anstatt Energie aufzunehmen und zu verbrennen. Thermodynamisch betrachtet war das paradox, aber es deutete darauf hin, dass der Prozess gesteuert und spezifisch ist. Wo immer es Spezifität und Steuerung gibt, bezahlt die Natur mit einer Münze namens Energie, chemisch gesehen mit dem ATP-Molekül. Und dann kam dieser wunderbare Wissenschaftler Christian de Duve dazu, der, wie ich höre, hier sein sollte, und er entdeckte dieses wunderbare Organell, das Lysosom. Das Lysosom ist ein interzelluläres Organell, das Proteasen enthält und von einer Membran umgeben ist, die die Haie, die Proteasen, vor der Umwelt schützt. Die Frage war, wie die zellulären Proteine in die Lysosome hineingelangen, um abgebaut zu werden. Durch die Arbeit vieler wunderbarer Wissenschaftler, darunter Mike Brown, Joe Goldstein und viele andere, fand man heraus, dass die extrazelluläre Protease die Endozytose oder Phagozytose oder Pinozytose der Proteine bewirkt, die von außerhalb der Zelle mittels eines Rezeptors in die Zelle hineingelangen. Dann werden die Proteine durch eine Folge von Vesikeln, die sich mit dem Lysosom zusammenschließen, weiter transportiert, und sie geben ihren Inhalt in das Lysosom ab, damit er dort abgebaut wird. Wie verhält es sich mit intrazellulären Proteinen? Intrazelluläre Proteine werden, wenn Sie den Pfeil hier betrachten, von autophagischen Mikro-Vesikeln vom Zytosol abgeschnürt. Diese autophagischen Mikro-Vesikel werden zu Vakuolen, und diese Vakuolen geben ihren Inhalt in das Lysosom ab, damit er dort abgebaut wird. Man weiß hier also bereits, dass Proteine abgebaut werden, sowohl die extrazellulären Proteine, die von den Zellen im Lysosom verdaut werden, und, wie Christian de Duve glauben wollte, auch die intrazellulären Proteine. Problematisch war hier immer auch das Überqueren der Membran Doch dann erhoben sich erste Zweifel, ob das Lysosom tatsächlich das Organell ist, das die intrazellulären Proteine abbaut. Ich will Sie nicht durch all die Diskussionen führen, sondern zeige Ihnen nur eine Aufstellung aus einem Artikel, der von Fred Goldberg, einem der Pioniere dieses Fachgebiets, an der Harvard Medical School verfasst wurde. Sie zeigt, dass unterschiedliche Proteine unterschiedliche Halbwertszeiten haben, die von wenigen Minuten bis zu mehreren Stunden variieren können. Wie konnte es möglich sein, dass, umflossen von einem autophagischen Mikro-Vesikel und der feindlichen Umgebung im Lysosom ausgesetzt, einige Proteine ewig überleben konnten, während andere zerstört wurden? Dies klang nicht richtig. Dann wurden viele weitere Entdeckungen gemacht, darunter natürlich wiederum die Entdeckung von Tim Hunt, das wunderschöne Gel, das er [immer] vorführt und wahrscheinlich auch hier vorführen wird, die Entdeckung, dass dasselbe Protein seine Stabilität verändern kann. Nehmen Sie den Zellzyklus – das Protein ist während des gesamten Zellzyklus stabil, dann findet die Mitose statt, und auf einmal wird es innerhalb weniger Minuten abgebaut. Man erkannte, dass auch bestimmte andere Proteine ihre Stabilität verändern können, und das konnte auf der Grundlage der Lysosom-Hypothese überhaupt nicht erklärt werden. Man begann daher, nach anderen Erklärungen zu suchen. Wieder gebe ich Ihnen nur Momentaufnahmen aus der Geschichte, Schnappschüsse von den Meilensteinen, die Avram wahrscheinlich leiteten, als er in diesem Gebiet zu arbeiten begann. Einer dieser Meilensteine ist Brian Poole zu verdanken, einem Kollegen von Christian de Duve an der Rockefeller University. Brian führte ein brillantes Experiment durch – ich werde nicht auf die Details eingehen – und beobachtete den Abbau intra- und extrazellulärer Proteine in denselben Zellen. Er markierte die Zellen, um den Abbau zu verfolgen, aber er verfütterte auch Zellen von außerhalb mit anders markierten Proteinen, mit Proteinen, die mit einem anderen Isotop markiert waren. Er beobachtete den Abbau unter kontrollierten Bedingungen, aber auch unter Bedingungen, bei denen er die Zellen mit Medikamenten behandelte. Er führte ihnen Chloroquin zu. Chloroquin hemmt das Lysosom, indem es den niedrigen intra-lysosomalen pH-Wert zerstört. Ich bitte um Entschuldigung – ich hatte Ihnen noch nicht gesagt, dass im Inneren des Lysosoms ein niedriger pH-Wert von ungefähr 5 herrscht, der für die Aktivität der intra-lysosomalen Proteasen optimal ist. Chloroquin ist eine Base, ähnlich wie Natriumhydroxid. Allerdings behandelt man Zellen nicht mit Natriumhydroxid. Wenn Sie die Zellen mit Chloroquin inkubieren, ändert dies den intra-lysosomalen pH-Wert und erhöht ihn um zwei Logarithmen, und das Lysosom stellt seine Aktivität ein. Brian wies nach, dass der extrazelluläre Abbau, der Abbau extrazellulärer Proteine, in hohem Maße beeinträchtigt wird, während der intrazelluläre Abbau durch die Behandlung mit Chloroquin kaum beeinflusst wird. Man erkennt nur eine leichte Auswirkung, der Abbau reduziert sich um 17 % von 4 auf 3,3 oder von 2,4 auf 2,3. Somit gelangte er zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass das Lysosom nur am Abbau extrazellulären Proteins beteiligt ist, denn dieser Abbau kann gehemmt werden, wenn man das Lysosom stilllegt, dass es aber nichts mit dem Abbau intrazellulärer Proteine zu tun hat und dass wahrscheinlich ein anderes geheimnisvolles System am Abbau dieser Proteine beteiligt ist. Ich muss Ihnen vorlesen, auf welche sehr poetische Art und Weise er seine Erkenntnisse in Worte fasste, und Sie werden es selbst lesen. Lassen Sie uns etwas aus dem Mittelteil lesen, nicht das gesamte Experiment. indem wir das Lysosom stilllegten – „wohingegen die endogenen Proteine dort zerlegt werden, wo auch immer endogene Proteine zerlegt werden.“ Irgendwo – gehen Sie hin und finden Sie heraus, wo. Das ist wirklich sehr poetisch ausgedrückt und, wie ich finde, nicht typisch für Naturwissenschaftler. Es war eine Art von grünem Licht, und natürlich begann Brian, nach diesem System Ausschau zu halten. Leider starb er schon früh auf tragische Weise. Dann begann Avram, sich für diese Fragestellung zu interessieren. Er promovierte bei Gordon Tompkins, bestätigte die Erkenntnis, dass für den Proteinabbau ATP bei einem sehr spezifischen Protein erforderlich ist, das er zu diesem Zeitpunkt untersuchte Wenn man beginnt, ein biologisches System, eine biologische Fragestellung zu untersuchen, dann braucht man selbstverständlich ein System. Das System, das wir uns aussuchten, war der Retikulozyt. Dabei handelt es sich um eine begrenzt differenzierende Zelle, die nicht über ein Lysosom verfügt, da sie während ihres Heranreifens im Knochenmark das Lysosom bereits ausgestoßen hat. Wir fingen an, das System in den Retikulozyten zu untersuchen, mit denen uns die Natur eine Zelle zur Verfügung stellte, die keinen Hintergrund hat. Damals gab es weder shRNA noch siRNA, keine An- und Abschaltung, wir mussten uns auf die Natur verlassen Sie war aufschlussreich, denn sie führte uns bereits über das Paradigma hinaus. In einem sehr einfachen Experiment verwendeten wir ein Hochgeschwindigkeits-Supernat und nur das Lysat, den Zellextrakt. In dem Extrakt stellten wir schon eine ATP-abhängige proteolytische Aktivität fest, wie Sie hier sehen können. Wir verwendeten einfach ein Modell-Substrat. Doch dann möchte man wie Biochemiker die Protease jedoch in reiner Form gewinnen. Also bedienten wir uns einer Trennsäule und begannen, das System aufzuspalten. Nachdem wir das Extrakt in einen Ionenaustauscher gegeben hatten, spalteten wir es bereits im ersten Schritt in zwei grobe Teile auf. Keiner dieser beiden wies die Aktivität auf. Weder Teil 1, was den Durchbruch bedeutete, noch Teil 2, der sich bei hohem Salzgehalt ergab, zeigte die ATP-abhängige Aktivität. Wir mussten die beiden Teile wieder miteinander kombinieren, wir mussten die Kombination der beiden wiederherstellen. Dieses Experiment war meiner Ansicht nach das wichtigste Experiment, das wir je durchgeführt hatten. Daher nehme ich Sie wieder mit zu der Einfachheit des Systems. Das Paradigma auf dem Gebiet der Proteolyse besagte, dass für diesen Tango immer nur zwei Partner erforderlich waren. Wir benötigen eine Protease und ein Substrat. Wenn man Trypsin einsetzt, werden Proteine verdaut, wenn man Chymotrypsin einsetzt, werden Proteine verdaut. Hier benötigten wir drei Teile, wir benötigten Teil 1, Teil 2 und das Substrat. Vergessen Sie nicht, dass Teil 1 und Teil 2 grobe Teile sind. Wer sagt uns, dass Teil 1 nur eine Komponente enthält – vielleicht enthält er 2 Komponenten, vielleicht 20, vielleicht 200. Mit Hilfe dieser Überlegungen führten wir das biochemische Patch-Clamp-Experiment durch, wie Erwin Neher und Bert Sakmann dies taten. Wir nahmen einen Teil, Teil 1, und fixierten ihn, hielten ihn konstant, und dann nahmen wir Teil 2, brachten ihn in eine Trennsäule ein und verloren wieder die Aktivität, die komplementäre Aktivität. Wir gingen also zur Trennsäule zurück und entdeckten die Teile 2A und 2B. Dann sagten wir uns: Gut, wir nehmen 2B und fixieren diesen Teil und gehen dann zu 2A über. Dann gingen wird zu 2A und brachten diesen Teil in eine weitere Trennsäule, und nun ging es weiter zu 2A’ und 2M’’. Dann fixierten wir den anderen Teil und so weiter und so fort. Letztendlich hatten wir sehr viel Glück und konnten alle grundlegenden Aktivitäten des Systems feststellen, nicht das gesamte System, und die proteolytische Aktivität nachweisen. Vor allem konnten wir die Aktivitäten der verschiedenen Komponenten verstehen, was sie jeweils taten. Das werde ich Ihnen gleich zeigen. Im Endeffekt hatten wir schließlich acht oder neun Faktoren, die alle im Reagenzglas vorliegen mussten. Es dauerte mehr als 20 Jahre, um das menschliche Genom zu enträtseln und die tatsächliche Anzahl der Komponenten des Ubiquitin-Systems zu bestimmen, die nahe bei 2000 liegt. Das Ubiquitin-System mit allen Zubringern, den Kinasen und den modifizierenden Enzymen macht fast 7 oder 8 % des gesamten menschlichen Genoms aus, das ungefähr 22.000 und mehr Proteine umfasst, wobei hier natürlich Antikörper, gespleißte Gene und Produkte etc. nicht berücksichtigt sind. Es handelt sich also um ein umfangreiches System. Doch ich glaube, dass bereits dieses sehr "primitive" und einfache Experiment, das wir in den späten 1970er Jahren durchführten, einen Hinweis auf dieses System darstellte. Wir nahmen also eine der Komponenten, die wir in einer reinen Form gewonnen hatten, und markierten sie. Damals bezeichneten wir diese Komponente als APF1 oder ATP-abhängigen Proteolyse-Faktor 1. Wir inkubierten diesen Faktor mit den anderen Faktoren und stellten bei Zugabe von ATP in das System fest, dass dieses mit Jod markierte Protein sich überhaupt nicht anheftet, wenn sich kein ATP in Bahn 1 befindet. Das mag Ihnen jetzt noch rätselhaft erscheinen, aber in einer Minute wird es klar werden. Sobald wir ATP hinzufügen, heftet sich diese Komponente, dieses markierte Protein kovalent an zahlreiche Proteine in dem Extrakt. Hier in Bahn 2 können Sie sehen, dass man entlang dieser Bahn Radioaktivität bekommt. Als wir dem System exogenes Protein hinzufügten, ein bekanntes angemessenes Substrat des Systems, begannen wir, ein deutliches Band zu sehen. Somit erkannten wir bereits, dass es wahrscheinlich eine Markierung des Substrats für den Abbau durch das System geben muss. Es ist unmöglich, dass diese Komponente von den vielen Komponenten, dieses APF 1 tatsächlich ein Enzym aktiviert. Denn wenn es ein Enzym aktiviert, dann wird es sich wahrscheinlich an eine oder zwei Komponenten anheften, aber nicht an zahlreiche. Ich gehe mit Ihnen jetzt zum Ubiquitin-System, wie wir es zur Zeit kennen, und Sie werden sehen, dass die Dinge jetzt wirklich klar werden. Hier ist also das Substrat, das Ziel-Substrat, das abgebaut werden soll. Dies ist das Opfer, das ist unser Protein, das wir abbauen möchten. In diesem Fall wird das Protein phosphoryliert. Sobald es phosphoryliert wird, wird es an ein E3 oder Ubiquitin-Ligase genanntes Enzym gebunden. Das ist das Enzym, das Ubiquitin kovalent an das Substrat bindet und dem Abbau zuführt. In der Datenbank befinden sich nahezu 1.000 Ligasen. Die Familie der Ligasen ist die Familie, die das System mit einem hohen Maß an Spezifität und Selektivität in Bezug auf die zahlreichen Substrate ausstattet. Das ist wieder eines der Geheimnisse des Systems, denen wir auf der Spur waren: Was macht das System spezifisch? Wie kommt es dazu, dass ein einziges Protein von den vielen Tausend Proteinen in der Zelle zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt zum Abbau ausgewählt wird? Das Geheimnis besteht in der selektiven und spezifischen Erkennung durch die Ubiquitin-Ligase. Von diesen gibt es Tausende, von denen eine jede eine kleine Untereinheit von Proteinen erkennt. Währenddessen wird ein kleines Protein namens Ubiquitin, das sich als unser APF1 erwies, das Protein, das konjugiert wird und von dem wir anfangs nicht wussten, was es war, durch ATP aktiviert, und zwar von einem als E1 bezeichneten Enzym. In der Datenbank gibt es ein einziges E1. Dann wird es auf ein anderes Enzym namens E2 übertragen. Es liegen ungefähr 30 E2 in der Datenbank vor. Anschließend wird es an das Substrat gebunden. Es wird kovalent gebunden, nicht einfach, sondern mehrfach. Das erste Ubiquitin wird an das Substrat gebunden, das zweite Ubiquitin wird an das erste Ubiquitin und das dritte an das zweite gebunden und so weiter und so fort. Es bildet sich eine Poly-Ubiquitin-Kette, die ein nachgeschaltetes Signal darstellt, damit das Substrat von einer Protease erkannt wird. Hier ist also die Protease, die Protease ist das 26S-Proteasom. Die Struktur des 26S-Proteasoms wurde von Wolfgang Baumeister und Robert Huber am Max Planck-Institut in Martinsried in einer sehr schönen Studie aufgeklärt. Die Vorhersage, dass dieses Protein dasjenige ist, welches ubiquitinierte Proteine abbaut, stammt jedoch aus der Arbeit von Marty Rechsteiner. Ubiquitin ist eine Brücke, ein Erkennungselement, ein Eingang. Es bindet sich an das Substrat, an die Protease und führt zur Auffaltung des Substrats. Hier ist die Injektion in die proteolytische Kammer dargestellt. Es handelt sich um eine 2 Megadalton-Protease, eine sehr große Protease, im Gegensatz zu allen anderen uns bekannten Proteasen. Es ist eine regulierte Protease, und das Protein wird zu kleinen Peptiden abgebaut. Das ist also das Ubiquitin-System – ich werde nicht die Chemie durchexerzieren –, und das Ubiquitin-System wuchs, und die Datenbank enthüllte uns andere Ubiquitin-ähnliche Proteine. Eines davon ist SUMO, das ist der SUMO-Krieger, aber es handelt sich nicht um den japanischen Sumo-Kämpfer, sondern um den kleinen Ubiquitin-Modifizierer (small ubiquitin modifier) – das ist der Name des Proteins. Sie sehen, dass es dem Ubiquitin sehr ähnlich ist, wenn man es daran ausrichtet. Inzwischen wurden weitere Ubiquitin-ähnliche Proteine entdeckt. Und wenn wir heute das System der Ubiquitin-Modifizierung definieren sollen, so handelt es sich nicht länger um ein proteolytisches System, sondern eher um ein post-translationales Modifizierungs-System, in dem auf die modifizierten Substrate zu unterschiedlichen Zwecken abgezielt wird. Einige werden gezielt abgebaut, einige werden ausgewählt, um Teil des Kernporen-Komplexes zu werden, andere werden durch die Modifizierung stabilisiert und so weiter und so fort. Die Sprache des Ubiquitin-Systems wurde sehr viel reicher. Lassen Sie mich nun zu den letzten zwei Minuten meines Vortrags springen und Ihnen die Umsetzung dieses Systems in Medikamente zeigen. Wieder habe ich nicht die Zeit, aber ich werde Ihnen in zwei Minuten einen Vorgeschmack darauf geben, warum man sich auf das Ubiquitin-System konzentrieren sollte. Wenn in diesem System von 2.000 Proteinen ein Protein fehlreguliert ist, verursacht es Krankheiten. Entweder wird es im Übermaß abgebaut und unterschreitet seinen Gleichgewichtszustand, oder es wird nicht abgebaut und reichert sich an. Maligne Transformationen sind eine solche Krankheit – ich tue einer komplexen Erkrankung hiermit massives Unrecht, aber Sie können sich das sehr einfach vorstellen. Links sehen Sie, dass ein onkogenes Protein oder ein Wachstum förderndes Protein, wenn es nicht abgebaut wird, der Zelle ein Nonstop-Wachstum signalisiert. Dies ist der Fall bei beta-Catenin oder einem mutierten EGF-Rezeptor und wird zu malignen Transformationen führen. Wenn andererseits ein Tumorsuppressor wie B53 im Übermaß abgebaut wird, dann sind wir ebenfalls mit malignen Transformationen konfrontiert. Mit diesem Thema hat sich Harald zur Hausen in seiner Arbeit zum Papillomvirus des Menschen, das für den gezielten Abbau von B53 verantwortlich ist, beschäftigt. Sie können also nachvollziehen, warum jede mögliche Abweichung, abhängig von dem betroffenen Protein, zu malignen Transformationen führen kann und wird. Dafür gibt es noch viele andere Ursachen. Doch worauf sollte man nun am Ubiquitin-System konkret abzielen? Offensichtlich ist die beste Stelle, die man im Ubiquitin-System gezielt untersuchen sollte, die Ebene der Erkennung zwischen dem Substrat und den Ligasen, da sie die breiteste Ebene ist, auf der die geringsten Nebenwirkungen zu erwarten sind. Das erste Medikament war jedoch ein Proteasom-Inhibitor und ist immer noch ein sehr erfolgreiches Medikament. Es handelt sich um einen aktiven Inhibitor, um einen Inhibitor auf der aktiven Seite des Threoninrests im aktiven Bereich im Inneren des Proteasoms. Dies ist das Medikament. Es ist unter dem Namen Velcade oder Bortezomib bekannt und befindet sich bereits auf dem Markt. Ich zeige Ihnen hier die entsprechende Krankheit, das multiple Myelom. Das multiple Myelom ist eine Form der Leukämie, bei der die B-Zellen sich im Übermaß vermehren. Der Klon einer B-Zelle vermehrt sich, eine monoklonale Vermehrung einer B-Zelle, und die Klone verdrängen die anderen normalen Vorläuferzellen des Knochenmarks. Die Krankheit ist tödlich, denn man verliert alle anderen Elemente des Knochenmarks und es kommt zu krankheitsbedingten Brüchen der Wirbel und der langen Knochen. Wie Sie hier sehen können, sondern diese Zellen ein Immunoglobulin ab. Der Immunoglobulinspiegel steigt an, dann kommt es zu Beginn der Chemotherapie zu einem geringfügigen Abfall, doch dann erleidet der Patient einen Rückfall. Hier beginnt die Behandlung mit einem Proteasom-Inhibitor, und Sie sehen, dass das Immunoglobulin abnimmt, was auf das Schrumpfen des Tumors hinweist. Zwei letzte Dias: Hier können Sie das Knochenmark sehen, damit Sie sich, ohne ein Hämatopathologe zu sein, eine Vorstellung machen können. Links sehen Sie das maligne Knochenmark, das homogen ist, 41 % der Zellen sind maligne Zellen, und nach der Behandlung ist die Menge der malignen Zellen auf 1 % gesunken und das Knochenmark wird wieder von normalen Vorläuferzellen besiedelt. Das letzte Dia zeigt eine verwandte Krankheit namens Non-Hodgkin-Lymphom. Hier können Sie einen Tumor erkennen, es ist eine Computertomografie des Brustkorbs, ein Teil des Brustkorbs. Man sieht hier die Lunge, die Rippen, das Sternum, die Wirbel und einen Tumor, der am Eingang des rechten Lungenflügels sitzt. Wie Sie hier sehen können, bleibt der Tumor bestehen. Ich habe versucht, Sie in 30 Minuten auf einen langen Marathon mitzunehmen – beginnend mit einer Idee, die in den 1970er Jahren noch nicht allgemein akzeptiert war, und nun zu einer bedeutenden Regulierungsplattform nicht nur für biologische Prozesse, sondern auch für die Entwicklung von Medikamenten geworden ist. Und ich bin der Ansicht, dass man von diesem einfachen Ansatz viel lernen kann und dass Sie am Ende dieses Treffens, wenn Sie all die einfachen Geschichten, die Sie von Bob und Roger und vielen anderen gehört haben, mitnehmen, erkennen werden, dass die Natur zwar komplex ist, aber die Anfänge von Entdeckungen immer, wie ich am Sonntag sagte, beschämend einfach sind. Vielen Dank. (Applaus)

...And Shows an Illustrative Description of Protein Degradation
(00:22:42 - 00:25:30)


Time and again, it becomes very obvious in Ciechanover’s lectures that, as he puts it, our proteins have to die so that we shall live.

[1] Both quotes from Tanford C, Reynolds J. Nature’s robots. A history of proteins. Oxford University Press, 2001, p. 11ff.
[2] B. Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, Fifth Edition, 2008, Garland Science,
New York, USA, p. 125
[3] Crick, Francis. "On Protein Synthesis." Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology 12, (1958): 138-163, p. 139
[4] B. Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, Fifth Edition, 2008, Garland Science,
New York, USA, p. 176
[5] Schoenheimer, R. The Dynamic State of Body Constituents (1942). Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, quoted from: Ciechanover A. Intracellular protein degradation (...) (Nobel lecture), http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2004/ciechanover-lecture.html, p. 152

Additional Lectures by the Nobel Laureates associated with Life of Proteins:

Introductory Mini Lecture on "Life of Proteins".
James Watson (1967): RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis.
Lawrence Bragg (1968): History of the Determination of Protein Structure.
Hugo Theorell (1969): Enzyme Research Earlier and Today.
Dorothy Hodgkin (1970): Structure of Insulin.
Richard Synge (1970): Proteins and Poisons in Plants.
Hartmut Michel (1998): From Photosynthesis to Respiration: Structure and Function of Energy Transforming Membrane Complexes.
Roderick McKinnon (2005): Ion Channels – Life’s Electronic Hardware.
Edmond Fischer (2007): Protein Crosstalk in Cell Signaling.
Robert Huber (2007): Proteolyis and its Regulation, a Molecular Basis.
Martin Chalfie (2009): GFP and After.