Why Do We Get Old?

by Hanna Kurlanda-Witek

What you are I once was, what I am you will surely become.

The inscription on the Renaissance painting, “Holy Trinity” by Masaccio serves as a message from those who have died to the living, but it may also be used to epitomise the passing of time within a lifespan. The process of aging has many negative connotations, particularly in the Western world. For many people, to age is synonymous with slowing down, becoming prone to illness and living in the past. The fear of aging manifests itself in magazines and on television (unless they are advertisements targeted at the elderly), in hair dyes which promise to cover grey hair, lasers that erase liver spots and shampoos that restore baldness. It seems that no one wants to get old, yet the fact that we are getting older with every day is a truth we can’t turn our back on. And once we resign ourselves to this fact, as with any inevitable experience linked to the future, we hope for the best. We strive to age well, to live a long time in good health.

What is the science of aging and how much of this gradual transformation of our bodies is dependent on our genes, and how much on the choices we make when we are young? Why do some humans live to be 120 years old and some only live to half of those years?

A person born in western Europe in 1900 could expect to live an average of 45 years. The three biggest killers in those days were bacterial infections; pneumonia, tuberculosis and diarrhea. Approximately 30 years have been added to the human lifespan in only a century, while a rise of 10-20 years took place in the preceding few hundred years from the Middle Ages. This was the result of several near-simultaneous factors – improved sanitation, the development of antibiotics and vaccines, and factors linked to childbirth, leading to decreased mother and child mortality (in 1900 in the United States, almost a third of all deaths were of children aged younger than five). During the 59th meeting in Lindau, Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine Aaron Ciechanover described the revolution caused by the discovery of penicillin:

 

Aaron Ciechanover (2009) - Why Our Proteins Have to Die so We Shall Live

Thank you Helmut, good morning everybody. Indeed I use the academic freedom to change the title of my talk and to go to my old passion which is medicine. I actually never got any formal training in chemistry, ever, neither did I get any formal training in biology. I’m a simple physician, a surgeon as a matter of fact. But then fell in love with science and what I’ll try to look with you today is to look at medicine but in different eyes. We are going to look at medicine from the eyes of how drugs were developed. How they are developed today and how we are going to use the power of science and mostly interdisciplinary science in order to develop drugs in the future. And then towards the end if time allows we shall go into some of the problems that we are facing with the new technologies and platforms. So we are into drug discovery and biomedical research in the 21st century. And I divided it into kind of 3 revolutions. And the first revolution was the revolution of the ‘30’s to the ‘60’s where all clinical observation at times dated back to old times, was followed later on, much later on by isolation of active ingredient and only last understanding the mechanism of action. So it was kind of a serendipitous era. And I want to bring you a few examples to this serendipitous era. Aspirin, Aspirin is a wonderful drug, it’s probably the drug that is being consumed and used to these days in tonnes, more than any other drug that has been ever produced. And the story of Aspirin is extremely, extremely interesting. We still don’t understand in full the effects of the drugs, the diseases that the drug effects and the history goes back to Hippocrates. And Hippocrates, the father of medicine, found that the barks and leaves of the willow tree have an effect on aches, on pains and also can reduce pain. It took many, many centuries for people to understand what's going on in these leaves and roots and barks of the willow tree. Until Johann Buchner a German scientist from Munich University in the 19th century isolated a material from these barks which is called salicin and showed that this may be the active drug, except that salicin was not soluble, it was extremely bitter and people couldn’t use it. It took another 8 years to the end of the 19th century, almost to the end of the 19th century where a French scientist by the name of Charles Frédéric Gerhardt took the salicin and neutralised it by acetylating it and made it a soluble drug that could be tolerated after being taken by people but then he dropped it completely. He didn’t do anything with it. And then it took this Jewish scientist that worked at the Bayer Company, Felix Hoffmann, to have his father, being sick with arthritis, with inflammation of the joints to remember the old experiments of Charles Frédéric Gerhardt in order to make a family experiment, maybe one of the first true clinical experiments. So he took the salicin, acetylated it again, actually he reproduced the experiment of Gerhardt and gave it to his father and his father was cured, the arthritis dissolved and disappeared. Felix Hoffmann went back to Bayer and convinced them to produce the drug and the drug made Bayer what it is, it’s a multi billion dollar selling drug that I’m not going, most of you are young here but I’m sure that among the little bit older among you here, many use aspirin and I can tell you that I use aspirin for many years now as a preventive drug and we still don’t know what's going on. What's interesting about the drug is that it was introduced by Bayer in the late 19th century and it was only in the ‘70’s that John Vane, who won the Nobel Prize in medicine in ’81, discovered the mechanism of action of the drug, showing that it’s an inhibitor of synthesis of prostaglandins. So aspirin is basically an anti-inflammatory drug and you can see here it’s an awfully simple molecule chemical, it’s acetylsalicylic acid, that's what it is, everybody can make it in tones in the basement. And it’s an excellent drug to relieve fever, people are using it to reduce fever and people are using it as an anti-inflammatory drug. You see here the patient with rheumatoid arthritis. In the last 2 decades or 3 decades it was introduced as a wonderful drug to combat heart attacks because it prevents aggregation of platelets and coagulation of blood in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart. So it’s really an excellent drug for patients after myocardial infarction. People claim that it can prevent coagulation even to patients that haven’t suffered yet a myocardial infarction. And because it’s anti-inflammatory, it’s only recently that people discovered the anti-cancerous effect of aspirin. Because it’s now known that chronic inflammation leads to cancer, you can go through chronic inflammation of the bowel to chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel to crone disease, all those chronic inflammatory states are ending up in many cases with malignant transformation. So it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-pain, anti-cardiac, anti-cancer - it’s a magic drug. People are using it all over the world as a preventive drug, it has side effects, it leads in some cases to bleeding from the gastro intestinal tract. But if we track back the history of aspirin it’s a wonderful story of complete serendipity. It’s a story of centuries old piece of knowledge that goes back, dates back to Hippocrates, that Felix Hoffmann with his sick father pulled out of the basement and made it probably one of the drugs of the century, complete serendipity. No planning, no designing, not knowing the proteome, not knowing the genome, not knowing anything, complete serendipity. So we are still in the era of serendipity. Let’s go to another one, to penicillin. And penicillin was the first antibiotic, it’s really changed the life of people in the 20th century. At the beginning of the 20th century people were living for 40, 50 years, they suffered every single small infection, woman delivered in the delivery room or at home, soldiers in the battle field, any scratch led to death, people suffered infections and died. And it was again a serendipitous discovery by Sir Alexander Fleming who was a bacteriologist and here you can see he grew this bacteria and he left on the desk by mistake, completely by mistake a Petri dish open to the air and one spore of fungus, penicillin fell on this spot and he came after a few days and he saw the penicillin grows. But then he saw a halo, so bacteria couldn’t grow around this halo and he concluded that the penicillin, the fungus secreted some anti-bacterial material. He isolated the material and it turned to be the first antibiotic. It turned out to be penicillin. And after penicillin, penicillin brought with it knowledge that fungi do generate anti-bacterial materials and it led to an enormous search for anti-bacterial materials and it truly switched the way that we are living, it had huge influence on human health. It is one of the major factors that led at the end of the 20th century to doubling of the life span of people in western civilisations. It opened up surgery, people were now not afraid anymore to take patients to the operating theatre, to open them, to protect them with antibiotics. Once they were infected there were many antibiotics to fight those infections and I think that antibiotics is one of the greatest discoveries of this century. Though now because of genomic resistance and changes in the bacterial world around us, we are facing again reinvasion of pathogenic bacteria into our lives. But no doubt this is one of the greatest discoveries. Again, complete serendipity. Nothing was planned, there was no knowledge at all that fungi can secrete antibiotics and all of a sudden it came into our lives. And the same is true for many other. Now we are entering the second revolution and the second revolution is a more planned revolution. I would say it’s a brute force, high throughput screening of large library of chemical compounds. What people are doing today, they have a purpose, they want to look for an anti-cancer drug, they don’t know anything, which target they are going to hit, they take dish with cancerous cells, cultured cells and they are screening hundreds and hundreds of thousands of compounds. It’s kind of a fishing in a swamp, it’s a fishing expedition that there is no real idea behind it, what we are going to hit but the idea is that one of hundreds of thousands of these compounds will prevent the cancerous cells from dividing and this hit or several hits that are coming from what we call chemical libraries will be taken further to animal experiments. If they are successful in animal experiments they will be taken to phase 1 human experiments to find out that they are not toxic and from there to sick patient to phase 2, to phase 3 and then at the end we shall make a drug. So this is the way that we are working now. I must admit that the era of serendipity hasn’t left us. If you will look into one of the wonderful discoveries that also won the Nobel Prize in medicine a few years ago to Barry Marshall and to Warren about the discovery of the cause of peptic ulcer which is a bacteria. Peptic ulcer, it’s a wound in the stomach that is caused by the acidity, was a disease that affected millions and millions of people all over the world. And people didn’t know the reason for it. people thought that it has to do with the state of mind and psychologists called it type A personality, people that are tense and hard working and secrete lots of adrenalin and steroids are more prone and sensitive to the disease while calm down people that are more relaxed, are less and there were numerous drugs that were designed and planned against a peptic ulcer, like all kinds of milk to neutralise it. And then surgeons were extremely busy, me myself, I remember myself as a surgeon, were extremely busy in the operating theatre cutting stomachs, cutting the nerves that go to the stomach, that lead to the secretion of the acid. And all of a sudden in modern times Warren, an Australian pathologist from Perth looked at sections in the microscope and found a spiral in the lesion, in the peptic ulcer and he suspected that the spiral is a bacteria, helicobacter pylori. And then a physician that came to work with him, Barry Marshall was unable to, did some animal experiments but the clinical and scientific community was dumb and deaf, they didn’t want to listen about it. This is such a big disease that it cannot be caused by a simple bacteria, that can be eradicated by a simple erythromycin dosage for 5 days. So Barry Marshall had no choice but to infect himself, he drank the bacteria, developed an ulcer, asked a colleague, gastroenterologist to put a camera into his stomach, to look and to see and to take pictures of the ulcer, the ulcer was there, he drank antibiotics for 5 days, put the camera again, the ulcer was gone. And one of the biggest epidemics in the 20th century, mostly of western civilisation was almost completely eradicated by simple antibiotics. So this is another story, a modern story of serendipity, just to tell you that the era of serendipity has not disappeared completely. But let’s go to the high throughput. And in the high throughput I’ll bring you just one example and it’s a wonderful example, this is a Japanese scientist by the name of Akira Endo who screened for anti-cholesterol synthesising drugs. Why did he do it, he didn’t care about heart patients and cholesterol, he cared about fungi and he realised that fungi are resistant to parasites. And he thought that the fungi secrete some anti-cholesterol synthesising drug so the parasite that infects the fungi cannot synthesise this cell wall. And he screened different fungi for different anti-cholesterol synthesising drug and he found the statins. Now what the statins are doing, the statin inhibit cholesterol synthesis at one point, they inhibit the key regulatory glutaryl enzyme of cholesterol synthesis which is called HMG or hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase. The fungi were forgotten, the parasite were forgotten and statin has become a $20 billion a year selling drug to reduce the level of cholesterol in patients that suffer high cholesterol level and suffer myocardial infraction or heart attack in the lay language. So much so that recently there was a huge clinical experiment by the name of JUPITER in which people tried statins on healthy patients but these healthy patients were prone to be already sensitive to develop in the future heart attack, they had some marker which is called CRP or C-reactive protein. And it turned out that it reduced the probability of suffering heart attack tremendously. So this immediately increased the number of the patients that are taking statin. A new experiment is going now, right now all over the world in which completely healthy patients are taking statin and the prediction is that it will reduce completely, it will reduce significantly the rate of heart attack in healthy patients that sometime in the future will develop heart attack. Just to show you and here is the coronary artery with the cholesterol that accumulates, that at the end occludes the lumen of the coronary space, doesn’t let blood flow into the heart and causes heart attack. And what the statins are doing, they are reducing the amount of cholesterol and do not let it accumulate and even regress already existing atheromatosis lesions. Statins are being consumed now by millions and millions of people all over the world and the prediction that the number will grow tremendously and here you can see the joke. let’s get everyone to pay us for those drugs." And then a third one says "I have the best idea, let’s call it a medicine." So the idea will be that statins at the end will be added to, as food additive, like vitamins to our diet. I mean that’s not going to happen probably but it’s just the prediction of what is going to happen with this drug. Now again, like aspirin we don’t know what's going in with statins, it looks that statins are preventing Alzheimer, they are preventing malignant transformation, there is a linkage between proteins that carry cholesterol up or before in prevalence of Alzheimer disease, I don’t want to go into this linkage but it looks that statins have a far long term and long distant effect that we thought originally just on heart diseases which are large enough in the western population. But it will go far beyond reducing the cholesterol level in the coronary arteries. So this drug which is a huge block buster nowadays, by the way the biosynthetic pathway also won the Nobel Prize to a wonderful scientist, to Mike Brown and Joe Goldstein in ’85. So you see that understanding of mechanisms at the end leads to development of drug and vice versa. So this is the story of statin and I call it the second revolution. Now let’s go to the third revolution. The third revolution is not going to be serendipitous at all and it’s going to be designed and planned. And it’s the era of planning, understanding the mechanism first followed by targeted drug design. We are going to understand exactly what's going on. I’ll give you few example of what I mean and then we’ll go to the problems. Well current medicine is awfully primitive, it’s one size fits all. What is one size fits all. A woman or a man walk to the clinic, the woman has, 2 women have a lump in their breast, the 2 men have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, doesn’t matter, and it looks the same, all x-rays, all imaging, MRI show that there are no metastasis in the bones for the men from the prostate or otherwise for the woman and everything looks the same in the men, the 2 pairs are being treated with the same treatment. Five years later, one woman is dead and one woman is completely disease-free. The same for the men, one man with the prostate cancer sent metastasis to the bone and died in agony, the other man is completely disease-free. How come? It means that the 2 women and the 2 men did not have the same disease. We illused ourselves because we used the very primitive tools to think that they have the same disease. What did we use, we used some imaging technology and we used the microscope, we asked the pathologist, tell us what is this cancer, is it grade 1, grade 4, how does it look but this is far away from what's really going in the cancerous cell. It’s far away from understanding the mechanism, the signal transduction pathways. We didn’t approach it all, we didn’t scratch even the surface of the diseases in doing the diagnoses. We treated them the same. But actually one of them was treated correctly and the other one was treated erroneously, wrongly because we didn’t treat the disease. What is the problem, the problem is again that we are one size fits all, we have one treatment or one first line of defence and then a second line of defence for what we think is the same disease but it’s not the same disease. So here you have a group of patients with a certain disease, some of them will respond, those will respond but those will not respond. And the problem will be to sort out the responders from the non responders. And we are doing it molecularly. Here are 2 women, 1 woman has an oestrogen receptor in the breast tumour, you can see here, it’s immunohistochemically stained and one woman doesn’t have it. It will be a waste to treat this woman with Tamoxifen that is an anti-oestrogen receptor drug because she will not respond. But it will be very wise to treat this woman with an anti-oestrogen receptor drug because she will respond, this is called molecular diagnoses. We are not just looking at the tumour, we are not just looking whether the tumour has sent metastasis. But we are asking what is the difference between the 2 tumours molecularly. And fit the treatment individually to one woman but not to the other. The problem is, what we are going to do with this woman, this is the problem, what we are going to do with this woman? And the story can go on and on and what is now being developed gradually is personalised medicine. But we are seeing only the tip of the ice berg and the same is for Herceptin, it’s another antibody, I will not go and bring you numerous examples, where we are designing drugs to causing proteins, to causing agents of tumours. So Herceptin is an antibody, just one example, it’s an antibody that is targeted against HER2 which is an EGF receptor. And the EGF receptor in this case is mutated and it signals to the cell all the time and the cells divide in an uncontrolled manner. We are taking the antibody, the antibody neutralises the receptor and leads it to internalisation into the cell and to its destruction. Now some woman will have the mutated receptor and some woman will not have the mutated receptor. Those that have the mutated receptor should be treated with Herceptin and those that don’t have the mutated receptor should not be treated with Herceptin. And again we have to take a biopsy, we have to stain the biopsy, we have to do some PCR in order to amplify the tumour, in order to diagnose the mutation and only then to decide on the treatment. So again these 2 women that apparently look the same, should be diagnosed at the deepest molecular level. Let’s leave this design and go further of what the future entails for us. The markers that we have discovered so far are very few. At the end we need to sequence the entire human genome of the diseased patient. You will tell me well the human genome was sequenced already, we know all about it. No you know nothing about it, it’s the human genome of one single person that walks on the face of earth that was sequenced. And it took more than 10 years and more than $10 billion to do it. The idea now is to sequence the human genome of each and every one of us if necessary and we’ll come to the problems in a minute. But how this is possible, it takes 10 years and $10 million, who can afford it. Well novel technologies can afford it. And we are driving now to a point and I apologise that you cannot see here, but it says here to drive down the cost of sequencing to $1,000 for genome. We are now already at $10,000 per genome, so the genome in each and every one of us can be sequenced by $10,000. Within 5 years it will be $1,000 and more than that it will take about 15 minutes. The computer technology, the informatics will enable to use now sequencing of each and every genome like an MRI, like a CAT scan, like a simple biochemical test that is going on in the lab. Now what this will give us, if we take the human genome of a disease patient or of the tumour itself and of a healthy tissue, we’ll be able to compare the 2 and to identify all the mutations in the disease tissue. Now this is not a drug yet, the road is extremely long but once we identify the targets like the oestrogen receptor, like the EGF receptor that I pointed out, there will be many more targets and this many more targets will be sequenced. The 3 dimensional structure will be determined and people will be able to design, to chemically design drugs by planning that will fit into the active site and inhibit it, like we are inhibiting today other targets in the body. So this will be the era of design, that will require a lot of interdisciplinary efforts between protein structural biologists, between synthetic chemists, between designers, between computer scientists, we are moving now into an era of design that one single person from one single discipline will not be able to do it anymore. Now so we are moving into interdisciplinarity, I hope to tell you about it a bit later, maybe in the afternoon but I just want to conclude with the problems that we are facing. Everything looks ideal, the road map looks like it’s taking us to the solution and indeed it does take us to the solution. But there are many roadblocks, one roadblock is that many diseases, metabolic, psychiatric or multigenic, we are not, you know we are going to identify several genes and they are going to interplay between one another, how we are going to sort them out. And which role each plays and in the hierarchy who is first, that will be worth to inhibit and who is the second and the third that inhibiting them will be less worthy. Malignancies are characterised by genomic instability. We attack the malignancy from the door, it will come from the window, we attack it from the window it will come from the ceiling. We attack it from the ceiling it will penetrate from the floor. You know targets are changing all the time, the cancerous cell is extremely clever and extremely wise and it escape, it evades all the time therapy. It doesn’t want to be treated, it has a target to attack, to divide and to evade treatment. So even if we describe and we identify new targets, it’s not certain that we’ll be able to really nail them down. Human experimentation is complicated, I don’t want, maybe in the afternoon to tell you about hormone replacement therapy for women after menopause or what the stents that enlarge the lumen of the coronary arteries, what revolution they brought and how the pendulum move from left to right with stenting the coronary arteries. But we need to do at the end human experimentation and they bring us very surprising result, far away from the result that we are getting in the lab. Like a faithful animal models, neuro-degeneration, metabolic diseases, malignancies. The huge research into malignancies didn’t yield the real revolution that we are expecting, so much because a mouse is not a human being at the end. The cost of developing new drugs, companies will not go to develop new drugs for the Third World, this is an extremely difficult problem because they are not going to make the money that they are expecting to make. But the last one is the one that I want to touch in my last 2 minutes. And that’s bioethical problem of availability of genetic information. Science is wonderful but there are human beings behind, there are societies behind, there are cultures behind, there are histories behind and languages and variability among people. And we should all not only respect but admire this variability of the society that we are living in. Now think about it, that in the future we are going to know what are the genes that will lead to psychiatric diseases, to depression, to schizophrenia, to heart diseases, to malignancies. And we shall be able to issue an ID card to an embryo before it even saw the light of the sun. Think about the risks and the huge dangerous potential in this information. Who is going to use this information, my government in recruiting me to the army when the government would like to have only the best soldiers? My employer that wants to have only the most intelligent fellow or woman working for him. But that’s ok, let’s say that we shall be able to protect the information in a deep buried 30 metres under the ground vault that have 1 metre thick stainless steel wall. What about ourselves, do we want to know the information or don’t we want to know the information. You will say well I don’t care, I don’t want to know the information, whatever happens to me happens to me. I will give you an example that you do want to know the information. Or if you don’t want to know the information you will be forced to know the information and I will give you just one example and I’ll finish with that. A woman got a breast cancer and it was discovered that she has a sensitive gene that causes breast cancer and it’s called BRCA1 which happens to be an element of the ubiquitin system that we discovered in the past. I don’t want to go into it. But bearing the mutated BRCA1 gene carries with it a risk of 80% of getting breast cancer and a high chance of getting ovarian cancer. So the woman says fine, I’ll take the tumour out and my ovaries out, will she tell her daughter that the daughter is at risk, the daughter is a 21-year-old college woman, beautiful lady. And the daughter will have a choice in her life, whether to make preventive mastectomy or not. But then it’s again in the family. But let’s say that the daughter is now dating a nice fellow and she is going to marry him, will she tell her fiancé that she, the one that he fell in love with, has a risk of 80% of getting breast cancer. What are the problems behind, the moral problems behind? And so on and so forth. And there are many, many examples. So you see that this woman, who all of a sudden while bathing felt that she has a lump in her left breast or right breast, all of a sudden faces a problem that goes much beyond her own tumours. It goes to her daughter and it goes to her grandchildren and it goes to the faith of the fiancé and the whole family is all of a sudden engaged in an unbelievable piece of information that they have to handle. And it goes on and on. All I wanted to tell you, it was my view of the revolution in medicine but we are in it, there is no choice, but also to throw a word of caution that this is not just science in the test tube, there are human beings behind it. Thank you very much.

Danke Helmut. Guten Morgen allerseits. Ich werde von der akademischen Freiheit, den Titel meines Vortrags zu ändern, Gebrauch machen und zu meiner alten Leidenschaft zurückkehren: der Medizin. Tatsächlich habe ich zu keiner Zeit eine formale Ausbildung in Chemie erhalten, ebenso wenig habe ich offiziell Biologie studiert. Ich bin ein einfacher Arzt, ein Chirurg, um genau zu sein. Doch dann habe ich mich in die Naturwissenschaften verliebt, und was ich mit Ihnen heute tun möchte, ist Folgendes: die Medizin mit anderen Augen zu betrachten. Wir betrachten die Medizin aus der Perspektive der Entwicklung von Medikamenten in der Vergangenheit, aus der Perspektive der heutigen Entwicklung, und [stellen uns die Frage,] wie wir die Macht der Wissenschaft nutzen werden, hauptsächlich der interdisziplinären Wissenschaft, um in Zukunft Medikamente zu entwickeln. Und gegen Ende - wenn es die Zeit erlaubt - werde ich einige der Probleme ansprechen, mit denen wir aufgrund der neuen Technologien und Gegebenheiten konfrontiert sein werden. Unser Thema ist also die Entdeckung von Medikamenten und die biochemische Forschung im 21. Jahrhundert. Ich habe das Thema in drei Revolutionen unterteilt. Die erste Revolution war die von den 1930er bis zu den 1960er Jahren, in der die klinischen Beobachtungen manchmal auf alte Zeiten zurückgingen. Daran schloss sich später - wesentlich später - die Isolierung der aktiven Bestandteile an, und erst zum Schluss gelang die Erklärung der Wirkungsmechanismen. Es war also in gewisser Weise eine von glücklichen Umständen bestimmte Ära. Ich möchte Ihnen einige Beispiele dieser Ära der Glücksfälle nennen: Aspirin, Aspirin ist ein wundervolles Medikament. Es ist wahrscheinlich dasjenige Medikament, das heutzutage tonnenweise konsumiert und verwendet wird, mehr als jedes andere Medikament, das jemals hergestellt worden ist. Und die Geschichte von Aspirin ist äußerst interessant. Wir verstehen noch immer nicht die volle Wirksamkeit der Medikamente, die Krankheiten, auf die ein Medikament wirkt, und diese Geschichte geht bis auf Hippokrates zurück. Und Hippokrates, der Vater der Medizin, fand heraus, dass die Rinde und die Blätter der Weide sich auf Schmerzen auswirken, dass sie Schmerzen lindern können. Es dauerte viele, viele Jahrhunderte, bis man verstand, was in diesen Blättern und Wurzeln und der Rinde der Weide vor sich geht. Bis Johann Buchner, ein Wissenschaftler an der Universität München im 19. Jahrhundert, aus diesen Rinden eine Substanz isolierte, die Salicin genannt wird, und bewies, dass dies das wirksame Medikament sein könnte - außer dass Salicin nicht löslich und äußerst bitter war und dass es nicht [als Medikament] verwendet werden konnte. Es dauerte weitere acht Jahre, bis zum Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts, fast genau bis zum Ende des Jahrhunderts, bis ein französischer Wissenschaftler mit dem Namen Charles Frédéric Gerhardt das Salicin nahm, es durch Acetylierung neutralisierte und zu einem löslichen Medikament machte, das von den Leuten, die es zu sich nahmen, toleriert werden konnte. Doch dann verfolgte er diese Spur nicht weiter. Er stellte keine weiteren Experimente damit an. Es bedurfte dann dieses jüdischen Wissenschaftlers, der in dem Unternehmen Bayer arbeitete, Felix Hoffmann, und dessen Vater an Arthritis litt, an einer Entzündung der Gelenke, und der sich an die alten Experimente von Charles Frédéric Gerhard erinnerte, um ein Familienexperiment zu machen, vielleicht das erste echte klinische Experiment. Er nahm also das Salicin und acetylierte es erneut. Eigentlich wiederholte er das Experiment von Gerhardt, gab die Substanz seinem Vater und sein Vater wurde geheilt: Die Arthritis ging zurück und verschwand. Felix Hoffman ging mit dieser Entdeckung zu Bayer und überzeugte sie davon, dieses Medikament herzustellen, und es machte Bayer zu dem, was es ist: ein milliardenschweres Pharma-Unternehmen. Ich werde nicht..... Die meisten von Ihnen hier sind jung, doch ich bin mir sicher, dass unter den etwas älteren Anwesenden viele Aspirin verwenden. Ich kann sagen, dass ich Aspirin jetzt schon seit vielen Jahren als präventives Medikament verwende, und wir wissen immer noch nicht, wie genau es wirkt. Interessant an dem Medikament ist, dass es im späten 19. Jahrhundert von Bayer eingeführt wurde, und es war erst in den 1970er Jahren, als John Vane, der 1981 den Nobelpreis für Medizin erhielt, den Wirkungsmechanismus des Medikaments entdeckte. Er konnte zeigen, dass es die Synthese der Prostaglandine hemmt. Aspirin ist also im Wesentlichen ein entzündungshemmendes Medikament, und wie Sie hier sehen, ist es ein äußerst einfaches Molekül. Es handelt sich dabei um Acetylsalicylsäure. Das ist seine chemische Struktur. Jeder kann es tonnenweise im eigenen Keller herstellen. Es ist ein hervorragendes Medikament zur Fiebersenkung. Es wird zur Fiebersenkung und zur Entzündungshemmung verwendet. Hier sehen Sie den Patienten mit Gelenksrheumatismus. In den letzten 20 oder 30 Jahren wurde das Medikament als wunderbares Gegenmittel bei Herzinfarkten eingeführt, da es die Verklumpung der Blutplättchen und die Koagulation des Blutes in den Herzkranzgefäßen, die das Herz mit Blut versorgen, verhindert. Es ist also wirklich ein hervorragendes Medikament für Patienten nach einem Herzinfarkt. Man behauptet, dass es die Koagulation sogar bei Patienten verhindern kann, die noch keinen Herzinfarkt erlitten haben. Und da es sich um ein entzündungshemmendes Medikament handelt, hat man erst in letzter Zeit entdeckt, dass Aspirin auch ein Anti-Krebs-Medikament ist, denn man weiß heute, dass eine chronische Entzündung zu Krebs führt. Man kann eine chronische Darmentzündung nehmen, eine chronische Entzündung des Darms, den Morbus Crohn. Alle diese chronischen Entzündungskrankheiten des Darms führen oft zu einer bösartigen Entwicklung. Die Wirkung von Aspirin ist also entzündungshemmend, schmerzlindernd, und es beugt einem Herzinfarkt und Krebs vor - es ist eine Wunderdroge. Es wird weltweit als präventives Medikament verwendet. Es hat Nebenwirkungen. In manchen Fällen führt es zu gastrointestinalen Blutungen. Wenn wir uns jedoch die Geschichte des Aspirins ansehen, ist es eine wunderbare Geschichte totaler Glücksfälle. Es ist eine Geschichte jahrhundertealten Wissens, das bis auf Hippokrates zurückgeht, das Felix Hoffman mit seinem kranken Vater aus dem Keller vorholte, und er machte daraus das Medikament des Jahrhunderts, ein völliger Glücksfall. Keine Planung, kein Design, keine Kenntnis des Proteoms, keine Kenntnis des Genoms, kein Wissen über irgendetwas: ein völliger Glücksfall. Wir sind also immer noch in der Ära der Glücksfälle. Schauen wir uns einen anderen an: das Penizillin. Penizillin war das erste Antibiotikum. Es hat das Leben der Menschen im 20. Jahrhundert wirklich verändert. Zu Beginn des Jahrhunderts betrug die Lebenserwartung der Menschen 40, 50 Jahre. Sie erkrankten an jeder kleinen Infektion, Frauen brachten ihre Kinder in einem Entbindungssaal oder zuhause zur Welt, bei Soldaten auf den Schlachtfeldern konnte ein beliebiger Kratzer tödliche Folgen haben. Die Menschen infizierten sich und starben. Und wieder kam es zu einer glücklichen Entdeckung - von Alexander Fleming, einem Bakteriologen. Hier sehen Sie, wie er seine Bakterien züchtete. Er ließ auf seinem Schreibtisch aus reinem Versehen eine Petrischale offen, und eine Spore des Pilzes, von Penizillin, fiel in diese Schale. Er kam einige Tage später wieder und sah, wie das Penizillin wuchs. Doch dann sah er einen Ring um das Penizillin. Bakterien konnten also in diesem Bereich nicht wachsen, und er zog daraus die Schlussfolgerung, dass das Penizillin, dass der Pilz eine anti-bakterielle Substanz absonderte. Er isolierte die Substanz und sie erwies sich als das erste Antibiotikum. Er hatte das Penizillin entdeckt. Und nach Penizillin, Penizillin lieferte das Wissen, dass Pilze antibakterielle Substanzen erzeugen, und dies führte zu einer intensiven Suche nach antibakteriellen Stoffen. Dies revolutionierte unsere Art zu leben, es hatte einen enormen Einfluss auf die menschliche Gesundheit. Es ist einer der Hauptfaktoren, die dazu geführt haben, dass sich die Lebenserwartung der Menschen der westlichen Zivilisationen am Ende des 20. Jahrhunderts Man fürchtete jetzt nicht mehr Menschen in den Operationssaal zu bringen, sie aufzuschneiden. Sie konnten mit Antibiotika geschützt werden. Sollten sie sich infiziert haben, gab es viele Antibiotika, mit denen man diese Infektionen bekämpfen konnte, und ich glaube, dass die Antibiotika eine der größten Entdeckungen dieses Jahrhunderts waren. Aufgrund der genomischen Resistenz und infolge von Veränderungen in der Welt der Bakterien in unserer Umwelt sind wir der Gefahr der erneuten Invasion krankheitserregender Bakterien in unser Leben ausgesetzt. Dies ist zweifelsohne eine der größten Entdeckungen. Auch hier lag ein glücklicher Umstand zugrunde. Nichts war geplant. Man wusste rein gar nichts darüber, dass Pilze Antibiotika absondern können, und plötzlich brach dies in unser Leben ein. Und dasselbe gilt für viele andere Entdeckungen. Nun treten wir in die zweite Phase der Revolution ein. Die zweite Revolution ist eine geplantere Revolution. Ich würde sagen, sie vollzieht sich mit roher Gewalt, durch Screeningverfahren mit hohem Durchsatz, wobei eine riesige Bibliothek chemischer Verbindungen überprüft wird. Bei dem, was die Leute heute tun, verfolgen sie einen [bestimmten] Zweck: Sie suchen nach einem Medikament gegen Krebs. Sie wissen nichts, sie wissen nicht, welche Zielscheibe sie treffen werden. Sie nehmen ein Gefäß mit einer aus Krebszellen bestehenden Zellkultur und testen viele Hunderttausende von Verbindungen. Es ist so, als ob man in einem Sumpf angelt. Es ist eine Angelexpedition, hinter der keine klare Idee über das mögliche Fangergebnis steht. Doch die Vorstellung ist, dass eine dieser vielen hunderttausend Verbindungen die Krebszellen an der Teilung hindern wird. Und dieser Treffer, oder mehrere dieser Treffer, die wir in den sogenannten chemischen Bibliotheken finden, werden dann in Tierversuchen weiteruntersucht. Wenn sie in Tierversuchen erfolgreich waren, werden sie in die erste Phase der Tests am Menschen übernommen, um sicherzustellen, dass sie nicht giftig sind, und danach in die zweite Phase der Tests an Patienten, dann in die dritte Phase, und zum Schluss stellen wir das Medikament her. Dies entspricht unserer gegenwärtigen Vorgehensweise. Ich muss gestehen, dass uns die Ära der Glücksfälle noch nicht verlassen hat. für die Barry Marshall und Warren vor ein paar Jahren den Nobelpreis für Medizin erhalten haben: Sie fanden die Ursache der Magengeschwüre, wobei es sich um ein Bakterium handelt. Magengeschwüre sind Verletzungen der Magenwand, die durch Säure verursacht werden. Hierbei handelte es sich um eine Krankheit, an der weltweit Abermillionen Menschen litten. Die Ursache der Krankheit war unbekannt. Man glaubte, dass es mit dem seelischen Zustand der Menschen zu tun habe, und Psychologen sprachen von einer Persönlichkeit vom Typ A. Hiermit waren Menschen gemeint, die angespannt und arbeitsam waren und jede Menge Adrenalin und Steroide produzierten. Sie sollten empfindlicher und anfälliger für die Krankheit sein als entspannte Menschen, die ruhiger sind. Und es wurden zahlreiche Medikamente gegen Magengeschwüre entwickelt und geplant, wie zum Beispiel verschiedenste Arten von Milch, die die Säure neutralisieren sollten. Chirurgen waren damals äußerst intensiv damit beschäftigt. Ich selbst erinnere mich daran, dass ich als Chirurg sehr viel im Operationssaal stand und Mägen aufschnitt und die Nerven durchtrennte, die zum Magen und zur Sekretion der Säure führen. Und plötzlich hat sich in neuerer Zeit Warren, ein australischer Pathologe aus Perth, Schnitte der Magenwand unter dem Mikroskop angeschaut, und er fand eine Spirale in der Wunde, in dem Magengeschwür, und er vermutete, dass es sich dabei um ein Bakterium handelt, um helicobacter pylori. Und dann arbeitete ein Arzt, Barry Marshall, mit ihm zusammen. Er führte einige Tierexperimente durch, doch die klinische und wissenschaftliche Welt war stumm und taub: Sie wollten nichts darüber hören. Dies war eine so weitverbreitete Krankheit, dass sie nicht durch ein einfaches Bakterium verursacht sein konnte, die durch eine über fünf Tage eingenommene einfache Erythromyzin-Dosis eliminiert werden konnte. Barry Marshall hatte also keine andere Wahl, als sich selbst zu infizieren. Er trank die Bakterien, entwickelte ein Magengeschwür, bat einen Kollegen, einen Gastroenterologen, eine Kamera in seinen Magen zu schieben und Bilder von dem Magengeschwür zu machen. Er hatte ein Magengeschwür, trank fünf Tage lang Antibiotika, ließ erneut ein Bild vom Inneren seines Magens machen, und das Magengeschwür war verschwunden. Eine der größten Epidemien des 20. Jahrhunderts, hauptsächlich der westlichen Zivilisation, war durch ein einfaches Antibiotikum fast vollständig eliminiert. Dies ist also eine weitere Geschichte; eine moderne Geschichte glücklicher Umstände, um Ihnen zu beweisen, dass die Ära der Glücksfälle noch nicht völlig zu Ende gegangen ist. Wenden wir uns jedoch dem hohen Durchsatz zu. In diesem Zusammenhang stelle ich Ihnen nur ein Beispiel vor, und es ist ein wunderbares Beispiel. Dies ist ein japanischer Wissenschaftler namens Akira Endo, der nach einem Medikament suchte, das die Synthese von Cholesterin verhindert. Warum tat er das? Er interessierte sich nicht für Herzpatienten und Cholesterin. Er war an Pilzen interessiert, und er erkannte, dass Pilze gegen Parasiten resistent sind. Und er nahm an, dass die Pilze ein Sekret absondern, das die Synthese von Cholesterin verhindert, damit die Parasiten, die die Pilze befallen, diese Zellwand nicht synthetisieren können. Er untersuchte also verschiedene Pilze auf unterschiedliche, die Synthese von Cholesterin verhindernde Substanzen und fand die Statine. Wie wirken die Statine? Statine verhindern die Cholesterinsynthese an einem [bestimmten] Punkt: Sie hemmen das wichtige Glutaryl-Steuerungsenzym der Cholesterinsynthese, das als HMG oder Hydroxy-Methylglutaryl-Coenzym-A-Reduktase bezeichnet wird. Die Pilze wurden vergessen, die Parasiten wurden vergessen, und Statin wurde zu einem Medikament mit einem Jahresumsatz von 20 Milliarden Dollar. Es reduziert den Cholesterinspiegel von Patienten mit einem hohen Cholesterinspiegel, der zu einem Infarkt des Herzmuskels führt bzw. einem Herzinfarkt, wie es in der Umgangssprache heißt. Der Cholesterinspiegel wird so deutlich gesenkt, dass neulich ein äußerst umfangreiches klinisches Experiment namens JUPITER durchgeführt wurde, in dem man gesunden Personen Statine verabreichte. Doch diese gesunden Patienten waren bereits dafür anfällig, eine Sensitivität zur Entwicklung eines künftigen Herzinfarkts auszubilden. Sie wiesen einen Marker auf, der als CRP oder C-reaktives Protein bezeichnet wird. Und es zeigte sich, dass er die Wahrscheinlichkeit einen Herzinfarkt zu erleiden drastisch verringerte. Dies führte also sofort dazu, dass die Zahl der Patienten, die Statin einnehmen, anstieg. Gegenwärtig läuft weltweit ein neues Experiment, in dem völlig gesunde Patienten Statin zu sich nehmen, und man sagt voraus, dass es die Häufigkeit von Herzinfarkten in gesunden Patienten, die zu irgendeinem künftigen Zeitpunkt einen Herzinfarkt bekommen werden, vollständig... beträchtlich verringern wird. Nur um Ihnen dies zu veranschaulichen: Hier ist das Herzkranzgefäß, in dem sich das Cholesterin ablagert, bis es schließlich das Lumen des Blutgefäßes verschließt, den Blutfluss zum Herzen verhindert und einen Herzinfarkt auslöst. Was die Statine bewirken, ist eine Verringerung der Cholesterinmenge und sie verhindern, dass es sich ansammelt. Sie können sogar zur Rückbildung eines bereits existierenden Atheroms führen. Statine werden heute von vielen Millionen Menschen auf der ganzen Welt eingenommen, und man sagt voraus, dass ihre Zahl noch enorm zunehmen wird. Hier sehen Sie ein Cartoon. Ein Dritter sagt daraufhin: "Ich habe die beste Idee: Nennen wir es ein Medikament". Die Idee wird sein, dass man Statine schließlich - wie Vitamine - unserer Nahrung hinzufügen wird. Ich meine, das wird wahrscheinlich nicht geschehen, aber es ist lediglich die Voraussage über das, was mit diesem Medikament geschehen wird. Wie im Falle von Aspirin wissen wir auch bei den Statinen nicht, wie sie wirken. Es sieht so aus, als ob Statine Alzheimer vorbeugen. Sie beugen einer malignen Transformation vor. Es gibt eine Verbindung zwischen Proteinen, die Cholesterin transportieren, und dem Beginn von Alzheimer. Ich möchte hierauf nicht näher eingehen, doch es scheint so, als ob Statine eine wesentlich längerfristige und weiterreichende Wirkung haben, als man ursprünglich annahm, als man meinte, sie beugten lediglich Herzkrankheiten vor, die in der Bevölkerung der westlichen Länder häufig genug vorkommen. Doch Statine bewirken wesentlich mehr, als eine Verringerung der Cholesterinablagerungen in den Herzarterien. Heutzutage ist dieses Medikament ein enormer Blockbuster, und - nebenbei bemerkt - bescherte die Aufklärung der einzelnen Schritte seiner Biosynthese 1985 zwei wunderbaren Wissenschaftlern den Nobelpreis: Mike Brown und Joe Goldstein. Sie sehen also, dass das Verständnis von Mechanismen schließlich zur Entwicklung von Medikamenten führt und umgekehrt. Dies ist die Geschichte der Statine, und ich nenne es die zweite Revolution. Gehen wir nun zur dritten Revolution. Die dritte Revolution wird sich keineswegs aus Glücksfällen zusammensetzen. Sie wird gestaltet und geplant sein. Es ist die Ära der Planung, des Verständnisses der Mechanismen, an das sich erstmals eine zielgerichtete Entwicklung von Medikamenten anschließen wird. Wir werden genau verstehen, wie ein Medikament wirkt. Ich gebe Ihnen einige Beispiele für das, was ich meine, und dann wenden wir uns den Problemen zu. Nun, die heutige Medizin ist ungeheuer primitiv. Sie handelt nach dem Motto: Eine Größe passt allen. Was soll das heißen? Zwei Frauen oder zwei Männer gehen in eine Klinik. Die zwei Frauen haben einen Knoten in der Brust, die beiden Männer erhalten die Diagnose Prostatakrebs. Das macht keinen Unterschied. Und es sieht gleich aus: Alle Röntgenaufnahmen, alle sonstigen bildgebenden Verfahren, MRI, zeigen, dass der Krebs in der Prostata zu keinen Metastasen in den Knochen geführt hat, und für die Frauen gilt dasselbe. Alles sieht bei den Männern gleich aus. Die beiden Paare erhalten dieselbe Therapie. Fünf Jahre später ist eine der Frauen gestorben und die andere Frau ist ohne Befund. Dasselbe bei den Männern: Bei einem Mann führte der Prostatakrebs zu Metastasen in den Knochen, und er starb unter großen Schmerzen, der andere Mann hat den Krebs überwunden. Wie kam es dazu? Es bedeutet, dass die beiden Frauen und die beiden Männer nicht dieselbe Krankheit hatten. Wir gaben uns der Illusion hin, dies sei der Fall, denn wir verwendeten dieselben primitiven Methoden und gelangten zu der Meinung, dass sie dieselbe Krankheit haben. Was haben wir verwendet? Wir verwendeten einige bildgebende Geräte und das Mikroskop. Wir fragten den Pathologen: "Sage uns, um was für einen Krebs es sich hier handelt. Ist es Stufe 1, Stufe 4? Wie sieht er aus?" Doch dies ist von dem, was sich in der Krebszelle tatsächlich abspielt, weit entfernt. Es ist von einem Verständnis des Mechanismus, des Signalübertragungsweges weit entfernt. Wir sind dem in keiner Weise näher gekommen. Indem wir die Diagnose stellten, haben wir noch nicht einmal die Oberfläche der Krankheit angekratzt. Wie haben sie gleich behandelt. Tatsächlich wurde einer jedoch richtig und der andere falsch behandelt - falsch, weil wir die Krankheit nicht behandelt haben. Worin besteht das Problem? Es besteht darin, dass wir wieder nach dem Motto vorgingen: Eine Größe passt allen. Wir haben eine Behandlung oder eine erste Verteidigungslinie und dann eine zweite Verteidigungslinie für das, was wir für dieselbe Krankheit halten, aber es ist nicht dieselbe Krankheit. Hier haben Sie also eine Patientengruppe mit einer bestimmten Krankheit. Einige Patienten werden auf die Therapie positiv reagieren. Diese werden positiv darauf reagieren, diese nicht. Und das Problem wird darin bestehen, diese beiden verschiedenen Patientengruppen auseinander zu sortieren. Und wir tun dies mithilfe molekularer Methoden. Hier sind zwei Frauen: Eine Frau hat einen Östrogenrezeptor in der Brust, einen Tumor, Sie können das hier sehen, er ist immunhistologisch eingefärbt, und eine Frau hat keinen. Es ist eine Verschwendung, diese Frau mit Tamoxifen - einem Anti-Östrogen-Medikament zu behandeln -, weil sie darauf nicht positiv reagieren wird. Doch es wird sehr vernünftig sein, diese Frau mit einem Anti-Östrogen-Medikament zu behandeln, weil sie positiv darauf reagieren wird. Man bezeichnet dies als molekulare Diagnose. Wir sehen nicht nur auf den Tumor. Wir untersuchen nicht nur, ob der Tumor Metastasen gestreut hat, sondern wir fragen, welches der molekulare Unterschied zwischen den beiden Tumoren ist, und wir passen die Behandlung individuell an die eine Frau, jedoch nicht an die andere an. Die Frage lautet: Was machen wir mit dieser Frau? Das ist das Problem: Was machen wir mit dieser Frau? Und die Geschichte kann weiter und immer weiter gehen. Was heute nach und nach entwickelt wird, sind auf einzelne Patienten zugeschnittene Medikamente. Doch wir sehen nur die Spitze des Eisbergs, und dasselbe gilt für Herceptin. Das ist ein weiterer Antikörper. Ich werde Ihnen nun nicht zahllose Beispiele liefern, die zeigen, wie wir Medikamente entwickeln, um Proteine herzustellen, um Wirkstoffe für Tumoren herzustellen. Herceptin ist also ein Antikörper, lediglich ein Beispiel. Es ist ein Antikörper, der gegen HER2 eingesetzt wird, bei dem es sich um einen EGF-Rezeptor handelt. Und der EGF-Rezeptor ist in diesem Fall mutiert. Er sendet der Zelle ständig Signale, und sie teilt sich auf unkontrollierte Weise. Wir nehmen den Antikörper, der Antikörper neutralisiert den Rezeptor und führt ihn zur Internalisierung in die Zelle und hat ihre Zerstörung zur Folge. Nun, bei einigen Frauen wird der Rezeptor in seiner mutierten Form vorliegen, bei anderen hingegen nicht. Die Frauen, deren Rezeptor mutiert ist, sollten mit Herceptin behandelt werden, und diejenigen, deren Rezeptor nicht mutiert ist, sollten nicht damit behandelt werden. Und auch in diesem Fall müssen wir eine Biopsie vornehmen, wir müssen die entnommene Probe einfärben, wir müssen eine Polymerase-Kettenreaktion (polymerase chain reaction, PCR) durchführen, um den Tumor zu vergrößern, um die Mutation diagnostizieren zu können, und erst dann wird über die Therapie entschieden. Diese beiden Frauen, deren Krankheitsbild scheinbar so ähnlich ist, sollten auf der untersten molekularen Ebene diagnostiziert werden. Verlassen wir das Thema der Medikamentenentwicklung und gehen wir weiter zu der Frage, was uns die Zukunft bringen wird. Wir haben bislang erst wenige Marker entdeckt. Letztlich müssen wir die Sequenz des gesamten Genoms des erkrankten Patienten analysieren. Sie werden mir sagen: "Die Sequenz des menschlichen Genoms wurde bereits analysiert. Wir wissen bereits alles darüber." Nein, wir wissen nichts darüber. Das Genom eines einzelnen Menschen, der auf der Erde herumläuft, wurde sequenziert. Das dauerte mehr als zehn Jahre und kostete mehr als 10 Millionen Dollar. Die neue Idee ist jetzt, die Gensequenz eines jeden von uns zu analysieren, wenn dies erforderlich ist. Wir werden auf dieses Problem in einer Minute zurückkommen. Doch wie soll das möglich sein? Es dauert zehn Jahre und kostet 10 Millionen. Wer kann sich das leisten? Nun, neue Technologien machen es erschwinglich. Wir kommen damit zu einem Punkt, und ich entschuldige mich dafür, dass Sie das hier nicht sehen können. Hier steht, dass wir die Kosten der Sequenzanalyse bis auf 1000 Dollar pro Genom reduzieren sollten. Wir liegen bereits jetzt bei Kosten von 10.000 Dollar pro Genom. Die Sequenz des Genoms eines jeden von uns kann also für 10.000 Dollar analysiert werden. Innerhalb von fünf Jahren wird es nur noch 1000 Dollar kosten, und außerdem wird es nur noch 15 Minuten dauern. Die Computertechnologie, die Informatik, wird es möglich machen das Genom eines jeden von uns genauso zu analysieren, wie wir ein MRI, einen CAT-Scan oder einen einfachen biochemischen Test durchführen, wie es in Laboren routinemäßig geschieht. Was dies uns ermöglichen wird, ist Folgendes: Wenn wir das Genom eines erkrankten Menschen nehmen oder das Genom des Tumors selbst und eines gesunden Gewebes, werden wir die beiden vergleichen und sämtliche Mutationen in diesem kranken Gewebe identifizieren können. Dies ist natürlich noch kein Medikament, der Weg dorthin ist extrem lang. Doch wenn wir einmal Targets, wie den Östrogenrezeptor, wie den EGF-Rezeptor, auf den ich hinwies, identifiziert haben, wird es mehr und mehr Targets geben, und die Sequenz dieser zusätzlichen Targets wird analysiert werden. Die dreidimensionale Struktur wird ermittelt werden, und man wird in der Lage sein, mit chemischen Methoden Medikamente zu entwickeln, indem man plant, was in das aktive Zentrum passt und es hemmt, wie wir heute andere Targets im Körper hemmen. Es wird also das Zeitalter der Entwicklung sein, in dem zahlreiche interdisziplinärer Bemühungen erforderlich sein werden: zwischen Biologen, die die Struktur von Proteinen untersuchen, Chemikern, die sich auf die Synthese von Verbindungen spezialisieren, Medikamentenentwicklern und Computerwissenschaftlern. Wir gelangen jetzt in eine Ära der Entwicklung, in der kein einzelner Vertreter einer einzelnen Disziplin mehr in der Lage sein wird, Medikamente allein zu entwickeln. Wir bewegen uns also in ein Zeitalter der Interdisziplinarität. Ich hoffe Ihnen später darüber noch ein wenig erzählen zu können, vielleicht heute Nachmittag. Ich möchte meinen Vortrag mit einem Hinweis auf die Probleme schließen, mit denen wir es zu tun haben werden. Alles sieht ideal aus. Es sieht so aus, als führe uns der Weg zur Lösung [unserer Fragen], und tatsächlich führt er uns zu ihrer Lösung. Doch es gibt viele Hindernisse auf diesem Weg. Eines besteht darin, dass viele Krankheiten - Stoffwechselkrankheiten, psychiatrische Krankheiten - durch mehrere Gene verursacht werden. Wissen Sie: Wir werden mehrere Gene identifizieren und sie werden miteinander in Wechselwirkung stehen. Wie sollen wir die einzelnen Wirkungen auseinanderhalten [und wie sollen wir erkennen,] welche Rolle die einzelnen Gene spielen und welches in der Hierarchie das erste ist, das es wert ist, inhibiert zu werden? Und welches das zweite und das dritte ist, die weniger wert sind, gehemmt zu werden. Tumorerkrankungen zeichnen sich durch eine genomische Instabilität aus. Wir greifen einen Tumor durch die Tür an und er kommt zum Fenster herein. Wir greifen ihn vom Fenster aus an, und er kommt von der Decke. Wir greifen ihn von der Decke an, und er dringt durch den Fußboden. Wir wissen, dass Targets sich ständig ändern. Krebszellen sind äußerst clever und extrem klug, und sie entkommen den Therapien immer wieder. Eine Krebszelle will nicht behandelt werden. Sie hat ein Ziel, das sie angreifen will, und sie will sich teilen und der Therapie entkommen. Selbst wenn wir neue Targets beschreiben und identifizieren, ist es nicht sicher, dass wir in der Lage sein werden, ihrer wirklich Herr zu werden. Experimente mit Menschen sind kompliziert. Vielleicht erzähle ich Ihnen heute Nachmittag, welche Revolution die Hormonersatztherapie für Frauen nach der Menopause oder diese Stents herbeigeführt haben, mit denen man das Lumen der Herzkranzgefäße vergrößern kann, und wie das Pendel bei der Vergrößerung der Herzkranzgefäße mit Stents von rechts nach links umschlug. Doch schließlich müssen wir Experimente am Menschen machen und sie bringen uns sehr überraschende Ergebnisse, fern ab von den Ergebnissen, die wir im Labor erhalten. Wie im tierischen Modell: Neuroregeneration, Stoffwechselkrankheiten, Tumore. Der riesige Forschungsaufwand zum Verständnis von Tumoren hat uns nicht die große Revolution gebracht, auf die wir so sehr warten, weil eine Maus letztlich kein Mensch ist. Die Kosten der Medikamentenentwicklung: Unternehmen entwickeln keine Medikamente für die Dritte Welt. Dies ist ein äußerst schwieriges Problem, weil sie auf diese Weise nicht das Geld verdienen, das sie zu verdienen hoffen. Auf das letzte Problem will ich in den letzten beiden Minuten meines Vortrags eingehen. Dies ist das bioethische Problem der Verfügbarkeit genetischer Informationen. Die Wissenschaft ist eine wunderbare Sache, aber hinter ihr stehen menschliche Wesen, es stehen Gesellschaften hinter ihr, Kulturen, geschichtliche Entwicklungen und Sprachen und die Variabilität unter den Menschen. Wir alle sollten diese Variabilität der Gesellschaft, in der wir leben, nicht nur respektieren, sondern bewundern. Denken Sie einmal darüber nach, dass wir in Zukunft wissen werden, welche Gene zu psychischen Krankheiten, zu Depression, zu Schizophrenie, zu Herz- und Tumorerkrankungen führen werden. Und wir werden in der Lage sein, für einen Embryo eine [genetische] ID-Karte auszustellen, noch bevor er das Licht der Welt erblickt hat. Denken Sie an die Risiken und das große Gefahrenpotenzial in dieser Information. Wer wird diese Informationen verwenden? Meine Regierung, die mich zur Armee einberuft, weil sie nur die besten Soldaten haben will? Mein Arbeitgeber, der nur die intelligentesten Männer oder Frauen für sich arbeiten lassen will? Doch das ist o.k. Nehmen wir einmal an, dass man in der Lage sein wird, diese Information in einem tiefen Verlies mit 1 Meter dicken, rostfreien Stahlwänden 30 m unter der Erde zu schützen. Wie steht es um uns selbst? Wollen wir diese Informationen haben, oder wollen wir sie nicht haben? Sie könnten sagen: Mir ist das gleichgültig. Ich möchte diese Daten nicht haben. Was immer mir zustößt, stößt mir zu. Ich gebe Ihnen ein Beispiel dafür, dass Sie diese Informationen haben wollen. Oder wenn sie diese Information nicht haben wollen, werden sie gezwungen werden, sie zur Kenntnis zu nehmen. Ich gebe dafür nur ein Beispiel, und ich komme damit zum Ende. Eine Frau hat Brustkrebs, und es wurde festgestellt, dass sie über ein sensitives Gen verfügt, das Brustkrebs verursacht. Es hat den Namen BRCA1, wobei es sich um ein Element des Ubiquitin-Systems handelt, das wir in der Vergangenheit entdeckt haben. Ich möchte nicht weiter darauf eingehen. Doch Träger des mutierten BRCA1-Gens zu sein bedeutet, dass ein 80%iges Risiko besteht, an Brustkrebs zu erkranken, sowie eine hohe Wahrscheinlichkeit, an Eierstockkrebs zu erkranken. Die Frau sagt also: Ok, ich lasse den Tumor und meine Eierstöcke entfernen. Wird sie ihrer Tochter sagen, dass ihre Tochter mit demselben Risiko lebt? Die Tochter ist eine 21jährige Studentin, eine schöne Lady. Und die Tochter steht in ihrem Leben vor der Wahl, ob sie sich als Präventivmaßnahme beide Brüste entfernen lassen soll oder nicht. Doch auch dann ist das Gen noch in ihrer Keimbahn. Doch nehmen wir an, dass die Tochter die Freundin eines netten jungen Mannes ist und dass die beiden heiraten werden. Wird sie ihrem Verlobten sagen, dass sie, die Frau, in die er sich verliebt hat, ein 80%iges Risiko hat, an Brustkrebs zu erkranken? Was sind die Probleme, die moralischen Probleme hinter diesen Fragen? Usw. usw. Es gibt viele, viele Beispiele. Sie sehen also, dass diese Frau, die plötzlich in der Badewanne einen Knoten in ihrer linken oder rechten Brust fühlt, plötzlich mit einem Problem konfrontiert ist, das weit über ihre eigene Tumorerkrankung hinausgeht. Es betrifft ihre Tochter und ihre Enkel, und es hat mit dem Vertrauen des Verlobten zu tun. Die ganze Familie verfügt plötzlich über ein Wissen, das sie nur schwer fassen kann, [aber] mit dem sie fertig werden muss. Und so geht es weiter und weiter. Alles, was ich Ihnen mitteilen wollte, war meine Sicht der Revolution in der Medizin. Doch wir stecken mitten darin. Wir haben keine Wahl. Allerdings möchte ich Ihnen auch ein Wort der Warnung sagen: dass dies keine Wissenschaft im Reagenzglas ist. Es stehen menschliche Wesen dahinter. Ich danke Ihnen sehr.

Aaron Ciechanover describing the revolution caused by the discovery of penicillin
(00:07:06 - 00:09:47)

 

As Ciechanover expresses in the interview, “Ageing, God and Lindau”, with the near disappearance of bacterial infections, longer lives have allowed such illnesses as cardiovascular diseases and cancer to surface, jointly accounting for over 50% of all deaths in developed countries at the present time. Alzheimer’s disease was unknown in 1900; not enough of the population lived long enough to succumb to the disease. 

The external symptoms of aging are well-known. The self-maintenance of hair melanocytes becomes faulty, and hair turns grey. Enzymes break down the elastin in the skin, there is an overall decrease in pigment-forming cells and fat deposits, and we get wrinkles. Why does this happen? Part of the answer may lie in our genes themselves, or the intensification of genetic errors in somatic cells. This theory of intrinsic mutagenesis, developed by Nobel Laureate Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet in the 1970’s, was outlined in Burnet’s lecture in Lindau in 1975:

 

Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet outlining the theory of intrinsic mutagenesis
(00:08:20 - 00:10:24)

 

Burnet laid emphasis on the concept that nature causes our genetic material to change, and aging to occur, while external, or environmental factors increase the chance of mutations of genetic material, but are not primarily responsible for mutations. DNA repair systems break down, leading to a “cascade of errors”. Burnet also explained the connection between immunity and aging, concluding that good health in old age is the result of a well-adjusted immune system:

 

Burnet explaining the connection between immunity and aging
(00:35:15 - 00:37:27)

 

In more recent research, molecular biologists are peering into the “libraries” of our cells, the chromosomes, which are tightly wound bundles of our DNA. The ends of chromosomes are a series of nucleotides, which are repeated multiple times. These ends, called telomeres, function as protective caps of the chromosomes. An often used comparison to telomeres is the plastic end of a shoelace, which keeps the shoelace (chromosome) from unravelling. Whenever chromosomes divide, it is the telomeres that become shortened, hence the rest of the chromosome is protected from this erosion. Once the telomeres become very short, the cell receives signals, one of which is to stop dividing, and this is the underlying reason for senescence, or biological aging. In the 1980’s, it was discovered that there is an enzyme responsible for adding telomere sequences to chromosomes, in effect reversing the shortening of telomeres. This enzyme is known as telomerase and was discovered by Elizabeth Blackburn and her graduate student Carol Greider, in the protozoa Tetrahymena. For this work, Blackburn and Greider, together with Jack Szostak, received the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. During her most recent lecture in Lindau, Elizabeth Blackburn explained the links between aging and shorter telomeres:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2015) - Telomeres: Telling Tails

It's truly a pleasure to be here again, at Lindau, and to have such wonderful interactions with all of the young scientists! So, what are telomeres, and more importantly, why would you care about it? So, I thought in the next half hour I'll take you through the journey that I had and which many others are continuing into, which has been a journey all the way from pond scum, rather unlikely journey to take us to something in humans, that we can call, the mind. And the general message and what comes out of this, quite surprisingly, from this journey, was implications of telomere maintenance for human health and disease. So, I'm going to tell you how I started on this journey, what took us into it, and then all of the things that have grown out and there are questions, of course, that'll be still exciting to answer. So, if we looked inside a cell that was about to divide, and took a picture of the chromosomes, which you can see in blue, you would see that the cell is about to divide, so all the chromosomes have replicated, so the DNA which is all compacted and looking blue, you can see is actually discernibly double. And at the end of the chromosomes, each end of each of those replicated chromosomes, you can see that there's a little blob. And that's actually lighting up the telomere. And what the telomere does, was for long time sort of known just by, a blob, but it was very functionally important It was known that it was actually protecting the end of the chromosome in ways that protected the genetic material, and without something, whatever that was, a protective structure, at the end of the chromosome, that chromosome could become very unstable, lose information, sometimes even stick by its ends to other chromosomes. Not good news! So, the telomere was a kind of a cap, capping off the end of the chromosomes. So, there was a mystery though. What was this blob? How could we answer that question? It required being able to get your hands on the molecules. And so, this is where the pond scum came in, because this little creature, called Tetrahymena thermophila, is a beautiful single-celled organism, it's lit up green, but it's not actually green. It lives in pond scum, but the point is, it has lots of very tiny and linear chromosomes. So, lots of ends per rest of the DNA. So, that enabled me to very directly analyse it molecularly and found out, sort of surprising, there was this very simple DNA sequence. It wasn't coding for proteins or anything, and the simple sequence was just repeated, over and over again. I'll show you an example in a moment. So, this was very curious and then we found that this was more general, this wasn't just confined to this wonderful creature, it was in yeast too, and that was work that we did together with Jack Szostak. And I collaborated with Jack and we found that, oh, it extended to yeast. And then, more and more people looked and found that actually, for eukaryotes, which have linear chromosomes, and, by the way, you're going to wonder about bacteria, they're just so much smarter, they have circular chromosomes, they don't worry about this stuff. So, we're talking about the eukaryotes, all of us, all the way down from us to pond scum. So, this is at every end, and this is the little repeat motif that you see at our ends. Now, in fact, there's much much more than I've shown, there's thousands and thousands of DNA building blocks, but the point is they make a scaffold, and that scaffold is a protective sheath of special protective proteins. And the point is, it has to be a big enough scaffold for that accretion of protective proteins, which are very well studied. I'll give you some names soon, that it has to be big enough to make a true protection. Now, that it has to be big enough. Okay, there was another mystery, and this was a real zinger, because people knew how DNA was replicated, they knew the machinery by the 1970s, and there was a real problem here, because the beautiful machinery that replicates all the rest of the chromosomal DNA is stupid enough that it can't replicate the very end. It's just the way it's built! So, if you just took this to its logical end, excuse the pun, it would be the, every time you replicated the DNA, you'd lose something from the end! And as the cells divided and replicated each time telomeres would get shorter and shorter and shorter. This would not be a great idea! And, in fact, it was predicted, perhaps this would lead to some kind of finishing off senescence, if you will, of the cells. But nobody knew what might be going on. So, at least we knew by then that the telomeres had repeated DNA at the ends, but also another observation was that they would, the numbers of repeats were actually more fluid, they were going up and down and changing at the ends of different chromosomes. Hmm, this was much more dynamic! Now, the shrinkage we could understand, the growing, that was weird! So, anyway, bottom line was that I decided that we should hunt for an enzymatic activity that maybe was adding DNA to the ends. So, very simply, here's what Carol Greider and I succeeded in doing: We made a synthetic little piece of telomere DNA, the little building blocks you can see here, from this Tetrahymena, the one that had lots and lots of linear chromosomes, so I thought maybe it has lots of something that makes those linear chromosome ends, and you could make the right sorts of extracts from these cells, and do it by chemical reaction, and just put in two building blocks, notice that the telomere DNA is just of these two in this species, and you could make that synthetic DNA grow. So, when we examined this a whole lot, we found it was a fascinating thing. It was putting on these nucleotides, doing something that normal cells were not thought to do. It was copying a bit of an RNA sequence information into complementary nucleotides added on to the DNA end, thereby elongating the DNA. So, this RNA is much bigger than this short sequence portion of it, but this RNA is built-in to this enzyme, which is partly protein and partly RNA. And the RNA helps the reaction, but it also provides this short portion of it as a template. Okay, so we're in the course of studying all of this mechanism, when serendipity happens. Okay, so, for various reasons we were making very precise mutations in the telomerase RNA, and we happen to make one at a particular place, which had actually an effect that was really useful for us. It kind of came back at the enzyme and made it stop. So, what that enabled us to do was ask a question, "How do cells feel if their telomerase isn't working well?" We had been doing things in the test tube and, lo and behold, we could go to Tetrahymena, which, I didn't tell you, but it's a lovely organism because it grows immortally, it just divides and divides and divides, so long as you feed it right, talk to it nicely, it'll keep dividing. Okay, and it had, as I showed you, relatively plenty of telomerase. So, the telomeres got a little bit shorter and longer, but there they were. So, what would happen if, we know inactivated it, using this very precise, surgical stiletto at the heart of the enzyme? It made it stop. And what happened is that the telomeres slowly shortened, took about 20 cell divisions, and then the cells simply stopped dividing. So, now our immortal cell, if you will, we'd turned it into a mortal cell. We had in fact, dealt it a mortal blow right at its heart. It now no longer was immortal, we just done this very simple, we knew what we were doing, we mutated just the telomerase, and it became mortal. So, the conclusion was then, the cell needs plenty of telomerase, it has it and it balances the shortening. Now, the shortening still happens, but the balances that you get, elongation when you need it, so these cells can keep going. Okay, so, now we'll go forward to lots and lots more work for many many different groups and synthesize what we now know is a much more complicated situation. Although the essence of what I told you, hang on to that, because that's exactly what's going to hold through all of what I'll tell you as we now move to thinking about this, essentially always from now and in humans. So, we have the RNA components, it's got a name, hTERC. We have a protein, which carries out this Reverse transcriptase, the core protein, hTERT, TERT, and that's the basic part of it! Now, what's known in humans is that this is extraordinarily complicatedly controlled. You don't have to read all of this, this is just to tell the aficionados that every kind of molecular control mechanism you can think of for the action of this enzyme, to make it more or less active, you can think of it'll be doing it. Telomere proteins themselves protect the telomere from too much telomerase action. They actually ration it a little bit. Telomerase levels, how much telomerase is made of the telomerase genes? How much the RNA products of the telomere transcription, telomere gene transcriptions are actually put into different spliced forms? How much they're assembled into the enzyme? Etcetera, etcetera. Okay, you get the idea, it's really complex how on earth we're going to work out which of these ones is actually the important ones, in humans. They're all doing something, somewhere. So, what you have to do, is you actually have to look in actual humans. And this is where it's really important to now think about scale of time, because humans, you might remember, we have a life expectancy, in many developed countries around the world, to something like, approaching 80 years. So, we can look at our experimental models, like a mouse, but it only lives for two years. And you look at a fruit fly, it's only about six weeks, and a worm, and it's only about three weeks. So, while we all have the same molecular and cellular building blocks in our cells, how that plays out in the whole organism is going to be on this very, very different time frame. And you don't know that what might be the critical rate limiting aspects of it, are going to be the same from organism to organism. And in fact, I'll tell you, each of those model organisms, the mouse, the worm, and so on, they don't die when they die of old age, they don't die of short telomeres. But they're on a really different time frame from us, so we have to look in us. Luckily, we can measure telomeres, we can take blood samples, we can take other samples. Commonly blood, sometimes just spit, our saliva, filled with useful cells, we can get a window inside our body, We can measure the telomeres and there's nice methodologies for doing that. I won't go into it, but I'm just tell you, you can measure in various ways and get good, reliable numbers out. So, bottom line is, what do we find? Well, we start off with about 10,000 nucleotides worth of these repeats. Really nice, long telomeres when we're born but by the time we get really old it's down to about half of that. Now, that half of that might sound like plenty to you, but what it's doing is it actually is now putting the cells in grave danger, because that protective sheath is no longer big enough. And what happens then, in humans, is really interesting. And there was no real reason to think this would be the case, because the telomeres gradually shorten as you look at most cell types, as we go through our decades and decades and decades, and the cells we gestate, called Senescence, which is a signal that those overly short telomeres cell send to the cells, and the say, "Stop!" And they say to do some other things too, that I'm going to tell you, but, first of all, they stop even multiplying, so if it's a replenishing cell type, it's not going to anymore. So, of course here was this gradual process, it's taking place over years. Is it like a life candle burning down, causing, eventually, is it related to our death? That's the question! Here was the cellular part of it, on this side and what was going on down here, what was going on in our whole lives here. So, and remember you've got that highly highly regulated telomerase, and now you could've imagined, well it could be saving things, but it isn't, it isn't doing a great job! It is good in certain cells, like certain cells that have to keep replenishing tissues over life, it's not bad, but not perfect. Luckily, it's really good in the cell lineages that give rise to our germ lines, otherwise we wouldn't be here. So, it does get maintained throughout our germ line, the sperm and egg-producing cells, that produce each of us and all our forebears and all our descendants. So, that's good, but it's pretty low in our body cells, in the many, many cell types. Now, there's also another variation, remember, I said this is complex. Turns out that human cancers, which of course, what are they, they're cells that just keep going and shouldn't keep going. They're not necessarily immortal, but they certainly are doing way too much replicating. They love their telomerase, and they actually rev it up really high. But they do a lot of other very bad things, too, as you know about cancers. Okay, so there we've got the situation in humans. How is all this going to play out? Now, we know a lot about the consequences of what happens if you look inside a cell and ask about the telomere. So, here we've got a nice human cell, looking at it under the microscope, so coiled up inside the nucleus, is all the chromosomes in purple, and out, filling the cytoplasm volume, lots of it is the mitochondria, which of course are the energy powerhouses of the cells. So, now we have 92 telomeres, 46 chromosomes, 92 telomeres, and so, here's one. Now, what is going to happen over life is that telomere in cells as they replicate, and even just as they undergo damages, you'll see, they will get shorter and shorter and now it will become too short and become uncapped. Now, that telomere is not silent, it talks to the cells, and one thing it talks to is mitochondria, and actually pushes them down, through a set of signalling molecules. Makes them less good. When mitochondria are not doing all their wonderful energy stuff really well they can start malfunctioning and producing reactive oxygen species. Really bad news, and particularly bad news for telomeres, and it actually sets up this vicious cycle, where telomeres can get even shorter. So, I've just shown one, but there are 92 and variously, they can get worse and worse. So, this is bad enough for the cell itself. But, these things are like these cells now, with these Uncapped Telomeres sending these signals, they're like a rotten apple in a barrel. They can now start affecting other things, because what happens is, another of a kind of signals that this Uncapped Telomere, which is a very worried telomere, is sending, is, for whatever reason, it is sending alarm signals which include secreting outside the cell. Factors that include those that are increasing inflammation. Now, through a whole series of things that go on in the wonderfully complex immune system, that also can up the body's reactive oxygen species, too. So, you've got even worse situation. Okay, so you can see a senescence cell with telomere damage is not a really good cell to have! So, this kind of cellular pathology is quite well studied, in cells and also in certain mouse models and so on. And there's every reason to think that it would go on if you get such cells in humans, as well. So, now let's say, well let's look at some consequences of what happens to telomere length. So, now, we had the good fortune to join a very large cohort project and we could measure telomere length in 100,000 people, so we can really start to get some good ideas about what happens in humanity, and first of all in a part of California. So, the first thing we did, was we looked at telomere length in 100,000 people just in spit samples. So you've got a nice sampling of cell types in the body. You look, just looked at average, over time, as people got older and older it was just one time point for each person, and what you saw was what I told you! There was this gradual decline. But then we saw something really interesting! Now, let me point out most mortality in this population is happening around here. So, you got this decline, most of the mortality, overall is around here. But there are people who you can see are surviving longer and longer. Now, it's just one time point, but what you see is the longer a person has survived, the more likely they are to have an average telomere length that's longer. So, this is very, very interesting, because it never been seen before! We replicated that males and females are different. But we did show that the difference, which is a bit less before about age 50, it sort of really splits off, between females and males. And then after this critical time, when most of the mortality, just population mortality happens to both of them show these sort of rises. So, really interesting. But now we can say what will happen if you actually ask if this has any consequence or any predictive value. And so, the DNA was taken in the year 2009, so the clock tick, and by 2012 you could go to the records and say who was still alive. And who had died in that time period. And then compared that, as a function of what were the telomeres like at the beginning. And, lo and behold, if you looked at the people in the bottom quartile and set their likelihood of dying to one, just as a reference, then you found that anybody whose telomeres where in the other quartiles, that is people whose telomeres three years earlier, or within that three year period you looked at deaths, you just found that, oh, longer telomeres actually had a decrease chance that you would be in that group of people who had died, within three years. We saw that age and sex clearly have an effect, so the blue line's actually, the blue bars show that that was already corrected for. But we also know that a lot of other things affect mortality. A lot of other things also affect telomere length. And we know what they are, and we can get the major ones out, and here's the big list. We did the age and gender, age and sex, race-ethnicity, education, cigarette packyears history, physical activity habits, alcohol intake, body mass index and so on, and, doesn't budge. What that's telling you is this is independent. This is a very diverse group of people, but California's, but you know Californians, meh, you know (laughs). Right, so, let's look at some serious, sober Danes, and see if the same thing happens. This is the Copenhagen study, Rode et al. published this beautiful work where they looked at 64,000 people's blood cell telomeres, just average telomere length, baseline and then time goes by and they looked at a bigger range but the average was about seven years, so longer than what we'd looked at. And they said, of those many people who did die, how many, in which telomere length category to begin with, how many had died? So, in other words, the same question, does the chance of you dying within that period of averaging about seven years, does the chance of you dying have any relationship to the telomere length, at the beginning of the baseline analysis? And, lo and behold, again, after correcting for all of these multiple possible variables that's called the Multivariate Adjusted, this is what this is, referring to telomere length shortness, as you see trends as worse and worse chance that you will have been in the group of people who died, the shorter the telomeres are, and it's a real kind of a trend. So, we get the message now, we got big studies, I think it's pretty clear. Reduced mortality, and I've shown you all causes is related to the observation, just observing the telomere length in people. Didn't show you the data from Rode at al.'s study and from others, that actually, when you start to divide it down into some of the major killers of the elderly, cardiovascular, all-cancers lumped together for the moment, all of those are related to reduced mortality from those causes, as well, are all related to observed having longer telomeres. Okay, and though the news is good too about longer telomeres in another parameter we care about. Well, lifespan, that's one thing, we want to know how long, how many years of healthy life we'll have, how long is our, quote, healthspan. And, in fact, again you see a relationship, here's a bit of numbers, but the point is they're related. Now, you can see another thing. You can say, now let's go the other way, what about bad news? What about diseases and shorter telomeres? Do we see a relationship? And the relationship goes in that direction, shorter telomeres correlate with, not only just finding an association, but actually also predicting, like I saw, I showed you predicting mortality, predicting, getting some disease, and there's a whole group of these diseases, and you can see they're very common kinds of impairments and diseases that happen with aging. Now, the observant of you have been noticing something, all of these arrows have double heads. I haven't said anything about causality yet. That's what we'd like to know! So, genetics! Genetics is wonderful because it gives us, if we can see a gene we can attribute a gene, especially one whose function we know, we can say causality. And wonderful beginning began in 2001, Vulliamy et al. found that if people inherit in families a mutation, fortunately rare, which is in the a Telomerase RNA Gene, remember that hTERC that I told you about, that RNA component of telomerase. If you have a mutation that knocks your telomerase down to half of its normal level, there's a very clear causality, we know what hTERC does, it's part of telomere maintenance, and people get really really short telomeres. Now the point is that really matters, there's a clear disease impact, related to how much the telomeres shorten. And the first things they've found were a bunch of very interesting diseases, they already showed certain overlapse with some of the diseases, which just occur in the population with aging. Here, we've got real causality, now, it's a bit extreme, these people are very much more likely to die much earlier, and as the telomeres get shorter and shorter, going down through the generations, because the short telomeres get passed down from person to person, they get worse and worse and die, sadly, earlier and earlier. So, the causality is extremely clear, but it is kind of extreme. Now, the genetics has just grown and grown since 2001, so more genetics has told us the same story, but really filled it out! So, again, inherit a rare mutation, half the telomerase level or other ways of reducing telomere maintenance, not only reducing telomerase levels, but also other ways that you can reduce it, which are to do with directly binding telomere proteins. So, what you see though is exactly what I showed you, but now, because there's more and more cases round the world there are various family pedigrees, people really, they find these sorts of things and the list now has got longer! So, now it's starting to even broaden out to neuropsychiatric diseases, very interestingly. This is looking like the big set of things that can happen, it doesn't all happen in one person. It varies on how much shorter the telomeres have got with succeeding generations. The genes though, and this is just for the specialists who'd like to look and say, "Yes, what genes are they?" Well, there's 11 of these now, six of them are related to telomerase itself or the biogenesis directly of telomerase, and there are five now, which are known telomere binding proteins. So, we know exactly what these things do, they are directly doing telomere maintenance. So, we got real causality here. So now let's look at the rest of us, who are fortunate enough not to have been afflicted with these rare, although extremely informative mutations. Now you can say, well, what about common alleles that actually just impair our telomere maintenance a bit? We had a wide range of telomere lengths, by the way, those means that I showed you with age, they're much much tighter than the actual range of telomere lengths at all ages. But you can do statistics on large numbers and in this beautiful study, looking at just what genes are associated with having shorter telomeres in the population at large. So, causality, because genes cause things. What was amazing was, the five top hits were our old friends, the known telomere telomerase genes. So, this was very clear, we know just what these do! And then they said, well, if you look at these alleles that actually are related to the shorter telomeres, and these are common ones, that can occur in all sorts of combinations in any of us, is there a disease impact? And there was, in cardiovascular in a particular form, coronary artery disease, and so, in fact, if you added up the short version alleles for each of these genes plus a couple more that were less related but showed up in the quantitative analyses, but these were the top five ones, we know what they do. Just out of the bat, you would have a 21% higher chance of getting coronary artery disease at some point in your life than the population at large. Now, to have all seven, right, there five plus two, seven genes, to have all the bad alleles of all, combinatorily it goes down and down, so it's probably only one in a few hundred or at most people. But, you can get that. Most of us have a mixture of these, because they're just all sorts of different genes. But this is really major thing, because again, it is saying that at least this short telomere thing, because we know what these genes do, must be able to contribute, contribute this particular form of cardiovascular disease. If you believe in the logic that genes have causality, and I think that's a rational thing to do, then, that's what we can say for this case. So, it's really useful! Now, telomeres is not all good news, because in the context of cells that are normal. You remember Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, it was one person in the daytime, he was this nice, good citizen, well-behaved, but at night-time, same person, was a horrible criminal, violent, right? And telomerase, in the setting of the night-time setting, if you will, cancer-prone cells that had changes. This can be really dangerous! Genetics, again, has told us. Now remember, I told you, if you have only half as much telomerase as you ought to have, one of the things that is caused is cancers. And it's actually a specific subset of cancers. But now, more recent genetics has come in, and we're finding another very interesting thing, that is just about cancers. Now, when I say, we, I mean the world at large. And so, just a little bit too much, even just as, less than twofold, too much expression of telomerase itself, actually causes some other cancers. You can see actual contributions here. And there are completely different set of cancers, and they're not the most frequent of the cancers in the world. But now, you can see where we are. Cancers first of all, vary. We are really living in a trade-off world here, right? We're precariously on a knife-edge here, because this is what has been learned by looking at actual humans and actual diseases and genetics and understanding the molecular basis of what's going on. You're going to say, "Well, telomeres, wait a minute, they are not cause to all diseases, diabetes, it's caused by other things. It's caused by insulin not working properly, there are other things that go on, it can't be all telomeres!" And I couldn't agree more! But I want to pose the idea that, in fact show you the data! Actually, it'll come from mouse models, because it's so clear that telomeres interact. So, now we've talked about this idea, the more the telomeres shorten, the more cells get engaged in harmful kinds of consequences, and the more severe the pathologies. And in a mouse, you actually have to delete telomerase completely, but then eventually if you breed the mice you can start to see these sort of graded effects. So now, let's look at mouse models, where we're looking at just single-gene mutations, which cause disease in humans. And so, here's three. One is Progeria, very premature, fast telomere shortening, sorry, premature, fast aging, actually, it has telomere shortening, too, in humans. Another one, completely different, a muscle wasting disease. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy, known mutation, another completely different one again, diabetes, not enough insulin in this mouse, single-gene mutation. So, completely different things. Now, each of these models, you put the same mutations that you find in humans, you put them into the mouse and it's actually a little bit disappointing. You don't get all the phenotypes, the Warner's doesn't have the full phenotype, the Duschenne Muscular dystrophy shows the skeletal muscles, but actual people with this disease die of cardiac disease. So, it's not really mimicking it perfectly! So, now let's go through with time and now let's superimpose in the mouse model a Telomerase deletion. What happens is really interesting, because well before the telomerase deletion is really showing any effect by itself, the telomeres only partly done some of the cells, you get an interaction, and what gets worse is the Warner's syndrome phenotypes. And you'd starts to look now like the human one. The right cells start to be showing pathologies. The same thing happened with the Duchenne muscular dystrophy in that setting, as the telomeres got shorter, now they started to get heart problems. And now, the same, the diabetes, part insulin deficiency, it became much worse and it was the diabetes symptoms that got worse. Okay, so bottom line is we've turned mice into furry little humans! Right? By removing telomerase and setting that as a background. So, interactions between telomeres and disease, we can see that in these mouse models. Now, I just want to tell you that it's not all genes, and in fact, people have long known that something you might think is totally different but, coming from the mind is something that does have an impact on telomeres. On disease, good example is heart disease, in fact. And so, we and others started studying this, and we started and found some effects on telomere maintenance. And now, the list is huge, I'm just going to show you this huge list of all these sorts of things, terrible things that happen in people's lives, which really argue, since it's the length of exposure that is often very much a quantitative predictor, or the duration, duration severity, length of abuse in these situation... It quantitatively predicts how short telomeres are. So, we think there's real causality here. And we know that Chronic psychological stress has impact on disease, but one of the things it does do is it reduces telomere maintenance. So, the big question is going to be, disease impact itself, and what can you do about it?" And why would you care? This is all very statistical. And now, I want to finish with something really remarkable. Which is: People who have bladder cancer, and you look at an interaction between something that you probably would never have dreamed of looking at if you're asking how much a bladder cancer patient will survive. An interaction of the short telomeres in the blood cells, the normal blood cells, with depression. Now, depression is fairly common. So, they just did a simple thing in this beautiful study, which was they divided people up at the time of their diagnosis, of course the bladder cancer had been developing all those years. Got to the point of being clinically diagnosed and they said that the person had depression, but not short telomeres or short telomeres and not depression, or neither, short telomeres or depression, or did they have both. Now this just says, well, they did the study right, this group at MD Anderson in Houston, Texas, I'm going to show it to you visually. Here are lots and lots of people! They had over 400 people. They're all just sorts of different people, and they've got bladder cancer. And at the diagnosis, they fell into one of those categories. One or either of depression and shorter blood cell telomeres, or neither, or both. After two and a half years, if you only had depression, or you only had short telomeres, or you had neither. it actually statistically didn't make much difference. So, this many people are no longer with us after two and a half years, they died within that two and a half years. But if you had both, it was that! So, this is a big difference, over half! And now, five years, is a very critical time for cancer. And now, if you only had one, well of course, more and more people did die, either depression or short telomeres, or neither, it's about the same. But if you had both, everybody had died. So, that starts to look clinically significant and I think the game that you've been seeing is, it's all about interactions. And so interactions between all sorts of factors. We've observed in lots of stress-like and other situations, things that will make your telomeres shorter. It has been observed things that will make them longer. The real thing is going to be finding out which of these things, quantitatively, will actually, in true, proper studies, that are not just looking, but really testing in trial-like arrangements, which of these kinds of things, and they'll be more, could actually improve telomere maintenance. And it's got to be this right balance, because remember, if you push it too far, cancer risks go up, of certain kinds of cancer. So, it's got to be really, really tuned right, and probably physiologically is important. Okay, so what I've done is I've said there are all sorts of inputs into the telomere shortening and the how it much it shortens is really a complex set of things. But you can measure all of that, and see what the telomere shortening is, and you can see these quantitative relationships, associations. And as I've shown you, the sum aspect of it, which is presenting causality, and of course there's plenty of other causality, all interacting as well, but we think that we have this sort of underlying situation, where we can say, here's something that's changeable in life, you can see it's influenced by a lot of things besides genes and it partly, at least, contributes to the very common diseases of aging, which account for so much morbidity in people. And that just is the long words way of saying what I just told you in a diagram. So, maintenance of telomeres is important, and it's something else that we think now is actually contributing to these diseases of aging. So, finally, I just want to finish with, the journey began, with curiosity, you have to be always willing to play with ideas, you had to had background knowledge to make all these kinds of discoveries, not only in the pond organism, but in humans. You had to have wonderful collaborators, so that meant working with people, working in a research environment that made this possible. So, I'm immensely grateful that I'd been able to have this journey, and the science community people, so important. I'm in the Bay Area, in San Francisco, but I have colleagues everywhere. This journey began in looking underwater, and I just thought I'd finish with this most beautiful graphic, it's a photograph taken just outside where I was born, in Tasmania, Australia. It's the shoreline at night, and beautiful, single-celled organisms, living under the sea, living underwater, just like Tetrahymena does. These beautiful organisms are shown lit up here, and of course, the wonders that they can show you are probably, perhaps almost as wondrous as the wonders that you can see when you look out into the galaxy. Thank you very much.

Es ist wirklich ein Vergnügen, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und solche wunderbaren Begegnungen mit jungen Wissenschaftlern zu pflegen! Was also sind Telomere und was noch wichtiger ist, warum sollte man sich darum kümmern? Ich dachte, in der nächsten halben Stunde nehme ich Sie auf die Reise mit, die ich gemacht habe und auf der ich mich noch immer mit vielen anderen befinde, eine Reise vom Wimpertierchen ausgehend, eine eher unwahrscheinliche Reise, die uns zu etwas Menschlichem führt, das wir Verstand nennen. Die allgemeine Botschaft und was aus der Reise folgt sind, als rechte Überraschung, Implikationen zum Telomeren-Erhalt für die Gesundheit und Krankheit des Menschen. Ich werden Ihnen also erzählen, wie ich diese Reise begonnen habe, was uns dazu veranlasste und dann alles das, was daraus erwuchs, und es gibt natürlich Fragen, die nach wie vor zu beantworten spannend sind. Wenn man in eine Zelle blickt, die im Begriff ist sich zu teilen und ein Bild von den Chromosomen machen würde, die Sie hier blau sehen, würden Sie sehen, die Zelle ist im Begriff, sich zu teilen, alle Chromosomen haben sich reproduziert, und die DNA, die ganz komprimiert ist und blau aussieht, Sie sehen, die ist deutlich doppelt. Am Ende jedes Chromosoms, an jedem Ende jedes dieser reproduzierten Chromosomen, da sehen Sie ein kleines Klümpchen. Das erhellt das Telomer. Die Funktion des Telomer war lange Zeit eigentlich nur durch ein Klümpchen bekannt, doch funktionell war es wichtig. Es war bekannt, dass es das Ende des Chromosoms in einer Weise schützte, die das genetische Material schützte, und ohne etwas, was auch immer das ist, eine schützende Struktur am Ende des Chromosoms, könnte das Chromosom sehr instabil werden, Informationen verlieren, es könnte sogar manchmal mit seinen Enden an anderen Chromosomen haften. Keine guten Nachrichten! Das Telomer war somit eine Art Kappe, die das Ende der Chromosomen abdeckt. Dennoch gab es da ein Rätsel. Was war dieses Klümpchen? Wie konnten wir diese Frage beantworten? Es erforderte, Moleküle in die Hand zu bekommen. Hier kam das Wimpertierchen ins Spiel, denn diese kleine Kreatur, genannt Tetrahymena thermophila ist ein schöner, einzelliger Organismus, er leuchtet grün auf, ist aber nicht wirklich grün. Es lebt im Wimpertierchen, der Punkt aber ist, es hat viele sehr kleine und lineare Chromosomen. Also viele Enden je Rest der DNA. Das ermöglichte es mir, es sehr direkt molekular zu analysieren und ich fand heraus, gewissermaßen überrascht, dass es diese sehr einfache DNA-Sequenz gab. Sie kodierte keine Proteine oder irgendetwas und die einfache Sequenz wurde einfach immer wieder wiederholt. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich ein Beispiel. Das war sehr seltsam und wir fanden dann, dies war allgemeiner, dies war nicht nur auf diese wundervolle Kreatur begrenzt, es fand sich auch in Hefe. Diese Arbeit führten wir mit Jack Szostak durch. Ich arbeitete mit Jack zusammen und wir entdeckten, oh, das erweitert sich zur Hefe. Und immer mehr Leute forschten und entdeckten das, für Eukaryoten, die linearen Chromosomen haben, und Sie werden sich übrigens wundern, wie das bei Bakterien ist, die sind so viel intelligenter, haben Ringchromosomen, die kümmern sich um so etwas nicht. Wir sprechen also von den Eukaryoten, wir alle bis hinunter zum Wimpertierchen. Das befindet sich also an jedem Ende und ist das kleine sich wiederholende Motiv, das Sie an unseren Enden sehen. Es gibt tatsächlich sehr viel mehr als was ich gezeigt habe und tausende von DNA-Bausteinen, der Punkt aber ist, sie bilden ein Gerüst und dieses Gerüst ist eine Schutzhülle besonders protektiver Proteine. Dabei muss das Gerüst groß genug für die Zunahme protektiver Proteinen sein, was sehr gut untersucht wurde. Ich werde Ihnen gleich ein paar Namen nennen, es muss groß genug sein, einen echten Schutz zu bieten. Nun, es musste groß genug sein. Gut, da gab es ein weiteres Rätsel und das war wirklich sensationell, denn man wusste, wie sich DNA replizierte, man kannte den Mechanismus seit 1970 und hier lag das wirkliche Problem. Der schöne Mechanismus, der den ganzen Rest der chromosomalen DNA repliziert, ist zu dumm, und kann das Ende nicht replizieren. So ist es eben gebaut! Wenn man das logisch zu Ende denkt, entschuldigen Sie das Wortspiel, würde man, jedes Mal, wenn man die DNA repliziert, etwas vom Ende verlieren. Indem sich Zellen teilen und replizieren würden Telomere jedes Mal immer kürzer werden. Das wäre keine gute Idee! Tatsächlich wurde vorausgesagt, dies würde vielleicht zu einer Art Beendigung des Alterungsprozesses der Zellen führen. Doch niemand wusste, was da vor sich ging. Zumindest wussten wir damit, dass Telomere DNA an den Enden wiederholten, aber es gab auch eine andere Beobachtung, dass sie, die Zahl der Wiederholungen war tatsächlich fließender, sie nahmen zu und ab und änderte sich an den Enden verschiedener Chromosomen. Hmm, dies war sehr viel dynamischer! Nun, die Verminderung konnten wir verstehen, das Wachstum, das war seltsam! Wie auch immer, wir entschieden uns schließlich nach einer enzymatischen Aktivität zu forschen, die DNA möglicherweise an die Enden anfügte. Also ganz einfach, dies ist es, was Carol Greider und mir glückte: Wir schufen ein kleines synthetisches Stück Telomer-DNA, die kleinen Bausteine, die Sie hier sehen, und zwar von diesem Tetrahymena, das sehr viele linear Chromosomen hat, ich dachte, vielleicht verfügt es über sehr viel von dem, was diese linearen Chromosomenenden erzeugt und man könne die richtigen Extrakte aus diesen Zellen erhalten, und dies durch eine chemische Reaktion vornehmen, und einfach zwei Bausteine nehmen, - beachten Sie, die Telomer-DNA ist nur von diesen beiden, in dieser Spezies, und diese synthetische DNA könne man zum Wachsen bringen. Als wir das ausgiebig untersuchten fanden wir, dass es eine faszinierende Sache war. Es legte diese Nukleotide an, und tat etwas, von dem man nicht angenommen hatte, dass normale Zellen dies tun würden. Es kopierte etwas der RNA-Sequenzinformation in komplementäre Nukleotide, die dem DNA-Ende hinzugefügt waren. Dadurch wurde die DNA verlängert. Diese RNA ist also sehr viel länger als diese kleine Teilsequenz, doch die RNA ist in dieses Enzym eingebaut, das zum Teil Protein, zum Teil RNA ist. Die RNA hilft bei der Reaktion, liefert aber auch dieses kurze Teil davon als Vorlage. Wir sind also dabei alle diese Mechanismen zu studieren, als sich ein Glücksfall ereignete. Aus verschiedenen Gründen ließen wir sehr präzise Mutationen der Telomerase RNA entstehen, und es gelang uns, eine an einem bestimmten Ort zu erzeugen, was eine Wirkung zeigte, die für uns sehr nützlich war. Es kam beim Enzym gewissermaßen zurück und ließ es stoppen. Das ermöglichte es uns, eine Frage zu stellen: „Was empfinden Zellen, wenn ihre Telomerase nicht gut funktioniert?“ Wir hatten im Reagenzglas Dinge vorgenommen und siehe da, wir konnten zum Tetrahymena gehen, das, was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe, ein wunderbarer Organismus ist, denn er wächst unsterblich, er teilt sich einfach ständig. Solange man ihn richtig ernährt, freundlich mit ihm spricht, fährt er fort sich zu teilen. Es hat, ich habe das gezeigt, relativ viel Telomerasen. Die Telomerasen wurden etwas kürzer und länger, aber da waren sie. Was würde nun geschehen, wenn, wir wussten es zu interaktivieren, wir dieses sehr präzise chirurgische Stilett am Herzen des Enzyms verwendeten? Es stoppte es. Die Telomere wurden langsam kürzer, es dauerte etwa 20 Zellteilungen und dann hörte die Zelle einfach auf sich zu teilen. Unsere unsterbliche Zelle, wenn Sie so wollen, wurde eine sterbliche Zelle. Wir hatten ihr in der Tat einen sterblichen Schlag ins Herz versetzt. Es war nicht mehr unsterblich, das hatten wir sehr einfach bewerkstelligt, wir wussten, was wir taten, wir mutierten die Telomerase und sie wurde sterblich. Die Schlussfolgerung war, die Zelle benötigt viel Telomerase, hat sie die, wird die Verkürzung balanciert. Nun, die Verkürzung findet weiterhin statt, doch das Geleichgewicht, das man erhält, Verlängerung, wenn sie benötigt wird, damit diese Zellen weiterleben. Wir gehen jetzt weiter zu sehr viel mehr Arbeit für sehr viele verschiedenen Gruppen und fassen das zusammen, von dem wir jetzt wissen, dass es sich um eine viel kompliziertere Situation handelt. Der Kern dessen, was ich ihnen erzählt habe, halten Sie den fest, denn genau das wird sich durch alles, was ich Ihnen erzähle, hindurchziehen, wenn wir jetzt darüber nachdenken, im Wesentlichen von jetzt an immer in Bezug auf den Menschen. Wir haben also die RNA-Komponenten, die haben einen Namen, hTERC. Wir haben ein Protein, das die reverse Transkriptase ausführt, das Kernprotein, hTERT, TERT und das ist der wichtigste Teil davon! Was man vom Menschen kennt ist, dass dies außerordentlich kompliziert gesteuert wird. Sie brauchen das nicht alles zu lesen, es geht nur darum, Ihnen die Aficionados zu nennen, damit jeder molekulare Kontrollmechanismus, den Sie sich für diese Aktion dieses Enzyms denken können, damit es mehr oder weniger aktiv wird, auch ausgeführt wird. Telomer-Proteine selbst schützen das Telomer vor einer zu starken Telomeraseaktivität. Sie rationieren diese ein bisschen. Telomerase-Ebenen, wie viel Telomerase wird aus Telomerase-Genen erzeugt? Wie viele RNA-Produkte der Telomer-Transkription, Telomer Transkription von Genen werden tatsächlich in verschiedene gespleißte Formen gegeben? Wie sehr werden sie in dem Enzym zusammengeführt? Und so weiter. Gut, Sie haben eine Vorstellung davon, es ist wirklich sehr komplex, wie erfährt man, welche von diesen sind die wirklich wichtigen im Menschen. Sie bewirken alle etwas irgendwo. Was man also tun muss, man muss sich die Menschen ansehen. Hier ist es sehr wichtig, in Bezug auf den Zeithorizont zu denken, denn Menschen, wie Sie sich erinnern, haben in vielen entwickelten Ländern weltweit eine Lebenserwartung von etwa annähernd 80 Jahren. Wir schauen uns unsere experimentellen Modelle an, etwa eine Maus, die lebt aber nur zwei Jahre lang. Und eine Fruchtfliege, die hat nur etwa sechs Wochen und ein Wurm, bei dem sind es etwa drei Wochen. Obgleich wir alle die gleichen molekularen und zellulären Bausteine in unseren Zellen haben, wie spielt sich das im gesamten Organismus ab, in Anbetracht dieser sehr verschiedenen Zeitrahmen. Was der kritische Anteil der begrenzenden Aspekte sein könnte, werden diese die Gleichen von Organismus zu Organismus sein? Ich sage Ihnen, jedes dieser Modellorganismen, die Maus, der Wurm und so weiter, die sterben nicht, wenn sie aus Altersschwäche sterben, die sterben nicht durch kurze Telomeren. Sie befinden sich aber in einem sehr anderen Zeitrahmen als wir, daher müssen wir unser Inneres schauen. Glücklicherweise können wir Telomere messen, man kann Blutproben nehmen, man kann andere Proben nehmen. Gewöhnlich nimmt man Blut, manchmal einfach Spucke, unseren Speichel, voller nützlicher Zellen, wir erhalten ein Fenster in unseren Körper. Wir können Telomere messen und es gibt schöne Methodologien dies zu tun. Ich werde das nicht weiter ausführen, nur so weit, man kann auf verschiedene Arten messen und gute, zuverlässige Zahlen erhalten. Also, was haben wir gefunden? Nun, wir begannen mit etwa 10.000 Nukleotiden, die diese Wiederholungen wert waren. Wirklich schöne, lange Telomere, wenn wir geboren werden, wenn wir dann wirklich alt sind, sind sie etwa halb so lang. Diese Hälfte mag Ihnen viel erscheinen, doch in Wirklichkeit bringt das die Zellen in ernste Gefahr, da die schützende Umhüllung nicht mehr groß genug ist. Was dann in den Menschen geschieht, ist wirklich interessant. Und es gab keinen realen Grund anzunehmen, dies sei der Fall, da die Telomere sich graduell verkürzen, wenn man sich die meisten Zellarten ansieht. Während wir ein Jahrzehnt nach dem anderen leben und die Zellen, die wir in uns tragen, genannt Seneszenz, ein Signal, das diese zu kurzen Telomeren an die Zellen senden, „Stopp!“ sagt. Sie teilen noch andere Dinge mit, die getan werden sollten, wovon ich Ihnen erzählen werde, aber zuallererst beenden sie sogar die Vermehrung. Wenn es sich um einen auffüllenden Zelltyp handelt, hört dieser damit auf. Hier war nun dieser allmähliche Prozess, der sich über Jahre erstreckt. Ist das wie eine Kerze, die herunterbrennt und vielleicht verursacht, - die mit unserem Tod in Verbindung steht? Das ist die Frage! Hier war der zelluläre Teil, auf dieser Seite und was hier unten stattfand, und hier was in unserem ganzen Leben stattfindet. Denken Sie daran, da ist diese sehr stark regulierte Telomerase und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, nun, es könnte etwas sagen, tut es aber nicht, es vollbringt eine großartige Arbeit. Das ist für gewissen Zellen gut, da gewisse Zellen die Gewebe im Lauf des Lebens auffüllen müssen, es ist nicht schlecht, aber nicht perfekt. Glücklicherweise ist das in den Zelllinien, die aus unseren Keimbahnen entstehen, wirklich gut, sonst wären wir nicht hier. Das wird also durchgehend in unseren Keimbahnen erhalten, den Sperma- und Ei-erzeugenden Zellen, die uns alle und alle unsere Vorfahren und Nachkommen hervorbringen. Das ist also gut, in unseren Körperzellen, in sehr vielen Zelltypen, aber ziemlich gering. Es gibt da noch eine andere Variante, erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, es sei komplex. Es zeigt sich, beim menschlichen Krebs, natürlich handelt es sich dabei um Zellen die einfach weitermachen, was sie nicht sollten. Sie sind nicht notwendigerweise unsterblich, vermehren sich aber viel zu sehr. Sie lieben ihre Telomerase und bringen sie wirklich auf Hochtouren. Sie machen aber noch eine Menge anderer schlimmer Dinge, wie man das vom Krebs kennt. Gut, da haben wir die Situation im Menschen. Wie spielt sich das nun alles ab? Wir wissen jetzt viel über die Konsequenzen dessen, was geschieht, wenn man in eine Zelle sieht und etwas über Telomere wissen will. Hier haben wir eine schöne menschliche Zelle, die unter dem Mikroskop angesehen wird, aufgerollt innerhalb des Zellkerns sind alle Chromosomen in violett, und außen, der Zytoplasmainhalt gefüllt, vieles davon sind die Mitochondrien, die selbstverständlich die Kraftzentren der Zellen sind. Wir haben hier jetzt 92 Telomere, 46 Chromosomen, 92 Telomere und so, hier ist eines. Was im Lauf des Lebens geschieht ist, die Telomere in den Zellen, wenn diese sich vermehren, und selbst wenn sie nur beschädigt werden, dann werden Telomere immer kürzer und dann wird es zu kurz und das Ende ist offen. Das Telomer hält jetzt nicht still, es spricht zu den anderen Zellen und es spricht zu seinen Mitochondrien und drückt sie mit einem Satz signalgebender Moleküle nach unten. Dadurch wird ihre Qualität schlechter. Wenn Mitochondrien nicht ihre gesamte wunderbare Energiearbeit gut ausführen, können sie anfangen zu versagen und reaktive Sauerstoff-Spezies erzeugen. Die wirklich schlechte Nachricht ist, und teilweise eine schlechte Nachricht für Telomere, es baut sich ein Teufelskreis auf, in dem Telomere noch kürzer werden können. Ich habe nur eines gezeigt, aber da gibt es 92 und verschiedenartige, die können sich immer weiter verschlechtern. Das ist für die Zelle selbst ziemlich schlecht. Diese Dinge sind jetzt aber wie diese Zellen, diese Telomere mit offenem Ende senden Signale, sie sind wie ein fauler Apfel in einem Fass. Sie können jetzt andere Dinge infizieren. denn eine andere Art Signale, die diese Teloreme mit offenem Ende, welches sehr besorgte Telomere sind, senden, sind aus irgend einem Grund Alarmsignale, die beinhalten, außerhalb der Zelle sekretierend zu wirken. Dies schließt Faktoren ein, die die Entzündung steigern. Aufgrund einer Reihe Dinge, die in diesem wundervoll komplexen Immunsystem stattfinden, können auch reaktive Sauerstoffspezies erhöht werden. Man hat also eine noch schlimmere Situation. Gut, Sie können eine Zellenseneszenz mit geschädigtem Telomer sehen, und das ist keine gute Zelle. Diese Art zellulärer Pathologie wurde gut untersucht, in Zellen und in gewissen Mausmodellen und so weiter. Und es gibt allen Grund anzunehmen, dies würde so auch bei menschlichen Zellen weitergehen. Wir wollen uns jetzt einmal einige der Konsequenzen ansehen, von dem, was mit der Telomerlänge geschieht. Wir hatten das Glück an einer sehr großen Kohortenstudie teilzunehmen und wir konnten Telomerlängen von 100.000 Menschen messen, wir beginnen also einen guten Begriff davon zu erhalten, was in der Menschheit geschieht, zuallererst einmal in einem Teil Kaliforniens. Als erstes schauten wir uns Telomerlängen in Speichelproben von 100.000 Menschen an. Man bekommt eine schöne Stichprobe von Zelltypen des Körpers. Man schaut sich mit der Zeit einen Durchschnitt an, wenn Menschen immer älter werden, es gab für jede Person einen Zeitpunkt, und was sich zeigte ist das, was ich Ihnen erzählt habe! Es gab da diesen allmählichen Rückgang. Dann sahen wir aber etwas wirklich Interessantes! Lassen Sie mich darauf verweisen, die höchste Sterblichkeit in dieser Population findet hier statt. Sie haben also diesen Rückgang, die höchste Sterblichkeit ist insgesamt hier. Sie sehen aber, es gibt Menschen, die leben immer weiter. Nun, das ist nur ein Zeitpunkt, was man aber sieht ist, je länger die Person überlebt, desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass sie eine durchschnittlich längere Telomerlänge hat. Das ist jetzt sehr, sehr interessant, weil man das bisher noch nie gesehen hatte. Wir wiederholen, dass Männer und Frauen verschieden sind. Wir zeigten aber, dass die Differenz, die vor dem 50sten Lebensjahr etwas geringer ist, sich wirklich zwischen Männern und Frauen aufzuspalten beginnt. Und nach dieser kritischen Zeit, in der die meiste Sterblichkeit, nun die Bevölkerungssterblichkeit von beiden, diesen Anstieg zeigt. Also, wirklich interessant. Wir können jetzt sagen, was ist, wenn man sich fragt, ob das irgendeine Konsequenz oder einen prädikativen Wert hat. Die DNA wurde im Jahre 2009 genommen, die Uhr tickt also und 2012 konnte man in den Aufzeichnungen nachsehen, wer noch lebte. Und wer schon gestorben war. Und dann ein Beziehung hergestellt, als Funktion zu wie die Telomere zu Beginn waren. Und siehe da, wenn man sich die Leute im unteren Viertel ansieht und ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben als eins nimmt, nur als Referenz, dann findet man, jeder, dessen Telomere sich drei Jahre zuvor in den anderen Vierteln befanden, oder innerhalb des Dreijahreszeitraums, und man sich die Sterberate ansieht, sieht man, oh, lange Telomere haben tatsächlich ein geringeres Risiko, dass man sich in der Menschengruppe befindet, die innerhalb dreier Jahre starb. Wir haben gesehen, Alter und Geschlecht haben eine deutliche Wirkung, die blaue Linie ist daher, der blaue Balken zeigt, dies wurde bereits bereinigt. Wir wissen aber auch, es gibt viele andere Dinge, die Sterblichkeit beeinflussen. Viele andere Dinge beeinflussen auch die Telomerlänge. Und wir kennen sie, und können die Hauptursachen herausnehmen und hier ist eine lange Liste. Wir beachteten Alter und Geschlecht, Rasse, Volkszugehörigkeit, Bildung, Zigaretten, Historie der Packungsjahre, Gewohnheiten bei körperlicher Betätigung, Alkoholkonsum, Body-Mass-Index und so weiter, und, es bewegte sich nichts. Das sagt Ihnen, es ist unabhängig. Dies ist eine sehr heterogene Gruppe von Menschen, aber wissen Sie, die Kalifornier, hm, wissen Sie (lacht). Also, schauen wir uns einige seriöse, nüchterne DNAs an, und sehen wir mal, ob das Gleiche zutrifft. Dies ist die Kopenhagen Studie, Rode et al. publizierten diese tolle Arbeit in der sie 64.000 Menschen untersuchten auf Blutzellen-Telomere, nur durchschnittliche Telomerlänge, Ausgangsdaten und dann im Laufe der Jahre sahen sie sich einen größeren Bereich an und der Durchschnitt war etwa sieben Jahre, etwa der Zeitraum, den wir untersucht hatten. Und sie fragten, von den vielen Menschen, die starben, zunächst wie viele, in welcher Telomerlängen-Kategorie, wie viele starben da? In anderen Worten, die gleiche Frage, ist das Risiko, dass Sie innerhalb dieses Zeitraums von durchschnittlich sieben Jahren sterben, steht dieses Risiko in irgendeiner Beziehung zur Telomerlänge bei Beginn der Analyse der Ausgangsdaten? Und siehe da, wieder, nach Bereinigen aller dieser vielen möglichen Variablen, die multivariat adjustiertes Modell genannt werden, das ist es, mit Bezug auf die Kürze der Telomerlänge, da sehen Sie, die Trends sind genauso schlecht und schlechte Aussichten in der Gruppe der Menschen zu sein, die starben, je kürzer die Telomere sind, es ist wirklich ein Trend. Wir haben jetzt die Botschaft erhalten, wir hatten große Studien, ich denke, es ist ziemlich klar. Verringerte Sterblichkeit, und ich zeigte Ihnen alle Ursachen, mit Bezug auf die Beobachtung, einfach durch Beobachtung der Telomerlänge in Menschen. Ich zeigte Ihnen die Daten der Untersuchung von Rode et al. und von anderen nicht, dass, wenn man beginnt es in die wesentlichen tödlichen Krankheiten älterer Menschen zu unterteilten, kardiovaskular, alle Krebserkrankungen für den Augenblick zusammengenommen, alle diese stehen in Beziehung zur verminderten Sterblichkeit aufgrund dieser Ursachen, und alle beziehen sich auch auf die Beobachtung des Vorhandenseins längerer Telomere. Gut, und jetzt die gute Nachricht über längere Telomere bei einem anderen Parameter, der uns ebenfalls interessiert. Lebensdauer ist eine Sache, wir möchten wissen wie lange, wie viele Jahre wir ein gesundes Leben leben können, wie lang ist unsere, Zitat, Langlebigkeit bei guter Gesundheit. In der Tat sehen Sie hier wieder eine Beziehung, hier ein paar Zahlen, der Punkt aber ist, sie stehen miteinander in Beziehung. Hier kann man jetzt etwas anderes sehen. Man kann sagen, gehen wir jetzt einmal den anderen Weg, wie verhält es sich mit den schlechten Nachrichten? Wie steht es bei kürzeren Telomeren mit Krankheiten? Sehen wir da eine Beziehung? Und die Beziehung geht in diese Richtung, kürzere Telomere korrelieren damit, nicht nur das Finden einer Zuordnung, sondern tatsächliche Voraussage, wie ich es sah, ich zeigte es Ihnen, wie Sterblichkeit vorausgesagt wird, Voraussage, eine Krankheit zu bekommen, und da gibt eine ganze Gruppe solcher Krankheiten und Sie sehen, die sind sehr häufig Formen von Beeinträchtigungen und Krankheiten, die im Alter auftreten. Die Aufmerksamen unter Ihnen haben etwas bemerkt, alle diese Pfeile haben doppelte Pfeilspitzen. Bislang habe ich noch nichts zur Kausalität gesagt. Das möchten wir gerne wissen! Also, Genetik! Genetik ist wunderbar, da sie uns ermöglicht, wenn wir ein Gen sehen können, wir ein Gen zuordnen können. Besonders eines, dessen Funktionen wir kennen, wir können von Kausalität sprechen. Ein wunderbarer Anfang wurde 2001 gemacht, Vulliamy et al. fanden heraus, wenn Menschen innerhalb einer Familie eine Mutation erbten, was glücklicherweise selten geschieht, dann liegt die in einem Telomerase RNA Gen, erinnern Sie sich, ich sprach von hTERC, diese RNA-Komponente der Telomerase. Wenn Sie eine Mutation haben, die Ihre Telomerase auf die Hälfte ihres normalen Niveaus zerlegt, da gibt es eine sehr deutliche Kausalität, wir wissen, was das hTERC bewirkt, es ist Teil des Telomeren-Erhalts und die Menschen erhalten sehr, sehr kurze Telomere. Der Punkt, der wirklich wichtig ist, es gibt einen deutlichen Krankheitseffekt in Bezug darauf, wie sehr sich Telomere verkürzen. Was ich sehr bald entdeckte waren eine Vielzahl sehr interessanter Krankheiten. sie zeigen bereits gewisse Überlappungen mit einigen der Krankheiten, die eben mit dem Alter in der Bevölkerung auftreten. Hier bekommen wir wirkliche Kausalität, nun ist das ein bisschen extrem, diese Menschen hier werden aller Wahrscheinlichkeit sehr viel früher sterben, und die Telomere werden immer kürzer, klingen im Laufe der Generationen ab, da die kürzeren Telomere von einer Person zur anderen weitergegeben werden, sie werden immer schlechter und sterben, leider, immer früher. Die Kausalität ist also ausgesprochen deutlich, aber etwas extrem. Nun befindet sich Genetik gerade im Wachsen und wuchs seit 2001, weitere Genetik hat uns die gleiche Geschichte erzählt, hat die aber ausgemalt. Also wiederum, erben einer seltenen Mutation, Hälfte der Telomerase-Ebene oder andere Wege, auf denen Telomer-Erhalt reduziert wird, nicht nur eine Verringerung von Telomerase-Ebenen, sondern auch andere Möglichkeiten, mit denen sich das reduzieren lässt, was mit dem direkten Binden von Telomer-Proteinen zu tun hat. Was man aber sieht ist genau das, was ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, da es weltweit immer mehr Fälle gibt. Es gibt verschiedene Familienstammbäume, die Leute finden solche Sachen und die Liste wird nun immer länger! Es beginnt sich jetzt sogar auf neuropsychiatrische Erkrankungen auszudehnen, sehr interessant. Es sieht wie eine wichtige Reihe von Dingen aus, die sich ereignen können, sie geschehen aber nicht alle in einem Menschen. Es variiert, je nachdem, wieviel kürzer die Telomere in den nachfolgenden Generationen wurden. Die Gene jedoch, und das ist nur für Spezialisten, die sich das gerne ansehen und sagen: „Ja, um welche Gene handelt es sich?“ Nun, da gibt es jetzt 11 von diesen, sechs davon sind selbst mit der Telomerase verwandt oder mit der unmittelbaren Biogenese von Telomerase, und hier sind jetzt fünf, die als Telomer-bindende Proteine bekannt sind. Wir wissen also genau, was die tun, sie kümmern sich direkt um den Telomer-Erhalt. Wir erhalten hier echte Kausalität. Schauen wir uns also die Verbleibenden unter uns an, die das Glück hatten, nicht von diese seltenen, wenn auch extremen informativen Mutationen betroffen zu sein. Sie können jetzt sagen, was ist mit den gemeinsamen Allelen, die unseren Telomer-Erhalt nur ein bisschen schädigen? Wir hatten übrigens einen großen Bereich an Telomerlängen, jene Mittel, die ich Ihnen beim Alter gezeigt habe, die sind viel enger als der tatsächliche Bereich von Telomerlängen aller Altersgruppen. Man kann aber bei hohen Zahlen Statistiken vornehmen und das ist eine schöne Studie, sich einfach einmal ansehen, womit Gene assoziiert sind, die kürzere Telomere in der Bevölkerung haben. Also Kausalität, weil Gene Dinge verursachen. Das Erstaunliche war, die fünf größten Hits waren unsere alten Freunde, die bekannten Telomer Telomerase Gene. Das war sehr deutlich, wir kennen deren Wirkung! Und dann sagten sie, wenn man sich diese Allele ansieht, die wirklich mit den kürzeren Telomeren verwandt sind, und dies die gewöhnlichen sind, dann kann dies in allen möglichen Kombinationen in jedem von uns auftreten, habe wir es hier mit dem Einfluss einer Krankheit zu tun? Da gab es, bei kardiovaskularer Erkrankung in einer bestimmten Form, der koronaren Herzkrankheit, in der Tat etwas, wenn man die kurze Allele-Version jedem dieser Gene hinzufügte und noch ein paar mehr, die weniger verwandt waren, sich aber in der quantitativen Analyse zeigten, doch dieses waren die Top fünf, und wir wissen wie die wirken. Man hätte einfach eine 21% höhere Chance, zu einer bestimmten Zeit seines Lebens an der koronaren Herzkrankheit zu erkranken, als dies bei der Allgemeinbevölkerung der Fall wäre. Jetzt haben wir alle sieben, hier sind fünf, plus zwei, sieben Gene, die alle schlechte Allele haben, kombinatorisch steigt das immer weiter ab, es befindet sich also vermutlich nur in wenigen hundert Menschen. Das kann man aber erhalten. Die meisten von uns haben hiervon eine Mischung, denn da gibt es allerlei verschiedene Gene. Die ist aber eine wichtige Sache, denn, noch einmal, man sagt, dass zumindest dieses kurze Telomer, da wir wissen, was diese Gene bewirken, in der Lage sein muss, einen Beitrag zu dieser bestimmten koronaren Herzkrankheit zu geben. Wenn man der Logik glaubt, diese Gene folgten einer Kausalität, und ich halte das für vernünftig, dann können wir das zu diesem Fall aussagen. Es ist also wirklich nützlich! Telomere bedeuten im Kontext normaler Zellen aber nicht nur gute Neuigkeiten. Sie erinnern sich an Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde, am Tag waren sie eine Person, es war dieser nette, gute Bürger, gesittet, aber nachts war dieselbe Person ein schrecklicher Verbrecher, gewalttätig, stimmt's? Und Telomerase, in ihrem nächtlichen Umfeld, wenn Sie so wollen, Krebs anfällige Zellen, die sich veränderten. Das kann wirklich gefährlich sein! Das konnte uns, wiederum, die Genetik sagen. Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte Ihnen, wenn Sie nur die Hälfte der Telomerase haben, die Sie haben sollten, ist eines, was dadurch veranlasst wird, Krebs. Es ist tatsächlich eine bestimmte Teilgruppe der Krebserkrankungen. Jetzt ist eine neuere Genetik dazugekommen, und wir finden etwas anderes, sehr Interessantes, was mit Krebs zusammenhängt. Wenn ich jetzt wir sage, dann meine ich die gesamte Welt. Ein bisschen zu viel, selbst etwas weniger als doppelt zu viel Expression von Telomerase, ruft andere Krebserkrankungen hervor. Sie können hier die tatsächlichen Beteiligungen sehen. Und es gibt vollständig verschiedene Krebsarten, und sie sind nicht die häufigsten Krebserkrankungen auf der Welt. Jetzt können Sie aber sehen, wo wir sind. Zunächst einmal variiert Krebs. Wir leben hier wirklich in einer Welt des Abwägens, stimmt's? Wir befinden uns hier in prekärer Weise auf Messers Schneide, denn dies ist es, was man erkannte, indem man sich reale Menschen und reale Krankheiten angesehen hat und Genetik und die molekulare Grundlage von dem was stattfindet verstanden hat. Sie werden sagen: „Nun, Telomere, einen Augenblick mal, die verursachen alle diese Krankheiten nicht, die Krankheiten haben andere Ursachen. Diese wird verursacht, weil das Insulin nicht richtig funktioniert, da finden noch andere Dinge statt, das kann nicht alles wegen der Telomeren sein!“ Und dem kann ich mich nur anschließen! Ich möchte aber den Gedanken hinstellen dass, sehen Sie sich diese Daten an! Die stammen von den Mausmodellen, denn da ist es so deutlich, dass Telomere interagieren. Wir haben den Gedanken besprochen, je kürzer Telomere werden, desto mehr Zellen befassen sich mit allen möglichen schädlichen Konsequenzen, und je schwerwiegender, desto pathologischer. In einer Maus muss man Telomerase vollständig tilgen, wenn man dann aber Mäuse züchtet, sieht man diese abgestuften Wirkungen. Sehen wir uns also ein Mausmodell an, bei dem wir uns nur einzelne Genmutationen ansehen, die im Menschen eine Krankheit verursachen. Hier sind drei. eines ist Progerie, sehr frühes Stadium, rapide Telomerverkürzung, Entschuldigung, frühes Stadium, schnell alternd, es hat auch Telomerverkürzung, bei Menschen. Ein weiteres, vollkommen anders, eine Muskelschwundkrankheit. Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, bekannte Mutation, eine weitere, vollkommen andere Krankheit, Diabetes, in dieser Maus kein ausreichendes Insulin, einzelne Genmutation. Also völlig verschiedene Dinge. Bei jedem dieser Modelle nimmt man die gleichen Mutationen, die man beim Menschen findet, fügt sie der Maus ein und in der Tat, es ist etwas enttäuschend. Man erhält nicht alle diese Phänotypen, das Werner-Syndrom hat nicht den ganzen Phänotyp, die Muskeldystrophie Duchenne zeigt die Skelettmuskeln, doch Menschen mit dieser Krankheit sind an einer Herzerkrankung gestorben. Es ahmt dies also nicht vollkommen nach! Wir gehen das jetzt mit der Zeit durch und kopieren in das Mausmodell eine Deletion der Telomerase. Etwas wirklich interessantes geschieht, denn lange vor der Deletion der Telomerase zeigt es eine eigene Wirkung, die Telomer haben nur einen Teil der Zellen gemacht, man erhält eine Interaktion und die Werner-Syndrom Phänotypen verschlechtern sich. Und die fangen nun an, wie die bei den Menschen auszusehen. Die richtigen Zellen zeigen Pathologien. Das gleiche geschieht bei diesem Milieu mit Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, während die Telomere kürzer werden, fangen sie an, Herzprobleme zu haben. Und jetzt das Gleiche, Diabetes, Teil Insulinmangel, der verschlechterte sich immer mehr und die Diabetessymptome verschlimmerten sich. Gut, im Grunde haben wir Mäuse in kleine pelzige Menschen verwandelt! Indem wir Telomerase entfernt und diesen Hintergrund geschaffen haben. Also, Wechselwirkungen zwischen Telomeren und Krankheit, wir können das in diesen Mausmodellen sehen. Jetzt möchte ich Ihnen sagen, dass nicht alles auf Gene hinausläuft, tatsächlich weiß man seit Langem, dass etwas, von dem man annimmt, es sei völlig anders, was vom Verstand her kommt, etwas ist, das eine Wirkung auf Telomere hat. Auf Krankheiten, ein gutes Beispiel ist die Herzerkrankung. Wir und andere fingen also damit an, dies zu studieren und wir fanden einige Wirkungen auf den Telomeren-Erhalt. Die Liste ist riesig, ich zeige Ihnen nur diese riesige Liste von all diesen Dingen, schrecklichen Dingen, die im Leben von Menschen geschehen, die wirklich dagegenhalten, denn es ist die Länge der Exposition, die häufig ein quantitativer Prädikator ist, oder die Dauer, Dauer und Ausmaß, Länge von Es sagt quantitativ voraus wie kurz Telomere sind. Also, wir glauben, da ist eine echte Kausalität. Wir wissen, dass chronischer Stress Hat eine Wirkung auf die Krankheit, doch etwas, was es ausführt ist, es reduziert den Telomer-Erhalt. Also, wird die große Frage sein: Und warum sollte einen das kümmern? Das ist alles sehr statistisch. Und jetzt möchte ich mit etwa wirklich Bemerkenswertem enden. Das ist: Menschen mit Blasenkrebs, und man sieht sich eine Wechselwirkung zwischen etwas an, von dem Sie sicher nie geträumt haben, dass Sie es ansehen werden, wenn man sich fragt, welche Überlebenschancen ein Blasenkrebspatient hat. Eine Interaktion der kurzen Telomere in den Blutzellen, den normalen Blutzellen mit Depression. Depression ist ziemlich verbreitet. Man nahm also etwas Einfaches in dieser schönen Studie vor, die teilten die Menschen zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Diagnose auf, natürlich hatte sich der Blasenkrebs bereits jahrelang entwickelt. An dem Punkt, an dem er klinisch diagnostiziert wurde, und man sagte, dass die Person Depressionen hat, aber keine kurzen Telomere oder kurze Telomere und keine Depression, oder nichts von beidem, kurze Telomere oder Depression, oder hatten sie beides. Dies sagt aus, die Studie war richtig angelegt, diese Gruppe des Arztes Anderson in Houston, Texas, ich zeige sie Ihnen in einem Bild. Hier sind sehr viele Menschen! Sie hatten mehr als 400 Menschen. Es waren Menschen von unterschiedlichster Art und alle hatten Blasenkrebs. Bei der Diagnose fielen sie jeweils unter eine dieser Kategorien. Entweder mit Depression und kürzeren Blutzellen-Telomeren, oder keins von beidem oder beides. Nach zweieinhalb Jahren, wenn man nur Depressionen hatte, oder man hatte nur kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann machte das statistisch gesehen tatsächlich einen Unterschied. Also so viele Menschen lebten nach zweieinhalb Jahren nicht mehr unter uns, sie starben innerhalb dieser zweieinhalb Jahre. Wenn man beides hatte, dann war dem so! Das ist also der große Unterschied, mehr als die Hälfte! Und jetzt fünf Jahre, das ist beim Krebs eine sehr kritische Zeit. Hatte man jetzt nur eines davon, natürlich starben immer mehr Menschen, entweder Depression oder kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann bleibt sich das etwa gleich. Wer aber beides hatte, da waren alle gestorben. Das beginnt nun klinisch signifikant zu sein, und ich glaube, was Sie sich hier abspielen sehen ist, es geht im Grunde um die Wechselwirkungen. Also Wechselwirkungen zwischen verschiedensten Faktoren. Wir haben viele stress-ähnliche und andere Situationen beobachtet, Dinge die Telomere kürzen. Es wurden Dinge beobachtet, die Telomere verlängern. Worum es wirklich geht ist herauszufinden, welches dieser Dinge, quantitativ, tatsächlich, in echten, geeigneten Studien, die nicht nur schauen, sondern wirklich in Versuchs-ähnlichen Anordnungen prüfen, welches dieser Dinge, und es werden mehr werden, tatsächlich den Telomer-Erhalt verbessern kann. Und es muss dieses richtige Gleichgewicht haben, denn, erinnern Sie sich, wenn man es zu weit treibt, steigt das Krebsrisiko, bei bestimmten Krebsarten. Das muss also wirklich, sehr gut abgestimmt sein und vermutlich wird Psychologie dabei von Bedeutung sein. Also was ich getan habe ist, ich sagte, es gibt verschiedenste Eingaben bei der Telomerverkürzung und wie sehr es verkürzt wird ist wirklich eine sehr komplexe Angelegenheit. Man kann das aber alles messen und sehen, was diese Telomerverkürzung ist, und man kann die quantitativen Beziehungen, Zuordnungen sehen. Und wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, der Aspekt davon ist, der die Kausalität repräsentiert, und natürlich gibt es eine Menge weitere Kausalitäten, welche auch alle miteinander interagieren, doch wir glauben, wir haben diese Art von Rahmenbedingungen, bei denen man sagen kann, hier ist etwas im Leben wandelbares, man sieht, es beeinflusst viele Dinge, neben Genen und es trägt zumindest teilweise zur den sehr verbreiteten Alterskrankheiten bei, die unter den Menschen eine so große Erkrankungsrate ausmachen. Es ist nur eine ausführliche Art das zu sagen, was ich Ihnen in einem Diagramm gezeigt habe. Also, Telomer-Erhalt ist wichtig, und es gibt etwas anderes, von dem wir jetzt annehmen, dass es zu den Alterserkrankungen beiträgt. Ich möchte am Ende damit schließen: Die Reise begann mit Neugierde, man muss immer gewillt sein mit Gedanken zu spielen, man muss über Hintergrundwissen verfügen, um alle diese Entdeckungen zu machen, nicht nur im Wimpertierchen-Organismus, sondern bei Menschen. Man braucht wunderbare Mitarbeiter, also das bedeutet mit Menschen zusammenzuarbeiten, in einer Forschungsumgebung arbeiten, in der dies ermöglicht wird. Ich bin also unglaublich dankbar, dass mir diese Reise möglich war, und der Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft, die ist so wichtig. Ich lebe in der Bay Area, in San Francisco, doch meine Kollegen sind überall. Diese Reise begann, indem man unter Wasser nachsah, und ich dachte, ich ende mit dieser so wunderschönen Grafik, einer Fotografie, die da draußen, wo ich geboren wurde, in Tasmanien, Australien, aufgenommen wurde. Es ist das Ufer bei Nacht und schöne Einzeller, die im Meer leben, die unter Wasser leben, so wie das Tetrahymena. Diese schönen Organismen werden hier erleuchtet gezeigt und, natürlich, die Wunder, die sie Ihnen zeigen können sind vermutlich so wunderbar, wie die Wunder, die Sie sehen können, wenn Sie hinaus ins Weltall schauen. Ich danke Ihnen.

Elizabeth Blackburn on the links between aging and shorter telomeres
(00:09:17 - 00:11:55)

 

Moreover, many studies have shown that shorter telomeres are associated with various diseases which are common in old age:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2011) - Telomeres and Telomerase in Human Health and Disease

Thank you very much and good morning everybody, it's wonderful to see so many faces here this morning. I feel as if I'm looking out at the future hope of much of what we'll see I think in biomedical research and medical research and biological research in the future. So welcome, I'm very glad to be here and giving this talk today. So my talk is going to be telling you something about the science which has been my journey from basic science and which has led us more recently into issues of human health and disease. And so I'm going to tell you just a very little bit about the early part of our work and then go into the aspect which is the human health and disease related part of it. And tell you a little bit about how I started that and then take you into how we're looking at, more recently we're looking at the interesting ramifications of all of this. So telomeres, they're the ends of chromosomes. And this kind of blobby picture where you sort of see the telomere lit up in pink here, that was pretty much what we knew about telomeres from about, you know from the stage when cytogeneticists looked at chromosomes under microscopes and could see that telomeres were, you know something at the end of chromosomes. And when I say something they were more defined by what they weren't. They didn't behave like DNA breaks, they didn't you know try to heal themselves when a break appeared, they're the end but they were not a broken end. And so it was conceptualised that they were really very different from breaks, but what were they. There was an absence of things that they did that more defined a telomere than what it actually was. So I was fortunate to be able to approach this question because. So first of all cast your minds back to the possibility that imagine a world in which you couldn't sequence DNA. Ok so that was the world in which I started my project in Cambridge in England in the lab of Fred Sanger who subsequently developed methods of DNA. But we didn't know how to sequence DNA. So there was this wonderful mystery of what on earth was the DNA like at the ends of the chromosome. And so being in Fred Sanger's lab I got very, you know well-acquainted with the then nascent methods of trying to sequence DNA, which was to try and piece together nucleotides in little patches by using a variety of chemical and biological methods. It doesn't matter but in other words you couldn't believe how impossible it was to sequence DNA in those days. But at least it seemed as if the ends might be a way of accessibility. And so I turned to a system by going to Yale University and the lab of Joe Gall where you could actually get at the ends of chromosomal DNA's, that is the DNA's of eukaryotes and their chromosomes which of course is linear. And this was because Joe Gall and others had discovered that there are very short chromosomes and large numbers of them. And one particular kind in this beast, shown in the slide here, which is the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena. Now this is not a famous organism in the sense that it doesn't cause diseases and it's not one of the favourite model systems although it's very well used now for certain questions relating to telomeres but it was just an obscure pond organism. But it had these large numbers of linear short chromosomes and that allowed me to biochemically if you will, using molecular techniques to get my hands on these, purify them out and analyse what might be going on at the ends of these chromosomes. And in fact I found that they ended up with these repeated sequences, very strange, you know there was no president for why they would do this. And they ended with short repeated sequences and that's the repeat unit shown there. And so they were the chromosomes in tetrahymena and then ending with short repeats. And then in collaboration with Jack Szostak who was in a different institution, we found the same thing was going on in yeast. And I should say that this was an example of where it's marvellous to go to meetings and have conversations because Jack and I struck up a conversation. I had just been talking about the telomeres of tetrahymena and we talked about how would you make, how would you use this information and see if you could get at telomeres in yeast, to cut a long story short. And so we did and we were able to see somewhat similar kinds of repeated sequences. Now a little bit irregular as you see from the formula on the slides. But the same kind of thing, at the end of yeast chromosomes. So this wasn't a peculiarity of this strange little beast that lived in pond scum, this was something that was more general. And indeed it had been found by others, starting to show up in slide moulds and you know, so these kinds of things were showing up at the end of chromosomes. So it looked as if it would be pretty general. And in fact, you know we did know from molecular biology, even back then, before we could sequence DNA properly, we did know that underlying principles of course of life were very similar as you look right across the living world. And so it wasn't too surprising to find some generalities here. But still it was good to find. So basically that then let us address a question which had been asked by others and which arose from the mechanism of DNA replication which as you recall occurs by a very beautiful complicated DNA replication enzymes, beautiful set of these enzymes which beautifully copy all the internal regions of chromosomal DNA. That is any linear DNA but they're just terrible at copying the very ends, because of the mechanistic aspects of how DNA replication occurs. And I won't go into the details, it's all in every text book, but the point is that the beautifully complicated sophisticated DNA replication machinery that so successfully and faithfully copies the genetic information inside chromosomes is terrible at copying the ends. So the ends can't get replicated. So every time a DNA replicated, if it's linear and unless something happened, it would just get shorter and shorter and shorter and shorter. So this was a mystery, well recognised from the early 1970's onwards and explicated by Olovnikov and Watson for example. This was a mystery. And now we knew what was at the ends of chromosomes. So there was the problem and there was a whole lot of interesting pieces of information. And I'm going to list them here because sometimes it sounds as though, when you say well you discovered telomeres, it sounds as though it just sort of fell out of the sky or something or we stumbled on it. Didn't work that way and I think this is more typical of real science, how real science works. What happened was that there were pieces of evidence, not all from one system, there were pieces of evidence in tetrahymena that the numbers of repeats at the ends of the chromosomes differed in the population of molecules. You could find that during the development of new chromosomes in this organism, has a very complicated lifestyle but it makes new telomeres and they got added on to non-telomeres. How did that happen? There was an interesting observation in the organism that causes sleeping sickness, these organisms when propagated, you could see the end DNA getting longer and longer. How did that happen? And Jack Szostak and I found that when you put a tetrahymena and a telomere into yeast, yeast telomere repeats, it got joined on to the tetrahymena repeats. So that was mysterious. And I was intrigued by another observation from the geneticist, the cytogeneticist who really conceptualised and named the features of telomeres, although not the name of telomeres, that is important, Barbara McClintock, maize geneticist and she had conceptualised telomeres and had even found a mutant that failed to heal broken ends which can normally happen if ends are broken at certain stages in development. Now when you've got a mutant that fails to do something, that says ah ha, there must be a normal process here. So all these pieces of the puzzle were there. Was there something going on in cells that could extend telomere DNA. So now as my little advice for the young moving into their careers here, ok so this was the question, we had a lot of interesting hints here that there may be something going on. Now you can't sit and write a grant application and say well I think I might find a new enzyme. Doesn't go down well with the review sections, ok. But you can, you can have wonderful funding which opens up the possibility which says let's look at how telomeres work. And I'm so grateful to a funding agency like the NIH that said you have a grant that's called structure and function of telomerics and within that I could run with the question. But I also want to tell you another very important thing that matter to me and that helped. Now I was studying the telomeric DNA, I was studying proteins associated with telomeric DNA. And what I then did was I got tenure and I had my grant and so I felt really brave, I thought ah I can do anything I like, I've got tenure, I've got a grant, right. So there's a very empowering feeling, even though of course I realised, you know later that that's not always true, that you can't do everything you like. But I felt very empowered because I had tenure and I had a grant, so I thought I'm just going to start looking for this enzyme activity. Now we kept the normal sort of things in our lab going, right, things that were on the grant application, things that were, you know things that were producing steady results. But I thought well I'll just try and do these experiments. And started to get hints that it was working. And then another important thing happened was that I would present this to people as they decided to join the lab and I'd say I've got this project, so one of my very sober post doctoral fellows said I think, when he came, he said I think Liz I don't think I'll work on this rather risky project. But Carol Greider, my graduate student who joined the lab, Carol was happy to do that and she thought it was the most interesting project in the lab and so I think that's very important, you know to find PhD students who want to go for what they think is the most interesting projects in the lab, even though it mightn't be the one that generates results. But in this case it did and so what in the end we were able to do was to have a synthetic DNA and I'd been doing this with restriction enzymes and pieces of DNA and seeing bits of DNA added on that looked like telomeric DNA was being added. But we refined it down to putting in a DNA oligonucleotide. And we were just able to get them, again grab the technology when it becomes available because synthetic DNA, oligonucleotides were just becoming available to the research community, so we grabbed this opportunity, had a synthetic DNA made and then we found that it could get elongated after a lot of painful work with cell extracts. We could find an enzymatic activity that made that DNA longer by adding more repeats. And so the important point was that here I had a student who was willing to take on a project that was risky but this person thought, Carol thought this was the most interesting of the projects in the lab. And then as I said we could take advantage of technologies, there was terrific biochemical technologies in terms of enzymologist out there, we could use the precedence that people had from DNA replication studies to make our cell extracts and so forth and incubate and make reactions. And as I said along came the technology which happened to be DNA oligo synthesis. So what we found was this enzyme telomerase, so now I'm depicting the end of a chromosome in the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena which being a rich source of short DNAs, I reasoned would probably be a rich source of any enzyme that might be making these DNAs. And so sure enough if you look at a chromosome end in tetrahymena very simplified, just showing the DNA here, what it does is it gets elongated by the enzyme telomerase which is a truly fascinating enzyme because it's made up of both RNA and DNA. They both help the reaction work, although the catalytic, sorry it's made of RNA and protein, the catalytic site is actually the protein, it's not the RNA. But the RNA plays crucial roles in making that protein catalytic site work. It's a fascinating collaboration of protein and RNA. In that RNA and the crucial thing that I've shown you on the slide here is a short RNA sequence that's copied into DNA, just by adding nucleotides and so the DNA gets elongated. So here was in the test tube the wherewithal for overcoming that DNA replication problem, the end replication problem that I alluded to. So here it was in the test tube, did it actually work this way in cells. And so we used tetrahymena and my student Guo-Liang Yu developed a technology for introducing genes back into tetrahymena. So we had to sort of build it up from the roots so to speak. But we could get the first evidence that you needed telomerase in cells. Now in tetrahymena, I didn't tell you but these organisms are mortal, they just keep growing, if you feed them and talk to them nicely they'll keep on multiplying, right, forever, they're immortal, right. So they must have very good DNA repair systems by the way. And they had plenty, so to speak of telomerase. Now were those 2 facts related, right. So what do you do, well you experimentally interfere with the telomerase and genetically make it not work anymore. So that's what we did. And so then we found that now in the next 20 or so generations the telomeres progressively shortened and shortened and the cells ceased to divide. Now when I say genetically kill telomerase, I'll make a confession to you. This sounds all very deliberate, right, like we set out to kill it. Actually we were doing a different experiment at the time. We were looking at the RNA and asking about its templating ability. But we were very lucky because one of the mutations turned out not to be copied into the DNA and we were very frustrated by it but then we noticed oh look the telomeres are getting shorter and the cells are dying. And then we found that the enzyme was no longer active in the cells. And so then ah this was a very useful mutant. But we hadn't actually set out to ask that immediate question. But again what the take home from this was, always look at what the organism is telling you, right, we hadn't designed that particular experiment with that in mind but it turned out to be absolutely the perfect experiment to answer the question of do you need telomerase because we inadvertently made a mutation that ablated or ruined, spoiled, killed the activity of the enzyme in cells. And so that enabled us to ask the question, that I now put up here and looks as though I planned to say this and do this, planned to do this experiment but we actually just lucked into it. We probably would have tried this experiment next but we were lucky and got a mutant that worked. And so what it did was we struck at the heart of the activity of the ability of these cells to multiple, so this was really, you know these cells all died, right. The telomeres ran down and they died. So the important message was an immortal organism, all you had to do was mutate the component of telomerase. It was the RNA, we knew what it was, very, very exactly and the cells became mortal. So that told us that telomerase was maintaining telomeres. Ok so now we knew something about telomere structure which has repeated DNA, these DNA sequences are made by telomerase and they're maintained by telomerase in a very complex highly regulated process. And what that accomplishes for the cells is to make a platform, a platform of DNA binding sites upon which bind a great many very interesting, interactive proteins that bind the DNA sequence specifically. They have protein partners and they very dynamically associating and disassociating with the telomere. But the point is they make a sheath and that protective sheath is the whole point for the telomeres and that's the cap, that's the protective cap, ok. And we always liked it, you know it's like the aglet at the end of your shoe lace, right. But as I said there's this inherent problem and that is that telomeres because of their inherent replication properties and because now we know nuclease activities, telomeres have a propensity to shorten. So it's like the shoe lace end frayed away, right, the tip got lost and now you have a frayed shoe lace. And this is a very bad situation, the cell responds very clearly to this. And what happens is that that very shortened telomere sends a signal to the cells and the cells will not multiple. And in fact they can undergo genomic instabilities. So this frayed end if you will, which is just a metaphor is very literally a shortened telomere or telomeres and that prevents cells from multiplying. So bottom line is that if you have too much erosion the cells will not live, ok. Now let's got to human situations. Ok so now we're going to switch to well how does this all work out in humans. So now we have a very different situation from say tetrahymenas or yeasts and things like that, that just keep multiplying. We have now us and you know in developed societies for example where conditions are good, you know we can expect life expectances of something like 80 degrees, 80 years, sorry, thinking of the warm weather we're having in Lindau today. We have in life expectancy around 80 years. And you know maximum life span is what, somewhere around 120, that kind of thing, right. So now our lives are lived out over many, many decades. Well we certainly know that the underlying molecular machineries are going to be similar, you know across all the eukaryotes that's been amply seen. You know we have telomerase just as do tetrahymenas and yeast and so forth. But the important point is that the kinetics of all of this is now going to be played out over very long, you know decades of life. So how does it all play out? So that's been the subject of research for many, many different labs in the last few decades. So a simple observation, very broad brush and there will be exceptions, is that in a general way telomerase is often limiting in adult human cells. And so they do in fact undergo some shortening and various systems in the body one can see evidence that this is likely to be occurring, that the telomeres are progressively shortening and senescence is occurring. And one can see evidence for that in vivo, in people. Now the question was does that cellular phenomenon play out in our lifetimes, you know does the candle burning down for the telomeres so to speak, does that actually get reflected in human life courses or not. So that was the question that many, many labs had been collecting evidence for. And so I'm going to tell you first of all just a very brief overview of what's been seen and then I want to take you into some aspects of what might influence this process. Ok so back to the basics, what would first influence this process would be whether you have telomerase or not. And so many analysis have been done on where do we find telomerase in human cells. First of all normal cells, well in normal cells, in cells that are going to have to be effectively immortal or have very long replicated life spans you find actually plenty of telomerase. Like in stem cells, in germ cells, germ lineage cells, you know we're all here today, that's because our germ lineages have telomerase. Keeps the telomeres going from generation to generation. And in certain stem cells that will have long proliferative properties throughout life, notably the immune system. But you also find telomerase in other cells and we found that actually quite instructive, to look at other cells and particularly cells of the immune system and particularly cells in peripheral blood where you can take a sample from somebody with a pretty non-invasive blood draw. And healthy people will give you blood and you can study telomeres and how they're being maintained using the white blood cells, the immune system cells from a blood draw as a kind of a window into the cells. And now we can even find, as I'll show you later, we can even do it with saliva as well because there's a lot of cells that leak out into your saliva and it gives you a nice source of genomic DNA as well. And so we can quantify the telomerase in blood cells and so you might expect, you know more or less telomerase will be influencing how short the telomeres get, how quickly. And we also can measure telomere length, obviously in such cells. Now another thing that's important is that we do find that telomerase is very highly activated in cancer cells. And cancer cells as you know have among their many undesirable properties, the property of too much replication. The cells proliferate too much because they've undergone mutations and epigenetic changes that have now made them ignore signals to cease multiplying and to go to the right places in the body and so forth. And so cancer cells are rogue cells, they're out of control and telomerase allows those out of control cells to maintain their telomeres and keep on multiplying. So in the context of cancer cells, telomerase is actually very bad news. But the cancer cells have undergone a great many other changes. And in fact the high telomerase often doesn't appear in the common cancers until they're pretty advanced. I'm actually not going to talk about telomerase in cancer cells today, it's a fascinating question, there are interesting questions of can you inhibit it or monkey around with it to kill cancer cells but I want to focus today on the normal cells, ok. So let's just imagine what situations we might expect to play out over the decades of you know of human life. So imagine in germ cells, well we'll have the cells stay maintained, you know just like tetrahymena or yeast and so you know we expect a balance between shortening and lengthening because the telomeres over all are maintained. And there's a great deal of genetic and non-genetic control of these processes as I'll talk about in a moment. But you can also imagine the balance goes in the other direction and this has been seen for certain immune cells as they go through certain multiplicative stages in the body, telomeres actually get longer in normal differentiated cells. So that generality I showed you, they don't always have to get shorter but they often do get shorter. And so if you have some telomerase, you could imagine that they would be getting shorter by those natural processes shortening but telomerase might try and keep them up and so you know it might be able to stave off the, you know terrible moments when the telomeres get too short, for quite a while but senescence would eventually come. And that would be later than everything else being equal if there were less telomerase. And then it would, you know not be able to stave off senescence for so long. So how would all these things work and we know even from a yeast cell which has 350 genes, at least and counting which influence telomere lengths and length distributions. So we know this process is going to be under many, many elaborate genetic controls. So we expect genetic controls and we expect non-genetic controls because everything is influenced by non-genetic effects too. That will be the main topic that I'll get to but I just wanted to tell you that the reason that we got very interested in this is that over the years many groups have seen that many of the common diseases of aging and including cancers but many of these diseases that characterise aging humans have been linked to shorter telomeres in the normal cells. This is just a sampling of the kinds of diseases in which you see this association and the list of the authors on the right is extremely incomplete, it's just a little sampling. On the left is the common diseases and if you look at these diseases you can see that they include some of the big killers and the big serious medical problems in populations, cancer, pulmonary fibroses, cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia, degenerative conditions, diabetes, in fact risk factors for some of these. This has been seen in associative studies. And so let's just think about it, let's think about this means. And we are interested in this symposium, in this wonderful meeting on big questions of global health. And this just shows the graph for, I think this is the US numbers and it's going to be true in different degrees around the world, that we have a situation where there's an aging population first of all and I just pulled something from an article that was published on the 25th of June just a couple of days ago, nearly 10% of the world's adults have diabetes. The prevalence is rising and the point is that it's not just in developed countries, this is arising in developing countries, this is really a world-wide problem, 10% almost of the world's adults in all countries across the world have diabetes. And the prevalence is only going up. So we've got some big health issue and we heard about several of them yesterday. But I think we really have to think about these ones as well. And today I bring up these ones because our research has tied what we are understanding about telomere maintenance in humans to this kind of disease, of which diabetes is one example. Ok so it's a rising problem. Ok so what have I just said, I've just said that telomere shortness in the general population, that's people overall, in mini cohorts around the world, has been associated with common diseases of aging, ok. And so what's going on. Well is it telomere maintenance that's causing the shortness. So what you do is of course, you turn to human genetics and you look at rare Mendelian mutations and you say what can you learn from those. They've been very instructive in humans and people have deliberately using mouse models removed telomerase from mice and it's very clear that in humans the rare telomerase mutations that occur in people, that are known to cause telomere shortness, because they make telomerase work less well. They interrupt the enzymatic activity of telomerase or its ability to add telomeres, ok. So mutated telomerase genes which is just, you know the luck of the draw, right, the roulette wheel you know spins and your parents give you some combination of genes, right. So that's the luck of the genes. And in this case the bad luck of the genes. And that leads to telomere shortness. And it's very clear that there's a disease impact of this, both in people and in the mouse models where it's been done experimentally. And these sorts of diseases, their prevalence goes way up, they become very prone to these diseases. And look at that list, it starts to remind you of the list that I showed you before, these common diseases of aging in the general population. Which are associated with telomere shortness. Here in these rare mutations we've got causality so now of course the interesting question is well what about the common snips, the common variations in the genome that cause telomeres to be shorter, do they also lead to disease. Those studies which are much more complex epidemiologically and people have only just started posing them, are already suggesting yes. And there's a beautiful case, case of cancer where a certain cancer, it's bladder cancer, quite a common one, you can see that a snip that causes telomere shortness also causes bladder cancer. And part of that effect is mediated through the telomere shortening, ok. So that genetically speaking we know is the case. Now I'm going to turn to what's been very interesting to us and that is non-genetics. And do know when you think about future challenges, you know genetics, I'd say we've got genetics, if you will well in hand. Now I mean that's a trivial statement in some ways because of course there's huge complexities still, but we get it, we get it with genetics. We understand yes genes have effects, yes the genes interact, yes we know they're important to varying degrees. You know there's a lot of ways we can study this. And it's being done very activity and very productively. Let's do something harder. You know let's have some fun here, right let's choose something that's more difficult, non-genetic things. And this was, my next sort of point is that when somebody comes to you with a really interesting question that just grabs you and you think that person is good at that kind of research, go for it. So we started a collaboration. And this was wonderful because our friends in the UCSF department of psychiatry were very interested in chronic stress and we found low and behold that we could interact with them and show that people in which chronic stress by the way is a known risk factor for common diseases such as cardiovascular, that telomere shortness was associated with chronic stress. And my timing is up and so what I'm going to do is, that was the message, the important thing was that we found that it causes telomere shortening. Things that happen to you in childhood such as multiple trauma exposures influence your telomeres when you're an adult. And that's what this graph here is showing. And so we've become very, very fascinated by this question. And so now we've realised when I'm just going to zoom through all this, I had much too much to say to you, I knew I'd be so excited. And we're really trying to understand the interactions between chronic stress, telomere shortening which we know it causes and diseases. And how these all interact. So the bottom line was that we look over time and we see effects but my wonderful technician decided he would set up a machine for analysing 100,000 telomere lengths, he built a very complicated robot and here it is in action here, ok. So we were able to get, you know tones of telomeric DNA information out. And so now I'm going to end with this because this is going to be my plea to all of you who are really interested in huge complicated data sets and how you analyse those. Because what we did was we generated, as my marvellous technician said, more telomere length data than ever before, right. So here it is, you know this is the just the raw data right, tones, 100,000 people but the beauty is that it's tied in with a wonderful project of genome wide association, 675,000 different snips on these 100,000 people. And 20 years of clinical information all longitudinal electronic health records, data. So this is going to be so exciting to use all of this marvellous information and start relating all these things together. Because the end is that we really want to understand this road of life, we want to understand telomere loss on the one hand, telomere gain on the other hand, telomere maintenance. We know there's genetic components and what I didn't tell you but it's published, is we know adverse childhood events and chronic psychological stress are putting you on the telomere shortness and disease risk side of things. Education I'm very happy to tell you is clearly related to longer telomeres as is exercise and stress reduction. So on this happy note I want to finish and just tell you why we think this is important because I think there's so much more to be learned. And these are the folks in my lab and our collaborators with whom we have so much fun addressing what I think are important questions when we think about the question of human health, we're seeing very common sorts of disease situations which are growing world-wide. So I want to throw the challenge out to you, once we've solved these acute problems, these severe problems of infectious diseases and the major health problems in the world, why don't you look ahead to the next decades and say what are we left with, we're left with these other chronic diseases and these other diseases and I think we should think about how do we deal with the very complex problem of preventing these diseases. We want to treat the acute ones, let's think about how we prevent the other diseases that we're going to be left with now we survive all of the acute infectious and other diseases. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank und guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist wunderbar an diesem Morgen so viele Gesichter hier zu sehen. Ich habe das Gefühl, als schaute ich auf die Zukunftshoffnung von so vielem, was wir, denke ich, in der biomedizinischen, medizinischen und biologischen Forschung in Zukunft sehen werden. Seien Sie also alle willkommen. Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier sein und diesen Vortrag halten zu können. Mein Vortrag wird Ihnen etwas über die Wissenschaft erzählen, über meine Reise, die mit der Grundlagenforschung begann und mich in letzter Zeit zu Fragen geführt hat, die mit menschlicher Gesundheit und menschlichen Erkrankungen in Zusammenhang stehen. Ich werde Ihnen ein wenig über die Anfangsphase meiner Arbeit erzählen und dann zu demjenigen Aspekt übergehen, der mit der menschlichen Gesundheit und mit Krankheiten zu tun hat. Und ich werde Ihnen ein bisschen davon erzählen, wie ich damit angefangen habe. Dann werde ich Ihnen berichten, wie wir in letzter Zeit angefangen haben, die interessanten Implikationen all dieser Dinge zu untersuchen. Also Telomere sind die Enden von Chromosomen. Und dieser Art von unscharfem Bild, auf dem Sie die Telomere hier in rosa aufleuchten sehen: Das war so ziemlich alles, was man über Telomere wusste, in dem Stadium, in dem die Zytogenetiker Chromosomen unter dem Mikroskop betrachteten und sehen konnten, dass Telomere etwas am Ende von Chromosomen sind. Und wenn ich sage "etwas", dann meine ich, Sie waren mehr durch das definiert, was sie nicht sind. Sie verhielten sich nicht wie Brüche des DNA-Strangs, sie versuchten sich nicht selbst zu reparieren, wenn es zu einem Bruch kam. Sie waren zwar das Ende der DNA, aber kein "abgebrochenes" Ende. Und so entwickelte man die Vorstellung, dass sie sich von DNA-Brüchen deutlich unterschieden. Doch was waren sie dann? Ein Telomer wurde mehr durch das definiert, was er nicht tat, als durch das, was er in Wirklichkeit war. Ich hatte also das Glück, mich mit dieser Frage zu beschäftigen. Denken Sie also zunächst an die Möglichkeit zurück, denken Sie an eine Welt, in der sich die DNA nicht sequenzieren lässt, ok. Das war die Welt, in der ich in Cambridge in England im Labor von Fred Sanger, der später selbst Methoden der DNA-Sequenzierung entwickelte, die Arbeit an meinem Projekt begann. Doch wir wussten nicht, wie man die DNA-Sequenz analysiert. Und da gab es dieses wundervolle Rätsel: Wie war die DNA an den Enden der Chromosomen nur beschaffen? Und da ich im Labor von Fred Sanger war, wurde ich mit den damals aufkommenden Methoden sehr vertraut, die man bei dem Versuch, die DNA Sequenz zu analysieren, entwickelt hatte. Sie bestanden darin, dass man mithilfe einer Vielzahl chemischer und biologischer Methoden versuchte, Nukleotide in kleinen Abschnitten zusammenzufügen. Auf die Einzelheiten kommt es nicht an, doch ich will damit sagen, dass Sie sich nicht vorstellen können, wie unmöglich es damals war, die Sequenz der DNA zu analysieren. Doch zumindest schien es so, als seien die Enden ein Zugangsweg zur DNA. Und so wendete ich mich, indem ich an die Yale Universität und das Labor von Joe Gall ging, einem System zu, mit dem man tatsächlich an die Enden der chromosomalen DNA herankam, d.h. an die DNA von Eukaryoten und ihre Chromosomen, die natürlich linear sind. Der Grund hierfür war, dass Joe Gall und andere entdeckt hatten, dass es sehr kurze Chromosomen gibt, und zwar in sehr großer Zahl. Und eine bestimmte Art von ihnen fand man in diesem Tier, das auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um das mit Cilien besetzte Urtierchen Tetrahymena. Und dies ist insofern kein berühmter Organismus in dem Sinne, als er keine Krankheiten verursacht und es ist keines der beliebten Modellsysteme. Er wird allerdings heute für bestimmte Fragen, die mit Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen, sehr häufig verwendet. Es war lediglich ein unbekannter Organismus, der in Teichen lebt. Doch er verfügte über diese große Anzahl linearer, kurzer Chromosomen, und das erlaubte mir - wenn Sie so wollen auf biochemische Weise - molekulare Techniken zu verwenden, mit denen ich an diese herankommen, sie isolieren und so analysieren konnte, was sich an den Enden dieser Chromosomen abspielte. Tatsächlich fand ich heraus, dass sie mit sich wiederholenden Sequenzen endeten. Es war sehr seltsam, wissen Sie. Es gab keinen vergleichbaren Fälle, die hätten erklären können, warum sie dies tun sollten. Sie endeten mit kurzen sich wiederholenden Sequenzen. In dieser Abbildung hier sehen Sie die Wiederholungseinheit. Dies also waren die Chromosomen in Tetrahymena, und sie endeten in kurzen Wiederholungssequenzen. Zusammen mit Jack Szostak, der an einem anderen Institut arbeitete, fanden wir dann heraus, dass dasselbe bei der Hefe geschieht. Und ich sollte Ihnen sagen, dass dies ein Beispiel dafür ist, wie wunderbar es sein kann, zu Treffen zu gehen und Gespräche zu führen. Denn Jack und ich kamen ins Gespräch. Ich hatte gerade über die Telomere von Tetrahymena gesprochen, und wir sprachen darüber - um eine lange Geschichte kurzzufassen - wie man diese Information nutzen könnte, um an die Telomere der Hefe heranzukommen. Wir verfolgten die Sache und wir konnten am Ende der Hefechromosomen in etwa ähnliche Formen von Wiederholungssequenzen beobachten. Nun, ein bisschen unregelmäßig, wie Sie anhand der Formeln auf diesen Dias sehen können, doch von derselben Art. Dies war also keine Besonderheit dieses merkwürdigen kleinen Tieres, das im Oberflächenfilm von Tümpeln lebte. Dies war etwas wesentlich Allgemeineres. Und in der Tat wurde dies auch von anderen gefunden. Man fand es in kriechenden Schimmelpilzen, und diese Art von Sequenzen zeigten sich an den Enden von Chromosomen. Es sah also so aus, als sei dies ein recht allgemeingültiges Phänomen. Und wissen Sie, aus der Molekularbiologie wussten wir tatsächlich - selbst damals schon, bevor wir die DNA-Sequenz korrekt analysieren konnten -, dass die grundlegenden Prinzipen des Lebens, wenn man es sich in seiner Breite anschaut, natürlich sehr ähnlich waren. Es war also nicht weiter erstaunlich, dass man hier einige allgemein gültige Entdeckungen machte. Dennoch war es gut, dies herausgefunden zu haben. Dies erlaubte es uns also im Prinzip eine Frage zu stellen, die schon von anderen gestellt worden war und die aus dem Mechanismus der DNA-Replikation hervorging, der - wie Sie sich erinnern - mit Hilfe wunderschöner, komplizierter DNA-Replikationsenzyme abläuft, eines wunderschönen Satzes dieser Enzyme, die auf wunderbare Weise alle internen Regionen der chromosomalen DNA kopiert, d.h. sämtliche lineare DNA. Doch wenn es um das Kopieren dieser Enden geht, sind sie einfach hoffnungslos überfordert, und zwar aufgrund der mechanischen Aspekte der DNA-Replikation. Ich werde die Einzelheiten nicht erläutern. Man findet sie in jedem Lehrbuch. Worum es mir geht, ist jedoch Folgendes: Der wunderbar komplizierte, intelligente DNA-Replikationsmechanismus, der die genetische Information im Inneren der Chromosomen so erfolgreich und originalgetreu kopiert, versagt an den Enden der Chromosomen. Die Enden können also nicht repliziert werden. Jedes Mal, wenn eine DNA repliziert wird, wenn sie linear ist und sofern nicht etwas anderes passiert, wird sie kürzer und kürzer und immer kürzer. Dies war also ein Rätsel, das seit den frühen 1970er Jahren wohl bekannt war, und zum Beispiel von Olovnikov und Watson als solches auch klar formuliert worden war. Dies war ein Rätsel. Und nun wussten wir, was sich am Ende der Chromosomen befindet. Es gab also dieses Problem, und zusätzlich gab es eine ganze Menge interessanter Teilinformationen. Ich werde sie hier auflisten. Denn manchmal klingt es so - wenn man sagt, dass man Telomere entdeckt hat - als seien sie aus dem Himmel gefallen oder als sei man darüber gestolpert. So war es nicht. Ich glaube, dies ist typischer für die tatsächliche Wissenschaft, dafür wie, die wirkliche Wissenschaft voranschreitet. Was geschah, war Folgendes: Es gab verschiedene Hinweise, die nicht alle aus einem System stammten. Es gab in Tetrahymena Hinweise darauf, dass die Zahl der Wiederholungen an den Chromosomenenden in der Molekülpopulation unterschiedlich war. Man konnte feststellen, dass während der Entwicklung neuer Chromosomen in diesem Organismus - er hat einen sehr komplizierten Lebensstil - neue Telomere erzeugt werden, und sie werden an Nicht-Telomere angefügt. Wie ging das vor sich? Es gab eine interessante Beobachtung in dem Organismus, der die Schlafkrankheit verursacht: Wenn diese Organismen sich vermehrten, konnte man beobachten, wie die Enden der DNA länger und immer länger wurden. Wie kam es dazu? Und Jack Szostak und ich fanden heraus, dass - wenn man ein Tetrahymena-Telomer in Hefe bringt - dass dieses Telomer wiederholt wird: Es wurde an die Wiederholungssequenzen von Tetrahymena angefügt. Dies war höchst geheimnisvoll. Und ich war von einer anderen Beobachtung der Genetiker, der Zytogenetiker fasziniert, die die Eigenschaften der Telomere auf den Begriff gebracht und benannt hatten, obwohl sie den Begriff Telomere nicht erfunden hatten, das ist wichtig. Barbara McClintock, eine Genetikerin, die sich mit Mais befasste, hat Telomere theoretisch beschrieben. Sie fand sogar eine Mutante, der es nicht gelang, gebrochene Enden zu reparieren. Diese treten in der Regel in bestimmten Stadien der Entwicklung auf. Wenn man also eine Mutante gefunden hat, die etwas Bestimmtes nicht tun kann, kommt es zu einem Aha-Erlebnis: Es muss hier einen normalen Prozess geben. Alle Teile des Puzzles lagen vor uns: Fand in den Zellen etwas statt, wodurch die Telomer-DNA verlängert werden konnte? Nun möchte ich den Jungen, die am Beginn ihrer Karriere stehen, einen kleinen Ratschlag geben, ok. Dies war also die Frage. Wir verfügten über eine Fülle interessanter Hinweise, dass hier möglicherweise etwas geschah. Nun kann man sich nicht hinsetzen und einen Antrag für Forschungsgelder schreiben und sagen: Das kommt bei den Leuten, die diese Anträge durchsehen, nicht gut an, ok. Doch man kann, man kann wunderbare finanzielle Unterstützung kommen, die einem die Forschungsmöglichkeit eröffnet, indem man sagt: "Lasst uns untersuchen, wie Telomere funktionieren." Ich bin einem Geldgeber wie dem NIH so dankbar, der sagte: Sie haben ein Stipendium mit dem Titel: "Struktur und Funktion der Telomerik". Unter dieser Überschrift kann ich der Frage nachgehen. Doch ich möchte Ihnen außerdem noch eine andere äußerst wichtige Sachen erzählen, die mir wichtig ist und die mir geholfen hat. Ich untersuchte nun also die DNA der Telomere. Ich studierte Proteine, die mit der DNA der Telomere in Zusammenhang standen, und dann geschah Folgendes: Ich erhielt eine feste Stelle und meine Forschungsgelder. Dadurch fühlte ich mich sehr mutig. Ich dachte mir: "Ah, ich kann tun, was ich will! Ich habe eine feste Stelle, ich habe Forschungsgelder, oder etwa nicht?" Dies war ein sehr bestärkendes Gefühl, obwohl ich natürlich später erkannte, dass das nicht immer wahr ist, dass man nicht alles tun kann, was man möchte. Doch ich fühlte mich sehr dadurch bestärkt, dass ich eine feste Stelle und Forschungsgelder hatte, und so dachte ich mir: Wir ließen also die normalen Arbeiten in unserem Labor weiterlaufen, ok, Arbeiten, die in dem Forschungsantrag beschrieben waren und die stetige Ergebnisse lieferten. Doch ich dachte mir: "Ok, ich werde einfach versuchen, diese Experimente durchzuführen", und ich erhielt Hinweise darauf, dass dies tatsächlich funktionierte. Dann geschah noch etwas Wichtiges: Ich stellte dies Leuten vor, als sie sich dem Labor anschlossen, und ich sagte ihnen: Einer meiner sehr nüchternen PostDoc-Fellows sagte, glaube ich, als er ankam: Doch Carol Greider, eine Doktorandin von mir, die in unser Labor kam, war bereit dies zu tun. Sie meinte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig, wissen Sie, Doktoranden zu finden, die sich auf das einlassen, was sie für das interessanteste Projekt am Labor halten, selbst wenn es nicht dasjenige ist, das Ergebnisse liefert. Doch in diesem Fall lieferte es Ergebnisse, und was uns schließlich gelang, war die Herstellung synthetischer DNA. Ich hatte dies bereits mit Restriktionsenzymen und DNA-Bruchstücken getan, und es zeigte sich dabei, dass DNA-Bruchstücke, die wie Telomer-DNA aussahen, angefügt wurden. Doch wir entwickelten die Sache zur Einfügung eines DNA-Oligonukleotids weiter. Und wir waren in der Lage davon zu profitieren, dass wir DNA-Oligonukleotids bekommen konnten. Wieder konnten wir Technologie nutzen, als sie soeben erst verfügbar geworden war, da synthetische DNA, Oligonukleotide, der Forschergemeinschaft gerade erst verfügbar geworden waren. Also griffen wir diese Gelegenheit beim Schopf und ließen eine synthetische DNA herstellen. Dann stellten wir fest, dass sie nach langer, mühevoller Arbeit mit Zellextrakten verlängert werden konnte. Wir konnten eine Enzymaktivität finden, die die DNA dadurch verlängerte, dass sie weitere Wiederholungssequenzen anfügte. Der wichtigste Aspekt war also, dass ich da eine Studentin hatte, die bereit war, ein riskantes Projekt zu übernehmen, aber diese Person, Carol, dachte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Und dann konnten wir, wie gesagt, die Vorteile von Technologien nutzen. Es gab fantastische biochemische Technologien in der Enzymologie. Wir konnten, um unsere Zellextrakte herzustellen usw. und um Inkubationen und Reaktionen durchzuführen, die früheren Erfahrungen nutzen, die Leute in DNA-Replikationsstudien gesammelt hatten. Wie ich bereits erwähnte, lief uns die Technologie über den Weg, bei der es sich zufällig um die DNA-Oligosynthese handelte. Was wir fanden, war dieses Enzym Telomerase. Jetzt zeige ich Ihnen das Ende eines Chromosoms im cilienbesetzten Urtierchen Tetrahymena, bei dem es sich um eine reiche Quelle kurzer DNAs handelt. Ich ging davon aus, dass dieser Organismus wahrscheinlich auch eine reiche Quelle für jegliche Enzyme sein würde, die diese DNAs herstellen würden. Und tatsächlich: Wenn man sich ein Chromosomende in Tetrahymena sehr vereinfacht anschaut, nur die DNA hier betrachtet, so geschieht hier Folgendes: Es wird durch das Enzym Telomerase verlängert. Dies ist ein wahrhaft faszinierendes Enzym, weil es sowohl aus RNA als auch aus DNA besteht. Beide Teile tragen zum Erfolg der Reaktion bei, obwohl der katalytische - Entschuldigung, es besteht aus RNA und Protein. Die katalytische Stelle ist tatsächlich das Protein. Es ist nicht die RNA. Doch die RNA spielt eine entscheidende Rolle dabei, diesen Ort der Proteinkatalyse funktionsfähig zu machen. Es ist eine faszinierende Zusammenarbeit zwischen einem Protein und der RNA. Und die entscheidende Sache, die ich Ihnen auf dem Dia hier gezeigt habe, ist eine kurze RNA-Sequenz, die in die DNA kopiert wird, einfach indem Nukleotide hinzugefügt werden, und auf diese Weise wird die DNA verlängert. In diesem Reagenzglas hatten wir also, was man brauchte, um das Problem der DNA-Replikation zu lösen, das Problem der Replikation der Enden, auf das ich angespielt habe. Hier war es also im Reagenzglas. Funktionierte es auch auf diese Weise in Zellen? Also verwendeten wir Tetrahymena und mein Student Guo-Liang Yu entwickelte eine Technologie, mit der man die Gene wieder in Tetrahymena zurückbringen konnte. Wir mussten die Sache sozusagen "von den Wurzeln her" wieder aufbauen. Doch wir erhielten die ersten Hinweise darauf, dass man Telomerase in Zellen benötigt. Nun, die Tetrahymena, ich habe Ihnen dies nicht gesagt, aber diese Organismen sind unsterblich. Sie vermehren sich einfach immer weiter. Wenn man sie füttert und freundlich mit ihnen spricht, vermehren sie sich endlos weiter. Sie sind unsterblich. Sie müssen also, nebenbei bemerkt, über sehr gute DNA-Reparatursysteme verfügen. Und sie besaßen jede Menge Telomerasen, sozusagen. Hingen diese beiden Tatsachen zusammen? Was tut man also? Nun, man manipuliert die Telomerase experimentell, und sorgt mit genetischen Methoden dafür, dass sie nicht mehr funktioniert. Das also taten wir. Dann stellten wir fest, dass in den nächsten 20 Generationen oder so, die Telomere nach und nach immer kürzer und kürzer wurden, und die Zellen hörten auf sich zu teilen. Wenn ich nun davon rede, dass wir die Telomerase genetisch zerstört haben, mache ich Ihnen ein Geständnis. Dies klingt alles sehr absichtlich nicht wahr, als hätten wir den Plan gehabt, sie zu zerstören. Tatsächlich führten wir damals ein anderes Experiment durch. Wir betrachteten die RNA und fragten uns nach ihrer Fähigkeit, als Schablone zu dienen. Doch wir hatten sehr großes Glück, weil es sich herausstellte, dass einige der Mutationen nicht in die DNA kopiert wurde, was uns sehr frustrierte. Doch dann bemerkten wir: "Oh, seht mal. Die Telomere werden kürzer und die Zellen sterben". Und dann stellten wir fest, dass das Enzym in den Zellen nicht mehr aktiv war. Und dies war nun also eine sehr nützliche Mutante. Doch wir hatten nicht damit begonnen, diese unmittelbare Frage zu stellen. Wieder war die Lektion dieser Sache: Schau immer nach dem, was der Organismus dir sagt. Wir hatten dieses besondere Experiment nicht mit dieser Frage im Hinterkopf entworfen. Doch es erwies sich als das absolut perfekte Experiment zur Beantwortung der Frage: "Braucht man Telomerase?" Denn wir hatten zufällig eine Mutation erzeugt, die die Aktivität der Enzyme in den Zellen beeinträchtigt oder ruiniert, verdirbt, zerstört. Und dies versetzte uns also in die Lage, die Frage zu stellen, die ich jetzt hier oben hinstelle. Und es sieht so aus, als ob ich die Absicht gehabt hätte, dies zu sagen und zu tun, als ob ich geplant hätte, dieses Experiment durchzuführen. Doch wir sind einfach durch einen glücklichen Zufall darüber gestolpert. Wahrscheinlich hätten wir dieses Experiment als nächstes durchzuführen versucht. Doch wir hatten Glück und erhielten eine Mutante, die funktioniert. Und was dies für uns bedeutete, war: Wir hatten das Zentrum der Fähigkeit dieser Zellen gefunden, sich zu vermehren. Dies war also wirklich.... Wissen Sie, alle diese Zellen starben. Die Telomere wurden immer kürzer und sie starben. Die wichtige Lektion war also ein unsterblicher Organismus: Wir mussten lediglich die Komponente der Telomerase mutieren. Es war die RNA. Wir wussten, was es war, sehr, sehr genau. Und die Zellen wurden sterblich. Das sagte uns, dass die Telomerase die Telomere erhielt. Nun gut, wir wussten nun also etwas über die Telomerstruktur, bei der es sich um sich wiederholende DNA handelt. Diese DNA-Sequenzen werden durch Telomerase hergestellt, und sie bleiben durch einen sehr komplizierten, hochgradig gesteuerten Prozess erhalten. Und was leistet das für die Zellen? Es erstellt eine Plattform, eine Plattform von DNA-Bindungsstellen, an die sich sehr viele sehr interessante interaktive Proteine binden, die speziell die DNA-Sequenz binden. Sie haben Proteinpartner und gehen auf dynamische Weise mit dem Telomer Verbindungen ein und lösen sie wieder auf. Doch das Wichtige ist: Sie erstellen eine Hülle, und diese Schutzhülle ist der ganze Zweck der Telomere. Und das ist diese Kappe. Das ist die Schutzkappe, ok. Ich vergleiche sie immer mit der Hülse am Ende von Schnürsenkeln. Doch wie ich sagte, gibt es dieses inhärente Problem, dass Telomere - aufgrund der ihnen wesentlichen Replikationseigenschaften und weil wir mittlerweile Nuklease-Aktivitäten kennen - dass Telomere die Tendenz haben, kürzer zu werden. Es ist also so, wie das verschlissene Ende eines Schnürsenkels: Sie haben die schützende Hülse verloren, und nun dröselt sich der Schnürsenkel auf. Und dies ist eine sehr schlechte Situation. Die Zelle reagiert eindeutig darauf. Was passiert, ist Folgendes: Dieses sehr verkürzte Telomer sendet ein Signal an die Zellen, und die Zellen stellen ihre Teilung ein. Tatsächlich können sie Instabilitäten ihres Genoms durchmachen. Und dieses "verschlissene Ende" - bei dem es sich lediglich um eine Metapher handelt - ist im wahrsten Sinne ein verkürztes Telomer oder es sind verkürzte Telomere, und das hindert Zellen an der weiteren Teilung. Zusammenfassend lässt sich also sagen: Wenn man zu viel Abnutzung hat, leben die Zellen nicht weiter, ok? Schauen wir uns nun also Situation beim Menschen an. Wir kommen nun zu der Frage: "Wie funktioniert all dies beim Menschen?" Wir haben jetzt eine deutlich andere Situation vor uns, als bei Tetrahymena oder Hefen und solchen Organismen, die sich einfach endlos weiter teilen. Wir haben es jetzt mit uns selbst zu tun. Und Sie wissen, dass wir in den Industriegesellschaften, in denen die Lebensbedingungen gut sind, zum Beispiel eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Grad haben, Entschuldigung, von 80 Jahren - ich denke an das warme Wetter, das wir heute in Lindau haben. Wir haben eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Jahren. Und die maximale Lebensdauer beträgt etwa 120 Jahre. Sie entspricht in etwa diesem Wert. Unser Leben erstreckt sich heute über viele Jahrzehnte. Nun, wir wissen mit Sicherheit, dass die dem zugrundeliegenden molekularen Prozesse bei allen Eukaryoten ähnlich sein werden. Das hat man umfassend beobachtet. Wissen Sie, wir haben Telomerase ebenso wie Tetrahymena und Hefen usw. Doch der wichtige Aspekt hieran ist, dass die Genetik all dieser Dinge sich nun über einen sehr langen Zeitraum manifestiert, über Jahrzehnte des Lebens. Wie also spielt sich das alles ab? Das war in vielen, vielen verschiedenen Labors in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten das Forschungsthema. Eine einfache Beobachtung also - grob umrissen, und es wird Ausnahmen geben - lautet, dass die Telomerase durch einen allgemeinen Vorgang häufig die erwachsenen menschlichen Zellen an weiteren Teilungen hindert. Sie werden also tatsächlich kürzer, und in vielen Systemen des Körpers findet man Hinweise darauf, dass wahrscheinlich Folgendes geschieht: dass die Telomere immer kürzer werden und der Alterungsprozess voranschreitet. Man kann Hinweise darauf in vivo, bei Menschen beobachten. Nun, die Frage lautete: Spielt sich dieses zelluläre Phänomen im Laufe unseres Lebens ab? Brennt die Kerze sozusagen für die Telomere ab? Zeigt sich das tatsächlich im Lauf des menschlichen Lebens, oder nicht? Das war die Frage, zu deren Beantwortung viele, viele Labors Beweismaterial zusammengetragen haben. Und so werde ich Ihnen also als erstes einen sehr kurzen Überblick über das geben, was man beobachtet hat. Anschließend möchte ich mit Ihnen einige Aspekte dessen bedenken, was diesen Prozess beeinflussen könnte. Ok, gehen wir also zurück zum Grundsätzlichen! Was diesen Prozess als erstes beeinflussen würde, wäre die Tatsache, ob man über Telomerase verfügt oder nicht. Es wurden so viele Analysen dazu durchgeführt, wo wir in menschlichen Zellen Telomerase finden. Zunächst die normalen Zellen: Nun, in normalen Zellen, in Zellen, die tatsächlich unsterblich sein müssen oder die eine sehr lange Replikationslebensspanne haben, findet man sehr viel Telomerase, zum Beispiel in Stammzellen, Keimzellen, Keimbahnzellen. Wissen Sie, wir alle sind heute hier, weil die Zellen unserer Keimbahnen Telomerase enthalten. Sie erhalten die Telomere von Generation zu Generation. Und in bestimmten Stammzellen, die während ihres ganzen Lebens über lange andauernde proliferative Eigenschaften verfügen, besonders im Immunsystem. Doch man findet Telomerase auch in anderen Zellen, und wir fanden das eigentlich sehr instruktiv, andere Zellen anzuschauen und besonders Zellen des Immunsystems und Zellen des peripheren Blutes, wo sie jemandem mit einer ziemlich nicht-invasiven Blutentnahme eine Probe entnehmen können. Gesunde Leute geben einem Blut, und man kann anhand der weißen Blutkörperchen, der Zellen des Immunsystems aus einer Blutprobe, die Telomere untersuchen und wie sie erhalten werden, als eine Art Fenster in die Zellen. Heute können wir dies sogar, wie ich Ihnen später zeigen werde, anhand von Speichel untersuchen, denn es gibt viele Zellen, die in Ihren Speichel gelangen, und er gibt einem auch eine gute Quelle genomischer DNA. Und so können wir die Telomerase in Blutzellen quantifizieren, und so könnte man erwarten, dass die Telomerase mehr oder weniger beeinflussen wird, wie kurz die Telomere werden, und in welcher Zeit. In solchen Zellen können wir natürlich auch die Länge der Telomere bestimmen. Eine weitere wichtige Entdeckung war, dass die Telomerase in Krebszellen stark aktiviert ist. Und Krebszellen haben, wie Sie wissen, außer ihren vielen anderen unerwünschten Eigenschaften, die Eigenschaft, zu viel zu wachsen. Die Zellen wachsen zu viel, weil sie mutiert sind und epigenetischen Änderungen unterlagen, die dazu geführt haben, dass sie die Signale ignorieren, die ihnen zeigen, dass sie die Vermehrung einstellen und sich an die richtige Stelle im Körper bewegen sollen usw. Krebszellen sind also bösartige Zellen, die keiner Kontrolle unterliegen, und die Telomerase erlaubt diesen unkontrollierten Zellen, ihre Telomere zu erhalten und sich weiter zu vermehren. Im Zusammenhang mit Krebszellen ist die Telomerase wirklich eine schlechte Sache. Doch die Krebszellen haben zahlreiche andere Änderungen durchgemacht. Tatsächlich erscheint in gewöhnlichen Krebszellen eine erhöhte Telomerase-Konzentration erst, wenn sie sich in einem ziemlich fortgeschrittenen Stadium befinden. Über die Telomerase in Krebszellen werde ich heute nicht sprechen. Es ist eine faszinierende Frage. Es gibt interessante Fragen darüber, ob man sie hemmen oder manipulieren kann, um die Krebszellen zu zerstören. Doch für heute werde ich mich auf die normalen Zellen konzentrieren, ok? Stellen wir uns also einfach vor, von welchen Situationen wir erwarten könnten, dass sie sich in den nächsten Jahrzehnten im menschlichen Leben ereignen werden. Stellen Sie sich die Situation in Keimzellen vor. Nun, die Zellen werden erhalten bleiben, genau wie bei Tetrahymena oder der Hefe. Und daher wissen wir, dass wir eine Balance zwischen der Verkürzung und Verlängerung erwarten, da die Telomere im Großen und Ganzen erhalten bleiben. Es gibt eine Menge genetischer und nicht-genetischer Steuerungen dieser Prozesse, wie ich Ihnen sogleich erklären werden. Doch Sie können sich auch vorstellen, dass die Balance in die andere Richtung geht, und dies hat man bei bestimmten Immunzellen beobachtet, während sie verschiedene multiplikative Stadien im Körper durchlaufen. In normalen differenzierten Zellen werden Telomere tatsächlich länger. Also diese Allgemeingültigkeit, die ich Ihnen gezeigt habe: Sie müssen nicht immer kürzer werden, doch häufig werden sie kürzer. Und wenn die Zellen über etwas Telomerase verfügen, könnten Sie sich vorstellen, dass sie durch diese natürlichen Prozesse kürzer werden, doch die Telomerase könnte versuchen, ihre Länge zu erhalten. Sie könnte in der Lage sein, den furchtbaren Moment, in dem die Telomere zu kurz werden, eine ganze Zeit lang aufzuschieben. Doch der Alterungsprozess würde schließlich doch weitergehen. Und das wäre - wenn alles andere gleich bliebe - später als alles andere, wenn es weniger Telomerase gäbe. Und könnte sie die Alterung nicht so lange aufschieben. Wie würden alle diese Dinge funktionieren? Wir wissen sogar aus einer Hefezelle, dass sie 350 Gene hat - mindestens, wir zählen noch -, die die Länge der Telomere und die Längenverteilungen beeinflussen. Wir wissen also, dass dieser Prozess sehr vielen genetischen Steuerungen unterliegt. Wir erwarten demnach genetische Steuerungen und wir erwarten nicht-genetische Steuerungen, da alles auch von nicht-genetischen Einflüssen mitbestimmt wird. Das wird das Hauptthema sein, dem ich mich zuwende. Doch ich wollte Ihnen noch kurz sagen, dass der Grund dafür, warum wir hieran so ein großes Interesse entwickelten, der ist, dass viele Arbeitsgruppen erkannt hatten, dass viele übliche Erkrankungen des Alterns - einschließlich der Krebsleiden, aber auch viele Krankheiten, die für alternde Menschen charakteristisch sind - mit kürzeren Telomeren in den normalen Zellen in Zusammenhang gebracht worden sind. Dies ist nur eine kleine Auswahl der Krankheiten, bei denen Sie diese Zuordnung finden, und die Liste des Autors auf der rechten Seite ist äußerst unvollständig, es ist nur eine kleine Auswahl. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie die üblichen Krankheiten. Wenn Sie sich diese Krankheiten ansehen, werden Sie erkennen, dass sich darunter einige der Krankheiten wiederfinden, die zu den häufigsten Todesursachen gehören, und die in den Bevölkerungen zu den ernsten medizinischen Problemen führen: Krebs, pulmonale Fibrosen, Herzkranzgefäßerkrankungen, vaskuläre Demenz, degenerative Zustände, Diabetes, sogar Risikofaktoren für einige von ihnen. Dies hat man in verwandten Studien erkannt. Lassen Sie uns einfach darüber nachdenken. Denken wir darüber nach, was dies bedeutet. Wir sind an diesem Symposium interessiert, an diesem wunderbaren Treffen zu den großen Fragen der globalen Gesundheit. Und dies zeigt das Diagramm für.... Ich glaube dies sind die Zahlen für die USA. Es wir in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß überall auf der Welt zutreffen: dass wir zunächst die Situation haben, in der die Bevölkerung überaltert. Ich haben soeben erst etwas aus einem Aufsatz entnommen, der am 25. Juni veröffentlicht wurde, vor nur wenigen Tagen. Fast 10 % der Erwachsenen haben Diabetes. Die Häufigkeit nimmt zu, und das Wichtige ist, dass dies nicht nur für die Industrienationen gilt. Sie steigt in den Entwicklungsländern. Dies ist ein wahrhaft globales Problem: 10 % der Erwachsenen weltweit, in allen Ländern, leiden an Diabetes. Und die Häufigkeit nimmt nur zu. Wir haben also einige große Gesundheitsfragen. Über mehrere von ihnen haben wir heute bereits etwas gehört. Doch ich denke, dass wir auch über diese Fragen nachdenken müssen. Ich spreche diese Fragen heute an, weil unsere Forschung das, was wir über die Erhaltung von Telomeren beim Menschen verstehen, mit dieser Art von Krankheiten, von denen Diabetes ein Beispiel ist, in Verbindung gebracht hat. Ok, es ist also ein wachsendes Problem. Ok, was habe ich soeben gesagt? Ich habe gesagt, dass die Kürze von Telomeren in der allgemeinen Bevölkerung, d.h. bei der Mehrzahl der Menschen, in kleinen Gruppen weltweit, mit häufigen Alterserkrankungen in Verbindung gebracht worden ist. Ok. Was geht also vor? Nun, sind es die "Wartungsarbeiten" an den Telomeren, was zu dieser Verkürzung führt? Was man in dieser Situation tut, ist natürlich, dass man sich der Humangenetik zuwendet und sich seltene Mendel'sche Mutationen anschaut, und man stellt fest, was man davon lernen kann. Sie sind beim Menschen sehr instruktiv gewesen. Und Forscher haben in Versuchen mit Mäusen absichtlich Telomerase entfernt. Außerdem ist es eindeutig, dass die seltenen Telomerase-Mutationen, die beim Menschen auftreten, die Enzymaktivität der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit beeinträchtigen, Telomere hinzuzufügen. Sie unterbrechen die enzymatische Funktion der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit, Telomere hinzuzufügen, ok. Mutierte Telomerasegene sind einfach reine Glückssache. Das Rouletterad dreht sich und Ihre Eltern geben Ihnen irgendeine Kombination von Genen. Es ist das Glück der Gene, und in diesem Fall das Unglück der Gene. Das führt zur Kürze der Telomere. Es ist sehr deutlich, dass dies eine Krankheitsfolge hat, sowohl beim Menschen als auch im Mausmodell, wo dies in Experimenten durchgeführt worden ist. Diese Art von Krankheiten, ihre Häufigkeit nimmt stark zu. Die betroffenen Organismen werden für diese Krankheiten sehr anfällig. Schauen Sie sich diese Liste an. Sie beginnt sie an die Liste zu erinnern, die ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, diese generellen Erkrankungen, die in der allgemein Bevölkerung mit dem Alterungsprozess und mit der Kürze von Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen. Hier, bei diesen seltenen Mutationen, haben wir es mit einer Kausalkette zu tun. Die interessante Frage lautet nun: Wie verhält es sich mit den gewöhnlichen Verkürzungen, den allgemeinen Variationen im Genom, die zur Folge haben, dass Telomere kürzer sind. Führen auch sie zu Krankheiten? Diese Untersuchungen, die epidemiologisch wesentlich komplexer sind - man hat soeben erst begonnen, diese Frage zu stellen - legen bereits eine positive Antwort nahe. Und es gibt einen wunderbaren Fall, einen Fall von Krebs, bei dem man bei einem bestimmten Krebs - dem Blasenkrebs, einer ziemlich häufigen Form von Krebs - sehen kann, dass eine Verkürzung, die zu kürzeren Telomeren führt, auch Blasenkrebs verursacht. Ein Teil dieser Wirkung wird durch die Kürzung der Telomere vermittelt. Genetisch gesehen wissen wir, dass dies der Fall ist. Nun wende ich mich einem Thema zu, dass sehr interessant für uns gewesen ist: den nicht-genetischen Faktoren. Wissen Sie, wenn man über künftige Herausforderungen nachdenkt, die Genetik... Ich denke, wir haben die Genetik, wenn man so will, fest in der Hand. Nun, ich meine, dass das in mancher Hinsicht eine triviale Feststellung ist, denn natürlich gibt es nach wie vor ungeheur komplexe Zusammenhänge. Doch wir verstehen es, wir kommen mit der Genetik klar. Wir verstehen, dass Gene Auswirkungen haben. Ja, Gene wirken wechselseitig aufeinander ein. Ja, wir wissen, dass sie unterschiedlich wichtig sind. Es gibt viele verschiedene Wege, auf denen wir dies untersuchen können, und dies geschieht mit großer Intensität auf äußerst produktive Weise. Lassen Sie uns etwas Schwierigeres tun. Lassen Sie uns etwas Spaß haben, ok? Wählen wir etwas aus, was schwieriger ist: nicht-genetische Faktoren. Und mein nächster Punkt ist, wenn jemand mit einer wirklich interessanten Frage zu Ihnen kommt, die Sie einfach ergreift, und wenn Sie denken, dass diese Person für diese Art von Forschung gut geeignet ist, dann greifen Sie zu! Wir begannen also eine Zusammenarbeit. Und das war wunderbar, denn unsere Freunde in der Abteilung für Psychiatrie am UCSF waren sehr an chronischem Stress interessiert. Wir fanden - man höre und staune -, dass wir mit Ihnen zusammenarbeiten und zeigen konnten, dass Patienten, bei denen, nebenbei bemerkt, chronischer Stress ein bekannter Risikofaktor für allgemeine Erkrankungen war, etwa der Herzkranzgefäße, dass die Kürze von Telomeren mit chronischem Stress assoziiert war. Meine Zeit ist zu Ende, und was ich tun werde ist.... Das war die Botschaft. Das Wichtige war, dass wir herausfanden, dass Stress eine Verkürzung der Telomere bewirkt. Dinge, die einem in der Kindheit zustoßen, wie zum Beispiel mehreren Traumata ausgesetzt zu sein, haben einen Einfluss auf die Telomere, wenn man erwachsen ist. Das ist es, was aus diesem Diagramm hier hervorgeht. Daher hat uns diese Frage sehr, sehr fasziniert. Nun haben wir also erkannt... Wenn ich in einem Schritt durch alle diese Dinge gehe, ich hatte Ihnen viel zu viel zu sagen. Ich wusste, dass ich so aufgeregt sein würde. Wir versuchen wirklich die Interaktion zwischen chronischem Stress und der Verkürzung der Telomere zu verstehen, von der wir wissen, dass sie zu Krankheiten führt. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, wie alle diese Dinge miteinander zusammenhängen. Das Fazit war also, dass wir uns die Sachen in der zeitlichen Entwicklung anschauen, und wir sehen Auswirkungen. Doch mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent entschied, dass er eine Maschine zur Analyse der Länge von 100.000 Telomeren einrichten würde. Er baute einen sehr komplizierten Roboter, und hier sieht man ihn in Aktion, ok. Wir konnten also massenweise Informationen über die DNA der Telomere bekommen. Und nun werde ich hiermit enden, denn es ist meine Bitte an Sie alle, die sie an wirklich komplizierten Datensätzen interessiert sind und daran, wie man sie analysiert. Denn was wir taten, war, wir erstellten - wie mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent sagte - mehr Daten über Telomerlängen als jemals zuvor. Hier sind sie also. Dies sind einfach die rohen Daten, ok, tonnenweise, 100.000 Leute. Doch das Schöne ist, dass sie mit einem wunderbaren Projekt der genomweiten Assoziation verbunden sind: mit 675.000 Verkürzungen bei diesen 100.000 Leuten. Und 20 Jahren klinischer Daten, alles longitudinale, elektronische Gesundheitsdaten. Dies wird so faszinierend sein, diese wunderbaren Informationen zu verwenden und damit zu beginnen, sie miteinander in Beziehung zu setzen. Denn das eigentliche Ziel ist, dass wir diesen Lebensweg wirklich verstehen wollen. Wir möchten den Verlust der Telomere auf der einen Seite, den Gewinn von Telomeren auf der anderen verstehen, die Erhaltung der Telomere. Wir wissen, dass es genetische Komponenten gibt. Und was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe - es ist jedoch publiziert - wir wissen, dass negative Ereignisse in der Kindheit und chronischer psychischer Stress zu einer Verkürzung der Telomere und damit zu einem erhöhten Krankheitsrisiko führen. Bildung, das freue ich mich Ihnen sagen zu können, ist eindeutig mit längeren Telomeren assoziiert, ebenso wie körperliche Betätigung und Stressreduktion. Mit diesem erfreulichen Hinweis möchte ich schließen und Ihnen lediglich sagen, warum ich denke, dass dies so wichtig ist: Weil ich denke, dass es so viel mehr zu lernen gibt. Und dies sind die Leute in meinem Labor und unsere Mitarbeiter, mit denen wir so viel Spaß haben bei der Konfrontation mit Fragen, die meines Erachtens wichtig sind, wenn wir über Fragen menschlicher Gesundheit nachdenken. Wir sehen sehr allgemein verbreitete Krankheitssituationen, die weltweit zunehmen. Ich möchte Sie zur Annahme dieser Herausforderung einladen, nachdem wir die akuten Probleme, diese schweren Probleme der ansteckenden Krankheiten und der größten globalen Gesundheitsprobleme gelöst haben werden. Warum schauen Sie nicht in die Zukunft der nächsten Jahrzehnte und sagen, was uns noch bleibt. Uns bleiben diese anderen chronischen Erkrankungen und diese anderen Krankheiten, und ich denke, wir sollten uns um das sehr komplexe Problem kümmern, wie wir diese Krankheiten verhindern. Wir wollen die akuten Krankheiten behandeln. Lassen Sie uns darüber nachdenken, wie wir die anderen, die übrig bleiben werden, verhindern können, jetzt, da wir die akuten Infektionen und anderen Krankheiten überleben. Haben Sie vielen Dank.

Blackburn on telomeres which are associated with various diseases common in old age
(00:30:42 - 00:32:48)

 

Here, Blackburn describes a large study looking at telomere length and aging in 100 000 people in California. The data demonstrate that telomeres become shorter with age, up until the current average lifespan (75-80 years), yet interestingly, people who are older than this average age have longer telomeres. There are also marked differences in telomere length between men and women:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2015) - Telomeres: Telling Tails

It's truly a pleasure to be here again, at Lindau, and to have such wonderful interactions with all of the young scientists! So, what are telomeres, and more importantly, why would you care about it? So, I thought in the next half hour I'll take you through the journey that I had and which many others are continuing into, which has been a journey all the way from pond scum, rather unlikely journey to take us to something in humans, that we can call, the mind. And the general message and what comes out of this, quite surprisingly, from this journey, was implications of telomere maintenance for human health and disease. So, I'm going to tell you how I started on this journey, what took us into it, and then all of the things that have grown out and there are questions, of course, that'll be still exciting to answer. So, if we looked inside a cell that was about to divide, and took a picture of the chromosomes, which you can see in blue, you would see that the cell is about to divide, so all the chromosomes have replicated, so the DNA which is all compacted and looking blue, you can see is actually discernibly double. And at the end of the chromosomes, each end of each of those replicated chromosomes, you can see that there's a little blob. And that's actually lighting up the telomere. And what the telomere does, was for long time sort of known just by, a blob, but it was very functionally important It was known that it was actually protecting the end of the chromosome in ways that protected the genetic material, and without something, whatever that was, a protective structure, at the end of the chromosome, that chromosome could become very unstable, lose information, sometimes even stick by its ends to other chromosomes. Not good news! So, the telomere was a kind of a cap, capping off the end of the chromosomes. So, there was a mystery though. What was this blob? How could we answer that question? It required being able to get your hands on the molecules. And so, this is where the pond scum came in, because this little creature, called Tetrahymena thermophila, is a beautiful single-celled organism, it's lit up green, but it's not actually green. It lives in pond scum, but the point is, it has lots of very tiny and linear chromosomes. So, lots of ends per rest of the DNA. So, that enabled me to very directly analyse it molecularly and found out, sort of surprising, there was this very simple DNA sequence. It wasn't coding for proteins or anything, and the simple sequence was just repeated, over and over again. I'll show you an example in a moment. So, this was very curious and then we found that this was more general, this wasn't just confined to this wonderful creature, it was in yeast too, and that was work that we did together with Jack Szostak. And I collaborated with Jack and we found that, oh, it extended to yeast. And then, more and more people looked and found that actually, for eukaryotes, which have linear chromosomes, and, by the way, you're going to wonder about bacteria, they're just so much smarter, they have circular chromosomes, they don't worry about this stuff. So, we're talking about the eukaryotes, all of us, all the way down from us to pond scum. So, this is at every end, and this is the little repeat motif that you see at our ends. Now, in fact, there's much much more than I've shown, there's thousands and thousands of DNA building blocks, but the point is they make a scaffold, and that scaffold is a protective sheath of special protective proteins. And the point is, it has to be a big enough scaffold for that accretion of protective proteins, which are very well studied. I'll give you some names soon, that it has to be big enough to make a true protection. Now, that it has to be big enough. Okay, there was another mystery, and this was a real zinger, because people knew how DNA was replicated, they knew the machinery by the 1970s, and there was a real problem here, because the beautiful machinery that replicates all the rest of the chromosomal DNA is stupid enough that it can't replicate the very end. It's just the way it's built! So, if you just took this to its logical end, excuse the pun, it would be the, every time you replicated the DNA, you'd lose something from the end! And as the cells divided and replicated each time telomeres would get shorter and shorter and shorter. This would not be a great idea! And, in fact, it was predicted, perhaps this would lead to some kind of finishing off senescence, if you will, of the cells. But nobody knew what might be going on. So, at least we knew by then that the telomeres had repeated DNA at the ends, but also another observation was that they would, the numbers of repeats were actually more fluid, they were going up and down and changing at the ends of different chromosomes. Hmm, this was much more dynamic! Now, the shrinkage we could understand, the growing, that was weird! So, anyway, bottom line was that I decided that we should hunt for an enzymatic activity that maybe was adding DNA to the ends. So, very simply, here's what Carol Greider and I succeeded in doing: We made a synthetic little piece of telomere DNA, the little building blocks you can see here, from this Tetrahymena, the one that had lots and lots of linear chromosomes, so I thought maybe it has lots of something that makes those linear chromosome ends, and you could make the right sorts of extracts from these cells, and do it by chemical reaction, and just put in two building blocks, notice that the telomere DNA is just of these two in this species, and you could make that synthetic DNA grow. So, when we examined this a whole lot, we found it was a fascinating thing. It was putting on these nucleotides, doing something that normal cells were not thought to do. It was copying a bit of an RNA sequence information into complementary nucleotides added on to the DNA end, thereby elongating the DNA. So, this RNA is much bigger than this short sequence portion of it, but this RNA is built-in to this enzyme, which is partly protein and partly RNA. And the RNA helps the reaction, but it also provides this short portion of it as a template. Okay, so we're in the course of studying all of this mechanism, when serendipity happens. Okay, so, for various reasons we were making very precise mutations in the telomerase RNA, and we happen to make one at a particular place, which had actually an effect that was really useful for us. It kind of came back at the enzyme and made it stop. So, what that enabled us to do was ask a question, "How do cells feel if their telomerase isn't working well?" We had been doing things in the test tube and, lo and behold, we could go to Tetrahymena, which, I didn't tell you, but it's a lovely organism because it grows immortally, it just divides and divides and divides, so long as you feed it right, talk to it nicely, it'll keep dividing. Okay, and it had, as I showed you, relatively plenty of telomerase. So, the telomeres got a little bit shorter and longer, but there they were. So, what would happen if, we know inactivated it, using this very precise, surgical stiletto at the heart of the enzyme? It made it stop. And what happened is that the telomeres slowly shortened, took about 20 cell divisions, and then the cells simply stopped dividing. So, now our immortal cell, if you will, we'd turned it into a mortal cell. We had in fact, dealt it a mortal blow right at its heart. It now no longer was immortal, we just done this very simple, we knew what we were doing, we mutated just the telomerase, and it became mortal. So, the conclusion was then, the cell needs plenty of telomerase, it has it and it balances the shortening. Now, the shortening still happens, but the balances that you get, elongation when you need it, so these cells can keep going. Okay, so, now we'll go forward to lots and lots more work for many many different groups and synthesize what we now know is a much more complicated situation. Although the essence of what I told you, hang on to that, because that's exactly what's going to hold through all of what I'll tell you as we now move to thinking about this, essentially always from now and in humans. So, we have the RNA components, it's got a name, hTERC. We have a protein, which carries out this Reverse transcriptase, the core protein, hTERT, TERT, and that's the basic part of it! Now, what's known in humans is that this is extraordinarily complicatedly controlled. You don't have to read all of this, this is just to tell the aficionados that every kind of molecular control mechanism you can think of for the action of this enzyme, to make it more or less active, you can think of it'll be doing it. Telomere proteins themselves protect the telomere from too much telomerase action. They actually ration it a little bit. Telomerase levels, how much telomerase is made of the telomerase genes? How much the RNA products of the telomere transcription, telomere gene transcriptions are actually put into different spliced forms? How much they're assembled into the enzyme? Etcetera, etcetera. Okay, you get the idea, it's really complex how on earth we're going to work out which of these ones is actually the important ones, in humans. They're all doing something, somewhere. So, what you have to do, is you actually have to look in actual humans. And this is where it's really important to now think about scale of time, because humans, you might remember, we have a life expectancy, in many developed countries around the world, to something like, approaching 80 years. So, we can look at our experimental models, like a mouse, but it only lives for two years. And you look at a fruit fly, it's only about six weeks, and a worm, and it's only about three weeks. So, while we all have the same molecular and cellular building blocks in our cells, how that plays out in the whole organism is going to be on this very, very different time frame. And you don't know that what might be the critical rate limiting aspects of it, are going to be the same from organism to organism. And in fact, I'll tell you, each of those model organisms, the mouse, the worm, and so on, they don't die when they die of old age, they don't die of short telomeres. But they're on a really different time frame from us, so we have to look in us. Luckily, we can measure telomeres, we can take blood samples, we can take other samples. Commonly blood, sometimes just spit, our saliva, filled with useful cells, we can get a window inside our body, We can measure the telomeres and there's nice methodologies for doing that. I won't go into it, but I'm just tell you, you can measure in various ways and get good, reliable numbers out. So, bottom line is, what do we find? Well, we start off with about 10,000 nucleotides worth of these repeats. Really nice, long telomeres when we're born but by the time we get really old it's down to about half of that. Now, that half of that might sound like plenty to you, but what it's doing is it actually is now putting the cells in grave danger, because that protective sheath is no longer big enough. And what happens then, in humans, is really interesting. And there was no real reason to think this would be the case, because the telomeres gradually shorten as you look at most cell types, as we go through our decades and decades and decades, and the cells we gestate, called Senescence, which is a signal that those overly short telomeres cell send to the cells, and the say, "Stop!" And they say to do some other things too, that I'm going to tell you, but, first of all, they stop even multiplying, so if it's a replenishing cell type, it's not going to anymore. So, of course here was this gradual process, it's taking place over years. Is it like a life candle burning down, causing, eventually, is it related to our death? That's the question! Here was the cellular part of it, on this side and what was going on down here, what was going on in our whole lives here. So, and remember you've got that highly highly regulated telomerase, and now you could've imagined, well it could be saving things, but it isn't, it isn't doing a great job! It is good in certain cells, like certain cells that have to keep replenishing tissues over life, it's not bad, but not perfect. Luckily, it's really good in the cell lineages that give rise to our germ lines, otherwise we wouldn't be here. So, it does get maintained throughout our germ line, the sperm and egg-producing cells, that produce each of us and all our forebears and all our descendants. So, that's good, but it's pretty low in our body cells, in the many, many cell types. Now, there's also another variation, remember, I said this is complex. Turns out that human cancers, which of course, what are they, they're cells that just keep going and shouldn't keep going. They're not necessarily immortal, but they certainly are doing way too much replicating. They love their telomerase, and they actually rev it up really high. But they do a lot of other very bad things, too, as you know about cancers. Okay, so there we've got the situation in humans. How is all this going to play out? Now, we know a lot about the consequences of what happens if you look inside a cell and ask about the telomere. So, here we've got a nice human cell, looking at it under the microscope, so coiled up inside the nucleus, is all the chromosomes in purple, and out, filling the cytoplasm volume, lots of it is the mitochondria, which of course are the energy powerhouses of the cells. So, now we have 92 telomeres, 46 chromosomes, 92 telomeres, and so, here's one. Now, what is going to happen over life is that telomere in cells as they replicate, and even just as they undergo damages, you'll see, they will get shorter and shorter and now it will become too short and become uncapped. Now, that telomere is not silent, it talks to the cells, and one thing it talks to is mitochondria, and actually pushes them down, through a set of signalling molecules. Makes them less good. When mitochondria are not doing all their wonderful energy stuff really well they can start malfunctioning and producing reactive oxygen species. Really bad news, and particularly bad news for telomeres, and it actually sets up this vicious cycle, where telomeres can get even shorter. So, I've just shown one, but there are 92 and variously, they can get worse and worse. So, this is bad enough for the cell itself. But, these things are like these cells now, with these Uncapped Telomeres sending these signals, they're like a rotten apple in a barrel. They can now start affecting other things, because what happens is, another of a kind of signals that this Uncapped Telomere, which is a very worried telomere, is sending, is, for whatever reason, it is sending alarm signals which include secreting outside the cell. Factors that include those that are increasing inflammation. Now, through a whole series of things that go on in the wonderfully complex immune system, that also can up the body's reactive oxygen species, too. So, you've got even worse situation. Okay, so you can see a senescence cell with telomere damage is not a really good cell to have! So, this kind of cellular pathology is quite well studied, in cells and also in certain mouse models and so on. And there's every reason to think that it would go on if you get such cells in humans, as well. So, now let's say, well let's look at some consequences of what happens to telomere length. So, now, we had the good fortune to join a very large cohort project and we could measure telomere length in 100,000 people, so we can really start to get some good ideas about what happens in humanity, and first of all in a part of California. So, the first thing we did, was we looked at telomere length in 100,000 people just in spit samples. So you've got a nice sampling of cell types in the body. You look, just looked at average, over time, as people got older and older it was just one time point for each person, and what you saw was what I told you! There was this gradual decline. But then we saw something really interesting! Now, let me point out most mortality in this population is happening around here. So, you got this decline, most of the mortality, overall is around here. But there are people who you can see are surviving longer and longer. Now, it's just one time point, but what you see is the longer a person has survived, the more likely they are to have an average telomere length that's longer. So, this is very, very interesting, because it never been seen before! We replicated that males and females are different. But we did show that the difference, which is a bit less before about age 50, it sort of really splits off, between females and males. And then after this critical time, when most of the mortality, just population mortality happens to both of them show these sort of rises. So, really interesting. But now we can say what will happen if you actually ask if this has any consequence or any predictive value. And so, the DNA was taken in the year 2009, so the clock tick, and by 2012 you could go to the records and say who was still alive. And who had died in that time period. And then compared that, as a function of what were the telomeres like at the beginning. And, lo and behold, if you looked at the people in the bottom quartile and set their likelihood of dying to one, just as a reference, then you found that anybody whose telomeres where in the other quartiles, that is people whose telomeres three years earlier, or within that three year period you looked at deaths, you just found that, oh, longer telomeres actually had a decrease chance that you would be in that group of people who had died, within three years. We saw that age and sex clearly have an effect, so the blue line's actually, the blue bars show that that was already corrected for. But we also know that a lot of other things affect mortality. A lot of other things also affect telomere length. And we know what they are, and we can get the major ones out, and here's the big list. We did the age and gender, age and sex, race-ethnicity, education, cigarette packyears history, physical activity habits, alcohol intake, body mass index and so on, and, doesn't budge. What that's telling you is this is independent. This is a very diverse group of people, but California's, but you know Californians, meh, you know (laughs). Right, so, let's look at some serious, sober Danes, and see if the same thing happens. This is the Copenhagen study, Rode et al. published this beautiful work where they looked at 64,000 people's blood cell telomeres, just average telomere length, baseline and then time goes by and they looked at a bigger range but the average was about seven years, so longer than what we'd looked at. And they said, of those many people who did die, how many, in which telomere length category to begin with, how many had died? So, in other words, the same question, does the chance of you dying within that period of averaging about seven years, does the chance of you dying have any relationship to the telomere length, at the beginning of the baseline analysis? And, lo and behold, again, after correcting for all of these multiple possible variables that's called the Multivariate Adjusted, this is what this is, referring to telomere length shortness, as you see trends as worse and worse chance that you will have been in the group of people who died, the shorter the telomeres are, and it's a real kind of a trend. So, we get the message now, we got big studies, I think it's pretty clear. Reduced mortality, and I've shown you all causes is related to the observation, just observing the telomere length in people. Didn't show you the data from Rode at al.'s study and from others, that actually, when you start to divide it down into some of the major killers of the elderly, cardiovascular, all-cancers lumped together for the moment, all of those are related to reduced mortality from those causes, as well, are all related to observed having longer telomeres. Okay, and though the news is good too about longer telomeres in another parameter we care about. Well, lifespan, that's one thing, we want to know how long, how many years of healthy life we'll have, how long is our, quote, healthspan. And, in fact, again you see a relationship, here's a bit of numbers, but the point is they're related. Now, you can see another thing. You can say, now let's go the other way, what about bad news? What about diseases and shorter telomeres? Do we see a relationship? And the relationship goes in that direction, shorter telomeres correlate with, not only just finding an association, but actually also predicting, like I saw, I showed you predicting mortality, predicting, getting some disease, and there's a whole group of these diseases, and you can see they're very common kinds of impairments and diseases that happen with aging. Now, the observant of you have been noticing something, all of these arrows have double heads. I haven't said anything about causality yet. That's what we'd like to know! So, genetics! Genetics is wonderful because it gives us, if we can see a gene we can attribute a gene, especially one whose function we know, we can say causality. And wonderful beginning began in 2001, Vulliamy et al. found that if people inherit in families a mutation, fortunately rare, which is in the a Telomerase RNA Gene, remember that hTERC that I told you about, that RNA component of telomerase. If you have a mutation that knocks your telomerase down to half of its normal level, there's a very clear causality, we know what hTERC does, it's part of telomere maintenance, and people get really really short telomeres. Now the point is that really matters, there's a clear disease impact, related to how much the telomeres shorten. And the first things they've found were a bunch of very interesting diseases, they already showed certain overlapse with some of the diseases, which just occur in the population with aging. Here, we've got real causality, now, it's a bit extreme, these people are very much more likely to die much earlier, and as the telomeres get shorter and shorter, going down through the generations, because the short telomeres get passed down from person to person, they get worse and worse and die, sadly, earlier and earlier. So, the causality is extremely clear, but it is kind of extreme. Now, the genetics has just grown and grown since 2001, so more genetics has told us the same story, but really filled it out! So, again, inherit a rare mutation, half the telomerase level or other ways of reducing telomere maintenance, not only reducing telomerase levels, but also other ways that you can reduce it, which are to do with directly binding telomere proteins. So, what you see though is exactly what I showed you, but now, because there's more and more cases round the world there are various family pedigrees, people really, they find these sorts of things and the list now has got longer! So, now it's starting to even broaden out to neuropsychiatric diseases, very interestingly. This is looking like the big set of things that can happen, it doesn't all happen in one person. It varies on how much shorter the telomeres have got with succeeding generations. The genes though, and this is just for the specialists who'd like to look and say, "Yes, what genes are they?" Well, there's 11 of these now, six of them are related to telomerase itself or the biogenesis directly of telomerase, and there are five now, which are known telomere binding proteins. So, we know exactly what these things do, they are directly doing telomere maintenance. So, we got real causality here. So now let's look at the rest of us, who are fortunate enough not to have been afflicted with these rare, although extremely informative mutations. Now you can say, well, what about common alleles that actually just impair our telomere maintenance a bit? We had a wide range of telomere lengths, by the way, those means that I showed you with age, they're much much tighter than the actual range of telomere lengths at all ages. But you can do statistics on large numbers and in this beautiful study, looking at just what genes are associated with having shorter telomeres in the population at large. So, causality, because genes cause things. What was amazing was, the five top hits were our old friends, the known telomere telomerase genes. So, this was very clear, we know just what these do! And then they said, well, if you look at these alleles that actually are related to the shorter telomeres, and these are common ones, that can occur in all sorts of combinations in any of us, is there a disease impact? And there was, in cardiovascular in a particular form, coronary artery disease, and so, in fact, if you added up the short version alleles for each of these genes plus a couple more that were less related but showed up in the quantitative analyses, but these were the top five ones, we know what they do. Just out of the bat, you would have a 21% higher chance of getting coronary artery disease at some point in your life than the population at large. Now, to have all seven, right, there five plus two, seven genes, to have all the bad alleles of all, combinatorily it goes down and down, so it's probably only one in a few hundred or at most people. But, you can get that. Most of us have a mixture of these, because they're just all sorts of different genes. But this is really major thing, because again, it is saying that at least this short telomere thing, because we know what these genes do, must be able to contribute, contribute this particular form of cardiovascular disease. If you believe in the logic that genes have causality, and I think that's a rational thing to do, then, that's what we can say for this case. So, it's really useful! Now, telomeres is not all good news, because in the context of cells that are normal. You remember Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, it was one person in the daytime, he was this nice, good citizen, well-behaved, but at night-time, same person, was a horrible criminal, violent, right? And telomerase, in the setting of the night-time setting, if you will, cancer-prone cells that had changes. This can be really dangerous! Genetics, again, has told us. Now remember, I told you, if you have only half as much telomerase as you ought to have, one of the things that is caused is cancers. And it's actually a specific subset of cancers. But now, more recent genetics has come in, and we're finding another very interesting thing, that is just about cancers. Now, when I say, we, I mean the world at large. And so, just a little bit too much, even just as, less than twofold, too much expression of telomerase itself, actually causes some other cancers. You can see actual contributions here. And there are completely different set of cancers, and they're not the most frequent of the cancers in the world. But now, you can see where we are. Cancers first of all, vary. We are really living in a trade-off world here, right? We're precariously on a knife-edge here, because this is what has been learned by looking at actual humans and actual diseases and genetics and understanding the molecular basis of what's going on. You're going to say, "Well, telomeres, wait a minute, they are not cause to all diseases, diabetes, it's caused by other things. It's caused by insulin not working properly, there are other things that go on, it can't be all telomeres!" And I couldn't agree more! But I want to pose the idea that, in fact show you the data! Actually, it'll come from mouse models, because it's so clear that telomeres interact. So, now we've talked about this idea, the more the telomeres shorten, the more cells get engaged in harmful kinds of consequences, and the more severe the pathologies. And in a mouse, you actually have to delete telomerase completely, but then eventually if you breed the mice you can start to see these sort of graded effects. So now, let's look at mouse models, where we're looking at just single-gene mutations, which cause disease in humans. And so, here's three. One is Progeria, very premature, fast telomere shortening, sorry, premature, fast aging, actually, it has telomere shortening, too, in humans. Another one, completely different, a muscle wasting disease. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy, known mutation, another completely different one again, diabetes, not enough insulin in this mouse, single-gene mutation. So, completely different things. Now, each of these models, you put the same mutations that you find in humans, you put them into the mouse and it's actually a little bit disappointing. You don't get all the phenotypes, the Warner's doesn't have the full phenotype, the Duschenne Muscular dystrophy shows the skeletal muscles, but actual people with this disease die of cardiac disease. So, it's not really mimicking it perfectly! So, now let's go through with time and now let's superimpose in the mouse model a Telomerase deletion. What happens is really interesting, because well before the telomerase deletion is really showing any effect by itself, the telomeres only partly done some of the cells, you get an interaction, and what gets worse is the Warner's syndrome phenotypes. And you'd starts to look now like the human one. The right cells start to be showing pathologies. The same thing happened with the Duchenne muscular dystrophy in that setting, as the telomeres got shorter, now they started to get heart problems. And now, the same, the diabetes, part insulin deficiency, it became much worse and it was the diabetes symptoms that got worse. Okay, so bottom line is we've turned mice into furry little humans! Right? By removing telomerase and setting that as a background. So, interactions between telomeres and disease, we can see that in these mouse models. Now, I just want to tell you that it's not all genes, and in fact, people have long known that something you might think is totally different but, coming from the mind is something that does have an impact on telomeres. On disease, good example is heart disease, in fact. And so, we and others started studying this, and we started and found some effects on telomere maintenance. And now, the list is huge, I'm just going to show you this huge list of all these sorts of things, terrible things that happen in people's lives, which really argue, since it's the length of exposure that is often very much a quantitative predictor, or the duration, duration severity, length of abuse in these situation... It quantitatively predicts how short telomeres are. So, we think there's real causality here. And we know that Chronic psychological stress has impact on disease, but one of the things it does do is it reduces telomere maintenance. So, the big question is going to be, disease impact itself, and what can you do about it?" And why would you care? This is all very statistical. And now, I want to finish with something really remarkable. Which is: People who have bladder cancer, and you look at an interaction between something that you probably would never have dreamed of looking at if you're asking how much a bladder cancer patient will survive. An interaction of the short telomeres in the blood cells, the normal blood cells, with depression. Now, depression is fairly common. So, they just did a simple thing in this beautiful study, which was they divided people up at the time of their diagnosis, of course the bladder cancer had been developing all those years. Got to the point of being clinically diagnosed and they said that the person had depression, but not short telomeres or short telomeres and not depression, or neither, short telomeres or depression, or did they have both. Now this just says, well, they did the study right, this group at MD Anderson in Houston, Texas, I'm going to show it to you visually. Here are lots and lots of people! They had over 400 people. They're all just sorts of different people, and they've got bladder cancer. And at the diagnosis, they fell into one of those categories. One or either of depression and shorter blood cell telomeres, or neither, or both. After two and a half years, if you only had depression, or you only had short telomeres, or you had neither. it actually statistically didn't make much difference. So, this many people are no longer with us after two and a half years, they died within that two and a half years. But if you had both, it was that! So, this is a big difference, over half! And now, five years, is a very critical time for cancer. And now, if you only had one, well of course, more and more people did die, either depression or short telomeres, or neither, it's about the same. But if you had both, everybody had died. So, that starts to look clinically significant and I think the game that you've been seeing is, it's all about interactions. And so interactions between all sorts of factors. We've observed in lots of stress-like and other situations, things that will make your telomeres shorter. It has been observed things that will make them longer. The real thing is going to be finding out which of these things, quantitatively, will actually, in true, proper studies, that are not just looking, but really testing in trial-like arrangements, which of these kinds of things, and they'll be more, could actually improve telomere maintenance. And it's got to be this right balance, because remember, if you push it too far, cancer risks go up, of certain kinds of cancer. So, it's got to be really, really tuned right, and probably physiologically is important. Okay, so what I've done is I've said there are all sorts of inputs into the telomere shortening and the how it much it shortens is really a complex set of things. But you can measure all of that, and see what the telomere shortening is, and you can see these quantitative relationships, associations. And as I've shown you, the sum aspect of it, which is presenting causality, and of course there's plenty of other causality, all interacting as well, but we think that we have this sort of underlying situation, where we can say, here's something that's changeable in life, you can see it's influenced by a lot of things besides genes and it partly, at least, contributes to the very common diseases of aging, which account for so much morbidity in people. And that just is the long words way of saying what I just told you in a diagram. So, maintenance of telomeres is important, and it's something else that we think now is actually contributing to these diseases of aging. So, finally, I just want to finish with, the journey began, with curiosity, you have to be always willing to play with ideas, you had to had background knowledge to make all these kinds of discoveries, not only in the pond organism, but in humans. You had to have wonderful collaborators, so that meant working with people, working in a research environment that made this possible. So, I'm immensely grateful that I'd been able to have this journey, and the science community people, so important. I'm in the Bay Area, in San Francisco, but I have colleagues everywhere. This journey began in looking underwater, and I just thought I'd finish with this most beautiful graphic, it's a photograph taken just outside where I was born, in Tasmania, Australia. It's the shoreline at night, and beautiful, single-celled organisms, living under the sea, living underwater, just like Tetrahymena does. These beautiful organisms are shown lit up here, and of course, the wonders that they can show you are probably, perhaps almost as wondrous as the wonders that you can see when you look out into the galaxy. Thank you very much.

Es ist wirklich ein Vergnügen, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und solche wunderbaren Begegnungen mit jungen Wissenschaftlern zu pflegen! Was also sind Telomere und was noch wichtiger ist, warum sollte man sich darum kümmern? Ich dachte, in der nächsten halben Stunde nehme ich Sie auf die Reise mit, die ich gemacht habe und auf der ich mich noch immer mit vielen anderen befinde, eine Reise vom Wimpertierchen ausgehend, eine eher unwahrscheinliche Reise, die uns zu etwas Menschlichem führt, das wir Verstand nennen. Die allgemeine Botschaft und was aus der Reise folgt sind, als rechte Überraschung, Implikationen zum Telomeren-Erhalt für die Gesundheit und Krankheit des Menschen. Ich werden Ihnen also erzählen, wie ich diese Reise begonnen habe, was uns dazu veranlasste und dann alles das, was daraus erwuchs, und es gibt natürlich Fragen, die nach wie vor zu beantworten spannend sind. Wenn man in eine Zelle blickt, die im Begriff ist sich zu teilen und ein Bild von den Chromosomen machen würde, die Sie hier blau sehen, würden Sie sehen, die Zelle ist im Begriff, sich zu teilen, alle Chromosomen haben sich reproduziert, und die DNA, die ganz komprimiert ist und blau aussieht, Sie sehen, die ist deutlich doppelt. Am Ende jedes Chromosoms, an jedem Ende jedes dieser reproduzierten Chromosomen, da sehen Sie ein kleines Klümpchen. Das erhellt das Telomer. Die Funktion des Telomer war lange Zeit eigentlich nur durch ein Klümpchen bekannt, doch funktionell war es wichtig. Es war bekannt, dass es das Ende des Chromosoms in einer Weise schützte, die das genetische Material schützte, und ohne etwas, was auch immer das ist, eine schützende Struktur am Ende des Chromosoms, könnte das Chromosom sehr instabil werden, Informationen verlieren, es könnte sogar manchmal mit seinen Enden an anderen Chromosomen haften. Keine guten Nachrichten! Das Telomer war somit eine Art Kappe, die das Ende der Chromosomen abdeckt. Dennoch gab es da ein Rätsel. Was war dieses Klümpchen? Wie konnten wir diese Frage beantworten? Es erforderte, Moleküle in die Hand zu bekommen. Hier kam das Wimpertierchen ins Spiel, denn diese kleine Kreatur, genannt Tetrahymena thermophila ist ein schöner, einzelliger Organismus, er leuchtet grün auf, ist aber nicht wirklich grün. Es lebt im Wimpertierchen, der Punkt aber ist, es hat viele sehr kleine und lineare Chromosomen. Also viele Enden je Rest der DNA. Das ermöglichte es mir, es sehr direkt molekular zu analysieren und ich fand heraus, gewissermaßen überrascht, dass es diese sehr einfache DNA-Sequenz gab. Sie kodierte keine Proteine oder irgendetwas und die einfache Sequenz wurde einfach immer wieder wiederholt. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich ein Beispiel. Das war sehr seltsam und wir fanden dann, dies war allgemeiner, dies war nicht nur auf diese wundervolle Kreatur begrenzt, es fand sich auch in Hefe. Diese Arbeit führten wir mit Jack Szostak durch. Ich arbeitete mit Jack zusammen und wir entdeckten, oh, das erweitert sich zur Hefe. Und immer mehr Leute forschten und entdeckten das, für Eukaryoten, die linearen Chromosomen haben, und Sie werden sich übrigens wundern, wie das bei Bakterien ist, die sind so viel intelligenter, haben Ringchromosomen, die kümmern sich um so etwas nicht. Wir sprechen also von den Eukaryoten, wir alle bis hinunter zum Wimpertierchen. Das befindet sich also an jedem Ende und ist das kleine sich wiederholende Motiv, das Sie an unseren Enden sehen. Es gibt tatsächlich sehr viel mehr als was ich gezeigt habe und tausende von DNA-Bausteinen, der Punkt aber ist, sie bilden ein Gerüst und dieses Gerüst ist eine Schutzhülle besonders protektiver Proteine. Dabei muss das Gerüst groß genug für die Zunahme protektiver Proteinen sein, was sehr gut untersucht wurde. Ich werde Ihnen gleich ein paar Namen nennen, es muss groß genug sein, einen echten Schutz zu bieten. Nun, es musste groß genug sein. Gut, da gab es ein weiteres Rätsel und das war wirklich sensationell, denn man wusste, wie sich DNA replizierte, man kannte den Mechanismus seit 1970 und hier lag das wirkliche Problem. Der schöne Mechanismus, der den ganzen Rest der chromosomalen DNA repliziert, ist zu dumm, und kann das Ende nicht replizieren. So ist es eben gebaut! Wenn man das logisch zu Ende denkt, entschuldigen Sie das Wortspiel, würde man, jedes Mal, wenn man die DNA repliziert, etwas vom Ende verlieren. Indem sich Zellen teilen und replizieren würden Telomere jedes Mal immer kürzer werden. Das wäre keine gute Idee! Tatsächlich wurde vorausgesagt, dies würde vielleicht zu einer Art Beendigung des Alterungsprozesses der Zellen führen. Doch niemand wusste, was da vor sich ging. Zumindest wussten wir damit, dass Telomere DNA an den Enden wiederholten, aber es gab auch eine andere Beobachtung, dass sie, die Zahl der Wiederholungen war tatsächlich fließender, sie nahmen zu und ab und änderte sich an den Enden verschiedener Chromosomen. Hmm, dies war sehr viel dynamischer! Nun, die Verminderung konnten wir verstehen, das Wachstum, das war seltsam! Wie auch immer, wir entschieden uns schließlich nach einer enzymatischen Aktivität zu forschen, die DNA möglicherweise an die Enden anfügte. Also ganz einfach, dies ist es, was Carol Greider und mir glückte: Wir schufen ein kleines synthetisches Stück Telomer-DNA, die kleinen Bausteine, die Sie hier sehen, und zwar von diesem Tetrahymena, das sehr viele linear Chromosomen hat, ich dachte, vielleicht verfügt es über sehr viel von dem, was diese linearen Chromosomenenden erzeugt und man könne die richtigen Extrakte aus diesen Zellen erhalten, und dies durch eine chemische Reaktion vornehmen, und einfach zwei Bausteine nehmen, - beachten Sie, die Telomer-DNA ist nur von diesen beiden, in dieser Spezies, und diese synthetische DNA könne man zum Wachsen bringen. Als wir das ausgiebig untersuchten fanden wir, dass es eine faszinierende Sache war. Es legte diese Nukleotide an, und tat etwas, von dem man nicht angenommen hatte, dass normale Zellen dies tun würden. Es kopierte etwas der RNA-Sequenzinformation in komplementäre Nukleotide, die dem DNA-Ende hinzugefügt waren. Dadurch wurde die DNA verlängert. Diese RNA ist also sehr viel länger als diese kleine Teilsequenz, doch die RNA ist in dieses Enzym eingebaut, das zum Teil Protein, zum Teil RNA ist. Die RNA hilft bei der Reaktion, liefert aber auch dieses kurze Teil davon als Vorlage. Wir sind also dabei alle diese Mechanismen zu studieren, als sich ein Glücksfall ereignete. Aus verschiedenen Gründen ließen wir sehr präzise Mutationen der Telomerase RNA entstehen, und es gelang uns, eine an einem bestimmten Ort zu erzeugen, was eine Wirkung zeigte, die für uns sehr nützlich war. Es kam beim Enzym gewissermaßen zurück und ließ es stoppen. Das ermöglichte es uns, eine Frage zu stellen: „Was empfinden Zellen, wenn ihre Telomerase nicht gut funktioniert?“ Wir hatten im Reagenzglas Dinge vorgenommen und siehe da, wir konnten zum Tetrahymena gehen, das, was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe, ein wunderbarer Organismus ist, denn er wächst unsterblich, er teilt sich einfach ständig. Solange man ihn richtig ernährt, freundlich mit ihm spricht, fährt er fort sich zu teilen. Es hat, ich habe das gezeigt, relativ viel Telomerasen. Die Telomerasen wurden etwas kürzer und länger, aber da waren sie. Was würde nun geschehen, wenn, wir wussten es zu interaktivieren, wir dieses sehr präzise chirurgische Stilett am Herzen des Enzyms verwendeten? Es stoppte es. Die Telomere wurden langsam kürzer, es dauerte etwa 20 Zellteilungen und dann hörte die Zelle einfach auf sich zu teilen. Unsere unsterbliche Zelle, wenn Sie so wollen, wurde eine sterbliche Zelle. Wir hatten ihr in der Tat einen sterblichen Schlag ins Herz versetzt. Es war nicht mehr unsterblich, das hatten wir sehr einfach bewerkstelligt, wir wussten, was wir taten, wir mutierten die Telomerase und sie wurde sterblich. Die Schlussfolgerung war, die Zelle benötigt viel Telomerase, hat sie die, wird die Verkürzung balanciert. Nun, die Verkürzung findet weiterhin statt, doch das Geleichgewicht, das man erhält, Verlängerung, wenn sie benötigt wird, damit diese Zellen weiterleben. Wir gehen jetzt weiter zu sehr viel mehr Arbeit für sehr viele verschiedenen Gruppen und fassen das zusammen, von dem wir jetzt wissen, dass es sich um eine viel kompliziertere Situation handelt. Der Kern dessen, was ich ihnen erzählt habe, halten Sie den fest, denn genau das wird sich durch alles, was ich Ihnen erzähle, hindurchziehen, wenn wir jetzt darüber nachdenken, im Wesentlichen von jetzt an immer in Bezug auf den Menschen. Wir haben also die RNA-Komponenten, die haben einen Namen, hTERC. Wir haben ein Protein, das die reverse Transkriptase ausführt, das Kernprotein, hTERT, TERT und das ist der wichtigste Teil davon! Was man vom Menschen kennt ist, dass dies außerordentlich kompliziert gesteuert wird. Sie brauchen das nicht alles zu lesen, es geht nur darum, Ihnen die Aficionados zu nennen, damit jeder molekulare Kontrollmechanismus, den Sie sich für diese Aktion dieses Enzyms denken können, damit es mehr oder weniger aktiv wird, auch ausgeführt wird. Telomer-Proteine selbst schützen das Telomer vor einer zu starken Telomeraseaktivität. Sie rationieren diese ein bisschen. Telomerase-Ebenen, wie viel Telomerase wird aus Telomerase-Genen erzeugt? Wie viele RNA-Produkte der Telomer-Transkription, Telomer Transkription von Genen werden tatsächlich in verschiedene gespleißte Formen gegeben? Wie sehr werden sie in dem Enzym zusammengeführt? Und so weiter. Gut, Sie haben eine Vorstellung davon, es ist wirklich sehr komplex, wie erfährt man, welche von diesen sind die wirklich wichtigen im Menschen. Sie bewirken alle etwas irgendwo. Was man also tun muss, man muss sich die Menschen ansehen. Hier ist es sehr wichtig, in Bezug auf den Zeithorizont zu denken, denn Menschen, wie Sie sich erinnern, haben in vielen entwickelten Ländern weltweit eine Lebenserwartung von etwa annähernd 80 Jahren. Wir schauen uns unsere experimentellen Modelle an, etwa eine Maus, die lebt aber nur zwei Jahre lang. Und eine Fruchtfliege, die hat nur etwa sechs Wochen und ein Wurm, bei dem sind es etwa drei Wochen. Obgleich wir alle die gleichen molekularen und zellulären Bausteine in unseren Zellen haben, wie spielt sich das im gesamten Organismus ab, in Anbetracht dieser sehr verschiedenen Zeitrahmen. Was der kritische Anteil der begrenzenden Aspekte sein könnte, werden diese die Gleichen von Organismus zu Organismus sein? Ich sage Ihnen, jedes dieser Modellorganismen, die Maus, der Wurm und so weiter, die sterben nicht, wenn sie aus Altersschwäche sterben, die sterben nicht durch kurze Telomeren. Sie befinden sich aber in einem sehr anderen Zeitrahmen als wir, daher müssen wir unser Inneres schauen. Glücklicherweise können wir Telomere messen, man kann Blutproben nehmen, man kann andere Proben nehmen. Gewöhnlich nimmt man Blut, manchmal einfach Spucke, unseren Speichel, voller nützlicher Zellen, wir erhalten ein Fenster in unseren Körper. Wir können Telomere messen und es gibt schöne Methodologien dies zu tun. Ich werde das nicht weiter ausführen, nur so weit, man kann auf verschiedene Arten messen und gute, zuverlässige Zahlen erhalten. Also, was haben wir gefunden? Nun, wir begannen mit etwa 10.000 Nukleotiden, die diese Wiederholungen wert waren. Wirklich schöne, lange Telomere, wenn wir geboren werden, wenn wir dann wirklich alt sind, sind sie etwa halb so lang. Diese Hälfte mag Ihnen viel erscheinen, doch in Wirklichkeit bringt das die Zellen in ernste Gefahr, da die schützende Umhüllung nicht mehr groß genug ist. Was dann in den Menschen geschieht, ist wirklich interessant. Und es gab keinen realen Grund anzunehmen, dies sei der Fall, da die Telomere sich graduell verkürzen, wenn man sich die meisten Zellarten ansieht. Während wir ein Jahrzehnt nach dem anderen leben und die Zellen, die wir in uns tragen, genannt Seneszenz, ein Signal, das diese zu kurzen Telomeren an die Zellen senden, „Stopp!“ sagt. Sie teilen noch andere Dinge mit, die getan werden sollten, wovon ich Ihnen erzählen werde, aber zuallererst beenden sie sogar die Vermehrung. Wenn es sich um einen auffüllenden Zelltyp handelt, hört dieser damit auf. Hier war nun dieser allmähliche Prozess, der sich über Jahre erstreckt. Ist das wie eine Kerze, die herunterbrennt und vielleicht verursacht, - die mit unserem Tod in Verbindung steht? Das ist die Frage! Hier war der zelluläre Teil, auf dieser Seite und was hier unten stattfand, und hier was in unserem ganzen Leben stattfindet. Denken Sie daran, da ist diese sehr stark regulierte Telomerase und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, nun, es könnte etwas sagen, tut es aber nicht, es vollbringt eine großartige Arbeit. Das ist für gewissen Zellen gut, da gewisse Zellen die Gewebe im Lauf des Lebens auffüllen müssen, es ist nicht schlecht, aber nicht perfekt. Glücklicherweise ist das in den Zelllinien, die aus unseren Keimbahnen entstehen, wirklich gut, sonst wären wir nicht hier. Das wird also durchgehend in unseren Keimbahnen erhalten, den Sperma- und Ei-erzeugenden Zellen, die uns alle und alle unsere Vorfahren und Nachkommen hervorbringen. Das ist also gut, in unseren Körperzellen, in sehr vielen Zelltypen, aber ziemlich gering. Es gibt da noch eine andere Variante, erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, es sei komplex. Es zeigt sich, beim menschlichen Krebs, natürlich handelt es sich dabei um Zellen die einfach weitermachen, was sie nicht sollten. Sie sind nicht notwendigerweise unsterblich, vermehren sich aber viel zu sehr. Sie lieben ihre Telomerase und bringen sie wirklich auf Hochtouren. Sie machen aber noch eine Menge anderer schlimmer Dinge, wie man das vom Krebs kennt. Gut, da haben wir die Situation im Menschen. Wie spielt sich das nun alles ab? Wir wissen jetzt viel über die Konsequenzen dessen, was geschieht, wenn man in eine Zelle sieht und etwas über Telomere wissen will. Hier haben wir eine schöne menschliche Zelle, die unter dem Mikroskop angesehen wird, aufgerollt innerhalb des Zellkerns sind alle Chromosomen in violett, und außen, der Zytoplasmainhalt gefüllt, vieles davon sind die Mitochondrien, die selbstverständlich die Kraftzentren der Zellen sind. Wir haben hier jetzt 92 Telomere, 46 Chromosomen, 92 Telomere und so, hier ist eines. Was im Lauf des Lebens geschieht ist, die Telomere in den Zellen, wenn diese sich vermehren, und selbst wenn sie nur beschädigt werden, dann werden Telomere immer kürzer und dann wird es zu kurz und das Ende ist offen. Das Telomer hält jetzt nicht still, es spricht zu den anderen Zellen und es spricht zu seinen Mitochondrien und drückt sie mit einem Satz signalgebender Moleküle nach unten. Dadurch wird ihre Qualität schlechter. Wenn Mitochondrien nicht ihre gesamte wunderbare Energiearbeit gut ausführen, können sie anfangen zu versagen und reaktive Sauerstoff-Spezies erzeugen. Die wirklich schlechte Nachricht ist, und teilweise eine schlechte Nachricht für Telomere, es baut sich ein Teufelskreis auf, in dem Telomere noch kürzer werden können. Ich habe nur eines gezeigt, aber da gibt es 92 und verschiedenartige, die können sich immer weiter verschlechtern. Das ist für die Zelle selbst ziemlich schlecht. Diese Dinge sind jetzt aber wie diese Zellen, diese Telomere mit offenem Ende senden Signale, sie sind wie ein fauler Apfel in einem Fass. Sie können jetzt andere Dinge infizieren. denn eine andere Art Signale, die diese Teloreme mit offenem Ende, welches sehr besorgte Telomere sind, senden, sind aus irgend einem Grund Alarmsignale, die beinhalten, außerhalb der Zelle sekretierend zu wirken. Dies schließt Faktoren ein, die die Entzündung steigern. Aufgrund einer Reihe Dinge, die in diesem wundervoll komplexen Immunsystem stattfinden, können auch reaktive Sauerstoffspezies erhöht werden. Man hat also eine noch schlimmere Situation. Gut, Sie können eine Zellenseneszenz mit geschädigtem Telomer sehen, und das ist keine gute Zelle. Diese Art zellulärer Pathologie wurde gut untersucht, in Zellen und in gewissen Mausmodellen und so weiter. Und es gibt allen Grund anzunehmen, dies würde so auch bei menschlichen Zellen weitergehen. Wir wollen uns jetzt einmal einige der Konsequenzen ansehen, von dem, was mit der Telomerlänge geschieht. Wir hatten das Glück an einer sehr großen Kohortenstudie teilzunehmen und wir konnten Telomerlängen von 100.000 Menschen messen, wir beginnen also einen guten Begriff davon zu erhalten, was in der Menschheit geschieht, zuallererst einmal in einem Teil Kaliforniens. Als erstes schauten wir uns Telomerlängen in Speichelproben von 100.000 Menschen an. Man bekommt eine schöne Stichprobe von Zelltypen des Körpers. Man schaut sich mit der Zeit einen Durchschnitt an, wenn Menschen immer älter werden, es gab für jede Person einen Zeitpunkt, und was sich zeigte ist das, was ich Ihnen erzählt habe! Es gab da diesen allmählichen Rückgang. Dann sahen wir aber etwas wirklich Interessantes! Lassen Sie mich darauf verweisen, die höchste Sterblichkeit in dieser Population findet hier statt. Sie haben also diesen Rückgang, die höchste Sterblichkeit ist insgesamt hier. Sie sehen aber, es gibt Menschen, die leben immer weiter. Nun, das ist nur ein Zeitpunkt, was man aber sieht ist, je länger die Person überlebt, desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass sie eine durchschnittlich längere Telomerlänge hat. Das ist jetzt sehr, sehr interessant, weil man das bisher noch nie gesehen hatte. Wir wiederholen, dass Männer und Frauen verschieden sind. Wir zeigten aber, dass die Differenz, die vor dem 50sten Lebensjahr etwas geringer ist, sich wirklich zwischen Männern und Frauen aufzuspalten beginnt. Und nach dieser kritischen Zeit, in der die meiste Sterblichkeit, nun die Bevölkerungssterblichkeit von beiden, diesen Anstieg zeigt. Also, wirklich interessant. Wir können jetzt sagen, was ist, wenn man sich fragt, ob das irgendeine Konsequenz oder einen prädikativen Wert hat. Die DNA wurde im Jahre 2009 genommen, die Uhr tickt also und 2012 konnte man in den Aufzeichnungen nachsehen, wer noch lebte. Und wer schon gestorben war. Und dann ein Beziehung hergestellt, als Funktion zu wie die Telomere zu Beginn waren. Und siehe da, wenn man sich die Leute im unteren Viertel ansieht und ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben als eins nimmt, nur als Referenz, dann findet man, jeder, dessen Telomere sich drei Jahre zuvor in den anderen Vierteln befanden, oder innerhalb des Dreijahreszeitraums, und man sich die Sterberate ansieht, sieht man, oh, lange Telomere haben tatsächlich ein geringeres Risiko, dass man sich in der Menschengruppe befindet, die innerhalb dreier Jahre starb. Wir haben gesehen, Alter und Geschlecht haben eine deutliche Wirkung, die blaue Linie ist daher, der blaue Balken zeigt, dies wurde bereits bereinigt. Wir wissen aber auch, es gibt viele andere Dinge, die Sterblichkeit beeinflussen. Viele andere Dinge beeinflussen auch die Telomerlänge. Und wir kennen sie, und können die Hauptursachen herausnehmen und hier ist eine lange Liste. Wir beachteten Alter und Geschlecht, Rasse, Volkszugehörigkeit, Bildung, Zigaretten, Historie der Packungsjahre, Gewohnheiten bei körperlicher Betätigung, Alkoholkonsum, Body-Mass-Index und so weiter, und, es bewegte sich nichts. Das sagt Ihnen, es ist unabhängig. Dies ist eine sehr heterogene Gruppe von Menschen, aber wissen Sie, die Kalifornier, hm, wissen Sie (lacht). Also, schauen wir uns einige seriöse, nüchterne DNAs an, und sehen wir mal, ob das Gleiche zutrifft. Dies ist die Kopenhagen Studie, Rode et al. publizierten diese tolle Arbeit in der sie 64.000 Menschen untersuchten auf Blutzellen-Telomere, nur durchschnittliche Telomerlänge, Ausgangsdaten und dann im Laufe der Jahre sahen sie sich einen größeren Bereich an und der Durchschnitt war etwa sieben Jahre, etwa der Zeitraum, den wir untersucht hatten. Und sie fragten, von den vielen Menschen, die starben, zunächst wie viele, in welcher Telomerlängen-Kategorie, wie viele starben da? In anderen Worten, die gleiche Frage, ist das Risiko, dass Sie innerhalb dieses Zeitraums von durchschnittlich sieben Jahren sterben, steht dieses Risiko in irgendeiner Beziehung zur Telomerlänge bei Beginn der Analyse der Ausgangsdaten? Und siehe da, wieder, nach Bereinigen aller dieser vielen möglichen Variablen, die multivariat adjustiertes Modell genannt werden, das ist es, mit Bezug auf die Kürze der Telomerlänge, da sehen Sie, die Trends sind genauso schlecht und schlechte Aussichten in der Gruppe der Menschen zu sein, die starben, je kürzer die Telomere sind, es ist wirklich ein Trend. Wir haben jetzt die Botschaft erhalten, wir hatten große Studien, ich denke, es ist ziemlich klar. Verringerte Sterblichkeit, und ich zeigte Ihnen alle Ursachen, mit Bezug auf die Beobachtung, einfach durch Beobachtung der Telomerlänge in Menschen. Ich zeigte Ihnen die Daten der Untersuchung von Rode et al. und von anderen nicht, dass, wenn man beginnt es in die wesentlichen tödlichen Krankheiten älterer Menschen zu unterteilten, kardiovaskular, alle Krebserkrankungen für den Augenblick zusammengenommen, alle diese stehen in Beziehung zur verminderten Sterblichkeit aufgrund dieser Ursachen, und alle beziehen sich auch auf die Beobachtung des Vorhandenseins längerer Telomere. Gut, und jetzt die gute Nachricht über längere Telomere bei einem anderen Parameter, der uns ebenfalls interessiert. Lebensdauer ist eine Sache, wir möchten wissen wie lange, wie viele Jahre wir ein gesundes Leben leben können, wie lang ist unsere, Zitat, Langlebigkeit bei guter Gesundheit. In der Tat sehen Sie hier wieder eine Beziehung, hier ein paar Zahlen, der Punkt aber ist, sie stehen miteinander in Beziehung. Hier kann man jetzt etwas anderes sehen. Man kann sagen, gehen wir jetzt einmal den anderen Weg, wie verhält es sich mit den schlechten Nachrichten? Wie steht es bei kürzeren Telomeren mit Krankheiten? Sehen wir da eine Beziehung? Und die Beziehung geht in diese Richtung, kürzere Telomere korrelieren damit, nicht nur das Finden einer Zuordnung, sondern tatsächliche Voraussage, wie ich es sah, ich zeigte es Ihnen, wie Sterblichkeit vorausgesagt wird, Voraussage, eine Krankheit zu bekommen, und da gibt eine ganze Gruppe solcher Krankheiten und Sie sehen, die sind sehr häufig Formen von Beeinträchtigungen und Krankheiten, die im Alter auftreten. Die Aufmerksamen unter Ihnen haben etwas bemerkt, alle diese Pfeile haben doppelte Pfeilspitzen. Bislang habe ich noch nichts zur Kausalität gesagt. Das möchten wir gerne wissen! Also, Genetik! Genetik ist wunderbar, da sie uns ermöglicht, wenn wir ein Gen sehen können, wir ein Gen zuordnen können. Besonders eines, dessen Funktionen wir kennen, wir können von Kausalität sprechen. Ein wunderbarer Anfang wurde 2001 gemacht, Vulliamy et al. fanden heraus, wenn Menschen innerhalb einer Familie eine Mutation erbten, was glücklicherweise selten geschieht, dann liegt die in einem Telomerase RNA Gen, erinnern Sie sich, ich sprach von hTERC, diese RNA-Komponente der Telomerase. Wenn Sie eine Mutation haben, die Ihre Telomerase auf die Hälfte ihres normalen Niveaus zerlegt, da gibt es eine sehr deutliche Kausalität, wir wissen, was das hTERC bewirkt, es ist Teil des Telomeren-Erhalts und die Menschen erhalten sehr, sehr kurze Telomere. Der Punkt, der wirklich wichtig ist, es gibt einen deutlichen Krankheitseffekt in Bezug darauf, wie sehr sich Telomere verkürzen. Was ich sehr bald entdeckte waren eine Vielzahl sehr interessanter Krankheiten. sie zeigen bereits gewisse Überlappungen mit einigen der Krankheiten, die eben mit dem Alter in der Bevölkerung auftreten. Hier bekommen wir wirkliche Kausalität, nun ist das ein bisschen extrem, diese Menschen hier werden aller Wahrscheinlichkeit sehr viel früher sterben, und die Telomere werden immer kürzer, klingen im Laufe der Generationen ab, da die kürzeren Telomere von einer Person zur anderen weitergegeben werden, sie werden immer schlechter und sterben, leider, immer früher. Die Kausalität ist also ausgesprochen deutlich, aber etwas extrem. Nun befindet sich Genetik gerade im Wachsen und wuchs seit 2001, weitere Genetik hat uns die gleiche Geschichte erzählt, hat die aber ausgemalt. Also wiederum, erben einer seltenen Mutation, Hälfte der Telomerase-Ebene oder andere Wege, auf denen Telomer-Erhalt reduziert wird, nicht nur eine Verringerung von Telomerase-Ebenen, sondern auch andere Möglichkeiten, mit denen sich das reduzieren lässt, was mit dem direkten Binden von Telomer-Proteinen zu tun hat. Was man aber sieht ist genau das, was ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, da es weltweit immer mehr Fälle gibt. Es gibt verschiedene Familienstammbäume, die Leute finden solche Sachen und die Liste wird nun immer länger! Es beginnt sich jetzt sogar auf neuropsychiatrische Erkrankungen auszudehnen, sehr interessant. Es sieht wie eine wichtige Reihe von Dingen aus, die sich ereignen können, sie geschehen aber nicht alle in einem Menschen. Es variiert, je nachdem, wieviel kürzer die Telomere in den nachfolgenden Generationen wurden. Die Gene jedoch, und das ist nur für Spezialisten, die sich das gerne ansehen und sagen: „Ja, um welche Gene handelt es sich?“ Nun, da gibt es jetzt 11 von diesen, sechs davon sind selbst mit der Telomerase verwandt oder mit der unmittelbaren Biogenese von Telomerase, und hier sind jetzt fünf, die als Telomer-bindende Proteine bekannt sind. Wir wissen also genau, was die tun, sie kümmern sich direkt um den Telomer-Erhalt. Wir erhalten hier echte Kausalität. Schauen wir uns also die Verbleibenden unter uns an, die das Glück hatten, nicht von diese seltenen, wenn auch extremen informativen Mutationen betroffen zu sein. Sie können jetzt sagen, was ist mit den gemeinsamen Allelen, die unseren Telomer-Erhalt nur ein bisschen schädigen? Wir hatten übrigens einen großen Bereich an Telomerlängen, jene Mittel, die ich Ihnen beim Alter gezeigt habe, die sind viel enger als der tatsächliche Bereich von Telomerlängen aller Altersgruppen. Man kann aber bei hohen Zahlen Statistiken vornehmen und das ist eine schöne Studie, sich einfach einmal ansehen, womit Gene assoziiert sind, die kürzere Telomere in der Bevölkerung haben. Also Kausalität, weil Gene Dinge verursachen. Das Erstaunliche war, die fünf größten Hits waren unsere alten Freunde, die bekannten Telomer Telomerase Gene. Das war sehr deutlich, wir kennen deren Wirkung! Und dann sagten sie, wenn man sich diese Allele ansieht, die wirklich mit den kürzeren Telomeren verwandt sind, und dies die gewöhnlichen sind, dann kann dies in allen möglichen Kombinationen in jedem von uns auftreten, habe wir es hier mit dem Einfluss einer Krankheit zu tun? Da gab es, bei kardiovaskularer Erkrankung in einer bestimmten Form, der koronaren Herzkrankheit, in der Tat etwas, wenn man die kurze Allele-Version jedem dieser Gene hinzufügte und noch ein paar mehr, die weniger verwandt waren, sich aber in der quantitativen Analyse zeigten, doch dieses waren die Top fünf, und wir wissen wie die wirken. Man hätte einfach eine 21% höhere Chance, zu einer bestimmten Zeit seines Lebens an der koronaren Herzkrankheit zu erkranken, als dies bei der Allgemeinbevölkerung der Fall wäre. Jetzt haben wir alle sieben, hier sind fünf, plus zwei, sieben Gene, die alle schlechte Allele haben, kombinatorisch steigt das immer weiter ab, es befindet sich also vermutlich nur in wenigen hundert Menschen. Das kann man aber erhalten. Die meisten von uns haben hiervon eine Mischung, denn da gibt es allerlei verschiedene Gene. Die ist aber eine wichtige Sache, denn, noch einmal, man sagt, dass zumindest dieses kurze Telomer, da wir wissen, was diese Gene bewirken, in der Lage sein muss, einen Beitrag zu dieser bestimmten koronaren Herzkrankheit zu geben. Wenn man der Logik glaubt, diese Gene folgten einer Kausalität, und ich halte das für vernünftig, dann können wir das zu diesem Fall aussagen. Es ist also wirklich nützlich! Telomere bedeuten im Kontext normaler Zellen aber nicht nur gute Neuigkeiten. Sie erinnern sich an Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde, am Tag waren sie eine Person, es war dieser nette, gute Bürger, gesittet, aber nachts war dieselbe Person ein schrecklicher Verbrecher, gewalttätig, stimmt's? Und Telomerase, in ihrem nächtlichen Umfeld, wenn Sie so wollen, Krebs anfällige Zellen, die sich veränderten. Das kann wirklich gefährlich sein! Das konnte uns, wiederum, die Genetik sagen. Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte Ihnen, wenn Sie nur die Hälfte der Telomerase haben, die Sie haben sollten, ist eines, was dadurch veranlasst wird, Krebs. Es ist tatsächlich eine bestimmte Teilgruppe der Krebserkrankungen. Jetzt ist eine neuere Genetik dazugekommen, und wir finden etwas anderes, sehr Interessantes, was mit Krebs zusammenhängt. Wenn ich jetzt wir sage, dann meine ich die gesamte Welt. Ein bisschen zu viel, selbst etwas weniger als doppelt zu viel Expression von Telomerase, ruft andere Krebserkrankungen hervor. Sie können hier die tatsächlichen Beteiligungen sehen. Und es gibt vollständig verschiedene Krebsarten, und sie sind nicht die häufigsten Krebserkrankungen auf der Welt. Jetzt können Sie aber sehen, wo wir sind. Zunächst einmal variiert Krebs. Wir leben hier wirklich in einer Welt des Abwägens, stimmt's? Wir befinden uns hier in prekärer Weise auf Messers Schneide, denn dies ist es, was man erkannte, indem man sich reale Menschen und reale Krankheiten angesehen hat und Genetik und die molekulare Grundlage von dem was stattfindet verstanden hat. Sie werden sagen: „Nun, Telomere, einen Augenblick mal, die verursachen alle diese Krankheiten nicht, die Krankheiten haben andere Ursachen. Diese wird verursacht, weil das Insulin nicht richtig funktioniert, da finden noch andere Dinge statt, das kann nicht alles wegen der Telomeren sein!“ Und dem kann ich mich nur anschließen! Ich möchte aber den Gedanken hinstellen dass, sehen Sie sich diese Daten an! Die stammen von den Mausmodellen, denn da ist es so deutlich, dass Telomere interagieren. Wir haben den Gedanken besprochen, je kürzer Telomere werden, desto mehr Zellen befassen sich mit allen möglichen schädlichen Konsequenzen, und je schwerwiegender, desto pathologischer. In einer Maus muss man Telomerase vollständig tilgen, wenn man dann aber Mäuse züchtet, sieht man diese abgestuften Wirkungen. Sehen wir uns also ein Mausmodell an, bei dem wir uns nur einzelne Genmutationen ansehen, die im Menschen eine Krankheit verursachen. Hier sind drei. eines ist Progerie, sehr frühes Stadium, rapide Telomerverkürzung, Entschuldigung, frühes Stadium, schnell alternd, es hat auch Telomerverkürzung, bei Menschen. Ein weiteres, vollkommen anders, eine Muskelschwundkrankheit. Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, bekannte Mutation, eine weitere, vollkommen andere Krankheit, Diabetes, in dieser Maus kein ausreichendes Insulin, einzelne Genmutation. Also völlig verschiedene Dinge. Bei jedem dieser Modelle nimmt man die gleichen Mutationen, die man beim Menschen findet, fügt sie der Maus ein und in der Tat, es ist etwas enttäuschend. Man erhält nicht alle diese Phänotypen, das Werner-Syndrom hat nicht den ganzen Phänotyp, die Muskeldystrophie Duchenne zeigt die Skelettmuskeln, doch Menschen mit dieser Krankheit sind an einer Herzerkrankung gestorben. Es ahmt dies also nicht vollkommen nach! Wir gehen das jetzt mit der Zeit durch und kopieren in das Mausmodell eine Deletion der Telomerase. Etwas wirklich interessantes geschieht, denn lange vor der Deletion der Telomerase zeigt es eine eigene Wirkung, die Telomer haben nur einen Teil der Zellen gemacht, man erhält eine Interaktion und die Werner-Syndrom Phänotypen verschlechtern sich. Und die fangen nun an, wie die bei den Menschen auszusehen. Die richtigen Zellen zeigen Pathologien. Das gleiche geschieht bei diesem Milieu mit Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, während die Telomere kürzer werden, fangen sie an, Herzprobleme zu haben. Und jetzt das Gleiche, Diabetes, Teil Insulinmangel, der verschlechterte sich immer mehr und die Diabetessymptome verschlimmerten sich. Gut, im Grunde haben wir Mäuse in kleine pelzige Menschen verwandelt! Indem wir Telomerase entfernt und diesen Hintergrund geschaffen haben. Also, Wechselwirkungen zwischen Telomeren und Krankheit, wir können das in diesen Mausmodellen sehen. Jetzt möchte ich Ihnen sagen, dass nicht alles auf Gene hinausläuft, tatsächlich weiß man seit Langem, dass etwas, von dem man annimmt, es sei völlig anders, was vom Verstand her kommt, etwas ist, das eine Wirkung auf Telomere hat. Auf Krankheiten, ein gutes Beispiel ist die Herzerkrankung. Wir und andere fingen also damit an, dies zu studieren und wir fanden einige Wirkungen auf den Telomeren-Erhalt. Die Liste ist riesig, ich zeige Ihnen nur diese riesige Liste von all diesen Dingen, schrecklichen Dingen, die im Leben von Menschen geschehen, die wirklich dagegenhalten, denn es ist die Länge der Exposition, die häufig ein quantitativer Prädikator ist, oder die Dauer, Dauer und Ausmaß, Länge von Es sagt quantitativ voraus wie kurz Telomere sind. Also, wir glauben, da ist eine echte Kausalität. Wir wissen, dass chronischer Stress Hat eine Wirkung auf die Krankheit, doch etwas, was es ausführt ist, es reduziert den Telomer-Erhalt. Also, wird die große Frage sein: Und warum sollte einen das kümmern? Das ist alles sehr statistisch. Und jetzt möchte ich mit etwa wirklich Bemerkenswertem enden. Das ist: Menschen mit Blasenkrebs, und man sieht sich eine Wechselwirkung zwischen etwas an, von dem Sie sicher nie geträumt haben, dass Sie es ansehen werden, wenn man sich fragt, welche Überlebenschancen ein Blasenkrebspatient hat. Eine Interaktion der kurzen Telomere in den Blutzellen, den normalen Blutzellen mit Depression. Depression ist ziemlich verbreitet. Man nahm also etwas Einfaches in dieser schönen Studie vor, die teilten die Menschen zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Diagnose auf, natürlich hatte sich der Blasenkrebs bereits jahrelang entwickelt. An dem Punkt, an dem er klinisch diagnostiziert wurde, und man sagte, dass die Person Depressionen hat, aber keine kurzen Telomere oder kurze Telomere und keine Depression, oder nichts von beidem, kurze Telomere oder Depression, oder hatten sie beides. Dies sagt aus, die Studie war richtig angelegt, diese Gruppe des Arztes Anderson in Houston, Texas, ich zeige sie Ihnen in einem Bild. Hier sind sehr viele Menschen! Sie hatten mehr als 400 Menschen. Es waren Menschen von unterschiedlichster Art und alle hatten Blasenkrebs. Bei der Diagnose fielen sie jeweils unter eine dieser Kategorien. Entweder mit Depression und kürzeren Blutzellen-Telomeren, oder keins von beidem oder beides. Nach zweieinhalb Jahren, wenn man nur Depressionen hatte, oder man hatte nur kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann machte das statistisch gesehen tatsächlich einen Unterschied. Also so viele Menschen lebten nach zweieinhalb Jahren nicht mehr unter uns, sie starben innerhalb dieser zweieinhalb Jahre. Wenn man beides hatte, dann war dem so! Das ist also der große Unterschied, mehr als die Hälfte! Und jetzt fünf Jahre, das ist beim Krebs eine sehr kritische Zeit. Hatte man jetzt nur eines davon, natürlich starben immer mehr Menschen, entweder Depression oder kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann bleibt sich das etwa gleich. Wer aber beides hatte, da waren alle gestorben. Das beginnt nun klinisch signifikant zu sein, und ich glaube, was Sie sich hier abspielen sehen ist, es geht im Grunde um die Wechselwirkungen. Also Wechselwirkungen zwischen verschiedensten Faktoren. Wir haben viele stress-ähnliche und andere Situationen beobachtet, Dinge die Telomere kürzen. Es wurden Dinge beobachtet, die Telomere verlängern. Worum es wirklich geht ist herauszufinden, welches dieser Dinge, quantitativ, tatsächlich, in echten, geeigneten Studien, die nicht nur schauen, sondern wirklich in Versuchs-ähnlichen Anordnungen prüfen, welches dieser Dinge, und es werden mehr werden, tatsächlich den Telomer-Erhalt verbessern kann. Und es muss dieses richtige Gleichgewicht haben, denn, erinnern Sie sich, wenn man es zu weit treibt, steigt das Krebsrisiko, bei bestimmten Krebsarten. Das muss also wirklich, sehr gut abgestimmt sein und vermutlich wird Psychologie dabei von Bedeutung sein. Also was ich getan habe ist, ich sagte, es gibt verschiedenste Eingaben bei der Telomerverkürzung und wie sehr es verkürzt wird ist wirklich eine sehr komplexe Angelegenheit. Man kann das aber alles messen und sehen, was diese Telomerverkürzung ist, und man kann die quantitativen Beziehungen, Zuordnungen sehen. Und wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, der Aspekt davon ist, der die Kausalität repräsentiert, und natürlich gibt es eine Menge weitere Kausalitäten, welche auch alle miteinander interagieren, doch wir glauben, wir haben diese Art von Rahmenbedingungen, bei denen man sagen kann, hier ist etwas im Leben wandelbares, man sieht, es beeinflusst viele Dinge, neben Genen und es trägt zumindest teilweise zur den sehr verbreiteten Alterskrankheiten bei, die unter den Menschen eine so große Erkrankungsrate ausmachen. Es ist nur eine ausführliche Art das zu sagen, was ich Ihnen in einem Diagramm gezeigt habe. Also, Telomer-Erhalt ist wichtig, und es gibt etwas anderes, von dem wir jetzt annehmen, dass es zu den Alterserkrankungen beiträgt. Ich möchte am Ende damit schließen: Die Reise begann mit Neugierde, man muss immer gewillt sein mit Gedanken zu spielen, man muss über Hintergrundwissen verfügen, um alle diese Entdeckungen zu machen, nicht nur im Wimpertierchen-Organismus, sondern bei Menschen. Man braucht wunderbare Mitarbeiter, also das bedeutet mit Menschen zusammenzuarbeiten, in einer Forschungsumgebung arbeiten, in der dies ermöglicht wird. Ich bin also unglaublich dankbar, dass mir diese Reise möglich war, und der Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft, die ist so wichtig. Ich lebe in der Bay Area, in San Francisco, doch meine Kollegen sind überall. Diese Reise begann, indem man unter Wasser nachsah, und ich dachte, ich ende mit dieser so wunderschönen Grafik, einer Fotografie, die da draußen, wo ich geboren wurde, in Tasmanien, Australien, aufgenommen wurde. Es ist das Ufer bei Nacht und schöne Einzeller, die im Meer leben, die unter Wasser leben, so wie das Tetrahymena. Diese schönen Organismen werden hier erleuchtet gezeigt und, natürlich, die Wunder, die sie Ihnen zeigen können sind vermutlich so wunderbar, wie die Wunder, die Sie sehen können, wenn Sie hinaus ins Weltall schauen. Ich danke Ihnen.

Elizabeth Blackburn on marked differences in telomere length between men and women
(00:15:10 - 00:16:51)

 

Telomerase has often been hailed as the answer to aging, especially when looking at encouraging studies, where aging processes, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and osteoporosis have been greatly reversed in mice. But there are many sides to telomerase. It is also very active in cancer cells, promoting the growth of tumours, while activity is low in most regular cells. Senescence in humans is remarkably multi-faceted, and it may be misleading to suppose that the effects of telomere length and telomerase are the main factor in aging, yet many exciting studies are being carried out, indicating that there are causal links between short telomeres and for example, Alzheimer’s disease. Elizabeth Blackburn concluded her lecture in Lindau in 2011 by saying that, now that we’ve solved problems of infectious diseases, we have to think about how we are going to prevent the other chronic diseases that we’re going to be left with.

“I know three people who have got better after a brain tumour. I haven’t heard of anyone who’s got better from Alzheimer’s.” –Terry Pratchett

According to Alzheimer’s Disease International, 1 in 9 Americans over the age of 65 have Alzheimer’s and the disease is most prevalent in Western Europe and North America. As populations in these parts of the world continue to age, we can expect Alzheimer’s, as well as other neurodegenerative diseases to become more common. It may seem that the activity of our brains cannot keep up with the progression of years. Alzheimer’s disease is caused by the occurrence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. During the 37th Meeting in Lindau, Carleton Gajdusek, a medical researcher who received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1976, described how the aging of the brain develops, with gradual loss of grey matter and an escalation of amyloid plaques in intraneuronal spaces, even in healthy brains:

 

Carleton Gajdusek describing how the aging of the brain develops
(00:02:00 - 00:06:17)

 

Amyloids are fibrous polypeptides, here dubbed by Gajdusek as second-rate proteins, since they are not metabolically active and are insoluble, having previously been soluble, globular proteins. The lack of methods of getting amyloids into solution, in order to be able to study their molecular properties, was one of the principle reasons of the delay in modern-day research in neurodegenerative disorders.
“All amyloid of the brain in normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease is built of the same building block”, explained Gajdusek, clearly stating the results of his collaboration with Konrad Beyreuther and Colin Masters. Even now, nearly thirty years after this lecture was given, it is still not understood why the increase in amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles leads to normal aging in some individuals, and to a “galloping senescence” such as Alzheimer’s disease in others. Another breakthrough took place when researchers were looking for the gene of the precursor protein of amyloid. It was found that the gene is located in the 21st chromosome, a mutation of which leads to Down syndrome, suggesting a relationship between Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. Indeed, further studies have shown that up to75% of those with Down syndrome over the age of 65 have Alzheimer’s disease.

Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease, bear the similarity that they are caused by the misfolding and aggregation of protein material, as was explained by Nobel Laureate Max Perutz in Lindau in 1999:

 

Max Perutz on neurodegenerative diseases
(00:35:21 - 00:39:09)

 

Scientists are still trying to understand why some proteins aggregate during stress and aging, and others maintain their solubility properties. Research progress for treatment of Alzheimer’s is fairly slow, especially when compared to the rate at which new drugs against cardiovascular diseases or cancer are produced. At present, pharmacological treatments can only delay the progression of the disease. Studies are currently being undertaken on monoclonal antibodies, which target misfolding proteins, reducing or neutralising amyloid plaque formation.

“(...) oxygen is both providing us with energy for the enjoyment of life but at the same time is decreasing the length of time that we will be around for such enjoyment.”

Paul Boyer, a recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, included the above sentence in the abstract of his lecture, presented in Lindau in 2002. As described in the title of Boyer’s lecture, oxygen is both our friend and foe; it is vital to living organisms for photosynthesis and respiration, but at the same time, its’ reactive oxygen species (ROS) – super oxide and hydrogen peroxide, are highly toxic to cells, damaging proteins, lipids and DNA, and increasing cellular senescence.

 

Paul Boyer on oxygen vital to living organisms for photosynthesis and respiration, but at the same time, highly toxic to cells because of its reactive oxygen species (ROS)
(00:25:34 - 00:27:32)

 

As we can hear in Boyer’s talk, it could be worse – 100 000 DNA molecules are damaged daily in a single cell in a rat, while 10 times fewer DNA molecules are damaged in a human cell at the same time. How well a person ages may also depend on how efficient his or her DNA repair processes are. Antioxidants, such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids or flavonoids can balance the harmful effects of ROS, particularly if they are taken in their natural forms, rather than in supplements, as high concentrations of antioxidants may promote pro-oxidation. Oxidative stress is also known to decrease through caloric restriction, or in other words, fasting. There is more and more evidence that non-genetic, or so-called environmental, or lifestyle factors, bear an influence on aging, yet to what extent can these factors influence healthy old age remains to be established.
Despite the setbacks of aging, the 20th century has witnessed the swift rise of a new age group – centenarians, those who are a hundred years old or older. Centenarians were very rare in the first half of the 20th century. For example, according to the 1960 census in the United States, there were 3600 people aged 100 or older, while today there are more than 60 000 centenarians in the United States, and an estimated 500 000 worldwide. There are some parts of the world where centenarians are fairly common, such as the Japanese island of Okinawa, the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, the island of Sardinia, or Costa Rica. Many studies have been carried out in these groups and genetic factors are relevant (their parents and children are often long-lived), but other, external factors also influence longevity. The lifestyle and diet of a person in Okinawa may differ from that of a Seventh-Day Adventist in California, yet there are some common threads between these diverse groups of centenarians. Most of them eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. They are moderately physically active. They don’t smoke and only drink alcohol from time to time, if at all. And, crucially, they keep close ties with friends and family, avoiding social isolation, which can lead to worsening of aging symptoms, and also depression. Hence, there’s not much we can do with our genetic blueprint, but we can certainly add quality years to our lives by taking care of our health and making the right choices. Elizabeth Blackburn wonderfully illustrated a study that showed the difference that external factors, such as stress and psychological aspects, can make when afflicted with a life-threatening disease:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2015) - Telomeres: Telling Tails

It's truly a pleasure to be here again, at Lindau, and to have such wonderful interactions with all of the young scientists! So, what are telomeres, and more importantly, why would you care about it? So, I thought in the next half hour I'll take you through the journey that I had and which many others are continuing into, which has been a journey all the way from pond scum, rather unlikely journey to take us to something in humans, that we can call, the mind. And the general message and what comes out of this, quite surprisingly, from this journey, was implications of telomere maintenance for human health and disease. So, I'm going to tell you how I started on this journey, what took us into it, and then all of the things that have grown out and there are questions, of course, that'll be still exciting to answer. So, if we looked inside a cell that was about to divide, and took a picture of the chromosomes, which you can see in blue, you would see that the cell is about to divide, so all the chromosomes have replicated, so the DNA which is all compacted and looking blue, you can see is actually discernibly double. And at the end of the chromosomes, each end of each of those replicated chromosomes, you can see that there's a little blob. And that's actually lighting up the telomere. And what the telomere does, was for long time sort of known just by, a blob, but it was very functionally important It was known that it was actually protecting the end of the chromosome in ways that protected the genetic material, and without something, whatever that was, a protective structure, at the end of the chromosome, that chromosome could become very unstable, lose information, sometimes even stick by its ends to other chromosomes. Not good news! So, the telomere was a kind of a cap, capping off the end of the chromosomes. So, there was a mystery though. What was this blob? How could we answer that question? It required being able to get your hands on the molecules. And so, this is where the pond scum came in, because this little creature, called Tetrahymena thermophila, is a beautiful single-celled organism, it's lit up green, but it's not actually green. It lives in pond scum, but the point is, it has lots of very tiny and linear chromosomes. So, lots of ends per rest of the DNA. So, that enabled me to very directly analyse it molecularly and found out, sort of surprising, there was this very simple DNA sequence. It wasn't coding for proteins or anything, and the simple sequence was just repeated, over and over again. I'll show you an example in a moment. So, this was very curious and then we found that this was more general, this wasn't just confined to this wonderful creature, it was in yeast too, and that was work that we did together with Jack Szostak. And I collaborated with Jack and we found that, oh, it extended to yeast. And then, more and more people looked and found that actually, for eukaryotes, which have linear chromosomes, and, by the way, you're going to wonder about bacteria, they're just so much smarter, they have circular chromosomes, they don't worry about this stuff. So, we're talking about the eukaryotes, all of us, all the way down from us to pond scum. So, this is at every end, and this is the little repeat motif that you see at our ends. Now, in fact, there's much much more than I've shown, there's thousands and thousands of DNA building blocks, but the point is they make a scaffold, and that scaffold is a protective sheath of special protective proteins. And the point is, it has to be a big enough scaffold for that accretion of protective proteins, which are very well studied. I'll give you some names soon, that it has to be big enough to make a true protection. Now, that it has to be big enough. Okay, there was another mystery, and this was a real zinger, because people knew how DNA was replicated, they knew the machinery by the 1970s, and there was a real problem here, because the beautiful machinery that replicates all the rest of the chromosomal DNA is stupid enough that it can't replicate the very end. It's just the way it's built! So, if you just took this to its logical end, excuse the pun, it would be the, every time you replicated the DNA, you'd lose something from the end! And as the cells divided and replicated each time telomeres would get shorter and shorter and shorter. This would not be a great idea! And, in fact, it was predicted, perhaps this would lead to some kind of finishing off senescence, if you will, of the cells. But nobody knew what might be going on. So, at least we knew by then that the telomeres had repeated DNA at the ends, but also another observation was that they would, the numbers of repeats were actually more fluid, they were going up and down and changing at the ends of different chromosomes. Hmm, this was much more dynamic! Now, the shrinkage we could understand, the growing, that was weird! So, anyway, bottom line was that I decided that we should hunt for an enzymatic activity that maybe was adding DNA to the ends. So, very simply, here's what Carol Greider and I succeeded in doing: We made a synthetic little piece of telomere DNA, the little building blocks you can see here, from this Tetrahymena, the one that had lots and lots of linear chromosomes, so I thought maybe it has lots of something that makes those linear chromosome ends, and you could make the right sorts of extracts from these cells, and do it by chemical reaction, and just put in two building blocks, notice that the telomere DNA is just of these two in this species, and you could make that synthetic DNA grow. So, when we examined this a whole lot, we found it was a fascinating thing. It was putting on these nucleotides, doing something that normal cells were not thought to do. It was copying a bit of an RNA sequence information into complementary nucleotides added on to the DNA end, thereby elongating the DNA. So, this RNA is much bigger than this short sequence portion of it, but this RNA is built-in to this enzyme, which is partly protein and partly RNA. And the RNA helps the reaction, but it also provides this short portion of it as a template. Okay, so we're in the course of studying all of this mechanism, when serendipity happens. Okay, so, for various reasons we were making very precise mutations in the telomerase RNA, and we happen to make one at a particular place, which had actually an effect that was really useful for us. It kind of came back at the enzyme and made it stop. So, what that enabled us to do was ask a question, "How do cells feel if their telomerase isn't working well?" We had been doing things in the test tube and, lo and behold, we could go to Tetrahymena, which, I didn't tell you, but it's a lovely organism because it grows immortally, it just divides and divides and divides, so long as you feed it right, talk to it nicely, it'll keep dividing. Okay, and it had, as I showed you, relatively plenty of telomerase. So, the telomeres got a little bit shorter and longer, but there they were. So, what would happen if, we know inactivated it, using this very precise, surgical stiletto at the heart of the enzyme? It made it stop. And what happened is that the telomeres slowly shortened, took about 20 cell divisions, and then the cells simply stopped dividing. So, now our immortal cell, if you will, we'd turned it into a mortal cell. We had in fact, dealt it a mortal blow right at its heart. It now no longer was immortal, we just done this very simple, we knew what we were doing, we mutated just the telomerase, and it became mortal. So, the conclusion was then, the cell needs plenty of telomerase, it has it and it balances the shortening. Now, the shortening still happens, but the balances that you get, elongation when you need it, so these cells can keep going. Okay, so, now we'll go forward to lots and lots more work for many many different groups and synthesize what we now know is a much more complicated situation. Although the essence of what I told you, hang on to that, because that's exactly what's going to hold through all of what I'll tell you as we now move to thinking about this, essentially always from now and in humans. So, we have the RNA components, it's got a name, hTERC. We have a protein, which carries out this Reverse transcriptase, the core protein, hTERT, TERT, and that's the basic part of it! Now, what's known in humans is that this is extraordinarily complicatedly controlled. You don't have to read all of this, this is just to tell the aficionados that every kind of molecular control mechanism you can think of for the action of this enzyme, to make it more or less active, you can think of it'll be doing it. Telomere proteins themselves protect the telomere from too much telomerase action. They actually ration it a little bit. Telomerase levels, how much telomerase is made of the telomerase genes? How much the RNA products of the telomere transcription, telomere gene transcriptions are actually put into different spliced forms? How much they're assembled into the enzyme? Etcetera, etcetera. Okay, you get the idea, it's really complex how on earth we're going to work out which of these ones is actually the important ones, in humans. They're all doing something, somewhere. So, what you have to do, is you actually have to look in actual humans. And this is where it's really important to now think about scale of time, because humans, you might remember, we have a life expectancy, in many developed countries around the world, to something like, approaching 80 years. So, we can look at our experimental models, like a mouse, but it only lives for two years. And you look at a fruit fly, it's only about six weeks, and a worm, and it's only about three weeks. So, while we all have the same molecular and cellular building blocks in our cells, how that plays out in the whole organism is going to be on this very, very different time frame. And you don't know that what might be the critical rate limiting aspects of it, are going to be the same from organism to organism. And in fact, I'll tell you, each of those model organisms, the mouse, the worm, and so on, they don't die when they die of old age, they don't die of short telomeres. But they're on a really different time frame from us, so we have to look in us. Luckily, we can measure telomeres, we can take blood samples, we can take other samples. Commonly blood, sometimes just spit, our saliva, filled with useful cells, we can get a window inside our body, We can measure the telomeres and there's nice methodologies for doing that. I won't go into it, but I'm just tell you, you can measure in various ways and get good, reliable numbers out. So, bottom line is, what do we find? Well, we start off with about 10,000 nucleotides worth of these repeats. Really nice, long telomeres when we're born but by the time we get really old it's down to about half of that. Now, that half of that might sound like plenty to you, but what it's doing is it actually is now putting the cells in grave danger, because that protective sheath is no longer big enough. And what happens then, in humans, is really interesting. And there was no real reason to think this would be the case, because the telomeres gradually shorten as you look at most cell types, as we go through our decades and decades and decades, and the cells we gestate, called Senescence, which is a signal that those overly short telomeres cell send to the cells, and the say, "Stop!" And they say to do some other things too, that I'm going to tell you, but, first of all, they stop even multiplying, so if it's a replenishing cell type, it's not going to anymore. So, of course here was this gradual process, it's taking place over years. Is it like a life candle burning down, causing, eventually, is it related to our death? That's the question! Here was the cellular part of it, on this side and what was going on down here, what was going on in our whole lives here. So, and remember you've got that highly highly regulated telomerase, and now you could've imagined, well it could be saving things, but it isn't, it isn't doing a great job! It is good in certain cells, like certain cells that have to keep replenishing tissues over life, it's not bad, but not perfect. Luckily, it's really good in the cell lineages that give rise to our germ lines, otherwise we wouldn't be here. So, it does get maintained throughout our germ line, the sperm and egg-producing cells, that produce each of us and all our forebears and all our descendants. So, that's good, but it's pretty low in our body cells, in the many, many cell types. Now, there's also another variation, remember, I said this is complex. Turns out that human cancers, which of course, what are they, they're cells that just keep going and shouldn't keep going. They're not necessarily immortal, but they certainly are doing way too much replicating. They love their telomerase, and they actually rev it up really high. But they do a lot of other very bad things, too, as you know about cancers. Okay, so there we've got the situation in humans. How is all this going to play out? Now, we know a lot about the consequences of what happens if you look inside a cell and ask about the telomere. So, here we've got a nice human cell, looking at it under the microscope, so coiled up inside the nucleus, is all the chromosomes in purple, and out, filling the cytoplasm volume, lots of it is the mitochondria, which of course are the energy powerhouses of the cells. So, now we have 92 telomeres, 46 chromosomes, 92 telomeres, and so, here's one. Now, what is going to happen over life is that telomere in cells as they replicate, and even just as they undergo damages, you'll see, they will get shorter and shorter and now it will become too short and become uncapped. Now, that telomere is not silent, it talks to the cells, and one thing it talks to is mitochondria, and actually pushes them down, through a set of signalling molecules. Makes them less good. When mitochondria are not doing all their wonderful energy stuff really well they can start malfunctioning and producing reactive oxygen species. Really bad news, and particularly bad news for telomeres, and it actually sets up this vicious cycle, where telomeres can get even shorter. So, I've just shown one, but there are 92 and variously, they can get worse and worse. So, this is bad enough for the cell itself. But, these things are like these cells now, with these Uncapped Telomeres sending these signals, they're like a rotten apple in a barrel. They can now start affecting other things, because what happens is, another of a kind of signals that this Uncapped Telomere, which is a very worried telomere, is sending, is, for whatever reason, it is sending alarm signals which include secreting outside the cell. Factors that include those that are increasing inflammation. Now, through a whole series of things that go on in the wonderfully complex immune system, that also can up the body's reactive oxygen species, too. So, you've got even worse situation. Okay, so you can see a senescence cell with telomere damage is not a really good cell to have! So, this kind of cellular pathology is quite well studied, in cells and also in certain mouse models and so on. And there's every reason to think that it would go on if you get such cells in humans, as well. So, now let's say, well let's look at some consequences of what happens to telomere length. So, now, we had the good fortune to join a very large cohort project and we could measure telomere length in 100,000 people, so we can really start to get some good ideas about what happens in humanity, and first of all in a part of California. So, the first thing we did, was we looked at telomere length in 100,000 people just in spit samples. So you've got a nice sampling of cell types in the body. You look, just looked at average, over time, as people got older and older it was just one time point for each person, and what you saw was what I told you! There was this gradual decline. But then we saw something really interesting! Now, let me point out most mortality in this population is happening around here. So, you got this decline, most of the mortality, overall is around here. But there are people who you can see are surviving longer and longer. Now, it's just one time point, but what you see is the longer a person has survived, the more likely they are to have an average telomere length that's longer. So, this is very, very interesting, because it never been seen before! We replicated that males and females are different. But we did show that the difference, which is a bit less before about age 50, it sort of really splits off, between females and males. And then after this critical time, when most of the mortality, just population mortality happens to both of them show these sort of rises. So, really interesting. But now we can say what will happen if you actually ask if this has any consequence or any predictive value. And so, the DNA was taken in the year 2009, so the clock tick, and by 2012 you could go to the records and say who was still alive. And who had died in that time period. And then compared that, as a function of what were the telomeres like at the beginning. And, lo and behold, if you looked at the people in the bottom quartile and set their likelihood of dying to one, just as a reference, then you found that anybody whose telomeres where in the other quartiles, that is people whose telomeres three years earlier, or within that three year period you looked at deaths, you just found that, oh, longer telomeres actually had a decrease chance that you would be in that group of people who had died, within three years. We saw that age and sex clearly have an effect, so the blue line's actually, the blue bars show that that was already corrected for. But we also know that a lot of other things affect mortality. A lot of other things also affect telomere length. And we know what they are, and we can get the major ones out, and here's the big list. We did the age and gender, age and sex, race-ethnicity, education, cigarette packyears history, physical activity habits, alcohol intake, body mass index and so on, and, doesn't budge. What that's telling you is this is independent. This is a very diverse group of people, but California's, but you know Californians, meh, you know (laughs). Right, so, let's look at some serious, sober Danes, and see if the same thing happens. This is the Copenhagen study, Rode et al. published this beautiful work where they looked at 64,000 people's blood cell telomeres, just average telomere length, baseline and then time goes by and they looked at a bigger range but the average was about seven years, so longer than what we'd looked at. And they said, of those many people who did die, how many, in which telomere length category to begin with, how many had died? So, in other words, the same question, does the chance of you dying within that period of averaging about seven years, does the chance of you dying have any relationship to the telomere length, at the beginning of the baseline analysis? And, lo and behold, again, after correcting for all of these multiple possible variables that's called the Multivariate Adjusted, this is what this is, referring to telomere length shortness, as you see trends as worse and worse chance that you will have been in the group of people who died, the shorter the telomeres are, and it's a real kind of a trend. So, we get the message now, we got big studies, I think it's pretty clear. Reduced mortality, and I've shown you all causes is related to the observation, just observing the telomere length in people. Didn't show you the data from Rode at al.'s study and from others, that actually, when you start to divide it down into some of the major killers of the elderly, cardiovascular, all-cancers lumped together for the moment, all of those are related to reduced mortality from those causes, as well, are all related to observed having longer telomeres. Okay, and though the news is good too about longer telomeres in another parameter we care about. Well, lifespan, that's one thing, we want to know how long, how many years of healthy life we'll have, how long is our, quote, healthspan. And, in fact, again you see a relationship, here's a bit of numbers, but the point is they're related. Now, you can see another thing. You can say, now let's go the other way, what about bad news? What about diseases and shorter telomeres? Do we see a relationship? And the relationship goes in that direction, shorter telomeres correlate with, not only just finding an association, but actually also predicting, like I saw, I showed you predicting mortality, predicting, getting some disease, and there's a whole group of these diseases, and you can see they're very common kinds of impairments and diseases that happen with aging. Now, the observant of you have been noticing something, all of these arrows have double heads. I haven't said anything about causality yet. That's what we'd like to know! So, genetics! Genetics is wonderful because it gives us, if we can see a gene we can attribute a gene, especially one whose function we know, we can say causality. And wonderful beginning began in 2001, Vulliamy et al. found that if people inherit in families a mutation, fortunately rare, which is in the a Telomerase RNA Gene, remember that hTERC that I told you about, that RNA component of telomerase. If you have a mutation that knocks your telomerase down to half of its normal level, there's a very clear causality, we know what hTERC does, it's part of telomere maintenance, and people get really really short telomeres. Now the point is that really matters, there's a clear disease impact, related to how much the telomeres shorten. And the first things they've found were a bunch of very interesting diseases, they already showed certain overlapse with some of the diseases, which just occur in the population with aging. Here, we've got real causality, now, it's a bit extreme, these people are very much more likely to die much earlier, and as the telomeres get shorter and shorter, going down through the generations, because the short telomeres get passed down from person to person, they get worse and worse and die, sadly, earlier and earlier. So, the causality is extremely clear, but it is kind of extreme. Now, the genetics has just grown and grown since 2001, so more genetics has told us the same story, but really filled it out! So, again, inherit a rare mutation, half the telomerase level or other ways of reducing telomere maintenance, not only reducing telomerase levels, but also other ways that you can reduce it, which are to do with directly binding telomere proteins. So, what you see though is exactly what I showed you, but now, because there's more and more cases round the world there are various family pedigrees, people really, they find these sorts of things and the list now has got longer! So, now it's starting to even broaden out to neuropsychiatric diseases, very interestingly. This is looking like the big set of things that can happen, it doesn't all happen in one person. It varies on how much shorter the telomeres have got with succeeding generations. The genes though, and this is just for the specialists who'd like to look and say, "Yes, what genes are they?" Well, there's 11 of these now, six of them are related to telomerase itself or the biogenesis directly of telomerase, and there are five now, which are known telomere binding proteins. So, we know exactly what these things do, they are directly doing telomere maintenance. So, we got real causality here. So now let's look at the rest of us, who are fortunate enough not to have been afflicted with these rare, although extremely informative mutations. Now you can say, well, what about common alleles that actually just impair our telomere maintenance a bit? We had a wide range of telomere lengths, by the way, those means that I showed you with age, they're much much tighter than the actual range of telomere lengths at all ages. But you can do statistics on large numbers and in this beautiful study, looking at just what genes are associated with having shorter telomeres in the population at large. So, causality, because genes cause things. What was amazing was, the five top hits were our old friends, the known telomere telomerase genes. So, this was very clear, we know just what these do! And then they said, well, if you look at these alleles that actually are related to the shorter telomeres, and these are common ones, that can occur in all sorts of combinations in any of us, is there a disease impact? And there was, in cardiovascular in a particular form, coronary artery disease, and so, in fact, if you added up the short version alleles for each of these genes plus a couple more that were less related but showed up in the quantitative analyses, but these were the top five ones, we know what they do. Just out of the bat, you would have a 21% higher chance of getting coronary artery disease at some point in your life than the population at large. Now, to have all seven, right, there five plus two, seven genes, to have all the bad alleles of all, combinatorily it goes down and down, so it's probably only one in a few hundred or at most people. But, you can get that. Most of us have a mixture of these, because they're just all sorts of different genes. But this is really major thing, because again, it is saying that at least this short telomere thing, because we know what these genes do, must be able to contribute, contribute this particular form of cardiovascular disease. If you believe in the logic that genes have causality, and I think that's a rational thing to do, then, that's what we can say for this case. So, it's really useful! Now, telomeres is not all good news, because in the context of cells that are normal. You remember Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, it was one person in the daytime, he was this nice, good citizen, well-behaved, but at night-time, same person, was a horrible criminal, violent, right? And telomerase, in the setting of the night-time setting, if you will, cancer-prone cells that had changes. This can be really dangerous! Genetics, again, has told us. Now remember, I told you, if you have only half as much telomerase as you ought to have, one of the things that is caused is cancers. And it's actually a specific subset of cancers. But now, more recent genetics has come in, and we're finding another very interesting thing, that is just about cancers. Now, when I say, we, I mean the world at large. And so, just a little bit too much, even just as, less than twofold, too much expression of telomerase itself, actually causes some other cancers. You can see actual contributions here. And there are completely different set of cancers, and they're not the most frequent of the cancers in the world. But now, you can see where we are. Cancers first of all, vary. We are really living in a trade-off world here, right? We're precariously on a knife-edge here, because this is what has been learned by looking at actual humans and actual diseases and genetics and understanding the molecular basis of what's going on. You're going to say, "Well, telomeres, wait a minute, they are not cause to all diseases, diabetes, it's caused by other things. It's caused by insulin not working properly, there are other things that go on, it can't be all telomeres!" And I couldn't agree more! But I want to pose the idea that, in fact show you the data! Actually, it'll come from mouse models, because it's so clear that telomeres interact. So, now we've talked about this idea, the more the telomeres shorten, the more cells get engaged in harmful kinds of consequences, and the more severe the pathologies. And in a mouse, you actually have to delete telomerase completely, but then eventually if you breed the mice you can start to see these sort of graded effects. So now, let's look at mouse models, where we're looking at just single-gene mutations, which cause disease in humans. And so, here's three. One is Progeria, very premature, fast telomere shortening, sorry, premature, fast aging, actually, it has telomere shortening, too, in humans. Another one, completely different, a muscle wasting disease. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy, known mutation, another completely different one again, diabetes, not enough insulin in this mouse, single-gene mutation. So, completely different things. Now, each of these models, you put the same mutations that you find in humans, you put them into the mouse and it's actually a little bit disappointing. You don't get all the phenotypes, the Warner's doesn't have the full phenotype, the Duschenne Muscular dystrophy shows the skeletal muscles, but actual people with this disease die of cardiac disease. So, it's not really mimicking it perfectly! So, now let's go through with time and now let's superimpose in the mouse model a Telomerase deletion. What happens is really interesting, because well before the telomerase deletion is really showing any effect by itself, the telomeres only partly done some of the cells, you get an interaction, and what gets worse is the Warner's syndrome phenotypes. And you'd starts to look now like the human one. The right cells start to be showing pathologies. The same thing happened with the Duchenne muscular dystrophy in that setting, as the telomeres got shorter, now they started to get heart problems. And now, the same, the diabetes, part insulin deficiency, it became much worse and it was the diabetes symptoms that got worse. Okay, so bottom line is we've turned mice into furry little humans! Right? By removing telomerase and setting that as a background. So, interactions between telomeres and disease, we can see that in these mouse models. Now, I just want to tell you that it's not all genes, and in fact, people have long known that something you might think is totally different but, coming from the mind is something that does have an impact on telomeres. On disease, good example is heart disease, in fact. And so, we and others started studying this, and we started and found some effects on telomere maintenance. And now, the list is huge, I'm just going to show you this huge list of all these sorts of things, terrible things that happen in people's lives, which really argue, since it's the length of exposure that is often very much a quantitative predictor, or the duration, duration severity, length of abuse in these situation... It quantitatively predicts how short telomeres are. So, we think there's real causality here. And we know that Chronic psychological stress has impact on disease, but one of the things it does do is it reduces telomere maintenance. So, the big question is going to be, disease impact itself, and what can you do about it?" And why would you care? This is all very statistical. And now, I want to finish with something really remarkable. Which is: People who have bladder cancer, and you look at an interaction between something that you probably would never have dreamed of looking at if you're asking how much a bladder cancer patient will survive. An interaction of the short telomeres in the blood cells, the normal blood cells, with depression. Now, depression is fairly common. So, they just did a simple thing in this beautiful study, which was they divided people up at the time of their diagnosis, of course the bladder cancer had been developing all those years. Got to the point of being clinically diagnosed and they said that the person had depression, but not short telomeres or short telomeres and not depression, or neither, short telomeres or depression, or did they have both. Now this just says, well, they did the study right, this group at MD Anderson in Houston, Texas, I'm going to show it to you visually. Here are lots and lots of people! They had over 400 people. They're all just sorts of different people, and they've got bladder cancer. And at the diagnosis, they fell into one of those categories. One or either of depression and shorter blood cell telomeres, or neither, or both. After two and a half years, if you only had depression, or you only had short telomeres, or you had neither. it actually statistically didn't make much difference. So, this many people are no longer with us after two and a half years, they died within that two and a half years. But if you had both, it was that! So, this is a big difference, over half! And now, five years, is a very critical time for cancer. And now, if you only had one, well of course, more and more people did die, either depression or short telomeres, or neither, it's about the same. But if you had both, everybody had died. So, that starts to look clinically significant and I think the game that you've been seeing is, it's all about interactions. And so interactions between all sorts of factors. We've observed in lots of stress-like and other situations, things that will make your telomeres shorter. It has been observed things that will make them longer. The real thing is going to be finding out which of these things, quantitatively, will actually, in true, proper studies, that are not just looking, but really testing in trial-like arrangements, which of these kinds of things, and they'll be more, could actually improve telomere maintenance. And it's got to be this right balance, because remember, if you push it too far, cancer risks go up, of certain kinds of cancer. So, it's got to be really, really tuned right, and probably physiologically is important. Okay, so what I've done is I've said there are all sorts of inputs into the telomere shortening and the how it much it shortens is really a complex set of things. But you can measure all of that, and see what the telomere shortening is, and you can see these quantitative relationships, associations. And as I've shown you, the sum aspect of it, which is presenting causality, and of course there's plenty of other causality, all interacting as well, but we think that we have this sort of underlying situation, where we can say, here's something that's changeable in life, you can see it's influenced by a lot of things besides genes and it partly, at least, contributes to the very common diseases of aging, which account for so much morbidity in people. And that just is the long words way of saying what I just told you in a diagram. So, maintenance of telomeres is important, and it's something else that we think now is actually contributing to these diseases of aging. So, finally, I just want to finish with, the journey began, with curiosity, you have to be always willing to play with ideas, you had to had background knowledge to make all these kinds of discoveries, not only in the pond organism, but in humans. You had to have wonderful collaborators, so that meant working with people, working in a research environment that made this possible. So, I'm immensely grateful that I'd been able to have this journey, and the science community people, so important. I'm in the Bay Area, in San Francisco, but I have colleagues everywhere. This journey began in looking underwater, and I just thought I'd finish with this most beautiful graphic, it's a photograph taken just outside where I was born, in Tasmania, Australia. It's the shoreline at night, and beautiful, single-celled organisms, living under the sea, living underwater, just like Tetrahymena does. These beautiful organisms are shown lit up here, and of course, the wonders that they can show you are probably, perhaps almost as wondrous as the wonders that you can see when you look out into the galaxy. Thank you very much.

Es ist wirklich ein Vergnügen, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und solche wunderbaren Begegnungen mit jungen Wissenschaftlern zu pflegen! Was also sind Telomere und was noch wichtiger ist, warum sollte man sich darum kümmern? Ich dachte, in der nächsten halben Stunde nehme ich Sie auf die Reise mit, die ich gemacht habe und auf der ich mich noch immer mit vielen anderen befinde, eine Reise vom Wimpertierchen ausgehend, eine eher unwahrscheinliche Reise, die uns zu etwas Menschlichem führt, das wir Verstand nennen. Die allgemeine Botschaft und was aus der Reise folgt sind, als rechte Überraschung, Implikationen zum Telomeren-Erhalt für die Gesundheit und Krankheit des Menschen. Ich werden Ihnen also erzählen, wie ich diese Reise begonnen habe, was uns dazu veranlasste und dann alles das, was daraus erwuchs, und es gibt natürlich Fragen, die nach wie vor zu beantworten spannend sind. Wenn man in eine Zelle blickt, die im Begriff ist sich zu teilen und ein Bild von den Chromosomen machen würde, die Sie hier blau sehen, würden Sie sehen, die Zelle ist im Begriff, sich zu teilen, alle Chromosomen haben sich reproduziert, und die DNA, die ganz komprimiert ist und blau aussieht, Sie sehen, die ist deutlich doppelt. Am Ende jedes Chromosoms, an jedem Ende jedes dieser reproduzierten Chromosomen, da sehen Sie ein kleines Klümpchen. Das erhellt das Telomer. Die Funktion des Telomer war lange Zeit eigentlich nur durch ein Klümpchen bekannt, doch funktionell war es wichtig. Es war bekannt, dass es das Ende des Chromosoms in einer Weise schützte, die das genetische Material schützte, und ohne etwas, was auch immer das ist, eine schützende Struktur am Ende des Chromosoms, könnte das Chromosom sehr instabil werden, Informationen verlieren, es könnte sogar manchmal mit seinen Enden an anderen Chromosomen haften. Keine guten Nachrichten! Das Telomer war somit eine Art Kappe, die das Ende der Chromosomen abdeckt. Dennoch gab es da ein Rätsel. Was war dieses Klümpchen? Wie konnten wir diese Frage beantworten? Es erforderte, Moleküle in die Hand zu bekommen. Hier kam das Wimpertierchen ins Spiel, denn diese kleine Kreatur, genannt Tetrahymena thermophila ist ein schöner, einzelliger Organismus, er leuchtet grün auf, ist aber nicht wirklich grün. Es lebt im Wimpertierchen, der Punkt aber ist, es hat viele sehr kleine und lineare Chromosomen. Also viele Enden je Rest der DNA. Das ermöglichte es mir, es sehr direkt molekular zu analysieren und ich fand heraus, gewissermaßen überrascht, dass es diese sehr einfache DNA-Sequenz gab. Sie kodierte keine Proteine oder irgendetwas und die einfache Sequenz wurde einfach immer wieder wiederholt. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich ein Beispiel. Das war sehr seltsam und wir fanden dann, dies war allgemeiner, dies war nicht nur auf diese wundervolle Kreatur begrenzt, es fand sich auch in Hefe. Diese Arbeit führten wir mit Jack Szostak durch. Ich arbeitete mit Jack zusammen und wir entdeckten, oh, das erweitert sich zur Hefe. Und immer mehr Leute forschten und entdeckten das, für Eukaryoten, die linearen Chromosomen haben, und Sie werden sich übrigens wundern, wie das bei Bakterien ist, die sind so viel intelligenter, haben Ringchromosomen, die kümmern sich um so etwas nicht. Wir sprechen also von den Eukaryoten, wir alle bis hinunter zum Wimpertierchen. Das befindet sich also an jedem Ende und ist das kleine sich wiederholende Motiv, das Sie an unseren Enden sehen. Es gibt tatsächlich sehr viel mehr als was ich gezeigt habe und tausende von DNA-Bausteinen, der Punkt aber ist, sie bilden ein Gerüst und dieses Gerüst ist eine Schutzhülle besonders protektiver Proteine. Dabei muss das Gerüst groß genug für die Zunahme protektiver Proteinen sein, was sehr gut untersucht wurde. Ich werde Ihnen gleich ein paar Namen nennen, es muss groß genug sein, einen echten Schutz zu bieten. Nun, es musste groß genug sein. Gut, da gab es ein weiteres Rätsel und das war wirklich sensationell, denn man wusste, wie sich DNA replizierte, man kannte den Mechanismus seit 1970 und hier lag das wirkliche Problem. Der schöne Mechanismus, der den ganzen Rest der chromosomalen DNA repliziert, ist zu dumm, und kann das Ende nicht replizieren. So ist es eben gebaut! Wenn man das logisch zu Ende denkt, entschuldigen Sie das Wortspiel, würde man, jedes Mal, wenn man die DNA repliziert, etwas vom Ende verlieren. Indem sich Zellen teilen und replizieren würden Telomere jedes Mal immer kürzer werden. Das wäre keine gute Idee! Tatsächlich wurde vorausgesagt, dies würde vielleicht zu einer Art Beendigung des Alterungsprozesses der Zellen führen. Doch niemand wusste, was da vor sich ging. Zumindest wussten wir damit, dass Telomere DNA an den Enden wiederholten, aber es gab auch eine andere Beobachtung, dass sie, die Zahl der Wiederholungen war tatsächlich fließender, sie nahmen zu und ab und änderte sich an den Enden verschiedener Chromosomen. Hmm, dies war sehr viel dynamischer! Nun, die Verminderung konnten wir verstehen, das Wachstum, das war seltsam! Wie auch immer, wir entschieden uns schließlich nach einer enzymatischen Aktivität zu forschen, die DNA möglicherweise an die Enden anfügte. Also ganz einfach, dies ist es, was Carol Greider und mir glückte: Wir schufen ein kleines synthetisches Stück Telomer-DNA, die kleinen Bausteine, die Sie hier sehen, und zwar von diesem Tetrahymena, das sehr viele linear Chromosomen hat, ich dachte, vielleicht verfügt es über sehr viel von dem, was diese linearen Chromosomenenden erzeugt und man könne die richtigen Extrakte aus diesen Zellen erhalten, und dies durch eine chemische Reaktion vornehmen, und einfach zwei Bausteine nehmen, - beachten Sie, die Telomer-DNA ist nur von diesen beiden, in dieser Spezies, und diese synthetische DNA könne man zum Wachsen bringen. Als wir das ausgiebig untersuchten fanden wir, dass es eine faszinierende Sache war. Es legte diese Nukleotide an, und tat etwas, von dem man nicht angenommen hatte, dass normale Zellen dies tun würden. Es kopierte etwas der RNA-Sequenzinformation in komplementäre Nukleotide, die dem DNA-Ende hinzugefügt waren. Dadurch wurde die DNA verlängert. Diese RNA ist also sehr viel länger als diese kleine Teilsequenz, doch die RNA ist in dieses Enzym eingebaut, das zum Teil Protein, zum Teil RNA ist. Die RNA hilft bei der Reaktion, liefert aber auch dieses kurze Teil davon als Vorlage. Wir sind also dabei alle diese Mechanismen zu studieren, als sich ein Glücksfall ereignete. Aus verschiedenen Gründen ließen wir sehr präzise Mutationen der Telomerase RNA entstehen, und es gelang uns, eine an einem bestimmten Ort zu erzeugen, was eine Wirkung zeigte, die für uns sehr nützlich war. Es kam beim Enzym gewissermaßen zurück und ließ es stoppen. Das ermöglichte es uns, eine Frage zu stellen: „Was empfinden Zellen, wenn ihre Telomerase nicht gut funktioniert?“ Wir hatten im Reagenzglas Dinge vorgenommen und siehe da, wir konnten zum Tetrahymena gehen, das, was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe, ein wunderbarer Organismus ist, denn er wächst unsterblich, er teilt sich einfach ständig. Solange man ihn richtig ernährt, freundlich mit ihm spricht, fährt er fort sich zu teilen. Es hat, ich habe das gezeigt, relativ viel Telomerasen. Die Telomerasen wurden etwas kürzer und länger, aber da waren sie. Was würde nun geschehen, wenn, wir wussten es zu interaktivieren, wir dieses sehr präzise chirurgische Stilett am Herzen des Enzyms verwendeten? Es stoppte es. Die Telomere wurden langsam kürzer, es dauerte etwa 20 Zellteilungen und dann hörte die Zelle einfach auf sich zu teilen. Unsere unsterbliche Zelle, wenn Sie so wollen, wurde eine sterbliche Zelle. Wir hatten ihr in der Tat einen sterblichen Schlag ins Herz versetzt. Es war nicht mehr unsterblich, das hatten wir sehr einfach bewerkstelligt, wir wussten, was wir taten, wir mutierten die Telomerase und sie wurde sterblich. Die Schlussfolgerung war, die Zelle benötigt viel Telomerase, hat sie die, wird die Verkürzung balanciert. Nun, die Verkürzung findet weiterhin statt, doch das Geleichgewicht, das man erhält, Verlängerung, wenn sie benötigt wird, damit diese Zellen weiterleben. Wir gehen jetzt weiter zu sehr viel mehr Arbeit für sehr viele verschiedenen Gruppen und fassen das zusammen, von dem wir jetzt wissen, dass es sich um eine viel kompliziertere Situation handelt. Der Kern dessen, was ich ihnen erzählt habe, halten Sie den fest, denn genau das wird sich durch alles, was ich Ihnen erzähle, hindurchziehen, wenn wir jetzt darüber nachdenken, im Wesentlichen von jetzt an immer in Bezug auf den Menschen. Wir haben also die RNA-Komponenten, die haben einen Namen, hTERC. Wir haben ein Protein, das die reverse Transkriptase ausführt, das Kernprotein, hTERT, TERT und das ist der wichtigste Teil davon! Was man vom Menschen kennt ist, dass dies außerordentlich kompliziert gesteuert wird. Sie brauchen das nicht alles zu lesen, es geht nur darum, Ihnen die Aficionados zu nennen, damit jeder molekulare Kontrollmechanismus, den Sie sich für diese Aktion dieses Enzyms denken können, damit es mehr oder weniger aktiv wird, auch ausgeführt wird. Telomer-Proteine selbst schützen das Telomer vor einer zu starken Telomeraseaktivität. Sie rationieren diese ein bisschen. Telomerase-Ebenen, wie viel Telomerase wird aus Telomerase-Genen erzeugt? Wie viele RNA-Produkte der Telomer-Transkription, Telomer Transkription von Genen werden tatsächlich in verschiedene gespleißte Formen gegeben? Wie sehr werden sie in dem Enzym zusammengeführt? Und so weiter. Gut, Sie haben eine Vorstellung davon, es ist wirklich sehr komplex, wie erfährt man, welche von diesen sind die wirklich wichtigen im Menschen. Sie bewirken alle etwas irgendwo. Was man also tun muss, man muss sich die Menschen ansehen. Hier ist es sehr wichtig, in Bezug auf den Zeithorizont zu denken, denn Menschen, wie Sie sich erinnern, haben in vielen entwickelten Ländern weltweit eine Lebenserwartung von etwa annähernd 80 Jahren. Wir schauen uns unsere experimentellen Modelle an, etwa eine Maus, die lebt aber nur zwei Jahre lang. Und eine Fruchtfliege, die hat nur etwa sechs Wochen und ein Wurm, bei dem sind es etwa drei Wochen. Obgleich wir alle die gleichen molekularen und zellulären Bausteine in unseren Zellen haben, wie spielt sich das im gesamten Organismus ab, in Anbetracht dieser sehr verschiedenen Zeitrahmen. Was der kritische Anteil der begrenzenden Aspekte sein könnte, werden diese die Gleichen von Organismus zu Organismus sein? Ich sage Ihnen, jedes dieser Modellorganismen, die Maus, der Wurm und so weiter, die sterben nicht, wenn sie aus Altersschwäche sterben, die sterben nicht durch kurze Telomeren. Sie befinden sich aber in einem sehr anderen Zeitrahmen als wir, daher müssen wir unser Inneres schauen. Glücklicherweise können wir Telomere messen, man kann Blutproben nehmen, man kann andere Proben nehmen. Gewöhnlich nimmt man Blut, manchmal einfach Spucke, unseren Speichel, voller nützlicher Zellen, wir erhalten ein Fenster in unseren Körper. Wir können Telomere messen und es gibt schöne Methodologien dies zu tun. Ich werde das nicht weiter ausführen, nur so weit, man kann auf verschiedene Arten messen und gute, zuverlässige Zahlen erhalten. Also, was haben wir gefunden? Nun, wir begannen mit etwa 10.000 Nukleotiden, die diese Wiederholungen wert waren. Wirklich schöne, lange Telomere, wenn wir geboren werden, wenn wir dann wirklich alt sind, sind sie etwa halb so lang. Diese Hälfte mag Ihnen viel erscheinen, doch in Wirklichkeit bringt das die Zellen in ernste Gefahr, da die schützende Umhüllung nicht mehr groß genug ist. Was dann in den Menschen geschieht, ist wirklich interessant. Und es gab keinen realen Grund anzunehmen, dies sei der Fall, da die Telomere sich graduell verkürzen, wenn man sich die meisten Zellarten ansieht. Während wir ein Jahrzehnt nach dem anderen leben und die Zellen, die wir in uns tragen, genannt Seneszenz, ein Signal, das diese zu kurzen Telomeren an die Zellen senden, „Stopp!“ sagt. Sie teilen noch andere Dinge mit, die getan werden sollten, wovon ich Ihnen erzählen werde, aber zuallererst beenden sie sogar die Vermehrung. Wenn es sich um einen auffüllenden Zelltyp handelt, hört dieser damit auf. Hier war nun dieser allmähliche Prozess, der sich über Jahre erstreckt. Ist das wie eine Kerze, die herunterbrennt und vielleicht verursacht, - die mit unserem Tod in Verbindung steht? Das ist die Frage! Hier war der zelluläre Teil, auf dieser Seite und was hier unten stattfand, und hier was in unserem ganzen Leben stattfindet. Denken Sie daran, da ist diese sehr stark regulierte Telomerase und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, nun, es könnte etwas sagen, tut es aber nicht, es vollbringt eine großartige Arbeit. Das ist für gewissen Zellen gut, da gewisse Zellen die Gewebe im Lauf des Lebens auffüllen müssen, es ist nicht schlecht, aber nicht perfekt. Glücklicherweise ist das in den Zelllinien, die aus unseren Keimbahnen entstehen, wirklich gut, sonst wären wir nicht hier. Das wird also durchgehend in unseren Keimbahnen erhalten, den Sperma- und Ei-erzeugenden Zellen, die uns alle und alle unsere Vorfahren und Nachkommen hervorbringen. Das ist also gut, in unseren Körperzellen, in sehr vielen Zelltypen, aber ziemlich gering. Es gibt da noch eine andere Variante, erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, es sei komplex. Es zeigt sich, beim menschlichen Krebs, natürlich handelt es sich dabei um Zellen die einfach weitermachen, was sie nicht sollten. Sie sind nicht notwendigerweise unsterblich, vermehren sich aber viel zu sehr. Sie lieben ihre Telomerase und bringen sie wirklich auf Hochtouren. Sie machen aber noch eine Menge anderer schlimmer Dinge, wie man das vom Krebs kennt. Gut, da haben wir die Situation im Menschen. Wie spielt sich das nun alles ab? Wir wissen jetzt viel über die Konsequenzen dessen, was geschieht, wenn man in eine Zelle sieht und etwas über Telomere wissen will. Hier haben wir eine schöne menschliche Zelle, die unter dem Mikroskop angesehen wird, aufgerollt innerhalb des Zellkerns sind alle Chromosomen in violett, und außen, der Zytoplasmainhalt gefüllt, vieles davon sind die Mitochondrien, die selbstverständlich die Kraftzentren der Zellen sind. Wir haben hier jetzt 92 Telomere, 46 Chromosomen, 92 Telomere und so, hier ist eines. Was im Lauf des Lebens geschieht ist, die Telomere in den Zellen, wenn diese sich vermehren, und selbst wenn sie nur beschädigt werden, dann werden Telomere immer kürzer und dann wird es zu kurz und das Ende ist offen. Das Telomer hält jetzt nicht still, es spricht zu den anderen Zellen und es spricht zu seinen Mitochondrien und drückt sie mit einem Satz signalgebender Moleküle nach unten. Dadurch wird ihre Qualität schlechter. Wenn Mitochondrien nicht ihre gesamte wunderbare Energiearbeit gut ausführen, können sie anfangen zu versagen und reaktive Sauerstoff-Spezies erzeugen. Die wirklich schlechte Nachricht ist, und teilweise eine schlechte Nachricht für Telomere, es baut sich ein Teufelskreis auf, in dem Telomere noch kürzer werden können. Ich habe nur eines gezeigt, aber da gibt es 92 und verschiedenartige, die können sich immer weiter verschlechtern. Das ist für die Zelle selbst ziemlich schlecht. Diese Dinge sind jetzt aber wie diese Zellen, diese Telomere mit offenem Ende senden Signale, sie sind wie ein fauler Apfel in einem Fass. Sie können jetzt andere Dinge infizieren. denn eine andere Art Signale, die diese Teloreme mit offenem Ende, welches sehr besorgte Telomere sind, senden, sind aus irgend einem Grund Alarmsignale, die beinhalten, außerhalb der Zelle sekretierend zu wirken. Dies schließt Faktoren ein, die die Entzündung steigern. Aufgrund einer Reihe Dinge, die in diesem wundervoll komplexen Immunsystem stattfinden, können auch reaktive Sauerstoffspezies erhöht werden. Man hat also eine noch schlimmere Situation. Gut, Sie können eine Zellenseneszenz mit geschädigtem Telomer sehen, und das ist keine gute Zelle. Diese Art zellulärer Pathologie wurde gut untersucht, in Zellen und in gewissen Mausmodellen und so weiter. Und es gibt allen Grund anzunehmen, dies würde so auch bei menschlichen Zellen weitergehen. Wir wollen uns jetzt einmal einige der Konsequenzen ansehen, von dem, was mit der Telomerlänge geschieht. Wir hatten das Glück an einer sehr großen Kohortenstudie teilzunehmen und wir konnten Telomerlängen von 100.000 Menschen messen, wir beginnen also einen guten Begriff davon zu erhalten, was in der Menschheit geschieht, zuallererst einmal in einem Teil Kaliforniens. Als erstes schauten wir uns Telomerlängen in Speichelproben von 100.000 Menschen an. Man bekommt eine schöne Stichprobe von Zelltypen des Körpers. Man schaut sich mit der Zeit einen Durchschnitt an, wenn Menschen immer älter werden, es gab für jede Person einen Zeitpunkt, und was sich zeigte ist das, was ich Ihnen erzählt habe! Es gab da diesen allmählichen Rückgang. Dann sahen wir aber etwas wirklich Interessantes! Lassen Sie mich darauf verweisen, die höchste Sterblichkeit in dieser Population findet hier statt. Sie haben also diesen Rückgang, die höchste Sterblichkeit ist insgesamt hier. Sie sehen aber, es gibt Menschen, die leben immer weiter. Nun, das ist nur ein Zeitpunkt, was man aber sieht ist, je länger die Person überlebt, desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass sie eine durchschnittlich längere Telomerlänge hat. Das ist jetzt sehr, sehr interessant, weil man das bisher noch nie gesehen hatte. Wir wiederholen, dass Männer und Frauen verschieden sind. Wir zeigten aber, dass die Differenz, die vor dem 50sten Lebensjahr etwas geringer ist, sich wirklich zwischen Männern und Frauen aufzuspalten beginnt. Und nach dieser kritischen Zeit, in der die meiste Sterblichkeit, nun die Bevölkerungssterblichkeit von beiden, diesen Anstieg zeigt. Also, wirklich interessant. Wir können jetzt sagen, was ist, wenn man sich fragt, ob das irgendeine Konsequenz oder einen prädikativen Wert hat. Die DNA wurde im Jahre 2009 genommen, die Uhr tickt also und 2012 konnte man in den Aufzeichnungen nachsehen, wer noch lebte. Und wer schon gestorben war. Und dann ein Beziehung hergestellt, als Funktion zu wie die Telomere zu Beginn waren. Und siehe da, wenn man sich die Leute im unteren Viertel ansieht und ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben als eins nimmt, nur als Referenz, dann findet man, jeder, dessen Telomere sich drei Jahre zuvor in den anderen Vierteln befanden, oder innerhalb des Dreijahreszeitraums, und man sich die Sterberate ansieht, sieht man, oh, lange Telomere haben tatsächlich ein geringeres Risiko, dass man sich in der Menschengruppe befindet, die innerhalb dreier Jahre starb. Wir haben gesehen, Alter und Geschlecht haben eine deutliche Wirkung, die blaue Linie ist daher, der blaue Balken zeigt, dies wurde bereits bereinigt. Wir wissen aber auch, es gibt viele andere Dinge, die Sterblichkeit beeinflussen. Viele andere Dinge beeinflussen auch die Telomerlänge. Und wir kennen sie, und können die Hauptursachen herausnehmen und hier ist eine lange Liste. Wir beachteten Alter und Geschlecht, Rasse, Volkszugehörigkeit, Bildung, Zigaretten, Historie der Packungsjahre, Gewohnheiten bei körperlicher Betätigung, Alkoholkonsum, Body-Mass-Index und so weiter, und, es bewegte sich nichts. Das sagt Ihnen, es ist unabhängig. Dies ist eine sehr heterogene Gruppe von Menschen, aber wissen Sie, die Kalifornier, hm, wissen Sie (lacht). Also, schauen wir uns einige seriöse, nüchterne DNAs an, und sehen wir mal, ob das Gleiche zutrifft. Dies ist die Kopenhagen Studie, Rode et al. publizierten diese tolle Arbeit in der sie 64.000 Menschen untersuchten auf Blutzellen-Telomere, nur durchschnittliche Telomerlänge, Ausgangsdaten und dann im Laufe der Jahre sahen sie sich einen größeren Bereich an und der Durchschnitt war etwa sieben Jahre, etwa der Zeitraum, den wir untersucht hatten. Und sie fragten, von den vielen Menschen, die starben, zunächst wie viele, in welcher Telomerlängen-Kategorie, wie viele starben da? In anderen Worten, die gleiche Frage, ist das Risiko, dass Sie innerhalb dieses Zeitraums von durchschnittlich sieben Jahren sterben, steht dieses Risiko in irgendeiner Beziehung zur Telomerlänge bei Beginn der Analyse der Ausgangsdaten? Und siehe da, wieder, nach Bereinigen aller dieser vielen möglichen Variablen, die multivariat adjustiertes Modell genannt werden, das ist es, mit Bezug auf die Kürze der Telomerlänge, da sehen Sie, die Trends sind genauso schlecht und schlechte Aussichten in der Gruppe der Menschen zu sein, die starben, je kürzer die Telomere sind, es ist wirklich ein Trend. Wir haben jetzt die Botschaft erhalten, wir hatten große Studien, ich denke, es ist ziemlich klar. Verringerte Sterblichkeit, und ich zeigte Ihnen alle Ursachen, mit Bezug auf die Beobachtung, einfach durch Beobachtung der Telomerlänge in Menschen. Ich zeigte Ihnen die Daten der Untersuchung von Rode et al. und von anderen nicht, dass, wenn man beginnt es in die wesentlichen tödlichen Krankheiten älterer Menschen zu unterteilten, kardiovaskular, alle Krebserkrankungen für den Augenblick zusammengenommen, alle diese stehen in Beziehung zur verminderten Sterblichkeit aufgrund dieser Ursachen, und alle beziehen sich auch auf die Beobachtung des Vorhandenseins längerer Telomere. Gut, und jetzt die gute Nachricht über längere Telomere bei einem anderen Parameter, der uns ebenfalls interessiert. Lebensdauer ist eine Sache, wir möchten wissen wie lange, wie viele Jahre wir ein gesundes Leben leben können, wie lang ist unsere, Zitat, Langlebigkeit bei guter Gesundheit. In der Tat sehen Sie hier wieder eine Beziehung, hier ein paar Zahlen, der Punkt aber ist, sie stehen miteinander in Beziehung. Hier kann man jetzt etwas anderes sehen. Man kann sagen, gehen wir jetzt einmal den anderen Weg, wie verhält es sich mit den schlechten Nachrichten? Wie steht es bei kürzeren Telomeren mit Krankheiten? Sehen wir da eine Beziehung? Und die Beziehung geht in diese Richtung, kürzere Telomere korrelieren damit, nicht nur das Finden einer Zuordnung, sondern tatsächliche Voraussage, wie ich es sah, ich zeigte es Ihnen, wie Sterblichkeit vorausgesagt wird, Voraussage, eine Krankheit zu bekommen, und da gibt eine ganze Gruppe solcher Krankheiten und Sie sehen, die sind sehr häufig Formen von Beeinträchtigungen und Krankheiten, die im Alter auftreten. Die Aufmerksamen unter Ihnen haben etwas bemerkt, alle diese Pfeile haben doppelte Pfeilspitzen. Bislang habe ich noch nichts zur Kausalität gesagt. Das möchten wir gerne wissen! Also, Genetik! Genetik ist wunderbar, da sie uns ermöglicht, wenn wir ein Gen sehen können, wir ein Gen zuordnen können. Besonders eines, dessen Funktionen wir kennen, wir können von Kausalität sprechen. Ein wunderbarer Anfang wurde 2001 gemacht, Vulliamy et al. fanden heraus, wenn Menschen innerhalb einer Familie eine Mutation erbten, was glücklicherweise selten geschieht, dann liegt die in einem Telomerase RNA Gen, erinnern Sie sich, ich sprach von hTERC, diese RNA-Komponente der Telomerase. Wenn Sie eine Mutation haben, die Ihre Telomerase auf die Hälfte ihres normalen Niveaus zerlegt, da gibt es eine sehr deutliche Kausalität, wir wissen, was das hTERC bewirkt, es ist Teil des Telomeren-Erhalts und die Menschen erhalten sehr, sehr kurze Telomere. Der Punkt, der wirklich wichtig ist, es gibt einen deutlichen Krankheitseffekt in Bezug darauf, wie sehr sich Telomere verkürzen. Was ich sehr bald entdeckte waren eine Vielzahl sehr interessanter Krankheiten. sie zeigen bereits gewisse Überlappungen mit einigen der Krankheiten, die eben mit dem Alter in der Bevölkerung auftreten. Hier bekommen wir wirkliche Kausalität, nun ist das ein bisschen extrem, diese Menschen hier werden aller Wahrscheinlichkeit sehr viel früher sterben, und die Telomere werden immer kürzer, klingen im Laufe der Generationen ab, da die kürzeren Telomere von einer Person zur anderen weitergegeben werden, sie werden immer schlechter und sterben, leider, immer früher. Die Kausalität ist also ausgesprochen deutlich, aber etwas extrem. Nun befindet sich Genetik gerade im Wachsen und wuchs seit 2001, weitere Genetik hat uns die gleiche Geschichte erzählt, hat die aber ausgemalt. Also wiederum, erben einer seltenen Mutation, Hälfte der Telomerase-Ebene oder andere Wege, auf denen Telomer-Erhalt reduziert wird, nicht nur eine Verringerung von Telomerase-Ebenen, sondern auch andere Möglichkeiten, mit denen sich das reduzieren lässt, was mit dem direkten Binden von Telomer-Proteinen zu tun hat. Was man aber sieht ist genau das, was ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, da es weltweit immer mehr Fälle gibt. Es gibt verschiedene Familienstammbäume, die Leute finden solche Sachen und die Liste wird nun immer länger! Es beginnt sich jetzt sogar auf neuropsychiatrische Erkrankungen auszudehnen, sehr interessant. Es sieht wie eine wichtige Reihe von Dingen aus, die sich ereignen können, sie geschehen aber nicht alle in einem Menschen. Es variiert, je nachdem, wieviel kürzer die Telomere in den nachfolgenden Generationen wurden. Die Gene jedoch, und das ist nur für Spezialisten, die sich das gerne ansehen und sagen: „Ja, um welche Gene handelt es sich?“ Nun, da gibt es jetzt 11 von diesen, sechs davon sind selbst mit der Telomerase verwandt oder mit der unmittelbaren Biogenese von Telomerase, und hier sind jetzt fünf, die als Telomer-bindende Proteine bekannt sind. Wir wissen also genau, was die tun, sie kümmern sich direkt um den Telomer-Erhalt. Wir erhalten hier echte Kausalität. Schauen wir uns also die Verbleibenden unter uns an, die das Glück hatten, nicht von diese seltenen, wenn auch extremen informativen Mutationen betroffen zu sein. Sie können jetzt sagen, was ist mit den gemeinsamen Allelen, die unseren Telomer-Erhalt nur ein bisschen schädigen? Wir hatten übrigens einen großen Bereich an Telomerlängen, jene Mittel, die ich Ihnen beim Alter gezeigt habe, die sind viel enger als der tatsächliche Bereich von Telomerlängen aller Altersgruppen. Man kann aber bei hohen Zahlen Statistiken vornehmen und das ist eine schöne Studie, sich einfach einmal ansehen, womit Gene assoziiert sind, die kürzere Telomere in der Bevölkerung haben. Also Kausalität, weil Gene Dinge verursachen. Das Erstaunliche war, die fünf größten Hits waren unsere alten Freunde, die bekannten Telomer Telomerase Gene. Das war sehr deutlich, wir kennen deren Wirkung! Und dann sagten sie, wenn man sich diese Allele ansieht, die wirklich mit den kürzeren Telomeren verwandt sind, und dies die gewöhnlichen sind, dann kann dies in allen möglichen Kombinationen in jedem von uns auftreten, habe wir es hier mit dem Einfluss einer Krankheit zu tun? Da gab es, bei kardiovaskularer Erkrankung in einer bestimmten Form, der koronaren Herzkrankheit, in der Tat etwas, wenn man die kurze Allele-Version jedem dieser Gene hinzufügte und noch ein paar mehr, die weniger verwandt waren, sich aber in der quantitativen Analyse zeigten, doch dieses waren die Top fünf, und wir wissen wie die wirken. Man hätte einfach eine 21% höhere Chance, zu einer bestimmten Zeit seines Lebens an der koronaren Herzkrankheit zu erkranken, als dies bei der Allgemeinbevölkerung der Fall wäre. Jetzt haben wir alle sieben, hier sind fünf, plus zwei, sieben Gene, die alle schlechte Allele haben, kombinatorisch steigt das immer weiter ab, es befindet sich also vermutlich nur in wenigen hundert Menschen. Das kann man aber erhalten. Die meisten von uns haben hiervon eine Mischung, denn da gibt es allerlei verschiedene Gene. Die ist aber eine wichtige Sache, denn, noch einmal, man sagt, dass zumindest dieses kurze Telomer, da wir wissen, was diese Gene bewirken, in der Lage sein muss, einen Beitrag zu dieser bestimmten koronaren Herzkrankheit zu geben. Wenn man der Logik glaubt, diese Gene folgten einer Kausalität, und ich halte das für vernünftig, dann können wir das zu diesem Fall aussagen. Es ist also wirklich nützlich! Telomere bedeuten im Kontext normaler Zellen aber nicht nur gute Neuigkeiten. Sie erinnern sich an Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde, am Tag waren sie eine Person, es war dieser nette, gute Bürger, gesittet, aber nachts war dieselbe Person ein schrecklicher Verbrecher, gewalttätig, stimmt's? Und Telomerase, in ihrem nächtlichen Umfeld, wenn Sie so wollen, Krebs anfällige Zellen, die sich veränderten. Das kann wirklich gefährlich sein! Das konnte uns, wiederum, die Genetik sagen. Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte Ihnen, wenn Sie nur die Hälfte der Telomerase haben, die Sie haben sollten, ist eines, was dadurch veranlasst wird, Krebs. Es ist tatsächlich eine bestimmte Teilgruppe der Krebserkrankungen. Jetzt ist eine neuere Genetik dazugekommen, und wir finden etwas anderes, sehr Interessantes, was mit Krebs zusammenhängt. Wenn ich jetzt wir sage, dann meine ich die gesamte Welt. Ein bisschen zu viel, selbst etwas weniger als doppelt zu viel Expression von Telomerase, ruft andere Krebserkrankungen hervor. Sie können hier die tatsächlichen Beteiligungen sehen. Und es gibt vollständig verschiedene Krebsarten, und sie sind nicht die häufigsten Krebserkrankungen auf der Welt. Jetzt können Sie aber sehen, wo wir sind. Zunächst einmal variiert Krebs. Wir leben hier wirklich in einer Welt des Abwägens, stimmt's? Wir befinden uns hier in prekärer Weise auf Messers Schneide, denn dies ist es, was man erkannte, indem man sich reale Menschen und reale Krankheiten angesehen hat und Genetik und die molekulare Grundlage von dem was stattfindet verstanden hat. Sie werden sagen: „Nun, Telomere, einen Augenblick mal, die verursachen alle diese Krankheiten nicht, die Krankheiten haben andere Ursachen. Diese wird verursacht, weil das Insulin nicht richtig funktioniert, da finden noch andere Dinge statt, das kann nicht alles wegen der Telomeren sein!“ Und dem kann ich mich nur anschließen! Ich möchte aber den Gedanken hinstellen dass, sehen Sie sich diese Daten an! Die stammen von den Mausmodellen, denn da ist es so deutlich, dass Telomere interagieren. Wir haben den Gedanken besprochen, je kürzer Telomere werden, desto mehr Zellen befassen sich mit allen möglichen schädlichen Konsequenzen, und je schwerwiegender, desto pathologischer. In einer Maus muss man Telomerase vollständig tilgen, wenn man dann aber Mäuse züchtet, sieht man diese abgestuften Wirkungen. Sehen wir uns also ein Mausmodell an, bei dem wir uns nur einzelne Genmutationen ansehen, die im Menschen eine Krankheit verursachen. Hier sind drei. eines ist Progerie, sehr frühes Stadium, rapide Telomerverkürzung, Entschuldigung, frühes Stadium, schnell alternd, es hat auch Telomerverkürzung, bei Menschen. Ein weiteres, vollkommen anders, eine Muskelschwundkrankheit. Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, bekannte Mutation, eine weitere, vollkommen andere Krankheit, Diabetes, in dieser Maus kein ausreichendes Insulin, einzelne Genmutation. Also völlig verschiedene Dinge. Bei jedem dieser Modelle nimmt man die gleichen Mutationen, die man beim Menschen findet, fügt sie der Maus ein und in der Tat, es ist etwas enttäuschend. Man erhält nicht alle diese Phänotypen, das Werner-Syndrom hat nicht den ganzen Phänotyp, die Muskeldystrophie Duchenne zeigt die Skelettmuskeln, doch Menschen mit dieser Krankheit sind an einer Herzerkrankung gestorben. Es ahmt dies also nicht vollkommen nach! Wir gehen das jetzt mit der Zeit durch und kopieren in das Mausmodell eine Deletion der Telomerase. Etwas wirklich interessantes geschieht, denn lange vor der Deletion der Telomerase zeigt es eine eigene Wirkung, die Telomer haben nur einen Teil der Zellen gemacht, man erhält eine Interaktion und die Werner-Syndrom Phänotypen verschlechtern sich. Und die fangen nun an, wie die bei den Menschen auszusehen. Die richtigen Zellen zeigen Pathologien. Das gleiche geschieht bei diesem Milieu mit Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, während die Telomere kürzer werden, fangen sie an, Herzprobleme zu haben. Und jetzt das Gleiche, Diabetes, Teil Insulinmangel, der verschlechterte sich immer mehr und die Diabetessymptome verschlimmerten sich. Gut, im Grunde haben wir Mäuse in kleine pelzige Menschen verwandelt! Indem wir Telomerase entfernt und diesen Hintergrund geschaffen haben. Also, Wechselwirkungen zwischen Telomeren und Krankheit, wir können das in diesen Mausmodellen sehen. Jetzt möchte ich Ihnen sagen, dass nicht alles auf Gene hinausläuft, tatsächlich weiß man seit Langem, dass etwas, von dem man annimmt, es sei völlig anders, was vom Verstand her kommt, etwas ist, das eine Wirkung auf Telomere hat. Auf Krankheiten, ein gutes Beispiel ist die Herzerkrankung. Wir und andere fingen also damit an, dies zu studieren und wir fanden einige Wirkungen auf den Telomeren-Erhalt. Die Liste ist riesig, ich zeige Ihnen nur diese riesige Liste von all diesen Dingen, schrecklichen Dingen, die im Leben von Menschen geschehen, die wirklich dagegenhalten, denn es ist die Länge der Exposition, die häufig ein quantitativer Prädikator ist, oder die Dauer, Dauer und Ausmaß, Länge von Es sagt quantitativ voraus wie kurz Telomere sind. Also, wir glauben, da ist eine echte Kausalität. Wir wissen, dass chronischer Stress Hat eine Wirkung auf die Krankheit, doch etwas, was es ausführt ist, es reduziert den Telomer-Erhalt. Also, wird die große Frage sein: Und warum sollte einen das kümmern? Das ist alles sehr statistisch. Und jetzt möchte ich mit etwa wirklich Bemerkenswertem enden. Das ist: Menschen mit Blasenkrebs, und man sieht sich eine Wechselwirkung zwischen etwas an, von dem Sie sicher nie geträumt haben, dass Sie es ansehen werden, wenn man sich fragt, welche Überlebenschancen ein Blasenkrebspatient hat. Eine Interaktion der kurzen Telomere in den Blutzellen, den normalen Blutzellen mit Depression. Depression ist ziemlich verbreitet. Man nahm also etwas Einfaches in dieser schönen Studie vor, die teilten die Menschen zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Diagnose auf, natürlich hatte sich der Blasenkrebs bereits jahrelang entwickelt. An dem Punkt, an dem er klinisch diagnostiziert wurde, und man sagte, dass die Person Depressionen hat, aber keine kurzen Telomere oder kurze Telomere und keine Depression, oder nichts von beidem, kurze Telomere oder Depression, oder hatten sie beides. Dies sagt aus, die Studie war richtig angelegt, diese Gruppe des Arztes Anderson in Houston, Texas, ich zeige sie Ihnen in einem Bild. Hier sind sehr viele Menschen! Sie hatten mehr als 400 Menschen. Es waren Menschen von unterschiedlichster Art und alle hatten Blasenkrebs. Bei der Diagnose fielen sie jeweils unter eine dieser Kategorien. Entweder mit Depression und kürzeren Blutzellen-Telomeren, oder keins von beidem oder beides. Nach zweieinhalb Jahren, wenn man nur Depressionen hatte, oder man hatte nur kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann machte das statistisch gesehen tatsächlich einen Unterschied. Also so viele Menschen lebten nach zweieinhalb Jahren nicht mehr unter uns, sie starben innerhalb dieser zweieinhalb Jahre. Wenn man beides hatte, dann war dem so! Das ist also der große Unterschied, mehr als die Hälfte! Und jetzt fünf Jahre, das ist beim Krebs eine sehr kritische Zeit. Hatte man jetzt nur eines davon, natürlich starben immer mehr Menschen, entweder Depression oder kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann bleibt sich das etwa gleich. Wer aber beides hatte, da waren alle gestorben. Das beginnt nun klinisch signifikant zu sein, und ich glaube, was Sie sich hier abspielen sehen ist, es geht im Grunde um die Wechselwirkungen. Also Wechselwirkungen zwischen verschiedensten Faktoren. Wir haben viele stress-ähnliche und andere Situationen beobachtet, Dinge die Telomere kürzen. Es wurden Dinge beobachtet, die Telomere verlängern. Worum es wirklich geht ist herauszufinden, welches dieser Dinge, quantitativ, tatsächlich, in echten, geeigneten Studien, die nicht nur schauen, sondern wirklich in Versuchs-ähnlichen Anordnungen prüfen, welches dieser Dinge, und es werden mehr werden, tatsächlich den Telomer-Erhalt verbessern kann. Und es muss dieses richtige Gleichgewicht haben, denn, erinnern Sie sich, wenn man es zu weit treibt, steigt das Krebsrisiko, bei bestimmten Krebsarten. Das muss also wirklich, sehr gut abgestimmt sein und vermutlich wird Psychologie dabei von Bedeutung sein. Also was ich getan habe ist, ich sagte, es gibt verschiedenste Eingaben bei der Telomerverkürzung und wie sehr es verkürzt wird ist wirklich eine sehr komplexe Angelegenheit. Man kann das aber alles messen und sehen, was diese Telomerverkürzung ist, und man kann die quantitativen Beziehungen, Zuordnungen sehen. Und wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, der Aspekt davon ist, der die Kausalität repräsentiert, und natürlich gibt es eine Menge weitere Kausalitäten, welche auch alle miteinander interagieren, doch wir glauben, wir haben diese Art von Rahmenbedingungen, bei denen man sagen kann, hier ist etwas im Leben wandelbares, man sieht, es beeinflusst viele Dinge, neben Genen und es trägt zumindest teilweise zur den sehr verbreiteten Alterskrankheiten bei, die unter den Menschen eine so große Erkrankungsrate ausmachen. Es ist nur eine ausführliche Art das zu sagen, was ich Ihnen in einem Diagramm gezeigt habe. Also, Telomer-Erhalt ist wichtig, und es gibt etwas anderes, von dem wir jetzt annehmen, dass es zu den Alterserkrankungen beiträgt. Ich möchte am Ende damit schließen: Die Reise begann mit Neugierde, man muss immer gewillt sein mit Gedanken zu spielen, man muss über Hintergrundwissen verfügen, um alle diese Entdeckungen zu machen, nicht nur im Wimpertierchen-Organismus, sondern bei Menschen. Man braucht wunderbare Mitarbeiter, also das bedeutet mit Menschen zusammenzuarbeiten, in einer Forschungsumgebung arbeiten, in der dies ermöglicht wird. Ich bin also unglaublich dankbar, dass mir diese Reise möglich war, und der Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft, die ist so wichtig. Ich lebe in der Bay Area, in San Francisco, doch meine Kollegen sind überall. Diese Reise begann, indem man unter Wasser nachsah, und ich dachte, ich ende mit dieser so wunderschönen Grafik, einer Fotografie, die da draußen, wo ich geboren wurde, in Tasmanien, Australien, aufgenommen wurde. Es ist das Ufer bei Nacht und schöne Einzeller, die im Meer leben, die unter Wasser leben, so wie das Tetrahymena. Diese schönen Organismen werden hier erleuchtet gezeigt und, natürlich, die Wunder, die sie Ihnen zeigen können sind vermutlich so wunderbar, wie die Wunder, die Sie sehen können, wenn Sie hinaus ins Weltall schauen. Ich danke Ihnen.

Elizabeth Blackburn stressing the influences of external factors on health and aging
(00:30:51 - 00:33:19)

 

In the end, as with most things in life, it’s all about balance, even when it comes to maintaining proper telomere length!

There are no straightforward answers on whether aging can be stopped or even reversed, but to counter that problem, maybe the solution is to accept, or even embrace this natural human condition. More and more elderly people work for a cause and they have the fulfilling knowledge that their work is necessary and important. To quote Murray Shusterman, a lawyer who celebrated his 100th birthday four years ago, “Get involved. You’ll find pleasure and sometimes disappointment, but there is a sense of achievement if you participate in a successful undertaking, whether it is organizational or professional.” This subject, regarding the fusion of passion and profession, was echoed in Richard Ernst’s lecture during the 56th Lindau Meeting in 2006:

 

Richard Ernst (2006) - Fourier Methods in Spectroscopy. From Monsieur Fourier to Medical Imaging

Dear friends, I'm enormously enjoying this year's Lindau meeting. Especially talking to you, my dear young enthusiastic and promising scientist friends. Among the lectures, so far, I particularly liked those that went beyond traditional science and revealed also the societal context. And in fact last year, at the same place here, I was talking about academic opportunities for conceiving and shaping our future. And in this context I made some rather strong and perhaps even offensive statements, for example condemning egoism as the driving force of all our actions, where we always ask ourselves what do we gain back from doing something. And rather promoting responsibility as the driving force, where we ask: What can we do in order that society profits something of it? And my lecture ended then with two quotes, one from François Rabelais: Or "Science without conscience ruins the soul." And on the other side, despite all the misery in our world, we have to remain optimist because we all together are jointly responsible for what will come in the future, we can't blame anybody else. So today I don't want to make any offensive statements and I will try to be a good boy and just tell you a small story, a purely scientific story: "From Monsieur Fourier to medical imaging." And in fact I like to demonstrate to you Fourier Transformation as a beautiful example how useful mathematics can be in the sciences. But, as usual, the inventor of Fourier Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptist-Joseph Fourier, he didn't know that today, at the beginning of a lecture, you could even peek into the head of the speaker in order to verify whether it's worthwhile to listen to his lecture, because all I can tell you is contained in this little sloppy piece of tissue here. So a lot of development went on from here to there. And I'd like to ask the question: Why is the Fourier Transformation so important in science? It's a very simple expression, it's an integral transform where we transform a function in time domain into a function in frequency domain. So we relate these two domains here by this integral transform. Or we can relate a momentum space to the geometric space, a function of K, of momentum and related to a function of coordinates. It has something to do with exploration of nature in general. When we explore an object, we consider it as a black box, we don't know what is inside and we try to perturb it. We knock at the input here and listen to the output. And that tells us what is inside. And actually a very unnatural way of exploring a black box is to apply a sine wave, a repetitive perturbation, and then listening to the output here. And I mean, just remember the lecture of Professor Hänsch two days ago, he told you that never measure anything but frequency. And that's exactly what we try to do in order to characterise the inside of this black box. And that makes sense because actually these trigonometric functions, they are Eigenfunctions of linear time-invariant systems. So whenever we apply such a function to a black box, which is linear and time-invariant, we get the same function back, multiplied with a certain complex quantity, which is, in quantum mechanical terms, the Eigenvalue, the Eigenfunction multiplied by the Eigenvalue. And if we block this Eigenvalue as a function of frequency, if we vary the frequency, we obtain the spectrum, that's the basis of spectroscopy, so it really makes sense. Now, we can do spectroscopy just in the normal way, applying one frequency after the other and measuring the response and blocking the amplitudes here as a function of frequency, that gives us a spectrum. But we could also do it in parallel, apply all these frequencies at once to the black box and saving time. Then we need something like a frequency sorter which sorts us out the various responses in order to again get the spectrum. And this frequency sort, that's after all nothing else than a Fourier Transformation. And by doing it in parallel here, we gain by the Multiplex Advantage, having done everything at the same time, often called also the Fellgett's Advantage. That's the advantage of going this way here. And the secret of the Fourier Transformation actually is also the orthogonality of the trigonometric function, when you multiple one with the other and integrate over this entire space, then you only get something when the two functions are identical. So they are orthogonal. And this allows one to separate them. And the simultaneous application of all these frequencies that can for example be implemented by a pulse. If you are by a pulse, then you have essentially all the frequencies contained, you obtain an impulse response. You have to do a Fourier Transformation and you obtain a spectrum, so simple. So again we have, so to say, two spaces here, which we relate, conjugate variables, the time and the frequency variable. The momentum space and the coordinate space, which are connected. There are, so to say, two different views of the same object. You can look at that in red colour or in green colour, and Heisenberg has said that a long time ago, that the most fruitful developments have happened whenever two different kinds of thinking were meeting. So these are the two different spaces. Or I mean, Professor Glauber, he has been telling you about waves and particles, this relation also belongs to the same category. And he also mentioned Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", and he has here the yin yang symbol, this also represents this two spaces which, so to say, contains the same truth. The whole world of Fourier transforms in spectroscopy is like complex. There are many different possibilities. In particular because actually what we are looking at is not just a function of time or a function of momentum, but it's set both at the same time, depending on four different variables, it is a plain wave, which develops in time and it develops in space. And so we can either use the time dependence, make a time domain experiment and finally obtain a spectrum. We can also use the K variables, the momentum variable and obtain, here for example the image of a molecule, that's the x-ray diffraction. We can do imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, which also uses this K dependence as the Fourier transform obtains an image of a head. And finally we can do for example interferometry, where we use the R dependence, we measure the interference in spatial domain, Fourier transform it and obtain again a spectrum, for example an infrared spectrum. So these are these various possibilities, which I briefly would like to describe. And everything goes back to this gentleman Monsieur Fourier. Who was Monsieur Fourier? That's him. He was at the same time, and that's a very, very great exception, at the same time a scientist and a politician. I mean, there are very, very few politicians who understand anything of science and there are very few scientists who are interested in politics. But he is, so to say, my role model, he has the same in him combined. And even, I mean, here he is in his office in Grenoble, and instead of studying his legal papers, he is doing a physics experiment, he actually measures here heat conduction, and he was writing at the same time a paper, which he presented actually at the Institute de France, being prefect to the département Isère. He was writing a book, 1822, on theory of, théorie analytique de la chaleur, heat conduction. And he did experiments and also this kind of input-output experiments. He had a black box here, a blue box, applying heat from the left side and measuring then the temperature distribution in the body. So it's again this input-output relation, he expanded the input in the Fourier Series and reconstituted the result again from a Spatial Fourier Series. So he used for the first time this Fourier expressions, of course he didn't call them Fourier expressions, but anyway, here they are in his book of 1822. Whenever somebody claims to have discovered something, of course it's interesting to ask what has developed out of that, but you also have to ask who was before, and there is always somebody before. And very few inventors really invented something for the first time. So for example Leonhard Euler, if you go through the text books of Fourier transform, you know you'll discover the Euler equations for the Fourier coefficients. These equations here, which I showed before, these are called Euler equations, so Euler must have contributed something. And indeed he did that already in 1777, and even before in 1729 he used trigonometric functions for interpolating functions and that's a reason why he's here on a Swiss bill, obviously he was Swiss, and otherwise I wouldn't speak about this to you. So indeed the Fourier transform is a Swiss invention, keep that in mind. So, I mean, we should come back to spectroscopy now. I mean, there is a huge range of different frequencies, from the gamma rays to the radio frequency and you can use all of them to do the spectroscopic explorations of nature. And you have the tree of knowledge and you like to go from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine, of course this is the most important level here for the true understanding of nature. Whenever you can explain a medical phenomenon in terms of chemical reactions, then you understand it, you normally don't have to go back to physics. That's the level. But I mean, in order to climb on the tree and come safely down again you need a tool, you need a ladder, spectroscopy serves that purpose. Anyway, the first time something like that, in connection with Fourier Transformations, has been used, was this gentleman, Michelson. He has also been mentioned in the lecture by Professor Hänsch, and Michelson, he invented the interferometer, so he has two light beams, or essentially one light beam, which is split in two parts, one part going to this moveable mirror and the other to the static mirror, coming back, being combined again. And there is an interference occurring here, so that's the machine as it happens here. Let's look at it in a little bit more detail. So again, the incoming wave here being split into a blue part, a red part and they are coming back and here, in this particular case, the two waves being reflected from the two mirrors are in phase, so there is constructive interference. If you move now this mirror slightly, then you get a destructive interference, the two are out of phase and if you add them you get zero. So in this way you can actually get an interference pattern. And that leads to interferometry, and when you have a single frequency, then you get just a single oscillation. If you have two frequencies present at the same time, you get this kind of interference here, between two frequencies, two frequencies with a certain line shape here, you get an attenuation and recovery and you have all these different signals which, when I looked at them first, I thought they are free induction decays from NMR, looks very simile to NMR spectroscopy, but it was done 50 years earlier. Anyway, a modern interferometer works exactly the same way, the source, the sample, which measures absorption or tries to measure absorption. A translucent mirror, mirrors here which reflect a detector value records interference as a function of the placement of the mirror here, to a Fourier transformation and gets a spectrum. The very first time this has been done was in 1951 by Fellgett, therefore the Fellgett advantage. And here the interferogram, here the Fourier transform of it, he had to do it by hand because he didn't have a computer at that time. But today you can buy these commercial instruments and they do the Fourier transformation automatically, and you get beautiful spectra without having to understand what is going on inside of the box. Something similar you can also do with Raman spectroscopy, you know in Raman you irradiate with a single frequency, a laser for example, you measure this captive light here and the frequencies are modified by the internal vibrations of a molecule for example, giving you this additional, so to say, side band of the same frequency here. And this contains now virtually the same as an infrared spectrum. That's a typical Raman, Fourier transform Raman spectrometer, where the same principle is being used. And it just gives me a chance here to tell you something about my passions. And to tell you how important passions are. I use this kind of Fourier Raman spectroscopy for the pigment analysis in central Asian paintings which I have a great love for. For example here you have Raman spectra of different blue pigments and you see just how different they are, you don't have to understand them, you just see they are different and this way you can distinguish indigo from azurite, from smalte and prussian blue and you can now get inside of paintings and identify the pigments. I'm doing painting restoration, so it's important to know what the artist has been using. And in this way you can, without destroying the painting, you can analyse pigments, fascinating. You see, when you want to walk along this road here, your professional road, for example towards Stockholm, then, oh it's so difficult to walk on one single food, you need a second one and the second one, that's your passions. And only when you have passions in addition to science, or whatever you are doing, then this spark will appear in your brain and the creativity occurs, that cross talk between the two legs is very important, keep that in mind. So let's come now to NMR, another application where the interference now happens in time domain. Very simple experiment, you have a nucleus which is recessing in a magnetic field, nuclear magnetic moment, having a frequency being proportion to the applied magnetic field, so in essence measuring the frequencies, you measure local magnetic fields, that has been done the first time in condensed matter by Edward Purcell and Felix Bloch, you can record spectra, like here of alcohol you get three different lines, because the local magnetic fields in the methyl groups, the methylene group and the OH proton here, they are different, so you can distinguish. But it's tedious to record one line after the other, it takes more time than I have for my lecture. So we had an associate in Palo Alto, there was Wes Anderson, he said: "Why not do it in parallel?", invented the multichannel spectrometer, where he irradiated with several frequencies at the same time. He built a multi frequency generator, this so called Prayer Wheel, it never worked, it's now in the Smithsonian museum, but at the same time he had a Swiss slave in his lab. And together with this Swiss slave they thought: ah, it's very easy, I told you everything before. Just apply a pulse, observe a free induction decay, do a Fourier transformation and you have a spectrum in fractions of a second. Here the impulse response of these molecules, the spectrum, and here the spectrum which you would have recorded with a traditional sweep method, the snail crawling through. Anyway, simultaneous excitation leads to sensitivity and you get beautiful spectra. And we felt great, at that time we published it, we thought we were inventors and we didn't know that before Mr. Morozov, he did very similar experiment about six years earlier. Fortunately the committee in Stockholm couldn't read Russian, otherwise you would have to listen now to a lecture in Russian. But anyway, he didn't know why he would do this crazy experiment, I mean, free induction decay, the Fourier transform of it, he didn't recognise that it could gain sensitivity this way, and really shorten the experiment time, I don't know for what reason actually he did it. Anyway, he was the first. So we have now this beautiful spectra, but they are virtually useless. How do I interpret all these lines, you remember Kurt Wüthrich's beautiful lecture, he wanted three-dimensional structures of molecules, and we were working together at that time in Zurich, and so he wanted to go from a primary protein structure to a three-dimensional structure, and the question was how. You need additional information, for example you need this correlation information, you have to relate nuclei, how near together are nuclei in space, how near together are they in the chemical bonding network. And this kind of information gives you really geometric information to get the structure. And so that leads to a correlation diagram where you correlate different nuclei and that could be neighbourhood in space, neighbourhood in chemical bonds, for example nucleus G has something in common with nucleus A, nucleus F has something in common with nucleus C, that leads to two-dimensional spectroscopy. Here all these correlations are being displayed, you can use them to determine structures. And the idea for that goes back to Jean Jeener, he proposed this kind of two-pulse experiment, bang two times on your black box, and in essence you transfer coherence from one mode, one transition in the energy level diagram to another transition in the energy level diagram. And that tells you something about connectivity of the nuclei. And this allows you to get this correlation or cosy spectra here from the Wüthrich group, which allows you then to make assignments of the protons, for example along a poly peptide chain. You need an additional experiment, you need also the through space interactions for this, you use a three-pulse experiment, first again some blue frequencies which are being transformed into red frequency, but here through close relaxations, through the space, depending on the dipolar interaction, so you really can measure distances. That's a complete experiment, that's a two-dimension cosy, a nosey spectrum, you measure the distances here between neighbouring amino acid residues, you can get then the complete set of information, chain coupling information, dipolar couplings, you can make an assignment, false resonance and finally determine geometry. And you are in business. That's the first example which Wüthrich was also mentioning three days ago. And that's why he got his Nobel Prize for this ingenuous technique how to determine three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Nowadays, when it's going to larger and larger molecules, inventing more and more tricks doing three-dimensional spectroscopy, doing four-dimensional spectroscopy, unfortunately I can't demonstrate the four-dimensional spectrum on this two-dimensional screen. But anyway, pulse sequence is becoming enormously complex, it's like a score of a symphony orchestra, you see the first violin, the second violin, the violas, the cellos and the percussion down here. That's the kind of pulse sequence which we use today, and you say, oh that's much too complicated for me. But even 10 years ago, when you wanted to find a job in industry, Merck research laboratories, you had to have experience in modern 2D, 3D and 4D heteronuclear NMR, otherwise you just were not considered. And today, Wüthrich told you, go up to seven-dimensional spectroscopy, that's important for finding jobs. NMR is also a beautiful example for determining molecular dynamics features. While x-ray diffraction delivers you the most reliable structures of biomolecules. NMR allows you also to go into dynamics and see what happens in a dynamic molecule and, I mean, static molecules, they're so boring, they are dead. Life is dynamics, dynamical molecules, that's where really is interesting chemical reactions, interactions with molecules, for that NMR is a beautiful technique. You have here an example, you have a benzene ring with seven methyl groups attached, you want too much, you think normally there are only places for five substituents, so methyl group number 7 is being chased back and forth here between the different positions and the question is how does it go? Is this methyl group jumping just to the next position step by step, or can it jump also directly into position? For what is a network of exchanges in such a molecule? To just record a two-dimensional spectrum, you have the four resonances here, 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have cross peaks and these cross peaks tell you how the jumps go. For example, if there would be a random exchange between all positions, there would have to be cross peaks everywhere. If there is only a 1-2 bond shift, then these are the circles which you prefer then, you see it fits. So indeed you have immediately determined the mechanism, how this exchange goes, you don't have to understand two-dimensional spectroscopy, it's a beautiful display, tells you everything. I mean, NMR is on the very far end of the spectrum, low frequency, there are other spectra, EPR, microwave spectroscopy, coherent optics, for example. And exactly the same principles apply here also, except that the practical difficulties increase, going to higher frequency. Electron spin resonance is perhaps the most similar technique to NMR, where just an electron spin is coupled to many nuclei, giving a multiplet here, very complicated spectrum which one can analyse with traditional methods or with Fourier methods. If the spectrum is very narrow, like for organic radicals here, one can really use directly the Fourier techniques. For transition metal complexes, the spectra are enormously wide and you cannot cover it with a single radio frequency pulse. But for this organic radicals you can record again an impulse response of free induction decay to the Fourier transform and get the spectrum. Exactly the same, you can get two-dimensional electron spin resonance spectra, so the same principles apply here as in NMR. When you have broad spectra, then you have to do more specialised experiments, I don't have the time to go into that, it goes into endopulse, endoexperiments, I don't want to describe that here, you measure then a modulation of an echo decay, do a Fourier transformation and then an ENDOR, an indirect detected NMR spectrum, but I don't have the time to explain that. And if you want to know more about that you can read this book by Arthur Schweiger and Gunnar Jeschke, Arthur Schweiger unfortunately just died two or three months ago, being less than 50 years old. Anyway, that's his legacy here, you can read about this beautiful experiment. Then, in the same frequency domain, in microwave spectroscopy, you can also do rotational spectroscopy, where molecules are rotating and you're measuring the speed of rotation about different axis, also internal rotations, that's microwave spectroscopy in the true sense, Flygare did the first pulse experiments, you see the free induction decays, you see the Fourier transform of single lines here, so to say, or single multiplets. You can go inside here, determine high resolution spectra, and making particular assignments, assignments of resonance lines which have for example one energy level in common, so this red line and this red line, they must give a cross peak here, somewhere, which tells you that, so you can study connectivity in energy level diagrams by these kind of two-dimensional spectroscopy. And then you can also go to optics, to optical time domain experiments, optical pulses, there are very short pulses, there are picosecond pulses, femtosecond pulses, done in the lab by Robin Hochstrasser here, it's a 4-pulse experiment, to study actually chemical exchange in real time, so to say in a biomolecule. And here the beautiful results, 2-dimensional optical spectra. So again exactly the same principle, it's just a little bit more tricky and more difficult, but gives you this beautiful spectra, which I don't want to interpret. You can apply exactly the same principle to mass spectroscopy. You can do time-resolved experiments here in an ion cyclotron, that's a magnetic field here again. You shoot in ions here, they start to circle around, you excite them by a radio frequency pulse and you measure again a free induction decay, here in mass spectroscopy. And you can for example distinguish here between two ions which have virtually the same mass, there is a very slow interference pattern which you can analyse by a Fourier transformation. You get very highly resolved mass spectra, but you can do that also for complicated molecules, here for a protein or a protein complex actually, which you can investigate by Fourier transform mass spectroscopy. So you see it's the same principle, it's virtually always the same, and it goes on and on and on. Then you can also do diffraction experiments, I mention this dependence on K here, Fourier transforming into real space determines this shape of a molecule. That leads to x-ray diffraction. Again you measure here structure factures in K space and the reciprocal lattice, you fully transform, you get electron densities in geometric space. Again it's the same kind of principles which apply here, here from a book, from x-ray diffraction, you see exactly the same kind of expressions here also occurring. An example in myoglobin, in the background you see the diffractogram and the Fourier transform structure here in front. I mean, you know this beautiful example of Michel, Deisenhofer and Huber, Professor Huber will probably speak about similar subjects this morning. Photosynthetic reaction centre being determined in this way, all relies on Fourier transformation. And finally I am coming to the last possibility, namely imaging. Imaging where you do an experiment which is very similar to diffraction. But you do it here in a slightly different way, you do it with magnetic resonance, with NMR, and you can in this way peek inside into the body. For example of your boyfriend, if you want to marry him, at first put him into a magnet and see what is wrong inside, whether he has a strong spine, whether there is anything in his head still left, whether he has soft knees, all that you can find out from MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And of course there are two windows to peak into a human body, you can use the x-ray window, you can use the radio frequency window, with optical radiation it's difficult to see through. But these are the two windows available. But the problem with magnetic resonance is resolution. How do you get with this long radio frequency waves spatial resolution? And the secret has been proposed by Paul Lauterbur, he said: as here, the nuclei have low recession frequencies and here they have high recession frequencies, so you get spatial resolution". That's what he got his Nobel Prize for, 2003. Applying magnetic field gradients in different directions, getting, so to say, projections of the proton density here, along different directions. And then from this projection one can reconstruct an image, that was his procedure. And the first time I heard about that was at the conference in the United States, 1974, and he showed an image of a mouse. It was recorded it in this way here, the mouse. Here these are the lungs, I mean it's proton imaging. And again, going back to what Professor Hänsch told you two days ago, never measure anything but hydrogen, that's exactly what we do in imaging, using protons for imaging. But there must be protons here in the centre, but what is that here? Nobody could understand what this feature here is. So somebody had the brilliant idea, this must be the soul of the mouse. But then, unfortunately, this poor mouse died in the magnet because the experiment lasted for such a long time. So then one found out, it's just an imaging artefact. So I got another idea, use the Fourier principle, apply to it in sequence first a vertical field gradient, then a horizontal and combining it to a dimensional experiment, do a Fourier transform and you get the image of a head. Data Fourier transformed in two dimensions, and that reveals everything. For example if there would be a tumour in my head, you would see it, fortunately it's not my head. That's an important image, that shows you how you convert a female brain into Swiss cheese, just drink too much. And you see the female brain, a normal female brain, an alcoholic female brain, who wants such a brain, so stop drinking alcohol, especially if you're a female, for the males it's less dangerous. Anyway, that's all you have to remember from my lecture and that's very worthwhile, small glass on this side, big glass on this side. And I mean, I know I should stop, I could go on forever, you can measure angiograms, blood vessels, you can look at chemical compositions after a stroke at different parts of the brain. You can do time resolved spectroscopy, Peter Mansfield got his Nobel prize for that, at the same time with Paul Lauterbur, using a particular pulse sequence, getting movies of a heart motion. And finally you can look into the brain and see what is going on while you are thinking, if you are thinking. And there is a particular principle which allows one to make NMR sensitive to thinking processes which I can't explain. You can get beautiful images here to distinguish a normal person from a schizophrenic person when you apply a certain input paradigm to him or her. And if you see a particular reaction, you know he might be ill. You can explore for example even compassion, that a person who suffers pain being tortured and you are just an onlooker and you feel then a reaction in the brain at exactly the same place as this person which is tortured himself, just by compassion. So it's quite exciting what you can do and I'm sure I have proved in this way that Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an irrefutable testimonial to the enormous value of basic research, it's directly linked to practical application. And finally: Happiness is finding still another use for Fourier Transformation. Thank you for your attention.

Liebe Freunde, das diesjährige Treffen in Lindau gefällt mir außerordentlich - insbesondere genieße ich es, zu Ihnen, meinen jungen enthusiastischen und vielversprechenden Wissenschaftlerfreunden, zu sprechen. Von den Vorträgen gefielen mir bislang vor allem jene, die über die herkömmliche Wissenschaft hinausgingen und auch etwas über den sozialen Kontext zu sagen hatten. Tatsächlich sprach ich letztes Jahr, an eben diesem Ort hier, über die Möglichkeiten der Wissenschaft, unsere Zukunft zu entwerfen und zu gestalten. In diesem Zusammenhang nahm ich auf eine sehr nachdrückliche und möglicherweise sogar Anstoß erregende Art und Weise Stellung, indem ich zum Beispiel Egoismus als treibende Kraft hinter all unseren Handlungen verurteilte, da wir uns in diesem Fall immer fragen, welchen Gewinn wir erzielen, wenn wir etwas tun. Stattdessen warb ich für Verantwortung als treibende Kraft, da wir uns dann fragen: Was können wir tun, damit die Gesellschaft daraus Nutzen zieht? Mein Vortrag endete damals mit zwei Zitaten, von denen das eine von François Rabelais stammt: denn wir alle sind mitverantwortlich für das, was in Zukunft geschieht - wir können keinem anderen die Schuld daran geben. Heute möchte ich keinerlei Äußerungen von mir geben, an denen man Anstoß nehmen könnte, sondern versuchen, ein guter Junge zu sein, und Ihnen nur eine kleine Geschichte, eine rein wissenschaftliche Geschichte, erzählen: Genau genommen möchte ich Ihnen die Fourier-Transformation als ein wunderschönes Beispiel dafür vorstellen, wie nützlich die Mathematik für die Naturwissenschaften sein kann. Wie üblich, wusste allerdings der Erfinder der Fourier-Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, nicht, dass man heutzutage sogar zu Beginn einer Vorlesung einen heimlichen Blick in den Kopf des Vortragenden werfen kann, um nachzuprüfen, ob es sich lohnt, sich die Vorlesung anzuhören, da alles, was ich Ihnen erzählen kann, in diesem labberigen Stück Gewebe hier enthalten ist. Von damals bis heute haben also viele Entwicklungen stattgefunden, und ich möchte gerne die Frage stellen: Warum ist die Fourier-Transformation für die Naturwissenschaft so wichtig? Sie ist ein sehr einfacher Ausdruck, sie ist eine Integraltransformation, bei der eine Funktion im Zeitbereich in eine Funktion im Frequenzbereich transformiert wird. Somit verknüpfen wir diese beiden Bereiche durch diese Integraltransformation. Oder wir können einen Impulsraum mit dem geometrischen Raum in Verbindung bringen, einer Funktion von K, des Impulses und verbunden mit einer Koordinatenfunktion. Es hat etwas mit der Erforschung der Natur im Allgemeinen zu tun. Wenn wir eine Sache untersuchen, betrachten wir sie als eine Black Box - wir wissen nicht, was sich in ihrem Inneren befindet - und wir versuchen, sie zu stören. Wir schauen uns den Input hier an und horchen auf den Output. Er verrät uns, was sich im Inneren befindet. Tatsächlich besteht eine sehr natürliche Art und Weise der Erforschung einer Black Box darin, eine Sinuswelle, eine sich periodisch wiederholende Störung, anzuwenden und dann auf den Output zu achten. Denken Sie nur an den Vortrag von Professor Hänsch vor zwei Tagen, in dem er Ihnen sagte, dass man niemals etwas anderes messen solle als Frequenzen. Genau das versuchen wir zu tun, um den Inhalt einer Black Box zu beschreiben. Und dies macht Sinn, denn tatsächlich sind diese trigonometrischen Funktionen Eigenfunktionen linearer zeitinvarianter Systeme. Somit bekommen wir jedes Mal, wenn wir eine solche Funktion auf eine Black Box anwenden, die linear und zeitinvariant ist, dieselbe Funktion zurück, multipliziert mit einer bestimmten komplexen Größe, bei der es sich in Begriffen der Quantenmechanik um den Eigenwert handelt. Wir erhalten also die mit dem Eigenwert multiplizierte Eigenfunktion. Und wenn wir diesen Eigenwert als eine Frequenzfunktion darstellen, wenn wir die Frequenz variieren, dann bekommen wir das Spektrum - das ist die Grundlage der Spektroskopie, also macht es wirklich Sinn. Wir können nun Spektroskopie auf die übliche Art und Weise betreiben, indem wir eine Frequenz nach der anderen anwenden, die Antwort messen und die Amplituden hier als eine Funktion der Frequenz darstellen. Das liefert uns ein Spektrum. Aber wir könnten dies auch parallel tun und alle Frequenzen gleichzeitig auf die Black Box anwenden und Zeit sparen. Dann brauchen wir so etwas wie einen Frequenzsortierer, der die verschiedenen Antworten für uns sortiert, damit wir wiederum das Spektrum bekommen. Dieser Frequenzsortierer ist letztendlich nichts anderes als eine Fourier-Transformation. Wenn wir das hier parallel tun, profitieren wir von dem Multiplex-Vorteil, der auch Fellgett-Vorteil genannt wird, da wir alles zur selben Zeit getan haben. Das ist der Vorteil, diesen Weg hier zu gehen. Das Geheimnis der Fourier-Transformation besteht tatsächlich in der Orthogonalität der trigonometrischen Funktion. Wenn Sie die eine mit der anderen multiplizieren und über den gesamten Raum integrieren, bekommen Sie nur dann etwas, wenn die beiden Funktionen identisch sind. Sie sind also orthogonal. Dies erlaubt es, sie zu trennen. Und die simultane Anwendung all dieser Frequenzen kann beispielsweise mit einem Puls implementiert werden. Wenn Sie einen Puls einsetzen, dann haben Sie im Wesentlichen alle Frequenzen eingebunden und Sie bekommen eine Impulsantwort. Sie müssen eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen, um das Spektrum zu bekommen - ganz einfach. Wiederum haben wir also sozusagen zwei Räume hier, die wir miteinander in Verbindung bringen, konjugierte Variablen, die Zeitvariable und die Frequenzvariable, der Impulsraum und der Koordinatenraum, die miteinander verbunden werden. Sie stellen, sozusagen, zwei verschiedene Ansichten desselben Gegenstands dar. Sie können sich das hier in Rot oder in Grün anschauen. Vor langer Zeit sagte Heisenberg, dass sich die fruchtbarsten Entwicklungen dann ergaben, wann immer zwei verschiedene Denkweisen aufeinandertrafen. Dies hier sind also die beiden verschiedenen Räume. Oder denken Sie an Professor Glauber, der Ihnen von Wellen und Teilchen erzählte - diese Beziehung gehört derselben Kategorie an. Er erwähnte auch Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", und hier ist das Yin-Yang-Symbol, das ebenfalls diese beiden Räume darstellt, welche dieselbe Wahrheit enthalten. Die ganze Welt der Fourier-Transformationen im Bereich der Spektroskopie ist ähnlich komplex. Es gibt viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten - insbesondere, weil das, was wir uns anschauen, tatsächlich nicht nur eine Funktion der Zeit oder eine Funktion des Impulses darstellt, sondern ein Set von beiden zur selben Zeit ist, in Abhängigkeit von vier verschiedenen Variablen. Es ist eine ebene Welle, die sich in der Zeit und im Raum ausbildet. Wir können uns also zum einen der Zeitabhängigkeit bedienen, ein Zeitbereichsexperiment durchführen und schließlich ein Spektrum gewinnen. Oder wir können die K-Variablen verwenden, die Impuls-Variable, und erhalten dann zum Beispiel, wie hier, das Bild eines Moleküls - das ist die Röntgenbeugung. Wir können bildgebende Verfahren anwenden, Magnetresonanztomografie, in der ebenfalls die K-Abhängigkeit genutzt wird und die Fourier-Transformation das Bild eines Kopfes liefert. Und schließlich können wir zum Beispiel die Methode der Interferometrie anwenden, in der wir uns der R-Abhängigkeit bedienen, die Interferenz auf der räumlichen Ebene messen, sie in einer Fourier-Transformation umwandeln und wiederum ein Spektrum, beispielsweise ein Infrarot-Spektrum, erhalten. Diese sind also die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten, die ich gerne kurz darstellen möchte. Alles ist auf jenen Herrn, Monsieur Fourier, zurückzuführen. Wer war Monsieur Fourier. Das ist er. Er war gleichzeitig - und stellt damit eine sehr große Ausnahme dar - Wissenschaftler und Politiker. Schließlich haben nur sehr, sehr wenige Politiker überhaupt eine Ahnung von Wissenschaft, und nur sehr wenige Wissenschaftler interessieren sich für Politik. Aber Fourier ist sozusagen mein Vorbild - in ihm ist beides vereint. Hier befindet er sich zum Beispiel in seinem Arbeitszimmer in Grenoble, und anstatt seine juristischen Akten zu studieren, führt er ein physikalisches Experiment durch. Er misst die Wärmeleitung. Zur selben Zeit schrieb er an einem Aufsatz, den er dem Institut de France vorlegte, während er Präfekt des Départements Isère war. Und er führte Experimente durch, darunter auch diese Art von Input-Output-Experimenten. Hier hatte er eine Black Box, eine blaue Box, der er von der linken Seite aus Hitze zuführte. Dann maß er die Wärmeverteilung in dem Objekt. Es handelt sich hier also wiederum um die Input-Output-Beziehung. Er weitete den Input in der Fourier-Reihe aus und rekonstituierte das Ergebnis wiederum aus einer räumlichen Fourier-Reihe. So verwendete er zum ersten Mal seine Fourier-Ausdrücke - selbstverständlich bezeichnete er sie nicht als Fourier-Ausdrücke, aber hier sind sie, in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1822. Wann immer jemand behauptet, etwas entdeckt zu haben, ist natürlich die Frage interessant, was sich daraus entwickelt hat. Jedoch muss man auch danach fragen, wer davor da war - und es gibt immer jemanden, der schon davor da war. Nur sehr wenige Erfinder erfanden eine Sache zum ersten Mal. Ein Beispiel dafür ist Leonhard Euler: Wenn man die Lehrbücher der Fourier-Transformationen durchgeht, wird man die Euler-Gleichungen für die Fourier-Koeffizienten entdecken. Diese Gleichungen hier, die ich zuvor gezeigt habe, werden als Euler-Gleichungen bezeichnet - also muss Euler irgend etwas beigetragen haben. Tatsächlich tat er dies bereits im Jahr 1777, und noch früher, im Jahr 1729, verwendete er trigonometrische Funktionen, um Funktionen zu interpolieren. Aus diesem Grund ist er hier auf einer schweizerischen Banknote abgebildet - offensichtlich war er Schweizer, sonst würde ich Ihnen das nicht erzählen. Folglich ist die Fourier-Transformation eine schweizerische Erfindung - vergessen Sie das nicht. Ich glaube, wir sollten uns jetzt wieder der Spektroskopie zuwenden. Es gibt eine sehr große Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Frequenzen, von den Gammastrahlen bis zu den Radiofrequenzen, und Sie können diese alle nutzen, um die Natur mit Hilfe spektroskopischer Untersuchungen zu erforschen. Hier haben wir den Baum des Wissens, bei dem man von der Physik über die Chemie zur Biologie und zur Medizin gelangt. Für das wirkliche Verständnis der Natur ist diese Ebene natürlich die wichtigste. Wenn Sie ein medizinisches Phänomen mit den Begriffen chemischer Reaktionen erklären können, dann verstehen Sie es. Sie müssen normalerweise nicht auf die Physik zurückgreifen. Das ist diese Ebene. Aber um den Baum hinauf- und sicher wieder hinunterzuklettern, braucht man ein Gerät, eine Leiter, und diesen Zweck erfüllt die Spektroskopie. Zum ersten Mal wurde so etwas in Verbindung mit Fourier-Transformationen von Herrn Michelson verwendet. Auch Professor Hänsch erwähnte ihn in seinem Vortrag. Michelson erfand das Interferometer. Er verwendet zwei Lichtstrahlen, beziehungsweise im Wesentlichen einen Lichtstrahl, der in zwei Lichtstrahlen geteilt wird. Einer trifft auf den beweglichen Spiegel und der andere auf den statischen Spiegel, und bei ihrer Rückkehr werden sie wieder zusammengeführt. Dabei kommt es zur Interferenz. Das ist die Maschinerie, so wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Schauen wir sie uns einmal ihre Details an. Die ankommende Welle hier wird in einen roten und in einen blauen Teil aufgeteilt. Dann kommen beide zurück. In diesem bestimmten Fall hier sind die zwei Wellen, die von den zwei Spiegeln reflektiert werden, in Phase, so dass hier eine konstruktive Interferenz vorliegt. Wenn Sie diesen Spiegel hier ein wenig verschieben, dann bekommen Sie eine destruktive Interferenz. Die beiden Wellen sind gegenphasig, und wenn man sie addiert, ist die Summe Null. Somit können Sie auf diese Weise in der Tat ein Interferenzmuster bekommen. Dies führt zur Interferometrie, und wenn Sie eine einzelne Frequenz haben, dann erhalten Sie nur eine einzelne Oszillation. Wenn Sie zwei Frequenzen zur selben Zeit haben, dann bekommen Sie diese Art von Interferenz hier, und zwischen zwei Frequenzen, zwei Frequenzen mit einer bestimmten Liniengestalt hier, bekommen Sie hier eine Abschwächung und einen Wiederanstieg und Sie haben all diese verschiedenen Signale, die ich, als ich sie mir zum ersten Mal anschaute, für freie Induktionszerfalle aus der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie hielt. Es sieht der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie sehr ähnlich, aber es wurde 50 Jahre früher aufgezeichnet. Jedenfalls funktioniert ein modernes Interferometer auf genau dieselbe Art und Weise. Wir haben die Quelle, die Probe, die die Absorption misst oder zu messen versucht, einen halbdurchlässigen Spiegel, zwei reflektierende Spiegel, einen Detektor, der die Interferenz als eine Funktion der Platzierung des Spiegels hier aufzeichnet - führen Sie eine Fourier-Transformation durch und Sie bekommen das Spektrum. Zum allerersten Mal wurde dies von Fellgett 1951 durchgeführt - daher der Begriff Fellgett-Vorteil. Hier haben wir das Interferogramm, hier dessen Fourier-Transformation. Er musste dies von Hand tun, da er damals noch über keinen Computer verfügte. Heute jedoch können Sie diese im Handel erhältlichen Geräte kaufen, welche die Fourier-Transformation automatisch durchführen, und erhalten wunderschöne Spektren, ohne verstehen zu müssen, was im Inneren der Box passiert. Etwas Ähnliches können Sie auch mit Hilfe der Raman-Spektroskopie tun. Wie Sie wissen, bestrahlen Sie hierbei mit einer einzelnen Frequenz, zum Beispiel mit einem Laser. Sie messen das gestreute Licht hier, und die Frequenzen werden von den internen Schwingungen beispielsweise eines Moleküls modifiziert und liefern Ihnen diese zusätzliche Seitenbande der zentralen Frequenz hier. Diese hat nun nahezu denselben Inhalt wie ein Infrarot-Spektrum. Es handelt sich um ein typisches Raman-Spektrometer, ein Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektrometer, bei dem dasselbe Prinzip genutzt wird. Und das gibt mir gerade die Gelegenheit, Ihnen etwas über meine Leidenschaften zu erzählen und Ihnen zu verraten, wie wichtig Leidenschaften sind. Ich setze diese Art von Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektroskopie bei der Pigmentanalyse bestimmter zentralasiatischer Gemälde ein, die ich sehr liebe. Hier haben Sie zum Beispiel Raman-Spektren verschiedener blauer Pigmente und Sie sehen, wie verschieden Sie sind. Sie brauchen Sie nicht zu verstehen, Sie sehen einfach, dass Sie verschieden sind, und auf diese Weise können Sie Indigo von Azurit, Smalte und Berliner Blau unterscheiden. Sie können in die Gemälde hineingelangen und die Pigmente identifizieren. Ich restauriere Gemälde, und aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, zu wissen, was der Künstler verwendete. Auf diese Weise können Sie, ohne das Gemälde zu zerstören, die Pigmente analysieren - faszinierend. Wissen Sie, wenn Sie diesen Weg, Ihren beruflichen Weg beispielsweise nach Stockholm, einschlagen möchten, dann ist es sehr schwierig, nur auf einem Fuß zu gehen. Sie brauchen einen zweiten, und dieser zweite sind Ihre Leidenschaften. Und nur, wenn Sie zusätzlich zur Wissenschaft oder was auch immer Sie tun, Ihre Leidenschaften haben, wird dieser Funke in Ihrem Gehirn aufleuchten und der kreative Prozess einsetzen. Diese Überlagerung zwischen den beiden Standbeinen ist von großer Bedeutung - denken Sie immer daran. Lassen Sie uns nun zur Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie übergehen, einer anderen Anwendung, bei der sich die Interferenz nun im Zeitbereich ereignet. Ein sehr einfaches Experiment: Sie haben einen Atomkern, der in einem magnetischen Feld präzediert, nuklear-magnetische Bewegung, Sie haben eine Frequenz in Proportion zu dem angewendeten Magnetfeld. Folglich werden im Wesentlichen die Frequenzen gemessen. Sie messen die lokalen Magnetfelder. Dies wurde erstmalig von Edward Purcell und Felix Bloch bei kondensierter Materie unternommen. Sie können Spektren aufzeichnen, wie hier die Spektren von Alkohol. Sie bekommen drei verschiedene Linien, denn die lokalen Magnetfelder in den Methylgruppen, der Methylengruppe und in dem OH-Proton hier sind verschieden, somit können Sie sie unterscheiden. Aber es ist ermüdend, eine Linie nach der anderen aufzuzeichnen, und man benötigt dafür mehr Zeit, als mir für meinen Vortrag zur Verfügung steht. Wir hatten in Varian Associates in Palo Alto einen Mitarbeiter, Wes Anderson. Er sagte: "Warum tun wir dies nicht gleichzeitig?" und er erfand das Mehrkanal-Spektrometer, in welchem er mit mehreren Frequenzen zur selben Zeit bestrahlte. Er konstruierte einen Multi-Frequenz-Generator, die sogenannte Gebetsmühle. Dieser funktionierte nicht und befindet sich nun im Smithsonian Museum. Aber zur selben Zeit hatte er in seinem Labor einen schweizerischen Sklaven. Gemeinsam mit diesem schweizerischen Sklaven überlegten sie: Ach, das ist doch ganz einfach, das habe ich Ihnen alles schon gesagt. Wir müssen nur einen Puls einsetzen, einen freien Induktionszerfall beobachten, eine Fourier-Transformation vornehmen - und haben in Sekundenbruchteilen ein Spektrum. Hier haben wir die Impulsantwort dieser Moleküle, das Spektrum, und hier das Spektrum, das man mit einer herkömmlichen Sweep-Methode im Schneckentempo aufgezeichnet hätte. Jedenfalls führt gleichzeitige Anregung zu Empfindlichkeit, und Sie bekommen wunderbare Spektren. Wir fanden uns großartig, veröffentlichten unsere Entdeckung und hielten uns für Erfinder. Wir wussten nicht, dass bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt, sechs Jahre zuvor, Herr Morozov ähnliche Experimente durchgeführt hatte. Glücklicherweise konnte das Komitee in Stockholm kein Russisch lesen, denn sonst müssten Sie sich nun einen Vortrag auf Russisch anhören. Ohnehin wusste er nicht, aus welchem Grund er dieses verrückte Experiment durchführte - freier Induktionszerfall, dessen Fourier-Transformation - er wusste nicht, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Empfindlichkeit zunehmen und die Dauer des Experiments deutlich verkürzt werden würde. Ich weiß nicht, aus welchem Grund er es tatsächlich tat. Trotzdem war er der erste. Wir haben also nun diese wunderschönen Spektren, aber sie sind praktisch nutzlos. Wie soll ich all diese Linien interpretieren? Sie erinnern sich an Kurt Wüthrichs hervorragende Vorlesung. Er wollte die dreidimensionale Struktur der Moleküle - wir arbeiteten zu jener Zeit in Zürich zusammen - und deshalb wollte er von einer primären Proteinstruktur zu einer dreidimensionalen Struktur gelangen. Die Frage war, wie. Sie benötigen zusätzliche Informationen. Beispielsweise benötigen Sie diese Korrelationsinformation: Sie müssen Atomkerne miteinander in Verbindung bringen, wie nahe beieinander Atomkerne im Raum sind, wie nahe beieinander sie im Netzwerk chemischer Bindungen sind. Diese Art von Informationen liefert Ihnen echte geometrische Informationen, um die Struktur zu bekommen. Dies führt zu einem Korrelationsdiagramm, in dem Sie verschiedene Atomkerne korrelieren. Dies könnte die Nachbarschaft im Raum betreffen, die Nachbarschaft in chemischen Bindungen, wobei zum Beispiel Atomkern G etwas mit Atomkern A gemeinsam und Atomkern F etwas mit Atomkern C gemeinsam hat, und das hat zweidimensionale Spektroskopie zur Folge. Hier sind alle diese Korrelationen dargestellt. Sie können sie benutzen, um Strukturen zu bestimmen. Die Idee hierfür geht auf Jean Jeener zurück. Er schlug diese Art eines Zwei-Puls-Experiments vor: Schlagen Sie zweimal auf Ihre Black Box. Im Wesentlichen übertragen Sie damit Kohärenz von einem Modus, einem Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm auf einen anderen Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm. Das verrät Ihnen etwas über die Konnektivität der Atomkerne. Und damit können Sie diese Korrelations- oder COSY-Spektren (Correlation Spectroscopy - Korrelationsspektroskopie) der Wüthrich-Gruppe bekommen, die Ihnen die Zuordnung der Protonen beispielsweise entlang einer Polypeptidkette ermöglichen. Sie brauchen ein zusätzliches Experiment, Sie brauchen hierfür auch die Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Atomkernen im Raum, und dafür bedienen Sie sich eines Drei-Puls-Experiments. Als erstes kommen wieder blaue Frequenzen zum Einsatz, die in rote Frequenzen umgewandelt werden, aber hier durch Kreuzrelaxationen, durch den Raum, abhängig von den dipolaren Wechselwirkungen, und so können Sie tatsächlich Entfernungen messen. Das ist ein vollständiges Experiment, das ist ein zweidimensionales COSY-Spektrum, ein NOESY-Spektrum (Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy - Kern-Overhauser-Effekt-Spektroskopie). Sie messen die Entfernungen zwischen benachbarten Aminosäureresten und können dann das komplette Set an Informationen bekommen, Informationen über die J-Kopplung, dipolare Kopplungen; Sie können eine Zuordnung vornehmen, auch der Anzeichen einer falsche Resonanz, und schließlich die Geometrie bestimmen. Und Sie sind im Geschäft. Das ist das erste Beispiel, das Wüthrich vor drei Tagen ebenfalls nannte. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er seinen Nobelpreis für die geniale Technik bekam, wie man die dreidimensionale Struktur von Biomolekülen bestimmen kann. Heutzutage, wo es um immer größere Moleküle geht, erfindet man immer mehr Tricks in der Anwendung dreidimensionaler und vierdimensionaler Spektroskopie. Leider kann ich auf diesem zweidimensionalen Schirm kein vierdimensionales Spektrum demonstrieren. Die Pulsfolgen werden jedenfalls sehr komplex. Es ist wie bei einer Partitur eines Symphonieorchesters: Sie haben die erste Geige, die zweite Geige, die Bratschen, die Cellos und dort unten das Schlagwerk. Das ist die Art von Pulsfolgen, die wir heute verwenden, und Sie mögen sagen: Oh, das ist viel zu kompliziert für mich. Jedoch mussten Sie schon vor zehn Jahren für eine Anstellung in der Industrie, zum Beispiel in den Forschungslaboren von Merck, Erfahrungen mit moderner 2D-, 3D- und 4D-Hetero-Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie vorweisen, denn sonst wurden Sie gar nicht erst in Betracht gezogen. Heute sollten Sie sich, wie Wüthrich Ihnen riet, mit der siebendimensionalen Spektroskopie vertraut machen - das ist wichtig, um einen Job zu finden. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ist außerdem ein schönes Beispiel für die Bestimmung von Eigenschaften der Molekulardynamik. Während die Röntgenbeugung Ihnen die verlässlichsten Strukturen für Biomoleküle liefert, erlaubt Ihnen die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie, die Dynamik zu untersuchen und zu beobachten, was in einem dynamischen Molekül geschieht. Schließlich sind statische Moleküle ja so langweilig - sie sind tot. Leben bedeutet Dynamik, dynamische Moleküle, dort finden die wirklich interessanten chemischen Reaktionen statt, die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Molekülen, und dafür ist die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie eine wunderbare Technik. Hier haben wir ein Beispiel: einen Benzolring, an den sieben Methylgruppen gebunden sind. Das ist einer zu viel - es gibt üblicherweise nur Plätze für fünf Substituenten, so dass die siebte Methylgruppe hier zwischen den verschiedenen Positionen hin- und hergejagt wird. Die Frage ist - wie bewegt sie sich? Springt diese Methylgruppe einfach Schritt für Schritt auf die jeweils nächste Position oder kann sie auch direkt auf irgendeine Position springen? Wie ist das Netzwerk des Austauschs in einem solchen Molekül aufgebaut? Um einfach ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aufzuzeichnen, haben Sie hier die vier Resonanzen, 1, 2, 3 und 4. Sie haben Cross Peaks, die Ihnen verraten, wie die Sprungbewegungen verlaufen. Wenn es zum Beispiel einen zufälligen Austausch zwischen allen Positionen gäbe, dann müssten überall Cross Peaks vorliegen. Wenn es nur eine 1-2-Bindungsverschiebung gibt, dann sind dies die bevorzugten Kreise - Sie sehen, es passt. Somit haben Sie in der Tat sofort den Mechanismus bestimmt, nach dem dieser Austausch funktioniert. Dafür müssen Sie zweidimensionale Spektroskopie nicht verstehen. Es ist eine wunderbare Darstellung, die Ihnen alles sagt. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie befindet sich an dem sehr weit entfernten, niederfrequenten Ende des Spektrums. Daneben gibt es andere Spektren - ESR (Elektronenspinresonanz), Mikrowellenspektroskopie, Kohärente Optik, um Beispiele zu nennen. Es gelten dieselben Prinzipien, wobei jedoch die praktischen Schwierigkeiten mit der Höhe der Frequenz zunehmen. Elektronenspinresonanzspektroskopie ist vielleicht die der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ähnlichste Technik. Hierbei ist ein Elektronenspin mit mehreren Atomkernen gekoppelt und liefert hier ein Multiplett, ein sehr kompliziertes Spektrum, das man mit herkömmlichen Methoden oder Fourier-Methoden analysieren kann. Wenn das Spektrum sehr schmal ist, wie hier für organische Radikale, kann man direkt die Fourier-Methoden anwenden. Für Übergangsmetallkomplexe sind die Spektren äußerst breit und können nicht mit dem Puls einer einzelnen Radiofrequenz abgedeckt werden. Aber für diese organischen Radikale können Sie wiederum eine Impulsantwort des freien Induktionszerfalls aufzeichnen, eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen und das Spektrum bekommen. Genau dasselbe - Sie können zweidimensionale Elektronenspinresonanzspektren bekommen, also gelten hier dieselben Prinzipien wie bei der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie. Wenn Sie breite Spektren haben, dann müssen Sie weitere spezialisierte Experimente durchführen. Ich habe nicht die Zeit, auf diese einzugehen - es handelt sich um einen ENDOR-Puls, ENDOR-Experimente, die ich hier nicht beschreiben möchte. Sie messen eine Modulation eines Echo-Zerfalls, führen eine Fourier-Transformation und dann eine Elektron-Kern-Doppelresonanz-Spektroskopie (ENDOR - electron nuclear double resonance) durch, ein indirekt ermitteltes Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektrum, aber mir fehlt die Zeit, um dies zu erläutern. Wenn Sie mehr darüber wissen möchten, können Sie dieses Buch hier von Arthur Schweiger und Gunnar Jeschke lesen. Leider ist Arthur Schweiger vor zwei oder drei Monaten im Alter von noch nicht einmal 50 Jahren gestorben. Dies hier ist sein Vermächtnis, und Sie können darin etwas über diese großartigen Experimente nachlesen. Dann können Sie, im selben Frequenzbereich in der Mikrowellenspektroskopie auch die Rotationsgeschwindigkeit messen, mit der Moleküle um verschiedene Achsen rotieren - also interne Rotationen und somit Mikrowellenspektroskopie im wahrsten Sinne. Flygare führte die ersten Pulsexperimente durch. Sie sehen die freien Induktionszerfalle, Sie sehen hier die Fourier-Transformation einzelner Linien oder einzelner Multipletts. Sie können nach innen gehen, Spektren in hoher Auflösung bestimmen und insbesondere Zuordnungen vornehmen. Sie können Resonanzlinien zuordnen, die beispielsweise ein Energieniveau gemeinsam haben. Diese rote Linie und diese rote Linie müssen irgendwo hier einen Cross Peak ergeben. Folglich lässt sich mit Hilfe dieser zweidimensionalen Spektroskopie die Konnektivität in Energieniveaudiagrammen studieren. Sie können auch zur Optik, zu optischen Zeitbereichs-Experimenten weitergehen. Optische Pulse sind sehr kurze Pulse, Picosekundenpulse, Femtosekundenpulse. Hier wird im Labor von Robin Hochstrasser ein Vier-Puls-Experiment durchgeführt, um die tatsächlichen chemischen Veränderungen in Realzeit, sozusagen in einem Biomolekül, zu studieren. Hier sind die großartigen Ergebnisse - zweidimensionale optische Spektren. Wiederum handelt es sich um exakt dasselbe Prinzip. Es ist nur ein kleines bisschen komplizierter und schwieriger, aber es liefert Ihnen diese wunderbaren Spektren, die ich nicht interpretieren möchte. Sie können genau dasselbe Prinzip bei der Massenspektroskopie anwenden. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Experimente hier in einem Ionenzyklotron beobachten. Das hier ist wieder ein magnetisches Feld. Sie schießen die Ionen hier hinein, sie beginnen zu kreisen, Sie regen sie mit einem Radiofrequenzpuls an und messen wiederum einen freien Induktionszerfall, hier in der Massenspektroskopie. Sie können zum Beispiel hier zwischen zwei Ionen unterscheiden, die nahezu dieselbe Masse besitzen. Es gibt ein sehr langsames Interferenzmuster, das Sie mit Hilfe einer Fourier-Transformation analysieren können. Sie bekommen Massenspektren mit sehr hoher Auflösung, aber Sie können dies auch für komplexe Moleküle durchführen, wie hier für ein Protein - eigentlich für einen Proteinkomplex -, die Sie mit der Fourier-Transformations-Massenspektroskopie untersuchen können. Sie sehen also - es ist dasselbe Prinzip, es ist eigentlich immer dasselbe, und so geht es weiter und weiter und weiter. Dann können Sie außerdem auch Diffraktionsexperimente durchführen. Ich erwähnte die Abhängigkeit von K hier, eine Fourier-Transformation, in den Realraum hinein, dies bestimmt diese Gestalt eines Moleküls. Das führt zur Röntgenbeugung. Wiederum messen Sie hier Strukturfaktoren im K-Raum. Das reziproke Gitter transformieren Sie vollständig, und Sie erhalten die Elektronendichte im geometrischen Raum. Hier gelten wieder dieselben Arten von Prinzipien - Sie sehen hier in einem Buch, bei einem Beispiel aus der Röntgenbeugung, dass genau dieselben Ausdrücke ebenfalls vorkommen. Hier ist ein Beispiel, Myoglobin, und im Hintergrund sehen Sie das Diffraktogramm und im Vordergrund die Fourier-Transformations-Struktur. Sie kennen dieses hervorragende Beispiel von Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber. Professor Huber wird heute Morgen vielleicht über ähnliche Themen sprechen. Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum wird auf diese Art und Weise bestimmt, und all das stützt sich auf die Fourier-Transformation. Schließlich komme ich zu der letzten Einsatzmöglichkeit, nämlich der Bildgebung. Bei der Bildgebung führen Sie ein der Diffraktion sehr ähnliches Experiment durch. Allerdings gehen Sie hier auf eine geringfügig andere Art und Weise vor. Sie bedienen sich der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie und können damit einen Blick in das Innere des Körpers werfen. So sollten Sie beispielsweise Ihren Freund, wenn Sie ihn heiraten möchten, zunächst in einen Magneten stecken und überprüfen, was in seinem Inneren vielleicht nicht in Ordnung ist: ob er ein starkes Rückgrat hat, ob er überhaupt noch etwas im Kopf hat, ob er weiche Knie hat - all das können Sie mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztomografie herausfinden. Selbstverständlich gibt es zwei Fenster, um in den menschlichen Körper hineinzuschauen - Sie können das Röntgenstrahlenfenster oder das Radiofrequenzfenster benutzen. Mit Hilfe optischer Strahlung hindurchzuschauen, ist schwierig. Aber diese beiden Fenster sind verfügbar. Allerdings besteht bei der Magnetresonanz das Problem der Auflösung. Wie bekommt man mit diesen langen Radiofrequenzwellen eine räumliche Auflösung? Das Geheimnis der Lösung wurde von Paul Lauterbur vorgeschlagen. Er sagte: "Setzen Sie einen Magnetfeld-Gradienten ein und verwenden Sie ein inhomogenes Magnetfeld, dann können Sie unterscheiden zwischen der linken Seite hier, wo die Atomkerne niedrige Präzessionsfrequenzen haben, und hier, wo sie hohe Präzessionsfrequenzen haben. So bekommen Sie eine räumliche Auflösung." Dafür erhielt er 2003 seinen Nobelpreis - für die Anwendung von Magnetfeldgradienten in verschiedene Richtungen, mit deren Hilfe man, sozusagen, Projektionen der Protonendichte hier, entlang verschiedener Richtungen, bekommt. Von diesen Projektionen ausgehend, kann man ein Bild rekonstruieren - das war seine Vorgehensweise. Das erste Mal hörte ich davon auf der Konferenz in den USA im Jahr 1974, und er zeigte das Bild einer Maus. Es war auf diese Weise hier aufgenommen worden. Hier sind die Lungen - es ist Protonenbildgebung. Und wenn wir nun auf das zurückkommen, was Professor Hänsch Ihnen vor zwei Tagen sagte, dass Sie nie etwas anderes als Wasserstoff messen sollten, dann ist das genau das, was wir bei diesem Bildgebungsverfahren tun - wir benutzen Protonen für die Bildgebung. Dies hier, im Zentrum, müssen Protonen sein, aber was ist das hier? Niemand konnte ergründen, was dieses Gebilde hier war. Also hatte jemand die geniale Idee, dass dies die Seele der Maus sein müsse. Unglücklicherweise starb jedoch die arme Maus in dem Magneten, da das Experiment sich über einen solch langen Zeitraum hingezogen hatte, und jemand fand heraus, dass es sich bei diesem Gebilde nur um einen Bildartefakt gehandelt hatte. Mir kam eine andere Idee: Man mache sich das Fourier-Prinzip zunutze, wende nacheinander zunächst einen vertikalen Feldgradienten und danach einen horizontalen Feldgradienten an und kombiniere dies zu einem zweidimensionalen Experiment, führe dann eine Fourier-Transformation durch - und man bekommt das Bild eines Kopfs. Wenn man also die Daten in zwei Dimensionen einer Fourier-Transformation unterzieht, wird alles enthüllt. Wenn sich beispielsweise in meinem Kopf ein Tumor befände, würden Sie ihn sehen - glücklicherweise ist dies nicht mein Kopf. Das hier ist ein wichtiges Bild. Es zeigt, wie man ein weibliches Gehirn in einen Schweizer Käse verwandelt - indem man einfach zu viel trinkt. Sie sehen hier ein weibliches Gehirn, ein normales weibliches Gehirn, ein Gehirn einer Alkoholikerin - wer möchte ein solches Gehirn haben? Also hören Sie auf, Alkohol zu trinken, insbesondere, wenn Sie eine Frau sind, für die Männer ist es weniger gefährlich. Das ist alles, was Sie sich von meinem Vortrag merken müssen, und es lohnt sich - das kleine Glas auf dieser Seite, das große Glas auf dieser Seite. Ich könnte ewig weitersprechen - Sie können Angiogramme messen, Blutgefäße, Sie können sich die chemischen Zusammensetzungen in verschiedenen Bereichen des Gehirns nach einem Schlaganfall anschauen. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Spektroskopieverfahren anwenden - dafür erhielt Peter Mansfield seinen Nobelpreis, zeitgleich mit Paul Lauterbur. Er hatte eine bestimmte Impulsfolge eingesetzt und mit ihrer Hilfe die Herzbewegung gefilmt. Und schließlich können Sie in das Gehirn hineinschauen und beobachten, was dort passiert, während Sie denken - wenn Sie denken. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Prinzip, das ich hier nicht erläutern kann, welches es erlaubt, die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie auf Denkprozesse reagieren zu lassen. Hier bekommen Sie hervorragende Bilder, mit denen Sie eine normale Person von einer schizophrenen Person unterscheiden können, wenn Sie auf ihn oder sie ein bestimmtes Input-Paradigma anwenden. Wenn Sie dann eine bestimmte Reaktion sehen, wissen sie, dass die Person krank sein könnte. Sie können zum Beispiel sogar Mitgefühl erforschen. Wenn eine andere Person gefoltert wird und Schmerz empfindet und Sie dabei nur Zuschauer sind, können Sie eine Reaktion in Ihrem Gehirn an genau derselben Stelle spüren, wo die gefolterte Person selbst diese Reaktion verspürt - hervorgerufen durch nichts anderes als Mitgefühl. Was man also alles tun kann, ist ziemlich spannend, und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich auf diese Weise bewiesen habe, dass das Verfahren der Magnetresonanztomografie ein unanfechtbarer Zeugnis für den enormen Wert der Grundlagenforschung ist, da sie direkt mit der praktischen Anwendung verbunden ist. Und zu guter Letzt: Glück ist, noch eine weitere Anwendung für die Fourier-Transformation zu finden. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Richard Ernst on the fulfilling fusion of passion and profession
(00:17:11 - 00:17:45)

 

On a personal note, the more lectures of Nobel laureates in Lindau that I listen to, the more convinced I am that enjoying what you do in life adds immense value to later years. I find it inspiring to listen to these scientists describe their ongoing research, knowing that many of them are over 70 (or even over 90) and yet they are still working daily in research institutes, travelling around the world and sharing their experiences with younger generations. In the words of Henry Ford, “Anyone who keeps learning stays young”.

In this lecture, which is one of the most popular in the Lindau Mediatheque, Oliver Smithies gave wise advice to his listeners on a life in science, but I believe it can easily be transcribed to life in general; “It’s pointless to do something you don’t enjoy! It won’t work.”

 

Oliver  Smithies (2014) - Where Do Ideas Come From?

Where do I begin? That’s the next question. And I thought that perhaps this is a good place to begin. It’s a combination of the beginning and the end because here I am at a school in England unveiling a plaque saying that Oliver Smithies was a student here from age 5 to 11. And here are all the 5 year olds helping me to unveil the plaque. It was a small school in a small place because it was a village in Yorkshire, Copley, with a population of only 1,500 people. So I wonder how many of you students here who are coming... How many of you are from a place as small as 1,500 population? Oh yeah, quite a few from 1,500. That’s very good. But this photograph is of where I lived. I lived here and this river is called the River Calder. And the school was about where the pointer is now. And I would walk to school down there. And that river at this time -I was living there- was very polluted. But now it’s recovering very well. But then my family moved to Halifax which was somewhere up here and had a bigger population. And there I went to school, a grammar school. These are the old... In fact this was founded in Elizabethan days, old schools of high quality. And I am their first Nobel Prize winner. But now let’s just go downstream a little way. And if we go downstream, we come to a place called Elland Yorkshire. And that’s about 5, less than 5 kilometres from here. And you can almost see it. And the students there went to another grammar school called Rastrick Grammar School. And you know, they also have a Nobel laureate. You just heard him talk. There he is, John Walker. But let’s pursue this and go upstream. So there’s Copley and you go upstream and you come to this place, population 15,000 and that’s Todmorden. And low and behold they have a grammar school too. And they have one, a Nobel Prize in 1951 in physics, and another Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1973. So what is the secret? But of course the water was actually rather poor. It had no fluoride in it and my teeth rotted with the candy I ate as a school child. But obviously it’s the teachers isn’t it. And in Todmorden that was the same teacher who taught them science. Both of those Nobel laureates were taught by the same person, 20 years apart. And I had some grand teachers of which I’ll mention perhaps only one in my high school, in the grammar school. And his name was Oddy Brown and he really was an awful man. Nobody liked him, I didn’t like him. And he was a cheat. But he loved mathematics. And he taught me calculus. And it was like, ah, this marvellous subject. So he could teach and you could learn from him. You could learn from him even if he wasn’t a nice person. You don’t have to learn necessarily from somebody who is nice. But I was lucky enough to get a scholarship to Oxford, to Balliol College. And my teacher there, my tutor Sandy Ogston, he was very nice. He was famous for a couple of things, one of which he’s a bit ashamed of because he said it only took him 15 minutes to think of it. And that was how enzymes can make levo or dextro rotary compound starting from something that is not optically active, the 3 point attachment hypothesis. But anyway Sandy was a good teacher obviously because he had a Nobel Prize winner in 1978 and he had another one in 2007. So you can be fortunate in your teachers and the way they teach. That’s where it comes from. So how was the teaching carried out in the university there and at that time? It was rather remarkable. You would be given a topic to write an essay on. For example he gave me this topic. And you were expected to go away and fiddle around and you weren’t expected to come back with something you got out of a text book or even a review. You were expected to come back with some work from original papers. And so here is then something that really was where ideas come from because this is a volume of Advances in Enzymology. And why on earth would I show you a picture of the volume. Well, the reason is that when I read the article, which I am going to tell you about in a moment in this journal, it was so revealing and so exciting that I remember where I was sitting, I remember what the colour of the journal was, I remember what the paper looks like. You can get so much inspiration from reading. Ideas come from reading and reading good things. And this was the article by Fritz Lipmann, who won the Nobel Prize in 1941. And it was about energy rich phosphate. And he invented this idea that some phosphate bonds have high energy and some have low energy. And I can give you an easy example from organic chemistry that some of you may be able to understand. If you take ethyl acetate, that’s a rather low energy ester between an alcohol and an acid. But if you take acetyl chloride, that is an acid and hydride, an acetic acid and hydrochloric acid. And that’s a very high energy compound and will acetylate many things. Whereas ethyl acetate hasn’t got much energy And what Lipmann was, to describe that difference. And this is where it comes into my sphere as it were because I wrote an essay for Sandy and came back with this scheme which I called the Smithies cycle. This was before Krebs cycle, before the tricarboxylic acid cycle. And I could take inorganic phosphate and through this series of reactions I could generate ATP. And that would require the loss of 2 hydrogen, 2 protons. And if I put the 2 protons back, I could go back here and I could keep going on round and round and round. I could make energy for nothing. Well, I knew this was wrong. But I didn’t know why it was wrong. And actually it took even Sandy a while to decipher it. But he did and he wrote an article as a result of this which was published in Physiological Reviews quite a while ago. But in it he showed that the system depended upon a gradient of chemical potential of the hydrogen ion or the hydrogen..., the proton moving along a gradient. Just as we’ve heard from John. And he also deduced that this would not be kinetically possible unless all the factors were in a complex because if they dissociated the rate of reaction would be too slow and they had to go in a complex. So he deduced that there should be a big complex and that the energy could come from the movement of a proton. So it’s very nice to have followed your talk John with Sandy. But anyway he published it and he was kind enough to put my name on it as a scholar of Oxford. But then somebody about probably 20 years ago came to me and said: “Are you that Smithies who wrote an article in Physiological Reviews in 1948?” And I said: “Well, yes as a matter of fact I am that Smithies.” He said: “Oh, I thought you were dead.” So anyway, let’s go on. And here’s my PhD thesis, my results. These are my experimental points. And those are the theoretical points. And you can see that the experimental points were so close together that you had to interrupt the line, the theoretical line, to let them show. I was very proud of this machine that I’d built. It was an osmometer. It doesn’t matter what that is. And I published it. And you know it has a record, this paper. And nobody ever quoted it. And nobody ever used the method. And I never used the method. So I ask the question: What was the point of it? And the answer is really rather revealing to you guys. Because the answer is that I enjoyed doing it and I learned to do good science. But it’s also obvious from this that it’s quite unimportant what you do, isn’t it? It doesn’t matter what you do to get a PhD. All that matters is that you learn to do good science. But there is a corollary. You have to enjoy it. If you don’t enjoy it, then go to your advisor and say: And then if your advisor won’t or can’t give you another problem, change your advisor. It sounds like a joke but really it’s the secret of life you might say, of scientific life certainly. Do something that you enjoy. Critical for your enjoyment in the future. And if you find you don’t like science go and play the guitar or go and write a book or go climbing or something. Do something you enjoy. It’s pointless doing something you don’t enjoy. It won’t work. Well, so my first job was in Toronto. And I went there and insulin was discovered in Toronto. And David Scott was important in that early work. And he said: “You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin.” And so I did a very systematic literature search. But in those days there wasn’t Google and you couldn’t do anything. So you just went to a thing called a chemical abstract. And you looked for everything that had the word insulin in it. Which was tabulated and all of these were looked at. And then every now and then one was worth looking at a bit more. And in that way you could get some idea what to do. And I decided that I would look for a precursor of insulin for various reasons. I might say I never found it. But that’s what I set out to do. And so I was doing electrophoresis to try to see if I could see insulin because if I couldn’t see insulin, I certainly couldn’t see a precursor. And you might notice that I’m working on January first but that’s not work, I’m playing after all. And here was insulin unrolling like a carpet, it was very annoying. I couldn’t get any migration. And then I heard that people in the local hospital were using a method devised by Kunkel and Slater. And they’d done experiments with filter paper. And they showed that if they had a certain protein, it would stick to the paper and unroll. Just like my insulin. But if they used starch grains as a supporting medium, it didn’t stick. And the starch grains were made into a rather complicated apparatus. But it was really a moist bed of starch grains. But in order to find out where the protein was, you would have to cut it into many, many, many slices. And do a protein determination on every slice. So imagine. One electrophoresis would take you 50 protein determinations. Well I was alone in the lab. I didn’t even have anybody to do my dishes. I couldn’t possibly do an experiment like that. But I wanted the feature of not absorbing. And then I remembered helping my mother to do the laundry. And I think I ought to say “helping”. I was there. And she used to cook starch into a gooey mess and apply it to the shirt collars of my father’s shirts. And then iron it. That’s how you made stiff collars in those days. And in tidying up at the end it would set into a jelly. And I remembered that. And I thought that, well now, if I just cook the starch into a jelly, then I can stain it and I won’t have to do any of these protein measurements. And I went back that afternoon and found some starch and cooked it up. And sure enough there my insulin ran as a neat band in the system. I had gotten over the problem of absorption and begun to do gel electrophoresis. And here a little bit later, a couple of months later I tried serum just for fun and as a rough test. And I got some resolution and I set it up again at midnight, I was a bachelor. And a few days later this was the sort of result I was getting. And in those days people thought there were only 5 proteins in serum: albumin, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta and gamma globulin. And here I was seeing all these bands. But I couldn’t label them even because I didn’t know what was what. But it was pretty promising. So I asked my boss, David Scott, if I could change and work on serum proteins. And he was a good scientist and he said: “Yes, by all means you’ve got something very interesting.” So I began to do studies on serum proteins. And here is a couple of gels when I was about ready to publish. A couple of things are noticeable. First of all, that isn’t a photograph. And the reason is my lab didn’t own a camera. It was just me. So that’s why it’s a sketch. But I could go and arrange to have a photograph taken. The other thing is that these blood samples were from 2 of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself. And I think... Didn’t you tell me John that you gave me some blood one time when you were passing through in Wisconsin? Did you? No it was somebody here, somebody else here. Some other member here passing through Wisconsin I bled. But anyway I was ready to publish and then just I want to stress what I had discovered. First of all, the critical thing is that starch only forms gels at high concentrations. And the concentrated gel impedes the movement of large molecules. And therefore starch gels separate molecules largely by size. And so quite accidentally I invented molecular sieving electrophoresis which of course you use these days with a polyacrylamide instead of starch. But ideas come from all sorts of places. And I was interested to find... I got a prize with Ed Southern. Some of you will have done Southern Blot for the discovery etc. of gel electrophoresis and so on. Both of us got our ideas from childhood memories. Mine, as I’ve told you, was from the laundry. And his was from a process called mimeographing. It was before the days of Xeroxing. And you would take a sheet of wax paper that had been typed on which had holes in it where the typewriter had hit it. And you would put dye through on to a gel below and then you would take imprints off the die which is what Southern blotting is. So ideas can come from many places. But just before publishing just by chance I ran another sample. And it was very strange. Most odd. Many extra components. All these extra bands. BW, what was different about BW? Well, BW was a woman. And this was the first time I’d run a sample from a woman. I thought I’d found a new method of telling men from women. And I called my pattern and the other guys pattern M and this, the F pattern. And I could do 2 a day. And I ran for the next 5 days, I ran the man and woman serum and it worked. The male, female, male, female. They fitted the pattern. And then about the 7th day they were switched. Well that’s alright, I’ve muddled the sample. Ran them again, no switching. So, oh, Casey Cock was the name of the guy and we went into him, Casey come on let’s have a look. But it turned out not to have anything to do with male femaleness. And this is my data file. But now although it looks crude, it’s a very good file because I can read it 60 years after it was written. Now your data files that you have in your computers I bet you can’t read them in 5 years from now. So make hard copies. Make hard copies of your data. Don’t rely entirely on an electronic copy. And this was... It turned out that the 2 types, the F and the M, had nothing to do with maleness and femaleness. And it turned out that there was a third type, a variation of the M type. This was worked out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker. And she and I together worked out that this was due to a difference in a single gene coding for a protein called haptoglobin. And then at that time Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram just had worked out the first protein difference, the globin gene with a G to V mutation, a glutamic acid to valine mutation. So this was an inspiration. And so George Connell and Gordon Dickson, my 2 friends, came back to Toronto and together we worked out what the difference was in haptoglobin. And it turned out that there was a simple difference of 1 amino acid and that was... I call it the F to S. But one of the types, the one that gave the multiple band, was due to the rather unusual form of crossing over, made a duplication. And the crossing over is called non-homologous because you see GH and BC have nothing to do with each other. They are not homologous sequences. But once you had the duplication you could get homologous crossing over because of an unusual thought. Because you could get CDE of the second copy of the gene, in the duplication. Could line up with CDE in the first half of the duplication. And you could get a crossover here which would produce a triplication. And this was predictable and we found it in the population. So this gave me the feeling that homologous recombination was a predictable event. It might be rare but it’s predictable. And it goes into the mind. So the time came, time marched on and we were able to clone genes and our lab looked at the G gamma and the A gamma of the globin genes. But then I was teaching and I was teaching molecular biology. And this was a very striking paper there by Terry Orr-Weaver in Rodney Rothstein’s lab. And she showed that in yeast you could get recombination between an incoming plasmid and the yeast chromosome due to homology. And this crossing over could lead to the insertion of a sequence. So a teaching, I knew about this and I taught it. And I began to think maybe it would be possible to do that with a globin gene and corrector gene, a homologous crossing over where this is a mutant gene. Here is the normal sequence. Line up, cross over and correct the gene. But I didn’t know how to do it. And I wasn’t even sure that it would be possible of course. But then teaching, I had to teach my course. And this paper came out in April of ’82. And I’m not going to go into the method except to say it required a thing called gene rescue in which they found a blue piece of DNA next to a red piece of DNA. And I thought I can use that for my gene targeting test. I can make an assay for gene placement. And the aim is to place the correcting DNA in the correct place. And I had this idea that this would be the blue piece of DNA, the same piece that those guys had used. And here’s a red piece of DNA on the globin gene. This is on the target. This is on the incoming DNA. If those 2 things come together, I have proven homologous recombination. And I did calculations here which led me to believe that the method was sensitive enough that even if it was random, I could find something that had a frequency of less than 1 over 3 times 10^9th the size of the human genome. So on with the work and make a targeting construct. We didn’t have DNA sequencing or we didn’t have DNA synthesising. And it was complicated. And there’s a page, a couple of pages from my notebook. They’re pretty aren’t they? I don’t know what they mean. But anyway the time came and I collaborated with Raju Kucherlapati and I sent my DNA to him. He would do the cellular work and send me back the pooled DNA and I would look for this recombinant fragment with a horrible assay. And here is the first test. The cosmos, the real thing. This was not an artifactual thing now from Raju. And here it is. And then I noticed the date. It won’t mean anything to you, this is my birthday. And it was my 58th birthday. So here I am doing some of my best experiments on my 58th birthday. And it didn’t work. You don’t get special dispensations on your birthday. But you can do experiments on them. Anyway, then we simplified the system. It looks more like Terry Orr-Weaver’s system now. And we could get recombination. And I’ll show you the end result of it where we could expect that if we hadn’t modified the gene, there would be a fragment of DNA, 11 kilobases. And if we had modified it, the fragment would be 8 kilobases. And here is the gel that showed... In fact one of the columns that we had, had the 8 kilobase fragment instead of the 20. And so as it says here: Number 20 is it! And very exciting, 3 years and 1 month after starting. Rather quick I think. We published. This is the important sentence. That although the frequency of success which is actually 10^-6 of the number of cells treated. It’s at present modest. This showed unequivocally that gene targeting was possible. And so on with the march. And then we heard of Martin Evans’s lovely work. And here EK cell system. That’s what he called it at that time and he brought personally into the lab. He came into the lab one day, visiting from the UK. He came in and here they are Oliver. So that’s what science is also about. It’s about sharing. Share willingly. And he shared willingly. And he shared also with Mario Capecchi. And both of us then went on and started to work on this. And I used [name inaudible 00:30:01] method instead of the complicated method eventually to detect the recombinant. And here’s the apparatus that it was done with. Still around in the lab. You wouldn’t believe it but this is the one that did homologous recombination in our lab in ES cells the first time. It should have this label on it. That was the label they used, that one of my graduate student friends when I was a graduate student, used to put on things, that were around about in the lab. NBGBOKFO it’s pronounced. And that’s translated as “no bloody good but ok for Oliver”. Which means that this is all junk that’s put together to make this machine. I didn’t have to buy anything. I’d just go around and scrounge. So that’s how you do science. But anyway, the gene targeting worked beautifully and my wife Nobuyo Maeda made a marvellous model of atherosclerosis with it. I’m not an author on that paper. It was the method we were using but it was all her idea. Oh, and there’s Sandy again. Well I’m at the end of my time but I’ll take a couple of minutes extra here to say that now I’ve got the date of his death and life because he asked me to write his scientific memoires when he died. If you had your advisor ask you to do that, you would probably say yes too. And then I had to read it and here was an equation he’d written. And this was an equation talking about gels and the space available in gels. And he was showing that he could calculate that big molecules could find only a small space and little molecules a large space. And I got exposed to the kidney. And there I thought that this idea might work in the kidney. And I began to test this idea. This is just a quick view of a high electron micrograph of the kidney. And here is the plasma and a red cell would be about as big as where I’m talking now. And these are albumin molecules. And I had the idea that this is a gel and here is the urine and that molecule could go through the gel and be separated according to their size using Ogston’s equation as it were. And to do that what do you have to do? Well you have to have something that you can see in the electron microscope. And Michael Faraday has a lovely paper. He had many discoveries. But he has a 50 page paper on making gold nanoparticle. And there are some made with the type of method that he used. And I still have one with me, I rather like these particles. And I don’t know whether I can get this out anymore but, ah yeah, here we are. Here they are, maybe you can just have some idea. That’s tube number 4X there and these gold nanoparticles are stable for long periods of time. And I’ve been putting them into kidneys and making them in different sizes as you can see there. Some of which are approaching molecular sizes of a immunoglobulin molecule and so on. And here are the smallest we can make, an image taken by my postdoc Marlon Lawrence very recently. And that’s got about 1,000 gold atoms in it. You’re seeing the individual gold atom in the crystal. And they assemble into various sizes. And here’s an example, a large particle which is mainly confined to plasma but can cross into the basement membrane. Rather like the diagram I showed you. Oh, what’s this? 2014. Still working at the weekends, Smithies. Why do you do it? Because you enjoy it. One last thing that I will take time for. I have a hobby and that’s flying. And this man here, Field Moray, taught me to fly. And like all pilots when they’re learning, you’re scared. At least you’re certainly nervous and I used to sweat terribly. I mean it would pour off me. So that I remember saying to him one day after a lesson: And I learned to teach flying too. And I taught some of these guys. And John Cooper used to get so sweaty that his shirt would be absolutely sodden through after he’d had a lesson. And when he went by himself the first time, he came back from going by himself and he walked across to the office and said: It’s a lesson in science too. If you want to do something and you’re frightened of it, learn about it, take lessons, go and teach, have somebody to teach you. You can do anything you want. You have to overcome your fear with knowledge. Very important part of learning to do science. Don’t be frightened of something new. Go and learn. And then you might have an airplane. This is my airplane and it’s a grand thing to have a companion with whom you’re happy. And that’s where I’ll end. Applause.

Wo fange ich an? Das ist die nächste Frage. Und ich dachte, vielleicht ist dies ein guter Ort für den Beginn. Er schlägt einen Bogen zwischen Anfang und Ende, denn hier enthülle ich an einer Schule in England eine Tafel mit einer Inschrift, die besagt, dass Oliver Smithies hier im Alter von fünf bis elf Schüler war. Und all die fünfjährigen Kinder helfen mir dabei, diese Tafel zu enthüllen. Es war eine kleine Schule in einem kleinen Ort. Es war ein Dorf in Yorkshire, Copley, mit nur 1500 Einwohnern. Ich frage mich gerade, wie viele Studenten hier wohl aus einem Ort kommen, der weniger als 1500 Einwohner hat? Oh, doch so einige…Das ist sehr gut. Dieses Foto hier stammt also von dort, wo ich gelebt habe. Ich habe hier gelebt und dieser Fluss heißt Calder. Und die Schule stand dort, wo der Pointer jetzt hinzeigt. Und mein Schulweg führte dort entlang. Dieser Fluss – dort habe ich gelebt – war sehr schadstoffbelastet. Aber inzwischen erholt er sich ganz gut. Dann zog meine Familie nach Halifax, das liegt irgendwo hier und hatte mehr Einwohner. Und dort ging ich zum Gymnasium. Das waren diese alten… tatsächlich wurde diese Schule in elisabethanischen Zeiten gegründet. Das waren alte Schulen von hoher Qualität. Und ich bin jetzt deren erster Nobelpreisgewinner. Aber bewegen wir uns jetzt etwas stromabwärts. Wenn wir uns stromabwärts bewegen, stoßen wir auf einen Ort, der Elland Yorkshire heißt. Das sind etwas weniger als fünf Kilometer von hier. Man kann es fast sehen. Und die Schüler dort besuchten ein anderes Gymnasium, das hieß Rastrick Grammar School. Und auch die haben einen Nobelpreisträger. Sie haben gerade seinen Vortrag gehört. Da ist er, John Walker. Aber machen wir mal weiter. Da ist also Copley und wenn man weiter nach oben geht, erreicht man diesen Ort, mit 15.000 Einwohnern. Das ist Todmorden. Und, es geschehen noch Zeichen und Wunder, dort gibt es ebenfalls ein Gymnasium. Und die haben 1951 einen Nobelpreisträger in Physik und 1973 einen weiteren Nobelpreisträger in Chemie hervorgebracht. Was ist das Geheimnis? Aber das Wasser war ja ziemlich schlecht. Es enthielt kein Fluorid und meine Zähne verrotteten bei den all Süßigkeiten, die ich als Schulkind aß. In Todmorden hat derselbe Lehrer diese beiden Nobelpreisträger in der Schule unterrichtet. Dazwischen lagen 20 Jahre. Und auch ich hatte großartige Lehrer, von denen ich nur einen vom Gymnasium erwähnen will. Sein Name ist Oddy Brown und er war wirklich ein fürchterlicher Mensch. Niemand mochte ihn, auch ich mochte ihn nicht. Er war ein Schwindler. Aber er liebte die Mathematik. Und er brachte mir die Infinitesimalrechnung bei. Er konnte also unterrichten und man konnte von ihm lernen. Man konnte von ihm lernen, obwohl er kein netter Mensch war. Man muss nicht unbedingt von jemandem lernen, der nett ist. Glücklicherweise erhielt ich ein Stipendium für Oxford, für das Balliol College. Und mein dortiger Lehrer, mein Tutor Sandy Ogston, war sehr sympathisch. Er ist für verschiedene Dinge bekannt geworden. Und für eines hat er sich sogar ein bisschen geschämt, weil er, wie er sagte, nur 15 Minuten gebraucht hatte, um darüber nachzudenken. Und das betraf die Frage, wie Enzyme links- oder rechtsrotierende Verbindungen aus etwas bilden können, was optisch nicht aktiv ist, die 3-Punkt-Anbindungshypothese. Aber wie auch immer, Sandy war offensichtlich ein guter Lehrer, hat er doch 1978 einen Nobelpreisgewinner geliefert und 2007 einen weiteren. Man kann also Glück haben mit seinen Lehrern und mit der Art und Weise, wie sie unterrichten. Daher kommt es. Aber wie wurde zur damaligen Zeit an der dortigen Hochschule unterrichtet? Das war ziemlich bemerkenswert. Man erhielt ein Thema, über das man einen Essay schreiben sollte. Er gab mir beispielsweise dieses Thema: „Oliver, schreib einen Essay über den Energiestoffwechsel für mich.“ Das war alles, was einem gesagt wurde. Und dann wurde von einem erwartet, dass man sich auf den Weg macht und etwas austüftelt. Und es ging nicht um etwas, was man in irgendeinem Lehrbuch oder in einer Rezension finden konnte. Erwartet wurde, dass man seine Arbeit über etwas schrieb, das in Originalarbeiten zu finden war. Und hier sehen Sie so etwas, aus dem wirklich Ideen hervorgegangen sind. Es ist ein Band von „Advances in Enzymology“. Und warum um alles in der Welt sollte ich Ihnen ein Bild von diesem Band zeigen? Der Grund ist der, dass der Moment, als ich den Artikel, über den ich Ihnen gleich erzählen werde, in diesem Fachjournal las, für mich so aufregend und aufschlussreich war, dass ich noch heute genau weiß, wo ich saß. Ich erinnere mich noch genau an die Farbe des Journals, ich erinnere mich noch genau daran, wie das Papier aussah. Man kann so sehr inspiriert werden durch das Lesen. Ideen kommen beim Lesen, beim Lesen von guten Sachen. Und das war der Artikel von Fritz Lipmann, der 1941 den Nobelpreis gewonnen hatte. Und das Thema waren energiereiche Phosphate. Er stellte die Theorie auf, dass einige Phosphatverbindungen eine hohe Energie und andere eine niedrige Energie haben. Und ich kann Ihnen ein einfaches Beispiel aus der organischen Chemie nennen, das vielleicht einige von Ihnen nachvollziehen können. Ethylacetat ist ein Niedrigenergieester, zwischen einem Alkohol und einer Säure. Aber Acetylchlorid, das ist Säure und Hydrid, Essigsäure und Salzsäure, das ist eine hochenergetische Verbindung, die vieles acetyliert, während Ethylacetat energieschwach ist. Lipmann hat diesen Unterschied beschrieben. Und an dieser Stelle haben sich sozusagen unsere Wege gekreuzt, weil ich einen Essay für Sandy schrieb und dieses Schema entwickelte, das ich als den Smithies-Zyklus bezeichnet habe. Das war vor dem Krebs-Zyklus, vor dem Tricarbonsäure-Zyklus. Und ich würde von anorganischem Phosphat ausgehen und über diese Serie von Reaktionen ATP erzeugen. Und das würde den Verlust von zwei Wasserstoffprotonen erfordern. Und wenn ich die zwei Protonen zurückgeben würde, könnte ich an diese Stelle zurückkehren und den Zyklus am Laufen halten, Runde um Runde. Ich könnte Energie erzeugen, die nichts kostet. Nun, natürlich wusste ich, dass das nicht stimmte. Aber ich wusste nicht, warum das falsch war. Und tatsächlich hat selbst Sandy eine Weile gebraucht, um das zu enträtseln. Aber es gelang ihm und er schrieb einen Artikel darüber, der vor längerem in Physiological Reviews veröffentlicht wurde. Darin hat er gezeigt, dass das System von einem chemischen Potenzialgradienten des Wasserstoffions abhängig war oder des Wasserstoffs…des Protons, das sich auf einem Gradienten bewegt. So, wie wir es gerade von John gehört haben. Und er folgerte auch, dass das kinetisch unmöglich wäre, sofern sich nicht alle Faktoren in einem Komplex befinden, weil die Reaktionsgeschwindigkeit bei einer Dissoziierung zu langsam sein würde. Sie mussten also einen Komplex bilden. Er leitete daraus ab, dass es einen riesigen Komplex geben musste und dass die Energie aus der Bewegung eines Protons stammen könnte. Deshalb war es richtig schön, von deinem Gespräch, John, mit Sandy zu hören. Jedenfalls veröffentlichte er das und er war so freundlich, auch meinen Namen als Stipendiat von Oxford darauf zu erwähnen. Vor ungefähr 20 Jahren kam jemand auf mich zu und fragte: Und ich sagte: „In der Tat, ich bin dieser Smithies.“ Und dann sagte er: „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären schon tot.“ Jedenfalls… also weiter. Hier ist meine Doktorarbeit, meine Ergebnisse. Dies sind meine Versuchspunkte und das hier sind die theoretischen Punkte. Und Sie sehen, dass die Versuchspunkte so eng zusammenlagen, dass man die theoretische Linie unterbrechen musste, um das darzustellen. Ich war sehr stolz auf die Maschine, die ich gebaut hatte. Es war ein Osmometer. Es spielt keine Rolle, was das ist. Und das habe ich dann veröffentlicht. Und wissen Sie, dieses Papier hat einen Rekord erzielt: Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Und niemand hat jemals die Methode angewandt. Und auch ich habe die Methode niemals angewandt. Ich frage also: Was hat es genützt? Und die Antwort dürfte tatsächlich ziemlich aufschlussreich für Sie sein. Denn sie lautet: Es hat mir Freude gemacht, das zu tun, und ich habe gelernt, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben. Aber dabei wird auch deutlich, dass es ziemlich egal ist, was man macht. Es ist egal, womit man sich beschäftigt, um den Doktortitel zu erhalten. Alles, worum es geht, ist, dass man lernt, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben. Aber es gibt auch noch einen Folgesatz. Man muss Freude an dieser Arbeit haben. Und wenn das nicht der Fall ist, sollte man zu seinem Studienbetreuer gehen und sagen: Ich meine das ganz ernst, ich meine das wirklich ernst. Und wenn Ihr Studienbetreuer Ihnen dann keine andere Fragestellung anbieten will oder kann, sollten Sie ihn wechseln. (Lachen) Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Witz, aber tatsächlich ist es das Geheimnis des Lebens, könnte man sagen, zumindest des wissenschaftlichen Lebens. Tu etwas, was dir Freude macht. Das entscheidet auch über deine zukünftige Freude. Und wenn du das Gefühl hast, dass du Wissenschaft nicht magst, dann spiel Gitarre oder schreib ein Buch oder geh Klettern oder mach etwas anderes. Mach etwas, das dir Freude macht. Es ist sinnlos, etwas zu tun, das dir keine Freude macht. Das funktioniert nicht. Mein erster Job war in Toronto. Ich ging also dorthin. In Toronto wurde das Insulin entdeckt. Und David Scott war für die frühen Arbeiten auf diesem Gebiet bedeutend. Er sagte: „Du kannst an jedem Thema arbeiten, was dir gefällt, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat.“ Und so nahm ich mir eine sehr systematische Literaturrecherche vor. Aber damals gab es noch kein Google und man konnte nicht alles machen. Man griff damals auf die so genannten Chemical Abstracts zurück. Und da suchte man dann nach allem, was irgendwie die Bezeichnung Insulin trug. Das war entsprechend geordnet und da konnte man dann nachschlagen. Und ab und zu fand man einen Artikel, mit dem man sich dann etwas näher beschäftigte. Und so konnte man eine Vorstellung darüber entwickeln, was man machen wollte. Und ich beschloss aus mehreren Gründen, einen Insulinvorläufer zu finden. Und ich sollte sagen, dass ich den nie gefunden habe. Aber das war das, was ich vorhatte. Und deshalb betrieb ich Elektrophorese, um Insulin zu entdecken, denn wenn ich kein Insulin finden würde, würde ich sicherlich auch keinen Vorläufer entdecken. Und vielleicht haben Sie gemerkt, dass ich an einem 1. Januar arbeite. Aber das ist keine Arbeit. Letzten Endes ist es eher eine Spielerei. Und hier ist Insulin, das sich wie ein Teppich ausrollt, das war sehr lästig. Mir gelang einfach keine Migration. Und dann hörte ich, dass Mitarbeiter des örtlichen Krankenhauses eine Methode verwendeten, die Kunkel und Slater entwickelt hatten. Die hatten mit Filterpapier experimentiert. Und die hatten nachgewiesen, dass ein bestimmtes Protein im Papier hängen bleibt und ausrollt, genau wie mein Insulin. Wenn sie aber Stärketeilchen als Trägermedium verwendeten, blieb es nicht hängen. Und die Stärketeilchen wurden in einen ziemlich komplizierten Apparat gesteckt. Tatsächlich war es ein feuchtes Bett aus Stärketeilchen. Aber um herauszufinden, wo das Protein steckte, musste man das in viele, viele Scheiben schneiden. Und dann musste man bei jeder Scheibe eine Proteinbestimmung vornehmen. Stellen Sie sich also vor, dass eine einzige Elektrophorese 50 Proteinbestimmungen bedeuten würde. Ich war allein im Labor. Ich hatte nicht mal jemanden, der den Abwasch erledigt hat. Wie sollte ich da überhaupt ein solches Experiment bewältigen? Ich wollte aber die nicht-absorbierende Eigenschaft. Und dann erinnerte ich mich daran, wie ich meiner Mutter bei der Wäsche geholfen hatte. Und ich denke, ich sollte ehrlicherweise „geholfen“ (deutet Anführungsstriche an) sagen. Ich war da. Und sie kochte gewöhnlich Stärke in Form einer zähflüssigen Masse und brachte sie auf die Hemdkragen der Hemden meines Vaters auf. Und dann wurde das gebügelt. So sorgte man damals für steife Kragen. Und zum Schluss beim Aufräumen war das dann schließlich zu einer Geleemasse geworden. Und daran erinnerte ich mich. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einfach die Stärke zu einem Gelee verkoche, dann kann ich das grundieren und muss diese Proteinmessungen nicht mehr machen. Und so holte ich mir am Nachmittag Stärke und kochte sie auf. Und tatsächlich floss mein Insulin wie ein ordentliches Band in das System. Ich hatte also das Absorbierungsproblem überwunden und begann mit der Gel-Elektrophorese. Und einige Zeit später, einige Monate später, probierte ich das Ganze einfach so als Spielerei mit Serum aus, ein grober Test. Und ich erhielt eine gewisse Auflösung und setzte das um Mitternacht erneut an, ich war ja Junggeselle. Nach einigen Tagen hatte ich dann dieses Ergebnis. Damals dachte man, dass es im Serum nur fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha 1, Alpha 2, Beta- und Gamma-Globulin. Und hier sah ich all diese Bänder. Ich konnte sie nicht einmal markieren, weil ich nicht wusste, was was war. Aber das sah ziemlich vielversprechend aus. So wandte ich mich also an meinen Chef, David Scott, mit der Frage, ob ich nicht das Thema wechseln könnte und zu Serumproteinen arbeiten dürfte. Er war ein guter Wissenschaftler und sagte: „Ja, du hast auf jeden Fall etwas sehr Interessantes entdeckt.“ So begann ich also mit der Erforschung von Serumproteinen. Und hier sind einige der Gels zu dem Zeitpunkt, als ich kurz vor der Veröffentlichung stand. Und dabei sind einige Dinge bemerkenswert. Erstens: Das ist kein Foto. Und der Grund dafür ist, dass mein Labor keine Kamera besaß. Es besaß nur mich. Aus diesem Grund ist es eine Skizze. Aber ich hätte ja die Aufnahme eines Fotos arrangieren können. Das Zweite ist, dass diese Blutproben von zwei meiner Freunde stammten. Ich hatte es satt, mir ständig selbst Blut abzunehmen. Und ich glaube… John, hast du mir nicht erzählt, dass du mir einmal, als du in Wisconsin warst, Blut zur Verfügung gestellt hast? Hast du? Nein, es war wohl jemand anderes, jemand anderes hier. Einige andere Leute, die Wisconsin bereisten, habe ich bluten lassen. Auf jeden Fall war ich zur Veröffentlichung bereit und ich möchte beschreiben, was ich entdeckt hatte. Erstmal ist dabei entscheidend, dass Stärke nur bei sehr hohen Konzentrationen geliert. Und das konzentrierte Gel behindert die Bewegung großer Moleküle. Und deshalb separieren Stärkegele Moleküle in erster Linie nach ihrer Größe. Und so habe ich relativ zufällig die Molekülsiebungselektrophorese erfunden, die man heute allerdings mit einem Polyacrylamid statt Stärke verwendet. Ideen können überall herkommen. Ich wollte herausfinden… ich erhielt einen Preis zusammen mit Ed Southern. Vielleicht haben einige von Ihnen schon mal die Southern-Blot-Methode eingesetzt, zur Entdeckung von Gel-Elektrophorese usw. Wir beide haben bei unseren Ideen auf Kindheitserinnerungen zurückgegriffen. Meine stammte, wie ich bereits erzählt habe, aus der Wäscherei. Und seine stammte aus von einem Vorgang mit der Bezeichnung Mimeographie. Das war in der Zeit, bevor es Kopiergeräte gab. Man nahm dazu ein Blatt Wachspapier, auf dem getippt worden war und das Löcher an den Stellen enthielt, wo die Schreibmaschine das Blatt getroffen hatte. Und dann trug man Farbe auf einem Gel unten auf und konnte davon Abzüge herstellen. Das ist das Southern-Blot-Verfahren. Ideen können also überall herkommen. Aber kurz vor der Veröffentlichung ließ ich zufällig eine andere Probe durchlaufen. Und das war sehr merkwürdig. Sehr sonderbar. Viele zusätzliche Bestandteile. All diese zusätzlichen Bänder. BW, was war bei BW anders? Nun, BW war eine Frau. Und dies war das erste Mal, dass ich die Blutprobe einer Frau durchlaufen ließ. Und ich dachte, ich hätte eine neue Methode gefunden, Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und so nannte ich die Muster von mir und den anderen Jungs M und dieses hier nannte ich das F-Muster. Und ich konnte zwei davon pro Tag durchlaufen lassen. Und das habe ich die ganzen nächsten fünf Tage gemacht, ich ließ das männliche und weibliche Serum durchlaufen und es funktionierte. Männlich, weiblich, männlich, weiblich. Das passte zum Muster. Und dann, es war wohl der siebte Tag, wurden sie verwechselt. Ja, okay, ich habe die Probe verwechselt, sie erneut durchlaufen lassen, ohne Verwechslung. Casey Cock war der Name des Jungen und wir suchten ihn auf und sagten: Casey, lass uns mal nachschauen. Aber es stellte sich dann heraus, dass es nichts mit Männlichkeit und Weiblichkeit zu tun hatte. Und das hier ist meine Datendatei. Die mag heute vielleicht ziemlich primitiv erscheinen. Aber es ist eine gute Datei, weil ich sie auch 60 Jahre, nachdem ich sie geschrieben habe, noch lesen kann. Und ich wette, dass Sie Ihre Datendateien, die Sie auf Ihrem Computer gespeichert haben, in fünf Jahren nicht mehr lesen können. Machen Sie also Ausdrucke davon. Drucken Sie Ihre Daten aus. Verlassen Sie sich nicht ausschließlich auf eine elektronische Kopie. Und es war… es stellte sich heraus, dass die beiden Typen, F und M, nichts mit Männlichkeit und Weiblichkeit zu tun hatten. Und es wurde noch eine dritte Art gefunden, eine Variation des M-Typs. Das wurde mit Unterstützung von Norma Ford-Walker ausgearbeitet. Und sie und ich arbeiteten gemeinsam daran und fanden heraus, dass dies mit einem Unterschied in einer einzigen Genkodierung für ein Protein mit der Bezeichnung Haptoglobin zusammenhängt. Zum damaligen Zeitpunkt hatten Linus Pauling, Harvey Itano und Vernon Ingram gerade die erste Proteindifferenz herausgefunden, das Globin-Gen mit einer G-zu-V-Mutation, eine Glutaminsäure-zu-Valin-Mutation. Das war wirklich inspirierend. George Connell und Gordon Dickson, meine beiden Freunde, kamen zurück nach Toronto. Gemeinsam fanden wir heraus, welcher Unterschied im Haptoglobin bestand. Es stellte sich heraus, dass es ein einfacher Unterschied von einer Aminosäure war und das war… ich nenne das das F-zu-S. Aber eine der Arten, nämlich die, die das multiple Band ergab, hing mit der ziemlich ungewöhnlichen Form einer Überkreuzung zusammen, bildete eine Duplizierung. Und diese Überkreuzung wird nicht-homolog genannt, weil GH und BC nichts miteinander zu tun haben. Das sind keine homologen Sequenzen. Aber wenn man die Duplizierung hatte, konnte man in einer ungewöhnlichen Weise eine homologe Überkreuzung erreichen. Weil man CDE der zweiten Kopie des Gens in der Duplizierung erhalten konnte. Man konnte das mit dem CDE aus der ersten Hälfte der Duplizierung aufreihen. Und man erreichte eine Überkreuzung, die eine Verdreifachung initiieren würde. Und das war vorhersagbar und wir fanden das in der Population bestätigt. Deshalb hatte ich den Eindruck, dass die homologe Rekombination ein vorhersagbares Ereignis ist, selten, aber vorhersagbar. Und das prägt sich ein. Und dann kam die Zeit…die Zeit verging und wir waren in der Lage Gene zu klonen und unser Labor beschäftigte sich mit dem G-Gamma und dem A-Gamma der Globin-Gene. Aber dann hatte ich eine Lehrtätigkeit und ich unterrichtete Molekularbiologie. Und ich stieß auf dieses sehr beeindruckende Papier von Terry Orr-Weaver in Rodney Rothsteins Labor. Sie wies nach, dass man in Hefe durch Homologie eine Rekombination zwischen einem ankommenden Plasmid und dem Hefechromosom erhalten konnte. Und diese Überkreuzung könnte zu der Einfügung einer Sequenz führen. Das war also der Unterrichtsstoff, ich wusste das und ich lehrte das. Und ich begann darüber nachzudenken, ob es vielleicht möglich wäre, das mit einem Globin-Gen und einem Korrektor-Gen durchzuführen – eine homologe Überkreuzung, wobei dies ein mutantes Gen ist. Hier ist die normale Sequenz. Ausrichten, überkreuzen und das Gen korrigieren. Aber ich wusste nicht, wie ich das anstellen sollte. Ich war nicht einmal sicher, ob es überhaupt möglich sein würde. Aber dann der Unterricht. Ich musste mein Seminar unterrichten. Und dieses Papier wurde im April '82 veröffentlicht. Und ich werde hier nicht tief auf die Methode eingehen, außer zu erwähnen, dass sie eine als Genrettung (gene rescue) bezeichnete Sache erforderlich machte, bei der man ein blaues Stück DNA neben einem roten Stück DNA fand. Und ich dachte mir, dass ich das für meine Gen-Targeting-Tests benutzen könnte. Ich kann einen Assay für die Genplatzierung herstellen. Das Ziel dabei ist es, die korrigierende DNA an der korrekten Stelle zu platzieren. Und ich hatte die Vorstellung, dass dies das blaue Stück der DNA sein würde, dasselbe Stück, das diese Forscher verwendet hatten. Und hier ist das rote Stück der DNA auf dem Globin-Gen. Das ist hier ist auf dem Target. Und das ist auf der ankommenden DNA. Wenn diese beiden Dinge zusammen kommen, habe ich eine nachgewiesene homologe Rekombination. Ich habe dann diese Berechnungen hier angestellt und das hat mich überzeugt, dass die Methode empfindlich genug ist, um – auch wenn es Zufall wäre – etwas zu finden, das eine Frequenz von unter 0,33 x 10^9 der Größe des Humangenoms aufweist. Die Arbeit ging also weiter und ich entwickelte ein Target-Konstrukt. Es gab damals keine DNA-Sequenzierung und keine DNA-Synthetisierung. Und es war kompliziert. Das hier ist eine Seite, sind mehrere Seiten aus meinem Notizbuch. Die sind doch herrlich, nicht wahr? Ich weiß gar nicht, was das bedeutet. Und dann kam die Zeit, in der ich mit Raju Kucherlapati zusammenarbeitete und ihm meine DNA zusandte. Er sollte die zelluläre Arbeit erledigen und mir die konzentrierte DNA zurücksenden und ich würde dieses rekombinante Fragment mit einer schrecklichen Gehaltsbestimmung suchen. Hier ist der erste Test. Der Kosmos, das Original. Das war kein Artefakt von Raju. Und hier ist es. Das Datum ist mir aufgefallen. Ihnen sagt das nichts, es ist mein Geburtstag. Und es war mein 58. Geburtstag. Ich mache also hier meine besten Experimente an meinem 58. Geburtstag. Und es funktionierte nicht. Man bekommt an seinem Geburtstag keine Ausnahmeregelungen geschenkt. Aber man kann an seinem Geburtstag Experimente durchführen. Jedenfalls haben wir das System dann vereinfacht. Es ähnelt heute eher dem System von Terry Orr-Weaver. Und wir waren erfolgreich mit der Rekombination. Und ich zeige Ihnen das Endresultat, nämlich, wo wir erwarten konnten, dass, wenn wir das Gen nicht modifiziert hätten, ein DNA-Fragment von 11 Kilobasen da wäre, und wenn wir es modifiziert hätten, ein Fragment von 8 Kilobasen. Und hier ist das Gel, das sich zeigte…Tatsächlich hatte eine unserer Säulen das 8 Kilobase-Fragment statt 20. Und wie es hier heißt: Nummer 20 ist es! Das war sehr aufregend, drei Jahre und einen Monat nach Beginn. Ich finde das ziemlich schnell. Wir veröffentlichten das. Und das hier ist ein wichtiger Satz: zeigt dies eindeutig, dass Gen-Targeting möglich ist.“ Wir machten also weiter. Und wir hörten von der tollen Arbeit von Martin Evans. Und hier ist das EK-Zellsystem. So nannte er das damals und er brachte das persönlich ins Labor. Eines Tages besuchte er uns aus Großbritannien im Labor. Er kam herein und sagte: „Hier hast du sie, Oliver.“ Und auch darum geht es in der Wissenschaft. Es geht um Teilen. Bereitwilliges Teilen. Er teilte bereitwillig. Und das machte er auch mit Mario Capecchi. Und wir beide machten dann weiter und arbeiteten damit. Und ich wandte schließlich die [Name unverständlich 00:30:01] Methode statt der komplizierten Methode an, um die Rekombinante zu finden. Und das hier ist der Apparat, mit dem das gemacht wurde. Der steht immer noch im Labor. Man glaubt es kaum, aber dieser Apparat hat erstmalig die homologe Rekombination in unserem Labor an ES-Zellen durchgeführt. Eigentlich sollte man diesen Aufkleber darauf anbringen. Das war der Aufkleber den einer meiner Doktoranden-Freunde, als ich selbst Doktorand war, überall auf die Sachen im Labor geklebt hat. NBGBOKFO wird es ausgesprochen. Und transkribiert bedeutet das „No Bloody Good But Ok For Oliver“. Und das heißt, dass für diese Maschine einfach aller möglicher Krimskram zusammengebaut wurde. Ich musste nichts kaufen. Ich hab einfach nur geguckt und geschnorrt. Und so macht man Wissenschaft. Jedenfalls funktionierte das Gen-Targeting hervorragend und meine Frau Nobuyo Maeda hat damit ein wunderbares Modell der Atherosklerose erstellt. Ich war nicht der Autor dieses Papiers. Es war die Methode, die wir verwendeten, aber es war allein ihre Idee. Und da ist wieder Sandy. Ich komme langsam zum Ende meiner Zeit, aber ich möchte noch einige Minuten speziell nutzen, um zu sagen, dass ich viele Aufzeichnungen von ihm habe, weil er mich, als er starb, bat, seine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren zu schreiben. Wenn Sie von Ihrem Begleiter gebeten würden, das zu tun, würden Sie wahrscheinlich auch ja sagen. Und deshalb habe ich das gelesen und ich fand eine Gleichung, die er aufgeschrieben hatte. Und das war eine Gleichung über Gele und über den in Gelen verfügbaren Raum. Und er zeigte auf, dass er berechnen konnte, dass große Moleküle nur einen kleinen Raum und kleine Moleküle einen großen Raum finden konnten. Und ich dachte an die Niere. Und ich dachte, dass diese Idee doch in der Niere funktionieren könnte. Und dann begann ich, diese Theorie zu testen. Dies ist eine Schnellansicht einer hochauflösenden elektronen-mikroskopischen Aufnahme der Niere. Und hier ist das Plasma. Und eine rote Zelle wäre genauso groß wie das hier. Und das sind Albumin-Moleküle. Und ich hatte die Idee, dass dies ein Gel ist und hier der Urin und dass das Molekül das Gel passieren könnte und mit Hilfe der Ogston-Gleichung gewissermaßen entsprechend der Größe getrennt werden könnte. Und was muss man tun, um das zu realisieren? Man braucht etwas, was man im Elektronen-Mikroskop sehen kann. Michael Faraday hat ein wunderbares Papier geschrieben. Er hat viele Entdeckungen gemacht. Aber er hat auch dieses wunderbare 50-seitige Papier über die Herstellung von Gold-Nanopartikeln geschrieben. Und das hier sind einige, die mit der von ihm eingesetzten Methode hergestellt wurden. Und ich habe noch welche dabei. Ich mag diese Partikel sehr. Und ich weiß nicht, ob ich das hier überhaupt herauskriege, aber ja, es funktioniert. Hier sind sie, vielleicht können Sie sich jetzt eine ungefähre Vorstellung davon machen. Das da ist Reagenzglas Nr. 4X. Diese Gold-Nanopartikel sind langzeitstabil. Ich habe sie in Nieren eingebracht und sie in unterschiedlichen Größen hergestellt, wie Sie hier sehen. Einige davon hatten annähernd Molekülgrößen eines Immunoglobulin-Moleküls usw. Und hier sind die Kleinsten, die wir herstellen können. Diese Aufnahme hat mein Postdoc-Mitarbeiter Marlon Lawrence vor kurzem gemacht. Und darin sind ungefähr 1.000 Goldatome enthalten. Sie sehen das einzelne Gold-Atom im Kristall. Und die setzen sich in verschiedenen Größen zusammen. Und hier ist ein Beispiel, ein großes Partikel, das in Plasma eingeschlossen ist, aber in die Basalmembran eindringen kann. Ziemlich ähnlich wie die Graphik, die ich Ihnen gezeigt habe. Oh, was ist das? Immer noch an Wochenenden arbeiten, Smithies. Warum macht man das? Weil man Freude daran hat. Eines noch. Ich habe ein Hobby und das ist fliegen. Dieser Mann hier, Field Moray, brachte mir das Fliegen bei. Und wie alle Piloten, die fliegen lernen, hatte ich Angst. Zumindest ist man nervös und ich schwitzte für gewöhnlich schrecklich. Das ist mir wirklich aus den Poren gelaufen. Und ich erinnere mich, dass ich eines Tages nach der Flugstunde zu ihm sagte: Das war so schlimm. Und ich lernte auch, anderen das Fliegen beizubringen. Und ich brachte einigen dieser Männer hier das Fliegen bei. Und John Cooper hat so geschwitzt, dass sein Hemd nach jeder Stunde absolut durchweicht war. Und als er zum ersten Mal allein geflogen war und zurückkam, kam er in das Büro und sagte: „Schau, Oliver, trocken.“ Das ist nicht nur in der Flugstunde so. Es ist auch in der Wissenschaft so. Wenn man etwas machen möchte und man Angst davor hat, sollte man möglichst viel darüber lernen, Stunden nehmen, und jemanden finden, der einem das beibringt. Und dann kann man alles machen, was man will. Man muss seine Angst durch Wissen überwinden. Das ist ein sehr wichtiger Teil, den man über wissenschaftliches Arbeiten lernen sollte. Hab keine Angst, etwas Neues auszuprobieren. Lerne es. Und dann hast du möglicherweise ein Flugzeug. Das hier ist mein Flugzeug. Und es ist großartig, einen Begleiter zu haben, mit dem man glücklich ist. Und hier mache ich einen Punkt. Applaus.

Oliver Smithies giving wise advice to his listeners on a life in science
(00:11:12 - 00:13:26)

 

 

Further Reading on Ageing:

Ageing, God and Lindau: an Interview with Aaron Ciechanover, by Stefano Sandrone
http://www.lindau-nobel.org/ageing-god-and-lindau-an-interview-with-aaron-ciechanover/
http://www.alz.org/dementia/down-syndrome-alzheimers-symptoms.asp
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/04/21/worlds-centenarian-population-projected-to-grow-eightfold-by-2050/
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150720154218.htm
http://time.com/4464811/aging-happiness-stress-anxiety-depression/
Callaway, E. (2010) Telomerase Reverses Ageing Process, Nature.com, doi:10.1038/news.2010.635
Ciryam, P., Tartaglia, G.G., Morimoto, R.I., Dobson, C.M., Vendruscolo, M. (2013) Widespread Aggregation and Neurodegenerative Diseases Are Associated with Supersaturated Proteins. Cell Reports 5(3), pp. 781-790.
Fjell, A.M., McEvoy, L., Holland, D., Dale, A.M., Walhovd, K.B. (2014) What is normal in normal aging? Effects of aging, amyloid and Alzheimer’s disease on the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. Progress in Neurobiology 117, pp. 20-40.
Jeune, B., Kannisto, V. (1997). The Emergence of Centenarians and Supercentenarians. In: Longevity: to the Limits and Beyond, J.-M. Robine et al. (eds) pp. 77-89. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York.
Knight, J.A. (2010) Human Longevity – the Major Determining Factors. Chapter 1: Life Expectancy, Life Span and Causes of Death. AuthorHouse.
Valko, M., Izakovic, M., Mazur, M., Rhodes, C.J., Telser, J. (2004) Role of Oxygen Radicals in DNA Damage and Cancer Incidence. Mol Cell Biochem 266 (1-2), pp 37-56.