Imaging in Science

by Hanna Kurlanda-Witek

A coastal landscape on our desktop, photographs of loved ones in our wallet, images of world events beneath the headlines…photographs surround us, signalling a range of emotions to our brains. With the rise of smartphones, photos have become even more ubiquitous, with the average phone user storing over 400 images. We take these increasing amounts of photographs to keep something in our memory; the bus schedule at a country bus stop, price codes of items we’d like to buy, or simply to remind ourselves of that summer picnic during a rainy week in November. The revolution that photography has undergone in only a few decades is often underestimated. At his last lecture at Lindau in 2015, the late Sir Harold Kroto gave a brief course on how to take a photograph:

 

Harold Kroto giving a brief course on how to take a photograph
(00:17:31 - 00:18:46)

 

With the growth of imaging technology, there is little wonder that many scientific fields are placing more and more emphasis on up-to-date imaging. This is the most powerful type of data – one that speaks to vision, the strongest human sense.

In the past several decades, images in science have allowed us to see, and therefore to discover and learn about, fundamental processes in diverse fields, from the medical sciences to earth and life sciences. We are now able to observe black holes in the Milky Way with the use of telescopes orbiting in space. We can visualise the detrimental effects of a stroke on the human brain. We are even able to discern ribosomes in cells. The physical sciences are at the core of these breakthroughs, allowing astronomers, doctors, radiologists and biologists to see objects at a closer range or to visualise the unseen or obscure.

“To the Top of the Atmosphere and Beyond” – Visualising the Cosmos

In his book on the history of telescopes, Geoff Andersen writes that, in sufficient darkness, we are able to witness up to 2000 stars in a single night using our eyes alone (2001 if you count the rise of the Sun). Our eyes are powerful tools for scanning the night sky and astronomical occurrences have absorbed cultures since ancient times, which resulted in written descriptions and drawings of moons and stars on stone walls, long before many earthly natural phenomena were explained.

During the 41st Lindau meeting, Physics Nobel Laureate Antony Hewish described a photo of a pulsar, or type of neutron star, in the Crab Nebula, which is what remains from a supernova, an explosion marking the death of a large star.

 

Antony Hewish describing a photo of a pulsar or type of neutron star
(00:11:39 - 00:13:24)

 

As Hewish explained, the supernova was observed by Chinese and Arab astronomers in the year 1054; the Chinese referred to it as a “guest star”, which was visible even in daylight for 23 days. Over the centuries, astronomy became the base of scientific thought and an attractive hobby for learned noblemen. Here is Riccardo Giacconi’s account of the unusual 16th century astronomer, Tycho Brahe, who set the stage for the later works of Kepler and Newton:


Riccardo Giacconi (2008) - The Impact of Big Science on Astrophysics

I decided I would start my lecture by telling you what I planned to say, and since there has been a certain variability in the time available, I’m not sure where I will end, nor that it will be all polished and so forth. So I decided if I tell you what I want to say, and then if I don’t get to say it well, you knew what you’re missing. So let me first summarise, give you a summary plan. So the first thing I wanted to say, we are in an exceptional period of transition in astrophysics, the like of which I think one has to go back 400 years or so to find, the time of Tycho, Kepler and so forth. It’s fair to say that everything we know in astrophysics is less than about 100 years old. You couldn’t explain even the sun, source of energy until nuclear power came about and so forth. Next point is that many of the big discoveries which have occurred recently have come about by means of new telescopes or new telescope systems. But I mean all - it was pointed out to me that the discovery of extra solar planets was done with a reasonably small telescope by Mayor at La Silla. I am well aware of that. But I think some of those things that I wish to discuss have come about because of large telescopes. And these large telescopes tend to be reasonably expensive, and that’s why I call them Big Science. I regret the title almost because Big Science sounds incredibly bad right away, so anyway. I will try to focus on an aspect of what big science allowed us to do, which is not sufficiently well understood in my opinion. And that is that while everybody understands how new technological developments, particularly space, new detectors, new telescopes, computers etc., have been key to making some of these major discoveries, other aspects are not fully realised, but they sum up to a change in methodology which is in my opinion as important as the changing technology itself. And this includes the derivatives, some good, some bad, of big science, management has to become different, what I call science system engineering, trying to understand what you are doing from end to end, and to have better systems, mostly automated, archives and the full use of IT capability to make astronomy a real flat world in the sense of Friedman’s book, we live in a flat world, where everybody has access to everything. And the good and the bad of that, and lastly the disclaimer that you know I’m trying for impact rather than for smoothness, so you will forgive me. So I will start off, the other statement that I want to make is, I tend to, I’m on the lower end of the Nobel Prizes, I tend to speak about what I know, that is not characteristic of our kind, but I try very hard to confine myself to what I know by direct experience. So I will use heavily my own work as example, and I don’t mean, it doesn’t mean that I’m not aware of the fact that there is important contribution by other people, but those happen to be the ones I know of. And since I’m not terribly literate in computer usage, I at least have the slides which I can use for many years. So let me start now. I will start off by the thing I am most familiar with, that is the technological development in x-ray astronomy that brought us to where we are today. Then I will stop a moment and then I go into methodological discussions. So the first thing that is important to say is that the advent of space technology has been essential to allow us to see the entire spectrum of radiation and I won’t go into things that you all know extremely well. In x-ray astronomy itself we started off in 1962 with the discovery of the first x-ray source, that is with the 2 findings, basically one was this huge peak of radiation here that you see. These are counts plotted on azimuth and here a kind of a second peak, this is the weaker, this is the harder radiation and it´s transmitted through a thicker filter. But basically you never get to zero, and this is the isotropic x-ray background that was found 1962. I’ll move fast. This is Uhuru satellite. And the satellite itself is man-sized still, and the big advantage is time, it´s long time as compared to 300 seconds of a rocket shot, this is 3 years. So there occur differences, major differences. One is you could see time development of emission from particular sources, and also you could have much higher resolution and finally you had much higher sensitivity. From about 30 sources that we knew in the sky, this is the sky plotted on galactic coordinates. Here is the galaxy, and up there is a …. And we were able then to make some sense, well, first of all we expanded greatly the number of objects we were seeing. I mean the first slide showed just one bump, it was a source, which was very lucky, and luck plays a very large role in these things I think, that it was obvious from the first that here was an object that emitted in x-rays alone 1000 times more than the sun in all wavelength. And furthermore that the x-ray emission dominated the emission of this object was 1000 times more than the optical infrared emission. Now that’s very strange, because in laboratory the reverse is true. Most of the power goes in heating the target, and that’s why you have coolers and coils and so forth in x-ray sources on the ground. Here there is an extremely efficient process by which you are producing x-rays, so the immediate discovery of an object of the new class of stellar objects and with strange physical processes was extremely attractive and was very helpful for the field. The next slide is now, we’re talking about technical developments here, remember I am not trying to do a history of x-ray astronomy or a history of the discoveries, but I will summarise at the end what the discoveries were. It became apparent, although we had found this very strong source, We expected x-ray fluxes from normal stars to be reasonably weak. And the idea of being able to build telescopes in x-rays that would allow to see very weak sources, was there at the very beginning. In fact we started developing x-ray telescopes before we launched the first rocket to do discovery flights. And the telescopes, the fact that you could use focussing uplifts, increased incidence comes out simply by the fact that in matter x-rays are negative in their self-reflection. So you could have total external reflection, just like you’d have total internal reflection in visible light, for instance in light optics by pipes. So we develop x-ray telescopes, the first slide shows the concept, you have a paraboloid, and you need to reflection, to obtain real images on an extended field. This is the first realisation, this happened as early as 1963 or so, this particular one is 1973. It shows a 30-centimetre telescope and 2 telescopes, one inside the other to increase the total area. And this thing was flown on Skylab, the first manned space station, this was very important, because there were no detectors at the time that could electronically detect the x-ray signals of the focus. So we had to use film, and it was very convenient to have astronauts going up and down, so they could take the film that had been exposed and bring it down and change the cassette, so to speak. And this made it possible to make observations of the sun, over entire solar rotations, and this went on for a few months. And so in ’73 already we used this to very good effect, I think that the most important result here, and I won’t go back to solar x-rays at all, is the fact that basically you have right away the impression that any model that would be based on isotropic emission of the sun is wrong, that magnetic fields play a fundamental role in both heating and the constraint of the x-ray emitting region. Now, why this variation? Because now I want to turn back to stellar x-ray astronomy. This is 1978, and the application of the optics which I described, however, this stellar x-ray telescope is the satellite Einstein. The stellar telescope was twice the diameter, 60 centimetre diameter, and to show you how this changed the sensitivity with which we could do x-ray studies, this is a picture of sources in the centre of M31, our neighbouring galaxy, and the change in sensitivity which occurred during this time was over a million, that is these sources that you are seeing here, the weakest ones, are a million times fainter than the very first source that we saw. Now, that’s not where x-ray astronomy stopped. Toward the end of the talk I will talk about Chandra, which is the latest of the x-ray telescopes. And there was a further 10 to the 4th gain in sensitivity. So altogether, in x-ray astronomy, by technology alone, we have gone from 1 to 10 to the minus 10 times less weaker sources, that corresponds, for those of you who have some, who prefer magnitudes to a change in 25th magnitude which is approximately the change in sensitivity that occurs going from the naked eye to Keck. And sometimes, you know, since I am so ignorant now in what's going on in x-ray astronomy anymore, I console myself by thinking about Tycho, suppose Tycho had had the opportunity not only of creating Hven and Uraniborg, but also to build Palomar and then Keck, and use it. And the poor guy would have been, you know, somewhat confused I think by the time, that that all was ended. I want to go back now, I want to break the talk and go back to Tycho, to talk about methodology and say why in my opinion this was very important. So to remind myself of this fact is, ok I had a table, I wanted to summarise at least what was going on while the technical advances were being made in x-ray astronomy, and this is the first source found, I think the most important thing is the discovery of binary stellar systems, neutron stars and black holes, the discovery, perhaps the most important, the intergalactic plasma containing most of the baryonic mass of the universe, and then finally the isotropy of the x-ray background. Then this was the interruption, so to speak, on solar, and then on Einstein and the further increase in sensitivity, which meant that all types of main sequence stars were detected, the crab nebular pulsar could be imaged, binary stars in external galaxies, supernovas, active galactic nuclear jets, QSOs and clusters of galaxies, and this all the background. The point to make here is of course that this created certain problems, in particular the fact that we could see all types of main sequence stars, I did say that we could also see x-rays from comets, from planetary bodies and so forth, meant that the data would only be useful if astronomers in all disciplines, who were not specialist in the field of x-ray astronomy, could have access and use to the data. And that created a particular problem and opportunity for us, because we were very conscious that in order to get support from the community who are doing some of the next and very expensive, terribly expensive thing, it was much better if the data were immediately distributed in a manner that would be useful to all disciplines in astronomy, rather than be retained as something of a private enterprise. So this will have effect on what I will talk about later. So then the next slide is to remind you about Tycho Brahe. Tycho Brahe in my mind is one of the very interesting figures of all astronomy. It is important to remember that his knowledge, let´s call it academic knowledge so to speak, was worse than that which occurred in the third century after Christ, or even in the third century before Christ, in the sense that he had a less clear understanding of conics And technology, it was not obvious that the technology in the 1500 epoch was any better than what was available to the Greeks when they built the Antikythera mechanism. So the question really is very interesting to us: Why did his work have such impact then? He had the same technology or worse, the same map or worse, the same crazy model of the universe which everybody was working with, I’m talking about Ptolemy, and so that becomes a real issue, and I think that he did it with a good method of observation, which he understood very early on. He discovered the nova in Cassiopeia in 1572, 1574 he was asked to give some lectures, it’s the only lectures apparently he gave, in Copenhagen university. And there he stressed the need to systematise the observation of planets at that time, not just a few points in the orbit but continually, he stressed the need of a team effort, if you look here you have essentially all of the kind of people that we have now, when we do data analysis, except for the dog, I mean, that’s not required, but this thing is, ok there’s the dog, but then there is this kind of person that writes down the thing, the person that looks at the observation, the printer, let’s see, the globe is somewhere here, where the position of 1000 stars is recorded. So he has data, team effort, recording of data, archives, continuity of observation. And by doing all of these things, he was the first to correct for refraction effects of the atmosphere, noticed in correct. And he finally achieved something like 2 arc minutes resolution rather than the more usual 15 arc minutes which had been obtained up to then. And it is my contention anyway that without Tycho, Kepler couldn’t have discovered his laws and without Kepler, Newton’s theory of gravity would have had no basis in experimental data. So in my mind, Tycho and then Kepler and so forth constituted almost integral whole. And what I found striking was this fact that all of the... I studied how Uraniborg was working, and it was interesting, it had visitor scientists, it had scholars that were invited and so on, the only thing it had that space telescope science field did not have was a jail, and that must have been extremely useful from time to time, but we didn’t have it. So now I want to go back to what I was trying to be my main subject, and say, well, how the methodology changed then? Because of big science. And the first thing that I could say is that chance played a very great role. I’m not entirely sure why I was chosen as director for space telescope science, except that I was known for being tough with NASA, that seemed to be a requisite that the astronomers could agree with. But actually what happened was that there occurred by this chance, by the fact that I agreed to do that, a transfer of points of view from x-ray astronomy, where we were well trained in space observation and the requirements for those, and optical astronomy. And what did the x-ray astronomy have to bring? Well, the fact that we work as a team, that was absolutely important. Ruthless intellectual clarity of communication - I should discuss what that means: If something was wrong in the program that you carried out, the greatest sin was not to have made a mistake, but was not to say that something was wrong and keep it hidden. And that’s what happened for instance, that was a disaster with respect to other programs, in which somehow or rather everybody was nice to each other. And by that, that’s what I mean by ruthless, if somebody was wrong, you told him to his face and gave him a chance to change. System engineering - the scientist becoming involved in designing the instrumentation, including the spacecraft, the data system, everything which had to do with getting the data, because you couldn’t trust anybody. For instance I think that Einstein was designed to fail after a year and a half, and this was the triple failure mode, it was put in too low an orbit so it would decay, there was a hook put on it to lift it up, to prevent it from decay, which of course never made it in time, it used gas jets to get rid of angular momentum rather than magnetic torquing, it would have lasted forever, gas jets were dying after. And this was a specifically desire on the part of the office of management and budget, which instructed NASA to keep missions short, so they wouldn’t keep spending money in operation, using all of this data coming through, enough already. So actually this was executed by NASA in this crazy form. So we tried everything we could to make the system last longer, for instance we changed the operation, we tried to fly with the flow, we tried to bounce between targets so we wouldn’t use too much of the gas and so forth. Much of it was silly but we did succeed in increasing the lifetime by factor 2 anyway. Science system engineering. This, by the way, I’m well aware that to many of my colleagues, this word “system engineer” sounds terrible. I mean it sounds like management, it must be bad. Well, the point is again that you have to go in a “Gedanken” way, so to speak from the beginning to the end. It´s not enough to say I want to do this. How are you actually going to achieve it, is it feasible, is it affordable? If not, can you do it some other ways? And one of the things for instance that happen with respect to Einstein, we figure out a way in which we didn’t need very good pointing. And that was very simple. We would project through the x-ray telescope an image of the detector with fiducial light and we would take pictures of the detector or the fiducial light of the detector, superimposed on a star field continuously, once a second. So the spacecraft could be wandering a little but we would always know where we were pointing, and since the x-ray photos come one at a time, very slowly, we had enough bandwidth to always correct for the pointing accuracy. That reduced, took away all of the problems that you have in maintaining very good alignment between telescope, optical system and so forth. This was done by scientists, not by engineers. So by system engineering I mean try to make the system as simple as you can, so that it will work even in the adverse conditions of space and institutional arrangements. The next thing is modelling of telescope and of instruments, that had a reasonably large role. Planning for operations. And then this end to end data system, including online data calibration to make them available to other astronomers so that they could use it for their own discipline or subdiscipline. That was the first one to my knowledge that was put together, and we had 2 people devoted to preparing this system. They created what was called the MAGIC. They were fortunately very, very bright young people who ended up then making their own companies and so forth and making lots of money, not on our program, but it was an heroic effort at the time, all done on laptops and so forth. And finally this issue of data distribution and archiving. In particular archiving was not terribly well done, that is normal archiving consisted of taking the rolled telemetry tapes and shipping them to Garda. And there they are sitting and nobody can use them because you have no random access, you have to go through the whole thing and so forth. And here, what we were talking about was a living archive that is a working archive which would allow you to continue study the subject. Now how did this all apply to Hubble space telescope? So the first thing that we found, and by “we” I mean that not only I as an expert astronomer became director, but then 1 or 2 because these other people I knew, Rodger Doxsey in particular, who was there for a very, he gave an extremely important contribution, and Ethan Schreier. Rodger Doxsey was from MIT, Ethan Schreier was also from Harvard, so at the top there was a small group of x-ray astronomers that were imposing their view on how to do science on to optical astronomers. And this was not done without some fighting, not only with NASA but with the community itself. For instance when we wanted to develop an end to end automated data system, the scientists involved in the science working group of Hubble, recommended to NASA that they not fund it at all. When the data system included the calibration system, automated calibration again, the point of view they expressed was that if people could not calibrate their own data, they shouldn’t use Hubble. Now it is interesting that by the time we ended the program, no group ever calibrated the Hubble data themselves, but rather allowed the automated system to do it, because it was just sheer impossible for people to calibrate data by hand. And I will come back to this in a moment. So at this point we introduce system engineering using that experience. One interesting case was how to point Hubble. To point Hubble you must have guide stars, the guide stars must be, you must go down to 15th magnitude, because otherwise there aren’t enough guide stars in the field of view. And there were no catalogues of guide stars to 15th magnitude, they stopped at 10th magnitude. So the idea was that we would take plates from Palomar Schmidt and from the Anglo-Australian Schmidt, north and south, we would have machines built to scan and as we went along every day, we would scan this 12 by 12 inch glass plates to find the position of the stars and then give instructions. Now, this process had not been thought through, to give instruction to Hubble we determined that 35 people typing continuously 24 hours a day, like instructed monkeys or something, I don’t know, could not produce enough data to give operational commands to Hubble. So you better do it in a semi-automated way. And in fact at the end it ended up being done with artificial intelligence techniques, meaning local… But for this particular thing could you do it as it was thought you could. Well, it turns out that you need something like 0.5 second precision, astrometric measurements of Schmidt plates are notoriously poor, they’ve never been done to that precision, except in some exceptional circumstances. So we thought that the correct decision was not to wait until launch, but to do a catalogue of 15 magnitude stars in the sky before launch, translate this into digital data and have the data available in real time on a computer, so that you could actually change your mind to another pointer and you wouldn’t have to go to scan another plate. Now, that was a horrifying work at the beginning. But it paid off tremendously. And it had additional benefit that, after we did Haar transforms and wavelet transforms, reduction of the compression of data, all of this data could be put on CD discs and sold to amateur astronomers who are now using them to point at quasars and so forth. This point I’ve already made, I won’t go on longer on development of e2e Data Management Systems. Let me however go on one point. When I talk about on-line calibration of the data, the point is the following: We construct a model of the instruments, some at the beginning very primitive, just black boxes, and we try to interpret the parameters that would connect the physical data to the instrument responses. Calibration meant that we measured this correlation on the ground and we had to check it from time to time in orbit. So that meant that some 10 to 12% of the observing time on Hubble had to be programmed to see calibration objects. And then you had to develop the software to reduce the data from the calibration object, instruct the parameters and throw them into the pipeline, which would continuously do this calibration. Now that was then, and I’m talking about late ‘80’s. Now things have become much better, in the following sense, the data now are in the archive and the archive was always built of archived, raw and calibrated data. At the moment we do on-line calibration of the data, meaning that when you ask for a piece of archived data, the calibration is done while the data is delivered to you - oh my god – ok, I’ll answer any question about this this afternoon, that will be my escape clause. I wanted to show you though, you know all these icons from Hubble, so I won’t stop on this, but I will take one particular Hubble observation which has produced important results. And this is the discovery of supernovas at large redshifts, in particular redshifts from 1.1 to 1.7, that had not been seen on the ground. And if I had the time I would have gone through the fact that, the following, I mean the following important points, one is for instance, let’s see if I can find it. Ok, this data shown here were obtained with the advance camera system. This instrument was not flown at the beginning of the Hubble mission, it was flown later on in one of the servicing mission, and the other instrument which is used to get the spectrum and to get the history of the supernova light curve, this one also was flown later on. And so this is a combination of real data and archive data, real time data and archive data, and what they did allowed us to discover very distant supernovas, and what that is good for, the red points are the ones measured by Hubble, so you can measure at larger Z and this gave confirmation of dark energy and of a time evolution of dark energy content of the universe. Now let’s go on, if I can. Ok. I wanted to, I will tighten up quite a bit now. VLT, the largest telescope array in the world now on the ground, built by ESO, also benefited enormously from the transfer of technology, which again occurred more or less by chance. I was offered to become director general of ESO and I brought x-ray astronomy plus Hubble experience on to VLT, and this was a dramatic change of point of view which ended up by making VLT not only the largest in the world but the most effective in doing observations. It has all of the features which I described before and to data system engineering modelling and so forth. But in fact this technological approach, this methodology was implied also in the construction of VLT and not only in the operation as it occurred on Hubble. These are the 3, let’s say … of Uranus. This is a funny one, it’s the same picture of the eagle nebular with the pillars of creation, so to speak, except it´s now in infrared, so you look right through it. It´s not as pretty but perhaps it´s more informative than in fact the Hubble picture. And here is one of the current and interesting application of adaptive optics on the VLT, whereby we receive images which have an angular resolution of 40 milliard seconds. I remember that Hubble has 70 milliard seconds in space, in optical. Now, again, this was just, but I will go really fast here, was to go through what we use computer simulations for, so there was a huge utilisation of this. And also there was the use of this new technique to upgrade all the telescopes that existed in La Silla. So that essentially by the time VLT got built and placed on Paranal, La Silla had become a modern observatory and in fact it produced much of the science that came after. This is a simulation of a wavefront, this is to show you how this is the active control, not inactive, but active control, 180 actuators behind the mirror. And this is the complexity you have to deal with now, which has now instead of 1 or 2 or 3 instruments, you are taking care of maybe 20, 30 instruments, different kinds. And this also has the advantage of showing the infrastructure for Very Large Telescope interferometry. And all of this was modelled…I got it, I got it. Ok, and this is the data system for VLT, so I won’t discuss it but to show you how exactly similar one of the, perhaps it was outstanding, most interesting discovery to me anyway, where the VLT is the application of adaptive optics, whereby this 40 milliard second picture is taken. The observation of the orbit of S2, which is one of the stars here in the field, which comes to, within 17 light hours of the black hole in the galactic centre, in an orbit which is only 10 times Sun-Pluto orbit and running around at a velocity of 5000 kilometres per second. And this absolutely restricted the choices of the density of the object at the centre, so that we had to conclude either it’s a boson star, which we don’t know if it exists, or it’s a black hole. This is work by Denzel and his group at, ok now this is to conclude. I wanted to conclude on going back to x-ray astronomy. This is the Chandra space craft, there were 3 pictures I wanted to show you, one was a movie and maybe we’ll get it at the end of the lecture when I stop and then the movie goes on and shows the crab pulsar pulsing. This is perhaps one of the most interesting results from Chandra and from x-ray astronomy and that is the collision of 2 clusters in which you see the gas, the plasma interaction with this bullet shock wavefront and I think I had another picture of this one because, ok and the fact that both the galaxy and the dark matter do not interact. And so that was the first kind of information we had on the international cross section for dark matter. The last, I’ll try to summarise even that, I think it´s not that everything is beautiful, I think that all of these findings which basically have to do with finding most of the mass of the universe in baryonic form, with finding properties of the dark matter and with finding, confirming the existence and perhaps showing the variability of the dark energy which will be discussed much more extensively by my colleague coming up, and to say that these things could not have been done without the kind of application and so forth. Another advantage that has been obtained with this is that everybody in the world today has access to the best data from the best telescopes in every way for any object that has been observed. This is a very strange phenomenon by the way. I think for many, many centuries that to change from what was an hermetic tradition, you only talk to your friends and, you know, it took 30 years to compare it, to decide, to publish, to have data available within a year to everybody in the world. It also made possible a much expanded outreach program, whereby every cab driver I have in Washington, who normally happens to be Ukrainian or Russian or Afghanistan or whatever, has seen the Hubble pictures, and so they become what I would call a people’s telescope. Those are all good things. The thing that occupies me most is that it has turned much of the astronomical community into consumers of goods, rather than in makers of instruments. And that’s very dangerous for the future, so we have to be very careful to balance this very large program with medium and small programs that will train the new generation to really do the instrumentation and learn the art that they will have to use to make the next steps. And finally, and I think it is the final, what is it going to be that we are going to be looking for, but I won’t even try to attempt to discuss this, thank you.

Ich habe beschlossen, dass ich meinen Vortrag damit beginne, Ihnen zu erzählen, was ich geplant habe und da es gewisse Variation in der zur Verfügung stehenden Zeit gibt, bin ich nicht sicher, wo ich aufhören werde und ob alles so geschliffen sein wird und so weiter. Ich möchte zunächst sagen, was ich erzählen werde, denn wenn ich es nicht schaffe, wissen Sie, was Sie verpasst haben. Zunächst gebe ich Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick. Als Erstes wollte ich darüber reden, dass wir uns in der Astrophysik in einer außergewöhnlichen Übergangsphase befinden, für die man 400 Jahre oder so zurückgehen muss, in die Zeit von Tycho, Kepler und so weiter. Man kann sagen, dass alles, was wir in der Astrophysik kennen, weniger als 100 Jahre alt ist. Man konnte ja noch nicht einmal die Sonne, die Energiequelle erklären, bis die Kernkraft entdeckt wurde usw. Der nächste Punkt ist, dass viele der großen Entdeckungen, die jüngst gemacht wurden, dank neuer Teleskope oder neue Teleskopsysteme zustande kamen. Aber wenn ich alle sage..., mir ist klar, dass die extrasolaren Planeten mit einem ziemlich kleinen Teleskop von Mayor in La Silla entdeckt wurden, das ist mir durchaus bewusst. Aber ich denke, dass viele dieser Dinge, die ich heute besprechen möchte, dank großer Teleskope entdeckt wurden. Und diese großen Teleskope sind meistens ziemlich teuer, deshalb nenne ich sie Big Science (Großforschung). Ich bedaure fast den Titel, weil sich Big Science unglaublich blöd anhört, aber nun gut. Ich versuche, den Fokus auf den Aspekt zu legen, was Big Science uns ermöglicht hat, was meiner Meinung nach nicht gut genug verstanden wird. Und das ist es, obwohl jeder versteht, wie neue technologische Entwicklungen, insbesondere im Weltraum, neue Detektoren, neue Teleskope, Computer usw. entscheidend zu solchen großen Entdeckungen beigetragen haben, werden andere Aspekte nicht voll wahrgenommen, aber letztendlich führen sie zu einem Wechsel in der Methodik, was meiner Meinung nach genauso wichtig wie die Veränderung in der Technologie selbst ist. Das bezieht sich auch auf die Derivate von Big Science, einige sind gut, andere sind schlecht, das Management muss anders werden, das nenne ich Wissenschaftssystem-Engineering, zu versuchen, zu verstehen, was man vom Anfang bis zum Ende macht. Und bessere Systeme zu haben, überwiegend automatisiert, Archive und der vollständige Einsatz von IT-Möglichkeiten, um aus der Astronomie eine richtige flache Welt zu machen, im Sinne von Friedmanns Buch. Wir leben in einer flachen Welt, in der jeder zu allem Zugang hat. Und das Gute und das weniger Gute daran, und letztendlich der Widerspruch, dass Sie wissen, dass ich mich eher um Wirkung als um Geschliffenheit bemühe, also bitte verzeihen Sie mir. Also ich werde jetzt beginnen – die andere Aussage, die ich machen möchte, ist, ich bin am unteren Ende der Nobelpreisträger; ich versuche, über das zu sprechen, worin ich mich auskenne, das ist nicht kennzeichnend für unsere Art, aber ich versuche mich auf das zu beschränken, was ich aus eigener Erfahrung kenne. Ich werde also hauptsächlich meine eigene Arbeit als Beispiel anführen, was nicht heißen soll, dass mir nicht bewusst wäre, dass es wichtige Beiträge von anderen Leuten gibt, aber das sind nun mal die Dinge, die ich kenne. Und ich habe zwar keine furchtbar guten Computerkenntnisse, aber ich habe zumindest die Folien, die ich lange benutzen kann. Los geht‘s. Ich werde mit dem beginnen, womit ich am meisten vertraut bin, das ist die technologische Entwicklung in der Röntgenastronomie, die uns dahin gebracht hat, wo wir heute stehen. Dann werde ich kurz anhalten und in die Diskussion der Methodik einsteigen. Das erste, was wichtig ist, ist, dass die Anfänge der Raumfahrttechnik für uns von wesentlicher Bedeutung waren, um das ganze Strahlungsspektrum zu sehen und ich werde hier nicht ins Detail gehen, denn das sind Sachen, die Sie alle sehr gut kennen. In der Röntgenastronomie starteten wir 1962 mit der Entdeckung der ersten Röntgenquelle, das sind diese beiden Ergebnisse, im Prinzip war das eine diese große Spitze der Strahlung, die Sie hier sehen. Dies sind Zählwerte, die über dem Azimut gezeichnet wurden und hier ist eine Art zweite Spitze, das ist die weichere, das ist die härtere Röntgenstrahlung, die wird durch einen dickeren Filter gebracht. Prinzipiell erreicht man nie den Nullpunkt und dies ist der isotrope Röntgenhintergrund, der 1962 entdeckt wurde. Ich mache schnell weiter. Das ist der Uhuru-Satellit. Der Satellit an sich ist noch mannsgroß, und sein großer Vorteil ist die Zeit, es ist eine lange Zeit im Vergleich zu 300 Sekunden eines Raketenstarts, dieser dauert 3 Jahre. Es gibt also Unterschiede, große Unterschiede. Der eine besteht darin, dass man die Zeitentwicklung der Emission von speziellen Quellen sehen kann, und außerdem konnte man eine viel größere Auflösung haben und letztendlich hatte man eine viel bessere Empfindlichkeit. Von ca. 30 Quellen, die uns am Himmel bekannt waren, ist das der Himmel mit den eingezeichneten galaktischen Koordinaten. Das ist die Galaxie und oben außen ... Und wir konnten einen Sinn darin erkennen, zunächst einmal erweiterten wir die Anzahl der Objekte erheblich, die wir sehen konnten. Ich meine, auf der ersten Folie wurde nur ein Peak angezeigt, es war eine Quelle, wir hatten Glück, und Glück spielt eine große Rolle bei diesen Dingen. Ich denke, dass es von vornherein offensichtlich war, dass hier ein Objekt war, das allein 1000 mal mehr Röntgenstrahlung aussendet als die Sonne über alle Wellenlängen. Und weiter heißt das, dass die Röntgenemission, die die Emission dieses Objekts dominierte, Nun, das ist sehr seltsam, denn im Labor ist das Gegenteil wahr. Die meiste Energie wird für das Aufheizen des Targets verbraucht, deshalb hat man in den Röntgenquellen auf der Erde Kühler und Spulen usw. Das hier ist ein äußerst effizienter Prozess, mit dem man Röntgenstrahlen produziert, deshalb war sofort die Entdeckung eines Objekts der neuen Klasse von Sternenobjekten und bei seltsamen physikalischen Prozessen äußerst attraktiv und für den Bereich sehr hilfreich. Die nächste Folie ist, nun ... wir sprechen hier über technische Entwicklungen, ich versuche nicht, die Geschichte der Röntgenastronomie oder die Entdeckungsgeschichte zu erklären, aber ich werde die Entdeckungen am Ende zusammenfassen. Es zeigte sich, obwohl wir diese sehr starke Quelle gefunden hatten, erwarteten wir, dass Röntgenflüsse von normalen Sternen ziemlich schwach sind. Und die Idee, Teleskope für Röntgenstrahlung zu bauen, mit denen man sehr schwache Quellen sehen kann, war erst der Anfang. Tatsächlich begannen wir den Entwurf eines Röntgenteleskops, bevor wir die erste Rakete für Entdeckungsflüge an den Start brachten. Und die Teleskope, durch die Tatsache, dass man die fokussierenden Optiken bei streifendem Einfall nutzen konnte, schlicht durch die Tatsache, dass Röntgenstrahlen in Materie eine negative Reflexion haben. So erhält man externe Totalreflexion, so wie man interne Totalreflexion in sichtbarem Licht hat, z.B. in der Lichtoptik in Röhren. Also entwickelten wir Röntgenteleskope. Die erste Folie zeigt den Entwurf, hier ist ein Paraboloid und man muss Reflexion erzeugen, um richtige Abbildungen auf einer großen Fläche zu erhalten. Das ist der erste Entwurf, der muss schon von 1963 gewesen sein, dieses Gerät hier ist von 1973. Hier sieht man ein 30 Zentimeter langes Teleskop und zwei Teleskope, die ineinander gebaut sind, um die Gesamtfläche zu vergrößern. Dieses Ding flog an Bord der Skylab, der ersten bemannten Weltraumstation, das war sehr wichtig, denn es gab zu der Zeit keine Detektoren, die die Röntgensignale im Fokus elektronisch erkennen konnten. Deshalb mussten wir Filme nehmen, und es war sehr praktisch, dass die Astronauten hoch und runter kamen, denn so konnten sie den Film einlegen und mitbringen und die Filmkassetten auswechseln usw. So wurde es möglich, Sonnenbeobachtungen durchzuführen, über ganze Sonnenrotationen, das dauerte einige Monate. Bereits 1973 nutzten wir dies sehr erfolgreich, ich denke, dass das wichtigste Ergebnis hierbei – und ich werde nicht zurück zur Röntgenstrahlung der Sonne gehen – die Tatsache ist, dass man im Prinzip direkt den Eindruck bekommt, dass jedes Modell, das auf isotroper Sonnenstrahlung basiert, falsch ist, dass magnetische Felder eine wesentliche Rolle sowohl in der Erwärmung als auch in der Begrenzung der Röntgenstrahlen aussendenden Fläche spielen. Warum jetzt diese Abschweifung? Weil ich jetzt zurück zur stellaren Röntgenastronomie kehren möchte. Das ist 1978 und der Einsatz der Optik, den ich erklärt habe, ... auf jeden Fall ist dieses stellare Röntgenteleskop des Satelliten Einstein. Das stellare Teleskop hatte den doppelten Durchmesser, 60 Zentimeter Durchmesser, und um Ihnen zu zeigen, wie die Empfindlichkeit verbessert wurde, um Röntgenuntersuchungen durchzuführen, hier ist ein Bild von Röntgenquellen im Zentrum von M31, unserer Nachbargalaxie, und die Empfindlichkeit wurde in dieser Zeit um eine Million verbessert, das sind diese Quellen, die man hier sieht, die schwächsten sind 1 Mio. mal schwächer als die erste Quelle, die wir gesehen haben. Aber hier hörte die Röntgenastronomie noch nicht auf. Am Ende des Vortrags werde ich über Chandra berichten, das aktuellste Röntgenteleskop. Damit wurde eine weitere Verbesserung der Empfindlichkeit um 10 hoch 4 erreicht. Also insgesamt haben wir in der Röntgenastronomie, allein durch Technologie, eine Verbesserung von 1 hoch minus 10 mal weniger, schwächere Quellen erreicht, das heißt für diejenigen unter Ihnen, die Magnituden bevorzugen, eine Veränderung in der 25. Magnitude, die ungefähr der Empfindlichkeitsveränderung entspricht, die vom bloßen Auge bis Keck gemeint ist. Und manchmal, wissen Sie, weil ich so unwissend bin, was in der Röntgenastronomie weiter passiert, tröste ich mich selbst mit dem Gedanken an Tycho, wenn man annähme, Tycho hätte die Chance gehabt, nicht nur Hven und Uranienburg aufzubauen, sondern auch Palomar und später Keck aufgebaut und benutzt hätte. Der Arme wäre am Ende irgendwie verwirrt gewesen, denke ich. Ich möchte jetzt zu Tycho zurück kehren, um über Methodik zu sprechen und erklären, warum das meiner Meinung nach sehr wichtig ist. Um mich selbst daran zu erinnern, hatte ich eine Tabelle, ich möchte zumindest kurz zusammenfassen, was passierte, als die technischen Fortschritte in der Röntgenastronomie gemacht wurden, und das ist die erste Quelle, die entdeckt wurde, 300 Quellen wurden mit den Flügen entdeckt. Ich glaube, dass das Wichtigste dabei die Entdeckung von Doppelsternen und Neutronensternen und den Schwarzen Löchern waren, vielleicht das Wichtigste, das intergalaktische Plasma, das überwiegend baryonische Materie des Universums enthält, und letztendlich der isotrope Röntgenhintergrund. Das war sozusagen die Unterbrechung über solare Strahlung, und dann die Konstruktion von Einstein mit der weiteren Verbesserung der Empfindlichkeit, was die Entdeckung aller Sterne der Hauptreihe ermöglichte, der Pulsar-Krebsnebel konnte abgebildet werden, Doppelsterne in äußeren Galaxien, Supernovae, aktive galaktische Nuklearjets, Quasare und Galaxienhaufen, das ist der ganze Hintergrund. Hier geht es natürlich darum, dass dies bestimmte Probleme verursachte, insbesondere die Tatsache, dass wir alle Arten von Sternen der Hauptreihe sehen konnten, bedeutete, dass die Daten nur nützlich waren, wenn Astronomen aller Disziplinen, die keine Spezialisten in der Röntgenastronomie waren, Zugang zu den Daten haben würden und sie verwenden könnten. Das verursachte ein besonderes Problem und bot uns zugleich Chancen, denn wir waren sehr darauf bedacht, um von der Gemeinschaft Unterstützung zu bekommen, die das nächste, sehr, sehr teure Projekt plante, dass es viel besser wäre, wenn die Daten sofort so verbreitet würden, dass sie allen Disziplinen der Astronomie Nutzen stiften konnten, statt zurückbehalten zu werden wie in einem privaten Unternehmen. Nun, darüber werde ich später noch mehr erzählen. Die nächste Folie soll Sie an Tycho Brahe erinnern. Ich finde, dass Tycho Brahe zu den interessanten Persönlichkeiten der Astronomie gehört. Es sei daran erinnert, dass sein Wissen, nennen wir es Gelehrtenwissen, schlechter war, als das, über das man im 3. Jahrhundert nach Christi oder sogar im 3. Jahrhundert vor Christi verfügte, in dem Sinne, dass er weitaus weniger Wissen über Kegelschnitte hatte – Appolonios von Perge war ihm weit voraus, – über Integralrechnung – Archimedes war viel besser, und über Technologie – es war nicht offensichtlich, dass die Technologie um 1500 besser war, als die, die den Griechen zur Verfügung stand, als sie den Mechanismus von Antikythera bauten. Diese Frage ist also für uns wirklich interessant: Warum hatte seine Arbeit dann solch einen großen Einfluss? Er verfügte über die gleiche oder sogar schlechtere Technologie, die gleiche Mathematik oder schlechter, das gleiche verrückte Weltsystem, mit dem jeder arbeitete, ich meine das Weltbild von Ptolemäus, und das ist wirklich die Frage, und ich denke, dass er eine sehr gute Beobachtungsmethode hatte, die er sehr früh verstand. Er entdeckte 1572 das Sternbild von Kassiopeia, 1574 wurde er gebeten, Vorlesungen an der Universität Kopenhagen zu halten, das waren im Übrigen die einzigen Vorlesungen, die er hielt. Damals betonte er die Notwendigkeit, die Beobachtung von Planeten zu systematisieren, nicht nur ein paar Punkte in den Umlaufbahnen, sondern kontinuierlich, er betonte die Notwendigkeit von Teamarbeit – wenn Sie sich das Bild anschauen, hat man im Grunde alle Arten von Leute, die wir auch heute haben, wenn wir Datenanalyse betreiben, außer dem Hund natürlich, der ist dafür nicht erforderlich, aber dann hat man hier jemanden, der alles aufschreibt, die Person, die die Beobachtung anschaut, den Drucker, der Globus ist irgendwo hier, wo die Position der 1000 Sterne aufgezeichnet wird. Er hat also Daten, Teamarbeit, Aufzeichnung der Daten, Archive, kontinuierliche Beobachtung. Und mit diesen Mitteln war er als Erster in der Lage, die astronomische Refraktion an der Atmosphäre zu korrigieren. Er schaffte es, Beobachtungen mit einer Genauigkeit von zwei Bogenminuten zu erreichen, im Gegensatz zu den damals erreichten 15 Bogenminuten. Und ich behaupte, dass Kepler ohne Tycho nicht seine Keplerschen Gesetze entdeckt hätte und dass Newton ohne Kepler für seine Gravitationstheorie keine Beobachtungswerte als Grundlage gehabt hätte. Meiner Meinung nach bildeten Tycho und später Kepler usw. fast so etwas wie ein vollständiges Ganzes. Und ich fand es beachtlich dass, ... ich habe untersucht, wie Uranienburg funktionierte, und das war interessant, denn es gab Gastwissenschaftler, Studenten, die eingeladen wurden und so weiter, das Einzige, was das Weltraumteleskop nicht hatte, war ein Gefängnis, das muss teilweise ganz nützlich gewesen sein, aber wir hatten es nicht. So nun möchte ich zu meinem Hauptthema zurückkehren, und erklären, wie sich die Methodik verändert hat. Wegen Big Science. Und das Erste, was ich sagen kann, ist, dass Glück eine große Rolle spielte. Ich bin mir nicht ganz sicher, warum ich zum Direktor für das Space Telescope Science Institute ausgewählt worden bin, außer dass ich dafür bekannt war, mit der NASA hartnäckig umzugehen, was wohl ein Kriterium war, dem die Astronomen zustimmten. Aber eigentlich fand dort eher durch Zufall, weil ich einwilligte, ein Transfer von Standpunkten aus der Röntgenastronomie, wo wir alle gut in Weltraumbeobachtung ausgebildet waren und die Anforderungen daraus, in die optische Astronomie statt. Und was konnte die Röntgenastronomie bringen? Nun, die Tatsache, dass wir als Team arbeiten war äußerst wichtig. Schonungslose intellektuelle klare Kommunikation - das muss ich genauer erklären: Wenn etwas in dem Programm schief gelaufen ist, war die größte Sünde nicht, dass man einen Fehler gemacht hat, sondern, dass man nicht gesagt, dass etwas falsch gelaufen ist und es verheimlicht hat. Und das passierte zum Beispiel, es war eine Katastrophe im Vergleich zu anderen Programmen, in denen irgendwie jeder zu jedem nett war. Und das meine ich mit schonungslos, wenn jemand einen Fehler gemacht hat, hast du es ihm direkt ins Gesicht gesagt und ihm die Möglichkeit gegeben, es zu ändern. System-Engineering - die Wissenschaftler werden bei dem Design des Instruments mit eingebunden, einschließlich der Raumsonde, dem Datensystem, alles, was mit der Datengewinnung zusammenhängt, weil man niemandem trauen konnte. Ich glaube z.B., dass Einstein so konstruiert wurde, dass es nach anderthalb Jahren versagen sollte, und es war der Dreifach-Fehler-Modus, er wurde in eine zu niedrige Erdumlaufbahn gebracht, sodass er herunterfallen würde, es wurde ein Haken angebracht, um es hochzuziehen, um es vor dem Herunterfallen zu retten, was natürlich nie rechtzeitig passierte, es wurden Gasjets eingesetzt, um den Drehimpuls zu beseitigen statt magnetischer Drehmomente, es hätte ewig halten können, Gasjets sterben danach. Und das war der ausdrückliche Wunsch seitens des Büros für Management und Budget, das die NASA instruierte, die Missionen kurz zu halten, damit sie nicht so viel Geld für den Betrieb ausgeben müssen, all die Daten zu benutzen, die dabei herauskommen, es waren schon genug. So verrückt wurde das von der NASA gehandhabt. Also versuchten wir alles Mögliche, um das System länger haltbar zu machen, zum Beispiel änderten wir die Operation, wir versuchten, mit der Strömung zu fliegen, wir versuchten zwischen zwei Zielen zu hüpfen, um nicht so viel Gas zu verschwenden. Viel davon war Blödsinn, aber wir schafften es, die Lebenszeit zu verdoppeln. Wissenschaftssystem-Engineering. Ich weiß übrigens, dass sich dieses Wort „System-Engineer“ für viele meiner Kollegen schrecklich anhört. Ich meine, es klingt wie Management, es muss schlecht sein. Nun, die Sache ist die, man muss sich Gedanken machen, sozusagen vom Anfang bis zum Ende. Es reicht nicht, zu sagen, ich möchte das tun. Wie wird man es denn erreichen, ist es machbar, kann man es sich leisten? Wenn nicht, kann man es anders machen? Was zum Beispiel in Bezug auf Einstein passiert, ist, dass wir einen Weg fanden, mit dem wir keine sehr guten Zieleinstellungen benötigten. Und das war sehr einfach. Wir würden durch das Röntgenteleskop ein Bild des Detektors mit Referenzlicht projizieren und Aufnahmen des Detektors oder des Referenzlichts des Detektors machen, die kontinuierlich auf ein Sternenfeld überlagert werden, ein Mal pro Sekunde. Die Raumsonde konnte so ein bisschen umherwandern, aber wir wussten immer, wo wir hinzielten, und weil die Röntgenbilder sehr langsam nacheinander gemacht wurden, hatten wir genug Bandbreite, um für die Zielgenauigkeit immer wieder zu korrigieren. Dadurch wurden alle Probleme verringert, denen man bei der richtigen Ausrichtung zwischen Teleskop, optischem System usw. begegnet. Das wurde von Wissenschaftlern gemacht, nicht von Ingenieuren. Mit System Engineering meine ich hier also, das System so einfach wie möglich zu machen, damit es sogar unter widrigen Umständen des Weltraums und institutionellen Regelungen funktioniert. Das nächste ist die Modellierung von Teleskopen und Instrumenten, die eine ziemlich große Rolle spielt. Planung für Operationen. End-to-End-Datensysteme, wie Online-Datenkalibrierung, um sie anderen Astronomen zur Verfügung zu stellen, damit sie die Daten für ihre eigene Disziplin oder ein Teilfachgebiet nutzen können. Das war das Erste, meines Wissens nach, das zusammengebaut wurde, und wir hatten zwei Leute, die sich damit befasst haben, das System vorzubereiten. Sie konstruierten etwas, das MAGIC genannt wurde. Es waren glücklicherweise zwei sehr intelligente Leute, die am Ende ihre eigenen Firmen aufgemacht haben und viel Geld verdient haben, nicht mit unserem Programm, aber sie haben damals heldenhafte Arbeit geleistet, alles auf Laptops und so weiter. Und nicht zuletzt die Sache mit der Datenverteilung und -archivierung. Insbesondere die Archivierung wurde nicht wahnsinnig gut gemacht, denn die normale Archivierung bestand darin, die aufgerollten Telemetriebänder einzupacken und nach Garda zu verschiffen. Und da sitzen sie dann und niemand kann sie benutzen, weil man keinen Direktzugriff hat, man muss alles durchgehen usw. Das nennt man dann ein lebendiges Archiv, das ist ein Arbeitsarchiv, in dem man die Untersuchung des Themas fortsetzen könnte. Wie passt das jetzt zum Hubble-Weltraumteleskop? Das Erste, was wir herausgefunden haben, und mit „wir“ meine ich, dass nicht nur ich als Röntgenastronom, der Direktor geworden ist, sondern ein oder zwei andere Leute, die ich kannte, Rodger Doxsey insbesondere, der einen wichtigen Beitrag leistete und Ethan Schreier. Rodger Doxsey war vom MIT, Ethan Schreier kam auch aus Harvard, an der Spitze war also eine kleine Gruppe Röntgenastronomen, die ihre Sichtweise optischen Astronomen aufoktroyierten, wie man Wissenschaft machte. Und das geschah nicht ganz reibungslos, sowohl mit der NASA als auch innerhalb der Gemeinschaft. Beispielsweise, als wir ein automatisiertes End-to-End-Datensystem entwickeln wollten, empfahlen die an der Hubble-Arbeitsgruppe beteiligten Wissenschaftler der NASA, es überhaupt nicht zu finanzieren. Als das Datensystem das Kalibrierungssystem beinhaltete, automatisierte Kalibrierung, war ihre Meinung, dass Leute, die ihre eigenen Daten nicht kalibrieren können, Hubble nicht einsetzen sollten. Das Interessante daran ist, als wir das Programm beendeten, hatte keine Gruppe jemals die Hubbledaten selber kalibriert, sondern dem automatischen System erlaubt, es zu tun, weil es für die Leute einfach unmöglich war, die Daten manuell zu kalibrieren. Ich komme gleich darauf zurück. An diesem Punkt führen wir System-Engineering ein und nutzen diese Erfahrung. Ein interessanter Fall war, wie man Hubble auszurichten hatte. Um Hubble auszurichten, muss man Leitsterne haben, man muss bis zur 15. Magnitude hinunter gehen, da sonst nicht genügend Leitsterne sichtbar sind. Es gab keine Sternenkataloge der 15. Magnitude, sie hörten alle bei der 10. Magnitude auf. Dann hatten wir die Idee, Platten vom Palomar-Schmidt-Teleskop und vom Anglo-Australian Teleskop zu nehmen, Nord und Süd, wir wollten Geräte zum Durchmustern bauen und als wir das Tag für Tag durchführten, wollten wir diese 12 mal 12 Inch-Glasplatten durchmustern, um die Position der Sterne zu finden und dann Anweisungen zu geben. Dieses Verfahren war aber nicht genau durchdacht, um Hubble Anweisungen zu geben, bestimmten wir 35 Personen, die 24 Stunden am Tag tippten, wie instruierte Affen oder so, ich weiß nicht, sie konnten nicht genügend Daten produzieren, um Hubble operationelle Befehle zu erteilen. Deshalb ist der halb-automatisierte Weg besser. Tatsächlich wurde es am Ende mit Verfahren künstlicher Intelligenz, das heißt lokal erledigt. Aber in dieser besonderen Sache konnte man es machen, wie man gedacht hatte, es zu tun. Nun, es stellte sich heraus, dass man so etwas wie 0,5 Winkelsekunden Genauigkeit braucht, astrometrische Messungen von Schmidt-Platten sind bekanntlich schlecht, sie haben es nie zu solch einer Genauigkeit gebracht, mit Ausnahme einiger besonderer Umstände. Wir dachten uns also, die richtige Entscheidung wäre, nicht bis zum Start zu warten, sondern einen Katalog von 15 Magnituden-Sternen am Himmel vor dem Start zu erstellen, dies in digitale Daten zu übersetzen, damit die Daten in Echtzeit auf dem Computer abgerufen werden können, denn dann könne man auch zu einem anderen „Zeiger“ wechseln und man müsste keine neue Platte durchmustern. Das war unglaublich viel Arbeit am Anfang. Aber es lohnte sich gewaltig. Und es hatte einen zusätzlichen Nutzen, nachdem wir Haar-Transformationen und Wavelet-Transformationen durchgeführt hatten, reduzierten wir Daten durch Komprimierung, alle Daten über Leitsterne konnten auf CDs gebrannt werden und an Amateurastronomen verkauft werden, die damit jetzt auf Quasare und so weiter zu zielen. Das habe ich ja schon erklärt, ich werde nicht länger die Entwicklung von End-to-End Daten-Management-Systemen erklären. Eine Sache möchte ich aber noch erläutern. Wenn ich von Online-Daten-Kalibrierung spreche, ist damit Folgendes gemeint: Wir konstruieren ein Instrumentenmodell, das am Anfang sehr primitiv sein mag, nur Black Boxes, und wir versuchen, die Parameter zu interpretieren, die die physikalischen Daten mit den Antworten der Instrumente verbinden. Kalibrierung hieß, dass wir diese Korrelation auf der Erde messen und sie gelegentlich im Orbit kontrollieren mussten. Das heißt, dass ungefähr 10 - 12% der Beobachtungszeit von Hubble programmiert werden mussten, um Kalibrierungsobjekte anzusehen. Und dann musste man die Software entwickeln, um die Daten aus dem Kalibrierungsobjekt zu verringern, die Parameter zu bekommen und in die Pipeline zu werfen, die diese Kalibrierung kontinuierlich durchführen würde. Nun, das war Ende der 80er-Jahre. Mittlerweile hat sich viel geändert, in dem Sinne, dass die Daten jetzt im Archiv sind und das Archiv wurde aus archivierten, rohen und kalibrierten Daten aufgebaut. Wenn wir Online-Kalibrierung der Daten machen, bedeutet dass, wenn man einen Teil archivierter Daten anfragt, wird die Kalibrierung durchgeführt, während Ihnen die Daten übermittelt werden – ok, ich werde alle Fragen hierzu heute Nachmittag beantworten, das ist meine Ausweichklausel. Ich wollte Ihnen aber zeigen, Sie kennen alle diese Ikonen von Hubble, deshalb möchte ich mich nicht damit aufhalten, aber ich werde eine besondere Hubble-Beobachtung wählen, die wichtige Ergebnisse gezeigt hat. Das ist die Entdeckung der Supernovae bei großen Rotverschiebungen, insbesondere von 1.1 bis 1.7, die wir vom Boden aus nicht gesehen hatten. Und wenn ich die Zeit gehabt hätte, nun, dann hätte ich Folgendes näher erläutern können, ich meine die folgenden wichtigen Punkte, mal sehen, ob ich es finde. Ok, diese Daten hier wurden mit dem Advanced Camera System gewonnen. Dieses Instrument flog am Anfang der Hubble-Mission nicht mit, es wurde erst später bei einem Wartungsflug eingebaut, und das andere Instrument, das Aufnahmen des Lichtspektrums macht und die Entwicklung der Supernova-Lichtkurve aufnimmt, wurde auch erst später eingebaut. Das ist also eine Kombination aus realen Daten und Archivdaten, Prozessdaten und Archivdaten, und sie erlaubten uns damit, sehr entfernte Supernovae zu sichten, und wofür das gut ist, die roten Punkte sind die Werte, die von Hubble gemessen wurden, d.h., man kann bei größer Z messen und das bestätigte die Dunkle Energie und die Zeitentwicklung des Dunklen Energie-Inhalts des Universums. Also weiter im Text, wenn ich kann. Ok. Ich werde jetzt ein bisschen straffen. VLT, die größte bodengebundene Teleskop-Gruppe, gebaut von der ESO, profitierte auch enorm vom Technologietransfer, der ja mehr oder weniger zufällig geschah. Mir wurde der Posten des Generaldirektors bei der ESO angeboten und ich brachte Erfahrung in der Röntgenastronomie und Hubble für das VLT mit, das war ein gewaltiger Perspektivenwechsel, der das VLT am Ende nicht nur zur größten Teleskop-Gruppe, sondern auch der Effektivsten in der Beobachtung machte. Es hat alle Eigenschaften, die ich vorhin beschrieben habe, End-to-End Data, System Engineering, Modeling und so weiter. Vielmehr wurde dieser technologische Ansatz, diese Methodologie, bei der Konstruktion des VLT angewendet, nicht nur im Betrieb wie bei Hubble. Hier sind die 3, sagen wir, ... Uranus-Symbole. Das ist lustig, es ist sozusagen das gleiche Bild des Adlernebels mit den Säulen der Schöpfung, aber es ist eine Infrarotaufnahme, als wenn man hindurch guckt. Es ist nicht genauso schön, aber vielleicht ist es informativer als das Bild von Hubble. Und hier haben wir eine der aktuellen und interessanten Anwendungen der adaptiven Optik auf VLT, durch die wir Bilder mit einem Auflösungsvermögen von 40 Millibogensekunden erhalten. Ich erinnere mich, dass Hubble 70 Millibogensekunden im Weltraum mit der adaptiven Optik optisch schaffte. Ich werde jetzt an Tempo zulegen, also, da wir Computersimulationen nutzten, hatte man also großen Nutzen davon. Außerdem wurde diese neue Technik genutzt, um alle vorhandenen Teleskope in La Silla zu verbessern. Im Wesentlichen als das VLT gebaut wurde, das auf dem Paranal gebaut wurde, wurde La Silla ein modernes Observatorium und erzeugte tatsächlich einen großen Teil der Forschung, die danach kam. Das ist eine Simulation einer Wellenfront, um Ihnen zu zeigen, dass es aktive Kontrolle, nicht inaktive, sondern aktive Kontrolle mit 180 Reglern hinter dem Spiegel, gibt. Und das ist die Komplexität, die man jetzt beherrschen muss, denn statt ein, zwei oder drei Instrumenten muss man sich jetzt um 20 oder 30 Instrumente unterschiedlichster Art kümmern. Und das hat auch den Vorteil, dass die Infrastruktur der Interferometrie des Very Large Telescope gezeigt wird. Und alles wurde modelliert... ich hab verstanden, ich hab‘s verstanden. Ok, und das ist das Datensystem für VLT, ich werde das nicht näher erläutern, aber um Ihnen zu zeigen, wie exakt..., vielleicht war das herausragend, die interessante Entdeckung für mich ohnehin, als das VLT die Anwendung der Adaptiven Optik war, wurde dieses 40 Millibogensekunden-Bild aufgenommen. Die Beobachtung der Umlaufbahn des S2, einer der Sterne hier im Feld, der in 17 Lichtstunden das Schwarze Loch im galaktischen Zentrum umrundet, auf einer Umlaufbahn, die nur 10 Mal der Umlaufbahn von Pluto um die Sonne entspricht und eine Geschwindigkeit von 5000 Kilometern pro Sekunde erreicht. Und das begrenzte die Auswahl der Dichte des Objekts im Zentrum, so dass wir feststellen mussten, ob es ein Bosonenstern ist, von dem wir nicht wissen, ob er existiert, oder ein Schwarzes Loch. Diese Arbeit ist von Denzel und seiner Gruppe... ich möchte das hier abschließen. Ich möchte das hier beenden und zur Röntgenastronomie zurückkehren. Das ist das Chandra-Röntgenteleskop, es gibt drei Bilder, die ich Ihnen zeigen wollte, eins war ein Film, den wir vielleicht am Ende der Lesung anschauen können, er zeigt den Crab-Pulsar im Krebsnebel. Dies ist vielleicht eines der interessantesten Ergebnisse von Chandra und in der Röntgenastronomie, und das ist die Kollision zweier Sternhaufen, die aus Gas bestehen, und man sieht die Plasma-Plasma-Wechselwirkung mit dieser Kugel-Wellenfront und ich glaube, ich hatte ein anderes Bild davon..., ok, und die Tatsache, dass die Galaxie und die Dunkle Materie nicht wechselwirken. Und das war die erste Information, die wir von dem internationalen Wirkungsquerschnitt für Dunkle Materie hatten. Als Letztes, ich versuche, sogar das zusammenzufassen, ich denke nicht, dass alles schön ist, ich glaube, dass all diese Ergebnisse, die im Grunde damit zusammenhängen, dass die meiste Masse des Universums in baryonischer Form gefunden wurde, mit Ergebnissen zu den Eigenschaften der Dunklen Materie und mit Ergebnissen, die die Existenz und vielleicht die Variabilität der Dunklen Energie bestätigen, was im Anschluss noch eingehender von meinem Kollegen erörtert wird, und zu behaupten, dass diese Dinge nicht ohne diese Art der Anwendungen und so weiter durchgeführt hätten werden können. Ein anderer Vorteil, der dadurch erzielt wurde, ist, dass jeder überall auf der Welt Zugang zu den besten Daten von den Teleskopen jeder Art für jedes Objekt, das beobachtet wurde, hat. Das ist übrigens ein sehr seltsames Phänomen. Ich glaube, dass über sehr viele Jahrhunderte hinweg der Wechsel nicht stattgefunden hat, von der Eremitentradition, d. h., man spricht nur mit den Freunden darüber, und es dauert 30 Jahre, um es zu vergleichen, zu entscheiden, zu veröffentlichen, bis dahin, dass die Daten innerhalb eines Jahres jedem weltweit zur Verfügung stehen. Es hat auch eine Art erweiterte Öffentlichkeitsarbeit möglich gemacht, wenn jeder Taxifahrer in Washington, der normalerweise Ukrainer, Russe, Afghane oder sonst was ist, die Hubble-Bilder gesehen hat, werden sie zu einem sogenannten Teleskop der Menschen. Das sind alles gute Dinge. Das, was mich am meisten besorgt, ist, dass die astronomische Gemeinschaft eher zu Güterverbrauchern, als zu Instrumentenherstellern geworden ist. Und das ist sehr gefährlich für die Zukunft, deshalb müssen wir sehr vorsichtig sein, um dieses riesige Programm mit mittleren und kleinen Programmen auszubalancieren, die die neue Generation schulen werden, die Instrumentierung zu beherrschen und die Kunst zu lernen, die sie nutzen müssen, um die nächsten Schritte zu machen. Und letztendlich, und ich glaube, das ist der Schluss, was es sein wird, wonach wir suchen, aber ich werde nicht mal mehr versuchen, das zu diskutieren, danke.

Riccardo Giacconi’s account of the unusual 16th century astronomer Tycho Brahe
(00:16:32 - 00:20:35)

 

“The telescope was the first physical apparatus that extended human perception beyond natural limits”, wrote Michael Marett-Crosby, and the astronomical progress of the 20th century has magnified that perception to an enormous scale. The Hooker telescope, a 2.5-metre optical telescope, built at the Mount Wilson Observatory in California in 1917, was the world’s largest telescope for over 30 years, and gave astronomers an unprecedented view of celestial bodies. In 1920, Albert Michelson and Francis Pease used the Hooker telescope to determine the size of a star. Edwin Hubble obtained hundreds of photographs with the telescope to demonstrate that nebula were in fact remote galaxies, which was presented in his famous paper, “Cepheids in Spiral Nebulae”. These observations led Hubble to find that most galaxies are moving away from each other, and hence that the universe is expanding.

The Earth is peppered with astronomical observatories, and while telescopes are becoming increasingly larger and technologically advanced, there is always the barrier of the Earth’s atmosphere that must be overcome, particularly with respect to optical telescopes. With the advent of space exploration in the 1960’s, the idea emerged to send telescopes into space. In 1968, the orbiting astronomical observatory OAO-2, or Stargazer, was the first successfully launched telescope, which collected ultraviolet data in the Earth’s orbit. Today, it is common to compare data from different telescopes, which detect a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum; radio, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes. During his lecture, “Seeing Farther with New Telescopes”, the 2006 Physics Nobel Laureate John Mather showed the difference in images taken with the optical and infrared capabilities of the Hubble telescope:

 

John Mather (2012) - Seeing Farther with New Telescopes

I wanted to tell you something about, not the work that I did to gain the Nobel Prize but what's happening now and coming. I wanted to say that growing up as a child I thought the most exciting thing I could do as a scientist was to build equipment that would measure things. So rather than trying to observe them, which was difficult, let me build something. So, that's what I've been doing for my entire life is figuring out how to build stuff to measure things. So I want to show you what is currently ongoing for us in astronomy and not just my particular work but other people's work. Just to give you some sense of what's coming. So I have a crystal ball for you. If you visit this particular website it till tell you everything. But I'm not going to go visit because I don't have a good question. So, we have an amazing tool now that we didn't have 30 years ago which is we have a super computer. We can take a computer and imagine that what Brian just said is correct. That the universe is full of cold dark matter and dark energy causing the acceleration. And ordinary matter. And we can predict from super computer simulations with 10 billion particles in a box, what the gravitational forces will do. And here is the simulation, the formation of a galaxy. This is a small sample of 10 billion particles. And you can see this happening before your very eyes in the computer. So this is one of the most powerful tools that we now have. But we have to admit that we don't know if it's true. So we are going to have to go measure something to find out if that beautiful picture that I just showed you has any resemblance to reality. So far it seems to match but of course it's telling us about things that happened over the course of 100's of millions of years, even billions of years in the early universe. And how are we going to tell? We are like, if you go to the football match and you take a picture of the entire crowd of people there. That's like taking a picture of all the galaxies that exist. And you see small people, large people, young people, old people and now you the scientist had to figure out how do small people become large people. And what is the history of people from taking a picture of the stadium full of football fans. So we have the same problem in astronomy so we're going to have to figure out how to compare the movie that I just showed you which is dynamic in time with what really happened. So another thing I wanted to mention is that this is going to happen to us. Here is another super computer simulation of 2 galaxies colliding. We know that the Andromeda Nebula which is the nearest large galaxy to ours is headed in our direction and we expect a collision to occur roughly like this in about 2 or 3 billion years. So it will be probably not observable to us because the sun will also be getting brighter over that period of time and it will be too hot for us to live here on earth regardless of what we do about climate change and energy sources. Another thing to point out about this one is that the solar system is on the outer boundary of our galaxy and it is pretty likely that it will be expelled from the galaxy altogether and it will go flying off into space in between galaxies. But in the end what we see in this picture is that the 2 galaxies merge and form a beautiful spinning object. By the way, if there's a black hole in the middle of each galaxy as seems to be true there will also be now 2 black holes in the middle of the combined galaxy. And eventually the 2 black holes will merge together. Then according to calculation they will produce a burst of gravitational waves coming out. Gravitational waves have never been observed in nature directly. Although we have deduced that they exist and a Nobel Prize was given for that proof. Anyways. So this is likely to happen to us. And now how are we going to know if any of this is true. So another thing that astronomers really want to know and probably you want to know also, how did we get here? So how about planet formation? Now since about 1996 or so we've been aware that this process occurs. That there are many planets around other stars, once in a while a planet will pass between us and a more distant star and will block some of the star light. So we can now observe this. In space especially it's relatively easy to do because we have very stable telescopes in space, no fluctuations from the earth's atmosphere. So a little bit of the star light passes through the planetary atmosphere on its way to our telescope. We can now analyse that light and determine the chemical composition and the physical properties of the atmosphere of a planet around another star. To this has already been accomplished with a fair number of such targets. We have a catalogue now from the Kepler observatory, which has been flying for a couple of years now, I think, of 2,000 such planets. And there are a few that somewhat resemble the earth. So we are getting close to understanding whether planets like the earth are common. And we can say that they're not very common but there are many, many planets. There are more planets in the galaxy than there are stars. Very, very common. So now however let me talk about how do we learn about these things. So I want to show you the beginnings of telescopes. I'm going to illustrate some of the great projects currently underway to learn about the rest of the universe. So I'm going to present them roughly in the order of increasing frequency of the photons that we use. So at very, very long wavelengths we cannot see anything from the ground because the earth's ionosphere is opaque and it reflects all the radiation back down to the earth that we transmit. And conversely it reflects all the radiation coming to us from outside away. So on the other hand, it is possible in certain parts of the world to go to a very quiet place and build this collection of dipole antennas which are hooked together electronically to synthesise a map of the sky. So this is a proof of concept observatory. Various things that we are aiming for with this radio telescope. Among other things, we hope to see the beginnings of the first emissions from hydrogen lines. Now hydrogen emits here on the ground at a frequency of 1,421 megahertz. If you are observing hydrogen at a great, great distance away, the material that's going away from us because of the red shift, the wave lengths will be much longer. And so we use these very large rays of dipoles. They're all hooked together by cables and actually produce an image of the sky by Fourier transformation of the waves that come in. So this is a case where computer technology has enabled us to do something that was never possible at all remotely before. So, another thing we're working on now is something called the Square Kilometre Array. Can you imagine a telescope covering an entire square kilometre? Well there are 2 concepts and the international body that decided which one to choose has just decided to do both of them. One will be built in Australia where it's relatively quiet, it's very far away from cell phones and other radio transmitters. The other one in South Africa, likewise a place that's protected from radio interference. So these are coming and it's a very difficult and expensive project but it is coming. The technical design has been basically completed. So we know what to build. So this will be able to detect things that we have barely only imagined. And of course we hope for surprises. You can just see from the picture how truly immense this is. We have already... We're nearing completion of this beautiful observatory. This is called the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. This is a collection of about 64 radio dishes in the high desert in Chile. It's a high enough altitude that people that go there require oxygen to be safe. There are little buildings that they have for you with enriched oxygen atmosphere. This is another totally amazing technological miracle. To make this one work we have to have microwave receivers at the focus points of each of these dishes. They have to be connected by fibre optics. And we have to measure the relative phase of the waves that are coming in to the different telescopes with a precision of a small fraction of a millimetre. In order to again use the giant computer to create an image of the sky. The computers that it takes to do this processing use hundreds of kilowatts of electrical power. And they are probably the most powerful special purpose computers anywhere in the world. Because they're not general purpose they can be optimised. But at any rate, we're already able to create images with the first dishes that have come on line. And there's one on the upper right corner. Comparing the radio picture with the pictures that we get at shorter wavelengths with the Hubble Space Telescope. So, the radio picture is quite different from what we see with the Hubble. And they've shown the different wavelengths in different colours. So now I want to talk just briefly about the equipment that we use to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation and what is coming next. Back in 1974 I was a recent escapee from Berkley, California. I had finished by PhD, working on a thesis project to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation. And I had concluded that this subject was extremely difficult because my thesis project actually failed to function correctly. It was a balloon instrumentation that went up on a balloon, it did not work at all for 3 different reasons. We got it back and my lap partner put it in a test chamber. We found out why it didn't work and then they flew it again later and it worked the second time. So it was now possible with that apparatus to measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, how bright is it at each different wavelength. Now the Big Bang theory tells you that the spectrum of this radiation must be perfectly black body. And so that apparatus, the balloon burn apparatus, said yes it's pretty close but not exactly. But then certainly after I left Berkley NASA said we want proposals for satellite missions. This is now only 5 years after the Apollo moon landing. So what is NASA going to do? So propose satellites. So, I said to my postdoctoral advisor: So we'd draw this little sketch and we built something about, like that upper left hand picture. And 15 years later it went into space and I guess 17 years after that we got a call from Stockholm. Because we had measured the Big Bang spectrum and it was indeed virtually perfect spectrum. And as George will probably tell you more later, we also measured the map of the radiation. And we found out it has hot and cold spots. Which are the primordial structures that Brian was telling you about. There are now more scientific papers written about those hot and cold spots than there are spots on that original map. It has become a huge industry. So following that everyone could see that we needed to know more. So the middle picture here is the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. It made an all sky map again but much better sensitivity and much better angular resolution. And it is now the sort of strongest basis for what Brian calls the standard model of cosmology. I would say that we may call it the standard model but it's extremely mysterious even if it is standard. As Brian mentioned we have both cold and dark matter and dark energy. Neither of which has ever been seen in a lab. So, the third project on the lower right hand side here is called the Planck mission, it's a European mission with a small American participation. And their cosmological results have not yet been announced but they are expected next spring. And so we're eagerly looking forward to seeing whether there is a big surprise coming from them. What is going to be done after this? We are now hot on the trail of measuring the effects of the primordial gravitational waves, if they exist. The hypothesis is this primordial material of the inflationary period with its quantum mechanical fluctuations had kind of equal partition between many different kinds of variations and oscillations including gravitational waves. There should have been some. So what would their effect be? We now propagate that idea forward. We calculate that the cosmic microwave background radiation should have tiny, tiny polarisation patterns. And these polarisation patterns should be detectable. They're not that far out of reach today. There is a possibility that they will be detected from the ground or with a balloon payload some time. But if that is not done or if we need to do it better we have already ideas about how to do it in outer space. So here is a concept from Goddard Space Flight Center where I work that shows a sort of improved version of the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite but with polarimeters inside to make a map. So it is possible that in another decade or so, maybe even less, you will hear about the demonstration that either the Big Bang material had gravitational waves in it or not. And this will tell us about the scalar fields or inflationary fields that may have existed that propelled the original expansion. So, this is nature's particle accelerator for us. It's capable of reaching much higher energies than we can ever imagine producing here on the ground. So, a few other things to illustrate. We have an observatory in space currently, built by the European Space Agency and its partners through Europe. This is called the Herschel Observatory and they have already produced some very interesting maps. This is the beautiful Andromeda Nebula. The same one that is headed in our direction. That is going to cause that beautiful collision. It looks quite different with the infrared radiation that they measure. You see these big rings out here. These are rings of places where stars are being formed recently and they're very hot and they produce a lot of dust around them. The dust absorbs the starlight and produces infrared radiation. So a very different phenomena. Here is a small American observatory in space measuring infrared radiation as well. The telescope is 8/10 of a metre in aperture. But nevertheless is able to see galaxies at a red shift of 2 or 3. It's quite astonishing that such a small piece of apparatus can see so far across the universe. But it is a demonstration that we were surprised one more time. When people first proposed building a small telescope like this they said: "Oh, we won't see anything". A few words about the telescope I'm currently working on. This is called the James Webb Space Telescope. By the way James Webb was the man who went to President Kennedy and said: "I know how to get us to the moon". And by the way he also asked for enough money and so they got there. And it took them less than 10 years, we can't even decide to try a project in 10 years. So I'm reporting on this on behalf of all of current earth inhabitants, about 10,000 future users of the observatory, about 1,000 engineers and technicians who are building it and about 100 scientists worldwide who are working on it and 3 space agencies. Because this is a project partnership between NASA and European and Canadian space agencies. So this is what this one looks like, this is the telescope in the upper right hand corner. It does not look like your telescopes you have seen before. It's nothing like Galileo's little tube of wood and nothing like the Hubble Telescope which is also like a tube. This one is very far away from earth. And we put it way away so that the telescope will be cold. The sun and the earth are down here below, here is this big umbrella, here is the telescope, it's in the dark. And it will cool itself down to 45 degrees Kelvin. So by the way to name some of the people who are working on it, our prime contractor is Northrop Grumman which is a large aerospace firm, primarily located near Los Angeles Airport. Anyway we have instruments coming from around the world. The University of Arizona. The European Space Agency with their company Astrium. Notice that we met one of the representatives of that company, who was here yesterday. Jet Propulsion Lab and a European consortium producing another instrument. And finally the Canadians are producing an instrument. The telescope will be operated like the Hubble Space Telescope from Baltimore at the Space Telescope Science Institute. So if you're an astronomer and you want to make a proposal you will be writing proposals the same way that they do today. So, I think it will be ready in time for many of you to write your proposals. So the telescope is huge, it is cold. By the way the European Space Agency is buying the rocket for us. It's an Ariane 5 rocket. So we'll be launching the telescope from Kourou in French Guiana in 2018. So a few things that we hope that this will see. Well, this illustrates the improvement in sensitivity and angular resolution compared with the Hubble Telescope. This is a visualisation from the computer of what the early universe might have looked like. We will certainly hope to see the details looking down inside with the James Webb Telescope. When and how did the galaxies form, how come they have the different shapes that they have. How did the heavy elements of the universe get formed, we know for instance that since, as Brian showed you, we have only the lightest elements came from the big bang. We're not made out of, primarily hydrogen and helium, we're made out of other chemical elements. So they were all produced in stars that exploded and came back out again. So we're quite recycled. The infrared capability will enable us to look inside these beautiful clouds where stars are being born today. The dust that's there in space is opaque. And you cannot see through it. So the aim of an infrared telescope is to see through the dust and around the dust grains. So, here's an illustration of 2 pictures taken with the Hubble Space Telescope of the same volume of space. The Hubble Telescope has some infrared capability. And you can see this region looks totally different. Visible wavelengths and infrared. The visible wavelengths show these beautiful glowing clouds. The dust is much more transparent, you can actually see inside the cloud and see that this star, whatever it is in there, is producing jets of material. And it's probably a very young star doing that. So another picture of the difference between infrared. Here's one picture and there's the same volume of space again. Here's the star in the middle sending out jets of material, quite different from what you see in the visible. So this is a way of us to look inside the clouds of gas and dust where stars are formed. And we begin to learn how this works. So when I went to college people knew how this worked. We still don't know how it works. Because when we actually try to get the computer to simulate what we think is true, we encounter places where it just doesn't work out. So how does the telescope work? Here's a picture of the deployed observatory. There are 5 layers of this giant sun shield. By the way the sun shied is as big as a tennis court. So where Serena Williams is playing that's how big this is, from there to there. And of course we've never had a tennis court in space before so this is a wonderful engineering project. The telescope is folded up for launch. It's much larger than the rocket is. So it's a tremendously difficult engineering project for that as well. We will be putting it far from earth. Here is the picture of where it is. The moon at 384,000 kilometres from earth. The Lagrange point L2, about 1.5 million kilometres. So here is a movie showing how the telescope will unfold in outer space. First we unfold the solar panels. Then we unfold the little parabolic antenna that sends the data back and forth. Now we begin to unfold the sun shield, the big umbrella that protects the observatory from the sun. The actual deployment will happen a few days after launch. We're not in a hurry, it doesn't run this fast. Here the telescope is separating from the warm boxes of the spacecraft electronics. Now we're unfolding the protective covers over the shield. You might say looking at this: Answer is yes. On the other hand, I asked our company: and they said no. So they work for other government agencies as well. So they have learned how to do big complicated things in space. But I've never seen the other things that they do. So here the telescope is finally coming to approximately the right shape. The parabolic, it's almost a parabolic mirror. By the way the telescope is clearly not in focus when it is launched. All of those big beryllium hexagons that make up the primary mirror are adjustable in position and in curvature. So that after a little while we will be able to focus the telescope and get a sharp image. So, how are we going to test this on the ground? Well, we have a giant test chamber at Johnson Space Flight Center in Texas. And this turns out to be the same test chamber where the Apollo astronauts rehearsed getting out of the Apollo capsule onto the surface of the moon. So it's very big and very capable. We've had to improve it by putting cryogenic cooling shrouds around it so it has now not only liquid nitrogen to cool the interior but also a gaseous helium refrigerator. So it will be capable of getting the telescope down to the temperature that it will have in outer space. So we'll be able to verify on the ground that it focuses. So if you want to know more there are many, many documents online. If you just hunt for the James Webb Space Telescope you'll find our home web page and there are documents you can download and many scientific white papers. So for much more detail it is available online, of course. Just to... I want to close with some other suggestions about what is possible in the future and what is happening on the ground. The European Southern Observatory built this amazing collection of 4 giant telescopes on the ground in Chile. Each one of them is 8 metres in diameter. We took our James Webb Telescope team down to visit. To see what was it like to get a huge telescope and of course we decided that we couldn't quite put an 8 metre telescope in space. Ours is only 6 ½ metres. But this collection has been working beautifully for a long time. And some of the most interesting scientific results that you know of today came from these telescopes. Here is one that is being built. It's called the large synoptic survey telescope. This is another 8 metre telescope with a very enormous field of view. So they will be able to scan the entire sky that they can see from their place on earth, every 3 nights. So we will be able to find with this telescope things that change from night to night. We will be able to find asteroids that move. We will find supernovae in great numbers. And possibly a few other remarkable things that change. Gamma ray bursts may turn up for instance. So anyway it's coming along. This is something even more ambitious. This is called the European Extremely Large Telescope. This is a concept for a 40 metre diameter telescope. It's huge. It is now logically possible to do this. We cannot make a 40 metre piece of glass. So, of course, as we do with the James Webb Telescope we will make the mirror out of many smaller pieces. And we will adjust them to shape after the thing is focused. So as I understood it quite recently the project has been approved by the European Southern Observatory subject to continuing negotiations with international partners to get enough money. But it is coming along and I fully expect that this one will happen. In the United States we have 2 competing versions. One is called the Giant Magellan Telescope. This one has 7, 8 metre pieces of glass. All figured to work together. Again these have to be adjusted so they simulate the one giant parabolic mirror. Some of the mirrors have already been made for this one. And so this one I think was also going to come along. In the United States we do not have much government funding for these, so private money has been raised. And so assuming that that continues successfully we will either have 1 or 2 large 30 metre class telescopes in the United States. Here is one that the European Space Agency has now approved to start development. This is called the Euclid mission. This is one which is going to test further the discovery that Brian described about the accelerating universe. We would like, and this is top priority for both Europe and the United States, to continue to measure better the acceleration process. We know pretty well what the acceleration is nearby. We would like to know the history of the acceleration. Now as you go farther back in time the acceleration is smaller relative to the expansion rate that already occurs. So, it's only in the last 5 billion years that acceleration has been dominant. Nevertheless we would like to know the entire history of the acceleration because then we would be able to say whether that W, that parameter that he showed in his equations is actually a constant. No one can prove that it's a constant. We are right now assuming that it's a constant. So this is a small telescope that would be able to cover a very large part of the sky. And with tremendous sensitivity and able to basically measure the curvature of space time over here as the drawing shows. I can't show you space telescopes without showing you the Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble has been visited 5 times by the space shuttle. And astronomers have upgraded it. It is still working beautifully. It is working better than it has ever worked in the past. So we don't know how long it will last but it's probably at least 5 or 10, maybe 15 years more that it will continue to work well. What happens after that, NASA has to be responsible for it. If we just wait for a while it will fall back down to the earth had could hit someone. So we are required by international treaty to dispose of it safely, either we will have to boost it to a much higher orbit or we will have to aim it at the Pacific Ocean. The piece of glass, there's several tons of glass there and it would come right through the atmosphere as a single piece. So whatever it hits will be damaged. Anyway right now we must send a robot to do this work. We do not have plans to send an astronaut back to end the life of the Hubble Space Telescope. Right now we're working on making sure that it continues. You may have heard that the spy satellites have been given to NASA quite recently. The National Reconnaissance Office is the spy satellite agency in the United States. They built 2 telescopes which they didn't quite finish, they ran out of money. But they said, eventually an agreement was reached with NASA. So NASA will receive the parts for these 2 telescopes. And now we're thinking about what to do with them. If we can get funding to do it, we'll eventually be able to fly 1 or 2 telescopes. These are as large as the Hubble telescope but right now there is no instrumentation to go with them, no space craft to carry them. So, right now it's just the optical parts and some mechanical parts to hold them. So, these are spectacularly good telescopes and they are available for us as soon as we can figure out what to do. Some ambitions for the longer term. When people say: What is the next visible wavelength or ultraviolet telescope for space?" We say: So these are 3 concepts that were provided to the National Academy of Science's survey a few years ago. And here is one where we say: "Let's just get a very large rocket." Then we could fly an 8 metre monolithic piece of glass that would carry this into space. That would work beautifully. If we can't get that, maybe make one out of many segments. Maybe a 9 metre that would fold up. If we have a big rocket and a great ambition, maybe we can make a 16.8 metre telescope with many segments and it would all be carried up in the giant rocket. I see my reminder is reminding me that my time is over. So, I will conclude by saying that there are many things to do with x-ray observatories. We have one up there now that takes great pictures, sees black holes, sees, I should say, things falling into black holes, can't see the black hole. We have ambitions for future x-ray observatories. We have ambitions for even more future x-ray observatories. And we have a project which is not currently going but we hope to revive it in some way to measure the gravitational waves from black holes as they merge. So this was a project that European and the NASA were combining forces to build. Right now it's not happening because we're waiting for revision. Anyway this turned out to be too hard for us at the moment. I think we'll get there eventually. We will find eventually a new way of doing astronomy with black holes and gravitational waves. So, thank you very much. I will be happy to answer questions this afternoon.

Ich möchte nicht über die Arbeit sprechen, für die ich den Nobelpreis erhalten habe, sondern darüber, was heute geschieht und was die Zukunft bringen wird. Als ich ein Kind war, war für mich das Faszinierendste, was ein Wissenschaftler tun konnte, Geräte herzustellen, mit denen man Dinge messen konnte. Anstatt diese Dinge zu beobachten, was sich als schwierig erwies, will ich also etwas bauen. Das habe ich mein ganzes Leben lang getan - ich habe darüber nachgedacht, wie etwas herzustellen war, womit man Dinge messen konnte. Ich will Ihnen zeigen, woran derzeit in der Astronomie gearbeitet wird - nicht nur meine eigene Arbeit, sondern auch die Arbeit anderer. Nur um Ihnen ein Gefühl dafür zu geben, womit wir in Zukunft zu rechnen haben. Ich habe also eine Kristallkugel mitgebracht. Wenn Sie diese Website besuchen, erfahren Sie alles. Ich mache das nicht, weil ich keine gute Frage habe. Heute verfügen wir über ein fantastisches Instrument, das wir vor 30 Jahren noch nicht hatten: einen Supercomputer. Anhand des Computers können wir uns ein Bild davon machen, dass das, was Brian gerade gesagt hat, richtig ist. Dass das Universum voller kalter, dunkler Materie ist und dunkle Energie die Beschleunigung hervorruft. Und gewöhnliche Materie. Anhand von Supercomputer-Simulationen mit zehn Milliarden Teilchen in einer Kiste können wir vorhersagen, was die Gravitationskräfte tun werden. Und hier ist die Simulation - die Bildung einer Galaxie. Das ist eine kleine Auswahl aus zehn Milliarden Teilchen. Und im Computer können Sie sehen, wie all das vor Ihren Augen geschieht. Das ist eines der leistungsstärksten Instrumente, die wir heute haben. Wir müssen aber zugeben, dass wir nicht wissen, ob das Gezeigte der Wahrheit entspricht. Wir müssen also etwas messen, um herauszufinden, ob dieses schöne Bild, das ich gerade gezeigt habe, irgendeine Ähnlichkeit mit der Realität aufweist. Bis jetzt scheint es zu passen, aber natürlich erzählt es uns etwas über Dinge, die im Verlaufe von Hunderten von Millionen Jahren, sogar von Milliarden Jahren im frühen Universum geschehen sind. Wie finden wir die Wahrheit heraus? Es ist so, als würde man bei einem Fußballspiel ein Foto von allen Zuschauern machen. Das ist wie eine Aufnahme aller existierenden Galaxien. Man sieht kleine Menschen, große Menschen, junge und alte Menschen - und jetzt müssen Sie, der Wissenschaftler, herausfinden, wie aus kleinen Leuten große Leute werden. Und welche Geschichte die Menschen haben - anhand der Aufnahme eines Stadions voller Fußballfans. Das gleiche Problem haben wir in der Astronomie. Wir müssen herausfinden, wie wir den Film, den ich Ihnen gerade gezeigt habe, der eine zeitliche Dynamik aufweist, damit vergleichen können, was wirklich geschehen ist. Ich will nicht unerwähnt lassen, was mit uns geschehen wird. Hier sehen Sie eine andere Supercomputer-Simulation von zwei kollidierenden Galaxien. Wir wissen, dass sich der Andromeda-Nebel, bei dem es sich um die unserer Galaxie am nächsten liegende große Galaxie handelt, in unsere Richtung bewegt, und wir erwarten, dass sich in etwa zwei oder drei Milliarden Jahren eine Kollision wie diese ereignet. Wahrscheinlich werden wir sie nicht beobachten können, weil die Sonne im Verlauf dieser Zeit heller werden wird. Hier auf Erden wird es zu heiß für uns sein - ganz egal, wie wir mit dem Klimawandel und den Energiequellen umgehen. In diesem Zusammenhang muss ich darauf hinweisen, dass sich das Sonnensystem im Außenbereich unserer Galaxie befindet. Es ist ziemlich wahrscheinlich, dass es vollständig aus der Galaxie hinausgeschleudert wird und in den intergalaktischen Raum verschwindet. Doch zu guter Letzt sehen wir auf diesem Bild, wie die zwei Galaxien miteinander verschmelzen und ein wunderschönes, sich drehendes Objekt bilden. Nebenbei: Wenn sich in der Mitte jeder der beiden Galaxien ein schwarzes Loch befindet - und danach sieht es aus - wird es in der Mitte der vereinigten Galaxie zwei schwarze Löcher geben. Und letztendlich werden die zwei schwarzen Löcher miteinander verschmelzen. Nach den Berechnungen werden sie dann einen Ausbruch von Gravitationswellen hervorrufen. Gravitationswellen wurden in der Natur noch nie direkt beobachtet, obwohl wir ihre Existenz hergeleitet haben und für diesen Beweis ein Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Wie auch immer. Das wird wahrscheinlich mit uns geschehen. Doch wie können wir wissen, ob irgendetwas davon wahr ist? Es gibt noch etwas, das Astronomen unbedingt wissen wollen, Sie wahrscheinlich auch: Wie sind wir hierher gekommen? Wie steht es um die Planetenbildung? Nun, seit etwa 1996 wissen wir, dass dieser Prozess abläuft. Dass es viele Planeten gibt, die um andere Sterne kreisen - hin und wieder schiebt sich ein Planet zwischen uns und einen weiter entfernten Stern und blockiert etwas vom Licht des Sterns. Das können wir jetzt beobachten. Vor allem im Weltraum ist das relativ einfach; wir haben sehr stabile Teleskope im Weltraum, ohne die von der Erdatmosphäre ausgehenden Fluktuationen. Ein kleines bisschen vom Licht des Sterns passiert also auf dem Weg zu unserem Teleskop die Atmosphäre des Planeten. Jetzt können wir dieses Licht analysieren und damit die chemische Zusammensetzung und die physikalischen Eigenschaften der Atmosphäre eines um einen anderen Stern kreisenden Planeten bestimmen. Das hat man bereits mit einer ganzen Reihe derartiger Ziele fertiggebracht. Dank des Observatoriums "Kepler", das seit ein paar Jahren im All unterwegs ist, haben wir mittlerweile einen Katalog von, ich glaube 2.000 derartiger Planeten. Und ein paar von ihnen gleichen ein bisschen der Erde. Wir nähern uns also der Antwort auf die Frage, ob Planeten wie die Erde häufig anzutreffen sind. Wir können sagen, dass sie nicht sehr häufig sind, aber es gibt viele, viele Planeten. Es gibt mehr Planeten als Sterne in der Galaxie. Sehr, sehr viele. Lassen Sie mich darüber sprechen, wie wir von diesen Dingen lernen. Ich möchte Ihnen etwas über Teleskope erzählen. Ich werde einige der großen derzeit laufenden Projekte erläutern, die uns Aufschluss über den Rest des Universums geben sollen. Die Reihenfolge, in der ich sie vorstelle, richtet sich nach der zunehmenden Frequenz der von uns verwendeten Photonen. Bei sehr, sehr großen Wellenlängen sehen wir vom Boden aus gar nichts, da die Ionosphäre der Erde undurchlässig ist und die gesamte Strahlung, die wir aussenden, zurück zur Erde reflektiert. Umgekehrt hält sie auch die gesamte Strahlung, die von außen zu uns kommt, ab. Andererseits ist es in bestimmten Teilen der Welt möglich, einen sehr ruhigen Platz aufzusuchen und diese Ansammlung von Dipolantennen zu bauen, die elektronisch zusammengeschaltet sind, um eine Karte des Himmels herzustellen. Das ist ein Beispiel für eine Konzeptsternwarte. Dieses Radioteleskop haben wir auf verschiedene Ziele ausgerichtet. Unter anderem hoffen wir, die Anfänge der ersten Emissionen von Wasserstofflinien zu sehen. Hier auf der Erde emittiert Wasserstoff mit einer Frequenz von 1421 MHz. Wenn man Wasserstoff aus sehr, sehr großer Entfernung beobachtet, wird das Material, das sich aufgrund der Rotverschiebung von uns wegbewegt... die Wellenlängen sind viel größer. Deshalb verwenden wir diese enorm großen Dipolstrahlen. Sie sind alle mit Kabeln zusammengeschaltet und produzieren durch die Fourier-Transformation der eintreffenden Wellen ein Bild vom Himmel. In diesem Fall versetzt uns die Computertechnik in die Lage, etwas zu tun, woran zuvor nicht im Entferntesten zu denken war. Ein anderes Projekt, an dem wir derzeit arbeiten, ist das so genannte Square Kilometre Array. Können Sie sich ein Teleskop vorstellen, das einen ganzen Quadratkilometer einnimmt? Nun, es gab zwei Entwürfe, und das internationale Gremium, das sich für einen der beiden entscheiden sollte, hat gerade entschieden, beide zu verwirklichen. Das eine wird in Australien gebaut, dort, wo es vergleichsweise ruhig ist; sehr weit entfernt von Handys und anderen Funksendern. Das andere in Südafrika, ebenfalls an einem vor Funkstörungen geschützten Ort. Das ist ein sehr schwieriges und teures Zukunftsprojekt, aber es wird verwirklicht. Die technische Entwurfsplanung ist im Wesentlichen fertig; wir wissen also, was zu bauen ist. Es wird in der Lage sein, Dinge wahrzunehmen, die wir uns bisher kaum vorstellen konnten. Und natürlich hoffen wir auf Überraschungen. An diesem Bild können sie sehen, wie wahrhaft gewaltig das Vorhaben ist. Wir haben bereits... wir nähern uns der Fertigstellung dieses wunderschönen Observatoriums. Es trägt den Namen Atacama Large Millimetre Array. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine Ansammlung von etwa 64 Radioantennen in der chilenischen Hochwüste. Es befindet sich in so großer Höhe, dass die Menschen, die sich dort aufhalten, zu ihrer Sicherheit Sauerstoff benötigen. Dafür gibt es kleine Gebäude mit angereichter Sauerstoffatmosphäre. Das ist ein weiteres absolut unfassbares technisches Wunderwerk. Damit es funktioniert, benötigen wir Mikrowellenempfänger an den Fokuspunkten all dieser Antennen. Sie müssen mit Glasfaser verbunden werden. Und wir müssen die Phasenlage der bei den verschiedenen Teleskopen eintreffenden Wellen mit der Präzision eines kleinen Millimeterbruchteils messen, um dann mit dem gigantischen Computer ein Bild vom Himmel zu erzeugen. Die Computer, die man für die Verarbeitung dieser Daten benötigt, verbrauchen Hunderte von Kilowatt elektrischen Stroms. Es handelt sich wahrscheinlich um die leistungsstärksten Spezialcomputer, die es auf der Welt gibt. Da es keine Universalcomputer sind, können sie optimiert werden. Jedenfalls sind wir schon in der Lage, mit den ersten Antennen, die in Betrieb genommen wurden, Bilder zu erzeugen. Eines sehen Sie rechts oben - ein Radiobild im Vergleich zu den Bildern, die das Weltraumteleskop Hubble bei kürzeren Wellenlängen liefert. Das Radiobild unterscheidet sich stark von dem, was wir mit Hubble sehen; die verschiedenen Wellenlängen werden in verschiedenen Farben dargestellt. Jetzt möchte ich kurz auf die Geräte eingehen, die wir zur Messung des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds verwenden; dann werfe ich noch einen Blick in die nächste Zukunft. Im Jahr 1974 hatte ich gerade Berkeley, California absolviert. Ich hatte promoviert; meine Doktorarbeit war ein Projekt zur Messung des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds. Und ich war zu der Erkenntnis gelangt, dass dieses Thema extrem schwierig war - mein Promotionsprojekt funktionierte nämlich nicht richtig. Es handelte sich um Messgeräte, die in einem Ballon nach oben stiegen. Das Ganze funktionierte überhaupt nicht, und zwar aus drei verschiedenen Gründen. Wir bekamen es zurück, und mein Laborpartner brachte es in eine Prüfkammer. Wir fanden heraus, warum es nicht funktioniert hatte. Dann ließ man es später erneut steigen, und beim zweiten Mal funktionierte es. Mit diesem Apparat war es nunmehr möglich, das Spektrum des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds zu messen - wie hell es bei den verschiedenen Wellenlängen ist. Nun, die Urknalltheorie sagt uns, dass das Spektrum dieser Strahlung das eines vollkommenen Schwarzkörpers sein muss. Und dieser Apparat, der in einem Ballon beförderte Apparat, sagt: Ja, es kommt dem ziemlich nahe, aber nicht genau. Nachdem ich Berkeley verlassen hatte, bat die NASA um Vorschläge für Satellitenmissionen. Das war nur fünf Jahre nach der Apollo-Mondlandung. Was gäbe es für die NASA jetzt zu tun? Also Vorschläge für Satelliten. Ich sagte zu meinem Promotionsbetreuer: "Nun, mein Promotionsprojekt hat nicht geklappt, aber es hätte auch im Weltraum durchgeführt werden müssen." Wir fertigten diese kleine Zeichnung an und bauten etwas, das wie auf dem Bild links oben aussah. Und 15 Jahre später flog es ins All, und ich glaube, weitere 17 Jahre danach bekamen wir einen Anruf aus Stockholm. Wir hatten nämlich das Spektrum des Urknalls gemessen, und es war in der Tat ein praktisch perfektes Spektrum. Wie Ihnen George später wahrscheinlich ausführlich erzählen wird, vermaßen wir auch die Karte der Strahlung. Und wir fanden heraus, dass sie warme und kalte Stellen aufweist, wobei es sich um die ursprünglichen Strukturen handelt, über die Brian gesprochen hat. Mittlerweile gibt es mehr wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen über diese warmen und kalten Stellen, als es Stellen auf der Originalkarte gibt. Das Ganze ist zu einer riesigen Industrie geworden. Im Anschluss daran konnte jeder sehen, dass wir mehr herausfinden mussten. Auf dem mittleren Bild sehen Sie die Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Sie fertigte erneut eine Karte des ganzen Himmels an, aber mit viel größerer Empfindlichkeit und viel besserer Winkelauflösung. Diese Karte ist heute so etwas wie der stärkste Grundpfeiler dessen, was Brian das Standardmodell der Kosmologie nennt. Ich würde sagen, wir können es das Standardmodell nennen, aber es ist hochgradig mysteriös, auch wenn es der Standard ist. Wie Brian sagte - wir haben sowohl kalte als auch dunkle Materie und dunkle Energie. Nichts davon wurde jemals in einem Labor gesehen. Das dritte Projekt, hier rechts unten zu sehen, trägt den Namen Planck-Mission. Es handelt sich um eine europäische Mission mit einem kleinen Beitrag Amerikas. Die kosmologischen Ergebnisse wurden noch nicht bekannt gegeben; sie werden für nächstes Frühjahr erwartet. Wir sind schon ganz gespannt darauf, ob es hier eine große Überraschung gibt. Was ist danach zu tun? Derzeit sind wir mit unseren Messungen den Auswirkungen der urzeitlichen Gravitationswellen auf der Spur, falls sie existieren. Die Hypothese lautet wie folgt: Die Urmaterie der Inflationsperiode mit ihren quantenmechanischen Fluktuationen wies so etwas wie gleich große Partitionen zwischen vielen verschiedenen Arten von Variationen und Oszillationen einschließlich Gravitationswellen auf. Es müsste ein paar gegeben haben. Was wären ihre Auswirkungen? Denken wir die Idee einmal weiter: Nach unseren Berechnungen sollte die kosmische Mikrowellen-Hintergrundstrahlung winzige Polarisationsmuster aufweisen. Diese Polarisationsmuster sollten nachweisbar sein; sie sind mittlerweile fast in Reichweite gerückt. Es besteht die Möglichkeit, dass sie eines Tages vom Boden aus oder mithilfe einer Vorrichtung in einem Ballon aufgespürt werden. Aber wenn das nicht oder nicht gut genug gelingt, haben wir schon Vorstellungen darüber, wie man es im Weltraum zuwege bringen könnte. Hier sehen Sie ein aus dem Goddard Space Flight Center, meinem Arbeitsplatz, stammendes Konzept. Es handelt sich um so etwas wie eine verbesserte Version des Satelliten Cosmic Background Explorer; im Inneren befinden sich Polarimeter zur Herstellung einer Karte. Es ist möglich, dass Sie in zehn Jahren, vielleicht sogar früher, von dem Nachweis hören, dass beim Urknall Gravitationswellen entstanden sind oder auch nicht. Und das wird uns Aufschlüsse über die Skalarfelder bzw. Inflationsfelder geben, die möglicherweise existiert und die ursprüngliche Expansion in Gang gesetzt haben. Das ist also unser Teilchenbeschleuniger der Natur. Er kann viel höhere Energien erzeugen, als wir uns das hier auf der Erde jemals vorstellen können. Ich will Ihnen noch ein paar andere Dinge nahebringen. Wir haben derzeit ein von der Europäischen Weltraumbehörde und ihren Partnern in Europa gebautes Observatorium im All. Es trägt den Namen Herschel-Weltraumteleskop und hat bereits einige sehr interessante Karten hergestellt. Das ist der wunderschöne Andromeda-Nebel. Eben jener, der in unsere Richtung unterwegs ist; der diese schöne Kollision hervorrufen wird. Im Bereich der Infrarotstrahlung gemessen sieht er ganz anders aus. Sie sehen diese großen Ringe hier draußen. Das sind Ringe von Orten, an denen sich vor kurzem Sterne gebildet haben; sie sind sehr heiß und produzieren eine Menge Staub um sich herum. Der Staub absorbiert das Sternenlicht und produziert Infrarotstrahlung. Also ein ganz anderes Phänomen. Hier sehen Sie ein kleines amerikanisches Weltraumteleskop, das ebenfalls Infrarotstrahlung misst. Das Teleskop hat eine Öffnung von 80 cm; dennoch ist es in der Lage, Galaxien bei Rotverschiebungen von 2 oder 3 zu sehen. Es ist wirklich erstaunlich, dass so ein kleiner Apparat so weit ins Universum blicken kann. Wir wurden wieder einmal überrascht. Als man vorschlug, ein kleines Teleskop wie dieses zu bauen, war die Antwort: "Oh, wir werden gar nichts sehen." Lassen Sie mich ein paar Worte über das Teleskop verlieren, an dem ich gerade arbeite. Es nennt sich James Webb-Weltraumteleskop. James Webb war übrigens der Mann, der zu Präsident Kennedy ging und sagte: "Ich weiß, wie wir zum Mond kommen." Nebenbei bat er um ausreichend Geld, und sie kamen hin. Sie brauchten dafür weniger als zehn Jahre - wir können uns in zehn Jahren nicht einmal dazu durchringen, ein Projekt zu versuchen. Ich berichte darüber im Namen aller derzeitigen Erdbewohner, im Namen von etwa 10.000 künftigen Nutzern des Teleskops, von etwa 1.000 Ingenieuren und Technikern, die es bauen, von etwa 100 Wissenschaftlern auf der ganzen Welt, die daran arbeiten, und von drei Weltraumbehörden. Das ist nämlich eine Projektpartnerschaft zwischen der NASA und der europäischen bzw. kanadischen Weltraumbehörde. So sieht es aus - es ist das Teleskop rechts oben. Es sieht ganz anders aus als die Teleskope, die Sie kennen. Es unterscheidet sich stark von Galileos kleiner Holzröhre, und auch vom Hubble-Teleskop, das ebenfalls röhrenartig ist. Das hier ist sehr weit von der Erde entfernt. Wir bringen es weit nach draußen, damit das Teleskop kalt bleibt. Sonne und Erde sind hier unten; hier ist dieser große Schirm, hier ist das Teleskop, es ist im Dunkeln. Und es kühlt sich auf 45 Grad Kelvin ab. Um einige der daran arbeitenden Namen zu erwähnen - unser Hauptauftragnehmer ist Northrop Grumman, ein großes, vor allem in der Nähe des Flughafens von Los Angeles ansässiges Luft- und Raumfahrtunternehmen. Aber unsere Instrumente kommen aus der ganzen Welt. Beteiligt sind die University of Arizona; die europäische Weltraumbehörde mit ihrem Unternehmen Astrium - einen der Vertreter dieses Unternehmens, der gestern hier war, haben wir getroffen. Jet Propulsion Lab stellt zusammen mit einem europäischen Konsortium ein weiteres Instrument her. Und schließlich produzieren auch die Kanadier ein Instrument. Das Teleskop wird wie das Hubble-Weltraumteleskop von Baltimore aus betrieben werden, im Space Telescope Science Institute. Wenn Sie dann Astronom sind und einen Vorschlag einreichen wollen, können Sie das auf die gleiche Weise tun, wie man es heute macht. Ich denke, es wird so rechtzeitig fertig, dass viele von Ihnen Vorschläge einreichen können. Das Teleskop ist riesig, und es ist kalt. Die europäische Weltraumbehörde besorgt übrigens die Rakete für uns. Es handelt sich um eine Ariane 5-Rakete. Wir werden das Teleskop im Jahr 2018 von Kourou in Französisch Guayana aus starten. Ein paar Dinge, die wir damit, so hoffen wir, sehen werden - dieses Bild macht die Verbesserung von Empfindlichkeit und Winkelauflösung im Vergleich zum Hubble-Teleskop deutlich. Das ist eine Visualisierung des Computers, wie das frühe Universum ausgesehen haben könnte. Wir hoffen sehr, dass wir die Einzelheiten erkennen, wenn wir mit dem James Webb-Teleskop hineinsehen. Wann und wie bildeten sich die Galaxien? Wie kam es dazu, dass sie verschiedene Formen aufweisen? Wie wurden die schweren Elemente des Universums gebildet? Wie Ihnen Brian gezeigt hat, wissen wir zum Beispiel, dass aus dem Urknall nur die leichtesten Elemente entstanden. Wir sind aber nicht hauptsächlich aus Wasserstoff und Helium, wir sind aus anderen chemischen Elementen gemacht. Sie wurden alle in Sternen hergestellt, die explodierten, und die Elemente wurden wieder freigesetzt. Wir sind also gewissermaßen recycelt. Die Infrarotfähigkeit wird uns in die Lage versetzen, ins Innere dieser schönen Wolken zu sehen, wo heute Sterne geboren werden. Der Staub, der sich im All befindet, ist lichtundurchlässig; man kann nicht durch ihn hindurchsehen. Ziel eines Infrarotteleskops ist es also, durch den Staub und um die Staubkörner herum zu sehen. Hier sehen Sie eine Darstellung von zwei mit dem Hubble-Weltraumteleskop aufgenommenen Bildern des gleichen Raumvolumens. Das Hubble-Teleskop verfügt über eine gewisse Infrarotfähigkeit. Wie Sie sehen, sieht diese Region ganz anders aus. Sichtbare Wellenlängen und Infrarot. Die sichtbaren Wellenlängen zeigen diese schönen glühenden Wolken. Der Staub ist viel transparenter; man kann tatsächlich in die Wolke hineinsehen und feststellen, dass dieser Stern, was immer sich darin befindet, Jets aus Materie produziert. Das ist wahrscheinlich ein sehr junger Stern. Ein weiteres Bild zur Veranschaulichung des Unterschieds, den Infrarot ausmacht. Hier sehen Sie ein Bild, und hier ist wieder das gleiche Raumvolumen - der Stern in der Mitte sendet Jets aus Materie aus, ganz anders als das, was man im sichtbaren Bereich erkennt. Auf diese Weise sehen wir also in das Innere von Wolken aus Gas und Staub, wo Sterne gebildet werden. Und wir fangen an zu lernen, wie das funktioniert. Als ich ins College ging, glaubte man zu wissen, wie es funktioniert, aber wir wissen es immer noch nicht. Wenn wir nämlich versuchen, mit dem Computer das zu simulieren, was wir für die Wahrheit halten, stoßen wir auf Orte, an denen es einfach nicht gelingt. Wie funktioniert das Teleskop? Hier sehen Sie ein Bild seiner Bestandteile. Diese riesige Sonnenblende besteht aus fünf Lagen. Die Sonnenblende ist übrigens so groß wie ein Tennisplatz; sie ist also so groß wie der Platz, auf dem Serena Williams spielt, von hier nach dort. Natürlich hatten wir bisher noch nie einen Tennisplatz im Weltall - das ist also ein wunderbares technisches Projekt. Das Teleskop wird für den Start zusammengefaltet. Es ist viel größer als die Rakete, weshalb das Projekt technisch ungemein schwierig ist. Wir bringen es weit von der Erde weg. Auf diesem Bild sieht man, wo es sich befinden wird. Der Mond ist 384.000 Kilometer von der Erde entfernt, der Lagrange-Punkt L2 ungefähr 1,5 Millionen Kilometer. Dieser Film zeigt, wie sich das Teleskop im Weltall entfaltet. Zuerst entfalten wir die Solarpaneele. Dann entfalten wir die kleine Parabolantenne, mit der die Daten hin und her gesendet werden. Nun beginnen wir mit der Entfaltung der Sonnenblende, des großen Schirms, der das Teleskop vor der Sonne schützt. Der tatsächliche Einsatz ist erst für ein paar Tage später vorgesehen. Wir sind nicht in Eile; so schnell läuft das nicht ab. Hier trennt sich das Teleskop von den warmen Behältern der Raumsondenelektronik. Jetzt entfalten wir die Schutzhülle über dem Schirm. Wenn Sie das sehen, werden Sie vielleicht sagen: "Ist das nicht furchtbar kompliziert?" Die Antwort lautet: ja. Andererseits habe ich das Unternehmen gefragt: "Ist das hier das komplizierteste Objekt, das Sie jemals ins All gebracht haben?" Sie sagten nein. Sie arbeiten auch für andere Behörden und haben gelernt, wie man mit großen komplizierten Dingen im Weltall umgeht. Die anderen Dinge, die sie tun, habe ich allerdings nie gesehen. Hier schließlich nimmt das Teleskop allmählich seine richtige Gestalt an. Der parabolförmige... der Spiegel ist fast parabolförmig. Übrigens ist das Teleskop natürlich zu Beginn nicht scharf eingestellt. All diese großen Beryllium-Sechsecke, aus denen der Hauptspiegel besteht, sind in Position und Krümmung verstellbar. Nach kurzer Zeit sind wir also in der Lage, das Teleskop zu fokussieren und ein scharfes Bild zu bekommen. Wie testen wir das auf der Erde? Nun, wir haben am Johnson Space Flight Center in Texas eine riesige Versuchskammer. Zufälligerweise handelt es sich um dieselbe Prüfkammer, in der die Apollo-Astronauten den Ausstieg aus der Apollo-Kapsel auf die Mondoberfläche geprobt haben. Sie ist also sehr groß und sehr leistungsstark. Wir mussten sie verbessern, indem wir um sie herum einen Flüssiggas-Kühlmantel anbrachten. Jetzt wird nicht nur ihr Inneres mit flüssigem Stickstoff gekühlt; sie verfügt auch über eine Kühlung mit gasförmigem Helium. Damit ist sie in der Lage, das Teleskop auf die Temperatur herunterzukühlen, die es im Weltall haben wird. Wir können also auf der Erde die Scharfstellung überprüfen. Wenn Sie noch mehr wissen wollen - online gibt es viele, viele Dokumente. Suchen Sie einfach nach dem James Webb Space Telescope, und Sie finden unsere Homepage. Es gibt Dokumente zum Herunterladen und viele wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen. Online erhalten Sie also viel ausführlichere Informationen. Schließen möchte ich mit einigen anderen Vorschlägen, was in der Zukunft möglich ist und was auf der Erde geschieht. Das European Southern Observatory hat dieses fantastische System von vier riesigen erdgebundenen Teleskopen in Chile gebaut. Jedes von Ihnen hat einen Durchmesser von acht Metern. Wir waren mit dem James Webb Telescope-Team dort - um zu sehen, wie es ist, wenn man mit einem riesigen Teleskop zu tun hat. Natürlich war uns klar, dass wir kein Acht-Meter-Teleskop in den Weltraum bringen würden. Das unsere hat nur 6 1/2 Meter. Aber dieses System arbeitet schon lange ganz hervorragend. Und einige der interessantesten wissenschaftlichen Ergebnisse, die Sie heute kennen, stammen von diesen Teleskopen. Hier sehen Sie eines, das gerade gebaut wird; es trägt den Namen Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Dabei handelt es sich um ein weiteres Acht-Meter-Teleskop mit einem enormen Blickfeld - 9,6 Quadratgrad, was CCD-Sensoren mit Milliarden von Pixeln bedeutet. Damit ist man in der Lage, in drei Nächten den gesamten Himmel zu durchmustern, den man von seinem Standort auf der Erde aus sehen kann. Mit diesem Teleskop werden wir also Dinge ausfindig machen können, die sich von einer Nacht zur anderen verändern. Wir entdecken Asteroiden, die sich bewegen. Wir werden eine große Zahl von Supernovae beobachten. Und möglicherweise ein paar andere bemerkenswerte Objekte, die sich verändern. Zum Beispiel können Gammastrahlenausbrüche auftauchen. Das Projekt läuft jedenfalls. Hier haben wir etwas, das noch ambitionierter ist. Es nennt sich das European Extremely Large Telescope. Dabei handelt es sich um den Entwurf eines Teleskops mit einem Durchmesser von 40 Metern. Mittlerweile ist es logisch möglich, so etwas zu machen. Wir können allerdings kein 40 Meter großes Stück Glas herstellen. Wir werden also, wie wir es beim James Webb-Teleskop machen, den Spiegel aus vielen kleineren Teilen zusammensetzen. Und nachdem das Ganze scharfgestellt ist, werden wir deren Form anpassen. Wie ich erst vor kurzem erfahren habe, wurde das Projekt von der Europäischen Südsternwarte genehmigt - vorbehaltlich laufender Verhandlungen mit internationalen Partnern zur Beschaffung ausreichender Geldmittel. Aber das Projekt läuft, und ich erwarte auf jeden Fall, dass es in die Tat umgesetzt wird. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir zwei konkurrierende Versionen. Die eine nennt sich Giant Magellan Telescope mit sieben, acht Meter großen Glasstücken. Alle so ausgerichtet, dass sie zusammenwirken. Auch sie müssen angepasst werden, um den einen gigantischen Parabolspiegel zu simulieren. Ein paar der Spiegel dafür wurden bereits hergestellt. Auch dieses Projekt läuft also, wie ich denke. In den Vereinigten Staaten gibt es für so etwas nicht viel staatliche Förderung, weshalb private Mittel beschafft wurden. Unter der Annahme einer erfolgreichen Weiterführung werden wir also in den Vereinigten Staaten entweder eines oder zwei große Teleskope der 30-Meter-Klasse haben. Hier sehen Sie eines, dessen Entwicklungsstart die europäische Weltraumbehörde gerade genehmigt hat. Sein Name ist Euclid-Mission. Damit wird die Entdeckung, die Brian im Zusammenhang mit dem sich beschleunigenden Universum dargestellt hat, weiter untersucht. Wir würden gerne die Messung des Beschleunigungsprozesses weiterhin verbessern - das hat sowohl in Europa als auch in den Vereinigten Staaten oberste Priorität. Wir wissen ziemlich gut, wie stark die Beschleunigung in der Nähe ist. Wir würden gerne die Geschichte der Beschleunigung kennen. Wenn man in der Zeit zurückgeht, ist die Beschleunigung im Verhältnis zur Rate der bereits vorhandenen Expansion kleiner. Erst in den letzten fünf Milliarden Jahren war die Beschleunigung dominant. Nichtsdestoweniger würden wir gerne die ganze Geschichte der Beschleunigung kennen, denn dann könnten wir sagen, ob W, jener Parameter, der aus seiner Gleichung hervorgeht, tatsächlich eine Konstante ist. Niemand kann beweisen, dass er eine Konstante ist. Zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt vermuten wir, dass er eine Konstante ist. Das ist ein kleines Teleskop, das in der Lage wäre, einen sehr großen Teil des Himmels abzudecken - und zwar mit enormer Empfindlichkeit und im Prinzip mit der Fähigkeit, die Krümmung der Raumzeit zu messen, wie die Zeichnung zeigt. Wenn ich über Weltraumteleskope spreche, muss ich Ihnen auch das Hubble Space Telescope vorstellen. Hubble wurde fünfmal vom Space Shuttle besucht. Astronomen haben es nachgerüstet. Es leistet immer noch hervorragende Arbeit. Es arbeitet besser als irgendwann in der Vergangenheit. Wir wissen nicht, wie lange es noch durchhält, aber es wird wahrscheinlich mindestens weitere fünf oder zehn, vielleicht sogar 15 Jahre gute Dienste leisten. Dafür, was dann passiert, ist die NASA verantwortlich. Wenn wir einfach abwarten, wird es zurück auf die Erde fallen und könnte jemanden treffen. Wir sind daher durch einen internationalen Vertrag verpflichtet, es sicher zu entsorgen. Entweder müssen wir es in eine viel höhere Umlaufbahn bringen, oder wir müssen es in den Pazifik fallen lassen. Das Glas... wir haben es mit mehreren Tonnen Glas zu tun; es würde die Atmosphäre in einem Stück durchdringen. Was auch immer getroffen wird, erleidet einen Schaden. Jedenfalls müssen wir diesen Job einen Roboter erledigen lassen. Wir planen nicht, einen Astronauten hinaufzuschicken, um das Leben des Hubble Space Telescope zu beenden. Derzeit arbeiten wir daran, sein Fortbestehen zu sichern. Sie haben vielleicht gehört, dass die NASA vor kurzem Spionagesatelliten geschenkt bekommen hat. Die für Spionagesatelliten zuständige Behörde in den Vereinigten Staaten ist das National Reconnaissance Office (nationaler Aufklärungsdienst). Dort wurden zwei Teleskope gebaut, aber sie sind nicht ganz fertig geworden; das Geld ist ausgegangen. Schließlich wurde eine Vereinbarung mit der NASA getroffen. Die NASA bekommt die Teile für diese zwei Teleskope. Und jetzt überlegen wir, was wir mit ihnen anstellen sollen. Wenn wir die Mittel dafür aufbringen, können wir irgendwann eines oder beide Teleskope ins All schießen. Sie sind so groß wie das Hubble-Teleskop, aber derzeit gibt es keine Instrumente, mit denen man sie ausstatten könnte, und kein Raumfahrzeug, das sie befördern würde. Momentan haben wir nur die optischen Teile und einige mechanische Teile als Halterung. Das sind spektakulär gute Teleskope, und sie stehen uns zur Verfügung, sobald wir herausfinden, was wir mit ihnen anfangen können. Einige langfristige Ambitionen. Wenn man uns fragt: "Was werden wir nach dem Hubble-Weltraumteleskop machen? Was ist die nächste sichtbare Wellenlänge, das nächste Ultraviolett-Teleskop im All?" Dann antworten wir: die der National Academy of Science vor einigen Jahren zur Prüfung vorgelegt wurden. Und hier ist eines, bei dem wir sagen: "Besorgen wir uns eine sehr große Rakete." Damit könnten wir dann ein aus einem Stück bestehendes Acht-Meter-Glas ins All schießen. Das würde wunderbare Arbeit leisten. Wenn daraus nichts wird, stellen wir vielleicht eins aus vielen Segmenten her. Vielleicht eins mit neun Metern zum Zusammenfalten. Wenn wir eine große Rakete und große Ambitionen haben, können wir vielleicht ein 16,8-Meter-Teleskop mit vielen Segmenten bauen, und alles würde in der riesigen Rakete nach oben befördert. Man ermahnt mich, dass meine Redezeit abgelaufen ist. Daher schließe ich mit der Bemerkung, dass man mit Röntgenobservatorien viele Dinge anstellen kann. Eines haben wir derzeit dort oben - es macht großartige Bilder, es sieht schwarze Löcher... ich sollte besser sagen: Es sieht Objekte in schwarze Löcher fallen. Ein schwarzes Loch kann es nicht sehen. Unser Ziel sind weitere Röntgenobservatorien in der Zukunft. Unser Ziel sind noch mehr Röntgenobservatorien in der Zukunft. Und wir haben ein Projekt, das derzeit ruht, aber wir hoffen, dass wir es irgendwie wiederbeleben können - ein Projekt zur Messung von Gravitationswellen bei ihrem Austritt aus schwarzen Löchern. Für dieses Projekt haben die europäische Weltraumbehörde und die NASA ihre Kräfte gebündelt. Derzeit ruht es; wir warten auf eine Überarbeitung. Wie auch immer - es hat sich gezeigt, dass es momentan für uns nicht machbar ist. Ich denke aber, irgendwann werden wir es verwirklichen. Letztendlich werden wir einen neuen Weg finden, Astronomie mit schwarzen Löchern und Gravitationswellen zu betreiben. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit. Fragen beantworte ich gerne heute Nachmittag.

John Mather explaining the difference in images taken with the optical and infrared capabilities of the Hubble telescope
(00:18:54 - 00:20:24)

 

In October 2018, the primarily infrared James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is scheduled for launch from French Guiana. This telescope will be the successor to the Hubble telescope (launched in 1990); it is longer (22 metres in length versus the Hubble’s 13.2 metres) and has a primary mirror that has a collecting area that is 7 times larger than that of the Hubble telescope. The JWST will be placed 1.5 million kilometres away, where it is hoped to register data of the first galaxies of the universe. In this lecture snippet, John Mather presents a film of how the JWST will unfold into operating mode:

 

John Mather (2012) - Seeing Farther with New Telescopes

I wanted to tell you something about, not the work that I did to gain the Nobel Prize but what's happening now and coming. I wanted to say that growing up as a child I thought the most exciting thing I could do as a scientist was to build equipment that would measure things. So rather than trying to observe them, which was difficult, let me build something. So, that's what I've been doing for my entire life is figuring out how to build stuff to measure things. So I want to show you what is currently ongoing for us in astronomy and not just my particular work but other people's work. Just to give you some sense of what's coming. So I have a crystal ball for you. If you visit this particular website it till tell you everything. But I'm not going to go visit because I don't have a good question. So, we have an amazing tool now that we didn't have 30 years ago which is we have a super computer. We can take a computer and imagine that what Brian just said is correct. That the universe is full of cold dark matter and dark energy causing the acceleration. And ordinary matter. And we can predict from super computer simulations with 10 billion particles in a box, what the gravitational forces will do. And here is the simulation, the formation of a galaxy. This is a small sample of 10 billion particles. And you can see this happening before your very eyes in the computer. So this is one of the most powerful tools that we now have. But we have to admit that we don't know if it's true. So we are going to have to go measure something to find out if that beautiful picture that I just showed you has any resemblance to reality. So far it seems to match but of course it's telling us about things that happened over the course of 100's of millions of years, even billions of years in the early universe. And how are we going to tell? We are like, if you go to the football match and you take a picture of the entire crowd of people there. That's like taking a picture of all the galaxies that exist. And you see small people, large people, young people, old people and now you the scientist had to figure out how do small people become large people. And what is the history of people from taking a picture of the stadium full of football fans. So we have the same problem in astronomy so we're going to have to figure out how to compare the movie that I just showed you which is dynamic in time with what really happened. So another thing I wanted to mention is that this is going to happen to us. Here is another super computer simulation of 2 galaxies colliding. We know that the Andromeda Nebula which is the nearest large galaxy to ours is headed in our direction and we expect a collision to occur roughly like this in about 2 or 3 billion years. So it will be probably not observable to us because the sun will also be getting brighter over that period of time and it will be too hot for us to live here on earth regardless of what we do about climate change and energy sources. Another thing to point out about this one is that the solar system is on the outer boundary of our galaxy and it is pretty likely that it will be expelled from the galaxy altogether and it will go flying off into space in between galaxies. But in the end what we see in this picture is that the 2 galaxies merge and form a beautiful spinning object. By the way, if there's a black hole in the middle of each galaxy as seems to be true there will also be now 2 black holes in the middle of the combined galaxy. And eventually the 2 black holes will merge together. Then according to calculation they will produce a burst of gravitational waves coming out. Gravitational waves have never been observed in nature directly. Although we have deduced that they exist and a Nobel Prize was given for that proof. Anyways. So this is likely to happen to us. And now how are we going to know if any of this is true. So another thing that astronomers really want to know and probably you want to know also, how did we get here? So how about planet formation? Now since about 1996 or so we've been aware that this process occurs. That there are many planets around other stars, once in a while a planet will pass between us and a more distant star and will block some of the star light. So we can now observe this. In space especially it's relatively easy to do because we have very stable telescopes in space, no fluctuations from the earth's atmosphere. So a little bit of the star light passes through the planetary atmosphere on its way to our telescope. We can now analyse that light and determine the chemical composition and the physical properties of the atmosphere of a planet around another star. To this has already been accomplished with a fair number of such targets. We have a catalogue now from the Kepler observatory, which has been flying for a couple of years now, I think, of 2,000 such planets. And there are a few that somewhat resemble the earth. So we are getting close to understanding whether planets like the earth are common. And we can say that they're not very common but there are many, many planets. There are more planets in the galaxy than there are stars. Very, very common. So now however let me talk about how do we learn about these things. So I want to show you the beginnings of telescopes. I'm going to illustrate some of the great projects currently underway to learn about the rest of the universe. So I'm going to present them roughly in the order of increasing frequency of the photons that we use. So at very, very long wavelengths we cannot see anything from the ground because the earth's ionosphere is opaque and it reflects all the radiation back down to the earth that we transmit. And conversely it reflects all the radiation coming to us from outside away. So on the other hand, it is possible in certain parts of the world to go to a very quiet place and build this collection of dipole antennas which are hooked together electronically to synthesise a map of the sky. So this is a proof of concept observatory. Various things that we are aiming for with this radio telescope. Among other things, we hope to see the beginnings of the first emissions from hydrogen lines. Now hydrogen emits here on the ground at a frequency of 1,421 megahertz. If you are observing hydrogen at a great, great distance away, the material that's going away from us because of the red shift, the wave lengths will be much longer. And so we use these very large rays of dipoles. They're all hooked together by cables and actually produce an image of the sky by Fourier transformation of the waves that come in. So this is a case where computer technology has enabled us to do something that was never possible at all remotely before. So, another thing we're working on now is something called the Square Kilometre Array. Can you imagine a telescope covering an entire square kilometre? Well there are 2 concepts and the international body that decided which one to choose has just decided to do both of them. One will be built in Australia where it's relatively quiet, it's very far away from cell phones and other radio transmitters. The other one in South Africa, likewise a place that's protected from radio interference. So these are coming and it's a very difficult and expensive project but it is coming. The technical design has been basically completed. So we know what to build. So this will be able to detect things that we have barely only imagined. And of course we hope for surprises. You can just see from the picture how truly immense this is. We have already... We're nearing completion of this beautiful observatory. This is called the Atacama Large Millimetre Array. This is a collection of about 64 radio dishes in the high desert in Chile. It's a high enough altitude that people that go there require oxygen to be safe. There are little buildings that they have for you with enriched oxygen atmosphere. This is another totally amazing technological miracle. To make this one work we have to have microwave receivers at the focus points of each of these dishes. They have to be connected by fibre optics. And we have to measure the relative phase of the waves that are coming in to the different telescopes with a precision of a small fraction of a millimetre. In order to again use the giant computer to create an image of the sky. The computers that it takes to do this processing use hundreds of kilowatts of electrical power. And they are probably the most powerful special purpose computers anywhere in the world. Because they're not general purpose they can be optimised. But at any rate, we're already able to create images with the first dishes that have come on line. And there's one on the upper right corner. Comparing the radio picture with the pictures that we get at shorter wavelengths with the Hubble Space Telescope. So, the radio picture is quite different from what we see with the Hubble. And they've shown the different wavelengths in different colours. So now I want to talk just briefly about the equipment that we use to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation and what is coming next. Back in 1974 I was a recent escapee from Berkley, California. I had finished by PhD, working on a thesis project to measure the cosmic microwave background radiation. And I had concluded that this subject was extremely difficult because my thesis project actually failed to function correctly. It was a balloon instrumentation that went up on a balloon, it did not work at all for 3 different reasons. We got it back and my lap partner put it in a test chamber. We found out why it didn't work and then they flew it again later and it worked the second time. So it was now possible with that apparatus to measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, how bright is it at each different wavelength. Now the Big Bang theory tells you that the spectrum of this radiation must be perfectly black body. And so that apparatus, the balloon burn apparatus, said yes it's pretty close but not exactly. But then certainly after I left Berkley NASA said we want proposals for satellite missions. This is now only 5 years after the Apollo moon landing. So what is NASA going to do? So propose satellites. So, I said to my postdoctoral advisor: So we'd draw this little sketch and we built something about, like that upper left hand picture. And 15 years later it went into space and I guess 17 years after that we got a call from Stockholm. Because we had measured the Big Bang spectrum and it was indeed virtually perfect spectrum. And as George will probably tell you more later, we also measured the map of the radiation. And we found out it has hot and cold spots. Which are the primordial structures that Brian was telling you about. There are now more scientific papers written about those hot and cold spots than there are spots on that original map. It has become a huge industry. So following that everyone could see that we needed to know more. So the middle picture here is the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. It made an all sky map again but much better sensitivity and much better angular resolution. And it is now the sort of strongest basis for what Brian calls the standard model of cosmology. I would say that we may call it the standard model but it's extremely mysterious even if it is standard. As Brian mentioned we have both cold and dark matter and dark energy. Neither of which has ever been seen in a lab. So, the third project on the lower right hand side here is called the Planck mission, it's a European mission with a small American participation. And their cosmological results have not yet been announced but they are expected next spring. And so we're eagerly looking forward to seeing whether there is a big surprise coming from them. What is going to be done after this? We are now hot on the trail of measuring the effects of the primordial gravitational waves, if they exist. The hypothesis is this primordial material of the inflationary period with its quantum mechanical fluctuations had kind of equal partition between many different kinds of variations and oscillations including gravitational waves. There should have been some. So what would their effect be? We now propagate that idea forward. We calculate that the cosmic microwave background radiation should have tiny, tiny polarisation patterns. And these polarisation patterns should be detectable. They're not that far out of reach today. There is a possibility that they will be detected from the ground or with a balloon payload some time. But if that is not done or if we need to do it better we have already ideas about how to do it in outer space. So here is a concept from Goddard Space Flight Center where I work that shows a sort of improved version of the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite but with polarimeters inside to make a map. So it is possible that in another decade or so, maybe even less, you will hear about the demonstration that either the Big Bang material had gravitational waves in it or not. And this will tell us about the scalar fields or inflationary fields that may have existed that propelled the original expansion. So, this is nature's particle accelerator for us. It's capable of reaching much higher energies than we can ever imagine producing here on the ground. So, a few other things to illustrate. We have an observatory in space currently, built by the European Space Agency and its partners through Europe. This is called the Herschel Observatory and they have already produced some very interesting maps. This is the beautiful Andromeda Nebula. The same one that is headed in our direction. That is going to cause that beautiful collision. It looks quite different with the infrared radiation that they measure. You see these big rings out here. These are rings of places where stars are being formed recently and they're very hot and they produce a lot of dust around them. The dust absorbs the starlight and produces infrared radiation. So a very different phenomena. Here is a small American observatory in space measuring infrared radiation as well. The telescope is 8/10 of a metre in aperture. But nevertheless is able to see galaxies at a red shift of 2 or 3. It's quite astonishing that such a small piece of apparatus can see so far across the universe. But it is a demonstration that we were surprised one more time. When people first proposed building a small telescope like this they said: "Oh, we won't see anything". A few words about the telescope I'm currently working on. This is called the James Webb Space Telescope. By the way James Webb was the man who went to President Kennedy and said: "I know how to get us to the moon". And by the way he also asked for enough money and so they got there. And it took them less than 10 years, we can't even decide to try a project in 10 years. So I'm reporting on this on behalf of all of current earth inhabitants, about 10,000 future users of the observatory, about 1,000 engineers and technicians who are building it and about 100 scientists worldwide who are working on it and 3 space agencies. Because this is a project partnership between NASA and European and Canadian space agencies. So this is what this one looks like, this is the telescope in the upper right hand corner. It does not look like your telescopes you have seen before. It's nothing like Galileo's little tube of wood and nothing like the Hubble Telescope which is also like a tube. This one is very far away from earth. And we put it way away so that the telescope will be cold. The sun and the earth are down here below, here is this big umbrella, here is the telescope, it's in the dark. And it will cool itself down to 45 degrees Kelvin. So by the way to name some of the people who are working on it, our prime contractor is Northrop Grumman which is a large aerospace firm, primarily located near Los Angeles Airport. Anyway we have instruments coming from around the world. The University of Arizona. The European Space Agency with their company Astrium. Notice that we met one of the representatives of that company, who was here yesterday. Jet Propulsion Lab and a European consortium producing another instrument. And finally the Canadians are producing an instrument. The telescope will be operated like the Hubble Space Telescope from Baltimore at the Space Telescope Science Institute. So if you're an astronomer and you want to make a proposal you will be writing proposals the same way that they do today. So, I think it will be ready in time for many of you to write your proposals. So the telescope is huge, it is cold. By the way the European Space Agency is buying the rocket for us. It's an Ariane 5 rocket. So we'll be launching the telescope from Kourou in French Guiana in 2018. So a few things that we hope that this will see. Well, this illustrates the improvement in sensitivity and angular resolution compared with the Hubble Telescope. This is a visualisation from the computer of what the early universe might have looked like. We will certainly hope to see the details looking down inside with the James Webb Telescope. When and how did the galaxies form, how come they have the different shapes that they have. How did the heavy elements of the universe get formed, we know for instance that since, as Brian showed you, we have only the lightest elements came from the big bang. We're not made out of, primarily hydrogen and helium, we're made out of other chemical elements. So they were all produced in stars that exploded and came back out again. So we're quite recycled. The infrared capability will enable us to look inside these beautiful clouds where stars are being born today. The dust that's there in space is opaque. And you cannot see through it. So the aim of an infrared telescope is to see through the dust and around the dust grains. So, here's an illustration of 2 pictures taken with the Hubble Space Telescope of the same volume of space. The Hubble Telescope has some infrared capability. And you can see this region looks totally different. Visible wavelengths and infrared. The visible wavelengths show these beautiful glowing clouds. The dust is much more transparent, you can actually see inside the cloud and see that this star, whatever it is in there, is producing jets of material. And it's probably a very young star doing that. So another picture of the difference between infrared. Here's one picture and there's the same volume of space again. Here's the star in the middle sending out jets of material, quite different from what you see in the visible. So this is a way of us to look inside the clouds of gas and dust where stars are formed. And we begin to learn how this works. So when I went to college people knew how this worked. We still don't know how it works. Because when we actually try to get the computer to simulate what we think is true, we encounter places where it just doesn't work out. So how does the telescope work? Here's a picture of the deployed observatory. There are 5 layers of this giant sun shield. By the way the sun shied is as big as a tennis court. So where Serena Williams is playing that's how big this is, from there to there. And of course we've never had a tennis court in space before so this is a wonderful engineering project. The telescope is folded up for launch. It's much larger than the rocket is. So it's a tremendously difficult engineering project for that as well. We will be putting it far from earth. Here is the picture of where it is. The moon at 384,000 kilometres from earth. The Lagrange point L2, about 1.5 million kilometres. So here is a movie showing how the telescope will unfold in outer space. First we unfold the solar panels. Then we unfold the little parabolic antenna that sends the data back and forth. Now we begin to unfold the sun shield, the big umbrella that protects the observatory from the sun. The actual deployment will happen a few days after launch. We're not in a hurry, it doesn't run this fast. Here the telescope is separating from the warm boxes of the spacecraft electronics. Now we're unfolding the protective covers over the shield. You might say looking at this: Answer is yes. On the other hand, I asked our company: and they said no. So they work for other government agencies as well. So they have learned how to do big complicated things in space. But I've never seen the other things that they do. So here the telescope is finally coming to approximately the right shape. The parabolic, it's almost a parabolic mirror. By the way the telescope is clearly not in focus when it is launched. All of those big beryllium hexagons that make up the primary mirror are adjustable in position and in curvature. So that after a little while we will be able to focus the telescope and get a sharp image. So, how are we going to test this on the ground? Well, we have a giant test chamber at Johnson Space Flight Center in Texas. And this turns out to be the same test chamber where the Apollo astronauts rehearsed getting out of the Apollo capsule onto the surface of the moon. So it's very big and very capable. We've had to improve it by putting cryogenic cooling shrouds around it so it has now not only liquid nitrogen to cool the interior but also a gaseous helium refrigerator. So it will be capable of getting the telescope down to the temperature that it will have in outer space. So we'll be able to verify on the ground that it focuses. So if you want to know more there are many, many documents online. If you just hunt for the James Webb Space Telescope you'll find our home web page and there are documents you can download and many scientific white papers. So for much more detail it is available online, of course. Just to... I want to close with some other suggestions about what is possible in the future and what is happening on the ground. The European Southern Observatory built this amazing collection of 4 giant telescopes on the ground in Chile. Each one of them is 8 metres in diameter. We took our James Webb Telescope team down to visit. To see what was it like to get a huge telescope and of course we decided that we couldn't quite put an 8 metre telescope in space. Ours is only 6 ½ metres. But this collection has been working beautifully for a long time. And some of the most interesting scientific results that you know of today came from these telescopes. Here is one that is being built. It's called the large synoptic survey telescope. This is another 8 metre telescope with a very enormous field of view. So they will be able to scan the entire sky that they can see from their place on earth, every 3 nights. So we will be able to find with this telescope things that change from night to night. We will be able to find asteroids that move. We will find supernovae in great numbers. And possibly a few other remarkable things that change. Gamma ray bursts may turn up for instance. So anyway it's coming along. This is something even more ambitious. This is called the European Extremely Large Telescope. This is a concept for a 40 metre diameter telescope. It's huge. It is now logically possible to do this. We cannot make a 40 metre piece of glass. So, of course, as we do with the James Webb Telescope we will make the mirror out of many smaller pieces. And we will adjust them to shape after the thing is focused. So as I understood it quite recently the project has been approved by the European Southern Observatory subject to continuing negotiations with international partners to get enough money. But it is coming along and I fully expect that this one will happen. In the United States we have 2 competing versions. One is called the Giant Magellan Telescope. This one has 7, 8 metre pieces of glass. All figured to work together. Again these have to be adjusted so they simulate the one giant parabolic mirror. Some of the mirrors have already been made for this one. And so this one I think was also going to come along. In the United States we do not have much government funding for these, so private money has been raised. And so assuming that that continues successfully we will either have 1 or 2 large 30 metre class telescopes in the United States. Here is one that the European Space Agency has now approved to start development. This is called the Euclid mission. This is one which is going to test further the discovery that Brian described about the accelerating universe. We would like, and this is top priority for both Europe and the United States, to continue to measure better the acceleration process. We know pretty well what the acceleration is nearby. We would like to know the history of the acceleration. Now as you go farther back in time the acceleration is smaller relative to the expansion rate that already occurs. So, it's only in the last 5 billion years that acceleration has been dominant. Nevertheless we would like to know the entire history of the acceleration because then we would be able to say whether that W, that parameter that he showed in his equations is actually a constant. No one can prove that it's a constant. We are right now assuming that it's a constant. So this is a small telescope that would be able to cover a very large part of the sky. And with tremendous sensitivity and able to basically measure the curvature of space time over here as the drawing shows. I can't show you space telescopes without showing you the Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble has been visited 5 times by the space shuttle. And astronomers have upgraded it. It is still working beautifully. It is working better than it has ever worked in the past. So we don't know how long it will last but it's probably at least 5 or 10, maybe 15 years more that it will continue to work well. What happens after that, NASA has to be responsible for it. If we just wait for a while it will fall back down to the earth had could hit someone. So we are required by international treaty to dispose of it safely, either we will have to boost it to a much higher orbit or we will have to aim it at the Pacific Ocean. The piece of glass, there's several tons of glass there and it would come right through the atmosphere as a single piece. So whatever it hits will be damaged. Anyway right now we must send a robot to do this work. We do not have plans to send an astronaut back to end the life of the Hubble Space Telescope. Right now we're working on making sure that it continues. You may have heard that the spy satellites have been given to NASA quite recently. The National Reconnaissance Office is the spy satellite agency in the United States. They built 2 telescopes which they didn't quite finish, they ran out of money. But they said, eventually an agreement was reached with NASA. So NASA will receive the parts for these 2 telescopes. And now we're thinking about what to do with them. If we can get funding to do it, we'll eventually be able to fly 1 or 2 telescopes. These are as large as the Hubble telescope but right now there is no instrumentation to go with them, no space craft to carry them. So, right now it's just the optical parts and some mechanical parts to hold them. So, these are spectacularly good telescopes and they are available for us as soon as we can figure out what to do. Some ambitions for the longer term. When people say: What is the next visible wavelength or ultraviolet telescope for space?" We say: So these are 3 concepts that were provided to the National Academy of Science's survey a few years ago. And here is one where we say: "Let's just get a very large rocket." Then we could fly an 8 metre monolithic piece of glass that would carry this into space. That would work beautifully. If we can't get that, maybe make one out of many segments. Maybe a 9 metre that would fold up. If we have a big rocket and a great ambition, maybe we can make a 16.8 metre telescope with many segments and it would all be carried up in the giant rocket. I see my reminder is reminding me that my time is over. So, I will conclude by saying that there are many things to do with x-ray observatories. We have one up there now that takes great pictures, sees black holes, sees, I should say, things falling into black holes, can't see the black hole. We have ambitions for future x-ray observatories. We have ambitions for even more future x-ray observatories. And we have a project which is not currently going but we hope to revive it in some way to measure the gravitational waves from black holes as they merge. So this was a project that European and the NASA were combining forces to build. Right now it's not happening because we're waiting for revision. Anyway this turned out to be too hard for us at the moment. I think we'll get there eventually. We will find eventually a new way of doing astronomy with black holes and gravitational waves. So, thank you very much. I will be happy to answer questions this afternoon.

Ich möchte nicht über die Arbeit sprechen, für die ich den Nobelpreis erhalten habe, sondern darüber, was heute geschieht und was die Zukunft bringen wird. Als ich ein Kind war, war für mich das Faszinierendste, was ein Wissenschaftler tun konnte, Geräte herzustellen, mit denen man Dinge messen konnte. Anstatt diese Dinge zu beobachten, was sich als schwierig erwies, will ich also etwas bauen. Das habe ich mein ganzes Leben lang getan - ich habe darüber nachgedacht, wie etwas herzustellen war, womit man Dinge messen konnte. Ich will Ihnen zeigen, woran derzeit in der Astronomie gearbeitet wird - nicht nur meine eigene Arbeit, sondern auch die Arbeit anderer. Nur um Ihnen ein Gefühl dafür zu geben, womit wir in Zukunft zu rechnen haben. Ich habe also eine Kristallkugel mitgebracht. Wenn Sie diese Website besuchen, erfahren Sie alles. Ich mache das nicht, weil ich keine gute Frage habe. Heute verfügen wir über ein fantastisches Instrument, das wir vor 30 Jahren noch nicht hatten: einen Supercomputer. Anhand des Computers können wir uns ein Bild davon machen, dass das, was Brian gerade gesagt hat, richtig ist. Dass das Universum voller kalter, dunkler Materie ist und dunkle Energie die Beschleunigung hervorruft. Und gewöhnliche Materie. Anhand von Supercomputer-Simulationen mit zehn Milliarden Teilchen in einer Kiste können wir vorhersagen, was die Gravitationskräfte tun werden. Und hier ist die Simulation - die Bildung einer Galaxie. Das ist eine kleine Auswahl aus zehn Milliarden Teilchen. Und im Computer können Sie sehen, wie all das vor Ihren Augen geschieht. Das ist eines der leistungsstärksten Instrumente, die wir heute haben. Wir müssen aber zugeben, dass wir nicht wissen, ob das Gezeigte der Wahrheit entspricht. Wir müssen also etwas messen, um herauszufinden, ob dieses schöne Bild, das ich gerade gezeigt habe, irgendeine Ähnlichkeit mit der Realität aufweist. Bis jetzt scheint es zu passen, aber natürlich erzählt es uns etwas über Dinge, die im Verlaufe von Hunderten von Millionen Jahren, sogar von Milliarden Jahren im frühen Universum geschehen sind. Wie finden wir die Wahrheit heraus? Es ist so, als würde man bei einem Fußballspiel ein Foto von allen Zuschauern machen. Das ist wie eine Aufnahme aller existierenden Galaxien. Man sieht kleine Menschen, große Menschen, junge und alte Menschen - und jetzt müssen Sie, der Wissenschaftler, herausfinden, wie aus kleinen Leuten große Leute werden. Und welche Geschichte die Menschen haben - anhand der Aufnahme eines Stadions voller Fußballfans. Das gleiche Problem haben wir in der Astronomie. Wir müssen herausfinden, wie wir den Film, den ich Ihnen gerade gezeigt habe, der eine zeitliche Dynamik aufweist, damit vergleichen können, was wirklich geschehen ist. Ich will nicht unerwähnt lassen, was mit uns geschehen wird. Hier sehen Sie eine andere Supercomputer-Simulation von zwei kollidierenden Galaxien. Wir wissen, dass sich der Andromeda-Nebel, bei dem es sich um die unserer Galaxie am nächsten liegende große Galaxie handelt, in unsere Richtung bewegt, und wir erwarten, dass sich in etwa zwei oder drei Milliarden Jahren eine Kollision wie diese ereignet. Wahrscheinlich werden wir sie nicht beobachten können, weil die Sonne im Verlauf dieser Zeit heller werden wird. Hier auf Erden wird es zu heiß für uns sein - ganz egal, wie wir mit dem Klimawandel und den Energiequellen umgehen. In diesem Zusammenhang muss ich darauf hinweisen, dass sich das Sonnensystem im Außenbereich unserer Galaxie befindet. Es ist ziemlich wahrscheinlich, dass es vollständig aus der Galaxie hinausgeschleudert wird und in den intergalaktischen Raum verschwindet. Doch zu guter Letzt sehen wir auf diesem Bild, wie die zwei Galaxien miteinander verschmelzen und ein wunderschönes, sich drehendes Objekt bilden. Nebenbei: Wenn sich in der Mitte jeder der beiden Galaxien ein schwarzes Loch befindet - und danach sieht es aus - wird es in der Mitte der vereinigten Galaxie zwei schwarze Löcher geben. Und letztendlich werden die zwei schwarzen Löcher miteinander verschmelzen. Nach den Berechnungen werden sie dann einen Ausbruch von Gravitationswellen hervorrufen. Gravitationswellen wurden in der Natur noch nie direkt beobachtet, obwohl wir ihre Existenz hergeleitet haben und für diesen Beweis ein Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Wie auch immer. Das wird wahrscheinlich mit uns geschehen. Doch wie können wir wissen, ob irgendetwas davon wahr ist? Es gibt noch etwas, das Astronomen unbedingt wissen wollen, Sie wahrscheinlich auch: Wie sind wir hierher gekommen? Wie steht es um die Planetenbildung? Nun, seit etwa 1996 wissen wir, dass dieser Prozess abläuft. Dass es viele Planeten gibt, die um andere Sterne kreisen - hin und wieder schiebt sich ein Planet zwischen uns und einen weiter entfernten Stern und blockiert etwas vom Licht des Sterns. Das können wir jetzt beobachten. Vor allem im Weltraum ist das relativ einfach; wir haben sehr stabile Teleskope im Weltraum, ohne die von der Erdatmosphäre ausgehenden Fluktuationen. Ein kleines bisschen vom Licht des Sterns passiert also auf dem Weg zu unserem Teleskop die Atmosphäre des Planeten. Jetzt können wir dieses Licht analysieren und damit die chemische Zusammensetzung und die physikalischen Eigenschaften der Atmosphäre eines um einen anderen Stern kreisenden Planeten bestimmen. Das hat man bereits mit einer ganzen Reihe derartiger Ziele fertiggebracht. Dank des Observatoriums "Kepler", das seit ein paar Jahren im All unterwegs ist, haben wir mittlerweile einen Katalog von, ich glaube 2.000 derartiger Planeten. Und ein paar von ihnen gleichen ein bisschen der Erde. Wir nähern uns also der Antwort auf die Frage, ob Planeten wie die Erde häufig anzutreffen sind. Wir können sagen, dass sie nicht sehr häufig sind, aber es gibt viele, viele Planeten. Es gibt mehr Planeten als Sterne in der Galaxie. Sehr, sehr viele. Lassen Sie mich darüber sprechen, wie wir von diesen Dingen lernen. Ich möchte Ihnen etwas über Teleskope erzählen. Ich werde einige der großen derzeit laufenden Projekte erläutern, die uns Aufschluss über den Rest des Universums geben sollen. Die Reihenfolge, in der ich sie vorstelle, richtet sich nach der zunehmenden Frequenz der von uns verwendeten Photonen. Bei sehr, sehr großen Wellenlängen sehen wir vom Boden aus gar nichts, da die Ionosphäre der Erde undurchlässig ist und die gesamte Strahlung, die wir aussenden, zurück zur Erde reflektiert. Umgekehrt hält sie auch die gesamte Strahlung, die von außen zu uns kommt, ab. Andererseits ist es in bestimmten Teilen der Welt möglich, einen sehr ruhigen Platz aufzusuchen und diese Ansammlung von Dipolantennen zu bauen, die elektronisch zusammengeschaltet sind, um eine Karte des Himmels herzustellen. Das ist ein Beispiel für eine Konzeptsternwarte. Dieses Radioteleskop haben wir auf verschiedene Ziele ausgerichtet. Unter anderem hoffen wir, die Anfänge der ersten Emissionen von Wasserstofflinien zu sehen. Hier auf der Erde emittiert Wasserstoff mit einer Frequenz von 1421 MHz. Wenn man Wasserstoff aus sehr, sehr großer Entfernung beobachtet, wird das Material, das sich aufgrund der Rotverschiebung von uns wegbewegt... die Wellenlängen sind viel größer. Deshalb verwenden wir diese enorm großen Dipolstrahlen. Sie sind alle mit Kabeln zusammengeschaltet und produzieren durch die Fourier-Transformation der eintreffenden Wellen ein Bild vom Himmel. In diesem Fall versetzt uns die Computertechnik in die Lage, etwas zu tun, woran zuvor nicht im Entferntesten zu denken war. Ein anderes Projekt, an dem wir derzeit arbeiten, ist das so genannte Square Kilometre Array. Können Sie sich ein Teleskop vorstellen, das einen ganzen Quadratkilometer einnimmt? Nun, es gab zwei Entwürfe, und das internationale Gremium, das sich für einen der beiden entscheiden sollte, hat gerade entschieden, beide zu verwirklichen. Das eine wird in Australien gebaut, dort, wo es vergleichsweise ruhig ist; sehr weit entfernt von Handys und anderen Funksendern. Das andere in Südafrika, ebenfalls an einem vor Funkstörungen geschützten Ort. Das ist ein sehr schwieriges und teures Zukunftsprojekt, aber es wird verwirklicht. Die technische Entwurfsplanung ist im Wesentlichen fertig; wir wissen also, was zu bauen ist. Es wird in der Lage sein, Dinge wahrzunehmen, die wir uns bisher kaum vorstellen konnten. Und natürlich hoffen wir auf Überraschungen. An diesem Bild können sie sehen, wie wahrhaft gewaltig das Vorhaben ist. Wir haben bereits... wir nähern uns der Fertigstellung dieses wunderschönen Observatoriums. Es trägt den Namen Atacama Large Millimetre Array. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine Ansammlung von etwa 64 Radioantennen in der chilenischen Hochwüste. Es befindet sich in so großer Höhe, dass die Menschen, die sich dort aufhalten, zu ihrer Sicherheit Sauerstoff benötigen. Dafür gibt es kleine Gebäude mit angereichter Sauerstoffatmosphäre. Das ist ein weiteres absolut unfassbares technisches Wunderwerk. Damit es funktioniert, benötigen wir Mikrowellenempfänger an den Fokuspunkten all dieser Antennen. Sie müssen mit Glasfaser verbunden werden. Und wir müssen die Phasenlage der bei den verschiedenen Teleskopen eintreffenden Wellen mit der Präzision eines kleinen Millimeterbruchteils messen, um dann mit dem gigantischen Computer ein Bild vom Himmel zu erzeugen. Die Computer, die man für die Verarbeitung dieser Daten benötigt, verbrauchen Hunderte von Kilowatt elektrischen Stroms. Es handelt sich wahrscheinlich um die leistungsstärksten Spezialcomputer, die es auf der Welt gibt. Da es keine Universalcomputer sind, können sie optimiert werden. Jedenfalls sind wir schon in der Lage, mit den ersten Antennen, die in Betrieb genommen wurden, Bilder zu erzeugen. Eines sehen Sie rechts oben - ein Radiobild im Vergleich zu den Bildern, die das Weltraumteleskop Hubble bei kürzeren Wellenlängen liefert. Das Radiobild unterscheidet sich stark von dem, was wir mit Hubble sehen; die verschiedenen Wellenlängen werden in verschiedenen Farben dargestellt. Jetzt möchte ich kurz auf die Geräte eingehen, die wir zur Messung des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds verwenden; dann werfe ich noch einen Blick in die nächste Zukunft. Im Jahr 1974 hatte ich gerade Berkeley, California absolviert. Ich hatte promoviert; meine Doktorarbeit war ein Projekt zur Messung des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds. Und ich war zu der Erkenntnis gelangt, dass dieses Thema extrem schwierig war - mein Promotionsprojekt funktionierte nämlich nicht richtig. Es handelte sich um Messgeräte, die in einem Ballon nach oben stiegen. Das Ganze funktionierte überhaupt nicht, und zwar aus drei verschiedenen Gründen. Wir bekamen es zurück, und mein Laborpartner brachte es in eine Prüfkammer. Wir fanden heraus, warum es nicht funktioniert hatte. Dann ließ man es später erneut steigen, und beim zweiten Mal funktionierte es. Mit diesem Apparat war es nunmehr möglich, das Spektrum des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds zu messen - wie hell es bei den verschiedenen Wellenlängen ist. Nun, die Urknalltheorie sagt uns, dass das Spektrum dieser Strahlung das eines vollkommenen Schwarzkörpers sein muss. Und dieser Apparat, der in einem Ballon beförderte Apparat, sagt: Ja, es kommt dem ziemlich nahe, aber nicht genau. Nachdem ich Berkeley verlassen hatte, bat die NASA um Vorschläge für Satellitenmissionen. Das war nur fünf Jahre nach der Apollo-Mondlandung. Was gäbe es für die NASA jetzt zu tun? Also Vorschläge für Satelliten. Ich sagte zu meinem Promotionsbetreuer: "Nun, mein Promotionsprojekt hat nicht geklappt, aber es hätte auch im Weltraum durchgeführt werden müssen." Wir fertigten diese kleine Zeichnung an und bauten etwas, das wie auf dem Bild links oben aussah. Und 15 Jahre später flog es ins All, und ich glaube, weitere 17 Jahre danach bekamen wir einen Anruf aus Stockholm. Wir hatten nämlich das Spektrum des Urknalls gemessen, und es war in der Tat ein praktisch perfektes Spektrum. Wie Ihnen George später wahrscheinlich ausführlich erzählen wird, vermaßen wir auch die Karte der Strahlung. Und wir fanden heraus, dass sie warme und kalte Stellen aufweist, wobei es sich um die ursprünglichen Strukturen handelt, über die Brian gesprochen hat. Mittlerweile gibt es mehr wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen über diese warmen und kalten Stellen, als es Stellen auf der Originalkarte gibt. Das Ganze ist zu einer riesigen Industrie geworden. Im Anschluss daran konnte jeder sehen, dass wir mehr herausfinden mussten. Auf dem mittleren Bild sehen Sie die Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Sie fertigte erneut eine Karte des ganzen Himmels an, aber mit viel größerer Empfindlichkeit und viel besserer Winkelauflösung. Diese Karte ist heute so etwas wie der stärkste Grundpfeiler dessen, was Brian das Standardmodell der Kosmologie nennt. Ich würde sagen, wir können es das Standardmodell nennen, aber es ist hochgradig mysteriös, auch wenn es der Standard ist. Wie Brian sagte - wir haben sowohl kalte als auch dunkle Materie und dunkle Energie. Nichts davon wurde jemals in einem Labor gesehen. Das dritte Projekt, hier rechts unten zu sehen, trägt den Namen Planck-Mission. Es handelt sich um eine europäische Mission mit einem kleinen Beitrag Amerikas. Die kosmologischen Ergebnisse wurden noch nicht bekannt gegeben; sie werden für nächstes Frühjahr erwartet. Wir sind schon ganz gespannt darauf, ob es hier eine große Überraschung gibt. Was ist danach zu tun? Derzeit sind wir mit unseren Messungen den Auswirkungen der urzeitlichen Gravitationswellen auf der Spur, falls sie existieren. Die Hypothese lautet wie folgt: Die Urmaterie der Inflationsperiode mit ihren quantenmechanischen Fluktuationen wies so etwas wie gleich große Partitionen zwischen vielen verschiedenen Arten von Variationen und Oszillationen einschließlich Gravitationswellen auf. Es müsste ein paar gegeben haben. Was wären ihre Auswirkungen? Denken wir die Idee einmal weiter: Nach unseren Berechnungen sollte die kosmische Mikrowellen-Hintergrundstrahlung winzige Polarisationsmuster aufweisen. Diese Polarisationsmuster sollten nachweisbar sein; sie sind mittlerweile fast in Reichweite gerückt. Es besteht die Möglichkeit, dass sie eines Tages vom Boden aus oder mithilfe einer Vorrichtung in einem Ballon aufgespürt werden. Aber wenn das nicht oder nicht gut genug gelingt, haben wir schon Vorstellungen darüber, wie man es im Weltraum zuwege bringen könnte. Hier sehen Sie ein aus dem Goddard Space Flight Center, meinem Arbeitsplatz, stammendes Konzept. Es handelt sich um so etwas wie eine verbesserte Version des Satelliten Cosmic Background Explorer; im Inneren befinden sich Polarimeter zur Herstellung einer Karte. Es ist möglich, dass Sie in zehn Jahren, vielleicht sogar früher, von dem Nachweis hören, dass beim Urknall Gravitationswellen entstanden sind oder auch nicht. Und das wird uns Aufschlüsse über die Skalarfelder bzw. Inflationsfelder geben, die möglicherweise existiert und die ursprüngliche Expansion in Gang gesetzt haben. Das ist also unser Teilchenbeschleuniger der Natur. Er kann viel höhere Energien erzeugen, als wir uns das hier auf der Erde jemals vorstellen können. Ich will Ihnen noch ein paar andere Dinge nahebringen. Wir haben derzeit ein von der Europäischen Weltraumbehörde und ihren Partnern in Europa gebautes Observatorium im All. Es trägt den Namen Herschel-Weltraumteleskop und hat bereits einige sehr interessante Karten hergestellt. Das ist der wunderschöne Andromeda-Nebel. Eben jener, der in unsere Richtung unterwegs ist; der diese schöne Kollision hervorrufen wird. Im Bereich der Infrarotstrahlung gemessen sieht er ganz anders aus. Sie sehen diese großen Ringe hier draußen. Das sind Ringe von Orten, an denen sich vor kurzem Sterne gebildet haben; sie sind sehr heiß und produzieren eine Menge Staub um sich herum. Der Staub absorbiert das Sternenlicht und produziert Infrarotstrahlung. Also ein ganz anderes Phänomen. Hier sehen Sie ein kleines amerikanisches Weltraumteleskop, das ebenfalls Infrarotstrahlung misst. Das Teleskop hat eine Öffnung von 80 cm; dennoch ist es in der Lage, Galaxien bei Rotverschiebungen von 2 oder 3 zu sehen. Es ist wirklich erstaunlich, dass so ein kleiner Apparat so weit ins Universum blicken kann. Wir wurden wieder einmal überrascht. Als man vorschlug, ein kleines Teleskop wie dieses zu bauen, war die Antwort: "Oh, wir werden gar nichts sehen." Lassen Sie mich ein paar Worte über das Teleskop verlieren, an dem ich gerade arbeite. Es nennt sich James Webb-Weltraumteleskop. James Webb war übrigens der Mann, der zu Präsident Kennedy ging und sagte: "Ich weiß, wie wir zum Mond kommen." Nebenbei bat er um ausreichend Geld, und sie kamen hin. Sie brauchten dafür weniger als zehn Jahre - wir können uns in zehn Jahren nicht einmal dazu durchringen, ein Projekt zu versuchen. Ich berichte darüber im Namen aller derzeitigen Erdbewohner, im Namen von etwa 10.000 künftigen Nutzern des Teleskops, von etwa 1.000 Ingenieuren und Technikern, die es bauen, von etwa 100 Wissenschaftlern auf der ganzen Welt, die daran arbeiten, und von drei Weltraumbehörden. Das ist nämlich eine Projektpartnerschaft zwischen der NASA und der europäischen bzw. kanadischen Weltraumbehörde. So sieht es aus - es ist das Teleskop rechts oben. Es sieht ganz anders aus als die Teleskope, die Sie kennen. Es unterscheidet sich stark von Galileos kleiner Holzröhre, und auch vom Hubble-Teleskop, das ebenfalls röhrenartig ist. Das hier ist sehr weit von der Erde entfernt. Wir bringen es weit nach draußen, damit das Teleskop kalt bleibt. Sonne und Erde sind hier unten; hier ist dieser große Schirm, hier ist das Teleskop, es ist im Dunkeln. Und es kühlt sich auf 45 Grad Kelvin ab. Um einige der daran arbeitenden Namen zu erwähnen - unser Hauptauftragnehmer ist Northrop Grumman, ein großes, vor allem in der Nähe des Flughafens von Los Angeles ansässiges Luft- und Raumfahrtunternehmen. Aber unsere Instrumente kommen aus der ganzen Welt. Beteiligt sind die University of Arizona; die europäische Weltraumbehörde mit ihrem Unternehmen Astrium - einen der Vertreter dieses Unternehmens, der gestern hier war, haben wir getroffen. Jet Propulsion Lab stellt zusammen mit einem europäischen Konsortium ein weiteres Instrument her. Und schließlich produzieren auch die Kanadier ein Instrument. Das Teleskop wird wie das Hubble-Weltraumteleskop von Baltimore aus betrieben werden, im Space Telescope Science Institute. Wenn Sie dann Astronom sind und einen Vorschlag einreichen wollen, können Sie das auf die gleiche Weise tun, wie man es heute macht. Ich denke, es wird so rechtzeitig fertig, dass viele von Ihnen Vorschläge einreichen können. Das Teleskop ist riesig, und es ist kalt. Die europäische Weltraumbehörde besorgt übrigens die Rakete für uns. Es handelt sich um eine Ariane 5-Rakete. Wir werden das Teleskop im Jahr 2018 von Kourou in Französisch Guayana aus starten. Ein paar Dinge, die wir damit, so hoffen wir, sehen werden - dieses Bild macht die Verbesserung von Empfindlichkeit und Winkelauflösung im Vergleich zum Hubble-Teleskop deutlich. Das ist eine Visualisierung des Computers, wie das frühe Universum ausgesehen haben könnte. Wir hoffen sehr, dass wir die Einzelheiten erkennen, wenn wir mit dem James Webb-Teleskop hineinsehen. Wann und wie bildeten sich die Galaxien? Wie kam es dazu, dass sie verschiedene Formen aufweisen? Wie wurden die schweren Elemente des Universums gebildet? Wie Ihnen Brian gezeigt hat, wissen wir zum Beispiel, dass aus dem Urknall nur die leichtesten Elemente entstanden. Wir sind aber nicht hauptsächlich aus Wasserstoff und Helium, wir sind aus anderen chemischen Elementen gemacht. Sie wurden alle in Sternen hergestellt, die explodierten, und die Elemente wurden wieder freigesetzt. Wir sind also gewissermaßen recycelt. Die Infrarotfähigkeit wird uns in die Lage versetzen, ins Innere dieser schönen Wolken zu sehen, wo heute Sterne geboren werden. Der Staub, der sich im All befindet, ist lichtundurchlässig; man kann nicht durch ihn hindurchsehen. Ziel eines Infrarotteleskops ist es also, durch den Staub und um die Staubkörner herum zu sehen. Hier sehen Sie eine Darstellung von zwei mit dem Hubble-Weltraumteleskop aufgenommenen Bildern des gleichen Raumvolumens. Das Hubble-Teleskop verfügt über eine gewisse Infrarotfähigkeit. Wie Sie sehen, sieht diese Region ganz anders aus. Sichtbare Wellenlängen und Infrarot. Die sichtbaren Wellenlängen zeigen diese schönen glühenden Wolken. Der Staub ist viel transparenter; man kann tatsächlich in die Wolke hineinsehen und feststellen, dass dieser Stern, was immer sich darin befindet, Jets aus Materie produziert. Das ist wahrscheinlich ein sehr junger Stern. Ein weiteres Bild zur Veranschaulichung des Unterschieds, den Infrarot ausmacht. Hier sehen Sie ein Bild, und hier ist wieder das gleiche Raumvolumen - der Stern in der Mitte sendet Jets aus Materie aus, ganz anders als das, was man im sichtbaren Bereich erkennt. Auf diese Weise sehen wir also in das Innere von Wolken aus Gas und Staub, wo Sterne gebildet werden. Und wir fangen an zu lernen, wie das funktioniert. Als ich ins College ging, glaubte man zu wissen, wie es funktioniert, aber wir wissen es immer noch nicht. Wenn wir nämlich versuchen, mit dem Computer das zu simulieren, was wir für die Wahrheit halten, stoßen wir auf Orte, an denen es einfach nicht gelingt. Wie funktioniert das Teleskop? Hier sehen Sie ein Bild seiner Bestandteile. Diese riesige Sonnenblende besteht aus fünf Lagen. Die Sonnenblende ist übrigens so groß wie ein Tennisplatz; sie ist also so groß wie der Platz, auf dem Serena Williams spielt, von hier nach dort. Natürlich hatten wir bisher noch nie einen Tennisplatz im Weltall - das ist also ein wunderbares technisches Projekt. Das Teleskop wird für den Start zusammengefaltet. Es ist viel größer als die Rakete, weshalb das Projekt technisch ungemein schwierig ist. Wir bringen es weit von der Erde weg. Auf diesem Bild sieht man, wo es sich befinden wird. Der Mond ist 384.000 Kilometer von der Erde entfernt, der Lagrange-Punkt L2 ungefähr 1,5 Millionen Kilometer. Dieser Film zeigt, wie sich das Teleskop im Weltall entfaltet. Zuerst entfalten wir die Solarpaneele. Dann entfalten wir die kleine Parabolantenne, mit der die Daten hin und her gesendet werden. Nun beginnen wir mit der Entfaltung der Sonnenblende, des großen Schirms, der das Teleskop vor der Sonne schützt. Der tatsächliche Einsatz ist erst für ein paar Tage später vorgesehen. Wir sind nicht in Eile; so schnell läuft das nicht ab. Hier trennt sich das Teleskop von den warmen Behältern der Raumsondenelektronik. Jetzt entfalten wir die Schutzhülle über dem Schirm. Wenn Sie das sehen, werden Sie vielleicht sagen: "Ist das nicht furchtbar kompliziert?" Die Antwort lautet: ja. Andererseits habe ich das Unternehmen gefragt: "Ist das hier das komplizierteste Objekt, das Sie jemals ins All gebracht haben?" Sie sagten nein. Sie arbeiten auch für andere Behörden und haben gelernt, wie man mit großen komplizierten Dingen im Weltall umgeht. Die anderen Dinge, die sie tun, habe ich allerdings nie gesehen. Hier schließlich nimmt das Teleskop allmählich seine richtige Gestalt an. Der parabolförmige... der Spiegel ist fast parabolförmig. Übrigens ist das Teleskop natürlich zu Beginn nicht scharf eingestellt. All diese großen Beryllium-Sechsecke, aus denen der Hauptspiegel besteht, sind in Position und Krümmung verstellbar. Nach kurzer Zeit sind wir also in der Lage, das Teleskop zu fokussieren und ein scharfes Bild zu bekommen. Wie testen wir das auf der Erde? Nun, wir haben am Johnson Space Flight Center in Texas eine riesige Versuchskammer. Zufälligerweise handelt es sich um dieselbe Prüfkammer, in der die Apollo-Astronauten den Ausstieg aus der Apollo-Kapsel auf die Mondoberfläche geprobt haben. Sie ist also sehr groß und sehr leistungsstark. Wir mussten sie verbessern, indem wir um sie herum einen Flüssiggas-Kühlmantel anbrachten. Jetzt wird nicht nur ihr Inneres mit flüssigem Stickstoff gekühlt; sie verfügt auch über eine Kühlung mit gasförmigem Helium. Damit ist sie in der Lage, das Teleskop auf die Temperatur herunterzukühlen, die es im Weltall haben wird. Wir können also auf der Erde die Scharfstellung überprüfen. Wenn Sie noch mehr wissen wollen - online gibt es viele, viele Dokumente. Suchen Sie einfach nach dem James Webb Space Telescope, und Sie finden unsere Homepage. Es gibt Dokumente zum Herunterladen und viele wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen. Online erhalten Sie also viel ausführlichere Informationen. Schließen möchte ich mit einigen anderen Vorschlägen, was in der Zukunft möglich ist und was auf der Erde geschieht. Das European Southern Observatory hat dieses fantastische System von vier riesigen erdgebundenen Teleskopen in Chile gebaut. Jedes von Ihnen hat einen Durchmesser von acht Metern. Wir waren mit dem James Webb Telescope-Team dort - um zu sehen, wie es ist, wenn man mit einem riesigen Teleskop zu tun hat. Natürlich war uns klar, dass wir kein Acht-Meter-Teleskop in den Weltraum bringen würden. Das unsere hat nur 6 1/2 Meter. Aber dieses System arbeitet schon lange ganz hervorragend. Und einige der interessantesten wissenschaftlichen Ergebnisse, die Sie heute kennen, stammen von diesen Teleskopen. Hier sehen Sie eines, das gerade gebaut wird; es trägt den Namen Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Dabei handelt es sich um ein weiteres Acht-Meter-Teleskop mit einem enormen Blickfeld - 9,6 Quadratgrad, was CCD-Sensoren mit Milliarden von Pixeln bedeutet. Damit ist man in der Lage, in drei Nächten den gesamten Himmel zu durchmustern, den man von seinem Standort auf der Erde aus sehen kann. Mit diesem Teleskop werden wir also Dinge ausfindig machen können, die sich von einer Nacht zur anderen verändern. Wir entdecken Asteroiden, die sich bewegen. Wir werden eine große Zahl von Supernovae beobachten. Und möglicherweise ein paar andere bemerkenswerte Objekte, die sich verändern. Zum Beispiel können Gammastrahlenausbrüche auftauchen. Das Projekt läuft jedenfalls. Hier haben wir etwas, das noch ambitionierter ist. Es nennt sich das European Extremely Large Telescope. Dabei handelt es sich um den Entwurf eines Teleskops mit einem Durchmesser von 40 Metern. Mittlerweile ist es logisch möglich, so etwas zu machen. Wir können allerdings kein 40 Meter großes Stück Glas herstellen. Wir werden also, wie wir es beim James Webb-Teleskop machen, den Spiegel aus vielen kleineren Teilen zusammensetzen. Und nachdem das Ganze scharfgestellt ist, werden wir deren Form anpassen. Wie ich erst vor kurzem erfahren habe, wurde das Projekt von der Europäischen Südsternwarte genehmigt - vorbehaltlich laufender Verhandlungen mit internationalen Partnern zur Beschaffung ausreichender Geldmittel. Aber das Projekt läuft, und ich erwarte auf jeden Fall, dass es in die Tat umgesetzt wird. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir zwei konkurrierende Versionen. Die eine nennt sich Giant Magellan Telescope mit sieben, acht Meter großen Glasstücken. Alle so ausgerichtet, dass sie zusammenwirken. Auch sie müssen angepasst werden, um den einen gigantischen Parabolspiegel zu simulieren. Ein paar der Spiegel dafür wurden bereits hergestellt. Auch dieses Projekt läuft also, wie ich denke. In den Vereinigten Staaten gibt es für so etwas nicht viel staatliche Förderung, weshalb private Mittel beschafft wurden. Unter der Annahme einer erfolgreichen Weiterführung werden wir also in den Vereinigten Staaten entweder eines oder zwei große Teleskope der 30-Meter-Klasse haben. Hier sehen Sie eines, dessen Entwicklungsstart die europäische Weltraumbehörde gerade genehmigt hat. Sein Name ist Euclid-Mission. Damit wird die Entdeckung, die Brian im Zusammenhang mit dem sich beschleunigenden Universum dargestellt hat, weiter untersucht. Wir würden gerne die Messung des Beschleunigungsprozesses weiterhin verbessern - das hat sowohl in Europa als auch in den Vereinigten Staaten oberste Priorität. Wir wissen ziemlich gut, wie stark die Beschleunigung in der Nähe ist. Wir würden gerne die Geschichte der Beschleunigung kennen. Wenn man in der Zeit zurückgeht, ist die Beschleunigung im Verhältnis zur Rate der bereits vorhandenen Expansion kleiner. Erst in den letzten fünf Milliarden Jahren war die Beschleunigung dominant. Nichtsdestoweniger würden wir gerne die ganze Geschichte der Beschleunigung kennen, denn dann könnten wir sagen, ob W, jener Parameter, der aus seiner Gleichung hervorgeht, tatsächlich eine Konstante ist. Niemand kann beweisen, dass er eine Konstante ist. Zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt vermuten wir, dass er eine Konstante ist. Das ist ein kleines Teleskop, das in der Lage wäre, einen sehr großen Teil des Himmels abzudecken - und zwar mit enormer Empfindlichkeit und im Prinzip mit der Fähigkeit, die Krümmung der Raumzeit zu messen, wie die Zeichnung zeigt. Wenn ich über Weltraumteleskope spreche, muss ich Ihnen auch das Hubble Space Telescope vorstellen. Hubble wurde fünfmal vom Space Shuttle besucht. Astronomen haben es nachgerüstet. Es leistet immer noch hervorragende Arbeit. Es arbeitet besser als irgendwann in der Vergangenheit. Wir wissen nicht, wie lange es noch durchhält, aber es wird wahrscheinlich mindestens weitere fünf oder zehn, vielleicht sogar 15 Jahre gute Dienste leisten. Dafür, was dann passiert, ist die NASA verantwortlich. Wenn wir einfach abwarten, wird es zurück auf die Erde fallen und könnte jemanden treffen. Wir sind daher durch einen internationalen Vertrag verpflichtet, es sicher zu entsorgen. Entweder müssen wir es in eine viel höhere Umlaufbahn bringen, oder wir müssen es in den Pazifik fallen lassen. Das Glas... wir haben es mit mehreren Tonnen Glas zu tun; es würde die Atmosphäre in einem Stück durchdringen. Was auch immer getroffen wird, erleidet einen Schaden. Jedenfalls müssen wir diesen Job einen Roboter erledigen lassen. Wir planen nicht, einen Astronauten hinaufzuschicken, um das Leben des Hubble Space Telescope zu beenden. Derzeit arbeiten wir daran, sein Fortbestehen zu sichern. Sie haben vielleicht gehört, dass die NASA vor kurzem Spionagesatelliten geschenkt bekommen hat. Die für Spionagesatelliten zuständige Behörde in den Vereinigten Staaten ist das National Reconnaissance Office (nationaler Aufklärungsdienst). Dort wurden zwei Teleskope gebaut, aber sie sind nicht ganz fertig geworden; das Geld ist ausgegangen. Schließlich wurde eine Vereinbarung mit der NASA getroffen. Die NASA bekommt die Teile für diese zwei Teleskope. Und jetzt überlegen wir, was wir mit ihnen anstellen sollen. Wenn wir die Mittel dafür aufbringen, können wir irgendwann eines oder beide Teleskope ins All schießen. Sie sind so groß wie das Hubble-Teleskop, aber derzeit gibt es keine Instrumente, mit denen man sie ausstatten könnte, und kein Raumfahrzeug, das sie befördern würde. Momentan haben wir nur die optischen Teile und einige mechanische Teile als Halterung. Das sind spektakulär gute Teleskope, und sie stehen uns zur Verfügung, sobald wir herausfinden, was wir mit ihnen anfangen können. Einige langfristige Ambitionen. Wenn man uns fragt: "Was werden wir nach dem Hubble-Weltraumteleskop machen? Was ist die nächste sichtbare Wellenlänge, das nächste Ultraviolett-Teleskop im All?" Dann antworten wir: die der National Academy of Science vor einigen Jahren zur Prüfung vorgelegt wurden. Und hier ist eines, bei dem wir sagen: "Besorgen wir uns eine sehr große Rakete." Damit könnten wir dann ein aus einem Stück bestehendes Acht-Meter-Glas ins All schießen. Das würde wunderbare Arbeit leisten. Wenn daraus nichts wird, stellen wir vielleicht eins aus vielen Segmenten her. Vielleicht eins mit neun Metern zum Zusammenfalten. Wenn wir eine große Rakete und große Ambitionen haben, können wir vielleicht ein 16,8-Meter-Teleskop mit vielen Segmenten bauen, und alles würde in der riesigen Rakete nach oben befördert. Man ermahnt mich, dass meine Redezeit abgelaufen ist. Daher schließe ich mit der Bemerkung, dass man mit Röntgenobservatorien viele Dinge anstellen kann. Eines haben wir derzeit dort oben - es macht großartige Bilder, es sieht schwarze Löcher... ich sollte besser sagen: Es sieht Objekte in schwarze Löcher fallen. Ein schwarzes Loch kann es nicht sehen. Unser Ziel sind weitere Röntgenobservatorien in der Zukunft. Unser Ziel sind noch mehr Röntgenobservatorien in der Zukunft. Und wir haben ein Projekt, das derzeit ruht, aber wir hoffen, dass wir es irgendwie wiederbeleben können - ein Projekt zur Messung von Gravitationswellen bei ihrem Austritt aus schwarzen Löchern. Für dieses Projekt haben die europäische Weltraumbehörde und die NASA ihre Kräfte gebündelt. Derzeit ruht es; wir warten auf eine Überarbeitung. Wie auch immer - es hat sich gezeigt, dass es momentan für uns nicht machbar ist. Ich denke aber, irgendwann werden wir es verwirklichen. Letztendlich werden wir einen neuen Weg finden, Astronomie mit schwarzen Löchern und Gravitationswellen zu betreiben. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit. Fragen beantworte ich gerne heute Nachmittag.

John Mather presenting a film of how the JWST will unfold into operating mode
(00:20:25 - 00:22:50)

 

Despite the current reluctance of sending humans into space, our curiosity of the cosmos has not waned, and the “microscopes of the sky”, as Nobel Laureate Charles Townes called telescopes in 1987, will continue to transfer visual information on what is happening in the universe. Paradoxically, by disentangling these astronomical mysteries, we are able to find out more about our own planet.

“New Kind of Invisible Light” – Pioneers in Medical Imaging

Wilhelm Röntgen’s wife Anna Bertha exclaimed, “I have seen my death!” when she saw the X-ray image of her hand that her husband had taken of her. This was essentially the first X-ray radiogram, and the discovery of X-rays won Röntgen the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901. It certainly must have left the young Anna Bertha aghast to see the clearly delineated bone structure of her hand, along with the ring she wore, yet over a century later, many of us are willing to wait hours in hospital emergency rooms to locate the source of our pain with X-rays. Even if we’ve never seen X-ray images of ourselves at the hospital or dentist’s office, it is certain that our hand luggage has been subject to X-rays at an airport. Röntgen’s experiments gave rise to the magical ability of visualising the internal form of objects.

The first steps in developing the science underpinning the two main technologies used today for medical imaging – computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - were taken soon after World War II. In CT, X-rays pass through an object, and the signal, which results from different attenuation of the beam by the object, is registered by a detector. Attenuation is dependent on the density of the object material; for example, in medical imaging, bones will attenuate more than muscles, which is why they have a sharper contrast in an X-ray image. X-rays are polychromatic beams and contain a spectrum of photon energies. When photons interact with the atoms of the imaged material, the interaction with electrons causes the photons to slow down, and new photons are ejected as a result. This emission of electromagnetic radiation of a range of energies is known as bremsstrahlung. The detector receives the photons and emits light, which is then converted to an electric signal and then digitally processed. When many X-ray images are taken from various angles of an object, the resulting images are effectively cross-sections of the object, and the more images taken at every angle, the better the reconstructed image. This technique was developed independently by Allan Cormack and Godfrey Hounsfield. During his last lecture in Lindau in 1997, Cormack, a nuclear physicist from Cape Town, South Africa, explained how he had encountered the main problem in X-ray imaging:

 

Allan Cormack explaining the main problem in X-ray imaging
(00:06:45 - 00:09:23)

 

Image reconstruction is derived using analytical methods, based on the Radon transform, which was calculated by Johann Radon in 1917. Here, Cormack describes the mathematics of the Radon transform in Lindau in 1984:

 

Cormack describing the mathematics of the Radon transform
(00:03:20 - 00:04:51)

 

Cormack published his findings in two papers in 1963 and 1964, but only three copies of the paper were requested (this being an era predating photocopiers, hence the author had to be contacted for paper copies), which was “very disappointing”, as Cormack reminisced over thirty years later. Hounsfield had not heard of Cormack’s mostly theoretical work on CT scanning when he began his experimental work in England in the late 1960s, using a computer to calculate image reconstructions. He patented the CT for medical applications in 1968, and by 1971 the first scan of a patient was performed, quickly leading to widespread clinical use (“and they went wild about it...”, as Cormack himself put it). Both Cormack and Hounsfield received the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1979, and the award ceremony was the first time the two scientists had met.

The downside of CT imaging is that prolonged and repeated imaging may be damaging to the patient due to the withering effects of X-rays on DNA. MRI is an imaging technique that was developed in the early 1970’s, hence in parallel to CT imaging. The technique is based on NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), and initially was known as NMRI, or nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, yet the first word, “nuclear”, was dropped, as it made patients uneasy. Nobel Laureate Douglas Osheroff presented the history of NMR and MRI during his lecture in Lindau in 2012:

 

Douglas Osheroff (2012) - How Advances in Science are Made

Well, it’s very hard for me to live up to the excitement of the last 2 talks, but I’ll do the best I can. I’m a low temperature physicist. I study the properties of matter near absolute zero. Specifically my favourite material which is helium-3. I decorate my slides with my own photo images. This is the Golden Gate Bridge, of course. So, the first question I want to ask is that those discoveries that most changed the way we think about nature cannot be anticipated. How then are such discoveries made? And are there research strategies that can substantially increase the chances of one making such a discovery? And I will illustrate this with a link chain of discoveries and inventions that occurred quite a long time ago, starting with one of my great heroes Heike Kamerlingh Onnes who was of course the first person to liquefy helium. But then he tried to...Basically Kamerlingh Onnes was in a competition with Dewar to see who could first liquefy the lightest and most inert of the atmospheric gases. And after liquefying helium Kamerlingh Onnes pumped on the vapour above the liquid in order to see what temperature helium solidified. This is exactly what Dewar had done with hydrogen. Unfortunately, helium does not solidify under its own vapour pressure at any temperature, even absolute zero. So in fact he eventually became frustrated about this and then looked around for some other interesting question of the day that he could answer with this remarkable refrigeration device that he had made. It was very complicated. So he got...There was an argument about what would happen to the electrical conductivity of metals if one could cool them to absolute zero. One argument was that if you had very pure metal and you cooled it you would eliminate the lattice vibrations which scattered the conduction electrons. And so the electrical resistance would slowly drop towards zero. But the other school of thought suggested that as you cool it down at some temperature the conduction electrons which were free to roam around the interior of the metal would re-condense on the ions from which they’d come and all electrical conductivity would cease. So Kamerlingh Onnes got a very pure sample of mercury, of metal which is particularly easy to purify and gave it to Gilles Holst, his associate. And Gilles Holst basically measured the electrical resistance. So here you can see that the measurements of the electrical resistance... This is the resistance at 2,000’s of an ohm, this is 4.2 Kelvin, this is 4 Kelvin. And you can see the electrical resistance is dropping slowly towards zero. But then at a temperature slightly above 4.2 Kelvin there was a discontinuous drop in the electrical resistance to a value which was less than 10^-5 ohms which is the resolution of their instrument. Now I believe that Kamerlingh Onnes was incredulous, felt that surely an electrical lead had fallen off the sample at this point. But of course that wasn’t the case. This was the first observation of super conductivity. So let’s look at the relevant research strategies that allowed this discovery to be made. First use the best instrumentation available. Now I must say that in fact this very complex set of refrigeration processes that Kamerlingh Onnes had developed was unique and it really allowed you to reach lower temperatures than anyone else could see. Don’t reinvent, borrow the technologies you can. Now Dewar and Kamerlingh Onnes were in a rather, nearly bitter competition to see who could win this race. Dewar had invented the Dewar flask in order to allow him to do that. Kamerlingh Onnes was very happy to borrow that technology even though these 2 were rather bitter rivals. Look into an unexplored region of the physical landscape. In this case, we’re looking at the properties of matter at temperatures that had never been reached before. And so after liquefying helium Kamerlingh Onnes did exactly what Dewar had done with hydrogen. Dewar had pumped on the vapour above the hydrogen in order to cool it further and find out where hydrogen solidified. Dewar tried that with liquid helium. And for quite some time he tried that. However, liquid helium does not solidify under its own vapour pressure. So then he thought about what other big questions of the day he could answer with this refrigeration process that he’d developed. And so I would say failure might be an invitation to try something new. That’s exactly what Kamerlingh Onnes did. And I should add: Be aware of subtle unexplained behaviour. Don’t dismiss it. Now, Kamerlingh Onnes had written in his log book that it appeared that the liquid helium stopped boiling at a temperature of about 2 Kelvin. That of course was due to the onset of superfluidity in helium 4, which of course has been a subject of study for many years. So this is one of my other great heroes, I suppose, Pyotr Kapitsa who shared the Nobel Prize in 1978 for measuring the viscosity of superfluid helium in the winter of 1937 in Moscow. I suppose that you can say that’s not fair because Kapitsa started at a lower temperature. That is his lower temperature outside. But in fact, so Kapitsa really was the person that first observed superfluidity in helium. But he shared the Nobel Prize with 2 very unlikely colleagues whose work had absolutely nothing to do with his own and these were Arno Penzias... When I was at Bell Laboratories Arno was my boss’s boss’s boss. And Robert Wilson. So these 2 people, of course, their work had nothing to do with low temperature physics. But rather the discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation. So Penzias had convinced AT&T to allow them, that is Penzias and Wilson, to use this very elegant piece of high tech machinery to look at the radiation coming in from outer space. This was a horn antenna which has the advantage that it doesn’t couple to radiation coming from the ground. It was actually developed by AT&T in order to test the feasibility of satellite telecommunications. And the key is not this horn antenna but inside this little shed here was one of the quietest receivers of its day. It was based on the development of the maser by Charles Townes shown here. This is actually Ammonia Maser 2. But this in fact, technology would not have allowed Penzias and Wilson to do what they wanted to do. In fact, it was up to Nicholas Blumbergen to actually modify the maser so that in fact it basically was a doped ruby rode that could be cooled to a temperature of 4.2 Kelvin. And in fact, that provided the most sensitive radio receiver of its day. So here’s some of the early evidence back in those days. And I dare say this was also true when I was a graduate student that data all came out on a strip chart recorder. And I don’t know if I have to explain what a strip chart recorder is but a piece of paper is pulled underneath a pen which moves back and forth. So anyway, he’s looking here. Actually the signal is going up this way, time is going this way. And so he’s looking at the signal coming in from the antenna. And then he as a microwave switch. He switches to a cold load which is basically a black body cooled to 4.2 Kelvin and compares the noise figures. And in the end they decided that there was extra noise at the level of about 3.3 Kelvin that they couldn’t understand. So they went back and they actually climbed up inside the antenna. And what they found was that the pigeons had been roosting inside the antenna. So always check your equipment before you start doing an experiment, especially for pigeon nests. So they knocked down the pigeon nests and I think a few of the copper plates inside this antenna were corroded and had to be replaced. But virtually nothing that they could do would eliminate this extra noise. And of course we now know that this noise is intrinsic. It is the cosmic microwave background radiation. So let’s look at the relevant research strategies. Use the best technology available. In this case, Penzias and Wilson were lucky enough to be able to borrow probably the best receiver of its day. Don’t reinvent the wheel, borrow if possible. And they did that. Look into a region of parameter space that is unexplored. They were the first people to make absolute radio noise measurements... of the radio noise coming from outer space. And then finally and I think this is very important for any researcher. Understand what your instrumentation is measuring. It would be very easy for Penzias and Wilson to say “Well, there’s a little bit of extra noise here.” and just dismiss that and redefine the base line of their instrument. But they didn’t do that. So this is of course...This was from the COBE satellite. It shows the intensity of that radiation as a function of wavelength and the temperature is 2.725 Kelvin with a resolution of 1,000th of a degree. Pretty impressive measurement. But if you look at the distribution of the intensity of that radiation as a function of position in the sky, what you find... Well first of all, because of the velocity of the earth, you see a Doppler shift. It’s hotter in one direction and colder in the other direction. Hotter in the direction the earth is going. And you can get rid of this easily. And then you see the plain of the Milky Way Galaxy which is also possible to get rid of this. This is really something that you don’t see except for long wavelengths because of dust scattering. And so once you get rid of this you’re left still with these fluctuations. And these fluctuations are relatively reproducible which suggests in fact it’s not some air in the equipment or anything like that. In any event it eventually became very clear that what they were looking at was the cosmic microwave background radiation. And for their work John Mather and George Smoot shared the 2006 Nobel Prize for physics, for their discovery of the black body form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. So, I don’t know how these guys felt when they made their discovery but it is, for me it’s always been, very exciting. Now I’m shifting gears again. This is a bit of the Iguaçu Falls. I’m an avid photographer. I like to decorate my images as I said before. So, the process of advancing science often leads to inventions and technologies that may benefit mankind. However, it is often impossible to know from where a particular advance might come that could benefit mankind. Consider for example nuclear magnetic resonance. And we heard already today 2 beautiful talks on nuclear magnetic resonance which is in fact one of my favourite probes for probing nature. NMR was invented in 1946, one year after the end of world war 2, by these gentlemen here, Felix Bloch at Stanford University and Ed Purcell at Harvard University. And supposedly when they get the Nobel Prize just 7 years later, I know exactly what happens. The press come up and they ask you to explain what it is that you’ve discovered. And you say you’re processing nuclear spins in a magnetic field and things like that. And after a while the press will get impatient and they will say: And so supposedly, I have not seen this written down but I’ve talked to plenty of people at Harvard and Stanford, Felix Bloch, who was a bit of a curmudgeon, suggested in fact that NMR was good for damn little. That is to say he had invented it for a specific purpose and didn’t envision other applications. Ed Purcell was kind of, somewhat of a more patient and kinder, gentler man I suspect. I knew Ed Purcell well. I didn’t know Felix Bloch. He’d died by the time I got to Stanford. But in fact Ed Purcell had suggested that perhaps one could use nuclear magnetic resonance to calibrate magnetic fields. Now, let’s see what in fact the visionaries that invented NMR hadn’t considered. So it didn’t take that long for people to actually produce very homogenous magnetic fields. And when they looked at the protons in organic solvent, they found, in fact, that the protons didn’t all resonate at the same frequency. There were the triplets and quadruplets. And these things were typically shifted by several parts per million. And it became clear very quickly, in fact, that these shifts were a result of the molecular bond lengths and interactions between the nuclear magnetic moments. So the next big step was really made by Richard Ernst. Now, you’ve heard his talk and I’m very reluctant to talk about something that I wasn’t involved in. But this was a spectacular development in NMR. Richard Ernst, who is Swiss of course, was working at varying associates in Palo Alto which is where Stanford University is located. And he invented pulsed NMR which allowed you to apply a very strong, very short pulse of radio frequency field. And in fact that would tip the nuclear spins by whatever angle you wanted. And then they would process and you could then get the frequency of procession very accurately. So, this is basically what's called 2 dimensional NMR. And it really allows you to determine the nature of these bonds. It can’t give you the structure very accurately but in fact, this was in fact, a remarkable advance. And so, for his contributions to NMR, Richard Ernst shared the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1991. Now, the first Nobel Prize for the development of NMR in the first place was in physics. Now, Richard Ernst was working in Switzerland with another colleague, Kurt Wüthrich who is here as well. And Kurt Wüthrich did not share the Nobel Prize with Richard Ernst. And I don’t know if I should say this or not but I think he was a bit unhappy, shall we say, that he didn’t share the Nobel Prize because these 2 had worked very closely together. But Kurt Wüthrich then continued on his own and eventually developed a very complex pulse sequences which allows anyone that has the equipment to determine the confirmation, even of complicated molecules such as proteins as shown here. So, here’s Kurt Wüthrich receiving his Nobel Prize. Now, the prize given to Richard Ernst was in 1991 so this is 11 years later. Kurt Wüthrich got his own Nobel Prize. My wife doesn’t like it but if you look very carefully you’ll see that he’s smiling. Everyone smiles at this moment in their lives. But I should say that in fact NMR development continued. And eventually people realised and I dare say I think I was one of the first people that applied a magnetic field gradient to a sample that I wished to study with NMR. And then each nuclear spin, the position of each nuclear spin is tagged by the frequency shift from the applied magnetic field gradient. So this is a very healthy human knee. You can see the medial meniscus is in very good shape. I’m afraid my knee now is made out of titanium and so you probably can’t do this measurement. But for the development of MRI as it’s called, Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield shared the Nobel Prize not in physics or chemistry but in physiology or medicine in 2003. Now it’s kind of amazing because this in fact was the fourth Nobel Prize given for developments in NMR. And it was the third different discipline that the Nobel Prize was given. And so you have physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine. Quite a remarkable and extremely valuable tool. Ok, now I’m going to really shift gears and talk about my discovery. Because this is really not a talk about a specific kind of physics, but rather about the process of discovery. So, to begin my life at the beginning of my life, I must report that I was born. Of course, that’s not my family line... My father was a medical doctor, my mother had been a nurse but gave up nursing to raise an unruly brood of 5 children. I was son number 2 right here and I was very interested. I think, in fact, there was a watershed moment in my life when for Christmas at age 5 I was given an electric train. And by the end of Christmas day I had torn apart the locomotive to get the electric motor out. If my parents had said you destructive devil go to bed without your dinner, I suspect I would not be giving this talk today. So, if you ask me who it was that most influenced the way I think about science, it was actually none of the professors at Caltech or at Cornell University, it was this man here, William Hawk, who was my chemistry teacher. One day he came into class and he had a milk carton, effectively 1 litre. It was really 1 quart milk carton. And inside there was something. And he said: “Research is like trying to find out what's inside the milk carton. You can do a series of experiments. And every time you do an experiment you’re asking a question of nature. Nature has to answer your questions but nature’s answers are a bit vague and difficult to understand. So then you have to do more experiments, asking more questions in order to constrain your interpretation of nature’s initial remarks, answers.” And that’s the way I still think about it. It’s basically a process where you try to trick nature into giving up her secrets. And it’s really a fun thing, particularly very late at night that you play with nature. So after going through high school I went to Caltech as an undergraduate and that’s when Richard Feynman was teaching all of the undergraduates. Now, I must say that for people like myself who are really deeply interested in physics this was phenomenal. And it’s remarkable that such a great physicist was teaching all the undergraduates. However my freshman class started out at 192 and only 120 returned for their sophomore year. And I dare say that I think that Richard Feynman had something to do with that. So bottom line was that only 60% of my freshman class returned for their sophomore year. So I don’t know whether to thank Richard Feynman. I should and I have. In fact, at one point I hosted his visit to Bell Laboratories. Anyway, after graduating from Caltech I went to Cornell University to do graduate work. And this is a picture in the fall I guess at Cornell University. That first semester there were 2 talks given in the physics department describing new refrigeration technologies that gave the promise of allowing me in particular to look at nature in a new and different realm. The first was the helium-3/helium-4 dilution refrigerator. Basically what happens is if you cool helium-3, a mixture of helium-3 and helium-4 down the helium-3 will phase separate into the top region and you have a mixture of helium-4 with about 6% helium-3 below that. If you pump on this region, in fact, more helium-3 atoms will diffuse across this phase boundary. And in the process each one occupies a larger volume. Which means it has a larger entropy. That entropy is gained by absorbing heat from the outside. This is a picture of my helium-3/helium-4 dilution refrigeration that I built as a first year graduate student. So, this shows the entropy of liquid helium-3. That line there. And this is solid helium-3. In the solid the nuclear spins can point either up or down, that gives you R log 2. Until a very low temperature where you see nuclear spin ordering. So the latent heat of solidification then is negative. Which is very strange. And this had been proposed by a Russian theorist Isaak Pomeranchuk and this basically is the technique that I used to reach the temperatures where liquid helium-3 becomes a superfluid. This is a picture of my Pomeranchuk cell. And these are the initial data. So strip chart recorded that the pressure was rising. Here I rebalanced the capacitance bridge. The pressure rises. And then there was this very sharp decrease in the rate of cooling. Of course, I was very concerned about that and hoped it would go away. But ultimately this was, in fact, I realised that this was the signature of a jump in the heat capacity in liquid helium-3. It was the onset of superfluidity in helium-3. So, here you can see that transition on cooling. And on warming there was another transition, in fact, a transition between super fluid phases. So, super fluid helium-3 had ended up being a very rich system for study. In order to differentiate the liquid from the solid, however, I invented an early form of MRI. This is back in 1971/’72. And I know that Paul Lauterbur actually read my paper. He was one of the architects, real architects of MRI. So it was kind of fun to be involved in that. This is a picture of some of the data. These huge lines are solid. And this little signal here is the liquid, this is the base line. And at the temperature of what we call the B-transition, that little blip I showed you in fact, the liquid NMR signal dropped by a factor of 2. So I wrote in my lab book that night at 2.40 in the morning, ‘have discovered the BCS transition in liquid helium 3 tonight’. And then I ran around the basement of the physics building to share this exciting news with people. Unfortunately, I was the only one in the entire physics building. So at 2 in the morning, at 2.40, probably about 3 AM actually I called up Dave Lee, my thesis advisor, who called me back at 6 AM. He wanted more details. It was kind of interesting because the phone call I got from Stockholm was at almost exactly the same time. It was 2.30 in the morning. I don’t have that but in fact the phone call went: Is this Douglas Osheroff?” I said: Of course, I didn’t know what this was all about. So, here in fact we’ve looked at, it turns out, the high temperature superfluid phase. It actually shows very large frequency shift. And here I’ve plotted the frequency in the liquid squared minus frequency in the solid squared and it all collapses on one line. So in the end here we are getting the Nobel Prize in 1996. This is yours truly, Dave Lee my thesis advisor and Bob Richardson who really is the person that trained me. Tony Leggett was the one that explained the shifts in the NMR frequencies. And so... What is it? This is ’96. So again I put up here this picture of my apparatus and I put in the names of people. And I won’t name them all or their contributions. But this was... Without any one of these names I suspect, I wouldn’t have made this discovery. So let me end by saying that advances in science are seldom made by individuals alone. They result from the progress of the scientific community. Asking questions, developing new technologies to answer those questions and sharing their results and their understanding with others. This is how advances in science are made. Thank you very much. Applause.

Nun, nach den letzten beiden packenden Vorträgen wird es wohl sehr schwer für mich werden, den Erwartungen gerecht zu werden. Ich werde aber mein Bestes geben. Ich bin Niedrigtemperaturphysiker und erforsche die Eigenschaften von Materie nahe dem absoluten Nullpunkt, insbesondere die meiner Lieblingsmaterie Helium-3. Ich habe meinen Vortrag mit selbst gemachten Fotos dekoriert. Das hier ist die Golden Gate Bridge, wie Sie erkennen werden. Als Erstes möchte ich eine Frage stellen: Wir können die Entdeckungen, die unsere Denkweise über die Natur am stärksten verändert haben, nicht vorhersehen. Wie kommt es aber dann zu solchen Entdeckungen? Und gibt es Forschungsstrategien, die die Wahrscheinlichkeit solcher Entdeckungen deutlich erhöhen können? Ich möchte dies anhand einer verketteten Liste von Entdeckungen und Erfindungen verdeutlichen, die vor langer Zeit stattfanden, wobei ich mit einem meiner größten Helden beginne, nämlich Heike Kamerlingh Onnes, der ja der erste Mensch war, der Helium verflüssigt hat. Aber dann versuchte er ... Kamerlingh Onnes war in dem Bemühen, als Erster das leichteste und flüchtigste der atmosphärischen Gase zu verflüssigen, im Grunde genommen ein Konkurrent von Dewar. Und nach der Heliumverflüssigung pumpte Kamerlingh Onnes den Dampf auf die Flüssigkeit, um zu sehen, bei welcher Temperatur sich Helium verfestigt. Das war exakt das, was Dewar mit Wasserstoff gemacht hatte. Leider verfestigt sich Helium aber bei keiner Temperatur unter dem eigenen Dampfdruck, auch nicht am absoluten Nullpunkt. Das frustrierte Kamerlingh Onnes schließlich und er suchte nach einer anderen interessanten Frage, die er mit diesem bemerkenswerten Gefriergerät beantworten könnte, das er gebaut hatte. Das war wirklich ein sehr komplexes Gerät. So kam er zu ... Es gab eine Diskussion darüber, was in Bezug auf die elektrische Leitfähigkeit von Metallen passieren würde, wenn man sie auf den absoluten Nullpunkt herunterkühlen könnte. Eines der Argumente war, dass man beim Herunterkühlen von sehr reinem Metall die Gitterschwingungen eliminieren würde, die die Leitungselektronen verteilen. Und deshalb würde der elektrische Widerstand langsam auf null absinken. Die andere Denkrichtung vermutete aber, dass die Leitungselektronen, die im Innern des Metalls frei herumwandern können, bei Abkühlung auf eine gewisse Temperatur auf den Ionen, von denen sie stammen, rekondensieren würden und die gesamte elektrische Leitfähigkeit aufhören würde. Kamerlingh Onnes wählte deshalb eine sehr reine Quecksilberprobe, also ein Metall, das besonders leicht zu reinigen ist, und gab es seinem Mitarbeiter Gilles Holst, der im Wesentlichen den elektrischen Widerstand maß. Hier sehen Sie also die Messungen des elektrischen Widerstandes ... Dies ist der Widerstand bei zwei Tausendstel Ohm. Das sind 4,2 Kelvin, das sind 4 Kelvin. Und Sie sehen, dass der elektrische Widerstand Richtung null langsam abfällt. Aber bei einer Temperatur von etwas über 4,2 Kelvin war ein unterbrochener Abfall des elektrischen Widerstands auf einen Wert festzustellen, der unter 10^-5 Ohm lag, was der Auflösung des Gerätes entsprach. Ich könnte mir vorstellen, dass Kamerlingh Onnes ziemlich ungläubig gewesen sein muss. Er dachte wohl, dass sich an diesem Punkt eine elektrische Leitung von der Probe gelöst hat. Aber das war natürlich nicht der Fall. Dies war die erste Beobachtung der Supraleitfähigkeit. Betrachten wir nun die entsprechenden Forschungsstrategien, die diese Entdeckung ermöglicht haben. Erstens: Nutze die bestverfügbaren Geräte. Und ich muss sagen, dass diese sehr komplizierte Konfiguration von Gefrierprozessen, die Kamerlingh Onnes entwickelt hatte, wirklich einzigartig war und es tatsächlich ermöglichte, geringere Temperaturen zu erreichen, als irgendjemand anderes beobachten konnte. Erfinde die Techniken nicht neu, sondern leihe sie dir aus, sofern möglich. Dewar und Kamerlingh Onnes standen in einem ziemlich erbitterten Konkurrenzkampf miteinander, den jeder von ihnen unbedingt gewinnen wollte. Dewar hatte den Dewar-Kolben für seine Untersuchungen entwickelt. Kamerlingh Onnes war sehr glücklich, dass er sich diese Technik leihen konnte, obwohl die beiden erbitterte Rivalen waren. Erforsche ein unerforschtes Gebiet der Physiklandschaft. In diesem Fall beschäftigen wir uns mit den Eigenschaften von Materie bei Temperaturen, die nie zuvor erreicht worden waren. Und nach der Verflüssigung von Helium machte Kamerlingh Onnes genau das Gleiche, was Dewar mit Wasserstoff getan hatte. Dewar hatte den Dampf über den Wasserstoff nach oben gepumpt, um für weitere Abkühlung zu sorgen und herauszufinden, wann sich der Wasserstoff verfestigt. Dewar versuchte das - über eine relativ lange Zeit - mit flüssigem Helium. Jedoch verfestigt sich flüssiges Helium nicht unter seinem eigenen Dampfdruck. Deshalb dachte er darüber nach, welche anderen aktuellen, großen Fragen er mit diesem Gefrierprozess, den er entwickelt hatte, beantworten könnte. Und vor diesem Hintergrund würde ich sagen, dass ein Misserfolg eine Einladung sein kann, etwas Neues auszuprobieren. Und das ist genau das, was Kamerlingh Onnes tat. Und ich sollte ergänzen: Achte auf unerklärliche, subtile Phänomene. Betrachte sie nicht als unbedeutend. Kamerlingh Onnes hat in seinem Protokollbuch notiert, dass das flüssige Helium bei einer Temperatur von ungefähr 2 Kelvin aufhörte zu kochen. Das war natürlich auf den Beginn der Suprafluidität in Helium-4 zurückzuführen, was jahrelang Forschungsthema war. Und das hier ist wohl einer meiner weiteren großen Helden, Pyotr Kapitsa, der 1978 den geteilten Nobelpreis dafür erhielt, dass er im Winter 1937 in Moskau Messungen von supraflüssigem Helium durchgeführt hatte. Man könnte dies für ungerecht halten, weil Kapitsa bei einer niedrigeren Temperatur startete, denn es herrschen dort doch wesentlich geringere Außentemperaturen. Aber tatsächlich ist Kapitsa derjenige, der erstmalig die Supraleitfähigkeit in Helium beobachtet hat. Er teilte sich den Nobelpreis aber mit zwei sehr ungleichen Kollegen, deren Arbeit überhaupt nichts mit seiner eigenen Forschung zu tun hatte. Das waren nämlich Arno Penzias ... als ich bei Bell Laboratories tätig war, war Arno der Chef meines Chefs meines Chefs ... und Robert Wilson. Und natürlich hatten die Arbeiten dieser beiden überhaupt nichts mit Niedrigtemperaturphysik zu tun, sondern mit der Entdeckung der kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung. Penzias hatte AT&T davon überzeugt, ihnen, das heißt Penzias und Wilson, die Verwendung dieser sehr eleganten Hightech-Maschine zu erlauben, um aus dem Weltraum einfallende Strahlung zu beobachten. Das hier ist eine Horn-Antenne, die den Vorteil hat, dass sie sich nicht an Strahlung vom Boden koppelt. Und sie wurde von AT&T eigentlich dazu entwickelt, die Durchführbarkeit der Satelliten-Telekommunikation zu testen. Und das Entscheidende ist nicht diese Horn-Antenne, sondern, dass sich innerhalb dieses kleinen Gehäuses einer der leisesten Receiver seiner Zeit befand. Er basierte auf der Maser-Entwicklung von Charles Townes, der hier zu sehen ist. Das hier ist allerdings der Ammoniak-Maser 2. Aber diese Technik hätte es Penzias und Wilson nicht ermöglicht, ihr Vorhaben umzusetzen. Tatsächlich war es dann Nicholas Blumbergen, der den Maser so modifizierte, dass es sich um einen legierten Rubin-Maser handelte, der auf eine Temperatur von 4,2 Kelvin heruntergekühlt werden konnte. Und dadurch entstand tatsächlich der empfindlichste Radioempfänger seiner Zeit. Das sind also frühe Nachweise aus diesen Tagen. Und ich darf wohl sagen, dass auch noch zu meiner Zeit als Doktorand alle Daten aus einem Streifenschreiber stammten. Und ich weiß nicht, ob ich bereits erklärt habe, was ein Streifenschreiber ist, aber dabei wird ein Stück Papier unterhalb eines sich hin- und her bewegenden Stiftes entlang gezogen. Wie auch immer, hier schaut er sich das Ergebnis an. Das Signal bewegt sich also in diese Richtung, die Zeit in diese Richtung. Und er betrachtet also das Signal, das von der Antenne kommt. Und dann hat er einen Mikrowellenschalter. Er schaltet auf eine Kälteleistung um, bei der es sich grundsätzlich um einen schwarzen Körper handelt, der auf 4,2 Kelvin heruntergekühlt wird, und vergleicht die Rauschmaße. Und schließlich stellten sie bei einem Niveau von rund 3,3 Kelvin ein zusätzliches Rauschen fest, was sie nicht verstanden. Sie gingen also zurück und kletterten tatsächlich in die Antenne hinein. Dort stellten sie fest, dass sich im Antennengehäuse Tauben niedergelassen hatten. Also: Vor dem Start eines Experiments sollte man immer seine Geräte überprüfen, insbesondere auf Taubennester. Sie rissen also die Taubennester auseinander und, soweit ich weiß, waren einige der Kupferplatten im Innern der Antenne korrodiert und mussten ersetzt werden. Aber tatsächlich konnten sie nichts tun, um dieses zusätzliche Rauschen zu beseitigen. Heute wissen wir natürlich, dass dieses Rauschen spezifisch ist. Es handelt sich nämlich um die kosmische Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung. Schauen wir uns also die relevanten Forschungsstrategien an. Nutze die bestverfügbare Technik. In diesem Fall hatten Penzias und Wilson das Glück, dass sie sich wahrscheinlich den besten Receiver der damaligen Zeit leihen konnten. Erfinde das Rad nicht neu. Leihe es aus, sofern möglich. Und diesen Grundsatz befolgten sie. Untersuche einen Parameterraum, der unerforscht ist. Sie waren die ersten, die absolute Funk-Rauschmessungen durchgeführt haben ... Funkrauschen aus dem Weltraum. Und dann geht es letztlich darum - und ich denke, das ist für jeden Forscher sehr wichtig -, zu verstehen, was ihre Instrumente eigentlich messen. Es wäre sehr einfach für Penzias und Wilson gewesen zu sagen: "Nun gut, hier gibt es ein bisschen zusätzliches Rauschen." Und dann hätten sie das einfach übergehen und die Grundlinie ihres Instruments neu definieren können. Aber das haben sie nicht getan. Das ist natürlich ... das war vom COBE-Satelliten. Es zeigt die Intensität dieser Strahlung als Funktion der Wellenlänge. Und die Temperatur liegt bei 2,725 Kelvin mit einer Auflösung von einem tausendstel Grad. Ziemlich beeindruckende Messung. Aber wenn man sich die Intensitätsverteilung dieser Strahlung als Funktion der Position im Himmel anschaut, stellt man fest ... Nun, als erstes sieht man aufgrund der Erdgeschwindigkeit eine Dopplerverschiebung. Es ist in einer Richtung wärmer und in der anderen Richtung kälter. Es ist wärmer in Richtung der Erdbewegung. Und das verliert sich dann schnell. Und dann sieht man die Ebene der Milchstraßengalaxie, die möglicherweise auch schnell verschwindet. Aufgrund des von Staub verursachten Streulichts sieht man das wirklich kaum, außer bei langen Wellenlängen. Und wenn man das einmal aus dem Blick verloren hat, bleiben nach wie vor diese Schwankungen. Und diese Schwankungen sind relativ gut reproduzierbar, was tatsächlich vermuten lässt, das nicht etwas Luft oder Ähnliches in das Gerät gelangt ist. Auf jeden Fall wurde letztendlich sehr deutlich, dass das, was sie dort sahen, die kosmische Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung war. Und John Mather und George Smoot konnten sich dann 2006 den Nobelpreis für Physik teilen für ihre Entdeckung, dass das Spektrum der Hintergrundstrahlung dem Strahlungsgesetz eines schwarzen Körpers gehorcht, und ihre Entdeckung der Anisotropie des kosmischen Mikrowellenhintergrunds. Ich weiß zwar nicht, wie sich diese Jungs gefühlt haben, als sie ihre Entdeckung machten, aber für mich war das immer sehr aufregend. Ich nehme noch einmal einen Perspektivwechsel vor. Das hier ist ein Teil der Iguaçu Falls. Ich bin ein begeisterter Fotograf und liebe es, meine Bilder in meine Präsentationen einzustreuen, wie ich bereits sagte. Fortschritte in den Wissenschaften führen oft zu Erfindungen und Techniken, von denen die Menschheit profitieren könnte. Aber oft weiß man im Vorfeld nicht, woher ein bestimmter, der Menschheit dienlicher Fortschritt kommen könnte. Denken Sie beispielsweise an die Kernspinresonanz. Wir haben heute bereits zwei wunderbare Vorträge zur Kernspinresonanz gehört, die in der Tat eines meiner Lieblingsbeispiele für das intellektuelle Eindringen in die Natur ist. Nur ein Jahr nach dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges wurde 1946 die magnetische Kernresonanzspektroskopie (NMR) von diesen Herren hier, nämlich Felix Bloch an der Stanford University und Ed Purcell an der Harvard University, erfunden. Und ich vermute mal, was passiert ist, als sie den Nobelpreis gerade einmal sieben Jahre später erhielten. Die Presse erscheint und bittet sie, ihre Entdeckung zu erläutern. Und dann sagt man so etwas wie, dass man Kernspins in einem Magnetfeld verarbeitet oder ähnliches. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wird die Presse ungeduldig und sagt dann: "Erklären Sie einfach, wofür die NMR-Technik gut sein könnte." Und wahrscheinlich - ich habe das nirgends schriftlich festgehalten gesehen, aber ich habe mit vielen Menschen in Harvard und Stanford gesprochen - hat Felix Bloch, der etwas griesgrämig war, tatsächlich vermutet, dass die NMR-Technik für verdammt wenig zu gebrauchen war. Damit will ich sagen, dass er diese Technik für einen speziellen Zweck erfunden hat und keine anderen Anwendungen im Blick hatte. Ed Purcell war ein etwas geduldigerer und freundlicherer Mensch, glaube ich. Ich kannte Ed Purcell gut. Felix Bloch kannte ich überhaupt nicht. Als ich nach Stanford kam, war er bereits tot. Aber Ed Purcell hat tatsächlich vorgeschlagen, dass man die Kernspinresonanz nutzen könnte, um Magnetfelder zu kalibrieren. Nun, schauen wir einmal, was die Visionäre, die die NMR-Technik erfunden haben, nicht berücksichtigt hatten. Es hat tatsächlich nicht sehr lange gedauert, bis man sehr homogene Magnetfelder erzeugen konnte. Und bei Betrachtung der Protonen im organischen Lösungsmittel stellten sie fest, dass die Protonen nicht alle bei der gleichen Frequenz resonierten. Es gab Triplette und Quadrupel. Und diese Dinge waren typischerweise um mehrere Parts per Million verschoben. Und es wurde sehr schnell klar, dass diese Verschiebungen das Ergebnis der Molekülbindungslängen und Interaktionen zwischen den kernmagnetischen Momenten waren. Der nächste große Schritt wurde dann auch tatsächlich durch Richard Ernst vollzogen. Sie haben seinen Vortrag gehört und es widerstrebt mir sehr, über etwas zu sprechen, an dem ich nicht mitgewirkt habe. Aber das war eine spektakuläre Entwicklung in der NMR-Technik. Richard Ernst, der ja Schweizer ist, arbeitete mit verschiedenen Partnern in Palo Alto in der Nähe der Stanford University zusammen. Und er erfand die sogenannte P-NMR-Technik (Pulsed NMR), bei der ein sehr, sehr kurzer Impuls auf das Hochfrequenzfeld angewandt wird. Und tatsächlich wurden dadurch die Kernspins von jedem gewünschten Winkel aus gelenkt. Und dann wurde ein Prozess initiiert und man erhielt dann eine sehr präzise Verarbeitungsperiodizität. Das ist im Grundsatz das, was als zweidimensionale NMR bezeichnet wird. Und sie ermöglicht es wirklich, die Art dieser Bindungen festzustellen. Die Struktur lässt sich zwar nicht genauestens darstellen. Aber das war tatsächlich ein bemerkenswerter Fortschritt. Und deshalb erhielt Richard Ernst für seine Beiträge zur NMR-Technik einen Teil des Nobelpreises für Chemie 1991. Der erste Nobelpreis für die Entwicklung der NMR-Technik war im Bereich der Physik verliehen worden. Richard Ernst arbeitete dann in der Schweiz mit einem weiteren Kollegen zusammen, nämlich Klaus Wüthrich, der ebenfalls hier ist. Und Kurt Wüthrich teilte sich nicht den Nobelpreis mit Richard Ernst. Und ich weiß eigentlich nicht, ob ich das sagen sollte oder nicht. Aber ich stelle mir vor, dass er etwas unglücklich war, dass er den Nobelpreis nicht mit ihm teilte, weil die beiden sehr eng zusammengearbeitet hatten. Aber Kurt Wüthrich setzte dann seine Arbeit allein fort und entwickelte schließlich eine sehr komplexe Pulssequenz, die es jedem, der über die Apparatur verfügt, ermöglicht, selbst komplizierte Moleküle wie die hier dargestellten Proteine aufzuklären. Hier ist also Kurt Wüthrich bei der Entgegennahme seines Nobelpreises zu sehen. Die Nobelpreisverleihung an Richard Ernst erfolgte 1991. Das hier war also elf Jahre später. Kurt Wüthrich erhielt seinen eigenen Nobelpreis. Meine Frau mag das nicht, aber wenn man sehr genau hinschaut, sieht man sein Lächeln. Jeder würde in einem solchen Moment seines Lebens lächeln. Dann ging die Entwicklung der NMR-Technik weiter. Und letzten Endes hat man sich das Potenzial dieser Technik realisiert. Ich darf wohl sagen, dass ich als einer der Ersten einen Magnetfeldgradienten auf eine Probe anwandte, die ich mit NMR untersuchen wollte. Und dann wird jedes Kernspin, die Position jeden Kernspins durch die Frequenzverschiebung des angewandten Magnetfeldgradienten markiert. Das hier ist ein sehr gesundes menschliches Knie. Sie sehen den Innenmeniskus, der in sehr gutem Zustand ist. Leider besteht mein Knie heute aus Titan und deshalb kann man dort wahrscheinlich solche Messungen nicht vornehmen. Aber für die Entwicklung dieser MRI-Technik, so heißt sie, teilten sich Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield 2003 den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin und nicht für Physik oder Chemie. Erstaunlicherweise war dies bereits der vierte Nobelpreis, der für Entwicklungen der NMR-Technik verliehen wurde und in der dritten unterschiedlichen Disziplin, also in der Physik, in der Chemie und in der Physiologie oder Medizin - ein enorm bemerkenswertes und wertvolles Instrumentarium. Jetzt mache ich wirklich einen Schwenk und erzähle etwas über meine Entdeckung. Denn es geht bei meinem Vortrag hier nicht um eine spezielle Art der Physik, sondern um den Prozess von Entdeckungen. Um an meinem Lebensanfang zu beginnen, muss ich berichten, dass ich geboren wurde. Das ist natürlich nicht mein Stammbaum ... Mein Vater war Arzt, meine Mutter Krankenschwester. Sie gab aber ihren Beruf auf, um eine ungezogene Bande von fünf Kindern aufzuziehen. Ich war der Sohn Nummer 2 und sehr vielseitig interessiert. Ich glaube wirklich, dass sich ein entscheidender Wendepunkt in meinem Leben ereignete, als ich im Alter von fünf Jahren zu Weihnachten eine elektrische Eisenbahn geschenkt bekam. Bis zum Ende des ersten Weihnachtstages hatte ich die Lokomotive total auseinandergenommen, um den Elektromotor freizulegen. Hätten meine Eltern ob dieser Zerstörung mit mir geschimpft und mich ohne Essen ins Bett geschickt, würde ich wohl heute nicht diesen Vortrag hier halten. Wenn Sie mich also fragen, was mich am stärksten hinsichtlich meiner Art beeinflusst hat, über Wissenschaft zu denken, war es tatsächlich keiner der Lehrer am Caltech oder an der Cornell University. Es war dieser Mann hier, William Hawk, mein Chemielehrer.Eines Tages kam er in den Klassenraum. Er hatte einen 1-Liter-Milchkarton mitgebracht.Tatsächlich war es ein 1-Quart-Milchkarton.Und darin befand sich etwas. Und er sagte: "Forschung ist wie der Versuch herauszufinden, was sich im Innern des Milchkartons befindet. Dazu kann man verschiedene Experimente durchführen. Und immer, wenn man ein Experiment durchführt, stellt man eine Naturfrage. Die Natur muss unsere Fragen beantworten. Aber die Antworten der Natur sind etwas vage und schwer zu verstehen. Dann muss man also weitere Experimente durchführen, weitere Fragen stellen, um die eigene Interpretation der ersten Antworten der Natur einzuschränken." Und so denke ich auch heute noch darüber. Es ist grundsätzlich ein Prozess, bei dem man versucht, der Natur ein Schnäppchen zu schlagen, damit sie ihre Geheimnisse preisgibt. Und es ist - insbesondere spät in der Nacht - wirklich ein interessanter Aspekt, dass man mit der Natur spielt. Nach der Highschool wechselte ich als Student zum Caltech. Das war damals zu der Zeit, als Richard Feynman noch alle Studenten unterrichtete. Ich muss sagen, dass das für jemanden wie mich, der wirklich zutiefst an der Physik interessiert ist, eine phänomenale Zeit war. Und es ist bemerkenswert, dass ein so großartiger Physiker alle Studenten unterrichtete. Allerdings waren wir zu Beginn 192 Studienanfänger, aber nur 120 traten ihr zweites Jahr an. Und ich glaube sagen zu können, dass Richard Feynman damit etwas zu tun hatte. Fazit war also, dass nur 60% meines Studienjahrgangs im zweiten Jahr noch dabei war. Ich weiß also nicht, ob ich Richard Feynman danken sollte. Ich sollte es und ich habe es auch tatsächlich später gemacht, als ich einmal Gastgeber seines Besuches bei Bell Laboratories war. Egal, nach Abschluss des Caltech wechselte ich zur Cornell University, um zu promovieren. Und das hier ist ein Bild von der Cornell University, das wohl im Herbst entstanden ist. Damals gab es in diesem ersten Semester im Fachbereich Physik zwei Vorträge über neue Kältetechniken, die mir sehr vielversprechend erschienen, um die Natur eines neuen und sehr differenzierten Bereichs zu untersuchen. Das erste war der Helium-3/Helium-4 Mischungskryostat. Wenn man Helium-3, eine Mischung aus Helium-3 und Helium-4 herunterkühlt, entmischt sich das Helium-3 in die obere Region und man erhält eine Mischung von Helium-4 mit rund 6% Helium-3 darunter. Wenn man diesen Bereich nach oben pumpt, diffundieren tatsächlich mehr Helium-3-Atome durch diese Phasengrenzen hindurch. Und in dem Prozess besetzt jedes Atom ein größeres Volumen. Das bedeutet, dass es eine größere Entropie hat. Diese Entropie entsteht durch die Aufnahme von Wärme von außen. Das hier ist ein Bild meines Helium-3/Helium-4 Mischungskryostats, den ich im ersten Doktorandenjahr gebaut habe. Hier ist die Entropie von flüssigem Helium-3 dargestellt, die Linie dort. Und das hier ist festes Helium-3. Im festen Helium können die Kernspins entweder nach oben oder nach unten zeigen. Das ergibt R log 2, bis eine sehr tiefe Temperatur erreicht wird, wo man die Kernspinordnung sieht. Die latente Verfestigungswärme ist also negativ, was ziemlich merkwürdig ist. Und das war bereits von einem russischen Theoretiker, nämlich Isaak Pomeranchuk, vermutet worden. Und das hier ist im Grundsatz die von mir verwendete Technik, um die Temperaturen zu erreichen, bei denen flüssiges Helium-3 zu einem Suprafluid wird. Das ist ein Bild meiner Pomeranchuk-Zelle. Und das hier sind die ersten Daten. Der Streifenschreiber hat den Druckanstieg erfasst. Hier habe ich die Kapazitätsbrücke ausgeglichen. Der Druck steigt. Und dann trat diese sehr starke Abnahme in der Abkühlungsgeschwindigkeit auf. Ich war natürlich sehr beunruhigt und hoffte, dass dieses Phänomen verschwinden würde. Aber letztendlich war dies - und das realisierte ich mir dann - charakteristisch für einen Wärmekapazitätssprung im flüssigen Helium-3. Es war der Beginn der Supraleitfähigkeit im Helium-3. Hier können Sie diesen Übergang in der Abkühlung sehen. Und bei der Erwärmung war ein weiterer Übergang zu beobachten, ein Übergang zwischen suprafluiden Phasen. So hatte sich letztendlich herausgestellt, dass suprafluides Helium-3 ein sehr facettenreiches Untersuchungssystem ist. Zur Differenzierung der Flüssigkeit vom Feststoff erfand ich eine Vorform der MRI-Technik. Das war 1971/1972. Und ich weiß, dass Paul Lauterbur mein Papier dazu wirklich gelesen hat. Er war einer der wahren Architekten von MRI. Es ist irgendwie lustig, dass ich auch daran beteiligt war. Das hier ist ein Bild von einiger der Daten. Die großen Linien sind Feststoffe. Und das kleine Signal hier ist die Flüssigkeit. Das ist die Grundlinie. Und bei der Temperatur, die wir als B-Übergang bezeichnen, sank dieser winzige Punkt, den ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, das Flüssig-MMR-Signal, um einen Faktor von 2. So notierte ich in dieser Nacht um 2.40 Uhr in meinem Laborprotokoll: Ich lief dann durch das Kellergeschoss des Physikgebäudes, weil ich diese aufregenden Neuigkeiten mit jemandem teilen wollte. Leider war ich ganz allein im gesamten Physikgebäude. Deshalb rief ich um 2.00 Uhr morgens - vielleicht war es auch 2.40 Uhr oder ungefähr 3.00 Uhr - meinen Doktorvater Dave Lee an, der mich dann um 6.00 Uhr morgens zurückrief, weil er weitere Einzelheiten dazu erfahren wollte. Es ist irgendwie interessant, aber der Anruf aus Stockholm ging bei mir ungefähr genau zur gleichen Uhrzeit ein. Es war 2.30 Uhr morgens. Ich hab keine Aufzeichnungen dazu, aber tatsächlich lief das Telefonat ungefähr so ab: "Hallo, hallo. Ist dort Douglas Osheroff?" Ich antwortete: "Ja, es ist 2.30 Uhr morgens." Ich weiß nicht, ob jeder normale Mensch so geantwortet hätte. Natürlich wusste ich überhaupt nicht, worum es eigentlich ging. Hier hatten wir also, wie sich herausstellt, in der Tat die suprafluide Hochtemperaturphase entdeckt, die genau genommen eine enorme Frequenzverschiebung aufweist. Und hier habe ich die quadrierte Frequenz in der Flüssigkeit minus der quadrierten Frequenz im Festkörper dargestellt und alles kollabiert auf einer Linie. Und letztendlich erhielten wir 1996 den Nobelpreis. Hier sehen Sie meine Wenigkeit, meinen Doktorvater Dave Lee und Bob Richardson, die Person, die mich eigentlich ausgebildet hat. Tony Leggett war derjenige, der die Verschiebungen in den NMR-Frequenzen erklärte.Und so ... was ist das? Das ist 1996. Sieben Jahre später erhielt Tony Leggett seinen eigenen Nobelpreis, den er sich mit zwei russischen Physikern, nämlich Abrikosov und Ginzburg, teilte. Ich möchte Ihnen hier erneut dieses Bild meiner Apparatur zeigen und dort habe ich die Namen der beteiligten Menschen eingetragen. Und ich will sie nicht alle aufzählen und ihren Beitrag erwähnen. Aber ohne all diese Menschen hätte ich vermutlich wohl kaum diese Entdeckung machen können. So möchte ich meine Ausführungen mit der Aussage beenden, dass wissenschaftliche Fortschritte selten durch die Leistungen einzelner möglich werden. Sie resultieren vielmehr aus dem Fortschritt der wissenschaftlichen Gemeinschaft. Durch das Stellen von Fragen, die Entwicklung neuer Techniken zur Beantwortung solcher Fragen und durch den Austausch von Ergebnissen und ihrer Interpretation mit anderen werden Fortschritte in der Wissenschaft möglich. Vielen Dank.

Douglas Osheroff presenting the history of NMR and MRI
(00:12:48 - 00:19:20)

 

What is the principle of MRI? The process is based on atomic nuclei, specifically protons, reacting to externally applied magnetic fields and radio waves. As the human body contains mostly water, and water molecules consist of two hydrogen atoms (each containing a single proton) and an oxygen atom, we can say the body is proton-dense. This abundance of protons is fundamental in MRI, as it is the protons that react to the external magnetic field, and the higher the concentration of protons, the better the image contrast. Nuclei, or in the case of hydrogen, protons, possess a particular property known as spin. The application of an external magnetic field causes most of them to become aligned to the field and some to become aligned in the opposite direction. This tiny surplus of aligned spins is known as net magnetisation, and this is the source of an MR signal. As an electromagnetic coil is moved towards the object, radio frequency pulses induce the excitation of the spins. The discontinued radio frequency signal causes the spins to again become aligned to the magnetic field, which produces a relaxation signal. This signal is dependent on various physical characteristics, such as density and water content, and this is why MRI is best used to visualise soft tissues in the body.

Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2003 “for their discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging”. Both scientists attended the Lindau meetings only once, in 2005, however, Allan Cormack provided a good explanation of the physics of MR imaging in his 1984 lecture at Lindau, despite the fact that we can’t see the “bit of hand-waving” he refers to by way of explanation:

 

Cormack providing a good explanation of the physics of MR imaging
(00:13:53 - 00:18:16)

 

When Lauterbur and Mansfield won the Nobel Prize, nearly 20 years after Cormack’s lecture, it was the culmination of many years of often frustrating research. Lauterbur’s now-famous paper containing noisy MR images of two test tubes, one filled with heavy water and one with ordinary water, was rejected by Nature in 1971. With time, the new imaging method began to gather interest. Mansfield and his student Andrew Maudsley produced the first image of a human body part, the cross-section of Maudsley’s finger, in 1977. Today, the use of MRI is extremely common and steadily growing; in Europe, depending on the country, 1000 to upwards of 11000 scans were performed per 100 000 inhabitants in 2013 alone. Not only is the technology of scanners being developed – scanners are beginning to resemble arm chairs rather than tunnels – but the principles of MRI are also changing. Currently, scientists are conjoining optical pumping (for which Roy Glauber, John Hall and Theodor Hänsch received a Nobel Prize in Physics in 2005) and NMR to obtain images of lungs. As lungs are filled with air, not water, it is impossible to image them using MRI, yet having a patient inhale polarised gas provides sufficient imaging contrast. Claude Cohen-Tannoudji briefly explained the method in 2015:

 

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji (2015) - The Adventure of Cold Atoms. From Optical Pumping to Quantum Gases

So what I would like to do in this lecture, is to briefly describe these effects and show you how they can be used for giving rise to very interesting applications. So let me now give you the outline of the talk. First, I will discuss optical pumping and light shifts. With principles, the important features of optical pumping. And I would like to give you a dressed atom interpretation of light shifts. Then, in the second part, I would like to describe laser cooling and trapping. The cooling mechanisms and the possibility to trap atoms between laser light and to get atomic mirrors or optical lattices. And then, in the third part, I would like to give applications of ultracold atoms, ultraprecise atomic clocks, measuring times at a high accuracy and quantum degenerate gases. And finally, in the last part, I would like to describe light shifts in cavity quantum electrodynamics and the possibility to get a single photon without destroying it. OK. So let me start with polarization of atoms by optical pumping and let me come back to two important papers, which appeared in 1949 and 1950, by my two physicist brothers, Alfred Kastler and Jean Brossel, who introduced the basic idea of mixtures of angular momentum between atoms and photons. Let me describe optical pumping. Suppose that you have a beam of light, with a circular polarization, propagating along the z-axis. And suppose that this light beam excites atoms having ground state g and an excited state. We have two sublevels, very simple case, with two spin states, minus one-half and plus one-half in the ground state, and minus on-half and plus one-half in the excited state. And these quantum numbers represents angular momentum in units of each bar. Each bar is equal to h over two pi. Sigma+ polarized photons have an angular momentum +1 along the z-axis. An atom can aborb these photons only by going from -1/2 to +1/2, because it is only on this transition that the quantum number varies by +1. By choosing the polarization of light, you excite selectively this transition, and very easy to understand, you have an angular momentum of +1 and by absorbing this photon the atom must gain an angular momentum +1. So it goes from this state to this state. Once it is in excited state, it falls back in the ground state, either in this way, or in this way. If it's falling back in this way, then it falls back into +1/2 state which is the ground state, and from this it can no longer absorb sigma+ photons, because there is no +3/2 state in the upper state. By this cycle you transfer atoms from the -1/2 state to the +1/2 state. You have transferred to the atom the angular momentum of light. It's some sort of a pump which takes atom from -1/2 and puts them in +1/2. This is why it's called "optical pumping." Once you have concentrated all atoms in this state, you can detect any transition between the two sub-levels in the ground state. Because if you have a transition between these two states, and used by magnetic resonance or by collision, then the absorption of sigma+ light starts again. By looking at the absorption of light, you can detect any transition between the two ground states of levels, to have an optical detection of magnetic resonance. And it's more sensitive than the usual detection. So you have a lot of fundamental and practical applications. Let me first give you an application which was not found at the beginning. It appeared only 30 years after the discovery of optical pumping. People realized that if you have a person breathing a mixture of air and polarized gas, polarized helium, then you can fill the lungs with the polarized gas. Helium gas. Which is not bad for the body because helium is a noble gas. You can detect magnetic resonance in the lungs and you can make I-R-M in the empty parts of the body in the lungs. And that's an example of an I-R-M picture, MRI, excuse me, in French it's I-R-M, in English it's MRI. MRI by proton, the usual MRI, we detect the protons of the water molecules. And MRI with helium-3, where you detect the cavity of the lungs and also you can detect some diseases like asthma or heavy smoker. That was a practical application of optical pumping which was not considered at the beginning. Let me now show you that light also can change the internal energy of the atoms. By what is called "light-shifts." A non-resonant light, which is slightly detuned from resonance, can shift the ground state by an amount, it is called the light shift, Delta E(g), which is proportional to the light intensity. If it's double the intensity, then it's double the light shift. And which has a sign which depends on the detuning between the light frequency Omega(L), and the atomic frequency, Omega(A). If Omega(L) is larger than Omega(A), the detuning, the shift is positive. If Omega(L) is smaller than Omega(A) the shift is negative. So you have a possibility to displace an atomic ground state by an amount that you can control and with a science that you can control. In fact, when you have two Zeeman sublevels in the ground state, in general the two ground states of levels have different light shifts and the magnetic resonance in the ground state is shifted by light. And this is the way, when I was able in my Ph.D. work, to demonstrate the existence and to measure the light shifts. And in fact, these effects can be considered from two different points of view. First, it's a perturbation, because light perturbs the energy you want to measure. And if you want to measure the real energy, you have to extrapolate where the real light energy is. But it appeared 30 years after that this effect is also very useful, because it can be the basis of important applications in laser cooling and in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Let me now show you how light shifts were first discovered. Let me come back to this transition between two sublevels, two states with 1/2 angular momentum. This is a sigma+ light, this is sigma- light. You see that depending on the polarization of the light, you can shift this level, or this level, by an amount which is the light shift. And you see that the two sublevels have shifted by the same amount, and you reduce the splitting between these two states by sigma- excitation and you increase it by a sigma+ excitation. To displace the magnetic resonance in different directions depending the light is sigma+ or sigma- polarized. This is the way how we have first observed that magnetic light shift. You had atoms here, atomic vapours, excited by optical pumping lights, it is resonant, and shifted by a second perturbing beam which is sigma+ or sigma- polarized. And you see that the magnetic resonance in the ground state, is shifted in opposite direction, depending the light is sigma plus or sigma minus polarized. At that time, we had no lasers, it was in 1961, we had ordinary lamps and light shift was extremely small on the order of one hertz. Now with laser beams, you can have light shift that can be gigahertz, much, much larger. Let me now go to the second example of manipulation, laser cooling. Let me first try to explain to you what that effect is. Let me take a simple example of a target C, which is bombarded by a beam of projectiles P coming all from the same direction. These projectiles bomb on the target, and go in any direction, and as a result of this bombardment, the target is pushed. The same effect exists if you replace the target by an atom and the projectile by photons. Photons are absorbed by the atoms and remitted in all possible directions, and photons have a momentum, and a result of this bombardment, the atom is pushed. This is what is called "radiation pressure." This effect actually is known, it's part of the explanation of the tails of the comet. The comet is the astrophysical object, and the light coming from the sun pushes this dust and gives rise to the tail of the comet. Which is along the direction of the sun and not along the direction of the trajectory of the comet. And that was explained by Keppler a long time ago. Of course, with laser beams, the radiation pressure can be much more important because the photons are all coming from the same direction, very clearly. And if we have enough power, a few tenths of milliwatts, you can get huge radiation pressure forces. And you can communicate through the atom an acceleration which is 10^5 of acceleration due to gravity. So it's a huge force that you can exert on atoms. And using this force, you can stop an atomic beam. To pause an atomic beam coming in that direction, we use a counterpropagating laser beam so the laser beam slows down the atom. But of course when the atom starts to be slowed down, because of the Doppler effects, they no longer are in resonance with the laser beam. So if you put the atomic beam in a magnetic field gradient by a tapered solenoid, as it was suggested by my colleague William Phillips, then you can maintain the resonance condition for the whole trajectory, and you can stop the atom in about half a meter. And I show you a picture. The atomic beam coming out of the solenoid, that's a straight light from the solenoid, and you can see that the atoms are stopped and come back to the oven from which they are emitted. So that's a very easy way to get a sample of atoms that are stopped. Of course, now with laser diodes, you can also sweep the laser frequency and maintain the resonance condition without any magnetic field. Once the atoms are stopped, they still have velocity dispersion around the mean value which is zero. You can try to reduce this zero velocity spread, which is cooling, because cooling, the temperature is not related to the mean velocity, but to the dispersion of velocity around the mean value. And the first thing that was proposed by Ted Haensch, and by other people, was to use the Doppler effect. Suppose you have a beam, you have an atom here, moving with the velocity V. And instead of taking this single-laser beam, you can take two opposite laser beams with the same frequency, and the same intensity, and the frequency is slightly detuned below the atomic frequency. First, if the atom is at rest, you have no Doppler effect, the two radiation pressure forces are equal and opposite, the net force is equal to zero. If the velocity is non-zero, and if the atom is moving to the right, because of the Doppler effect, the frequency of this beam appears to be slightly higher, so it gets closer to resonance because if Ny(L) is smaller than Ny(A), if Ny(L) increases it gets closer to Ny(A). And in this beam, Ny(L), the Doppler shift is opposite, it gets farther from Ny(A), so the two radiaton pressure forces no longer cancel out, and the net force is opposite to the velocity, and the force will dampen the velocity. This is why this scheme has been called "optical molasses." It looks like an atom was moving in a pot of honey, except that the honey is now replaced by light. Light exerts a friction mechanism. With this, when you make the theory of this effect, you predict that you can reach temperatures on the order of 200 microkelvin, which is already very, very low. But when measurement by time and the right techniques became available, it turned out that the temperature was much lower than expected. It was one, two, three microkelvin. That's not usual when you do experiments especially if it's less good than predicted by theory. It was much lower. In fact, that was an application of optical pumping and light shift. And this is, what we called with my young colleague Jean Dalibard "Sisyphus cooling," for the following reason: You remember that in the ground state you can have atoms having two spin-states, spin up and spin down. And these two spin-states are shifted by light differently. Not the same way. And seems like this non-resonance, slightly between below the atomic frequency, the light shift is non-zero. And you can have the two spin-states displaced periodically in space. And altough the light is not different too far from resonance, so you can have atoms absorbing light from one sublevel and going to the other one. So you can be optically pumped from one state to the other. And you can reach a situation where you have the two beam states shifted by light. Like that. And the atom, going to the right, climbs a potential hill and when it is at the top of the hill, it has a probability to be optically pumped to the other state, as if to say to the bottom of a valley, and again climbing a potential hill, optically pumped to the bottom of the valley, and so on. It the same situation as the era of the Greek mythology, Sisyphus, was condemned to roll up rocks to the top of a mountain and once it was on top, the gods was putting him on the bottom of the valley, had to do the job again and again. And it was exhausting, and the same thing occurs with the atoms. And when you make the theories of this effect you can explain the result and you can explain why you get a temperature in the microkelvin range. Now, you have even more when the atoms are very cold. And if they are dense enough, if they are trapped in a potential well, they can undergo elastic collisions like that, and two atoms with energy E1 and E2 can collide. And reach energy E3 and E4 with of course, E1 plus E2 equals E3 plus E4. Conservation of energy. If E4 is larger than the depth of the potential, the atom with E4 leaves the trap and the remaining atoms of the much lower energy held by colliding with other atoms, the whole sample cools down. That's exactly what is called evaporation. This is exactly what you do when you blow above your cup of coffee, to eliminate the hot molecules and the remaining liquid becomes colder. And with this technique, starting from Sisyphus cooling using evaporative cooling, you can reach nanokelvin. Which is extremely cold. And this gives you an idea of the progress that has been achieve. You know the temperature of the sun, the interior of the sun is several million kelvin. The surface of the sun several thousand kelvin, the temperature of the Earth, 27 Celsius is 300 kelvin. The cosmic microwave background radiation, after the Big Bang, a few hundred centuries after the Big Bang, is 2.7 kelvin. The cryogenic techniques is a few millikelvin. With laser cooling, one microkelvin, with evaporation, one nanokelvin. So you have a huge step in the temperature scale which had been achieved. And with these ultracold atoms, you have a lot of new applications which have emerged. In fact I'll explain briefly how you can trap atoms. Here again is an application of light shift because when you have a focused laser beam, like that, the light shift of the atomic state, which is proportional to the light intensity is maximum at the focus where the ligh tintensity is maximum. And if the tuning of the laser beam is negative, the shift is negative. So you have a potential well here in which you can trap atoms if they are cold enough. And this is what is called a "laser trap." You cannot slow, and that's fascinating,... if you have... First observed by Steve Chu, a Nobel Laureate in1997. And of course all those types of traps have been developed, we have no time to explain. I would like just to tell you something which is quite interesting. If you have a standing wave, instead of a propagating wave, the standing wave you have periodic array of maxima and minima of the light intensity. One dimension, two dimensions, three dimensions. With negative light shift, you can produce a periodic array of potential wells in which you can trap atoms like eggs, in a box for eggs. You can have what is called an "optical lattice", when you get a periodic array of trapped atoms. And this trapped atoms have properties which are quite similar to the properties of electrons in periodic potential produced by a periodic array of ions. And that's a very good model for establishing connection between atomic physics and solid state physics. Now, let me return to the applications of these cold atoms. And the first of use application is to have long interaction times. Because atoms are moving slowly, you can observe them for a very long time. And in principle, the longer the observation time, the higher the precision. So you can make very precise measurements, and in particular very precise atomic clocks. Second application, you remember that Louis de Broglie introduced the idea that any matter particle is associated with a wave, which is called a de Broglie wave, and which have a wavelength inversely proportional to the atomic velocity. With cold atoms, having a very low velocity, you can have large de Broglie wavelengths, and you can make use of the wave properties of matter. So, how do you improve atomic clocks? Usually atomic clocks use atomic beams of caesium because the second is defined from the caesium atom's condition, crossing two cavities where you have current microwave fields exciting the caesium atoms. And the two cavities are separated by about half a meter. And you observe resonance lines with the fringes which are called "Ramsey fringes," which is determined by the time of life of atoms from one cavity to the other, with a velocity of a hundred meter per second. And we're just pacing 0.5 metre, so the time of life is about five milliseconds. What you can do now, with cold atoms, you can have a cloud of cold atoms, and with a laser pulse, you can push atoms upwards, and they go upwards, like that. And they cross the cavity, a single cavity now, once on their way up, and once on their way down. It's some sort of fountain, the water molecules are replaced by atoms. Pushed by a laser pulse. And the time it takes for the atom to cross a cavity once on the way up, once on the way down, can be hundred times longer than this time. They can be 5 seconds. And then by increasing the jumping time, you can get now precision. You can switch from time 0.005 second to 0.5 seconds, you can improve the accuracy by two orders of magnitude of the clock. And actually, atomic fountains have been achieved in Paris by my colleague Christophe Salomon and Andre Clairon at the Observatory of Paris. And you have here examples of Ramsey fringes, with a very high signal-to-noise ratio, and with this concept, you can measure time with a relative accuracy which reaches 10^-16. And relative accuracy of 10^-16 for an interaction time of about 10,000 seconds means that you can measure time with an accuracy so that, shift of time, the error in time, is only one second in 300 million years. So that give you an idea of the accuracy we can reach. Now new clocks have been achieved using optical transition instead of microwave transition in caesium, reaching 10^-17. Which is an accuracy of one second in the age of the universe. And in fact, what we are planning to do now, because you know in Earth we are always bothered by gravity, we have the atom falling, and accelerating, because they fall. So the best thing is to go to space, where the atom are no longer submitted to the gravity. And to make an experiment in microgravity. And there's a campaign which has been developed, putting this clock in a Zero-G flight, a flight doing zero free flight like that, during 20 second, and then again, a second parabola, and so on, and you see the people in the plane, here, different people working in physics, chemistry, biology, and now it's planned to put this clock in the space station. And Thursday, I will go with Ted Haensch to the Airbus space station in Germany, not far from here, to visit the clock which has been developed in Paris, and which will be put in the space station. Hopefully, the space station will get the clock, in 2017, in two years from now. Then we hope to be able to reach a very high accuracy. Of course we have lots of applications by measuring the difference of the time between in the clock in the space station and the clock on earth, you can test the theory of general relativity because Einstein predicted that two clocks in different gravitational fields do not oscillate at the same frequency. Here is the progress in the accuracy of the clocks during six decades, and reaching now 10^-17. Let me just briefly outline the other application of cold atoms: the long de Broglie wavelengths. When you have many atoms in a trap, separated by distances smaller than the de Broglie wavelengths they are predicted to condense in a single quantum space; that was predicted by Einstein in 1924, and this is called "Bose Einstein condensation." And this effect has been observed recently about 20 years ago by several groups, Carl Wieman, Wolfgang Ketterle, and Eric Cornell and now you have a billion of atoms all in the same macroscopic quantum wave function. That's a very fascinating story. I have a lot of pictures, we just have no time to discuss. Let me say that just by having this macroscopic quantum waves open the way to a lot of new phenomena: Like superfluidity of matter waves, like atom lasers. You have two condensates, you let them overlap, and you get interference between macroscopic matter waves. So I switch now to the last point of my talk. Suppose that you have an atom, with two states, a ground state and an excited state, sent though a cavity, high Q cavity, very good quality cavity. So the two states undergo light shifts if the cavity is not resonant. And the two shifts are not the same, so the frequency splitting between the two states is non-zero, and is a value which depends on the number of photons in the cavity. If you measure this phase shift of the transition where the atom cross the cavity by a second pulse, here, you get the phase shift which depends on the number of photon in the cavity which is not the same depending the cavities are empty, or contain a single photon. And you don't destroy the photon, because the photon is not absorbed. So you have a non-destructive detection of photons in the cavity. And that has been researched by my colleague Serge Haroche and other people and this is why they obtained a Noble Prize three years ago in 2012. So you see the light shifts have had a lot of applications: cooling, the atomic clocks, cavity QED. So let me finish by showing a photo of the group of Professor Kastler, who's here. In 1966, Alfred Kastler got the Noble Prize for optical pumping. He's here, Brossel was here, Jean Brossel. I was here. Some time ago, in 1966, I had just finished my Ph.D. work two years ago, and I was starting a new research group, and my first student was Serge Haroche, who is here. So you see, in this picture, in the same lab you have three generations of Nobel Prize winners, Alfred Kastler, myself, and Serge Haroche. This is where we'll conclude, I think. I hope to have shown you all a better understanding, fundamental research, trying to understand the properties of atom-photon interaction has allowed several important advances, like the invention of new light sources, like the laser, which has completely transformed optics. New mechanisms, like optical pumping, laser cooling, for manipulating atoms. These advances are opening new research fields and allow us to ask new questions, to investigate new systems, new states of matter, like macroscopic matter waves. I think that I give this example because I think that shows clearly, the importance of long-term research. Basic research is long-term. You need the long-term to build the group and to get a deep physical understanding of the physical mechanisms you are studying. And that you increase the background of knowledge, which can be at the origin of new fruitful ideas. And finally, I think it's important to keep talented and experienced young people a long time enough to allow them to get good knowledge, and to contribute themselves to the advances of science. And this is why it is important to have here, in Lindau, a lot of new young students coming from all over the world to listen to lectures and try to be motivated. Because to do research, you have to be passionate about what you are doing. Thank you very much. Thank you! Merci beaucoup. Merci beaucoup.

Ich möchte in diesem Vortrag kurz diese Wirkungen beschreiben und Ihnen zeigen, wie sie verwendet werden können für sehr interessante Anwendungen. Ich zeige Ihnen eine Skizze zum Verlauf dieses Vortrags. Zuerst werde ich über optisches Pumpen und Lichtverschiebungen sprechen. Mit Grundsätzen, den wichtigen Eigenschaften des optischen Pumpens. Ich möchte Ihnen auch eine Dressed-Atom Interpretation von Lichtverschiebungen geben. Dann, im zweiten Teil, möchte ich Laserkühlung und –speicherung beschreiben. Der Kühlungsmechanismus und die Möglichkeit Atome zwischen Laserlicht einzufangen und Atomspiegel oder optische Gitter zu erhalten. Dann möchte ich im dritten Teil Anwendungen von ultrakalten Atomen, ultrapräzisen Atomuhren, Zeitmessungen in hoher Genauigkeit und quantenentarteten Gasen nennen. Schließlich, im letzten Teil, möchte ich Lichtverschiebungen bei der Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik beschreiben und die Möglichkeit ein einzelnes Photon zu erhalten, ohne es zu zerstören. Gut, lassen Sie mich mit der Polarisierung von Atomen durch optisches Pumpen beginnen, und lassen Sie mich auf zwei wichtige Papers zurückgreifen, die 1949 und 1950 veröffentlicht wurden, von meinen beiden Physikerkollegen Alfred Kastler und Jean Brossel, die als Grundgedanken den Austausch von Drehmoment zwischen Atomen und Photonen eingeführt haben. Lassen Sie mich optisches Pumpen beschreiben. Angenommen, man hat einen Lichtstrahl mit einer kreisförmigen Polarisation, der sich entlang der Z-Achse ausbreitet. Und angenommen, dieser Lichtstrahl regt Atome zum Grundzustand g und einem Anregungszustand an. Wir haben zwei Unterniveaus, sehr einfacher Fall, mit zwei Spinzuständen, -1/2 und +1/2 im Grundzustand, und -1/2 und +1/2 im Anregungszustand. Und diese Quantenzahlen repräsentieren den Drehimpuls in Einheiten h(Strich). Jeder Balke entspricht h/2*Pi. Sigma+ polarisierte Photonen haben ein Drehmoment +1 längs der Z-Achse. Ein Atom kann diese Photonen nur aufnehmen wenn es von -1/2 nach +1/2 geht, da nur in diesem Übergang die Quantenzahl um +1 variiert. Durch Wahl der Polarisation des Lichts, kann man diesen Übergang selektiv anregen und leicht zu verstehen ist, man hat ein Drehmoment von +1 und durch Absorption dieses Photons muss das Atom ein Drehmoment von +1 erlangen. Es gelangt aus diesem Zustand in diesen Zustand. Sobald es sich im Anregungszustand befindet, fällt es in den Grundzustand zurück, entweder auf diese Art, oder auf diese. Fällt es auf diese Art zurück, fällt es in den +1/2 Zustand, welches der Grundzustand ist, und von hier können Sigma+ Photonen nicht mehr absorbiert werden, denn es gibt im oberen Zustand keinen +3/2 Zustand. In diesem Zyklus werden Atome vom -1/2 Zustand in den +1/2 Zustand übertragen. Sie haben dem Atom das Drehmoment des Lichts übertragen. Es ist eine Art Pumpe, die Atome von -1/2 holen und nach +1/2 bringen. Daher wird es „optisches Pumpen“ genannt. Sobald man alle Atome in diesem Zustand konzentriert hat, kann man einen Übergang zwischen den beiden Unterniveaus im Grundzustand erkennen. Denn, wenn Sie einen Übergang zwischen diesen beiden Zuständen haben, der mit magnetischer Resonanz oder durch Stoß verwendet wird, beginnt die Absorption von Sigma+ Licht erneut. Sieht man sich die Lichtabsorption an, kann man jeden Übergang zwischen den zwei Grundzuständen von Niveaus erfassen, um eine optische Erfassung magnetischer Resonanz zu haben. Es ist auch empfindlicher als die gewöhnliche Erfassung. Man hat also eine Menge grundlegender und praktischer Applikationen Lassen Sie mich eine Anwendung nennen, die zu Beginn nicht entdeckt wurde. Sie tauchte erst 30 Jahre nach der Entdeckung des optischen Pumpens auf. Man erkannten bei einer atmenden Person eine Mischung aus Luft und polarisiertem Gas, polarisiertes Helium, man kann dann die Lungen mit polarisiertem Gas füllen, Helium. Das ist für den Körper nicht schädlich, Helium ist ein edles Gas. Man kann in den Lungen Magnetresonanz erkennen und in den leeren Teilen des Körpers in den Lungen ein I-R-M vornehmen. Dies ist das Beispiel eines I-R-M-Bildes, MRI, Entschuldigung, auf Französisch heißt es ein I-R-M, auf Englisch MRI. MRI nach Proton, das gewöhnliche MRI, wir erkennen die Protonen der Wassermoleküle. Und MRI mit Helium-3, hier erkennt man die Lungenhöhle und man erkennt auch einige Krankheiten wie Asthma oder den schweren Raucher. Das war eine praktische Anwendung des optischen Pumpens, an die man zu Beginn nicht gedacht hatte. Lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie auch Licht die interne Energie des Atoms verändern kann. Durch das, was man “Lichtverschiebungen“ nennt. Ein nicht-resonantes Licht, dass durch Resonanz leicht verstimmt ist, kann den Grundzustand um einen Betrag verschieben, das wird Lichtverschiebung, Delta E(g), genannt, die proportional zur Lichtintensität ist. Es ist die doppelte Intensität, da es das Doppelte der Lichtverschiebung ist. Es hat ein Zeichen, das von der Verstimmung zwischen er Lichtfrequenz Omega(L), und der Atomfrequenz Omega(A) abhängt. Ist Omega(L) größer als Omega(A), die Verstimmung, ist die Verschiebung positiv. Ist Omega(L) kleiner als Omega(A) ist die Verschiebung negativ. Sie haben die Möglichkeit einen atomaren Grundzustand entsprechend einem Betrag zu verlagern, den Sie steuern können, mit einer Wissenschaft, die Sie steuern können. Wenn Sie zwei Zeeman-Unterniveaus im Grundzustand haben, haben die zwei Grundzustände der Niveaus im Allgemeinen verschiedene Lichtverschiebungen und die Magnetresonanz im Grundzustand wird durch Licht verschoben. Auf diese Weise war es mir in meiner Doktorarbeit möglich, die Existenz der Lichtverschiebungen aufzuzeigen und zu messen. Diese Wirkungen lassen sich unter zwei Gesichtspunkten betrachten. Erstens, es ist eine Störung, da das Licht die Energie, die man messen will, stört. Wenn man die wirkliche Energie messen will, muss man ableiten, wo die wirkliche Lichtenergie ist. Es zeigte sich 30 Jahre später, dass auch diese Wirkung sehr nützlich ist, da sie die Grundlage wichtiger Anwendungen bei Laserkühlung und der Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik sein kann. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie Lichtverschiebungen zuerst entdeckt wurden. Ich gehe nochmals zurück zu diesem Übergang zwischen zwei Unterniveaus, zwei Zustände mit 1/2 Drehmoment. Dies ist ein Sigma+ Licht, dies ist Sigma Licht. Sie sehen, je nach Polarisation des Lichts kann man dieses Niveau oder dieses Niveau durch den Betrag der Lichtverschiebung verschieben. Sie sehen, die beiden Unterniveaus haben sich um den gleichen Betrag verschoben, und Sie reduzieren die Spaltung zwischen diesen beiden Zuständen durch Sigma- Anregung und vergrößern sie durch Sigma+ Anregung. Verschieben der Magnetresonanz in verschiedene Richtungen, sofern das Licht Sigma+ oder Sigma- polarisiert ist. Auf diese Weise haben wir zuerst die magnetische Lichtverschiebung beobachtet. Sie haben hier alle Atome, atomare Dämpfe, angeregt durch Licht optischen Pumpens, es ist resonant und verschob sich um einen zweiten störenden Strahl, der Sigma+ oder Sigma- polarisiert ist. Sie sehen, die Magnetresonanz im Grundzustand verschob sich in die entgegengesetzte Richtung, je nachdem, ob das Licht Sigma plus oder Sigma minus polarisiert ist. Damals hatten wir kein Laser, das war 1961, wir hatten gewöhnliche Lampen und die Lichtverschiebung war außergewöhnlich gering, in der Größenordnung von einem Hertz. Heute kann man mit Laserstrahlen Lichtverschiebungen in Gigahertz haben, viel, viel größer. Lassen Sie mich nun das zweite Beispiel der Manipulation nenne, Laserkühlung. Ich möchte zuerst die Wirkung davon erklären. Ich nehme das einfache Beispiel eines Ziels C, das mit einem Strahl von P-Partikeln bombardiert wird, die alle aus der gleichen Richtung kommen. Diese Partikel bombardieren das Ziel und gehen in alle Richtungen, und Ergebnis dieses Bombardements ist, das Ziel wird geschoben. Die gleiche Wirkung besteht, wenn man das Ziel durch ein Atom ersetzt und die Partikel durch Photonen. Photonen werden durch die Atome absorbiert und in alle möglichen Richtungen weitergeleitet. Und Photonen haben ein Moment und als Ergebnis dieses Bombardements, wird das Atom geschoben. Das nennt man “Strahlungsdruck”. Diese Wirkung ist bekannt, es ist Teil der Erklärung für den Schweif eines Kometen. Der Komet ist ein astrophysikalisches Objekt und das Licht der Sonne drückt diesen Staub und lässt den Kometenschweif entstehen. Dieser befindet sich entlang der Richtung der Sonne und nicht entlang der Flugbahn des Kometen. Das wurde von Keppler vor langer Zeit erklärt. Natürlich kann mit den Laserstrahlen der Strahlungsdruck wegen der Photonen sehr viel bedeutender sein, da sie alle sehr klar aus der gleichen Richtung kommen. Wenn wir über genügende Leistung verfügen, ein paar Zehntel Milliwatt, kann man riesige Strahlungsdruckkräfte erhalten. Und man kann über das Atom eine Beschleunigung von 10^5 der Schwerkraftbeschleunigung aufbringen. Es ist also eine riesige Kraft, die man auf Atome ausüben kann. Und wenn man diese Kraft verwendet, kann man einen Atomstrahl stoppen. Um einen Atomstrahl zu unterbrechen, der aus dieser Richtung kommt, verwenden wir einen Counterpropagating-Laserstrahl, damit der Laserstrahl das Atom verlangsamt. Wenn Atome sich aber aufgrund des Dopplereffekts verlangsamen, befinden sie sich nicht länger in Resonanz mit dem Laserstrahl. Wenn man also den Atomstrahl durch eine konische Spule in einen Magnetfeldgradienten gibt, wie mein Kollege William Phillips dies vorgeschlagen hat, kann man die Resonanzbedingung des gesamten Bahnverlaufs beibehalten und man kann das Atom etwa innerhalb eines halben Meters stoppen. Ich zeige Ihnen ein Bild. Der Atomstrahl kommt aus der Spule, das ist direktes Licht aus der Spule, Und Sie sehen, die Atome werden angehalten und kehren zum Ofen zurück, von dem sie ausgegangen sind. Dies ist ein sehr einfacher Weg, um Atome zu erhalten, die gestoppt wurden. Natürlich lässt sich mit den Laserdioden auch die Laserfrequenz ändern und die Resonanzbedingung ohne irgendein Magnetfeld beibehalten. Sobald die Atome gestoppt sind, haben sie noch immer eine Geschwindigkeitsdispersion um den Mittelwert, welcher Null ist. Man kann versuchen, die Null-Geschwindigkeitsverbreitung zu reduzieren, was durch Kühlen geschieht, denn die Temperatur hat keine Beziehung zum Mittelwert der Geschwindigkeit, aber zur Geschwindigkeitsdispersion um den Mittelwert. Als erstes haben Ted Hänsch und andere vorgeschlagen, den Dopplereffekt zu verwenden. Angenommen, Sie haben einen Strahl, Sie haben hier ein Atom, das sich mit der Geschwindigkeit V bewegt. Und statt diesen einzelnen Laserstrahl zu nehmen, nehmen Sie zwei entgegengesetzte Laserstrahlen mit der gleichen Frequenz und Intensität und die Frequenz wird leicht unter der Atomfrequenz verstimmt. Zuerst, ist das Atom im Ruhezustand, gibt es keinen Dopplereffekt; die beiden Kräfte des Strahlungsdrucks sind gleich und entgegengesetzt, die resultierende Kraft ist gleich Null. Ist die Geschwindigkeit nicht Null, und falls das Atom sich wegen des Dopplereffekts nach rechts bewegt, scheint die Frequenz des Strahles leicht höher zu sein, sie kommt der Resonanz also näher, denn Ny(L) ist kleiner als Ny(A), nimmt Ny(L) zu, kommt sie Ny(A) näher. Und in diesem Strahl, Ny(L), ist die Dopplerverschiebung entgegengesetzt, entfernt sich von Ny(A), die beiden Strahlungsdruck-Kräfte heben sich nicht länger auf und die resultierende Kraft ist entgegengesetzt der Geschwindigkeit und die Kraft wird die Geschwindigkeit abschwächen. Aus diesem Grund wurde diese Anordnung „optische Melasse“ genannt. Es sieht so aus, als würde ein Atom sich in einem Honigtopf bewegen, außer dass der Honig jetzt durch Licht ersetzt ist. Licht übt einen Reibungsmechanismus aus. Damit, leitet man aus dieser Wirkung eine Theorie ab, sagt man voraus, man kann Temperaturen in der Größenordnung von 200 Mikrokelvin erreichen, was sehr, sehr niedrig ist. Als mit der Zeit aber Messungen und die richtigen Techniken verfügbar waren, zeigt es sich, dass die Temperatur sehr viel niedriger als erwartet war. Sie lag bei eins, zwei, drei Mikrokelvin. Das ist nicht üblich, wenn man Experimente vornimmt, besonders wenn das Ergebnis nicht so gut ist, wie in der Theorie vorausgesagt. Es lag sehr viel niedriger. Tatsächlich war dies eine Anwendung des optischen Pumpens und der Lichtverschiebung. Das nenne ich mit meinem jungen Kollegen Dalibard "Sisyphuskühlung", und das aus folgendem Grund: Sie erinnern sich, im Grundzustand können Sie Atome mit zwei Spinzuständen haben, nach oben und nach unten gedreht. Und diese zwei Spinzustände werden durch Licht unterschiedlich verschoben. Nicht auf die gleichen Art. Es scheint wie dieses nicht-resonant, leicht unter der Atomfrequenz, die Lichtverschiebung ist nicht Null. Und man kann diese zwei Spinzustände im Raum periodisch verschoben haben. Und auch wenn das Licht sich nicht zu sehr von der Resonanz unterscheidet, kann man Atome bekommen, die Licht aus einem Unterniveau absorbieren und zum nächsten gehen. Man kann also optisch von einem Zustand zum anderen pumpen. Und man erhält eine Situation, bei dem die zwei Strahlenzustände durch Licht verschoben werden. Wie hier. Und das Atom, das nach rechts geht, erklimmt einen Potentialberg, und wenn es oben angekommen ist, hat es eine Wahrscheinlichkeit zum anderen Zustand optisch gepumpt zu werden, sozusagen zur Talsohle, und wieder wird ein Potentialberg erklommen, optisch gepumpt in die Talsohle, und so weiter. Es ist die gleiche Situation wie in der griechischen Mythologie, Sisyphus war verflucht, Felsen auf die Bergspitze zu rollen und wenn er oben war, versetzten ihn die Götter nach unten ins Tal und er musste die ganze Arbeit erneut vollbringen. Und es war anstrengend und das Gleiche geschieht mit den Atomen. Und wenn man die Theorien dieser Wirkung aufstellt, kann man das Ergebnis erklären und man kann erklären, weshalb man eine Temperatur im Mikrokelvin Bereich erhält. Nun verstärkt sich das noch, wenn die Atome sehr kalt sind. Und wenn sie dicht genug sind, wenn sie in einer Potentialmulde gefangen sind, können sie sich solchen elastischen Stößen unterziehen, und zwei Atome mit der Energie E1 und E2 können zusammenstoßen, und erreichen Energie E3 und E4, natürlich mit E1 plus E3 gleich E3 plus E4. Energieerhaltung. Ist E4 größer als die Tiefe des Potentials, verlässt E4 die Falle und die verbleibenden Atome mit viel geringerer Energie, gehalten durch den Zusammenstoß mit anderen Atomen, diese ganze Probe kühlt ab. Genau das nennt man Verdunstung. Genau das machen Sie, wenn Sie über ihre Tasse Kaffee blasen, um die heißen Moleküle zu eliminieren und die verbleibende Flüssigkeit wird kühler. Und mit dieser Technik, beginnend bei der Sisyphuskühlung, unter Verwendung von Verdunstungskühlung, kann man Nanokelvin erreichen. Das ist extrem kalt. Das gibt Ihnen eine Vorstellung des Vorgangs, der erreicht werden muss. Sie wissen, die Temperatur der Sonne, das Innere der Sonne, beträgt mehrere Millionen Kelvin. Die Oberfläche der Sonne beträgt mehrere Tausend Kelvin, die Temperatur der Erde, 27 Celsius ist 300 Kelvin. Die kosmische Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung, nach dem Urknall, wenige Jahrhunderte nach dem Urknall ist 2,7 Kelvin. Die Kryotechnik ist wenige Millikelvin, mit Laserkühlung ein Mikrokelvin, mit Verdunstung ein Nanokelvin. Sie haben einen riesigen Schritt auf der Temperaturskala, der erreicht wurde. Mit diesen ultrakalten Atomen gibt es eine Menge neuer Anwendungen, die sich entwickelt haben. Ich werde kurz erklären, wie man ein Atom einfangen kann. Hier ist wieder eine Anwendung der Lichtverschiebung, wenn Sie einen fokussierten Laserstrahl haben, wie diesen hier, die Lichtverschiebung des Atomzustands, proportional zu der Lichtintensität ist das Maximum im Mittelpunkt, in dem die Lichtintensität maximal ist. Ist die Abstimmung des Laserstrahles negativ, ist die Verschiebung negativ. Sie haben eine Potentialmulde, in der Sie Atome einfangen können, sofern sie kalt genug sind. Das nennt man „Laserfalle“. Man kann nicht verlangsamen, und das ist faszinierend,… wenn Sie… Zuerst von Steve Chu, einem Nobelpreisträger im Jahre 1997 beobachtet. Natürlich wurden alle diese Arten von Fallen entwickelt, wir haben nicht die Zeit, das zu erläutern. Ich möchte Ihnen nur etwas erzählen, was recht interessant ist. Wenn Sie eine stehende Welle haben, an Stelle einer sich ausbreitenden Welle, wird die stehende Welle eine periodische Anordnung von Maxima und Minima der Lichtintensität haben. Eine Dimension, zwei Dimensionen, drei Dimensionen. Mit negativer Lichtverschiebung, können Sie eine periodische Anordnung der Potentialmulde erzeugen, in der Sie Atome wie Eier fangen können, in einer Eierschachtel. Sie können das, was ein „optisches Gitter“ genannt wird erhalten, wenn Sie eine periodische Anordnung gefangener Atome haben. Und diese gefangenen Atome haben Eigenschaften, die den Eigenschaften der Elektronen in einem periodischen Potential, erzeugt durch eine periodische Anordnung von Ionen, ziemlich ähnlich ist. Und das ist ein sehr gutes Modell für das Zustandekommen einer Verbindung zwischen Atomphysik und Festkörperphysik. Lassen Sie mich wieder zu den Anwendungen dieser kalten Atome zurückkehren. Der erste Nutzen der Anwendung ist, man hat eine große Interaktionszeit. Da Atome sich langsam bewegen, kann man sie lange beobachten. Im Prinzip, je länger die Beobachtungszeit, desto größer die Präzision. Man kann also sehr präzise Messungen vornehmen und insbesondere sehr präzise Atomuhren. Zweite Anwendung, Sie erinnern sich, Louis de Broglie stellte das Konzept vor, dass jedes Stoffteilchen einer Welle zugeordnet ist, was man dann eine De-Broglie-Wellenlänge nennt und welche eine Wellenlänge umgekehrt proportional zur Atomgeschwindigkeit hat. Bei kalten Atomen, mit einer sehr niedrigen Geschwindigkeit, kann man große De-Broglie-Wellenlängen haben, Und man kann die Welleneigenschaften der Materie nutzen. Wie optimiert man Atomuhren? Gewöhnlich verwenden Atomuhren Atomstrahlen von Cäsium, da die Sekunde durch den Zustand des Cäsium-Atoms definiert ist, das zwei Kavitäten durchquert, wo aktuelle Mikrowellenfelder vorhanden sind, die die Cäsium-Atome anregen. Die zwei Kavitäten sind etwa einen halben Meter voneinander getrennt. Und man beobachtet Resonanzlinien mit Streifen, die „Ramsey-Streifen“ genannt werden, die durch die Lebenszeit der Atome von einer Kavität zur anderen bestimmt sind, mit einer Geschwindigkeit von hundert Meter pro Sekunde. Wir durchschreiten 0,5 Meter, die Lebenszeit ist also etwas fünf Millisekunden. Was man nun mit kalten Atomen tun kann: man kann eine Wolke kalter Atome haben und mit einem Laserimpuls lassen sich die Atome hochdrücken und sie gehen hoch, wie hier. Und sie durchqueren die Kavität, jetzt eine einzelne, einmal auf ihrem Weg nach oben, einmal auf ihrem Weg nach unten. Es ist eine Art Fontäne, die Wassermoleküle werden durch Atome ersetzt. Angetrieben durch einen Laserimpuls. Und die Zeit, die das Atom braucht, die Kavität einmal nach oben zu durchqueren, einmal den Weg nach unten, kann hundert Mal länger sein, als diese Zeit. Sie kann 5 Sekunden betragen. Und indem man die Zeitsprünge erhöht, erhält man jetzt Präzision. Man kann von 0,005 Sekunden auf 0,5 Sekunden umschalten, man kann die Genauigkeit um zwei Größenordnungen der Uhr optimieren. Und in der Tat, Atomfontänen wurden in Paris von meinen Kollegen Christophe Salomon und Andre Clairon am Pariser Observatorium erzielt. Sie haben hier Beispiele der Ramsey-Streifen mit einem sehr hohen Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis, und mit diesem Konzept lässt sich Zeit mit relativer Genauigkeit bis zu 10^-16 messen. Und relative Genauigkeit von 10^-16 für eine Wechselwirkungszeit von etwa 10.000 Sekunden bedeutet, man kann Zeit mit einer Genauigkeit messen, so dass Zeitverschiebung, Fehler bei Zeit, nur eine Sekunde in 300 Millionen Jahren beträgt. Damit haben sie eine Idee von der Genauigkeit, die wir erreichen können. Neue Uhren haben nun, durch Verwendung des optischen Übergangs statt des Mikrowellenübergangs in Cäsium, Damit haben wir eine Genauigkeit von einer Sekunde während des Weltalters. Was wir jetzt vorhaben ist, Sie wissen, auf der Erde werden wir immer durch die Schwerkraft behindert, hier fallen die Atome und beschleunigen sich, weil sie fallen. Man begibt sich also am Besten in den Weltraum, in dem Atome nicht länger der Schwerkraft unterliegen. Und dort soll ein Experiment in der Schwerelosigkeit vorgenommen werden. Es wurde eine Kampagne entwickelt, diese Uhr einem Zero-G Flug beizugeben, ein Flug, der Zero-G Flug wie dieser, während 20 Sekunden, und dann wieder, ein zweiter Parabelflug und so weiter, und Sie sehen, die Leute im Flugzeug, hier, verschiedene Leute, arbeiten in der Physik, Chemie, Biologie und jetzt hat man vor, diese Uhr in die Raumstation zu bringen. Am Donnerstag werde ich mit Ted Hänsch zu Airbus-Deutschland fahren, nicht weit von hier, um die Uhr zu besuchen, die in Paris entwickelt wurden und die in der Raumstation aufgestellt werden wird. Hoffentlich erhält die Raumstation die Uhr im Jahre 2017, also in zwei Jahren. Dann, so hoffen wir, sind wir in der Lage eine sehr hohe Genauigkeit zu erreichen. Natürlich gibt es viele Anwendungen durch das Messen des Zeitunterschieds zwischen der Uhr in der Raumstation und der Uhr auf der Erde, man kann die allgemeine Relativitätstheorie testen, denn Einstein sagte voraus, dass zwei Uhren in verschiedenen Gravitationsfeldern nicht in der gleichen Frequenz schwingen. Hier ist der Verlauf bei der Genauigkeit der Uhr während sechs Jahrzenten, und jetzt ist 10^-17 erreicht. Lassen Sie mich kurz die andere Anwendung kühler Atome skizzieren: Die lange De-Broglie-Wellenlänge. Wenn Sie viele Atome in einer Falle haben, getrennt durch Entfernungen die kleiner als die De-Broglie-Wellenlängen sind, wird vorausgesagt, dass sie sich in einem einzigen Quantenraum verdichten. Das wurde von Einstein 1924 vorausgesagt und wird “Bose-Einstein-Kondensation“ genannt. Dieser Effekt wurde kürzlich, etwa vor 20 Jahren, von verschiedenen Gruppen beobachtet, Carl Wieman, Wolfgang Ketterle und Eric Cornell, und jetzt hat man eine Milliarde Atome alle in der gleichen makroskopischen, quantenmechanischen Wellenfunktion. Das ist eine sehr faszinierende Geschichte. Ich habe viele Bilder, wir haben nur keine Zeit zum Besprechen. Lassen Sie mich sagen, alleine durch diese makroskopischen, quantenmechanischen Wellen öffnen sich Wege zu einer Menge neuer Phänomene. Wie Supraflüssigkeit von Materiewellen, wie Atomlaser. Man hat zwei Kondensate, lässt sie sich überlappen, und man erhält eine Wechselwirkung zwischen makroskopischen Materiewellen. Ich gehe zum letzten Punkt meiner Rede über. Angenommen, Sie haben ein Atom, mit zwei Zuständen, ein Grundzustand und ein Anregungszustand, sie werden durch eine Kavität geschickt, hohe Q Kavität, sehr gute Qualität der Kavität. Die zwei Zustände erfahren Lichtverschiebungen, falls die Kavität nicht resonant ist. Und die beiden Verschiebungen sind nicht dieselben, das Frequenzsplitting zwischen den beiden Zuständen ist nicht Null und ein Wert, der von der Anzahl der Photonen in der Kavität abhängt. Wenn man diese Phasenverschiebung des Übergangs misst, bei dem das Atom die Kavität in einem Sekundenimpuls durchquert, hier, erhalten Sie die Phasenverschiebung, die von der Anzahl der Phontonen in der Kavität abhängt, welche nicht dieselbe ist, abhängig davon, ob die Kavitäten leer sind oder ein einziges Photon enthalten. Und man zerstört das Photon nicht, da es nicht absorbiert ist. Man hat also einen zerstörungsfreien Nachweis von Photonen in der Kavität. Dies wurde von meinem Kollegen Serge Haroche und anderen erforscht, weshalb ihnen vor drei Jahren, 2012, der Nobelpreis verliehen wurde. Sie sehen, die Lichtverschiebungen haben sehr viele Anwendungen: Kühlung, die Atomuhren, Resonator-Quanten-Elektrodynamik (QED). Ich möchte damit enden, Ihnen ein Foto der Gruppe von Professor Kastler zu zeigen, hier. Er ist hier, Brossel war hier, Jean Brossel. Ich war da. Vor geraumer Zeit, im Jahre 1966, ich hatte gerade zwei Jahre zuvor meine Doktorarbeit beendet, ich begann mit einer neuen Forschungsgruppe, und mein erster Student war Serge Haroche, der hier ist. Sie sehen in diesem Bild, im gleichen Labor haben Sie drei Generationen von Nobelpreisträgern. Alfred Kastler, ich und Serge Haroche Ich denke, hier schließen wir. Ich hoffe, ich habe Ihnen allen ein besseres Verständnis von der Grundlagenforschung geben können, der Versuch die Eigenschaften der Atom-Photon-Wechselwirkung zu verstehen, hat verschiedene bedeutende Fortschritte ermöglicht, wie die Erfindung neuer Lichtquellen, wie den Laser, der die Optik vollständig verändert hat. Neue Mechanismen, wie das optische Pumpen, Laserkühlung zur Manipulation von Atomen. Diese Fortschritte eröffnen neue Forschungsfelder und erlauben es uns, neue Fragen zu stellen, neue Systeme zu erforschen, neue Zustände der Materie, wie makroskopische Materiewellen. Ich zeige diese Beispiele, denn ich denke, sie verdeutlichen die Bedeutung langfristiger Forschung. Grundlagenforschung ist langfristig. Man braucht viel Zeit die Gruppe aufzubauen und ein tieferes physikalisches Verständnis der physikalischen Mechanismen, die man untersucht, zu erlangen. Und dass man das Hintergrundwissen erweitert, was der Beginn neuer fruchtbarer Ideen sein kann. Und schließlich denke ich, ist es wichtig, begabte und erfahrene junge Menschen lange genug halten zu können, damit sie ein solides Wissen erlangen und selbst zu den Fortschritten der Wissenschaft beitragen. Aus diesem Grunde ist es so wichtig, dass hier nach Lindau, von überall aus der Welt, eine Menge junger Studenten kommen, die sich die Vorträge anhören und vielleicht motiviert werden. Denn für Forschung braucht man eine Leidenschaft für das, was man tut. Ich danke Ihnen. Danke! Merci beaucoup Merci beaucoup

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji on optical pumping
(00:04:39 - 00:05:54)

 


It should be noted that CT and MRI are used in scientific fields other than medical imaging; the use of MRI to study oil migration in rocks or the use of CT scans in forensic medicine or to image fossils are just some examples. Developments in physics have made it possible for scientists to better see what is taking place inside an object without cutting it open. In clinical diagnosis, CT and MRI reveal various hidden diseases, enabling subsequent treatment. Yet in order to better understand the progression of these diseases, it is necessary to rescale the investigations to the cellular, or sub-cellular, level. George Orwell wrote, “To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle” and nowhere is this more apparent than in microscopy. The problems of this rapidly developing field has directed many physicists towards biology.

“Thousands of Living Creatures in One Small Drop of Water” – Developments in Microscopy

The 17th century scientist and philosopher Robert Hooke was the first person to see and name plant cells, or “little boxes”, as he initially described them, in a slice of cork. However, his elaborate, custom-made microscope with gold etchings was not as good as the simple lens of his contemporary, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, which provided a much larger magnification. Suddenly, the scientists of the day became aware that insects’ legs were covered in hairs, plants were made of smaller components, and a drop of supposedly clean water was home to swarms of tiny animals. The invisible had to be reckoned with.

In modern times, an enormous leap in the development of microscopy came in 1933, when Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll invented the electron microscope. As Stefan Hell, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry in 2014 (alongside Eric Betzig and William E. Moerner), explained in his lecture in 2016, resolution, or the ability to tell one object apart from the other under the microscope lens, was presumed to be limited to a ¼ wavelength of light (or 200 nm) in optical microscopy. This is known as the Abbe limit, after the German physicist Ernst Abbe. Stefan Hell describes this theory in his lecture, given at Lindau in 2016:

 

Stefan W. Hell (2016) - Optical Microscopy: the Resolution Revolution

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Vielen Dank! Ich denke, jeder hier kennt den Spruch: „Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte“ oder „Sehen ist Glauben“. Das trifft nicht nur auf unser Alltagsleben zu, sondern auch auf die Wissenschaften. Und dies ist auch der Grund, weshalb die Mikroskopie eine derartige Schlüsselrolle in der Entwicklung der Naturwissenschaften gespielt hat. Mit der Lichtmikroskopie hat die Menschheit entdeckt, dass jedes Lebewesen aus Zellen als strukturelle und funktionelle Grundeinheiten besteht. Bakterien wurden entdeckt usw. Wir haben aber in der Schule gelernt, dass die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskop durch die Beugung grundsätzlich auf eine halbe Wellenlänge begrenzt ist. Und wenn man kleinere Dinge sehen möchte, muss man auf die Elektronenmikroskopie zurückgreifen. Tatsächlich hat die Entwicklung des Elektronenmikroskops in der zweiten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts die Dinge dramatisch geändert: Man konnte kleinere Dinge sehen, wie Viren, Proteinkomplexe und, in einigen Fällen, kann man eine räumliche Auflösung erzielen, die so gut ist wie die Größe eines Moleküls oder Atoms. Und daher stellt sich die Frage, wenigstens für einen Physiker: Warum sollte ich mich um eine optisches Mikroskop und seine Auflösung kümmern, wo wir jetzt das Elektronenmikroskop haben? Die Antwort auf diese Frage steht auf der nächsten Folie, auf der ich die Zahl der Veröffentlichungen, die ein Elektronenmikroskop nutzten, und der, die ein optisches Mikroskop nutzten, in dieser grundlegenden Medizinzeitschrift gezählt habe. Und jetzt sehen Sie, welche der beiden Methoden gewonnen hat. Das ist tatsächlich ziemlich repräsentativ. Die Antwort ist daher, dass das Lichtmikroskop immer noch das gängigste Mikroskopiemodell in den Lebenswissenschaften ist. Und zwar aus 2 wichtigen Gründen: Der erste Grund ist, dass es der einzige Weg ist, mit dem man in das Innere einer lebenden Zelle sehen kann. Das funktioniert nicht mit einem Elektronenmikroskop. Man muss sie normalerweise dehydrieren und die Elektronen bleiben an der Oberfläche hängen. Aber Licht kann die Zelle durchdringen und Informationen aus dem Inneren herausbekommen. Es gibt noch einen zweiten Grund. Wir wissen bereits, dass es unterschiedliche Organellenarten gibt. Aber wir möchten wissen, was die spezifischen Proteine machen. Es gibt bestimmte Proteinspezies, es gibt 10.000 unterschiedliche Moleküle in einer Zelle. Und das kann man mit der Lichtmikroskopie relativ leicht durchführen, indem man beispielsweise ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das interessante Protein anhängt. Und wenn man dann das Molekül anhängt, kann man das fluoreszierende Molekül sehen. Und dann weiß man genau, wo das betreffende Molekül ist. Hier ist also der Punkt, wenn Sie wollen, wo die Chemie Einzug hält. Sie hängen ein fluoreszierendes Molekül an das betreffende Protein. Und weil es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül ist - wenn man beispielsweise grünes Licht auf es scheint, kann es ein grünes Photon absorbieren. Dann geht es in einen hochliegenden, elektronisch angeregten Zustand über. Und dann gibt es etwas Vibration und Zerfall. Und nach etwa einer Nanosekunde relaxiert das Molekül, indem es ein Fluoreszenzphoton aussendet, das wegen des Vibrationsenergieverlustes leicht ins Rote verschoben ist. Nun, diese Rotverschiebung ist sehr nützlich, da es die Methode sehr empfindlich macht. Man kann das Fluoreszenzlicht leicht vom Anregungslicht trennen. Das macht die Methode extrem leicht reagierend. Tatsächlich kann man ein einzelnes Protein in einer Zelle markieren, und immer noch dieses einzelne, sagen wir, fluoreszierende Molekül sehen, und daher dieses einzelne Protein sehen, nur durch die Tatsache, dass diese Methode so leicht reagierend ist, so untergrundunterdrückend. Aber, es ist klar, wenn es ein zweites Molekül gibt, eine drittes, ein viertes, eine fünftes, das dem ersten sehr nahe kommt, näher als 200 Nanometer, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Ich sage das, um an die Tatsache zu erinnern, dass es bei der Auflösung um die Fähigkeit geht, Dinge auseinanderzuhalten. Daher ist es klar, dass man in der Lichtmikroskopie, und natürlich auch in der Fluoreszenzmikroskopie, trotz ihrer Empfindlichkeit, Dinge nicht auseinanderhalten kann, wenn etwas dichter als 200 Nanometer angeordnet ist. Und wenn man diese Barriere überwinden kann, tut man etwas Gutes für das Gebiet und daher auch für die Lebenswissenschaften. Nun möchte ich ein wenig bei der Frage verweilen, warum es diese Beugungsgrenze gibt. Ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen sie. Und Sie haben vielleicht von der Abbeschen Theorie gehört, einer sehr eleganten Erklärung der Beugungsgrenze. Sie ist sehr elegant, aber in meinen Augen auch sehr irreführend. Manchmal können elegante Theorien sehr irreführend sein. Und vielleicht ist die beste Erklärung die, die man einem Biologen geben würde. Sie ist hier dargestellt. Man kann sagen, dass das grundlegendste oder wichtigste Element eines Lichtmikroskops das Objektiv ist. Die Aufgabe des Objektivs ist keine andere als die, Licht auf einen einzigen Punkt zu konzentrieren, es in einem Punkt zu fokussieren. Und weil Licht sich wie eine Welle ausbreitet, bekommen wir das Licht nicht in einem dramatischen Brennpunkt fokussiert. Wir erhalten einen Lichtfleck, der hier verschmiert ist. Das beträgt mindestens etwa 200 Nanometer in der Brennebene und bestenfalls etwa 500 Nanometer in der optischen Achse. Und dies zieht natürlich wichtige Konsequenzen nach sich. Die Konsequenz ist, dass, wenn wir hier mehrere Merkmale haben, sagen wir Moleküle, dann würden sie mehr oder weniger zur selben Zeit mit dem Licht überflutet. Und daher streuen sie das Licht in mehr oder weniger derselben Zeit zurück. Wenn wir jetzt den Detektor hier positionieren, um das fluoreszierende Licht nachzuweisen, wird der Detektor nicht in der Lage sein, das Licht von den Molekülen auseinanderzuhalten. Nun werden Sie sagen, ok, ich würde den Detektor aber nicht hier platzieren, das ist nicht klug. Ich benutze das Objektiv, um das Licht zurück zu projizieren. Aber gut, Sie haben hier dasselbe Problem, weil jedes der Moleküle hier fluoresziert. Wenn man das Licht sammelt, produziert es ebenfalls einen Lichtfleck des fokussierten Lichts hier, der als Ergebnis der Beugung eine minimale räumliche Ausdehnung hat. Und wenn man einen zweiten, einen dritten, einen vierten, einen fünften usw. hat, dann erzeugen sie auch Lichtflecke. Und das Ergebnis der Beugung – nun, kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten. Es spielt keine Rolle, welchen Detektor Sie dorthin platzieren, sei es ein Fotomultiplier, das Auge oder sogar eine Pixeldetektor wie eine Kamera, sie können die Signale dieser Moleküle nicht auseinanderhalten. Mehrere Menschen erkannten dieses Problem am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts. Ernst Abbe war vielleicht derjenige, der die profundeste Einsicht hatte. Er stellte diese Gleichung der Brechungsgrenze auf, die seinen Namen trägt. Wie Sie wissen, findet man diese Gleichung in jedem Lehrbuch der Physik, Optik, aber auch in den Lehrbüchern der Zell- und Molekularbiologie wegen der enormen Relevanz, die die Beugung in der optischen Mikroskopie für dieses Gebiet hat. Aber man findet sie auch auf dem Denkmal, das zu Ernst Abbes Ehre in Jena errichtet wurde, wo er lebte und arbeitete. Und dort findet man diese Gleichung in Stein gemeißelt. Und alle glaubten dies während des gesamten 20. Jahrhunderts. Sie glaubten es nicht nur, es war auch eine Tatsache. Als ich am Ende der 80er-Jahre als Student in Heidelberg war und ein bisschen optische Mikroskopie durchführte – konfokale Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein -, war das die Auflösung, die man zu der Zeit erhalten konnte. Dies ist ein Bild, aufgenommen innerhalb des Gerüsts eines Teils der Zelle. Und man kann einige verschwommene Merkmale hier drin sehen. Die Entwicklung der STED-Mikroskopie, über die ich gleich reden werde, zeigte, dass es Physik gibt, sozusagen, in dieser Welt, die es erlaubt, diese Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Und wenn man diese Physik mit Klugheit nutzt, kann man Merkmale sehen, die viel feiner sind. Man kann Details erkennen, die jenseits der Beugungsgrenze sind. Diese Entdeckung hat mir einen Anteil des Nobelpreises gebracht. Und persönlich, ich glaube, dass sehr oft - und Sie werden es auf diesem Treffen hören – die Entdeckungen bestimmter Leute mit deren persönlicher Geschichte eng verbunden sind. Und darum verweile ich ein wenig damit, zu erzählen, wie ich tatsächlich die Idee hatte, an diesem Problem zu arbeiten und die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Einige von Ihnen werden das wissen, manche nicht: Ich wurde im Jahr 1962 im westlichen Teil Rumäniens geboren. Ich gehörte zu der Zeit einer deutschen ethnischen Minderheit an. Und im Alter von 13 Jahren nahm ich wahr, dass es ein kommunistisches Rumänien war. Und Teil einer Minderheit zu sein, wohl nicht die beste Art, sein Leben in einem kommunistischen Land zu verbringen. Daher überzeugte ich im Alter von 13 Jahren meine Eltern, das Land zu verlassen und nach Westdeutschland auszuwandern, indem wir unseren deutschen ethnischen Hintergrund nutzten. Und daher waren wir, nach einigen Schwierigkeiten, in der Lage, uns 1978 hier in Ludwigshafen niederzulassen. Ich mochte die Stadt, weil sie recht nah an Heidelberg liegt. Ich wollte Physik studieren und wollte mich in Heidelberg einschreiben, um Physik zu studieren. Das machte ich, nachdem ich mein Abitur hatte. Wie die meisten Physikstudenten, und ich denke, das ist heute noch so, hat die moderne Physik mich fasziniert, natürlich die Quantenmechanik, Relativitätstheorie. Ich wollte Teilchenphysik machen, wollte natürlich ein Theoretiker werden. Aber damals musste ich entscheiden, welches Thema ich für meine Doktorarbeit auswählen wollte. So sah ich damals als Doktorand aus, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht. Ich verlor meinen Mut, ich verlor den Mut und es ist ganz verständlich, da meine Eltern sich noch immer darum bemühten, im Westen anzukommen. Meine Eltern hatten Arbeit, aber mein Vater war von Arbeitslosigkeit bedroht. Meine Mutter wurde damals mit Krebs diagnostiziert und starb schließlich. Ich fühlte damals, dass ich etwas machen muss, das meine Eltern unterstützt, keine theoretische Physik usw. Und die älteren Semester sagten mir: „Mach keine theoretische Physik - du könntest sonst als Taxifahrer enden.“ Also mach das nicht, mach das nicht. Ich schrieb mich daher entgegen meiner Neigung bei einem Professor ein, der eine Start-up-Firma gegründet hatte, die sich auf die Entwicklung der Lichtmikroskopie spezialisierte – der konfokalen Mikroskopie, um genau zu sein, für die Inspektion von Computerchips usw. Ich schrieb mich ein. Mein Thema war es, Computerchips zu inspizieren und die Computerchips mit einem optischen Mikroskop auszurichten. Und ich dachte, wenn du das machst, bekommst du einen Job bei Siemens oder IBM usw. Aber nun, wie Sie sich vorstellen können, wenn man andere Neigungen hat, arbeitete ich ein halbes Jahr, sogar ein Jahr, aber ich war gelangweilt. Es war fürchterlich. Ich hasste es, ins Labor zu gehen. Ich war kurz davor aufzuhören. Ich schaute mich insgeheim nach anderen Themen um. Und ich hatte jetzt 2 Optionen: entweder konnte ich unglücklich werden oder darüber nachdenken ob ich noch irgendetwas Interessantes mit der Lichtmikroskopie machen konnte. Mit dieser Physik des 19. Jahrhunderts, die nichts war, nur Beugung und Polarisation, nichts mit dem man etwas anfangen konnte. Na gut, vielleicht gibt es den einen oder anderen Abbildungsfehler, aber das ist langweilig. Also dachte ich: Was bleibt noch übrig? Und dann merkte ich: die Beugungsgrenze zu brechen, das wäre doch cool, weil alle glauben, dass das unmöglich ist. Ich war von dieser Idee so fasziniert und erkannte irgendwann, dass es möglich sein müsste. Meine Logik war sehr einfach. Ich sagte mir, diese Beugungsgrenze wurde im Jahr 1873 formuliert - jetzt war es Ende der 80er-Jahre. So viel Physik war in der Zwischenzeit passiert, da muss es wenigstens ein Phänomen geben, das mich für irgendeine Ausführungsart jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. Könnte Reflexion sein, Fluoreszenz, was auch immer - ich bin nicht wählerisch. Es muss doch irgendein Phänomen geben, das mich jenseits der Beugungsgrenze bringt. An einem Punkt schrieb ich diese Philosophie auf. Ich merkte, dass es nicht funktionieren würde, wenn ich die Art der Fokussierung änderte, weil man das nicht ändern kann, wenn man Licht benutzt. Aber vielleicht wenn man in einem Fluoreszenzmikroskop sich die Zustände der Fluorophore ansieht, ihre spektralen Eigenschaften. Vielleicht gibt es einen quantenoptischen Effekt. Man könnte vielleicht mit der Quantennatur des Lichts spielen, sozusagen, und es machen. Das war also die Idee. Ich sollte dazusagen, dass es zu der Zeit schon ein Konzept gab. Darum habe ich hier ‚Fernfeld‘ geschrieben auf etwas, das Nahfeldlichtmikroskop genannt wird. Und das benutzt eine winzige Spitze. Es ist wie ein Rastertunnelmikroskop, um eine Licht-Präparat-Wechselwirkung hier auf kleine Maßstäbe zu beschränken. Aber ich hatte das Gefühl, sah das wie ein Lichtmikroskop aus? Natürlich nicht, es sah aus wie ein Rasterkraftmikroskop aus. Ich wollte die Brechungsgrenze für Lichtmikroskope besiegen, die wie ein Mikroskop aussehen und wie ein Lichtmikroskop arbeiten – etwas, was niemand vorhersah. Und so versuchte ich damit mein Glück in Heidelberg, aber ich fand keine Stelle dafür. Aber ich hatte das Glück, jemand zu treffen, der mir die Chance gab, hier in Turku, in Finnland zu arbeiten. Ich wollte eigentlich nicht dorthin, aber ich hatte keine Wahl, und so landete ich dort. Im Herbst ‘93, an einem Samstagmorgen, machte ich, was ich immer machte: Ich durchsuchte Lehrbücher, um ein Phänomen zu finden, das mich jenseits der Barriere brachte. Ich öffnete dieses Lehrbuch in der Hoffnung, etwas Quantenoptisches zu finden: gequentschtes Licht, verschränkte Photonenpaare und solche Sachen. Und ich öffnete diese Seite und sah 'stimulierte Emission'. Und plötzlich traf es mich wie ein der Blitz und ich sagte: Toll, das könnte ein Phänomen sein, das mich jenseits der Barriere bringt, wenigstens für die Fluoreszenzmikroskopie. Und ich sage Ihnen jetzt, warum ich so fasziniert war. Ich ging zurück ins Labor und führte einige Berechnungen durch, um die Idee zu erklären. Ich sagte, dass man die Tatsache nicht ändern kann, dass all diese Moleküle mit Licht geflutet werden. Und daher würden sie normalerweise diesen Lichtfleck hier erzeugen. Das können wir natürlich nicht ändern. Wir könnten aber vielleicht die Tatsache ändern, dass die Moleküle, die alle mit Licht geflutet werden, mit Anregungslicht, am Ende in der Lage sind, Licht am Detektor zu erzeugen. Anders ausgedrückt, wenn man es fertigbringt, diese Moleküle hier in einen Zustand versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich diese separieren, die die können von denen, die nicht können. Und daher, wenn ich in der Lage wäre, diese Moleküle in einen stillen Zustand zu versetzen, wo sie kein Licht beim Detektor erzeugen können, dann kann ich dieses Molekül vom Rest trennen. Die Idee ist daher, wie ich gesagt habe, nicht mit der Fokussierung zu spielen, sondern mit den Zuständen der Moleküle. Das war daher die entscheidende Idee: die Moleküle im dunklen Zustand zu halten. Und ich sagte, was sind die dunklen Zustände bei einem fluoreszierenden Molekül? Ich schaute auf das grundlegende Energiediagramm. Es gibt den Grundzustand und den angeregten Zustand. Der angeregte Zustand ist natürlich ein heller Zustand. Aber der Grundzustand ist ein dunkler Zustand, weil das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, wenn es im Grundzustand ist. Das ist ziemlich offensichtlich. Und nun raten Sie, warum ich so aufgeregt war. Ich wusste, dass stimulierte Emission genau dies machte: Moleküle erzeugen, die im Grundzustand sind, Moleküle vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand schicken. Ich bin an dem stimulierten Photon natürlich nicht interessiert. Aber ich bin an Tatsache interessiert, dass das Phänomen der stimulierten Emission Moleküle im dunklen Zustand erzeugt. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich. Man hat eine Linse, man hat eine Probe, man hat einen Detektor, man hat Licht, um die Moleküle anzuschalten. Also regen wir sie an, bringen sie zur Fluoreszenz, sie gehen in den hellen Zustand über. Und dann haben wir natürlich einen Strahl, um die Moleküle abzuschalten. Wir schicken sie vom hellen Zustand zurück zum Grundzustand, damit sie sozusagen nach Belieben den Grundzustand sofort einnehmen. Und die Bedingung, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang passiert, ist natürlich, dass man darauf achtet, dass es bei dem Molekül ein Photon gibt, wenn das Molekül angeregt wird. Anders gesagt, man benötigt eine bestimmte Intensität, um den spontanen Zerfall der Fluoreszenz zu übertreffen. Also muss man dahin ein Photon innerhalb von dieser Lebenszeit von einer Nanosekunde bringen. Das bedeutet, dass man eine bestimmte Intensität haben muss, die hier gezeigt ist, die Intensität des stimulierenden Strahls. Man muss eine bestimmte Intensität beim Molekül haben, um sicherzustellen, dass dieser Übergang wirklich stattfindet. Und dies ist eine Besetzungswahrscheinlichkeit des angeregten Zustands als Funktion der Helligkeit des stimulierenden Strahls. Und wenn man diese Schwelle einmal erreicht hat, kann man sicher sein, dass das Molekül kein Licht emittieren kann, obwohl es dem grünen Licht ausgesetzt ist. Natürlich gibt es ein stimuliertes Photon, das hierhin fliegt, aber das kümmert uns nicht. Weil uns nur interessiert, dass das Molekül nicht vom Detektor gesehen wird. Und daher können wir Moleküle nur durch die Präsenz des stimulierenden Strahls abschalten. Und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, dass wir nicht alle Moleküle hier in der Beugungszone abschalten wollen, weil das unklug wäre. Also was machen wir? Wir modifizieren den Strahl, sodass er nicht in eine Flächenscheibe fokussiert ist, in einen Fleck, sondern in einen Ring. Und dies kann sehr leicht über eine phasenmodifizierende Maske hier drin gemacht werden, die eine Phasenverschiebung in der Wellenfront generiert. Und dann erhalten wir einen Ring hier drin, der die Moleküle in der Präsenz der roten Intensität abschaltet. Aber jetzt lassen Sie uns natürlich annehmen, dass wir nur die Moleküle hier im Zentrum sehen wollen. Also müssen wir dieses und jenes abschalten. Was machen wir? Wir können den Ring nicht kleiner machen, weil auch er durch die Beugung begrenzt wird. Aber wir müssen das auch gar nicht tun, weil wir mit dem Zustand spielen können, das ist der Punkt. Wir machen den Strahl hell genug, sodass sogar in dem Bereich, in dem der rote Strahl schwach ist. Tatsächlich ist er hier im Zentrum null. Wo der rote Strahl in absolutem Maßstab schwach ist, ist jenseits der Schwelle, weil ich nur diesen Schwellwert benötige, um das Molekül abzuschalten. So erhöhe ich die Intensität so weit, dass nur eine kleine Region übrig bleibt, wo die Intensität unter der Schwelle bleibt. Und dann sehe ich nur diese Moleküle im Zentrum. Jetzt ist es offensichtlich, dass ich Merkmale trennen kann, die näher sind als die Beugungsgrenze. Weil diejenigen, die innerhalb der Beugungsgrenze nahe dran sind, vorübergehend abgeschaltet werden. Nun können Sie sagen: Was ich hier mache, ist, dass ich die Nichtlinearität dieses Übergangs sozusagen benutze. Aber das ist die altmodische Denkweise, die Denkweise des 20. Jahrhunderts. Und sie ist kein gutes Bild, weil es bei Nichtlinearität um die Photonenanzahl geht: dass viele hineingehen, dass viele herauskommen, oder weniger oder mehr. Hier geht es um Zustände. Um Ihnen das klar zu machen, entferne ich jetzt den Ring. Was wir machen, ist, die Moleküle innerhalb der Beugungszone in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen zu paaren. Sie sehen hier, dass die Moleküle gezwungen werden, die gesamte Zeit im Grundzustand zu verbringen, weil sie sofort zurückgestoßen werden, sobald sie hochkommen. Diese sind daher immer im Grundzustand. Dagegen dürfen jene im Zentrum den An-Zustand annehmen, den angeregten elektronischen Zustand. Und weil sie in 2 unterschiedlichen Zuständen sind, können wir sie trennen. Und auf diesem Weg werden in diesem Konzept Merkmale getrennt. Ich habe den Ring nur weggenommen, um Klarheit zu schaffen, sodass Sie die Notwendigkeiten sehen können, die Unterschiede in den Zuständen. Aber jetzt lege ich ihn zurück, damit Sie nicht vergessen, dass er da ist. Und jetzt könnten Sie sagen: Na gut, schlaue Idee. Die Leute werden begeistert sein, wenn ich das veröffentliche - was das nicht der Fall. Ich ging zu vielen Konferenzen, teilweise aus eigener Tasche bezahlt, weil ich ein armer Mensch war. Aber niemand glaubte wirklich an diese linsenbasierte Auflösung im Nanomaßstab. Es gab einfach zu viele falsche Propheten im 20. Jahrhundert, die das versprachen, aber nie lieferten. Und so sagten sie, warum sollte der Typ von hier erfolgreich sein. Das Überleben war daher sehr schwierig. Um zu überleben, verkaufte ich eine Lizenz, persönliche Patente, an eine Firma, und sie gaben mir im Austausch Forschungsgeld. Aber eine Sache möchte ich betonen: Ich war viel glücklicher als während meiner Doktorarbeit, weil ich das machen konnte, was ich wollte. Ich war von dem Problem fasziniert. Ich hatte eine Passion für meine Arbeit. Und auch wenn es schwierig war, wenn man sich die Fakten ansieht, machte ich es gern. Und so wurde ich erfolgreich. Am Ende entdeckte mich jemand von hier am Max-Planck-Institut in Göttingen. Und dann entwickelten wir es. Am Ende war es natürlich auch eine Teamanstrengung, über die Zeit. Und jetzt haben Sie diese Folie gesehen, sie ist bereits ein Klassiker geworden. Zunächst sah es so aus, und jetzt sieht es so aus - dies sind Kernporenkomplexe. Und man sieht sehr schön diese achtfache Symmetrie. Und ich vergleiche sie immer noch sehr gern mit der vorherigen Auflösung, muss ich zugeben. Und es ist sehr offensichtlich, dass am Ende die Methode funktionierte. Nicht nur funktionierte sie, natürlich kann man sie auch anwenden. Und dies ist die erste Anwendung auf Viren. Wenn man ein HIV-Teilchen hat - man hat hier beispielsweise Proteine, die interessant sind. Wie sind sie hier auf der Virenhülle verteilt? Wenn man nur die beugungslimitierte Mikroskopie nimmt, kann man es nicht sehen. Aber wenn man, sagen wir STED oder hochauflösende Abbildung, sieht man, wie sie Muster formen, alle Arten von Muster. Und was man dann herausgefunden hat, ist dass die, die in der Lage sind, die nächste Zelle zu infizieren, ihre Proteine, diese Proteine, an einer einzigen Stelle haben. Also lernt man etwas. Man kann auch dynamische Dinge mit schlechter Auflösung sehen, wenn man die Superauflösung nicht hat, das STED. Aber jetzt sieht man, wie Dinge sich bewegen, und man kann etwas über Bewegung lernen. So, dies ist eine Stärke des Lichtmikroskops. Eine weitere Stärke des Lichtmikroskops ist, natürlich, dass man in die Zelle fokussieren kann, wie angedeutet, und dreidimensionale Bilder aufnehmen kann. Und hier sehen Sie eine dreidimensionale Interpretation des Streckens eines Neurons. Nur um zu zeigen, was man damit als Methode machen kann. Die Methode wird in hunderten unterschiedlichen Laboratorien angewendet und ich werde Sie nicht mit Biologie langweilen. Ich komme auf eine eher physikalische Frage zurück und rede über die Auflösung. Und Sie werden fragen, was ist die Auflösungsgrenze, die wir jetzt haben? Zunächst, die erzielbare Auflösung wird nicht die Abbesche Auflösung sein. Weil offensichtlich die Auflösung durch die Region bestimmt wird, in der das Molekül seinen An-Zustand annehmen kann, den Fluoreszenzzustand, und der wird kleiner. Und das hängt natürlich von der Helligkeit des Strahls ab, der maximalen Intensität, und von der Schwelle, die natürlich ein Merkmal der Licht-Molekülwechselwirkung ist, natürlich molekülabhängig. Wenn man sie berechnet oder misst, findet man, dass dies wie gezeigt umgekehrt zum Verhältnis I geteilt durch IS. IS ist daher die Schwelle und I die angewandte Intensität. Und so kann man die räumliche Auflösung zwischen hoch und niedrig tunen, indem wir nur diese Region vergrößern oder verkleinern. Und dies ist sehr nützlich, weil man die räumliche Auflösung an das Problem anpassen kann, das man sich anschaut. Und das funktioniert nicht nur in der Theorie, es funktioniert auch in der Praxis. Hier haben wir etwas, es wird immer klarer, je höher man mit der Intensität geht. Man kann es natürlich auch herunterregeln, man kann es heraufregeln, oder man kann die Beugungsschranke so überspringen. Und daher ist dies ein wichtiges Merkmal. Aber schließlich sagt die Gleichung, d wird null, was heißt das? Wenn man 2 Moleküle hat und sie sind sehr nah, dann kann man sie nicht auseinanderhalten, weil sie zur selben Zeit emittieren können, wie man hier sieht. Was müssen wir machen, um sie zu trennen? Wir schalten dieses hier ab, so dass nur eins hereinpasst. Und dann können wir sie trennen, indem wir sie zeitlich hintereinander sehen. Warum? Weil wir den Rest abschalten und wir nur eins davon in diesem Fall sehen können. Und die Auflösungsgrenze ist am Ende die Größe des Moleküls. Nun, bei organischen Molekülen haben wir sie noch nicht erreicht. Aber man kann das bei bestimmten Molekülen, Arten der Moleküle, wie Defekte in Kristallen, wo man an und aus spielen kann. Und das ist klarerweise eine Begrenzung in diesem Konzept: wie oft man an und aus spielen kann. Man kann sehr, sehr kleine, sagen wir, Regionen zeigen - wie in diesem Fall 2,4 Nanometer. Man muss das daher ernst nehmen. Dies ist ein kleiner Bruchteil der Wellenlänge, und schließlich wird es auf 1 Nanometer hinuntergehen, da bin ich sehr zuversichtlich. Es gibt also andere Anwendungen. Beispielsweise gibt es, wie Sie erkannt haben, Stickstoff-Fehlstellen in Diamanten. Dies hat Implikationen für die magnetische Abtastung, Quanteninformation und so weiter. Es gibt also mehr als Biologie. Um das auf den Punkt zu bringen: Die Entdeckung war nicht, dass man stimulierte Emission machen sollte. Es war mir klar, dass es mehr als nur stimulierte Emission gibt, stimulierte Emission ist nur das erste Beispiel. Die Entdeckung war, dass man an und aus mit dem Molekülen spielen kann, um sie zu trennen. Das war für mich offensichtlich. Und obwohl stimulierte Emission natürlich sehr grundsätzlich ist – es ist die fundamentalste Ausschaltung, die man sich in einem Fluorophor vorstellen kann –, kann man auch andere Dinge ausspielen, wie die Moleküle in einen langlebigen dunklen Zustand zu versetzen. Es gibt mehr Zustände, als nur den ersten elektronisch angeregten Zustand. Oder, wenn Sie ein wenig Ahnung von Chemie haben, wissen Sie, dass Sie mit der Repositionierung von Atomen spielen können. Wie beispielsweise diese Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung wie hier. Und wenn eine davon, die Cis, beispielsweise fluoreszierend ist und man Licht auf sie scheint, fluoresziert sie. Oder wenn das Trans nicht fluoresziert, emittiert es kein Licht, wenn es im Trans-Modus ist. Man kann also an und aus mit den Cis- und Trans-Zuständen spielen. Ich hatte Schwierigkeiten, das zu veröffentlichen, darum steht hier ‘95 und nicht ‘94. Und sogar das wurde zurückgewiesen. Das ist also ein Reviewpaper, in dem ich das aufschrieb, und der Grund war der folgende: Man verstand nicht die Logik, obwohl dies in den Veröffentlichungen klar erklärt war. Die Logik war sehr einfach. Nun vergessen Sie nicht, wir trennen, indem wir ein Molekül ein- und das andere abschalten. Und dann ist es natürlich extrem günstig, wenn die Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände lang ist oder relativ lang. Weil, wenn dies an und der Nachbar aus ist, muss ich mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell hineinzukriegen. Ich muss mich nicht beeilen, die Photonen hier schnell herauszuholen. Die Intensität, die ich hier anwenden muss, um daher diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen, Skalen herzustellen, ist natürlich umgekehrt zur Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Je länger die Lebenszeit, je höher die optische und Bio-Stabilität von etwas ist, desto weniger Intensität benötige ich. Die Schwellintensität wird also niedriger mit der Lebenszeit der involvierten Zustände. Das bedeutet, wenn dies hier 6 Größenordnungen größer wird, dann wird die Intensitätsschwelle 6 Größenordnungen kleiner. Und dies ist hier der Fall, weil wir wegen der langen Lebensdauern weniger Licht benötigen, um dieselbe Auflösung zu erzielen. Also wird das IS verkleinert und damit auch das I in der Gleichung. Insbesondere ein fluoreszierendes Protein zu schalten ist sehr, sehr attraktiv, einfach weil es schaltbare fluoreszierende Proteine gibt, die eine Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung machen. Und man kann die Beugungsgrenze bei sehr viel niedrigeren Lichtniveaus brechen. Das haben wir nach etwas Entwicklungsarbeit gezeigt. Es ist hier angezeigt, wenn man wenig Licht benötigt, dann könnte man doch sagen: Warum sollte ich nur einen Ring verwenden, wo ich doch viele dieser Ringe oder parallele Löcher nutzen könnte? Und daher wenden wir hier viele parallel an, um, sagen wir, eine Abschaltung durch Cis-Trans-Isomerisierung durchzuführen. Und man kann natürlich leicht das ganze Ding parallelisieren, indem man eine Kamera als Detektor nimmt und viele davon hat. Wenn sie weiter entfernt sind, dann ist die Beugungsgrenze kein Problem. Wir können sie immer trennen. Was wir daher hier machten, war, wir bildeten eine lebende Zelle mit mehr als 100.000 Ringen sozusagen in weniger als 2 Sekunden bei niedrigen Lichtniveaus ab. Der Grund warum ich Ihnen dies zeige: Es ist nicht mehr die Linse und der Detektor, die entscheidend sind, es ist der Zustandsübergang. Weil der Zustandsübergang, die Lebensdauer der Zustands, tatsächlich die Abbildungstechnik bestimmt, den Kontrast, die Auflösung – alles, was Sie sehen, dass der molekulare Übergang im Molekül das Entscheidende bei der Technik wird. Damit komme ich fast zum Ende. Was ist nötig, um die beste Auflösung zu erhalten? Angenommen, Sie hätten diese Frage im 20. Jahrhundert gestellt. Die Antwort wäre gewesen: Man benötigt ein gutes Objektiv – es ist ziemlich offensichtlich, weil man das Licht so gut wie möglich fokussieren muss. Also hätte man zu Zeiss oder Leica gehen müssen und um das beste Objektiv bitten. Aber wenn man natürlich die Merkmale trennt, indem man das Licht, wie ich erklärt habe, hier fokussiert oder dort, dann ist man offensichtlich durch die Beugung begrenzt. Weil man Licht nicht besser als bis zu einem gewissen Punkt fokussieren kann, der durch die Beugung bestimmt wird. Was war daher die Lösung des Problems? Die Lösung des Problems war, nicht durch das Phänomen der Fokussierung zu trennen, sondern zu trennen, indem man mit den molekularen Zuständen spielt. Hier trennen wir also nicht nur, indem wir den Brennpunkt so klein wie möglich machen – das brauchen wir nicht wirklich -, sondern indem wir eines der Moleküle oder eine Gruppe Moleküle in einem hellen Zustand haben, das (oder die) anderen in einem dunklen Zustand - 2 unterscheidbare Zustände. Ich habe Ihnen Beispiele für die Zustände genannt - und es gibt viele mehr die man sich vorstellen kann -, um diesen Unterschied in den Zuständen auszuspielen, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Und das ist der Punkt. Ich habe über die Methode 'STED' und die Ableitung von STED gesprochen. Sie verwendeten einen Lichtstrahl, um zu bestimmen, wo das Molekül im An-Zustand ist. Hier ist es im Zentrum an und hier ist es aus. Und es ist sozusagen eng kontrolliert, wo innerhalb der Probe das Molekül im An-Zustand und wo das Molekül im Aus-Zustand ist. Dies ist eines der Kennzeichen dieser Methode, die STED genannt wird, und ihrer Ableitungen. Wie Sie wissen, habe ich den Nobelpreis mit 2 Leuten geteilt. Eric Betzig entwickelte eine Methode, die auf einem fundamentalen Niveau mit der STED-Methode verwandt ist. Weil es auch diesen An-und-Aus-Übergang verwendet, um Dinge trennbar zu machen. Nun haben Sie hier 1 Molekül, der Rest ist dunkel. Aber der Hauptunterschied ist, dass nur 1 Molekül angeschaltet ist - das ist sehr kritisch. Und wenn man nur 1 Molekül im An-Zustand hat, dann hat man die Möglichkeit, die Position zu finden, indem man die von dem Molekül kommenden Photonen nutzt. Man nimmt daher einen Pixeldetektor, der Ihnen eine Koordinate gibt. Und wenn dieses Molekül das spezifische Merkmal besitzt, und es muss das haben, diesen An-Zustand, dann erzeugt es ein ganzes Bündel mit vielen Photonen. Man kann auch die Photonen, die hier emittiert werden, nutzen, um die Position herauszufinden. Man lokalisiert es hier, wie Steve Chu gestern zeigte. Man kann das sehr, sehr präzise durchführen, es gibt Ihnen die Koordinate. Aber der Zustandsunterschied ist unbedingt notwendig, um die Trennung durchzuführen. Dies gibt Ihnen daher die Koordinate. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Hier benötigt man viele Photonen hier. Man benötigt daher immer viele Photonen, um die Koordinate herauszufinden. - Warum? Weil ein Photon irgendwo in die Beugungszone fliegen würde. Aber wenn man viele Photonen hat, dann kann man natürlich den Mittelwert nehmen. Und dann kann man eine Koordinate sehr präzise definieren. Aber das ist nur die Definition der Koordinate. Das tatsächliche Element, dass es erlaubt, Merkmale zu trennen ist die Tatsache, dass eines der Moleküle hier im An-Zustand ist, der Rest ist aus. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese eine darf emittieren. Sie werden alle mit Licht angestrahlt, aber nur diese Gruppe darf emittieren. Der Rest ist dunkel. Wenn Sie also mich fragen - und als Physiker will man immer das eine Element herausfinden, das wirklich das Ding auf die Bühne stellt -, dann ist es der An-/Aus-Übergang. Ohne das, wenn man es herausnähme, würden keine der sogenannten Superauflösungskonzepte funktionieren. Und das ist das Fazit. Also warum trennen wir jetzt Merkmale, die vorher nicht getrennt werden konnten? Es ist ganz einfach, weil wir einen Zustandsübergang induziert haben, der uns eine Trennung liefert. Fluoreszierend und nicht-fluoreszierend, es ist nur eine Möglichkeit, diesen Zustandsübergang zu spielen. Es ist der Einfachste, weil man das fluoreszierende Molekül einfach stören kann. Wenn ich es mit etwas anderem hätte tun können, dann hätte ich das getan, keine Sorge. Ich wollte es nicht unbedingt für die Lebenswissenschaften machen. Aber dies bringt mich natürlich zu dem Punkt, dass es im 20. Jahrhundert um Linsen und die Fokussierung des Lichts ging. Heute sind es die Moleküle. Und man kann das rechtfertigen, indem man sagt, dass es eine Entdeckung der Chemie, ein Chemiepreis ist. Weil das Molekül nun in den Vordergrund rückt, sind die Zustände des Moleküls wichtig. Aber dieses Konzept kann umgesetzt werden. Natürlich kann man sagen, 2 unterschiedliche Zustände, A und B, aber es könnte auch etwas Absorbierendes sein, Nichtabsorbierendes, Streuung, Spin-Up, Spin-Down. Solange man die Zustände trennt, ist man innerhalb des Rahmens dieser Idee. Nun, die Abbesche Beugungsgrenze. Die Gleichung bleibt nicht gültig, man kann das leicht korrigieren, ohne Probleme. Man kann diesen Wurzelfaktor einsetzen, und dann können wir auf die molekulare Größenordnung hinuntergehen. Und das bedeutet als eine Einsicht: Das Missverständnis war, dass Leute annahmen, für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie wären nur Wellen wichtig. Aber das stimmt nicht. Für die Auflösung in der Mikroskopie sind Wellen und Zustände wichtig. Und wenn man es im Licht der Möglichkeiten der Zustände sieht, dann wird die Lichtmikroskopie sehr, sehr kraftvoll. Und das ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte. Es gibt noch mehr zu entdecken. Zum Schluss möchte ich die Leute herausstellen, die wichtige Beiträge zu dieser Entwicklung gemacht haben. Einige sind weggegangen und sind Professoren an anderen Institutionen, einige sind noch in meinem Labor und arbeiten mit mir oder haben eigene Firmen aufgebaut. Nun, noch eine Sache – es ist das Letzte, das ich am Ende erwähnen möchte: Sie sollten nicht vergessen, dass es nicht dieser Typ war, der die Idee hatte, es war der hier. Vielen Dank.

Stefan Hell on the Abbe limit
(00:03:55 - 00:06:23)

 

Ruska demonstrated that by using a stream of electrons instead of light, he would be able to surpass this diffraction limit and observe finer objects than optical microscopy would allow. Ruska was unacquainted with de Broglie’s 1925 thesis on the wave theory of electrons. As Ruska himself remembered in his Nobel lecture, “ (...) I was very much disappointed that now even at the electron microscope the resolution should be limited again by a wavelength (of the "Materiestrahlung"). I was immediately heartened, though, when with the aid of the de Broglie equation I became satisfied that these waves must be around five orders of magnitude shorter in length than light waves. Thus, there was no reason to abandon the aim of electron microscopy surpassing the resolution of light microscopy.” The electron microscope made visualising single molecules or even atoms possible, and, to quote Ruska, “many scientific disciplines today can reap its benefits”. Ruska won the Nobel prize in 1986, with Heinrich Rohrer and Gerd Binnig. He was going to attend the 38th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Physics in 1988, but sadly passed away one month before the meeting.

What is interesting to note is that, while it became possible to see particular cells and even protein structures, before the advance of computers, there weren’t any possibilities to immortalise the microworld under the lens. Biologists and materials scientists were aided by artists, who were able to colourfully convey the complex architecture to others using sketches and paintings. Kurt Wüthrich pays a tribute to one such artist, Irving Geis, in his lecture in 2016:

 

Kurt Wüthrich (2016) - NMR in Physics, Structural Biology and Medical Diagnosis

Well, thank you, Astrid. I think I should say right at the outset that we are now going to talk about down-to-earth science. NMR stands for nuclear magnetic resonance. And I am going to discuss how this physics phenomenon is presently used in structural biology and structural chemistry as well as in medical diagnoses. I’ll spend the first few minutes trying to give you an impression of what we can do with nuclear magnetic resonance today – on the one hand from studying intact bodies on the other hand studying molecules. Here you have protein structure in light blue, a drug molecule attached to it. Then you take the drug away, you can study the surface of the protein and try in a rational way to improve existing drugs or discover new drugs. Now, the special thing about using NMR for such studies is that we work in solution. You will see in the following talks this morning that crystallography, or more recently cryo-electron microscopy, makes pictures of such molecules in some ways similar to taking photographic pictures. For us the question arises, how can we make a short picture if those particles are in solution and undergo random stochastic motions on a nanosecond timescale? Another application of the NMR principle helps to see bodily harm. Now, you see this is my right knee in ’89, so about 20-some years ago. And I need to have a look at my knee. And I still have to have a look at my knee. You see Peter Badge took a lot of photographs of me, once during a training session some 10 months ago. And my knee still looks ok. Comparing knee to knee in 1989 and now in February 29 of this year shows that the knee is still ok. So I continue to play football. And you also see the advance made from ’89 to 2016 in the quality of the pictures that we get. Now here the physics question arises, why do we get contrast? Why do we get good contrast in these images? Why can we distinguish between bone and tendons and muscles and water? And actually, it is so that we only see the water and all the remainders of the imagine are inferred from observing the water. What is the physics basis for this? Well, this goes a long way back. In 1827 an English botanist, Mr. Brown, made the following observation. He carelessly dropped pollen from his plants. He was a botanist so he had pollen and he dropped pollen into a beaker with water. And the pollen broke so he had pieces of variable size. And then he looked at this mess under the microscope. And in contrast to his expectations those smaller and larger particles didn’t stand still in the water. They moved laterally and they moved in random ways. And he published this in 1827 and had no idea as to the background of this observation. And now you will be surprised. This is Robert Brown who solved the problem. Einstein – this is hardly ever mentioned among physicists. What happened in 1905 is that Einstein started this year with a publication that analysed the lateral diffusion as observed under the microscope by Mr. Brown about 100 years earlier. That was also in many ways the start of statistical mechanics. I mean the key is that he understood that the thermal motion, the thermal energy of the solvent consisting of much smaller molecules than these particles that Mr. Brown observed, are the reason for the stochastic translational diffusion that Brown observed. Then I think Einstein must have been distracted by other work, much less important for me, such as the special relativity theory which he published in July. And then the magnet optic effect which he published in August. And then he sat down again to do serious work and in December he published a second paper. It must have taken him a few months to realise that if he had this coupling between the thermal agitation of the solvent molecules and solute, that this must induce not only translational diffusion but also rotational diffusion. And so he published the second paper on the rotational Brownian motion in December of 1905. So that was the 4th paper of Einstein’s production of that year. And that is the key to understanding what we see in NMR and how we can conduct and continuously improve the NMR techniques in solution. And the relation that goes down to very simple principles. We have the Stokes-Einstein relation which essentially says that there is a correlation time that describes the length during which a particle keeps memory of his past and that this correlation time is proportional to the third power of the radius of the particle, if you represent the particle with an equivalent sphere. And then the size of the particle determines all the relevant NMR parameters, longitudinal, transverse, relaxation time and the nuclear Overhauser effect. Now it is so that depending on the relative frequency of the rotational Brownian motion and the Larmor frequency used to observe the NMR signal we either are in spin physics of conservative transitions or dissipative transitions. And the reason why we can determine NMR structures of proteins is that we are in this regime. In this regime it would be literally impossible, or at least very much more difficult, that is the regime of small molecules. I mean water would fall into here. And so we now understand why we see contrast in imaging. So water molecules in our body still move rapidly and give a sharp signal. Bones, muscles, tendons are far beyond good and bad. They don’t move at all. The signals are gone. And that’s why we can do magnetic resonance imaging observing only the water molecule. On the other hand, if we want to use NMR in structural biology, we have to make sure that we are in the regime of conservative transitions between the spin levels. Actually, that was the most important thing I had to say today. And let me now briefly remind you of what NMR is all about. The simplest case is when you look at the spin-½, you have 2 eigenstates. And in the absence of a magnetic field the 2 states of a spin-½ are degenerate, cannot be distinguished. In 1896 Zeeman observed in optical spectra that there was fine structure splitting - it’s a very small energy. And he actually lost his job, that’s important for the students here. Zeeman was a graduate student and, for some reason that I think nobody can really understand, he had to study the optical spectra of some materials. And his thesis advisor had strictly prohibited the use of magnetic field for these experiments. He disobeyed, put the sample into a magnetic field and observed the Zeeman effect. Then he lost his job and 6 years later he got the Nobel Prize. And his thesis advisor lost his job and he became director of the institute. (Laughter) That’s a very important message. So Zeeman observed the splitting. Now, this splitting is of very low energy in the radio frequency range. And there was no way to directly observe transitions between this level until after World War 2 where hordes of scientists came back from the US army, having worked on radar developments. And they had the techniques available to observe these very low energy transitions between the Zeeman levels of nuclear spins and in parallel also between the corresponding levels of electron spin. So here you see Pieter Zeeman. It is perhaps also interesting to notice that Albert Einstein visited Zeeman in his lab, sometime around 1920. So you see networking was important a long time ago. Then, as I mentioned, after the war Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell, who got the Physics Nobel Prize in 1952, were able to directly detect the transitions between the 2 energy levels of spin-½ nuclei. Now, if you look at water, you see only one line. Let’s assume oxygen has no spin, for our purpose we have a spin-½ in 2 equivalent hydrogen atoms of the water and that gives a single line. That seems reasonably uninteresting. I have worked several years in the 1960s looking at this line. And what actually today are contrast agents in MRI, we didn’t know this at the time. You just add paramagnetic particles and observe how this affected the parameters in the water. Others had a much smarter idea which is the following: In addition to the external magnetic field, they would apply a magnetic field gradient across microscopic objects. So we always see only the water. That’s too simple. So the spectrum had to be made more complicated. So you take about 100 recordings across the head, at an always slightly different field. That means when you go across the head, the resonance condition changes. And when you get 3 lines with 3 different positions of the head you do this in 3 dimensions. And then you develop some mathematical tools and you get images. Now you see it can also be done of the head, not only of the knee. Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield got the Medicine Prize in 2003 for this achievement. And you can see such a magnet is quite a frightening thing to look at. Even today there is an awful lot of noise when you are inside. It’s like being subjected to the noise of a machine gun. I was amazed when I went back into it in February that this has not improved. Now, when we worked in this field early on we worked with new born infants. This was in the 1980s. We didn’t have a whole-body magnet, we had a smaller magnet which could be used for babies up to about 1 year old. But usually we would study babies that had between age 2 days and 3 weeks, usually with heavy trauma to the head. And we couldn’t sedate these kids with chemicals. We had to ask the parents to come in and just hold the baby until it fell asleep and we could push it into the magnet. Now, the parents were extremely frightened about the magnet. And so we built a fairy house. (Laughter. Applause) This is Chris Boesch, a physics student who is now head of radiology at the University of Bern. Now let’s turn to structural biology. I give you a few years so that you see the chronological development. This picture is from 1969. It shows a particular protein, cytochrome c. There were no computers which could make a drawing. That was long in the future. So there was an artist, Irving Geis, who would prepare drawings and paintings of the molecules based on the atomic coordinates that had at that time been determined by X-ray crystallography. There is a museum in New York with about 300 of these paintings. Now we have a different situation. Before we were looking at the water we had to make the water spectrum more complicated in 3 dimensions, in each dimension 100 recordings. And that gives a reasonably complex spectrum to deal with. Now, here the macro molecule presents us with a complex spectrum and 100s of lines overlap. You see, it should be like this but that’s what it was. So some other way it had to be done and that is to introduce an artificial time axis and to go from one-dimensional to multi-dimensional NMR. And then you have to sell this. So we had in 1982 in collaboration with Richard Ernst we had COSY, NOESY, SECSY and FOCSY. This you can sell. SECSY stands for spin-echo correlated spectroscopy. If you use this word 300 times in a publication nobody will read it. And that’s how a 2-dimensional spectrum looks. You see now you have the added artificial time axis, a 2-dimensional Fourier transformation gets us into 2-dimensional frequency space. But now the lines that all used to be on the single frequency axis move out into the plain and are reasonably well separated. And Richard Ernst got the Chemistry Nobel Prize in 1991. Then we had to do something with these well-resolved spectra. And the problem now is that the particle of which we want to get a high-resolution structure moves at random frequencies - I am not talking about momentum or similar, it is stochastic movements in the frequency range of 10^-11 to 10^-9 or there abouts. So the solution to the problem is to find parameters that determine the structure but are invariant on the rotational and translational motion. And one such quantity is the distance between 2 atoms. This is a scale and as long as the structure stays intact they can translate and rotate at any frequency. So the distance will remain the same. And that was the solution to the problem: with the so-called nuclear Overhauser effect we can measure the inverse 6 power of the distance between atoms inside a micro molecule. And then we have the correlation function which we could read in ways that would not interfere with these distance measurements. And with the 2-dimensional experiments we will get plenty of peaks. Each peak represents a distance between 2 atoms in the structure. And all it needed was a few years of developing algorithms that could then transfer the high-dimensional distance space back into 3-dimensional space where we could present the structures. And that was the first structure that we had solved in 1984. And that was then also good enough for a trip to Stockholm, much, much later of course. Ok, the final thing which is perhaps also of some interest for physicists is that when we went into the conservative regime of spin physics we were in good shape to work with small molecules, such as the one that I had shown before. But then we would - this is an old picture, it shows the size distribution of the proteins for which the structure had been studied. It goes up to about 30 kilodalton and that was the end of it. You see there are a lot of membrane proteins. You will hear more about this from my colleagues who use crystallography for these studies. But in order to be able to apply the method to membrane proteins, we had to beat that size limit and be able to work in the range from 60 kilodalton upward. And for this we would study systems of 2 coupled spins-½, typically 15N and 1H or it could also be done with methyl groups out on the periphery of amino acid side chains. But you need microbiology to introduce nitrogen 15 at high concentration into the polypeptide chain. When you have a 2-spin-½ system you get 4 transitions between the combined eigenstate of which now is a spin system of spin-1. And it turns out that only 1 of the 4 transitions is under certain circumstances coupled to the Brownian motion. One of the transitions can be uncoupled from the Brownian motion and that then enables to beat the size limit. Here you see the fine-structure of a peak of such a nitrogen 15 hydrogen group. And you can see that one of the 4 components, I am talking about these 4 transitions: So the point was to select this peak only, throw away 75% of the intensity and gain about a factor of 50 in the end. And that led to TROSY in 1997, Transverse Relaxation Optimised Spectroscopy. I mean you can just write out the evolution of single transition basis operators, then you have a few relaxation terms which destroys the spectrum when you go to large molecules. And there you have 2 of these relaxation terms which include the difference between a dipole-dipole coupling and the so-called chemical-shift anisotropy coupling. Now it is so that the chemical-shift anisotropy coupling is very strongly dependent on the magnetic field, here given as corresponding hydrogen resonant frequency, whereas the dipole coupling is essentially invariant, to a very good approximation invariant, of the strength of the magnetic field. Now, this had been recognised long ago, in the 1960s. But then the highest available magnetic field was here. So there was no use for this theory. And then by 1997 we had the magnet here and then p minus Delta vanishes and 1 of the 4 components in the 2-spin system is now uncoupled from the Brownian motion. And we could go as far as studying particles of 1 million molecular weight in solution, such as the complex of GroEL with GroES, and we will get this sort of a spectrum. And I hope that, even speaking about terrestrial experiments, I could give you an impression of the importance of basic physics research for practical applications. I mean the use of NMR today has major impact in medical diagnoses. Football would be essentially impossible today if the MRI were not available for the players after the game. And it plays an important role, jointly with X-ray crystallography, in providing the basis for rational drug design and improvement of existing drugs. And I am impressed, actually, and very happy to be in this field, which shows that basic research that dates back 200 years to Mr. Brown, who dropped his pollen into a water beaker, led to applications which can now day to day make improvements to the quality of human life. And I think we should remind our politicians how important it was that Einstein had the liberty of working on the Brownian motion long before having an idea that there would ever be an NMR experiment. Zeeman had no idea that there would be an NMR experiment, not to speak of Mr. Brown. And I think you might want to take this along and keep enthusiastic about doing basic research in physics. Thank you.

Vielen Dank, Astrid. Ich sollte gleich hier am Anfang erwähnen, dass wir jetzt über bodenständige Wissenschaft sprechen werden. NMR ist die Abkürzung für nuclear magnetic resonance, oder auf Deutsch Kernspinresonanz oder magnetische Kernresonanz. Ich werde darüber sprechen, wie dieses physikalische Phänomen derzeit in der Strukturbiologie und der Strukturchemie sowie in der medizinischen Diagnostik eingesetzt wird. Ich werde die ersten paar Minuten versuchen, Ihnen einen Eindruck zu vermitteln, was wir heute mit der Kernspinresonanz machen können – einerseits bei der Untersuchung intakter Körper und andererseits bei der Untersuchung von Molekülen. Hier ist eine Proteinstruktur in hellem Blau mit einem angehängten Pharmamolekül. Dann entfernt man das Medikament, man kann die Oberfläche des Moleküls untersuchen und versuchen, auf rationalem Weg existierende Medikamente zu verbessern oder neue Medikamente zu entwickeln. Nun, das Spezielle bei der Benutzung der NMR für solche Untersuchungen ist, dass wir in Lösung arbeiten. Sie werden in den folgenden Vorträgen heute Morgen sehen, dass die Kristallografie oder in jüngster Zeit die Kryo-Elektronenmikroskopie Bilder solcher Moleküle macht, die in mancher Hinsicht der Aufnahme eines Fotos ähnlich ist. Für uns stellt sich die Frage, wie wir ein schnelles Bild machen können, wenn diese Partikel in Lösung sind und schnelle, zufällige Bewegungen auf der Nanosekundenskala durchführen? Eine weitere Anwendung des NMR-Prinzips hilft, Körperverletzungen zu sehen. Hier sehen Sie mein rechtes Knie im Jahr 1989, also vor etwas mehr als 20 Jahren. Ich muss einen Blick auf mein Knie werfen. Ich muss immer noch einen Blick auf mein Knie werfen. Wissen Sie, Peter Badge machte einmal während einer Trainingssitzung vor etwa 10 Monaten eine Menge Aufnahmen von mir. Mein Knie sieht immer noch gut aus. Wenn man mein Knie im Jahr 1989 mit dem am 29. Februar dieses Jahres vergleicht, zeigt sich, dass es immer noch gut ist. Also werde ich weiter Fußball spielen. Sie sehen also den Fortschritt, den wir in der Qualität der erhaltenen Bilder zwischen 1989 und 2016 erzielt haben. Nun stellt sich die physikalische Frage, wo kommt der Kontrast her? Warum erhalten wir auf diesen Bildern einen guten Kontrast? Warum können wir zwischen Knochen und Bändern und Muskeln und Wasser unterscheiden? Tatsächlich sehen wir nur Wasser, der Rest auf den Bildern ist eine Schlussfolgerung aus der Beobachtung des Wassers. Was ist die physikalische Grundlage dafür? Die Geschichte reicht lange zurück. Im Jahr 1827 machte ein englischer Botaniker, Mr. Brown, die folgende Beobachtung. Unvorsichtigerweise verschüttete er Pollen seiner Pflanzen. Er war ein Botaniker, also besaß er Pollen, und er ließ den Pollen in ein Glas Wasser fallen. Der Pollen zerbrach und er hatte unterschiedlich große Stücke. Und dann sah er sich das Durcheinander unter dem Mikroskop an. Entgegen seiner Erwartung verhielten sich diese kleineren und größeren Teilchen im Wasser nicht ruhig. Sie bewegten sich unregelmäßig hin und her. Er veröffentlichte dies im Jahr 1827 und hatte keine Idee, was der Hintergrund seiner Beobachtung war. Und jetzt werden Sie überrascht sein. Dies ist Robert Brown, der das Problem löste. Einstein – kaum jemals wird unter Physikern erwähnt, was 1905 passierte, nämlich dass Einstein das Jahr mit einer Veröffentlichung begann, die die laterale Diffusion untersuchte, wie sie unter dem Mikroskop von Mr. Brown etwa 100 Jahre vorher beobachtet wurde. In vielfacher Hinsicht was dies auch der Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Ich meine, der Schlüssel war, dass er verstand, dass die thermische Bewegung, die thermische Energie des Lösungsmittels, das aus viel kleineren Molekülen bestand als die, die Mr. Brown beobachtete, der Grund für die stochastische, translatorische Diffusion war, die Brown beobachtete. Damals muss Einstein durch andere Arbeit abgelenkt worden sein, viel weniger wichtig für mich, als die spezielle Relativitätstheorie, die er im Juli veröffentlichte. Und dann den magneto-optischen Effekt, den er im August veröffentlichte. Dann machte er sich wieder an ernste Arbeiten, und im Dezember hatte er eine zweite Veröffentlichung. Es muss ein paar Monate gedauert haben, bis er realisierte, dass er diese Kopplung zwischen der thermischen Agitation der Lösungsmittelmoleküle und dem Gelösten hatte, dass dies nicht nur eine Translationsdiffusion, sondern auch eine Rotationsdiffusion induzierte. Und so hatte er eine zweite Veröffentlichung über die Brownsche Rotationsbewegung im Dezember 1905. Das war also die vierte Veröffentlichung aus Einsteins Feder in dem Jahr. Diese ist der Schlüssel zum Verständnis, was wir in der NMR sehen und wie wir die NMR-Techniken in Lösung durchführen und kontinuierlich verbessern können. Und die Relation basiert auf sehr einfachen Prinzipien. Es gibt die Stokes-Einstein-Relation, die im Wesentlichen aussagt, dass es eine Korrelationszeit gibt, die die Zeitdauer beschreibt, in der ein Teilchen sich an seine Vergangenheit erinnert, und dass diese Korrelationszeit proportional zur dritten Potenz des Teilchenradius ist, wenn man ein Teilchen mit einer äquivalenten Kugel repräsentiert. Und dann bestimmt die Teilchengröße alle relevanten NMR-Parameter, längs, quer, Relaxationszeit und den Kern-Overhauser-Effekt. Es ist nun so, dass wir, abhängig von der relativen Frequenz der Brownschen Rotationsbewegung und der benutzten Larmorfrequenz, um das NMR-Signal zu beobachten, entweder in der Spinphysik der konservativen Übergänge sind oder bei dissipativen Übergängen. Und der Grund, warum wir NMR-Strukturen der Proteine bestimmen können, ist, dass wir in diesem Regime sind. In diesem Regime wäre es buchstäblich unmöglich oder wenigstens sehr viel schwieriger, das ist das Regime der kleinen Moleküle. Wasser würde hier hineinfallen. Daher verstehen wir jetzt, warum wir in der Abbildung Kontrast sehen. Wassermoleküle in unserem Körper bewegen sich immer noch schnell und liefern ein scharfes Signal. Knochen, Muskeln, Sehnen sind jenseits von Gut und Böse, sie bewegen sich überhaupt nicht. Die Signale sind weg. Deshalb können wir Kernspinresonanzabbildungen produzieren, indem wir nur Wassermoleküle beobachten. Auf der anderen Seite, wenn wir NMR in der Strukturbiologie verwenden wollen, dann müssen wir sicherstellen, dass wir in dem Regime der konservativen Übergänge zwischen Spinniveaus sind. Das war tatsächlich das Wichtigste, was ich heute sagen musste. Und darf ich Sie jetzt kurz daran erinnern, was NMR macht? Im einfachsten Fall schaut man sich den Spin ½ an, man hat 2 Eigenzustände. Wenn ein magnetisches Feld fehlt, sind die beiden Zustände des Spins ½ degeneriert, können nicht unterschieden werden. Im Jahr 1896 beobachtete Zeeman in optischen Spektren, dass es eine Feinstrukturaufspaltung gibt - es ist eine sehr kleine Energie. Er verlor tatsächlich seinen Job, das ist wichtig für die Studenten hier. Zeeman war Doktorand und musste aus einem Grund, den niemand wirklich versteht, die optischen Spektren irgendwelcher Materialien untersuchen. Sein Doktorvater hatte ihm streng verboten, ein magnetisches Feld für diese Experimente zu benutzen. Er war ungehorsam, stellte die Probe in ein magnetisches Feld und beobachtete den Zeeman-Effekt. Dann verlor er seinen Job und 6 Jahre später bekam er den Nobelpreis. Und sein Doktorvater verlor seinen Job und er wurde Direktor des Instituts. (Lachen) Das ist eine sehr wichtige Botschaft. Zeeman beobachtete also die Aufspaltung. Diese Aufspaltung hat eine sehr niedrige Energie im Hochfrequenzbereich. Es existierte keine Methode, diese Übergänge zwischen den Niveaus direkt zu beobachten, bis nach dem zweiten Weltkrieg Horden von Wissenschaftlern von der US-Armee zurückkamen, wo sie an der Radarentwicklung gearbeitet hatten. Sie hatten die Technik zur Verfügung, diese Übergänge zwischen den Zeeman-Niveaus des Kernspins und parallel dazu auch zwischen den entsprechenden Niveaus des Elektronenspins bei sehr niedrigen Energien zu beobachten. Hier sehen Sie Pieter Zeeman. Es ist vielleicht auch interessant anzumerken, dass Albert Einstein Zeeman in seinem Labor besucht hat, etwa um 1920. Sie sehen, Vernetzen war damals auch schon wichtig. Dann waren, wie schon erwähnt, nach dem Krieg Felix Bloch und Edward Purcell, die den Physik-Nobelpreis im Jahr 1952 erhielten, in der Lage, die Übergänge zwischen den 2 Energieniveaus der Spin-½-Kerne direkt nachzuweisen. Wenn Sie sich Wasser anschauen, sehen Sie nur eine Linie. Gehen wir mal davon aus, dass Sauerstoff keinen Spin hat: Für unsere Zwecke haben wir Spin ½ in 2 äquivalenten Wasserstoffatomen des Wassers und das ergibt eine einzige Linie. Das scheint einigermaßen uninteressant zu sein. Ich habe in den 1960ern mehrere Jahre daran gearbeitet, mir diese Linie anzusehen. Und was heute in der MRI die Kontrastmittel sind, kannten wir zu der Zeit nicht. Man gab paramagnetische Teilchen hinzu und beobachtete, wie dies die Parameter im Wasser beeinflusste. Andere hatten eine viel schlauere Idee, nämlich: Sie würden zusätzlich zum externen magnetischen Feld einen Magnetfeldgradienten über die mikroskopischen Objekte anwenden. Wie sehen daher immer nur Wasser. Das ist zu einfach. Das Spektrum musste komplizierter gemacht werden. Man nahm daher etwa 100 Aufnahmen über den gesamten Kopf, immer bei einem etwas anderen Feld. Das bedeutet, wenn man über den gesamten Kopf geht, dass die Resonanzbedingung sich ändert. Und wenn man 3 Linien mit 3 unterschiedlichen Positionen des Kopfes bekommt, macht man das in 3 Dimensionen. Dann entwickelt man mathematische Werkzeuge und bekommt Bilder. Nun sehen Sie, man kann es auch mit dem Kopf machen, nicht nur dem Knie. Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield erhielten den Medizin-Nobelpreis für diese Leistung im Jahr 2003. Sie können sehen, ein solcher Magnet ist ziemlich erschreckend anzuschauen. Sogar heute noch macht er einen fürchterlichen Krach, wenn man darin ist. Es ist, als wäre man dem Geräusch eines Maschinengewehrs ausgesetzt. Als ich im Februar wieder in einem drin war, war ich überrascht, dass das noch nicht verbessert hat. Als wir anfangs auf diesem Gebiet arbeiteten, arbeiteten wir mit Neugeborenen. Das war in den 1980er-Jahren. Wir hatten keinen Ganzkörpermagneten, wir hatten einen kleineren Magneten, den wir für Babys bis zu etwa 1 Jahr nehmen konnten. Aber üblicherweise untersuchten wir Babys im Alter zwischen 2 Tagen und 3 Wochen, meist Babys mit einer schweren Schädelverletzung. Wir konnten diese Kinder nicht chemisch sedieren. Wir mussten die Eltern bitten zu kommen und das Baby zu halten, bis es einschlief und wir es in den Magneten einschieben konnten. Die Eltern hatten fürchterliche Angst vor dem Magneten, und daher bauten wir ein Feenhaus. (Lachen. Applaus) Dies ist Chris Boesch, ein Physikstudent, der jetzt Leiter der Radiologie an der Universität Bern ist. Wenden wir uns nun der Strukturbiologie zu. Ich gehe durch ein paar Jahre, damit Sie die chronologische Entwicklung sehen. Dieses Bild ist aus dem Jahr 1969. Es zeigt ein spezielles Protein, Cytochrom c. Damals gab es keine Computer, die eine Zeichnung erstellen konnten, das war viel später. Es gab damals einen Künstler, Irving Geis, der Zeichnungen und Bilder der Moleküle basierend auf Atomkoordinaten erstellte, die damals von der Röntgenkristallografie bestimmt wurden. In New York ist ein Museum mit 300 dieser Bilder. Jetzt haben wir eine andere Situation. Vorhin haben wir uns Wasser angeschaut: Wir mussten das Wasserspektrum in 3 Dimensionen komplizierter machen, 100 Aufnahmen in jeder Dimension. Und das erzeugt ein vernünftig komplexes Spektrum für die Arbeit. Hier präsentieren uns die Makromoleküle mit einem komplexen Spektrum und hunderte von Linien überlappen. Sie sehen, es sollte so aussehen, aber so sah es aus. Man musste es also anders machen, und das heißt, eine künstliche Zeitachse musste eingeführt werden. Man musste von eindimensionaler zu vieldimensionaler NMR übergehen und dann musste man das verkaufen. In Zusammenarbeit mit Richard Ernst hatten wir im Jahr 1982 COSY, NOESY, SECSY und FOCSY. Das kann man verkaufen. SECSY ist die Abkürzung für spin-echo-korrelierte Spektroskopie (engl.: 'spin-echo correlated spectroscopy'). Wenn man dieses Wort 300 Mal in einer Veröffentlichung benutzt, liest sie niemand. Und so sieht ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aus. Sie sehen, wenn man die zusätzliche künstliche Zeitachse hat, dann bringt uns eine zweidimensionale Fourier-Transformation in den zweidimensionalen Frequenzraum. Aber jetzt haben sich die Linien, die alle auf der einzigen Frequenzachse waren, aus der Ebene herausbewegt und sind einigermaßen gut getrennt. Richard Ernst erhielt dafür den Chemie-Nobelpreis im Jahr 1991. Dann mussten wir etwas mit diesen gut aufgelösten Spektren machen. Das Problem jetzt ist, dass das Teilchen, für das wir hochauflösende Strukturbewegungen bei zufälligen Frequenzen – ich rede nicht über Impuls oder etwas Ähnliches, es sind stochastische Bewegungen im Frequenzbereich von ungefähr 10^-11 bis 10^-9 Hz. Die Problemlösung bestand also darin, Parameter zu finden, die die Struktur bestimmen, aber invariant sind zur Rotations- oder Translationsbewegung. Eine solche Größe ist der Abstand zwischen 2 Atomen. Dies ist eine Skala und solange die Struktur ganz bleibt, können sie bei jeder Frequenz Rotations- oder Translationsbewegungen ausführen. Der Abstand wird daher gleich bleiben. Und das war die Problemlösung, mit dem sogenannten Kern-Overhauser-Effekt konnten wir den inversen Abstand hoch sechs zwischen Atomen innerhalb eines Mikromoleküls messen. Und dann haben wir die Korrelationsfunktion, die wir auf eine Weise lesen konnten, die diese Abstandsmessungen nicht stören. Mit den zweidimensionalen Experimenten erhalten wir viele Peaks. Jeder Peak repräsentiert einen Abstand zwischen 2 Atomen in der Struktur. Und alles was wir noch benötigten, waren einige Jahre Entwicklungsarbeit, um die Algorithmen zu entwickeln, die dann den hochdimensionalen Abstandsraum zurück in den dreidimensionalen Raum transferieren, wo wir die Strukturen darstellen können. Dies war die erste Struktur, die wir 1984 aufgelöst hatten. Und das war dann gut genug für einen Ausflug nach Stockholm, viel, viel später natürlich. Gut, das letzte, was vielleicht auch für Physiker interessant ist, war, als wir in das konservative Regime der Spinphysik gingen, waren wir gut gerüstet, um mit kleinen Molekülen zu arbeiten, wie ich vorhin zeigte. Aber dann würden wir - dies ist ein altes Bild, es zeigt die Größenverteilung der Proteine, deren Struktur untersucht worden war. Es geht hoch bis 30 Kilodalton und das war das Ende. Sie sehen, es gibt eine Menge Membranproteine. Sie werden mehr davon von meinen Kollegen hören, die Kristallografie für diese Untersuchungen nutzen. Aber um die Methode auf Membranproteine anwenden zu können, mussten wir die Größenbegrenzung überwinden und im Bereich von 60 Kilodalton aufwärts arbeiten können. Dafür haben wir Systeme mit zwei gekoppelten Spins 1/2 untersucht, typischerweise 15N und 1H, oder es ginge auch mit Methylgruppen an der Peripherie der Aminosäurenseitenketten. Aber man benötigt Mikrobiologie, um Stickstoff-15 in hohen Konzentrationen in die Polypeptidkette einzuführen. Wenn man ein 2-Spin-½-System hat, erhält man 4 Übergänge zwischen den kombinierten Eigenzuständen, die nun ein Spinsystem mit Spin 1 sind. Und es stellt sich heraus, dass nur einer der 4 Übergänge unter bestimmten Umständen an die Brownsche Bewegung gekoppelt ist. Einer der Übergänge kann von der Brownschen Bewegung entkoppelt werden und das ermöglicht dann die Überwindung der Größenbegrenzung. Hier sehen Sie die Feinstruktur eines Peaks einer solchen Stickstoff-15-Wasserstoffgruppe. Und Sie können sehen, dass eine der 4 Komponenten, ich rede von diesen 4 Übergängen: Es ging darum, nur diesen Peak auszuwählen, 75 % der Intensität wegzuwerfen und einen Faktor von etwa 50 am Ende zu gewinnen. Das führte im Jahr 1997 zu TROSY, 'Transverse Relaxation Optimised Spectroscopy'. Man kann einfach die Entwicklung der Einzelübergangsbasisoperatoren ausschreiben, dann kommen ein paar Relaxationsterme dazu, die das Spektrum zerstören, wenn man zu großen Molekülen geht. Und hier sind 2 dieser Relaxationsterme, die den Unterschied zwischen Dipol-Dipol-Kopplung und der sogenannten chemischen Verschiebungs-Anisotropiekopplung einschließen. Die chemische Verschiebungs-Anisotropiekopplung hängt sehr stark vom Magnetfeld ab, hier als die entsprechende Wasserstoffresonanzfrequenz gezeigt, während die Dipol-Kopplung im Wesentlichen in guter Näherung invariant zur Stärke des Magnetfelds ist. Nun, das ist schon vor langer Zeit, in den 1960er-Jahren, erkannt worden. Aber damals war das größte verfügbare Magnetfeld hier. Die Theorie war also nicht zu gebrauchen. Und 1997 hatten wir diesen Magneten und dann verschwindet p minus Delta und eine der 4 Komponenten im 2-Spin-System ist jetzt von der Brownschen Bewegung entkoppelt. Wir könnten sogar Teilchen mit einem Molekulargewicht von 1 Million Dalton in Lösung untersuchen, wie den Komplex GroEL mit GroES, und diese Art Spektrum erhalten. Ich hoffe, auch wenn ich nur über irdische Experimente gesprochen habe, ich Ihnen einen Eindruck von der Wichtigkeit der Forschung in Grundlagenphysik für praktische Anwendungen vermitteln konnte. Die Nutzung von NMR hat heutzutage große Auswirkungen in der medizinischen Diagnostik. Fußball wäre im Wesentlichen heute unmöglich, wenn die MRI nicht für die Spieler nach dem Spiel verfügbar wäre. Die Methode spielt zusammen mit Röntgenkristallografie eine wichtige Rolle in der Grundlage für die rationale Entwicklung von Medikamenten und der Verbesserung existierender Medikamente. Ich bin wirklich beeindruckt und sehr glücklich, auf diesem Gebiet zu arbeiten, das zeigt, dass die Grundlagenforschung, die 200 Jahre auf Mr. Brown zurückgeht, der seinen Pollen in das Wasserglas fallen ließ, zu Anwendungen führte, die heutzutage jeden Tag die Qualität des menschlichen Lebens verbessern. Und ich denke, wir sollten unsere Politiker daran erinnern, wie wichtig es war, dass Einstein die Freiheit hatte, an der Brownschen Bewegung zu arbeiten, lange bevor man wissen konnte, dass es jemals ein NMR-Experiment geben würde. Zeeman wusste nicht, dass es ein NMR-Experiment geben würde, ganz zu schweigen von Mr. Brown. Und ich denke, Sie möchten dies vielleicht mitnehmen und weiterhin begeistert sein von Grundlagenforschung in der Physik. Vielen Dank.

Kurt Wüthrich paying a tribute to Irving Geis
(00:16:11 - 00:16:51)

 

The drawbacks of electron microscopy are well known and often lamented over, particularly by biologists. Biological samples, even with good preparation, have low contrast in the resulting images, which means they must be often treated with metals to increase contrast. Moreover, the samples generally become dehydrated or deformed by freeze-drying, hence by peering into the microscope we are effectively looking at a sample that was.

“ (...) the dream really was to be able to have an optical microscope that could look at living cells with the resolution of an electron microscope (...)”, explained Eric Betzig during his lecture, “Working Where Others Aren’t”, in Lindau in 2015.

Over time, optical microscopy began to improve, and an important step in its development was the use of fluorescent stains in biological samples. A laser beam passes onto the stained material, in the process exciting the fluorescently stained molecule, which then emits at a longer wavelength. What emerges is a detailed map of fluorescently-labelled elements, which can then be processed by visualisation software. Also, the progress in image processing greatly increased the quality of visualisation. Yet in order to achieve better resolution, it was clear that, as in electron microscopy, the diffraction limit had to be beaten. Eric Betzig expressed it very well when he asked the question, “What can we do as physicists to make better microscopes for biologists?” The Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM), perfected in the early 1990s, demonstrated resolution at the nanometre scale, but as Stefan Hell expressed in his 2016 lecture, “ (...) I felt, does this look like a light microscope? Of course not! This looks like a scanning force microscope. I wanted to break the diffraction barrier for a light microscope, that looks like a light microscope and operates like a light microscope. So something that no one anticipates”. Hell’s work eventually led to stimulated emission depletion microscopy, or STED, a scanning microscopy technique where the fluorescence of the molecules is turned on and off to increase resolution, “playing with molecular states”, as Hell described. A laser beam that is smaller than the diffraction limit is directed at fluorescent molecules. The molecule’s electrons reach the excited state, and just before the spontaneous emission of photons, a second laser beam is guided onto the fluorescent molecules, pushing the photons into the red shift, depleting the fluorophore’s emission outside the centre of the beam by stimulated emission, effectively “keeping the molecules dark”. The molecules in the centre of the depletion beam fluoresce unhindered, and this is the area that is being imaged (Hell uses a diagram with a doughnut-shaped beam, where the centre of the doughnut is the imaged area).

In their 2015 lectures, Hell’s co-recipients of the Nobel prize, William Moerner and Eric Betzig gave very good explanations on what is super-resolution (for single molecules) and why super-resolution, respectively:

 

William Moerner (2015) - Fun with Light and Single Molecules

Well good morning everybody. It's a great pleasure to be here and I'm very happy to have this opportunity to talk to the young scientists. Let me first give you a quick road map of what's going to happen. I want to start out by telling you about the historical overview to give you the feeling of what happened in the very first days of detecting single molecules. It's a beautiful story of spectroscopy but also statistics so I hope you're awake now. We're going to talk a little bit about mathematics in a few moments. Then in the middle, I'm going to give you some things that you can use. That you students and young scientists can use to tell your friends about molecules and show them about molecular fluorescents. Then I'll talk about the super resolution idea and how it works and give you a few examples to wind up. So first of all, back to the history. Let's go back to the middle of the 1980's and at that time, many amazing things were happening produced by many of the Nobel Laureates who are here actually. People were looking at individual ions in a vacuum trap and looking at single quantum systems in various ways and the question that arose, why not molecules? Shouldn't we be able to look at a single molecule as well as these single ions? Of course, there was a bit of a problem. This great physicist, one of the founders of quantum mechanics, Erwin Schrödinger, wrote in 1952 that we never experiment with just one electron atom or molecule. He had this feeling of course but it's sort of one of the dangers of saying, "What can not be done," if you like. (laughs) But there were plenty of other people who felt that detecting a single molecule optically might be very difficult. So what I have to do first is to explain how we got to the point to believe that is was possible. That requires talking a little bit about spectroscopy. So think about this kind of a molecule, this is a terrylene molecule. It has conjugated pi systems so it has absorption in the visible and at room temperature you could measure a UV-vis spectrum of it, you would see absorption bands. But let's cool it to low temperatures, in a solid, in a transparent host of para-Terphenyl. What happens when you cool down, you get rid of all the phonons, of course, and the absorption lines get very, very narrow, so narrow that I'm now showing those absorption lines here, this is the first electronic transition, there's not really four of them, there are four different sites inside the crystal, so think of this as the lowest electronic transition of the molecule and it's gotten very narrow. We can't even see the width very well. Let's expand the scale a little bit to try to do a more high resolution spectrum and here these lines appear to be resolved. But they have this big width, this I've now switched to pentacene, it's another molecule that's similar to terrylene and it has four sites but I'm only showing to of them. The question is, is that all there is? Well it shouldn't be of course. This molecule with all the phonones turned off and all vibrations turned off at this low temperature, ought to have it's first transition to be narrow, really on the order of 10 MHz because of the excited state lifetime should be the only thing limiting the width of the spectral line. So what's going on? Well what's going on here is something that is called Inhomogeneous Broadening. It's really like this picture shown on the right. There are very narrow absorption lines for the molecules because of what I just said but there is a distribution of central frequencies coming from the different environments in the solid that have slightly different stresses and strains. These absorption lines have gotten so narrow that now you can see the perturbations or the shifts produced by these individual, or different local environments. Inhomogeneous Broadening prevents you from seeing the homogeneous widths underneath it. So there were a number of techniques invented to measure the homogeneous width such as photon echoes. Another one is spectral-hole burning. A way of marking this inhomogeneous line or making a dip in the inhomogeneous line to see the homogeneous width. There was a lot of beautiful research being done on these topics in the 70's and 80's. I was at IBM research at this time where we were trying to use this spectral-hole burning idea as an optical storage scheme. Well the beauty of that particular research lab and those environments in those days is that we also could ask fundamental questions about this particular idea. I was intrigued by the following question, is there some sort of a spectral roughness on this inhomogeneous line that might represent some limit to signal-to-noise of writing data in this inhomogeneously broadened line that might be coming from statistical number fluctuations? So remember, this picture that had been measured of the inhomogeneous line, it sort of looked like a smooth Gaussian and so we're sort of asking the question, is this a smooth Gaussian or not? Now to understand what's going on here, I want to give a quick probability exercise for you this morning okay? Suppose we have these 10 boxes and we're going to throw 50 balls at these 10 boxes and all of the boxes are going to be equally likely for the balls to fall into the boxes. Here's one possibility, what do you think? Do you think this is a probable situation or not? How many think this is a probable situation? How many think this in an improbable situation? Ah good, okay, you know, that in this kind of an experiment, what is more likely to happen even though, they all have equal probability that you'll get different numbers in those different bins. Basically, scattering according to the square root of N around the mean. That's what I mean by number fluctuations. It's the well known number fluctuation effect. Who's amplitude is about the square root of N. It rises from the fact that the molecules are independent when they enter these boxes. So now, think of this horizontal axis here as a frequency axis or this spectral axis that I was just showing you a few moments ago and everyone of these bins is a homogeneous width in size and so now you'll see that the number of molecules that might fall into different regions of frequency space if they're going to spread all over like this, should vary with frequency. There should be some spectral roughness on the inhomogeneous line. Here's a quick simulation. Now I'm using a Gaussian shape probability which is smooth but in this simulation, you'd still see that there's this roughness on this inhomogeneously broadened line. In the mid 80's, no one had ever observed this roughness directly. So we set out to measure it. My postdoc Tom Carter and I, for pentacene in para-terphenyl at low temperatures and now you want to think of this inhomogeneously broadened line as being spread out tremendously so it's essentially horizontal on the scale of the stage and we used a laser technique, a powerful laser, high resolution technique to ask whether there is any such spectral structure and here's what we saw. It's amazing, there's this unbelievable structure that is, in fact, not noise. See, I'm not calling it noise, it's a roughness. If you measure it once, you see that shape. If you measure it again, you see exactly the same shape. That's because at low temperatures, this is static inhomogeneous broadening and this is coming from the effect I just described, that every spectral window, even though the probability of molecules landing at different frequencies is uniform, we see the number fluctuations. So we call this Statistical Fine Structure, where the average absorption, of course, scales as N, in fact, essentially everything you measure in experiments normally scales as N or if there's no linear effects maybe N squared or others. But having a spectral feature who's RMS size scales as the square root of N is pretty different, pretty interesting, something to wake you up okay on a Thursday morning early. Now, let me say that this was detected by using a special technique called FM spectroscopy. I won't describe all the details of that but it is uniquely suited to measuring the deviations of the absorption from the average value, that's what we needed here, admitted by Gary Bjorklund, 1980 and also in this area was developed a lot by Jan Hall and his collaborators. I want to emphasize one key thing here. I'm scanning a tunable single frequency laser to measure this and the laser line width is about 1 MHz, notice the scale here 400 MHz here. Every feature here is fully resolved. There is no limit produced by the measuring device. The measuring device is narrower than every spectral feature. These widths or the shapes, the ultimate narrowness of these things is being produced by the width of the molecules absorption. So everything in resolved here. Remember that because we're going to talk about resolution later in the spatial domain. So this was interesting to observe and it also had another effect for me. It made it clear that the single molecule limit was obtainable. Why is that? Well if the average absorption scales is N and let's say N is 1,000 in this case, then that means that the RMS amplitude of these features is about square root of 1,000 or 32 which means that once you see this, you only have to work 32 times harder to get to the single molecule limit. Only 32 times harder. Not 1,000 times harder. Believe me, that's a lot better. So we decided to push on with this method. That sort of came out of the blue, out of right field or something at this research that was going on on an optical storage scheme at this industrial lab. Can we push it to the N equal to one limit? Indeed, in 1989, Lothar Kador, my postdoc at the time, and I did push it to the single molecule limit and measured single molecule absorption by detecting these tiny changes in the transmitted light. For pentacene molecules as dopants in para-terphenyl. Now, this was an important advance because we showed that it could be done and a useful model system we had found. That method can be quantum limited and can be very, very sensitive but you can't get a lot of power on the detector in these measurements. Otherwise you'll broaden the absorption's and then you won't have as much sensitivity. A year later, a very important advance occurred, Michel Orrit, in France at that time, decided to detect the single molecule absorption also for pentacene in para-Terphenyl but by detecting the emitted light, the fluorescents from the molecules. This method, of course, could be difficult to do if you have backgrounds or scattered light. You have to detect this tiny signal from the individual molecules but they showed it could be done as very important advance in the field. You got better signal-to-noise by this method so everyone switched to fluorescents detection afterwards. So immediately the surprises started to occur. Here's some examples of where we're scanning the laser and detecting the molecules. You can see the molecular absorption's there. But look what's going on. There's something crazy. These molecules are moving around in frequency space, they're moving back and forth in a digital sort of fashion. When my postdoc Pat Ambrose saw this, he came running in and said, "The molecules "are jumping around." (laughs) We go, "Wow, that's really interesting." This is a surprise for us. We're at low temperatures, liquid helium in a crystal and so forth for a very stable molecule why would this be happening? Well, some theorists like Jim Skinner and others helped us to understand that this is coming from some dynamics in the host crystal that are changing at that low temperature to shift the molecules back and forth. Anyway, if I set the laser at one fixed frequency here some times the molecule will be in resonance and you'll see a signal. Other times it will be off, on, off, on and so you could also see blinking effects with these molecules at this early time, in 1991. Another surprise, Thomas Bass, now we've change to perylene in polyethylene, another host and look what happens here. You scan a molecule, scan it again, scan it again, nothing's changing and then if you go into resonance and just sit on top of the molecule for a little bit then you see the fluorescence drop down and if you quickly scan again, you see it's gone. It's moved somewhere, it's moved somewhere way off the screen to another wave length very far away. You've changed something in the nearby host. You've flipped a two level system that's made the molecule's absorption move. Amazingly, after another moment, the molecule comes exactly back. You scan it again and you see it again and again and again with no change. Go into resonance with it, you can drive it away. So, we were excited about this too because we could switch the molecule back and forth with laser light. These two effects, blinking and optical control are useful for things that are going to happen later. So now I want to, just for a moment, ask this question, why should we study single molecules? Of course you know that we've removed ensemble averaging and we can watch the individuals and see whether they are behaving differently or not. I just gave you some great examples of when they do behave differently. Now for your pedagogical interest, I just want to give you a way of explaining this issue to your friends. Why study single molecules? Let's think about baseball for a moment. If you think back to 2004, there was this team in The United States, the Red Sox, who were the Series champs and here are the rankings of the various teams and their team batting averages. So here's the team batting averages here and this is the ensemble measurement of course but if you measure the batting average player-by-player and then make a distribution like I'm showing here, then you see something interesting beyond the average. On the left, now you see that there's a distribution but there's also some outliers here. What are the outliers? Anybody know? (laughs) Pitchers, exactly, so here they are. (laughs) So basically, what we're doing is translating this idea from baseball to the molecular scale. Are the molecules marching to different drummers or not and maybe that is something else you might use. Another thing to explain to your friends is well, what is this business of molecular fluorescents? What is it really? Well you know it's like their day glow... ways of having socks or whatever but there's another cool way to demonstrate fluorescents to your friends and I'm going to show you that in a moment. But first you have to explain to them that first molecules start in a ground state and after absorbing the proper photon they go to an excited state of course. But then, there's some molecular relaxation, some vibrations are emitted etcetera and when the photon is emitted, it's shifted to a longer wavelength okay? It has lower energy. Well, I want to show you a neat way to demonstrate that. There's a very easy, simple demo that I'd like to describe. So what you need to do to demonstrate this is get one of these orange highlighters that you can buy. Make sure you get the cheap one. Don't get the no smudge variety, the no smudge variety doesn't dissolve as well in water. The cheap ones dissolve in water much better. And then you've got a little vial with water in it, that's what I've go here. All I have to do is open this highlighter and stick it into the water just for a few seconds, twirl it around a little bit, that's all I had to do. That's the highlighter done. Close the vial and we're going to just shake it a little bit, that's all we'll do. And then, of course the next thing you need is your green laser pointer which you have. You don't need a fancy one. You don't need high power. You don't need anything like that just five milliwatts is plenty. Now if you're prepared to turn off the lights, I'll show you what you can do with this. And I'll get this off as well. Well, it's not completely dark but maybe you'll see it. I hope you can. So it's really cool okay? (laughs) Now what's cool about this is that it's a little light saber right? And it's got that color. Remember the laser's green and this light coming out of the sample is more like orange and you can demonstrate that even though when the light goes through this, it emits green when it's going through but look, it's orange when it goes through but look, the transmitted light is still green. You haven't used up all of the light from the laser, the transmitted light is green. And that's a good example of, we only needed a few molecules to get this light coming out and to see it clearly. So what we're doing in our experiments of course, is reducing the concentration in that sample down to an unbelievably low level. Down to the single molecule limit. Also reducing the volume and detecting that light from the individual molecules. Well it turns out, you can even do that with your own eyes. In the experiments that are done at room temperature these days now, here let me just remind you how we are doing them at room temperature. We're not using FM spectroscopy but we're pumping from the ground state to the excited state and detecting this fluorescent shift into long wave lengths. Typically, we look at these little, small molecules which are about a nanometre in size or two. Aequorea green fluorescent protein and attach that to the molecule of interest and then here is, let's say a cell for example, where you have these molecules inside but in order to detect single molecules then, we focus the laser down to the smallest spot possible and that size is limited by diffraction to lend over two times the numberical aperture. So to get to the single molecule limit, you have to dilute the molecules. You have to have them farther apart then the width of this small focal spot. That's how we detect single molecules at room temperature and work at room temperature of course, even started back with the work of Keller and many others beginning even in 1990 but the near-field techniques and confocal techniques and wide-field techniques were demonstrated all along the way. So to show you some real data on a real system just see what it's like. This is the system composed of a cell where the transmembrane protein, which is called MHCII is in the cell membrane and it's been labeled by labeling an antigen that has a Fluor-4 on it. So each one of these spots in this image is coming from the light from individual MHCII complex. By the way, as I said, you can see this light with your very own eyes. You can look into our microscopes, get dark adapted, you could see the light from single molecules with your own eyes. They're very wonderful detectors. If you now watch this movie as a function of time, that's where the excitement comes. We're able to do this in living cells and this is room temperature. You can see that they're diffusing around. They're moving all over the cell membrane having this dance on the surface of the cell. They also turn off, that's some of the photo bleaching processes. There maybe some blinking in this experiment too that we'll talk about in a moment. That's an example of what can be done with single molecules at room temperature. We're still in, this happens to be from 2002 but there's one thing that happened in the 1990's that I want to mention. We decided to look at single copies of these fluorescent proteins that were being developed by Robert Tsien and others that you've already met and heard about at this wonderful meeting. I was at UC San Diego at that time, where Roger was and I asked him for some protein and Andy Cubitt gave us something that was called, at that time, a yellow fluorescent protein which had a few mutations to stabilize the longer wavelength absorption of GFP and we wanted to see, can we detect them and image them at room temperature and here's some examples. Yes, Rob Dickson was able to do that. This had not been done before at that time and so immediately new surprises appeared. We saw blinking, that is we saw the molecules emit, emit, emit, frame after frame but then turn off for a long time and then turn back on again and turn off and turn on and so forth in a stochastic sort of way. In other words, we were pumping and collecting photons but after some time period, the system went into a dark state, probably some isomerization of the chromophore from which it could return thermally and start emitting again. Another surprise is that after a longer radiation, we saw that these molecules went into a long lived dark state. We thought they might have been photo bleached but Rob used a little bit of shorter wave length blue light and he could restore those molecules back that had been turned off. You could then have them emit again for a long time and then if they finished, you could restore them back with 405 nanometers. So it was both blinking and light induced photo recovery that we observed in these experiments. This work and others, led to a huge increase in development of switchable fluorescent proteins. The photo activatable GFP was generated later DRONPA for switching by Miyawaki and others. The basic idea though is that the sort of dynamics that we had seen at low temperatures was also available at room temperature. Note by the way, here's this patent that Roger and I got for this particular process (laughs) at that time but what was in our mind? We weren't thinking about a super resolution. We were thinking about optical storage. We were thinking about using these molecules to store individual bits in the days. Remember I came from IBM and that was in our minds at the time. Now let's talk about the super resolution. Circumventing the optical diffraction limit. To illustrate this in a simple way for everyone. Here is a bacterial cell, only a couple of microns long and maybe 500 nanometers across and a particular protein has been labeled with yellow fluorescent protein in this case and you might think that all you have to do is buy one of those really, really expensive microscopes, the best microscope you can buy. Really expensive and here it is. Here's that expensive microscope but the problem is, you don't see any more detail, you want to see the shapes and the positions that those molecules might have and you're thwarted, you're thwarted by all these diffraction limit. Even though the emitters are really small, just a few nanometres in size, they appear to be a few hundred nanometres in size due to this particular important physical effect that's coming from the wavelength of light and numerical aperture that you're using. So, the reason that super resolution is exciting to many people today is that you can go from this kind of an image to that kind of an image. Tremendous increase in detail. Tremendous increase in what can be measured and quantified about what's going on inside the cell. In order to explain this, even though you heard beautiful explanations earlier in week from both Stefan and Eric. Let me just describe it in a very general way that I like to use. I like to say that first you need to detect single molecules and then you need two essential ingredients. Please note, I'm only going to describe the super resolution based on single molecules. Stefan already did a wonderful job talking about STED and the other methods that depend upon a patterned light beam to turn molecules on and off. First you have to super localize the individual molecules. A neat way to think about that. Here's a cinder cone inside a volcanic lake at Crater Lake Oregon and if you get a chance to go there, you should go. It's really a beautiful lake and here's a cinder cone inside that lake and of course, I have my obligatory scale bar. Now you know very well that if you just walk up to the top of this mountain with your cell phone, you can read out the GPS coordinates of the peak of the mountain. That's basically what we're doing. Here's one of our single molecule images. Now this is a molecule YFP, Yellow Fluorescent Protein, in a bacterium and I've now turned it into a 3-D picture just to show you the brightness here on the Z-axis. You see that that single molecule has a width that is coming from diffraction. What we do is we spread out the spot on a pixilated detector and we get multiple samples of the shape of that spot. By having those samples, you can fit the shape and get a very good estimate of the position that's much better then the diffraction limit, then the width of the mountain. The other key idea, I like to think of it as active control of the emitting concentration. This is something the experimenter has to do, has to actively choose a mechanism that controls the emitting concentration. So why is that at all useful? Well first of all, here's the structure. Suppose that we want to observe that structure and you decorate it with those fluorescent labels that I've been talking about. Now if you just turn on the laser then all of them will emit at the same time and that of course, is the problem. You see that all of the spots from the individual molecules overlap and that's the low resolution situation. What we do then is we use an on/off process. We use some way of having the molecules be in either an admissive state or in a dark state and use that to control the concentration at a low level. Then, you only turned a few on and then localize them. Do that again and do it again and ultimately, you can use a pointillist technique, connection to art here, a pointillist technique to reconstruct the underlying structure. This idea I heard about first in 2006 from Eric Betzig calling it PALM. Later we heard about STORM from Zhuang, F-PALM and then a whole variety of acronyms appeared showing different mechanisms for doing this. We started to use, at that time then, our YFP reactivation that I just showed you and we didn't give it an acronym so, of course, that's been forgotten right? So here's an acronym to add something back to the pile just for fun, that's mechanism independent, Single-Molecule Active Control Microscopy or SMACM. How does this work in a real system? Here's an image with many single molecules. There are these spots appearing on the right that are coming from localizing the molecules and when you do this many times, then you can build up the data required to reconstruct this high resolution image of the underlying structure. It also works in bacteria but I want to show you in bacteria how yellow fluorescent protein does this for you. YFP, that I was showing you earlier, blinks beautifully. Here's some bacterial cells and here's the fluorescents from those cells where there's something labeled in the cells. It's this that we're really using in our data taking. This beautiful blinking of the individual fluorescent proteins gives us information about where those molecules are located. And that approach then allows us to go from these kinds of diffraction limited images of several different proteins to these kinds of super resolution images of all those proteins. It's really a wonderful way to see the structure that was not observable before. These are actually our live cells. This is a fixed cell. We have this both in fixed and live situations. To show you that you can get more information that's a little bit of time dependence from this scheme, I want to mention the paint idea that came from Robin Hochstrasser. The way that paint works is that you have a structure that you want to observe and you bring fluorophores in from the outside, from the solution, fluorophores are zooming around while they're in the solution and you can't detect them easily but when they bind to something, they sit there and give you all that light and then you localize the ones that have bound. So we use that idea based on now a fluorescently labeled ligand, fluorescently labeled saxitoxin, to light up voltage gated sodium channels in a neuronal model cell, a PC12 cell. That's what this picture's showing you. This is one of the axonal projections outside of a differentiated PC12 cell and the beauty, of course, is in the movie. This is a movie where we're essentially averaging on the 500 millisecond time scale. All localization's we see within the 500 millisecond time and then playing that back as a sort of a sliding box car and you see all of these structures that grow and disappear over time as the cell is continuously growing. Time is very short so I'm going to have to skip a few things. I'll skip the applications of this to Huntington's disease. Here's some beautiful aggregates that we can observe by super resolution that are aggregates of the Huntington protein. I'm going to skip another example and end up with a few lessons that I would like to sort of give you that you can go tell your friends to end up today. You've all seen this beautiful Nobel medal. You can see, of course, Alred Noble's picture on this side of the medal. But I bet you haven't seen the back of the medal. Here's the back of the Nobel medal. It's really very, very beautiful. It's a beautiful, beautiful rendition. Here on the left is nature. Nature's holding a cornucopia and on the right is science. And science is lifting the veil off of nature. It's just amazing. So you want to communicate that science is fun. Help lift this veil of nature in our world. But there's more that you want to think about and communicate to those younger. Basically, the undergraduates and those who are getting interested in science. It's always important to find your passion. That's incredibly essential because it can be hard work to work through the problems that we do in our very methodical way. You have to be determined, persistent and methodical but having fun along the way is really important. It's all based on asking how things work. There's too many people that take their cell phone for granted, take some of the technology in our world so much for granted. We really ought to be asking more about how things actually work on the deep fundamental level all the way down to single molecules. So that means pushing beyond conventional wisdom and questioning assumptions. So, of course, we believe that science provides a rational and predictive way to understand our world and that's why we do it. So I want to thank my past students, postdocs and collaborators and of course, the current Guacamole team. Here they are being very serious as you can see. It's right before Halloween. Thanking our agencies as well. Here's a little fun, it's our No Ensemble Averaging logo. Which stands for single molecule spectroscopy. I forgot to say, why are we called the Guacamole team? Well, you know, one molecule is one guacamole right? One over avocado's number of moles. So with that, thank you very much for your attention.

Guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist mir eine besondere Freude, hier zu sein, und ich freue mich sehr über diese Möglichkeit, zu jungen Wissenschaftlern zu sprechen. Zunächst ein kleiner Überblick über den folgenden Vortrag. Ich beginne mit einem geschichtlichen Überblick, damit Sie ein Gefühl für die Geschehnisse in den Anfangstagen der Entdeckung einzelner Moleküle erhalten. Dabei handelt es sich um eine schöne Geschichte der Spektroskopie sowie der Statistik, hoffentlich sind Sie jetzt wach. Wir werden in Kürze auch ein wenig über Mathematik sprechen. Etwa in der Mitte werde ich über einige Dinge sprechen, die Sie selbst nutzen können. Die Sie als Studenten und junge Wissenschaftler nutzen können, um Freunden Moleküle und molekulare Fluoreszenz zu zeigen. Dann spreche ich über die Idee der Super-Resolution und wie sie funktioniert und gebe zum Schluss einige Beispiele. Zunächst einmal zurück zur Geschichte. Gehen wir zurück in die Mitte der 1980er-Jahre und in eine Zeit, in der viele erstaunlich Dinge passierten, übrigens hervorgebracht von vielen Nobelpreisträger, die ebenfalls hier sind. Leute schauten sich einzelne Ionen in einer Vakuumkammer an und betrachteten einzelne Quantensysteme auf verschiedene Weisen. Und die Frage kam auf, warum nicht auch Moleküle? Sollte es nicht möglich sein, so wie diese einzelnen Ionen auch ein einzelnes Molekül zu betrachten? Natürlich gab es da gewisse Probleme. Der großartige Physiker und Mitbegründer der Quantenmechanik, Erwin Schrödinger, schrieb 1952, dass wir nie mit einem einzelnen Atom, Elektron oder Molekül experimentieren. Er hatte so ein Gefühl, aber hierin steckt auch die Gefahr: zu sagen, was nicht möglich ist, wenn Sie so wollen (lacht). Es gab aber viele andere Leute, die meinten, dass die optische Entdeckung eines einzelnen Moleküls sehr schwierig wäre. Ich muss Ihnen also zunächst erklären, wie es dazu kam, dass man es überhaupt für möglich hielt. Dazu muss ich ein wenig über Spektroskopie sprechen. Denken Sie also an diese Art von Molekül, es handelt es um ein Terylen-Molekül. Es besitzt konjugierte Pi-Systeme, absorbiert also im Lichtspektrum und unter Raumtemperatur könnte man sein UV-VIS-Spektrum messen und würde Absorptionsbanden sehen. Aber lassen Sie es uns auf niedrige Temperatur herunterkühlen, zu einer festen, transparenten Masse aus para-Terphenyl. Durch das Herunterkühlen beseitigt man natürlich alle Phonone und die Absorptionslinien werden sehr, sehr schmal. So schmal, dass ich Ihnen nun diese Absorptionslinien hier zeige, dies ist der erste elektronische Übergang, es gibt nicht wirklich vier davon, es gibt innerhalb des Kristalls vier verschiedene Ansichten, also stellen Sie es sich als niedrigsten elektronischen Übergang des Moleküls vor und dass es sehr schmal geworden ist. Selbst die Breite können wir nicht sehr gut sehen. Dehnen wir also den Maßstab ein wenig, um mehr hochauflösendes Spektrum zu erhalten und diese Linien scheinen hier behoben zu sein. Sie haben aber diese große Breite. Ich habe hier auf Pentacen gewechselt, ein weiteres Terylen-ähnliches Molekül, das vier Ansichten besitzt, von denen ich aber nur zwei zeige. Dieser niedrigste elektronische Übergang entspricht eher einer Wellenzahl oder 30 GHz in der Breite. Nun stellt sich die Frage: Ist das wirklich alles? Natürlich sollte dem nicht so sein. Bei diesem Molekül, bei dem unter dieser niedrigen Temperatur alle Phonons und Vibrationen abgestellt wurden, sollte der erste Übergang schmal sein, eher im Bereich von 10 MHz aufgrund der Lebensdauer im angeregten Zustand. Dies sollte als Einziges die Breite der Spektrallinie einschränken. Was ist da also los? Nun, hier findet etwas statt, was als inhomogene Verbreitung bezeichnet wird. Auf dem rechten Bild kann man es gut sehen. Aufgrund des eben Gesagten gibt es für die Moleküle sehr schmale Absorptionslinien, es gibt aber eine Verteilung von zentralen Frequenzen, die aus den verschiedenen Umgebungen des Festkörpers kommen, die unter leicht anderen Belastungen und Spannungen stehen. Diese Absorptionslinien sind so dünn geworden, dass man nun die von diesen einzelnen oder unterschiedlichen lokalen Umgebungen produzierten Störungen oder Verlagerungen beobachten kann. Inhomogene Verbreitung verhindert die Betrachtung der darunterliegenden homogenen Breiten. Es wurden also verschiedene Techniken zur Messung der homogenen Breite wie etwa Photonechos erfunden. Bei einer weiteren handelt es um spektrales Lochbrennen. Eine Methode zur Markierung dieser inhomogenen Linie oder zu deren Senkung, um die homogene Breite sichtbar zu machen. In den 70er- und 80er-Jahren gab es zu diesen Themen viele schöne Untersuchungen. Zu dieser Zeit arbeitete ich bei IBM Research, wo wir versuchten, die Idee des spektralen Lochbrennens als System zur optischen Speicherung zu nutzen. Das Schöne an diesem Untersuchungslabor und dessen Umgebungen damals war, dass wir uns auch fundamentale Fragen zu dieser speziellen Idee stellen konnten. Eine Frage faszinierte mich besonders: Gibt es eine Art spektrale Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogenen Linie, die vielleicht eine Grenze zum Störabstand bei Schreiben von Daten in dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie repräsentierte, die eventuell durch Fluktuation statischer Zahlen erzeugt wurde? Erinnern Sie sich, dieses Bild, das aus der inhomogenen Linie gemessen worden war, sah in etwa wie eine glatte Gaußsche aus, und wir stellen uns also im Prinzip die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich darum handelte oder nicht? Für ein besseres Verständnis möchte ich Ihnen jetzt eine kurze Wahrscheinlichkeitsaufgabe stellen. Nehmen wir an, wir haben diese 10 Kisten und werfen 50 Bälle auf diese 10 Kisten, und alle Kisten haben dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Bälle in diese Kisten fallen. Hier ist eine Möglichkeit, was halten Sie davon? Halten Sie dies für eine wahrscheinliche Situation oder nicht? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine wahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Wer denkt, dass es sich um eine unwahrscheinliche Situation handelt? Ah, gut, okay, Sie wissen, dass es bei dieser Art von Experiment, obwohl alle dieselbe Wahrscheinlichkeit haben, wahrscheinlicher ist, eine unterschiedliche Anzahl in den verschiedenen Kisten zu erhalten. Im Prinzip Streuung gemäß der Quadratwurzel von N um den Durchschnitt. Das meine ich mit Zahlenfluktuation. Es handelt sich um den wohlbekannten Effekt von Zahlenfluktuation, dessen Größe in etwa die Quadratwurzel von N beträgt. Er steigt aufgrund der Tatsache, dass die Moleküle beim Eintritt in diese Kisten unabhängig sind. Stellen Sie sich nun diese horizontale Achse als Frequenzachse oder spektrale Achse, die ich Ihnen kurz zuvor gezeigt hatte, vor, und jede dieser Kisten hat eine homogene Breite. Und nun werden Sie sehen, dass die Anzahl der Moleküle, die in verschiedene Regionen des Frequenzraumes fallen könnten, falls sie sich so gleichmäßig verteilen, in der Häufigkeit variieren sollten. Auf der inhomogenen Linie sollte sich eine gewisse spektrale Rauigkeit befinden. Hier haben wir eine kurze Simulation. Jetzt benutze ich eine Gauß-förmige Wahrscheinlichkeit, die glatt ist, aber in dieser Simulation sieht man trotzdem noch, dass es diese Rauigkeit auf dieser inhomogen verbreiterten Linie gibt. Aber Mitte der 80er-Jahre hatte noch niemand diese Rauigkeit jemals direkt beobachtet. Wir machten uns also daran, sie zu messen, mein Postdoc Tom Carter und ich, anhand von Pentacen und para-Terphenyl in niedrigen Temperaturen. Und nun müssen Sie sich diese inhomogen verbreitete Line als extrem ausgedehnt vorstellen, so dass sie im Prinzip horizontal ist, und wir benutzen dafür Lasertechnik, eine leistungsstarke Laser-High-Resolution-Technik um zu schauen, ob eine solche spektrale Struktur existierte, und haben das hier gesehen. Es ist erstaunlich, es gibt eine unglaubliche Struktur, bei der es sich in der Tat nicht um Störung handelt. Ich nenne es nicht Störung, es handelt sich um eine Rauigkeit. Wenn man sie einmal misst, sieht man diese Form. Wenn man sie erneut misst, sieht man die exakt gleiche Form. Weil es sich hier bei niedrigen Temperaturen - hier handelt es sich um statische inhomogene Verbreitung, was von dem eben beschriebenen Effekt kommt: dass wir bei jedem Spektralfenster die Zahlenfluktuation sehen, selbst wenn die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Moleküle bei verschiedenen Frequenzen landen, konstant ist. Wir bezeichnen dies als statistische Feinstruktur, in der die durchschnittliche Absorption natürlich den Maßstab N hat, wobei bei jeder Messung in Experimenten normalerweise N der Maßstab ist, oder N zum Quadrat oder ähnliches, wenn es keine linearen Effekte gibt. Aber ein Spektralmerkmal, dessen RMS-Größe den Maßstab Quadratwurzel von N hat, ist ziemlich anders, ziemlich interessant, und lässt einen an einem frühen Donnerstagmorgen recht gut wach werden. Dies wurde mithilfe einer speziellen Technik namens FM Spektroskopie entdeckt. Ich werde nicht alle Details dessen beschreiben, aber es ist besonders zur Messung der Abweichungen der Absorption vom Durchschnittswert geeignet, also genau, was wir hier brauchten. Es wurde 1980 von Gary Bjorklund entwickelt, wobei auf diesem Gebiet auch viel Entwicklung von Jan Hall und dessen Mitarbeitern beigetragen wurde. Ich möchte hier eine Schlüsselkomponente hervorheben. Ich scanne für diese Messung einen einstellbaren Einzelfrequenzlaser und die Breite der Laserlinie beträgt in etwa 1 MHz - bitte beachten Sie den Maßstab hier von 400 MHz. Jedes Merkmal ist hier also vollauf aufgelöst. Es gibt keine vom Messgerät erzeugte Einschränkung. Das Messgerät ist schmaler als jedes Spektralmerkmal. Diese Formen, die endgültige Enge dieser Dinge wird durch die Breite der Molekülabsorption erzeugt. Somit ist hier alles aufgelöst. Behalten Sie dies im Hinterkopf, da wir später noch über Auflösung im Raumbereich sprechen werden. Dies war also eine interessante Beobachtung, die für mich einen weiteren Effekt hatte. Sie machte deutlich, dass die Grenze des einzelnen Moleküls erreichbar war. Warum dem so ist? Wenn der durchschnittliche Absorptionsmaßstab N ist und sagen wir N in diesem Fall 1.000 beträgt, dann bedeutet dies, dass die RMS-Amplitude dieser Merkmale etwa die Quadratwurzel von 1.000, also 32 beträgt, was bedeutet, dass es, sobald man an diesem Punkt ist, Nur 32-mal mehr anstrengen. Nicht 1.000-mal anstrengen. Glauben Sie mir, dass ist sehr viel besser. Wir entschlossen uns also, diese Methode voranzutreiben. Das kam ein wenig aus dem Nichts oder aus heiterem Himmel: Können wir diese Untersuchungen zum System optischer Speicherung in jenem Industrielaboratorium, können wir sie bis zur Grenze von N gleich Eins bringen? Tatsächlich schafften Lothar Kador, mein damaliger Postdoc, und ich es 1989 an die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und maßen die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls anhand dieser winzigen Veränderungen im übertragenden Licht. Für Pentacen-Moleküle als Dopanten in para-Terphenyl. Hierbei handelte es sich um einen wichtigen Vorstoß, da wir gezeigt hatten, dass es ging, und dabei ein nützliches Modellsystem gefunden hatten. Jene Methode kann quantenbegrenzt und sehr, sehr empfindlich sein, aber man bekommt in diesen Messungen nicht viel Energie auf den Detektor. Sonst verbreitert man die Absorptionen und hat dadurch weniger Sensitivität. Ein Jahr später fand ein sehr wichtiger Vorstoß statt, diesmal in Frankreich, wo Michel Orrit die Absorption des Einzelmoleküls auch für Pentacen in para-Terphenyl entdeckte, allerdings indem er das abgestrahlte Licht entdeckte, die Fluoreszenzen der Moleküle. Diese Methode konnte natürlich schwierig in der Ausführung sein, falls es zu Störungen oder Lichtstreuung kam. Man muss dieses winzige Signal der Einzelmoleküle finden, aber sie zeigten, dass es funktionierte, was einem sehr wichtigen Schritt in dem Gebiet gleichkam. Mit dieser Methode erhielt man ein besseres Signal-Stör-Verhältnis, weshalb danach alle zum Fluoreszenz-Detektor wechselten. Und sofort ging es mit Überraschungen los. Hier sehen Sie einige Beispiele, wo wir den Laser scannen und die Moleküle entdecken. Die molekulare Absorption können Sie dort sehen. Aber schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Da ist etwas Verrücktes. Diese Moleküle bewegen sich im Frequenzraum umher, sie bewegen sich in digitaler Art und Weise hin und her. Als mein Postdoc Pat Ambrose dies sah, kam er reingerannt und meinte: "Die Moleküle hüpfen umher!" (lacht) Und wir sagten: "Prima, das ist echt interessant." Weil das war für uns eine Überraschung. Wir befinden uns in niedrigen Temperaturen, flüssiges Helium in einem Kristall und so weiter, warum sollte dies also bei einem sehr stabilen Molekül passieren? Nun, einige Theoretiker wie Jim Skinner und andere halfen uns dabei zu verstehen, dass dies von einigen Kräftespielen im Wirtskristall kam, die sich bei dieser niedrigen Temperatur verändern und die Moleküle hin und her bewegen. Wenn ich den Laser hier auf eine feste Frequenz stelle, schwingt das Molekül manchmal mit und man sieht ein Signal. Manchmal aber ist es aus; an, aus, an und daher konnte man in den Anfangszeiten, 1991, auch Blinkeffekte bei diesen Molekülen sehen. Eine weitere Überraschung durch Thomas Basché: Jetzt wurde zu Perylen in Polyethylen als anderen Wirt gewechselt und schauen Sie, was hier passiert. Man scannt das Molekül, scannt es wieder und wieder, nichts verändert sich, und wenn man dann in Resonanz geht und für eine kleine Weile nur auf dem Molekül sitzt, dann sieht man wie die Fluoreszenz sinkt. Und wenn man schnell wieder scannt, dann sieht man, dass er verschwunden ist. Er ist woandershin gewandert, irgendwo weit abseits des Bildschirms auf eine andere, weit entfernte Wellenlänge. Man hat etwas beim nahegelegenen Wirt verändert. Man hat ein zweistufiges System gedreht, was zur Bewegung der Molekülabsorption geführt hat. Erstaunlicherweise kehrt das Molekül einen Moment später genau an seinen Platz zurück. Man scannt wieder und man sieht es wieder und wieder und wieder ohne Veränderung. Geht man mit ihm in Resonanz, so kann man es wegtreiben. Davon waren wir ebenfalls begeistert, weil wir das Molekül mit Laserlicht hin und her schalten konnten. Diese beiden Effekte, Blinken und optische Kontrolle, sind für die Dinge, die später passieren, nützlich. Jetzt will ich Ihnen kurz folgende Frage stellen: Warum sollten wir Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Sie wissen natürlich, dass wir den Ensemblemittelwert entfernt haben und die Individuen beobachten und dabei sehen können, inwiefern sie sich anders verhalten. Für ein unterschiedliches Verhalten habe ich Ihnen gerade einige gute Beispiele genannt. Im Sinn Ihres pädagogischen Interesses möchte ich Ihnen eine Weise zeigen, wie Sie diese Thematik Ihren Freunden erklären können. Warum Einzelmoleküle untersuchen? Denken wir für einen Moment an Baseball. Wenn wir uns an das Jahr 2004 zurückerinnern, gab es da dieses Team in den USA, die Red Sox, die die Meisterschaft gewonnen hatten. Und hier sehen Sie die Rangliste der verschiedenen Teams und deren Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen. Hier also die teamübergreifenden Schläger-Durchschnittsleistungen, und wie Sie wissen, entspricht dies dem Ensemblemittelwert. Wenn man jedoch die Schläger-Durchschnittsleistung von Spieler zu Spieler misst und dann eine solche Aufteilung wie hier erstellt, dann sieht man etwas Interessantes. Über die Durchschnittverteilung auf der linken Seite hinaus gibt es daneben auch eine Verteilung, aber mit einigen Ausreißern. Was sind die Ausreißer? Weiß das jemand? (lacht) Werfer, genau, die haben wir hier. (lacht) Im Prinzip übersetzen wir diese Idee aus dem Baseball in den molekularen Maßstab. Tanzen die Moleküle aus der Reihe oder nicht? Das ist vielleicht eine weitere Analogie, die Sie nutzen können. Was Sie Ihren Freunden ebenfalls erklären können, ist, worum es in der molekularen Fluoreszenz geht. Was ist das eigentlich? Sie kennen vielleicht diese Socken oder sowas, die bei Tageslicht leuchten. Es gibt aber eine weitere lässige Art und Weise, wie man seinen Freunden Fluoreszenz zeigen kann, und die zeige ich Ihnen gleich. Aber zunächst müssen Sie ihnen erklären, dass Moleküle in einem Grundzustand beginnen, und nach der Absorption des richtigen Photons gehen Sie natürlich in einen angeregten Zustand über. Dann gibt es eine gewisse molekulare Entspannung, einige Vibrationen werden ausgestoßen usw. Und wenn das Photon abgestoßen wird, hat es sich zu einer längeren Wellenlänge verschoben, okay? Es hat niedrigere Energie. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie sie das auf ziemlich geschickte Art und Weise zeigen können. Es gibt eine sehr leichte, einfache Vorführung, die ich beschreiben möchte. Um dies zu demonstrieren, müssen Sie sich einen dieser orangen Textmarker besorgen, die man überall kaufen kann. Nehmen Sie auf jeden Fall einen von den billigen. Nehmen Sie keinen von denen, die nicht verschmieren, die lösen sich in Wasser nicht so gut auf. Die billigen lösen sich in Wasser viel besser auf. Dann brauchen Sie ein kleines Fläschchen mit Wasser, wie ich es hier habe. Und ich muss lediglich diesen Textmarker öffnen und ihn für einige Sekunden ins Wasser stecken, ein bisschen herumdrehen, mehr brauche ich gar nicht machen. Mit dem Textmarker sind wir dann fertig. Das Fläschchen verschließen und ein bisschen schütteln, mehr braucht man nicht machen. Und als Nächstes braucht man einen grünen Laserpointer, den die meisten von uns haben. Es braucht kein besonders toller zu sein. Man braucht keine hohe Kraft. All das braucht man nicht, fünf Milliwatt sind vollkommend ausreichend. Wenn jetzt das Licht ausgemacht wird, zeige ich Ihnen, was Sie hiermit machen können. Das schalte ich auch aus. Es ist nicht komplett dunkel, aber vielleicht können Sie es trotzdem sehen. Das hoffe ich zumindest. Das ist doch echt lässig, oder? (Iacht) Das Lässige daran ist, dass es ein kleines extra Licht ist. Und es diese Farbe hat. Wie Sie wissen, ist der Laser grün, und das Licht aus dieser Probe ist eher orange, und Sie können zeigen, dass obwohl das Licht orange abstrahlt, wenn es hier durch geht, das übertragene Licht immer noch grün ist. Man hat nicht das gesamte Licht des Lasers aufgebraucht, das übertragene Licht ist grün. Und dies ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür, dass wir nur ein paar Moleküle brauchten, um dieses Licht herauszuholen und es deutlich zu sehen. Was wir also in unseren Experimenten machen, ist natürlich, dass wir die Konzentration in der Probe auf ein unglaublich niedriges Niveau reduzieren, bis auf die Grenze des Einzelmoleküls und dabei auch das Volumen reduzieren und das Licht der einzelnen Moleküle feststellen. Wie man sieht, kann man das sogar mit den eigenen Augen machen. Bei den Experimenten, die heutzutage bei Raumtemperatur durchgeführt werden, lassen Sie mich Sie kurz erinnern, wie wir sie bei Raumtemperatur durchführen. Wir nutzen keine FM-Spektroskopie, sondern pumpen vom Ausgangszustand zum angeregten Zustand und stellen dabei diese Fluoreszenzverlagerung in langen Wellenlängen fest. Normalerweise betrachten wir diese kleinen, winzigen Moleküle, die etwa ein bis zwei Nanometer groß sind, oder ein grünes Fluoreszenzprotein, und verbinden das mit einem Molekül, das uns interessiert, beispielsweise eine Zelle, wo man diese Moleküle innen hat. Aber um einzelne Moleküle festzustellen, konzentrieren wir den Laser auf den kleinstmöglichen Punkt herunter und diese Größe wird durch Beugung eingeschränkt, um über zwei Mal der numerischen Blende zu landen. Um also zur Grenze des Einzelmoleküls zu gelangen, muss man die Moleküle verdünnen. Man braucht sie weiter auseinander als die Breite dieses kleinen Brennflecks. So stellen wir Einzelmoleküle bei Raumtemperatur fest. Und die Arbeit bei Raumtemperatur begann natürlich mit der Arbeit Kellers und vielen anderen Anfang 1990, aber die Nahfeld-Techniken und konfokalen Techniken und Weitfeld-Techniken wurden alle schon währenddessen gezeigt. Um Ihnen einige echte Daten über ein echtes System zu zeigen, damit Sie sehen, wie das aussieht: Hier ist das aus einer Zelle gebildete System, bei der sich das transmembrane Protein namens MHCII in der Zellmembran befindet, und das durch Markierung eines Antigens, das Fluor-4 an sich hat, markiert wird. Jeder der Punkte auf diesem Bild kommt also von dem Licht vom individuellen MHCII-Komplex. Übrigens, wie ich bereits sagte, kann man dieses Licht mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Man kann in unsere Mikroskope schauen, sich ans Dunkel anpassen, und das Licht einzelner Moleküle mit den eigenen Augen sehen. Deshalb lohnt es sich, die Augen zu schützen. Sie sind großartige Detektoren. Schaut man sich diesen Film als zeitabhängige Funktion an, dann wird es wirklich spannend. Wir können das mit lebendigen Zellen und bei Raumtemperatur machen. Man sieht, dass sie sich ausbreiten. Sie bewegen sie über die ganze Zellmembran und tanzen regelrecht auf der Oberfläche der Zelle. Sie gehen auch aus, das ist ein Teil der Fotobleichungsprozesse. Es kann in diesem Experiment auch zu Blinken kommen, worüber wir gleich sprechen werden. Das ist ein Beispiel dafür, was mit Einzelmolekülen bei Raumtemperatur gemacht werden kann. Das war aus dem Jahr 2002, aber es gibt noch ein Ereignis aus den 1990er-Jahren, das ich erwähnen möchte. Wir hatten uns entschlossen, uns einzelne Abzüge dieser fluoreszierenden Proteine anzuschauen, die von Roger Tsien und anderen, die Sie bereits bei diesem wunderbaren Meeting getroffen oder von denen Sie gehört haben, entwickelt wurden. Ich war zu der Zeit an der UC San Diego, wo auch Roger war, und bat ihn um ein Protein. Und Andy Cubitt gab uns etwas, was zu der Zeit als gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) bezeichnet wurde und das einige Mutationen besaß, und die längere Wellenlängenabsorption von YFP zu stabilisieren- Und wir wollten schauen, ob wir diese bei Raumtemperatur feststellen und abbilden konnten. Und hier sind einige Beispiele. Ja, Rob Dickson ist das gelungen. Das hatte zu dem Zeitpunkt noch niemand gemacht und gleich traten neue Überraschungen auf. Wir sahen Blinken, das heißt wie die Moleküle Bild für Bild ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten, ausstrahlten und dann für lange Zeit abschalteten und dann wieder angingen und ausgingen und angingen und so weiter auf sozusagen zufällige Art und Weise. Anders gesagt pumpten wir und sammelten Photonen, aber nach einer gewissen Zeitspanne ging das System in einen Dunkelzustand, wahrscheinlich eine Isomerisierung des Chromophors, von dem aus es thermisch zurückkehren und wieder ausstrahlen konnte. Eine weitere Überraschung bestand darin, dass wir nach einer langen Bestrahlung sahen, wie diese Moleküle in einen langlebigen Dunkelzustand übergingen. Wir dachten, dass sie vielleicht fotogebleicht wurden, aber Rob benutzte ein klein wenig blaues Licht mit kürzerer Wellenlänge und konnte so die zuvor ausgeschalteten Moleküle wiederherstellen. Man konnte sie dann wieder für eine lange Zeit ausstrahlen lassen und wenn sie dann aufhörten, konnte man sie mit 405 Nanometern wieder herstellen. Bei diesen Experimenten beobachteten wir also sowohl Blinken als auch lichtinduzierte Fotowiederherstellung. Diese und andere Arbeiten führten zu einem hohen Anstieg der Entwicklung von schaltbaren fluoreszierender Proteine. Das fotoaktivierbare YFP wurde später entwickelt, DRONPA zum Schalten von Miyawaki und anderen. Die Grundidee bestand jedoch darin, dass das Kräftespiel, das wir bei niedrigen Temperaturen gesehen hatten, auch bei Raumtemperatur verfügbar war. Hier ist übrigens das Patent, das Roger und ich für diesen speziellen Prozess damals erhalten haben (lacht). Aber was hatten wir im Sinn? An Super-Resolution dachten wir gar nicht. Wir dachten an optische Speicher. Wir dachten damals daran, diese Moleküle zur Speicherung einzelner Stücke zu nutzen. Wie gesagt kam ich von IBM und an solche Dinge dachten wir damals. Lassen sie uns nun über die Super-Resolution sprechen. Umgehung der optischen Auflösungsgrenze. Um dies für alle auf einfache Weise darzustellen, haben wir hier eine Bakterienzelle, gerade mal ein paar Mikrometer lang und vielleicht 500 Nanometer breit. Und ein bestimmtes Protein wurde in diesem Fall mit gelb fluoreszierendem Protein markiert. Und man könnte denken, dass man lediglich eins dieser richtig, richtig teuren Mikroskope kaufen braucht, das beste Mikroskop, das es zu kaufen gibt, richtig teuer. Hier haben wir es. Hier ist das teure Mikroskop. Aber das Problem ist, dass man keine weiteren Einzelheiten sieht. Man möchte die möglichen Formen und Positionen dieser Moleküle sehen, und das wird durch die offensichtliche Auflösungsgrenze vereitelt. Obwohl die Emitter sehr klein sind, gerade mal ein paar Nanometer groß, sehen sie aus, als wären sie mehrere hundert Nanometer groß, was an diesem speziellen wichtigen physikalischen Effekt liegt, der von der Wellenlänge von Licht und der numerischen Apertur, die man benutzt, stammt. Der Grund dafür, warum Super-Resolution für viele Menschen heute aufregend ist, besteht darin, dass man von dieser Art Bild zu dieser Art Bild gelangt. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg im Detail. Ein gewaltiger Anstieg dessen, was darüber, was in der Zelle passiert, gemessen und quantifiziert werden kann. Um dies zu erklären, obwohl Sie zu Beginn der Woche bereits wunderschöne Erklärungen von Stefan und Eric gehört haben, möchte ich es auf eine sehr allgemeine Art und Weise beschreiben. Ich sage gerne, dass man zunächst Einzelmoleküle erfassen muss und dann zwei wesentliche Zutaten benötigt. Wohlgemerkt beschreibe ich die Super-Resolution nur auf der Basis von Einzelmolekülen. Stefan hat bereits wunderbare Arbeit bei der Besprechung von STED und anderen Methoden, die auf einem gemusterten Lichtstrahl beruhen, um Moleküle ein- und auszuschalten, geleistet. Zunächst muss man die Einzelmoleküle super-lokalisieren. So kann man sich das auf hübsche Art und Weise vorstellen: Hier haben wir einen Aschekegel in einem vulkanischen See am Crater Lake in Oregon. Falls Sie mal die Möglichkeit haben, dorthin zu reisen, sollten Sie sie nutzen. Es ist wirklich ein schöner See und es gibt einen Aschekegel in diesem See. Und selbstverständliche habe ich meinen obligatorischen Kartenmaßstab: 120 mal 10 hoch 9 Nanometer. Jetzt wissen Sie natürlich ganz genau, dass man, wenn man mit dem Handy auf die Spitze des Berges geht, die GPS-Koordinaten des Berggipfels auslesen kann. Das ist es im Prinzip, was wir machen. Hier ist eins unserer Einzelmolekül-Bilder. Hierbei handelt es sich um ein YFP-Molekül, gelb fluoreszierendes Protein, in einer Bakterie, und ich habe es in ein 3D-Bild umgewandelt, um Ihnen diese Helligkeit hier auf der Z-Achse zu zeigen. Wie Sie sehen besitzt das Einzelmolekül eine Breite, die von Beugung hervorgerufen wird. Wir verbreitern also diese Stelle auf einem verpixelten Detektor und nehmen mehrere Proben der Form dieser Stelle. Anhand dieser Proben kann man die Form zusammensetzen und ein sehr gutes Aufmaß der Position erhalten, welches viel besser als die Auflösungsgrenze, als die Breite des Berges ist. Die andere Schlüsselidee bezeichne ich gerne als aktive Kontrolle der abgestrahlten Konzentration. Ein Forscher muss sich aktiv für einen Mechanismus entscheiden, der die abgestrahlte Konzentration kontrolliert. Warum das überhaupt nützlich ist? Hier haben wir zunächst die Struktur. Stellen Sie sich vor, dass wir diese Struktur beobachten wollen und sie dafür mit den fluoreszierenden Markern versehen, von denen ich vorhin gesprochen habe. Wenn man jetzt einfach den Laser einschaltet, dann strahlen alle von ihnen gleichzeitig ab, worin selbstverständlich das Problem besteht. Wie man sieht, überlappen sich alle Punkte der Einzelmoleküle, so sieht die Situation bei niedriger Auflösung aus. Wir nutzen dann einen Ein-/Aus-Prozess. Wir nutzen eine Methode, um die Moleküle entweder in einen Grundzustand oder einen Dunkelzustand zu versetzen, und nutzen dies zur Kontrolle der Konzentration auf einem niedrigen Niveau. Dann schaltet man nur einige an und ortet diese. Das macht man wieder und wieder und kann schließlich eine pointillistische Technik, ein Begriff aus der Kunst, eine pointillistische Technik zur Rekonstruktion der zugrunde liegenden Struktur verwenden. Von dieser Idee hörte ich 2006 zum ersten Mal von Eric Betzig, der dies als PALM bezeichnete. Später hörte man von STORM von Zhuang, F-PALM und dann erschien eine ganze Reihe von Akronymen, die für verschiedene Mechanismen mit dieser Funktion standen. Wir begannen damals mit der Nutzung unserer YFP-Reaktivierung, die ich Ihnen gerade zeigte, und gaben dem kein Akronym, was natürlich der Grund dafür ist, dass es in Vergessenheit geriet. Hier also ein Akronym, um dem Stapel spaßeshalber ein weiteres hinzuzufügen, Single Molecule Active Control Microscopy (Einzelmolekül-Aktivsteuerungs-Mikroskopie), kurz SMACM. Wie funktioniert diese Arbeit in einem echten System? Hier ein Bild mit vielen Einzelmolekülen. Diese rechts erscheinenden Punkte entstehen durch die Lokalisierung von Molekülen, und wenn man dies viele Male tut, dann kann man die Daten aufbauen, die man braucht, um dieses hochauflösende Bild der zugrunde liegenden Struktur zu rekonstruieren. Das funktioniert auch in Bakterien, aber ich will Ihnen zeigen, wie gelb fluoreszierendes Protein (YFP) in Bakterien funktioniert. YFP, das ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt hatte, blinkt wunderschön. Hier sind einige Bakterienzellen und hier die Fluoreszenzen dieser Zellen, in denen etwas markiert ist. Genau dies verwenden wir in unserer Datenaufnahme. Das schöne Blinken der einzelnen fluoreszierenden Proteine gibt uns Aufschluss darüber, wo sich diese Moleküle befinden. Und dieser Ansatz half uns, von diesen Arten von auflösungsbegrenzten Bildern mehrerer verschiedener Proteine zu diesen hochauflösenden Bildern all jener Proteine zu gelangen. Es handelt sich um eine wirklich wunderbare Art, um die Struktur zu sehen, die vorher nicht beobachtbar war. Hierbei handelt es um Live-Zellen. Hier eine fixierte Zelle. Wir haben es also sowohl in fixierten als auch in Live-Situationen. Um Ihnen zu zeigen, dass man weitere Informationen erlangen kann, die von diesem Schema etwas zeitabhängig sind, möchte ich die von Robin Hochstrasser entwickelte PAINT-Idee erwähnen. Bei PAINT nimmt man die Struktur, die man beobachten möchte, und bringt Luminophore von außen hinein, von außerhalb der Lösung. Luminophore schwirren herum, wenn sie sich in der Lösung befinden, und lassen sich nicht einfach auffinden, wenn sie sich aber mit etwas verbinden, dann sitzen sie dort und geben einem all das Licht, mit dem man dann die Verbundenen ortet. Also nutzen wir diese Idee auf der Basis eines nun mit Fluoreszenz markierten Liganden, mit Fluoreszenz markierten Saxitoxinen, um spannungsversperrte Natriumkanäle in einer neuronalen Modellzelle, einer PC12-Zelle, zu beleuchten. Dies wird auf diesem Bild gezeigt. Dies ist eine der axonalen Projektionen außerhalb einer abgegrenzten PC12-Zelle, und die Schönheit steckt selbstverständlich im Film. Bei diesem Film beträgt der Durchschnitt rund 500 Millisekunden. Wir sehen alle Ortungen während des Zeitfensters von 500 Millisekunden und spielen dies wie bei einem Daumenkino ab, und man sieht, wie all diese Strukturen mit der Zeit wachsen und verschwinden, während die Zelle fortlaufend wächst. Die Zeit rennt mir davon, weshalb ich einige Dinge überspringen muss. Ich überspringe diese Anwendungen bei der Huntington-Krankheit. Hier einige schöne Gesamtsummen, die wir mit Super-Resolution bei Aggregaten des Huntington-Proteins beobachten können. Ich werde ein weiteres Beispiel überspringen und mit einigen Lehren abschließen, die ich Ihnen gerne mitgeben möchte, damit Sie diese mit Ihren Freunden teilen können. Sie alle kennen diese schöne Nobel-Medaille. Selbstverständlich sieht man Alfred Nobels Abbild auf dieser Medaillenseite. Ich würde aber wetten, dass Sie die Rückseite der Medaille noch nie gesehen haben. Hier die Rückseite der Nobel-Medaille. Sie ist wirklich sehr, sehr schön. Eine schöne, bewundernswerte Darbietung. Hier auf der linken Seite ist die Natur, die Natur, die ein Füllhorn hält, und auf der rechten Seite ist die Wissenschaft. Und die Wissenschaft lüftet den Schleier der Natur. Es ist ganz erstaunlich. Ihr Ziel sollte es sein zu kommunizieren, dass Wissenschaft Spaß macht. Helfen Sie mit, den Schleier der Natur in unserer Welt zu lüften. Es gibt aber mehr, über das Sie nachdenken und das Sie an die Jüngeren kommunizieren sollten, hauptsächlich an die Studenten im Vorstudium und jene, die sich für Wissenschaft zu interessieren beginnen. Es ist immer wichtig, seine Passion zu finden. Das ist unerlässlich, weil es schwere Arbeit sein kann, sich durch die Aufgabenstellungen zu arbeiten, die wir auf unsere eigene methodische Art stellen. Man muss dafür entschlossen, hartnäckig und methodisch sein, aber es ist von großer Wichtigkeit, dabei auch Spaß zu haben. Alles basiert auf der Frage, wie Dinge funktionieren. Zu viele Menschen betrachten ihr Handy für selbstverständlich, betrachten einige der Technologien in unserer Welt für zu selbstverständlich. Wir sollten wirklich öfter hinterfragen, wie Dinge auf einer tiefen, fundamentalen Ebene wirklich funktionieren, bis hin zu einzelnen Molekülen. Mit der Konsequenz, dass man über konventionelles Wissen hinausgeht und Annahmen hinterfragt. Natürlich glauben wir, dass uns Wissenschaft eine rationale und voraussehende Methode bietet, unsere Welt zu verstehen, und aus diesem Grund üben wir sie aus. Deshalb möchte ich meinen ehemaligen Studenten, Postdoktoranten und Mitarbeitern und natürlich dem jetzigen Guacamole-Team danken. Hier können Sie sehen, wie ernst sie sein können. Das ist kurz vor Halloween. Danke auch an unsere Agenturen. Und hier noch etwas zum Spaß, unser Kein-Ensemblemittelwert-Logo, das für Einzelmolekül-Spektroskopie steht. Ich vergaß zu sagen, warum wir Guacamole-Team heißen. Nun, Sie wissen ja, ein Molekül entspricht einer Guacamole. Eins hoch die Anzahl der Mole in der Avocado. In diesem Sinn, vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

William Moerner on super-resolution
(00:23:44 - 00:26:53)


 

Eric Betzig (2015) - Working Where Others Aren't

I'd just like to thank the Foundation for their hospitality and all of you for being here today. I'm a tool builder by instinct and inclination. I got my start as a tool builder as a graduate student at Cornell when my advisers were working on an idea to basically shine light through a hole that's much smaller than a wavelength of light and use that as a little nano-flashlight to drive across the sample point by point and beat that diffraction limit that you heard about from Stefan and get a super-resolution image. I worked on that technology for six years in graduate school and was fortunate enough to kind of get it sort of working to the point where I got my foot in the door at Bell Labs and then had my own lab at Bell Labs, and proceeded to work on it for another six years. During that time, we did a number of applications eventually as the technology slowly improved. We could use polarization contrast to look at magneto-optic materials or use fluorescence to be able to look at phase transitions and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers, do super-resolution lithography, histology, and low temperature cryogenic spectroscopy of quantum wells. So the technique started to take off, but the reason I got into near field was two-fold. I wanted to get into science not to do incremental things, but to do really impactful big things, and it seemed like near field was a possible way of doing that kind of thing. But the other thing I really liked about it was, at the time we started we didn't know anybody doing this. And I really liked the idea of going in a field from its birth and not having a bunch of elbows to bang up against while I'm trying to do my work. It turned out there were a couple of other groups working on it, and the idea goes all the way back to the twenties, but still it was pretty wide open territory at that time, and that felt a lot of fun. As it continued to develop, though, and as we started to have successes the field got more and more crowded. Particularly with two applications that we demonstrated. In '92, we were able to basically have the world record of data storage density by writing bits with near field as small as 60 nanometres. This started a whole big area with people jumping into this. I was under a little gentle pressure to start a commercialization programme based on this, but I didn't really want to go and do that. I didn't want to lead a big group. I wanted to still just explore where near field might go. Fortunately, my bosses at Bell were conducive to that and so I was able to do that. And it paid off because very quickly we were able to do what I dreamed of doing which was biology, which was, in this case, to be able to look at the actin cytoskeleton at about 50 nanometre resolution back in 1993. The problem is this was a fixed cell, and the dream really was to be able to have an optical microscope that could look at living cells with the resolution of an electron microscope, and we still weren't there. There was one thing about this experiment, which is that these single actin filaments had high enough signal-to-noise that it suggested that we could even see single molecules. And so, this was pretty much in the air in this era because a few years earlier W. E. Moerner had seen at cryogenic temperatures the spectral signature of single molecules. And you'll hear about that in a few days. And it turned out to be actually very easy to see single molecules with near field because the focus is so small that you reduce the background to near zero, and then it becomes very easy to see these single molecules, but there were surprises like their shapes were different and so forth. It turned out this was due to the orientations of the molecules, so we could measure the orientations and even determine their positions down to about a 40th of the wavelength of light. So at this time, this takes us up to '94, many people jumped into the field because of the spectroscopy applications, the data storage applications, the potential biology and single molecule applications, and I was basically really, really sick of doing near field at this time, and part of it was because of the fundamental limitations of the technology. The worst of them is that the light that comes out of that sub-wavelength hole spreads extremely rapidly. And if you're even about ten molecules away, you get a significant loss of resolution. Well, if the dream is to look at living cells, a cell is a lot rougher than that. But it had many other limitations, but at the same time so many people were jumping in the field and saying that, you know, it would cure cancer or that the moon was made of green cheese, or whatever. And what I basically learned in a career in science is that science has all of these fads, where there are these booms and busts, and so forth. And near field became one of these fads. And technologies basically go like this, and this is where I like to get in. This is where it's really fun, where it starts to pay off on the investment, and this is the time I found where you want to bail because this is where basically, you know, people go crazy, you know, with these things. This is where you'd like to believe it will go, but every new technology to me is like a new-born baby, and you think that it's going to become president or that it's going to cure cancer, win a Nobel prize, but usually you're happy if it just stays out of jail in the end. (laughing) So this is basically where most technologies end up, with some level that's above zero so it was a net gain, but not so much. And with near field, I felt like every good paper I was doing was just providing the justification for a hundred pieces of crap that followed. And I really felt like, what I was doing was a net negative to society because it was a waste of time and a waste of taxpayer's money. So basically I up and quit, and I quit not just Bell, I quit science. And so, I didn't have any idea what I wanted to do so I became a house husband. And a few months later while I was pushing my daughter around in a stroller, I realized that there was a way of taking some of the experiments I had done previously to come up with a different way of beating the diffraction limit. So the idea is if we care about fluorescence, which Stefan told you, why fluorescence is so important, the problem is that each of the molecules makes a little fuzzy ball, and those fuzzy balls overlap, and you got nothing but a mush. But if those molecules were different from one another in some way, say that they glowed in different colours, then I could look at them by their different colours in a higher dimensional space of XY and wavelength in that axis. Once they were isolated from one another, then I can just find the centroid, find the centre of those fuzzy blobs to much better precision than the diameter of the fuzzy blob and hence get with near molecular precision the coordinate of every molecule in the sample. So that was the basic idea. I was really excited about that for a month, but then I realized the catch is that even with the best focus you can create with a conventional microscope, there might be hundreds or thousands of molecules in that diffraction limited spot. And so you need ridiculously good discrimination be it wavelength or whatever in that third dimension to be able to turn on and see one molecule on top of hundreds or thousands of others. So I didn't really know how to do that, so I just published that while unemployed and left it at that. And so in the end, I fell back on my backup plan which was: my dad had started a machine tool company in '85 which by '94 had grown to about 50 million in sales. What they did is, they would make these very customized very large machines to make in very high volume a single part, customized for that part, for the auto industry. And so, this was a successful technology, but I had so much ego and still do, and so much naivety and still do, that I believe that if a single physicist when to the Rust Belt he could save it from the Japanese. So I went there and tried to see if I could do something to improve upon this technology. So I developed this machine which used an old technology called hydraulics, married it to energy storage principles you have in hybrid cars and also nonlinear control algorithms, and was able to make a machine that would take something the size of the width of this auditorium and collapse it to something the size of a compact car. And it would move four tons at eight g's of acceleration and position it to five micron precision. It was an amazing thing that I was very proud of. I spent four years developing it, three years trying to sell it, and in that time I sold two of them. And so, I learned that while I may not be an academic scientist, I'm a really horrible business man. And so, after blowing through over a million dollars of my dad's money, I went to him and I apologized, and I said, "I'm sorry, I gave this everything I had, but I just can't sell this thing." And so, I quit again. So then, it's the blackest time in my life because not only had I pissed away my academic career, I had also thrown away my backup plan of working for my family. And so, I needed to find something, and so I reconnected with my best friend at Bell, Harald Hess, who had also left Bell as Bell continued to shrink in the 90s and went to work in industry. And he was suffering the same sort of midlife crisis I was. He was more successful in business than I was, but still unsatisfied. That we really wanted to go back and do curiosity driven research and be able to work with our own hands and not be managers or anything like that, which typically is what starts to happen to you when you're in your 40s. We wanted to live like graduate students basically, okay. So we started to meet at various national parks and start to plan out what could we do in order to get back into a lab. And so, I started reading the scientific literature for the first time in a decade, and the first thing I ran across that just knocked me out was green florescent protein. The idea that you could snip some DNA out of a glowing jellyfish, and get that any organism you want to express any protein you want in a live organism, and have that fluorescence specific, 100% specificity, to the protein, was magic to me because it was so difficult in that actin experiment I showed, to get the labelling in there well enough to be able to see the actin without seeing a whole bunch of nonspecific crap besides. And so, I said, "Damn it. I guess I got to be a microscopist again." But I had a problem in that in ten years of not doing any physics, all my physics knowledge had flown straight out of my head. I couldn't remember anything. Well, I would take the kids to school. I would then go down to the cottage that we had nearby and sit out on the lake, and just start relearning physics from freshman textbooks onward, but within three months, it pretty much all fell back into place. I hadn't really forgotten it. It was just kind of blocked. And I started trying to figure out how I could use light in order to make a better microscope. Not a super-resolution microscope at this time but a better microscope that would exploit the advantages of live cell imaging of GFP. So I started thinking in fundamental terms from initially two wave vectors creating a standing wave. I added more wave vectors, got these weird periodic patterns, looked in the literature and heard about these things called optical lattices, which are used in quantum optics to trap and cool atoms. And I eventually came up with new classes of optical lattices that would actually be really good as a 3D multifocal excitation field to do massively parallel imaging at high speed of live cells. So I called that optical lattice microscopy, and that was the idea I wanted to pitch to get back into science. So Harald was helping me in this task of getting back in, and one of the places we went to visit to sell this idea was Florida State University where we met Mike Davidson. And Mike told us about not just fluorescent proteins but there was a very new type of fluorescent protein on the scene, which initially if you shine blue light on it, nothing happens. But if you shine purple light on it first, you activate the molecules, and then blue light causes it to turn green or to emit green light. And so, basically, it's a fluorescent molecule that you can turn on and off. So Harald and I were sitting in the airport in Tallahassee, and it struck us that this the missing link to make that idea that I had pitched in my first round of unemployment ten years earlier to work. So the idea is you turn the violet light down so low that only a few molecules come on at a time. And statistically they're likely to be separated by more than the diffraction limit so then you can find the centres of those fuzzy balls. Those molecules either turn off or bleach. You turn on the violet again to turn on another subset and round and round and round you go until you bleed out every molecule from the sample. So it was the idea I had in '95 except with time as the discriminating dimension, and that violet light is the knob by which we could get higher and higher resolution across that time axis. So obviously we had another problem in that I had convinced Harald on the basis of the lattice microscope, although he wasn't convinced to do it with me, to quit his job so now you got to unemployed guys. So how are we going to implement this idea because we think it's too ridiculously simple and a lot of people have to be thinking of it, and we were right. There were a lot of people just right on our heels. The good news is that Harald is a lot smarter than I am. So when I left Bell, I told them to go to hell, but when Harald left Bell, he was able to take all of his equipment with him. So we pulled that out of the storage shed, and then normally you do this type of work in the garage, but we were able to do it in his living room because he wasn't married, and it was a lot more comfortable there. In a couple of months, we had the scope built, and then I was scheduled to give a talk at NIH about about my lattice microscope, and I begged Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz and George Patterson, who invented this photoactivated protein to come to my talk. Took them to lunch, swore them to secrecy, told them the idea, and that's the last missing link that needed to be filled, because Harald and I knew zip about biology. But Jennifer is one of the best cell biologist in the world and so she said just bring it here. So we packed up the scope, went to Jennifer's dark room, and within another couple months after that, we went from this sort of... This is looking at a slice through a cell at two lysosomes, little protein degradation bags, and then this is the diffraction limit and that's the photoactivated localization microscope or PALM image, and the resolution went from this to this. So two things, one Harald and I went from the concept of this idea to having the data in our science paper in six months, and we were able to do that because everybody left us alone. We were able to work just by ourselves. The second thing is that this type of work really requires that sort of solitude that you get in that sort of situation. That ability to focus 100%, and that's again and again I have found in my career critical, is to not be in academia for me has been key. Because whether I was at Bell, working for my father or working there, or working where I work now, it's the idea of just being left alone and focused with 100% attention on a problem is what allows me to get things done. So that's all the good news about super-resolution, but every new stage of my career has been influenced by the limitations of the thing I was doing before. And super-resolution has a crap-load of limitations. The first is that again we're looking at fluorescence, and if you don't decorate your fluorescence molecules densely enough, then you can completely miss a feature if you're at less than half a period in the spacing. And so, this is called the Nyquist criterion. You can see here that if you want to sample this image it doesn't matter what the intrinsic resolution of the microscope is, you don't have enough information. The bad news is that if you relate this to super-resolution if you don't have on the order of 500 molecules to get 20 nanometre resolution, you're done. It turns out that's a very high standard of labelling density compared to what most biologist had done previously for doing diffraction limited work. And what it means is that the ownness in making these technologies work is not on the tool developer it's, unfortunately, all on the biologist to figure out sample prep procedures that will work properly for this. And so now, you can also ask what is the big deal about super-resolution. I mean we've had EM for a long time, and its' pretty damn good. Well, there's two main reasons which Stefan hit upon. First is to do protein specific contrast, usually that's done by structural imaging on fixed cells. But the problem is that 95% of what we think we learned by super-resolution has been from chemically fixed cells, and their purpose is to cross-link proteins so they screw up the ultrastructure, and so it means we have to put an asterisk next to almost everything we learn when we look at fixed cells. The other more exciting application would be to do live cell imaging, but the problem is you can think if I want even just a factor of two resolution improvement in each of three dimensions, it means my voxels are eight times smaller. It means I have one eighth as many molecules in each voxel. If I want to get the same number of photons to get the same signal and noise as in a diffraction limited experiment, I either need to bang my cell with eight times as much light which it's not going to like, or else I'm going to have to wait eight times as long for those photons to come out. And the whole damn image will get smeared by motion artefacts. So there's claims in the literature of resolution for live cell imaging that require just by this back of the envelope calculation of a thousand to over ten thousand times as many photons from the cell as in a diffraction limited experiment. This is almost fantasy again. So I'm basically sometimes, with super-resolution, I felt like I was living the same bad nightmare all over again that I was in the near field era. By 2008, there were all sorts of crazy claims in terms of what could be done with super-resolution. And I knew just from my experience that this was not possible. And so, other problems are the intensities that are required for STED or for PALM are anywhere from kilowatts to gigawatts per square centimetre. But life evolved at a tenth of a watt per square centimetre. So we have to ask ourselves if we're doing live cell imaging, are we looking at a live cell or are we looking at a dead cell or a dying cell from the application of all this light. And these methods take a long time to create an image, and the cell is moving, and so you end up getting motion artefacts. So the moral of the story is I don't care what method you want to use, if you want higher spacial resolution you need more pixels. More pixels means more measurements. That takes more time. It means throwing more potentially damaging light at the specimen, and so if you're going to be honest your always playing with trade-offs between spatial resolution toxicity, temporal resolution, and imaging depth. The guy who really understood these trade-offs better than all of us, earlier than all of us, was Swedish native Mats Gustafsson who developed a third method of far field super-resolution, called structured illumination microscopy. And this technique you use a standing wave of excitation rather than uniform illumination of the sample which creates these Moiré fringes against the information in the sample to create lower spatial frequencies that the microscope can detect. One of the arguments in the Nobel committee's report as to why this did not share the Nobel prize, is it's limited to a factor of two in resolution gain, whereas STED's localization is diffraction unlimited. But in my opinion, this weakness of SIM is actually its strength. Because, first off, you need much lower labelling densities to achieve that which is much more compatible with current technology. And second, it requires orders of magnitude less light, and is orders of magnitude faster than the other methods. So here are a couple of examples. Here you're looking at the endoplasmic reticulum in a live cell, and yes the resolution is only you have because you're able to look at this cell for 1800 rounds of imaging at subsecond intervals. You get this dynamic aspect that you can't get with the other methods. Here is another example of showing the dynamics of actin in a T-cell after it's provoked the immunological synapse. So the good news is we were able to recruit Mats from UCSF to Janelia in 2008, but he was diagnosed with... Oops, that was interesting. So he was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2009, and he ended up dying in 2011. So I ended up inheriting much of his group and his technology, and we've been trying to extend his legacy with this tool, too. Key to that is, if the argument is that SIM doesn't deserve to be spoken of in the same breath with STED and PALM because it doesn't have the same resolution, how can we get past that 100 nanometre barrier? Well, the simple and stupid way is to just increase the numerical aperture of your lens. So recently a 1.7 NA lens came onto the market which allows you with the GFP channel to push to 80 nanometre resolution. And then you can study for dozens or hundreds of time points in multiple colours because it doesn't require specialised labels. Dynamics in this case looking at clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and its interaction with the cortical actin, and how that helps to pull in these pits to bring cargoes inside of the cell. We've also developed recently another technique, a nonlinear structured illumination technique, that uses again this photo switching principle to put on a standing wave to generate the activation light in a spatially patterned way and read out the detection the same way to go from twice beyond the diffraction limit to three times beyond the diffraction limit. And then, that has gotten us to 60 nanometre resolution. Not as many time points and not quite as fast, but still allows us to look at live cells. So if, again, the knock has been that it doesn't have the resolution of other methods: Here we've compared this nonlinear SIM to RESOLFT and to localization microscopy, and basically we have resolution every bit as good, if not better with SIM now than we have with these other tools, but with hundreds of times less light and hundreds of times faster than these other methods. So I really think for live imaging between 60 and 200 nanometres SIM is going to be the go-to tool, and for structural imaging below 60 nanometres, PALM will be the tool. So the moral of the story is that while, again, everybody is crowding up against this goal of getting the highest spatial resolution, Mats wanted a space for himself working where others aren't and by pulling a little bit back, he had this whole play area where he could develop this tool. So it begs the question of, what if we go back all the way to the diffraction limit. Is there something we can do as physicists to make microscopes better for biologist and particularly, is there a way that we can increase the speed and noninvasiveness of imaging and live cell imaging to improve it by that same order of magnitude that PALM does in spatial aspect? And so, why do you want to do that? Well, the hallmark of life is that it's animate. And every living thing is a complex thermodynamic pocket of reduced entropy through which matter and energy is flowing continuously. So while structural imaging like super-resolution or electron microscopy will always be important, the only way we're going to understand how inanimate molecules self-assemble to create the animate cell is by studying it across all four dimensions of space time at the same time. So when I got as sick of super-resolution in 2008 as I was of near field in 1994, that's what I set out as my goal. The good news is that there was a new tool on the market that we could exploit which is the light sheet microscope. So what it does is it shoots a plane of illumination through a 3D sample to only illuminate one plane at once, so there's no damage to the regions above and below, and you can take a very quick picture cause the whole plane is illuminated then go plane by plane through the specimen. It's been transformative for understanding embryogenesis at single cell resolution, but it has a limitation in that the light sheets are pretty darn thick on the single cell level. We were able, basically, to then bring some physics tricks called nondiffracting beams. First these were Bessel beams, and eventually I was able to dust off my old ten-year-old lattice theory because two dimensional optical lattices are nondiffracting beams and create a light sheet that's much thinner, to then be able to look at the dynamics inside of single cells. So here are a bunch of examples of this. We've had about 50 different groups come to our lab to use this microscope and almost everyone has left with big smiles and ten terabytes of data. We never hear from them after that because they don't know what to do with ten terabytes of data. But in any case, I'm very proud of what we've done with PALM, but I'm morally convinced at this point that this will be the high water technique of my career. So one of the other things that that light sheet turned up, the lattice light sheet as we called it, turned out to be good for is that single molecule techniques in general have been limited to very thin samples because out of focus molecules obscure the signatures of the ones in focus. But the lattice light sheet is so thin that only in focus molecules are illuminated. And so that allowed us to apply another method of localization microscopy, developed by Robin Hochstrasser's group in the same year we developed PALM, where instead of prelabelling your cell and having a fixed number of molecules. Remember I said the basic problem is getting enough molecules in there to get the resolution you want. Well with PAINT, instead of prelabelling, the whole media around the cell is labelled with fluorophores. They're whizzing usually too fast to see, but when they stick they glow as a spot and then you localize those. So the advantage to this is there's an infinite army of molecules that can keep coming and coming and coming and decorate your cell. The disadvantage is because the media is glowing the SNR normally is too poor to do much single molecule imaging. So lattice light sheet with this PAINT technology is a marriage made in heaven. So here you're seeing 3D imaging over large volumes by using this method, and we're able to basically see. Now, basically, take localization microscopy to much thicker specimens at orders of magnitude higher density, and basically make something so we don't need to use EM to do sort of global contrast to combine with a local contrast we get from PALM. So the last thing Astrid, and then I'll be then off. I got two minutes and 22 seconds it says. You're early. Okay, is that we still have to deal with taking cells away from the cover slip. So much of what we've learned have been from immortalized cells, and all of these methods, if you take them from single cells and try to put them in organisms, they're incredibly sensitive to the refractive index variations that scramble the light as you go in and out with the fluorescent photons. So with STED, you have to have that perfect node in that doughnut. That's very sensitive to aberrations. With SIM, that standing wave gets corrupted. With confocal, your focus gets corrupted. With localization, your PSF, you have to have knowledge of the shape of that spot in order to find its centroid properly. And all of those things get screwed up by aberrations. Light sheet this is not showing, but as you go into an embryo. Right now, light sheet is in that same bullshit phase that other techniques are in, where people are saying: by using light sheet", but it just isn't so because the aberrations make the resolution so poor, you can't resolve single somas in certain areas of the brain. So what we've also been working on, is stealing from astronomers and using the tools of adaptive optics to allow us then to be able to look deep into live organisms. So this is an example here of looking in the brain of a developing zebrafish. In this case we had to develop a very fast AO technique because as you move from place to place the aberration is different so this represents 20,000 different adaptive optic corrections to cover this large volume. And as we go deep into the midbrain of the zebrafish, about 200 microns deep, we'll turn the adaptive optics off. That's what you would see with a state of the art microscope today, and then you turn the AO on and you get back to recovering the diffraction limit and recovering the signal. So for my group, what I really believe at this point is that we are on the cusp of a revolution in cell biology, because we still have not studied cells as cells really are. We need to study the cell on its own terms, and there's three parts of that puzzle. While GFP is great, it's largely been uncontrolled in its expression. So in the last couple years, these genome editing techniques have come on the scene to allow these proteins to be expressed at endogenous levels. These end up to be typically low levels so now confocal microscopy and these other techniques are far too perturbative to study dynamics, and you need things like lattice light sheet to be able to do that. But again, you can't look at cells in isolation and really see the whole story. You need to see all the cell-cell interactions, all the signalling that happens inside, where they actually evolved, and that's where the adaptive optics plays a part. So the future of my group is to develop adaptive optics to get that to work, to combine it with the lattice light sheet so we have a fast and noninvasive tool to look at dynamics. And then scroll in the super-resolution methods like SIM and PALM to add the high resolution on top of that. And with that, I thank you for your time.

Mein Dank geht an die Stiftung für ihre Gastfreundschaft und an Sie alle für Ihre Anwesenheit hier. Ich bin Maschinenbauer aus Instinkt und Neigung. Ich begann mit dem Maschinenbau als Doktorand in Cornell, als meine Betreuer an einer Idee arbeiteten, Licht durch ein Loch zu senden, das sehr viel kleiner als die Lichtwellenlänge war, und dies als ein kleine Nanolampe zu verwenden, um Punkt für Punkt durch die Probe zu fahren. Die Beugungsgrenze sollte überwunden werden, von der Stefan sprach, um ein Höchstauflösungsbild zu erreichen. Ich arbeitete an der Hochschule für Aufbaustudien sechs Jahre lang an dieser Technologie und hatte das Glück, sie solange weiterzuentwickeln bis zum Tage, an dem ich meinen Fuß in die Tür der Bell Labs bekam, dort schließlich mein eigenes Labor erhielt und weitere sechs Jahre an dieser Technologie arbeitete. In dieser Zeit entwickelten wir, während die Technologie langsam verbessert wurde, einige Anwendungen. Wir konnten Polarisationskontraste verwenden, zum Betrachten magneto-optischer Materialien, oder wir verwendeten Fluoreszenz, um Phasenübergänge und Langmuir-Blodgett Monoschichten sehen zu können, und Höchstauflösungslithografie, Histologie und kryogene Spektroskopie von Quantentöpfen vorzunehmen. Die Technologie gewann zunehmend an Bedeutung, aber zweierlei Gründe brachten mich zum Nahfeld. Ich wollte mich in der Wissenschaft nicht mit inkrementellen Dingen sondern mit wirklich Großem und Wirkungsvollem befassen und dafür schien Nahfeld eine Möglichkeit zu bieten. Das andere, was ich daran mochte war, als wir damit begannen, war uns keiner bekannt, der daran arbeitete. Ich mochte den Gedanken, ein noch unerforschtes Feld zu betreten, in dem es nicht jede Menge Ellbogen gab, die mir in die Seite stießen, während ich versuchte meine Arbeit zu tun. Es zeigte sich, dass ein paar andere Gruppen bereits daran arbeiteten. Die Idee reicht bis in die zwanziger Jahre zurück, damals war es dennoch ein ziemlich offenes Territorium und es fühlte sich faszinierend an. Allerdings, im Laufe der Entwicklung und mit dem Beginn unsers Erfolgs drängten immer mehr in das Feld. Besonders mit zwei Anwendungen, die wir im Jahr 1992 vorstellten, erreichten wir den Weltrekord bei der Datenspeicherdichte durch das Schreiben von Bits mit Nahfeld im 60-Nanometer-Bereich. Damit eröffnete sich ein großer Bereich, auf den sich die Leute stürzten. Ich stand unter dem Druck auf dieser Basis ein Programm zur späteren Vermarktung zu starten, was ich aber nicht wirklich wollte. Ich wollte keine große Gruppe leiten. Ich wollte noch immer einfach erkunden, wohin das Nahfeld führen könnte. Zum Glück hatten meine Vorgesetzten bei Bell Verständnis dafür und so konnte ich dies verfolgen. Es zahlte sich aus: Wir waren nämlich sehr schnell zu dem in der Lage, von dem ich geträumt hatte, nämlich im Bereich Biologie im Jahre 1993 das Aktinzytoskelett in einer etwa 50-Nanometer-Auflösung anzusehen. Das Problem war, es handelte sich um eine fixierte Zelle; der Traum war aber ein optisches Mikroskop, mit dem man sich lebenden Zellen mit der Auflösung eines elektronischen Mikroskops ansehen kann, und da waren wir noch nicht. Es gab eine Sache bei diesem Experiment: diese einzelnen Aktinfilamente hatten einen ausreichend großen Signal-Rausch-Abstand, der nahelegte, wir könnten sogar einzelne Moleküle sehen. Zu dieser Zeit war das noch ziemlich ungewiss, einige Jahre zuvor hatte nämlich W. E. Moerner bei kryogenen Temperaturen die spektrale Signatur einzelner Moleküle gesehen. Sie werden davon in wenigen Tagen hören. Es zeigte sich, dass es in der Tat sehr leicht war, einzelne Moleküle mit Nahfeld zu sehen, da der Brennpunkt so klein ist, dass man den Hintergrund nahezu auf Null reduziert und danach ist es sehr leicht, die einzelnen Moleküle zu sehen. Doch gab es Überraschungen, etwa dass die Formen unterschiedlich waren und so weiter. Als Ursache dafür stellte sich die Ausrichtung der Moleküle heraus, wir konnten also die Ausrichtungen messen und sogar ihre Positionen bis hinunter auf ein Vierzigstel der Lichtwellenlänge bestimmen. Damals, das führt uns ins Jahr ’94, stürzten sich viele Leute wegen der Spektroskopie-Anwendungen, der Datenspeicheranwendungen, der potentiellen biologischen und einzelmolekularen Anwendungen auf diesen Bereich und ich war es damals wirklich überdrüssig, mich mit Nahfeld zu befassen und das zum Teil auch wegen den fundamentalen Grenzen der Technologie. Das Schlimmste daran ist, dass das Licht, das aus dem Sub-Wellenlängen-Loch tritt, sich extrem schnell ausbreitet. Selbst wenn man nur zehn Moleküle entfernt ist, erhält man einen signifikanten Auflösungsverlust. Wenn man davon träumt, lebende Zellen zu sehen, so ist eine Zelle sehr viel gröber. Doch es gibt sehr viele andere Grenzen, zudem stürzten sich so viele Leute auf diesen Bereich und meinten, sie könnten Krebs heilen oder der Mond sei aus grünem Käse, oder was auch immer. Ich lernte in meiner wissenschaftlichen Laufbahn, dass es in der Wissenschaft alle diese Modeerscheinungen gibt, mit ihrem Auf und Ab und so weiter. Und Nahfeld wurde zu einer dieser Modeerscheinungen. Technologien entwickeln sich in etwa so, und hier möchte ich ansetzen. Hier macht es wirklich Freude und der Einsatz beginnt sich auszuzahlen und das ist die Zeit, in der man abspringen möchte, weil die Leute bei diesen Dingen ausflippen. Man möchte dann gerne glauben, es würde aufhören. Aber für mich ist jede neue Technologie wie ein Neugeborenes, man glaubt, es wird Präsident werden, oder den Krebs heilen, einen Nobelpreis gewinne, doch meist ist man nur froh, wenn es schließlich nicht im Gefängnis landet. So ist es im Grunde, wie die meisten Technologien enden, mit einem Niveau, das etwas über Null liegt, es gab also einen Nettogewinn, aber eben doch nicht allzu viel. Beim Nahfeld hatte ich das Gefühl, jedes gute Paper, das ich schrieb, war nur eine Rechtfertigung für hunderte Paper sinnlosen Quatsches, die dann folgten. Ich hatte wirklich das Gefühl, was ich tat war ein Negativbeitrag für die Gesellschaft, weil es Zeitverschwendung und eine Vergeudung von Steuergeldern war. Also stieg ich aus, und ich stieg nicht nur bei Bell aus, ich gab auch die Wissenschaft auf. Und da ich keine Ahnung hatte, was ich wollte, wurde ich Hausmann. Ein paar Monate später, ich fuhr gerade meine Tochter in ihrem Kinderwagen spazieren, erkannte ich, es gab eine Möglichkeit sich bei einige Experimente, die ich kürzlich durchgeführt hatte, einen anderen Weg einfallen zu lassen, um die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Der Gedanke war, ob wir uns um Fluoreszenz kümmern. Stefan hat davon gesprochen, weshalb Fluoreszenz so wichtig ist. Das Problem ist, jedes Molekül ist eine kleine unscharfe Kugel und diese unscharfen Kugeln überlagern sich und man erhält nur einen Brei. Würden sich diese Moleküle irgendwie voneinander unterscheiden, zum Beispiel in unterschiedlichen Farben leuchten, könnte ich sie auf ihre unterschiedlichen Farben hin in einem höher-dimensionalen Raum von XY und der Wellenlänge in dieser Achse ansehen. Sobald sie voneinander isoliert sind, kann ich den Zentroid, das Zentrum dieser unscharfen Kugeln, sehr viel präziser finden, anstelle des Durchmessers der unscharfen Kugel, und erhalte so mit beinahe molekularer Präzision die Koordinate jedes Moleküls in der Probe. Das war also die Grundidee. Ich war etwa einen Monat ganz begeistert davon, erkannte dann aber, der Haken ist, selbst mit dem besten Brennpunkt, den man bei einem konventionellen Mikroskop erhalten kann, kann es in diesem beugungsbegrenzten Punkt Hunderte oder Tausende von Molekülen geben. Daher braucht es eine absurd gute Auflösung, sei es bei der Wellenlänge, oder was auch immer es in dieser dritten Dimension ist, um einschalten zu können und ein Molekül auf innerhalb von Hunderten oder Tausenden zu sehen. Ich wusste nicht wirklich, wie das erzeugt werden kann. Ich publizierte das einfach während meiner Arbeitslosigkeit und beließ es dabei. Am Ende griff ich auf meinen Absicherungsplan zurück. Mein Vater hatte im Jahre 1985 ein Unternehmen für Werkzeugmaschinen gegründet, das bereits 1994 einen Umsatz von 50 Millionen erzielte. Das Unternehmen stellte sehr kundenspezifische, sehr große Maschinen für sehr große Losgrößen eines einzelnen Teils her. Die Maschinen werden für die Automobilindustrie genau für ein Teil kundenspezifisch hergestellt. Es handelte sich um eine erfolgreiche Technologie. Ich hatte aber ein so großes Ego und hab es immer noch, und sehr viel Naivität, die ich auch immer noch habe, dass ich der Meinung war, wenn ein einzelner Physiker in die alte Industrieregion der USA ginge, könnte er sie vor den Japanern retten. Also ging ich dorthin, um zu sehen, ob ich etwas zur Optimierung dieser Technologie tun könnte. Ich entwickelte diese Maschine, die eine alte Technologie nutzte, Hydraulik genannt, verband diese mit Prinzipien der Energiespeicherung, wie sie bei Hybridautos verwendet werden, sowie mit nichtlinearen Regelalgorithmen und war damit in der Lage eine Maschine herzustellen, die erst in etwa die Breite dieses Hörsaals hatte, und die ich dann in etwa auf die Größe eines Kleinwagens reduzierte. Dazu würde sie vier Tonnen bei 8 G Beschleunigung bewegen und auf 5 Mikrometer genau positionieren. Es war ein erstaunliches Ding, auf das ich sehr stolz war. Ich verbrachte vier Jahre damit, sie zu entwickeln, drei Jahre damit, sie zu verkaufen, und in dieser Zeit habe ich zwei davon verkauft. Ich lernte also, dass ich vielleicht kein Wissenschaftler bin aber sicher ein miserabler Geschäftsmann. Nachdem ich also mehr als eine Million Dollar meines Vaters in den Sand gesetzt hatte, ging ich zu ihm und entschuldigte mich. Ich sagte: “Es tut mir leid, ich habe alles was mir möglich ist gegeben, ich kann das Teil aber einfach nicht verkaufen.“ Und so kündigte ich wieder. Das war die dunkelste Zeit meines Lebens, ich hatte nicht nur meine akademische Laufbahn hingeschmissen sondern auch die Idee in den Sand gesetzt, im Familienbetrieb zu arbeiten. Ich musste also etwas finden und nahm daher wieder Kontakt mit einem Freund, Harald Hess, bei Bell auf. Auch er hatte Bell verlassen, als diese in den 90er Jahren schrumpften, und war in die Industrie gegangen. Er litt an der gleichen Art Midlife-Krise, an der auch ich litt. Im Geschäftsleben war er erfolgreicher als ich, aber eben doch unzufrieden. Wir wünschten uns wieder neugierige Forschung zu betreiben und mit den eigenen Händen zu arbeiten. Wir wollten keine Manager sein, was einem gewöhnlich passiert, wenn man in den 40ern ist. Wir wollten im Grunde wie Doktoranden leben. Wir begannen uns in verschiedenen Nationalparks zu treffen und schmiedeten Pläne, wie wir wieder zurück ins Labor gelangen könnten. Und ich begann nach einem Jahrzehnt wieder damit, wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu lesen. Das Erste, was mir da begegnete haute mich um. Es war das grüne fluoreszierende Protein. Der Gedanke, man könne etwas DNA aus einer leuchtenden Qualle schneiden und damit jedes Protein in einem gewünschten lebende Organismus spezifisch fluoreszieren lassen, mit 100% Bestimmtheit, das faszinierte mich, da es in dem Aktin-Experiment, das ich gezeigt hatte, so schwierig gewesen war, eine ausreichende gute Markierung zur Betrachtung des Aktins zu erhalten, ohne dass daneben eine Menge unspezifischen Mists auftauchte. Und da meinte ich: “Verdammt, ich glaube, ich werde wieder ein Mikroskopierer.“ Ich hatte aber ein Problem, da ich zehn Jahren lang aus der Physik heraus war, war mir mein ganzes physikalisches Wissen abhanden gekommen. Ich konnte mich an nichts erinnern. Nun, ich brachte die Kinder zur Schule. Danach ging ich zu dem Häuschen, das wir in der Nähe hatten, setzte mich am See hin und begann Physik neu zu lernen, ab den Lehrbüchern der Erstsemester und dann weiter. Innerhalb von drei Monaten fügte sich alles wieder zusammen. Ich hatte es nicht wirklich vergessen. Ich war nur irgendwie blockiert. Und ich versuchte herauszufinden, wie ich das Licht dazu verwenden könnte, um ein besseres Mikroskop zu erhalten. Damals ging es nicht um ein super-auflösendes Mikroskop, sondern um ein besseres Mikroskop, welches die Vorteile des Live Cell Imaging von GFP nutzen würde. Ich begann in grundlegenden Begriffen zu denken, von anfänglich zwei Wellenvektoren, die eine stehende Welle erzeugen. Ich fügte weitere Wellenvektoren hinzu und erhielt diese merkwürdig periodischen Muster, sah in der Literatur nach und hörte von etwas, das optische Gitter genannt wurde, die in der Quantenoptik dazu verwendet werden, Atome einzufangen und zu kühlen. Schließlich dachte ich mir die neuen Arten optischer Gitter aus, die sich wirklich gut als ein 3D multifokales Erregerfeld eignen würden, um bei lebenden Zellen eine sehr leistungsfähige Bildgebung in hoher Geschwindigkeit zu erhalten. Ich nannte dies optische Gitter-Mikroskopie und wollte es mit dieser Idee schaffen, wieder zur Wissenschaft zurückzukehren. Harald half mir bei der Aufgabe mich wieder hineinzuarbeiten und ein Ort, den wir aufsuchten, um diese Idee vorzustellen war die Florida State University, wo wir auf Mike Davidson trafen. Mike erzählte uns nicht nur von fluoreszierendem Protein, sondern von einer ganz neuen Art fluoreszierenden Proteins, bei dem, wenn man es zuerst mit blauem Licht anstrahlt, nichts geschieht. Wenn man es aber zuerst mit violettem Licht anstrahlt, die Moleküle aktiviert werden und blaues Licht daraufhin verursacht, dass es grün wird oder grünes Licht ausstrahlt. Im Grunde ist es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül, das man ein- und ausschalten kann. Da saßen Harald und ich also im Flughafen von Tallahassee, und uns wurde klar, dass dies das fehlende Glied war, um jene Idee, die ich während meiner ersten Arbeitslosigkeit zehn Jahren zuvor umrissen hatte, zu realisieren. Der Gedanke war, das violette Licht so niedrig zu fahren, dass sich jeweils nur wenige Moleküle einschalten. Rein statistisch werden sie wahrscheinlich durch mehr als die Beugungsgrenze getrennt, sodass man die Zentren der unscharfen Kugeln finden kann. Diese Moleküle schalten sich entweder aus oder verblassen. Man fährt das Violett wieder hoch, um eine andere Teilmenge anzuschalten und so geht es in einem fort weiter, bis man aus der Probe alle Moleküle extrahiert hat (Bleed-Out). Das war die Idee, die ich 1995 hatte, ausgenommen der Zeit als kritischer Dimension und dem violetten Licht als Knopf, mittels dessen wir immer höhere Auflösungen entlang dieser Zeitachse erhielten. Wir hatten ein weiteres Problem, da ich Harald auf der Grundlage des Gittermikroskops überzeugt hatte, obgleich er nicht davon überzeugt war, es mit mir zu versuchen, und er hatte seine Arbeit gekündigt und da gab es jetzt zwei arbeitslose Typen. Wie also setzen wir diese Idee um, denn wir waren der Meinung, dass es so lächerlich einfach ist und bereits eine Menge Leute darüber nachgedacht haben, und darin hatten wir recht. Es gab eine Menge Leute, die uns unmittelbar auf den Fersen waren. Die gute Nachricht ist: Harald ist sehr viel klüger als ich. Als ich Bell verließ, sagte ich ihnen, sie sollten sich zum Teufel scheren. Als Harald Bell verließ, konnte er seine gesamte Ausrüstung mitnehmen. Wir holten sie also aus dem Lagerschuppen und normalerweise macht man solche Arbeiten in der Garage, aber wir konnten es in seinem Wohnzimmer tun, denn er war nicht verheiratet und dort war es sehr viel gemütlicher. In wenigen Monaten hatten wir das Mikroskop gebaut und dann hatte ich einen Termin bei NIH, bei dem ich über mein Gittermikroskop berichtete und ich bat Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz und George Patterson, die das photoaktivierte Protein erfunden hatten, auf ein Gespräch ein. Wir aßen zusammen zu Mittag, verpflichtete sie zum Stillschweigen und ich erzählte ihnen von meiner Idee, und dass dies das letzte fehlende Glied sei, Harald und ich hatten nämlich keine Ahnung von Biologie. Jennifer ist jedoch eine der besten Zellbiologen der Welt und meinte, ich solle es eben mal mitbringen. Wir packten unser Mikroskop ein und gingen in Jennifers Dunkelkammer und danach, innerhalb von zwei Monaten, kamen wir von dieser Art von… Hier sieht man auf eine Scheibe durch eine Zelle auf zwei Lysosome, kleine Beutel mit Proteinabbau, dann ist da die Beugungsgrenze und das ist das photoaktivierte Lokalisierungsmikroskop oder PALM Image und die Auflösung verlief von hier nach hier. Also zwei Dinge, einmal, Harald und ich wollten vom Konzept dieser Idee ausgehend, die Daten innerhalb von sechs Monaten in unserer wissenschaftlichen Schrift vorlegen, und wir konnten es, weil uns alle ließen. Wir konnten einfach für uns arbeiten. Das Zweite ist, diese Art Arbeit erfordert diese Abgeschiedenheit, die man in einer solchen Situation nun mal hat. Die Fähigkeit sich 100% zu konzentrieren, und das immer wieder, habe ich in meiner Laufbahn als essentiell erfahren; nicht im akademischen Betrieb zu sein, das war für mich der Schlüssel. Denn ob es bei Bell war, bei der Arbeit für meinen Vater, oder da, wo ich jetzt arbeite, es ist der Gedanke alleine zu sein und sich mit Das sind also alle guten Nachrichten über die Superauflösung, doch jedes neue Stadium meiner Laufbahn wurde durch die Einschränkungen der Dinge beeinflusst, an denen ich zuvor gearbeitet hatte. Superauflösung war ein Haufen voller Einschränkungen. Zuerst schauen wir uns wieder Fluoreszenz an, und wenn man seine fluoreszierenden Moleküle nicht dicht genug umkleidet, kann man eine Eigenschaft völlig übersehen, wenn man nicht weniger als eine Halbwertzeit in den Abständen ist. Das also nennt man das Nyquist-Kriterium. Sie sehen, will man von diesem Bild eine Stichprobe nehmen, ist die intrinsische Auflösung des Mikroskops unwesentlich; Sie haben nicht genug Informationen. Die schlechte Nachricht ist, wenn man dies auf die Superauflösung bezieht, sofern man nicht den Auftrag hat, von 500 Molekülen eine 20-Nanometer-Auflösung zu erhalten, ist man erledigt. Es zeigte sich, dies ist ein sehr hoher Standard für Dichte ist, verglichen mit dem was die meisten Biologen zuvor an beugungsbegrenzter Arbeit getan haben. Dies bedeutet, die Realisierung dieser Technologien liegt nicht beim Werkzeugentwickler, leider, sondern beim Biologen, der Vorbereitungsverfahren für Proben finden muss, die dafür funktionieren. Sie können jetzt natürlich fragen, was das Besondere an der Superauflösung ist. Wir verwendeten lange Zeit EM, und das war verdammt gut. Es gibt zwei Hauptgründe, auf die Stefan bereits hingewiesen hat. Der erste ist der proteinspezifische Kontrast, der gewöhnlich mit struktureller Bildgebung an fixierten Zellen eingestellt wird. Das Problem jedoch ist, 95% von dem, was wir glauben durch Superauflösung gelernt zu haben, geschah mit chemisch fixierten Zellen, deren Zweck ist das Vernetzen von Proteinen, wodurch die Ultrastruktur vermasselt wird. Das bedeutet, wir müssen fast alles, was wir beim Ansehen von fixierten Zellen erfahren, mit einem Sternchen versehen. Aufregender wäre es, Live Cell Imaging vorzunehmen. Das Problem ist, wie Sie sich denken können, selbst wenn ich nur einen Faktor von zwei Auflösungsverbesserungen möchte in jeder der drei Dimensionen, bedeutet dies meine Voxel sind acht Mal kleiner. Also habe ich in jedem Voxel ein Achtel so viele Moleküle. Wenn ich die gleiche Anzahl Photonen möchte, um das gleiche Signal und Geräusch wie in einem beugungsbegrenzten Experiment zu erhalten, muss ich auf meine Zelle entweder acht Mal so viel Licht geben, was dieser nicht gefallen wird, oder aber ich muss acht Mal länger darauf warten, dass diese Photonen zum Vorschein kommen und das ganze Bild wird durch Bewegungsartefakte verwischt. Man braucht laut Literatur zur Auflösung von Live Cell Imaging Das wiederum ist beinahe ein Hirngespinst. Manchmal empfinde ich, als würde ich bei der Superauflösung den gleichen Albtraum, den ich beim Nahfeld-Bereich hatte, wieder aufs Neue erleben. Ich weiß aus meiner Erfahrung, dies war nicht möglich. Weitere Probleme sind die Intensität, die für STED oder für PALM irgendwo zwischen Kilowatt bis Gigawatt pro Quadratzentimeter beträgt. Doch Leben entwickelt sich bei einem Zehntel eines Watts pro Quadratzentimeter. Wir müssen uns also fragen, wenn wir Live Cell Imaging vornehmen, schauen wir uns dann eine lebende Zelle an oder eine tote oder eine sterbende, aufgrund der Anwendung all dieses Lichts. Und diese Methoden erfordern viel Zeit, um ein Bild zu erzeugen und die Zelle ist in Bewegung und am Ende erhält man Bewegungsartefakte. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, mich kümmert es nicht, welche Methode Sie anwenden. Will man eine höhere räumliche Auflösung, braucht man mehr Pixel. Mehr Pixel bedeutet mehr Messungen. Das dauert länger. Es bedeutet, die Probe mehr potentiell schädigendem Licht auszusetzen und wenn Sie ehrlich sind, man hat es immer mit Abwägungen zwischen räumlicher Auflösung, zeitlicher Auflösung und Abbildungstiefe zu tun. Jemand, der diese Abwägungen besser und früher als wir alle wirklich verstanden hatte war der gebürtige Schwede Mats Gustafsson, der eine dritte Methode der Fernfeld-Superauflösung entwickelte, genannt "strukturierte Beleuchtung". Bei dieser Technik verwendet man eine Anregung per stehender Welle statt einer einheitlichen Beleuchtung der Probe, wodurch diese Moiré-Effekte aus den Informationen in der Probe entstehen, die wiederum niedrigere Frequenzen bewirken und so vom Mikroskop erkennbar werden. Ein Argument im Bericht des Nobelpreis-Komitees, weshalb dies keinen Nobelpreis erhielt war, dies sei auf einen Faktor zwei beim Auflösungsgewinn begrenzt, wohingegen die Lokalisation von STED beugungsunbegrenzt sei. Doch ich meine, diese Schwäche von SIM ist eigentlich eine Stärke. Denn erstens, man benötigt sehr viel niedrigere Kennzeichnungsdichten, was mit der derzeitigen Technologie sehr viel kompatibler ist. Und zweitens erfordert es um Größenordnungen weniger Licht und ist um Größenordnungen schneller als andere Methoden. Hier sind ein paar Beispiele. Sie sehen hier das endoplasmatische Retikulum einer lebenden Zelle und ja, die Auflösung beträgt nur 100 Nanometer, Sie sehen aber die Detailfülle an Informationen, die man erhält, weil man in der Lage ist, diese Zelle 1800 Umläufe lang bei der Bildverarbeitung in Subsekunden-Intervallen anzusehen. Man erhält diesen dynamischen Aspekt, den man mit den anderen Methoden nicht bekommt. Hier ist ein weiteres Beispiel, das Verhalten von Aktin in einer T-Zelle, nachdem sie die immunologische Synapse ausgelöst hat. Die gute Nachricht ist, wir konnten 2008 Mats von der UCSF für Janelia anwerben, aber es wurde diagnostiziert… Ich übernahm viel aus seiner Gruppe und seiner Technologie und wir versuchen auch, mit diesem Instrument sein Vermächtnis weiterzuführen. Der Schlüssel dazu ist: Wenn der Einwand, weshalb man SIM nicht im gleichen Atemzug mit STED und PALM nennt, der ist, dass es nicht die gleiche Auflösung hat, wie können wir dann diese 100 Nanometer-Barriere überwinden? Der einfache und dumme Weg ist, einfach die numerische Apertur des Objektivs zu erhöhen. Vor kurzem kam ein 1,7 NA Objektiv auf den Markt, mit dem man mittels des GFP-Kanals bis zur 80 Nanometer-Auflösung klettern kann. Dann kann man dutzende oder hunderte Zeitpunkte mehrfarbig studieren, da keine speziellen Markierungen notwendig sind. Bewegung heißt hier, sich die clathrin-vermittelte Endozytose und seine Interaktion mit dem Cortactin anzusehen, und wie dies dazu beiträgt, diese Vertiefungen hineinzuziehen, um Material in die Zelle zu bekommen Kürzlich haben wir eine weitere Technik entwickelt. Eine nichtlineare strukturierte Beleuchtungstechnik, die wieder dieses Photo-Schaltprinzip verwendet, um eine stehende Welle aufzustellen, um das Aktivierungslicht auf eine räumlich gestaltete Art zu generieren und auf die gleiche Art die Erkennung vorzunehmen. Hier hebt man die Auflösung von der doppelten Beugungsgrenze zur dreifachen Beugungsgrenze. Das brachte uns zu einer 60-Nanometer-Auflösung. Nicht so viel Zeitpunkte und nicht ganz so schnell, aber man kann damit lebende Zellen sehen. Nochmal, wenn es das war, dass es nicht die Auflösung anderer Methoden hatte: Wir haben dieses nichtlineare SIM mit RESOLFT und Lokalisationsmikroskopie verglichen. Im Grunde haben wir jetzt mit SIM eine ebenso gute Auflösung, wenn nicht sogar eine bessere, als wir dies mit den anderen Instrumenten haben, doch mit hunderte Male weniger Licht und hunderte Male schneller als mit diesen anderen Methoden. Ich glaube wirklich, für die Lebendzellenbeobachtung zwischen 60 und 200 Nanometer wird SIM das Go-to-Instrument und für die strukturelle Bildgebung unter 60 Nanometer wird es PALM sein. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, während jedermann sich um dieses Ziel drängte, um die höchste räumliche Auflösung zu erhalten, wünschte sich Mats einen eigenen Raum zum Arbeiten, da wo andere es nicht tun. Und indem er sich etwas zurücknahm, hatte er diese ganze Spielwiese, auf der er sein Instrument entwickeln konnte. Es stellt sich also die Frage, was ist, wenn wir den ganzen Weg zur Beugungsgrenze zurückgehen. Gibt es da etwas, was wir als Physiker tun können, um für Biologen bessere Mikroskope zu entwickeln und insbesondere, gibt es eine Möglichkeit die Geschwindigkeit zu erhöhen und Nichtinvasivität bei der Bildgebung und dem Live Cell Imaging zu haben, um es in der gleichen Größenordnung zu optimieren, wie PALM dies hinsichtlich räumlicher Auflösung leistet? Und warum würde man dies tun wollen? Nun, das Kennzeichen von Leben ist: es ist lebendig. Und alles Lebendige ist eine komplexe thermodynamische Melange verringerter Entropie, durch welche fortlaufend Materie und Energie strömen. Auch wenn strukturelle Bildgebung wie Superauflösung oder Elektronenmikroskopie immer wichtig bleiben werden, die einzige Möglichkeit, wie wir verstehen können, wie sich leblose Moleküle miteinander verbinden, um eine lebendige Zelle zu schaffen ist, dies quer über alle vier Dimensionen von Raum-Zeit gleichzeitig zu studieren. Als mir 2008 Superauflösung ebenso zuwider wurde wie das Nahfeld 1994, habe ich mir dies zum Ziel gesetzt. Die gute Nachricht ist, es gab auf dem Markt ein neues Instrument, das wir nutzen konnten, das Lichtscheibenmikroskop. Es schießt eine Beleuchtungsebene durch eine 3D Probe, damit nur eine Ebene auf einmal beleuchtet wird. Es werden also keine Bereiche darüber und darunter beschädigt und man kann ein sehr schnelles Bild aufnehmen, denn die gesamte Ebene ist beleuchtet, dann führt man das Ebene für Ebene durch die Probe fort. Dies war für das Verständnis der Embryogenese bei einer einzelnen Zellenauflösung sehr wichtig, hatte aber eine Einschränkung dadurch, dass die Lichtscheiben auf dem Einzel-Zell-Level ziemlich dick sind. Wir konnten dann einige Physik-Tricks einsetzen, nämlich sogenannt nicht-brechende Strahlen. Zuerst waren es Bessel-Strahlen und schließlich konnte ich meine zehn Jahre alte Gittertheorie aus der Versenkung holen, denn die zweidimensionalen optischen Gitter sind nicht-brechende Strahlen, die eine Lichtscheibe erzeugen, die viel dünner ist, und man kann sich dann die Bewegungen innerhalb einzelner Zellen ansehen. Hier sind einige Beispiele dafür. In unser Labor kamen etwa 50 verschiedene Gruppen, um dieses Mikroskop zu nutzen und fast jeder verließ das Labor mit einem breiten Lächeln und zehn Terabytes an Daten. Danach hören wir nichts mehr von ihnen, denn sie wissen nicht, was man mit zehn Terabytes an Daten anfangen soll. Ich bin aber auf jeden Fall sehr stolz darauf, was wir mit PALM zuwege gebracht haben, an diesem Punkt bin ich aber überzeugt, dass dies die Spitzentechnik meiner Laufbahn sein wird. Eine weitere Sache, die Klarheit brachte, tauchte auf, die Gitter-Lichtscheibe, wie wir sie nannten, erwies sich als für Einzelmolekül-Techniken geeignet, da sich diese allgemein auf sehr dünne Proben beschränken, da unscharfe Moleküle die Signatur der scharf eingestellten Moleküle verdunkeln. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe ist aber so dünn, dass nur die scharf eingestellten Moleküle beleuchtet werden. Dadurch konnten wir eine andere Methode der Lokalisationsmikroskopie anwenden, die die Gruppe Robin Hochstrassers im gleichen Jahr entwickelt hatte in dem wir PALM entwickelten, statt der Vormarkierung der Zelle und einer festgelegten Anzahl von Molekülen... Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, das Grundproblem ist, ausreichend Moleküle zu erhalten, um die gewünschte Auflösung zu bekommen. Bei PAINT wird statt der Vormarkierung das ganze Medium um die Zelle mit Fluoreszenz-Farbstoffen markiert. Gewöhnlich schwirren die Farbstoffe zu schnell herum, als dass man sie sehen könnte, wenn sie aber haften, leuchten sie wie ein Fleck und man kann sie dann lokalisieren. Der Vorteil hiervon ist, es gibt eine unendliche Armee an Molekülen, die ständig hinzukommen und Ihre Zelle umkleiden. Der Nachteil ist, da das Medium leuchtet, ist SNR normalerweise zu schwach, um viel an Einzel-Molekül-Imaging vorzunehmen. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe zusammen mit dieser PAINT-Technologie ist eine höchst wundervolle Kombination. Sie sehen hier den Einsatz dieser Methode die 3D-Bilderfassung bei großen Volumina, und prinzipiell können wir das sehen. Nehmen Sie Lokalisierungsmikroskopie für viel dickere Proben in der Größenordnung hoher Dichte und wir haben etwas, damit wir kein EM für den allgemeinen Kontrast benötigen, um es mit einem lokalen Kontrast zu kombinieren, den wir von PALM erhalten. Noch eine letzte Sache, Astrid, und dann mache ich Schluss. Ich habe noch zwei Minuten und 22 Sekunden zum Reden. Sie sind früh dran. Es geht darum, wir müssen immer noch die Zellen vom Deckglas nehmen. Vieles was wir gelernt haben, haben wir durch immortalisierte Zellen gelernt und alle diese Methoden, versucht man sie von der Einzelzelle auf den Organismus anzuwenden, sind unglaublich empfindlich hinsichtlich der Variationen des Brechungsindexes, die das Licht beim Hinein- und Hinausgehen der fluoreszierenden Photonen verwischen. Bei STED haben Sie diesen perfekten Knoten im Doughnut. Der ist bei Abweichungen sehr empfindlich. Bei SIM wird die stehende Welle beschädigt. Bei konfokal wird der Brennpunkt beschädigt. Bei Lokalisierung, ihrer PFS, benötigt man die Kenntnis über die Form jenes Flecks, damit man seinen Zentroid genau findet. Alles das wird durch Abweichungen vermasselt. Lichtscheibe wird nicht gezeigt, aber wenn man es mit einem Embryo zu tun hat... Die Lichtscheibe ist in der gleichen miserablen Phase, in der sich andere Techniken befinden, bei denen die Leute sagen: wenn wir die Lichtscheibe verwenden“, doch dem ist nicht so, da durch die Abweichungen die Auflösung so schlecht wird. Man kann einzelne Zellsoma in bestimmten Bereichen des Gehirns nicht auflösen. An was wir gearbeitet haben war, Anleihen bei Astronomen zu machen und die Instrumente der adaptiven Optik zu verwenden, damit wir tiefer in die leben Organismen hineinsehen können. Dies ist das Beispiel für den Blick in das Gehirn eines sich entwickelnden Zebrafisches. In diesem Falle mussten wir eine sehr schnelle AO-Technik entwickeln, da beim Wechsel von einem Ort zum andern die Abweichung sich ändert. Das hier repräsentiert 20.000 verschiedene adaptive optische Berichtigungen, damit dieses große Volumen abgedeckt wird. Wenn wir tiefer in das Mittelgehirn des Zebrafisches gehen, etwa 200 Mikrometer tief, schalten wir die adaptive Optik aus. Das würden Sie mit einem modernen Mikroskop sehen und dann schalten Sie die AO ein und man ist wieder da, wo man die Beugungsgrenze erhält und das Signal erhält. Was meine Gruppe betrifft und an was ich derzeit wirklich glaube ist, wir stehen am Scheitelpunkt zu einer Revolution in der Zellbiologie, denn wir haben Zellen noch immer nicht so untersucht, wie sie in Wirklichkeit sind. Wir müssen die Zelle unter ihren eigenen Bedingungen studieren und bei diesem Rätsel gibt es drei Teile. GFP ist großartig, seine Rohdaten sind aber weitgehend ungeordnet. In den letzten zwei Jahren traten diese Bearbeitungstechniken des Erbguts hervor, mit denen man mit diesen Proteinen auf endogenen Leveln experimentieren kann. Es zeigte sich, dass es typischerweise niedrige Stufen waren, konfokale Mikroskopie und diese anderen Techniken sind viel zu pertubative, um Dynamiken zu untersuchen und man braucht dazu so etwas wie Gitter-Lichtscheiben. Nochmals, man kann Zellen nicht isoliert betrachten und dabei den Gesamtzusammenhang sehen. Man muss alle Zell-Zell-Interaktionen sehen, alle Nachrichtenübermittlungen, die im Innern stattfinden, da, wo sie sich entwickeln, und hier spielt die adaptive Optik eine Rolle. Die Zukunft meiner Gruppe wird sein, adaptive Optik zu entwickeln, damit dies funktioniert, dies mit der Gitter-Lichtscheibe zu kombinieren, damit wir ein nichtinvasives Instrument haben, um Dynamiken anzusehen. Und dann schieben wir die Superauflösungsmethoden wie SIM und PALM mit hinein, um darüber hinaus die höhere Auflösung hinzuzufügen. Damit danke ich Ihnen für ‘s Zuhören.

Eric Betzig on super-resolution
(00:17:45 - 00:19:17)

 

The field of optical microscopy is constantly changing, with improvements in both technology and software. In this lecture, Steven Chu, another physicist with interests in the realm of life sciences, defines his “Christmas wish list” for optical microscopy:

 

Steven Chu (2016) - Optical Microscopy 2.0

Thank you very much. So let me just begin and talk about what is very important philosophy. This is the greatest American philosopher of the 20th century. Just in case you’re wondering who that is, that is a catcher for the New York Yankees named Yogi Berra. And on the right he’s in a very philosophical conversation. He said many wise things, for example, if you come to a fork in the road, take it. He also said, you can observe a lot by just watching. And many advances in physics, in biology, in particular in medicine, actually have been made by advances in imaging technologies. This is a small sampling of inventions that were useful. The inventions were all awarded Nobel Prizes. The ones in white have to do with optical microscopy, and so you might think, optical microscopy, wasn’t that done long, long ago and reached its prime in the 1920s or ‘30s? - but not quite. But let me bring you back a little bit to the invention of the very first good optical microscope by Leeuwenhoek, and that microscope is on the right hand side. What you see is actually not a compound microscope but a simple spherical lens. But that lens, made by drawing a fibre and turning it into a nearly perfect sphere that’s fire polished, coupled with your eye, made the first really good optical microscope. Now, he started working on this, beginning to see strange things, people started hearing rumours about this - one great Brit visits Leeuwenhoek and encourages him to submit a paper to the Royal Society. So he writes it up and submits it and then he gets this reply from the secretary of the Royal Society in October 1676: Dear Mr. Anthony van Leeuwenhoek. Your letter of October 10th has been received here with amusement. Your account of the myriad “little animals” seen swimming in rainwater ... led one member to imagine that your “rainwater” might have contained an ample portion of distilled spirits – imbibed by the investigator. For myself, I withhold judgement as to the sobriety of your observations and the veracity of your instrument. However, a vote has been taken ... [and] it’s been decided not to publish your communication ... However, all here wish your “little animals” health, prodigality and good husbandry by their ingenious “discoverer”. That is surely a letter of rejection. (Laughter) Well, they didn’t believe it but soon they did and off it went. Now, let me fast forward in time, and in 2014 the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to 3 physicists, as it should be. So normally the resolution of an optical microscope is dictated by the uncertainty principle. If you want to localise something and make an image, and that means you want to know that the light is coming from a little spot delta X along this dimension, then you need to make the delta P of the light coming out as broad as possible. So how do you make delta P wide? Well, you open up the angles so the lens has to collect as much light as possible and, of course, you go to short wavelengths. So short wavelengths and a bigger angle means that delta P, the spread in momentum, becomes bigger. And so that is actually what defines the diffraction limit. In most modern optical microscopes the diffraction limit in green light is something around 200 to 300 nanometres. And that’s that blur circle, that’s the minimum diffraction or uncertainty principle. But if you ask a different question and you ask, what’s the centre of that blob of light? That really depends on the width of that blob of light divided by the signal-to-noise. So if the signal-to-noise is 10 to 1 you in principle get 10 times better signal, 100 to 1 in principle 100 times better. Now, if you have 1 dye molecule and you look at it for a while it goes away and you look at another dye molecule and another dye molecule and another dye molecule, not all at the same time because clearly if you see this all at the same time, you see a big blob. So sequentially in some stochastic way if you see them one at a time, finding the centre of each one, you can create a better image. And so that was the idea that Eric Betzig and his collaborators introduced. W. E. Moerner was the first to detect molecules in absorption. But also he found that you can photoactivate these molecules. A different method was invented by Stefan Hell who is here at this meeting and I encourage you to go and find him. But here is what you see. On the left-hand side you see an optical resolution microscope and on the right-hand side you see this reconstructed image when you see dots blinking on and off one at a time you go to higher resolution. Now, the scale bars are half a micron and you see in this blown up thing 0.1 microns, 0.2 microns. Each little dot is a single dye molecule that’s identifying a particular protein. Stefan Hell, again I’m not going to explain this, because I encourage you to go and find him. If you’re looking at some nuclear proteins in a membrane this is what you might see in the highest-resolution confocal microscope. But the image is greatly improved if you go to these so-called super-resolution images. And in that little white square you can blow that up, and again the scale bar is 150 microns. So this was very exciting and in my group we adapted those methods looking at the cholera, this is a conventional image of something but this is what it looks like in super-resolution. You blow that up and again the scale bar being 200 nanometres and so you’re seeing about 15 nanometre resolution. Let me tell you one example of how you can, instead of just seeing pretty pictures, how can it be actually useful in science. So there’s a study where you’re looking at a particular molecule involved in a signalling pathway. The signalling pathway works as follows: If you’re a cell embodied in an organism, in a tissue, you don’t willy-nilly divide, that’s considered very anti-social behaviour. You divide when the surrounding tissue says it’s ok to divide, to replace, to repair, whatever. But if you willy-nilly divide, divide, divide, saying me, me, me, that’s called cancer. And so in this particular molecule a protein, one amino acid chain in this protein causes cancer. And in this particular instance 90% of all pancreatic cancers are caused by this single-point mutation. Now, I’m going to show you a little – let’s see if I can play this – a cartoon movie made by Genetec of, of – oh, this thing not works. So let me start this thing. And so there’s a signal coming from the outside, that so-called yellow thing or ligand, it attaches to the receptors. And when it attaches to the receptors you see that these receptors on the outside of the cell extend through the cell and the tail ends down here in the cell get together. They induce other molecules to come along, these molecules have names, the names are not important unless you’re a biologist, finally recruiting a membrane protein called RAS. The story then continues, it’s pretty complicated. There’s a cascade of molecules being turned on, the RAS then recruits another molecule called RAF. After that is recruited and activated it goes on to a scaffolding inside the cell which then activates a molecule called MEK, a molecule called ERK. ERK diffuses into the nucleus of the cell, works its magic and then tells the cell to proliferate. Alright, about half of that is wrong. For example, it was discovered in 2009 that that single RAF molecule wasn’t enough, the RAF molecules had to pair up and it’s the double paired RAF molecules that presented the signal. And so a drug was invented that keeps them from pairing and, lo and behold, multiple myeloma at least temporarily had a dramatic cure. You take this drug and within weeks all the tumours disappear. No, not multiple myeloma - melanoma, it's a very, very deadly skin cancer. And so it was the first miracle drug, a targeted therapy and it was great. What about RAF? We didn’t know about RAF and so it’s a suspicion that perhaps RAF would also have to pair up before it was able to send its signal to the RAF molecule. And in single molecule work it becomes actually pretty simple. What you have is you look at, this is on a cell membrane, each little dot of light is the centroid of a single RAS molecule, RAS molecule. And at certain cell density, in this case, we can up-regulate the expression of these molecules. And we find that in the case of a certain concentration that you see in the upper left hand corner, you find that they’re mostly singles, very, very few doubles or triples, probably accidental, and there is no using more conventional biochemical techniques, there is no downstream signalling that tells the cell to proliferate. When you up the concentration, let’s say 7 fold and you’ve got a lot more dots you see, voilà, pairing. How do you see pairing? Because the dots are together. It becomes really naïve data analysis, oh I see dumbbells. And when you see dumbbells, but not that many, only 20% of them are pairs, it’s sufficient actually to send the downstream signalling to say, aha, proliferate - without an outside signal. So this is just a trivial example of how super-resolution immediately gives you something very important. If you can prevent the pairing of the RAS molecules then you can defeat this. And it’s very much important to make this molecule double. Anything upstream is a better drug because as you go downstream the number of molecules multiplies. I spent about 10 years sabbatical worrying about energy. And I’m still not off that sabbatical completely, I still worry about energy and climate change and I’m having a master class this afternoon on that. But when I got back from being Secretary of Energy I said, well, time to look for some new things to do. And, in fact, time to look for new technology. Indeed, all my life what I would try to do is to say, ok, if there’s a new technology that can advance science and apply it to the problems I’m interested in, including this signalling problem, that would be good. So I sat down, fresh out of government with no lab, no students, no post docs, no money. The only thing I could do was think. And that turns out to be liberating. And so I put together a Christmas Wish List for new probes. I wanted the probes to be photostable that would last forever, give out millions of photons over periods of seconds but really last forever, Because I knew already that if you can get 5 million photons from a probe, and there were other caveats, you can actually get sub-nanometre spatial resolution. That was a paper my colleagues and I published in 2010. If they were bright enough, you can follow the dynamics of what’s happening in a live cell with 1 millisecond time scales, and finally is it possible to look through several millimetres of tissue. So in order to do that these probes weren’t available commercially at the time. So we started looking at rare earth impurities embedded in nanocrystals that a lot of work had been done on, up-converting particles for this, but more recently, in the last 3 or 4 years, a lot of work has been done in biology. So I’m going to be describing the work of 2 post docs in my group. And here we’re comparing organic dye molecules that are used in single-molecule super-resolution experiments. And compare that to the light emitted by rare earth embedded in crystals, and you see that they’re narrower, and these happen to be synthesised by another person in my group. But that’s not really why we’re doing this. We’re doing this because you can dope a crystal with maybe 5,000, 10,000 impurities and you can put them so they emit at a certain colour of light in the near infrared, 800 nanometres. You can take another crystal and you can dope it equally with 2 impurities, so they emit at 880 nanometres. Another crystal can emit this colour. Another crystal can emit with a different ratio of colours. And so it doesn’t take much imagination to say if you can see high, medium, nothing in 3 colours, you build up combinatorily the number of different crystals you can see. So instead of 1, 2 or 3 specially resolved probes you can get 10, 12, 20. And indeed it’s this essentially spectral bar coding that was very attractive. Now, the other thing my guys wanted to do would be to see if you can combine this with electron microscopy. This is a very famous photograph of the gap between one neuron and another neuron. If this is a neuron and this is the axon of the neuron, voltage spikes go down here, they go to the tips of the axon. They open up calcium channels. And those calcium channels induce a set of proteins on the cell membrane to take these little spheres, vesicles full of neurotransmitters, to very quickly, sub-millisecond times, a 10th of a millisecond, to fuse the vesicles into the cell membrane, releasing neurotransmitters, they diffuse across the gap, only 40 nanometres across, and they hit on receptors. And so that happens very, very quickly. And that’s how one neuron talks to another neuron. But you have this beautiful black and white picture. But you want to see what are the roles of the proteins and where are they located to really figure out how this thing works. So to this end what they did is they were borrowing a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory microscope. Two people over there in the Molecular Foundry have put together a microscope with a scanning electron beam but they also attached a light-collecting mirror. So you also can look at what are called cathodoluminesence, the electron beams excite something and it fluoresces. And so if you take that light and divide it spectrally by a few dichroic filters into photon counting photodiodes you can actually read the spectral bar code. You can do this with a scanning electron microscope or a scanning transmission electron microscope. So this is an example, this is a part of a He-La cell, it’s a cancer cell labelled with rare earth particles, I have these arrows to show these tiny little dots of rare earth particles on the He-La cell. And in an optical microscope, in a best high resolution confocal microscope, you get your 200 or so nanometre spatial, And the fluorescent or luminescence signal that you see is actually dictated by the size of the particle because it is an electron microscope. So that’s the thing you see, that’s the image you see and that’s what you see in the electron microscope of the structure of the particle. But remember the electron microscope is taking the structure, the microstructure or the nanostructure, of the sample itself. As we improve we’re getting down, this is signal- to-noise, this is the size, and we’re pretty confident we can get down to maybe 10 nanometre size nanoparticles and still have a signal-to-noise of 10 to 1 which is sufficient to do the spectral bar coding. So that is good. Work is going apace on that to really combine multiple protein labelling with electron microscopy resolution with the identification of multiple proteins. Another thing about these rare earth particles is that they can be made to emit and absorb light in the most transparent region of human tissue, or animal tissue, in the visible light range. This is the effect of plotting on this axis, on a log axis, is the effective absorption and light scattering of visible light, but once you go on to the near infrared above 650 nanometres all the way out to 1,300, 1,400 nanometres, you’re up in transmission by roughly an order of magnitude. Alright, so we’d like to do that. That means we have the potential of seeing more deeply into tissue. But here you see the red glow of some red particles coming out of a mouse but they’re scattered. So the scattered beam actually distorts the image. So to that end we’re going to adopt something else that’s been used first in astronomy, called adaptive optics. In this picture there’s a bright green laser that illuminates the sodium layer in the upper atmosphere, creates an artificial guide star, and then you know that that’s a point light, you adjust the mirror of the telescopes and the secondary mirror, and you adjust it to take out the intrinsic fraction changes of the air and you take out the twinkle of the star with the hopes that you get closer to diffraction limit. In optical microscopy you have the same situation. If the light propagates in air you have a wonderful image but as it goes through scattering medium the wave fronts get distorted, they mess up the resolution and, in fact, in strongest scattering media it turns out it’s like looking into fog. And so the question is can you make adaptive optics do the right thing and fix up the image, looking deeper into tissue. And we began collaborating with Bruce Macintosh who recently joined Stanford Physics Department. And his guide stars, he’s looking for extrasolar plants, he’s looking for planets. And if you get the resolution high enough you’re looking at the star, that’s your guide star. And if it’s high enough you can actually see the planet traverse. Ok, so I’m going to now show you work not done in my group but done by others. This is in the lab of Na Ji, also in collaboration with Eric Betzig at Janelia Farms. And this is looking 400 microns into a brain of a mouse. But it’s better than that, the mouse is alive, it’s interacting and they’re showing pictures to the mouse. And they want to show what is the brain doing when it sees these pictures. On the left-hand side is no adaptive optics correction, on the right-hand side you have adaptive optics correction. You’re going to see flashes of light. There is a dye, a genetic dye that’s introduced into the mouse and when the neuron fires, I told you that neurons, the voltage spikes go down, they open up calcium channels, the calcium channels induce the vesicles to fuse. This dye actually makes those calcium channels visible. And so here you have in a live mouse, so that the image is wiggling around because it’s looking around, trying to make, they’re putting images in front of it, it’s blinking and deciding, his brain is deciding what to do. So this is in the visual cortex of a mouse. Pretty spectacular but the image is a little better, a little brighter, but it’s an important step forward. It’s actually very spectacular work. Here is something, another type of work. This is now shining 2 photon light into a mouse, again a live mouse. This time we’re not going to open up the skull cap, we’re going to just look through the skull And, again, adaptive optics tries to correct the distortions - this technique works in a different way. On the left-hand side, you can barely see it, but there’s maybe faint green that you might see here. But if you adjust the adaptive optics to correct for the strongly scattered medium, the actual skull of the mouse, at a certain depth, and you do that by locking on to a little bright spot over here, shown by the little arrow – I guess I can also show it here, this little bright spot – you wiggle the mirror elements. After you wiggle the mirror elements this is what you see. And you’re really achieving your optical resolution 400 microns. Now looking through 150 microns intact skull and further 180 microns into the brain. So that’s all fine and good. These are using WFp photons that are strongly absorbing light. So the question is, if you go deeper into the infrared, can you look not 500 microns but maybe 5 millimetres? This is an open question. We’re working on this, we’ve gotten down to a millimetre, but we’ll see. Another few applications of these probes. An imaging embryo development and also seeing if we can watch stem cells migrate and cancer metastasis. We approached a geneticist at Stanford, Hiro Nakauchi, and said, why don’t we collaborate and see if we can put nanoparticles into a developing embryo and as the embryo develops and differentiates you can actually track them. So to this end we put 100,000 nanodiamonds into the embryo by simply injecting them in. And this first set of experiments is done in a petri dish. The cells divide, divide, divide. As they divide, since there are now diamonds are in the cytosol of the cell, they’re evenly divided and they seemed to divide. And here are the late-stage, the mid-stage blastocysts, you see it in there. So the next thing we did is we put these 100,000 Nano diamonds into the eggs and put them in surrogate mothers, waited 13 days. It takes 22 days to reach full gestation. By 13 days you see the skull and you see the spine, you see developed organs. And we were trying to figure out do we see nanoparticles also and we were trying to figure out where they went. So you can see time points, but the real pay dirt is if you can look through the tummy of the mother mouse, looking several millimetres in and every day you check on what’s happening as the nanoparticles divide, where are they? That’s what we really want to do. And cancer metathesis also you have a solid tumour, they go into the blood stream, they migrate around. It turns out as they pop out somewhere else most of those cells, those tumour cells, metastasising cells don’t make it. These microtumours do not make it, the natural body defences squash them; very few of them do make it. What if you can put labels on to these cancer cells as they multiply and move around and you can see as they move around through the skin without opening the mouse, then you can actually do single needle biopsies and try to figure out which ones make it, why do they make it, by analysing the RNA DNA. These are single-cell technologies that have really lurched forward. Now, these cells are too small to put lots of particles into cells. It’s not a big egg, fertilised egg of 80 microns, these are somatic cells. So how do you inject nanoparticles into them? You can just drop them on in the endocytose. But then they end up in little stomachs, lysosomes of the cell. And we’d like to put them in the cytoplasm so when the cells divide, divide, divide, they divide evenly. Otherwise they would be a point source emission. So to this end we found luckily that there’s a fellow at Stanford who is making nanostraws. He takes the standard nanopore filter, this is b over here, it’s plastic polymer film, and you make little channels, you coat this with 3 layers of aluminium oxide, you etch it away with lithographic techniques. You put some cellular binding thing on the cell, the cells like to lay down, thousands and thousands of cells lay down, about 8% of the little straws poke into the cell. And Nick Melosh and his group have shown that you can actually get dyes into this. You can get DNA out of the cell. And very recently, in collaboration with us, it was shown that you can now begin to get nanoparticles into the cell and into the cytosol. So it’s another little piece. Diamonds, fluorescence diamonds is another particle we’re looking at. This is a diamond. And if you have a silicon impurity in a diamond, it’s too big to fit into lattice-size, so it fits into interstitial. Nitrogen-vacancy diamonds are available commercially. They’re made in bulk, they’re ground up and they’re sorted. And so that’s the state of the art. We are trying to grow nanodiamonds from the ground up using diamond structure molecules laid on a surface in a CVD process. And so it’s either a microwave CVD on a direct plasma or an indirect plasma. Again colleagues, I found colleagues at Stanford and they were making these. These are nanodiamonds clearly showing the diamond facets. This is Nick Melosh, Zhi-Xun Shen, and the graduate student working on the project graduated. And one of my post docs, Yan Kai Tzeng, decided why not make a poor person’s indirect CVD, put the wafer on its edge, the plasma is on the top and see what you get. What you get, as you go down from the top plasma, is really rotten stuff up here, getting better and better and better. If you look at the Raman spectrum, by the time you’re several millimetres down, you see a very clear Raman spectrum that looks like a diamond and not graphite which is this peak over here. So that’s a better looking diamond. That’s one micron diamond, looks to be single crystal. That’s 500 nanometres, 200 nanometres, 100 nanometres, 50 nanometres. All look to be single crystal. How small can you get? - Well, 5 to 10 nanometres. Now, if you stare at this long enough you might convince yourself that there’s a little facet that looks like that. But that’s wishful thinking, you say. You can take a Fourier transform of that, a lattice image, and you do get the lattice spacing. But there’s a better way. Just focus the electron beam on the little particle and take a diffraction image and what you see is the background silicon lattice and you see the diamond lattice and you see one diamond lattice. So it appears that that too is a single crystal. We do calculations on the growth conditions, as you go up from the top of the plasma the temperature goes from about 900 degrees C to 500 degrees C. Where you make the best diamonds is about 600 degrees C which is 200 degrees less than the standard fabrication method. This is the density of hydrogen in there. We think that atomic hydrogen eats away the graphite if it forms to preserve the pristine diamond surface. The optical spectra is pretty good. This is in a big diamond, 100 nanometres in diameter, and the linewidth is very narrow compared to a diamond film. So we believe that probably it may be possible to get linewidth-1 diamonds. We know how to put diamonds, other impurities, chromium, we’re able to put in germanium, we’re able to put in impurities and we’re just right now in the process of seeing how small we can make these colour centres. Of course, you know, all this microscopy always had precursors, even earlier than Leeuwenhoek. So I end by just noting that there was even earlier microscopes. Thank you.

Vielen Dank! Lassen Sie mich damit beginnen, über eine sehr wichtige Philosophie zu sprechen. Dies ist der größte amerikanische Philosoph des 20. Jahrhunderts. Nur für den Fall, dass Sie sich fragen, wer das ist - es ist ein Fänger für die New York Yankees namens Yogi Berra. Und rechts befindet er sich in einer sehr philosophischen Unterhaltung. Er hat viele weise Dinge gesagt, beispielsweise: "Wenn Sie an eine Weggabelung kommen, dann nehmen Sie sie." Er sagte auch: "Man kann nur durch Zusehen viel beobachten." Und viele Fortschritte in der Physik, aber auch in Biologie und insbesondere in Medizin, wurden wirklich durch Fortschritte in Abbildungstechnologien gemacht. Dies ist eine kleine Sammlung von Erfindungen, die nützlich waren. Die Erfindungen wurden alle mit Nobelpreisen ausgezeichnet. Die weißen befassen sich mit der Lichtmikroskopie. Und man könnte denken, Lichtmikroskopie wurde schon seit langer Zeit durchgeführt und erreichte ihren Zenit in den 1920er- oder 30er-Jahren, aber nicht ganz. Aber lassen Sie mich ein wenig in der Zeit zurückgehen zur Erfindung des ersten guten Lichtmikroskops durch Leeuwenhoek, und dieses Mikroskop ist rechts zu sehen. Sie sehen eigentlich kein zusammengesetztes Mikroskop, sondern eine einfache Kugellinse. Aber durch diese Linse, gefertigt durch Ziehen eines Fadens und Verwandlung in eine nahezu perfekte Kugel, die feuerpoliert wurde, in Verbindung mit dem Auge, entstand das erste wirklich gute Lichtmikroskop. Er begann, damit zu arbeiten und merkwürdige Dinge zu sehen. Es fing an, dass es Gerüchte darüber gab, wie zum Beispiel: Ein bedeutender Brite besuchte Leeuwenhoek und ermutigte ihn, eine Veröffentlichung zur Royal Society zu einzusenden. Also schrieb er es auf, schickte es ein, und bekam im Oktober 1676 diese Antwort vom Sekretär der Royal Society: Ihr Bericht der Unzahl von „kleinen Tierchen“, die man im Regenwasser schwimmen sehen kann ..., führte dazu, dass ein Mitglied sich vorstellte, dass Ihr „Regenwasser“ eine gehörige Portion destillierten Alkohol enthalten haben könnte – der durch den Forscher getrunken wurde. Ich selbst enthalte mich des Urteils über die Nüchternheit Ihrer Beobachtungen und der Wahrheitsliebe ihres Instruments. Aber eine Abstimmung fand statt ... [und] es wurde entschieden, Ihre Mitteilung nicht zu veröffentlichen ... Wir alle hier wünschen aber Ihren „kleinen Tieren“ Gesundheit, Fülle und gute Vermehrung durch ihren findigen 'Entdecker'." Wenn das mal kein Ablehnungsschreiben ist. (Lachen) Nun, sie glaubten ihm nicht, aber schon bald taten sie es und von da ging es los. Lassen Sie mich in der Zeit schnell nach vorne spulen. Im Jahr 2014 wurde der Nobelpreis in der Chemie an 3 Physiker vergeben, wie es auch sein sollte! (Lachen und Applaus) Normalerweise wird die Auflösung eines Lichtmikroskops durch das Unschärfeprinzip bestimmt. Wenn man etwas lokalisieren möchte und ein Foto macht – und das bedeutet, dass man wissen möchte, dass das Licht von einen kleinen Fleck Delta X entlang dieser Achse kommt -, dann muss man das Delta P des herauskommenden Lichts so groß wie möglich machen. Wie macht man Delta P groß? Nun, man öffnet die Winkel so, dass die Optik soviel Licht wie möglich sammelt und geht auf kurze Wellenlängen über. Kurze Wellenlängen und ein größerer Winkel bedeutet, dass Delta P, die Impulsverteilung, größer wird. Und dies definiert tatsächlich die Beugungsgrenze. In den meisten Lichtmikroskopen ist die Beugungsgrenze im grünen Licht etwa 200 bis 300 Nanometer. Und das ist dieser Verschwommenheitskreis, das ist die minimale Beugung oder das Unschärfeprinzip. Aber wenn man eine andere Frage stellt und zwar: Was ist das Zentrum dieses Lichtflecks? Das hängt in Wirklichkeit von der Breite des Lichtflecks geteilt durch das Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis ab. Wenn das Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis 10 zu 1 ist, dann bekommt man prinzipiell ein zehnfach besseres Signal, Wenn man ein Farbstoffmolekül hat und es sich ansieht, während es weggeht und sich noch ein weiteres Farbstoffmolekül ansieht und noch eins und noch eins - nicht alle zur selben Zeit, weil man natürlich einen großen Fleck sieht, wenn man alle zusammen ansieht. Wenn man in irgendeiner stochastischen Weise sich eines nach dem anderen ansieht, das Zentrum eines jeden findet, dann kann man ein besseres Bild erzeugen. Das war die Idee, die Eric Betzig und seine Mitarbeiter einführten. W. E. Moerner war der Erste, der Moleküle in Absorption erfasste. Aber er fand auch heraus, dass man diese Moleküle photoaktivieren kann. Stefan Hell, der hier auf diesem Treffen ist, erfand eine andere Methode, und ich ermutige Sie, zu ihm zu gehen. Das hier ist, was Sie hier sehen - auf der linken Seite sehen Sie ein Mikroskop mit optischer Auflösung und auf der rechten Seite sehen Sie dieses rekonstruierte Bild. Wenn die Punkte an und ausgehen, einer nach dem anderen, dann bekommt man eine höhere Auflösung. Die Skalenbalken sind ein halbes Mikrometer, und Sie sehen in dieser Vergrößerung 0,1 Mikrometer, 0,2 Mikrometer. Jeder kleine Punkt ist ein einzelnes Farbstoffmolekül, das ein spezielles Proton identifiziert. Stefan Hell - ich werde das nicht erklären, weil ich Sie ermutige, zu ihm zu gehen. Wenn man sich Zellkernproteine in einer Membrane ansieht, könnte man dies mit dem konfokalen Mikroskop der höchsten Auflösung sehen. Das Bild wird aber stark verbessert, wenn man zu diesen sogenannten Superauflösungsbildern übergeht. Und man kann das in dem kleinen weißen Quadrat vergrößern, und wieder ist der Skalenbalken 150 Mikrometer. Das war sehr aufregend. Wir haben diese Methoden in meiner Gruppe angepasst, um uns Cholera anzuschauen. Dies ist ein gewöhnliches Bild von irgendetwas, aber so sieht es in Superauflösung aus. Man vergrößert dies und der Skalenbalken ist wieder 200 Nanometer, und dann sieht man eine Auflösung von etwa 15 Nanometer. Lassen Sie mich ein Beispiel erzählen, wie man, statt nur nette Bilder anzuschauen, wie es tatsächlich in der Wissenschaft brauchbar sein kann. Hier ist eine Untersuchung, in der man sich ein spezielles Molekül ansieht, das in einem Signalpfad involviert ist. Der Signalpfad funktioniert wie folgt: Wenn man eine Zelle ist, die sich in einem Organismus, in einem Gewebe befindet, dann teilt man sich nicht einfach so, das wird als sehr antisoziales Verhalten angesehen. Man teilt sich, wenn das umgebende Gewebe sagt, es ist ok sich zu teilen, zu ersetzen, zu reparieren, was auch immer. Aber wenn man sich einfach so teilt, teilt, teilt und dabei ich, ich, ich sagt, dann wird das Krebs genannt. In diesem speziellen Molekül verursacht ein Protein, eine Aminosäurekette in diesem Protein Krebs. In diesem speziellen Fall werden 90 % aller Fälle von Bauchspeicheldrüsenkrebs durch diese Einzelmutation verursacht. Ich werde Ihnen nun einen kleinen – schauen wir mal, ob ich das abspielen kann – Trickfilm von Genetec zeigen von, von – oh, das funktioniert nicht. Lassen Sie mich es starten. Hier ist das von außen kommende Signal, dieses sogenannte gelbe Ding oder Ligand. Es bindet sich an die Rezeptoren. Und wenn es sich an die Rezeptoren bindet, sehen Sie, dass diese Rezeptoren außerhalb der Zelle durch die Zelle hindurchgehen und die Schwanzenden hier unten in der Zelle zusammenkommen. Sie veranlassen andere Moleküle zu kommen. Diese Moleküle hier haben Namen, die Namen sind nicht wichtig, es sei denn Sie sind Biologe. Am Ende rekrutieren sie ein Membranprotein, das RAS genannt wird. Die Geschichte geht dann weiter, es ist ziemlich kompliziert. Eine Abfolge von Molekülen wird eingeschaltet, das RAS rekrutiert dann ein weiteres Molekül, dass RAF genannt wird. Nachdem das rekrutiert und aktiviert ist, geht es zu einem Gerüst innerhalb der Zelle, das dann ein Molekül aktiviert, das MEK, ein Molekül, das ERK genannt wird. ERK diffundiert in den Zellkern, tut seine Arbeit und sagt dann der Zelle, sich zu vermehren. Gut, etwa die Hälfte davon ist falsch. Im Jahr 2009 wurde beispielsweise entdeckt, dass ein einzelnes RAF-Molekül nicht genug war - das RAF-Molekül muss sich paaren. Und es ist dass doppelte Paar des RAF-Moleküls, das das Signal darstellt. Daher wurde ein Medikament erfunden, das diese Paarbildung verhindert. Und siehe da, das multiple Myelom hatte wenigstens zeitweilig eine dramatische Heilung. Man nimmt dieses Medikament und innerhalb von Wochen verschwinden die Geschwüre. Nein, nicht multiple Myelom - Melanom, das ist ein sehr, sehr gefährlicher Hautkrebs. Und daher war es das erste Wundermedikament, eine gezielte Therapie, und es war großartig. Was ist mit RAF? Wir wussten nichts über RAF und es ist daher eine Vermutung, dass sich vielleicht RAF auch paaren muss, bevor es sein Signal an das RAF-Molekül senden kann. In der Arbeit mit einzelnen Molekülen wird es tatsächlich ziemlich einfach. Was man hier hat, ist eine Zellmembrane,auf der jeder kleine Lichtfleck der Schwerpunkt eines einzelnen RAS-Moleküls ist. Bei einer bestimmten Zelldichte, in diesem Fall, können wir die Expression dieser Moleküle vermehren. Und wir fanden heraus, dass im Fall einer bestimmten Konzentration, die man in der oberen linken Ecke sehen kann, es hauptsächlich einzelne sind, sehr, sehr wenige doppelte oder dreifache, vermutlich zufällig. Bei Verwendung konventioneller biochemischer Techniken gibt es keine weitergereichten Signale, die der Zelle sagen, sich zu vermehren. Wenn man die Konzentration erhöht, sagen wir siebenfach, bekommt man viel mehr Flecken, sehen Sie, siehe da: Paarungen. Wie sieht man Paarungen? Weil die Flecken zusammen sind. Es wird eine wirklich harmlose Datenanalyse - oh, ich sehe Hanteln. Und wenn man Hanteln sieht, aber nicht so viele, nur 20 % davon sind Paare, reicht es eigentlich, das Signal weiterzusenden und zu sagen, aha, vermehrt sich - ohne ein Signal von außen. Dies ist nur ein triviales Beispiel, wie die Superauflösung Ihnen sofort etwas sehr Wichtiges sagt. Wenn man die Paarung der RAS-Moleküle verhindern kann, dann kann man dies besiegen. Und es ist sehr wichtig, dieses Molekül zu verdoppeln. Alles weiter zum Anfang hin ist das bessere Medikament, weil sich die Zahl der Moleküle vervielfacht, je weiter man voranschreitet. Ich verbrachte einen 10-jährigen Forschungsurlaub, um mich um Energie zu kümmern. Und ich habe diesen Forschungsurlaub noch immer nicht ganz beendet. Ich sorge mich immer noch um Energie und Klimaveränderung, und ich habe eine Masterklasse über das Thema heute Nachmittag. Aber als ich von meinem Posten als Energieminister zurückkam, sagte ich, es ist Zeit, mich nach neuer Arbeit umzusehen. Und eigentlich Zeit, eine neue Technologie zu suchen. Eigentlich versuchte ich mein ganzes Leben lang es folgendermaßen zu machen: Ok, wenn es eine neue Technologie gibt, die die Wissenschaft weiterentwickelt, und man es auf die Probleme anwenden kann, an denen ich Interesse habe, dieses Signalisierungsproblem eingeschlossen, das wäre toll. Also setzte ich mich hin, gerade zurück von der Regierung, ohne Labor, ohne Studenten, ohne Postdocs, ohne Geld. Das Einzige, was ich tun konnte, war zu denken. Und es stellte sich heraus, dass das befreiend war. Daher habe ich eine Wunschliste zu Weihnachten für neue Sonden zusammengestellt. Ich wollte, dass die Sonden lichtbeständig sind, ewig funktionieren würden. Millionen Photonen über Zeitspannen von Sekunden emittieren, wirklich ewig funktionieren. Weil ich schon wusste, dass man, wenn man 5 Millionen Photonen von einer Sonde bekommt - und es gab weitere Vorbehalte -, dann kann man tatsächlich eine räumliche Auflösung von weniger als einem Nanometer erzielen. Dies war eine Veröffentlichung, die meine Kollegen und ich im Jahr 2010 publizierten. Wenn sie hell genug wären, dann kann man die Dynamik des Geschehens in einer lebenden Zellen innerhalb von Zeitskalen einer Millisekunde verfolgen. Und schlussendlich ist es möglich, durch mehrere Millimeter an Gewebe hindurchzusehen. Um dies zu tun - diese Sonden waren zu der Zeit nicht kommerziell erhältlich – begannen wir daher, uns Verunreinigungen mit seltenen Erden anzusehen, eingebettet in Nanokristalle, worüber schon viel Arbeit geleistet wurde, und Teilchen dafür umzuwandeln. Aber in jüngster Zeit, den letzten 3 oder 4 Jahren, wurde viel Arbeit dazu in der Biologie gemacht. Ich werde daher die Arbeit zweier Postdocs in meiner Gruppe beschreiben. Hier vergleichen wir organische Farbstoffmoleküle, die in Einzelmolekül-Superauflösungsexperimenten verwendet werden. Und vergleichen das mit dem Licht, das seltene Erden eingebettet in Kristallen emittieren, und man sieht, sie sind schmaler, und diese wurden zufälligerweise durch jemand anderen in meiner Gruppe synthetisiert. Aber das ist nicht der Grund, warum wir das tun. Wir machen dies, weil man einen Kristall mit vielleicht 5.000, 10.000 Verunreinigungen dotieren kann. Und dann kann man es so machen, dass sie eine bestimmte Lichtfarbe im nahen Infrarot emittieren, 800 Nanometer. Man kann einen weiteren Kristall nehmen und ihn auch mit 2 Verunreinigungen dotieren, so dass sie bei 880 Nonmeter emittieren. Ein weiterer Kristall kann diese Farbe emittieren. Ein weiterer Kristall kann mit unterschiedlichen Verhältnissen der Farben emittieren. Es braucht nicht viel Vorstellungskraft, um zu sagen, wenn man viel, mittel, nichts in 3 Farben sehen kann, erhöht man kombinatorisch die Anzahl der unterschiedlichen Kristalle, die man sehen kann. Anstelle von 1, 2, 3 speziell aufgelösten Sonden kann man 10, 12, 20 haben. Und tatsächlich war es im Wesentlichen dieser spektrale Barcode, der sehr attraktiv war. Das andere, das meine Leute tun wollten, war zu sehen, ob man das mit der Elektronenmikroskopie verbinden konnte. Die ist ein sehr berühmtes Foto der Lücke zwischen 2 Neuronen. Wenn dies ein Neuron ist, und dies das Axon des Neurons, dann fließen Spannungsstöße hier herunter, sie fließen zu den Spitzen des Axon. Sie eröffnen Kalziumkanäle, und diese Kalziumkanäle veranlassen einen Proteinsatz auf der Zellmembrane, diese Kügelchen, Vesikel voller Neurotransmitter, zu nehmen und sehr schnell, innerhalb von Millisekunden, einem Zehntel einer Millisekunde, zu verschmelzen, die Vesikel in die Zellmembrane zu verschmelzen und dabei Neurotransmitter freizusetzen. Diese diffundieren durch die Lücke, die nur 40 Nanometer breit ist, und treffen auf Rezeptoren. Und das passiert sehr, sehr schnell. Und so spricht ein Neuron mit einem anderen. Aber es gibt dieses wunderschöne Schwarz-Weiß-Bild. Aber man will sehen, welche Rolle die Proteine spielen und wo sie lokalisiert sind, um wirklich herauszubekommen, wie das funktioniert. Zu diesem Zweck borgten sie sich ein Mikroskop vom Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Dort haben 2 Leute von der Molekularschmiede ein Mikroskop mit einem rasternden Elektronenstrahl gebaut, aber sie haben auch einen lichtsammelnden Spiegel hinzugefügt. Damit man sich auch das anschauen kann, was Kathodolumineszenz genannt wird: Ein Elektronenstrahl regt etwas an und es fluoresziert. Und wenn man das Licht nimmt und es über ein paar zweifarbige Filter in photonenzählende Photodioden aufspaltet, kann man tatsächlich den spektralen Barcode lesen. Man kann dies mit einem Rasterelektronenmikroskop oder einen Rastertransmissionselektronenmikroskop machen. Dies ist also ein Beispiel: Dies ist Teil einer He-La-Zelle, es ist eine Krebszelle, die mit seltenen Erdpartikeln gekennzeichnet ist. Die Pfeile sind dazu da, um diese winzig kleinen Flecken der seltenen Erdpartikel an der He-La-Zelle zu zeigen. Und mit einem Lichtmikroskop, mit dem besten hochauflösenden konfokalen Mikroskop erzielt man etwa 200 - 250 Nanometer räumliche Auflösung. Das Fluoreszenz- oder Lumineszenzsignal, das man sieht, ist tatsächlich durch die Partikelgröße bestimmt, weil es ein Elektronenmikroskop ist. Das ist das Bild, das man sieht, und das sieht man in dem Elektronenmikroskop von der Struktur des Partikels. Aber erinnern Sie sich, das Elektronenmikroskop macht das Bild der Struktur, die Mikrostruktur oder Nanostruktur der Probe selbst. Mit der Verbesserung werden wir niedriger: Das ist das Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis, das ist die Größe. Wir sind sehr zuversichtlich, dass wir vielleicht sogar auf Nanoteilchen in der Größe von 10 Nanometer heruntergehen können und immer noch ein Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis von 10 zu 1 haben, was für den spektralen Barcode ausreicht. Das ist also gut. Die Arbeit schreitet schnell voran, um tatsächlich multiple Proteinmarkierung mit der Elektronenmikroskopie-Auflösung und der Identifizierung vieler Proteine zu kombinieren. Eine andere Sache mit diesen Teilchen seltener Erden ist, dass man sie so herstellen kann, dass sie Licht in den transparentesten Bereich des menschlichen Gewebes oder tierischen Gewebes im sichtbaren Lichtbereich emittieren und absorbieren. Das ist der Effekt, wenn man s auf dieser Achse zeichnet: Das ist die effektive Absorption und Lichtstreuung des sichtbaren Lichts. Aber wenn ich zum infraroten Licht über 650 Nanometer weitergehe, ganz hoch bis 1.300, 1.400 Nanometer, dann erhöht sich die Transmission um etwa eine Größenordnung. Also, das möchten wir machen. Das bedeutet, wir haben die Chance, tiefer in das Gewebe hineinzusehen. Hier sehen Sie das rote Glühen einiger roter Teilchen, die aus einer Maus herauskommen, aber sie sind gestreut. Der gestreute Strahl verzerrt eigentlich das Bild. Deswegen werden wir etwas anderes nehmen, das zuerst in der Astronomie benutzt wurde, sogenannte adaptive Optik. In diesem Bild gibt es einen hellen grünen Laser, der die Natriumschicht in der oberen Atmosphäre beleuchtet, einen künstlichen Leitstern erzeugt, und dann weiß man, dass dieses eine Punktlichtquelle ist. Man passt den Teleskopspiegel an und den Hilfsspiegel. Man passt ihn an, um die intrinsischen, kleinen Änderungen der Luft zu kompensieren und das Funkeln der Sterne zu kompensieren, in der Hoffnung, näher an die Brechungsgrenze zu kommen. In der Lichtmikroskopie hat man dieselbe Situation. Wenn das Licht sich durch Luft fortpflanzt, hat man ein wunderbares Bild, aber wenn es durch ein streuendes Medium geht, werden die Wellenfronten verzerrt. Sie verschlechtern die Auflösung und in den am stärksten streuenden Medien ist es sogar, als ob man in einen Nebel sieht. Und so stellt sich die Frage: Kann man adaptive Optik dazu bringen, das Richtige zu tun und das Bild wiederherzustellen, wenn man tiefer und tiefer in Gewebe schaut? Wir begannen, mit Bruce Macintosh zusammenzuarbeiten, der vor kurzem zur Physikabteilung in Stanford gekommen ist. Seine Leitsterne, er sucht nach extrasolaren Planeten, er sucht nach Planeten. Und wenn man die Auflösung gut genug bekommt, schaut man sich einen Stern an, das ist dann der Leitstern. Und wenn sie gut genug ist, kann man tatsächlich sehen, wie der Planet ihn durchquert. Gut, ich werde Ihnen nur Arbeiten zeigen, die nicht in meiner Gruppe durchgeführt werden, sondern in anderen. Dies ist Na Jis Labor, der auch mit Eric Betzig bei Janelia Farm zusammenarbeitet. Und dies schaut 400 Mikrometer tief in das Hirn einer Maus. Aber es ist noch besser: die Maus lebt, sie interagiert und sie zeigen der Maus Bilder. Und sie wollen zeigen, was das Hirn macht, wenn es diese Bilder sieht. Auf der linken Seite gibt es keine Korrektur durch adaptive Optik, auf der rechten Seite gibt es eine Korrektur durch adaptive Optik. Sie werden Lichtblitze sehen. Dort ist ein Farbstoff, ein genetischer Farbstoff, der in die Maus eingebracht wird und wenn das Neuron zündet – ich habe erzählt, dass die Spannungsstöße hier hinunter fließen -, dann öffnen sie Kalziumkanäle. Die Kalziumkanäle veranlassen die Vesikel zu verschmelzen. Dieser Farbstoff macht tatsächlich diese Kalziumkanäle sichtbar. Und hier dies ist ein einer lebenden Maus, so dass das Bild wackelt, weil sie herumschaut und versucht – sie zeigen Bilder vor ihr, sie blinzelt, und entscheiden, ihr Gehirn entscheidet, was es tun soll. Dies ist in der Sehrinde einer Maus. Ziemlich spektakulär, aber dieses Bild ist ein wenig besser, ein wenig heller. Aber es ist ein wichtiger Schritt vorwärts. Es ist tatsächlich eine sehr spektakuläre Arbeit. Hier ist etwas, eine andere Art von Arbeit. Hier wird jetzt 2-Photonenlicht in eine Maus hineingeleuchtet, wieder eine lebende Maus. Diese Mal wird das knöcherne Schädeldach nicht geöffnet. Wir schauen nun durch den Schädel hindurch und adaptive Optik versucht dann, die Verzerrungen zu korrigieren. Diese Technik arbeitet anders. Auf der linken Seite kann, man es kaum sehen, aber da ist vielleicht ein schwaches grünes Licht, das Sie sehen können. Aber wenn man die adaptive Optik einstellt, sodass sie das stark streuende Medium korrigiert, den tatsächlichen Schädel der Maus bei einer gewissen Tiefe. Und man macht das, indem man auf einen kleinen Fleck hier aufschaltet, durch den kleinen Pfeil angezeigt – ich nehme an, ich kann es auch hier zeigen, dieser kleine helle Fleck. Man bewegt die Spiegelelemente; nachdem man die Spiegelelemente bewegt hat, kann man dies sehen. Und man erzielt wirklich die optische Auflösung von 400 Mikrometern. Man schaut jetzt durch 150 Mikrometer unbeschädigter Schädeldecke und weitere 180 Mikrometer in das Gehirn. So, dies ist alles schön und gut. Sie benutzen YFP-Photonen, die Licht stark absorbieren. Die Frage ist, wenn wir tiefer in das Infrarot gehen, kann man dann nicht 500 Mikrometer, sondern vielleicht 5 Millimeter tief schauen? Die Frage ist noch ungelöst. Wir arbeiten daran, wir sind bis zu einem Millimeter gekommen, aber wir werden sehen. Ein paar weitere Anwendungen dieser Sonden: Die Abbildung von der Embryoentwicklung und auch um zu sehen, ob wir Stammzellen während der Migration sehen können und Krebsmetastasen. Wir kontaktierten einen Stanford Genetiker, Hiro Nakauchi, und sagten: Warum sollten wir nicht zusammenarbeiten und schauen, ob wir Nanoteilchen nicht in einen sich entwickelnden Embryo einbauen und sie tatsächlich verfolgen können, während sich der Embryo entwickelt und differenziert. Dafür gaben wir 100,000 Nanodiamanten in den Embryo, indem wir sie einfach injizierten. Diese erste Experimentserie ist in einer Petrischale ausgeführt. Und die Zellen teilen sich, teilen sich, teilen sich. Und während sie sich teilen, da dort nun Diamanten in dem Zytosol der Zelle sind, teilen sie sich gleichmäßig auf. Und hier bei der Spätstufe, den Blastozysten der mittleren Stufe, man kann es sehen. Als nächstes gaben wir diese 100.000 Nanodiamanten in Eier, gaben sie Ersatzmüttern und warteten 13 Tage. Es dauert 22 Tage bis zur vollen Reife. Nach 13 Tagen kann man den Schädel sehen und die Wirbelsäule, man sieht entwickelte Organe. Wir versuchten herauszufinden, ob wir Nanoteilchen sehen und wir versuchten herauszufinden, wo sie hingingen. Sie können die Zeitpunkte sehen, aber der wirkliche Erfolg ist, wenn man durch den Bauch der Muttermaus schauen kann, mehrere Millimeter tief, und jeden Tag überprüfen kann, was passiert ist, während die Nanoteilchen sich aufteilen, wo sind sie? Das ist, was wir wirklich tun wollen. Und Krebsmetastasen auch. Es gibt einen festen Tumor, sie gehen in den Blutstrom, sie wandern herum. Es stellt sich heraus, während sie irgendwo auftauchen, dass es die meisten dieser Zellen, dieser Tumorzellen, metastasierende Zellen nicht schaffen. Diese Mikrotumore überleben es nicht. Die natürlichen Abwehrkräfte des Körpers zerquetschen sie, nur wenige überleben es. Was, wenn man diese Krebszellen markieren kann, während sie sich vervielfältigen und herumbewegen? Man kann sie durch die Haut sehen, während sie herumwandern, ohne die Maus zu öffnen. Dann kann man tatsächlich eine Einspritzenbiopsie durchführen und versuchen herauszufinden, welche es schaffen, warum sie es schaffen, indem man die RNA und DNA analysiert. Dies sind Einzellentechnologien, die sich rasant entwickelt haben. Nun, diese Zellen sind zu klein, um viele Teilchen in die Zellen hineinzutun. Es ist kein großes Ei, befruchtetes Ei von 80 Mikrometer, dies sind Körperzellen. Wie injizieren wir daher Nanoteilchen in sie hinein? Man kann sie einfach in die Endozytose einbringen. Aber dann verbleiben sie in kleinen Mägen, den Lysosomen der Zellen. Und wir möchten sie in das Zytoplasma tun, damit sie sich gleichmäßig aufteilen, wenn die Zellen sich immer wieder teilen. Sonst hätte man eine punktuelle Emission. Zu diesem Zweck fanden wir glücklicherweise, dass es in Stanford jemanden gibt, der Nanoröhrchen herstellt. Er nimmt einen Standard-Nanoporenfilter, dies ist b hier drüben, es ist ein Plastikpolymerfilm. Und man erzeugt kleine Kanäle, man beschichtet ihn mit 3 Schichten Aluminiumoxid, man ätzt es weg mit Lithografietechniken. Man gibt etwas für die Zellbindung auf die Zelle. Die Zellen mögen es, sich draufzulegen, abertausende Zellen legen sich darauf, etwa 8 % der kleinen Röhrchen ragen in die Zelle. Und Nick Melosh mit seiner Gruppe hat gezeigt, dass man tatsächlich Farbstoffe einfügen kann. Man kann DNA aus der Zelle herausbekommen. Und kürzlich, in Zusammenarbeit mit uns, konnte gezeigt werden, dass man jetzt beginnen kann, Nanoteilchen in die Zelle und in das Zytosol bekommen kann. Dies ist daher ein weiteres kleines Stück. Diamanten, fluoreszierende Diamanten sind ein weiteres Teilchen, das wir uns anschauen. Dies ist ein Diamant. Und wenn man eine Siliziumverunreinigung in einem Diamanten hat, ist es zu groß, um in die Gittergröße zu passen, also passt es in die Zwischengitterstelle. Stickstofffehlstellendiamanten sind kommerziell erhältlich. Sie werden in großer Menge hergestellt, sie werden gemahlen und sortiert - das ist der Stand der Technik. Wir versuchen die Zucht von Nanodiamanten vom Anfang her, indem wir Diamantstrukturmoleküle mit einem CVD-Prozess auf eine Oberfläche ablegen. Und es ist entweder Mikrowellen-CVD mit einem direkten Plasma oder einem indirekten Plasma. Ich fand wieder Kollegen in Stanford, die diese erzeugten. Dies sind Nanodiamanten, die klar die Diamantkristallflächen aufweisen. Dies sind Nick Melosh, Z.-X. Shen und der Student, der an dem Projekt arbeitet, hat den Abschluss gemacht. Einer meiner Postdocs, Yan Kai Tzeng, entschied, warum nicht einen indirekten CVD eines Armen machen: den Wafer auf die Kante stellen, das Plasma ist darüber und sehen, was man bekommt. Was man bekommt, wenn man hier vom oberen Plasma heruntergeht, ist wirklich fürchterliches Zeug hier oben, dann wird es besser und besser und besser. Wenn man sich das Ramanspektrum anschaut, wenn man mehrere Millimeter weiter herunter geht, sieht man ein sehr klares Ramanspektrum, das wie Diamant aussieht - und nicht Grafit, das ist der Peak hier drüben. So, dieser Diamant sieht besser aus. Dies ist ein 1-Mikrometer-Diamant, sieht aus wie ein Einkristall. Das sind 500 Nanometer, 200 Nanometer, 100 Nanometer, 50 Nanometer. Alle sehen wie Einkristalle aus. Wie klein kann das werden - 5 bis 10 Nanometer. Wenn man sich dies lang genug ansieht, könnte man überzeugt sein, dass es eine kleine Kristallfläche ist, die so aussieht. Aber das ist Wunschdenken, könnte man sagen. Man kann eine Fouriertransformierte davon nehmen, ein Gitterbild, und man bekommt den Gitterabstand. Aber es gibt einen besseren Weg: einfach den Elektronenstrahl auf das kleine Teilchen fokussieren und ein Beugungsbild machen, und man sieht den Hintergrund des Siliziumgitters, man sieht ein Diamantgitter. Es scheint, als ob dies auch ein Einkristall ist. Wir berechnen die Zuchtbedingungen: Wenn wir von der Spitze des Plasmas hochgehen, gehen die Temperaturen von etwa 900 °C zu 500 °C. Man bekommt die besten Diamanten bei etwa 600 °C, das ist 200 Grad weniger als bei der Standardherstellungsmethode. Das ist die Wasserstoffdichte darin. Wir denken, dass der atomare Wasserstoff das Grafit auffrisst, wenn es sich formiert, um die unverfälschte Diamantenoberfläche zu bewahren. Das optische Spektrum ist ziemlich gut. Dies ist für einen großen Diamanten, 100 Nanometer Durchmesser, und die Linienbreite ist sehr klein verglichen mit einem Diamantfilm. Wir glauben, dass es wahrscheinlich möglich ist, Diamanten mit 1 Linienbreite zu bekommen. Wir wissen, wie wir andere Verunreinigungen, Chrom, in Diamanten bekommen, wir können Germanium hineintun. Wir sind in der Lage, Verunreinigungen hineinzutun, und wir sind gerade jetzt dabei zu schauen, wie klein wir diese Farbzentren machen können. Natürlich, wissen Sie, all diese Mikroskopie hatte Vorläufer, sogar noch früher als Leeuwenhoek. Ich schließe, indem ich konstatiere, dass es sogar noch ältere Mikroskope gab. Vielen Dank.

Steven Chu defining his “Christmas wish list” for optical microscopy
(00:12:00 - 00:13:21)

 

Fortunately, for most Nobel Prize Laureates, obtaining a Nobel Prize is a notable highlight, but does not mark the culmination point of their research careers. Soon after receiving the Prize for photoactivation localization microscopy, or PALM, Betzig achieved yet another innovation in microscopy by introducing lattice light-sheet microscopy:

 

Eric Betzig (2015) - Working Where Others Aren't

I'd just like to thank the Foundation for their hospitality and all of you for being here today. I'm a tool builder by instinct and inclination. I got my start as a tool builder as a graduate student at Cornell when my advisers were working on an idea to basically shine light through a hole that's much smaller than a wavelength of light and use that as a little nano-flashlight to drive across the sample point by point and beat that diffraction limit that you heard about from Stefan and get a super-resolution image. I worked on that technology for six years in graduate school and was fortunate enough to kind of get it sort of working to the point where I got my foot in the door at Bell Labs and then had my own lab at Bell Labs, and proceeded to work on it for another six years. During that time, we did a number of applications eventually as the technology slowly improved. We could use polarization contrast to look at magneto-optic materials or use fluorescence to be able to look at phase transitions and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers, do super-resolution lithography, histology, and low temperature cryogenic spectroscopy of quantum wells. So the technique started to take off, but the reason I got into near field was two-fold. I wanted to get into science not to do incremental things, but to do really impactful big things, and it seemed like near field was a possible way of doing that kind of thing. But the other thing I really liked about it was, at the time we started we didn't know anybody doing this. And I really liked the idea of going in a field from its birth and not having a bunch of elbows to bang up against while I'm trying to do my work. It turned out there were a couple of other groups working on it, and the idea goes all the way back to the twenties, but still it was pretty wide open territory at that time, and that felt a lot of fun. As it continued to develop, though, and as we started to have successes the field got more and more crowded. Particularly with two applications that we demonstrated. In '92, we were able to basically have the world record of data storage density by writing bits with near field as small as 60 nanometres. This started a whole big area with people jumping into this. I was under a little gentle pressure to start a commercialization programme based on this, but I didn't really want to go and do that. I didn't want to lead a big group. I wanted to still just explore where near field might go. Fortunately, my bosses at Bell were conducive to that and so I was able to do that. And it paid off because very quickly we were able to do what I dreamed of doing which was biology, which was, in this case, to be able to look at the actin cytoskeleton at about 50 nanometre resolution back in 1993. The problem is this was a fixed cell, and the dream really was to be able to have an optical microscope that could look at living cells with the resolution of an electron microscope, and we still weren't there. There was one thing about this experiment, which is that these single actin filaments had high enough signal-to-noise that it suggested that we could even see single molecules. And so, this was pretty much in the air in this era because a few years earlier W. E. Moerner had seen at cryogenic temperatures the spectral signature of single molecules. And you'll hear about that in a few days. And it turned out to be actually very easy to see single molecules with near field because the focus is so small that you reduce the background to near zero, and then it becomes very easy to see these single molecules, but there were surprises like their shapes were different and so forth. It turned out this was due to the orientations of the molecules, so we could measure the orientations and even determine their positions down to about a 40th of the wavelength of light. So at this time, this takes us up to '94, many people jumped into the field because of the spectroscopy applications, the data storage applications, the potential biology and single molecule applications, and I was basically really, really sick of doing near field at this time, and part of it was because of the fundamental limitations of the technology. The worst of them is that the light that comes out of that sub-wavelength hole spreads extremely rapidly. And if you're even about ten molecules away, you get a significant loss of resolution. Well, if the dream is to look at living cells, a cell is a lot rougher than that. But it had many other limitations, but at the same time so many people were jumping in the field and saying that, you know, it would cure cancer or that the moon was made of green cheese, or whatever. And what I basically learned in a career in science is that science has all of these fads, where there are these booms and busts, and so forth. And near field became one of these fads. And technologies basically go like this, and this is where I like to get in. This is where it's really fun, where it starts to pay off on the investment, and this is the time I found where you want to bail because this is where basically, you know, people go crazy, you know, with these things. This is where you'd like to believe it will go, but every new technology to me is like a new-born baby, and you think that it's going to become president or that it's going to cure cancer, win a Nobel prize, but usually you're happy if it just stays out of jail in the end. (laughing) So this is basically where most technologies end up, with some level that's above zero so it was a net gain, but not so much. And with near field, I felt like every good paper I was doing was just providing the justification for a hundred pieces of crap that followed. And I really felt like, what I was doing was a net negative to society because it was a waste of time and a waste of taxpayer's money. So basically I up and quit, and I quit not just Bell, I quit science. And so, I didn't have any idea what I wanted to do so I became a house husband. And a few months later while I was pushing my daughter around in a stroller, I realized that there was a way of taking some of the experiments I had done previously to come up with a different way of beating the diffraction limit. So the idea is if we care about fluorescence, which Stefan told you, why fluorescence is so important, the problem is that each of the molecules makes a little fuzzy ball, and those fuzzy balls overlap, and you got nothing but a mush. But if those molecules were different from one another in some way, say that they glowed in different colours, then I could look at them by their different colours in a higher dimensional space of XY and wavelength in that axis. Once they were isolated from one another, then I can just find the centroid, find the centre of those fuzzy blobs to much better precision than the diameter of the fuzzy blob and hence get with near molecular precision the coordinate of every molecule in the sample. So that was the basic idea. I was really excited about that for a month, but then I realized the catch is that even with the best focus you can create with a conventional microscope, there might be hundreds or thousands of molecules in that diffraction limited spot. And so you need ridiculously good discrimination be it wavelength or whatever in that third dimension to be able to turn on and see one molecule on top of hundreds or thousands of others. So I didn't really know how to do that, so I just published that while unemployed and left it at that. And so in the end, I fell back on my backup plan which was: my dad had started a machine tool company in '85 which by '94 had grown to about 50 million in sales. What they did is, they would make these very customized very large machines to make in very high volume a single part, customized for that part, for the auto industry. And so, this was a successful technology, but I had so much ego and still do, and so much naivety and still do, that I believe that if a single physicist when to the Rust Belt he could save it from the Japanese. So I went there and tried to see if I could do something to improve upon this technology. So I developed this machine which used an old technology called hydraulics, married it to energy storage principles you have in hybrid cars and also nonlinear control algorithms, and was able to make a machine that would take something the size of the width of this auditorium and collapse it to something the size of a compact car. And it would move four tons at eight g's of acceleration and position it to five micron precision. It was an amazing thing that I was very proud of. I spent four years developing it, three years trying to sell it, and in that time I sold two of them. And so, I learned that while I may not be an academic scientist, I'm a really horrible business man. And so, after blowing through over a million dollars of my dad's money, I went to him and I apologized, and I said, "I'm sorry, I gave this everything I had, but I just can't sell this thing." And so, I quit again. So then, it's the blackest time in my life because not only had I pissed away my academic career, I had also thrown away my backup plan of working for my family. And so, I needed to find something, and so I reconnected with my best friend at Bell, Harald Hess, who had also left Bell as Bell continued to shrink in the 90s and went to work in industry. And he was suffering the same sort of midlife crisis I was. He was more successful in business than I was, but still unsatisfied. That we really wanted to go back and do curiosity driven research and be able to work with our own hands and not be managers or anything like that, which typically is what starts to happen to you when you're in your 40s. We wanted to live like graduate students basically, okay. So we started to meet at various national parks and start to plan out what could we do in order to get back into a lab. And so, I started reading the scientific literature for the first time in a decade, and the first thing I ran across that just knocked me out was green florescent protein. The idea that you could snip some DNA out of a glowing jellyfish, and get that any organism you want to express any protein you want in a live organism, and have that fluorescence specific, 100% specificity, to the protein, was magic to me because it was so difficult in that actin experiment I showed, to get the labelling in there well enough to be able to see the actin without seeing a whole bunch of nonspecific crap besides. And so, I said, "Damn it. I guess I got to be a microscopist again." But I had a problem in that in ten years of not doing any physics, all my physics knowledge had flown straight out of my head. I couldn't remember anything. Well, I would take the kids to school. I would then go down to the cottage that we had nearby and sit out on the lake, and just start relearning physics from freshman textbooks onward, but within three months, it pretty much all fell back into place. I hadn't really forgotten it. It was just kind of blocked. And I started trying to figure out how I could use light in order to make a better microscope. Not a super-resolution microscope at this time but a better microscope that would exploit the advantages of live cell imaging of GFP. So I started thinking in fundamental terms from initially two wave vectors creating a standing wave. I added more wave vectors, got these weird periodic patterns, looked in the literature and heard about these things called optical lattices, which are used in quantum optics to trap and cool atoms. And I eventually came up with new classes of optical lattices that would actually be really good as a 3D multifocal excitation field to do massively parallel imaging at high speed of live cells. So I called that optical lattice microscopy, and that was the idea I wanted to pitch to get back into science. So Harald was helping me in this task of getting back in, and one of the places we went to visit to sell this idea was Florida State University where we met Mike Davidson. And Mike told us about not just fluorescent proteins but there was a very new type of fluorescent protein on the scene, which initially if you shine blue light on it, nothing happens. But if you shine purple light on it first, you activate the molecules, and then blue light causes it to turn green or to emit green light. And so, basically, it's a fluorescent molecule that you can turn on and off. So Harald and I were sitting in the airport in Tallahassee, and it struck us that this the missing link to make that idea that I had pitched in my first round of unemployment ten years earlier to work. So the idea is you turn the violet light down so low that only a few molecules come on at a time. And statistically they're likely to be separated by more than the diffraction limit so then you can find the centres of those fuzzy balls. Those molecules either turn off or bleach. You turn on the violet again to turn on another subset and round and round and round you go until you bleed out every molecule from the sample. So it was the idea I had in '95 except with time as the discriminating dimension, and that violet light is the knob by which we could get higher and higher resolution across that time axis. So obviously we had another problem in that I had convinced Harald on the basis of the lattice microscope, although he wasn't convinced to do it with me, to quit his job so now you got to unemployed guys. So how are we going to implement this idea because we think it's too ridiculously simple and a lot of people have to be thinking of it, and we were right. There were a lot of people just right on our heels. The good news is that Harald is a lot smarter than I am. So when I left Bell, I told them to go to hell, but when Harald left Bell, he was able to take all of his equipment with him. So we pulled that out of the storage shed, and then normally you do this type of work in the garage, but we were able to do it in his living room because he wasn't married, and it was a lot more comfortable there. In a couple of months, we had the scope built, and then I was scheduled to give a talk at NIH about about my lattice microscope, and I begged Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz and George Patterson, who invented this photoactivated protein to come to my talk. Took them to lunch, swore them to secrecy, told them the idea, and that's the last missing link that needed to be filled, because Harald and I knew zip about biology. But Jennifer is one of the best cell biologist in the world and so she said just bring it here. So we packed up the scope, went to Jennifer's dark room, and within another couple months after that, we went from this sort of... This is looking at a slice through a cell at two lysosomes, little protein degradation bags, and then this is the diffraction limit and that's the photoactivated localization microscope or PALM image, and the resolution went from this to this. So two things, one Harald and I went from the concept of this idea to having the data in our science paper in six months, and we were able to do that because everybody left us alone. We were able to work just by ourselves. The second thing is that this type of work really requires that sort of solitude that you get in that sort of situation. That ability to focus 100%, and that's again and again I have found in my career critical, is to not be in academia for me has been key. Because whether I was at Bell, working for my father or working there, or working where I work now, it's the idea of just being left alone and focused with 100% attention on a problem is what allows me to get things done. So that's all the good news about super-resolution, but every new stage of my career has been influenced by the limitations of the thing I was doing before. And super-resolution has a crap-load of limitations. The first is that again we're looking at fluorescence, and if you don't decorate your fluorescence molecules densely enough, then you can completely miss a feature if you're at less than half a period in the spacing. And so, this is called the Nyquist criterion. You can see here that if you want to sample this image it doesn't matter what the intrinsic resolution of the microscope is, you don't have enough information. The bad news is that if you relate this to super-resolution if you don't have on the order of 500 molecules to get 20 nanometre resolution, you're done. It turns out that's a very high standard of labelling density compared to what most biologist had done previously for doing diffraction limited work. And what it means is that the ownness in making these technologies work is not on the tool developer it's, unfortunately, all on the biologist to figure out sample prep procedures that will work properly for this. And so now, you can also ask what is the big deal about super-resolution. I mean we've had EM for a long time, and its' pretty damn good. Well, there's two main reasons which Stefan hit upon. First is to do protein specific contrast, usually that's done by structural imaging on fixed cells. But the problem is that 95% of what we think we learned by super-resolution has been from chemically fixed cells, and their purpose is to cross-link proteins so they screw up the ultrastructure, and so it means we have to put an asterisk next to almost everything we learn when we look at fixed cells. The other more exciting application would be to do live cell imaging, but the problem is you can think if I want even just a factor of two resolution improvement in each of three dimensions, it means my voxels are eight times smaller. It means I have one eighth as many molecules in each voxel. If I want to get the same number of photons to get the same signal and noise as in a diffraction limited experiment, I either need to bang my cell with eight times as much light which it's not going to like, or else I'm going to have to wait eight times as long for those photons to come out. And the whole damn image will get smeared by motion artefacts. So there's claims in the literature of resolution for live cell imaging that require just by this back of the envelope calculation of a thousand to over ten thousand times as many photons from the cell as in a diffraction limited experiment. This is almost fantasy again. So I'm basically sometimes, with super-resolution, I felt like I was living the same bad nightmare all over again that I was in the near field era. By 2008, there were all sorts of crazy claims in terms of what could be done with super-resolution. And I knew just from my experience that this was not possible. And so, other problems are the intensities that are required for STED or for PALM are anywhere from kilowatts to gigawatts per square centimetre. But life evolved at a tenth of a watt per square centimetre. So we have to ask ourselves if we're doing live cell imaging, are we looking at a live cell or are we looking at a dead cell or a dying cell from the application of all this light. And these methods take a long time to create an image, and the cell is moving, and so you end up getting motion artefacts. So the moral of the story is I don't care what method you want to use, if you want higher spacial resolution you need more pixels. More pixels means more measurements. That takes more time. It means throwing more potentially damaging light at the specimen, and so if you're going to be honest your always playing with trade-offs between spatial resolution toxicity, temporal resolution, and imaging depth. The guy who really understood these trade-offs better than all of us, earlier than all of us, was Swedish native Mats Gustafsson who developed a third method of far field super-resolution, called structured illumination microscopy. And this technique you use a standing wave of excitation rather than uniform illumination of the sample which creates these Moiré fringes against the information in the sample to create lower spatial frequencies that the microscope can detect. One of the arguments in the Nobel committee's report as to why this did not share the Nobel prize, is it's limited to a factor of two in resolution gain, whereas STED's localization is diffraction unlimited. But in my opinion, this weakness of SIM is actually its strength. Because, first off, you need much lower labelling densities to achieve that which is much more compatible with current technology. And second, it requires orders of magnitude less light, and is orders of magnitude faster than the other methods. So here are a couple of examples. Here you're looking at the endoplasmic reticulum in a live cell, and yes the resolution is only you have because you're able to look at this cell for 1800 rounds of imaging at subsecond intervals. You get this dynamic aspect that you can't get with the other methods. Here is another example of showing the dynamics of actin in a T-cell after it's provoked the immunological synapse. So the good news is we were able to recruit Mats from UCSF to Janelia in 2008, but he was diagnosed with... Oops, that was interesting. So he was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2009, and he ended up dying in 2011. So I ended up inheriting much of his group and his technology, and we've been trying to extend his legacy with this tool, too. Key to that is, if the argument is that SIM doesn't deserve to be spoken of in the same breath with STED and PALM because it doesn't have the same resolution, how can we get past that 100 nanometre barrier? Well, the simple and stupid way is to just increase the numerical aperture of your lens. So recently a 1.7 NA lens came onto the market which allows you with the GFP channel to push to 80 nanometre resolution. And then you can study for dozens or hundreds of time points in multiple colours because it doesn't require specialised labels. Dynamics in this case looking at clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and its interaction with the cortical actin, and how that helps to pull in these pits to bring cargoes inside of the cell. We've also developed recently another technique, a nonlinear structured illumination technique, that uses again this photo switching principle to put on a standing wave to generate the activation light in a spatially patterned way and read out the detection the same way to go from twice beyond the diffraction limit to three times beyond the diffraction limit. And then, that has gotten us to 60 nanometre resolution. Not as many time points and not quite as fast, but still allows us to look at live cells. So if, again, the knock has been that it doesn't have the resolution of other methods: Here we've compared this nonlinear SIM to RESOLFT and to localization microscopy, and basically we have resolution every bit as good, if not better with SIM now than we have with these other tools, but with hundreds of times less light and hundreds of times faster than these other methods. So I really think for live imaging between 60 and 200 nanometres SIM is going to be the go-to tool, and for structural imaging below 60 nanometres, PALM will be the tool. So the moral of the story is that while, again, everybody is crowding up against this goal of getting the highest spatial resolution, Mats wanted a space for himself working where others aren't and by pulling a little bit back, he had this whole play area where he could develop this tool. So it begs the question of, what if we go back all the way to the diffraction limit. Is there something we can do as physicists to make microscopes better for biologist and particularly, is there a way that we can increase the speed and noninvasiveness of imaging and live cell imaging to improve it by that same order of magnitude that PALM does in spatial aspect? And so, why do you want to do that? Well, the hallmark of life is that it's animate. And every living thing is a complex thermodynamic pocket of reduced entropy through which matter and energy is flowing continuously. So while structural imaging like super-resolution or electron microscopy will always be important, the only way we're going to understand how inanimate molecules self-assemble to create the animate cell is by studying it across all four dimensions of space time at the same time. So when I got as sick of super-resolution in 2008 as I was of near field in 1994, that's what I set out as my goal. The good news is that there was a new tool on the market that we could exploit which is the light sheet microscope. So what it does is it shoots a plane of illumination through a 3D sample to only illuminate one plane at once, so there's no damage to the regions above and below, and you can take a very quick picture cause the whole plane is illuminated then go plane by plane through the specimen. It's been transformative for understanding embryogenesis at single cell resolution, but it has a limitation in that the light sheets are pretty darn thick on the single cell level. We were able, basically, to then bring some physics tricks called nondiffracting beams. First these were Bessel beams, and eventually I was able to dust off my old ten-year-old lattice theory because two dimensional optical lattices are nondiffracting beams and create a light sheet that's much thinner, to then be able to look at the dynamics inside of single cells. So here are a bunch of examples of this. We've had about 50 different groups come to our lab to use this microscope and almost everyone has left with big smiles and ten terabytes of data. We never hear from them after that because they don't know what to do with ten terabytes of data. But in any case, I'm very proud of what we've done with PALM, but I'm morally convinced at this point that this will be the high water technique of my career. So one of the other things that that light sheet turned up, the lattice light sheet as we called it, turned out to be good for is that single molecule techniques in general have been limited to very thin samples because out of focus molecules obscure the signatures of the ones in focus. But the lattice light sheet is so thin that only in focus molecules are illuminated. And so that allowed us to apply another method of localization microscopy, developed by Robin Hochstrasser's group in the same year we developed PALM, where instead of prelabelling your cell and having a fixed number of molecules. Remember I said the basic problem is getting enough molecules in there to get the resolution you want. Well with PAINT, instead of prelabelling, the whole media around the cell is labelled with fluorophores. They're whizzing usually too fast to see, but when they stick they glow as a spot and then you localize those. So the advantage to this is there's an infinite army of molecules that can keep coming and coming and coming and decorate your cell. The disadvantage is because the media is glowing the SNR normally is too poor to do much single molecule imaging. So lattice light sheet with this PAINT technology is a marriage made in heaven. So here you're seeing 3D imaging over large volumes by using this method, and we're able to basically see. Now, basically, take localization microscopy to much thicker specimens at orders of magnitude higher density, and basically make something so we don't need to use EM to do sort of global contrast to combine with a local contrast we get from PALM. So the last thing Astrid, and then I'll be then off. I got two minutes and 22 seconds it says. You're early. Okay, is that we still have to deal with taking cells away from the cover slip. So much of what we've learned have been from immortalized cells, and all of these methods, if you take them from single cells and try to put them in organisms, they're incredibly sensitive to the refractive index variations that scramble the light as you go in and out with the fluorescent photons. So with STED, you have to have that perfect node in that doughnut. That's very sensitive to aberrations. With SIM, that standing wave gets corrupted. With confocal, your focus gets corrupted. With localization, your PSF, you have to have knowledge of the shape of that spot in order to find its centroid properly. And all of those things get screwed up by aberrations. Light sheet this is not showing, but as you go into an embryo. Right now, light sheet is in that same bullshit phase that other techniques are in, where people are saying: by using light sheet", but it just isn't so because the aberrations make the resolution so poor, you can't resolve single somas in certain areas of the brain. So what we've also been working on, is stealing from astronomers and using the tools of adaptive optics to allow us then to be able to look deep into live organisms. So this is an example here of looking in the brain of a developing zebrafish. In this case we had to develop a very fast AO technique because as you move from place to place the aberration is different so this represents 20,000 different adaptive optic corrections to cover this large volume. And as we go deep into the midbrain of the zebrafish, about 200 microns deep, we'll turn the adaptive optics off. That's what you would see with a state of the art microscope today, and then you turn the AO on and you get back to recovering the diffraction limit and recovering the signal. So for my group, what I really believe at this point is that we are on the cusp of a revolution in cell biology, because we still have not studied cells as cells really are. We need to study the cell on its own terms, and there's three parts of that puzzle. While GFP is great, it's largely been uncontrolled in its expression. So in the last couple years, these genome editing techniques have come on the scene to allow these proteins to be expressed at endogenous levels. These end up to be typically low levels so now confocal microscopy and these other techniques are far too perturbative to study dynamics, and you need things like lattice light sheet to be able to do that. But again, you can't look at cells in isolation and really see the whole story. You need to see all the cell-cell interactions, all the signalling that happens inside, where they actually evolved, and that's where the adaptive optics plays a part. So the future of my group is to develop adaptive optics to get that to work, to combine it with the lattice light sheet so we have a fast and noninvasive tool to look at dynamics. And then scroll in the super-resolution methods like SIM and PALM to add the high resolution on top of that. And with that, I thank you for your time.

Mein Dank geht an die Stiftung für ihre Gastfreundschaft und an Sie alle für Ihre Anwesenheit hier. Ich bin Maschinenbauer aus Instinkt und Neigung. Ich begann mit dem Maschinenbau als Doktorand in Cornell, als meine Betreuer an einer Idee arbeiteten, Licht durch ein Loch zu senden, das sehr viel kleiner als die Lichtwellenlänge war, und dies als ein kleine Nanolampe zu verwenden, um Punkt für Punkt durch die Probe zu fahren. Die Beugungsgrenze sollte überwunden werden, von der Stefan sprach, um ein Höchstauflösungsbild zu erreichen. Ich arbeitete an der Hochschule für Aufbaustudien sechs Jahre lang an dieser Technologie und hatte das Glück, sie solange weiterzuentwickeln bis zum Tage, an dem ich meinen Fuß in die Tür der Bell Labs bekam, dort schließlich mein eigenes Labor erhielt und weitere sechs Jahre an dieser Technologie arbeitete. In dieser Zeit entwickelten wir, während die Technologie langsam verbessert wurde, einige Anwendungen. Wir konnten Polarisationskontraste verwenden, zum Betrachten magneto-optischer Materialien, oder wir verwendeten Fluoreszenz, um Phasenübergänge und Langmuir-Blodgett Monoschichten sehen zu können, und Höchstauflösungslithografie, Histologie und kryogene Spektroskopie von Quantentöpfen vorzunehmen. Die Technologie gewann zunehmend an Bedeutung, aber zweierlei Gründe brachten mich zum Nahfeld. Ich wollte mich in der Wissenschaft nicht mit inkrementellen Dingen sondern mit wirklich Großem und Wirkungsvollem befassen und dafür schien Nahfeld eine Möglichkeit zu bieten. Das andere, was ich daran mochte war, als wir damit begannen, war uns keiner bekannt, der daran arbeitete. Ich mochte den Gedanken, ein noch unerforschtes Feld zu betreten, in dem es nicht jede Menge Ellbogen gab, die mir in die Seite stießen, während ich versuchte meine Arbeit zu tun. Es zeigte sich, dass ein paar andere Gruppen bereits daran arbeiteten. Die Idee reicht bis in die zwanziger Jahre zurück, damals war es dennoch ein ziemlich offenes Territorium und es fühlte sich faszinierend an. Allerdings, im Laufe der Entwicklung und mit dem Beginn unsers Erfolgs drängten immer mehr in das Feld. Besonders mit zwei Anwendungen, die wir im Jahr 1992 vorstellten, erreichten wir den Weltrekord bei der Datenspeicherdichte durch das Schreiben von Bits mit Nahfeld im 60-Nanometer-Bereich. Damit eröffnete sich ein großer Bereich, auf den sich die Leute stürzten. Ich stand unter dem Druck auf dieser Basis ein Programm zur späteren Vermarktung zu starten, was ich aber nicht wirklich wollte. Ich wollte keine große Gruppe leiten. Ich wollte noch immer einfach erkunden, wohin das Nahfeld führen könnte. Zum Glück hatten meine Vorgesetzten bei Bell Verständnis dafür und so konnte ich dies verfolgen. Es zahlte sich aus: Wir waren nämlich sehr schnell zu dem in der Lage, von dem ich geträumt hatte, nämlich im Bereich Biologie im Jahre 1993 das Aktinzytoskelett in einer etwa 50-Nanometer-Auflösung anzusehen. Das Problem war, es handelte sich um eine fixierte Zelle; der Traum war aber ein optisches Mikroskop, mit dem man sich lebenden Zellen mit der Auflösung eines elektronischen Mikroskops ansehen kann, und da waren wir noch nicht. Es gab eine Sache bei diesem Experiment: diese einzelnen Aktinfilamente hatten einen ausreichend großen Signal-Rausch-Abstand, der nahelegte, wir könnten sogar einzelne Moleküle sehen. Zu dieser Zeit war das noch ziemlich ungewiss, einige Jahre zuvor hatte nämlich W. E. Moerner bei kryogenen Temperaturen die spektrale Signatur einzelner Moleküle gesehen. Sie werden davon in wenigen Tagen hören. Es zeigte sich, dass es in der Tat sehr leicht war, einzelne Moleküle mit Nahfeld zu sehen, da der Brennpunkt so klein ist, dass man den Hintergrund nahezu auf Null reduziert und danach ist es sehr leicht, die einzelnen Moleküle zu sehen. Doch gab es Überraschungen, etwa dass die Formen unterschiedlich waren und so weiter. Als Ursache dafür stellte sich die Ausrichtung der Moleküle heraus, wir konnten also die Ausrichtungen messen und sogar ihre Positionen bis hinunter auf ein Vierzigstel der Lichtwellenlänge bestimmen. Damals, das führt uns ins Jahr ’94, stürzten sich viele Leute wegen der Spektroskopie-Anwendungen, der Datenspeicheranwendungen, der potentiellen biologischen und einzelmolekularen Anwendungen auf diesen Bereich und ich war es damals wirklich überdrüssig, mich mit Nahfeld zu befassen und das zum Teil auch wegen den fundamentalen Grenzen der Technologie. Das Schlimmste daran ist, dass das Licht, das aus dem Sub-Wellenlängen-Loch tritt, sich extrem schnell ausbreitet. Selbst wenn man nur zehn Moleküle entfernt ist, erhält man einen signifikanten Auflösungsverlust. Wenn man davon träumt, lebende Zellen zu sehen, so ist eine Zelle sehr viel gröber. Doch es gibt sehr viele andere Grenzen, zudem stürzten sich so viele Leute auf diesen Bereich und meinten, sie könnten Krebs heilen oder der Mond sei aus grünem Käse, oder was auch immer. Ich lernte in meiner wissenschaftlichen Laufbahn, dass es in der Wissenschaft alle diese Modeerscheinungen gibt, mit ihrem Auf und Ab und so weiter. Und Nahfeld wurde zu einer dieser Modeerscheinungen. Technologien entwickeln sich in etwa so, und hier möchte ich ansetzen. Hier macht es wirklich Freude und der Einsatz beginnt sich auszuzahlen und das ist die Zeit, in der man abspringen möchte, weil die Leute bei diesen Dingen ausflippen. Man möchte dann gerne glauben, es würde aufhören. Aber für mich ist jede neue Technologie wie ein Neugeborenes, man glaubt, es wird Präsident werden, oder den Krebs heilen, einen Nobelpreis gewinne, doch meist ist man nur froh, wenn es schließlich nicht im Gefängnis landet. So ist es im Grunde, wie die meisten Technologien enden, mit einem Niveau, das etwas über Null liegt, es gab also einen Nettogewinn, aber eben doch nicht allzu viel. Beim Nahfeld hatte ich das Gefühl, jedes gute Paper, das ich schrieb, war nur eine Rechtfertigung für hunderte Paper sinnlosen Quatsches, die dann folgten. Ich hatte wirklich das Gefühl, was ich tat war ein Negativbeitrag für die Gesellschaft, weil es Zeitverschwendung und eine Vergeudung von Steuergeldern war. Also stieg ich aus, und ich stieg nicht nur bei Bell aus, ich gab auch die Wissenschaft auf. Und da ich keine Ahnung hatte, was ich wollte, wurde ich Hausmann. Ein paar Monate später, ich fuhr gerade meine Tochter in ihrem Kinderwagen spazieren, erkannte ich, es gab eine Möglichkeit sich bei einige Experimente, die ich kürzlich durchgeführt hatte, einen anderen Weg einfallen zu lassen, um die Beugungsgrenze zu überwinden. Der Gedanke war, ob wir uns um Fluoreszenz kümmern. Stefan hat davon gesprochen, weshalb Fluoreszenz so wichtig ist. Das Problem ist, jedes Molekül ist eine kleine unscharfe Kugel und diese unscharfen Kugeln überlagern sich und man erhält nur einen Brei. Würden sich diese Moleküle irgendwie voneinander unterscheiden, zum Beispiel in unterschiedlichen Farben leuchten, könnte ich sie auf ihre unterschiedlichen Farben hin in einem höher-dimensionalen Raum von XY und der Wellenlänge in dieser Achse ansehen. Sobald sie voneinander isoliert sind, kann ich den Zentroid, das Zentrum dieser unscharfen Kugeln, sehr viel präziser finden, anstelle des Durchmessers der unscharfen Kugel, und erhalte so mit beinahe molekularer Präzision die Koordinate jedes Moleküls in der Probe. Das war also die Grundidee. Ich war etwa einen Monat ganz begeistert davon, erkannte dann aber, der Haken ist, selbst mit dem besten Brennpunkt, den man bei einem konventionellen Mikroskop erhalten kann, kann es in diesem beugungsbegrenzten Punkt Hunderte oder Tausende von Molekülen geben. Daher braucht es eine absurd gute Auflösung, sei es bei der Wellenlänge, oder was auch immer es in dieser dritten Dimension ist, um einschalten zu können und ein Molekül auf innerhalb von Hunderten oder Tausenden zu sehen. Ich wusste nicht wirklich, wie das erzeugt werden kann. Ich publizierte das einfach während meiner Arbeitslosigkeit und beließ es dabei. Am Ende griff ich auf meinen Absicherungsplan zurück. Mein Vater hatte im Jahre 1985 ein Unternehmen für Werkzeugmaschinen gegründet, das bereits 1994 einen Umsatz von 50 Millionen erzielte. Das Unternehmen stellte sehr kundenspezifische, sehr große Maschinen für sehr große Losgrößen eines einzelnen Teils her. Die Maschinen werden für die Automobilindustrie genau für ein Teil kundenspezifisch hergestellt. Es handelte sich um eine erfolgreiche Technologie. Ich hatte aber ein so großes Ego und hab es immer noch, und sehr viel Naivität, die ich auch immer noch habe, dass ich der Meinung war, wenn ein einzelner Physiker in die alte Industrieregion der USA ginge, könnte er sie vor den Japanern retten. Also ging ich dorthin, um zu sehen, ob ich etwas zur Optimierung dieser Technologie tun könnte. Ich entwickelte diese Maschine, die eine alte Technologie nutzte, Hydraulik genannt, verband diese mit Prinzipien der Energiespeicherung, wie sie bei Hybridautos verwendet werden, sowie mit nichtlinearen Regelalgorithmen und war damit in der Lage eine Maschine herzustellen, die erst in etwa die Breite dieses Hörsaals hatte, und die ich dann in etwa auf die Größe eines Kleinwagens reduzierte. Dazu würde sie vier Tonnen bei 8 G Beschleunigung bewegen und auf 5 Mikrometer genau positionieren. Es war ein erstaunliches Ding, auf das ich sehr stolz war. Ich verbrachte vier Jahre damit, sie zu entwickeln, drei Jahre damit, sie zu verkaufen, und in dieser Zeit habe ich zwei davon verkauft. Ich lernte also, dass ich vielleicht kein Wissenschaftler bin aber sicher ein miserabler Geschäftsmann. Nachdem ich also mehr als eine Million Dollar meines Vaters in den Sand gesetzt hatte, ging ich zu ihm und entschuldigte mich. Ich sagte: “Es tut mir leid, ich habe alles was mir möglich ist gegeben, ich kann das Teil aber einfach nicht verkaufen.“ Und so kündigte ich wieder. Das war die dunkelste Zeit meines Lebens, ich hatte nicht nur meine akademische Laufbahn hingeschmissen sondern auch die Idee in den Sand gesetzt, im Familienbetrieb zu arbeiten. Ich musste also etwas finden und nahm daher wieder Kontakt mit einem Freund, Harald Hess, bei Bell auf. Auch er hatte Bell verlassen, als diese in den 90er Jahren schrumpften, und war in die Industrie gegangen. Er litt an der gleichen Art Midlife-Krise, an der auch ich litt. Im Geschäftsleben war er erfolgreicher als ich, aber eben doch unzufrieden. Wir wünschten uns wieder neugierige Forschung zu betreiben und mit den eigenen Händen zu arbeiten. Wir wollten keine Manager sein, was einem gewöhnlich passiert, wenn man in den 40ern ist. Wir wollten im Grunde wie Doktoranden leben. Wir begannen uns in verschiedenen Nationalparks zu treffen und schmiedeten Pläne, wie wir wieder zurück ins Labor gelangen könnten. Und ich begann nach einem Jahrzehnt wieder damit, wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zu lesen. Das Erste, was mir da begegnete haute mich um. Es war das grüne fluoreszierende Protein. Der Gedanke, man könne etwas DNA aus einer leuchtenden Qualle schneiden und damit jedes Protein in einem gewünschten lebende Organismus spezifisch fluoreszieren lassen, mit 100% Bestimmtheit, das faszinierte mich, da es in dem Aktin-Experiment, das ich gezeigt hatte, so schwierig gewesen war, eine ausreichende gute Markierung zur Betrachtung des Aktins zu erhalten, ohne dass daneben eine Menge unspezifischen Mists auftauchte. Und da meinte ich: “Verdammt, ich glaube, ich werde wieder ein Mikroskopierer.“ Ich hatte aber ein Problem, da ich zehn Jahren lang aus der Physik heraus war, war mir mein ganzes physikalisches Wissen abhanden gekommen. Ich konnte mich an nichts erinnern. Nun, ich brachte die Kinder zur Schule. Danach ging ich zu dem Häuschen, das wir in der Nähe hatten, setzte mich am See hin und begann Physik neu zu lernen, ab den Lehrbüchern der Erstsemester und dann weiter. Innerhalb von drei Monaten fügte sich alles wieder zusammen. Ich hatte es nicht wirklich vergessen. Ich war nur irgendwie blockiert. Und ich versuchte herauszufinden, wie ich das Licht dazu verwenden könnte, um ein besseres Mikroskop zu erhalten. Damals ging es nicht um ein super-auflösendes Mikroskop, sondern um ein besseres Mikroskop, welches die Vorteile des Live Cell Imaging von GFP nutzen würde. Ich begann in grundlegenden Begriffen zu denken, von anfänglich zwei Wellenvektoren, die eine stehende Welle erzeugen. Ich fügte weitere Wellenvektoren hinzu und erhielt diese merkwürdig periodischen Muster, sah in der Literatur nach und hörte von etwas, das optische Gitter genannt wurde, die in der Quantenoptik dazu verwendet werden, Atome einzufangen und zu kühlen. Schließlich dachte ich mir die neuen Arten optischer Gitter aus, die sich wirklich gut als ein 3D multifokales Erregerfeld eignen würden, um bei lebenden Zellen eine sehr leistungsfähige Bildgebung in hoher Geschwindigkeit zu erhalten. Ich nannte dies optische Gitter-Mikroskopie und wollte es mit dieser Idee schaffen, wieder zur Wissenschaft zurückzukehren. Harald half mir bei der Aufgabe mich wieder hineinzuarbeiten und ein Ort, den wir aufsuchten, um diese Idee vorzustellen war die Florida State University, wo wir auf Mike Davidson trafen. Mike erzählte uns nicht nur von fluoreszierendem Protein, sondern von einer ganz neuen Art fluoreszierenden Proteins, bei dem, wenn man es zuerst mit blauem Licht anstrahlt, nichts geschieht. Wenn man es aber zuerst mit violettem Licht anstrahlt, die Moleküle aktiviert werden und blaues Licht daraufhin verursacht, dass es grün wird oder grünes Licht ausstrahlt. Im Grunde ist es ein fluoreszierendes Molekül, das man ein- und ausschalten kann. Da saßen Harald und ich also im Flughafen von Tallahassee, und uns wurde klar, dass dies das fehlende Glied war, um jene Idee, die ich während meiner ersten Arbeitslosigkeit zehn Jahren zuvor umrissen hatte, zu realisieren. Der Gedanke war, das violette Licht so niedrig zu fahren, dass sich jeweils nur wenige Moleküle einschalten. Rein statistisch werden sie wahrscheinlich durch mehr als die Beugungsgrenze getrennt, sodass man die Zentren der unscharfen Kugeln finden kann. Diese Moleküle schalten sich entweder aus oder verblassen. Man fährt das Violett wieder hoch, um eine andere Teilmenge anzuschalten und so geht es in einem fort weiter, bis man aus der Probe alle Moleküle extrahiert hat (Bleed-Out). Das war die Idee, die ich 1995 hatte, ausgenommen der Zeit als kritischer Dimension und dem violetten Licht als Knopf, mittels dessen wir immer höhere Auflösungen entlang dieser Zeitachse erhielten. Wir hatten ein weiteres Problem, da ich Harald auf der Grundlage des Gittermikroskops überzeugt hatte, obgleich er nicht davon überzeugt war, es mit mir zu versuchen, und er hatte seine Arbeit gekündigt und da gab es jetzt zwei arbeitslose Typen. Wie also setzen wir diese Idee um, denn wir waren der Meinung, dass es so lächerlich einfach ist und bereits eine Menge Leute darüber nachgedacht haben, und darin hatten wir recht. Es gab eine Menge Leute, die uns unmittelbar auf den Fersen waren. Die gute Nachricht ist: Harald ist sehr viel klüger als ich. Als ich Bell verließ, sagte ich ihnen, sie sollten sich zum Teufel scheren. Als Harald Bell verließ, konnte er seine gesamte Ausrüstung mitnehmen. Wir holten sie also aus dem Lagerschuppen und normalerweise macht man solche Arbeiten in der Garage, aber wir konnten es in seinem Wohnzimmer tun, denn er war nicht verheiratet und dort war es sehr viel gemütlicher. In wenigen Monaten hatten wir das Mikroskop gebaut und dann hatte ich einen Termin bei NIH, bei dem ich über mein Gittermikroskop berichtete und ich bat Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz und George Patterson, die das photoaktivierte Protein erfunden hatten, auf ein Gespräch ein. Wir aßen zusammen zu Mittag, verpflichtete sie zum Stillschweigen und ich erzählte ihnen von meiner Idee, und dass dies das letzte fehlende Glied sei, Harald und ich hatten nämlich keine Ahnung von Biologie. Jennifer ist jedoch eine der besten Zellbiologen der Welt und meinte, ich solle es eben mal mitbringen. Wir packten unser Mikroskop ein und gingen in Jennifers Dunkelkammer und danach, innerhalb von zwei Monaten, kamen wir von dieser Art von… Hier sieht man auf eine Scheibe durch eine Zelle auf zwei Lysosome, kleine Beutel mit Proteinabbau, dann ist da die Beugungsgrenze und das ist das photoaktivierte Lokalisierungsmikroskop oder PALM Image und die Auflösung verlief von hier nach hier. Also zwei Dinge, einmal, Harald und ich wollten vom Konzept dieser Idee ausgehend, die Daten innerhalb von sechs Monaten in unserer wissenschaftlichen Schrift vorlegen, und wir konnten es, weil uns alle ließen. Wir konnten einfach für uns arbeiten. Das Zweite ist, diese Art Arbeit erfordert diese Abgeschiedenheit, die man in einer solchen Situation nun mal hat. Die Fähigkeit sich 100% zu konzentrieren, und das immer wieder, habe ich in meiner Laufbahn als essentiell erfahren; nicht im akademischen Betrieb zu sein, das war für mich der Schlüssel. Denn ob es bei Bell war, bei der Arbeit für meinen Vater, oder da, wo ich jetzt arbeite, es ist der Gedanke alleine zu sein und sich mit Das sind also alle guten Nachrichten über die Superauflösung, doch jedes neue Stadium meiner Laufbahn wurde durch die Einschränkungen der Dinge beeinflusst, an denen ich zuvor gearbeitet hatte. Superauflösung war ein Haufen voller Einschränkungen. Zuerst schauen wir uns wieder Fluoreszenz an, und wenn man seine fluoreszierenden Moleküle nicht dicht genug umkleidet, kann man eine Eigenschaft völlig übersehen, wenn man nicht weniger als eine Halbwertzeit in den Abständen ist. Das also nennt man das Nyquist-Kriterium. Sie sehen, will man von diesem Bild eine Stichprobe nehmen, ist die intrinsische Auflösung des Mikroskops unwesentlich; Sie haben nicht genug Informationen. Die schlechte Nachricht ist, wenn man dies auf die Superauflösung bezieht, sofern man nicht den Auftrag hat, von 500 Molekülen eine 20-Nanometer-Auflösung zu erhalten, ist man erledigt. Es zeigte sich, dies ist ein sehr hoher Standard für Dichte ist, verglichen mit dem was die meisten Biologen zuvor an beugungsbegrenzter Arbeit getan haben. Dies bedeutet, die Realisierung dieser Technologien liegt nicht beim Werkzeugentwickler, leider, sondern beim Biologen, der Vorbereitungsverfahren für Proben finden muss, die dafür funktionieren. Sie können jetzt natürlich fragen, was das Besondere an der Superauflösung ist. Wir verwendeten lange Zeit EM, und das war verdammt gut. Es gibt zwei Hauptgründe, auf die Stefan bereits hingewiesen hat. Der erste ist der proteinspezifische Kontrast, der gewöhnlich mit struktureller Bildgebung an fixierten Zellen eingestellt wird. Das Problem jedoch ist, 95% von dem, was wir glauben durch Superauflösung gelernt zu haben, geschah mit chemisch fixierten Zellen, deren Zweck ist das Vernetzen von Proteinen, wodurch die Ultrastruktur vermasselt wird. Das bedeutet, wir müssen fast alles, was wir beim Ansehen von fixierten Zellen erfahren, mit einem Sternchen versehen. Aufregender wäre es, Live Cell Imaging vorzunehmen. Das Problem ist, wie Sie sich denken können, selbst wenn ich nur einen Faktor von zwei Auflösungsverbesserungen möchte in jeder der drei Dimensionen, bedeutet dies meine Voxel sind acht Mal kleiner. Also habe ich in jedem Voxel ein Achtel so viele Moleküle. Wenn ich die gleiche Anzahl Photonen möchte, um das gleiche Signal und Geräusch wie in einem beugungsbegrenzten Experiment zu erhalten, muss ich auf meine Zelle entweder acht Mal so viel Licht geben, was dieser nicht gefallen wird, oder aber ich muss acht Mal länger darauf warten, dass diese Photonen zum Vorschein kommen und das ganze Bild wird durch Bewegungsartefakte verwischt. Man braucht laut Literatur zur Auflösung von Live Cell Imaging Das wiederum ist beinahe ein Hirngespinst. Manchmal empfinde ich, als würde ich bei der Superauflösung den gleichen Albtraum, den ich beim Nahfeld-Bereich hatte, wieder aufs Neue erleben. Ich weiß aus meiner Erfahrung, dies war nicht möglich. Weitere Probleme sind die Intensität, die für STED oder für PALM irgendwo zwischen Kilowatt bis Gigawatt pro Quadratzentimeter beträgt. Doch Leben entwickelt sich bei einem Zehntel eines Watts pro Quadratzentimeter. Wir müssen uns also fragen, wenn wir Live Cell Imaging vornehmen, schauen wir uns dann eine lebende Zelle an oder eine tote oder eine sterbende, aufgrund der Anwendung all dieses Lichts. Und diese Methoden erfordern viel Zeit, um ein Bild zu erzeugen und die Zelle ist in Bewegung und am Ende erhält man Bewegungsartefakte. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, mich kümmert es nicht, welche Methode Sie anwenden. Will man eine höhere räumliche Auflösung, braucht man mehr Pixel. Mehr Pixel bedeutet mehr Messungen. Das dauert länger. Es bedeutet, die Probe mehr potentiell schädigendem Licht auszusetzen und wenn Sie ehrlich sind, man hat es immer mit Abwägungen zwischen räumlicher Auflösung, zeitlicher Auflösung und Abbildungstiefe zu tun. Jemand, der diese Abwägungen besser und früher als wir alle wirklich verstanden hatte war der gebürtige Schwede Mats Gustafsson, der eine dritte Methode der Fernfeld-Superauflösung entwickelte, genannt "strukturierte Beleuchtung". Bei dieser Technik verwendet man eine Anregung per stehender Welle statt einer einheitlichen Beleuchtung der Probe, wodurch diese Moiré-Effekte aus den Informationen in der Probe entstehen, die wiederum niedrigere Frequenzen bewirken und so vom Mikroskop erkennbar werden. Ein Argument im Bericht des Nobelpreis-Komitees, weshalb dies keinen Nobelpreis erhielt war, dies sei auf einen Faktor zwei beim Auflösungsgewinn begrenzt, wohingegen die Lokalisation von STED beugungsunbegrenzt sei. Doch ich meine, diese Schwäche von SIM ist eigentlich eine Stärke. Denn erstens, man benötigt sehr viel niedrigere Kennzeichnungsdichten, was mit der derzeitigen Technologie sehr viel kompatibler ist. Und zweitens erfordert es um Größenordnungen weniger Licht und ist um Größenordnungen schneller als andere Methoden. Hier sind ein paar Beispiele. Sie sehen hier das endoplasmatische Retikulum einer lebenden Zelle und ja, die Auflösung beträgt nur 100 Nanometer, Sie sehen aber die Detailfülle an Informationen, die man erhält, weil man in der Lage ist, diese Zelle 1800 Umläufe lang bei der Bildverarbeitung in Subsekunden-Intervallen anzusehen. Man erhält diesen dynamischen Aspekt, den man mit den anderen Methoden nicht bekommt. Hier ist ein weiteres Beispiel, das Verhalten von Aktin in einer T-Zelle, nachdem sie die immunologische Synapse ausgelöst hat. Die gute Nachricht ist, wir konnten 2008 Mats von der UCSF für Janelia anwerben, aber es wurde diagnostiziert… Ich übernahm viel aus seiner Gruppe und seiner Technologie und wir versuchen auch, mit diesem Instrument sein Vermächtnis weiterzuführen. Der Schlüssel dazu ist: Wenn der Einwand, weshalb man SIM nicht im gleichen Atemzug mit STED und PALM nennt, der ist, dass es nicht die gleiche Auflösung hat, wie können wir dann diese 100 Nanometer-Barriere überwinden? Der einfache und dumme Weg ist, einfach die numerische Apertur des Objektivs zu erhöhen. Vor kurzem kam ein 1,7 NA Objektiv auf den Markt, mit dem man mittels des GFP-Kanals bis zur 80 Nanometer-Auflösung klettern kann. Dann kann man dutzende oder hunderte Zeitpunkte mehrfarbig studieren, da keine speziellen Markierungen notwendig sind. Bewegung heißt hier, sich die clathrin-vermittelte Endozytose und seine Interaktion mit dem Cortactin anzusehen, und wie dies dazu beiträgt, diese Vertiefungen hineinzuziehen, um Material in die Zelle zu bekommen Kürzlich haben wir eine weitere Technik entwickelt. Eine nichtlineare strukturierte Beleuchtungstechnik, die wieder dieses Photo-Schaltprinzip verwendet, um eine stehende Welle aufzustellen, um das Aktivierungslicht auf eine räumlich gestaltete Art zu generieren und auf die gleiche Art die Erkennung vorzunehmen. Hier hebt man die Auflösung von der doppelten Beugungsgrenze zur dreifachen Beugungsgrenze. Das brachte uns zu einer 60-Nanometer-Auflösung. Nicht so viel Zeitpunkte und nicht ganz so schnell, aber man kann damit lebende Zellen sehen. Nochmal, wenn es das war, dass es nicht die Auflösung anderer Methoden hatte: Wir haben dieses nichtlineare SIM mit RESOLFT und Lokalisationsmikroskopie verglichen. Im Grunde haben wir jetzt mit SIM eine ebenso gute Auflösung, wenn nicht sogar eine bessere, als wir dies mit den anderen Instrumenten haben, doch mit hunderte Male weniger Licht und hunderte Male schneller als mit diesen anderen Methoden. Ich glaube wirklich, für die Lebendzellenbeobachtung zwischen 60 und 200 Nanometer wird SIM das Go-to-Instrument und für die strukturelle Bildgebung unter 60 Nanometer wird es PALM sein. Die Moral von der Geschichte ist, während jedermann sich um dieses Ziel drängte, um die höchste räumliche Auflösung zu erhalten, wünschte sich Mats einen eigenen Raum zum Arbeiten, da wo andere es nicht tun. Und indem er sich etwas zurücknahm, hatte er diese ganze Spielwiese, auf der er sein Instrument entwickeln konnte. Es stellt sich also die Frage, was ist, wenn wir den ganzen Weg zur Beugungsgrenze zurückgehen. Gibt es da etwas, was wir als Physiker tun können, um für Biologen bessere Mikroskope zu entwickeln und insbesondere, gibt es eine Möglichkeit die Geschwindigkeit zu erhöhen und Nichtinvasivität bei der Bildgebung und dem Live Cell Imaging zu haben, um es in der gleichen Größenordnung zu optimieren, wie PALM dies hinsichtlich räumlicher Auflösung leistet? Und warum würde man dies tun wollen? Nun, das Kennzeichen von Leben ist: es ist lebendig. Und alles Lebendige ist eine komplexe thermodynamische Melange verringerter Entropie, durch welche fortlaufend Materie und Energie strömen. Auch wenn strukturelle Bildgebung wie Superauflösung oder Elektronenmikroskopie immer wichtig bleiben werden, die einzige Möglichkeit, wie wir verstehen können, wie sich leblose Moleküle miteinander verbinden, um eine lebendige Zelle zu schaffen ist, dies quer über alle vier Dimensionen von Raum-Zeit gleichzeitig zu studieren. Als mir 2008 Superauflösung ebenso zuwider wurde wie das Nahfeld 1994, habe ich mir dies zum Ziel gesetzt. Die gute Nachricht ist, es gab auf dem Markt ein neues Instrument, das wir nutzen konnten, das Lichtscheibenmikroskop. Es schießt eine Beleuchtungsebene durch eine 3D Probe, damit nur eine Ebene auf einmal beleuchtet wird. Es werden also keine Bereiche darüber und darunter beschädigt und man kann ein sehr schnelles Bild aufnehmen, denn die gesamte Ebene ist beleuchtet, dann führt man das Ebene für Ebene durch die Probe fort. Dies war für das Verständnis der Embryogenese bei einer einzelnen Zellenauflösung sehr wichtig, hatte aber eine Einschränkung dadurch, dass die Lichtscheiben auf dem Einzel-Zell-Level ziemlich dick sind. Wir konnten dann einige Physik-Tricks einsetzen, nämlich sogenannt nicht-brechende Strahlen. Zuerst waren es Bessel-Strahlen und schließlich konnte ich meine zehn Jahre alte Gittertheorie aus der Versenkung holen, denn die zweidimensionalen optischen Gitter sind nicht-brechende Strahlen, die eine Lichtscheibe erzeugen, die viel dünner ist, und man kann sich dann die Bewegungen innerhalb einzelner Zellen ansehen. Hier sind einige Beispiele dafür. In unser Labor kamen etwa 50 verschiedene Gruppen, um dieses Mikroskop zu nutzen und fast jeder verließ das Labor mit einem breiten Lächeln und zehn Terabytes an Daten. Danach hören wir nichts mehr von ihnen, denn sie wissen nicht, was man mit zehn Terabytes an Daten anfangen soll. Ich bin aber auf jeden Fall sehr stolz darauf, was wir mit PALM zuwege gebracht haben, an diesem Punkt bin ich aber überzeugt, dass dies die Spitzentechnik meiner Laufbahn sein wird. Eine weitere Sache, die Klarheit brachte, tauchte auf, die Gitter-Lichtscheibe, wie wir sie nannten, erwies sich als für Einzelmolekül-Techniken geeignet, da sich diese allgemein auf sehr dünne Proben beschränken, da unscharfe Moleküle die Signatur der scharf eingestellten Moleküle verdunkeln. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe ist aber so dünn, dass nur die scharf eingestellten Moleküle beleuchtet werden. Dadurch konnten wir eine andere Methode der Lokalisationsmikroskopie anwenden, die die Gruppe Robin Hochstrassers im gleichen Jahr entwickelt hatte in dem wir PALM entwickelten, statt der Vormarkierung der Zelle und einer festgelegten Anzahl von Molekülen... Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, das Grundproblem ist, ausreichend Moleküle zu erhalten, um die gewünschte Auflösung zu bekommen. Bei PAINT wird statt der Vormarkierung das ganze Medium um die Zelle mit Fluoreszenz-Farbstoffen markiert. Gewöhnlich schwirren die Farbstoffe zu schnell herum, als dass man sie sehen könnte, wenn sie aber haften, leuchten sie wie ein Fleck und man kann sie dann lokalisieren. Der Vorteil hiervon ist, es gibt eine unendliche Armee an Molekülen, die ständig hinzukommen und Ihre Zelle umkleiden. Der Nachteil ist, da das Medium leuchtet, ist SNR normalerweise zu schwach, um viel an Einzel-Molekül-Imaging vorzunehmen. Die Gitter-Lichtscheibe zusammen mit dieser PAINT-Technologie ist eine höchst wundervolle Kombination. Sie sehen hier den Einsatz dieser Methode die 3D-Bilderfassung bei großen Volumina, und prinzipiell können wir das sehen. Nehmen Sie Lokalisierungsmikroskopie für viel dickere Proben in der Größenordnung hoher Dichte und wir haben etwas, damit wir kein EM für den allgemeinen Kontrast benötigen, um es mit einem lokalen Kontrast zu kombinieren, den wir von PALM erhalten. Noch eine letzte Sache, Astrid, und dann mache ich Schluss. Ich habe noch zwei Minuten und 22 Sekunden zum Reden. Sie sind früh dran. Es geht darum, wir müssen immer noch die Zellen vom Deckglas nehmen. Vieles was wir gelernt haben, haben wir durch immortalisierte Zellen gelernt und alle diese Methoden, versucht man sie von der Einzelzelle auf den Organismus anzuwenden, sind unglaublich empfindlich hinsichtlich der Variationen des Brechungsindexes, die das Licht beim Hinein- und Hinausgehen der fluoreszierenden Photonen verwischen. Bei STED haben Sie diesen perfekten Knoten im Doughnut. Der ist bei Abweichungen sehr empfindlich. Bei SIM wird die stehende Welle beschädigt. Bei konfokal wird der Brennpunkt beschädigt. Bei Lokalisierung, ihrer PFS, benötigt man die Kenntnis über die Form jenes Flecks, damit man seinen Zentroid genau findet. Alles das wird durch Abweichungen vermasselt. Lichtscheibe wird nicht gezeigt, aber wenn man es mit einem Embryo zu tun hat... Die Lichtscheibe ist in der gleichen miserablen Phase, in der sich andere Techniken befinden, bei denen die Leute sagen: wenn wir die Lichtscheibe verwenden“, doch dem ist nicht so, da durch die Abweichungen die Auflösung so schlecht wird. Man kann einzelne Zellsoma in bestimmten Bereichen des Gehirns nicht auflösen. An was wir gearbeitet haben war, Anleihen bei Astronomen zu machen und die Instrumente der adaptiven Optik zu verwenden, damit wir tiefer in die leben Organismen hineinsehen können. Dies ist das Beispiel für den Blick in das Gehirn eines sich entwickelnden Zebrafisches. In diesem Falle mussten wir eine sehr schnelle AO-Technik entwickeln, da beim Wechsel von einem Ort zum andern die Abweichung sich ändert. Das hier repräsentiert 20.000 verschiedene adaptive optische Berichtigungen, damit dieses große Volumen abgedeckt wird. Wenn wir tiefer in das Mittelgehirn des Zebrafisches gehen, etwa 200 Mikrometer tief, schalten wir die adaptive Optik aus. Das würden Sie mit einem modernen Mikroskop sehen und dann schalten Sie die AO ein und man ist wieder da, wo man die Beugungsgrenze erhält und das Signal erhält. Was meine Gruppe betrifft und an was ich derzeit wirklich glaube ist, wir stehen am Scheitelpunkt zu einer Revolution in der Zellbiologie, denn wir haben Zellen noch immer nicht so untersucht, wie sie in Wirklichkeit sind. Wir müssen die Zelle unter ihren eigenen Bedingungen studieren und bei diesem Rätsel gibt es drei Teile. GFP ist großartig, seine Rohdaten sind aber weitgehend ungeordnet. In den letzten zwei Jahren traten diese Bearbeitungstechniken des Erbguts hervor, mit denen man mit diesen Proteinen auf endogenen Leveln experimentieren kann. Es zeigte sich, dass es typischerweise niedrige Stufen waren, konfokale Mikroskopie und diese anderen Techniken sind viel zu pertubative, um Dynamiken zu untersuchen und man braucht dazu so etwas wie Gitter-Lichtscheiben. Nochmals, man kann Zellen nicht isoliert betrachten und dabei den Gesamtzusammenhang sehen. Man muss alle Zell-Zell-Interaktionen sehen, alle Nachrichtenübermittlungen, die im Innern stattfinden, da, wo sie sich entwickeln, und hier spielt die adaptive Optik eine Rolle. Die Zukunft meiner Gruppe wird sein, adaptive Optik zu entwickeln, damit dies funktioniert, dies mit der Gitter-Lichtscheibe zu kombinieren, damit wir ein nichtinvasives Instrument haben, um Dynamiken anzusehen. Und dann schieben wir die Superauflösungsmethoden wie SIM und PALM mit hinein, um darüber hinaus die höhere Auflösung hinzuzufügen. Damit danke ich Ihnen für ‘s Zuhören.

Betzig introducing lattice light-sheet microscopy
(00:25:46 - 00:27:10)


In their lectures, Betzig and Moerner also described a new method, known as PAINT, where fluorophores are added to the sample while imaging, and attach to certain areas of the cell or molecule, which can be focused on during its short-lived fluorescence, and detected by a camera.

At the moment, none of these super-resolution methods can be applied universally to every sample, but scientists are continually advancing these methods, and their combination, enabling real-time, fast, live-cell imaging, may soon become more than just a concept. “What I really believe at this point is that we are on a cusp of a revolution in cell biology, because we still have not studied cells as cells really are. We need to study the cell on its own terms”, said Betzig, concluding his lecture.

Obtaining a better image may be a goal in itself and microscopy researchers must derive a great deal of satisfaction when they compare sharp images of cell organelles compared with previous fuzzy ones. The fascination is equal to that of the 16th century microscopists, peering into handmade lenses. But the essential message of these new technologies is that knowledge is power; the more we observe, the more we learn about biological mechanisms, which can only advance treatment of many illnesses that still afflict us.

The Future

In the next few years, the imaging techniques described in this topic cluster will become more sophisticated, through progress in resolution and instrument precision, but also as a result of new discoveries based on basic science. Whether the initial finding seems to be good for “damn little”, as Felix Bloch supposedly said of NMR in the 1950’s, or a defined solution is actively pursued by applying physical processes, as in the development of STED microscopy, it is evident that theoretical physics is the groundwork for exciting applications in various fields. We have evidence in the form of incredible images to show for it.

 

Notes:

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Healthcare_resource_statistics_-_technical_resources_and_medical_technology&oldid=280129
http://jwst.nasa.gov/comparison_about.html
Andersen, G. (2006). The Telescope: Its History, Technology and Future. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, USA.
Cierniak, R. (2011). X-ray Computed Tomography in Biomedical Imaging. Springer New York.
Dawson, M.J. (2013) Paul Lauterbur and the Invention of the MRI. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Edwards, S.A. (2006). The Nanotech Pioneers: Where are They Taking Us? Wiley-Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA, Weinheim.
Hudelist, M.A., Schoeffmann, K., Ahlström, D., and Lux, M. (2015). How Many, What and Why? Visual Media Statistics on Smartphones and Tablets. Workshop Proceedings of ICME 2015, June 29 - 3 July 2015, Torino, Italy.
Lang, K.R. (2006). Parting the Cosmic Veil. Springer.
Marett-Crosby, M. (2013). Twenty-five Astronomical Observations that Changed the World: And How to Make Them Yourself. Springer.
Mikla, V.I., Mikla, V.V. (2014). Medical Imaging Technology. Elsevier.
Ruska, E. (1986). The Development of the Electron Microscope and of Electron Microscopy. Nobel lecture.
Snyder, L.J. (2015). Eye of the Beholder. Johannes Vermeer, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek and the Reinvention of Seeing. W.W. Norton & Company.
Stephenson, F.R., Green, D.A. (2003). Was the supernova of AD1054 reported in European history? Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage 6(1), 46-52.
Thorley, J.A., Pike, J., Rappaport, J.Z. (2014). Super-resolution Microscopy: A Comparison of Commercially Available Options. In: Fluorescence Microscopy. Super-resolution and Other Techniques, Chapter 14. Cornea, A., Conn, P.M. (eds.), Elsevier.