HIV and AIDS

HIV – a Difficult Foe

Viruses have been proposed to be the most successful inhabitants of our planet.1 Why have they been so successful, and what makes a successful virus? The reasons are several, but central to viral success is their ability to propagate themselves to a degree that is probably unprecedented in all of nature. In less than one hour an infected cell can be hijacked to produce thousands of copies of a viral genome.2

An additional prerequisite for a successful virus is the ability to evade or actively suppress the host’s immune system. Some such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have alighted on a devilishly effective strategy that allows them to propagate their genetic material and ensure that they are spared from potentially debilitating immune responses in one fell swoop. Manfred Eigen, Chemistry Nobel Laureate 1967 for his work in studying chemical reactions, explains:

Manfred Eigen (1990): Virus quasi species, Pandora`s box
(00:09:45 - 00:10:23)

The complete video is available here.

Thus, HIV has evolved to infect those very cells of the immune system: helper T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, that are responsible for keeping it in check. This is not the only strategy in HIV’s armoury, though. This is a virus that changes its genetic code exceedingly rapidly3, essentially representing a moving target both for our own immune system and for efforts to design effective vaccines. Manfred Eigen, again, makes this point in his lecture from 1990.

Manfred Eigen (1990): Virus quasi species, Pandora`s box
(00:35:04 - 00:35:52)

The complete video is available here.

Why exactly is rapid change so hard to deal with for our immune system? In response to viral infection, our immune systems produce so-called neutralising antibodies that bind to molecules on the virus surface and, as their name suggests, incapacitate viral function.4 Immunologist Peter C. Doherty who received a share of the 1996 Prize for Physiology or Medicine for discoveries concerning cell-mediated immune defence, here explains why a rapidly mutating virus is a problem for neutralising antibodies.

Peter Doherty (1999): How we Deal with Virus Infections
(00:13:26 - 00:13:39)

The complete video is available here.

Discovery and First Treatments

The infection that later became known as AIDS (for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) was first described in the US during the summer of 1981. Young, almost always gay men were being struck down with an affliction that was baffling doctors. While the causative agent was not yet clear, what was obvious is that those suffering from the condition were having severe problems with dealing with routine infections – their immune systems were in effect being wiped out. In the absence of any hard data about what exactly caused the condition and how it was being spread, theories, some fantastical, and almost all hurtful, abounded. It was postulated that AIDS was a condition caused by the ‘lifestyles’ associated with gay men or intravenous drug users. By 1982, it had become clear that AIDS was being spread by bodily fluids, and soon after it was clear that heterosexuals and non-drug users could also contract it. The race was now on to identify the agent that caused it.5 Françoise Barré-Sinoussi shared half of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with fellow Institut Pasteur researcher Luc Montagnier for discovering HIV. In this excerpt from her talk at the Lindau Meeting in 2010, Barré-Sinoussi talks about the history of HIV and the AIDS epidemic and highlights the lessons that can be learned from the discovery of HIV with a special emphasis on the importance of multidisciplinary teams, of careful observation and of being in the right place at the right time.

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2010) - HIV, a Discovery Highlighting the Global Benefit of Translational Research

Thank you very much for these very nice words of introduction. What I’d like to do in the next 20 minutes or so, it’s a short talk so I’m not going to go into details but I like to give the example of HIV to show the young researcher how it’s important to make multidisciplinary and translational research. For HIV everything started really by observation, observation of our colleagues, epidemiologists and clinicians who reported the few cases of young homosexuals that were all presenting with severe immune deficiency. It is also based on those observations that we had the idea that probably a virus was the cause of this newly recognised epidemic. First cases were found in haemophilic patients indicating that probably a virus was the cause of this new emerging disease. And it is by our colleagues, the clinicians that we have been mobilised at the Pasteur Institute. They came to us because some of them were following training and virology course at the Pasteur Institute and they remember that Luc Montagnier and Chermann and myself were giving courses on retroviruses. So this story really started like a good opportunity at the point that it was an evolution of technology and evolution of research on retroviruses, everything start from opportunities and to be there at the right moment with the good technology. They recognise in France the first cases of AIDS in 1982, but at that time the first human retrovirus was identified in the United States by Robert Gallo’s group and these human retroviruses was causing T cell leukaemia. The virus was infecting T cells so our colleagues and clinicians came to us at Pasteur and asked whether we thought that HTLV could be the cause of AIDS. And our first reaction if I remember correctly was to say this is curious because HTLV is transforming the T lymphocyte. And you are just explaining to us that the cells are dying in the patient. So to remember that in other retroviruses like for example feline leukaemia virus, the cats were dying of immune deficiency before dying of leukaemia. Progress in technology turn out that few years before it was also the identification of what was called T cell growth factor, now known under the name of interleukin 2, that means we were able to grow in the laboratory T lymphocyte using these cellular factors. So it's really this collective adventure started in the early ‘80’s ... the clinician and we had a very decisive meeting at the Pasteur Institute when we had very simple question when, where and how to look for which virus. I’m showing you this slide for the young researchers, it’s also to keep in mind that we have to be careful about dogma. If we had started with the idea that HTLV could be the cause of the disease certainly the approach that we have used will not have been successful. So it’s how the virus was identified in 1983, it was called at that time lymphadenopathy-associated virus because where we decide to look for the virus was in the lymph node of the patients. And another important decision was to decide to follow in the culture of the cell derived from the left node, to follow in the culture every 3, 4 days in culture to find out a reverse transitive activity with the enzyme which is specific of this family of retroviruses. And that was also an important decision, when to look. A few days after the culture we had the first sign of disease virus in our supernatant. So immediately after this first identification of the virus we of course had in mind to go to application as fast as possible. First of all we had an emergency, the emergency was to prevent blood transmission and transmission of HIV, this new virus in haemophiliacs. So that means that we had to develop diagnoses tests and that was done very rapidly and in parallel these tests were used to make very large epidemiological survey in order to make the link between the virus and the disease itself. Of course, these diagnoses tests were available to test, to prevent mother-to-child transmission and through information, counselling and so on, to try also to have some impact on the prevention of sexual transmission. We’re rapidly after the isolation of the virus, also we together, we mobilised our colleagues immunologists to work with us and to try to identify the tropism of the virus and we very rapidly showed that the virus was infecting preferential ECD4 lymphocyte, but also that the CD4 molecule itself was a receptor of the virus, that was the basis of monitoring CD4 cells in the patients, and it’s still in use today. We started very rapidly, after mobilisation of our colleagues and molecular biologists at Pasteur to characterise HIV genome and to start to characterise a repetition cycle of the virus into target cells. With another colleague we start to characterise a reverse phosphatase of the virus with the idea that individuals of the reverse phosphatase maybe important to develop therapies. Indeed, the first antiretroviral drug that has been shown with some efficiency was AZT, AZT was not sufficient as a therapy, but AZT was the first drug showing that we can prevent mother-to-child transmission. And you just heard from Professor Montagnier that today, since 1996, we have a very efficient combined 3 therapy, also named as highly active antiretroviral therapy. We characterise the genome of the virus and very rapidly we found out that it was a very complex organisation. You just saw on the slide of Professor Montagnier, the organisation of the virus and very rapidly, as soon as 1984, we knew that we had a very viable virus. But the identification of the genome of HIV was certainly the basis to develop later on a monitoring test for measuring the viral load in the patient and also to follow resistance to antiretroviral treatment as well. Since then, since the beginning of 1983 it has been a lot of progress of course in acknowledge and in changing biology and pathogenesis, I am not going into the detail of all this progress that are reported on this slide, I just let you know that of course we know that HIV originated from a transmission of the virus from monkey to humans although the intermissions were very rare. And of course we have made a lot of progress in our knowledge of the interaction of the virus and the host and leading to the development of progress in the knowledge of disease outcome. It has been a lot of progress in diagnoses and therapy but as you know regarding the vaccine it has not been very successful. Vaccine research started as soon as 1985/86 and still today we don’t have any efficient vaccine. Another discovery at least for me was the fact that we will have to face a global scale epidemic. And I had the chance personally to go as soon as 1985 in Central African Republic and to realise the situation over there in those countries. So the theory started from the discovery of the disease in the United States in 1981, followed by the discovery of the virus in France, but indeed we have to face a global epidemic and we had really to learn how to work all together. I mentioned Central African Republic, but soon after in 1988 I also started to go in South East Asia and it was there before the identification of the first case of HIV in Vietnam in 1990. So it’s how really another story start, the story how much is important and it’s our responsibility as a scientist to provide scientific evidences to convince the political leaders and authorities to make intervention in their countries. It’s important for providing scientific evidences to make multidisciplinary research and to work also together with HIV communities, their participation I think is an example in the field of HIV. We have learned to work altogether, scientists, doctors and activists. In the developing world it’s very important to provide scientific evidences directly on site and to make multidisciplinary research directly on site to provide this scientific evidence locally in order to develop intervention through convincing the political leaders. So as I heard yesterday students and young researchers are asking when they are from poor resource limited countries, whether they can provide contribution, of course they can contribute and they will contribute and there is a lot of progress regarding science in resource limited countries in the field of HIV, I’m sure in other fields. Those contribution from the country itself are very important for the decision, for the benefit of the public health in their own country. Regarding HIV it has been progressive to access antiretroviral treatment in those resource limited countries. This is a report of UNAIDS WHO last year, in 2009 showing that we improve the access of treatment by 10 between the end of 2003 and the end of 2008 as you can see on this slide. That means that around 40% of patients that are in need for antiretroviral treatment are treated. This is bad and previous WHO recommendation to treat patients when they are 200 CD4 cells or less. We know today that the recommendation is to treat patients when there are more CD4 cells. So that means that all therefore that has been done its already wonderful but its not sufficient at all. We know today that for 2 patients starting treatment there is 5 new cases of infection and still there is 2.7 million new cases of infection per year. Today we have more about 30 million of people living with HIV all over the world and still 2.5 million of deaths per year. So the effort should continue, the effort should continue, in particular we need to have future strategy to reduce the incidence of HIV-1 globally in the world. And of course it will be combined approaches. One approach is based on behavioural changes, and for that information, education is very important, of course. And as researcher we have to participate to this information education program as well. We have biomedical strategies like condoms use, like circumcision that was proved to reduce the incidence, the risk of infection by 50/60% and we have the antiretroviral treatment. We have that already showing that treatment as prevention is a nice approach to reduce the risk of infection, that are indicating that around 90% reduction of the risk of transmitting the virus when someone is on treatment. One also, part of the approach to reduce the incidence of infection is certainly to improve everywhere in the world social justice and respect of human rights because if we want to treat earlier we need to improve testing. And to improve testing we have to fight against discrimination and stigmatisation of patients that are HIV positive. Because this is one very important obstacle today for someone to go for the test is afraid about the eyes of the others. So this is a combination of those approach, broad based and biochemical approach and those other issues that we need to work for the future. Of course another component for the strategy will be the vaccine. But still today we don’t have it. So we need to think about the new therapeutic prevention strategy for tomorrow. On that slide you have 2 pictures, the picture of the situation, to be brief I mention the north, today we are not speaking any more about AIDS mortality, we are speaking about chronic HIV infection, patients are living with HIV. In the poor countries still we have AIDS mortality, you can see on this slide that in our countries in Europe, United States, after 5 years after infection the mortality rate is indeed exactly the same in the general population as in patients infected. In other countries still we have 8 to 26% of patient mortality during the first year of treatment initiation even. So that means that we have to improve the access of treatment as I said, we have to improve also the access of pregnant women to antiretroviral treatment, only 45% of them have access to treatment. But we have also on this slide some other challenges that we have to face for the future. Professor Montagnier just mentioned the viral latency in HIV reservoir, this is one critical issue because we cannot stop the treatment and we have to have new therapeutic approach at least to reduce the size of the reservoir in the future. Another critical issue in HIV research is to understand better the mechanism by which the virus or viral component are inducing very rapidly inflammation activation and we know that there is insufficient immune restoration even on antiretroviral treatment. We have in our countries, in Europe and United States new complication, new complication associated to long term HAART, for example you can see on this slide that 8% of patients that are on long term HAART are developing cardiovascular disease. Some of them are developing cancers as mentioned before, lymphoma mostly but other cancer as well, 15% of them. Some of them are developing liver disease, around 7% and we are seeing more and more neurological disorders in HIV patient on long term HAART, aging disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer like disease. So we have to improve the situation regarding, acknowledge also why, why there is such complication, what is the role of the virus or viral component, what is the role of HAART together with viral components. So we still need further research today. We certainly have learned as I said before from HIV pathogenesis but we need to learn much more, much more in particular during this very early phase of infection which is in grey on my slide. As you can see during the very first, lets say week, I was ready to say first hours after infection. We have already data indicating that everything is decided, during let’s say the first 96 hours after exposure to the virus. When I say everything is decided in the HIV infection outcome, that means that very rapidly after exposure to the virus you have the infection itself, the dissemination of the virus in the body and the establishment as you can see on the red part in the bottom of the slide, the establishment of HIV latency and HIV reservoir. We have also to learn better what are the mechanics, like to explain the chronic immune activation and how to control chronic immune activation, how to control the establishment of the reservoir. We know all of us here that we have a very complex interplay between the virus, viral components and the host itself, of course we have learned about HIV diversity, we know about the tropism of the virus, and variation in the tropism of the virus and the capacity of the virus and also we know that some of the variation are due to the virus, some of the variation are due also to host cell factors, involving in virus life cycle. We know that the cells have intrinsic cellular defence with restriction factors. It has been discovered like APOBEC TRIM5 and Tetherin, the last one. And we know also that the virus and components of the virus have immune suppressive capacity, they’re capable to induce abnormal activation signal. Some of the viral components that are capable to induce abnormalities are the envelope, the nef protein, vpr and so on. And of course they will influence the immune response, the alternating immune response as well as the adaptive immunity. And of course the genetic of the host is important for the host immune response as well. So we have to consider both the genetic diversity of the host and the genetic diversity of the virus itself. There is distinct, innate and inflammatory response to HIV, SIV infection in the host and we know that indeed this distinct responses is depending of the dialogue, the dialogue between different actors of our immune defence. We have to consider the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, you know that are defence, several actors are playing a key role, like the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, like natural killer cells, T-cells and so on, of course B-cells for the production of antibodies. But you have to consider that the virus is coming, HIV and viral protein that recognise, that can be recognised by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. But the response of the plasmacytoid dendritic cells through receptors, receptors like TLR’s but even maybe through other receptors for example a paper will come soon showing that one restriction factor TRIM5alpha might be one receptor. So we have to consider the interaction between receptors and ligands. And according to the diversity of both the receptor and the ligands you may have diverse innate response. Innate response involving pDC’s, NK cells and of course involving as a consequence different recruitment that activation of those cells, that are critical for B-cells and T-cell response in lymph node tissue, like lymph node as shown on this slide. But we have to consider the diversity as I said to the host receptors or ligands. Like for example the NK receptors which are important, the KIR , we know the genetic polymorphism of the KIR is influencing HIV infection. We know that HLADR is influencing of course HIV infection and we know that nef is down regulating HLA, class 1 molecules. So we have to take together both the host and the virus diversity in the distinct innate and inflammatory response that makes then distinct HIV, SIV disease outcome. And we can learn from this diverse spectrum of response. Indeed it is different models that can be used to try to understand better the protection against HIV or against AIDS, let’s show very rapidly on this slide 2 of the model on which we are working in my lab and others are working as well. We have first HIV controllers or SIV controllers in the monkeys. Those are very interesting because they control naturally the reservoir, they have low level of reservoir. And no detection of viral load in the monkey, natural control of the repetition of the virus. The other model is the African primate, that are infected by SIV, 40/50% of them in Africa but they do not develop the disease, why, because they do not have abnormal immune activation of the immune system, do not have abnormal inflammation. So we can understand from both model and we are starting to understand from both model. For example HIV controllers, we know already that they are, most of them are HLA, B57, B27, we know that about half of them have very strong CD8 response but so 50% of them we cannot explain by a strong CD8 response but maybe by innate immunity or viral components. And also we are learning from the monkey. So to finish I would say that we are learning on HIV, but I am convinced and I like to believe that we can learn beyond HIV AIDS, HIV is a retrovirus and I just mentioned that of course we have new challenges with cancer, with aging disorders and HIV disease. We know that retrovirus in animals, we were very much studying at the end of the ‘60’s as potential agent for causing cancer and leukaemia. But today HIV might be also a tool to understand better cancer and lymphoma. HIV may also be a tool to understand better aging disorder, HIV may certainly be a tool to understand better immune defect and inflammatory and autoimmune malignancy. And the last slide says that HIV AIDS since the beginning has been a wonderful scientific and human adventure but it’s still continuing. We have new challenges, new technology, new concept to say and a new generation of players. They will be responsible for the new discovery but they would have to keep in mind, they have to work with connection, connection with others as shown on my slide, basic science together with clinical and operational research, basis science and different discipline and also one discipline that I mention on my slide which is not represented at Lindau is a social economy called science which is an important part also. And to work together, all together with the patients themselves. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank für diese sehr freundlichen Einführungsworte. Was ich in den nächsten 20 Minuten oder so - es ist ein kurzer Vortrag, so dass ich nicht auf Einzelheiten eingehen werde - tun möchte, ist Folgendes: Ich möchte Ihnen das Beispiel von HIV vorstellen, um den jungen Forschern zu demonstrieren, wie wichtig es ist, dass sie ihre Forschung multidisziplinär und translational durchführen. Für HIV begann alles eigentlich mit der Beobachtung, mit der Beobachtung unserer Kollegen, Epidemiologen und Kliniker, die über einige Fälle von jungen Homosexuellen berichteten, die alle ein stark geschwächtes Immunsystem hatten. Auf diesen Beobachtungen basierte auch unsere Vorstellung, dass es sich bei der Ursache dieser neuerkannten Epidemie wahrscheinlich um ein Virus handelte. Die ersten Fälle wurden bei Blutern festgestellt, was darauf hinwies, dass wahrscheinlich ein Virus die Ursache dieser neu auftauchenden Krankheit war. Und es geschah durch unsere Kollegen, die Kliniker, dass wir am Pasteur-Institut "mobilisiert" wurden. Sie kamen zu uns, weil einige von ihnen Ausbildungs- und Virologiekurse bei uns am Pasteur-Institut belegten, und sie erinnerten sich daran, dass Luc Montagnier und Chermann und ich Kurse über Retroviren abhielten. Diese Geschichte begann also tatsächlich wie eine gute Gelegenheit an dem Punkt, der die Entwicklung einer Technologie mit der Entwicklung der Forschung über Retroviren zusammenbrachte. Alles beginnt mit Möglichkeiten, damit, dass man sich mit guter Technologie zur richtigen Zeit am richtigen Ort befindet. Doch zu dieser Zeit wurde der erste menschliche Retrovirus in den USA von der Gruppe von Robert Gallo identifiziert, und dieser menschliche Retrovirus verursachte die T-Zellen-Leukämie. Der Virus infizierte T-Zellen. Also kamen unsere Kollegen und die Kliniker zu uns an das Pasteur-Institut und fragten uns, ob wir der Meinung seien, dass HTLV die Ursache von AIDS sein könnte. Und unsere erste Reaktion - wenn ich mich recht erinnere - bestand darin, dass wir sagten, dies sei merkwürdig, weil HTLV die T-Lymphozyten verändert, und sie erklären uns soeben, dass die Zellen in den Patienten absterben. Wir sollten uns daran erinnern, dass bei anderen Retroviren, wie zum Beispiel dem Leukämievirus der Katzen, die Katzen an Immunschwäche sterben, bevor sie an Leukämie sterben. Durch einen technologischen Fortschritt, der ein paar Jahre vorher erzielt worden war, gelang die Bestimmung des sogenannten T-Zellenwachstumsfaktors, der jetzt unter dem Namen Interleukin 2 bekannt ist. Und dies bedeutete, dass wir mithilfe dieser Zellfaktoren in der Lage waren, die Lymphozyten im Labor wachsen zu lassen. So ist es tatsächlich dieses kollektive Abenteuer, das in den frühen 1980er Jahren begann, eine wirkliche Mobilisation unserer Kollegen, der Kliniker. Wir hatten ein sehr entscheidendes Treffen im Pasteur-Institut, bei dem wir sehr einfache Fragen stellten: wann, wo und wie wir nach welchem Virus suchen sollten. Ich zeige dieses Dia für die jungen Forscher. Es soll auch dazu dienen, dass wir uns bewusst bleiben, dass man mit dogmatischen Behauptungen vorsichtig sein muss. Wenn wir mit der Vorstellung begonnen hätten, dass HTLV die Ursache der Krankheit sein könnte, wäre die Vorgehensweise, die wir verwendet hätten, mit Sicherheit ohne Erfolg gewesen. So wurde also das Virus im Jahre 1983 erkannt. Es wurde damals als mit "Lymphadenopathie assoziiertes Virus" bezeichnet, denn wir entschieden uns, in den Lymphknoten der Patienten nach dem Virus zu suchen. Und eine weitere wichtige Entscheidung bestand darin, die Zellkultur, die von den linken Lymphknoten entnommen war, alle drei oder vier Tage daraufhin zu untersuchen, ob darin eine umgekehrt-transitive Aktivität bei den Enzymen festzustellen war, die für die Familie der Retroviren spezifisch ist. Und dies war ebenfalls eine wichtige Entscheidung: der Zeitpunkt, zu dem wir danach suchten. Einige Tage nach [dem Ansatz] der Zellkultur stellten wir die ersten Anzeichen des Krankheitsvirus in unserem Überstand fest. Unmittelbar nach dieser ersten Identifizierung des Virus dachten wir natürlich daran, so schnell wie möglich zur Anwendung überzugehen. Zunächst hatten wir es mit einem Notfall zu tun, der darin bestand, zu verhindern, dass bei Blutübertragungen der HIV-Virus mitübertragen wurde, dieser neue Virus der Bluter. Dies bedeutete, dass wir Diagnosetests entwickeln mussten. Das geschah sehr schnell, und diese Tests wurden parallel dazu verwendet, sehr groß angelegte epidemiologische Studien durchzuführen, um die Verbindung zwischen dem Virus und der Krankheit selbst herzustellen. Natürlich standen diese Diagnose-Kits für Tests zur Verfügung, um die Übertragung von Müttern auf ihre Kinder zu verhindern und um durch Informationen, Beratung usw. zu versuchen, eine Verhinderung der sexuellen Übertragung zu bewirken. Gemeinsam bemühten wir uns um eine schnelle Isolierung des Virus. Wir mobilisierten unsere Kollegen in der Immunologie zur Zusammenarbeit mit uns, um die Tropismen des Virus zu erforschen. Wir konnten sehr bald zeigen, dass der Virus vorzugsweise ECD4-Lymphozyten infizierte, doch auch, dass das CD4-Molekül selbst ein Rezeptor des Virus war. Das war der Ausgangspunkt für die Beobachtung der CD4-Zellen in den Patienten, und sie wird auch heute noch eingesetzt. Nach der Mobilisierung unserer Kollegen und der Molekularbiologen am Pasteur-Institut begannen wir sehr schnell, das Genom des HIV-Virus zu charakterisieren und einen Repetitionszyklus des Virus in Target-Zellen zu beschreiben. Mit einem anderen Kollegen begannen wir, eine reverse Transkriptase des Virus zu charakterisieren, dass Einzelmoleküle der reversen Transkriptase für die Entwicklung von Therapien wichtig sein könnten. Tatsächlich war das erste Medikament gegen Retroviren, das eine Wirkung zeigte, AZT. AZT war zwar als Therapie nicht ausreichend, doch AZT war das erste Medikament, das bewies, dass man die Übertragung von der Mutter auf ihr Kind verhindern kann. Und sie haben soeben von Professor Montagnier gehört, dass wir heute, seit 1996, über eine sehr effektive, aus drei Komponenten bestehende Therapie verfügen, die auch als "hochaktive antiretrovirale Therapie" (HAART) bezeichnet wird. Wir charakterisierten das Genom des Virus und stellten sehr schnell fest, dass es eine sehr komplexe Struktur aufweist. Die Struktur des Virus haben Sie soeben auf dem Dia von Professor Montagnier gesehen, und schon sehr bald - bereits 1984 - wussten wir, dass wir es mit einen sehr widerstandsfähigen Virus zu tun hatten. Die Bestimmung des Genoms des HIV-Virus war jedoch mit Sicherheit die Grundlage für die spätere Entwicklung eines Überwachungstests zur Messung der Virusbelastung des Patienten und außerdem zur Beobachtung der Resistenz gegen die antiretrovirale Behandlung. In der Zwischenzeit, seit Beginn des Jahres 1983, hat es natürlich beachtliche Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis [des Virus] sowie in der Veränderung seiner Biologie und Pathogenese gegeben. Auf sämtliche Einzelheiten dieser Fortschritte, die in diesem Dia wiedergegeben sind, werde ich nicht eingehen. Ich wollte Ihnen lediglich sagen, dass wir natürlich wissen, dass der HIV-Virus aus einer Übertragung des Virus von Affen auf den Menschen hervorgegangen ist, obwohl die Übertragungen nur selten gewesen sind. Und selbstverständlich haben wir große Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis der Wechselwirkung des Virus mit dem Host gemacht, und dies hat zur Erweiterung unseres Wissens über den Ausgang der Krankheit geführt. Es hat große Fortschritte bei der Diagnose und Behandlung gegeben, doch wie sie wissen, war die Suche nach einem Impfstoff bislang nicht sehr erfolgreich. Diese Suche begann bereits 1985/86, und bis heute verfügen wir noch über keinen wirksamen Impfstoff. Eine weitere Entdeckung - zumindest für mich - war die Tatsache, dass wir mit einer globalen Epidemie konfrontiert sein werden. Bereits 1985 hatte ich persönlich die Gelegenheit, in die Zentralafrikanische Republik zu reisen und die Situation dort und in anderen Ländern kennen zu lernen. Die Geschichte begann also mit der Entdeckung der Krankheit in den USA im Jahre 1981, gefolgt von der Entdeckung des Virus in Frankreich, doch tatsächlich müssen wir uns auf eine globale Epidemie gefasst machen, und wir sollten wirklich lernen, wie wir alle zusammenarbeiten können. Ich erwähnte die Zentralafrikanische Republik. Kurz darauf ging ich jedoch im Jahre 1988 nach Südostasien, und ich war dort, bevor 1990 in Vietnam der erste Fall einer HIV-Infektion erkannt wurde. Dies ist tatsächlich der Beginn einer anderen Geschichte, der Geschichte darüber, wie wichtig es ist, dass wir in unserer Verantwortung als Wissenschaftler den politisch Verantwortlichen und Machthabern wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial liefern und davon zu überzeugen, in ihren Ländern zu intervenieren. Es ist für die Bereitstellung von wissenschaftlichem Beweismaterial wichtig, eine multidisziplinäre Forschung durchzuführen und mit den von HIV Betroffenen zusammenzuarbeiten. Ihre Teilnahme ist meiner Meinung nach beispielhaft auf dem Gebiet der HIV-Forschung. Wir alle - Wissenschaftler, Ärzte und Aktivisten - haben gelernt zusammenzuarbeiten. In den Entwicklungsländern ist es sehr wichtig, wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial direkt vor Ort zu liefern und multidisziplinäre Forschungen an Ort und Stelle durchzuführen, um dieses wissenschaftliche Material lokal verfügbar zu machen. So lässt sich durch die Überzeugung der politisch Verantwortlichen eine Intervention in Gang bringen. Wie ich gestern gehört habe, fragen Studenten und junge Forscher, die aus Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen stammen, ob sie einen Beitrag leisten können. Natürlich können Sie einen Beitrag leisten, und sie werden einen Beitrag leisten. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV - und sicherlich auch auf anderen Gebieten - gibt es in Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen große Fortschritte in der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. Diese Beiträge aus dem Lande selbst sind für [politische] Entscheidungen sehr wichtig, zum Wohl der öffentlichen Gesundheit in ihrem eigenen Land. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV hat es Fortschritte beim Zugang zu antiretroviralen Behandlungen gegeben. Dies ist ein Bericht von UNAIDS WHO vom letzten Jahr (2009). Er zeigt, dass wir den Zugang zu Behandlungen zwischen Ende des Jahres 2003 und Ende des Jahres 2008, wie Sie auf diesem Dia sehen können, um das Zehnfache verbessert haben. Dies bedeutet, dass etwa 40 % der Patienten, die eine antiretrovirale Behandlung benötigen, eine solche Behandlung auch bekommen. Dies ist ein schlechtes Ergebnis und bleibt hinter den WHO-Empfehlungen zurück, die besagen, dass Patienten behandelt werden sollten, wenn sie 200 CD4-Zellen haben oder weniger. Wir wissen heute, dass die Empfehlung lautet, Patienten zu behandeln, wenn es mehr CD4-Zellen gibt: 350. Wir wissen, dass die Reaktion auf eine antiretrovirale Behandlung dann wesentlich besser ausfällt. Das bedeutet also, dass alles, was bisher getan worden ist, bereits wunderbar ist, doch es reicht längst nicht aus. Wir wissen heute, dass auf zwei Patienten, die eine Behandlung beginnen, fünf neuinfizierte Fälle kommen. Und es gibt jährlich immer noch 2,7 Millionen Fälle von Neuinfektionen. Heute leben weltweit mehr als 30 Millionen Menschen mit HIV, und jährlich kommt es zu 2,5 Millionen Todesfällen. Die Bemühungen sollten also fortgesetzt werden. Die Bemühungen sollten besonders dort fortgesetzt werden, wo eine zukünftige Strategie erforderlich ist, um die Häufigkeit von HIV-1 weltweit zu verringern. Und natürlich wird dies durch eine Kombination von Vorgehensweisen geschehen. Eine Vorgehensweise basiert auf der Verhaltensänderung, und dafür ist natürlich Information, Wissensvermittlung sehr wichtig. Und als Forscher müssen wir an diesen Programmen der Wissensvermittlung ebenfalls teilnehmen. Es gibt biomedizinische Strategien, wie beispielsweise die Verwendung von Kondomen, wie die Beschneidung. Man hat bewiesen, dass sie das Risiko einer Ansteckung um 50-60 % verringert. Und außerdem steht uns die antiretrovirale Behandlung zur Verfügung. Dies zeigt uns bereits, dass eine Behandlung in Form einer Prävention eine sehr gute Vorgehensweise ist, um das Ansteckungsrisiko zu verringern. Es zeigt sich, dass es zu einer 90%igen Verringerung des Übertragungsrisikos kommt, wenn sich jemand in Behandlung befindet. Ein Teil der Vorgehensweise zur Verringerung der Ansteckungshäufigkeit ist sicherlich auch die globale Verbesserung der sozialen Gerechtigkeit und des Respekts für Menschenrechte, denn wenn wir die Behandlung früher beginnen wollen, müssen wir die Testmethoden verbessern. Und zur Verbesserung der Tests müssen wir gegen die Diskriminierung und Stigmatisierung der HIV-positiven Patienten kämpfen. Denn dies ist heute eines der wichtigen Hindernisse für jemanden, wenn es darum geht, sich testen zu lassen: Sie haben Angst vor dem Blick der anderen. Dies ist also eine Kombination dieser Vorgehensweisen: eine breit angelegte biochemische Vorgehensweise und die anderen Aspekte, an denen wir in Zukunft arbeiten müssen. Eine weitere Komponente der Strategie wird natürlich der Impfstoff sein. Doch wir haben immer noch keinen Impfstoff gefunden. Wir müssen also über die neuen therapeutischen Präventionsstrategien für morgen nachdenken. Auf diesem Dia sehen Sie zwei Bilder, eine Darstellung der Situation. Um mich kurz zu fassen, spreche ich über die nördliche Hemisphäre. Heute sprechen wir nicht mehr über AIDS-Sterblichkeit, sondern über chronische HIV-Infektion. Patienten leben mit AIDS. In den armen Ländern haben wir nach wie vor eine AIDS-Sterblichkeit. Auf diesem Dia können Sie hier sehen, dass in unseren Ländern in Europa, in den USA, die Sterblichkeit von HIV-infizierten Menschen tatsächlich identisch ist mit derjenigen der Restbevölkerung. In anderen Ländern haben wir noch immer eine Sterblichkeit von 8 - 26 %, sogar noch im ersten Jahr nach Beginn der Behandlung. Dies bedeutet also, dass wir den Zugang zur Therapie verbessern müssen, wie ich gesagt habe. Außerdem müssen wir den Zugang schwangerer Frauen zu einer antiretroviralen Behandlung verbessern. Nur 45 % von ihnen haben Zugang zu einer Behandlung. Wir können diesem Dia jedoch auch noch einige andere Herausforderungen entnehmen, mit denen wir in Zukunft konfrontiert sein werden. Professor Montagnier erwähnte vorhin die virale Latenz im HIV-Reservoir. Dies ist ein kritischer Punkt, denn wir können die Behandlung nicht abbrechen, und wir brauchen neue Behandlungsmethoden, zumindest um die Größe des Reservoirs zukünftig zu verringern. Ein weiterer kritischer Punkt der HIV-Forschung betrifft das bessere Verständnis des Mechanismus, durch den das Virus oder die virale Komponente sehr schnell zur Aktivierung von Entzündungen führt. Wir wissen, dass es nach einer anti-retroviralen Behandlung nur zu einer unzureichenden Wiederherstellung des Immunsystems kommt. In unseren Ländern, in Europa und in den USA, haben wir es mit einer neuen Komplikation zu tun, die mit der längerfristigen HAART-Therapie zusammenhängt. Diesem Dia können Sie beispielsweise entnehmen, dass 8 % der Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, eine Erkrankung der Herzkranzgefäße entwickeln. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zur Entstehung von Krebs, wie ich bereits erwähnte. Sie erkranken hauptsächlich an Lymphomen, jedoch auch an anderen Krebsarten, 15 % von ihnen. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zu Erkrankungen der Leber, bei etwa 7 %. Und wir sehen bei immer mehr Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, nun neurologische Erkrankungen, Alterskrankheiten wie Osteoporose und Alzheimer-ähnliche Erkrankungen. Wir müssen demnach die entsprechende Situation verbessern und die Gründe erkennen, warum es zu solchen Komplikationen kommt. und welches die Rolle von HAART in Verbindung mit der viralen Komponente ist. Wir brauchen also heute noch weitere Forschungen. Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, haben wir gewiss vieles über die HIV-Pathogenese gelernt, doch wir müssen noch wesentlich mehr lernen, insbesondere sehr viel mehr über diese erste frühe Phase der Infektion, die auf meinem Dia grau dargestellt ist. Wie Sie sehen, der Phase der ersten, sagen wir Woche, ich wollte schon sagen: der ersten Stunden nach der Infektion. Es stehen uns bereits Daten zur Verfügung, die darauf hinweisen, dass sich schon innerhalb der ersten 96 Stunden nach der Infektion durch das Virus alles entscheidet. Wenn ich sage, dass sich alles über den Ausgang der HIV-Infektion entscheidet, so bedeutet das, dass jemand sehr schnell, nachdem er dem Virus ausgesetzt ist, die Infektion selbst bekommt, dass sich das Virus im Körper verteilt. Es etabliert sich im Körper, wie sie auf dem roten Teil am unteren Rand des Dias sehen können, das die Etablierung der HIV-Latenz und das HIV-Reservoir zeigt. Wir müssen auch die Mechanismen besser verstehen, mit denen sich beispielsweise die chronische Immunaktivierung erklären lässt und wie wir die chronische Immunaktivierung steuern können, wie wir die Etablierung des Reservoirs steuern können. Wir alle hier wissen, dass wir es mit einer komplexen Wechselwirkung zwischen dem Virus, den viralen Komponenten und dem Host selbst zu tun haben. Selbstverständlich haben wir einiges über die Vielfalt des HIV-Virus gelernt, wir kennen den Tropismus des Virus und die Variationen seines Tropismus und die Kapazität des Virus. Außerdem kennen wir einige der Variationen, die auf das Virus zurückzuführen sind. Einige der Variationen sind auch auf Faktoren in der Host-Zelle zurückzuführen. Sie haben mit dem Lebenszyklus des Virus zu tun. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen über eine intrinsische Zellabwehr mit Restriktionsfaktoren verfügen. Sie wurden entdeckt, wie zum Beispiel APOBEC, TRIM5 Alpha und Tetherin, der zuletzt entdeckte Faktor. Des Weiteren wissen wir, dass das Virus und Komponenten des Virus über die Fähigkeit verfügen, das Immunsystem zu schwächen. Sie können ein abnormales Aktivierungssignal induzieren. Einige der viralen Komponenten, die Abnormalitäten induzieren können, sind die Hülle des Virus, das nef-Protein, vpr usw. Und natürlich wirken sie sich auf die Immunreaktion aus, sowohl auf die alternierende als auch auf die adaptive Immunreaktion. Natürlich ist auch die Genetik des Hosts für seine Immunreaktion ebenfalls wichtig. Wir müssen demzufolge sowohl die genetische Vielfalt des Hosts als auch die genetische Vielfalt des Virus selbst in Betracht ziehen. Es gibt eine distinkte, angeborene Entzündungsreaktion auf eine HIV-, SIV-Infektion des Hosts, und wir wissen, dass diese distinkte Reaktion tatsächlich von dem Dialog abhängt, vom Dialog zwischen den verschiedenen Akteuren unserer Immunverteidigung. Wir müssen die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen betrachten. Sie wissen, dass es sich hierbei um eine Abwehr handelt. Verschiedene Akteure spielen eine Schlüsselrolle, wie etwa die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen, wie natürliche Killerzellen, T-Zellen usw. Natürlich B-Zellen für die Produktion von Antikörpern. Doch sie müssen bedenken, dass das Virus kommt, HIV und virales Protein, das von plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen erkannt werden kann. Doch die Reaktion der plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen durch Rezeptoren, Rezeptoren wie TLRs, doch vielleicht sogar durch andere Rezeptoren. In Kürze wird beispielsweise ein Aufsatz erscheinen, der beweist, dass ein Restriktionsfaktor von TRIM5 alpha ein Rezeptor sein könnte. Wir müssen also die Wechselwirkung zwischen Rezeptoren und Liganden betrachten. Und gemäß der Vielfalt sowohl der Rezeptoren als auch der Liganden kann man es mit verschiedenen angeborenen Reaktionen zu tun haben: angeborene Reaktionen im Zusammenhang mit pDCs, NK-Zellen und selbstverständlich solche, bei denen sich als Konsequenz ein unterschiedlicher Einsatz der Aktivierung derjenigen Zellen ergibt, die für die B-Zellen- und T-Zellen-Reaktion in lymphatischem Gewebe kritisch sind, wie zum Beispiel in Lymphknoten, wie es auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Doch wir müssen, wie ich gesagt habe, die Vielfalt der Host-Rezeptoren oder Liganden betrachten. Wie beispielsweise die NK-Rezeptoren, die wichtig sind, und KIR. Wir wissen, dass der genetische Polymorphismus von KIR die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst. Wir wissen, dass HLADR selbstverständlich die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst, und wir wissen, dass nef HLA herunterreguliert, zu Molekülen der Klasse 1. Wir müssen also bei der distinkten angeborenen Entzündungsreaktion, die zum Ergebnis der distinkten HIV-, SIV-Erkrankung führt, sowohl die Vielfalt des Hosts als auch des Virus berücksichtigen. Und wir können aus diesem mannigfaltigen Reaktionsspektrum manches lernen. Tatsächlich sind es verschiedene Modelle, die verwendet werden können, um den Schutz vor HIV oder vor AIDS besser zu verstehen. Ich will Ihnen kurz auf diesem Dia zwei der Modelle zeigen, über die wir zur Zeit in meinem Labor und über die auch andere arbeiten. Zuerst haben wir HIV-Controller oder SIV-Controller in den Affen. Diese sind sehr interessant, da sie das Reservoir auf natürliche Weise kontrollieren. Sie haben ein Reservoir auf niedriger Ebene. In den Affen lässt sich keine Virusbelastung nachweisen, die Vermehrung des Virus wird auf natürliche Weise kontrolliert. Das andere Modell sind die afrikanischen Primaten. Sie sind zu 40-50 % durch SIV infiziert, doch sie entwickeln die Krankheit nicht. Warum? Da sie über keine abnormale Immunaktivierung des Immunsystems verfügen. Sie haben daher keine abnormale Entzündung. Wir können also beiden Modellen Einsichten entnehmen, und wir beginnen durch beide Modelle unser Verständnis zu vertiefen. Wir wissen bereits, dass die meisten von ihnen HLA, B57, B27 sind. Wir wissen, dass etwa die Hälfte von ihnen eine sehr starke CD8-Reaktion hat. vielleicht jedoch durch eine angeborene Immunität oder durch eine virale Komponente. Und wir lernen also auch von den Affen. Abschließend würde ich demnach sagen, dass wir über HIV etwas lernen, doch ich bin davon überzeugt und ich möchte glauben, dass wir etwas über HIV AIDS hinaus lernen können. HIV ist ein Retrovirus, und wie ich soeben erwähnte, haben wir es natürlich mit neuen Herausforderungen zu tun, mit Krebs, mit Alterskrankheiten und der HIV-Krankheit. Wir wissen, dass Retroviren in Tieren vorkommen. Wir haben sie am Ende der sechziger Jahre als mögliche Erreger von Krebs und Leukämie intensiv studiert. Doch heute könnte auch HIV ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Krebs und Lymphome besser zu verstehen. HIV könnte sicherlich auch ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Immundefekte und Tumoren zu verstehen, die auf Entzündungen und Autoimmunphänomene zurückzuführen sind. Und das letzte Dia besagt, dass HIV AIDS von Anfang an ein wunderbares wissenschaftliches und menschliches Abenteuer gewesen ist, das noch andauert. Wir haben neue Herausforderungen, eine neue Technologie und neue Konzepte und - um auch dies zu erwähnen - eine neue Generation von Akteuren. Sie werden für die neuen Entdeckungen verantwortlich sein. Sie müssen jedoch Folgendes berücksichtigen: Sie müssen zusammenarbeiten, in Verbindung mit anderen, wie es auf meinen Dia dargestellt ist. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit klinischer und operationaler Forschung. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit verschiedenen Disziplinen und auch mit einer Disziplin, die ich auf meinen Dia erwähne, die aber in Lindau nicht repräsentiert ist: mit der Wissenschaft der Sozialökonomie, die ebenfalls ein wichtiger Teil ist. Und zusammen arbeiten, alle zusammen mit den Patienten selbst. Ich danke Ihnen sehr für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2010): HIV, a Discovery Highlighting the Global Benefit of Translational Research
(00:00:32 - 00:02:15)

The complete video is available here.

All scientific discoveries are made by researchers who are ‘standing on the shoulders’ of previous findings that have paved the way – and this was no different for HIV. In fact, just before the first AIDS patients were identified in 1981, important breakthroughs had been made both in research on human retroviruses as well as on T lymphocytes that furnished scientists with the tools that they needed to identify the AIDS virus and describe its effects on the human immune system.6 In this excerpt from her talk in 2010, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi explains the innovations that made it possible to grow and observe T lymphocytes in the laboratory

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2010) - HIV, a Discovery Highlighting the Global Benefit of Translational Research

Thank you very much for these very nice words of introduction. What I’d like to do in the next 20 minutes or so, it’s a short talk so I’m not going to go into details but I like to give the example of HIV to show the young researcher how it’s important to make multidisciplinary and translational research. For HIV everything started really by observation, observation of our colleagues, epidemiologists and clinicians who reported the few cases of young homosexuals that were all presenting with severe immune deficiency. It is also based on those observations that we had the idea that probably a virus was the cause of this newly recognised epidemic. First cases were found in haemophilic patients indicating that probably a virus was the cause of this new emerging disease. And it is by our colleagues, the clinicians that we have been mobilised at the Pasteur Institute. They came to us because some of them were following training and virology course at the Pasteur Institute and they remember that Luc Montagnier and Chermann and myself were giving courses on retroviruses. So this story really started like a good opportunity at the point that it was an evolution of technology and evolution of research on retroviruses, everything start from opportunities and to be there at the right moment with the good technology. They recognise in France the first cases of AIDS in 1982, but at that time the first human retrovirus was identified in the United States by Robert Gallo’s group and these human retroviruses was causing T cell leukaemia. The virus was infecting T cells so our colleagues and clinicians came to us at Pasteur and asked whether we thought that HTLV could be the cause of AIDS. And our first reaction if I remember correctly was to say this is curious because HTLV is transforming the T lymphocyte. And you are just explaining to us that the cells are dying in the patient. So to remember that in other retroviruses like for example feline leukaemia virus, the cats were dying of immune deficiency before dying of leukaemia. Progress in technology turn out that few years before it was also the identification of what was called T cell growth factor, now known under the name of interleukin 2, that means we were able to grow in the laboratory T lymphocyte using these cellular factors. So it's really this collective adventure started in the early ‘80’s ... the clinician and we had a very decisive meeting at the Pasteur Institute when we had very simple question when, where and how to look for which virus. I’m showing you this slide for the young researchers, it’s also to keep in mind that we have to be careful about dogma. If we had started with the idea that HTLV could be the cause of the disease certainly the approach that we have used will not have been successful. So it’s how the virus was identified in 1983, it was called at that time lymphadenopathy-associated virus because where we decide to look for the virus was in the lymph node of the patients. And another important decision was to decide to follow in the culture of the cell derived from the left node, to follow in the culture every 3, 4 days in culture to find out a reverse transitive activity with the enzyme which is specific of this family of retroviruses. And that was also an important decision, when to look. A few days after the culture we had the first sign of disease virus in our supernatant. So immediately after this first identification of the virus we of course had in mind to go to application as fast as possible. First of all we had an emergency, the emergency was to prevent blood transmission and transmission of HIV, this new virus in haemophiliacs. So that means that we had to develop diagnoses tests and that was done very rapidly and in parallel these tests were used to make very large epidemiological survey in order to make the link between the virus and the disease itself. Of course, these diagnoses tests were available to test, to prevent mother-to-child transmission and through information, counselling and so on, to try also to have some impact on the prevention of sexual transmission. We’re rapidly after the isolation of the virus, also we together, we mobilised our colleagues immunologists to work with us and to try to identify the tropism of the virus and we very rapidly showed that the virus was infecting preferential ECD4 lymphocyte, but also that the CD4 molecule itself was a receptor of the virus, that was the basis of monitoring CD4 cells in the patients, and it’s still in use today. We started very rapidly, after mobilisation of our colleagues and molecular biologists at Pasteur to characterise HIV genome and to start to characterise a repetition cycle of the virus into target cells. With another colleague we start to characterise a reverse phosphatase of the virus with the idea that individuals of the reverse phosphatase maybe important to develop therapies. Indeed, the first antiretroviral drug that has been shown with some efficiency was AZT, AZT was not sufficient as a therapy, but AZT was the first drug showing that we can prevent mother-to-child transmission. And you just heard from Professor Montagnier that today, since 1996, we have a very efficient combined 3 therapy, also named as highly active antiretroviral therapy. We characterise the genome of the virus and very rapidly we found out that it was a very complex organisation. You just saw on the slide of Professor Montagnier, the organisation of the virus and very rapidly, as soon as 1984, we knew that we had a very viable virus. But the identification of the genome of HIV was certainly the basis to develop later on a monitoring test for measuring the viral load in the patient and also to follow resistance to antiretroviral treatment as well. Since then, since the beginning of 1983 it has been a lot of progress of course in acknowledge and in changing biology and pathogenesis, I am not going into the detail of all this progress that are reported on this slide, I just let you know that of course we know that HIV originated from a transmission of the virus from monkey to humans although the intermissions were very rare. And of course we have made a lot of progress in our knowledge of the interaction of the virus and the host and leading to the development of progress in the knowledge of disease outcome. It has been a lot of progress in diagnoses and therapy but as you know regarding the vaccine it has not been very successful. Vaccine research started as soon as 1985/86 and still today we don’t have any efficient vaccine. Another discovery at least for me was the fact that we will have to face a global scale epidemic. And I had the chance personally to go as soon as 1985 in Central African Republic and to realise the situation over there in those countries. So the theory started from the discovery of the disease in the United States in 1981, followed by the discovery of the virus in France, but indeed we have to face a global epidemic and we had really to learn how to work all together. I mentioned Central African Republic, but soon after in 1988 I also started to go in South East Asia and it was there before the identification of the first case of HIV in Vietnam in 1990. So it’s how really another story start, the story how much is important and it’s our responsibility as a scientist to provide scientific evidences to convince the political leaders and authorities to make intervention in their countries. It’s important for providing scientific evidences to make multidisciplinary research and to work also together with HIV communities, their participation I think is an example in the field of HIV. We have learned to work altogether, scientists, doctors and activists. In the developing world it’s very important to provide scientific evidences directly on site and to make multidisciplinary research directly on site to provide this scientific evidence locally in order to develop intervention through convincing the political leaders. So as I heard yesterday students and young researchers are asking when they are from poor resource limited countries, whether they can provide contribution, of course they can contribute and they will contribute and there is a lot of progress regarding science in resource limited countries in the field of HIV, I’m sure in other fields. Those contribution from the country itself are very important for the decision, for the benefit of the public health in their own country. Regarding HIV it has been progressive to access antiretroviral treatment in those resource limited countries. This is a report of UNAIDS WHO last year, in 2009 showing that we improve the access of treatment by 10 between the end of 2003 and the end of 2008 as you can see on this slide. That means that around 40% of patients that are in need for antiretroviral treatment are treated. This is bad and previous WHO recommendation to treat patients when they are 200 CD4 cells or less. We know today that the recommendation is to treat patients when there are more CD4 cells. So that means that all therefore that has been done its already wonderful but its not sufficient at all. We know today that for 2 patients starting treatment there is 5 new cases of infection and still there is 2.7 million new cases of infection per year. Today we have more about 30 million of people living with HIV all over the world and still 2.5 million of deaths per year. So the effort should continue, the effort should continue, in particular we need to have future strategy to reduce the incidence of HIV-1 globally in the world. And of course it will be combined approaches. One approach is based on behavioural changes, and for that information, education is very important, of course. And as researcher we have to participate to this information education program as well. We have biomedical strategies like condoms use, like circumcision that was proved to reduce the incidence, the risk of infection by 50/60% and we have the antiretroviral treatment. We have that already showing that treatment as prevention is a nice approach to reduce the risk of infection, that are indicating that around 90% reduction of the risk of transmitting the virus when someone is on treatment. One also, part of the approach to reduce the incidence of infection is certainly to improve everywhere in the world social justice and respect of human rights because if we want to treat earlier we need to improve testing. And to improve testing we have to fight against discrimination and stigmatisation of patients that are HIV positive. Because this is one very important obstacle today for someone to go for the test is afraid about the eyes of the others. So this is a combination of those approach, broad based and biochemical approach and those other issues that we need to work for the future. Of course another component for the strategy will be the vaccine. But still today we don’t have it. So we need to think about the new therapeutic prevention strategy for tomorrow. On that slide you have 2 pictures, the picture of the situation, to be brief I mention the north, today we are not speaking any more about AIDS mortality, we are speaking about chronic HIV infection, patients are living with HIV. In the poor countries still we have AIDS mortality, you can see on this slide that in our countries in Europe, United States, after 5 years after infection the mortality rate is indeed exactly the same in the general population as in patients infected. In other countries still we have 8 to 26% of patient mortality during the first year of treatment initiation even. So that means that we have to improve the access of treatment as I said, we have to improve also the access of pregnant women to antiretroviral treatment, only 45% of them have access to treatment. But we have also on this slide some other challenges that we have to face for the future. Professor Montagnier just mentioned the viral latency in HIV reservoir, this is one critical issue because we cannot stop the treatment and we have to have new therapeutic approach at least to reduce the size of the reservoir in the future. Another critical issue in HIV research is to understand better the mechanism by which the virus or viral component are inducing very rapidly inflammation activation and we know that there is insufficient immune restoration even on antiretroviral treatment. We have in our countries, in Europe and United States new complication, new complication associated to long term HAART, for example you can see on this slide that 8% of patients that are on long term HAART are developing cardiovascular disease. Some of them are developing cancers as mentioned before, lymphoma mostly but other cancer as well, 15% of them. Some of them are developing liver disease, around 7% and we are seeing more and more neurological disorders in HIV patient on long term HAART, aging disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer like disease. So we have to improve the situation regarding, acknowledge also why, why there is such complication, what is the role of the virus or viral component, what is the role of HAART together with viral components. So we still need further research today. We certainly have learned as I said before from HIV pathogenesis but we need to learn much more, much more in particular during this very early phase of infection which is in grey on my slide. As you can see during the very first, lets say week, I was ready to say first hours after infection. We have already data indicating that everything is decided, during let’s say the first 96 hours after exposure to the virus. When I say everything is decided in the HIV infection outcome, that means that very rapidly after exposure to the virus you have the infection itself, the dissemination of the virus in the body and the establishment as you can see on the red part in the bottom of the slide, the establishment of HIV latency and HIV reservoir. We have also to learn better what are the mechanics, like to explain the chronic immune activation and how to control chronic immune activation, how to control the establishment of the reservoir. We know all of us here that we have a very complex interplay between the virus, viral components and the host itself, of course we have learned about HIV diversity, we know about the tropism of the virus, and variation in the tropism of the virus and the capacity of the virus and also we know that some of the variation are due to the virus, some of the variation are due also to host cell factors, involving in virus life cycle. We know that the cells have intrinsic cellular defence with restriction factors. It has been discovered like APOBEC TRIM5 and Tetherin, the last one. And we know also that the virus and components of the virus have immune suppressive capacity, they’re capable to induce abnormal activation signal. Some of the viral components that are capable to induce abnormalities are the envelope, the nef protein, vpr and so on. And of course they will influence the immune response, the alternating immune response as well as the adaptive immunity. And of course the genetic of the host is important for the host immune response as well. So we have to consider both the genetic diversity of the host and the genetic diversity of the virus itself. There is distinct, innate and inflammatory response to HIV, SIV infection in the host and we know that indeed this distinct responses is depending of the dialogue, the dialogue between different actors of our immune defence. We have to consider the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, you know that are defence, several actors are playing a key role, like the plasmacytoid dendritic cells, like natural killer cells, T-cells and so on, of course B-cells for the production of antibodies. But you have to consider that the virus is coming, HIV and viral protein that recognise, that can be recognised by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. But the response of the plasmacytoid dendritic cells through receptors, receptors like TLR’s but even maybe through other receptors for example a paper will come soon showing that one restriction factor TRIM5alpha might be one receptor. So we have to consider the interaction between receptors and ligands. And according to the diversity of both the receptor and the ligands you may have diverse innate response. Innate response involving pDC’s, NK cells and of course involving as a consequence different recruitment that activation of those cells, that are critical for B-cells and T-cell response in lymph node tissue, like lymph node as shown on this slide. But we have to consider the diversity as I said to the host receptors or ligands. Like for example the NK receptors which are important, the KIR , we know the genetic polymorphism of the KIR is influencing HIV infection. We know that HLADR is influencing of course HIV infection and we know that nef is down regulating HLA, class 1 molecules. So we have to take together both the host and the virus diversity in the distinct innate and inflammatory response that makes then distinct HIV, SIV disease outcome. And we can learn from this diverse spectrum of response. Indeed it is different models that can be used to try to understand better the protection against HIV or against AIDS, let’s show very rapidly on this slide 2 of the model on which we are working in my lab and others are working as well. We have first HIV controllers or SIV controllers in the monkeys. Those are very interesting because they control naturally the reservoir, they have low level of reservoir. And no detection of viral load in the monkey, natural control of the repetition of the virus. The other model is the African primate, that are infected by SIV, 40/50% of them in Africa but they do not develop the disease, why, because they do not have abnormal immune activation of the immune system, do not have abnormal inflammation. So we can understand from both model and we are starting to understand from both model. For example HIV controllers, we know already that they are, most of them are HLA, B57, B27, we know that about half of them have very strong CD8 response but so 50% of them we cannot explain by a strong CD8 response but maybe by innate immunity or viral components. And also we are learning from the monkey. So to finish I would say that we are learning on HIV, but I am convinced and I like to believe that we can learn beyond HIV AIDS, HIV is a retrovirus and I just mentioned that of course we have new challenges with cancer, with aging disorders and HIV disease. We know that retrovirus in animals, we were very much studying at the end of the ‘60’s as potential agent for causing cancer and leukaemia. But today HIV might be also a tool to understand better cancer and lymphoma. HIV may also be a tool to understand better aging disorder, HIV may certainly be a tool to understand better immune defect and inflammatory and autoimmune malignancy. And the last slide says that HIV AIDS since the beginning has been a wonderful scientific and human adventure but it’s still continuing. We have new challenges, new technology, new concept to say and a new generation of players. They will be responsible for the new discovery but they would have to keep in mind, they have to work with connection, connection with others as shown on my slide, basic science together with clinical and operational research, basis science and different discipline and also one discipline that I mention on my slide which is not represented at Lindau is a social economy called science which is an important part also. And to work together, all together with the patients themselves. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank für diese sehr freundlichen Einführungsworte. Was ich in den nächsten 20 Minuten oder so - es ist ein kurzer Vortrag, so dass ich nicht auf Einzelheiten eingehen werde - tun möchte, ist Folgendes: Ich möchte Ihnen das Beispiel von HIV vorstellen, um den jungen Forschern zu demonstrieren, wie wichtig es ist, dass sie ihre Forschung multidisziplinär und translational durchführen. Für HIV begann alles eigentlich mit der Beobachtung, mit der Beobachtung unserer Kollegen, Epidemiologen und Kliniker, die über einige Fälle von jungen Homosexuellen berichteten, die alle ein stark geschwächtes Immunsystem hatten. Auf diesen Beobachtungen basierte auch unsere Vorstellung, dass es sich bei der Ursache dieser neuerkannten Epidemie wahrscheinlich um ein Virus handelte. Die ersten Fälle wurden bei Blutern festgestellt, was darauf hinwies, dass wahrscheinlich ein Virus die Ursache dieser neu auftauchenden Krankheit war. Und es geschah durch unsere Kollegen, die Kliniker, dass wir am Pasteur-Institut "mobilisiert" wurden. Sie kamen zu uns, weil einige von ihnen Ausbildungs- und Virologiekurse bei uns am Pasteur-Institut belegten, und sie erinnerten sich daran, dass Luc Montagnier und Chermann und ich Kurse über Retroviren abhielten. Diese Geschichte begann also tatsächlich wie eine gute Gelegenheit an dem Punkt, der die Entwicklung einer Technologie mit der Entwicklung der Forschung über Retroviren zusammenbrachte. Alles beginnt mit Möglichkeiten, damit, dass man sich mit guter Technologie zur richtigen Zeit am richtigen Ort befindet. Doch zu dieser Zeit wurde der erste menschliche Retrovirus in den USA von der Gruppe von Robert Gallo identifiziert, und dieser menschliche Retrovirus verursachte die T-Zellen-Leukämie. Der Virus infizierte T-Zellen. Also kamen unsere Kollegen und die Kliniker zu uns an das Pasteur-Institut und fragten uns, ob wir der Meinung seien, dass HTLV die Ursache von AIDS sein könnte. Und unsere erste Reaktion - wenn ich mich recht erinnere - bestand darin, dass wir sagten, dies sei merkwürdig, weil HTLV die T-Lymphozyten verändert, und sie erklären uns soeben, dass die Zellen in den Patienten absterben. Wir sollten uns daran erinnern, dass bei anderen Retroviren, wie zum Beispiel dem Leukämievirus der Katzen, die Katzen an Immunschwäche sterben, bevor sie an Leukämie sterben. Durch einen technologischen Fortschritt, der ein paar Jahre vorher erzielt worden war, gelang die Bestimmung des sogenannten T-Zellenwachstumsfaktors, der jetzt unter dem Namen Interleukin 2 bekannt ist. Und dies bedeutete, dass wir mithilfe dieser Zellfaktoren in der Lage waren, die Lymphozyten im Labor wachsen zu lassen. So ist es tatsächlich dieses kollektive Abenteuer, das in den frühen 1980er Jahren begann, eine wirkliche Mobilisation unserer Kollegen, der Kliniker. Wir hatten ein sehr entscheidendes Treffen im Pasteur-Institut, bei dem wir sehr einfache Fragen stellten: wann, wo und wie wir nach welchem Virus suchen sollten. Ich zeige dieses Dia für die jungen Forscher. Es soll auch dazu dienen, dass wir uns bewusst bleiben, dass man mit dogmatischen Behauptungen vorsichtig sein muss. Wenn wir mit der Vorstellung begonnen hätten, dass HTLV die Ursache der Krankheit sein könnte, wäre die Vorgehensweise, die wir verwendet hätten, mit Sicherheit ohne Erfolg gewesen. So wurde also das Virus im Jahre 1983 erkannt. Es wurde damals als mit "Lymphadenopathie assoziiertes Virus" bezeichnet, denn wir entschieden uns, in den Lymphknoten der Patienten nach dem Virus zu suchen. Und eine weitere wichtige Entscheidung bestand darin, die Zellkultur, die von den linken Lymphknoten entnommen war, alle drei oder vier Tage daraufhin zu untersuchen, ob darin eine umgekehrt-transitive Aktivität bei den Enzymen festzustellen war, die für die Familie der Retroviren spezifisch ist. Und dies war ebenfalls eine wichtige Entscheidung: der Zeitpunkt, zu dem wir danach suchten. Einige Tage nach [dem Ansatz] der Zellkultur stellten wir die ersten Anzeichen des Krankheitsvirus in unserem Überstand fest. Unmittelbar nach dieser ersten Identifizierung des Virus dachten wir natürlich daran, so schnell wie möglich zur Anwendung überzugehen. Zunächst hatten wir es mit einem Notfall zu tun, der darin bestand, zu verhindern, dass bei Blutübertragungen der HIV-Virus mitübertragen wurde, dieser neue Virus der Bluter. Dies bedeutete, dass wir Diagnosetests entwickeln mussten. Das geschah sehr schnell, und diese Tests wurden parallel dazu verwendet, sehr groß angelegte epidemiologische Studien durchzuführen, um die Verbindung zwischen dem Virus und der Krankheit selbst herzustellen. Natürlich standen diese Diagnose-Kits für Tests zur Verfügung, um die Übertragung von Müttern auf ihre Kinder zu verhindern und um durch Informationen, Beratung usw. zu versuchen, eine Verhinderung der sexuellen Übertragung zu bewirken. Gemeinsam bemühten wir uns um eine schnelle Isolierung des Virus. Wir mobilisierten unsere Kollegen in der Immunologie zur Zusammenarbeit mit uns, um die Tropismen des Virus zu erforschen. Wir konnten sehr bald zeigen, dass der Virus vorzugsweise ECD4-Lymphozyten infizierte, doch auch, dass das CD4-Molekül selbst ein Rezeptor des Virus war. Das war der Ausgangspunkt für die Beobachtung der CD4-Zellen in den Patienten, und sie wird auch heute noch eingesetzt. Nach der Mobilisierung unserer Kollegen und der Molekularbiologen am Pasteur-Institut begannen wir sehr schnell, das Genom des HIV-Virus zu charakterisieren und einen Repetitionszyklus des Virus in Target-Zellen zu beschreiben. Mit einem anderen Kollegen begannen wir, eine reverse Transkriptase des Virus zu charakterisieren, dass Einzelmoleküle der reversen Transkriptase für die Entwicklung von Therapien wichtig sein könnten. Tatsächlich war das erste Medikament gegen Retroviren, das eine Wirkung zeigte, AZT. AZT war zwar als Therapie nicht ausreichend, doch AZT war das erste Medikament, das bewies, dass man die Übertragung von der Mutter auf ihr Kind verhindern kann. Und sie haben soeben von Professor Montagnier gehört, dass wir heute, seit 1996, über eine sehr effektive, aus drei Komponenten bestehende Therapie verfügen, die auch als "hochaktive antiretrovirale Therapie" (HAART) bezeichnet wird. Wir charakterisierten das Genom des Virus und stellten sehr schnell fest, dass es eine sehr komplexe Struktur aufweist. Die Struktur des Virus haben Sie soeben auf dem Dia von Professor Montagnier gesehen, und schon sehr bald - bereits 1984 - wussten wir, dass wir es mit einen sehr widerstandsfähigen Virus zu tun hatten. Die Bestimmung des Genoms des HIV-Virus war jedoch mit Sicherheit die Grundlage für die spätere Entwicklung eines Überwachungstests zur Messung der Virusbelastung des Patienten und außerdem zur Beobachtung der Resistenz gegen die antiretrovirale Behandlung. In der Zwischenzeit, seit Beginn des Jahres 1983, hat es natürlich beachtliche Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis [des Virus] sowie in der Veränderung seiner Biologie und Pathogenese gegeben. Auf sämtliche Einzelheiten dieser Fortschritte, die in diesem Dia wiedergegeben sind, werde ich nicht eingehen. Ich wollte Ihnen lediglich sagen, dass wir natürlich wissen, dass der HIV-Virus aus einer Übertragung des Virus von Affen auf den Menschen hervorgegangen ist, obwohl die Übertragungen nur selten gewesen sind. Und selbstverständlich haben wir große Fortschritte in der Erkenntnis der Wechselwirkung des Virus mit dem Host gemacht, und dies hat zur Erweiterung unseres Wissens über den Ausgang der Krankheit geführt. Es hat große Fortschritte bei der Diagnose und Behandlung gegeben, doch wie sie wissen, war die Suche nach einem Impfstoff bislang nicht sehr erfolgreich. Diese Suche begann bereits 1985/86, und bis heute verfügen wir noch über keinen wirksamen Impfstoff. Eine weitere Entdeckung - zumindest für mich - war die Tatsache, dass wir mit einer globalen Epidemie konfrontiert sein werden. Bereits 1985 hatte ich persönlich die Gelegenheit, in die Zentralafrikanische Republik zu reisen und die Situation dort und in anderen Ländern kennen zu lernen. Die Geschichte begann also mit der Entdeckung der Krankheit in den USA im Jahre 1981, gefolgt von der Entdeckung des Virus in Frankreich, doch tatsächlich müssen wir uns auf eine globale Epidemie gefasst machen, und wir sollten wirklich lernen, wie wir alle zusammenarbeiten können. Ich erwähnte die Zentralafrikanische Republik. Kurz darauf ging ich jedoch im Jahre 1988 nach Südostasien, und ich war dort, bevor 1990 in Vietnam der erste Fall einer HIV-Infektion erkannt wurde. Dies ist tatsächlich der Beginn einer anderen Geschichte, der Geschichte darüber, wie wichtig es ist, dass wir in unserer Verantwortung als Wissenschaftler den politisch Verantwortlichen und Machthabern wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial liefern und davon zu überzeugen, in ihren Ländern zu intervenieren. Es ist für die Bereitstellung von wissenschaftlichem Beweismaterial wichtig, eine multidisziplinäre Forschung durchzuführen und mit den von HIV Betroffenen zusammenzuarbeiten. Ihre Teilnahme ist meiner Meinung nach beispielhaft auf dem Gebiet der HIV-Forschung. Wir alle - Wissenschaftler, Ärzte und Aktivisten - haben gelernt zusammenzuarbeiten. In den Entwicklungsländern ist es sehr wichtig, wissenschaftliches Beweismaterial direkt vor Ort zu liefern und multidisziplinäre Forschungen an Ort und Stelle durchzuführen, um dieses wissenschaftliche Material lokal verfügbar zu machen. So lässt sich durch die Überzeugung der politisch Verantwortlichen eine Intervention in Gang bringen. Wie ich gestern gehört habe, fragen Studenten und junge Forscher, die aus Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen stammen, ob sie einen Beitrag leisten können. Natürlich können Sie einen Beitrag leisten, und sie werden einen Beitrag leisten. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV - und sicherlich auch auf anderen Gebieten - gibt es in Ländern mit begrenzten Ressourcen große Fortschritte in der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. Diese Beiträge aus dem Lande selbst sind für [politische] Entscheidungen sehr wichtig, zum Wohl der öffentlichen Gesundheit in ihrem eigenen Land. Im Zusammenhang mit HIV hat es Fortschritte beim Zugang zu antiretroviralen Behandlungen gegeben. Dies ist ein Bericht von UNAIDS WHO vom letzten Jahr (2009). Er zeigt, dass wir den Zugang zu Behandlungen zwischen Ende des Jahres 2003 und Ende des Jahres 2008, wie Sie auf diesem Dia sehen können, um das Zehnfache verbessert haben. Dies bedeutet, dass etwa 40 % der Patienten, die eine antiretrovirale Behandlung benötigen, eine solche Behandlung auch bekommen. Dies ist ein schlechtes Ergebnis und bleibt hinter den WHO-Empfehlungen zurück, die besagen, dass Patienten behandelt werden sollten, wenn sie 200 CD4-Zellen haben oder weniger. Wir wissen heute, dass die Empfehlung lautet, Patienten zu behandeln, wenn es mehr CD4-Zellen gibt: 350. Wir wissen, dass die Reaktion auf eine antiretrovirale Behandlung dann wesentlich besser ausfällt. Das bedeutet also, dass alles, was bisher getan worden ist, bereits wunderbar ist, doch es reicht längst nicht aus. Wir wissen heute, dass auf zwei Patienten, die eine Behandlung beginnen, fünf neuinfizierte Fälle kommen. Und es gibt jährlich immer noch 2,7 Millionen Fälle von Neuinfektionen. Heute leben weltweit mehr als 30 Millionen Menschen mit HIV, und jährlich kommt es zu 2,5 Millionen Todesfällen. Die Bemühungen sollten also fortgesetzt werden. Die Bemühungen sollten besonders dort fortgesetzt werden, wo eine zukünftige Strategie erforderlich ist, um die Häufigkeit von HIV-1 weltweit zu verringern. Und natürlich wird dies durch eine Kombination von Vorgehensweisen geschehen. Eine Vorgehensweise basiert auf der Verhaltensänderung, und dafür ist natürlich Information, Wissensvermittlung sehr wichtig. Und als Forscher müssen wir an diesen Programmen der Wissensvermittlung ebenfalls teilnehmen. Es gibt biomedizinische Strategien, wie beispielsweise die Verwendung von Kondomen, wie die Beschneidung. Man hat bewiesen, dass sie das Risiko einer Ansteckung um 50-60 % verringert. Und außerdem steht uns die antiretrovirale Behandlung zur Verfügung. Dies zeigt uns bereits, dass eine Behandlung in Form einer Prävention eine sehr gute Vorgehensweise ist, um das Ansteckungsrisiko zu verringern. Es zeigt sich, dass es zu einer 90%igen Verringerung des Übertragungsrisikos kommt, wenn sich jemand in Behandlung befindet. Ein Teil der Vorgehensweise zur Verringerung der Ansteckungshäufigkeit ist sicherlich auch die globale Verbesserung der sozialen Gerechtigkeit und des Respekts für Menschenrechte, denn wenn wir die Behandlung früher beginnen wollen, müssen wir die Testmethoden verbessern. Und zur Verbesserung der Tests müssen wir gegen die Diskriminierung und Stigmatisierung der HIV-positiven Patienten kämpfen. Denn dies ist heute eines der wichtigen Hindernisse für jemanden, wenn es darum geht, sich testen zu lassen: Sie haben Angst vor dem Blick der anderen. Dies ist also eine Kombination dieser Vorgehensweisen: eine breit angelegte biochemische Vorgehensweise und die anderen Aspekte, an denen wir in Zukunft arbeiten müssen. Eine weitere Komponente der Strategie wird natürlich der Impfstoff sein. Doch wir haben immer noch keinen Impfstoff gefunden. Wir müssen also über die neuen therapeutischen Präventionsstrategien für morgen nachdenken. Auf diesem Dia sehen Sie zwei Bilder, eine Darstellung der Situation. Um mich kurz zu fassen, spreche ich über die nördliche Hemisphäre. Heute sprechen wir nicht mehr über AIDS-Sterblichkeit, sondern über chronische HIV-Infektion. Patienten leben mit AIDS. In den armen Ländern haben wir nach wie vor eine AIDS-Sterblichkeit. Auf diesem Dia können Sie hier sehen, dass in unseren Ländern in Europa, in den USA, die Sterblichkeit von HIV-infizierten Menschen tatsächlich identisch ist mit derjenigen der Restbevölkerung. In anderen Ländern haben wir noch immer eine Sterblichkeit von 8 - 26 %, sogar noch im ersten Jahr nach Beginn der Behandlung. Dies bedeutet also, dass wir den Zugang zur Therapie verbessern müssen, wie ich gesagt habe. Außerdem müssen wir den Zugang schwangerer Frauen zu einer antiretroviralen Behandlung verbessern. Nur 45 % von ihnen haben Zugang zu einer Behandlung. Wir können diesem Dia jedoch auch noch einige andere Herausforderungen entnehmen, mit denen wir in Zukunft konfrontiert sein werden. Professor Montagnier erwähnte vorhin die virale Latenz im HIV-Reservoir. Dies ist ein kritischer Punkt, denn wir können die Behandlung nicht abbrechen, und wir brauchen neue Behandlungsmethoden, zumindest um die Größe des Reservoirs zukünftig zu verringern. Ein weiterer kritischer Punkt der HIV-Forschung betrifft das bessere Verständnis des Mechanismus, durch den das Virus oder die virale Komponente sehr schnell zur Aktivierung von Entzündungen führt. Wir wissen, dass es nach einer anti-retroviralen Behandlung nur zu einer unzureichenden Wiederherstellung des Immunsystems kommt. In unseren Ländern, in Europa und in den USA, haben wir es mit einer neuen Komplikation zu tun, die mit der längerfristigen HAART-Therapie zusammenhängt. Diesem Dia können Sie beispielsweise entnehmen, dass 8 % der Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, eine Erkrankung der Herzkranzgefäße entwickeln. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zur Entstehung von Krebs, wie ich bereits erwähnte. Sie erkranken hauptsächlich an Lymphomen, jedoch auch an anderen Krebsarten, 15 % von ihnen. Bei einigen von Ihnen kommt es zu Erkrankungen der Leber, bei etwa 7 %. Und wir sehen bei immer mehr Patienten, die eine längerfristige HAART-Therapie durchführen, nun neurologische Erkrankungen, Alterskrankheiten wie Osteoporose und Alzheimer-ähnliche Erkrankungen. Wir müssen demnach die entsprechende Situation verbessern und die Gründe erkennen, warum es zu solchen Komplikationen kommt. und welches die Rolle von HAART in Verbindung mit der viralen Komponente ist. Wir brauchen also heute noch weitere Forschungen. Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, haben wir gewiss vieles über die HIV-Pathogenese gelernt, doch wir müssen noch wesentlich mehr lernen, insbesondere sehr viel mehr über diese erste frühe Phase der Infektion, die auf meinem Dia grau dargestellt ist. Wie Sie sehen, der Phase der ersten, sagen wir Woche, ich wollte schon sagen: der ersten Stunden nach der Infektion. Es stehen uns bereits Daten zur Verfügung, die darauf hinweisen, dass sich schon innerhalb der ersten 96 Stunden nach der Infektion durch das Virus alles entscheidet. Wenn ich sage, dass sich alles über den Ausgang der HIV-Infektion entscheidet, so bedeutet das, dass jemand sehr schnell, nachdem er dem Virus ausgesetzt ist, die Infektion selbst bekommt, dass sich das Virus im Körper verteilt. Es etabliert sich im Körper, wie sie auf dem roten Teil am unteren Rand des Dias sehen können, das die Etablierung der HIV-Latenz und das HIV-Reservoir zeigt. Wir müssen auch die Mechanismen besser verstehen, mit denen sich beispielsweise die chronische Immunaktivierung erklären lässt und wie wir die chronische Immunaktivierung steuern können, wie wir die Etablierung des Reservoirs steuern können. Wir alle hier wissen, dass wir es mit einer komplexen Wechselwirkung zwischen dem Virus, den viralen Komponenten und dem Host selbst zu tun haben. Selbstverständlich haben wir einiges über die Vielfalt des HIV-Virus gelernt, wir kennen den Tropismus des Virus und die Variationen seines Tropismus und die Kapazität des Virus. Außerdem kennen wir einige der Variationen, die auf das Virus zurückzuführen sind. Einige der Variationen sind auch auf Faktoren in der Host-Zelle zurückzuführen. Sie haben mit dem Lebenszyklus des Virus zu tun. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen über eine intrinsische Zellabwehr mit Restriktionsfaktoren verfügen. Sie wurden entdeckt, wie zum Beispiel APOBEC, TRIM5 Alpha und Tetherin, der zuletzt entdeckte Faktor. Des Weiteren wissen wir, dass das Virus und Komponenten des Virus über die Fähigkeit verfügen, das Immunsystem zu schwächen. Sie können ein abnormales Aktivierungssignal induzieren. Einige der viralen Komponenten, die Abnormalitäten induzieren können, sind die Hülle des Virus, das nef-Protein, vpr usw. Und natürlich wirken sie sich auf die Immunreaktion aus, sowohl auf die alternierende als auch auf die adaptive Immunreaktion. Natürlich ist auch die Genetik des Hosts für seine Immunreaktion ebenfalls wichtig. Wir müssen demzufolge sowohl die genetische Vielfalt des Hosts als auch die genetische Vielfalt des Virus selbst in Betracht ziehen. Es gibt eine distinkte, angeborene Entzündungsreaktion auf eine HIV-, SIV-Infektion des Hosts, und wir wissen, dass diese distinkte Reaktion tatsächlich von dem Dialog abhängt, vom Dialog zwischen den verschiedenen Akteuren unserer Immunverteidigung. Wir müssen die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen betrachten. Sie wissen, dass es sich hierbei um eine Abwehr handelt. Verschiedene Akteure spielen eine Schlüsselrolle, wie etwa die plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen, wie natürliche Killerzellen, T-Zellen usw. Natürlich B-Zellen für die Produktion von Antikörpern. Doch sie müssen bedenken, dass das Virus kommt, HIV und virales Protein, das von plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen erkannt werden kann. Doch die Reaktion der plasmazytoiden dendritischen Zellen durch Rezeptoren, Rezeptoren wie TLRs, doch vielleicht sogar durch andere Rezeptoren. In Kürze wird beispielsweise ein Aufsatz erscheinen, der beweist, dass ein Restriktionsfaktor von TRIM5 alpha ein Rezeptor sein könnte. Wir müssen also die Wechselwirkung zwischen Rezeptoren und Liganden betrachten. Und gemäß der Vielfalt sowohl der Rezeptoren als auch der Liganden kann man es mit verschiedenen angeborenen Reaktionen zu tun haben: angeborene Reaktionen im Zusammenhang mit pDCs, NK-Zellen und selbstverständlich solche, bei denen sich als Konsequenz ein unterschiedlicher Einsatz der Aktivierung derjenigen Zellen ergibt, die für die B-Zellen- und T-Zellen-Reaktion in lymphatischem Gewebe kritisch sind, wie zum Beispiel in Lymphknoten, wie es auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Doch wir müssen, wie ich gesagt habe, die Vielfalt der Host-Rezeptoren oder Liganden betrachten. Wie beispielsweise die NK-Rezeptoren, die wichtig sind, und KIR. Wir wissen, dass der genetische Polymorphismus von KIR die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst. Wir wissen, dass HLADR selbstverständlich die HIV-Infektion beeinflusst, und wir wissen, dass nef HLA herunterreguliert, zu Molekülen der Klasse 1. Wir müssen also bei der distinkten angeborenen Entzündungsreaktion, die zum Ergebnis der distinkten HIV-, SIV-Erkrankung führt, sowohl die Vielfalt des Hosts als auch des Virus berücksichtigen. Und wir können aus diesem mannigfaltigen Reaktionsspektrum manches lernen. Tatsächlich sind es verschiedene Modelle, die verwendet werden können, um den Schutz vor HIV oder vor AIDS besser zu verstehen. Ich will Ihnen kurz auf diesem Dia zwei der Modelle zeigen, über die wir zur Zeit in meinem Labor und über die auch andere arbeiten. Zuerst haben wir HIV-Controller oder SIV-Controller in den Affen. Diese sind sehr interessant, da sie das Reservoir auf natürliche Weise kontrollieren. Sie haben ein Reservoir auf niedriger Ebene. In den Affen lässt sich keine Virusbelastung nachweisen, die Vermehrung des Virus wird auf natürliche Weise kontrolliert. Das andere Modell sind die afrikanischen Primaten. Sie sind zu 40-50 % durch SIV infiziert, doch sie entwickeln die Krankheit nicht. Warum? Da sie über keine abnormale Immunaktivierung des Immunsystems verfügen. Sie haben daher keine abnormale Entzündung. Wir können also beiden Modellen Einsichten entnehmen, und wir beginnen durch beide Modelle unser Verständnis zu vertiefen. Wir wissen bereits, dass die meisten von ihnen HLA, B57, B27 sind. Wir wissen, dass etwa die Hälfte von ihnen eine sehr starke CD8-Reaktion hat. vielleicht jedoch durch eine angeborene Immunität oder durch eine virale Komponente. Und wir lernen also auch von den Affen. Abschließend würde ich demnach sagen, dass wir über HIV etwas lernen, doch ich bin davon überzeugt und ich möchte glauben, dass wir etwas über HIV AIDS hinaus lernen können. HIV ist ein Retrovirus, und wie ich soeben erwähnte, haben wir es natürlich mit neuen Herausforderungen zu tun, mit Krebs, mit Alterskrankheiten und der HIV-Krankheit. Wir wissen, dass Retroviren in Tieren vorkommen. Wir haben sie am Ende der sechziger Jahre als mögliche Erreger von Krebs und Leukämie intensiv studiert. Doch heute könnte auch HIV ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Krebs und Lymphome besser zu verstehen. HIV könnte sicherlich auch ein Thema sein, das uns hilft, Immundefekte und Tumoren zu verstehen, die auf Entzündungen und Autoimmunphänomene zurückzuführen sind. Und das letzte Dia besagt, dass HIV AIDS von Anfang an ein wunderbares wissenschaftliches und menschliches Abenteuer gewesen ist, das noch andauert. Wir haben neue Herausforderungen, eine neue Technologie und neue Konzepte und - um auch dies zu erwähnen - eine neue Generation von Akteuren. Sie werden für die neuen Entdeckungen verantwortlich sein. Sie müssen jedoch Folgendes berücksichtigen: Sie müssen zusammenarbeiten, in Verbindung mit anderen, wie es auf meinen Dia dargestellt ist. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit klinischer und operationaler Forschung. Grundlagenforschung in Verbindung mit verschiedenen Disziplinen und auch mit einer Disziplin, die ich auf meinen Dia erwähne, die aber in Lindau nicht repräsentiert ist: mit der Wissenschaft der Sozialökonomie, die ebenfalls ein wichtiger Teil ist. Und zusammen arbeiten, alle zusammen mit den Patienten selbst. Ich danke Ihnen sehr für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2010): HIV, a Discovery Highlighting the Global Benefit of Translational Research
(00:03:21 - 00:03:46)

The complete video is available here.

After the discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS, a second race now began: to discover effective treatments. The first drug to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA was azidothymidine (AZT). AZT was originally developed for the treatment of cancer by US researchers in the 1960s.7 The drug was found to be ineffective against cancer and was then more or less forgotten for 20 years. However, AZT was then included in a National Cancer Institute screening programme to identify drugs to treat AIDS and was found to block HIV replication while leaving normal cells unscathed. Gertrude Elion was awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with George H. Hitchings and Sir James Black for elucidating ‘important principles of drug treatment’. Elion and Hitchings began their extremely fruitful collaboration in the 1940s, which was based on the strategy of exploiting differences in nucleic acid metabolism between normal human cells, cancer cells, protozoa, bacteria and viruses, in order to selectively target malignant and harmful cells. It was a philosophy which was to lead among others to the use of AZT for the treatment of AIDS.8 Elion took part in the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings on three occasions, for the last time in 1996, where she talked about the history of the AIDS epidemic in the USA, the discovery of how AZT selectively targets retroviruses and how it was approved for treating AIDS.

Gertrude Elion (1996): Antiviral Chemotherapy: Successes and Challenges
(00:26:36 - 00:31:58)

The complete video is available here.

Gertrude Elion (1996): Antiviral Chemotherapy: Successes and Challenges
(00:34:35 - 00:36:20)

The complete video is available here.

HIV’s high mutation rate is not only a problem for the immune system. It also means that the virus can quickly gain resistance to therapies. Thus, it quickly became clear that, although AZT is effective in targeting HIV, it cannot completely eradicate it, and resistance to the drug arises quickly. For this reason, combination therapies including a protease inhibitor together with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors were developed in the mid-1990s and quickly became a cornerstone of HIV therapy, which they remain to this day.9 Elion talks about this triple combination – at that time recently developed – in her talk at the 1996 meeting.

Gertrude Elion (1996): Antiviral Chemotherapy: Successes and Challenges
(00:44:46 - 00:46:40)

The complete video is available here.

Thanks to these combination therapies, the outlook for those living with HIV has improved vastly from the early days of the AIDS epidemic: mortality rates have fallen dramatically while life expectancy for regions with high rates of HIV infection have risen substantially.9 In this excerpt from her talk at the 2014 meeting, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi emphasises how effective combined antiretroviral therapy or cART has been in combatting AIDS.

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2014) - On The Road Toward an HIV Cure

Thank you very much, Stefan. It's my real pleasure to start this morning session and to be here for my second time in Lindau. It's really a wonderful meeting, and I hope that all of you really will enjoy this week in Lindau. So today I decided to talk about not only my work, but the work of many people in the world trying to find a cure for HIV. It's not an easy task as you can imagine. So my first slide is just to remind you that indeed it’s more than 30 years of HIV science today. The virus was isolated at the Pasteur Institute in 1983, and you can see on this slide certainly not all the achievements that have been done over the 30 years. But, I like to show on this slide main progresses that have been done in basic research and in parallel the translation, let’s say, of this basis knowledge in tools for the benefit of patients. So in blue on this slide to be short you have the progresses that have been made in our basic knowledge on HIV. In green you have the tools that derived from those progresses. And in pink you have some success in prevention. Of course as you know we still do not have a vaccine and as you know we do not have a cure. However, we have because of our knowledge on HIV it has been able to develop a therapeutic strategy which is combined antiretroviral treatment which is capable to stop HIV replication in the infected patients. This treatment is also capable to restore at least partially immune function and at the end is capable to prevent the development of the disease AIDS. It has improved the quality of life, it prolongs the life expectancy. Even we can say today that if the treatment is started very early on, the life expectancy is almost the same as one of people that are not infected by HIV. We learnt all over the last years that the treatment is also prevention. It's capable to prevent the transmission of HIV from one infected individual on treatment to his or her partner. It has been a wonderful progress also in the access to the combined antiretroviral therapy in low and middle-income countries. This slide is reminding you that we have about 35 million people living with HIV, most of them are in sub-Saharan Africa. Fortunately this treatment, and really thanks to antiretroviral treatment, more than 4 million of deaths have been avoided. We have today around 10 million of people on treatment. This is not sufficient. As indicated on this slide, the last WHO guideline, published last year in July 2013, indicates that we have to treat earlier, that means we have around 26 million of people in need of treatment. This is a big challenge as you can imagine. So today we can say that in the field of HIV AIDS one of the first priorities is implementation: Implementation of tools to prevent new infection in uninfected people, of course using all the tools – combining the tools like education, condoms, circumcision, risk reduction, antiretroviral treatment -used as prevention today. We have also to improve testing, treating and retaining the patient into the treatment, the continuum of care. Unfortunately the cascade of continuum of care is indicating that the patients on long-term do not adhere to treatment. There is a loss. So it’s a loss which, according to the country, can be 25% to 50%. In addition we have between 30 and 50% of people that do not know that they are HIV positive - this is not acceptable today. So this is a real challenge. Among the challenges that are listed on this list you have the political willingness fighting against stigma and discrimination, which is very important if we want to improve the frequency of people going for the test. We have also key scientific challenges and priorities in HIV science today. I mentioned the biggest one, HIV discovery, of course. We are making significant progress in the field of HIV vaccine during the last years, in particular with the discovery of very potent broadly neutralising antibody, but we are not there yet. I mentioned comorbidity on long life treatment, because unfortunately long-term we can see between 8 to 15% of patients on treatments that develop what we call non-AIDS-related morbidities. And I will make a link by the way towards this challenge to the cure discovery itself. HIV cure is a very big challenge. We have a persistent infection on HAART and we have to understand how to manage to eliminate the virus, to eradicate the virus from the body. So for this challenge we need novel ideas; we need multidisciplinary collaboration; we need to have a partnership between the public and private sector; we need to have international collaboration and of course we need funding. Why do we need a cure? My first answer to that is generally because the patients are looking for it. My first thing when I met them in different countries in the world including in resource-limited settings as yet I always ask the question, “What are you expecting from us as scientists? in 80% of the cases they answer, they would like a treatment that we can stop. So that's as yet. That’s as yet, and this is exactly what Fred Verdult, a representative of people living with HIV, said to my colleague Steve Deeks in in St. Maarten in 2011. Saying to him, “Look I made a little survey in my country in Netherlands and found out that 72% of the people living with HIV are thinking it is very important for them to be cured.” And for reasons that are not exactly the same that Steve Deeks and many others were expecting, for example for them it was very important because they will not have to deal anymore with stigma; they will not be afraid anymore to infect other people. So we have to take this as a scientist into consideration. Why do we need a cure? It's because a lifelong treatment for all is unlikely to be sustainable. Of course we are all calling for universal access to antiretroviral treatment, however as I said only 10 million are on treatment today. For each 3 patients starting treatment we have 5 new cases of infection. We have only very few countries with the coverage of more than 80%. This lifelong treatment, as I mentioned, is with a difficult adherence; we have substantial stigma and discrimination fears; life expectancy is still reduced in a significant proportion of patients; and it’s a long-term cost. So we really need to think about other strategies. First of all we have to understand why - why the infection is persisting on HAART. This slide is showing you that the results, by way of different studies, trying to interrupt the treatment. And we were surprised in those studies to see a viral rebound as indicated on this slide. By looking more carefully, even if the patients who were on HAART had undetectable viral load measure by quantifying the viral RNA in the plasma, it turns out that we were able to detect HIV DNA in patient cells. So this is what we call the reservoirs. The reservoirs are the latently infected T cells. But we have also to consider that even on treatment we cannot exclude a residual low level of residual viral replication, which is related to inflammation, immune activation that remains abnormal in patients on HAART. We have to consider that latently infected cells are present in several compartments, including in the brain. We have to consider also the fact that the treatment not always penetrates very well in all of the tissues of the host. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research now? It's because also we have a better knowledge on HIV pathogenesis. I will not go into detail of this slide, but we certainly learned a lot over the years regarding the importance of immune activation, the importance of the persistence of infection. We know that very early on, as this slide is showing you, we have a loss of gut integrity and microbial translocations that probably play a role in abnormal immune activation and inflammation. We know that everything in this disease is decided very early on during the acute phase of infection, and the establishment of viral persistence and viral reservoir is really during this very early phase of infection. Abnormal inflammation is also starting during the early phase and infection is maintained, and both of them are interdependent. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research? It is also because we have a better knowledge on the molecular mechanism of HIV latency. This slide is a summary of the different mechanisms that should be considered for HIV latency, first of all as a sequestration of transcription factors but also as potential mechanism of latency. We have to consider the promoter occlusion, the convergent transcription, the defective transcription elongation factors, DNA methylation and chromatin silencing. All these mechanisms are certainly to be considered for the development of novel strategies for the future, but I must say we are still far to understand deeply all the mechanisms of latency and there is progress to be made in this area. We have a better knowledge on HIV reservoirs, which are indeed in many cell subsets and tissues. We know that the persistence and the stability of the reservoir is very long, since even after 10 years of HAART we can detect this reservoir. It was our belief that the CD4 cells that are latently infected by the virus were quite rare. The estimate was between 1/10^5 to 1/10^6 resting CD4 T cells. The very recent data indicates that indeed it's probably underestimated and we have probably more reservoir cells than we thought. What are the reservoir cells? The main reservoir is the resting central and transitional CD4 memory T cells. We have to consider the fact that the latent infection is also present in other cells like astrocytes, monocytes, myeloid lineage, hematopoietic progenitor cells as well. The compartments that contain the latently infected cells are not only the blood but the gut and genital tract, lymphoid tissue, the central nervous system. We are understanding also more and more about why the latently infected cells are persisting. We know that the cells by themselves, the CD4 cells are the long half-life CD4 cells that survive. We know today that there is a homeostatic proliferation of those cells. I explain why: we have the persistence of these latently infected cells. We have to consider immune mechanisms that maintain cells in the resting state, like for example an up-regulation of PD-1 which may contribute to HIV persistence. We are understanding also better and better the main driver of inflammation and chronic activation. I already mentioned microbial translocation but you can see on this slide that there are many other mechanisms like the altered balance of the CD4 T cells subset between T-regulatory T cell and Th17 for example; the loss of regulatory T cells; the role of viral protein like Nef, Tat or Vpx for example. The fact that other pathogens might play a role in this inflammation, like for example CMV coinfection. And this inflammation and activation is probably related to the comorbidities and ageing that we could see long-term in patients on HAART. Which kind of cure are we looking for? Generally when we are speaking about cure, we are speaking about eradication; eradication that means sterilising cure. So that means elimination of all latently infected cells. This is an almost impossible mission after what I said. However, we have one proof of concept: the Berlin patient who received a very complicated treatment bone marrow transplant from a particular donor with a mutation in the co-receptor CCF5 mutation which is present only in Caucasians. So it's not a strategy that can be used at large scale, but we cannot detect anymore the virus in different compartments of his body. Remission. Remission is probably our main goal, and it's more reasonable in my opinion. Remission that means that we will have a long-term health without any treatment, without any risk to transmit to others. And we have also proofs of concept. What are the proofs of concept? One of the first ones by the way, our natural protection against AIDS in African monkeys that do not develop AIDS as they have viral replication. They have attenuated inflammation, attenuated chronic immune activation. Bone marrow transplantation I already mentioned, the Berlin patient. We thought we will have 2 other cases with the Boston patients who received also a bone marrow transplant, however, we learnt after they stopped the treatment that unfortunately they had a relapse of HIV viremia We have HIV controllers, the people that are naturally controlling their infection: they never receive antiretroviral treatment; they have undetectable viral load, low size of reservoir; they have a very efficient suppressive CD8 response, correlated to HLA B27 and B57, so to a particular genetic background. They have also for some of them a capacity to restrict the infection of their CD4 cells and of their macrophages. Finally we have also the case of "functional" cure in very early treatment, the "Mississippi baby", probably you have heard of her from the media, she was treated 30 hours after birth, so very early on, for 18 months. Her mother stopped the treatment for 6 months, she came back and the virus was not detected anymore in the baby. In my country, in France, we, my group in collaboration with others, we identified a group of 14 patients, we have 20 patients today, treated very early on about 10 weeks during the primary infection for 3 years. They stopped the treatment. Now it's 9 years that they are without any treatment, they are doing perfectly well: They have low size of reservoir as well; they don’t have a strong CD8 suppressive response; they don’t have the same genetic background as the HIV controllers So we are trying to understand why - why these men were capable to control their infection. So that's the reason, we thought it was time at the International AIDS Society to accelerate research on HIV cure. I personally thought that the best way to go was to have a bottom-up approach and to really ask a group of scientists to work together and to define what are the main priorities to accelerate research on HIV cure. It's what we did, and we published in 2012, in Nature Review Immunology, a kind of scientific roadmap with the main priority in cure research. We can summarise them as 7 priorities which are shown on this slide: Starting from molecular and cellular and viral mechanisms of persistence that still need to be better understood; have a better understanding of tissue and cellular sources of persistent infection in animal models as well as in patients on long-term ART; to understand better the origins of immune activation and dysfunction in the presence of ART; to understand better the host and immune mechanisms that control HIV infection but still allow viral persistence; to have better assays to study and measure the reservoir; and to develop therapeutic strategies and immunological strategies to eliminate the latently infected cells in patients; and also to certainly enhance the host response to control replication. Where are we today? Can we cure HIV latency with "reactivation" drugs? Several drugs which are mentioned on this slide like NF-kappaB activators have been tried already. And the administration of the Vorinostat in a patient on HAART showed that we can reactivate the virus but indeed, when we measured recently, the size of the reservoir is the same. So it’s a little bit disappointing, I must say. So it's probably not enough. We need to ask the question: What proportion of the reservoir is susceptible to this drug? Are proteins of variants being produced on this kind of treatment? How safe is this approach? Can we cure HIV infection with immune-based therapy? We have some arguments to think that that might be the way to go. For example we know that the frequency of HIV DNA-containing resting memory cells correlates with the frequency of activated CD4 T cells. By the way we know in our patients that were treated earlier, the VISCONTI patients, that they have a very, very low level of inflammation and immune activation. We have this study with rapamycin, which reduces CCR5 expression and T cell activation and was associated with the lower size reservoir in post-renal transplant. So we have several questions that we are asking regarding immune-based therapy today. Can we enhance killing of HIV-infected cells by vaccine therapy in vivo? There is promising data like this study of Louis Picker in a macaque model, using a very highly pathogenic SIV and using as a vaccine CMV vector which is capable to induce a very high level of effector CD8 T cells in lymphoid and mucosa tissue and this study clearly showed that the CD8 response was capable to decrease the size of the reservoir in the monkey. So this is very promising. Probably... I'd like to say that regarding vaccine therapy: we have to consider also the antibodies. There is very promising data today with broadly neutralising antibodies, and I must say that the data also in macaques is very encouraging regarding the possibility from broadly neutralising antibodies to decreasing the size of the reservoirs. Finally can we cure HIV infection with allogeneic stem cell transplantation? I told you about the Boston patient - there are those gene therapies studies using for example CCR5-modified T cells that show some interesting data. But my question is whether gene modification of T cells for a cure is feasible? Can stem cells be harvested gene-modified and transplanted in a safe, effective, affordable, and scalable manner, especially in resource-limited settings? What are the barriers but new opportunities? We are very... there are new opportunities for clinical research toward a cure. I already mentioned some of them like the direct acting anti-latency drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs But we have to keep in mind that we really want a strategy that will be affordable as I say for resource-limited settings. The future cure strategy will probably be a combined approach with these different strategies I would like to say based certainly on our basic knowledge on the mechanism of persistence. Quantifying the reservoir and tools for cure studies are really something that we have to work on. I told you the Boston patient really said to us, you don’t have the right to measure the reservoirs. We need to understand the biology of HIV persistence as well for that. We need to have a biomarker to predict the efficacy of the functional cure. We need to have those markers to evaluate the impact of any intervention on the reservoirs. And based on those biomarkers, in the future, I would not be surprised to have an approach, let's say, towards a personalised cure therapy. So I will end by saying that what we need is really an integrated strategy with all the components Remember inflammation, as it was said yesterday, inflammation is critical in many diseases We have to work also with social scientists and scientists involved in economic science. We have to work together with the stakeholders, with the donors; and it's what we did at International Society by implementing an international Advisory Board responsible for implementing and following the strategy: to make funding, of course; to have a coordination in funding; and to make sure that we have international multidisciplinary collaboration at all the levels. I'd like to say that we might be successful, I'm sure we will be successful in a remission, in a chemical remission in the future, if we work all together as we did in the very early years of HIV research. It's what we are trying to do with my co-chair of the next conference in Melbourne, Sharon Lewin. I was glad to see in Lindau the strong implication of Australia. Sharon is from Melbourne, she will be as the Director of the Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. And I am pleased to say that we are used, with Sharon and Steve, to organise regularly now a meeting on HIV cure before the AIDS conference. Thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Stefan. Ich freue mich sehr darüber, diese Vormittagssitzung beginnen zu können und zum zweiten Mal hier in Lindau zu sein. Das ist eine wunderbare Tagung, und ich hoffe, Sie alle werden die Woche in Lindau genießen. Heute habe ich mich dazu entschlossen, nicht nur über meine Arbeit zu sprechen, sondern über die Arbeit vieler Menschen auf der ganzen Welt, die versuchen, ein Heilmittel gegen HIV zu finden. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das keine leichte Aufgabe. Mit meiner ersten Folie möchte ich Sie daran erinnern, dass wir heute tatsächlich schon auf über 30 Jahre HIV-Wissenschaft zurückblicken. Das Virus wurde 1983 im Institut Pasteur isoliert. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie bei weitem nicht alle Erfolge, die in diesen 30 Jahren erzielt wurden. Ich möchte jedoch auf der Folie die wichtigsten in der Grundlagenforschung erzielten Fortschritte darstellen, und parallel dazu die, sagen wir: Umsetzung dieses Grundlagenwissens zu Instrumenten, die dem Wohl der Patienten dienen. Um es kurz zu machen: In blauer Farbe sehen Sie auf dieser Folie die Fortschritte unseres Grundlagenwissens über HIV. In grün sehen Sie die Instrumente, die auf diese Fortschritte zurückzuführen sind. Und in pink sehen einige Erfolge bei der Prävention. Natürlich haben wir, wie Sie wissen, immer noch keinen Impfstoff und auch noch kein Heilmittel. Allerdings haben wir... aufgrund unserer Kenntnisse über HIV war es möglich, eine therapeutische Strategie zu entwickeln - es handelt sich um eine kombinierte antiretrovirale Therapie, mit der die HIV-Replikation bei den infizierten Patienten gestoppt werden kann. Diese Behandlung ist außerdem in der Lage, zumindest teilweise die Immunfunktion wiederherzustellen, wodurch letztlich die Entstehung der Krankheit AIDS verhindert werden kann. Die Lebensqualität hat sich dadurch verbessert, die Lebenserwartung wurde verlängert. Heute können wir sogar sagen, dass die Lebenserwartung, wenn man mit der Behandlung sehr früh beginnt, fast ebenso hoch ist wie die der nicht von HIV infizierten Menschen. In den vergangenen Jahren haben wir gelernt, dass die Behandlung auch präventiv wirkt. Sie ist in der Lage, die Übertragung des HIV von einer infizierten Person, die behandelt wird, auf den Partner oder die Partnerin zu verhindern. Auch was den Zugang zur kombinierten antiretroviralen Therapie in Ländern mit niedrigen und mittleren Einkommen betrifft, wurden sehr schöne Erfolge erzielt. Diese Folie soll Sie daran erinnern, dass ungefähr 35 Millionen Menschen mit HIV leben, die meisten von ihnen in Afrika südlich der Sahara. Glücklicherweise konnten dank dieser antiretroviralen Behandlung mehr als vier Millionen Menschen gerettet werden. Heute befinden sich etwa zehn Millionen Menschen in Behandlung. Das ist nicht genug. Wie aus dieser Folie ersichtlich, machte die letzte, im Juli 2013 veröffentlichte WHO-Richtlinie darauf aufmerksam, dass wir früher mit der Behandlung beginnen müssen. Das bedeutet, es gibt etwa 26 Millionen Menschen, die eine Behandlung benötigen. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das eine große Herausforderung. Heute können wir sagen, dass eine der obersten Prioritäten im Bereich HIV/AIDS die Umsetzung ist, also die Einführung von Instrumenten zur Verhinderung von Neuinfektionen bei nicht infizierten Menschen, wobei natürlich heute alle Instrumente - Bildung, Kondome, Beschneidung, Risikoreduzierung, antiretrovirale Behandlung - kombiniert zur Prävention eingesetzt werden. Daneben müssen wir die Testverfahren verbessern, außerdem die Behandlung selbst und die weitere Behandlung des Patienten - die Kontinuität der Betreuung. Leider deutet der Rückgang bei der Kontinuität der Betreuung darauf hin, dass die Patienten langfristig die Behandlung nicht durchhalten. Das ist ein Verlust - ein Verlust, der je nach Land 25 bis 50 Prozent betragen kann. Darüber hinaus wissen zwischen 30 und 50 Prozent der Menschen nicht, dass sie HIV-positiv sind - das ist heutzutage nicht hinnehmbar. Hierin liegt eine echte Herausforderung. Zu den auf dieser Liste aufgeführten Herausforderungen zählt der politische Wille, Stigmatisierung und Diskriminierung zu bekämpfen, was sehr wichtig ist, wenn wir erreichen wollen, dass sich die Menschen häufiger testen lassen. In der HIV-Wissenschaft von heute gibt es wichtige wissenschaftliche Herausforderungen und Prioritäten. Ich habe die größte schon erwähnt - natürlich die Entdeckung von HIV. Auf dem Gebiet des HIV-Impfstoffs hatten wir in den letzten Jahren erhebliche Fortschritte zu verzeichnen, insbesondere mit der Entdeckung der äußerst wirksamen breit neutralisierenden Antikörper, aber wir sind noch nicht am Ziel. Ich erwähnte Komorbidität bei einer langfristigen Behandlung - leider stellen wir fest, dass sich bei acht bis 15 Prozent der behandelten Patienten die so genannten Nicht-AIDS-definierenden Erkrankungen entwickeln. Ich werde übrigens eine Verknüpfung mit der Herausforderung der Entdeckung eines Heilmittels herstellen. Die Heilung von HIV ist eine sehr große Herausforderung. HAART ändert ja nichts an der Infektion; wir müssen verstehen, wie wir es schaffen können, das Virus zu eliminieren, das Virus aus dem Körper zu entfernen. Für diese Aufgabe bedarf es neuer Ideen; es bedarf einer multidisziplinären Zusammenarbeit; es bedarf einer Partnerschaft zwischen dem öffentlichen und dem privaten Sektor; es bedarf einer internationalen Zusammenarbeit, und natürlich bedarf es finanzieller Mittel. Warum brauchen wir überhaupt ein Heilmittel? Meine erste Antwort darauf lautet im Allgemeinen: Weil es sich die Patienten wünschen. Wenn ich mit ihnen in verschiedenen Ländern der Welt zusammentreffe, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden, stelle ich bisher als Erstes immer die Frage: Und sie sagen...in 80 Prozent der Fälle antworten sie, sie hätten gerne eine Behandlung, die man beenden kann. Bisher ist das so. Bisher ist das eben so, und das ist genau das, was Fred Verdult, ein Vertreter von mit HIV lebenden Menschen, 2011 in St. Maarten zu meinem Kollegen Steve Deeks sagte. Er sagte: Das Ergebnis war: Und zwar aus Gründen, die nicht genau jenen entsprechen, welche Steve Deeks und viele andere erwartet hatten. Zum Beispiel wäre die Heilung für sie deshalb wichtig, weil sie dann nicht mehr mit der Stigmatisierung leben müssten, und sie müssten keine Angst mehr davor haben, andere Menschen zu infizieren. Als Wissenschaftler müssen wir das berücksichtigen. Warum benötigen wir ein Heilmittel? Weil eine lebenslange Behandlung für alle wahrscheinlich nicht nachhaltig ist. Natürlich fordern wir alle weltweiten Zugang zur antiretroviralen Behandlung, aber wie ich schon sagte: Nur zehn Millionen befinden sich heute in Behandlung. Auf drei Patienten, die mit der Behandlung beginnen, kommen fünf neue Ansteckungsfälle. Nur in sehr wenigen Ländern haben wir eine Abdeckung von mehr als 80 Prozent. Diese lebenslange Behandlung ist, wie erwähnt, schwer durchzuhalten, es gibt beträchtliche Stigmatisierungs- und Diskriminierungsängste, die Lebenserwartung ist bei einem erheblichen Teil der Patienten noch immer verkürzt, und es fallen langfristig Kosten an. Wir müssen also wirklich über andere Strategien nachdenken. Zuallererst müssen wir verstehen, warum die Infektion mit HAART fortbesteht. Diese Folie zeigt ihnen - anhand verschiedener Studien - die Resultate nach Versuchen, die Behandlung abzusetzen. Und wir waren überrascht, dass sich in diesen Studien, wie aus der Folie ersichtlich, ein viraler Rebound zeigte. Bei genauerem Hinsehen erwies es sich, dass wir selbst dann in der Lage waren, HIV-DNA in den Zellen der mit HAART behandelten Patienten nachzuweisen, wenn sich bei diesen Patienten eine Viruslast durch Quantifizierung der viralen DNA nicht nachweisen ließ. Wir nennen das die Reservoire. Die Reservoire sind die latent infizierten T-Zellen. Wir müssen aber auch berücksichtigen, dass wir selbst während einer Behandlung eine geringfügige residuale virale Replikation nicht ausschließen können - im Zusammenhang mit einer Entzündung/Immunaktivierung, die bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten nach wie vor krankhaft ist. Wir müssen berücksichtigen, dass sich latent infizierte Zellen in verschiedenen Kompartimenten befinden, auch im Gehirn. Wir müssen außerdem die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die Behandlung nicht immer gut in das gesamte Gewebe eindringt. Warum ist es jetzt an der Zeit, die Erforschung eines HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Weil wir eine bessere Kenntnis von der HIV-Pathogenese haben. Auf die Einzelheiten dieser Folie will ich nicht eingehen, aber wir haben im Laufe der Jahre eine Menge über die Bedeutung der Immunaktivierung, über die Bedeutung des Fortbestehens der Infektion gelernt. Wir wissen, dass ganz zu Beginn, wie Sie aus dieser Folie ersehen, ein Verlust der Darmintegrität auftritt; außerdem mikrobielle Translokationen, die wahrscheinlich bei krankhafter Immunaktivierung/Entzündung eine Rolle spielen. Wir wissen, dass sich bei dieser Krankheit alles sehr früh entscheidet, während der akuten Phase der Infektion, und dass die Viruspersistenz ebenso wie das virale Reservoir während dieser ersten Frühphase der Infektion entsteht. Die abnormale Entzündung beginnt ebenfalls während der Frühphase, während die Infektion unabhängig davon fortbesteht. Warum ist es an der Zeit, die Erforschung des HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Auch deshalb, weil wir besser über die molekularen Mechanismen der HIV-Latenz Bescheid wissen. Diese Folie enthält eine Zusammenfassung der verschiedenen Mechanismen, die im Rahmen der HIV-Latenz zu berücksichtigen sind - zunächst als Ausschluss von Transkriptionsfaktoren, aber auch als potentieller Mechanismus der Latenz. Wir müssen den Verschluss des Promotors berücksichtigen, die konvergente Transkription, die defekte Transkription, Elongationsfaktoren, DNA-Methylierung und Chromatin Silencing. All diese Mechanismen sind natürlich bei der Entwicklung neuer Strategien für die Zukunft zu berücksichtigen. Ich muss aber sagen, dass wir noch weit davon entfernt sind, alle Latenzmechanismen wirklich zu verstehen; auf diesem Gebiet liegt noch ein weiter Weg vor uns. Besser Bescheid wissen wir über HIV-Reservoire, die in vielen Zell-Subpopulationen und Geweben zu finden sind. Wir wissen, dass Persistenz und Stabilität des Reservoirs sehr langlebig sind, da wir dieses Reservoir selbst nach einer zehnjährigen HAART-Behandlung immer noch nachweisen können. Wir waren der Ansicht, dass die vom Virus latent befallenen CD4-Zellen selten sind - die Schätzungen reichten von 1*10^5 bis 1*10^6 ruhenden CD4-T-Zellen. Die jüngsten Daten weisen indes darauf hin, dass ihre Menge wahrscheinlich unterschätzt wurde und es wohl mehr Reservoirzellen gibt als wir dachten. Was sind diese Reservoirzellen? Das Hauptreservoir besteht aus den ruhenden Zentralzellen und den transitionalen CD4-T-Gedächtniszellen. Wir müssen die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die latente Infektion auch andere Zellen befällt, etwa Astrozyten, Monozyten, Myeloidlinien und hämatopoetische Vorläuferzellen. Bei den Kompartimenten, welche die latent infizierten Zellen enthalten, handelt es sich nicht nur um das Blut, sondern auch um den Darm und den Genitaltrakt, Lymphgewebe, das zentrale Nervensystem... Wir verstehen auch immer besser, warum die latent infizierten Zellen so hartnäckig sind. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen selbst, dass diejenigen Zellen, die überleben, die CD4-Zellen mit den langen Halbwertszeiten sind. Wir wissen heute, dass sich diese Zellen homöostatisch ausbreiten. Ich erkläre auch, warum: Wir sehen die Persistenz dieser latent infizierten Zellen. Wir müssen Immunmechanismen in Betracht ziehen, welche die Zellen im ruhenden Zustand belassen, wie zum Beispiel eine Hochregulierung von PD-1, die zur HIV-Persistenz beitragen könnte. Auch die Hauptursache von Entzündungen und chronischer Aktivierung verstehen wir immer besser. Mikrobielle Translokation habe ich schon erwähnt, doch auf dieser Folie können Sie sehen, dass es noch viele andere Mechanismen gibt, wie zum Beispiel das gestörte Gleichgewicht zwischen der Subpopulation von CD4-T-Zellen, den regulatorischen T-Zellen, und den Th17-Zellen; der Verlust von regulatorischen T-Zellen; die Rolle von viralen Proteinen wie Nef, Tat oder Vpx. Die Tatsache, dass für die Entzündung andere Pathogene eine Rolle spielen könnten, zum Beispiel eine CMV-Koinfektion. Und diese Entzündung bzw. Aktivierung hängt wahrscheinlich mit den Komorbiditäten und dem Alterungsprozess zusammen, die wir langfristig bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten beobachten könnten. Welche Art von Heilung schwebt uns vor? Wenn wir von Heilung sprechen, dann sprechen wir im Allgemeinen von Eradikation; Eradikation bedeutet sterilisierende Heilung. Das wiederum heißt: Eliminierung aller latent infizierten Zellen. Nach allem, was ich gesagt habe, ist das eine fast unmögliche Mission. Es gibt allerdings einen Machbarkeitsnachweis: den Berlin-Patienten, der einer sehr komplizierten Behandlung unterzogen wurde - einer Knochenmarktransplantation von einem besonderen Spender mit einer Mutation des Korezeptors CCF5. Diese Mutation gibt es nur bei Weißen, weshalb das keine in großem Maßstab einsetzbare Strategie ist. Aber wir können das Virus in den verschiedenen Kompartimenten seines Körpers nicht mehr nachweisen. Remission. Remission ist wohl unser Hauptziel, und meiner Ansicht nach ist es auch das vernünftigere. Remission bedeutet, es gibt eine lange gesunde Phase ohne Behandlung, ohne das Risiko der Übertragung auf Andere. Und auch hier gibt es Machbarkeitsnachweise. Was hat es mit diesen Machbarkeitsnachweisen auf sich? Einer der ersten ist der natürliche Schutz vor AIDS bei afrikanischen Affen, die kein AIDS bekommen - es gibt virale Replikation, die Entzündung ist schwächer, ebenso die chronische Immunaktivierung. Knochenmarktransplantation habe ich schon erwähnt, der Berlin-Patient. Wir dachten schon, wir hätten zwei weitere Fälle - die Boston-Patienten, die ebenfalls eine Knochenmarktransplantation erhielten. Nachdem sie die Behandlung abgesetzt hatten, erfuhren wir aber leider, dass sie einen Rückfall erlitten hatten, die HIV-Viräme war zurückgekehrt - daraus haben wir übrigens gelernt, dass die Technik, die uns zur Messung des viralen Reservoirs zur Verfügung steht, bei weitem nicht ausreicht. Es gibt die HIV-Kontrolleure, jene Menschen, die ihre Infektion auf natürliche Weise in Schach halten: Sie werden niemals antiretroviral behandelt; die Viruslast ist nicht nachweisebar, das Reservoir ist klein; sie verfügen über eine äußerst effiziente suppressive CD8-Reaktion, die mit HLA B27 und B57 korreliert, also mit einem besonderen genetischen Hintergrund. Einige von ihnen verfügen außerdem über die Fähigkeit, die Infektion ihrer CD4-Zellen und ihrer Makrophagen einzuschränken. Schließlich gibt es den Fall einer "funktionalen" Heilung bei einer sehr frühen Behandlung - das Mississippi-Baby, das Sie wahrscheinlich aus den Medien kennen. Das Mädchen wurde schon 30 Stunden nach der Geburt behandelt, also sehr früh, und dann 18 Monate lang. Ihre Mutter setzte die Behandlung für sechs Monate ab; danach kam sie zurück, und das Virus konnte in ihrem Baby nicht mehr nachgewiesen werden. In meinem Land, in Frankreich, stellten wir - meine Gruppe in Zusammenarbeit mit anderen - eine Gruppe von 14 Patienten zusammen; heute haben wir 20 Patienten...wir behandelten sie sehr frühzeitig, in den ersten zehn Wochen nach der Primärinfektion und dann drei Jahre lang. Sie setzten die Behandlung ab. Jetzt sind sie schon seit neun Jahren ohne jede Behandlung, und es geht ihnen ausgezeichnet. Ihr Reservoir ist ebenfalls klein. Ihre suppressive CD8-Reaktion ist nicht sehr stark; sie haben also nicht den gleichen genetischen Hintergrund wie die HIV-Kontrolleure - ihr genetischer Hintergrund, HLA-B35, wird sogar im Allgemeinen mit einem schnellen Fortschreiten der Krankheit in Verbindung gebracht. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, warum das so ist - warum diese Männer in der Lage sind, ihre Infektion zu kontrollieren. Das ist der Grund dafür, weshalb es unserer Ansicht nach an der Zeit ist, bei der International AIDS Society auf eine Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung zu drängen. Ich persönlich bin der Meinung, dass die beste Vorgehensweise darin besteht, einen "Bottom-up"-Ansatz zu verfolgen und eine Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern darum zu bitten, zusammenzuarbeiten und zu definieren, worin für sie die Hauptprioritäten einer Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung liegen. Das haben wir auch gemacht, und im Jahr 2012 veröffentlichten wir in Nature Review Immunology so etwas wie eine wissenschaftliche Roadmap mit den Hauptprioritäten bei der Heilungsforschung. Wir können sieben Prioritäten benennen, die auf dieser Folie dargestellt sind: Beginnend mit molekularen, zellulären und viralen Persistenzmechanismen, die wir immer noch nicht gut genug verstehen. Dann ein besseres Verständnis von den Gewebe- und Zellquellen einer persistenten Infektion sowohl bei Versuchstieren als auch bei Patienten, die langfristig mit ART behandelt werden; ein besseres Verständnis von den Ursprüngen der Immunaktivierung und -dysfunktion bei der Behandlung mit ART; ein besseres Verständnis von den Wirts- und Immunmechanismen, die eine HIV-Infektion trotz viraler Persistenz kontrollieren; bessere Proben zur Untersuchung und Messung des Reservoirs; die Entwicklung therapeutischer immunologischer Strategien zur Eliminierung der latent infizierten Zellen in den Patienten; und natürlich die Verbesserung der Wirtsreaktion zur Kontrolle der Replikation. Wo stehen wir heute? Können wir HIV-Latenz mit "Reaktivierungs"-Medikamenten heilen? Verschiedene, auf dieser Folie stehende Medikamente wie etwa NF-kappaB-Aktivatoren, wurden bereits getestet. Und die Behandlung eines HAART-Patienten mit Vorinostat hat gezeigt, dass wir das Virus reaktivieren können - als wir allerdings vor kurzem die Größe des Reservoirs maßen, war sie unverändert. Ich muss sagen, das ist ein bisschen enttäuschend. Es reicht also wahrscheinlich nicht. Wir müssen uns die Frage stellen: Welcher Teil des Reservoirs spricht auf dieses Medikament an? Werden bei dieser Art von Behandlung Proteine oder Virionen produziert? Wie sicher ist diese Methode? Können wir die HIV-Infektion mit einer immunbasierten Therapie heilen? Einige Gesichtspunkte sprechen dafür, dass dies der richtige Weg sein könnte. Wir wissen zum Beispiel, dass die Häufigkeit der ruhenden Zellen, die HIV-DNA enthalten, mit der Häufigkeit aktivierter CD4-T-Zellen korreliert. Übrigens wissen wir, dass die Entzündungen und die Immunaktivierung bei unseren früh behandelten Patienten, den VISCONTI-Patienten, sehr geringfügig sind. Es gibt diese Studie mit Rapamycin, das die CCR5-Expression ebenso wie die T-Zellen-Aktivierung reduziert und mit den kleineren Reservoiren nach Nierentransplantationen in Verbindung gebracht wurde. Es gibt also verschiedene Fragen, die sich uns heute im Hinblick auf die immunbasierte Therapie stellen. Können wir die Abtötung HIV-infizierter Zellen durch Impftherapien in vivo verbessern? Es gibt vielversprechende Daten wie etwa diese Studie von Louis Picker an einem Makaken. Er setzt ein in hohem Maße pathogenes SIV ein, und als Impfstoff verwendet er einen CMV-Vektor, der in der Lage ist, CD8-T-Effektorzellen in großen Mengen in das Lymph- und Schleimhautgewebe einzubringen. Diese Studie hat deutlich gezeigt, dass die CD8-Reaktion in der Lage ist, das Reservoir im Affen zu verkleinern. Das ist also sehr vielversprechend. Wahrscheinlich...Ich möchte noch Folgendes zur Impftherapie sagen: Wir dürfen auch die Antikörper nicht vergessen. Heute gibt es sehr vielversprechende Daten über breit neutralisierende Antikörper, und ich muss sagen, dass auch die Daten der Makaken sehr ermutigend sind, was die Möglichkeit einer Verkleinerung des Reservoirs durch breit neutralisierende Antikörper betrifft. Und schließlich - können wir die HIV-Infektion durch allogene Stammzellentransplantation heilen? Ich habe Ihnen vom Boston-Patienten erzählt - es gibt Gentherapiestudien, zum Beispiel mit CCR5-modifizierten T-Zellen, die einige interessante Daten hervorbringen. Meine Frage geht aber dahin, ob die Genmodifizierung von T-Zellen als Therapie machbar ist? Können Stammzellen genmodifiziert gewonnen und auf sichere, effektive, kostengünstige und skalierbare Art und Weise transplantiert werden, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden? Welche Hindernisse gibt es? Welche neuen Möglichkeiten? Wir sind sehr...es gibt neue Möglichkeiten einer klinischen, auf Heilung gerichteten Forschung. Einige davon habe ich bereits erwähnt, etwa die direkt wirkenden Antilatenz-Medikamente, entzündungshemmende Medikamente - derzeit laufen Studien; therapeutische Impfung und Zelltherapie. Wir müssen aber immer im Auge behalten, dass wir unbedingt eine Strategie brauchen, die man sich in ressourcenknappen Gegenden leisten kann. Die Heilungsstrategie der Zukunft ist wahrscheinlich ein aus diesen verschiedenen Strategien kombinierter Ansatz sicherlich basierend auf unserem Grundwissen über den Mechanismus der Persistenz. Studien über die Quantifizierung des Reservoirs und über Mittel zur Heilung sind sicherlich etwas, woran wir arbeiten müssen. Der Boston-Patient sagte zu uns: Sie haben nicht das richtige Werkzeug zur Messung des Reservoirs. Hierfür müssen wir auch die Biologie der HIV-Persistenz verstehen. Wir brauchen Biomarker, um Prognosen über die Wirksamkeit der funktionellen Heilung treffen zu können. Wir brauchen diese Marker zur Beurteilung der Auswirkung von Interventionen am Reservoir. Und ich wäre ich nicht überrascht, wenn uns künftig basierend auf diesen Biomarkern die Methode einer personalisierten Heilungstherapie zur Verfügung stünde. Abschließend möchte ich sagen, dass wir eine integrierte Strategie mit all diesen Komponenten benötigen - Grundlagenforschung, klinische Forschung, alles zusammen; doch wir müssen auch mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Denken Sie an Entzündungen; wie gestern ausgeführt wurde, sind Entzündungen bei vielen Krankheiten von entscheidender Bedeutung. Wir müssen also mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen auch mit Sozialwissenschaftlern und Wirtschaftswissenschaftlern zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen mit den Wirtschaftsbeteiligten zusammenarbeiten, mit den Spendern. Das haben wir bei der International Society beherzigt; wir bildeten einen internationalen Beirat, der für die Umsetzung und Verfolgung dieser Strategie zuständig ist: Mittel beschaffen natürlich; die Beschaffung der Mittel koordinieren und sicherstellen dass wir auf allen Ebenen international und multidisziplinär zusammenarbeiten. Ich möchte sagen, dass wir Erfolg haben können. Ich bin sicher, dass wir mit einer Remission, einer chemischen Remission erfolgreich sein werden, wenn wir alle zusammenarbeiten, so wie wir das in den ersten Jahren der HIV-Forschung getan haben. Das ist es, was wir zusammen mit Sharon Lewis, die mit mir zusammen die nächste Konferenz in Melbourne leiten wird, erreichen wollen. Mit Freuden habe ich in Lindau den starken australischen Einfluss wahrgenommen. Sharon ist aus Melbourne, sie wird Direktorin des Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. Und ich freue mich Ihnen mitteilen zu können, dass wir mittlerweile zusammen mit Sharon und Steve vor der AIDS-Konferenz regelmäßige Tagungen zur HIV-Heilung veranstalten. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2014): On The Road Toward an HIV Cure
(00:03:01 - 00:03:41)

The complete video is available here.

While there is still no cure for HIV, i.e. no treatment that can completely eradicate the virus, effective management is now possible. However, there are a number of important problems with the approach of simply keeping AIDS in check rather than completely eliminating the virus, which are discussed by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi here.

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2014) - On The Road Toward an HIV Cure

Thank you very much, Stefan. It's my real pleasure to start this morning session and to be here for my second time in Lindau. It's really a wonderful meeting, and I hope that all of you really will enjoy this week in Lindau. So today I decided to talk about not only my work, but the work of many people in the world trying to find a cure for HIV. It's not an easy task as you can imagine. So my first slide is just to remind you that indeed it’s more than 30 years of HIV science today. The virus was isolated at the Pasteur Institute in 1983, and you can see on this slide certainly not all the achievements that have been done over the 30 years. But, I like to show on this slide main progresses that have been done in basic research and in parallel the translation, let’s say, of this basis knowledge in tools for the benefit of patients. So in blue on this slide to be short you have the progresses that have been made in our basic knowledge on HIV. In green you have the tools that derived from those progresses. And in pink you have some success in prevention. Of course as you know we still do not have a vaccine and as you know we do not have a cure. However, we have because of our knowledge on HIV it has been able to develop a therapeutic strategy which is combined antiretroviral treatment which is capable to stop HIV replication in the infected patients. This treatment is also capable to restore at least partially immune function and at the end is capable to prevent the development of the disease AIDS. It has improved the quality of life, it prolongs the life expectancy. Even we can say today that if the treatment is started very early on, the life expectancy is almost the same as one of people that are not infected by HIV. We learnt all over the last years that the treatment is also prevention. It's capable to prevent the transmission of HIV from one infected individual on treatment to his or her partner. It has been a wonderful progress also in the access to the combined antiretroviral therapy in low and middle-income countries. This slide is reminding you that we have about 35 million people living with HIV, most of them are in sub-Saharan Africa. Fortunately this treatment, and really thanks to antiretroviral treatment, more than 4 million of deaths have been avoided. We have today around 10 million of people on treatment. This is not sufficient. As indicated on this slide, the last WHO guideline, published last year in July 2013, indicates that we have to treat earlier, that means we have around 26 million of people in need of treatment. This is a big challenge as you can imagine. So today we can say that in the field of HIV AIDS one of the first priorities is implementation: Implementation of tools to prevent new infection in uninfected people, of course using all the tools – combining the tools like education, condoms, circumcision, risk reduction, antiretroviral treatment -used as prevention today. We have also to improve testing, treating and retaining the patient into the treatment, the continuum of care. Unfortunately the cascade of continuum of care is indicating that the patients on long-term do not adhere to treatment. There is a loss. So it’s a loss which, according to the country, can be 25% to 50%. In addition we have between 30 and 50% of people that do not know that they are HIV positive - this is not acceptable today. So this is a real challenge. Among the challenges that are listed on this list you have the political willingness fighting against stigma and discrimination, which is very important if we want to improve the frequency of people going for the test. We have also key scientific challenges and priorities in HIV science today. I mentioned the biggest one, HIV discovery, of course. We are making significant progress in the field of HIV vaccine during the last years, in particular with the discovery of very potent broadly neutralising antibody, but we are not there yet. I mentioned comorbidity on long life treatment, because unfortunately long-term we can see between 8 to 15% of patients on treatments that develop what we call non-AIDS-related morbidities. And I will make a link by the way towards this challenge to the cure discovery itself. HIV cure is a very big challenge. We have a persistent infection on HAART and we have to understand how to manage to eliminate the virus, to eradicate the virus from the body. So for this challenge we need novel ideas; we need multidisciplinary collaboration; we need to have a partnership between the public and private sector; we need to have international collaboration and of course we need funding. Why do we need a cure? My first answer to that is generally because the patients are looking for it. My first thing when I met them in different countries in the world including in resource-limited settings as yet I always ask the question, “What are you expecting from us as scientists? in 80% of the cases they answer, they would like a treatment that we can stop. So that's as yet. That’s as yet, and this is exactly what Fred Verdult, a representative of people living with HIV, said to my colleague Steve Deeks in in St. Maarten in 2011. Saying to him, “Look I made a little survey in my country in Netherlands and found out that 72% of the people living with HIV are thinking it is very important for them to be cured.” And for reasons that are not exactly the same that Steve Deeks and many others were expecting, for example for them it was very important because they will not have to deal anymore with stigma; they will not be afraid anymore to infect other people. So we have to take this as a scientist into consideration. Why do we need a cure? It's because a lifelong treatment for all is unlikely to be sustainable. Of course we are all calling for universal access to antiretroviral treatment, however as I said only 10 million are on treatment today. For each 3 patients starting treatment we have 5 new cases of infection. We have only very few countries with the coverage of more than 80%. This lifelong treatment, as I mentioned, is with a difficult adherence; we have substantial stigma and discrimination fears; life expectancy is still reduced in a significant proportion of patients; and it’s a long-term cost. So we really need to think about other strategies. First of all we have to understand why - why the infection is persisting on HAART. This slide is showing you that the results, by way of different studies, trying to interrupt the treatment. And we were surprised in those studies to see a viral rebound as indicated on this slide. By looking more carefully, even if the patients who were on HAART had undetectable viral load measure by quantifying the viral RNA in the plasma, it turns out that we were able to detect HIV DNA in patient cells. So this is what we call the reservoirs. The reservoirs are the latently infected T cells. But we have also to consider that even on treatment we cannot exclude a residual low level of residual viral replication, which is related to inflammation, immune activation that remains abnormal in patients on HAART. We have to consider that latently infected cells are present in several compartments, including in the brain. We have to consider also the fact that the treatment not always penetrates very well in all of the tissues of the host. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research now? It's because also we have a better knowledge on HIV pathogenesis. I will not go into detail of this slide, but we certainly learned a lot over the years regarding the importance of immune activation, the importance of the persistence of infection. We know that very early on, as this slide is showing you, we have a loss of gut integrity and microbial translocations that probably play a role in abnormal immune activation and inflammation. We know that everything in this disease is decided very early on during the acute phase of infection, and the establishment of viral persistence and viral reservoir is really during this very early phase of infection. Abnormal inflammation is also starting during the early phase and infection is maintained, and both of them are interdependent. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research? It is also because we have a better knowledge on the molecular mechanism of HIV latency. This slide is a summary of the different mechanisms that should be considered for HIV latency, first of all as a sequestration of transcription factors but also as potential mechanism of latency. We have to consider the promoter occlusion, the convergent transcription, the defective transcription elongation factors, DNA methylation and chromatin silencing. All these mechanisms are certainly to be considered for the development of novel strategies for the future, but I must say we are still far to understand deeply all the mechanisms of latency and there is progress to be made in this area. We have a better knowledge on HIV reservoirs, which are indeed in many cell subsets and tissues. We know that the persistence and the stability of the reservoir is very long, since even after 10 years of HAART we can detect this reservoir. It was our belief that the CD4 cells that are latently infected by the virus were quite rare. The estimate was between 1/10^5 to 1/10^6 resting CD4 T cells. The very recent data indicates that indeed it's probably underestimated and we have probably more reservoir cells than we thought. What are the reservoir cells? The main reservoir is the resting central and transitional CD4 memory T cells. We have to consider the fact that the latent infection is also present in other cells like astrocytes, monocytes, myeloid lineage, hematopoietic progenitor cells as well. The compartments that contain the latently infected cells are not only the blood but the gut and genital tract, lymphoid tissue, the central nervous system. We are understanding also more and more about why the latently infected cells are persisting. We know that the cells by themselves, the CD4 cells are the long half-life CD4 cells that survive. We know today that there is a homeostatic proliferation of those cells. I explain why: we have the persistence of these latently infected cells. We have to consider immune mechanisms that maintain cells in the resting state, like for example an up-regulation of PD-1 which may contribute to HIV persistence. We are understanding also better and better the main driver of inflammation and chronic activation. I already mentioned microbial translocation but you can see on this slide that there are many other mechanisms like the altered balance of the CD4 T cells subset between T-regulatory T cell and Th17 for example; the loss of regulatory T cells; the role of viral protein like Nef, Tat or Vpx for example. The fact that other pathogens might play a role in this inflammation, like for example CMV coinfection. And this inflammation and activation is probably related to the comorbidities and ageing that we could see long-term in patients on HAART. Which kind of cure are we looking for? Generally when we are speaking about cure, we are speaking about eradication; eradication that means sterilising cure. So that means elimination of all latently infected cells. This is an almost impossible mission after what I said. However, we have one proof of concept: the Berlin patient who received a very complicated treatment bone marrow transplant from a particular donor with a mutation in the co-receptor CCF5 mutation which is present only in Caucasians. So it's not a strategy that can be used at large scale, but we cannot detect anymore the virus in different compartments of his body. Remission. Remission is probably our main goal, and it's more reasonable in my opinion. Remission that means that we will have a long-term health without any treatment, without any risk to transmit to others. And we have also proofs of concept. What are the proofs of concept? One of the first ones by the way, our natural protection against AIDS in African monkeys that do not develop AIDS as they have viral replication. They have attenuated inflammation, attenuated chronic immune activation. Bone marrow transplantation I already mentioned, the Berlin patient. We thought we will have 2 other cases with the Boston patients who received also a bone marrow transplant, however, we learnt after they stopped the treatment that unfortunately they had a relapse of HIV viremia We have HIV controllers, the people that are naturally controlling their infection: they never receive antiretroviral treatment; they have undetectable viral load, low size of reservoir; they have a very efficient suppressive CD8 response, correlated to HLA B27 and B57, so to a particular genetic background. They have also for some of them a capacity to restrict the infection of their CD4 cells and of their macrophages. Finally we have also the case of "functional" cure in very early treatment, the "Mississippi baby", probably you have heard of her from the media, she was treated 30 hours after birth, so very early on, for 18 months. Her mother stopped the treatment for 6 months, she came back and the virus was not detected anymore in the baby. In my country, in France, we, my group in collaboration with others, we identified a group of 14 patients, we have 20 patients today, treated very early on about 10 weeks during the primary infection for 3 years. They stopped the treatment. Now it's 9 years that they are without any treatment, they are doing perfectly well: They have low size of reservoir as well; they don’t have a strong CD8 suppressive response; they don’t have the same genetic background as the HIV controllers So we are trying to understand why - why these men were capable to control their infection. So that's the reason, we thought it was time at the International AIDS Society to accelerate research on HIV cure. I personally thought that the best way to go was to have a bottom-up approach and to really ask a group of scientists to work together and to define what are the main priorities to accelerate research on HIV cure. It's what we did, and we published in 2012, in Nature Review Immunology, a kind of scientific roadmap with the main priority in cure research. We can summarise them as 7 priorities which are shown on this slide: Starting from molecular and cellular and viral mechanisms of persistence that still need to be better understood; have a better understanding of tissue and cellular sources of persistent infection in animal models as well as in patients on long-term ART; to understand better the origins of immune activation and dysfunction in the presence of ART; to understand better the host and immune mechanisms that control HIV infection but still allow viral persistence; to have better assays to study and measure the reservoir; and to develop therapeutic strategies and immunological strategies to eliminate the latently infected cells in patients; and also to certainly enhance the host response to control replication. Where are we today? Can we cure HIV latency with "reactivation" drugs? Several drugs which are mentioned on this slide like NF-kappaB activators have been tried already. And the administration of the Vorinostat in a patient on HAART showed that we can reactivate the virus but indeed, when we measured recently, the size of the reservoir is the same. So it’s a little bit disappointing, I must say. So it's probably not enough. We need to ask the question: What proportion of the reservoir is susceptible to this drug? Are proteins of variants being produced on this kind of treatment? How safe is this approach? Can we cure HIV infection with immune-based therapy? We have some arguments to think that that might be the way to go. For example we know that the frequency of HIV DNA-containing resting memory cells correlates with the frequency of activated CD4 T cells. By the way we know in our patients that were treated earlier, the VISCONTI patients, that they have a very, very low level of inflammation and immune activation. We have this study with rapamycin, which reduces CCR5 expression and T cell activation and was associated with the lower size reservoir in post-renal transplant. So we have several questions that we are asking regarding immune-based therapy today. Can we enhance killing of HIV-infected cells by vaccine therapy in vivo? There is promising data like this study of Louis Picker in a macaque model, using a very highly pathogenic SIV and using as a vaccine CMV vector which is capable to induce a very high level of effector CD8 T cells in lymphoid and mucosa tissue and this study clearly showed that the CD8 response was capable to decrease the size of the reservoir in the monkey. So this is very promising. Probably... I'd like to say that regarding vaccine therapy: we have to consider also the antibodies. There is very promising data today with broadly neutralising antibodies, and I must say that the data also in macaques is very encouraging regarding the possibility from broadly neutralising antibodies to decreasing the size of the reservoirs. Finally can we cure HIV infection with allogeneic stem cell transplantation? I told you about the Boston patient - there are those gene therapies studies using for example CCR5-modified T cells that show some interesting data. But my question is whether gene modification of T cells for a cure is feasible? Can stem cells be harvested gene-modified and transplanted in a safe, effective, affordable, and scalable manner, especially in resource-limited settings? What are the barriers but new opportunities? We are very... there are new opportunities for clinical research toward a cure. I already mentioned some of them like the direct acting anti-latency drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs But we have to keep in mind that we really want a strategy that will be affordable as I say for resource-limited settings. The future cure strategy will probably be a combined approach with these different strategies I would like to say based certainly on our basic knowledge on the mechanism of persistence. Quantifying the reservoir and tools for cure studies are really something that we have to work on. I told you the Boston patient really said to us, you don’t have the right to measure the reservoirs. We need to understand the biology of HIV persistence as well for that. We need to have a biomarker to predict the efficacy of the functional cure. We need to have those markers to evaluate the impact of any intervention on the reservoirs. And based on those biomarkers, in the future, I would not be surprised to have an approach, let's say, towards a personalised cure therapy. So I will end by saying that what we need is really an integrated strategy with all the components Remember inflammation, as it was said yesterday, inflammation is critical in many diseases We have to work also with social scientists and scientists involved in economic science. We have to work together with the stakeholders, with the donors; and it's what we did at International Society by implementing an international Advisory Board responsible for implementing and following the strategy: to make funding, of course; to have a coordination in funding; and to make sure that we have international multidisciplinary collaboration at all the levels. I'd like to say that we might be successful, I'm sure we will be successful in a remission, in a chemical remission in the future, if we work all together as we did in the very early years of HIV research. It's what we are trying to do with my co-chair of the next conference in Melbourne, Sharon Lewin. I was glad to see in Lindau the strong implication of Australia. Sharon is from Melbourne, she will be as the Director of the Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. And I am pleased to say that we are used, with Sharon and Steve, to organise regularly now a meeting on HIV cure before the AIDS conference. Thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Stefan. Ich freue mich sehr darüber, diese Vormittagssitzung beginnen zu können und zum zweiten Mal hier in Lindau zu sein. Das ist eine wunderbare Tagung, und ich hoffe, Sie alle werden die Woche in Lindau genießen. Heute habe ich mich dazu entschlossen, nicht nur über meine Arbeit zu sprechen, sondern über die Arbeit vieler Menschen auf der ganzen Welt, die versuchen, ein Heilmittel gegen HIV zu finden. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das keine leichte Aufgabe. Mit meiner ersten Folie möchte ich Sie daran erinnern, dass wir heute tatsächlich schon auf über 30 Jahre HIV-Wissenschaft zurückblicken. Das Virus wurde 1983 im Institut Pasteur isoliert. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie bei weitem nicht alle Erfolge, die in diesen 30 Jahren erzielt wurden. Ich möchte jedoch auf der Folie die wichtigsten in der Grundlagenforschung erzielten Fortschritte darstellen, und parallel dazu die, sagen wir: Umsetzung dieses Grundlagenwissens zu Instrumenten, die dem Wohl der Patienten dienen. Um es kurz zu machen: In blauer Farbe sehen Sie auf dieser Folie die Fortschritte unseres Grundlagenwissens über HIV. In grün sehen Sie die Instrumente, die auf diese Fortschritte zurückzuführen sind. Und in pink sehen einige Erfolge bei der Prävention. Natürlich haben wir, wie Sie wissen, immer noch keinen Impfstoff und auch noch kein Heilmittel. Allerdings haben wir... aufgrund unserer Kenntnisse über HIV war es möglich, eine therapeutische Strategie zu entwickeln - es handelt sich um eine kombinierte antiretrovirale Therapie, mit der die HIV-Replikation bei den infizierten Patienten gestoppt werden kann. Diese Behandlung ist außerdem in der Lage, zumindest teilweise die Immunfunktion wiederherzustellen, wodurch letztlich die Entstehung der Krankheit AIDS verhindert werden kann. Die Lebensqualität hat sich dadurch verbessert, die Lebenserwartung wurde verlängert. Heute können wir sogar sagen, dass die Lebenserwartung, wenn man mit der Behandlung sehr früh beginnt, fast ebenso hoch ist wie die der nicht von HIV infizierten Menschen. In den vergangenen Jahren haben wir gelernt, dass die Behandlung auch präventiv wirkt. Sie ist in der Lage, die Übertragung des HIV von einer infizierten Person, die behandelt wird, auf den Partner oder die Partnerin zu verhindern. Auch was den Zugang zur kombinierten antiretroviralen Therapie in Ländern mit niedrigen und mittleren Einkommen betrifft, wurden sehr schöne Erfolge erzielt. Diese Folie soll Sie daran erinnern, dass ungefähr 35 Millionen Menschen mit HIV leben, die meisten von ihnen in Afrika südlich der Sahara. Glücklicherweise konnten dank dieser antiretroviralen Behandlung mehr als vier Millionen Menschen gerettet werden. Heute befinden sich etwa zehn Millionen Menschen in Behandlung. Das ist nicht genug. Wie aus dieser Folie ersichtlich, machte die letzte, im Juli 2013 veröffentlichte WHO-Richtlinie darauf aufmerksam, dass wir früher mit der Behandlung beginnen müssen. Das bedeutet, es gibt etwa 26 Millionen Menschen, die eine Behandlung benötigen. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das eine große Herausforderung. Heute können wir sagen, dass eine der obersten Prioritäten im Bereich HIV/AIDS die Umsetzung ist, also die Einführung von Instrumenten zur Verhinderung von Neuinfektionen bei nicht infizierten Menschen, wobei natürlich heute alle Instrumente - Bildung, Kondome, Beschneidung, Risikoreduzierung, antiretrovirale Behandlung - kombiniert zur Prävention eingesetzt werden. Daneben müssen wir die Testverfahren verbessern, außerdem die Behandlung selbst und die weitere Behandlung des Patienten - die Kontinuität der Betreuung. Leider deutet der Rückgang bei der Kontinuität der Betreuung darauf hin, dass die Patienten langfristig die Behandlung nicht durchhalten. Das ist ein Verlust - ein Verlust, der je nach Land 25 bis 50 Prozent betragen kann. Darüber hinaus wissen zwischen 30 und 50 Prozent der Menschen nicht, dass sie HIV-positiv sind - das ist heutzutage nicht hinnehmbar. Hierin liegt eine echte Herausforderung. Zu den auf dieser Liste aufgeführten Herausforderungen zählt der politische Wille, Stigmatisierung und Diskriminierung zu bekämpfen, was sehr wichtig ist, wenn wir erreichen wollen, dass sich die Menschen häufiger testen lassen. In der HIV-Wissenschaft von heute gibt es wichtige wissenschaftliche Herausforderungen und Prioritäten. Ich habe die größte schon erwähnt - natürlich die Entdeckung von HIV. Auf dem Gebiet des HIV-Impfstoffs hatten wir in den letzten Jahren erhebliche Fortschritte zu verzeichnen, insbesondere mit der Entdeckung der äußerst wirksamen breit neutralisierenden Antikörper, aber wir sind noch nicht am Ziel. Ich erwähnte Komorbidität bei einer langfristigen Behandlung - leider stellen wir fest, dass sich bei acht bis 15 Prozent der behandelten Patienten die so genannten Nicht-AIDS-definierenden Erkrankungen entwickeln. Ich werde übrigens eine Verknüpfung mit der Herausforderung der Entdeckung eines Heilmittels herstellen. Die Heilung von HIV ist eine sehr große Herausforderung. HAART ändert ja nichts an der Infektion; wir müssen verstehen, wie wir es schaffen können, das Virus zu eliminieren, das Virus aus dem Körper zu entfernen. Für diese Aufgabe bedarf es neuer Ideen; es bedarf einer multidisziplinären Zusammenarbeit; es bedarf einer Partnerschaft zwischen dem öffentlichen und dem privaten Sektor; es bedarf einer internationalen Zusammenarbeit, und natürlich bedarf es finanzieller Mittel. Warum brauchen wir überhaupt ein Heilmittel? Meine erste Antwort darauf lautet im Allgemeinen: Weil es sich die Patienten wünschen. Wenn ich mit ihnen in verschiedenen Ländern der Welt zusammentreffe, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden, stelle ich bisher als Erstes immer die Frage: Und sie sagen...in 80 Prozent der Fälle antworten sie, sie hätten gerne eine Behandlung, die man beenden kann. Bisher ist das so. Bisher ist das eben so, und das ist genau das, was Fred Verdult, ein Vertreter von mit HIV lebenden Menschen, 2011 in St. Maarten zu meinem Kollegen Steve Deeks sagte. Er sagte: Das Ergebnis war: Und zwar aus Gründen, die nicht genau jenen entsprechen, welche Steve Deeks und viele andere erwartet hatten. Zum Beispiel wäre die Heilung für sie deshalb wichtig, weil sie dann nicht mehr mit der Stigmatisierung leben müssten, und sie müssten keine Angst mehr davor haben, andere Menschen zu infizieren. Als Wissenschaftler müssen wir das berücksichtigen. Warum benötigen wir ein Heilmittel? Weil eine lebenslange Behandlung für alle wahrscheinlich nicht nachhaltig ist. Natürlich fordern wir alle weltweiten Zugang zur antiretroviralen Behandlung, aber wie ich schon sagte: Nur zehn Millionen befinden sich heute in Behandlung. Auf drei Patienten, die mit der Behandlung beginnen, kommen fünf neue Ansteckungsfälle. Nur in sehr wenigen Ländern haben wir eine Abdeckung von mehr als 80 Prozent. Diese lebenslange Behandlung ist, wie erwähnt, schwer durchzuhalten, es gibt beträchtliche Stigmatisierungs- und Diskriminierungsängste, die Lebenserwartung ist bei einem erheblichen Teil der Patienten noch immer verkürzt, und es fallen langfristig Kosten an. Wir müssen also wirklich über andere Strategien nachdenken. Zuallererst müssen wir verstehen, warum die Infektion mit HAART fortbesteht. Diese Folie zeigt ihnen - anhand verschiedener Studien - die Resultate nach Versuchen, die Behandlung abzusetzen. Und wir waren überrascht, dass sich in diesen Studien, wie aus der Folie ersichtlich, ein viraler Rebound zeigte. Bei genauerem Hinsehen erwies es sich, dass wir selbst dann in der Lage waren, HIV-DNA in den Zellen der mit HAART behandelten Patienten nachzuweisen, wenn sich bei diesen Patienten eine Viruslast durch Quantifizierung der viralen DNA nicht nachweisen ließ. Wir nennen das die Reservoire. Die Reservoire sind die latent infizierten T-Zellen. Wir müssen aber auch berücksichtigen, dass wir selbst während einer Behandlung eine geringfügige residuale virale Replikation nicht ausschließen können - im Zusammenhang mit einer Entzündung/Immunaktivierung, die bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten nach wie vor krankhaft ist. Wir müssen berücksichtigen, dass sich latent infizierte Zellen in verschiedenen Kompartimenten befinden, auch im Gehirn. Wir müssen außerdem die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die Behandlung nicht immer gut in das gesamte Gewebe eindringt. Warum ist es jetzt an der Zeit, die Erforschung eines HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Weil wir eine bessere Kenntnis von der HIV-Pathogenese haben. Auf die Einzelheiten dieser Folie will ich nicht eingehen, aber wir haben im Laufe der Jahre eine Menge über die Bedeutung der Immunaktivierung, über die Bedeutung des Fortbestehens der Infektion gelernt. Wir wissen, dass ganz zu Beginn, wie Sie aus dieser Folie ersehen, ein Verlust der Darmintegrität auftritt; außerdem mikrobielle Translokationen, die wahrscheinlich bei krankhafter Immunaktivierung/Entzündung eine Rolle spielen. Wir wissen, dass sich bei dieser Krankheit alles sehr früh entscheidet, während der akuten Phase der Infektion, und dass die Viruspersistenz ebenso wie das virale Reservoir während dieser ersten Frühphase der Infektion entsteht. Die abnormale Entzündung beginnt ebenfalls während der Frühphase, während die Infektion unabhängig davon fortbesteht. Warum ist es an der Zeit, die Erforschung des HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Auch deshalb, weil wir besser über die molekularen Mechanismen der HIV-Latenz Bescheid wissen. Diese Folie enthält eine Zusammenfassung der verschiedenen Mechanismen, die im Rahmen der HIV-Latenz zu berücksichtigen sind - zunächst als Ausschluss von Transkriptionsfaktoren, aber auch als potentieller Mechanismus der Latenz. Wir müssen den Verschluss des Promotors berücksichtigen, die konvergente Transkription, die defekte Transkription, Elongationsfaktoren, DNA-Methylierung und Chromatin Silencing. All diese Mechanismen sind natürlich bei der Entwicklung neuer Strategien für die Zukunft zu berücksichtigen. Ich muss aber sagen, dass wir noch weit davon entfernt sind, alle Latenzmechanismen wirklich zu verstehen; auf diesem Gebiet liegt noch ein weiter Weg vor uns. Besser Bescheid wissen wir über HIV-Reservoire, die in vielen Zell-Subpopulationen und Geweben zu finden sind. Wir wissen, dass Persistenz und Stabilität des Reservoirs sehr langlebig sind, da wir dieses Reservoir selbst nach einer zehnjährigen HAART-Behandlung immer noch nachweisen können. Wir waren der Ansicht, dass die vom Virus latent befallenen CD4-Zellen selten sind - die Schätzungen reichten von 1*10^5 bis 1*10^6 ruhenden CD4-T-Zellen. Die jüngsten Daten weisen indes darauf hin, dass ihre Menge wahrscheinlich unterschätzt wurde und es wohl mehr Reservoirzellen gibt als wir dachten. Was sind diese Reservoirzellen? Das Hauptreservoir besteht aus den ruhenden Zentralzellen und den transitionalen CD4-T-Gedächtniszellen. Wir müssen die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die latente Infektion auch andere Zellen befällt, etwa Astrozyten, Monozyten, Myeloidlinien und hämatopoetische Vorläuferzellen. Bei den Kompartimenten, welche die latent infizierten Zellen enthalten, handelt es sich nicht nur um das Blut, sondern auch um den Darm und den Genitaltrakt, Lymphgewebe, das zentrale Nervensystem... Wir verstehen auch immer besser, warum die latent infizierten Zellen so hartnäckig sind. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen selbst, dass diejenigen Zellen, die überleben, die CD4-Zellen mit den langen Halbwertszeiten sind. Wir wissen heute, dass sich diese Zellen homöostatisch ausbreiten. Ich erkläre auch, warum: Wir sehen die Persistenz dieser latent infizierten Zellen. Wir müssen Immunmechanismen in Betracht ziehen, welche die Zellen im ruhenden Zustand belassen, wie zum Beispiel eine Hochregulierung von PD-1, die zur HIV-Persistenz beitragen könnte. Auch die Hauptursache von Entzündungen und chronischer Aktivierung verstehen wir immer besser. Mikrobielle Translokation habe ich schon erwähnt, doch auf dieser Folie können Sie sehen, dass es noch viele andere Mechanismen gibt, wie zum Beispiel das gestörte Gleichgewicht zwischen der Subpopulation von CD4-T-Zellen, den regulatorischen T-Zellen, und den Th17-Zellen; der Verlust von regulatorischen T-Zellen; die Rolle von viralen Proteinen wie Nef, Tat oder Vpx. Die Tatsache, dass für die Entzündung andere Pathogene eine Rolle spielen könnten, zum Beispiel eine CMV-Koinfektion. Und diese Entzündung bzw. Aktivierung hängt wahrscheinlich mit den Komorbiditäten und dem Alterungsprozess zusammen, die wir langfristig bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten beobachten könnten. Welche Art von Heilung schwebt uns vor? Wenn wir von Heilung sprechen, dann sprechen wir im Allgemeinen von Eradikation; Eradikation bedeutet sterilisierende Heilung. Das wiederum heißt: Eliminierung aller latent infizierten Zellen. Nach allem, was ich gesagt habe, ist das eine fast unmögliche Mission. Es gibt allerdings einen Machbarkeitsnachweis: den Berlin-Patienten, der einer sehr komplizierten Behandlung unterzogen wurde - einer Knochenmarktransplantation von einem besonderen Spender mit einer Mutation des Korezeptors CCF5. Diese Mutation gibt es nur bei Weißen, weshalb das keine in großem Maßstab einsetzbare Strategie ist. Aber wir können das Virus in den verschiedenen Kompartimenten seines Körpers nicht mehr nachweisen. Remission. Remission ist wohl unser Hauptziel, und meiner Ansicht nach ist es auch das vernünftigere. Remission bedeutet, es gibt eine lange gesunde Phase ohne Behandlung, ohne das Risiko der Übertragung auf Andere. Und auch hier gibt es Machbarkeitsnachweise. Was hat es mit diesen Machbarkeitsnachweisen auf sich? Einer der ersten ist der natürliche Schutz vor AIDS bei afrikanischen Affen, die kein AIDS bekommen - es gibt virale Replikation, die Entzündung ist schwächer, ebenso die chronische Immunaktivierung. Knochenmarktransplantation habe ich schon erwähnt, der Berlin-Patient. Wir dachten schon, wir hätten zwei weitere Fälle - die Boston-Patienten, die ebenfalls eine Knochenmarktransplantation erhielten. Nachdem sie die Behandlung abgesetzt hatten, erfuhren wir aber leider, dass sie einen Rückfall erlitten hatten, die HIV-Viräme war zurückgekehrt - daraus haben wir übrigens gelernt, dass die Technik, die uns zur Messung des viralen Reservoirs zur Verfügung steht, bei weitem nicht ausreicht. Es gibt die HIV-Kontrolleure, jene Menschen, die ihre Infektion auf natürliche Weise in Schach halten: Sie werden niemals antiretroviral behandelt; die Viruslast ist nicht nachweisebar, das Reservoir ist klein; sie verfügen über eine äußerst effiziente suppressive CD8-Reaktion, die mit HLA B27 und B57 korreliert, also mit einem besonderen genetischen Hintergrund. Einige von ihnen verfügen außerdem über die Fähigkeit, die Infektion ihrer CD4-Zellen und ihrer Makrophagen einzuschränken. Schließlich gibt es den Fall einer "funktionalen" Heilung bei einer sehr frühen Behandlung - das Mississippi-Baby, das Sie wahrscheinlich aus den Medien kennen. Das Mädchen wurde schon 30 Stunden nach der Geburt behandelt, also sehr früh, und dann 18 Monate lang. Ihre Mutter setzte die Behandlung für sechs Monate ab; danach kam sie zurück, und das Virus konnte in ihrem Baby nicht mehr nachgewiesen werden. In meinem Land, in Frankreich, stellten wir - meine Gruppe in Zusammenarbeit mit anderen - eine Gruppe von 14 Patienten zusammen; heute haben wir 20 Patienten...wir behandelten sie sehr frühzeitig, in den ersten zehn Wochen nach der Primärinfektion und dann drei Jahre lang. Sie setzten die Behandlung ab. Jetzt sind sie schon seit neun Jahren ohne jede Behandlung, und es geht ihnen ausgezeichnet. Ihr Reservoir ist ebenfalls klein. Ihre suppressive CD8-Reaktion ist nicht sehr stark; sie haben also nicht den gleichen genetischen Hintergrund wie die HIV-Kontrolleure - ihr genetischer Hintergrund, HLA-B35, wird sogar im Allgemeinen mit einem schnellen Fortschreiten der Krankheit in Verbindung gebracht. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, warum das so ist - warum diese Männer in der Lage sind, ihre Infektion zu kontrollieren. Das ist der Grund dafür, weshalb es unserer Ansicht nach an der Zeit ist, bei der International AIDS Society auf eine Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung zu drängen. Ich persönlich bin der Meinung, dass die beste Vorgehensweise darin besteht, einen "Bottom-up"-Ansatz zu verfolgen und eine Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern darum zu bitten, zusammenzuarbeiten und zu definieren, worin für sie die Hauptprioritäten einer Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung liegen. Das haben wir auch gemacht, und im Jahr 2012 veröffentlichten wir in Nature Review Immunology so etwas wie eine wissenschaftliche Roadmap mit den Hauptprioritäten bei der Heilungsforschung. Wir können sieben Prioritäten benennen, die auf dieser Folie dargestellt sind: Beginnend mit molekularen, zellulären und viralen Persistenzmechanismen, die wir immer noch nicht gut genug verstehen. Dann ein besseres Verständnis von den Gewebe- und Zellquellen einer persistenten Infektion sowohl bei Versuchstieren als auch bei Patienten, die langfristig mit ART behandelt werden; ein besseres Verständnis von den Ursprüngen der Immunaktivierung und -dysfunktion bei der Behandlung mit ART; ein besseres Verständnis von den Wirts- und Immunmechanismen, die eine HIV-Infektion trotz viraler Persistenz kontrollieren; bessere Proben zur Untersuchung und Messung des Reservoirs; die Entwicklung therapeutischer immunologischer Strategien zur Eliminierung der latent infizierten Zellen in den Patienten; und natürlich die Verbesserung der Wirtsreaktion zur Kontrolle der Replikation. Wo stehen wir heute? Können wir HIV-Latenz mit "Reaktivierungs"-Medikamenten heilen? Verschiedene, auf dieser Folie stehende Medikamente wie etwa NF-kappaB-Aktivatoren, wurden bereits getestet. Und die Behandlung eines HAART-Patienten mit Vorinostat hat gezeigt, dass wir das Virus reaktivieren können - als wir allerdings vor kurzem die Größe des Reservoirs maßen, war sie unverändert. Ich muss sagen, das ist ein bisschen enttäuschend. Es reicht also wahrscheinlich nicht. Wir müssen uns die Frage stellen: Welcher Teil des Reservoirs spricht auf dieses Medikament an? Werden bei dieser Art von Behandlung Proteine oder Virionen produziert? Wie sicher ist diese Methode? Können wir die HIV-Infektion mit einer immunbasierten Therapie heilen? Einige Gesichtspunkte sprechen dafür, dass dies der richtige Weg sein könnte. Wir wissen zum Beispiel, dass die Häufigkeit der ruhenden Zellen, die HIV-DNA enthalten, mit der Häufigkeit aktivierter CD4-T-Zellen korreliert. Übrigens wissen wir, dass die Entzündungen und die Immunaktivierung bei unseren früh behandelten Patienten, den VISCONTI-Patienten, sehr geringfügig sind. Es gibt diese Studie mit Rapamycin, das die CCR5-Expression ebenso wie die T-Zellen-Aktivierung reduziert und mit den kleineren Reservoiren nach Nierentransplantationen in Verbindung gebracht wurde. Es gibt also verschiedene Fragen, die sich uns heute im Hinblick auf die immunbasierte Therapie stellen. Können wir die Abtötung HIV-infizierter Zellen durch Impftherapien in vivo verbessern? Es gibt vielversprechende Daten wie etwa diese Studie von Louis Picker an einem Makaken. Er setzt ein in hohem Maße pathogenes SIV ein, und als Impfstoff verwendet er einen CMV-Vektor, der in der Lage ist, CD8-T-Effektorzellen in großen Mengen in das Lymph- und Schleimhautgewebe einzubringen. Diese Studie hat deutlich gezeigt, dass die CD8-Reaktion in der Lage ist, das Reservoir im Affen zu verkleinern. Das ist also sehr vielversprechend. Wahrscheinlich...Ich möchte noch Folgendes zur Impftherapie sagen: Wir dürfen auch die Antikörper nicht vergessen. Heute gibt es sehr vielversprechende Daten über breit neutralisierende Antikörper, und ich muss sagen, dass auch die Daten der Makaken sehr ermutigend sind, was die Möglichkeit einer Verkleinerung des Reservoirs durch breit neutralisierende Antikörper betrifft. Und schließlich - können wir die HIV-Infektion durch allogene Stammzellentransplantation heilen? Ich habe Ihnen vom Boston-Patienten erzählt - es gibt Gentherapiestudien, zum Beispiel mit CCR5-modifizierten T-Zellen, die einige interessante Daten hervorbringen. Meine Frage geht aber dahin, ob die Genmodifizierung von T-Zellen als Therapie machbar ist? Können Stammzellen genmodifiziert gewonnen und auf sichere, effektive, kostengünstige und skalierbare Art und Weise transplantiert werden, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden? Welche Hindernisse gibt es? Welche neuen Möglichkeiten? Wir sind sehr...es gibt neue Möglichkeiten einer klinischen, auf Heilung gerichteten Forschung. Einige davon habe ich bereits erwähnt, etwa die direkt wirkenden Antilatenz-Medikamente, entzündungshemmende Medikamente - derzeit laufen Studien; therapeutische Impfung und Zelltherapie. Wir müssen aber immer im Auge behalten, dass wir unbedingt eine Strategie brauchen, die man sich in ressourcenknappen Gegenden leisten kann. Die Heilungsstrategie der Zukunft ist wahrscheinlich ein aus diesen verschiedenen Strategien kombinierter Ansatz sicherlich basierend auf unserem Grundwissen über den Mechanismus der Persistenz. Studien über die Quantifizierung des Reservoirs und über Mittel zur Heilung sind sicherlich etwas, woran wir arbeiten müssen. Der Boston-Patient sagte zu uns: Sie haben nicht das richtige Werkzeug zur Messung des Reservoirs. Hierfür müssen wir auch die Biologie der HIV-Persistenz verstehen. Wir brauchen Biomarker, um Prognosen über die Wirksamkeit der funktionellen Heilung treffen zu können. Wir brauchen diese Marker zur Beurteilung der Auswirkung von Interventionen am Reservoir. Und ich wäre ich nicht überrascht, wenn uns künftig basierend auf diesen Biomarkern die Methode einer personalisierten Heilungstherapie zur Verfügung stünde. Abschließend möchte ich sagen, dass wir eine integrierte Strategie mit all diesen Komponenten benötigen - Grundlagenforschung, klinische Forschung, alles zusammen; doch wir müssen auch mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Denken Sie an Entzündungen; wie gestern ausgeführt wurde, sind Entzündungen bei vielen Krankheiten von entscheidender Bedeutung. Wir müssen also mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen auch mit Sozialwissenschaftlern und Wirtschaftswissenschaftlern zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen mit den Wirtschaftsbeteiligten zusammenarbeiten, mit den Spendern. Das haben wir bei der International Society beherzigt; wir bildeten einen internationalen Beirat, der für die Umsetzung und Verfolgung dieser Strategie zuständig ist: Mittel beschaffen natürlich; die Beschaffung der Mittel koordinieren und sicherstellen dass wir auf allen Ebenen international und multidisziplinär zusammenarbeiten. Ich möchte sagen, dass wir Erfolg haben können. Ich bin sicher, dass wir mit einer Remission, einer chemischen Remission erfolgreich sein werden, wenn wir alle zusammenarbeiten, so wie wir das in den ersten Jahren der HIV-Forschung getan haben. Das ist es, was wir zusammen mit Sharon Lewis, die mit mir zusammen die nächste Konferenz in Melbourne leiten wird, erreichen wollen. Mit Freuden habe ich in Lindau den starken australischen Einfluss wahrgenommen. Sharon ist aus Melbourne, sie wird Direktorin des Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. Und ich freue mich Ihnen mitteilen zu können, dass wir mittlerweile zusammen mit Sharon und Steve vor der AIDS-Konferenz regelmäßige Tagungen zur HIV-Heilung veranstalten. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2014): On The Road Toward an HIV Cure
(00:09:58 - 00:12:41)

The complete video is available here.

Towards a Cure for AIDS?

While we have made great strides in treating and managing HIV, we are still – decades after the discovery of the HIV virus as the cause of AIDS – lacking a vaccine that might completely eradicate AIDS. Here again, HIV’s high rate of mutation has proved very difficult to surmount. However, there are also other reasons as discussed by Rolf M. Zinkernagel in his lecture from 2007.

Rolf Zinkernagel (2007) - Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?

HANS JÖRNVALL. …the scientific talks in the series. And the speaker is Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. He is from the Institute of Experimental Immunology at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. And he received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1996. And the quotation was 'for the discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence'. And we now continue that subject in the title of his talk, why we do not have a vaccine against HIV or tuberculosis yet. Please, Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thanks very much for the invitation to come and talk to you today. And it’s a pleasure to be here to talk about a, I think very important problem. Why do we have excellent vaccines against most acute childhood infections such as tetanus, diphtheria, smallpox, measles, polio and so on. And why haven’t we succeeded in developing a vaccine that protects against tuberculosis, HIV, hepatitis C, malaria, schistosomiasis, leishmaniosis and you name it. The reason why we don’t have these vaccines is, first and above all, that co-evolution, that is the balance between infectious agents and us as vertebrate hosts haven’t in a way foreseen a solution that could be easily corrected or let’s say improved by a vaccine. In contrast against acute cytopathic types, acute killer types of infections, evolution had to find a very efficient solution. And I’ve tried to summarise some of these very general aspects in this slide. If we talk about immunity and not immunology - and there is a big difference, you know - immunity is about protection via specific immune reactivity by vertebrate hosts against basically infectious agents. Now, most of immunology actually deals with so called small chemical groups called haptens or sheep red blood cells or similar things. And of course the difference between infectious agents and these model types of antigens is simply that infectious agents kill and model antigens don’t. And therefore you can measure many things, you know, with these surrogate model systems, but you very often cannot measure what really matters in life, namely to avoid disease and certainly to avoid death before the age of 25. Because if you die after 25, you know, it doesn’t really matter, because by that time you have done your biological function, which is to create the next generation. And all the rest doesn’t really matter. Now you see immediately the solution to the question I raised. If you get killed between, let’s say before you are 15 or 18, then you are out of evolution. If you get killed after 25, doesn’t matter. So it’s interesting to recognise that, besides specific immune responses, there is a whole gamut and background of resistance mechanisms which are very important and in fact cover let’s say 95 or more percent of our resistance mechanisms. And they include for example interferon alpha. There have been models created in mice where the interferon alpha receptor is lacking. These mice die of viral infections if they see a virus at 10 metres distance. So without interferon there is no way to survive, and so on, there are many incidences. I will not talk about these innate or natural resistance mechanisms. There are however highly specific adaptive types of immune mechanism, including antibodies and cell mediated immunity. And there it is interesting to note that antibodies are actually at high concentrations and in enormous amounts, for example in chicken eggs, actually also in reptile eggs, in fish eggs. Why is that, why should the mother hen hand over grams of immunoglobulin, of antibodies to the offspring. And this question I think is very interesting. Then we also can recognise that all the vaccines that are successful protect via antibodies. There is not a single vaccine that protects us from the consequences of infection via cell mediated immunity. Which of course would be necessary if we were to develop a vaccine against tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, schisostomiasis and so on. But so far we haven’t succeeded, although many people promised, you know, within the past 10 years we should have developed HIV or TB vaccines. Then there’s another very general observation that autoimmunity, that is the deviation of the immune system to start attacking our own antigens or organs, resulting in let’s say diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis and so on. Actually these diseases, in very general terms, come up let’s say after 25. And this fits again with what I’ve, oversimplified stated before, that after 25 it doesn’t really matter what happens. The other point is that female people are much more susceptible to so called autoimmune disease, particularly if the autoimmune disease is dependent on autoantibodies. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus and so on. Then of course tumours also come up after 25 or 30, and this again would correlate with the fact that it doesn’t matter. Of course individually it matters but in terms of overall population balance it doesn’t. And the question there arises of course in parallel with tuberculosis and HIV, why are we so inefficient in using immune responses against tumours to actually change the tumour prognoses and outcome. And above all is the question, you know, does that failure to come up with solutions to this HIV, TB vaccine problem, have something to do with the way we measure things. We can measure many things, in fact we can measure more things than ever before. And molecular measurements just make measurements more easy and more accurate. But it doesn’t solve the problem whether what we measure is really what we should measure. And I think in terms of medical disease it’s very simple what we should measure. Either this disease is ameliorated, is improved, is less severe or death is avoided, or not. All the rest is in a way, from a medical point of view, rather not so important. So let me now get into matters directly, give you my biased view of the functioning of the immune system, then get into some peculiarities of the virus host relationships and then go into ideas and concepts about vaccines which include of course the idea of immunological memory. Now, memory, you know, is something very interesting, because that’s what you lose when you age. But immunological memory seems to persist for the rest of our lives. So once having had a disease will cover you and protect you for the rest of your life. How is that guaranteed and how does that function? Of course, there are two very extreme interpretations. Either you can remember like with your neuronal networks, or it’s not true and in fact neuronal memory isn’t really understood. So there are some postulates that in fact, to keep up your memory, you need to see or reencounter the same thing, you know repeatedly, be it during your dreaming time or your wake time. And it’s only this repetitiveness of encountering certain inputs that keeps your memory up, that’s certainly true for myself. But immunology of course, the idea of memory says ‘once seen, always remembered’. Measles virus, once contracted as a child, you’re resistant against measles virus infections disease, for the rest of the life. And the question is, is that some sort of mystical type of interaction or mechanism, network or is it simply that measles virus persists in fragments in our body to keep the immune system sort of reminded by boosting it all over the years. And that of course isn’t really what we understand academically or theoretically from memory, it would be simply an antigen driven process. And of course if that were the explanation, then you would have to rethink about the way we make vaccines, because if vaccines cannot imitate that situation, that is persist at a very low level, that is innocuous, but keeps driving the immune response at a sufficiently high level, then we have a problem. And my conclusion will be that for TB, HIV, malaria, schisto and so on, we actually would need a vaccine of that type. Ok, so the problem is summarised here, infections basically destroy host cells very efficiently, like in this case, pox virus, smallpox or polio or rabies would do that within a few hours after infecting a cell. And of course, in this case the only thing that can lead to the survival of the host is immediate rejection of that infection within a few days. Because if that continues for more than 7 to 10 days, then the chances of these types of agents hitting neurons is so high that you die. And of course this situation, where a virus infects a cell but leaves the physiology of that cell rather and largely intact, doesn’t need immunology because the virus actually doesn’t cause primarily any harm. And many more viruses actually belong to that category than to this. Because it is not in the prime interest of an infectious agent to kill all hosts. Because if all hosts are killed, then the virus by definition is gone as well, because the virus needs living cells to replicate. So it’s relatively easy. So that’s why here immunology plays a major role. In fact here immunology doesn’t play a role and most of these viruses jump from one infected subject to the next before or at birth. And why is that? Because before birth the offspring doesn’t have a functioning immune system, actually at birth the immune system doesn’t function, isn’t mature. So this is our optimal time for these agents to jump. And there are examples of that, HIV, for example, jumps, usually at birth, with that small blood transfusion from the mother to the offspring. And the mother of course is a carrier because her immune response against that virus infection is inadequate. Well, for HIV, I will come back to that, the problem hasn’t been solved yet, as you know, because it is a new or emerging virus. So the co-adaptation of host and virus hasn’t happened. But eventually it will end up like HIV 2, you know, the West African form of HIV infection, where it is very clear that the balance between host and virus has already reached a very balanced situation, in fact HIV 2 doesn’t make people sick or doesn’t kill them. So it’s just a matter of time. But in this case what is interesting is if now an immune response comes along, like a T cell, a solo immune response, then you see immediately it’s not the virus that causes the tissue and organ failure, it’s actually the immune response because this immune response now kills infected host cells that otherwise wouldn’t be killed by the infection. And this we call immunopathology, that is an immune response with pathological consequences where in fact there wouldn't need to be such a confrontation. And that’s why these agents jump at a time when there is no immune response. Now, I try to illustrate the same aspect with this cartoon. Just try to follow. If you take a virus that jumps through the placenta or at birth, then this virus will be all over the host and this antigen or this virus will behave like a self antigen. Because it was there before birth, it was there at birth, and therefore these viral antigens are considered from the functioning immune system as self. Because if that were not so, then the immune response would be against all these host infected cells and this would result in a graph versus host type immunopathology, and in fact the patient wouldn’t survive. The other extreme is this, I’ve just depicted here an infection with papillomavirus, which is a virus that infects the outer most types of cells of the skin. And expresses the viral antigens only in matured keratinocytes. Now, this is a localisation that is so far out of the immune system, namely lymph nodes or spleen or the blood circulation, that the immune system doesn’t even notice that there is an infection going on in the skin. And therefore the immune response doesn’t happen very quickly, in fact it may take months, as you may well remember from your own warts you may have had, you know, where it takes weeks to months, if not years, to get rid of these warts, eventually these warts will disappear. That means if an antigen, even an infectious agents antigen is outside of the reach of lymph nodes or spleen or the so called secondary organised lymphatic tissues, then there is no immune response. And the antigen, the viral antigen even has to reach draining lymph nodes or the spleen to get a response induced. And of course this happens with warts, if your dear doctor scraps off the warts or cauterises them with hot needles to get rid of these warts. And that’s exactly what you do, you create a wound where cells get necrotic, these cells are picked up by macrophages, the necrotic cells, these bring the antigen to the draining lymph node and now an immune response is improved or accelerated. And of course the usual classical situation is depicted here. The virus, let’s say hits you on the big toe or in your mucosal surfaces, and from there the infection spreads to the draining lymph nodes and eventually via viremia to the spleen. And you know the classical rashes after measles or smallpox correspond to this viremicspread. And this staggered spread of the virus to the draining lymph node and then to the spleen actually amplifies the immune response because once in the lymph node the immune response immediately starts within 2 days or 3 days. The T cells and the antibody producing cells get amplified and by the time there is a viremic spread, this amplification already of the immune response will catch up with the systemic spread and will prevent, and this is the key, will prevent the virus spreading to the brain, because that’s the end of it, once the virus is in a neuron, that’s it. And rabies, tollwut, is of course a classical example, where the virus hits a neuron. Once in, you can’t do much about it. So let’s now take two extreme forms of infections. One being the rabies-like infection of a very close relative to rabies, it’s called vesicular stomatitis virus, which in mice causes a form of rabies because it’s strictly neurotrophic. What you see is the virus replicates, you get T cell responses and you get antibody responses. And you get basically two types, neutralising, that is they can protect you and you get ELISA, that is binding types of antibodies. And they are virtually coincident. If you take a non cytopathic virus type, HIV or hepatitis C and so on, you find that the virus replicates, there’s a good T cell response and actually the T cell response initially that controls the virus load down to undetectable levels. Undetectable means by conventional means you can’t detect it, but it also means that in fact it always persists at very low levels. Now, what is important is that the ELISA, that is, you know, sticking antigens on plastic plates, you can always measure antibodies very early, about as early as for these acute killer viruses. But the neutralising, the protective antibodies take between 80 and 300 days to come up. Now, of course you can ask why should this mouse or human make neutralising antibodies That’s the best sign actually that the virus is never gone completely. So the fact is that eventually neutralising or protective antibodies come up, and this is true for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, malaria, all these persisting chronic types of infections have basically this pattern. Remember it’s crucial that the T cell response comes up early because that’s the mechanism that really reduces viral loads initially drastically. And if that doesn’t happen, basically the virus goes all over the infected host. Now, if a virus needs 100 days for protective antibodies to come up, does it always happen? Yes, it happens always. But in the meantime these viruses or agents, malaria, have started to replicate, every replication of course increases chances of mutations and they mutate in particular also their neutralising antibody target antigens, so the neutralising determinant. And this is illustrated here. So we have this non-cytopathic virus, it replicates,it’s controlled largely by these T cell mediated immunity. You cannot measure it for let’s say 30, 40 days, but then very often the virus is controlled for the rest of the mouse’s life or the human life. But in some cases the virus comes up again. Now, this is strange, isn’t it, because before that point in time there was a very good efficient T cell immune response that controlled the virus. What happens? Well, around this time, 80 days or so, the neutralising antibodies, the protective antibody response has come up. And it is this T cell response plus the neutralising antibody response in these individuals that keeps the virus below detection. In these cases, these are all neutralising antibody escape mutants. So let’s take the open square virus, take the serum from that mouse, test it for neutralising protective capacity against the open square virus and you find that this serum cannot neutralise the open square virus. Of course this is understandable,viraemia in the presence of all sorts of neutralising antibodies, but not against that particular variant or selectant. But take this serum of that mouse, that is inefficient against this open square virus, and test it against the original virus you stuck into the mouse or against all the other variants or these controlled viruses, and you find that this serum actually is efficient in neutralising all these other variants. So you can repeat that experiment that was done by … (inaudible25:20), and you find that in fact each of these individual viruses, and we have only gone about to 20 or 30, is distinct. So the anti open square serum does not work against this one but against most others. And the controllers down here, in fact this serum has neutralising activity against most of the variants, which means that the virus within one individual changes all the time, mutates and the host makes neutralising antibodies, in fact often very sufficient and efficient, as in this case. But in some cases the relative kinetics between virus mutation and growth, and the slowly developing neutralising antibodies is such that the virus finds the loopholes through which it can escape and this will determine the balance. Now, of course you may want to ask, why should then the T cell response, which has been mounted in this early phase, not be efficient against all these upcoming variant viruses? Well, the conclusion and the answer is very simple: Many mice will die in this period of time, similar to HIV-AIDS, because the T cell immune response destroys infected host cells and the large part of the HIV-AIDS type of disease is in fact immune destruction of virus-infected host cells. And this will result in the death of the patient or at least severe disease. And only in some cases will the T cells actually be deleted, disappear, and thereby the immunopathology gets reduced or eliminated and the end effect is that the virus basically wins, stays, but since the T cell response has gone, nobody cares because the virus itself doesn’t really do much harm. Again I say, HIV 1 isn’t quite there yet, but HIV 2 basically seems to have chosen this outcome. And of course the next question is where does the virus hide, since you say it’s below control. Now, where can you control for virus in a host, in a patient? Well, you draw some blood and hope you find the virus in blood cells or in blood. Of course blood is very important, but it’s not where you would hide as a virus. Because, as I’ve said, if the virus is in the lymphohematopoietic system, then it’s particularly prone and susceptible to immune attack. Therefore these viruses all hide in cells outside of the immune system, particularly neurons, just think of herpes viruses, they hide in the ganglion. Or many viruses hide in neurons. And if they are away outside of the immune system, the immune system basically can’t treat them because the serum antibodies can only reach peripheral solid tissue cells if there is a lesion. Now, if the virus keeps dormant and doesn’t cause cell damage, there is no reason why there should be bleeding into the lesion. And exactly such balances are used in very general terms by viruses, and they use peripheral sites, neurons, kidney, tubular cells, testis cells, long epithelial cells. And of course the advantage of these sites is that the viruses can be spread from these peripheral sites very easily. You know, pissing, coughing, virus around is obviously very efficient in distributing. And this just give an example here in the urethra, here in the kidney tubular cells. So I summarise here that the immune system basically makes antibodies of several types, the IgA on mucosal surfaces, the IgM very acutely and very efficiently within the first few days, then the switch to IgD for long lasting antibodies, of about three weeks half life. And I’ll come back to that because this antibody, the IgD antibody has of course a particular characteristic that via its Fc, the constant path of the antibody, it can bind to Fc receptors. And via these Fc receptors, these antibodies can be transferred from mothers to offsprings via the Fc receptors, not only in the placenta but then to the offspring via blood transfusion, but also in the gut. And this is particularly important with calves or ruminants because we all use in biology foetal calf serum, because foetal calves do not get antibodies from their mothers. Because the membranes in the placenta are fully doubled from both sides. So proteins cannot transgress. So calves have to take up maternal antibodies in their first colostral milk they get within the first 24 hours. T cells control eliminate intracell parasites, but I’ve given you an idea about this sort of dangerous situation because of the immunopathology. They of course regulate these immunoglobulin switch, this long lasting, this is basically to avoid too easy generation of alto antibodies. But the T cells also cause this immunopathological complication. Let me just go now to the key question, why do we need so called immunological memory, which is defined as an earlier and a better response if you already have encountered the antigen previously. And the text books say ‘earlier and better is all there is about immunological memory’. However, if the first infection kills you, you certainly don’t need memory. And if the first infection is well survived, you again could argue whether you need immunological memory. Because if you have survived the first infection, you know the system has proven efficient to survive the next infection, at least for the next 25 years, and that’s all that matters. Of course I’ve already said that all vaccines that protect do so via antibodies. Now, let’s do a very simple experiment and this was done by Ulrich Steinhoff some time ago, a post doc in the lab, you immunise mice with this rabies-like virus, and then after some time, let’s say 3 months, you say, well, now we have immunological memory, we have so called T cell memory and B cell memory, we take these spleen cells, T and B memory cells, adoptively transfer into a naïve recipient that has never seen this virus, and then challenge the mouse with this same virus and we find all mice die. Now, the prediction would have been that transfer of so called memory B and T cells should provide very solid protection, doesn’t seem to be the case. Now, let’s do a second experiment, let’s take the serum of this mouse with these IgD antibodies which we can measure as protective antibodies, we transfuse those to a naïve recipient and we find that all mice are protected. So that means memory T and B cells is nice for immunologists to play in the lab, this is fine. It’s also interesting to understand what happens, but the key to survival against these acute cytopathic viruses is actually to have a pre-existent level of antibodies and then you are protected against the challenge infection of this neurotropic type of virus. Now, this of course is exactly the situation you all have encountered when you were born. Because you are born without a functioning immune system. Now, of course, not nowadays in Lindau or Berlin or Zurich, but let’s just go 200 years back, when you were born you were basically exposed to all epidemiologically important infections immediately, as of time zero. And at that time the only thing that protected you were your maternal antibodies. Your mother’s immunological experience that was transfused to you and transferred from the mother via these Fc receptors of their antibodies. So that’s exactly that experiment and now let’s see how this looks in general terms. You see, if your mother is a virus carrier, then of course she has viraemia and this virus will be transferred to the offspring either before birth through infection through the placenta or at birth where in every single birth process there is a certain amount of maternal blood being transfused to the offspring. And that’s the way, you know, the problem of rhesus incompatibility and all these problems arise from this maternal blood transfusion. But this is of course a fantastically efficient way of a virus to reach the next generation. Of course you can only do that if you are a virus that is non-cytopathic, otherwise you would kill the offspring, but your mother wouldn’t have been able to be pregnant and give birth to you because she would have died before. Now, the transferred virus will persist because the immune system will not start to react because it was immature at the stage when this first encounter came. So everything goes smoothly and in fact you could argue this is the ultimate way for a virus or infectious agent to behave. Cause no harm, cause no immune response that may cause harm, so called immunopathology, everybody is happy. Actually integrated virus, retrovirally integrated types of mechanism would even be more advanced co-evolution. But I don’t have time to go into. Now, let’s take the acute situation, your maternal experience in terms of anti-infectious agents will have accumulated over 15 years in the mother and this antibody will have accumulated then in the offspring at the time of birth, the offspring will have obtained let’s say therapeutic doses and preventive doses of maternal antibodies. And it is this maternal antibody that eventually will decline according to the half life of this immunoglobulin and during the first 6 to 12 months there will be many infections, namely all the infections that play a role epidemiologically. If an infection isn’t there, of course it doesn’t matter. But until 200 years ago all infections were always all there, always there all the time. Now, these infections of course are controlled very efficiently initially, but eventually with the decline of antibodies less and less, and there will be a point where the protection via the maternal antibodies will be sort of half way or only a quarter and this means the infection will take but will be reduced drastically. So it’s an attenuation process that is very interesting. The virus infection happens but the disease process is so reduced that in fact the offspring doesn’t get sick or get killed. Now, you remember other vaccines we use like polio or measles, we use a different process, we actually attenuate the virus by mutation so that it is less virulent. Therefore we can use the dose that induces immunity without actually making the recipient sick. Evolution has chosen a different way to actually attenuate the whole process, the same is true for virile viruses because there the milk antibodies in the maternal milk do basically the same. So the initial confrontation of infectious agents with maternal antibodies is key to the understanding of the overall epidemiology and outcome. So I can conclude, what drives the immune response, because your mother has to have guaranteed high enough levels of infection. And this is all mediated by neutralising antibodies. It can be by increase of the B cell frequency, this largely antigen independent and I don’t have time to go into that. But the maintenance of neutralising antibodies in the serum of the mother is antigen dependent because of the half life of the immunoglobulin and with the maturation of a B cell to become an antibody producing plasma cell is antigen dependent. And this re-exposure can come from within, from these persisting reservoirs of the virus, can come from antibody-antigen complexes in lymphatic tissues and can come from the outside as is the case for example by all the diarrhoeal viruses which you reencounter on your door handle or in the swimming pool or in school etc. So my conclusion is vaccinations are possible and efficient if you use the same mechanism as evolution has used, namely protection by neutralising antibodies. To keep up the antibody level, we need antigen periodically from these various sources. We cannot yet imitate such a low level persistence antigen driven type of protective immunity for all the chronic types of infections. Just take tuberculosis, you have a granuloma lesion in your lung, in my age more than half would have that lesion. I do not get sick of tuberculosis, why? Because my immune response is still good enough to control that lesion. But without that lesion the T cell immune response wouldn't be driven to control the existing lesion, so it’s well balanced. So why can I not get rid of my lesion? It’s a microscopic lesion. Well, because if I would have to boost up my immune response to such high levels to get rid of these micro lesions, I would kill myself by immunopathology. So there’s a delicate balance. In fact TB, wild type TB is in a way the best vaccine against TB, this is politically incorrect you say, but practically that's the way it goes. And to imitate that process we have simply not achieved. And for HIV it’s the same, for malaria it’s the same, for schisto and so on. So you could say: why haven’t we achieved it? Well, because it looks as if co-evolution in a physiological process has been trying this for a million years and now to imitate that in a few weeks or years is not impossible but apparently not successful. But the other point is much more important. Most of these types of chronic infections can be controlled by antibiotics for TB and leprosy or anti-virals like HIV and others or antiparasitics or vector control, you know, again politically incorrect but necessary, DDT has controlled malaria. But the limiting fact in all these cases is our human stupidity. Because we as individuals could avoid HIV very nicely, particularly in the western half of the world by simply avoiding the procedures that lead to HIV infections, drug abuse, unprotected sex and so on. But we are too stupid to really do as we can think about that would be correct. Thanks very much. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much for a very educative and also very good lecture. I would normally have had several questions to this but the program which we have participated in doing does not allow that because now we have a round table discussion. And I think after all I would anyway take two questions, who wants to say two questions, yes. QUESTION. I was just wondering, given the vertical transmission of HIV into children, as it goes through the CD4 receptor, it can get into cells which are important for development of internal organs like (inaudible 44:42), is there any evidence that infant children don’t go on to have developmental abnormalities in their…(inaudible 44:50 )cells? And therefore any consequential effects on their ability to mount immune response to other infections. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. So the question is how does HIV infection in very small kids, in newborns, how does that effect both the host and the virus capability. Well, as I tried to mention, HIV 1 is just at the moment a bad example. You know, let’s wait 500 years, because by that time HIV 1 would have to adapt and adopt more reasonable ways. HIV 2 has done that, but you know you don’t get funding for HIV 2, because HIV 2 is not a problem. So I cannot answer your question because we simply don’t know and the epidemiology hasn’t progressed to a stage where things are balanced. But the prediction is it will have to be balanced, otherwise HIV, either humanity or HIV 1 will not survive. HANS JÖRNVALL. You make answers very simple, very good. Do we have the second question, yes? QUESTION. First I would like to thank you for a very nice lecture. My question is about tuberculosis. It’s known that some population of Ashkenazi Jews are extremely resistant to tuberculosis. But in this population there is a high incidence of Tay-Sachs. Are there any links between the Tay-Sachs disease and the resistance to tuberculosis? ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thank you for this question. So the question is, is there a link between a macrophage associated storage disease and susceptibility to TB. And you know that in fact the effector mechanism to control so called facultative intracellular bacteria is the capacity of the macrophages or monocytes to deal with the infection. So, yes, there is a link. I don’t know the molecular details but the point I think you make is a very good one. In biology, medicine, there is never an absolute winner. So you may have a disadvantage with storage, but you buy an advantage against certain infections and this is true for many things. You know, the CCR5 receptor for HIV 1, if you have a certain allele or you lack it, you have more resistance against HIV, so far not discovered but you can bet, you know that there will be disadvantages if you lack CCR5. So conclusion, biology is never black and white. It’s always, you know certainadvantages and you have by them with disadvantages. And I think, you know, human behaviour is of the same type, if you want to buy certain whatever, lost behaviour, it costs, that's biology. Keeps us honest. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much.

HANS JÖRNVALL. …die wissenschaftlichen Vorträge in dieser Reihe. Und der Sprecher ist Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. Er kommt vom Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie der Universität Zürich in der Schweiz und hat 1996 den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin erhalten. Und verliehen wurde der Preis für die Entdeckungen zur Spezifität der zellvermittelten Immunabwehr. Und wir fahren jetzt mit dem Thema aus der Überschrift dieses Vortrags fort, nämlich warum wir bis jetzt noch keinen Impfstoff gegen HIV oder Tuberkulose haben. Bitte Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Vielen Dank für die Einladung heute hier vor Ihnen zu sprechen. Und ich freue mich sehr, hier zu sein, um über ein, wie ich denke, sehr wichtiges Problem zu sprechen. Warum haben wir ausgezeichnete Impfstoffe gegen die meisten akuten Kinderkrankheiten wie Tetanus, Diphtherie, Pocken, Masern, Polio usw. und warum ist es uns bis jetzt nicht gelungen, einen Impfstoff zu entwickeln, der uns vor Tuberkulose, HIV, Hepatitis C, Malaria, Bilharziose, Leishmaniose und wie sie alle heißen, schützt. Der erste und wichtigste Grund, warum wir diese Impfstoffe nicht haben, ist der, dass die Koevolution, also das Gleichgewicht zwischen Infektionserregern und uns als Wirbeltierwirten, sozusagen keine Lösung vorhergesehen hat, bei der die Situation einfach durch einen Impfstoff korrigiert oder sagen wir verbessert werden könnte. Gegen die akut zytopathischen Arten, die akuten Killerinfektionen, musste die Evolution eine sehr effiziente Lösung finden. Auf dieser Folie habe ich versucht, die ganz allgemeinen Aspekte zusammenzufassen. Wenn wir von Immunität sprechen und nicht von Immunologie – und da gibt es einen sehr großen Unterschied, wissen Sie – Immunität handelt vom Schutz der Wirbeltierwirte gegen grundsätzlich infektiöse Erreger durch spezifische Immunreaktivität. Nun, bei Immunologie geht es dagegen meistens um kleine chemische Gruppen, sogenannte Haptene oder rote Schafsblutzellen oder ähnliche Dinge. Und der Unterschied zwischen Infektionserregern und diesen Modellantigenen besteht einfach darin, dass Infektionserreger töten und Modellantigene nicht. Und daher, wissen Sie, kann man mit diesen Ersatzmodellsystemen Vieles messen, aber sehr oft kann man nicht messen, worauf es im Leben wirklich ankommt, nämlich Krankheit zu vermeiden und ganz bestimmt den Tod vor dem 25. Lebensjahr zu vermeiden. Denn wenn Sie nach dem 25. Lebensjahr sterben, wissen Sie, spielt das nicht wirklich eine Rolle, denn dann haben Sie Ihre biologische Funktion erfüllt, nämlich die Erschaffung der nächsten Generation. Und der ganze Rest spielt keine wesentliche Rolle. Nun, Sie erkennen sofort die Lösung für das von mir aufgeworfene Problem. Wenn Sie, sagen wir, vor dem 15. oder 18. Lebensjahr getötet werden, nehmen Sie keinen Einfluss auf die Evolution. Wenn Sie nach 25 getötet werden, ist das egal. Daher ist es interessant zu erkennen, dass es neben der spezifischen Immunantwort eine ganze Palette und einen Hintergrund sehr wichtiger Resistenzmechanismen gibt, die tatsächlich, sagen wir, 95 Prozent oder mehr unserer Resistenzmechanismen ausmachen. Und dazu gehört zum Beispiel Interferon-alpha. Es wurden Mausmodelle entwickelt, bei denen der Rezeptor für Interferon-alpha fehlte. Diese Mäuse sterben an Virusinfektionen, wenn Sie ein Virus nur aus 10 Metern Entfernung sehen. Ohne Interferon haben wir also keine Überlebenschance und so weiter, es gibt viele Beispiele. Ich möchte aber nicht über diese angeborenen oder natürlichen Resistenzmechanismen sprechen. Es gibt jedoch hoch spezifische, adaptive Immunmechanismen, darunter Antikörper und zellvermittelte Immunität. Und da ist die Feststellung interessant, dass sich Antikörper tatsächlich in hohen Konzentrationen und in ungeheuren Mengen zum Beispiel in Hühnereiern finden, und sogar auch in Reptilien- und Fischeiern. Warum ist das so, warum sollte die Mutterhenne Immunglobuline, Antikörper, grammweise an ihre Nachzucht weitergeben? Und diese Frage ist, glaube ich, sehr interessant. Dann können wir weiterhin feststellen, dass alle erfolgreichen Impfstoffe durch Antikörper schützen. Es gibt nicht einen einzigen Impfstoff, der uns durch zellvermittelte Immunität vor den Folgen einer Infektion schützt, was natürlich erforderlich wäre, wollten wir einen Impfstoff gegen Tuberkulose, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. entwickeln. Aber bis jetzt hatten wir keinen Erfolg, obwohl viele Leute versprachen, wissen Sie, innerhalb der letzten 10 Jahre sollten wir Impfstoffe gegen HIV oder TB entwickelt haben. Dann gibt es da eine weitere, sehr allgemeine Beobachtung, dass Autoimmunität, also die Entgleisung des Immunsystems, bei der es beginnt, unsere eigenen Antigene oder Organe anzugreifen, was zu, sagen wir, Diabetes, Multipler Sklerose, Hashimoto-Thyroiditis, rheumatoider Arthritis usw. führt. In der Tat treten diese Erkrankungen, ganz allgemein gesprochen, nach dem, sagen wir, 25. Lebensjahr auf. Und auch das wiederum passt zu dem, was ich zuvor in stark vereinfachter Form behauptet habe, dass es nach 25 nicht wirklich eine Rolle spielt, was geschieht. Ein weiterer Punkt ist, dass weibliche Personen sehr viel anfälliger für sogenannte Autoimmunerkrankungen sind, insbesondere, wenn die Autoimmunerkrankung von Autoantikörpern abhängt. Rheumatoide Arthritis, Lupus erythematodes usw. Dann treten natürlich Tumore erst nach 25 oder 30 auf, und dies korreliert erneut mit der Tatsache, dass es keine Rolle spielt. Für den Einzelnen spielt es natürlich schon eine Rolle, aber in Bezug auf das Bevölkerungsgleichgewicht insgesamt nicht. Und die Frage, die sich stellt, natürlich parallel zu Tuberkulose und HIV lautet, warum sind wir so ineffizient beim Einsatz von Immunantworten gegen Tumore, um die Tumorprognosen und -ergebnisse wirkungsvoll zu verändern? Und über allem steht die Frage, wissen Sie, hat unser Versagen, Lösungen für dieses HIV-, TB-Impfstoffproblem zu finden, etwas mit der Art und Weise zu tun, wie wir Dinge bestimmen? Wir können viele Dinge bestimmen, in der Tat können wir mehr Dinge bestimmen als jemals zuvor. Und molekulare Bestimmungen machen Bestimmungen einfach leichter und genauer. Aber es löst nicht das Problem, ob das, was wir bestimmen, wirklich das ist, was wir bestimmen sollten. Und ich glaube, in Bezug auf medizinische Krankheiten ist das, was wir messen sollten, ganz einfach. Entweder wird diese Krankheit gemildert, verbessert, ist weniger schwerwiegend oder der Tod wird vermieden oder nicht. Alles andere ist aus medizinischer Sicht eher nicht so wichtig. Lassen Sie mich jetzt direkt auf die Dinge eingehen, Ihnen meine voreingenommene Sicht auf die Funktionsweise des Immunsystems schildern, dann auf einige Besonderheiten der Virus-Wirt-Beziehung eingehen und danach auf die Ideen und Konzepte zu Impfstoffen, zu denen natürlich die Vorstellung von einem immunologischen Gedächtnis gehört. Nun, Gedächtnis, wissen Sie, ist etwas sehr Interessantes, denn das verlieren wir, wenn wir älter werden. Das immunologische Gedächtnis scheint jedoch für den Rest unseres Lebens fortzubestehen. Wenn Sie einmal eine Krankheit gehabt haben, sind Sie für den Rest Ihres Lebens davor geschützt. Wie wird das sichergestellt und wie funktioniert das? Natürlich gibt es zwei sehr extreme Interpretationen. Entweder können Sie sich erinnern, wie mit Ihrem neuronalen Netz, oder das stimmt nicht und wir haben tatsächlich das neuronale Gedächtnis nicht wirklich verstanden. Es gibt also einige Postulate, dass man tatsächlich, um das Gedächtnis aufrecht zu erhalten, dasselbe Ding wiederholt sehen oder ihm wieder begegnen muss, sei es während der Traumzeit oder während der Wachzeit. Und nur durch diese wiederholte Begegnung mit bestimmten Stimuli bleibt das Gedächtnis bestehen, das gilt sicherlich für mich. Aber die Immunologie natürlich, die Vorstellung vom Gedächtnis besagt „einmal gesehen, immer behalten.“ Haben Sie sich das Masernvirus einmal als Kind zugezogen, sind Sie Ihr Leben lang gegen Infektionen durch das Masernvirus resistent. Und die Frage lautet, ist das eine Art mystischer Wechselwirkung oder Mechanismus, Netz, oder liegt das einfach daran, dass das Masernvirus in Fragmenten in unserem Körper verbleibt, um das Immunsystem so etwas wie zu erinnern, indem es dieses all die Jahre immer wieder ankurbelt. Und das entspricht natürlich nicht dem, was wir akademisch oder theoretisch über das Gedächtnis zu wissen glauben, es wäre einfach ein antigengebundener Prozess. Und wäre das die Erklärung, müsste man natürlich die Art der Vakzinherstellung überdenken, denn wenn Vakzine die Situation nicht imitieren können, also auf sehr geringem Niveau, das unschädlich ist, aber die Immunantwort ständig auf ausreichend hohem Niveau ankurbelt, dann haben wir ein Problem. Und meine Schlussfolgerung wird sein, dass für TB, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. wir genau diese Art Impfstoff bräuchten. OK, das Problem wird also hier zusammengefasst, Infektionen zerstören Wirtszellen grundsätzlich sehr effektiv, wie in diesem Fall das Pockenvirus, Pocken oder Polio oder Tollwut bräuchten dazu nach Infektion der Zelle nur wenige Stunden. Und natürlich kann in diesem Fall nur eine Sache zum Überleben des Wirtes führen, nämlich die sofortige Unterdrückung der Infektion innerhalb weniger Tage. Denn wenn dies länger als 7 bis 10 Tage anhält, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass diese Arten von Erregern Neuronen befallen so hoch, dass man stirbt. Und natürlich braucht es für diese Situation, in der ein Virus eine Zelle befällt, aber die Physiologie dieser Zelle im Großen und Ganzen intakt lässt, keine Immunologie, denn das Virus verursacht im Wesentlichen keinen Schaden. Und es gehören tatsächlich viel mehr Viren zu dieser Kategorie als zu jener. Denn es liegt nicht im primären Interesse eines Infektionserregers alle Wirte zu töten. Denn wenn alle Wirte tot sind, ist auch das Virus per definitionem verschwunden, denn das Virus braucht lebende Zellen, um sich zu replizieren. Das ist also relativ einfach. Deshalb spielt Immunologie hier eine wichtige Rolle. Tatsächlich spielt Immunologie hier keine Rolle und die meisten dieser Viren werden vor oder während der Geburt von einem infizierten Wirt zum nächsten übertragen. Und woran liegt das? Daran, dass der Nachwuchs vor der Geburt kein funktionierendes Immunsystem hat, in der Tat funktioniert das Immunsystem während der Geburt nicht, ist nicht ausgereift. Das ist also der optimale Zeitpunkt zur Übertragung dieser Erreger. Und es gibt Beispiele dafür, HIV zum Beispiel wird gewöhnlich während der Geburt mit dieser kleinen Bluttransfusion von der Mutter an Ihre Nachkommen übertragen. Und die Mutter ist natürlich ein Träger, denn ihre Immunantwort gegen diese Virusinfektion ist unzulänglich. Nun, bei HIV, darauf komme ich noch zurück, ist das Problem, wie Sie wissen, noch nicht gelöst, denn es ist ein neues oder sich entwickelndes Virus. Also kam es noch nicht zu einer Koadaptation von Wirt und Virus. Am Ende wird es jedoch wie bei HIV 2 sein, wissen Sie, die westafrikanische Form der HIV-Infektion, bei der man ganz deutlich erkennen kann, dass das Gleichgewicht zwischen Wirt und Virus bereits sehr weit fortgeschritten ist, tatsächlich macht HIV 2 die Menschen nicht krank oder tötet sie. Es ist also nur eine Frage der Zeit. Was aber an diesem Fall jetzt interessant ist, ist, wenn es jetzt zu einer Immunantwort kommt, wie eine T-Zelle, eine einzelne Immunantwort, dann erkennt man sofort, dass es nicht das Virus ist, das das Gewebe- und Organversagen verursacht, sondern tatsächlich die Immunantwort, denn diese Immunantwort tötet die infizierte Wirtszelle, die durch die Infektion an sich nicht getötet worden wäre. Und das nennen wir Immunpathologie, das ist eine Immunantwort mit pathologischem Ausgang, wo eine solche Konfrontation eigentlich unnötig wäre. Und deshalb werden diese Erreger zu einem Zeitpunkt übertragen, zu dem es keine Immunantwort gibt. Jetzt versuche ich denselben Aspekt mit dieser Zeichnung darzustellen. Versuchen Sie, mir zu folgen. Wenn man ein Virus betrachtet, das durch die Plazenta oder während der Geburt übertragen wird, dann findet man dieses Virus im gesamten Wirt und dieses Antigen oder dieses Virus werden sich wie ein Eigenantigen verhalten. Denn es war vor der Geburt da, es war während der Geburt da, und daher werden diese viralen Antigene von einem funktionierenden Immunsystem als Selbst erkannt. Denn wenn das nicht so wäre, würde sich die Immunantwort gegen alle diese infizierten Wirtszellen richten und das würde zu einer Immunpathologie vom Typ Graft-versus-Host führen und der Patient würde das nicht überleben. Und das andere Extrem ist dies: Ich habe hier gerade eine Infektion mit dem Papillomavirus bildlich dargestellt. Das ist ein Virus, das die äußersten Hautzellen befällt und die viralen Antigene nur in reifen Keratinozyten exprimiert. Nun, das ist ein Ort, der so weit außerhalb des Immunsystems, nämlich Lymphknoten oder Milz oder Blutkreislauf, liegt, dass das Immunsystem nicht einmal merkt, dass eine Infektion in der Haut stattfindet. Und daher kommt es nicht sehr schnell zu einer Immunantwort, es kann sogar Monate dauern, wie Sie es vielleicht aus eigener Erfahrung mit den Warzen kennen, die Sie vielleicht mal hatten, bei denen es Wochen bis Monate, wenn nicht Jahre dauert, sie loszuwerden, irgendwann verschwinden diese Warzen. Das heißt, wenn sich ein Antigen, sogar das Antigen eines Infektionserregers außerhalb der Reichweite der Lymphknoten oder der Milz oder der sogenannten sekundären lymphatischen Organe befindet, erfolgt keine Immunantwort. Und das Antigen, sogar das virale Antigen, muss erst die drainierenden Lymphknoten oder die Milz erreichen, um eine Antwort auszulösen. Und das passiert natürlich auch mit Warzen, wenn Ihr lieber Arzt die Warzen abschabt oder sie mit heißen Nadeln kauterisiert, um diese Warzen loszuwerden. Und genau das macht man, man verursacht eine Wunde, in der die Zellen nekrotisch werden, diese Zellen, die nekrotischen Zellen, werden dann von Makrophagen aufgenommen, die das Antigen zu dem drainierenden Lymphknoten bringen und jetzt wird eine Immunantwort ausgelöst oder beschleunigt. Und natürlich wird hier die gewöhnliche, klassische Situation dargestellt. Das Virus befällt, sagen wir, Ihren großen Zeh oder Ihre oberflächlichen Schleimhäute, und von dort breitet sich die Infektion zu den drainierenden Lymphknoten und schließlich über eine Virämie zur Milz aus. Und die klassischen Ausschläge, wissen Sie, nach Masern oder Pocken, entsprechen dieser virämischen Ausbreitung. Und diese phasenweise Ausbreitung des Virus zum drainierenden Lymphknoten und dann zur Milz verstärkt die Immunantwort tatsächlich, denn einmal im Lymphknoten angekommen, beginnt die Immunantwort sofort innerhalb von 2 oder 3 Tagen. Die T-Zellen und die Antikörper-produzierenden Zellen werden aktiviert, und wenn die virämische Ausbreitung beginnt, holt diese frühzeitige Aktivierung der Immunantwort die systemische Ausbreitung ein und verhindert, und das ist der Schlüssel, verhindert, dass sich das Virus bis ins Gehirn ausbreitet, denn das wäre das Ende, hat das Virus erst einmal ein Neuron infiziert, war's das. Und Tollwut ist natürlich ein klassisches Beispiel, bei dem das Virus ein Neuron infiziert. Einmal eingedrungen, gibt es wenig, was man dagegen tun kann. Lassen Sie uns jetzt zwei extreme Infektionsformen betrachten. Einmal die tollwut-ähnliche Infektion mit einem sehr engen Verwandten der Tollwut, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus genannt, das bei Mäusen eine Art Tollwut auslöst, denn es ist streng neurotrop. Sie sehen, wie sich das Virus repliziert, man erhält T-Zellantworten und man erhält Antikörperantworten. Und man erhält grundsätzlich zwei Arten, neutralisierend, d. h. diese können Sie beschützen, und man erhält ELISA, also bindende Antikörper. Und sie treten quasi gleichzeitig auf. Wenn man eine nicht-zytophatische Virusart, HIV oder Hepatitis C usw., nimmt, erkennt man, dass sich das Virus repliziert, es gibt eine gute T-Zellantwort und tatsächlich regelt die anfängliche T-Zellantwort die Viruslast auf ein nicht nachweisbares Niveau herunter. Nicht nachweisbar heißt, mit herkömmlichen Mitteln kann man es nicht erkennen, es heißt aber auch, dass es tatsächlich auf sehr geringem Niveau weiterbesteht. Wichtig ist jetzt, dass mit dem ELISA, d.h., wissen Sie, man steckt Antigene auf Plastikplatten, man kann die Antikörper immer sehr früh nachweisen, ungefähr so früh wie für diese akuten Killerviren. Die neutralisierenden, die schützenden Antikörper jedoch tauchen erst nach 80 bis 300 Tagen auf. Nun, jetzt kann man natürlich fragen, warum sollte diese Maus oder dieser Mensch ohne dass sich das Virus noch im Wirt befindet. Das ist der beste Beweis dafür, dass das Virus niemals ganz verschwindet. Tatsache ist also, dass am Ende neutralisierende oder schützende Antikörper entstehen, und das gilt für Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, Malaria, all diese persistierenden, chronischen Infektionstypen haben grundsätzlich dieses Muster. Wir erinnern uns, entscheidend ist die frühe T-Zellantwort, denn das ist der Mechanismus, der die Viruslast anfänglich drastisch reduziert. Wenn das nicht der Fall ist, breitet sich das Virus grundsätzlich über den gesamten infizierten Wirt aus. Nun, wenn es bei einem Virus 100 Tage dauert, bis schützende Antikörper aufkommen, geschieht das immer? Ja, das geschieht immer. In der Zwischenzeit haben diese Viren oder Erreger, Malaria, aber angefangen, sich zu replizieren, jede Replikation erhöht natürlich die Chancen auf Mutationen, und dabei mutieren insbesondere auch ihre Antigene, die Ziele für die neutralisierenden Antikörper, also die neutralisierende Determinante. Und das ist hier dargestellt. Hier haben wir also dieses nicht-zytopathische Virus, es repliziert sich, es wird größtenteils durch diese T-Zell-vermittelte Immunität kontrolliert. Man kann es für, sagen wir, 30, 40 Tage nicht nachweisen, aber dann ist das Virus sehr häufig für den Rest des Mause- oder Menschenlebens unter Kontrolle. In manchen Fällen aber kommt das Virus wieder auf. Nun, das ist merkwürdig, nicht, denn vor diesem Zeitpunkt gab es eine sehr gute, effiziente T-Zell-Immunantwort, die das Virus kontrollierte. Was ist passiert? Nun, ungefähr hier, nach 80 Tagen oder so, beginnt die Immunantwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, schützenden Antikörpern. Und es ist diese T-Zellantwort zusammen mit der Antwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, die in diesen Individuen das Virus auf nicht erkennbarem Niveau hält. In diesen Fällen sind das alles Mutanten, die den neutralisierenden Antikörpern entkommen. Nehmen wir also das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus, das Serum aus dieser Maus, testen es auf seine Fähigkeit, durch Neutralisation gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus zu schützen, und man findet heraus, dass dieses Serum das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus nicht neutralisieren kann. Das ist natürlich verständlich, Virämie in Gegenwart aller möglichen Sorten von neutralisierenden Antikörpern, aber nicht gegen diese bestimmte Variante oder Selektanten. Aber nimmt man das Serum dieser Maus, das gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus unwirksam ist, und testet es an dem ursprünglichen Virus, mit dem die Maus infiziert wurde, oder an allen anderen Varianten oder diesen kontrollierten Viren, findet man heraus, dass dieses Serum tatsächlich all diese anderen Varianten wirksam neutralisiert. Man kann also dieses von … durchgeführte Experiment wiederholen, und findet heraus, dass sich tatsächlich jedes einzelne dieser Viren, und wir sind nur bis etwa 20 oder 30 gegangen, von den anderen unterscheidet. Also wirkt das Anti-Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Serum nicht gegen dieses, aber gegen die meisten anderen. Und die Kontrolleure hier unten, tatsächlich hat das Serum neutralisierende Wirkung gegen die meisten dieser Varianten, was bedeutet, dass das Virus in einem Individuum sich die ganze Zeit ändert, mutiert, und der Wirt produziert neutralisierende Antikörper, tatsächlich ist das häufig ausreichend und effizient, wie in diesem Fall. In manchen Fällen sieht die relative Kinetik zwischen Virusmutation und -wachstum und den sich langsam entwickelnden, neutralisierenden Antikörpern jedoch so aus, dass das Virus Schlupflöcher findet, durch die es entkommen kann, und das bestimmt das Gleichgewicht. Jetzt fragt man sich natürlich, warum sollte dann die T-Zellantwort, die in dieser frühen Phase aktiviert wurde, nicht gegen all diese entstehenden Virusvarianten wirken. Nun, die Folgerung und die Antwort ist ganz einfach: Viele Mäuse sterben in diesem Zeitraum, ähnlich wie bei HIV-AIDS, weil die T-Zellimmunantwort die infizierten Wirtszellen zerstört, und ein großer Teil der HIV-AIDS-artigen Krankheiten besteht tatsächlich aus einer immunvermittelten Zerstörung der durch das Virus infizierten Wirtszellen. Und das führt zum Tod des Patienten oder zumindest zu einer schwerwiegenden Erkrankung. Und nur in manchen Fällen werden die T-Zellen tatsächlich vernichtet, verschwinden, und dadurch wird die Immunpathologie reduziert oder beseitigt und das Endergebnis ist, dass das Virus gewinnt, bleibt, aber da die T-Zellantwort aufgehört hat, kümmert das niemanden, denn das Virus selbst richtet wirklich keinen großen Schaden an. Und ich sage noch mal, HIV 1 hat dieses Stadium noch nicht ganz erreicht, aber HIV 2 scheint dieses Ergebnis grundsätzlich gewählt zu haben. Und natürlich ist die nächste Frage, wo versteckt sich das Virus, da man sagt, es sei unter Kontrolle. Nun, wo kann man einen Wirt, einen Patienten, auf das Virus untersuchen? Gut, man nimmt etwas Blut ab und hofft, das Virus in Blutzellen oder im Blut zu finden. Natürlich ist Blut sehr wichtig, aber dort würden Sie sich als Virus nicht verstecken. Denn wie ich schon gesagt habe, ist das Virus, wenn es sich im lymphohämatopoetischen System befindet, besonders anfällig und empfindlich gegen Immunangriffe. Deshalb verbergen sich alle diese Viren in Zellen außerhalb des Immunsystems, insbesondere in Neuronen, denken Sie nur an die Herpesviren, sie verbergen sich im Ganglion. Oder viele Viren verbergen sich in Neuronen. Und wenn sie sich außerhalb des Immunsystems befinden, kann das Immunsystem grundsätzlich nichts gegen sie unternehmen, denn die Serumantikörper können nur dann periphere feste Gewebszellen erreichen, wenn es dort eine Verletzung gibt. Bleibt das Virus jetzt latent und verursacht keinen Zellschaden, gibt es keinen Grund, warum es zu einer Blutung in die Wunde kommen sollte. Und genau dieses Gleichgewicht wird im Allgemeinen von Viren genutzt, und sie nutzen periphere Stellen, Neuronen, Nieren, Tubuluszellen, Hodenzellen, lange Epithelzellen. Und natürlich besteht der Vorteil dieser Orte darin, dass sich das Virus von diesen peripheren Orten aus sehr leicht verbreiten kann. Wissen Sie, Viren auszupinkeln, auszuhusten ist offensichtlich eine sehr effiziente Art der Verbreitung. Und das zeigt einfach ein Beispiel hier, in der Harnröhre, hier in den Zellen der Nierentubuli. Ich fasse hier also zusammen, dass das Immunsystem grundsätzlich verschiedene Arten von Antikörpern produziert, das IgA auf oberflächlichen Schleimhäuten, das IgM ganz akut und sehr effizient innerhalb der ersten paar Tage, dann das Umschalten auf IgD für langlebige Antikörper mit etwa 3 Wochen Halbwertszeit. Und ich komme darauf zurück, denn dieser Antikörper, der IgD-Antikörper hat natürlich ein besonderes Merkmal, nämlich dass er über sein Fc, dem konstanten Teil des Antikörpers, an Fc-Rezeptoren binden kann. Und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren können diese Antikörper von Müttern an ihren Nachwuchs übertragen werden, über diese Fc-Rezeptoren, nicht nur in der Plazenta, sondern dann auch an den Nachwuchs über Bluttransfusion, aber auch im Darm. Und dies ist besonders wichtig bei Kälbern oder Wiederkäuern, denn wir alle verwenden in der Biologie fötales Kälberserum, denn Kuhföten erhalten keine Antikörper von ihren Müttern. Die Plazenta weist von beiden Seiten vollständig doppelte Membranen auf. Daher können Proteine nicht passieren. Deswegen müssen Kälber die mütterlichen Antikörper mit der ersten Kolostralmilch aufnehmen, die sie in den ersten 24 Stunden erhalten. T-Zell-Kontrolle beseitigt intrazelluläre Parasiten, aber ich habe Ihnen eine Vorstellung von dieser Art der Situation vermittelt, gefährlich aufgrund der Immunpathologie. Sie regulieren natürlich diesen Immunglobulin-Schalter, diese langlebigen, dies dient überwiegend dazu, eine zu einfache Generierung von Antikörpern zu vermeiden. Aber die T-Zellen verursachen auch diese immunpathologische Komplikation. Lassen Sie mich jetzt auf die Schlüsselfrage kommen, warum brauchen wir das sogenannte immunologische Gedächtnis, was als schnellere und bessere Antwort definiert ist, wenn Sie dem Antigen vorher schon einmal begegnet sind. Und in den Lehrbüchern steht, schneller und besser ist alles, was es zum immunologischen Gedächtnis zu sagen gibt. Wenn Sie aber die erste Infektion nicht überleben, brauchen Sie sicherlich kein Gedächtnis. Und überstehen Sie die erste Infektion gut, könnte man trotzdem in Frage stellen, dass man ein immunologisches Gedächtnis braucht. Denn wenn Sie die erste Infektion überlebt haben, wissen Sie, dass das System effizient genug ist, auch die nächste Infektion zu überstehen, zumindest für die nächsten 25 Jahre, und das ist alles, worauf es ankommt. Natürlich habe ich bereits gesagt, dass alle Impfstoffe, die schützen, dazu auf Antikörper zurückgreifen. Lassen Sie uns nun ein ganz einfaches Experiment durchführen, und das wurde vor einiger Zeit von Ulrich Steinhoff durchgeführt, einem Post-Doc in meinem Labor; man immunisiert Mäuse gegen dieses tollwutähnliche Virus und dann, nach einiger Zeit, sagen wir 3 Monate, sagt man, gut, wir haben jetzt ein immunologisches Gedächtnis, wir haben das sogenannte T-Zell-Gedächtnis und das B-Zell-Gedächtnis, wir nehmen diese Milzzellen, T- und B-Gedächtniszellen, übertragen diese auf einen naiven Empfänger, der dem Virus nie ausgesetzt war, und bringen die Maus dann mit genau diesem Virus in Kontakt, und es stellt sich heraus, dass alle Mäuse sterben. Nun, man hätte annehmen sollen, dass die Übertragung der sogenannten B- und T-Gedächtniszellen einen sehr soliden Schutz darstellt, scheint aber nicht der Fall zu sein. Jetzt machen wir ein zweites Experiment, wir nehmen das Serum dieser Maus mit diesen IgD-Antikörpern, die wir als schützende Antikörper nachweisen können, wir übertragen dieses per Transfusion auf den naiven Empfänger und wir stellen fest, dass alle Mäuse geschützt sind. Das bedeutet also, dass T- und B-Gedächtniszellen ein nettes Spielzeug für den Immunologen im Labor darstellen, prima. Es ist auch interessant zu verstehen, was passiert, aber der Schlüssel dazu, diese akuten zytopathischen Viren zu überleben, liegt tatsächlich darin, ein bereits bestehendes Antikörperniveau zu haben, dann sind sie gegen die Herausforderung einer Infektion mit diesem neurotropen Virus gerüstet. Nun, das ist natürlich genau die Situation, der wir alle ausgesetzt waren als wir geboren wurden. Denn wir werden ohne ein funktionierendes Immunsystem geboren. Jetzt, natürlich nicht heute in Lindau oder Berlin oder Zürich, aber lassen Sie uns 200 Jahre zurück gehen, damals war man bei der Geburt praktisch allen epidemiologisch bedeutenden Infektionen sofort, zum Zeitpunkt Null, ausgesetzt. Und damals war das Einzige, was Sie beschützte, Ihre mütterlichen Antikörper. Die immunologische Erfahrung Ihrer Mutter, die Ihnen per Transfusion und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren ihrer Antikörper von der Mutter übertragen wurden. Das entspricht also genau diesem Experiment und jetzt wollen wir mal sehen, wie sich das verallgemeinern lässt. Sehen Sie, wenn Ihre Mutter ein Virusträger ist, dann hat sie natürlich Virämie, und dieses Virus wird entweder vor der Geburt durch Infektion über die Plazenta oder bei der Geburt übertragen, denn bei jedem einzelnen Geburtsvorgang wird eine gewisse Menge mütterlichen Blutes an den Nachwuchs übertragen. Und das ist auch der Grund, wissen Sie, das Problem der Rhesusunverträglichkeit und all diese Probleme entstehen aufgrund der mütterlichen Bluttransfusion. Aber für das Virus ist das natürlich eine phantastisch effiziente Möglichkeit, die nächste Generation zu erreichen. Natürlich können Sie nur so vorgehen, wenn Sie ein nicht-zytopathisches Virus sind, ansonsten würden Sie den Nachwuchs umbringen, aber Ihre Mutter wäre auch gar nicht in der Lage gewesen, schwanger zu werden und zu gebären, denn sie wäre vorher gestorben. Jetzt bleibt das übertragene Virus bestehen, denn das Immunsystem reagiert nicht, weil es zum Zeitpunkt der ersten Begegnung noch nicht ausgereift war. Alles läuft also reibungslos und tatsächlich könnte man argumentieren, dass dies die ultimative Verhaltensweise für ein Virus oder einen Infektionserreger ist. Verursache keinen Schaden, verursache keine Immunreaktion, die Schaden verursachen könnte, sogenannte Immunpathologie, alle sind glücklich. Ein integriertes Virus übrigens, Mechanismen der retroviralen Integration wären eine sogar noch fortschrittlichere Koevolution. Aber ich habe keine Zeit, auf Einzelheiten einzugehen. Nun, lassen Sie uns die akute Situation…, die mütterliche Erfahrung in Bezug auf Anti-Infektionserreger hat sich über 15 Jahre in der Mutter angesammelt, und dieser Antikörper hat sich dann zum Zeitpunkt der Geburt im Nachwuchs angesammelt, der Nachwuchs hat, sagen wir, therapeutische Dosen und präventive Dosen der mütterlichen Antikörper erhalten. Und dieser mütterliche Antikörper wird schließlich entsprechend der Halbwertszeit dieses Immunglobulins abnehmen und während der ersten 6 bis 12 Monate wird es viele Infektionen geben, nämlich alle Infektionen, die epidemiologisch eine Rolle spielen. Ist eine Infektion nicht vorhanden, ist das nicht schlimm. Aber bis vor ungefähr 200 Jahre waren alle Infektionen immer vorhanden, waren immer vorhanden die ganze Zeit. Jetzt werden diese Infektionen anfänglich natürlich sehr effizient kontrolliert, aber schließlich mit abnehmenden Antikörpern immer weniger, und es wird einen Punkt geben, an dem der Schutz durch mütterliche Antikörper nur noch halb da ist oder nur noch zu einem Viertel und das bedeutet, die Infektion findet statt, wird aber drastisch gemildert. Das ist also ein Dämpfungseffekt, der sehr interessant ist. Die Virusinfektion findet statt, aber der Krankheitsverlauf wird so herabgesetzt, dass der Nachwuchs in der Tat gar nicht krank wird oder gar stirbt. Nun erinnern Sie sich an andere Impfstoffe, die wir verwenden, wie Polio oder Masern, dafür nutzen wir einen anderen Vorgang, tatsächlich dämpfen wir das Virus durch Mutation, sodass es weniger virulent ist. Daher können wir eine Dosis verabreichen, die Immunität induziert, ohne den Geimpften wirklich krank zu machen. Die Evolution hat sich für einen anderen Weg entschieden, den gesamten Vorgang zu mildern, dasselbe gilt für virulente Viren, denn dort machen die Milchantikörper in der Muttermilch im Grunde das Gleiche. Die erstmalige Konfrontation zwischen Infektionserregern und mütterlichen Antikörpern ist daher der Schlüssel zum Verständnis der gesamten Epidemiologie und des Ergebnisses. Daher kann ich schlussfolgern, was die Immunantwort steuert, denn Ihre Mutter muss garantiert mit einem ausreichenden Infektionsniveau konfrontiert gewesen sein. Und all dies wird über neutralisierende Antikörper vermittelt. Das kann durch einen Anstieg der B-Zellfrequenz geschehen, dies größtenteils antigenunabhängig, und ich habe keine Zeit darauf einzugehen. Aber der Erhalt der neutralisierenden Antikörper im Serum der Mutter geschieht antigenabhängig aufgrund der Halbwertszeit des Immunglobulins, und die Reifung einer B-Zelle, damit daraus eine antikörperproduzierende Plasmazelle wird, ist antigenabhängig. Und dieser erneute Kontakt kann von innen kommen, aus diesem persistierenden Virusreservoir, kann aus diesen Antikörper-Antigen-Komplexen im lymphatischen Gewebe stammen und von außerhalb, wie das bei all diesen Durchfall verursachenden Viren der Fall ist, denen Sie am Türgriff oder im Schwimmbad oder in der Schule usw. wieder begegnen. Daher ist meine Schlussfolgerung, Impfungen sind möglich und effizient, wenn man denselben Mechanismus verwendet, den auch die Evolution verwendet, nämlich Schutz durch neutralisierende Antikörper. Um das Antikörperniveau hoch zu halten, brauchen wir regelmäßig Antigen aus diesen verschiedenen Quellen. Noch können wir diese Art der schützenden Immunität, die auf einer sehr niedrigen Konzentration eines persistierenden Antigens basiert, nicht für alle chronischen Infektionen nachahmen. Nehmen wir einfach Tuberkulose, Sie haben ein Granulom in Ihrer Lunge, in meinem Alter hätten mehr als die Hälfte diese Wunde. Ich erkranke nicht an Tuberkulose, warum? Da meine Immunantwort immer noch gut genug ist, diese Wunde zu kontrollieren. Aber ohne diese Wunde würde die T-Zell-Immunantwort nicht dazu gebracht, die vorhandene Wunde zu kontrollieren, es ist also gut ausbalanciert. Warum kann ich also meine Wunde nicht los werden? Es ist eine mikroskopisch kleine Wunde. Nun, weil ich meine Immunantwort auf ein so hohes Niveau treiben müsste, um diese Mikrowunden los zu werden, dass ich mich selbst durch Immunpathologie umbringen würde. Da gibt es also ein empfindliches Gleichgewicht. In der Tat ist TB, der Wildstamm der TB, auf eine Art der beste Impfstoff gegen TB, Sie sagen, dass sei politisch inkorrekt, aber praktisch ist es genau so. Und es ist uns bisher einfach nicht gelungen, diesen Vorgang zu imitieren. Und das gilt auch für HIV, das gilt auch für Malaria, für Bilharziose usw. Sie könnten also fragen: Warum haben wir das nicht geschafft? Nun, es sieht so aus, als hätte die Koevolution dies in einem physiologischen Prozess seit Millionen von Jahren versucht, und das jetzt in ein paar Wochen oder Jahren nachzuahmen ist nicht unmöglich, aber anscheinend nicht erfolgreich. Sehr viel wichtiger ist aber ein anderer Punkt. Die meisten dieser chronischen Infektionsarten können durch Antibiotika wie bei TB und Lepra oder Virostatika wie bei HIV und anderen oder Antiparasitika oder Vektorkontrolle eingedämmt werden, wissen Sie, wieder politisch inkorrekt aber notwendig, DDT hat Malaria eingedämmt. Aber der begrenzende Faktor in all diesen Fällen ist unsere menschliche Dummheit. Denn wir als Einzelne könnten HIV ganz einfach verhindern, insbesondere in der westlichen Hälfte der Welt, indem wir einfach auf die Handlungen verzichten, die zu einer HIV-Infektion führen, Drogenmissbrauch, ungeschützter Sex usw. Aber wir sind zu dumm, um wirklich zu tun, was wir denken, dass es das Richtige wäre. Vielen Dank. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank für einen sehr lehrreichen und auch sehr guten Vortrag. Normalerweise würde ich mehrere Fragen dazu entgegennehmen, aber das Programm, an dem wir uns beteiligen, lässt das nicht zu, denn jetzt haben wir eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Und ich glaube, nach alldem, würde ich trotzdem zwei Fragen zulassen, wer möchte zwei Fragen stellen, ja. FRAGE. Ich frage mich gerade, wenn man von der vertikalen Übertragung von HIV an Kinder ausgeht, da es über den CD4-Rezeptor geht, kann es Zellen befallen, die für die Entwicklung der inneren Organe wie (nicht hörbar 44:42) wichtig sind, gibt es einen Nachweis, dass es bei Kleinkindern nicht zu Entwicklungsstörungen in ihren … (nicht hörbar 44:50 ) Zellen kommt und damit zu folgenschweren Auswirkungen auf ihre Fähigkeit, eine Immunantwort auf andere Infektionen aufzubauen. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Die Frage lautet also, wie wirkt sich eine HIV-Infektion bei Kleinkindern, bei Neugeborenen, wie wirkt sich das auf die Fähigkeit sowohl des Wirts als auch des Virus aus. Nun, ich habe versucht zu erläutern, dass HIV 1 im Moment gerade ein schlechtes Beispiel ist. Wissen Sie, lassen Sie uns 500 Jahre warten, denn bis dahin wird HIV 1 zwangsläufig vernünftigere Wege entwickelt und eingeschlagen haben. HIV 2 hat das schon getan, aber Sie wissen, man bekommt keine Forschungsgelder für HIV 2, denn HIV 2 ist kein Problem. Daher kann ich Ihre Frage nicht beantworten, denn wir wissen es einfach nicht und die Epidemiologie hat noch nicht das Stadium erreicht, in dem sich ein Gleichgewicht eingestellt hat. Die Voraussage ist jedoch, es wird sich ein Gleichgewicht einstellen müssen, denn sonst wird HIV, wird entweder die Menschheit oder HIV 1 nicht überleben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Sie machen Antworten sehr leicht, sehr gut. Gibt es noch die zweite Frage, ja? FRAGE. Zuerst möchte ich Ihnen für einen sehr spannenden Vortrag danken. Meine Frage betrifft Tuberkulose. Es ist bekannt, dass eine Population von aschkenasischen Juden extrem resistent gegen Tuberkulose ist. Aber in dieser Population gibt es eine hohe Inzidenz von Tay-Sachs. Gibt es irgendwelche Zusammenhänge zwischen der Tay-Sachs-Krankheit und der Resistenz gegen Tuberkulose? Vielen Dank für diese Frage. Die Frage lautet also, gibt es einen Zusammenhang zwischen einer Makrophagen-assoziierten Speicherkrankheit und der Anfälligkeit für TB. Und Sie wissen, dass der Effektormechanismus zur Kontrolle sogenannter fakultativ intrazellulärer Bakterien tatsächlich die Fähigkeit der Makrophagen oder Monozyten ist, mit der Infektion fertig zu werden. Also ja, es gibt einen Zusammenhang. Ich kenne die molekularen Einzelheiten nicht, aber ich glaube, worauf Sie hinauswollen, ist ein guter Punkt. In der Biologie, Medizin, gibt es nie einen absoluten Gewinner. Sie können also einen Nachteil bei der Speicherung haben, aber Sie gewinnen einen Vorteil gegen bestimmte Infektionen und das gilt für viele Dinge. Wissen Sie, der CCR5-Rezeptor für HIV 1, wenn Sie ein bestimmtes Allel haben oder es fehlt Ihnen, sind Sie resistenter gegen HIV, bisher nicht entdeckt, aber man kann darauf wetten, wissen Sie, dass es einen Nachteil geben wird, wenn Ihnen CCR5 fehlt. Fazit also, Biologie ist niemals schwarz oder weiß. Es hat immer, wissen Sie, bestimmte Vorteile und Sie erkaufen sich diese mit Nachteilen. Und ich glaube, wissen Sie, menschliches Verhalten funktioniert genauso. Wenn man was auch immer kaufen möchte, Lustverhalten, kostet das etwas, das ist Biologie. Das lässt uns ehrlich bleiben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank.

Rolf Zinkernagel (2007): Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?
(00:01:29 - 00:02:31)

The complete video is available here.

Rolf Zinkernagel (2007) - Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?

HANS JÖRNVALL. …the scientific talks in the series. And the speaker is Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. He is from the Institute of Experimental Immunology at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. And he received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1996. And the quotation was 'for the discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence'. And we now continue that subject in the title of his talk, why we do not have a vaccine against HIV or tuberculosis yet. Please, Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thanks very much for the invitation to come and talk to you today. And it’s a pleasure to be here to talk about a, I think very important problem. Why do we have excellent vaccines against most acute childhood infections such as tetanus, diphtheria, smallpox, measles, polio and so on. And why haven’t we succeeded in developing a vaccine that protects against tuberculosis, HIV, hepatitis C, malaria, schistosomiasis, leishmaniosis and you name it. The reason why we don’t have these vaccines is, first and above all, that co-evolution, that is the balance between infectious agents and us as vertebrate hosts haven’t in a way foreseen a solution that could be easily corrected or let’s say improved by a vaccine. In contrast against acute cytopathic types, acute killer types of infections, evolution had to find a very efficient solution. And I’ve tried to summarise some of these very general aspects in this slide. If we talk about immunity and not immunology - and there is a big difference, you know - immunity is about protection via specific immune reactivity by vertebrate hosts against basically infectious agents. Now, most of immunology actually deals with so called small chemical groups called haptens or sheep red blood cells or similar things. And of course the difference between infectious agents and these model types of antigens is simply that infectious agents kill and model antigens don’t. And therefore you can measure many things, you know, with these surrogate model systems, but you very often cannot measure what really matters in life, namely to avoid disease and certainly to avoid death before the age of 25. Because if you die after 25, you know, it doesn’t really matter, because by that time you have done your biological function, which is to create the next generation. And all the rest doesn’t really matter. Now you see immediately the solution to the question I raised. If you get killed between, let’s say before you are 15 or 18, then you are out of evolution. If you get killed after 25, doesn’t matter. So it’s interesting to recognise that, besides specific immune responses, there is a whole gamut and background of resistance mechanisms which are very important and in fact cover let’s say 95 or more percent of our resistance mechanisms. And they include for example interferon alpha. There have been models created in mice where the interferon alpha receptor is lacking. These mice die of viral infections if they see a virus at 10 metres distance. So without interferon there is no way to survive, and so on, there are many incidences. I will not talk about these innate or natural resistance mechanisms. There are however highly specific adaptive types of immune mechanism, including antibodies and cell mediated immunity. And there it is interesting to note that antibodies are actually at high concentrations and in enormous amounts, for example in chicken eggs, actually also in reptile eggs, in fish eggs. Why is that, why should the mother hen hand over grams of immunoglobulin, of antibodies to the offspring. And this question I think is very interesting. Then we also can recognise that all the vaccines that are successful protect via antibodies. There is not a single vaccine that protects us from the consequences of infection via cell mediated immunity. Which of course would be necessary if we were to develop a vaccine against tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, schisostomiasis and so on. But so far we haven’t succeeded, although many people promised, you know, within the past 10 years we should have developed HIV or TB vaccines. Then there’s another very general observation that autoimmunity, that is the deviation of the immune system to start attacking our own antigens or organs, resulting in let’s say diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis and so on. Actually these diseases, in very general terms, come up let’s say after 25. And this fits again with what I’ve, oversimplified stated before, that after 25 it doesn’t really matter what happens. The other point is that female people are much more susceptible to so called autoimmune disease, particularly if the autoimmune disease is dependent on autoantibodies. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus and so on. Then of course tumours also come up after 25 or 30, and this again would correlate with the fact that it doesn’t matter. Of course individually it matters but in terms of overall population balance it doesn’t. And the question there arises of course in parallel with tuberculosis and HIV, why are we so inefficient in using immune responses against tumours to actually change the tumour prognoses and outcome. And above all is the question, you know, does that failure to come up with solutions to this HIV, TB vaccine problem, have something to do with the way we measure things. We can measure many things, in fact we can measure more things than ever before. And molecular measurements just make measurements more easy and more accurate. But it doesn’t solve the problem whether what we measure is really what we should measure. And I think in terms of medical disease it’s very simple what we should measure. Either this disease is ameliorated, is improved, is less severe or death is avoided, or not. All the rest is in a way, from a medical point of view, rather not so important. So let me now get into matters directly, give you my biased view of the functioning of the immune system, then get into some peculiarities of the virus host relationships and then go into ideas and concepts about vaccines which include of course the idea of immunological memory. Now, memory, you know, is something very interesting, because that’s what you lose when you age. But immunological memory seems to persist for the rest of our lives. So once having had a disease will cover you and protect you for the rest of your life. How is that guaranteed and how does that function? Of course, there are two very extreme interpretations. Either you can remember like with your neuronal networks, or it’s not true and in fact neuronal memory isn’t really understood. So there are some postulates that in fact, to keep up your memory, you need to see or reencounter the same thing, you know repeatedly, be it during your dreaming time or your wake time. And it’s only this repetitiveness of encountering certain inputs that keeps your memory up, that’s certainly true for myself. But immunology of course, the idea of memory says ‘once seen, always remembered’. Measles virus, once contracted as a child, you’re resistant against measles virus infections disease, for the rest of the life. And the question is, is that some sort of mystical type of interaction or mechanism, network or is it simply that measles virus persists in fragments in our body to keep the immune system sort of reminded by boosting it all over the years. And that of course isn’t really what we understand academically or theoretically from memory, it would be simply an antigen driven process. And of course if that were the explanation, then you would have to rethink about the way we make vaccines, because if vaccines cannot imitate that situation, that is persist at a very low level, that is innocuous, but keeps driving the immune response at a sufficiently high level, then we have a problem. And my conclusion will be that for TB, HIV, malaria, schisto and so on, we actually would need a vaccine of that type. Ok, so the problem is summarised here, infections basically destroy host cells very efficiently, like in this case, pox virus, smallpox or polio or rabies would do that within a few hours after infecting a cell. And of course, in this case the only thing that can lead to the survival of the host is immediate rejection of that infection within a few days. Because if that continues for more than 7 to 10 days, then the chances of these types of agents hitting neurons is so high that you die. And of course this situation, where a virus infects a cell but leaves the physiology of that cell rather and largely intact, doesn’t need immunology because the virus actually doesn’t cause primarily any harm. And many more viruses actually belong to that category than to this. Because it is not in the prime interest of an infectious agent to kill all hosts. Because if all hosts are killed, then the virus by definition is gone as well, because the virus needs living cells to replicate. So it’s relatively easy. So that’s why here immunology plays a major role. In fact here immunology doesn’t play a role and most of these viruses jump from one infected subject to the next before or at birth. And why is that? Because before birth the offspring doesn’t have a functioning immune system, actually at birth the immune system doesn’t function, isn’t mature. So this is our optimal time for these agents to jump. And there are examples of that, HIV, for example, jumps, usually at birth, with that small blood transfusion from the mother to the offspring. And the mother of course is a carrier because her immune response against that virus infection is inadequate. Well, for HIV, I will come back to that, the problem hasn’t been solved yet, as you know, because it is a new or emerging virus. So the co-adaptation of host and virus hasn’t happened. But eventually it will end up like HIV 2, you know, the West African form of HIV infection, where it is very clear that the balance between host and virus has already reached a very balanced situation, in fact HIV 2 doesn’t make people sick or doesn’t kill them. So it’s just a matter of time. But in this case what is interesting is if now an immune response comes along, like a T cell, a solo immune response, then you see immediately it’s not the virus that causes the tissue and organ failure, it’s actually the immune response because this immune response now kills infected host cells that otherwise wouldn’t be killed by the infection. And this we call immunopathology, that is an immune response with pathological consequences where in fact there wouldn't need to be such a confrontation. And that’s why these agents jump at a time when there is no immune response. Now, I try to illustrate the same aspect with this cartoon. Just try to follow. If you take a virus that jumps through the placenta or at birth, then this virus will be all over the host and this antigen or this virus will behave like a self antigen. Because it was there before birth, it was there at birth, and therefore these viral antigens are considered from the functioning immune system as self. Because if that were not so, then the immune response would be against all these host infected cells and this would result in a graph versus host type immunopathology, and in fact the patient wouldn’t survive. The other extreme is this, I’ve just depicted here an infection with papillomavirus, which is a virus that infects the outer most types of cells of the skin. And expresses the viral antigens only in matured keratinocytes. Now, this is a localisation that is so far out of the immune system, namely lymph nodes or spleen or the blood circulation, that the immune system doesn’t even notice that there is an infection going on in the skin. And therefore the immune response doesn’t happen very quickly, in fact it may take months, as you may well remember from your own warts you may have had, you know, where it takes weeks to months, if not years, to get rid of these warts, eventually these warts will disappear. That means if an antigen, even an infectious agents antigen is outside of the reach of lymph nodes or spleen or the so called secondary organised lymphatic tissues, then there is no immune response. And the antigen, the viral antigen even has to reach draining lymph nodes or the spleen to get a response induced. And of course this happens with warts, if your dear doctor scraps off the warts or cauterises them with hot needles to get rid of these warts. And that’s exactly what you do, you create a wound where cells get necrotic, these cells are picked up by macrophages, the necrotic cells, these bring the antigen to the draining lymph node and now an immune response is improved or accelerated. And of course the usual classical situation is depicted here. The virus, let’s say hits you on the big toe or in your mucosal surfaces, and from there the infection spreads to the draining lymph nodes and eventually via viremia to the spleen. And you know the classical rashes after measles or smallpox correspond to this viremicspread. And this staggered spread of the virus to the draining lymph node and then to the spleen actually amplifies the immune response because once in the lymph node the immune response immediately starts within 2 days or 3 days. The T cells and the antibody producing cells get amplified and by the time there is a viremic spread, this amplification already of the immune response will catch up with the systemic spread and will prevent, and this is the key, will prevent the virus spreading to the brain, because that’s the end of it, once the virus is in a neuron, that’s it. And rabies, tollwut, is of course a classical example, where the virus hits a neuron. Once in, you can’t do much about it. So let’s now take two extreme forms of infections. One being the rabies-like infection of a very close relative to rabies, it’s called vesicular stomatitis virus, which in mice causes a form of rabies because it’s strictly neurotrophic. What you see is the virus replicates, you get T cell responses and you get antibody responses. And you get basically two types, neutralising, that is they can protect you and you get ELISA, that is binding types of antibodies. And they are virtually coincident. If you take a non cytopathic virus type, HIV or hepatitis C and so on, you find that the virus replicates, there’s a good T cell response and actually the T cell response initially that controls the virus load down to undetectable levels. Undetectable means by conventional means you can’t detect it, but it also means that in fact it always persists at very low levels. Now, what is important is that the ELISA, that is, you know, sticking antigens on plastic plates, you can always measure antibodies very early, about as early as for these acute killer viruses. But the neutralising, the protective antibodies take between 80 and 300 days to come up. Now, of course you can ask why should this mouse or human make neutralising antibodies That’s the best sign actually that the virus is never gone completely. So the fact is that eventually neutralising or protective antibodies come up, and this is true for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, malaria, all these persisting chronic types of infections have basically this pattern. Remember it’s crucial that the T cell response comes up early because that’s the mechanism that really reduces viral loads initially drastically. And if that doesn’t happen, basically the virus goes all over the infected host. Now, if a virus needs 100 days for protective antibodies to come up, does it always happen? Yes, it happens always. But in the meantime these viruses or agents, malaria, have started to replicate, every replication of course increases chances of mutations and they mutate in particular also their neutralising antibody target antigens, so the neutralising determinant. And this is illustrated here. So we have this non-cytopathic virus, it replicates,it’s controlled largely by these T cell mediated immunity. You cannot measure it for let’s say 30, 40 days, but then very often the virus is controlled for the rest of the mouse’s life or the human life. But in some cases the virus comes up again. Now, this is strange, isn’t it, because before that point in time there was a very good efficient T cell immune response that controlled the virus. What happens? Well, around this time, 80 days or so, the neutralising antibodies, the protective antibody response has come up. And it is this T cell response plus the neutralising antibody response in these individuals that keeps the virus below detection. In these cases, these are all neutralising antibody escape mutants. So let’s take the open square virus, take the serum from that mouse, test it for neutralising protective capacity against the open square virus and you find that this serum cannot neutralise the open square virus. Of course this is understandable,viraemia in the presence of all sorts of neutralising antibodies, but not against that particular variant or selectant. But take this serum of that mouse, that is inefficient against this open square virus, and test it against the original virus you stuck into the mouse or against all the other variants or these controlled viruses, and you find that this serum actually is efficient in neutralising all these other variants. So you can repeat that experiment that was done by … (inaudible25:20), and you find that in fact each of these individual viruses, and we have only gone about to 20 or 30, is distinct. So the anti open square serum does not work against this one but against most others. And the controllers down here, in fact this serum has neutralising activity against most of the variants, which means that the virus within one individual changes all the time, mutates and the host makes neutralising antibodies, in fact often very sufficient and efficient, as in this case. But in some cases the relative kinetics between virus mutation and growth, and the slowly developing neutralising antibodies is such that the virus finds the loopholes through which it can escape and this will determine the balance. Now, of course you may want to ask, why should then the T cell response, which has been mounted in this early phase, not be efficient against all these upcoming variant viruses? Well, the conclusion and the answer is very simple: Many mice will die in this period of time, similar to HIV-AIDS, because the T cell immune response destroys infected host cells and the large part of the HIV-AIDS type of disease is in fact immune destruction of virus-infected host cells. And this will result in the death of the patient or at least severe disease. And only in some cases will the T cells actually be deleted, disappear, and thereby the immunopathology gets reduced or eliminated and the end effect is that the virus basically wins, stays, but since the T cell response has gone, nobody cares because the virus itself doesn’t really do much harm. Again I say, HIV 1 isn’t quite there yet, but HIV 2 basically seems to have chosen this outcome. And of course the next question is where does the virus hide, since you say it’s below control. Now, where can you control for virus in a host, in a patient? Well, you draw some blood and hope you find the virus in blood cells or in blood. Of course blood is very important, but it’s not where you would hide as a virus. Because, as I’ve said, if the virus is in the lymphohematopoietic system, then it’s particularly prone and susceptible to immune attack. Therefore these viruses all hide in cells outside of the immune system, particularly neurons, just think of herpes viruses, they hide in the ganglion. Or many viruses hide in neurons. And if they are away outside of the immune system, the immune system basically can’t treat them because the serum antibodies can only reach peripheral solid tissue cells if there is a lesion. Now, if the virus keeps dormant and doesn’t cause cell damage, there is no reason why there should be bleeding into the lesion. And exactly such balances are used in very general terms by viruses, and they use peripheral sites, neurons, kidney, tubular cells, testis cells, long epithelial cells. And of course the advantage of these sites is that the viruses can be spread from these peripheral sites very easily. You know, pissing, coughing, virus around is obviously very efficient in distributing. And this just give an example here in the urethra, here in the kidney tubular cells. So I summarise here that the immune system basically makes antibodies of several types, the IgA on mucosal surfaces, the IgM very acutely and very efficiently within the first few days, then the switch to IgD for long lasting antibodies, of about three weeks half life. And I’ll come back to that because this antibody, the IgD antibody has of course a particular characteristic that via its Fc, the constant path of the antibody, it can bind to Fc receptors. And via these Fc receptors, these antibodies can be transferred from mothers to offsprings via the Fc receptors, not only in the placenta but then to the offspring via blood transfusion, but also in the gut. And this is particularly important with calves or ruminants because we all use in biology foetal calf serum, because foetal calves do not get antibodies from their mothers. Because the membranes in the placenta are fully doubled from both sides. So proteins cannot transgress. So calves have to take up maternal antibodies in their first colostral milk they get within the first 24 hours. T cells control eliminate intracell parasites, but I’ve given you an idea about this sort of dangerous situation because of the immunopathology. They of course regulate these immunoglobulin switch, this long lasting, this is basically to avoid too easy generation of alto antibodies. But the T cells also cause this immunopathological complication. Let me just go now to the key question, why do we need so called immunological memory, which is defined as an earlier and a better response if you already have encountered the antigen previously. And the text books say ‘earlier and better is all there is about immunological memory’. However, if the first infection kills you, you certainly don’t need memory. And if the first infection is well survived, you again could argue whether you need immunological memory. Because if you have survived the first infection, you know the system has proven efficient to survive the next infection, at least for the next 25 years, and that’s all that matters. Of course I’ve already said that all vaccines that protect do so via antibodies. Now, let’s do a very simple experiment and this was done by Ulrich Steinhoff some time ago, a post doc in the lab, you immunise mice with this rabies-like virus, and then after some time, let’s say 3 months, you say, well, now we have immunological memory, we have so called T cell memory and B cell memory, we take these spleen cells, T and B memory cells, adoptively transfer into a naïve recipient that has never seen this virus, and then challenge the mouse with this same virus and we find all mice die. Now, the prediction would have been that transfer of so called memory B and T cells should provide very solid protection, doesn’t seem to be the case. Now, let’s do a second experiment, let’s take the serum of this mouse with these IgD antibodies which we can measure as protective antibodies, we transfuse those to a naïve recipient and we find that all mice are protected. So that means memory T and B cells is nice for immunologists to play in the lab, this is fine. It’s also interesting to understand what happens, but the key to survival against these acute cytopathic viruses is actually to have a pre-existent level of antibodies and then you are protected against the challenge infection of this neurotropic type of virus. Now, this of course is exactly the situation you all have encountered when you were born. Because you are born without a functioning immune system. Now, of course, not nowadays in Lindau or Berlin or Zurich, but let’s just go 200 years back, when you were born you were basically exposed to all epidemiologically important infections immediately, as of time zero. And at that time the only thing that protected you were your maternal antibodies. Your mother’s immunological experience that was transfused to you and transferred from the mother via these Fc receptors of their antibodies. So that’s exactly that experiment and now let’s see how this looks in general terms. You see, if your mother is a virus carrier, then of course she has viraemia and this virus will be transferred to the offspring either before birth through infection through the placenta or at birth where in every single birth process there is a certain amount of maternal blood being transfused to the offspring. And that’s the way, you know, the problem of rhesus incompatibility and all these problems arise from this maternal blood transfusion. But this is of course a fantastically efficient way of a virus to reach the next generation. Of course you can only do that if you are a virus that is non-cytopathic, otherwise you would kill the offspring, but your mother wouldn’t have been able to be pregnant and give birth to you because she would have died before. Now, the transferred virus will persist because the immune system will not start to react because it was immature at the stage when this first encounter came. So everything goes smoothly and in fact you could argue this is the ultimate way for a virus or infectious agent to behave. Cause no harm, cause no immune response that may cause harm, so called immunopathology, everybody is happy. Actually integrated virus, retrovirally integrated types of mechanism would even be more advanced co-evolution. But I don’t have time to go into. Now, let’s take the acute situation, your maternal experience in terms of anti-infectious agents will have accumulated over 15 years in the mother and this antibody will have accumulated then in the offspring at the time of birth, the offspring will have obtained let’s say therapeutic doses and preventive doses of maternal antibodies. And it is this maternal antibody that eventually will decline according to the half life of this immunoglobulin and during the first 6 to 12 months there will be many infections, namely all the infections that play a role epidemiologically. If an infection isn’t there, of course it doesn’t matter. But until 200 years ago all infections were always all there, always there all the time. Now, these infections of course are controlled very efficiently initially, but eventually with the decline of antibodies less and less, and there will be a point where the protection via the maternal antibodies will be sort of half way or only a quarter and this means the infection will take but will be reduced drastically. So it’s an attenuation process that is very interesting. The virus infection happens but the disease process is so reduced that in fact the offspring doesn’t get sick or get killed. Now, you remember other vaccines we use like polio or measles, we use a different process, we actually attenuate the virus by mutation so that it is less virulent. Therefore we can use the dose that induces immunity without actually making the recipient sick. Evolution has chosen a different way to actually attenuate the whole process, the same is true for virile viruses because there the milk antibodies in the maternal milk do basically the same. So the initial confrontation of infectious agents with maternal antibodies is key to the understanding of the overall epidemiology and outcome. So I can conclude, what drives the immune response, because your mother has to have guaranteed high enough levels of infection. And this is all mediated by neutralising antibodies. It can be by increase of the B cell frequency, this largely antigen independent and I don’t have time to go into that. But the maintenance of neutralising antibodies in the serum of the mother is antigen dependent because of the half life of the immunoglobulin and with the maturation of a B cell to become an antibody producing plasma cell is antigen dependent. And this re-exposure can come from within, from these persisting reservoirs of the virus, can come from antibody-antigen complexes in lymphatic tissues and can come from the outside as is the case for example by all the diarrhoeal viruses which you reencounter on your door handle or in the swimming pool or in school etc. So my conclusion is vaccinations are possible and efficient if you use the same mechanism as evolution has used, namely protection by neutralising antibodies. To keep up the antibody level, we need antigen periodically from these various sources. We cannot yet imitate such a low level persistence antigen driven type of protective immunity for all the chronic types of infections. Just take tuberculosis, you have a granuloma lesion in your lung, in my age more than half would have that lesion. I do not get sick of tuberculosis, why? Because my immune response is still good enough to control that lesion. But without that lesion the T cell immune response wouldn't be driven to control the existing lesion, so it’s well balanced. So why can I not get rid of my lesion? It’s a microscopic lesion. Well, because if I would have to boost up my immune response to such high levels to get rid of these micro lesions, I would kill myself by immunopathology. So there’s a delicate balance. In fact TB, wild type TB is in a way the best vaccine against TB, this is politically incorrect you say, but practically that's the way it goes. And to imitate that process we have simply not achieved. And for HIV it’s the same, for malaria it’s the same, for schisto and so on. So you could say: why haven’t we achieved it? Well, because it looks as if co-evolution in a physiological process has been trying this for a million years and now to imitate that in a few weeks or years is not impossible but apparently not successful. But the other point is much more important. Most of these types of chronic infections can be controlled by antibiotics for TB and leprosy or anti-virals like HIV and others or antiparasitics or vector control, you know, again politically incorrect but necessary, DDT has controlled malaria. But the limiting fact in all these cases is our human stupidity. Because we as individuals could avoid HIV very nicely, particularly in the western half of the world by simply avoiding the procedures that lead to HIV infections, drug abuse, unprotected sex and so on. But we are too stupid to really do as we can think about that would be correct. Thanks very much. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much for a very educative and also very good lecture. I would normally have had several questions to this but the program which we have participated in doing does not allow that because now we have a round table discussion. And I think after all I would anyway take two questions, who wants to say two questions, yes. QUESTION. I was just wondering, given the vertical transmission of HIV into children, as it goes through the CD4 receptor, it can get into cells which are important for development of internal organs like (inaudible 44:42), is there any evidence that infant children don’t go on to have developmental abnormalities in their…(inaudible 44:50 )cells? And therefore any consequential effects on their ability to mount immune response to other infections. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. So the question is how does HIV infection in very small kids, in newborns, how does that effect both the host and the virus capability. Well, as I tried to mention, HIV 1 is just at the moment a bad example. You know, let’s wait 500 years, because by that time HIV 1 would have to adapt and adopt more reasonable ways. HIV 2 has done that, but you know you don’t get funding for HIV 2, because HIV 2 is not a problem. So I cannot answer your question because we simply don’t know and the epidemiology hasn’t progressed to a stage where things are balanced. But the prediction is it will have to be balanced, otherwise HIV, either humanity or HIV 1 will not survive. HANS JÖRNVALL. You make answers very simple, very good. Do we have the second question, yes? QUESTION. First I would like to thank you for a very nice lecture. My question is about tuberculosis. It’s known that some population of Ashkenazi Jews are extremely resistant to tuberculosis. But in this population there is a high incidence of Tay-Sachs. Are there any links between the Tay-Sachs disease and the resistance to tuberculosis? ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thank you for this question. So the question is, is there a link between a macrophage associated storage disease and susceptibility to TB. And you know that in fact the effector mechanism to control so called facultative intracellular bacteria is the capacity of the macrophages or monocytes to deal with the infection. So, yes, there is a link. I don’t know the molecular details but the point I think you make is a very good one. In biology, medicine, there is never an absolute winner. So you may have a disadvantage with storage, but you buy an advantage against certain infections and this is true for many things. You know, the CCR5 receptor for HIV 1, if you have a certain allele or you lack it, you have more resistance against HIV, so far not discovered but you can bet, you know that there will be disadvantages if you lack CCR5. So conclusion, biology is never black and white. It’s always, you know certainadvantages and you have by them with disadvantages. And I think, you know, human behaviour is of the same type, if you want to buy certain whatever, lost behaviour, it costs, that's biology. Keeps us honest. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much.

HANS JÖRNVALL. …die wissenschaftlichen Vorträge in dieser Reihe. Und der Sprecher ist Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. Er kommt vom Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie der Universität Zürich in der Schweiz und hat 1996 den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin erhalten. Und verliehen wurde der Preis für die Entdeckungen zur Spezifität der zellvermittelten Immunabwehr. Und wir fahren jetzt mit dem Thema aus der Überschrift dieses Vortrags fort, nämlich warum wir bis jetzt noch keinen Impfstoff gegen HIV oder Tuberkulose haben. Bitte Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Vielen Dank für die Einladung heute hier vor Ihnen zu sprechen. Und ich freue mich sehr, hier zu sein, um über ein, wie ich denke, sehr wichtiges Problem zu sprechen. Warum haben wir ausgezeichnete Impfstoffe gegen die meisten akuten Kinderkrankheiten wie Tetanus, Diphtherie, Pocken, Masern, Polio usw. und warum ist es uns bis jetzt nicht gelungen, einen Impfstoff zu entwickeln, der uns vor Tuberkulose, HIV, Hepatitis C, Malaria, Bilharziose, Leishmaniose und wie sie alle heißen, schützt. Der erste und wichtigste Grund, warum wir diese Impfstoffe nicht haben, ist der, dass die Koevolution, also das Gleichgewicht zwischen Infektionserregern und uns als Wirbeltierwirten, sozusagen keine Lösung vorhergesehen hat, bei der die Situation einfach durch einen Impfstoff korrigiert oder sagen wir verbessert werden könnte. Gegen die akut zytopathischen Arten, die akuten Killerinfektionen, musste die Evolution eine sehr effiziente Lösung finden. Auf dieser Folie habe ich versucht, die ganz allgemeinen Aspekte zusammenzufassen. Wenn wir von Immunität sprechen und nicht von Immunologie – und da gibt es einen sehr großen Unterschied, wissen Sie – Immunität handelt vom Schutz der Wirbeltierwirte gegen grundsätzlich infektiöse Erreger durch spezifische Immunreaktivität. Nun, bei Immunologie geht es dagegen meistens um kleine chemische Gruppen, sogenannte Haptene oder rote Schafsblutzellen oder ähnliche Dinge. Und der Unterschied zwischen Infektionserregern und diesen Modellantigenen besteht einfach darin, dass Infektionserreger töten und Modellantigene nicht. Und daher, wissen Sie, kann man mit diesen Ersatzmodellsystemen Vieles messen, aber sehr oft kann man nicht messen, worauf es im Leben wirklich ankommt, nämlich Krankheit zu vermeiden und ganz bestimmt den Tod vor dem 25. Lebensjahr zu vermeiden. Denn wenn Sie nach dem 25. Lebensjahr sterben, wissen Sie, spielt das nicht wirklich eine Rolle, denn dann haben Sie Ihre biologische Funktion erfüllt, nämlich die Erschaffung der nächsten Generation. Und der ganze Rest spielt keine wesentliche Rolle. Nun, Sie erkennen sofort die Lösung für das von mir aufgeworfene Problem. Wenn Sie, sagen wir, vor dem 15. oder 18. Lebensjahr getötet werden, nehmen Sie keinen Einfluss auf die Evolution. Wenn Sie nach 25 getötet werden, ist das egal. Daher ist es interessant zu erkennen, dass es neben der spezifischen Immunantwort eine ganze Palette und einen Hintergrund sehr wichtiger Resistenzmechanismen gibt, die tatsächlich, sagen wir, 95 Prozent oder mehr unserer Resistenzmechanismen ausmachen. Und dazu gehört zum Beispiel Interferon-alpha. Es wurden Mausmodelle entwickelt, bei denen der Rezeptor für Interferon-alpha fehlte. Diese Mäuse sterben an Virusinfektionen, wenn Sie ein Virus nur aus 10 Metern Entfernung sehen. Ohne Interferon haben wir also keine Überlebenschance und so weiter, es gibt viele Beispiele. Ich möchte aber nicht über diese angeborenen oder natürlichen Resistenzmechanismen sprechen. Es gibt jedoch hoch spezifische, adaptive Immunmechanismen, darunter Antikörper und zellvermittelte Immunität. Und da ist die Feststellung interessant, dass sich Antikörper tatsächlich in hohen Konzentrationen und in ungeheuren Mengen zum Beispiel in Hühnereiern finden, und sogar auch in Reptilien- und Fischeiern. Warum ist das so, warum sollte die Mutterhenne Immunglobuline, Antikörper, grammweise an ihre Nachzucht weitergeben? Und diese Frage ist, glaube ich, sehr interessant. Dann können wir weiterhin feststellen, dass alle erfolgreichen Impfstoffe durch Antikörper schützen. Es gibt nicht einen einzigen Impfstoff, der uns durch zellvermittelte Immunität vor den Folgen einer Infektion schützt, was natürlich erforderlich wäre, wollten wir einen Impfstoff gegen Tuberkulose, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. entwickeln. Aber bis jetzt hatten wir keinen Erfolg, obwohl viele Leute versprachen, wissen Sie, innerhalb der letzten 10 Jahre sollten wir Impfstoffe gegen HIV oder TB entwickelt haben. Dann gibt es da eine weitere, sehr allgemeine Beobachtung, dass Autoimmunität, also die Entgleisung des Immunsystems, bei der es beginnt, unsere eigenen Antigene oder Organe anzugreifen, was zu, sagen wir, Diabetes, Multipler Sklerose, Hashimoto-Thyroiditis, rheumatoider Arthritis usw. führt. In der Tat treten diese Erkrankungen, ganz allgemein gesprochen, nach dem, sagen wir, 25. Lebensjahr auf. Und auch das wiederum passt zu dem, was ich zuvor in stark vereinfachter Form behauptet habe, dass es nach 25 nicht wirklich eine Rolle spielt, was geschieht. Ein weiterer Punkt ist, dass weibliche Personen sehr viel anfälliger für sogenannte Autoimmunerkrankungen sind, insbesondere, wenn die Autoimmunerkrankung von Autoantikörpern abhängt. Rheumatoide Arthritis, Lupus erythematodes usw. Dann treten natürlich Tumore erst nach 25 oder 30 auf, und dies korreliert erneut mit der Tatsache, dass es keine Rolle spielt. Für den Einzelnen spielt es natürlich schon eine Rolle, aber in Bezug auf das Bevölkerungsgleichgewicht insgesamt nicht. Und die Frage, die sich stellt, natürlich parallel zu Tuberkulose und HIV lautet, warum sind wir so ineffizient beim Einsatz von Immunantworten gegen Tumore, um die Tumorprognosen und -ergebnisse wirkungsvoll zu verändern? Und über allem steht die Frage, wissen Sie, hat unser Versagen, Lösungen für dieses HIV-, TB-Impfstoffproblem zu finden, etwas mit der Art und Weise zu tun, wie wir Dinge bestimmen? Wir können viele Dinge bestimmen, in der Tat können wir mehr Dinge bestimmen als jemals zuvor. Und molekulare Bestimmungen machen Bestimmungen einfach leichter und genauer. Aber es löst nicht das Problem, ob das, was wir bestimmen, wirklich das ist, was wir bestimmen sollten. Und ich glaube, in Bezug auf medizinische Krankheiten ist das, was wir messen sollten, ganz einfach. Entweder wird diese Krankheit gemildert, verbessert, ist weniger schwerwiegend oder der Tod wird vermieden oder nicht. Alles andere ist aus medizinischer Sicht eher nicht so wichtig. Lassen Sie mich jetzt direkt auf die Dinge eingehen, Ihnen meine voreingenommene Sicht auf die Funktionsweise des Immunsystems schildern, dann auf einige Besonderheiten der Virus-Wirt-Beziehung eingehen und danach auf die Ideen und Konzepte zu Impfstoffen, zu denen natürlich die Vorstellung von einem immunologischen Gedächtnis gehört. Nun, Gedächtnis, wissen Sie, ist etwas sehr Interessantes, denn das verlieren wir, wenn wir älter werden. Das immunologische Gedächtnis scheint jedoch für den Rest unseres Lebens fortzubestehen. Wenn Sie einmal eine Krankheit gehabt haben, sind Sie für den Rest Ihres Lebens davor geschützt. Wie wird das sichergestellt und wie funktioniert das? Natürlich gibt es zwei sehr extreme Interpretationen. Entweder können Sie sich erinnern, wie mit Ihrem neuronalen Netz, oder das stimmt nicht und wir haben tatsächlich das neuronale Gedächtnis nicht wirklich verstanden. Es gibt also einige Postulate, dass man tatsächlich, um das Gedächtnis aufrecht zu erhalten, dasselbe Ding wiederholt sehen oder ihm wieder begegnen muss, sei es während der Traumzeit oder während der Wachzeit. Und nur durch diese wiederholte Begegnung mit bestimmten Stimuli bleibt das Gedächtnis bestehen, das gilt sicherlich für mich. Aber die Immunologie natürlich, die Vorstellung vom Gedächtnis besagt „einmal gesehen, immer behalten.“ Haben Sie sich das Masernvirus einmal als Kind zugezogen, sind Sie Ihr Leben lang gegen Infektionen durch das Masernvirus resistent. Und die Frage lautet, ist das eine Art mystischer Wechselwirkung oder Mechanismus, Netz, oder liegt das einfach daran, dass das Masernvirus in Fragmenten in unserem Körper verbleibt, um das Immunsystem so etwas wie zu erinnern, indem es dieses all die Jahre immer wieder ankurbelt. Und das entspricht natürlich nicht dem, was wir akademisch oder theoretisch über das Gedächtnis zu wissen glauben, es wäre einfach ein antigengebundener Prozess. Und wäre das die Erklärung, müsste man natürlich die Art der Vakzinherstellung überdenken, denn wenn Vakzine die Situation nicht imitieren können, also auf sehr geringem Niveau, das unschädlich ist, aber die Immunantwort ständig auf ausreichend hohem Niveau ankurbelt, dann haben wir ein Problem. Und meine Schlussfolgerung wird sein, dass für TB, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. wir genau diese Art Impfstoff bräuchten. OK, das Problem wird also hier zusammengefasst, Infektionen zerstören Wirtszellen grundsätzlich sehr effektiv, wie in diesem Fall das Pockenvirus, Pocken oder Polio oder Tollwut bräuchten dazu nach Infektion der Zelle nur wenige Stunden. Und natürlich kann in diesem Fall nur eine Sache zum Überleben des Wirtes führen, nämlich die sofortige Unterdrückung der Infektion innerhalb weniger Tage. Denn wenn dies länger als 7 bis 10 Tage anhält, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass diese Arten von Erregern Neuronen befallen so hoch, dass man stirbt. Und natürlich braucht es für diese Situation, in der ein Virus eine Zelle befällt, aber die Physiologie dieser Zelle im Großen und Ganzen intakt lässt, keine Immunologie, denn das Virus verursacht im Wesentlichen keinen Schaden. Und es gehören tatsächlich viel mehr Viren zu dieser Kategorie als zu jener. Denn es liegt nicht im primären Interesse eines Infektionserregers alle Wirte zu töten. Denn wenn alle Wirte tot sind, ist auch das Virus per definitionem verschwunden, denn das Virus braucht lebende Zellen, um sich zu replizieren. Das ist also relativ einfach. Deshalb spielt Immunologie hier eine wichtige Rolle. Tatsächlich spielt Immunologie hier keine Rolle und die meisten dieser Viren werden vor oder während der Geburt von einem infizierten Wirt zum nächsten übertragen. Und woran liegt das? Daran, dass der Nachwuchs vor der Geburt kein funktionierendes Immunsystem hat, in der Tat funktioniert das Immunsystem während der Geburt nicht, ist nicht ausgereift. Das ist also der optimale Zeitpunkt zur Übertragung dieser Erreger. Und es gibt Beispiele dafür, HIV zum Beispiel wird gewöhnlich während der Geburt mit dieser kleinen Bluttransfusion von der Mutter an Ihre Nachkommen übertragen. Und die Mutter ist natürlich ein Träger, denn ihre Immunantwort gegen diese Virusinfektion ist unzulänglich. Nun, bei HIV, darauf komme ich noch zurück, ist das Problem, wie Sie wissen, noch nicht gelöst, denn es ist ein neues oder sich entwickelndes Virus. Also kam es noch nicht zu einer Koadaptation von Wirt und Virus. Am Ende wird es jedoch wie bei HIV 2 sein, wissen Sie, die westafrikanische Form der HIV-Infektion, bei der man ganz deutlich erkennen kann, dass das Gleichgewicht zwischen Wirt und Virus bereits sehr weit fortgeschritten ist, tatsächlich macht HIV 2 die Menschen nicht krank oder tötet sie. Es ist also nur eine Frage der Zeit. Was aber an diesem Fall jetzt interessant ist, ist, wenn es jetzt zu einer Immunantwort kommt, wie eine T-Zelle, eine einzelne Immunantwort, dann erkennt man sofort, dass es nicht das Virus ist, das das Gewebe- und Organversagen verursacht, sondern tatsächlich die Immunantwort, denn diese Immunantwort tötet die infizierte Wirtszelle, die durch die Infektion an sich nicht getötet worden wäre. Und das nennen wir Immunpathologie, das ist eine Immunantwort mit pathologischem Ausgang, wo eine solche Konfrontation eigentlich unnötig wäre. Und deshalb werden diese Erreger zu einem Zeitpunkt übertragen, zu dem es keine Immunantwort gibt. Jetzt versuche ich denselben Aspekt mit dieser Zeichnung darzustellen. Versuchen Sie, mir zu folgen. Wenn man ein Virus betrachtet, das durch die Plazenta oder während der Geburt übertragen wird, dann findet man dieses Virus im gesamten Wirt und dieses Antigen oder dieses Virus werden sich wie ein Eigenantigen verhalten. Denn es war vor der Geburt da, es war während der Geburt da, und daher werden diese viralen Antigene von einem funktionierenden Immunsystem als Selbst erkannt. Denn wenn das nicht so wäre, würde sich die Immunantwort gegen alle diese infizierten Wirtszellen richten und das würde zu einer Immunpathologie vom Typ Graft-versus-Host führen und der Patient würde das nicht überleben. Und das andere Extrem ist dies: Ich habe hier gerade eine Infektion mit dem Papillomavirus bildlich dargestellt. Das ist ein Virus, das die äußersten Hautzellen befällt und die viralen Antigene nur in reifen Keratinozyten exprimiert. Nun, das ist ein Ort, der so weit außerhalb des Immunsystems, nämlich Lymphknoten oder Milz oder Blutkreislauf, liegt, dass das Immunsystem nicht einmal merkt, dass eine Infektion in der Haut stattfindet. Und daher kommt es nicht sehr schnell zu einer Immunantwort, es kann sogar Monate dauern, wie Sie es vielleicht aus eigener Erfahrung mit den Warzen kennen, die Sie vielleicht mal hatten, bei denen es Wochen bis Monate, wenn nicht Jahre dauert, sie loszuwerden, irgendwann verschwinden diese Warzen. Das heißt, wenn sich ein Antigen, sogar das Antigen eines Infektionserregers außerhalb der Reichweite der Lymphknoten oder der Milz oder der sogenannten sekundären lymphatischen Organe befindet, erfolgt keine Immunantwort. Und das Antigen, sogar das virale Antigen, muss erst die drainierenden Lymphknoten oder die Milz erreichen, um eine Antwort auszulösen. Und das passiert natürlich auch mit Warzen, wenn Ihr lieber Arzt die Warzen abschabt oder sie mit heißen Nadeln kauterisiert, um diese Warzen loszuwerden. Und genau das macht man, man verursacht eine Wunde, in der die Zellen nekrotisch werden, diese Zellen, die nekrotischen Zellen, werden dann von Makrophagen aufgenommen, die das Antigen zu dem drainierenden Lymphknoten bringen und jetzt wird eine Immunantwort ausgelöst oder beschleunigt. Und natürlich wird hier die gewöhnliche, klassische Situation dargestellt. Das Virus befällt, sagen wir, Ihren großen Zeh oder Ihre oberflächlichen Schleimhäute, und von dort breitet sich die Infektion zu den drainierenden Lymphknoten und schließlich über eine Virämie zur Milz aus. Und die klassischen Ausschläge, wissen Sie, nach Masern oder Pocken, entsprechen dieser virämischen Ausbreitung. Und diese phasenweise Ausbreitung des Virus zum drainierenden Lymphknoten und dann zur Milz verstärkt die Immunantwort tatsächlich, denn einmal im Lymphknoten angekommen, beginnt die Immunantwort sofort innerhalb von 2 oder 3 Tagen. Die T-Zellen und die Antikörper-produzierenden Zellen werden aktiviert, und wenn die virämische Ausbreitung beginnt, holt diese frühzeitige Aktivierung der Immunantwort die systemische Ausbreitung ein und verhindert, und das ist der Schlüssel, verhindert, dass sich das Virus bis ins Gehirn ausbreitet, denn das wäre das Ende, hat das Virus erst einmal ein Neuron infiziert, war's das. Und Tollwut ist natürlich ein klassisches Beispiel, bei dem das Virus ein Neuron infiziert. Einmal eingedrungen, gibt es wenig, was man dagegen tun kann. Lassen Sie uns jetzt zwei extreme Infektionsformen betrachten. Einmal die tollwut-ähnliche Infektion mit einem sehr engen Verwandten der Tollwut, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus genannt, das bei Mäusen eine Art Tollwut auslöst, denn es ist streng neurotrop. Sie sehen, wie sich das Virus repliziert, man erhält T-Zellantworten und man erhält Antikörperantworten. Und man erhält grundsätzlich zwei Arten, neutralisierend, d. h. diese können Sie beschützen, und man erhält ELISA, also bindende Antikörper. Und sie treten quasi gleichzeitig auf. Wenn man eine nicht-zytophatische Virusart, HIV oder Hepatitis C usw., nimmt, erkennt man, dass sich das Virus repliziert, es gibt eine gute T-Zellantwort und tatsächlich regelt die anfängliche T-Zellantwort die Viruslast auf ein nicht nachweisbares Niveau herunter. Nicht nachweisbar heißt, mit herkömmlichen Mitteln kann man es nicht erkennen, es heißt aber auch, dass es tatsächlich auf sehr geringem Niveau weiterbesteht. Wichtig ist jetzt, dass mit dem ELISA, d.h., wissen Sie, man steckt Antigene auf Plastikplatten, man kann die Antikörper immer sehr früh nachweisen, ungefähr so früh wie für diese akuten Killerviren. Die neutralisierenden, die schützenden Antikörper jedoch tauchen erst nach 80 bis 300 Tagen auf. Nun, jetzt kann man natürlich fragen, warum sollte diese Maus oder dieser Mensch ohne dass sich das Virus noch im Wirt befindet. Das ist der beste Beweis dafür, dass das Virus niemals ganz verschwindet. Tatsache ist also, dass am Ende neutralisierende oder schützende Antikörper entstehen, und das gilt für Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, Malaria, all diese persistierenden, chronischen Infektionstypen haben grundsätzlich dieses Muster. Wir erinnern uns, entscheidend ist die frühe T-Zellantwort, denn das ist der Mechanismus, der die Viruslast anfänglich drastisch reduziert. Wenn das nicht der Fall ist, breitet sich das Virus grundsätzlich über den gesamten infizierten Wirt aus. Nun, wenn es bei einem Virus 100 Tage dauert, bis schützende Antikörper aufkommen, geschieht das immer? Ja, das geschieht immer. In der Zwischenzeit haben diese Viren oder Erreger, Malaria, aber angefangen, sich zu replizieren, jede Replikation erhöht natürlich die Chancen auf Mutationen, und dabei mutieren insbesondere auch ihre Antigene, die Ziele für die neutralisierenden Antikörper, also die neutralisierende Determinante. Und das ist hier dargestellt. Hier haben wir also dieses nicht-zytopathische Virus, es repliziert sich, es wird größtenteils durch diese T-Zell-vermittelte Immunität kontrolliert. Man kann es für, sagen wir, 30, 40 Tage nicht nachweisen, aber dann ist das Virus sehr häufig für den Rest des Mause- oder Menschenlebens unter Kontrolle. In manchen Fällen aber kommt das Virus wieder auf. Nun, das ist merkwürdig, nicht, denn vor diesem Zeitpunkt gab es eine sehr gute, effiziente T-Zell-Immunantwort, die das Virus kontrollierte. Was ist passiert? Nun, ungefähr hier, nach 80 Tagen oder so, beginnt die Immunantwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, schützenden Antikörpern. Und es ist diese T-Zellantwort zusammen mit der Antwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, die in diesen Individuen das Virus auf nicht erkennbarem Niveau hält. In diesen Fällen sind das alles Mutanten, die den neutralisierenden Antikörpern entkommen. Nehmen wir also das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus, das Serum aus dieser Maus, testen es auf seine Fähigkeit, durch Neutralisation gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus zu schützen, und man findet heraus, dass dieses Serum das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus nicht neutralisieren kann. Das ist natürlich verständlich, Virämie in Gegenwart aller möglichen Sorten von neutralisierenden Antikörpern, aber nicht gegen diese bestimmte Variante oder Selektanten. Aber nimmt man das Serum dieser Maus, das gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus unwirksam ist, und testet es an dem ursprünglichen Virus, mit dem die Maus infiziert wurde, oder an allen anderen Varianten oder diesen kontrollierten Viren, findet man heraus, dass dieses Serum tatsächlich all diese anderen Varianten wirksam neutralisiert. Man kann also dieses von … durchgeführte Experiment wiederholen, und findet heraus, dass sich tatsächlich jedes einzelne dieser Viren, und wir sind nur bis etwa 20 oder 30 gegangen, von den anderen unterscheidet. Also wirkt das Anti-Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Serum nicht gegen dieses, aber gegen die meisten anderen. Und die Kontrolleure hier unten, tatsächlich hat das Serum neutralisierende Wirkung gegen die meisten dieser Varianten, was bedeutet, dass das Virus in einem Individuum sich die ganze Zeit ändert, mutiert, und der Wirt produziert neutralisierende Antikörper, tatsächlich ist das häufig ausreichend und effizient, wie in diesem Fall. In manchen Fällen sieht die relative Kinetik zwischen Virusmutation und -wachstum und den sich langsam entwickelnden, neutralisierenden Antikörpern jedoch so aus, dass das Virus Schlupflöcher findet, durch die es entkommen kann, und das bestimmt das Gleichgewicht. Jetzt fragt man sich natürlich, warum sollte dann die T-Zellantwort, die in dieser frühen Phase aktiviert wurde, nicht gegen all diese entstehenden Virusvarianten wirken. Nun, die Folgerung und die Antwort ist ganz einfach: Viele Mäuse sterben in diesem Zeitraum, ähnlich wie bei HIV-AIDS, weil die T-Zellimmunantwort die infizierten Wirtszellen zerstört, und ein großer Teil der HIV-AIDS-artigen Krankheiten besteht tatsächlich aus einer immunvermittelten Zerstörung der durch das Virus infizierten Wirtszellen. Und das führt zum Tod des Patienten oder zumindest zu einer schwerwiegenden Erkrankung. Und nur in manchen Fällen werden die T-Zellen tatsächlich vernichtet, verschwinden, und dadurch wird die Immunpathologie reduziert oder beseitigt und das Endergebnis ist, dass das Virus gewinnt, bleibt, aber da die T-Zellantwort aufgehört hat, kümmert das niemanden, denn das Virus selbst richtet wirklich keinen großen Schaden an. Und ich sage noch mal, HIV 1 hat dieses Stadium noch nicht ganz erreicht, aber HIV 2 scheint dieses Ergebnis grundsätzlich gewählt zu haben. Und natürlich ist die nächste Frage, wo versteckt sich das Virus, da man sagt, es sei unter Kontrolle. Nun, wo kann man einen Wirt, einen Patienten, auf das Virus untersuchen? Gut, man nimmt etwas Blut ab und hofft, das Virus in Blutzellen oder im Blut zu finden. Natürlich ist Blut sehr wichtig, aber dort würden Sie sich als Virus nicht verstecken. Denn wie ich schon gesagt habe, ist das Virus, wenn es sich im lymphohämatopoetischen System befindet, besonders anfällig und empfindlich gegen Immunangriffe. Deshalb verbergen sich alle diese Viren in Zellen außerhalb des Immunsystems, insbesondere in Neuronen, denken Sie nur an die Herpesviren, sie verbergen sich im Ganglion. Oder viele Viren verbergen sich in Neuronen. Und wenn sie sich außerhalb des Immunsystems befinden, kann das Immunsystem grundsätzlich nichts gegen sie unternehmen, denn die Serumantikörper können nur dann periphere feste Gewebszellen erreichen, wenn es dort eine Verletzung gibt. Bleibt das Virus jetzt latent und verursacht keinen Zellschaden, gibt es keinen Grund, warum es zu einer Blutung in die Wunde kommen sollte. Und genau dieses Gleichgewicht wird im Allgemeinen von Viren genutzt, und sie nutzen periphere Stellen, Neuronen, Nieren, Tubuluszellen, Hodenzellen, lange Epithelzellen. Und natürlich besteht der Vorteil dieser Orte darin, dass sich das Virus von diesen peripheren Orten aus sehr leicht verbreiten kann. Wissen Sie, Viren auszupinkeln, auszuhusten ist offensichtlich eine sehr effiziente Art der Verbreitung. Und das zeigt einfach ein Beispiel hier, in der Harnröhre, hier in den Zellen der Nierentubuli. Ich fasse hier also zusammen, dass das Immunsystem grundsätzlich verschiedene Arten von Antikörpern produziert, das IgA auf oberflächlichen Schleimhäuten, das IgM ganz akut und sehr effizient innerhalb der ersten paar Tage, dann das Umschalten auf IgD für langlebige Antikörper mit etwa 3 Wochen Halbwertszeit. Und ich komme darauf zurück, denn dieser Antikörper, der IgD-Antikörper hat natürlich ein besonderes Merkmal, nämlich dass er über sein Fc, dem konstanten Teil des Antikörpers, an Fc-Rezeptoren binden kann. Und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren können diese Antikörper von Müttern an ihren Nachwuchs übertragen werden, über diese Fc-Rezeptoren, nicht nur in der Plazenta, sondern dann auch an den Nachwuchs über Bluttransfusion, aber auch im Darm. Und dies ist besonders wichtig bei Kälbern oder Wiederkäuern, denn wir alle verwenden in der Biologie fötales Kälberserum, denn Kuhföten erhalten keine Antikörper von ihren Müttern. Die Plazenta weist von beiden Seiten vollständig doppelte Membranen auf. Daher können Proteine nicht passieren. Deswegen müssen Kälber die mütterlichen Antikörper mit der ersten Kolostralmilch aufnehmen, die sie in den ersten 24 Stunden erhalten. T-Zell-Kontrolle beseitigt intrazelluläre Parasiten, aber ich habe Ihnen eine Vorstellung von dieser Art der Situation vermittelt, gefährlich aufgrund der Immunpathologie. Sie regulieren natürlich diesen Immunglobulin-Schalter, diese langlebigen, dies dient überwiegend dazu, eine zu einfache Generierung von Antikörpern zu vermeiden. Aber die T-Zellen verursachen auch diese immunpathologische Komplikation. Lassen Sie mich jetzt auf die Schlüsselfrage kommen, warum brauchen wir das sogenannte immunologische Gedächtnis, was als schnellere und bessere Antwort definiert ist, wenn Sie dem Antigen vorher schon einmal begegnet sind. Und in den Lehrbüchern steht, schneller und besser ist alles, was es zum immunologischen Gedächtnis zu sagen gibt. Wenn Sie aber die erste Infektion nicht überleben, brauchen Sie sicherlich kein Gedächtnis. Und überstehen Sie die erste Infektion gut, könnte man trotzdem in Frage stellen, dass man ein immunologisches Gedächtnis braucht. Denn wenn Sie die erste Infektion überlebt haben, wissen Sie, dass das System effizient genug ist, auch die nächste Infektion zu überstehen, zumindest für die nächsten 25 Jahre, und das ist alles, worauf es ankommt. Natürlich habe ich bereits gesagt, dass alle Impfstoffe, die schützen, dazu auf Antikörper zurückgreifen. Lassen Sie uns nun ein ganz einfaches Experiment durchführen, und das wurde vor einiger Zeit von Ulrich Steinhoff durchgeführt, einem Post-Doc in meinem Labor; man immunisiert Mäuse gegen dieses tollwutähnliche Virus und dann, nach einiger Zeit, sagen wir 3 Monate, sagt man, gut, wir haben jetzt ein immunologisches Gedächtnis, wir haben das sogenannte T-Zell-Gedächtnis und das B-Zell-Gedächtnis, wir nehmen diese Milzzellen, T- und B-Gedächtniszellen, übertragen diese auf einen naiven Empfänger, der dem Virus nie ausgesetzt war, und bringen die Maus dann mit genau diesem Virus in Kontakt, und es stellt sich heraus, dass alle Mäuse sterben. Nun, man hätte annehmen sollen, dass die Übertragung der sogenannten B- und T-Gedächtniszellen einen sehr soliden Schutz darstellt, scheint aber nicht der Fall zu sein. Jetzt machen wir ein zweites Experiment, wir nehmen das Serum dieser Maus mit diesen IgD-Antikörpern, die wir als schützende Antikörper nachweisen können, wir übertragen dieses per Transfusion auf den naiven Empfänger und wir stellen fest, dass alle Mäuse geschützt sind. Das bedeutet also, dass T- und B-Gedächtniszellen ein nettes Spielzeug für den Immunologen im Labor darstellen, prima. Es ist auch interessant zu verstehen, was passiert, aber der Schlüssel dazu, diese akuten zytopathischen Viren zu überleben, liegt tatsächlich darin, ein bereits bestehendes Antikörperniveau zu haben, dann sind sie gegen die Herausforderung einer Infektion mit diesem neurotropen Virus gerüstet. Nun, das ist natürlich genau die Situation, der wir alle ausgesetzt waren als wir geboren wurden. Denn wir werden ohne ein funktionierendes Immunsystem geboren. Jetzt, natürlich nicht heute in Lindau oder Berlin oder Zürich, aber lassen Sie uns 200 Jahre zurück gehen, damals war man bei der Geburt praktisch allen epidemiologisch bedeutenden Infektionen sofort, zum Zeitpunkt Null, ausgesetzt. Und damals war das Einzige, was Sie beschützte, Ihre mütterlichen Antikörper. Die immunologische Erfahrung Ihrer Mutter, die Ihnen per Transfusion und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren ihrer Antikörper von der Mutter übertragen wurden. Das entspricht also genau diesem Experiment und jetzt wollen wir mal sehen, wie sich das verallgemeinern lässt. Sehen Sie, wenn Ihre Mutter ein Virusträger ist, dann hat sie natürlich Virämie, und dieses Virus wird entweder vor der Geburt durch Infektion über die Plazenta oder bei der Geburt übertragen, denn bei jedem einzelnen Geburtsvorgang wird eine gewisse Menge mütterlichen Blutes an den Nachwuchs übertragen. Und das ist auch der Grund, wissen Sie, das Problem der Rhesusunverträglichkeit und all diese Probleme entstehen aufgrund der mütterlichen Bluttransfusion. Aber für das Virus ist das natürlich eine phantastisch effiziente Möglichkeit, die nächste Generation zu erreichen. Natürlich können Sie nur so vorgehen, wenn Sie ein nicht-zytopathisches Virus sind, ansonsten würden Sie den Nachwuchs umbringen, aber Ihre Mutter wäre auch gar nicht in der Lage gewesen, schwanger zu werden und zu gebären, denn sie wäre vorher gestorben. Jetzt bleibt das übertragene Virus bestehen, denn das Immunsystem reagiert nicht, weil es zum Zeitpunkt der ersten Begegnung noch nicht ausgereift war. Alles läuft also reibungslos und tatsächlich könnte man argumentieren, dass dies die ultimative Verhaltensweise für ein Virus oder einen Infektionserreger ist. Verursache keinen Schaden, verursache keine Immunreaktion, die Schaden verursachen könnte, sogenannte Immunpathologie, alle sind glücklich. Ein integriertes Virus übrigens, Mechanismen der retroviralen Integration wären eine sogar noch fortschrittlichere Koevolution. Aber ich habe keine Zeit, auf Einzelheiten einzugehen. Nun, lassen Sie uns die akute Situation…, die mütterliche Erfahrung in Bezug auf Anti-Infektionserreger hat sich über 15 Jahre in der Mutter angesammelt, und dieser Antikörper hat sich dann zum Zeitpunkt der Geburt im Nachwuchs angesammelt, der Nachwuchs hat, sagen wir, therapeutische Dosen und präventive Dosen der mütterlichen Antikörper erhalten. Und dieser mütterliche Antikörper wird schließlich entsprechend der Halbwertszeit dieses Immunglobulins abnehmen und während der ersten 6 bis 12 Monate wird es viele Infektionen geben, nämlich alle Infektionen, die epidemiologisch eine Rolle spielen. Ist eine Infektion nicht vorhanden, ist das nicht schlimm. Aber bis vor ungefähr 200 Jahre waren alle Infektionen immer vorhanden, waren immer vorhanden die ganze Zeit. Jetzt werden diese Infektionen anfänglich natürlich sehr effizient kontrolliert, aber schließlich mit abnehmenden Antikörpern immer weniger, und es wird einen Punkt geben, an dem der Schutz durch mütterliche Antikörper nur noch halb da ist oder nur noch zu einem Viertel und das bedeutet, die Infektion findet statt, wird aber drastisch gemildert. Das ist also ein Dämpfungseffekt, der sehr interessant ist. Die Virusinfektion findet statt, aber der Krankheitsverlauf wird so herabgesetzt, dass der Nachwuchs in der Tat gar nicht krank wird oder gar stirbt. Nun erinnern Sie sich an andere Impfstoffe, die wir verwenden, wie Polio oder Masern, dafür nutzen wir einen anderen Vorgang, tatsächlich dämpfen wir das Virus durch Mutation, sodass es weniger virulent ist. Daher können wir eine Dosis verabreichen, die Immunität induziert, ohne den Geimpften wirklich krank zu machen. Die Evolution hat sich für einen anderen Weg entschieden, den gesamten Vorgang zu mildern, dasselbe gilt für virulente Viren, denn dort machen die Milchantikörper in der Muttermilch im Grunde das Gleiche. Die erstmalige Konfrontation zwischen Infektionserregern und mütterlichen Antikörpern ist daher der Schlüssel zum Verständnis der gesamten Epidemiologie und des Ergebnisses. Daher kann ich schlussfolgern, was die Immunantwort steuert, denn Ihre Mutter muss garantiert mit einem ausreichenden Infektionsniveau konfrontiert gewesen sein. Und all dies wird über neutralisierende Antikörper vermittelt. Das kann durch einen Anstieg der B-Zellfrequenz geschehen, dies größtenteils antigenunabhängig, und ich habe keine Zeit darauf einzugehen. Aber der Erhalt der neutralisierenden Antikörper im Serum der Mutter geschieht antigenabhängig aufgrund der Halbwertszeit des Immunglobulins, und die Reifung einer B-Zelle, damit daraus eine antikörperproduzierende Plasmazelle wird, ist antigenabhängig. Und dieser erneute Kontakt kann von innen kommen, aus diesem persistierenden Virusreservoir, kann aus diesen Antikörper-Antigen-Komplexen im lymphatischen Gewebe stammen und von außerhalb, wie das bei all diesen Durchfall verursachenden Viren der Fall ist, denen Sie am Türgriff oder im Schwimmbad oder in der Schule usw. wieder begegnen. Daher ist meine Schlussfolgerung, Impfungen sind möglich und effizient, wenn man denselben Mechanismus verwendet, den auch die Evolution verwendet, nämlich Schutz durch neutralisierende Antikörper. Um das Antikörperniveau hoch zu halten, brauchen wir regelmäßig Antigen aus diesen verschiedenen Quellen. Noch können wir diese Art der schützenden Immunität, die auf einer sehr niedrigen Konzentration eines persistierenden Antigens basiert, nicht für alle chronischen Infektionen nachahmen. Nehmen wir einfach Tuberkulose, Sie haben ein Granulom in Ihrer Lunge, in meinem Alter hätten mehr als die Hälfte diese Wunde. Ich erkranke nicht an Tuberkulose, warum? Da meine Immunantwort immer noch gut genug ist, diese Wunde zu kontrollieren. Aber ohne diese Wunde würde die T-Zell-Immunantwort nicht dazu gebracht, die vorhandene Wunde zu kontrollieren, es ist also gut ausbalanciert. Warum kann ich also meine Wunde nicht los werden? Es ist eine mikroskopisch kleine Wunde. Nun, weil ich meine Immunantwort auf ein so hohes Niveau treiben müsste, um diese Mikrowunden los zu werden, dass ich mich selbst durch Immunpathologie umbringen würde. Da gibt es also ein empfindliches Gleichgewicht. In der Tat ist TB, der Wildstamm der TB, auf eine Art der beste Impfstoff gegen TB, Sie sagen, dass sei politisch inkorrekt, aber praktisch ist es genau so. Und es ist uns bisher einfach nicht gelungen, diesen Vorgang zu imitieren. Und das gilt auch für HIV, das gilt auch für Malaria, für Bilharziose usw. Sie könnten also fragen: Warum haben wir das nicht geschafft? Nun, es sieht so aus, als hätte die Koevolution dies in einem physiologischen Prozess seit Millionen von Jahren versucht, und das jetzt in ein paar Wochen oder Jahren nachzuahmen ist nicht unmöglich, aber anscheinend nicht erfolgreich. Sehr viel wichtiger ist aber ein anderer Punkt. Die meisten dieser chronischen Infektionsarten können durch Antibiotika wie bei TB und Lepra oder Virostatika wie bei HIV und anderen oder Antiparasitika oder Vektorkontrolle eingedämmt werden, wissen Sie, wieder politisch inkorrekt aber notwendig, DDT hat Malaria eingedämmt. Aber der begrenzende Faktor in all diesen Fällen ist unsere menschliche Dummheit. Denn wir als Einzelne könnten HIV ganz einfach verhindern, insbesondere in der westlichen Hälfte der Welt, indem wir einfach auf die Handlungen verzichten, die zu einer HIV-Infektion führen, Drogenmissbrauch, ungeschützter Sex usw. Aber wir sind zu dumm, um wirklich zu tun, was wir denken, dass es das Richtige wäre. Vielen Dank. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank für einen sehr lehrreichen und auch sehr guten Vortrag. Normalerweise würde ich mehrere Fragen dazu entgegennehmen, aber das Programm, an dem wir uns beteiligen, lässt das nicht zu, denn jetzt haben wir eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Und ich glaube, nach alldem, würde ich trotzdem zwei Fragen zulassen, wer möchte zwei Fragen stellen, ja. FRAGE. Ich frage mich gerade, wenn man von der vertikalen Übertragung von HIV an Kinder ausgeht, da es über den CD4-Rezeptor geht, kann es Zellen befallen, die für die Entwicklung der inneren Organe wie (nicht hörbar 44:42) wichtig sind, gibt es einen Nachweis, dass es bei Kleinkindern nicht zu Entwicklungsstörungen in ihren … (nicht hörbar 44:50 ) Zellen kommt und damit zu folgenschweren Auswirkungen auf ihre Fähigkeit, eine Immunantwort auf andere Infektionen aufzubauen. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Die Frage lautet also, wie wirkt sich eine HIV-Infektion bei Kleinkindern, bei Neugeborenen, wie wirkt sich das auf die Fähigkeit sowohl des Wirts als auch des Virus aus. Nun, ich habe versucht zu erläutern, dass HIV 1 im Moment gerade ein schlechtes Beispiel ist. Wissen Sie, lassen Sie uns 500 Jahre warten, denn bis dahin wird HIV 1 zwangsläufig vernünftigere Wege entwickelt und eingeschlagen haben. HIV 2 hat das schon getan, aber Sie wissen, man bekommt keine Forschungsgelder für HIV 2, denn HIV 2 ist kein Problem. Daher kann ich Ihre Frage nicht beantworten, denn wir wissen es einfach nicht und die Epidemiologie hat noch nicht das Stadium erreicht, in dem sich ein Gleichgewicht eingestellt hat. Die Voraussage ist jedoch, es wird sich ein Gleichgewicht einstellen müssen, denn sonst wird HIV, wird entweder die Menschheit oder HIV 1 nicht überleben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Sie machen Antworten sehr leicht, sehr gut. Gibt es noch die zweite Frage, ja? FRAGE. Zuerst möchte ich Ihnen für einen sehr spannenden Vortrag danken. Meine Frage betrifft Tuberkulose. Es ist bekannt, dass eine Population von aschkenasischen Juden extrem resistent gegen Tuberkulose ist. Aber in dieser Population gibt es eine hohe Inzidenz von Tay-Sachs. Gibt es irgendwelche Zusammenhänge zwischen der Tay-Sachs-Krankheit und der Resistenz gegen Tuberkulose? Vielen Dank für diese Frage. Die Frage lautet also, gibt es einen Zusammenhang zwischen einer Makrophagen-assoziierten Speicherkrankheit und der Anfälligkeit für TB. Und Sie wissen, dass der Effektormechanismus zur Kontrolle sogenannter fakultativ intrazellulärer Bakterien tatsächlich die Fähigkeit der Makrophagen oder Monozyten ist, mit der Infektion fertig zu werden. Also ja, es gibt einen Zusammenhang. Ich kenne die molekularen Einzelheiten nicht, aber ich glaube, worauf Sie hinauswollen, ist ein guter Punkt. In der Biologie, Medizin, gibt es nie einen absoluten Gewinner. Sie können also einen Nachteil bei der Speicherung haben, aber Sie gewinnen einen Vorteil gegen bestimmte Infektionen und das gilt für viele Dinge. Wissen Sie, der CCR5-Rezeptor für HIV 1, wenn Sie ein bestimmtes Allel haben oder es fehlt Ihnen, sind Sie resistenter gegen HIV, bisher nicht entdeckt, aber man kann darauf wetten, wissen Sie, dass es einen Nachteil geben wird, wenn Ihnen CCR5 fehlt. Fazit also, Biologie ist niemals schwarz oder weiß. Es hat immer, wissen Sie, bestimmte Vorteile und Sie erkaufen sich diese mit Nachteilen. Und ich glaube, wissen Sie, menschliches Verhalten funktioniert genauso. Wenn man was auch immer kaufen möchte, Lustverhalten, kostet das etwas, das ist Biologie. Das lässt uns ehrlich bleiben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank.

Rolf Zinkernagel (2007): Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?
(00:06:06 - 00:06:44)

The complete video is available here.

The holy grail of a cure for AIDS seemed to have come within our grasp with the case of the ‘Berlin patient’, first reported at a scientific conference in 2008. This HIV sufferer underwent a bone marrow transplant to treat leukaemia, which then also remarkably cured his HIV.10 This naturally generated a lot of excitement. Could this be a way to eradicate HIV completely? Well, as often in science, things are not that simple.

HIV in Hiding (2014): Françoise Barré-Sinoussi on the most recent developments in the battle against HIV
(00:04:54 - 00:06:26)

The complete video is available here.

The caveats mentioned by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi highlight how difficult it will be to develop treatments that cure AIDS completely. Does this mean that we should give up the fight? Françoise Barré-Sinoussi is adamant that while achieving lasting cures remains daunting, scientists should continue to exert their efforts in this direction and to improve AIDS treatments further. Indeed, as she has emphasised in her talks at Lindau, advances in therapy have often followed soon after important insights into HIV biology. Important discoveries in the last decade mean that the time is right to push for more effective AIDS treatments.

Françoise  Barré-Sinoussi (2014) - On The Road Toward an HIV Cure

Thank you very much, Stefan. It's my real pleasure to start this morning session and to be here for my second time in Lindau. It's really a wonderful meeting, and I hope that all of you really will enjoy this week in Lindau. So today I decided to talk about not only my work, but the work of many people in the world trying to find a cure for HIV. It's not an easy task as you can imagine. So my first slide is just to remind you that indeed it’s more than 30 years of HIV science today. The virus was isolated at the Pasteur Institute in 1983, and you can see on this slide certainly not all the achievements that have been done over the 30 years. But, I like to show on this slide main progresses that have been done in basic research and in parallel the translation, let’s say, of this basis knowledge in tools for the benefit of patients. So in blue on this slide to be short you have the progresses that have been made in our basic knowledge on HIV. In green you have the tools that derived from those progresses. And in pink you have some success in prevention. Of course as you know we still do not have a vaccine and as you know we do not have a cure. However, we have because of our knowledge on HIV it has been able to develop a therapeutic strategy which is combined antiretroviral treatment which is capable to stop HIV replication in the infected patients. This treatment is also capable to restore at least partially immune function and at the end is capable to prevent the development of the disease AIDS. It has improved the quality of life, it prolongs the life expectancy. Even we can say today that if the treatment is started very early on, the life expectancy is almost the same as one of people that are not infected by HIV. We learnt all over the last years that the treatment is also prevention. It's capable to prevent the transmission of HIV from one infected individual on treatment to his or her partner. It has been a wonderful progress also in the access to the combined antiretroviral therapy in low and middle-income countries. This slide is reminding you that we have about 35 million people living with HIV, most of them are in sub-Saharan Africa. Fortunately this treatment, and really thanks to antiretroviral treatment, more than 4 million of deaths have been avoided. We have today around 10 million of people on treatment. This is not sufficient. As indicated on this slide, the last WHO guideline, published last year in July 2013, indicates that we have to treat earlier, that means we have around 26 million of people in need of treatment. This is a big challenge as you can imagine. So today we can say that in the field of HIV AIDS one of the first priorities is implementation: Implementation of tools to prevent new infection in uninfected people, of course using all the tools – combining the tools like education, condoms, circumcision, risk reduction, antiretroviral treatment -used as prevention today. We have also to improve testing, treating and retaining the patient into the treatment, the continuum of care. Unfortunately the cascade of continuum of care is indicating that the patients on long-term do not adhere to treatment. There is a loss. So it’s a loss which, according to the country, can be 25% to 50%. In addition we have between 30 and 50% of people that do not know that they are HIV positive - this is not acceptable today. So this is a real challenge. Among the challenges that are listed on this list you have the political willingness fighting against stigma and discrimination, which is very important if we want to improve the frequency of people going for the test. We have also key scientific challenges and priorities in HIV science today. I mentioned the biggest one, HIV discovery, of course. We are making significant progress in the field of HIV vaccine during the last years, in particular with the discovery of very potent broadly neutralising antibody, but we are not there yet. I mentioned comorbidity on long life treatment, because unfortunately long-term we can see between 8 to 15% of patients on treatments that develop what we call non-AIDS-related morbidities. And I will make a link by the way towards this challenge to the cure discovery itself. HIV cure is a very big challenge. We have a persistent infection on HAART and we have to understand how to manage to eliminate the virus, to eradicate the virus from the body. So for this challenge we need novel ideas; we need multidisciplinary collaboration; we need to have a partnership between the public and private sector; we need to have international collaboration and of course we need funding. Why do we need a cure? My first answer to that is generally because the patients are looking for it. My first thing when I met them in different countries in the world including in resource-limited settings as yet I always ask the question, “What are you expecting from us as scientists? in 80% of the cases they answer, they would like a treatment that we can stop. So that's as yet. That’s as yet, and this is exactly what Fred Verdult, a representative of people living with HIV, said to my colleague Steve Deeks in in St. Maarten in 2011. Saying to him, “Look I made a little survey in my country in Netherlands and found out that 72% of the people living with HIV are thinking it is very important for them to be cured.” And for reasons that are not exactly the same that Steve Deeks and many others were expecting, for example for them it was very important because they will not have to deal anymore with stigma; they will not be afraid anymore to infect other people. So we have to take this as a scientist into consideration. Why do we need a cure? It's because a lifelong treatment for all is unlikely to be sustainable. Of course we are all calling for universal access to antiretroviral treatment, however as I said only 10 million are on treatment today. For each 3 patients starting treatment we have 5 new cases of infection. We have only very few countries with the coverage of more than 80%. This lifelong treatment, as I mentioned, is with a difficult adherence; we have substantial stigma and discrimination fears; life expectancy is still reduced in a significant proportion of patients; and it’s a long-term cost. So we really need to think about other strategies. First of all we have to understand why - why the infection is persisting on HAART. This slide is showing you that the results, by way of different studies, trying to interrupt the treatment. And we were surprised in those studies to see a viral rebound as indicated on this slide. By looking more carefully, even if the patients who were on HAART had undetectable viral load measure by quantifying the viral RNA in the plasma, it turns out that we were able to detect HIV DNA in patient cells. So this is what we call the reservoirs. The reservoirs are the latently infected T cells. But we have also to consider that even on treatment we cannot exclude a residual low level of residual viral replication, which is related to inflammation, immune activation that remains abnormal in patients on HAART. We have to consider that latently infected cells are present in several compartments, including in the brain. We have to consider also the fact that the treatment not always penetrates very well in all of the tissues of the host. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research now? It's because also we have a better knowledge on HIV pathogenesis. I will not go into detail of this slide, but we certainly learned a lot over the years regarding the importance of immune activation, the importance of the persistence of infection. We know that very early on, as this slide is showing you, we have a loss of gut integrity and microbial translocations that probably play a role in abnormal immune activation and inflammation. We know that everything in this disease is decided very early on during the acute phase of infection, and the establishment of viral persistence and viral reservoir is really during this very early phase of infection. Abnormal inflammation is also starting during the early phase and infection is maintained, and both of them are interdependent. Why is it time to accelerate HIV cure research? It is also because we have a better knowledge on the molecular mechanism of HIV latency. This slide is a summary of the different mechanisms that should be considered for HIV latency, first of all as a sequestration of transcription factors but also as potential mechanism of latency. We have to consider the promoter occlusion, the convergent transcription, the defective transcription elongation factors, DNA methylation and chromatin silencing. All these mechanisms are certainly to be considered for the development of novel strategies for the future, but I must say we are still far to understand deeply all the mechanisms of latency and there is progress to be made in this area. We have a better knowledge on HIV reservoirs, which are indeed in many cell subsets and tissues. We know that the persistence and the stability of the reservoir is very long, since even after 10 years of HAART we can detect this reservoir. It was our belief that the CD4 cells that are latently infected by the virus were quite rare. The estimate was between 1/10^5 to 1/10^6 resting CD4 T cells. The very recent data indicates that indeed it's probably underestimated and we have probably more reservoir cells than we thought. What are the reservoir cells? The main reservoir is the resting central and transitional CD4 memory T cells. We have to consider the fact that the latent infection is also present in other cells like astrocytes, monocytes, myeloid lineage, hematopoietic progenitor cells as well. The compartments that contain the latently infected cells are not only the blood but the gut and genital tract, lymphoid tissue, the central nervous system. We are understanding also more and more about why the latently infected cells are persisting. We know that the cells by themselves, the CD4 cells are the long half-life CD4 cells that survive. We know today that there is a homeostatic proliferation of those cells. I explain why: we have the persistence of these latently infected cells. We have to consider immune mechanisms that maintain cells in the resting state, like for example an up-regulation of PD-1 which may contribute to HIV persistence. We are understanding also better and better the main driver of inflammation and chronic activation. I already mentioned microbial translocation but you can see on this slide that there are many other mechanisms like the altered balance of the CD4 T cells subset between T-regulatory T cell and Th17 for example; the loss of regulatory T cells; the role of viral protein like Nef, Tat or Vpx for example. The fact that other pathogens might play a role in this inflammation, like for example CMV coinfection. And this inflammation and activation is probably related to the comorbidities and ageing that we could see long-term in patients on HAART. Which kind of cure are we looking for? Generally when we are speaking about cure, we are speaking about eradication; eradication that means sterilising cure. So that means elimination of all latently infected cells. This is an almost impossible mission after what I said. However, we have one proof of concept: the Berlin patient who received a very complicated treatment bone marrow transplant from a particular donor with a mutation in the co-receptor CCF5 mutation which is present only in Caucasians. So it's not a strategy that can be used at large scale, but we cannot detect anymore the virus in different compartments of his body. Remission. Remission is probably our main goal, and it's more reasonable in my opinion. Remission that means that we will have a long-term health without any treatment, without any risk to transmit to others. And we have also proofs of concept. What are the proofs of concept? One of the first ones by the way, our natural protection against AIDS in African monkeys that do not develop AIDS as they have viral replication. They have attenuated inflammation, attenuated chronic immune activation. Bone marrow transplantation I already mentioned, the Berlin patient. We thought we will have 2 other cases with the Boston patients who received also a bone marrow transplant, however, we learnt after they stopped the treatment that unfortunately they had a relapse of HIV viremia We have HIV controllers, the people that are naturally controlling their infection: they never receive antiretroviral treatment; they have undetectable viral load, low size of reservoir; they have a very efficient suppressive CD8 response, correlated to HLA B27 and B57, so to a particular genetic background. They have also for some of them a capacity to restrict the infection of their CD4 cells and of their macrophages. Finally we have also the case of "functional" cure in very early treatment, the "Mississippi baby", probably you have heard of her from the media, she was treated 30 hours after birth, so very early on, for 18 months. Her mother stopped the treatment for 6 months, she came back and the virus was not detected anymore in the baby. In my country, in France, we, my group in collaboration with others, we identified a group of 14 patients, we have 20 patients today, treated very early on about 10 weeks during the primary infection for 3 years. They stopped the treatment. Now it's 9 years that they are without any treatment, they are doing perfectly well: They have low size of reservoir as well; they don’t have a strong CD8 suppressive response; they don’t have the same genetic background as the HIV controllers So we are trying to understand why - why these men were capable to control their infection. So that's the reason, we thought it was time at the International AIDS Society to accelerate research on HIV cure. I personally thought that the best way to go was to have a bottom-up approach and to really ask a group of scientists to work together and to define what are the main priorities to accelerate research on HIV cure. It's what we did, and we published in 2012, in Nature Review Immunology, a kind of scientific roadmap with the main priority in cure research. We can summarise them as 7 priorities which are shown on this slide: Starting from molecular and cellular and viral mechanisms of persistence that still need to be better understood; have a better understanding of tissue and cellular sources of persistent infection in animal models as well as in patients on long-term ART; to understand better the origins of immune activation and dysfunction in the presence of ART; to understand better the host and immune mechanisms that control HIV infection but still allow viral persistence; to have better assays to study and measure the reservoir; and to develop therapeutic strategies and immunological strategies to eliminate the latently infected cells in patients; and also to certainly enhance the host response to control replication. Where are we today? Can we cure HIV latency with "reactivation" drugs? Several drugs which are mentioned on this slide like NF-kappaB activators have been tried already. And the administration of the Vorinostat in a patient on HAART showed that we can reactivate the virus but indeed, when we measured recently, the size of the reservoir is the same. So it’s a little bit disappointing, I must say. So it's probably not enough. We need to ask the question: What proportion of the reservoir is susceptible to this drug? Are proteins of variants being produced on this kind of treatment? How safe is this approach? Can we cure HIV infection with immune-based therapy? We have some arguments to think that that might be the way to go. For example we know that the frequency of HIV DNA-containing resting memory cells correlates with the frequency of activated CD4 T cells. By the way we know in our patients that were treated earlier, the VISCONTI patients, that they have a very, very low level of inflammation and immune activation. We have this study with rapamycin, which reduces CCR5 expression and T cell activation and was associated with the lower size reservoir in post-renal transplant. So we have several questions that we are asking regarding immune-based therapy today. Can we enhance killing of HIV-infected cells by vaccine therapy in vivo? There is promising data like this study of Louis Picker in a macaque model, using a very highly pathogenic SIV and using as a vaccine CMV vector which is capable to induce a very high level of effector CD8 T cells in lymphoid and mucosa tissue and this study clearly showed that the CD8 response was capable to decrease the size of the reservoir in the monkey. So this is very promising. Probably... I'd like to say that regarding vaccine therapy: we have to consider also the antibodies. There is very promising data today with broadly neutralising antibodies, and I must say that the data also in macaques is very encouraging regarding the possibility from broadly neutralising antibodies to decreasing the size of the reservoirs. Finally can we cure HIV infection with allogeneic stem cell transplantation? I told you about the Boston patient - there are those gene therapies studies using for example CCR5-modified T cells that show some interesting data. But my question is whether gene modification of T cells for a cure is feasible? Can stem cells be harvested gene-modified and transplanted in a safe, effective, affordable, and scalable manner, especially in resource-limited settings? What are the barriers but new opportunities? We are very... there are new opportunities for clinical research toward a cure. I already mentioned some of them like the direct acting anti-latency drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs But we have to keep in mind that we really want a strategy that will be affordable as I say for resource-limited settings. The future cure strategy will probably be a combined approach with these different strategies I would like to say based certainly on our basic knowledge on the mechanism of persistence. Quantifying the reservoir and tools for cure studies are really something that we have to work on. I told you the Boston patient really said to us, you don’t have the right to measure the reservoirs. We need to understand the biology of HIV persistence as well for that. We need to have a biomarker to predict the efficacy of the functional cure. We need to have those markers to evaluate the impact of any intervention on the reservoirs. And based on those biomarkers, in the future, I would not be surprised to have an approach, let's say, towards a personalised cure therapy. So I will end by saying that what we need is really an integrated strategy with all the components Remember inflammation, as it was said yesterday, inflammation is critical in many diseases We have to work also with social scientists and scientists involved in economic science. We have to work together with the stakeholders, with the donors; and it's what we did at International Society by implementing an international Advisory Board responsible for implementing and following the strategy: to make funding, of course; to have a coordination in funding; and to make sure that we have international multidisciplinary collaboration at all the levels. I'd like to say that we might be successful, I'm sure we will be successful in a remission, in a chemical remission in the future, if we work all together as we did in the very early years of HIV research. It's what we are trying to do with my co-chair of the next conference in Melbourne, Sharon Lewin. I was glad to see in Lindau the strong implication of Australia. Sharon is from Melbourne, she will be as the Director of the Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. And I am pleased to say that we are used, with Sharon and Steve, to organise regularly now a meeting on HIV cure before the AIDS conference. Thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Stefan. Ich freue mich sehr darüber, diese Vormittagssitzung beginnen zu können und zum zweiten Mal hier in Lindau zu sein. Das ist eine wunderbare Tagung, und ich hoffe, Sie alle werden die Woche in Lindau genießen. Heute habe ich mich dazu entschlossen, nicht nur über meine Arbeit zu sprechen, sondern über die Arbeit vieler Menschen auf der ganzen Welt, die versuchen, ein Heilmittel gegen HIV zu finden. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das keine leichte Aufgabe. Mit meiner ersten Folie möchte ich Sie daran erinnern, dass wir heute tatsächlich schon auf über 30 Jahre HIV-Wissenschaft zurückblicken. Das Virus wurde 1983 im Institut Pasteur isoliert. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie bei weitem nicht alle Erfolge, die in diesen 30 Jahren erzielt wurden. Ich möchte jedoch auf der Folie die wichtigsten in der Grundlagenforschung erzielten Fortschritte darstellen, und parallel dazu die, sagen wir: Umsetzung dieses Grundlagenwissens zu Instrumenten, die dem Wohl der Patienten dienen. Um es kurz zu machen: In blauer Farbe sehen Sie auf dieser Folie die Fortschritte unseres Grundlagenwissens über HIV. In grün sehen Sie die Instrumente, die auf diese Fortschritte zurückzuführen sind. Und in pink sehen einige Erfolge bei der Prävention. Natürlich haben wir, wie Sie wissen, immer noch keinen Impfstoff und auch noch kein Heilmittel. Allerdings haben wir... aufgrund unserer Kenntnisse über HIV war es möglich, eine therapeutische Strategie zu entwickeln - es handelt sich um eine kombinierte antiretrovirale Therapie, mit der die HIV-Replikation bei den infizierten Patienten gestoppt werden kann. Diese Behandlung ist außerdem in der Lage, zumindest teilweise die Immunfunktion wiederherzustellen, wodurch letztlich die Entstehung der Krankheit AIDS verhindert werden kann. Die Lebensqualität hat sich dadurch verbessert, die Lebenserwartung wurde verlängert. Heute können wir sogar sagen, dass die Lebenserwartung, wenn man mit der Behandlung sehr früh beginnt, fast ebenso hoch ist wie die der nicht von HIV infizierten Menschen. In den vergangenen Jahren haben wir gelernt, dass die Behandlung auch präventiv wirkt. Sie ist in der Lage, die Übertragung des HIV von einer infizierten Person, die behandelt wird, auf den Partner oder die Partnerin zu verhindern. Auch was den Zugang zur kombinierten antiretroviralen Therapie in Ländern mit niedrigen und mittleren Einkommen betrifft, wurden sehr schöne Erfolge erzielt. Diese Folie soll Sie daran erinnern, dass ungefähr 35 Millionen Menschen mit HIV leben, die meisten von ihnen in Afrika südlich der Sahara. Glücklicherweise konnten dank dieser antiretroviralen Behandlung mehr als vier Millionen Menschen gerettet werden. Heute befinden sich etwa zehn Millionen Menschen in Behandlung. Das ist nicht genug. Wie aus dieser Folie ersichtlich, machte die letzte, im Juli 2013 veröffentlichte WHO-Richtlinie darauf aufmerksam, dass wir früher mit der Behandlung beginnen müssen. Das bedeutet, es gibt etwa 26 Millionen Menschen, die eine Behandlung benötigen. Wie Sie sich vorstellen können, ist das eine große Herausforderung. Heute können wir sagen, dass eine der obersten Prioritäten im Bereich HIV/AIDS die Umsetzung ist, also die Einführung von Instrumenten zur Verhinderung von Neuinfektionen bei nicht infizierten Menschen, wobei natürlich heute alle Instrumente - Bildung, Kondome, Beschneidung, Risikoreduzierung, antiretrovirale Behandlung - kombiniert zur Prävention eingesetzt werden. Daneben müssen wir die Testverfahren verbessern, außerdem die Behandlung selbst und die weitere Behandlung des Patienten - die Kontinuität der Betreuung. Leider deutet der Rückgang bei der Kontinuität der Betreuung darauf hin, dass die Patienten langfristig die Behandlung nicht durchhalten. Das ist ein Verlust - ein Verlust, der je nach Land 25 bis 50 Prozent betragen kann. Darüber hinaus wissen zwischen 30 und 50 Prozent der Menschen nicht, dass sie HIV-positiv sind - das ist heutzutage nicht hinnehmbar. Hierin liegt eine echte Herausforderung. Zu den auf dieser Liste aufgeführten Herausforderungen zählt der politische Wille, Stigmatisierung und Diskriminierung zu bekämpfen, was sehr wichtig ist, wenn wir erreichen wollen, dass sich die Menschen häufiger testen lassen. In der HIV-Wissenschaft von heute gibt es wichtige wissenschaftliche Herausforderungen und Prioritäten. Ich habe die größte schon erwähnt - natürlich die Entdeckung von HIV. Auf dem Gebiet des HIV-Impfstoffs hatten wir in den letzten Jahren erhebliche Fortschritte zu verzeichnen, insbesondere mit der Entdeckung der äußerst wirksamen breit neutralisierenden Antikörper, aber wir sind noch nicht am Ziel. Ich erwähnte Komorbidität bei einer langfristigen Behandlung - leider stellen wir fest, dass sich bei acht bis 15 Prozent der behandelten Patienten die so genannten Nicht-AIDS-definierenden Erkrankungen entwickeln. Ich werde übrigens eine Verknüpfung mit der Herausforderung der Entdeckung eines Heilmittels herstellen. Die Heilung von HIV ist eine sehr große Herausforderung. HAART ändert ja nichts an der Infektion; wir müssen verstehen, wie wir es schaffen können, das Virus zu eliminieren, das Virus aus dem Körper zu entfernen. Für diese Aufgabe bedarf es neuer Ideen; es bedarf einer multidisziplinären Zusammenarbeit; es bedarf einer Partnerschaft zwischen dem öffentlichen und dem privaten Sektor; es bedarf einer internationalen Zusammenarbeit, und natürlich bedarf es finanzieller Mittel. Warum brauchen wir überhaupt ein Heilmittel? Meine erste Antwort darauf lautet im Allgemeinen: Weil es sich die Patienten wünschen. Wenn ich mit ihnen in verschiedenen Ländern der Welt zusammentreffe, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden, stelle ich bisher als Erstes immer die Frage: Und sie sagen...in 80 Prozent der Fälle antworten sie, sie hätten gerne eine Behandlung, die man beenden kann. Bisher ist das so. Bisher ist das eben so, und das ist genau das, was Fred Verdult, ein Vertreter von mit HIV lebenden Menschen, 2011 in St. Maarten zu meinem Kollegen Steve Deeks sagte. Er sagte: Das Ergebnis war: Und zwar aus Gründen, die nicht genau jenen entsprechen, welche Steve Deeks und viele andere erwartet hatten. Zum Beispiel wäre die Heilung für sie deshalb wichtig, weil sie dann nicht mehr mit der Stigmatisierung leben müssten, und sie müssten keine Angst mehr davor haben, andere Menschen zu infizieren. Als Wissenschaftler müssen wir das berücksichtigen. Warum benötigen wir ein Heilmittel? Weil eine lebenslange Behandlung für alle wahrscheinlich nicht nachhaltig ist. Natürlich fordern wir alle weltweiten Zugang zur antiretroviralen Behandlung, aber wie ich schon sagte: Nur zehn Millionen befinden sich heute in Behandlung. Auf drei Patienten, die mit der Behandlung beginnen, kommen fünf neue Ansteckungsfälle. Nur in sehr wenigen Ländern haben wir eine Abdeckung von mehr als 80 Prozent. Diese lebenslange Behandlung ist, wie erwähnt, schwer durchzuhalten, es gibt beträchtliche Stigmatisierungs- und Diskriminierungsängste, die Lebenserwartung ist bei einem erheblichen Teil der Patienten noch immer verkürzt, und es fallen langfristig Kosten an. Wir müssen also wirklich über andere Strategien nachdenken. Zuallererst müssen wir verstehen, warum die Infektion mit HAART fortbesteht. Diese Folie zeigt ihnen - anhand verschiedener Studien - die Resultate nach Versuchen, die Behandlung abzusetzen. Und wir waren überrascht, dass sich in diesen Studien, wie aus der Folie ersichtlich, ein viraler Rebound zeigte. Bei genauerem Hinsehen erwies es sich, dass wir selbst dann in der Lage waren, HIV-DNA in den Zellen der mit HAART behandelten Patienten nachzuweisen, wenn sich bei diesen Patienten eine Viruslast durch Quantifizierung der viralen DNA nicht nachweisen ließ. Wir nennen das die Reservoire. Die Reservoire sind die latent infizierten T-Zellen. Wir müssen aber auch berücksichtigen, dass wir selbst während einer Behandlung eine geringfügige residuale virale Replikation nicht ausschließen können - im Zusammenhang mit einer Entzündung/Immunaktivierung, die bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten nach wie vor krankhaft ist. Wir müssen berücksichtigen, dass sich latent infizierte Zellen in verschiedenen Kompartimenten befinden, auch im Gehirn. Wir müssen außerdem die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die Behandlung nicht immer gut in das gesamte Gewebe eindringt. Warum ist es jetzt an der Zeit, die Erforschung eines HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Weil wir eine bessere Kenntnis von der HIV-Pathogenese haben. Auf die Einzelheiten dieser Folie will ich nicht eingehen, aber wir haben im Laufe der Jahre eine Menge über die Bedeutung der Immunaktivierung, über die Bedeutung des Fortbestehens der Infektion gelernt. Wir wissen, dass ganz zu Beginn, wie Sie aus dieser Folie ersehen, ein Verlust der Darmintegrität auftritt; außerdem mikrobielle Translokationen, die wahrscheinlich bei krankhafter Immunaktivierung/Entzündung eine Rolle spielen. Wir wissen, dass sich bei dieser Krankheit alles sehr früh entscheidet, während der akuten Phase der Infektion, und dass die Viruspersistenz ebenso wie das virale Reservoir während dieser ersten Frühphase der Infektion entsteht. Die abnormale Entzündung beginnt ebenfalls während der Frühphase, während die Infektion unabhängig davon fortbesteht. Warum ist es an der Zeit, die Erforschung des HIV-Heilmittels zu beschleunigen? Auch deshalb, weil wir besser über die molekularen Mechanismen der HIV-Latenz Bescheid wissen. Diese Folie enthält eine Zusammenfassung der verschiedenen Mechanismen, die im Rahmen der HIV-Latenz zu berücksichtigen sind - zunächst als Ausschluss von Transkriptionsfaktoren, aber auch als potentieller Mechanismus der Latenz. Wir müssen den Verschluss des Promotors berücksichtigen, die konvergente Transkription, die defekte Transkription, Elongationsfaktoren, DNA-Methylierung und Chromatin Silencing. All diese Mechanismen sind natürlich bei der Entwicklung neuer Strategien für die Zukunft zu berücksichtigen. Ich muss aber sagen, dass wir noch weit davon entfernt sind, alle Latenzmechanismen wirklich zu verstehen; auf diesem Gebiet liegt noch ein weiter Weg vor uns. Besser Bescheid wissen wir über HIV-Reservoire, die in vielen Zell-Subpopulationen und Geweben zu finden sind. Wir wissen, dass Persistenz und Stabilität des Reservoirs sehr langlebig sind, da wir dieses Reservoir selbst nach einer zehnjährigen HAART-Behandlung immer noch nachweisen können. Wir waren der Ansicht, dass die vom Virus latent befallenen CD4-Zellen selten sind - die Schätzungen reichten von 1*10^5 bis 1*10^6 ruhenden CD4-T-Zellen. Die jüngsten Daten weisen indes darauf hin, dass ihre Menge wahrscheinlich unterschätzt wurde und es wohl mehr Reservoirzellen gibt als wir dachten. Was sind diese Reservoirzellen? Das Hauptreservoir besteht aus den ruhenden Zentralzellen und den transitionalen CD4-T-Gedächtniszellen. Wir müssen die Tatsache berücksichtigen, dass die latente Infektion auch andere Zellen befällt, etwa Astrozyten, Monozyten, Myeloidlinien und hämatopoetische Vorläuferzellen. Bei den Kompartimenten, welche die latent infizierten Zellen enthalten, handelt es sich nicht nur um das Blut, sondern auch um den Darm und den Genitaltrakt, Lymphgewebe, das zentrale Nervensystem... Wir verstehen auch immer besser, warum die latent infizierten Zellen so hartnäckig sind. Wir wissen, dass die Zellen selbst, dass diejenigen Zellen, die überleben, die CD4-Zellen mit den langen Halbwertszeiten sind. Wir wissen heute, dass sich diese Zellen homöostatisch ausbreiten. Ich erkläre auch, warum: Wir sehen die Persistenz dieser latent infizierten Zellen. Wir müssen Immunmechanismen in Betracht ziehen, welche die Zellen im ruhenden Zustand belassen, wie zum Beispiel eine Hochregulierung von PD-1, die zur HIV-Persistenz beitragen könnte. Auch die Hauptursache von Entzündungen und chronischer Aktivierung verstehen wir immer besser. Mikrobielle Translokation habe ich schon erwähnt, doch auf dieser Folie können Sie sehen, dass es noch viele andere Mechanismen gibt, wie zum Beispiel das gestörte Gleichgewicht zwischen der Subpopulation von CD4-T-Zellen, den regulatorischen T-Zellen, und den Th17-Zellen; der Verlust von regulatorischen T-Zellen; die Rolle von viralen Proteinen wie Nef, Tat oder Vpx. Die Tatsache, dass für die Entzündung andere Pathogene eine Rolle spielen könnten, zum Beispiel eine CMV-Koinfektion. Und diese Entzündung bzw. Aktivierung hängt wahrscheinlich mit den Komorbiditäten und dem Alterungsprozess zusammen, die wir langfristig bei mit HAART behandelten Patienten beobachten könnten. Welche Art von Heilung schwebt uns vor? Wenn wir von Heilung sprechen, dann sprechen wir im Allgemeinen von Eradikation; Eradikation bedeutet sterilisierende Heilung. Das wiederum heißt: Eliminierung aller latent infizierten Zellen. Nach allem, was ich gesagt habe, ist das eine fast unmögliche Mission. Es gibt allerdings einen Machbarkeitsnachweis: den Berlin-Patienten, der einer sehr komplizierten Behandlung unterzogen wurde - einer Knochenmarktransplantation von einem besonderen Spender mit einer Mutation des Korezeptors CCF5. Diese Mutation gibt es nur bei Weißen, weshalb das keine in großem Maßstab einsetzbare Strategie ist. Aber wir können das Virus in den verschiedenen Kompartimenten seines Körpers nicht mehr nachweisen. Remission. Remission ist wohl unser Hauptziel, und meiner Ansicht nach ist es auch das vernünftigere. Remission bedeutet, es gibt eine lange gesunde Phase ohne Behandlung, ohne das Risiko der Übertragung auf Andere. Und auch hier gibt es Machbarkeitsnachweise. Was hat es mit diesen Machbarkeitsnachweisen auf sich? Einer der ersten ist der natürliche Schutz vor AIDS bei afrikanischen Affen, die kein AIDS bekommen - es gibt virale Replikation, die Entzündung ist schwächer, ebenso die chronische Immunaktivierung. Knochenmarktransplantation habe ich schon erwähnt, der Berlin-Patient. Wir dachten schon, wir hätten zwei weitere Fälle - die Boston-Patienten, die ebenfalls eine Knochenmarktransplantation erhielten. Nachdem sie die Behandlung abgesetzt hatten, erfuhren wir aber leider, dass sie einen Rückfall erlitten hatten, die HIV-Viräme war zurückgekehrt - daraus haben wir übrigens gelernt, dass die Technik, die uns zur Messung des viralen Reservoirs zur Verfügung steht, bei weitem nicht ausreicht. Es gibt die HIV-Kontrolleure, jene Menschen, die ihre Infektion auf natürliche Weise in Schach halten: Sie werden niemals antiretroviral behandelt; die Viruslast ist nicht nachweisebar, das Reservoir ist klein; sie verfügen über eine äußerst effiziente suppressive CD8-Reaktion, die mit HLA B27 und B57 korreliert, also mit einem besonderen genetischen Hintergrund. Einige von ihnen verfügen außerdem über die Fähigkeit, die Infektion ihrer CD4-Zellen und ihrer Makrophagen einzuschränken. Schließlich gibt es den Fall einer "funktionalen" Heilung bei einer sehr frühen Behandlung - das Mississippi-Baby, das Sie wahrscheinlich aus den Medien kennen. Das Mädchen wurde schon 30 Stunden nach der Geburt behandelt, also sehr früh, und dann 18 Monate lang. Ihre Mutter setzte die Behandlung für sechs Monate ab; danach kam sie zurück, und das Virus konnte in ihrem Baby nicht mehr nachgewiesen werden. In meinem Land, in Frankreich, stellten wir - meine Gruppe in Zusammenarbeit mit anderen - eine Gruppe von 14 Patienten zusammen; heute haben wir 20 Patienten...wir behandelten sie sehr frühzeitig, in den ersten zehn Wochen nach der Primärinfektion und dann drei Jahre lang. Sie setzten die Behandlung ab. Jetzt sind sie schon seit neun Jahren ohne jede Behandlung, und es geht ihnen ausgezeichnet. Ihr Reservoir ist ebenfalls klein. Ihre suppressive CD8-Reaktion ist nicht sehr stark; sie haben also nicht den gleichen genetischen Hintergrund wie die HIV-Kontrolleure - ihr genetischer Hintergrund, HLA-B35, wird sogar im Allgemeinen mit einem schnellen Fortschreiten der Krankheit in Verbindung gebracht. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, warum das so ist - warum diese Männer in der Lage sind, ihre Infektion zu kontrollieren. Das ist der Grund dafür, weshalb es unserer Ansicht nach an der Zeit ist, bei der International AIDS Society auf eine Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung zu drängen. Ich persönlich bin der Meinung, dass die beste Vorgehensweise darin besteht, einen "Bottom-up"-Ansatz zu verfolgen und eine Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern darum zu bitten, zusammenzuarbeiten und zu definieren, worin für sie die Hauptprioritäten einer Beschleunigung der HIV-Heilungsforschung liegen. Das haben wir auch gemacht, und im Jahr 2012 veröffentlichten wir in Nature Review Immunology so etwas wie eine wissenschaftliche Roadmap mit den Hauptprioritäten bei der Heilungsforschung. Wir können sieben Prioritäten benennen, die auf dieser Folie dargestellt sind: Beginnend mit molekularen, zellulären und viralen Persistenzmechanismen, die wir immer noch nicht gut genug verstehen. Dann ein besseres Verständnis von den Gewebe- und Zellquellen einer persistenten Infektion sowohl bei Versuchstieren als auch bei Patienten, die langfristig mit ART behandelt werden; ein besseres Verständnis von den Ursprüngen der Immunaktivierung und -dysfunktion bei der Behandlung mit ART; ein besseres Verständnis von den Wirts- und Immunmechanismen, die eine HIV-Infektion trotz viraler Persistenz kontrollieren; bessere Proben zur Untersuchung und Messung des Reservoirs; die Entwicklung therapeutischer immunologischer Strategien zur Eliminierung der latent infizierten Zellen in den Patienten; und natürlich die Verbesserung der Wirtsreaktion zur Kontrolle der Replikation. Wo stehen wir heute? Können wir HIV-Latenz mit "Reaktivierungs"-Medikamenten heilen? Verschiedene, auf dieser Folie stehende Medikamente wie etwa NF-kappaB-Aktivatoren, wurden bereits getestet. Und die Behandlung eines HAART-Patienten mit Vorinostat hat gezeigt, dass wir das Virus reaktivieren können - als wir allerdings vor kurzem die Größe des Reservoirs maßen, war sie unverändert. Ich muss sagen, das ist ein bisschen enttäuschend. Es reicht also wahrscheinlich nicht. Wir müssen uns die Frage stellen: Welcher Teil des Reservoirs spricht auf dieses Medikament an? Werden bei dieser Art von Behandlung Proteine oder Virionen produziert? Wie sicher ist diese Methode? Können wir die HIV-Infektion mit einer immunbasierten Therapie heilen? Einige Gesichtspunkte sprechen dafür, dass dies der richtige Weg sein könnte. Wir wissen zum Beispiel, dass die Häufigkeit der ruhenden Zellen, die HIV-DNA enthalten, mit der Häufigkeit aktivierter CD4-T-Zellen korreliert. Übrigens wissen wir, dass die Entzündungen und die Immunaktivierung bei unseren früh behandelten Patienten, den VISCONTI-Patienten, sehr geringfügig sind. Es gibt diese Studie mit Rapamycin, das die CCR5-Expression ebenso wie die T-Zellen-Aktivierung reduziert und mit den kleineren Reservoiren nach Nierentransplantationen in Verbindung gebracht wurde. Es gibt also verschiedene Fragen, die sich uns heute im Hinblick auf die immunbasierte Therapie stellen. Können wir die Abtötung HIV-infizierter Zellen durch Impftherapien in vivo verbessern? Es gibt vielversprechende Daten wie etwa diese Studie von Louis Picker an einem Makaken. Er setzt ein in hohem Maße pathogenes SIV ein, und als Impfstoff verwendet er einen CMV-Vektor, der in der Lage ist, CD8-T-Effektorzellen in großen Mengen in das Lymph- und Schleimhautgewebe einzubringen. Diese Studie hat deutlich gezeigt, dass die CD8-Reaktion in der Lage ist, das Reservoir im Affen zu verkleinern. Das ist also sehr vielversprechend. Wahrscheinlich...Ich möchte noch Folgendes zur Impftherapie sagen: Wir dürfen auch die Antikörper nicht vergessen. Heute gibt es sehr vielversprechende Daten über breit neutralisierende Antikörper, und ich muss sagen, dass auch die Daten der Makaken sehr ermutigend sind, was die Möglichkeit einer Verkleinerung des Reservoirs durch breit neutralisierende Antikörper betrifft. Und schließlich - können wir die HIV-Infektion durch allogene Stammzellentransplantation heilen? Ich habe Ihnen vom Boston-Patienten erzählt - es gibt Gentherapiestudien, zum Beispiel mit CCR5-modifizierten T-Zellen, die einige interessante Daten hervorbringen. Meine Frage geht aber dahin, ob die Genmodifizierung von T-Zellen als Therapie machbar ist? Können Stammzellen genmodifiziert gewonnen und auf sichere, effektive, kostengünstige und skalierbare Art und Weise transplantiert werden, insbesondere in ressourcenknappen Gegenden? Welche Hindernisse gibt es? Welche neuen Möglichkeiten? Wir sind sehr...es gibt neue Möglichkeiten einer klinischen, auf Heilung gerichteten Forschung. Einige davon habe ich bereits erwähnt, etwa die direkt wirkenden Antilatenz-Medikamente, entzündungshemmende Medikamente - derzeit laufen Studien; therapeutische Impfung und Zelltherapie. Wir müssen aber immer im Auge behalten, dass wir unbedingt eine Strategie brauchen, die man sich in ressourcenknappen Gegenden leisten kann. Die Heilungsstrategie der Zukunft ist wahrscheinlich ein aus diesen verschiedenen Strategien kombinierter Ansatz sicherlich basierend auf unserem Grundwissen über den Mechanismus der Persistenz. Studien über die Quantifizierung des Reservoirs und über Mittel zur Heilung sind sicherlich etwas, woran wir arbeiten müssen. Der Boston-Patient sagte zu uns: Sie haben nicht das richtige Werkzeug zur Messung des Reservoirs. Hierfür müssen wir auch die Biologie der HIV-Persistenz verstehen. Wir brauchen Biomarker, um Prognosen über die Wirksamkeit der funktionellen Heilung treffen zu können. Wir brauchen diese Marker zur Beurteilung der Auswirkung von Interventionen am Reservoir. Und ich wäre ich nicht überrascht, wenn uns künftig basierend auf diesen Biomarkern die Methode einer personalisierten Heilungstherapie zur Verfügung stünde. Abschließend möchte ich sagen, dass wir eine integrierte Strategie mit all diesen Komponenten benötigen - Grundlagenforschung, klinische Forschung, alles zusammen; doch wir müssen auch mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Denken Sie an Entzündungen; wie gestern ausgeführt wurde, sind Entzündungen bei vielen Krankheiten von entscheidender Bedeutung. Wir müssen also mit anderen Fachrichtungen zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen auch mit Sozialwissenschaftlern und Wirtschaftswissenschaftlern zusammenarbeiten. Wir müssen mit den Wirtschaftsbeteiligten zusammenarbeiten, mit den Spendern. Das haben wir bei der International Society beherzigt; wir bildeten einen internationalen Beirat, der für die Umsetzung und Verfolgung dieser Strategie zuständig ist: Mittel beschaffen natürlich; die Beschaffung der Mittel koordinieren und sicherstellen dass wir auf allen Ebenen international und multidisziplinär zusammenarbeiten. Ich möchte sagen, dass wir Erfolg haben können. Ich bin sicher, dass wir mit einer Remission, einer chemischen Remission erfolgreich sein werden, wenn wir alle zusammenarbeiten, so wie wir das in den ersten Jahren der HIV-Forschung getan haben. Das ist es, was wir zusammen mit Sharon Lewis, die mit mir zusammen die nächste Konferenz in Melbourne leiten wird, erreichen wollen. Mit Freuden habe ich in Lindau den starken australischen Einfluss wahrgenommen. Sharon ist aus Melbourne, sie wird Direktorin des Peter Doherty Institute in Melbourne. Und ich freue mich Ihnen mitteilen zu können, dass wir mittlerweile zusammen mit Sharon und Steve vor der AIDS-Konferenz regelmäßige Tagungen zur HIV-Heilung veranstalten. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2014): On The Road Toward an HIV Cure
(00:12:43 - 00:14:00)

The complete video is available here.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2015): Translational Science on Viral Infectious Diseases: From Louis Pasteur to Today
(00:15:41 - 00:16:47)

The complete video is available here.

What are these new insights into HIV that may have brought cures within closer reach? In this long excerpt from her most recent talk at Lindau in 2015, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi talks about some of the most important developments in recent years that have potentially brought a cure for AIDS closer.

Françoise Barré-Sinoussi (2015): Translational Science on Viral Infectious Diseases: From Louis Pasteur to Today
(00:22:21 - 00:28:15)

The complete video is available here.

Looking Forward

Even before the emergence of COVID-19 and the reprioritization of health goals worldwide, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi was worried by what she perceived as a decreasing political focus on HIV and AIDS. Indeed, many appear to believe that the AIDS epidemic is already over. However, there are still 37 million people living with HIV in the world and there are two million new HIV infections every year.11 In some populations, in fact, there has been an increase in the number of new HIV infections, for example among homosexual men in France, the United States and Australia. Finally, while treatment can now manage the symptoms of AIDS effectively, HIV-positive individuals are still stigmatized and discriminated against and are still afraid of infecting others. Barré-Sinoussi on why the search for a HIV cure must continue.

HIV in Hiding (2014): Françoise Barré-Sinoussi on the most recent developments in the battle against HIV
(00:08:40 - 00:09:57)

The complete video is available here.

REFERENCES
1. On the biological success of viruses. Wasik BR, Turner PE. Annual Review of Microbiology, 2013 Vol. 67:519-541
2. Kinetics of influenza A virus infection in humans. Baccam P, Beauchemin C, Macken CA, Hayden FG, Perelson AS. Journal of Virology, Jul 2006, 80(15):7590-7599
3. Extremely high mutation rate of HIV-1 in vivo. Cuevas JM, Geller R, Garijo R, LópezAldeguer J, Sanjuán R. PloS Biology, 2015, 13(9): e1002251
4. Immunity and resistance to viruses, in: Viruses from understanding to integration. Payne S. 2017, Academic Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts
5. A history of AIDS: Looking back to see ahead. Greene WC. European Journal of Immunology 2007, 37: S94–102
6. The discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS. Gallo RC, Montagnier L. New England Journal of Medicine, 2003, 349;24
7. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/antiretroviral-drug-development retrieved on 27/07/2020
8. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/1988/press-release/ retrieved on 27/07/2020
9. Protease inhibitors give wings to combination therapy. Cully M. retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/d42859-018-00015-7 on 27/07/2020
10. I am the Berlin patient: a personal reflection. Brown TR. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 2015, Jan 1; 31(1): 2–3.
11. From discovery to a cure: a conversation with Françoise Barré-Sinoussi. retrieved from https://www.iasociety.org/IASONEVOICE/FROM-DISCOVERY-TO-A-CURE-A-CONVERSATION-WITH-FRANCOISE-BARRE-SINOUSSI on 27/07/2020

 


Content User Level

Beginner  Intermediate  Advanced 

Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Content User Level

Beginner  Intermediate  Advanced 

Cite


Specify width: px

Share