The Rise of Life

by Hanna Kurlanda-Witek

The story of how life formed on Earth keeps unfolding, revealing new clues about how our planet evolved from being barren and hostile to life, wrapped in harmful gases, to the lush and diverse place we know today. The problem associated with the formation of the first cellular organisms – or the organic compounds from which they are built – is that these processes took place over four billion years ago and much of the evidence has ceased to exist. As Nobel Laureate George Smoot mentioned during his lecture in Lindau in 2008, this area of research is not unlike forensic science, where evidence is collected just like at a crime scene. Author Peter Forbes wrote that the origin of life “could once be safely consigned to wistful armchair musing – we’ll never know (...)”. Nevertheless, the topic has not ceased to fascinate scores of scientists, among them Nobel Laureates. Even though Nobel Prizes are not given for abiogenesis or evolutionary biology, many laureates have shifted their research interests to this exciting field after winning the Nobel Prize in another discipline. Harold Urey, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 “for the discovery of heavy hydrogen”, dedicated many years to the early geochemistry of planets and meteorites; his lectures at the Lindau Meetings in the 1960s and 1970s focused on the chemical evidence of the origin of the solar system. Christian de Duve is probably equally famous for his discovery of the cellular organelles lysosomes and peroxisomes, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1974, as for his many books on the rise of life.

Recent developments in molecular biology, genomics and biochemistry have added even more clues to theories of abiogenesis. De Duve wrote in 1995: “The history of life on earth is written in the cells and molecules of existing organisms. Thanks to the advances of cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology, scientists are becoming increasingly adept at reading the text.” There is much ongoing debate as to how probable the formation of life was. If we went back in time, would the same processes occur? Or would Earth be colonised by decidedly different organisms (or none at all)? The origin of life was a singular occurrence that led to a sequence of events – one offshoot coming from one type of model formation, others leading to evolutionary dead ends. During the 1994 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting dedicated to Physics, the physicist Murray Gell-Mann presented a theory that could be echoed by evolutionary biologists as well as chemists, which stated that complexity arises from simplicity, or from an initial order, and is then subject to chance.


Murray Gell-Mann stating that complexity arises from simplicity, or from an initial order, and is then subject to chance
(00:01:46 - 00:02:54)

 

The Big Bang occurred 13.7 billion years ago, producing the first elements – hydrogen and helium. As John Mather explained in his lecture in 2010, a small piece of the primordial material started to expand very quickly, at a rate that was faster than the speed of light. Yet, our local universe is not expanding and this can be explained by the inhomogeneity of some parts of the early universe; some were denser than others, which led to an uneven distribution of matter, allowing for the formation of the solar system approximately 4.5 billion years ago. Nuclear reactions taking place inside stars initiated the formation of chemical elements, hence all matter today is the recycled material left over from those early stars.

John Mather (2010) - The History of the Universe, from the Beginning to the Ultimate End

I would like to tell you as a thespian the entire history of the universe from the beginning to end, I have only half an hour so it will be brief. So thank you for inviting me to come and telling you this amazing story. Astronomers have actually made tremendous progress on this and we are still guessing about many of the things I'm going to tell you. Many of the things are probably not true, but you will find out later, as we all will, as this comes to be discussed. So astronomers are now working on this question of how did we get here. Just as Jack and Ada were talking about, we are very interested in the origins of life. So astronomers have the easy part, I think, we have the challenge of describing the physical universe that leads to the conditions where life could exist here on the planet earth. We have a story about the Big Bang, we have a story about how galaxies are made from the primordial material. How galaxies change with time, how stars are made within galaxies, how planets can be made around stars. And eventually, how the conditions for life may come to exist here and perhaps many other places. So we are as astronomers working on the physical universe part and then we say, okay, biologists, you have the next step. So first I want to show you about the expanding universe. Back in 1929 this chart was made by Edwin Hubble. He plots here each dot as a galaxy. A galaxy as you know is 100 billion stars orbiting around each other. On the horizontal axis is his estimated distance, on the vertical axis is the speed that he measured from the Doppler shift. So the immediate conclusion from this chart in 1929 is that the universe is expanding. The most distant galaxies are going away from us at speeds approximately proportional to the distance, and that means that you can calculate the approximate age of the universe by dividing the distance by the speed. So in those days he had wrong estimates for the distance, so we had a very confusing picture for a time, and the universe appeared to be younger than the oldest objects in it. So that mistake took several decades to correct, but at any rate it was corrected. Now we have this story which we call Hubble’s law, it’s not just a theory, it´s the law. And, by the way, also in 1929 it was discovered, that the worldwide economy could collapse. So it’s a good thing to remember that that’s the year we also discovered that the entire universe could expand. In 1929 this was a very large surprise. I will show you pictures of some of the people who thought about this. In the middle there you see Albert Einstein, and he is the man who told us that space and time are not absolute but are mixed together in order to have special relativity. Special relativity is the set of formulae that explains how it is possible that the speed of light would be a constant regardless of whether we are moving or not. So it turns out that’s the unique solution to that particular problem. In 1916 he generalised this theory to include the forces of gravity and he said that space and time are curved by the action of gravitation. And this then gave us for the first time the ability to calculate the force of gravity across an infinite universe, because his equations are differential equations and not just what Isaac Newton had given us. When Isaac Newton thought about this problem of gravitation across the universe, the result was infinities. So it was not possible to come to a definite conclusion, but Isaac Newton already was aware that there was a problem. In 1929 this was still a surprise. Now I want to tell you about the work of the two people here on the left, Alexander Friedmann in 1922 applied Einstein’s equations, and he said “I think the universe is expanding”, and he gave us the right equations for how to describe it. In 1925 he died, so he didn’t get to see that he was correct. In 1927 George Lemaître here, who is shown next to Einstein, wearing his Belgium priest´s collar, who was a mathematician and a Belgian priest, derived the same equations and said “I call this the primeval atom”. And in both cases Einstein said this is mathematically correct but physics is abominable. So he was quite sure, Einstein was, that the universe could not possibly be expanding. How would he know? Well he asked his friends and the friends said “everyone knows the universe is not expanding”. So Einstein had included in his equations a constant of integration, which we now call the Lambda constant, and his idea was that the Lambda constant was a force of repulsion, which would balance the force of contraction that gravitation would produce. So Einstein was greatly surprised in 1929 to find that his constant was not needed in the expanding universe, and he had to apologise for being rude, as well as for making a great mistake, which he supposedly called his greatest blunder. So that’s in the early part of the 20th century. In the middle of the 20th century George Gamow, who is shown here, was a Ukrainian physicist who came to the United States to work. After the war was over and people know about nuclear reactions much more, they were able to calculate the processes that should have occurred in the early universe. So they said “what if we calculate the properties of the Big Bang?”. So they were able to say and the lifetime of the neutron was known”, so it was realised that the primordial material should make hydrogen and helium in the first few minutes. And then after that the neutrons would be gone, so the cosmic abundance of hydrogen and helium was set in the first few minutes of the expanding universe. He also said the universe should be filled with radiation, cosmic microwave radiation, which would have a temperature of a few degrees, about five degrees above absolute zero. And this was not possible to measure at that time. It would have been a very difficult measurement. Now we know that it´s possible for a determined high school student to measure it with equipment from television receivers. In 1948, when they calculated these things, it was not possible. They tried quite hard but it was not measured, until it was discovered in 1965 by two of the Nobel prize winners, who actually are here today, Arnold Penzias and Bob Wilson, and so the discovery of this cosmic radiation was a tremendous surprise as it turns out, even though some people had already been thinking about it decades before. I’ll point out that this radiation is incredibly bright, although it’s difficult for us to measure in that order of magnitude it´s very bright and in fact if you tune your television receiver between channels, about 1% of the snow flakes you see on a TV screen come from the cosmos, come from the Big Bang radiation itself. So if you knew what you were looking at you'd say “aha now I understand the Big Bang!”. I have two other pictures here. On the bottom on the left are Alpher and Herman. They were working with George Gamow and they were the ones who actually did these calculations in 1948. They are shown here as they appeared when they came to the launch of their satellite which made a more precise measurement and earned the Nobel prize. On the right hand side we have Sunyaev and Peebles, who are two modern theorists. This is a reminder that no theorist has earned a prize yet for the Big Bang, but many observers have now. I want to point out that a consequence of Hubble’s Law, the straight line on his graph, is that there is no measurable centre or edge of the universe. You might say “well, I see all the galaxies are going away from us here on earth, doesn’t that mean that we are at the centre?”. And the conclusion of the calculation is here, each of these astronomers would conclude that he or she is at the centre of the universe. Therefore there is no centre that we can determine. Astronomers have of course been very busy looking for a centre or an edge for many generations and we have not found one. There is of course a practical edge. You cannot see past the time that we’ve been allotted, if we have existed here for 13.7 billion years, that means you can see 13.7 billion light years in every direction and that’s as far as we can see, because we are looking back towards the beginning by looking at most distant things. We look back in time as we look at distant objects. So the practical fact is, there is a small part of the universe we can see, and there is probably much more universe beyond that that we cannot see, because we have not existed long enough. So to wave my arms very vigorously we imagine there was some primordial material. Possibly infinite in extent, possibly not. Some small volume of it began expanding by some strange and bizarre quantum mechanical process. One of the great challenges of modern physics is to understand this initial period of time when we believe that quantum mechanics and gravitation must be merged into some kind of quantum gravity theory. And we do not have yet a successful theory. Many people are still working on it. At any rate not only did material start flowing away from other material in the expansion but we picture that space itself has been expanding. Now space is not necessarily a substance we do not know what space or time actually are for themselves, but perhaps when we get a theory of quantum gravity, then we will have a better idea. At any rate this early universe began expanding exponentially rapidly. It doubled in size about a hundred times in a very, very tiny instant of time and kicked off the expanding universe of today. Now we say “well, we look around and we do not see our local universe expanding”. The solar system is not expanding, the galaxy is not expanding, nearby galaxies are not all of them going away. So what is it that has made possible the non-expansion of our local part? How can we exist if the whole universe is expanding? So the idea is that some parts of the early universe were more dense than others, and they would have enough self attraction through their own gravitational forces to combat the expansion rate. And so this is the story, the initial material had to be slightly inhomogeneous, some parts denser than others, so that the gravitation could stop the expansion in those volumes and fall back and make stars and galaxies. Of course after a star can be born, then we can have the nuclear reactions inside this star that produce the other elements. I told you earlier, that we had only hydrogen and helium from the Big Bang, so where did the chemical elements of life come from? They come from stars that have, a previous generation of stars that have burned their nuclear material and exploded and distributed the chemical elements back into space. So we ourselves are already recycled material from inside stars. If you look in the mirror in the morning, and you see the chemical elements of life, you have to remember, they were not there in the Big Bang. They were formed already inside stars. So you can be doing your cosmology every morning when you are doing your cosmetics. So I have a short chart to summarise the early history of the universe, we have a picture of the Big Bang as measured with microwaves. We have an idea that galaxies are formed by small objects merging together to form large ones. Just as small streams flow together to form large rivers. We have a picture in the lower left of our nearest large neighbour galaxy, the Andromeda nebula, which you can see with binoculars quite nicely. It’s about as big as the full moon but not nearly as bright. So in the beginning we have a story which was – the Big Bang by the way was renamed the "Horrendous Space Kablooie" by our American cartoonist of Calvin and Hobbes. So I like the name actually better than the “Big Bang”, because it suggests that there is something strange that happens about space itself. So it´s compatible with the idea that there’s an inflation and space itself may be expanding. Since we don’t know what space is, that’s a little bit tricky, but it’s a different point of perspective. So the original material gave us the chemical elements of hydrogen and helium, it started off the universe with the expansion, it gave us a dark matter, which is important. We would not exist without dark matter. And that all happened 13.75 billion years ago with a very small error bar. We are now in the era of precision cosmology. So I mentioned earlier that the helium nuclei, that were made in the first few minutes, then the universe expanded and cooled when it was about 389.000 years old, the electrons found the atomic nuclei and the primordial gases material became neutral. Before that it was opaque as a plasma, and after that it was neutral, and the photons of the background radiation could propagate to us. The universe became transparent. So then hypothetical events on the chart, the first generation of stars, we imagine they were very different from the sun, and much more massive, and that they would burn out very promptly in a few million years. Then galaxies were formed and then at the end, here I point out, that about 5 billion years ago the universe began to accelerate again and to go faster and faster. This is a tremendous surprise of the last decade of astronomy, and it tells us a little bit about what may happen at the end of the universe. We see now that the universe is accelerating and going faster and faster, that means that in a number of billions of years, the distant galaxies will be so far away that most of them will be invisible to us. Their velocities of recession will continue to increase and in 100 billion years or so almost all of them will be invisible. Not only will the stars go out, but the galaxies will be too far away for us to see. So we have a few billion years before we have to move. This chart illustrates very briefly why we talk so much about the microwave background radiation. It is the strong remnant of the primordial material, it is a material that we can measure very precisely in every direction, and at the right hand side of the picture is one of the space probes that is out there currently measuring the radiation. And the properties of this microwave radiation turn out to be extremely informative. I don’t have time to tell you details. I do want to show you one picture of the first satellite that was built to measure this radiation: this was the cosmic background explorer or COBE Satellite. At least for me the idea came from the failure of my thesis project, which was an attempt to measure the cosmic background radiation with a balloon payload. The balloon payload failed for a number of reasons, and I concluded that this subject was much too difficult, I would leave the subject. But a few months later NASA solicited proposals for satellite missions, and I said to my advisor We had no idea how hard that project would be, but here it is, it was launched fifteen years later. And here it is as an artist would see it in space. It carried instruments to measure the microwave radiation and to look for the light of the first galaxies. So I’ll show you just a few things from it. Here is the spectrum of the microwave radiation. The frequency of the waves, the cycles per centimetre on horizontal axis, brightness in the vertical direction. You see all the little boxes are exactly on the curve as it should be if the Big Bang theory is correct. So we received a standing ovation when we showed this to the astronomical society. I was a little surprised, because I knew this was the right answer. The astronomers were assembled. They had been quite worried that the Big Bang theory might not have been correct. So this was a tremendous relief for people. Now this little picture is in all the text books. Our second discovery was this set of maps of the sky, the one to focus on is the Ellipse at the bottom of the picture. This is a map after taking out all of the local effects that we know and the blobs, the objects on the map, are primordial temperature variations. The tiny variations of the temperature of the microwave radiation from place to place. As it turns out the cold regions on this map are the ones which are more dense in the early universe, and those are the volumes which are going to develop into galaxies and clusters of galaxies. And the bright regions, the pink ones are the ones which are going to turn out to be empty, where the gravitation will pull the material away. Stephen Hawking saw this picture. He said it was the most important scientific discovery of the century if not of all time. I was appreciative of his good words but of course I think there have been some other discoveries as well. So on the other hand, if those blobs were not there, we would not exist, so maybe it´s important. Years have passed, we have now a great deal of activity in characterising the statistics of those objects, that you see in those maps. And this is a theoretical curve which has been used and interpreted to determine many cosmological parameters down to the percent level of accuracy. I don’t have time to explain the details, but I just wanted to show that there’s a tremendous amount that can be learned from the shapes of those objects on the microwave map. Now time is short, so I will not actually give you all the details of anything else either. This is a picture of three people who discovered that the universe is accelerating, and we named the cause of this acceleration Dark Energy. Now that means that we do not have any idea what it is. So in a few years maybe somebody will have the correct description, but right now it´s only a name. There are a few mysteries remaining for us, astronomers would say we know that there is only matter in the universe. There are no anti-matter galaxies. Particle physicists want to know why this is true. I told you there is dark matter out there, there´s a lot more of it than there are atoms and molecules. The question of what is the dark energy, what is it beyond, just a name? Everyone wants to know from astronomers, is Einstein right about relativity? And of course we are busy testing it but we are not there yet. And we would certainly like to answer the question of our own history. How did the earth come to exist and how did all those things come to be that we can live here? Are we the only living things in the universe? Is it possible, of course, in the remote possibility, that you could communicate with other living things and of course for our own history what would happen next? So astronomers are now pursuing the infrared region of observations in space. I will show you the project I'm currently working on. We would like very much to be able to study infrared radiation from outer space. And it’s a very difficult project because infrared does not come well through the earths atmosphere, and because telescopes emit infrared radiation of their own. So on the other hand, it´s interesting because of that same factor objects at room temperature emit infrared radiation. Your body is emitting about 500 watts of infrared radiation, as each of us are sitting here in the room. So the telescope we are currently building is called the James Webb Space Telescope and named after the man at NASA, who organised us to go to the moon, and did it successfully. This telescope is being now built by a partnership with a European and Canadian space agencies with my agency, NASA, in the United States. We are well along in the process of building it, which was started fifteen years ago. This telescope that you see here does not look like an ordinary telescope. It looks more like a solar energy concentrator. Actually think of it as a galaxy energy concentrator, bringing light from the distant universe to concentrate and be focused by the giant hexagonal parabolic mirror down into the instrument package. The large blue system that you see underneath is a umbrella, a sun shield to protect the telescope from the sun and the earth, and allow it to become cold. The telescope will operate at a temperature of about 40° Kelvin and it is also much larger than a rocket. You see that it is a structure, not just a tube, so I don’t have the video for you but it actually will unfold after launch from the Ariane 5 rocket. And we are hoping to launch it in 2014 with luck. So I’ll show you just a few of the scientific topics that we hope to address with it. I wanted to assure you that we are learning how to focus the telescope. the Hubble Space Telescope, as you all know, was imperfect when it was launched and it was repaired by astronauts. Our telescope is going to be much farther away, a million miles away from the earth and it cannot be fixed. So we have to get it right the first time, so we are practicing. We have this small model and then we will take the telescope that we will fly to this giant test chamber in Houston, Texas, where the Apollo astronauts actually want to practice being in a vacuum. A few things to illustrate about our scientific program. One of the remarkable discoveries is that as Einstein told us it would happen, gravitation can bend light. So you can barely see in the upper right corner of the picture that there is a pink arc and the pink arc is actually the image of a very distant galaxy that has been magnified and distorted by the gravitational field of these other galaxies that you see in the picture. So Einstein’s gravitation is helping us see even farther into the distant universe. We have the capability of understanding how galaxies were formed, not by watching them do this, but by simulating them. So in the lower right we see a computer simulation, that for a moment matches the picture of real galaxies They completely change their appearance as they merge together. By the way the Andromeda nebula is coming towards us and it is going to do that to our galaxy in about 5 billion years. We have these projects in front of us. We will watch stars explode occasionally. This is an image, on the right is an image of a star that will explode in the next few hundred thousand years quite nearby to us. On the left there’s a concept of how it may work. Anyway we have seen something like this happened. Well, this is a rare case but probably like the earliest stars in the universe as they explode. Once in a while a star blows up and has a jet of material that comes out and is aimed at us. This is a jet of material moving at nearly the speed of light, and once in a while, when it is aimed at us, we receive a burst of gamma radiation that lasts for about two seconds. And just in the last few years it was recognised that these are the sources. These are stars exploding at the edge of the universe and just happening to be aimed at us we can get these gamma rays. So all of these things are mysteries we will pursue to try to understand. Another closer target for us is the Eagle nebula. If we could lower the lights a little bit this would really help with these pictures. But in any way this is a very famous picture from the Hubble Space Telescope, it shows, where you see these beautiful images of a star forming region, stars have been born inside these dark clouds of material. And the Hubble Telescope even cannot see inside because the dark clouds of dust are opaque. Now if you can use infrared light, you can see through the dusty material inside and see where stars are being born these days. So we have a chance to learn much more about the formation of stars like the sun, as we look at clouds nearby where it is currently happening. It was mentioned earlier by Jack that we are now able to take pictures of planets around other stars, and we have a picture here that illustrates this. We have hundreds of targets eventually, maybe thousands, and the possibility, which I will now illustrate in the next chart, that we can learn about the chemistry of the atmospheres of those planets. The movie shows a planet going in front of a distant star, and you should imagine that a little bit of the starlight is going through the atmosphere of that planet on its way to our telescope. That means we can do spectroscopy, we can determine the chemical composition of the atmosphere of another planet by doing this. And we do not have to have a telescope that makes a separate image of this planet, we can have a telescope that just watches the change of light as the planet intercepts some starlight. So once in a while even the opposite occurs as well, the planet will be obscured by this star. And both of these have already been done with telescopes in space, with our new telescope we hope to do better. It is not probable that our telescope will be able to do this for an earth-like planet around a sun-like star, but for a future generation of observatory that would be built just for this purpose. We should be able to learn whether a planet around another star has an atmosphere like the earth with oxygen, and that would be a clue that there’s life. So there’s a little paperback book which has been published, that summarises or story, and it´s available from Amazon.com. And of course there are plenty of websites that convey the general information of our story. So anyway, thank you very much for hearing the story of the universe and appreciating the mysteries that are still in front of us. Applause.

Ich würde Ihnen gerne als Darsteller die gesamte Geschichte des Universums vom Anfang bis zum Ende erzählen, dabei habe ich nur eine halbe Stunde, es wird also kurz. So, vielen Dank für die Einladung, hierher zu kommen und diese erstaunliche Geschichte zu erzählen. Die Astronomen haben tatsächlich enorme Fortschritte gemacht und viele Dinge, über die ich berichten werde, sind immer noch Vermutungen. Viele Dinge sind wahrscheinlich nicht wahr, aber das finden Sie später heraus, wir alle finden das heraus, wenn darüber diskutiert wird. Die Astronomen beschäftigen sich also jetzt mit der Frage, wie wir hierher kamen. Wie uns Jack und Etta berichtet haben, sind wir sehr an den Ursprüngen des Lebens interessiert. Astronomen haben dabei den leichteren Part, glaube ich, wir stehen vor der Herausforderung, das physische Universum zu erklären, das zu den Bedingungen führte, durch die Leben hier auf dem Planeten Erde entstehen konnte. Wir haben die Geschichte des Urknalls, wir haben die Geschichte über die Entstehung der Galaxien aus dem Ursprungsmaterial. Wie sich Galaxien mit der Zeit verändern, wie Sterne innerhalb der Galaxien entstehen, wie Planeten um die Sterne herum entstehen können. Und schließlich, wie die Bedingungen für das Leben hier und vielleicht an vielen anderen Orten entstanden sein könnten. So arbeiten wir als Astronomen am Teil mit dem physischen Universum und dann sagen wir, OK, jetzt seid Ihr Biologen an der Reihe. Als Erstes möchte ich Ihnen daher das sich ausdehnende Universum zeigen. Im Jahre 1929 wurde dieses Diagramm von Edwin Hubble angefertigt. Er stellt hier jede Galaxie grafisch als Punkt dar. Eine Galaxie besteht, wie Sie wissen, aus 100 Milliarden Sternen, die sich um einander drehen. Auf der horizontalen Achse liegt die geschätzte Entfernung, auf der vertikalen Achse die Geschwindigkeit, die er aus der Dopplerverschiebung abgeleitet hat. Aus diesem Diagramm von 1929 ergibt sich sofort der Schluss, dass sich das Universum ausdehnt. Die am weitesten entfernten Galaxien entfernen sich von uns mit Geschwindigkeiten, die beinahe proportional zur Entfernung sind, was bedeutet, dass man das ungefähre Alter des Universums berechnen kann, indem man die Entfernung durch die Geschwindigkeit teilt. Damals hatte er aber falsche Schätzungen der Entfernung, daher ergab sich für uns eine zeitlang ein sehr verwirrendes Bild und das Universum schien jünger zu sein als die ältesten Objekte darin. Es dauerte mehrere Jahrzehnte, diesen Fehler zu korrigieren, aber immerhin wurde er korrigiert. Jetzt gibt es also diese Geschichte, die wir das Hubble’sche Gesetz nennen, sie ist nicht nur eine Theorie, sie ist Gesetz. Und nebenbei, 1929 entdeckte man auch, dass die Weltwirtschaft zusammenbrechen könnte. Man tut gut, sich daran zu erinnern, dass dies das Jahr ist, in dem entdeckt wurde, dass sich das ganze Universum ausdehnen könnte. Ich zeige Ihnen Bilder einiger Leute, die sich damit beschäftigten. In der Mitte hier sehen Sie Albert Einstein, und das ist der Mann, der uns erzählte, dass Raum und Zeit nicht absolut, sondern miteinander vermischt seien, um spezielle Relativität zu ergeben. Spezielle Relativität ist ein Satz an Formeln, der erklärt, wie es möglich ist, dass die Lichtgeschwindigkeit eine Konstante bildet, egal, ob wir uns selbst fortbewegen oder nicht. Und es stellt sich heraus, dass dies die einmalige Lösung dieses speziellen Problems ist. dass Raum und Zeit durch die Wirkung der Schwerkraft gekrümmt seien. Und dies ermöglichte es uns zum ersten Mal, die Schwerkraft in einem unendlichen Universum zu berechnen, denn seine Gleichungen sind Differentialgleichungen und nicht nur das, was uns Isaac Newton gegeben hatte. Als Isaac Newton über das Problem der Schwerkraft im Universum nachdachte, war das Ergebnis Unendlichkeit. Daher war es nicht möglich, zu einer endgültigen Schlussfolgerung zu kommen, aber Isaac Newton war sich bereits darüber im Klaren, dass es ein Problem gab. Jetzt möchte ich Ihnen von der Arbeit der beiden Männer hier links berichten, Alexander Friedman wandte Einsteins Gleichungen 1922 an und sagte: Er starb 1925 und erlebt daher nicht mehr mit, dass er Recht hatte. der in seiner belgischen Priesterrobe neben Einstein steht, dieselben Gleichungen her und sagte: dies sei zwar mathematisch korrekt, aber Physik sei nun mal abscheulich. Er war sich also ziemlich sicher, Einstein meine ich, dass sich das Universum unmöglich ausdehnen könne. Wie kam er darauf? Nun, er fragte seine Freunde und seine Freunde sagten, jeder wisse, dass sich das Universum nicht ausdehnt. Daher führte Einstein eine Integrationskonstante in seine Gleichungen ein, die wir heute kosmologische oder Lambda-Konstante nennen, und seine Vorstellung war, dass die Lambda-Konstante eine abstoßende Kraft sei, die der durch die Gravitation hervorgerufenen Anziehungskraft entgegen wirken würde. Also war Einstein sehr überrascht, als sich 1929 herausstellte, dass diese Konstante im sich ausdehnenden Universum nicht nötig war, und er musste sich dafür entschuldigen, dass er so unfreundlich gewesen war, und dafür, dass er einen großen Fehler begangen hatte, den er angeblich seinen größten Schnitzer nannte. Das also geschah Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts. Mitte des 20. Jh. war George Gamow, der hier gezeigt wird, ein ukrainischer Physiker, der zum Arbeiten in die Vereinigten Staaten kam. Nach Kriegsende wussten die Menschen weit mehr über nukleare Reaktionen und waren in der Lage, die Prozesse, die im frühen Universum stattgefunden haben sollten, zu berechnen. So sagten Sie: Sie konnten sagen, wir wissen, welche Reaktionen stattgefunden haben sollten, die Reaktionsrate der Neutronen mit den Protonen konnte geschätzt werden und die Lebensspanne des Neutrons war bekannt, so wurde klar, dass aus dem Ursprungsmaterial in den ersten paar Minuten Wasserstoff und Helium hervorgegangen sein sollte. Und danach wären die Neutronen verschwunden, und der kosmische Reichtum an Wasserstoff und Helium ergab sich in den ersten paar Minuten des sich ausdehnenden Universums. Er behauptete weiter, dass das Universum voller Strahlung sei, kosmische Mikrowellenstrahlung, mit einer Temperatur von ein paar Grad, ungefähr 5 Grad über dem absoluten Nullpunkt. Und das konnte zu jener Zeit nicht gemessen werden. Es wäre sehr schwer zu messen gewesen. Jetzt wissen wir, dass es für einen entschlossenen Gymnasiasten möglich ist, diese mit einer Ausrüstung aus Fernsehempfängern zu messen. Man gab sich alle Mühe, aber sie konnte nicht gemessen werden, bis sie 1965 von zwei der heute hier anwesenden Nobelpreisträger, Arnold Penzias und Bob Wilson, entdeckt wurde, und so war die Entdeckung dieser kosmischen Strahlung, wie sich herausstellt, eine Riesenüberraschung, obwohl einige Leute bereits Jahrzehnte zuvor darüber nachgedacht hatten. Und ich weise darauf hin, dass diese Strahlung unglaublich hell ist, obwohl sie für uns schwer zu messen ist sie ist sehr hell und tatsächlich, wenn Sie Ihren Fernseher auf einen Empfang zwischen den Kanälen einstellen, stammen rund 1 % des Schneegrieselns, das Sie dann im Fernseher sehen, aus dem All, stammen aus der Urknallstrahlung selbst. Wenn Sie also wüssten, was Sie da sehen, würden Sie sagen: Ich habe hier zwei weitere Bilder. Links unten sehen Sie Alpher und Herman. Sie arbeiteten mit George Gamow und waren diejenigen, die 1948 diese Berechnungen tatsächlich anstellten. Hier sehen Sie sie, wie sie zum Start ihres Satelliten erschienen, der eine weit genauere Messung vornahm und den Nobelpreis einbrachte. Rechts haben wir Sunjajew und Peebles, zwei moderne Theoretiker. Das ist eine kleine Erinnerung daran, dass kein Theoretiker bisher einen Preis für den Urknall gewonnen hat, aber bereits viele Beobachter. Ich möchte darauf hinweisen, dass aus dem Hubble’schen Gesetz, der geraden Linie in diesem Diagramm, folgt, dass es kein messbares Zentrum oder keinen messbaren Rand des Universums gibt. Sie könnten fragen, „nun, ich sehe wie sich all diese Galaxien von uns hier auf der Erde entfernen, folgt daraus nicht, dass wir uns im Zentrum befinden?" Und die Schlussfolgerung aus der Berechnung hier ist, dass jeder dieser Astronomen schließen würde, dass er oder sie sich im Mittelpunkt des Universums befindet. Daher gibt es keinen Mittelpunkt, den wir bestimmen könnten. Die Astronomen waren natürlich viele Generationen sehr damit beschäftigt, nach einem Mittelpunkt oder Rand Ausschau zu halten, aber wir haben keinen gefunden. Es gibt natürlich eine praktische Grenze. Wir können nicht weiter sehen als bis zur Zeit, die uns zugeteilt wurde, wenn wir hier seit 13,7 Milliarden Jahren existiert haben, heißt das, Sie können 13,7 Milliarden Lichtjahre in jede Richtung sehen und das ist die äußerste Entfernung die wir sehen können, denn wir schauen zurück auf den Anfang, wenn wir die am weitesten entfernten Dinge betrachten. Wir schauen in der Zeit zurück, wenn wir ferne Objekte betrachten. Daher ist es eine praktische Tatsache, dass es einen kleinen Teil des Universums gibt, den wir sehen können, und dass es darüber hinaus vermutlich noch viel mehr Universum gibt, das wir nicht sehen können, weil wir noch nicht lange genug existieren. Um es ganz deutlich zu machen, wir stellen uns vor, dass es Ursprungsmaterial gab. Möglicherweise unendlich in Ausdehnung, möglicherweise auch nicht. Ein kleiner Teil davon begann, sich durch einen merkwürdigen und bizarren quantenmechanischen Prozess auszudehnen. Eine der großen Herausforderungen in der modernen Physik ist es, diese anfängliche Periode der Zeit zu verstehen, von der wir glauben, dass damals Quantenmechanik und Gravitation zu einer Art Quantengravitationstheorie verschmolzen sein mussten. Und bis jetzt gibt es noch keine erfolgreiche Theorie. Viele Leute beschäftigen sich noch damit. Auf jeden Fall begann Materie nicht nur, sich bei der Ausdehnung von anderer Materie zu entfernen, sondern unsere Vorstellung ist, dass sich der Raum selbst ausdehnt. Nun, der Raum ist nicht notwendigerweise eine Substanz, wir wissen nicht, was Raum und Zeit an sich tatsächlich sind, aber vielleicht erhalten wir durch eine Theorie der Quantengravitation eine bessere Vorstellung davon. Auf jeden Fall begann das frühe Universum, sich mit exponentiell wachsender Geschwindigkeit auszudehnen. Es verdoppelte seine Größe ca. 100 Mal in einem sehr, sehr kurzen Augenblick der Zeit und führte zum sich ausdehnenden Universum von heute. Jetzt sagen wir, gut, wir sehen uns um und wir erkennen keine Ausdehnung unseres lokalen Universums. Das Sonnensystem dehnt sich nicht aus, die Galaxie dehnt sich nicht aus, nahe gelegene Galaxien entfernen sich nicht allesamt. Was also hat die Nicht-Ausdehnung unseres lokalen Teils möglich gemacht? Wir können wir existieren, wenn sich das ganze Universum ausdehnt? Die Vorstellung ist, dass einige Teile des frühen Universums dichter waren als andere und sie deshalb genug Selbstanziehung durch ihre eigenen Gravitationskräfte hatten, um der Ausdehnung entgegenzuwirken. Und so lautet die Geschichte, die anfängliche Materie muss leicht inhomogen gewesen sein, einige Teile dichter als andere, sodass die Gravitation die Ausdehnung in diesen Volumina stoppen, die Materie zurückfallen und Sterne und Galaxien entstehen lassen konnte. Natürlich haben wir nach der Entstehung eines Sterns all die Kernreaktionen innerhalb des Sterns, aus denen die anderen Elemente hervorgehen. Wie zuvor bereits erwähnt, gab es nur Wasserstoff und Helium nach dem Urknall, woher kamen also die chemischen Elemente, aus denen das Leben besteht? Sie stammen aus Sternen, die…, früheren Generationen von Sternen, die ihr Kernmaterial verbrannt haben und dann explodiert sind und die chemischen Elemente zurück in den Weltraum verteilt haben. Wir selbst sind also wieder aufbereitetes Material aus dem Inneren von Sternen. Wenn Sie morgens in den Spiegel schauen und die chemischen Elemente des Lebens sehen, sollten Sie daran denken, dass es diese beim Urknall nicht gab. Sie wurden erst im Inneren der Sterne gebildet. So können Sie sich also jeden Morgen mit Kosmologie beschäftigen, während Sie sich mit Ihrer Kosmetik beschäftigen. Ich habe hier einen kurzen Graphen, um die frühe Geschichte des Universums zusammenzufassen, wir haben ein anhand von Mikrowellen gemessenes Bild des Urknalls. Nach unserer Vorstellung bildeten sich die Galaxien durch Verschmelzung kleiner Objekte zu großen Objekten. Genau wie viele kleine Bäche zusammenkommen, um große Flüsse zu bilden. Unten links sehen Sie ein Bild unserer großen Nachbargalaxie, dem Andromedanebel, den Sie mit einem Fernglas ganz gut erkennen können. Er ist ungefähr so groß wie der Vollmond, nur nicht annähernd so hell. So am Anfang haben wir eine Geschichte, die… , der Urknall wurde von unserem amerikanischen Karikaturisten Calvin and Hobbs in „Horrendous Space Kablooie (Schreckliches Weltraumratazong)" umbenannt. Mir gefällt dieser Name tatsächlich besser als Urknall, denn er lässt vermuten, dass etwas Seltsames mit dem Raum selbst vor sich geht. Es ist mit der Vorstellung kompatibel, dass es eine Inflation gibt und der Raum selbst sich ausdehnt. Da wir nicht wissen, was Raum ist, ist das ein bisschen kompliziert, aber es ist eine andere Perspektive. Das Ursprungsmaterial gab uns also die chemischen Elemente Wasserstoff und Helium, rief das Universum mit seiner Ausdehnung ins Leben und gab uns die dunkle Materie, was wichtig ist. Wir würden ohne dunkle Materie nicht existieren. Und das alles geschah vor 13,75 Milliarden Jahren mit einem sehr kleinen Fehlerbalken. Wir befinden uns jetzt im Zeitalter der Präzisionskosmologie. Ich erwähnte zuvor, dass die Heliumkerne, die in den ersten paar Minuten entstanden…, dann dehnte sich das Universum aus und kühlte sich ab, als es etwa 389 000 Jahre alt war, die Elektronen fanden die Atomkerne und das überwiegend aus Gasen bestehende Material wurde neutral. Davor war es undurchsichtig wie ein Plasma und danach war es neutral und die Protonen der Hintergrundstrahlung konnten sich zu uns ausbreiten. Das Universum wurde transparent. So hypothetische Ereignisse auf dem Diagramm, die erste Sternengeneration, stellen wir uns als von der Sonne sehr verschieden und viel massereicher vor, sie wären sehr schnell ausgebrannt, in nur ein paar Millionen Jahren. Dann bildeten sich Galaxien und dann, am Ende hier, auf das ich deute, begann vor ungefähr 5 Milliarden Jahren das Universum erneut, sich zu beschleunigen und schneller und schneller zu werden. Das ist die Riesenüberraschung des letzten Jahrzehnts in der Astronomie, und es deutet ein wenig an, was am Ende des Universums geschehen könnte. Wir erkennen jetzt, dass das Universum beschleunigt und immer schneller wird, was bedeutet, dass in ein paar Milliarden Jahren die entfernten Galaxien so weit weg sein werden, dass die meisten für uns nicht mehr sichtbar sind. Ihre Rückzugsgeschwindigkeit wird weiter zunehmen und in 100 Milliarden Jahren oder so werden beinahe alle unsichtbar sein. Nicht nur die Sterne werden erlöschen, auch die Galaxien werden zu weit entfernt sein, als dass wir sie noch sehen könnten. Wir haben also ein paar Milliarden Jahre, bevor wir umziehen müssen. Die Grafik verdeutlicht ganz kurz, warum wir so viel über die Mikrowellenhintergrundstrahlung sprechen. Sie ist ein starker Überrest der Ursprungsmaterie, sie ist eine Materie, die wir sehr genau in jeder Richtung messen können, und rechts im Bild sehen Sie eine der Raumsonden, die derzeit dort draußen die Strahlung misst. Und die Eigenschaften der Mikrowellenstrahlung erwiesen sich als äußerst informativ. Ich habe keine Zeit, ins Detail zu gehen. Ich möchte Ihnen aber ein Bild des ersten Satelliten zeigen, der zur Messung dieser Strahlung gebaut wurde: das war der Satellit COBE (kurz für Cosmic Background Explorer). Bei mir entstand die Idee aus dem Scheitern meines Doktorarbeitsprojekts, das aus dem Versuch bestand, die kosmische Hintergrundstrahlung mithilfe einer Ballon-Nutzlast zu messen. Die Ballon-Nutzlast scheiterte aus einer Reihe von Gründen und ich schloss daraus, dass das Thema viel zu schwierig sei und ich das Thema aufgeben würde. Ein paar Monate später jedoch bemühte sich die NASA um Vorschläge für Satellitenmissionen und ich sagte zu meinem Berater, das Projekt meiner Doktorarbeit war kein Erfolg, aber es hätte vom Weltraum aus sehr viel besser geklappt. Wir hatten keine Ahnung, wie schwierig das Projekt sein würde, aber hier ist es, es wurde 15 Jahre später gestartet. Und hier ist es, wie es ein Künstler im Weltraum sehen würde. Dabei waren Instrumente, um die Mikrowellenstrahlung zu messen und um nach dem Licht der ersten Galaxien Ausschau zu halten. Ich werde Ihnen nur ein paar Dinge daraus zeigen. Hier ist das Spektrum der Mikrowellenstrahlung. Die Frequenz der Wellen, die Zyklen pro Zentimeter auf der horizontalen Achse, die Helligkeit in vertikaler Richtung. Sie sehen, dass all die kleinen Kästchen genau auf der Kurve liegen, wie das auch sein sollte, wenn die Urknalltheorie korrekt ist. Wir erhielten deshalb stehenden Applaus, als wir das der Astronomischen Gesellschaft zeigten. Ich war etwas überrascht, denn ich wusste, das war die richtige Antwort. Die Astronomen waren versammelt. Sie waren sehr besorgt gewesen, dass dies…, dass sich die Urknalltheorie als falsch erweisen könnte. Das war also eine enorme Erleichterung für die Leute. Dieses kleine Bild findet sich jetzt in allen Lehrbüchern. Unsere zweite Entdeckung bestand aus diesem Satz Karten des Himmels, wir wollen uns auf die Ellipse unten im Bild konzentrieren. Dies ist eine Karte, nachdem alle bekannten lokalen Auswirkungen herausgefiltert wurden, und die Flecken, die Objekte auf der Karte, sind die Schwankungen in der Ursprungstemperatur. Die winzigen Schwankungen in der Temperatur der Mikrowellenstrahlung von einem Ort zum anderen. Wie sich herausstellt, sind die kälteren Regionen auf dieser Karte diejenigen, die im frühen Universum dichter waren, und dies sind die Volumina, aus denen die Galaxien und Galaxienhaufen hervorgehen werden. Und die hellen Regionen, die rosafarbenen, sind diejenigen, die sich als leer erweisen werden. Dort zieht die Gravitation die Materie weg. Stephen Hawking sah dieses Bild. Er sagte, dies sei die wichtigste wissenschaftliche Entdeckung des Jahrhunderts, wenn nicht aller Zeiten. Ich nahm seine lobenden Worte dankbar an, aber natürlich gab es, glaube ich, noch ein paar andere Entdeckungen. Andererseits, wenn es diese Flecken nicht gäbe, würden wir nicht existieren, so vielleicht ist es tatsächlich wichtig. Es sind Jahre vergangen, es gibt jetzt viele Aktivitäten zur Erklärung der Statistik dieser Objekte, die Sie in den Karten sehen. Und dies ist eine theoretische Kurve, die zur Bestimmung bis hin zu einem Prozent Genauigkeit vieler kosmologischer Parameter verwendet und interpretiert wird. Ich habe keine Zeit, die Details zu erklären, aber ich wollte gerne zeigen, dass man aus den Formen dieser Objekte in der Mikrowellenkarte jede Menge lernen kann. Nun, die Zeit ist kurz, daher gehe ich auch sonst auf keine Details ein. Dies ist ein Bild von drei Leuten, die entdeckten, dass sich das Universum beschleunigt, und wir nannten den Grund dieser Beschleunigung Dunkle Energie. Nun, das bedeutet, dass wir keine Ahnung haben, was das ist. In ein paar Jahren hat vielleicht jemand eine korrekte Beschreibung, aber jetzt im Moment ist es nur eine Bezeichnung. Es bleiben noch ein paar Geheimnisse für uns über, Astronomen würden sagen, wir wissen, dass es nur Materie im Universum gibt. Es gibt keine Antimateriegalaxien. Teilchenphysiker wollen wissen, warum das wahr ist. Ich sagte bereits, dass es da draußen dunkle Materie gibt, viel mehr als es Atome und Moleküle gibt. Die Frage lautet, was ist die dunkle Energie, was ist sie tatsächlich, mehr als nur ein Name? Jeder möchte von den Astronomen wissen, hat Einstein recht mit seiner Relativität? Und natürlich sind wir damit beschäftigt, diese zu testen, aber wir haben noch keinen endgültigen Beweis. Und wir würden selbstverständlich gerne die Fragen nach unserer eigenen Geschichte beantworten. Wie entstand die Erde und wie kam es zu all den Umständen, die das Leben hier ermöglichen? Sind wir die einzigen Lebewesen im Universum? Ist es möglich, gibt es die natürlich nur entfernte Möglichkeit, mit anderen Lebewesen zu kommunizieren, und natürlich in Bezug auf unsere eigene Geschichte, was passiert als Nächstes? Astronomen verfolgen jetzt den Infrarotbereich der Beobachtungen im Weltraum. Ich zeige Ihnen das Projekt, an dem ich gerade arbeite. Wir würden sehr gerne in der Lage sein, die Infrarotstrahlung aus dem Weltall zu erforschen. Und das ist ein sehr schwieriges Projekt, da Infrarotstrahlung die Erdatmosphäre nicht sehr gut durchdringt, und da Teleskope ihre eigene Infrarotstrahlung emittieren. Auf der anderen Seite ist sie aus genau demselben Faktor interessant, aus dem Objekte bei Zimmertemperatur Infrarotstrahlung abgeben. Ihr Körper emittiert ca. 500 Watt an Infrarotstrahlung, so wie wir hier im Saal sitzen. Das Teleskop, an dem wir derzeit bauen, wird das James-Webb-Weltraumteleskop genannt, benannt nach dem Mann bei der NASA, der die Mondflüge organisierte, und das mit Erfolg. Dieses Teleskop wird in Zusammenarbeit europäischer und kanadischer Weltraumagenturen mit meiner Agentur, der NASA, in den Vereinigten Staaten gebaut. Wir sind beim Bau, der vor 15 Jahren begann, schon ein gutes Stück vorangekommen. Dieses Teleskop, das Sie hier sehen, sieht nicht wie ein gewöhnliches Teleskop aus. Es ähnelt mehr einem Sonnenenergiebündler. Stellen Sie es sich als Bündler galaktischer Energie vor, der Licht aus dem entfernten Universum bündelt und durch den riesigen sechseckigen Parabolspiegel auf den Instrumentenkasten unten konzentriert. Das große blaue System, das Sie unten sehen, ist ein Schirm, eine Sonnenblende, um das Teleskop vor der Sonne und der Erde zu schützen, damit es auskühlen kann. Das Teleskop arbeitet bei einer Temperatur von etwa 40 °K und es ist auch viel größer als die Rakete. Sie erkennen, dass es eine Struktur und nicht nur eine Röhre ist, ich habe kein Video für Sie, aber es klappt sich nach der Freigabe durch die Ariane-5-Rakete aus. Und mit etwas Glück hoffen wir, es 2014 zu starten. Ich werde Ihnen einfach ein paar der wissenschaftlichen Themen zeigen, die wir damit hoffentlich angehen werden. Ich wollte sicherstellen, dass wir alle lernen, wie man das Teleskop ausrichtet. Wie Sie alle wissen, war das Hubble-Weltraumteleskop nach seinem Start fehlerhaft und wurde von Astronauten repariert. Unser Teleskop wird viel weiter entfernt sein, eine Million Meilen von der Erde entfernt und es kann nicht repariert werden. Wir müssen es auf Anhieb richtig machen, daher üben wir. Wir haben dieses kleine Modell und dann bringen wir das Teleskop, das wir fliegen lassen werden, in diese riesige Testkammer in Houston, Texas, in der die Apollo-Astronauten übten, sich im Vakuum aufzuhalten. Ein paar Dinge, die ich über unser wissenschaftliches Programm zeigen möchte. Eine bemerkenswerte Entdeckung ist die, wie es uns Einstein vorausgesagt hatte, dass die Schwerkraft das Licht krümmen kann. Sie können in der rechten oberen Ecke des Bildes kaum erkennen, dass sich dort ein rosafarbener Bogen befindet, und der rosafarbene Bogen ist in Wirklichkeit das Bild einer sehr weit entfernten Galaxie, das durch die Gravitationsfelder dieser anderen Galaxien, die Sie im Bild sehen, vergrößert und verzerrt wurde. So hilft uns Einsteins Gravitation sogar noch weiter ins entfernte Universum hinauszusehen. Wir sind in der Lage zu verstehen, wie sich Galaxien bildeten, nicht, indem wir sie dabei beobachten, sondern durch Simulation. Unten rechts sehen wir eine Computersimulation, die einen Moment lang dem Bild echter Galaxien entspricht Bei der Verschmelzung ändern sie ihr Aussehen völlig. Übrigens nähert sich uns der Andromedanebel und wird das in ungefähr 5 Milliarden Jahren mit unserer Galaxie machen. Diese Projekte liegen vor uns. Gelegentlich werden wir Sterne explodieren sehen. Dies ist ein Bild, und rechts sehen Sie das Bild eines Sterns, der in den nächsten paar Hunderttausend Jahren ziemlich nahe bei uns explodieren wird. Links sehen Sie ein Konzept wie das vor sich gehen könnte. Überdies haben wir so etwas in der Art schon geschehen sehen. Nun, das ist selten, aber wahrscheinlich wie die ersten Sterne im Universum als sie explodierten. Ab und zu explodiert ein Stern und ein Strahl aus Materie kommt heraus und zielt auf uns. Dieser Materiestrahl bewegt sich beinahe mit Lichtgeschwindigkeit und ab und zu, wenn er in unsere Richtung zielt, bekommen wir einen Ausbruch an Gammastrahlung ab, der für etwa 2 Sekunden anhält. Und man erkannte erst in den letzten paar Jahren, dass dies die Quellen dafür sind. Das sind Sterne, die am Rande des Universums explodieren und zufällig auf uns gerichtet sind. Wir können diese Gammastrahlungen empfangen. Alle diese Dinge sind Mysterien, denen wir nachgehen und die wir versuchen werden, zu verstehen. Ein anderes, näheres Ziel für uns ist der Adlernebel. Wenn wir das Licht etwas dimmen könnten, wäre das bei diesen Bildern hilfreich, wenn das schnell genug geht. Auf jeden Fall ist das ein sehr berühmtes Bild vom Hubble-Weltraumteleskop und es zeigt…, könnten wir den Saal etwas abdunkeln, bitte…, Sie sehen diese wundervollen Bilder einer sternbildenden Region. Sterne wurden in diesen dunklen Materialwolken geboren und selbst das Hubble-Teleskop kann nicht hineinsehen, denn die dunklen Staubwolken sind undurchsichtig. Nun, wenn Sie Infrarotlicht einsetzen können, können Sie durch dieses staubige rote Material da drinnen hindurchsehen und erkennen, wo Sterne gerade geboren werden. Wir haben die Chance, viel mehr über das Entstehen von Sternen wie die Sonne zu erfahren, wenn wir nahe gelegene Wolken betrachten, in denen das gerade geschieht. Jack hat zuvor schon erwähnt, dass wir jetzt in der Lage sind, Aufnahmen von Planeten um andere Sterne herum zu machen, und wir haben hier ein Bild, das das veranschaulicht. Wir haben schließlich Hunderte Ziele, vielleicht sogar Tausende, und die Chance, was ich jetzt in der nächsten Grafik zeigen werde, etwas über die Chemie der Atmosphäre dieser Planeten herauszufinden. Der Film zeigt einen Planeten, der sich vor einen entfernten Stern bewegt, und Sie sollten sich vorstellen, dass ein kleines bisschen Sternenlicht auf seinem Weg zu unseren Teleskopen durch die Atmosphäre dieses Planeten hindurch geht. Das bedeutet, wir können eine Spektroskopie machen, wir können die chemische Zusammensetzung der Atmosphäre eines anderen Planeten dadurch bestimmen. Und wir brauchen dazu kein Teleskop, das ein eigenes Bild dieses Planeten macht, wir können dazu ein Teleskop verwenden, das einfach nur die Veränderung des Lichts beobachtet, während der Planet ein wenig Sternenlicht abfängt. Ab und zu tritt auch das Gegenteil davon ein, der Planet wird durch diesen Stern verdunkelt, und beides wurde bereits mit Teleskopen im All aufgenommen. Mit unserem neuen Teleskop hoffen wir auf noch bessere Aufnahmen. Es ist nicht wahrscheinlich, dass unser Teleskop in der Lage sein wird, das bei einem erdähnlichen Planeten um einen sonnenähnlichen Stern herum zu machen, aber vielleicht eine zukünftige Generation von Sternwarten, die eigens für diesen Zweck gebaut werden. Wir sollten in der Lage sein zu erfahren, ob ein Planet um einen anderen Stern herum eine Atmosphäre wie die Erde mit Sauerstoff aufweist, und das wäre ein Hinweis darauf, dass dort Leben existiert. Es gibt ein kleines Taschenbuch, das herausgegeben wurde, das unsere Geschichte zusammenfasst, und das ist bei Amazon.com erhältlich. Und natürlich gibt es jede Menge Webseiten, die die allgemeinen Informationen unserer Geschichte vermitteln. Auf jeden Fall vielen Dank, dass Sie der Geschichte des Universums gelauscht haben und die Mysterien zu schätzen wissen, vor denen wir immer noch stehen.

John Mather on the expansion of the primordial material.
(00:10:44 - 00:12:26)

 

Life took its time to produce complicated organisms such as ourselves, but once the process began it never stopped. The Earth was only physically able to bear life approximately four billion years ago, half a billion years after the solar system was born. Half a billion years after the Earth possessed water and adequate temperatures, the first prokaryotes, or unicellular organisms without nuclei, appeared on the scene. Earth was home to only these very small and simple organisms for over 1.5 billion years, eventually giving rise to blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, which used energy from the sun to photosynthesise, releasing oxygen as a by-product in the process. Two billion years ago marked the rise of eukaryotes, single cell organisms with nuclei; yet, another one billion years were to pass before multicellular organisms came to life. The development of complex organisms speeded up; the first marine vertebrates appeared 600 million years ago, and the first primates only 60 million years ago. Although we are not able to see this timeline, in 2010, Christian de Duve gave a brief description of the chronology of events in Earth’s biological history:

 

Christian de Duve (2010) - Natural Selection and the Future of Life (Lecture + Discussion)

Good afternoon. It’s a tremendous pleasure to see so many young people to take the time in this hot weather to listen to this very old man. I appreciate it very much and I’ll tell you at the same time I have a few very old friends, not as old as I am but who are here and I want to greet them and say how touched I am that, Manfred Eigen and Ruthild, who are very old friends, took the trouble to come here. I want to correct 2 little mistakes, one that was made in the program and one that maybe was made in your head. In the program they say my Nobel Prize goes back to 1964, I’m not that old, ’74. The young lady that you just found there, I’m sorry to say is not my girlfriend, she’s my granddaughter (laugh). Ok so I’m going to give a very informal talk, this is not the kind of formal lecture. And so if there is a question please don’t worry to interrupt me. I’m going to cover a lot of ground which means I’m going to leave many important questions untouched, and so if there is a question you wish to ask don’t bother. So let me first show you my first slide, I hope it works. So what you see is a time scale, it's billions of years before the present, that’s 4 billion years ago, up to the present. The Big Bang was, according to the latest estimates, 13.7 billion years ago. So this is almost 10 billion years after the Big Bang. In fact this is half a billion years before the birth of the solar system, And 4 billion years is the first time in the history of the solar system that our planet became physically able to bear life. It had liquid water, it had mild temperature and so it was physically able to bear life. And at least half a billion years later and probably earlier than that, there was life. Life in the shape of small microbes, bacteria, I call them bacteria, specialists will call them prokaryotes, that is organisms that are made of a single cell and very small, not the big organisation. And bacteria have survived and evolved all this long time and today there are billions of different kinds of bacteria on earth today. And this lasted for a very long time, until about 1½ billion years later when, you see, 2 billion years ago, that’s 1½ billion years of bacteria life, then a new kind of cell appeared which we call eukaryotes. These are much bigger than bacteria, they have a nucleus, they have different cell organelles, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, peroxisomes. They have all complicated structures and organs of ourselves also. And first of all there were single cells, organisms which we call protease, I mean me and others, with just a single cell, like bacteria but more complicated and bigger. And then it took another 1 billion years before the first multi cellular organisms. The first organisms made of more than one cell appeared 2½ billion years after the origin of life. It took 2½ billion years before cells decided that they could do better things if they got together than if they were alone. And so the first multi cellular organisms were the plants, they were followed by the fungi, mushrooms and things like that. And then 600 million years ago, which is a long time ago, but which is very late in the history of life, you have the first animals. The first invertebrates, the sponges, the jelly fish and others. And then we get to crustacean and molluscs etc. And then 600 million years ago you had the first, I forget it’s probably 7 or 8, the first fish, anyway it doesn’t really matter. You have the first vertebrates and the first marine vertebrates, the fish. And then they were followed by the amphibians which were the first animals in this line to, in the vertebrate line to come on earth. And then they were followed by reptiles, the reptiles gave rise to the birds and to the mammals and then among the mammals, 60 million years ago, And that is the whole history of life as we know it today. Now if you were living let us say 400 years ago, that’s a very short time in this history, that’s the time of Galileo, if you were living at that time you would know nothing of this history, all you would know is the end result. You’ll know all those organisms that survived at that time and you wouldn’t even know about the protease and bacteria because 400 years ago the microscope had not yet been discovered. So all this has been known since the last 400 years ago. And now I can tell you that we have not only all the information but the proof, the proof that in fact all these organisms, including humans, are derived from a single ancestor. A single ancestral cell, a single ancestral organism out of which all that lives today or that we know that lives today has been derived by evolution. Now I’m saying that the proof is there and if some of you question this statement I’m willing to give you the proof. But since this is so clearly demonstrated and should be known by all of you, I don’t think it's necessary but I have some evidence that I can show but I don’t want to waste time demonstrating something that I think everyone knows, at least everyone who has a scientific education. No objection? Ok so let’s continue. The existence of biological evolution was of course defended by Charles Darwin, you know, last year was the Darwin year. It was the 200 anniversary of his birth in 1809 and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his book, But Darwin did not discover evolution, evolution was discovered by another Darwin, Erasmus Darwin, who was the grandfather of Charles. And not only by Erasmus Darwin but even before Erasmus Darwin, by Lamarck, a French biologist who is really the father of evolution, together with Darwin’s grandfather. And Lamarck is famous today because he defended a different theory, the theory of acquired characters, which is different from the theory of natural selection, that Darwin proposed to explain evolution. But I think we should not forget that Lamarck was a very great biologist and he was really, maybe with Erasmus Darwin, the father of what he called le transformisme, the theory that all living organisms derive by evolution from a single ancestral form. But, as you all know, Darwin is particularly famous, or should be particularly famous for having proposed, together with another British biologist called Wallace, proposed natural selection as the mechanism of evolution. Now natural selection is not the only mechanism, there are other mechanisms that I don’t have time to go into but certainly natural selection is the most important mechanism of evolution and it’s certainly demonstrated as playing a very important role in evolution and a major role in evolution. So I would like to spend a few minutes discussing natural selection with you and some aspects of natural selection that I think are particularly important. Now I’m going to try to recall to you how Darwin came to the concept of natural selection. Well, it all starts with heredity. Now, heredity has been known, you know, in the bible they even know about heredity, that children inherit some characters from their parents. So heredity has been known for a very long time. And Darwin of course knew of heredity like everybody else in his days. But he didn’t know the mechanism of heredity. There were laws of heredity that had not been discovered by Mendel, that’s 1868, of course DNA had not been discovered, that’s 1953, and so on. So that is very recent, but the concept of heredity was known to Darwin and it was very important to him. And of course heredity depends on replication, reproduction, that’s why we call it reproduction because every generation reproduces properties inherited from the father, the mother, the ancestor, so heredity is the mechanism whereby information that is inscribed in the parents is transmitted to the children. So it involves copying, replication. Now, you’ve all used the copier and you’ve all done some copying and you know that many times, if you’re lucky, you get perfect copies. And if you get perfect copies, that means that from generation to generation the same information is reproduced. Ok, now, that is the basis of genetic continuity. Genetic continuity is the product of perfect copying generation, generation after generation. But nothing is perfect in this world as you know and some, from time to time, for all kinds of reasons, imperfect copies are made, I won’t say mistakes because it maybe for different reasons than mistakes but you get imperfect copies. And the consequence of imperfect copies is variation. And Darwin was very aware of variation because that has been a very important point in his reasoning. He knew variation because, he was impressed with variation because of the work of artificial selectors, that people who tried by selecting the progenitors to create horses that run faster than other horses, cows that gave more milk, wheat that would grow faster or in cooler climates and so on, the artificial selectors used existing inherent variation and they just played with it to take advantage of natural variability to select what they wanted. They selected with a goal in mind, the goal being the cow that gave more milk or a horse that would run faster than another horse. And so Darwin went further, he applied the concept that variation would lead to competition. If you have variants who are competing for the same limited resources, then you get competition for resources. And he borrowed this concept, the struggle for life, the concept of struggle for life from Thomas Malthus who was a late 18th century economist, a biologist, and Malthus, I will speak of him later, maybe at the end of my talk. Malthus defended this idea that if you have too many people and limited resources the people will grow up to the point where they will start struggling, competing with each other to survive. And so Darwin borrowed the concept of struggle for life from Malthus. And he came to the conclusion that if you get competition for limited resources, automatically, and obligatorily those best equipped to survive and to reproduce under the existing conditions, must obligatorily emerge. And that is what he called natural selection. This is selection without a goal, this is not like the selection of the breeders who try to select cows that give more milk, this is not a cow that gives more milk, it’s a cow that produces, that survives better under the conditions and makes more little cows. And that’s natural selection instead of artificial selection. So you can see how Darwin’s thinking was modelled and influenced by his experience and by the writings and the thinkings of others who influenced him very much. Alright, now, one very important point about natural selection is here: What causes the imperfect copies? And here already Darwin defended this theory and this is demonstrated by everything we know today, it’s a chance, chance is responsible for the imperfect copies. When I say chance I mean accidents. There may be all kinds of accidents, maybe just the machinery that copies DNA in the organism makes a mistake, it happens very rarely. One time in one billion which is really, you know if you have a typist who makes one mistake in one billion, she can copy the oxford dictionary 100 times and make one mistake, so that’s really very accurate. But even so DNA copying does go with mistakes and those mistakes are responsible for some of the variation. Also you can have chemical injuries to the DNA, physical injuries by radiation, mutagenic substances and so on. So all kinds of causes will cause, will be responsible for the imperfect copies in reproduction. But all those causes are accidental and more clearly they are unrelated to the end result, that is they are not directed toward a goal, unlike the artificial selectors who will take into account a goal, an aim, cows that give more milk. Now, in this case these are chance occurrences, accidental occurrences that have nothing to do with the final result. And this leads us to intelligence design, you’ve I’m sure heard of intelligent design and intelligent designers, unlike creationists accept evolution or at least to some extent, they accept the concept. You know the creationist will not accept evolution because they will accept the account as given in the bible and therefore they say that’s, evolution is not in the bible, therefore it’s not true. Well I notice that we didn’t have to discuss that point but intelligent design is a more subtle kind of theory, it does accept evolution or some parts of it but it says there are some steps in evolution that cannot be explained simply by accidental changes and natural selection. Some changes must have been guided by some outside influence, they will not name that influence, some will call it god, some say just some extra material influence that will guide the change in a given direction. And I will I think probably come back to this. But today let me just say that we in science do not accept intelligent design for a very simple reason, there are many other reasons, I can, for instance I can tell you about some of their arguments. They will tell you, well, you can’t go from a reptile to a bird without some changes designed by somebody who knows that it’s going to become a bird. I can tell you about their arguments and show where they’re wrong. But what I want to tell without going into any detail, is that intelligent design is not a scientific theory, period. It has nothing to do with science, because in science we start from a premise, a hypothesis, a postulate, it doesn’t have to be true, we don’t make statements about it being true, but we just say we take as hypothesis that the world as we see it can be explained in natural terms, can be explained in terms of physics and chemistry, that is the working hypothesis. And no scientist, at least not this kind of scientist will affirm that this is true, that the world is explainable, that is for the future to prove or to disprove. But that is my hypothesis, things can be explained because if I say no, things cannot be explained or some thing cannot be explained, as the defenders of intelligent design say, they say this cannot be explained, I say that’s not science. If you tell me that something cannot be explained, I shut my laboratory, I don’t have to work because if it can’t be explained why should I spend time to try and find an explanation. So it’s just to say this is not explainable, is leaving the field of science, is leaving the conceptual framework within which we do scientific research. If we do scientific research it’s not because we believe in something, some do, but it’s not necessary, it’s because we take as a postulate, as a hypothesis that things can be explained. And so I would say that so far the results have been very encouraging, for those who believe that things can be explained, well when you look just at the last 50 years and see all that was not known when I started my career and all that has become, that has been explained in the last 50 years, by people who just went into their labs and did experiments and observations on the basis that things can be explained. I mean they’ve been very productive. So I would say that on the whole this encourages us scientists to continue to work on the basis of this hypothesis. There is a lot left to be explained. Maybe some day we’ll run into something that cannot be explained, if this happens well future scientists will see it. But so far we haven’t reached that stage at all. Now there are a couple more things that I want to say about natural selection. Let me see what’s the time, at what time did I start, 2.30, I won’t use too much time I promise. But one more thing, unfortunately this is not a very good slide but the important thing is really what you see in the middle. It’s the lottery, the evolutionary, it’s a picture which is supposed to present the evolutionary lottery. And so just to summarise what we have seen before, you have chance, who creates the variation which we call mutation, so you have all kinds of different mutations and then you have one that comes out and is selected and that’s the one that will survive best or produce progeny best under the prevailing conditions. So this is another picture of the evolutionary lottery by natural selection. Now there are a few additional details that I want to point out on this picture, I’m sorry it’s so bad but it doesn’t matter. First of all as I already mentioned, chance is responsible for the mutation, there is no design, its just accidental, ok we’ve seen that. Now another very important point is that the selection depends on the prevailing conditions. Now that is clearly part of natural selection. Those organisms or mutants who compete, that are best adapted, best able to survive and to produce progeny, especially to produce progeny, under the prevailing conditions, will emerge. But this depends on the prevailing conditions. If for instance we are going to the ice age and the temperature is getting colder and colder and colder, those who will emerge will be those best able to cope with very cold weather. But if the weather is getting warmer and warmer and warmer, you will have a different kind, which will emerge. So the emergence depends on the prevailing conditions, that’s an extremely important point. The second important point which is maybe not quite clear on this graph is that selection can work only on those mutants that have been offered to it by chance. There could be many other possible mutants who maybe might be better able to resist cold or to resist very hot weather and so on. There may be other mutants who will be much better able to resist under the prevailing conditions than the one that is selected. But if that particular species is not present in the sample offered by chance to the lottery, it will not come out. So the result of natural selection depends on what kind of sampling chance offers to evolution, to natural selection. Now the general attitude of evolutionists, let us say up to 25 years ago was that chance would offer only a very small subset of all the possible variants for competition, only a very small subset because there are so many billions and billions of possible, chance can possibly not produce so many billions and therefore what we get in reality is a small subset of all the possible ones. And the evolutionists who claimed this theory, who defended this theory went further and they said well this means that if it had to start all over again, a different set would emerge because chance would probably offer a different subset of all the possible, because this is chance so you will not repeat the same selection of a few small numbers in a big population. And therefore every time you start again you get a different subset offered by chance and therefore a different organism that will be selected by natural selection. And this theory was defended by many famous men: Jacques Monod, who won the Nobel Prize in biology, I think it was ’65 or something like that, together with Jacob and Lwoff. In his famous book,“Le Hasard et la Nécessité”, “Chance and Necessity”, he defended this theory and he said that chance and chance alone has ruled the whole process of evolution. Some famous American evolutionists, Ernst Mayr who is German originally, Stephen Jay Gould and many others have defended the same theory. Gould is well known for his tape analogy, he says you run the tape back to its origin and you let it run again, its not a very good picture anyway, you’ll get a different story. So all that, they defended the theory that I had called in earlier books, “The Gospel of Contingency”. That is the whole history of life, that I summarised at the beginning of this talk, the whole history of life is something that could not be repeated anywhere, has been ruled completely by contingency, by chance, it’s not reproducible. But they never considered the possibility, probably because they said it was very improbable, that the lot offered by chance to selection would include most of the possible variants, that you would get in fact an almost complete subset or set of possible. If you get that then the result of natural selection is reproducible, it’s obligatory. If you have the same set of possible mutants offered by chance then you will have the same kind of organism selected by natural selection. And you’ll say well this is not possible, chance cannot possibly offer so many variants, well in fact yes, the answer is yes, chance does often provide an almost complete set. And there is a lot of proof. And now a new generation of evolutionists, Richard Dawkins, Simon Conway Morris, have come up with a completely different theory and they claim that indeed if you should start all over again you’ll get the same result. And they will give you as proof, as arguments supporting that statement the very frequent occurrence of what is called convergent evolution, evolutionary convergence. Let’s say you have 2 lines evolving completely separately, one in Australia and the other one in Brazil and they evolve for hundreds of millions of years, completely separately but they meet the same challenges and what has been found in more and more cases is that organisms that evolve separately but meet the same challenges, develop the same responses to those challenges. If you have ant eaters, they look the same all over the world, even though they’re not related and so on. And they will, I cannot give you all the detail, I’m not an expert on this but they will, they tell you and I think their arguments are very important and its very important to mention that this is defended by 2 British evolutionists, maybe many others but I mention Dawkins and Conway Morris because I know them personally, I know their books and they wrote very, very beautiful books. But what is interesting is that for some very, I think important reason, their attitude is purely scientific and has nothing to do with religion or ideology. Dawkins is a militant atheist, Conway Morris is a practicing Christian. And so they do not share the same views on religion but they do agree on scientific grounds and I think that strengthens their theory. Now let me tell you, I’m not an expert on this, you know I am just an onlooker, I try to think about it but in my very simply way, but I try to understand and to share what I think I’ve understood, probably wrongly, with the people who come and are kind enough to listen to me. And so what I’ve done is very modestly I made some calculations. To find out how chance can be converted to necessity. How chance is not incompatible with inevitability. And what you see here, you know are a number of games of chance. Toss of a coin, pile ou face, toss of a dice, 6 faces, roulette 36, lottery 7 digits and this is, I will talk about it later, point mutations in DNA. Now this is the probability of getting one result in a single test. Well toss of a coin it’s 1 in 2, pile ou face, heads or tails, toss of a dicee it’s 1 in 6, you have 6 faces on the dice. And this goes on, roulette is 1 in 37, if you have 1 zero in the roulette, the lottery was 7 digits, it’s 1 in 10 million. Now what I calculated here is how many times you have to try to get whatever result you want with 99.9% probability. So how many times do I toss a coin to get heads, well if I do it 10 times I have a 99.9% probability that heads will come out at least once, is that clear. With a dice 1 in 6, if I roll the dice 38 times there is a 99.9% probability that number 5 will come up at least once. At roulette it’s 250 times, you have to play number 8 250 times and you have 99.9% probability of winning. And with the lottery ticket, you have a 7 digit lottery ticket and you have a 99.9% chance of winning if there are 69 million drawings, 69 million drawings, of course the lottery won’t give you that chance because they won’t make any money if they gave you that probability, they give you only one. But it just shows you that in fact if you provide a number of opportunities equal to something like 7 times the inverse of the probability of a single shot you get a 99.9% recovery. Alright now point mutations, this is a calculation that I made. You have a DNA sequence and in this DNA sequence you have a given nucleotide changed say A for instance is changed to say G, A to G, that is what is called the point mutation, you have one replacing one other. Alright so that is the probability of getting a point mutation, well due to mistakes, you know not to accidents but just to replication mistakes, well it’s whatever here, one in 3 billion per cell division. Now this means that to get a given point mutation, A to G in a given site of a given gene with a 99.9% probability you need 20 billion cell divisions. Now you may think that’s a lot, 20 billion cell divisions before you get a given point mutation with a 99.9% probability, in fact 20 billion cell divisions is not that much. It’s the number of cell divisions that will take place in your bone marrow in about 2 hours. In about 2 hours just replacing your red blood cells has involved 20 billion cell divisions and therefore the chance of a single point mutation in a given site is 99.9%. So you’ll tell me how come we get so many perfect copies, because you know if so many mistakes are made just in 2 hours in my bone marrow, how do I survive. How did this man survive 92 years with all those mistakes and it’s a good question. And we survive because we have mechanism for correcting the mistakes, we have all kinds of correction mechanisms to repair the mistakes that are made in our DNA. And many genetic deficiencies are associated with some defect in our ability to repair mistakes. Ok so, so much for natural selection.

Guten Tag. Es ist mir eine riesige Freude, so viele junge Menschen zu sehen, die sich bei diesem heißen Wetter die Zeit nehmen, diesem alten Mann zuzuhören. Ich bin dafür sehr dankbar, und ich werde Ihnen auch sagen, dass ich einige sehr alte Freunde habe, nicht so alt wie ich selbst, doch die ebenfalls hier sind. Ich möchte Sie begrüßen, und Ihnen sagen, wie sehr es mich berührt, dass Manfred Eigen und Ruthild, die beide sehr langjährige Freunde sind, sich die Mühe gemacht haben, hierher zu kommen. Ich möchte zwei kleine Fehler korrigieren: einen, der sich in das Programm eingeschlichen hat, und einen, den Sie möglicherweise in Ihrem Kopf gemacht haben. Im Programm steht, dass ich den Nobelpreis im Jahre 1964 bekommen hat. So alt bin ich noch nicht. Es war 1974. Und die junge Dame, die Ihnen da gerade begegnet ist, ist leider nicht meine Freundin, sondern meine Enkelin (Lachen). Ok. Ich werde also einen informellen Vortrag halten. Dies ist keine formale Vorlesung. Wenn Sie also eine Frage haben, scheuen Sie sich nicht, mich zu unterbrechen. Ich werde über eine Vielzahl von Themen sprechen, was bedeutet, dass ich viele wichtige Fragen nicht ansprechen werde. Wenn Sie daher eine Frage stellen möchten, tun Sie sich keinen Zwang an. Lassen Sie mich Ihnen also mein erstes Dia zeigen. Ich hoffe, es funktioniert. Was Sie hier sehen, ist eine Zeitskala. Dies sind Milliarden von Jahren vor der Gegenwart. Dies ist die Zeit von vor 4 Milliarden Jahren, bis hinauf zur Jetztzeit. Nach den neusten Schätzungen ereignete sich der Big Bang vor 13,7 Milliarden Jahren. Dies sind also fast 10 Milliarden Jahre nach dem Big Bang. Dies ist eine halbe Milliarden Jahre vor der Entstehung des Sonnensystems, die Sonne entstand nach etwa viereinhalb Milliarden Jahren, ebenso die Planeten und die Erde. Und vor 4 Milliarden Jahren herrschten auf unserem Planet erstmals in der Geschichte des Sonnensystems physische Bedingungen, die Leben zulassen. Er hatte flüssiges Wasser, eine gemäßigte Temperatur und konnte auf diese Weise Leben unterstützen. Und etwa eine halbe Milliarde Jahre später, wahrscheinlich schon früher, gab es Leben. Leben in der Form kleiner Mikroben, Bakterien. Ich nenne sie Bakterien. Fachleute werden Sie Prokaryoten nennen, d.h. einzellige und sehr kleine Organismen, ohne größere innere Struktur. Bakterien haben diese ganze Zeit überlebt und sich entwickelt, und heute gibt es auf der Erde Milliarden verschiedener Arten von Bakterien. Und dies dauerte eine sehr lange Zeit, bis vor etwa anderthalb Milliarden Jahren. Und dann sehen Sie, wie vor 2 Milliarden Jahren - das sind anderthalb Milliarden Jahre des Lebens der Bakterien - eine neue Art von Zellen auftaucht, die wir als Eukaryoten bezeichnen. Sie sind wesentlich größer als Bakterien. Sie verfügen über einen Kern, sie haben verschiedene Zellorganellen, Mitochondrien, ein endoplasmatisches Retikulum, Lysosomen, Peroxisomen. Sie alle haben komplizierte Strukturen und Organe. Auch wir gehören dazu. Zuerst gab es Einzeller, Organismen, die wir, ich meine ich selbst und andere, als Protisten bezeichnen. Sie bestehen wie Bakterien aus einer einzigen Zelle, sind aber wesentlich komplizierter und größer. Und dann dauerte es eine weitere Milliarde von Jahren, bevor die ersten mehrzelligen Organismen auftauchten. Die ersten Organismen, die aus mehr als einer Zelle bestanden, tauchten zweieinhalb Milliarden Jahre nach der Entstehung des Lebens auf. Es dauerte zweieinhalb Milliarden Jahre, ehe die Zellen entschieden, dass es besser für sie sei, wenn sie sich, statt allein zu bleiben, zusammenschließen würden. Die ersten mehrzelligen Organismen waren die Pflanzen. Ihnen folgten Pilze und derartige Lebewesen. Und dann, vor 600 Millionen Jahren, was sehr weit zurück liegt, doch in der Geschichte des Lebens sehr spät ist, entstanden die ersten Tiere. Die ersten Wirbellosen, die Schwämme, Quallen und andere Tiere. Und dann kommen wir zu den Schalentieren und Weichtieren usw. Und dann, vor 600 Million Jahren - ich vergesse es, wahrscheinlich waren es sieben oder 8 Millionen Jahre -, tauchten die ersten Fische auf. Wie auch immer. Es ist nicht so wichtig. Wir haben die ersten Wirbeltiere, die ersten im Meer lebenden Wirbeltiere, die Fische. Ihnen folgten die Amphibien. Sie waren die ersten Tiere dieser Entwicklungslinie, der Linie der Wirbeltiere, die das Land eroberten. An sie schlossen sich die Reptilien an, und aus den Reptilien entwickelten sich die Vögel und die Säugetiere. Und dann tauchten vor 60 Millionen Jahren, 70 Millionen Jahren die ersten Primaten auf, die Affen, und aus den Affen haben sich dann die Menschen entwickelt. Und das ist die gesamte Geschichte des Lebens, wie wir sie heute erkannt haben. Nun, wenn Sie, sagen wir, vor 400 Jahren gelebt hätten, das ist eine sehr kurze Zeit in der Geschichte, in der Zeit von Galileo, wenn sie zu dieser Zeit gelebt hätten, hätten Sie nichts von dieser Geschichte gewusst. Allein das Endergebnis wäre Ihnen bekannt gewesen. Sie würden alle diese Organismen kennen, die bis zur damaligen Zeit überlebt haben, und Sie würden noch nicht einmal etwas über die Protisten und Bakterien gewusst haben, denn vor 400 Jahren hatte man das Mikroskop noch nicht entdeckt. All dies hat man seit den letzten 400 Jahren herausgefunden. Und ich kann Ihnen sagen, dass wir nicht nur über alle diese Informationen verfügen, sondern auch über den Beweis, den Beweis dafür, dass alle diese Organismen einschließlich des Menschen, tatsächlich von einem einzelnen Urahnen abstammen. Von einer einzelnen ursprünglichen Zelle, einem einzelnen Urorganismus, aus dem sich alle heutigen Lebewesen, oder alle uns heute bekannten Lebewesen, durch Evolution entwickelt haben. Ich behaupte, dass dieser Beweis existiert, und wenn einige von Ihnen diese Behauptung in Frage stellen, bin ich bereit, den Beweis zu liefern. Aber da dies so klar bewiesen ist und allen von Ihnen bekannt sein sollte, glaube ich, dass es nicht notwendig ist [diesen Beweis zu liefern]. Ich verfüge jedoch über einiges Beweismaterial, das ich vorlegen kann. Allerdings möchte ich keine Zeit mit dem Beweis von etwas verschwenden, von dem ich annehme, dass es jeder weiß, zumindest jeder, der über eine wissenschaftliche Bildung verfügt. Keine Einwände. Ok. Fahren wir also fort. Dass sich die Lebewesen durch einen Prozess der Evolution entwickelt haben, wurde natürlich von Charles Darwin verteidigt. Sie wissen, dass letztes Jahr das Darwin-Jahr war: Es war das 200-jährige Jubiläum seiner Geburt im Jahre 1809 und das 150-jährige Jubiläum der Veröffentlichung seines Buches Über den Ursprung der Arten durch natürliche Zuchtwahl. Doch er hat die Evolution nicht entdeckt. Die Evolution wurde durch einen anderen Darwin entdeckt, Erasmus Darwin, den Großvater von Charles Darwin. Und nicht nur durch Erasmus Darwin, sondern vor Erasmus Darwin durch Lamarck, einen französischen Biologen, der in Wirklichkeit zusammen mit dem Großvater Darwins der Vater der Evolution ist. Lamarck ist heute dafür bekannt, dass er eine andere Theorie verteidigte, die Theorie [der Vererbung] erworbener Eigenschaften, die von der Theorie der natürlichen Zuchtwahl, die Darwin zur Erklärung der Evolution vorschlug, verschieden ist. Doch ich denke, wir sollten nicht vergessen, dass Lamarck ein sehr großer Biologe war, und er war tatsächlich, vielleicht gemeinsam mit Erasmus Darwin, der Vater dessen, was er selbst als le transformisme bezeichnet, die Theorie, dass alle Lebewesen aus einer ursprünglichen Urform durch Evolution abgeleitet werden können. Darwin ist jedoch, wie Sie alle wissen, oder er sollte zumindest besonders dafür berühmt sein, dass er zusammen mit einem anderen britischen Biologen namens Wallace die natürliche Zuchtwahl als Mechanismus der Evolution vorschlug. Natürliche Zuchtwahl ist nicht der einzige Mechanismus. Es gibt andere Mechanismen, auf die ich aus Zeitgründen nicht näher eingehen kann. Natürliche Zuchtwahl ist jedoch sicherlich der wichtigste Mechanismus der Evolution, und man hat mit Sicherheit bewiesen, dass er eine sehr wichtige Rolle, ja eine Hauptrolle in der Evolution spielt. Ich möchte also einige Minuten damit zubringen, die natürliche Zuchtwahl und einige Aspekte der natürlichen Zuchtwahl mit Ihnen zu erörtern, die ich für besonders wichtig halte. Ich werde nun versuchen, Ihnen in Erinnerung zu rufen, wie Darwin auf den Begriff der natürlichen Zuchtwahl kam. Nun, es beginnt alles mit der Erblichkeit von Eigenschaften. Diese Erblichkeit war bekannt. Selbst die Bibel weiß von Erblichkeit, davon, dass Kinder einige Eigenschaften von ihren Eltern erben. Erblichkeit war also seit langer Zeit bekannt. Und Darwin war die Tatsache der Erblichkeit wie jedem anderen seiner Zeitgenossen bekannt. Er kannte allerdings noch nicht den Mechanismus der Vererbung. Es gab Gesetze der Vererbung, die von Mendel noch nicht entdeckt worden waren. Dies geschah erst 1868. Und natürlich hatte man die DNA noch nicht entdeckt, was 1953 gelang, usw. Das war erst vor kurzer Zeit. Doch der Begriff der Erblichkeit war Darwin bekannt, und er war sehr wichtig für ihn. Und natürlich hängt Erblichkeit von Replikation ab, von Reproduktion. Aus diesem Grund sprechen wir ja von "Re-Produktion", weil jede Generation, die vom Vater, der Mutter, und den Ahnen geerbten Eigenschaften reproduziert. Vererbung ist aber der Mechanismus, durch den Informationen, die in den Eltern vorhanden sind, auf die Kinder übertragen werden. Hierzu ist also eine Form von originalgetreuer Wiedergabe, von Replikation erforderlich. Nun gut. Wir alle haben ein Kopiergerät verwendet und einige Kopien erstellt. Und Sie wissen, dass man häufig - wenn man Glück hat - perfekte Kopien erhält. Man erhält perfekte Kopien, und wenn man perfekte Kopien erhält, so bedeutet dies, das von Generation zu Generation die gleiche Information reproduziert wird. Ok, das ist die Grundlage der genetischen Kontinuität. Genetische Kontinuität ist das Ergebnis der Herstellung perfekter Kopien, Generation für Generation. Doch wie Sie wissen, ist nichts in dieser Welt perfekt, und aus einer Reihe verschiedenster Gründe werden von Zeit zu Zeit Kopien erstellt, die nicht perfekt sind. Ich rede nicht von Fehlern, denn dies kann aus anderen Gründen als aufgrund von Fehlern geschehen. Man erhält jedenfalls Kopien, die nicht perfekt sind. Und die Folge der nicht-perfekten Kopien ist Variation. Darwin war sich dieser Variation sehr bewusst, denn das war ein sehr wichtiger Aspekt seiner Schlussfolgerungen. Er kannte die Variation, denn er war beeindruckt von der Variation aufgrund der Arbeit von Züchtern, von denjenigen Leuten, die durch Auswahl der Eltern versuchen, Pferde zu züchten, die schneller laufen können als andere Pferde, Kühe, die mehr Milch geben, Weizen, der schneller oder in älteren Regionen wächst usw. Die eine künstliche Auswahl betreibenden Züchter verwenden die vorhandene inhärente Variation und spielten einfach mit ihr, um die natürliche Variabilität dazu auszunutzen, dasjenige auszuwählen, was sie wollten. Sie trafen die Auswahl mit einem bestimmten Ziel vor Augen, wobei das Ziel die Kuh war, die mehr Milch gab, oder das Pferd, das schneller läuft als ein anderes Pferd. Darwin ging darüber hinaus. Er wendete das Konzept an, dass Variation zu Wettbewerb führen würde. Wenn man verschiedene Varianten hat, die um dieselben begrenzten Ressourcen konkurrieren, so erhält man einen Streit um die Ressourcen. Er entlehnte diesen Begriff, den Kampf ums Dasein, den Überlebenskampf, Thomas Malthus, einem Ökonom des späten 18. Jahrhunderts, einem Biologen. Ich werde später, vielleicht nach meinem Vortrag, noch über Malthus sprechen. Malthus verteidigte diese Idee, dass die Zahl der Menschen, wenn man zu viele Menschen hat und begrenzte Ressourcen, bis zu einem Punkt zunimmt, ab dem sie dann gegeneinander konkurrieren, miteinander um das Überleben kämpfen. Darwin entlehnte also den Begriff des Kampfs ums Dasein von Malthus. Und er gelangte zu der Schlussfolgerung, dass in einer Situation, in der man eine Konkurrenz um begrenzte Ressourcen hat, automatisch und notwendigerweise diejenigen, die zum Überleben und zur Fortpflanzung unter den gegebenen Bedingungen am besten ausgerüstet sind, zwangsläufig [zahlenmäßig stärker] hervortreten werden. Dies ist es, was er als "natürliche Zuchtwahl" bezeichnete. Dies ist eine Auswahl ohne ein Ziel. Sie ist nicht wie die Auswahl der Züchter, die versuchen, Kühe auszuwählen, die mehr Milch geben. Dies ist nicht eine Kuh, die mehr Milch gibt: E ist eine Kuh, die sich unter den gegebenen Umständen vermehrt und besser überlebt und weitere kleine Kühe produziert. Und das ist statt einer künstlichen eine natürliche Zuchtwahl. Sie können also sehen, wie das Denken Darwins durch seine Erfahrung und durch die Schriften und das Denken anderer, die ihn stark beeinflussten, modifiziert und geprägt wurde. Nun gut. Nun, ein sehr wichtiger Punkt im Zusammenhang mit der natürlichen Zuchtwahl betrifft den Grund für die nicht-perfekten Kopien, und Darwin verteidigte bereits eine Theorie hierzu, und dies wird durch alles bewiesen, was wir heute wissen. Der Grund ist der Zufall. Der Zufall ist dafür verantwortlich, dass Kopien nicht perfekt sind. Wenn ich von Zufall rede, meine ich damit "Unfälle". Es kann alle möglichen Arten von Unfällen geben. Vielleicht unterläuft einfach dem Mechanismus, der die DNA in dem Organismus kopiert, ein Fehler. Das geschieht sehr selten. In einem aus einer Milliarde von Fällen. Das entspricht folgendem Fall: Wenn man auf einer Schreibmaschine bei einem von einer Milliarde von Anschlägen einen Fehler macht, so kann man das Oxford Dictionary hundertmal abschreiben und dabei nur einen Fehler machen. Das ist wirklich sehr genau. Dennoch kommt es bei der Kopie der DNA zu Fehlern, und diese Fehler sind für einen Teil der Variation verantwortlich. Außerdem kann es durch chemische Einflüsse zur Beschädigung der DNA kommen, zu einer physischen Beschädigungen durch Strahlung, durch mutagene Substanzen usw. Alle möglichen Ursachen werden also bei der Reproduktion nicht-perfekte Kopien verursachen bzw. dafür verantwortlich sein. Doch alle diese Ursachen wirken zufällig, und - um es genauer zu formulieren: Sie stehen mit dem Endergebnis nicht in Beziehung, d.h. im Gegensatz zur künstlichen Zuchtwahl sind sie auf kein Ziel gerichtet. Züchter verfolgen ein Ziel, Kühe die mehr Milch geben. In diesem Fall hat man es mit zufälligen Ereignissen zu tun, mit von keiner Absicht gelenkten Ereignissen, die mit dem Endergebnis nichts zu tun haben. Und dies führt uns zum Thema des Intelligent Designs. Ich bin mir sicher, dass Sie bereits von Intelligent Design und von Vertretern dieser Theorie gehört haben. Im Gegensatz zu Kreationisten akzeptieren Sie die Evolution, oder zumindest in einem gewissen Umfang akzeptieren sie ihren Begriff. Sie wissen, dass die Kreationisten die Evolution nicht akzeptieren, denn sie akzeptieren den Schöpfungsbericht der Bibel. Daher sagen sie: Evolution kommt in der Bibel nicht vor. Daher entspricht sie nicht der Wahrheit. Nun, ich habe festgestellt, dass wir diesen Punkt nicht diskutieren mussten, aber Intelligent Design ist eine subtilere Theorie. Sie akzeptiert die Evolution oder Teile von ihr. Sie behauptet jedoch, dass es in der Evolution einige Schritte gibt, die nicht einfach durch zufällige Änderungen und natürliche Auswahl erklärt werden können. Einige Änderungen müssen durch einen äußeren Einfluss gelenkt worden sein. Sie benennen diesen Einfluss nicht. Einige nennen ihn Gott, andere sprechen einfach von einem Einfluss außerhalb der Materie, der die Änderung in eine bestimmte Richtung lenkt. Ich denke, ich werde wahrscheinlich darauf zurückkommen. Doch lassen Sie mich heute einfach sagen, dass wir in der Wissenschaft aus einem sehr einfachen Grund Intelligent Design nicht akzeptieren. Es gibt viele andere Gründe. Ich kann Ihnen etwas über einige der Argumente der Vertreter des Intelligent Design berichten. Sie behaupten, dass man von einem Reptil nicht zu einem Vogel gelangt, ohne dass einige Änderungen von jemandem gestaltet sind, der weiß, dass das Reptil zu einem Vogel werden wird. Ich kann Ihnen Ihre Argumente erläutern und zeigen, an welcher Stelle sie dem Irrtum verfallen. Doch was ich sagen möchte, ohne ins Detail zu gehen, ist Folgendes: Intelligent Design ist keine wissenschaftliche Theorie, Punkt. Sie hat nichts mit Wissenschaft zu tun, denn in der Wissenschaft beginnen wir mit einer Prämisse, einer Hypothese, einem Postulat. Es muss nicht wahr sein, wir machen keine Aussage über seine Wahrheit. Wir sagen einfach, dass wir es als Hypothese annehmen, dass die Welt, wie wir sie erleben, in natürlichen Begriffen erklärt werden kann, in Begriffen der Physik und Chemie. Das ist die Arbeitshypothese. Und kein Wissenschaftler - zumindest nicht diese Art von Wissenschaftler - wird behaupten, dass dies wahr ist, dass die Welt erklärbar ist. Das muss in Zukunft bewiesen oder widerlegt werden. Doch das ist meine Hypothese, dass Dinge erklärt werden können. Denn wenn ich es bestreite, [wenn ich behaupte, dass] Dinge oder einige Dinge nicht erklärt werden können, wie es die Vertreter des Intelligent Design behaupten (sie behaupten, dass dies nicht erklärt werden kann), dann sage ich: das ist keine Wissenschaft. Wenn sie mir sagen, dass etwas nicht erklärt werden kann, dann schließe ich mein Labor. Ich muss nicht arbeiten, denn wenn es nicht erklärt werden kann, warum sollte ich Zeit mit dem Versuch verbringen, eine Erklärung zu finden. Einfach zu sagen, dass etwas nicht erklärt werden kann, bedeutet das Feld der Wissenschaft zu verlassen, den begrifflichen Rahmen zu verlassen, innerhalb dessen wir wissenschaftliche Forschung betreiben. Wenn wir wissenschaftliche Forschung betreiben, so geschieht dies nicht, weil wir etwas glauben - einige tun dies, aber es ist nicht notwendig. Wir tun es, weil wir als Postulat, als eine Hypothese voraussetzen, dass die Dinge erklärbar sind. Und ich würde also sagen, dass die Ergebnisse für diejenigen, die glauben, dass die Dinge erklärt werden können, bisher sehr ermutigend sind. Nun, wenn man sich einfach die letzten 50 Jahre ansieht und betrachtet, was alles noch nicht gewusst wurde, als ich meine Karriere begann, und was alles in den letzten 50 Jahren von Menschen erklärt worden ist, die in ihre Labore gingen und Experimente und Beobachtungen auf der Grundlage der Annahme durchführten, dass die Dinge erklärt werden können. Ich meine, sie sind sehr produktiv gewesen. Ich würde also sagen, dass dies uns Wissenschaftler insgesamt ermutigt, unsere Arbeit auf der Grundlage dieser Hypothese fortzusetzen. Es gibt noch sehr viel, was erklärt werden muss. Vielleicht begegnet uns eines Tages etwas, das nicht erklärt werden kann. Wenn dies geschieht, werden künftige Wissenschaftler dies erkennen. Doch bislang haben wir dieses Stadium noch längst nicht erreicht. Nun, es gibt noch einige weitere Dinge, die ich über die natürliche Zuchtwahl sagen möchte. Lassen sie mich nach der Zeit schauen. Um wie viel Uhr habe ich begonnen. Ich werde nicht zu viel Zeit beanspruchen, das verspreche ich. Doch eins will ich noch sagen. Leider ist dies kein sehr gutes Dia, doch das Wichtige ist eigentlich, was Sie in der Mitte sehen. Es ist die Lotterie, die Lotterie der Evolution, ein Bild, das die evolutionäre Lotterie wiedergeben soll. Und um einfach zusammenzufassen, was wir bislang gesehen haben: Sie haben den Zufall, der die Variationen hervorbringt, die wir als Mutationen bezeichnen. Man hat also alle möglichen verschiedenen Arten von Mutationen, und dann hat man eine, die sich durchsetzt und ausgewählt wird, und das ist diejenige, die am besten überlebt, oder die unter den vorherrschenden Bedingungen am besten Nachkommen hervorbringt. Dies ist also ein weiteres Bild der evolutionären Lotterie, aber der natürlichen Zuchtwahl. Nun, es gibt einige zusätzliche Details auf diesem Bild, auf die ich hinweisen möchte. Es tut mir leid, dass es so schlecht ist, doch das ist nicht wichtig. Erstens ist, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, der Zufall für die Mutationen verantwortlich. Es gibt kein Design, die Mutationen sind einfach zufällig. Ok, das haben wir gesehen. Ein weiterer wichtiger Punkt ist nun, dass die Auswahl von den vorherrschenden Bedingungen abhängt. Das ist offensichtlich Teil der natürlichen Auslese. Diejenigen unter den konkurrierenden Organismen oder Mutanten, die am besten angepasst sind, die am besten überleben und sich fortpflanzen können - vor allem dies: die sich unter den gegebenen Bedingungen am besten fortpflanzen zu können -, tauchen zahlenmäßig am stärksten auf. Doch dies hängt von den vorherrschenden Bedingungen ab. Wenn wir zum Beispiel in die Eiszeit gehen und die Temperaturen kälter und kälter und immer kälter werden, dann werden diejenigen Organismen sich durchsetzen, die mit dem sehr kalten Wetter am besten fertig werden. Wenn das Wetter jedoch wärmer und wärmer und immer wärmer wird, wird sich eine andere Art von Organismus durchsetzen. Welche Art von Organismus auftaucht, hängt von den vorherrschenden Bedingungen ab. Das ist ein äußerst wichtiger Punkt. Der zweite wichtige Punkt, der aus dieser Darstellung möglicherweise nicht recht klar wird, ist der, dass die Selektion nur auf diejenigen Mutanten einwirken kann, die ihr durch den Zufall bereitgestellt werden. Es könnte viele andere mögliche Mutanten geben, die bei kaltem oder sehr heißem Wetter usw. vielleicht viel widerstandsfähiger sein würden. Es könnte andere Mutanten geben, die den vorherrschenden Bedingungen wesentlich besser standhalten können, als diejenige Mutante, die durch die Evolution tatsächlich ausgewählt wurde. Doch wenn diese besondere Art in den Exemplaren, die der Lotterie der Evolution durch den Zufall zur Auswahl angebotenen werden, nicht vertreten ist, dann kann sie sich auch nicht durchsetzen. Das Ergebnis der natürlichen Selektion hängt also davon ab, welche Art von Exemplaren der Zufall der evolutionären, der natürlichen Selektion anbietet. Die allgemeine Haltung der Evolutionisten, sagen wir bis vor 25 Jahren, bestand nun darin, dass der Zufall nur eine sehr kleine Anzahl aller möglichen Varianten zur Konkurrenz anbietet - nur eine sehr kleine Anzahl, da es so viele Milliarden und Abermilliarden von möglichen Varianten gibt. Der Zufall kann unmöglich so viele Milliarden von Varianten hervorbringen, und was wir erhalten, ist in Wirklichkeit eine kleine Anzahl aus den zahllosen möglichen Varianten. Die Evolutionisten, die diese Theorie aufstellten und verteidigten, gingen noch weiter und sagten: Nun ja, dies bedeutet, dass sich - wenn die Evolution noch einmal von Neuem beginnen müsste - eine andere Anzahl von Varianten ergeben würde, da der Zufall wahrscheinlich eine andere Auswahl aus all den möglichen Varianten bereitstellen würde. Denn dies geschieht zufällig. Dieselbe Selektion einer kleinen Anzahl in einer großen Population würde sich daher nicht wiederholen. Daher würde man bei jedem Neubeginn durch den Zufall eine andere Auswahl angeboten bekommen, und daher auch einen anderen Organismus, der durch die natürliche Auswahl selektiert würde. Diese Theorie wurde von zahlreichen berühmten Männern verteidigt. Von Jacques Monod, der den Nobelpreis für Biologie bekommen hat. Ich glaube, das war im Jahre 1965 oder so, zusammen mit Jacob und Lwoff. In seinem berühmten Buch "Le Hasard et la Nécessité", "Zufall und Notwendigkeit", verteidigt er diese Theorie. Er vertrat die Auffassung, dass der Zufall, und der Zufall allein, den ganzen Prozess der Evolution regiert hat. Ein berühmter amerikanischer Evolutionist, Ernst Mayr, der deutscher Abstammung ist, Stephen Jay Gould und viele andere haben dieselbe Theorie verteidigt. Gould ist bekannt für seine Tonbandanalogie. Er sagt, wenn man ein Tonband an seinen Anfang zurückspult und es noch einmal laufen lässt, erhält man eine andere Geschichte. Wie dem auch sei: Das ist kein sonderlich treffendes Bild. Also all dies, sie verteidigten die Theorie, die ich in früheren Büchern "Das Evangelium der Kontingenz" genannt habe. Es besagt, dass die gesamte Geschichte des Lebens, die ich zu Beginn dieses Vortrags kurz zusammengefasst habe, dass die gesamte Geschichte des Lebens etwas ist, das sich nirgendwo wiederholen könnte, etwas, das vollständig von kontingenten Umständen, vom Zufall regiert wurde. Sie ist nicht reproduzierbar. Sie haben jedoch niemals die Möglichkeit bedacht - wahrscheinlich, weil sie sich sagten, dass dies sehr unwahrscheinlich ist -, dass die Anzahl der Exemplare, die der Selektion durch den Zufall angeboten werden, die meisten aller möglichen Varianten enthält, dass man tatsächlich eine fast vollständige Anzahl aller möglichen Varianten erhält. Wenn man eine solche Anzahl erhält, dann ist das Ergebnis der natürlichen Auswahl reproduzierbar, es stellt sich dann zwangsläufig ein. Hat man dieselbe Auswahl von möglichen, durch den Zufall bereitgestellten Mutanten, dann wird durch die natürliche Auslese dieselbe Art von Organismus selektiert. Sie werden sagen: Es ist unmöglich, es kann nicht sein, dass der Zufall so viele Varianten anbietet. Es ist jedoch tatsächlich so. Die Antwort lautet ja: Häufig stellt der Zufall einen fast vollständigen Satz von Varianten bereit. Und dafür gibt es eine Menge Beweismaterial. Eine neue Generation von Evolutionisten, Richard Dawkins, Simon Conway Morris, hat nun eine völlig andere Theorie aufgestellt. Sie behaupten, dass sich im Laufe der Evolution - könnte sie noch einmal von vorne beginnen - dasselbe Ergebnis einstellen würde. Und als Beweis für diese Behauptung, als Argument zur Unterstützung dieser Feststellung, führen sie das häufige Vorkommen dessen an, was als "konvergente Evolution" bezeichnet wird, als evolutionären Konvergenz. Angenommen, man hat zwei Linien, die sich völlig unabhängig voneinander entwickeln: eine in Australien und die andere in Brasilien. Sie entwickeln sich über Hunderte von Millionen von Jahren, vollständig voneinander getrennt, stehen aber denselben Herausforderungen gegenüber. Was man in immer mehr Fällen festgestellt hat, ist nun, dass Organismen, die sich getrennt voneinander entwickeln, aber denselben Herausforderungen begegnen, dieselben Antworten auf diese Herausforderungen entwickeln. Wenn Sie einen Ameisenfresser vor sich haben, dann sehen sie überall auf der Welt gleich aus, auch wenn sie nicht miteinander verwandt sind, usw. Und diese Leute - ich kann Ihnen nicht alle Einzelheiten angeben, ich bin kein Fachmann in dieser Sache, aber ich denke, dass ihre Argumente sehr wichtig sind. Und es ist sehr wichtig zu erwähnen, dass diese Theorie von zwei britischen Evolutionisten vertreten wird, vielleicht von vielen anderen. Doch ich erwähnte Dawkins und Conway Morris, weil sie mir persönlich bekannt sind. Ich kenne ihre Bücher, und sie haben sehr, sehr schöne Bücher geschrieben. Was jedoch interessant ist, ist Folgendes: Aus einem wie ich glaube sehr wichtigen Grund ist ihre Haltung rein wissenschaftlich und hat nichts mit Religion oder Ideologie zu tun. Dawkins ist militanter Atheist und Conway Morris ein praktizierender Christ. Sie teilen also nicht dieselbe Auffassung über die Religion, doch sie sind sich aus wissenschaftlichen Gründen einig, und ich denke, das verleiht ihrer Theorie mehr Gewicht. Nun, lassen sie mich Ihnen sagen, dass ich kein Fachmann in dieser Sache bin, wissen Sie, ich bin einfach ein Zuschauer. Ich versuche darüber nachzudenken, allerdings auf meine sehr einfache Art. Doch ich versuche die Dinge zu verstehen und mitzuteilen, was ich verstanden zu haben glaube, wahrscheinlich falsch, und zwar den Leuten, die kommen und freundlich genug sind, mir zuzuhören. Und was ich getan habe, ist sehr bescheiden. Ich habe einige Berechnungen angestellt, um festzustellen, wie Zufall in Notwendigkeit verwandelt werden kann, wie Zufall mit Unausweichlichkeit vereinbar sein kann. Und was sie hier sehen, sind eine Reihe von Zufallsspielen: das Werfen einer Münze, Kopf oder Zahl, das Werfen eines Würfels, 6 Seiten, Roulette 36, Lotto 7-stellig, und dies sind - ich werde später darauf zurückkommen - Punktmutationen der DNA. Nun, dies entspricht der Wahrscheinlichkeit, ein positives Ergebnis bei einem einzigen Versuch zu erhalten. Beim Werfen einer Münze ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit 1:2, pile ou face, Kopf oder Zahl, beim Werfen eines Würfels beträgt sie 1:6. Ein Würfel hat sechs Seiten. Und dies geht so weiter. Bei Roulette ist das Verhältnis 1:36, wenn Sie eine Null auf dem Spielbrett haben. Bei der Lotterie war es ein 7-stelliges Verhältnis. Das entspricht 1 : 10 Millionen. Was ich hier ausgerechnet habe, ist die Anzahl der Versuche, die man durchführen muss, um das gewünschte Ergebnis mit einer Wahrscheinlichkeit von 99,9 % zu bekommen. Wie oft muss ich also eine Münze werfen, um eine Zahl zu bekommen. Wenn ich sie zehnmal werfe, besteht eine 99,9%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass ich mindestens einmal die Zahl erhalte. Ist das klar. Bei einem Würfel mit der Wahrscheinlichkeit von 1:6 besteht eine 99,9%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass ich mindestens einmal eine 5 bekomme, wenn ich ihn 38 Mal werfe. Bei Roulette sind es 250 Versuche. Man muss 250 Mal auf 8 setzen, um eine 99,9%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit eines Gewinns zu erhalten. Beim Lottoschein haben Sie eine siebenstellige Zahl, und Sie haben eine 99,9%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit zu gewinnen, wenn es 69 Millionen Verlosungen gibt, 69 Millionen Verlosungen. Natürlich gibt Ihnen die Lotterie nicht diese Chance, weil sie kein Geld verdienen würde, wenn sie Ihnen diese Wahrscheinlichkeit anbieten würde. Sie geben Ihnen nur eine einzige Chance. Doch es beweist, dass man eine 99,9%ige Wahrscheinlichkeit hat, den Einsatz zurückzugewinnen, wenn man eine Anzahl von Möglichkeiten anbietet, die in etwa dem Siebenfachen der umgekehrten Wahrscheinlichkeit eines einzelnen Treffers entspricht. Ok. Nun zu den Punktmutationen. Dies ist eine Berechnung, die ich angestellt habe. Sie haben eine DNA-Sequenz, und in dieser DNA-Sequenz hat sich ein bestimmtes Nukleotid, sagen wir A, beispielsweise zu G geändert, A zu G. Dies bezeichnet man als "Punktmutation". Eine Base ersetzt eine andere. Was ist nun also die Wahrscheinlichkeit, eine Punktmutation zu erhalten. Nun, aufgrund von Fehlern, nicht aufgrund von Zufällen, sondern aufgrund von Replikationsfehlern. Sie beträgt hier 1 : 3 Milliarden (1 : 3x109) pro Zellteilung. Dies bedeutet nun, dass man, um mit 99,9%iger Wahrscheinlichkeit eine bestimmte Zellmutation zu erhalten, von A zu G an einer bestimmten Stelle eines Gens, 20 Milliarden Zellteilungen benötigt. Sie mögen nun denken, das sei eine große Anzahl, 20 Milliarden Zellteilungen, bevor man mit 99,9%iger Wahrscheinlichkeit eine bestimmte Zellmutation erhält. Tatsächlich ist 20 Milliarden keine besonders große Anzahl von Zellteilungen. Sie entspricht der Anzahl der Zellteilungen, die in etwa 2 Stunden in Ihrem Knochenmark stattfinden. In etwa 2 Stunden lediglich Ihre roten Blutkörperchen zu ersetzen, erfordert 20 Milliarden Zellteilungen, und daher beträgt die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer bestimmten Punktmutation an einer bestimmten Stelle eines Gens 99,9 %. Sie werden mich also fragen, wie es kommt, dass wir so viele perfekten Kopien erhalten. Denn wenn allein in meinem Knochenmark in 2 Stunden so viele Fehler gemacht werden, wie überlebe ich dann. Und wie hat dieser Mann bei all diesen Fehlern 92 Jahre überlebt. Das ist eine gute Frage. Wir überleben, weil wir über Mechanismen verfügen, die die Fehler korrigieren. Wir verfügen über alle möglichen Korrekturmechanismen zur Reparatur der Fehler, die bei der Replikation unserer DNA vorkommen. Viele genetische Mängel haben mit Defekten in unserer Fähigkeit zur Reparatur von Fehlern zu tun. Ok, so viel zur natürlichen Zuchtwahl....

Christian de Duve describes the chronology of events in Earth's biological history.
(00:02:00 - 00:07:56)

 

As de Duve mentioned here, this timeline has only been known to us for the last several decades. The questions we ask today go back even further, to the very beginnings of the timeline. How were the first proteins and nucleic acids formed and did this occur simultaneously? What were the origins of primitive cellular life? Scientists are now trying to experimentally decipher “the chemistry of a young planet to the beginnings of biology” in the words of Nobel Laureate Jack Szostak. One of the first experiments in abiotic chemistry took place in 1953, when Nobel Laureate Harold Urey’s graduate student, Stanley Miller, sought to examine what effect lightning may have had on the Earth’s early atmosphere. Two flasks were linked together, one containing water, the other one a mixture of methane, hydrogen, ammonia and water vapour, and these were subjected to electrical discharges imitating lightning. After a few days, it was found that many organic compounds had developed in the flasks, among them amino acids. This now-famous experiment, known as the Urey-Miller experiment, generated a lot of attention but has since become invalid as scientists now believe the early atmosphere contained mostly nitrogen and carbon dioxide, which would not be as conducive to life. Also, the experiment lacked an example of redox chemistry, or the transfer of electrons from donors to acceptors in order to produce carbons.

For many years, the major dilemma centred on the unlikely synchronous establishment of proteins and DNA. “Proteins can’t exist without DNA and DNA has no purpose without proteins,” wrote Bill Bryson in his book “A Short History of Nearly Everything”. As Jack Szostak explained in his lecture at the Lindau Meeting in 2015, starting from the 1960s, molecular biologists theorised that early life could be much simpler; perhaps there was a molecule that could act as an enzyme and could catalyse its own replication – the all-in-one biological macromolecule. Experiments conducted by Sidney Altman and Thomas Cech in the 1970s demonstrated that RNA possessed these catalytic properties, a discovery for which the two were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1989. Here, Szostak introduces us to the “RNA world”:

 

Jack Szostak on the "RNA world".
(00:04:07 - 00:08:04)

 

Ribosomes are cell structures responsible for deciphering RNA and forming polypeptides out of amino acids. Research conducted by Nobel Laureate Ada Yonath’s group has suggested the structure of the ancestral ribosome – the proto-ribosome, in which the prebiotic bonding is still abundantly functioning in our own bodies. During the 66th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Yonath explained the dimer hypothesis, stating that the proto-ribosome formed from two foldable RNA chains. The hypothesis also states that only those constructs that had a tendency to dimerise in this fashion could evolve, leading to the conclusion that even molecules were susceptible to Darwinian selection.

 

Ada Yonath (2016) - What was First, the Genetic Code or Its Products?

Good morning. I prepared a different starting way, because I thought that I have to explain why I talk about a title that has more biochemical, biological meaning than physics. But actually I don’t think I have to do it now. Because I see that most of you are interested in such titles, in such projects. And second, our project was really dealing with biological, medical problems. The method was physics, crystallography. And the result is in chemistry. So maybe I convinced you that it belongs here. So the genetic code, I am sure you know what it is. I was younger than you, but not much younger, when it was found or when it was established. But now everybody knows, and even children know. When I talk to young children, 6, 7 years old, and I ask them, "You know what is the genetic code?" They say, "Of course, this is the tool that the police is using to identify criminals." (laughter) So we will not talk about each gene on its own. Most of the genes that any organism has are common to the same organisms of the same type. Some are different, like blond and black and so on, but in principle. The genetic code is the code that decides how we work, how we live, what we are or what any other organism is. And its products are proteins. And proteins are the workers of every living cell, from bacteria, cockroaches, flowers and so on. So I don’t think I have to tell you what proteins are or what they are doing. But if you want I can, in the intermission, talk about this. But I want to show you the DNA, the DNA that all of you know now its structure. It's a double helix that is connected, the 2 sides of it are connected by pairs of bases. The bases are the DNA language. There are 4 of them, that’s all. I am until now, since I was a high school kid, I am impressed by the fact that all life on earth is coded by 4 letters. So these 4 letters are the clue how to put together the amino acids that are making the proteins. So the DNA is 4 letters, proteins of 20. Proteins are long chains, I think you know all that. And the way that the flow of the information is shown here. This is the DNA as you saw earlier, here. These are the letters, the bases for those of you that still don’t know that. Here the information in the DNA is not available, it’s covered by the structure. So it’s been transcribed into a similar molecule that has the great ability to live as a single helix. This is called RNA, in this particular case messenger RNA. This is done by transcription, which in my drawing is just an arrow but actually it’s a very, very complicated process. And Roger Kornberg got for it the Nobel Prize in 2005. So then the messenger RNA which has again 4 letters, 3 of them exactly like DNA. One of them is slightly different but chemically it’s not important. It’s been translated to growing proteins by ribosomes. Ribosomes are cell components that know to translate. So now that we know how they work, we love to describe them as factories. Like this factory that is making a long chain. According to the code it comes in linearly. The factory is made of 2 floors. The top floor gets the code and decodes it. And when there is here a triplet - and this I didn’t say yet: each triplet of the combinations of the 4 letters is coding a specific, a cognate amino acid. So the amino acids are being brought into this factory on trucks by another molecule called tRNA. All tRNAs are very similar, but each of them is specific to its cognate amino acid. So they are being brought here. And when a triplet that is coding for this amino acid is found, the amino acid will get in and connect to the newly grown protein. Now this happens inside. My arrow is inside, but I don’t know how to draw inside, so please forgive me. And then the truck will be emptied and go out with the empty trucks. And this elongation cycle that I just showed needs some energy which I symbolise by these chimneys. But not much, it’s very efficient. So that’s the story. This is the way ribosome works. Just to go from the factory to life. Ribosomes are made of 2 subunits, small and large. The small is where the decoding happens. Here is the messenger RNA coming in. And the decoding is using the tRNAs. The tRNAs, each of them has an anti-codon loop that can make the same base pairs And there are 3 sites, each of them a triplet. Here in the P-site, peptidyl transferase centre, is where the tRNA will be connected to the next tRNA in order to make the chain. And the protein chain comes out of the ribosome through a tunnel that spans the large subunit. Once this bond is being made, everything will move. An aminoacylated tRNA will go into the P-site. Now it sits here and waits for the next tRNA. And this empty one will come out through the exit site. And that’s all, so simple. Took us only 20 years minus 2 weeks. (laughter). It’s important these 2 weeks. So we made a movie but, unfortunately, I can’t show it to you. So I’ll show you the movie in the movie file - hopefully it works. I think it’s important. So actually what this shows is what I just described: Messenger RNA is coming to the small subunit. So in the cell the 2 subunits are separated, each of them is an entity on its own right. They associate together when they have to start. And the starting is when the cell meets. And also it’s activated by initiation factors. So in bacteria, that’s what you will see here, the movie is about ribosomes of bacteria. The initiation machinery involves 3 factors, 1, 2 and 3, and you will see number 3. Maybe you can already see the end of it, you will see it in a minute. In higher organisms the initiation is much, much more complicated. But the ribosomes are also larger and more developed with evolution. But the main functions of the ribosome, the decoding and the production of the protein making the peptide bond, are done the same in all ribosomes, no matter where they come from, the smallest and the largest. So I am showing here the smallest, the bacterial. This is what we had 13 years ago when we did the movie. I want to tell you the movie exists in youtube - you can take it if you like or look at it - for 13 years. And so far there was nobody that complained. You think that this shows that they are correct or at least as correct as possible today? I think so. Anyway, messenger comes to the small subunit. And the small subunit takes it, look now, chuck, chuck, chuck, puck. Did you see the puck? The initiation factor number 3 is sitting here and monitors it all. And once it’s happy, the first tRNA is brought by initiation factor number 2. When everything is now monitored and happy, the large subunit can come and associate with the small subunit by surface complementarity. And by bridges that are made chemically between the 2 subunits in bacteria, 13 of them. Have a look, you see these bridges. So now this is the association of the active ribosome. Once it's active, tRNAs can be brought into it by factors that are called elongation factors. They are being decoded here and the peptide bond is being made here. And you see the ribosome is really happy and really helping, in/out, in/out real quick. I didn’t talk to you about speed but it can make up to 40 bonds a second, in one second, with a mistake rate of 1 to 1,000,000. I was a good student in second year, really good, and I got a really good book, how to make a peptide bond, the "Berichte". It took me 6 hours, I was the fastest. So they can make here, these are the peptide bonds, they can make 40 in a second. So you see here they are making. But I want you to pay attention to something really important. And this is that the main motion of the tRNA is sideways, whereas the lower part is rotating. So this is pseudo-symmetrical to this. There is in the lower part, which is the only part of the tRNA which is a single chain, there is rotation. And I’ll come back to it in a minute. But you see it comes in like that and goes out like this. And hopefully I can show it to you, yah. The tunnel is within the large subunit. Now you can see it here, this shiny thing. And the protein comes out at the end of it. The tunnel protects the newly born protein. It does other things too. And the protein folds when it comes out until there is the end of the code. And then instead of tRNA there are factors - recycling factors, release factors – that replace the tRNA and everything dissociates. And can go on to the next protein or to whatever the cell needs. So this is the protein coming out already folded. And here are all the players in this game that are now ready for the next task. So let’s go back now to the talk. In the movie the ribosomes looked very fuzzy but actually we determined the position of each and every atom – in bacteria a quarter of a million atoms. You can see here the small and the large subunit rotating. Each of them is made of many components. Ribosomal RNA is the grey, is the main one. And many ribosomal proteins in many colours. Any question here, no? So please don’t disturb. So the small subunit makes the decoding, the large makes the nascent protein. So when we look at the sites, at the regions where the activity is, in the large and in the small subunit, we see that here is the decoding. Here is the production of the peptide bond. And they are connected by the tRNA that always have this L-shape, double helical L-shape with anti-codon loop here. And the end of it, what we saw in the movie, the end always single chain, always fully conserve for evolution, CCA, cystosine-cystosine-adenine. So it is being decoded here. And this part reaches here. And here, where peptide bond is being made, and where the decoding is being performed, it’s only RNA, only ribosomal RNA. This means that the ribosome is actually a ribozyme, RNA enzyme. And when I asked these young children, Why do you think it is proteins can do almost everything that the cells want? They could have done it themselves. Why does the RNA make them? You know what these children answered me, these ones that talked about the police? They said, Because they don’t want the bias. If the cell had proteins making proteins they could have bias to the ones they love, the ones they don’t love. So this is the way the cell works and I think that the children are right. It’s a very sophisticated regulatory machinery. It is also in good agreement with the composition of ribosomes, I just showed you. They are mainly made of RNA. And it is in agreement with the idea that before life there was an RNA-dominated prebiotic world. So there are people that call it RNA world, maybe there were more elements there. I don’t want to go into it because I am not studying it, I am not an expert in it. But it was mainly RNA. And another thing is, RNA when they become enzymes, in our days they are really, really bad, lousy, lazy, whatever you want to call them. They can become efficient, like the ribosome is. So nature has mechanisms that are beyond our understanding as yet. So when we looked at the structures and when we look at the way the RNA is arranged in the ribosome here. You see the RNA of the large subunit and the little local double helixes that it makes and non-double helixes structures. When we look at it we don’t see any symmetry. We don’t see even any pseudo-symmetry. And the tRNA, if you remember, came out in a pseudo 2-fold rotation, I showed it to you this way. All of it moved sideways and the lower part this way. So there is no symmetry here and no symmetry in the sequence of the nucleotides. But if we look at the structure, this part has internal pseudo-symmetry like that. So this part can be rotated around this and come out to this part. Only the chain, not the sequence, not the nucleotide. I want to show it to you in larger, in higher detail. So this part of this region, the top part, is accommodating the P-site tRNA, the end of it. And the lower part is accommodating the A tRNA. And altogether it's 180 nucleotides. So if you want to see mathematically: we put the main chain of this on top of this or this on top of this by 180 degrees rotation. And we got that. You see how similar they are? They are not exact, of course, because one of these sites is accommodating tRNA, the other one is getting rid of it. But they are very, very similar. In the ribosome they sit here in the centre of activities. It is directly connected to the 2 hands. You remember in the movie, in/out. So it’s directly connected chemically to the 2 hands. And for the tRNA in one of the bridges it’s connected to the messenger RNA of the small sub unit. What you see here is only the large one and the position of this region. The blue and the green I will keep it blue and green. Blue, like here, for the A-region and green for the P-region. So this is the place it sits. And here is the position where the peptide bond is being made. It means it’s in the centre of everything, of activities. And we think that it can be a useful signal transaction because messenger RNA has to move here by a triplet when a peptide bond is being made. But how will it know it, it’s so far away? And how will the A-site tRNA know to come in when the peptide bond is made and the other one went out? So we think that this can be transmission of the signals. I want to show you the size of it. Because in this picture we focused on it but it’s, of course, not the exact one. So what you see here rotating is the large subunit. And this is the size of it, that’s all, this little piece. About 3 to 4% of the structure. But anyway that’s all. This is the way it looks for the chemists here or those that are interested. Grey is the ribosome and the tip of tRNA, A and P, are shown here. Peptide bond will be made here. And in order to show it more clearly: I have down there again the ribosome in grey, A and P blue and green, and peptide bond will be made here. That’s it. And this is the CCA, the conserved piece. If you want to see it, the machine, this machinery that we look at here. From the side it looks like this, the blue and the green. And here the CCA of the A and of the P. So as I said it’s the same in all ribosomes. In every ribosome, bacteria, elephant, dinosaurs, everything. So if we just look at this region, that we discussed earlier. I superposed all the known structures 6 years ago or something, there are here several. A is the blue and green is the P, as before. Here is peptide bond formation. Look they are the same. Once I superposed, I cannot even separate them. Of course, I superposed only the main chain. And here I put in the rotation axis, the imaginary rotation axis, to show where peptide bond is being made. So the high conservation of the symmetrical region or semi-symmetrical region indicates that its existence is beyond environmental conditions. So we called it the proto-ribosomes. We proposed that this is the beginning of the ribosome. That’s the way it started. So what does it say? That the prebiotic bonding entity, termed by us the proto-ribosome, is still functioning in the contemporary ribosomes. In us, all the time, millions of them. You know how many ribosomes there are in cells? In the liver they can reach 4 to 5 million. And in every other cell thousands, hundred thousands. So this is what we say. And if I write it in a prebiotic way, old letters. There is an RNA apparatus with catalytic capabilities that is functioning within the contemporary ribosomes, which means in all ribosomes. So just to show you again: it looks like that, I enlarged one of the previous ones. And what is how you here is crystallography result for the A-site, and mathematically derived rotational for the P-site. CCA of the tRNA. So we have an idea, we have many hypotheses how it came about. And one of them is the dimer hypothesis which we like very much, but we may find others too. So there were dimers like this in the prebiotic world of RNA that could self-fold, self-associate in a way that could make a pocket and make inside reactions. So it was actually a dimer. And I must say that we were very alone in the field for a long time. Until a group in Montreal showed it in a different way. So now it is more acceptable. So we are trying to make these dimers. We either make RNA that should fold similar to what it is in the pocket, which is stem, elbow, stem. Or we take it from what is available in nature, this part. So we can make these type of dimers, this type of dimers. These are the parts that are in the dimer all together, A and P - the positions of them in the A-site and the P-site. What did we find? Something, a very highly surprising result. There is a non-uniform tendency to dimerise. Not all of our constructs dimerised. Between A and P, only P. And between others about half of them. So we don’t really understand what’s going on but we think that we discovered the pre-Darwinian Darwinism, that even molecules can decide if they want to go on or not. So based on the suggested existence of an RNA-dominated world. And on the finding that RNA can replicate and elongate itself and has catalytic capabilities. This is all what we base on. We propose that the proto-ribosome is the entity around which life has evolved, not only ribosomes. So now we can try to answer the question, What was first - the genetic code or its products? Which is what I asked in the beginning. Or we can discuss for a second the emergence of the genetic code. And it’s just a possible pathway, it doesn’t have to be THE pathway. So possible substrates are shown here. Neither of them is ours. Many good chemists showed it could be substrate in the prebiotic world. And we take it and we think that the initial dipeptides that were made in this machinery could be the substrates for the formation of the next peptide bond and so on. So in this way oligopeptides could be formed - not very long but there you go. And the existence of well-performed oligopeptides catalysing fundamental reactions, or stabilising the machine producing them, may have led to the emergence of the genetic code. Because they were needed. I want to show you 2 examples. This is an example of an oligopeptide that has lots of histidines that can carry metals. And this is the example of where the machine could be stabilised, which is still not bound there. So this suggests that the genetic code was created by, or according to, its products which were found fit and useful and therefore survived. And led to the creation of a primitive original genetic code which co-evolved together with the products. So I hope that I gave some idea and I want to emphasise: the genetic code co-evolved together with its ribosome and its products. So one little comment from inefficient RNA enzymes, I said earlier the ribosomes are lazy or lousy as you want to call them. The contemporary ribosome is very efficient. It shows that nature has machinery to make it efficient. And we think that this is the ribosomal proteins that you could see in the beginning. But here are 2 representations of all ribosomal proteins in bacteria. They all have very long extensions of internal loops, otherwise they are small. And they are stabilising the structure. So I focus here on 4 of them. And I show them here in the small subunit. And you can see how beautifully they enter the structure and stabilise it. I can't talk more about it but we have wonderful examples. So our hypothesis is based on the existence of self-replicating RNA molecules with catalytic capabilities and on the assumption that the genetic code followed its products. Just to show it where it is again to remind you. Here it is in the ribosome. In this very complex structure we identified this piece - this is here - and it amounts to 3 to 4% of the RNA in ribosomes. So during the 4 days that I have been here, everybody asked me about antibiotics - especially the media but also many of you. So I decided to give a few minutes to antibiotics. Over 40% of the useful antibiotics are hampering protein biosynthesis, mainly by paralysing the ribosome. Because it’s clear if the next generation will have less proteins or wrong proteins, it's death to the bacteria. Natural antibiotics are the main antibiotics we are using now. And they are the weapons that bacteria from one type is using to interfere with the cell life of different species. So the question is: antibiotics are very small, around 500, sometimes they reach 1,000; bacterial ribosomes are 2,500,000 - how does this work? So if we think about the factory that I showed in the beginning. Factory works in assembly lines. If you stop one assembly line the whole thing is done. So this is what the antibiotics do: they stop one function. And you can see here the shape of the large and the small subunit. And all these balloons, each of them is describing a family of antibiotics. Just a second for "What is a family of antibiotics?" It’s what the companies made from the natural antibiotics, they made them better. And they are all in the decoding, in the hinging, tunnelling and bonding. So now we have another movie that doesn’t go and maybe I’ll show it at the end. Because I see that my share is already up and I didn’t really finish. So we talk about antibiotics a few more minutes. All antibiotics bind to functional sites. And it’s based on very small differences - I won’t show it now. But the problem is what everybody talks about is resistance. And a prominent mechanism for antibiotics to acquire resistance is to change their own binding pocket. And maybe there is no way against it, but maybe there is a little bit. So I’m not sure that it’s possible to combat resistance fully. Because bacteria want to live, they were on earth before us, they are with us. But it was found that even in tribes that never had European food or medicine, there are already resistance mechanisms. So it suggests that bacteria knows what to do. What do we do in order to contribute to this? Until recently all the structures of ribosomes and antibiotics that were known were models of pathogens. That explained exactly how antibiotics bind, but not the species specificity of resistance. And they are different, they are species specificity in resistance. So we grew a ribosome from a pathogen. And we learned that it’s possible to make better antibiotics. You can see here a family of antibiotics that was improved just by adding one hydrogen bond - 16-fold higher potency. Second, beyond our expectations we found that some of the pathogenic ribosomes in pathogenic bacteria have insertions. So if we look at protein L3 in many, many bacteria, only here there are insertions. And these 2 are in pathogens. So when we superposed the ribosome and the structure of a protein, not the particular one before, but the latter one, of 4 different bacteria, only this one came out. And this is a pathogen. So we think that it can be a potential new species. The same is on the surface. All these cyan are extensions of the pathogen. And if we look at it, it looks like this. Everything exactly the same between pathogens and normal. But this is an addition. We think that we can use this as a potential binding site that the bacteria didn’t find out yet about. That the bacteria didn’t find out yet about. So we identified 25 new potentials like this. Blocking 16 really stopped the ribosome work because these positions are used for the ribosome to interact with other components. And we think that we can make better antibiotics. And here I come to environmental and ecological considerations. Almost all known antibiotics until now have cores that are not digestible, not degradable. So they contaminate the environment. And they come back to us for the grass that is grown on the contaminated water. So the newly identified potential binding sites can be exploited for the design of degradable antibiotics. As I showed earlier we already did some degradable - for the chemists: PNA, DNA and small amino acids, small peptides. So the insight we have can really help both antibiotic resistance and ecological. And I am not going to show it all, but they will help to separate between what we call good bacteria, the microbiome, the trillions of bacteria that live in us and contribute to our good life, and the pathogens. Because we suggest to make pathogen-specific antibiotics, for each pathogen its own antibiotic. So this will also reduce resistance. So let’s just say that this is a revolution in the antibiotic field that today prefers a broad range. For having this we have to identify what type of bacteria. And we have to find a smooth way to find out the important, unique features of each pathogen. Both take a long time - look at the time limit. The first structure, 20 years as I said earlier. Afterwards there were structures that came out at 5, 3, 4 years. This is not good, we want to do structures in months. And for this there is now a new way, cryo-electron microscopy. And I just want to show you that we did solve several structures with it All the RNA, all the proteins and for the crystallographers, the level of accuracy. It’s not always like this but in this structure. And we can even see mutations. So thank you really very much.(Applause)

Guten Morgen. Ich hatte ja eigentlich einen anderen Anfang vorbereitet. Ich dachte nämlich, dass ich erklären müsste, warum ich über ein Thema spreche, das mehr mit Biochemie und Biologie zu tun hat als mit Physik. Aber das ist wohl nicht nötig, denn ich sehe, dass die meisten von Ihnen an solchen Themen, an Projekten dieser Art interessiert sind. Und außerdem ging es in unserem Projekt ja um biologische, um medizinische Probleme. Die Methode war Physik, Kristallographie. Und die Ergebnisse gehören zur Chemie. Ich habe Sie also vielleicht davon überzeugt, dass das Thema hierher gehört. Der genetische Code - ich bin sicher, Sie wissen, was das ist. Als er gefunden bzw. entschlüsselt wurde, war ich jünger als Sie - aber nicht viel jünger. Heutzutage kennt ihn jeder, sogar Kinder. Wenn ich mit kleinen Kindern spreche, 6, 7 Jahre alt, und sie frage: „Wisst ihr, was der genetische Code ist?“, dann antworten sie: „Na klar, das ist das Gerät, mit dem die Polizei Verbrecher identifiziert.“ (Gelächter) Wir werden nicht über jedes einzelne Gen sprechen. Die meisten Gene, über die ein Organismus verfügt, hat er mit den gleichen Organismen der gleichen Art gemeinsam. Einige sind verschieden - es gibt blond und schwarz und so weiter. Aber grundsätzlich entscheidet der genetische Code, wie wir funktionieren, wie wir leben, was wir sind oder was irgendein anderer Organismus ist. Und seine Produkte sind Proteine. Proteine sind die Arbeiter jeder lebenden Zelle, von Bakterien, Kakerlaken, Blumen und so weiter. Ich denke nicht, dass Ihnen erzählen muss, was Proteine sind oder was sie tun. Doch wenn Sie möchten, können wir in der Pause darüber sprechen. Jetzt aber will ich Ihnen die DNA zeigen - die DNA, deren Struktur Sie alle kennen. Es ist eine Doppelhelix, deren zwei Seiten durch Basenpaare miteinander verbunden sind. Die Basen sind die Sprache der DNA. Es gibt vier von Ihnen - das ist auch schon alles. Seit meiner High-School-Zeit beeindruckt mich die Tatsache, dass alles Leben auf der Erde durch 4 Buchstaben verschlüsselt ist. Diese 4 Buchstaben sind der Schlüssel dafür, wie die Aminosäuren, die die Proteine produzieren, zusammenzusetzen sind. Die DNA besteht also aus 4 Buchstaben, Proteine aus 20. Proteine sind lange Ketten - ich denke, dass wissen Sie. Und der Weg, der Fluss der Informationen ist hier zu sehen: Das ist die DNA, die Sie vorhin schon gesehen haben. Hier sind die Buchstaben, die Basen - für diejenigen unter Ihnen, die das immer noch nicht wissen. Hier steht die Information in der DNA nicht zur Verfügung, sie ist von der Struktur verdeckt. Sie wird in ein ähnliches Molekül transkribiert, das die tolle Fähigkeit besitzt, als Einzelhelix leben zu können. Die Einzelhelix wird 'RNA' genannt, in diesem besonderen Fall 'Boten-RNA'. Das geschieht durch Transkription, die in meiner Zeichnung nur ein Pfeil ist. Tatsächlich aber ist das ein sehr, sehr komplizierter Prozess. Roger Kornberg hat dafür im Jahr 2005 den Nobelpreis bekommen. Die Boten-RNA hat ebenfalls 4 Buchstaben, von denen 3 genauso sind wie in der DNA. Einer von ihnen ist ein bisschen anders, aber chemisch hat das keine Bedeutung. Er wurde translatiert, um durch Ribosomen Proteine entstehen zu lassen. Ribosomen sind Zellbausteine, die translatieren können. Jetzt, da wir wissen, wie sie arbeiten, beschreiben wir sie gerne als Fabriken - wie diese Fabrik, die eine lange Kette herstellt. Im Einklang mit dem Code kommt sie linear herein. Die Fabrik hat 2 Stockwerke: Das obere Stockwerk erhält den Code und entschlüsselt ihn. Und wenn hier ein Triplett ist - das habe ich noch nicht erwähnt: Jedes Triplett der Kombination aus den 4 Buchstaben verschlüsselt eine spezifische, eine genetisch verwandte Aminosäure. Die Aminosäuren werden auf LKW in diese Fabrik gebracht - durch ein anderes Molekül namens tRNA. Alle tRNA-Moleküle sind sich sehr ähnlich, aber jedes von ihnen ist auf die mit ihm verwandte Aminosäure zugeschnitten. Hier werden sie herangebracht. Und wenn das Triplett, das für diese Aminosäure verschlüsselt, gefunden ist, kommt die Aminosäure herein und verbindet sich mit dem neu entstandenen Protein. Das geschieht innen. Mein Pfeil ist innen, aber ich weiß nicht, wie ich ihn innen zeichnen soll - bitte sehen Sie mir das nach. Dann ist der LKW leer und kommt mit den anderen leeren LKW heraus. Der Elongationszyklus, den ich gerade gezeigt habe, benötigt Energie, die ich durch diese Kamine symbolisiere. Aber nicht viel - er ist sehr effizient. Das ist die ganze Geschichte. So arbeitet das Ribosom. Gehen wir jetzt von der Fabrik ins richtige Leben. Ribosomen bestehen aus 2 Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. In der kleinen geht die Entschlüsselung vor sich. Hier kommt die Boten-RNA herein. Und zum Entschlüsseln werden tRNA genutzt. Jede tRNA hat eine Anticodonschleife, die dieselben Basenpaare - Watson-Crick-Basenpaare genannt - herstellen kann, wie die in DNA oder RNA. Und es gibt 3 Stellen, bei denen es sich jeweils um ein Triplett handelt. Hier, an der P-Stelle, dem Peptidyltransferasezentrum, wird die tRNA mit der nächsten tRNA verbunden, so dass eine Kette entsteht. Die Proteinkette verlässt das Ribosom durch einen Tunnel, der sich über die gesamte Untereinheit erstreckt. Ist diese Verbindung hergestellt, gerät alles in Bewegung. Eine aminoacylierte tRNA wandert zur P-Stelle. Dort sitzt sie jetzt und wartet auf die nächste tRNA, und diese leere tritt durch den Ausgang aus. Das ist auch schon alles - ganz einfach. Wir haben nur 20 Jahre minus 2 Wochen dafür gebraucht (Gelächter) - auf diese 2 Wochen kommt es an. Wir haben einen Film gedreht, aber den kann ich Ihnen leider nicht vorspielen. Ich zeige Ihnen den Film in der Filmdatei - hoffentlich klappt das, ich halte das für wichtig. Hier sieht man, was ich gerade beschrieben habe: Boten-RNA gelangt zur kleinen Untereinheit. In der Zelle sind die beiden Untereinheiten getrennt, jede von ihnen ist eine eigenständige Einheit. Sie verbinden sich miteinander, wenn sie beginnen müssen. Und das ist dann, wenn es für die Zelle nötig ist. Es gibt auch eine Aktivierung durch Initiationsfaktoren. In Bakterien - das sehen Sie hier, in dem Film geht es um Ribosomen von Bakterien – arbeitet die Initiationsmaschine mit 3 Faktoren: 1, 2 und 3. Sie werden Nummer 3 sehen. Vielleicht können Sie jetzt schon das Ende sehen - Sie sehen es in 1 Minute. In höheren Organismen ist die Initiation viel, viel komplizierter. Aber deren Ribosomen sind auch größer und haben sich im Verlauf der Evolution weiter entwickelt. Die Hauptfunktionen der Ribosome jedoch, das Entschlüsseln und die Herstellung des Proteins, das die Peptidbindung herstellt, laufen in allen Ribosomen gleich ab, in den kleinsten und den größten, ganz egal, woher sie kommen. Ich zeige Ihnen hier die kleinsten, die bakteriellen. Das hatten wir vor 13 Jahren, als wir den Film drehten. Den Film gibt es seit 13 Jahren auf YouTube zu sehen - Sie können ihn mitnehmen oder dort ansehen. Bis jetzt hat niemand Einwände vorgebracht. Glauben Sie nicht auch, daran zeigt sich, dass er heute noch richtig ist, oder zumindest so richtig wie möglich? Ich glaube das schon. Wie auch immer - der Bote kommt zur kleinen Untereinheit. Und die kleine Untereinheit holt ihn sich, sehen Sie, tuck, tuck, tuck. Haben Sie das gesehen? Der Initiationsfaktor Nummer 3 sitzt hier und überwacht alles. Und wenn er zufrieden ist, wird die erste tRNA durch Initiationsfaktor Nummer 2 herbeigebracht. Wenn jetzt alles unter Kontrolle ist und alle zufrieden sind, kann die große Untereinheit kommen und sich mit der kleinen Untereinheit verbinden - durch Oberflächenkomplementarität und durch Brücken, die zwischen den 2 Untereinheiten in Bakterien - 13 an der Zahl - chemisch gebildet werden. Sehen Sie, das sind die Brücken. Das ist die Verbindung des aktiven Ribosoms. Ist es aktiv, können tRNA hereingebracht werden - durch Faktoren, die Elongationsfaktoren genannt werden. Sie werden hier entschlüsselt, und die Peptidbindung wird hier erzeugt. Und wie Sie sehen, ist das Ribosom sehr zufrieden und wirklich hilfreich - rein, raus, rein, raus, richtig schnell. Über die Geschwindigkeit habe ich Ihnen noch gar nichts gesagt: Es kann 40 Bindungen in der Sekunde erzeugen, mit einer Fehlerquote von 1 zu 1.000.000. In meinem zweiten Jahr war ich eine gute Studentin, wirklich gut, und ich hatte ein sehr gutes Buch über die Bildung einer Peptidbindung, die „Berichte.“ Ich brauchte 6 Stunden dafür - ich war die Schnellste. Und die hier - das sind die Peptidbindungen - die schaffen 40 in der Sekunde. Hier sehen Sie, wie sie gebildet werden. Ich möchte aber Ihre Aufmerksamkeit auf etwas sehr Wichtiges lenken. Nämlich auf die Tatsache, das sich die tRNA hauptsächlich seitwärts bewegt, während der untere Teil rotiert. Das ist also pseudosymmetrisch hierzu. Im unteren Teil, dem einzigen Teil der tRNA, der eine Einzelkette ist, gibt es Rotation. Darauf komme ich gleich zurück. Aber wie Sie sehen, so kommt sie herein und so tritt sie aus. Hoffentlich kann ich es Ihnen zeigen - ja. Der Tunnel ist in der großen Untereinheit. Dort können Sie ihn jetzt sehen, dieses glänzende Ding. Und das Protein kommt am Ende des Tunnels heraus. Der Tunnel schützt das neugeborene Protein. Er macht auch andere Dinge. Wenn es herauskommt, ist das Protein gefaltet, bis das Ende des Codes erreicht ist. Und anstelle von tRNA sind hier Faktoren - Recycling-Faktor, Release-Faktor -, die an die Stelle der tRNA treten, und alles dissoziiert und kann zum nächsten Protein wandern oder wohin auch immer von der Zelle benötigt. Das ist das austretende Protein, bereits gefaltet. Und hier sind alle Teilnehmer an diesem Spiel, bereit für die nächste Aufgabe. Kommen wir zurück zum Vortrag. Im Film haben die Ribosomen sehr unscharf ausgesehen, doch wir konnten die Position von jedem einzelnen Atom bestimmen – eine Viertelmillion Atome in Bakterien. Hier können Sie die kleine und die große Untereinheit rotieren sehen. Jede von ihnen besteht aus vielen Komponenten - ribosomale RNAs, die graue ist die wichtigste, und viele ribosomale Proteine in vielen Farben. Haben Sie eine Frage? Nein? Dann stören Sie bitte nicht. – Die kleinen Untereinheiten sind also für die Entschlüsselung zuständig, die großen für die Herstellung des naszierenden Proteins. Wenn wir uns die Orte, die Regionen in der großen und kleinen Untereinheit ansehen, wo die Aktivität stattfindet, dann sehen wir hier die Entschlüsselung. Hier wird die Peptidbindung hergestellt. Verbunden sind sie durch die tRNA, die stets diese L-Form aufweist, eine doppelhelikale L-Form mit Anticodonschleife hier. Und wie wir im Film gesehen haben, das Ende ist immer eine Einzelkette, immer vollständig für die Evolution konserviert, CCA, Cytosin-Cytosin-Adenin. Hier wird also entschlüsselt, und dieser Teil reicht bis hier. Und hier, wo die Peptidbindung gebildet und die Entschlüsselung durchgeführt wird, gibt es nur RNA, nur ribosomale RNA. Das bedeutet: Das Ribosom ist ein Ribozym, ein RNA-Enzym. Und als ich diese kleinen Kinder fragte: "Warum wohl können Proteine fast alles machen, was die Zelle will? Sie könnte es auch selber machen. Warum macht es die RNA?" - wissen Sie, was mir diese Kinder antworteten, die mit der Polizei? Sie sagten: "Weil sie niemanden bevorzugen will." Würde die Zelle Proteine durch Proteine herstellen lassen, könnten die gegenüber denen, die sie mögen und die sie nicht mögen, voreingenommen sein. So also arbeitet die Zelle. Und ich denke, die Kinder hatten recht: Sie ist eine hochentwickelte Regulierungsmaschine. Sie stimmt auch gut mit der Zusammensetzung der Ribosomen überein, das habe ich Ihnen gerade gezeigt. Sie besteht hauptsächlich aus RNA. Und das passt zu der Vorstellung einer von RNA dominierten präbiotischen Welt, bevor es Leben gab. Manche nennen sie die RNA-Welt, aber es gab vielleicht noch weitere Bestandteile. Darauf will ich nicht näher eingehen, weil ich mich nicht damit befasse, ich bin keine Expertin auf diesem Gebiet. Hauptsächlich aber war es RNA. Und noch etwas: Wenn RNA zu Enzymen werden, sind sie in unserer Zeit richtig, richtig unartig, miserabel, faul - wie auch immer man sie nennen will. Sie können effizient werden, wie das Ribosom. Die Natur verfügt also über Mechanismen, die wir noch nicht verstehen. Wenn wir uns die Strukturen ansehen, die Art und Weise, wie die RNA hier im Ribosom angeordnet ist. Sie sehen die RNA der großen Untereinheit und die kleinen lokalen Doppelhelices, die sie herstellt und Strukturen,die keine Doppelhelices sind. Wenn wir uns das ansehen, erkennen wir keine Symmetrie; wir sehen nicht einmal Pseudosymmetrie. Und wie Sie sich vielleicht erinnern, kam die tRNA in einer zweifachen Pseudorotation heraus, das habe ich Ihnen gezeigt - so. Alles davon bewegte sich seitwärts und der untere Teil bewegte sich so. Es gibt hier also keine Symmetrie, und es gibt keine Symmetrie in der Sequenz der Nukleotiden. Wenn wir aber die Struktur untersuchen, dann sehen wir, dass dieser Teil eine interne Pseudosymmetrie aufweist. Dieser Teil kann dort herum rotieren und hier herauskommen. Nur die Kette, nicht die Sequenz, nicht die Nukleotide. Ich zeige Ihnen das größer, in höherer Auflösung. Dieser Teil der Region, der obere Teil, beherbergt die tRNA der P-Stelle, das Ende davon. Und der untere Teil beherbergt die A tRNA. Zusammen sind es 180 Nukleotiden. Mathematisch betrachtet, bedeutet das: Wir legten die Hauptkette hiervon und diesen Teil übereinander, durch eine Rotation um 180 Grad. Und wir bekamen das. Sehen Sie die Ähnlichkeit? Sie sind natürlich nicht genau gleich, da eine dieser Stellen tRNA beherbergt und die andere sich davon trennt. Doch sie sind sich sehr, sehr ähnlich. Im Ribosom sind sie hier zu finden, im Zentrum der Aktivitäten. Es besteht eine direkte Verbindung zu den 2 Händen - erinnern Sie sich an den Film: rein, raus. Es besteht also eine direkte chemische Verbindung zu den zwei Händen. Und die tRNA in einer der Brücken ist mit der Boten-RNA der kleinen Untereinheit verbunden. Hier sehen Sie nur die große und die Position dieser Stelle. Die blaue und die grüne lasse ich blau und grün. Blau, wie etwa hier, steht für die A-Stelle und grün für die P-Stelle. Hier ist es also zu finden. Und hier ist die Position, in der die Peptidbindung hergestellt wird. Das bedeutet, dass sie im Zentrum von Allem, im Zentrum der Aktivitäten ist. Und wir denken, dass sie als Signalübertragung dient, da sich die Boten-RNA durch ein Triplett hierher bewegen muss, wenn eine Peptidbindung hergestellt wird. Aber woher weiß sie das, wo sie doch so weit weg ist? Und woher weiß die tRNA der A-Stelle, dass sie hereinkommen kann, wenn sich die Peptidbindung gebildet und die andere sich gelöst hat? Wir denken, hier werden die Signale übertragen. Ich zeige Ihnen einmal die Größe dieser Stelle. Dieses Bild befasst sich zwar damit, aber es ist natürlich nicht exakt. Was sich hier dreht, ist die große Untereinheit. Und das die Größe der Stelle. Das ist alles, dieses kleine Teil. Etwa 3 bis 4 Prozent der Struktur - 3 Prozent, wenn es Eukaryoten sind und 4 Prozent bei Bakterienenzymen. Aber das ist alles. Das ist der Anblick für die Chemiker unter Ihnen oder für die, die es interessiert. Grau ist das Ribosom; die Spitze der tRNA sowie A und P sind hier zu sehen. Die Peptidbindung wird hier hergestellt. Und um es noch deutlicher zu zeigen, habe ich es hier noch einmal vergrößert: Das Ribosom ist grau, A und P sind blau und grün, und die Peptidbindung wird hier gebildet. Das ist alles. Und das ist CCA, das konservierte Stück. Wenn Sie es sehen möchten - die Maschine, diese Maschine, die wir hier sehen. Von der Seite sieht es so aus, das Blau und das Grün. Und hier CCA der A-Stelle und der P-Stelle. Wie ich schon sagte, ist das in allen Ribosomen gleich. In jedem Ribosom - von Bakterien, Elefanten, Dinosauriern, von allem. Wenn wir nur diese Region betrachten, die wir gerade erörtert haben. Ich habe vor etwa 6 Jahren alle bekannten Strukturen übereinandergelegt - hier sind einige aufgeführt: A ist blau und P ist grün, wie gerade eben. Hier findet die Peptidbildung statt. Sehen Sie, sie sind alle gleich. Nachdem ich sie übereinandergelegt hatte, konnte ich sie nicht mehr auseinanderhalten. Natürlich habe ich nur die Hauptketten übereinandergelegt. Hier habe ich die Rotationsachse eingefügt, die imaginäre Rotationsachse, um zu zeigen, wo die Peptidbindung hergestellt wird. Die hohe Konservierung der symmetrischen Region bzw. der semi-symmetrischen Region weist darauf hin, dass ihre Existenz von Umweltbedingungen unabhängig ist. Daher nannten wir sie Protoribosomen. Nach unserer Theorie ist das der Ursprung des Ribosoms. So hat es begonnen. Was sagt uns das? Dass die präbiotische Bindungsmaschine, von uns 'Protoribosom' genannt, in den heutigen Ribosomen noch immer am Werk ist. In uns, die ganze Zeit - Millionen davon. Wissen Sie, wie viele Ribosomen in einer Zelle sind? In der Leber können es 4 bis 5 Millionen sein. Und in jeder anderen Zelle Tausende, Hunderttausende. Das ist unsere Aussage - ich schreibe sie auf „präbiotische“ Weise, in alten Buchstaben: Es gibt einen RNA-Apparat mit katalytischen Fähigkeiten, der in den heutigen Ribosomen am Werk ist - also in allen Ribosomen. Ich zeige es Ihnen noch einmal: So sieht er aus, ich habe eine der vorherigen Darstellungen vergrößert. Was ich Ihnen hier zeige, ist das kristallographische Resultat für die A-Stelle, für die P-Stelle mathematisch durch Rotation abgeleitet. CCA der tRNA. Wir haben eine Vorstellung davon, wie das entstand, viele Hypothesen. Eine davon ist die Dimer-Hypothese, die uns sehr gut gefällt, aber vielleicht finden wir noch andere. Demnach gab es in der präbiotischen Welt der RNA Dimere wie dieses, das sich selbst falten konnte. Das dergestalt zur Selbstassoziation in der Lage war, dass es eine Tasche bilden und Innenreaktionen hervorrufen konnte. Es war also ein Dimer. Und ich muss sagen, damit standen wir in unserem Gebiet eine lange Zeit ganz alleine da. Bis eine Gruppe in Montreal die Hypothese auf andere Weise bestätigte. Mittlerweile wird sie eher akzeptiert. Wir versuchen auch, diese Dimere herzustellen. Wir stellen entweder RNA her, die sich ähnlich falten sollte wie in der Tasche: Schenkel, Verbindungsstück, Schenkel. Oder wir entnehmen sie dem, was in der Natur zur Verfügung steht, diesem Teil. Auf diese Weise können wir Dimere dieser Art herstellen und Dimere dieser Art. Das sind die Teile, die sich im Dimer befinden, alle zusammen: A und P - ihre Positionen in der A-Stelle und in der P-Stelle. Was haben wir herausgefunden? Ein äußerst überraschendes Ergebnis. Es gibt eine nicht-einheitliche Tendenz, Dimere zu bilden. Nicht alle unsere Konstruktionen dimerisierten - von A und P nur P und von anderen etwa die Hälfte. Wir verstehen nicht wirklich, was da vor sich geht. Aber wir sind der Meinung, dass wir den prä-darwinschen Darwinismus entdeckt haben – dass sogar Moleküle entscheiden können, ob sie sich bewegen oder nicht. Auf der Grundlage der unterstellten Existenz einer RNA-dominierten Welt sowie der Erkenntnis, dass sich RNA replizieren und elongieren kann und katalytische Fähigkeiten besitzt - das ist unsere ganze Grundlage -, schlagen wir vor, dass das Protoribosom das Gebilde ist, um das sich Leben entwickelt hat, nicht nur Ribosomen. Nun können wir versuchen, die Frage zu beantworten: Was war zuerst da - der genetische Code oder seine Produkte? Das ist die Frage, die ich eingangs gestellt hatte. Beziehungsweise können wir kurz die Entstehung des genetischen Codes erörtern. Und das ist nur ein möglicher Weg, es muss nicht DER Weg sein. Mögliche Substrate sehen Sie hier. Keines davon ist von uns. Viele gute Chemiker haben nachgewiesen, dass es Substrat aus der präbiotischen Welt sein könnte. Wir verwenden das also in der Meinung, dass die ursprünglichen Dipeptide, die in dieser Maschine hergestellt wurden, das Substrat für die Bildung der nächsten Peptidbindung sein könnten und so weiter. Auf diese Weise könnten also Oligopeptide gebildet werden - nicht sehr lang, aber immerhin. Und die Existenz leistungsfähiger Oligopeptide, welche fundamentale Reaktionen katalysieren bzw. die Maschine, die sie herstellt, stabilisieren, hat vielleicht zur Entstehung des genetischen Codes geführt. Denn sie wurden gebraucht. Ich möchte Ihnen 2 Beispiele zeigen. Hier ist das Beispiel eines Oligopeptids mit vielen Histidinen, das Metalle befördern kann. Und das ist ein Beispiel dafür, wo die Maschine, die dort immer noch nicht gebunden ist, stabilisiert werden könnte. Damit wird Folgendes unterstellt: Der genetische Code entstand durch oder nach Maßgabe jener seiner Produkte, die als tauglich und nützlich befunden wurden. Und die daher überlebten und zur Entstehung eines primitiven ursprünglichen genetischen Codes führten, der sich koevolutionär mit den Produkten weiterentwickelte. Ich hoffe, dass ich das verdeutlichen konnte. Und ich möchte nochmals betonen: Der genetische Code entwickelte sich koevolutionär mit seinen Ribosomen und Produkten. Noch eine Bemerkung zu den ineffizienten RNA-Enzymen: Ich habe vorhin gesagt, dass die Ribosomen faul oder minderwertig seien, wie auch immer man sie nennen will. Das Ribosom von heute ist sehr effizient. Daran zeigt sich, dass die Natur über eine Maschine verfügt, die es effizient macht. Und wir glauben, das sind die ribosomalen Proteine, die Sie zu Beginn sehen konnten. Hier sind 2 Darstellungen aller ribosomalen Proteine in Bakterien. Sie haben alle sehr stark verlängerte interne Schleifen; ansonsten sind sie sehr klein. Und sie stabilisieren die Struktur. Ich konzentriere mich auf 4 von ihnen und zeige sie hier in der kleinen Untereinheit. Sie können sehen, auf welch schöne Weise sie in das Gebilde eindringen und es stabilisieren. Ich kann nicht weiter darauf eingehen, aber wir haben wunderbare Beispiele. Unsere Hypothese beruht also auf der Existenz selbstreplizierender RNA-Moleküle mit katalytischen Fähigkeiten sowie auf der Annahme, dass der genetische Code seinen Produkten folgte. Nur zur Erinnerung, wo sich all das befindet: Es ist hier, im Ribosom. In dieser äußerst komplexen Struktur haben wir dieses Stück identifiziert – es ist hier und macht 3 bis 4 Prozent der RNA in Ribosomen aus. In den 4 Tagen, seit ich hier bin, fragte mich jeder nach Antibiotika - vor allem die Medien, aber auch viele von Ihnen. Ich habe mich also dazu entschlossen, ein paar Minuten über Antibiotika zu sprechen. Über 40 Prozent der nützlichen Antibiotika hindern die Proteinbiosynthese hauptsächlich dadurch, dass sie das Ribosom paralysieren. Denn eines ist klar: Hat die nächste Generation weniger Proteine oder falsche Proteine, ist das der Tod der Bakterien. Heutzutage verwenden wir hauptsächlich natürliche Antibiotika. Sie sind die Waffen, die Bakterien einer bestimmten Art dazu verwenden, in das Leben der Zellen anderer Arten einzugreifen. Die Frage ist also - Antibiotika sind sehr klein, etwa 500 Da, manchmal 1.000. Bakterielle Ribosomen haben eine Größe von 2.500.000 Da - wie funktioniert das? Denken wir an die Fabrik zurück, die ich Ihnen eingangs gezeigt habe. Fabriken arbeiten mit Fließbändern. Wenn Sie ein Fließband anhalten, steht alles still. Das ist es, was Antibiotika tun: Sie halten eine Funktion an. Hier sehen Sie die Formen der großen und der kleinen Untereinheit, und jeder dieser Ballone beschreibt eine Familie von Antibiotika. Kurz zu der Frage: „Was ist eine Familie von Antibiotika?“ Das ist das, was die Unternehmen aus den natürlichen Antibiotika gemacht haben. Sie haben sie verbessert. Und sie sind alle beim Entschlüsseln, sie hängen sich ein, graben Tunnel und bilden Bindungen. Jetzt haben wir wieder einen Film, der nicht läuft. Vielleicht zeige ich ihn zum Schluss, denn ich sehe, dass meine Redezeit fast vorbei ist, und ich bin noch nicht am Ende. Sprechen wir also noch ein paar Minuten über Antibiotika. Alle Antibiotika binden sich an funktionelle Stellen. Es beruht auf sehr kleinen Unterschieden - ich kann das jetzt nicht zeigen. Doch das Problem, über das alle sprechen, ist Resistenz. Und der hauptsächliche Mechanismus, gegen Antibiotika resistent zu werden, besteht darin, seine eigene Bindungstasche zu ändern. Vielleicht gibt es dagegen kein Mittel - vielleicht aber doch ein bisschen. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob es möglich ist, die Resistenz vollständig zu bekämpfen, denn Bakterien wollen leben, sie waren vor uns auf der Welt, sie leben mit uns. Man hat festgestellt, dass es sogar bei Stämmen, die noch nie Essen oder Medizin aus Europa bekommen haben, bereits Resistenzmechanismen gibt. Das lässt vermuten, dass Bakterien wissen, was zu tun ist. Was ist unser Beitrag in diesem Kampf? Bis vor kurzem waren alle bekannten Strukturen von Ribosomen und Antibiotika Modelle von Pathogenen. Das erklärte genau, wie sich Antibiotika binden, aber nicht die Artenspezifizität der Resistenz. Und sie sind unterschiedlich, die Resistenz ist artenspezifisch. Daher entwickelten wir ein Ribosom aus einem Pathogen, und wir stellten fest, dass es möglich ist, bessere Antibiotika herzustellen. Hier sehen Sie eine Familie von Antibiotika, die nur durch das Hinzufügen einer Wasserstoffbindung verbessert wurde – um das 16-fache. Zweitens: Entgegen unserer Erwartungen fanden wir heraus, das einige der Ribosomen in pathogenen Bakterien Insertionen aufweisen. Wir sehen hier das Protein L3 in vielen, vielen Bakterien, aber nur hier gibt es Insertionen. Und diese beiden sind in Pathogenen. Als wir das Ribosom und die Struktur eines Proteins von 4 verschiedenen Bakterien übereinanderlegten – nicht die erstgenannten, sondern letztere -, kam nur das heraus. Und das ist ein Pathogen. Wir denken, es ist eine potentielle neue Art. An der Oberfläche ist es genauso. Alle diese türkisfarbenen Stellen sind Verlängerungen des Pathogens. Und bei näherem Hinsehen sieht es so aus. Kein Unterschied zwischen pathogen und normal. Aber das ist ein Zusatz. Wir denken, das können wir als mögliche Bindungsstelle nutzen, von der die Bakterien noch nichts wissen. Wir haben 25 mögliche neue Stellen dieser Art identifiziert. Als wir 16 davon blockierten, stellte das Ribosom die Tätigkeit ein; denn diese Stellen werden vom Ribosom dazu genutzt, mit anderen Komponenten zu interagieren. Und wir glauben, dass wir bessere Antibiotika herstellen können. Jetzt komme ich zu den ökologischen Erwägungen. Fast alle bisher bekannten Antibiotika haben Kerne, die nicht verdaulich sind, nicht abbaubar. Sie kontaminieren also die Umwelt. Und im Gras, das mit kontaminiertem Wasser gewachsen ist, kommen sie zu uns zurück. Die neu identifizierten möglichen Bindungsstellen können für die Entwicklung abbaubarer Antibiotika genutzt werden. Wie vorhin gezeigt, haben wir bereits einige abbaubare hergestellt - für die Chemiker unter Ihnen: PNA, DNA und kleine Aminosäuren, kleine Peptide. Die neuen Erkenntnisse können tatsächlich zur Lösung des Resistenz- und des Umweltproblems beitragen. Ich kann nicht alles zeigen, aber sie werden uns dabei helfen, die sogenannten guten Bakterien, die Mikrobiome, die Billionen von Bakterien, die in uns leben und für unser Wohlergehen sorgen, von den Pathogenen zu trennen. Denn wir schlagen vor, pathogen-spezifische Antibiotika herzustellen. Jedes Pathogen kann nämlich sein eigenes Antibiotikum bekommen. Das wird die Resistenz ebenfalls verringern. Es ist eine Revolution auf dem Gebiet der Antibiotika, auf dem heute Breitbandantibiotika bevorzugt werden. Um unser Ziel zu erreichen, müssen wir die Art der Bakterien identifizieren. Und wir müssen eine einfache Möglichkeit finden, wie wir die wichtigen, einzigartigen Eigenschaften eines jeden Pathogens herausfinden können. Beides nimmt viel Zeit in Anspruch. Sehen Sie sich den zeitlichen Rahmen an - die erste Struktur: 20 Jahre, wie vorhin erwähnt. Danach gab es Strukturen, die nach 5, 3, 4 Jahren herauskamen. Das ist nicht gut, wir wollen Strukturen in einigen Monaten erkennen. Und dafür gibt es jetzt einen neuen Weg: die Kryoelektronenmikroskopie. Damit haben wir einige Strukturen - das ist die Struktur eines eukaryotischen Ribosoms - in wenigen Wochen aufgelöst. Die ganze RNA, alle Proteine und, für die Kristallographen unter Ihnen, das Maß an Genauigkeit. Es ist nicht immer so, aber in dieser Struktur schon. Und wir können sogar Mutationen sehen. Vielen Dank.

Ada Yonath explains the dimer hypothesis.
(00:21:14 - 00:24:55)

 

But molecules themselves aren’t enough to produce life – a cellular membrane is required in order for the protometabolism to function and replication to occur, as it is the proximity of the molecular components encapsulated within a protective membrane that enable the simple cellular structure to work. Szostak described the schematic “protocell” with membranes made out of fatty acids and fatty alcohols, which are more permeable and dynamic than our own phospholipid cell membranes:

 

Jack Szostak talks about the schematic "protocell".
(00:10:08 - 00:13:25)

 

For the primitive cell to function, it requires a membrane, a means of replicating genetic information and a source of external energy to operate the cell machinery. The surrounding environment of these primitive cells must be favourable for these conditions to occur. During his lecture dedicated to microbes, Richard Roberts described hydrothermal vents in the ocean floor, also known as black smokers. These chimney-like structures made from iron sulphide were discovered near the Galápagos Islands in 1977, and are the result of magma mixing with seawater. Many different organisms live close to these hydrothermal vents, and many theories link these environments to early life:

 

Richard Roberts (2007) - Why I love microbes

Good morning everyone and welcome. Today we have three talks and then we have a round-table discussion. The first speaker is Richard Roberts from New England Biolabs. But the discovery he made in 1977 about the mosaic structure of genes was made when he was working in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York. He received the Nobel Prize 1993 for the discovery of split genes. And the title of his talk is why I love microbes, Dr. Roberts, please. Thank you. Well, what I’m going to try and do today is to give you some idea of why I find microbes absolutely fascinating. I think they have so much going for them that I would encourage all of you to perhaps think about working in this area at some point. One of the things I like about microbes is that they’re essentially very simple organisms. And it seems to me possible that if we had enough effort put into studying them, before I die we might actually understand how the very simplest microbe works. And I think all of us as biologists would like to understand how life works. We’re not going to understand how humans work in my lifetime, perhaps not in your lifetimes either. But I think we may be able to understand how a microbe works. And for me that would be a very exciting possibility. The microbes also have the great advantage, from my point of view, that most of them are undiscovered. Less than 1%, perhaps less than .1% of all the microbes on this planet have actually been discovered, characterised in the laboratory or grown in the laboratory. Most of them we can’t grow. Part of this is because many of them will only grow when there are two or three or four, all growing together. They need one another in order to be successful in life. Many of them also live in incredibly inhospitable places. And I will show you one or two of these microbes. They also have one very remarkable property. And that is that they live with us, our bodies are literally crawling with bugs of one sort and another, we have them on our skin, we have them in our mouths, we have them inside us. Everywhere you can imagine microbes live. And I will show you a little about this, too. So we’ll start off by taking a quick trip through the environment. I’ll show you one or two bugs that I find particularly interesting, and then we’ll head into the human body and human health and the kind of organisms that live with us. So if we go on to the next slide, I want to use this just to show you how microbes – and by microbes I’m talking about bacteria and archaea, and these are the three kingdoms of life, shown here. The archaea originally were thought to be bacteria, in fact they’re a completely separate kingdom of life, as shown by Carl Woese in 1977. And what this tree of life does is to try to show you how everything is related to one another in terms of its diversity. So for instance the eucarya, the large organisms that you see, plants, people, giraffes, rhinoceros, anything big, mice and so on, all of these form up here. Many of these down here, giardia and so on, are very tiny microorganisms, microscopic. And all of these other organisms, the bacteria and archaea, you can see they’re a long way away, very distantly related to us. And we sit up here, this is homo and this is maize, so we’re much more closely related to maize than many things that you might have thought of, we’re a long way away from the bacteria. But notice here the mitochondria, the red organisms, these are small organelles that live inside ourselves, that produce energy for us and these are very closely related to the bacteria. I’m showing that the human cells, the human genome has actually something that has acreated from many other different genomes over time. So most of the diversity on this earth are microbes, in fact most of the mass is on microbes. This may be hard to believe, you sort of are used to looking around and you see all this vegetable matter and lots of animal life and so on. You can easily be confused into thinking that this is most of the mass of life on this planet. It’s not, the microbes are most of the mass of life on this planet. Not just with us but in the seas, the seas are absolutely seething with microorganisms. Even if you dig three miles down into the earth you will find microorganisms, typically about 10 to the 5 to 10 to the 6 cells per gram of material, three miles down in the earth. So these things are everywhere, they’re in the Antarctic, under the ice, everywhere you can imagine. And one of the reasons that you don’t really appreciate how much there is, is because you can’t see them, these are microscopic organisms, you have to look under a microscope to find them. Now, the first slide that I’m showing here is a photosynthetic organism. And in fact this organism is rather interesting in the sense that it was the original polluter of this planet. When life first began on this planet, it began in an anaerobic environment, there was no oxygen around, most of the oxygen was wrapped up in minerals inside the rocks of this planet or in water. These organisms started doing photosynthesis, they started producing oxygen, and in fact they wiped out most of the existing life that was all anaerobic, that didn’t like all of this oxygen around. And you can see they’re very nice organisms, they form these beautiful long chains and every so often you see one of these slightly larger heterosis, very strange little form of the microorganism. And these can live anaerobically whereas the others live aerobically. If you look in soil, anywhere where there is material rotting, you will find things called myxobacteria. They look like little mushrooms, except you can only see them under the microscope. And they form these beautiful little fruiting bodies, they’re very nice little fruiting bodies. They’re essentially bacteria that are able to differentiate. They can produce different kinds, different forms of cells and different forms of acreations of cells in order to survive. These things are just all over the soil. Many of them are this beautiful orange colour, they’re very, very pretty. Sometimes you see them as films on rotting wood. But there are many, many of these things, without them we would actually probably be full of debris of one sort and another, they’re very important in terms of getting rid of waste material. Now, this organism I love, it’s an example of a spirillic bacteria, this one is called aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. And this is a guy that lives in the oceans and has within it a very interesting structure, shown here in black, that is an acreation of ion and it’s a magnet. So this organism has formed a magnet within itself and it uses this to navigate. And it swims in the direction of the earth’s field. If it’s in the northern hemisphere it likes to swim north, if it’s in the southern hemisphere it likes to swim south. And it’s also very sensitive to the force fields and so it actually swims underwater and swims away from the surface. We don’t really know why it does this, it’s just a behaviour that one can observe, there are several theories, some people think that it’s swimming to get away from predators, others think it’s swimming to get to food. But why it would use a magnet to do this is completely unknown. And there’s actually a whole bunch of organisms, some 40 or 50 different species of organisms are now known that can do this same sort of thing, they have little magnets in them for devising, for getting around. This is something else in the ocean, beautiful tube worm. These things live on these deep sea vents, you know underneath the oceans there are many volcanoes, many hot vents in which we have magma and other materials spewing out of the earth and sometimes these are called ‘deep smokers’, ‘dark smokers’. They were discovered about the mid 1970’s by deep diving oceanographic vessels, mainly from Woods Hole. And these things have magma, they have steam coming out at incredibly high temperatures, anything up to 1,000° centigrade. And this is right in the middle of the deep ocean very often and so you have these great thermal changes that take place from the deep vents with material at 1,000° out into the ocean which is typically about four or five° centigrade and so you get a big thermocline develops. And it turns out that there are many organisms that like to live in this zone between the actual vent and the ocean and where temperatures vary from anywhere from 100°, suddenly coming down to 5°, and there are not only many bacteria and archaea that live there, typically the archaea love to live in these kinds of environments, but there are also eukaryotes. And one of the eukaryotes is this tube worm. So this is actually a worm, this is the sheath of the worm and this is the plume. And the centre of this worm is actually a massive bacteria. In fact without the bacteria the worm couldn’t exist. So the bacteria are busy taking advantage of all of the minerals and all of the energy that is coming out of this deep vent and using it to manufacture materials that then keep the worm going. So very bizarre, and you find these everywhere. So let us say, you know, you might have imagined one of these things could have arisen in one particular vent, they then spread everywhere. Wherever these things occur in the oceans, you find these tube worms and you find these beautiful bacteria that live within them. Now, when we go to Yellowstone National Park - and there are many parks like this but I’ve not been to one that’s quite as nice as Yellowstone - this is where I do my little tourist bit, I think if ever you get the chance to go to Yellowstone National Park, you should. It’s just an amazing place, it’s a volcanic caldera where there are many hot springs, many geysers, the ground in general is extremely hot in many parts of Yellowstone still. And there are wonderful examples of bacteria and archaea that live there. And when you look around some of these thermal pools, so here’s a thermal pool and here’s some hot water that’s running down into it, you see lots of these phototrophic organisms that are living here. They show up with these beautiful colours, they form bacterial films. If you look down through these films you discover that at the very top there are organisms that are using one wavelength of light in order to do photosynthesis and get energy. And as you go down you have bacteria that are using whatever light is left. And so by the time you get down really only a few centimetres and there is no light then penetrating, because it’s all been used up by the bacteria that have developed to take advantage of it. And they form just these beautiful colours all the way around these pools and they’re all films of bacteria. This is where for instance the enzyme Taq polymerase from thermos aquaticus came from. A man called Brock, a very famous microbiologist first found this organism at Yellowstone, and this is in fact the place where we’re now able to do PCR and all these other wonderful things, because of the organism that came out of this hot spring. Typically organisms here live anywhere between 80° and 100° centigrade, imagine at 100°C, normally your DNA is completely denatured. But these organisms have found ways to keep the DNA strands apart. Now, another nice thing you see in Yellowstone are these beautiful sulphur springs. This yellow colour here is all elemental sulphur and it’s caused from this archael organism, sulfolobus and sulfotaracus, which is able to take advantage of the hydrogen sulphide that is coming out of this spring. And they can then oxidise that, produce sulphur and in the process gain enough energy to live. Wonderful organisms, many, many examples of this when we look around. Now, I want to move away from the environment at large and talk about our local environment. Talk about humans and the bacteria that live with us. We often are not completely aware of all the bacteria that live with us until we get sick. Many of us, you know, we come down, we have a nasty infection that’s caused by a staphylococcus perhaps. When I was a child, before there were antibiotics, every time I would get a cut on my leg it would always get infected and turn yellow and nasty, absolutely awful. And now of course you can treat all of that with antibiotics, although we probably use antibiotics more than we should. But there are many, many things that come along and cause us problems and I will take you through and talk to you about one or two of these organisms that cause problems. Because even when they cause problems, they’re still extremely interesting organisms, they have wonderful lifestyles, they’re able to do all sorts of interesting things. And there are also many organisms that live with us that are completely harmless. And in fact others that are very, very good for us, things that we call probiotics and I will finish by talking about those. But I wanted first just to talk a little bit about the cells that we have, and to compare humans with the bacteria. So in a typical human there are about 10 to the 13 cells, that is human cells, and there are about 10 to the 14 bacteria. So there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in a typical human as there are human cells. The number of different strains in humans is 1, in bacteria I’d put this down as greater than 400. In fact the bottom line is we really don’t know in any great detail just how many different kinds of bacteria there are living with us. And there are several projects underway at the moment to actually look at all of the bacterial genomes that are associated with humans. People are going around taking samples of skin, taking samples from the mouth, from the stomach and so on to try to get a feel for just how many strains there are. And I think this could easily be actually 10 times as many as this, there could easily be 4,000, and we really wouldn’t know at the present time. Most of these organisms we can’t grow, the only reason we know they’re there is because we can study their DNA, we can look at their ribosomal content, the ribosomal DNA content and get some idea of just what the diversity is. But it really is quite immense, these things are everywhere. If you look at the number of DNA basis - in a typical human cell there are about three billion – if you tot up all of the DNA basis, the individual genes, the individual sequences in these various strains of bacteria, we’re talking about maybe a third as many DNA basis, but that equates to many more genes. So these three types 10 to the 9 DNA basis in a human cell, the estimate is 30,000 genes, maybe that’s down to 25,000, it seems to be going down all the time, the number of human genes we have. And the bacterial genes are probably going up and up and up. And so there are many more bacterial genes that are associated with our bodies than there are human genes. That's something also to think about. The bacterial population is very, very much greater than ours in terms of its diversity. Just to give you some idea of where you typically find large numbers of organisms. On skin you have staphylococci, there’s a lovely organism called staphylococcus epidermidis, I sometimes show a slide of this thing, this organism lives inside the pores inside your skin and it’s essentially impervious to anything we do. You can wash your hands and your arms all day and these organisms don’t mind at all because the soap really just never gets to them. They’ve found some very good ways to hide. There are corynebacterium, lots of different species here, I don’t propose to go through them all. In our mouths we have a very interesting set of organisms. About 1 in 10 of all of the organisms that we can recognise as living in our mouths have we ever been able to grow or even just to identify in any reasonable way. Most of the organisms we don’t know what they do, we don’t know why they’re there, and we have very little knowledge of them. In the respiratory tract all sorts of organisms, too, the gastrointestinal tract and the urogenital tract. And of course, here you have lots of organisms that can cause problems. And many of these organisms are pathogens, but many of them are not. And in fact, even the ones that are pathogenic in some ways are a little beneficial, because some of the organisms that we have, that are actually good for us, are producing compounds that keep these pathogenic organisms at bay. There’s a constant fight between microorganisms and they all want to live in this little niche. And so many of the organisms that are actually rather good for us are producing compounds to keep these pathogens at bay, which is a good thing. Now, I love to show this slide, it shows exactly what happens when you sneeze without stifling it. And this is the way that an awful lot of these pathogenic organisms like to get around. They like to live in the nasal passages, in the throat and in the mouth and so on. And so this is the kind of aerosol that is produced every time that you sneeze. And of course these have microorganisms in and they’re spreading around all the time. Of course tuberculosis, you probably heard about the recent scare in the US, tuberculosis gets around this way and is in fact an incredibly dangerous organism in terms of its ability to pass from one human to another, very, very infectious nasty agent. Now, the history of disease kind of goes back to 1877 and in fact it was anthrax that was the very first organism that was shown definitively to be the producer of a disease. This was shown by the great microbiologist Robert Koch. He then went on and found a whole bunch of other things, came up with the rules that determine whether or not we could declare that something was the causative agent. And coming down here, you’ll see all sorts of really nasty diseases and that are caused by these microorganisms. One or two of these I will tell you something more about. But there’s been a long history of this and it’s obviously been something that microbiologists have been very keen to look at, and one would always like to know what are the organisms that are causing disease. And of course then how to deal with them, how can we stop them. Now, one organism that I like to talk about quite a lot is helicobacter pylori, this is an organism that lives in your stomach, lives at extremely low pH, it lives in the lining of the stomach, in the endothelium. Two years ago this organism was the subject of the Nobel prize in medicine when it was awarded to Marshall and Warren who were the first people to show that this organism was in fact the cause of ulcers. Prior to that the pharmaceutical companies thought that all you needed to do if you had an ulcer was to take an antacid, this would solve the problem of the acid that was present in the stomach but it did absolutely no good at all for the cause of the disease. And Barry Marshall did the classic experiment that many doctors like to do, he was convinced that this was the source of the infection, it was the cause of ulcers and so he grew some in the lab and drank it. And sure enough, within a few days, he came down with an ulcer and fortunately the helicobacter that he drank was susceptible to antibiotics and he was able to cure himself very rapidly. And in fact you can cure most causes of ulcers through helicobacter pylori just by taking antibiotics, of course the pharmaceutical industry didn’t like that very much because the sales of antacids went way down. But nevertheless this is the cause. And this is an actual helicobacter pylori here, this is the bacterial cell adhering to one of these epithelial cells lining the stomach. And you can see it causes a very close interaction. And in fact it is known that helicobacter pylori can cause cancer, it causes stomach cancer and it can also cause oesophageal cancer if you have acid reflux disease, we don’t know how this happens but the evidence is very strong that it can do that. Now, most of us who live in the western world no longer have a lot of helicobacter pylori in our stomachs. If you live in the developing world almost everybody is infected, you pick it up at a very early age. But in the western world we take so many antibiotics that we’ve usually killed off this population. And a man called Martin Blaser at New York medical school has recently been looking at this organism and finds a very strong correlation between whether you have a helicobacter pylori infection and whether you’re susceptible to asthma. And it turns out that if you have a very high concentration of helicobacter pylori, a good infection going, you almost never get asthma. And as the amounts of helicobacter go down in the population, up goes the rates of asthma. He believes there’s a causal connection here, it’s still too early to know for sure, but it does point out the fact that there are many bacteria who live within us, that we indiscriminately get rid of by the poor use of antibiotics, and when we do that there may well be all sorts of unintended consequences. I show this one, this is a very nice organism, just a beautiful slide, it’s one of these spirillum organisms, it’s called borrelia, it’s the cause of lyme disease. Vibrio cholerae causes the disease we know as cholera. However, vibrio cholerae is really interesting, it’s a small microorganism that lives in conjunction with a large eukaryotic organism called volvox. And it actually sits on the surface of the volvox to a point where if you have a cholera infection going, and you believe the water is contaminated, merely by filtering the water through something like a very fine thread, something like a sari, you can actually get rid of most of the vibrio organisms in the water. Very simple public health measure can be useful here. This is another spirillum and this time treponema that causes periodontal disease. Yersinia pestis is the cause of plague, this was the organism that caused the Black Death in Europe, that decimated the population of Europe in the Middle Ages. I always like to show the next slide, this is one of the little bubos that is produced by this organism. And when you get a really good infection going, then you get a very severe gangrene in the fingers, in the toes and thorax. By the time you reach this stage, there’s almost nothing can be done about it. But if you catch it early it’s very susceptible to antibiotic treatment. And I want to close just by talking a little about lactobacillus sake, lactobacillus is one of these organisms that we think of as a probiotic. They’re very good for you and this organism you get in yoghurt, wonderful thing to eat lots and lots of yoghurt if you like it. I personally don’t like it but I would recommend it to all of you. These organisms produce compounds that will keep many of the pathogenic organisms at bay. There are many other such organisms that do this, bifidobacterium is another one that you sometimes find in yoghurt, but there are really lots and lots of wonderful microorganisms that do in fact do wonders for you, you want them in your bodies, you want them around because they’re keeping the pathogens at bay. And I want to close just by asking you to think about something I find quite remarkable. So here we are, we’re humans, we’re walking around, we’re absolutely full of bacteria, they’re living all over the place, they make a very nice living with us. When we evolve, as humans evolve, so the bacterial populations evolve, too. The two are really in a tremendous symbiosis, we’re both evolving together. And it’s rather easy to think that perhaps humans were invented by bacteria in order to provide a nice place to live. Thank you very much. Thank you very much, you did very well on time, so we have time for questions. Are there any questions here? QUESTION. I think nowadays lots of people use antibiotics and I think it’s maybe a damage to our human flora of microorganism. Do you think it’s quite a severe problem we use too many antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yes, so antibiotics, you know, they really are the wonder drug, they were the wonder drug when they came along and we very much abuse them. We feed them to cattle and so they get into meat, they get into our food supply. Certainly in the western world the slightest hint of an infection, whether it’s a viral infection, for which antibiotics will do no good at all, or whether it’s a bacterial infection where they will work, we use way, way too many. And that is really clear, if you look at tuberculosis as one of the best examples of this. When I was a kid, tuberculosis was a major problem, if you had tuberculosis, in England you were put into a sanatorium, you were separated from the rest of the population to stop it spread. Along came antibiotics, we could cure microbacterium tuberculosis and so everybody stopped worrying about it, now we’ve reached a point where the microbacterium many, many strains of microbacterium are drug resistant and god forbid you should ever go to prison in Russia, but if you do, the odds are you’ll come out of prison with a nasty tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis kills more than a million people a year around the world and the US government in its wisdom stopped funding research on microbacterium many, many years ago. They’ve only just started putting more money into it and we have a major problem again with tuberculosis. And so, yes, we’ve done a terrible job of actually handling the antibiotics that we had. And there are very few new ones, sort of new forms of antibiotics in the pipelines. There are a few beginning to appear now, but we’ve gone through a long period of neglect. QUESTION. I’m a medical doctor from Pakistan, I was fascinated when I found that intravesical tuberculosis therapy was being used for bladder cancer. And when I looked at the literature, I found that many viruses are being used as anti-tumour agents, do you think that this is a promising area of microbes being used to treat cancers? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yeah, so the question here relates to the use of microbes and viruses in order to treat cancer, and I’m afraid I don’t know anything about that. I’m completely ignorant on that front. I know about bacteria phages being used to treat bacterial infections. This is something that was taking place in Russia for a long, long time. But I know nothing about using microorganisms to treat cancer. So maybe we can talk about that afterwards, because I would love to hear some more about that. QUESTION. I just wanted to know, a lot of companies are selling now changed food with probiotics, is there really any evidence that it is much better for us to buy this more expensive food. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, I think it’s really hard to know. The problem with health supplements, health food supplements is they’re not well regulated and so it’s an obvious market for any charlatan to come along and try to sell you snake oil. I think for some of the probiotics, when they tell you exactly what is in there, and especially if they have lactobacillus or if they have bifidobacterium in there, there’s a good chance that they will be useful. But I think equally there are many things on the market that one would do best to avoid. I think if you really want to go the probiotic route, I would absolutely recommend yoghurt as the way to go. Yoghurt is very wonderful for you, just doesn’t taste good. QUESTION. You talked about co-evolution of bacteria with human being, so like in case of h pylori, it is in developing countries, as you said, that in developing countries most of the people are infected with the bacterium. But there is no disease outcome in most of the persons. So what do you think, is it a pathogen or is it a symbiont? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, so the question relates to helicobacter pylori. And the fact that most people in developing countries have infections with helicobacter pylori, most of the infections are relatively low-level, so you have the organism but you don’t have any serious disease associated with it. We don’t really know why you suddenly get a disease associated with helicobacter. In the western world it may be related to diet, it may be related to other organisms that come along. The incidence of stomach cancer caused by helicobacter pylori are very low in the developing world, although there are a few cases from time to time, much higher elsewhere. But I think the real problem is that, as soon as you go from one population to another, the whole microbiome, the whole set of microbes that are living with you are different. And so one has to think about not just the helicobacter pylori but all the other organisms that you typically find. And many of these you simply don’t find in the western world. And so we have a long way to go. You know, when you recognise that most of the organisms living with us we don’t know what they are, we don’t know what they do, it becomes very easy to make hypothesis and much more difficult to test them, because these are very complicated biota, very complicated environments in which these organisms are living. QUESTION. My question is how we can fight the multiple drug resistance problem. Do you think we need to find a perpetual target so that in future we don’t have to look for new antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, well, I think the whole question about multiple drug resistance means that we do have to find new drugs and typically new drugs do not necessarily mean new targets, sometimes they do, but different classes of compounds that are able to go after a known target but in some different way. So for instance, if you imagine you’ve got a protein that is really key to the bacterium, you find a drug that will bind at this point and inhibit it, and so there will be aminoacid changes at the point of interaction. If you find a different drug that will hit the molecule at some different point in the sequence, then these mutations won’t affect it and in order for the organism then to become resistant, it has to make mutations at a different point. And we know that some of the new drugs that are in the pipelines just have very different chemical structures from the ones that we’ve already been using as antibiotics. In some case there are new targets. And the nice thing about all of the genome sequencing of bacteria that’s taken place over the last few years, and we have the genomes now for about 500 organisms, there are about another 2,000 or 3,000 that are on the way, is that there are lots and lots of targets, potential targets that you can find. So I think there’s no shortage of sort of good targets that one might go after for bacteria, but there is a shortage of effort to go looking for antibiotics. You know, in general the drug companies are not very keen on looking for antibiotics because they have the disadvantage that they cure the disease and so there’s only a small amount of profit for them to make. The drug companies would much prefer to have something that alleviates the symptoms, that you have to take for the rest of your life and then you have a very nice profit margin. QUESTION. Do you believe that with the changing behaviour of human beings, the pathogenicity of bacteria or any other microbes has either evolved or has even gone down, besides the antibiotic resistance. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, you know, we’re in a constant fight between the pathogens that would like to live on us and cause trouble and our ability to defend against them. And this is not something that is ever going to go away, you're going to continue to have this evolution, there will constantly be new pathogens, there will constantly be a need for us to be vigilant, to find ways of dealing with them. The bacteria have the advantage they in general can evolve very much faster than we are able to evolve. You know, if you’ve got a 30 minute lifetime, double in 30 minutes, we typically double in, even in the most favourable situations, every 14 years, chances of making mutations to accommodate diseases are very much in the favour of the bacteria. Fortunately our immune system is able to deal with some of these things more effectively, but there will always be this arms race between the pathogen and the host. It’s just one of these things, it’s going to happen. There will fortunately always be a need for microbiologists and for chemists and for scientists to work in this area and find new antibiotics and find better ways to deal with disease. QUESTION. Professor, don’t you think that some of the normal organism, for instance which live in the oral cavity, when there are lowered immunity states, they become pathogens. So why do you think that happens and how can antibiotics sort of overcome that or play a role in that. RICHARD ROBERTS. So the question really is, when we’re in a state of lower immune resistance to things, does this allow pathogens to become much more pathogenic if you like. And the answer is that whenever an organism becomes pathogenic, it just means that it’s able to grow and you can make lots of it. Provided you just have low levels of a pathogen, typically they don’t cause problems. This is why you can sit next to someone who has influenza or tuberculosis, provided you don’t get a significant dose of it, then your own immune system is typically able to take care of it. And so it’s really usually a question of the quantity of the organism that is produced. If you just keep it at very low levels, it’s not pathogenic, you don’t have any severe symptoms. On the other hand, if it grows to large levels because it’s not being contained, then you can get all of the symptoms of pathogenicity. And very often what happens is that as soon as you reach this critical point where you’re making a lot of the organism, it’s dividing rapidly. That will then compromise the body’s ability to mount an effective immune response. And this is what happens in the case of say cholera for instance. So low levels of vibrio cholerae are fine, but as soon as the organism starts to divide, the body just can’t keep track of it and can’t keep pace with it, our immune system is not good enough to hold really large quantities of the organism. Once again, thank you Richard for this wonderful exposé.

Guten Morgen allerseits und willkommen. Heute werden wir drei Vorträge hören, und anschließend gibt es eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Unser erster Sprecher ist Richard Roberts von den New England Biolabs. Die Entdeckung, die er 1977 über die Mosaikstruktur der Gene machte, gelang ihm jedoch, als er an den Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York, arbeitete. Der Titel seines Vortrags lautet: Dr. Roberts, Sie haben das Wort. Vielen Dank. Nun, was ich heute zu tun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon zu geben, warum ich Mikroben absolut faszinierend finde. Ich denke, dass sie so interessant sind, dass ich alle von Ihnen ermutigen möchte, sich zu überlegen, in diesem Fachgebiet einmal zu forschen. Eine Sache, die mir an Mikroben gefällt, ist, dass es im Wesentlichen sehr einfache Organismen sind. Und es scheint mir möglich, dass wir - vorausgesetzt wir investieren in ihr Studium genug Energie – noch zu meinen Lebzeiten verstehen könnten, wie der einfachste Mikroorganismus funktioniert. Ich nehme an, dass wir als Biologen alle verstehen möchten, wie das Leben funktioniert. Wir werden zu meinen Lebzeiten nicht verstehen, wie der Mensch funktioniert, vielleicht auch nicht zu Ihren Lebzeiten. Doch ich denke, dass wir vielleicht verstehen könnten, wie Mikroben funktionieren. Für mich wäre das eine faszinierende Möglichkeit. Die Mikroben haben aus meiner Sicht den unschätzbaren Vorteil, dass die meisten von ihnen unentdeckt sind. Weniger als 1 %, vielleicht sogar weniger als 0,1 %, aller Mikroben auf diesem Planeten wurden bisher entdeckt, im Labor beschrieben und vermehrt. Die meisten Mikroben können wir nicht züchten. Ein Grund hierfür ist, dass viele von ihnen nur wachsen, wenn zwei oder drei oder vier von ihnen gemeinsam wachsen. Sie brauchen sich gegenseitig, um im Leben erfolgreich sein zu können. Viele von ihnen leben außerdem unter äußerst unwirtlichen Umständen. Ein oder zwei dieser Mikroorganismen werde ich Ihnen vorstellen. Darüber hinaus verfügen sie über eine bemerkenswerte Eigenschaft. Sie besteht darin, dass sie in uns leben: Unsere Körper sind im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes voller Mikroorganismen dieser oder jener Art. Sie leben auf unserer Haut, in unserem Mund, im Inneren unserer Körper. Wo immer Sie es sich vorstellen: Mikroorganismen leben dort. Und auch hierüber werde ich Ihnen etwas zeigen. Lassen Sie uns also mit einer kurzen Reise durch die Umwelt beginnen. Ich stelle Ihnen ein oder zwei Mikroben vor, die ich besonders interessant finde. Anschließend sprechen wir über den menschlichen Körper und seine Gesundheit und über die Art der Organismen, die in uns leben. Gehen wir also zum nächsten Dia. Ich möchte Ihnen dies zeigen, nur um Ihnen zu erklären, wie Mikroben…. Und unter Mikroben verstehe ich Bakterien und Archaeen, und dies hier sind die drei Reiche des Lebens. Ursprünglich nahm man an, dass es sich bei den Archaeen um Bakterien handelt, tatsächlich machen sie jedoch ein eigenes Reich des Lebens aus, wie von Carl Woese 1977 gezeigt wurde. Was dieser Baum des Lebens Ihnen zeigen soll, ist, wie hinsichtlich seiner Diversität alles miteinander verwandt ist. Die Eukaryoten, die großen Organismen, die Sie sehen Viele von diesen hier unten, Giardien usw., sind winzige Mikroorganismen, mikroskopisch kleine. Und alle diese anderen Organismen, die Bakterien und Archaeen sind, wie sie sehen, sehr weit weg. Sie sind nur entfernt mit uns verwandt. Und wir sitzen hier oben. Dies ist Homo und dies ist der Mais. Wir sind also mit dem Mais wesentlich enger verwandt als mit vielen anderen Organismen, von denen Sie das gedacht hätten. Wir sind von den Bakterien weit entfernt. Doch beachten Sie die Mitochondrien hier, die roten Organismen. Hierbei handelt es sich um kleine Organellen, die in uns leben, die Energie für uns produzieren und die sehr eng mit den Bakterien verwandt sind. Ich zeige Ihnen damit, dass die menschlichen Zellen, das menschliche Genom tatsächlich etwas enthält, was uns aus vielen verschiedenen Genomen im Laufe der Zeit zugewachsen ist. Der größte Teil der Vielfalt auf dieser Erde besteht aus Mikroben. Der größte Teil der Biomasse besteht aus Bakterien. Dies mag nur schwer zu glauben sein. Man ist gewissermaßen daran gewöhnt sich umzuschauen und das pflanzliche Leben und jede Menge Tiere zu sehen usw. Man kann sehr leicht zum dem irrigen Schluss gelangen, dass diese Organismen den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten ausmachen. Doch dies ist nicht der Fall. Den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten stellen die Mikroben dar. Nicht nur in uns, sondern auch in den Meeren. Die Meere schäumen von Mikroorganismen geradezu über. Selbst wenn Sie 5 Kilometer in die Erde graben, finden Sie Mikroorganismen, typischerweise 10 hoch 5 bis 10 hoch 6 pro Gramm des Erdmaterials, 5 Kilometer unter der Erde. Diese Wesen sind also überall: Sie sind in der Antarktis, unter dem Eis: an jedem Ort, den Sie sich vorstellen können. Und einer der Gründe, weshalb Sie sich nicht wirklich vorstellen können, wie viele Mikroorganismen es gibt, ist ihre Unsichtbarkeit. Es handelt sich bei ihnen um mikroskopisch kleine Organismen. Man muss durch ein Mikroskop schauen, um sie zu entdecken. Das erste Dia, das ich Ihnen hier zeige, ist ein Photosynthese treibender Organismus. Tatsächlich ist dieser Organismus insofern recht interessant, als er der erste Umweltverschmutzer auf diesem Planeten war. Als das Leben auf diesem Planeten entstand, begann es in einer anaeroben Umgebung. Es gab keinen Sauerstoff. Der meiste Sauerstoff lag in Mineralien im Inneren dieses Planeten oder im Wasser gebunden vor. Diese Organismen begannen damit, Photosynthese zu treiben. Sie begannen, Sauerstoff zu produzieren, und tatsächlich vernichteten sie den größten Teil der Lebewesen, die anaerob waren und die diesen freien Sauerstoff gar nicht mochten. Wie Sie sehen, sind es sehr schöne Organismen. Sie bilden diese schönen langen Ketten, und hin und wieder sehen Sie eine etwas größere Heterosis, eine sehr merkwürdige kleine Form dieses Organismus. Sie kann anaerob leben, während die andere Form aerob lebt. Wenn man das Erdreich untersucht, findet man überall, wo Stoffe verwesen, sogenannte Myxobakterien. Sie sehen aus wie kleine Pilze, nur dass man sie ohne Mikroskop nicht sehen kann, und sie bilden diese wunderschönen kleinen Fruchtkörper. Es sind sehr schöne kleine Fruchtkörper. Es sind im Wesentlichen Bakterien, die sich differenzieren können. Um zu überleben, können sie verschiedene Arten von Zellen und verschiedene Formen von Zusammenschlüssen von Zellen hervorbringen. Diese Organismen befinden sich überall im Boden. Viele von ihnen haben diese schöne orangene Farbe. Sie sind sehr, sehr schön. Manchmal sehen Sie sie als einen Film auf faulendem Holz. Es gibt sehr, sehr viele dieser Bakterien: Ohne sie wären wir wahrscheinlich voller Abfallstoffe irgendwelcher Art. Sie sind äußerst wichtig zur Beseitigung von Abfallmaterial. Diesen Organismus hier liebe ich: Er ist ein Beispiel für ein Spirillenbakterium. Er hat den Namen aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. Dieses Lebewesen existiert in den Weltmeeren. Es zeichnet sich durch eine sehr interessante Struktur aus, die hier in Schwarz dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um eine Anlagerung (Akkretion) von Eisen, und sie ist magnetisch. Dieser Organismus hat also in seinem Inneren einen Magneten gebildet, und er verwendet ihn zur räumlichen Orientierung. Er schwimmt in der Richtung des Magnetfelds der Erde. Wenn er sich auf der nördlichen Hemisphäre befindet, schwimmt er gerne nach Norden, befindet er sich auf der südlichen Hemisphäre, schwimmt er vorzugsweise nach Süden. Außerdem ist er sehr sensibel für das Gravitationsfeld, so dass er von der Wasseroberfläche nach unten schwimmt. Wir verstehen nicht wirklich, warum er dies tut. Es ist einfach ein Verhalten, das sich beobachten lässt. Es gibt verschieden Theorien hierüber. Einige Leute meinen, dass die Bakterien vor Feinden davon schwimmen, andere, dass sie zu ihrer Nahrungsquelle schwimmen. Doch warum das Bakterium einen Magneten hierfür verwenden sollte, ist vollkommen ungeklärt. Tatsächlich gibt es eine ganze Reihe von Organismen, man kennt 40 bis 50 verschiedene Arten, die dies tun können. Sie verfügen über kleine Magneten in ihrem Inneren, mit deren Hilfe sie sich orientieren. Dies ist ein weiterer Bewohner des Ozeans: ein wunderschöner Kalkröhrenwurm. Diese Wesen leben auf diesen Tiefseeschloten. Wie Sie wissen, befinden sich auf dem Grund der Ozeane zahlreiche Vulkane, viele Vulkane, in denen wir Magma und andere Materialien finden, die die Erde ausspuckt. Manchmal werden sie auch als „Schwarze Raucher“ bezeichnet. Sie wurden um die Mitte der 1970er Jahre von ozeanographischen Tiefsee-U-Booten entdeckt, in der Hauptsache von Woods Hole. Und diese Schlote enthalten Magma. Dampf mit ungeheuer hohen Temperaturen kommt aus ihnen heraus, mit bis zu 1000°C. Dies spielt sich an zahlreichen Stellen mitten im tiefen Ozean ab, so dass sich diese großen Temperaturgefälle entwickeln: zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem Material mit einer Temperatur von 1000°C, das sie abgeben, und dem Ozean, der dort normalerweise eine Temperatur von 4°C oder 5°C hat. Und wie man festgestellt hat, gibt es viele derartige Organismen, die bevorzugt in dieser Zone zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem umgebenden Ozean leben, wo die Temperaturen von um die 100°C bis plötzlich herab auf 5°C liegen. Dort leben zahlreiche Bakterien und Archaeen. Besonders die Archaeen lieben diese Umgebung, doch es gibt hier auch Eukaryoten. Und einer dieser Eukaryoten ist dieser Kalkröhrenwurm. Dies ist tatsächlich ein Wurm: Dies ist die Schutzumhüllung des Wurms und dies ist die fedrige Plume. In der Mitte dieses Wurms befindet sich ein riesengroßes Bakterium. Ohne das Bakterium könnte der Wurm nicht existieren. Das Bakterium nutzt all die Mineralien und die Energie, die aus diesen tiefen Schloten kommt, und verwendet sie zur Herstellung von Stoffen, die den Wurm am Leben erhalten. Das ist so bizarr. Man findet diese Würmer überall. Sagen wir also, man hätte sich vorstellen können, dass diese Wesen in einem bestimmten Schwarzen Raucher entstanden sind und sich von dort aus ausgebreitet haben. Wo immer diese Schlote im Ozean zu finden sind, begegnet man diesen Kalkröhrenwürmern und findet man diese wunderschönen Bakterien, die in ihrem Inneren leben. Nun, wenn wir zum Yellowstone Nationalpark gehen – es gibt viele solcher Parks, doch bin noch in keinem gewesen, der so schön ist wie der Yellowstone –, dies ist meine touristische Werbung: Wenn Sie jemals die Gelegenheit bekommen, den Yellowstone Nationalpark zu besuchen, dann sollten Sie dies tun. Es ist einfach ein fantastischer Ort. Es ist eine vulkanische Caldera und es gibt dort zahlreiche heiße Quellen und viele Geysire. Der Boden ist an vielen Stellen des Yellowstone Nationalpark noch immer extrem heiß. Und es gibt wunderbare Beispiele von Bakterien und Archaeen, die dort leben. Sehen wir uns einige dieser warmen Teiche und Wasseransammlungen genauer an: Hier ist ein warmer Tümpel, und hier ist etwas heißes Wasser, das in ihn hineinfließt. Man findet hier jede Menge dieser phototropen Organismen, die dort leben. Man erkennt sie an diesen wunderschönen Farben. Sie bilden Bakterienfilme. Wenn man sich den Querschnitt dieser Filme ansieht, stellt man fest, dass sich an ihrem oberen Rand Organismen befinden, die eine bestimmte Wellenlänge des Lichts verwenden, um Photosynthese zu betreiben und Energie zu erzeugen. Und unterhalb dieser oberen Schicht findet man Bakterien, die das restliche Licht nutzen. Und wenn man nur wenige Zentimeter unter die Oberfläche geht, gelangt kein Licht mehr dorthin, da alles Licht bereits von den Bakterien aufgebraucht wurde, die sich entwickelt haben, um es zu nutzen. Sie bilden alle rund um diese Wasseransammlungen diese wunderschönen Farben aus, und es sind alles Bakterienfilme. Dies ist auch beispielsweise der Ursprung des Enzyms Taq-Polymerase von Thermos aquaticus. Ein Mann namens Brock, ein sehr berühmter Mikrobiologe, entdeckte diesen Organismus in Yellowstone. Tatsächlich ist dies der Ort, an dem wir heute Polymerase-Kettenreaktionen (PCR) und alle diese wunderbaren Dinge durchführen können: aufgrund des Organismus, der aus dieser heißen Quelle kam. Normalerweise leben Organismen hier zwischen 80°C und 100°C. Stellen Sie sich das vor: bei 100°C. Normalerweise ist Ihre DNA bei dieser Temperatur völlig denaturiert. Doch diese Organismen haben Wege gefunden, die DNA-Stränge getrennt zu halten. Ein weiteres schönes Phänomen, dem Sie im Yellowstone-Nationalpark begegnen können, sind diese schönen Schwefelquellen. Diese gelbe Farbe hier ist ein Hinweis auf das Element Schwefel in reiner Form. Es wird von diesen archaischen Organismen, Sulfolobus und Sulfotaracus, produziert, die den Schwefelwasserstoff nutzen können, der aus dieser Quelle kommt. Und sie können ihn dann oxydieren, dadurch Schwefel erzeugen und auf diese Weise genug Energie gewinnen, um sich am Leben zu erhalten. Wundervolle Organismen, viele, viele Beispiele dafür, wenn wir uns umschauen. Nun möchte ich statt über die Umwelt im Allgemeinen über unsere „örtliche“ Umwelt reden: über uns Menschen und die Bakterien, die in uns leben. Wir sind uns häufig nicht all der Bakterien bewusst, die in uns leben – bis wir krank werden. Viele von uns erkranken an einer schlimmen Infektion, die vielleicht von einem Staphylococcus ausgelöst wird. Als ich ein Kind war, bevor es Antibiotika gab, bekam ich jedes Mal, wenn ich mich am Bein schnitt, eine böse, eitrige Infektion. Furchtbar war das. Heute kann man all das mit Antibiotika behandeln, obwohl wir Antibiotika wahrscheinlich häufiger einsetzen, als wir dies tun sollten. Doch es gibt viele, viele Organismen, denen wir begegnen und die uns keine Probleme bereiten. Ich werde Ihnen ein oder zwei von ihnen vorstellen, die für uns problematisch sind. Denn obwohl sie Probleme verursachen, sind es dennoch höchst interessante Organismen. Sie haben wunderbare „Lifestyles“: Sie können alle möglichen interessanten Dinge tun. Und es gibt so viele in uns lebende Organismen die vollkommen harmlos sind. Tatsächlich sind andere sehr, sehr gut für uns. Sie werden als Probiotika bezeichnet, und ich werde gegen Ende meines Vortrags über sie sprechen. Vorher möchte ich jedoch ein wenig über die Zellen reden, aus denen wir bestehen, und den Menschen mit den Bakterien vergleichen. Normalerweise besteht ein Mensch aus 10 hoch 13 Zellen, d. h. menschlichen Zellen, und außerdem aus 10 hoch 14 Bakterien. Im Körper des Menschen befinden sich also 10mal so viele Bakterien wie körpereigene Zellen. Die Zahl der Stämme des Menschen beträgt 1, bei den Bakterien würde ich eine Zahl von über 400 annehmen. Tatsächlich wissen wir unter dem Strich wirklich nichts Genaueres darüber, wie viele verschiedene Arten von Bakterien in uns leben. Gegenwärtig gibt es eine Reihe von Forschungsprojekten, die die Genome sämtlicher Bakterien untersuchen, die mit dem Menschen verbunden sind. Man untersucht Proben der Haut, aus dem Mund, dem Magen usw., um ein Gefühl dafür zu bekommen, genau wieviele Stämme es gibt. Ich bin der Meinung, dass es sehr leicht 10mal so viele sein könnten, es könnten leicht 4000 sein. Wir wissen es zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt einfach nicht. Die meisten dieser Organismen können wir nicht in Kulturen züchten. Wir wissen von ihrer Existenz nur, weil wir ihre DNA studieren können. Wir können uns ihren ribosomalen Inhalt ansehen, den Inhalt der ribosomalen DNA, und eine Vorstellung davon gewinnen, wie groß ihre Vielfalt ist. Doch sie ist wirklich immens: Bakterien gibt es überall. Wenn wir uns den Umfang der DNA-Basen ansehen – in einer typischen menschlichen Zelle gibt es etwa 3 Milliarden – wenn wir alle DNA-Basen aufaddieren, die einzelnen Gene, die einzelnen Sequenzen in diesen verschiedenen Bakterienstämmen, so haben wir es vielleicht mit einem Drittel der DNA-Basen zu tun. Doch das entspricht wesentlich mehr Genen. Also diese 3 mal 10 hoch 9 DNA-Basen in einer Zelle des Menschen – die Schätzung beläuft sich auf 30.000, oder vielleicht auf nicht mehr als 25.000, die Zahl scheint ständig zurückzugehen, die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben. Und die Zahl der Bakteriengene steigt wahrscheinlich ständig weiter an. Daher gibt es sehr viel mehr Bakteriengene, die mit unserem Körper verbunden sind, als es Gene des Menschen gibt. Auch das sollte man sich einmal klarmachen. Die Population der Bakterien ist hinsichtlich ihrer Diversität sehr, sehr viel größer als unsere. Ich möchte Ihnen nun kurz eine Vorstellung davon geben, wo große Anzahlen von Bakterien typischerweise vorkommen. Auf der Haut findet man Staphylokokken. Es gibt einen sehr schönen Organismus namens Staphylococcus epidermidis. Manchmal zeige ich ihn auf einem Dia. Er lebt in den Poren unserer Haut und ist im Wesentlichen unempfindlich gegen alles, was wir tun. Sie können sich die Hände und die Arme den ganzen Tag lang waschen: Diese Organismen stört es nicht, weil die Seife wirklich niemals bis zu ihnen vordringt. Sie haben gute Methoden entwickelt, sich zu verstecken. Außerdem gibt es viele verschiedene Arten von Corynebakterien. Ich will sie hier nicht alle durchgehen. In unserem Mund lebt eine recht interessante Ansammlung von Organismen. Ungefähr ein Zehntel der Organismen, von denen wir erkannt haben, dass sie in unserem Mund leben, haben wir weder in Kulturen züchten noch auf irgendeine vernünftige Weise identifizieren können. Von den meisten Organismen wissen wir nicht, was sie machen. Wir wissen nicht, warum sie dort sind, und wir wissen überhaupt sehr wenig über sie. Auch in den Luftwegen, im Magendarmkanal und im Urogenitalsystem befinden sich alle möglichen Organismen. Und natürlich haben wir es hier mit Organismen zu tun, die Probleme verursachen können. Viele dieser Organismen sind Krankheitserreger, viele andere von ihnen hingegen nicht. Und tatsächlich sind selbst die pathogenen Organismen in mancher Hinsicht sogar ein wenig hilfreich, da einige der Organismen, die in uns leben, die nützlich für uns sind, Verbindungen produzieren, die diese pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Zwischen den Mikroorganismen besteht ein ständiger Kampf. Sie alle wollen in dieser kleinen Nische leben. Daher stellen viele der Organismen, die uns eher nützlich sind, Verbindungen her, die uns diese Pathogene vom Leib halten, was eine gute Sache ist. Das folgende Dia liebe ich: Es zeigt genau, was passiert, wenn man niest und es nicht unterdrückt, und dies ist der Weg, auf dem sich sehr, sehr viele dieser pathogenen Organismen vorzugsweise verbreiten. Sie leben gerne in den Nasenhöhlen, im Rachen und im Mund usw. und dies ist die Art von Aerosol, das bei jedem Niesen produziert wird. Natürlich befinden sich Mikroorganismen darin und sie verbreiten sich ständig. Sie haben wahrscheinlich über die jüngste Tuberkulosegefahr in den US gehört. Die Tuberkulose verbreitet sich auf diese Weise. Sie ist ein unglaublich gefährlicher Organismus, was ihre Ansteckungsgefahr betrifft. Es handelt sich bei ihr um einen äußerst bösartigen Erreger. Nun, die Geschichte der Krankheit geht auf das Jahr 1877 zurück. Tatsächlich war Anthrax der erste Organismus, von dem definitiv gezeigt werden konnte, dass er eine Krankheit verursacht. Dies zu beweisen gelang dem bedeutenden Mikrobiologen Robert Koch. Er entdeckte später noch eine ganze Reihe anderer Dinge. Außerdem stellte er die Regeln auf, anhand deren entschieden wird, ob wir etwas als einen ursächlichen Erreger bezeichnen oder nicht. Weiter hier unten sehen Sie jede Menge wirklich übler Erkrankungen, die von diesen Mikroorganismen verursacht werden. Über ein oder zwei von ihnen werde ich Ihnen etwas ausführlicher berichten. Es gibt eine lange Geschichte und es war offensichtlich etwas, für das sich Mikrobiologen sehr interessiert haben. Man möchte immer wissen, welche Organismen Krankheiten verursachen und dann natürlich, wie man damit am besten verfährt, wie man sie eindämmen kann. Ein Organismus, über den ich sehr gern rede, ist Helicobacter pylori. Dies ist ein Organismus, der in ihrem Magen lebt, im Endothel. Vor zwei Jahren war dieser Organismus der Gegenstand des Nobelpreises in der Medizin, als Marshall und Warren den Preis dafür erhielten, weil sie zeigten, dass dieser Organismus die Ursache von Magengeschwüren sein kann. Vorher hatten die Pharmaunternehmen geglaubt, dass man, wenn man ein Magengeschwür hat, lediglich ein säurebindendes Mittel zu sich nehmen muss. Dies würde das Problem der Säure im Magen lösen, doch es war völlig wirkungslos gegen die Ursache der Krankheit. Und Barry Marshall führte das klassische Experiment durch, das viele Ärzte gerne durchführen. Er war davon überzeugt, dass Helicobacter die Ursache der Infektion war, dass er die Ursache der Magengeschwüre war, und daher kultivierte er einige in seinem Labor und trank sie. Tatsächlich entwickelte er innerhalb weniger Tage ein Magengeschwür, und glücklicherweise waren Antibiotika gegen den Helicobacter, den er zu sich genommen hatte, wirksam und er konnte sich sehr schnell heilen. Man kann in der Tat die meisten durch Helicobacter pylori verursachten Magengeschwüre durch die Einnahme von Antibiotika kurieren. Der Pharmaindustrie gefiel das natürlich überhaupt nicht, weil der Verkauf von Magensäureblockern drastisch zurückging. Doch dennoch ist dies der Fall. Dies hier ist ein echter Helicobacter pylori. Dies zeigt die Bakterienzelle, wie sie sich an eine der Epithelzellen anheftet, die den Magen auskleiden. Und wie sie sehen, führt es zu einer sehr engen Wechselwirkung. Tatsächlich ist bekannt, dass Helicobacter pylori Krebs verursachen kann. Das Bakterium kann Magenkrebs und auch Speiseröhrenkrebs verursachen, wenn man an einem Säure-Reflux leidet. Wir wissen nicht, wie dies im Einzelnen geschieht, doch es gibt sehr deutliche Hinweise darauf, dass dies geschehen kann. Nun, die meisten von uns, die wir in der westlichen Welt leben, haben nur noch wenige Bakterien von Helicobacter pylori im Magen. In den Entwicklungsländern ist jedoch fast jeder infiziert, und zwar schon ab einem sehr frühen Alter. In der westlichen Welt nehmen wir jedoch so viele Antibiotika zu uns, dass wir diese Population in der Regel beseitigt haben. Ein Mann namens Martin Blaser von der medizinischen Fakultät der Universität New York hat kürzlich diesen Organismus untersucht und herausgefunden, dass es eine enge Korrelation zwischen einer Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori und der Anfälligkeit für Asthma gibt. Und es hat sich herausgestellt, dass man – wenn man eine starke Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori hat, fast so gut wie nie an Asthma erkrankt. Und in dem Maße, wie die Infektionsrate von Helicobacter pylori in einer Bevölkerung zurückgeht, steigt die Zahl der an Asthma Erkrankten. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass es sich hierbei um eine Kausalbeziehung handelt. Es ist noch zu früh, um sich in dieser Sache sicher sein zu können; doch der Zusammenhang deutet auf die Tatsache, dass viele Bakterien in uns leben, die wir durch die unbedachte Verwendung von Antibiotika unterschiedslos abtöten, und dass es hierdurch sehr wohl zu zahlreichen verschiedenen, unbeabsichtigter Folgen kommen kann. Ich zeige Ihnen nun einen sehr schönen Organismus, auf diesem schönen Dia. Es ist einer dieser Spirillum-Organismen. Er heißt Borrelia und verursacht die Borreliose. Vibrio cholerae ist derjenige Organismus, der die als Cholera bekannte Krankheit verursacht. Dennoch ist Vibrio cholerae sehr interessant. Es ist ein kleiner Mikroorganismus, der mit einem großen eukaryotischen Organismus namens Volvox zusammenlebt. Und er sitzt tatsächlich fast ausschließlich auf der Oberfläche von Volvox, so dass man, wenn man eine Cholera-Infektion vorliegen hat und glaubt, dass Wasser verunreinigt ist, allein durch das Filtern des Wassers durch ein sehr eng gewebtes Tuch, etwa einen Sari, den größten Teil der Vibrio-Organismen aus dem Wasser entfernen kann. Sehr einfache Maßnahmen der öffentlichen Gesundheit können hier nützlich sein. Dies ist ein weiteres Spirillum, Trepanoma, das die Parodontose verursacht. Yersinia pestis ist der Erreger der Pest. Dies ist der Organismus, der im Mittelalter in Europa die Pandemie des Schwarzen Todes herbeiführte. Das nächste Dia zeige ich stets besonders gern: das Dia der kleinen Beulen, die von diesem Organismus verursacht werden. Und wenn man eine starke Infektion hat, bekommt man einen starken Wundbrand (Gangrän) an den Fingern, den Zehen und am Brustkorb. Wenn man dieses Stadium erreicht hat, lässt sich fast nichts mehr an der Erkrankung machen. Wenn man sie jedoch früh erkennt, lässt sie sich mit Antibiotika erfolgreich behandeln. Zum Schluss möchte ich Ihnen noch etwas über Lactobacillus erzählen. Lactobacillus ist einer von den Organismen, die wir für probiotisch halten. Sie sind sehr nützlich für uns. Man findet diesen Organismus in Joghurt. Joghurt zu essen, wenn man ihn mag, ist eine wunderbare Sache. Mir selbst schmeckt er nicht, aber ich würde ihn allen von Ihnen empfehlen. Diese Organismen stellen Verbindungen her, die viele der pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Es gibt zahlreiche Organismen, die dies tun, Bifidobacterium ist ein weiterer, den man manchmal in Joghurt findet, doch es gibt tatsächlich jede Menge Mikroorganismen, die Wunderbares für uns leisten. Wir wollen sie in unserem Körper haben, wie wollen, dass sie in uns leben, weil sie Krankheitserreger unter Kontrolle halten. Schließen möchte ich mit der Bitte an sie wenden, sich etwas vorzustellen, was ich recht außerordentlich finde. Hier sind wir also: Wir sind Menschen, wir laufen herum, wir sind randvoll mit Bakterien, sie leben überall in uns und haben es gut dabei. Wenn wir evolvieren, wie Menschen evolvieren, werden die Bakterienpopulationen ebenfalls evolvieren. Die beiden leben also tatsächlich in einer wunderbaren Symbiose: Wir evolvieren zusammen. Und es fällt nicht schwer sich vorzustellen, dass Menschen vielleicht von Bakterien erfunden wurden, um einen schönen Lebensraum abzugeben. Ich danke Ihnen. Vielen Dank. Sie haben sich gut an die Zeit gehalten. Wir haben daher Zeit für Fragen. Hat jemand eine Frage? FRAGE. Ich denke, dass viele Menschen heute Antibiotika verwenden und ich denke, dass es vielleicht eine Beschädigung der mikroorganismischen Flora des Menschen darstellt. Halten Sie es für ein ernstes Problem, dass wir zu viele Antibiotika verwenden? RICHARD ROBERTS. Ja, Antibiotika, wissen Sie, sind wirklich das Wundermedikament. Sie waren das Wundermedikament, als man sie entdeckte, und wir missbrauchen sie sehr. Wir verabreichen sie Rindern und auf diese Weise gelangen sie in Fleisch und in unsere Nahrungskette. In der westlichen Welt ist es gewiss so, dass wir Antibiotika beim geringsten Anzeichen einer Infektion Wir verwenden sie viel zu häufig. Die Sache wird wirklich klar, wenn man sich die Tuberkulose als eines der besten Beispiele hierfür ansieht. Als ich Kind war, war die Tuberkulose ein großes Problem. Wenn man – in England – Tuberkulose hatte, wurde man in ein Sanatorium gesteckt. Man wurde vom Rest der Bevölkerung isoliert, um die Ausbreitung der Krankheit zu verhindern. Dann standen Antibiotika zur Verfügung, man konnte eine Infektion mit Microbacterium tuberculosis heilen, und alle Welt hörte auf, sich darüber Sorgen zu machen. Jetzt haben wir einen Punkt erreicht, an dem es von Microbacterium tuberculosis sehr, sehr viele Stämme gibt, die resistent gegen Medikamente sind. Wenn Sie – Gott bewahre – jemals in Russland ins Gefängnis kämen, dann wäre es sehr wahrscheinlich, dass Sie mit einer bösen Tuberkulose-Infektion wieder herauskämen. Weltweit sterben jährlich mehr als eine Million Menschen an Tuberkulose, und die Regierung der USA hat in ihrer Weisheit schon vor vielen, vielen Jahren beschlossen, die Erforschung von Microbacterium tuberculosis nicht weiter zu finanzieren. Sie hat erst kürzlich damit begonnen, sie finanziell zu unterstützen, und die Tuberkulose ist heute wieder zu einem großen Problem geworden. Und um Ihre Frage zu beantworten: Ja, wir sind mit den Antibiotika, die uns zur Verfügung standen, völlig falsch umgegangen. Und es gibt nur sehr wenig neue, neue Arten von Antibiotika, die in nächster Zeit verfügbar werden. Einige neue erscheinen, doch wir haben diese Forschung sehr lange vernachlässigt. FRAGE. Ich bin Arzt und komme aus Pakistan. Ich war fasziniert, als ich erfuhr, dass die intravesikale Therapie der Tuberkulose gegen Blasenkrebs eingesetzt wird. Als ich die Literatur zu Rate zog, stellte ich fest, dass viele Viren als Anti-Tumor-Mittel verwendet werden. Glauben Sie, dass dies ein vielsprechendes Gebiet ist: der Einsatz von Mikroben zur Behandlung von Krebs? RICHARD ROBERTS. Also, Ihre Frage richtet sich auf die Verwendung von Mikroben und Viren zur Behandlung von Krebs. Ich fürchte, dass ich darüber nichts weiß. Ich bin in dieser Sache völlig unwissend. Mir ist bekannt, dass man bakterielle Phagen zur Behandlung bakterieller Infektionen verwendet. Dies ist etwas, womit man sich in Russland seit sehr langer Zeit beschäftigt. Über die Behandlung von Krebs mithilfe von Mikroorganismen weiß ich jedoch nichts. Vielleicht können wir später noch darüber reden. Ich würde sehr gerne mehr darüber erfahren. FRAGE. Ich möchte Folgendes wissen: Zahlreiche Unternehmen verkaufen heute mit Probiotika veränderte Lebensmittel: Ist es wirklich erwiesen, dass es wesentlich besser für uns ist, diese teuren Lebensmittel zu kaufen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, ich denke, es ist wirklich schwer zu wissen. Das Problem mit den Mitteln zur Unterstützung der Gesundheit, den Nahrungsergänzungsmitteln, besteht darin, dass sie nicht reglementiert sind. Daher ist es ein offensichtlicher Markt für irgendeinen Scharlatan, der daherkommt und versucht, Ihnen ein Quacksalberprodukt zu verkaufen. Ich denke, dass einige der Probiotika, wenn man sagt, was genau sich darin befindet und besonders wenn sie Lactobacillus oder wenn sie Bifidobacterium enthalten, wahrscheinlich tatsächlich gesundheitsfördernd sind. Doch ich glaube ebenso, dass es zahlreiche Produkte auf dem Markt gibt, die man besser meidet. Ich empfehle Ihnen, dass Sie – wenn Sie wirklich Probiotika verwenden wollen – unbedingt Joghurt essen sollten. Joghurt ist sehr gesund, nur schmeckt er nicht. FRAGE. Sie sprachen über die Koevolution der Bakterien und des Menschen. Im Fall von Helicobacter pylori, sagten Sie, seien die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit diesen Bakterien infiziert. Es kommt jedoch bei den meisten Menschen nicht zum Ausbruch einer Krankheit. Was meinen Sie: Handelt es sich dabei um einen Krankheitserreger ober um einen Symbionten? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, die Frage richtet sich auf Helicobacter pylori und die Tatsache, dass die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit Helicobacter pylori infiziert sind. Die meisten dieser Infektionen sind relativ unterschwellig. Man hat also den Organismus, doch keine damit zusammenhängenden ernsthaften Krankheitssymptome. Wir wissen nicht wirklich, warum man plötzlich eine mit Helicobacter zusammenhängende Krankheit bekommt. In der westlichen Welt mag es einen Zusammenhang mit der Ernährung oder mit anderen Organismen geben, die hinzukommen. In den Entwicklungsländern sind die Fälle von durch Helicobacter verursachten Magenkrebs sehr selten, obwohl es von Zeit zu Zeit einige Fälle gibt. Anderswo ist die Häufigkeit wesentlich größer. Ich denke jedoch, dass das wirkliche Problem darin besteht, dass das ganze Mikrobiom, der Satz an Mikroben, der in einer Population lebt, sich ändert, wenn man von einer Population zu einer anderen geht. Daher muss man also nicht nur an Helicobacter pylori denken, sondern auch an alle anderen Organismen, die man typischerweise findet. Und viele von ihnen sind in der westlichen Welt einfach nicht anzutreffen. Demnach haben wir noch einen langen Weg vor uns. Wissen Sie: Wenn wir erkennen, dass wir die meisten der in uns lebenden Organismen nicht kennen und dass wir nicht wissen, was sie tun, ist es sehr leicht, eine Hypothese aufzustellen und sehr viel schwieriger, sie zu testen, weil wir es hier mit komplizierten Lebensräumen zu tun haben, in denen diese Organismen leben. FRAGE. Meine Frage lautet: Wie können wir dem Problem der Resistenz gegen mehrere Medikamente begegnen? Meinen Sie, wir müssten einen universalen Angriffspunkt finden, damit wir in Zukunft nicht mehr nach neuen Antibiotika suchen müssen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun gut, ich denke, die ganze Sache bezüglich der mehrfachen Resistenz gegen Medikamente bedeutet, dass wir neue Medikamente finden müssen, und typischerweise bedeuten neue Medikamente nicht neue Angriffspunkte, manchmal ist das so. Allerdings handelt es sich hierbei um unterschiedliche Klassen von Verbindungen, die sich gegen ein bekanntes Angriffsziel richten, obwohl auf andere Weise. Wenn sie sich beispielsweise vorstellen, dass Sie es mit einem Protein zu tun haben, das für das Bakterium eine Schlüsselfunktion erfüllt, und dass Sie ein Medikament finden, das an dieser Stelle eine Bindung eingeht und die Funktion des Proteins hemmt, so wird es zu einer Aminosäurenänderung am Punkt der Wechselwirkung kommen. Wenn Sie ein anderes Mittel finden, das das Molekül an demselben Punkt in der Sequenz trifft, dann haben diese Mutationen keine Wirkung darauf. Damit der Organismus dann resistent wird, muss es zu Mutationen an einer anderen Stelle kommen. Wir wissen, dass einige der neuen Medikamente, die zur Zeit entwickelt werden, eine von den Medikamenten, die wir als Antibiotika verwenden, sehr verschiedene Struktur haben. In manchen Fällen, richten sie sich gegen neue Angriffspunkte. Das Schöne an der Tatsache, dass wir im Laufe der letzten paar Jahre so viele Genomsequenzen von Bakterien analysiert haben ist Folgendes: Es gibt zahllose Angriffspunkte, die wir finden können. Ich denke also, dass es keinen Mangel an guten Angriffspunkten gibt, gegen die wir uns bei Bakterien richten können, doch es fehlt an Anstrengungen bei der Suche nach Antibiotika. Im Allgemeinen, wissen Sie, sind die Pharmaunternehmen nicht sehr darauf bedacht nach Antibiotika zu suchen, da sie den Nachteil haben, dass sich mit ihnen die Krankheit heilen und daher nur ein geringer Gewinn erzielen lässt. Die Pharmaunternehmen hätten viel lieber etwas, was die Symptome erleichtert, was man für den Rest seines Lebens einnehmen muss. Dann ergibt sich eine sehr schöne Gewinnspanne. FRAGE. Glauben Sie, dass sich – außer der Resistenz gegen Antibiotika – aufgrund des veränderten Verhaltens der Menschen die Pathogenität der Bakterien oder irgendwelcher anderer Mikroben entweder entwickelt hat oder zurückgegangen ist? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, wissen Sie, wir befinden uns in einem ständigen Kampf zwischen den Pathogenen, die gerne in uns leben und uns Probleme bereiten möchten, und unserer Fähigkeit, uns gegen sie zu wehren. Dies ist nicht etwas, was irgendwann einmal aufhören wird. Diese Evolution wird weitergehen. Es wird ständig neue Krankheitserreger geben, es wird stets erforderlich sein, dass wir davor auf der Hut sind, dass wir Wege finden, mit ihnen fertig zu werden. Die Bakterien haben den Vorteil, dass sie sehr viel schneller evolvieren können, als es uns möglich ist. Wenn Sie eine Lebenszeit von 30 Minuten haben, wenn Sie sich in 30 Minuten vermehren dann ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, Mutationen zu finden, die mit Krankheiten fertig werden, im Falle von Bakterien sehr viel höher. Glücklicherweise ist unser Immunsystem in der Lage, mit einigen dieser Dinge effektiver umzugehen, doch diesen „Rüstungswettlauf“ zwischen dem Krankheitserreger und dem Wirtsorganismus wird es immer geben. Er gehört einfach zu den Dingen, die eben nun einmal immer geschehen. Zum Glück wird es immer einen Bedarf an Mikrobiologen und Chemikern geben und an Wissenschaftlern, die auf diesem Gebiet arbeiten und neue Antibiotika und bessere Wege finden, mit Krankheiten fertig zu werden. FRAGE. Herr Professor, meinen Sie nicht, dass einige der normalen Organismen, die beispielsweise in der Mundhöhle leben, zu Krankheitserregern werden, wenn es zu einer Schwächung der Immunität kommt? Warum ist dies nach Ihrer Meinung so, und wie können Antibiotika dies verhindern oder eine Rolle hierbei spielen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Die Frage ist also eigentlich: Wenn wir uns in einem Zustand geringerer Immunität befinden: Erlaubt dies Krankheitserregern sozusagen „krankmachender“ zu werden? Die Antwort hierauf lautet, dass ein Organismus pathogen wird, wenn es ihm gelingt, zu wachsen und sich stark zu vermehren. Wenn Sie nur wenige Erreger in sich haben, führt dies in der Regel zu keinen Problemen. Dies ist der Grund dafür, warum Sie neben jemandem sitzen können, der eine Grippe oder Tuberkulose hat: Solange Sie keine größere Anzahl der Erreger aufnehmen, kann Ihr eigenes Immunsystem normalerweise damit fertig werden. Es ist also normalerweise eigentlich eine Frage der Anzahl der Organismen, die entstehen. Wenn er sich kaum vermehrt, ist er nicht pathogen und sie erleiden keine schweren Symptome. Wenn der Organismus sich andererseits sehr stark vermehrt und nicht eingedämmt werden kann, dann erleiden sie sämtliche Symptome seiner Pathogenität. Und was oft geschieht ist Folgendes: Sobald dieser kritische Punkt erreicht ist, ab dem zahlreiche Organismen vorhanden sind, vermehrt er sich sehr schnell. Hierdurch wird dann die Fähigkeit des Körpers, durch seine eigene Abwehr der Lage Herr zu werden, beeinträchtigt. Und dies geschieht zum Beispiel im Fall der Cholera. Mit geringen Anzahlen von Vibrio cholerae wird der Körper fertig, doch sobald der Organismus beginnt, sich stark zu vermehren, kommt die körpereigene Abwehr dem nicht mehr nach und kann damit nicht Schritt halten. Unser Immunsystem ist nicht leistungsstark genug, um mit großen Mengen des Organismus fertig zu werden. Habe nochmals vielen Dank, Richard, für dieses wunderbare Exposé.

Richard Roberts on the hydrothermal vents in the ocean floor.
(00:09:10 - 00:11:32)

 

Jack Szostak further explained what environmental conditions were necessary:

 

Jack Szostak explains what environmental conditions where necessary for primitive cells to function.
(00:29:32 - 00:31:03)

 

In 1989, William Martin from the University of Düsseldorf and Michael Russell of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory pointed out that black smokers were too acidic and the temperatures too great to support the growth and proliferation of primitive life. They suggested that it is more probable that life originated in alkaline hydrothermal vents, a hypothesis known as the “water world” theory. These vents are cooler than black smokers, and the alkaline fluids bubbling from the vents could have been more amicable to the first life-forms than the surrounding acidic oceans. At this boundary, two chemical imbalances could take place: a proton gradient and an electrical gradient, which led to electron transfer. Both of these gradients occur in mitochondria, cell structures which produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), an energy-carrying molecule. Alkaline hydrothermal vents are the main source of hydrogen on Earth, and when hydrogen mixed with carbon dioxide, which was abundant in early oceans, organic compounds, such as thioesters, could have formed. De Duve viewed this event as “primeval in the development of life”. Amino acids, present in the form of thioesters, could spontaneously assemble into peptides in bacteria, as demonstrated by Nobel Laureate Fritz Lipmann in the late 1960s. Moreover, the minerals found in these vents, such as iron-sulphur clusters, may have brought about iron-sulphur compounds. Evidence of this is present in the enzymes of many organisms, a sort of remnant passed down from unicellular ancestors.

The pathways of survival of the fittest began with the earliest life-forms, even at a molecular level, as was mentioned in Ada Yonath’s lecture. De Duve stated in Lindau in 2011 that variation brings about competition and that natural selection operates on the here and now. In his lecture in 1990, Werner Arber explained that evolution is not aimed at any particular group, it is a completely random occurrence and is dependent on changes in living conditions and the surrounding environment. In light of experiments in biological evolution, it is easier to track mutations in microorganisms.

 

Christian de Duve (2011) - The Future of Life

It’s a great pleasure to be with all of you here, thank you for coming and thank you for this nice introduction. I should tell you that I have a jacket and I have a tie at the hotel, but I hope you will excuse this informal attire. Thank you, if somebody has a jacket, he’s allowed to take it off. Now, let’s see if this machine works, great. So before talking about the future of life, I would like to spend a little time going back, just a few million years, as you can see this is a scale. Now, I don’t know why you are applauding, but never mind, wait till the end of the lecture. What you see is a scale of time, eight millions of years. That’s a great deal from your point of view and my point of view, eight million years ago, that is 8.000 millennia, But in terms of the history of life, this is just an instant, because the first animals appeared 600 million years ago, that’s about half a mile from here. And the first signs of life on earth were detected in terrains that are almost 3.6 billion years ago, But it’s those last years are particularly important for us humans. And what I'm showing on this scale of time is the volume of the brain, the volume of the brain of the individuals, whose skulls, fossil skulls were found mostly in Africa during those times, and what I want to show is the change in the volume, the size of the brain during that time. There you have on the right the size of the brain of the chimpanzee, which is 350 cubic centimetres and which is about the biggest size for an animal brain, compared to size in the whole of animal kingdom, except of course for humans. Now, something happened around six million years ago or even later, here you have an individual called Australopithecus africanus. He’s a sort of remote cousin of Lucy, you’ve heard of Lucy of course, and Lucy had a brain of about 400 cubic centimetres, and he lived for about half a million years, and then became extinct, so the length of that line shows the time during which fossil skulls of this individual of the species had been found. And so let’s continue, here you see the next one, Paranthropus boisei, and then it goes on, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster, Homo erectus, who lived, as you can see, Then we have heidelbergensis and then we have neanderthalensis. And then we have you and me with a slightly smaller brain than the neanderthal, smaller but probably more efficient. And so this is the whole history of the brain, and we can connect all these, we see something which is really the most extraordinary event in the whole of evolution, this is this fantastic rise in the size of the brain over just about two million years. Remember it took 600 million years for the brain of the chimpanzee to reach this size, 600 million. And here, in a couple of million years, you see the size growing up fourfold. This is an absolutely extraordinary event, nobody has explained it from the genetic point of view, and I think very few genes can be involved in this, so this is a really extraordinary thing. It’s extraordinary in terms of the size, the fastness, but it’s also extraordinary in terms of smallness. Because just four times as many neurons, four times, makes a difference between a chimpanzee and a human being. Now, the chimpanzees as you know, they do make a few tools from time to time, they can use a branch, remove the leaves, stick the branch into a termite nest and then wait and they pick it out again and they lick the termites off. And that’s how they get insects to feed on. And that’s manufacturing your tools, so there is some intelligence involved in that. But we, our ancestors, with about twice that brain size, we make stone tools. Chimpanzee also, he would use a stone to crush a nut or to crush his neighbours’ head, but our ancestors did much better. They didn’t just pick up a stone, they started carving it and fashioning it into all kinds of different tools, and so they made stone tools of greater efficiency or sophistication. But that’s still nothing against what we have been doing, now, with just four times as many neurons as the chimp, we are sending man to the moon, we are sending messages all over the world, we are decrypting the human genome, we are manipulating life, we are doing all those extraordinary things that, you know better than I do, are being done today, with just four times as many neurons as the chimpanzee. I think this is absolutely remarkable and the neurobiologists will have to explain how, with such a small difference, you can make, I mean there can be such a huge difference in the results. Okay, now I want to look at the end of this story in terms of numbers. So there is another timescale, we are going to look at the population in terms of time. Half a billion years ago - well, there was no census, but it’s estimated that the human population was about 3.000 individuals. It’s estimated that there were about 10.000 human beings. Okay, then 10.000 years ago, that’s when the first human settlements started, when they started cultivating land and raising cattle and so on, five to ten million individuals. Half a billion, that’s quite a lot already. I was almost finished school at that time, I almost entered university, but anyway, doesn’t matter. Two billion, that’s what I learnt at school, we are two billions. So in the meantime it’s changed, from 1930 to 1970, that’s four years before i got a Nobel prize, four billion. Just in one lifetime, from two to four. Today, or yesterday, 2009 six and a half billion, tomorrow maybe nine billion, maybe more, we don’t know. So this is really a staggering increase in population, this is even more frightening when you see the curve how suddenly more than exponential fashion this number has risen. What this means is that we, the human species, Homo sapiens sapiens, we are, among all the living organisms that have ever existed on this planet. We are the most successful species. We started in Central Africa, in small bands roaming Central Africa, we have come to invade the whole of our planet, to occupy almost every liveable corner of this planet. We’ve come to use virtually all the resources that are available for our own benefit, we have really become tremendously successful. But this success has a price. I was explaining how we have become the most successful, by far the most successful species on this planet, but as I said, there’s a price to pay and let’s see the cost of success. You open your television, you open your newspaper, you open your radio and you hear of it. So I just list the price, because everyone knows that the cost of our success is exhaustion of natural resources, almost complete exhaustion. It’s loss of biodiversity, every day species, living species disappear. Deforestation, desertification, we are losing forests in the Amazon at a fantastic rate, the deserts are becoming wider. Climate changes, we all know about climate changes, but we hear only about climate change in the newspapers, but climate change is just a small aspect of this whole tragedy that we have inflicted on our planet. Energy crisis, you know how we all try to find new ways to power our needs because we are using more and more energy. We are using more energy in one day than our ancestors did in a year in the African savannah. Pollution, we are polluting the earth to the point of making it unliveable in certain parts of the world. Overcrowded cities, that’s becoming a major, if you ever travel to Tokyo or Mexico city or Sao Paolo or even go to London, Paris, Brussels, and you will find the effects of too many people living on a too small piece of land. Conflicts and wars, I don’t have to tell you, I’ve seen two wars in my lifetime and today the wars or conflicts are raging all over the world. I don’t have to tell you about that. And of course, the main problem, of course, of our success is that there are simply too many of us. There are too many of us. Now who is the culprit? Who is responsible for this? Well, it’s not a ‘who’, it’s a ‘what’. It is natural selection. I think Dr. Arber has told you about the theory of natural selection and I'm sure you are all familiar with the theory of natural selection. Just let me remind you, with natural selection, what you start with is diversity, variation. Variation brings about conflict, competition between the different variants for the available resources. And out of that conflict there will emerge those individuals or those groups that are best fit to survive and especially to reproduce under the existing conditions. So natural selection is simply the automatic obligatory emergence under certain given conditions of those particular species or individuals or groups that are best fit to survive. And to reproduce, especially to reproduce under those conditions. That is natural selection. Now, we have to remember about natural selection one very important point: Natural selection acts on the immediate, on the here-and-now level. Natural selection doesn’t look into the future, natural selection doesn’t look into the future and calculate the amount of energy that remains available and say natural selection takes care only of the hic-and-nunc, the now-and-here. So, now try and go back to the early history of our species, at that time, say 200.000 years ago, you saw there were about 10.000 human beings. Well, those 10.000 human beings 200.000 years ago, they were not all in one place. They were in little groups of maybe 30 or 50 individuals, and they were roaming around the African savannah or the African forests, and what were they doing? Well, they were looking for food, because their main problem, their main concern was to survive. To survive and make young, reproduce, survive and reproduce, and so they were looking for food, they were looking for animals to hunt, because they also needed some hunting at that time. And so what were the qualities that were useful to our ancestors 200.000 years ago, when they were doing this, looking for food, looking for shelter, fighting predators. Well, I would summarize the quality that was needed at that time was group selfishness, two words. Selfishness because, if you have to survive, you have to take care of your own, you don’t think about the others, you want to survive, you must be selfish, you must be egoistic, you are looking for your own means of survival. But if you are part of a group, then it becomes more advantageous for the members of the group to help each other than to fight each other. Because if they cooperate, they have a better chance of surviving, and so natural selection will privilege those qualities or those genetic traits that were favourable to the survival and/or production of the groups’ concern, that is group selfishness. But, as I said, this was not the only group, there were 50 or 100 such groups doing the same thing, roaming through the savannah or the forest in Central Africa. From time to time they would meet, two groups would meet. And what would happen? Well, they each were looking for the best hunting grounds, looking for the best places to find food, the best shelter and so: Conflict. What happened when they met was conflict, each trying to get the better hunting grounds or the better food, each trying to get the better females, the most attractive females at least, and so on. So in addition to intra-group selfishness, you had inter-group hostility, conflict, aggressiveness. So the traits that were selected 200.000 years ago in our ancestors, because they were useful to them at the time, were intra-group selfishness and inter-group hostility. And look at the world today: Things have not changed. Things have not changed. The groups have changed. They are no longer tribes or families or clans, they are groups of human beings grouped around some thing like a nation, religion, belief, culture and so on. But the fighting goes on, I’ve seen two and the fight goes on all over the world today. Inter-group hostility is still very much alive today, and intra-group selfishness is still alive today, bankers work for bankers, and the scientists for scientists and so on. So I don’t mean that scientists work for humanity, those I know, but in general we all work for our own. And so group selfishness is still acting today, our genes have not changed because over those 200.000 years, there has been no reason for them. There has been no circumstance where it would have been useful to them to change. So things have not changed today, and is there something that we can do? What can we do to try and offset those bad effects of natural selection that has imprinted in our genes? Those nasty traits were useful to our ancestors but are obnoxious and harmful to us today. I think that the fact that there’s something wrong with human nature was already detected several thousand years ago by those wise men who wrote the bible. They of course didn’t know anything about genes, about DNA, about natural selection, but they knew something about human nature and they knew something about heredity. And so they detected the fact that there is something wrong in our human nature, and so they invented an explanation. And so they invented the Garden of Eden and Adam and Eve and the serpent and the tree and the apple and the sin, the original sin, which is responsible for this flaw in human nature that they invented. And so, my latest book is called Genetics of Original Sin, which is an explanation or an attempt to explain what it is. Then I come to the last question: Is there something that we can do? Well, in that latest book, Genetics of Original Sin, I consider seven options. Seven scenarios for the future, so I come to the topic of my lecture and I have five minutes more. First: Do nothing. That’s what we are doing today almost, do nothing. Well, if we do nothing, I think what will happen is easy to predict. Things will only get worse. Things can only get worse, we’ll just let natural selection continue to do its nasty work, things will get worse, and they will very soon get so bad that life will become very difficult on this planet, that the conditions for life will be menaced and endangered more and more, and that we, the human species will progressively move towards extinction. You have seen that all those that preceded us, my first slide, ended by becoming extinct, the neanderthals only 35.000 years ago, why not us, why not we? Well, that’s a good question, but you have to remember that if ten billion individuals have to go extinct, that’s not the same thing as 10.000 in Central Africa. Ten billion all over the world, that means that before we will become extinct, the most unimaginable apocalyptic events can take place, fights and epidemics and what not. If we let things go, there wont’ be enough food for everyone, there won’t be climate to sustain us, so we are doomed if we don’t do something about it. Fortunately, we have received from natural selection a gift no other living species possesses. We of all the living organisms on this planet that have ever existed, we are the only ones who are capable, thanks to this brain that we have received from natural selection - that you’ve seen has grown in the last years – thanks to this brain, we have received the ability to do something natural selection cannot do. We can look into the future, we can make predictions about what will happen if we do something or if we do something else. We can make decisions about the future and we can act according to those decisions. So we can act against natural selection, we are the only living organisms on this planet that have the ability to purposefully, intentionally, willingly, consciously acting against natural selection. And therefore, that is what we have to do before it becomes too late. And so the first thing we can do: Improve our genes. We have bad genes? So okay, let’s do what we do in plants and animals, remove the bad genes and replace them with good genes. We can make GMOs, genetically modified organisms, why not make GMHs, genetically modified humans? Well, technically this is not quite possible, for reasons that we won’t go into, we can do it with animals, but with humans it would be more difficult. Ethically, of course, it’s something that nobody wants to do today, and in any case, suppose it was technically and ethically possible, we wouldn’t know what to do. We simply wouldn't know what to do, because we don’t know the relationship between genes and abilities. We would like to make a new little Mozart, we wouldn't know what genes to remove and what genes to implant to make a new Mozart or to make a new Venus Williams or a new Angela Merkel. We wouldn't know what to do. Therefore forget it, this is not a solution. Next possibility: Rewire the brain. Now, I use the word ‘rewiring’ because that’s a very technical way of putting it, what I mean is education, educate. Because rewiring the brain, I think it’s very important to know about that and, as you know, neurobiologists have made major discoveries in the last few decades about how the brain is wired. We have been told that when we are born, very little of our brain is yet wired, and the wiring takes place under the influence of all the stimuli, sounds and visual stimuli and touch and so on. A baby receives influences from the outside, and those influences will create networks in the baby’s brain. So the brain is wired at a very young age, and as you see, this is important for the point I will make, and so what we need is education. Education of the young, especially. And if you need education, this means that you need educators. So the question is, if you are going to educate, you need educators, but who is going to educate the educators? So we have another question: Where will we find the wise men and women who will do the education of the educators? One obvious answer to that is the religions. The religions have been very much involved in the last millennia almost, centuries, in educating the young and even the adult. They have a whole world network of schools and parishes and meeting halls and churches where they can influence. Some religions, like the catholic religion, can influence one billion people in this whole world, so they have a huge ability or power to do what is needed, the education. And here, I hope you won’t blame me or be too disappointed, I think the religions are not doing their job properly. I think they are more busy defending their own beliefs, their own ideologies, their own doctrines, their own hierarchies, they are much more involved with their own survival than with the survival of the world. They are more involved with lobbying happy in the next world but not in this world. And so I think, unfortunately, I hope there will be a change, and there was signs today that there is a change, I think there should come, from people like you, an influence that goes up to the hierarchy and tell those old men that there’s need for change. I'm glad you agree with me, at least some of you. So, anyway, I think that with you people and your contemporaries in this world, this may still happen, and I hope very much it will happen. In the meantime, there’s another religion which is protecting environment. Now, I think that’s a very important thing to do, we’ve seen to what extent that development of the human species has harmed the environment, and so I think this new concern, because this did not exist when I was young. This started just after the war, this concern for the environment is very recent, and I think this is extremely important, and we should all participate in this job. But here again, I think the organisations that try to defend the environment don’t do it the way they should do or some of them don’t, because they have turned into political parties. They are defending political styles like they are against multinational corporations and they are against capitalism, but anyway, they have become political parties, more than they have become environmental movements. Another problem with the environmental movement is that it has degenerated into some kind of a religion, which is sort of a Jean-Jacques Rousseau kind of religion that is based on the belief that nature is perfect. That you shouldn’t touch nature, because nature is sacred, and anything that is natural is good and we should not interfere with nature, we should not interfere with life on earth and so on. Now, that is ridiculous, because nature is not good, nature is not bad, nature is indifferent. Natural selection doesn’t look at the qualities of the organisms that it allows to emerge, it’s blind. It’s passive and so nature is just, nature has as much solicitude for the mould that makes penicillin and for the virus that causes HIV, AIDS. It has as much solicitude for the poet and for the scorpion. Nature is not good, it’s not bad, it’s indifferent. So again, I think we should protect the environment, but we should try to free this concern for the environment, which is extremely important, we should free it from its political implications and from its ideological implications. Okay, next scenario... Amazing, all the men are applauding also. Well, I'm glad, not amazing, it means they are intelligent. Give women a chance, now listen. This is not, I'm not a social worker, I'm not a politician, so I'm not defending some kind of a feminist agenda. What I'm acting here, speaking as a scientist. In mammals, the females are less tainted by this original sin, by this flaw that I have mentioned because of their biological nature. They are less aggressive, the wars have been raged mostly by men, not by women. Women tend to the sick, they tend to the wounded, they tend to the sexual needs of the soldiers, but they rarely fight, they rarely fight, except in exceptional surroundings. They are not aggressive, except if their young are threatened, then a female can become aggressive. So biologically, genetically they are less aggressive than the males. Also they have much more influence than the males on the early education of the young. They give birth to those babies, this is not going to change in the near future, they give birth to the babies and they nurture them, they feed the babies. And so they provide the very early education to the babies, and therefore I think they are biologically better placed to lead the world. Unfortunately, what we see now - and I always end with unfortunate things - but what we see in the world today is that, maybe in order to gain the power that I would like them to have, women have to behave like men, on the political side or on the tennis court and so on. So anyway, I think it’s important to give women a chance. Now, I can see that my chairman, you know there’s nothing after this, so if I have two more minutes they won’t mind, I hope. I'm not taking anybody’s time. So let’s look at the last option, which obviously is the most important one of all, population control. Because all the ills that I have mentioned are due to one single cause, there simply are too many human beings in the world. You have seen the curve that I showed. It’s staggering, it’s frightening to see how quickly our numbers have increased just in that time, fourfold increase, from the time I was born to today. It’s terrible, terrifying. And so we have to do something about it. Now, you know, Thomas Malthus was an economist at the end of the 18th century, and he predicted this, he said human beings will multiply geometrically, exponentially, the resources can only multiply arithmetically, linearly, and therefore some day the time will come when there will be too many mouths to feed, as compared to the amount of food available. And so he said that there are only two solutions. One is to do what the hunters do, cull, remove the sick, the old and so on, get rid of them. And the other possibility is prevent the extra human beings from being born. So either you remove or you prevent them from being born. Now, we’ve been very good at removing, not the sick and the old, but mostly the young. In the last two wars, I don’t know how many million young men and women have lost their lives before they were able to reproduce. So this has been a rather sickening method of preventing the population from being born. But obviously the most civilised way is to prevent them from being born than to kill them after they are born. So that’s what we ought to do, and for 200 years people said Malthus was wrong, because every time when Malthus was going to be proved right, some new development was made, technique in agriculture, or expanding resources, and so the earth was allowed or made to feed more and more individuals. But today the writing is on the wall. Today there is no place, we can’t start seeding the moon or even Mars, forget about those things. We have to live on this little planet, and this little planet has become too small, or we have become too many. So we really, I think this is the major lesson of this, we have to do something about population control if possible by preventing, by birth control. I hope I haven’t been too long, but I'm coming to my conclusion. I just want to read it because I want to make sure that it’s clear. All is not lost, but the writing is on the wall. If we don’t act soon to overcome our genetic tendency to intra-group selfishness and inter-group hostility, the future of humanity and of much of life on earth will be gravely endangered, possibly leading to total extinction under conditions that can only be visualised as apocalyptic. Here I turn to the young, this is the most wonderful thing about these Lindau Nobel meetings, and as long as I can be physically able to come, I will come back, because here is where we meet the young people of the world. And they are here and I would like to turn to all you young people in this audience and say to them, I want to tell you: My generation, our generation has made a mess of things. It’s up to you to do better. The future is in your hands. Good luck. Thank you, thank you so much!

Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier bei Ihnen zu sein. Vielen Dank für Ihr Kommen und für diese nette Vorstellung. Ich sollte Ihnen vielleicht mitteilen, dass ich ein Jackett habe, und eine Krawatte, im Hotel, aber ich hoffe, Sie verzeihen mir diese etwas legere Aufmachung. Vielen Dank. Sollte jemand ein Jackett anhaben, dann darf er es natürlich ablegen. Jetzt wollen wir doch mal sehen, ob dieses Gerät funktioniert, großartig. Also, bevor wir uns der Zukunft des Lebens zuwenden, möchte ich gerne erst etwas in der Zeit zurückgehen, nur ein paar Millionen Jahre. Wie Sie hier sehen, ist das eine Skala. Mir ist nicht ganz klar, warum Sie jetzt applaudieren, aber kein Problem, warten Sie bis zum Ende dieses Vortrags. Was Sie hier sehen ist eine Zeitskala, 8 Millionen Jahre. Das ist ein langer Zeitraum aus Ihrer Sicht, und aus meiner. Aber in Bezug auf die Geschichte des Lebens ist das nur ein Augenblick, denn die ersten Tiere traten vor sechshundert Millionen Jahren auf, das ist etwa eine halbe Meile von hier. Und die ersten Spuren des Lebens auf der Erde wurden in Gebieten entdeckt aus einer Zeit von vor beinahe 3,6 Milliarden Jahren, sechsunddreißighundert Millionen Jahre zurück, vor einer sehr, sehr langen Zeit also verglichen mit diesen allerletzten Jahren in der Geschichte des Lebens. Aber genau diese letzten Jahre sind von besonderer Bedeutung für uns Menschen. Und was ich auf dieser Skala zeige ist das Volumen des Gehirns, das Volumen des Gehirns der Individuen, deren Schädel, fossile Schädel aus jener Zeit vor allem in Afrika gefunden wurden, und was ich zeigen möchte ist die Änderung des Volumens, der Größe des Gehirns während dieser Zeit. Hier zur Rechten haben wir die Größe des Gehirns des Schimpansen, etwa 350 Kubikzentimeter und so etwa das größte Gehirn eines Tieres im Vergleich zur Körpergröße im gesamten Tierreich, abgesehen natürlich vom Menschen. Dann, vor etwa 6 Millionen Jahren, oder sogar später, geschah etwas, hier gab es ein Individuum mit der Bezeichnung Australopithecus africanus. Er ist eine Art entfernter Verwandter von Lucy, natürlich haben Sie alle schon von Lucy gehört, und Lucy hatte ein Gehirn von etwa 400 Kubikzentimetern und lebte etwa eine halbe Million Jahre und starb dann aus. Die Länge dieser Linie zeigt daher den Zeitraum, aus dem Funde fossiler Schädel dieses Exemplars, nicht dieses Exemplars sondern der Spezies, gefunden wurden. Und lassen Sie uns fortfahren, hier sehen Sie den nächsten, Paranthropus boisei, und weiter geht es mit Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster, Homo erectus, der, wie Sie sehen können, ein und eine halbe Million Jahre lebte, bevor er ausstarb. Danach haben wir heidelbergensis und danach neandertalensis. Und danach kamen Sie und ich mit einem etwas kleineren Gehirn als das des Neandertalers, kleiner, aber vermutlich effizienter. Und das ist die ganze Geschichte des Gehirns, und wenn wir dies alles verknüpfen, sehen wir etwas, das wirklich das außergewöhnlichste Ereignis in der ganzen Evolution ist, dies ist der fantastische Anstieg der Größe des Gehirns über ungefähr 2 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Erinnern wir uns, das Gehirn des Schimpansen brauchte sechshundert Millionen Jahre, um diese Größe zu erreichen, sechshundert Millionen. Und hier sehen Sie, wie sich die Größe in nur 2 Millionen Jahren vervierfacht. Das ist ein absolut außergewöhnliches Ereignis, niemand konnte das bisher aus genetischer Sicht erklären und ich glaube, es können nur sehr wenige Gene daran beteiligt gewesen sein, daher ist es ein wirklich außergewöhnliches Geschehen. Es ist außergewöhnlich in Bezug auf die Größe, auf die Schnelligkeit, aber es ist auch außergewöhnlich in Bezug auf die Kleinheit. Denn nur 4 Mal so viele Neuronen, vier Mal, machen den Unterschied aus zwischen einem Schimpansen und einem Menschen. sie können einen Zweig nehmen, die Blätter entfernen, den Zweig in ein Termitennest stecken, dann warten und ihn wieder herausziehen, dann lecken sie die Termiten ab. So kommen Sie an Insekten, um sich davon zu ernähren. Und das ist Herstellen von Werkzeugen, wozu eine gewisse Intelligenz erforderlich ist. Aber wir, d. h. unsere Vorfahren, mit ungefähr der doppelten Gehirngröße, wir fertigten Werkzeuge aus Stein. Auch Schimpansen benutzen einen Stein, um eine Nuss zu knacken oder den Schädel des Nachbarn, aber unsere Vorfahren waren viel besser. Sie hoben den Stein nicht nur auf, sie begannen, ihn zu behauen und alle möglichen Arten von Werkzeug daraus zu formen, und so stellten sie wirkungsvollere und raffiniertere Steinwerkzeuge her. Aber selbst das ist nichts im Vergleich zu dem, was wir leisten. Mit nur vier Mal so vielen Neuronen wie der Schimpanse schicken wir Menschen zum Mond, wir senden Nachrichten um die ganze Welt, wir entschlüsseln das menschliche Genom, wir manipulieren das Leben, wir tun all die außergewöhnlichen Dinge, die, das wissen Sie besser als ich, heute getan werden, mit nur vier Mal so vielen Neuronen wie der Schimpanse. Ich halte das für absolut bemerkenswert und die Neurobiologen werden erklären müssen, wie es mit einem solch kleinen Unterschied möglich ist, ich meine, wie es damit zu einem so großen Unterschied bei den Ergebnissen kommen kann. OK, jetzt möchte ich mit Ihnen das Ende der Geschichte zahlenmäßig betrachten. Hier ist eine andere Zeitskala, wir betrachten die Bevölkerung in Relation zur Zeit. Vor einer halben Milliarde Jahre – gut, es gab keinen Zensus, aber es wird vermutet, dass die menschliche Bevölkerung aus dreitausend Individuen bestand – vor 200.000 Jahren, zu einer Zeit also, als wir uns bereits von den Neandertalern getrennt hatten, wird geschätzt, dass es etwa 10.000 Menschen gab. OK, dann vor 10 000 Jahren, das ist zur Zeit der ersten menschlichen Siedlungen, als die Menschen begannen, Land zu kultivieren und Vieh zu halten usw., fünf bis zehn Millionen Individuen. Vor 1.600 Jahren, zu Zeiten von Galileo, von Descartes, nicht vor 1.600 Jahren, sondern im Jahr 1600, eine halbe Milliarde, das ist bereits eine ganze Menge, eine halbe Milliarde. Zu der Zeit war ich fast schon mit der Schule fertig, besuchte beinahe die Universität, aber egal, das spielt keine Rolle. Zwei Milliarden, das ist die Zahl, die ich in der Schule lernte, wir sind 2 Milliarden. So in der Zwischenzeit hat sich das geändert, von 1930 bis 1970, das sind vier Jahre bevor ich einen Nobelpreis erhielt, vier Milliarden. Im Verlauf nur eines Lebens, von zwei auf vier. Heute, oder gestern, 2009, sechseinhalb Milliarden, morgen, vielleicht neun Milliarden, vielleicht mehr, wer weiß. Das ist also wirklich ein atemberaubendes Bevölkerungswachstum, es ist sogar noch erschreckender, wenn Sie die Kurve betrachten, sehen wie diese Zahl plötzlich mehr als exponentiell ansteigt. Was dies bedeutet ist, dass wir, die menschliche Rasse, Homo sapiens sapiens, unter all den lebenden Organismen, die je auf diesem Planeten existiert haben, wir sind die erfolgreichste Spezies. Wir begannen in Zentralafrika, in kleinen Horden, die in Zentralafrika umherstreiften, wir haben unseren gesamten Planeten eingenommen, beinahe jedes bewohnbare Fleckchen dieses Planeten besetzt. Wir nutzen beinahe alle verfügbaren Ressourcen zu unserem eigenen Vorteil, wir sind wirklich ungeheuer erfolgreich geworden. Aber dieser Erfolg hat einen Preis. Ich habe erklärt, wie wir zur erfolgreichsten, bei weitem erfolgreichsten Spezies auf diesem Planeten geworden sind, aber, wie ich schon sagte, es gibt einen Preis, der bezahlt werden muss, und betrachten wir einmal die Kosten dieses Erfolgs. Sie schalten Ihren Fernseher ein, Sie schlagen Ihre Zeitung auf, Sie schalten Ihr Radio ein und Sie hören davon. Daher führe ich den Preis einfach nur auf, denn jeder weiß, dass die Kosten unseres Erfolgs die Erschöpfung der natürlichen Ressourcen sind, beinahe die vollständige Erschöpfung. Es ist der Verlust der Artenvielfalt, jeden Tag verschwinden Spezies, lebende Spezies. Abholzung, Versteppung, die Wälder im Amazonasgebiet verschwinden mit atemberaubender Geschwindigkeit, die Wüsten breiten sich aus. Klimaveränderungen, wir alle wissen von den Klimaveränderungen, aber wir hören vom Klimawandel nur in der Zeitung, aber der Klimawandel ist nur ein kleiner Aspekt der ganzen Tragödie, die wir über unseren Planeten gebracht haben. Energiekrise, Sie wissen, wie wir alle versuchen, neue Wege zur Deckung unseres Energiebedarfs zu finden, denn wir verbrauchen immer mehr Energie. Wir verbrauchen an einem Tag mehr Energie als unsere Vorfahren in der afrikanischen Savanne in einem Jahr. Umweltverschmutzung, wir verschmutzen die Erde in einem Ausmaß, das sie in bestimmten Gegenden unbewohnbar macht. Überbevölkerte Städte, das wird zu einem Hauptproblem, wenn Sie einmal nach Tokio oder Mexiko City oder Sao Paolo oder sogar London, Paris, Brüssel reisen, dann begegnen Ihnen die Auswirkungen von zu vielen Menschen auf zu wenig Raum. Konflikte und Kriege, das brauche ich Ihnen nicht zu erzählen, ich habe in meinem Leben zwei Kriege erlebt, und Kriege und Konflikte toben heute auf der ganzen Welt. All das brauche ich Ihnen nicht zu erzählen. Und natürlich, das Hauptproblem unseres Erfolges ist natürlich, dass es einfach zu viele von uns gibt. Es gibt zu viele von uns. Und wer ist schuld daran? Wer ist dafür verantwortlich? Nun, es ist nicht ein „Wer“, sondern ein „Was“. Es ist die natürliche Selektion. Ich glaube, Dr. Arber hat Ihnen bereits die Theorie der natürlichen Selektion vorgestellt, und ich bin sicher, Sie alle kennen die Theorie der natürlichen Selektion. Lassen Sie mich nur kurz erwähnen, bei der natürlichen Selektion beginnen Sie mit Vielfalt, Variabilität. Variabilität führt zu Konflikt, Wettbewerb zwischen den verschiedenen Varianten um die verfügbaren Ressourcen. Und aus diesem Konflikt gehen die Individuen oder Gruppen hervor, die am überlebensfähigsten sind, und insbesondere, die sich unter den herrschenden Bedingungen am besten fortpflanzen konnten. Natürliche Selektion ist also einfach das automatische, zwangsläufige Hervorgehen unter bestimmten gegebenen Bedingungen der Spezies oder Individuen oder Gruppen, die am ehesten fähig sind, zu überleben, und sich fortzupflanzen, insbesondere sich fortzupflanzen unter diesen Umständen, das ist natürliche Selektion. Jetzt dürfen wir bei der natürlichen Selektion aber einen wichtigen Aspekt nicht vergessen: Natürliche Selektion handelt unmittelbar, im Hier und Jetzt. Natürliche Selektion wirft keinen Blick in die Zukunft, natürliche Selektion wirft keinen Blick in die Zukunft und berechnet, welche Menge an Energie noch zur Verfügung steht, und sagt „Stopp“, wir müssen uns ändern, sonst gibt es nicht mehr… Natürliche Selektion kann das nicht, natürliche Selektion kümmert sich nur um das Hic und Nunc, das Hier und Jetzt. Versuchen wir jetzt einmal, in die Frühgeschichte unserer Spezies zurückzugehen, in eine Zeit, sagen wir vor 200.000 Jahren, zu der es, wie Sie gesehen haben, etwa 10.000 Menschen gab. Nun, diese 10.000 Menschen vor 200.000 Jahren lebten nicht alle an einem Ort. Sie lebten in kleinen Horden von vielleicht 30 oder 50 Individuen und sie durchstreiften die afrikanische Savanne oder die afrikanischen Wälder, und was taten sie? Nun, sie suchten nach Nahrung, sie suchten nach Nahrung, denn Ihr Hauptproblem, Ihr Hauptanliegen war das Überleben. Das Überleben und das Produzieren von Nachwuchs, Fortpflanzung, Überleben und Fortpflanzung, und so suchten sie nach Nahrung, sie suchten nach Tieren zum Jagen, denn zu jener Zeit mussten sie auch ab und zu jagen. Und welche Eigenschaften nützten unseren Vorfahren vor 200.000 Jahren am meisten, wenn sie dies taten, Nahrung suchen, Unterschlupf suchen, gegen Raubtiere kämpfen. Nun, ich würde sagen, die zu dieser Zeit benötigte Eigenschaft war gruppenbezogener Egoismus, zwei Wörter. Egoismus, weil Sie sich um sich selbst kümmern müssen, wenn Sie ums Überleben kämpfen, Sie denken nicht an die Anderen, Sie wollen überleben, Sie müssen eigennützig sein, Sie müssen egoistisch sein, Sie suchen nach eigenen Mitteln zum Überleben. Wenn Sie jedoch Teil einer Gruppe sind, ist es für die Mitglieder dieser Gruppe von größerem Vorteil, einander zu helfen, statt einander zu bekämpfen. Denn wenn sie zusammenarbeiten, steigen Ihre Chancen zu überleben, und daher bevorzugt die natürliche Selektion die Eigenschaften oder die genetischen Merkmale, die für das Überleben und/oder die Produktion des Anliegens der Gruppe nützlich waren, also Gruppenegoismus. Aber wie ich schon sagte, war dies nicht die einzige Gruppe, es gab 50 oder 100 solcher Gruppen, die alle das Gleiche taten, sie durchstreiften die Savanne oder die Wälder Zentralafrikas. Von Zeit zu Zeit begegneten sie sich, zwei Gruppen begegneten sich. Und was geschah? Nun, jede Gruppe suchte nach den besten Jagdgründen, nach den besten Stellen, um Nahrung zu finden, den besten Unterschlupf, und daher: Konflikt. Wenn Sie aufeinandertrafen gab es Konflikt, jeder versuchte, die besseren Jagdgründe oder die bessere Nahrung zu erlangen, jeder versuchte, die besten Weibchen, die attraktivsten Weibchen zumindest, zu erobern und so weiter. Also gab es neben dem auf die Gruppe bezogenen Egoismus Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen, Konflikt, Aggressivität. Die Eigenschaften, die bei unseren Vorfahren vor 200.000 Jahren selektiert wurden, da sie ihnen zu dieser Zeit nützten, waren also auf die Gruppe bezogener Egoismus und Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen. Und sehen wir uns die Welt heute an: Es hat sich nichts geändert. Es hat sich nichts geändert. Die Gruppen haben sich geändert. Nicht länger sind es Stämme, Familien oder Clans, es sind Menschengruppen, die sich um etwas wie Nation, Religion, Glaube, Kultur usw. scharen. Aber die Kämpfe gehen weiter, ich habe zwei gesehen, und der Kampf geht heute auf der ganzen Welt weiter. Die Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen ist heute immer noch sehr existent, und der auf die Gruppe bezogene Egoismus ist heute noch existent, Bankleute arbeiten für Bankleute, Wissenschaftler für Wissenschaftler und so weiter. Ich meine also nicht, dass Wissenschaftler für die Menschheit arbeiten, die, die ich kenne, sondern im Allgemeinen arbeiten wir alle für uns selbst. Und so ist der Gruppenegoismus heute immer noch aktiv, unsere Gene haben sich nicht geändert, denn in diesen 200.000 Jahren gab es für sie keinen Grund dazu. Es gab keinerlei Umstand, durch den es für sie nützlich gewesen wäre, sich zu ändern. Daher hat sich bis heute nichts geändert, und gibt es etwas, das wir tun können? Was können wir tun, um zu versuchen, diese negativen Auswirkungen natürlicher Selektion, die sich in unseren Genen eingeprägt hat, auszugleichen. Diese hässlichen Eigenschaften, die für unsere Vorfahren vorteilhaft waren, aber für uns heute abscheulich und schädlich sind. Ich glaube, die Tatsache, dass etwas mit der menschlichen Natur nicht stimmt, wurde bereits vor mehreren Tausend Jahren von jenen weisen Menschen erkannt, die die Bibel schrieben. Sie wussten natürlich nichts über Gene, über DNA, über natürliche Selektion, aber sie wussten etwas über die menschliche Natur und sie wussten etwas über Vererbung. Und so erkannten Sie, dass etwas mit der menschlichen Natur nicht stimmt, und so erfanden sie eine Erklärung. Und so erfanden sie den Garten Eden, und Adam und Eva, und die Schlange, und den Baum und den Apfel und die Sünde, die Ursünde, die für diesen Fehler in der menschlichen Natur verantwortlich ist, den sie erfanden. Und daher heißt mein neuestes Buch „Die Genetik der Ursünde“, und es ist eine Erklärung oder ein Versuch zu erklären, was das ist. Und damit komme ich zur letzten Frage: Gibt es etwas, das wir tun können? Nun, in diesem neusten Buch, Die Genetik der Ursünde, betrachte ich sieben Möglichkeiten. Sieben Szenarien für die Zukunft, und damit komme ich zum Thema meines Vortrags und ich habe noch fünf Minuten. Erstens: Nichts tun. Das ist das, was wir heute tun, beinahe nichts. Nun, wenn wir nichts tun, ist es leicht vorherzusagen, was geschehen wird, denke ich. Es wird immer schlechter werden. Es kann nur immer schlechter werden, wir überlassen der natürlichen Selektion einfach ihre hässliche Arbeit und es wird schlechter werden, und bald wird es so schlimm sein, dass Leben auf diesem Planeten äußerst schwierig wird, dass die Bedingungen für das Leben mehr und mehr bedroht und gefährdet werden, und dass wir, die menschliche Rasse sich schrittweise dem Aussterben nähert. Sie haben selbst gesehen, dass alle, die vor uns da waren, meine erste Folie, mit dem Aussterben endeten, die Neandertaler vor nur 35 000 Jahren, warum also nicht wir, warum nicht wir? Tja, das ist eine gute Frage, aber Sie müssen bedenken, dass das Aussterben von zehn Milliarden Individuen nicht dasselbe ist wie das Aussterben von 10.000 in Zentralafrika. Zehn Milliarden über die ganze Welt verteilt, das heißt, dass, bevor wir aussterben, die undenkbarsten, apokalyptischen Ereignisse stattfinden können, Feuer, Epidemien und was nicht alles. Wenn wir den Dingen ihren Lauf lassen, wird es nicht genug zu essen für Alle geben, kein Klima, das uns erhält, daher sind wir dem Untergang geweiht, wenn wir nichts dagegen tun. Zum Glück haben wir von der natürlichen Selektion ein Geschenk bekommen, das keine andere lebende Spezies besitzt. Wir von allen lebenden Organismen, die jemals auf diesem Planeten existiert haben, wir sind die Einzigen, die in der Lage sind, dank dieses Gehirns, das wir von der natürlichen Selektion erhalten haben dank dieses Gehirns haben wir die Fähigkeit erhalten, etwas zu tun, wozu die natürliche Selektion nicht in der Lage ist. Wir können einen Blick in die Zukunft werfen, wir können Annahmen treffen über das, was geschehen wird, wenn wir dies tun oder wenn wir jenes tun. Wir können Entscheidungen für die Zukunft treffen und wir können uns diesen Entscheidungen entsprechend verhalten. Daher können wir auch gegen die natürliche Selektion handeln, wir sind die einzigen lebenden Organismen auf diesem Planeten mit der Fähigkeit, gezielt, absichtlich, willentlich, bewusst gegen die natürliche Selektion zu handeln. Und daher ist dies genau das, was wir tun müssen, bevor es zu spät ist. Und daher ist das Erste, was wir tun können: unsere Gene verbessern. Wir haben schlechte Gene? OK, tun wir also, was wir mit Pflanzen und Tieren machen, entfernen wir die schlechten Gene und ersetzen sie durch gute Gene. Wir können GMOs produzieren, genetisch modifizierte Organismen, warum also nicht auch GMMs, genetisch modifizierte Menschen? Nun, technisch ist dies nicht ganz möglich, aus Gründen, auf die wir hier nicht eingehen werden, wir können das bei Tieren machen, aber bei Menschen wäre es ungleich schwieriger. Ethisch ist das natürlich etwas, das niemand heute machen möchte, und auf jeden Fall, selbst wenn es technisch und ethisch möglich wäre, wüssten wir gar nicht, was wir tun sollten. Wir wüssten ganz einfach nicht, was wir tun sollten, da wir nichts über die Zusammenhänge zwischen Genen und Fähigkeiten wissen. Wollten wir einen neuen kleinen Mozart erschaffen, wir wüssten nicht, welche Gene zu entfernen wären und welche Gene hinzuzufügen, um einen neuen Mozart zu erschaffen, oder um eine neue Venus Williams oder eine neue Angela Merkel zu erschaffen. Wir wüssten nicht, was zu tun wäre. Daher vergessen Sie es, dies ist keine Lösung. Nächste Möglichkeit: Neuverdrahtung des Gehirns. Jetzt verwende ich das Wort „Verdrahtung“, weil es ein sehr technischer Ausdruck ist, was ich meine ist Erziehung, erziehen. Denn eine Neuverdrahtung des Gehirns, ich glaube, es ist sehr wichtig darüber Bescheid zu wissen, und, wie Sie wissen, haben Neurobiologen in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten wichtige Erkenntnisse darüber gewonnen, wie das Gehirn verdrahtet ist. Uns wurde gesagt, dass, wenn wir geboren werden, nur ein kleiner Teil des Gehirns bereits verdrahtet ist, und dass die Verdrahtung unter dem Einfluss all der Stimuli, Geräusche und visuellen Stimuli und Berührung und so weiter, erfolgt. Ein Baby nimmt die Einflüsse der Umwelt auf und diese Einflüsse erzeugen Netze im Gehirn des Babys. So wird das Gehirn schon in sehr jungen Jahren verdrahtet und, wie Sie sehen, ist das wichtig für das, auf das ich hinaus will, und daher ist das, was wir brauchen, Erziehung. Insbesondere Erziehung in jungen Jahren. Und wenn wir Erziehung brauchen, bedeutet das, dass wir Erzieher brauchen. Daher lautet die Frage, wenn Sie erziehen möchten, brauchen Sie Erzieher, aber wer erzieht die Erzieher? Damit kommen wir zu einer anderen Frage: Wo finden wir die weisen Männer und Frauen, die sich der Erziehung der Erzieher widmen? Eine offensichtliche Antwort darauf ist, bei den Religionen. Die Religionen sind seit beinahe einem Jahrtausend, Jahrhunderten, stark an der Erziehung der Jugend und sogar der Erwachsenen beteiligt. Sie verfügen über ein weltumspannendes Netz aus Schulen und Gemeinden und Versammlungshallen und Kirchen, in denen sie Einfluss nehmen können. Manche Religionen, wie die katholische Religion, können eine Milliarde Menschen auf der ganzen Welt beeinflussen, sie verfügen daher über ein riesiges Potenzial oder die Macht, zu tun, was nötig ist, die Erziehung. Und genau da, Ich hoffe, Sie nehmen es mir nicht übel oder sind jetzt enttäuscht, denke ich, dass die Religionen Ihre Aufgabe nicht richtig erfüllen. Ich denke, Sie sind mehr damit beschäftigt, ihren eigenen Glauben zu verteidigen, ihre eigenen Ideologien, ihre eigenen Doktrinen, ihre eigenen Hierarchien, sie sind weit mehr mit ihrem eigenen Überleben beschäftigt als mit dem Überleben der Welt. Sie sind mehr mit glücklicher Lobbyarbeit in der nächsten Welt beschäftigt, aber nicht in dieser Welt. Und daher glaube ich, leider, ich hoffe, es wird sich etwas ändern, und es gab heute Anzeichen, dass sich etwas ändert, ich denke es muss, von Leuten wie Ihnen, ein Anstoß ausgehen, der die Hierarchie hinaufgeht, und diesen alten Männern mitteilt, dass Veränderung notwendig ist. Ich bin froh, dass Sie mir da zustimmen, zumindest einige von Ihnen. So, egal, Ich glaube, dass mit Ihnen hier und Ihren Zeitgenossen in dieser Welt, dies immer noch geschehen kann, und ich hoffe sehr, dass es geschehen wird. Mittlerweile gibt es eine andere Religion, nämlich den Schutz der Umwelt. Nun, ich glaube, das ist eine sehr wichtige Sache, wir haben gesehen, in welchem Ausmaß die Entwicklung der menschlichen Rasse die Umwelt geschädigt hat, und daher glaube ich, dieses neue Anliegen, denn dieses gab es noch nicht, als ich jung war. Dies begann kurz nach dem Krieg, diese Sorge um die Umwelt gibt es noch nicht sehr lange, und ich glaube, sie ist extrem wichtig, und wir sollten alle zu dieser Aufgabe beitragen. Aber auch hier glaube ich, die Organisationen, die versuchen, die Umwelt zu schützen, machen das nicht so, wie sie es machen sollten, manche zumindest nicht, denn sie sind zu politischen Parteien geworden. Sie verteidigen Politikstile, etwa sind sie gegen multinationale Konzerne und sie sind gegen Kapitalismus, aber wie dem auch sei, sie sind mehr zu politischen Parteien geworden als zu Umweltschutzbewegungen. Ein weiteres Problem mit den Umweltschutzbewegungen ist, dass sie zu einer Art Religion degeneriert sind, einer Art Jean-Jacques-Rousseau-Religion, die auf dem Glauben basiert, die Natur sei perfekt. Dass man in die Natur nicht eingreifen sollte, denn die Natur ist heilig, und alles, was natürlich ist, ist gut, und wir sollten uns in die Natur nicht einmischen, wir sollten uns in das Leben auf der Erde nicht einmischen und so weiter. Nun, das ist lächerlich, denn die Natur ist nicht gut, die Natur ist nicht schlecht, die Natur ist gleichgültig. Die natürliche Selektion achtet nicht auf die Eigenschaften der Organismen, denen sie gestattet, zu entstehen, sie ist blind. Sie ist passiv, die Natur sorgt gleichermaßen für den Schimmelpilz, der Penicillin hervorbringt, wie für das Virus, das HIV, AIDS, verursacht. Sie sorgt gleichermaßen für den Dichter wie für den Skorpion. Die Natur ist nicht gut, sie ist nicht schlecht, sie ist gleichgültig. Und noch mal, ich glaube, wir sollten die Umwelt schützen, aber wir sollten versuchen, diese Sorge um die Umwelt, die extrem wichtig ist, frei zu machen, wir sollten sie freimachen von ihren politischen Verwicklungen und von ihren ideologischen Verwicklungen. OK, nächstes Szenario… Erstaunlich, auch alle Männer applaudieren. Nun, Ich freue mich, es ist nicht erstaunlich, es bedeutet, dass sie intelligent sind. Gebt Frauen eine Chance, na gut, es geht hier nicht um, ich bin kein Sozialarbeiter, ich bin kein Politiker, daher vertrete ich auch nicht irgendein feministisches Programm. Was ich hier tue, ich spreche als Wissenschaftler. Bei Säugetieren sind die Weibchen weniger durch diese Ursünde verdorben, durch diesen Fehler, den ich erwähnt habe, aufgrund ihrer biologischen Natur. Sie sind weniger aggressiv, Kriege wurden überwiegend von Männern ausgefochten, nicht von Frauen. Frauen kümmern sich um die Kranken, sie kümmern sich um die Verwundeten, sie kümmern sich um die sexuellen Bedürfnisse der Soldaten, aber sie kämpfen selten, sie kämpfen selten, außer unter außergewöhnlichen Umständen. Sie sind nicht aggressiv, außer, wenn ihre Jungen bedroht werden, dann kann ein Weibchen aggressiv werden. Daher sind sie biologisch, genetisch weniger aggressiv als die Männchen. Auch üben sie sehr viel mehr Einfluss aus als die Männchen auf die Früherziehung der Jungen. Sie gebären diese Babys, das wird sich auch in naher Zukunft nicht ändern, sie gebären die Babys und sie nähren sie, sie füttern die Babys. Und so sorgen sie für die sehr frühe Erziehung der Babys und sind daher, glaube ich, biologisch besser geeignet die Welt zu führen. Leider sehen wir heutzutage – und ich gelange am Ende immer zu bedauerlichen Gegebenheiten – aber was wir in der heutigen Welt sehen ist, dass – vielleicht um die Macht zu erlangen, von der ich wünschte, dass sie sie hätten – dass sich Frauen wie Männer verhalten müssen, ob auf der politischen Bühne oder auf dem Tennisplatz und so weiter. Aber wie dem auch sei, ich glaube, es ist wichtig, Frauen eine Chance zu geben. Nun, ich sehe meinen Vorsitzenden… Sie wissen, dass danach nichts mehr kommt, daher habe ich doch zwei weitere Minuten… Sie nehmen es mir nicht übel, hoffe ich. Ich nehme niemandem die Zeit weg. OK, gut. Lassen Sie uns daher die letzte Option betrachten, die offensichtlich die wichtigste von allen ist, Bevölkerungskontrolle. Denn alles Übel, das ich erwähnt habe, hat eine einzige Ursache, es gibt einfach zu viele Menschen auf der Welt. Sie haben die Kurve gesehen, die ich gezeigt habe. Es ist atemberaubend, es ist beängstigend zu sehen, wie schnell unsere Zahl in der kurzen Zeit gestiegen ist, eine Vervierfachung, vom Jahr, in dem ich geboren wurde, bis heute. Es ist schrecklich, erschreckend. Und deshalb müssen wir etwas dagegen tun. Nun, wie Sie wissen war Thomas Malthus ein Ökonom am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts, und er hat dies vorhergesagt, er sagte, dass sich die Menschen geometrisch, exponentiell vermehren werden, die Ressourcen jedoch nur arithmetisch, linear wachsen können und dass daher der Tag kommen wird, an dem es zu viele Mäuler zu stopfen gibt im Verhältnis zur verfügbaren Nahrung. Und daher, so sagte er, gibt es nur zwei Lösungen. Zum einen, es wie die Jäger zu machen, auszumerzen, die Kranken, die Alten auszusieben, sie loszuwerden. Und die andere Möglichkeit ist zu verhindern, dass überzählige Menschen geboren werden. Also entweder aussieben oder verhindern, dass sie geboren werden. Nun, wir sind sehr gut im Aussieben, nicht die Kranken und die Alten, sondern vor allem die jungen Menschen. In den letzten beiden Kriegen, ich weiß nicht, wie viele Millionen junger Männer und Frauen ihr Leben verloren, bevor sie in der Lage waren, sich fortzupflanzen. Das war also eine eher widerliche Art zu verhindern, dass Menschen geboren werden. Dennoch ist der humanere Weg ganz offensichtlich, ihre Geburt zu verhindern, als sie nach der Geburt zu töten. Dies sollten wir daher tun, und 200 Jahre lang sagten die Leute, Malthus hätte Unrecht, denn jedes Mal, wenn Malthus’ Vorhersage kurz davor war, sich zu bewahrheiten, gab es irgendeine neue Entwicklung, Technik in der Landwirtschaft oder Ausbau der Ressourcen, und so wurde der Erde gestattet bzw. sie wurde gezwungen, mehr und mehr Individuen zu ernähren. Heute jedoch kann es niemand mehr übersehen. Heute gibt es keinen Raum mehr, wir können nicht den Mond bepflanzen oder gar den Mars, vergessen Sie so was. Wir müssen auf diesem kleinen Planeten leben und dieser kleine Planet ist zu eng geworden, oder wir sind zu viele geworden. Also müssen wir wirklich, ich denke, das ist die wichtigste Lektion daraus, müssen wir etwas gegen das Bevölkerungswachstum tun, wenn möglich durch Verhinderung, durch Geburtenkontrolle. Ich hoffe, ich habe nicht zu sehr überzogen, aber ich komme jetzt zu meinem Fazit. Ich möchte es vorlesen, denn ich möchte sichergehen, dass es klar wird. Es ist noch nicht alles verloren, aber es ist nicht mehr zu übersehen. Wenn wir nicht bald handeln, um unsere genetische Tendenz zum gruppenbezogenen Egoismus und zur Feindseligkeit zwischen den Gruppen zu überwinden, ist die Zukunft der Menschheit und eines Großteils des Lebens auf der Erde in ernster Gefahr, möglicherweise mit dem Ergebnis eines völligen Aussterbens unter Bedingungen, die man sich nur als apokalyptisch vorstellen kann. Und hiermit wende ich mich an die jungen Leute, das ist das Beste an diesen Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertreffen, und so lange ich körperlich in der Lage bin zu kommen, werde ich wiederkommen, denn hier treffen wir die jungen Leute dieser Welt. Und sie sind hier und ich möchte mich an all die jungen Leute in diesem Publikum wenden und Ihnen sagen, ich möchte Ihnen sagen: Meine Generation, unsere Generation hat ein Chaos angerichtet. Es liegt an Ihnen, es besser zu machen. Die Zukunft liegt in Ihrer Hand. Viel Erfolg. Danke, danke, vielen Dank!

Christian de Duve on how variation brings about competition.
(00:14:13 - 00:15:45)

 

Werner Arber on the elements of the microbial evolution
(00:02:20 - 00:06:24)

 

Ian Tattersall called humans “a very egotistical species”. Many of us feel that evolution progressed in a linear fashion, culminating in ourselves, whereas no such evidence exists, unless to support the current theory that many evolutionary sidelines developed and eventually disappeared. For billions of years, Earth was home to life in the form of single cells, and, as Nobel Laureate Richard Roberts explained in Lindau in 2007, most of the diversity and mass on Earth are still accounted for by microbes, which we often underestimate simply because they are too small to see:

 

Richard Roberts (2007) - Why I love microbes

Good morning everyone and welcome. Today we have three talks and then we have a round-table discussion. The first speaker is Richard Roberts from New England Biolabs. But the discovery he made in 1977 about the mosaic structure of genes was made when he was working in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York. He received the Nobel Prize 1993 for the discovery of split genes. And the title of his talk is why I love microbes, Dr. Roberts, please. Thank you. Well, what I’m going to try and do today is to give you some idea of why I find microbes absolutely fascinating. I think they have so much going for them that I would encourage all of you to perhaps think about working in this area at some point. One of the things I like about microbes is that they’re essentially very simple organisms. And it seems to me possible that if we had enough effort put into studying them, before I die we might actually understand how the very simplest microbe works. And I think all of us as biologists would like to understand how life works. We’re not going to understand how humans work in my lifetime, perhaps not in your lifetimes either. But I think we may be able to understand how a microbe works. And for me that would be a very exciting possibility. The microbes also have the great advantage, from my point of view, that most of them are undiscovered. Less than 1%, perhaps less than .1% of all the microbes on this planet have actually been discovered, characterised in the laboratory or grown in the laboratory. Most of them we can’t grow. Part of this is because many of them will only grow when there are two or three or four, all growing together. They need one another in order to be successful in life. Many of them also live in incredibly inhospitable places. And I will show you one or two of these microbes. They also have one very remarkable property. And that is that they live with us, our bodies are literally crawling with bugs of one sort and another, we have them on our skin, we have them in our mouths, we have them inside us. Everywhere you can imagine microbes live. And I will show you a little about this, too. So we’ll start off by taking a quick trip through the environment. I’ll show you one or two bugs that I find particularly interesting, and then we’ll head into the human body and human health and the kind of organisms that live with us. So if we go on to the next slide, I want to use this just to show you how microbes – and by microbes I’m talking about bacteria and archaea, and these are the three kingdoms of life, shown here. The archaea originally were thought to be bacteria, in fact they’re a completely separate kingdom of life, as shown by Carl Woese in 1977. And what this tree of life does is to try to show you how everything is related to one another in terms of its diversity. So for instance the eucarya, the large organisms that you see, plants, people, giraffes, rhinoceros, anything big, mice and so on, all of these form up here. Many of these down here, giardia and so on, are very tiny microorganisms, microscopic. And all of these other organisms, the bacteria and archaea, you can see they’re a long way away, very distantly related to us. And we sit up here, this is homo and this is maize, so we’re much more closely related to maize than many things that you might have thought of, we’re a long way away from the bacteria. But notice here the mitochondria, the red organisms, these are small organelles that live inside ourselves, that produce energy for us and these are very closely related to the bacteria. I’m showing that the human cells, the human genome has actually something that has acreated from many other different genomes over time. So most of the diversity on this earth are microbes, in fact most of the mass is on microbes. This may be hard to believe, you sort of are used to looking around and you see all this vegetable matter and lots of animal life and so on. You can easily be confused into thinking that this is most of the mass of life on this planet. It’s not, the microbes are most of the mass of life on this planet. Not just with us but in the seas, the seas are absolutely seething with microorganisms. Even if you dig three miles down into the earth you will find microorganisms, typically about 10 to the 5 to 10 to the 6 cells per gram of material, three miles down in the earth. So these things are everywhere, they’re in the Antarctic, under the ice, everywhere you can imagine. And one of the reasons that you don’t really appreciate how much there is, is because you can’t see them, these are microscopic organisms, you have to look under a microscope to find them. Now, the first slide that I’m showing here is a photosynthetic organism. And in fact this organism is rather interesting in the sense that it was the original polluter of this planet. When life first began on this planet, it began in an anaerobic environment, there was no oxygen around, most of the oxygen was wrapped up in minerals inside the rocks of this planet or in water. These organisms started doing photosynthesis, they started producing oxygen, and in fact they wiped out most of the existing life that was all anaerobic, that didn’t like all of this oxygen around. And you can see they’re very nice organisms, they form these beautiful long chains and every so often you see one of these slightly larger heterosis, very strange little form of the microorganism. And these can live anaerobically whereas the others live aerobically. If you look in soil, anywhere where there is material rotting, you will find things called myxobacteria. They look like little mushrooms, except you can only see them under the microscope. And they form these beautiful little fruiting bodies, they’re very nice little fruiting bodies. They’re essentially bacteria that are able to differentiate. They can produce different kinds, different forms of cells and different forms of acreations of cells in order to survive. These things are just all over the soil. Many of them are this beautiful orange colour, they’re very, very pretty. Sometimes you see them as films on rotting wood. But there are many, many of these things, without them we would actually probably be full of debris of one sort and another, they’re very important in terms of getting rid of waste material. Now, this organism I love, it’s an example of a spirillic bacteria, this one is called aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. And this is a guy that lives in the oceans and has within it a very interesting structure, shown here in black, that is an acreation of ion and it’s a magnet. So this organism has formed a magnet within itself and it uses this to navigate. And it swims in the direction of the earth’s field. If it’s in the northern hemisphere it likes to swim north, if it’s in the southern hemisphere it likes to swim south. And it’s also very sensitive to the force fields and so it actually swims underwater and swims away from the surface. We don’t really know why it does this, it’s just a behaviour that one can observe, there are several theories, some people think that it’s swimming to get away from predators, others think it’s swimming to get to food. But why it would use a magnet to do this is completely unknown. And there’s actually a whole bunch of organisms, some 40 or 50 different species of organisms are now known that can do this same sort of thing, they have little magnets in them for devising, for getting around. This is something else in the ocean, beautiful tube worm. These things live on these deep sea vents, you know underneath the oceans there are many volcanoes, many hot vents in which we have magma and other materials spewing out of the earth and sometimes these are called ‘deep smokers’, ‘dark smokers’. They were discovered about the mid 1970’s by deep diving oceanographic vessels, mainly from Woods Hole. And these things have magma, they have steam coming out at incredibly high temperatures, anything up to 1,000° centigrade. And this is right in the middle of the deep ocean very often and so you have these great thermal changes that take place from the deep vents with material at 1,000° out into the ocean which is typically about four or five° centigrade and so you get a big thermocline develops. And it turns out that there are many organisms that like to live in this zone between the actual vent and the ocean and where temperatures vary from anywhere from 100°, suddenly coming down to 5°, and there are not only many bacteria and archaea that live there, typically the archaea love to live in these kinds of environments, but there are also eukaryotes. And one of the eukaryotes is this tube worm. So this is actually a worm, this is the sheath of the worm and this is the plume. And the centre of this worm is actually a massive bacteria. In fact without the bacteria the worm couldn’t exist. So the bacteria are busy taking advantage of all of the minerals and all of the energy that is coming out of this deep vent and using it to manufacture materials that then keep the worm going. So very bizarre, and you find these everywhere. So let us say, you know, you might have imagined one of these things could have arisen in one particular vent, they then spread everywhere. Wherever these things occur in the oceans, you find these tube worms and you find these beautiful bacteria that live within them. Now, when we go to Yellowstone National Park - and there are many parks like this but I’ve not been to one that’s quite as nice as Yellowstone - this is where I do my little tourist bit, I think if ever you get the chance to go to Yellowstone National Park, you should. It’s just an amazing place, it’s a volcanic caldera where there are many hot springs, many geysers, the ground in general is extremely hot in many parts of Yellowstone still. And there are wonderful examples of bacteria and archaea that live there. And when you look around some of these thermal pools, so here’s a thermal pool and here’s some hot water that’s running down into it, you see lots of these phototrophic organisms that are living here. They show up with these beautiful colours, they form bacterial films. If you look down through these films you discover that at the very top there are organisms that are using one wavelength of light in order to do photosynthesis and get energy. And as you go down you have bacteria that are using whatever light is left. And so by the time you get down really only a few centimetres and there is no light then penetrating, because it’s all been used up by the bacteria that have developed to take advantage of it. And they form just these beautiful colours all the way around these pools and they’re all films of bacteria. This is where for instance the enzyme Taq polymerase from thermos aquaticus came from. A man called Brock, a very famous microbiologist first found this organism at Yellowstone, and this is in fact the place where we’re now able to do PCR and all these other wonderful things, because of the organism that came out of this hot spring. Typically organisms here live anywhere between 80° and 100° centigrade, imagine at 100°C, normally your DNA is completely denatured. But these organisms have found ways to keep the DNA strands apart. Now, another nice thing you see in Yellowstone are these beautiful sulphur springs. This yellow colour here is all elemental sulphur and it’s caused from this archael organism, sulfolobus and sulfotaracus, which is able to take advantage of the hydrogen sulphide that is coming out of this spring. And they can then oxidise that, produce sulphur and in the process gain enough energy to live. Wonderful organisms, many, many examples of this when we look around. Now, I want to move away from the environment at large and talk about our local environment. Talk about humans and the bacteria that live with us. We often are not completely aware of all the bacteria that live with us until we get sick. Many of us, you know, we come down, we have a nasty infection that’s caused by a staphylococcus perhaps. When I was a child, before there were antibiotics, every time I would get a cut on my leg it would always get infected and turn yellow and nasty, absolutely awful. And now of course you can treat all of that with antibiotics, although we probably use antibiotics more than we should. But there are many, many things that come along and cause us problems and I will take you through and talk to you about one or two of these organisms that cause problems. Because even when they cause problems, they’re still extremely interesting organisms, they have wonderful lifestyles, they’re able to do all sorts of interesting things. And there are also many organisms that live with us that are completely harmless. And in fact others that are very, very good for us, things that we call probiotics and I will finish by talking about those. But I wanted first just to talk a little bit about the cells that we have, and to compare humans with the bacteria. So in a typical human there are about 10 to the 13 cells, that is human cells, and there are about 10 to the 14 bacteria. So there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in a typical human as there are human cells. The number of different strains in humans is 1, in bacteria I’d put this down as greater than 400. In fact the bottom line is we really don’t know in any great detail just how many different kinds of bacteria there are living with us. And there are several projects underway at the moment to actually look at all of the bacterial genomes that are associated with humans. People are going around taking samples of skin, taking samples from the mouth, from the stomach and so on to try to get a feel for just how many strains there are. And I think this could easily be actually 10 times as many as this, there could easily be 4,000, and we really wouldn’t know at the present time. Most of these organisms we can’t grow, the only reason we know they’re there is because we can study their DNA, we can look at their ribosomal content, the ribosomal DNA content and get some idea of just what the diversity is. But it really is quite immense, these things are everywhere. If you look at the number of DNA basis - in a typical human cell there are about three billion – if you tot up all of the DNA basis, the individual genes, the individual sequences in these various strains of bacteria, we’re talking about maybe a third as many DNA basis, but that equates to many more genes. So these three types 10 to the 9 DNA basis in a human cell, the estimate is 30,000 genes, maybe that’s down to 25,000, it seems to be going down all the time, the number of human genes we have. And the bacterial genes are probably going up and up and up. And so there are many more bacterial genes that are associated with our bodies than there are human genes. That's something also to think about. The bacterial population is very, very much greater than ours in terms of its diversity. Just to give you some idea of where you typically find large numbers of organisms. On skin you have staphylococci, there’s a lovely organism called staphylococcus epidermidis, I sometimes show a slide of this thing, this organism lives inside the pores inside your skin and it’s essentially impervious to anything we do. You can wash your hands and your arms all day and these organisms don’t mind at all because the soap really just never gets to them. They’ve found some very good ways to hide. There are corynebacterium, lots of different species here, I don’t propose to go through them all. In our mouths we have a very interesting set of organisms. About 1 in 10 of all of the organisms that we can recognise as living in our mouths have we ever been able to grow or even just to identify in any reasonable way. Most of the organisms we don’t know what they do, we don’t know why they’re there, and we have very little knowledge of them. In the respiratory tract all sorts of organisms, too, the gastrointestinal tract and the urogenital tract. And of course, here you have lots of organisms that can cause problems. And many of these organisms are pathogens, but many of them are not. And in fact, even the ones that are pathogenic in some ways are a little beneficial, because some of the organisms that we have, that are actually good for us, are producing compounds that keep these pathogenic organisms at bay. There’s a constant fight between microorganisms and they all want to live in this little niche. And so many of the organisms that are actually rather good for us are producing compounds to keep these pathogens at bay, which is a good thing. Now, I love to show this slide, it shows exactly what happens when you sneeze without stifling it. And this is the way that an awful lot of these pathogenic organisms like to get around. They like to live in the nasal passages, in the throat and in the mouth and so on. And so this is the kind of aerosol that is produced every time that you sneeze. And of course these have microorganisms in and they’re spreading around all the time. Of course tuberculosis, you probably heard about the recent scare in the US, tuberculosis gets around this way and is in fact an incredibly dangerous organism in terms of its ability to pass from one human to another, very, very infectious nasty agent. Now, the history of disease kind of goes back to 1877 and in fact it was anthrax that was the very first organism that was shown definitively to be the producer of a disease. This was shown by the great microbiologist Robert Koch. He then went on and found a whole bunch of other things, came up with the rules that determine whether or not we could declare that something was the causative agent. And coming down here, you’ll see all sorts of really nasty diseases and that are caused by these microorganisms. One or two of these I will tell you something more about. But there’s been a long history of this and it’s obviously been something that microbiologists have been very keen to look at, and one would always like to know what are the organisms that are causing disease. And of course then how to deal with them, how can we stop them. Now, one organism that I like to talk about quite a lot is helicobacter pylori, this is an organism that lives in your stomach, lives at extremely low pH, it lives in the lining of the stomach, in the endothelium. Two years ago this organism was the subject of the Nobel prize in medicine when it was awarded to Marshall and Warren who were the first people to show that this organism was in fact the cause of ulcers. Prior to that the pharmaceutical companies thought that all you needed to do if you had an ulcer was to take an antacid, this would solve the problem of the acid that was present in the stomach but it did absolutely no good at all for the cause of the disease. And Barry Marshall did the classic experiment that many doctors like to do, he was convinced that this was the source of the infection, it was the cause of ulcers and so he grew some in the lab and drank it. And sure enough, within a few days, he came down with an ulcer and fortunately the helicobacter that he drank was susceptible to antibiotics and he was able to cure himself very rapidly. And in fact you can cure most causes of ulcers through helicobacter pylori just by taking antibiotics, of course the pharmaceutical industry didn’t like that very much because the sales of antacids went way down. But nevertheless this is the cause. And this is an actual helicobacter pylori here, this is the bacterial cell adhering to one of these epithelial cells lining the stomach. And you can see it causes a very close interaction. And in fact it is known that helicobacter pylori can cause cancer, it causes stomach cancer and it can also cause oesophageal cancer if you have acid reflux disease, we don’t know how this happens but the evidence is very strong that it can do that. Now, most of us who live in the western world no longer have a lot of helicobacter pylori in our stomachs. If you live in the developing world almost everybody is infected, you pick it up at a very early age. But in the western world we take so many antibiotics that we’ve usually killed off this population. And a man called Martin Blaser at New York medical school has recently been looking at this organism and finds a very strong correlation between whether you have a helicobacter pylori infection and whether you’re susceptible to asthma. And it turns out that if you have a very high concentration of helicobacter pylori, a good infection going, you almost never get asthma. And as the amounts of helicobacter go down in the population, up goes the rates of asthma. He believes there’s a causal connection here, it’s still too early to know for sure, but it does point out the fact that there are many bacteria who live within us, that we indiscriminately get rid of by the poor use of antibiotics, and when we do that there may well be all sorts of unintended consequences. I show this one, this is a very nice organism, just a beautiful slide, it’s one of these spirillum organisms, it’s called borrelia, it’s the cause of lyme disease. Vibrio cholerae causes the disease we know as cholera. However, vibrio cholerae is really interesting, it’s a small microorganism that lives in conjunction with a large eukaryotic organism called volvox. And it actually sits on the surface of the volvox to a point where if you have a cholera infection going, and you believe the water is contaminated, merely by filtering the water through something like a very fine thread, something like a sari, you can actually get rid of most of the vibrio organisms in the water. Very simple public health measure can be useful here. This is another spirillum and this time treponema that causes periodontal disease. Yersinia pestis is the cause of plague, this was the organism that caused the Black Death in Europe, that decimated the population of Europe in the Middle Ages. I always like to show the next slide, this is one of the little bubos that is produced by this organism. And when you get a really good infection going, then you get a very severe gangrene in the fingers, in the toes and thorax. By the time you reach this stage, there’s almost nothing can be done about it. But if you catch it early it’s very susceptible to antibiotic treatment. And I want to close just by talking a little about lactobacillus sake, lactobacillus is one of these organisms that we think of as a probiotic. They’re very good for you and this organism you get in yoghurt, wonderful thing to eat lots and lots of yoghurt if you like it. I personally don’t like it but I would recommend it to all of you. These organisms produce compounds that will keep many of the pathogenic organisms at bay. There are many other such organisms that do this, bifidobacterium is another one that you sometimes find in yoghurt, but there are really lots and lots of wonderful microorganisms that do in fact do wonders for you, you want them in your bodies, you want them around because they’re keeping the pathogens at bay. And I want to close just by asking you to think about something I find quite remarkable. So here we are, we’re humans, we’re walking around, we’re absolutely full of bacteria, they’re living all over the place, they make a very nice living with us. When we evolve, as humans evolve, so the bacterial populations evolve, too. The two are really in a tremendous symbiosis, we’re both evolving together. And it’s rather easy to think that perhaps humans were invented by bacteria in order to provide a nice place to live. Thank you very much. Thank you very much, you did very well on time, so we have time for questions. Are there any questions here? QUESTION. I think nowadays lots of people use antibiotics and I think it’s maybe a damage to our human flora of microorganism. Do you think it’s quite a severe problem we use too many antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yes, so antibiotics, you know, they really are the wonder drug, they were the wonder drug when they came along and we very much abuse them. We feed them to cattle and so they get into meat, they get into our food supply. Certainly in the western world the slightest hint of an infection, whether it’s a viral infection, for which antibiotics will do no good at all, or whether it’s a bacterial infection where they will work, we use way, way too many. And that is really clear, if you look at tuberculosis as one of the best examples of this. When I was a kid, tuberculosis was a major problem, if you had tuberculosis, in England you were put into a sanatorium, you were separated from the rest of the population to stop it spread. Along came antibiotics, we could cure microbacterium tuberculosis and so everybody stopped worrying about it, now we’ve reached a point where the microbacterium many, many strains of microbacterium are drug resistant and god forbid you should ever go to prison in Russia, but if you do, the odds are you’ll come out of prison with a nasty tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis kills more than a million people a year around the world and the US government in its wisdom stopped funding research on microbacterium many, many years ago. They’ve only just started putting more money into it and we have a major problem again with tuberculosis. And so, yes, we’ve done a terrible job of actually handling the antibiotics that we had. And there are very few new ones, sort of new forms of antibiotics in the pipelines. There are a few beginning to appear now, but we’ve gone through a long period of neglect. QUESTION. I’m a medical doctor from Pakistan, I was fascinated when I found that intravesical tuberculosis therapy was being used for bladder cancer. And when I looked at the literature, I found that many viruses are being used as anti-tumour agents, do you think that this is a promising area of microbes being used to treat cancers? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yeah, so the question here relates to the use of microbes and viruses in order to treat cancer, and I’m afraid I don’t know anything about that. I’m completely ignorant on that front. I know about bacteria phages being used to treat bacterial infections. This is something that was taking place in Russia for a long, long time. But I know nothing about using microorganisms to treat cancer. So maybe we can talk about that afterwards, because I would love to hear some more about that. QUESTION. I just wanted to know, a lot of companies are selling now changed food with probiotics, is there really any evidence that it is much better for us to buy this more expensive food. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, I think it’s really hard to know. The problem with health supplements, health food supplements is they’re not well regulated and so it’s an obvious market for any charlatan to come along and try to sell you snake oil. I think for some of the probiotics, when they tell you exactly what is in there, and especially if they have lactobacillus or if they have bifidobacterium in there, there’s a good chance that they will be useful. But I think equally there are many things on the market that one would do best to avoid. I think if you really want to go the probiotic route, I would absolutely recommend yoghurt as the way to go. Yoghurt is very wonderful for you, just doesn’t taste good. QUESTION. You talked about co-evolution of bacteria with human being, so like in case of h pylori, it is in developing countries, as you said, that in developing countries most of the people are infected with the bacterium. But there is no disease outcome in most of the persons. So what do you think, is it a pathogen or is it a symbiont? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, so the question relates to helicobacter pylori. And the fact that most people in developing countries have infections with helicobacter pylori, most of the infections are relatively low-level, so you have the organism but you don’t have any serious disease associated with it. We don’t really know why you suddenly get a disease associated with helicobacter. In the western world it may be related to diet, it may be related to other organisms that come along. The incidence of stomach cancer caused by helicobacter pylori are very low in the developing world, although there are a few cases from time to time, much higher elsewhere. But I think the real problem is that, as soon as you go from one population to another, the whole microbiome, the whole set of microbes that are living with you are different. And so one has to think about not just the helicobacter pylori but all the other organisms that you typically find. And many of these you simply don’t find in the western world. And so we have a long way to go. You know, when you recognise that most of the organisms living with us we don’t know what they are, we don’t know what they do, it becomes very easy to make hypothesis and much more difficult to test them, because these are very complicated biota, very complicated environments in which these organisms are living. QUESTION. My question is how we can fight the multiple drug resistance problem. Do you think we need to find a perpetual target so that in future we don’t have to look for new antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, well, I think the whole question about multiple drug resistance means that we do have to find new drugs and typically new drugs do not necessarily mean new targets, sometimes they do, but different classes of compounds that are able to go after a known target but in some different way. So for instance, if you imagine you’ve got a protein that is really key to the bacterium, you find a drug that will bind at this point and inhibit it, and so there will be aminoacid changes at the point of interaction. If you find a different drug that will hit the molecule at some different point in the sequence, then these mutations won’t affect it and in order for the organism then to become resistant, it has to make mutations at a different point. And we know that some of the new drugs that are in the pipelines just have very different chemical structures from the ones that we’ve already been using as antibiotics. In some case there are new targets. And the nice thing about all of the genome sequencing of bacteria that’s taken place over the last few years, and we have the genomes now for about 500 organisms, there are about another 2,000 or 3,000 that are on the way, is that there are lots and lots of targets, potential targets that you can find. So I think there’s no shortage of sort of good targets that one might go after for bacteria, but there is a shortage of effort to go looking for antibiotics. You know, in general the drug companies are not very keen on looking for antibiotics because they have the disadvantage that they cure the disease and so there’s only a small amount of profit for them to make. The drug companies would much prefer to have something that alleviates the symptoms, that you have to take for the rest of your life and then you have a very nice profit margin. QUESTION. Do you believe that with the changing behaviour of human beings, the pathogenicity of bacteria or any other microbes has either evolved or has even gone down, besides the antibiotic resistance. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, you know, we’re in a constant fight between the pathogens that would like to live on us and cause trouble and our ability to defend against them. And this is not something that is ever going to go away, you're going to continue to have this evolution, there will constantly be new pathogens, there will constantly be a need for us to be vigilant, to find ways of dealing with them. The bacteria have the advantage they in general can evolve very much faster than we are able to evolve. You know, if you’ve got a 30 minute lifetime, double in 30 minutes, we typically double in, even in the most favourable situations, every 14 years, chances of making mutations to accommodate diseases are very much in the favour of the bacteria. Fortunately our immune system is able to deal with some of these things more effectively, but there will always be this arms race between the pathogen and the host. It’s just one of these things, it’s going to happen. There will fortunately always be a need for microbiologists and for chemists and for scientists to work in this area and find new antibiotics and find better ways to deal with disease. QUESTION. Professor, don’t you think that some of the normal organism, for instance which live in the oral cavity, when there are lowered immunity states, they become pathogens. So why do you think that happens and how can antibiotics sort of overcome that or play a role in that. RICHARD ROBERTS. So the question really is, when we’re in a state of lower immune resistance to things, does this allow pathogens to become much more pathogenic if you like. And the answer is that whenever an organism becomes pathogenic, it just means that it’s able to grow and you can make lots of it. Provided you just have low levels of a pathogen, typically they don’t cause problems. This is why you can sit next to someone who has influenza or tuberculosis, provided you don’t get a significant dose of it, then your own immune system is typically able to take care of it. And so it’s really usually a question of the quantity of the organism that is produced. If you just keep it at very low levels, it’s not pathogenic, you don’t have any severe symptoms. On the other hand, if it grows to large levels because it’s not being contained, then you can get all of the symptoms of pathogenicity. And very often what happens is that as soon as you reach this critical point where you’re making a lot of the organism, it’s dividing rapidly. That will then compromise the body’s ability to mount an effective immune response. And this is what happens in the case of say cholera for instance. So low levels of vibrio cholerae are fine, but as soon as the organism starts to divide, the body just can’t keep track of it and can’t keep pace with it, our immune system is not good enough to hold really large quantities of the organism. Once again, thank you Richard for this wonderful exposé.

Guten Morgen allerseits und willkommen. Heute werden wir drei Vorträge hören, und anschließend gibt es eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Unser erster Sprecher ist Richard Roberts von den New England Biolabs. Die Entdeckung, die er 1977 über die Mosaikstruktur der Gene machte, gelang ihm jedoch, als er an den Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York, arbeitete. Der Titel seines Vortrags lautet: Dr. Roberts, Sie haben das Wort. Vielen Dank. Nun, was ich heute zu tun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon zu geben, warum ich Mikroben absolut faszinierend finde. Ich denke, dass sie so interessant sind, dass ich alle von Ihnen ermutigen möchte, sich zu überlegen, in diesem Fachgebiet einmal zu forschen. Eine Sache, die mir an Mikroben gefällt, ist, dass es im Wesentlichen sehr einfache Organismen sind. Und es scheint mir möglich, dass wir - vorausgesetzt wir investieren in ihr Studium genug Energie – noch zu meinen Lebzeiten verstehen könnten, wie der einfachste Mikroorganismus funktioniert. Ich nehme an, dass wir als Biologen alle verstehen möchten, wie das Leben funktioniert. Wir werden zu meinen Lebzeiten nicht verstehen, wie der Mensch funktioniert, vielleicht auch nicht zu Ihren Lebzeiten. Doch ich denke, dass wir vielleicht verstehen könnten, wie Mikroben funktionieren. Für mich wäre das eine faszinierende Möglichkeit. Die Mikroben haben aus meiner Sicht den unschätzbaren Vorteil, dass die meisten von ihnen unentdeckt sind. Weniger als 1 %, vielleicht sogar weniger als 0,1 %, aller Mikroben auf diesem Planeten wurden bisher entdeckt, im Labor beschrieben und vermehrt. Die meisten Mikroben können wir nicht züchten. Ein Grund hierfür ist, dass viele von ihnen nur wachsen, wenn zwei oder drei oder vier von ihnen gemeinsam wachsen. Sie brauchen sich gegenseitig, um im Leben erfolgreich sein zu können. Viele von ihnen leben außerdem unter äußerst unwirtlichen Umständen. Ein oder zwei dieser Mikroorganismen werde ich Ihnen vorstellen. Darüber hinaus verfügen sie über eine bemerkenswerte Eigenschaft. Sie besteht darin, dass sie in uns leben: Unsere Körper sind im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes voller Mikroorganismen dieser oder jener Art. Sie leben auf unserer Haut, in unserem Mund, im Inneren unserer Körper. Wo immer Sie es sich vorstellen: Mikroorganismen leben dort. Und auch hierüber werde ich Ihnen etwas zeigen. Lassen Sie uns also mit einer kurzen Reise durch die Umwelt beginnen. Ich stelle Ihnen ein oder zwei Mikroben vor, die ich besonders interessant finde. Anschließend sprechen wir über den menschlichen Körper und seine Gesundheit und über die Art der Organismen, die in uns leben. Gehen wir also zum nächsten Dia. Ich möchte Ihnen dies zeigen, nur um Ihnen zu erklären, wie Mikroben…. Und unter Mikroben verstehe ich Bakterien und Archaeen, und dies hier sind die drei Reiche des Lebens. Ursprünglich nahm man an, dass es sich bei den Archaeen um Bakterien handelt, tatsächlich machen sie jedoch ein eigenes Reich des Lebens aus, wie von Carl Woese 1977 gezeigt wurde. Was dieser Baum des Lebens Ihnen zeigen soll, ist, wie hinsichtlich seiner Diversität alles miteinander verwandt ist. Die Eukaryoten, die großen Organismen, die Sie sehen Viele von diesen hier unten, Giardien usw., sind winzige Mikroorganismen, mikroskopisch kleine. Und alle diese anderen Organismen, die Bakterien und Archaeen sind, wie sie sehen, sehr weit weg. Sie sind nur entfernt mit uns verwandt. Und wir sitzen hier oben. Dies ist Homo und dies ist der Mais. Wir sind also mit dem Mais wesentlich enger verwandt als mit vielen anderen Organismen, von denen Sie das gedacht hätten. Wir sind von den Bakterien weit entfernt. Doch beachten Sie die Mitochondrien hier, die roten Organismen. Hierbei handelt es sich um kleine Organellen, die in uns leben, die Energie für uns produzieren und die sehr eng mit den Bakterien verwandt sind. Ich zeige Ihnen damit, dass die menschlichen Zellen, das menschliche Genom tatsächlich etwas enthält, was uns aus vielen verschiedenen Genomen im Laufe der Zeit zugewachsen ist. Der größte Teil der Vielfalt auf dieser Erde besteht aus Mikroben. Der größte Teil der Biomasse besteht aus Bakterien. Dies mag nur schwer zu glauben sein. Man ist gewissermaßen daran gewöhnt sich umzuschauen und das pflanzliche Leben und jede Menge Tiere zu sehen usw. Man kann sehr leicht zum dem irrigen Schluss gelangen, dass diese Organismen den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten ausmachen. Doch dies ist nicht der Fall. Den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten stellen die Mikroben dar. Nicht nur in uns, sondern auch in den Meeren. Die Meere schäumen von Mikroorganismen geradezu über. Selbst wenn Sie 5 Kilometer in die Erde graben, finden Sie Mikroorganismen, typischerweise 10 hoch 5 bis 10 hoch 6 pro Gramm des Erdmaterials, 5 Kilometer unter der Erde. Diese Wesen sind also überall: Sie sind in der Antarktis, unter dem Eis: an jedem Ort, den Sie sich vorstellen können. Und einer der Gründe, weshalb Sie sich nicht wirklich vorstellen können, wie viele Mikroorganismen es gibt, ist ihre Unsichtbarkeit. Es handelt sich bei ihnen um mikroskopisch kleine Organismen. Man muss durch ein Mikroskop schauen, um sie zu entdecken. Das erste Dia, das ich Ihnen hier zeige, ist ein Photosynthese treibender Organismus. Tatsächlich ist dieser Organismus insofern recht interessant, als er der erste Umweltverschmutzer auf diesem Planeten war. Als das Leben auf diesem Planeten entstand, begann es in einer anaeroben Umgebung. Es gab keinen Sauerstoff. Der meiste Sauerstoff lag in Mineralien im Inneren dieses Planeten oder im Wasser gebunden vor. Diese Organismen begannen damit, Photosynthese zu treiben. Sie begannen, Sauerstoff zu produzieren, und tatsächlich vernichteten sie den größten Teil der Lebewesen, die anaerob waren und die diesen freien Sauerstoff gar nicht mochten. Wie Sie sehen, sind es sehr schöne Organismen. Sie bilden diese schönen langen Ketten, und hin und wieder sehen Sie eine etwas größere Heterosis, eine sehr merkwürdige kleine Form dieses Organismus. Sie kann anaerob leben, während die andere Form aerob lebt. Wenn man das Erdreich untersucht, findet man überall, wo Stoffe verwesen, sogenannte Myxobakterien. Sie sehen aus wie kleine Pilze, nur dass man sie ohne Mikroskop nicht sehen kann, und sie bilden diese wunderschönen kleinen Fruchtkörper. Es sind sehr schöne kleine Fruchtkörper. Es sind im Wesentlichen Bakterien, die sich differenzieren können. Um zu überleben, können sie verschiedene Arten von Zellen und verschiedene Formen von Zusammenschlüssen von Zellen hervorbringen. Diese Organismen befinden sich überall im Boden. Viele von ihnen haben diese schöne orangene Farbe. Sie sind sehr, sehr schön. Manchmal sehen Sie sie als einen Film auf faulendem Holz. Es gibt sehr, sehr viele dieser Bakterien: Ohne sie wären wir wahrscheinlich voller Abfallstoffe irgendwelcher Art. Sie sind äußerst wichtig zur Beseitigung von Abfallmaterial. Diesen Organismus hier liebe ich: Er ist ein Beispiel für ein Spirillenbakterium. Er hat den Namen aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. Dieses Lebewesen existiert in den Weltmeeren. Es zeichnet sich durch eine sehr interessante Struktur aus, die hier in Schwarz dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um eine Anlagerung (Akkretion) von Eisen, und sie ist magnetisch. Dieser Organismus hat also in seinem Inneren einen Magneten gebildet, und er verwendet ihn zur räumlichen Orientierung. Er schwimmt in der Richtung des Magnetfelds der Erde. Wenn er sich auf der nördlichen Hemisphäre befindet, schwimmt er gerne nach Norden, befindet er sich auf der südlichen Hemisphäre, schwimmt er vorzugsweise nach Süden. Außerdem ist er sehr sensibel für das Gravitationsfeld, so dass er von der Wasseroberfläche nach unten schwimmt. Wir verstehen nicht wirklich, warum er dies tut. Es ist einfach ein Verhalten, das sich beobachten lässt. Es gibt verschieden Theorien hierüber. Einige Leute meinen, dass die Bakterien vor Feinden davon schwimmen, andere, dass sie zu ihrer Nahrungsquelle schwimmen. Doch warum das Bakterium einen Magneten hierfür verwenden sollte, ist vollkommen ungeklärt. Tatsächlich gibt es eine ganze Reihe von Organismen, man kennt 40 bis 50 verschiedene Arten, die dies tun können. Sie verfügen über kleine Magneten in ihrem Inneren, mit deren Hilfe sie sich orientieren. Dies ist ein weiterer Bewohner des Ozeans: ein wunderschöner Kalkröhrenwurm. Diese Wesen leben auf diesen Tiefseeschloten. Wie Sie wissen, befinden sich auf dem Grund der Ozeane zahlreiche Vulkane, viele Vulkane, in denen wir Magma und andere Materialien finden, die die Erde ausspuckt. Manchmal werden sie auch als „Schwarze Raucher“ bezeichnet. Sie wurden um die Mitte der 1970er Jahre von ozeanographischen Tiefsee-U-Booten entdeckt, in der Hauptsache von Woods Hole. Und diese Schlote enthalten Magma. Dampf mit ungeheuer hohen Temperaturen kommt aus ihnen heraus, mit bis zu 1000°C. Dies spielt sich an zahlreichen Stellen mitten im tiefen Ozean ab, so dass sich diese großen Temperaturgefälle entwickeln: zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem Material mit einer Temperatur von 1000°C, das sie abgeben, und dem Ozean, der dort normalerweise eine Temperatur von 4°C oder 5°C hat. Und wie man festgestellt hat, gibt es viele derartige Organismen, die bevorzugt in dieser Zone zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem umgebenden Ozean leben, wo die Temperaturen von um die 100°C bis plötzlich herab auf 5°C liegen. Dort leben zahlreiche Bakterien und Archaeen. Besonders die Archaeen lieben diese Umgebung, doch es gibt hier auch Eukaryoten. Und einer dieser Eukaryoten ist dieser Kalkröhrenwurm. Dies ist tatsächlich ein Wurm: Dies ist die Schutzumhüllung des Wurms und dies ist die fedrige Plume. In der Mitte dieses Wurms befindet sich ein riesengroßes Bakterium. Ohne das Bakterium könnte der Wurm nicht existieren. Das Bakterium nutzt all die Mineralien und die Energie, die aus diesen tiefen Schloten kommt, und verwendet sie zur Herstellung von Stoffen, die den Wurm am Leben erhalten. Das ist so bizarr. Man findet diese Würmer überall. Sagen wir also, man hätte sich vorstellen können, dass diese Wesen in einem bestimmten Schwarzen Raucher entstanden sind und sich von dort aus ausgebreitet haben. Wo immer diese Schlote im Ozean zu finden sind, begegnet man diesen Kalkröhrenwürmern und findet man diese wunderschönen Bakterien, die in ihrem Inneren leben. Nun, wenn wir zum Yellowstone Nationalpark gehen – es gibt viele solcher Parks, doch bin noch in keinem gewesen, der so schön ist wie der Yellowstone –, dies ist meine touristische Werbung: Wenn Sie jemals die Gelegenheit bekommen, den Yellowstone Nationalpark zu besuchen, dann sollten Sie dies tun. Es ist einfach ein fantastischer Ort. Es ist eine vulkanische Caldera und es gibt dort zahlreiche heiße Quellen und viele Geysire. Der Boden ist an vielen Stellen des Yellowstone Nationalpark noch immer extrem heiß. Und es gibt wunderbare Beispiele von Bakterien und Archaeen, die dort leben. Sehen wir uns einige dieser warmen Teiche und Wasseransammlungen genauer an: Hier ist ein warmer Tümpel, und hier ist etwas heißes Wasser, das in ihn hineinfließt. Man findet hier jede Menge dieser phototropen Organismen, die dort leben. Man erkennt sie an diesen wunderschönen Farben. Sie bilden Bakterienfilme. Wenn man sich den Querschnitt dieser Filme ansieht, stellt man fest, dass sich an ihrem oberen Rand Organismen befinden, die eine bestimmte Wellenlänge des Lichts verwenden, um Photosynthese zu betreiben und Energie zu erzeugen. Und unterhalb dieser oberen Schicht findet man Bakterien, die das restliche Licht nutzen. Und wenn man nur wenige Zentimeter unter die Oberfläche geht, gelangt kein Licht mehr dorthin, da alles Licht bereits von den Bakterien aufgebraucht wurde, die sich entwickelt haben, um es zu nutzen. Sie bilden alle rund um diese Wasseransammlungen diese wunderschönen Farben aus, und es sind alles Bakterienfilme. Dies ist auch beispielsweise der Ursprung des Enzyms Taq-Polymerase von Thermos aquaticus. Ein Mann namens Brock, ein sehr berühmter Mikrobiologe, entdeckte diesen Organismus in Yellowstone. Tatsächlich ist dies der Ort, an dem wir heute Polymerase-Kettenreaktionen (PCR) und alle diese wunderbaren Dinge durchführen können: aufgrund des Organismus, der aus dieser heißen Quelle kam. Normalerweise leben Organismen hier zwischen 80°C und 100°C. Stellen Sie sich das vor: bei 100°C. Normalerweise ist Ihre DNA bei dieser Temperatur völlig denaturiert. Doch diese Organismen haben Wege gefunden, die DNA-Stränge getrennt zu halten. Ein weiteres schönes Phänomen, dem Sie im Yellowstone-Nationalpark begegnen können, sind diese schönen Schwefelquellen. Diese gelbe Farbe hier ist ein Hinweis auf das Element Schwefel in reiner Form. Es wird von diesen archaischen Organismen, Sulfolobus und Sulfotaracus, produziert, die den Schwefelwasserstoff nutzen können, der aus dieser Quelle kommt. Und sie können ihn dann oxydieren, dadurch Schwefel erzeugen und auf diese Weise genug Energie gewinnen, um sich am Leben zu erhalten. Wundervolle Organismen, viele, viele Beispiele dafür, wenn wir uns umschauen. Nun möchte ich statt über die Umwelt im Allgemeinen über unsere „örtliche“ Umwelt reden: über uns Menschen und die Bakterien, die in uns leben. Wir sind uns häufig nicht all der Bakterien bewusst, die in uns leben – bis wir krank werden. Viele von uns erkranken an einer schlimmen Infektion, die vielleicht von einem Staphylococcus ausgelöst wird. Als ich ein Kind war, bevor es Antibiotika gab, bekam ich jedes Mal, wenn ich mich am Bein schnitt, eine böse, eitrige Infektion. Furchtbar war das. Heute kann man all das mit Antibiotika behandeln, obwohl wir Antibiotika wahrscheinlich häufiger einsetzen, als wir dies tun sollten. Doch es gibt viele, viele Organismen, denen wir begegnen und die uns keine Probleme bereiten. Ich werde Ihnen ein oder zwei von ihnen vorstellen, die für uns problematisch sind. Denn obwohl sie Probleme verursachen, sind es dennoch höchst interessante Organismen. Sie haben wunderbare „Lifestyles“: Sie können alle möglichen interessanten Dinge tun. Und es gibt so viele in uns lebende Organismen die vollkommen harmlos sind. Tatsächlich sind andere sehr, sehr gut für uns. Sie werden als Probiotika bezeichnet, und ich werde gegen Ende meines Vortrags über sie sprechen. Vorher möchte ich jedoch ein wenig über die Zellen reden, aus denen wir bestehen, und den Menschen mit den Bakterien vergleichen. Normalerweise besteht ein Mensch aus 10 hoch 13 Zellen, d. h. menschlichen Zellen, und außerdem aus 10 hoch 14 Bakterien. Im Körper des Menschen befinden sich also 10mal so viele Bakterien wie körpereigene Zellen. Die Zahl der Stämme des Menschen beträgt 1, bei den Bakterien würde ich eine Zahl von über 400 annehmen. Tatsächlich wissen wir unter dem Strich wirklich nichts Genaueres darüber, wie viele verschiedene Arten von Bakterien in uns leben. Gegenwärtig gibt es eine Reihe von Forschungsprojekten, die die Genome sämtlicher Bakterien untersuchen, die mit dem Menschen verbunden sind. Man untersucht Proben der Haut, aus dem Mund, dem Magen usw., um ein Gefühl dafür zu bekommen, genau wieviele Stämme es gibt. Ich bin der Meinung, dass es sehr leicht 10mal so viele sein könnten, es könnten leicht 4000 sein. Wir wissen es zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt einfach nicht. Die meisten dieser Organismen können wir nicht in Kulturen züchten. Wir wissen von ihrer Existenz nur, weil wir ihre DNA studieren können. Wir können uns ihren ribosomalen Inhalt ansehen, den Inhalt der ribosomalen DNA, und eine Vorstellung davon gewinnen, wie groß ihre Vielfalt ist. Doch sie ist wirklich immens: Bakterien gibt es überall. Wenn wir uns den Umfang der DNA-Basen ansehen – in einer typischen menschlichen Zelle gibt es etwa 3 Milliarden – wenn wir alle DNA-Basen aufaddieren, die einzelnen Gene, die einzelnen Sequenzen in diesen verschiedenen Bakterienstämmen, so haben wir es vielleicht mit einem Drittel der DNA-Basen zu tun. Doch das entspricht wesentlich mehr Genen. Also diese 3 mal 10 hoch 9 DNA-Basen in einer Zelle des Menschen – die Schätzung beläuft sich auf 30.000, oder vielleicht auf nicht mehr als 25.000, die Zahl scheint ständig zurückzugehen, die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben. Und die Zahl der Bakteriengene steigt wahrscheinlich ständig weiter an. Daher gibt es sehr viel mehr Bakteriengene, die mit unserem Körper verbunden sind, als es Gene des Menschen gibt. Auch das sollte man sich einmal klarmachen. Die Population der Bakterien ist hinsichtlich ihrer Diversität sehr, sehr viel größer als unsere. Ich möchte Ihnen nun kurz eine Vorstellung davon geben, wo große Anzahlen von Bakterien typischerweise vorkommen. Auf der Haut findet man Staphylokokken. Es gibt einen sehr schönen Organismus namens Staphylococcus epidermidis. Manchmal zeige ich ihn auf einem Dia. Er lebt in den Poren unserer Haut und ist im Wesentlichen unempfindlich gegen alles, was wir tun. Sie können sich die Hände und die Arme den ganzen Tag lang waschen: Diese Organismen stört es nicht, weil die Seife wirklich niemals bis zu ihnen vordringt. Sie haben gute Methoden entwickelt, sich zu verstecken. Außerdem gibt es viele verschiedene Arten von Corynebakterien. Ich will sie hier nicht alle durchgehen. In unserem Mund lebt eine recht interessante Ansammlung von Organismen. Ungefähr ein Zehntel der Organismen, von denen wir erkannt haben, dass sie in unserem Mund leben, haben wir weder in Kulturen züchten noch auf irgendeine vernünftige Weise identifizieren können. Von den meisten Organismen wissen wir nicht, was sie machen. Wir wissen nicht, warum sie dort sind, und wir wissen überhaupt sehr wenig über sie. Auch in den Luftwegen, im Magendarmkanal und im Urogenitalsystem befinden sich alle möglichen Organismen. Und natürlich haben wir es hier mit Organismen zu tun, die Probleme verursachen können. Viele dieser Organismen sind Krankheitserreger, viele andere von ihnen hingegen nicht. Und tatsächlich sind selbst die pathogenen Organismen in mancher Hinsicht sogar ein wenig hilfreich, da einige der Organismen, die in uns leben, die nützlich für uns sind, Verbindungen produzieren, die diese pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Zwischen den Mikroorganismen besteht ein ständiger Kampf. Sie alle wollen in dieser kleinen Nische leben. Daher stellen viele der Organismen, die uns eher nützlich sind, Verbindungen her, die uns diese Pathogene vom Leib halten, was eine gute Sache ist. Das folgende Dia liebe ich: Es zeigt genau, was passiert, wenn man niest und es nicht unterdrückt, und dies ist der Weg, auf dem sich sehr, sehr viele dieser pathogenen Organismen vorzugsweise verbreiten. Sie leben gerne in den Nasenhöhlen, im Rachen und im Mund usw. und dies ist die Art von Aerosol, das bei jedem Niesen produziert wird. Natürlich befinden sich Mikroorganismen darin und sie verbreiten sich ständig. Sie haben wahrscheinlich über die jüngste Tuberkulosegefahr in den US gehört. Die Tuberkulose verbreitet sich auf diese Weise. Sie ist ein unglaublich gefährlicher Organismus, was ihre Ansteckungsgefahr betrifft. Es handelt sich bei ihr um einen äußerst bösartigen Erreger. Nun, die Geschichte der Krankheit geht auf das Jahr 1877 zurück. Tatsächlich war Anthrax der erste Organismus, von dem definitiv gezeigt werden konnte, dass er eine Krankheit verursacht. Dies zu beweisen gelang dem bedeutenden Mikrobiologen Robert Koch. Er entdeckte später noch eine ganze Reihe anderer Dinge. Außerdem stellte er die Regeln auf, anhand deren entschieden wird, ob wir etwas als einen ursächlichen Erreger bezeichnen oder nicht. Weiter hier unten sehen Sie jede Menge wirklich übler Erkrankungen, die von diesen Mikroorganismen verursacht werden. Über ein oder zwei von ihnen werde ich Ihnen etwas ausführlicher berichten. Es gibt eine lange Geschichte und es war offensichtlich etwas, für das sich Mikrobiologen sehr interessiert haben. Man möchte immer wissen, welche Organismen Krankheiten verursachen und dann natürlich, wie man damit am besten verfährt, wie man sie eindämmen kann. Ein Organismus, über den ich sehr gern rede, ist Helicobacter pylori. Dies ist ein Organismus, der in ihrem Magen lebt, im Endothel. Vor zwei Jahren war dieser Organismus der Gegenstand des Nobelpreises in der Medizin, als Marshall und Warren den Preis dafür erhielten, weil sie zeigten, dass dieser Organismus die Ursache von Magengeschwüren sein kann. Vorher hatten die Pharmaunternehmen geglaubt, dass man, wenn man ein Magengeschwür hat, lediglich ein säurebindendes Mittel zu sich nehmen muss. Dies würde das Problem der Säure im Magen lösen, doch es war völlig wirkungslos gegen die Ursache der Krankheit. Und Barry Marshall führte das klassische Experiment durch, das viele Ärzte gerne durchführen. Er war davon überzeugt, dass Helicobacter die Ursache der Infektion war, dass er die Ursache der Magengeschwüre war, und daher kultivierte er einige in seinem Labor und trank sie. Tatsächlich entwickelte er innerhalb weniger Tage ein Magengeschwür, und glücklicherweise waren Antibiotika gegen den Helicobacter, den er zu sich genommen hatte, wirksam und er konnte sich sehr schnell heilen. Man kann in der Tat die meisten durch Helicobacter pylori verursachten Magengeschwüre durch die Einnahme von Antibiotika kurieren. Der Pharmaindustrie gefiel das natürlich überhaupt nicht, weil der Verkauf von Magensäureblockern drastisch zurückging. Doch dennoch ist dies der Fall. Dies hier ist ein echter Helicobacter pylori. Dies zeigt die Bakterienzelle, wie sie sich an eine der Epithelzellen anheftet, die den Magen auskleiden. Und wie sie sehen, führt es zu einer sehr engen Wechselwirkung. Tatsächlich ist bekannt, dass Helicobacter pylori Krebs verursachen kann. Das Bakterium kann Magenkrebs und auch Speiseröhrenkrebs verursachen, wenn man an einem Säure-Reflux leidet. Wir wissen nicht, wie dies im Einzelnen geschieht, doch es gibt sehr deutliche Hinweise darauf, dass dies geschehen kann. Nun, die meisten von uns, die wir in der westlichen Welt leben, haben nur noch wenige Bakterien von Helicobacter pylori im Magen. In den Entwicklungsländern ist jedoch fast jeder infiziert, und zwar schon ab einem sehr frühen Alter. In der westlichen Welt nehmen wir jedoch so viele Antibiotika zu uns, dass wir diese Population in der Regel beseitigt haben. Ein Mann namens Martin Blaser von der medizinischen Fakultät der Universität New York hat kürzlich diesen Organismus untersucht und herausgefunden, dass es eine enge Korrelation zwischen einer Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori und der Anfälligkeit für Asthma gibt. Und es hat sich herausgestellt, dass man – wenn man eine starke Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori hat, fast so gut wie nie an Asthma erkrankt. Und in dem Maße, wie die Infektionsrate von Helicobacter pylori in einer Bevölkerung zurückgeht, steigt die Zahl der an Asthma Erkrankten. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass es sich hierbei um eine Kausalbeziehung handelt. Es ist noch zu früh, um sich in dieser Sache sicher sein zu können; doch der Zusammenhang deutet auf die Tatsache, dass viele Bakterien in uns leben, die wir durch die unbedachte Verwendung von Antibiotika unterschiedslos abtöten, und dass es hierdurch sehr wohl zu zahlreichen verschiedenen, unbeabsichtigter Folgen kommen kann. Ich zeige Ihnen nun einen sehr schönen Organismus, auf diesem schönen Dia. Es ist einer dieser Spirillum-Organismen. Er heißt Borrelia und verursacht die Borreliose. Vibrio cholerae ist derjenige Organismus, der die als Cholera bekannte Krankheit verursacht. Dennoch ist Vibrio cholerae sehr interessant. Es ist ein kleiner Mikroorganismus, der mit einem großen eukaryotischen Organismus namens Volvox zusammenlebt. Und er sitzt tatsächlich fast ausschließlich auf der Oberfläche von Volvox, so dass man, wenn man eine Cholera-Infektion vorliegen hat und glaubt, dass Wasser verunreinigt ist, allein durch das Filtern des Wassers durch ein sehr eng gewebtes Tuch, etwa einen Sari, den größten Teil der Vibrio-Organismen aus dem Wasser entfernen kann. Sehr einfache Maßnahmen der öffentlichen Gesundheit können hier nützlich sein. Dies ist ein weiteres Spirillum, Trepanoma, das die Parodontose verursacht. Yersinia pestis ist der Erreger der Pest. Dies ist der Organismus, der im Mittelalter in Europa die Pandemie des Schwarzen Todes herbeiführte. Das nächste Dia zeige ich stets besonders gern: das Dia der kleinen Beulen, die von diesem Organismus verursacht werden. Und wenn man eine starke Infektion hat, bekommt man einen starken Wundbrand (Gangrän) an den Fingern, den Zehen und am Brustkorb. Wenn man dieses Stadium erreicht hat, lässt sich fast nichts mehr an der Erkrankung machen. Wenn man sie jedoch früh erkennt, lässt sie sich mit Antibiotika erfolgreich behandeln. Zum Schluss möchte ich Ihnen noch etwas über Lactobacillus erzählen. Lactobacillus ist einer von den Organismen, die wir für probiotisch halten. Sie sind sehr nützlich für uns. Man findet diesen Organismus in Joghurt. Joghurt zu essen, wenn man ihn mag, ist eine wunderbare Sache. Mir selbst schmeckt er nicht, aber ich würde ihn allen von Ihnen empfehlen. Diese Organismen stellen Verbindungen her, die viele der pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Es gibt zahlreiche Organismen, die dies tun, Bifidobacterium ist ein weiterer, den man manchmal in Joghurt findet, doch es gibt tatsächlich jede Menge Mikroorganismen, die Wunderbares für uns leisten. Wir wollen sie in unserem Körper haben, wie wollen, dass sie in uns leben, weil sie Krankheitserreger unter Kontrolle halten. Schließen möchte ich mit der Bitte an sie wenden, sich etwas vorzustellen, was ich recht außerordentlich finde. Hier sind wir also: Wir sind Menschen, wir laufen herum, wir sind randvoll mit Bakterien, sie leben überall in uns und haben es gut dabei. Wenn wir evolvieren, wie Menschen evolvieren, werden die Bakterienpopulationen ebenfalls evolvieren. Die beiden leben also tatsächlich in einer wunderbaren Symbiose: Wir evolvieren zusammen. Und es fällt nicht schwer sich vorzustellen, dass Menschen vielleicht von Bakterien erfunden wurden, um einen schönen Lebensraum abzugeben. Ich danke Ihnen. Vielen Dank. Sie haben sich gut an die Zeit gehalten. Wir haben daher Zeit für Fragen. Hat jemand eine Frage? FRAGE. Ich denke, dass viele Menschen heute Antibiotika verwenden und ich denke, dass es vielleicht eine Beschädigung der mikroorganismischen Flora des Menschen darstellt. Halten Sie es für ein ernstes Problem, dass wir zu viele Antibiotika verwenden? RICHARD ROBERTS. Ja, Antibiotika, wissen Sie, sind wirklich das Wundermedikament. Sie waren das Wundermedikament, als man sie entdeckte, und wir missbrauchen sie sehr. Wir verabreichen sie Rindern und auf diese Weise gelangen sie in Fleisch und in unsere Nahrungskette. In der westlichen Welt ist es gewiss so, dass wir Antibiotika beim geringsten Anzeichen einer Infektion Wir verwenden sie viel zu häufig. Die Sache wird wirklich klar, wenn man sich die Tuberkulose als eines der besten Beispiele hierfür ansieht. Als ich Kind war, war die Tuberkulose ein großes Problem. Wenn man – in England – Tuberkulose hatte, wurde man in ein Sanatorium gesteckt. Man wurde vom Rest der Bevölkerung isoliert, um die Ausbreitung der Krankheit zu verhindern. Dann standen Antibiotika zur Verfügung, man konnte eine Infektion mit Microbacterium tuberculosis heilen, und alle Welt hörte auf, sich darüber Sorgen zu machen. Jetzt haben wir einen Punkt erreicht, an dem es von Microbacterium tuberculosis sehr, sehr viele Stämme gibt, die resistent gegen Medikamente sind. Wenn Sie – Gott bewahre – jemals in Russland ins Gefängnis kämen, dann wäre es sehr wahrscheinlich, dass Sie mit einer bösen Tuberkulose-Infektion wieder herauskämen. Weltweit sterben jährlich mehr als eine Million Menschen an Tuberkulose, und die Regierung der USA hat in ihrer Weisheit schon vor vielen, vielen Jahren beschlossen, die Erforschung von Microbacterium tuberculosis nicht weiter zu finanzieren. Sie hat erst kürzlich damit begonnen, sie finanziell zu unterstützen, und die Tuberkulose ist heute wieder zu einem großen Problem geworden. Und um Ihre Frage zu beantworten: Ja, wir sind mit den Antibiotika, die uns zur Verfügung standen, völlig falsch umgegangen. Und es gibt nur sehr wenig neue, neue Arten von Antibiotika, die in nächster Zeit verfügbar werden. Einige neue erscheinen, doch wir haben diese Forschung sehr lange vernachlässigt. FRAGE. Ich bin Arzt und komme aus Pakistan. Ich war fasziniert, als ich erfuhr, dass die intravesikale Therapie der Tuberkulose gegen Blasenkrebs eingesetzt wird. Als ich die Literatur zu Rate zog, stellte ich fest, dass viele Viren als Anti-Tumor-Mittel verwendet werden. Glauben Sie, dass dies ein vielsprechendes Gebiet ist: der Einsatz von Mikroben zur Behandlung von Krebs? RICHARD ROBERTS. Also, Ihre Frage richtet sich auf die Verwendung von Mikroben und Viren zur Behandlung von Krebs. Ich fürchte, dass ich darüber nichts weiß. Ich bin in dieser Sache völlig unwissend. Mir ist bekannt, dass man bakterielle Phagen zur Behandlung bakterieller Infektionen verwendet. Dies ist etwas, womit man sich in Russland seit sehr langer Zeit beschäftigt. Über die Behandlung von Krebs mithilfe von Mikroorganismen weiß ich jedoch nichts. Vielleicht können wir später noch darüber reden. Ich würde sehr gerne mehr darüber erfahren. FRAGE. Ich möchte Folgendes wissen: Zahlreiche Unternehmen verkaufen heute mit Probiotika veränderte Lebensmittel: Ist es wirklich erwiesen, dass es wesentlich besser für uns ist, diese teuren Lebensmittel zu kaufen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, ich denke, es ist wirklich schwer zu wissen. Das Problem mit den Mitteln zur Unterstützung der Gesundheit, den Nahrungsergänzungsmitteln, besteht darin, dass sie nicht reglementiert sind. Daher ist es ein offensichtlicher Markt für irgendeinen Scharlatan, der daherkommt und versucht, Ihnen ein Quacksalberprodukt zu verkaufen. Ich denke, dass einige der Probiotika, wenn man sagt, was genau sich darin befindet und besonders wenn sie Lactobacillus oder wenn sie Bifidobacterium enthalten, wahrscheinlich tatsächlich gesundheitsfördernd sind. Doch ich glaube ebenso, dass es zahlreiche Produkte auf dem Markt gibt, die man besser meidet. Ich empfehle Ihnen, dass Sie – wenn Sie wirklich Probiotika verwenden wollen – unbedingt Joghurt essen sollten. Joghurt ist sehr gesund, nur schmeckt er nicht. FRAGE. Sie sprachen über die Koevolution der Bakterien und des Menschen. Im Fall von Helicobacter pylori, sagten Sie, seien die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit diesen Bakterien infiziert. Es kommt jedoch bei den meisten Menschen nicht zum Ausbruch einer Krankheit. Was meinen Sie: Handelt es sich dabei um einen Krankheitserreger ober um einen Symbionten? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, die Frage richtet sich auf Helicobacter pylori und die Tatsache, dass die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit Helicobacter pylori infiziert sind. Die meisten dieser Infektionen sind relativ unterschwellig. Man hat also den Organismus, doch keine damit zusammenhängenden ernsthaften Krankheitssymptome. Wir wissen nicht wirklich, warum man plötzlich eine mit Helicobacter zusammenhängende Krankheit bekommt. In der westlichen Welt mag es einen Zusammenhang mit der Ernährung oder mit anderen Organismen geben, die hinzukommen. In den Entwicklungsländern sind die Fälle von durch Helicobacter verursachten Magenkrebs sehr selten, obwohl es von Zeit zu Zeit einige Fälle gibt. Anderswo ist die Häufigkeit wesentlich größer. Ich denke jedoch, dass das wirkliche Problem darin besteht, dass das ganze Mikrobiom, der Satz an Mikroben, der in einer Population lebt, sich ändert, wenn man von einer Population zu einer anderen geht. Daher muss man also nicht nur an Helicobacter pylori denken, sondern auch an alle anderen Organismen, die man typischerweise findet. Und viele von ihnen sind in der westlichen Welt einfach nicht anzutreffen. Demnach haben wir noch einen langen Weg vor uns. Wissen Sie: Wenn wir erkennen, dass wir die meisten der in uns lebenden Organismen nicht kennen und dass wir nicht wissen, was sie tun, ist es sehr leicht, eine Hypothese aufzustellen und sehr viel schwieriger, sie zu testen, weil wir es hier mit komplizierten Lebensräumen zu tun haben, in denen diese Organismen leben. FRAGE. Meine Frage lautet: Wie können wir dem Problem der Resistenz gegen mehrere Medikamente begegnen? Meinen Sie, wir müssten einen universalen Angriffspunkt finden, damit wir in Zukunft nicht mehr nach neuen Antibiotika suchen müssen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun gut, ich denke, die ganze Sache bezüglich der mehrfachen Resistenz gegen Medikamente bedeutet, dass wir neue Medikamente finden müssen, und typischerweise bedeuten neue Medikamente nicht neue Angriffspunkte, manchmal ist das so. Allerdings handelt es sich hierbei um unterschiedliche Klassen von Verbindungen, die sich gegen ein bekanntes Angriffsziel richten, obwohl auf andere Weise. Wenn sie sich beispielsweise vorstellen, dass Sie es mit einem Protein zu tun haben, das für das Bakterium eine Schlüsselfunktion erfüllt, und dass Sie ein Medikament finden, das an dieser Stelle eine Bindung eingeht und die Funktion des Proteins hemmt, so wird es zu einer Aminosäurenänderung am Punkt der Wechselwirkung kommen. Wenn Sie ein anderes Mittel finden, das das Molekül an demselben Punkt in der Sequenz trifft, dann haben diese Mutationen keine Wirkung darauf. Damit der Organismus dann resistent wird, muss es zu Mutationen an einer anderen Stelle kommen. Wir wissen, dass einige der neuen Medikamente, die zur Zeit entwickelt werden, eine von den Medikamenten, die wir als Antibiotika verwenden, sehr verschiedene Struktur haben. In manchen Fällen, richten sie sich gegen neue Angriffspunkte. Das Schöne an der Tatsache, dass wir im Laufe der letzten paar Jahre so viele Genomsequenzen von Bakterien analysiert haben ist Folgendes: Es gibt zahllose Angriffspunkte, die wir finden können. Ich denke also, dass es keinen Mangel an guten Angriffspunkten gibt, gegen die wir uns bei Bakterien richten können, doch es fehlt an Anstrengungen bei der Suche nach Antibiotika. Im Allgemeinen, wissen Sie, sind die Pharmaunternehmen nicht sehr darauf bedacht nach Antibiotika zu suchen, da sie den Nachteil haben, dass sich mit ihnen die Krankheit heilen und daher nur ein geringer Gewinn erzielen lässt. Die Pharmaunternehmen hätten viel lieber etwas, was die Symptome erleichtert, was man für den Rest seines Lebens einnehmen muss. Dann ergibt sich eine sehr schöne Gewinnspanne. FRAGE. Glauben Sie, dass sich – außer der Resistenz gegen Antibiotika – aufgrund des veränderten Verhaltens der Menschen die Pathogenität der Bakterien oder irgendwelcher anderer Mikroben entweder entwickelt hat oder zurückgegangen ist? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, wissen Sie, wir befinden uns in einem ständigen Kampf zwischen den Pathogenen, die gerne in uns leben und uns Probleme bereiten möchten, und unserer Fähigkeit, uns gegen sie zu wehren. Dies ist nicht etwas, was irgendwann einmal aufhören wird. Diese Evolution wird weitergehen. Es wird ständig neue Krankheitserreger geben, es wird stets erforderlich sein, dass wir davor auf der Hut sind, dass wir Wege finden, mit ihnen fertig zu werden. Die Bakterien haben den Vorteil, dass sie sehr viel schneller evolvieren können, als es uns möglich ist. Wenn Sie eine Lebenszeit von 30 Minuten haben, wenn Sie sich in 30 Minuten vermehren dann ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, Mutationen zu finden, die mit Krankheiten fertig werden, im Falle von Bakterien sehr viel höher. Glücklicherweise ist unser Immunsystem in der Lage, mit einigen dieser Dinge effektiver umzugehen, doch diesen „Rüstungswettlauf“ zwischen dem Krankheitserreger und dem Wirtsorganismus wird es immer geben. Er gehört einfach zu den Dingen, die eben nun einmal immer geschehen. Zum Glück wird es immer einen Bedarf an Mikrobiologen und Chemikern geben und an Wissenschaftlern, die auf diesem Gebiet arbeiten und neue Antibiotika und bessere Wege finden, mit Krankheiten fertig zu werden. FRAGE. Herr Professor, meinen Sie nicht, dass einige der normalen Organismen, die beispielsweise in der Mundhöhle leben, zu Krankheitserregern werden, wenn es zu einer Schwächung der Immunität kommt? Warum ist dies nach Ihrer Meinung so, und wie können Antibiotika dies verhindern oder eine Rolle hierbei spielen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Die Frage ist also eigentlich: Wenn wir uns in einem Zustand geringerer Immunität befinden: Erlaubt dies Krankheitserregern sozusagen „krankmachender“ zu werden? Die Antwort hierauf lautet, dass ein Organismus pathogen wird, wenn es ihm gelingt, zu wachsen und sich stark zu vermehren. Wenn Sie nur wenige Erreger in sich haben, führt dies in der Regel zu keinen Problemen. Dies ist der Grund dafür, warum Sie neben jemandem sitzen können, der eine Grippe oder Tuberkulose hat: Solange Sie keine größere Anzahl der Erreger aufnehmen, kann Ihr eigenes Immunsystem normalerweise damit fertig werden. Es ist also normalerweise eigentlich eine Frage der Anzahl der Organismen, die entstehen. Wenn er sich kaum vermehrt, ist er nicht pathogen und sie erleiden keine schweren Symptome. Wenn der Organismus sich andererseits sehr stark vermehrt und nicht eingedämmt werden kann, dann erleiden sie sämtliche Symptome seiner Pathogenität. Und was oft geschieht ist Folgendes: Sobald dieser kritische Punkt erreicht ist, ab dem zahlreiche Organismen vorhanden sind, vermehrt er sich sehr schnell. Hierdurch wird dann die Fähigkeit des Körpers, durch seine eigene Abwehr der Lage Herr zu werden, beeinträchtigt. Und dies geschieht zum Beispiel im Fall der Cholera. Mit geringen Anzahlen von Vibrio cholerae wird der Körper fertig, doch sobald der Organismus beginnt, sich stark zu vermehren, kommt die körpereigene Abwehr dem nicht mehr nach und kann damit nicht Schritt halten. Unser Immunsystem ist nicht leistungsstark genug, um mit großen Mengen des Organismus fertig zu werden. Habe nochmals vielen Dank, Richard, für dieses wunderbare Exposé.

Richard Roberts explains that most of the diversity and mass on Earth are still microbes.
(00:03:16 - 00:05:51)

 

Roberts finished his talk by proposing, “Perhaps humans were invented by bacteria in order to provide a nice place to live.”

The transition period between prokaryotes and eukaryotes is a critical chapter in Earth’s early evolution. The defining moment took place when oceanic cyanobacteria started to produce oxygen, which, approximately 300 million years later, led to the so-called Great Oxygenation Event 2.4 billion years ago. However, the earliest fossil records demonstrate that eukaryotes appeared 1.4 billion years ago. It took about a billion years, but the accumulation of oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere finally gave aerobic and more complex organisms the upper hand.

 

Richard Roberts (2007) - Why I love microbes

Good morning everyone and welcome. Today we have three talks and then we have a round-table discussion. The first speaker is Richard Roberts from New England Biolabs. But the discovery he made in 1977 about the mosaic structure of genes was made when he was working in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York. He received the Nobel Prize 1993 for the discovery of split genes. And the title of his talk is why I love microbes, Dr. Roberts, please. Thank you. Well, what I’m going to try and do today is to give you some idea of why I find microbes absolutely fascinating. I think they have so much going for them that I would encourage all of you to perhaps think about working in this area at some point. One of the things I like about microbes is that they’re essentially very simple organisms. And it seems to me possible that if we had enough effort put into studying them, before I die we might actually understand how the very simplest microbe works. And I think all of us as biologists would like to understand how life works. We’re not going to understand how humans work in my lifetime, perhaps not in your lifetimes either. But I think we may be able to understand how a microbe works. And for me that would be a very exciting possibility. The microbes also have the great advantage, from my point of view, that most of them are undiscovered. Less than 1%, perhaps less than .1% of all the microbes on this planet have actually been discovered, characterised in the laboratory or grown in the laboratory. Most of them we can’t grow. Part of this is because many of them will only grow when there are two or three or four, all growing together. They need one another in order to be successful in life. Many of them also live in incredibly inhospitable places. And I will show you one or two of these microbes. They also have one very remarkable property. And that is that they live with us, our bodies are literally crawling with bugs of one sort and another, we have them on our skin, we have them in our mouths, we have them inside us. Everywhere you can imagine microbes live. And I will show you a little about this, too. So we’ll start off by taking a quick trip through the environment. I’ll show you one or two bugs that I find particularly interesting, and then we’ll head into the human body and human health and the kind of organisms that live with us. So if we go on to the next slide, I want to use this just to show you how microbes – and by microbes I’m talking about bacteria and archaea, and these are the three kingdoms of life, shown here. The archaea originally were thought to be bacteria, in fact they’re a completely separate kingdom of life, as shown by Carl Woese in 1977. And what this tree of life does is to try to show you how everything is related to one another in terms of its diversity. So for instance the eucarya, the large organisms that you see, plants, people, giraffes, rhinoceros, anything big, mice and so on, all of these form up here. Many of these down here, giardia and so on, are very tiny microorganisms, microscopic. And all of these other organisms, the bacteria and archaea, you can see they’re a long way away, very distantly related to us. And we sit up here, this is homo and this is maize, so we’re much more closely related to maize than many things that you might have thought of, we’re a long way away from the bacteria. But notice here the mitochondria, the red organisms, these are small organelles that live inside ourselves, that produce energy for us and these are very closely related to the bacteria. I’m showing that the human cells, the human genome has actually something that has acreated from many other different genomes over time. So most of the diversity on this earth are microbes, in fact most of the mass is on microbes. This may be hard to believe, you sort of are used to looking around and you see all this vegetable matter and lots of animal life and so on. You can easily be confused into thinking that this is most of the mass of life on this planet. It’s not, the microbes are most of the mass of life on this planet. Not just with us but in the seas, the seas are absolutely seething with microorganisms. Even if you dig three miles down into the earth you will find microorganisms, typically about 10 to the 5 to 10 to the 6 cells per gram of material, three miles down in the earth. So these things are everywhere, they’re in the Antarctic, under the ice, everywhere you can imagine. And one of the reasons that you don’t really appreciate how much there is, is because you can’t see them, these are microscopic organisms, you have to look under a microscope to find them. Now, the first slide that I’m showing here is a photosynthetic organism. And in fact this organism is rather interesting in the sense that it was the original polluter of this planet. When life first began on this planet, it began in an anaerobic environment, there was no oxygen around, most of the oxygen was wrapped up in minerals inside the rocks of this planet or in water. These organisms started doing photosynthesis, they started producing oxygen, and in fact they wiped out most of the existing life that was all anaerobic, that didn’t like all of this oxygen around. And you can see they’re very nice organisms, they form these beautiful long chains and every so often you see one of these slightly larger heterosis, very strange little form of the microorganism. And these can live anaerobically whereas the others live aerobically. If you look in soil, anywhere where there is material rotting, you will find things called myxobacteria. They look like little mushrooms, except you can only see them under the microscope. And they form these beautiful little fruiting bodies, they’re very nice little fruiting bodies. They’re essentially bacteria that are able to differentiate. They can produce different kinds, different forms of cells and different forms of acreations of cells in order to survive. These things are just all over the soil. Many of them are this beautiful orange colour, they’re very, very pretty. Sometimes you see them as films on rotting wood. But there are many, many of these things, without them we would actually probably be full of debris of one sort and another, they’re very important in terms of getting rid of waste material. Now, this organism I love, it’s an example of a spirillic bacteria, this one is called aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. And this is a guy that lives in the oceans and has within it a very interesting structure, shown here in black, that is an acreation of ion and it’s a magnet. So this organism has formed a magnet within itself and it uses this to navigate. And it swims in the direction of the earth’s field. If it’s in the northern hemisphere it likes to swim north, if it’s in the southern hemisphere it likes to swim south. And it’s also very sensitive to the force fields and so it actually swims underwater and swims away from the surface. We don’t really know why it does this, it’s just a behaviour that one can observe, there are several theories, some people think that it’s swimming to get away from predators, others think it’s swimming to get to food. But why it would use a magnet to do this is completely unknown. And there’s actually a whole bunch of organisms, some 40 or 50 different species of organisms are now known that can do this same sort of thing, they have little magnets in them for devising, for getting around. This is something else in the ocean, beautiful tube worm. These things live on these deep sea vents, you know underneath the oceans there are many volcanoes, many hot vents in which we have magma and other materials spewing out of the earth and sometimes these are called ‘deep smokers’, ‘dark smokers’. They were discovered about the mid 1970’s by deep diving oceanographic vessels, mainly from Woods Hole. And these things have magma, they have steam coming out at incredibly high temperatures, anything up to 1,000° centigrade. And this is right in the middle of the deep ocean very often and so you have these great thermal changes that take place from the deep vents with material at 1,000° out into the ocean which is typically about four or five° centigrade and so you get a big thermocline develops. And it turns out that there are many organisms that like to live in this zone between the actual vent and the ocean and where temperatures vary from anywhere from 100°, suddenly coming down to 5°, and there are not only many bacteria and archaea that live there, typically the archaea love to live in these kinds of environments, but there are also eukaryotes. And one of the eukaryotes is this tube worm. So this is actually a worm, this is the sheath of the worm and this is the plume. And the centre of this worm is actually a massive bacteria. In fact without the bacteria the worm couldn’t exist. So the bacteria are busy taking advantage of all of the minerals and all of the energy that is coming out of this deep vent and using it to manufacture materials that then keep the worm going. So very bizarre, and you find these everywhere. So let us say, you know, you might have imagined one of these things could have arisen in one particular vent, they then spread everywhere. Wherever these things occur in the oceans, you find these tube worms and you find these beautiful bacteria that live within them. Now, when we go to Yellowstone National Park - and there are many parks like this but I’ve not been to one that’s quite as nice as Yellowstone - this is where I do my little tourist bit, I think if ever you get the chance to go to Yellowstone National Park, you should. It’s just an amazing place, it’s a volcanic caldera where there are many hot springs, many geysers, the ground in general is extremely hot in many parts of Yellowstone still. And there are wonderful examples of bacteria and archaea that live there. And when you look around some of these thermal pools, so here’s a thermal pool and here’s some hot water that’s running down into it, you see lots of these phototrophic organisms that are living here. They show up with these beautiful colours, they form bacterial films. If you look down through these films you discover that at the very top there are organisms that are using one wavelength of light in order to do photosynthesis and get energy. And as you go down you have bacteria that are using whatever light is left. And so by the time you get down really only a few centimetres and there is no light then penetrating, because it’s all been used up by the bacteria that have developed to take advantage of it. And they form just these beautiful colours all the way around these pools and they’re all films of bacteria. This is where for instance the enzyme Taq polymerase from thermos aquaticus came from. A man called Brock, a very famous microbiologist first found this organism at Yellowstone, and this is in fact the place where we’re now able to do PCR and all these other wonderful things, because of the organism that came out of this hot spring. Typically organisms here live anywhere between 80° and 100° centigrade, imagine at 100°C, normally your DNA is completely denatured. But these organisms have found ways to keep the DNA strands apart. Now, another nice thing you see in Yellowstone are these beautiful sulphur springs. This yellow colour here is all elemental sulphur and it’s caused from this archael organism, sulfolobus and sulfotaracus, which is able to take advantage of the hydrogen sulphide that is coming out of this spring. And they can then oxidise that, produce sulphur and in the process gain enough energy to live. Wonderful organisms, many, many examples of this when we look around. Now, I want to move away from the environment at large and talk about our local environment. Talk about humans and the bacteria that live with us. We often are not completely aware of all the bacteria that live with us until we get sick. Many of us, you know, we come down, we have a nasty infection that’s caused by a staphylococcus perhaps. When I was a child, before there were antibiotics, every time I would get a cut on my leg it would always get infected and turn yellow and nasty, absolutely awful. And now of course you can treat all of that with antibiotics, although we probably use antibiotics more than we should. But there are many, many things that come along and cause us problems and I will take you through and talk to you about one or two of these organisms that cause problems. Because even when they cause problems, they’re still extremely interesting organisms, they have wonderful lifestyles, they’re able to do all sorts of interesting things. And there are also many organisms that live with us that are completely harmless. And in fact others that are very, very good for us, things that we call probiotics and I will finish by talking about those. But I wanted first just to talk a little bit about the cells that we have, and to compare humans with the bacteria. So in a typical human there are about 10 to the 13 cells, that is human cells, and there are about 10 to the 14 bacteria. So there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in a typical human as there are human cells. The number of different strains in humans is 1, in bacteria I’d put this down as greater than 400. In fact the bottom line is we really don’t know in any great detail just how many different kinds of bacteria there are living with us. And there are several projects underway at the moment to actually look at all of the bacterial genomes that are associated with humans. People are going around taking samples of skin, taking samples from the mouth, from the stomach and so on to try to get a feel for just how many strains there are. And I think this could easily be actually 10 times as many as this, there could easily be 4,000, and we really wouldn’t know at the present time. Most of these organisms we can’t grow, the only reason we know they’re there is because we can study their DNA, we can look at their ribosomal content, the ribosomal DNA content and get some idea of just what the diversity is. But it really is quite immense, these things are everywhere. If you look at the number of DNA basis - in a typical human cell there are about three billion – if you tot up all of the DNA basis, the individual genes, the individual sequences in these various strains of bacteria, we’re talking about maybe a third as many DNA basis, but that equates to many more genes. So these three types 10 to the 9 DNA basis in a human cell, the estimate is 30,000 genes, maybe that’s down to 25,000, it seems to be going down all the time, the number of human genes we have. And the bacterial genes are probably going up and up and up. And so there are many more bacterial genes that are associated with our bodies than there are human genes. That's something also to think about. The bacterial population is very, very much greater than ours in terms of its diversity. Just to give you some idea of where you typically find large numbers of organisms. On skin you have staphylococci, there’s a lovely organism called staphylococcus epidermidis, I sometimes show a slide of this thing, this organism lives inside the pores inside your skin and it’s essentially impervious to anything we do. You can wash your hands and your arms all day and these organisms don’t mind at all because the soap really just never gets to them. They’ve found some very good ways to hide. There are corynebacterium, lots of different species here, I don’t propose to go through them all. In our mouths we have a very interesting set of organisms. About 1 in 10 of all of the organisms that we can recognise as living in our mouths have we ever been able to grow or even just to identify in any reasonable way. Most of the organisms we don’t know what they do, we don’t know why they’re there, and we have very little knowledge of them. In the respiratory tract all sorts of organisms, too, the gastrointestinal tract and the urogenital tract. And of course, here you have lots of organisms that can cause problems. And many of these organisms are pathogens, but many of them are not. And in fact, even the ones that are pathogenic in some ways are a little beneficial, because some of the organisms that we have, that are actually good for us, are producing compounds that keep these pathogenic organisms at bay. There’s a constant fight between microorganisms and they all want to live in this little niche. And so many of the organisms that are actually rather good for us are producing compounds to keep these pathogens at bay, which is a good thing. Now, I love to show this slide, it shows exactly what happens when you sneeze without stifling it. And this is the way that an awful lot of these pathogenic organisms like to get around. They like to live in the nasal passages, in the throat and in the mouth and so on. And so this is the kind of aerosol that is produced every time that you sneeze. And of course these have microorganisms in and they’re spreading around all the time. Of course tuberculosis, you probably heard about the recent scare in the US, tuberculosis gets around this way and is in fact an incredibly dangerous organism in terms of its ability to pass from one human to another, very, very infectious nasty agent. Now, the history of disease kind of goes back to 1877 and in fact it was anthrax that was the very first organism that was shown definitively to be the producer of a disease. This was shown by the great microbiologist Robert Koch. He then went on and found a whole bunch of other things, came up with the rules that determine whether or not we could declare that something was the causative agent. And coming down here, you’ll see all sorts of really nasty diseases and that are caused by these microorganisms. One or two of these I will tell you something more about. But there’s been a long history of this and it’s obviously been something that microbiologists have been very keen to look at, and one would always like to know what are the organisms that are causing disease. And of course then how to deal with them, how can we stop them. Now, one organism that I like to talk about quite a lot is helicobacter pylori, this is an organism that lives in your stomach, lives at extremely low pH, it lives in the lining of the stomach, in the endothelium. Two years ago this organism was the subject of the Nobel prize in medicine when it was awarded to Marshall and Warren who were the first people to show that this organism was in fact the cause of ulcers. Prior to that the pharmaceutical companies thought that all you needed to do if you had an ulcer was to take an antacid, this would solve the problem of the acid that was present in the stomach but it did absolutely no good at all for the cause of the disease. And Barry Marshall did the classic experiment that many doctors like to do, he was convinced that this was the source of the infection, it was the cause of ulcers and so he grew some in the lab and drank it. And sure enough, within a few days, he came down with an ulcer and fortunately the helicobacter that he drank was susceptible to antibiotics and he was able to cure himself very rapidly. And in fact you can cure most causes of ulcers through helicobacter pylori just by taking antibiotics, of course the pharmaceutical industry didn’t like that very much because the sales of antacids went way down. But nevertheless this is the cause. And this is an actual helicobacter pylori here, this is the bacterial cell adhering to one of these epithelial cells lining the stomach. And you can see it causes a very close interaction. And in fact it is known that helicobacter pylori can cause cancer, it causes stomach cancer and it can also cause oesophageal cancer if you have acid reflux disease, we don’t know how this happens but the evidence is very strong that it can do that. Now, most of us who live in the western world no longer have a lot of helicobacter pylori in our stomachs. If you live in the developing world almost everybody is infected, you pick it up at a very early age. But in the western world we take so many antibiotics that we’ve usually killed off this population. And a man called Martin Blaser at New York medical school has recently been looking at this organism and finds a very strong correlation between whether you have a helicobacter pylori infection and whether you’re susceptible to asthma. And it turns out that if you have a very high concentration of helicobacter pylori, a good infection going, you almost never get asthma. And as the amounts of helicobacter go down in the population, up goes the rates of asthma. He believes there’s a causal connection here, it’s still too early to know for sure, but it does point out the fact that there are many bacteria who live within us, that we indiscriminately get rid of by the poor use of antibiotics, and when we do that there may well be all sorts of unintended consequences. I show this one, this is a very nice organism, just a beautiful slide, it’s one of these spirillum organisms, it’s called borrelia, it’s the cause of lyme disease. Vibrio cholerae causes the disease we know as cholera. However, vibrio cholerae is really interesting, it’s a small microorganism that lives in conjunction with a large eukaryotic organism called volvox. And it actually sits on the surface of the volvox to a point where if you have a cholera infection going, and you believe the water is contaminated, merely by filtering the water through something like a very fine thread, something like a sari, you can actually get rid of most of the vibrio organisms in the water. Very simple public health measure can be useful here. This is another spirillum and this time treponema that causes periodontal disease. Yersinia pestis is the cause of plague, this was the organism that caused the Black Death in Europe, that decimated the population of Europe in the Middle Ages. I always like to show the next slide, this is one of the little bubos that is produced by this organism. And when you get a really good infection going, then you get a very severe gangrene in the fingers, in the toes and thorax. By the time you reach this stage, there’s almost nothing can be done about it. But if you catch it early it’s very susceptible to antibiotic treatment. And I want to close just by talking a little about lactobacillus sake, lactobacillus is one of these organisms that we think of as a probiotic. They’re very good for you and this organism you get in yoghurt, wonderful thing to eat lots and lots of yoghurt if you like it. I personally don’t like it but I would recommend it to all of you. These organisms produce compounds that will keep many of the pathogenic organisms at bay. There are many other such organisms that do this, bifidobacterium is another one that you sometimes find in yoghurt, but there are really lots and lots of wonderful microorganisms that do in fact do wonders for you, you want them in your bodies, you want them around because they’re keeping the pathogens at bay. And I want to close just by asking you to think about something I find quite remarkable. So here we are, we’re humans, we’re walking around, we’re absolutely full of bacteria, they’re living all over the place, they make a very nice living with us. When we evolve, as humans evolve, so the bacterial populations evolve, too. The two are really in a tremendous symbiosis, we’re both evolving together. And it’s rather easy to think that perhaps humans were invented by bacteria in order to provide a nice place to live. Thank you very much. Thank you very much, you did very well on time, so we have time for questions. Are there any questions here? QUESTION. I think nowadays lots of people use antibiotics and I think it’s maybe a damage to our human flora of microorganism. Do you think it’s quite a severe problem we use too many antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yes, so antibiotics, you know, they really are the wonder drug, they were the wonder drug when they came along and we very much abuse them. We feed them to cattle and so they get into meat, they get into our food supply. Certainly in the western world the slightest hint of an infection, whether it’s a viral infection, for which antibiotics will do no good at all, or whether it’s a bacterial infection where they will work, we use way, way too many. And that is really clear, if you look at tuberculosis as one of the best examples of this. When I was a kid, tuberculosis was a major problem, if you had tuberculosis, in England you were put into a sanatorium, you were separated from the rest of the population to stop it spread. Along came antibiotics, we could cure microbacterium tuberculosis and so everybody stopped worrying about it, now we’ve reached a point where the microbacterium many, many strains of microbacterium are drug resistant and god forbid you should ever go to prison in Russia, but if you do, the odds are you’ll come out of prison with a nasty tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis kills more than a million people a year around the world and the US government in its wisdom stopped funding research on microbacterium many, many years ago. They’ve only just started putting more money into it and we have a major problem again with tuberculosis. And so, yes, we’ve done a terrible job of actually handling the antibiotics that we had. And there are very few new ones, sort of new forms of antibiotics in the pipelines. There are a few beginning to appear now, but we’ve gone through a long period of neglect. QUESTION. I’m a medical doctor from Pakistan, I was fascinated when I found that intravesical tuberculosis therapy was being used for bladder cancer. And when I looked at the literature, I found that many viruses are being used as anti-tumour agents, do you think that this is a promising area of microbes being used to treat cancers? RICHARD ROBERTS. Yeah, so the question here relates to the use of microbes and viruses in order to treat cancer, and I’m afraid I don’t know anything about that. I’m completely ignorant on that front. I know about bacteria phages being used to treat bacterial infections. This is something that was taking place in Russia for a long, long time. But I know nothing about using microorganisms to treat cancer. So maybe we can talk about that afterwards, because I would love to hear some more about that. QUESTION. I just wanted to know, a lot of companies are selling now changed food with probiotics, is there really any evidence that it is much better for us to buy this more expensive food. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, I think it’s really hard to know. The problem with health supplements, health food supplements is they’re not well regulated and so it’s an obvious market for any charlatan to come along and try to sell you snake oil. I think for some of the probiotics, when they tell you exactly what is in there, and especially if they have lactobacillus or if they have bifidobacterium in there, there’s a good chance that they will be useful. But I think equally there are many things on the market that one would do best to avoid. I think if you really want to go the probiotic route, I would absolutely recommend yoghurt as the way to go. Yoghurt is very wonderful for you, just doesn’t taste good. QUESTION. You talked about co-evolution of bacteria with human being, so like in case of h pylori, it is in developing countries, as you said, that in developing countries most of the people are infected with the bacterium. But there is no disease outcome in most of the persons. So what do you think, is it a pathogen or is it a symbiont? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, so the question relates to helicobacter pylori. And the fact that most people in developing countries have infections with helicobacter pylori, most of the infections are relatively low-level, so you have the organism but you don’t have any serious disease associated with it. We don’t really know why you suddenly get a disease associated with helicobacter. In the western world it may be related to diet, it may be related to other organisms that come along. The incidence of stomach cancer caused by helicobacter pylori are very low in the developing world, although there are a few cases from time to time, much higher elsewhere. But I think the real problem is that, as soon as you go from one population to another, the whole microbiome, the whole set of microbes that are living with you are different. And so one has to think about not just the helicobacter pylori but all the other organisms that you typically find. And many of these you simply don’t find in the western world. And so we have a long way to go. You know, when you recognise that most of the organisms living with us we don’t know what they are, we don’t know what they do, it becomes very easy to make hypothesis and much more difficult to test them, because these are very complicated biota, very complicated environments in which these organisms are living. QUESTION. My question is how we can fight the multiple drug resistance problem. Do you think we need to find a perpetual target so that in future we don’t have to look for new antibiotics? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, well, I think the whole question about multiple drug resistance means that we do have to find new drugs and typically new drugs do not necessarily mean new targets, sometimes they do, but different classes of compounds that are able to go after a known target but in some different way. So for instance, if you imagine you’ve got a protein that is really key to the bacterium, you find a drug that will bind at this point and inhibit it, and so there will be aminoacid changes at the point of interaction. If you find a different drug that will hit the molecule at some different point in the sequence, then these mutations won’t affect it and in order for the organism then to become resistant, it has to make mutations at a different point. And we know that some of the new drugs that are in the pipelines just have very different chemical structures from the ones that we’ve already been using as antibiotics. In some case there are new targets. And the nice thing about all of the genome sequencing of bacteria that’s taken place over the last few years, and we have the genomes now for about 500 organisms, there are about another 2,000 or 3,000 that are on the way, is that there are lots and lots of targets, potential targets that you can find. So I think there’s no shortage of sort of good targets that one might go after for bacteria, but there is a shortage of effort to go looking for antibiotics. You know, in general the drug companies are not very keen on looking for antibiotics because they have the disadvantage that they cure the disease and so there’s only a small amount of profit for them to make. The drug companies would much prefer to have something that alleviates the symptoms, that you have to take for the rest of your life and then you have a very nice profit margin. QUESTION. Do you believe that with the changing behaviour of human beings, the pathogenicity of bacteria or any other microbes has either evolved or has even gone down, besides the antibiotic resistance. RICHARD ROBERTS. Well, you know, we’re in a constant fight between the pathogens that would like to live on us and cause trouble and our ability to defend against them. And this is not something that is ever going to go away, you're going to continue to have this evolution, there will constantly be new pathogens, there will constantly be a need for us to be vigilant, to find ways of dealing with them. The bacteria have the advantage they in general can evolve very much faster than we are able to evolve. You know, if you’ve got a 30 minute lifetime, double in 30 minutes, we typically double in, even in the most favourable situations, every 14 years, chances of making mutations to accommodate diseases are very much in the favour of the bacteria. Fortunately our immune system is able to deal with some of these things more effectively, but there will always be this arms race between the pathogen and the host. It’s just one of these things, it’s going to happen. There will fortunately always be a need for microbiologists and for chemists and for scientists to work in this area and find new antibiotics and find better ways to deal with disease. QUESTION. Professor, don’t you think that some of the normal organism, for instance which live in the oral cavity, when there are lowered immunity states, they become pathogens. So why do you think that happens and how can antibiotics sort of overcome that or play a role in that. RICHARD ROBERTS. So the question really is, when we’re in a state of lower immune resistance to things, does this allow pathogens to become much more pathogenic if you like. And the answer is that whenever an organism becomes pathogenic, it just means that it’s able to grow and you can make lots of it. Provided you just have low levels of a pathogen, typically they don’t cause problems. This is why you can sit next to someone who has influenza or tuberculosis, provided you don’t get a significant dose of it, then your own immune system is typically able to take care of it. And so it’s really usually a question of the quantity of the organism that is produced. If you just keep it at very low levels, it’s not pathogenic, you don’t have any severe symptoms. On the other hand, if it grows to large levels because it’s not being contained, then you can get all of the symptoms of pathogenicity. And very often what happens is that as soon as you reach this critical point where you’re making a lot of the organism, it’s dividing rapidly. That will then compromise the body’s ability to mount an effective immune response. And this is what happens in the case of say cholera for instance. So low levels of vibrio cholerae are fine, but as soon as the organism starts to divide, the body just can’t keep track of it and can’t keep pace with it, our immune system is not good enough to hold really large quantities of the organism. Once again, thank you Richard for this wonderful exposé.

Guten Morgen allerseits und willkommen. Heute werden wir drei Vorträge hören, und anschließend gibt es eine Diskussion am runden Tisch. Unser erster Sprecher ist Richard Roberts von den New England Biolabs. Die Entdeckung, die er 1977 über die Mosaikstruktur der Gene machte, gelang ihm jedoch, als er an den Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in Long Island, New York, arbeitete. Der Titel seines Vortrags lautet: Dr. Roberts, Sie haben das Wort. Vielen Dank. Nun, was ich heute zu tun versuchen werde, ist Folgendes: Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon zu geben, warum ich Mikroben absolut faszinierend finde. Ich denke, dass sie so interessant sind, dass ich alle von Ihnen ermutigen möchte, sich zu überlegen, in diesem Fachgebiet einmal zu forschen. Eine Sache, die mir an Mikroben gefällt, ist, dass es im Wesentlichen sehr einfache Organismen sind. Und es scheint mir möglich, dass wir - vorausgesetzt wir investieren in ihr Studium genug Energie – noch zu meinen Lebzeiten verstehen könnten, wie der einfachste Mikroorganismus funktioniert. Ich nehme an, dass wir als Biologen alle verstehen möchten, wie das Leben funktioniert. Wir werden zu meinen Lebzeiten nicht verstehen, wie der Mensch funktioniert, vielleicht auch nicht zu Ihren Lebzeiten. Doch ich denke, dass wir vielleicht verstehen könnten, wie Mikroben funktionieren. Für mich wäre das eine faszinierende Möglichkeit. Die Mikroben haben aus meiner Sicht den unschätzbaren Vorteil, dass die meisten von ihnen unentdeckt sind. Weniger als 1 %, vielleicht sogar weniger als 0,1 %, aller Mikroben auf diesem Planeten wurden bisher entdeckt, im Labor beschrieben und vermehrt. Die meisten Mikroben können wir nicht züchten. Ein Grund hierfür ist, dass viele von ihnen nur wachsen, wenn zwei oder drei oder vier von ihnen gemeinsam wachsen. Sie brauchen sich gegenseitig, um im Leben erfolgreich sein zu können. Viele von ihnen leben außerdem unter äußerst unwirtlichen Umständen. Ein oder zwei dieser Mikroorganismen werde ich Ihnen vorstellen. Darüber hinaus verfügen sie über eine bemerkenswerte Eigenschaft. Sie besteht darin, dass sie in uns leben: Unsere Körper sind im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes voller Mikroorganismen dieser oder jener Art. Sie leben auf unserer Haut, in unserem Mund, im Inneren unserer Körper. Wo immer Sie es sich vorstellen: Mikroorganismen leben dort. Und auch hierüber werde ich Ihnen etwas zeigen. Lassen Sie uns also mit einer kurzen Reise durch die Umwelt beginnen. Ich stelle Ihnen ein oder zwei Mikroben vor, die ich besonders interessant finde. Anschließend sprechen wir über den menschlichen Körper und seine Gesundheit und über die Art der Organismen, die in uns leben. Gehen wir also zum nächsten Dia. Ich möchte Ihnen dies zeigen, nur um Ihnen zu erklären, wie Mikroben…. Und unter Mikroben verstehe ich Bakterien und Archaeen, und dies hier sind die drei Reiche des Lebens. Ursprünglich nahm man an, dass es sich bei den Archaeen um Bakterien handelt, tatsächlich machen sie jedoch ein eigenes Reich des Lebens aus, wie von Carl Woese 1977 gezeigt wurde. Was dieser Baum des Lebens Ihnen zeigen soll, ist, wie hinsichtlich seiner Diversität alles miteinander verwandt ist. Die Eukaryoten, die großen Organismen, die Sie sehen Viele von diesen hier unten, Giardien usw., sind winzige Mikroorganismen, mikroskopisch kleine. Und alle diese anderen Organismen, die Bakterien und Archaeen sind, wie sie sehen, sehr weit weg. Sie sind nur entfernt mit uns verwandt. Und wir sitzen hier oben. Dies ist Homo und dies ist der Mais. Wir sind also mit dem Mais wesentlich enger verwandt als mit vielen anderen Organismen, von denen Sie das gedacht hätten. Wir sind von den Bakterien weit entfernt. Doch beachten Sie die Mitochondrien hier, die roten Organismen. Hierbei handelt es sich um kleine Organellen, die in uns leben, die Energie für uns produzieren und die sehr eng mit den Bakterien verwandt sind. Ich zeige Ihnen damit, dass die menschlichen Zellen, das menschliche Genom tatsächlich etwas enthält, was uns aus vielen verschiedenen Genomen im Laufe der Zeit zugewachsen ist. Der größte Teil der Vielfalt auf dieser Erde besteht aus Mikroben. Der größte Teil der Biomasse besteht aus Bakterien. Dies mag nur schwer zu glauben sein. Man ist gewissermaßen daran gewöhnt sich umzuschauen und das pflanzliche Leben und jede Menge Tiere zu sehen usw. Man kann sehr leicht zum dem irrigen Schluss gelangen, dass diese Organismen den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten ausmachen. Doch dies ist nicht der Fall. Den größten Teil der Biomasse auf diesem Planeten stellen die Mikroben dar. Nicht nur in uns, sondern auch in den Meeren. Die Meere schäumen von Mikroorganismen geradezu über. Selbst wenn Sie 5 Kilometer in die Erde graben, finden Sie Mikroorganismen, typischerweise 10 hoch 5 bis 10 hoch 6 pro Gramm des Erdmaterials, 5 Kilometer unter der Erde. Diese Wesen sind also überall: Sie sind in der Antarktis, unter dem Eis: an jedem Ort, den Sie sich vorstellen können. Und einer der Gründe, weshalb Sie sich nicht wirklich vorstellen können, wie viele Mikroorganismen es gibt, ist ihre Unsichtbarkeit. Es handelt sich bei ihnen um mikroskopisch kleine Organismen. Man muss durch ein Mikroskop schauen, um sie zu entdecken. Das erste Dia, das ich Ihnen hier zeige, ist ein Photosynthese treibender Organismus. Tatsächlich ist dieser Organismus insofern recht interessant, als er der erste Umweltverschmutzer auf diesem Planeten war. Als das Leben auf diesem Planeten entstand, begann es in einer anaeroben Umgebung. Es gab keinen Sauerstoff. Der meiste Sauerstoff lag in Mineralien im Inneren dieses Planeten oder im Wasser gebunden vor. Diese Organismen begannen damit, Photosynthese zu treiben. Sie begannen, Sauerstoff zu produzieren, und tatsächlich vernichteten sie den größten Teil der Lebewesen, die anaerob waren und die diesen freien Sauerstoff gar nicht mochten. Wie Sie sehen, sind es sehr schöne Organismen. Sie bilden diese schönen langen Ketten, und hin und wieder sehen Sie eine etwas größere Heterosis, eine sehr merkwürdige kleine Form dieses Organismus. Sie kann anaerob leben, während die andere Form aerob lebt. Wenn man das Erdreich untersucht, findet man überall, wo Stoffe verwesen, sogenannte Myxobakterien. Sie sehen aus wie kleine Pilze, nur dass man sie ohne Mikroskop nicht sehen kann, und sie bilden diese wunderschönen kleinen Fruchtkörper. Es sind sehr schöne kleine Fruchtkörper. Es sind im Wesentlichen Bakterien, die sich differenzieren können. Um zu überleben, können sie verschiedene Arten von Zellen und verschiedene Formen von Zusammenschlüssen von Zellen hervorbringen. Diese Organismen befinden sich überall im Boden. Viele von ihnen haben diese schöne orangene Farbe. Sie sind sehr, sehr schön. Manchmal sehen Sie sie als einen Film auf faulendem Holz. Es gibt sehr, sehr viele dieser Bakterien: Ohne sie wären wir wahrscheinlich voller Abfallstoffe irgendwelcher Art. Sie sind äußerst wichtig zur Beseitigung von Abfallmaterial. Diesen Organismus hier liebe ich: Er ist ein Beispiel für ein Spirillenbakterium. Er hat den Namen aquaspirillum magnetotacticum. Dieses Lebewesen existiert in den Weltmeeren. Es zeichnet sich durch eine sehr interessante Struktur aus, die hier in Schwarz dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um eine Anlagerung (Akkretion) von Eisen, und sie ist magnetisch. Dieser Organismus hat also in seinem Inneren einen Magneten gebildet, und er verwendet ihn zur räumlichen Orientierung. Er schwimmt in der Richtung des Magnetfelds der Erde. Wenn er sich auf der nördlichen Hemisphäre befindet, schwimmt er gerne nach Norden, befindet er sich auf der südlichen Hemisphäre, schwimmt er vorzugsweise nach Süden. Außerdem ist er sehr sensibel für das Gravitationsfeld, so dass er von der Wasseroberfläche nach unten schwimmt. Wir verstehen nicht wirklich, warum er dies tut. Es ist einfach ein Verhalten, das sich beobachten lässt. Es gibt verschieden Theorien hierüber. Einige Leute meinen, dass die Bakterien vor Feinden davon schwimmen, andere, dass sie zu ihrer Nahrungsquelle schwimmen. Doch warum das Bakterium einen Magneten hierfür verwenden sollte, ist vollkommen ungeklärt. Tatsächlich gibt es eine ganze Reihe von Organismen, man kennt 40 bis 50 verschiedene Arten, die dies tun können. Sie verfügen über kleine Magneten in ihrem Inneren, mit deren Hilfe sie sich orientieren. Dies ist ein weiterer Bewohner des Ozeans: ein wunderschöner Kalkröhrenwurm. Diese Wesen leben auf diesen Tiefseeschloten. Wie Sie wissen, befinden sich auf dem Grund der Ozeane zahlreiche Vulkane, viele Vulkane, in denen wir Magma und andere Materialien finden, die die Erde ausspuckt. Manchmal werden sie auch als „Schwarze Raucher“ bezeichnet. Sie wurden um die Mitte der 1970er Jahre von ozeanographischen Tiefsee-U-Booten entdeckt, in der Hauptsache von Woods Hole. Und diese Schlote enthalten Magma. Dampf mit ungeheuer hohen Temperaturen kommt aus ihnen heraus, mit bis zu 1000°C. Dies spielt sich an zahlreichen Stellen mitten im tiefen Ozean ab, so dass sich diese großen Temperaturgefälle entwickeln: zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem Material mit einer Temperatur von 1000°C, das sie abgeben, und dem Ozean, der dort normalerweise eine Temperatur von 4°C oder 5°C hat. Und wie man festgestellt hat, gibt es viele derartige Organismen, die bevorzugt in dieser Zone zwischen den Schwarzen Rauchern und dem umgebenden Ozean leben, wo die Temperaturen von um die 100°C bis plötzlich herab auf 5°C liegen. Dort leben zahlreiche Bakterien und Archaeen. Besonders die Archaeen lieben diese Umgebung, doch es gibt hier auch Eukaryoten. Und einer dieser Eukaryoten ist dieser Kalkröhrenwurm. Dies ist tatsächlich ein Wurm: Dies ist die Schutzumhüllung des Wurms und dies ist die fedrige Plume. In der Mitte dieses Wurms befindet sich ein riesengroßes Bakterium. Ohne das Bakterium könnte der Wurm nicht existieren. Das Bakterium nutzt all die Mineralien und die Energie, die aus diesen tiefen Schloten kommt, und verwendet sie zur Herstellung von Stoffen, die den Wurm am Leben erhalten. Das ist so bizarr. Man findet diese Würmer überall. Sagen wir also, man hätte sich vorstellen können, dass diese Wesen in einem bestimmten Schwarzen Raucher entstanden sind und sich von dort aus ausgebreitet haben. Wo immer diese Schlote im Ozean zu finden sind, begegnet man diesen Kalkröhrenwürmern und findet man diese wunderschönen Bakterien, die in ihrem Inneren leben. Nun, wenn wir zum Yellowstone Nationalpark gehen – es gibt viele solcher Parks, doch bin noch in keinem gewesen, der so schön ist wie der Yellowstone –, dies ist meine touristische Werbung: Wenn Sie jemals die Gelegenheit bekommen, den Yellowstone Nationalpark zu besuchen, dann sollten Sie dies tun. Es ist einfach ein fantastischer Ort. Es ist eine vulkanische Caldera und es gibt dort zahlreiche heiße Quellen und viele Geysire. Der Boden ist an vielen Stellen des Yellowstone Nationalpark noch immer extrem heiß. Und es gibt wunderbare Beispiele von Bakterien und Archaeen, die dort leben. Sehen wir uns einige dieser warmen Teiche und Wasseransammlungen genauer an: Hier ist ein warmer Tümpel, und hier ist etwas heißes Wasser, das in ihn hineinfließt. Man findet hier jede Menge dieser phototropen Organismen, die dort leben. Man erkennt sie an diesen wunderschönen Farben. Sie bilden Bakterienfilme. Wenn man sich den Querschnitt dieser Filme ansieht, stellt man fest, dass sich an ihrem oberen Rand Organismen befinden, die eine bestimmte Wellenlänge des Lichts verwenden, um Photosynthese zu betreiben und Energie zu erzeugen. Und unterhalb dieser oberen Schicht findet man Bakterien, die das restliche Licht nutzen. Und wenn man nur wenige Zentimeter unter die Oberfläche geht, gelangt kein Licht mehr dorthin, da alles Licht bereits von den Bakterien aufgebraucht wurde, die sich entwickelt haben, um es zu nutzen. Sie bilden alle rund um diese Wasseransammlungen diese wunderschönen Farben aus, und es sind alles Bakterienfilme. Dies ist auch beispielsweise der Ursprung des Enzyms Taq-Polymerase von Thermos aquaticus. Ein Mann namens Brock, ein sehr berühmter Mikrobiologe, entdeckte diesen Organismus in Yellowstone. Tatsächlich ist dies der Ort, an dem wir heute Polymerase-Kettenreaktionen (PCR) und alle diese wunderbaren Dinge durchführen können: aufgrund des Organismus, der aus dieser heißen Quelle kam. Normalerweise leben Organismen hier zwischen 80°C und 100°C. Stellen Sie sich das vor: bei 100°C. Normalerweise ist Ihre DNA bei dieser Temperatur völlig denaturiert. Doch diese Organismen haben Wege gefunden, die DNA-Stränge getrennt zu halten. Ein weiteres schönes Phänomen, dem Sie im Yellowstone-Nationalpark begegnen können, sind diese schönen Schwefelquellen. Diese gelbe Farbe hier ist ein Hinweis auf das Element Schwefel in reiner Form. Es wird von diesen archaischen Organismen, Sulfolobus und Sulfotaracus, produziert, die den Schwefelwasserstoff nutzen können, der aus dieser Quelle kommt. Und sie können ihn dann oxydieren, dadurch Schwefel erzeugen und auf diese Weise genug Energie gewinnen, um sich am Leben zu erhalten. Wundervolle Organismen, viele, viele Beispiele dafür, wenn wir uns umschauen. Nun möchte ich statt über die Umwelt im Allgemeinen über unsere „örtliche“ Umwelt reden: über uns Menschen und die Bakterien, die in uns leben. Wir sind uns häufig nicht all der Bakterien bewusst, die in uns leben – bis wir krank werden. Viele von uns erkranken an einer schlimmen Infektion, die vielleicht von einem Staphylococcus ausgelöst wird. Als ich ein Kind war, bevor es Antibiotika gab, bekam ich jedes Mal, wenn ich mich am Bein schnitt, eine böse, eitrige Infektion. Furchtbar war das. Heute kann man all das mit Antibiotika behandeln, obwohl wir Antibiotika wahrscheinlich häufiger einsetzen, als wir dies tun sollten. Doch es gibt viele, viele Organismen, denen wir begegnen und die uns keine Probleme bereiten. Ich werde Ihnen ein oder zwei von ihnen vorstellen, die für uns problematisch sind. Denn obwohl sie Probleme verursachen, sind es dennoch höchst interessante Organismen. Sie haben wunderbare „Lifestyles“: Sie können alle möglichen interessanten Dinge tun. Und es gibt so viele in uns lebende Organismen die vollkommen harmlos sind. Tatsächlich sind andere sehr, sehr gut für uns. Sie werden als Probiotika bezeichnet, und ich werde gegen Ende meines Vortrags über sie sprechen. Vorher möchte ich jedoch ein wenig über die Zellen reden, aus denen wir bestehen, und den Menschen mit den Bakterien vergleichen. Normalerweise besteht ein Mensch aus 10 hoch 13 Zellen, d. h. menschlichen Zellen, und außerdem aus 10 hoch 14 Bakterien. Im Körper des Menschen befinden sich also 10mal so viele Bakterien wie körpereigene Zellen. Die Zahl der Stämme des Menschen beträgt 1, bei den Bakterien würde ich eine Zahl von über 400 annehmen. Tatsächlich wissen wir unter dem Strich wirklich nichts Genaueres darüber, wie viele verschiedene Arten von Bakterien in uns leben. Gegenwärtig gibt es eine Reihe von Forschungsprojekten, die die Genome sämtlicher Bakterien untersuchen, die mit dem Menschen verbunden sind. Man untersucht Proben der Haut, aus dem Mund, dem Magen usw., um ein Gefühl dafür zu bekommen, genau wieviele Stämme es gibt. Ich bin der Meinung, dass es sehr leicht 10mal so viele sein könnten, es könnten leicht 4000 sein. Wir wissen es zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt einfach nicht. Die meisten dieser Organismen können wir nicht in Kulturen züchten. Wir wissen von ihrer Existenz nur, weil wir ihre DNA studieren können. Wir können uns ihren ribosomalen Inhalt ansehen, den Inhalt der ribosomalen DNA, und eine Vorstellung davon gewinnen, wie groß ihre Vielfalt ist. Doch sie ist wirklich immens: Bakterien gibt es überall. Wenn wir uns den Umfang der DNA-Basen ansehen – in einer typischen menschlichen Zelle gibt es etwa 3 Milliarden – wenn wir alle DNA-Basen aufaddieren, die einzelnen Gene, die einzelnen Sequenzen in diesen verschiedenen Bakterienstämmen, so haben wir es vielleicht mit einem Drittel der DNA-Basen zu tun. Doch das entspricht wesentlich mehr Genen. Also diese 3 mal 10 hoch 9 DNA-Basen in einer Zelle des Menschen – die Schätzung beläuft sich auf 30.000, oder vielleicht auf nicht mehr als 25.000, die Zahl scheint ständig zurückzugehen, die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben. Und die Zahl der Bakteriengene steigt wahrscheinlich ständig weiter an. Daher gibt es sehr viel mehr Bakteriengene, die mit unserem Körper verbunden sind, als es Gene des Menschen gibt. Auch das sollte man sich einmal klarmachen. Die Population der Bakterien ist hinsichtlich ihrer Diversität sehr, sehr viel größer als unsere. Ich möchte Ihnen nun kurz eine Vorstellung davon geben, wo große Anzahlen von Bakterien typischerweise vorkommen. Auf der Haut findet man Staphylokokken. Es gibt einen sehr schönen Organismus namens Staphylococcus epidermidis. Manchmal zeige ich ihn auf einem Dia. Er lebt in den Poren unserer Haut und ist im Wesentlichen unempfindlich gegen alles, was wir tun. Sie können sich die Hände und die Arme den ganzen Tag lang waschen: Diese Organismen stört es nicht, weil die Seife wirklich niemals bis zu ihnen vordringt. Sie haben gute Methoden entwickelt, sich zu verstecken. Außerdem gibt es viele verschiedene Arten von Corynebakterien. Ich will sie hier nicht alle durchgehen. In unserem Mund lebt eine recht interessante Ansammlung von Organismen. Ungefähr ein Zehntel der Organismen, von denen wir erkannt haben, dass sie in unserem Mund leben, haben wir weder in Kulturen züchten noch auf irgendeine vernünftige Weise identifizieren können. Von den meisten Organismen wissen wir nicht, was sie machen. Wir wissen nicht, warum sie dort sind, und wir wissen überhaupt sehr wenig über sie. Auch in den Luftwegen, im Magendarmkanal und im Urogenitalsystem befinden sich alle möglichen Organismen. Und natürlich haben wir es hier mit Organismen zu tun, die Probleme verursachen können. Viele dieser Organismen sind Krankheitserreger, viele andere von ihnen hingegen nicht. Und tatsächlich sind selbst die pathogenen Organismen in mancher Hinsicht sogar ein wenig hilfreich, da einige der Organismen, die in uns leben, die nützlich für uns sind, Verbindungen produzieren, die diese pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Zwischen den Mikroorganismen besteht ein ständiger Kampf. Sie alle wollen in dieser kleinen Nische leben. Daher stellen viele der Organismen, die uns eher nützlich sind, Verbindungen her, die uns diese Pathogene vom Leib halten, was eine gute Sache ist. Das folgende Dia liebe ich: Es zeigt genau, was passiert, wenn man niest und es nicht unterdrückt, und dies ist der Weg, auf dem sich sehr, sehr viele dieser pathogenen Organismen vorzugsweise verbreiten. Sie leben gerne in den Nasenhöhlen, im Rachen und im Mund usw. und dies ist die Art von Aerosol, das bei jedem Niesen produziert wird. Natürlich befinden sich Mikroorganismen darin und sie verbreiten sich ständig. Sie haben wahrscheinlich über die jüngste Tuberkulosegefahr in den US gehört. Die Tuberkulose verbreitet sich auf diese Weise. Sie ist ein unglaublich gefährlicher Organismus, was ihre Ansteckungsgefahr betrifft. Es handelt sich bei ihr um einen äußerst bösartigen Erreger. Nun, die Geschichte der Krankheit geht auf das Jahr 1877 zurück. Tatsächlich war Anthrax der erste Organismus, von dem definitiv gezeigt werden konnte, dass er eine Krankheit verursacht. Dies zu beweisen gelang dem bedeutenden Mikrobiologen Robert Koch. Er entdeckte später noch eine ganze Reihe anderer Dinge. Außerdem stellte er die Regeln auf, anhand deren entschieden wird, ob wir etwas als einen ursächlichen Erreger bezeichnen oder nicht. Weiter hier unten sehen Sie jede Menge wirklich übler Erkrankungen, die von diesen Mikroorganismen verursacht werden. Über ein oder zwei von ihnen werde ich Ihnen etwas ausführlicher berichten. Es gibt eine lange Geschichte und es war offensichtlich etwas, für das sich Mikrobiologen sehr interessiert haben. Man möchte immer wissen, welche Organismen Krankheiten verursachen und dann natürlich, wie man damit am besten verfährt, wie man sie eindämmen kann. Ein Organismus, über den ich sehr gern rede, ist Helicobacter pylori. Dies ist ein Organismus, der in ihrem Magen lebt, im Endothel. Vor zwei Jahren war dieser Organismus der Gegenstand des Nobelpreises in der Medizin, als Marshall und Warren den Preis dafür erhielten, weil sie zeigten, dass dieser Organismus die Ursache von Magengeschwüren sein kann. Vorher hatten die Pharmaunternehmen geglaubt, dass man, wenn man ein Magengeschwür hat, lediglich ein säurebindendes Mittel zu sich nehmen muss. Dies würde das Problem der Säure im Magen lösen, doch es war völlig wirkungslos gegen die Ursache der Krankheit. Und Barry Marshall führte das klassische Experiment durch, das viele Ärzte gerne durchführen. Er war davon überzeugt, dass Helicobacter die Ursache der Infektion war, dass er die Ursache der Magengeschwüre war, und daher kultivierte er einige in seinem Labor und trank sie. Tatsächlich entwickelte er innerhalb weniger Tage ein Magengeschwür, und glücklicherweise waren Antibiotika gegen den Helicobacter, den er zu sich genommen hatte, wirksam und er konnte sich sehr schnell heilen. Man kann in der Tat die meisten durch Helicobacter pylori verursachten Magengeschwüre durch die Einnahme von Antibiotika kurieren. Der Pharmaindustrie gefiel das natürlich überhaupt nicht, weil der Verkauf von Magensäureblockern drastisch zurückging. Doch dennoch ist dies der Fall. Dies hier ist ein echter Helicobacter pylori. Dies zeigt die Bakterienzelle, wie sie sich an eine der Epithelzellen anheftet, die den Magen auskleiden. Und wie sie sehen, führt es zu einer sehr engen Wechselwirkung. Tatsächlich ist bekannt, dass Helicobacter pylori Krebs verursachen kann. Das Bakterium kann Magenkrebs und auch Speiseröhrenkrebs verursachen, wenn man an einem Säure-Reflux leidet. Wir wissen nicht, wie dies im Einzelnen geschieht, doch es gibt sehr deutliche Hinweise darauf, dass dies geschehen kann. Nun, die meisten von uns, die wir in der westlichen Welt leben, haben nur noch wenige Bakterien von Helicobacter pylori im Magen. In den Entwicklungsländern ist jedoch fast jeder infiziert, und zwar schon ab einem sehr frühen Alter. In der westlichen Welt nehmen wir jedoch so viele Antibiotika zu uns, dass wir diese Population in der Regel beseitigt haben. Ein Mann namens Martin Blaser von der medizinischen Fakultät der Universität New York hat kürzlich diesen Organismus untersucht und herausgefunden, dass es eine enge Korrelation zwischen einer Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori und der Anfälligkeit für Asthma gibt. Und es hat sich herausgestellt, dass man – wenn man eine starke Infektion mit Helicobacter pylori hat, fast so gut wie nie an Asthma erkrankt. Und in dem Maße, wie die Infektionsrate von Helicobacter pylori in einer Bevölkerung zurückgeht, steigt die Zahl der an Asthma Erkrankten. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass es sich hierbei um eine Kausalbeziehung handelt. Es ist noch zu früh, um sich in dieser Sache sicher sein zu können; doch der Zusammenhang deutet auf die Tatsache, dass viele Bakterien in uns leben, die wir durch die unbedachte Verwendung von Antibiotika unterschiedslos abtöten, und dass es hierdurch sehr wohl zu zahlreichen verschiedenen, unbeabsichtigter Folgen kommen kann. Ich zeige Ihnen nun einen sehr schönen Organismus, auf diesem schönen Dia. Es ist einer dieser Spirillum-Organismen. Er heißt Borrelia und verursacht die Borreliose. Vibrio cholerae ist derjenige Organismus, der die als Cholera bekannte Krankheit verursacht. Dennoch ist Vibrio cholerae sehr interessant. Es ist ein kleiner Mikroorganismus, der mit einem großen eukaryotischen Organismus namens Volvox zusammenlebt. Und er sitzt tatsächlich fast ausschließlich auf der Oberfläche von Volvox, so dass man, wenn man eine Cholera-Infektion vorliegen hat und glaubt, dass Wasser verunreinigt ist, allein durch das Filtern des Wassers durch ein sehr eng gewebtes Tuch, etwa einen Sari, den größten Teil der Vibrio-Organismen aus dem Wasser entfernen kann. Sehr einfache Maßnahmen der öffentlichen Gesundheit können hier nützlich sein. Dies ist ein weiteres Spirillum, Trepanoma, das die Parodontose verursacht. Yersinia pestis ist der Erreger der Pest. Dies ist der Organismus, der im Mittelalter in Europa die Pandemie des Schwarzen Todes herbeiführte. Das nächste Dia zeige ich stets besonders gern: das Dia der kleinen Beulen, die von diesem Organismus verursacht werden. Und wenn man eine starke Infektion hat, bekommt man einen starken Wundbrand (Gangrän) an den Fingern, den Zehen und am Brustkorb. Wenn man dieses Stadium erreicht hat, lässt sich fast nichts mehr an der Erkrankung machen. Wenn man sie jedoch früh erkennt, lässt sie sich mit Antibiotika erfolgreich behandeln. Zum Schluss möchte ich Ihnen noch etwas über Lactobacillus erzählen. Lactobacillus ist einer von den Organismen, die wir für probiotisch halten. Sie sind sehr nützlich für uns. Man findet diesen Organismus in Joghurt. Joghurt zu essen, wenn man ihn mag, ist eine wunderbare Sache. Mir selbst schmeckt er nicht, aber ich würde ihn allen von Ihnen empfehlen. Diese Organismen stellen Verbindungen her, die viele der pathogenen Organismen unter Kontrolle halten. Es gibt zahlreiche Organismen, die dies tun, Bifidobacterium ist ein weiterer, den man manchmal in Joghurt findet, doch es gibt tatsächlich jede Menge Mikroorganismen, die Wunderbares für uns leisten. Wir wollen sie in unserem Körper haben, wie wollen, dass sie in uns leben, weil sie Krankheitserreger unter Kontrolle halten. Schließen möchte ich mit der Bitte an sie wenden, sich etwas vorzustellen, was ich recht außerordentlich finde. Hier sind wir also: Wir sind Menschen, wir laufen herum, wir sind randvoll mit Bakterien, sie leben überall in uns und haben es gut dabei. Wenn wir evolvieren, wie Menschen evolvieren, werden die Bakterienpopulationen ebenfalls evolvieren. Die beiden leben also tatsächlich in einer wunderbaren Symbiose: Wir evolvieren zusammen. Und es fällt nicht schwer sich vorzustellen, dass Menschen vielleicht von Bakterien erfunden wurden, um einen schönen Lebensraum abzugeben. Ich danke Ihnen. Vielen Dank. Sie haben sich gut an die Zeit gehalten. Wir haben daher Zeit für Fragen. Hat jemand eine Frage? FRAGE. Ich denke, dass viele Menschen heute Antibiotika verwenden und ich denke, dass es vielleicht eine Beschädigung der mikroorganismischen Flora des Menschen darstellt. Halten Sie es für ein ernstes Problem, dass wir zu viele Antibiotika verwenden? RICHARD ROBERTS. Ja, Antibiotika, wissen Sie, sind wirklich das Wundermedikament. Sie waren das Wundermedikament, als man sie entdeckte, und wir missbrauchen sie sehr. Wir verabreichen sie Rindern und auf diese Weise gelangen sie in Fleisch und in unsere Nahrungskette. In der westlichen Welt ist es gewiss so, dass wir Antibiotika beim geringsten Anzeichen einer Infektion Wir verwenden sie viel zu häufig. Die Sache wird wirklich klar, wenn man sich die Tuberkulose als eines der besten Beispiele hierfür ansieht. Als ich Kind war, war die Tuberkulose ein großes Problem. Wenn man – in England – Tuberkulose hatte, wurde man in ein Sanatorium gesteckt. Man wurde vom Rest der Bevölkerung isoliert, um die Ausbreitung der Krankheit zu verhindern. Dann standen Antibiotika zur Verfügung, man konnte eine Infektion mit Microbacterium tuberculosis heilen, und alle Welt hörte auf, sich darüber Sorgen zu machen. Jetzt haben wir einen Punkt erreicht, an dem es von Microbacterium tuberculosis sehr, sehr viele Stämme gibt, die resistent gegen Medikamente sind. Wenn Sie – Gott bewahre – jemals in Russland ins Gefängnis kämen, dann wäre es sehr wahrscheinlich, dass Sie mit einer bösen Tuberkulose-Infektion wieder herauskämen. Weltweit sterben jährlich mehr als eine Million Menschen an Tuberkulose, und die Regierung der USA hat in ihrer Weisheit schon vor vielen, vielen Jahren beschlossen, die Erforschung von Microbacterium tuberculosis nicht weiter zu finanzieren. Sie hat erst kürzlich damit begonnen, sie finanziell zu unterstützen, und die Tuberkulose ist heute wieder zu einem großen Problem geworden. Und um Ihre Frage zu beantworten: Ja, wir sind mit den Antibiotika, die uns zur Verfügung standen, völlig falsch umgegangen. Und es gibt nur sehr wenig neue, neue Arten von Antibiotika, die in nächster Zeit verfügbar werden. Einige neue erscheinen, doch wir haben diese Forschung sehr lange vernachlässigt. FRAGE. Ich bin Arzt und komme aus Pakistan. Ich war fasziniert, als ich erfuhr, dass die intravesikale Therapie der Tuberkulose gegen Blasenkrebs eingesetzt wird. Als ich die Literatur zu Rate zog, stellte ich fest, dass viele Viren als Anti-Tumor-Mittel verwendet werden. Glauben Sie, dass dies ein vielsprechendes Gebiet ist: der Einsatz von Mikroben zur Behandlung von Krebs? RICHARD ROBERTS. Also, Ihre Frage richtet sich auf die Verwendung von Mikroben und Viren zur Behandlung von Krebs. Ich fürchte, dass ich darüber nichts weiß. Ich bin in dieser Sache völlig unwissend. Mir ist bekannt, dass man bakterielle Phagen zur Behandlung bakterieller Infektionen verwendet. Dies ist etwas, womit man sich in Russland seit sehr langer Zeit beschäftigt. Über die Behandlung von Krebs mithilfe von Mikroorganismen weiß ich jedoch nichts. Vielleicht können wir später noch darüber reden. Ich würde sehr gerne mehr darüber erfahren. FRAGE. Ich möchte Folgendes wissen: Zahlreiche Unternehmen verkaufen heute mit Probiotika veränderte Lebensmittel: Ist es wirklich erwiesen, dass es wesentlich besser für uns ist, diese teuren Lebensmittel zu kaufen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, ich denke, es ist wirklich schwer zu wissen. Das Problem mit den Mitteln zur Unterstützung der Gesundheit, den Nahrungsergänzungsmitteln, besteht darin, dass sie nicht reglementiert sind. Daher ist es ein offensichtlicher Markt für irgendeinen Scharlatan, der daherkommt und versucht, Ihnen ein Quacksalberprodukt zu verkaufen. Ich denke, dass einige der Probiotika, wenn man sagt, was genau sich darin befindet und besonders wenn sie Lactobacillus oder wenn sie Bifidobacterium enthalten, wahrscheinlich tatsächlich gesundheitsfördernd sind. Doch ich glaube ebenso, dass es zahlreiche Produkte auf dem Markt gibt, die man besser meidet. Ich empfehle Ihnen, dass Sie – wenn Sie wirklich Probiotika verwenden wollen – unbedingt Joghurt essen sollten. Joghurt ist sehr gesund, nur schmeckt er nicht. FRAGE. Sie sprachen über die Koevolution der Bakterien und des Menschen. Im Fall von Helicobacter pylori, sagten Sie, seien die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit diesen Bakterien infiziert. Es kommt jedoch bei den meisten Menschen nicht zum Ausbruch einer Krankheit. Was meinen Sie: Handelt es sich dabei um einen Krankheitserreger ober um einen Symbionten? RICHARD ROBERTS. Okay, die Frage richtet sich auf Helicobacter pylori und die Tatsache, dass die meisten Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern mit Helicobacter pylori infiziert sind. Die meisten dieser Infektionen sind relativ unterschwellig. Man hat also den Organismus, doch keine damit zusammenhängenden ernsthaften Krankheitssymptome. Wir wissen nicht wirklich, warum man plötzlich eine mit Helicobacter zusammenhängende Krankheit bekommt. In der westlichen Welt mag es einen Zusammenhang mit der Ernährung oder mit anderen Organismen geben, die hinzukommen. In den Entwicklungsländern sind die Fälle von durch Helicobacter verursachten Magenkrebs sehr selten, obwohl es von Zeit zu Zeit einige Fälle gibt. Anderswo ist die Häufigkeit wesentlich größer. Ich denke jedoch, dass das wirkliche Problem darin besteht, dass das ganze Mikrobiom, der Satz an Mikroben, der in einer Population lebt, sich ändert, wenn man von einer Population zu einer anderen geht. Daher muss man also nicht nur an Helicobacter pylori denken, sondern auch an alle anderen Organismen, die man typischerweise findet. Und viele von ihnen sind in der westlichen Welt einfach nicht anzutreffen. Demnach haben wir noch einen langen Weg vor uns. Wissen Sie: Wenn wir erkennen, dass wir die meisten der in uns lebenden Organismen nicht kennen und dass wir nicht wissen, was sie tun, ist es sehr leicht, eine Hypothese aufzustellen und sehr viel schwieriger, sie zu testen, weil wir es hier mit komplizierten Lebensräumen zu tun haben, in denen diese Organismen leben. FRAGE. Meine Frage lautet: Wie können wir dem Problem der Resistenz gegen mehrere Medikamente begegnen? Meinen Sie, wir müssten einen universalen Angriffspunkt finden, damit wir in Zukunft nicht mehr nach neuen Antibiotika suchen müssen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun gut, ich denke, die ganze Sache bezüglich der mehrfachen Resistenz gegen Medikamente bedeutet, dass wir neue Medikamente finden müssen, und typischerweise bedeuten neue Medikamente nicht neue Angriffspunkte, manchmal ist das so. Allerdings handelt es sich hierbei um unterschiedliche Klassen von Verbindungen, die sich gegen ein bekanntes Angriffsziel richten, obwohl auf andere Weise. Wenn sie sich beispielsweise vorstellen, dass Sie es mit einem Protein zu tun haben, das für das Bakterium eine Schlüsselfunktion erfüllt, und dass Sie ein Medikament finden, das an dieser Stelle eine Bindung eingeht und die Funktion des Proteins hemmt, so wird es zu einer Aminosäurenänderung am Punkt der Wechselwirkung kommen. Wenn Sie ein anderes Mittel finden, das das Molekül an demselben Punkt in der Sequenz trifft, dann haben diese Mutationen keine Wirkung darauf. Damit der Organismus dann resistent wird, muss es zu Mutationen an einer anderen Stelle kommen. Wir wissen, dass einige der neuen Medikamente, die zur Zeit entwickelt werden, eine von den Medikamenten, die wir als Antibiotika verwenden, sehr verschiedene Struktur haben. In manchen Fällen, richten sie sich gegen neue Angriffspunkte. Das Schöne an der Tatsache, dass wir im Laufe der letzten paar Jahre so viele Genomsequenzen von Bakterien analysiert haben ist Folgendes: Es gibt zahllose Angriffspunkte, die wir finden können. Ich denke also, dass es keinen Mangel an guten Angriffspunkten gibt, gegen die wir uns bei Bakterien richten können, doch es fehlt an Anstrengungen bei der Suche nach Antibiotika. Im Allgemeinen, wissen Sie, sind die Pharmaunternehmen nicht sehr darauf bedacht nach Antibiotika zu suchen, da sie den Nachteil haben, dass sich mit ihnen die Krankheit heilen und daher nur ein geringer Gewinn erzielen lässt. Die Pharmaunternehmen hätten viel lieber etwas, was die Symptome erleichtert, was man für den Rest seines Lebens einnehmen muss. Dann ergibt sich eine sehr schöne Gewinnspanne. FRAGE. Glauben Sie, dass sich – außer der Resistenz gegen Antibiotika – aufgrund des veränderten Verhaltens der Menschen die Pathogenität der Bakterien oder irgendwelcher anderer Mikroben entweder entwickelt hat oder zurückgegangen ist? RICHARD ROBERTS. Nun ja, wissen Sie, wir befinden uns in einem ständigen Kampf zwischen den Pathogenen, die gerne in uns leben und uns Probleme bereiten möchten, und unserer Fähigkeit, uns gegen sie zu wehren. Dies ist nicht etwas, was irgendwann einmal aufhören wird. Diese Evolution wird weitergehen. Es wird ständig neue Krankheitserreger geben, es wird stets erforderlich sein, dass wir davor auf der Hut sind, dass wir Wege finden, mit ihnen fertig zu werden. Die Bakterien haben den Vorteil, dass sie sehr viel schneller evolvieren können, als es uns möglich ist. Wenn Sie eine Lebenszeit von 30 Minuten haben, wenn Sie sich in 30 Minuten vermehren dann ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, Mutationen zu finden, die mit Krankheiten fertig werden, im Falle von Bakterien sehr viel höher. Glücklicherweise ist unser Immunsystem in der Lage, mit einigen dieser Dinge effektiver umzugehen, doch diesen „Rüstungswettlauf“ zwischen dem Krankheitserreger und dem Wirtsorganismus wird es immer geben. Er gehört einfach zu den Dingen, die eben nun einmal immer geschehen. Zum Glück wird es immer einen Bedarf an Mikrobiologen und Chemikern geben und an Wissenschaftlern, die auf diesem Gebiet arbeiten und neue Antibiotika und bessere Wege finden, mit Krankheiten fertig zu werden. FRAGE. Herr Professor, meinen Sie nicht, dass einige der normalen Organismen, die beispielsweise in der Mundhöhle leben, zu Krankheitserregern werden, wenn es zu einer Schwächung der Immunität kommt? Warum ist dies nach Ihrer Meinung so, und wie können Antibiotika dies verhindern oder eine Rolle hierbei spielen? RICHARD ROBERTS. Die Frage ist also eigentlich: Wenn wir uns in einem Zustand geringerer Immunität befinden: Erlaubt dies Krankheitserregern sozusagen „krankmachender“ zu werden? Die Antwort hierauf lautet, dass ein Organismus pathogen wird, wenn es ihm gelingt, zu wachsen und sich stark zu vermehren. Wenn Sie nur wenige Erreger in sich haben, führt dies in der Regel zu keinen Problemen. Dies ist der Grund dafür, warum Sie neben jemandem sitzen können, der eine Grippe oder Tuberkulose hat: Solange Sie keine größere Anzahl der Erreger aufnehmen, kann Ihr eigenes Immunsystem normalerweise damit fertig werden. Es ist also normalerweise eigentlich eine Frage der Anzahl der Organismen, die entstehen. Wenn er sich kaum vermehrt, ist er nicht pathogen und sie erleiden keine schweren Symptome. Wenn der Organismus sich andererseits sehr stark vermehrt und nicht eingedämmt werden kann, dann erleiden sie sämtliche Symptome seiner Pathogenität. Und was oft geschieht ist Folgendes: Sobald dieser kritische Punkt erreicht ist, ab dem zahlreiche Organismen vorhanden sind, vermehrt er sich sehr schnell. Hierdurch wird dann die Fähigkeit des Körpers, durch seine eigene Abwehr der Lage Herr zu werden, beeinträchtigt. Und dies geschieht zum Beispiel im Fall der Cholera. Mit geringen Anzahlen von Vibrio cholerae wird der Körper fertig, doch sobald der Organismus beginnt, sich stark zu vermehren, kommt die körpereigene Abwehr dem nicht mehr nach und kann damit nicht Schritt halten. Unser Immunsystem ist nicht leistungsstark genug, um mit großen Mengen des Organismus fertig zu werden. Habe nochmals vielen Dank, Richard, für dieses wunderbare Exposé.

Richard Roberts on the anaerobic environment that prevailed when life began.
(00:05:53 - 00:06:57)

 

There are many models of how the nucleus and mitochondria, important for aerobically respiring organisms, came into being. These models originated from the endosymbiotic theory propagated by Lynn Margulis in 1967. A host bacterium collected another bacterium and with time the “swallowed” bacterium became part of the host cell. Fritz Lipmann described the process during his lecture in 1978, at a time when the endosymbiotic theory was not as universally accepted as it is today:

Bill Bryson succinctly summarised eukaryotic cells’ relationship with mitochondria: “(...) yet even after a billion years mitochondria behave as if they think things might not work out between us. They maintain their own DNA, RNA and ribosomes. They reproduce at a different time from their host cells. They look like bacteria, divide like bacteria and sometimes respond to antibiotics in the way bacteria do. They don’t even speak the same genetic language as the cell in which they live. In short, they keep their bags packed. It is like having a stranger in your house, but one who has been there for a billion years.”

The plastids, such as chloroplasts – organelles in photosynthesising eukaryotes – are believed to have evolved from cyanobacteria, also as a result of endosymbiosis.

There are a great many questions still to be answered regarding life’s origins, laying the foundations for debate as theories and counter-theories, which are based on the findings of biochemists and molecular biologists but also geologists and geochemists, flourish. Yet, what is truly captivating is that these labyrinthine developments have eventually brought forth humans, who are increasingly able to solve puzzles of life’s origins across the expanse of four billion years and more.

 

Further Readings: 

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4109

http://www.math.uwaterloo.ca/~hdesterc/websiteW/Data/publications/journal/TianScience2005/StoryOfO2Kerr.pdf

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tattersall-paleoanthropologist-ian-tattersall-talks-about-what-makes-humans-special-video/

Bryson, B. (2003). Chapter 19: The Rise of Life, in: A Short History of Nearly Everything. Doubleday.

De Duve, C. (1995). The Beginnings of Life on Earth. American Scientist, September-October issue.

Forbes, P. The Vital Question by Nick Lane – a game-changing book about the origins of life. The Guardian, Wednesday, 22 April, 2015.

Lane, N. (2010). Chance or Necessity? Bioenergetics and the Probability of Life. Journal of Cosmology 10, pp. 3286-3304.

Martin, W.F., Garg, S. and Zimorski V. (2015). Endosymbiotic theories for eukaryote origin. Philiosophical Transactions B. 370.


Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Share