Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

by Joachim Pietzsch

Introducing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) means talking about the music of matter and how listening to it makes the score of nature more intelligible. “Each atom is like a subtle and refined instrument, playing its own faint, magnetic melody, inaudible to human ears. By your methods, this music has been made perceptible, and the characteristic melody of an atom can be used as an identification signal“, Harald Cramér, member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, praised Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell on occasion of the Nobel Banquet in 1952. In similar words, Richard Ernst explained the NMR method forty years later to his audience in Lindau:

Richard Ernst on the Melody of Molecules
(00:22:30 - 00:22:50)
 
Equally Spanning Three Disciplines?

Bloch, Ernst and Purcell are three of six scientists, who received a Nobel Prize explicitly linked to the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance. Bloch and Purcell shared the Nobel Prize in Physics 1952 “for their development of new methods for nuclear magnetic precision measurements and discoveries in connection therewith”. Richard Ernst was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1991 “for his contributions to the development of the methodology of high resolution nuclear magnetic (NMR) spectroscopy”. Kurt Wüthrich received a Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002 “for his development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules in solution”. Paul Lauterbur and Sir Peter Mansfield shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2003 “for their discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging”. Two laureates in physics, two in chemistry and two in physiology or medicine – the history of NMR seems to span in equal measure all three scientific Nobel disciplines. This impression, however, is misleading, because the invention of NMR has its sole and strong foundation in a basic discovery of physics, as Kurt Wüthrich suggested in his Lindau lecture in 2014.

Kurt Wüthrich (2014) - A Personal View of the History of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine

Well thank you, it’s a pleasure to be here. Why a personal view? Because as all of us I will over exaggerate my own contributions. My talk starts in 20 minutes. And I expect that 100s of people will be coming in 20 minutes to listen to me. Therefore I’ll speak slowly so that those newcomers will also get part of it. Now nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR is a technique which can provide us today with quite a lot of interesting information. So it is NMR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It’s not No Meaningful Results. And it’s not No More Research. Nuclear magnetic resonance. And it can be used to study man. And it can be used to study molecules. And today we expect that in chemistry NMR enables us to decide about the structures. That is NMR can tell us about the presence of each and every atom in such a molecule. It can be a larger molecule, a smaller molecule. It can be the result of synthetic chemistry where the chemist wants to check about the coincidence of what he expected to get and what he did actually get in his work. This particular molecule that I showed to you is cyclosporine A. It was essential in the start of transplantation in human medicine. It is the first viable immune suppressant that actually enabled the start of transplantation medicine and it was also a big economic success. Now, what can NMR do next? Now we move from chemistry to structural biology. Now, NMR can tell us where our drug molecule, this is again cyclosporine A, binds to particular sites in cells, in this case in the human cell. And here you have the primary receptor. This is a small protein, cyclophilin. And so NMR can tell us about the structure of the complex formed by the drug molecule and its receptor. Once we have such a result, we can remove the drug from its binding site and study in detail the contacts that the drug undergoes with its receptor. And then we can go back to the chemists and tell them: “Look, this piece is too big. That doesn’t really fit into this crevice. So cut it off and check whether you can improve some properties of the drug which might lead to reduced site effect that are inevitable in any drug and need to be minimised.” This is one area where we use NMR widely today. Another area is in imaging. It’s a very different approach. Also we are on a very different scale. This is a knee. It happens to be my own. You can see... Others usually show their heads but because of my major occupation, knees are considerably more important that other parts of my body. Now, you all want to get a Nobel Prize and we should tell you how to do it. This is a bit difficult. But, you see, it’s much easier to predict the past. So I’m going to tell you how things have happened in NMR. There are 6 Nobel laureates who got the Prize for NMR. And the first thing... Now if you want to get the prize, you have to choose your field. After Switzerland lost to Argentina in a painful way last night, I find out again that it was the right choice for me 50 years ago not to continue playing football as my major occupation but to join NMR because of the 6 NMR Nobel Prizes. So choosing the right field of activity is important. Never mind if it’s a Nobel Prize. You have to be happy. You have to have a satisfactory life. And if you live in Argentina, I would recommend that you rather go into football than into natural science. Well next you have to be visible. You see I stay in Argentina. When I don’t play football, then I go fishing. And these are quite nice trouts which I caught in the Lago Escondido near Bariloche in the Andes in Argentina. And in Bariloche there’s a very famous theoretical physics institute where many European leading physicists would spend part of the year. But you see these fish are very nice eating but they are sort of small. And Stockholm is far away. And it’s dark in the winter. So Swedes may not see these fish. So you have to catch big fish. Then you have a chance that the Nobel Committee may actually see the fish. And I am now going to tell you about the 3 big fish that gave Nobel Prizes in NMR. And then there will be a fourth big fish, which provides the basis of it all. NMR started with Felix Bloch. This is the Swiss physicist and Edward Purcell an American physicist, they both worked in the United States. And they discovered within a few weeks independent of each other the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance. It is not so that this was an all or nothing breakthrough. There have been different experiments for example by a physicist with the name of Rabi. Other physicist with the name of Stern, who performed so called beam experiments which already indicated that nuclear magnetic resonance could happen. But it was Bloch and Purcell who actually did the first experiment. Now what is the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon? We consider just the simplest case, namely the case of a hydrogen atom like you find it in water for example. Hydrogen atom has a spin. The nucleus of the hydrogen has a spin. And in a quantum mechanical description you have a spin of one half. And this has 2 so called eigenstates. So that nucleus can exist in 2 different forms. One is described by an arrow pointing up, the other one by an arrow pointing down. Or it’s called beta or alpha and the corresponding quantum numbers are -1/2 and +1/2. Here in this audience we will not be able to distinguish between the 2 states because you are only subject to the Earth’s magnetic field and that’s so small that you do not get an energy difference between the 2 states. But if you place the material to study, in this case the hydrogen atoms, into a strong magnetic field that may be half a million times the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field, then you lift the degeneracy. That means you now have 2 states that are energetically different. And the energy difference can be explained -this is delta E- can be expressed in terms of a frequency, a radio frequency. When you listen to a radio set, then you work with the same kind of wavelengths that we use in NMR experiments. Now, the key point here is that this size of the energy splitting is proportional to the applied magnetic field. So we have it in hand to decide how big we want this energy gap to be and hence at what frequency we want to see transitions between these 2 energetically different states. And when we change the applied field, then this difference will become a bit smaller. If we increase it, it will become a bit bigger. Recognising this was of course the first of those 3 big NMR fishes. Now we come to the second fish. You have already seen the water molecule in Peter Agre’s talk. It’s a simple structure. You have 2 hydrogen atoms in white and the reddish blue oxygen atom. In the NMR experiment we don’t see the oxygen, we only see the 2 hydrogens. And because of the symmetry of the molecular structure we cannot distinguish between the 2. Therefore we get a single line in a spectrum. Now this line... Since I have enough time let me go back. This line now represents exactly this energy difference in terms of the frequency at which we observe this peak. And now comes the big idea which leads to the use of the NMR phenomenon for macroscopic imaging as it is used in medical diagnosis. You now take a macroscopic structure like human head or human knee as you have seen before and you apply a variation of the field, the so called field gradient across this macroscopic object. Now you have a different energy splitting on the left eye than on the right eye because you have a difference in the applied magnetic field. Though also we only and exclusively observe the water molecule -I mean most of the inside of our head is water, about 80%- we can see, we can distinguish between the water at this part of the head and here. And then we do the same thing perpendicular to this plain and in the third dimension and with some mathematical procedures. We can then reproduce the image. So this is the big fish. To realise if you go across the macroscopic object, you can distinguish between the water next to the left eye from the water next to the right eye. It’s the same. You can distinguish between the 2 ears although you always observe the water. And this big fish was caught by Paul Lauterbur and by Peter Mansfield who received the Nobel Prize in medicine and physiology in 2003. Let me just for... You see I can also say that there are 4 of us who got the Nobel Prize in NMR in new times. And we all worked in both, in spectroscopy and in imaging. So let me just recount how we got into imaging. That was very early on in the game in the 1980s. And it wasn’t trivial to get a sufficiently big magnet to place an adult human body inside. So we got a small magnet and we worked in the children’s hospital in Zurich. And actually my graduate students Chris Bösch and Rolf Grütter are now both leading scientists in Swiss hospitals in this area. We would work with new born infants. And the most difficult problem that we faced was to monitor the state of the infants inside the magnet because new born infants with birth trauma are highly unstable and all vital functions need to be constantly monitored. And the children were also so weak that we couldn’t use chemicals to sedate the children. Therefore we would ask the parents to come in and put the children to sleep. Then the parents were extremely upset and scared of seeing their little ones disappear in a magnet. So Chris Bösch devised the fairy house. Now the magnet is inside here, the baby goes here and the parents were extremely relieved to see the baby go into a fairy house rather than into an iron core magnet. The result of the study was very often very painful. I show you here an image of the head of a 17 year old girl who had heavy mechanical birth trauma which caused a huge hematoma here in this area of the scull. Very sad story of course. But this is the sort of things that happened to us when we were into MRI many years ago. Now let me go to the third big fish story. This is work that led to the use of NMR in structural biology. And here the problem to be solved was a very different one from the problem that you have to solve when you try to image macroscopic objects. We are now dealing not with water molecules which give a single line in any sort of spectroscopic technique but now we work with macromolecules such as this marvellous painting by Geis from the 1960s. This is cytochrome C. I always like to show such pictures from the times before computers were able to draw molecules. So Irving Geis was a painter who painted all the early 3 dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids in the 1960s and ‘70s. And only with the 1980s were computers getting able to make similar but not quite equally nice drawings. The point here is that I do not have just one kind of hydrogen atom. I have many different kinds, chemically different types of atoms. And as a result I don’t get a single line but I get a complicated spectrum. This is just a usual scale, corresponds to the frequency at which we observe the signals. And you can see that in this particular case we see some well resolved signals but these correspond only in this case to exactly 6 hydrogen atoms whereas here we have overlapping signals of about 400 NMR signals. Now, we knew from studying these well resolved lines that the information was available to determine 3 dimensional structures. But we couldn’t get the information out of this part which contains most of the resonances. And here the big fish experience was to go from one dimension to 2 dimensions. See, instead of arranging all these many lines on a single axis, you get the 2 dimensional plain and now individual lines move out of the mess here and are well separated in this 2 dimensional plain. So that was the advent of 2 dimensional NMR. We had the first set of experiments by 1982. COSY, NOESY, SECSY and FOCSY. I mean this is serious. I mean SECSY stands for spin-echo correlated spectroscopy. I mean compared to the notations that we see in immunology for example this is relatively straightforward. Now, what is behind this multidimensional NMR? I say multidimensional because although it was 2 dimensional originally, today when we determine an NMR structure of a protein we use 2 five dimensional, 1 four dimensional and 3 three dimensional experiments. So the principle that I’m now going to explain is not limited to 2 dimensions but it can be expanded in principle to an unlimited number of dimensions. This is a 2 dimensional experiment. Now it’s perhaps a bit difficult for some of you to see what is happening. Let me just try to be simple. You have here T1 and T2. T2 is the time that runs. Ok, all of us get older every second that passes today. And in my age that goes much faster than for some of you. But it goes for all of us. So when we perform an experiment, for example with an ensemble of nuclear spins, everything is in principle in equilibrium. We can perturb this equilibrium and study how the system behaves. And we follow this for a long time. So this is just the time. The experiment may last for 100 milliseconds or so. And we perturb the system. I don’t need to go into details. What happens then is that we observe an oscillation of certain parameters that we measure. Now, the idea that leads to 2 dimensional and higher dimensional spectroscopy is to create an artificial second time axis. And this is done in the following way. You perturb the system. Perturbing means that I take a hammer and hit and then wait for a certain time and hit again, ok? Now, then the response to the second hammer hit will depend on the length of time that passes between the first hammer and the second hammer because the system starts, as we say, to evolve and depending on the length of this time T1 we will start this recording. Is it here or here or here? And if we now repeat this experiment 100 times, that is we change this time T1 100 times, then we have created a second time axis which is perpendicular to the normal running time. And the 2 dimensional Fourier transformation then gets us into the 2 dimensional frequency space. And Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1991 for having worked out these principles and realised the first 2 dimensional NMR experiments. So that’s big fish number 3. When you then look more closely at the 2 dimensional or higher dimensional spectrum of a protein, then you see that there is an awful lot of information. This is a so called contour plot. This is now what I get after I resolved that series of overlapping lines in the 1 dimensional spectrum into 2 dimensions. And this is clearly enough information to define a 3 dimensional protein structure. And all it needed from thereon was to develop mathematical tools that could calculate the 3 dimensional structure from this array of NMR peaks that we have seen in this picture. So from here distance geometry techniques get us to here. And from here you then go to Stockholm. So these are the 3 big fish. So the first one is to have observed the phenomenon of NMR by physicists. At the time I met Felix Bloch many times later. He was already retired at the time, lived in Zurich. He did not expect that NMR would yield interesting data other than some new insights into the structure and properties of nuclei. So pure physics. Then we got the development of magnetic resonance imaging by applying field gradients across macroscopic objects. Very clearly, just an application of the basic principle of NMR. And then we got to the point where we could unravel highly complex spectra by introducing artificial new time dimensions into the experiment. I told you there is an additional big fish. Now I am going all the way back to Albert Einstein. I am talking about the Brownian motion and its impact on NMR in solution. What Albert Einstein did in 1905, in addition to sidecars like relativity theory and the likes, he analysed the Brownian motion of particles suspended in liquids at ambient temperature. And it was also pretty much the start of statistical mechanics. So, you only look at the right hand side of my slide here. And what it shows is the behaviour of a small sphere and the behaviour of a large sphere when immersed in a liquid. If we have a small sphere then under the thermal motion of the much smaller solvent molecules, that sphere changes direction and it also changes rotational movements stochastically at a relatively high frequency. When you have a large sphere, its inertia is much larger and it reacts with much lower frequency to the onslaught of the thermally agitated solvent molecules. For NMR this means that we are in a completely different regime of spin physics when we have low frequency Brownian motion or when we have high frequency Brownian motion. And this is what Albert Einstein worked out in 1905 when he was a clerk in the patent office in Bern. And he comes up with the key (that) is that he described the behaviour of molecules with regard to rotational Brownian motion in terms of a correlation time tauC which governs all essential parameters that enable both MRI and studies of large molecules in solution. So Albert Einstein contributes directly to the wellbeing of dozens of football players in Brazil these days. You can introduce the findings of Einstein into the description of NMR experiments by single transition basis operators. This led more recently to transverse relaxation optimised spectroscopy. It led to breaking size barriers -you see here a rather large protein complex. The GroEL-GroES-ADP complex- and gives a rather nice spectrum when using all these principles of recognising the proper impact of the frequency of Brownian motion on NMR in solution. What are exactly, what does this help us? Why is this a fourth big fish in the field? When we look at human bodies with MRI, we don’t see fat. We don’t see proteins, we don’t see membranes. We only see the water molecules. And this is due to this very simple scheme here that the water molecule is very small. And even in our bodies it moves sufficiently fast so as that it gives a sharp NMR line and we can perform MRI on living human subjects. On the other hand having recognised the TROSY principle we are now able to study membrane proteins with solution NMR. And we have heard yesterday from Doctor Kobilka’s talk that he said again and again: And this is actually my own current research area. I don’t need to go into any details. I am working in a team with Professor Raymond Stevens, a crystallographer. And we joined forces by using crystallography and NMR in much the way that Doctor Kobilka described to you yesterday. I hope that this historical review gave you an idea of how far basic research can be before it yields fruit. Fruit means betterment of human life. But it also means money. MRI today is a huge business. Thousands of machines are operating in hospitals. Ten thousands of high tech jobs have been created. If we go to a congress on MRI which didn’t exist 30 years ago, we have 10,000 participants, 12,000 participants. And when we look at things very closely, we see that some of the basics have been accrued long... I mean in the case of Einstein, the theory of Brownian motion came long before NMR was invented. And I think that today’s trend, especially in the United States, to support only research that promises to go to the bedside the next day inhibits the possibility that 50 years from now we will be able to use novel principles of physics in practical medicine and biomedical research. I should also emphasise that all this research in NMR which brought these results was small scale research. It wasn’t a big project where politicians could put their names on top and advertise their support of science. This was all small group research. And it is exactly this kind of work that is very poorly supported these days. I’m afraid that we will suffer from this in the decades to come. Thank you. Applause.

Danke, ich freue mich, hier zu sein. Warum eine persönliche Sicht? Weil ich wie jeder von uns meine eigenen Beiträge überbewerte. Mein Vortrag beginnt in 20 Minuten. Und ich gehe davon aus, dass in 20 Minuten Hunderte Menschen kommen, um mich zu hören. Deshalb werde ich langsam sprechen, damit auch diese Nachzügler etwas davon mitbekommen. Die Kernspinresonanz oder NMR ist eine Technik, die uns heute viele interessante Informationen liefern kann. NMR steht für "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance", nicht für "No Meaningful Results" oder "No More Research". Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, die zur Erforschung des Menschen eingesetzt werden kann. Und es kann genutzt werden um Moleküle zu erforschen. Und heute gehen wir davon aus, dass NMR uns in der Chemie die Entscheidung über Strukturen ermöglicht, dass NMR etwas über das Vorhandensein von allen Atomen in einem solchen Molekül aussagen kann. Es kann ein größeres Molekül oder ein kleineres Molekül sein. Es kann das Ergebnis von synthetischer Chemie sein, wenn der Chemiker etwas über die Koinzidenz von erwarteten und tatsächlichen Ergebnissen seiner Arbeit erfahren möchte. Das spezielle Molekül, das ich Ihnen zeige, ist Cyclosporin A. Es war entscheidend für die Anfänge der Transplantationsmedizin. Es ist das erste brauchbare Immunsuppressivum, das tatsächlich den Start der Transplantationsmedizin ermöglichte und zudem ein großer wirtschaftlicher Erfolg wurde. Was kann NMR als Nächstes bewirken? Wir bewegen uns jetzt von der Chemie zur Strukturbiologie. NMR kann uns zeigen, wo unser Wirkstoffmolekül - das hier ist wieder Cyclosporin A - an bestimmte Stellen in Zellen bindet, in diesem Fall in der menschlichen Zelle. Und hier sehen Sie den primären Rezeptor. Das ist ein kleines Protein, Cyclophilin. Und so kann uns NMR etwas über die Struktur des Komplexes zeigen, der vom Wirkstoffmolekül und seinem Rezeptor gebildet wird. Haben wir erst einmal ein solches Resultat, können wir den Wirkstoff von seiner Bindungsstelle lösen und detailliert die Kontakte untersuchen, die der Wirkstoff mit seinem Rezeptor eingeht. Und dann können wir uns wieder an die Chemiker wenden und ihnen sagen: Es passt nicht richtig in diesen Spalt. Schneide es ab und überprüfe, ob du bestimmte Eigenschaften des Arzneimittels verbessern kannst, damit die Nebenwirkungen reduziert werden, die bei einem Arzneimittel unumgänglich sind, aber auf ein Minimum reduziert werden sollten." Das ist einer der Bereiche, in denen wir die NMR-Technik heute umfassend einsetzen. Ein anderer Bereich sind Bildgebungsverfahren, ein völlig anderer Ansatz. Dort bewegen wir uns auch in völlig anderen Größenordnungen. Das ist ein Knie, übrigens mein eigenes. Sie sehen ...Andere zeigen normalerweise ihre Köpfe, aber aufgrund meines Hauptberufs spielen die Knie eine wesentlich wichtigere Rolle als andere Teile meines Körpers. Sie alle wollen doch einen Nobelpreis bekommen und wir sollten Ihnen zeigen, wie das geht. Das ist gar nicht so leicht. Wesentlich einfacher ist es, die Vergangenheit vorherzusagen. Deshalb erzähle ich Ihnen, wie das im Fall von NMR gewesen ist. Es gibt sechs Nobelpreisträger, die den Nobelpreis für NMR bekommen haben. Und zu allererst ...Wenn man den Preis erhalten will, muss man sein Fachgebiet richtig wählen. Nachdem die Schweiz gestern so schmerzhaft gegen Argentinien verloren hat, hat mich das wieder einmal darin bestätigt, dass ich vor 50 Jahren die richtige Entscheidung getroffen habe, nämlich nicht weiter im Hauptberuf Fußball zu spielen, sondern im Bereich von NMR tätig zu werden - denn von sechs NMR-Nobelpreisen gingen drei an Schweizer Wissenschaftler, während die Schweiz nie auch nur eine einzige Fußballweltmeisterschaft gewonnen oder auch nur fast gewonnen hätte. Wichtig ist also die richtige Wahl des Tätigkeitsfeldes. Egal, ob es der Nobelpreis ist. Man sollte glücklich sein, ein zufriedenes Leben führen. Und wenn Sie in Argentinien leben, so würde ich Ihnen empfehlen, eher Fußball zu spielen als in die Naturwissenschaften zu gehen. Als Nächstes muss man sichtbar sein. Ich lebe in Argentinien. Wenn ich nicht Fußball spiele, gehe ich angeln. Im Lago Escondido in der Nähe von Bariloche in den argentinischen Anden habe ich recht ansehnliche Forellen gefangen. Und in Bariloche gibt es ein sehr berühmtes Institut für Theoretische Physik, an dem viele führende Physiker Europas einen Teil des Jahres verbringen. Diese Fische sind ganz lecker, aber ziemlich klein. Und Stockholm ist weit weg. Und im Winter ist es dunkel, weshalb die Schweden diese Fische möglicherweise gar nicht sehen können. Wenn die Chance bestehen soll, dass das Nobelkomittee den Fisch tatsächlich wahrnimmt, muss man also große Fische fangen. Und ich erzähle Ihnen jetzt etwas über die drei "großen Fische", die mit einem Nobelpreis für NMR ausgezeichnet wurden. Und dann gibt es noch einen vierten großen Fisch, der die Grundlage für das alles ist. NMR begann mit dem Schweizer Physiker Felix Bloch und dem amerikanischen Physiker Edward Purcell, die beide in den Vereinigten Staaten tätig waren. Innerhalb weniger Wochen entdeckten sie unabhängig voneinander das Phänomen der kernmagnetischen Resonanz. Das war allerdings kein "Alles oder Nichts"-Durchbruch. Vorher hatte es bereits verschiedene Experimente, etwa von einem Physiker namens Rabi oder einem weiteren Physiker Namens Stern gegeben, die so genannte Strahlexperimente durchführten, die schon andeuteten, dass eine Kernspinresonanz vorkommen kann. Bloch und Purcell führten allerdings das erste Experiment durch. Worin besteht das Phänomen der Kernspinresonanz? Wir gehen einmal vom einfachsten Fall aus, nämlich einem Wasserstoffatom, wie es beispielsweise in Wasser zu finden ist. Ein Wasserstoffatom hat einen Spin. Der Kern des Wasserstoffatoms hat einen Spin. Und in einer quantenmechanischen Beschreibung gibt es einen Spin von 1/2. Und dieser hat zwei sogenannte Eigenzustände. Dieser Kern kann also in zwei unterschiedlichen Formen existieren. Die eine wird durch einen nach oben zeigenden Pfeil, die andere durch einen nach unten zeigenden Pfeil angezeigt. Oder sie werden als Beta oder Alpha bezeichnet. Die entsprechenden Quantenzahlen lauten -1/2 und +1/2. Hier im Publikum können wir nicht zwischen den beiden Zuständen unterscheiden, da Sie nur dem Magnetfeld der Erde unterliegen und das ist so schwach, dass man keinen Energieunterschied zwischen den beiden Zuständen feststellen kann. Platziert man aber das zu untersuchende Material, in diesem Fall die Wasserstoffatome, in einem starken Magnetfeld, das eine halbe Million Mal so stark ist wie das Magnetfeld der Erde, wird die Entartung sichtbar, das heißt, man hat jetzt zwei Zustände, die sich energetisch voneinander unterscheiden. Die Energiedifferenz lässt sich erklären, das ist Delta E, sie kann als Frequenz, als Radiofrequenz ausgedrückt werden. Wenn Sie ein Radio einschalten, haben Sie die gleiche Art von Wellenlängen, die wir in unseren NMR-Experimenten verwenden. Entscheidend ist, dass diese Größe der Energieverteilung im Verhältnis zum angewandten Magnetfeld steht. Wir können also entscheiden, wie groß diese Energiedifferenz sein soll und bei welcher Frequenz Übergänge zwischen diesen beiden energetisch unterschiedlichen Zuständen vorkommen sollen. Wenn wir das angewandte Feld verändern, verringert sich dieser Unterschied etwas. Wenn wir es vergrößern, vergrößert es sich etwas. Diese Entdeckung war die erste dieser drei großen NMR-Fische. Kommen wir jetzt zum zweiten Fisch. Im Vortrag von Peter Agre haben Sie das Wassermolekül ja schon gesehen. Das ist eine einfache Struktur. Es gibt zwei Wasserstoffatome, in Weiß, und das rötlich-blaue Sauerstoffatom. Im NMR-Experiment sehen wir den Sauerstoff nicht, wir sehen nur die beiden Wasserstoffe. Und aufgrund der Symmetrie der Molekülstruktur können wir die beiden nicht voneinander unterscheiden. Deshalb erhalten wir eine einzelne Linie in einem Spektrum. Diese Linie ...Da ich genügend Zeit habe, gehe ich noch einmal zurück. Diese Linie repräsentiert exakt diese Energiedifferenz hinsichtlich der Frequenz, bei der wir diesen Höchstwert beobachten. Und hier kommt die zündende Idee ins Spiel, die zur Verwendung des NMR-Phänomens für makroskopische Bildgebungsverfahren in der medizinischen Diagnose führte. Auf eine makroskopische Struktur, wie den menschlichen Kopf oder das vorher dargestellte Knie wendet man jetzt eine Variation des Feldes an, den so genannten Feldgradienten, durch dieses makroskopische Objekt. Jetzt besteht auf dem linken Auge eine andere Energieverteilung als auf dem rechten Auge, weil die angewandten Magnetfelder unterschiedlich sind. Obwohl wir ausschließlich das Wassermolekül betrachten - das Innere unseres Kopfes besteht zum großen Teil, rund 80%, aus Wasser - können wir zwischen dem Wasser in diesem Teil des Kopfes und diesem hier unterscheiden. Und dann wiederholen wir das Ganze senkrecht zu dieser Fläche und in der dritten Dimension und mit einigen mathematischen Verfahren können wir dann das Bild erstellen. Das ist also der "große Fisch" - die Feststellung, dass man, wenn man über das makroskopische Objekt fährt, zwischen dem Wasser am linken Auge und dem Wasser am rechten Auge unterscheiden kann. Es ist das gleiche. Man kann zwischen den beiden Ohren unterscheiden, obwohl man immer das Wasser betrachtet. Und diesen großen Fisch gefangen haben Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield, die 2003 den Nobelpreis für Medizin und Physiologie erhielten. Lassen Sie mich ...Ich könnte auch sagen, dass vier von uns den Nobelpreis für NMR in neuer Zeit erhalten haben. Und wir haben alle in beiden Bereichen gearbeitet, Spektroskopie und Bildgebungsverfahren. Lassen Sie mich gerade erzählen, wie wir zum Bildgebungsverfahren kamen. Das war relativ zu Anfang in den 1980er-Jahren. Und es war nicht gerade einfach, an einen ausreichend großen Magneten zu kommen, um den Körper eines Erwachsenen darin unterbringen zu können. Deshalb hatten wir einen kleinen Magneten und arbeiteten in der Kinderklinik in Zürich. Zwei meiner Doktoranden, Chris Bösch und Rolf Grütter, sind heute führende Wissenschaftler auf diesem Gebiet in Schweizer Krankenhäusern. Wir beschlossen, mit Neugeborenen zu arbeiten. Das Schwierigste daran war, den Zustand der Neugeborenen im Magneten zu überwachen, weil Neugeborene mit Geburtstrauma sehr instabil sind und alle lebenswichtigen Funktionen kontinuierlich überwacht werden müssen. Und die Kinder waren so schwach, dass wir auch keine Arzneimittel zur Ruhigstellung verwenden konnten. Deshalb baten wir die Eltern, die Kinder in den Schlaf zu wiegen. Und die waren extrem verunsichert und aufgeschreckt, wenn sie ihre Kleinen in einem Magneten verschwinden sahen. Deshalb dachte sich Chris Bösch dieses Märchenhaus aus, in dem der Magnet dann untergebracht war. Das Baby wird hier in das Gerät gefahren und die Eltern waren sehr erleichtert, wenn ihr Baby in einem Märchenhaus statt in einem Eisenkernmagneten verschwand. Das Ergebnis der Untersuchung war oft sehr schmerzlich. Hier sehen Sie die Darstellung des Kopfes eines 17 Tage alten Mädchens mit heftigem mechanischen Geburtstrauma, das in diesem Bereich des Schädels ein riesiges Hämatom verursacht hatte. Natürlich eine sehr traurige Geschichte. Aber solche Dinge kamen vor, als wir vor vielen Jahren mit MRI anfingen. Ich komme jetzt zum dritten großen Fisch. Das ist die Arbeit, die zur Anwendung von NMR in der Strukturbiologie führte. Das in diesem Bereich zu lösende Problem war ein ganz anderes als das, was man mit der Darstellung makroskopischer Objekte versuchte. Hier haben wir es nicht mit Wassermolekülen zu tun, die in jeder spektroskopischen Technik eine einzelne Linie ergeben, sondern mit Makromolekülen wie bei diesem wunderbaren Gemälde von Geis aus den 1960er-Jahren. Das ist Cytochrom C. Ich mag diese Bilder aus den Zeiten, bevor man Moleküle mit Computerprogrammen darzustellen begann. Irving Geis war ein Maler, der in den 1960er- und 1970er-Jahren all die frühen dreidimensionalen Strukturen von Proteinen und Nukleinsäuren darstellte. Erst in den 1980er-Jahren waren dann die Computer so langsam in der Lage, ähnliche, wenn auch nicht ganz so schöne Darstellungen zu erzeugen. Es geht darum, dass hier nicht nur eine Art von Wasserstoffatom vorhanden ist, sondern chemisch sehr verschiedene Atomarten. Deshalb ergibt sich keine einzelne Linie, sondern ein kompliziertes Spektrum. Das hier ist einfach eine normale Skalenbreite, die der Frequenz entspricht, bei der wir die Signale beobachten. Und in diesem speziellen Fall erkennen wir einige gut aufgelöste Signale, die aber nur in diesem Fall exakt sechs Wasserstoffatomen entsprechen, während wir hier überlappende Signale von rund 400 NMR-Signalen haben. Aus der Analyse dieser gut aufgelösten Linien wussten wir, dass die Informationen zur Ermittlung dreidimensionaler Strukturen zur Verfügung standen. Aber wir erhielten keine Informationen aus diesem Teil, der die meisten Resonanzen enthält. Der "große Fisch" bestand nun darin, von einer auf zwei Dimensionen überzugehen. Statt einer Anordnung dieser gesamten Linien auf einer einzelnen Achse erhält man eine zweidimensionale Fläche. Jetzt bewegen sich hier einzelne Linien aus diesem Durcheinander heraus und werden hier in dieser zweidimensionalen Fläche gut voneinander getrennt dargestellt. Das war der Beginn der zweidimensionalen NMR-Technik. Die ersten Versuchsserien fanden um das Jahr 1982 statt. COSY, NOESY, SECSY und FOCSY. Die heißen tatsächlich so. SECSY steht für "Spin-echo Correlated Spectroscopy". Im Vergleich zu den Bezeichnungen, die wir beispielsweise in der Immunologie kennen, ist das doch relativ geradlinig. Was steckt nun hinter der multidimensionalen NMR-Technik? Ich sage "multidimensional", weil es zwar ursprünglich zweidimensional war, wir aber heute bei der Ermittlung einer NMR-Struktur eines Proteins zwei fünfdimensionale, ein vierdimensionales und drei dreidimensionale Experimente benutzen. Das Prinzip, das ich erklären werde, ist also nicht auf zwei Dimensionen begrenzt, sondern lässt sich grundsätzlich auf eine unbegrenzte Anzahl von Dimensionen erweitern. Das hier ist ein zweidimensionales Experiment. Vielleicht ist nicht für alle zu sehen, was hier passiert. Ich versuche das einfach zu erklären. Hier gibt es t1 und t2. t2 ist die verstreichende Zeit. Wir alle werden mit jeder Sekunde etwas älter. Und in meinem Alter geht das noch viel schneller als bei einigen von Ihnen. Aber es gilt für uns alle. Wenn wir beispielsweise ein Experiment mit einem Kernspin-Ensemble durchführen, ist im Prinzip alles im Gleichgewicht. Wir können das Gleichgewicht stören und untersuchen, wie sich das System verhält. Und wir verfolgen das dann eine lange Zeit. Das hier ist also einfach die Zeit. Das Experiment kann z. B. 100 Millisekunden andauern. Und wir stören das System. Ich brauche nicht ins Detail zu gehen. Und dann beobachten wir die Oszillation bestimmter Parameter, die wir messen. Die Idee, die hinter der zweidimensionalen und höherdimensionalen Spektroskopie steckt, ist es, eine künstliche zweite Zeitachse zu schaffen, indem man das System stört. Stören bedeutet, dass man einen Hammer nimmt und schlägt, dann eine bestimmte Zeit wartet und erneut schlägt. Die Reaktion auf den zweiten Hammerschlag hängt von der Länge der Zeit ab, die zwischen dem erstem und dem zweiten Hammerschlag vergeht, weil das System, wie wir sagen, sich zu entwickeln beginnt. Und abhängig von der Länge dieser Zeit t1 beginnen wir mit der Erfassung. Ist das hier oder hier oder hier? Und wenn wir dieses Experiment 100 Mal wiederholen, also diese Zeit t1 einhundert Mal verändern, haben wir eine zweite Zeitachse geschaffen, die senkrecht zur normalen Laufzeit verläuft. Und mit der zweidimensionalen Fourier-Transformation sind wir im zweidimensionalen Frequenzbereich. Für die Ausarbeitung dieser Grundsätze erhielt Richard Ernst 1991 den Nobelpreis in Chemie. Er führte auch die ersten zweidimensionalen NMR-Experimente durch. Das war also der große Fisch Nr. 3. Wenn man sich das zwei- oder höherdimensionale Spektrum eines Proteins genauer anschaut, erkennt man eine Menge an Informationen. Hier sehen Sie ein so genanntes Konturdiagramm. Das ist das Ergebnis, nachdem ich diese Serie von überlappenden Linien im eindimensionalen Spektrum in zwei Dimensionen aufgelöst habe. Und diese Informationen reichen definitiv aus, um eine dreidimensionale Proteinstruktur zu definieren. Und dann brauchte man nur noch mathematische Werkzeuge zu entwickeln, die die dreidimensionale Struktur aus diesem Spektrum von NMR-Peaks berechnen, die in diesem Bild zu sehen waren. Diesen Schritt haben uns Distanzgeometrie-Rechnungen ermöglicht. Und von dort ging es dann weiter nach Stockholm. Das also sind die drei großen Fische. Der erste bestand darin, dass Physiker das NMR-Phänomen beobachtet hatten. Als ich Felix Bloch sehr viel später einmal traf, war er bereits pensioniert und lebte in Zürich. Er hätte niemals erwartet, dass die NMR-Technik außer einigen neuen Erkenntnissen über die Struktur und die Eigenschaften von Zellkernen interessante Daten liefern würde. Also reine Physik. Dann erfolgte die Weiterentwicklung der Kernspintomographie durch Anwendung von Feldgradienten auf makroskopische Objekte. Das war ganz klar einfach eine Anwendung des Grundprinzips von NMR. Und so konnten wir äußerst komplexe Spektren entwirren, in dem künstliche, neue Zeitdimensionen in das Experiment eingebracht wurden. Ich erwähnte bereits einen weiteren "großen Fisch". Und dazu gehe ich zurück bis zu Albert Einstein. Ich spreche über die Brownsche Bewegung und ihre Auswirkung auf NMR in Lösung. die Brownsche Bewegung von in Flüssigkeit suspendierten Teilchen bei Umgebungstemperatur. Und das war so ziemlich der Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Schauen Sie sich nur die rechte Seite dieser Folie hier an. Zu sehen ist dort das Verhalten der kleinen Kugelfläche und der großen Kugelfläche, die in eine Flüssigkeit eingetaucht wird. Bei einer kleinen Kugelfläche ändert diese Kugelfläche unter der thermischen Bewegung der wesentlich kleineren Lösungsmittelmoleküle die Richtung und zudem die Drehbewegungen stochastisch bei einer relativ hohen Frequenz. Bei einer großen Kugelfläche ist die Trägheit wesentlich größer. Sie reagiert mit einer wesentlich geringeren Frequenz auf den Angriff der thermisch agitierten Lösungsmittelmoleküle. Für NMR bedeutet das, dass wir uns in einem vollständig anderen System der Spinphysik bewegen, abhängig davon, ob wir eine niederfrequente Brownsche Bewegung oder eine hochfrequente Brownsche Bewegung haben. Und das hat Albert Einstein 1905 ausgearbeitet, als er als Sachbearbeiter beim Patentamt in Bern tätig war. Und er lieferte damit den Schlüssel, indem er das Verhalten von Molekülen in Bezug zur Brownsche Drehbewegung im Sinne einer Korrelationszeit TauC lieferte, die alle wesentlichen Parameter steuert, die sowohl MRI als auch die Analyse großer Moleküle in Lösung ermöglichen. Albert Einstein hat also direkt zum Wohlergehen dutzender Fußballspieler in Brasilien in diesen Tagen beigetragen. Die Ergebnisse von Einstein lassen sich durch einzelne Übergangsbasisoperatoren in die Beschreibung von NMR-Experimenten integrieren. Das hat in jüngerer Zeit zur transversalen relaxationsoptimierten Spektroskopie geführt. Dadurch konnten Größenhindernisse überwunden werden - Sie sehen hier einen ziemlich großen Proteinkomplex. Der GroEL-GroES-ADP-Komplex - und ergibt das dann ein ziemlich schönes Spektrum wenn man all diese Grundsätze der richtig erkannten Auswirkungen der Frequenz der Brownsche Bewegung auf NMR in Lösung anwendet. Wie kann das für uns von Nutzen sein? Warum ist das der vierte "große Fisch" auf diesem Gebiet? Wenn wir einen menschlichen Körper mit MRI betrachten, sehen wir kein Fett. Wir sehen keine Proteine, wir sehen keine Membranen. Wir sehen nur die Wassermoleküle. Und das hängt sehr einfach damit zusammen, dass das Wassermolekül sehr klein ist. Und selbst in unserem Körper bewegt es sich schnell genug, um eine scharfe NMR-Linie zu erzeugen, so dass wir MRI an lebenden Menschen durchführen können. Nachdem das TROSY-Prinzip entdeckt wurde, sind wir jetzt in der Lage, Membranproteine mit NMR in Lösung zu untersuchen. Und gestern hat Dr. Kobilka in seinem Vortrag mehrfach gesagt: wenn wir die Funktionsweise von komplexen Molekülen wie GPCR (G-Protein gekoppelte Rezeptoren) verstehen wollen." Das ist mein derzeitiges Forschungsgebiet. Ich möchte das hier nicht vertiefen. Ich arbeite in einem Team mit Professor Raymond Stevens, einem Kristallographen, zusammen. Und gemeinsam nutzen wir die Kristallographie und NMR in ähnlicher Weise, die Dr. Kobilka Ihnen das gestern beschrieben hat. Ich hoffe, dass diese historische Übersicht Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon vermitteln konnte, wie weit Grundlagenforschung geht, bevor sie Früchte trägt. Mit Früchten ist eine Verbesserung des menschlichen Lebens gemeint. Aber es bedeutet auch Geld. MRI ist heute ein Riesengeschäft. In den Krankenhäusern sind Tausende solcher Geräte im Einsatz. Dadurch wurden zehntausende Hightech-Arbeitsplätze geschaffen. Kongresse zum Thema MRI, die vor 30 Jahren überhaupt noch nicht existierten, werden von 10.000 bis 12.000 Teilnehmern besucht. Und bei genauerer Betrachtung ist zu erkennen, dass einige der Grundlagen dafür vor langer Zeit geschaffen wurden ... In Einsteins Fall ... die Theorie der Brownschen Bewegung wurde lange vor der Erfindung von NMR entwickelt. Der heute insbesondere in den USA zu spürende Trend, nur Forschung zu unterstützen, die sich sofort am Krankenbett umsetzen lässt, verhindert meiner Ansicht nach die Möglichkeit, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sind, neuartige physikalische Prinzipien in der praktischen Medizin und in der biomedizinischen Forschung einzusetzen. Ich sollte auch noch erwähnen, dass die gesamte NMR-Forschung, die zu diesen Ergebnissen geführt hat, im Rahmen kleiner Forschungsprojekte erfolgt ist. Das war kein Riesenprojekt, das sich Politiker auf ihre Fahnen schreiben konnten und mit dem sie Werbung für ihre Unterstützung der Wissenschaften machen konnten. Das waren alles kleine Forschungsarbeiten. Und genau diese Art von Arbeit wird heute wenig unterstützt. Ich befürchte, dass wir die Folgen in den nächsten Jahrzehnten zu spüren bekommen werden. Danke. Applaus.

Kurt Wüthrich on the Origins on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
(00:08:06 - 00:08:56)


Caught in Quantization

Without Otto Stern’s discovery of space quantization and his first direct measurement of the magnetic moment of an atom and without the advancement of this discovery by Isidor Isaac Rabi, who first established radio contact with nuclear magnetic moments, NMR could not have been invented. With good cause, the former was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Physics 1943, the latter with the Nobel Prize in Physics 1944. While Stern only attended the 1968 Lindau meeting and gave no lecture, Rabi attended the Lindau meeting six times between 1956 and 1979. His lecture from 1971 is mainly a reverence for Stern. “The reason I am giving this talk about 60 years of molecular beams”, Rabi said, “is to a great degree in remembrance of this very great German physicist, who unfortunately had to leave his country and its culture and went to America where he never did succeed in entering a new culture and I regard it as a great personal tragedy for this great man, and an enormous loss for science.” Otto Stern made his discovery in February 1922 together with his colleague Walther Gerlach in Frankfurt/Main, whose university had been founded just eight years before in the spirit of the city’s liberal bourgeois tradition. At that time, in the early years of the Weimar Republic, it was “the only German university where republican professors were not outnumbered by conservatives pining for the old order; its charter outlawed all racial and religious discriminations”[1]. Besides Berlin, Frankfurt therefore was an especially thriving hub of science and the humanities then and a perfect place for a creative and fruitful German-Jewish symbiosis. Before we describe the Stern-Gerlach experiment in more detail, let us listen to Isaac Rabi’s account of it:

Isidor Rabi on the Discovery of Stern and Gerlach
(00:07:26 - 00:13:29)

A Triumph of Experimental Physics

From today’s perspective, the experiment that Stern and Gerlach conducted appears to be easy. Yet in 1922, it was technically extremely challenging. Its successful performance, which took them one year of planning and preparation, was a triumph of experimental physics. Its intention was to find out how atomic magnets behave in a magnetic field. Classical physics and the only just emerging quantum theory gave contradictory answers in this respect. Within a highly evacuated apparatus (first challenge) in which huge temperature differences had to be maintained over many hours (second challenge), Stern and Gerlach evaporated silver in a hot oven and produced a collimated, very thin beam of silver atoms (third challenge) that they sent through a very inhomogeneous magnetic field (fourth challenge) towards a collector plate on which the meager film of atoms had to be made visible to detect their deflection in the magnetic field (fifth challenge). There they observed two distinct lines. The silver atoms had split into two beams. This “was a shock from the moment it was discovered (although it was expected theoretically)”[2]. According to classical physics, the silver beam should have broadened to one large spot because of the random distribution of the magnetic moments of its atoms. Yet obviously the atoms had the choice between two directions only, one parallel and the other anti-parallel to the external magnetic field. Their orientation in space is quantized between two distinct states. The correct explanation for this behavior was given in 1925 by de Laer Kronig, Uhlenbeck and Goldsmith: Every electron possesses an intrinsic spin with a related magnetic moment. In case of silver with its 47 electrons, 46 electrons possess pair-wise opposite spins that cancel each other out. “The forty-seventh unpaired electron also has zero orbital angular momentum, so the only source of magnetic moment is the intrinsic spin, a purely quantum mechanical effect, having no classical analogue. The beam of silver atoms divides in two, depending on the spin of the forty-seventh electron, so there are two possible states of spin which came to be known as up and down.“[3]

With their experiment, Stern and Gerlach did not only lay the foundation for nuclear magnetic resonance. Their “key concept of sorting quantum states via space quantization” resulted in “the prototypes for ... optical pumping, the laser, and atomic clocks, as well as incisive discoveries such as the Lamb shift and the anomalous increment in the magnetic moment of the electron, which launched quantum electrodynamics. The means to probe nuclei, proteins, and galaxies; image bodies and brains; perform eye surgery; read music or data from compact disks; and scan bar codes on grocery packages or DNA base pairs in the human genome all stem from exploiting transitions between space-quantized quantum states.“[4]

The Stern-Gerlach experiment was not mentioned in the quotation of Stern’s Nobel Prize, but E. Hulthén highlighted it in the broadcasted award ceremony speech on 10th December 1944. Stern earned his Nobel Prize “for his contribution to the development of the molecular ray method and his discovery of the magnetic moment of the proton”. Isidor Isaac Rabi in Lindau explained the importance of the latter and its surprising result: 

Isidor Rabi on the Proton's Mysterious Magnetic Moment

(00:20:25 - 00:22:10)

Isaac Rabi had begun to study physics at Columbia University in 1923. Yet in terms of modern physics, the US was a developing country at that time. “The only people who had read papers on quantum mechanics were the graduate students, but none of the professors”, Rabi remembered in Lindau. So he gave a departmental seminar on the Stern-Gerlach experiment for his fellow students on his own[5]. After he had obtained his Ph.D. in 1927, he set out for a two-year postgraduate journey through Switzerland, Germany and Denmark. “I felt I had to come to Europe, which was the source of all this excitement and inspiration”. He visited Schrödinger, Sommerfeld, Bohr and Heisenberg, but spent the majority of his time in Otto Stern’s lab, who was then working together with Wolfgang Pauli in Hamburg. Practicing the molecular beam method there paved his way to the invention of magnetic resonance almost ten years later at Columbia where he had become a professor in 1929 on the recommendation of Werner Heisenberg.

Radio Waves Cause Quantum Jumps

Stern’s experiments had proven the existence of quantized intrinsic magnetic spins in electrons and nuclei. Although this metaphor does not truly match the quantum mechanical reality, these spins can be compared to tiny gyroscopes precessing with a certain frequency around the direction of an external magnetic field. But is there a possibility to accurately measure the magnetic spins within a hydrogen atom when the strength of the external magnetic field is known? This was Rabi’s fundamental question. With modest distinction, he only briefly eluded on how he solved it in his Lindau lecture:

Isidor Rabi on his successful radio wave intervention
(00:33:40 - 00:35:45)

Rabi and his collaborators exposed the molecular beam that passes the magnetic field to radio waves. For this purpose, they inserted a loop of wire into the magnetic field and attached it to an oscillating circuit. Then they tuned the frequency of the electromagnetic waves generated by this circuit – until it matched the precession frequency of the nuclei under investigation. In this moment, the resonance phenomenon occurs: The nuclei flip over from one quantum state to the other. Their chance to reach the detector sharply decreases and the detector registers this effect as a marked minimum. The invention of this “resonance method for recording the magnetic properties of atomic nuclei”, as the quotation says, earned Rabi the Nobel Prize in Physics 1944. Based on the artificial laboratory setting of molecular beams as it was, however, the method was not yet applicable for the structural elucidation of molecules.

Introducing Nuclear Induction

Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell developed Rabi’s concept further by complementing it with the principle of nuclear induction. When the radio waves that have caused the quantum jumps in hydrogen nuclei are switched off, the energized nuclei relax back to their initial state and fire out radio signals themselves, which induce an oscillating voltage in a pick-up coil. Bloch and Purcell succeeded in converting these signals into spectra where the radio signals transmitted from each nucleus register as a series of specific peaks and thus can reveal the structure of small molecules: Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was born. Felix Bloch attended the Lindau meeting twice. The only lecture he gave there in 1976 did not deal with his Nobel Prize winning topic but rather with current aspects of superfluidity. To deepen our understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance, it’s therefore well worth listening to Kurt Wüthrich’s concise explanation:

Kurt Wüthrich (2014) - A Personal View of the History of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine

Well thank you, it’s a pleasure to be here. Why a personal view? Because as all of us I will over exaggerate my own contributions. My talk starts in 20 minutes. And I expect that 100s of people will be coming in 20 minutes to listen to me. Therefore I’ll speak slowly so that those newcomers will also get part of it. Now nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR is a technique which can provide us today with quite a lot of interesting information. So it is NMR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It’s not No Meaningful Results. And it’s not No More Research. Nuclear magnetic resonance. And it can be used to study man. And it can be used to study molecules. And today we expect that in chemistry NMR enables us to decide about the structures. That is NMR can tell us about the presence of each and every atom in such a molecule. It can be a larger molecule, a smaller molecule. It can be the result of synthetic chemistry where the chemist wants to check about the coincidence of what he expected to get and what he did actually get in his work. This particular molecule that I showed to you is cyclosporine A. It was essential in the start of transplantation in human medicine. It is the first viable immune suppressant that actually enabled the start of transplantation medicine and it was also a big economic success. Now, what can NMR do next? Now we move from chemistry to structural biology. Now, NMR can tell us where our drug molecule, this is again cyclosporine A, binds to particular sites in cells, in this case in the human cell. And here you have the primary receptor. This is a small protein, cyclophilin. And so NMR can tell us about the structure of the complex formed by the drug molecule and its receptor. Once we have such a result, we can remove the drug from its binding site and study in detail the contacts that the drug undergoes with its receptor. And then we can go back to the chemists and tell them: “Look, this piece is too big. That doesn’t really fit into this crevice. So cut it off and check whether you can improve some properties of the drug which might lead to reduced site effect that are inevitable in any drug and need to be minimised.” This is one area where we use NMR widely today. Another area is in imaging. It’s a very different approach. Also we are on a very different scale. This is a knee. It happens to be my own. You can see... Others usually show their heads but because of my major occupation, knees are considerably more important that other parts of my body. Now, you all want to get a Nobel Prize and we should tell you how to do it. This is a bit difficult. But, you see, it’s much easier to predict the past. So I’m going to tell you how things have happened in NMR. There are 6 Nobel laureates who got the Prize for NMR. And the first thing... Now if you want to get the prize, you have to choose your field. After Switzerland lost to Argentina in a painful way last night, I find out again that it was the right choice for me 50 years ago not to continue playing football as my major occupation but to join NMR because of the 6 NMR Nobel Prizes. So choosing the right field of activity is important. Never mind if it’s a Nobel Prize. You have to be happy. You have to have a satisfactory life. And if you live in Argentina, I would recommend that you rather go into football than into natural science. Well next you have to be visible. You see I stay in Argentina. When I don’t play football, then I go fishing. And these are quite nice trouts which I caught in the Lago Escondido near Bariloche in the Andes in Argentina. And in Bariloche there’s a very famous theoretical physics institute where many European leading physicists would spend part of the year. But you see these fish are very nice eating but they are sort of small. And Stockholm is far away. And it’s dark in the winter. So Swedes may not see these fish. So you have to catch big fish. Then you have a chance that the Nobel Committee may actually see the fish. And I am now going to tell you about the 3 big fish that gave Nobel Prizes in NMR. And then there will be a fourth big fish, which provides the basis of it all. NMR started with Felix Bloch. This is the Swiss physicist and Edward Purcell an American physicist, they both worked in the United States. And they discovered within a few weeks independent of each other the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance. It is not so that this was an all or nothing breakthrough. There have been different experiments for example by a physicist with the name of Rabi. Other physicist with the name of Stern, who performed so called beam experiments which already indicated that nuclear magnetic resonance could happen. But it was Bloch and Purcell who actually did the first experiment. Now what is the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon? We consider just the simplest case, namely the case of a hydrogen atom like you find it in water for example. Hydrogen atom has a spin. The nucleus of the hydrogen has a spin. And in a quantum mechanical description you have a spin of one half. And this has 2 so called eigenstates. So that nucleus can exist in 2 different forms. One is described by an arrow pointing up, the other one by an arrow pointing down. Or it’s called beta or alpha and the corresponding quantum numbers are -1/2 and +1/2. Here in this audience we will not be able to distinguish between the 2 states because you are only subject to the Earth’s magnetic field and that’s so small that you do not get an energy difference between the 2 states. But if you place the material to study, in this case the hydrogen atoms, into a strong magnetic field that may be half a million times the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field, then you lift the degeneracy. That means you now have 2 states that are energetically different. And the energy difference can be explained -this is delta E- can be expressed in terms of a frequency, a radio frequency. When you listen to a radio set, then you work with the same kind of wavelengths that we use in NMR experiments. Now, the key point here is that this size of the energy splitting is proportional to the applied magnetic field. So we have it in hand to decide how big we want this energy gap to be and hence at what frequency we want to see transitions between these 2 energetically different states. And when we change the applied field, then this difference will become a bit smaller. If we increase it, it will become a bit bigger. Recognising this was of course the first of those 3 big NMR fishes. Now we come to the second fish. You have already seen the water molecule in Peter Agre’s talk. It’s a simple structure. You have 2 hydrogen atoms in white and the reddish blue oxygen atom. In the NMR experiment we don’t see the oxygen, we only see the 2 hydrogens. And because of the symmetry of the molecular structure we cannot distinguish between the 2. Therefore we get a single line in a spectrum. Now this line... Since I have enough time let me go back. This line now represents exactly this energy difference in terms of the frequency at which we observe this peak. And now comes the big idea which leads to the use of the NMR phenomenon for macroscopic imaging as it is used in medical diagnosis. You now take a macroscopic structure like human head or human knee as you have seen before and you apply a variation of the field, the so called field gradient across this macroscopic object. Now you have a different energy splitting on the left eye than on the right eye because you have a difference in the applied magnetic field. Though also we only and exclusively observe the water molecule -I mean most of the inside of our head is water, about 80%- we can see, we can distinguish between the water at this part of the head and here. And then we do the same thing perpendicular to this plain and in the third dimension and with some mathematical procedures. We can then reproduce the image. So this is the big fish. To realise if you go across the macroscopic object, you can distinguish between the water next to the left eye from the water next to the right eye. It’s the same. You can distinguish between the 2 ears although you always observe the water. And this big fish was caught by Paul Lauterbur and by Peter Mansfield who received the Nobel Prize in medicine and physiology in 2003. Let me just for... You see I can also say that there are 4 of us who got the Nobel Prize in NMR in new times. And we all worked in both, in spectroscopy and in imaging. So let me just recount how we got into imaging. That was very early on in the game in the 1980s. And it wasn’t trivial to get a sufficiently big magnet to place an adult human body inside. So we got a small magnet and we worked in the children’s hospital in Zurich. And actually my graduate students Chris Bösch and Rolf Grütter are now both leading scientists in Swiss hospitals in this area. We would work with new born infants. And the most difficult problem that we faced was to monitor the state of the infants inside the magnet because new born infants with birth trauma are highly unstable and all vital functions need to be constantly monitored. And the children were also so weak that we couldn’t use chemicals to sedate the children. Therefore we would ask the parents to come in and put the children to sleep. Then the parents were extremely upset and scared of seeing their little ones disappear in a magnet. So Chris Bösch devised the fairy house. Now the magnet is inside here, the baby goes here and the parents were extremely relieved to see the baby go into a fairy house rather than into an iron core magnet. The result of the study was very often very painful. I show you here an image of the head of a 17 year old girl who had heavy mechanical birth trauma which caused a huge hematoma here in this area of the scull. Very sad story of course. But this is the sort of things that happened to us when we were into MRI many years ago. Now let me go to the third big fish story. This is work that led to the use of NMR in structural biology. And here the problem to be solved was a very different one from the problem that you have to solve when you try to image macroscopic objects. We are now dealing not with water molecules which give a single line in any sort of spectroscopic technique but now we work with macromolecules such as this marvellous painting by Geis from the 1960s. This is cytochrome C. I always like to show such pictures from the times before computers were able to draw molecules. So Irving Geis was a painter who painted all the early 3 dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids in the 1960s and ‘70s. And only with the 1980s were computers getting able to make similar but not quite equally nice drawings. The point here is that I do not have just one kind of hydrogen atom. I have many different kinds, chemically different types of atoms. And as a result I don’t get a single line but I get a complicated spectrum. This is just a usual scale, corresponds to the frequency at which we observe the signals. And you can see that in this particular case we see some well resolved signals but these correspond only in this case to exactly 6 hydrogen atoms whereas here we have overlapping signals of about 400 NMR signals. Now, we knew from studying these well resolved lines that the information was available to determine 3 dimensional structures. But we couldn’t get the information out of this part which contains most of the resonances. And here the big fish experience was to go from one dimension to 2 dimensions. See, instead of arranging all these many lines on a single axis, you get the 2 dimensional plain and now individual lines move out of the mess here and are well separated in this 2 dimensional plain. So that was the advent of 2 dimensional NMR. We had the first set of experiments by 1982. COSY, NOESY, SECSY and FOCSY. I mean this is serious. I mean SECSY stands for spin-echo correlated spectroscopy. I mean compared to the notations that we see in immunology for example this is relatively straightforward. Now, what is behind this multidimensional NMR? I say multidimensional because although it was 2 dimensional originally, today when we determine an NMR structure of a protein we use 2 five dimensional, 1 four dimensional and 3 three dimensional experiments. So the principle that I’m now going to explain is not limited to 2 dimensions but it can be expanded in principle to an unlimited number of dimensions. This is a 2 dimensional experiment. Now it’s perhaps a bit difficult for some of you to see what is happening. Let me just try to be simple. You have here T1 and T2. T2 is the time that runs. Ok, all of us get older every second that passes today. And in my age that goes much faster than for some of you. But it goes for all of us. So when we perform an experiment, for example with an ensemble of nuclear spins, everything is in principle in equilibrium. We can perturb this equilibrium and study how the system behaves. And we follow this for a long time. So this is just the time. The experiment may last for 100 milliseconds or so. And we perturb the system. I don’t need to go into details. What happens then is that we observe an oscillation of certain parameters that we measure. Now, the idea that leads to 2 dimensional and higher dimensional spectroscopy is to create an artificial second time axis. And this is done in the following way. You perturb the system. Perturbing means that I take a hammer and hit and then wait for a certain time and hit again, ok? Now, then the response to the second hammer hit will depend on the length of time that passes between the first hammer and the second hammer because the system starts, as we say, to evolve and depending on the length of this time T1 we will start this recording. Is it here or here or here? And if we now repeat this experiment 100 times, that is we change this time T1 100 times, then we have created a second time axis which is perpendicular to the normal running time. And the 2 dimensional Fourier transformation then gets us into the 2 dimensional frequency space. And Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1991 for having worked out these principles and realised the first 2 dimensional NMR experiments. So that’s big fish number 3. When you then look more closely at the 2 dimensional or higher dimensional spectrum of a protein, then you see that there is an awful lot of information. This is a so called contour plot. This is now what I get after I resolved that series of overlapping lines in the 1 dimensional spectrum into 2 dimensions. And this is clearly enough information to define a 3 dimensional protein structure. And all it needed from thereon was to develop mathematical tools that could calculate the 3 dimensional structure from this array of NMR peaks that we have seen in this picture. So from here distance geometry techniques get us to here. And from here you then go to Stockholm. So these are the 3 big fish. So the first one is to have observed the phenomenon of NMR by physicists. At the time I met Felix Bloch many times later. He was already retired at the time, lived in Zurich. He did not expect that NMR would yield interesting data other than some new insights into the structure and properties of nuclei. So pure physics. Then we got the development of magnetic resonance imaging by applying field gradients across macroscopic objects. Very clearly, just an application of the basic principle of NMR. And then we got to the point where we could unravel highly complex spectra by introducing artificial new time dimensions into the experiment. I told you there is an additional big fish. Now I am going all the way back to Albert Einstein. I am talking about the Brownian motion and its impact on NMR in solution. What Albert Einstein did in 1905, in addition to sidecars like relativity theory and the likes, he analysed the Brownian motion of particles suspended in liquids at ambient temperature. And it was also pretty much the start of statistical mechanics. So, you only look at the right hand side of my slide here. And what it shows is the behaviour of a small sphere and the behaviour of a large sphere when immersed in a liquid. If we have a small sphere then under the thermal motion of the much smaller solvent molecules, that sphere changes direction and it also changes rotational movements stochastically at a relatively high frequency. When you have a large sphere, its inertia is much larger and it reacts with much lower frequency to the onslaught of the thermally agitated solvent molecules. For NMR this means that we are in a completely different regime of spin physics when we have low frequency Brownian motion or when we have high frequency Brownian motion. And this is what Albert Einstein worked out in 1905 when he was a clerk in the patent office in Bern. And he comes up with the key (that) is that he described the behaviour of molecules with regard to rotational Brownian motion in terms of a correlation time tauC which governs all essential parameters that enable both MRI and studies of large molecules in solution. So Albert Einstein contributes directly to the wellbeing of dozens of football players in Brazil these days. You can introduce the findings of Einstein into the description of NMR experiments by single transition basis operators. This led more recently to transverse relaxation optimised spectroscopy. It led to breaking size barriers -you see here a rather large protein complex. The GroEL-GroES-ADP complex- and gives a rather nice spectrum when using all these principles of recognising the proper impact of the frequency of Brownian motion on NMR in solution. What are exactly, what does this help us? Why is this a fourth big fish in the field? When we look at human bodies with MRI, we don’t see fat. We don’t see proteins, we don’t see membranes. We only see the water molecules. And this is due to this very simple scheme here that the water molecule is very small. And even in our bodies it moves sufficiently fast so as that it gives a sharp NMR line and we can perform MRI on living human subjects. On the other hand having recognised the TROSY principle we are now able to study membrane proteins with solution NMR. And we have heard yesterday from Doctor Kobilka’s talk that he said again and again: And this is actually my own current research area. I don’t need to go into any details. I am working in a team with Professor Raymond Stevens, a crystallographer. And we joined forces by using crystallography and NMR in much the way that Doctor Kobilka described to you yesterday. I hope that this historical review gave you an idea of how far basic research can be before it yields fruit. Fruit means betterment of human life. But it also means money. MRI today is a huge business. Thousands of machines are operating in hospitals. Ten thousands of high tech jobs have been created. If we go to a congress on MRI which didn’t exist 30 years ago, we have 10,000 participants, 12,000 participants. And when we look at things very closely, we see that some of the basics have been accrued long... I mean in the case of Einstein, the theory of Brownian motion came long before NMR was invented. And I think that today’s trend, especially in the United States, to support only research that promises to go to the bedside the next day inhibits the possibility that 50 years from now we will be able to use novel principles of physics in practical medicine and biomedical research. I should also emphasise that all this research in NMR which brought these results was small scale research. It wasn’t a big project where politicians could put their names on top and advertise their support of science. This was all small group research. And it is exactly this kind of work that is very poorly supported these days. I’m afraid that we will suffer from this in the decades to come. Thank you. Applause.

Danke, ich freue mich, hier zu sein. Warum eine persönliche Sicht? Weil ich wie jeder von uns meine eigenen Beiträge überbewerte. Mein Vortrag beginnt in 20 Minuten. Und ich gehe davon aus, dass in 20 Minuten Hunderte Menschen kommen, um mich zu hören. Deshalb werde ich langsam sprechen, damit auch diese Nachzügler etwas davon mitbekommen. Die Kernspinresonanz oder NMR ist eine Technik, die uns heute viele interessante Informationen liefern kann. NMR steht für "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance", nicht für "No Meaningful Results" oder "No More Research". Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, die zur Erforschung des Menschen eingesetzt werden kann. Und es kann genutzt werden um Moleküle zu erforschen. Und heute gehen wir davon aus, dass NMR uns in der Chemie die Entscheidung über Strukturen ermöglicht, dass NMR etwas über das Vorhandensein von allen Atomen in einem solchen Molekül aussagen kann. Es kann ein größeres Molekül oder ein kleineres Molekül sein. Es kann das Ergebnis von synthetischer Chemie sein, wenn der Chemiker etwas über die Koinzidenz von erwarteten und tatsächlichen Ergebnissen seiner Arbeit erfahren möchte. Das spezielle Molekül, das ich Ihnen zeige, ist Cyclosporin A. Es war entscheidend für die Anfänge der Transplantationsmedizin. Es ist das erste brauchbare Immunsuppressivum, das tatsächlich den Start der Transplantationsmedizin ermöglichte und zudem ein großer wirtschaftlicher Erfolg wurde. Was kann NMR als Nächstes bewirken? Wir bewegen uns jetzt von der Chemie zur Strukturbiologie. NMR kann uns zeigen, wo unser Wirkstoffmolekül - das hier ist wieder Cyclosporin A - an bestimmte Stellen in Zellen bindet, in diesem Fall in der menschlichen Zelle. Und hier sehen Sie den primären Rezeptor. Das ist ein kleines Protein, Cyclophilin. Und so kann uns NMR etwas über die Struktur des Komplexes zeigen, der vom Wirkstoffmolekül und seinem Rezeptor gebildet wird. Haben wir erst einmal ein solches Resultat, können wir den Wirkstoff von seiner Bindungsstelle lösen und detailliert die Kontakte untersuchen, die der Wirkstoff mit seinem Rezeptor eingeht. Und dann können wir uns wieder an die Chemiker wenden und ihnen sagen: Es passt nicht richtig in diesen Spalt. Schneide es ab und überprüfe, ob du bestimmte Eigenschaften des Arzneimittels verbessern kannst, damit die Nebenwirkungen reduziert werden, die bei einem Arzneimittel unumgänglich sind, aber auf ein Minimum reduziert werden sollten." Das ist einer der Bereiche, in denen wir die NMR-Technik heute umfassend einsetzen. Ein anderer Bereich sind Bildgebungsverfahren, ein völlig anderer Ansatz. Dort bewegen wir uns auch in völlig anderen Größenordnungen. Das ist ein Knie, übrigens mein eigenes. Sie sehen ...Andere zeigen normalerweise ihre Köpfe, aber aufgrund meines Hauptberufs spielen die Knie eine wesentlich wichtigere Rolle als andere Teile meines Körpers. Sie alle wollen doch einen Nobelpreis bekommen und wir sollten Ihnen zeigen, wie das geht. Das ist gar nicht so leicht. Wesentlich einfacher ist es, die Vergangenheit vorherzusagen. Deshalb erzähle ich Ihnen, wie das im Fall von NMR gewesen ist. Es gibt sechs Nobelpreisträger, die den Nobelpreis für NMR bekommen haben. Und zu allererst ...Wenn man den Preis erhalten will, muss man sein Fachgebiet richtig wählen. Nachdem die Schweiz gestern so schmerzhaft gegen Argentinien verloren hat, hat mich das wieder einmal darin bestätigt, dass ich vor 50 Jahren die richtige Entscheidung getroffen habe, nämlich nicht weiter im Hauptberuf Fußball zu spielen, sondern im Bereich von NMR tätig zu werden - denn von sechs NMR-Nobelpreisen gingen drei an Schweizer Wissenschaftler, während die Schweiz nie auch nur eine einzige Fußballweltmeisterschaft gewonnen oder auch nur fast gewonnen hätte. Wichtig ist also die richtige Wahl des Tätigkeitsfeldes. Egal, ob es der Nobelpreis ist. Man sollte glücklich sein, ein zufriedenes Leben führen. Und wenn Sie in Argentinien leben, so würde ich Ihnen empfehlen, eher Fußball zu spielen als in die Naturwissenschaften zu gehen. Als Nächstes muss man sichtbar sein. Ich lebe in Argentinien. Wenn ich nicht Fußball spiele, gehe ich angeln. Im Lago Escondido in der Nähe von Bariloche in den argentinischen Anden habe ich recht ansehnliche Forellen gefangen. Und in Bariloche gibt es ein sehr berühmtes Institut für Theoretische Physik, an dem viele führende Physiker Europas einen Teil des Jahres verbringen. Diese Fische sind ganz lecker, aber ziemlich klein. Und Stockholm ist weit weg. Und im Winter ist es dunkel, weshalb die Schweden diese Fische möglicherweise gar nicht sehen können. Wenn die Chance bestehen soll, dass das Nobelkomittee den Fisch tatsächlich wahrnimmt, muss man also große Fische fangen. Und ich erzähle Ihnen jetzt etwas über die drei "großen Fische", die mit einem Nobelpreis für NMR ausgezeichnet wurden. Und dann gibt es noch einen vierten großen Fisch, der die Grundlage für das alles ist. NMR begann mit dem Schweizer Physiker Felix Bloch und dem amerikanischen Physiker Edward Purcell, die beide in den Vereinigten Staaten tätig waren. Innerhalb weniger Wochen entdeckten sie unabhängig voneinander das Phänomen der kernmagnetischen Resonanz. Das war allerdings kein "Alles oder Nichts"-Durchbruch. Vorher hatte es bereits verschiedene Experimente, etwa von einem Physiker namens Rabi oder einem weiteren Physiker Namens Stern gegeben, die so genannte Strahlexperimente durchführten, die schon andeuteten, dass eine Kernspinresonanz vorkommen kann. Bloch und Purcell führten allerdings das erste Experiment durch. Worin besteht das Phänomen der Kernspinresonanz? Wir gehen einmal vom einfachsten Fall aus, nämlich einem Wasserstoffatom, wie es beispielsweise in Wasser zu finden ist. Ein Wasserstoffatom hat einen Spin. Der Kern des Wasserstoffatoms hat einen Spin. Und in einer quantenmechanischen Beschreibung gibt es einen Spin von 1/2. Und dieser hat zwei sogenannte Eigenzustände. Dieser Kern kann also in zwei unterschiedlichen Formen existieren. Die eine wird durch einen nach oben zeigenden Pfeil, die andere durch einen nach unten zeigenden Pfeil angezeigt. Oder sie werden als Beta oder Alpha bezeichnet. Die entsprechenden Quantenzahlen lauten -1/2 und +1/2. Hier im Publikum können wir nicht zwischen den beiden Zuständen unterscheiden, da Sie nur dem Magnetfeld der Erde unterliegen und das ist so schwach, dass man keinen Energieunterschied zwischen den beiden Zuständen feststellen kann. Platziert man aber das zu untersuchende Material, in diesem Fall die Wasserstoffatome, in einem starken Magnetfeld, das eine halbe Million Mal so stark ist wie das Magnetfeld der Erde, wird die Entartung sichtbar, das heißt, man hat jetzt zwei Zustände, die sich energetisch voneinander unterscheiden. Die Energiedifferenz lässt sich erklären, das ist Delta E, sie kann als Frequenz, als Radiofrequenz ausgedrückt werden. Wenn Sie ein Radio einschalten, haben Sie die gleiche Art von Wellenlängen, die wir in unseren NMR-Experimenten verwenden. Entscheidend ist, dass diese Größe der Energieverteilung im Verhältnis zum angewandten Magnetfeld steht. Wir können also entscheiden, wie groß diese Energiedifferenz sein soll und bei welcher Frequenz Übergänge zwischen diesen beiden energetisch unterschiedlichen Zuständen vorkommen sollen. Wenn wir das angewandte Feld verändern, verringert sich dieser Unterschied etwas. Wenn wir es vergrößern, vergrößert es sich etwas. Diese Entdeckung war die erste dieser drei großen NMR-Fische. Kommen wir jetzt zum zweiten Fisch. Im Vortrag von Peter Agre haben Sie das Wassermolekül ja schon gesehen. Das ist eine einfache Struktur. Es gibt zwei Wasserstoffatome, in Weiß, und das rötlich-blaue Sauerstoffatom. Im NMR-Experiment sehen wir den Sauerstoff nicht, wir sehen nur die beiden Wasserstoffe. Und aufgrund der Symmetrie der Molekülstruktur können wir die beiden nicht voneinander unterscheiden. Deshalb erhalten wir eine einzelne Linie in einem Spektrum. Diese Linie ...Da ich genügend Zeit habe, gehe ich noch einmal zurück. Diese Linie repräsentiert exakt diese Energiedifferenz hinsichtlich der Frequenz, bei der wir diesen Höchstwert beobachten. Und hier kommt die zündende Idee ins Spiel, die zur Verwendung des NMR-Phänomens für makroskopische Bildgebungsverfahren in der medizinischen Diagnose führte. Auf eine makroskopische Struktur, wie den menschlichen Kopf oder das vorher dargestellte Knie wendet man jetzt eine Variation des Feldes an, den so genannten Feldgradienten, durch dieses makroskopische Objekt. Jetzt besteht auf dem linken Auge eine andere Energieverteilung als auf dem rechten Auge, weil die angewandten Magnetfelder unterschiedlich sind. Obwohl wir ausschließlich das Wassermolekül betrachten - das Innere unseres Kopfes besteht zum großen Teil, rund 80%, aus Wasser - können wir zwischen dem Wasser in diesem Teil des Kopfes und diesem hier unterscheiden. Und dann wiederholen wir das Ganze senkrecht zu dieser Fläche und in der dritten Dimension und mit einigen mathematischen Verfahren können wir dann das Bild erstellen. Das ist also der "große Fisch" - die Feststellung, dass man, wenn man über das makroskopische Objekt fährt, zwischen dem Wasser am linken Auge und dem Wasser am rechten Auge unterscheiden kann. Es ist das gleiche. Man kann zwischen den beiden Ohren unterscheiden, obwohl man immer das Wasser betrachtet. Und diesen großen Fisch gefangen haben Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield, die 2003 den Nobelpreis für Medizin und Physiologie erhielten. Lassen Sie mich ...Ich könnte auch sagen, dass vier von uns den Nobelpreis für NMR in neuer Zeit erhalten haben. Und wir haben alle in beiden Bereichen gearbeitet, Spektroskopie und Bildgebungsverfahren. Lassen Sie mich gerade erzählen, wie wir zum Bildgebungsverfahren kamen. Das war relativ zu Anfang in den 1980er-Jahren. Und es war nicht gerade einfach, an einen ausreichend großen Magneten zu kommen, um den Körper eines Erwachsenen darin unterbringen zu können. Deshalb hatten wir einen kleinen Magneten und arbeiteten in der Kinderklinik in Zürich. Zwei meiner Doktoranden, Chris Bösch und Rolf Grütter, sind heute führende Wissenschaftler auf diesem Gebiet in Schweizer Krankenhäusern. Wir beschlossen, mit Neugeborenen zu arbeiten. Das Schwierigste daran war, den Zustand der Neugeborenen im Magneten zu überwachen, weil Neugeborene mit Geburtstrauma sehr instabil sind und alle lebenswichtigen Funktionen kontinuierlich überwacht werden müssen. Und die Kinder waren so schwach, dass wir auch keine Arzneimittel zur Ruhigstellung verwenden konnten. Deshalb baten wir die Eltern, die Kinder in den Schlaf zu wiegen. Und die waren extrem verunsichert und aufgeschreckt, wenn sie ihre Kleinen in einem Magneten verschwinden sahen. Deshalb dachte sich Chris Bösch dieses Märchenhaus aus, in dem der Magnet dann untergebracht war. Das Baby wird hier in das Gerät gefahren und die Eltern waren sehr erleichtert, wenn ihr Baby in einem Märchenhaus statt in einem Eisenkernmagneten verschwand. Das Ergebnis der Untersuchung war oft sehr schmerzlich. Hier sehen Sie die Darstellung des Kopfes eines 17 Tage alten Mädchens mit heftigem mechanischen Geburtstrauma, das in diesem Bereich des Schädels ein riesiges Hämatom verursacht hatte. Natürlich eine sehr traurige Geschichte. Aber solche Dinge kamen vor, als wir vor vielen Jahren mit MRI anfingen. Ich komme jetzt zum dritten großen Fisch. Das ist die Arbeit, die zur Anwendung von NMR in der Strukturbiologie führte. Das in diesem Bereich zu lösende Problem war ein ganz anderes als das, was man mit der Darstellung makroskopischer Objekte versuchte. Hier haben wir es nicht mit Wassermolekülen zu tun, die in jeder spektroskopischen Technik eine einzelne Linie ergeben, sondern mit Makromolekülen wie bei diesem wunderbaren Gemälde von Geis aus den 1960er-Jahren. Das ist Cytochrom C. Ich mag diese Bilder aus den Zeiten, bevor man Moleküle mit Computerprogrammen darzustellen begann. Irving Geis war ein Maler, der in den 1960er- und 1970er-Jahren all die frühen dreidimensionalen Strukturen von Proteinen und Nukleinsäuren darstellte. Erst in den 1980er-Jahren waren dann die Computer so langsam in der Lage, ähnliche, wenn auch nicht ganz so schöne Darstellungen zu erzeugen. Es geht darum, dass hier nicht nur eine Art von Wasserstoffatom vorhanden ist, sondern chemisch sehr verschiedene Atomarten. Deshalb ergibt sich keine einzelne Linie, sondern ein kompliziertes Spektrum. Das hier ist einfach eine normale Skalenbreite, die der Frequenz entspricht, bei der wir die Signale beobachten. Und in diesem speziellen Fall erkennen wir einige gut aufgelöste Signale, die aber nur in diesem Fall exakt sechs Wasserstoffatomen entsprechen, während wir hier überlappende Signale von rund 400 NMR-Signalen haben. Aus der Analyse dieser gut aufgelösten Linien wussten wir, dass die Informationen zur Ermittlung dreidimensionaler Strukturen zur Verfügung standen. Aber wir erhielten keine Informationen aus diesem Teil, der die meisten Resonanzen enthält. Der "große Fisch" bestand nun darin, von einer auf zwei Dimensionen überzugehen. Statt einer Anordnung dieser gesamten Linien auf einer einzelnen Achse erhält man eine zweidimensionale Fläche. Jetzt bewegen sich hier einzelne Linien aus diesem Durcheinander heraus und werden hier in dieser zweidimensionalen Fläche gut voneinander getrennt dargestellt. Das war der Beginn der zweidimensionalen NMR-Technik. Die ersten Versuchsserien fanden um das Jahr 1982 statt. COSY, NOESY, SECSY und FOCSY. Die heißen tatsächlich so. SECSY steht für "Spin-echo Correlated Spectroscopy". Im Vergleich zu den Bezeichnungen, die wir beispielsweise in der Immunologie kennen, ist das doch relativ geradlinig. Was steckt nun hinter der multidimensionalen NMR-Technik? Ich sage "multidimensional", weil es zwar ursprünglich zweidimensional war, wir aber heute bei der Ermittlung einer NMR-Struktur eines Proteins zwei fünfdimensionale, ein vierdimensionales und drei dreidimensionale Experimente benutzen. Das Prinzip, das ich erklären werde, ist also nicht auf zwei Dimensionen begrenzt, sondern lässt sich grundsätzlich auf eine unbegrenzte Anzahl von Dimensionen erweitern. Das hier ist ein zweidimensionales Experiment. Vielleicht ist nicht für alle zu sehen, was hier passiert. Ich versuche das einfach zu erklären. Hier gibt es t1 und t2. t2 ist die verstreichende Zeit. Wir alle werden mit jeder Sekunde etwas älter. Und in meinem Alter geht das noch viel schneller als bei einigen von Ihnen. Aber es gilt für uns alle. Wenn wir beispielsweise ein Experiment mit einem Kernspin-Ensemble durchführen, ist im Prinzip alles im Gleichgewicht. Wir können das Gleichgewicht stören und untersuchen, wie sich das System verhält. Und wir verfolgen das dann eine lange Zeit. Das hier ist also einfach die Zeit. Das Experiment kann z. B. 100 Millisekunden andauern. Und wir stören das System. Ich brauche nicht ins Detail zu gehen. Und dann beobachten wir die Oszillation bestimmter Parameter, die wir messen. Die Idee, die hinter der zweidimensionalen und höherdimensionalen Spektroskopie steckt, ist es, eine künstliche zweite Zeitachse zu schaffen, indem man das System stört. Stören bedeutet, dass man einen Hammer nimmt und schlägt, dann eine bestimmte Zeit wartet und erneut schlägt. Die Reaktion auf den zweiten Hammerschlag hängt von der Länge der Zeit ab, die zwischen dem erstem und dem zweiten Hammerschlag vergeht, weil das System, wie wir sagen, sich zu entwickeln beginnt. Und abhängig von der Länge dieser Zeit t1 beginnen wir mit der Erfassung. Ist das hier oder hier oder hier? Und wenn wir dieses Experiment 100 Mal wiederholen, also diese Zeit t1 einhundert Mal verändern, haben wir eine zweite Zeitachse geschaffen, die senkrecht zur normalen Laufzeit verläuft. Und mit der zweidimensionalen Fourier-Transformation sind wir im zweidimensionalen Frequenzbereich. Für die Ausarbeitung dieser Grundsätze erhielt Richard Ernst 1991 den Nobelpreis in Chemie. Er führte auch die ersten zweidimensionalen NMR-Experimente durch. Das war also der große Fisch Nr. 3. Wenn man sich das zwei- oder höherdimensionale Spektrum eines Proteins genauer anschaut, erkennt man eine Menge an Informationen. Hier sehen Sie ein so genanntes Konturdiagramm. Das ist das Ergebnis, nachdem ich diese Serie von überlappenden Linien im eindimensionalen Spektrum in zwei Dimensionen aufgelöst habe. Und diese Informationen reichen definitiv aus, um eine dreidimensionale Proteinstruktur zu definieren. Und dann brauchte man nur noch mathematische Werkzeuge zu entwickeln, die die dreidimensionale Struktur aus diesem Spektrum von NMR-Peaks berechnen, die in diesem Bild zu sehen waren. Diesen Schritt haben uns Distanzgeometrie-Rechnungen ermöglicht. Und von dort ging es dann weiter nach Stockholm. Das also sind die drei großen Fische. Der erste bestand darin, dass Physiker das NMR-Phänomen beobachtet hatten. Als ich Felix Bloch sehr viel später einmal traf, war er bereits pensioniert und lebte in Zürich. Er hätte niemals erwartet, dass die NMR-Technik außer einigen neuen Erkenntnissen über die Struktur und die Eigenschaften von Zellkernen interessante Daten liefern würde. Also reine Physik. Dann erfolgte die Weiterentwicklung der Kernspintomographie durch Anwendung von Feldgradienten auf makroskopische Objekte. Das war ganz klar einfach eine Anwendung des Grundprinzips von NMR. Und so konnten wir äußerst komplexe Spektren entwirren, in dem künstliche, neue Zeitdimensionen in das Experiment eingebracht wurden. Ich erwähnte bereits einen weiteren "großen Fisch". Und dazu gehe ich zurück bis zu Albert Einstein. Ich spreche über die Brownsche Bewegung und ihre Auswirkung auf NMR in Lösung. die Brownsche Bewegung von in Flüssigkeit suspendierten Teilchen bei Umgebungstemperatur. Und das war so ziemlich der Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Schauen Sie sich nur die rechte Seite dieser Folie hier an. Zu sehen ist dort das Verhalten der kleinen Kugelfläche und der großen Kugelfläche, die in eine Flüssigkeit eingetaucht wird. Bei einer kleinen Kugelfläche ändert diese Kugelfläche unter der thermischen Bewegung der wesentlich kleineren Lösungsmittelmoleküle die Richtung und zudem die Drehbewegungen stochastisch bei einer relativ hohen Frequenz. Bei einer großen Kugelfläche ist die Trägheit wesentlich größer. Sie reagiert mit einer wesentlich geringeren Frequenz auf den Angriff der thermisch agitierten Lösungsmittelmoleküle. Für NMR bedeutet das, dass wir uns in einem vollständig anderen System der Spinphysik bewegen, abhängig davon, ob wir eine niederfrequente Brownsche Bewegung oder eine hochfrequente Brownsche Bewegung haben. Und das hat Albert Einstein 1905 ausgearbeitet, als er als Sachbearbeiter beim Patentamt in Bern tätig war. Und er lieferte damit den Schlüssel, indem er das Verhalten von Molekülen in Bezug zur Brownsche Drehbewegung im Sinne einer Korrelationszeit TauC lieferte, die alle wesentlichen Parameter steuert, die sowohl MRI als auch die Analyse großer Moleküle in Lösung ermöglichen. Albert Einstein hat also direkt zum Wohlergehen dutzender Fußballspieler in Brasilien in diesen Tagen beigetragen. Die Ergebnisse von Einstein lassen sich durch einzelne Übergangsbasisoperatoren in die Beschreibung von NMR-Experimenten integrieren. Das hat in jüngerer Zeit zur transversalen relaxationsoptimierten Spektroskopie geführt. Dadurch konnten Größenhindernisse überwunden werden - Sie sehen hier einen ziemlich großen Proteinkomplex. Der GroEL-GroES-ADP-Komplex - und ergibt das dann ein ziemlich schönes Spektrum wenn man all diese Grundsätze der richtig erkannten Auswirkungen der Frequenz der Brownsche Bewegung auf NMR in Lösung anwendet. Wie kann das für uns von Nutzen sein? Warum ist das der vierte "große Fisch" auf diesem Gebiet? Wenn wir einen menschlichen Körper mit MRI betrachten, sehen wir kein Fett. Wir sehen keine Proteine, wir sehen keine Membranen. Wir sehen nur die Wassermoleküle. Und das hängt sehr einfach damit zusammen, dass das Wassermolekül sehr klein ist. Und selbst in unserem Körper bewegt es sich schnell genug, um eine scharfe NMR-Linie zu erzeugen, so dass wir MRI an lebenden Menschen durchführen können. Nachdem das TROSY-Prinzip entdeckt wurde, sind wir jetzt in der Lage, Membranproteine mit NMR in Lösung zu untersuchen. Und gestern hat Dr. Kobilka in seinem Vortrag mehrfach gesagt: wenn wir die Funktionsweise von komplexen Molekülen wie GPCR (G-Protein gekoppelte Rezeptoren) verstehen wollen." Das ist mein derzeitiges Forschungsgebiet. Ich möchte das hier nicht vertiefen. Ich arbeite in einem Team mit Professor Raymond Stevens, einem Kristallographen, zusammen. Und gemeinsam nutzen wir die Kristallographie und NMR in ähnlicher Weise, die Dr. Kobilka Ihnen das gestern beschrieben hat. Ich hoffe, dass diese historische Übersicht Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon vermitteln konnte, wie weit Grundlagenforschung geht, bevor sie Früchte trägt. Mit Früchten ist eine Verbesserung des menschlichen Lebens gemeint. Aber es bedeutet auch Geld. MRI ist heute ein Riesengeschäft. In den Krankenhäusern sind Tausende solcher Geräte im Einsatz. Dadurch wurden zehntausende Hightech-Arbeitsplätze geschaffen. Kongresse zum Thema MRI, die vor 30 Jahren überhaupt noch nicht existierten, werden von 10.000 bis 12.000 Teilnehmern besucht. Und bei genauerer Betrachtung ist zu erkennen, dass einige der Grundlagen dafür vor langer Zeit geschaffen wurden ... In Einsteins Fall ... die Theorie der Brownschen Bewegung wurde lange vor der Erfindung von NMR entwickelt. Der heute insbesondere in den USA zu spürende Trend, nur Forschung zu unterstützen, die sich sofort am Krankenbett umsetzen lässt, verhindert meiner Ansicht nach die Möglichkeit, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sind, neuartige physikalische Prinzipien in der praktischen Medizin und in der biomedizinischen Forschung einzusetzen. Ich sollte auch noch erwähnen, dass die gesamte NMR-Forschung, die zu diesen Ergebnissen geführt hat, im Rahmen kleiner Forschungsprojekte erfolgt ist. Das war kein Riesenprojekt, das sich Politiker auf ihre Fahnen schreiben konnten und mit dem sie Werbung für ihre Unterstützung der Wissenschaften machen konnten. Das waren alles kleine Forschungsarbeiten. Und genau diese Art von Arbeit wird heute wenig unterstützt. Ich befürchte, dass wir die Folgen in den nächsten Jahrzehnten zu spüren bekommen werden. Danke. Applaus.

Kurt Wüthrich on the Principle of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
(00:09:05 - 00:11:49)


An Esoteric Tool Goes High-Tech

In its early years, NMR spectroscopy was still more of an esoteric tool than the method of choice to solve complicated chemical structures. The first commercial NMR spectrometers in the 1950s enabled frequency degeneracy between the two eigenstates of hydrogen nuclei of just 30 Megahertz. Their magnetic field was too weak to provide sufficiently resolved spectra. The radio signals sent from the resonating nuclei remained relatively feeble, and so it was extremely difficult for an experimental observer to discriminate signals from noise. Small amounts of nuclei were almost impossible to detect. Three developments helped to overcome this initial weakness of NMR spectroscopy: One was the rapid improvement in the application of superconductivity. It had been discovered already in 1911 by Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (Nobel Prize in Physics 1913), but began to yield its first practical results only more than four decades later. Several Nobel Prizes in Physics (e.g. 1972, 1973, 1987 and 2003) substantiate the progress in this field. Superconducting magnet coils helped to enhance the field strength of NMR spectrometers dramatically. Today, the first one-billion-hertz machines are in use. They can generate a magnetic field of 23.5 Tesla. The other development, as in science in general, was the exponential growth of computing power. The third development was a sharp increase in detection speed and sensitivity, which led to the advent of high-resolution NMR and mainly was the merit of Richard Ernst.

After receiving his PhD in the early 1960s, he joined the Californian company Varian Associates. There, Ernst was excited by his boss Weston Anderson's work on a mechanical device called the "wheel of fortune". Instead of the usual method of bathing a compound in a slowly tuned sweep of radio waves, Anderson was trying to develop a mechanical generator that excited atomic nuclei with more than one radio frequency, which he hoped would save time by plotting several signals in parallel. This approach eventually proved to be unpractical, but Anderson suggested that Ernst work on another possibility for acquiring parallel data. And indeed Ernst achieved a similar effect by using a series of short and intense radio pulses. He plotted all the signals together as a function of time after each pulse. A computer converted this complex graph into the conventional NMR pattern, using the same mathematical calculation that is used to identify molecular structures in X-ray crystallography, a formula called the Fourier transformation (FT).

Richard Ernst (2006) - Fourier Methods in Spectroscopy. From Monsieur Fourier to Medical Imaging

Dear friends, I'm enormously enjoying this year's Lindau meeting. Especially talking to you, my dear young enthusiastic and promising scientist friends. Among the lectures, so far, I particularly liked those that went beyond traditional science and revealed also the societal context. And in fact last year, at the same place here, I was talking about academic opportunities for conceiving and shaping our future. And in this context I made some rather strong and perhaps even offensive statements, for example condemning egoism as the driving force of all our actions, where we always ask ourselves what do we gain back from doing something. And rather promoting responsibility as the driving force, where we ask: What can we do in order that society profits something of it? And my lecture ended then with two quotes, one from François Rabelais: Or "Science without conscience ruins the soul." And on the other side, despite all the misery in our world, we have to remain optimist because we all together are jointly responsible for what will come in the future, we can't blame anybody else. So today I don't want to make any offensive statements and I will try to be a good boy and just tell you a small story, a purely scientific story: "From Monsieur Fourier to medical imaging." And in fact I like to demonstrate to you Fourier Transformation as a beautiful example how useful mathematics can be in the sciences. But, as usual, the inventor of Fourier Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptist-Joseph Fourier, he didn't know that today, at the beginning of a lecture, you could even peek into the head of the speaker in order to verify whether it's worthwhile to listen to his lecture, because all I can tell you is contained in this little sloppy piece of tissue here. So a lot of development went on from here to there. And I'd like to ask the question: Why is the Fourier Transformation so important in science? It's a very simple expression, it's an integral transform where we transform a function in time domain into a function in frequency domain. So we relate these two domains here by this integral transform. Or we can relate a momentum space to the geometric space, a function of K, of momentum and related to a function of coordinates. It has something to do with exploration of nature in general. When we explore an object, we consider it as a black box, we don't know what is inside and we try to perturb it. We knock at the input here and listen to the output. And that tells us what is inside. And actually a very unnatural way of exploring a black box is to apply a sine wave, a repetitive perturbation, and then listening to the output here. And I mean, just remember the lecture of Professor Hänsch two days ago, he told you that never measure anything but frequency. And that's exactly what we try to do in order to characterise the inside of this black box. And that makes sense because actually these trigonometric functions, they are Eigenfunctions of linear time-invariant systems. So whenever we apply such a function to a black box, which is linear and time-invariant, we get the same function back, multiplied with a certain complex quantity, which is, in quantum mechanical terms, the Eigenvalue, the Eigenfunction multiplied by the Eigenvalue. And if we block this Eigenvalue as a function of frequency, if we vary the frequency, we obtain the spectrum, that's the basis of spectroscopy, so it really makes sense. Now, we can do spectroscopy just in the normal way, applying one frequency after the other and measuring the response and blocking the amplitudes here as a function of frequency, that gives us a spectrum. But we could also do it in parallel, apply all these frequencies at once to the black box and saving time. Then we need something like a frequency sorter which sorts us out the various responses in order to again get the spectrum. And this frequency sort, that's after all nothing else than a Fourier Transformation. And by doing it in parallel here, we gain by the Multiplex Advantage, having done everything at the same time, often called also the Fellgett's Advantage. That's the advantage of going this way here. And the secret of the Fourier Transformation actually is also the orthogonality of the trigonometric function, when you multiple one with the other and integrate over this entire space, then you only get something when the two functions are identical. So they are orthogonal. And this allows one to separate them. And the simultaneous application of all these frequencies that can for example be implemented by a pulse. If you are by a pulse, then you have essentially all the frequencies contained, you obtain an impulse response. You have to do a Fourier Transformation and you obtain a spectrum, so simple. So again we have, so to say, two spaces here, which we relate, conjugate variables, the time and the frequency variable. The momentum space and the coordinate space, which are connected. There are, so to say, two different views of the same object. You can look at that in red colour or in green colour, and Heisenberg has said that a long time ago, that the most fruitful developments have happened whenever two different kinds of thinking were meeting. So these are the two different spaces. Or I mean, Professor Glauber, he has been telling you about waves and particles, this relation also belongs to the same category. And he also mentioned Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", and he has here the yin yang symbol, this also represents this two spaces which, so to say, contains the same truth. The whole world of Fourier transforms in spectroscopy is like complex. There are many different possibilities. In particular because actually what we are looking at is not just a function of time or a function of momentum, but it's set both at the same time, depending on four different variables, it is a plain wave, which develops in time and it develops in space. And so we can either use the time dependence, make a time domain experiment and finally obtain a spectrum. We can also use the K variables, the momentum variable and obtain, here for example the image of a molecule, that's the x-ray diffraction. We can do imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, which also uses this K dependence as the Fourier transform obtains an image of a head. And finally we can do for example interferometry, where we use the R dependence, we measure the interference in spatial domain, Fourier transform it and obtain again a spectrum, for example an infrared spectrum. So these are these various possibilities, which I briefly would like to describe. And everything goes back to this gentleman Monsieur Fourier. Who was Monsieur Fourier? That's him. He was at the same time, and that's a very, very great exception, at the same time a scientist and a politician. I mean, there are very, very few politicians who understand anything of science and there are very few scientists who are interested in politics. But he is, so to say, my role model, he has the same in him combined. And even, I mean, here he is in his office in Grenoble, and instead of studying his legal papers, he is doing a physics experiment, he actually measures here heat conduction, and he was writing at the same time a paper, which he presented actually at the Institute de France, being prefect to the département Isère. He was writing a book, 1822, on theory of, théorie analytique de la chaleur, heat conduction. And he did experiments and also this kind of input-output experiments. He had a black box here, a blue box, applying heat from the left side and measuring then the temperature distribution in the body. So it's again this input-output relation, he expanded the input in the Fourier Series and reconstituted the result again from a Spatial Fourier Series. So he used for the first time this Fourier expressions, of course he didn't call them Fourier expressions, but anyway, here they are in his book of 1822. Whenever somebody claims to have discovered something, of course it's interesting to ask what has developed out of that, but you also have to ask who was before, and there is always somebody before. And very few inventors really invented something for the first time. So for example Leonhard Euler, if you go through the text books of Fourier transform, you know you'll discover the Euler equations for the Fourier coefficients. These equations here, which I showed before, these are called Euler equations, so Euler must have contributed something. And indeed he did that already in 1777, and even before in 1729 he used trigonometric functions for interpolating functions and that's a reason why he's here on a Swiss bill, obviously he was Swiss, and otherwise I wouldn't speak about this to you. So indeed the Fourier transform is a Swiss invention, keep that in mind. So, I mean, we should come back to spectroscopy now. I mean, there is a huge range of different frequencies, from the gamma rays to the radio frequency and you can use all of them to do the spectroscopic explorations of nature. And you have the tree of knowledge and you like to go from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine, of course this is the most important level here for the true understanding of nature. Whenever you can explain a medical phenomenon in terms of chemical reactions, then you understand it, you normally don't have to go back to physics. That's the level. But I mean, in order to climb on the tree and come safely down again you need a tool, you need a ladder, spectroscopy serves that purpose. Anyway, the first time something like that, in connection with Fourier Transformations, has been used, was this gentleman, Michelson. He has also been mentioned in the lecture by Professor Hänsch, and Michelson, he invented the interferometer, so he has two light beams, or essentially one light beam, which is split in two parts, one part going to this moveable mirror and the other to the static mirror, coming back, being combined again. And there is an interference occurring here, so that's the machine as it happens here. Let's look at it in a little bit more detail. So again, the incoming wave here being split into a blue part, a red part and they are coming back and here, in this particular case, the two waves being reflected from the two mirrors are in phase, so there is constructive interference. If you move now this mirror slightly, then you get a destructive interference, the two are out of phase and if you add them you get zero. So in this way you can actually get an interference pattern. And that leads to interferometry, and when you have a single frequency, then you get just a single oscillation. If you have two frequencies present at the same time, you get this kind of interference here, between two frequencies, two frequencies with a certain line shape here, you get an attenuation and recovery and you have all these different signals which, when I looked at them first, I thought they are free induction decays from NMR, looks very simile to NMR spectroscopy, but it was done 50 years earlier. Anyway, a modern interferometer works exactly the same way, the source, the sample, which measures absorption or tries to measure absorption. A translucent mirror, mirrors here which reflect a detector value records interference as a function of the placement of the mirror here, to a Fourier transformation and gets a spectrum. The very first time this has been done was in 1951 by Fellgett, therefore the Fellgett advantage. And here the interferogram, here the Fourier transform of it, he had to do it by hand because he didn't have a computer at that time. But today you can buy these commercial instruments and they do the Fourier transformation automatically, and you get beautiful spectra without having to understand what is going on inside of the box. Something similar you can also do with Raman spectroscopy, you know in Raman you irradiate with a single frequency, a laser for example, you measure this captive light here and the frequencies are modified by the internal vibrations of a molecule for example, giving you this additional, so to say, side band of the same frequency here. And this contains now virtually the same as an infrared spectrum. That's a typical Raman, Fourier transform Raman spectrometer, where the same principle is being used. And it just gives me a chance here to tell you something about my passions. And to tell you how important passions are. I use this kind of Fourier Raman spectroscopy for the pigment analysis in central Asian paintings which I have a great love for. For example here you have Raman spectra of different blue pigments and you see just how different they are, you don't have to understand them, you just see they are different and this way you can distinguish indigo from azurite, from smalte and prussian blue and you can now get inside of paintings and identify the pigments. I'm doing painting restoration, so it's important to know what the artist has been using. And in this way you can, without destroying the painting, you can analyse pigments, fascinating. You see, when you want to walk along this road here, your professional road, for example towards Stockholm, then, oh it's so difficult to walk on one single food, you need a second one and the second one, that's your passions. And only when you have passions in addition to science, or whatever you are doing, then this spark will appear in your brain and the creativity occurs, that cross talk between the two legs is very important, keep that in mind. So let's come now to NMR, another application where the interference now happens in time domain. Very simple experiment, you have a nucleus which is recessing in a magnetic field, nuclear magnetic moment, having a frequency being proportion to the applied magnetic field, so in essence measuring the frequencies, you measure local magnetic fields, that has been done the first time in condensed matter by Edward Purcell and Felix Bloch, you can record spectra, like here of alcohol you get three different lines, because the local magnetic fields in the methyl groups, the methylene group and the OH proton here, they are different, so you can distinguish. But it's tedious to record one line after the other, it takes more time than I have for my lecture. So we had an associate in Palo Alto, there was Wes Anderson, he said: "Why not do it in parallel?", invented the multichannel spectrometer, where he irradiated with several frequencies at the same time. He built a multi frequency generator, this so called Prayer Wheel, it never worked, it's now in the Smithsonian museum, but at the same time he had a Swiss slave in his lab. And together with this Swiss slave they thought: ah, it's very easy, I told you everything before. Just apply a pulse, observe a free induction decay, do a Fourier transformation and you have a spectrum in fractions of a second. Here the impulse response of these molecules, the spectrum, and here the spectrum which you would have recorded with a traditional sweep method, the snail crawling through. Anyway, simultaneous excitation leads to sensitivity and you get beautiful spectra. And we felt great, at that time we published it, we thought we were inventors and we didn't know that before Mr. Morozov, he did very similar experiment about six years earlier. Fortunately the committee in Stockholm couldn't read Russian, otherwise you would have to listen now to a lecture in Russian. But anyway, he didn't know why he would do this crazy experiment, I mean, free induction decay, the Fourier transform of it, he didn't recognise that it could gain sensitivity this way, and really shorten the experiment time, I don't know for what reason actually he did it. Anyway, he was the first. So we have now this beautiful spectra, but they are virtually useless. How do I interpret all these lines, you remember Kurt Wüthrich's beautiful lecture, he wanted three-dimensional structures of molecules, and we were working together at that time in Zurich, and so he wanted to go from a primary protein structure to a three-dimensional structure, and the question was how. You need additional information, for example you need this correlation information, you have to relate nuclei, how near together are nuclei in space, how near together are they in the chemical bonding network. And this kind of information gives you really geometric information to get the structure. And so that leads to a correlation diagram where you correlate different nuclei and that could be neighbourhood in space, neighbourhood in chemical bonds, for example nucleus G has something in common with nucleus A, nucleus F has something in common with nucleus C, that leads to two-dimensional spectroscopy. Here all these correlations are being displayed, you can use them to determine structures. And the idea for that goes back to Jean Jeener, he proposed this kind of two-pulse experiment, bang two times on your black box, and in essence you transfer coherence from one mode, one transition in the energy level diagram to another transition in the energy level diagram. And that tells you something about connectivity of the nuclei. And this allows you to get this correlation or cosy spectra here from the Wüthrich group, which allows you then to make assignments of the protons, for example along a poly peptide chain. You need an additional experiment, you need also the through space interactions for this, you use a three-pulse experiment, first again some blue frequencies which are being transformed into red frequency, but here through close relaxations, through the space, depending on the dipolar interaction, so you really can measure distances. That's a complete experiment, that's a two-dimension cosy, a nosey spectrum, you measure the distances here between neighbouring amino acid residues, you can get then the complete set of information, chain coupling information, dipolar couplings, you can make an assignment, false resonance and finally determine geometry. And you are in business. That's the first example which Wüthrich was also mentioning three days ago. And that's why he got his Nobel Prize for this ingenuous technique how to determine three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Nowadays, when it's going to larger and larger molecules, inventing more and more tricks doing three-dimensional spectroscopy, doing four-dimensional spectroscopy, unfortunately I can't demonstrate the four-dimensional spectrum on this two-dimensional screen. But anyway, pulse sequence is becoming enormously complex, it's like a score of a symphony orchestra, you see the first violin, the second violin, the violas, the cellos and the percussion down here. That's the kind of pulse sequence which we use today, and you say, oh that's much too complicated for me. But even 10 years ago, when you wanted to find a job in industry, Merck research laboratories, you had to have experience in modern 2D, 3D and 4D heteronuclear NMR, otherwise you just were not considered. And today, Wüthrich told you, go up to seven-dimensional spectroscopy, that's important for finding jobs. NMR is also a beautiful example for determining molecular dynamics features. While x-ray diffraction delivers you the most reliable structures of biomolecules. NMR allows you also to go into dynamics and see what happens in a dynamic molecule and, I mean, static molecules, they're so boring, they are dead. Life is dynamics, dynamical molecules, that's where really is interesting chemical reactions, interactions with molecules, for that NMR is a beautiful technique. You have here an example, you have a benzene ring with seven methyl groups attached, you want too much, you think normally there are only places for five substituents, so methyl group number 7 is being chased back and forth here between the different positions and the question is how does it go? Is this methyl group jumping just to the next position step by step, or can it jump also directly into position? For what is a network of exchanges in such a molecule? To just record a two-dimensional spectrum, you have the four resonances here, 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have cross peaks and these cross peaks tell you how the jumps go. For example, if there would be a random exchange between all positions, there would have to be cross peaks everywhere. If there is only a 1-2 bond shift, then these are the circles which you prefer then, you see it fits. So indeed you have immediately determined the mechanism, how this exchange goes, you don't have to understand two-dimensional spectroscopy, it's a beautiful display, tells you everything. I mean, NMR is on the very far end of the spectrum, low frequency, there are other spectra, EPR, microwave spectroscopy, coherent optics, for example. And exactly the same principles apply here also, except that the practical difficulties increase, going to higher frequency. Electron spin resonance is perhaps the most similar technique to NMR, where just an electron spin is coupled to many nuclei, giving a multiplet here, very complicated spectrum which one can analyse with traditional methods or with Fourier methods. If the spectrum is very narrow, like for organic radicals here, one can really use directly the Fourier techniques. For transition metal complexes, the spectra are enormously wide and you cannot cover it with a single radio frequency pulse. But for this organic radicals you can record again an impulse response of free induction decay to the Fourier transform and get the spectrum. Exactly the same, you can get two-dimensional electron spin resonance spectra, so the same principles apply here as in NMR. When you have broad spectra, then you have to do more specialised experiments, I don't have the time to go into that, it goes into endopulse, endoexperiments, I don't want to describe that here, you measure then a modulation of an echo decay, do a Fourier transformation and then an ENDOR, an indirect detected NMR spectrum, but I don't have the time to explain that. And if you want to know more about that you can read this book by Arthur Schweiger and Gunnar Jeschke, Arthur Schweiger unfortunately just died two or three months ago, being less than 50 years old. Anyway, that's his legacy here, you can read about this beautiful experiment. Then, in the same frequency domain, in microwave spectroscopy, you can also do rotational spectroscopy, where molecules are rotating and you're measuring the speed of rotation about different axis, also internal rotations, that's microwave spectroscopy in the true sense, Flygare did the first pulse experiments, you see the free induction decays, you see the Fourier transform of single lines here, so to say, or single multiplets. You can go inside here, determine high resolution spectra, and making particular assignments, assignments of resonance lines which have for example one energy level in common, so this red line and this red line, they must give a cross peak here, somewhere, which tells you that, so you can study connectivity in energy level diagrams by these kind of two-dimensional spectroscopy. And then you can also go to optics, to optical time domain experiments, optical pulses, there are very short pulses, there are picosecond pulses, femtosecond pulses, done in the lab by Robin Hochstrasser here, it's a 4-pulse experiment, to study actually chemical exchange in real time, so to say in a biomolecule. And here the beautiful results, 2-dimensional optical spectra. So again exactly the same principle, it's just a little bit more tricky and more difficult, but gives you this beautiful spectra, which I don't want to interpret. You can apply exactly the same principle to mass spectroscopy. You can do time-resolved experiments here in an ion cyclotron, that's a magnetic field here again. You shoot in ions here, they start to circle around, you excite them by a radio frequency pulse and you measure again a free induction decay, here in mass spectroscopy. And you can for example distinguish here between two ions which have virtually the same mass, there is a very slow interference pattern which you can analyse by a Fourier transformation. You get very highly resolved mass spectra, but you can do that also for complicated molecules, here for a protein or a protein complex actually, which you can investigate by Fourier transform mass spectroscopy. So you see it's the same principle, it's virtually always the same, and it goes on and on and on. Then you can also do diffraction experiments, I mention this dependence on K here, Fourier transforming into real space determines this shape of a molecule. That leads to x-ray diffraction. Again you measure here structure factures in K space and the reciprocal lattice, you fully transform, you get electron densities in geometric space. Again it's the same kind of principles which apply here, here from a book, from x-ray diffraction, you see exactly the same kind of expressions here also occurring. An example in myoglobin, in the background you see the diffractogram and the Fourier transform structure here in front. I mean, you know this beautiful example of Michel, Deisenhofer and Huber, Professor Huber will probably speak about similar subjects this morning. Photosynthetic reaction centre being determined in this way, all relies on Fourier transformation. And finally I am coming to the last possibility, namely imaging. Imaging where you do an experiment which is very similar to diffraction. But you do it here in a slightly different way, you do it with magnetic resonance, with NMR, and you can in this way peek inside into the body. For example of your boyfriend, if you want to marry him, at first put him into a magnet and see what is wrong inside, whether he has a strong spine, whether there is anything in his head still left, whether he has soft knees, all that you can find out from MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And of course there are two windows to peak into a human body, you can use the x-ray window, you can use the radio frequency window, with optical radiation it's difficult to see through. But these are the two windows available. But the problem with magnetic resonance is resolution. How do you get with this long radio frequency waves spatial resolution? And the secret has been proposed by Paul Lauterbur, he said: as here, the nuclei have low recession frequencies and here they have high recession frequencies, so you get spatial resolution". That's what he got his Nobel Prize for, 2003. Applying magnetic field gradients in different directions, getting, so to say, projections of the proton density here, along different directions. And then from this projection one can reconstruct an image, that was his procedure. And the first time I heard about that was at the conference in the United States, 1974, and he showed an image of a mouse. It was recorded it in this way here, the mouse. Here these are the lungs, I mean it's proton imaging. And again, going back to what Professor Hänsch told you two days ago, never measure anything but hydrogen, that's exactly what we do in imaging, using protons for imaging. But there must be protons here in the centre, but what is that here? Nobody could understand what this feature here is. So somebody had the brilliant idea, this must be the soul of the mouse. But then, unfortunately, this poor mouse died in the magnet because the experiment lasted for such a long time. So then one found out, it's just an imaging artefact. So I got another idea, use the Fourier principle, apply to it in sequence first a vertical field gradient, then a horizontal and combining it to a dimensional experiment, do a Fourier transform and you get the image of a head. Data Fourier transformed in two dimensions, and that reveals everything. For example if there would be a tumour in my head, you would see it, fortunately it's not my head. That's an important image, that shows you how you convert a female brain into Swiss cheese, just drink too much. And you see the female brain, a normal female brain, an alcoholic female brain, who wants such a brain, so stop drinking alcohol, especially if you're a female, for the males it's less dangerous. Anyway, that's all you have to remember from my lecture and that's very worthwhile, small glass on this side, big glass on this side. And I mean, I know I should stop, I could go on forever, you can measure angiograms, blood vessels, you can look at chemical compositions after a stroke at different parts of the brain. You can do time resolved spectroscopy, Peter Mansfield got his Nobel prize for that, at the same time with Paul Lauterbur, using a particular pulse sequence, getting movies of a heart motion. And finally you can look into the brain and see what is going on while you are thinking, if you are thinking. And there is a particular principle which allows one to make NMR sensitive to thinking processes which I can't explain. You can get beautiful images here to distinguish a normal person from a schizophrenic person when you apply a certain input paradigm to him or her. And if you see a particular reaction, you know he might be ill. You can explore for example even compassion, that a person who suffers pain being tortured and you are just an onlooker and you feel then a reaction in the brain at exactly the same place as this person which is tortured himself, just by compassion. So it's quite exciting what you can do and I'm sure I have proved in this way that Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an irrefutable testimonial to the enormous value of basic research, it's directly linked to practical application. And finally: Happiness is finding still another use for Fourier Transformation. Thank you for your attention.

Liebe Freunde, das diesjährige Treffen in Lindau gefällt mir außerordentlich - insbesondere genieße ich es, zu Ihnen, meinen jungen enthusiastischen und vielversprechenden Wissenschaftlerfreunden, zu sprechen. Von den Vorträgen gefielen mir bislang vor allem jene, die über die herkömmliche Wissenschaft hinausgingen und auch etwas über den sozialen Kontext zu sagen hatten. Tatsächlich sprach ich letztes Jahr, an eben diesem Ort hier, über die Möglichkeiten der Wissenschaft, unsere Zukunft zu entwerfen und zu gestalten. In diesem Zusammenhang nahm ich auf eine sehr nachdrückliche und möglicherweise sogar Anstoß erregende Art und Weise Stellung, indem ich zum Beispiel Egoismus als treibende Kraft hinter all unseren Handlungen verurteilte, da wir uns in diesem Fall immer fragen, welchen Gewinn wir erzielen, wenn wir etwas tun. Stattdessen warb ich für Verantwortung als treibende Kraft, da wir uns dann fragen: Was können wir tun, damit die Gesellschaft daraus Nutzen zieht? Mein Vortrag endete damals mit zwei Zitaten, von denen das eine von François Rabelais stammt: denn wir alle sind mitverantwortlich für das, was in Zukunft geschieht - wir können keinem anderen die Schuld daran geben. Heute möchte ich keinerlei Äußerungen von mir geben, an denen man Anstoß nehmen könnte, sondern versuchen, ein guter Junge zu sein, und Ihnen nur eine kleine Geschichte, eine rein wissenschaftliche Geschichte, erzählen: Genau genommen möchte ich Ihnen die Fourier-Transformation als ein wunderschönes Beispiel dafür vorstellen, wie nützlich die Mathematik für die Naturwissenschaften sein kann. Wie üblich, wusste allerdings der Erfinder der Fourier-Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, nicht, dass man heutzutage sogar zu Beginn einer Vorlesung einen heimlichen Blick in den Kopf des Vortragenden werfen kann, um nachzuprüfen, ob es sich lohnt, sich die Vorlesung anzuhören, da alles, was ich Ihnen erzählen kann, in diesem labberigen Stück Gewebe hier enthalten ist. Von damals bis heute haben also viele Entwicklungen stattgefunden, und ich möchte gerne die Frage stellen: Warum ist die Fourier-Transformation für die Naturwissenschaft so wichtig? Sie ist ein sehr einfacher Ausdruck, sie ist eine Integraltransformation, bei der eine Funktion im Zeitbereich in eine Funktion im Frequenzbereich transformiert wird. Somit verknüpfen wir diese beiden Bereiche durch diese Integraltransformation. Oder wir können einen Impulsraum mit dem geometrischen Raum in Verbindung bringen, einer Funktion von K, des Impulses und verbunden mit einer Koordinatenfunktion. Es hat etwas mit der Erforschung der Natur im Allgemeinen zu tun. Wenn wir eine Sache untersuchen, betrachten wir sie als eine Black Box - wir wissen nicht, was sich in ihrem Inneren befindet - und wir versuchen, sie zu stören. Wir schauen uns den Input hier an und horchen auf den Output. Er verrät uns, was sich im Inneren befindet. Tatsächlich besteht eine sehr natürliche Art und Weise der Erforschung einer Black Box darin, eine Sinuswelle, eine sich periodisch wiederholende Störung, anzuwenden und dann auf den Output zu achten. Denken Sie nur an den Vortrag von Professor Hänsch vor zwei Tagen, in dem er Ihnen sagte, dass man niemals etwas anderes messen solle als Frequenzen. Genau das versuchen wir zu tun, um den Inhalt einer Black Box zu beschreiben. Und dies macht Sinn, denn tatsächlich sind diese trigonometrischen Funktionen Eigenfunktionen linearer zeitinvarianter Systeme. Somit bekommen wir jedes Mal, wenn wir eine solche Funktion auf eine Black Box anwenden, die linear und zeitinvariant ist, dieselbe Funktion zurück, multipliziert mit einer bestimmten komplexen Größe, bei der es sich in Begriffen der Quantenmechanik um den Eigenwert handelt. Wir erhalten also die mit dem Eigenwert multiplizierte Eigenfunktion. Und wenn wir diesen Eigenwert als eine Frequenzfunktion darstellen, wenn wir die Frequenz variieren, dann bekommen wir das Spektrum - das ist die Grundlage der Spektroskopie, also macht es wirklich Sinn. Wir können nun Spektroskopie auf die übliche Art und Weise betreiben, indem wir eine Frequenz nach der anderen anwenden, die Antwort messen und die Amplituden hier als eine Funktion der Frequenz darstellen. Das liefert uns ein Spektrum. Aber wir könnten dies auch parallel tun und alle Frequenzen gleichzeitig auf die Black Box anwenden und Zeit sparen. Dann brauchen wir so etwas wie einen Frequenzsortierer, der die verschiedenen Antworten für uns sortiert, damit wir wiederum das Spektrum bekommen. Dieser Frequenzsortierer ist letztendlich nichts anderes als eine Fourier-Transformation. Wenn wir das hier parallel tun, profitieren wir von dem Multiplex-Vorteil, der auch Fellgett-Vorteil genannt wird, da wir alles zur selben Zeit getan haben. Das ist der Vorteil, diesen Weg hier zu gehen. Das Geheimnis der Fourier-Transformation besteht tatsächlich in der Orthogonalität der trigonometrischen Funktion. Wenn Sie die eine mit der anderen multiplizieren und über den gesamten Raum integrieren, bekommen Sie nur dann etwas, wenn die beiden Funktionen identisch sind. Sie sind also orthogonal. Dies erlaubt es, sie zu trennen. Und die simultane Anwendung all dieser Frequenzen kann beispielsweise mit einem Puls implementiert werden. Wenn Sie einen Puls einsetzen, dann haben Sie im Wesentlichen alle Frequenzen eingebunden und Sie bekommen eine Impulsantwort. Sie müssen eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen, um das Spektrum zu bekommen - ganz einfach. Wiederum haben wir also sozusagen zwei Räume hier, die wir miteinander in Verbindung bringen, konjugierte Variablen, die Zeitvariable und die Frequenzvariable, der Impulsraum und der Koordinatenraum, die miteinander verbunden werden. Sie stellen, sozusagen, zwei verschiedene Ansichten desselben Gegenstands dar. Sie können sich das hier in Rot oder in Grün anschauen. Vor langer Zeit sagte Heisenberg, dass sich die fruchtbarsten Entwicklungen dann ergaben, wann immer zwei verschiedene Denkweisen aufeinandertrafen. Dies hier sind also die beiden verschiedenen Räume. Oder denken Sie an Professor Glauber, der Ihnen von Wellen und Teilchen erzählte - diese Beziehung gehört derselben Kategorie an. Er erwähnte auch Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", und hier ist das Yin-Yang-Symbol, das ebenfalls diese beiden Räume darstellt, welche dieselbe Wahrheit enthalten. Die ganze Welt der Fourier-Transformationen im Bereich der Spektroskopie ist ähnlich komplex. Es gibt viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten - insbesondere, weil das, was wir uns anschauen, tatsächlich nicht nur eine Funktion der Zeit oder eine Funktion des Impulses darstellt, sondern ein Set von beiden zur selben Zeit ist, in Abhängigkeit von vier verschiedenen Variablen. Es ist eine ebene Welle, die sich in der Zeit und im Raum ausbildet. Wir können uns also zum einen der Zeitabhängigkeit bedienen, ein Zeitbereichsexperiment durchführen und schließlich ein Spektrum gewinnen. Oder wir können die K-Variablen verwenden, die Impuls-Variable, und erhalten dann zum Beispiel, wie hier, das Bild eines Moleküls - das ist die Röntgenbeugung. Wir können bildgebende Verfahren anwenden, Magnetresonanztomografie, in der ebenfalls die K-Abhängigkeit genutzt wird und die Fourier-Transformation das Bild eines Kopfes liefert. Und schließlich können wir zum Beispiel die Methode der Interferometrie anwenden, in der wir uns der R-Abhängigkeit bedienen, die Interferenz auf der räumlichen Ebene messen, sie in einer Fourier-Transformation umwandeln und wiederum ein Spektrum, beispielsweise ein Infrarot-Spektrum, erhalten. Diese sind also die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten, die ich gerne kurz darstellen möchte. Alles ist auf jenen Herrn, Monsieur Fourier, zurückzuführen. Wer war Monsieur Fourier. Das ist er. Er war gleichzeitig - und stellt damit eine sehr große Ausnahme dar - Wissenschaftler und Politiker. Schließlich haben nur sehr, sehr wenige Politiker überhaupt eine Ahnung von Wissenschaft, und nur sehr wenige Wissenschaftler interessieren sich für Politik. Aber Fourier ist sozusagen mein Vorbild - in ihm ist beides vereint. Hier befindet er sich zum Beispiel in seinem Arbeitszimmer in Grenoble, und anstatt seine juristischen Akten zu studieren, führt er ein physikalisches Experiment durch. Er misst die Wärmeleitung. Zur selben Zeit schrieb er an einem Aufsatz, den er dem Institut de France vorlegte, während er Präfekt des Départements Isère war. Und er führte Experimente durch, darunter auch diese Art von Input-Output-Experimenten. Hier hatte er eine Black Box, eine blaue Box, der er von der linken Seite aus Hitze zuführte. Dann maß er die Wärmeverteilung in dem Objekt. Es handelt sich hier also wiederum um die Input-Output-Beziehung. Er weitete den Input in der Fourier-Reihe aus und rekonstituierte das Ergebnis wiederum aus einer räumlichen Fourier-Reihe. So verwendete er zum ersten Mal seine Fourier-Ausdrücke - selbstverständlich bezeichnete er sie nicht als Fourier-Ausdrücke, aber hier sind sie, in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1822. Wann immer jemand behauptet, etwas entdeckt zu haben, ist natürlich die Frage interessant, was sich daraus entwickelt hat. Jedoch muss man auch danach fragen, wer davor da war - und es gibt immer jemanden, der schon davor da war. Nur sehr wenige Erfinder erfanden eine Sache zum ersten Mal. Ein Beispiel dafür ist Leonhard Euler: Wenn man die Lehrbücher der Fourier-Transformationen durchgeht, wird man die Euler-Gleichungen für die Fourier-Koeffizienten entdecken. Diese Gleichungen hier, die ich zuvor gezeigt habe, werden als Euler-Gleichungen bezeichnet - also muss Euler irgend etwas beigetragen haben. Tatsächlich tat er dies bereits im Jahr 1777, und noch früher, im Jahr 1729, verwendete er trigonometrische Funktionen, um Funktionen zu interpolieren. Aus diesem Grund ist er hier auf einer schweizerischen Banknote abgebildet - offensichtlich war er Schweizer, sonst würde ich Ihnen das nicht erzählen. Folglich ist die Fourier-Transformation eine schweizerische Erfindung - vergessen Sie das nicht. Ich glaube, wir sollten uns jetzt wieder der Spektroskopie zuwenden. Es gibt eine sehr große Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Frequenzen, von den Gammastrahlen bis zu den Radiofrequenzen, und Sie können diese alle nutzen, um die Natur mit Hilfe spektroskopischer Untersuchungen zu erforschen. Hier haben wir den Baum des Wissens, bei dem man von der Physik über die Chemie zur Biologie und zur Medizin gelangt. Für das wirkliche Verständnis der Natur ist diese Ebene natürlich die wichtigste. Wenn Sie ein medizinisches Phänomen mit den Begriffen chemischer Reaktionen erklären können, dann verstehen Sie es. Sie müssen normalerweise nicht auf die Physik zurückgreifen. Das ist diese Ebene. Aber um den Baum hinauf- und sicher wieder hinunterzuklettern, braucht man ein Gerät, eine Leiter, und diesen Zweck erfüllt die Spektroskopie. Zum ersten Mal wurde so etwas in Verbindung mit Fourier-Transformationen von Herrn Michelson verwendet. Auch Professor Hänsch erwähnte ihn in seinem Vortrag. Michelson erfand das Interferometer. Er verwendet zwei Lichtstrahlen, beziehungsweise im Wesentlichen einen Lichtstrahl, der in zwei Lichtstrahlen geteilt wird. Einer trifft auf den beweglichen Spiegel und der andere auf den statischen Spiegel, und bei ihrer Rückkehr werden sie wieder zusammengeführt. Dabei kommt es zur Interferenz. Das ist die Maschinerie, so wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Schauen wir sie uns einmal ihre Details an. Die ankommende Welle hier wird in einen roten und in einen blauen Teil aufgeteilt. Dann kommen beide zurück. In diesem bestimmten Fall hier sind die zwei Wellen, die von den zwei Spiegeln reflektiert werden, in Phase, so dass hier eine konstruktive Interferenz vorliegt. Wenn Sie diesen Spiegel hier ein wenig verschieben, dann bekommen Sie eine destruktive Interferenz. Die beiden Wellen sind gegenphasig, und wenn man sie addiert, ist die Summe Null. Somit können Sie auf diese Weise in der Tat ein Interferenzmuster bekommen. Dies führt zur Interferometrie, und wenn Sie eine einzelne Frequenz haben, dann erhalten Sie nur eine einzelne Oszillation. Wenn Sie zwei Frequenzen zur selben Zeit haben, dann bekommen Sie diese Art von Interferenz hier, und zwischen zwei Frequenzen, zwei Frequenzen mit einer bestimmten Liniengestalt hier, bekommen Sie hier eine Abschwächung und einen Wiederanstieg und Sie haben all diese verschiedenen Signale, die ich, als ich sie mir zum ersten Mal anschaute, für freie Induktionszerfalle aus der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie hielt. Es sieht der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie sehr ähnlich, aber es wurde 50 Jahre früher aufgezeichnet. Jedenfalls funktioniert ein modernes Interferometer auf genau dieselbe Art und Weise. Wir haben die Quelle, die Probe, die die Absorption misst oder zu messen versucht, einen halbdurchlässigen Spiegel, zwei reflektierende Spiegel, einen Detektor, der die Interferenz als eine Funktion der Platzierung des Spiegels hier aufzeichnet - führen Sie eine Fourier-Transformation durch und Sie bekommen das Spektrum. Zum allerersten Mal wurde dies von Fellgett 1951 durchgeführt - daher der Begriff Fellgett-Vorteil. Hier haben wir das Interferogramm, hier dessen Fourier-Transformation. Er musste dies von Hand tun, da er damals noch über keinen Computer verfügte. Heute jedoch können Sie diese im Handel erhältlichen Geräte kaufen, welche die Fourier-Transformation automatisch durchführen, und erhalten wunderschöne Spektren, ohne verstehen zu müssen, was im Inneren der Box passiert. Etwas Ähnliches können Sie auch mit Hilfe der Raman-Spektroskopie tun. Wie Sie wissen, bestrahlen Sie hierbei mit einer einzelnen Frequenz, zum Beispiel mit einem Laser. Sie messen das gestreute Licht hier, und die Frequenzen werden von den internen Schwingungen beispielsweise eines Moleküls modifiziert und liefern Ihnen diese zusätzliche Seitenbande der zentralen Frequenz hier. Diese hat nun nahezu denselben Inhalt wie ein Infrarot-Spektrum. Es handelt sich um ein typisches Raman-Spektrometer, ein Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektrometer, bei dem dasselbe Prinzip genutzt wird. Und das gibt mir gerade die Gelegenheit, Ihnen etwas über meine Leidenschaften zu erzählen und Ihnen zu verraten, wie wichtig Leidenschaften sind. Ich setze diese Art von Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektroskopie bei der Pigmentanalyse bestimmter zentralasiatischer Gemälde ein, die ich sehr liebe. Hier haben Sie zum Beispiel Raman-Spektren verschiedener blauer Pigmente und Sie sehen, wie verschieden Sie sind. Sie brauchen Sie nicht zu verstehen, Sie sehen einfach, dass Sie verschieden sind, und auf diese Weise können Sie Indigo von Azurit, Smalte und Berliner Blau unterscheiden. Sie können in die Gemälde hineingelangen und die Pigmente identifizieren. Ich restauriere Gemälde, und aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, zu wissen, was der Künstler verwendete. Auf diese Weise können Sie, ohne das Gemälde zu zerstören, die Pigmente analysieren - faszinierend. Wissen Sie, wenn Sie diesen Weg, Ihren beruflichen Weg beispielsweise nach Stockholm, einschlagen möchten, dann ist es sehr schwierig, nur auf einem Fuß zu gehen. Sie brauchen einen zweiten, und dieser zweite sind Ihre Leidenschaften. Und nur, wenn Sie zusätzlich zur Wissenschaft oder was auch immer Sie tun, Ihre Leidenschaften haben, wird dieser Funke in Ihrem Gehirn aufleuchten und der kreative Prozess einsetzen. Diese Überlagerung zwischen den beiden Standbeinen ist von großer Bedeutung - denken Sie immer daran. Lassen Sie uns nun zur Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie übergehen, einer anderen Anwendung, bei der sich die Interferenz nun im Zeitbereich ereignet. Ein sehr einfaches Experiment: Sie haben einen Atomkern, der in einem magnetischen Feld präzediert, nuklear-magnetische Bewegung, Sie haben eine Frequenz in Proportion zu dem angewendeten Magnetfeld. Folglich werden im Wesentlichen die Frequenzen gemessen. Sie messen die lokalen Magnetfelder. Dies wurde erstmalig von Edward Purcell und Felix Bloch bei kondensierter Materie unternommen. Sie können Spektren aufzeichnen, wie hier die Spektren von Alkohol. Sie bekommen drei verschiedene Linien, denn die lokalen Magnetfelder in den Methylgruppen, der Methylengruppe und in dem OH-Proton hier sind verschieden, somit können Sie sie unterscheiden. Aber es ist ermüdend, eine Linie nach der anderen aufzuzeichnen, und man benötigt dafür mehr Zeit, als mir für meinen Vortrag zur Verfügung steht. Wir hatten in Varian Associates in Palo Alto einen Mitarbeiter, Wes Anderson. Er sagte: "Warum tun wir dies nicht gleichzeitig?" und er erfand das Mehrkanal-Spektrometer, in welchem er mit mehreren Frequenzen zur selben Zeit bestrahlte. Er konstruierte einen Multi-Frequenz-Generator, die sogenannte Gebetsmühle. Dieser funktionierte nicht und befindet sich nun im Smithsonian Museum. Aber zur selben Zeit hatte er in seinem Labor einen schweizerischen Sklaven. Gemeinsam mit diesem schweizerischen Sklaven überlegten sie: Ach, das ist doch ganz einfach, das habe ich Ihnen alles schon gesagt. Wir müssen nur einen Puls einsetzen, einen freien Induktionszerfall beobachten, eine Fourier-Transformation vornehmen - und haben in Sekundenbruchteilen ein Spektrum. Hier haben wir die Impulsantwort dieser Moleküle, das Spektrum, und hier das Spektrum, das man mit einer herkömmlichen Sweep-Methode im Schneckentempo aufgezeichnet hätte. Jedenfalls führt gleichzeitige Anregung zu Empfindlichkeit, und Sie bekommen wunderbare Spektren. Wir fanden uns großartig, veröffentlichten unsere Entdeckung und hielten uns für Erfinder. Wir wussten nicht, dass bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt, sechs Jahre zuvor, Herr Morozov ähnliche Experimente durchgeführt hatte. Glücklicherweise konnte das Komitee in Stockholm kein Russisch lesen, denn sonst müssten Sie sich nun einen Vortrag auf Russisch anhören. Ohnehin wusste er nicht, aus welchem Grund er dieses verrückte Experiment durchführte - freier Induktionszerfall, dessen Fourier-Transformation - er wusste nicht, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Empfindlichkeit zunehmen und die Dauer des Experiments deutlich verkürzt werden würde. Ich weiß nicht, aus welchem Grund er es tatsächlich tat. Trotzdem war er der erste. Wir haben also nun diese wunderschönen Spektren, aber sie sind praktisch nutzlos. Wie soll ich all diese Linien interpretieren? Sie erinnern sich an Kurt Wüthrichs hervorragende Vorlesung. Er wollte die dreidimensionale Struktur der Moleküle - wir arbeiteten zu jener Zeit in Zürich zusammen - und deshalb wollte er von einer primären Proteinstruktur zu einer dreidimensionalen Struktur gelangen. Die Frage war, wie. Sie benötigen zusätzliche Informationen. Beispielsweise benötigen Sie diese Korrelationsinformation: Sie müssen Atomkerne miteinander in Verbindung bringen, wie nahe beieinander Atomkerne im Raum sind, wie nahe beieinander sie im Netzwerk chemischer Bindungen sind. Diese Art von Informationen liefert Ihnen echte geometrische Informationen, um die Struktur zu bekommen. Dies führt zu einem Korrelationsdiagramm, in dem Sie verschiedene Atomkerne korrelieren. Dies könnte die Nachbarschaft im Raum betreffen, die Nachbarschaft in chemischen Bindungen, wobei zum Beispiel Atomkern G etwas mit Atomkern A gemeinsam und Atomkern F etwas mit Atomkern C gemeinsam hat, und das hat zweidimensionale Spektroskopie zur Folge. Hier sind alle diese Korrelationen dargestellt. Sie können sie benutzen, um Strukturen zu bestimmen. Die Idee hierfür geht auf Jean Jeener zurück. Er schlug diese Art eines Zwei-Puls-Experiments vor: Schlagen Sie zweimal auf Ihre Black Box. Im Wesentlichen übertragen Sie damit Kohärenz von einem Modus, einem Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm auf einen anderen Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm. Das verrät Ihnen etwas über die Konnektivität der Atomkerne. Und damit können Sie diese Korrelations- oder COSY-Spektren (Correlation Spectroscopy - Korrelationsspektroskopie) der Wüthrich-Gruppe bekommen, die Ihnen die Zuordnung der Protonen beispielsweise entlang einer Polypeptidkette ermöglichen. Sie brauchen ein zusätzliches Experiment, Sie brauchen hierfür auch die Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Atomkernen im Raum, und dafür bedienen Sie sich eines Drei-Puls-Experiments. Als erstes kommen wieder blaue Frequenzen zum Einsatz, die in rote Frequenzen umgewandelt werden, aber hier durch Kreuzrelaxationen, durch den Raum, abhängig von den dipolaren Wechselwirkungen, und so können Sie tatsächlich Entfernungen messen. Das ist ein vollständiges Experiment, das ist ein zweidimensionales COSY-Spektrum, ein NOESY-Spektrum (Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy - Kern-Overhauser-Effekt-Spektroskopie). Sie messen die Entfernungen zwischen benachbarten Aminosäureresten und können dann das komplette Set an Informationen bekommen, Informationen über die J-Kopplung, dipolare Kopplungen; Sie können eine Zuordnung vornehmen, auch der Anzeichen einer falsche Resonanz, und schließlich die Geometrie bestimmen. Und Sie sind im Geschäft. Das ist das erste Beispiel, das Wüthrich vor drei Tagen ebenfalls nannte. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er seinen Nobelpreis für die geniale Technik bekam, wie man die dreidimensionale Struktur von Biomolekülen bestimmen kann. Heutzutage, wo es um immer größere Moleküle geht, erfindet man immer mehr Tricks in der Anwendung dreidimensionaler und vierdimensionaler Spektroskopie. Leider kann ich auf diesem zweidimensionalen Schirm kein vierdimensionales Spektrum demonstrieren. Die Pulsfolgen werden jedenfalls sehr komplex. Es ist wie bei einer Partitur eines Symphonieorchesters: Sie haben die erste Geige, die zweite Geige, die Bratschen, die Cellos und dort unten das Schlagwerk. Das ist die Art von Pulsfolgen, die wir heute verwenden, und Sie mögen sagen: Oh, das ist viel zu kompliziert für mich. Jedoch mussten Sie schon vor zehn Jahren für eine Anstellung in der Industrie, zum Beispiel in den Forschungslaboren von Merck, Erfahrungen mit moderner 2D-, 3D- und 4D-Hetero-Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie vorweisen, denn sonst wurden Sie gar nicht erst in Betracht gezogen. Heute sollten Sie sich, wie Wüthrich Ihnen riet, mit der siebendimensionalen Spektroskopie vertraut machen - das ist wichtig, um einen Job zu finden. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ist außerdem ein schönes Beispiel für die Bestimmung von Eigenschaften der Molekulardynamik. Während die Röntgenbeugung Ihnen die verlässlichsten Strukturen für Biomoleküle liefert, erlaubt Ihnen die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie, die Dynamik zu untersuchen und zu beobachten, was in einem dynamischen Molekül geschieht. Schließlich sind statische Moleküle ja so langweilig - sie sind tot. Leben bedeutet Dynamik, dynamische Moleküle, dort finden die wirklich interessanten chemischen Reaktionen statt, die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Molekülen, und dafür ist die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie eine wunderbare Technik. Hier haben wir ein Beispiel: einen Benzolring, an den sieben Methylgruppen gebunden sind. Das ist einer zu viel - es gibt üblicherweise nur Plätze für fünf Substituenten, so dass die siebte Methylgruppe hier zwischen den verschiedenen Positionen hin- und hergejagt wird. Die Frage ist - wie bewegt sie sich? Springt diese Methylgruppe einfach Schritt für Schritt auf die jeweils nächste Position oder kann sie auch direkt auf irgendeine Position springen? Wie ist das Netzwerk des Austauschs in einem solchen Molekül aufgebaut? Um einfach ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aufzuzeichnen, haben Sie hier die vier Resonanzen, 1, 2, 3 und 4. Sie haben Cross Peaks, die Ihnen verraten, wie die Sprungbewegungen verlaufen. Wenn es zum Beispiel einen zufälligen Austausch zwischen allen Positionen gäbe, dann müssten überall Cross Peaks vorliegen. Wenn es nur eine 1-2-Bindungsverschiebung gibt, dann sind dies die bevorzugten Kreise - Sie sehen, es passt. Somit haben Sie in der Tat sofort den Mechanismus bestimmt, nach dem dieser Austausch funktioniert. Dafür müssen Sie zweidimensionale Spektroskopie nicht verstehen. Es ist eine wunderbare Darstellung, die Ihnen alles sagt. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie befindet sich an dem sehr weit entfernten, niederfrequenten Ende des Spektrums. Daneben gibt es andere Spektren - ESR (Elektronenspinresonanz), Mikrowellenspektroskopie, Kohärente Optik, um Beispiele zu nennen. Es gelten dieselben Prinzipien, wobei jedoch die praktischen Schwierigkeiten mit der Höhe der Frequenz zunehmen. Elektronenspinresonanzspektroskopie ist vielleicht die der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ähnlichste Technik. Hierbei ist ein Elektronenspin mit mehreren Atomkernen gekoppelt und liefert hier ein Multiplett, ein sehr kompliziertes Spektrum, das man mit herkömmlichen Methoden oder Fourier-Methoden analysieren kann. Wenn das Spektrum sehr schmal ist, wie hier für organische Radikale, kann man direkt die Fourier-Methoden anwenden. Für Übergangsmetallkomplexe sind die Spektren äußerst breit und können nicht mit dem Puls einer einzelnen Radiofrequenz abgedeckt werden. Aber für diese organischen Radikale können Sie wiederum eine Impulsantwort des freien Induktionszerfalls aufzeichnen, eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen und das Spektrum bekommen. Genau dasselbe - Sie können zweidimensionale Elektronenspinresonanzspektren bekommen, also gelten hier dieselben Prinzipien wie bei der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie. Wenn Sie breite Spektren haben, dann müssen Sie weitere spezialisierte Experimente durchführen. Ich habe nicht die Zeit, auf diese einzugehen - es handelt sich um einen ENDOR-Puls, ENDOR-Experimente, die ich hier nicht beschreiben möchte. Sie messen eine Modulation eines Echo-Zerfalls, führen eine Fourier-Transformation und dann eine Elektron-Kern-Doppelresonanz-Spektroskopie (ENDOR - electron nuclear double resonance) durch, ein indirekt ermitteltes Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektrum, aber mir fehlt die Zeit, um dies zu erläutern. Wenn Sie mehr darüber wissen möchten, können Sie dieses Buch hier von Arthur Schweiger und Gunnar Jeschke lesen. Leider ist Arthur Schweiger vor zwei oder drei Monaten im Alter von noch nicht einmal 50 Jahren gestorben. Dies hier ist sein Vermächtnis, und Sie können darin etwas über diese großartigen Experimente nachlesen. Dann können Sie, im selben Frequenzbereich in der Mikrowellenspektroskopie auch die Rotationsgeschwindigkeit messen, mit der Moleküle um verschiedene Achsen rotieren - also interne Rotationen und somit Mikrowellenspektroskopie im wahrsten Sinne. Flygare führte die ersten Pulsexperimente durch. Sie sehen die freien Induktionszerfalle, Sie sehen hier die Fourier-Transformation einzelner Linien oder einzelner Multipletts. Sie können nach innen gehen, Spektren in hoher Auflösung bestimmen und insbesondere Zuordnungen vornehmen. Sie können Resonanzlinien zuordnen, die beispielsweise ein Energieniveau gemeinsam haben. Diese rote Linie und diese rote Linie müssen irgendwo hier einen Cross Peak ergeben. Folglich lässt sich mit Hilfe dieser zweidimensionalen Spektroskopie die Konnektivität in Energieniveaudiagrammen studieren. Sie können auch zur Optik, zu optischen Zeitbereichs-Experimenten weitergehen. Optische Pulse sind sehr kurze Pulse, Picosekundenpulse, Femtosekundenpulse. Hier wird im Labor von Robin Hochstrasser ein Vier-Puls-Experiment durchgeführt, um die tatsächlichen chemischen Veränderungen in Realzeit, sozusagen in einem Biomolekül, zu studieren. Hier sind die großartigen Ergebnisse - zweidimensionale optische Spektren. Wiederum handelt es sich um exakt dasselbe Prinzip. Es ist nur ein kleines bisschen komplizierter und schwieriger, aber es liefert Ihnen diese wunderbaren Spektren, die ich nicht interpretieren möchte. Sie können genau dasselbe Prinzip bei der Massenspektroskopie anwenden. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Experimente hier in einem Ionenzyklotron beobachten. Das hier ist wieder ein magnetisches Feld. Sie schießen die Ionen hier hinein, sie beginnen zu kreisen, Sie regen sie mit einem Radiofrequenzpuls an und messen wiederum einen freien Induktionszerfall, hier in der Massenspektroskopie. Sie können zum Beispiel hier zwischen zwei Ionen unterscheiden, die nahezu dieselbe Masse besitzen. Es gibt ein sehr langsames Interferenzmuster, das Sie mit Hilfe einer Fourier-Transformation analysieren können. Sie bekommen Massenspektren mit sehr hoher Auflösung, aber Sie können dies auch für komplexe Moleküle durchführen, wie hier für ein Protein - eigentlich für einen Proteinkomplex -, die Sie mit der Fourier-Transformations-Massenspektroskopie untersuchen können. Sie sehen also - es ist dasselbe Prinzip, es ist eigentlich immer dasselbe, und so geht es weiter und weiter und weiter. Dann können Sie außerdem auch Diffraktionsexperimente durchführen. Ich erwähnte die Abhängigkeit von K hier, eine Fourier-Transformation, in den Realraum hinein, dies bestimmt diese Gestalt eines Moleküls. Das führt zur Röntgenbeugung. Wiederum messen Sie hier Strukturfaktoren im K-Raum. Das reziproke Gitter transformieren Sie vollständig, und Sie erhalten die Elektronendichte im geometrischen Raum. Hier gelten wieder dieselben Arten von Prinzipien - Sie sehen hier in einem Buch, bei einem Beispiel aus der Röntgenbeugung, dass genau dieselben Ausdrücke ebenfalls vorkommen. Hier ist ein Beispiel, Myoglobin, und im Hintergrund sehen Sie das Diffraktogramm und im Vordergrund die Fourier-Transformations-Struktur. Sie kennen dieses hervorragende Beispiel von Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber. Professor Huber wird heute Morgen vielleicht über ähnliche Themen sprechen. Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum wird auf diese Art und Weise bestimmt, und all das stützt sich auf die Fourier-Transformation. Schließlich komme ich zu der letzten Einsatzmöglichkeit, nämlich der Bildgebung. Bei der Bildgebung führen Sie ein der Diffraktion sehr ähnliches Experiment durch. Allerdings gehen Sie hier auf eine geringfügig andere Art und Weise vor. Sie bedienen sich der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie und können damit einen Blick in das Innere des Körpers werfen. So sollten Sie beispielsweise Ihren Freund, wenn Sie ihn heiraten möchten, zunächst in einen Magneten stecken und überprüfen, was in seinem Inneren vielleicht nicht in Ordnung ist: ob er ein starkes Rückgrat hat, ob er überhaupt noch etwas im Kopf hat, ob er weiche Knie hat - all das können Sie mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztomografie herausfinden. Selbstverständlich gibt es zwei Fenster, um in den menschlichen Körper hineinzuschauen - Sie können das Röntgenstrahlenfenster oder das Radiofrequenzfenster benutzen. Mit Hilfe optischer Strahlung hindurchzuschauen, ist schwierig. Aber diese beiden Fenster sind verfügbar. Allerdings besteht bei der Magnetresonanz das Problem der Auflösung. Wie bekommt man mit diesen langen Radiofrequenzwellen eine räumliche Auflösung? Das Geheimnis der Lösung wurde von Paul Lauterbur vorgeschlagen. Er sagte: "Setzen Sie einen Magnetfeld-Gradienten ein und verwenden Sie ein inhomogenes Magnetfeld, dann können Sie unterscheiden zwischen der linken Seite hier, wo die Atomkerne niedrige Präzessionsfrequenzen haben, und hier, wo sie hohe Präzessionsfrequenzen haben. So bekommen Sie eine räumliche Auflösung." Dafür erhielt er 2003 seinen Nobelpreis - für die Anwendung von Magnetfeldgradienten in verschiedene Richtungen, mit deren Hilfe man, sozusagen, Projektionen der Protonendichte hier, entlang verschiedener Richtungen, bekommt. Von diesen Projektionen ausgehend, kann man ein Bild rekonstruieren - das war seine Vorgehensweise. Das erste Mal hörte ich davon auf der Konferenz in den USA im Jahr 1974, und er zeigte das Bild einer Maus. Es war auf diese Weise hier aufgenommen worden. Hier sind die Lungen - es ist Protonenbildgebung. Und wenn wir nun auf das zurückkommen, was Professor Hänsch Ihnen vor zwei Tagen sagte, dass Sie nie etwas anderes als Wasserstoff messen sollten, dann ist das genau das, was wir bei diesem Bildgebungsverfahren tun - wir benutzen Protonen für die Bildgebung. Dies hier, im Zentrum, müssen Protonen sein, aber was ist das hier? Niemand konnte ergründen, was dieses Gebilde hier war. Also hatte jemand die geniale Idee, dass dies die Seele der Maus sein müsse. Unglücklicherweise starb jedoch die arme Maus in dem Magneten, da das Experiment sich über einen solch langen Zeitraum hingezogen hatte, und jemand fand heraus, dass es sich bei diesem Gebilde nur um einen Bildartefakt gehandelt hatte. Mir kam eine andere Idee: Man mache sich das Fourier-Prinzip zunutze, wende nacheinander zunächst einen vertikalen Feldgradienten und danach einen horizontalen Feldgradienten an und kombiniere dies zu einem zweidimensionalen Experiment, führe dann eine Fourier-Transformation durch - und man bekommt das Bild eines Kopfs. Wenn man also die Daten in zwei Dimensionen einer Fourier-Transformation unterzieht, wird alles enthüllt. Wenn sich beispielsweise in meinem Kopf ein Tumor befände, würden Sie ihn sehen - glücklicherweise ist dies nicht mein Kopf. Das hier ist ein wichtiges Bild. Es zeigt, wie man ein weibliches Gehirn in einen Schweizer Käse verwandelt - indem man einfach zu viel trinkt. Sie sehen hier ein weibliches Gehirn, ein normales weibliches Gehirn, ein Gehirn einer Alkoholikerin - wer möchte ein solches Gehirn haben? Also hören Sie auf, Alkohol zu trinken, insbesondere, wenn Sie eine Frau sind, für die Männer ist es weniger gefährlich. Das ist alles, was Sie sich von meinem Vortrag merken müssen, und es lohnt sich - das kleine Glas auf dieser Seite, das große Glas auf dieser Seite. Ich könnte ewig weitersprechen - Sie können Angiogramme messen, Blutgefäße, Sie können sich die chemischen Zusammensetzungen in verschiedenen Bereichen des Gehirns nach einem Schlaganfall anschauen. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Spektroskopieverfahren anwenden - dafür erhielt Peter Mansfield seinen Nobelpreis, zeitgleich mit Paul Lauterbur. Er hatte eine bestimmte Impulsfolge eingesetzt und mit ihrer Hilfe die Herzbewegung gefilmt. Und schließlich können Sie in das Gehirn hineinschauen und beobachten, was dort passiert, während Sie denken - wenn Sie denken. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Prinzip, das ich hier nicht erläutern kann, welches es erlaubt, die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie auf Denkprozesse reagieren zu lassen. Hier bekommen Sie hervorragende Bilder, mit denen Sie eine normale Person von einer schizophrenen Person unterscheiden können, wenn Sie auf ihn oder sie ein bestimmtes Input-Paradigma anwenden. Wenn Sie dann eine bestimmte Reaktion sehen, wissen sie, dass die Person krank sein könnte. Sie können zum Beispiel sogar Mitgefühl erforschen. Wenn eine andere Person gefoltert wird und Schmerz empfindet und Sie dabei nur Zuschauer sind, können Sie eine Reaktion in Ihrem Gehirn an genau derselben Stelle spüren, wo die gefolterte Person selbst diese Reaktion verspürt - hervorgerufen durch nichts anderes als Mitgefühl. Was man also alles tun kann, ist ziemlich spannend, und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich auf diese Weise bewiesen habe, dass das Verfahren der Magnetresonanztomografie ein unanfechtbarer Zeugnis für den enormen Wert der Grundlagenforschung ist, da sie direkt mit der praktischen Anwendung verbunden ist. Und zu guter Letzt: Glück ist, noch eine weitere Anwendung für die Fourier-Transformation zu finden. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Richard Ernst on Simultaneous Excitation Increases Sensitivity

(00:17:45 - 00:19:44)

Ernst likened the way in which the new process called Fourier Transform NMR, or FT NMR, identifies nuclei to listening to a piano. "Imagine you want to find out which strings are broken in an old piano, and how time consuming it would be to strike one key after the other," said Ernst. "FT NMR is like striking all 88 keys at once and immediately identifying which keys are still functioning."[6] This new method „could increase the sensitivity by a factor of 30 or more“[7]. In addition, it became possible now to detect not only hydrogen signals but also those of 13C and 15N-isotopes (NMR-active nuclei need to have an odd number of protons and neutrons). In his Lindau lecture from 2006, Ernst explained the general importance of the Fourier transformation in science:

Richard Ernst (2006) - Fourier Methods in Spectroscopy. From Monsieur Fourier to Medical Imaging

Dear friends, I'm enormously enjoying this year's Lindau meeting. Especially talking to you, my dear young enthusiastic and promising scientist friends. Among the lectures, so far, I particularly liked those that went beyond traditional science and revealed also the societal context. And in fact last year, at the same place here, I was talking about academic opportunities for conceiving and shaping our future. And in this context I made some rather strong and perhaps even offensive statements, for example condemning egoism as the driving force of all our actions, where we always ask ourselves what do we gain back from doing something. And rather promoting responsibility as the driving force, where we ask: What can we do in order that society profits something of it? And my lecture ended then with two quotes, one from François Rabelais: Or "Science without conscience ruins the soul." And on the other side, despite all the misery in our world, we have to remain optimist because we all together are jointly responsible for what will come in the future, we can't blame anybody else. So today I don't want to make any offensive statements and I will try to be a good boy and just tell you a small story, a purely scientific story: "From Monsieur Fourier to medical imaging." And in fact I like to demonstrate to you Fourier Transformation as a beautiful example how useful mathematics can be in the sciences. But, as usual, the inventor of Fourier Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptist-Joseph Fourier, he didn't know that today, at the beginning of a lecture, you could even peek into the head of the speaker in order to verify whether it's worthwhile to listen to his lecture, because all I can tell you is contained in this little sloppy piece of tissue here. So a lot of development went on from here to there. And I'd like to ask the question: Why is the Fourier Transformation so important in science? It's a very simple expression, it's an integral transform where we transform a function in time domain into a function in frequency domain. So we relate these two domains here by this integral transform. Or we can relate a momentum space to the geometric space, a function of K, of momentum and related to a function of coordinates. It has something to do with exploration of nature in general. When we explore an object, we consider it as a black box, we don't know what is inside and we try to perturb it. We knock at the input here and listen to the output. And that tells us what is inside. And actually a very unnatural way of exploring a black box is to apply a sine wave, a repetitive perturbation, and then listening to the output here. And I mean, just remember the lecture of Professor Hänsch two days ago, he told you that never measure anything but frequency. And that's exactly what we try to do in order to characterise the inside of this black box. And that makes sense because actually these trigonometric functions, they are Eigenfunctions of linear time-invariant systems. So whenever we apply such a function to a black box, which is linear and time-invariant, we get the same function back, multiplied with a certain complex quantity, which is, in quantum mechanical terms, the Eigenvalue, the Eigenfunction multiplied by the Eigenvalue. And if we block this Eigenvalue as a function of frequency, if we vary the frequency, we obtain the spectrum, that's the basis of spectroscopy, so it really makes sense. Now, we can do spectroscopy just in the normal way, applying one frequency after the other and measuring the response and blocking the amplitudes here as a function of frequency, that gives us a spectrum. But we could also do it in parallel, apply all these frequencies at once to the black box and saving time. Then we need something like a frequency sorter which sorts us out the various responses in order to again get the spectrum. And this frequency sort, that's after all nothing else than a Fourier Transformation. And by doing it in parallel here, we gain by the Multiplex Advantage, having done everything at the same time, often called also the Fellgett's Advantage. That's the advantage of going this way here. And the secret of the Fourier Transformation actually is also the orthogonality of the trigonometric function, when you multiple one with the other and integrate over this entire space, then you only get something when the two functions are identical. So they are orthogonal. And this allows one to separate them. And the simultaneous application of all these frequencies that can for example be implemented by a pulse. If you are by a pulse, then you have essentially all the frequencies contained, you obtain an impulse response. You have to do a Fourier Transformation and you obtain a spectrum, so simple. So again we have, so to say, two spaces here, which we relate, conjugate variables, the time and the frequency variable. The momentum space and the coordinate space, which are connected. There are, so to say, two different views of the same object. You can look at that in red colour or in green colour, and Heisenberg has said that a long time ago, that the most fruitful developments have happened whenever two different kinds of thinking were meeting. So these are the two different spaces. Or I mean, Professor Glauber, he has been telling you about waves and particles, this relation also belongs to the same category. And he also mentioned Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", and he has here the yin yang symbol, this also represents this two spaces which, so to say, contains the same truth. The whole world of Fourier transforms in spectroscopy is like complex. There are many different possibilities. In particular because actually what we are looking at is not just a function of time or a function of momentum, but it's set both at the same time, depending on four different variables, it is a plain wave, which develops in time and it develops in space. And so we can either use the time dependence, make a time domain experiment and finally obtain a spectrum. We can also use the K variables, the momentum variable and obtain, here for example the image of a molecule, that's the x-ray diffraction. We can do imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, which also uses this K dependence as the Fourier transform obtains an image of a head. And finally we can do for example interferometry, where we use the R dependence, we measure the interference in spatial domain, Fourier transform it and obtain again a spectrum, for example an infrared spectrum. So these are these various possibilities, which I briefly would like to describe. And everything goes back to this gentleman Monsieur Fourier. Who was Monsieur Fourier? That's him. He was at the same time, and that's a very, very great exception, at the same time a scientist and a politician. I mean, there are very, very few politicians who understand anything of science and there are very few scientists who are interested in politics. But he is, so to say, my role model, he has the same in him combined. And even, I mean, here he is in his office in Grenoble, and instead of studying his legal papers, he is doing a physics experiment, he actually measures here heat conduction, and he was writing at the same time a paper, which he presented actually at the Institute de France, being prefect to the département Isère. He was writing a book, 1822, on theory of, théorie analytique de la chaleur, heat conduction. And he did experiments and also this kind of input-output experiments. He had a black box here, a blue box, applying heat from the left side and measuring then the temperature distribution in the body. So it's again this input-output relation, he expanded the input in the Fourier Series and reconstituted the result again from a Spatial Fourier Series. So he used for the first time this Fourier expressions, of course he didn't call them Fourier expressions, but anyway, here they are in his book of 1822. Whenever somebody claims to have discovered something, of course it's interesting to ask what has developed out of that, but you also have to ask who was before, and there is always somebody before. And very few inventors really invented something for the first time. So for example Leonhard Euler, if you go through the text books of Fourier transform, you know you'll discover the Euler equations for the Fourier coefficients. These equations here, which I showed before, these are called Euler equations, so Euler must have contributed something. And indeed he did that already in 1777, and even before in 1729 he used trigonometric functions for interpolating functions and that's a reason why he's here on a Swiss bill, obviously he was Swiss, and otherwise I wouldn't speak about this to you. So indeed the Fourier transform is a Swiss invention, keep that in mind. So, I mean, we should come back to spectroscopy now. I mean, there is a huge range of different frequencies, from the gamma rays to the radio frequency and you can use all of them to do the spectroscopic explorations of nature. And you have the tree of knowledge and you like to go from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine, of course this is the most important level here for the true understanding of nature. Whenever you can explain a medical phenomenon in terms of chemical reactions, then you understand it, you normally don't have to go back to physics. That's the level. But I mean, in order to climb on the tree and come safely down again you need a tool, you need a ladder, spectroscopy serves that purpose. Anyway, the first time something like that, in connection with Fourier Transformations, has been used, was this gentleman, Michelson. He has also been mentioned in the lecture by Professor Hänsch, and Michelson, he invented the interferometer, so he has two light beams, or essentially one light beam, which is split in two parts, one part going to this moveable mirror and the other to the static mirror, coming back, being combined again. And there is an interference occurring here, so that's the machine as it happens here. Let's look at it in a little bit more detail. So again, the incoming wave here being split into a blue part, a red part and they are coming back and here, in this particular case, the two waves being reflected from the two mirrors are in phase, so there is constructive interference. If you move now this mirror slightly, then you get a destructive interference, the two are out of phase and if you add them you get zero. So in this way you can actually get an interference pattern. And that leads to interferometry, and when you have a single frequency, then you get just a single oscillation. If you have two frequencies present at the same time, you get this kind of interference here, between two frequencies, two frequencies with a certain line shape here, you get an attenuation and recovery and you have all these different signals which, when I looked at them first, I thought they are free induction decays from NMR, looks very simile to NMR spectroscopy, but it was done 50 years earlier. Anyway, a modern interferometer works exactly the same way, the source, the sample, which measures absorption or tries to measure absorption. A translucent mirror, mirrors here which reflect a detector value records interference as a function of the placement of the mirror here, to a Fourier transformation and gets a spectrum. The very first time this has been done was in 1951 by Fellgett, therefore the Fellgett advantage. And here the interferogram, here the Fourier transform of it, he had to do it by hand because he didn't have a computer at that time. But today you can buy these commercial instruments and they do the Fourier transformation automatically, and you get beautiful spectra without having to understand what is going on inside of the box. Something similar you can also do with Raman spectroscopy, you know in Raman you irradiate with a single frequency, a laser for example, you measure this captive light here and the frequencies are modified by the internal vibrations of a molecule for example, giving you this additional, so to say, side band of the same frequency here. And this contains now virtually the same as an infrared spectrum. That's a typical Raman, Fourier transform Raman spectrometer, where the same principle is being used. And it just gives me a chance here to tell you something about my passions. And to tell you how important passions are. I use this kind of Fourier Raman spectroscopy for the pigment analysis in central Asian paintings which I have a great love for. For example here you have Raman spectra of different blue pigments and you see just how different they are, you don't have to understand them, you just see they are different and this way you can distinguish indigo from azurite, from smalte and prussian blue and you can now get inside of paintings and identify the pigments. I'm doing painting restoration, so it's important to know what the artist has been using. And in this way you can, without destroying the painting, you can analyse pigments, fascinating. You see, when you want to walk along this road here, your professional road, for example towards Stockholm, then, oh it's so difficult to walk on one single food, you need a second one and the second one, that's your passions. And only when you have passions in addition to science, or whatever you are doing, then this spark will appear in your brain and the creativity occurs, that cross talk between the two legs is very important, keep that in mind. So let's come now to NMR, another application where the interference now happens in time domain. Very simple experiment, you have a nucleus which is recessing in a magnetic field, nuclear magnetic moment, having a frequency being proportion to the applied magnetic field, so in essence measuring the frequencies, you measure local magnetic fields, that has been done the first time in condensed matter by Edward Purcell and Felix Bloch, you can record spectra, like here of alcohol you get three different lines, because the local magnetic fields in the methyl groups, the methylene group and the OH proton here, they are different, so you can distinguish. But it's tedious to record one line after the other, it takes more time than I have for my lecture. So we had an associate in Palo Alto, there was Wes Anderson, he said: "Why not do it in parallel?", invented the multichannel spectrometer, where he irradiated with several frequencies at the same time. He built a multi frequency generator, this so called Prayer Wheel, it never worked, it's now in the Smithsonian museum, but at the same time he had a Swiss slave in his lab. And together with this Swiss slave they thought: ah, it's very easy, I told you everything before. Just apply a pulse, observe a free induction decay, do a Fourier transformation and you have a spectrum in fractions of a second. Here the impulse response of these molecules, the spectrum, and here the spectrum which you would have recorded with a traditional sweep method, the snail crawling through. Anyway, simultaneous excitation leads to sensitivity and you get beautiful spectra. And we felt great, at that time we published it, we thought we were inventors and we didn't know that before Mr. Morozov, he did very similar experiment about six years earlier. Fortunately the committee in Stockholm couldn't read Russian, otherwise you would have to listen now to a lecture in Russian. But anyway, he didn't know why he would do this crazy experiment, I mean, free induction decay, the Fourier transform of it, he didn't recognise that it could gain sensitivity this way, and really shorten the experiment time, I don't know for what reason actually he did it. Anyway, he was the first. So we have now this beautiful spectra, but they are virtually useless. How do I interpret all these lines, you remember Kurt Wüthrich's beautiful lecture, he wanted three-dimensional structures of molecules, and we were working together at that time in Zurich, and so he wanted to go from a primary protein structure to a three-dimensional structure, and the question was how. You need additional information, for example you need this correlation information, you have to relate nuclei, how near together are nuclei in space, how near together are they in the chemical bonding network. And this kind of information gives you really geometric information to get the structure. And so that leads to a correlation diagram where you correlate different nuclei and that could be neighbourhood in space, neighbourhood in chemical bonds, for example nucleus G has something in common with nucleus A, nucleus F has something in common with nucleus C, that leads to two-dimensional spectroscopy. Here all these correlations are being displayed, you can use them to determine structures. And the idea for that goes back to Jean Jeener, he proposed this kind of two-pulse experiment, bang two times on your black box, and in essence you transfer coherence from one mode, one transition in the energy level diagram to another transition in the energy level diagram. And that tells you something about connectivity of the nuclei. And this allows you to get this correlation or cosy spectra here from the Wüthrich group, which allows you then to make assignments of the protons, for example along a poly peptide chain. You need an additional experiment, you need also the through space interactions for this, you use a three-pulse experiment, first again some blue frequencies which are being transformed into red frequency, but here through close relaxations, through the space, depending on the dipolar interaction, so you really can measure distances. That's a complete experiment, that's a two-dimension cosy, a nosey spectrum, you measure the distances here between neighbouring amino acid residues, you can get then the complete set of information, chain coupling information, dipolar couplings, you can make an assignment, false resonance and finally determine geometry. And you are in business. That's the first example which Wüthrich was also mentioning three days ago. And that's why he got his Nobel Prize for this ingenuous technique how to determine three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Nowadays, when it's going to larger and larger molecules, inventing more and more tricks doing three-dimensional spectroscopy, doing four-dimensional spectroscopy, unfortunately I can't demonstrate the four-dimensional spectrum on this two-dimensional screen. But anyway, pulse sequence is becoming enormously complex, it's like a score of a symphony orchestra, you see the first violin, the second violin, the violas, the cellos and the percussion down here. That's the kind of pulse sequence which we use today, and you say, oh that's much too complicated for me. But even 10 years ago, when you wanted to find a job in industry, Merck research laboratories, you had to have experience in modern 2D, 3D and 4D heteronuclear NMR, otherwise you just were not considered. And today, Wüthrich told you, go up to seven-dimensional spectroscopy, that's important for finding jobs. NMR is also a beautiful example for determining molecular dynamics features. While x-ray diffraction delivers you the most reliable structures of biomolecules. NMR allows you also to go into dynamics and see what happens in a dynamic molecule and, I mean, static molecules, they're so boring, they are dead. Life is dynamics, dynamical molecules, that's where really is interesting chemical reactions, interactions with molecules, for that NMR is a beautiful technique. You have here an example, you have a benzene ring with seven methyl groups attached, you want too much, you think normally there are only places for five substituents, so methyl group number 7 is being chased back and forth here between the different positions and the question is how does it go? Is this methyl group jumping just to the next position step by step, or can it jump also directly into position? For what is a network of exchanges in such a molecule? To just record a two-dimensional spectrum, you have the four resonances here, 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have cross peaks and these cross peaks tell you how the jumps go. For example, if there would be a random exchange between all positions, there would have to be cross peaks everywhere. If there is only a 1-2 bond shift, then these are the circles which you prefer then, you see it fits. So indeed you have immediately determined the mechanism, how this exchange goes, you don't have to understand two-dimensional spectroscopy, it's a beautiful display, tells you everything. I mean, NMR is on the very far end of the spectrum, low frequency, there are other spectra, EPR, microwave spectroscopy, coherent optics, for example. And exactly the same principles apply here also, except that the practical difficulties increase, going to higher frequency. Electron spin resonance is perhaps the most similar technique to NMR, where just an electron spin is coupled to many nuclei, giving a multiplet here, very complicated spectrum which one can analyse with traditional methods or with Fourier methods. If the spectrum is very narrow, like for organic radicals here, one can really use directly the Fourier techniques. For transition metal complexes, the spectra are enormously wide and you cannot cover it with a single radio frequency pulse. But for this organic radicals you can record again an impulse response of free induction decay to the Fourier transform and get the spectrum. Exactly the same, you can get two-dimensional electron spin resonance spectra, so the same principles apply here as in NMR. When you have broad spectra, then you have to do more specialised experiments, I don't have the time to go into that, it goes into endopulse, endoexperiments, I don't want to describe that here, you measure then a modulation of an echo decay, do a Fourier transformation and then an ENDOR, an indirect detected NMR spectrum, but I don't have the time to explain that. And if you want to know more about that you can read this book by Arthur Schweiger and Gunnar Jeschke, Arthur Schweiger unfortunately just died two or three months ago, being less than 50 years old. Anyway, that's his legacy here, you can read about this beautiful experiment. Then, in the same frequency domain, in microwave spectroscopy, you can also do rotational spectroscopy, where molecules are rotating and you're measuring the speed of rotation about different axis, also internal rotations, that's microwave spectroscopy in the true sense, Flygare did the first pulse experiments, you see the free induction decays, you see the Fourier transform of single lines here, so to say, or single multiplets. You can go inside here, determine high resolution spectra, and making particular assignments, assignments of resonance lines which have for example one energy level in common, so this red line and this red line, they must give a cross peak here, somewhere, which tells you that, so you can study connectivity in energy level diagrams by these kind of two-dimensional spectroscopy. And then you can also go to optics, to optical time domain experiments, optical pulses, there are very short pulses, there are picosecond pulses, femtosecond pulses, done in the lab by Robin Hochstrasser here, it's a 4-pulse experiment, to study actually chemical exchange in real time, so to say in a biomolecule. And here the beautiful results, 2-dimensional optical spectra. So again exactly the same principle, it's just a little bit more tricky and more difficult, but gives you this beautiful spectra, which I don't want to interpret. You can apply exactly the same principle to mass spectroscopy. You can do time-resolved experiments here in an ion cyclotron, that's a magnetic field here again. You shoot in ions here, they start to circle around, you excite them by a radio frequency pulse and you measure again a free induction decay, here in mass spectroscopy. And you can for example distinguish here between two ions which have virtually the same mass, there is a very slow interference pattern which you can analyse by a Fourier transformation. You get very highly resolved mass spectra, but you can do that also for complicated molecules, here for a protein or a protein complex actually, which you can investigate by Fourier transform mass spectroscopy. So you see it's the same principle, it's virtually always the same, and it goes on and on and on. Then you can also do diffraction experiments, I mention this dependence on K here, Fourier transforming into real space determines this shape of a molecule. That leads to x-ray diffraction. Again you measure here structure factures in K space and the reciprocal lattice, you fully transform, you get electron densities in geometric space. Again it's the same kind of principles which apply here, here from a book, from x-ray diffraction, you see exactly the same kind of expressions here also occurring. An example in myoglobin, in the background you see the diffractogram and the Fourier transform structure here in front. I mean, you know this beautiful example of Michel, Deisenhofer and Huber, Professor Huber will probably speak about similar subjects this morning. Photosynthetic reaction centre being determined in this way, all relies on Fourier transformation. And finally I am coming to the last possibility, namely imaging. Imaging where you do an experiment which is very similar to diffraction. But you do it here in a slightly different way, you do it with magnetic resonance, with NMR, and you can in this way peek inside into the body. For example of your boyfriend, if you want to marry him, at first put him into a magnet and see what is wrong inside, whether he has a strong spine, whether there is anything in his head still left, whether he has soft knees, all that you can find out from MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And of course there are two windows to peak into a human body, you can use the x-ray window, you can use the radio frequency window, with optical radiation it's difficult to see through. But these are the two windows available. But the problem with magnetic resonance is resolution. How do you get with this long radio frequency waves spatial resolution? And the secret has been proposed by Paul Lauterbur, he said: as here, the nuclei have low recession frequencies and here they have high recession frequencies, so you get spatial resolution". That's what he got his Nobel Prize for, 2003. Applying magnetic field gradients in different directions, getting, so to say, projections of the proton density here, along different directions. And then from this projection one can reconstruct an image, that was his procedure. And the first time I heard about that was at the conference in the United States, 1974, and he showed an image of a mouse. It was recorded it in this way here, the mouse. Here these are the lungs, I mean it's proton imaging. And again, going back to what Professor Hänsch told you two days ago, never measure anything but hydrogen, that's exactly what we do in imaging, using protons for imaging. But there must be protons here in the centre, but what is that here? Nobody could understand what this feature here is. So somebody had the brilliant idea, this must be the soul of the mouse. But then, unfortunately, this poor mouse died in the magnet because the experiment lasted for such a long time. So then one found out, it's just an imaging artefact. So I got another idea, use the Fourier principle, apply to it in sequence first a vertical field gradient, then a horizontal and combining it to a dimensional experiment, do a Fourier transform and you get the image of a head. Data Fourier transformed in two dimensions, and that reveals everything. For example if there would be a tumour in my head, you would see it, fortunately it's not my head. That's an important image, that shows you how you convert a female brain into Swiss cheese, just drink too much. And you see the female brain, a normal female brain, an alcoholic female brain, who wants such a brain, so stop drinking alcohol, especially if you're a female, for the males it's less dangerous. Anyway, that's all you have to remember from my lecture and that's very worthwhile, small glass on this side, big glass on this side. And I mean, I know I should stop, I could go on forever, you can measure angiograms, blood vessels, you can look at chemical compositions after a stroke at different parts of the brain. You can do time resolved spectroscopy, Peter Mansfield got his Nobel prize for that, at the same time with Paul Lauterbur, using a particular pulse sequence, getting movies of a heart motion. And finally you can look into the brain and see what is going on while you are thinking, if you are thinking. And there is a particular principle which allows one to make NMR sensitive to thinking processes which I can't explain. You can get beautiful images here to distinguish a normal person from a schizophrenic person when you apply a certain input paradigm to him or her. And if you see a particular reaction, you know he might be ill. You can explore for example even compassion, that a person who suffers pain being tortured and you are just an onlooker and you feel then a reaction in the brain at exactly the same place as this person which is tortured himself, just by compassion. So it's quite exciting what you can do and I'm sure I have proved in this way that Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an irrefutable testimonial to the enormous value of basic research, it's directly linked to practical application. And finally: Happiness is finding still another use for Fourier Transformation. Thank you for your attention.

Liebe Freunde, das diesjährige Treffen in Lindau gefällt mir außerordentlich - insbesondere genieße ich es, zu Ihnen, meinen jungen enthusiastischen und vielversprechenden Wissenschaftlerfreunden, zu sprechen. Von den Vorträgen gefielen mir bislang vor allem jene, die über die herkömmliche Wissenschaft hinausgingen und auch etwas über den sozialen Kontext zu sagen hatten. Tatsächlich sprach ich letztes Jahr, an eben diesem Ort hier, über die Möglichkeiten der Wissenschaft, unsere Zukunft zu entwerfen und zu gestalten. In diesem Zusammenhang nahm ich auf eine sehr nachdrückliche und möglicherweise sogar Anstoß erregende Art und Weise Stellung, indem ich zum Beispiel Egoismus als treibende Kraft hinter all unseren Handlungen verurteilte, da wir uns in diesem Fall immer fragen, welchen Gewinn wir erzielen, wenn wir etwas tun. Stattdessen warb ich für Verantwortung als treibende Kraft, da wir uns dann fragen: Was können wir tun, damit die Gesellschaft daraus Nutzen zieht? Mein Vortrag endete damals mit zwei Zitaten, von denen das eine von François Rabelais stammt: denn wir alle sind mitverantwortlich für das, was in Zukunft geschieht - wir können keinem anderen die Schuld daran geben. Heute möchte ich keinerlei Äußerungen von mir geben, an denen man Anstoß nehmen könnte, sondern versuchen, ein guter Junge zu sein, und Ihnen nur eine kleine Geschichte, eine rein wissenschaftliche Geschichte, erzählen: Genau genommen möchte ich Ihnen die Fourier-Transformation als ein wunderschönes Beispiel dafür vorstellen, wie nützlich die Mathematik für die Naturwissenschaften sein kann. Wie üblich, wusste allerdings der Erfinder der Fourier-Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, nicht, dass man heutzutage sogar zu Beginn einer Vorlesung einen heimlichen Blick in den Kopf des Vortragenden werfen kann, um nachzuprüfen, ob es sich lohnt, sich die Vorlesung anzuhören, da alles, was ich Ihnen erzählen kann, in diesem labberigen Stück Gewebe hier enthalten ist. Von damals bis heute haben also viele Entwicklungen stattgefunden, und ich möchte gerne die Frage stellen: Warum ist die Fourier-Transformation für die Naturwissenschaft so wichtig? Sie ist ein sehr einfacher Ausdruck, sie ist eine Integraltransformation, bei der eine Funktion im Zeitbereich in eine Funktion im Frequenzbereich transformiert wird. Somit verknüpfen wir diese beiden Bereiche durch diese Integraltransformation. Oder wir können einen Impulsraum mit dem geometrischen Raum in Verbindung bringen, einer Funktion von K, des Impulses und verbunden mit einer Koordinatenfunktion. Es hat etwas mit der Erforschung der Natur im Allgemeinen zu tun. Wenn wir eine Sache untersuchen, betrachten wir sie als eine Black Box - wir wissen nicht, was sich in ihrem Inneren befindet - und wir versuchen, sie zu stören. Wir schauen uns den Input hier an und horchen auf den Output. Er verrät uns, was sich im Inneren befindet. Tatsächlich besteht eine sehr natürliche Art und Weise der Erforschung einer Black Box darin, eine Sinuswelle, eine sich periodisch wiederholende Störung, anzuwenden und dann auf den Output zu achten. Denken Sie nur an den Vortrag von Professor Hänsch vor zwei Tagen, in dem er Ihnen sagte, dass man niemals etwas anderes messen solle als Frequenzen. Genau das versuchen wir zu tun, um den Inhalt einer Black Box zu beschreiben. Und dies macht Sinn, denn tatsächlich sind diese trigonometrischen Funktionen Eigenfunktionen linearer zeitinvarianter Systeme. Somit bekommen wir jedes Mal, wenn wir eine solche Funktion auf eine Black Box anwenden, die linear und zeitinvariant ist, dieselbe Funktion zurück, multipliziert mit einer bestimmten komplexen Größe, bei der es sich in Begriffen der Quantenmechanik um den Eigenwert handelt. Wir erhalten also die mit dem Eigenwert multiplizierte Eigenfunktion. Und wenn wir diesen Eigenwert als eine Frequenzfunktion darstellen, wenn wir die Frequenz variieren, dann bekommen wir das Spektrum - das ist die Grundlage der Spektroskopie, also macht es wirklich Sinn. Wir können nun Spektroskopie auf die übliche Art und Weise betreiben, indem wir eine Frequenz nach der anderen anwenden, die Antwort messen und die Amplituden hier als eine Funktion der Frequenz darstellen. Das liefert uns ein Spektrum. Aber wir könnten dies auch parallel tun und alle Frequenzen gleichzeitig auf die Black Box anwenden und Zeit sparen. Dann brauchen wir so etwas wie einen Frequenzsortierer, der die verschiedenen Antworten für uns sortiert, damit wir wiederum das Spektrum bekommen. Dieser Frequenzsortierer ist letztendlich nichts anderes als eine Fourier-Transformation. Wenn wir das hier parallel tun, profitieren wir von dem Multiplex-Vorteil, der auch Fellgett-Vorteil genannt wird, da wir alles zur selben Zeit getan haben. Das ist der Vorteil, diesen Weg hier zu gehen. Das Geheimnis der Fourier-Transformation besteht tatsächlich in der Orthogonalität der trigonometrischen Funktion. Wenn Sie die eine mit der anderen multiplizieren und über den gesamten Raum integrieren, bekommen Sie nur dann etwas, wenn die beiden Funktionen identisch sind. Sie sind also orthogonal. Dies erlaubt es, sie zu trennen. Und die simultane Anwendung all dieser Frequenzen kann beispielsweise mit einem Puls implementiert werden. Wenn Sie einen Puls einsetzen, dann haben Sie im Wesentlichen alle Frequenzen eingebunden und Sie bekommen eine Impulsantwort. Sie müssen eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen, um das Spektrum zu bekommen - ganz einfach. Wiederum haben wir also sozusagen zwei Räume hier, die wir miteinander in Verbindung bringen, konjugierte Variablen, die Zeitvariable und die Frequenzvariable, der Impulsraum und der Koordinatenraum, die miteinander verbunden werden. Sie stellen, sozusagen, zwei verschiedene Ansichten desselben Gegenstands dar. Sie können sich das hier in Rot oder in Grün anschauen. Vor langer Zeit sagte Heisenberg, dass sich die fruchtbarsten Entwicklungen dann ergaben, wann immer zwei verschiedene Denkweisen aufeinandertrafen. Dies hier sind also die beiden verschiedenen Räume. Oder denken Sie an Professor Glauber, der Ihnen von Wellen und Teilchen erzählte - diese Beziehung gehört derselben Kategorie an. Er erwähnte auch Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", und hier ist das Yin-Yang-Symbol, das ebenfalls diese beiden Räume darstellt, welche dieselbe Wahrheit enthalten. Die ganze Welt der Fourier-Transformationen im Bereich der Spektroskopie ist ähnlich komplex. Es gibt viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten - insbesondere, weil das, was wir uns anschauen, tatsächlich nicht nur eine Funktion der Zeit oder eine Funktion des Impulses darstellt, sondern ein Set von beiden zur selben Zeit ist, in Abhängigkeit von vier verschiedenen Variablen. Es ist eine ebene Welle, die sich in der Zeit und im Raum ausbildet. Wir können uns also zum einen der Zeitabhängigkeit bedienen, ein Zeitbereichsexperiment durchführen und schließlich ein Spektrum gewinnen. Oder wir können die K-Variablen verwenden, die Impuls-Variable, und erhalten dann zum Beispiel, wie hier, das Bild eines Moleküls - das ist die Röntgenbeugung. Wir können bildgebende Verfahren anwenden, Magnetresonanztomografie, in der ebenfalls die K-Abhängigkeit genutzt wird und die Fourier-Transformation das Bild eines Kopfes liefert. Und schließlich können wir zum Beispiel die Methode der Interferometrie anwenden, in der wir uns der R-Abhängigkeit bedienen, die Interferenz auf der räumlichen Ebene messen, sie in einer Fourier-Transformation umwandeln und wiederum ein Spektrum, beispielsweise ein Infrarot-Spektrum, erhalten. Diese sind also die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten, die ich gerne kurz darstellen möchte. Alles ist auf jenen Herrn, Monsieur Fourier, zurückzuführen. Wer war Monsieur Fourier. Das ist er. Er war gleichzeitig - und stellt damit eine sehr große Ausnahme dar - Wissenschaftler und Politiker. Schließlich haben nur sehr, sehr wenige Politiker überhaupt eine Ahnung von Wissenschaft, und nur sehr wenige Wissenschaftler interessieren sich für Politik. Aber Fourier ist sozusagen mein Vorbild - in ihm ist beides vereint. Hier befindet er sich zum Beispiel in seinem Arbeitszimmer in Grenoble, und anstatt seine juristischen Akten zu studieren, führt er ein physikalisches Experiment durch. Er misst die Wärmeleitung. Zur selben Zeit schrieb er an einem Aufsatz, den er dem Institut de France vorlegte, während er Präfekt des Départements Isère war. Und er führte Experimente durch, darunter auch diese Art von Input-Output-Experimenten. Hier hatte er eine Black Box, eine blaue Box, der er von der linken Seite aus Hitze zuführte. Dann maß er die Wärmeverteilung in dem Objekt. Es handelt sich hier also wiederum um die Input-Output-Beziehung. Er weitete den Input in der Fourier-Reihe aus und rekonstituierte das Ergebnis wiederum aus einer räumlichen Fourier-Reihe. So verwendete er zum ersten Mal seine Fourier-Ausdrücke - selbstverständlich bezeichnete er sie nicht als Fourier-Ausdrücke, aber hier sind sie, in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1822. Wann immer jemand behauptet, etwas entdeckt zu haben, ist natürlich die Frage interessant, was sich daraus entwickelt hat. Jedoch muss man auch danach fragen, wer davor da war - und es gibt immer jemanden, der schon davor da war. Nur sehr wenige Erfinder erfanden eine Sache zum ersten Mal. Ein Beispiel dafür ist Leonhard Euler: Wenn man die Lehrbücher der Fourier-Transformationen durchgeht, wird man die Euler-Gleichungen für die Fourier-Koeffizienten entdecken. Diese Gleichungen hier, die ich zuvor gezeigt habe, werden als Euler-Gleichungen bezeichnet - also muss Euler irgend etwas beigetragen haben. Tatsächlich tat er dies bereits im Jahr 1777, und noch früher, im Jahr 1729, verwendete er trigonometrische Funktionen, um Funktionen zu interpolieren. Aus diesem Grund ist er hier auf einer schweizerischen Banknote abgebildet - offensichtlich war er Schweizer, sonst würde ich Ihnen das nicht erzählen. Folglich ist die Fourier-Transformation eine schweizerische Erfindung - vergessen Sie das nicht. Ich glaube, wir sollten uns jetzt wieder der Spektroskopie zuwenden. Es gibt eine sehr große Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Frequenzen, von den Gammastrahlen bis zu den Radiofrequenzen, und Sie können diese alle nutzen, um die Natur mit Hilfe spektroskopischer Untersuchungen zu erforschen. Hier haben wir den Baum des Wissens, bei dem man von der Physik über die Chemie zur Biologie und zur Medizin gelangt. Für das wirkliche Verständnis der Natur ist diese Ebene natürlich die wichtigste. Wenn Sie ein medizinisches Phänomen mit den Begriffen chemischer Reaktionen erklären können, dann verstehen Sie es. Sie müssen normalerweise nicht auf die Physik zurückgreifen. Das ist diese Ebene. Aber um den Baum hinauf- und sicher wieder hinunterzuklettern, braucht man ein Gerät, eine Leiter, und diesen Zweck erfüllt die Spektroskopie. Zum ersten Mal wurde so etwas in Verbindung mit Fourier-Transformationen von Herrn Michelson verwendet. Auch Professor Hänsch erwähnte ihn in seinem Vortrag. Michelson erfand das Interferometer. Er verwendet zwei Lichtstrahlen, beziehungsweise im Wesentlichen einen Lichtstrahl, der in zwei Lichtstrahlen geteilt wird. Einer trifft auf den beweglichen Spiegel und der andere auf den statischen Spiegel, und bei ihrer Rückkehr werden sie wieder zusammengeführt. Dabei kommt es zur Interferenz. Das ist die Maschinerie, so wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Schauen wir sie uns einmal ihre Details an. Die ankommende Welle hier wird in einen roten und in einen blauen Teil aufgeteilt. Dann kommen beide zurück. In diesem bestimmten Fall hier sind die zwei Wellen, die von den zwei Spiegeln reflektiert werden, in Phase, so dass hier eine konstruktive Interferenz vorliegt. Wenn Sie diesen Spiegel hier ein wenig verschieben, dann bekommen Sie eine destruktive Interferenz. Die beiden Wellen sind gegenphasig, und wenn man sie addiert, ist die Summe Null. Somit können Sie auf diese Weise in der Tat ein Interferenzmuster bekommen. Dies führt zur Interferometrie, und wenn Sie eine einzelne Frequenz haben, dann erhalten Sie nur eine einzelne Oszillation. Wenn Sie zwei Frequenzen zur selben Zeit haben, dann bekommen Sie diese Art von Interferenz hier, und zwischen zwei Frequenzen, zwei Frequenzen mit einer bestimmten Liniengestalt hier, bekommen Sie hier eine Abschwächung und einen Wiederanstieg und Sie haben all diese verschiedenen Signale, die ich, als ich sie mir zum ersten Mal anschaute, für freie Induktionszerfalle aus der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie hielt. Es sieht der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie sehr ähnlich, aber es wurde 50 Jahre früher aufgezeichnet. Jedenfalls funktioniert ein modernes Interferometer auf genau dieselbe Art und Weise. Wir haben die Quelle, die Probe, die die Absorption misst oder zu messen versucht, einen halbdurchlässigen Spiegel, zwei reflektierende Spiegel, einen Detektor, der die Interferenz als eine Funktion der Platzierung des Spiegels hier aufzeichnet - führen Sie eine Fourier-Transformation durch und Sie bekommen das Spektrum. Zum allerersten Mal wurde dies von Fellgett 1951 durchgeführt - daher der Begriff Fellgett-Vorteil. Hier haben wir das Interferogramm, hier dessen Fourier-Transformation. Er musste dies von Hand tun, da er damals noch über keinen Computer verfügte. Heute jedoch können Sie diese im Handel erhältlichen Geräte kaufen, welche die Fourier-Transformation automatisch durchführen, und erhalten wunderschöne Spektren, ohne verstehen zu müssen, was im Inneren der Box passiert. Etwas Ähnliches können Sie auch mit Hilfe der Raman-Spektroskopie tun. Wie Sie wissen, bestrahlen Sie hierbei mit einer einzelnen Frequenz, zum Beispiel mit einem Laser. Sie messen das gestreute Licht hier, und die Frequenzen werden von den internen Schwingungen beispielsweise eines Moleküls modifiziert und liefern Ihnen diese zusätzliche Seitenbande der zentralen Frequenz hier. Diese hat nun nahezu denselben Inhalt wie ein Infrarot-Spektrum. Es handelt sich um ein typisches Raman-Spektrometer, ein Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektrometer, bei dem dasselbe Prinzip genutzt wird. Und das gibt mir gerade die Gelegenheit, Ihnen etwas über meine Leidenschaften zu erzählen und Ihnen zu verraten, wie wichtig Leidenschaften sind. Ich setze diese Art von Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektroskopie bei der Pigmentanalyse bestimmter zentralasiatischer Gemälde ein, die ich sehr liebe. Hier haben Sie zum Beispiel Raman-Spektren verschiedener blauer Pigmente und Sie sehen, wie verschieden Sie sind. Sie brauchen Sie nicht zu verstehen, Sie sehen einfach, dass Sie verschieden sind, und auf diese Weise können Sie Indigo von Azurit, Smalte und Berliner Blau unterscheiden. Sie können in die Gemälde hineingelangen und die Pigmente identifizieren. Ich restauriere Gemälde, und aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, zu wissen, was der Künstler verwendete. Auf diese Weise können Sie, ohne das Gemälde zu zerstören, die Pigmente analysieren - faszinierend. Wissen Sie, wenn Sie diesen Weg, Ihren beruflichen Weg beispielsweise nach Stockholm, einschlagen möchten, dann ist es sehr schwierig, nur auf einem Fuß zu gehen. Sie brauchen einen zweiten, und dieser zweite sind Ihre Leidenschaften. Und nur, wenn Sie zusätzlich zur Wissenschaft oder was auch immer Sie tun, Ihre Leidenschaften haben, wird dieser Funke in Ihrem Gehirn aufleuchten und der kreative Prozess einsetzen. Diese Überlagerung zwischen den beiden Standbeinen ist von großer Bedeutung - denken Sie immer daran. Lassen Sie uns nun zur Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie übergehen, einer anderen Anwendung, bei der sich die Interferenz nun im Zeitbereich ereignet. Ein sehr einfaches Experiment: Sie haben einen Atomkern, der in einem magnetischen Feld präzediert, nuklear-magnetische Bewegung, Sie haben eine Frequenz in Proportion zu dem angewendeten Magnetfeld. Folglich werden im Wesentlichen die Frequenzen gemessen. Sie messen die lokalen Magnetfelder. Dies wurde erstmalig von Edward Purcell und Felix Bloch bei kondensierter Materie unternommen. Sie können Spektren aufzeichnen, wie hier die Spektren von Alkohol. Sie bekommen drei verschiedene Linien, denn die lokalen Magnetfelder in den Methylgruppen, der Methylengruppe und in dem OH-Proton hier sind verschieden, somit können Sie sie unterscheiden. Aber es ist ermüdend, eine Linie nach der anderen aufzuzeichnen, und man benötigt dafür mehr Zeit, als mir für meinen Vortrag zur Verfügung steht. Wir hatten in Varian Associates in Palo Alto einen Mitarbeiter, Wes Anderson. Er sagte: "Warum tun wir dies nicht gleichzeitig?" und er erfand das Mehrkanal-Spektrometer, in welchem er mit mehreren Frequenzen zur selben Zeit bestrahlte. Er konstruierte einen Multi-Frequenz-Generator, die sogenannte Gebetsmühle. Dieser funktionierte nicht und befindet sich nun im Smithsonian Museum. Aber zur selben Zeit hatte er in seinem Labor einen schweizerischen Sklaven. Gemeinsam mit diesem schweizerischen Sklaven überlegten sie: Ach, das ist doch ganz einfach, das habe ich Ihnen alles schon gesagt. Wir müssen nur einen Puls einsetzen, einen freien Induktionszerfall beobachten, eine Fourier-Transformation vornehmen - und haben in Sekundenbruchteilen ein Spektrum. Hier haben wir die Impulsantwort dieser Moleküle, das Spektrum, und hier das Spektrum, das man mit einer herkömmlichen Sweep-Methode im Schneckentempo aufgezeichnet hätte. Jedenfalls führt gleichzeitige Anregung zu Empfindlichkeit, und Sie bekommen wunderbare Spektren. Wir fanden uns großartig, veröffentlichten unsere Entdeckung und hielten uns für Erfinder. Wir wussten nicht, dass bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt, sechs Jahre zuvor, Herr Morozov ähnliche Experimente durchgeführt hatte. Glücklicherweise konnte das Komitee in Stockholm kein Russisch lesen, denn sonst müssten Sie sich nun einen Vortrag auf Russisch anhören. Ohnehin wusste er nicht, aus welchem Grund er dieses verrückte Experiment durchführte - freier Induktionszerfall, dessen Fourier-Transformation - er wusste nicht, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Empfindlichkeit zunehmen und die Dauer des Experiments deutlich verkürzt werden würde. Ich weiß nicht, aus welchem Grund er es tatsächlich tat. Trotzdem war er der erste. Wir haben also nun diese wunderschönen Spektren, aber sie sind praktisch nutzlos. Wie soll ich all diese Linien interpretieren? Sie erinnern sich an Kurt Wüthrichs hervorragende Vorlesung. Er wollte die dreidimensionale Struktur der Moleküle - wir arbeiteten zu jener Zeit in Zürich zusammen - und deshalb wollte er von einer primären Proteinstruktur zu einer dreidimensionalen Struktur gelangen. Die Frage war, wie. Sie benötigen zusätzliche Informationen. Beispielsweise benötigen Sie diese Korrelationsinformation: Sie müssen Atomkerne miteinander in Verbindung bringen, wie nahe beieinander Atomkerne im Raum sind, wie nahe beieinander sie im Netzwerk chemischer Bindungen sind. Diese Art von Informationen liefert Ihnen echte geometrische Informationen, um die Struktur zu bekommen. Dies führt zu einem Korrelationsdiagramm, in dem Sie verschiedene Atomkerne korrelieren. Dies könnte die Nachbarschaft im Raum betreffen, die Nachbarschaft in chemischen Bindungen, wobei zum Beispiel Atomkern G etwas mit Atomkern A gemeinsam und Atomkern F etwas mit Atomkern C gemeinsam hat, und das hat zweidimensionale Spektroskopie zur Folge. Hier sind alle diese Korrelationen dargestellt. Sie können sie benutzen, um Strukturen zu bestimmen. Die Idee hierfür geht auf Jean Jeener zurück. Er schlug diese Art eines Zwei-Puls-Experiments vor: Schlagen Sie zweimal auf Ihre Black Box. Im Wesentlichen übertragen Sie damit Kohärenz von einem Modus, einem Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm auf einen anderen Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm. Das verrät Ihnen etwas über die Konnektivität der Atomkerne. Und damit können Sie diese Korrelations- oder COSY-Spektren (Correlation Spectroscopy - Korrelationsspektroskopie) der Wüthrich-Gruppe bekommen, die Ihnen die Zuordnung der Protonen beispielsweise entlang einer Polypeptidkette ermöglichen. Sie brauchen ein zusätzliches Experiment, Sie brauchen hierfür auch die Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Atomkernen im Raum, und dafür bedienen Sie sich eines Drei-Puls-Experiments. Als erstes kommen wieder blaue Frequenzen zum Einsatz, die in rote Frequenzen umgewandelt werden, aber hier durch Kreuzrelaxationen, durch den Raum, abhängig von den dipolaren Wechselwirkungen, und so können Sie tatsächlich Entfernungen messen. Das ist ein vollständiges Experiment, das ist ein zweidimensionales COSY-Spektrum, ein NOESY-Spektrum (Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy - Kern-Overhauser-Effekt-Spektroskopie). Sie messen die Entfernungen zwischen benachbarten Aminosäureresten und können dann das komplette Set an Informationen bekommen, Informationen über die J-Kopplung, dipolare Kopplungen; Sie können eine Zuordnung vornehmen, auch der Anzeichen einer falsche Resonanz, und schließlich die Geometrie bestimmen. Und Sie sind im Geschäft. Das ist das erste Beispiel, das Wüthrich vor drei Tagen ebenfalls nannte. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er seinen Nobelpreis für die geniale Technik bekam, wie man die dreidimensionale Struktur von Biomolekülen bestimmen kann. Heutzutage, wo es um immer größere Moleküle geht, erfindet man immer mehr Tricks in der Anwendung dreidimensionaler und vierdimensionaler Spektroskopie. Leider kann ich auf diesem zweidimensionalen Schirm kein vierdimensionales Spektrum demonstrieren. Die Pulsfolgen werden jedenfalls sehr komplex. Es ist wie bei einer Partitur eines Symphonieorchesters: Sie haben die erste Geige, die zweite Geige, die Bratschen, die Cellos und dort unten das Schlagwerk. Das ist die Art von Pulsfolgen, die wir heute verwenden, und Sie mögen sagen: Oh, das ist viel zu kompliziert für mich. Jedoch mussten Sie schon vor zehn Jahren für eine Anstellung in der Industrie, zum Beispiel in den Forschungslaboren von Merck, Erfahrungen mit moderner 2D-, 3D- und 4D-Hetero-Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie vorweisen, denn sonst wurden Sie gar nicht erst in Betracht gezogen. Heute sollten Sie sich, wie Wüthrich Ihnen riet, mit der siebendimensionalen Spektroskopie vertraut machen - das ist wichtig, um einen Job zu finden. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ist außerdem ein schönes Beispiel für die Bestimmung von Eigenschaften der Molekulardynamik. Während die Röntgenbeugung Ihnen die verlässlichsten Strukturen für Biomoleküle liefert, erlaubt Ihnen die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie, die Dynamik zu untersuchen und zu beobachten, was in einem dynamischen Molekül geschieht. Schließlich sind statische Moleküle ja so langweilig - sie sind tot. Leben bedeutet Dynamik, dynamische Moleküle, dort finden die wirklich interessanten chemischen Reaktionen statt, die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Molekülen, und dafür ist die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie eine wunderbare Technik. Hier haben wir ein Beispiel: einen Benzolring, an den sieben Methylgruppen gebunden sind. Das ist einer zu viel - es gibt üblicherweise nur Plätze für fünf Substituenten, so dass die siebte Methylgruppe hier zwischen den verschiedenen Positionen hin- und hergejagt wird. Die Frage ist - wie bewegt sie sich? Springt diese Methylgruppe einfach Schritt für Schritt auf die jeweils nächste Position oder kann sie auch direkt auf irgendeine Position springen? Wie ist das Netzwerk des Austauschs in einem solchen Molekül aufgebaut? Um einfach ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aufzuzeichnen, haben Sie hier die vier Resonanzen, 1, 2, 3 und 4. Sie haben Cross Peaks, die Ihnen verraten, wie die Sprungbewegungen verlaufen. Wenn es zum Beispiel einen zufälligen Austausch zwischen allen Positionen gäbe, dann müssten überall Cross Peaks vorliegen. Wenn es nur eine 1-2-Bindungsverschiebung gibt, dann sind dies die bevorzugten Kreise - Sie sehen, es passt. Somit haben Sie in der Tat sofort den Mechanismus bestimmt, nach dem dieser Austausch funktioniert. Dafür müssen Sie zweidimensionale Spektroskopie nicht verstehen. Es ist eine wunderbare Darstellung, die Ihnen alles sagt. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie befindet sich an dem sehr weit entfernten, niederfrequenten Ende des Spektrums. Daneben gibt es andere Spektren - ESR (Elektronenspinresonanz), Mikrowellenspektroskopie, Kohärente Optik, um Beispiele zu nennen. Es gelten dieselben Prinzipien, wobei jedoch die praktischen Schwierigkeiten mit der Höhe der Frequenz zunehmen. Elektronenspinresonanzspektroskopie ist vielleicht die der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ähnlichste Technik. Hierbei ist ein Elektronenspin mit mehreren Atomkernen gekoppelt und liefert hier ein Multiplett, ein sehr kompliziertes Spektrum, das man mit herkömmlichen Methoden oder Fourier-Methoden analysieren kann. Wenn das Spektrum sehr schmal ist, wie hier für organische Radikale, kann man direkt die Fourier-Methoden anwenden. Für Übergangsmetallkomplexe sind die Spektren äußerst breit und können nicht mit dem Puls einer einzelnen Radiofrequenz abgedeckt werden. Aber für diese organischen Radikale können Sie wiederum eine Impulsantwort des freien Induktionszerfalls aufzeichnen, eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen und das Spektrum bekommen. Genau dasselbe - Sie können zweidimensionale Elektronenspinresonanzspektren bekommen, also gelten hier dieselben Prinzipien wie bei der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie. Wenn Sie breite Spektren haben, dann müssen Sie weitere spezialisierte Experimente durchführen. Ich habe nicht die Zeit, auf diese einzugehen - es handelt sich um einen ENDOR-Puls, ENDOR-Experimente, die ich hier nicht beschreiben möchte. Sie messen eine Modulation eines Echo-Zerfalls, führen eine Fourier-Transformation und dann eine Elektron-Kern-Doppelresonanz-Spektroskopie (ENDOR - electron nuclear double resonance) durch, ein indirekt ermitteltes Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektrum, aber mir fehlt die Zeit, um dies zu erläutern. Wenn Sie mehr darüber wissen möchten, können Sie dieses Buch hier von Arthur Schweiger und Gunnar Jeschke lesen. Leider ist Arthur Schweiger vor zwei oder drei Monaten im Alter von noch nicht einmal 50 Jahren gestorben. Dies hier ist sein Vermächtnis, und Sie können darin etwas über diese großartigen Experimente nachlesen. Dann können Sie, im selben Frequenzbereich in der Mikrowellenspektroskopie auch die Rotationsgeschwindigkeit messen, mit der Moleküle um verschiedene Achsen rotieren - also interne Rotationen und somit Mikrowellenspektroskopie im wahrsten Sinne. Flygare führte die ersten Pulsexperimente durch. Sie sehen die freien Induktionszerfalle, Sie sehen hier die Fourier-Transformation einzelner Linien oder einzelner Multipletts. Sie können nach innen gehen, Spektren in hoher Auflösung bestimmen und insbesondere Zuordnungen vornehmen. Sie können Resonanzlinien zuordnen, die beispielsweise ein Energieniveau gemeinsam haben. Diese rote Linie und diese rote Linie müssen irgendwo hier einen Cross Peak ergeben. Folglich lässt sich mit Hilfe dieser zweidimensionalen Spektroskopie die Konnektivität in Energieniveaudiagrammen studieren. Sie können auch zur Optik, zu optischen Zeitbereichs-Experimenten weitergehen. Optische Pulse sind sehr kurze Pulse, Picosekundenpulse, Femtosekundenpulse. Hier wird im Labor von Robin Hochstrasser ein Vier-Puls-Experiment durchgeführt, um die tatsächlichen chemischen Veränderungen in Realzeit, sozusagen in einem Biomolekül, zu studieren. Hier sind die großartigen Ergebnisse - zweidimensionale optische Spektren. Wiederum handelt es sich um exakt dasselbe Prinzip. Es ist nur ein kleines bisschen komplizierter und schwieriger, aber es liefert Ihnen diese wunderbaren Spektren, die ich nicht interpretieren möchte. Sie können genau dasselbe Prinzip bei der Massenspektroskopie anwenden. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Experimente hier in einem Ionenzyklotron beobachten. Das hier ist wieder ein magnetisches Feld. Sie schießen die Ionen hier hinein, sie beginnen zu kreisen, Sie regen sie mit einem Radiofrequenzpuls an und messen wiederum einen freien Induktionszerfall, hier in der Massenspektroskopie. Sie können zum Beispiel hier zwischen zwei Ionen unterscheiden, die nahezu dieselbe Masse besitzen. Es gibt ein sehr langsames Interferenzmuster, das Sie mit Hilfe einer Fourier-Transformation analysieren können. Sie bekommen Massenspektren mit sehr hoher Auflösung, aber Sie können dies auch für komplexe Moleküle durchführen, wie hier für ein Protein - eigentlich für einen Proteinkomplex -, die Sie mit der Fourier-Transformations-Massenspektroskopie untersuchen können. Sie sehen also - es ist dasselbe Prinzip, es ist eigentlich immer dasselbe, und so geht es weiter und weiter und weiter. Dann können Sie außerdem auch Diffraktionsexperimente durchführen. Ich erwähnte die Abhängigkeit von K hier, eine Fourier-Transformation, in den Realraum hinein, dies bestimmt diese Gestalt eines Moleküls. Das führt zur Röntgenbeugung. Wiederum messen Sie hier Strukturfaktoren im K-Raum. Das reziproke Gitter transformieren Sie vollständig, und Sie erhalten die Elektronendichte im geometrischen Raum. Hier gelten wieder dieselben Arten von Prinzipien - Sie sehen hier in einem Buch, bei einem Beispiel aus der Röntgenbeugung, dass genau dieselben Ausdrücke ebenfalls vorkommen. Hier ist ein Beispiel, Myoglobin, und im Hintergrund sehen Sie das Diffraktogramm und im Vordergrund die Fourier-Transformations-Struktur. Sie kennen dieses hervorragende Beispiel von Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber. Professor Huber wird heute Morgen vielleicht über ähnliche Themen sprechen. Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum wird auf diese Art und Weise bestimmt, und all das stützt sich auf die Fourier-Transformation. Schließlich komme ich zu der letzten Einsatzmöglichkeit, nämlich der Bildgebung. Bei der Bildgebung führen Sie ein der Diffraktion sehr ähnliches Experiment durch. Allerdings gehen Sie hier auf eine geringfügig andere Art und Weise vor. Sie bedienen sich der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie und können damit einen Blick in das Innere des Körpers werfen. So sollten Sie beispielsweise Ihren Freund, wenn Sie ihn heiraten möchten, zunächst in einen Magneten stecken und überprüfen, was in seinem Inneren vielleicht nicht in Ordnung ist: ob er ein starkes Rückgrat hat, ob er überhaupt noch etwas im Kopf hat, ob er weiche Knie hat - all das können Sie mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztomografie herausfinden. Selbstverständlich gibt es zwei Fenster, um in den menschlichen Körper hineinzuschauen - Sie können das Röntgenstrahlenfenster oder das Radiofrequenzfenster benutzen. Mit Hilfe optischer Strahlung hindurchzuschauen, ist schwierig. Aber diese beiden Fenster sind verfügbar. Allerdings besteht bei der Magnetresonanz das Problem der Auflösung. Wie bekommt man mit diesen langen Radiofrequenzwellen eine räumliche Auflösung? Das Geheimnis der Lösung wurde von Paul Lauterbur vorgeschlagen. Er sagte: "Setzen Sie einen Magnetfeld-Gradienten ein und verwenden Sie ein inhomogenes Magnetfeld, dann können Sie unterscheiden zwischen der linken Seite hier, wo die Atomkerne niedrige Präzessionsfrequenzen haben, und hier, wo sie hohe Präzessionsfrequenzen haben. So bekommen Sie eine räumliche Auflösung." Dafür erhielt er 2003 seinen Nobelpreis - für die Anwendung von Magnetfeldgradienten in verschiedene Richtungen, mit deren Hilfe man, sozusagen, Projektionen der Protonendichte hier, entlang verschiedener Richtungen, bekommt. Von diesen Projektionen ausgehend, kann man ein Bild rekonstruieren - das war seine Vorgehensweise. Das erste Mal hörte ich davon auf der Konferenz in den USA im Jahr 1974, und er zeigte das Bild einer Maus. Es war auf diese Weise hier aufgenommen worden. Hier sind die Lungen - es ist Protonenbildgebung. Und wenn wir nun auf das zurückkommen, was Professor Hänsch Ihnen vor zwei Tagen sagte, dass Sie nie etwas anderes als Wasserstoff messen sollten, dann ist das genau das, was wir bei diesem Bildgebungsverfahren tun - wir benutzen Protonen für die Bildgebung. Dies hier, im Zentrum, müssen Protonen sein, aber was ist das hier? Niemand konnte ergründen, was dieses Gebilde hier war. Also hatte jemand die geniale Idee, dass dies die Seele der Maus sein müsse. Unglücklicherweise starb jedoch die arme Maus in dem Magneten, da das Experiment sich über einen solch langen Zeitraum hingezogen hatte, und jemand fand heraus, dass es sich bei diesem Gebilde nur um einen Bildartefakt gehandelt hatte. Mir kam eine andere Idee: Man mache sich das Fourier-Prinzip zunutze, wende nacheinander zunächst einen vertikalen Feldgradienten und danach einen horizontalen Feldgradienten an und kombiniere dies zu einem zweidimensionalen Experiment, führe dann eine Fourier-Transformation durch - und man bekommt das Bild eines Kopfs. Wenn man also die Daten in zwei Dimensionen einer Fourier-Transformation unterzieht, wird alles enthüllt. Wenn sich beispielsweise in meinem Kopf ein Tumor befände, würden Sie ihn sehen - glücklicherweise ist dies nicht mein Kopf. Das hier ist ein wichtiges Bild. Es zeigt, wie man ein weibliches Gehirn in einen Schweizer Käse verwandelt - indem man einfach zu viel trinkt. Sie sehen hier ein weibliches Gehirn, ein normales weibliches Gehirn, ein Gehirn einer Alkoholikerin - wer möchte ein solches Gehirn haben? Also hören Sie auf, Alkohol zu trinken, insbesondere, wenn Sie eine Frau sind, für die Männer ist es weniger gefährlich. Das ist alles, was Sie sich von meinem Vortrag merken müssen, und es lohnt sich - das kleine Glas auf dieser Seite, das große Glas auf dieser Seite. Ich könnte ewig weitersprechen - Sie können Angiogramme messen, Blutgefäße, Sie können sich die chemischen Zusammensetzungen in verschiedenen Bereichen des Gehirns nach einem Schlaganfall anschauen. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Spektroskopieverfahren anwenden - dafür erhielt Peter Mansfield seinen Nobelpreis, zeitgleich mit Paul Lauterbur. Er hatte eine bestimmte Impulsfolge eingesetzt und mit ihrer Hilfe die Herzbewegung gefilmt. Und schließlich können Sie in das Gehirn hineinschauen und beobachten, was dort passiert, während Sie denken - wenn Sie denken. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Prinzip, das ich hier nicht erläutern kann, welches es erlaubt, die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie auf Denkprozesse reagieren zu lassen. Hier bekommen Sie hervorragende Bilder, mit denen Sie eine normale Person von einer schizophrenen Person unterscheiden können, wenn Sie auf ihn oder sie ein bestimmtes Input-Paradigma anwenden. Wenn Sie dann eine bestimmte Reaktion sehen, wissen sie, dass die Person krank sein könnte. Sie können zum Beispiel sogar Mitgefühl erforschen. Wenn eine andere Person gefoltert wird und Schmerz empfindet und Sie dabei nur Zuschauer sind, können Sie eine Reaktion in Ihrem Gehirn an genau derselben Stelle spüren, wo die gefolterte Person selbst diese Reaktion verspürt - hervorgerufen durch nichts anderes als Mitgefühl. Was man also alles tun kann, ist ziemlich spannend, und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich auf diese Weise bewiesen habe, dass das Verfahren der Magnetresonanztomografie ein unanfechtbarer Zeugnis für den enormen Wert der Grundlagenforschung ist, da sie direkt mit der praktischen Anwendung verbunden ist. Und zu guter Letzt: Glück ist, noch eine weitere Anwendung für die Fourier-Transformation zu finden. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Richard Ernst on the Importance of Fourier Transformation for Science
(00:03:22 - 00:06:57)

From One to Two to More Dimensions

Ernst's contributions to the field of NMR didn't end there. He returned to Switzerland and became the head of the NMR research group at ETH Zürich. In 1971, Ernst's first graduate student came back from summer school and told him about an interesting presentation by the Belgian scientist Jean Jeener, who had proposed a way of capturing more information by using a simple two-pulse sequence – in other words allowing the complex interactions within adjacent nuclei to evolve after the first radio pulse before hitting it with a second pulse. Jeener never developed his idea further, but using his original concept Ernst's lab successfully created a method known as two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. This method worked by hitting compounds with radio pulses of varying lengths and intervals, creating a complex table of information that requires two Fourier transformations to convert into a NMR spectrum. This opened up the possibilities of NMR, allowing hopelessly difficult parts of NMR spectra to be analyzed, and making it possible to find out which atoms are closely linked to others in a molecule.

NMR could now advance to the stage at which it could be used to identify the structure of large biomolecules like proteins, which contain thousands of atoms. Kurt Wüthrich pioneered the NMR analysis of proteins through his inventions at the beginning of the 1980s, and this led to NMR becoming an important alternative to X-ray crystallography. NMR has the advantage that it can assess proteins in their natural state in solution, unlike crystallography, which requires the protein to be in a crystalline form. „Direct practical applications of biomacromolecular NMR in pharmaceutical industrial research include screening studies when a particularly important protein is being considered as a target for new drugs. The protein is exposed to a variety of small molecules, potential leads for a new drug. When a particular small molecule interacts with the macromolecule, the NMR spectrum of the macromolecule will change. If the resonances of the macromolecule have been assigned, it is also possible to determine which residues are involved in the interaction, and the potential use of the small molecule in further drug development can be assessed.“[8]

Wüthrich and Ernst partly worked together during the 1970s. To better understand the fast progress of NMR methods, it is interesting to see how each of them acclaims the achievements of his colleague from a different perspective:

Richard Ernst (2006) - Fourier Methods in Spectroscopy. From Monsieur Fourier to Medical Imaging

Dear friends, I'm enormously enjoying this year's Lindau meeting. Especially talking to you, my dear young enthusiastic and promising scientist friends. Among the lectures, so far, I particularly liked those that went beyond traditional science and revealed also the societal context. And in fact last year, at the same place here, I was talking about academic opportunities for conceiving and shaping our future. And in this context I made some rather strong and perhaps even offensive statements, for example condemning egoism as the driving force of all our actions, where we always ask ourselves what do we gain back from doing something. And rather promoting responsibility as the driving force, where we ask: What can we do in order that society profits something of it? And my lecture ended then with two quotes, one from François Rabelais: Or "Science without conscience ruins the soul." And on the other side, despite all the misery in our world, we have to remain optimist because we all together are jointly responsible for what will come in the future, we can't blame anybody else. So today I don't want to make any offensive statements and I will try to be a good boy and just tell you a small story, a purely scientific story: "From Monsieur Fourier to medical imaging." And in fact I like to demonstrate to you Fourier Transformation as a beautiful example how useful mathematics can be in the sciences. But, as usual, the inventor of Fourier Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptist-Joseph Fourier, he didn't know that today, at the beginning of a lecture, you could even peek into the head of the speaker in order to verify whether it's worthwhile to listen to his lecture, because all I can tell you is contained in this little sloppy piece of tissue here. So a lot of development went on from here to there. And I'd like to ask the question: Why is the Fourier Transformation so important in science? It's a very simple expression, it's an integral transform where we transform a function in time domain into a function in frequency domain. So we relate these two domains here by this integral transform. Or we can relate a momentum space to the geometric space, a function of K, of momentum and related to a function of coordinates. It has something to do with exploration of nature in general. When we explore an object, we consider it as a black box, we don't know what is inside and we try to perturb it. We knock at the input here and listen to the output. And that tells us what is inside. And actually a very unnatural way of exploring a black box is to apply a sine wave, a repetitive perturbation, and then listening to the output here. And I mean, just remember the lecture of Professor Hänsch two days ago, he told you that never measure anything but frequency. And that's exactly what we try to do in order to characterise the inside of this black box. And that makes sense because actually these trigonometric functions, they are Eigenfunctions of linear time-invariant systems. So whenever we apply such a function to a black box, which is linear and time-invariant, we get the same function back, multiplied with a certain complex quantity, which is, in quantum mechanical terms, the Eigenvalue, the Eigenfunction multiplied by the Eigenvalue. And if we block this Eigenvalue as a function of frequency, if we vary the frequency, we obtain the spectrum, that's the basis of spectroscopy, so it really makes sense. Now, we can do spectroscopy just in the normal way, applying one frequency after the other and measuring the response and blocking the amplitudes here as a function of frequency, that gives us a spectrum. But we could also do it in parallel, apply all these frequencies at once to the black box and saving time. Then we need something like a frequency sorter which sorts us out the various responses in order to again get the spectrum. And this frequency sort, that's after all nothing else than a Fourier Transformation. And by doing it in parallel here, we gain by the Multiplex Advantage, having done everything at the same time, often called also the Fellgett's Advantage. That's the advantage of going this way here. And the secret of the Fourier Transformation actually is also the orthogonality of the trigonometric function, when you multiple one with the other and integrate over this entire space, then you only get something when the two functions are identical. So they are orthogonal. And this allows one to separate them. And the simultaneous application of all these frequencies that can for example be implemented by a pulse. If you are by a pulse, then you have essentially all the frequencies contained, you obtain an impulse response. You have to do a Fourier Transformation and you obtain a spectrum, so simple. So again we have, so to say, two spaces here, which we relate, conjugate variables, the time and the frequency variable. The momentum space and the coordinate space, which are connected. There are, so to say, two different views of the same object. You can look at that in red colour or in green colour, and Heisenberg has said that a long time ago, that the most fruitful developments have happened whenever two different kinds of thinking were meeting. So these are the two different spaces. Or I mean, Professor Glauber, he has been telling you about waves and particles, this relation also belongs to the same category. And he also mentioned Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", and he has here the yin yang symbol, this also represents this two spaces which, so to say, contains the same truth. The whole world of Fourier transforms in spectroscopy is like complex. There are many different possibilities. In particular because actually what we are looking at is not just a function of time or a function of momentum, but it's set both at the same time, depending on four different variables, it is a plain wave, which develops in time and it develops in space. And so we can either use the time dependence, make a time domain experiment and finally obtain a spectrum. We can also use the K variables, the momentum variable and obtain, here for example the image of a molecule, that's the x-ray diffraction. We can do imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, which also uses this K dependence as the Fourier transform obtains an image of a head. And finally we can do for example interferometry, where we use the R dependence, we measure the interference in spatial domain, Fourier transform it and obtain again a spectrum, for example an infrared spectrum. So these are these various possibilities, which I briefly would like to describe. And everything goes back to this gentleman Monsieur Fourier. Who was Monsieur Fourier? That's him. He was at the same time, and that's a very, very great exception, at the same time a scientist and a politician. I mean, there are very, very few politicians who understand anything of science and there are very few scientists who are interested in politics. But he is, so to say, my role model, he has the same in him combined. And even, I mean, here he is in his office in Grenoble, and instead of studying his legal papers, he is doing a physics experiment, he actually measures here heat conduction, and he was writing at the same time a paper, which he presented actually at the Institute de France, being prefect to the département Isère. He was writing a book, 1822, on theory of, théorie analytique de la chaleur, heat conduction. And he did experiments and also this kind of input-output experiments. He had a black box here, a blue box, applying heat from the left side and measuring then the temperature distribution in the body. So it's again this input-output relation, he expanded the input in the Fourier Series and reconstituted the result again from a Spatial Fourier Series. So he used for the first time this Fourier expressions, of course he didn't call them Fourier expressions, but anyway, here they are in his book of 1822. Whenever somebody claims to have discovered something, of course it's interesting to ask what has developed out of that, but you also have to ask who was before, and there is always somebody before. And very few inventors really invented something for the first time. So for example Leonhard Euler, if you go through the text books of Fourier transform, you know you'll discover the Euler equations for the Fourier coefficients. These equations here, which I showed before, these are called Euler equations, so Euler must have contributed something. And indeed he did that already in 1777, and even before in 1729 he used trigonometric functions for interpolating functions and that's a reason why he's here on a Swiss bill, obviously he was Swiss, and otherwise I wouldn't speak about this to you. So indeed the Fourier transform is a Swiss invention, keep that in mind. So, I mean, we should come back to spectroscopy now. I mean, there is a huge range of different frequencies, from the gamma rays to the radio frequency and you can use all of them to do the spectroscopic explorations of nature. And you have the tree of knowledge and you like to go from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine, of course this is the most important level here for the true understanding of nature. Whenever you can explain a medical phenomenon in terms of chemical reactions, then you understand it, you normally don't have to go back to physics. That's the level. But I mean, in order to climb on the tree and come safely down again you need a tool, you need a ladder, spectroscopy serves that purpose. Anyway, the first time something like that, in connection with Fourier Transformations, has been used, was this gentleman, Michelson. He has also been mentioned in the lecture by Professor Hänsch, and Michelson, he invented the interferometer, so he has two light beams, or essentially one light beam, which is split in two parts, one part going to this moveable mirror and the other to the static mirror, coming back, being combined again. And there is an interference occurring here, so that's the machine as it happens here. Let's look at it in a little bit more detail. So again, the incoming wave here being split into a blue part, a red part and they are coming back and here, in this particular case, the two waves being reflected from the two mirrors are in phase, so there is constructive interference. If you move now this mirror slightly, then you get a destructive interference, the two are out of phase and if you add them you get zero. So in this way you can actually get an interference pattern. And that leads to interferometry, and when you have a single frequency, then you get just a single oscillation. If you have two frequencies present at the same time, you get this kind of interference here, between two frequencies, two frequencies with a certain line shape here, you get an attenuation and recovery and you have all these different signals which, when I looked at them first, I thought they are free induction decays from NMR, looks very simile to NMR spectroscopy, but it was done 50 years earlier. Anyway, a modern interferometer works exactly the same way, the source, the sample, which measures absorption or tries to measure absorption. A translucent mirror, mirrors here which reflect a detector value records interference as a function of the placement of the mirror here, to a Fourier transformation and gets a spectrum. The very first time this has been done was in 1951 by Fellgett, therefore the Fellgett advantage. And here the interferogram, here the Fourier transform of it, he had to do it by hand because he didn't have a computer at that time. But today you can buy these commercial instruments and they do the Fourier transformation automatically, and you get beautiful spectra without having to understand what is going on inside of the box. Something similar you can also do with Raman spectroscopy, you know in Raman you irradiate with a single frequency, a laser for example, you measure this captive light here and the frequencies are modified by the internal vibrations of a molecule for example, giving you this additional, so to say, side band of the same frequency here. And this contains now virtually the same as an infrared spectrum. That's a typical Raman, Fourier transform Raman spectrometer, where the same principle is being used. And it just gives me a chance here to tell you something about my passions. And to tell you how important passions are. I use this kind of Fourier Raman spectroscopy for the pigment analysis in central Asian paintings which I have a great love for. For example here you have Raman spectra of different blue pigments and you see just how different they are, you don't have to understand them, you just see they are different and this way you can distinguish indigo from azurite, from smalte and prussian blue and you can now get inside of paintings and identify the pigments. I'm doing painting restoration, so it's important to know what the artist has been using. And in this way you can, without destroying the painting, you can analyse pigments, fascinating. You see, when you want to walk along this road here, your professional road, for example towards Stockholm, then, oh it's so difficult to walk on one single food, you need a second one and the second one, that's your passions. And only when you have passions in addition to science, or whatever you are doing, then this spark will appear in your brain and the creativity occurs, that cross talk between the two legs is very important, keep that in mind. So let's come now to NMR, another application where the interference now happens in time domain. Very simple experiment, you have a nucleus which is recessing in a magnetic field, nuclear magnetic moment, having a frequency being proportion to the applied magnetic field, so in essence measuring the frequencies, you measure local magnetic fields, that has been done the first time in condensed matter by Edward Purcell and Felix Bloch, you can record spectra, like here of alcohol you get three different lines, because the local magnetic fields in the methyl groups, the methylene group and the OH proton here, they are different, so you can distinguish. But it's tedious to record one line after the other, it takes more time than I have for my lecture. So we had an associate in Palo Alto, there was Wes Anderson, he said: "Why not do it in parallel?", invented the multichannel spectrometer, where he irradiated with several frequencies at the same time. He built a multi frequency generator, this so called Prayer Wheel, it never worked, it's now in the Smithsonian museum, but at the same time he had a Swiss slave in his lab. And together with this Swiss slave they thought: ah, it's very easy, I told you everything before. Just apply a pulse, observe a free induction decay, do a Fourier transformation and you have a spectrum in fractions of a second. Here the impulse response of these molecules, the spectrum, and here the spectrum which you would have recorded with a traditional sweep method, the snail crawling through. Anyway, simultaneous excitation leads to sensitivity and you get beautiful spectra. And we felt great, at that time we published it, we thought we were inventors and we didn't know that before Mr. Morozov, he did very similar experiment about six years earlier. Fortunately the committee in Stockholm couldn't read Russian, otherwise you would have to listen now to a lecture in Russian. But anyway, he didn't know why he would do this crazy experiment, I mean, free induction decay, the Fourier transform of it, he didn't recognise that it could gain sensitivity this way, and really shorten the experiment time, I don't know for what reason actually he did it. Anyway, he was the first. So we have now this beautiful spectra, but they are virtually useless. How do I interpret all these lines, you remember Kurt Wüthrich's beautiful lecture, he wanted three-dimensional structures of molecules, and we were working together at that time in Zurich, and so he wanted to go from a primary protein structure to a three-dimensional structure, and the question was how. You need additional information, for example you need this correlation information, you have to relate nuclei, how near together are nuclei in space, how near together are they in the chemical bonding network. And this kind of information gives you really geometric information to get the structure. And so that leads to a correlation diagram where you correlate different nuclei and that could be neighbourhood in space, neighbourhood in chemical bonds, for example nucleus G has something in common with nucleus A, nucleus F has something in common with nucleus C, that leads to two-dimensional spectroscopy. Here all these correlations are being displayed, you can use them to determine structures. And the idea for that goes back to Jean Jeener, he proposed this kind of two-pulse experiment, bang two times on your black box, and in essence you transfer coherence from one mode, one transition in the energy level diagram to another transition in the energy level diagram. And that tells you something about connectivity of the nuclei. And this allows you to get this correlation or cosy spectra here from the Wüthrich group, which allows you then to make assignments of the protons, for example along a poly peptide chain. You need an additional experiment, you need also the through space interactions for this, you use a three-pulse experiment, first again some blue frequencies which are being transformed into red frequency, but here through close relaxations, through the space, depending on the dipolar interaction, so you really can measure distances. That's a complete experiment, that's a two-dimension cosy, a nosey spectrum, you measure the distances here between neighbouring amino acid residues, you can get then the complete set of information, chain coupling information, dipolar couplings, you can make an assignment, false resonance and finally determine geometry. And you are in business. That's the first example which Wüthrich was also mentioning three days ago. And that's why he got his Nobel Prize for this ingenuous technique how to determine three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Nowadays, when it's going to larger and larger molecules, inventing more and more tricks doing three-dimensional spectroscopy, doing four-dimensional spectroscopy, unfortunately I can't demonstrate the four-dimensional spectrum on this two-dimensional screen. But anyway, pulse sequence is becoming enormously complex, it's like a score of a symphony orchestra, you see the first violin, the second violin, the violas, the cellos and the percussion down here. That's the kind of pulse sequence which we use today, and you say, oh that's much too complicated for me. But even 10 years ago, when you wanted to find a job in industry, Merck research laboratories, you had to have experience in modern 2D, 3D and 4D heteronuclear NMR, otherwise you just were not considered. And today, Wüthrich told you, go up to seven-dimensional spectroscopy, that's important for finding jobs. NMR is also a beautiful example for determining molecular dynamics features. While x-ray diffraction delivers you the most reliable structures of biomolecules. NMR allows you also to go into dynamics and see what happens in a dynamic molecule and, I mean, static molecules, they're so boring, they are dead. Life is dynamics, dynamical molecules, that's where really is interesting chemical reactions, interactions with molecules, for that NMR is a beautiful technique. You have here an example, you have a benzene ring with seven methyl groups attached, you want too much, you think normally there are only places for five substituents, so methyl group number 7 is being chased back and forth here between the different positions and the question is how does it go? Is this methyl group jumping just to the next position step by step, or can it jump also directly into position? For what is a network of exchanges in such a molecule? To just record a two-dimensional spectrum, you have the four resonances here, 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have cross peaks and these cross peaks tell you how the jumps go. For example, if there would be a random exchange between all positions, there would have to be cross peaks everywhere. If there is only a 1-2 bond shift, then these are the circles which you prefer then, you see it fits. So indeed you have immediately determined the mechanism, how this exchange goes, you don't have to understand two-dimensional spectroscopy, it's a beautiful display, tells you everything. I mean, NMR is on the very far end of the spectrum, low frequency, there are other spectra, EPR, microwave spectroscopy, coherent optics, for example. And exactly the same principles apply here also, except that the practical difficulties increase, going to higher frequency. Electron spin resonance is perhaps the most similar technique to NMR, where just an electron spin is coupled to many nuclei, giving a multiplet here, very complicated spectrum which one can analyse with traditional methods or with Fourier methods. If the spectrum is very narrow, like for organic radicals here, one can really use directly the Fourier techniques. For transition metal complexes, the spectra are enormously wide and you cannot cover it with a single radio frequency pulse. But for this organic radicals you can record again an impulse response of free induction decay to the Fourier transform and get the spectrum. Exactly the same, you can get two-dimensional electron spin resonance spectra, so the same principles apply here as in NMR. When you have broad spectra, then you have to do more specialised experiments, I don't have the time to go into that, it goes into endopulse, endoexperiments, I don't want to describe that here, you measure then a modulation of an echo decay, do a Fourier transformation and then an ENDOR, an indirect detected NMR spectrum, but I don't have the time to explain that. And if you want to know more about that you can read this book by Arthur Schweiger and Gunnar Jeschke, Arthur Schweiger unfortunately just died two or three months ago, being less than 50 years old. Anyway, that's his legacy here, you can read about this beautiful experiment. Then, in the same frequency domain, in microwave spectroscopy, you can also do rotational spectroscopy, where molecules are rotating and you're measuring the speed of rotation about different axis, also internal rotations, that's microwave spectroscopy in the true sense, Flygare did the first pulse experiments, you see the free induction decays, you see the Fourier transform of single lines here, so to say, or single multiplets. You can go inside here, determine high resolution spectra, and making particular assignments, assignments of resonance lines which have for example one energy level in common, so this red line and this red line, they must give a cross peak here, somewhere, which tells you that, so you can study connectivity in energy level diagrams by these kind of two-dimensional spectroscopy. And then you can also go to optics, to optical time domain experiments, optical pulses, there are very short pulses, there are picosecond pulses, femtosecond pulses, done in the lab by Robin Hochstrasser here, it's a 4-pulse experiment, to study actually chemical exchange in real time, so to say in a biomolecule. And here the beautiful results, 2-dimensional optical spectra. So again exactly the same principle, it's just a little bit more tricky and more difficult, but gives you this beautiful spectra, which I don't want to interpret. You can apply exactly the same principle to mass spectroscopy. You can do time-resolved experiments here in an ion cyclotron, that's a magnetic field here again. You shoot in ions here, they start to circle around, you excite them by a radio frequency pulse and you measure again a free induction decay, here in mass spectroscopy. And you can for example distinguish here between two ions which have virtually the same mass, there is a very slow interference pattern which you can analyse by a Fourier transformation. You get very highly resolved mass spectra, but you can do that also for complicated molecules, here for a protein or a protein complex actually, which you can investigate by Fourier transform mass spectroscopy. So you see it's the same principle, it's virtually always the same, and it goes on and on and on. Then you can also do diffraction experiments, I mention this dependence on K here, Fourier transforming into real space determines this shape of a molecule. That leads to x-ray diffraction. Again you measure here structure factures in K space and the reciprocal lattice, you fully transform, you get electron densities in geometric space. Again it's the same kind of principles which apply here, here from a book, from x-ray diffraction, you see exactly the same kind of expressions here also occurring. An example in myoglobin, in the background you see the diffractogram and the Fourier transform structure here in front. I mean, you know this beautiful example of Michel, Deisenhofer and Huber, Professor Huber will probably speak about similar subjects this morning. Photosynthetic reaction centre being determined in this way, all relies on Fourier transformation. And finally I am coming to the last possibility, namely imaging. Imaging where you do an experiment which is very similar to diffraction. But you do it here in a slightly different way, you do it with magnetic resonance, with NMR, and you can in this way peek inside into the body. For example of your boyfriend, if you want to marry him, at first put him into a magnet and see what is wrong inside, whether he has a strong spine, whether there is anything in his head still left, whether he has soft knees, all that you can find out from MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And of course there are two windows to peak into a human body, you can use the x-ray window, you can use the radio frequency window, with optical radiation it's difficult to see through. But these are the two windows available. But the problem with magnetic resonance is resolution. How do you get with this long radio frequency waves spatial resolution? And the secret has been proposed by Paul Lauterbur, he said: as here, the nuclei have low recession frequencies and here they have high recession frequencies, so you get spatial resolution". That's what he got his Nobel Prize for, 2003. Applying magnetic field gradients in different directions, getting, so to say, projections of the proton density here, along different directions. And then from this projection one can reconstruct an image, that was his procedure. And the first time I heard about that was at the conference in the United States, 1974, and he showed an image of a mouse. It was recorded it in this way here, the mouse. Here these are the lungs, I mean it's proton imaging. And again, going back to what Professor Hänsch told you two days ago, never measure anything but hydrogen, that's exactly what we do in imaging, using protons for imaging. But there must be protons here in the centre, but what is that here? Nobody could understand what this feature here is. So somebody had the brilliant idea, this must be the soul of the mouse. But then, unfortunately, this poor mouse died in the magnet because the experiment lasted for such a long time. So then one found out, it's just an imaging artefact. So I got another idea, use the Fourier principle, apply to it in sequence first a vertical field gradient, then a horizontal and combining it to a dimensional experiment, do a Fourier transform and you get the image of a head. Data Fourier transformed in two dimensions, and that reveals everything. For example if there would be a tumour in my head, you would see it, fortunately it's not my head. That's an important image, that shows you how you convert a female brain into Swiss cheese, just drink too much. And you see the female brain, a normal female brain, an alcoholic female brain, who wants such a brain, so stop drinking alcohol, especially if you're a female, for the males it's less dangerous. Anyway, that's all you have to remember from my lecture and that's very worthwhile, small glass on this side, big glass on this side. And I mean, I know I should stop, I could go on forever, you can measure angiograms, blood vessels, you can look at chemical compositions after a stroke at different parts of the brain. You can do time resolved spectroscopy, Peter Mansfield got his Nobel prize for that, at the same time with Paul Lauterbur, using a particular pulse sequence, getting movies of a heart motion. And finally you can look into the brain and see what is going on while you are thinking, if you are thinking. And there is a particular principle which allows one to make NMR sensitive to thinking processes which I can't explain. You can get beautiful images here to distinguish a normal person from a schizophrenic person when you apply a certain input paradigm to him or her. And if you see a particular reaction, you know he might be ill. You can explore for example even compassion, that a person who suffers pain being tortured and you are just an onlooker and you feel then a reaction in the brain at exactly the same place as this person which is tortured himself, just by compassion. So it's quite exciting what you can do and I'm sure I have proved in this way that Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an irrefutable testimonial to the enormous value of basic research, it's directly linked to practical application. And finally: Happiness is finding still another use for Fourier Transformation. Thank you for your attention.

Liebe Freunde, das diesjährige Treffen in Lindau gefällt mir außerordentlich - insbesondere genieße ich es, zu Ihnen, meinen jungen enthusiastischen und vielversprechenden Wissenschaftlerfreunden, zu sprechen. Von den Vorträgen gefielen mir bislang vor allem jene, die über die herkömmliche Wissenschaft hinausgingen und auch etwas über den sozialen Kontext zu sagen hatten. Tatsächlich sprach ich letztes Jahr, an eben diesem Ort hier, über die Möglichkeiten der Wissenschaft, unsere Zukunft zu entwerfen und zu gestalten. In diesem Zusammenhang nahm ich auf eine sehr nachdrückliche und möglicherweise sogar Anstoß erregende Art und Weise Stellung, indem ich zum Beispiel Egoismus als treibende Kraft hinter all unseren Handlungen verurteilte, da wir uns in diesem Fall immer fragen, welchen Gewinn wir erzielen, wenn wir etwas tun. Stattdessen warb ich für Verantwortung als treibende Kraft, da wir uns dann fragen: Was können wir tun, damit die Gesellschaft daraus Nutzen zieht? Mein Vortrag endete damals mit zwei Zitaten, von denen das eine von François Rabelais stammt: denn wir alle sind mitverantwortlich für das, was in Zukunft geschieht - wir können keinem anderen die Schuld daran geben. Heute möchte ich keinerlei Äußerungen von mir geben, an denen man Anstoß nehmen könnte, sondern versuchen, ein guter Junge zu sein, und Ihnen nur eine kleine Geschichte, eine rein wissenschaftliche Geschichte, erzählen: Genau genommen möchte ich Ihnen die Fourier-Transformation als ein wunderschönes Beispiel dafür vorstellen, wie nützlich die Mathematik für die Naturwissenschaften sein kann. Wie üblich, wusste allerdings der Erfinder der Fourier-Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, nicht, dass man heutzutage sogar zu Beginn einer Vorlesung einen heimlichen Blick in den Kopf des Vortragenden werfen kann, um nachzuprüfen, ob es sich lohnt, sich die Vorlesung anzuhören, da alles, was ich Ihnen erzählen kann, in diesem labberigen Stück Gewebe hier enthalten ist. Von damals bis heute haben also viele Entwicklungen stattgefunden, und ich möchte gerne die Frage stellen: Warum ist die Fourier-Transformation für die Naturwissenschaft so wichtig? Sie ist ein sehr einfacher Ausdruck, sie ist eine Integraltransformation, bei der eine Funktion im Zeitbereich in eine Funktion im Frequenzbereich transformiert wird. Somit verknüpfen wir diese beiden Bereiche durch diese Integraltransformation. Oder wir können einen Impulsraum mit dem geometrischen Raum in Verbindung bringen, einer Funktion von K, des Impulses und verbunden mit einer Koordinatenfunktion. Es hat etwas mit der Erforschung der Natur im Allgemeinen zu tun. Wenn wir eine Sache untersuchen, betrachten wir sie als eine Black Box - wir wissen nicht, was sich in ihrem Inneren befindet - und wir versuchen, sie zu stören. Wir schauen uns den Input hier an und horchen auf den Output. Er verrät uns, was sich im Inneren befindet. Tatsächlich besteht eine sehr natürliche Art und Weise der Erforschung einer Black Box darin, eine Sinuswelle, eine sich periodisch wiederholende Störung, anzuwenden und dann auf den Output zu achten. Denken Sie nur an den Vortrag von Professor Hänsch vor zwei Tagen, in dem er Ihnen sagte, dass man niemals etwas anderes messen solle als Frequenzen. Genau das versuchen wir zu tun, um den Inhalt einer Black Box zu beschreiben. Und dies macht Sinn, denn tatsächlich sind diese trigonometrischen Funktionen Eigenfunktionen linearer zeitinvarianter Systeme. Somit bekommen wir jedes Mal, wenn wir eine solche Funktion auf eine Black Box anwenden, die linear und zeitinvariant ist, dieselbe Funktion zurück, multipliziert mit einer bestimmten komplexen Größe, bei der es sich in Begriffen der Quantenmechanik um den Eigenwert handelt. Wir erhalten also die mit dem Eigenwert multiplizierte Eigenfunktion. Und wenn wir diesen Eigenwert als eine Frequenzfunktion darstellen, wenn wir die Frequenz variieren, dann bekommen wir das Spektrum - das ist die Grundlage der Spektroskopie, also macht es wirklich Sinn. Wir können nun Spektroskopie auf die übliche Art und Weise betreiben, indem wir eine Frequenz nach der anderen anwenden, die Antwort messen und die Amplituden hier als eine Funktion der Frequenz darstellen. Das liefert uns ein Spektrum. Aber wir könnten dies auch parallel tun und alle Frequenzen gleichzeitig auf die Black Box anwenden und Zeit sparen. Dann brauchen wir so etwas wie einen Frequenzsortierer, der die verschiedenen Antworten für uns sortiert, damit wir wiederum das Spektrum bekommen. Dieser Frequenzsortierer ist letztendlich nichts anderes als eine Fourier-Transformation. Wenn wir das hier parallel tun, profitieren wir von dem Multiplex-Vorteil, der auch Fellgett-Vorteil genannt wird, da wir alles zur selben Zeit getan haben. Das ist der Vorteil, diesen Weg hier zu gehen. Das Geheimnis der Fourier-Transformation besteht tatsächlich in der Orthogonalität der trigonometrischen Funktion. Wenn Sie die eine mit der anderen multiplizieren und über den gesamten Raum integrieren, bekommen Sie nur dann etwas, wenn die beiden Funktionen identisch sind. Sie sind also orthogonal. Dies erlaubt es, sie zu trennen. Und die simultane Anwendung all dieser Frequenzen kann beispielsweise mit einem Puls implementiert werden. Wenn Sie einen Puls einsetzen, dann haben Sie im Wesentlichen alle Frequenzen eingebunden und Sie bekommen eine Impulsantwort. Sie müssen eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen, um das Spektrum zu bekommen - ganz einfach. Wiederum haben wir also sozusagen zwei Räume hier, die wir miteinander in Verbindung bringen, konjugierte Variablen, die Zeitvariable und die Frequenzvariable, der Impulsraum und der Koordinatenraum, die miteinander verbunden werden. Sie stellen, sozusagen, zwei verschiedene Ansichten desselben Gegenstands dar. Sie können sich das hier in Rot oder in Grün anschauen. Vor langer Zeit sagte Heisenberg, dass sich die fruchtbarsten Entwicklungen dann ergaben, wann immer zwei verschiedene Denkweisen aufeinandertrafen. Dies hier sind also die beiden verschiedenen Räume. Oder denken Sie an Professor Glauber, der Ihnen von Wellen und Teilchen erzählte - diese Beziehung gehört derselben Kategorie an. Er erwähnte auch Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", und hier ist das Yin-Yang-Symbol, das ebenfalls diese beiden Räume darstellt, welche dieselbe Wahrheit enthalten. Die ganze Welt der Fourier-Transformationen im Bereich der Spektroskopie ist ähnlich komplex. Es gibt viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten - insbesondere, weil das, was wir uns anschauen, tatsächlich nicht nur eine Funktion der Zeit oder eine Funktion des Impulses darstellt, sondern ein Set von beiden zur selben Zeit ist, in Abhängigkeit von vier verschiedenen Variablen. Es ist eine ebene Welle, die sich in der Zeit und im Raum ausbildet. Wir können uns also zum einen der Zeitabhängigkeit bedienen, ein Zeitbereichsexperiment durchführen und schließlich ein Spektrum gewinnen. Oder wir können die K-Variablen verwenden, die Impuls-Variable, und erhalten dann zum Beispiel, wie hier, das Bild eines Moleküls - das ist die Röntgenbeugung. Wir können bildgebende Verfahren anwenden, Magnetresonanztomografie, in der ebenfalls die K-Abhängigkeit genutzt wird und die Fourier-Transformation das Bild eines Kopfes liefert. Und schließlich können wir zum Beispiel die Methode der Interferometrie anwenden, in der wir uns der R-Abhängigkeit bedienen, die Interferenz auf der räumlichen Ebene messen, sie in einer Fourier-Transformation umwandeln und wiederum ein Spektrum, beispielsweise ein Infrarot-Spektrum, erhalten. Diese sind also die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten, die ich gerne kurz darstellen möchte. Alles ist auf jenen Herrn, Monsieur Fourier, zurückzuführen. Wer war Monsieur Fourier. Das ist er. Er war gleichzeitig - und stellt damit eine sehr große Ausnahme dar - Wissenschaftler und Politiker. Schließlich haben nur sehr, sehr wenige Politiker überhaupt eine Ahnung von Wissenschaft, und nur sehr wenige Wissenschaftler interessieren sich für Politik. Aber Fourier ist sozusagen mein Vorbild - in ihm ist beides vereint. Hier befindet er sich zum Beispiel in seinem Arbeitszimmer in Grenoble, und anstatt seine juristischen Akten zu studieren, führt er ein physikalisches Experiment durch. Er misst die Wärmeleitung. Zur selben Zeit schrieb er an einem Aufsatz, den er dem Institut de France vorlegte, während er Präfekt des Départements Isère war. Und er führte Experimente durch, darunter auch diese Art von Input-Output-Experimenten. Hier hatte er eine Black Box, eine blaue Box, der er von der linken Seite aus Hitze zuführte. Dann maß er die Wärmeverteilung in dem Objekt. Es handelt sich hier also wiederum um die Input-Output-Beziehung. Er weitete den Input in der Fourier-Reihe aus und rekonstituierte das Ergebnis wiederum aus einer räumlichen Fourier-Reihe. So verwendete er zum ersten Mal seine Fourier-Ausdrücke - selbstverständlich bezeichnete er sie nicht als Fourier-Ausdrücke, aber hier sind sie, in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1822. Wann immer jemand behauptet, etwas entdeckt zu haben, ist natürlich die Frage interessant, was sich daraus entwickelt hat. Jedoch muss man auch danach fragen, wer davor da war - und es gibt immer jemanden, der schon davor da war. Nur sehr wenige Erfinder erfanden eine Sache zum ersten Mal. Ein Beispiel dafür ist Leonhard Euler: Wenn man die Lehrbücher der Fourier-Transformationen durchgeht, wird man die Euler-Gleichungen für die Fourier-Koeffizienten entdecken. Diese Gleichungen hier, die ich zuvor gezeigt habe, werden als Euler-Gleichungen bezeichnet - also muss Euler irgend etwas beigetragen haben. Tatsächlich tat er dies bereits im Jahr 1777, und noch früher, im Jahr 1729, verwendete er trigonometrische Funktionen, um Funktionen zu interpolieren. Aus diesem Grund ist er hier auf einer schweizerischen Banknote abgebildet - offensichtlich war er Schweizer, sonst würde ich Ihnen das nicht erzählen. Folglich ist die Fourier-Transformation eine schweizerische Erfindung - vergessen Sie das nicht. Ich glaube, wir sollten uns jetzt wieder der Spektroskopie zuwenden. Es gibt eine sehr große Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Frequenzen, von den Gammastrahlen bis zu den Radiofrequenzen, und Sie können diese alle nutzen, um die Natur mit Hilfe spektroskopischer Untersuchungen zu erforschen. Hier haben wir den Baum des Wissens, bei dem man von der Physik über die Chemie zur Biologie und zur Medizin gelangt. Für das wirkliche Verständnis der Natur ist diese Ebene natürlich die wichtigste. Wenn Sie ein medizinisches Phänomen mit den Begriffen chemischer Reaktionen erklären können, dann verstehen Sie es. Sie müssen normalerweise nicht auf die Physik zurückgreifen. Das ist diese Ebene. Aber um den Baum hinauf- und sicher wieder hinunterzuklettern, braucht man ein Gerät, eine Leiter, und diesen Zweck erfüllt die Spektroskopie. Zum ersten Mal wurde so etwas in Verbindung mit Fourier-Transformationen von Herrn Michelson verwendet. Auch Professor Hänsch erwähnte ihn in seinem Vortrag. Michelson erfand das Interferometer. Er verwendet zwei Lichtstrahlen, beziehungsweise im Wesentlichen einen Lichtstrahl, der in zwei Lichtstrahlen geteilt wird. Einer trifft auf den beweglichen Spiegel und der andere auf den statischen Spiegel, und bei ihrer Rückkehr werden sie wieder zusammengeführt. Dabei kommt es zur Interferenz. Das ist die Maschinerie, so wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Schauen wir sie uns einmal ihre Details an. Die ankommende Welle hier wird in einen roten und in einen blauen Teil aufgeteilt. Dann kommen beide zurück. In diesem bestimmten Fall hier sind die zwei Wellen, die von den zwei Spiegeln reflektiert werden, in Phase, so dass hier eine konstruktive Interferenz vorliegt. Wenn Sie diesen Spiegel hier ein wenig verschieben, dann bekommen Sie eine destruktive Interferenz. Die beiden Wellen sind gegenphasig, und wenn man sie addiert, ist die Summe Null. Somit können Sie auf diese Weise in der Tat ein Interferenzmuster bekommen. Dies führt zur Interferometrie, und wenn Sie eine einzelne Frequenz haben, dann erhalten Sie nur eine einzelne Oszillation. Wenn Sie zwei Frequenzen zur selben Zeit haben, dann bekommen Sie diese Art von Interferenz hier, und zwischen zwei Frequenzen, zwei Frequenzen mit einer bestimmten Liniengestalt hier, bekommen Sie hier eine Abschwächung und einen Wiederanstieg und Sie haben all diese verschiedenen Signale, die ich, als ich sie mir zum ersten Mal anschaute, für freie Induktionszerfalle aus der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie hielt. Es sieht der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie sehr ähnlich, aber es wurde 50 Jahre früher aufgezeichnet. Jedenfalls funktioniert ein modernes Interferometer auf genau dieselbe Art und Weise. Wir haben die Quelle, die Probe, die die Absorption misst oder zu messen versucht, einen halbdurchlässigen Spiegel, zwei reflektierende Spiegel, einen Detektor, der die Interferenz als eine Funktion der Platzierung des Spiegels hier aufzeichnet - führen Sie eine Fourier-Transformation durch und Sie bekommen das Spektrum. Zum allerersten Mal wurde dies von Fellgett 1951 durchgeführt - daher der Begriff Fellgett-Vorteil. Hier haben wir das Interferogramm, hier dessen Fourier-Transformation. Er musste dies von Hand tun, da er damals noch über keinen Computer verfügte. Heute jedoch können Sie diese im Handel erhältlichen Geräte kaufen, welche die Fourier-Transformation automatisch durchführen, und erhalten wunderschöne Spektren, ohne verstehen zu müssen, was im Inneren der Box passiert. Etwas Ähnliches können Sie auch mit Hilfe der Raman-Spektroskopie tun. Wie Sie wissen, bestrahlen Sie hierbei mit einer einzelnen Frequenz, zum Beispiel mit einem Laser. Sie messen das gestreute Licht hier, und die Frequenzen werden von den internen Schwingungen beispielsweise eines Moleküls modifiziert und liefern Ihnen diese zusätzliche Seitenbande der zentralen Frequenz hier. Diese hat nun nahezu denselben Inhalt wie ein Infrarot-Spektrum. Es handelt sich um ein typisches Raman-Spektrometer, ein Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektrometer, bei dem dasselbe Prinzip genutzt wird. Und das gibt mir gerade die Gelegenheit, Ihnen etwas über meine Leidenschaften zu erzählen und Ihnen zu verraten, wie wichtig Leidenschaften sind. Ich setze diese Art von Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektroskopie bei der Pigmentanalyse bestimmter zentralasiatischer Gemälde ein, die ich sehr liebe. Hier haben Sie zum Beispiel Raman-Spektren verschiedener blauer Pigmente und Sie sehen, wie verschieden Sie sind. Sie brauchen Sie nicht zu verstehen, Sie sehen einfach, dass Sie verschieden sind, und auf diese Weise können Sie Indigo von Azurit, Smalte und Berliner Blau unterscheiden. Sie können in die Gemälde hineingelangen und die Pigmente identifizieren. Ich restauriere Gemälde, und aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, zu wissen, was der Künstler verwendete. Auf diese Weise können Sie, ohne das Gemälde zu zerstören, die Pigmente analysieren - faszinierend. Wissen Sie, wenn Sie diesen Weg, Ihren beruflichen Weg beispielsweise nach Stockholm, einschlagen möchten, dann ist es sehr schwierig, nur auf einem Fuß zu gehen. Sie brauchen einen zweiten, und dieser zweite sind Ihre Leidenschaften. Und nur, wenn Sie zusätzlich zur Wissenschaft oder was auch immer Sie tun, Ihre Leidenschaften haben, wird dieser Funke in Ihrem Gehirn aufleuchten und der kreative Prozess einsetzen. Diese Überlagerung zwischen den beiden Standbeinen ist von großer Bedeutung - denken Sie immer daran. Lassen Sie uns nun zur Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie übergehen, einer anderen Anwendung, bei der sich die Interferenz nun im Zeitbereich ereignet. Ein sehr einfaches Experiment: Sie haben einen Atomkern, der in einem magnetischen Feld präzediert, nuklear-magnetische Bewegung, Sie haben eine Frequenz in Proportion zu dem angewendeten Magnetfeld. Folglich werden im Wesentlichen die Frequenzen gemessen. Sie messen die lokalen Magnetfelder. Dies wurde erstmalig von Edward Purcell und Felix Bloch bei kondensierter Materie unternommen. Sie können Spektren aufzeichnen, wie hier die Spektren von Alkohol. Sie bekommen drei verschiedene Linien, denn die lokalen Magnetfelder in den Methylgruppen, der Methylengruppe und in dem OH-Proton hier sind verschieden, somit können Sie sie unterscheiden. Aber es ist ermüdend, eine Linie nach der anderen aufzuzeichnen, und man benötigt dafür mehr Zeit, als mir für meinen Vortrag zur Verfügung steht. Wir hatten in Varian Associates in Palo Alto einen Mitarbeiter, Wes Anderson. Er sagte: "Warum tun wir dies nicht gleichzeitig?" und er erfand das Mehrkanal-Spektrometer, in welchem er mit mehreren Frequenzen zur selben Zeit bestrahlte. Er konstruierte einen Multi-Frequenz-Generator, die sogenannte Gebetsmühle. Dieser funktionierte nicht und befindet sich nun im Smithsonian Museum. Aber zur selben Zeit hatte er in seinem Labor einen schweizerischen Sklaven. Gemeinsam mit diesem schweizerischen Sklaven überlegten sie: Ach, das ist doch ganz einfach, das habe ich Ihnen alles schon gesagt. Wir müssen nur einen Puls einsetzen, einen freien Induktionszerfall beobachten, eine Fourier-Transformation vornehmen - und haben in Sekundenbruchteilen ein Spektrum. Hier haben wir die Impulsantwort dieser Moleküle, das Spektrum, und hier das Spektrum, das man mit einer herkömmlichen Sweep-Methode im Schneckentempo aufgezeichnet hätte. Jedenfalls führt gleichzeitige Anregung zu Empfindlichkeit, und Sie bekommen wunderbare Spektren. Wir fanden uns großartig, veröffentlichten unsere Entdeckung und hielten uns für Erfinder. Wir wussten nicht, dass bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt, sechs Jahre zuvor, Herr Morozov ähnliche Experimente durchgeführt hatte. Glücklicherweise konnte das Komitee in Stockholm kein Russisch lesen, denn sonst müssten Sie sich nun einen Vortrag auf Russisch anhören. Ohnehin wusste er nicht, aus welchem Grund er dieses verrückte Experiment durchführte - freier Induktionszerfall, dessen Fourier-Transformation - er wusste nicht, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Empfindlichkeit zunehmen und die Dauer des Experiments deutlich verkürzt werden würde. Ich weiß nicht, aus welchem Grund er es tatsächlich tat. Trotzdem war er der erste. Wir haben also nun diese wunderschönen Spektren, aber sie sind praktisch nutzlos. Wie soll ich all diese Linien interpretieren? Sie erinnern sich an Kurt Wüthrichs hervorragende Vorlesung. Er wollte die dreidimensionale Struktur der Moleküle - wir arbeiteten zu jener Zeit in Zürich zusammen - und deshalb wollte er von einer primären Proteinstruktur zu einer dreidimensionalen Struktur gelangen. Die Frage war, wie. Sie benötigen zusätzliche Informationen. Beispielsweise benötigen Sie diese Korrelationsinformation: Sie müssen Atomkerne miteinander in Verbindung bringen, wie nahe beieinander Atomkerne im Raum sind, wie nahe beieinander sie im Netzwerk chemischer Bindungen sind. Diese Art von Informationen liefert Ihnen echte geometrische Informationen, um die Struktur zu bekommen. Dies führt zu einem Korrelationsdiagramm, in dem Sie verschiedene Atomkerne korrelieren. Dies könnte die Nachbarschaft im Raum betreffen, die Nachbarschaft in chemischen Bindungen, wobei zum Beispiel Atomkern G etwas mit Atomkern A gemeinsam und Atomkern F etwas mit Atomkern C gemeinsam hat, und das hat zweidimensionale Spektroskopie zur Folge. Hier sind alle diese Korrelationen dargestellt. Sie können sie benutzen, um Strukturen zu bestimmen. Die Idee hierfür geht auf Jean Jeener zurück. Er schlug diese Art eines Zwei-Puls-Experiments vor: Schlagen Sie zweimal auf Ihre Black Box. Im Wesentlichen übertragen Sie damit Kohärenz von einem Modus, einem Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm auf einen anderen Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm. Das verrät Ihnen etwas über die Konnektivität der Atomkerne. Und damit können Sie diese Korrelations- oder COSY-Spektren (Correlation Spectroscopy - Korrelationsspektroskopie) der Wüthrich-Gruppe bekommen, die Ihnen die Zuordnung der Protonen beispielsweise entlang einer Polypeptidkette ermöglichen. Sie brauchen ein zusätzliches Experiment, Sie brauchen hierfür auch die Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Atomkernen im Raum, und dafür bedienen Sie sich eines Drei-Puls-Experiments. Als erstes kommen wieder blaue Frequenzen zum Einsatz, die in rote Frequenzen umgewandelt werden, aber hier durch Kreuzrelaxationen, durch den Raum, abhängig von den dipolaren Wechselwirkungen, und so können Sie tatsächlich Entfernungen messen. Das ist ein vollständiges Experiment, das ist ein zweidimensionales COSY-Spektrum, ein NOESY-Spektrum (Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy - Kern-Overhauser-Effekt-Spektroskopie). Sie messen die Entfernungen zwischen benachbarten Aminosäureresten und können dann das komplette Set an Informationen bekommen, Informationen über die J-Kopplung, dipolare Kopplungen; Sie können eine Zuordnung vornehmen, auch der Anzeichen einer falsche Resonanz, und schließlich die Geometrie bestimmen. Und Sie sind im Geschäft. Das ist das erste Beispiel, das Wüthrich vor drei Tagen ebenfalls nannte. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er seinen Nobelpreis für die geniale Technik bekam, wie man die dreidimensionale Struktur von Biomolekülen bestimmen kann. Heutzutage, wo es um immer größere Moleküle geht, erfindet man immer mehr Tricks in der Anwendung dreidimensionaler und vierdimensionaler Spektroskopie. Leider kann ich auf diesem zweidimensionalen Schirm kein vierdimensionales Spektrum demonstrieren. Die Pulsfolgen werden jedenfalls sehr komplex. Es ist wie bei einer Partitur eines Symphonieorchesters: Sie haben die erste Geige, die zweite Geige, die Bratschen, die Cellos und dort unten das Schlagwerk. Das ist die Art von Pulsfolgen, die wir heute verwenden, und Sie mögen sagen: Oh, das ist viel zu kompliziert für mich. Jedoch mussten Sie schon vor zehn Jahren für eine Anstellung in der Industrie, zum Beispiel in den Forschungslaboren von Merck, Erfahrungen mit moderner 2D-, 3D- und 4D-Hetero-Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie vorweisen, denn sonst wurden Sie gar nicht erst in Betracht gezogen. Heute sollten Sie sich, wie Wüthrich Ihnen riet, mit der siebendimensionalen Spektroskopie vertraut machen - das ist wichtig, um einen Job zu finden. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ist außerdem ein schönes Beispiel für die Bestimmung von Eigenschaften der Molekulardynamik. Während die Röntgenbeugung Ihnen die verlässlichsten Strukturen für Biomoleküle liefert, erlaubt Ihnen die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie, die Dynamik zu untersuchen und zu beobachten, was in einem dynamischen Molekül geschieht. Schließlich sind statische Moleküle ja so langweilig - sie sind tot. Leben bedeutet Dynamik, dynamische Moleküle, dort finden die wirklich interessanten chemischen Reaktionen statt, die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Molekülen, und dafür ist die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie eine wunderbare Technik. Hier haben wir ein Beispiel: einen Benzolring, an den sieben Methylgruppen gebunden sind. Das ist einer zu viel - es gibt üblicherweise nur Plätze für fünf Substituenten, so dass die siebte Methylgruppe hier zwischen den verschiedenen Positionen hin- und hergejagt wird. Die Frage ist - wie bewegt sie sich? Springt diese Methylgruppe einfach Schritt für Schritt auf die jeweils nächste Position oder kann sie auch direkt auf irgendeine Position springen? Wie ist das Netzwerk des Austauschs in einem solchen Molekül aufgebaut? Um einfach ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aufzuzeichnen, haben Sie hier die vier Resonanzen, 1, 2, 3 und 4. Sie haben Cross Peaks, die Ihnen verraten, wie die Sprungbewegungen verlaufen. Wenn es zum Beispiel einen zufälligen Austausch zwischen allen Positionen gäbe, dann müssten überall Cross Peaks vorliegen. Wenn es nur eine 1-2-Bindungsverschiebung gibt, dann sind dies die bevorzugten Kreise - Sie sehen, es passt. Somit haben Sie in der Tat sofort den Mechanismus bestimmt, nach dem dieser Austausch funktioniert. Dafür müssen Sie zweidimensionale Spektroskopie nicht verstehen. Es ist eine wunderbare Darstellung, die Ihnen alles sagt. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie befindet sich an dem sehr weit entfernten, niederfrequenten Ende des Spektrums. Daneben gibt es andere Spektren - ESR (Elektronenspinresonanz), Mikrowellenspektroskopie, Kohärente Optik, um Beispiele zu nennen. Es gelten dieselben Prinzipien, wobei jedoch die praktischen Schwierigkeiten mit der Höhe der Frequenz zunehmen. Elektronenspinresonanzspektroskopie ist vielleicht die der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ähnlichste Technik. Hierbei ist ein Elektronenspin mit mehreren Atomkernen gekoppelt und liefert hier ein Multiplett, ein sehr kompliziertes Spektrum, das man mit herkömmlichen Methoden oder Fourier-Methoden analysieren kann. Wenn das Spektrum sehr schmal ist, wie hier für organische Radikale, kann man direkt die Fourier-Methoden anwenden. Für Übergangsmetallkomplexe sind die Spektren äußerst breit und können nicht mit dem Puls einer einzelnen Radiofrequenz abgedeckt werden. Aber für diese organischen Radikale können Sie wiederum eine Impulsantwort des freien Induktionszerfalls aufzeichnen, eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen und das Spektrum bekommen. Genau dasselbe - Sie können zweidimensionale Elektronenspinresonanzspektren bekommen, also gelten hier dieselben Prinzipien wie bei der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie. Wenn Sie breite Spektren haben, dann müssen Sie weitere spezialisierte Experimente durchführen. Ich habe nicht die Zeit, auf diese einzugehen - es handelt sich um einen ENDOR-Puls, ENDOR-Experimente, die ich hier nicht beschreiben möchte. Sie messen eine Modulation eines Echo-Zerfalls, führen eine Fourier-Transformation und dann eine Elektron-Kern-Doppelresonanz-Spektroskopie (ENDOR - electron nuclear double resonance) durch, ein indirekt ermitteltes Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektrum, aber mir fehlt die Zeit, um dies zu erläutern. Wenn Sie mehr darüber wissen möchten, können Sie dieses Buch hier von Arthur Schweiger und Gunnar Jeschke lesen. Leider ist Arthur Schweiger vor zwei oder drei Monaten im Alter von noch nicht einmal 50 Jahren gestorben. Dies hier ist sein Vermächtnis, und Sie können darin etwas über diese großartigen Experimente nachlesen. Dann können Sie, im selben Frequenzbereich in der Mikrowellenspektroskopie auch die Rotationsgeschwindigkeit messen, mit der Moleküle um verschiedene Achsen rotieren - also interne Rotationen und somit Mikrowellenspektroskopie im wahrsten Sinne. Flygare führte die ersten Pulsexperimente durch. Sie sehen die freien Induktionszerfalle, Sie sehen hier die Fourier-Transformation einzelner Linien oder einzelner Multipletts. Sie können nach innen gehen, Spektren in hoher Auflösung bestimmen und insbesondere Zuordnungen vornehmen. Sie können Resonanzlinien zuordnen, die beispielsweise ein Energieniveau gemeinsam haben. Diese rote Linie und diese rote Linie müssen irgendwo hier einen Cross Peak ergeben. Folglich lässt sich mit Hilfe dieser zweidimensionalen Spektroskopie die Konnektivität in Energieniveaudiagrammen studieren. Sie können auch zur Optik, zu optischen Zeitbereichs-Experimenten weitergehen. Optische Pulse sind sehr kurze Pulse, Picosekundenpulse, Femtosekundenpulse. Hier wird im Labor von Robin Hochstrasser ein Vier-Puls-Experiment durchgeführt, um die tatsächlichen chemischen Veränderungen in Realzeit, sozusagen in einem Biomolekül, zu studieren. Hier sind die großartigen Ergebnisse - zweidimensionale optische Spektren. Wiederum handelt es sich um exakt dasselbe Prinzip. Es ist nur ein kleines bisschen komplizierter und schwieriger, aber es liefert Ihnen diese wunderbaren Spektren, die ich nicht interpretieren möchte. Sie können genau dasselbe Prinzip bei der Massenspektroskopie anwenden. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Experimente hier in einem Ionenzyklotron beobachten. Das hier ist wieder ein magnetisches Feld. Sie schießen die Ionen hier hinein, sie beginnen zu kreisen, Sie regen sie mit einem Radiofrequenzpuls an und messen wiederum einen freien Induktionszerfall, hier in der Massenspektroskopie. Sie können zum Beispiel hier zwischen zwei Ionen unterscheiden, die nahezu dieselbe Masse besitzen. Es gibt ein sehr langsames Interferenzmuster, das Sie mit Hilfe einer Fourier-Transformation analysieren können. Sie bekommen Massenspektren mit sehr hoher Auflösung, aber Sie können dies auch für komplexe Moleküle durchführen, wie hier für ein Protein - eigentlich für einen Proteinkomplex -, die Sie mit der Fourier-Transformations-Massenspektroskopie untersuchen können. Sie sehen also - es ist dasselbe Prinzip, es ist eigentlich immer dasselbe, und so geht es weiter und weiter und weiter. Dann können Sie außerdem auch Diffraktionsexperimente durchführen. Ich erwähnte die Abhängigkeit von K hier, eine Fourier-Transformation, in den Realraum hinein, dies bestimmt diese Gestalt eines Moleküls. Das führt zur Röntgenbeugung. Wiederum messen Sie hier Strukturfaktoren im K-Raum. Das reziproke Gitter transformieren Sie vollständig, und Sie erhalten die Elektronendichte im geometrischen Raum. Hier gelten wieder dieselben Arten von Prinzipien - Sie sehen hier in einem Buch, bei einem Beispiel aus der Röntgenbeugung, dass genau dieselben Ausdrücke ebenfalls vorkommen. Hier ist ein Beispiel, Myoglobin, und im Hintergrund sehen Sie das Diffraktogramm und im Vordergrund die Fourier-Transformations-Struktur. Sie kennen dieses hervorragende Beispiel von Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber. Professor Huber wird heute Morgen vielleicht über ähnliche Themen sprechen. Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum wird auf diese Art und Weise bestimmt, und all das stützt sich auf die Fourier-Transformation. Schließlich komme ich zu der letzten Einsatzmöglichkeit, nämlich der Bildgebung. Bei der Bildgebung führen Sie ein der Diffraktion sehr ähnliches Experiment durch. Allerdings gehen Sie hier auf eine geringfügig andere Art und Weise vor. Sie bedienen sich der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie und können damit einen Blick in das Innere des Körpers werfen. So sollten Sie beispielsweise Ihren Freund, wenn Sie ihn heiraten möchten, zunächst in einen Magneten stecken und überprüfen, was in seinem Inneren vielleicht nicht in Ordnung ist: ob er ein starkes Rückgrat hat, ob er überhaupt noch etwas im Kopf hat, ob er weiche Knie hat - all das können Sie mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztomografie herausfinden. Selbstverständlich gibt es zwei Fenster, um in den menschlichen Körper hineinzuschauen - Sie können das Röntgenstrahlenfenster oder das Radiofrequenzfenster benutzen. Mit Hilfe optischer Strahlung hindurchzuschauen, ist schwierig. Aber diese beiden Fenster sind verfügbar. Allerdings besteht bei der Magnetresonanz das Problem der Auflösung. Wie bekommt man mit diesen langen Radiofrequenzwellen eine räumliche Auflösung? Das Geheimnis der Lösung wurde von Paul Lauterbur vorgeschlagen. Er sagte: "Setzen Sie einen Magnetfeld-Gradienten ein und verwenden Sie ein inhomogenes Magnetfeld, dann können Sie unterscheiden zwischen der linken Seite hier, wo die Atomkerne niedrige Präzessionsfrequenzen haben, und hier, wo sie hohe Präzessionsfrequenzen haben. So bekommen Sie eine räumliche Auflösung." Dafür erhielt er 2003 seinen Nobelpreis - für die Anwendung von Magnetfeldgradienten in verschiedene Richtungen, mit deren Hilfe man, sozusagen, Projektionen der Protonendichte hier, entlang verschiedener Richtungen, bekommt. Von diesen Projektionen ausgehend, kann man ein Bild rekonstruieren - das war seine Vorgehensweise. Das erste Mal hörte ich davon auf der Konferenz in den USA im Jahr 1974, und er zeigte das Bild einer Maus. Es war auf diese Weise hier aufgenommen worden. Hier sind die Lungen - es ist Protonenbildgebung. Und wenn wir nun auf das zurückkommen, was Professor Hänsch Ihnen vor zwei Tagen sagte, dass Sie nie etwas anderes als Wasserstoff messen sollten, dann ist das genau das, was wir bei diesem Bildgebungsverfahren tun - wir benutzen Protonen für die Bildgebung. Dies hier, im Zentrum, müssen Protonen sein, aber was ist das hier? Niemand konnte ergründen, was dieses Gebilde hier war. Also hatte jemand die geniale Idee, dass dies die Seele der Maus sein müsse. Unglücklicherweise starb jedoch die arme Maus in dem Magneten, da das Experiment sich über einen solch langen Zeitraum hingezogen hatte, und jemand fand heraus, dass es sich bei diesem Gebilde nur um einen Bildartefakt gehandelt hatte. Mir kam eine andere Idee: Man mache sich das Fourier-Prinzip zunutze, wende nacheinander zunächst einen vertikalen Feldgradienten und danach einen horizontalen Feldgradienten an und kombiniere dies zu einem zweidimensionalen Experiment, führe dann eine Fourier-Transformation durch - und man bekommt das Bild eines Kopfs. Wenn man also die Daten in zwei Dimensionen einer Fourier-Transformation unterzieht, wird alles enthüllt. Wenn sich beispielsweise in meinem Kopf ein Tumor befände, würden Sie ihn sehen - glücklicherweise ist dies nicht mein Kopf. Das hier ist ein wichtiges Bild. Es zeigt, wie man ein weibliches Gehirn in einen Schweizer Käse verwandelt - indem man einfach zu viel trinkt. Sie sehen hier ein weibliches Gehirn, ein normales weibliches Gehirn, ein Gehirn einer Alkoholikerin - wer möchte ein solches Gehirn haben? Also hören Sie auf, Alkohol zu trinken, insbesondere, wenn Sie eine Frau sind, für die Männer ist es weniger gefährlich. Das ist alles, was Sie sich von meinem Vortrag merken müssen, und es lohnt sich - das kleine Glas auf dieser Seite, das große Glas auf dieser Seite. Ich könnte ewig weitersprechen - Sie können Angiogramme messen, Blutgefäße, Sie können sich die chemischen Zusammensetzungen in verschiedenen Bereichen des Gehirns nach einem Schlaganfall anschauen. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Spektroskopieverfahren anwenden - dafür erhielt Peter Mansfield seinen Nobelpreis, zeitgleich mit Paul Lauterbur. Er hatte eine bestimmte Impulsfolge eingesetzt und mit ihrer Hilfe die Herzbewegung gefilmt. Und schließlich können Sie in das Gehirn hineinschauen und beobachten, was dort passiert, während Sie denken - wenn Sie denken. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Prinzip, das ich hier nicht erläutern kann, welches es erlaubt, die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie auf Denkprozesse reagieren zu lassen. Hier bekommen Sie hervorragende Bilder, mit denen Sie eine normale Person von einer schizophrenen Person unterscheiden können, wenn Sie auf ihn oder sie ein bestimmtes Input-Paradigma anwenden. Wenn Sie dann eine bestimmte Reaktion sehen, wissen sie, dass die Person krank sein könnte. Sie können zum Beispiel sogar Mitgefühl erforschen. Wenn eine andere Person gefoltert wird und Schmerz empfindet und Sie dabei nur Zuschauer sind, können Sie eine Reaktion in Ihrem Gehirn an genau derselben Stelle spüren, wo die gefolterte Person selbst diese Reaktion verspürt - hervorgerufen durch nichts anderes als Mitgefühl. Was man also alles tun kann, ist ziemlich spannend, und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich auf diese Weise bewiesen habe, dass das Verfahren der Magnetresonanztomografie ein unanfechtbarer Zeugnis für den enormen Wert der Grundlagenforschung ist, da sie direkt mit der praktischen Anwendung verbunden ist. Und zu guter Letzt: Glück ist, noch eine weitere Anwendung für die Fourier-Transformation zu finden. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Richard Ernst:&amp
(00:20:30 - 00:23:12)

Kurt Wüthrich (2014) - A Personal View of the History of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine

Well thank you, it’s a pleasure to be here. Why a personal view? Because as all of us I will over exaggerate my own contributions. My talk starts in 20 minutes. And I expect that 100s of people will be coming in 20 minutes to listen to me. Therefore I’ll speak slowly so that those newcomers will also get part of it. Now nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR is a technique which can provide us today with quite a lot of interesting information. So it is NMR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It’s not No Meaningful Results. And it’s not No More Research. Nuclear magnetic resonance. And it can be used to study man. And it can be used to study molecules. And today we expect that in chemistry NMR enables us to decide about the structures. That is NMR can tell us about the presence of each and every atom in such a molecule. It can be a larger molecule, a smaller molecule. It can be the result of synthetic chemistry where the chemist wants to check about the coincidence of what he expected to get and what he did actually get in his work. This particular molecule that I showed to you is cyclosporine A. It was essential in the start of transplantation in human medicine. It is the first viable immune suppressant that actually enabled the start of transplantation medicine and it was also a big economic success. Now, what can NMR do next? Now we move from chemistry to structural biology. Now, NMR can tell us where our drug molecule, this is again cyclosporine A, binds to particular sites in cells, in this case in the human cell. And here you have the primary receptor. This is a small protein, cyclophilin. And so NMR can tell us about the structure of the complex formed by the drug molecule and its receptor. Once we have such a result, we can remove the drug from its binding site and study in detail the contacts that the drug undergoes with its receptor. And then we can go back to the chemists and tell them: “Look, this piece is too big. That doesn’t really fit into this crevice. So cut it off and check whether you can improve some properties of the drug which might lead to reduced site effect that are inevitable in any drug and need to be minimised.” This is one area where we use NMR widely today. Another area is in imaging. It’s a very different approach. Also we are on a very different scale. This is a knee. It happens to be my own. You can see... Others usually show their heads but because of my major occupation, knees are considerably more important that other parts of my body. Now, you all want to get a Nobel Prize and we should tell you how to do it. This is a bit difficult. But, you see, it’s much easier to predict the past. So I’m going to tell you how things have happened in NMR. There are 6 Nobel laureates who got the Prize for NMR. And the first thing... Now if you want to get the prize, you have to choose your field. After Switzerland lost to Argentina in a painful way last night, I find out again that it was the right choice for me 50 years ago not to continue playing football as my major occupation but to join NMR because of the 6 NMR Nobel Prizes. So choosing the right field of activity is important. Never mind if it’s a Nobel Prize. You have to be happy. You have to have a satisfactory life. And if you live in Argentina, I would recommend that you rather go into football than into natural science. Well next you have to be visible. You see I stay in Argentina. When I don’t play football, then I go fishing. And these are quite nice trouts which I caught in the Lago Escondido near Bariloche in the Andes in Argentina. And in Bariloche there’s a very famous theoretical physics institute where many European leading physicists would spend part of the year. But you see these fish are very nice eating but they are sort of small. And Stockholm is far away. And it’s dark in the winter. So Swedes may not see these fish. So you have to catch big fish. Then you have a chance that the Nobel Committee may actually see the fish. And I am now going to tell you about the 3 big fish that gave Nobel Prizes in NMR. And then there will be a fourth big fish, which provides the basis of it all. NMR started with Felix Bloch. This is the Swiss physicist and Edward Purcell an American physicist, they both worked in the United States. And they discovered within a few weeks independent of each other the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance. It is not so that this was an all or nothing breakthrough. There have been different experiments for example by a physicist with the name of Rabi. Other physicist with the name of Stern, who performed so called beam experiments which already indicated that nuclear magnetic resonance could happen. But it was Bloch and Purcell who actually did the first experiment. Now what is the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon? We consider just the simplest case, namely the case of a hydrogen atom like you find it in water for example. Hydrogen atom has a spin. The nucleus of the hydrogen has a spin. And in a quantum mechanical description you have a spin of one half. And this has 2 so called eigenstates. So that nucleus can exist in 2 different forms. One is described by an arrow pointing up, the other one by an arrow pointing down. Or it’s called beta or alpha and the corresponding quantum numbers are -1/2 and +1/2. Here in this audience we will not be able to distinguish between the 2 states because you are only subject to the Earth’s magnetic field and that’s so small that you do not get an energy difference between the 2 states. But if you place the material to study, in this case the hydrogen atoms, into a strong magnetic field that may be half a million times the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field, then you lift the degeneracy. That means you now have 2 states that are energetically different. And the energy difference can be explained -this is delta E- can be expressed in terms of a frequency, a radio frequency. When you listen to a radio set, then you work with the same kind of wavelengths that we use in NMR experiments. Now, the key point here is that this size of the energy splitting is proportional to the applied magnetic field. So we have it in hand to decide how big we want this energy gap to be and hence at what frequency we want to see transitions between these 2 energetically different states. And when we change the applied field, then this difference will become a bit smaller. If we increase it, it will become a bit bigger. Recognising this was of course the first of those 3 big NMR fishes. Now we come to the second fish. You have already seen the water molecule in Peter Agre’s talk. It’s a simple structure. You have 2 hydrogen atoms in white and the reddish blue oxygen atom. In the NMR experiment we don’t see the oxygen, we only see the 2 hydrogens. And because of the symmetry of the molecular structure we cannot distinguish between the 2. Therefore we get a single line in a spectrum. Now this line... Since I have enough time let me go back. This line now represents exactly this energy difference in terms of the frequency at which we observe this peak. And now comes the big idea which leads to the use of the NMR phenomenon for macroscopic imaging as it is used in medical diagnosis. You now take a macroscopic structure like human head or human knee as you have seen before and you apply a variation of the field, the so called field gradient across this macroscopic object. Now you have a different energy splitting on the left eye than on the right eye because you have a difference in the applied magnetic field. Though also we only and exclusively observe the water molecule -I mean most of the inside of our head is water, about 80%- we can see, we can distinguish between the water at this part of the head and here. And then we do the same thing perpendicular to this plain and in the third dimension and with some mathematical procedures. We can then reproduce the image. So this is the big fish. To realise if you go across the macroscopic object, you can distinguish between the water next to the left eye from the water next to the right eye. It’s the same. You can distinguish between the 2 ears although you always observe the water. And this big fish was caught by Paul Lauterbur and by Peter Mansfield who received the Nobel Prize in medicine and physiology in 2003. Let me just for... You see I can also say that there are 4 of us who got the Nobel Prize in NMR in new times. And we all worked in both, in spectroscopy and in imaging. So let me just recount how we got into imaging. That was very early on in the game in the 1980s. And it wasn’t trivial to get a sufficiently big magnet to place an adult human body inside. So we got a small magnet and we worked in the children’s hospital in Zurich. And actually my graduate students Chris Bösch and Rolf Grütter are now both leading scientists in Swiss hospitals in this area. We would work with new born infants. And the most difficult problem that we faced was to monitor the state of the infants inside the magnet because new born infants with birth trauma are highly unstable and all vital functions need to be constantly monitored. And the children were also so weak that we couldn’t use chemicals to sedate the children. Therefore we would ask the parents to come in and put the children to sleep. Then the parents were extremely upset and scared of seeing their little ones disappear in a magnet. So Chris Bösch devised the fairy house. Now the magnet is inside here, the baby goes here and the parents were extremely relieved to see the baby go into a fairy house rather than into an iron core magnet. The result of the study was very often very painful. I show you here an image of the head of a 17 year old girl who had heavy mechanical birth trauma which caused a huge hematoma here in this area of the scull. Very sad story of course. But this is the sort of things that happened to us when we were into MRI many years ago. Now let me go to the third big fish story. This is work that led to the use of NMR in structural biology. And here the problem to be solved was a very different one from the problem that you have to solve when you try to image macroscopic objects. We are now dealing not with water molecules which give a single line in any sort of spectroscopic technique but now we work with macromolecules such as this marvellous painting by Geis from the 1960s. This is cytochrome C. I always like to show such pictures from the times before computers were able to draw molecules. So Irving Geis was a painter who painted all the early 3 dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids in the 1960s and ‘70s. And only with the 1980s were computers getting able to make similar but not quite equally nice drawings. The point here is that I do not have just one kind of hydrogen atom. I have many different kinds, chemically different types of atoms. And as a result I don’t get a single line but I get a complicated spectrum. This is just a usual scale, corresponds to the frequency at which we observe the signals. And you can see that in this particular case we see some well resolved signals but these correspond only in this case to exactly 6 hydrogen atoms whereas here we have overlapping signals of about 400 NMR signals. Now, we knew from studying these well resolved lines that the information was available to determine 3 dimensional structures. But we couldn’t get the information out of this part which contains most of the resonances. And here the big fish experience was to go from one dimension to 2 dimensions. See, instead of arranging all these many lines on a single axis, you get the 2 dimensional plain and now individual lines move out of the mess here and are well separated in this 2 dimensional plain. So that was the advent of 2 dimensional NMR. We had the first set of experiments by 1982. COSY, NOESY, SECSY and FOCSY. I mean this is serious. I mean SECSY stands for spin-echo correlated spectroscopy. I mean compared to the notations that we see in immunology for example this is relatively straightforward. Now, what is behind this multidimensional NMR? I say multidimensional because although it was 2 dimensional originally, today when we determine an NMR structure of a protein we use 2 five dimensional, 1 four dimensional and 3 three dimensional experiments. So the principle that I’m now going to explain is not limited to 2 dimensions but it can be expanded in principle to an unlimited number of dimensions. This is a 2 dimensional experiment. Now it’s perhaps a bit difficult for some of you to see what is happening. Let me just try to be simple. You have here T1 and T2. T2 is the time that runs. Ok, all of us get older every second that passes today. And in my age that goes much faster than for some of you. But it goes for all of us. So when we perform an experiment, for example with an ensemble of nuclear spins, everything is in principle in equilibrium. We can perturb this equilibrium and study how the system behaves. And we follow this for a long time. So this is just the time. The experiment may last for 100 milliseconds or so. And we perturb the system. I don’t need to go into details. What happens then is that we observe an oscillation of certain parameters that we measure. Now, the idea that leads to 2 dimensional and higher dimensional spectroscopy is to create an artificial second time axis. And this is done in the following way. You perturb the system. Perturbing means that I take a hammer and hit and then wait for a certain time and hit again, ok? Now, then the response to the second hammer hit will depend on the length of time that passes between the first hammer and the second hammer because the system starts, as we say, to evolve and depending on the length of this time T1 we will start this recording. Is it here or here or here? And if we now repeat this experiment 100 times, that is we change this time T1 100 times, then we have created a second time axis which is perpendicular to the normal running time. And the 2 dimensional Fourier transformation then gets us into the 2 dimensional frequency space. And Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1991 for having worked out these principles and realised the first 2 dimensional NMR experiments. So that’s big fish number 3. When you then look more closely at the 2 dimensional or higher dimensional spectrum of a protein, then you see that there is an awful lot of information. This is a so called contour plot. This is now what I get after I resolved that series of overlapping lines in the 1 dimensional spectrum into 2 dimensions. And this is clearly enough information to define a 3 dimensional protein structure. And all it needed from thereon was to develop mathematical tools that could calculate the 3 dimensional structure from this array of NMR peaks that we have seen in this picture. So from here distance geometry techniques get us to here. And from here you then go to Stockholm. So these are the 3 big fish. So the first one is to have observed the phenomenon of NMR by physicists. At the time I met Felix Bloch many times later. He was already retired at the time, lived in Zurich. He did not expect that NMR would yield interesting data other than some new insights into the structure and properties of nuclei. So pure physics. Then we got the development of magnetic resonance imaging by applying field gradients across macroscopic objects. Very clearly, just an application of the basic principle of NMR. And then we got to the point where we could unravel highly complex spectra by introducing artificial new time dimensions into the experiment. I told you there is an additional big fish. Now I am going all the way back to Albert Einstein. I am talking about the Brownian motion and its impact on NMR in solution. What Albert Einstein did in 1905, in addition to sidecars like relativity theory and the likes, he analysed the Brownian motion of particles suspended in liquids at ambient temperature. And it was also pretty much the start of statistical mechanics. So, you only look at the right hand side of my slide here. And what it shows is the behaviour of a small sphere and the behaviour of a large sphere when immersed in a liquid. If we have a small sphere then under the thermal motion of the much smaller solvent molecules, that sphere changes direction and it also changes rotational movements stochastically at a relatively high frequency. When you have a large sphere, its inertia is much larger and it reacts with much lower frequency to the onslaught of the thermally agitated solvent molecules. For NMR this means that we are in a completely different regime of spin physics when we have low frequency Brownian motion or when we have high frequency Brownian motion. And this is what Albert Einstein worked out in 1905 when he was a clerk in the patent office in Bern. And he comes up with the key (that) is that he described the behaviour of molecules with regard to rotational Brownian motion in terms of a correlation time tauC which governs all essential parameters that enable both MRI and studies of large molecules in solution. So Albert Einstein contributes directly to the wellbeing of dozens of football players in Brazil these days. You can introduce the findings of Einstein into the description of NMR experiments by single transition basis operators. This led more recently to transverse relaxation optimised spectroscopy. It led to breaking size barriers -you see here a rather large protein complex. The GroEL-GroES-ADP complex- and gives a rather nice spectrum when using all these principles of recognising the proper impact of the frequency of Brownian motion on NMR in solution. What are exactly, what does this help us? Why is this a fourth big fish in the field? When we look at human bodies with MRI, we don’t see fat. We don’t see proteins, we don’t see membranes. We only see the water molecules. And this is due to this very simple scheme here that the water molecule is very small. And even in our bodies it moves sufficiently fast so as that it gives a sharp NMR line and we can perform MRI on living human subjects. On the other hand having recognised the TROSY principle we are now able to study membrane proteins with solution NMR. And we have heard yesterday from Doctor Kobilka’s talk that he said again and again: And this is actually my own current research area. I don’t need to go into any details. I am working in a team with Professor Raymond Stevens, a crystallographer. And we joined forces by using crystallography and NMR in much the way that Doctor Kobilka described to you yesterday. I hope that this historical review gave you an idea of how far basic research can be before it yields fruit. Fruit means betterment of human life. But it also means money. MRI today is a huge business. Thousands of machines are operating in hospitals. Ten thousands of high tech jobs have been created. If we go to a congress on MRI which didn’t exist 30 years ago, we have 10,000 participants, 12,000 participants. And when we look at things very closely, we see that some of the basics have been accrued long... I mean in the case of Einstein, the theory of Brownian motion came long before NMR was invented. And I think that today’s trend, especially in the United States, to support only research that promises to go to the bedside the next day inhibits the possibility that 50 years from now we will be able to use novel principles of physics in practical medicine and biomedical research. I should also emphasise that all this research in NMR which brought these results was small scale research. It wasn’t a big project where politicians could put their names on top and advertise their support of science. This was all small group research. And it is exactly this kind of work that is very poorly supported these days. I’m afraid that we will suffer from this in the decades to come. Thank you. Applause.

Danke, ich freue mich, hier zu sein. Warum eine persönliche Sicht? Weil ich wie jeder von uns meine eigenen Beiträge überbewerte. Mein Vortrag beginnt in 20 Minuten. Und ich gehe davon aus, dass in 20 Minuten Hunderte Menschen kommen, um mich zu hören. Deshalb werde ich langsam sprechen, damit auch diese Nachzügler etwas davon mitbekommen. Die Kernspinresonanz oder NMR ist eine Technik, die uns heute viele interessante Informationen liefern kann. NMR steht für "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance", nicht für "No Meaningful Results" oder "No More Research". Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, die zur Erforschung des Menschen eingesetzt werden kann. Und es kann genutzt werden um Moleküle zu erforschen. Und heute gehen wir davon aus, dass NMR uns in der Chemie die Entscheidung über Strukturen ermöglicht, dass NMR etwas über das Vorhandensein von allen Atomen in einem solchen Molekül aussagen kann. Es kann ein größeres Molekül oder ein kleineres Molekül sein. Es kann das Ergebnis von synthetischer Chemie sein, wenn der Chemiker etwas über die Koinzidenz von erwarteten und tatsächlichen Ergebnissen seiner Arbeit erfahren möchte. Das spezielle Molekül, das ich Ihnen zeige, ist Cyclosporin A. Es war entscheidend für die Anfänge der Transplantationsmedizin. Es ist das erste brauchbare Immunsuppressivum, das tatsächlich den Start der Transplantationsmedizin ermöglichte und zudem ein großer wirtschaftlicher Erfolg wurde. Was kann NMR als Nächstes bewirken? Wir bewegen uns jetzt von der Chemie zur Strukturbiologie. NMR kann uns zeigen, wo unser Wirkstoffmolekül - das hier ist wieder Cyclosporin A - an bestimmte Stellen in Zellen bindet, in diesem Fall in der menschlichen Zelle. Und hier sehen Sie den primären Rezeptor. Das ist ein kleines Protein, Cyclophilin. Und so kann uns NMR etwas über die Struktur des Komplexes zeigen, der vom Wirkstoffmolekül und seinem Rezeptor gebildet wird. Haben wir erst einmal ein solches Resultat, können wir den Wirkstoff von seiner Bindungsstelle lösen und detailliert die Kontakte untersuchen, die der Wirkstoff mit seinem Rezeptor eingeht. Und dann können wir uns wieder an die Chemiker wenden und ihnen sagen: Es passt nicht richtig in diesen Spalt. Schneide es ab und überprüfe, ob du bestimmte Eigenschaften des Arzneimittels verbessern kannst, damit die Nebenwirkungen reduziert werden, die bei einem Arzneimittel unumgänglich sind, aber auf ein Minimum reduziert werden sollten." Das ist einer der Bereiche, in denen wir die NMR-Technik heute umfassend einsetzen. Ein anderer Bereich sind Bildgebungsverfahren, ein völlig anderer Ansatz. Dort bewegen wir uns auch in völlig anderen Größenordnungen. Das ist ein Knie, übrigens mein eigenes. Sie sehen ...Andere zeigen normalerweise ihre Köpfe, aber aufgrund meines Hauptberufs spielen die Knie eine wesentlich wichtigere Rolle als andere Teile meines Körpers. Sie alle wollen doch einen Nobelpreis bekommen und wir sollten Ihnen zeigen, wie das geht. Das ist gar nicht so leicht. Wesentlich einfacher ist es, die Vergangenheit vorherzusagen. Deshalb erzähle ich Ihnen, wie das im Fall von NMR gewesen ist. Es gibt sechs Nobelpreisträger, die den Nobelpreis für NMR bekommen haben. Und zu allererst ...Wenn man den Preis erhalten will, muss man sein Fachgebiet richtig wählen. Nachdem die Schweiz gestern so schmerzhaft gegen Argentinien verloren hat, hat mich das wieder einmal darin bestätigt, dass ich vor 50 Jahren die richtige Entscheidung getroffen habe, nämlich nicht weiter im Hauptberuf Fußball zu spielen, sondern im Bereich von NMR tätig zu werden - denn von sechs NMR-Nobelpreisen gingen drei an Schweizer Wissenschaftler, während die Schweiz nie auch nur eine einzige Fußballweltmeisterschaft gewonnen oder auch nur fast gewonnen hätte. Wichtig ist also die richtige Wahl des Tätigkeitsfeldes. Egal, ob es der Nobelpreis ist. Man sollte glücklich sein, ein zufriedenes Leben führen. Und wenn Sie in Argentinien leben, so würde ich Ihnen empfehlen, eher Fußball zu spielen als in die Naturwissenschaften zu gehen. Als Nächstes muss man sichtbar sein. Ich lebe in Argentinien. Wenn ich nicht Fußball spiele, gehe ich angeln. Im Lago Escondido in der Nähe von Bariloche in den argentinischen Anden habe ich recht ansehnliche Forellen gefangen. Und in Bariloche gibt es ein sehr berühmtes Institut für Theoretische Physik, an dem viele führende Physiker Europas einen Teil des Jahres verbringen. Diese Fische sind ganz lecker, aber ziemlich klein. Und Stockholm ist weit weg. Und im Winter ist es dunkel, weshalb die Schweden diese Fische möglicherweise gar nicht sehen können. Wenn die Chance bestehen soll, dass das Nobelkomittee den Fisch tatsächlich wahrnimmt, muss man also große Fische fangen. Und ich erzähle Ihnen jetzt etwas über die drei "großen Fische", die mit einem Nobelpreis für NMR ausgezeichnet wurden. Und dann gibt es noch einen vierten großen Fisch, der die Grundlage für das alles ist. NMR begann mit dem Schweizer Physiker Felix Bloch und dem amerikanischen Physiker Edward Purcell, die beide in den Vereinigten Staaten tätig waren. Innerhalb weniger Wochen entdeckten sie unabhängig voneinander das Phänomen der kernmagnetischen Resonanz. Das war allerdings kein "Alles oder Nichts"-Durchbruch. Vorher hatte es bereits verschiedene Experimente, etwa von einem Physiker namens Rabi oder einem weiteren Physiker Namens Stern gegeben, die so genannte Strahlexperimente durchführten, die schon andeuteten, dass eine Kernspinresonanz vorkommen kann. Bloch und Purcell führten allerdings das erste Experiment durch. Worin besteht das Phänomen der Kernspinresonanz? Wir gehen einmal vom einfachsten Fall aus, nämlich einem Wasserstoffatom, wie es beispielsweise in Wasser zu finden ist. Ein Wasserstoffatom hat einen Spin. Der Kern des Wasserstoffatoms hat einen Spin. Und in einer quantenmechanischen Beschreibung gibt es einen Spin von 1/2. Und dieser hat zwei sogenannte Eigenzustände. Dieser Kern kann also in zwei unterschiedlichen Formen existieren. Die eine wird durch einen nach oben zeigenden Pfeil, die andere durch einen nach unten zeigenden Pfeil angezeigt. Oder sie werden als Beta oder Alpha bezeichnet. Die entsprechenden Quantenzahlen lauten -1/2 und +1/2. Hier im Publikum können wir nicht zwischen den beiden Zuständen unterscheiden, da Sie nur dem Magnetfeld der Erde unterliegen und das ist so schwach, dass man keinen Energieunterschied zwischen den beiden Zuständen feststellen kann. Platziert man aber das zu untersuchende Material, in diesem Fall die Wasserstoffatome, in einem starken Magnetfeld, das eine halbe Million Mal so stark ist wie das Magnetfeld der Erde, wird die Entartung sichtbar, das heißt, man hat jetzt zwei Zustände, die sich energetisch voneinander unterscheiden. Die Energiedifferenz lässt sich erklären, das ist Delta E, sie kann als Frequenz, als Radiofrequenz ausgedrückt werden. Wenn Sie ein Radio einschalten, haben Sie die gleiche Art von Wellenlängen, die wir in unseren NMR-Experimenten verwenden. Entscheidend ist, dass diese Größe der Energieverteilung im Verhältnis zum angewandten Magnetfeld steht. Wir können also entscheiden, wie groß diese Energiedifferenz sein soll und bei welcher Frequenz Übergänge zwischen diesen beiden energetisch unterschiedlichen Zuständen vorkommen sollen. Wenn wir das angewandte Feld verändern, verringert sich dieser Unterschied etwas. Wenn wir es vergrößern, vergrößert es sich etwas. Diese Entdeckung war die erste dieser drei großen NMR-Fische. Kommen wir jetzt zum zweiten Fisch. Im Vortrag von Peter Agre haben Sie das Wassermolekül ja schon gesehen. Das ist eine einfache Struktur. Es gibt zwei Wasserstoffatome, in Weiß, und das rötlich-blaue Sauerstoffatom. Im NMR-Experiment sehen wir den Sauerstoff nicht, wir sehen nur die beiden Wasserstoffe. Und aufgrund der Symmetrie der Molekülstruktur können wir die beiden nicht voneinander unterscheiden. Deshalb erhalten wir eine einzelne Linie in einem Spektrum. Diese Linie ...Da ich genügend Zeit habe, gehe ich noch einmal zurück. Diese Linie repräsentiert exakt diese Energiedifferenz hinsichtlich der Frequenz, bei der wir diesen Höchstwert beobachten. Und hier kommt die zündende Idee ins Spiel, die zur Verwendung des NMR-Phänomens für makroskopische Bildgebungsverfahren in der medizinischen Diagnose führte. Auf eine makroskopische Struktur, wie den menschlichen Kopf oder das vorher dargestellte Knie wendet man jetzt eine Variation des Feldes an, den so genannten Feldgradienten, durch dieses makroskopische Objekt. Jetzt besteht auf dem linken Auge eine andere Energieverteilung als auf dem rechten Auge, weil die angewandten Magnetfelder unterschiedlich sind. Obwohl wir ausschließlich das Wassermolekül betrachten - das Innere unseres Kopfes besteht zum großen Teil, rund 80%, aus Wasser - können wir zwischen dem Wasser in diesem Teil des Kopfes und diesem hier unterscheiden. Und dann wiederholen wir das Ganze senkrecht zu dieser Fläche und in der dritten Dimension und mit einigen mathematischen Verfahren können wir dann das Bild erstellen. Das ist also der "große Fisch" - die Feststellung, dass man, wenn man über das makroskopische Objekt fährt, zwischen dem Wasser am linken Auge und dem Wasser am rechten Auge unterscheiden kann. Es ist das gleiche. Man kann zwischen den beiden Ohren unterscheiden, obwohl man immer das Wasser betrachtet. Und diesen großen Fisch gefangen haben Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield, die 2003 den Nobelpreis für Medizin und Physiologie erhielten. Lassen Sie mich ...Ich könnte auch sagen, dass vier von uns den Nobelpreis für NMR in neuer Zeit erhalten haben. Und wir haben alle in beiden Bereichen gearbeitet, Spektroskopie und Bildgebungsverfahren. Lassen Sie mich gerade erzählen, wie wir zum Bildgebungsverfahren kamen. Das war relativ zu Anfang in den 1980er-Jahren. Und es war nicht gerade einfach, an einen ausreichend großen Magneten zu kommen, um den Körper eines Erwachsenen darin unterbringen zu können. Deshalb hatten wir einen kleinen Magneten und arbeiteten in der Kinderklinik in Zürich. Zwei meiner Doktoranden, Chris Bösch und Rolf Grütter, sind heute führende Wissenschaftler auf diesem Gebiet in Schweizer Krankenhäusern. Wir beschlossen, mit Neugeborenen zu arbeiten. Das Schwierigste daran war, den Zustand der Neugeborenen im Magneten zu überwachen, weil Neugeborene mit Geburtstrauma sehr instabil sind und alle lebenswichtigen Funktionen kontinuierlich überwacht werden müssen. Und die Kinder waren so schwach, dass wir auch keine Arzneimittel zur Ruhigstellung verwenden konnten. Deshalb baten wir die Eltern, die Kinder in den Schlaf zu wiegen. Und die waren extrem verunsichert und aufgeschreckt, wenn sie ihre Kleinen in einem Magneten verschwinden sahen. Deshalb dachte sich Chris Bösch dieses Märchenhaus aus, in dem der Magnet dann untergebracht war. Das Baby wird hier in das Gerät gefahren und die Eltern waren sehr erleichtert, wenn ihr Baby in einem Märchenhaus statt in einem Eisenkernmagneten verschwand. Das Ergebnis der Untersuchung war oft sehr schmerzlich. Hier sehen Sie die Darstellung des Kopfes eines 17 Tage alten Mädchens mit heftigem mechanischen Geburtstrauma, das in diesem Bereich des Schädels ein riesiges Hämatom verursacht hatte. Natürlich eine sehr traurige Geschichte. Aber solche Dinge kamen vor, als wir vor vielen Jahren mit MRI anfingen. Ich komme jetzt zum dritten großen Fisch. Das ist die Arbeit, die zur Anwendung von NMR in der Strukturbiologie führte. Das in diesem Bereich zu lösende Problem war ein ganz anderes als das, was man mit der Darstellung makroskopischer Objekte versuchte. Hier haben wir es nicht mit Wassermolekülen zu tun, die in jeder spektroskopischen Technik eine einzelne Linie ergeben, sondern mit Makromolekülen wie bei diesem wunderbaren Gemälde von Geis aus den 1960er-Jahren. Das ist Cytochrom C. Ich mag diese Bilder aus den Zeiten, bevor man Moleküle mit Computerprogrammen darzustellen begann. Irving Geis war ein Maler, der in den 1960er- und 1970er-Jahren all die frühen dreidimensionalen Strukturen von Proteinen und Nukleinsäuren darstellte. Erst in den 1980er-Jahren waren dann die Computer so langsam in der Lage, ähnliche, wenn auch nicht ganz so schöne Darstellungen zu erzeugen. Es geht darum, dass hier nicht nur eine Art von Wasserstoffatom vorhanden ist, sondern chemisch sehr verschiedene Atomarten. Deshalb ergibt sich keine einzelne Linie, sondern ein kompliziertes Spektrum. Das hier ist einfach eine normale Skalenbreite, die der Frequenz entspricht, bei der wir die Signale beobachten. Und in diesem speziellen Fall erkennen wir einige gut aufgelöste Signale, die aber nur in diesem Fall exakt sechs Wasserstoffatomen entsprechen, während wir hier überlappende Signale von rund 400 NMR-Signalen haben. Aus der Analyse dieser gut aufgelösten Linien wussten wir, dass die Informationen zur Ermittlung dreidimensionaler Strukturen zur Verfügung standen. Aber wir erhielten keine Informationen aus diesem Teil, der die meisten Resonanzen enthält. Der "große Fisch" bestand nun darin, von einer auf zwei Dimensionen überzugehen. Statt einer Anordnung dieser gesamten Linien auf einer einzelnen Achse erhält man eine zweidimensionale Fläche. Jetzt bewegen sich hier einzelne Linien aus diesem Durcheinander heraus und werden hier in dieser zweidimensionalen Fläche gut voneinander getrennt dargestellt. Das war der Beginn der zweidimensionalen NMR-Technik. Die ersten Versuchsserien fanden um das Jahr 1982 statt. COSY, NOESY, SECSY und FOCSY. Die heißen tatsächlich so. SECSY steht für "Spin-echo Correlated Spectroscopy". Im Vergleich zu den Bezeichnungen, die wir beispielsweise in der Immunologie kennen, ist das doch relativ geradlinig. Was steckt nun hinter der multidimensionalen NMR-Technik? Ich sage "multidimensional", weil es zwar ursprünglich zweidimensional war, wir aber heute bei der Ermittlung einer NMR-Struktur eines Proteins zwei fünfdimensionale, ein vierdimensionales und drei dreidimensionale Experimente benutzen. Das Prinzip, das ich erklären werde, ist also nicht auf zwei Dimensionen begrenzt, sondern lässt sich grundsätzlich auf eine unbegrenzte Anzahl von Dimensionen erweitern. Das hier ist ein zweidimensionales Experiment. Vielleicht ist nicht für alle zu sehen, was hier passiert. Ich versuche das einfach zu erklären. Hier gibt es t1 und t2. t2 ist die verstreichende Zeit. Wir alle werden mit jeder Sekunde etwas älter. Und in meinem Alter geht das noch viel schneller als bei einigen von Ihnen. Aber es gilt für uns alle. Wenn wir beispielsweise ein Experiment mit einem Kernspin-Ensemble durchführen, ist im Prinzip alles im Gleichgewicht. Wir können das Gleichgewicht stören und untersuchen, wie sich das System verhält. Und wir verfolgen das dann eine lange Zeit. Das hier ist also einfach die Zeit. Das Experiment kann z. B. 100 Millisekunden andauern. Und wir stören das System. Ich brauche nicht ins Detail zu gehen. Und dann beobachten wir die Oszillation bestimmter Parameter, die wir messen. Die Idee, die hinter der zweidimensionalen und höherdimensionalen Spektroskopie steckt, ist es, eine künstliche zweite Zeitachse zu schaffen, indem man das System stört. Stören bedeutet, dass man einen Hammer nimmt und schlägt, dann eine bestimmte Zeit wartet und erneut schlägt. Die Reaktion auf den zweiten Hammerschlag hängt von der Länge der Zeit ab, die zwischen dem erstem und dem zweiten Hammerschlag vergeht, weil das System, wie wir sagen, sich zu entwickeln beginnt. Und abhängig von der Länge dieser Zeit t1 beginnen wir mit der Erfassung. Ist das hier oder hier oder hier? Und wenn wir dieses Experiment 100 Mal wiederholen, also diese Zeit t1 einhundert Mal verändern, haben wir eine zweite Zeitachse geschaffen, die senkrecht zur normalen Laufzeit verläuft. Und mit der zweidimensionalen Fourier-Transformation sind wir im zweidimensionalen Frequenzbereich. Für die Ausarbeitung dieser Grundsätze erhielt Richard Ernst 1991 den Nobelpreis in Chemie. Er führte auch die ersten zweidimensionalen NMR-Experimente durch. Das war also der große Fisch Nr. 3. Wenn man sich das zwei- oder höherdimensionale Spektrum eines Proteins genauer anschaut, erkennt man eine Menge an Informationen. Hier sehen Sie ein so genanntes Konturdiagramm. Das ist das Ergebnis, nachdem ich diese Serie von überlappenden Linien im eindimensionalen Spektrum in zwei Dimensionen aufgelöst habe. Und diese Informationen reichen definitiv aus, um eine dreidimensionale Proteinstruktur zu definieren. Und dann brauchte man nur noch mathematische Werkzeuge zu entwickeln, die die dreidimensionale Struktur aus diesem Spektrum von NMR-Peaks berechnen, die in diesem Bild zu sehen waren. Diesen Schritt haben uns Distanzgeometrie-Rechnungen ermöglicht. Und von dort ging es dann weiter nach Stockholm. Das also sind die drei großen Fische. Der erste bestand darin, dass Physiker das NMR-Phänomen beobachtet hatten. Als ich Felix Bloch sehr viel später einmal traf, war er bereits pensioniert und lebte in Zürich. Er hätte niemals erwartet, dass die NMR-Technik außer einigen neuen Erkenntnissen über die Struktur und die Eigenschaften von Zellkernen interessante Daten liefern würde. Also reine Physik. Dann erfolgte die Weiterentwicklung der Kernspintomographie durch Anwendung von Feldgradienten auf makroskopische Objekte. Das war ganz klar einfach eine Anwendung des Grundprinzips von NMR. Und so konnten wir äußerst komplexe Spektren entwirren, in dem künstliche, neue Zeitdimensionen in das Experiment eingebracht wurden. Ich erwähnte bereits einen weiteren "großen Fisch". Und dazu gehe ich zurück bis zu Albert Einstein. Ich spreche über die Brownsche Bewegung und ihre Auswirkung auf NMR in Lösung. die Brownsche Bewegung von in Flüssigkeit suspendierten Teilchen bei Umgebungstemperatur. Und das war so ziemlich der Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Schauen Sie sich nur die rechte Seite dieser Folie hier an. Zu sehen ist dort das Verhalten der kleinen Kugelfläche und der großen Kugelfläche, die in eine Flüssigkeit eingetaucht wird. Bei einer kleinen Kugelfläche ändert diese Kugelfläche unter der thermischen Bewegung der wesentlich kleineren Lösungsmittelmoleküle die Richtung und zudem die Drehbewegungen stochastisch bei einer relativ hohen Frequenz. Bei einer großen Kugelfläche ist die Trägheit wesentlich größer. Sie reagiert mit einer wesentlich geringeren Frequenz auf den Angriff der thermisch agitierten Lösungsmittelmoleküle. Für NMR bedeutet das, dass wir uns in einem vollständig anderen System der Spinphysik bewegen, abhängig davon, ob wir eine niederfrequente Brownsche Bewegung oder eine hochfrequente Brownsche Bewegung haben. Und das hat Albert Einstein 1905 ausgearbeitet, als er als Sachbearbeiter beim Patentamt in Bern tätig war. Und er lieferte damit den Schlüssel, indem er das Verhalten von Molekülen in Bezug zur Brownsche Drehbewegung im Sinne einer Korrelationszeit TauC lieferte, die alle wesentlichen Parameter steuert, die sowohl MRI als auch die Analyse großer Moleküle in Lösung ermöglichen. Albert Einstein hat also direkt zum Wohlergehen dutzender Fußballspieler in Brasilien in diesen Tagen beigetragen. Die Ergebnisse von Einstein lassen sich durch einzelne Übergangsbasisoperatoren in die Beschreibung von NMR-Experimenten integrieren. Das hat in jüngerer Zeit zur transversalen relaxationsoptimierten Spektroskopie geführt. Dadurch konnten Größenhindernisse überwunden werden - Sie sehen hier einen ziemlich großen Proteinkomplex. Der GroEL-GroES-ADP-Komplex - und ergibt das dann ein ziemlich schönes Spektrum wenn man all diese Grundsätze der richtig erkannten Auswirkungen der Frequenz der Brownsche Bewegung auf NMR in Lösung anwendet. Wie kann das für uns von Nutzen sein? Warum ist das der vierte "große Fisch" auf diesem Gebiet? Wenn wir einen menschlichen Körper mit MRI betrachten, sehen wir kein Fett. Wir sehen keine Proteine, wir sehen keine Membranen. Wir sehen nur die Wassermoleküle. Und das hängt sehr einfach damit zusammen, dass das Wassermolekül sehr klein ist. Und selbst in unserem Körper bewegt es sich schnell genug, um eine scharfe NMR-Linie zu erzeugen, so dass wir MRI an lebenden Menschen durchführen können. Nachdem das TROSY-Prinzip entdeckt wurde, sind wir jetzt in der Lage, Membranproteine mit NMR in Lösung zu untersuchen. Und gestern hat Dr. Kobilka in seinem Vortrag mehrfach gesagt: wenn wir die Funktionsweise von komplexen Molekülen wie GPCR (G-Protein gekoppelte Rezeptoren) verstehen wollen." Das ist mein derzeitiges Forschungsgebiet. Ich möchte das hier nicht vertiefen. Ich arbeite in einem Team mit Professor Raymond Stevens, einem Kristallographen, zusammen. Und gemeinsam nutzen wir die Kristallographie und NMR in ähnlicher Weise, die Dr. Kobilka Ihnen das gestern beschrieben hat. Ich hoffe, dass diese historische Übersicht Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon vermitteln konnte, wie weit Grundlagenforschung geht, bevor sie Früchte trägt. Mit Früchten ist eine Verbesserung des menschlichen Lebens gemeint. Aber es bedeutet auch Geld. MRI ist heute ein Riesengeschäft. In den Krankenhäusern sind Tausende solcher Geräte im Einsatz. Dadurch wurden zehntausende Hightech-Arbeitsplätze geschaffen. Kongresse zum Thema MRI, die vor 30 Jahren überhaupt noch nicht existierten, werden von 10.000 bis 12.000 Teilnehmern besucht. Und bei genauerer Betrachtung ist zu erkennen, dass einige der Grundlagen dafür vor langer Zeit geschaffen wurden ... In Einsteins Fall ... die Theorie der Brownschen Bewegung wurde lange vor der Erfindung von NMR entwickelt. Der heute insbesondere in den USA zu spürende Trend, nur Forschung zu unterstützen, die sich sofort am Krankenbett umsetzen lässt, verhindert meiner Ansicht nach die Möglichkeit, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sind, neuartige physikalische Prinzipien in der praktischen Medizin und in der biomedizinischen Forschung einzusetzen. Ich sollte auch noch erwähnen, dass die gesamte NMR-Forschung, die zu diesen Ergebnissen geführt hat, im Rahmen kleiner Forschungsprojekte erfolgt ist. Das war kein Riesenprojekt, das sich Politiker auf ihre Fahnen schreiben konnten und mit dem sie Werbung für ihre Unterstützung der Wissenschaften machen konnten. Das waren alles kleine Forschungsarbeiten. Und genau diese Art von Arbeit wird heute wenig unterstützt. Ich befürchte, dass wir die Folgen in den nächsten Jahrzehnten zu spüren bekommen werden. Danke. Applaus.

Kurt Wüthrich: Two-Dimensional NMR as a Prerequisite for Protein Elucidation - Wüthrich on the Achievements of Ernst

(00:19:37 - 00:25:39)

 

From Molecules to Medical Diagnosis

Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy could also be applied to imaging, and this paved the way to the invention of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for medical diagnosis. In the 1970s, the decade that witnessed the successful introduction of computer tomography, this invention was initiated and brought forward against the reluctance of both the scientific and the radiologic community with an enormous energy and persistence by Paul Lauterbur, a professor of chemistry at the State University of New York in Stony Brook, and facilitated in its technical applicability by Peter Mansfield, a professor of physics at the University of Nottingham. Two years after both scientists had shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, they both lectured in Lindau in 2005, Lauterbur on „From molecules to mice and back again” and Mansfield on “Real-time MRI: Echo-planar imaging”. Unfortunately, both presentations have not been recorded. To introduce the invention of MRI, we therefore rely again on Richard Ernst and Kurt Wüthrich and watch their brief descriptions of this ingenious technology:

Richard Ernst (2006) - Fourier Methods in Spectroscopy. From Monsieur Fourier to Medical Imaging

Dear friends, I'm enormously enjoying this year's Lindau meeting. Especially talking to you, my dear young enthusiastic and promising scientist friends. Among the lectures, so far, I particularly liked those that went beyond traditional science and revealed also the societal context. And in fact last year, at the same place here, I was talking about academic opportunities for conceiving and shaping our future. And in this context I made some rather strong and perhaps even offensive statements, for example condemning egoism as the driving force of all our actions, where we always ask ourselves what do we gain back from doing something. And rather promoting responsibility as the driving force, where we ask: What can we do in order that society profits something of it? And my lecture ended then with two quotes, one from François Rabelais: Or "Science without conscience ruins the soul." And on the other side, despite all the misery in our world, we have to remain optimist because we all together are jointly responsible for what will come in the future, we can't blame anybody else. So today I don't want to make any offensive statements and I will try to be a good boy and just tell you a small story, a purely scientific story: "From Monsieur Fourier to medical imaging." And in fact I like to demonstrate to you Fourier Transformation as a beautiful example how useful mathematics can be in the sciences. But, as usual, the inventor of Fourier Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptist-Joseph Fourier, he didn't know that today, at the beginning of a lecture, you could even peek into the head of the speaker in order to verify whether it's worthwhile to listen to his lecture, because all I can tell you is contained in this little sloppy piece of tissue here. So a lot of development went on from here to there. And I'd like to ask the question: Why is the Fourier Transformation so important in science? It's a very simple expression, it's an integral transform where we transform a function in time domain into a function in frequency domain. So we relate these two domains here by this integral transform. Or we can relate a momentum space to the geometric space, a function of K, of momentum and related to a function of coordinates. It has something to do with exploration of nature in general. When we explore an object, we consider it as a black box, we don't know what is inside and we try to perturb it. We knock at the input here and listen to the output. And that tells us what is inside. And actually a very unnatural way of exploring a black box is to apply a sine wave, a repetitive perturbation, and then listening to the output here. And I mean, just remember the lecture of Professor Hänsch two days ago, he told you that never measure anything but frequency. And that's exactly what we try to do in order to characterise the inside of this black box. And that makes sense because actually these trigonometric functions, they are Eigenfunctions of linear time-invariant systems. So whenever we apply such a function to a black box, which is linear and time-invariant, we get the same function back, multiplied with a certain complex quantity, which is, in quantum mechanical terms, the Eigenvalue, the Eigenfunction multiplied by the Eigenvalue. And if we block this Eigenvalue as a function of frequency, if we vary the frequency, we obtain the spectrum, that's the basis of spectroscopy, so it really makes sense. Now, we can do spectroscopy just in the normal way, applying one frequency after the other and measuring the response and blocking the amplitudes here as a function of frequency, that gives us a spectrum. But we could also do it in parallel, apply all these frequencies at once to the black box and saving time. Then we need something like a frequency sorter which sorts us out the various responses in order to again get the spectrum. And this frequency sort, that's after all nothing else than a Fourier Transformation. And by doing it in parallel here, we gain by the Multiplex Advantage, having done everything at the same time, often called also the Fellgett's Advantage. That's the advantage of going this way here. And the secret of the Fourier Transformation actually is also the orthogonality of the trigonometric function, when you multiple one with the other and integrate over this entire space, then you only get something when the two functions are identical. So they are orthogonal. And this allows one to separate them. And the simultaneous application of all these frequencies that can for example be implemented by a pulse. If you are by a pulse, then you have essentially all the frequencies contained, you obtain an impulse response. You have to do a Fourier Transformation and you obtain a spectrum, so simple. So again we have, so to say, two spaces here, which we relate, conjugate variables, the time and the frequency variable. The momentum space and the coordinate space, which are connected. There are, so to say, two different views of the same object. You can look at that in red colour or in green colour, and Heisenberg has said that a long time ago, that the most fruitful developments have happened whenever two different kinds of thinking were meeting. So these are the two different spaces. Or I mean, Professor Glauber, he has been telling you about waves and particles, this relation also belongs to the same category. And he also mentioned Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", and he has here the yin yang symbol, this also represents this two spaces which, so to say, contains the same truth. The whole world of Fourier transforms in spectroscopy is like complex. There are many different possibilities. In particular because actually what we are looking at is not just a function of time or a function of momentum, but it's set both at the same time, depending on four different variables, it is a plain wave, which develops in time and it develops in space. And so we can either use the time dependence, make a time domain experiment and finally obtain a spectrum. We can also use the K variables, the momentum variable and obtain, here for example the image of a molecule, that's the x-ray diffraction. We can do imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, which also uses this K dependence as the Fourier transform obtains an image of a head. And finally we can do for example interferometry, where we use the R dependence, we measure the interference in spatial domain, Fourier transform it and obtain again a spectrum, for example an infrared spectrum. So these are these various possibilities, which I briefly would like to describe. And everything goes back to this gentleman Monsieur Fourier. Who was Monsieur Fourier? That's him. He was at the same time, and that's a very, very great exception, at the same time a scientist and a politician. I mean, there are very, very few politicians who understand anything of science and there are very few scientists who are interested in politics. But he is, so to say, my role model, he has the same in him combined. And even, I mean, here he is in his office in Grenoble, and instead of studying his legal papers, he is doing a physics experiment, he actually measures here heat conduction, and he was writing at the same time a paper, which he presented actually at the Institute de France, being prefect to the département Isère. He was writing a book, 1822, on theory of, théorie analytique de la chaleur, heat conduction. And he did experiments and also this kind of input-output experiments. He had a black box here, a blue box, applying heat from the left side and measuring then the temperature distribution in the body. So it's again this input-output relation, he expanded the input in the Fourier Series and reconstituted the result again from a Spatial Fourier Series. So he used for the first time this Fourier expressions, of course he didn't call them Fourier expressions, but anyway, here they are in his book of 1822. Whenever somebody claims to have discovered something, of course it's interesting to ask what has developed out of that, but you also have to ask who was before, and there is always somebody before. And very few inventors really invented something for the first time. So for example Leonhard Euler, if you go through the text books of Fourier transform, you know you'll discover the Euler equations for the Fourier coefficients. These equations here, which I showed before, these are called Euler equations, so Euler must have contributed something. And indeed he did that already in 1777, and even before in 1729 he used trigonometric functions for interpolating functions and that's a reason why he's here on a Swiss bill, obviously he was Swiss, and otherwise I wouldn't speak about this to you. So indeed the Fourier transform is a Swiss invention, keep that in mind. So, I mean, we should come back to spectroscopy now. I mean, there is a huge range of different frequencies, from the gamma rays to the radio frequency and you can use all of them to do the spectroscopic explorations of nature. And you have the tree of knowledge and you like to go from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine, of course this is the most important level here for the true understanding of nature. Whenever you can explain a medical phenomenon in terms of chemical reactions, then you understand it, you normally don't have to go back to physics. That's the level. But I mean, in order to climb on the tree and come safely down again you need a tool, you need a ladder, spectroscopy serves that purpose. Anyway, the first time something like that, in connection with Fourier Transformations, has been used, was this gentleman, Michelson. He has also been mentioned in the lecture by Professor Hänsch, and Michelson, he invented the interferometer, so he has two light beams, or essentially one light beam, which is split in two parts, one part going to this moveable mirror and the other to the static mirror, coming back, being combined again. And there is an interference occurring here, so that's the machine as it happens here. Let's look at it in a little bit more detail. So again, the incoming wave here being split into a blue part, a red part and they are coming back and here, in this particular case, the two waves being reflected from the two mirrors are in phase, so there is constructive interference. If you move now this mirror slightly, then you get a destructive interference, the two are out of phase and if you add them you get zero. So in this way you can actually get an interference pattern. And that leads to interferometry, and when you have a single frequency, then you get just a single oscillation. If you have two frequencies present at the same time, you get this kind of interference here, between two frequencies, two frequencies with a certain line shape here, you get an attenuation and recovery and you have all these different signals which, when I looked at them first, I thought they are free induction decays from NMR, looks very simile to NMR spectroscopy, but it was done 50 years earlier. Anyway, a modern interferometer works exactly the same way, the source, the sample, which measures absorption or tries to measure absorption. A translucent mirror, mirrors here which reflect a detector value records interference as a function of the placement of the mirror here, to a Fourier transformation and gets a spectrum. The very first time this has been done was in 1951 by Fellgett, therefore the Fellgett advantage. And here the interferogram, here the Fourier transform of it, he had to do it by hand because he didn't have a computer at that time. But today you can buy these commercial instruments and they do the Fourier transformation automatically, and you get beautiful spectra without having to understand what is going on inside of the box. Something similar you can also do with Raman spectroscopy, you know in Raman you irradiate with a single frequency, a laser for example, you measure this captive light here and the frequencies are modified by the internal vibrations of a molecule for example, giving you this additional, so to say, side band of the same frequency here. And this contains now virtually the same as an infrared spectrum. That's a typical Raman, Fourier transform Raman spectrometer, where the same principle is being used. And it just gives me a chance here to tell you something about my passions. And to tell you how important passions are. I use this kind of Fourier Raman spectroscopy for the pigment analysis in central Asian paintings which I have a great love for. For example here you have Raman spectra of different blue pigments and you see just how different they are, you don't have to understand them, you just see they are different and this way you can distinguish indigo from azurite, from smalte and prussian blue and you can now get inside of paintings and identify the pigments. I'm doing painting restoration, so it's important to know what the artist has been using. And in this way you can, without destroying the painting, you can analyse pigments, fascinating. You see, when you want to walk along this road here, your professional road, for example towards Stockholm, then, oh it's so difficult to walk on one single food, you need a second one and the second one, that's your passions. And only when you have passions in addition to science, or whatever you are doing, then this spark will appear in your brain and the creativity occurs, that cross talk between the two legs is very important, keep that in mind. So let's come now to NMR, another application where the interference now happens in time domain. Very simple experiment, you have a nucleus which is recessing in a magnetic field, nuclear magnetic moment, having a frequency being proportion to the applied magnetic field, so in essence measuring the frequencies, you measure local magnetic fields, that has been done the first time in condensed matter by Edward Purcell and Felix Bloch, you can record spectra, like here of alcohol you get three different lines, because the local magnetic fields in the methyl groups, the methylene group and the OH proton here, they are different, so you can distinguish. But it's tedious to record one line after the other, it takes more time than I have for my lecture. So we had an associate in Palo Alto, there was Wes Anderson, he said: "Why not do it in parallel?", invented the multichannel spectrometer, where he irradiated with several frequencies at the same time. He built a multi frequency generator, this so called Prayer Wheel, it never worked, it's now in the Smithsonian museum, but at the same time he had a Swiss slave in his lab. And together with this Swiss slave they thought: ah, it's very easy, I told you everything before. Just apply a pulse, observe a free induction decay, do a Fourier transformation and you have a spectrum in fractions of a second. Here the impulse response of these molecules, the spectrum, and here the spectrum which you would have recorded with a traditional sweep method, the snail crawling through. Anyway, simultaneous excitation leads to sensitivity and you get beautiful spectra. And we felt great, at that time we published it, we thought we were inventors and we didn't know that before Mr. Morozov, he did very similar experiment about six years earlier. Fortunately the committee in Stockholm couldn't read Russian, otherwise you would have to listen now to a lecture in Russian. But anyway, he didn't know why he would do this crazy experiment, I mean, free induction decay, the Fourier transform of it, he didn't recognise that it could gain sensitivity this way, and really shorten the experiment time, I don't know for what reason actually he did it. Anyway, he was the first. So we have now this beautiful spectra, but they are virtually useless. How do I interpret all these lines, you remember Kurt Wüthrich's beautiful lecture, he wanted three-dimensional structures of molecules, and we were working together at that time in Zurich, and so he wanted to go from a primary protein structure to a three-dimensional structure, and the question was how. You need additional information, for example you need this correlation information, you have to relate nuclei, how near together are nuclei in space, how near together are they in the chemical bonding network. And this kind of information gives you really geometric information to get the structure. And so that leads to a correlation diagram where you correlate different nuclei and that could be neighbourhood in space, neighbourhood in chemical bonds, for example nucleus G has something in common with nucleus A, nucleus F has something in common with nucleus C, that leads to two-dimensional spectroscopy. Here all these correlations are being displayed, you can use them to determine structures. And the idea for that goes back to Jean Jeener, he proposed this kind of two-pulse experiment, bang two times on your black box, and in essence you transfer coherence from one mode, one transition in the energy level diagram to another transition in the energy level diagram. And that tells you something about connectivity of the nuclei. And this allows you to get this correlation or cosy spectra here from the Wüthrich group, which allows you then to make assignments of the protons, for example along a poly peptide chain. You need an additional experiment, you need also the through space interactions for this, you use a three-pulse experiment, first again some blue frequencies which are being transformed into red frequency, but here through close relaxations, through the space, depending on the dipolar interaction, so you really can measure distances. That's a complete experiment, that's a two-dimension cosy, a nosey spectrum, you measure the distances here between neighbouring amino acid residues, you can get then the complete set of information, chain coupling information, dipolar couplings, you can make an assignment, false resonance and finally determine geometry. And you are in business. That's the first example which Wüthrich was also mentioning three days ago. And that's why he got his Nobel Prize for this ingenuous technique how to determine three-dimensional structures of biomolecules. Nowadays, when it's going to larger and larger molecules, inventing more and more tricks doing three-dimensional spectroscopy, doing four-dimensional spectroscopy, unfortunately I can't demonstrate the four-dimensional spectrum on this two-dimensional screen. But anyway, pulse sequence is becoming enormously complex, it's like a score of a symphony orchestra, you see the first violin, the second violin, the violas, the cellos and the percussion down here. That's the kind of pulse sequence which we use today, and you say, oh that's much too complicated for me. But even 10 years ago, when you wanted to find a job in industry, Merck research laboratories, you had to have experience in modern 2D, 3D and 4D heteronuclear NMR, otherwise you just were not considered. And today, Wüthrich told you, go up to seven-dimensional spectroscopy, that's important for finding jobs. NMR is also a beautiful example for determining molecular dynamics features. While x-ray diffraction delivers you the most reliable structures of biomolecules. NMR allows you also to go into dynamics and see what happens in a dynamic molecule and, I mean, static molecules, they're so boring, they are dead. Life is dynamics, dynamical molecules, that's where really is interesting chemical reactions, interactions with molecules, for that NMR is a beautiful technique. You have here an example, you have a benzene ring with seven methyl groups attached, you want too much, you think normally there are only places for five substituents, so methyl group number 7 is being chased back and forth here between the different positions and the question is how does it go? Is this methyl group jumping just to the next position step by step, or can it jump also directly into position? For what is a network of exchanges in such a molecule? To just record a two-dimensional spectrum, you have the four resonances here, 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have cross peaks and these cross peaks tell you how the jumps go. For example, if there would be a random exchange between all positions, there would have to be cross peaks everywhere. If there is only a 1-2 bond shift, then these are the circles which you prefer then, you see it fits. So indeed you have immediately determined the mechanism, how this exchange goes, you don't have to understand two-dimensional spectroscopy, it's a beautiful display, tells you everything. I mean, NMR is on the very far end of the spectrum, low frequency, there are other spectra, EPR, microwave spectroscopy, coherent optics, for example. And exactly the same principles apply here also, except that the practical difficulties increase, going to higher frequency. Electron spin resonance is perhaps the most similar technique to NMR, where just an electron spin is coupled to many nuclei, giving a multiplet here, very complicated spectrum which one can analyse with traditional methods or with Fourier methods. If the spectrum is very narrow, like for organic radicals here, one can really use directly the Fourier techniques. For transition metal complexes, the spectra are enormously wide and you cannot cover it with a single radio frequency pulse. But for this organic radicals you can record again an impulse response of free induction decay to the Fourier transform and get the spectrum. Exactly the same, you can get two-dimensional electron spin resonance spectra, so the same principles apply here as in NMR. When you have broad spectra, then you have to do more specialised experiments, I don't have the time to go into that, it goes into endopulse, endoexperiments, I don't want to describe that here, you measure then a modulation of an echo decay, do a Fourier transformation and then an ENDOR, an indirect detected NMR spectrum, but I don't have the time to explain that. And if you want to know more about that you can read this book by Arthur Schweiger and Gunnar Jeschke, Arthur Schweiger unfortunately just died two or three months ago, being less than 50 years old. Anyway, that's his legacy here, you can read about this beautiful experiment. Then, in the same frequency domain, in microwave spectroscopy, you can also do rotational spectroscopy, where molecules are rotating and you're measuring the speed of rotation about different axis, also internal rotations, that's microwave spectroscopy in the true sense, Flygare did the first pulse experiments, you see the free induction decays, you see the Fourier transform of single lines here, so to say, or single multiplets. You can go inside here, determine high resolution spectra, and making particular assignments, assignments of resonance lines which have for example one energy level in common, so this red line and this red line, they must give a cross peak here, somewhere, which tells you that, so you can study connectivity in energy level diagrams by these kind of two-dimensional spectroscopy. And then you can also go to optics, to optical time domain experiments, optical pulses, there are very short pulses, there are picosecond pulses, femtosecond pulses, done in the lab by Robin Hochstrasser here, it's a 4-pulse experiment, to study actually chemical exchange in real time, so to say in a biomolecule. And here the beautiful results, 2-dimensional optical spectra. So again exactly the same principle, it's just a little bit more tricky and more difficult, but gives you this beautiful spectra, which I don't want to interpret. You can apply exactly the same principle to mass spectroscopy. You can do time-resolved experiments here in an ion cyclotron, that's a magnetic field here again. You shoot in ions here, they start to circle around, you excite them by a radio frequency pulse and you measure again a free induction decay, here in mass spectroscopy. And you can for example distinguish here between two ions which have virtually the same mass, there is a very slow interference pattern which you can analyse by a Fourier transformation. You get very highly resolved mass spectra, but you can do that also for complicated molecules, here for a protein or a protein complex actually, which you can investigate by Fourier transform mass spectroscopy. So you see it's the same principle, it's virtually always the same, and it goes on and on and on. Then you can also do diffraction experiments, I mention this dependence on K here, Fourier transforming into real space determines this shape of a molecule. That leads to x-ray diffraction. Again you measure here structure factures in K space and the reciprocal lattice, you fully transform, you get electron densities in geometric space. Again it's the same kind of principles which apply here, here from a book, from x-ray diffraction, you see exactly the same kind of expressions here also occurring. An example in myoglobin, in the background you see the diffractogram and the Fourier transform structure here in front. I mean, you know this beautiful example of Michel, Deisenhofer and Huber, Professor Huber will probably speak about similar subjects this morning. Photosynthetic reaction centre being determined in this way, all relies on Fourier transformation. And finally I am coming to the last possibility, namely imaging. Imaging where you do an experiment which is very similar to diffraction. But you do it here in a slightly different way, you do it with magnetic resonance, with NMR, and you can in this way peek inside into the body. For example of your boyfriend, if you want to marry him, at first put him into a magnet and see what is wrong inside, whether he has a strong spine, whether there is anything in his head still left, whether he has soft knees, all that you can find out from MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging. And of course there are two windows to peak into a human body, you can use the x-ray window, you can use the radio frequency window, with optical radiation it's difficult to see through. But these are the two windows available. But the problem with magnetic resonance is resolution. How do you get with this long radio frequency waves spatial resolution? And the secret has been proposed by Paul Lauterbur, he said: as here, the nuclei have low recession frequencies and here they have high recession frequencies, so you get spatial resolution". That's what he got his Nobel Prize for, 2003. Applying magnetic field gradients in different directions, getting, so to say, projections of the proton density here, along different directions. And then from this projection one can reconstruct an image, that was his procedure. And the first time I heard about that was at the conference in the United States, 1974, and he showed an image of a mouse. It was recorded it in this way here, the mouse. Here these are the lungs, I mean it's proton imaging. And again, going back to what Professor Hänsch told you two days ago, never measure anything but hydrogen, that's exactly what we do in imaging, using protons for imaging. But there must be protons here in the centre, but what is that here? Nobody could understand what this feature here is. So somebody had the brilliant idea, this must be the soul of the mouse. But then, unfortunately, this poor mouse died in the magnet because the experiment lasted for such a long time. So then one found out, it's just an imaging artefact. So I got another idea, use the Fourier principle, apply to it in sequence first a vertical field gradient, then a horizontal and combining it to a dimensional experiment, do a Fourier transform and you get the image of a head. Data Fourier transformed in two dimensions, and that reveals everything. For example if there would be a tumour in my head, you would see it, fortunately it's not my head. That's an important image, that shows you how you convert a female brain into Swiss cheese, just drink too much. And you see the female brain, a normal female brain, an alcoholic female brain, who wants such a brain, so stop drinking alcohol, especially if you're a female, for the males it's less dangerous. Anyway, that's all you have to remember from my lecture and that's very worthwhile, small glass on this side, big glass on this side. And I mean, I know I should stop, I could go on forever, you can measure angiograms, blood vessels, you can look at chemical compositions after a stroke at different parts of the brain. You can do time resolved spectroscopy, Peter Mansfield got his Nobel prize for that, at the same time with Paul Lauterbur, using a particular pulse sequence, getting movies of a heart motion. And finally you can look into the brain and see what is going on while you are thinking, if you are thinking. And there is a particular principle which allows one to make NMR sensitive to thinking processes which I can't explain. You can get beautiful images here to distinguish a normal person from a schizophrenic person when you apply a certain input paradigm to him or her. And if you see a particular reaction, you know he might be ill. You can explore for example even compassion, that a person who suffers pain being tortured and you are just an onlooker and you feel then a reaction in the brain at exactly the same place as this person which is tortured himself, just by compassion. So it's quite exciting what you can do and I'm sure I have proved in this way that Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an irrefutable testimonial to the enormous value of basic research, it's directly linked to practical application. And finally: Happiness is finding still another use for Fourier Transformation. Thank you for your attention.

Liebe Freunde, das diesjährige Treffen in Lindau gefällt mir außerordentlich - insbesondere genieße ich es, zu Ihnen, meinen jungen enthusiastischen und vielversprechenden Wissenschaftlerfreunden, zu sprechen. Von den Vorträgen gefielen mir bislang vor allem jene, die über die herkömmliche Wissenschaft hinausgingen und auch etwas über den sozialen Kontext zu sagen hatten. Tatsächlich sprach ich letztes Jahr, an eben diesem Ort hier, über die Möglichkeiten der Wissenschaft, unsere Zukunft zu entwerfen und zu gestalten. In diesem Zusammenhang nahm ich auf eine sehr nachdrückliche und möglicherweise sogar Anstoß erregende Art und Weise Stellung, indem ich zum Beispiel Egoismus als treibende Kraft hinter all unseren Handlungen verurteilte, da wir uns in diesem Fall immer fragen, welchen Gewinn wir erzielen, wenn wir etwas tun. Stattdessen warb ich für Verantwortung als treibende Kraft, da wir uns dann fragen: Was können wir tun, damit die Gesellschaft daraus Nutzen zieht? Mein Vortrag endete damals mit zwei Zitaten, von denen das eine von François Rabelais stammt: denn wir alle sind mitverantwortlich für das, was in Zukunft geschieht - wir können keinem anderen die Schuld daran geben. Heute möchte ich keinerlei Äußerungen von mir geben, an denen man Anstoß nehmen könnte, sondern versuchen, ein guter Junge zu sein, und Ihnen nur eine kleine Geschichte, eine rein wissenschaftliche Geschichte, erzählen: Genau genommen möchte ich Ihnen die Fourier-Transformation als ein wunderschönes Beispiel dafür vorstellen, wie nützlich die Mathematik für die Naturwissenschaften sein kann. Wie üblich, wusste allerdings der Erfinder der Fourier-Transformation, Monsieur Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, nicht, dass man heutzutage sogar zu Beginn einer Vorlesung einen heimlichen Blick in den Kopf des Vortragenden werfen kann, um nachzuprüfen, ob es sich lohnt, sich die Vorlesung anzuhören, da alles, was ich Ihnen erzählen kann, in diesem labberigen Stück Gewebe hier enthalten ist. Von damals bis heute haben also viele Entwicklungen stattgefunden, und ich möchte gerne die Frage stellen: Warum ist die Fourier-Transformation für die Naturwissenschaft so wichtig? Sie ist ein sehr einfacher Ausdruck, sie ist eine Integraltransformation, bei der eine Funktion im Zeitbereich in eine Funktion im Frequenzbereich transformiert wird. Somit verknüpfen wir diese beiden Bereiche durch diese Integraltransformation. Oder wir können einen Impulsraum mit dem geometrischen Raum in Verbindung bringen, einer Funktion von K, des Impulses und verbunden mit einer Koordinatenfunktion. Es hat etwas mit der Erforschung der Natur im Allgemeinen zu tun. Wenn wir eine Sache untersuchen, betrachten wir sie als eine Black Box - wir wissen nicht, was sich in ihrem Inneren befindet - und wir versuchen, sie zu stören. Wir schauen uns den Input hier an und horchen auf den Output. Er verrät uns, was sich im Inneren befindet. Tatsächlich besteht eine sehr natürliche Art und Weise der Erforschung einer Black Box darin, eine Sinuswelle, eine sich periodisch wiederholende Störung, anzuwenden und dann auf den Output zu achten. Denken Sie nur an den Vortrag von Professor Hänsch vor zwei Tagen, in dem er Ihnen sagte, dass man niemals etwas anderes messen solle als Frequenzen. Genau das versuchen wir zu tun, um den Inhalt einer Black Box zu beschreiben. Und dies macht Sinn, denn tatsächlich sind diese trigonometrischen Funktionen Eigenfunktionen linearer zeitinvarianter Systeme. Somit bekommen wir jedes Mal, wenn wir eine solche Funktion auf eine Black Box anwenden, die linear und zeitinvariant ist, dieselbe Funktion zurück, multipliziert mit einer bestimmten komplexen Größe, bei der es sich in Begriffen der Quantenmechanik um den Eigenwert handelt. Wir erhalten also die mit dem Eigenwert multiplizierte Eigenfunktion. Und wenn wir diesen Eigenwert als eine Frequenzfunktion darstellen, wenn wir die Frequenz variieren, dann bekommen wir das Spektrum - das ist die Grundlage der Spektroskopie, also macht es wirklich Sinn. Wir können nun Spektroskopie auf die übliche Art und Weise betreiben, indem wir eine Frequenz nach der anderen anwenden, die Antwort messen und die Amplituden hier als eine Funktion der Frequenz darstellen. Das liefert uns ein Spektrum. Aber wir könnten dies auch parallel tun und alle Frequenzen gleichzeitig auf die Black Box anwenden und Zeit sparen. Dann brauchen wir so etwas wie einen Frequenzsortierer, der die verschiedenen Antworten für uns sortiert, damit wir wiederum das Spektrum bekommen. Dieser Frequenzsortierer ist letztendlich nichts anderes als eine Fourier-Transformation. Wenn wir das hier parallel tun, profitieren wir von dem Multiplex-Vorteil, der auch Fellgett-Vorteil genannt wird, da wir alles zur selben Zeit getan haben. Das ist der Vorteil, diesen Weg hier zu gehen. Das Geheimnis der Fourier-Transformation besteht tatsächlich in der Orthogonalität der trigonometrischen Funktion. Wenn Sie die eine mit der anderen multiplizieren und über den gesamten Raum integrieren, bekommen Sie nur dann etwas, wenn die beiden Funktionen identisch sind. Sie sind also orthogonal. Dies erlaubt es, sie zu trennen. Und die simultane Anwendung all dieser Frequenzen kann beispielsweise mit einem Puls implementiert werden. Wenn Sie einen Puls einsetzen, dann haben Sie im Wesentlichen alle Frequenzen eingebunden und Sie bekommen eine Impulsantwort. Sie müssen eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen, um das Spektrum zu bekommen - ganz einfach. Wiederum haben wir also sozusagen zwei Räume hier, die wir miteinander in Verbindung bringen, konjugierte Variablen, die Zeitvariable und die Frequenzvariable, der Impulsraum und der Koordinatenraum, die miteinander verbunden werden. Sie stellen, sozusagen, zwei verschiedene Ansichten desselben Gegenstands dar. Sie können sich das hier in Rot oder in Grün anschauen. Vor langer Zeit sagte Heisenberg, dass sich die fruchtbarsten Entwicklungen dann ergaben, wann immer zwei verschiedene Denkweisen aufeinandertrafen. Dies hier sind also die beiden verschiedenen Räume. Oder denken Sie an Professor Glauber, der Ihnen von Wellen und Teilchen erzählte - diese Beziehung gehört derselben Kategorie an. Er erwähnte auch Niels Bohr, "Contraria sunt complementa", und hier ist das Yin-Yang-Symbol, das ebenfalls diese beiden Räume darstellt, welche dieselbe Wahrheit enthalten. Die ganze Welt der Fourier-Transformationen im Bereich der Spektroskopie ist ähnlich komplex. Es gibt viele verschiedene Möglichkeiten - insbesondere, weil das, was wir uns anschauen, tatsächlich nicht nur eine Funktion der Zeit oder eine Funktion des Impulses darstellt, sondern ein Set von beiden zur selben Zeit ist, in Abhängigkeit von vier verschiedenen Variablen. Es ist eine ebene Welle, die sich in der Zeit und im Raum ausbildet. Wir können uns also zum einen der Zeitabhängigkeit bedienen, ein Zeitbereichsexperiment durchführen und schließlich ein Spektrum gewinnen. Oder wir können die K-Variablen verwenden, die Impuls-Variable, und erhalten dann zum Beispiel, wie hier, das Bild eines Moleküls - das ist die Röntgenbeugung. Wir können bildgebende Verfahren anwenden, Magnetresonanztomografie, in der ebenfalls die K-Abhängigkeit genutzt wird und die Fourier-Transformation das Bild eines Kopfes liefert. Und schließlich können wir zum Beispiel die Methode der Interferometrie anwenden, in der wir uns der R-Abhängigkeit bedienen, die Interferenz auf der räumlichen Ebene messen, sie in einer Fourier-Transformation umwandeln und wiederum ein Spektrum, beispielsweise ein Infrarot-Spektrum, erhalten. Diese sind also die verschiedenen Möglichkeiten, die ich gerne kurz darstellen möchte. Alles ist auf jenen Herrn, Monsieur Fourier, zurückzuführen. Wer war Monsieur Fourier. Das ist er. Er war gleichzeitig - und stellt damit eine sehr große Ausnahme dar - Wissenschaftler und Politiker. Schließlich haben nur sehr, sehr wenige Politiker überhaupt eine Ahnung von Wissenschaft, und nur sehr wenige Wissenschaftler interessieren sich für Politik. Aber Fourier ist sozusagen mein Vorbild - in ihm ist beides vereint. Hier befindet er sich zum Beispiel in seinem Arbeitszimmer in Grenoble, und anstatt seine juristischen Akten zu studieren, führt er ein physikalisches Experiment durch. Er misst die Wärmeleitung. Zur selben Zeit schrieb er an einem Aufsatz, den er dem Institut de France vorlegte, während er Präfekt des Départements Isère war. Und er führte Experimente durch, darunter auch diese Art von Input-Output-Experimenten. Hier hatte er eine Black Box, eine blaue Box, der er von der linken Seite aus Hitze zuführte. Dann maß er die Wärmeverteilung in dem Objekt. Es handelt sich hier also wiederum um die Input-Output-Beziehung. Er weitete den Input in der Fourier-Reihe aus und rekonstituierte das Ergebnis wiederum aus einer räumlichen Fourier-Reihe. So verwendete er zum ersten Mal seine Fourier-Ausdrücke - selbstverständlich bezeichnete er sie nicht als Fourier-Ausdrücke, aber hier sind sie, in seinem Buch aus dem Jahr 1822. Wann immer jemand behauptet, etwas entdeckt zu haben, ist natürlich die Frage interessant, was sich daraus entwickelt hat. Jedoch muss man auch danach fragen, wer davor da war - und es gibt immer jemanden, der schon davor da war. Nur sehr wenige Erfinder erfanden eine Sache zum ersten Mal. Ein Beispiel dafür ist Leonhard Euler: Wenn man die Lehrbücher der Fourier-Transformationen durchgeht, wird man die Euler-Gleichungen für die Fourier-Koeffizienten entdecken. Diese Gleichungen hier, die ich zuvor gezeigt habe, werden als Euler-Gleichungen bezeichnet - also muss Euler irgend etwas beigetragen haben. Tatsächlich tat er dies bereits im Jahr 1777, und noch früher, im Jahr 1729, verwendete er trigonometrische Funktionen, um Funktionen zu interpolieren. Aus diesem Grund ist er hier auf einer schweizerischen Banknote abgebildet - offensichtlich war er Schweizer, sonst würde ich Ihnen das nicht erzählen. Folglich ist die Fourier-Transformation eine schweizerische Erfindung - vergessen Sie das nicht. Ich glaube, wir sollten uns jetzt wieder der Spektroskopie zuwenden. Es gibt eine sehr große Bandbreite unterschiedlicher Frequenzen, von den Gammastrahlen bis zu den Radiofrequenzen, und Sie können diese alle nutzen, um die Natur mit Hilfe spektroskopischer Untersuchungen zu erforschen. Hier haben wir den Baum des Wissens, bei dem man von der Physik über die Chemie zur Biologie und zur Medizin gelangt. Für das wirkliche Verständnis der Natur ist diese Ebene natürlich die wichtigste. Wenn Sie ein medizinisches Phänomen mit den Begriffen chemischer Reaktionen erklären können, dann verstehen Sie es. Sie müssen normalerweise nicht auf die Physik zurückgreifen. Das ist diese Ebene. Aber um den Baum hinauf- und sicher wieder hinunterzuklettern, braucht man ein Gerät, eine Leiter, und diesen Zweck erfüllt die Spektroskopie. Zum ersten Mal wurde so etwas in Verbindung mit Fourier-Transformationen von Herrn Michelson verwendet. Auch Professor Hänsch erwähnte ihn in seinem Vortrag. Michelson erfand das Interferometer. Er verwendet zwei Lichtstrahlen, beziehungsweise im Wesentlichen einen Lichtstrahl, der in zwei Lichtstrahlen geteilt wird. Einer trifft auf den beweglichen Spiegel und der andere auf den statischen Spiegel, und bei ihrer Rückkehr werden sie wieder zusammengeführt. Dabei kommt es zur Interferenz. Das ist die Maschinerie, so wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Schauen wir sie uns einmal ihre Details an. Die ankommende Welle hier wird in einen roten und in einen blauen Teil aufgeteilt. Dann kommen beide zurück. In diesem bestimmten Fall hier sind die zwei Wellen, die von den zwei Spiegeln reflektiert werden, in Phase, so dass hier eine konstruktive Interferenz vorliegt. Wenn Sie diesen Spiegel hier ein wenig verschieben, dann bekommen Sie eine destruktive Interferenz. Die beiden Wellen sind gegenphasig, und wenn man sie addiert, ist die Summe Null. Somit können Sie auf diese Weise in der Tat ein Interferenzmuster bekommen. Dies führt zur Interferometrie, und wenn Sie eine einzelne Frequenz haben, dann erhalten Sie nur eine einzelne Oszillation. Wenn Sie zwei Frequenzen zur selben Zeit haben, dann bekommen Sie diese Art von Interferenz hier, und zwischen zwei Frequenzen, zwei Frequenzen mit einer bestimmten Liniengestalt hier, bekommen Sie hier eine Abschwächung und einen Wiederanstieg und Sie haben all diese verschiedenen Signale, die ich, als ich sie mir zum ersten Mal anschaute, für freie Induktionszerfalle aus der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie hielt. Es sieht der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie sehr ähnlich, aber es wurde 50 Jahre früher aufgezeichnet. Jedenfalls funktioniert ein modernes Interferometer auf genau dieselbe Art und Weise. Wir haben die Quelle, die Probe, die die Absorption misst oder zu messen versucht, einen halbdurchlässigen Spiegel, zwei reflektierende Spiegel, einen Detektor, der die Interferenz als eine Funktion der Platzierung des Spiegels hier aufzeichnet - führen Sie eine Fourier-Transformation durch und Sie bekommen das Spektrum. Zum allerersten Mal wurde dies von Fellgett 1951 durchgeführt - daher der Begriff Fellgett-Vorteil. Hier haben wir das Interferogramm, hier dessen Fourier-Transformation. Er musste dies von Hand tun, da er damals noch über keinen Computer verfügte. Heute jedoch können Sie diese im Handel erhältlichen Geräte kaufen, welche die Fourier-Transformation automatisch durchführen, und erhalten wunderschöne Spektren, ohne verstehen zu müssen, was im Inneren der Box passiert. Etwas Ähnliches können Sie auch mit Hilfe der Raman-Spektroskopie tun. Wie Sie wissen, bestrahlen Sie hierbei mit einer einzelnen Frequenz, zum Beispiel mit einem Laser. Sie messen das gestreute Licht hier, und die Frequenzen werden von den internen Schwingungen beispielsweise eines Moleküls modifiziert und liefern Ihnen diese zusätzliche Seitenbande der zentralen Frequenz hier. Diese hat nun nahezu denselben Inhalt wie ein Infrarot-Spektrum. Es handelt sich um ein typisches Raman-Spektrometer, ein Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektrometer, bei dem dasselbe Prinzip genutzt wird. Und das gibt mir gerade die Gelegenheit, Ihnen etwas über meine Leidenschaften zu erzählen und Ihnen zu verraten, wie wichtig Leidenschaften sind. Ich setze diese Art von Fourier-Transformations-Raman-Spektroskopie bei der Pigmentanalyse bestimmter zentralasiatischer Gemälde ein, die ich sehr liebe. Hier haben Sie zum Beispiel Raman-Spektren verschiedener blauer Pigmente und Sie sehen, wie verschieden Sie sind. Sie brauchen Sie nicht zu verstehen, Sie sehen einfach, dass Sie verschieden sind, und auf diese Weise können Sie Indigo von Azurit, Smalte und Berliner Blau unterscheiden. Sie können in die Gemälde hineingelangen und die Pigmente identifizieren. Ich restauriere Gemälde, und aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, zu wissen, was der Künstler verwendete. Auf diese Weise können Sie, ohne das Gemälde zu zerstören, die Pigmente analysieren - faszinierend. Wissen Sie, wenn Sie diesen Weg, Ihren beruflichen Weg beispielsweise nach Stockholm, einschlagen möchten, dann ist es sehr schwierig, nur auf einem Fuß zu gehen. Sie brauchen einen zweiten, und dieser zweite sind Ihre Leidenschaften. Und nur, wenn Sie zusätzlich zur Wissenschaft oder was auch immer Sie tun, Ihre Leidenschaften haben, wird dieser Funke in Ihrem Gehirn aufleuchten und der kreative Prozess einsetzen. Diese Überlagerung zwischen den beiden Standbeinen ist von großer Bedeutung - denken Sie immer daran. Lassen Sie uns nun zur Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie übergehen, einer anderen Anwendung, bei der sich die Interferenz nun im Zeitbereich ereignet. Ein sehr einfaches Experiment: Sie haben einen Atomkern, der in einem magnetischen Feld präzediert, nuklear-magnetische Bewegung, Sie haben eine Frequenz in Proportion zu dem angewendeten Magnetfeld. Folglich werden im Wesentlichen die Frequenzen gemessen. Sie messen die lokalen Magnetfelder. Dies wurde erstmalig von Edward Purcell und Felix Bloch bei kondensierter Materie unternommen. Sie können Spektren aufzeichnen, wie hier die Spektren von Alkohol. Sie bekommen drei verschiedene Linien, denn die lokalen Magnetfelder in den Methylgruppen, der Methylengruppe und in dem OH-Proton hier sind verschieden, somit können Sie sie unterscheiden. Aber es ist ermüdend, eine Linie nach der anderen aufzuzeichnen, und man benötigt dafür mehr Zeit, als mir für meinen Vortrag zur Verfügung steht. Wir hatten in Varian Associates in Palo Alto einen Mitarbeiter, Wes Anderson. Er sagte: "Warum tun wir dies nicht gleichzeitig?" und er erfand das Mehrkanal-Spektrometer, in welchem er mit mehreren Frequenzen zur selben Zeit bestrahlte. Er konstruierte einen Multi-Frequenz-Generator, die sogenannte Gebetsmühle. Dieser funktionierte nicht und befindet sich nun im Smithsonian Museum. Aber zur selben Zeit hatte er in seinem Labor einen schweizerischen Sklaven. Gemeinsam mit diesem schweizerischen Sklaven überlegten sie: Ach, das ist doch ganz einfach, das habe ich Ihnen alles schon gesagt. Wir müssen nur einen Puls einsetzen, einen freien Induktionszerfall beobachten, eine Fourier-Transformation vornehmen - und haben in Sekundenbruchteilen ein Spektrum. Hier haben wir die Impulsantwort dieser Moleküle, das Spektrum, und hier das Spektrum, das man mit einer herkömmlichen Sweep-Methode im Schneckentempo aufgezeichnet hätte. Jedenfalls führt gleichzeitige Anregung zu Empfindlichkeit, und Sie bekommen wunderbare Spektren. Wir fanden uns großartig, veröffentlichten unsere Entdeckung und hielten uns für Erfinder. Wir wussten nicht, dass bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt, sechs Jahre zuvor, Herr Morozov ähnliche Experimente durchgeführt hatte. Glücklicherweise konnte das Komitee in Stockholm kein Russisch lesen, denn sonst müssten Sie sich nun einen Vortrag auf Russisch anhören. Ohnehin wusste er nicht, aus welchem Grund er dieses verrückte Experiment durchführte - freier Induktionszerfall, dessen Fourier-Transformation - er wusste nicht, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Empfindlichkeit zunehmen und die Dauer des Experiments deutlich verkürzt werden würde. Ich weiß nicht, aus welchem Grund er es tatsächlich tat. Trotzdem war er der erste. Wir haben also nun diese wunderschönen Spektren, aber sie sind praktisch nutzlos. Wie soll ich all diese Linien interpretieren? Sie erinnern sich an Kurt Wüthrichs hervorragende Vorlesung. Er wollte die dreidimensionale Struktur der Moleküle - wir arbeiteten zu jener Zeit in Zürich zusammen - und deshalb wollte er von einer primären Proteinstruktur zu einer dreidimensionalen Struktur gelangen. Die Frage war, wie. Sie benötigen zusätzliche Informationen. Beispielsweise benötigen Sie diese Korrelationsinformation: Sie müssen Atomkerne miteinander in Verbindung bringen, wie nahe beieinander Atomkerne im Raum sind, wie nahe beieinander sie im Netzwerk chemischer Bindungen sind. Diese Art von Informationen liefert Ihnen echte geometrische Informationen, um die Struktur zu bekommen. Dies führt zu einem Korrelationsdiagramm, in dem Sie verschiedene Atomkerne korrelieren. Dies könnte die Nachbarschaft im Raum betreffen, die Nachbarschaft in chemischen Bindungen, wobei zum Beispiel Atomkern G etwas mit Atomkern A gemeinsam und Atomkern F etwas mit Atomkern C gemeinsam hat, und das hat zweidimensionale Spektroskopie zur Folge. Hier sind alle diese Korrelationen dargestellt. Sie können sie benutzen, um Strukturen zu bestimmen. Die Idee hierfür geht auf Jean Jeener zurück. Er schlug diese Art eines Zwei-Puls-Experiments vor: Schlagen Sie zweimal auf Ihre Black Box. Im Wesentlichen übertragen Sie damit Kohärenz von einem Modus, einem Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm auf einen anderen Übergang im Energieniveaudiagramm. Das verrät Ihnen etwas über die Konnektivität der Atomkerne. Und damit können Sie diese Korrelations- oder COSY-Spektren (Correlation Spectroscopy - Korrelationsspektroskopie) der Wüthrich-Gruppe bekommen, die Ihnen die Zuordnung der Protonen beispielsweise entlang einer Polypeptidkette ermöglichen. Sie brauchen ein zusätzliches Experiment, Sie brauchen hierfür auch die Wechselwirkungen zwischen den Atomkernen im Raum, und dafür bedienen Sie sich eines Drei-Puls-Experiments. Als erstes kommen wieder blaue Frequenzen zum Einsatz, die in rote Frequenzen umgewandelt werden, aber hier durch Kreuzrelaxationen, durch den Raum, abhängig von den dipolaren Wechselwirkungen, und so können Sie tatsächlich Entfernungen messen. Das ist ein vollständiges Experiment, das ist ein zweidimensionales COSY-Spektrum, ein NOESY-Spektrum (Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy - Kern-Overhauser-Effekt-Spektroskopie). Sie messen die Entfernungen zwischen benachbarten Aminosäureresten und können dann das komplette Set an Informationen bekommen, Informationen über die J-Kopplung, dipolare Kopplungen; Sie können eine Zuordnung vornehmen, auch der Anzeichen einer falsche Resonanz, und schließlich die Geometrie bestimmen. Und Sie sind im Geschäft. Das ist das erste Beispiel, das Wüthrich vor drei Tagen ebenfalls nannte. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er seinen Nobelpreis für die geniale Technik bekam, wie man die dreidimensionale Struktur von Biomolekülen bestimmen kann. Heutzutage, wo es um immer größere Moleküle geht, erfindet man immer mehr Tricks in der Anwendung dreidimensionaler und vierdimensionaler Spektroskopie. Leider kann ich auf diesem zweidimensionalen Schirm kein vierdimensionales Spektrum demonstrieren. Die Pulsfolgen werden jedenfalls sehr komplex. Es ist wie bei einer Partitur eines Symphonieorchesters: Sie haben die erste Geige, die zweite Geige, die Bratschen, die Cellos und dort unten das Schlagwerk. Das ist die Art von Pulsfolgen, die wir heute verwenden, und Sie mögen sagen: Oh, das ist viel zu kompliziert für mich. Jedoch mussten Sie schon vor zehn Jahren für eine Anstellung in der Industrie, zum Beispiel in den Forschungslaboren von Merck, Erfahrungen mit moderner 2D-, 3D- und 4D-Hetero-Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie vorweisen, denn sonst wurden Sie gar nicht erst in Betracht gezogen. Heute sollten Sie sich, wie Wüthrich Ihnen riet, mit der siebendimensionalen Spektroskopie vertraut machen - das ist wichtig, um einen Job zu finden. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ist außerdem ein schönes Beispiel für die Bestimmung von Eigenschaften der Molekulardynamik. Während die Röntgenbeugung Ihnen die verlässlichsten Strukturen für Biomoleküle liefert, erlaubt Ihnen die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie, die Dynamik zu untersuchen und zu beobachten, was in einem dynamischen Molekül geschieht. Schließlich sind statische Moleküle ja so langweilig - sie sind tot. Leben bedeutet Dynamik, dynamische Moleküle, dort finden die wirklich interessanten chemischen Reaktionen statt, die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Molekülen, und dafür ist die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie eine wunderbare Technik. Hier haben wir ein Beispiel: einen Benzolring, an den sieben Methylgruppen gebunden sind. Das ist einer zu viel - es gibt üblicherweise nur Plätze für fünf Substituenten, so dass die siebte Methylgruppe hier zwischen den verschiedenen Positionen hin- und hergejagt wird. Die Frage ist - wie bewegt sie sich? Springt diese Methylgruppe einfach Schritt für Schritt auf die jeweils nächste Position oder kann sie auch direkt auf irgendeine Position springen? Wie ist das Netzwerk des Austauschs in einem solchen Molekül aufgebaut? Um einfach ein zweidimensionales Spektrum aufzuzeichnen, haben Sie hier die vier Resonanzen, 1, 2, 3 und 4. Sie haben Cross Peaks, die Ihnen verraten, wie die Sprungbewegungen verlaufen. Wenn es zum Beispiel einen zufälligen Austausch zwischen allen Positionen gäbe, dann müssten überall Cross Peaks vorliegen. Wenn es nur eine 1-2-Bindungsverschiebung gibt, dann sind dies die bevorzugten Kreise - Sie sehen, es passt. Somit haben Sie in der Tat sofort den Mechanismus bestimmt, nach dem dieser Austausch funktioniert. Dafür müssen Sie zweidimensionale Spektroskopie nicht verstehen. Es ist eine wunderbare Darstellung, die Ihnen alles sagt. Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie befindet sich an dem sehr weit entfernten, niederfrequenten Ende des Spektrums. Daneben gibt es andere Spektren - ESR (Elektronenspinresonanz), Mikrowellenspektroskopie, Kohärente Optik, um Beispiele zu nennen. Es gelten dieselben Prinzipien, wobei jedoch die praktischen Schwierigkeiten mit der Höhe der Frequenz zunehmen. Elektronenspinresonanzspektroskopie ist vielleicht die der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ähnlichste Technik. Hierbei ist ein Elektronenspin mit mehreren Atomkernen gekoppelt und liefert hier ein Multiplett, ein sehr kompliziertes Spektrum, das man mit herkömmlichen Methoden oder Fourier-Methoden analysieren kann. Wenn das Spektrum sehr schmal ist, wie hier für organische Radikale, kann man direkt die Fourier-Methoden anwenden. Für Übergangsmetallkomplexe sind die Spektren äußerst breit und können nicht mit dem Puls einer einzelnen Radiofrequenz abgedeckt werden. Aber für diese organischen Radikale können Sie wiederum eine Impulsantwort des freien Induktionszerfalls aufzeichnen, eine Fourier-Transformation durchführen und das Spektrum bekommen. Genau dasselbe - Sie können zweidimensionale Elektronenspinresonanzspektren bekommen, also gelten hier dieselben Prinzipien wie bei der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie. Wenn Sie breite Spektren haben, dann müssen Sie weitere spezialisierte Experimente durchführen. Ich habe nicht die Zeit, auf diese einzugehen - es handelt sich um einen ENDOR-Puls, ENDOR-Experimente, die ich hier nicht beschreiben möchte. Sie messen eine Modulation eines Echo-Zerfalls, führen eine Fourier-Transformation und dann eine Elektron-Kern-Doppelresonanz-Spektroskopie (ENDOR - electron nuclear double resonance) durch, ein indirekt ermitteltes Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektrum, aber mir fehlt die Zeit, um dies zu erläutern. Wenn Sie mehr darüber wissen möchten, können Sie dieses Buch hier von Arthur Schweiger und Gunnar Jeschke lesen. Leider ist Arthur Schweiger vor zwei oder drei Monaten im Alter von noch nicht einmal 50 Jahren gestorben. Dies hier ist sein Vermächtnis, und Sie können darin etwas über diese großartigen Experimente nachlesen. Dann können Sie, im selben Frequenzbereich in der Mikrowellenspektroskopie auch die Rotationsgeschwindigkeit messen, mit der Moleküle um verschiedene Achsen rotieren - also interne Rotationen und somit Mikrowellenspektroskopie im wahrsten Sinne. Flygare führte die ersten Pulsexperimente durch. Sie sehen die freien Induktionszerfalle, Sie sehen hier die Fourier-Transformation einzelner Linien oder einzelner Multipletts. Sie können nach innen gehen, Spektren in hoher Auflösung bestimmen und insbesondere Zuordnungen vornehmen. Sie können Resonanzlinien zuordnen, die beispielsweise ein Energieniveau gemeinsam haben. Diese rote Linie und diese rote Linie müssen irgendwo hier einen Cross Peak ergeben. Folglich lässt sich mit Hilfe dieser zweidimensionalen Spektroskopie die Konnektivität in Energieniveaudiagrammen studieren. Sie können auch zur Optik, zu optischen Zeitbereichs-Experimenten weitergehen. Optische Pulse sind sehr kurze Pulse, Picosekundenpulse, Femtosekundenpulse. Hier wird im Labor von Robin Hochstrasser ein Vier-Puls-Experiment durchgeführt, um die tatsächlichen chemischen Veränderungen in Realzeit, sozusagen in einem Biomolekül, zu studieren. Hier sind die großartigen Ergebnisse - zweidimensionale optische Spektren. Wiederum handelt es sich um exakt dasselbe Prinzip. Es ist nur ein kleines bisschen komplizierter und schwieriger, aber es liefert Ihnen diese wunderbaren Spektren, die ich nicht interpretieren möchte. Sie können genau dasselbe Prinzip bei der Massenspektroskopie anwenden. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Experimente hier in einem Ionenzyklotron beobachten. Das hier ist wieder ein magnetisches Feld. Sie schießen die Ionen hier hinein, sie beginnen zu kreisen, Sie regen sie mit einem Radiofrequenzpuls an und messen wiederum einen freien Induktionszerfall, hier in der Massenspektroskopie. Sie können zum Beispiel hier zwischen zwei Ionen unterscheiden, die nahezu dieselbe Masse besitzen. Es gibt ein sehr langsames Interferenzmuster, das Sie mit Hilfe einer Fourier-Transformation analysieren können. Sie bekommen Massenspektren mit sehr hoher Auflösung, aber Sie können dies auch für komplexe Moleküle durchführen, wie hier für ein Protein - eigentlich für einen Proteinkomplex -, die Sie mit der Fourier-Transformations-Massenspektroskopie untersuchen können. Sie sehen also - es ist dasselbe Prinzip, es ist eigentlich immer dasselbe, und so geht es weiter und weiter und weiter. Dann können Sie außerdem auch Diffraktionsexperimente durchführen. Ich erwähnte die Abhängigkeit von K hier, eine Fourier-Transformation, in den Realraum hinein, dies bestimmt diese Gestalt eines Moleküls. Das führt zur Röntgenbeugung. Wiederum messen Sie hier Strukturfaktoren im K-Raum. Das reziproke Gitter transformieren Sie vollständig, und Sie erhalten die Elektronendichte im geometrischen Raum. Hier gelten wieder dieselben Arten von Prinzipien - Sie sehen hier in einem Buch, bei einem Beispiel aus der Röntgenbeugung, dass genau dieselben Ausdrücke ebenfalls vorkommen. Hier ist ein Beispiel, Myoglobin, und im Hintergrund sehen Sie das Diffraktogramm und im Vordergrund die Fourier-Transformations-Struktur. Sie kennen dieses hervorragende Beispiel von Michel, Deisenhofer und Huber. Professor Huber wird heute Morgen vielleicht über ähnliche Themen sprechen. Das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum wird auf diese Art und Weise bestimmt, und all das stützt sich auf die Fourier-Transformation. Schließlich komme ich zu der letzten Einsatzmöglichkeit, nämlich der Bildgebung. Bei der Bildgebung führen Sie ein der Diffraktion sehr ähnliches Experiment durch. Allerdings gehen Sie hier auf eine geringfügig andere Art und Weise vor. Sie bedienen sich der Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie und können damit einen Blick in das Innere des Körpers werfen. So sollten Sie beispielsweise Ihren Freund, wenn Sie ihn heiraten möchten, zunächst in einen Magneten stecken und überprüfen, was in seinem Inneren vielleicht nicht in Ordnung ist: ob er ein starkes Rückgrat hat, ob er überhaupt noch etwas im Kopf hat, ob er weiche Knie hat - all das können Sie mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztomografie herausfinden. Selbstverständlich gibt es zwei Fenster, um in den menschlichen Körper hineinzuschauen - Sie können das Röntgenstrahlenfenster oder das Radiofrequenzfenster benutzen. Mit Hilfe optischer Strahlung hindurchzuschauen, ist schwierig. Aber diese beiden Fenster sind verfügbar. Allerdings besteht bei der Magnetresonanz das Problem der Auflösung. Wie bekommt man mit diesen langen Radiofrequenzwellen eine räumliche Auflösung? Das Geheimnis der Lösung wurde von Paul Lauterbur vorgeschlagen. Er sagte: "Setzen Sie einen Magnetfeld-Gradienten ein und verwenden Sie ein inhomogenes Magnetfeld, dann können Sie unterscheiden zwischen der linken Seite hier, wo die Atomkerne niedrige Präzessionsfrequenzen haben, und hier, wo sie hohe Präzessionsfrequenzen haben. So bekommen Sie eine räumliche Auflösung." Dafür erhielt er 2003 seinen Nobelpreis - für die Anwendung von Magnetfeldgradienten in verschiedene Richtungen, mit deren Hilfe man, sozusagen, Projektionen der Protonendichte hier, entlang verschiedener Richtungen, bekommt. Von diesen Projektionen ausgehend, kann man ein Bild rekonstruieren - das war seine Vorgehensweise. Das erste Mal hörte ich davon auf der Konferenz in den USA im Jahr 1974, und er zeigte das Bild einer Maus. Es war auf diese Weise hier aufgenommen worden. Hier sind die Lungen - es ist Protonenbildgebung. Und wenn wir nun auf das zurückkommen, was Professor Hänsch Ihnen vor zwei Tagen sagte, dass Sie nie etwas anderes als Wasserstoff messen sollten, dann ist das genau das, was wir bei diesem Bildgebungsverfahren tun - wir benutzen Protonen für die Bildgebung. Dies hier, im Zentrum, müssen Protonen sein, aber was ist das hier? Niemand konnte ergründen, was dieses Gebilde hier war. Also hatte jemand die geniale Idee, dass dies die Seele der Maus sein müsse. Unglücklicherweise starb jedoch die arme Maus in dem Magneten, da das Experiment sich über einen solch langen Zeitraum hingezogen hatte, und jemand fand heraus, dass es sich bei diesem Gebilde nur um einen Bildartefakt gehandelt hatte. Mir kam eine andere Idee: Man mache sich das Fourier-Prinzip zunutze, wende nacheinander zunächst einen vertikalen Feldgradienten und danach einen horizontalen Feldgradienten an und kombiniere dies zu einem zweidimensionalen Experiment, führe dann eine Fourier-Transformation durch - und man bekommt das Bild eines Kopfs. Wenn man also die Daten in zwei Dimensionen einer Fourier-Transformation unterzieht, wird alles enthüllt. Wenn sich beispielsweise in meinem Kopf ein Tumor befände, würden Sie ihn sehen - glücklicherweise ist dies nicht mein Kopf. Das hier ist ein wichtiges Bild. Es zeigt, wie man ein weibliches Gehirn in einen Schweizer Käse verwandelt - indem man einfach zu viel trinkt. Sie sehen hier ein weibliches Gehirn, ein normales weibliches Gehirn, ein Gehirn einer Alkoholikerin - wer möchte ein solches Gehirn haben? Also hören Sie auf, Alkohol zu trinken, insbesondere, wenn Sie eine Frau sind, für die Männer ist es weniger gefährlich. Das ist alles, was Sie sich von meinem Vortrag merken müssen, und es lohnt sich - das kleine Glas auf dieser Seite, das große Glas auf dieser Seite. Ich könnte ewig weitersprechen - Sie können Angiogramme messen, Blutgefäße, Sie können sich die chemischen Zusammensetzungen in verschiedenen Bereichen des Gehirns nach einem Schlaganfall anschauen. Sie können zeitaufgelöste Spektroskopieverfahren anwenden - dafür erhielt Peter Mansfield seinen Nobelpreis, zeitgleich mit Paul Lauterbur. Er hatte eine bestimmte Impulsfolge eingesetzt und mit ihrer Hilfe die Herzbewegung gefilmt. Und schließlich können Sie in das Gehirn hineinschauen und beobachten, was dort passiert, während Sie denken - wenn Sie denken. Es gibt ein bestimmtes Prinzip, das ich hier nicht erläutern kann, welches es erlaubt, die Nuklearmagnetresonanzspektroskopie auf Denkprozesse reagieren zu lassen. Hier bekommen Sie hervorragende Bilder, mit denen Sie eine normale Person von einer schizophrenen Person unterscheiden können, wenn Sie auf ihn oder sie ein bestimmtes Input-Paradigma anwenden. Wenn Sie dann eine bestimmte Reaktion sehen, wissen sie, dass die Person krank sein könnte. Sie können zum Beispiel sogar Mitgefühl erforschen. Wenn eine andere Person gefoltert wird und Schmerz empfindet und Sie dabei nur Zuschauer sind, können Sie eine Reaktion in Ihrem Gehirn an genau derselben Stelle spüren, wo die gefolterte Person selbst diese Reaktion verspürt - hervorgerufen durch nichts anderes als Mitgefühl. Was man also alles tun kann, ist ziemlich spannend, und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich auf diese Weise bewiesen habe, dass das Verfahren der Magnetresonanztomografie ein unanfechtbarer Zeugnis für den enormen Wert der Grundlagenforschung ist, da sie direkt mit der praktischen Anwendung verbunden ist. Und zu guter Letzt: Glück ist, noch eine weitere Anwendung für die Fourier-Transformation zu finden. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Richard Ernst on Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(00:31:35 - 00:33:18)

Kurt Wüthrich (2014) - A Personal View of the History of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Biology and Medicine

Well thank you, it’s a pleasure to be here. Why a personal view? Because as all of us I will over exaggerate my own contributions. My talk starts in 20 minutes. And I expect that 100s of people will be coming in 20 minutes to listen to me. Therefore I’ll speak slowly so that those newcomers will also get part of it. Now nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR is a technique which can provide us today with quite a lot of interesting information. So it is NMR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It’s not No Meaningful Results. And it’s not No More Research. Nuclear magnetic resonance. And it can be used to study man. And it can be used to study molecules. And today we expect that in chemistry NMR enables us to decide about the structures. That is NMR can tell us about the presence of each and every atom in such a molecule. It can be a larger molecule, a smaller molecule. It can be the result of synthetic chemistry where the chemist wants to check about the coincidence of what he expected to get and what he did actually get in his work. This particular molecule that I showed to you is cyclosporine A. It was essential in the start of transplantation in human medicine. It is the first viable immune suppressant that actually enabled the start of transplantation medicine and it was also a big economic success. Now, what can NMR do next? Now we move from chemistry to structural biology. Now, NMR can tell us where our drug molecule, this is again cyclosporine A, binds to particular sites in cells, in this case in the human cell. And here you have the primary receptor. This is a small protein, cyclophilin. And so NMR can tell us about the structure of the complex formed by the drug molecule and its receptor. Once we have such a result, we can remove the drug from its binding site and study in detail the contacts that the drug undergoes with its receptor. And then we can go back to the chemists and tell them: “Look, this piece is too big. That doesn’t really fit into this crevice. So cut it off and check whether you can improve some properties of the drug which might lead to reduced site effect that are inevitable in any drug and need to be minimised.” This is one area where we use NMR widely today. Another area is in imaging. It’s a very different approach. Also we are on a very different scale. This is a knee. It happens to be my own. You can see... Others usually show their heads but because of my major occupation, knees are considerably more important that other parts of my body. Now, you all want to get a Nobel Prize and we should tell you how to do it. This is a bit difficult. But, you see, it’s much easier to predict the past. So I’m going to tell you how things have happened in NMR. There are 6 Nobel laureates who got the Prize for NMR. And the first thing... Now if you want to get the prize, you have to choose your field. After Switzerland lost to Argentina in a painful way last night, I find out again that it was the right choice for me 50 years ago not to continue playing football as my major occupation but to join NMR because of the 6 NMR Nobel Prizes. So choosing the right field of activity is important. Never mind if it’s a Nobel Prize. You have to be happy. You have to have a satisfactory life. And if you live in Argentina, I would recommend that you rather go into football than into natural science. Well next you have to be visible. You see I stay in Argentina. When I don’t play football, then I go fishing. And these are quite nice trouts which I caught in the Lago Escondido near Bariloche in the Andes in Argentina. And in Bariloche there’s a very famous theoretical physics institute where many European leading physicists would spend part of the year. But you see these fish are very nice eating but they are sort of small. And Stockholm is far away. And it’s dark in the winter. So Swedes may not see these fish. So you have to catch big fish. Then you have a chance that the Nobel Committee may actually see the fish. And I am now going to tell you about the 3 big fish that gave Nobel Prizes in NMR. And then there will be a fourth big fish, which provides the basis of it all. NMR started with Felix Bloch. This is the Swiss physicist and Edward Purcell an American physicist, they both worked in the United States. And they discovered within a few weeks independent of each other the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance. It is not so that this was an all or nothing breakthrough. There have been different experiments for example by a physicist with the name of Rabi. Other physicist with the name of Stern, who performed so called beam experiments which already indicated that nuclear magnetic resonance could happen. But it was Bloch and Purcell who actually did the first experiment. Now what is the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomenon? We consider just the simplest case, namely the case of a hydrogen atom like you find it in water for example. Hydrogen atom has a spin. The nucleus of the hydrogen has a spin. And in a quantum mechanical description you have a spin of one half. And this has 2 so called eigenstates. So that nucleus can exist in 2 different forms. One is described by an arrow pointing up, the other one by an arrow pointing down. Or it’s called beta or alpha and the corresponding quantum numbers are -1/2 and +1/2. Here in this audience we will not be able to distinguish between the 2 states because you are only subject to the Earth’s magnetic field and that’s so small that you do not get an energy difference between the 2 states. But if you place the material to study, in this case the hydrogen atoms, into a strong magnetic field that may be half a million times the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field, then you lift the degeneracy. That means you now have 2 states that are energetically different. And the energy difference can be explained -this is delta E- can be expressed in terms of a frequency, a radio frequency. When you listen to a radio set, then you work with the same kind of wavelengths that we use in NMR experiments. Now, the key point here is that this size of the energy splitting is proportional to the applied magnetic field. So we have it in hand to decide how big we want this energy gap to be and hence at what frequency we want to see transitions between these 2 energetically different states. And when we change the applied field, then this difference will become a bit smaller. If we increase it, it will become a bit bigger. Recognising this was of course the first of those 3 big NMR fishes. Now we come to the second fish. You have already seen the water molecule in Peter Agre’s talk. It’s a simple structure. You have 2 hydrogen atoms in white and the reddish blue oxygen atom. In the NMR experiment we don’t see the oxygen, we only see the 2 hydrogens. And because of the symmetry of the molecular structure we cannot distinguish between the 2. Therefore we get a single line in a spectrum. Now this line... Since I have enough time let me go back. This line now represents exactly this energy difference in terms of the frequency at which we observe this peak. And now comes the big idea which leads to the use of the NMR phenomenon for macroscopic imaging as it is used in medical diagnosis. You now take a macroscopic structure like human head or human knee as you have seen before and you apply a variation of the field, the so called field gradient across this macroscopic object. Now you have a different energy splitting on the left eye than on the right eye because you have a difference in the applied magnetic field. Though also we only and exclusively observe the water molecule -I mean most of the inside of our head is water, about 80%- we can see, we can distinguish between the water at this part of the head and here. And then we do the same thing perpendicular to this plain and in the third dimension and with some mathematical procedures. We can then reproduce the image. So this is the big fish. To realise if you go across the macroscopic object, you can distinguish between the water next to the left eye from the water next to the right eye. It’s the same. You can distinguish between the 2 ears although you always observe the water. And this big fish was caught by Paul Lauterbur and by Peter Mansfield who received the Nobel Prize in medicine and physiology in 2003. Let me just for... You see I can also say that there are 4 of us who got the Nobel Prize in NMR in new times. And we all worked in both, in spectroscopy and in imaging. So let me just recount how we got into imaging. That was very early on in the game in the 1980s. And it wasn’t trivial to get a sufficiently big magnet to place an adult human body inside. So we got a small magnet and we worked in the children’s hospital in Zurich. And actually my graduate students Chris Bösch and Rolf Grütter are now both leading scientists in Swiss hospitals in this area. We would work with new born infants. And the most difficult problem that we faced was to monitor the state of the infants inside the magnet because new born infants with birth trauma are highly unstable and all vital functions need to be constantly monitored. And the children were also so weak that we couldn’t use chemicals to sedate the children. Therefore we would ask the parents to come in and put the children to sleep. Then the parents were extremely upset and scared of seeing their little ones disappear in a magnet. So Chris Bösch devised the fairy house. Now the magnet is inside here, the baby goes here and the parents were extremely relieved to see the baby go into a fairy house rather than into an iron core magnet. The result of the study was very often very painful. I show you here an image of the head of a 17 year old girl who had heavy mechanical birth trauma which caused a huge hematoma here in this area of the scull. Very sad story of course. But this is the sort of things that happened to us when we were into MRI many years ago. Now let me go to the third big fish story. This is work that led to the use of NMR in structural biology. And here the problem to be solved was a very different one from the problem that you have to solve when you try to image macroscopic objects. We are now dealing not with water molecules which give a single line in any sort of spectroscopic technique but now we work with macromolecules such as this marvellous painting by Geis from the 1960s. This is cytochrome C. I always like to show such pictures from the times before computers were able to draw molecules. So Irving Geis was a painter who painted all the early 3 dimensional structures of proteins and nucleic acids in the 1960s and ‘70s. And only with the 1980s were computers getting able to make similar but not quite equally nice drawings. The point here is that I do not have just one kind of hydrogen atom. I have many different kinds, chemically different types of atoms. And as a result I don’t get a single line but I get a complicated spectrum. This is just a usual scale, corresponds to the frequency at which we observe the signals. And you can see that in this particular case we see some well resolved signals but these correspond only in this case to exactly 6 hydrogen atoms whereas here we have overlapping signals of about 400 NMR signals. Now, we knew from studying these well resolved lines that the information was available to determine 3 dimensional structures. But we couldn’t get the information out of this part which contains most of the resonances. And here the big fish experience was to go from one dimension to 2 dimensions. See, instead of arranging all these many lines on a single axis, you get the 2 dimensional plain and now individual lines move out of the mess here and are well separated in this 2 dimensional plain. So that was the advent of 2 dimensional NMR. We had the first set of experiments by 1982. COSY, NOESY, SECSY and FOCSY. I mean this is serious. I mean SECSY stands for spin-echo correlated spectroscopy. I mean compared to the notations that we see in immunology for example this is relatively straightforward. Now, what is behind this multidimensional NMR? I say multidimensional because although it was 2 dimensional originally, today when we determine an NMR structure of a protein we use 2 five dimensional, 1 four dimensional and 3 three dimensional experiments. So the principle that I’m now going to explain is not limited to 2 dimensions but it can be expanded in principle to an unlimited number of dimensions. This is a 2 dimensional experiment. Now it’s perhaps a bit difficult for some of you to see what is happening. Let me just try to be simple. You have here T1 and T2. T2 is the time that runs. Ok, all of us get older every second that passes today. And in my age that goes much faster than for some of you. But it goes for all of us. So when we perform an experiment, for example with an ensemble of nuclear spins, everything is in principle in equilibrium. We can perturb this equilibrium and study how the system behaves. And we follow this for a long time. So this is just the time. The experiment may last for 100 milliseconds or so. And we perturb the system. I don’t need to go into details. What happens then is that we observe an oscillation of certain parameters that we measure. Now, the idea that leads to 2 dimensional and higher dimensional spectroscopy is to create an artificial second time axis. And this is done in the following way. You perturb the system. Perturbing means that I take a hammer and hit and then wait for a certain time and hit again, ok? Now, then the response to the second hammer hit will depend on the length of time that passes between the first hammer and the second hammer because the system starts, as we say, to evolve and depending on the length of this time T1 we will start this recording. Is it here or here or here? And if we now repeat this experiment 100 times, that is we change this time T1 100 times, then we have created a second time axis which is perpendicular to the normal running time. And the 2 dimensional Fourier transformation then gets us into the 2 dimensional frequency space. And Richard Ernst was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1991 for having worked out these principles and realised the first 2 dimensional NMR experiments. So that’s big fish number 3. When you then look more closely at the 2 dimensional or higher dimensional spectrum of a protein, then you see that there is an awful lot of information. This is a so called contour plot. This is now what I get after I resolved that series of overlapping lines in the 1 dimensional spectrum into 2 dimensions. And this is clearly enough information to define a 3 dimensional protein structure. And all it needed from thereon was to develop mathematical tools that could calculate the 3 dimensional structure from this array of NMR peaks that we have seen in this picture. So from here distance geometry techniques get us to here. And from here you then go to Stockholm. So these are the 3 big fish. So the first one is to have observed the phenomenon of NMR by physicists. At the time I met Felix Bloch many times later. He was already retired at the time, lived in Zurich. He did not expect that NMR would yield interesting data other than some new insights into the structure and properties of nuclei. So pure physics. Then we got the development of magnetic resonance imaging by applying field gradients across macroscopic objects. Very clearly, just an application of the basic principle of NMR. And then we got to the point where we could unravel highly complex spectra by introducing artificial new time dimensions into the experiment. I told you there is an additional big fish. Now I am going all the way back to Albert Einstein. I am talking about the Brownian motion and its impact on NMR in solution. What Albert Einstein did in 1905, in addition to sidecars like relativity theory and the likes, he analysed the Brownian motion of particles suspended in liquids at ambient temperature. And it was also pretty much the start of statistical mechanics. So, you only look at the right hand side of my slide here. And what it shows is the behaviour of a small sphere and the behaviour of a large sphere when immersed in a liquid. If we have a small sphere then under the thermal motion of the much smaller solvent molecules, that sphere changes direction and it also changes rotational movements stochastically at a relatively high frequency. When you have a large sphere, its inertia is much larger and it reacts with much lower frequency to the onslaught of the thermally agitated solvent molecules. For NMR this means that we are in a completely different regime of spin physics when we have low frequency Brownian motion or when we have high frequency Brownian motion. And this is what Albert Einstein worked out in 1905 when he was a clerk in the patent office in Bern. And he comes up with the key (that) is that he described the behaviour of molecules with regard to rotational Brownian motion in terms of a correlation time tauC which governs all essential parameters that enable both MRI and studies of large molecules in solution. So Albert Einstein contributes directly to the wellbeing of dozens of football players in Brazil these days. You can introduce the findings of Einstein into the description of NMR experiments by single transition basis operators. This led more recently to transverse relaxation optimised spectroscopy. It led to breaking size barriers -you see here a rather large protein complex. The GroEL-GroES-ADP complex- and gives a rather nice spectrum when using all these principles of recognising the proper impact of the frequency of Brownian motion on NMR in solution. What are exactly, what does this help us? Why is this a fourth big fish in the field? When we look at human bodies with MRI, we don’t see fat. We don’t see proteins, we don’t see membranes. We only see the water molecules. And this is due to this very simple scheme here that the water molecule is very small. And even in our bodies it moves sufficiently fast so as that it gives a sharp NMR line and we can perform MRI on living human subjects. On the other hand having recognised the TROSY principle we are now able to study membrane proteins with solution NMR. And we have heard yesterday from Doctor Kobilka’s talk that he said again and again: And this is actually my own current research area. I don’t need to go into any details. I am working in a team with Professor Raymond Stevens, a crystallographer. And we joined forces by using crystallography and NMR in much the way that Doctor Kobilka described to you yesterday. I hope that this historical review gave you an idea of how far basic research can be before it yields fruit. Fruit means betterment of human life. But it also means money. MRI today is a huge business. Thousands of machines are operating in hospitals. Ten thousands of high tech jobs have been created. If we go to a congress on MRI which didn’t exist 30 years ago, we have 10,000 participants, 12,000 participants. And when we look at things very closely, we see that some of the basics have been accrued long... I mean in the case of Einstein, the theory of Brownian motion came long before NMR was invented. And I think that today’s trend, especially in the United States, to support only research that promises to go to the bedside the next day inhibits the possibility that 50 years from now we will be able to use novel principles of physics in practical medicine and biomedical research. I should also emphasise that all this research in NMR which brought these results was small scale research. It wasn’t a big project where politicians could put their names on top and advertise their support of science. This was all small group research. And it is exactly this kind of work that is very poorly supported these days. I’m afraid that we will suffer from this in the decades to come. Thank you. Applause.

Danke, ich freue mich, hier zu sein. Warum eine persönliche Sicht? Weil ich wie jeder von uns meine eigenen Beiträge überbewerte. Mein Vortrag beginnt in 20 Minuten. Und ich gehe davon aus, dass in 20 Minuten Hunderte Menschen kommen, um mich zu hören. Deshalb werde ich langsam sprechen, damit auch diese Nachzügler etwas davon mitbekommen. Die Kernspinresonanz oder NMR ist eine Technik, die uns heute viele interessante Informationen liefern kann. NMR steht für "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance", nicht für "No Meaningful Results" oder "No More Research". Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, die zur Erforschung des Menschen eingesetzt werden kann. Und es kann genutzt werden um Moleküle zu erforschen. Und heute gehen wir davon aus, dass NMR uns in der Chemie die Entscheidung über Strukturen ermöglicht, dass NMR etwas über das Vorhandensein von allen Atomen in einem solchen Molekül aussagen kann. Es kann ein größeres Molekül oder ein kleineres Molekül sein. Es kann das Ergebnis von synthetischer Chemie sein, wenn der Chemiker etwas über die Koinzidenz von erwarteten und tatsächlichen Ergebnissen seiner Arbeit erfahren möchte. Das spezielle Molekül, das ich Ihnen zeige, ist Cyclosporin A. Es war entscheidend für die Anfänge der Transplantationsmedizin. Es ist das erste brauchbare Immunsuppressivum, das tatsächlich den Start der Transplantationsmedizin ermöglichte und zudem ein großer wirtschaftlicher Erfolg wurde. Was kann NMR als Nächstes bewirken? Wir bewegen uns jetzt von der Chemie zur Strukturbiologie. NMR kann uns zeigen, wo unser Wirkstoffmolekül - das hier ist wieder Cyclosporin A - an bestimmte Stellen in Zellen bindet, in diesem Fall in der menschlichen Zelle. Und hier sehen Sie den primären Rezeptor. Das ist ein kleines Protein, Cyclophilin. Und so kann uns NMR etwas über die Struktur des Komplexes zeigen, der vom Wirkstoffmolekül und seinem Rezeptor gebildet wird. Haben wir erst einmal ein solches Resultat, können wir den Wirkstoff von seiner Bindungsstelle lösen und detailliert die Kontakte untersuchen, die der Wirkstoff mit seinem Rezeptor eingeht. Und dann können wir uns wieder an die Chemiker wenden und ihnen sagen: Es passt nicht richtig in diesen Spalt. Schneide es ab und überprüfe, ob du bestimmte Eigenschaften des Arzneimittels verbessern kannst, damit die Nebenwirkungen reduziert werden, die bei einem Arzneimittel unumgänglich sind, aber auf ein Minimum reduziert werden sollten." Das ist einer der Bereiche, in denen wir die NMR-Technik heute umfassend einsetzen. Ein anderer Bereich sind Bildgebungsverfahren, ein völlig anderer Ansatz. Dort bewegen wir uns auch in völlig anderen Größenordnungen. Das ist ein Knie, übrigens mein eigenes. Sie sehen ...Andere zeigen normalerweise ihre Köpfe, aber aufgrund meines Hauptberufs spielen die Knie eine wesentlich wichtigere Rolle als andere Teile meines Körpers. Sie alle wollen doch einen Nobelpreis bekommen und wir sollten Ihnen zeigen, wie das geht. Das ist gar nicht so leicht. Wesentlich einfacher ist es, die Vergangenheit vorherzusagen. Deshalb erzähle ich Ihnen, wie das im Fall von NMR gewesen ist. Es gibt sechs Nobelpreisträger, die den Nobelpreis für NMR bekommen haben. Und zu allererst ...Wenn man den Preis erhalten will, muss man sein Fachgebiet richtig wählen. Nachdem die Schweiz gestern so schmerzhaft gegen Argentinien verloren hat, hat mich das wieder einmal darin bestätigt, dass ich vor 50 Jahren die richtige Entscheidung getroffen habe, nämlich nicht weiter im Hauptberuf Fußball zu spielen, sondern im Bereich von NMR tätig zu werden - denn von sechs NMR-Nobelpreisen gingen drei an Schweizer Wissenschaftler, während die Schweiz nie auch nur eine einzige Fußballweltmeisterschaft gewonnen oder auch nur fast gewonnen hätte. Wichtig ist also die richtige Wahl des Tätigkeitsfeldes. Egal, ob es der Nobelpreis ist. Man sollte glücklich sein, ein zufriedenes Leben führen. Und wenn Sie in Argentinien leben, so würde ich Ihnen empfehlen, eher Fußball zu spielen als in die Naturwissenschaften zu gehen. Als Nächstes muss man sichtbar sein. Ich lebe in Argentinien. Wenn ich nicht Fußball spiele, gehe ich angeln. Im Lago Escondido in der Nähe von Bariloche in den argentinischen Anden habe ich recht ansehnliche Forellen gefangen. Und in Bariloche gibt es ein sehr berühmtes Institut für Theoretische Physik, an dem viele führende Physiker Europas einen Teil des Jahres verbringen. Diese Fische sind ganz lecker, aber ziemlich klein. Und Stockholm ist weit weg. Und im Winter ist es dunkel, weshalb die Schweden diese Fische möglicherweise gar nicht sehen können. Wenn die Chance bestehen soll, dass das Nobelkomittee den Fisch tatsächlich wahrnimmt, muss man also große Fische fangen. Und ich erzähle Ihnen jetzt etwas über die drei "großen Fische", die mit einem Nobelpreis für NMR ausgezeichnet wurden. Und dann gibt es noch einen vierten großen Fisch, der die Grundlage für das alles ist. NMR begann mit dem Schweizer Physiker Felix Bloch und dem amerikanischen Physiker Edward Purcell, die beide in den Vereinigten Staaten tätig waren. Innerhalb weniger Wochen entdeckten sie unabhängig voneinander das Phänomen der kernmagnetischen Resonanz. Das war allerdings kein "Alles oder Nichts"-Durchbruch. Vorher hatte es bereits verschiedene Experimente, etwa von einem Physiker namens Rabi oder einem weiteren Physiker Namens Stern gegeben, die so genannte Strahlexperimente durchführten, die schon andeuteten, dass eine Kernspinresonanz vorkommen kann. Bloch und Purcell führten allerdings das erste Experiment durch. Worin besteht das Phänomen der Kernspinresonanz? Wir gehen einmal vom einfachsten Fall aus, nämlich einem Wasserstoffatom, wie es beispielsweise in Wasser zu finden ist. Ein Wasserstoffatom hat einen Spin. Der Kern des Wasserstoffatoms hat einen Spin. Und in einer quantenmechanischen Beschreibung gibt es einen Spin von 1/2. Und dieser hat zwei sogenannte Eigenzustände. Dieser Kern kann also in zwei unterschiedlichen Formen existieren. Die eine wird durch einen nach oben zeigenden Pfeil, die andere durch einen nach unten zeigenden Pfeil angezeigt. Oder sie werden als Beta oder Alpha bezeichnet. Die entsprechenden Quantenzahlen lauten -1/2 und +1/2. Hier im Publikum können wir nicht zwischen den beiden Zuständen unterscheiden, da Sie nur dem Magnetfeld der Erde unterliegen und das ist so schwach, dass man keinen Energieunterschied zwischen den beiden Zuständen feststellen kann. Platziert man aber das zu untersuchende Material, in diesem Fall die Wasserstoffatome, in einem starken Magnetfeld, das eine halbe Million Mal so stark ist wie das Magnetfeld der Erde, wird die Entartung sichtbar, das heißt, man hat jetzt zwei Zustände, die sich energetisch voneinander unterscheiden. Die Energiedifferenz lässt sich erklären, das ist Delta E, sie kann als Frequenz, als Radiofrequenz ausgedrückt werden. Wenn Sie ein Radio einschalten, haben Sie die gleiche Art von Wellenlängen, die wir in unseren NMR-Experimenten verwenden. Entscheidend ist, dass diese Größe der Energieverteilung im Verhältnis zum angewandten Magnetfeld steht. Wir können also entscheiden, wie groß diese Energiedifferenz sein soll und bei welcher Frequenz Übergänge zwischen diesen beiden energetisch unterschiedlichen Zuständen vorkommen sollen. Wenn wir das angewandte Feld verändern, verringert sich dieser Unterschied etwas. Wenn wir es vergrößern, vergrößert es sich etwas. Diese Entdeckung war die erste dieser drei großen NMR-Fische. Kommen wir jetzt zum zweiten Fisch. Im Vortrag von Peter Agre haben Sie das Wassermolekül ja schon gesehen. Das ist eine einfache Struktur. Es gibt zwei Wasserstoffatome, in Weiß, und das rötlich-blaue Sauerstoffatom. Im NMR-Experiment sehen wir den Sauerstoff nicht, wir sehen nur die beiden Wasserstoffe. Und aufgrund der Symmetrie der Molekülstruktur können wir die beiden nicht voneinander unterscheiden. Deshalb erhalten wir eine einzelne Linie in einem Spektrum. Diese Linie ...Da ich genügend Zeit habe, gehe ich noch einmal zurück. Diese Linie repräsentiert exakt diese Energiedifferenz hinsichtlich der Frequenz, bei der wir diesen Höchstwert beobachten. Und hier kommt die zündende Idee ins Spiel, die zur Verwendung des NMR-Phänomens für makroskopische Bildgebungsverfahren in der medizinischen Diagnose führte. Auf eine makroskopische Struktur, wie den menschlichen Kopf oder das vorher dargestellte Knie wendet man jetzt eine Variation des Feldes an, den so genannten Feldgradienten, durch dieses makroskopische Objekt. Jetzt besteht auf dem linken Auge eine andere Energieverteilung als auf dem rechten Auge, weil die angewandten Magnetfelder unterschiedlich sind. Obwohl wir ausschließlich das Wassermolekül betrachten - das Innere unseres Kopfes besteht zum großen Teil, rund 80%, aus Wasser - können wir zwischen dem Wasser in diesem Teil des Kopfes und diesem hier unterscheiden. Und dann wiederholen wir das Ganze senkrecht zu dieser Fläche und in der dritten Dimension und mit einigen mathematischen Verfahren können wir dann das Bild erstellen. Das ist also der "große Fisch" - die Feststellung, dass man, wenn man über das makroskopische Objekt fährt, zwischen dem Wasser am linken Auge und dem Wasser am rechten Auge unterscheiden kann. Es ist das gleiche. Man kann zwischen den beiden Ohren unterscheiden, obwohl man immer das Wasser betrachtet. Und diesen großen Fisch gefangen haben Paul Lauterbur und Peter Mansfield, die 2003 den Nobelpreis für Medizin und Physiologie erhielten. Lassen Sie mich ...Ich könnte auch sagen, dass vier von uns den Nobelpreis für NMR in neuer Zeit erhalten haben. Und wir haben alle in beiden Bereichen gearbeitet, Spektroskopie und Bildgebungsverfahren. Lassen Sie mich gerade erzählen, wie wir zum Bildgebungsverfahren kamen. Das war relativ zu Anfang in den 1980er-Jahren. Und es war nicht gerade einfach, an einen ausreichend großen Magneten zu kommen, um den Körper eines Erwachsenen darin unterbringen zu können. Deshalb hatten wir einen kleinen Magneten und arbeiteten in der Kinderklinik in Zürich. Zwei meiner Doktoranden, Chris Bösch und Rolf Grütter, sind heute führende Wissenschaftler auf diesem Gebiet in Schweizer Krankenhäusern. Wir beschlossen, mit Neugeborenen zu arbeiten. Das Schwierigste daran war, den Zustand der Neugeborenen im Magneten zu überwachen, weil Neugeborene mit Geburtstrauma sehr instabil sind und alle lebenswichtigen Funktionen kontinuierlich überwacht werden müssen. Und die Kinder waren so schwach, dass wir auch keine Arzneimittel zur Ruhigstellung verwenden konnten. Deshalb baten wir die Eltern, die Kinder in den Schlaf zu wiegen. Und die waren extrem verunsichert und aufgeschreckt, wenn sie ihre Kleinen in einem Magneten verschwinden sahen. Deshalb dachte sich Chris Bösch dieses Märchenhaus aus, in dem der Magnet dann untergebracht war. Das Baby wird hier in das Gerät gefahren und die Eltern waren sehr erleichtert, wenn ihr Baby in einem Märchenhaus statt in einem Eisenkernmagneten verschwand. Das Ergebnis der Untersuchung war oft sehr schmerzlich. Hier sehen Sie die Darstellung des Kopfes eines 17 Tage alten Mädchens mit heftigem mechanischen Geburtstrauma, das in diesem Bereich des Schädels ein riesiges Hämatom verursacht hatte. Natürlich eine sehr traurige Geschichte. Aber solche Dinge kamen vor, als wir vor vielen Jahren mit MRI anfingen. Ich komme jetzt zum dritten großen Fisch. Das ist die Arbeit, die zur Anwendung von NMR in der Strukturbiologie führte. Das in diesem Bereich zu lösende Problem war ein ganz anderes als das, was man mit der Darstellung makroskopischer Objekte versuchte. Hier haben wir es nicht mit Wassermolekülen zu tun, die in jeder spektroskopischen Technik eine einzelne Linie ergeben, sondern mit Makromolekülen wie bei diesem wunderbaren Gemälde von Geis aus den 1960er-Jahren. Das ist Cytochrom C. Ich mag diese Bilder aus den Zeiten, bevor man Moleküle mit Computerprogrammen darzustellen begann. Irving Geis war ein Maler, der in den 1960er- und 1970er-Jahren all die frühen dreidimensionalen Strukturen von Proteinen und Nukleinsäuren darstellte. Erst in den 1980er-Jahren waren dann die Computer so langsam in der Lage, ähnliche, wenn auch nicht ganz so schöne Darstellungen zu erzeugen. Es geht darum, dass hier nicht nur eine Art von Wasserstoffatom vorhanden ist, sondern chemisch sehr verschiedene Atomarten. Deshalb ergibt sich keine einzelne Linie, sondern ein kompliziertes Spektrum. Das hier ist einfach eine normale Skalenbreite, die der Frequenz entspricht, bei der wir die Signale beobachten. Und in diesem speziellen Fall erkennen wir einige gut aufgelöste Signale, die aber nur in diesem Fall exakt sechs Wasserstoffatomen entsprechen, während wir hier überlappende Signale von rund 400 NMR-Signalen haben. Aus der Analyse dieser gut aufgelösten Linien wussten wir, dass die Informationen zur Ermittlung dreidimensionaler Strukturen zur Verfügung standen. Aber wir erhielten keine Informationen aus diesem Teil, der die meisten Resonanzen enthält. Der "große Fisch" bestand nun darin, von einer auf zwei Dimensionen überzugehen. Statt einer Anordnung dieser gesamten Linien auf einer einzelnen Achse erhält man eine zweidimensionale Fläche. Jetzt bewegen sich hier einzelne Linien aus diesem Durcheinander heraus und werden hier in dieser zweidimensionalen Fläche gut voneinander getrennt dargestellt. Das war der Beginn der zweidimensionalen NMR-Technik. Die ersten Versuchsserien fanden um das Jahr 1982 statt. COSY, NOESY, SECSY und FOCSY. Die heißen tatsächlich so. SECSY steht für "Spin-echo Correlated Spectroscopy". Im Vergleich zu den Bezeichnungen, die wir beispielsweise in der Immunologie kennen, ist das doch relativ geradlinig. Was steckt nun hinter der multidimensionalen NMR-Technik? Ich sage "multidimensional", weil es zwar ursprünglich zweidimensional war, wir aber heute bei der Ermittlung einer NMR-Struktur eines Proteins zwei fünfdimensionale, ein vierdimensionales und drei dreidimensionale Experimente benutzen. Das Prinzip, das ich erklären werde, ist also nicht auf zwei Dimensionen begrenzt, sondern lässt sich grundsätzlich auf eine unbegrenzte Anzahl von Dimensionen erweitern. Das hier ist ein zweidimensionales Experiment. Vielleicht ist nicht für alle zu sehen, was hier passiert. Ich versuche das einfach zu erklären. Hier gibt es t1 und t2. t2 ist die verstreichende Zeit. Wir alle werden mit jeder Sekunde etwas älter. Und in meinem Alter geht das noch viel schneller als bei einigen von Ihnen. Aber es gilt für uns alle. Wenn wir beispielsweise ein Experiment mit einem Kernspin-Ensemble durchführen, ist im Prinzip alles im Gleichgewicht. Wir können das Gleichgewicht stören und untersuchen, wie sich das System verhält. Und wir verfolgen das dann eine lange Zeit. Das hier ist also einfach die Zeit. Das Experiment kann z. B. 100 Millisekunden andauern. Und wir stören das System. Ich brauche nicht ins Detail zu gehen. Und dann beobachten wir die Oszillation bestimmter Parameter, die wir messen. Die Idee, die hinter der zweidimensionalen und höherdimensionalen Spektroskopie steckt, ist es, eine künstliche zweite Zeitachse zu schaffen, indem man das System stört. Stören bedeutet, dass man einen Hammer nimmt und schlägt, dann eine bestimmte Zeit wartet und erneut schlägt. Die Reaktion auf den zweiten Hammerschlag hängt von der Länge der Zeit ab, die zwischen dem erstem und dem zweiten Hammerschlag vergeht, weil das System, wie wir sagen, sich zu entwickeln beginnt. Und abhängig von der Länge dieser Zeit t1 beginnen wir mit der Erfassung. Ist das hier oder hier oder hier? Und wenn wir dieses Experiment 100 Mal wiederholen, also diese Zeit t1 einhundert Mal verändern, haben wir eine zweite Zeitachse geschaffen, die senkrecht zur normalen Laufzeit verläuft. Und mit der zweidimensionalen Fourier-Transformation sind wir im zweidimensionalen Frequenzbereich. Für die Ausarbeitung dieser Grundsätze erhielt Richard Ernst 1991 den Nobelpreis in Chemie. Er führte auch die ersten zweidimensionalen NMR-Experimente durch. Das war also der große Fisch Nr. 3. Wenn man sich das zwei- oder höherdimensionale Spektrum eines Proteins genauer anschaut, erkennt man eine Menge an Informationen. Hier sehen Sie ein so genanntes Konturdiagramm. Das ist das Ergebnis, nachdem ich diese Serie von überlappenden Linien im eindimensionalen Spektrum in zwei Dimensionen aufgelöst habe. Und diese Informationen reichen definitiv aus, um eine dreidimensionale Proteinstruktur zu definieren. Und dann brauchte man nur noch mathematische Werkzeuge zu entwickeln, die die dreidimensionale Struktur aus diesem Spektrum von NMR-Peaks berechnen, die in diesem Bild zu sehen waren. Diesen Schritt haben uns Distanzgeometrie-Rechnungen ermöglicht. Und von dort ging es dann weiter nach Stockholm. Das also sind die drei großen Fische. Der erste bestand darin, dass Physiker das NMR-Phänomen beobachtet hatten. Als ich Felix Bloch sehr viel später einmal traf, war er bereits pensioniert und lebte in Zürich. Er hätte niemals erwartet, dass die NMR-Technik außer einigen neuen Erkenntnissen über die Struktur und die Eigenschaften von Zellkernen interessante Daten liefern würde. Also reine Physik. Dann erfolgte die Weiterentwicklung der Kernspintomographie durch Anwendung von Feldgradienten auf makroskopische Objekte. Das war ganz klar einfach eine Anwendung des Grundprinzips von NMR. Und so konnten wir äußerst komplexe Spektren entwirren, in dem künstliche, neue Zeitdimensionen in das Experiment eingebracht wurden. Ich erwähnte bereits einen weiteren "großen Fisch". Und dazu gehe ich zurück bis zu Albert Einstein. Ich spreche über die Brownsche Bewegung und ihre Auswirkung auf NMR in Lösung. die Brownsche Bewegung von in Flüssigkeit suspendierten Teilchen bei Umgebungstemperatur. Und das war so ziemlich der Beginn der statistischen Mechanik. Schauen Sie sich nur die rechte Seite dieser Folie hier an. Zu sehen ist dort das Verhalten der kleinen Kugelfläche und der großen Kugelfläche, die in eine Flüssigkeit eingetaucht wird. Bei einer kleinen Kugelfläche ändert diese Kugelfläche unter der thermischen Bewegung der wesentlich kleineren Lösungsmittelmoleküle die Richtung und zudem die Drehbewegungen stochastisch bei einer relativ hohen Frequenz. Bei einer großen Kugelfläche ist die Trägheit wesentlich größer. Sie reagiert mit einer wesentlich geringeren Frequenz auf den Angriff der thermisch agitierten Lösungsmittelmoleküle. Für NMR bedeutet das, dass wir uns in einem vollständig anderen System der Spinphysik bewegen, abhängig davon, ob wir eine niederfrequente Brownsche Bewegung oder eine hochfrequente Brownsche Bewegung haben. Und das hat Albert Einstein 1905 ausgearbeitet, als er als Sachbearbeiter beim Patentamt in Bern tätig war. Und er lieferte damit den Schlüssel, indem er das Verhalten von Molekülen in Bezug zur Brownsche Drehbewegung im Sinne einer Korrelationszeit TauC lieferte, die alle wesentlichen Parameter steuert, die sowohl MRI als auch die Analyse großer Moleküle in Lösung ermöglichen. Albert Einstein hat also direkt zum Wohlergehen dutzender Fußballspieler in Brasilien in diesen Tagen beigetragen. Die Ergebnisse von Einstein lassen sich durch einzelne Übergangsbasisoperatoren in die Beschreibung von NMR-Experimenten integrieren. Das hat in jüngerer Zeit zur transversalen relaxationsoptimierten Spektroskopie geführt. Dadurch konnten Größenhindernisse überwunden werden - Sie sehen hier einen ziemlich großen Proteinkomplex. Der GroEL-GroES-ADP-Komplex - und ergibt das dann ein ziemlich schönes Spektrum wenn man all diese Grundsätze der richtig erkannten Auswirkungen der Frequenz der Brownsche Bewegung auf NMR in Lösung anwendet. Wie kann das für uns von Nutzen sein? Warum ist das der vierte "große Fisch" auf diesem Gebiet? Wenn wir einen menschlichen Körper mit MRI betrachten, sehen wir kein Fett. Wir sehen keine Proteine, wir sehen keine Membranen. Wir sehen nur die Wassermoleküle. Und das hängt sehr einfach damit zusammen, dass das Wassermolekül sehr klein ist. Und selbst in unserem Körper bewegt es sich schnell genug, um eine scharfe NMR-Linie zu erzeugen, so dass wir MRI an lebenden Menschen durchführen können. Nachdem das TROSY-Prinzip entdeckt wurde, sind wir jetzt in der Lage, Membranproteine mit NMR in Lösung zu untersuchen. Und gestern hat Dr. Kobilka in seinem Vortrag mehrfach gesagt: wenn wir die Funktionsweise von komplexen Molekülen wie GPCR (G-Protein gekoppelte Rezeptoren) verstehen wollen." Das ist mein derzeitiges Forschungsgebiet. Ich möchte das hier nicht vertiefen. Ich arbeite in einem Team mit Professor Raymond Stevens, einem Kristallographen, zusammen. Und gemeinsam nutzen wir die Kristallographie und NMR in ähnlicher Weise, die Dr. Kobilka Ihnen das gestern beschrieben hat. Ich hoffe, dass diese historische Übersicht Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon vermitteln konnte, wie weit Grundlagenforschung geht, bevor sie Früchte trägt. Mit Früchten ist eine Verbesserung des menschlichen Lebens gemeint. Aber es bedeutet auch Geld. MRI ist heute ein Riesengeschäft. In den Krankenhäusern sind Tausende solcher Geräte im Einsatz. Dadurch wurden zehntausende Hightech-Arbeitsplätze geschaffen. Kongresse zum Thema MRI, die vor 30 Jahren überhaupt noch nicht existierten, werden von 10.000 bis 12.000 Teilnehmern besucht. Und bei genauerer Betrachtung ist zu erkennen, dass einige der Grundlagen dafür vor langer Zeit geschaffen wurden ... In Einsteins Fall ... die Theorie der Brownschen Bewegung wurde lange vor der Erfindung von NMR entwickelt. Der heute insbesondere in den USA zu spürende Trend, nur Forschung zu unterstützen, die sich sofort am Krankenbett umsetzen lässt, verhindert meiner Ansicht nach die Möglichkeit, dass wir in 50 Jahren in der Lage sind, neuartige physikalische Prinzipien in der praktischen Medizin und in der biomedizinischen Forschung einzusetzen. Ich sollte auch noch erwähnen, dass die gesamte NMR-Forschung, die zu diesen Ergebnissen geführt hat, im Rahmen kleiner Forschungsprojekte erfolgt ist. Das war kein Riesenprojekt, das sich Politiker auf ihre Fahnen schreiben konnten und mit dem sie Werbung für ihre Unterstützung der Wissenschaften machen konnten. Das waren alles kleine Forschungsarbeiten. Und genau diese Art von Arbeit wird heute wenig unterstützt. Ich befürchte, dass wir die Folgen in den nächsten Jahrzehnten zu spüren bekommen werden. Danke. Applaus.

Kurt Wüthrich on Magnetic Resonance Imaging
(00:13:13 - 00:15:18)

MRI was introduced into practical medicine in the early 1980s. Initially, there were twelve machines worldwide, and everybody working with MR imaging knew each other. Today, approximately 25,000 MRI machines are in use worldwide. About 2,000 MR imaging units are sold worldwide every year. After an average of seven years, machines are being replaced.[9] Peter Lauterbur, however, did not get a patent on his basic discovery when he applied for it in the 1970s. Officials from his university declined his patent application, reasoning that the foreseeable applications of his discovery would not cover the expense of securing a patent.[10]

While MRI will continue to play a very important role in medical diagnosis, NMR is expected to deliver the more insights into nature’s structures and score, the deeper scientists dive into the dynamic processes within the nanocosmos of living cells and the less crystallography can help them there. Spectrometers will continue to increase in size and strength. At Frankfurt University, for example, where the NMR story began with the Stern-Gerlach experiment almost 100 years ago, one of the world’s first 1,2 Gigahertz NMR machines with a height of more than four meters and a weight of ten tons will be installed soon. It could enable researchers to study proteins and RNA in the cell at physiological concentrations, light activated states of membrane receptors at millisecond time-resolution or the formation of macromolecular complexes.


Footnotes:

[1] Amos Elon. The pity of it all. A portrait of the German-Jewish epoch 1743-1933. New York 2002, p. 362.

[2] Richard Feynman. Feynman lectures on Physics Complete Volumes 2, p. 445.

[3] Luisa Bonolis. Research Profile Otto Stern. With regard to NMR, Luisa Bonolis’ Research Profiles of Isidor Isaac Rabi, Felix Bloch and Richard Ernst within this mediatheque are also highly recommendable.

[4] Bretislav, F. and Herschbach, D. (2003) Stern and Gerlach: How a bad cigar helped reorient atomic physics. Physics Today 56: 53-59, p. 53.

[5] cf. http://www.magnet.fsu.edu/education/tutorials/pioneers/rabi.html

[6] cf. http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/physics/imaginglife/documents/article_che_1991.html

[7] Luisa Bonolis. Research Profile Richard Ernst.

[8] cf. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2002/advanced-chemistryprize2002.pdf, p. 10

[9] cf. Magnetic Resonance. A peer-reviewed, critical introduction http://www.magnetic-resonance.org/ch/21-01.html

[10] cf. http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/physics/imaginglife/documents/article_med_2003.html


Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Share