Viruses

It’s not a typical setting for a vaccination. A woman dressed in a white dress is holding her squirming toddler, who is about to be pierced in the arm by the white-haired doctor, squinting through his spectacles. Other members of the family are crowded around, peering at the scene. The family dog is quietly sitting nearby. A baby, already undressed and oblivious to the fact that he is to go next, is petting the household cat. The nannies are comforting two older children. There are no white aprons or latex gloves, and the whole procedure is taking place in a sitting room with billowing green drapes. The oil painting depicting this scene was painted by the French painter Louis-Léopold Boilly in 1807. The very first vaccination, against smallpox, was carried out several years earlier by the British physician Edward Jenner, most likely in a similar fashion as illustrated by Boilly[1]. In the next decades, vaccination against smallpox, a virus that had a fatality rate of between 20% and 60% of those infected (80% in children), was moderately successful, but it was a global immunisation campaign initiated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1967 that led to the complete eradication of smallpox ten years later[2]. In 1980, the World Health Assembly declared that “the world and all its people have won freedom of smallpox”, and vaccination against the disease became medical history. This is succinctly described by the Lindau mediatheque’s Mini Lecture on herd immunity.

In 1978, Nobel Laureate Thomas Weller gave an interesting account of how smallpox was defeated, with the “utilisation of practically all elements of our industrial revolution”:

To listen to the full lecture click here.

 

Microbes Which Pass Through Filters

Despite the fact that viral infections are very common, and symptoms of infections have been described for millennia, viruses were not discovered until the end of the 19th century, and even then, they were simply described as infectious agents, or pathogens, smaller than microbes. The first studies were carried out on the tobacco mosaic virus, a plant virus. In 1890, the Russian microbiologist Dmitri Ivanovsky was asked to study mosaic disease, which was damaging tobacco crops in Crimea. He found that the pathogen was able to pass through porcelain filters, thus it was much smaller than commonly known bacteria. It was Martinus Beijerinck, who, in 1898 confirmed that the agent causing tobacco mosaic disease is not bacterial in origin, but caused by a contagium vivum fluidum, a tiny molecule that only multiplies in living cells. In the same year, the German scientists Friedrich Loeffler and Paul Frosch discovered that the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease was filterable, hence this became the first known animal virus. Yellow fever virus was the first discovered human virus, reported by Walter Reed and colleagues in Cuba and the United States in 1901[3].

For the next 30 years, illnesses were labelled as caused by viruses, yet no one knew exactly what a virus was. In terms of size, viruses were believed to occupy the unknown area between large proteins and bacteria. This gap between living and non-living things was closed by Wendell Stanley, a virologist who crystallised tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), making it possible to visualise the virus under an electron microscope. A new continuum was formed between the chemists’ molecules and the microbiologists’ bacteria. Stanley received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1946, and gave this definition of viruses at the 5th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting:

Wendell Stanley (1955) - Viruses

It is a pleasure to see so many of you here this morning after the very pleasant evening that we all enjoyed last night. I want to take this opportunity to express my thanks to the group at Lindau for inviting me and Mrs. Stanley to attend this meeting. Fortunately it fitted in with a trip through Europe in company with our three daughters. They too are enjoying this bit of hospitality. I can only say that it reminds me very much of an earlier pleasant experience in Stockholm which Mrs. Stanley and I enjoyed. Lindau it seems to me is for the time being just a little bit of Sweden. Now, to the topic of viruses. I have considerable difficulty in determining the nature of the talk this morning because we range here in the audience from experts in a variety of specialities to, as I understand, beginning students. This makes it somewhat difficult. I shall attempt therefore to give a sort of cross section of the virus work carried out in our laboratory at the University of California, in Berkeley. First I shall attempt just a little bit of background material of philosophy if you please. Then a little bit of chemistry, then some current work on poliomyelitis virus and vaccine. And hope that you will find something of interest in one or another of these divisions. Now, viruses represent a comparatively new field since they were discovered just at the turn of the century. The first virus to be discovered was that of tobacco mosaic, a plant virus. The next was an animal virus, that of the foot and mouth disease of cattle. The third was the virus of yellow fever discovered by Reed and co-workers in 1901. For about 30 years the work on viruses stemmed largely on medical aspects, upon the disease producing characteristics of viruses. Very little was known about the true characters of these infectious disease producing agents. Now, perhaps a definition of a virus at the outset. They are small, extremely small, self duplicating mechanisms which multiply or reproduce only within the living cells of certain specific hosts. During their multiplication or their growth or their reproduction in these living cells they occasionally change or mutate. And when they do this, they produce a new kind of a disease. Hence the viruses provide an unusually fruitful pathway to the area that Professor Muller will speak about later. Because of the ability to reproduce or to grow, because of the ability of viruses to mutate or to change, they have for years been regarded as examples of life. Now, in order to understand what one speaks about when one talks about a living entity, it is necessary to indulge in a bit of philosophy with respect to the nature of life. You have no difficulty in seeing the persons surrounding you as examples of living entities. And yet the metal of the microphone you have as an admitted example of a non living structure. Yet somewhere in between there is a borderline, a line of the unknown so to speak, a boundary between living things and non-living things. It is of some interest that an early philosopher, Aristotle, thought about this boundary line and about 2,000 years ago suggested that the boundary line between living things and non-living things was doubtful and perhaps non-existent. So now you may ask where do the viruses fit in to this size of structures which exists in the world? And I have prepared a slide which I hope will give you a better idea of this borderline area. By 1930 chemists had worked up to the large molecules, some of which you heard Professor Staudinger discuss yesterday. The large macromolecules of the proteins which on this scale will come to somewhere in this range. In other words, chemists working with larger and larger and larger molecules worked up to protein molecules, for example those of the hemocyanin molecule. And beyond this there was the gap of the unknown. The biologists on the other hand working downwards from larger and larger animals had come down to the second line from the top, that is bacillus prodigiosus, for example. The bacteria, which on this scale are in the neighbourhood of 450 or so millimicrons, and between the bacteria or the smallest of the living organisms of the biologist and the largest of the chemical molecules of the chemists, there was this unknown area. This is the area I think that Aristotle was speaking, that the boundary line in between the two was doubtful and perhaps non-existent. Prior to the discovery of the viruses, this area was an unknown area. But, as you can see, many, many, many entities have been filled in here, so that if you look at the size of the structure, going from the smallest here to the largest there, there is almost a continuum with respect to structures. So that in truth there is no boundary line now between the accepted living organisms of the biologist, such as bacillus prodigiosus and the molecules of the chemists at this level. And the viruses, these infectious disease producing agents have been the structures which serve to fill in at long last this gap which has existed for years and years. Well, now I indicated that from the time of the discovery of viruses, around the turn of the century, up until about 1935, the basic nature of these structures in this area was unknown. It was not known whether they were still smaller ordinary living organisms like bacillus prodigiosus. Some new kind of a chemical molecule or simply a specialised grouping attached to a chemical molecule. And it became very important to determine the exact nature of one of the viruses. And for this, the virus in the middle here, tobacco mosaic virus was selected for chemical study. And to make a long story quite short, this virus was isolated in the form of a crystallisable nucleoprotein. And after a long series of tests designed to prove whether or not the biological activity was a part and parcel of the protein, the nucleoprotein molecule, it was concluded that beyond a reasonable doubt the virus activity was a specific property of the nucleoprotein. Then came of course the business of finding out whether tobacco mosaic virus was a representative virus or whether it was something unusual. So studies on a variety of viruses were made. And for example another virus was obtained in the form of the beautiful dodecahedral crystals that you see here. This is another plant virus, that of the tomato bushy stunt virus. It can be isolated in the form of the crystals that you see here. These crystals are composed of very tiny macromolecules about 30 or so millimicrons in diameter. And then, to give you a cross section now of the variety of structures that have been isolated in the form of purified viruses, I’d like to show this slide, which in effect covers almost the entire range of sizes of the viruses that I showed you on the first chart of sizes. Starting at the top upper left, we have the vaccinia, elementary bodies of vaccinia, the vaccine which is used to protect you against smallpox, you will probably all have had the little scratch on your arm. Probably didn’t realise that they were rubbing into your arm the large redshaped objects that you see on the upper right hand. At the upper right we have an example of a smaller virus, that of influenza virus. An extremely interesting virus, one which could serve as the subject of an entire lecture, because this virus in 1918 caused the deaths of more people than had died on the battle fields of two great world wars. In our own country of the United States we lost over 400,000 persons within a 4 month period and activities of that virus are on the upper right hand side. And in 1918 influenza was not even recognised as a virus disease, for it was not so discovered until 1931, first by the English workers and a similar virus in swine by Doctor Shope in our laboratory. Here is an example of a group of viruses known as bacteria viruses, the viruses which attack bacteria. Here is a T2 bacterial virus with an unusual structure, such as you see, with the head and the sperm shape tail. On the right hand side here is an extremely interesting virus because this is a cancer producing virus. A virus which produces cancer in rabbits in the United States. It is of course of extreme interest because this provides one of the avenues that approached to the solution of the cancer problem. This is another example of a bacteria virus or a bacterial virus. This one has the very short stubby tail, this tail organ is very important because it is believed that this provides a mechanism by means of which the infective process is carried out. And for some time it was not recognised that this particular bacteria virus had a tail. Here is an example of the little macromolecules which go to make up the tomato bushy stunt virus, which gives the beautiful crystals that you saw just a moment ago. Here is a familiar tobacco mosaic virus about which I shall say just a bit more in a moment. And here are some molecules, macromolecules perhaps is a better word, of a virus which affects orchids. You ladies perhaps have not realised that the flowers that you wear on your dresses in the evening, the orchids are subject also to virus infection. And when you isolate the virus which causes a disease of orchids, you obtain the material on the right. Now, if you go from the small spherical virus through the range of sizes that you see here, you cover almost the entire range from about 20 millimicrons up to 300 millimicrons. So that here you have a birds eye view of real structures which have been found to exist in this borderline which existed between the living and the non-living. Now, for just a little bit of chemistry, needless to say my background and my training is in chemistry. Having isolated some of these materials such as tobacco mosaic viruses, it was only natural to subject purified preparations of this virus to the normal procedures of characterisation, analysis and so forth. And the next slide will give you an example of the building blocks which go to make up the tobacco mosaic virus. Now, for those of you who are not chemists, don’t worry too much, I’ll point out in gross terms the significance of this slide. But first this row or columns give the amounts of the various amino acids which go to make up the tobacco mosaic virus. You can see them here. These amounts are very characteristic, whether you isolate the tobacco mosaic virus in Sweden, in the United States, in Australia, whether you isolate the virus from Turkish tobacco plants, from tomato plants, from spinach plants. In other words, there is a characteristic composition which exists throughout the world and regardless of the host in which you grow this material. Now, I indicated at the beginning of this talk that one of the characteristics of viruses is that they can mutate. Needless to say as chemists we wondered what would happen when a virus mutates and causes a slightly different kind of a disease. We therefore isolated it and purified a variety of strains of tobacco mosaic virus. And the results of these analysis are also on this slide. We have the masked strain of the virus, the JD141 strain of the virus, the green aucuba, the yellow aucuba, the ribgrass virus and two cucumber viruses. These for a time have been regarded as strains of tobacco mosaic virus. Now, whenever differences in composition exist, differences in composition from the tobacco mosaic virus, the figure has been imposed in a little block. So as I have indicated, those of you who are not chemists, you need only to determine the number of little figures enclosed in a heavy line to get some idea of the nature and extent of the changes which exist. For example, there are only two changes in the JD141 strain, here and here. On the other hand, in the case of the Holmes ribgrass virus, there are many, many changes in the nature of the amino acids. And as you can see, there is an example here of the introduction of a new amino acid into the strain. In other words, the amino acid or the building block, if you please, histidine does not exist in the tobacco mosaic virus. Yet when this strain mutated and formed the Holmes ribgrass strain, it was accompanied by the introduction of histidine, it was accompanied by the introduction of a new amino acid. This data provided therefore the first information concerning the nature of mutation in the field of viruses. And I hope this may also serve as an indication of the nature of the changes which take place in the mutation of genes of higher organisms. And if so, this provides an experimental approach to the nature of the changes that Professor Muller has been interested in these many years. Now, we have recently been interested in the detailed structure of tobacco mosaic virus. You can make a variety of kinds of studies on this virus and one of the useful approaches from a standpoint of technique is the newly developed spray drop technique of Professor Williams in our laboratory. In which a solution of virus is mixed in known proportions with a polystyrene latex solution. The polystyrene latex particles are shown here and the tobacco mosaic virus particles are here. And you see a small segment at the right which has been enlarged, so that you can see the particles somewhere on the plain. By mixing the two, you get a relationship between the number of particles of polystyrene latex which you know by virtue of having prepared the solution and the number of particles of tobacco mosaic virus. You get a micro drop and hence a representative sample of this mixture by means of a spraying technique from an atomiser. And the spray drop is showing an outline here, shows quite clearly. Hence, this micro drop gives you a representative sample and enables you to get a relationship between the number of particles of tobacco mosaic virus and the number of particles of the polystyrene latex. And thus you can carry out much work on the relationship of biological activity to the little rods which go to make up the virus. Now, our recent work on the structure, the detailed structure of these rods, has given us some rather unusual results. This work was stimulated primarily by the results obtained in our laboratory and in other laboratories on the bacteriophage particles. And work, stemming also from the workers here in Germany on a protein component which can be obtained by degradation of tobacco mosaic virus. The next slide shows in outline some of the electron micrographs which can be obtained from such mixtures. At the upper left in high magnification is the intact tobacco mosaic virus particle. And if you break this particle, for example by means of high sound treatment, you can simply slice it across as you would slice a piece of sausage. If you do that, you get the two particles, or you get particles such as those that you see in the upper right hand corner. These have been found to be hexagons so it would appear that the cross section of this rod is that of a hexagon. Within the past few months it has been possible to devise a technique by means of which an individual macromolecule can be partially denatured. If you subject a solution of tobacco mosaic virus to mild temperature treatment, to mild heat, the one end will tend to ball up. And when this is then treated with a detergent such as sodium dodecyl sulphate, the part of the protein which has balled up will disappear and leaving the fine thread that you see here. We now believe that this represents for the first time proof of the location of the nucleic acid portion of the nucleoprotein. In other words that the nucleic acid is centrally located in the virus rod. Now, another bit of information which indicates a similar conclusion is when you take the so called X protein that can be obtained from diseased plants, or if you take a degradation product, as Dr. Klauser has shown in this country, and cause it to re-aggregate, you can retain once again the hexagonal shaped cross section material. But as you can see, there is a hole down the centre of the tube. Well, needless to say the re- aggregation or the re-synthesis, partial re-synthesis of this unusual virus rock provides a very great challenge to the chemist. Theoretically it should be possible to bring together the protein components which go to make up this biologically active material and the nucleic acid components and hopefully be able to re-synthesise the biologically active particle. And I’m sure that there is very active work going on in Germany and I know that there is very active work going on in our laboratory in this direction. This then gives you the beginning of the intimate detailed structure of a biologically active structure. The biological activity consisting of the ability to reproduce itself under certain specific conditions. I believe that with time the chemist should be able to synthesise the building blocks which go to make up a virus, such as for example tobacco mosaic virus with the ultimate building blocks being protein units of only 17,000 molecular weight. Already synthetic approaches in connection with insulin and with some of the other hormones are well on the way. And I believe that within the next few years the biochemists should be able to synthesise these small building blocks, the structural units of a virus. And then, through a special technique, cause these to assemble around the nucleic acid component and regain their activity. This may be a little bit on the utopian side, but I believe that it is a real possibility within the next few years. And with this of course you see because of the genetic characteristic of viruses one can then gaze just a bit further over the horizon and see that the chemist should be able eventually to determine the nature of the germ bioism of the world. And this of course would give the chemists a type of power which currently seems to rest only in the hands of the atom physicist. Now, having gone this far with the structure of tobacco mosaic virus, I know that I dare not stop here, particularly with Professor Butenandt in the audience, or at least I believe I saw him here. I’d like to provide at least for his benefit our perhaps most recent ideas on the ultimate structure of tobacco mosaic virus. And I must say that this next structure is based, not entirely on work in our own laboratory but on work carried out in Germany and in England and in many other laboratories. And it is just a sort of a trial balloon with respect to the intimate and detailed structure of this very interesting nuclear protein rod. We believe that it’s, we know I should say, perhaps it’s a matter of fact that it is 150 Å across. And that it is 1,500 Å in length and it consists of a progression of spirals in which there are probably 12 1/3 of little subunits per turn. And that viewed in cross section, the nucleic acid which composed entirely of ribonucleic acid is located in the central area of the nucleoprotein molecule. This of course we have now fairly definite experimental methods. There is reason to believe, based primarily on x-ray work in England, that the protein consists of little sub units of 17,000 molecular weight and that these are divided in half. And that probably the protein chain runs along in this direction. And that there is very probably a hole, a completely empty hole in the centre of the structure. Why should nature select this type of structure for this unusual biological activity of the viruses? I’m sure that I do not know. But I believe that this may be characteristic of the virus structure, something similar to this seems to occur in the case of the bacterial viruses. We have a similar pattern in three or four other viruses about which we know partially. So that this may represent an unusual type of structure which gives this type of genetic material. It is believed that the infectious process consists of the entrance of the virus particle followed by a dissolution or disappearance of the protein overcoat. The reproduction of the nucleic acid portion of this followed by the assembly of a protein overcoat around each individual particle subsequent to that. And this protein overcoat apparently is the means by which nature has provided this important genetic material with the ability to withstand the rigours of the world. And that this is the reason that the viruses are able to exist as infectious disease producing agents. Now, if I have the lights please. I’d like to divert now and speak just a few moments about the work on poliomyelitis virus. The lantern operator has very kindly given you a preview in the form of a slide which you just saw there of purified poliomyelitis virus. Perhaps we’ll return to it. We have had a job as chemists working for the national foundation for infantile paralysis of studying the biochemical properties of poliomyelitis virus. We initially used the cotton wrap cord and brain material as starting material. More recently, as a result of the very important discovery of Dr. Enders of Harvard university, showing that poliomyelitis virus could be grown in non-nervous tissue, we turned to tissue culture for the production of poliomyelitis virus. And as you know used monkey kidneys as the tissue which was subjected to tissued culture. This gave us an unusually good starting material and we were able to obtain what we believe to be completely pure poliomyelitis virus. In brief, this virus is a small spherical particle, 28 millimicrons in cross section, and most unexpectedly has been found to contain about 30% of ribose nucleic acid. I must say we had anticipated that there would be deoxyribose nucleic acid. But this has not been found to be the case. It is so far as we can tell entirely ribose nucleic acid. One need only to give thought that if this 30%, a very high amount of nucleic acid if this nucleic acid is centrally located, the attempt to make a vaccine by means of treatment with formaldehyde, which acts primarily on the peripheral protein component, may be wrong, may be in error, because the antigenic characteristics of the virus probably are located on the exterior. And the reproductive capacity probably is located on the nucleic acid, on the interior. Hence the approach of workers in Chicago for example to inactivate by means of ultraviolet light, may be a better approach. We developed over the course of the years a procedure for purifying poliomyelitis virus on a commercial scale. Unfortunately this has not yet been put into practice in the United States, although there is some reason now to believe, as a result of what generally has been characterised in our newspapers as a mess, it is now possible that there will be a change. It is perhaps worth knowing from the standpoint of science generally that we in the United States have made some very serious errors in our program of poliomyelitis vaccine. This program has been entirely self contained within the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis which is a voluntary organisation headed by a layman, Mr. Basil O’Connor. Decisions with respect to the program have been made almost entirely either through closed committees consisting of a few individuals. As a result the progress has not been subjected to the ordinary procedures and techniques of science. I need not tell this audience that science has progressed by virtue of a simple stepwise procedure of discovery, of publication, so that your fellow scientists can check upon your results and that you go on stepwise with discovery, publication, verification or confirmation and so forth. This has not been possible in connection with the polio program because publication has lagged far behind. And that the important decisions have been made with small closed groups which have not subjected themselves to the criticism of their colleagues. For example, in accordance with Dr. Salk’s initial recommendation, the committee of quite eminent virologists incorporated a strain known as the Mahoney strain into the vaccine. Over very vigorous protests by numerous scientists, this strain is remarkable in its paralytic propensities, its ability to cause paralysis. And you may have seen in the newspapers that vaccination in some cases in the United States was followed by outbreaks of poliomyelitis. Serological checks have proved this to be due to the Mahoney strain and just the day before I sailed for Europe, at a congressional hearing there was unanimous agreement by a group of experts, including Dr. Salk, that the Mahoney strain should be removed and replaced by a less virulent strain. Had this been subjected to the criticism generally, I think the Mahoney strain would never have been put into the vaccine in the first place. Another example, the use of formaldehyde as a means of enactivating the virus. The tissue culture fluid consists of about a 10,000th of a milligram of virus per cc. In a medium containing approximately 1,000 to 10,000 times more extraneous protein than virus. The interaction therefore between formaldehyde and the virus is conditioned largely by this large amount of impurity. And those of you who are chemists know very well that all chemical reactions are subject to equilibrium constants and that these can vary. And hence that the assumption that the interaction between formaldehyde and poliomyelitis virus went to completion, to get a completely inactive material, was actually in error and it was against the best known chemical principles. And yet here again, this was not subjected to the wide spread criticism, which again I think would have resulted in another or perhaps more severe testing procedure which would have eliminated this particular error. It is not generally known, but I happen to know and it’s not a secret I think, that the manufacturers, the six manufacturers in our country have had extreme difficulty in obtaining material, obtaining vaccine which is totally inactive. The general run of most of them, they obtain about 30% of the vaccine which contains fully active virus. The testing procedures have gradually been improved so that the material which is now being released is relatively safe. But it is uncertain. Information which is now available, just been released, has shown that strains of pools of strains of the viruses when completely inactive by all known tests have become active when they are mixed to form the try valid pool. In other words, this vaccine consists of equal mixtures of three different poliomyelitis strains. You can take completely inactive, by any tests yet devised, individual strains, mix them together, test them again and then find active material. This was a great surprise to Dr. Salk and to the manufacturers. But again, if one had realised that the ratio between the biologically active virus and the inert monkey kidney protein ranges from 1 to 1,000, to 1 to 10,000, that you can have a redistribution of the formaldehyde and thus account for this reactivation. This has resulted of course in the discarding of an additional 30% of the vaccine made by the manufacturers. So that I can assure you that the experience of the United States has not been a very profitable one so far as the manufacturers have been concerned. Then lastly I’ve indicated that we have developed a procedure for the large scale purification of a virus. One doesn’t know what will happen on repeated injections of a vaccine containing so much organ protein, monkey kidney protein. There are some eminent immunologists who believe that repeated vaccination with a vaccine containing large amounts of an organ protein will eventually sensitise a substantial number of individuals to this organ protein. And hence cause very disastrous results. I think again that it’s quite probable that now as a result of things being thrown out in the open that a purification procedure will be introduced into the production of the vaccine. I need only comment that if this is done, the safety of the vaccine can be increased immeasurably, perhaps 100 to 1,000 fold by virtue of working with concentrated material in concentrated form and then diluting back again. It’s quite possible that ultraviolet light may enter, as I’ve already indicated, the vaccine program. I think this is an example of where haste makes waste. The great urgency to get a vaccine that caused Mr. O’Connor to push his scientists very, very hard and I’m sure that he did it with the best of motives. But he is unfamiliar with science. He does not know the true pathways of science. And I think we as scientists made a mistake in not preventing him from distorting this normal pathway, because it is possible that we have suffered a rather severe setback in medicine in the United States as a result of this, shall I say mess, which we hope is well on the way towards being clarified. Fortunately this has not been repeated in many other countries. England for example has called off their entire program and I think it has not been started to my knowledge here in Germany. Permit me now to close with just a few remarks on the place of viruses in the world. I have indicated that they are in this borderline region between the living and the non-living. I indicated that certain viruses can cause cancer in plants and in animals. We believe that the virus approach offers a most fruitful approach to the human cancer problem. We have just within the past month in our laboratory isolated a normal human cell which can be grown in large quantities, which is readily available throughout the world as a matter of fact, because it consists of the human amnion cell, which is the little membrane which surrounds the baby at birth. And as in the United States you have a great many babies in Germany and wherever a baby is born, if you select the amnion, the chorion membrane, you have an equivalent amount of cells to that which exist in a monkey kidney for example. We have also found just recently that this human amnion cell can be used to support the growth of poliomyelitis virus. Hence very probably, again the production of polio vaccine will be switched from the monkey kidney, which is extremely difficult to obtain as those of you who are in medical research well know, to the human amnion cell. One only has to rule out the probability or the possibility of carrier viruses and this may not be too difficult to do. This human amnion cell therefore offers great potentialities, not only for poliomyelitis which was not in our minds when this discovery was made, but for the human cancer problem, because this offers now the possibility of making extracts from various human cancers and determining the effect of such extracts in normal human cells. The viruses therefore provide I believe an excellent approach to the human cancer problem. They always will interest us of course as to the nature of life itself because you have here in the structures that you saw on the screen examples of living, duplicating mechanisms which certainly must represent the most elemental form of life itself. And then in this day when we think so much in terms of what may happen to the world, I think the viruses, despite the fact that they are disease producing agents, probably hold many, many important secrets. Because as we learn more about the structure of the viruses we should be able to eliminate the infectious diseases and possibly we should be able to eliminate cancer. I believe that the latter disease is one of the most devastating diseases with which to deal. And that through the viruses we have that approach. So that the viruses should provide a means for better health for the people of the world. And I’m sure that if we can overcome the difficulties which surround our war-like attributes and gain a peaceful world, then we still cannot enjoy that world if we are subject to infectious diseases and to organic diseases and to disease such as cancer. But given the peaceful world, then mankind will have the opportunity to enjoy that world if he can make good use of the knowledge which I’m sure can be gleaned from these little microscopic entities, the viruses. Thank you very much.

Ich freue mich, Sie nach dem schönen gestrigen Abend heute Morgen so zahlreich hier zu sehen. Ich möchte die Gelegenheit nutzen und der Lindauer Gruppe meinen Dank aussprechen, dass sie mich und meine Frau zu dieser Veranstaltung eingeladen hat. Glücklicherweise passte die Einladung gut in den Terminplan unserer Europareise, die wir zusammen mit unseren drei Töchtern unternehmen. Sie freuen sich ebenfalls über diese Geste der Gastfreundschaft. Ich kann nur sagen, dass ich mich sehr an eine frühere erfreuliche Erfahrung in Stockholm erinnert fühle, die meine Frau und ich sehr genossen haben. Lindau, so scheint mir, ist gerade ein kleines Bisschen Schweden. Nun aber zum eigentlichen Thema, den Viren. Ich finde es außerordentlich schwierig, den Charakter meines heutigen Vortrags zu definieren, da das Publikum aus Experten der verschiedensten Fachgebiete bis hin zu, wie ich es verstanden habe, Studenten der ersten Semester besteht. Das macht die Sache etwas problematisch. Ich werde deshalb versuchen, Ihnen einen Querschnitt durch die Virusforschung in unserem Labor an der Universität von Kalifornien in Berkeley zu zeigen. Zunächst möchte ich, wenn es Ihnen recht ist, versuchen den philosophischen Hintergrund kurz zu erläutern. Anschließend wenden wir uns ein wenig der Chemie sowie der aktuellen Arbeit am Poliomyelitis-Virus bzw. -Impfstoff zu. Ich hoffe, der eine oder andere Bereich hat für Sie etwas Interessantes zu bieten. Nun, Viren stellen ein vergleichsweise neues Forschungsgebiet dar, da sie erst um die Jahrhundertwende entdeckt wurden. Der erste Virus, den man fand, war der Tabakmosaikvirus, ein Pflanzenvirus. Danach folgte der Virus, der bei Rindern die Maul- und Klauenseuche auslöst. Der dritte Virus, der Gelbfiebervirus, wurde 1901 von Reed et al. entdeckt. Etwa 30 Jahre lang drehte sich die Virusforschung hauptsächlich um medizinische Aspekte, d.h. die krankheitsauslösenden Eigenschaften von Viren. Über den tatsächlichen Charakter dieser infektiösen Krankheitserreger war nur sehr wenig bekannt. Nun, vielleicht sollte ich eingangs definieren, was Viren überhaupt sind. Es sind kleine, extrem kleine, sich selbst vervielfältigende Mechanismen die sich nur innerhalb lebender Zellen eines bestimmten Wirts vermehren bzw. reproduzieren. Während ihrer Vermehrung bzw. ihres Wachstums in diesen lebenden Zellen verändern sie sich gelegentlich oder mutieren, so dass eine neue Krankheitsform entsteht. Damit stellen die Viren einen ungewöhnlich erfolgreichen Weg dar, der genau zu dem Thema führt, über das Professor Muller später sprechen wird. Infolge ihrer Fähigkeit sich zu vermehren bzw. zu wachsen, zu mutieren oder sich zu verändern, gelten Viren seit Jahren als eine Form des Lebens. Um nun zu verstehen, worum es geht, wenn wir von einem Lebewesen sprechen, müssen wir uns in Bezug auf das Wesen des Lebens ein wenig mit Philosophie beschäftigen. Sie haben kein Problem damit, die um Sie herum sitzenden Personen als Lebewesen wahrzunehmen. Das Metall des Mikrophons, so wird jeder einräumen, ist dagegen ein Beispiel für eine nicht-lebendige Struktur. Doch dazwischen liegt eine Grenze, sozusagen eine Linie des Unbekannten, eine Grenze zwischen dem Lebendigen und Nicht-Lebendigen. Es ist interessant, dass der antike Philosoph Aristoteles über diese Grenze nachdachte und vor etwa 2000 Jahren darauf hinwies, dass diese Linie zwischen dem Lebendigen und Nicht-Lebendigen zweifelhaft und möglicherweise nicht existent ist. Sie mögen jetzt vielleicht fragen „Wie passen die Viren in die Dimension der Strukturen in unserer Welt hinein?“ Ich habe ein Dia vorbereitet, das Ihnen hoffentlich eine bessere Vorstellung dieses Grenzbereichs vermittelt. Bis 1930 hatten sich Chemiker zu den großen Molekülen vorgearbeitet. Einige von ihnen hat Ihnen Professor Staudinger gestern erläutert: die großen Makromoleküle der Proteine, die auf dieser Skala bis etwa hierhin reichen. Mit anderen Worten, Chemiker forschten an immer größeren Molekülen bis hin zu Proteinmolekülen, z.B. dem Hämocyaninmolekül. Dahinter lag unbekanntes Terrain. Die Biologen wiederum, die sich von den ganz großen Tieren nach unten gearbeitet hatten, erreichten die zweite Reihe von oben, z.B. den Bacillus prodigiosus. Bakterien besitzen auf dieser Skala eine Größe von ca. 450 Nanometer. Zwischen den Bakterien bzw. den kleinsten lebenden Organismen der Biologen und den größten chemischen Molekülen der Chemiker lag diese unbekannte Zone. Das ist meiner Ansicht nach der Bereich, von dem Aristoteles sprach und dessen Grenzlinie er für zweifelhaft und möglicherweise nicht existent hielt. Vor der Entdeckung der Viren war dieser Bereich unbekanntes Terrain. Doch wie Sie sehen, wurde diese Lücke mittlerweile durch zahlreiche Strukturen gefüllt. Schaut man auf die Größe dieser Strukturen, von der kleinsten hier bis zur größten dort, findet sich praktisch ein Kontinuum. In Wahrheit existiert auf dieser Ebene also keine Grenzlinie zwischen den anerkannten lebenden Organismen der Biologen wie z.B. dem Bacillus prodigiosus und den Molekülen der Chemiker. Es waren die Viren, diese infektiösen Krankheitserreger, die diese seit vielen Jahren bestehende Lücke zu guter Letzt füllten. Nun, ich habe bereits angesprochen, dass von der Entdeckung der Viren um die Jahrhundertwende herum bis etwa 1935 die zugrunde liegende Natur der Strukturen in diesem Bereich unbekannt war. Man wusste nicht, ob ein Virus ein normaler, kleiner, lebender Organismus wie der Bacillus prodigiosus, eine neue Art chemisches Molekül oder einfach eine an einem chemischen Molekül hängende spezialisierte Gruppe ist. Die genaue Natur eines dieser Viren zu bestimmen, war von sehr großer Bedeutung. Aus diesem Grund wählte man diesen Virus hier in der Mitte, den Tabakmosaikvirus, für eine chemische Studie aus. Um es kurz zu machen, das Virus wurde in Form eines kristallisierbaren Nukleoproteins isoliert. Nach einer langen Reihe von Tests, anhand derer man herausfinden wollte, ob die biologische Aktivität fester Bestandteil des Nukleoproteinmoleküls ist, kam man zu dem Schluss, dass die Virusaktivität ohne begründeten Zweifel eine spezifische Eigenschaft des Nukleoproteins darstellt. Anschließend musste man natürlich überprüfen, ob das Tabakmosaikvirus ein repräsentatives Virus oder untypisch ist. Es wurde daher eine Reihe von Viren untersucht. Dabei erhielt man z.B. ein anderes Virus in Form der schönen Dodekaeder-Kristalle, die Sie hier sehen. Das hier ist ein weiterer Pflanzenvirus, das Tomatenzwergbuschvirus. Es kann in Form der Kristalle, die Sie hier sehen, isoliert werden. Diese Kristalle bestehen aus winzigsten Makromolekülen eines Durchmessers von ca. 30 Nanometer. Damit Sie einen Querschnitt durch die Vielfalt der bislang in Form gereinigter Viren isolierten Strukturen erhalten, möchte ich Ihnen diese Dia zeigen, das de facto den gesamten Größenbereich der Viren abdeckt, die ich Ihnen auf dem ersten Größendiagramm gezeigt habe. Ganz oben links beginnend haben wir die Kuhpocken, Elementarkörper der Kuhpocken, den Pockenimpfstoff – Sie hatten wahrscheinlich alle diesen kleinen Kratzer am Arm und haben nicht realisiert, dass Ihnen diese großen stäbchenförmigen Gebilde, die Sie hier oben rechts sehen, in den Schnitt gerieben wurden. Oben rechts haben wir ein Beispiel für ein kleineres Virus, das Grippevirus. Ein äußerst interessantes Virus, über das man einen eigenen Vortrag halten könnte. Im Winter 1918 waren 150 Millionen Menschen mit Grippe infiziert, 50 Millionen davon starben. In unserem eigenen Land, den Vereinigten Staaten, kamen innerhalb von 4 Monaten mehr als 400.000 Menschen um. Die Aktivitäten des Virus sehen Sie hier oben rechts. Ein ähnliches Virus bei Schweinen wurde von Richard Erwin Shope in unserem Labor entdeckt. Hier ist ein Beispiel für eine Gruppe von Viren, die als Bakterienviren, also Bakterien angreifende Viren bezeichnet werden. Das hier ist ein T2-Bakterienvirus mit einer, wie Sie sehen, ungewöhnlichen Struktur, einem Kopf und einem spermienförmigen Schwanz. Hier rechts sehen Sie ein ausnehmend interessantes Virus – es löste bei Kaninchen in den Vereinigten Staaten Krebs aus. Das Virus ist natürlich deswegen von besonders großem Interesse, weil es uns einen Weg zur Lösung der Krebsproblematik zeigen könnte. Dies hier ist ein weiteres Beispiel für ein Bakterienvirus. Es besitzt einen ganz kurzen Stummelschwanz. Dieser Schwanzbereich ist von großer Bedeutung, da man davon ausgeht, dass er einen Mechanismus bereitstellt, mit dessen Hilfe der infektiöse Prozess erfolgt. Lange Zeit hatte man nicht erkannt, dass dieses spezielle Bakterienvirus einen Schwanz hat. Das hier ist ein Beispiel für die kleinen Makromoleküle, aus denen das Tomatenzwergstrauchvirus besteht, das die schönen Kristalle erzeugt, die Sie eben gesehen haben. Hier haben wir das bekannte Tabakmosaikvirus, zu dem ich gleich ein bisschen mehr sagen werde. Hier sind einige Moleküle, Makromoleküle ist vielleicht das bessere Wort, eines Virus, der Orchideen befällt. Die Damen unter Ihnen wissen vielleicht nicht, dass die Blumen auf Ihren Abendkleidern – Orchideen – ebenfalls unter Virenbefall leiden. Isoliert man das Virus, das zu einer Orchideenkrankheit führt, erhält man das, was Sie hier rechts sehen. Wenn wir uns nun von dem kleinen, kugelförmigen Virus durch die verschiedenen Größenordnungen, die Sie hier sehen, bewegen, ist damit beinahe das gesamte Spektrum von etwa 20 bis 300 Nanometer abgedeckt. Hier sehen Sie die an der Grenze zwischen Lebewesen und unbelebter Materie existierenden realen Strukturen aus der Vogelperspektive. Nun, das war ein bisschen Chemie, denn ich bin meinem Hintergrund und meiner Ausbildung nach natürlich in der Chemie angesiedelt. Nachdem man also einige dieser Materialien wie z.B. das Tabakmosaikvirus isoliert hatte, war es nur natürlich, gereinigte Präparate dieser Viren den normalen Verfahren zur Charakterisierung, Analyse und so weiter zu unterziehen. Im nächsten Dia sehen Sie die Bausteine, aus denen das Tabakmosaikvirus besteht. Die Nicht-Chemiker unter Ihnen brauchen sich keine Sorgen zu machen, ich werde Ihnen die Bedeutung dieses Dias in groben Zügen erläutern. Doch zunächst einmal geben diese Reihen bzw. Spalten die Mengen der verschiedenen Aminosäuren an, aus denen das Tabakmosaikvirus besteht. Sie können sie hier sehen. Diese Mengen sind ganz charakteristisch. Dabei spielt es weder eine Rolle, ob Sie das Tabakmosaikvirus in Schweden, den Vereinigten Staaten oder Australien isolieren noch ob die Isolierung aus türkischen Tabakpflanzen, Tomatenpflanzen oder Spinatpflanzen erfolgt. Mit anderen Worten, die Zusammensetzung ist überall auf der Welt und ungeachtet des Wirts, in dem das Material gezüchtet wird, charakteristisch. Nun, ich habe zu Beginn dieses Vortrags angedeutet, dass eine Eigenschaft von Viren ist, dass sie mutieren können. Natürlich fragten wir uns als Chemiker, was passieren würde, wenn ein Virus mutiert und dadurch eine leicht veränderte Krankheitsform auslöst. Wir isolierten also das Material und reinigten verschiedene Stämme des Tabakmosaikvirus. Die Ergebnisse dieser Analysen sehen Sie ebenfalls auf diesem Dia. Wir haben den maskierten Virenstamm, den JD141-Stamm, die grüne Aukube, die gelbe Aukube, das Spitzwegerichvirus und zwei Gurkenviren. Diese wurden eine Zeit lang für Stämme des Tabakmosaikvirus gehalten. Wann immer ein Unterschied bezüglich der Zusammensetzung im Vergleich zum Tabakmosaikvirus bestand, wurde die relevante Zahl im Block entsprechend vermerkt. Wie ich angedeutet habe, müssen die Nicht-Chemiker unter Ihnen nur die Anzahl der kleinen Zahl auf einer Schwerelinie bestimmen, um eine Vorstellung von Art und Ausmaß der Veränderungen zu bekommen. Der JD141-Stamm ist beispielsweise nur an zwei Stellen verändert, hier und hier. Andererseits finden sich im Falle des Holmes-Spitzwegerich-Virus sehr viele Veränderungen bei den Aminosäuren. Wie Sie sehen können, ist das hier ein Beispiel für die Einführung einer neuen Aminosäure in den Stamm. Anders ausgedrückt, die Aminosäure bzw., wenn Sie so wollen, der Baustein Histidin existiert im Tabakmosaikvirus nicht. Als dieser Stamm jedoch mutierte und den Holmes-Spitzwegerich-Stamm bildete, ging dies mit der Einführung einer neuen Aminosäure, nämlich Histidin einher. Diese Daten stellten daher die ersten Informationen über das Wesen der Mutation bei Viren dar. Ich hoffe, sie liefern auch Hinweis auf die Art der Veränderungen, die bei der Mutation von Genen in höheren Organismen stattfinden. Falls ja, ist dies eine experimentelle Herangehensweise an den Charakter der Veränderungen, für die sich Professor Muller bereits seit vielen Jahren interessiert. Nun, wir interessieren uns seit kurzem für die genaue Struktur des Tabakmosaikvirus. Dieses Virus lässt sich anhand der verschiedensten Studien untersuchen; ein vom Standpunkt der Technik zweckmäßiger Ansatz ist die von Professor Williams in unserem Labor neu entwickelte Sprühtropfentechnik, bei der eine Viruslösung in bekannten Anteilen mit einer Polystyrol-Latex-Lösung gemischt wird. Die Polystyrol-Latex-Partikel sind hier dargestellt, die Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel hier. Sie sehen hier rechts einen kleinen Teilabschnitt, der vergrößert wurde, damit man die Partikel auf der Fläche erkennen kann. Durch Mischen der beiden Lösungen lässt sich eine Beziehung zwischen der Anzahl der Polystyrol-Latex-Partikel, die Ihnen bekannt ist, weil Sie die Lösung hergestellt haben, und der Anzahl der Tabakmosaikviren herstellen. Sie erhalten mittels Sprühtechnik anhand eines Zerstäubers einen Mikrotropfen und somit eine repräsentative Probe dieses Gemisches. Der Sprühtropfen weist hier einen ziemlich deutlichen Umriss auf. Der Mikrotropfen stellt somit eine repräsentative Probe dar und ermöglicht es Ihnen, eine Beziehung zwischen der Anzahl der Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel und der Anzahl der Polystyrol-Latex-Partikel herzustellen. Sie beschäftigen sich also intensiv mit der Beziehung zwischen der biologischen Aktivität und den kleinen Stäbchen, aus denen das Virus besteht. Nun, unsere neuesten Arbeiten zur detaillierten Struktur dieser Stäbchen haben einige relativ ungewöhnliche Ergebnisse erbracht. Angespornt wurden wir dabei hauptsächlich durch die in unserem Labor und anderen Labors erzielten Ergebnissen zu den Bakteriophagen. Forscher hier in Deutschland arbeiten z.B. an einem Proteinbaustein, der beim Zerfall des Tabakmosaikvirus entsteht. Das nächste Dia zeigt einige der elektronenmikroskopischen Aufnahmen, die man von solchen Gemischen erhält, im Überblick. Oben links sehen Sie stark vergrößert das intakte Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel. Wenn Sie dieses Partikel zum Beispiel mittels Hochtonbehandlung zerschlagen, können Sie es wie ein Stück Wurst aufschneiden. In diesem Fall erhalten Sie die beiden Partikel, oder es entstehen Partikel wie die hier in der oberen rechten Ecke. Da sich zeigte, dass es Sechsecke sind, scheint der Querschnitt dieses Stäbchens ein Hexagon zu sein. In den letzten Monaten gelang es uns eine Technik zu entwickeln, mit deren Hilfe sich ein einzelnes Makromolekül teilweise denaturieren lässt. Unterzieht man eine Lösung des Tabakmosaikvirus einer leichten Temperaturbehandlung mit geringer Wärme, rollt sich ein Ende häufig ein. Erfolgt nun eine Behandlung mit einem Detergens wie z.B. Natriumdodecylsulphat, verschwindet derjenige Teil des Proteins, der sich zusammengerollt hat, so dass dieser dünne Faden, den Sie hier sehen, übrig bleibt. Wir glauben heute, dass dies der erste Beweis für die Lage des Nukleinsäureabschnitts des Nukleoproteins war. Mit anderen Worten ein Beleg dafür, dass sich die Nukleinsäure in der Mitte des Virusstäbchens befindet. Andere Informationen legen einen ähnlichen Schluss nahe: Nimmt man ein so genanntes X-Protein, das sich aus erkrankten Pflanzen gewinnen lässt, oder ein Zersetzungsprodukt, wie es Herr Dr. Klauser in Deutschland gezeigt hat, und lässt es erneut aggregieren, erhält man wieder das Material mit dem sechseckigen Querschnitt. Doch wie Sie hier sehen, weist das Röhrchen in der Mitte eine Öffnung auf. Nun, natürlich stellt die erneute Aggregation bzw. erneute partielle Synthese dieses ungewöhnlichen Virus für den Chemiker eine ganz große Herausforderung dar. Theoretisch sollte es möglich sein, die Proteinbausteine, aus denen dieses biologisch aktive Material besteht, mit den Nukleinsäurebestandteilen zusammenzuführen. Daraus könnte dann hoffentlich das biologisch aktive Partikel erneut synthetisiert werden. Ich bin sicher, dass derzeit in Deutschland ganz aktiv daran gearbeitet wird, und ich weiß, dass auch in unserem Labor intensiv in diese Richtung geforscht wird. Das ist also der Ursprung der detaillierten Struktur eines biologisch aktiven Mechanismus, d.h. der biologischen Aktivität, die in der Fähigkeit zur Vermehrung unter ganz spezifischen Bedingungen besteht. Ich glaube, dass die Chemiker mit der Zeit in der Lage sein müssten, die Bausteine eines Virus, z.B. des Tabakmosaikvirus, dessen ultimative Bausteine Proteineinheiten eines Molekulargewichts von nur 17.000 sind, zu synthetisieren. Syntheseansätze im Zusammenhang mit Insulin und einigen anderen Hormonen werden bereits in die Wege geleitet. Ich denke, dass die Biochemiker in den nächsten Jahren in der Lage sein werden, diese kleinen Bausteine, die Struktureinheiten der Viren zu synthetisieren und sie mittels einer Spezialtechnik um die Nukleinsäurekomponente herum anzuordnen, so dass sie ihre Aktivität wiedererlangen. Das ist vielleicht ein bisschen utopisch, ich glaube aber, dass es eine reale Möglichkeit in den nächsten Jahren sein wird. Wenn wir ein wenig weiter über den Tellerrand schauen, erkennen wir, dass die Chemiker eines Tages aufgrund der genetischen Eigenart von Viren in der Lage sein sollten, letztendlich den Bioismus aller Krankheitserreger auf der Welt zu erklären. Das gäbe ihnen natürlich eine Macht, die derzeit nur die Atomphysiker in den Händen zu halten scheinen. Nun, nachdem ich mit der Struktur des Tabakmosaikvirus so weit gekommen bin, ist mir klar, dass ich mich nicht traue hier aufzuhören, zumal sich Professor Butenandt im Publikum befindet, oder zumindest glaube ihn dort entdeckt zu haben. Ich möchte zumindest zu seinen Gunsten unsere vielleicht neuesten Ideen zur ultimativen Struktur des Tabakmosaikvirus vorstellen. Ich muss dazu sagen, dass die nächste Struktur nicht ausschließlich auf der Arbeit unseres eigenen Labors, sondern auch auf Forschungen in Deutschland und England und vielen anderen Labors beruht. Es handelt sich schlicht um eine Art Versuchsballon bezüglich der genauen Struktur dieses hochinteressanten Nukleoproteinstäbchens. Wir glauben, d.h. vielleicht sollte ich sagen, wir wissen oder es ist eine Tatsache, dass dieses Stäbchen einen Durchmesser von 150 Å und eine Länge von 1500 Å besitzt und aus einer Reihe von Spiralen besteht, in der sich wahrscheinlich 12 1/3 kleine Untereinheiten pro Windung befinden. Betrachtet man den Querschnitt, befindet sich die Nukleinsäure, die ganz aus Ribonukleinsäure besteht, im zentralen Bereich des Nukleoproteinmoleküls. Natürlich verfügen wir heute über recht konkrete experimentelle Verfahren. Es besteht, hauptsächlich auf der Grundlage von Röntgentests in England, Grund zu der Annahme, dass das Protein aus kleinen, zweigeteilten Untereinheiten von 17.000 Molekulargewicht besteht, die Proteinkette wahrscheinlich in diese Richtung verläuft und das Zentrum der Struktur höchstwahrscheinlich eine Öffnung, ein vollständig leeres Loch aufweist. Warum sollte die Natur eine solche Struktur für diese ungewöhnliche biologische Aktivität der Viren auswählen? Ich weiß es wirklich nicht, aber ich glaube, dass diese Virusstruktur charakteristisch sein könnte, denn bei den Bakterienviren scheint etwas ganz Ähnliches aufzutreten. Da ein ähnliches Muster auch bei drei oder vier Viren, die wir genauer kennen, auftaucht, könnte es sich um eine ungewöhnliche Struktur handeln, die zu diesem Typ von genetischem Material führt. Man geht davon aus, dass der infektiöse Prozess die Eintrittspforte für das Viruspartikel darstellt und sich anschließend die Proteinhülle auflöst oder verschwindet. Danach erfolgt die Reproduktion des Nukleinsäureabschnitts und im Anschluss daran erhalten die einzelnen Partikel eine Proteinhülle. Diese Proteinhülle stellt offensichtlich das Mittel dar, das nach dem Willen der Natur diesem bedeutenden genetischen Material die Fähigkeit verleiht, der Unbill der Welt zu trotzen. Das ist auch der Grund dafür, dass die Viren als infektiöse Krankheitserreger existieren können. Könnte ich bitte Licht haben? Ich möchte das Thema wechseln und kurz über die Arbeit am Poliomyelitis-Virus sprechen. Die Person, die den Diaprojektor bedient, hat Ihnen freundlicherweise bereits eine Vorschau in Form eines Dias des gereinigten Poliomyelitis-Virus gezeigt. Vielleicht kommen wir darauf zurück. Wir arbeiteten als Chemiker für die Nationale Stiftung für Kinderlähmung und untersuchten die biochemischen Eigenschaften des Poliomyelitis-Virus. Anfangs setzten wir mit Watte umwickeltes Material aus Rückenmark und Gehirn als Ausgangsmaterial ein, seit neuestem verwenden wir als Ergebnis der außerordentlich wichtigen Entdeckung von Herrn Dr. Enders von der Universität Harvard, dass das Poliomyelitis-Virus auch in anderem Gewebe als Nervengewebe gezüchtet werden kann, für die Erzeugung des Poliomyelitis-Virus Gewebekulturen. Als Gewebe für die Gewebekulturen dienen, wie Sie wissen, Affennieren. Damit hatten wir ein ungewöhnlich gutes Ausgangsmaterial und konnten unseres Wissens nach vollständig reines Poliomyelitis-Virus gewinnen. Kurz gesagt handelt es sich bei diesem Virus um ein kleines, kugelförmiges Partikel eines Durchmessers von 28 Nanometer, das unerwarteterweise etwa 30% Ribonukleinsäure enthält. Ich muss sagen, wir hatten angenommen, es würde Desoxyribonukleinsäure enthalten. Das war jedoch nicht der Fall. Es besteht, soweit wir das sagen können, zur Gänze aus Ribonukleinsäure. Bedenken Sie: Wenn sich diese 30% – eine sehr große Menge Nukleinsäure, das Tabakmosaikvirus verfügt im Vergleich dazu nur über 6% – wenn sich also die Nukleinsäure in der Mitte befindet, könnte der Versuch der Herstellung eines Impfstoffs durch Behandlung mit Formaldehyd, das hauptsächlich auf die periphere Proteinkomponente wirkt, falsch sein, da die antigenen Eigenschaften des Virus wahrscheinlich im äußeren Bereich angesiedelt sind. Die Reproduktionsfunktion liegt vermutlich in der Nukleinsäure, im Inneren. Der Ansatz, den z.B. Forscher in Chicago verfolgen, nämlich das Virus mit ultraviolettem Licht zu deaktivieren, erscheint da vielversprechender. Wir haben im Verlauf der Jahre ein Verfahren zur Reinigung des Poliomyelitis-Virus im Industriemaßstab entwickelt. Leider kam dies bislang in den Vereinigten Staaten noch nicht zur Anwendung, obwohl Grund besteht zu glauben, dass sich dies nach dem von unseren Zeitungen allgemein so bezeichneten Fiasko ändern könnte. Es ist vielleicht vom wissenschaftlichen Standpunkt generell von Interesse, dass wir in den Vereinigten Staaten bei unserem Poliomyelitis-Impfstoffprogramm einige äußerst schwerwiegende Fehler gemacht haben. Dieses Programm wurde ausschließlich von der Nationalen Stiftung für Kinderlähmung kontrolliert, einer freiwilligen Organisation, die von einem Laien, Herrn Basil O’Connor geleitet wird. Entscheidungen bezüglich des Programms wurden fast ausschließlich von geschlossenen Gremien bestehend aus wenigen Einzelpersonen getroffen. Demzufolge wurde der Fortschritt des Programms nicht den üblichen wissenschaftlichen Verfahren unterzogen. Ich muss diesem Publikum nicht erklären, dass die Fortschritte der Wissenschaft auf dem einfachen und schrittweisen Prozedere der Entdeckung, Veröffentlichung Dies war im Zusammenhang mit dem Polio-Programm nicht möglich, da die Publikation lange auf sich warten ließ. Wichtige Entscheidungen wurden von kleinen, geschlossenen Gruppen getroffen, die sich der Kritik ihrer Kollegen nicht stellten. Entsprechend der ursprünglichen Empfehlung von Dr. Salk führte die aus recht angesehenen Virologen bestehende Kommission z.B. den so genannten Mahoney-Stamm in den Impfstoff ein – unter massiven Protesten zahlreicher Wissenschaftler, denn dieser Stamm führt häufig zu Lähmungen. Wie Sie vielleicht den Zeitungen entnommen haben, ist es in den Vereinigten Staaten in einigen Fällen als Folge der Impfung zum Ausbruch der Erkrankung gekommen. Serologische Tests belegen, dass der Grund hierfür der Mahoney-Stamm war. Am Tag bevor ich nach Europa gefahren bin, entschied eine Gruppe von Experten einschließlich Dr. Salk bei einer Anhörung im Kongress einstimmig, den Mahoney-Stamm zu entfernen und durch einen weniger virulenten Stamm zu ersetzen. Wäre dieser Punkt von der Fachwelt kritisch diskutiert worden, wäre der Mahoney-Stamm meiner Ansicht nach gar nicht erst in den Impfstoff gelangt. Ein weiteres Beispiel: Die Verwendung von Formaldehyd als Mittel zur Deaktivierung des Virus. Die Gewebekulturflüssigkeit besteht aus etwa einem 10.000stel Milligramm Virus pro cm3. In einem Medium, das etwa 1.000 bis 10.000 Mal mehr Fremdprotein als Virus enthält, wird die Wechselwirkung zwischen Formaldehyd und dem Virus hauptsächlich durch diese große Menge an Verunreinigungen bestimmt. Die Chemiker unter Ihnen wissen sehr gut, dass alle chemischen Reaktionen Gleichgewichtskonstanten unterliegen und diese schwanken können. Damit war die Annahme, dass die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Formaldehyd und dem Poliomyelitis-Virus bis zum Ende ablaufen und ein vollständig inaktives Material entsteht, de facto falsch und verstieß gegen die bekanntesten chemischen Prinzipien. Doch auch dies wurde nicht kritisch zur Diskussion gestellt. Wäre dies geschehen, hätte dies meiner Ansicht nach ein anderes oder möglicherweise strengere Testverfahren zur Folge gehabt, wodurch dieser spezielle Fehler hätte vermieden werden können. Es ist zwar nicht allgemein bekannt, doch ich weiß zufällig, und es ist auch kein Geheimnis, dass die sechs Hersteller in unserem Land massive Probleme haben, absolut inaktiven Impfstoff zu gewinnen. Die meisten von ihnen gewinnen ca. 30% Impfstoff, der das vollständig aktive Virus enthält. Die Testverfahren haben sich allmählich verbessert, so dass das jetzt freigegebene Material relativ sicher ist. Doch ist es das wirklich? Kürzlich bekannt gewordene Informationen zeigen, dass Stämme aus diesem Virenstamm-Pool, die in allen bekannten Tests vollständig inaktiv sind, bei Vermischung zum gültigen Testpool aktiviert werden. Anders ausgedrückt besteht dieser Impfstoff aus gleich großen Mischungen dreier unterschiedlicher Poliomyelitis-Stämme. Sie können gemäß allen nur denkbaren Tests vollständig inaktive Einzelstämme nehmen, sie miteinander vermischen und erneut testen, Sie werden stets aktives Material finden. Das war eine große Überraschung für Dr. Salk und die Hersteller. Doch nochmals: Wenn erkannt worden wäre, dass das Verhältnis zwischen dem biologisch aktiven Virus und dem inerten Affennierenprotein 1:1000 bis 1:10.000 beträgt, hätte man bei einer Umverteilung des Formaldehyd die erneute Aktivierung erklären können. Das Ganze hatte natürlich zur Folge, dass weitere 30% des von den Herstellern gewonnenen Impfstoffes verworfen wurden. Ich kann Ihnen also versichern, dass die Erfahrungen der Vereinigten Staaten mit den Herstellern nicht sehr einträglich waren. Schließlich habe ich angedeutet, dass wir ein Verfahren zur Virusreinigung im Industriemaßstab entwickelt haben. Man weiß nicht, was bei wiederholten Injektionen eines so viel Organprotein – Affennierenprotein – enthaltenden Impfstoffs geschieht. Einige angesehene Immunologen glauben, dass die wiederholte Impfung mit einem große Mengen Organprotein enthaltenden Impfstoff letztlich eine erhebliche Anzahl an Menschen für dieses Organprotein sensibilisieren und damit zu katastrophalen Ergebnissen führen wird. Auch hier denke ich, dass es recht wahrscheinlich ist, dass jetzt, wo alles ans Licht gekommen ist, bei der Impfstoffherstellung ein Reinigungsverfahren zum Einsatz kommen wird. Ich möchte nur anmerken, dass für den Fall, dass dies geschieht, die Sicherheit des Impfstoffes unermesslich, vielleicht um das 100- bis 1000-Fache erhöht werden kann, wenn man mit konzentriertem Material in konzentrierter Form arbeitet und dann eine Rückverdünnung durchführt. Es ist gut möglich, dass ultraviolettes Licht, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, Eingang in das Impfstoffprogramm findet. Ich denke, das ist ein Beispiel für Eile mit Weile, betrachtet man den großen Druck einen Impfstoff zu produzieren, der Herrn O’Connor veranlasst seine Wissenschaftler so unerbittlich anzutreiben. Ich bin sicher, er hat es mit den besten Absichten getan, aber er ist mit der Wissenschaft nicht vertraut, er kennt ihre eigentliche Funktionsweise nicht. Ich glaube, wir Wissenschaftler haben einen Fehler gemacht, weil wir ihn nicht daran gehindert haben, vom üblichen Weg abzuweichen, denn möglicherweise haben wir als Folge davon einen ziemlich schweren Rückschlag, wenn nicht gar ein Fiasko in der Medizin der Vereinigten Staaten erlitten, das hoffentlich bald aufgeklärt werden wird. Glücklicherweise wurde dieser Fehler nicht in allzu vielen Ländern wiederholt. England zum Beispiel hat sein gesamtes Programm abgeblasen, und in Deutschland wurde es meines Wissens nach noch gar nicht begonnen. Erlauben Sie mir nun meinen Vortrag mit ein paar Anmerkungen zum Platz der Viren in unserer Welt zu schließen. Ich habe angedeutet, dass sie sich in der Grenzregion zwischen dem Lebendigen und Nicht-Lebendigen befinden und bestimmte Viren bei Pflanzen und Tieren Krebs erzeugen können. Wir glauben, dass Viren einen sehr ergiebigen Ansatz für das Krebsproblem beim Menschen bieten. Wir haben erst im letzten Monat in unserem Labor eine normale menschliche Zelle isoliert, die sich in großen Mengen züchten lässt und die tatsächlich überall auf der Welt leicht verfügbar ist, da sie aus dem menschlichen Amnion, der kleinen Membran, die das Baby bei der Geburt umhüllt, stammt. Genau wie in den Vereinigten Staaten gibt es auch bei Ihnen in Deutschland viele Babys, und immer wenn ein Baby geboren wird, verfügen Sie im Falle des Amnions, der Chorionmembran über eine Zellmenge, die z.B. der einer Affenniere entspricht. Außerdem haben wir erst kürzlich festgestellt, dass diese menschliche Amnionzelle zur Unterstützung des Wachstums des Poliomyelitis-Virus eingesetzt werden kann. Auch hier wird die Herstellung des Polio-Impfstoffes höchstwahrscheinlich von der Affenniere, die, wie diejenigen von Ihnen, die in der medizinischen Forschung tätig sind, wissen, extrem schwer erhältlich ist, auf die menschliche Amnionzelle umgestellt werden. Man muss lediglich die Wahrscheinlichkeit bzw. Möglichkeit von Trägerviren ausschließen, was allerdings nicht allzu schwierig sein sollte. Diese menschliche Amnionzelle bietet also großartige Möglichkeiten nicht nur für die Poliomyelitis, die wir bei dieser Entdeckung gar nicht im Sinn hatten, sondern auch für die Krebsproblematik, denn hier besteht die Möglichkeit zur Herstellung von Extrakten aus verschiedenen Tumoren und Bestimmung der Wirkung solcher Extrakte auf normale menschliche Zellen. Die Viren stellen somit meiner Ansicht nach einen hervorragenden Ansatz für die Problematik der Krebserkrankungen beim Menschen dar. Sie werden für uns natürlich allein schon wegen der Natur des Lebens selbst immer von Interesse sein, denn wir haben hier in den Strukturen, die Sie auf der Leinwand gesehen haben, Beispiele für lebende, sich reproduzierende Mechanismen, die sicherlich die elementarste Form des Lebens darstellen. Heute, wo wir uns so viele Gedanken darüber machen, was mit der Welt geschehen könnte, bergen die Viren meiner Ansicht nach trotz der Tatsache, dass sie Krankheitserreger sind, wahrscheinlich sehr viele bedeutende Geheimnisse. Mit zunehmendem Wissen über die Virusstruktur sollten wir in der Lage sein, die Infektionskrankheiten und möglicherweise auch den Krebs zu besiegen. Ich denke, Krebs ist eine der verheerendsten Krankheiten, mit denen wir es zu tun haben. Durch die Viren steht uns aber dieser Ansatz zur Verfügung, mit dessen Hilfe sich die Gesundheit der Weltbevölkerung verbessern ließe. Ich bin sicher, dass wir uns selbst dann, wenn wir die Schwierigkeiten, die mit unseren militanten Attributen einhergehen, meistern und eine friedliche Welt erreichen, des Lebens nicht erfreuen können, wenn wir an Infektionskrankheiten, organischen Erkrankungen oder Krebs leiden. In einer friedlichen Welt aber hat die Menschheit die Möglichkeit, das Leben zu genießen, wenn sie das Wissen, dass sich meiner Überzeugung nach aus diesen kleinen mikroskopischen Strukturen, den Viren gewinnen lässt, gut nutzen kann. Vielen Dank.

 
(00:02:52 - 00:05:39)
To listen to the full lecture click here.


Nothing like this had been known before; an inert crystal that sprang to life in a living cell, becoming highly infectious. Were it not for the non-living characteristics of viruses, they would probably have been identified and analysed much later than the 1930s. Here, Wendell Stanley describes the crystallisation features of viruses:

 To listen to the full lecture click here.

 

Viruses as Models in the Field of Molecular Biology

A virus could now be seen, but what qualified viruses as living organisms – how they replicated, what was their genetic makeup – was still unknown. James Watson studied bacterial viruses for his PhD and postdoctoral work, which eventually led him to study the chemistry of nucleic acids at the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge in 1951. There, Watson and his colleague Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA, which, during his first lecture at Lindau in 1967, Watson described as “a pleasant surprise”. Watson continued to investigate bacterial viruses, also known as bacteriophages, because he believed he could learn more about the structure and replication of viruses from its very simplest representative. If one were to study animal viruses, the complexity would increase one hundred-fold. Watson dubbed viruses as “small chromosomes inside a protein shell” and went on to describe the structure of the bacteriophage R17:

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

 
(00:35:42 - 00:38:04)
To listen to the full lecture click here.


This lack of complexity in structure allows viruses to maintain life cycles of incredible speed and efficiency. Each virus species attacks the host cells somewhat differently, yet the overall stages of the viral life cycle are similar. The virions first attach to specific receptors in the cell membrane, then penetrate the cell. The protein coat of the virus, also known as the capsid, is degraded by enzymes in the host cell, thus releasing the genetic material (for most bacteriophages, however, the capsids remain outside the cell, and the nucleic acid is injected directly into the cell). The virus then invades the cell’s nucleus, where it uses the cell structures to make copies of the viral genetic material. New virions are assembled from the replicated genetic material and protein capsids, ready to exit the cell and infect other cells[4]. The bacteriophage studied by Watson and his colleagues completes its’ life cycle in an E. coli bacterial cell in approximately 30 minutes:

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

 
(00:40:07 - 00:41:18)
To listen to the full lecture click here.  


Soon after Watson’s lecture, in 1969, Max Delbrück, Alfred D. Hershey and Salvador E. Luria (Watson’s PhD supervisor) won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries concerning the replication mechanism and the genetic structure of viruses”, crowning nearly three decades of research on bacteriophages.
As the title of Watson’s lecture accentuates, DNA is not the only type of genetic material present in viruses. During work on TMV it became clear that there are DNA viruses and RNA viruses, although how exactly RNA viruses multiply in host cells would not be known for some time.

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

 
(00:25:12 - 00:28:31)
To listen to the full lecture click here.  


For many years, the firm belief was that the transfer of genetic information was from DNA to RNA to protein. The genetic information encoded in DNA is transferred to RNA in the cell nucleus, a process known as transcription. Afterwards, a molecule named messenger RNA (mRNA) carries the information outside the nucleus, where a cell structure known as a ribosome interprets the information in mRNA to make amino acids, the components of proteins. Another type of RNA, transfer RNA (tRNA) puts the amino acids together to form new proteins. This progression of information from DNA to RNA to protein was even known as “the central dogma”[5]. If that was the case, how could RNA viruses replicate in cells? An important breakthrough in virology, but also molecular biology took place in 1970, when David Baltimore and Howard M. Temin independently demonstrated that an enzyme, known as reverse transcriptase, is responsible for synthesizing DNA from an RNA template. The DNA is then cleverly incorporated into the host cell’s DNA, and is replicated along with the host cell. As was stated in Baltimore’s article in Nature, “apparently the classical process of information transfer from DNA to RNA can be inverted.”[6] J. Michael Bishop told the story of the discovery of reverse transcriptase during his lecture in 2015:

J. Michael Bishop (2015) - A Virus, a Gene and Cancer: An Anatomy of Discovery

Thank you very much. It's nice once again to be here. I want to say that it was impressive that Eric Betzig did some of his crucial work in a living room, somebody's living room. This story starts with chickens. I don't think that would work. So late in... There we go. Late in the year 1909, a farmer on Long Island in New York noticed a tumour on the breast of one of his Plymouth Rock hens. He watched this tumour grow for several months, and then took it to the Rockefeller Institute in New York City to see what might be done. The farmer was referred to Peyton Rous, a young pathologist with an interest in cancer, although not much of a publication record in the field. He's said to have been a very forceful, even fiery individual. So perhaps by virtue of his personality, he was able to convince the farmer to donate his chicken to medical research. So this serendipitous encounter launched a sequence of discoveries that spanned almost three quarters of a century, and culminated in the realization that the seeds of cancer reside in our own genomes. And my purpose today is to explore how all that happened, in an effort to illustrate how discoveries are made. And then in the following lecture, my colleague Harold Varmus will explain where these discoveries have taken us in the struggle to understand and control cancer. Now Rous began with a very simple experiment, by attempting to pass the tumours with grafts from one chicken to another. The experiment was not exactly a resounding success. In this example, with each passage... there you go... Finky taught me that... (laughs) only a single engraftment succeeded. That's the black squares there. Moreover, the transplantation succeeded only when Rous used chickens from the inbred flock of the farmer. The tumour would not grow in Plymouth Rock hens from other sources, nor in other breeds of birds. Rous explained this by saying that the tumours were obeying what he called the laws of tissue biology. We call it histoincompatibility. Now mundane as this experiment may seem to us, it's widely believed that the passaging of the tumour was serendipitously essential to the next step, which took Peyton Rous to a new dimension and to lasting fame. Beginning with the sixth passage of tumours, Rous began to make cell-free extracts of the tumours, and found that injection of these into chickens from the same flock could elicit the identical tumour, a spindle cell sarcoma. He announced this discovery with a two page article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. You will not find much about chickens in that journal in this day and age. Now, Rous realized that he had made, in his words, a unique and significant finding, but he was very careful about what that finding might connote. And I quote from his first paper: active in this sarcoma of the fowl as a minute parasitic organism. But an agency of another sort is not out of the question. For the moment, we have not adopted either hypothesis." That sort of language would not get you into many journals these days either. Now within a year, however, Rous had identified a second filterable agent that caused a different kind of chicken tumour, an osteochondrosarcoma, and at that point, he succumbed to using the recently coined term "virus," the very concept of which was just about a decade old. In his writings, Rous was never particularly illuminating about his inspiration for his work. He explained his effort to transplant the tumour by pointing out that transplantation of tumours had succeeded in mammals, so why not try it in chickens? He justified his landmark experiments with filterable extracts by pointing out that such work had never succeeded with mammals, so why not try it in chickens? That's literally the case. Perhaps his motive was best captured by Nobel laureate Renato Dulbecco in his biographical sketch of Rous, who wrote that Rous was a medical man who wished to learn about cancer as a disease, and a biologist who did not want to follow the beaten path, willing to hunt for new clues in well-designed but slow experiments. The work with chicken viruses was greeted with what Rous described in his Nobel lecture as downright disbelief. Nobody really took it seriously. And Rous himself eventually became disillusioned when he failed to identify causative viruses in transplantable tumours of mammals, particularly rodents. It would be fifty-five years before his discovery of the chicken tumour virus earned him the Nobel Prize, and Finky, if you're in the audience, that's the real record. Okay. Rous certainly deserved the Nobel Prize, because he had fashioned two momentous legacies. The first, the eventual recognition that viruses are major causes of human cancer, something that Rous had toyed with but abandoned after his failure with rodent tumours. That's a story that Professor zur Hausen could tell you. The second legacy represents an unbroken chain of research that would eventually link wayward genes to cancer. For several decades after Rous, his sarcoma virus lay fallow. Beginning in the 1960s however, the pace quickened, and it became apparent that Rous's virus was an archetype for a vast and seemingly ubiquitous family of what came to be called RNA tumour viruses, signalling the nature of their newly discovered genome, RNA. The discovery of Peyton Rous now blossomed from a two page report in the Journal of the American Medical Association to a 1500 page monograph, and I doubt that many have ever read it cover to cover. I first encountered these viruses when I arrived at UCSF, University of California San Francisco, in 1968, to take up what proved to be my only academic job. As a newly minted assistant professor whose research concerned the replication of polio viruses, I really was not very much aware of RNA tumour viruses at the time. And there I was introduced to a fellow newcomer to the faculty, Warren Levinson, who was schooled in the biological aspects of Rous sarcoma virus. And all of us pretty much looked like that in those days. Under Warren's tutelage, it quickly became apparent to me that this virus represents a potentially powerful tool with which to probe the secrets of the cancer cell. It was a simple and tractable experimental system whose biological properties were actually pretty well characterized. It could transform cells in vitro, in a petri dish, to neoplastic phenotype, literally overnight. There was a well-established and highly reproducible bioassay for the virus in vitro, which among other things made the virus amenable to genetic analysis. The virus could be propagated and purified in very large quantities, sufficient for biochemical and structural analysis. And its inability to replicate in human cells meant it posed little if any threat to those of us who were working with it, and so it could be worked with under relatively unconstrained conditions. At the time, no other RNA tumour virus offered such a powerful suite of advantages. So we bashed ahead with the chicken virus. Warren and I joined to study Rous sarcoma virus, and two great puzzles defined the field at the time. First, it appeared that the viral genome could be established as a heritable property of the host cell. How could this happen with a virus whose genome was RNA rather than DNA? And second, there was that powerful tumorigenic potential to be explained. Warren and I resolved to take on the replication of Rous sarcoma virus, just how does it propagate, about which virtually nothing was known at the molecular level. And in doing so, we implicitly took on the puzzle of how the virus could establish itself as a heritable property of the host cell. And I can dramatize that puzzle by reviewing what happens when Rous sarcoma virus is applied to rodent cells. At first it appears that nothing has happened, because the virus cannot replicate in those cells. But in due course, clones of neoplastic cells emerge, cells that will form a tumour in the same species of animal. And although these cells produce no virus, their morphological phenotype is determined by the particular strain of virus that was used. And mirabile dictu, if at any subsequent point the transformed cells are fused with normal chicken cells, the virus re-emerges, phenotype intact. Where had it been hiding? Now looming over that puzzle was the central dogma, enunciated with special authority by Francis Crick, but generally ingrained in most biologists at the time. The transfer of genetic information was thought to be unidirectional from DNA to RNA to protein. It turns out that future events about, which I'll talk in a moment, would prompt Francis Crick in a bit of hindsight to point out that chemistry may preclude direct transfer of information from protein to RNA, but there had been no inherent reason to discredit transfer from RNA to DNA. But that bias was existent and powerful. In any event, two individuals paid little heed to the central dogma: Howard Temin and David Baltimore. The two first crossed paths in 1955 at a science camp for high school students put on by the Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine. At the time, Temin was a student at Swarthmore College who was serving as the guru for the camp, the one adult presence. Baltimore was a high school student from New York City who attended the camp. Temin is on the right, Baltimore is on the left. Look at that. I've never had one of those before. Now, although Baltimore went on to attend Swarthmore as well, Temin apparently had nothing to do with that, the two parted ways until the spring of 1970, when they independently wreaked havoc with the central dogma. Now, Temin and Baltimore came at the puzzle of Rous sarcoma virus from very different vantage points. Temin began work with the virus as a graduate student at Caltech, where he first of all helped develop the quantitative bioassay that we all then used thereafter. And at Caltech, he became familiar with the phenomenon of lysogenic conversion of bacteria by viruses that we call bacteriophage. And during the course of infection, the phage can go into hiding by inserting its genome into the genome of the host cell and from that position can bestow new properties on the host cell. The phage can be brought out of hiding by irradiating the cell. Temin thought this might just well represent how Rous sarcoma viruses might replicate, stabilize its genome in the host, and initiate neoplastic transformation of the host cell. There was only one problem with this of course. Lysogenic phage had double stranded DNA genomes, whereas Rous sarcoma virus has a single stranded RNA genome. How could that create a lysogenic phenomenon in the host cell? By 1964, Temin had solved this problem in his own mind by proposing what he called the DNA provirus hypothesis. The RNA genome of Rous sarcoma virus must be transcribed into DNA, which then serves as template for the synthesis of both viral messenger and genome RNA. Temin ruefully remarked in his Nobel lecture that for the next six years this hypothesis was essentially ignored. He might well have said soundly denigrated. I heard that done on many occasions. Most observers absolutely loathed the idea. Undeterred by criticism, Temin produced a variety of suggestive data to support his idea. Using chemical inhibitors, he demonstrated that infection by Rous sarcoma virus requires both new DNA synthesis and DNA dependent RNA synthesis. And using molecular hybridization, he claimed to have detected viral DNA in Rous sarcoma virus infected cells, although in all honesty the data were quite frail. In 1969 however, Satoshi Mizutani joined Temin's laboratory and in his first experiments, literally his very first experiments, he demonstrated that new protein synthesis was necessary for the early stages of Rous sarcoma virus replication. That result was actually never published, but it allowed Mizutani and Temin to conclude that the RNA directed DNA polymerase required by the provirus hypothesis must pre-exist infection. And at the time there was no precedent for such an enzyme in normal cells. We all know better now. So in that case ignorance was indeed bliss, because it directed Mizutani and Temin to look for a DNA polymerase in the virions of Rous sarcoma virus itself. David Baltimore came at the problem from a completely different perspective: the replication of animal viral genomes, which I have portrayed here, in terms of how the viral messenger RNA is generated in order to get replication underway. Baltimore had cut his research teeth on picornaviruses such as polio virus, whose single stranded RNA genomes serve directly as messenger RNA once they have gained access to the cell, so that's... yes. Consequently, we define the polarity of the genome as positive. That's a convention in the field. The messenger in turn produces all the necessary viral proteins including an RNA polymerase that replicates the viral genome. Baltimore discovered this RNA replicase while a graduate student. He completed, incidentally, he completed his thesis work in 18 months. The replicase was the first enzyme of its kind to be uncovered, and it was consistent with the idea, the conventional view that virus particles themselves contain nothing but the viral genome and the requisite structural proteins. That view was changed by the discovery that a variety of viruses carry within their virions an enzyme encoded by the viral genome and required to initiate infection by producing viral messenger RNA. And in chronological order of those discoveries: An RNA polymerase was discovered within the virions of the large pox viruses that transcribes the double stranded DNA genome of these viruses into messenger RNA. An RNA polymerase that transcribes the double stranded RNA genome of reoviruses into viral messenger RNA. And an RNA polymerase that transcribes RNA genomes of negative polarity into messenger RNA. And it was the last of these that carried the greatest weight for Baltimore because he and Alice Huang discovered the first such example in vesicular stomatitis virus and followed that by finding a similar polymerase in Newcastle disease virus. Like Rous sarcoma virus, these are envelope viruses with single stranded RNA genomes. But they have a negative polarity, remember. And although the genome of Rous sarcoma virus has a positive polarity, Baltimore was struck by the possibility that it might utilize a virion polymerase for its replication. So even before publishing the results on the negative stranded RNA genome viruses, Baltimore went looking for both RNA and DNA polymerases in the virions of RNA tumour viruses. And he had to get the virus from other labs, he had never laid a pipette on an RNA tumour virus before. He literally leaped into the field unannounced. He was undeterred by the reigning scepticism about Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis, because as he explained in his Nobel lecture, "I had no experience in the field and no axe to grind." And that too can be a state of bliss for the right scientist. In the late spring of 1970, the paths of Temin and Baltimore finally converged again when they simultaneously reported their respective discoveries of an RNA directed DNA polymerase within the virions of RNA tumour viruses, which soon acquired the name reverse transcriptase. And in turn the RNA tumour viruses were reffered to as retroviruses. Now the discovery of reverse transcriptase of course was a transformative event intellectually. But it also provided a powerfully enabling technique: the ability to copy any single stranded RNA into DNA, which made it invaluable to both fundamental research and the burgeoning biotechnology industry. For my colleagues and me it was a godsend. Now we could make probes so that we could examine infected cells for viral nucleic acids at will, and we quickly set up assays to do so. So, the means by which the virus could produce proviral DNA were at hand, but was there really a stable provirus in the infected cell, and if so, where was it hiding? Was infection by Rous sarcoma virus truly an analogue of lysogeny? The first credible sighting of proviral DNA was actually biological in nature. Introduction of DNA taken from Rous sarcoma virus infected cells into uninfected cells by transfection gave rise to the original virus. The entire viral genome must have been lurking in the DNA of infected cells. But exactly where was the provirus and what did it look like? Those questions were taken up by Harold Varmus, who joined me in San Francisco in 1970, and we were to work together for the next sixteen years. Here we are in 1978, with me as usual one step behind Harold. Well, his legs were considerably longer than mine. And using molecular hybridization with radioactive probe copied from the Rous sarcoma's genome, we and others were able to demonstrate where and when the provirus was synthesized, what molecular forms it took within the infected cell, its eventual integration into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, where it is perpetuated and expressed as an unwelcome addition to the cellular genome. Now all of this adhered to what Howard Temin had posited a decade before. And contemplating this intimate interaction between viral and cellular genomes prepared us for what was soon to follow. Meanwhile progress was made towards solving a second great puzzle: How does Rous sarcoma virus elicit malignant growth? The first step was the demonstration by genetic analysis that the virus possesses an oncogene that is responsible for malignant transformation of host cells. This is a beautiful story which time does not permit me to tell, but it was fundamental to the field. And this oncogene was dubbed src because it causes sarcomas in chickens. Now src proved to be one of the only four genes, simply put, in the Rous sarcoma virus. And remarkably this gene plays no role in viral replication. That's the job of the other three genes in this exquisitely compact and efficient genome. Now src gene itself raised two puzzles of its own. First, what is the biochemical mechanism by which the gene elicits cancerous growth, and second, why does the virus have such a gene, given that it is not required for replication? The mechanism puzzle was solved with a discovery by Art Levinson in our lab and Mark Collett and Ray Erickson's lab in Denver that src encodes a protein kinase. Two years later, Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute surprised himself and everyone else with the discovery that the src kinase carries out a heretofore unknown reaction, phosphorylation of tyrosine. And there is a direct line from this line of experimentation to modern therapeutic practices, but that's also a story for another time. The ways in which these discoveries emerged are illuminating. In Denver, it was an inspired guess, based on the pleiotropism of src. Protein phosphorylation ranks among the most versatile agents of change known to biochemists. What better way to evoke the myriad changes that give rise to the neoplastic cell? In San Francisco, shrewd enzymology by Art Levinson led to the recognition that the src protein was actually phosphorylating itself, and thus might well phosphorylate other proteins as well. And at the Salk Institute, Tony Hunter's fortuitous use of an outdated buffer that's pH had gone off led to the separation of phosphotyrosine from phosphothreonine for the first time in recorded history. And here is Art Levinson, in creative costume at a lab Halloween party, many years before he became CEO of Genentech, chair of the Apple board of directors... he doesn't dress like that for those meetings... and most recently the founder of his own company, Calico. Now what about the second puzzle, the origin of the src gene in Rous sarcoma virus? Many years, two opposing lines of thought directed us to the genome of normal cells. First, there was the so-called virogene oncogene hypothesis, formulated by Robert Huebner and George Todaro. It was sort of an effort to create a universal theory of cancer. I for one didn't take it very seriously, but nevertheless it was out there. The thought was that retroviruses had deposited themselves with their oncogenes in the germ lines of ancient ancestors of modern species. And these genes were normally repressed by the cell, but they could be activated by various cancer-causing agents. By this account, we might possibly find src in normal cells, but it would be in the form of a retroviral oncogene, and its origin would remain unexplained. The opposing thought was Darwinian in nature. Since src is irrelevant to the viral life cycle, it is not likely to have arisen in concert with the remainder of the viral genome. There was no apparent selective pressure to accomplish that. Instead the intermittent interaction between viral and cellular genomes during the course of infection might have created an accident in which src was acquired from the cell, in essence reversing the hypothesis of Huebner and Todaro. And this thought also favoured a search for src in normal DNA. The search required a radioactive probe that could be used in molecular hybridization with the exquisite specificity to detect the src gene with great sensitivity. Now in his previous work as a postdoctoral fellow, Harold had used deletion mutants of bacteriophage to detect the expression of individual genes by molecular hybridization. And we were able to adapt this technique to our purposes. Because our collaborator Peter Vogt had isolated spontaneous deletion mutants of Rous sarcoma virus that appeared to remove the bulk of src. So as illustrated here, we could use the RNA of one of these deletion mutants to perform what later came to called subtractive hybridization. First transcribe the genome, the entire genome, both the replication genes and the src gene, into complementary radioactive cDNA. Then second, hybridize that cDNA to RNA from the deletion mutant which would capture all the DNA except that representing src. And finally remove the double stranded hybrids, leaving the single stranded cDNA for src, the probe we needed. The preparation and use of the src probe was laborious, given that the work far antedated the advent of recombinant DNA. And the requisite experiments occupied more than three years. The fact that they were done at all was a tribute to the valiant efforts of two postdoctoral fellows, Ramareddy Guntaka, who demonstrated that we could probably make the probe we needed. And Dominique Stehelin, shown here, who carried the work to its decisive conclusion. Today, with the assistance of recombinant DNA and other contemporary technologies you could probably have it done in a matter of weeks or months, but I for one am very glad we didn't wait. By 1974 we knew that our probe could detect sequences homologous to the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus in the DNA of various avians. The top panel here demonstrates the specificity of the probe. It reacted with the RNA from which it had been transcribed, but not with RNA from the deletion mutant. The middle panel shows that the src probe reacted with normal chicken DNA, but so did a probe for the deletion mutant. And that reflects the presence of what we call endogenous retroviruses, known to pollute the genomes of many species, ourselves included. The bottom panel is the crucial one. Only the src probe reacted with DNA from other avians, and this was our first indication that we were picking up something that was not linked to a retrovirus, and unlike the genomes of endogenous retroviruses, was conserved across substantial phylogenetic distances. Note the results with emu DNA, among the most primitive of surviving avians. We published these findings in 1976 as a brief note in Nature, two figures and two tables. The simplicity belied the extraordinary difficulty of the underlying experiments, and the remarkable paradigm shift that they represented. We were pleased and so apparently was the Nobel committee. But oh how times have changed. A week ago, a colleague told me that he had asked a class of graduate students to read that paper. Their reaction? They got the Nobel Prize for that? Yeah, we did. Gradually, we built the case that our probe was detecting a normal cellular gene. We found that it was conserved across vast phylogenetic distances, suggesting that it serves a vital function. We found that normal cells contained a protein with the same biochemical properties, the same size as the viral src protein, and that this was expressed in numerous tissues. And when at long last we could use recombinant DNA to clone cellular src, we sealed the deal. Cellular src had the structural hallmarks of a normal cellular gene, the viral oncogene src had indeed been pirated from the host cell as a fully spliced version of the progenitor, and at some point the cellular gene had sustained a mutation which converted it to an oncogene. And it soon became apparent that src was more than an isolated curiosity. The inventory of retroviral oncogenes mounted steadily, and each of these had been derived from the genome of a normal cell. Thus for each viral oncogene, there was a cognate proto-oncogene in the cell. Accidents of nature had uncovered a battery of potential cancer genes in normal cells. The cellular src proto-oncogene is a well behaved and vital switch in the signalling network of normal cells, we know a great deal about that now. The viral src oncogene, however, is a mutant malefactor, whose gene product has been constitutively activated, a genetic gain of function that creates a cancer gene. Gain of function, by one means or another, proved true for all the other retroviral oncogenes as well. It was easy to imagine that the battery of cellular proto-oncogenes could be a keyboard on which all manner of carcinogens could play, independent of viruses, creating cellular oncogenes without the intervention of a retrovirus, for example. Such has proven to be the case. Proto-oncogenes that have suffered gain of function are a virtually inevitable feature of all human tumours. And as such they are major drivers for tumour genesis, and consequently, candidates as targets for new therapeutics, and that is a thriving industry now. With the assistance of modern genomic tools, the number of these genes has been expanded well beyond two hundred. The gain of function that creates oncogenes can be affected by various means. First, gain of chromosomes, or focal gene amplification, both of which increase gene dosage. Chromosomal translocations, which can either disturb the control of gene expression, or create mongrel gene products that malfunction. Point mutations, which can disrupt the control of gene expression, or create malfunctioning gene products. And defective epigenetic control of gene expression. All of these have been found in human tumours. But the end result is always the same: The equivalent of a jammed accelerator with the capacity to drive tumour genesis. The transduction of normal cellular genes into oncogenes by retroviruses, an accident of nature, had brought genetic seeds of cancer to view for the very first time. What are the factors that drove this line of discovery? Well here are a few, for the students. First of all, an eye for the main chance. David Baltimore discovered a reverse transcriptase with his very first experiment with an RNA tumour virus. He was not thinking about it before, but he saw an opportunity and seized it. Judicious disregard for received wisdom. Consider Temin and Baltimore's benign neglect of the central dogma. A willingness to gamble. Consider the years invested in the pursuit of cellular src, in what could easily have been a fool's errand. Faith in the universality of nature. The example? Our conviction that there was something to be learned about human cancer from studying a chicken virus, albeit not in anybody's living room. The choice of experimental system. The attractions that drew me to Rous sarcoma virus. Technical innovation. The assay that found cellular src. And self-confidence. Howard Temin's steadfast pursuit of his ideas during more than a decade in intellectual exile while he promulgated the provirus hypothesis to disbelieving ears. So I conclude with a shout out to Rous sarcoma virus, which has been a fecund friend of cancer research. Consider its offspring. Demonstration that viruses can cause cancer. Reverse transcriptase, a truly disruptive and generative discovery. The first example of a gene that can directly cause cancer, src. Nothing like it had been seen before. The role of protein kinases in tumorigenesis. Phosphorylation of tyrosine, now a prime player in cell signalling and a prime target in cancer therapeutics. Proto-oncogenes, the first glimpse of a genetic keyboard for carcinogens. And to date, for what it's worth, five Nobel laureates. Not bad for a chicken. Thank you.

Ich danke Ihnen. Es ist schön, wieder hier zu sein. Ich möchte anmerken, ich fand es beeindruckend, dass Eric Betzig einige seiner zentralen Arbeiten in einem Wohnzimmer durchgeführt hat. Diese Geschichte beginnt mit Hühnern. Ich glaubte nicht, dass es da geklappt hätte. Also Ende des… Da haben wir es. Ende des Jahres 1909 bemerkte ein Bauer auf Long Island in New York an der Brust einer seiner Plymouth Rock Hennen einen Tumor. Mehrere Monate lang beobachtete er das Wachsen des Tumors, dann brachte er sie in das Rockefeller Institute in New York City, um zu sehen, ob man da was tun könnte. Der Bauer wurde an Peyton Rous verwiesen, einen jungen Pathologen, der sich für Krebs interessierte, obgleich seine Publikationsliste dazu nicht groß waren. Über ihn wird gesagt, er sei eine sehr energische, sogar hitzige Person gewesen. Vielleicht war er dank seiner Persönlichkeit fähig, den Bauer davon zu überzeugen, dieses Huhn der medizinischen Forschung zu schenken. Diese zufällige Begegnung startete eine Reihe von Entdeckungen, die sich beinahe über drei Viertel eines Jahrhunderts erstreckten und zu der Erkenntnis führte, dass der Keim des Krebses in unseren eigenen Genomen sitzt. Ich möchte heute untersuchen, wie sich das alles zugetragen hat, um zu zeigen, wie Entdeckungen gemacht werden. Im darauf folgenden Vortrag wird mein Kollege Harold Varmus erläutern, wohin uns diese Entdeckungen im Kampf gegen Krebs geführt haben. Rous fing mit einem sehr einfachen Experiment an: er versuchte, den Tumor mittels Körpergewebe von einem Huhn auf ein anderes weiterzugeben. Das Experiment war nicht unbedingt ein voller Erfolg. In diesem Beispiel, mit jedem Durchgang… da haben wir es…Finky hat mir das beigebracht… (lacht) Es war nur eine Übertragung erfolgreich. Es ist dieses schwarze Quadrat. Zudem war die Transplantation nur erfolgreich, wenn Rous Hühner aus der durch Inzucht gewachsenen Hühnerschar des Bauern verwendete. Der Tumor wuchs nicht bei Plymouth Rock Hühnern aus anderen Quellen, auch nicht bei anderen Vogelarten. Rous erklärte dies damit, dass die Tumore dem folgten, was er die Gesetze der Gewebebiologie nannte. Wir nennen es Histokompatibilität. So banal uns dieses Experiment auch scheinen mag, es wird allgemein angenommen, dass die Weitergabe des Tumors glücklicherweise für den nächsten Schritt essentiell war, der Peyton Rous in eine neue Dimension führte und ihm bleibenden Ruhm verschaffte. Beginnend mit den sechs Passagen von Tumoren, begann Rous aus den Tumoren zellfreie Extrakte herzustellen und entdeckte, dass deren Injektionen bei Hühnern aus der gleichen Schar einen identischen Tumor hervorrufen konnten, ein Spindelzellsarkom. Er veröffentlichte diese Entdeckung in einem zweiseitigen Artikel im Journal of the American Medical Association. In jenen Tagen und zu jener Zeit werden Sie nicht viel über Hühner in dieser Fachzeitschrift finden. Rous erkannte, dass er, mit seinen eigenen Worten, eine einzigartige und signifikante Entdeckung gemacht hatte, er war aber sehr vorsichtig dahingehend, was diese Entdeckung implizieren könnte. Ich zitiere aus seinem ersten Artikel: in diesem Sarkom des Geflügels als einen winzigen parasitären Organismus zu betrachten. Aber eine andersartige Wirkung ist nicht ausgeschlossen. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt haben wir uns keiner der beiden Hypothesen verschrieben.“ Mit einer solchen Sprache könnten Sie heutzutage nicht in vielen Fachzeitschriften landen. Doch innerhalb eines Jahres hatte Rous einen zweiten filtrierbaren Erreger identifiziert, der eine andere Art Tumor bei Hühnern verursachte, ein Osteochondrosarkom, und an diesem Punkt erlag er der Versuchung, den vor Kurzem geprägten Begriff „Virus“ zu verwenden, ein Konzept, das erst seit einem Jahrzehnt vorlag. In seinen Schriften war Rous nie besonders eindeutig hinsichtlich der Inspiration zu seiner Arbeit. Er erklärte seine Bemühung den Tumor zu transplantieren, indem er darauf verwies, dass die Transplantation von Tumoren bei Säugetieren erfolgreich war, warum es also nicht auch an Hühnern ausprobieren? Er begründete seine Meilenstein-Experimente mit filtrierbaren Extrakten indem er darauf verwies, diese Arbeit sei bei Säugern nie erfolgreich gewesen, also warum es nicht mal an Hühnern versuchen? Das ist wortwörtlich der Fall. Vielleicht wird sein Motiv am besten von dem Nobelpreisträger Renato Dulbecco in seiner biographischen Schrift über Rous erklärt, der schrieb, dass Rous ein Mediziner war, der mehr über Krebs als Krankheit erfahren wollte und ein Biologe, der nicht den ausgetretenen Pfaden folgen wollte - gewillt, nach neuen Spuren in gut konzipierten, aber langsamen Experimenten zu suchen. Die Arbeit mit den Hühnerviren wurde, wie Rous es in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag beschreibt, ausgesprochen uninteressiert aufgenommen. Keiner nahm das wirklich ernst. Rous war schließlich selbst desillusioniert, da es ihm nicht gelang, die verursachenden Viren in den transplantierbaren Tumoren der Säugetiere, besonders der Nager, zu bestimmen. Es dauerte fünfundfünfzig Jahre, ehe seine Entdeckung des Hühnertumor-Virus ihm den Nobelpreis einbrachte und Finky, solltest du hier unter den Zuhörern sein, das ist wirklich ein Rekord. Gut. Rous hat sicherlich den Nobelpreis verdient, denn er hat zwei bedeutsame Vermächtnisse geformt. Das Erste ist die letztendliche Anerkennung, dass Viren eine Hauptursache für Krebs beim Menschen sind, etwas, mit dem Rous gespielt hatte, dies aber nach seinem Misserfolg mit Tumoren bei Nagern verwarf. Das ist eine Geschichte, die Ihnen Professor zur Hausen erzählen kann. Das zweite Vermächtnis stellt eine ununterbrochene Forschungskette dar, die schließlich fehlentwickelte Gene mit Krebs in Verbindung brachte. Einige Jahrzehnte lang nach Rous lag sein Sarkom-Virus brach. Doch Anfang der 1960er kam Tempo in die Angelegenheit und es wurde offensichtlich, dass das Rous Virus ein Archetyp einer umfangreichen und scheinbar ubiquitären Familie dessen war, was RNA-Tumorviren genannt wurde, was auf die Beschaffenheit ihres neu entdeckten Genom, RNA, hinwies. Die Entdeckung von Peyton Rous wuchs nun von einem zweiseitigen Bericht im Journal of the American Medical Association zu einer 1500 Seiten starken Monographie und ich habe meine Zweifel, ob es viele gibt, die diese Seite für Seite gelesen haben. Ich begegnete diesen Viren zum ersten Mal nachdem ich an der University of California San Francisco im Jahre 1968 begann, beim Antritt einer Stelle, die sich als meine einzige akademische Anstellung herausstellen sollte. Als frischgebackener Assistant Professor, dessen Forschungsarbeiten sich mit der Reproduktion von Polioviren befassten, wusste ich damals wirklich kaum etwas über RNA-Tumorvieren. Dann wurde ich einem weiteren Neuling der Fakultät, Warren Levinson, vorgestellt, der bei den biologischen Aspekten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus bewandert war. Damals sahen wir so ziemlich alle so aus. Unter Warrens Anleitung wurde es mir schnell deutlich: dieses Virus stellte eine potentiell kraftvolles Instrument dar, um die Geheimnisse der Krebszelle zu erforschen. Die Experimente waren einfach, die biologischen Grundmerkmale des Virus recht gut charakterisiert. Es konnte Zellen in vitro in einer Petrischale buchstäblich über Nacht in einen krebsartigen Phänotyp umwandeln. Es gab ein gut etabliertes und stark reproduzierbares Bioassay für das Virus in vitro, die das Virus unter anderem für die genetische Analyse nutzbar machte. Das Virus ließ sich in großen Mengen, die für eine biochemische und strukturelle Analyse ausreichten, vermehren und reinigen. Seine Unfähigkeit zur Vermehrung in menschlichen Zellen bedeutete, es würde kaum, wenn überhaupt, eine Bedrohung für diejenigen darstellen, die damit arbeiteten, weshalb man unter relativ lockeren Bedingungen würde arbeiten können. Zu der Zeit bot kein anderes RNA-Tumorvirus so viele Vorteile. Wir preschten also mit dem Hühnervirus vor. Warren und ich taten uns zusammen, um das Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu studieren, und zu der Zeit gab es zwei große Rätsel. Erstens: es schien, als könnte das virale Genom zu einer vererbbaren Eigenschaft der Wirtszelle werden. Wie war das mit einem Virus möglich, dessen Genom RNA statt DNA war? Und zweitens, gab es dieses starke tumorerregende Potential, das es zu erklären galt. Warren und ich entschieden, uns mit der Vermehrung des Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu befassen - einfach mal sehen, wie es sich vermehrt, wovon auf der molekularen Ebene so gut wie nichts bekannt war. Damit befassten wir uns implizit mit dem Rätsel, wie sich das Virus selbst als eine vererbbare Eigenschaft in der Wirtszelle herausbilden konnte. Ich kann dieses Rätsel noch weiter herausarbeiten, indem ich prüfe was geschieht, wenn das Rous-Sarkom-Virus in die Zellen von Nagern eingesetzt wird. Zuerst sieht es so aus, als würde nichts geschehen, da sich das Virus in diesen Zellen nicht vermehren kann. Doch zu gegebener Zeit tauchen Klone krebsartiger Zellen auf; Zellen, die einen Tumor in der gleichen Tierspezies formen werden. Obgleich diese Zellen keine Viren erzeugen, wird ihr morphologischer Phänotyp durch den verwendeten speziellen Virenstamm bestimmt. Und, mirabile dictu, werden irgendwann die umgewandelten Zellen mit normalen Hühnerzellen verschmolzen, taucht das Virus wieder auf, der Phänotyp ist intakt. Wo hat er sich versteckt? Über diesem Rätsel schwebte das zentrale Dogma, ausgesprochen durch die Autorität Francis Crick, damals aber auch ganz allgemein in den meisten Biologen tief verwurzelt. Man dachte nämlich, die Übertragung genetischer Informationen geschehe in einer Richtung von der DNA zur RNA zum Protein. Zukünftige Ereignisse, die ich gleich ansprechen werde, veranlassten Francis Crick, in einer etwas späten Einsicht, darauf hinzuweisen, dass die Chemie vielleicht die direkte Übertragung vom Protein zur RNA ausschloss, es gab aber keinen Grund, die Übertragung von der RNA zur DNA in zu verwerfen. Doch diese Grundannahme war vorhanden und sehr mächtig. Auf jeden Fall schenkten zwei Personen diesem zentralen Dogma wenig Aufmerksamkeit: Howard Temin und David Baltimore. das die Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine, veranstaltet hatten. Damals war Temin Student des Swarthmore College, der als Experte für das Camp amtierte, der einzig anwesende Erwachsene. Baltimore war ein Gymnasiast aus New York City, ein Teilnehmer des Camps. Temin ist rechts, Baltimore ist links zu sehen. Sehen Sie sich das an. So eines hatte ich noch nie. Obgleich Baltimore weiterhin in Swarthmore blieb, hatte Temin damit nichts mehr zu tun; die beiden gingen verschiedene Wege bis zum Frühjahr 1970, als sie unabhängig voneinander gegen das zentrale Dogma wüteten. Temin und Baltimore gingen aus sehr verschiedenen Blickwinkeln das Rätsel des Rous-Sarkom-Virus an. Temin fing als Doktorand bei Caltech an, mit dem Virus zu arbeiten, wobei er zuerst an der Entwicklung des quantitativen Bioassay mitwirkte, das wir danach alle verwendeten. Bei Caltech wurde er mit dem Phänomen der lysogenen Umwandlung von Bakterien durch Viren, die wir Bakteriophage nennen, bekannt. Im Laufe einer Infektion, kann der Phage sich verbergen, indem er sein Genom in das Genom der Wirtszelle einfügt. Aus dieser Position kann er der Wirtszelle neue Eigenschaften zuteilen. Der Phage lässt sich durch Bestrahlen der Zelle aus dem Versteck herausholen. Temin glaubte, dies könne vielleicht gut erklären, wie die Rous-Sarkom-Viren sich vermehren, ihr Genom im Wirt stabilisieren und krebsartige Transformationen der Wirtszelle auslösen. Es gab bei diesem Verlauf nur ein Problem: Der lysogene Phage hat doppelsträngige DNA-Genome, während das Rous-Sarkom-Virus ein einsträngiges RNA-Genom hat. Wie konnte dadurch ein lysogenes Phänomen in einer Wirtszelle erzeugt werden? den er die DNA-Provirus-Hypothese nannte. Das RNA-Genom des Rous-Sarkom-Virus muss in die DNA transkribiert werden, was dann als Schablone für die Synthese sowohl der viralen Boten-RNA und des RNA-Genom diente. Temin bemerkte in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag, dass seine Hypothese im wesentlich während der nächsten sechs Jahre ignoriert wurde. Er hätte auch sagen können, sie wurde entschieden verunglimpft. Ich habe das bei vielen Gelegenheiten gehört. Die meisten Beobachter verabscheuten diese Idee. Unbeirrt von der Kritik stellte Temin eine Vielfalt aussagekräftiger Daten her, um seine Idee zu stützen. Unter Verwendung von chemischen Inhibitoren demonstrierte er, dass die Infektion durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus sowohl eine neue DNA-Synthese als auch eine DNA-abhängige RNA-Synthese erforderte. Mit der molekularen Hybridisierung beanspruchte er für sich, die virale DNA in den durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen entdeckt zu haben, auch wenn, ehrlich gesagt, die Daten ziemlich schwach waren. Doch 1969 wurde Satoshi Mizutani Mitarbeiter in Temins Labor und in seinen ersten Experimenten, buchstäblich in seinen allerersten Experimenten, demonstrierte er, dass eine neue Proteinsynthese in den frühen Stadien der Rous-Sarkom-Virus-Reproduktion notwendig war. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nie publiziert, doch erlaubte es Mizutani und Temin die Schlussfolgerung, dass die RNA-abhängige DNA-Polymerase, die die Provirus-Hypothese forderte, vor der Infektion vorhanden sein musste. Zu dieser Zeit gab es keine Präzedenz für ein solches Enzym in normalen Zellen. Heute wissen wir es besser. In diesem Falle war Ahnungslosigkeit in der Tat ein Segen, denn sie veranlasste Mizutani und Temin, nach einer DNA-Polymerase in den Viria des Rous-Sarkom-Virus selbst zu suchen. David Baltimore näherte sich dem Problem aus einer vollkommen anderen Perspektive: Die Replikation tierischer viraler Genome, die ich hier porträtiert habe, in Hinblick auf die virale Boten-RNA wird erzeugt, um Replikationen in Gang zu setzen. Baltimore hatte sich bei seiner Forschung auf Picornaviren, wie etwa das Polio-Virus konzentriert, dessen einzelsträngiges RNA-Genom direkt als eine Boten-RNA diente, sobald dies einen Zugang zu den Zellen erlangte, so ist das… ja. Folglich definieren wir die Polarität des Genoms als positiv. Das ist in diesem Bereich eine Konvention. Der Bote wiederum erzeugt alle notwendigen viralen Proteine, einschließlich einer RNA- Polymerase, die das virale Genom kopiert. Baltimore entdeckte diese RNA-Replikase als Doktorand. Nebenbei bemerkt schloss er seine Doktorarbeit innerhalb von 18 Monaten ab. Die Replikase war das erste Enzym dieser Art, das aufgedeckt wurde, und es stimmte mit der konventionellen Ansicht überein, wonach Viruspartikel selbst nichts außer dem viralen Genom und den erforderlichen strukturellen Proteinen enthalten. Diese Ansicht änderte sich durch die Entdeckung einer Vielzahl an Viren, die in ihren Viria ein Enzym enthielten, kodiert durch das virale Genom, das für die Anfangsinfektion erforderlich war, da es die virale Boten-RNA erzeugte. Hier in chronologischer Folge die Entdeckungen: Eine RNA- Polymerase wurde in den Viria eines großen Pockenvirus entdeckt, die das doppelsträngige DNA-Genom dieser Viren in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Eine RNA-Polymerase die das doppelsträngige RNA-Genom von Reoviren in virale Boten-RNA transkribiert. Und eine RNA-Polymerase, die RNA-Genome von negativer Polarität in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Das Letztere hiervon hatte für Baltimore das größte Gewicht, da er und Alice Huang das erste entsprechende Beispiel im Vesicular Stomatitis Virus entdeckten und in der Folge eine ähnliche Polymerase im Newcastle Disease Virus. Wie das Rous-Sarkom-Virus sind dies verkapselte Viren mit einzelsträngigen RNA-Genomen. Doch erinnern Sie sich, sie haben eine negative Polarität. Und obgleich das Rous-Sarkom-Virus eine positive Polarität hat, war Baltimore von der Möglichkeit beeindruckt, es könne eine Virion-Polymerase zu seiner Replikation verwenden. Noch bevor die Ergebnisse der negative-strängigen RNA-Genom-Viren publiziert wurden, suchte Baltimore in Viria der RNA-Tumorviren sowohl nach RNA und DNA-Polymerasen. Er musste das Virus aus anderen Labors bekommen, er hatte zuvor nie ein RNA-Tumorvirus mit der Pinzette berührt. Er sprang buchstäblich unangekündigt in dieses Feld hinein. Er ließ sich nicht durch die herrschende Skepsis hinsichtlich Termins DNA-Provirus-Hypothese beirren, denn, wie er in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag erläuterte: „Ich hatte auf diesem Feld keine Erfahrung und auch keine persönlichen Interessen.“ Auch das kann für einen richtigen Wissenschaftler ein wahrer Segen sein. Schließlich, im späten Frühjahr 1970 führten die Wege von Temin und Baltimore erneut zueinander. Sie berichteten gleichzeitig von ihren jeweiligen Entdeckungen einer RNA-abhängigen DNA-Polymerase in den Viria der RNA-Tumorviren, welches bald reverse Transkriptase genannt wurde. Die RNA-Tumorviren wiederum wurden als die Retroviren bezeichnet. Diese Entdeckung der reversen Transkriptase bedeutete eine Umkehr vom normalen Denken. Es bot aber auch eine viele neue Möglichkeiten: Die Fähigkeit, eine einzelsträngige RNA in die DNA zu kopieren, was für die Grundlagenforschung und die im Entstehen begriffene industriell genutzte Biotechnologie von unschätzbarem Wert war. Für mich und meine Kollegen war es ein Geschenk des Himmels. Wir konnten jetzt beliebig infizierte Zellen auf virale Nukleinsäuren untersuchen und wir bauten sehr schnell Assays dafür auf. Die Mittel, mit denen das Virus provirale DNA erzeugen konnte, waren vorhanden. Gab es in der infizierten Zelle aber wirklich einen stabilen Provirus, und wenn dem so war, wo versteckte er sich? War die Infektion durch das Rous-Sarkom-Virus wirklich eine Nachbildung der Lysogenie? Die erste glaubwürdige Sichtung der proviralen DNA war biologischer Natur. Die Einführung der DNA, aus Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen in nichtinfizierte Zellen durch Transfektion, riefen das ursprüngliche Virus hervor. Das ganze virale Genom hatte sich offenbar in der DNA der infizierten Zellen versteckt. Doch wo genau war das Provirus und wie sah es aus? Dies Fragen wurden von Harold Varmus aufgegriffen, der 1970 in San Francisco zu mir stieß und wir arbeiteten dann die folgenden 16 Jahre zusammen. Hier sind wir im Jahr 1978, ich, wie gewöhnlich, einen Schritt hinter Harold. Nun, seine Beine waren sehr viel länger als meine. Unter Verwendung molekularer Hybridisierung mit radioaktiven Sonden, kopiert vom Rous-Sarkom-Genom, waren wir und andere in der Lage aufzuzeigen, wo und wann das Provirus synthetisiert wurde, welche molekularen Formen es innerhalb der infizierten Zelle annahm, seine endgültige Integration in die chromosomale DNA der Wirtszelle, in der es als ein unerwünschter Zusatz zum zellulären Genom bewahrt und ausgedrückt wird. Alles das stimmte mit dem überein, was Howard Temin bereits vor einem Jahrzehnt postulierte. Und das Nachdenken über diese innige Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen bereiteten uns auf das vor, was bald darauf folgte. Inzwischen gab es Fortschritte beim Lösen des zweiten großen Rätsels: Wie löste das Rous-Sarkom-Virus das maligne Wachstum aus? Der erste Schritt war der Beweis der Genanalyse, dass das Virus über ein Onkogen verfügte, welches für die maligne Transformation der Wirtszelle verantwortlich war. Es ist eine schöne Geschichte, aber ich habe nicht die Zeit, sie Ihnen zu erzählen, Sie war für dieses Gebiet jedoch grundlegend. Dieses Onkogen wurde Src genannt, da es Sarkome in Hühnern verursacht. Es zeigte sich, Src war, vereinfach gesagt, eines von nur vier Genen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus. Bemerkenswerter Weise spielt dieses Gen keine Rolle bei der viralen Replikation. Das ist die Aufgabe der anderen drei Gene in diesem ausnehmend kompakten und effizienten Genom. Nun werden durch das Src Gen selbst zwei Rätsel gestellt. Erstens: Was ist der biochemische Mechanismus, durch den das Gen das maligne Wachstum auslöst? Und zweitens: Warum verfügt das Virus über ein solches Gen, obwohl es dies nicht zur Replikation benötigt? Das Rätsel des Mechanismus wurde in unserem Labor durch die Entdeckung von Art Levinson, und im Labor von Mark Collett und Ray Erickson in Denver gelöst: Das Src kodiert eine Proteinkinase. Zwei Jahre danach überraschte Tony Hunter am Salk Institute sich selbst und alle anderen mit der Entdeckung, dass die Src Kinase bislang unbekannte Reaktionen vornahm, nämlich die Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin. Es besteht eine direkte Linie zwischen dieser Reihe von Experimenten zu modernen therapeutischen Behandlungen, doch auch das ist eine Geschichte für einen anderen Zeitpunkt. Die Arten, auf denen diese Entdeckungen gemacht wurden, sind wegweisend. In Denver war es eine inspirierte Vermutung auf Basis der Pleiotropie des Src. Proteinphosphorylierung zählt zu den unter Biochemikern bekannten vielseitigsten Wirkstoffen für Veränderungen. Was eignete sich besser für das Hervorrufen einer Unzahl von Veränderungen, die Anlass für eine neoplasmatische Zelle geben? In San Francisco hatte die schafsinnige Enzymologie Art Levinsons zu der Erkenntnis geführt, dass das Src-Protein selbst eine Phosphorylierung war und daher durchaus andere Proteine phosphorylieren könnte. Am Salk Institute hatte Tony Hunters zufällige Verwendung eines veralteten Puffers, dessen pH abgelaufen war, zum ersten Mal seit Menschengedenken zu einer Trennung des Phosphotyrosin vom Phosphothreonin geführt. Das hier ist Art Levinson in einem Fantasiekostüm bei der Halloween-Party des Labors, viele Jahre ehe er der CEO von Genentech, Vorsitzender des Apple-Vorstands wurde…. er kleidet sich für solche Sitzungen nicht so ein… und seit Kurzem ist er Gründer des eigenen Unternehmens Calico. Wie steht es nun mit dem zweiten Rätsel, dem Ursprung des Src-Gens im Rous-Sarkom-Virus? Viele Jahre lang haben uns zwei entgegengesetzte Ansätze zum Genom normaler Zellen geführt. Einmal war da die sogenannte virogene Onkogenhypothese, aufgestellt von Robert Huebner und George Todaro. Es war ein Bestreben, eine universelle Theorie über Krebs aufzustellen. Ich selbst bewertete sie nicht sehr hoch, doch es gab sie. Der Gedanke war, Retroviren hätten sich mit ihren Onkogenen selbst in die Keimbahnen der Urahnen der modernen Spezies deponiert. Diese Gene wurden gewöhnlich durch die Zelle unterdrückt, konnten aber durch verschiedene krebsverursachende Wirkungen aktiviert werden. Unter der Voraussetzung können wir Src möglicherweise in normalen Zellen finden, das wäre aber in Form eines retroviralen Onkogens, dessen Ursprung ungeklärt bliebe. Der entgegengesetzte Gedanke war darwinistischer Natur. Da Src für den viralen Lebenszyklus ohne Bedeutung ist, ist es unwahrscheinlich, dass es gemeinsam mit dem Rest des viralen Genoms entstanden ist. Es gab keinen ausreichend selektiven Druck, der dies erreicht hätte. Statt dessen könnte die periodische Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen im Laufe einer Infektion eine Störung verursacht haben, in der Src von der Zelle gewonnen wurde; im Wesentlichen wurde damit die Hypothese von Huebner und Todaro umgekehrt. Dieser Gedanke befürwortete auch die Suche nach Src in der normalen DNA. Die Suche erforderte eine radioaktive Sonde, die bei molekularer Hybridisierung verwendet wurde, um ein Src-Gen mit großer Sonden-Empfindlichkeit zu entdecken. In seiner vorherigen Arbeit als Post-Doc, hatte Harold Deletionsmutanten des Bakteriophagen verwendet, um die Expressionen einzelner Gene durch molekulare Hybridisierung zu erkennen. Wir waren in der Lage diese Technik für unsere Zwecke zu übernehmen. Denn unser Mitarbeiter Peter Vogt hatte den spontanen Deletionsmutanten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus isoliert, der den Hauptteil von Src zu entfernen schien. Wie hier dargestellt, konnten wir die RNA eines dieser Deletionsmutanten verwenden, um später das durchzuführen, was dann Substrathybridisierung genannt wurde. Zuerst transkribiert man das Genom, das gesamte Genom, sowohl die Replikationsgene und das Src-Gen in komplimentäre radioaktive cDNA. Als zweites hybridisiert man vom Deletionsmutanten cDNA mit RNA, was die gesamte DNA erfasst, ausgenommen jener, die Src repräsentiert. Schließlich entfernt man die doppelsträngigen Hybriden und lässt die einzelsträngige cDNA für Src über für die Sonde. Die Vorbereitung und Verwendung der Src-Sonde war mühselig, in Anbetracht, dass die Arbeit weit vor Erscheinen der rekombinanten DNA erfolgte. Die erforderlichen Experimente beanspruchten dann drei Jahre. Dass sie überhaupt durchgeführt wurden war das Verdienst zweier Post-Docs: Ramareddy Guntaka, der nachwies, dass wir die notwendige Sonde vermutlich herstellen können, und Dominique Stehelin, der hier zu sehen ist, hat die Arbeit bis zu ihrer entscheidenden Schlussfolgerung durchgeführte. Heute, mit Hilfe der rekombinanten DNA und weiteren zeitgemäßen Technologien, hätte man das vermutlich innerhalb von Wochen oder Monaten erreicht, ich bin allerdings froh, dass wir nicht gewartet haben. Onkogen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus in der DNA verschiedener Vogelarten. Die obere Tafel hier zeigt die Genauigkeit der Sonde. Sie reagiert mit der RNA aus der sie transkribiert wurde, nicht aber mit der RNA des Deletionsmutanten. Die mittlere Tafel zeigt dass die Src-Sonde mit normaler Hühner-DNA reagiert, doch das tat auch eine Sonde für den Deletionsmutanten. Das beweist die Anwesenheit dessen, was wir endogene Retroviren nannten, die dafür bekannt sind, dass sie die Genome vieler Spezies, auch die unseren, angreifen. Die untere Tafel ist die Entscheidende. Nur die Src-Sonde reagierte mit der DNA anderer Vogelarten und dies war unsere erste Indikation dafür, dass wir etwas erfasst hatten, das nicht mit dem Retrovirus verknüpft war, und anders als die Genome der endogenen Retroviren, über bedeutende phylogenetische Distanzen konserviert wurde. Beachten Sie die Ergebnisse mit Emu DNA, unter den primitivsten überlebenden Vogelarten. Wir publizierten diese Ergebnisse 1976 in einer kurzen Notiz in Nature, zwei Abbildungen und zwei Tabellen. Die Simplizität täuschte über die außerordentliche Schwierigkeit der zugrundeliegenden Experimente und den bemerkenswerten Paradigmenwechsel hinweg. Wir waren erfreut, und offenbar auch das Nobelpreiskomitee. Wie haben die Zeiten sich jedoch geändert. Vor einer Woche erzählte mir ein Kollege, er habe eine Klasse Studenten gebeten, das Papier zu lesen. Ihre Reaktion? Die haben dafür einen Nobelpreis erhalten? Ja, das haben wir. Schrittweise arbeiteten wir daran, dass unsere Sonde ein normales zelluläres Gen erkennen konnte. Wir entdeckten, es war über weite polygenetische Distanzen konserviert, was seine lebenswichtige Funktion nahelegte. Wir entdeckten, dass normale Zelle ein Protein mit den gleichen biochemischen Eigenschaften enthielten, von gleicher Größe wie die des Src-Proteins und das in zahllosen Geweben exprimiert war. Und als wir endlich die rekombinante DNA verwenden konnten, um zelluläres Src zu klonen, hatten wir das Ganze besiegelt. Zelluläres Src verfügte über die strukturellen Besonderheiten eines normalen zellulären Gens, Das virale Onkogen Src hatte sich tatsächlich unerlaubt von der Wirtszelle als vollständig gespleißte Version des Vorfahren kopiert und zugleich hatte das zelluläre Gen eine Mutation erhalten, die es in ein Onkogen umwandelte. Bald wurde klar: Src war mehr als eine abseitige Merkwürdigkeit. Der Bestand der introviralen Onkogene wuchs ständig und jedes davon wurde vom Genom einer normalen Zelle abgeleitet. Für jedes virale Onkogen gab es in der Zelle ein verwandtes Proto-Onkogen. Zufälligkeiten der Natur hatten eine Batterie potentieller Krebsgene in normalen Zellen aufgedeckt. Das zelluläre Src Proto-Onkogen ist ein sich anständig verhaltender und vitaler Schalter im Signalgebungsnetzwerk normaler Zellen. Darüber wissen wir inzwischen eine Menge. Das virale Src-Onkogen ist jedoch ein mutanter Übeltäter, dessen Genprodukt ständig aktiviert wird, mit einer genetischen “Gain-of-function”, die Krebszellen erzeugt. Die Gain-of-function erwies sich in der einen oder anderen Weise auch für alle weiteren retroviralen Onkogene als richtig. Es war leicht sich vorzustellen, dass die Vielzahl zellulärer Proto-Onkogene gleichsam eine Klaviatur sein kann, auf der alle denkbaren Karzinogene spielen konnten und - unabhängig von den Viren - zelluläre Onkogene erzeugten, wobei beispielsweise kein Retrovirus intervenieren konnte. Dies hat sich als zutreffend herausgestellt. Proto-Onkogene, die eine Gain-of-function erhalten haben, sind praktisch unvermeidbare Eigenschaften aller menschlichen Tumore. Als solches sind sie wesentliche Triebkräfte für die Tumorentstehen und folglich Kandidaten für Ziele von neuen Therapeutika, was nun ein blühender Wirtschaftszweig ist. Mit Hilfe moderner Genominstrumente ließ sich die Zahl dieser Gene auf weit über zweihundert erweitern. Die Gain-of-function, die Onkogene erzeugt, lässt sich durch verschiedene Methoden beeinträchtigen. Zuerst die Gewinne von Chromosomen oder fokale Genamplifikation, die beide die Gendosierung erhöhen. Chromosomale Translokationen, die entweder die Steuerung der Genexpression stören oder Bastard-Genprodukte erzeugen, die nicht richtig arbeiten. Punktmutationen, die die Steuerung der Genexpression unterbrechen oder nichtfunktionierende Genprodukte schaffen, und defekte epigenetische Steuerung der Genexpression. Alles das wurde in menschlichen Tumoren gefunden. Das Endergebnis ist aber immer das Gleiche: Das Äquivalent eines blockierten Gaspedals mit der Kapazität, die Tumorentstehung voranzutreiben. Die Signalübertragung normaler zellulärer Gene in Onkogenen durch Retroviren, ein Missgeschick der Natur, zeigte zum allerersten Mal die genetischen Merkmale von Krebs. Was sind die Faktoren, die diese Entdeckung förderten? Hier sind einige für die Studenten. Zu allererst, ein Auge für die beste Gelegenheit. David Baltimore entdeckte bei seinem allerersten Experiment eine reverse Transkriptase mit einem RNA-Tumorvirus. Er hatte zuvor nicht daran gedacht, aber er sah die Gelegenheit und ergriff sie. Umsichtige Missachtung der bestehenden Weisheit. Beachten Sie Temin und Baltimores wohlwollende Vernachlässigung eines zentralen Dogmas. Den Willen, etwas aufs Spiel zu setzen. Beachten Sie all die Jahre, die sie der zellulären Src nachjagten, was sich leicht als närrischer Irrtum hätte herausstellen können. Vertrauen in die Allgemeingültigkeit der Natur. Das Beispiel? Unsere Überzeugung, es gäbe etwas über den menschlichen Krebs zu lernen, indem man einen Hühnervirus untersuchte, wenn auch nicht in irgendjemandes Wohnzimmer. Die Wahl des experimentellen Systems. Der Anziehungskraft, die mich zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus führte. Technische Innovation. Das Assay, mit dem das zelluläre Src gefunden wurde. Und Selbstvertrauen. Howard Temins fokussiertes Verfolgen einer Idee über mehr als ein Jahrzehnt im intellektuellen Exil, wobei er die Provirus-Hypothese ungläubigen Ohren verkündete. Ich schließe also mit einem lauten Ruf zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus, der ein wertvoller Freund der Krebsforschung wurde. Bedenken Sie seinen Ursprung. Die Demonstration, dass Viren Krebs erregen. Reverse Transkriptase, eine wahrhaft revolutionäre und produktive Entdeckung. Das erste Beispiel eines Gens, das unmittelbar Krebs verursacht, Src. Dergleichen hatte man zuvor nie gesehen. Die Rolle der Protein-Kinasen bei der Tumorentstehung. Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin, nun maßgeblich bei der Zell-Signalgebung und vorrangiges Ziel bei Krebstherapien. Proto-Onkogene, der erste flüchtige Blick auf eine genetische Klaviatur für Karzinogene. Und bis heute, das auch noch: fünf Nobelpreise. Nicht schlecht, für ein Huhn. Vielen Dank

 
(00:09:56 - 00:18:05)
To listen to the ful lecture click here.

Temin and Baltimore, as well as Renato Dulbecco, who proved that viral DNA becomes integrated with the host’s DNA, won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1975.

 

“We Still Cannot Enjoy a Peaceful World If We Have Infectious Diseases.” – Wendell Stanley, Lindau, 1955

The Chlorella virus infects algae, white spot syndrome virus devastates shrimp populations, tomato spotted wilt virus is responsible for disfiguring over a thousand plant species[7][8]. Viruses infect all living organisms, yet naturally it’s the human viruses that receive the most attention, and much effort is put into eliminating these disease-producing agents. Unfortunately, once we are infected with a virus, there is not much that can be done to combat the virus itself, other than antivirals which may stop the virus from multiplying, and symptomatic treatment. When looking at the vast amount of virus types, only a few can be kept at bay with vaccines. In this lecture, Peter C. Doherty, who in 1996 won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Rolf M. Zinkernagel, commented on the optimism of the 1960s when viral infections such as polio were largely defeated thanks to vaccination:

To listen to the ful lecture click here. 


Doherty points out that even “not very good” vaccines are better than nothing, and of course the cost of vaccines is directly related to their distribution. Yet, because viruses mutate so quickly, they are often “one step ahead”, and in the unusual but nonetheless frightening event of a far-reaching epidemic taking place, it may take several months to vaccinate significant populations, provided a sufficient vaccine is available. In this lecture fragment, Doherty describes the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919, also known as the Spanish flu, which killed 20-40 million people in just four months:

To listen to the ful lecture click here.  


Generally, viruses are most damaging to children and the elderly, but what is still puzzling about the Spanish flu is that the mortality rate was highest among young adults[9]. It is best to overcome some infections during childhood as symptoms are much more severe in adults. Thomas H. Weller received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1954 for work on poliomyelitis viruses but was also known for isolating the Varicella zoster virus, which causes chicken pox. Weller was the last speaker at the 31st Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 1981, and his lecture stressed that even relatively benign human viruses can produce terrifying effects at multiple exposure, especially considering that humans live longer than ever before:

To listen to the ful lecture click here. 


At the start of the lecture, Weller mentioned that a vaccine for Varicella zoster is on the horizon. Today, the vaccine is available, yet immunisation practices differ from country to country. It is compulsory in some countries and not recommended in others, for the reason that the virus should circulate in the population so that children gain immunity at an early age.
Some parents, particularly in developed countries, refuse to vaccinate their children in the belief that vaccines cause more harm than good. This rejection of vaccines for childhood diseases was commented on by Peter Doherty:

To listen to the ful lecture click here.


As Doherty mentioned here, most people have never seen a child ill with measles, which may make it seem that the disease doesn’t exist and the threat of becoming ill is insignificant. In low-income countries, where child mortality is higher, there is less vaccine scepticism.

 

“The Only Certain Fast Way to Make a Cancer Is With a Virus” – Wendell Stanley, Lindau, 1961

The discovery of the link between viruses and cancer is almost as old as virology itself. Michael J. Bishop dedicated part of his lecture to the research conducted by Peyton Rous, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1966 “for his discovery of tumour-inducing viruses”, which had taken place over half a century earlier. Rous carried out this research on chickens; perhaps this was one of the reasons scientists in the field treated his findings with “downright disbelief”:

J. Michael Bishop (2015) - A Virus, a Gene and Cancer: An Anatomy of Discovery

Thank you very much. It's nice once again to be here. I want to say that it was impressive that Eric Betzig did some of his crucial work in a living room, somebody's living room. This story starts with chickens. I don't think that would work. So late in... There we go. Late in the year 1909, a farmer on Long Island in New York noticed a tumour on the breast of one of his Plymouth Rock hens. He watched this tumour grow for several months, and then took it to the Rockefeller Institute in New York City to see what might be done. The farmer was referred to Peyton Rous, a young pathologist with an interest in cancer, although not much of a publication record in the field. He's said to have been a very forceful, even fiery individual. So perhaps by virtue of his personality, he was able to convince the farmer to donate his chicken to medical research. So this serendipitous encounter launched a sequence of discoveries that spanned almost three quarters of a century, and culminated in the realization that the seeds of cancer reside in our own genomes. And my purpose today is to explore how all that happened, in an effort to illustrate how discoveries are made. And then in the following lecture, my colleague Harold Varmus will explain where these discoveries have taken us in the struggle to understand and control cancer. Now Rous began with a very simple experiment, by attempting to pass the tumours with grafts from one chicken to another. The experiment was not exactly a resounding success. In this example, with each passage... there you go... Finky taught me that... (laughs) only a single engraftment succeeded. That's the black squares there. Moreover, the transplantation succeeded only when Rous used chickens from the inbred flock of the farmer. The tumour would not grow in Plymouth Rock hens from other sources, nor in other breeds of birds. Rous explained this by saying that the tumours were obeying what he called the laws of tissue biology. We call it histoincompatibility. Now mundane as this experiment may seem to us, it's widely believed that the passaging of the tumour was serendipitously essential to the next step, which took Peyton Rous to a new dimension and to lasting fame. Beginning with the sixth passage of tumours, Rous began to make cell-free extracts of the tumours, and found that injection of these into chickens from the same flock could elicit the identical tumour, a spindle cell sarcoma. He announced this discovery with a two page article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. You will not find much about chickens in that journal in this day and age. Now, Rous realized that he had made, in his words, a unique and significant finding, but he was very careful about what that finding might connote. And I quote from his first paper: active in this sarcoma of the fowl as a minute parasitic organism. But an agency of another sort is not out of the question. For the moment, we have not adopted either hypothesis." That sort of language would not get you into many journals these days either. Now within a year, however, Rous had identified a second filterable agent that caused a different kind of chicken tumour, an osteochondrosarcoma, and at that point, he succumbed to using the recently coined term "virus," the very concept of which was just about a decade old. In his writings, Rous was never particularly illuminating about his inspiration for his work. He explained his effort to transplant the tumour by pointing out that transplantation of tumours had succeeded in mammals, so why not try it in chickens? He justified his landmark experiments with filterable extracts by pointing out that such work had never succeeded with mammals, so why not try it in chickens? That's literally the case. Perhaps his motive was best captured by Nobel laureate Renato Dulbecco in his biographical sketch of Rous, who wrote that Rous was a medical man who wished to learn about cancer as a disease, and a biologist who did not want to follow the beaten path, willing to hunt for new clues in well-designed but slow experiments. The work with chicken viruses was greeted with what Rous described in his Nobel lecture as downright disbelief. Nobody really took it seriously. And Rous himself eventually became disillusioned when he failed to identify causative viruses in transplantable tumours of mammals, particularly rodents. It would be fifty-five years before his discovery of the chicken tumour virus earned him the Nobel Prize, and Finky, if you're in the audience, that's the real record. Okay. Rous certainly deserved the Nobel Prize, because he had fashioned two momentous legacies. The first, the eventual recognition that viruses are major causes of human cancer, something that Rous had toyed with but abandoned after his failure with rodent tumours. That's a story that Professor zur Hausen could tell you. The second legacy represents an unbroken chain of research that would eventually link wayward genes to cancer. For several decades after Rous, his sarcoma virus lay fallow. Beginning in the 1960s however, the pace quickened, and it became apparent that Rous's virus was an archetype for a vast and seemingly ubiquitous family of what came to be called RNA tumour viruses, signalling the nature of their newly discovered genome, RNA. The discovery of Peyton Rous now blossomed from a two page report in the Journal of the American Medical Association to a 1500 page monograph, and I doubt that many have ever read it cover to cover. I first encountered these viruses when I arrived at UCSF, University of California San Francisco, in 1968, to take up what proved to be my only academic job. As a newly minted assistant professor whose research concerned the replication of polio viruses, I really was not very much aware of RNA tumour viruses at the time. And there I was introduced to a fellow newcomer to the faculty, Warren Levinson, who was schooled in the biological aspects of Rous sarcoma virus. And all of us pretty much looked like that in those days. Under Warren's tutelage, it quickly became apparent to me that this virus represents a potentially powerful tool with which to probe the secrets of the cancer cell. It was a simple and tractable experimental system whose biological properties were actually pretty well characterized. It could transform cells in vitro, in a petri dish, to neoplastic phenotype, literally overnight. There was a well-established and highly reproducible bioassay for the virus in vitro, which among other things made the virus amenable to genetic analysis. The virus could be propagated and purified in very large quantities, sufficient for biochemical and structural analysis. And its inability to replicate in human cells meant it posed little if any threat to those of us who were working with it, and so it could be worked with under relatively unconstrained conditions. At the time, no other RNA tumour virus offered such a powerful suite of advantages. So we bashed ahead with the chicken virus. Warren and I joined to study Rous sarcoma virus, and two great puzzles defined the field at the time. First, it appeared that the viral genome could be established as a heritable property of the host cell. How could this happen with a virus whose genome was RNA rather than DNA? And second, there was that powerful tumorigenic potential to be explained. Warren and I resolved to take on the replication of Rous sarcoma virus, just how does it propagate, about which virtually nothing was known at the molecular level. And in doing so, we implicitly took on the puzzle of how the virus could establish itself as a heritable property of the host cell. And I can dramatize that puzzle by reviewing what happens when Rous sarcoma virus is applied to rodent cells. At first it appears that nothing has happened, because the virus cannot replicate in those cells. But in due course, clones of neoplastic cells emerge, cells that will form a tumour in the same species of animal. And although these cells produce no virus, their morphological phenotype is determined by the particular strain of virus that was used. And mirabile dictu, if at any subsequent point the transformed cells are fused with normal chicken cells, the virus re-emerges, phenotype intact. Where had it been hiding? Now looming over that puzzle was the central dogma, enunciated with special authority by Francis Crick, but generally ingrained in most biologists at the time. The transfer of genetic information was thought to be unidirectional from DNA to RNA to protein. It turns out that future events about, which I'll talk in a moment, would prompt Francis Crick in a bit of hindsight to point out that chemistry may preclude direct transfer of information from protein to RNA, but there had been no inherent reason to discredit transfer from RNA to DNA. But that bias was existent and powerful. In any event, two individuals paid little heed to the central dogma: Howard Temin and David Baltimore. The two first crossed paths in 1955 at a science camp for high school students put on by the Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine. At the time, Temin was a student at Swarthmore College who was serving as the guru for the camp, the one adult presence. Baltimore was a high school student from New York City who attended the camp. Temin is on the right, Baltimore is on the left. Look at that. I've never had one of those before. Now, although Baltimore went on to attend Swarthmore as well, Temin apparently had nothing to do with that, the two parted ways until the spring of 1970, when they independently wreaked havoc with the central dogma. Now, Temin and Baltimore came at the puzzle of Rous sarcoma virus from very different vantage points. Temin began work with the virus as a graduate student at Caltech, where he first of all helped develop the quantitative bioassay that we all then used thereafter. And at Caltech, he became familiar with the phenomenon of lysogenic conversion of bacteria by viruses that we call bacteriophage. And during the course of infection, the phage can go into hiding by inserting its genome into the genome of the host cell and from that position can bestow new properties on the host cell. The phage can be brought out of hiding by irradiating the cell. Temin thought this might just well represent how Rous sarcoma viruses might replicate, stabilize its genome in the host, and initiate neoplastic transformation of the host cell. There was only one problem with this of course. Lysogenic phage had double stranded DNA genomes, whereas Rous sarcoma virus has a single stranded RNA genome. How could that create a lysogenic phenomenon in the host cell? By 1964, Temin had solved this problem in his own mind by proposing what he called the DNA provirus hypothesis. The RNA genome of Rous sarcoma virus must be transcribed into DNA, which then serves as template for the synthesis of both viral messenger and genome RNA. Temin ruefully remarked in his Nobel lecture that for the next six years this hypothesis was essentially ignored. He might well have said soundly denigrated. I heard that done on many occasions. Most observers absolutely loathed the idea. Undeterred by criticism, Temin produced a variety of suggestive data to support his idea. Using chemical inhibitors, he demonstrated that infection by Rous sarcoma virus requires both new DNA synthesis and DNA dependent RNA synthesis. And using molecular hybridization, he claimed to have detected viral DNA in Rous sarcoma virus infected cells, although in all honesty the data were quite frail. In 1969 however, Satoshi Mizutani joined Temin's laboratory and in his first experiments, literally his very first experiments, he demonstrated that new protein synthesis was necessary for the early stages of Rous sarcoma virus replication. That result was actually never published, but it allowed Mizutani and Temin to conclude that the RNA directed DNA polymerase required by the provirus hypothesis must pre-exist infection. And at the time there was no precedent for such an enzyme in normal cells. We all know better now. So in that case ignorance was indeed bliss, because it directed Mizutani and Temin to look for a DNA polymerase in the virions of Rous sarcoma virus itself. David Baltimore came at the problem from a completely different perspective: the replication of animal viral genomes, which I have portrayed here, in terms of how the viral messenger RNA is generated in order to get replication underway. Baltimore had cut his research teeth on picornaviruses such as polio virus, whose single stranded RNA genomes serve directly as messenger RNA once they have gained access to the cell, so that's... yes. Consequently, we define the polarity of the genome as positive. That's a convention in the field. The messenger in turn produces all the necessary viral proteins including an RNA polymerase that replicates the viral genome. Baltimore discovered this RNA replicase while a graduate student. He completed, incidentally, he completed his thesis work in 18 months. The replicase was the first enzyme of its kind to be uncovered, and it was consistent with the idea, the conventional view that virus particles themselves contain nothing but the viral genome and the requisite structural proteins. That view was changed by the discovery that a variety of viruses carry within their virions an enzyme encoded by the viral genome and required to initiate infection by producing viral messenger RNA. And in chronological order of those discoveries: An RNA polymerase was discovered within the virions of the large pox viruses that transcribes the double stranded DNA genome of these viruses into messenger RNA. An RNA polymerase that transcribes the double stranded RNA genome of reoviruses into viral messenger RNA. And an RNA polymerase that transcribes RNA genomes of negative polarity into messenger RNA. And it was the last of these that carried the greatest weight for Baltimore because he and Alice Huang discovered the first such example in vesicular stomatitis virus and followed that by finding a similar polymerase in Newcastle disease virus. Like Rous sarcoma virus, these are envelope viruses with single stranded RNA genomes. But they have a negative polarity, remember. And although the genome of Rous sarcoma virus has a positive polarity, Baltimore was struck by the possibility that it might utilize a virion polymerase for its replication. So even before publishing the results on the negative stranded RNA genome viruses, Baltimore went looking for both RNA and DNA polymerases in the virions of RNA tumour viruses. And he had to get the virus from other labs, he had never laid a pipette on an RNA tumour virus before. He literally leaped into the field unannounced. He was undeterred by the reigning scepticism about Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis, because as he explained in his Nobel lecture, "I had no experience in the field and no axe to grind." And that too can be a state of bliss for the right scientist. In the late spring of 1970, the paths of Temin and Baltimore finally converged again when they simultaneously reported their respective discoveries of an RNA directed DNA polymerase within the virions of RNA tumour viruses, which soon acquired the name reverse transcriptase. And in turn the RNA tumour viruses were reffered to as retroviruses. Now the discovery of reverse transcriptase of course was a transformative event intellectually. But it also provided a powerfully enabling technique: the ability to copy any single stranded RNA into DNA, which made it invaluable to both fundamental research and the burgeoning biotechnology industry. For my colleagues and me it was a godsend. Now we could make probes so that we could examine infected cells for viral nucleic acids at will, and we quickly set up assays to do so. So, the means by which the virus could produce proviral DNA were at hand, but was there really a stable provirus in the infected cell, and if so, where was it hiding? Was infection by Rous sarcoma virus truly an analogue of lysogeny? The first credible sighting of proviral DNA was actually biological in nature. Introduction of DNA taken from Rous sarcoma virus infected cells into uninfected cells by transfection gave rise to the original virus. The entire viral genome must have been lurking in the DNA of infected cells. But exactly where was the provirus and what did it look like? Those questions were taken up by Harold Varmus, who joined me in San Francisco in 1970, and we were to work together for the next sixteen years. Here we are in 1978, with me as usual one step behind Harold. Well, his legs were considerably longer than mine. And using molecular hybridization with radioactive probe copied from the Rous sarcoma's genome, we and others were able to demonstrate where and when the provirus was synthesized, what molecular forms it took within the infected cell, its eventual integration into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, where it is perpetuated and expressed as an unwelcome addition to the cellular genome. Now all of this adhered to what Howard Temin had posited a decade before. And contemplating this intimate interaction between viral and cellular genomes prepared us for what was soon to follow. Meanwhile progress was made towards solving a second great puzzle: How does Rous sarcoma virus elicit malignant growth? The first step was the demonstration by genetic analysis that the virus possesses an oncogene that is responsible for malignant transformation of host cells. This is a beautiful story which time does not permit me to tell, but it was fundamental to the field. And this oncogene was dubbed src because it causes sarcomas in chickens. Now src proved to be one of the only four genes, simply put, in the Rous sarcoma virus. And remarkably this gene plays no role in viral replication. That's the job of the other three genes in this exquisitely compact and efficient genome. Now src gene itself raised two puzzles of its own. First, what is the biochemical mechanism by which the gene elicits cancerous growth, and second, why does the virus have such a gene, given that it is not required for replication? The mechanism puzzle was solved with a discovery by Art Levinson in our lab and Mark Collett and Ray Erickson's lab in Denver that src encodes a protein kinase. Two years later, Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute surprised himself and everyone else with the discovery that the src kinase carries out a heretofore unknown reaction, phosphorylation of tyrosine. And there is a direct line from this line of experimentation to modern therapeutic practices, but that's also a story for another time. The ways in which these discoveries emerged are illuminating. In Denver, it was an inspired guess, based on the pleiotropism of src. Protein phosphorylation ranks among the most versatile agents of change known to biochemists. What better way to evoke the myriad changes that give rise to the neoplastic cell? In San Francisco, shrewd enzymology by Art Levinson led to the recognition that the src protein was actually phosphorylating itself, and thus might well phosphorylate other proteins as well. And at the Salk Institute, Tony Hunter's fortuitous use of an outdated buffer that's pH had gone off led to the separation of phosphotyrosine from phosphothreonine for the first time in recorded history. And here is Art Levinson, in creative costume at a lab Halloween party, many years before he became CEO of Genentech, chair of the Apple board of directors... he doesn't dress like that for those meetings... and most recently the founder of his own company, Calico. Now what about the second puzzle, the origin of the src gene in Rous sarcoma virus? Many years, two opposing lines of thought directed us to the genome of normal cells. First, there was the so-called virogene oncogene hypothesis, formulated by Robert Huebner and George Todaro. It was sort of an effort to create a universal theory of cancer. I for one didn't take it very seriously, but nevertheless it was out there. The thought was that retroviruses had deposited themselves with their oncogenes in the germ lines of ancient ancestors of modern species. And these genes were normally repressed by the cell, but they could be activated by various cancer-causing agents. By this account, we might possibly find src in normal cells, but it would be in the form of a retroviral oncogene, and its origin would remain unexplained. The opposing thought was Darwinian in nature. Since src is irrelevant to the viral life cycle, it is not likely to have arisen in concert with the remainder of the viral genome. There was no apparent selective pressure to accomplish that. Instead the intermittent interaction between viral and cellular genomes during the course of infection might have created an accident in which src was acquired from the cell, in essence reversing the hypothesis of Huebner and Todaro. And this thought also favoured a search for src in normal DNA. The search required a radioactive probe that could be used in molecular hybridization with the exquisite specificity to detect the src gene with great sensitivity. Now in his previous work as a postdoctoral fellow, Harold had used deletion mutants of bacteriophage to detect the expression of individual genes by molecular hybridization. And we were able to adapt this technique to our purposes. Because our collaborator Peter Vogt had isolated spontaneous deletion mutants of Rous sarcoma virus that appeared to remove the bulk of src. So as illustrated here, we could use the RNA of one of these deletion mutants to perform what later came to called subtractive hybridization. First transcribe the genome, the entire genome, both the replication genes and the src gene, into complementary radioactive cDNA. Then second, hybridize that cDNA to RNA from the deletion mutant which would capture all the DNA except that representing src. And finally remove the double stranded hybrids, leaving the single stranded cDNA for src, the probe we needed. The preparation and use of the src probe was laborious, given that the work far antedated the advent of recombinant DNA. And the requisite experiments occupied more than three years. The fact that they were done at all was a tribute to the valiant efforts of two postdoctoral fellows, Ramareddy Guntaka, who demonstrated that we could probably make the probe we needed. And Dominique Stehelin, shown here, who carried the work to its decisive conclusion. Today, with the assistance of recombinant DNA and other contemporary technologies you could probably have it done in a matter of weeks or months, but I for one am very glad we didn't wait. By 1974 we knew that our probe could detect sequences homologous to the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus in the DNA of various avians. The top panel here demonstrates the specificity of the probe. It reacted with the RNA from which it had been transcribed, but not with RNA from the deletion mutant. The middle panel shows that the src probe reacted with normal chicken DNA, but so did a probe for the deletion mutant. And that reflects the presence of what we call endogenous retroviruses, known to pollute the genomes of many species, ourselves included. The bottom panel is the crucial one. Only the src probe reacted with DNA from other avians, and this was our first indication that we were picking up something that was not linked to a retrovirus, and unlike the genomes of endogenous retroviruses, was conserved across substantial phylogenetic distances. Note the results with emu DNA, among the most primitive of surviving avians. We published these findings in 1976 as a brief note in Nature, two figures and two tables. The simplicity belied the extraordinary difficulty of the underlying experiments, and the remarkable paradigm shift that they represented. We were pleased and so apparently was the Nobel committee. But oh how times have changed. A week ago, a colleague told me that he had asked a class of graduate students to read that paper. Their reaction? They got the Nobel Prize for that? Yeah, we did. Gradually, we built the case that our probe was detecting a normal cellular gene. We found that it was conserved across vast phylogenetic distances, suggesting that it serves a vital function. We found that normal cells contained a protein with the same biochemical properties, the same size as the viral src protein, and that this was expressed in numerous tissues. And when at long last we could use recombinant DNA to clone cellular src, we sealed the deal. Cellular src had the structural hallmarks of a normal cellular gene, the viral oncogene src had indeed been pirated from the host cell as a fully spliced version of the progenitor, and at some point the cellular gene had sustained a mutation which converted it to an oncogene. And it soon became apparent that src was more than an isolated curiosity. The inventory of retroviral oncogenes mounted steadily, and each of these had been derived from the genome of a normal cell. Thus for each viral oncogene, there was a cognate proto-oncogene in the cell. Accidents of nature had uncovered a battery of potential cancer genes in normal cells. The cellular src proto-oncogene is a well behaved and vital switch in the signalling network of normal cells, we know a great deal about that now. The viral src oncogene, however, is a mutant malefactor, whose gene product has been constitutively activated, a genetic gain of function that creates a cancer gene. Gain of function, by one means or another, proved true for all the other retroviral oncogenes as well. It was easy to imagine that the battery of cellular proto-oncogenes could be a keyboard on which all manner of carcinogens could play, independent of viruses, creating cellular oncogenes without the intervention of a retrovirus, for example. Such has proven to be the case. Proto-oncogenes that have suffered gain of function are a virtually inevitable feature of all human tumours. And as such they are major drivers for tumour genesis, and consequently, candidates as targets for new therapeutics, and that is a thriving industry now. With the assistance of modern genomic tools, the number of these genes has been expanded well beyond two hundred. The gain of function that creates oncogenes can be affected by various means. First, gain of chromosomes, or focal gene amplification, both of which increase gene dosage. Chromosomal translocations, which can either disturb the control of gene expression, or create mongrel gene products that malfunction. Point mutations, which can disrupt the control of gene expression, or create malfunctioning gene products. And defective epigenetic control of gene expression. All of these have been found in human tumours. But the end result is always the same: The equivalent of a jammed accelerator with the capacity to drive tumour genesis. The transduction of normal cellular genes into oncogenes by retroviruses, an accident of nature, had brought genetic seeds of cancer to view for the very first time. What are the factors that drove this line of discovery? Well here are a few, for the students. First of all, an eye for the main chance. David Baltimore discovered a reverse transcriptase with his very first experiment with an RNA tumour virus. He was not thinking about it before, but he saw an opportunity and seized it. Judicious disregard for received wisdom. Consider Temin and Baltimore's benign neglect of the central dogma. A willingness to gamble. Consider the years invested in the pursuit of cellular src, in what could easily have been a fool's errand. Faith in the universality of nature. The example? Our conviction that there was something to be learned about human cancer from studying a chicken virus, albeit not in anybody's living room. The choice of experimental system. The attractions that drew me to Rous sarcoma virus. Technical innovation. The assay that found cellular src. And self-confidence. Howard Temin's steadfast pursuit of his ideas during more than a decade in intellectual exile while he promulgated the provirus hypothesis to disbelieving ears. So I conclude with a shout out to Rous sarcoma virus, which has been a fecund friend of cancer research. Consider its offspring. Demonstration that viruses can cause cancer. Reverse transcriptase, a truly disruptive and generative discovery. The first example of a gene that can directly cause cancer, src. Nothing like it had been seen before. The role of protein kinases in tumorigenesis. Phosphorylation of tyrosine, now a prime player in cell signalling and a prime target in cancer therapeutics. Proto-oncogenes, the first glimpse of a genetic keyboard for carcinogens. And to date, for what it's worth, five Nobel laureates. Not bad for a chicken. Thank you.

Ich danke Ihnen. Es ist schön, wieder hier zu sein. Ich möchte anmerken, ich fand es beeindruckend, dass Eric Betzig einige seiner zentralen Arbeiten in einem Wohnzimmer durchgeführt hat. Diese Geschichte beginnt mit Hühnern. Ich glaubte nicht, dass es da geklappt hätte. Also Ende des… Da haben wir es. Ende des Jahres 1909 bemerkte ein Bauer auf Long Island in New York an der Brust einer seiner Plymouth Rock Hennen einen Tumor. Mehrere Monate lang beobachtete er das Wachsen des Tumors, dann brachte er sie in das Rockefeller Institute in New York City, um zu sehen, ob man da was tun könnte. Der Bauer wurde an Peyton Rous verwiesen, einen jungen Pathologen, der sich für Krebs interessierte, obgleich seine Publikationsliste dazu nicht groß waren. Über ihn wird gesagt, er sei eine sehr energische, sogar hitzige Person gewesen. Vielleicht war er dank seiner Persönlichkeit fähig, den Bauer davon zu überzeugen, dieses Huhn der medizinischen Forschung zu schenken. Diese zufällige Begegnung startete eine Reihe von Entdeckungen, die sich beinahe über drei Viertel eines Jahrhunderts erstreckten und zu der Erkenntnis führte, dass der Keim des Krebses in unseren eigenen Genomen sitzt. Ich möchte heute untersuchen, wie sich das alles zugetragen hat, um zu zeigen, wie Entdeckungen gemacht werden. Im darauf folgenden Vortrag wird mein Kollege Harold Varmus erläutern, wohin uns diese Entdeckungen im Kampf gegen Krebs geführt haben. Rous fing mit einem sehr einfachen Experiment an: er versuchte, den Tumor mittels Körpergewebe von einem Huhn auf ein anderes weiterzugeben. Das Experiment war nicht unbedingt ein voller Erfolg. In diesem Beispiel, mit jedem Durchgang… da haben wir es…Finky hat mir das beigebracht… (lacht) Es war nur eine Übertragung erfolgreich. Es ist dieses schwarze Quadrat. Zudem war die Transplantation nur erfolgreich, wenn Rous Hühner aus der durch Inzucht gewachsenen Hühnerschar des Bauern verwendete. Der Tumor wuchs nicht bei Plymouth Rock Hühnern aus anderen Quellen, auch nicht bei anderen Vogelarten. Rous erklärte dies damit, dass die Tumore dem folgten, was er die Gesetze der Gewebebiologie nannte. Wir nennen es Histokompatibilität. So banal uns dieses Experiment auch scheinen mag, es wird allgemein angenommen, dass die Weitergabe des Tumors glücklicherweise für den nächsten Schritt essentiell war, der Peyton Rous in eine neue Dimension führte und ihm bleibenden Ruhm verschaffte. Beginnend mit den sechs Passagen von Tumoren, begann Rous aus den Tumoren zellfreie Extrakte herzustellen und entdeckte, dass deren Injektionen bei Hühnern aus der gleichen Schar einen identischen Tumor hervorrufen konnten, ein Spindelzellsarkom. Er veröffentlichte diese Entdeckung in einem zweiseitigen Artikel im Journal of the American Medical Association. In jenen Tagen und zu jener Zeit werden Sie nicht viel über Hühner in dieser Fachzeitschrift finden. Rous erkannte, dass er, mit seinen eigenen Worten, eine einzigartige und signifikante Entdeckung gemacht hatte, er war aber sehr vorsichtig dahingehend, was diese Entdeckung implizieren könnte. Ich zitiere aus seinem ersten Artikel: in diesem Sarkom des Geflügels als einen winzigen parasitären Organismus zu betrachten. Aber eine andersartige Wirkung ist nicht ausgeschlossen. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt haben wir uns keiner der beiden Hypothesen verschrieben.“ Mit einer solchen Sprache könnten Sie heutzutage nicht in vielen Fachzeitschriften landen. Doch innerhalb eines Jahres hatte Rous einen zweiten filtrierbaren Erreger identifiziert, der eine andere Art Tumor bei Hühnern verursachte, ein Osteochondrosarkom, und an diesem Punkt erlag er der Versuchung, den vor Kurzem geprägten Begriff „Virus“ zu verwenden, ein Konzept, das erst seit einem Jahrzehnt vorlag. In seinen Schriften war Rous nie besonders eindeutig hinsichtlich der Inspiration zu seiner Arbeit. Er erklärte seine Bemühung den Tumor zu transplantieren, indem er darauf verwies, dass die Transplantation von Tumoren bei Säugetieren erfolgreich war, warum es also nicht auch an Hühnern ausprobieren? Er begründete seine Meilenstein-Experimente mit filtrierbaren Extrakten indem er darauf verwies, diese Arbeit sei bei Säugern nie erfolgreich gewesen, also warum es nicht mal an Hühnern versuchen? Das ist wortwörtlich der Fall. Vielleicht wird sein Motiv am besten von dem Nobelpreisträger Renato Dulbecco in seiner biographischen Schrift über Rous erklärt, der schrieb, dass Rous ein Mediziner war, der mehr über Krebs als Krankheit erfahren wollte und ein Biologe, der nicht den ausgetretenen Pfaden folgen wollte - gewillt, nach neuen Spuren in gut konzipierten, aber langsamen Experimenten zu suchen. Die Arbeit mit den Hühnerviren wurde, wie Rous es in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag beschreibt, ausgesprochen uninteressiert aufgenommen. Keiner nahm das wirklich ernst. Rous war schließlich selbst desillusioniert, da es ihm nicht gelang, die verursachenden Viren in den transplantierbaren Tumoren der Säugetiere, besonders der Nager, zu bestimmen. Es dauerte fünfundfünfzig Jahre, ehe seine Entdeckung des Hühnertumor-Virus ihm den Nobelpreis einbrachte und Finky, solltest du hier unter den Zuhörern sein, das ist wirklich ein Rekord. Gut. Rous hat sicherlich den Nobelpreis verdient, denn er hat zwei bedeutsame Vermächtnisse geformt. Das Erste ist die letztendliche Anerkennung, dass Viren eine Hauptursache für Krebs beim Menschen sind, etwas, mit dem Rous gespielt hatte, dies aber nach seinem Misserfolg mit Tumoren bei Nagern verwarf. Das ist eine Geschichte, die Ihnen Professor zur Hausen erzählen kann. Das zweite Vermächtnis stellt eine ununterbrochene Forschungskette dar, die schließlich fehlentwickelte Gene mit Krebs in Verbindung brachte. Einige Jahrzehnte lang nach Rous lag sein Sarkom-Virus brach. Doch Anfang der 1960er kam Tempo in die Angelegenheit und es wurde offensichtlich, dass das Rous Virus ein Archetyp einer umfangreichen und scheinbar ubiquitären Familie dessen war, was RNA-Tumorviren genannt wurde, was auf die Beschaffenheit ihres neu entdeckten Genom, RNA, hinwies. Die Entdeckung von Peyton Rous wuchs nun von einem zweiseitigen Bericht im Journal of the American Medical Association zu einer 1500 Seiten starken Monographie und ich habe meine Zweifel, ob es viele gibt, die diese Seite für Seite gelesen haben. Ich begegnete diesen Viren zum ersten Mal nachdem ich an der University of California San Francisco im Jahre 1968 begann, beim Antritt einer Stelle, die sich als meine einzige akademische Anstellung herausstellen sollte. Als frischgebackener Assistant Professor, dessen Forschungsarbeiten sich mit der Reproduktion von Polioviren befassten, wusste ich damals wirklich kaum etwas über RNA-Tumorvieren. Dann wurde ich einem weiteren Neuling der Fakultät, Warren Levinson, vorgestellt, der bei den biologischen Aspekten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus bewandert war. Damals sahen wir so ziemlich alle so aus. Unter Warrens Anleitung wurde es mir schnell deutlich: dieses Virus stellte eine potentiell kraftvolles Instrument dar, um die Geheimnisse der Krebszelle zu erforschen. Die Experimente waren einfach, die biologischen Grundmerkmale des Virus recht gut charakterisiert. Es konnte Zellen in vitro in einer Petrischale buchstäblich über Nacht in einen krebsartigen Phänotyp umwandeln. Es gab ein gut etabliertes und stark reproduzierbares Bioassay für das Virus in vitro, die das Virus unter anderem für die genetische Analyse nutzbar machte. Das Virus ließ sich in großen Mengen, die für eine biochemische und strukturelle Analyse ausreichten, vermehren und reinigen. Seine Unfähigkeit zur Vermehrung in menschlichen Zellen bedeutete, es würde kaum, wenn überhaupt, eine Bedrohung für diejenigen darstellen, die damit arbeiteten, weshalb man unter relativ lockeren Bedingungen würde arbeiten können. Zu der Zeit bot kein anderes RNA-Tumorvirus so viele Vorteile. Wir preschten also mit dem Hühnervirus vor. Warren und ich taten uns zusammen, um das Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu studieren, und zu der Zeit gab es zwei große Rätsel. Erstens: es schien, als könnte das virale Genom zu einer vererbbaren Eigenschaft der Wirtszelle werden. Wie war das mit einem Virus möglich, dessen Genom RNA statt DNA war? Und zweitens, gab es dieses starke tumorerregende Potential, das es zu erklären galt. Warren und ich entschieden, uns mit der Vermehrung des Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu befassen - einfach mal sehen, wie es sich vermehrt, wovon auf der molekularen Ebene so gut wie nichts bekannt war. Damit befassten wir uns implizit mit dem Rätsel, wie sich das Virus selbst als eine vererbbare Eigenschaft in der Wirtszelle herausbilden konnte. Ich kann dieses Rätsel noch weiter herausarbeiten, indem ich prüfe was geschieht, wenn das Rous-Sarkom-Virus in die Zellen von Nagern eingesetzt wird. Zuerst sieht es so aus, als würde nichts geschehen, da sich das Virus in diesen Zellen nicht vermehren kann. Doch zu gegebener Zeit tauchen Klone krebsartiger Zellen auf; Zellen, die einen Tumor in der gleichen Tierspezies formen werden. Obgleich diese Zellen keine Viren erzeugen, wird ihr morphologischer Phänotyp durch den verwendeten speziellen Virenstamm bestimmt. Und, mirabile dictu, werden irgendwann die umgewandelten Zellen mit normalen Hühnerzellen verschmolzen, taucht das Virus wieder auf, der Phänotyp ist intakt. Wo hat er sich versteckt? Über diesem Rätsel schwebte das zentrale Dogma, ausgesprochen durch die Autorität Francis Crick, damals aber auch ganz allgemein in den meisten Biologen tief verwurzelt. Man dachte nämlich, die Übertragung genetischer Informationen geschehe in einer Richtung von der DNA zur RNA zum Protein. Zukünftige Ereignisse, die ich gleich ansprechen werde, veranlassten Francis Crick, in einer etwas späten Einsicht, darauf hinzuweisen, dass die Chemie vielleicht die direkte Übertragung vom Protein zur RNA ausschloss, es gab aber keinen Grund, die Übertragung von der RNA zur DNA in zu verwerfen. Doch diese Grundannahme war vorhanden und sehr mächtig. Auf jeden Fall schenkten zwei Personen diesem zentralen Dogma wenig Aufmerksamkeit: Howard Temin und David Baltimore. das die Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine, veranstaltet hatten. Damals war Temin Student des Swarthmore College, der als Experte für das Camp amtierte, der einzig anwesende Erwachsene. Baltimore war ein Gymnasiast aus New York City, ein Teilnehmer des Camps. Temin ist rechts, Baltimore ist links zu sehen. Sehen Sie sich das an. So eines hatte ich noch nie. Obgleich Baltimore weiterhin in Swarthmore blieb, hatte Temin damit nichts mehr zu tun; die beiden gingen verschiedene Wege bis zum Frühjahr 1970, als sie unabhängig voneinander gegen das zentrale Dogma wüteten. Temin und Baltimore gingen aus sehr verschiedenen Blickwinkeln das Rätsel des Rous-Sarkom-Virus an. Temin fing als Doktorand bei Caltech an, mit dem Virus zu arbeiten, wobei er zuerst an der Entwicklung des quantitativen Bioassay mitwirkte, das wir danach alle verwendeten. Bei Caltech wurde er mit dem Phänomen der lysogenen Umwandlung von Bakterien durch Viren, die wir Bakteriophage nennen, bekannt. Im Laufe einer Infektion, kann der Phage sich verbergen, indem er sein Genom in das Genom der Wirtszelle einfügt. Aus dieser Position kann er der Wirtszelle neue Eigenschaften zuteilen. Der Phage lässt sich durch Bestrahlen der Zelle aus dem Versteck herausholen. Temin glaubte, dies könne vielleicht gut erklären, wie die Rous-Sarkom-Viren sich vermehren, ihr Genom im Wirt stabilisieren und krebsartige Transformationen der Wirtszelle auslösen. Es gab bei diesem Verlauf nur ein Problem: Der lysogene Phage hat doppelsträngige DNA-Genome, während das Rous-Sarkom-Virus ein einsträngiges RNA-Genom hat. Wie konnte dadurch ein lysogenes Phänomen in einer Wirtszelle erzeugt werden? den er die DNA-Provirus-Hypothese nannte. Das RNA-Genom des Rous-Sarkom-Virus muss in die DNA transkribiert werden, was dann als Schablone für die Synthese sowohl der viralen Boten-RNA und des RNA-Genom diente. Temin bemerkte in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag, dass seine Hypothese im wesentlich während der nächsten sechs Jahre ignoriert wurde. Er hätte auch sagen können, sie wurde entschieden verunglimpft. Ich habe das bei vielen Gelegenheiten gehört. Die meisten Beobachter verabscheuten diese Idee. Unbeirrt von der Kritik stellte Temin eine Vielfalt aussagekräftiger Daten her, um seine Idee zu stützen. Unter Verwendung von chemischen Inhibitoren demonstrierte er, dass die Infektion durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus sowohl eine neue DNA-Synthese als auch eine DNA-abhängige RNA-Synthese erforderte. Mit der molekularen Hybridisierung beanspruchte er für sich, die virale DNA in den durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen entdeckt zu haben, auch wenn, ehrlich gesagt, die Daten ziemlich schwach waren. Doch 1969 wurde Satoshi Mizutani Mitarbeiter in Temins Labor und in seinen ersten Experimenten, buchstäblich in seinen allerersten Experimenten, demonstrierte er, dass eine neue Proteinsynthese in den frühen Stadien der Rous-Sarkom-Virus-Reproduktion notwendig war. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nie publiziert, doch erlaubte es Mizutani und Temin die Schlussfolgerung, dass die RNA-abhängige DNA-Polymerase, die die Provirus-Hypothese forderte, vor der Infektion vorhanden sein musste. Zu dieser Zeit gab es keine Präzedenz für ein solches Enzym in normalen Zellen. Heute wissen wir es besser. In diesem Falle war Ahnungslosigkeit in der Tat ein Segen, denn sie veranlasste Mizutani und Temin, nach einer DNA-Polymerase in den Viria des Rous-Sarkom-Virus selbst zu suchen. David Baltimore näherte sich dem Problem aus einer vollkommen anderen Perspektive: Die Replikation tierischer viraler Genome, die ich hier porträtiert habe, in Hinblick auf die virale Boten-RNA wird erzeugt, um Replikationen in Gang zu setzen. Baltimore hatte sich bei seiner Forschung auf Picornaviren, wie etwa das Polio-Virus konzentriert, dessen einzelsträngiges RNA-Genom direkt als eine Boten-RNA diente, sobald dies einen Zugang zu den Zellen erlangte, so ist das… ja. Folglich definieren wir die Polarität des Genoms als positiv. Das ist in diesem Bereich eine Konvention. Der Bote wiederum erzeugt alle notwendigen viralen Proteine, einschließlich einer RNA- Polymerase, die das virale Genom kopiert. Baltimore entdeckte diese RNA-Replikase als Doktorand. Nebenbei bemerkt schloss er seine Doktorarbeit innerhalb von 18 Monaten ab. Die Replikase war das erste Enzym dieser Art, das aufgedeckt wurde, und es stimmte mit der konventionellen Ansicht überein, wonach Viruspartikel selbst nichts außer dem viralen Genom und den erforderlichen strukturellen Proteinen enthalten. Diese Ansicht änderte sich durch die Entdeckung einer Vielzahl an Viren, die in ihren Viria ein Enzym enthielten, kodiert durch das virale Genom, das für die Anfangsinfektion erforderlich war, da es die virale Boten-RNA erzeugte. Hier in chronologischer Folge die Entdeckungen: Eine RNA- Polymerase wurde in den Viria eines großen Pockenvirus entdeckt, die das doppelsträngige DNA-Genom dieser Viren in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Eine RNA-Polymerase die das doppelsträngige RNA-Genom von Reoviren in virale Boten-RNA transkribiert. Und eine RNA-Polymerase, die RNA-Genome von negativer Polarität in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Das Letztere hiervon hatte für Baltimore das größte Gewicht, da er und Alice Huang das erste entsprechende Beispiel im Vesicular Stomatitis Virus entdeckten und in der Folge eine ähnliche Polymerase im Newcastle Disease Virus. Wie das Rous-Sarkom-Virus sind dies verkapselte Viren mit einzelsträngigen RNA-Genomen. Doch erinnern Sie sich, sie haben eine negative Polarität. Und obgleich das Rous-Sarkom-Virus eine positive Polarität hat, war Baltimore von der Möglichkeit beeindruckt, es könne eine Virion-Polymerase zu seiner Replikation verwenden. Noch bevor die Ergebnisse der negative-strängigen RNA-Genom-Viren publiziert wurden, suchte Baltimore in Viria der RNA-Tumorviren sowohl nach RNA und DNA-Polymerasen. Er musste das Virus aus anderen Labors bekommen, er hatte zuvor nie ein RNA-Tumorvirus mit der Pinzette berührt. Er sprang buchstäblich unangekündigt in dieses Feld hinein. Er ließ sich nicht durch die herrschende Skepsis hinsichtlich Termins DNA-Provirus-Hypothese beirren, denn, wie er in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag erläuterte: „Ich hatte auf diesem Feld keine Erfahrung und auch keine persönlichen Interessen.“ Auch das kann für einen richtigen Wissenschaftler ein wahrer Segen sein. Schließlich, im späten Frühjahr 1970 führten die Wege von Temin und Baltimore erneut zueinander. Sie berichteten gleichzeitig von ihren jeweiligen Entdeckungen einer RNA-abhängigen DNA-Polymerase in den Viria der RNA-Tumorviren, welches bald reverse Transkriptase genannt wurde. Die RNA-Tumorviren wiederum wurden als die Retroviren bezeichnet. Diese Entdeckung der reversen Transkriptase bedeutete eine Umkehr vom normalen Denken. Es bot aber auch eine viele neue Möglichkeiten: Die Fähigkeit, eine einzelsträngige RNA in die DNA zu kopieren, was für die Grundlagenforschung und die im Entstehen begriffene industriell genutzte Biotechnologie von unschätzbarem Wert war. Für mich und meine Kollegen war es ein Geschenk des Himmels. Wir konnten jetzt beliebig infizierte Zellen auf virale Nukleinsäuren untersuchen und wir bauten sehr schnell Assays dafür auf. Die Mittel, mit denen das Virus provirale DNA erzeugen konnte, waren vorhanden. Gab es in der infizierten Zelle aber wirklich einen stabilen Provirus, und wenn dem so war, wo versteckte er sich? War die Infektion durch das Rous-Sarkom-Virus wirklich eine Nachbildung der Lysogenie? Die erste glaubwürdige Sichtung der proviralen DNA war biologischer Natur. Die Einführung der DNA, aus Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen in nichtinfizierte Zellen durch Transfektion, riefen das ursprüngliche Virus hervor. Das ganze virale Genom hatte sich offenbar in der DNA der infizierten Zellen versteckt. Doch wo genau war das Provirus und wie sah es aus? Dies Fragen wurden von Harold Varmus aufgegriffen, der 1970 in San Francisco zu mir stieß und wir arbeiteten dann die folgenden 16 Jahre zusammen. Hier sind wir im Jahr 1978, ich, wie gewöhnlich, einen Schritt hinter Harold. Nun, seine Beine waren sehr viel länger als meine. Unter Verwendung molekularer Hybridisierung mit radioaktiven Sonden, kopiert vom Rous-Sarkom-Genom, waren wir und andere in der Lage aufzuzeigen, wo und wann das Provirus synthetisiert wurde, welche molekularen Formen es innerhalb der infizierten Zelle annahm, seine endgültige Integration in die chromosomale DNA der Wirtszelle, in der es als ein unerwünschter Zusatz zum zellulären Genom bewahrt und ausgedrückt wird. Alles das stimmte mit dem überein, was Howard Temin bereits vor einem Jahrzehnt postulierte. Und das Nachdenken über diese innige Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen bereiteten uns auf das vor, was bald darauf folgte. Inzwischen gab es Fortschritte beim Lösen des zweiten großen Rätsels: Wie löste das Rous-Sarkom-Virus das maligne Wachstum aus? Der erste Schritt war der Beweis der Genanalyse, dass das Virus über ein Onkogen verfügte, welches für die maligne Transformation der Wirtszelle verantwortlich war. Es ist eine schöne Geschichte, aber ich habe nicht die Zeit, sie Ihnen zu erzählen, Sie war für dieses Gebiet jedoch grundlegend. Dieses Onkogen wurde Src genannt, da es Sarkome in Hühnern verursacht. Es zeigte sich, Src war, vereinfach gesagt, eines von nur vier Genen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus. Bemerkenswerter Weise spielt dieses Gen keine Rolle bei der viralen Replikation. Das ist die Aufgabe der anderen drei Gene in diesem ausnehmend kompakten und effizienten Genom. Nun werden durch das Src Gen selbst zwei Rätsel gestellt. Erstens: Was ist der biochemische Mechanismus, durch den das Gen das maligne Wachstum auslöst? Und zweitens: Warum verfügt das Virus über ein solches Gen, obwohl es dies nicht zur Replikation benötigt? Das Rätsel des Mechanismus wurde in unserem Labor durch die Entdeckung von Art Levinson, und im Labor von Mark Collett und Ray Erickson in Denver gelöst: Das Src kodiert eine Proteinkinase. Zwei Jahre danach überraschte Tony Hunter am Salk Institute sich selbst und alle anderen mit der Entdeckung, dass die Src Kinase bislang unbekannte Reaktionen vornahm, nämlich die Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin. Es besteht eine direkte Linie zwischen dieser Reihe von Experimenten zu modernen therapeutischen Behandlungen, doch auch das ist eine Geschichte für einen anderen Zeitpunkt. Die Arten, auf denen diese Entdeckungen gemacht wurden, sind wegweisend. In Denver war es eine inspirierte Vermutung auf Basis der Pleiotropie des Src. Proteinphosphorylierung zählt zu den unter Biochemikern bekannten vielseitigsten Wirkstoffen für Veränderungen. Was eignete sich besser für das Hervorrufen einer Unzahl von Veränderungen, die Anlass für eine neoplasmatische Zelle geben? In San Francisco hatte die schafsinnige Enzymologie Art Levinsons zu der Erkenntnis geführt, dass das Src-Protein selbst eine Phosphorylierung war und daher durchaus andere Proteine phosphorylieren könnte. Am Salk Institute hatte Tony Hunters zufällige Verwendung eines veralteten Puffers, dessen pH abgelaufen war, zum ersten Mal seit Menschengedenken zu einer Trennung des Phosphotyrosin vom Phosphothreonin geführt. Das hier ist Art Levinson in einem Fantasiekostüm bei der Halloween-Party des Labors, viele Jahre ehe er der CEO von Genentech, Vorsitzender des Apple-Vorstands wurde…. er kleidet sich für solche Sitzungen nicht so ein… und seit Kurzem ist er Gründer des eigenen Unternehmens Calico. Wie steht es nun mit dem zweiten Rätsel, dem Ursprung des Src-Gens im Rous-Sarkom-Virus? Viele Jahre lang haben uns zwei entgegengesetzte Ansätze zum Genom normaler Zellen geführt. Einmal war da die sogenannte virogene Onkogenhypothese, aufgestellt von Robert Huebner und George Todaro. Es war ein Bestreben, eine universelle Theorie über Krebs aufzustellen. Ich selbst bewertete sie nicht sehr hoch, doch es gab sie. Der Gedanke war, Retroviren hätten sich mit ihren Onkogenen selbst in die Keimbahnen der Urahnen der modernen Spezies deponiert. Diese Gene wurden gewöhnlich durch die Zelle unterdrückt, konnten aber durch verschiedene krebsverursachende Wirkungen aktiviert werden. Unter der Voraussetzung können wir Src möglicherweise in normalen Zellen finden, das wäre aber in Form eines retroviralen Onkogens, dessen Ursprung ungeklärt bliebe. Der entgegengesetzte Gedanke war darwinistischer Natur. Da Src für den viralen Lebenszyklus ohne Bedeutung ist, ist es unwahrscheinlich, dass es gemeinsam mit dem Rest des viralen Genoms entstanden ist. Es gab keinen ausreichend selektiven Druck, der dies erreicht hätte. Statt dessen könnte die periodische Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen im Laufe einer Infektion eine Störung verursacht haben, in der Src von der Zelle gewonnen wurde; im Wesentlichen wurde damit die Hypothese von Huebner und Todaro umgekehrt. Dieser Gedanke befürwortete auch die Suche nach Src in der normalen DNA. Die Suche erforderte eine radioaktive Sonde, die bei molekularer Hybridisierung verwendet wurde, um ein Src-Gen mit großer Sonden-Empfindlichkeit zu entdecken. In seiner vorherigen Arbeit als Post-Doc, hatte Harold Deletionsmutanten des Bakteriophagen verwendet, um die Expressionen einzelner Gene durch molekulare Hybridisierung zu erkennen. Wir waren in der Lage diese Technik für unsere Zwecke zu übernehmen. Denn unser Mitarbeiter Peter Vogt hatte den spontanen Deletionsmutanten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus isoliert, der den Hauptteil von Src zu entfernen schien. Wie hier dargestellt, konnten wir die RNA eines dieser Deletionsmutanten verwenden, um später das durchzuführen, was dann Substrathybridisierung genannt wurde. Zuerst transkribiert man das Genom, das gesamte Genom, sowohl die Replikationsgene und das Src-Gen in komplimentäre radioaktive cDNA. Als zweites hybridisiert man vom Deletionsmutanten cDNA mit RNA, was die gesamte DNA erfasst, ausgenommen jener, die Src repräsentiert. Schließlich entfernt man die doppelsträngigen Hybriden und lässt die einzelsträngige cDNA für Src über für die Sonde. Die Vorbereitung und Verwendung der Src-Sonde war mühselig, in Anbetracht, dass die Arbeit weit vor Erscheinen der rekombinanten DNA erfolgte. Die erforderlichen Experimente beanspruchten dann drei Jahre. Dass sie überhaupt durchgeführt wurden war das Verdienst zweier Post-Docs: Ramareddy Guntaka, der nachwies, dass wir die notwendige Sonde vermutlich herstellen können, und Dominique Stehelin, der hier zu sehen ist, hat die Arbeit bis zu ihrer entscheidenden Schlussfolgerung durchgeführte. Heute, mit Hilfe der rekombinanten DNA und weiteren zeitgemäßen Technologien, hätte man das vermutlich innerhalb von Wochen oder Monaten erreicht, ich bin allerdings froh, dass wir nicht gewartet haben. Onkogen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus in der DNA verschiedener Vogelarten. Die obere Tafel hier zeigt die Genauigkeit der Sonde. Sie reagiert mit der RNA aus der sie transkribiert wurde, nicht aber mit der RNA des Deletionsmutanten. Die mittlere Tafel zeigt dass die Src-Sonde mit normaler Hühner-DNA reagiert, doch das tat auch eine Sonde für den Deletionsmutanten. Das beweist die Anwesenheit dessen, was wir endogene Retroviren nannten, die dafür bekannt sind, dass sie die Genome vieler Spezies, auch die unseren, angreifen. Die untere Tafel ist die Entscheidende. Nur die Src-Sonde reagierte mit der DNA anderer Vogelarten und dies war unsere erste Indikation dafür, dass wir etwas erfasst hatten, das nicht mit dem Retrovirus verknüpft war, und anders als die Genome der endogenen Retroviren, über bedeutende phylogenetische Distanzen konserviert wurde. Beachten Sie die Ergebnisse mit Emu DNA, unter den primitivsten überlebenden Vogelarten. Wir publizierten diese Ergebnisse 1976 in einer kurzen Notiz in Nature, zwei Abbildungen und zwei Tabellen. Die Simplizität täuschte über die außerordentliche Schwierigkeit der zugrundeliegenden Experimente und den bemerkenswerten Paradigmenwechsel hinweg. Wir waren erfreut, und offenbar auch das Nobelpreiskomitee. Wie haben die Zeiten sich jedoch geändert. Vor einer Woche erzählte mir ein Kollege, er habe eine Klasse Studenten gebeten, das Papier zu lesen. Ihre Reaktion? Die haben dafür einen Nobelpreis erhalten? Ja, das haben wir. Schrittweise arbeiteten wir daran, dass unsere Sonde ein normales zelluläres Gen erkennen konnte. Wir entdeckten, es war über weite polygenetische Distanzen konserviert, was seine lebenswichtige Funktion nahelegte. Wir entdeckten, dass normale Zelle ein Protein mit den gleichen biochemischen Eigenschaften enthielten, von gleicher Größe wie die des Src-Proteins und das in zahllosen Geweben exprimiert war. Und als wir endlich die rekombinante DNA verwenden konnten, um zelluläres Src zu klonen, hatten wir das Ganze besiegelt. Zelluläres Src verfügte über die strukturellen Besonderheiten eines normalen zellulären Gens, Das virale Onkogen Src hatte sich tatsächlich unerlaubt von der Wirtszelle als vollständig gespleißte Version des Vorfahren kopiert und zugleich hatte das zelluläre Gen eine Mutation erhalten, die es in ein Onkogen umwandelte. Bald wurde klar: Src war mehr als eine abseitige Merkwürdigkeit. Der Bestand der introviralen Onkogene wuchs ständig und jedes davon wurde vom Genom einer normalen Zelle abgeleitet. Für jedes virale Onkogen gab es in der Zelle ein verwandtes Proto-Onkogen. Zufälligkeiten der Natur hatten eine Batterie potentieller Krebsgene in normalen Zellen aufgedeckt. Das zelluläre Src Proto-Onkogen ist ein sich anständig verhaltender und vitaler Schalter im Signalgebungsnetzwerk normaler Zellen. Darüber wissen wir inzwischen eine Menge. Das virale Src-Onkogen ist jedoch ein mutanter Übeltäter, dessen Genprodukt ständig aktiviert wird, mit einer genetischen “Gain-of-function”, die Krebszellen erzeugt. Die Gain-of-function erwies sich in der einen oder anderen Weise auch für alle weiteren retroviralen Onkogene als richtig. Es war leicht sich vorzustellen, dass die Vielzahl zellulärer Proto-Onkogene gleichsam eine Klaviatur sein kann, auf der alle denkbaren Karzinogene spielen konnten und - unabhängig von den Viren - zelluläre Onkogene erzeugten, wobei beispielsweise kein Retrovirus intervenieren konnte. Dies hat sich als zutreffend herausgestellt. Proto-Onkogene, die eine Gain-of-function erhalten haben, sind praktisch unvermeidbare Eigenschaften aller menschlichen Tumore. Als solches sind sie wesentliche Triebkräfte für die Tumorentstehen und folglich Kandidaten für Ziele von neuen Therapeutika, was nun ein blühender Wirtschaftszweig ist. Mit Hilfe moderner Genominstrumente ließ sich die Zahl dieser Gene auf weit über zweihundert erweitern. Die Gain-of-function, die Onkogene erzeugt, lässt sich durch verschiedene Methoden beeinträchtigen. Zuerst die Gewinne von Chromosomen oder fokale Genamplifikation, die beide die Gendosierung erhöhen. Chromosomale Translokationen, die entweder die Steuerung der Genexpression stören oder Bastard-Genprodukte erzeugen, die nicht richtig arbeiten. Punktmutationen, die die Steuerung der Genexpression unterbrechen oder nichtfunktionierende Genprodukte schaffen, und defekte epigenetische Steuerung der Genexpression. Alles das wurde in menschlichen Tumoren gefunden. Das Endergebnis ist aber immer das Gleiche: Das Äquivalent eines blockierten Gaspedals mit der Kapazität, die Tumorentstehung voranzutreiben. Die Signalübertragung normaler zellulärer Gene in Onkogenen durch Retroviren, ein Missgeschick der Natur, zeigte zum allerersten Mal die genetischen Merkmale von Krebs. Was sind die Faktoren, die diese Entdeckung förderten? Hier sind einige für die Studenten. Zu allererst, ein Auge für die beste Gelegenheit. David Baltimore entdeckte bei seinem allerersten Experiment eine reverse Transkriptase mit einem RNA-Tumorvirus. Er hatte zuvor nicht daran gedacht, aber er sah die Gelegenheit und ergriff sie. Umsichtige Missachtung der bestehenden Weisheit. Beachten Sie Temin und Baltimores wohlwollende Vernachlässigung eines zentralen Dogmas. Den Willen, etwas aufs Spiel zu setzen. Beachten Sie all die Jahre, die sie der zellulären Src nachjagten, was sich leicht als närrischer Irrtum hätte herausstellen können. Vertrauen in die Allgemeingültigkeit der Natur. Das Beispiel? Unsere Überzeugung, es gäbe etwas über den menschlichen Krebs zu lernen, indem man einen Hühnervirus untersuchte, wenn auch nicht in irgendjemandes Wohnzimmer. Die Wahl des experimentellen Systems. Der Anziehungskraft, die mich zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus führte. Technische Innovation. Das Assay, mit dem das zelluläre Src gefunden wurde. Und Selbstvertrauen. Howard Temins fokussiertes Verfolgen einer Idee über mehr als ein Jahrzehnt im intellektuellen Exil, wobei er die Provirus-Hypothese ungläubigen Ohren verkündete. Ich schließe also mit einem lauten Ruf zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus, der ein wertvoller Freund der Krebsforschung wurde. Bedenken Sie seinen Ursprung. Die Demonstration, dass Viren Krebs erregen. Reverse Transkriptase, eine wahrhaft revolutionäre und produktive Entdeckung. Das erste Beispiel eines Gens, das unmittelbar Krebs verursacht, Src. Dergleichen hatte man zuvor nie gesehen. Die Rolle der Protein-Kinasen bei der Tumorentstehung. Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin, nun maßgeblich bei der Zell-Signalgebung und vorrangiges Ziel bei Krebstherapien. Proto-Onkogene, der erste flüchtige Blick auf eine genetische Klaviatur für Karzinogene. Und bis heute, das auch noch: fünf Nobelpreise. Nicht schlecht, für ein Huhn. Vielen Dank

 
(00:00:48 - 00:06:09)
To listen to the ful lecture click here.  


In the 1960s, Baruch S. Blumberg and colleagues discovered a specific protein in the blood of a haemophilia patient, which was later found to be a surface antigen of a new virus, hepatitis B (HBV). The virus is one of the most widespread human viruses. In the opening lines of his book, “Hepatitis B: The Hunt for a Killer Virus”, Blumberg postulated that even half of the world’s population may be infected with HBV, yet fortunately most infections clear up before the infected is aware[10]. By the late 1960s, Blumberg was certain that HBV often led to liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, or HCC). The ensuing years of research around the globe, particularly in Asia, convinced the scientific community that this was indeed the case. Future studies would demonstrate that HBV carriers had 200 times greater risk of developing HCC[11]. Blumberg was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1976, and two years later took part in his only Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. In this lecture fragment, Blumberg described the main points of how HBV infection is connected to HCC:

Baruch Blumberg (1978) - Hepatitis B-Virus and Cancer of the Liver

Count Bernadotte, distinguished guests, students, colleagues, ladies and gentlemen. Very little is known about the primary prevention of cancer, with the exception of the very important link between cigarette smoking and cancer of the lung. According to the present understanding the cessation of smoking could eventually result in the near elimination of cancer of the lung, which is said to represent up to about 40% of cancers in some communities. To my knowledge there is not at present any known association of a pollutant with a cancer which occurs in very high frequency. Although for theoretical reasons it is very well worthwhile continuing to investigate this possibility. I’d like today to discuss the association between hepatitis B and primary cancer of the liver. If the present findings which I’ll report on are sustained on this possible aetiological connection between hepatitis B and cancer of the liver, then it may be possible in due course to prevent a cancer which is probably again one of the very common cancers of the world. The work which I’ll be reporting on which has been, some of which has been done in our laboratory. was done over the course of the last 10 or more years in collaboration with my colleagues Doctor London, Sutnick, Millman, Lustbader, Werner, Drew and others. In a paper presented in 1974 we pointed out that for many years workers in Africa and elsewhere had suspected that hepatitis infection might predispose or cause the subsequent development of primary cancer of the liver. When these suggestions were made it was not possible to test the hypothesis since methods for the detection of the virus in occult, in hidden infections were not available. And it was known that many patients became infected without any clinical evidence of the disease. With the discovery of Australia antigen and its subsequent identification with the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus, and particularly with the development of the sensitive methods - for example radio immunoassay, or in particular radio immunoassay - it became possible to look at this question directly. Since the publication of this paper in 1974, which included a discussion of the information that was then available, a large body of data bearing on this subject has become available. Today I’d like to present the evidence which supports the hypothesis that in many parts of the world chronic infection with hepatitis B virus is a necessary condition for the subsequent development of primary cancer of the liver. If this evidence is convincing then it follows that planning for public health measures for prevention of chronic infection should be investigated. And this raises the problems that are associated with all extensive public health projects, namely anything that you do in order to prevent disease, has other consequences. And as scientists we have a responsibility to try to learn as much as we possibly can about these possible consequences in order to deal with them most effectively if the control measures are undertaken. Now I propose to present this evidence using the technique of parallel evidence. That is showing you several bodies of data, all of which presumably would converge on this hypothesis that I’ve stated. This incidentally, I’ve learned recently, was a technique used very much by Darwin in building up his convincing evidence relating to relativity and in many ways an important introduction which he made into scientific process. Before presenting this evidence I’d like to quickly summarise the information available on the nature of the hepatitis B virus. In the first slide is a diagram of the Dane particle which is thought to be the whole particle of the hepatitis B virus. It consists of an inner core which contains within it a DNA and in addition a specific DNA polymerase. There is a specific antigen associated with the core, hepatitis B core antigen. Surrounding that is the surface antigen which also has a specificity, Hepatitis B surface antigen. There as far as we know is no cross reactivity between the core antigen and the surface antigen. The coexistence of the DNA and the DNA polymerase in the same location apparently is an unusual feature of viruses of this kind. Antibodies to the hepatitis B surface antigen can be identified in peripheral blood. These appear to be highly protective. People who develop titers of antibody to the surface antigen are unlikely to become re-infected with the hepatitis B virus. Antibody to the core antigen may also be detected in peripheral blood and is nearly always found when the individual is a carrier of the hepatitis B virus. Antibody to the core does not protect against subsequent infection as far as is known. There are different determinants on the surface of the hepatitis B surface antigen. And they have a rather odd characteristic similar to serum protein polymorphisms. All viruses have a common determinant A. In addition there are allelic determinants D and Y, that is a virus can be either D or Y, rarely both, rarely neither. And there is also W and R. And again the virus can be either W or R, rarely both and rarely neither. There are highly specific geographic localisations for these specificities, and they don’t travel well. That is you don’t find rapid spread of particular geographically associated viruses from one location to the next the way you do with let’s say influenza virus, which can start in Hong Kong and within a period of months or half year or so spread throughout the world. So the hepatitis B virus specificity stayed close to home. This is a projection of an electron micrograph showing the 3 forms, the 3 sort of flavours, that hepatitis B particles come in. The large particle here is the whole DNA virus, the so-called Dane particle, named after the British investigator who first saw this. These smaller particles consist entirely of the hepatitis B surface antigen and, apparently, do not contain any nucleic acid. They are found in very large quantities in the peripheral blood. And are essentially always identified in the peripheral blood of people who are carriers of the hepatitis B virus. By carriers we mean that the person that is infected with the virus. The virus or the surface antigen is detectable in the peripheral blood, usually in extremely large amounts, but the individual himself does not have any apparent signs of illness. There are in addition these elongated particles, also made up as far as we know entirely of hepatitis B surface antigen. And the function of these rather strange particles are not known, although there’s some intimation they may be a kind of a transitional phase. But very little is known about these. Now later on I’ll talk about work on the vaccine. The process of making the vaccine is an unusual one, different from the production of any other vaccine. In it the surface antigen particles, which occur in very high frequency, are separated from the Dane particles. And then they’re treated in such a way to kill any whole virus particles that may have been left in the preparation. Then the surface antigen produced in this manner from the peripheral blood of carriers is used as the vaccine. This vaccine has now been tested in animals. The initial study tests in humans have now been done. And planning for field trials is now in progress. So far the results are very encouraging. If this vaccine proves to be effective and safe then it may have a very important role in the prevention of infection with hepatitis B. And if what I’m about to tell you is true, it may have a role in the prevention of cancer of the liver. That is it would represent the kind of a vaccine which in the long run may have an effect on the development of cancer. Next slide please. There is a very unusual characteristic to the DNA associated with the Dane particle, the large virus particle. Most viruses have DNA which is either double-stranded or single-stranded. The DNA of the Dane particle of the hepatitis B virus again has 2 forms. It’s both single-stranded in part and double-stranded in part. The length of the single-stranded section varies literally from virus to virus and appears to be polymorphic for this characteristic - again a rather unusual feature of a virus. The next slide please. These photographs are taken by my colleague Doctor Summers at the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia. And these were done with Doctor Kelly in Baltimore. In order to demonstrate the single-strandedness they used in effect a kind of a stain, a protein removed from E. coli, which will adhere only to single-stranded sections of a DNA circle, but does not adhere to double-stranded areas. This is a control virus which is totally double-stranded. These are hepatitis B viruses with the stain indicating that the single-stranded portion is different in the different viruses which are shown here. So again this is an unusual feature of the hepatitis B virus. The biological significance of this is not clear. But I guess you can say intuitively that if there are advantages to being double-stranded and there are also advantages to being single-stranded, then this has both sets of advantages and both sets of disadvantages. However, it has prepared it to cope very well with its environment, since the virus has developed many kinds of vectors and can be transmitted in a very large number of ways. And this will come up during the course of the discussion. In these following slides I’ve listed these independent points which I hope to make. So I’ll follow a course which I was advised to do by Doctor Schultz of our institute. Who told me that when giving a scientific paper, the first thing you do is say what you’re going to say. And then say it and then say what you’ve said afterwards. And in that way there’s a possibility that what you have to say will actually get across. So what I plan to do is to list the topics that I would like to discuss. The first point is that there’s a high prevalence of chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus in the areas of the world where primary hepatocellular carcinoma is common. In northern Europe, the United States, the frequency of carriers is of the order of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3% - 1 or 2 or 3 out of 1,000. However, in many tropical regions of the world - in Southeast Asia, in Oceania, in South Asia, in Malaysia – the frequencies may reach up to 4, 5, 10 and even 15 or higher percentages of the population are carriers of the hepatitis B virus. That means that there are probably several hundred million carriers of hepatitis B virus in the world. It’s in those regions where hepatitis B virus is common that primary hepatocellular carcinoma is common. If in these regions one examines people who have primary hepatocellular carcinoma, then they have a higher frequency of carriers than appropriate controls from the same region. I’ll show you the data on these items shortly. The third point is that primary hepatocellular carcinoma usually arises in a liver which is already diseased with sclerosis, chronic hepatitis of various kinds. The frequency of underlying sclerosis or chronic hepatitis varies from place to place. But where it’s been studied very carefully indeed, it’s very often in the region of 70, 80, 90 or even 100% of the cases will have an underlying chronic liver disease. In these diseases, that is the chronic liver disease and the sclerosis, there is also a high prevalence of carriers of hepatitis B virus. That is the disease which in effect precedes cancer of the liver also has a high association with the presence of carriers of the hepatitis B virus. Now what I’ve mentioned so far are retrospective studies or studies taken at a point in time. There are now several prospective studies in progress to determine what happens if you look at people who have hepatitis B virus, to see what happens to them in the future. Since these studies have just begun, the results are very early. But I’ll tell you about these to indicate the kinds of studies that are being undertaken. In one study in Japan sclerosis patients who had chronic liver disease and sclerosis were compared depending on whether they had hepatitis B virus or did not. Those with hepatitis B virus were the ones who developed cancer. A similar study, prospective study was done in asymptomatic individuals who were chronic carries of hepatitis B virus. And again, based on very small numbers, the much higher probability of the development of cancer of the liver was demonstrated in those. I’ll show you these data shortly. that liver tissue which contains primary hepatocellular carcinoma also contains evidence of infection with hepatitis B virus. That is if hepatitis B virus were concerned with the development of cancer of the liver, you would expect to find it in the liver and you do find it in the liver. The 8th point is that the specific hepatitis B virus DNA has been isolated from the majority of livers with PHC that have been tested. And it’s not found in controls. Again that’s what you would expect if the virus were involved in the illness. A further point is that there is a family clustering of hepatitis B virus carriers and chronic liver disease including primary hepatocellular carcinoma. And in particular there’s a very high frequency of carriers among the mothers of people who have primary hepatocellular carcinoma. And we’ll get back to all these points, or some of these points, to show you some of the data. Now there have been a very large number of studies demonstrating the third point that I told you, namely that in areas where primary hepatocellular carcinoma is common and where carriers of hepatitis B virus are common, then in those areas the frequency of hepatitis B virus is much more common in the people with the cancer than in what appear to be appropriate controls. These are illustrations from 2 of the studies that we’ve done in Africa, in West Africa. And these were done in conjunction with Professor Payet from University of Dakar and University of Paris. Doctors Larouze, Saimot, Barrois, Feret and Professor Sankale, a large group of French, American and Senegalese co-workers. In the Mali study the frequency of hepatitis B surface antigen was 47% as compared to about 5% in controls. The frequency of antibody against the core, which is thought to be an indication of active infection, was 75% in the patients, 25% in controls. The frequency of antibody was actually rather less in the patients with cancer than in the controls. The overall infection rate was high in both groups but higher in the patients with cancer. But again the important point is that there’s a much higher frequency of carriers in the patients as compared to the controls. The data from Senegal are similar, in the same direction and rather higher than in the Mali study. Now these 2 studies are representative of about let’s say 15 studies of the same kind and they’re essentially all in the same direction. Now to deal with point number 4 I believe it was, or 5, in which I said that the patients who get primary hepatocellular carcinoma. It’s superimposed on an underlying chronic liver disease, including chronic active hepatitis, sclerosis, here is PHC and then controls. These were studies done in South Korea by Doctor Hie-Won Hann from our Philadelphia laboratory. And Professor Kim from the medical school in Seoul. In this study they found that there’s a very much higher frequency of hepatitis B surface antigen, 58.6%, than in the control groups, 2% and 6%, 3% and 6%. Also of sclerosis, a very high frequency of hepatitis B surface antigen, 93% compared to 6%. And again a very high frequency of the surface antigen in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma than controls. And on the contrary the frequency of antibody against the surface antigen, that is the protective antibody, is lower in the patients with these various diseases than in controls. And this again has been seen where it’s been studied. The suggestion being that the patients who go on to develop chronic liver disease and primary hepatocellular carcinoma have a rather different immune response when they’re infected with the hepatitis B virus. They’re more likely to become carriers and incidentally at the same time form antibody against the core of the virus. That is they’re more likely to become carriers than they are to develop antibody against the surface antigen. Now it’s not quite appropriate to say that they’re immunodeficient since they’re quite able to form antibody against the core. They’re sort of immune-specific, that is they’re more likely to become carriers and form antibody against the core than they are to form antibody against the surface antigen. So again they cannot be characterised as deficient, but rather as different from the individuals who don’t go on to develop these chronic illnesses. Now this is an illustration of the prospective study that has been done in Japan. And this is illustrative of similar studies which were going on elsewhere in Asia, in Taiwan, in People’s Republic of China, and in Seoul. In this study some 80 or so patients with sclerosis were identified by the Japanese workers. They then found that 25 of these had hepatitis B surface antigen. And 43 were apparently uninfected. Now if the hypothesis were correct one would project that the people who had surface antigen would be more likely to develop primary hepatocellular carcinoma than the people in the other 2 groups. The follow-up has now taken place for about 3½ years. And 7 cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma developed in this 80 or so people – incidentally an incredible high risk group and also a very rapid development of cancer. and 1 in the uninfected group. Again this is close, even though the numbers are quite small, it corresponds very closely to the expectation generated by the hypothesis. It also discloses an extraordinarily high-risk group for cancer of the liver, namely people with sclerosis who are carriers of hepatitis B virus. Now I apologise for this slide. It contains more detail than is necessary, so you can forget about the material below the line. And I’ll lead you by the hand through the other portions of the slide. This was a study done, again in Japan, on the national railway system. Where regular physical examinations are done on the very large number of employees. As part of this examination they collected blood on some 18,195 individuals and tested them for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen or other manifestations of infection with hepatitis B virus. They found that 341 of these people were carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen. And these number were not… now they followed these people for a period of about from a ½ year to 3½ years. That is a relatively short time. Now again these were asymptomatic individuals who were healthy, coming in for a regular physical examination. Now again the prediction from the hypothesis would be that the individuals who were carriers of hepatitis B virus, even though asymptomatic, were at a measurably higher risk of developing PHC, primary hepatocellular carcinoma, than those normal individuals who were not carriers, who were not occult carriers. And all of them fall in the category of individuals who were hepatitis B carriers. Now all 3 of them incidentally were people who had relatively low SGPT elevations. They were slightly above normal but not very high. Now if this prospective study is sustained it provides considerable support for the hypothesis for which I’ve been accumulating this evidence. And as I said such studies are now in progress elsewhere. Doctor Nayak and his colleagues in India did an extensive and comprehensive study of liver taken from autopsies of people with various liver diseases, including primary hepatocellular carcinoma, sclerosis. And in addition people who died for reasons that were unconnected with liver disease. There are various methods of detecting manifestations of hepatitis B virus in tissue. These include fluorescent techniques where fluorescent material is bound to specific antibody. That is fluorescent material would be bound to antibody against surface antigen. Fluorescent material could be bound to antibody against core antigen. In addition you can see the particles and they can be identified by the use of ferritin-labelled antibodies. So that under the electron microscope their actual location there can be shown. Now using these various techniques Doctor Nayak and his colleagues found the following. In the patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma, 94% of them had evidence that hepatitis B surface antigen was present in the liver where there was cancer of the liver, 71% of the patients with sclerosis and 2% of controls. Hepatitis B core antigen was again found in high frequency in the primary hepatocellular carcinoma patients, in the sclerosis patients, but not in the controls. There is also some cases where both surface antigen and core antigen are found and again in much higher frequency in the patients with cancer and those with sclerosis and again none in the controls. So again the virus is where you would expect it to be, if the virus is associated with cancer of the liver. Now generally speaking, in these studies the presence of the virus is shown not in the cancer cells themselves, that is the transform cells, but in the cells immediately surrounding the transformed or the cancerous cells and in many cases in the liver tissue in general. There has so far been no evidence according to my colleague Doctor Summers who has investigated this. And he has said that there’s no evidence of incorporation of the DNA of the virus into the DNA of the liver cells. He, and I believe nobody else, has found any evidence for this. Occasionally you do find the virus actually within the cancer cells but the general finding is that it’s in the surrounding tissue. Now the specific DNA can be identified by traditional methods. And Doctor Summers has used the hepatitis B virus DNA as a probe to look at the tissues taken from livers of people who have cancer of the liver. He’s found the DNA present in such tissue and it’s not present in controls. Within the group of PHC patients he looked specifically at individuals who had surface antigen and had primary hepatocellular carcinoma. And those few individuals with cancer of the liver who had antibody against the surface antigen. The specific DNA was identified in 10 of the 11 cases where there were carriers, but in only one of the 4 where the people had antibody. The significance of having cancer of the liver with antibody against surface antigen is unclear. But as you may recall from the previous studies, that represents a smaller percentage than the individuals who have cancer and are carriers of the virus. Now our work started out as a consequence of a genetic investigation. We were studying polymorphisms in blood. And as a consequence a lot of the focus of our work has been on families. In human genetics you study families. So you get very kind of family-oriented. One of the investigations which we did rather early on was to study the families of people who are carriers of hepatitis B virus. And found that there was a very much higher frequency of carriers among the offspring when the mother was a carrier of the hepatitis virus than when the father was the carrier of the hepatitis virus. This was consistent with the notion that the mother could transmit the hepatitis B virus to her children if she were a carrier. Subsequently workers in many areas, particularly in Asia, have found that a very high frequency of children born to mothers who were carriers will become carriers within a few weeks or months. And some 50% of them will be carriers. They may not become carriers directly at the time of birth, but the carrier state may develop subsequently. In some cases the hepatitis B virus is found in the cord blood. Based on this and now a large number of observations, it appears the hepatitis B virus may be transmitted from mother to child during in effect any time of their association with each other. For example it conceivably could occur even before conception, that is if the egg became infected. It could occur during conception by passage through the placenta. It’s very likely that it could occur at the moment of birth. The moment of birth is a very dangerous time in one’s life, very exciting time and also very dangerous. In particular there’s a breakdown of the barrier between the circulations of the mother and child. And it’s possible for quite large things to get across both ways. On the basis of what we know about incubation period, it appears that infection of the child by the mother may occur at that time. And we’ve heard from Doctor Tinbergen about the possibilities of damage to individuals in this very crucial period in our lives. Now it also appears that transmission from the mothers to the children may occur during the early period of their close intimacy. In all cultures mothers and children are very close to each other during their first months and years, much closer than they are later on. And it’s probable that transmission could occur then. As a consequence of the importance of material transmission, or parental effect I think we’d say, we’ve devoted a lot of time to studying mother-child interactions, or as a matter of fact family interactions, using these aetiological techniques that we’ve heard about this week. And a student of mine, Miss Dickie, has made observations in the New Hebrides on newborn children and their mothers, making the behavioural observations that - in the nature of which we’ve heard about that have been done so much on animals – to see how mothers and children interact with each other in relation to behaviour patterns that might lead to the transmission of a virus from one to the other, primarily from the mother to the child. And we’re hoping to learn something about this since it may have an important bearing on control techniques. In the studies in Senegal we examined the mothers of patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and compared them to the mothers of controls. The controls were mostly people who were asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. We found that there was a much higher frequency of hepatitis B surface antigen in the mothers of the patients than in the mothers of the controls. We also found that there was a much lower frequency of antibody against the surface antigen in the fathers of the patients than in the fathers of the controls. And this study has not been repeated. If it is supported this suggests that there’s a parental effect, that there may be transmission from the mother to the child. And the nature of the response that the child has will be conditioned by some characteristic that they either inherit or acquire from their father. Now I should say in discussing, this raises some very important psychological problems. If in fact there is maternal transmission which in due course may lead to serious illness in children, this could represent a very difficult psychological burden for parents. When children are sick, parents are very concerned of course. And if there’s any implication that they somehow had a role in it, then this could have a very serious effect on their psyche and their relations with each other and with the children. And particularly, conceivably between parents. Obviously there’s no guilt wrapped up in a situation of this kind. But I think it’s very important for us to try to understand this process as well as we possibly can in order to first of all deal with preventive measures if that becomes possible. And certainly so that we can understand it sufficiently to deal with the questions raised by parents. It’s been my experience that ethical issues usually require more information. If you have an ethical problem, what you usually need is more knowledge and less argument, I think. But more knowledge in order to be able to deal with it. And in many cases the ethical question - it doesn’t exactly go away, but it changes into something else which you then have to deal with also; but at any rate you’re in another place. The next slide is a very rough diagram of what we think may be happening in the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. We think that children may become infected early in life, and it’s possible that the infection may occur from the mother, probably with some affect of the father in developing the carrier’s state. Some of these then will go on to become chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Some will go off in another direction and will not become carriers of hepatitis B virus. Some of those who are chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus will go on to the development of chronic hepatitis. Some of them will go on to no effect, that is they won’t know they’ve ever been infected unless they’re tested. Some of those with chronic hepatitis will go on to the development of postnecrotic sclerosis, which in itself is a very serious disease and is life-shortening. Some of those with postnecrotic sclerosis will go on to die of that. Others will go on to the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Now its patent, it’s obviously, it’s clear that there must be other factors involved in following this unfortunate cause. About 10% of the people in Senegal, let’s say, are carriers of hepatitis B virus. Whereas only even in high-frequency countries for PHC the frequency is 100 per 100,000, or let's say in the order of 50 per 100,000. So obviously there are other factors which are involved in the development of the cancer. Aflatoxins have been implicated. Nutritional factors have been suggested. Other edible materials, toxins, have also been suggested as necessary for the development of PHC, of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Could we have the lights please? We’re trying to determine what the other factors involved in the development of the cancer are. But it’s a very interesting characteristic of preventative medicine, and as a matter of fact an extremely hopeful one, that you don’t have to know everything in order to prevent disease. Now I don’t want to sound like a philistine, that is to say that I’m not advocating not learning things, quite the contrary. The more you know the more effective control methods could be. But medicine is a very emergent business. You’re dealing with life and death or deaths in this case. And if some method of prevention is known and it can be executed, then there’s a kind of an obligation to use it as soon as possible. But at the same time exerting all the precautions to do as little damage to the general population and to the people who were subjected to these preventive methods. But there is an obligation. You can’t sort of not do anything, because that’s the equivalent of doing something. Well I want to remind you that in preventive medicine it has been possible to go ahead with rather fragmentary knowledge. And a classic example is that of Snow in the cholera epidemic in London who found that people who were drinking from a particular well were more likely to get cholera than those who weren’t drinking from that well, people who worked at a brewery in the same region and drank their own beer or had water from another source. He therefore decided that you shouldn’t drink from that well. And he removed the handle of the well as a preventative measure. Now this was done before any knowledge of the germ theory of disease. And well before the discovery of the agent that causes cholera. Nevertheless, it was effective in preventing the further spread of this illness and it died out in that region. So again I want to emphasise that we do have an obligation to learn as much as we can about a problem, obviously. Particularly so that it can be done in the most effective and least harmful way. But at the same time I think anyone who has seen these people dying – cancer of the liver is a terrible disease and there’s no treatment for it. There is very little that can be done for these people and a kind of an urgency develops. Now if this vaccine that I mentioned is effective and as we learn more about the methods of transmission, I think we’re now kind of ready to start thinking about design. Again I think it’s kind of an obligation that we have to learn more about the biology of hepatitis B virus in order to deal with this problem in the most effective way. Now as physicians we always... viruses and bacteria have a kind of rather bad name in medicine. Because we only see the worst things that they do, like disease. You know that’s the end of the spectrum we see. We have a rather distorted view of life, terribly distorted view of viruses and microorganisms. Just think of all the nice beer that we wouldn’t have if we didn’t have microorganisms. They do all sorts of things. But we tend to think about their negative aspects. But obviously that can, in terms of the viruses' attitudes - if they do have such things – that can only be a very small part of what they deal with. I’d like to tell you about some, in a very brief way, about some of the studies we’ve done on one biological aspect of the virus, namely how it interacts differently with males and females, human males and females. The next slide is taken from a study by my colleague Doctor London and Gene Drew, where a group of individuals on a renal dialysis unit in Philadelphia was studied. There’s a very high infection rate for hepatitis B virus in renal dialysis unit. And this particular unit has been organised so that all the carriers in the Delaware valley, that's the area around Philadelphia, are kept in this unit. So there’s a very high infection rate in this unit. Now they asked the question, what happens if a person is infected with hepatitis B virus? What's the likelihood of they becoming carriers or their likelihood of developing antibody? And the data was broken down into whether the patients were females or males. So the 2 things that can happen, that can be measured, that were measured: whether you became a carrier of hepatitis B virus or whether you developed the protective antibody, antibody against the surface antigen. Bloods were collected over the course of several years, every 2 months, and all were tested. People who were known to have been infected were identified. This indicates the probability of remaining a carrier after one is infected for this number of months. So for example if a female is infected, at the time of the first infection, the probability that she would become and remain a carrier is about something over 30%. If a male is infected the probability of his becoming a carrier is more than twice as much. And this difference exists for other lengths of time of infection. So following infection, males are more likely to become carriers than females, as we’ll see. This is sort of the obverse of this. If a person is once infected, what's the probability of their developing antibody against the surface antigen? Females are much more likely to develop antibody once infected than males. So from this we can say that once infected males are more likely to become carriers, females more likely to develop antibody. Now this may explain the rather unusual male preponderance of diseases associated with hepatitis B virus. Cancer of the liver occurs in 7 or 8 times as many males as females. Chronic liver disease associated with hepatitis B virus is much more common in males than in females. Now if males, once infected, are more likely to become carriers of hepatitis B virus, then they’re much more likely to develop diseases associated with chronic infection, i.e. primary cancer of the liver, chronic liver disease, and a whole variety of other diseases associated with this illness. So this may offer one of the most perplexing problems in medicine for certain diseases: why males are more likely to get them than females and in some cases vice versa. Now another interesting interaction between the virus and humans in respect of males and females is shown in the next slide. Which is a summary of data collected in a small community of Plati in Macedonia, in North Greece. This was selected because it was quite a homogeneous community in many respects. But also they had one of the highest infection rates for hepatitis B virus in the Greek populations which we surveyed with our Greek colleagues, Doctor Economidou and Hadziyannis and others. Now the whole village or most of the village was tested, the parents were all classified into 3 groups. Whether the parent was a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen and did not have antibody - that’s one class. Second class were parents who were not carriers, but who did develop antibody against the surface antigen. And then a third class: individuals who had no evidence of infection. Then the number of children they had and the sex of the children was determined. And the sex ratio was computed for each of these groups separately. Sex ratio is the number of male live births over the number of female live births. This is the secondary sex ratio, the sex ratio at birth; the primary sex ratio is the ratio at conception. There was a highly significant difference between the sex ratio of the families where the parents were carriers compared to the families where the parents had developed antibody. And an intermediate ratio in the families where neither had any evidence of infection. Now we’ve subsequently tested the same hypothesis in an island called Kar Kar which is the north coast of New Guinea, in 2 communities in Greenland, a place called Scoresbysund, Ammassalik, and then in Mali. And in each of these communities none of the data have rejected the hypothesis, the observations generated by this first study. Namely that we can... if this data is supported by subsequent studies, then it suggests that the virus has a very important kind of interaction with humans, which is different than calling it disease. I’m not exactly sure how you’d classify it - that is the determination of sex ratio - but it’s certainly not disease. So again if these data are sustained by other investigators - and that hasn’t happened yet by the way; that is it hasn’t been rejected, but I don’t think it’s been tested. But if it is supported then this says that this virus has a very important interaction with a human characteristic which is of great importance to us, that is whether people are males and females. And this has a great effect, a great psychological, economic, sociological effect on the make-up of populations. Now there are other biological characteristics associated with this virus that we’d like to learn more about, while we’re preparing for public health measures in the hope that we’ll be able to deal very effectively with the prevention of this illness and do as little damage as possible. I think we always in medical work in particular have to kind of balance possible advantages against possible disadvantages. Nothing that happens in life is without risk. And what we want to do is maximise the benefit and minimise the disadvantage. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Ehrengäste, Studierende, Kollegen, Damen und Herren. Man weiß sehr wenig über die Primärprävention von Krebserkrankungen, bis auf den sehr wichtigen Zusammenhang zwischen Zigarettenkonsum und Lungenkrebs. Nach dem heutigen Wissenstand könnte ein Rauchverzicht den Lungenkrebs beinahe beseitigen, der in einigen Gemeinschaften bis zu 40 % der Krebserkrankungen betrifft. Meines Wissens gibt es derzeit keine bekannte Verbindung eines Schadstoffs mit einer Krebserkrankung, die sehr häufig auftritt. Obwohl es aus theoretischen Gründen sehr sinnvoll ist, diese Möglichkeit weiterhin zu untersuchen. Ich möchte heute den mit Hepatitis B assoziierten Leberkrebs besprechen. Wenn die aktuellen Forschungsergebnisse, die ich Ihnen vorstelle, auf diesen möglichen ursächlichen Zusammenhang zwischen Hepatitis B und Leberkrebs hinweisen, kann es zu gegebener Zeit möglich sein, Krebs zu verhindern, der wahrscheinlich wieder einer der häufigsten Krebsarten weltweit ist. Die Arbeiten, die ich Ihnen vorstelle und die teilweise in unserm Laboratorium erfolgten, wurden in den letzten 10 Jahren oder länger in Zusammenarbeit mit meinen Kollegen Doktor London, Sutnick, Millman, Lustbader, Werner, Drew und anderen durchgeführt. In einer 1974 veröffentlichten Arbeit wiesen wir darauf hin, dass Arbeiter in Afrika und anderswo nahmen an, dass Hepatitisinfektionen die Entwicklung einer primären Leberkrebserkrankung begünstigen oder verursachen könnten. Als diese Annahmen aufgestellt wurden, war es nicht möglich, die Hypothese zu überprüfen, weil die Methoden für die Entdeckung des verborgenen Virus in versteckten Infektionen nicht verfügbar waren. Es war bekannt, dass sich viele Patienten ohne klinische Nachweise der Krankheit infizierten. Mit der Entdeckung des Australia-Antigens und der nachfolgenden Identifizierung mit dem Oberflächen-Antigen des Hepatitis B-Virus und vor allem der Entwicklung sensibler Methoden - z.B. der Radioimmunoassay oder insbesondere der Radioimmunoassay - wurde es möglich, dieser Frage direkt nachzugehen. Seit der Veröffentlichung dieser Arbeit im Jahr 1974, die eine Diskussion der damals verfügbaren Informationen enthielt, ist ein großer Datenkorpus zu diesem Thema entstanden. Heute möchte ich die Nachweise präsentieren, die die Hypothese unterstützen, dass in vielen Teilen der Welt eine chronische Infektion mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus eine notwendige Voraussetzung ist, um in der Folge primären Leberkrebs zu entwickeln. Wenn diese Nachweise überzeugen, folgt daraus, dass die Planung öffentlicher Gesundheitsvorsorgemaßnahmen zur Prävention einer chronischen Infektion untersucht werden sollten. Damit treten die Probleme auf, die mit allen umfangreichen öffentlichen Gesundheitsvorsorgeprojekten, nämlich alles, das für die Prävention von Krankheit getan wird, andere Konsequenzen hat. Als Wissenschaftler tragen wir eine Verantwortung, so viel wie möglich über die möglichen Folgen herauszufinden, um möglichst effektiv damit umzugehen, wenn die Kontrollmaßnahmen unternommen werden. Ich möchte Ihnen die Nachweise anhand der Parallel Evidence-Technik präsentieren. Das heißt, verschiedenes Datenmaterial zeigen, von dem jedes vermutlich auf die genannte Hypothese hinausläuft. Diese Technik wurde übrigens häufig von Darwin für seinen überzeugenden Nachweis von Relativität angewendet, und war in vielerlei Hinsicht ein wichtiger Beitrag für den wissenschaftlichen Fortschritt von ihm. Bevor ich den Nachweis präsentiere, möchte ich schnell die verfügbaren Informationen über die Natur des Hepatitis B-Virus zusammenfassen. Auf der ersten Folie ist ein Diagramm des Dane-Partikels, von dem angenommen wird, das gesamte Partikel des Hepatitis B-Virus zu sein. Er besteht aus einem inneren Core, der in sich eine DNA enthält und außerdem eine spezifische DNA-Polymerase. Mit dem Core wird ein spezifisches Antigen assoziiert, das Hepatitis-B-Core-Antigen. Es ist vom Oberflächenantigen umgeben, das auch ganz spezifisch ist, das Hepatitis-B-Oberflächen-Antigen. Soweit wir wissen, gibt es keine Kreuzreaktivität zwischen dem Core-Antigen und dem Oberflächen-Antigen. Die Koexistenz der DNA und der DNA-Polymerase am selben Ort ist in dieser Art Viren anscheinend ein ungewöhnliches Merkmal. Antikörper des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens kann in peripherem Blut identifiziert werden. Sie scheinen eine sehr hohe Schutzwirkung zu haben. Menschen, die Antikörpertiter des Oberflächenantigens entwickeln, werden eher nicht erneut mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus infiziert. Antikörper des Core-Antigens können auch in peripherem Blut entdeckt werden, und wird fast immer gefunden, wenn die Person ein Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus ist. Soweit bekannt ist, schützen Core-Antikörper nicht gegen eine nachfolgende Infektion. Es gibt verschiedene Determinanten auf der Oberfläche des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens. Und sie haben ein ziemlich seltsames Merkmal, ähnlich der Serumproteinpolymorphismen. Alle Viren haben eine gemeinsame Determinante A. Außerdem gibt es die allelischen Determinanten D und Y, das heißt, ein Virus kann entweder D oder Y, selten beides, selten keines davon sein. Und es gibt auch W und R. Und wieder kann der Virus entweder W oder R, selten beides und selten keines davon sein. Es gibt hochspezifische geografische Lokalisierungen für diese Spezifitäten und sie reisen nicht gut. Das heißt, dass sich geografisch assoziierte Viren von einem Ort zum anderen nicht schnell verbreiten, so wie z.B. der Influenza-Virus, der in Hong Kong beginnt und sich in wenigen Monaten oder einem halben Jahr über die ganze Welt verbreitet. Also die Hepatitis B-Virusspezifität blieb nah beim Zuhause. Das ist eine Projektion von einem Elektronenmikrograf mit 3 Formen, die 3 Geschmacksrichtungen, in der Hepatitis B-Partikel auftreten. Das große Partikel hier ist der gesamte DNA-Virus, das sogenannte Danke-Partikel, genannt nach dem britischen Forscher, der es zuerst sah. Diese kleineren Partikel bestehen zur Gänze aus dem Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigen und enthalten anscheinend keine Nukleinsäure. Sie sind in großen Mengen in peripherem Blut zu finden. Und sie werden notwendigerweise immer im peripheren Blut von Menschen identifiziert, die Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus sind. Träger bedeutet, dass die Person mit dem Virus infiziert ist. Der Virus oder das Oberflächenantigen sind im peripheren Blut identifizierbar, normalerweise in extrem großen Mengen, aber die Person selbst zeigt keine offensichtlichen Krankheitsanzeichen. Außerdem gibt es diese länglichen Partikel, die soweit wir wissen, vollständig aus dem Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigen bestehen. Und die Funktion dieser eher seltsamen Partikel ist nicht bekannt, obwohl es Anzeichen dafür gibt, dass es eine Art Übergangsphase ist. Aber darüber ist sehr wenig bekannt. Später werde ich über die Arbeit am Impfstoff sprechen. Der Prozess der Impfstoff-Herstellung ist ungewöhnlich, anders als bei der Herstellung irgendeines anderen Impfstoffs. Dabei werden die Oberflächenantigenpartikel, die in sehr großen Mengen auftreten, vom Dane-Partikel getrennt. Und dann werden sie behandelt, sodass sie ganze Viruspartikel töten, die bei der Vorbereitung vielleicht übrig blieben. Dann wird das Oberflächenantigen, das auf diese Weise vom peripheren Blut der Träger produziert wird, als Impfstoff verwendet. Dieser Impfstoff wurde nun an Tieren getestet. Die ersten Studien an Menschen wurden nun durchgeführt. Und die Planung für die Feldversuche läuft. Bis jetzt sind die Resultate sehr ermutigend. Wenn sich dieser Impfstoff als effektiv und sicher herausstellt, kann er eine sehr wichtige Rolle bei der Prävention einer Hepatitis B-Infektion spielen. Und wenn das, was ich Ihnen gleich erzählen werde, wahr ist, kann es eine Rolle bei der Prävention von Leberkrebs spielen. Das heißt, es würde eine Art Impfstoff sein, der sich auf lange Sicht möglicherweise auf die Krebsentwicklung auswirkt. Nächste Folie bitte. Es gibt ein sehr ungewöhnliches Merkmal der DNA, das mit dem Dane-Partikel assoziiert wird, den großen Viruspartikel. Die meisten Viren haben eine DNA, die entweder doppel- oder einsträngig ist. Die DNA des Dane-Partikels des Hepatitis B-Virus hat wieder 2 Formen. Sie ist teilweise sowohl ein- als auch doppelsträngig. Die Länge des einsträngigen Abschnitts ändert sich buchstäblich von Virus zu Virus und erscheint dabei polymorph - wieder ein ziemlich ungewöhnliches Merkmal eines Virus. Die nächste Folie bitte. Diese Fotos wurden von meinem Kollegen Doktor Summers am Institut für Krebsforschung in Philadelphia gemacht. Und diese wurden bei Doktor Kelly in Baltimore aufgenommen. Um die Einsträngigkeit zu demonstrieren, verwendeten sie einen Art Farbstoff, ein Protein, das dem E.-coli entnommen wurde, das sich nur an einsträngige Abschnitte des DNA-Kreises anheftet, aber nicht an doppelsträngige Bereiche. Das ist ein Kontrollvirus, der vollständig doppelsträngig ist. Das sind Hepatitis B-Viren mit dem Farbstoff, der zeigt, dass sich der einsträngige Bereich in den verschiedenen hier gezeigten Viren unterscheidet. Also das ist wieder ein ungewöhnliches Merkmal des Hepatitis B-Virus. Die biologische Signifikanz davon ist nicht klar. Aber ich glaube, dass sie intuitiv sagen können, dass wenn die Doppelsträngigkeit Vorteile hat, und auch die Einsträngigkeit Vorteile hat, gibt es sowohl Vorteile als auch Nachteile. Aber er wurde gut auf sein Umfeld vorbereitet, da der Virus viele Arten von Vektoren entwickelt hat und auf sehr viele Arten übertragen werden kann. Das wird im Rahmen der Diskussion behandelt. Auf den folgenden Folien habe ich diese unabhängigen Punkte aufgezählt, die ich hoffentlich machen werde. Ich folge einem Kurs, der mir von Doktor Schultz von unserem Institut empfohlen wurde. Niemand sagte mir, dass wenn ich eine wissenschaftliche Arbeit vorstelle, man als erstes sagt, was man sagen wird. Und dann sagt man es und sagt nachher noch einmal, was man gesagt hat. Auf diese Weise besteht die Möglichkeit, dass Sie das, was Sie zu sagen haben, auch verständlich machen. Ich habe also vor, die Themen aufzuzählen, die ich gerne diskutieren möchte. Der erste Punkt ist, dass es eine hohe Prävalenz von chronischen Trägern des Hepatitis B-Virus in den Teilen der Welt gibt, wo das primäre Leberzellkarzinom häufig ist. In Nordeuropa und den Vereinigten Staaten beträgt die Häufigkeit der Träger etwa 0,1, 0,2, 0,3% - 1 oder 2 oder 3 von 1000. Aber in vielen tropischen Regionen der Welt - in Südostasien, Ozeanien, Südasien und Malaysia - kann die Häufigkeit bis zu 4, 5, 10 und sogar 15 oder mehr Prozent der Bevölkerung betragen, die Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus sind. Das bedeutet, dass es wahrscheinlich mehrere hundert Millionen Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus auf der Welt gibt. Es sind diese Regionen, wo der Hepatitis B-Virus häufig auftritt, wo auch das primäre Leberzellkarzinom häufig ist. Wenn man in diesen Regionen Menschen mit primären Leberzellkarzinom untersucht, dann haben Sie eine höhere Trägerhäufigkeit als in den entsprechenden Kontrollen in derselben Region. Ich werde Ihnen die Daten dazu gleich zeigen. Der dritte Punkt ist, dass das primäre Leberzellkarzinom normalerweise in einer Leber auftritt, die bereits an Sklerose, chronischer Hepatitis unterschiedlicher Form, erkrankt ist. Die Häufigkeit der zugrunde liegenden Sklerose oder chronischen Hepatitis ist von Ort zu Ort unterschiedlich. Aber wo er wirklich sehr genau untersucht wurde, tritt es ungefähr in 70, 80, 90 oder sogar 100% der Fälle auf, wo eine chronische Leberkrankheit zugrunde liegt. In diesen Erkrankungen, also der chronischen Lebererkrankung und der Sklerose, gibt es auch eine hohe Prävalenz von Trägern des Hepatitis B-Virus. Das ist die Krankheit, die tatsächlich dem Leberkrebs vorausgeht und die sehr mit dem Vorhandensein von Trägern des Hepatitis B-Virus assoziiert wird. Was ich bis jetzt erwähnte, sind retrospektive Studien oder Studien, die bereits durchgeführt wurden. Es sind derzeit einige zukunftsorientierte Studien in Gang, um zu bestimmen, was mit Menschen mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus in Zukunft passiert. Nachdem diese Studien erst begonnen wurden, sind die Resultate noch in einem sehr frühen Stadium. Aber ich erwähne diese Art von Studien, um zu zeigen, welche Art von Studien durchgeführt werden. In einer japanischen Studie wurden Sklerosepatienten, die eine chronische Lebererkrankung und Sklerose hatten dahingehend verglichen, ob sie den Hepatitis B-Virus hatten oder nicht. Die mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus entwickelten Krebs. Eine ähnliche zukunftsorientierte Studie wurde in asymptomatischen Personen durchgeführt, die chronische Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus waren. Und wieder zeigte sich basierend auf einer sehr kleinen Anzahl die viel höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit in diesen Personen, Leberkrebs zu entwickeln. Ich zeige Ihnen die Daten in Kürze. dass Lebergewebe, das das primäre Leberzellkarzinom enthält, auch Anzeichen auf eine Infektion mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus enthält. Das heißt, wenn der Hepatitis B-Virus mit der Entstehung von Leberkrebs zu tun hätte, würde man annehmen, ihn auch in der Leber zu finden und man findet ihn in der Leber. Der 8. Punkt ist, dass die spezifische Hepatitis B-Virus-DNA von der Mehrheit der Lebern mit primären Leberzellkarzinom isoliert wurde, die getestet wurden. Und in Kontrollen wird sie nicht gefunden. Das würde man wieder annehmen, wenn der Virus mit der Erkrankung zu tun hätte. Ein weiterer Punkt ist, dass es einen Familiencluster von Hepatitis B-Virus-Trägern und chronischen Lebererkrankungen, einschließlich dem primären Leberzellkarzinom, gibt. Insbesondere gibt es eine große Häufigkeit von Trägern unter den Müttern von Menschen, die das primäre Leberzellkarzinom haben. Wir kommen auf alle diese Punkte, oder einige davon, zurück, um Ihnen die Daten zu präsentieren. Es gab sehr viele Studien, die den 3. Punkt, den ich erwähnte, demonstrierten, nämlich dass in Gebieten, wo das primäre Leberzellkarzinom häufig auftritt, es auch häufig Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus gibt, also ist in diesen Gebieten die Häufigkeit des Hepatitis B-Virus viel höher bei Menschen mit dem Krebs als in den entsprechenden Kontrollgruppen. Das sind Abbildungen von 2 Studien, die wir in Afrika, in Westafrika, durchführten. Sie wurden in Zusammenarbeit mit Professor Payet von der Universität von Dakar und der Universität von Paris durchgeführt unter den Doktoren Larouze, Saimot, Barrois, Feret und Professor Sankale sowie einer großen Gruppe französischer, amerikanischer und senegalesischer Kollegen. In der Mali-Studie betrug die Häufigkeit des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens 47 % im Vergleich zu etwa 5 % bei den Kontrollen. Die Häufigkeit des Antikörpers gegen den Core, die für einen Hinweis auf eine aktive Infektion gehalten wird, betrug bei den Patienten 75 % und in den Kontrollen 25 %. Die Häufigkeit der Antikörper war in Krebspatienten im Vergleich zu den Kontrollen ziemlich gering. Die Gesamtinfektionsrate war in beiden Gruppen hoch, aber höher in der Gruppe der Krebskranken. Aber der wichtige Punkt ist wieder, dass es eine viel höhere Trägerhäufigkeit in den Patienten im Vergleich zur Kontrollgruppe gibt. Die Daten aus Senegal sind ähnlich, weisen in dieselbe Richtung und sind höher als in der Mali-Studie. Diese 2 Studien sind repräsentativ für ungefähr 15 Studien dieser Art und sie zeigen im Grunde alle in dieselbe Richtung. Nun gehen wir zu Punkt 4 oder 5, glaube ich, wo ich auf die Patienten hinwies, die ein primäres Leberzellkarzinom entwickeln. Es überlagert eine zugrundeliegende chronische Lebererkrankung, einschließlich einer chronischen aktiven Hepatitis, Sklerose, hier haben wir das primäre Leberzellkarzinom und die Kontrollen. Diese Studien wurden in Südkorea von Doktor Hie-Won Hann von unserem Labor in Philadelphia durchgeführt. Und Professor von der medizinischen Hochschule in Seoul. In dieser Studie fanden sie heraus, dass es eine viel höhere Häufigkeit des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens gibt, 58,6 %, als in den Kontrollgruppen, 2% und 6%, 3% und 6%. Auch bei der Sklerose, eine sehr hohe Häufigkeit des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens, 93 % im Vergleich zu 6 %. Und wieder eine sehr hohe Frequenz des Oberflächenantigens in Patienten mit primären Leberzellkarzinom verglichen mit den Kontrollen. Im Gegensatz dazu ist die Häufigkeit des Antikörpers gegen das Oberflächenantigen, das der schützende Antikörper ist, niedriger in Patienten mit diesen unterschiedlichen Erkrankungen als in den Kontrollen. Und das wurde dort gefunden, wo es untersucht wurde. Die Vermutung ist, dass die Patienten, die eine chronische Lebererkrankung und das primäre Leberzellkarzinom entwickeln, eine ziemlich unterschiedliche Immunreaktion zeigen, wenn sie mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus infiziert werden. Sie werden mit höherer Wahrscheinlichkeit zu Trägern und bilden zufällig zur selben Zeit Antikörper gegen den Core des Virus. Das heißt, sie werden mit höherer Wahrscheinlichkeit Träger als dass sie Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen entwickeln. Es ist nicht ganz angemessen zu sagen, dass sie immunschwach sind, weil sie in der Lage sind, Antikörper gegen den Core zu bilden. Sie sind eine Art immunspezifisch, das heißt, sie werden mit höherer Wahrscheinlichkeit Träger und bilden Antikörper gegen den Core als dass sie Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen bilden. Also kann man sie wieder nicht als geschwächt beschreiben, sondern eher als anders als die Personen, die diese chronischen Erkrankungen nicht entwickeln. Das ist eine Illustration der zukunftsorientierten Studie, die in Japan durchgeführt wurde. Sie veranschaulicht ähnliche Studien, die anderswo in Asien, Taiwan, in der Volksrepublik China und Seoul durchgeführt wurden. In dieser Studie wurden etwa 80 Patienten mit Sklerose von den japanischen Kollegen identifiziert. Es stellte sich dann heraus, dass 25 von ihnen das Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigen hatten. Und 43 waren anscheinend nicht infiziert. Wenn die Hypothese korrekt wäre, würde man annehmen, dass die Menschen mit dem Oberflächenantigen eher als die beiden anderen Gruppen das primäre Leberzellkarzinom entwickeln würden. Die Nacharbeit findet nun seit den letzten 3,5 Jahren statt. Und es traten 7 Fälle von primären Leberzellkarzinom in diesen etwa 80 Menschen auf – übrigens eine unglaublich hohe Risikogruppe und auch eine sehr schnelle Entstehung des Krebses. und eine Person in die Gruppe der Nicht-Infizierten. Das sind geringe Unterschiede, auch wenn die Gruppen ziemlich klein sind, aber es stimmt ziemlich genau mit den Erwartungen der Hypothese überein. Es zeigt auch eine ungewöhnlich hohe Risikogruppe für Leberkrebs, nämlich Leute mit Sklerose, die Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus sind. Ich entschuldige mich für diese Folie. Sie ist ausführlicher als notwendig, vergessen Sie das Material unter der Linie. Ich führe Sie an der Hand durch die anderen Abschnitte auf der Folie. Das war wieder eine japanische Studie, die bei der nationalen Eisenbahn durchgeführt wurde. Es werden dort regelmäßig körperliche Untersuchungen an sehr vielen Mitarbeitern vorgenommen. Als Teil dieser Untersuchung wurden Blutproben von 18.195 Personen genommen und auf das Vorhandensein des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens oder anderer Infektionsanzeichen mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus untersucht. Es stellte sich heraus, dass 341 von ihnen Träger des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens waren. Diese Zahlen waren nicht...also sie beobachteten diese Menschen über einen Zeitraum von 0,5 - 3,5 Jahren. Das ist eine relativ kurze Zeit. Es handelte sich wieder um asymptomatische Personen, die gesunde waren und sich regelmäßig körperlich untersuchen ließen. Entsprechend der Hypothese würden die Personen, die Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus sind, obwohl sie asymptomatisch sind, ein messbar höheres Risiko haben, das primäre Leberzellkarzinom zu entwickeln, als die normalen Personen, die keine Träger oder keine verborgenen Träger sind. Und jeder von ihnen fällt in die Kategorie der Personen der Hepatitis B-Träger. Übrigens waren alle 3 von ihnen Menschen, die relativ geringer SGPT-Erhöhungen. Sie waren leicht über normal aber nicht sehr hoch. Wenn diese zukunftsorientierte Studie getragen wird, unterstützt sie die Hypothese, für die ich diese Nachweise zusammentrage, beträchtlich. Wie schon gesagt, werden solche Studien jetzt auch anderswo durchgeführt. Doktor Nayak und seine Kollegen in Indien führten eine sehr breite und umfassende Leberstudie mit Autopsien von Leuten mit verschiedenen Lebererkrankungen durch, darunter auch dem primären Leberzellkarzinom und Sklerose. Außerdem auch Leute, deren Todesursache nicht mit Lebererkrankungen in Verbindung stand. Es gibt verschiedene Methoden, um Anzeichen des Hepatitis B-Virus im Gewebe festzustellen. Darunter fluoreszente Techniken, wobei fluoreszierendes Material verschiedenen Antikörpern anhaftet. Das heißt, das fluoreszierende Material bindet sich an Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen. Fluoreszierendes Material könnte sich an Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen binden. Außerdem können Sie die Partikel sehen, die durch Ferritin-markierte Antikörper identifizierbar sind. Also kann Ihre tatsächliche Lage gezeigt werden. Mit diesen verschiedenen Techniken fanden Dr. Nayak und seine Kollegen Folgendes heraus: Bei Patienten mit dem primären Leberzellkarzinom konnte in 94 % von ihnen das Vorhandensein des Hepatitis B-Virus in der Leber nachgewiesen werden, wenn es Leberkrebs war, in 71 % der Sklerosepatienten und 2 % der Kontrollgruppen. Das Hepatitis B-Core-Antigen wurde wieder mit hoher Häufigkeit in Patienten mit primärem Leberzellkarzinom, in Sklerosepatienten aber nicht in den Kontrollgruppen gefunden. Es gibt auch einige Fälle, wo sowohl das Oberflächenantigen und Core-Antigen gefunden werden und wieder mit viel höherer Häufigkeit in Krebspatienten und Patienten mit Sklerose, aber keinem in den Kontrollgruppen. Also ist der Virus wieder, wo man ihn erwarten würde, wenn der Virus in Verbindung mit Leberkrebs auftritt. Allgemein gesagt, wird in diesen Studien das Vorhandensein des Virus nicht den Krebszellen selbst gezeigt, die transformierte Zellen sind, sondern den Zellen, die die transformierten oder Krebszellen unmittelbar umgeben, und in vielen Fällen auch allgemein im Lebergewebe. Doktor Summers zufolge, der das untersuchte, konnte dies bis jetzt nicht nachgewiesen werden. Und er sagte auch, dass es keinen Hinweis für den Einbau der DNA des Virus in die DNA der Leberzellen gibt. Er und ich glauben, dass niemand Hinweise dafür gefunden hat. Gelegentlich findet man den Virus tatsächlich innerhalb der Krebszellen, aber die allgemeine Ansicht ist, dass er im umliegenden Gewebe vorhanden ist. Die spezifische DNA kann durch herkömmliche Methoden identifiziert werden. Doktor Summers verwendete die Hepatitis B-Virus-DNA als Probe, um sich diese Lebergewebe von Menschen mit Leberkrebs anzusehen. Er fand die DNA in solchen Geweben vor, aber nicht in den Kontrollen. Bei der Gruppe der primären Leberzellkarzinome achtete er besonders auf Personen, die das Oberflächenantigen und das primäre Leberzellkarzinom hatten. Und den wenigen Personen mit Leberkrebs, die Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen hatten. Die spezifische DNA wurde in 10 von 11 Fällen identifiziert, wo es Träger gab, aber nur in einem von 4, wo die Personen Antikörper hatten. Die Signifikanz, Leberkrebs mit Antikörper gegen Oberflächenantigene zu haben, ist unklar. Aber wie Sie sich aus früheren Studien erinnern, stellt diese Gruppe einen kleineren Prozentsatz dar als die Personen, die Krebs haben und Virusträger sind. Unsere Arbeit begann als eine Konsequenz einer genetischen Untersuchung. Wir untersuchten Polymorphismen im Blut. In der Folge konzentrierten wir unsere Arbeit auf Familien. In der Humangenetik werden Familien untersucht. Man wird also auf eine Art familienorientiert. Eine unserer frühen Untersuchungen führten wir an Familien von Personen durch, die Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus waren. Wir fanden, dass es eine viel höhere Häufigkeit von Trägern unter den Kindern gab, wenn die Mutter ein Träger des Hepatitis-Virus war, als wenn der Vater der Träger des Hepatitis-Virus war. Das stimmte mit der Auffassung überein, dass die Mutter den Hepatitis B-Virus auf ihr Kind übertragen konnte, wenn sie ein Träger war. Daher fanden Kollegen in vielen Gebieten, vor allem in Asien, heraus, dass eine sehr hohe Häufigkeit von Kindern, die von Müttern geboren wurden, die Träger sind, innerhalb von wenigen Wochen oder Monaten Träger wurden. Und etwa 50 % werden Träger sein. Sie sind möglicherweise direkt bei der Geburt keine Träger, aber der Trägerstatus kann sich in der Folge entwickeln. In einigen Fällen wird der Hepatitis B-Virus im Nabelschnurblut gefunden. Darauf und auf einer großen Anzahl von Beobachtungen basierend erscheint es, dass der Hepatitis B-Virus von Mutter zu Kind während irgendeiner Zeit der Assoziation miteinander übertragen werden kann. Z.B. es wäre vorstellbar, dass es noch vor der Empfängnis auftritt, d. h. wenn das Ein infiziert wurde. Es könnte während der Empfängnis bei der Wanderung durch die Plazenta auftreten. Es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass es zum Zeitpunkt der Geburt auftritt. Der Zeitpunkt der Geburt ist eine sehr gefährliche Zeit im Leben, eine sehr aufregende Zeit und auch sehr gefährlich. Insbesondere wird die Schranke zwischen der Zirkulation der Mutter und des Kindes aufgehoben. Und es ist möglich, dass ziemlich große Dinge auf beide Seiten übertragen werden. Aufgrund dessen, was wir über die Inkubationszeit wissen, sieht es so aus, dass die Infizierung des Kindes durch die Mutter zu dieser Zeit stattfindet. Wir hörten von Doktor Tinbergen über die möglichen Schäden, die Personen in dieser sehr entscheidenden Phase unseres Lebens davontragen. Es sieht auch so aus, dass die Übertragung von Müttern an die Kinder während der frühen Zeit ihrer engen Verbundenheit auftritt. In allen Kulturen stehen sich Mütter und Kinder während der ersten Monate und Jahre sehr nahe, viel näher als später. Und es ist wahrscheinlich, dass die Übertragung dann stattfindet. Als Konsequenz der Bedeutung von Materialübertragung, oder elterlicher Effekte, würde ich sagen, wir widmeten der Untersuchung von Mutter-Kind-Interaktionen, eigentlich Familien-Interaktionen, sehr viel Zeit, und verwendeten diese ätiologischen Techniken, über die wir in dieser Woche gehört haben. Eine meiner Studierenden, Miss Dickie, machte auf den Neuen Hebriden Beobachtungen an Neugeborenen und ihren Müttern, und beobachtete das Verhalten, das in der Natur so oft an Tieren beobachtet wird, um zu sehen, wie Mütter und Kinder miteinander im Vergleich mit Verhaltensmustern interagieren, die zur Übertragung eines Virus von einem zum anderen führen könnte, insbesondere von der Mutter an das Kind. Wir hoffen, etwas darüber zu erfahren, weil es wichtige Einflüsse auf die Kontrolltechniken haben könnte. In den Studien in Senegal untersuchten wir Müttern von Patienten mit dem primären Leberzellkarzinom und verglichen Sie mit den Müttern der Kontrollgruppen. Die Kontrollen waren meistens Leute, die asymptomatische Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus waren. Wir fanden heraus, dass es eine viel höhere Häufigkeit von Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigen in den Müttern der Patienten als in den Müttern der Kontrollgruppen gab. Wir fanden auch heraus, dass es eine viel geringere Häufigkeit von Antikörpern in den Vätern der Patienten als in den Vätern der Kontrolle gab. Diese Studie wurde nicht wiederholt. Wenn Sie unterstützt wird, lässt dies vermuten, dass es einen elterlichen Effekt gibt, dass es eine Übertragung von der Mutter auf das Kind geben kann. Und in der Natur der Antwort liegt, dass das Kind ein Merkmal vom Vater entweder erben oder erwerben wird. Ich sollte jetzt bei der Diskussion sagen, dass das einige sehr wichtige psychologische Probleme aufwirft. Wenn tatsächlich Material übertragen wird, das in gegebener Zeit zu einer ernsthaften Erkrankung bei Kindern führt, könnte das eine sehr schwierige psychologische Belastung für Eltern sein. Wenn Kinder krank sind, sind die Eltern natürlich sehr besorgt. Und wenn es irgendeine Schlussfolgerung gibt, dass sie dabei eine Rolle spielten, könnte sich das ernsthaft auf ihre Psyche und die Beziehung miteinander und den Kindern auswirken. Insbesondere zwischen den Eltern ist das vorstellbar. Natürlich verbirgt sich in einer solchen Situation keine Schuld. Aber ich glaube, es ist sehr wichtig für uns, dass wir diesen Prozess so gut wie möglich verstehen, um in erster Linie Präventivmaßnahmen zu ergreifen, wenn das möglich ist. Und wir müssen es ausreichend verstehen, um die Fragen der Eltern dazu zu beantworten. Aus meiner Erfahrung erfordern ethische Fragen normalerweise mehr Informationen. Wenn Sie ein ethisches Problem haben, glaube ich, dass Sie normalerweise mehr Wissen und weniger Argumente brauchen. Aber eben mehr Wissen, um damit umgehen zu können. Und in vielen Fällen löst sich die ethische Frage nicht wirklich auf, aber sie verändert sich zu etwas anderem, mit dem wir uns dann auch befassen müssen; aber Sie sind jedenfalls in einer anderen Position. Auf der nächsten Folie sehen Sie ein Diagramm, das skizziert, was wir glauben, dass bei der Entstehung eines primären Leberzellkarzinoms passiert. Wir glauben, dass Kinder früh im Leben infiziert werden können und es möglich ist, dass die Infektion durch die Mutter erfolgt, vielleicht mit einem Einfluss des Vaters bei der Entwicklung des Trägerstatus. Einige von diesen werden chronische Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus werden. Einige gehen in eine andere Richtung und werden nicht zu Trägern des Hepatitis B-Virus. Einige der chronischen Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus werden in der Folge chronische Hepatitis entwickeln. Einige werden keine Anzeichen spüren, das heißt, sie wissen nicht, dass sie jemals infiziert wurden, wenn sie nicht getestet werden. Einige der an chronischer Hepatitis Erkrankten werden in der Folge post-nekrotische Sklerose entwickeln, eine sehr ernste Erkrankung, die das Leben verkürzt. Einige mit post-nekrotischer Sklerose werden in der Folge daran sterben. Andere werden in der Folge ein primäres Leberzellkarzinom entwickeln. Jetzt ist es natürlich offensichtlich klar, dass andere Faktoren an diesem unglücklichen Fall beteiligt sein müssen. Etwa 10% der Menschen in Senegal sind Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus. Wobei auch nur in Ländern mit einer hohen Häufigkeit des primären Leberzellkarzinoms die Häufigkeit bei 100 pro 100.000 oder sagen wir ca. 50 pro 100.000 beträgt. Es ist also offensichtlich, dass es auch andere Faktoren bei der Entstehung des Krebses eine Rolle spielen. Aflatoxine wurden damit in Verbindung gebracht. Ernährungsfaktoren wurden angenommen. Anderes essbares Material, Toxine, wurden auch als notwendig für die Entstehung des primären Leberzellkarzinoms angenommen. Könnten wir das Licht einschalten bitte? Wir versuchen zu bestimmen, welche anderen Faktoren an der Entstehung des Krebses beteiligt sind. Aber es ist ein sehr interessantes Merkmal der Präventivmedizin und wirklich ein extrem hoffnungsvolles Merkmal, dass man nicht alles wissen muss, um Krankheiten zu verhindern. Ich möchte nicht wie ein Banause klingen, das heißt, ich bin nicht dafür, Dinge nicht zu lernen, ganz im Gegenteil. Je mehr Sie wissen, desto effektiver könnten die Kontrollmethoden sein. Aber die Medizin ist ein sehr aufstrebender Markt. Sie haben es in diesem Fall mit Leben oder Tod zu tun. Und wenn eine Präventionsmaßnahme bekannt ist und angewendet werden kann, dann ist es eine Art Verpflichtung, sie so schnell wie möglich zu verwenden. Aber gleichzeitig müssen alle Vorsichtsmaßnahmen getroffen werden, um so geringen Schaden wie möglich der allgemeinen Bevölkerung und den Menschen, die diesen Vorsorgemaßnahmen ausgesetzt waren, zuzufügen. Aber es gibt eine Verpflichtung. Sie können nicht nichts tun, denn das ist dasselbe als wenn Sie etwas tun. Ich wollte Sie nur erinnern, dass es in der Präventivmedizin möglich ist, mit ziemlich fragmentärem Wissen vorzugehen. Ein klassisches Beispiel ist das von Snow bei der Choleraepidemie in London, der entdeckte, dass die Leute, die von einem bestimmten Brunnen tranken eher Cholera bekamen als andere, die nicht aus von diesem Brunnen tranken, oder Leute, die in einer Brauerei in derselben Region arbeiteten und ihr eigenes Bier tranken oder Wasser aus einer anderen Quelle hatten. Er entschied daher, dass man von diesem Brunnen nicht trinken sollte. Und er entfernte den Hebelgriff des Brunnens als Präventivmaßnahme. Das geschah, bevor die Keimtheorie als Ursache von Krankheiten bekannt war. Und lange, bevor der Cholera-Erreger entdeckt wurde. Trotzdem war es effektiv, um die weitere Verbreitung dieser Krankheit zu verhindern und konnte in dieser Region eliminiert werden. Ich will also wieder betonen, dass wir natürlich eine Verpflichtung haben, so viel wie möglich über ein Problem zu lernen. Vor allem, damit wir auf die effektivste und am wenigsten schädliche Form damit umgehen können. Aber gleichzeitig glaube ich, dass jeder, der diese Menschen sterben sah – Leberkrebs ist eine furchtbare Krankheit und es gibt keine Behandlung dafür. Es gibt sehr wenig, dass wir für diese Menschen tun können und es entwickelt sich eine Art Dringlichkeit. Wenn dieser Impfstoff, den ich erwähnte, effektiv ist und wir mehr über die Übertragungsmethoden erfahren, glaube ich, dass wir jetzt bereit sind, über die Gestaltung nachzudenken. Ich glaube wieder, dass es eine Verpflichtung ist, mehr über die Biologie des Hepatitis B-Virus zu erfahren, um mit diesem Problem auf die effektivste Weise umzugehen. Als Ärzte sind wir immer...Viren und Bakterien haben in der Medizin einen ziemlich schlechten Ruf. Weil wir nur die schlimmsten Dinge sehen, die sie anrichten, wie Krankheiten. Sie wissen, dass wir nur das Ende des Spektrums betrachten. Wir haben eine etwas verkorkste Sicht auf das Leben, eine verkorkste Sicht auf Viren und Mikroorganismen. Denken Sie einfach an all das gute Bier, das es nicht gäbe, wenn wir keine Mikroorganismen hätten. Sie machen alle Arten von Dingen. Aber wir neigen dazu, nur an ihre negativen Aspekte zu denken. Aber das kann natürlich, in Bezug auf die Einstellung des Virus - wenn es so etwas gibt – es kann nur ein kleiner Teil davon sein, mit dem sie zu tun haben. Ich möchte Ihnen ganz kurz über einige unserer Studien erzählen, die wir über den biologischen Aspekt des Virus durchführten, nämlich wie unterschiedlich er mit männlich und weiblich, mit Männern und Frauen, umgeht. Die nächste Folie entstand bei einer Studie meiner Kollegen Doktor London und Gene Drew, bei der eine Gruppe von Patienten auf einer Dialysestation für Nierenkranke untersucht wurden. Die Infektionsrate für den Hepatitis B-Virus auf der Dialysestation ist sehr hoch. Und diese bestimmte Station ist so organisiert, dass alle Träger im Delaware Tal, das ist das Gebiet um Philadelphia, in dieser Station aufgenommen wurden. Also auf dieser Station gibt es eine sehr hohe Infektionsrate. Sie stellten die Frage, was passiert, wenn eine Person mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus infiziert ist? Wie hoch ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sie Träger werden bzw. dass sie Antikörper entwickeln? Die Daten wurden anhand der Kategorien männlich und weiblich aufgeschlüsselt. Also die 2 Dinge, die eintreten können, können gemessen werden und wurden gemessen: ob man zum Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus wurde oder ob man die schützenden Antikörper entwickelte, Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen. Blutproben wurden über mehrere Jahre alle 2 Monate abgenommen und untersucht. Leute, von denen man wusste, dass sie infiziert waren, wurden identifiziert. Das zeigt die Wahrscheinlichkeit an, ein Träger zu bleiben, nachdem man diese Anzahl von Monaten infiziert war. Also z.B. wenn eine Frau infiziert ist, liegt die Wahrscheinlichkeit zur Zeit der ersten Infektion, dass sie ein Träger werden und bleiben würde, etwas über 30 %. Wenn ein Mann infiziert wird, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass er ein Träger wird mehr als doppelt so hoch. Und dieser Unterschied besteht bei unterschiedlichen Zeitspannen der Infektion. Also nach der Infektion ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, Träger zu werden, bei Männern größer als bei Frauen. Das ist eine Art Vorderseite davon. Sobald eine Person einmal infiziert wurde, wie hoch ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass die Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen entwickelt? Die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass infizierte Frauen Antikörper entwickeln, ist viel größer als bei Männern. Daher können wir sagen, dass sobald die Infektion stattfand, Männer eher Träger werden und Frauen eher Antikörper entwickeln. Das erklärt vielleicht die eher ungewöhnliche männliche Vorherrschaft im Zusammenhang mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus. Leberkrebs tritt 7 oder 8 Mal häufiger in Männern als Frauen auf. Eine chronische Lebererkrankung, die mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus assoziiert wird, tritt viel häufiger bei Männern als bei Frauen auf. Wenn Männer, sobald sie infiziert sind, eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit haben, Träger des Hepatitis B-Virus zu werden, dann haben sie eine höhere Wahrscheinlichkeit, Krankheiten zu entwickeln, die mit einer chronischen Infektion assoziiert werden, z.B. primärer Leberkrebs, chronische Lebererkrankung und eine Vielfalt anderer Erkrankungen, die mit dieser Krankheit webbasierte werden. Das könnte in der Medizin eines der verwirrendsten Probleme für bestimmte Erkrankungen darstellen: warum die Wahrscheinlichkeit für Männer höher als für Frauen ist und in manchen Fällen umgekehrt. Eine weitere interessante Interaktion zwischen dem Virus und Menschen in Bezug auf männlich und weiblich sehen Sie auf der nächsten Folie: Es ist eine Zusammenfassung von Daten, die im kleinen Ort Plati in Mazedonien, im Norden Griechenlands, erfasst wurden. Der Ort wurde gewählt, weil er in vieler Hinsicht eine recht homogene Gemeinschaft ist. Es gab dort aber auch eine der höchsten Infektionsraten des Hepatitis B-Virus in der griechischen Bevölkerung, die wir mit unseren griechischen Kollegen, Doktor Economidou und Hadziyannis sowie anderen untersuchten. Also das gesamte Dorf oder der Großteil des Dorfs wurde untersucht und die Eltern wurden in 3 Gruppen eingeteilt. Wenn der Elternteil ein Träger des Hepatitis B-Oberflächenantigens war und keine Antikörper hatte - das war eine Klasse. Die 2. Klasse waren Eltern, die keine Träger waren, aber Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen entwickelten. Und dann eine 3. Klasse: Personen die keine Anzeichen einer Infektion zeigten. Dann wurden die Anzahl der Kinder, die sie hatten und ihr Geschlecht bestimmt. Das Geschlechterverhältnis wurde für jede diese Gruppen berechnet. Das Geschlechterverhältnis ist die Anzahl der männlichen Lebendgeburten im Vergleich zu den weiblichen Lebendgeburten. Das ist das sekundäre Geschlechterverhältnis, das Geschlechterverhältnis zum Geburtszeitpunkt; das primäre Geschlechterverhältnis ist das Verhältnis bei der Empfängnis. Es gab einen sehr signifikanten Unterschied zwischen den Geschlechterverhältnissen von Familien, die Träger waren im Vergleich zu den Familien, in welchen die Eltern Antikörper entwickelt hatten. Und ein dazwischenliegendes Verhältnis in den Familien, wo keiner irgendwelche Anzeichen einer Infektion zeigten. Wir haben anschließend dieselbe Hypothese auf einer Insel namens Kar Kar durchgeführt, die an der Nordküste von Neuguinea liegt, in 2 Gemeinschaften in Grönland, in Orten namens Scoresbysund und Ammassalik und dann auf Mali. Und in keinen dieser Gemeinschaften wurden irgendwelche Daten der Hypothese widerlegt, die Beobachtungen, die in dieser ersten Studie gemacht wurden. Dass wir nämlich...wenn diese Daten durch weitere Studien unterstützt werden, dann kann man annehmen, dass der Virus eine sehr wichtige Art der Interaktion mit Menschen hat, anders, als es als Erkrankung zu bezeichnen. Ich bin nicht ganz sicher, wie man sie klassifizieren sollte - die Bestimmung des Geschlechterverhältnisses - aber es ist sicher keine Krankheit. Wenn also diese Daten durch andere Forscher unterstützt werden - was bis jetzt übrigens noch nicht geschah - dass sie widerlegt wurden, aber ich glaube nicht, dass es Untersuchungen gab. Aber wenn sie unterstützt werden, heißt das, dass dieser Virus eine sehr wichtige Interaktion mit einem menschlichen Merkmal hat, das sehr wichtig für uns ist, ob nämlich Menschen Männer oder Frauen sind. Und das hat einen großen Effekt, einen großen psychologischen, wirtschaftlichen, soziologischen Effekt auf den Aufbau der Bevölkerungen. Es gibt andere biologische Merkmale, die mit diesem Virus identifiziert werden, über die wir gerne mehr erfahren möchten, während wir öffentliche Vorsorgemaßnahmen in der Hoffnung vorbereiten, dass wir sehr effektiv mit der Prävention dieser Erkrankung umgehen können und so wenig Schaden wie möglich verursachen. Ich glaube, dass wir insbesondere in der Medizin mögliche Vorteile mit möglichen Nachteilen abwägen müssen. Im Leben passiert nichts ohne Risiko. Und was wir tun wollen, ist, den Vorteil zu maximieren und den Nachteil zu minimieren. Danke!

 
(00:13:44 - 00:18:10)
To listen to the ful lecture click here.  


Soon after Blumberg’s lecture, field tests for the HBV vaccine were initiated and the vaccine was introduced into immunisation programms by the mid-1980s. Today, it is one of the most frequently used vaccines in the world, usually the first vaccine provided to babies shortly after birth. Follow-up studies show that the HBV vaccine prevents liver cancer, as presented by Nobel Laureate Harald zur Hausen:

Harald  zur Hausen (2011) - Infections in the Etiology of Human Cancers

Thank you very much it's indeed a great pleasure for me to be here. What I'm planning to do today is neither to talk about something which happens at the beginning of life, nor about something that happens at end of the life but what is happening in between namely acquiring infections. I will talk about a specific set of infections namely those which are linked to cancer. I very briefly review those aspects which are presently known today. And subsequently I plan to talk about a subject in which I never received a formal training, namely epidemiology. Some hints, why and where we suspect that some additional kinds of human cancers might be linked to infections. So let me start out with a summary table, which just says to which extent we presently can deal with infections as a cause of the global picture of cancer development. We can roughly calculate at about twenty-one percent of cancers are linked to infections. Quite a variety of different infections. On parasitic infections like bilharziosis, liver fluke which play an important role in some countries. In fact in Egypt bladder cancer which is due to Schistosoma infections is one of THE major cancers at all. And it's interesting to note that on the global scale it accounts for approximately 1% of those cancers which are linked to infections. And they can be cured relatively, readily, not the cancer but the infections by chemotherapy. But, and this is one of the problems, immediately after clearing, eliminating the parasites it becomes possible subsequently to re-infect the respective patients again with the same agents. That is also true for another very important human carcinogen, a bacterium namely helicobacter pylori which is presently THE major cause of gastric cancer. Where you can cure the patients of helicobacter pylori infection by antibiotics but again soon thereafter re-infection becomes possible. And quite a number of those patients which have had the bacteria eliminated become re-infected subsequently. There's a different category of agents, viruses which account for about two/thirds of the infections linked to cancer. And there are two of them where we presently know that they can be, that you can protect against these types of infections by vaccination. And the major difference here is that we deal here with long lasting protection against re-infection and as we at least in one case know quite clearly and the other case it's highly likely that we can protect against respective forms of cancer. I'll come back to these a little bit later once again. There are a couple of other agents, but we also know that they are linked to cancers. Epstein-Barr virus already discovered in 1965 by Epstein and his colleagues at that time in Bristol. The longest known human tumour virus being responsible for b-cell lymphomas and a couple of other types of tumours, I will not dwell on them in detail. Human herpes virus type 8 which is the agent causing Kaposi's sarcomas, vascular tumours, which occur mainly in AIDs patients or in organ transplant recipients. Merkel cell polyoma virus, a virus which has been only discovered close to three years ago which is an interesting agent. It causes again a condition which of course mainly on the immunosuppression, and which shows a very peculiar mode of interaction with the cancer cells. I may come back to this later on. And a couple of others Hepatitis C an important carcinogen, liver carcinogen in particular here in this region, in Europe and also in the United States, it's an important liver carcinogen. HTLV-1 which is interesting in terms of prevention because the virus is usually acquired from persistently infected mothers who infect their babies via breastfeeding. So if the mothers are known to carry the virus and if they avoid breastfeeding it really limits the spread of the infection and might be really a way in the long run to eradicate this infection which plays a major role in the coastal regions of southern Japan for instance. Human immunodeficiency viruses clearly acting as indirect carcinogens because they induce immunosuppression. And under those conditions of immunosuppression other types of persisting tumour viruses usually arise and may lead to tumours like Epstein-Barr, like human herpes virus type 8 and also the Merkel cell Polyomaviruses. They are in fact then those which we call the direct carcinogens whereas HIV act as indirect carcinogens. This is a slide which I like to show in order to demonstrate a little bit about the mechanisms by which these agents contribute to cancer. It's important to understand it because we've very long latency periods. In some instances up to sixty years after primary infection before cancer develops. For a long time this was one of the obstacles, why it was so difficult to pinpoint an infection to a specific form of cancer. And one aspect which clarified at least to some degree the picture is an Epstein-Barr virus linked to a condition with a complicated name of x-chromosome linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this case the children acquire via the germ line and modification within the x-chromosome and in males, male progeny here, they may develop this syndrome and upon infection by EBV, by Epstein-Barr virus they acquire a rather deadly form of lymphoma which kills them after a couple of months in these cases. The reasons that we have here genetic modification, which regulates specific t-cell response against Epstein-Barr virus the gene has been identified and also functionally clarified. Under those conditions of this inherited change the boys acquire the disease. Now this tells us an important aspect because in all of these cases where we have these long latency periods the infection per se by itself is never sufficient for the malignant transformation. It is necessary in many of these incidents, but not sufficient. And the infected cell has to acquire additional modifications which eventually lead then to cancer development. For instance in the case of cervical cancer we can define at least three types of modifications which have to occur prior to the development of the respective form of cancer. Unless those are occurring there's virus persistence but not the development of cancer there may be more than three but three have been identified by now. The length of the latency period is an indication for the number of additional modifications within the respective cells prior to the development of that form of cancer. Let me very quickly look to the two types of cancers which you can prevent by vaccination. Hepatitis B virus infection responsible for about 80% of the liver cancers in East Asia, Africa. The virus is mainly transmitted similar to the HTLV from persistently infected mothers to the newborn babies. And about 80% of these children become carriers for lifetime. Those are the ones who are at risk, who after 30, 40, 50 or 60 years eventually develop liver cancer. A vaccination against the virus has been developed already in the 1960s. Initially not intended, or 70s, initially not intended to protect against cancer but to protect against the acute consequences of the infection. But interestingly it turned out to be a cancer, effective cancer vaccine. Because in Taiwan for instance since 1984 every newborn child was vaccinated against Hepatitis B virus in order to protect them against the persistent infection, which turned out to be highly successful. About 80% of those children did not develop a chronic Hepatitis B virus infection and now after about slightly more than twenty years in the meantime the first reports which clearly demonstrated the statistically significant protective effect against the development of liver cancer after this kind of vaccination. In a way the first vaccine which prevents cancer, we can clearly state it prevents cancer. What about cancer of the cervix? It was the main topic for us for much more than thirty years by now. Well we know it is the second most frequent cancer in females globally. And the majority of these types of cancers occur in resource-constrained countries. The precursors of this type of cancer also occurred high frequency worldwide, at any other places. But they usually remove, this removal means that there's a large reduction in the incidents of the respective form of cancers. A couple of cancers linked to the same types of infections. These are so-called high risk human papillomavirus infections mainly HPV 16 but also 18 and a couple of others. Cervical cancer is linked to about 100%. Interestingly these types of cancers vulval and penile cancers are only linked to the infection to the more limited degree. It's interesting because these two types of cancers increase dramatically after immunosuppression quite in contrast to cervical cancer which is only marginally increased. And we don't know yet whether these are the HPV negative cases or the positive ones. I think clearly this requires further investigation. Now cancers of the tonsils, of the oropharynx to one-quarter, to one-third are linked to same types of infection as cervical cancer, anal cancers, vaginal cancers and the rare nailbed cancers they are also highly linked to this type of infection. We know that the infection usually persists in an infected woman for instance for about ten months and then 70% of them are able to clear the infection by the new mechanisms. And after two years about 90% clear the infection. But still close to 10% positive. And those are the ones who are at risk for cervical cancer development. I've shown this slide at many other occasions, this was the first model to demonstrate that the vaccine works very well. In the case of papillomavirus infections because kennels in the United States producing Beagles for experimental purposes on a large scale. They had the problem that virtually all of the young puppies developed these ugly papillomas, they persisted for six months and they couldn't sell these dogs during this period of time. We got hold of this DNA of these papillomavirus here, we provided information to the George Town University Group and they prepared a vaccine by expressing the capsid proteins, the major protein of the virus particle in experimental systems. And this was injected into more than fourteen thousand puppies of Beagles. None of them developed papilloma subsequently, whereas all non-vaccinated dogs did. It was a remarkable success story which eventually showed clearly it would work in humans as well, where this major structure protein is expressed either in insect cells or in yeast. And also conditions forming capsomers and also capsid structures. Under those conditions which are really empty shells of the virus produced here and they can be purified and as a basis for the vaccine which is presently available. This is just a summary of the clinical studies which have been conducted, which clearly demonstrates that the vaccines produce high antibody titers. That they persist for prolonged periods of times. We know it now for eight or nine years right now. And in spite of opposing press reports there are no significant side effects observed. In fact from an Australian study we can calculate that there is one allergy against the viral proteins among one hundred thousand vaccines doses which is clearly better result than obtained for many of the vaccines which are presently applied to small children. Now in addition we know today already that we prevent the infection by these types of vaccines against those types which are in the vaccine. And we also prevent the development of cervical, respective cervical precursor lesions. We do not know yet whether it prevents really cancer because it takes as I pointed out before something like 15 to 25 years before cancer develops after infection. And the first vaccine applied about 8 or 9 years ago. Do we have a chance to eradicate these types of infections? Yes, because this infection is restricted to humans. And we can achieve this if we vaccinate globally girls at an age prior to onset of sexual activity. And if you wish to really achieve this we have to vaccinate boys as well if we wish to achieve it in the foreseeable period of time. Indeed if we would only vaccinate boys we probably would have at least the same but probably even better result in preventing cervical cancer than only vaccinating girls. Because of course transmit infection which is virtually exclusively transmitted via sexual contacts. Now let me finish this chapter which although it involved us for a long period of time. And dwell at the end of my talk about some questions which are interesting us presently even more so, where is it worthwhile to look for an infectious etiology. And what I am trying to do now is to go and spoil your appetite for juicy steak or roast beef. Hopefully it will not be too bad for you. Now there are a couple of points which you can raise here. Cancers which are occurring at increased frequency under immunosuppression. We know that in many of these incidents latent tumour virus infections become activated and in those conditions produce cancer. But there are still cancers where we don't know whether they have an infectious etiology. Take thyroid cancer, take renal cancers they are clearly increased under immunosuppression but have not been found yet to be linked to infections. Cancers with reduced incidents of infection, human breast cancer is a best example really because AIDs patients. Patients who receive organ transplants and under immunosuppression they usually have a 15% reduced risk for developing breast cancer in a way contra-intuitive as one may say. But we know in animal examples where the same happens, namely that mouse mammary tumour infections, which are acquired through the milk of the feeding mothers. They infect the lymphocytes and the pyres patches and those lymphocytes start to proliferate very actively. They explode so to speak and produce large quantities of virus, which are released with the activated lymphocytes into the peripheral blood. And the load of the virus apparently is a major risk factor for reaching the mammary gland and leading to the mammary gland cancers. Now if you immunosuppress those mice there's a reduction of the load and under those conditions also reduction of the risk because the lymphocytes are no longer persisting in these patients. What I want to discuss with you briefly are just nutritional cancer risk factors possibly linked to infections and cancer influenced basically be non-tumourogenic infections. And I show you a picture which I've shown at many other occasions but it triggered our interest into this question. Because we do know quite a number of human pathogenic viruses like Polyomaviruses BK and JC which are wildly spread in human populations usually as lifetime infections. EBV and high risk HPV although occasionally carcinogenic in humans it's relatively rare. Adenoviruses which are not carcinogenic in humans, all these viruses cannot replicate in animals. But if you inoculate them into animal systems where they cannot replicate, where they are replication incompetent they are able to cause cancer. And this is an interesting point which of course leads to the converse question namely are some of the domestic animals with which we live in close proximity which are replicating here persisting and in part for lifetime, if they are transmitting to a host where they cannot replicate. They become replication incompetent are they carcinogenic under those conditions? And here is a rather interesting example of cancer of the colon or colorectal cancer because here these cancers have been epidemiologically linked to red meat consumption. There are really a remarkably consistent number of epidemiological reports describing that about 20 ~ 30% of these cancers are linked to the consumption of red meat, particularly beef. Countries with a high rate of consumption, Europe belongs to the same category, they usually have a high rate of colorectal cancer. There are even recent reports that breast cancer is linked to red meat consumption, endometrial and ovarian cancer which shows a similar epidemiology as breast cancer also linked. And even to some degree lung cancer particularly in non-smokers it's much more difficult to evaluate this in smokers. And there are also a couple of reports which are much less consistent in some other kinds of cancers. Let's quickly look at the geographic, at the epidemiology of colorectal cancer here in red sea areas there's a very high risk. Here for breast cancer in dark green the colours don't correspond, but clearly there's a rather remarkable overlap of those regions which show a high risk for breast cancer and a high risk for colorectal cancer. There's the same picture again compared for instance to pancreatic cancer and lung cancer. And there are clearly some areas where there is discordances, at least with these two types of cancers. But relatively concordance between the other two types of cancers. But since 1977 it was suspected that the reasons are known for this effect. Because if you broil, barbecue, roast, grill meat you get a number of chemical compounds in the cooking, in the preparation process formed, which are clearly carcinogenic when inoculated into rodents. And this was obviously a good explanation for the high risk of red meat after consumption for long periods of times. A couple of them are listed here. Now the problem which arose here was already basically visible in the very first publication in 1977 from Sugimura and his colleagues. Because if you roast, grill fish, prepare fish in a similar way the same kinds of carcinogens arise. If you do it with poultry the same kinds of carcinogens occur. Even in some instances at higher concentration than red meat. And this requires some kind of an explanation. Now it's even more specific because if you look into countries where red meat is consumed to a larger degree, let's take say Arabic countries where mainly mutton and lamb and goat meat is consumed the rate is amazingly low of this type of cancer. Pork in China, China doesn't eat, the Chinese don't eat only exclusively pork but it's a major source. The red is more intermediate here and it's most interesting to see, look into the situation in India where basically no beef is being consumed. India is a global leader, the lowest rate of colorectal cancer. And I saw in Calcutta in the pathology department there was one case for the year 2008 of colorectal cancer occurring. Quite amazing for the European pathology departments, what are the explanations? There must be a reason behind it. So it seems to be a specific beef factor. And of course there exists a chance that there might be still undiscovered chemical carcinogens in beef which are not present in white meat. But the other explanation at least for biologists as I am there's a more tempting one, namely that there exists an infectious agents which is relatively thermo-resistant persisting in beef and the beef factor which can be transmitted to humans and may lead to cancer under those developments. If you measure the temperatures in these nicely prepared roast beefs it's about something like 30 ~ 50° C usually. Only in temperatures which quite a number of potentially carcinogenic agents survive very happily without any loss of infectivity as for instance papillomavirus, polyoma type viruses are most likely also slightly more difficult to test also single stranded DNA viruses under these conditions. Polyomaviruses are particularly attractive as well as these ones here because they survive temperatures very easily of 80°C for long periods of time. And we know only one type in cattle but we know of already nine types in humans and it's very likely that others exist. Let me come onto one other point which even seems to stress the situation if you compare Japan and India under those conditions. Japan amazingly enough has a high rate of colorectal cancer. And it's interesting to look into the epidemiology of what happened in Japan in comparison to India. You see some statistics which in Japan have been collected since about 1975, 1980 and you see there's an enormous bias in this cancer. During this period of time you can interpolate that it probably started around '65 or so. In Korea the statistics started later but you see exactly the same thing. What happened in these countries? Well one of the major aspects which happened really was the introduction of large amounts of beef particularly from the United States. The increasing custom and it's a very popular way of eating Shabu-shabu it's a meat fondue in Japan where you dip briefly thin slices of meat into boiling water very quickly if you take it out, they usually take it out after less than one minute and you unfold it and it's still very raw. It's happily consumed. These are correlations, they do not prove anything but it's an interesting point. And they raise the question indeed whether there exists a bovine infectious factor for colorectal cancer which needs to be resolved in the future. Now I have hopefully still a few more minutes, I will finish by talking another aspect because it's quite as interesting, the childhood malignancy leukaemia's. Very briefly only, by pointing out that we have here also an extremely interesting epidemiological situation namely that multiple infections in the first year of life are protective against the development of childhood leukaemias. And under privileged social state, crowded households, many siblings, inverse risk of birth orders, a first born child has a higher risk than subsequent children and so on. Breastfeeding is a protective factor. And conversely here you have a number of risk factors, rare infections, high socioeconomic state, prenatal chromosomal translocations clearly an important factor for the leukaemia development. Yet the same types of locations occur also at a low rate in healthy individuals. So per se they are not sufficient for cancer development. A couple of other points which I will skip for time reasons. If you look into some countries with high level of good well going economy the risk is high whereas in poor populations it's comparatively very low for these types of leukaemias. We tried to develop a kind of speculation what might be the reason for this peculiar phenomenon and suggested that a prenatal infection occurring prior to the time of delivery would lead to infected cells which are propagating after delivery. The number of those cells is increased dramatically and that there is an infectious agent in these cells and it's a load here, might be THE major risk factor for the subsequent development of the leukaemias. Where subsequent infections in the postnatal phase due to the effect that these are mainly respiratory infections which lead to interferon production and antiviral cytokine and under those conditions you get a reduction of the load and a reduction of the risk concomitantly. So if you postulate something like this you have to search for infections first of all which may occur prenatally which probably replicate in the cells from which leukaemias arise. Specific childhood leukaemias arise. And subsequently there should be also quite susceptible to interferon other such infections. The answer is yes. There exists at least one which is fulfilling all these types of criteria and these are so-called TT viruses, anellovirusus as they are called, a mix up with names really. But the interesting aspect is that we are all infected with those agents, carry them in our peripheral blood at this stage. And they replicate in lymphatic and bone marrow cells quite clearly so. It has been shown that patients who are treated with interferon because they are persistently infected with Hepatitis C viruses at the same time reduce drastically the levels of TT viruses and they are acquired as prenatal infections. They occur prenatally at least to a certain percentage they are acquired under those conditions. This is just a summary of what we know about there are more than 100, probably far more than one hundred, genotypes of these viruses they are widely spread in all human populations. Vertical transmission I mentioned. The most interesting aspect here that we mostly frequently, very frequently rearrange the genome in part resulting in autonomously replicated sub-genomic molecules with novel open reading frames. I think this would serve another talk in order to discuss it in more details. And yet a relatively poorly characterised there, episomally persisting single stranded DNA viruses which contain only one region which is highly preserved among all these different genotypes. And in fact we did a large number of studies along these lines which demonstrate first of all that there is some chimeric molecules in tumour cells as well, which show a linkage between this region here and specific cellular sequences which turned out to be extremely interesting. I forgot to mention that there are about 3,800, although there are smaller molecules as well, 2,800 basis here available. And this is now chapter which we do find in leukemic cells in Hodgkin lymphoma cells and also in colorectal cells lines specifically. The persistence of many of these chimeric types of molecules which are present in a large number of them almost uniformly present so far, as far as our experiments tell us right now. But we still do not know the cause of these types of conditions and this requires further investigation and further studies. But these are the people, the team really working mainly on the TT viruses. Ethel-Michele de Villiers who is here in this audience as well, who happens also to be my wife. And a couple others of these ladies here and I think Sylvia Barkosky is also here at this meeting so you may approach her also for some questions which you have. But I feel right now is that we really need to look more carefully also for novel types of mechanisms, by which infectious agents may contribute to human cancer. And you know if we presently can already identify the global burden, 21% of human cancers to these types of infections if it would be true that the malignancies of some hematopoietic system or blood building system and if gastric, sorry not gastric, if colon cancer would be also linked to infections it would immediately jump up to 35% of global cancer burden. And even here gastric cancer counts for something like, sorry colon cancer accounts for something like 20% of the total cancer incidents. So it's an important problem and particularly and I join in with Prof. Blackburn who said it before, if I see all the young students who are working on these issues it's really important to keep your eyes open. It's not a field which has been finished so far, I think it's a field which deserves much more attention. For about thirty years it was difficult to find any kind of interest for these types of agents, right now it's changing fortunately but we need to do more. So thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Dr. Jerwall. Es ist mir in der Tat eine große Freude, hier sein zu können. Dasjenige, worüber ich heute sprechen möchte, hat weder mit dem zu tun, was am Anfang des Lebens, noch mit demjenigen, was an seinem Ende geschieht, sondern handelt von etwas, das in der Zeit dazwischen passiert: von der Tatsache, dass wir uns infizieren. Ich werde über eine bestimmte Gruppe von Infektionen sprechen, nämlich über solche, die mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Ich werde die heute bekannten Aspekte kurz erläutern. Anschließend möchte ich dann über ein Fachgebiet sprechen, in dem ich nie eine formale Ausbildung erhalten habe, nämlich über die Epidemiologie. Ich möchte einige Hinweise darauf geben, warum und in welchen Fällen wir vermuten, dass einige Formen von Krebserkrankungen des Menschen, von denen dies zur Zeit nicht bekannt ist, mit Infektionen zusammenhängen. Lassen Sie mich mit einer tabellarischen Übersicht beginnen, aus der lediglich hervorgeht, in welchem Maße wir gegenwärtig von Infektionen als einer der Ursachen im globalen Bild der Krebsentwicklung ausgehen. Wir können errechnen, dass etwa 21 % der Krebsformen mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen. Eine ziemliche Vielzahl verschiedener Infektionen. Parasitische Infektionen wie die Bilharziose, durch den Leberegel, die in einigen Ländern eine Rolle spielen. Tatsächlich ist in Ägypten Blasenkrebs, der durch Schistosoma-Infektionen verursacht wird, der häufigste Krebs überhaupt. Und es ist interessant darauf hinzuweisen, dass er im globalen Maßstab für 1 % aller mit Krebs in Zusammenhang gebrachten Krebsformen verantwortlich ist. Sie können relativ einfach durch Chemotherapie geheilt werden; nicht die Krebserkrankungen, sondern die Infektionen. Allerdings - und dies ist eines der Probleme - ist es möglich, dass sich die betroffenen Patienten unmittelbar nach der Beseitigung der Parasiten mit denselben Erregern erneut infizieren. Dasselbe gilt auch für einen anderen, sehr wichtigen Krebserreger des Menschen, nämlich für das Bakterium helicobacter pylori, bei dem es sich gegenwärtig um die hauptsächliche Ursache von Magenkrebs handelt: Man kann zwar eine Infektion mit helicobacter pylori mit Antibiotika beseitigen, doch eine Neuinfektion ist kurz darauf wieder möglich. Und eine ziemlich große Anzahl derjenigen Patienten, bei denen man die Bakterien eliminiert hat, infiziert sich anschließend erneut. Es gibt eine andere Kategorie von Erregern, und zwar Viren. Sie sind für zwei Drittel der mit Infektionen verbundenen Krebsformen verantwortlich. Und es gibt zwei von ihnen, von denen wir heute wissen, dass man sich gegen diese Infektionsarten durch Impfungen schützen kann. Der Hauptunterschied besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einem lange anhaltenden Schutz vor einer Neuinfektion zu tun haben, wie wir zumindest in einem Fall ziemlich genau wissen. In dem anderen Fall ist es höchst wahrscheinlich, dass wir uns gegen entsprechende Formen von Krebs schützen können. Ich werde darauf ein wenig später noch zu sprechen kommen. Es gibt noch eine Reihe anderer Erreger, von denen wir ebenfalls wissen, dass sie mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Das Epstein-Barr-Virus wurde bereits 1965 von Epstein und seinen damaligen Kollegen in Bristol entdeckt. Dabei handelt es sich um das am längsten bekannte menschliche Tumorvirus. Es ist für B-Zellen-Lymphome und eine Reihe anderer Tumore verantwortlich. Ich werde nicht im Detail darauf eingehen. Der menschliche Herpesvirus Typ 8 ist der Erreger des Kaposi-Sarkoms, eines vaskulären Tumors, der hauptsächlich bei AIDS-Patienten und bei Empfängern transplantierter Organe auftritt. Das Merkelzell-Polyomavirus wurde im Januar 2008 entdeckt. Es ist ein interessanter Erreger. Auch dieses Virus verursacht einen Zustand, bei dem es sich in der Hauptsache um eine Unterdrückung des Immunsystems handelt. Dabei zeigt sich eine sehr merkwürdige Art der Wechselwirkung mit den Krebszellen. Ich werde darauf später vielleicht noch zurückkommen. Außerdem gibt es noch einige andere. Hepatitis C ist ein wichtiger Krebsfaktor, ein Karzinogen der Leber, besonders in dieser Region, in Europa und auch in den USA. Es ist ein wichtiger Faktor bei der Entstehung von Leberkrebs. HTLV-1 ist bezüglich der Prävention von Interesse, denn das Virus wird in der Regel von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern übertragen, die ihre Kinder durch das Stillen anstecken. Wenn also von Müttern bekannt ist, dass sie Trägerinnen des Virus sind, und wenn sie es unterlassen ihre Kinder zu stillen, lässt sich hierdurch die Verbreitung der Infektion tatsächlich eindämmen. Längerfristig könnte es sogar möglich sein, diese Infektion, die zum Beispiel in den Küstenregionen von Südjapan eine große Rolle spielt, völlig zu beseitigen. HIV-Viren wirken offensichtlich als indirekte Karzinogene, da sie zu einer Schwächung des Immunsystems führen. Und in diesem Zustand eines geschwächten Immunsystems treten in der Regel andere Arten persistierender Tumorviren auf, und sie können zu Tumoren führen, die beispielsweise durch das Epstein-Barr-Virus, das menschliche Herpesvirus Typ III und auch durch Merkelzell-Polyomaviren verursacht werden. Tatsächlich handelt es sich bei ihnen dann um diejenigen Karzinogene, die wir als direkte Karzinogene bezeichnen, während HIV als indirektes Karzinogen wirkt. Dies ist ein Dia, das ich gerne zeige, um den Mechanismus, durch den diese Erreger zur Entstehung von Krebs beitragen, etwas zu verdeutlichen. Es ist wichtig ihn zu verstehen, weil wir es hier mit sehr langen Latenzzeiten zu tun haben. In manchen Fällen dauert die Entwicklung von Krebs nach der ursprünglichen Infektion bis zu 60 Jahre. Für lange Zeit war dies eines der Hindernisse, die es erschwert haben, eine Infektion einer bestimmten Krebsart als Ursache zuzuordnen. Und ein Aspekt, der das Bild zumindest in gewissem Umfang aufgeklärt hat, ist ein Epstein-Barr-Virus, das mit einem Leiden zusammenhängt, das den komplizierten Namen In diesem Fall erhalten die Kinder über die Keimbahn eine Modifikation des X-Chromosoms, und bei männlichen Nachkommen entwickelt sich dieses Syndrom nach der Infektion durch EBV, das Epstein-Barr-Virus. Sie entwickeln eine sehr virulente Form eines Lymphoms, an dem sie innerhalb weniger Monate sterben. Der Grund besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einer genetischen Änderung [des Mechanismus] zu tun haben, der die spezifische T-Zellen-Reaktion gegen das Epstein-Barr-Virus steuert. Das Gen wurde identifiziert und seiner Funktion aufgeklärt. Unter diesen Bedingungen und aufgrund dieser erblichen Änderung, entwickeln diese Jungen diese Krankheit. Nun, dies gibt uns einen wichtigen Aspekt zu erkennen, denn in allen diesen Fällen, in denen wir diese langen Latenzzeiten haben, reicht die Infektion an sich niemals aus, eine maligne Veränderung herbeizuführen. Sie ist in vielen dieser Fälle zwar notwendig, reicht aber dazu nicht aus. Die infizierte Zelle muss weitere Veränderungen durchmachen, die dann schließlich zur Entwicklung von Krebs führen. So können wir beispielsweise im Falle von Gebärmutterhalskrebs mindestens drei Typen von Veränderungen angeben, die vor der Entwicklung dieser Krebsformen stattgefunden haben müssen. Wenn diese Veränderungen nicht auftreten, besteht der Virus zwar fort, doch es kommt zu keiner Entwicklung von Krebs. Es mag mehr als drei Typen der Veränderung geben, doch bis heute hat man drei erkannt. Die Länge der Latenzzeit ist ein Hinweis auf die Anzahl der zusätzlichen Modifikationen innerhalb der entsprechenden Zellen, bevor es zu Entwicklung der jeweiligen Krebsform kommt. Lassen Sie mich kurz auf die beiden Krebsarten eingehen, die durch Impfung verhindert werden können. Eine Infektion mit dem Hepatitis-B-Virus ist in Ostasien und Afrika für etwa 80 % der Leberkrebsleiden verantwortlich. Das Virus wird hauptsächlich - ähnlich wie das HTLV-Virus - von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern auf ihre neugeborenen Kinder übertragen. Und etwa 80 % dieser Kinder werden zu lebenslangen Trägern dieses Virus. Diese Kinder leben mit einem Krebsrisiko, da sie den Leberkrebs schließlich nach 30, 40, 50 oder 60 Jahren entwickeln. Eine Impfung gegen das Virus wurde bereits in den 1960er - oder den 1970er - Jahren entwickelt. Ursprünglich sollte die Impfung nicht vor Krebs schützen, sondern vor den akuten Folgen der Infektion. Doch interessanterweise erwies sie sich als eine gegen Krebs wirksamer Impfung. In Taiwan wurde beispielsweise seit 1984 jedes neugeborene Kind gegen das Hepatitis-B-Virus geimpft, um es gegen die dauerhafte Infektion zu schützen, und diese Impfung erwies sich als äußerst erfolgreich. Etwa 80 % dieser Kinder entwickelten keine chronische Hepatitis-B-Virusinfektion. Und nun, etwas mehr als 20 Jahre nach dem Beginn der Impfungen, zeigen die ersten Berichte eindeutig einen statistisch signifikanten Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leberkrebs nach dieser Art der Impfung. In gewisser Weise handelt es sich hierbei um den ersten Impfstoff, der Krebs verhindert. Wir können eindeutig feststellen, dass er Krebs verhindert. Wie steht es um den Gebärmutterhalskrebs? Es ist seit mehr als 30 Jahren ein Hauptgebiet meines Interesses. Wir wissen, dass es sich hierbei weltweit um den zweithäufigsten Krebs der Frauen handelt. Und die Mehrzahl dieser Krebsarten treten in Ländern auf, in denen eine Ressourcenknappheit besteht. Die Vorläufer dieser Krebsart traten weltweit ebenfalls mit großer Häufigkeit auf, an allen anderen Orten der Welt. Diese Vorstufen gehen jedoch normalerweise wieder zurück, was zur Folge hat, dass es zu einem umfangreichen Rückgang der Fälle dieser speziellen Krebsarten kommt. Eine Reihe von Krebsformen steht mit denselben Infektionsarten in Zusammenhang. Dies sind die sogenannten Papillomavirus-Infektionen mit hohem Risiko, hauptsächlich HPV 16, jedoch auch 18, sowie eine Reihe anderer. Sie korrelieren zu fast 100 % mit Gebärmutterhalskrebs. Interessanterweise stehen diese Krebsraten, die die Vulva und den Penis betreffen, nur zu einem geringeren Grad mit dieser Infektion in Zusammenhang. Dies ist deshalb interessant, weil diese beiden Krebsarten nach einer Unterdrückung des Immunsystems dramatisch zunehmen, ganz im Gegensatz zum Gebärmutterhalskrebs, der nur in geringem Umfang zunimmt. Und wir wissen noch nicht, ob es sich hierbei um die HPV-negativen Fälle oder um die positiven handelt. Ich denke, dies erfordert offensichtlich weitere Nachforschungen. Nun, die Krebserkrankungen der Mandeln, des Mund- und Rachenraums, stehen zu einem Viertel oder sogar Drittel mit derselben Art von Infektion in Verbindung, wie die Krebse des Gebärmutterhalses, des Analbereichs, der Vagina und die seltenen Nagelbettkrebse. Sie korrelieren ebenfalls eng mit dieser Art von Infektion. Wir wissen, dass die Infektion bei einer infizierten Frau normalerweise etwa 10 Monate lang andauert. Anschließend kann sie bei etwa 70 % durch die neuen Mechanismen beseitigt werden. Nach ungefähr 2 Jahren sind etwa 90 % ohne Infektion, doch fast 10 % weisen nach wie vor eine Infektion auf. Dies sind die Frauen, die das Risiko tragen, dass es bei Ihnen zur Entwicklung eines Gebärmutterhalskrebses kommt. Ich habe dieses Dia bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt. Dies war das erste Modell, mit dem sich demonstrieren ließ, dass der Impfstoff sehr gut wirkt: im Falle der Papillomavirus-Infektionen. In einigen Hundezuchtstationen in den USA werden für experimentelle Zwecke Beagles in großer Zahl gezüchtet. Sie hatten das Problem, dass fast alle Jungtiere diese hässlichen Warzengeschwülste entwickelten. Die Infektion hielt sechs Monate an, und sie konnten die Hunde in diesem Zeitraum nicht verkaufen. Wir besorgten uns Proben der DNA dieses Papillomavirus hier und stellten der Arbeitsgruppe an der George Town University Informationen zur Verfügung, mit deren Hilfe sie einen Impfstoff herstellte. Sie taten dies durch die Expression der Kapsid-Proteine, des wichtigsten Proteins dieses Viruspartikels, in experimentellen Systemen. Dieser Impfstoff wurde mehr als 14.000 jungen Beagles injiziert. Anschließend entwickelte kein einziger von ihnen ein Papillom, während alle nichtgeimpften Hunde weiterhin davon befallen waren. Dies war eine bemerkenswerte Erfolgsgeschichte, die schließlich eindeutig bewies, dass es auch beim Menschen funktionieren würde, wo dieses wichtige Strukturprotein entweder in Insektenzellen oder in Hefe exprimiert wird. Es gibt auch Bedingungen, unter denen sich Kapsomere und auch Kapsidstrukturen bilden. Unter diesen Bedingungen, bei denen es sich tatsächlich um leere Gehäuse des Virus handelt, die hierbei entstehen. Sie können gereinigt und als Grundlage für den Impfstoff verwendet werden, der gegenwärtig verfügbar ist. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung der klinischen Studien, die durchgeführt worden sind und die eindeutig beweisen, dass die Impfstoffe zu sehr hohen Konzentrationen von Antikörpern führen und dass sie für längere Zeiten erhalten und wirksam bleiben. Wir wissen dies jetzt seit acht oder neun Jahren. Und trotz gegenteiliger Presseberichte sind keine signifikanten Nebeneffekte beobachtet worden. Tatsächlich können wir einer australischen Studie entnehmen, dass es pro 100.000 Impfdosierungen nur eine Allergie gegen die Virusproteine gibt. Dies ist offensichtlich ein besseres Ergebnis als es diejenigen für Impfstoffe sind, mit denen zurzeit Kleinkindern behandelt werden. Nun, zusätzlich wissen wir heute bereits, dass wir durch diese Impfstoffarten die Infektion durch diejenigen Arten von Viren verhindern, die sich in dem Impfstoff finden. Außerdem verhindern wir die Entwicklung von zervikalen Läsionen beziehungsweise ihrer Vorstufen. Wir wissen noch nicht, ob sich damit tatsächlich Krebserkrankungen vorbeugen lassen, denn es dauert - wie ich bereits erwähnt habe - etwa 15-25 Jahre, bis sich eine Krebserkrankung nach einer Infektion entwickelt. Und der erste Impfstoff wurde vor acht oder neun Jahren verabreicht. Haben wir die Chance, diese Art von Infektionen vollständig zu eliminieren? Ja, denn diese Infektion ist auf den Menschen eingeschränkt. Wir können dies erreichen, indem wir weltweit Mädchen vor dem Beginn ihrer sexuellen Aktivität impfen. Und wenn man dies wirklich erreichen will, müssen wir die Jungen ebenfalls impfen, wenn wir dies in absehbarer Zukunft erzielen wollen. Tatsächlich würden wir zumindest dasselbe, wahrscheinlich aber sogar ein besseres Ergebnis bei der Vorbeugung gegen Gebärmutterhalskrebs erzielen, wenn wir nur die Jungen impfen würden statt nur die Mädchen, da die Übertragung der Infektion fast ausschließlich durch sexuelle Kontakte zu Stande kommt. Lassen Sie mich nun dieses Kapitel zum Abschluss bringen, obwohl ich mich damit für lange Zeit beschäftigt habe. Gegen Ende meines Vortrags möchte ich auf einige Fragen eingehen, die uns gegenwärtig noch mehr interessieren, da es sich lohnt, nach der Ursache der Infektion zu suchen. Was ich nun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen den Appetit auf ein saftiges Steak oder Roastbeef zu verderben. Ich hoffe, das wird für Sie nicht so schlimm sein. Man kann an dieser Stelle eine Reihe von Bemerkungen machen. Krebserkrankungen treten mit größerer Häufigkeit auf, wenn das Immunsystem unterdrückt ist. Wir wissen, dass in vielen dieser Fälle latente Infektionen mit Tumorviren aktiviert werden und dass es unter solchen Umständen zur Entstehung von Krebs kommt. Es gibt jedoch weiterhin Krebsarten, von denen wir nicht wissen, ob sie durch Infektionen verursacht werden können. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel Schilddrüsenkrebs, oder Nierenkrebsleiden. Sie treten bei einem unterdrückten Immunsystem eindeutig häufiger auf, man hat jedoch noch nicht zeigen können, dass sie mit Infektion in Zusammenhang stehen. Es gibt Krebsarten, die mit einer verringerten Infektionshäufigkeit korrelieren. Aufgrund von AIDS-Patienten wissen wir, dass Brustkrebs das beste Beispiel hierfür ist. Patienten, die transplantierte Organe erhalten haben und deren Immunsystem unterdrückt wurde, haben normalerweise ein um 15 % geringeres Risiko an Brustkrebs zu erkranken. Dies entspricht in gewisser Weise dem Gegenteil von dem, was man erwarten würde. Doch wir kennen Tierexperimentbeispiele, in denen das Gleiche geschieht, nämlich bei Tumoren nach Infektionen der Brustdrüsen bei Mäusen. Hier wird das Virus durch die Milch von den Muttertieren übertragen. Sie infizieren die Lymphozyten und die Peyer-Plaques und diese Lymphozyten beginnen sich sehr schnell aktiv zu vermehren. Sie explodieren gewissermaßen und erzeugen riesige Mengen des Virus. Die Viren werden dann mit den aktivierten Lymphozyten in das periphere Blut abgegeben, und die Belastung des Blutes mit den Viren ist scheinbar ein wesentlicher Faktor für das Risiko, die Milchdrüsen zu erreichen und zur Entwicklung von Brustkrebs zu führen. Wenn man das Immunsystem dieser Mäuse unterdrückt, kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Virusbelastung und unter diesen Bedingungen auch zu einer Verringerung des Krebsrisikos, da die Lymphozyten in diesen Tieren nicht länger fortbestehen. Was ich nun noch kurz mit Ihnen besprechen möchte, sind diejenigen nahrungsbedingten Faktoren eines Krebsrisikos, die möglicherweise mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen sowie von Krebsleiden beeinflusste Infektionen, die nicht zu Tumorleiden führen. Ich werde Ihnen ein Bild zeigt, das ich schon bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt habe. Doch es hat unser Interesse an dieser Frage geweckt, denn wir kennen eine ziemliche Anzahl von krankheitserregenden Viren des Menschen, wie die Polyomaviren BK und JC, die in menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind und bei denen es sich in der Regel um lebenslange Infektion handelt. EBV und das hochriskante HPV, obwohl sie beim Menschen manchmal zu Krebs führen, sind relativ selten. Außerdem gibt es beim Menschen Adenoviren, die nicht zu Krebs führen. Alle diese Viren können sich in Tieren nicht vermehren. Wenn man sie jedoch in tierische Organismen, in denen sie sich nicht fortpflanzen können, einimpft, können Sie dort Krebs verursachen. Und dies ist ein interessanter Punkt, der natürlich zu der entgegengesetzten Frage führt, nämlich: Übertragen einige der Haustiere, mit denen wir eng zusammenleben und in denen sich die Viren vermehren und zum Teil lebenslang vorhanden sind, die Viren auf einen Host, in dem sie sich nicht vermehren können? Sie verlieren die Fähigkeit der Vermehrung. Sind sie unter diesen Umständen karzinogen? Und hier ist ein ziemlich interessantes Beispiel von Krebs des Dickdarms oder des Dickdarms und Rektums, denn diese Krebsarten wurden epidemiologisch mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch in Verbindung gebracht. Es gibt wirklich bemerkenswert konsistente Zahlen in epidemiologischen Berichten, die beschreiben, dass etwa 20-30 % dieser Krebsarten mit dem Genuss von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängen, in der Hauptsache von Rindfleisch. In Ländern, in denen sehr viel Rindfleisch verzehrt wird - Europa gehört in diese Kategorie - liegt normalerweise ein hoher Anteil von Krebsarten des Kolons und Rektums vor. Es gibt sogar neuere Berichte darüber, dass Brustkrebs mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängt. Krebserkrankungen des Endometriums und der Eierstöcke zeigen eine ähnliche Epidemiologie wie Brustkrebs und werden ebenfalls damit in Zusammenhang gebracht, ja - zu einem gewissen Grad - sogar auch Lungenkrebs, insbesondere bei Nichtrauchern. Es ist sehr viel komplizierter, dies bei Rauchern zu bewerten. Außerdem gibt es noch eine Reihe von Berichten über einige andere Arten von Krebsleiden, die sehr viel weniger konsistent sind. Schauen wir uns kurz die geographische Verteilung an, die Epidemiologie der Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums. Hier im Bereich des Toten Meeres sieht man ein sehr hohes Risiko. Hier das Risiko für Brustkrebs in Dunkelgrün. Die Farben entsprechen einander nicht. Doch offensichtlich gibt es eine bemerkenswerte Überlappung dieser Bereiche, woraus hervorgeht, dass hier ein hohes Risiko für Brustkrebs und für Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums besteht. Dasselbe Bild ergibt sich, wenn man beispielsweise die Bereiche für Krebserkrankungen der Bauchspeicheldrüse und der Lunge vergleicht. Schließlich gibt es offensichtlich einige Bereiche, in denen es zu Diskrepanzen kommt, zumindest bei diesen beiden Krebsformen, jedoch eine relative Übereinstimmung zwischen den anderen beiden Krebsarten. Doch seit 1977 wurde vermutet, dass wir die Gründe für diese Wirkung erkannt haben, denn wenn man Fleisch grillt, brät oder röstet, erhält man eine Reihe chemischer Verbindungen während der Zubereitung, die eindeutig karzinogen sind, wenn man sie Nagetieren einimpft. Und dies war offensichtlich eine gute Erklärung für das hohe Risiko des Verzehrs von rotem Fleisch über längere Zeiträume. Eine Reihe von ihnen sind hier aufgelistet. Nun, das Problem, das sich hier ergab, war im Prinzip bereits in der ersten Veröffentlichung von Sugimura und seinen Kollegen aus dem Jahre 1977 sichtbar. Denn wenn man Fisch brät oder grillt, Fisch auf ähnliche Weise zubereitet, entstehen dieselben Karzinogene. Wenn man Geflügel auf gleiche Weise zubereitet, entstehen diese Arten von Karzinogenen ebenfalls - in manchen Fällen sogar in höheren Konzentrationen als bei der Zubereitung von rotem Fleisch. Und dies erfordert eine Erklärung. Die Sache ist sogar noch spezifischer, denn wenn man sich Länder anschaut, in denen rotes Fleisch in größerem Umfang konsumiert wird - sagen wir in arabischen Ländern, wo hauptsächlich Schaf-, Lamb- und Ziegenfleisch gegessen wird -, dort ist die Häufigkeit dieser Krebsarten erstaunlich gering. Schweinefleisch in China. Die Chinesen essen zwar nicht ausschließlich Schweinefleisch, aber es ist eine Hauptquelle von rotem Fleisch. Das Rot ist hier eher intermediär, und es ist sehr interessant, dies zu sehen. Schauen Sie sich die Situation in Indien an, wo praktisch kein Rindfleisch verzehrt wird. Indien ist weltweit führend: Die Häufigkeit von Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und Rektums ist hier weltweit am geringsten. In einem pathologischen Institut in Kalkutta sah ich im Jahr 2008 einen einzigen Fall von kolorektalem Krebs. Im Vergleich zu den europäischen pathologischen Instituten ist das ziemlich erstaunlich. Was sind die Erklärungen hierfür? Es muss einen Grund hierfür geben. Es scheint also ein speziell mit Rindfleisch zusammenhängender Faktor zu sein. Natürlich besteht die Möglichkeit, dass es in Rindfleisch noch unentdeckte chemische Karzinogene gibt, die in weißem Fleisch nicht vorhanden sind. Doch die andere Erklärung - zumindest für einen Biologen wie mich - ist attraktiver: Nämlich dass es in Rindfleisch einen ansteckenden Erreger gibt, der relativ hitzebeständig ist und dass dieser Rindfleischfaktor auf Menschen übertragen werden und unter diesen Bedingungen zur Entstehung von Krebs führen kann. Wenn Sie die Temperatur in diesen schmackhaft zubereiteten Roastbeefs messen, so entspricht sie normalerweise etwa 30-50° C. Dies sind Temperaturen, die eine ganze Reihe von potentiellen Krebserregern problemlos überstehen, ohne ihre Infektiosität einzubüßen, wie zum Beispiel das Papillomavirus. Viren vom Polyomatyp sind sehr wahrscheinlich auch etwas schwerer zu testen. Auch Viren mit einzelnen DNA-Strängen können diese Bedingungen überleben. Polyomaviren kommen hier ebenfalls besonders in Frage, ebenso wie diese hier, da sie Temperaturen von 80°C problemlos für längere Zeit überstehen. Wir kennen nur eine Art bei Rindern, doch bereits neun Arten bei Menschen, und es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass es sie gibt. Lassen Sie mich noch auf einen anderen Punkt eingehen, der die Situation sogar noch hervorzuheben scheint, wenn man Japan und Indien unter diesen Bedingungen vergleicht. Erstaunlicherweise hat Japan eine sehr hohe Häufigkeit von Krebserkrankungen des Dickdarms und Rektums, und es ist interessant, sich die Epidemiologie dessen anzusehen, was in Japan im Vergleich zu Indien geschehen ist. Sie sehen hier einige statistische Daten, die in Japan seit etwa 1975, 1980 gesammelt wurden, und Sie sehen, dass diese Krebsart enorm angestiegen ist. Man kann aus diesem Zeitabschnitt zurückrechnen, dass der Anstieg etwa um 1965 begann. In Korea begannen die Aufzeichnungen später, doch man sieht genau dieselbe Entwicklung. Was ist in diesen Ländern geschehen? Nun, einer der Hauptaspekte dessen, was sich hier ereignete, war die Einführung von großen Mengen von Rindfleisch, besonders aus den USA. Die zunehmende Essgewohnheit - und es ist eine sehr beliebte Art Shabu-Shabu zu essen, ein japanisches Fleischfondue - besteht darin, dünne Fleischscheiben in kochendes Wasser zu tauchen und dann schnell wieder herauszunehmen. Normalerweise wird es nach weniger als einer Minute wieder herausgenommen. Man breitet es aus und es ist noch sehr roh. Es wird sehr gern gegessen. Dies sind Korrelationen, sie beweisen nichts. Doch es ist eine interessante Beobachtung, die tatsächlich die Frage aufwirft, ob es im Rindfleisch einen Infektionsfaktor für Krebserkrankungen von Dickdarm und Rektum gibt, der künftig noch gefunden werden muss. Nun, hoffentlich bleiben mir noch einige Minuten. Ich werde abschließend noch über einen anderen Aspekt sprechen, da er sehr interessant ist: die Krebserkrankungen im Kindesalter, Leukämie in der Kindheit. Ich werde nur kurz darauf eingehen, indem ich darauf hinweise, dass wir es hier ebenfalls mit einer äußerst interessanten epidemiologischen Situation zu tun haben, dass nämlich mehrere Infektionen im ersten Lebensjahr einen Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leukämie in der Kindheit bieten. Ein unterprivilegierter sozialer Status, gedrängte Wohnverhältnisse, viele Geschwister. Das Risiko ist umgekehrt proportional zur Geburtsreihenfolge, d.h. ein erstgeborenes Kind hat ein höheres Risiko als die nachgeborenen Kinder, usw. Stillen ist ein Schutzfaktor. Und im umgekehrten Fall haben Sie hier eine Reihe von Risikofaktoren: seltene Infektionen, ein hoher sozioökonomischer Status und pränatale chromosomale Translokationen sind offensichtlich wichtige Faktoren bei der Entstehung von Leukämie. Dieselben Translokationsarten treten jedoch auch bei gesunden Individuen in geringer Häufigkeit auf. Daher sind sie an sich für die Entwicklung von Krebs nicht ausreichend. Ein paar andere Punkte werde ich aus Zeitgründen übergehen. Wenn man sich einige Länder mit erfolgreichen Volkswirtschaften anschaut, so ist das Risiko in ihnen höher, während es in ärmeren Bevölkerungen für diese Arten von Leukämie vergleichsweise geringer ist. Wir haben versucht, darüber zu spekulieren, was der Grund für dieses seltsame Phänomen sein könnte, und haben den Vorschlag gemacht, dass eine pränatale Infektion, eine Infektion vor der Geburt zu infizierten Zellen führen könnte, die sich nach der Geburt vermehren. Die Anzahl dieser Zellen nimmt drastisch zu, und es befindet sich ein ansteckender Erreger in diesen Zellen. Es liegt hier eine Belastung vor, die möglicherweise der Hauptfaktor für die anschließende Entwicklung der Leukämien ist. Durch anschließende Infektionen nach der Geburt kommt es dann - da es sich hierbei hauptsächlich um Infektionen der Atemwege handelt - zur Produktion von Interferon und antiviralem Zytokin, und unter diesen Bedingungen kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Belastung und des damit einhergehenden Risikos. Wenn man also so etwas postuliert, muss man zunächst nach Infektionen suchen, zu denen es vor der Geburt kommt, die wahrscheinlich zu Vermehrungen in den Zellen führen, aus denen die Leukämien hervorgehen, die speziellen Leukämien der Kindheit. Und anschließend sollte sie auch ziemlich empfindlich für Interferon sein. Gibt es solche Infektionen? Die Antwort lautet: ja. Es gibt mindestens eine Infektion, die alle diese Kriterien erfüllt, und dies sind die sogenannten TT-Viren, Anelloviren, wie man sie nennt - eigentlich eine Namensverwechslung. Doch der interessante Aspekt ist, dass wir alle mit diesen Erregern infiziert sind, dass wir sie in diesem Alter in unserem peripheren Blut tragen. Sie vermehren sich offensichtlich in lymphatischen und Knochenmarkszellen. Man hat zeigen können, dass es bei Patienten, die mit Interferon behandelt werden, weil sie dauerhaft mit Hepatitis-C-Viren infiziert sind, ebenfalls zu einer drastischen Verringerung der Anzahl der TT-Viren kommt, die durch pränatale Infektion erworben werden. Sie werden vor der Geburt erworben, oder zumindest geschieht die Ansteckung zu einem bestimmten Prozentsatz unter dieser Bedingung. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung dessen, was wir über diese mehr als hundert, wahrscheinlich weit mehr als hundert Genotypen dieser Viren wissen, die in allen menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind. Die vertikale Übertragung habe ich erwähnt. Der interessanteste Aspekt ist in diesem Zusammenhang, dass es meistens, sehr häufig, dazu kommt, dass das Genom sich neu anordnet, was teilweise zu sich eigenständig replizierenden, sub-genomischen Molekülen mit neuen offenen Leserahmen führt. Ich denke, dies würde einen weiteren Vortrag verdienen, um es im Detail besprechen zu können. Dennoch möchte ich sagen, dass es sich hierbei um relativ unzureichend beschriebene, episomal persistierende Viren mit DNA-Einzelsträngen handelt, die nur einen Bereich enthalten, der in all diesen verschiedenen Genotypen äußerst gut erhalten bleibt. Tatsächlich haben wir in dieser Richtung zahlreiche Untersuchungen durchgeführt, die zunächst beweisen, dass es auch in Tumorzellen einige chimäre Moleküle gibt, die eine Verbindung zwischen diesem Bereich hier und spezifischen zellulären Sequenzen beweisen, die sich als äußerst interessant herausgestellt hat. Ich habe vergessen zu erwähnen, dass hier etwa 3800 Basen zur Verfügung stehen, obwohl es auch kleinere Moleküle mit 2800 Basen gibt. Und dies ist nun ein Kapitel, dem wir bei Leukämiezellen, bei Zellen des Hodgkin-Lymphoms und insbesondere in Zelllinien von kolorektalen Tumoren begegnen. Die Persistenz vieler dieser chimären Molekültypen, die in einer großen Zahl von Ihnen vorhanden sind, hat sich bislang fast überall gezeigt, soweit unsere Experimente uns dies zu erkennen geben. Doch die Ursachen dieser Arten von Zuständen sind uns noch unbekannt. Hierzu sind weitere Untersuchungen und Studien erforderlich. Dies sind die Personen, das Team, das hauptsächlich über TT-Viren arbeitet: Ethel-Michele de Villiers, die ebenfalls im Auditorium sitzt, ist zufälligerweise auch meine Frau. Auch einige andere dieser Damen hier sind Zuhörer, und ich glaube, dass Sylvia Barkosky ebenfalls an diesem Treffen teilnimmt. Fragen, die Sie zu diesem Thema haben, können Sie auch ihr stellen. Was ich momentan denke, ist, dass wir wirklich sorgfältiger nach neuen Arten von Mechanismen suchen müssen, durch die Infektionserreger zur Entwicklung von Krebs beim Menschen beitragen können. Und wissen Sie: Wenn wir gegenwärtig bereits 21 % der menschlichen Krebserkrankungen auf diese Art von Infektionen zurückführen können und wenn es zutrifft, dass die Bösartigkeit einiger blutbildender Systeme und der Magenkrebs - nein, nicht der Magenkrebs - der Dickdarmkrebs ebenfalls mit Infektionen zusammenhängt, dann würde dieser Prozentsatz auf weltweit 35 % aller Krebsleiden ansteigen. Und selbst hier ist Magenkrebs - Entschuldigung - Dickdarmkrebs für etwa 20 % aller Krebserkrankungen verantwortlich. Es ist also ein wichtiges Problem, und ich schließe mich insbesondere Prof. Blackburn an, die dies bereits gesagt hat: Wenn man all diese jungen Studenten sieht, die an diesen Problemen arbeiten, ist es wirklich wichtig, dass meine seine Augen offenhält. Dies ist kein Arbeitsgebiet, das abgeschlossen ist. Ich glaube, es ist ein Arbeitsgebiet, das wesentlich mehr Aufmerksamkeit verdient. Dreißig Jahre lang war es sehr schwer, irgendein Interesse für diese Art von Erregern zu finden. Zurzeit ändert sich das glücklicherweise, doch wir müssen noch mehr darüber forschen. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

 
(00:08:00 - 00:09:38)
To listen to the ful lecture click here.  


Nearly 20 years later, another cancer-preventing vaccine was introduced. Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer among women worldwide and for decades, Harald zur Hausen and his colleagues tried to demonstrate that the cancer was caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). The process was very laborious as the virus is difficult to isolate and will not grow in tissue cultures. It was also found along the way that there are many different strains of the virus – over 200 to date, of which the strains HPV-16 and HPV-18 are the most cancer-inducing. While the vaccine has been available on the market since 2006, most countries have not yet implemented the vaccine into their immunisation policies, whether as a result of cost or sceptical attitudes of health officials. HPV will rarely culminate in cancer. But the time period from infection to tumour development may stretch to decades, therefore studies fully validating the efficacy of the vaccines will have to wait until the first vaccinated group reaches middle age[12]. Zur Hausen noted that the eradication of cancers linked to HPV infections is possible only if large populations of adolescent boys and girls are vaccinated:

Harald  zur Hausen (2011) - Infections in the Etiology of Human Cancers

Thank you very much it's indeed a great pleasure for me to be here. What I'm planning to do today is neither to talk about something which happens at the beginning of life, nor about something that happens at end of the life but what is happening in between namely acquiring infections. I will talk about a specific set of infections namely those which are linked to cancer. I very briefly review those aspects which are presently known today. And subsequently I plan to talk about a subject in which I never received a formal training, namely epidemiology. Some hints, why and where we suspect that some additional kinds of human cancers might be linked to infections. So let me start out with a summary table, which just says to which extent we presently can deal with infections as a cause of the global picture of cancer development. We can roughly calculate at about twenty-one percent of cancers are linked to infections. Quite a variety of different infections. On parasitic infections like bilharziosis, liver fluke which play an important role in some countries. In fact in Egypt bladder cancer which is due to Schistosoma infections is one of THE major cancers at all. And it's interesting to note that on the global scale it accounts for approximately 1% of those cancers which are linked to infections. And they can be cured relatively, readily, not the cancer but the infections by chemotherapy. But, and this is one of the problems, immediately after clearing, eliminating the parasites it becomes possible subsequently to re-infect the respective patients again with the same agents. That is also true for another very important human carcinogen, a bacterium namely helicobacter pylori which is presently THE major cause of gastric cancer. Where you can cure the patients of helicobacter pylori infection by antibiotics but again soon thereafter re-infection becomes possible. And quite a number of those patients which have had the bacteria eliminated become re-infected subsequently. There's a different category of agents, viruses which account for about two/thirds of the infections linked to cancer. And there are two of them where we presently know that they can be, that you can protect against these types of infections by vaccination. And the major difference here is that we deal here with long lasting protection against re-infection and as we at least in one case know quite clearly and the other case it's highly likely that we can protect against respective forms of cancer. I'll come back to these a little bit later once again. There are a couple of other agents, but we also know that they are linked to cancers. Epstein-Barr virus already discovered in 1965 by Epstein and his colleagues at that time in Bristol. The longest known human tumour virus being responsible for b-cell lymphomas and a couple of other types of tumours, I will not dwell on them in detail. Human herpes virus type 8 which is the agent causing Kaposi's sarcomas, vascular tumours, which occur mainly in AIDs patients or in organ transplant recipients. Merkel cell polyoma virus, a virus which has been only discovered close to three years ago which is an interesting agent. It causes again a condition which of course mainly on the immunosuppression, and which shows a very peculiar mode of interaction with the cancer cells. I may come back to this later on. And a couple of others Hepatitis C an important carcinogen, liver carcinogen in particular here in this region, in Europe and also in the United States, it's an important liver carcinogen. HTLV-1 which is interesting in terms of prevention because the virus is usually acquired from persistently infected mothers who infect their babies via breastfeeding. So if the mothers are known to carry the virus and if they avoid breastfeeding it really limits the spread of the infection and might be really a way in the long run to eradicate this infection which plays a major role in the coastal regions of southern Japan for instance. Human immunodeficiency viruses clearly acting as indirect carcinogens because they induce immunosuppression. And under those conditions of immunosuppression other types of persisting tumour viruses usually arise and may lead to tumours like Epstein-Barr, like human herpes virus type 8 and also the Merkel cell Polyomaviruses. They are in fact then those which we call the direct carcinogens whereas HIV act as indirect carcinogens. This is a slide which I like to show in order to demonstrate a little bit about the mechanisms by which these agents contribute to cancer. It's important to understand it because we've very long latency periods. In some instances up to sixty years after primary infection before cancer develops. For a long time this was one of the obstacles, why it was so difficult to pinpoint an infection to a specific form of cancer. And one aspect which clarified at least to some degree the picture is an Epstein-Barr virus linked to a condition with a complicated name of x-chromosome linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this case the children acquire via the germ line and modification within the x-chromosome and in males, male progeny here, they may develop this syndrome and upon infection by EBV, by Epstein-Barr virus they acquire a rather deadly form of lymphoma which kills them after a couple of months in these cases. The reasons that we have here genetic modification, which regulates specific t-cell response against Epstein-Barr virus the gene has been identified and also functionally clarified. Under those conditions of this inherited change the boys acquire the disease. Now this tells us an important aspect because in all of these cases where we have these long latency periods the infection per se by itself is never sufficient for the malignant transformation. It is necessary in many of these incidents, but not sufficient. And the infected cell has to acquire additional modifications which eventually lead then to cancer development. For instance in the case of cervical cancer we can define at least three types of modifications which have to occur prior to the development of the respective form of cancer. Unless those are occurring there's virus persistence but not the development of cancer there may be more than three but three have been identified by now. The length of the latency period is an indication for the number of additional modifications within the respective cells prior to the development of that form of cancer. Let me very quickly look to the two types of cancers which you can prevent by vaccination. Hepatitis B virus infection responsible for about 80% of the liver cancers in East Asia, Africa. The virus is mainly transmitted similar to the HTLV from persistently infected mothers to the newborn babies. And about 80% of these children become carriers for lifetime. Those are the ones who are at risk, who after 30, 40, 50 or 60 years eventually develop liver cancer. A vaccination against the virus has been developed already in the 1960s. Initially not intended, or 70s, initially not intended to protect against cancer but to protect against the acute consequences of the infection. But interestingly it turned out to be a cancer, effective cancer vaccine. Because in Taiwan for instance since 1984 every newborn child was vaccinated against Hepatitis B virus in order to protect them against the persistent infection, which turned out to be highly successful. About 80% of those children did not develop a chronic Hepatitis B virus infection and now after about slightly more than twenty years in the meantime the first reports which clearly demonstrated the statistically significant protective effect against the development of liver cancer after this kind of vaccination. In a way the first vaccine which prevents cancer, we can clearly state it prevents cancer. What about cancer of the cervix? It was the main topic for us for much more than thirty years by now. Well we know it is the second most frequent cancer in females globally. And the majority of these types of cancers occur in resource-constrained countries. The precursors of this type of cancer also occurred high frequency worldwide, at any other places. But they usually remove, this removal means that there's a large reduction in the incidents of the respective form of cancers. A couple of cancers linked to the same types of infections. These are so-called high risk human papillomavirus infections mainly HPV 16 but also 18 and a couple of others. Cervical cancer is linked to about 100%. Interestingly these types of cancers vulval and penile cancers are only linked to the infection to the more limited degree. It's interesting because these two types of cancers increase dramatically after immunosuppression quite in contrast to cervical cancer which is only marginally increased. And we don't know yet whether these are the HPV negative cases or the positive ones. I think clearly this requires further investigation. Now cancers of the tonsils, of the oropharynx to one-quarter, to one-third are linked to same types of infection as cervical cancer, anal cancers, vaginal cancers and the rare nailbed cancers they are also highly linked to this type of infection. We know that the infection usually persists in an infected woman for instance for about ten months and then 70% of them are able to clear the infection by the new mechanisms. And after two years about 90% clear the infection. But still close to 10% positive. And those are the ones who are at risk for cervical cancer development. I've shown this slide at many other occasions, this was the first model to demonstrate that the vaccine works very well. In the case of papillomavirus infections because kennels in the United States producing Beagles for experimental purposes on a large scale. They had the problem that virtually all of the young puppies developed these ugly papillomas, they persisted for six months and they couldn't sell these dogs during this period of time. We got hold of this DNA of these papillomavirus here, we provided information to the George Town University Group and they prepared a vaccine by expressing the capsid proteins, the major protein of the virus particle in experimental systems. And this was injected into more than fourteen thousand puppies of Beagles. None of them developed papilloma subsequently, whereas all non-vaccinated dogs did. It was a remarkable success story which eventually showed clearly it would work in humans as well, where this major structure protein is expressed either in insect cells or in yeast. And also conditions forming capsomers and also capsid structures. Under those conditions which are really empty shells of the virus produced here and they can be purified and as a basis for the vaccine which is presently available. This is just a summary of the clinical studies which have been conducted, which clearly demonstrates that the vaccines produce high antibody titers. That they persist for prolonged periods of times. We know it now for eight or nine years right now. And in spite of opposing press reports there are no significant side effects observed. In fact from an Australian study we can calculate that there is one allergy against the viral proteins among one hundred thousand vaccines doses which is clearly better result than obtained for many of the vaccines which are presently applied to small children. Now in addition we know today already that we prevent the infection by these types of vaccines against those types which are in the vaccine. And we also prevent the development of cervical, respective cervical precursor lesions. We do not know yet whether it prevents really cancer because it takes as I pointed out before something like 15 to 25 years before cancer develops after infection. And the first vaccine applied about 8 or 9 years ago. Do we have a chance to eradicate these types of infections? Yes, because this infection is restricted to humans. And we can achieve this if we vaccinate globally girls at an age prior to onset of sexual activity. And if you wish to really achieve this we have to vaccinate boys as well if we wish to achieve it in the foreseeable period of time. Indeed if we would only vaccinate boys we probably would have at least the same but probably even better result in preventing cervical cancer than only vaccinating girls. Because of course transmit infection which is virtually exclusively transmitted via sexual contacts. Now let me finish this chapter which although it involved us for a long period of time. And dwell at the end of my talk about some questions which are interesting us presently even more so, where is it worthwhile to look for an infectious etiology. And what I am trying to do now is to go and spoil your appetite for juicy steak or roast beef. Hopefully it will not be too bad for you. Now there are a couple of points which you can raise here. Cancers which are occurring at increased frequency under immunosuppression. We know that in many of these incidents latent tumour virus infections become activated and in those conditions produce cancer. But there are still cancers where we don't know whether they have an infectious etiology. Take thyroid cancer, take renal cancers they are clearly increased under immunosuppression but have not been found yet to be linked to infections. Cancers with reduced incidents of infection, human breast cancer is a best example really because AIDs patients. Patients who receive organ transplants and under immunosuppression they usually have a 15% reduced risk for developing breast cancer in a way contra-intuitive as one may say. But we know in animal examples where the same happens, namely that mouse mammary tumour infections, which are acquired through the milk of the feeding mothers. They infect the lymphocytes and the pyres patches and those lymphocytes start to proliferate very actively. They explode so to speak and produce large quantities of virus, which are released with the activated lymphocytes into the peripheral blood. And the load of the virus apparently is a major risk factor for reaching the mammary gland and leading to the mammary gland cancers. Now if you immunosuppress those mice there's a reduction of the load and under those conditions also reduction of the risk because the lymphocytes are no longer persisting in these patients. What I want to discuss with you briefly are just nutritional cancer risk factors possibly linked to infections and cancer influenced basically be non-tumourogenic infections. And I show you a picture which I've shown at many other occasions but it triggered our interest into this question. Because we do know quite a number of human pathogenic viruses like Polyomaviruses BK and JC which are wildly spread in human populations usually as lifetime infections. EBV and high risk HPV although occasionally carcinogenic in humans it's relatively rare. Adenoviruses which are not carcinogenic in humans, all these viruses cannot replicate in animals. But if you inoculate them into animal systems where they cannot replicate, where they are replication incompetent they are able to cause cancer. And this is an interesting point which of course leads to the converse question namely are some of the domestic animals with which we live in close proximity which are replicating here persisting and in part for lifetime, if they are transmitting to a host where they cannot replicate. They become replication incompetent are they carcinogenic under those conditions? And here is a rather interesting example of cancer of the colon or colorectal cancer because here these cancers have been epidemiologically linked to red meat consumption. There are really a remarkably consistent number of epidemiological reports describing that about 20 ~ 30% of these cancers are linked to the consumption of red meat, particularly beef. Countries with a high rate of consumption, Europe belongs to the same category, they usually have a high rate of colorectal cancer. There are even recent reports that breast cancer is linked to red meat consumption, endometrial and ovarian cancer which shows a similar epidemiology as breast cancer also linked. And even to some degree lung cancer particularly in non-smokers it's much more difficult to evaluate this in smokers. And there are also a couple of reports which are much less consistent in some other kinds of cancers. Let's quickly look at the geographic, at the epidemiology of colorectal cancer here in red sea areas there's a very high risk. Here for breast cancer in dark green the colours don't correspond, but clearly there's a rather remarkable overlap of those regions which show a high risk for breast cancer and a high risk for colorectal cancer. There's the same picture again compared for instance to pancreatic cancer and lung cancer. And there are clearly some areas where there is discordances, at least with these two types of cancers. But relatively concordance between the other two types of cancers. But since 1977 it was suspected that the reasons are known for this effect. Because if you broil, barbecue, roast, grill meat you get a number of chemical compounds in the cooking, in the preparation process formed, which are clearly carcinogenic when inoculated into rodents. And this was obviously a good explanation for the high risk of red meat after consumption for long periods of times. A couple of them are listed here. Now the problem which arose here was already basically visible in the very first publication in 1977 from Sugimura and his colleagues. Because if you roast, grill fish, prepare fish in a similar way the same kinds of carcinogens arise. If you do it with poultry the same kinds of carcinogens occur. Even in some instances at higher concentration than red meat. And this requires some kind of an explanation. Now it's even more specific because if you look into countries where red meat is consumed to a larger degree, let's take say Arabic countries where mainly mutton and lamb and goat meat is consumed the rate is amazingly low of this type of cancer. Pork in China, China doesn't eat, the Chinese don't eat only exclusively pork but it's a major source. The red is more intermediate here and it's most interesting to see, look into the situation in India where basically no beef is being consumed. India is a global leader, the lowest rate of colorectal cancer. And I saw in Calcutta in the pathology department there was one case for the year 2008 of colorectal cancer occurring. Quite amazing for the European pathology departments, what are the explanations? There must be a reason behind it. So it seems to be a specific beef factor. And of course there exists a chance that there might be still undiscovered chemical carcinogens in beef which are not present in white meat. But the other explanation at least for biologists as I am there's a more tempting one, namely that there exists an infectious agents which is relatively thermo-resistant persisting in beef and the beef factor which can be transmitted to humans and may lead to cancer under those developments. If you measure the temperatures in these nicely prepared roast beefs it's about something like 30 ~ 50° C usually. Only in temperatures which quite a number of potentially carcinogenic agents survive very happily without any loss of infectivity as for instance papillomavirus, polyoma type viruses are most likely also slightly more difficult to test also single stranded DNA viruses under these conditions. Polyomaviruses are particularly attractive as well as these ones here because they survive temperatures very easily of 80°C for long periods of time. And we know only one type in cattle but we know of already nine types in humans and it's very likely that others exist. Let me come onto one other point which even seems to stress the situation if you compare Japan and India under those conditions. Japan amazingly enough has a high rate of colorectal cancer. And it's interesting to look into the epidemiology of what happened in Japan in comparison to India. You see some statistics which in Japan have been collected since about 1975, 1980 and you see there's an enormous bias in this cancer. During this period of time you can interpolate that it probably started around '65 or so. In Korea the statistics started later but you see exactly the same thing. What happened in these countries? Well one of the major aspects which happened really was the introduction of large amounts of beef particularly from the United States. The increasing custom and it's a very popular way of eating Shabu-shabu it's a meat fondue in Japan where you dip briefly thin slices of meat into boiling water very quickly if you take it out, they usually take it out after less than one minute and you unfold it and it's still very raw. It's happily consumed. These are correlations, they do not prove anything but it's an interesting point. And they raise the question indeed whether there exists a bovine infectious factor for colorectal cancer which needs to be resolved in the future. Now I have hopefully still a few more minutes, I will finish by talking another aspect because it's quite as interesting, the childhood malignancy leukaemia's. Very briefly only, by pointing out that we have here also an extremely interesting epidemiological situation namely that multiple infections in the first year of life are protective against the development of childhood leukaemias. And under privileged social state, crowded households, many siblings, inverse risk of birth orders, a first born child has a higher risk than subsequent children and so on. Breastfeeding is a protective factor. And conversely here you have a number of risk factors, rare infections, high socioeconomic state, prenatal chromosomal translocations clearly an important factor for the leukaemia development. Yet the same types of locations occur also at a low rate in healthy individuals. So per se they are not sufficient for cancer development. A couple of other points which I will skip for time reasons. If you look into some countries with high level of good well going economy the risk is high whereas in poor populations it's comparatively very low for these types of leukaemias. We tried to develop a kind of speculation what might be the reason for this peculiar phenomenon and suggested that a prenatal infection occurring prior to the time of delivery would lead to infected cells which are propagating after delivery. The number of those cells is increased dramatically and that there is an infectious agent in these cells and it's a load here, might be THE major risk factor for the subsequent development of the leukaemias. Where subsequent infections in the postnatal phase due to the effect that these are mainly respiratory infections which lead to interferon production and antiviral cytokine and under those conditions you get a reduction of the load and a reduction of the risk concomitantly. So if you postulate something like this you have to search for infections first of all which may occur prenatally which probably replicate in the cells from which leukaemias arise. Specific childhood leukaemias arise. And subsequently there should be also quite susceptible to interferon other such infections. The answer is yes. There exists at least one which is fulfilling all these types of criteria and these are so-called TT viruses, anellovirusus as they are called, a mix up with names really. But the interesting aspect is that we are all infected with those agents, carry them in our peripheral blood at this stage. And they replicate in lymphatic and bone marrow cells quite clearly so. It has been shown that patients who are treated with interferon because they are persistently infected with Hepatitis C viruses at the same time reduce drastically the levels of TT viruses and they are acquired as prenatal infections. They occur prenatally at least to a certain percentage they are acquired under those conditions. This is just a summary of what we know about there are more than 100, probably far more than one hundred, genotypes of these viruses they are widely spread in all human populations. Vertical transmission I mentioned. The most interesting aspect here that we mostly frequently, very frequently rearrange the genome in part resulting in autonomously replicated sub-genomic molecules with novel open reading frames. I think this would serve another talk in order to discuss it in more details. And yet a relatively poorly characterised there, episomally persisting single stranded DNA viruses which contain only one region which is highly preserved among all these different genotypes. And in fact we did a large number of studies along these lines which demonstrate first of all that there is some chimeric molecules in tumour cells as well, which show a linkage between this region here and specific cellular sequences which turned out to be extremely interesting. I forgot to mention that there are about 3,800, although there are smaller molecules as well, 2,800 basis here available. And this is now chapter which we do find in leukemic cells in Hodgkin lymphoma cells and also in colorectal cells lines specifically. The persistence of many of these chimeric types of molecules which are present in a large number of them almost uniformly present so far, as far as our experiments tell us right now. But we still do not know the cause of these types of conditions and this requires further investigation and further studies. But these are the people, the team really working mainly on the TT viruses. Ethel-Michele de Villiers who is here in this audience as well, who happens also to be my wife. And a couple others of these ladies here and I think Sylvia Barkosky is also here at this meeting so you may approach her also for some questions which you have. But I feel right now is that we really need to look more carefully also for novel types of mechanisms, by which infectious agents may contribute to human cancer. And you know if we presently can already identify the global burden, 21% of human cancers to these types of infections if it would be true that the malignancies of some hematopoietic system or blood building system and if gastric, sorry not gastric, if colon cancer would be also linked to infections it would immediately jump up to 35% of global cancer burden. And even here gastric cancer counts for something like, sorry colon cancer accounts for something like 20% of the total cancer incidents. So it's an important problem and particularly and I join in with Prof. Blackburn who said it before, if I see all the young students who are working on these issues it's really important to keep your eyes open. It's not a field which has been finished so far, I think it's a field which deserves much more attention. For about thirty years it was difficult to find any kind of interest for these types of agents, right now it's changing fortunately but we need to do more. So thank you very much for your attention.

Vielen Dank, Dr. Jerwall. Es ist mir in der Tat eine große Freude, hier sein zu können. Dasjenige, worüber ich heute sprechen möchte, hat weder mit dem zu tun, was am Anfang des Lebens, noch mit demjenigen, was an seinem Ende geschieht, sondern handelt von etwas, das in der Zeit dazwischen passiert: von der Tatsache, dass wir uns infizieren. Ich werde über eine bestimmte Gruppe von Infektionen sprechen, nämlich über solche, die mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Ich werde die heute bekannten Aspekte kurz erläutern. Anschließend möchte ich dann über ein Fachgebiet sprechen, in dem ich nie eine formale Ausbildung erhalten habe, nämlich über die Epidemiologie. Ich möchte einige Hinweise darauf geben, warum und in welchen Fällen wir vermuten, dass einige Formen von Krebserkrankungen des Menschen, von denen dies zur Zeit nicht bekannt ist, mit Infektionen zusammenhängen. Lassen Sie mich mit einer tabellarischen Übersicht beginnen, aus der lediglich hervorgeht, in welchem Maße wir gegenwärtig von Infektionen als einer der Ursachen im globalen Bild der Krebsentwicklung ausgehen. Wir können errechnen, dass etwa 21 % der Krebsformen mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen. Eine ziemliche Vielzahl verschiedener Infektionen. Parasitische Infektionen wie die Bilharziose, durch den Leberegel, die in einigen Ländern eine Rolle spielen. Tatsächlich ist in Ägypten Blasenkrebs, der durch Schistosoma-Infektionen verursacht wird, der häufigste Krebs überhaupt. Und es ist interessant darauf hinzuweisen, dass er im globalen Maßstab für 1 % aller mit Krebs in Zusammenhang gebrachten Krebsformen verantwortlich ist. Sie können relativ einfach durch Chemotherapie geheilt werden; nicht die Krebserkrankungen, sondern die Infektionen. Allerdings - und dies ist eines der Probleme - ist es möglich, dass sich die betroffenen Patienten unmittelbar nach der Beseitigung der Parasiten mit denselben Erregern erneut infizieren. Dasselbe gilt auch für einen anderen, sehr wichtigen Krebserreger des Menschen, nämlich für das Bakterium helicobacter pylori, bei dem es sich gegenwärtig um die hauptsächliche Ursache von Magenkrebs handelt: Man kann zwar eine Infektion mit helicobacter pylori mit Antibiotika beseitigen, doch eine Neuinfektion ist kurz darauf wieder möglich. Und eine ziemlich große Anzahl derjenigen Patienten, bei denen man die Bakterien eliminiert hat, infiziert sich anschließend erneut. Es gibt eine andere Kategorie von Erregern, und zwar Viren. Sie sind für zwei Drittel der mit Infektionen verbundenen Krebsformen verantwortlich. Und es gibt zwei von ihnen, von denen wir heute wissen, dass man sich gegen diese Infektionsarten durch Impfungen schützen kann. Der Hauptunterschied besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einem lange anhaltenden Schutz vor einer Neuinfektion zu tun haben, wie wir zumindest in einem Fall ziemlich genau wissen. In dem anderen Fall ist es höchst wahrscheinlich, dass wir uns gegen entsprechende Formen von Krebs schützen können. Ich werde darauf ein wenig später noch zu sprechen kommen. Es gibt noch eine Reihe anderer Erreger, von denen wir ebenfalls wissen, dass sie mit Krebs zusammenhängen. Das Epstein-Barr-Virus wurde bereits 1965 von Epstein und seinen damaligen Kollegen in Bristol entdeckt. Dabei handelt es sich um das am längsten bekannte menschliche Tumorvirus. Es ist für B-Zellen-Lymphome und eine Reihe anderer Tumore verantwortlich. Ich werde nicht im Detail darauf eingehen. Der menschliche Herpesvirus Typ 8 ist der Erreger des Kaposi-Sarkoms, eines vaskulären Tumors, der hauptsächlich bei AIDS-Patienten und bei Empfängern transplantierter Organe auftritt. Das Merkelzell-Polyomavirus wurde im Januar 2008 entdeckt. Es ist ein interessanter Erreger. Auch dieses Virus verursacht einen Zustand, bei dem es sich in der Hauptsache um eine Unterdrückung des Immunsystems handelt. Dabei zeigt sich eine sehr merkwürdige Art der Wechselwirkung mit den Krebszellen. Ich werde darauf später vielleicht noch zurückkommen. Außerdem gibt es noch einige andere. Hepatitis C ist ein wichtiger Krebsfaktor, ein Karzinogen der Leber, besonders in dieser Region, in Europa und auch in den USA. Es ist ein wichtiger Faktor bei der Entstehung von Leberkrebs. HTLV-1 ist bezüglich der Prävention von Interesse, denn das Virus wird in der Regel von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern übertragen, die ihre Kinder durch das Stillen anstecken. Wenn also von Müttern bekannt ist, dass sie Trägerinnen des Virus sind, und wenn sie es unterlassen ihre Kinder zu stillen, lässt sich hierdurch die Verbreitung der Infektion tatsächlich eindämmen. Längerfristig könnte es sogar möglich sein, diese Infektion, die zum Beispiel in den Küstenregionen von Südjapan eine große Rolle spielt, völlig zu beseitigen. HIV-Viren wirken offensichtlich als indirekte Karzinogene, da sie zu einer Schwächung des Immunsystems führen. Und in diesem Zustand eines geschwächten Immunsystems treten in der Regel andere Arten persistierender Tumorviren auf, und sie können zu Tumoren führen, die beispielsweise durch das Epstein-Barr-Virus, das menschliche Herpesvirus Typ III und auch durch Merkelzell-Polyomaviren verursacht werden. Tatsächlich handelt es sich bei ihnen dann um diejenigen Karzinogene, die wir als direkte Karzinogene bezeichnen, während HIV als indirektes Karzinogen wirkt. Dies ist ein Dia, das ich gerne zeige, um den Mechanismus, durch den diese Erreger zur Entstehung von Krebs beitragen, etwas zu verdeutlichen. Es ist wichtig ihn zu verstehen, weil wir es hier mit sehr langen Latenzzeiten zu tun haben. In manchen Fällen dauert die Entwicklung von Krebs nach der ursprünglichen Infektion bis zu 60 Jahre. Für lange Zeit war dies eines der Hindernisse, die es erschwert haben, eine Infektion einer bestimmten Krebsart als Ursache zuzuordnen. Und ein Aspekt, der das Bild zumindest in gewissem Umfang aufgeklärt hat, ist ein Epstein-Barr-Virus, das mit einem Leiden zusammenhängt, das den komplizierten Namen In diesem Fall erhalten die Kinder über die Keimbahn eine Modifikation des X-Chromosoms, und bei männlichen Nachkommen entwickelt sich dieses Syndrom nach der Infektion durch EBV, das Epstein-Barr-Virus. Sie entwickeln eine sehr virulente Form eines Lymphoms, an dem sie innerhalb weniger Monate sterben. Der Grund besteht darin, dass wir es hier mit einer genetischen Änderung [des Mechanismus] zu tun haben, der die spezifische T-Zellen-Reaktion gegen das Epstein-Barr-Virus steuert. Das Gen wurde identifiziert und seiner Funktion aufgeklärt. Unter diesen Bedingungen und aufgrund dieser erblichen Änderung, entwickeln diese Jungen diese Krankheit. Nun, dies gibt uns einen wichtigen Aspekt zu erkennen, denn in allen diesen Fällen, in denen wir diese langen Latenzzeiten haben, reicht die Infektion an sich niemals aus, eine maligne Veränderung herbeizuführen. Sie ist in vielen dieser Fälle zwar notwendig, reicht aber dazu nicht aus. Die infizierte Zelle muss weitere Veränderungen durchmachen, die dann schließlich zur Entwicklung von Krebs führen. So können wir beispielsweise im Falle von Gebärmutterhalskrebs mindestens drei Typen von Veränderungen angeben, die vor der Entwicklung dieser Krebsformen stattgefunden haben müssen. Wenn diese Veränderungen nicht auftreten, besteht der Virus zwar fort, doch es kommt zu keiner Entwicklung von Krebs. Es mag mehr als drei Typen der Veränderung geben, doch bis heute hat man drei erkannt. Die Länge der Latenzzeit ist ein Hinweis auf die Anzahl der zusätzlichen Modifikationen innerhalb der entsprechenden Zellen, bevor es zu Entwicklung der jeweiligen Krebsform kommt. Lassen Sie mich kurz auf die beiden Krebsarten eingehen, die durch Impfung verhindert werden können. Eine Infektion mit dem Hepatitis-B-Virus ist in Ostasien und Afrika für etwa 80 % der Leberkrebsleiden verantwortlich. Das Virus wird hauptsächlich - ähnlich wie das HTLV-Virus - von dauerhaft infizierten Müttern auf ihre neugeborenen Kinder übertragen. Und etwa 80 % dieser Kinder werden zu lebenslangen Trägern dieses Virus. Diese Kinder leben mit einem Krebsrisiko, da sie den Leberkrebs schließlich nach 30, 40, 50 oder 60 Jahren entwickeln. Eine Impfung gegen das Virus wurde bereits in den 1960er - oder den 1970er - Jahren entwickelt. Ursprünglich sollte die Impfung nicht vor Krebs schützen, sondern vor den akuten Folgen der Infektion. Doch interessanterweise erwies sie sich als eine gegen Krebs wirksamer Impfung. In Taiwan wurde beispielsweise seit 1984 jedes neugeborene Kind gegen das Hepatitis-B-Virus geimpft, um es gegen die dauerhafte Infektion zu schützen, und diese Impfung erwies sich als äußerst erfolgreich. Etwa 80 % dieser Kinder entwickelten keine chronische Hepatitis-B-Virusinfektion. Und nun, etwas mehr als 20 Jahre nach dem Beginn der Impfungen, zeigen die ersten Berichte eindeutig einen statistisch signifikanten Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leberkrebs nach dieser Art der Impfung. In gewisser Weise handelt es sich hierbei um den ersten Impfstoff, der Krebs verhindert. Wir können eindeutig feststellen, dass er Krebs verhindert. Wie steht es um den Gebärmutterhalskrebs? Es ist seit mehr als 30 Jahren ein Hauptgebiet meines Interesses. Wir wissen, dass es sich hierbei weltweit um den zweithäufigsten Krebs der Frauen handelt. Und die Mehrzahl dieser Krebsarten treten in Ländern auf, in denen eine Ressourcenknappheit besteht. Die Vorläufer dieser Krebsart traten weltweit ebenfalls mit großer Häufigkeit auf, an allen anderen Orten der Welt. Diese Vorstufen gehen jedoch normalerweise wieder zurück, was zur Folge hat, dass es zu einem umfangreichen Rückgang der Fälle dieser speziellen Krebsarten kommt. Eine Reihe von Krebsformen steht mit denselben Infektionsarten in Zusammenhang. Dies sind die sogenannten Papillomavirus-Infektionen mit hohem Risiko, hauptsächlich HPV 16, jedoch auch 18, sowie eine Reihe anderer. Sie korrelieren zu fast 100 % mit Gebärmutterhalskrebs. Interessanterweise stehen diese Krebsraten, die die Vulva und den Penis betreffen, nur zu einem geringeren Grad mit dieser Infektion in Zusammenhang. Dies ist deshalb interessant, weil diese beiden Krebsarten nach einer Unterdrückung des Immunsystems dramatisch zunehmen, ganz im Gegensatz zum Gebärmutterhalskrebs, der nur in geringem Umfang zunimmt. Und wir wissen noch nicht, ob es sich hierbei um die HPV-negativen Fälle oder um die positiven handelt. Ich denke, dies erfordert offensichtlich weitere Nachforschungen. Nun, die Krebserkrankungen der Mandeln, des Mund- und Rachenraums, stehen zu einem Viertel oder sogar Drittel mit derselben Art von Infektion in Verbindung, wie die Krebse des Gebärmutterhalses, des Analbereichs, der Vagina und die seltenen Nagelbettkrebse. Sie korrelieren ebenfalls eng mit dieser Art von Infektion. Wir wissen, dass die Infektion bei einer infizierten Frau normalerweise etwa 10 Monate lang andauert. Anschließend kann sie bei etwa 70 % durch die neuen Mechanismen beseitigt werden. Nach ungefähr 2 Jahren sind etwa 90 % ohne Infektion, doch fast 10 % weisen nach wie vor eine Infektion auf. Dies sind die Frauen, die das Risiko tragen, dass es bei Ihnen zur Entwicklung eines Gebärmutterhalskrebses kommt. Ich habe dieses Dia bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt. Dies war das erste Modell, mit dem sich demonstrieren ließ, dass der Impfstoff sehr gut wirkt: im Falle der Papillomavirus-Infektionen. In einigen Hundezuchtstationen in den USA werden für experimentelle Zwecke Beagles in großer Zahl gezüchtet. Sie hatten das Problem, dass fast alle Jungtiere diese hässlichen Warzengeschwülste entwickelten. Die Infektion hielt sechs Monate an, und sie konnten die Hunde in diesem Zeitraum nicht verkaufen. Wir besorgten uns Proben der DNA dieses Papillomavirus hier und stellten der Arbeitsgruppe an der George Town University Informationen zur Verfügung, mit deren Hilfe sie einen Impfstoff herstellte. Sie taten dies durch die Expression der Kapsid-Proteine, des wichtigsten Proteins dieses Viruspartikels, in experimentellen Systemen. Dieser Impfstoff wurde mehr als 14.000 jungen Beagles injiziert. Anschließend entwickelte kein einziger von ihnen ein Papillom, während alle nichtgeimpften Hunde weiterhin davon befallen waren. Dies war eine bemerkenswerte Erfolgsgeschichte, die schließlich eindeutig bewies, dass es auch beim Menschen funktionieren würde, wo dieses wichtige Strukturprotein entweder in Insektenzellen oder in Hefe exprimiert wird. Es gibt auch Bedingungen, unter denen sich Kapsomere und auch Kapsidstrukturen bilden. Unter diesen Bedingungen, bei denen es sich tatsächlich um leere Gehäuse des Virus handelt, die hierbei entstehen. Sie können gereinigt und als Grundlage für den Impfstoff verwendet werden, der gegenwärtig verfügbar ist. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung der klinischen Studien, die durchgeführt worden sind und die eindeutig beweisen, dass die Impfstoffe zu sehr hohen Konzentrationen von Antikörpern führen und dass sie für längere Zeiten erhalten und wirksam bleiben. Wir wissen dies jetzt seit acht oder neun Jahren. Und trotz gegenteiliger Presseberichte sind keine signifikanten Nebeneffekte beobachtet worden. Tatsächlich können wir einer australischen Studie entnehmen, dass es pro 100.000 Impfdosierungen nur eine Allergie gegen die Virusproteine gibt. Dies ist offensichtlich ein besseres Ergebnis als es diejenigen für Impfstoffe sind, mit denen zurzeit Kleinkindern behandelt werden. Nun, zusätzlich wissen wir heute bereits, dass wir durch diese Impfstoffarten die Infektion durch diejenigen Arten von Viren verhindern, die sich in dem Impfstoff finden. Außerdem verhindern wir die Entwicklung von zervikalen Läsionen beziehungsweise ihrer Vorstufen. Wir wissen noch nicht, ob sich damit tatsächlich Krebserkrankungen vorbeugen lassen, denn es dauert - wie ich bereits erwähnt habe - etwa 15-25 Jahre, bis sich eine Krebserkrankung nach einer Infektion entwickelt. Und der erste Impfstoff wurde vor acht oder neun Jahren verabreicht. Haben wir die Chance, diese Art von Infektionen vollständig zu eliminieren? Ja, denn diese Infektion ist auf den Menschen eingeschränkt. Wir können dies erreichen, indem wir weltweit Mädchen vor dem Beginn ihrer sexuellen Aktivität impfen. Und wenn man dies wirklich erreichen will, müssen wir die Jungen ebenfalls impfen, wenn wir dies in absehbarer Zukunft erzielen wollen. Tatsächlich würden wir zumindest dasselbe, wahrscheinlich aber sogar ein besseres Ergebnis bei der Vorbeugung gegen Gebärmutterhalskrebs erzielen, wenn wir nur die Jungen impfen würden statt nur die Mädchen, da die Übertragung der Infektion fast ausschließlich durch sexuelle Kontakte zu Stande kommt. Lassen Sie mich nun dieses Kapitel zum Abschluss bringen, obwohl ich mich damit für lange Zeit beschäftigt habe. Gegen Ende meines Vortrags möchte ich auf einige Fragen eingehen, die uns gegenwärtig noch mehr interessieren, da es sich lohnt, nach der Ursache der Infektion zu suchen. Was ich nun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen den Appetit auf ein saftiges Steak oder Roastbeef zu verderben. Ich hoffe, das wird für Sie nicht so schlimm sein. Man kann an dieser Stelle eine Reihe von Bemerkungen machen. Krebserkrankungen treten mit größerer Häufigkeit auf, wenn das Immunsystem unterdrückt ist. Wir wissen, dass in vielen dieser Fälle latente Infektionen mit Tumorviren aktiviert werden und dass es unter solchen Umständen zur Entstehung von Krebs kommt. Es gibt jedoch weiterhin Krebsarten, von denen wir nicht wissen, ob sie durch Infektionen verursacht werden können. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel Schilddrüsenkrebs, oder Nierenkrebsleiden. Sie treten bei einem unterdrückten Immunsystem eindeutig häufiger auf, man hat jedoch noch nicht zeigen können, dass sie mit Infektion in Zusammenhang stehen. Es gibt Krebsarten, die mit einer verringerten Infektionshäufigkeit korrelieren. Aufgrund von AIDS-Patienten wissen wir, dass Brustkrebs das beste Beispiel hierfür ist. Patienten, die transplantierte Organe erhalten haben und deren Immunsystem unterdrückt wurde, haben normalerweise ein um 15 % geringeres Risiko an Brustkrebs zu erkranken. Dies entspricht in gewisser Weise dem Gegenteil von dem, was man erwarten würde. Doch wir kennen Tierexperimentbeispiele, in denen das Gleiche geschieht, nämlich bei Tumoren nach Infektionen der Brustdrüsen bei Mäusen. Hier wird das Virus durch die Milch von den Muttertieren übertragen. Sie infizieren die Lymphozyten und die Peyer-Plaques und diese Lymphozyten beginnen sich sehr schnell aktiv zu vermehren. Sie explodieren gewissermaßen und erzeugen riesige Mengen des Virus. Die Viren werden dann mit den aktivierten Lymphozyten in das periphere Blut abgegeben, und die Belastung des Blutes mit den Viren ist scheinbar ein wesentlicher Faktor für das Risiko, die Milchdrüsen zu erreichen und zur Entwicklung von Brustkrebs zu führen. Wenn man das Immunsystem dieser Mäuse unterdrückt, kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Virusbelastung und unter diesen Bedingungen auch zu einer Verringerung des Krebsrisikos, da die Lymphozyten in diesen Tieren nicht länger fortbestehen. Was ich nun noch kurz mit Ihnen besprechen möchte, sind diejenigen nahrungsbedingten Faktoren eines Krebsrisikos, die möglicherweise mit Infektionen in Zusammenhang stehen sowie von Krebsleiden beeinflusste Infektionen, die nicht zu Tumorleiden führen. Ich werde Ihnen ein Bild zeigt, das ich schon bei zahlreichen anderen Gelegenheiten gezeigt habe. Doch es hat unser Interesse an dieser Frage geweckt, denn wir kennen eine ziemliche Anzahl von krankheitserregenden Viren des Menschen, wie die Polyomaviren BK und JC, die in menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind und bei denen es sich in der Regel um lebenslange Infektion handelt. EBV und das hochriskante HPV, obwohl sie beim Menschen manchmal zu Krebs führen, sind relativ selten. Außerdem gibt es beim Menschen Adenoviren, die nicht zu Krebs führen. Alle diese Viren können sich in Tieren nicht vermehren. Wenn man sie jedoch in tierische Organismen, in denen sie sich nicht fortpflanzen können, einimpft, können Sie dort Krebs verursachen. Und dies ist ein interessanter Punkt, der natürlich zu der entgegengesetzten Frage führt, nämlich: Übertragen einige der Haustiere, mit denen wir eng zusammenleben und in denen sich die Viren vermehren und zum Teil lebenslang vorhanden sind, die Viren auf einen Host, in dem sie sich nicht vermehren können? Sie verlieren die Fähigkeit der Vermehrung. Sind sie unter diesen Umständen karzinogen? Und hier ist ein ziemlich interessantes Beispiel von Krebs des Dickdarms oder des Dickdarms und Rektums, denn diese Krebsarten wurden epidemiologisch mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch in Verbindung gebracht. Es gibt wirklich bemerkenswert konsistente Zahlen in epidemiologischen Berichten, die beschreiben, dass etwa 20-30 % dieser Krebsarten mit dem Genuss von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängen, in der Hauptsache von Rindfleisch. In Ländern, in denen sehr viel Rindfleisch verzehrt wird - Europa gehört in diese Kategorie - liegt normalerweise ein hoher Anteil von Krebsarten des Kolons und Rektums vor. Es gibt sogar neuere Berichte darüber, dass Brustkrebs mit dem Verzehr von rotem Fleisch zusammenhängt. Krebserkrankungen des Endometriums und der Eierstöcke zeigen eine ähnliche Epidemiologie wie Brustkrebs und werden ebenfalls damit in Zusammenhang gebracht, ja - zu einem gewissen Grad - sogar auch Lungenkrebs, insbesondere bei Nichtrauchern. Es ist sehr viel komplizierter, dies bei Rauchern zu bewerten. Außerdem gibt es noch eine Reihe von Berichten über einige andere Arten von Krebsleiden, die sehr viel weniger konsistent sind. Schauen wir uns kurz die geographische Verteilung an, die Epidemiologie der Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums. Hier im Bereich des Toten Meeres sieht man ein sehr hohes Risiko. Hier das Risiko für Brustkrebs in Dunkelgrün. Die Farben entsprechen einander nicht. Doch offensichtlich gibt es eine bemerkenswerte Überlappung dieser Bereiche, woraus hervorgeht, dass hier ein hohes Risiko für Brustkrebs und für Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und des Rektums besteht. Dasselbe Bild ergibt sich, wenn man beispielsweise die Bereiche für Krebserkrankungen der Bauchspeicheldrüse und der Lunge vergleicht. Schließlich gibt es offensichtlich einige Bereiche, in denen es zu Diskrepanzen kommt, zumindest bei diesen beiden Krebsformen, jedoch eine relative Übereinstimmung zwischen den anderen beiden Krebsarten. Doch seit 1977 wurde vermutet, dass wir die Gründe für diese Wirkung erkannt haben, denn wenn man Fleisch grillt, brät oder röstet, erhält man eine Reihe chemischer Verbindungen während der Zubereitung, die eindeutig karzinogen sind, wenn man sie Nagetieren einimpft. Und dies war offensichtlich eine gute Erklärung für das hohe Risiko des Verzehrs von rotem Fleisch über längere Zeiträume. Eine Reihe von ihnen sind hier aufgelistet. Nun, das Problem, das sich hier ergab, war im Prinzip bereits in der ersten Veröffentlichung von Sugimura und seinen Kollegen aus dem Jahre 1977 sichtbar. Denn wenn man Fisch brät oder grillt, Fisch auf ähnliche Weise zubereitet, entstehen dieselben Karzinogene. Wenn man Geflügel auf gleiche Weise zubereitet, entstehen diese Arten von Karzinogenen ebenfalls - in manchen Fällen sogar in höheren Konzentrationen als bei der Zubereitung von rotem Fleisch. Und dies erfordert eine Erklärung. Die Sache ist sogar noch spezifischer, denn wenn man sich Länder anschaut, in denen rotes Fleisch in größerem Umfang konsumiert wird - sagen wir in arabischen Ländern, wo hauptsächlich Schaf-, Lamb- und Ziegenfleisch gegessen wird -, dort ist die Häufigkeit dieser Krebsarten erstaunlich gering. Schweinefleisch in China. Die Chinesen essen zwar nicht ausschließlich Schweinefleisch, aber es ist eine Hauptquelle von rotem Fleisch. Das Rot ist hier eher intermediär, und es ist sehr interessant, dies zu sehen. Schauen Sie sich die Situation in Indien an, wo praktisch kein Rindfleisch verzehrt wird. Indien ist weltweit führend: Die Häufigkeit von Krebsleiden des Dickdarms und Rektums ist hier weltweit am geringsten. In einem pathologischen Institut in Kalkutta sah ich im Jahr 2008 einen einzigen Fall von kolorektalem Krebs. Im Vergleich zu den europäischen pathologischen Instituten ist das ziemlich erstaunlich. Was sind die Erklärungen hierfür? Es muss einen Grund hierfür geben. Es scheint also ein speziell mit Rindfleisch zusammenhängender Faktor zu sein. Natürlich besteht die Möglichkeit, dass es in Rindfleisch noch unentdeckte chemische Karzinogene gibt, die in weißem Fleisch nicht vorhanden sind. Doch die andere Erklärung - zumindest für einen Biologen wie mich - ist attraktiver: Nämlich dass es in Rindfleisch einen ansteckenden Erreger gibt, der relativ hitzebeständig ist und dass dieser Rindfleischfaktor auf Menschen übertragen werden und unter diesen Bedingungen zur Entstehung von Krebs führen kann. Wenn Sie die Temperatur in diesen schmackhaft zubereiteten Roastbeefs messen, so entspricht sie normalerweise etwa 30-50° C. Dies sind Temperaturen, die eine ganze Reihe von potentiellen Krebserregern problemlos überstehen, ohne ihre Infektiosität einzubüßen, wie zum Beispiel das Papillomavirus. Viren vom Polyomatyp sind sehr wahrscheinlich auch etwas schwerer zu testen. Auch Viren mit einzelnen DNA-Strängen können diese Bedingungen überleben. Polyomaviren kommen hier ebenfalls besonders in Frage, ebenso wie diese hier, da sie Temperaturen von 80°C problemlos für längere Zeit überstehen. Wir kennen nur eine Art bei Rindern, doch bereits neun Arten bei Menschen, und es ist sehr wahrscheinlich, dass es sie gibt. Lassen Sie mich noch auf einen anderen Punkt eingehen, der die Situation sogar noch hervorzuheben scheint, wenn man Japan und Indien unter diesen Bedingungen vergleicht. Erstaunlicherweise hat Japan eine sehr hohe Häufigkeit von Krebserkrankungen des Dickdarms und Rektums, und es ist interessant, sich die Epidemiologie dessen anzusehen, was in Japan im Vergleich zu Indien geschehen ist. Sie sehen hier einige statistische Daten, die in Japan seit etwa 1975, 1980 gesammelt wurden, und Sie sehen, dass diese Krebsart enorm angestiegen ist. Man kann aus diesem Zeitabschnitt zurückrechnen, dass der Anstieg etwa um 1965 begann. In Korea begannen die Aufzeichnungen später, doch man sieht genau dieselbe Entwicklung. Was ist in diesen Ländern geschehen? Nun, einer der Hauptaspekte dessen, was sich hier ereignete, war die Einführung von großen Mengen von Rindfleisch, besonders aus den USA. Die zunehmende Essgewohnheit - und es ist eine sehr beliebte Art Shabu-Shabu zu essen, ein japanisches Fleischfondue - besteht darin, dünne Fleischscheiben in kochendes Wasser zu tauchen und dann schnell wieder herauszunehmen. Normalerweise wird es nach weniger als einer Minute wieder herausgenommen. Man breitet es aus und es ist noch sehr roh. Es wird sehr gern gegessen. Dies sind Korrelationen, sie beweisen nichts. Doch es ist eine interessante Beobachtung, die tatsächlich die Frage aufwirft, ob es im Rindfleisch einen Infektionsfaktor für Krebserkrankungen von Dickdarm und Rektum gibt, der künftig noch gefunden werden muss. Nun, hoffentlich bleiben mir noch einige Minuten. Ich werde abschließend noch über einen anderen Aspekt sprechen, da er sehr interessant ist: die Krebserkrankungen im Kindesalter, Leukämie in der Kindheit. Ich werde nur kurz darauf eingehen, indem ich darauf hinweise, dass wir es hier ebenfalls mit einer äußerst interessanten epidemiologischen Situation zu tun haben, dass nämlich mehrere Infektionen im ersten Lebensjahr einen Schutz vor der Entwicklung von Leukämie in der Kindheit bieten. Ein unterprivilegierter sozialer Status, gedrängte Wohnverhältnisse, viele Geschwister. Das Risiko ist umgekehrt proportional zur Geburtsreihenfolge, d.h. ein erstgeborenes Kind hat ein höheres Risiko als die nachgeborenen Kinder, usw. Stillen ist ein Schutzfaktor. Und im umgekehrten Fall haben Sie hier eine Reihe von Risikofaktoren: seltene Infektionen, ein hoher sozioökonomischer Status und pränatale chromosomale Translokationen sind offensichtlich wichtige Faktoren bei der Entstehung von Leukämie. Dieselben Translokationsarten treten jedoch auch bei gesunden Individuen in geringer Häufigkeit auf. Daher sind sie an sich für die Entwicklung von Krebs nicht ausreichend. Ein paar andere Punkte werde ich aus Zeitgründen übergehen. Wenn man sich einige Länder mit erfolgreichen Volkswirtschaften anschaut, so ist das Risiko in ihnen höher, während es in ärmeren Bevölkerungen für diese Arten von Leukämie vergleichsweise geringer ist. Wir haben versucht, darüber zu spekulieren, was der Grund für dieses seltsame Phänomen sein könnte, und haben den Vorschlag gemacht, dass eine pränatale Infektion, eine Infektion vor der Geburt zu infizierten Zellen führen könnte, die sich nach der Geburt vermehren. Die Anzahl dieser Zellen nimmt drastisch zu, und es befindet sich ein ansteckender Erreger in diesen Zellen. Es liegt hier eine Belastung vor, die möglicherweise der Hauptfaktor für die anschließende Entwicklung der Leukämien ist. Durch anschließende Infektionen nach der Geburt kommt es dann - da es sich hierbei hauptsächlich um Infektionen der Atemwege handelt - zur Produktion von Interferon und antiviralem Zytokin, und unter diesen Bedingungen kommt es zu einer Verringerung der Belastung und des damit einhergehenden Risikos. Wenn man also so etwas postuliert, muss man zunächst nach Infektionen suchen, zu denen es vor der Geburt kommt, die wahrscheinlich zu Vermehrungen in den Zellen führen, aus denen die Leukämien hervorgehen, die speziellen Leukämien der Kindheit. Und anschließend sollte sie auch ziemlich empfindlich für Interferon sein. Gibt es solche Infektionen? Die Antwort lautet: ja. Es gibt mindestens eine Infektion, die alle diese Kriterien erfüllt, und dies sind die sogenannten TT-Viren, Anelloviren, wie man sie nennt - eigentlich eine Namensverwechslung. Doch der interessante Aspekt ist, dass wir alle mit diesen Erregern infiziert sind, dass wir sie in diesem Alter in unserem peripheren Blut tragen. Sie vermehren sich offensichtlich in lymphatischen und Knochenmarkszellen. Man hat zeigen können, dass es bei Patienten, die mit Interferon behandelt werden, weil sie dauerhaft mit Hepatitis-C-Viren infiziert sind, ebenfalls zu einer drastischen Verringerung der Anzahl der TT-Viren kommt, die durch pränatale Infektion erworben werden. Sie werden vor der Geburt erworben, oder zumindest geschieht die Ansteckung zu einem bestimmten Prozentsatz unter dieser Bedingung. Dies ist lediglich eine Zusammenfassung dessen, was wir über diese mehr als hundert, wahrscheinlich weit mehr als hundert Genotypen dieser Viren wissen, die in allen menschlichen Populationen weit verbreitet sind. Die vertikale Übertragung habe ich erwähnt. Der interessanteste Aspekt ist in diesem Zusammenhang, dass es meistens, sehr häufig, dazu kommt, dass das Genom sich neu anordnet, was teilweise zu sich eigenständig replizierenden, sub-genomischen Molekülen mit neuen offenen Leserahmen führt. Ich denke, dies würde einen weiteren Vortrag verdienen, um es im Detail besprechen zu können. Dennoch möchte ich sagen, dass es sich hierbei um relativ unzureichend beschriebene, episomal persistierende Viren mit DNA-Einzelsträngen handelt, die nur einen Bereich enthalten, der in all diesen verschiedenen Genotypen äußerst gut erhalten bleibt. Tatsächlich haben wir in dieser Richtung zahlreiche Untersuchungen durchgeführt, die zunächst beweisen, dass es auch in Tumorzellen einige chimäre Moleküle gibt, die eine Verbindung zwischen diesem Bereich hier und spezifischen zellulären Sequenzen beweisen, die sich als äußerst interessant herausgestellt hat. Ich habe vergessen zu erwähnen, dass hier etwa 3800 Basen zur Verfügung stehen, obwohl es auch kleinere Moleküle mit 2800 Basen gibt. Und dies ist nun ein Kapitel, dem wir bei Leukämiezellen, bei Zellen des Hodgkin-Lymphoms und insbesondere in Zelllinien von kolorektalen Tumoren begegnen. Die Persistenz vieler dieser chimären Molekültypen, die in einer großen Zahl von Ihnen vorhanden sind, hat sich bislang fast überall gezeigt, soweit unsere Experimente uns dies zu erkennen geben. Doch die Ursachen dieser Arten von Zuständen sind uns noch unbekannt. Hierzu sind weitere Untersuchungen und Studien erforderlich. Dies sind die Personen, das Team, das hauptsächlich über TT-Viren arbeitet: Ethel-Michele de Villiers, die ebenfalls im Auditorium sitzt, ist zufälligerweise auch meine Frau. Auch einige andere dieser Damen hier sind Zuhörer, und ich glaube, dass Sylvia Barkosky ebenfalls an diesem Treffen teilnimmt. Fragen, die Sie zu diesem Thema haben, können Sie auch ihr stellen. Was ich momentan denke, ist, dass wir wirklich sorgfältiger nach neuen Arten von Mechanismen suchen müssen, durch die Infektionserreger zur Entwicklung von Krebs beim Menschen beitragen können. Und wissen Sie: Wenn wir gegenwärtig bereits 21 % der menschlichen Krebserkrankungen auf diese Art von Infektionen zurückführen können und wenn es zutrifft, dass die Bösartigkeit einiger blutbildender Systeme und der Magenkrebs - nein, nicht der Magenkrebs - der Dickdarmkrebs ebenfalls mit Infektionen zusammenhängt, dann würde dieser Prozentsatz auf weltweit 35 % aller Krebsleiden ansteigen. Und selbst hier ist Magenkrebs - Entschuldigung - Dickdarmkrebs für etwa 20 % aller Krebserkrankungen verantwortlich. Es ist also ein wichtiges Problem, und ich schließe mich insbesondere Prof. Blackburn an, die dies bereits gesagt hat: Wenn man all diese jungen Studenten sieht, die an diesen Problemen arbeiten, ist es wirklich wichtig, dass meine seine Augen offenhält. Dies ist kein Arbeitsgebiet, das abgeschlossen ist. Ich glaube, es ist ein Arbeitsgebiet, das wesentlich mehr Aufmerksamkeit verdient. Dreißig Jahre lang war es sehr schwer, irgendein Interesse für diese Art von Erregern zu finden. Zurzeit ändert sich das glücklicherweise, doch wir müssen noch mehr darüber forschen. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

 
(00:09:39 - 00:14:46)
To listen to the ful lecture click here. 

During the 34th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 1984, Howard Temin explained that development of most cancers is related to lifestyle, not viruses. This still holds true; approximately 21% of cancers are associated with infections, whether by viruses, bacteria or parasites.

 

“The Report of the Virus Was, However, Just the Beginning” – Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, Nobel Lecture, 2008


In hindsight, it was very fortunate that Baltimore and Temin discovered reverse transcriptase in 1970. This gave virologists slightly over a decade to study retroviruses, which at the time pertained only to animal viruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus. In the early 1970s at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, a young researcher succeeded in suppressing reverse transcriptase activity in the Friend virus, which causes leukaemia in mice, and for this was awarded her PhD. Ten years later, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi was part of a team working to discover a new human retrovirus, which was responsible for a mysterious epidemic that was swiftly spreading across the world. Success in discovering the virus came early, after only several weeks of experiments in early 1983, yet still little was known on the transmission of the virus, named Lymphadenopathy Associated Virus (LAV), and later renamed Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). At that point there was also no diagnostic tool for blood testing, so there was no way of telling whether blood was infected with the virus[13][14].

What makes HIV stand out from other viruses is that it specifically targets CD4 receptors of T cells, which are white blood cells critical for the functioning of the immune system. This leads to the deterioration of the immune system. HIV is thus the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). An effective protease inhibitor became available in 1996, and combined antiretroviral treatment (cART), with the use of several drugs, is the only option for patients today. Death from AIDS has fortunately dropped 60-80% following the introduction of treatment, but as Barré-Sinoussi told her audience at Lindau in 2015, the problem is retaining patients on antiretroviral treatment, as stopping will result in viral rebound in a matter of weeks. The virus still remains in the genome of the cells. Barré-Sinoussi also explained why cART should not be a long-term solution, and what the future may hold in terms of treatment of AIDS:

To listen to the ful lecture click here.  

 

The Slow Viruses

Baruch Blumberg’s co-recipient for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1976 was D. Carleton Gajdusek, who spent many years studying a brain disease specific to the Fore people of New Guinea. Two years later, Gajdusek described the terrible disease, known as Kuru, during his lecture at Lindau. Here, Gajdusek introduces the pathogen responsible for Kuru as a “slow-acting virus”, or a virus “without core or coat”, although he mentions that many scientists are unwilling to use the term “virus” altogether:

To listen to the ful lecture click here. 


Several years later, Stanley Prusiner published a paper stipulating that infectious proteins, which he called prions, cause scrapie, a neurodegenerative disease affecting sheep and goats. It was later found that Kuru, Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and other related neurodegenerative diseases are caused by prions, a new type of infectious agent. For this discovery, Prusiner was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1997. What is fascinating is that prions replicate without the use of any genetic material; the infection is spread by modifying the structure of proteins, turning them into amyloid, a fibrous, insoluble form of protein. Interestingly, amyloid deposits are also the underlying cause of Alzheimer’s disease[15][16].

 


More Important Than We Think

From the point of view of medicine there is much work to be done to combat viral infections that affect millions. Progress in finding new vaccines is always too slow for those who are ill. But there is also another angle to the discussion – that of co-evolution of humans and viruses. The reason many people die as a result of viral infections is that our immune system responses are still inadequate from an evolutionary standpoint. In his 2007 Lindau lecture, “Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?” Nobel Laureate Rolf M. Zinkernagel explained that the human lifespan is much longer than nature intended, leading to an invasion of new diseases. Viral infections act as a biological balancing mechanism.

Rolf Zinkernagel (2007) - Why do we not have a vaccine against TB or HIV (yet)?

HANS JÖRNVALL. …the scientific talks in the series. And the speaker is Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. He is from the Institute of Experimental Immunology at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. And he received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1996. And the quotation was 'for the discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence'. And we now continue that subject in the title of his talk, why we do not have a vaccine against HIV or tuberculosis yet. Please, Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thanks very much for the invitation to come and talk to you today. And it’s a pleasure to be here to talk about a, I think very important problem. Why do we have excellent vaccines against most acute childhood infections such as tetanus, diphtheria, smallpox, measles, polio and so on. And why haven’t we succeeded in developing a vaccine that protects against tuberculosis, HIV, hepatitis C, malaria, schistosomiasis, leishmaniosis and you name it. The reason why we don’t have these vaccines is, first and above all, that co-evolution, that is the balance between infectious agents and us as vertebrate hosts haven’t in a way foreseen a solution that could be easily corrected or let’s say improved by a vaccine. In contrast against acute cytopathic types, acute killer types of infections, evolution had to find a very efficient solution. And I’ve tried to summarise some of these very general aspects in this slide. If we talk about immunity and not immunology - and there is a big difference, you know - immunity is about protection via specific immune reactivity by vertebrate hosts against basically infectious agents. Now, most of immunology actually deals with so called small chemical groups called haptens or sheep red blood cells or similar things. And of course the difference between infectious agents and these model types of antigens is simply that infectious agents kill and model antigens don’t. And therefore you can measure many things, you know, with these surrogate model systems, but you very often cannot measure what really matters in life, namely to avoid disease and certainly to avoid death before the age of 25. Because if you die after 25, you know, it doesn’t really matter, because by that time you have done your biological function, which is to create the next generation. And all the rest doesn’t really matter. Now you see immediately the solution to the question I raised. If you get killed between, let’s say before you are 15 or 18, then you are out of evolution. If you get killed after 25, doesn’t matter. So it’s interesting to recognise that, besides specific immune responses, there is a whole gamut and background of resistance mechanisms which are very important and in fact cover let’s say 95 or more percent of our resistance mechanisms. And they include for example interferon alpha. There have been models created in mice where the interferon alpha receptor is lacking. These mice die of viral infections if they see a virus at 10 metres distance. So without interferon there is no way to survive, and so on, there are many incidences. I will not talk about these innate or natural resistance mechanisms. There are however highly specific adaptive types of immune mechanism, including antibodies and cell mediated immunity. And there it is interesting to note that antibodies are actually at high concentrations and in enormous amounts, for example in chicken eggs, actually also in reptile eggs, in fish eggs. Why is that, why should the mother hen hand over grams of immunoglobulin, of antibodies to the offspring. And this question I think is very interesting. Then we also can recognise that all the vaccines that are successful protect via antibodies. There is not a single vaccine that protects us from the consequences of infection via cell mediated immunity. Which of course would be necessary if we were to develop a vaccine against tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, schisostomiasis and so on. But so far we haven’t succeeded, although many people promised, you know, within the past 10 years we should have developed HIV or TB vaccines. Then there’s another very general observation that autoimmunity, that is the deviation of the immune system to start attacking our own antigens or organs, resulting in let’s say diabetes, multiple sclerosis, hashimoto’s thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis and so on. Actually these diseases, in very general terms, come up let’s say after 25. And this fits again with what I’ve, oversimplified stated before, that after 25 it doesn’t really matter what happens. The other point is that female people are much more susceptible to so called autoimmune disease, particularly if the autoimmune disease is dependent on autoantibodies. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus and so on. Then of course tumours also come up after 25 or 30, and this again would correlate with the fact that it doesn’t matter. Of course individually it matters but in terms of overall population balance it doesn’t. And the question there arises of course in parallel with tuberculosis and HIV, why are we so inefficient in using immune responses against tumours to actually change the tumour prognoses and outcome. And above all is the question, you know, does that failure to come up with solutions to this HIV, TB vaccine problem, have something to do with the way we measure things. We can measure many things, in fact we can measure more things than ever before. And molecular measurements just make measurements more easy and more accurate. But it doesn’t solve the problem whether what we measure is really what we should measure. And I think in terms of medical disease it’s very simple what we should measure. Either this disease is ameliorated, is improved, is less severe or death is avoided, or not. All the rest is in a way, from a medical point of view, rather not so important. So let me now get into matters directly, give you my biased view of the functioning of the immune system, then get into some peculiarities of the virus host relationships and then go into ideas and concepts about vaccines which include of course the idea of immunological memory. Now, memory, you know, is something very interesting, because that’s what you lose when you age. But immunological memory seems to persist for the rest of our lives. So once having had a disease will cover you and protect you for the rest of your life. How is that guaranteed and how does that function? Of course, there are two very extreme interpretations. Either you can remember like with your neuronal networks, or it’s not true and in fact neuronal memory isn’t really understood. So there are some postulates that in fact, to keep up your memory, you need to see or reencounter the same thing, you know repeatedly, be it during your dreaming time or your wake time. And it’s only this repetitiveness of encountering certain inputs that keeps your memory up, that’s certainly true for myself. But immunology of course, the idea of memory says ‘once seen, always remembered’. Measles virus, once contracted as a child, you’re resistant against measles virus infections disease, for the rest of the life. And the question is, is that some sort of mystical type of interaction or mechanism, network or is it simply that measles virus persists in fragments in our body to keep the immune system sort of reminded by boosting it all over the years. And that of course isn’t really what we understand academically or theoretically from memory, it would be simply an antigen driven process. And of course if that were the explanation, then you would have to rethink about the way we make vaccines, because if vaccines cannot imitate that situation, that is persist at a very low level, that is innocuous, but keeps driving the immune response at a sufficiently high level, then we have a problem. And my conclusion will be that for TB, HIV, malaria, schisto and so on, we actually would need a vaccine of that type. Ok, so the problem is summarised here, infections basically destroy host cells very efficiently, like in this case, pox virus, smallpox or polio or rabies would do that within a few hours after infecting a cell. And of course, in this case the only thing that can lead to the survival of the host is immediate rejection of that infection within a few days. Because if that continues for more than 7 to 10 days, then the chances of these types of agents hitting neurons is so high that you die. And of course this situation, where a virus infects a cell but leaves the physiology of that cell rather and largely intact, doesn’t need immunology because the virus actually doesn’t cause primarily any harm. And many more viruses actually belong to that category than to this. Because it is not in the prime interest of an infectious agent to kill all hosts. Because if all hosts are killed, then the virus by definition is gone as well, because the virus needs living cells to replicate. So it’s relatively easy. So that’s why here immunology plays a major role. In fact here immunology doesn’t play a role and most of these viruses jump from one infected subject to the next before or at birth. And why is that? Because before birth the offspring doesn’t have a functioning immune system, actually at birth the immune system doesn’t function, isn’t mature. So this is our optimal time for these agents to jump. And there are examples of that, HIV, for example, jumps, usually at birth, with that small blood transfusion from the mother to the offspring. And the mother of course is a carrier because her immune response against that virus infection is inadequate. Well, for HIV, I will come back to that, the problem hasn’t been solved yet, as you know, because it is a new or emerging virus. So the co-adaptation of host and virus hasn’t happened. But eventually it will end up like HIV 2, you know, the West African form of HIV infection, where it is very clear that the balance between host and virus has already reached a very balanced situation, in fact HIV 2 doesn’t make people sick or doesn’t kill them. So it’s just a matter of time. But in this case what is interesting is if now an immune response comes along, like a T cell, a solo immune response, then you see immediately it’s not the virus that causes the tissue and organ failure, it’s actually the immune response because this immune response now kills infected host cells that otherwise wouldn’t be killed by the infection. And this we call immunopathology, that is an immune response with pathological consequences where in fact there wouldn't need to be such a confrontation. And that’s why these agents jump at a time when there is no immune response. Now, I try to illustrate the same aspect with this cartoon. Just try to follow. If you take a virus that jumps through the placenta or at birth, then this virus will be all over the host and this antigen or this virus will behave like a self antigen. Because it was there before birth, it was there at birth, and therefore these viral antigens are considered from the functioning immune system as self. Because if that were not so, then the immune response would be against all these host infected cells and this would result in a graph versus host type immunopathology, and in fact the patient wouldn’t survive. The other extreme is this, I’ve just depicted here an infection with papillomavirus, which is a virus that infects the outer most types of cells of the skin. And expresses the viral antigens only in matured keratinocytes. Now, this is a localisation that is so far out of the immune system, namely lymph nodes or spleen or the blood circulation, that the immune system doesn’t even notice that there is an infection going on in the skin. And therefore the immune response doesn’t happen very quickly, in fact it may take months, as you may well remember from your own warts you may have had, you know, where it takes weeks to months, if not years, to get rid of these warts, eventually these warts will disappear. That means if an antigen, even an infectious agents antigen is outside of the reach of lymph nodes or spleen or the so called secondary organised lymphatic tissues, then there is no immune response. And the antigen, the viral antigen even has to reach draining lymph nodes or the spleen to get a response induced. And of course this happens with warts, if your dear doctor scraps off the warts or cauterises them with hot needles to get rid of these warts. And that’s exactly what you do, you create a wound where cells get necrotic, these cells are picked up by macrophages, the necrotic cells, these bring the antigen to the draining lymph node and now an immune response is improved or accelerated. And of course the usual classical situation is depicted here. The virus, let’s say hits you on the big toe or in your mucosal surfaces, and from there the infection spreads to the draining lymph nodes and eventually via viremia to the spleen. And you know the classical rashes after measles or smallpox correspond to this viremicspread. And this staggered spread of the virus to the draining lymph node and then to the spleen actually amplifies the immune response because once in the lymph node the immune response immediately starts within 2 days or 3 days. The T cells and the antibody producing cells get amplified and by the time there is a viremic spread, this amplification already of the immune response will catch up with the systemic spread and will prevent, and this is the key, will prevent the virus spreading to the brain, because that’s the end of it, once the virus is in a neuron, that’s it. And rabies, tollwut, is of course a classical example, where the virus hits a neuron. Once in, you can’t do much about it. So let’s now take two extreme forms of infections. One being the rabies-like infection of a very close relative to rabies, it’s called vesicular stomatitis virus, which in mice causes a form of rabies because it’s strictly neurotrophic. What you see is the virus replicates, you get T cell responses and you get antibody responses. And you get basically two types, neutralising, that is they can protect you and you get ELISA, that is binding types of antibodies. And they are virtually coincident. If you take a non cytopathic virus type, HIV or hepatitis C and so on, you find that the virus replicates, there’s a good T cell response and actually the T cell response initially that controls the virus load down to undetectable levels. Undetectable means by conventional means you can’t detect it, but it also means that in fact it always persists at very low levels. Now, what is important is that the ELISA, that is, you know, sticking antigens on plastic plates, you can always measure antibodies very early, about as early as for these acute killer viruses. But the neutralising, the protective antibodies take between 80 and 300 days to come up. Now, of course you can ask why should this mouse or human make neutralising antibodies That’s the best sign actually that the virus is never gone completely. So the fact is that eventually neutralising or protective antibodies come up, and this is true for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, malaria, all these persisting chronic types of infections have basically this pattern. Remember it’s crucial that the T cell response comes up early because that’s the mechanism that really reduces viral loads initially drastically. And if that doesn’t happen, basically the virus goes all over the infected host. Now, if a virus needs 100 days for protective antibodies to come up, does it always happen? Yes, it happens always. But in the meantime these viruses or agents, malaria, have started to replicate, every replication of course increases chances of mutations and they mutate in particular also their neutralising antibody target antigens, so the neutralising determinant. And this is illustrated here. So we have this non-cytopathic virus, it replicates,it’s controlled largely by these T cell mediated immunity. You cannot measure it for let’s say 30, 40 days, but then very often the virus is controlled for the rest of the mouse’s life or the human life. But in some cases the virus comes up again. Now, this is strange, isn’t it, because before that point in time there was a very good efficient T cell immune response that controlled the virus. What happens? Well, around this time, 80 days or so, the neutralising antibodies, the protective antibody response has come up. And it is this T cell response plus the neutralising antibody response in these individuals that keeps the virus below detection. In these cases, these are all neutralising antibody escape mutants. So let’s take the open square virus, take the serum from that mouse, test it for neutralising protective capacity against the open square virus and you find that this serum cannot neutralise the open square virus. Of course this is understandable,viraemia in the presence of all sorts of neutralising antibodies, but not against that particular variant or selectant. But take this serum of that mouse, that is inefficient against this open square virus, and test it against the original virus you stuck into the mouse or against all the other variants or these controlled viruses, and you find that this serum actually is efficient in neutralising all these other variants. So you can repeat that experiment that was done by … (inaudible25:20), and you find that in fact each of these individual viruses, and we have only gone about to 20 or 30, is distinct. So the anti open square serum does not work against this one but against most others. And the controllers down here, in fact this serum has neutralising activity against most of the variants, which means that the virus within one individual changes all the time, mutates and the host makes neutralising antibodies, in fact often very sufficient and efficient, as in this case. But in some cases the relative kinetics between virus mutation and growth, and the slowly developing neutralising antibodies is such that the virus finds the loopholes through which it can escape and this will determine the balance. Now, of course you may want to ask, why should then the T cell response, which has been mounted in this early phase, not be efficient against all these upcoming variant viruses? Well, the conclusion and the answer is very simple: Many mice will die in this period of time, similar to HIV-AIDS, because the T cell immune response destroys infected host cells and the large part of the HIV-AIDS type of disease is in fact immune destruction of virus-infected host cells. And this will result in the death of the patient or at least severe disease. And only in some cases will the T cells actually be deleted, disappear, and thereby the immunopathology gets reduced or eliminated and the end effect is that the virus basically wins, stays, but since the T cell response has gone, nobody cares because the virus itself doesn’t really do much harm. Again I say, HIV 1 isn’t quite there yet, but HIV 2 basically seems to have chosen this outcome. And of course the next question is where does the virus hide, since you say it’s below control. Now, where can you control for virus in a host, in a patient? Well, you draw some blood and hope you find the virus in blood cells or in blood. Of course blood is very important, but it’s not where you would hide as a virus. Because, as I’ve said, if the virus is in the lymphohematopoietic system, then it’s particularly prone and susceptible to immune attack. Therefore these viruses all hide in cells outside of the immune system, particularly neurons, just think of herpes viruses, they hide in the ganglion. Or many viruses hide in neurons. And if they are away outside of the immune system, the immune system basically can’t treat them because the serum antibodies can only reach peripheral solid tissue cells if there is a lesion. Now, if the virus keeps dormant and doesn’t cause cell damage, there is no reason why there should be bleeding into the lesion. And exactly such balances are used in very general terms by viruses, and they use peripheral sites, neurons, kidney, tubular cells, testis cells, long epithelial cells. And of course the advantage of these sites is that the viruses can be spread from these peripheral sites very easily. You know, pissing, coughing, virus around is obviously very efficient in distributing. And this just give an example here in the urethra, here in the kidney tubular cells. So I summarise here that the immune system basically makes antibodies of several types, the IgA on mucosal surfaces, the IgM very acutely and very efficiently within the first few days, then the switch to IgD for long lasting antibodies, of about three weeks half life. And I’ll come back to that because this antibody, the IgD antibody has of course a particular characteristic that via its Fc, the constant path of the antibody, it can bind to Fc receptors. And via these Fc receptors, these antibodies can be transferred from mothers to offsprings via the Fc receptors, not only in the placenta but then to the offspring via blood transfusion, but also in the gut. And this is particularly important with calves or ruminants because we all use in biology foetal calf serum, because foetal calves do not get antibodies from their mothers. Because the membranes in the placenta are fully doubled from both sides. So proteins cannot transgress. So calves have to take up maternal antibodies in their first colostral milk they get within the first 24 hours. T cells control eliminate intracell parasites, but I’ve given you an idea about this sort of dangerous situation because of the immunopathology. They of course regulate these immunoglobulin switch, this long lasting, this is basically to avoid too easy generation of alto antibodies. But the T cells also cause this immunopathological complication. Let me just go now to the key question, why do we need so called immunological memory, which is defined as an earlier and a better response if you already have encountered the antigen previously. And the text books say ‘earlier and better is all there is about immunological memory’. However, if the first infection kills you, you certainly don’t need memory. And if the first infection is well survived, you again could argue whether you need immunological memory. Because if you have survived the first infection, you know the system has proven efficient to survive the next infection, at least for the next 25 years, and that’s all that matters. Of course I’ve already said that all vaccines that protect do so via antibodies. Now, let’s do a very simple experiment and this was done by Ulrich Steinhoff some time ago, a post doc in the lab, you immunise mice with this rabies-like virus, and then after some time, let’s say 3 months, you say, well, now we have immunological memory, we have so called T cell memory and B cell memory, we take these spleen cells, T and B memory cells, adoptively transfer into a naïve recipient that has never seen this virus, and then challenge the mouse with this same virus and we find all mice die. Now, the prediction would have been that transfer of so called memory B and T cells should provide very solid protection, doesn’t seem to be the case. Now, let’s do a second experiment, let’s take the serum of this mouse with these IgD antibodies which we can measure as protective antibodies, we transfuse those to a naïve recipient and we find that all mice are protected. So that means memory T and B cells is nice for immunologists to play in the lab, this is fine. It’s also interesting to understand what happens, but the key to survival against these acute cytopathic viruses is actually to have a pre-existent level of antibodies and then you are protected against the challenge infection of this neurotropic type of virus. Now, this of course is exactly the situation you all have encountered when you were born. Because you are born without a functioning immune system. Now, of course, not nowadays in Lindau or Berlin or Zurich, but let’s just go 200 years back, when you were born you were basically exposed to all epidemiologically important infections immediately, as of time zero. And at that time the only thing that protected you were your maternal antibodies. Your mother’s immunological experience that was transfused to you and transferred from the mother via these Fc receptors of their antibodies. So that’s exactly that experiment and now let’s see how this looks in general terms. You see, if your mother is a virus carrier, then of course she has viraemia and this virus will be transferred to the offspring either before birth through infection through the placenta or at birth where in every single birth process there is a certain amount of maternal blood being transfused to the offspring. And that’s the way, you know, the problem of rhesus incompatibility and all these problems arise from this maternal blood transfusion. But this is of course a fantastically efficient way of a virus to reach the next generation. Of course you can only do that if you are a virus that is non-cytopathic, otherwise you would kill the offspring, but your mother wouldn’t have been able to be pregnant and give birth to you because she would have died before. Now, the transferred virus will persist because the immune system will not start to react because it was immature at the stage when this first encounter came. So everything goes smoothly and in fact you could argue this is the ultimate way for a virus or infectious agent to behave. Cause no harm, cause no immune response that may cause harm, so called immunopathology, everybody is happy. Actually integrated virus, retrovirally integrated types of mechanism would even be more advanced co-evolution. But I don’t have time to go into. Now, let’s take the acute situation, your maternal experience in terms of anti-infectious agents will have accumulated over 15 years in the mother and this antibody will have accumulated then in the offspring at the time of birth, the offspring will have obtained let’s say therapeutic doses and preventive doses of maternal antibodies. And it is this maternal antibody that eventually will decline according to the half life of this immunoglobulin and during the first 6 to 12 months there will be many infections, namely all the infections that play a role epidemiologically. If an infection isn’t there, of course it doesn’t matter. But until 200 years ago all infections were always all there, always there all the time. Now, these infections of course are controlled very efficiently initially, but eventually with the decline of antibodies less and less, and there will be a point where the protection via the maternal antibodies will be sort of half way or only a quarter and this means the infection will take but will be reduced drastically. So it’s an attenuation process that is very interesting. The virus infection happens but the disease process is so reduced that in fact the offspring doesn’t get sick or get killed. Now, you remember other vaccines we use like polio or measles, we use a different process, we actually attenuate the virus by mutation so that it is less virulent. Therefore we can use the dose that induces immunity without actually making the recipient sick. Evolution has chosen a different way to actually attenuate the whole process, the same is true for virile viruses because there the milk antibodies in the maternal milk do basically the same. So the initial confrontation of infectious agents with maternal antibodies is key to the understanding of the overall epidemiology and outcome. So I can conclude, what drives the immune response, because your mother has to have guaranteed high enough levels of infection. And this is all mediated by neutralising antibodies. It can be by increase of the B cell frequency, this largely antigen independent and I don’t have time to go into that. But the maintenance of neutralising antibodies in the serum of the mother is antigen dependent because of the half life of the immunoglobulin and with the maturation of a B cell to become an antibody producing plasma cell is antigen dependent. And this re-exposure can come from within, from these persisting reservoirs of the virus, can come from antibody-antigen complexes in lymphatic tissues and can come from the outside as is the case for example by all the diarrhoeal viruses which you reencounter on your door handle or in the swimming pool or in school etc. So my conclusion is vaccinations are possible and efficient if you use the same mechanism as evolution has used, namely protection by neutralising antibodies. To keep up the antibody level, we need antigen periodically from these various sources. We cannot yet imitate such a low level persistence antigen driven type of protective immunity for all the chronic types of infections. Just take tuberculosis, you have a granuloma lesion in your lung, in my age more than half would have that lesion. I do not get sick of tuberculosis, why? Because my immune response is still good enough to control that lesion. But without that lesion the T cell immune response wouldn't be driven to control the existing lesion, so it’s well balanced. So why can I not get rid of my lesion? It’s a microscopic lesion. Well, because if I would have to boost up my immune response to such high levels to get rid of these micro lesions, I would kill myself by immunopathology. So there’s a delicate balance. In fact TB, wild type TB is in a way the best vaccine against TB, this is politically incorrect you say, but practically that's the way it goes. And to imitate that process we have simply not achieved. And for HIV it’s the same, for malaria it’s the same, for schisto and so on. So you could say: why haven’t we achieved it? Well, because it looks as if co-evolution in a physiological process has been trying this for a million years and now to imitate that in a few weeks or years is not impossible but apparently not successful. But the other point is much more important. Most of these types of chronic infections can be controlled by antibiotics for TB and leprosy or anti-virals like HIV and others or antiparasitics or vector control, you know, again politically incorrect but necessary, DDT has controlled malaria. But the limiting fact in all these cases is our human stupidity. Because we as individuals could avoid HIV very nicely, particularly in the western half of the world by simply avoiding the procedures that lead to HIV infections, drug abuse, unprotected sex and so on. But we are too stupid to really do as we can think about that would be correct. Thanks very much. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much for a very educative and also very good lecture. I would normally have had several questions to this but the program which we have participated in doing does not allow that because now we have a round table discussion. And I think after all I would anyway take two questions, who wants to say two questions, yes. QUESTION. I was just wondering, given the vertical transmission of HIV into children, as it goes through the CD4 receptor, it can get into cells which are important for development of internal organs like (inaudible 44:42), is there any evidence that infant children don’t go on to have developmental abnormalities in their…(inaudible 44:50 )cells? And therefore any consequential effects on their ability to mount immune response to other infections. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. So the question is how does HIV infection in very small kids, in newborns, how does that effect both the host and the virus capability. Well, as I tried to mention, HIV 1 is just at the moment a bad example. You know, let’s wait 500 years, because by that time HIV 1 would have to adapt and adopt more reasonable ways. HIV 2 has done that, but you know you don’t get funding for HIV 2, because HIV 2 is not a problem. So I cannot answer your question because we simply don’t know and the epidemiology hasn’t progressed to a stage where things are balanced. But the prediction is it will have to be balanced, otherwise HIV, either humanity or HIV 1 will not survive. HANS JÖRNVALL. You make answers very simple, very good. Do we have the second question, yes? QUESTION. First I would like to thank you for a very nice lecture. My question is about tuberculosis. It’s known that some population of Ashkenazi Jews are extremely resistant to tuberculosis. But in this population there is a high incidence of Tay-Sachs. Are there any links between the Tay-Sachs disease and the resistance to tuberculosis? ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Thank you for this question. So the question is, is there a link between a macrophage associated storage disease and susceptibility to TB. And you know that in fact the effector mechanism to control so called facultative intracellular bacteria is the capacity of the macrophages or monocytes to deal with the infection. So, yes, there is a link. I don’t know the molecular details but the point I think you make is a very good one. In biology, medicine, there is never an absolute winner. So you may have a disadvantage with storage, but you buy an advantage against certain infections and this is true for many things. You know, the CCR5 receptor for HIV 1, if you have a certain allele or you lack it, you have more resistance against HIV, so far not discovered but you can bet, you know that there will be disadvantages if you lack CCR5. So conclusion, biology is never black and white. It’s always, you know certainadvantages and you have by them with disadvantages. And I think, you know, human behaviour is of the same type, if you want to buy certain whatever, lost behaviour, it costs, that's biology. Keeps us honest. HANS JÖRNVALL. Thank you very much.

HANS JÖRNVALL. …die wissenschaftlichen Vorträge in dieser Reihe. Und der Sprecher ist Professor Rolf Zinkernagel. Er kommt vom Institut für Experimentelle Immunologie der Universität Zürich in der Schweiz und hat 1996 den Nobelpreis für Physiologie oder Medizin erhalten. Und verliehen wurde der Preis für die Entdeckungen zur Spezifität der zellvermittelten Immunabwehr. Und wir fahren jetzt mit dem Thema aus der Überschrift dieses Vortrags fort, nämlich warum wir bis jetzt noch keinen Impfstoff gegen HIV oder Tuberkulose haben. Bitte Dr. Zinkernagel. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Vielen Dank für die Einladung heute hier vor Ihnen zu sprechen. Und ich freue mich sehr, hier zu sein, um über ein, wie ich denke, sehr wichtiges Problem zu sprechen. Warum haben wir ausgezeichnete Impfstoffe gegen die meisten akuten Kinderkrankheiten wie Tetanus, Diphtherie, Pocken, Masern, Polio usw. und warum ist es uns bis jetzt nicht gelungen, einen Impfstoff zu entwickeln, der uns vor Tuberkulose, HIV, Hepatitis C, Malaria, Bilharziose, Leishmaniose und wie sie alle heißen, schützt. Der erste und wichtigste Grund, warum wir diese Impfstoffe nicht haben, ist der, dass die Koevolution, also das Gleichgewicht zwischen Infektionserregern und uns als Wirbeltierwirten, sozusagen keine Lösung vorhergesehen hat, bei der die Situation einfach durch einen Impfstoff korrigiert oder sagen wir verbessert werden könnte. Gegen die akut zytopathischen Arten, die akuten Killerinfektionen, musste die Evolution eine sehr effiziente Lösung finden. Auf dieser Folie habe ich versucht, die ganz allgemeinen Aspekte zusammenzufassen. Wenn wir von Immunität sprechen und nicht von Immunologie – und da gibt es einen sehr großen Unterschied, wissen Sie – Immunität handelt vom Schutz der Wirbeltierwirte gegen grundsätzlich infektiöse Erreger durch spezifische Immunreaktivität. Nun, bei Immunologie geht es dagegen meistens um kleine chemische Gruppen, sogenannte Haptene oder rote Schafsblutzellen oder ähnliche Dinge. Und der Unterschied zwischen Infektionserregern und diesen Modellantigenen besteht einfach darin, dass Infektionserreger töten und Modellantigene nicht. Und daher, wissen Sie, kann man mit diesen Ersatzmodellsystemen Vieles messen, aber sehr oft kann man nicht messen, worauf es im Leben wirklich ankommt, nämlich Krankheit zu vermeiden und ganz bestimmt den Tod vor dem 25. Lebensjahr zu vermeiden. Denn wenn Sie nach dem 25. Lebensjahr sterben, wissen Sie, spielt das nicht wirklich eine Rolle, denn dann haben Sie Ihre biologische Funktion erfüllt, nämlich die Erschaffung der nächsten Generation. Und der ganze Rest spielt keine wesentliche Rolle. Nun, Sie erkennen sofort die Lösung für das von mir aufgeworfene Problem. Wenn Sie, sagen wir, vor dem 15. oder 18. Lebensjahr getötet werden, nehmen Sie keinen Einfluss auf die Evolution. Wenn Sie nach 25 getötet werden, ist das egal. Daher ist es interessant zu erkennen, dass es neben der spezifischen Immunantwort eine ganze Palette und einen Hintergrund sehr wichtiger Resistenzmechanismen gibt, die tatsächlich, sagen wir, 95 Prozent oder mehr unserer Resistenzmechanismen ausmachen. Und dazu gehört zum Beispiel Interferon-alpha. Es wurden Mausmodelle entwickelt, bei denen der Rezeptor für Interferon-alpha fehlte. Diese Mäuse sterben an Virusinfektionen, wenn Sie ein Virus nur aus 10 Metern Entfernung sehen. Ohne Interferon haben wir also keine Überlebenschance und so weiter, es gibt viele Beispiele. Ich möchte aber nicht über diese angeborenen oder natürlichen Resistenzmechanismen sprechen. Es gibt jedoch hoch spezifische, adaptive Immunmechanismen, darunter Antikörper und zellvermittelte Immunität. Und da ist die Feststellung interessant, dass sich Antikörper tatsächlich in hohen Konzentrationen und in ungeheuren Mengen zum Beispiel in Hühnereiern finden, und sogar auch in Reptilien- und Fischeiern. Warum ist das so, warum sollte die Mutterhenne Immunglobuline, Antikörper, grammweise an ihre Nachzucht weitergeben? Und diese Frage ist, glaube ich, sehr interessant. Dann können wir weiterhin feststellen, dass alle erfolgreichen Impfstoffe durch Antikörper schützen. Es gibt nicht einen einzigen Impfstoff, der uns durch zellvermittelte Immunität vor den Folgen einer Infektion schützt, was natürlich erforderlich wäre, wollten wir einen Impfstoff gegen Tuberkulose, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. entwickeln. Aber bis jetzt hatten wir keinen Erfolg, obwohl viele Leute versprachen, wissen Sie, innerhalb der letzten 10 Jahre sollten wir Impfstoffe gegen HIV oder TB entwickelt haben. Dann gibt es da eine weitere, sehr allgemeine Beobachtung, dass Autoimmunität, also die Entgleisung des Immunsystems, bei der es beginnt, unsere eigenen Antigene oder Organe anzugreifen, was zu, sagen wir, Diabetes, Multipler Sklerose, Hashimoto-Thyroiditis, rheumatoider Arthritis usw. führt. In der Tat treten diese Erkrankungen, ganz allgemein gesprochen, nach dem, sagen wir, 25. Lebensjahr auf. Und auch das wiederum passt zu dem, was ich zuvor in stark vereinfachter Form behauptet habe, dass es nach 25 nicht wirklich eine Rolle spielt, was geschieht. Ein weiterer Punkt ist, dass weibliche Personen sehr viel anfälliger für sogenannte Autoimmunerkrankungen sind, insbesondere, wenn die Autoimmunerkrankung von Autoantikörpern abhängt. Rheumatoide Arthritis, Lupus erythematodes usw. Dann treten natürlich Tumore erst nach 25 oder 30 auf, und dies korreliert erneut mit der Tatsache, dass es keine Rolle spielt. Für den Einzelnen spielt es natürlich schon eine Rolle, aber in Bezug auf das Bevölkerungsgleichgewicht insgesamt nicht. Und die Frage, die sich stellt, natürlich parallel zu Tuberkulose und HIV lautet, warum sind wir so ineffizient beim Einsatz von Immunantworten gegen Tumore, um die Tumorprognosen und -ergebnisse wirkungsvoll zu verändern? Und über allem steht die Frage, wissen Sie, hat unser Versagen, Lösungen für dieses HIV-, TB-Impfstoffproblem zu finden, etwas mit der Art und Weise zu tun, wie wir Dinge bestimmen? Wir können viele Dinge bestimmen, in der Tat können wir mehr Dinge bestimmen als jemals zuvor. Und molekulare Bestimmungen machen Bestimmungen einfach leichter und genauer. Aber es löst nicht das Problem, ob das, was wir bestimmen, wirklich das ist, was wir bestimmen sollten. Und ich glaube, in Bezug auf medizinische Krankheiten ist das, was wir messen sollten, ganz einfach. Entweder wird diese Krankheit gemildert, verbessert, ist weniger schwerwiegend oder der Tod wird vermieden oder nicht. Alles andere ist aus medizinischer Sicht eher nicht so wichtig. Lassen Sie mich jetzt direkt auf die Dinge eingehen, Ihnen meine voreingenommene Sicht auf die Funktionsweise des Immunsystems schildern, dann auf einige Besonderheiten der Virus-Wirt-Beziehung eingehen und danach auf die Ideen und Konzepte zu Impfstoffen, zu denen natürlich die Vorstellung von einem immunologischen Gedächtnis gehört. Nun, Gedächtnis, wissen Sie, ist etwas sehr Interessantes, denn das verlieren wir, wenn wir älter werden. Das immunologische Gedächtnis scheint jedoch für den Rest unseres Lebens fortzubestehen. Wenn Sie einmal eine Krankheit gehabt haben, sind Sie für den Rest Ihres Lebens davor geschützt. Wie wird das sichergestellt und wie funktioniert das? Natürlich gibt es zwei sehr extreme Interpretationen. Entweder können Sie sich erinnern, wie mit Ihrem neuronalen Netz, oder das stimmt nicht und wir haben tatsächlich das neuronale Gedächtnis nicht wirklich verstanden. Es gibt also einige Postulate, dass man tatsächlich, um das Gedächtnis aufrecht zu erhalten, dasselbe Ding wiederholt sehen oder ihm wieder begegnen muss, sei es während der Traumzeit oder während der Wachzeit. Und nur durch diese wiederholte Begegnung mit bestimmten Stimuli bleibt das Gedächtnis bestehen, das gilt sicherlich für mich. Aber die Immunologie natürlich, die Vorstellung vom Gedächtnis besagt „einmal gesehen, immer behalten.“ Haben Sie sich das Masernvirus einmal als Kind zugezogen, sind Sie Ihr Leben lang gegen Infektionen durch das Masernvirus resistent. Und die Frage lautet, ist das eine Art mystischer Wechselwirkung oder Mechanismus, Netz, oder liegt das einfach daran, dass das Masernvirus in Fragmenten in unserem Körper verbleibt, um das Immunsystem so etwas wie zu erinnern, indem es dieses all die Jahre immer wieder ankurbelt. Und das entspricht natürlich nicht dem, was wir akademisch oder theoretisch über das Gedächtnis zu wissen glauben, es wäre einfach ein antigengebundener Prozess. Und wäre das die Erklärung, müsste man natürlich die Art der Vakzinherstellung überdenken, denn wenn Vakzine die Situation nicht imitieren können, also auf sehr geringem Niveau, das unschädlich ist, aber die Immunantwort ständig auf ausreichend hohem Niveau ankurbelt, dann haben wir ein Problem. Und meine Schlussfolgerung wird sein, dass für TB, HIV, Malaria, Bilharziose usw. wir genau diese Art Impfstoff bräuchten. OK, das Problem wird also hier zusammengefasst, Infektionen zerstören Wirtszellen grundsätzlich sehr effektiv, wie in diesem Fall das Pockenvirus, Pocken oder Polio oder Tollwut bräuchten dazu nach Infektion der Zelle nur wenige Stunden. Und natürlich kann in diesem Fall nur eine Sache zum Überleben des Wirtes führen, nämlich die sofortige Unterdrückung der Infektion innerhalb weniger Tage. Denn wenn dies länger als 7 bis 10 Tage anhält, ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass diese Arten von Erregern Neuronen befallen so hoch, dass man stirbt. Und natürlich braucht es für diese Situation, in der ein Virus eine Zelle befällt, aber die Physiologie dieser Zelle im Großen und Ganzen intakt lässt, keine Immunologie, denn das Virus verursacht im Wesentlichen keinen Schaden. Und es gehören tatsächlich viel mehr Viren zu dieser Kategorie als zu jener. Denn es liegt nicht im primären Interesse eines Infektionserregers alle Wirte zu töten. Denn wenn alle Wirte tot sind, ist auch das Virus per definitionem verschwunden, denn das Virus braucht lebende Zellen, um sich zu replizieren. Das ist also relativ einfach. Deshalb spielt Immunologie hier eine wichtige Rolle. Tatsächlich spielt Immunologie hier keine Rolle und die meisten dieser Viren werden vor oder während der Geburt von einem infizierten Wirt zum nächsten übertragen. Und woran liegt das? Daran, dass der Nachwuchs vor der Geburt kein funktionierendes Immunsystem hat, in der Tat funktioniert das Immunsystem während der Geburt nicht, ist nicht ausgereift. Das ist also der optimale Zeitpunkt zur Übertragung dieser Erreger. Und es gibt Beispiele dafür, HIV zum Beispiel wird gewöhnlich während der Geburt mit dieser kleinen Bluttransfusion von der Mutter an Ihre Nachkommen übertragen. Und die Mutter ist natürlich ein Träger, denn ihre Immunantwort gegen diese Virusinfektion ist unzulänglich. Nun, bei HIV, darauf komme ich noch zurück, ist das Problem, wie Sie wissen, noch nicht gelöst, denn es ist ein neues oder sich entwickelndes Virus. Also kam es noch nicht zu einer Koadaptation von Wirt und Virus. Am Ende wird es jedoch wie bei HIV 2 sein, wissen Sie, die westafrikanische Form der HIV-Infektion, bei der man ganz deutlich erkennen kann, dass das Gleichgewicht zwischen Wirt und Virus bereits sehr weit fortgeschritten ist, tatsächlich macht HIV 2 die Menschen nicht krank oder tötet sie. Es ist also nur eine Frage der Zeit. Was aber an diesem Fall jetzt interessant ist, ist, wenn es jetzt zu einer Immunantwort kommt, wie eine T-Zelle, eine einzelne Immunantwort, dann erkennt man sofort, dass es nicht das Virus ist, das das Gewebe- und Organversagen verursacht, sondern tatsächlich die Immunantwort, denn diese Immunantwort tötet die infizierte Wirtszelle, die durch die Infektion an sich nicht getötet worden wäre. Und das nennen wir Immunpathologie, das ist eine Immunantwort mit pathologischem Ausgang, wo eine solche Konfrontation eigentlich unnötig wäre. Und deshalb werden diese Erreger zu einem Zeitpunkt übertragen, zu dem es keine Immunantwort gibt. Jetzt versuche ich denselben Aspekt mit dieser Zeichnung darzustellen. Versuchen Sie, mir zu folgen. Wenn man ein Virus betrachtet, das durch die Plazenta oder während der Geburt übertragen wird, dann findet man dieses Virus im gesamten Wirt und dieses Antigen oder dieses Virus werden sich wie ein Eigenantigen verhalten. Denn es war vor der Geburt da, es war während der Geburt da, und daher werden diese viralen Antigene von einem funktionierenden Immunsystem als Selbst erkannt. Denn wenn das nicht so wäre, würde sich die Immunantwort gegen alle diese infizierten Wirtszellen richten und das würde zu einer Immunpathologie vom Typ Graft-versus-Host führen und der Patient würde das nicht überleben. Und das andere Extrem ist dies: Ich habe hier gerade eine Infektion mit dem Papillomavirus bildlich dargestellt. Das ist ein Virus, das die äußersten Hautzellen befällt und die viralen Antigene nur in reifen Keratinozyten exprimiert. Nun, das ist ein Ort, der so weit außerhalb des Immunsystems, nämlich Lymphknoten oder Milz oder Blutkreislauf, liegt, dass das Immunsystem nicht einmal merkt, dass eine Infektion in der Haut stattfindet. Und daher kommt es nicht sehr schnell zu einer Immunantwort, es kann sogar Monate dauern, wie Sie es vielleicht aus eigener Erfahrung mit den Warzen kennen, die Sie vielleicht mal hatten, bei denen es Wochen bis Monate, wenn nicht Jahre dauert, sie loszuwerden, irgendwann verschwinden diese Warzen. Das heißt, wenn sich ein Antigen, sogar das Antigen eines Infektionserregers außerhalb der Reichweite der Lymphknoten oder der Milz oder der sogenannten sekundären lymphatischen Organe befindet, erfolgt keine Immunantwort. Und das Antigen, sogar das virale Antigen, muss erst die drainierenden Lymphknoten oder die Milz erreichen, um eine Antwort auszulösen. Und das passiert natürlich auch mit Warzen, wenn Ihr lieber Arzt die Warzen abschabt oder sie mit heißen Nadeln kauterisiert, um diese Warzen loszuwerden. Und genau das macht man, man verursacht eine Wunde, in der die Zellen nekrotisch werden, diese Zellen, die nekrotischen Zellen, werden dann von Makrophagen aufgenommen, die das Antigen zu dem drainierenden Lymphknoten bringen und jetzt wird eine Immunantwort ausgelöst oder beschleunigt. Und natürlich wird hier die gewöhnliche, klassische Situation dargestellt. Das Virus befällt, sagen wir, Ihren großen Zeh oder Ihre oberflächlichen Schleimhäute, und von dort breitet sich die Infektion zu den drainierenden Lymphknoten und schließlich über eine Virämie zur Milz aus. Und die klassischen Ausschläge, wissen Sie, nach Masern oder Pocken, entsprechen dieser virämischen Ausbreitung. Und diese phasenweise Ausbreitung des Virus zum drainierenden Lymphknoten und dann zur Milz verstärkt die Immunantwort tatsächlich, denn einmal im Lymphknoten angekommen, beginnt die Immunantwort sofort innerhalb von 2 oder 3 Tagen. Die T-Zellen und die Antikörper-produzierenden Zellen werden aktiviert, und wenn die virämische Ausbreitung beginnt, holt diese frühzeitige Aktivierung der Immunantwort die systemische Ausbreitung ein und verhindert, und das ist der Schlüssel, verhindert, dass sich das Virus bis ins Gehirn ausbreitet, denn das wäre das Ende, hat das Virus erst einmal ein Neuron infiziert, war's das. Und Tollwut ist natürlich ein klassisches Beispiel, bei dem das Virus ein Neuron infiziert. Einmal eingedrungen, gibt es wenig, was man dagegen tun kann. Lassen Sie uns jetzt zwei extreme Infektionsformen betrachten. Einmal die tollwut-ähnliche Infektion mit einem sehr engen Verwandten der Tollwut, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus genannt, das bei Mäusen eine Art Tollwut auslöst, denn es ist streng neurotrop. Sie sehen, wie sich das Virus repliziert, man erhält T-Zellantworten und man erhält Antikörperantworten. Und man erhält grundsätzlich zwei Arten, neutralisierend, d. h. diese können Sie beschützen, und man erhält ELISA, also bindende Antikörper. Und sie treten quasi gleichzeitig auf. Wenn man eine nicht-zytophatische Virusart, HIV oder Hepatitis C usw., nimmt, erkennt man, dass sich das Virus repliziert, es gibt eine gute T-Zellantwort und tatsächlich regelt die anfängliche T-Zellantwort die Viruslast auf ein nicht nachweisbares Niveau herunter. Nicht nachweisbar heißt, mit herkömmlichen Mitteln kann man es nicht erkennen, es heißt aber auch, dass es tatsächlich auf sehr geringem Niveau weiterbesteht. Wichtig ist jetzt, dass mit dem ELISA, d.h., wissen Sie, man steckt Antigene auf Plastikplatten, man kann die Antikörper immer sehr früh nachweisen, ungefähr so früh wie für diese akuten Killerviren. Die neutralisierenden, die schützenden Antikörper jedoch tauchen erst nach 80 bis 300 Tagen auf. Nun, jetzt kann man natürlich fragen, warum sollte diese Maus oder dieser Mensch ohne dass sich das Virus noch im Wirt befindet. Das ist der beste Beweis dafür, dass das Virus niemals ganz verschwindet. Tatsache ist also, dass am Ende neutralisierende oder schützende Antikörper entstehen, und das gilt für Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV 1, 2, Malaria, all diese persistierenden, chronischen Infektionstypen haben grundsätzlich dieses Muster. Wir erinnern uns, entscheidend ist die frühe T-Zellantwort, denn das ist der Mechanismus, der die Viruslast anfänglich drastisch reduziert. Wenn das nicht der Fall ist, breitet sich das Virus grundsätzlich über den gesamten infizierten Wirt aus. Nun, wenn es bei einem Virus 100 Tage dauert, bis schützende Antikörper aufkommen, geschieht das immer? Ja, das geschieht immer. In der Zwischenzeit haben diese Viren oder Erreger, Malaria, aber angefangen, sich zu replizieren, jede Replikation erhöht natürlich die Chancen auf Mutationen, und dabei mutieren insbesondere auch ihre Antigene, die Ziele für die neutralisierenden Antikörper, also die neutralisierende Determinante. Und das ist hier dargestellt. Hier haben wir also dieses nicht-zytopathische Virus, es repliziert sich, es wird größtenteils durch diese T-Zell-vermittelte Immunität kontrolliert. Man kann es für, sagen wir, 30, 40 Tage nicht nachweisen, aber dann ist das Virus sehr häufig für den Rest des Mause- oder Menschenlebens unter Kontrolle. In manchen Fällen aber kommt das Virus wieder auf. Nun, das ist merkwürdig, nicht, denn vor diesem Zeitpunkt gab es eine sehr gute, effiziente T-Zell-Immunantwort, die das Virus kontrollierte. Was ist passiert? Nun, ungefähr hier, nach 80 Tagen oder so, beginnt die Immunantwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, schützenden Antikörpern. Und es ist diese T-Zellantwort zusammen mit der Antwort aus neutralisierenden Antikörpern, die in diesen Individuen das Virus auf nicht erkennbarem Niveau hält. In diesen Fällen sind das alles Mutanten, die den neutralisierenden Antikörpern entkommen. Nehmen wir also das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus, das Serum aus dieser Maus, testen es auf seine Fähigkeit, durch Neutralisation gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus zu schützen, und man findet heraus, dass dieses Serum das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus nicht neutralisieren kann. Das ist natürlich verständlich, Virämie in Gegenwart aller möglichen Sorten von neutralisierenden Antikörpern, aber nicht gegen diese bestimmte Variante oder Selektanten. Aber nimmt man das Serum dieser Maus, das gegen das Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Virus unwirksam ist, und testet es an dem ursprünglichen Virus, mit dem die Maus infiziert wurde, oder an allen anderen Varianten oder diesen kontrollierten Viren, findet man heraus, dass dieses Serum tatsächlich all diese anderen Varianten wirksam neutralisiert. Man kann also dieses von … durchgeführte Experiment wiederholen, und findet heraus, dass sich tatsächlich jedes einzelne dieser Viren, und wir sind nur bis etwa 20 oder 30 gegangen, von den anderen unterscheidet. Also wirkt das Anti-Unausgefüllte-Quadrat-Serum nicht gegen dieses, aber gegen die meisten anderen. Und die Kontrolleure hier unten, tatsächlich hat das Serum neutralisierende Wirkung gegen die meisten dieser Varianten, was bedeutet, dass das Virus in einem Individuum sich die ganze Zeit ändert, mutiert, und der Wirt produziert neutralisierende Antikörper, tatsächlich ist das häufig ausreichend und effizient, wie in diesem Fall. In manchen Fällen sieht die relative Kinetik zwischen Virusmutation und -wachstum und den sich langsam entwickelnden, neutralisierenden Antikörpern jedoch so aus, dass das Virus Schlupflöcher findet, durch die es entkommen kann, und das bestimmt das Gleichgewicht. Jetzt fragt man sich natürlich, warum sollte dann die T-Zellantwort, die in dieser frühen Phase aktiviert wurde, nicht gegen all diese entstehenden Virusvarianten wirken. Nun, die Folgerung und die Antwort ist ganz einfach: Viele Mäuse sterben in diesem Zeitraum, ähnlich wie bei HIV-AIDS, weil die T-Zellimmunantwort die infizierten Wirtszellen zerstört, und ein großer Teil der HIV-AIDS-artigen Krankheiten besteht tatsächlich aus einer immunvermittelten Zerstörung der durch das Virus infizierten Wirtszellen. Und das führt zum Tod des Patienten oder zumindest zu einer schwerwiegenden Erkrankung. Und nur in manchen Fällen werden die T-Zellen tatsächlich vernichtet, verschwinden, und dadurch wird die Immunpathologie reduziert oder beseitigt und das Endergebnis ist, dass das Virus gewinnt, bleibt, aber da die T-Zellantwort aufgehört hat, kümmert das niemanden, denn das Virus selbst richtet wirklich keinen großen Schaden an. Und ich sage noch mal, HIV 1 hat dieses Stadium noch nicht ganz erreicht, aber HIV 2 scheint dieses Ergebnis grundsätzlich gewählt zu haben. Und natürlich ist die nächste Frage, wo versteckt sich das Virus, da man sagt, es sei unter Kontrolle. Nun, wo kann man einen Wirt, einen Patienten, auf das Virus untersuchen? Gut, man nimmt etwas Blut ab und hofft, das Virus in Blutzellen oder im Blut zu finden. Natürlich ist Blut sehr wichtig, aber dort würden Sie sich als Virus nicht verstecken. Denn wie ich schon gesagt habe, ist das Virus, wenn es sich im lymphohämatopoetischen System befindet, besonders anfällig und empfindlich gegen Immunangriffe. Deshalb verbergen sich alle diese Viren in Zellen außerhalb des Immunsystems, insbesondere in Neuronen, denken Sie nur an die Herpesviren, sie verbergen sich im Ganglion. Oder viele Viren verbergen sich in Neuronen. Und wenn sie sich außerhalb des Immunsystems befinden, kann das Immunsystem grundsätzlich nichts gegen sie unternehmen, denn die Serumantikörper können nur dann periphere feste Gewebszellen erreichen, wenn es dort eine Verletzung gibt. Bleibt das Virus jetzt latent und verursacht keinen Zellschaden, gibt es keinen Grund, warum es zu einer Blutung in die Wunde kommen sollte. Und genau dieses Gleichgewicht wird im Allgemeinen von Viren genutzt, und sie nutzen periphere Stellen, Neuronen, Nieren, Tubuluszellen, Hodenzellen, lange Epithelzellen. Und natürlich besteht der Vorteil dieser Orte darin, dass sich das Virus von diesen peripheren Orten aus sehr leicht verbreiten kann. Wissen Sie, Viren auszupinkeln, auszuhusten ist offensichtlich eine sehr effiziente Art der Verbreitung. Und das zeigt einfach ein Beispiel hier, in der Harnröhre, hier in den Zellen der Nierentubuli. Ich fasse hier also zusammen, dass das Immunsystem grundsätzlich verschiedene Arten von Antikörpern produziert, das IgA auf oberflächlichen Schleimhäuten, das IgM ganz akut und sehr effizient innerhalb der ersten paar Tage, dann das Umschalten auf IgD für langlebige Antikörper mit etwa 3 Wochen Halbwertszeit. Und ich komme darauf zurück, denn dieser Antikörper, der IgD-Antikörper hat natürlich ein besonderes Merkmal, nämlich dass er über sein Fc, dem konstanten Teil des Antikörpers, an Fc-Rezeptoren binden kann. Und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren können diese Antikörper von Müttern an ihren Nachwuchs übertragen werden, über diese Fc-Rezeptoren, nicht nur in der Plazenta, sondern dann auch an den Nachwuchs über Bluttransfusion, aber auch im Darm. Und dies ist besonders wichtig bei Kälbern oder Wiederkäuern, denn wir alle verwenden in der Biologie fötales Kälberserum, denn Kuhföten erhalten keine Antikörper von ihren Müttern. Die Plazenta weist von beiden Seiten vollständig doppelte Membranen auf. Daher können Proteine nicht passieren. Deswegen müssen Kälber die mütterlichen Antikörper mit der ersten Kolostralmilch aufnehmen, die sie in den ersten 24 Stunden erhalten. T-Zell-Kontrolle beseitigt intrazelluläre Parasiten, aber ich habe Ihnen eine Vorstellung von dieser Art der Situation vermittelt, gefährlich aufgrund der Immunpathologie. Sie regulieren natürlich diesen Immunglobulin-Schalter, diese langlebigen, dies dient überwiegend dazu, eine zu einfache Generierung von Antikörpern zu vermeiden. Aber die T-Zellen verursachen auch diese immunpathologische Komplikation. Lassen Sie mich jetzt auf die Schlüsselfrage kommen, warum brauchen wir das sogenannte immunologische Gedächtnis, was als schnellere und bessere Antwort definiert ist, wenn Sie dem Antigen vorher schon einmal begegnet sind. Und in den Lehrbüchern steht, schneller und besser ist alles, was es zum immunologischen Gedächtnis zu sagen gibt. Wenn Sie aber die erste Infektion nicht überleben, brauchen Sie sicherlich kein Gedächtnis. Und überstehen Sie die erste Infektion gut, könnte man trotzdem in Frage stellen, dass man ein immunologisches Gedächtnis braucht. Denn wenn Sie die erste Infektion überlebt haben, wissen Sie, dass das System effizient genug ist, auch die nächste Infektion zu überstehen, zumindest für die nächsten 25 Jahre, und das ist alles, worauf es ankommt. Natürlich habe ich bereits gesagt, dass alle Impfstoffe, die schützen, dazu auf Antikörper zurückgreifen. Lassen Sie uns nun ein ganz einfaches Experiment durchführen, und das wurde vor einiger Zeit von Ulrich Steinhoff durchgeführt, einem Post-Doc in meinem Labor; man immunisiert Mäuse gegen dieses tollwutähnliche Virus und dann, nach einiger Zeit, sagen wir 3 Monate, sagt man, gut, wir haben jetzt ein immunologisches Gedächtnis, wir haben das sogenannte T-Zell-Gedächtnis und das B-Zell-Gedächtnis, wir nehmen diese Milzzellen, T- und B-Gedächtniszellen, übertragen diese auf einen naiven Empfänger, der dem Virus nie ausgesetzt war, und bringen die Maus dann mit genau diesem Virus in Kontakt, und es stellt sich heraus, dass alle Mäuse sterben. Nun, man hätte annehmen sollen, dass die Übertragung der sogenannten B- und T-Gedächtniszellen einen sehr soliden Schutz darstellt, scheint aber nicht der Fall zu sein. Jetzt machen wir ein zweites Experiment, wir nehmen das Serum dieser Maus mit diesen IgD-Antikörpern, die wir als schützende Antikörper nachweisen können, wir übertragen dieses per Transfusion auf den naiven Empfänger und wir stellen fest, dass alle Mäuse geschützt sind. Das bedeutet also, dass T- und B-Gedächtniszellen ein nettes Spielzeug für den Immunologen im Labor darstellen, prima. Es ist auch interessant zu verstehen, was passiert, aber der Schlüssel dazu, diese akuten zytopathischen Viren zu überleben, liegt tatsächlich darin, ein bereits bestehendes Antikörperniveau zu haben, dann sind sie gegen die Herausforderung einer Infektion mit diesem neurotropen Virus gerüstet. Nun, das ist natürlich genau die Situation, der wir alle ausgesetzt waren als wir geboren wurden. Denn wir werden ohne ein funktionierendes Immunsystem geboren. Jetzt, natürlich nicht heute in Lindau oder Berlin oder Zürich, aber lassen Sie uns 200 Jahre zurück gehen, damals war man bei der Geburt praktisch allen epidemiologisch bedeutenden Infektionen sofort, zum Zeitpunkt Null, ausgesetzt. Und damals war das Einzige, was Sie beschützte, Ihre mütterlichen Antikörper. Die immunologische Erfahrung Ihrer Mutter, die Ihnen per Transfusion und über diese Fc-Rezeptoren ihrer Antikörper von der Mutter übertragen wurden. Das entspricht also genau diesem Experiment und jetzt wollen wir mal sehen, wie sich das verallgemeinern lässt. Sehen Sie, wenn Ihre Mutter ein Virusträger ist, dann hat sie natürlich Virämie, und dieses Virus wird entweder vor der Geburt durch Infektion über die Plazenta oder bei der Geburt übertragen, denn bei jedem einzelnen Geburtsvorgang wird eine gewisse Menge mütterlichen Blutes an den Nachwuchs übertragen. Und das ist auch der Grund, wissen Sie, das Problem der Rhesusunverträglichkeit und all diese Probleme entstehen aufgrund der mütterlichen Bluttransfusion. Aber für das Virus ist das natürlich eine phantastisch effiziente Möglichkeit, die nächste Generation zu erreichen. Natürlich können Sie nur so vorgehen, wenn Sie ein nicht-zytopathisches Virus sind, ansonsten würden Sie den Nachwuchs umbringen, aber Ihre Mutter wäre auch gar nicht in der Lage gewesen, schwanger zu werden und zu gebären, denn sie wäre vorher gestorben. Jetzt bleibt das übertragene Virus bestehen, denn das Immunsystem reagiert nicht, weil es zum Zeitpunkt der ersten Begegnung noch nicht ausgereift war. Alles läuft also reibungslos und tatsächlich könnte man argumentieren, dass dies die ultimative Verhaltensweise für ein Virus oder einen Infektionserreger ist. Verursache keinen Schaden, verursache keine Immunreaktion, die Schaden verursachen könnte, sogenannte Immunpathologie, alle sind glücklich. Ein integriertes Virus übrigens, Mechanismen der retroviralen Integration wären eine sogar noch fortschrittlichere Koevolution. Aber ich habe keine Zeit, auf Einzelheiten einzugehen. Nun, lassen Sie uns die akute Situation…, die mütterliche Erfahrung in Bezug auf Anti-Infektionserreger hat sich über 15 Jahre in der Mutter angesammelt, und dieser Antikörper hat sich dann zum Zeitpunkt der Geburt im Nachwuchs angesammelt, der Nachwuchs hat, sagen wir, therapeutische Dosen und präventive Dosen der mütterlichen Antikörper erhalten. Und dieser mütterliche Antikörper wird schließlich entsprechend der Halbwertszeit dieses Immunglobulins abnehmen und während der ersten 6 bis 12 Monate wird es viele Infektionen geben, nämlich alle Infektionen, die epidemiologisch eine Rolle spielen. Ist eine Infektion nicht vorhanden, ist das nicht schlimm. Aber bis vor ungefähr 200 Jahre waren alle Infektionen immer vorhanden, waren immer vorhanden die ganze Zeit. Jetzt werden diese Infektionen anfänglich natürlich sehr effizient kontrolliert, aber schließlich mit abnehmenden Antikörpern immer weniger, und es wird einen Punkt geben, an dem der Schutz durch mütterliche Antikörper nur noch halb da ist oder nur noch zu einem Viertel und das bedeutet, die Infektion findet statt, wird aber drastisch gemildert. Das ist also ein Dämpfungseffekt, der sehr interessant ist. Die Virusinfektion findet statt, aber der Krankheitsverlauf wird so herabgesetzt, dass der Nachwuchs in der Tat gar nicht krank wird oder gar stirbt. Nun erinnern Sie sich an andere Impfstoffe, die wir verwenden, wie Polio oder Masern, dafür nutzen wir einen anderen Vorgang, tatsächlich dämpfen wir das Virus durch Mutation, sodass es weniger virulent ist. Daher können wir eine Dosis verabreichen, die Immunität induziert, ohne den Geimpften wirklich krank zu machen. Die Evolution hat sich für einen anderen Weg entschieden, den gesamten Vorgang zu mildern, dasselbe gilt für virulente Viren, denn dort machen die Milchantikörper in der Muttermilch im Grunde das Gleiche. Die erstmalige Konfrontation zwischen Infektionserregern und mütterlichen Antikörpern ist daher der Schlüssel zum Verständnis der gesamten Epidemiologie und des Ergebnisses. Daher kann ich schlussfolgern, was die Immunantwort steuert, denn Ihre Mutter muss garantiert mit einem ausreichenden Infektionsniveau konfrontiert gewesen sein. Und all dies wird über neutralisierende Antikörper vermittelt. Das kann durch einen Anstieg der B-Zellfrequenz geschehen, dies größtenteils antigenunabhängig, und ich habe keine Zeit darauf einzugehen. Aber der Erhalt der neutralisierenden Antikörper im Serum der Mutter geschieht antigenabhängig aufgrund der Halbwertszeit des Immunglobulins, und die Reifung einer B-Zelle, damit daraus eine antikörperproduzierende Plasmazelle wird, ist antigenabhängig. Und dieser erneute Kontakt kann von innen kommen, aus diesem persistierenden Virusreservoir, kann aus diesen Antikörper-Antigen-Komplexen im lymphatischen Gewebe stammen und von außerhalb, wie das bei all diesen Durchfall verursachenden Viren der Fall ist, denen Sie am Türgriff oder im Schwimmbad oder in der Schule usw. wieder begegnen. Daher ist meine Schlussfolgerung, Impfungen sind möglich und effizient, wenn man denselben Mechanismus verwendet, den auch die Evolution verwendet, nämlich Schutz durch neutralisierende Antikörper. Um das Antikörperniveau hoch zu halten, brauchen wir regelmäßig Antigen aus diesen verschiedenen Quellen. Noch können wir diese Art der schützenden Immunität, die auf einer sehr niedrigen Konzentration eines persistierenden Antigens basiert, nicht für alle chronischen Infektionen nachahmen. Nehmen wir einfach Tuberkulose, Sie haben ein Granulom in Ihrer Lunge, in meinem Alter hätten mehr als die Hälfte diese Wunde. Ich erkranke nicht an Tuberkulose, warum? Da meine Immunantwort immer noch gut genug ist, diese Wunde zu kontrollieren. Aber ohne diese Wunde würde die T-Zell-Immunantwort nicht dazu gebracht, die vorhandene Wunde zu kontrollieren, es ist also gut ausbalanciert. Warum kann ich also meine Wunde nicht los werden? Es ist eine mikroskopisch kleine Wunde. Nun, weil ich meine Immunantwort auf ein so hohes Niveau treiben müsste, um diese Mikrowunden los zu werden, dass ich mich selbst durch Immunpathologie umbringen würde. Da gibt es also ein empfindliches Gleichgewicht. In der Tat ist TB, der Wildstamm der TB, auf eine Art der beste Impfstoff gegen TB, Sie sagen, dass sei politisch inkorrekt, aber praktisch ist es genau so. Und es ist uns bisher einfach nicht gelungen, diesen Vorgang zu imitieren. Und das gilt auch für HIV, das gilt auch für Malaria, für Bilharziose usw. Sie könnten also fragen: Warum haben wir das nicht geschafft? Nun, es sieht so aus, als hätte die Koevolution dies in einem physiologischen Prozess seit Millionen von Jahren versucht, und das jetzt in ein paar Wochen oder Jahren nachzuahmen ist nicht unmöglich, aber anscheinend nicht erfolgreich. Sehr viel wichtiger ist aber ein anderer Punkt. Die meisten dieser chronischen Infektionsarten können durch Antibiotika wie bei TB und Lepra oder Virostatika wie bei HIV und anderen oder Antiparasitika oder Vektorkontrolle eingedämmt werden, wissen Sie, wieder politisch inkorrekt aber notwendig, DDT hat Malaria eingedämmt. Aber der begrenzende Faktor in all diesen Fällen ist unsere menschliche Dummheit. Denn wir als Einzelne könnten HIV ganz einfach verhindern, insbesondere in der westlichen Hälfte der Welt, indem wir einfach auf die Handlungen verzichten, die zu einer HIV-Infektion führen, Drogenmissbrauch, ungeschützter Sex usw. Aber wir sind zu dumm, um wirklich zu tun, was wir denken, dass es das Richtige wäre. Vielen Dank. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank für einen sehr lehrreichen und auch sehr guten Vortrag. Normalerweise würde ich mehrere Fragen dazu entgegennehmen, aber das Programm, an dem wir uns beteiligen, lässt das nicht zu, denn jetzt haben wir eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Und ich glaube, nach alldem, würde ich trotzdem zwei Fragen zulassen, wer möchte zwei Fragen stellen, ja. FRAGE. Ich frage mich gerade, wenn man von der vertikalen Übertragung von HIV an Kinder ausgeht, da es über den CD4-Rezeptor geht, kann es Zellen befallen, die für die Entwicklung der inneren Organe wie (nicht hörbar 44:42) wichtig sind, gibt es einen Nachweis, dass es bei Kleinkindern nicht zu Entwicklungsstörungen in ihren … (nicht hörbar 44:50 ) Zellen kommt und damit zu folgenschweren Auswirkungen auf ihre Fähigkeit, eine Immunantwort auf andere Infektionen aufzubauen. ROLF ZINKERNAGEL. Die Frage lautet also, wie wirkt sich eine HIV-Infektion bei Kleinkindern, bei Neugeborenen, wie wirkt sich das auf die Fähigkeit sowohl des Wirts als auch des Virus aus. Nun, ich habe versucht zu erläutern, dass HIV 1 im Moment gerade ein schlechtes Beispiel ist. Wissen Sie, lassen Sie uns 500 Jahre warten, denn bis dahin wird HIV 1 zwangsläufig vernünftigere Wege entwickelt und eingeschlagen haben. HIV 2 hat das schon getan, aber Sie wissen, man bekommt keine Forschungsgelder für HIV 2, denn HIV 2 ist kein Problem. Daher kann ich Ihre Frage nicht beantworten, denn wir wissen es einfach nicht und die Epidemiologie hat noch nicht das Stadium erreicht, in dem sich ein Gleichgewicht eingestellt hat. Die Voraussage ist jedoch, es wird sich ein Gleichgewicht einstellen müssen, denn sonst wird HIV, wird entweder die Menschheit oder HIV 1 nicht überleben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Sie machen Antworten sehr leicht, sehr gut. Gibt es noch die zweite Frage, ja? FRAGE. Zuerst möchte ich Ihnen für einen sehr spannenden Vortrag danken. Meine Frage betrifft Tuberkulose. Es ist bekannt, dass eine Population von aschkenasischen Juden extrem resistent gegen Tuberkulose ist. Aber in dieser Population gibt es eine hohe Inzidenz von Tay-Sachs. Gibt es irgendwelche Zusammenhänge zwischen der Tay-Sachs-Krankheit und der Resistenz gegen Tuberkulose? Vielen Dank für diese Frage. Die Frage lautet also, gibt es einen Zusammenhang zwischen einer Makrophagen-assoziierten Speicherkrankheit und der Anfälligkeit für TB. Und Sie wissen, dass der Effektormechanismus zur Kontrolle sogenannter fakultativ intrazellulärer Bakterien tatsächlich die Fähigkeit der Makrophagen oder Monozyten ist, mit der Infektion fertig zu werden. Also ja, es gibt einen Zusammenhang. Ich kenne die molekularen Einzelheiten nicht, aber ich glaube, worauf Sie hinauswollen, ist ein guter Punkt. In der Biologie, Medizin, gibt es nie einen absoluten Gewinner. Sie können also einen Nachteil bei der Speicherung haben, aber Sie gewinnen einen Vorteil gegen bestimmte Infektionen und das gilt für viele Dinge. Wissen Sie, der CCR5-Rezeptor für HIV 1, wenn Sie ein bestimmtes Allel haben oder es fehlt Ihnen, sind Sie resistenter gegen HIV, bisher nicht entdeckt, aber man kann darauf wetten, wissen Sie, dass es einen Nachteil geben wird, wenn Ihnen CCR5 fehlt. Fazit also, Biologie ist niemals schwarz oder weiß. Es hat immer, wissen Sie, bestimmte Vorteile und Sie erkaufen sich diese mit Nachteilen. Und ich glaube, wissen Sie, menschliches Verhalten funktioniert genauso. Wenn man was auch immer kaufen möchte, Lustverhalten, kostet das etwas, das ist Biologie. Das lässt uns ehrlich bleiben. HANS JÖRNVALL. Vielen Dank.

 
(00:01:13 - 00:04:26)
To listen to the ful lecture click here.

 
Zinkernagel puts forward the idea that the search for vaccines for chronic illnesses is futile and perhaps even impossible. They will always be too fast for us, mutating and hiding in genomes, they may often be specific to the host, which eliminates a “one size fits all” approach in prevention[17]. As Zinkernagel stated, “to imitate co-evolution in a few weeks or years is not impossible, but apparently not successful”. Therefore, the solution for an emerging virus such as HIV may be prevention of infection in the first place through widespread education. With time, the virus will learn to symbiotically coexist with humans. It is not in any virus’s interest to kill too many hosts; a virus needs a host to survive, otherwise it will become extinct.

From a non-human-centric perspective, viruses are a vital part of our ecosystems. A recent study found that there are nearly 200 000 virus species in the Earth’s oceans[18]. Most are not pathogenic to humans, although many can infect marine wildlife. But what is important to note, marine viruses are part of the biological carbon pump, converting carbon dioxide into organic carbon, and sequestering carbon in ocean depths. Long-term survival of humans on the planet would not be possible without viruses.

 

[1] Tomato spotted wilt virus
[2] Riedel, S. (2005). Edward Jenner and the History of Smallpox and Vaccination. Baylor University Medical Centre Proceedings 18(1): 21-15.
[3] Horzinek, M.C. (1997) The Birth of Virology. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 71: 15-20.
[4] Samji, T. (2009). Influenza A: Understanding the Viral Life Cycle. Yake J Biol Med 82(4), 153-159.
[5] How do genes direct the production of proteins?
[6] Baltimore D. (1970) Viral RNA-dependent DNA Polymerase. Nature 226: 1209 – 1211.
[7] Karunasagar, I. and Ababouch, L. (2012) Shrimp Viral Diseases, Import Risk Assessment and International Trade. Indian J Virol 23(2), 141-148.
[8] https://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/disandpath/viral/pdlessons/Pages/TomatoSpottedWilt.aspx
[9] Gagnon, A., Miller, M.S., Hallman, S.A., Bourbeau, R., Herring, D.A., Earn, D.J.D., and Madrenas, J. (2013). Age-Specific Mortality During the 1918 Influenza Pandemic: Unraveling the Mystery of High Young Adult Mortality. PLoS One, 2013 8(8): e69586.
[10] Blumberg, Baruch s. (2002). Hepatitis B: The Hunt for a Killer Virus. Princeton University Press.
[11] Baruch S. Blumberg - Biographical
[12] Research Profile - Harald zur Hausen
[13] Research Profile - Françoise Barré-Sinoussi
[14] Nobel Lecture by Françoise Barré-Sinoussi - 251HIV: A Discovery Opening the Road to Novel Scientific Knowledge and Global Health Improvement 
[15] Press Release - Stanley B. Prusiner
[16] Prusiner, S.B. (1998) Prions. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95(23) (Nobel Lecture)
[17] Kulkarni, H.S., and Goenka A.H. (2007) Science and Sensibility: An Interview with Professor Rolf M. Zinkernagel, Nobel Prize Winner for Medicine 1996. MedGenMed 9(4), 28.
[18] Hundreds of thousands of marine viruses discovered in world's oceans