The Brain and How It Works

Brain Function 101

The age of modern neuroscience has been ushered in with the brilliant work of the Spaniard Santiago Ramón y Cajal. His amazingly intricate and beautiful depictions of the nervous system laid the basis for the identification and characterisation of many important brain structures and, together with the Italian Camillo Golgi, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906. Listening to contemporary Nobel Laureates talking at the Lindau Meetings, it is striking how often Cajal’s name comes up and how many still acknowledge their debt to him.

In this spirit, laureates visiting Lindau often provide their audiences with basic insights into the function of the brain and of its functional units, neurons, before discussing the intricacies of their Nobel Prize-winning research. What sets neurons apart from other cells and how do they communicate with each other? Here is a succinct summary by Nobel Laureate Erwin Neher:

 

Erwin Neher (2014) - Short-term Synaptic Plasticity

Thank you, Dr. Blatt, for the introduction. It’s a great privilege to speak in front of about 600 hundred of the very best young researchers of the world which I hope a fraction of it at least is interested in a very interesting topic, namely understanding how our brain functions. So Roger Tsien a few minutes ago told you about some interesting ideas and interesting facts about the very long term forms of plasticity which indeed are believed or are apt to store information in the brain to mediate learning and memory. Let me go to the other side, to the very short term forms of plasticity. But before doing so, let me show you in a few slides a little bit about how our understanding of what happens in the brain developed over the last 200 years. And this of course starts with the famous experiments of the Italian scientists Walter and Galvani, Galvani who taught us or showed in spectacular experiments that the frog muscle can be made to twitch when the nerve is stimulated by a shock of electricity. This demonstrated that indeed there was something like electricity, electrical signalling in our body. that our brain is made up of this filigrane network of neurons. Roger Tsien already referred to this. And today we know that our brain is a network of about 10^12 of such neurons which are connected with each other via synapses. And on average a given neuron receives about 1000 or 10,000 inputs from other neurons. So what is it, this strange cell, a neuron? This strange structure? It is nothing else but a quite general cell which however has some special structures. So, even a normal cell has some kind of processes called microvilli. In the neuron such processes are exaggerated in the sense that a neuron possesses two kinds of protrusions some are called dendrites which are the receiving organs of the neuron. One special protrusion is the axon, a tube-like structure which can be very long and which transmits the nerve impulse to cells to which this given neuron is connected to. So each neuron receives inputs from thousands of other neurons primarily on its dendrites and these inputs delivered by proceeding cells can be both excitatory and inhibitory. A given neuron integrates or adds up these signals and whenever the electrical potential inside the cell soma, as a consequence of all these influences converging onto a given cell, whenever the potential inside the cell surpasses a certain threshold an action potential or a nerve impulse is generated at the so-called axon hillock. And this nerve action potential then travels down the axon to the nerve endings exciting or inhibiting other neurons. So there’s a nice movie or animation provided by Dr. Hasan from the Science Bridge in Heidelberg who illustrates, gives an impression on how this firework of axon potentials may happen in parts of our brain. You can see that an input fires an action potential which then spreads, excites other ones and this is going on. The movie is not correct in every detail but I think that doesn’t matter for getting the general idea. So the point of interest of course when you want to study the connectivity between neurons is the synapse. What appears to be here is this little bouton where a preceding neuron signals... or a sending neuron signals onto a receiving neuron. And knowledge about what happens at the synapse started actually not at the synapse between nerve cells but it started at the so-called neuromuscular junction, a synapse which makes a connection between a neuron and the underlying muscle cell. So when the nervous system wants a certain muscle to contract it sends an action potential through the motor nerve to the corresponding muscle cells. There the nerve ending splits up into several endings and what happens there is exactly the same thing which happens between two neurons, namely that the presynaptic ending liberates a transmitter which excites the underlying neuron. So our knowledge about these processes came to a large extent from experiments by Sir Bernard Katz Castillo and Del Castillo studying the synapse. And I show here one of their early registrations of the signal which can be recorded in a muscle fibre You can see two phases, first a so-called excitatory postsynaptic potential which represents the effect of the transmitter being liberated by the nerve and then surpassing the threshold just like in a nerve cell an action potential is being elicited in the muscle cell which then initiates the contraction. What Katz and Del Castillo did is they looked in detail at what happens here before or just during resting periods. And they recognised when they turned up the gain of their amplifier that there were all these little spontaneously occurring little blips. You know, very, very small signals. Now ordinarily many researchers dealing with sensitive amplifiers at high gain would dismiss such signals because there are multiple sources of interference, just influences by some instruments in the vicinity. Katz and Del Castillo did not do so. They actually started to study these small signals because they realised that they saw these little blips only when they recorded at sites close to the neuromuscular junction to where the nerve is. When they recorded a few millimetres away on the same muscle they wouldn't see these characteristic blips. Also some distance away from the muscle the wave form of the global signal would be different. This initial postsynaptic potential would be missing. What they saw is just the electrical excitability spreading in the muscle fibre. Also what they realised is that this amplitude of this excitatory postsynaptic signal is very much dependent on the calcium concentration in the medium. So when they reduced the calcium concentration, this initial signal became smaller so that eventually the action potential failed. What was left was a small signal. And when they reduced this to the extreme, they saw that the stimulating nerve impulse sometimes elicited a signal like this. And sometimes it failed to elicit any signal. So this kind of finding together with electron microscopy data from the De Robertis Laboratory in Argentina which showed that there were in the synaptic terminal some small structures, some vesicles now known as synaptic vesicles lead to this idea that indeed what happens at the nerve, at the synapse is the following. The nerve impulse causes influx of calcium into the nerve terminal. This is why the process is so much dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. The calcium causes the fusion of such vesicles which then release their contents in neurotransmitter. Now, of course an action potential with calcium influx leads to the simultaneous release of many of such vesicles. The little blips which they saw in the recording at high resolution was interpreted to be spontaneous fusion of such vesicles with the plasma membrane. And then postsynaptically the neurotransmitter diffuses to the postsynapse and opens ion channels in the postsynaptic membrane. So we have a kind of transformation of an electrical signal into a chemical signal released from a presynaptic terminal and back translated into an electrical signal in the postsynaptic membrane. Now, synaptic plasticity. The term plasticity describes the observation that synaptic strength which is the signal being produced in the postsynaptic neuron by a presynaptic action potential is not a fixed quantity like in the electronic computer but changes constantly depending on the use of the synapse. Neuroscientists are convinced that this plasticity is a very important aspect of neuronal signal processing in the nervous system. And that indeed particularly the long term changes, the long term changes in connectivity between neurons underlies learning and memory. And this as I understand was Roger Tsien’s topic. Now, short term plasticity on the other hand I think is not less important because it mediates basic information processing tasks like adaptation, filtering and others. I will mention a few of these tasks in one of my following slides. What's also interesting is that different types of synapses have their own personality with respect to this short term plasticity. Some synapses, when you stimulate them repetitively like those of the climbing fibres, show depression in the sense that after some rest period a first response is very large followed by smaller responses. Other synapses show exactly the opposite, namely at first smaller response followed by subsequently increasing responses. Still other synapses have more complex types of behaviour. So given synapse on average displays a certain type of plasticity. Now here is just an example of what short term depression can be good for in a network in which many of such neurons are put together to subserve some task. I mentioned already a depression is good for providing adaptation to sensory stimuli. It is good for so called gain control, regulating the amine activity in certain brain areas. You can build networks with synapses displaying depression which provide, which generate rhythms. You can do temporal filtering but also more complex tasks of the central nervous system like sound localisation can be implemented in neural networks which use a short term depression. And even the so-called orientation tuning, an individual system which is seen in the primary visual cortex in the sense, that there are certain cells which primarily respond to contrasts in a certain orientation. One can simulate this and obtain insensitivity towards, invariance towards differences in absolute contrast by implying in the network short term depression. Okay, so another aspect which is being discussed now is a manifestation of short term plasticity, is the switching between different brain states. We know that our brain can switch within seconds between different states such as quiet state, stress, arousal, and focusing, attention. There are different sleep states which can be observed with EEG, where within seconds again the pattern of the EEG can change between the well-known REM sleep phase and other phases. Such fast switching of course cannot be due to long term plastic changes because they need time to develop, they need time to be trained and so on. So it is known that such brain states are controlled by a number of diffusely projecting transmitter systems such as dopaminergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, peptidergic and so on. Basically all the kinds of input mechanisms which were discussed by Dr. Kobilka yesterday in his lecture. And it is also known that such diffusely projected transmitter systems short term change, short term plasticity in their target areas. So my conclusion is that studying such short term plasticity, its dynamic nature and its mechanism may reveal some very important aspects of brain function, which may not be less important than the long term changes. Now, although these short forms of plasticity have been described already in the very early work on the neuromuscular junction by Katz and Miledi, we still... I think there are still many things which we don’t know about them and some of the essential features that we don’t probably understand yet. Now, what can happen when a synapse changes its strength, its short term plasticity? These are of course many things because it’s a multi-step process. There may be changes in the action potential wave form and the associated calcium influx. There may be postsynaptic changes, there may be inhibitory so-called auto receptors which feed back so that the transmitter feeds back onto the willingness of the remaining vesicles to release. There is a problem of recycling of vesicles and consumption of vesicles. In general, I think these are processes which molecularly mainly involve changes in second messenger levels, changes in phosphorylation and possibly also cytoskeletal reorganisations due to all the trafficking. Now in the rest of my talk I want to concentrate on basically two aspects, namely the depression mediated by the depletion of vesicles and the changes in the... molecular changes in the release apparatus which modulate the willingness of release-ready vesicles to actually fuse in response to a calcium stimulus. Now, we have been studying this process for a number of years in a very special synapse, the so-called Calyx of Held synapse. This is a synapse in the auditory pathway. What you see here is a slice of the brain stem with the auditory pathway laid out. The auditory fibres make first synapse in the ventral cochlear nucleus. The axon of the receiving neuron transverses the midline and makes a contact here with another cell in the so-called medium MNTB, the medium nucleus of trapezoid body. And both of these synapses here which have this very special shape of a calix or cup-like presynaptic terminal surrounding a compact postsynaptic cell body. And the special shape of the synapses is probably due to the fact that for the sound localisation for directional hearing the signals are coming from the two ears have to be processed very precisely so that at the point where the information from one ear meets the information from the other ear in the lateral superior olive the very fine differences in intensity and timing can be detected. So we have here a synapse which is very special in its geometry but which offers for electrophysiology the advantage that both the pre- and the postsynaptic compartments can be voltage clamped, can be a subject of very precise electrophysiological measurements simultaneously. And this was indeed found in Bert Sakmann’s lab by Gerard Borst and Bert Sakmann now almost twenty years ago. So we studied this synapse and studied its plasticity. Just to point out what we can do since we can voltage clamp the pre- and postsynaptic compartments and record corresponding currents. We can control the ionic milieu inside both compartments for precise analysis of the current flow. We can load the terminal with fluorescent indicator. Theis and me have been doing so over fifteen years, mainly using Roger Tsien’s fluorescent dyes. Well, we can do many things with this synapse which cannot be done in other synapses because usually synapses are very small bouton-like structures which are just too small to be approached and targeted by electrophysiological electrodes. Now, most of the calyxes of this kind show prominent synaptic depression. This is a response to a 100 Hz stimulus after the synapse was given some rest. We see a very large first excitatory current now, an invert current which is induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate which is released from the presynaptic terminal. A second stimulus 10 ms later gives a smaller response and finally after four or five stimuli the response is quite small. Now the synapse works at very high spike rates. The auditory nerve is highly active with between 10 and 50 action potentials per second even in the completely silent state. So this synapse, at least the one shown here, would work in a permanent state of partial depression. So that’s the physiological state of the synapse. But when we look in detail... This is the average response. When we look in detail at the pattern of short term plasticity, we see that some of the cells here just one particular cell displayed does show this very strong depression. This is shown here for three frequencies: 200 Hz, 100 Hz and 50 Hz. But in the same preparation next to that cell which shows this behaviour maybe we may find another cell which shows exactly the opposite, namely an initial facilitation. The second response is bigger than the first one followed by depression. Now, this is understood in the sense... Or I should point out that compared to this cell that cell has a very much smaller first EPSC namely of only about 1.1 nanoamp, whereas this had 2.5 nanoamp. So the understanding of this pattern is that in this cell the release probability was so high that during the first response already a good fraction of the available vesicles got released so that subsequent responses were smaller. In this cell the release probability during the first stimulus was smaller so that the record reveals that indeed for the second and third stimulus the excitation power of the nerve is stronger that the release probability for the remaining vesicles increases. So this biphasic behaviour comes about by first an increase in the release probability which is seen only when the initial release probability is very small. But then eventually there’s more and more stimuli. The synapse will use up all its vesicles and will fall into depression. Okay, so this consideration already points out that the so-called paired-pulse ratio, the ratio of the second to the first stimulus is a kind of measure which is used by many physiologists to first of all characterise the short term plasticity behaviour of the synapse and then also this measure is used as a kind of indicator of how large initial release probability is. Now when I record from 31 synapses like this and plot this so-called paired-pulse ratio against the amplitude of the first EPSC, I see there is a systematic relationship and that the larger the first EPSCs, the smaller the paired-pulse ratio. This is in line with many observations that were made at other synapses. Okay, but still since we are dealing here with synapses which are supposed to do the same job, which are morphologically all the same, which no obvious differences, one asks the question Why does this have a smaller release probability and a large PPR and this one is the opposite? So the hypothesis is that vesicles which are release-ready can indeed exist in two states. In a state of low release probability, typically the numbers would be that about 5 - 10% of the vesicles would be released by a single action potential. And the so-called super prime state with high release probability. Now, this term “super-prime” has been used in a number of contexts and a number of molecular mechanisms have been proposed. Why a super-prime vesicle has higher release probability than the other one, I will come back to that and try to explain that it’s probably the energy barrier of fusion which is being changed by biochemical modulatory influences. Okay, that’s written here in this last sentence, namely that it’s background modulator influences probably by diffusely projecting transmitting systems which cause diversity. Now, what kind of signalling mechanism might be underlying this? The most prominent one which probably is connected to this is the diacylglycerol mediated signalling pathways, one variant of the g-protein mediated pathways discussed yesterday by Dr. Kobilka. Where a receptor interacts with a g-protein, the g-protein activates phospholipase C splitting inositol phospholipids generating the second messenger diacylglycerol and IP3 which releases calcium. Now, it has been shown before that this diacylglycerol branch of the pathway has a special role in priming of synaptic vesicles and also in the release of synaptic vesicles. Namely there is a protein called MON-13 which has a so-called C1 domain. A domain which responds to a diacylglycerol and previous work has shown that this MON-131 is involved in the priming process and probably also then in the regulation of the energy barrier for release. So, we cannot of course change the brain state by stimulating... by diffusely projecting neurons in the brain slice preparation. I should mention this, all these experiments are done in rat brain slices with the conventional electrophysiological techniques. But we can mimic so to speak the action of this diacylglycerol mediated signalling by applying a phorbol ester, a mimic of diacylglycerol. And what you observe is when you apply this substance all the EPSCs are on average 2-5 times larger than under control conditions. And if we now plot the paired-pulse ratio again against the first EPSCs, we see that these new data points which are the filled symbols nicely follow the trend from the control data point and this more or less seamless continuation also overlapping between some of the points under phorbol ester and some of the points under control conditions. Seems to tell me or provokes the hypothesis that phorbol ester shifts this equilibrium or this dynamic equilibrium between primed and super-primed vesicles to the super-primed site. Now when you look at this property further, you can see that super-priming is a property of rested synapses. At 200 Hz stimulation EPSCs converge to the same steady state value. This is shown here in these recordings. Here is the first response of a relatively large cell or a cell with large EPSC under the influence of phorbol ester. This value is from the same cell without phorbol ester. This is a cell with a relatively small amplitude but under phorbol ester and this is the corresponding first value for the same cell without phorbol ester. Now you see the first responses are very, very different. Nevertheless the second, third, fourth, fifth responses converge to the same level. And the same level is not 0, it is just very similar. So in that sense it seems that super-priming or this differentiation between synapses only occurs... it needs time. It’s only present when the time, when the synapses had time to develop its super-priming. Interpretation of this finding is that as I just mentioned if the synapse has time to develop a super-prime state, then there is this difference. If however during such a drain there is a kind of constant flow of vesicles being released and newly recruited... I mean this steady state is a kind of steady state between vesicle consumption and vesicle delivery. So the hypothesis is that, well, if the cell is not allowed to go into super-prime state, then all these cells behaves the same. Of course this can be readily put into a simple kinetic model, where you assume that in order for vesicles to be released, they have to first undergo some molecular, some step which puts them docked at the membrane and into a state which is ready to be released. And if there is enough time then they can even mature further into super-prime state. So the first priming state will be fast. The second state would be slow. Now, this explains this behaviour. It also explains quantitatively what you observe when you plot the steady state value of release versus stimulation frequency. Here you see two curves, one under control conditions, one under a phorbol ester. These are normalised to the respective first value but you can see that the broken curves which are predictions of this simple model very nicely follow the experimental points. This is also the case for the low end of the relationship connecting steady state release and frequency. And of course from this model you then can extract the relevant and most interesting parameters, namely the data are compatible with the idea that the normally primed state has a release probability of here in this case 0.06, a relatively small release probability, whereas the super-prime state has a probability of 0.42. The so-called priming rate is fast, 4 per second, which means that in about 250 mms a new vesicle is loaded onto a release site whereas the rate for this second super-priming step is very low in the control case and enhanced by the action of the phorbol ester. Okay, now the findings which I described are not singular to the Calyx of Held. The various aspects of the findings are shared by a variety of other synapses. So the heterogeneity between synapses of the same type has been described also for the mouse neuromuscular junction. The prototype synapse, the hippocampus between CA3 and CA1 neurons, has been shown a few years ago to show similar, very similar kind of heterogeneity by a series of papers by Hanse and Gustafsson and some more recent papers. Also this phenomenon of what I call here the collapse of heterogeneity at higher frequency has been described by Hanse and Gustafsson and discussed by Walters and Smith in the context of information processing in neuronal networks. And this slow conversion from prime to super-prime state has indeed also been an element in a model proposed by Stefan Hallermann for cerebellar mossy fibre synapses. So, although I think the action potential wave form and calcium influx is the strongest modulatory influence on the short term plasticity because calcium currents are known to be able to show what's called facilitation, also inactivation, they are regulated themselves by G-protein pathways and so on. And when there are changes in calcium influx there are very large changes as a consequence in the release due to the very steep relationship between calcium influx and release. But I think the experiments and the Calyx of Held make a strong point for this other form of modulation of short term plasticity which is not due to calcium influx. We can tell this is a Calyx of Held because the influence of phorbol ester on calcium influx has been very carefully studied by Ralf Schneggenburger’s laboratory a few years ago. Although these previous papers have shown that there are no major changes in pool size. So the phenomenon I described really seems to be a relatively novel form of change of modulation in the energy barrier for releasing a vesicle. Well, the similarity between modulation by phorbol ester and the heterogeneity at the synapses at rest suggests that the heterogeneity actually comes from different degrees of background modulation. And I think that this concept of two states of release-ready vesicles and the influence of super-priming will contribute to understanding a number of important phenomena of signal processing in our brain. So of course this is not my work, indeed all the data shown were obtained by Holger Taschenberger who until recently was a postdoctoral fellow in my lab. My contribution as an Emeritus is only data analysis and model building. Many of the ideas and background data were provided by Takeshi Sakaba, a long term collaborator who is now in Doshisha University in Kyoto, Ralf Schneggenburger who is a professor at the APFL in Lausanne and Suk-Ho Lee, a colleague from Seoul National University. Thank you for your attention.

Vielen Dank Ihnen, Dr. Blatt, für die einführenden Worte. Für mich ist es eine große Ehre, vor rund 600 der besten jungen Nachwuchswissenschaftler der Welt sprechen zu können, von denen, so hoffe ich, vielleicht einige an einem sehr spannenden Thema interessiert sind, nämlich zu verstehen, wie unser Gehirn funktioniert. Roger Tsien hat Ihnen eben einige interessante Theorien und Fakten über die sehr langzeitigen Formen von Plastizität vermittelt, von denen man sogar annimmt oder die dazu geeignet sind, Informationen im Gehirn zu speichern, um Mechanismen des Lernens und des Gedächtnisses zu vermitteln. Ich möchte die andere Seite beleuchten, nämlich die sehr kurzzeitigen Formen der Plastizität. Aber bevor ich damit beginne, möchte ich Ihnen zunächst einige Folien darüber zeigen, wie sich unsere Kenntnisse über die Vorgänge im Gehirn in den letzten 200 Jahren entwickelt haben. Und das beginnt natürlich mit den berühmten Experimenten der italienischen Wissenschaftler Walter und Galvani. Galvani, der uns gelehrt hat bzw. in spektakulären Experimenten gezeigt hat, dass der Froschmuskel durch eine Stromstoßstimulation des Nervs zum Kontrahieren angeregt werden kann. Damit wurde nachgewiesen, dass es in unserem Körper in der Tat so etwas wie Elektrizität, elektrische Signalwege gibt. Hundert Jahre später zeigten uns die wunderbaren Zeichnungen des spanischen Neuroanatomisten Ramón y Cajal, dass unser Gehirn aus diesem filigranen Neuronennetzwerk besteht. Roger Tsien hat bereits darauf Bezug genommen. Und heute wissen wir, dass unser Gehirn ein Netzwerk aus rund 10^12 solcher über Synapsen miteinander verbundenen Neuronen ist. Durchschnittlich empfängt jedes einzelne Neuron rund 1000 bis 10.000 Inputsignale von anderen Neuronen. Was ist eigentlich ein Neuron, diese merkwürdige Zelle, diese merkwürdige Struktur? Es ist nichts anderes als eine relativ normale Zelle, die allerdings mit einigen speziellen Strukturen ausgestattet ist. Selbst eine normale Zelle verfügt über bestimmte Prozesse, die als Mikrovilli bezeichnet werden. Im Neuron werden solche Prozesse in dem Sinne verstärkt, dass ein Neuron über zwei Arten von Protrusionen verfügt, von denen einige als Dendriten bezeichnet werden, die die Empfängerorgane des Neurons sind. Und ein spezielles Protrusion ist das Axon, eine röhrenartige Struktur, die sehr lang sein kann und die den Nervenimpuls auf Zellen überträgt, mit denen dieses spezielle Neuron verbunden ist. Jedes Neuron erhält also Input-Signale von Tausenden anderer Neurone, in erster Linie an seinen Dendriten. Diese Signale, die von sich entwickelnden Zellen geliefert werden, können sowohl erregend als auch hemmend wirken. Ein einzelnes Neuron integriert oder summiert diese Signale. Immer dann, wenn das elektrische Potenzial im Zellsoma infolge all dieser auf eine bestimmte Zelle einwirkenden Einflüsse einen bestimmten Schwellenwert übersteigt, wird ein Aktionspotenzial oder ein Nervenimpuls am so genannten Axonhügel erzeugt. Und dieses Nervenaktionspotenzial wandert dann das Axon herunter zu den Nervenenden, die andere Neuronen anregen oder hemmen. Es gibt einen netten Animationsfilm von Dr. Hasan von der Science Bridge in Heidelberg, der einen Eindruck darüber vermittelt bzw. verdeutlicht, wie dieses Feuerwerk von Axonpotenzialen in Teilen unseres Gehirns ablaufen könnte. Sie sehen hier, dass ein Signalinput ein Aktionspotenzial abfeuert, das sich verbreitet und weiter erregt. Und das setzt sich dann weiter fort. Der Film ist nicht in jedem Detail korrekt, aber das ändert nichts daran, dass man, wie ich finde, eine grundsätzliche Vorstellung erhält. Wenn man die Konnektivität zwischen Neuronen untersuchen möchte, gilt das Interesse der Synapse, die hier dieser kleine Bouton ist, wo ein vorausgehendes Neuron Signale … oder ein sendendes Neuron Signale auf ein empfangendes Neuron überträgt. Und Kenntnisse darüber, was an der Synapse passiert, wurden zunächst tatsächlich nicht an der Synapse zwischen Nervenzellen gesammelt, sondern das begann bei der neuromuskulären Verbindung – einer Synapse, die eine Verbindung zwischen einem Neuron und der zugrunde liegenden Muskelzelle herstellt. Wenn das Nervensystem die Kontraktion eines bestimmten Muskels erreichen will, sendet es über den motorischen Nerv ein Aktionspotenzial an die entsprechenden Muskelzellen. Dort verzweigen sich die Nervenenden in mehrere Enden und dort passiert dann exakt das Gleiche wie zwischen zwei Neuronen, nämlich, dass das präsynaptische Ende einen Transmitter freisetzt, der das zugrunde liegende Neuron erregt. Unsere Kenntnisse über diese Prozesse stammen größtenteils von Experimenten, die Sir Bernard Katz und Del Castillo zur Untersuchung der Synapse durchgeführt haben. Und ich zeige Ihnen hier eine ihrer frühen Registrierungen des Signals, das in einer Muskelfaser erfasst werden kann wenn der diesen Muskel integrierende Nerv stimuliert wird. Sie sehen hier zwei Phasen, zuerst ein sogenanntes exzitatorisches postsynaptisches Potenzial, das den Effekt des vom Nerv freigesetzten Transmitters repräsentiert. Und beim Überschreiten des Schwellenwertes wird genauso wie in einer Nervenzelle ein Aktionspotenzial in der Muskelzelle ausgelöst, das dann die Kontraktion initiiert. Katz und Del Castillo beschäftigten sich detailliert mit dem, was hier vor oder unmittelbar während der Ruheperioden geschieht. Und sie entdeckten, dass beim Aufdrehen der Leistung ihres Verstärkers all diese spontan auftretenden, kleinen Signalpunkte erschienen. Das waren wirklich sehr, sehr, sehr kleine Signale. Üblicherweise würden die meisten Forscher, die die Arbeit mit empfindlichen Verstärkern bei hoher Leistung gewohnt sind, solche Signale verwerfen, da es eine Vielzahl von Störquellen und Einflüssen durch andere Instrumente in der Nähe gibt. Katz und Del Castillo machten das aber nicht und untersuchten tatsächlich diese kleinen Signale, weil ihnen aufgefallen war, dass diese kleinen Signalpunkte nur zu sehen waren, wenn die Signalerfassung in der direkten Nähe der neuromuskulären Verbindung erfolgte, wo der Nerv ist. Erfolgte die Signalerfassung nur einige wenige Millimeter daneben auf demselben Muskel, beobachteten sie diese charakteristischen Signalpunkte nicht. In einiger Entfernung zum Muskel war auch die Wellenform des globalen Signals anders. Dieses anfängliche postsynaptische Potenzial fehlte. Was sie sahen, war einfach die elektrische Erregbarkeit, die sich in der Muskelfaser ausbreitet. Sie stellten außerdem fest, dass die Amplitude dieses exzitatorischen postsynaptischen Signals sehr stark von der Kalziumkonzentration im Medium abhängt. Wenn sie die Kalziumkonzentration reduzierten, wurde dieses Ausgangssignal kleiner, sodass schließlich das Aktionspotenzial versagte. Zurück blieb ein kleines Signal. Und wenn sie dieses extrem reduzierten, beobachteten sie, dass der stimulierende Nervenimpuls manchmal ein Signal wie dieses auslöste und es ihm manchmal nicht gelang, ein Signal auszulösen. Solche Ergebnisse führten in Kombination mit den elektronenmikroskopischen Daten aus dem De Robertis Labor in Argentinien über an den synaptischen Enden bestehende, kleine Strukturen, die heute als synaptische Vesikel bezeichnet werden, zu der Erkenntnis, dass an dem Nerv, an der Synapse das Folgende passiert: Der Nervenimpuls verursacht einen Kalziumeinstrom in die Nervenendigung. Deshalb ist dieser Prozess so stark von der extrazellulären Kalziumkonzentration abhängig. Das Kalzium verursacht die Fusion dieser Vesikel, die dann ihren Neurotransmitterinhalt freisetzen. Und natürlich führt ein Aktionspotenzial mit Kalziumeinstrom zu einer simultanen Freisetzung vieler solcher Vesikel. Die kleinen Signalpunkte, die bei der hochauflösenden Erfassung beobachtet worden waren, wurden als Spontanfusion solcher Vesikel mit der Plasmamembran interpretiert. Der Neurotransmitter diffundiert postsynaptisch zur Postsynapse und öffnet Ionenkanäle in der postsynaptischen Membran. Wir haben hier also eine Art von Transformation eines elektrischen Signals in ein chemisches Signal, das von einem präsynaptischen Ende freigesetzt wird und in der postsynaptischen Membran in ein elektrisches Signal zurückübersetzt wird. Nun zur synaptischen Plastizität. Der Begriff „Plastizität“ beschreibt die Beobachtung, dass die synaptische Erregung, bei der es sich um ein im postsynaptischen Neuron durch ein präsynaptisches Aktionspotenzial erzeugtes Signal handelt, keine feststehende Größenordnung wie bei einem Computer aufweist, sondern sich, abhängig vom Gebrauch der Synapse, kontinuierlich verändert. Neurowissenschaftler sind davon überzeugt, dass diese Plastizität ein sehr entscheidender Aspekt in der neuronalen Signalverarbeitung des Nervensystems ist und dass tatsächlich insbesondere die langfristigen Veränderungen der neuronalen Konnektivität Lernen und Gedächtnis zugrunde liegen. Und das war, so wie ich es verstanden habe, auch das Thema von Roger Tsien. Die Kurzzeitplastizität ist demgegenüber meiner Meinung nach genauso wichtig, weil sie grundsätzliche informationsverarbeitende Aufgaben wie Adaptation, Filterung und andere vermittelt. Ich werde in einer meiner nächsten Folien auf solche Aufgaben eingehen. Interessant ist auch, dass verschiedene Synapsentypen eine eigene Persönlichkeit in Bezug auf diese Kurzzeitplastizität zeigen. Wenn man Synapsen, etwa Kletterfasern, wiederholt stimuliert, zeigen einige Synapsen eine Art von Depression in dem Sinne, dass die erste Reaktion nach einer Ruhephase sehr groß ist und danach kleinere Reaktionen folgen. Bei anderen Synapsen ist exakt das Gegenteil zu beobachten, nämlich zunächst eine kleinere Reaktion, gefolgt von zunehmend größeren Reaktionen. Und wieder andere Synapsen weisen komplexere Verhaltensweisen auf. Eine bestimme Synapse verfügt also durchschnittlich über eine gewisse Form der Plastizität. Hier ist ein Beispiel dafür, wozu eine Kurzzeitdepression in einem Netzwerk gut sein kann, in dem viele solcher Neuronen zusammenkommen, um eine Aufgabe zu erfüllen. Ich erwähnte bereits, dass eine solche Depression gut dafür ist, die Adaptation an sensorische Stimuli zu ermöglichen. Das ist gut für die so genannte Verstärkungsregelung, die die Amin-Aktivität in bestimmten Hirnregionen reguliert. Man kann Netzwerke mit Synapsen bauen, an denen eine rhythmisch auftretende Depression erfolgt. Es kann eine zeitliche Filterung veranlasst werden. Aber auch komplexere Aufgaben des zentralen Nervensystems, wie die Schalllokalisation können in neuronalen Netzen mit Hilfe einer Kurzzeitdepression bewältigt werden. Und selbst das so genannte Orientierungstuning, ein im primären visuellen Kortex beobachtbares individuelles System mit bestimmten Zellen, die in erster Linie auf Kontraste in einer bestimmten Orientierung reagieren … Man kann das simulieren und eine Unempfindlichkeit gegenüber…eine Invarianz gegenüber Differenzen im absoluten Kontrast erreichen, indem man eine Kurzzeitdepression in das Netzwerk induziert. Auch ein weiterer, heute diskutierter Aspekt ist eine Erscheinungsform der Kurzzeitplastizität, nämlich das Umschalten zwischen verschiedenen Gehirnzuständen. Wir wissen, dass unser Gehirn innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen unterschiedlichen Zuständen hin und her schalten kann, beispielsweise Ruhezustand, Stresszustand, Erregungszustand, Fokussierung, Aufmerksamkeit. Mit dem EEG lassen sich verschiedene Schlafzustände beobachten, bei denen das EEG-Muster innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen den gut bekannten REM-Schlafphasen und anderen Phasen wechselt. Solche schnellen Wechsel können natürlich nicht auf Veränderungen in der Langzeitplastizität zurückgeführt werden, weil diese Zeit braucht, um sich zu entwickeln, und trainiert werden muss usw. Es ist bekannt, dass solche Gehirnzustände durch zahlreiche diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme gesteuert werden, wie dopaminerge, adrenerge, cholinerge, peptiderge Systeme usw. Da geht es grundsätzlich um all die Arten von Inputmechanismen, die Dr. Kobilka gestern in seinem Vortrag erläutert hat. Und man weiß auch, dass solche diffus projizierten Transmittersysteme Kurzzeitänderungen, Kurzzeitplastizität in ihren Zielgebieten [verursachen]. Meine Schlussfolgerung lautet deshalb, dass die Untersuchung dieser Kurzzeitplastizität, ihrer dynamischen Art und ihres Mechanismus einige sehr bedeutende Aspekte der Gehirnfunktion aufklären könnte, die ebenso wichtig sein dürften wie die Langzeitveränderungen. Obwohl diese kurzzeitigen Plastizitätstypen bereits in der sehr frühen Arbeit über die neuromuskuläre Verbindung von Katz und Miledi beschrieben wurden, gibt es immer noch … gibt es meiner Meinung nach immer noch viele Dinge, die wir darüber nicht wissen, und bis heute verstehen wir viele wesentliche Merkmale nicht. Was geschieht, wenn eine Synapse ihre Stärke, ihre kurzzeitige Plastizität verändert? Das sind natürlich viele Dinge, denn das ist ein mehrstufiger Prozess. Es können Veränderungen an der Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und im assoziierten Kalziumeinstrom auftreten. Es kann postsynaptische Veränderungen geben. Inhibitorische, so genannte Autorezeptoren können für eine Rückkopplung sorgen, sodass der Transmitter auf die Freisetzungsbereitschaft der restlichen Vesikel zurückwirkt. Dann entsteht ein Problem des Vesikelrecyclings und des Vesikelverbrauchs. Grundsätzlich glaube ich, dass es sich hier um Prozesse handelt, die molekular im Wesentlichen Änderungen auf der Ebene von Second Messenger-Systemen, Änderungen bei der Phosphorylierung und möglicherweise zytoskeletale Reorganisationen aufgrund des gesamten Transports verursachen. Ich möchte mich für den Rests meines Vortrags im Wesentlichen auf zwei Aspekte konzentrieren, nämlich auf die durch die Vesikeldepletion vermittelte Depression und auf die Änderungen im … die molekularen Änderungen im Freisetzungsapparat, die die Bereitschaft der freisetzungsbereiten Vesikel modulieren, in Reaktion auf einen Kalziumstimulus tatsächlich zu fusionieren. Wir untersuchen diesen Prozess seit einigen Jahren an einer sehr speziellen Synapse, der so genannten Heldsche-Calyx-Synapse, einer Synapse in der Hörbahn. Das hier ist ein Schnitt des Stammhirns mit der angelegten Hörbahn. Die Hörhärchen stellen im ventralen Bereich des Nukleus cochlearis eine erste Synapse her. Das Axon des empfangenden Neurons überquert die Mittellinie und stellt einen Kontakt zu einer anderen Zelle im so genannten mittleren MNTB her, dem mittleren Nukleus des trapezförmigen Körpers. Und diese beiden Synapsen hier haben diese sehr spezielle Form einer Kylix oder einer schalenförmigen, präsynaptischen Endigung, die einen kompakten postsynaptischen Zellkörper umgibt. Die spezielle Synapsenform hängt wahrscheinlich mit der Tatsache zusammen, dass die von beiden Ohren kommenden Signale für die Schalllokalisierung sehr exakt verarbeitet werden müssen, damit an dem Punkt, an dem die Informationen an der lateralen und superioren Hirnolive von einem Ohr auf die Informationen vom anderen Ohr treffen, sehr feine Intensitäts- und Zeitunterschiede erfasst werden können. Wir haben hier eine Synapse mit einer sehr speziellen Geometrie, die allerdings im Sinne der Elektrophysiologie den Vorteil bietet, dass die beiden prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgt werden und simultan sehr genauen elektrophysiologischen Messungen unterzogen werden können. Und dies wurde vor inzwischen mehr als 20 Jahren in Bert Sakmanns Labor von Gerard Borst und Bert Sakmann herausgefunden. Diese Synapse also haben wir untersucht und ihre Plastizität erforscht. Nur um Ihnen zu zeigen, was uns möglich ist, seit wir die prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgen können und entsprechende Ströme erfassen können: Wir können in der ionischen Umgebung innerhalb der beiden Kompartimente den Stromfluss exakt messen. Wir können das Ende mit einem Fluoreszenzindikator aufladen. Theis und ich machen das seit über fünfzehn Jahren, wir arbeiten dazu hauptsächlich mit den Fluoreszenzfarbstoffen von Roger Tsien. Wir können mit dieser Synapse viele Dinge machen, die mit anderen Synapsen nicht möglich sind, weil Synapsen normalerweise sehr kleine, boutonartige Strukturen sind, die einfach zu klein sind, um sie mit elektrophysiologischen Elektroden anzugehen. Die meisten Calyxe dieser Art weisen eine markante synaptische Depression auf. Das hier ist die Reaktion auf einen 100-Hz-Reiz, nachdem die Synapse eine Erholungspause hatte. Wir sehen jetzt einen sehr großen ersten Erregungsstrom, einen inverten Strom, der durch das Neurotransmitter-Glutamat induziert wird, das von der präsynaptischen Endigung freigesetzt wird. Ein zweiter Reiz, 10 ms später, ergibt eine kleine Reaktion. Und schließlich ist die Reaktion nach vier oder fünf Stimuli nur noch sehr gering. Die Synapse arbeitet bei sehr hohen Spike-Raten. Der Hörnerv ist mit 10 bis 50 Aktionspotenzialen pro Sekunde sogar im vollständigen Ruhezustand äußerst aktiv. Diese Synapse, zumindest die hier dargestellte, würde also in einem Dauerzustand der partiellen Depression arbeiten, obwohl das der physiologische Zustand der Synapse ist. Aber wenn wir uns das genau anschauen … das ist die Durchschnittsreaktion. Wenn wir uns das Muster der kurzzeitigen Plastizität detailliert anschauen, erkennen wir, dass einige Zellen – hier nur eine dargestellte Zelle – diese sehr starke Depression aufweisen. Das wird hier für drei Frequenzen gezeigt: 200 Hz, 100 Hz und 50 Hz. In derselben Darstellung können wir neben der Zelle mit diesem Verhalten möglicherweise eine andere Zelle finden, die exakt das Gegenteil zeigt, nämlich eine erste Fazilitation. Die zweite Reaktion ist größer als die erste, gefolgt von einer Depression. Nun, dies ist in dem Sinne zu verstehen … oder ich sollte anmerken, dass diese Zelle im Vergleich zu dieser Zelle einen sehr viel geringeren ersten EPSC (Excitatory Postsynaptic Current) aufweist, nämlich nur rund 1,1 Nanoamp, wobei das hier bei 2,5 Nanoamp liegt. Das Muster ist also so zu verstehen, dass in dieser Zelle die Freisetzung wahrscheinlich so hoch ist, dass bereits während der ersten Reaktion ein guter Bruchteil der verfügbaren Vesikel freigesetzt wurde, sodass nachfolgende Reaktionen geringer ausfielen. In dieser Zelle war wahrscheinlich die Freisetzung während des ersten Reizes geringer, sodass die erfassten Daten offen legen, dass die Erregungsleistung des Nervs bei der zweiten und dritten Stimulierung tatsächlich stärker ist und die Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit für die restlichen Vesikel zunimmt. Diese biphasische Verhaltensweise hat zunächst einen Anstieg in der Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit zur Folge, die nur beobachtet wird, wenn die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit sehr gering ist. Aber dann gibt es schließlich mehr und mehr Stimuli und die Synapse wird ihre gesamten Vesikel verbrauchen und danach in die Depression verfallen. Okay, diese Überlegung deutet bereits darauf hin, dass das so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis, das Verhältnis des zweiten zum ersten Stimulus, ein Maßstab ist, den viele Physiologen zur ersten Charakterisierung des kurzzeitigen Plastizitätsverhaltens der Synapse verwenden. Dieser Parameter wird auch als eine Art Indikator darüber verwendet, wie groß die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit ist. Wenn man solche Erfassungen an 31 Synapsen vornimmt und dieses so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber der Amplitude des ersten EPSC darstellt, erkennt man, dass eine systematische Beziehung besteht: Je größer die ersten EPSCs sind, umso kleiner fällt das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis aus. Das stimmt mit vielen Beobachtungen überein, die an anderen Synapsen gemacht wurden. Okay, aber noch immer haben wir es hier mit Synapsen zu tun, die vermutlich die gleiche Aufgabe erfüllen, morphologisch alle gleich sind und keine offensichtlichen Unterschiede aufweisen. Und dann stellt man sich doch die Frage, was diese Synapsen so unterschiedlich macht? Warum hat diese dann eine wesentlich geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit und eine großes PPR (Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis) und warum ist bei dieser genau das Gegenteil der Fall? Die Hypothese ist, dass freisetzungsbereite Vesikel tatsächlich in zwei Zuständen vorkommen können: In einem Zustand mit geringer Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, wobei typischerweise rund 5 bis 10% der Vesikel durch ein einzelnes Aktionspotenzial freigesetzt würden, und im so genannten Super-Prime-Zustand mit hoher Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit. Der Begriff „Super Prime“ wurde in verschiedenen Kontexten verwendet, wobei verschiedene molekulare Mechanismen vermutet wurden. Warum ein Super-Prime-Vesikel eine höhere Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit aufweist als ein anderes, werde ich später erläutern. Wahrscheinlich hat das mit der Fusionsenergiebarriere zu tun, die sich durch biochemische modulatorische Einflüsse verändert. Okay, das steht hier in diesem letzten Satz hier, nämlich dass wahrscheinlich die modulatorischen Hintergrundeinflüsse durch diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme Diversität verursachen. Welche Signalmechanismen können dem zugrunde liegen? Der markanteste, der wahrscheinlich damit zu tun hat, sind die diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalwege, eine Variante der G-Protein-vermittelten Signalwege, die Dr. Kobilka gestern erläutert hat. Dabei interagiert ein Rezeptor mit einem G-Protein, das G-Protein aktiviert Phospholipase C, die Inositolphospholipide werden aufspalten, was Second-Messenger-Diacylglycerol und IP3 erzeugt, das dann Kalzium freisetzt. Es wurde nachgewiesen, dass dieser Diacylglyerol-Zweig des Signalweges eine spezielle Funktion beim Priming von synaptischen Vesikeln sowie in der Freisetzung von synaptischen Vesikeln übernimmt. Konkret gibt es ein Protein mit der Bezeichnung MON-13, das eine so genannte C1-Domäne hat, eine Domäne, die auf ein Diacylglycerol reagiert. Frühere Arbeiten haben gezeigt, dass dieses MON-13.1 am Primingprozess und wahrscheinlich auch an der Regulierung der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung beteiligt ist. Natürlich können wir den Gehirnzustand nicht durch Stimulation … durch diffuse Projektion von Neuronen im Hirnschnittpräparat verändern. Ich sollte erwähnen, dass all diese Experimente mit konventionellen elektrophysiologischen Techniken an Hirnschnitten von Ratten durchgeführt werden. Aber wir können sozusagen die Aktion dieses diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalweges nachahmen, indem wir Phorbol-Ester anwenden, eine Nachahmung von Diacylglycerol. Und bei Anwendung dieser Substanz kann man beobachten, dass alle EPSCs durchschnittlich zwei bis fünf Mal stärker sind als unter Kontrollbedingungen. Und wenn wir dann erneut das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber den ersten EPSCs abbilden, sehen wir, dass diese neuen Datenpunkte, also diese gefüllten Symbole, sehr gut dem Trend der Kontrolldatenpunkte folgen und dann sieht man diese mehr oder weniger nahtlose Fortsetzung mit einer Überlappung zwischen einigen Punkten unter Phorbol-Ester und einigen Punkten unter Kontrollbedingungen. Das scheint mir zu sagen bzw. reizt mich zumindest zu der Hypothese, dass Phorbol-Ester dieses Gleichgewicht oder dieses dynamische Gleichgewicht zwischen geprimten und super-geprimten Vesikeln zur super-geprimten Seite hin verlagert. Bei näherer Betrachtung dieser Eigenschaft erkennt man, dass Super-Priming eine Eigenschaft von ausgeruhten Synapsen ist. Bei einer 200 Hz starken Stimulierung konvergieren die EPSCs beim gleichen Steady-State-Wert. Das wird hier an diesen Daten ersichtlich. Hier ist die erste Reaktion einer relativ großen Zelle oder einer Zelle mit großem EPSC unter dem Einfluss von Phorbol-Ester. Dieser Wert stammt von derselben Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Das hier ist eine Zelle mit einer relativ kleinen Amplitude, aber unter Phorbol-Ester, und das ist der entsprechende erste Wert für dieselbe Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Die ersten Reaktionen weichen also sehr stark voneinander ab. Dennoch laufen die zweite, dritte, vierte, fünfte Reaktion auf derselben Ebene zusammen. Und dieselbe Ebene heißt nicht 0, aber ziemlich ähnlich. Und in diesem Sinne scheint es so zu sein, dass das Super-Priming oder diese Differenzierung zwischen Synapsen nur auftritt … sie braucht Zeit … sie also nur auftritt, wenn die …Synapsen Zeit hatten, ihr Super-Priming zu entwickeln. Die Interpretation dieses Ergebnisses ist die, die ich gerade bereits erwähnt habe: Wenn die Synapse Zeit genug hat, einen Super-Prime-Zustand zu entwickeln, ergibt sich diese Differenz. Wenn allerdings während eines solchen Ablaufs ein konstanter Vesikelstrom freigesetzt und neu rekrutiert wird…ich meine, dieser Dauerzustand ist eine Art von Steady-State zwischen Vesikelverbrauch und Vesikellieferung. Die Hypothese lautet also: Wenn es der Zelle nicht ermöglicht wird, in den Super-Prime-Zustand zu gehen, verhalten sich all diese Zellen gleich. Dies kann man natürlich in einem simplen kinetischen Modell darstellen, wobei man annimmt, dass die freizusetzenden Vesikel zunächst einige molekulare Schritte durchlaufen müssen, die sie an die Membran andocken und in einen Zustand versetzen, der eine Freisetzung ermöglicht. Und wenn genug Zeit ist, können sie sogar weiter zum Super-Prime-Zustand heranreifen. Der erste Priming-Zustand wird sich schnell entwickeln, der zweite wäre langsam. Das erklärt also dieses Verhalten. Es ist auch eine quantitative Erklärung dessen, was man bei der Darstellung des Steady-State-Wertes der Freisetzung gegenüber der Stimulationsfrequenz beobachtet. Hier sehen Sie zwei Kurven, eine unter Kontrollbedingungen, eine mit Phorbol-Ester. Sie sind auf den jeweiligen ersten Wert normalisiert. Aber man sieht, dass die unterbrochenen Kurven den Versuchspunkten sehr schön folgen. Dies gilt auch für das untere Ende der Beziehung, die Steady-State-Freisetzung und Frequenz verbindet. Und ausgehend von diesem Modell kann man dann die relevanten, interessantesten Parameter extrahieren. Die Daten sind vor allem mit der Theorie kompatibel, dass der normal-geprimte Zustand eine Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit von in diesem Fall 0,06 hat, also eine relativ geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, während der Super-Prime-Zustand eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von 0,42 aufweist. Die so genannte Priming-Rate ist schnell, vier pro Sekunde. Das bedeutet, dass in rund 250 mms ein neues Vesikel auf eine Freisetzungsstelle geladen wird, während die Rate für diesen zweiten Super-Priming-Schritt im Kontrollfall sehr gering ist und durch die Einwirkung des Phorbol-Esters verbessert wird. Die von mir beschriebenen Ergebnisse gelten nicht nur für die Heldsche Calyx. Verschiedene Aspekte der Resultate gelten für eine Vielzahl anderer Synapsen. Die Heterogenität zwischen Synapsen der gleichen Art wurde auch für die neuromuskuläre Verbindung in der Maus beschrieben. Die Prototypsynapse, der Hippocampus zwischen CA3- und CA1-Neuronen, weist, wie vor einigen Jahren nachgewiesen, eine sehr ähnliche Art der Heterogenität auf, wie es von Hanse und Gustafsson in einer Reihe von Aufsätzen und darüber hinaus in weiteren kürzlich erschienenen Papieren beschrieben wurde. Dieses Phänomen, das ich als den Kollaps der Heterogenität bei höherer Frequenz bezeichne, wurde auch von Hanse und Gustafsson beschrieben und von Walter und Smith im Kontext der Informationsverarbeitung in neuronalen Netzen erörtert. Und diese langsame Umstellung vom Prime- auf den Super-Prime-Status war tatsächlich auch Bestandteil eines Modells, das Stefan Hallermann für zerebellare Moosfasersynapsen vorgeschlagen hat. Obwohl ich denke, dass die Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und der Kalziumeinstrom die stärksten modulatorischen Einflüsse auf die Kurzzeitplastizität haben, weil Kalziumströme bekanntermaßen in der Lage sind, das zu zeigen, was als Fazilitation bezeichnet wird, auch Inaktivierung, regulieren sie sich selbst durch G-Protein-Signale und so weiter. Veränderungen im Kalziumeinstrom verursachen in der Folge auch riesige Veränderungen in der Freisetzung, weil Kalziumeinstrom und Freisetzung sehr stark zusammenhängen. Aber ich denke, dass die Experimente und die Heldsche Calyx starke Argumente für diese andere Form der Modulation kurzzeitiger Plastizität liefern, die nicht auf den Kalziumeinstrom zurückzuführen ist. Wir können sagen, dass dies eine Heldsche Calyx ist, weil der Einfluss des Phorbol-Esters auf den Kalziumeinstrom vor mehreren Jahren sehr intensiv von Ralf Schneggenburgers Labor untersucht wurde, wenn auch diese früheren Papiere gezeigt haben, dass es keine bedeutende Veränderungen in der Pool-Größe gibt. Das von mir beschriebene Phänomen scheint also tatsächlich eine relative neuartige Form der Modulationsveränderung in der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung eines Vesikels zu sein. Die Ähnlichkeit zwischen der Modulation durch Phorbol-Ester und der Heterogenität an den Synapsen im Ruhezustand lässt vermuten, dass die Heterogenität tatsächlich aus verschiedenen Abstufungen der Hintergrundmodulation hervorgeht. Und ich denke, dass dieses Konzept von zwei Zuständen freisetzungsbereiter Vesikel und dem Einfluss von Super-Priming dazu beitragen wird, einige wichtige Phänomene der Signalverarbeitung in unserem Gehirn zu verstehen. Das hier ist selbstverständlich nicht meine Arbeit. Vielmehr wurden alle präsentierten Daten von Holger Taschenberger zusammengetragen, der bis vor kurzem ein Postdoc-Wissenschaftler in meinem Labor war. Mein Beitrag als Emeritus besteht lediglich in einer Datenanalyse und in der Modellbildung. Viele der Ideen und Hintergrunddaten wurden von Takeshi Sakaba, einem langjährigen Kollegen, der heute an der Doshisha Hochschule in Kyoto arbeitet, von Ralf Schneggenburger, der Professor am APFL in Lausanne ist, und von Suk-Ho Lee, einem Kollegen von der Seoul National University, zur Verfügung gestellt. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

 
(00:02:49 - 00:04:41)

The complete video is available here.


Communication between neurons – the basis of brain function – is achieved through so-called action potentials or nerve impulses that arise through rapid changes in the cell membranes. These changes are enabled by ion channels, proteins that form pores through cell membranes allowing electrically charged molecules or ions to pass through. Thus, ion channels can be said to participate in all brain tasks, from thinking to breathing to moving.[1] For their characterisation, Erwin Neher shared the 1991 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. In this excerpt from his talk in 2018, Neher talks about what first drew him to these crucial proteins:


The complete video is available here.


Characterising the function of ion channels would not have been possible without the so-called patch clamp technique, which Neher and Sakmann developed to allow the study of ionic currents in individual cells. In 2018, Neher also briefly discusses the principles and development of the method:


The complete video is available here.


Based on how they are opened, ion channels come in two ‘flavours’: voltage-gated ion channels open or close based on changes to the voltage gradient that are caused by fluctuations in ion concentrations close to the membrane, while so-called ligand-gated ion channels are regulated by molecules such as neurotransmitters that bind to the channels and induce them to open to allow ions through.[1] For his work on the release and uptake of the catecholamine class of neurotransmitters, which includes adrenaline and dopamine, Julius Axelrod was awarded a share of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1970. In his talk from a visit to the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in 1970, Axelrod gives a general introduction into how neurotransmitters work and how they elicit action potentials.


The complete video is available here. 


Moving Through Space

The transmission of signals from one neuron to another is facilitated by the synapse. Interestingly, much of what we know regarding how these structures function was actually discovered in the context of neuronal communication with muscles rather than within the brain. Indeed, one of the most important tasks that our brain carries out is telling our muscles to move. The experiments of the Italians Luigi Galvani and Alessandro Volta performed over 200 years ago showed that muscle movement is based on electrical signals.[2] How does this work at a molecular level and how does the brain direct muscles to move? Bernhard Katz shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Julius Axelrod and Ulf Keuler in 1970 for working out precisely these questions. In his talk at the 2014 meeting, Erwin Neher briefly describes what synapses are and how neuronal communication with muscles leads to muscle contraction.


Erwin Neher (2014) - Short-term Synaptic Plasticity

Thank you, Dr. Blatt, for the introduction. It’s a great privilege to speak in front of about 600 hundred of the very best young researchers of the world which I hope a fraction of it at least is interested in a very interesting topic, namely understanding how our brain functions. So Roger Tsien a few minutes ago told you about some interesting ideas and interesting facts about the very long term forms of plasticity which indeed are believed or are apt to store information in the brain to mediate learning and memory. Let me go to the other side, to the very short term forms of plasticity. But before doing so, let me show you in a few slides a little bit about how our understanding of what happens in the brain developed over the last 200 years. And this of course starts with the famous experiments of the Italian scientists Walter and Galvani, Galvani who taught us or showed in spectacular experiments that the frog muscle can be made to twitch when the nerve is stimulated by a shock of electricity. This demonstrated that indeed there was something like electricity, electrical signalling in our body. that our brain is made up of this filigrane network of neurons. Roger Tsien already referred to this. And today we know that our brain is a network of about 10^12 of such neurons which are connected with each other via synapses. And on average a given neuron receives about 1000 or 10,000 inputs from other neurons. So what is it, this strange cell, a neuron? This strange structure? It is nothing else but a quite general cell which however has some special structures. So, even a normal cell has some kind of processes called microvilli. In the neuron such processes are exaggerated in the sense that a neuron possesses two kinds of protrusions some are called dendrites which are the receiving organs of the neuron. One special protrusion is the axon, a tube-like structure which can be very long and which transmits the nerve impulse to cells to which this given neuron is connected to. So each neuron receives inputs from thousands of other neurons primarily on its dendrites and these inputs delivered by proceeding cells can be both excitatory and inhibitory. A given neuron integrates or adds up these signals and whenever the electrical potential inside the cell soma, as a consequence of all these influences converging onto a given cell, whenever the potential inside the cell surpasses a certain threshold an action potential or a nerve impulse is generated at the so-called axon hillock. And this nerve action potential then travels down the axon to the nerve endings exciting or inhibiting other neurons. So there’s a nice movie or animation provided by Dr. Hasan from the Science Bridge in Heidelberg who illustrates, gives an impression on how this firework of axon potentials may happen in parts of our brain. You can see that an input fires an action potential which then spreads, excites other ones and this is going on. The movie is not correct in every detail but I think that doesn’t matter for getting the general idea. So the point of interest of course when you want to study the connectivity between neurons is the synapse. What appears to be here is this little bouton where a preceding neuron signals... or a sending neuron signals onto a receiving neuron. And knowledge about what happens at the synapse started actually not at the synapse between nerve cells but it started at the so-called neuromuscular junction, a synapse which makes a connection between a neuron and the underlying muscle cell. So when the nervous system wants a certain muscle to contract it sends an action potential through the motor nerve to the corresponding muscle cells. There the nerve ending splits up into several endings and what happens there is exactly the same thing which happens between two neurons, namely that the presynaptic ending liberates a transmitter which excites the underlying neuron. So our knowledge about these processes came to a large extent from experiments by Sir Bernard Katz Castillo and Del Castillo studying the synapse. And I show here one of their early registrations of the signal which can be recorded in a muscle fibre You can see two phases, first a so-called excitatory postsynaptic potential which represents the effect of the transmitter being liberated by the nerve and then surpassing the threshold just like in a nerve cell an action potential is being elicited in the muscle cell which then initiates the contraction. What Katz and Del Castillo did is they looked in detail at what happens here before or just during resting periods. And they recognised when they turned up the gain of their amplifier that there were all these little spontaneously occurring little blips. You know, very, very small signals. Now ordinarily many researchers dealing with sensitive amplifiers at high gain would dismiss such signals because there are multiple sources of interference, just influences by some instruments in the vicinity. Katz and Del Castillo did not do so. They actually started to study these small signals because they realised that they saw these little blips only when they recorded at sites close to the neuromuscular junction to where the nerve is. When they recorded a few millimetres away on the same muscle they wouldn't see these characteristic blips. Also some distance away from the muscle the wave form of the global signal would be different. This initial postsynaptic potential would be missing. What they saw is just the electrical excitability spreading in the muscle fibre. Also what they realised is that this amplitude of this excitatory postsynaptic signal is very much dependent on the calcium concentration in the medium. So when they reduced the calcium concentration, this initial signal became smaller so that eventually the action potential failed. What was left was a small signal. And when they reduced this to the extreme, they saw that the stimulating nerve impulse sometimes elicited a signal like this. And sometimes it failed to elicit any signal. So this kind of finding together with electron microscopy data from the De Robertis Laboratory in Argentina which showed that there were in the synaptic terminal some small structures, some vesicles now known as synaptic vesicles lead to this idea that indeed what happens at the nerve, at the synapse is the following. The nerve impulse causes influx of calcium into the nerve terminal. This is why the process is so much dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. The calcium causes the fusion of such vesicles which then release their contents in neurotransmitter. Now, of course an action potential with calcium influx leads to the simultaneous release of many of such vesicles. The little blips which they saw in the recording at high resolution was interpreted to be spontaneous fusion of such vesicles with the plasma membrane. And then postsynaptically the neurotransmitter diffuses to the postsynapse and opens ion channels in the postsynaptic membrane. So we have a kind of transformation of an electrical signal into a chemical signal released from a presynaptic terminal and back translated into an electrical signal in the postsynaptic membrane. Now, synaptic plasticity. The term plasticity describes the observation that synaptic strength which is the signal being produced in the postsynaptic neuron by a presynaptic action potential is not a fixed quantity like in the electronic computer but changes constantly depending on the use of the synapse. Neuroscientists are convinced that this plasticity is a very important aspect of neuronal signal processing in the nervous system. And that indeed particularly the long term changes, the long term changes in connectivity between neurons underlies learning and memory. And this as I understand was Roger Tsien’s topic. Now, short term plasticity on the other hand I think is not less important because it mediates basic information processing tasks like adaptation, filtering and others. I will mention a few of these tasks in one of my following slides. What's also interesting is that different types of synapses have their own personality with respect to this short term plasticity. Some synapses, when you stimulate them repetitively like those of the climbing fibres, show depression in the sense that after some rest period a first response is very large followed by smaller responses. Other synapses show exactly the opposite, namely at first smaller response followed by subsequently increasing responses. Still other synapses have more complex types of behaviour. So given synapse on average displays a certain type of plasticity. Now here is just an example of what short term depression can be good for in a network in which many of such neurons are put together to subserve some task. I mentioned already a depression is good for providing adaptation to sensory stimuli. It is good for so called gain control, regulating the amine activity in certain brain areas. You can build networks with synapses displaying depression which provide, which generate rhythms. You can do temporal filtering but also more complex tasks of the central nervous system like sound localisation can be implemented in neural networks which use a short term depression. And even the so-called orientation tuning, an individual system which is seen in the primary visual cortex in the sense, that there are certain cells which primarily respond to contrasts in a certain orientation. One can simulate this and obtain insensitivity towards, invariance towards differences in absolute contrast by implying in the network short term depression. Okay, so another aspect which is being discussed now is a manifestation of short term plasticity, is the switching between different brain states. We know that our brain can switch within seconds between different states such as quiet state, stress, arousal, and focusing, attention. There are different sleep states which can be observed with EEG, where within seconds again the pattern of the EEG can change between the well-known REM sleep phase and other phases. Such fast switching of course cannot be due to long term plastic changes because they need time to develop, they need time to be trained and so on. So it is known that such brain states are controlled by a number of diffusely projecting transmitter systems such as dopaminergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, peptidergic and so on. Basically all the kinds of input mechanisms which were discussed by Dr. Kobilka yesterday in his lecture. And it is also known that such diffusely projected transmitter systems short term change, short term plasticity in their target areas. So my conclusion is that studying such short term plasticity, its dynamic nature and its mechanism may reveal some very important aspects of brain function, which may not be less important than the long term changes. Now, although these short forms of plasticity have been described already in the very early work on the neuromuscular junction by Katz and Miledi, we still... I think there are still many things which we don’t know about them and some of the essential features that we don’t probably understand yet. Now, what can happen when a synapse changes its strength, its short term plasticity? These are of course many things because it’s a multi-step process. There may be changes in the action potential wave form and the associated calcium influx. There may be postsynaptic changes, there may be inhibitory so-called auto receptors which feed back so that the transmitter feeds back onto the willingness of the remaining vesicles to release. There is a problem of recycling of vesicles and consumption of vesicles. In general, I think these are processes which molecularly mainly involve changes in second messenger levels, changes in phosphorylation and possibly also cytoskeletal reorganisations due to all the trafficking. Now in the rest of my talk I want to concentrate on basically two aspects, namely the depression mediated by the depletion of vesicles and the changes in the... molecular changes in the release apparatus which modulate the willingness of release-ready vesicles to actually fuse in response to a calcium stimulus. Now, we have been studying this process for a number of years in a very special synapse, the so-called Calyx of Held synapse. This is a synapse in the auditory pathway. What you see here is a slice of the brain stem with the auditory pathway laid out. The auditory fibres make first synapse in the ventral cochlear nucleus. The axon of the receiving neuron transverses the midline and makes a contact here with another cell in the so-called medium MNTB, the medium nucleus of trapezoid body. And both of these synapses here which have this very special shape of a calix or cup-like presynaptic terminal surrounding a compact postsynaptic cell body. And the special shape of the synapses is probably due to the fact that for the sound localisation for directional hearing the signals are coming from the two ears have to be processed very precisely so that at the point where the information from one ear meets the information from the other ear in the lateral superior olive the very fine differences in intensity and timing can be detected. So we have here a synapse which is very special in its geometry but which offers for electrophysiology the advantage that both the pre- and the postsynaptic compartments can be voltage clamped, can be a subject of very precise electrophysiological measurements simultaneously. And this was indeed found in Bert Sakmann’s lab by Gerard Borst and Bert Sakmann now almost twenty years ago. So we studied this synapse and studied its plasticity. Just to point out what we can do since we can voltage clamp the pre- and postsynaptic compartments and record corresponding currents. We can control the ionic milieu inside both compartments for precise analysis of the current flow. We can load the terminal with fluorescent indicator. Theis and me have been doing so over fifteen years, mainly using Roger Tsien’s fluorescent dyes. Well, we can do many things with this synapse which cannot be done in other synapses because usually synapses are very small bouton-like structures which are just too small to be approached and targeted by electrophysiological electrodes. Now, most of the calyxes of this kind show prominent synaptic depression. This is a response to a 100 Hz stimulus after the synapse was given some rest. We see a very large first excitatory current now, an invert current which is induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate which is released from the presynaptic terminal. A second stimulus 10 ms later gives a smaller response and finally after four or five stimuli the response is quite small. Now the synapse works at very high spike rates. The auditory nerve is highly active with between 10 and 50 action potentials per second even in the completely silent state. So this synapse, at least the one shown here, would work in a permanent state of partial depression. So that’s the physiological state of the synapse. But when we look in detail... This is the average response. When we look in detail at the pattern of short term plasticity, we see that some of the cells here just one particular cell displayed does show this very strong depression. This is shown here for three frequencies: 200 Hz, 100 Hz and 50 Hz. But in the same preparation next to that cell which shows this behaviour maybe we may find another cell which shows exactly the opposite, namely an initial facilitation. The second response is bigger than the first one followed by depression. Now, this is understood in the sense... Or I should point out that compared to this cell that cell has a very much smaller first EPSC namely of only about 1.1 nanoamp, whereas this had 2.5 nanoamp. So the understanding of this pattern is that in this cell the release probability was so high that during the first response already a good fraction of the available vesicles got released so that subsequent responses were smaller. In this cell the release probability during the first stimulus was smaller so that the record reveals that indeed for the second and third stimulus the excitation power of the nerve is stronger that the release probability for the remaining vesicles increases. So this biphasic behaviour comes about by first an increase in the release probability which is seen only when the initial release probability is very small. But then eventually there’s more and more stimuli. The synapse will use up all its vesicles and will fall into depression. Okay, so this consideration already points out that the so-called paired-pulse ratio, the ratio of the second to the first stimulus is a kind of measure which is used by many physiologists to first of all characterise the short term plasticity behaviour of the synapse and then also this measure is used as a kind of indicator of how large initial release probability is. Now when I record from 31 synapses like this and plot this so-called paired-pulse ratio against the amplitude of the first EPSC, I see there is a systematic relationship and that the larger the first EPSCs, the smaller the paired-pulse ratio. This is in line with many observations that were made at other synapses. Okay, but still since we are dealing here with synapses which are supposed to do the same job, which are morphologically all the same, which no obvious differences, one asks the question Why does this have a smaller release probability and a large PPR and this one is the opposite? So the hypothesis is that vesicles which are release-ready can indeed exist in two states. In a state of low release probability, typically the numbers would be that about 5 - 10% of the vesicles would be released by a single action potential. And the so-called super prime state with high release probability. Now, this term “super-prime” has been used in a number of contexts and a number of molecular mechanisms have been proposed. Why a super-prime vesicle has higher release probability than the other one, I will come back to that and try to explain that it’s probably the energy barrier of fusion which is being changed by biochemical modulatory influences. Okay, that’s written here in this last sentence, namely that it’s background modulator influences probably by diffusely projecting transmitting systems which cause diversity. Now, what kind of signalling mechanism might be underlying this? The most prominent one which probably is connected to this is the diacylglycerol mediated signalling pathways, one variant of the g-protein mediated pathways discussed yesterday by Dr. Kobilka. Where a receptor interacts with a g-protein, the g-protein activates phospholipase C splitting inositol phospholipids generating the second messenger diacylglycerol and IP3 which releases calcium. Now, it has been shown before that this diacylglycerol branch of the pathway has a special role in priming of synaptic vesicles and also in the release of synaptic vesicles. Namely there is a protein called MON-13 which has a so-called C1 domain. A domain which responds to a diacylglycerol and previous work has shown that this MON-131 is involved in the priming process and probably also then in the regulation of the energy barrier for release. So, we cannot of course change the brain state by stimulating... by diffusely projecting neurons in the brain slice preparation. I should mention this, all these experiments are done in rat brain slices with the conventional electrophysiological techniques. But we can mimic so to speak the action of this diacylglycerol mediated signalling by applying a phorbol ester, a mimic of diacylglycerol. And what you observe is when you apply this substance all the EPSCs are on average 2-5 times larger than under control conditions. And if we now plot the paired-pulse ratio again against the first EPSCs, we see that these new data points which are the filled symbols nicely follow the trend from the control data point and this more or less seamless continuation also overlapping between some of the points under phorbol ester and some of the points under control conditions. Seems to tell me or provokes the hypothesis that phorbol ester shifts this equilibrium or this dynamic equilibrium between primed and super-primed vesicles to the super-primed site. Now when you look at this property further, you can see that super-priming is a property of rested synapses. At 200 Hz stimulation EPSCs converge to the same steady state value. This is shown here in these recordings. Here is the first response of a relatively large cell or a cell with large EPSC under the influence of phorbol ester. This value is from the same cell without phorbol ester. This is a cell with a relatively small amplitude but under phorbol ester and this is the corresponding first value for the same cell without phorbol ester. Now you see the first responses are very, very different. Nevertheless the second, third, fourth, fifth responses converge to the same level. And the same level is not 0, it is just very similar. So in that sense it seems that super-priming or this differentiation between synapses only occurs... it needs time. It’s only present when the time, when the synapses had time to develop its super-priming. Interpretation of this finding is that as I just mentioned if the synapse has time to develop a super-prime state, then there is this difference. If however during such a drain there is a kind of constant flow of vesicles being released and newly recruited... I mean this steady state is a kind of steady state between vesicle consumption and vesicle delivery. So the hypothesis is that, well, if the cell is not allowed to go into super-prime state, then all these cells behaves the same. Of course this can be readily put into a simple kinetic model, where you assume that in order for vesicles to be released, they have to first undergo some molecular, some step which puts them docked at the membrane and into a state which is ready to be released. And if there is enough time then they can even mature further into super-prime state. So the first priming state will be fast. The second state would be slow. Now, this explains this behaviour. It also explains quantitatively what you observe when you plot the steady state value of release versus stimulation frequency. Here you see two curves, one under control conditions, one under a phorbol ester. These are normalised to the respective first value but you can see that the broken curves which are predictions of this simple model very nicely follow the experimental points. This is also the case for the low end of the relationship connecting steady state release and frequency. And of course from this model you then can extract the relevant and most interesting parameters, namely the data are compatible with the idea that the normally primed state has a release probability of here in this case 0.06, a relatively small release probability, whereas the super-prime state has a probability of 0.42. The so-called priming rate is fast, 4 per second, which means that in about 250 mms a new vesicle is loaded onto a release site whereas the rate for this second super-priming step is very low in the control case and enhanced by the action of the phorbol ester. Okay, now the findings which I described are not singular to the Calyx of Held. The various aspects of the findings are shared by a variety of other synapses. So the heterogeneity between synapses of the same type has been described also for the mouse neuromuscular junction. The prototype synapse, the hippocampus between CA3 and CA1 neurons, has been shown a few years ago to show similar, very similar kind of heterogeneity by a series of papers by Hanse and Gustafsson and some more recent papers. Also this phenomenon of what I call here the collapse of heterogeneity at higher frequency has been described by Hanse and Gustafsson and discussed by Walters and Smith in the context of information processing in neuronal networks. And this slow conversion from prime to super-prime state has indeed also been an element in a model proposed by Stefan Hallermann for cerebellar mossy fibre synapses. So, although I think the action potential wave form and calcium influx is the strongest modulatory influence on the short term plasticity because calcium currents are known to be able to show what's called facilitation, also inactivation, they are regulated themselves by G-protein pathways and so on. And when there are changes in calcium influx there are very large changes as a consequence in the release due to the very steep relationship between calcium influx and release. But I think the experiments and the Calyx of Held make a strong point for this other form of modulation of short term plasticity which is not due to calcium influx. We can tell this is a Calyx of Held because the influence of phorbol ester on calcium influx has been very carefully studied by Ralf Schneggenburger’s laboratory a few years ago. Although these previous papers have shown that there are no major changes in pool size. So the phenomenon I described really seems to be a relatively novel form of change of modulation in the energy barrier for releasing a vesicle. Well, the similarity between modulation by phorbol ester and the heterogeneity at the synapses at rest suggests that the heterogeneity actually comes from different degrees of background modulation. And I think that this concept of two states of release-ready vesicles and the influence of super-priming will contribute to understanding a number of important phenomena of signal processing in our brain. So of course this is not my work, indeed all the data shown were obtained by Holger Taschenberger who until recently was a postdoctoral fellow in my lab. My contribution as an Emeritus is only data analysis and model building. Many of the ideas and background data were provided by Takeshi Sakaba, a long term collaborator who is now in Doshisha University in Kyoto, Ralf Schneggenburger who is a professor at the APFL in Lausanne and Suk-Ho Lee, a colleague from Seoul National University. Thank you for your attention.

Vielen Dank Ihnen, Dr. Blatt, für die einführenden Worte. Für mich ist es eine große Ehre, vor rund 600 der besten jungen Nachwuchswissenschaftler der Welt sprechen zu können, von denen, so hoffe ich, vielleicht einige an einem sehr spannenden Thema interessiert sind, nämlich zu verstehen, wie unser Gehirn funktioniert. Roger Tsien hat Ihnen eben einige interessante Theorien und Fakten über die sehr langzeitigen Formen von Plastizität vermittelt, von denen man sogar annimmt oder die dazu geeignet sind, Informationen im Gehirn zu speichern, um Mechanismen des Lernens und des Gedächtnisses zu vermitteln. Ich möchte die andere Seite beleuchten, nämlich die sehr kurzzeitigen Formen der Plastizität. Aber bevor ich damit beginne, möchte ich Ihnen zunächst einige Folien darüber zeigen, wie sich unsere Kenntnisse über die Vorgänge im Gehirn in den letzten 200 Jahren entwickelt haben. Und das beginnt natürlich mit den berühmten Experimenten der italienischen Wissenschaftler Walter und Galvani. Galvani, der uns gelehrt hat bzw. in spektakulären Experimenten gezeigt hat, dass der Froschmuskel durch eine Stromstoßstimulation des Nervs zum Kontrahieren angeregt werden kann. Damit wurde nachgewiesen, dass es in unserem Körper in der Tat so etwas wie Elektrizität, elektrische Signalwege gibt. Hundert Jahre später zeigten uns die wunderbaren Zeichnungen des spanischen Neuroanatomisten Ramón y Cajal, dass unser Gehirn aus diesem filigranen Neuronennetzwerk besteht. Roger Tsien hat bereits darauf Bezug genommen. Und heute wissen wir, dass unser Gehirn ein Netzwerk aus rund 10^12 solcher über Synapsen miteinander verbundenen Neuronen ist. Durchschnittlich empfängt jedes einzelne Neuron rund 1000 bis 10.000 Inputsignale von anderen Neuronen. Was ist eigentlich ein Neuron, diese merkwürdige Zelle, diese merkwürdige Struktur? Es ist nichts anderes als eine relativ normale Zelle, die allerdings mit einigen speziellen Strukturen ausgestattet ist. Selbst eine normale Zelle verfügt über bestimmte Prozesse, die als Mikrovilli bezeichnet werden. Im Neuron werden solche Prozesse in dem Sinne verstärkt, dass ein Neuron über zwei Arten von Protrusionen verfügt, von denen einige als Dendriten bezeichnet werden, die die Empfängerorgane des Neurons sind. Und ein spezielles Protrusion ist das Axon, eine röhrenartige Struktur, die sehr lang sein kann und die den Nervenimpuls auf Zellen überträgt, mit denen dieses spezielle Neuron verbunden ist. Jedes Neuron erhält also Input-Signale von Tausenden anderer Neurone, in erster Linie an seinen Dendriten. Diese Signale, die von sich entwickelnden Zellen geliefert werden, können sowohl erregend als auch hemmend wirken. Ein einzelnes Neuron integriert oder summiert diese Signale. Immer dann, wenn das elektrische Potenzial im Zellsoma infolge all dieser auf eine bestimmte Zelle einwirkenden Einflüsse einen bestimmten Schwellenwert übersteigt, wird ein Aktionspotenzial oder ein Nervenimpuls am so genannten Axonhügel erzeugt. Und dieses Nervenaktionspotenzial wandert dann das Axon herunter zu den Nervenenden, die andere Neuronen anregen oder hemmen. Es gibt einen netten Animationsfilm von Dr. Hasan von der Science Bridge in Heidelberg, der einen Eindruck darüber vermittelt bzw. verdeutlicht, wie dieses Feuerwerk von Axonpotenzialen in Teilen unseres Gehirns ablaufen könnte. Sie sehen hier, dass ein Signalinput ein Aktionspotenzial abfeuert, das sich verbreitet und weiter erregt. Und das setzt sich dann weiter fort. Der Film ist nicht in jedem Detail korrekt, aber das ändert nichts daran, dass man, wie ich finde, eine grundsätzliche Vorstellung erhält. Wenn man die Konnektivität zwischen Neuronen untersuchen möchte, gilt das Interesse der Synapse, die hier dieser kleine Bouton ist, wo ein vorausgehendes Neuron Signale … oder ein sendendes Neuron Signale auf ein empfangendes Neuron überträgt. Und Kenntnisse darüber, was an der Synapse passiert, wurden zunächst tatsächlich nicht an der Synapse zwischen Nervenzellen gesammelt, sondern das begann bei der neuromuskulären Verbindung – einer Synapse, die eine Verbindung zwischen einem Neuron und der zugrunde liegenden Muskelzelle herstellt. Wenn das Nervensystem die Kontraktion eines bestimmten Muskels erreichen will, sendet es über den motorischen Nerv ein Aktionspotenzial an die entsprechenden Muskelzellen. Dort verzweigen sich die Nervenenden in mehrere Enden und dort passiert dann exakt das Gleiche wie zwischen zwei Neuronen, nämlich, dass das präsynaptische Ende einen Transmitter freisetzt, der das zugrunde liegende Neuron erregt. Unsere Kenntnisse über diese Prozesse stammen größtenteils von Experimenten, die Sir Bernard Katz und Del Castillo zur Untersuchung der Synapse durchgeführt haben. Und ich zeige Ihnen hier eine ihrer frühen Registrierungen des Signals, das in einer Muskelfaser erfasst werden kann wenn der diesen Muskel integrierende Nerv stimuliert wird. Sie sehen hier zwei Phasen, zuerst ein sogenanntes exzitatorisches postsynaptisches Potenzial, das den Effekt des vom Nerv freigesetzten Transmitters repräsentiert. Und beim Überschreiten des Schwellenwertes wird genauso wie in einer Nervenzelle ein Aktionspotenzial in der Muskelzelle ausgelöst, das dann die Kontraktion initiiert. Katz und Del Castillo beschäftigten sich detailliert mit dem, was hier vor oder unmittelbar während der Ruheperioden geschieht. Und sie entdeckten, dass beim Aufdrehen der Leistung ihres Verstärkers all diese spontan auftretenden, kleinen Signalpunkte erschienen. Das waren wirklich sehr, sehr, sehr kleine Signale. Üblicherweise würden die meisten Forscher, die die Arbeit mit empfindlichen Verstärkern bei hoher Leistung gewohnt sind, solche Signale verwerfen, da es eine Vielzahl von Störquellen und Einflüssen durch andere Instrumente in der Nähe gibt. Katz und Del Castillo machten das aber nicht und untersuchten tatsächlich diese kleinen Signale, weil ihnen aufgefallen war, dass diese kleinen Signalpunkte nur zu sehen waren, wenn die Signalerfassung in der direkten Nähe der neuromuskulären Verbindung erfolgte, wo der Nerv ist. Erfolgte die Signalerfassung nur einige wenige Millimeter daneben auf demselben Muskel, beobachteten sie diese charakteristischen Signalpunkte nicht. In einiger Entfernung zum Muskel war auch die Wellenform des globalen Signals anders. Dieses anfängliche postsynaptische Potenzial fehlte. Was sie sahen, war einfach die elektrische Erregbarkeit, die sich in der Muskelfaser ausbreitet. Sie stellten außerdem fest, dass die Amplitude dieses exzitatorischen postsynaptischen Signals sehr stark von der Kalziumkonzentration im Medium abhängt. Wenn sie die Kalziumkonzentration reduzierten, wurde dieses Ausgangssignal kleiner, sodass schließlich das Aktionspotenzial versagte. Zurück blieb ein kleines Signal. Und wenn sie dieses extrem reduzierten, beobachteten sie, dass der stimulierende Nervenimpuls manchmal ein Signal wie dieses auslöste und es ihm manchmal nicht gelang, ein Signal auszulösen. Solche Ergebnisse führten in Kombination mit den elektronenmikroskopischen Daten aus dem De Robertis Labor in Argentinien über an den synaptischen Enden bestehende, kleine Strukturen, die heute als synaptische Vesikel bezeichnet werden, zu der Erkenntnis, dass an dem Nerv, an der Synapse das Folgende passiert: Der Nervenimpuls verursacht einen Kalziumeinstrom in die Nervenendigung. Deshalb ist dieser Prozess so stark von der extrazellulären Kalziumkonzentration abhängig. Das Kalzium verursacht die Fusion dieser Vesikel, die dann ihren Neurotransmitterinhalt freisetzen. Und natürlich führt ein Aktionspotenzial mit Kalziumeinstrom zu einer simultanen Freisetzung vieler solcher Vesikel. Die kleinen Signalpunkte, die bei der hochauflösenden Erfassung beobachtet worden waren, wurden als Spontanfusion solcher Vesikel mit der Plasmamembran interpretiert. Der Neurotransmitter diffundiert postsynaptisch zur Postsynapse und öffnet Ionenkanäle in der postsynaptischen Membran. Wir haben hier also eine Art von Transformation eines elektrischen Signals in ein chemisches Signal, das von einem präsynaptischen Ende freigesetzt wird und in der postsynaptischen Membran in ein elektrisches Signal zurückübersetzt wird. Nun zur synaptischen Plastizität. Der Begriff „Plastizität“ beschreibt die Beobachtung, dass die synaptische Erregung, bei der es sich um ein im postsynaptischen Neuron durch ein präsynaptisches Aktionspotenzial erzeugtes Signal handelt, keine feststehende Größenordnung wie bei einem Computer aufweist, sondern sich, abhängig vom Gebrauch der Synapse, kontinuierlich verändert. Neurowissenschaftler sind davon überzeugt, dass diese Plastizität ein sehr entscheidender Aspekt in der neuronalen Signalverarbeitung des Nervensystems ist und dass tatsächlich insbesondere die langfristigen Veränderungen der neuronalen Konnektivität Lernen und Gedächtnis zugrunde liegen. Und das war, so wie ich es verstanden habe, auch das Thema von Roger Tsien. Die Kurzzeitplastizität ist demgegenüber meiner Meinung nach genauso wichtig, weil sie grundsätzliche informationsverarbeitende Aufgaben wie Adaptation, Filterung und andere vermittelt. Ich werde in einer meiner nächsten Folien auf solche Aufgaben eingehen. Interessant ist auch, dass verschiedene Synapsentypen eine eigene Persönlichkeit in Bezug auf diese Kurzzeitplastizität zeigen. Wenn man Synapsen, etwa Kletterfasern, wiederholt stimuliert, zeigen einige Synapsen eine Art von Depression in dem Sinne, dass die erste Reaktion nach einer Ruhephase sehr groß ist und danach kleinere Reaktionen folgen. Bei anderen Synapsen ist exakt das Gegenteil zu beobachten, nämlich zunächst eine kleinere Reaktion, gefolgt von zunehmend größeren Reaktionen. Und wieder andere Synapsen weisen komplexere Verhaltensweisen auf. Eine bestimme Synapse verfügt also durchschnittlich über eine gewisse Form der Plastizität. Hier ist ein Beispiel dafür, wozu eine Kurzzeitdepression in einem Netzwerk gut sein kann, in dem viele solcher Neuronen zusammenkommen, um eine Aufgabe zu erfüllen. Ich erwähnte bereits, dass eine solche Depression gut dafür ist, die Adaptation an sensorische Stimuli zu ermöglichen. Das ist gut für die so genannte Verstärkungsregelung, die die Amin-Aktivität in bestimmten Hirnregionen reguliert. Man kann Netzwerke mit Synapsen bauen, an denen eine rhythmisch auftretende Depression erfolgt. Es kann eine zeitliche Filterung veranlasst werden. Aber auch komplexere Aufgaben des zentralen Nervensystems, wie die Schalllokalisation können in neuronalen Netzen mit Hilfe einer Kurzzeitdepression bewältigt werden. Und selbst das so genannte Orientierungstuning, ein im primären visuellen Kortex beobachtbares individuelles System mit bestimmten Zellen, die in erster Linie auf Kontraste in einer bestimmten Orientierung reagieren … Man kann das simulieren und eine Unempfindlichkeit gegenüber…eine Invarianz gegenüber Differenzen im absoluten Kontrast erreichen, indem man eine Kurzzeitdepression in das Netzwerk induziert. Auch ein weiterer, heute diskutierter Aspekt ist eine Erscheinungsform der Kurzzeitplastizität, nämlich das Umschalten zwischen verschiedenen Gehirnzuständen. Wir wissen, dass unser Gehirn innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen unterschiedlichen Zuständen hin und her schalten kann, beispielsweise Ruhezustand, Stresszustand, Erregungszustand, Fokussierung, Aufmerksamkeit. Mit dem EEG lassen sich verschiedene Schlafzustände beobachten, bei denen das EEG-Muster innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen den gut bekannten REM-Schlafphasen und anderen Phasen wechselt. Solche schnellen Wechsel können natürlich nicht auf Veränderungen in der Langzeitplastizität zurückgeführt werden, weil diese Zeit braucht, um sich zu entwickeln, und trainiert werden muss usw. Es ist bekannt, dass solche Gehirnzustände durch zahlreiche diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme gesteuert werden, wie dopaminerge, adrenerge, cholinerge, peptiderge Systeme usw. Da geht es grundsätzlich um all die Arten von Inputmechanismen, die Dr. Kobilka gestern in seinem Vortrag erläutert hat. Und man weiß auch, dass solche diffus projizierten Transmittersysteme Kurzzeitänderungen, Kurzzeitplastizität in ihren Zielgebieten [verursachen]. Meine Schlussfolgerung lautet deshalb, dass die Untersuchung dieser Kurzzeitplastizität, ihrer dynamischen Art und ihres Mechanismus einige sehr bedeutende Aspekte der Gehirnfunktion aufklären könnte, die ebenso wichtig sein dürften wie die Langzeitveränderungen. Obwohl diese kurzzeitigen Plastizitätstypen bereits in der sehr frühen Arbeit über die neuromuskuläre Verbindung von Katz und Miledi beschrieben wurden, gibt es immer noch … gibt es meiner Meinung nach immer noch viele Dinge, die wir darüber nicht wissen, und bis heute verstehen wir viele wesentliche Merkmale nicht. Was geschieht, wenn eine Synapse ihre Stärke, ihre kurzzeitige Plastizität verändert? Das sind natürlich viele Dinge, denn das ist ein mehrstufiger Prozess. Es können Veränderungen an der Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und im assoziierten Kalziumeinstrom auftreten. Es kann postsynaptische Veränderungen geben. Inhibitorische, so genannte Autorezeptoren können für eine Rückkopplung sorgen, sodass der Transmitter auf die Freisetzungsbereitschaft der restlichen Vesikel zurückwirkt. Dann entsteht ein Problem des Vesikelrecyclings und des Vesikelverbrauchs. Grundsätzlich glaube ich, dass es sich hier um Prozesse handelt, die molekular im Wesentlichen Änderungen auf der Ebene von Second Messenger-Systemen, Änderungen bei der Phosphorylierung und möglicherweise zytoskeletale Reorganisationen aufgrund des gesamten Transports verursachen. Ich möchte mich für den Rests meines Vortrags im Wesentlichen auf zwei Aspekte konzentrieren, nämlich auf die durch die Vesikeldepletion vermittelte Depression und auf die Änderungen im … die molekularen Änderungen im Freisetzungsapparat, die die Bereitschaft der freisetzungsbereiten Vesikel modulieren, in Reaktion auf einen Kalziumstimulus tatsächlich zu fusionieren. Wir untersuchen diesen Prozess seit einigen Jahren an einer sehr speziellen Synapse, der so genannten Heldsche-Calyx-Synapse, einer Synapse in der Hörbahn. Das hier ist ein Schnitt des Stammhirns mit der angelegten Hörbahn. Die Hörhärchen stellen im ventralen Bereich des Nukleus cochlearis eine erste Synapse her. Das Axon des empfangenden Neurons überquert die Mittellinie und stellt einen Kontakt zu einer anderen Zelle im so genannten mittleren MNTB her, dem mittleren Nukleus des trapezförmigen Körpers. Und diese beiden Synapsen hier haben diese sehr spezielle Form einer Kylix oder einer schalenförmigen, präsynaptischen Endigung, die einen kompakten postsynaptischen Zellkörper umgibt. Die spezielle Synapsenform hängt wahrscheinlich mit der Tatsache zusammen, dass die von beiden Ohren kommenden Signale für die Schalllokalisierung sehr exakt verarbeitet werden müssen, damit an dem Punkt, an dem die Informationen an der lateralen und superioren Hirnolive von einem Ohr auf die Informationen vom anderen Ohr treffen, sehr feine Intensitäts- und Zeitunterschiede erfasst werden können. Wir haben hier eine Synapse mit einer sehr speziellen Geometrie, die allerdings im Sinne der Elektrophysiologie den Vorteil bietet, dass die beiden prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgt werden und simultan sehr genauen elektrophysiologischen Messungen unterzogen werden können. Und dies wurde vor inzwischen mehr als 20 Jahren in Bert Sakmanns Labor von Gerard Borst und Bert Sakmann herausgefunden. Diese Synapse also haben wir untersucht und ihre Plastizität erforscht. Nur um Ihnen zu zeigen, was uns möglich ist, seit wir die prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgen können und entsprechende Ströme erfassen können: Wir können in der ionischen Umgebung innerhalb der beiden Kompartimente den Stromfluss exakt messen. Wir können das Ende mit einem Fluoreszenzindikator aufladen. Theis und ich machen das seit über fünfzehn Jahren, wir arbeiten dazu hauptsächlich mit den Fluoreszenzfarbstoffen von Roger Tsien. Wir können mit dieser Synapse viele Dinge machen, die mit anderen Synapsen nicht möglich sind, weil Synapsen normalerweise sehr kleine, boutonartige Strukturen sind, die einfach zu klein sind, um sie mit elektrophysiologischen Elektroden anzugehen. Die meisten Calyxe dieser Art weisen eine markante synaptische Depression auf. Das hier ist die Reaktion auf einen 100-Hz-Reiz, nachdem die Synapse eine Erholungspause hatte. Wir sehen jetzt einen sehr großen ersten Erregungsstrom, einen inverten Strom, der durch das Neurotransmitter-Glutamat induziert wird, das von der präsynaptischen Endigung freigesetzt wird. Ein zweiter Reiz, 10 ms später, ergibt eine kleine Reaktion. Und schließlich ist die Reaktion nach vier oder fünf Stimuli nur noch sehr gering. Die Synapse arbeitet bei sehr hohen Spike-Raten. Der Hörnerv ist mit 10 bis 50 Aktionspotenzialen pro Sekunde sogar im vollständigen Ruhezustand äußerst aktiv. Diese Synapse, zumindest die hier dargestellte, würde also in einem Dauerzustand der partiellen Depression arbeiten, obwohl das der physiologische Zustand der Synapse ist. Aber wenn wir uns das genau anschauen … das ist die Durchschnittsreaktion. Wenn wir uns das Muster der kurzzeitigen Plastizität detailliert anschauen, erkennen wir, dass einige Zellen – hier nur eine dargestellte Zelle – diese sehr starke Depression aufweisen. Das wird hier für drei Frequenzen gezeigt: 200 Hz, 100 Hz und 50 Hz. In derselben Darstellung können wir neben der Zelle mit diesem Verhalten möglicherweise eine andere Zelle finden, die exakt das Gegenteil zeigt, nämlich eine erste Fazilitation. Die zweite Reaktion ist größer als die erste, gefolgt von einer Depression. Nun, dies ist in dem Sinne zu verstehen … oder ich sollte anmerken, dass diese Zelle im Vergleich zu dieser Zelle einen sehr viel geringeren ersten EPSC (Excitatory Postsynaptic Current) aufweist, nämlich nur rund 1,1 Nanoamp, wobei das hier bei 2,5 Nanoamp liegt. Das Muster ist also so zu verstehen, dass in dieser Zelle die Freisetzung wahrscheinlich so hoch ist, dass bereits während der ersten Reaktion ein guter Bruchteil der verfügbaren Vesikel freigesetzt wurde, sodass nachfolgende Reaktionen geringer ausfielen. In dieser Zelle war wahrscheinlich die Freisetzung während des ersten Reizes geringer, sodass die erfassten Daten offen legen, dass die Erregungsleistung des Nervs bei der zweiten und dritten Stimulierung tatsächlich stärker ist und die Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit für die restlichen Vesikel zunimmt. Diese biphasische Verhaltensweise hat zunächst einen Anstieg in der Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit zur Folge, die nur beobachtet wird, wenn die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit sehr gering ist. Aber dann gibt es schließlich mehr und mehr Stimuli und die Synapse wird ihre gesamten Vesikel verbrauchen und danach in die Depression verfallen. Okay, diese Überlegung deutet bereits darauf hin, dass das so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis, das Verhältnis des zweiten zum ersten Stimulus, ein Maßstab ist, den viele Physiologen zur ersten Charakterisierung des kurzzeitigen Plastizitätsverhaltens der Synapse verwenden. Dieser Parameter wird auch als eine Art Indikator darüber verwendet, wie groß die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit ist. Wenn man solche Erfassungen an 31 Synapsen vornimmt und dieses so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber der Amplitude des ersten EPSC darstellt, erkennt man, dass eine systematische Beziehung besteht: Je größer die ersten EPSCs sind, umso kleiner fällt das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis aus. Das stimmt mit vielen Beobachtungen überein, die an anderen Synapsen gemacht wurden. Okay, aber noch immer haben wir es hier mit Synapsen zu tun, die vermutlich die gleiche Aufgabe erfüllen, morphologisch alle gleich sind und keine offensichtlichen Unterschiede aufweisen. Und dann stellt man sich doch die Frage, was diese Synapsen so unterschiedlich macht? Warum hat diese dann eine wesentlich geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit und eine großes PPR (Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis) und warum ist bei dieser genau das Gegenteil der Fall? Die Hypothese ist, dass freisetzungsbereite Vesikel tatsächlich in zwei Zuständen vorkommen können: In einem Zustand mit geringer Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, wobei typischerweise rund 5 bis 10% der Vesikel durch ein einzelnes Aktionspotenzial freigesetzt würden, und im so genannten Super-Prime-Zustand mit hoher Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit. Der Begriff „Super Prime“ wurde in verschiedenen Kontexten verwendet, wobei verschiedene molekulare Mechanismen vermutet wurden. Warum ein Super-Prime-Vesikel eine höhere Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit aufweist als ein anderes, werde ich später erläutern. Wahrscheinlich hat das mit der Fusionsenergiebarriere zu tun, die sich durch biochemische modulatorische Einflüsse verändert. Okay, das steht hier in diesem letzten Satz hier, nämlich dass wahrscheinlich die modulatorischen Hintergrundeinflüsse durch diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme Diversität verursachen. Welche Signalmechanismen können dem zugrunde liegen? Der markanteste, der wahrscheinlich damit zu tun hat, sind die diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalwege, eine Variante der G-Protein-vermittelten Signalwege, die Dr. Kobilka gestern erläutert hat. Dabei interagiert ein Rezeptor mit einem G-Protein, das G-Protein aktiviert Phospholipase C, die Inositolphospholipide werden aufspalten, was Second-Messenger-Diacylglycerol und IP3 erzeugt, das dann Kalzium freisetzt. Es wurde nachgewiesen, dass dieser Diacylglyerol-Zweig des Signalweges eine spezielle Funktion beim Priming von synaptischen Vesikeln sowie in der Freisetzung von synaptischen Vesikeln übernimmt. Konkret gibt es ein Protein mit der Bezeichnung MON-13, das eine so genannte C1-Domäne hat, eine Domäne, die auf ein Diacylglycerol reagiert. Frühere Arbeiten haben gezeigt, dass dieses MON-13.1 am Primingprozess und wahrscheinlich auch an der Regulierung der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung beteiligt ist. Natürlich können wir den Gehirnzustand nicht durch Stimulation … durch diffuse Projektion von Neuronen im Hirnschnittpräparat verändern. Ich sollte erwähnen, dass all diese Experimente mit konventionellen elektrophysiologischen Techniken an Hirnschnitten von Ratten durchgeführt werden. Aber wir können sozusagen die Aktion dieses diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalweges nachahmen, indem wir Phorbol-Ester anwenden, eine Nachahmung von Diacylglycerol. Und bei Anwendung dieser Substanz kann man beobachten, dass alle EPSCs durchschnittlich zwei bis fünf Mal stärker sind als unter Kontrollbedingungen. Und wenn wir dann erneut das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber den ersten EPSCs abbilden, sehen wir, dass diese neuen Datenpunkte, also diese gefüllten Symbole, sehr gut dem Trend der Kontrolldatenpunkte folgen und dann sieht man diese mehr oder weniger nahtlose Fortsetzung mit einer Überlappung zwischen einigen Punkten unter Phorbol-Ester und einigen Punkten unter Kontrollbedingungen. Das scheint mir zu sagen bzw. reizt mich zumindest zu der Hypothese, dass Phorbol-Ester dieses Gleichgewicht oder dieses dynamische Gleichgewicht zwischen geprimten und super-geprimten Vesikeln zur super-geprimten Seite hin verlagert. Bei näherer Betrachtung dieser Eigenschaft erkennt man, dass Super-Priming eine Eigenschaft von ausgeruhten Synapsen ist. Bei einer 200 Hz starken Stimulierung konvergieren die EPSCs beim gleichen Steady-State-Wert. Das wird hier an diesen Daten ersichtlich. Hier ist die erste Reaktion einer relativ großen Zelle oder einer Zelle mit großem EPSC unter dem Einfluss von Phorbol-Ester. Dieser Wert stammt von derselben Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Das hier ist eine Zelle mit einer relativ kleinen Amplitude, aber unter Phorbol-Ester, und das ist der entsprechende erste Wert für dieselbe Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Die ersten Reaktionen weichen also sehr stark voneinander ab. Dennoch laufen die zweite, dritte, vierte, fünfte Reaktion auf derselben Ebene zusammen. Und dieselbe Ebene heißt nicht 0, aber ziemlich ähnlich. Und in diesem Sinne scheint es so zu sein, dass das Super-Priming oder diese Differenzierung zwischen Synapsen nur auftritt … sie braucht Zeit … sie also nur auftritt, wenn die …Synapsen Zeit hatten, ihr Super-Priming zu entwickeln. Die Interpretation dieses Ergebnisses ist die, die ich gerade bereits erwähnt habe: Wenn die Synapse Zeit genug hat, einen Super-Prime-Zustand zu entwickeln, ergibt sich diese Differenz. Wenn allerdings während eines solchen Ablaufs ein konstanter Vesikelstrom freigesetzt und neu rekrutiert wird…ich meine, dieser Dauerzustand ist eine Art von Steady-State zwischen Vesikelverbrauch und Vesikellieferung. Die Hypothese lautet also: Wenn es der Zelle nicht ermöglicht wird, in den Super-Prime-Zustand zu gehen, verhalten sich all diese Zellen gleich. Dies kann man natürlich in einem simplen kinetischen Modell darstellen, wobei man annimmt, dass die freizusetzenden Vesikel zunächst einige molekulare Schritte durchlaufen müssen, die sie an die Membran andocken und in einen Zustand versetzen, der eine Freisetzung ermöglicht. Und wenn genug Zeit ist, können sie sogar weiter zum Super-Prime-Zustand heranreifen. Der erste Priming-Zustand wird sich schnell entwickeln, der zweite wäre langsam. Das erklärt also dieses Verhalten. Es ist auch eine quantitative Erklärung dessen, was man bei der Darstellung des Steady-State-Wertes der Freisetzung gegenüber der Stimulationsfrequenz beobachtet. Hier sehen Sie zwei Kurven, eine unter Kontrollbedingungen, eine mit Phorbol-Ester. Sie sind auf den jeweiligen ersten Wert normalisiert. Aber man sieht, dass die unterbrochenen Kurven den Versuchspunkten sehr schön folgen. Dies gilt auch für das untere Ende der Beziehung, die Steady-State-Freisetzung und Frequenz verbindet. Und ausgehend von diesem Modell kann man dann die relevanten, interessantesten Parameter extrahieren. Die Daten sind vor allem mit der Theorie kompatibel, dass der normal-geprimte Zustand eine Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit von in diesem Fall 0,06 hat, also eine relativ geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, während der Super-Prime-Zustand eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von 0,42 aufweist. Die so genannte Priming-Rate ist schnell, vier pro Sekunde. Das bedeutet, dass in rund 250 mms ein neues Vesikel auf eine Freisetzungsstelle geladen wird, während die Rate für diesen zweiten Super-Priming-Schritt im Kontrollfall sehr gering ist und durch die Einwirkung des Phorbol-Esters verbessert wird. Die von mir beschriebenen Ergebnisse gelten nicht nur für die Heldsche Calyx. Verschiedene Aspekte der Resultate gelten für eine Vielzahl anderer Synapsen. Die Heterogenität zwischen Synapsen der gleichen Art wurde auch für die neuromuskuläre Verbindung in der Maus beschrieben. Die Prototypsynapse, der Hippocampus zwischen CA3- und CA1-Neuronen, weist, wie vor einigen Jahren nachgewiesen, eine sehr ähnliche Art der Heterogenität auf, wie es von Hanse und Gustafsson in einer Reihe von Aufsätzen und darüber hinaus in weiteren kürzlich erschienenen Papieren beschrieben wurde. Dieses Phänomen, das ich als den Kollaps der Heterogenität bei höherer Frequenz bezeichne, wurde auch von Hanse und Gustafsson beschrieben und von Walter und Smith im Kontext der Informationsverarbeitung in neuronalen Netzen erörtert. Und diese langsame Umstellung vom Prime- auf den Super-Prime-Status war tatsächlich auch Bestandteil eines Modells, das Stefan Hallermann für zerebellare Moosfasersynapsen vorgeschlagen hat. Obwohl ich denke, dass die Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und der Kalziumeinstrom die stärksten modulatorischen Einflüsse auf die Kurzzeitplastizität haben, weil Kalziumströme bekanntermaßen in der Lage sind, das zu zeigen, was als Fazilitation bezeichnet wird, auch Inaktivierung, regulieren sie sich selbst durch G-Protein-Signale und so weiter. Veränderungen im Kalziumeinstrom verursachen in der Folge auch riesige Veränderungen in der Freisetzung, weil Kalziumeinstrom und Freisetzung sehr stark zusammenhängen. Aber ich denke, dass die Experimente und die Heldsche Calyx starke Argumente für diese andere Form der Modulation kurzzeitiger Plastizität liefern, die nicht auf den Kalziumeinstrom zurückzuführen ist. Wir können sagen, dass dies eine Heldsche Calyx ist, weil der Einfluss des Phorbol-Esters auf den Kalziumeinstrom vor mehreren Jahren sehr intensiv von Ralf Schneggenburgers Labor untersucht wurde, wenn auch diese früheren Papiere gezeigt haben, dass es keine bedeutende Veränderungen in der Pool-Größe gibt. Das von mir beschriebene Phänomen scheint also tatsächlich eine relative neuartige Form der Modulationsveränderung in der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung eines Vesikels zu sein. Die Ähnlichkeit zwischen der Modulation durch Phorbol-Ester und der Heterogenität an den Synapsen im Ruhezustand lässt vermuten, dass die Heterogenität tatsächlich aus verschiedenen Abstufungen der Hintergrundmodulation hervorgeht. Und ich denke, dass dieses Konzept von zwei Zuständen freisetzungsbereiter Vesikel und dem Einfluss von Super-Priming dazu beitragen wird, einige wichtige Phänomene der Signalverarbeitung in unserem Gehirn zu verstehen. Das hier ist selbstverständlich nicht meine Arbeit. Vielmehr wurden alle präsentierten Daten von Holger Taschenberger zusammengetragen, der bis vor kurzem ein Postdoc-Wissenschaftler in meinem Labor war. Mein Beitrag als Emeritus besteht lediglich in einer Datenanalyse und in der Modellbildung. Viele der Ideen und Hintergrunddaten wurden von Takeshi Sakaba, einem langjährigen Kollegen, der heute an der Doshisha Hochschule in Kyoto arbeitet, von Ralf Schneggenburger, der Professor am APFL in Lausanne ist, und von Suk-Ho Lee, einem Kollegen von der Seoul National University, zur Verfügung gestellt. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

 
(00:05:30 - 00:07:43)

The complete video is available here. 


Being able to move is obviously crucial, but such a skill would not be much use without the ability to map space, choose direction and measure the speed of movement. These are skills that we take so much for granted that we generally don’t give them any serious thought. However, these fundamental everyday activities rely on hugely sophisticated operations involving different parts of the brain that work together to act like a navigation system.[3] For the discovery and characterisation of this system, John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2014. The Mosers talk listeners through the discovery of this navigation system and give other fascinating insights into their science in their Nobel Lab 360°.

How does the brain represent space and how was this discovered? John O’Keefe started to focus on the hippocampus, a brain region that was highly interesting to him because it was thought to be involved in memory. However, based on what are now landmark experiments that O’Keefe performed with his student Jonathan Dostrovsky, he concluded that the hippocampus was actually doing something else.[3] Edvard Moser, who shared the 2014 prize with O’Keefe and with whom he has closely collaborated, picks up the story:


The complete video is available here.  


These experiments subsequently led O’Keefe and his collaborator Lynn Nadel to propose that the hippocampus constitutes a cognitive map in which the aforementioned place cells represent separate locations in the environment.[3] Knowing where you are and where you should go involves a lot of brain power, however, not only the hippocampus. Where do the place cells receive their signals from? This was what motivated the Mosers when starting their lab. They discovered that the entorhinal cortex, an area of the brain now known to function as a hub in many important cerebral processes such as memory and time perception, is responsible. Thus, they measured brain activity from that region.


The complete video is available here.


Grid cells coexist with head-direction cells or “compass cells” discovered by Jim Ranck in the entorhinal system as well as border cells that fire specifically along local borders (intermingled along the grid cells), and speed cells whose firing rates increase proportionally with running speed. Many of these insights were made in experiments where rats were navigating in empty spaces. However, in the real world, we of course have to make our way through spaces that are full of all kinds of different objects. How do we navigate such terrains? Well, it turns out we also have cells for that. The Mosers have very recently discovered a new type of cell in the entorhinal cortex that are responsible for defining our relationship to significant objects in our environment.[4]


The complete video is available here.


How the Brain Measures Time

Time is also encoded in another region of the entorhinal cortex, the lateral entorhinal cortex. In contrast to the representation of space, which is essentially ‘all or nothing’ firing of grid cells and other position-determining cells, time is expressed in the activity of many individual cells from this region. Describing the recent experiments of a postdoctoral researcher in his lab, Moser shows how the activity or firing of cells in this region changes over time at multiple scales. That is, some cells in the lateral entorhinal cortex ramp up their activities each time over the course of a discrete episode, in this case while rats explore a maze, while, for example, the activity of other cells decreases steadily over the course of multiple episodes.[5]


The complete video is available here. 


 As mentioned at another point in the lecture, as well as in the Mosers’ Nobel Lab 360°, this type of measurement is not the absolute circadian representation of the passing of time but rather the time relative to events.

 

Visual Processing

We talk about our eyes as being our instruments of vision, but considering the amount of brain computation involved, it might be more appropriate to say that it is our brain that ‘sees’. The Swede Torsten Wiesel shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with David Hubel for their work into visual processing in the brain, i.e., how specialised cells in the visual cortex convert the outside world into the images that we perceive. In this excerpt from his lecture in 1990, he describes the reductionist approach that they took.


Torsten Wiesel (1990) - Brain mechanisms of vision

Thank you very much for introduction and I appreciate to be invited to participate in this meeting. I'm also very grateful to Jack Eccles who has made it possible for me to just make a few comments about the vision system. It’s true that by working on a system like the vision system you may learn some of the principles that are used also by other areas of the brain. And for those of us who are brain scientists it often pays off to focus your attention on one particular subject which I have done for about thirty years. That is on the primary visual cortex in the cat and the monkey. I'd like here to present work that first David Hubel and I did in the ‘60s and ‘70s and then discuss work that Charles Gilbert and some other colleagues have done more recently at Harvard and the Rockefeller University. I will sort of try to, for the students’ sake, show, illustrate something about how cells in the brain respond to visual stimuli and give you a sense of how it is to be a neurobiologist. With the hope obviously to try to seduce you to the fact that the brain is a very interesting structure and we know something about it and there’s a great deal more to learn. Why I'm using this thing is that the first slide (could I have the first slide and the light down) is by the same painter as Jack Eccles showed that means that in the field we think alike! So this is a painting of Seurat, maybe Jack has made a choice on this but the point I like to make in addition to the fact that these painters used small points to make their images. It’s also if you think about this painting when it falls on your retina it’s going to stimulate single photoreceptors which absorb the light and then convert that into electrical energy. And then it’s sent, being processed by the eye and by the higher visual centres. There are about 200 million receptors in your eyes and only one million optic nerve fibres, so already in the eye there is some processing occurring. So, let’s first take a picture, (could I have the next slide, I don’t know if I can control it myself). So this is a picture then of the human brain with the eye and outlined here is the visual pathway. As you know the retinal ganglion cells project into the thalamus, the nucleus called the lateral geniculate nucleus which in turn synapses there and then send their fibres up to the primary visual cortex. And Jack Eccles pointed out these cells in the primary visual cortex send fibres to higher visual areas V2, V4 and V5 etc. I'm only going to discuss what happens in the one, it’s a complicated enough structure for me to try to understand. There are many people now Zaki and many others who are recording from higher visual centres, both in anesthetised animals and also wide awake monkeys with implanted electrodes. So you can record single cell activity in the behaving monkey and correlate the behaviour of the monkey and response what the monkey sees with single cell activity. The fundamental assumption here in this work is that by recording from single cells and studying their response properties you can indeed learn something about how the brain works. When I left Sweden to go to the United States to Stephen Kuffler’s laboratory I was sworn by my colleagues who will be unnamed that this may be a useful task to try to understand the structure with billions and billions of cells by looking at one cell at a time. But as you will see this has over the last thirty years in many laboratories turned out to be a fruitful way of looking at things. And it’s still profitable and will be for many more years I believe be useful approach to try to probe out the secrets of the brain because a large part of this structure or knowledge is still very primitive. Now if you look at the visual pathway, (next slide) this is looking at the human brain from underside and just to make the point that the projection from the two eyes and the crossing here, so each left side of the brain projects to the left hemisphere and the right to the right. This makes it possible, and then each hemisphere receiving input from the contralateral visual field. This crossing makes possible binocular vision, that’s perception, fusion of the image etc, which I won’t have time to discuss today. The other important fact of the organisation of this visual system is called topography and that is, it’s a very orderly projection of each half retina onto that geniculate and onto the visual cortex. So that the peripheral part of the retina or the visual field projects to this part and the most central part here. So if you record from cells in this part of the brain you have to stimulate this part of the retina. If you record more on this part you have to stimulate more peripheral parts. So this is one of the fundamental organisations of all our sensory system is topography, the laying out of here the visual field in a very highly orderly fashion. The next slide shows the processing in the eye, here we have the eye with all this beautiful optics and a piece of the retina has been enlarged and here you can see the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, the second order neurons and the retinal ganglion cells that project centrally into the central nervous system. Now there are also fibres, cells, horizontal cells, amacrine cells that make horizontal interconnect these cells lines and they are often inhibitor neurons. So this circuit here is possible to interact spatially, excitatory and inhibitory influences. And my mentor Stephen Kuffler was the first to show in the mammalian retina what happened. He showed that if you stimulate photoreceptors in the centre here then there’s a direct axonal pathway for some cells into the retinal ganglion cells into the brain. Then he stimulated the receptors on the side, the cell was inhibited rather than excited. So that was then a spatial separation, these cells receptors excitatory and these inhibitory. And if you could imagine that you are looking down on the retina from above in the next slide you will have then the area over which the cell responds, this is a centre. You stimulate here you excite the cell, if you stimulate the receptors in the surrounding area the ganglion cell we record from is inhibited. Now all these recordings are done with microelectrode extra-cellularly and you can then record action potential. I will show you an example in a film in a few minutes of a cell like this, excited in the centre and is inhibited when you stimulate the surround. These cells are built, this is very sophisticated type of processing but now cells don’t only respond to light that falls on the retina but the pattern of light. The contrast is very important in order to optimally activate the cells. The bar here is to show that this is a circular symmetric thing and this is just to make the contrast with the way cells individual cortex respond. The size of these varies in a fovea that can only be a minute of all, that is very, very small and this is when you go to the eye doctor. The smallest distance between the bar of the E for example and then in the periphery that could be a degree or more to the centre area. So the higher acuity region is small and in the periphery larger. There it’s larger because the sum of the larger area and your high sensitivity whereas in the centre you have high acuity and lower sensitivity. These types of cell organisation, Kuffler also showed that you had the reverse arrangement in also about half of the cells have inhibitory centres and excitatory surrounds. In the film I will only show this kind of cell. Now the cells in the visual cortex which receive projection from lateral geniculate cells which have exactly the same organisation, the centre symmetric surround is quite different. It’s a major transformation that occurs in the way cells respond to visual stimuli. And this is illustrated in the next slide which is a diagrammatic illustration. This is a visual field, here’s a fovea and this is the cell that is then in the left hemisphere with visual field in the right. This is the size of the area over which the cell responds, called the receptive field. This is the small square form and here in the centre we are moving the bar across the receptive field in different orientations and we get the best response at the one o’clock orientation moving to the right. If you change orientation the response declines. And you can plot this sensitivity to a different orientation in the tuning curve shown here. The remarkable thing and I will show you, you see that in the film is that here you stimulate the same area, the same receptors in the retina and the only difference we make is that the change orientation of the stimulus and the cell doesn’t see that. It only sees the cell, the bar of a particular or a contour of a particular orientation. Now I'd like to show you the film of a few cells just to get you a feeling and the first cell is then a recording from the lateral geniculate body in the cat. The animal is asleep and is like you looking onto the screen, onto which we project spots of light and map the receptive field. You see the small area in the centre where you get a response and we will then stimulate the surround and the whole field. After that there will be two cortical cells with properties quite different. So this change from the first cell into the cell sensitive to orientation of contour is through specific wiring in the cortex, specific circuitry that makes it possible to generate these kinds of. So maybe we can have the film now? This is the centre of the receptive field (we could increase the sound a little bit more, that would be better). This is stimulating the whole field centre and surround cell response. This is a surround only, you see the response when you turn the light off. You are not eliminating the light that is in the centre. When you turn it off, you release inhibition and the cell fires. Also when you have a big spot and you contract it, this is now the centre only, big spot contracted you remove the inhibition and the cell fires. So again it’s quite powerful inhibition in this. This is just to illustrate that these cells are symmetric, orientation of the bar is of no consequences. We can move this orientation. This is very important because this is not seen at the cortical level. So now we have a cortical cell, we first map the receptive field, map the area of the individual field over which a cell responds. For the animal, it’s looking at the screen, is anesthetised but the sensors still active even if this animal is asleep and you then try to determine the area over which you can evoke the ordered influences, these charges. As you know cells communicate to each other through an action potential which is like a Morse code in a way, frequency tells you about the intensity or effectiveness of a stimulus. This is a rough map of the receptive field. This is in the area in which the cell responds. As you can see the orientation isn’t quite right and the field is a little smaller than it ought to be because its ... This cell is best to left but also to the right. So now we are stimulating the same receptive area in the eye or the visual field and there’s no response. So again you have to understand that it’s through specific wiring in the retina and in the cortex that this happens. This is a very robust thing, you can take an ordinary paint brush and move it across in different orientations and you will see. You can see cells like moving stimuli, just like we do. Our eyes are constantly moving so if you stabilise the visual image which is possible to do technically you go blind in three to five seconds. Then if you move the stimulus of the eye the whole visual scenes come back. These cells similarly stop firing if you don’t move the stimulus after a while. Now this is another cortical cell which I show because it has similar properties to the one you just saw but still an additional quality that is again an elegant demonstration or a demonstration of an elegant wiring, I should say, in the cortex. I didn’t know that field. So we have a map here and then we have a very directional cell, it varies, some cells are very directional, some cells responds to both direction, the first one…And this is the punch line of the cell. Here what happens is that you have inhibitory reflex here, you get no response here but there are reflex here that make it possible, that inhibit the cell from firing. And it’s only when you stimulate the centre alone. This is what we now call an end inhibitor cell, I like to in this talk to try to give you some feeling. So this I hope gives you a feeling for the, (its fine leave the slide on) now it turns out the organisation of the cortex, what we call the functional architecture is highly specific. You can keep in mind what Jack Eccles talked about dendrons. That is, cells close to each other have common properties. And what you find when you record from the visual cortex make a perpendicular penetration and record from cell after cell after cell is, it goes through all the cells in a given path we have the same orientation preference. Prefer the same orientation of a contra-crossing a receptive field. This is what we hope you find in orientation columns. That is columns of cells in the same orientation preference. Now, this really is a term common that we use, a term from some years ago but it turns out there are no real columns or had the structural architecture showed as circular but they are long narrow bands going through. Now, if you make many penetrations then you can get a feeling for the organisation of the orientation columns in the cortex and that’s illustrated in the next slide. Here is a visual cortex surface, white matter and here is one penetration perpendicular penetration here, all the cells had more or less vertical orientation preference and here’s another penetration also the cell had the same vertical orientation. The receptive fields you record from ten or so cells in this penetration all had overlapping receptive fields. Now because of the topography as you move from this point to this point there is a shift in the receptive field position. So all the cells we recorded here had their receptive fields here. In fact you have to move about one to two millimetres in order to get the fields not to overlap anymore. Now the main point here is to show that as you make an oblique penetration, so you go and record from several columns and these are steps about 50 micrometre steps, there is a shift in orientation preference. As you can see here from contra-clockwise back to after, actually in real life it’s about eighteen shifts, but it’s hard to draw from one vertical orientation column to the next. The highly orderly sequence on this changed orientation is shown here as you go from vertical counter-clockwise over many steps back to the vertical again. This is a distance of cortex about between half a millimetre, that is a chunk of cortex that deal with a small part of the visual field in terms of analysing orientation of contours, what David Hubel and I have called a hyper-column type of organisation. Now when we had come to this stage, Charles Gilbert and I started to collaborate and we were interested to understand the wiring of the cells within a given column. The approach we used was to record intracellularly with micropipette electrodes which were filled with a dye horseradish peroxidase, HRP, and as the next slide shows a cell filled with horseradish peroxidase, this is a cell here, the dark is a pyramidal cell you can see the apical dendrite and basal dendrite and also axons. This HRP stain is wonderful because it fills axons over long distances and also maleimited the fibres which the Golgi method does not do. It’s a counter stain to show all the other cells in the surrounding area. It’s to see how big a single cell is, you may think these are small cells but in fact most of them have this spread over several hundred My with their dendrites. Now in order to get this cell reconstructed you have to do serial section and then ... tracing (inaudible, 20.02) and a two-dimensional reconstruction is shown in the next slide of a pyramidal cell. These then are very beautiful cells, cell body, basal dendrite, epical dendrite and then axon leaving the cortex. This cell is in layer six, as Jack said there are six layers, this is layer six. And it leaves the cortex and goes back to the lateral geniculate body but it also has a very important projection up to layer four, to have a very specific function. Now Charles Gilbert and I we have recording from hundreds of cells in different layers and this has led us to do a circuit diagram of the connections that cross the cortex and that’s shown in the next slide. I don’t want you to pay too much attention to the details but it’s a nice picture that you get which very much confirms the classical histology with some additions. The projection is primarily into the middle of the cortex of layer four where geniculate fibres with a circular symmetric field make contact with spiny stellate cells in this layer and they have the simple cell properties. The simplest properties you find in the cortex. These cells in turn project to superficial layers, pyramidal cell for example which have more complex properties than larger receptive fields and these cells are the ones that project to higher visual centres. They leave the cortex and go to V2 and V3 and V4 etc. But they on the way out have a very important projection down to cells in layer five, where we have these beautiful pyramidal cells that Jack mentioned. And these are cells that project subcortically to the superior colliculus for example which is an important structure for control of eye movement and things of that sort. But they also on their way out give collateral to cells in layer six. Now the receptive fields in these cells are large, again as you go from step to step the fields get larger and larger. And in layer six cell that receives input then from layer five cells they are particularly large as you will, I will come back to in a little bit and then this recurrent projection. In each layer about 80% of the cells in the cortex are either pyramidal or spiny stellate cells and about 20 – 25% are inhibitory GABAergic cells. And these are illustrated here, I don’t want to go into the details of that. You have to keep in mind that at each stage and at each layer there is an interaction again between excitatory input and inhibitory circuitry. Now the one discovery that we made with this method of intercellular injections with HRP is illustrated in the next couple of slides. This is a cell in superficial, (could I have the next slide) this is a pyramidal cell in layer two and three, epical dendrite and basal dendrite. It looks messy but if you do a three-dimensional reconstruction with a computer graphic system of the dendrite axonal projection you can see what is shown in the next slide. And here is more or less axonal projection in the same plane which we saw before and this is rotated 90 degrees. Look in my hand, in one orientation and in the other. This is very interesting, I have a cluster of axon collaterals around the cell body here and then there’s a distance and then there’s another cluster of endings at a distance away and here too. And in the projection in layer five you have the same thing, you have a cluster of endings here and here and they are beautifully lined up. Now these sort of projections and this distance here in this case is the distance you would expect from going from one column to the next. So of this cell with vertical orientation preference our hypothesis from seeing pictures like these would be that they are projecting to cells in the same orientation columns, which is the thesis of this talk. Now I like to show you the three-dimension of this film and if the sound is off we can have the last part of the film, unfortunately there is no sound for this. This is a cell in the superficial layers and the cell body is here and then these are axonal processes. It’s just to show you the complex organisation of the cell and how they project not across the cortex but along the cortical surface. And they have these very typical clustered endings visually then our connection to cell with the same orientation preference as the cell here. And you can see this is then looking across a layer and you can see how it’s like a flat sheet within the cortex. This is a cell that you saw before, the dendrites and here are the axons and as you rotate it you can see the, it’s a little bit like a ship, majestic ship sailing. You can see again how the clusters are lined up very beautifully in a columnar fashion. So if you make a penetration through here and record the cells they will all have the same orientation preference. So maybe that’s enough of the film, just to give you a sense. So this is a general scheme which we have evidence and I always like to present evidence particularly since students are here. But time is not making it possible to go to those slides. But this is the scheme we ended up with, here are the highlighted cells you may be able to see from the back, cells all with the same orientation preference, in this case vertical orientation. And the proposal is that these cells are interconnected. They don’t connect with cells with different orientation preference. We can show that by physiological means by recording from this as a reference cell determining its orientation and then record from cell life to cell life and correlate their firing. And we find there are only cells that are correlated with our cell are the same or very close to the same orientation preference. The other method we have used is an anatomical one. You can inject a reticulated tracer, you inject the tracer in a region with a cell with vertical orientation and the reticulated tracer will then go back and fill cells that project to this area. We have shown that the cells that project to this area by this anatomical method are all within the vertical orientation, or the same orientation as the cell to which they project. So we believe that we have good evidence for this very highly precise horizontal connection. So the next slide then shows the general diagram, (could we have the next slide). So this is then the vertical connections that I talked about first between the different lamina. And then there is a horizontal connection which makes it possible for cell with the same orientation preference to interconnect. Now these connections go over many, many millimetres and it makes possible then to integrate the visual area not only to have an atomistic, very small representation but that cells connect and talk to each other over wide regions. Now we like to end up with a demonstration of how we try to illustrate the importance of the circuitry and the next slide is just the same (could I have the next slide). This is a cell what we showed on the film, the last one is end-stopped. It gives a good response to a short bar moved across back and forth across the receptive field. The long bar gives a very poor response. So this is then what we call an end-stopped cell. The next slide shows the circuit that we proposed to explain, and that is as I mentioned there’s a projection from layer six cells back to layer four and we have shown by EM studies that 80% of connections are within GABAergic inhibitory neurons and they in turn project to the spiny stellate cells. Now the spiny stellate cells respond very well to short bar as shown here and poorly to a long bar whereas the cell in layer six and this inhibitor neuron responds very well to a long bar because it needs summation over this area but very little at all to short bar. The experiment to test this circuit is shown in the next slide, in which we have the cortical layers, we have recording electrode one from spiny stellate cells here and another recording electrode in layer six which also have a GABA-electrode, so we can inject GABA and GABA is an inhibitory substance. So you can silence this area of the cortex without interfering directly with this cell. And if you do such an experiment which is shown in the next slide you have then the same cell, an inhibited cell, before injection of the GABA you get poor response to long bar, good response to short bar. And when we inject the GABA and activate layer six inhibitory you get as good a response to long bar as to a short bar. And then it recovers within a few minutes. The next slide shows the role of cells of this type to detect curvatures. A cell with no end inhibition, see no difference between a short bar, a long bar or a curve bar whereas a cell without inhibition responds well to a long bar, to a short bar and not at all to a long bar and reasonably well to a curve bar because the curvature here, these end cells here are the same orientation and sensitivity as the centre region. The late David Moore used these sort of cells as a building block (could we have the next slide) to think about how our perception works. This is from a teddy bear and you imagine that individual cells are in the primary visual cortex. Here cells are vertical, respond in the vertical contour will be activated and here the horizontal contours and in this way you could more or less do a complex picture like a teddy bear quite well. So this then is the concept, I like to think that cells of the kind that I’ve shown you are important for form vision and that they are building blocks. The last slide is (could I have the last slide), is a picture that ... Young, a well-known British neuroscientist, sent to me when David Hubel and I published original papers on oriented cells, cells that are in oriented lines and he said this is all very interesting, your work, but nothing new. It’s clear that Van Gogh knew about the importance of oriented line. So, I interpret this to mean that perhaps visual, that artists have a deeper, more profound understanding of the mind than individual neuroscientists who record from single cells. Thank you.

 
(00:03:57 - 00:04:47)

The complete video is available here.


Wiesel and Hubel elucidated several key aspects of how image processing happens in the brain, including the revelation that the angle of incoming light determined if cells in the visual cortex responded to visual stimuli.[6] A highlight of Wiesel’s talk at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting was a short movie of the original 1958 experiment performed in the basement of Johns Hopkins University, which illustrates this principle. In these very “low-tech” experiments performed with David Hubel, Wiesel stimulated individual cells in the visual cortex of cats with small spots of light using a slide projector lying around in the basement and then monitored the window that the cell that they recorded from could “see”.


The complete video is available here. 


In his talk from 1990, Wiesel then goes into detail to explain the Nobel citation accompanying Hubel’s and his award which explicitly mentioned insights into how the ‘image falling on the retina undergoes a step-wise analysis in a system of nerve cells stored in columns.’ The column principle encompasses both ‘orientation columns’ in which cells that respond to light of the same angle are grouped together vertically as well as ‘ocular dominance columns’ that exhibit preference for input from one eye or the other.[6] Later.


Torsten Wiesel (1990) - Brain mechanisms of vision

Thank you very much for introduction and I appreciate to be invited to participate in this meeting. I'm also very grateful to Jack Eccles who has made it possible for me to just make a few comments about the vision system. It’s true that by working on a system like the vision system you may learn some of the principles that are used also by other areas of the brain. And for those of us who are brain scientists it often pays off to focus your attention on one particular subject which I have done for about thirty years. That is on the primary visual cortex in the cat and the monkey. I'd like here to present work that first David Hubel and I did in the ‘60s and ‘70s and then discuss work that Charles Gilbert and some other colleagues have done more recently at Harvard and the Rockefeller University. I will sort of try to, for the students’ sake, show, illustrate something about how cells in the brain respond to visual stimuli and give you a sense of how it is to be a neurobiologist. With the hope obviously to try to seduce you to the fact that the brain is a very interesting structure and we know something about it and there’s a great deal more to learn. Why I'm using this thing is that the first slide (could I have the first slide and the light down) is by the same painter as Jack Eccles showed that means that in the field we think alike! So this is a painting of Seurat, maybe Jack has made a choice on this but the point I like to make in addition to the fact that these painters used small points to make their images. It’s also if you think about this painting when it falls on your retina it’s going to stimulate single photoreceptors which absorb the light and then convert that into electrical energy. And then it’s sent, being processed by the eye and by the higher visual centres. There are about 200 million receptors in your eyes and only one million optic nerve fibres, so already in the eye there is some processing occurring. So, let’s first take a picture, (could I have the next slide, I don’t know if I can control it myself). So this is a picture then of the human brain with the eye and outlined here is the visual pathway. As you know the retinal ganglion cells project into the thalamus, the nucleus called the lateral geniculate nucleus which in turn synapses there and then send their fibres up to the primary visual cortex. And Jack Eccles pointed out these cells in the primary visual cortex send fibres to higher visual areas V2, V4 and V5 etc. I'm only going to discuss what happens in the one, it’s a complicated enough structure for me to try to understand. There are many people now Zaki and many others who are recording from higher visual centres, both in anesthetised animals and also wide awake monkeys with implanted electrodes. So you can record single cell activity in the behaving monkey and correlate the behaviour of the monkey and response what the monkey sees with single cell activity. The fundamental assumption here in this work is that by recording from single cells and studying their response properties you can indeed learn something about how the brain works. When I left Sweden to go to the United States to Stephen Kuffler’s laboratory I was sworn by my colleagues who will be unnamed that this may be a useful task to try to understand the structure with billions and billions of cells by looking at one cell at a time. But as you will see this has over the last thirty years in many laboratories turned out to be a fruitful way of looking at things. And it’s still profitable and will be for many more years I believe be useful approach to try to probe out the secrets of the brain because a large part of this structure or knowledge is still very primitive. Now if you look at the visual pathway, (next slide) this is looking at the human brain from underside and just to make the point that the projection from the two eyes and the crossing here, so each left side of the brain projects to the left hemisphere and the right to the right. This makes it possible, and then each hemisphere receiving input from the contralateral visual field. This crossing makes possible binocular vision, that’s perception, fusion of the image etc, which I won’t have time to discuss today. The other important fact of the organisation of this visual system is called topography and that is, it’s a very orderly projection of each half retina onto that geniculate and onto the visual cortex. So that the peripheral part of the retina or the visual field projects to this part and the most central part here. So if you record from cells in this part of the brain you have to stimulate this part of the retina. If you record more on this part you have to stimulate more peripheral parts. So this is one of the fundamental organisations of all our sensory system is topography, the laying out of here the visual field in a very highly orderly fashion. The next slide shows the processing in the eye, here we have the eye with all this beautiful optics and a piece of the retina has been enlarged and here you can see the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, the second order neurons and the retinal ganglion cells that project centrally into the central nervous system. Now there are also fibres, cells, horizontal cells, amacrine cells that make horizontal interconnect these cells lines and they are often inhibitor neurons. So this circuit here is possible to interact spatially, excitatory and inhibitory influences. And my mentor Stephen Kuffler was the first to show in the mammalian retina what happened. He showed that if you stimulate photoreceptors in the centre here then there’s a direct axonal pathway for some cells into the retinal ganglion cells into the brain. Then he stimulated the receptors on the side, the cell was inhibited rather than excited. So that was then a spatial separation, these cells receptors excitatory and these inhibitory. And if you could imagine that you are looking down on the retina from above in the next slide you will have then the area over which the cell responds, this is a centre. You stimulate here you excite the cell, if you stimulate the receptors in the surrounding area the ganglion cell we record from is inhibited. Now all these recordings are done with microelectrode extra-cellularly and you can then record action potential. I will show you an example in a film in a few minutes of a cell like this, excited in the centre and is inhibited when you stimulate the surround. These cells are built, this is very sophisticated type of processing but now cells don’t only respond to light that falls on the retina but the pattern of light. The contrast is very important in order to optimally activate the cells. The bar here is to show that this is a circular symmetric thing and this is just to make the contrast with the way cells individual cortex respond. The size of these varies in a fovea that can only be a minute of all, that is very, very small and this is when you go to the eye doctor. The smallest distance between the bar of the E for example and then in the periphery that could be a degree or more to the centre area. So the higher acuity region is small and in the periphery larger. There it’s larger because the sum of the larger area and your high sensitivity whereas in the centre you have high acuity and lower sensitivity. These types of cell organisation, Kuffler also showed that you had the reverse arrangement in also about half of the cells have inhibitory centres and excitatory surrounds. In the film I will only show this kind of cell. Now the cells in the visual cortex which receive projection from lateral geniculate cells which have exactly the same organisation, the centre symmetric surround is quite different. It’s a major transformation that occurs in the way cells respond to visual stimuli. And this is illustrated in the next slide which is a diagrammatic illustration. This is a visual field, here’s a fovea and this is the cell that is then in the left hemisphere with visual field in the right. This is the size of the area over which the cell responds, called the receptive field. This is the small square form and here in the centre we are moving the bar across the receptive field in different orientations and we get the best response at the one o’clock orientation moving to the right. If you change orientation the response declines. And you can plot this sensitivity to a different orientation in the tuning curve shown here. The remarkable thing and I will show you, you see that in the film is that here you stimulate the same area, the same receptors in the retina and the only difference we make is that the change orientation of the stimulus and the cell doesn’t see that. It only sees the cell, the bar of a particular or a contour of a particular orientation. Now I'd like to show you the film of a few cells just to get you a feeling and the first cell is then a recording from the lateral geniculate body in the cat. The animal is asleep and is like you looking onto the screen, onto which we project spots of light and map the receptive field. You see the small area in the centre where you get a response and we will then stimulate the surround and the whole field. After that there will be two cortical cells with properties quite different. So this change from the first cell into the cell sensitive to orientation of contour is through specific wiring in the cortex, specific circuitry that makes it possible to generate these kinds of. So maybe we can have the film now? This is the centre of the receptive field (we could increase the sound a little bit more, that would be better). This is stimulating the whole field centre and surround cell response. This is a surround only, you see the response when you turn the light off. You are not eliminating the light that is in the centre. When you turn it off, you release inhibition and the cell fires. Also when you have a big spot and you contract it, this is now the centre only, big spot contracted you remove the inhibition and the cell fires. So again it’s quite powerful inhibition in this. This is just to illustrate that these cells are symmetric, orientation of the bar is of no consequences. We can move this orientation. This is very important because this is not seen at the cortical level. So now we have a cortical cell, we first map the receptive field, map the area of the individual field over which a cell responds. For the animal, it’s looking at the screen, is anesthetised but the sensors still active even if this animal is asleep and you then try to determine the area over which you can evoke the ordered influences, these charges. As you know cells communicate to each other through an action potential which is like a Morse code in a way, frequency tells you about the intensity or effectiveness of a stimulus. This is a rough map of the receptive field. This is in the area in which the cell responds. As you can see the orientation isn’t quite right and the field is a little smaller than it ought to be because its ... This cell is best to left but also to the right. So now we are stimulating the same receptive area in the eye or the visual field and there’s no response. So again you have to understand that it’s through specific wiring in the retina and in the cortex that this happens. This is a very robust thing, you can take an ordinary paint brush and move it across in different orientations and you will see. You can see cells like moving stimuli, just like we do. Our eyes are constantly moving so if you stabilise the visual image which is possible to do technically you go blind in three to five seconds. Then if you move the stimulus of the eye the whole visual scenes come back. These cells similarly stop firing if you don’t move the stimulus after a while. Now this is another cortical cell which I show because it has similar properties to the one you just saw but still an additional quality that is again an elegant demonstration or a demonstration of an elegant wiring, I should say, in the cortex. I didn’t know that field. So we have a map here and then we have a very directional cell, it varies, some cells are very directional, some cells responds to both direction, the first one…And this is the punch line of the cell. Here what happens is that you have inhibitory reflex here, you get no response here but there are reflex here that make it possible, that inhibit the cell from firing. And it’s only when you stimulate the centre alone. This is what we now call an end inhibitor cell, I like to in this talk to try to give you some feeling. So this I hope gives you a feeling for the, (its fine leave the slide on) now it turns out the organisation of the cortex, what we call the functional architecture is highly specific. You can keep in mind what Jack Eccles talked about dendrons. That is, cells close to each other have common properties. And what you find when you record from the visual cortex make a perpendicular penetration and record from cell after cell after cell is, it goes through all the cells in a given path we have the same orientation preference. Prefer the same orientation of a contra-crossing a receptive field. This is what we hope you find in orientation columns. That is columns of cells in the same orientation preference. Now, this really is a term common that we use, a term from some years ago but it turns out there are no real columns or had the structural architecture showed as circular but they are long narrow bands going through. Now, if you make many penetrations then you can get a feeling for the organisation of the orientation columns in the cortex and that’s illustrated in the next slide. Here is a visual cortex surface, white matter and here is one penetration perpendicular penetration here, all the cells had more or less vertical orientation preference and here’s another penetration also the cell had the same vertical orientation. The receptive fields you record from ten or so cells in this penetration all had overlapping receptive fields. Now because of the topography as you move from this point to this point there is a shift in the receptive field position. So all the cells we recorded here had their receptive fields here. In fact you have to move about one to two millimetres in order to get the fields not to overlap anymore. Now the main point here is to show that as you make an oblique penetration, so you go and record from several columns and these are steps about 50 micrometre steps, there is a shift in orientation preference. As you can see here from contra-clockwise back to after, actually in real life it’s about eighteen shifts, but it’s hard to draw from one vertical orientation column to the next. The highly orderly sequence on this changed orientation is shown here as you go from vertical counter-clockwise over many steps back to the vertical again. This is a distance of cortex about between half a millimetre, that is a chunk of cortex that deal with a small part of the visual field in terms of analysing orientation of contours, what David Hubel and I have called a hyper-column type of organisation. Now when we had come to this stage, Charles Gilbert and I started to collaborate and we were interested to understand the wiring of the cells within a given column. The approach we used was to record intracellularly with micropipette electrodes which were filled with a dye horseradish peroxidase, HRP, and as the next slide shows a cell filled with horseradish peroxidase, this is a cell here, the dark is a pyramidal cell you can see the apical dendrite and basal dendrite and also axons. This HRP stain is wonderful because it fills axons over long distances and also maleimited the fibres which the Golgi method does not do. It’s a counter stain to show all the other cells in the surrounding area. It’s to see how big a single cell is, you may think these are small cells but in fact most of them have this spread over several hundred My with their dendrites. Now in order to get this cell reconstructed you have to do serial section and then ... tracing (inaudible, 20.02) and a two-dimensional reconstruction is shown in the next slide of a pyramidal cell. These then are very beautiful cells, cell body, basal dendrite, epical dendrite and then axon leaving the cortex. This cell is in layer six, as Jack said there are six layers, this is layer six. And it leaves the cortex and goes back to the lateral geniculate body but it also has a very important projection up to layer four, to have a very specific function. Now Charles Gilbert and I we have recording from hundreds of cells in different layers and this has led us to do a circuit diagram of the connections that cross the cortex and that’s shown in the next slide. I don’t want you to pay too much attention to the details but it’s a nice picture that you get which very much confirms the classical histology with some additions. The projection is primarily into the middle of the cortex of layer four where geniculate fibres with a circular symmetric field make contact with spiny stellate cells in this layer and they have the simple cell properties. The simplest properties you find in the cortex. These cells in turn project to superficial layers, pyramidal cell for example which have more complex properties than larger receptive fields and these cells are the ones that project to higher visual centres. They leave the cortex and go to V2 and V3 and V4 etc. But they on the way out have a very important projection down to cells in layer five, where we have these beautiful pyramidal cells that Jack mentioned. And these are cells that project subcortically to the superior colliculus for example which is an important structure for control of eye movement and things of that sort. But they also on their way out give collateral to cells in layer six. Now the receptive fields in these cells are large, again as you go from step to step the fields get larger and larger. And in layer six cell that receives input then from layer five cells they are particularly large as you will, I will come back to in a little bit and then this recurrent projection. In each layer about 80% of the cells in the cortex are either pyramidal or spiny stellate cells and about 20 – 25% are inhibitory GABAergic cells. And these are illustrated here, I don’t want to go into the details of that. You have to keep in mind that at each stage and at each layer there is an interaction again between excitatory input and inhibitory circuitry. Now the one discovery that we made with this method of intercellular injections with HRP is illustrated in the next couple of slides. This is a cell in superficial, (could I have the next slide) this is a pyramidal cell in layer two and three, epical dendrite and basal dendrite. It looks messy but if you do a three-dimensional reconstruction with a computer graphic system of the dendrite axonal projection you can see what is shown in the next slide. And here is more or less axonal projection in the same plane which we saw before and this is rotated 90 degrees. Look in my hand, in one orientation and in the other. This is very interesting, I have a cluster of axon collaterals around the cell body here and then there’s a distance and then there’s another cluster of endings at a distance away and here too. And in the projection in layer five you have the same thing, you have a cluster of endings here and here and they are beautifully lined up. Now these sort of projections and this distance here in this case is the distance you would expect from going from one column to the next. So of this cell with vertical orientation preference our hypothesis from seeing pictures like these would be that they are projecting to cells in the same orientation columns, which is the thesis of this talk. Now I like to show you the three-dimension of this film and if the sound is off we can have the last part of the film, unfortunately there is no sound for this. This is a cell in the superficial layers and the cell body is here and then these are axonal processes. It’s just to show you the complex organisation of the cell and how they project not across the cortex but along the cortical surface. And they have these very typical clustered endings visually then our connection to cell with the same orientation preference as the cell here. And you can see this is then looking across a layer and you can see how it’s like a flat sheet within the cortex. This is a cell that you saw before, the dendrites and here are the axons and as you rotate it you can see the, it’s a little bit like a ship, majestic ship sailing. You can see again how the clusters are lined up very beautifully in a columnar fashion. So if you make a penetration through here and record the cells they will all have the same orientation preference. So maybe that’s enough of the film, just to give you a sense. So this is a general scheme which we have evidence and I always like to present evidence particularly since students are here. But time is not making it possible to go to those slides. But this is the scheme we ended up with, here are the highlighted cells you may be able to see from the back, cells all with the same orientation preference, in this case vertical orientation. And the proposal is that these cells are interconnected. They don’t connect with cells with different orientation preference. We can show that by physiological means by recording from this as a reference cell determining its orientation and then record from cell life to cell life and correlate their firing. And we find there are only cells that are correlated with our cell are the same or very close to the same orientation preference. The other method we have used is an anatomical one. You can inject a reticulated tracer, you inject the tracer in a region with a cell with vertical orientation and the reticulated tracer will then go back and fill cells that project to this area. We have shown that the cells that project to this area by this anatomical method are all within the vertical orientation, or the same orientation as the cell to which they project. So we believe that we have good evidence for this very highly precise horizontal connection. So the next slide then shows the general diagram, (could we have the next slide). So this is then the vertical connections that I talked about first between the different lamina. And then there is a horizontal connection which makes it possible for cell with the same orientation preference to interconnect. Now these connections go over many, many millimetres and it makes possible then to integrate the visual area not only to have an atomistic, very small representation but that cells connect and talk to each other over wide regions. Now we like to end up with a demonstration of how we try to illustrate the importance of the circuitry and the next slide is just the same (could I have the next slide). This is a cell what we showed on the film, the last one is end-stopped. It gives a good response to a short bar moved across back and forth across the receptive field. The long bar gives a very poor response. So this is then what we call an end-stopped cell. The next slide shows the circuit that we proposed to explain, and that is as I mentioned there’s a projection from layer six cells back to layer four and we have shown by EM studies that 80% of connections are within GABAergic inhibitory neurons and they in turn project to the spiny stellate cells. Now the spiny stellate cells respond very well to short bar as shown here and poorly to a long bar whereas the cell in layer six and this inhibitor neuron responds very well to a long bar because it needs summation over this area but very little at all to short bar. The experiment to test this circuit is shown in the next slide, in which we have the cortical layers, we have recording electrode one from spiny stellate cells here and another recording electrode in layer six which also have a GABA-electrode, so we can inject GABA and GABA is an inhibitory substance. So you can silence this area of the cortex without interfering directly with this cell. And if you do such an experiment which is shown in the next slide you have then the same cell, an inhibited cell, before injection of the GABA you get poor response to long bar, good response to short bar. And when we inject the GABA and activate layer six inhibitory you get as good a response to long bar as to a short bar. And then it recovers within a few minutes. The next slide shows the role of cells of this type to detect curvatures. A cell with no end inhibition, see no difference between a short bar, a long bar or a curve bar whereas a cell without inhibition responds well to a long bar, to a short bar and not at all to a long bar and reasonably well to a curve bar because the curvature here, these end cells here are the same orientation and sensitivity as the centre region. The late David Moore used these sort of cells as a building block (could we have the next slide) to think about how our perception works. This is from a teddy bear and you imagine that individual cells are in the primary visual cortex. Here cells are vertical, respond in the vertical contour will be activated and here the horizontal contours and in this way you could more or less do a complex picture like a teddy bear quite well. So this then is the concept, I like to think that cells of the kind that I’ve shown you are important for form vision and that they are building blocks. The last slide is (could I have the last slide), is a picture that ... Young, a well-known British neuroscientist, sent to me when David Hubel and I published original papers on oriented cells, cells that are in oriented lines and he said this is all very interesting, your work, but nothing new. It’s clear that Van Gogh knew about the importance of oriented line. So, I interpret this to mean that perhaps visual, that artists have a deeper, more profound understanding of the mind than individual neuroscientists who record from single cells. Thank you.

 
(00:16:01 - 00:17:54)

The complete video is available here.

 

Speech

Although he won his Nobel Prize for work on the synapse, Sir John Eccles chose to devote much of his talk at the 1972 Nobel Laureate Meeting to the work of another laureate, Roger Sperry, who won his award for split-brain research, i.e., for work that revealed how specific brain functions tend to localise to either the left or right hemispheres of the brain, respectively. At the beginning of his lecture, Eccles gives an overview of different brain areas and where specific functions are localised. Of particular relevance for speech are Broca’s area and Wernicke’s area discovered by Pierre Paul and Carl Wernicke, respectively, in the 19th century, and which are usually found in the left hemisphere.


Sir John Eccles (1972) - Brain, Speech and Consciousness

Thank you for your kind introduction. I'm very happy indeed to be back again talking here to this distinguished audience in Lindau. I have chosen a subject today which I think will be of interest to a wide section of thinking people. it deals with the problem of brain and mind, which is I would say the most outstanding problem confronting man today. I first want to tell you that by conscious experience, I don’t use the word ‘mind’, it’s often misused, but by conscious experience I mean something that each of us has privately for himself. And there are various aspects of it to illustrate. First of all, there is outer sensing, that is everything given to us in perception. So all of our receptor organs, such as vision and hearing and touch and so on. Then there is inner sensing and this is more subtle. This is the experiences we have in our thinking, in our memories, in our dreams, in our imagining. All of this inner life that we spend so much of our time in communion with, this is inner sensing. And finally, central to it all, is the ego or self. This is something that gives us our continuity throughout life, a sense of identity and continuity. It is interrupted of course by sleep and other less pleasant ways, but it is the stream that has carried us on from our earliest times. Now, on the basis of this, I want now go in to consider the brain mind problem. There is at present time quite remarkable advances in this field, some of them have not been fully understood and followed up. I hope to introduce you to some of these new thinkings that comes out of this work, quite recently. I will base my talk on experimental evidence with regard to the split brain experiments of Sperry and to the speech areas as have been known for a long time but which recently have come into prominence again. Now, we’ll have the first slide, please. Here is a human brain, the left hemisphere looked at from the side and here you see the convolutions and the motor cortex here, and here the sensory semantic cortex and here is where vision comes in and here is where hearing comes. And then the rest of it is labelled interpretive but there’s also speech areas there. In this general diagram, we’ll have the next slide, we can simplify it now. Here you have shown the speech areas, the Broca area here in this inferior frontal convolution, first discovered over a hundred years ago, it gives right by Broca and defects there, lesions there gave the patient inability to speak coherently, although he could understand he couldn't actually make good conversation, good speech. Behind here is the larger and much more important area discovered a few years later by Wernicke, and in this area lesions, this was all done on human lesion work, quite magnificent clinical work when you come to think of it back in those long time ago. The patient could speak in a kind of – he was still able to speak but he only spoke nonsense, he couldn't understand, he lost as it were the sense of language. Then there’s a supplementary one up here. Now, this work of course has got immense clinical base now, in all kinds of additional areas, dyslexia and dysgraphia and so on, are described. The other point I want to make about this picture is that if you stimulate here with a gentle current for example, as Penfield has done, you get interference with speech particularly here. The patient will be say counting, and he’ll go on and say one, two, three, three, three, while the stimulus is on and then goes on afterwards. Or he may stop all together or he may lose the sense of what he is saying while the stimulus is applied in this area. In that way you can delimit these areas by electrical stimulation, with interference results. Much other work has supported this whole idea of the speech areas being localized in this way, and in 98% of human beings it is in the left hemisphere. But you can also get by the way vocalization by stimulating here. And we have now the next slide which shows you the right hemisphere. So it’s the mirror image and here is where, along here is the motor area and if you stimulate here you get vocalization, hu, ha, all kinds of sounds, but no words clearly said at all, it’s just voice control motor area. Otherwise stimulation here gives you nothing in the way of linguistic performance. And lesions here don’t interfere with the language at all. Except in this 1 - 2%. Now, you might think it’s to do with left-handed and right-handedness but that is not so. Almost all left handed patients, also people, have their speech on the other side, only a few of them have their speech in the right hemisphere, but that is in this very rare number, speech in the right side. So the first point I want to make, is this remarkable localization of speech to one side of the brain. And I don’t think that this has been fully appreciated when we come to think of how does it come about, how did it grow that way. How did it come that you spoke using your left brain and certain areas there and not your right brain. This I will come to later. Now, I want to now go into the – oh, by the way, animals, even if you stimulate this area, you hardly even get vocalization, these cords, in a chimpanzee and so on. They are practically always mute when you stimulate in all areas, and of course they have no proper speech. Now, the next evidence I want to jump across to, and we’ll go back to the speech after this, is to the work of Sperry. And he split the brain cutting the corpus callosum, he was working on split brain patients. If we have the next slide, we will see what this means. Here is a - this is by the way a chimpanzee brain, but it’s just like a human one really, and he suspects good enough. Here are the two hemispheres, the left and the right and here is this great track of fibres joining the two cerebral hemispheres. You see we have one here and they are apparently independent, except for deep areas here, except for this crossing here of the big commissural tract. It has 200 million fibres, which is an enormous number, and it connects across symmetrical areas on the two sides, in almost all parts of the brain. There are now known to be blind areas to the corpus callosum, we won’t bother about those. What you can do in these patients is to severe the corpus callosum. It’s a nice clean lesion going through white matter only, if you cut here you see you destroy all kinds of micro-messy damage. But this is quite a clean and sharp lesion that you can make in this way. Now, why do you do it? It seems a dreadful thing to do on human beings. But there is good therapeutic reason, these subjects have incessant epilepsy, fits many times a day and their life is becoming quite hopeless. And it was thought that by cutting the corpus callosum, you could stop at least one hemisphere from being incited by the epileptic seizures in the other. And it was also known on animal experiments that Sperry had worked on quite a lot that cutting the corpus callosum in chimpanzees didn’t give too bad after-effects in the way of performance and behaviour. So they cut the corpus callosum in these subjects to stop the epileptic seizures in one bad hemisphere affecting the other. But it turned out that it was better than that, they stopped both hemispheres in almost all cases from having epilepsy, either one, it turned out that it looked like as if this one was inciting this one and this one backwards and forwards through the corpus callosum and if you cut it they behave much better. So the patients have done very well and there are now over twenty of these patients in the Los Angeles area that have had their cutting of the corpus callosum. Hence, you might say, except for the lower areas a complete separation in their two hemispheres. The important thing about these experiments of Sperry’s, and I think they are the most important experiments ever done on human brains, was to examine these cases very carefully indeed. And this I think is a masterpiece of investigation that he has presented over the last eight years or so. Next slide. I will show first of all a diagram of his. Here is the two brains, here is the left hemisphere we are looking at the one on top the right hemisphere. Here’s the corpus callosum connecting the two. And here is the lesion across. One of the things that’s very important about this is how you get the information into these two hemispheres from the receptor organs. The eyes either give you the most sharp separation. Here you will see a visual field, the left visual field and the right visual field. And the left visual field will go into this eye here and this eye here and then, as you look at the optic nerve here, you’ll see that the left visual field comes through to this hemisphere and appears in the right hemisphere. So in the right hemisphere, you get the visual half field of the left, and vice versa for the right visual field, it comes here and comes here. So you have a clear separation now, your brain separating, the hemispheres are split here, and now all left visual field information comes to this right hemisphere and the right visual field comes to the left hemisphere. This you will understand as the language hemisphere, with the linguistic areas in it. Also this diagram shows that for your hands and the sensation from your hands and the movements of your hands, the left hand is run from the right hemisphere here and the right hand from the left hemisphere, for movements and all sensing. That’s because of the decussation of the pathways. From this basis now we’ll be able to see the way in which the testing is done. Next slide, please. Here is an example, and I’ve seen these happenings myself, it’s a very simple but very elegant technique. The subject sits here, the examiner is here, the subject is looking at a central spot here, and in fact the examiner is fixing his gaze there and the examiner has a way of seeing that he really is doing that all the time. And then you can project onto this screen here, onto the left visual field, which would be this side or the right visual field that side, the subject fixing there all the time. And you have here a screen, the subject’s hand, in this case the left hand, goes under the screen, so he can’t see what’s happening at all and perform with sensing, touching sense and movement. That’s the set-up of the experiment. The important thing that Sperry did was to flash only for a tenth of a second, no longer, and if you flash for a tenth of a second, the subject's eyes can’t move across. So his right eye, he could shift his right visual field over to here, by moving his eyes or vice versa. So you can be quite sure in these cases that what is flashed into the left visual field only goes into the right visual cortex and vice versa. Then the hands for example now, to give you a look at the picture, he could have for example the word 'pencil' flashed here in the left visual field and his hand goes out here and searches all these various objects, spoons and so on, and pyramids and spheres, and will search them all, feel them and always comes up with the right object. It’s extremely accurately done by the left visual field to the left hand and yet the subject knows nothing about this. He doesn’t see the message, he hasn’t in fact known what the hand was doing at all. I mean he doesn’t know if it’s a success, he knows nothing. The next slide will give you an example of that. Here the word ‘nut’ is flashed on the left visual field, there’s the fixation point and goes into, as I’ve described, into the right hemisphere here, which runs of course to the left hand by the decussation. The left hand goes up and finds from these objects here screened from view the nut amongst all the other objects. This you can do with any variety of common nouns that you’d like for objects. You can flash here and the subject will go out and 100% will get it right. And not only knows that this right hemisphere working the left hand can not only get the right object but can demonstrate its use. It can put the nut onto a bolt if there’s one there and all that sort of thing. Yet the subject, the speaking subject doesn’t know anything, as shown by the query. The remarkable thing about this is – oh, you could do it also if you put a picture of an object here, like a key or something, they can find it there and so on. But you can’t do it for verbs, it’s only for common nouns. If you flash onto the left field here ‘nod’ or ‘wink’ or ‘point’ or something like that, some verb, no result. Only for names of common objects can there be an understanding by the right hemisphere of the signal and appropriate action. So this is remarkable, I don’t need to tell you that if you put it on the right hemisphere, the subject performs as normal and knows what he’s doing. You put it in the right visual field to the left hemisphere and the subject knows what is happening all the time. The remarkable thing about these experiments then is that the uniqueness and the exclusiveness of the dominant hemisphere, this is the speech hemisphere in giving the subject information in being able to talk to you and know what’s going on and in fact it is all the goings on in this hemisphere which gives you the whole expression and personality of the subject. Recognised by his relatives and friends as before, and it’s only what goes on in this hemisphere that is in fact now behaving as the self of the subject in relationship to the self. What’s going on in this hemisphere, this split from the left, the right hemisphere, the minor hemisphere is all unknown to the subject. And he will describe his left hand as I don’t know this left hand, it’s no good to me, I can’t do anything with it, it does things on its own, like doing successfully retrievals and so on. The subject doesn’t know how it happens and is embarrassed by the success of the left hand, which he knows nothing about. Nor does he know anything about anything flashed onto the left visual field, except in a vague way. So here we have split the subject in quite a remarkable way and speech and consciousness go entirely with the left hemisphere. I should mention that in all cases so far split they have been left speakers, speech in the left hemisphere. There’ve been no right speaking person so far treated but one can assume that it would be symmetrical in that case. The unity of the conscious experience that we all have, the mental singleness, as Bremer calls it, is preserved at the expense of losing all that goes on in the right hemisphere. This is another world, completely unknown to the subject what actions are there. But I hope to show you that this right hemisphere is a very clever hemisphere in all kinds of ways. It can read and retrieve as you see here and it can do in fact many other things even more significant. For example, if you can put here not just the name of an object, but you can put for ‘lighting fires’, print it out, the left hand can go out and find a match. Or if you can put here ‘measuring instrument’, it will find a ruler. In all kinds of ways it’s clever and I’ll give you other examples, if you put a dollar sign here, this is an American civilization, you have to understand with the dollar sign. There are no dollar notes out there, but the left hand goes out and searches around and comes up with a quarter, instead a coin and this is a successful retrieval. Likewise, if you put here a picture of a big wall clock there, then the left hand, there’s no big wall clock here, but the left hand will go out and eventually after searching everything, and looking, comes up with a child’s toy wristlet watch. It’s the nearest the left hand can do, and you can see the right hemisphere therefore, programming the left hand in light of that information it’s got, is quite an intelligent and clever hemisphere. But nothing of this is known to the subject. Now, we’ll go back, next slide, to the Sperry diagram. Here we have this diagram again, as you’ve seen already, and here you can see printed out here some of the programming that’s done on two sides. We’ve done the visual fields already and the right and left hands, the left hemisphere here. Right visual field, right hand, also mostly right ear, but for smell it’s entirely the other way. The left nostril here and the right there, that’s uncrossed. And then here is the main language centre, and also the calculation, all kinds of arithmetical calculations can be done here, here it’s only very simple calculation, such as for example 2 and 7, the hand can find all these numbers. If you put 2 and 7 up on the screen it can go and find a 9 and get a successful in the left hand. But nothing complicated, no multiplication, it doesn’t understand, or subtraction or division. Whereas of course the right hand and the flashes on the right visual field it is behaving rather normally but not as well, it’s a bit deteriorated. So the point I now have is that what else can we show here? Everything that’s in the left visual field, nothing gets through to here. And the answer is no, that’s too much of a claim. If you, for example, put some on the left visual field here, you put a picture giving very frightening look of a gun pointing at you or something, the subject doesn’t see that, he knows nothing about it, nothing has got through to his conscious left hemisphere. But he gets all the symptoms of fear and shaking and trembling and looking anxious, but doesn’t know, he feels fearful but doesn’t know why he feels fearful, because the picture was never registered, it was only registered there. Another example is one of Sperry’s more amusing pictures, he put a picture of a nude here, a nude lady. And this picture was not seen by the subject, but the subject suddenly started to giggle and blush a bit, it happened to be a lady who was looking at the picture. She didn’t know why, she had no idea why she felt embarrassed and this went on for several minutes. So something gets across that has got into here, and this we can take as the deeper centres, say through the hypothalamus which is still able to communicate across the mid-line. But this was quite crude information. Another thing is that if you put a painful stimulus on the finger of the left hand, the subject will feel again discomfort, consciously, but not know why or where or what is happening, it just has a feeling of discomfort. Only this vague and crude information crosses and that can be explained by communication at the lower level. You see the problem now is here is the left speaking hemisphere with all the consciousness of the subject, all of the self of the subject, everything from the past that can be remembered and so on is performed by this hemisphere. This hemisphere is now completely separated from the conscious subject, except in this crude manner I just described. Now, I put up the hypothesis, next slide, shown in this next diagram, that here is a diagram now, it’s an information flow diagram I have, you know. This is not an anatomical diagram, and it shows quite a number of things I think, all in fact are the results of Sperry is diagrammed here. We look at the central part here, only for a start this we will come to later. Here is in this diagram the left hemisphere, here is the right hemisphere, the dominant hemisphere, so called the minor hemisphere. This is the speaking hemisphere. The one that gives consciousness to the subject. And because of the decussation shown here, the right side of receptors comes up here for the most part and informs the dominant hemisphere of the right world and the right visual field. And likewise for the left side to the minor hemisphere. It is all shown here. And the motor actions for the cortex decussation come out here and work the right hand from the dominant left hemisphere and vice versa here. Normally - here is the corpus callosum - these two hemispheres are tremendously connected across. and that’s 4,000 billion impulses a second are passing from one hemisphere to the other, one way or the other way across here. And so you can see that normally the two hemispheres a very adequately connected for every purpose you could imagine. And likewise, of course all parts of one hemisphere connected to other parts, but this is just as efficient. The separation of the brain into the anatomical separation to two hemispheres is fully looked after by this immense comissure here. Now, if you cut the comissure, you find out as in these tests show, that this speaking dominant hemisphere is the only one which gives the subject conscious experiences of any kind. And it’s the only one from which the subject, the conscious subject can program a hand. May his right hand do this or that as normal, then it’s done from this hemisphere. This hemisphere has, so far as the subject is concerned, is completely inactive, it cannot be operated at all or programmed at all by any willing of the subject. This is an experimental fact. So my theory is that the conscious self with only a liaison with the dominant hemisphere normally, there was nothing here. The linking between the mind brain problem is only for the left dominant hemisphere, the speaking hemisphere, the ideation of hemisphere. And the arrow shows you that. This by the way is not meant to indicate that the conscious self is hovering above the brain some way or another. This is information flow only. And so here you have then the situation that everything coming into the right hemisphere comes through here the right side, comes in here to the left hemisphere, is experienced worked up thought and actions can be programmed from here and speech can be operated from here in the linguistic areas and so on. This is the way that it happens in these split brain patients and what goes on here is unknown to them, although it has a great deal of high level performance more and more, as we come to talk about it. In a way it’s got the status of an animal brain, you work on animals and you can get all kinds of reactions from them, but you cannot know what kind of conscious self the animal had. Because it’s got no way of communicating adequately with you. All you can say is you have to be agnostic about the conscious life of animals. Even your dog! And it’s the same here, you have to be agnostic about the conscious life that may have been maybe in this minor hemisphere in these split brain patients. But normally you will understand that everything that goes on here, all the intense performance and memory and skills and so on that are coded here get amazingly through here and through to here and so you realize them and the time across is only about a 100th of a second to cross from any part of the minor hemisphere to the major hemisphere through this immense tract. So normally we don’t know this at all, and without this splitting of the brain investigations, one would never have predicted such a thing. But there it is, it comes up now with this stark clarity. And it is always the speaking hemisphere that gives you this consciousness. It’s linked entirely, the speech and consciousness are linked together. We ought to go back now in view of this, and look again at the speaking hemisphere. What is this dominant hemisphere got specially, related to this incredible communication where the brain mind problem is really exposed. What has it got? Now, here we go back to the hemispheres and there is the motor speech area of Broca, this posterior speech area of Wernicke, and here is the arcuate fasciculus joining the two. Because in all linguistic experiences you have to think and understand what you are saying, and then to say it you have to go here and trigger off the speaking machinery as I'm trying to do now. So this is the two hemispheres. Now, it was always thought until recently that in macroscopic view they were symmetrical. The remarkable thing now is that it has been discovered that they are not. If we take certain areas of the brain, here is the cerebral hemisphere and here is the temporal lobe and this is the left one, and the speech areas would be here and here. And here is the right hemisphere with no speech areas. Now, if you look at the surface of the brain, you see and an anatomist would tell you that they are symmetrical, you can’t see any difference from the left and the right, although there is the remarkable association of speech with this one and not with that one. This turns out to be not true. People haven’t looked down and peered down opening up the fissure of Sylvius and looked at it from the top. It’s amazing that this has had to wait till now to be discovered, although the Germans did report it in the early, about 1908, and then it was forgotten. But when you do that, and you can do it by cutting here and cutting there, taking the lid off the brain and now looking on top of this remaining part here. Then you get this remarkable result that the Wernicke area here on the left brain is quite asymmetrical in most cases with the right. There’s only that little piece there matching that piece there. So we have a really extraordinary macroscopic crude observation here, to show that the speech area has a special part of the brain that isn’t matched in the right hemisphere. The dominant hemisphere here has got some special structure not matched on the right. But it’s not true always, sometimes you get it like this, with almost symmetry on the two sides. I might mention that in antipode apes they are always symmetrical. So this was a remarkable thing, it was also shown by Wada that this area here. This is Geschwind in Boston and Wada shows that the Broca area, if you look down in the fissure, has also got this asymmetry. Still more remarkable is the finding that this is already present in the five month old foetus. That you have amazingly enough there, in this very early stage of existence, a asymmetry already grown. That’s what I want to make the point, is that you have the genetic information builds the brain and builds the speech areas in this very early stage, ready for the speech that eventually would come. You don’t grow your area by speaking, your area is genetically grown, genetic instructions already in advance and so it comes out. I prophesy that in the near future one would be seeing other areas related to such a special performance as music and that we do know that music is associated and the musical sense with the right temporal lobe. Not with the left, it’s matching language and that lesions and excision of the right temporal lobe destroys the musical sense of patients. Now, this can’t be tested in the Sperry case, well, it could be perhaps, but not any of them seem to have any musical ability so you are testing almost nothing. But this might be the case here. Here with these cases where you have a speech area in the left, you have a large equivalent area on the right, which isn’t a speech area, but this could be the musical area. I would suggest possibly that we will find that people with musical ability have already genetically built, as here with speech, so an area here, specifically related and giving them that musical ability. It is for them to realise this potentiality when of course later in life, just as it is for us to realise our own speaking ability. Some people then are born good speakers with good linguistic usage, some with others and some with both. This is I think the message that we get through from this. It’s all genetically coded and it’s genetically instructed, it builds brains for the special performances. Now, I want to go on to consider the story of the right hemisphere, this minor hemisphere. We’ve mentioned music already and I have a feeling you know, I always had a feeling that it was somehow or other left out in these split brain patients because it was doing lots of things but it couldn't get across to give performance, conscious performance. What is this big right brain of ours doing? It weighs as much as the left, it’s got a few little deficiencies often, but otherwise what is this great right brain doing? You can find out that its very clever in all kinds of ways. For example the next slide shows you – this is just another one that shows the asymmetry on the left hemisphere compared with the right. There is though a hypertrophy here, two for one, of another part of the temporal lobe. This is in the centre of the Wernicke area though and you can see how much larger it is there. Next slide, please. Here is example to show you where the right hemisphere and the programming of the left hand can do a quite considerable thing. You can flash on here a list you’ve already told the subject, a list of names of common things like ‘book’ and ‘cup’ and ‘pen’ and so on, and so this is what they are going to get. They are all trained for this of course in advance. And then you flash on 'book' here and the left hand can go out, it’s in the left visual field programmed from here and writes even in script with the left hand quite, a script, not a copy of that but in ordinary writing script. Meanwhile the subject knows nothing about it and knows that the hand is doing something and doesn’t know. And you ask him and he makes a guess like ‘cup’ which is one of the words in the list. But has no knowledge whatsoever of what is being done by the right hemisphere here with programming the left hand. In other ways, the right hemisphere does much better. If you are, for example I’ll show you. I’ll just draw here an ordinary cube, ... and this is shown to the patient with the split brain. And with his left hand he can go and make a quite reasonable picture. Just like I can do now without any real trouble. With his right hand he can’t do that at all, this is the conscious side. Seeing this, knowing it’s a cube in prospective, and the right hand will go and do things like this and then put a line this way and then look at it and then put another one, and then he’s getting it right now, but then he puts the next one up there and then he finally puts another one there and then he gives up. And then he starts again. But the conscious subject in the split brain patient cannot do that. He’s got no abilities for geometrical drawing, it doesn’t understand the 3-dimensional spacial pictures at all, it’s got no pictorial sense. This is the conscious subject. The left can do it and the subject looking at his left hand doing this, is filled with chagrin, here is the unconscious movement, he can’t program, he can’t stop. Yet the left hand can do it, the right hand is doing this and then the left hand, always watching, wants to come up and fix the thing for the right hand. Unconsciously you have to hold the left hand back because if the left hand got there it would immediately see how to make this picture come out right and do this, and get the thing right. But the right hand can’t do it. It’s a sign that this pictorial ability in the right hemisphere programming the left hand that the left hand has there. And there are many other things in this way. So now we’ll have the next slide, here you see Sperry and Levy who have investigated this quite a lot. And now put down the dominant hemisphere and the minor hemisphere and put a kind of list now, of performances in the split brain patients as disclosed. It’s quite remarkable. This is 100% liaison to consciousness, there is nothing at all coming to the consciousness of the subjects from all the goings on in that brain. That is 100% clear. This is verbal, it’s got the linguistic centres, this is almost non-verbal but can read nouns and simple phrases. I’ve put this in because I think it hasn’t been tested yet but from our other work we expect the minor hemisphere to be the musical one from all the lesion work and the removal of the right temporal lobe, losing all musical ability. And this could match the verbal. This is ideational, linguistic ideation, which can be expressed and thought and this is pictorial and pattern sense, as you see there. This subject has no idea of pictures and patterns and matching any pictures shown or doing anything with his conscious hemisphere, dominant hemisphere. This hemisphere is analytic, taking things to pieces if you like, this is synthetic. This is Sperry’s idea, this is sequential and this is holistic. And you come to think of it this has something to do with music, it’s synthetic and holistic. Building things together out of the total detail of sounds that come and giving you a whole musical experience. This is going on in your minor hemisphere and this is arisymmetrical and computer-like and this is geometrical and spacial. So here we have now an extraordinary split in our brain performance. Quite unpredicted until these experiments were done. What is it for? Well, Sperry I think is on the right lines, this is evolved this way with separate functions for the two hemispheres, they can each get on with their own job and then when they’ve done all the cooking up and integrating and coding and decoding, then they can fuse it of course through the corpus callosum and get it out into consciousness. This is the way we are normally working. So we go back to our diagram again, ... now the next slide will show you another way of looking at the whole problem now. This is three worlds of Karl Popper which I list out here. The world one is the world of physical objects and states. The whole of biology including human brains, all the operations of brains should be here and all the artefacts like books and so on, the paper and ink and everything that we have here. The whole of the cosmos materially. Here is the world of states of consciousness that I started off with, with the two kinds of sensing, outer sensing, inner sensing and the conscious self. And here is knowledge and the objective sense, which is all coded culture. All that is written in books, in artefacts of all kinds and all of our theories, whole of science is here, the whole of literature is here, the whole of music and philosophy and literature, everything that man has made is there coded on objects here which are in world one. I think this is quite an inclusive diagram. All existence, everything that exists and everything that is experienced is in this diagram. We go back to the diagram here. Here is the world three that we have been talking about, all that is coded in all forms from the whole history of mankind. This is the story of culture and civilisation created by man is what exists in world three. It’s coded upon world one here, which is of course the paper and ink and books and the materials of pictures and sculpture and all the rest of it would be the base for the information that is coded, the ideas that are coded. And normally of course we get this in by reading it, it comes through receptors like this, and is put into one or the other hemisphere and it is all worked out there. In regards say to music it’s mostly worked out here and then shot across for recognition there. And when you want to do anything, if you want to carry out any action in response to a situation give it to your right hand, it’s quite easy, you just go through here to your motor areas and out to your right hand. If it’s your left hand, if I want to do something I still can do it, I can come out here, cross through here and out the motor cortex to my left hand. Everything you can explain is in here, and even the few uncrossed pathways which account for the odd findings of Sperry which he has used are in this picture. So this then is a diagram on how we think it relates to the whole of experience. Sperry himself has ideas much like mine now, we used to differ quite a lot and now my feeling is that he’s coming closer to me. He may think I'm coming closer to him but never mind. In one of his latest publications he writes: do interact on the brain processes exerting an active causal influence. In this view, consciousness is conceived to have a directive role in determining the flow pattern of cerebral excitation.” So this is what it does, here’s the conscious having a flow pattern, working upon, here the neuro machinery of the brain, but not everywhere. Not at all here, only in special areas which I think are associated with linguistic and ideational abilities of our dominant hemisphere. This gives of course big trouble for the psycho-neural identity hypothesis people. There they are in trouble because they would have thought originally, they postulated all activities in the cerebral cortex have also a conscious side to them that our own experiences, the inner side and that the neuro machinery operation is the outer side that can be seen by an observer. Now, finally I come to the problems of how it all started. Immense and fundamental problems are involved in how the brain developed this, how did speech come to the brain? How did from the ape a million or so years ago, from the primitive hominid, how did we come to have this linguistic areas in the dominant hemisphere and all that flows from that? These areas that you see macroscopically in those earlier pictures on the left side and which have not yet been looked at adequately with the electron microscope and not at all with physiological testing. There is a future for you to study the linguistic areas, because they must be very special areas in the cerebral cortex. I'm sure at the EM level quite different, they will have properties of a kind unmatched anywhere else. This has yet to be discovered. Man came, I think, to evolve in these last million years or so, by forging linguistic communication of ever increasing precision from just cries and so on and calls, he began to become descriptive and lateron argumentative. This subtlety grew and man gradually became a selfconscious being, aware of his identity and his selfhood. This was the immense change from the ape to man. It came I think through the evolution development of areas here related to the use of the brain now for memory, for expression of experience for argument. So the group, you can think of the importance of this for the tribal group, in survival, in hunting and in their own affairs. And that was all very well, they became much more efficient but at the same time they also, when they realised their own self existence with language becoming a person in itself. They also realised that they were like other human beings and that they would die, as they saw death in others, they too would die, and this terrible sense of death awareness, and with that all the myths to explain the meaning of life and the end of life. This we are still living with. This happened at least 100,000 years ago, at that time man for the first time was having ceremonial burials of other dead men and these have been recognised as the first signs of this selfawareness came to man, I doubt that it was earlier. But all of this would be related to highly developed linguistic abilities. This takes you on through all the times then with gradually increasing, and this is the point, that this became a self-catalysing or cross-catalysing thing. The more men spoke and discussed, you see, the more they became efficient, the efficiency of the speaking led to the better performance of the man and gave very high survival value to those brains that had evolved with these abilities and so on and so on. This gradually, through the few hundred thousand years, amazingly fast, gave you a modern man’s brain with all of the potentialities that we now have when we are born, already genetically programmed and coded there and built. From this we developed the whole of our culture and civilisation. Gradually men having this ability here to think and do and perceive was able to evolve all of the imaginative side of performance, which is the whole story of man’s history, man’s culture and man’s civilisation. And so this is the world we are born into now, we are born into it with all of this done for us as it were. We are the inheritors of this wonderful evolutionary period of man, where man created himself by creating his culture. It was a trust symbiosis, cross-catalysis. And so we have now man confronted with problems that he now has. What is the meaning of it all? What is the sense and meaning of life of this selfconscious existence of ours? Does it have more meaning than that of being merely a clever animal? Why are we born? What does it all stand for? How should we live? And all the problems of morality and so on. So these are the problems I don’t talk about them now, but these are the problems that I think are now sharpened up and made acute by this discovery of the way in which the brain works in relationship to the conscious self into this area here in particular. Thank you.

Vielen Dank für Ihre freundliche Einführung. Ich freue mich außerordentlich, wieder hier zu sein und zu diesem ausgezeichneten Publikum hier in Lindau sprechen zu können. Ich habe für meinen heutigen Vortrag ein Thema gewählt, von dem ich annehme, dass es für einen Großteil der denkenden Menschen von Interesse ist. Er behandelt das Problem des Verhältnisses von Gehirn und Bewusstsein, von dem ich sagen würde, dass es das größte noch offene Problem ist, mit dem sich der Mensch heute konfrontiert sieht. Zuerst möchte ich Ihnen sagen, dass ich unter bewusster Erfahrung – das Wort „Geist“ verwende ich nicht, weil es häufig missbraucht wird –etwas verstehe, was jeder von uns für sich privat hat. Sie hat verschiedene Aspekte, die zu verdeutlichen sind. Da ist zunächst die äußere Empfindung. Sie umfasst alles, was uns in der Wahrnehmung gegeben ist, also alle unsere rezeptorischen Organe: den Gesichtssinn, das Gehör, den Tastsinn usw. Dann gibt es noch die innere Wahrnehmung, und diese ist komplizierter. Dies ist die Erfahrung, die wir in unserem Denken machen, in unseren Erinnerungen, in unseren Träumen und in unseren inneren Vorstellungsbildern. Dieses ganze innere Leben, mit dem wir so viel Zeit im inneren Selbstgespräch verbringen, mit dieser inneren Wahrnehmung. Und schließlich gibt es noch, was für all dies zentral ist, das Ich oder Selbst. Dies ist etwas, was uns unsere Kontinuität im Laufe unseres gesamten Lebens gibt. Es ist ein Sinn für Identität und Kontinuität. Er wird natürlich durch Schlaf und auf andere weniger angenehme Weise unterbrochen, doch es ist der Erlebnisstrom, der uns seit unseren frühesten Zeiten mitgenommen hat. Auf dieser Grundlage möchte ich nun das Problem des Verhältnisses von Gehirn und Bewusstsein betrachten. Es gibt zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt bemerkenswerte Fortschritte auf diesem Gebiet. Einige von ihnen wurden noch nicht voll verstanden und weiterverfolgt. Ich hoffe Ihnen einige dieser neuen Gedanken, die aus diesen Arbeiten erst in jüngster Zeit hervorgegangen sind, vorstellen zu können. Mein Vortrag basiert auf experimentellen Belegen aus den Split-Brain-Experimenten von Sperry und aus Experimenten zu den Sprachregionen, die schon seit langer Zeit bekannt sind, jedoch in letzter Zeit wieder an Bedeutung gewonnen haben. Könnte ich nun bitte das erste Dia haben? Hier ist ein menschliches Gehirn. Sie sehen die linke Hemisphäre in einer Seitenansicht. Hier sehen Sie die Windungen der motorischen Großhirnrinde und hier den sensorisch-semantischen Kortex. An dieser Stelle treffend die visuellen Daten ein und an dieser hier die akustischen. Der Rest wird als „interpretativ“ bezeichnet, doch es gibt auch hier Sprachbereiche. In diesem allgemeinen Diagramm – wir kommen jetzt zum nächsten Dia – können wir die Darstellung jetzt vereinfachen. Hier sehen Sie die Sprachbereiche: den Broca-Bereich hier in dieser unteren Frontalwindung. Er wurde vor mehr als 100 Jahren erstmals entdeckt. Dies gibt Broca das Namensgebungsrecht. Defekte, Verletzungen an dieser Stelle hatten zur Folge, dass der Patient die Fähigkeit verlor, zusammenhängend zu sprechen. Obwohl er Sprache verstehen konnte, konnte er sich nicht richtig unterhalten, seine Sprache nicht richtig einsetzen. Dahinter befindet sich der größere und wesentlich wichtigere Bereich, der ein paar Jahre später von Wernicke entdeckt wurde. Wenn es in diesem Bereich zu einer Verletzung kam – all dies war an verletzten Menschen erarbeitet worden, in hervorragender klinischer Arbeit, wenn man bedenkt, vor wie langer Zeit das war –, dann konnte der Patient zwar auf bestimmte Art und Weise sprechen; er konnte noch sprechen, aber er sprach nur Unsinn, er konnte nichts mehr verstehen. Er verlor sozusagen den Sinn für Sprache. Dann gibt es hier noch einen ergänzenden Bereich. Nun, diese Arbeit hat mittlerweile eine äußerst umfangreiche klinische Grundlage in allen möglichen zusätzlichen Bereichen. Dyslexia und Dysgraphia und so weiter sind beschrieben worden. Der andere Punkt, den ich zu diesem Bild noch erwähnen möchte, ist der folgende: Wenn man zum Beispiel diese Stelle hier mit einem schwachen Strom stimuliert, wie es Penfield getan hat, erhält man eine Sprachbeeinträchtigung besonders in diesem Bereich. Der Patient wird beispielsweise zählen und etwa sagen: eins, zwei, drei, drei , drei – während die Stimulierung erfolgt – und dann weiterzählen. Oder er hört völlig auf oder er verliert den Sinn für das, was er sagt, während dieser Bereich stimuliert wird. Auf diese Weise kann man diese Bereiche durch Störungsergebnisse anhand elektrischer Stimulierung voneinander abgrenzen. Viele andere Arbeiten haben diese Theorie, dass die Sprachbereiche auf diese Weise lokalisiert sind, unterstützt, und bei 98 % der Menschen befinden sie sich in der linken Hemisphäre. Nebenbei bemerkt, kann man durch die Stimulierung in diesem Bereich auch Vokalisationen auslösen. Nun haben wir das nächste Dia, auf dem Sie die rechte Hemisphäre sehen. Es ist das Spiegelbild, und hier befindet sich der motorische Bereich. Wenn man diesen stimuliert erhält man Vokalisationen, Hu, Ha, alle möglichen Geräusche, doch keinerlei klar ausgesprochenen Wörter. Es ist lediglich der motorische Bereich der Sprachsteuerung. Ansonsten löst die Stimulierung hier keine sprachlichen Äußerungen aus. Verletzungen in diesem Bereich haben überhaupt keinen Einfluss auf die Sprache; außer bei diesen 1 bis 2 % der Menschen. Man könnte vermuten, dass dies etwas mit Rechts- oder Linkshändigkeit zu tun hat, doch das ist nicht der Fall. Fast alle linkshändigen Patienten, oder Personen generell, haben ihr Sprachzentrum auf der anderen Seite, nur wenige von ihnen haben es in der rechten Hemisphäre. Doch das ist bei dieser sehr kleinen Anzahl, die das Sprachzentrum auf der anderen Seite hat, der Fall. Das Erste, worauf ich hinweisen möchte, ist diese bemerkenswerte Lokalisierung der Sprache auf einer Seite des Gehirns. Ich glaube, man hat dies noch nicht richtig gewürdigt, wenn man die Frage bedenkt, wie es dazu kam, wie es so geworden ist. Was ist der Grund dafür, dass wir mit der linken Hirnhälfte und bestimmten Bereichen auf dieser Seite gesprochen haben, und nicht mit der rechten? Darauf werde ich später zurückkommen. Nun möchte ich weitergehen zu ... Oh, nebenbei bemerkt, erhält man bei Tieren, selbst wenn man diesen Bereich stimuliert, kaum irgendwelche Vokalisierungen, Bewegungen der Stimmbänder, bei Schimpansen und so weiter. Sie sind fast immer stumm, wenn man in diesem gesamten Bereich Stimulierungen vornimmt, und natürlich haben sie keine richtige Sprache. Nun, die nächsten Befunde, zu denen ich nun springen möchte – anschließend werde ich zur Sprache zurückkehren – sind die Arbeiten von Sperry. Er teilte das Gehirn, in dem er das corpus callosum durchschnitt, er arbeitete mit „Split Brain“-Patienten. Wenn ich das nächste Dia haben könnte, werden wir sehen, was dies bedeutet. Hier haben wir ein - dies ist, nebenbei bemerkt, ein Schimpansenhirn, es sieht jedoch aus wie ein menschliches Gehirn, und ist in dieser Hinsicht gut genug. Hier sind die beiden Hemisphären, die linke und die rechte, und hier ist diese umfangreiche Nervenfaserbahn, die die beiden Hirnhälften miteinander verbindet. Wie Sie sehen, haben wir eine von ihnen hier, und sie sind scheinbar unabhängig, mit Ausnahme von tief liegenden Bereichen hier, mit Ausnahme dieser Querverbindung der großen Kommissurbahn. Sie enthält 200 Millionen Fasern, was eine ungeheuer große Anzahl darstellt, und sie verbindet symmetrische Bereiche auf beiden Seiten in fast allen Teilen des Gehirns. Wir wissen heute, dass das corpus callosum blinde Bereiche enthält. Mit ihnen werden wir uns nicht beschäftigen. Was man bei diesen Patienten vornehmen kann, ist ein Schnitt durch das corpus callosum. Es ist ein sauberer Schnitt, der nur durch weiße Substanz geführt wird. Wenn Sie den Schnitt hier führen, verursachen sie alle möglichen mikroskopischen Schäden. Doch es ist eine ziemlich saubere und scharf abgegrenzte Läsion, die man auf diese Weise herbeiführen kann. Nun, warum tut man dies? Es scheint eine furchtbare Sache zu sein, die man einem Menschen damit zufügt. Doch es gibt gute therapeutische Gründe hierfür. Diese Patienten haben ständig Epilepsieanfälle, mehrmals am Tag, und sie befinden sich in einem recht hoffnungslosen Zustand. Und man nahm an, dass es durch die Durchtrennung des corpus callosum zumindest möglich sein würde, zu verhindern, dass die eine Hemisphäre durch epileptische Krämpfe in der anderen angeregt wird. Und man wusste auch aus Tierversuchen, von denen Sperry sehr viele durchgeführt hatte, dass die Durchtrennung des corpus callosum bei Schimpansen keine besonders nachteiligen Auswirkungen auf ihre Leistungsfähigkeit und ihr Verhalten hatte. Man durchtrennte also das corpus callosum dieser Versuchspersonen, um zu verhindern, dass die epileptischen Krämpfe der kranken Hemisphäre sich auf die andere auswirkten. Doch es stellte sich heraus, dass das Ergebnis noch besser war: In fast allen Fällen beendete dies die epileptischen Krämpfe in beiden Hemisphären. Es sah so aus, als ob die beiden Hemisphären sich durch das corpus callosum – hin und her - gegenseitig erregten, und dass die Anfälle unterblieben, wenn man es durchtrennte. Den Patienten ging es also sehr gut, und es gibt im Bereich von Los Angeles heute mehr als 20 Patienten, bei denen man das corpus callosum durchtrennt hat. Man könnte also sagen, dass bei ihnen - mit Ausnahme der tieferliegenden Bereiche – eine vollständige Trennung der beiden Hemisphären vorliegt. Das Wichtigste an diesen Experimenten von Sperry war – und ich glaube, es waren die wichtigsten Experimente, die jemals an einem menschlichen Gehirn vorgenommen wurden –, dass diese Fälle äußerst sorgfältig untersucht wurden. Und ich glaube, es ist ein Meisterstück in der Analyse, was er im Laufe der letzten etwa acht Jahre vorgelegt hat. Das nächste Dia bitte. Zuerst werde ich ein Diagramm von ihm zeigen. Hier sind die beiden Gehirne. Hier ist die linke Hemisphäre – wir schauen von oben – und hier die rechte Hemisphäre. Hier ist das corpus callosum, das die beiden verbindet. Und hier verläuft der Schnitt. Eine der Fragen, die hierbei sehr wichtig ist, ist die Frage, wie man die Informationen der Sinnesorgane in diese beiden Hemisphären bekommt. Die beiden Augen geben einem die schärfste Trennung. Hier sehen Sie ein Gesichtsfeld: das linke Gesichtsfeld und das rechte Gesichtsfeld. Und das linke Gesichtsfeld gelangt in dieses Auge hier und in dieses Auge, und dann, wenn man sich den Sehnerv und das Chiasma anschaut, sieht man, dass das linke Gesichtsfeld zu dieser Hemisphäre gelangt und in der rechten Hemisphäre erscheint. In der rechten Hemisphäre erhält man die linke Hälfte des Gesichtsfeldes und umgekehrt für die rechte Hälfte des Gesichtsfeldes: Die Daten gelangen nach hier und nach hier. Man hat nun eine klare Trennung, das Gehirn ist geteilt, die Hemisphären sind hier getrennt, und nun gelangen alle Daten aus dem linken Gesichtsfeld zu dieser rechten Hemisphäre und die Daten aus dem rechten Gesichtsfeld zu dieser linken Hemisphäre. Dies wird man als die Sprachhemisphäre ansehen, die die sprachrelevanten Bereiche enthält. Dieses Diagramm zeigt außerdem für Ihre Hände, die Empfindungen Ihrer Hände und die Bewegungen Ihrer Hände, dass die linke Hand von der rechten Hemisphäre gesteuert wird und die rechte Hand von der linken Hemisphäre; dies gilt für alle Bewegungen und Empfindungen. Der Grund hierfür ist die Überkreuzung der Leitungsbahnen. Ausgehend von diesen Grundlagen werden wir nun verstehen können, wie die Tests durchgeführt werden. Das nächste Dia, bitte. Hier ist ein Beispiel, ich habe dieses Geschehen selbst beobachtet. Es ist eine sehr einfache aber elegante Technik. Die Testperson sitzt hier, der Untersuchende hier, die Testperson schaut auf einen zentralen Punkt an dieser Stelle. Der Untersuchende fixiert den Blick der Testperson auf diesen Punkt, und er hat eine Methode zu überprüfen, ob er dies auch während der ganzen Zeit tut. Und dann kann man auf diesen Bildschirm hier, im linken Gesichtsfeld, was dieser Seite oder dem rechten Gesichtsfeld dieser Seite entsprechen würde, Bilder projizieren, wobei die Testperson fortwährend diesen Punkt fixiert. Und hier hat man eine Abschirmung. Die Hand der Testperson, in diesem Fall die linke Hand, kommt unter die Abdeckung, so dass die Testperson überhaupt nicht sehen kann, was geschieht, und sie muss sich durch Sinneswahrnehmung, durch den Tastsinn und Bewegung orientieren. Das ist der Aufbau des Versuchs. Nun war das Wichtige, was Sperry tat, dass er nur für ein Zehntel einer Sekunde etwas einblendete, nicht länger. Wenn man etwas für eine Zehntelsekunde einblendet, können sich die Augen der Testperson nicht zur anderen Seite bewegen. Also sein rechtes Auge... Er konnte sein rechtes Gesichtsfeld nach hier bewegen, indem er seine Augen bewegte oder vice versa. Man kann sich in diesen Fällen sehr sicher sein, dass dasjenige, was blitzartig im linken Gesichtsfeld eingeblendet wird, nur in den rechten visuellen Kortex gelangt, und umgekehrt. Und dann die Hände zum Beispiel, um Ihnen einen Eindruck von diesem Bild zu geben... Ihm könnte beispielsweise hier im linken Gesichtsfeld blitzartig das Wort „Bleistift“ eingeblendet werden, und seine Hand bewegt sich nach hier und betastet alle diese verschiedenen Gegenstände, Löffel usw. und Pyramiden und Kugeln, sie untersucht sie alle, befühlt sie und findet immer den richtigen Gegenstand. Es wird äußerst genau ausgeführt vom linken Gesichtsfeld zur linken Hand, und trotzdem weiß die Testperson nichts davon. Sie sieht den Text nicht, sie weiß noch nicht einmal, was die Hand getan hat. Ich meine, sie weiß nicht, ob es ein Erfolg war, sie weiß garnichts. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie ein Beispiel hierfür. Hier wird das Wort „Schraubenmutter“ blitzartig im linken Gesichtsfeld eingeblendet – dort ist der fixierte Punkt – und es geht, wie ich beschrieben habe, in die rechte Hemisphäre hier, die natürlich durch die Überkreuzung mit der linken Hand verbunden ist. Die linke Hand bewegt sich nach hier oben und findet unter diesen durch die Abschirmung unsichtbaren Gegenständen unter allen anderen von ihnen die Mutter. Man kann diesen Versuch mit einer beliebigen Auswahl geläufiger Hauptwörter, die man als Gegenstände verwenden möchte, durchführen. Man kann hier das Wort aufblitzen lassen, und die Testperson wird mit der Hand in 100 % der Fälle den richtigen Gegenstand auswählen. Und diese die linke Hand steuernde rechte Hemisphäre erkennt den Gegenstand nicht nur wieder, sondern sie kann auch seine Verwendung veranschaulichen. Sie kann die Mutter zum Beispiel auf eine Schraube setzen, wenn eine Schraube vorhanden ist, bzw. Entsprechendes in ähnlichen Fällen tun. Doch das Subjekt, das sprechende Subjekt, weiß nichts, wie sich durch Fragen ergibt. Die erstaunliche Sache hierbei ist – oh, man könnte stattdessen auch ein Bild eines Gegenstandes hier anzeigen, wie etwa einen Schlüssel oder soetwas, sie können es dort finden usw. Doch man kann es nicht für Verben durchführen, nur für gewöhnliche Substantive. Wenn man im linken Feld hier „nicken“ oder „blinzeln“ oder „zeigen“ aufblitzen lässt, irgendein Verb, erhält man keine Reaktion. Nur bei Namen gewöhnlicher Gegenstände kommt es zu einem Verstehen des Signals in der rechten Hemisphäre und zu einer passenden Aktivität. Dies ist erstaunlich. Ich muss Ihnen nicht sagen, dass - wenn man das Bild im rechten Gesichtsfeld anzeigt, von wo es zur linken Hemisphäre geleitet wird, die Testperson die ganze Zeit weiß, was geschieht. Das Erstaunliche an diesen Experimenten ist dann, dass die Einzigartigkeit und Ausschließlichkeit der dominanten Hemisphäre über die sie mit Ihnen reden kann, und die sie wissen lässt, was geschieht – dass diese Einzigartigkeit und Ausschließlichkeit und alles, was in dieser Hemisphäre geschieht, den ganzen Ausdruck und die Persönlichkeit des Menschen ausmacht. So wird er von seinen Verwandten und Freunden als derselbe wiedererkannt, und es ist allein das, was in dieser Hemisphäre geschieht, was sich, als das Selbst des Menschen, zu sich selbst verhält. Was in dieser Hemisphäre geschieht, die von der linken abgespalten ist, der rechten Hemisphäre, der untergeordneten Hemisphäre, ist der Testperson gänzlich unbekannt. Und sie sagt von dieser linken Hand: Sie tut Dinge von sich aus, wie zum Beispiel Gegenstände erfolgreich wiederfinden usw.“ Die Testperson weiß nicht, wie dies geschieht und der Erfolg der linken Hand, von der sie nichts weiß, ist ihr peinlich. Ebenso wenig weiß sie irgendetwas über das, was im linken Gesichtsfeld aufblitzt; höchstens auf eine unbestimmte Weise. Hier haben wir also die Person auf eine bemerkenswerte Weise gespalten, und die Sprache und das Bewusstsein befinden sich ausschließlich in der linken Hemisphäre. Ich sollte erwähnen, dass in allen bisherigen Fällen dieser Schnitt bei linken Sprechern durchgeführt wurde, deren Sprache sich in der linken Hemisphäre befand. Bislang wurden keine Personen behandelt, deren Sprachzentrum in der rechten Hemisphäre lag, doch man kann vermuten, dass die Dinge in diesem Fall symmetrisch verändert wären. Die Einheit der bewussten Erfahrung, über die wir alle verfügen, die „mentale Einzigkeit“, wie Bremer sie nennt, bleibt auf Kosten des Verlusts all dessen erhalten, was in der rechten Hemisphäre vor sich geht. Dies ist eine andere Welt. Dem Subjekt ist völlig unbekannt, was dort geschieht. Doch ich hoffe Ihnen zeigen zu können, dass diese rechte Hemisphäre in vieler Hinsicht eine sehr clevere Hemisphäre ist. Sie kann lesen und Gegenstände wiederfinden, wie Sie hier sehen, und sie kann tatsächlich viele andere Dinge tun, sogar noch bedeutsamere Dinge. Sie können hier beispielsweise nicht nur den Namen von Gegenständen anzeigen, sondern zum Beispiel „Feuer anzünden“, und es ausdrucken. Die linke Hand kann dann ein Streichholz finden. Oder wenn sie hier „Messinstrument“ anzeigen, kann sie ein Lineal finden. Diese Hirnhälfte ist auf vielfache Weise intelligent. Ich gebe Ihnen weitere Beispiele. Wenn Sie hier ein $-Zeichen anzeigen - dies ist eine amerikanische Zivilisation, Sie müssen das $ verstehen. Es sind keine Dollarscheine vorhanden, doch die linke Hand sucht umher und findet ein 25-Cent-Stück. Sie findet stattdessen eine Münze, und dies ist ein erfolgreiches Suchergebnis. In ähnlicher Weise können Sie hier das Bild einer großen Wanduhr anzeigen. Es befindet sich keine große Wanduhr hier, doch die linke Hand beginnt zu suchen und findet schließlich, nachdem sie alles überprüft und gesichtet hat, die Spielzeugarmbanduhr eines Kindes. Das ist das Beste, was die linke Hand in diesem Fall tun konnte. Sie sehen also, dass die rechte Hemisphäre, indem sie die linke Hand mit den Informationen programmiert, die ihr zur Verfügung stehen, eine ziemlich intelligente und clevere Hemisphäre ist. Die Testperson weiß davon jedoch hierüber nichts. Nun schauen wir uns – das nächste Dia bitte – noch einmal das Sperry-Diagramm an. Hier sehen Sie dieses Diagramm noch einmal, wie Sie es bereits gesehen haben, und hier sehen Sie einiges von der Programmierung ausgedruckt, die auf beiden Seiten geschieht. Wir haben die Gesichtsfelder bereits betrachtet, ebenso die rechte und linke Hand und die linke Hemisphäre hier. Rechtes Gesichtsfeld, rechte Hand, auch meistens das rechte Ohr, doch für den Geruchssinn ist es völlig umgekehrt. Das linke Nasenloch hier und das rechte dort: Hier findet keine Überkreuzung statt. Und hier ist dann das Hauptsprachzentrum, auch das Zentrum für Rechenaufgaben, alle möglichen arithmetischen Berechnungen können hier durchgeführt werden. Hier sind es nur sehr einfache Aufgaben, wie zum Beispiel 2 plus 7. Die Hand kann alle diese Zahlen finden. Wenn Sie 2 und 7 auf dem Bildschirm anzeigen, kann die linke Hand erfolgreich eine 9 finden. Doch keine komplizierten Aufgaben, keine Multiplikation. Die wird nicht verstanden, ebenso wenig Subtraktion oder Division. Während sich natürlich die rechte Hand normal verhält und die blitzartigen Anzeigen im rechten Gesichtsfeld auch in ziemlich normalem, wenn auch nicht ganz so erfolgreichem Verhalten resultieren. Die Leistung ist ein wenig verschlechtert. Ich möchte jetzt auf die Frage eingehen, was wir sonst noch hier zeigen können. Von allem, was sich im linken Gesichtsfeld befindet, gelangt nichts davon hierher? Nein, das wäre zu viel gesagt. Wenn Sie beispielsweise hier im linken Gesichtsfeld ein sehr bedrohlichen Bild anzeigen, ein Gewehr, das auf die Testperson gerichtet ist oder so etwas, so sieht sie das nicht. Sie weiß nichts davon, nichts davon ist zur bewussten linken Hemisphäre gelangt. Doch sie zeigt alle Symptome der Angst. Sie zittert und sieht geängstigt aus, weiß aber nicht warum. Sie hat Angst, weiß aber nicht, warum sie Angst hat, weil das Bild nicht registriert wurde, es wurde nur dort registriert. Ein anderes Beispiel ist eins von Sperrys belustigenderen Bildern. Er zeigte hier das Bild einer nackten Frau. Dieses Bild wurde von der Testperson nicht gesehen, doch sie begann plötzlich zu kichern und ein wenig rot zu werden. Es war eine Frau, die das Bild sah. Sie wusste nicht warum, sie hatte keine Vorstellung davon, was ihr peinlich war, und dies dauerte mehrere Minuten. Irgendetwas, was hier hinein gelangt ist, gelangt also dennoch in die andere Hirnhälfte hinüber. Wir können davon ausgehen, dass dies über die tieferen Zentren geschieht, zum Beispiel durch den Hypothalamus, der nach wie vor über Nervenstränge mit der anderen Hälfte des Gehirns kommunizieren kann. Doch handelte es sich hierbei um sehr rudimentäre Informationen. Ein ähnliches Beispiel ist folgendes: Wenn Sie in einem Finger der linken Hand Schmerzen erzeugen, fühlt die Testperson ein bewusstes Unbehagen, sie weiß jedoch nicht warum, oder wo was geschieht. Sie hat lediglich ein unbehagliches Gefühl. Nur diese unbestimmte, undifferenzierte Information gelangt in die andere Hirnhälfte, und dies kann durch Kommunikation auf der tieferliegenden Ebene erklärt werden. Wie Sie sehen, besteht nun folgendes Problem: Hier ist die linke sprechende Hirnhälfte mit dem gesamten Bewusstsein der Testperson, mit ihrem gesamten Selbst: alle Einzelheiten der Vergangenheit, an die sie sich erinnern kann usw. alle Leistungen gehen von dieser Hemisphäre aus. Dieser Hemisphäre ist jetzt vom bewussten Subjekt völlig getrennt, bis auf diese undifferenzierte Weise, die ich soeben beschrieben habe. Nun stellte ich eine Hypothese auf - nächstes Dia bitte -, die in diesem Diagramm dargestellt ist. Dies ist nämlich, das müssen Sie wissen, ein Informationsflussdiagramm. Dies ist kein anatomisches Diagramm. Ich denke, dass eine ganze Reihe von Dingen daraus hervorgeht. Ja, sämtliche Ergebnisse von Sperry sind hier dargestellt. Wir schauen uns den zentralen Abschnitt hier an. Nur zu Beginn. Dies besprechen wir später. In diesem Diagramm befindet sich hier die linke Hemisphäre, hier die rechte, die dominante Hemisphäre, und hier die untergeordnete Hemisphäre. Dies ist die sprechende Hemisphäre, die Hemisphäre, die dem Subjekt Bewusstsein verleiht. Und aufgrund der hier dargestellten Überkreuzung gelangen die Rezeptoren der rechten Seite größtenteils nach hier oben und informieren die dominante Hemisphäre über die rechte Welt und das rechte Gesichtsfeld. Entsprechendes gilt für die linke Seite und die untergeordnete Hemisphäre. Es ist alles hier dargestellt. Und die motorischen Handlungen kommen aufgrund der Überkreuzung des Kortex hier heraus und steuern die rechte Hand von der linken dominanten Hemisphäre aus, und umgekehrt. Normalerweise – hier ist das corpus callosum – sind beide Hemisphären darüber äußerst eng miteinander verbunden. Hier verlaufen 200 Millionen Nervenfasern, und selbst im Ruhezustand könnte die Rate der übertragenen Impulse 20 pro Sekunde betragen. Das bedeutet, dass in 1 Sekunde 4 Milliarden Impulse über diese Verbindung von einer Hemisphäre zu anderen gelangen, in der einen oder anderen Richtung. Sie sehen also, dass diese beiden Hemisphären für jeden nur vorstellbaren Zweck ausreichend miteinander verbunden sind. Natürlich sind alle Teile einer Hemisphäre mit allen anderen Teilen genauso verbunden, doch diese Verbindung ist ebenso effizient. Die Teilung des Gehirns in seine zwei anatomischen Hälften wird durch diese massive Verbindung hier gesteuert. Wenn man diese Verbindung durchtrennt, so stellt man fest - wie diese Untersuchungen zeigen -, dass diese sprechende dominante Hemisphäre die einzige ist, die dem Menschen bewusste Erfahrungen irgendwelcher Art verleiht. Und es ist die einzige, die es dem Menschen, dem bewussten Menschen, ermöglicht, eine Handbewegung zu steuern. Wenn seine rechte Hand dies oder das normal ausführt, so wird dies von dieser Hemisphäre aus gesteuert. Diese Hemisphäre ist, was das Subjekt betrifft, völlig inaktiv. Sie kann durch keinen Willensakt des Subjekts in Aktion versetzt oder programmiert werden. Dies ist eine experimentelle Tatsache. Ich habe daher die Theorie aufgestellt, dass das bewusste Selbst sich normalerweise mit der dominanten Hemisphäre nur in bloßer Liaison befindet. Hier fand sich keinerlei Bewusstsein. Das Problem der Verbindung zwischen Geist und Gehirn stellt sich also nur für die linke dominante Hemisphäre, die sprechende Hemisphäre, die ideenbildende Hemisphäre. Und der Pfeil zeigt Ihnen das. Dies soll, nebenbei bemerkt, nicht bedeuten, dass das bewusste Selbst auf irgendeine Weise über dem Gehirn schwebt. Dies bezeichnet nur den Informationsfluss. Wir haben hier also die Situation, dass alles, was in die rechte Hemisphäre gelangt, hierdurch gelangt. Die rechte Seite kommt hier in die linke Hemisphäre, wird erlebt, bearbeitet und gedacht. Von hier aus können Handlungen programmiert und Sprache kann von diesen linguistischen Bereichen hier gesteuert werden usw. Auf diese Art und Weise läuft dies in diesen Split-Brain-Patienten ab, und was hier geschieht, ist ihnen unbekannt, obwohl es sich hierbei um sehr viele Leistungen auf einer hohen Ebene handelt. Wenn wir darauf im Einzelnen eingehen, werden Sie sehen, wie umfangreich sie sind. In gewisser Weise hat es den Status des Gehirns eines Tieres. Wenn man mit Tieren arbeitet, kann man alle möglichen Reaktionen von ihnen bekommen, doch man kann nicht wissen, welche Art von bewusstem Selbst ein Tier hat, weil es über keine Möglichkeit verfügt, angemessen mit uns zu kommunizieren. Das einzige, was man sagen kann, ist, dass man bezüglich des bewussten Lebens von Tieren eine agnostische Position einnehmen muss. Das gilt auch für Ihren Hund! Und hier verhält es sich genauso: Bezüglich des bewussten Lebens, das möglicherweise in dieser untergeordneten Hemisphäre dieser Split-Brain-Patienten vorhanden war, müssen wir eine agnostische Position beziehen. Doch normalerweise versteht man, dass alles, was hier abläuft, alle intensiven Leistungen und Gedächtnis und Fertigkeiten usw., die hier kodiert werden, erstaunlicherweise hier hindurch gelangen und hierher gelangen, und daher wird man sich ihrer bewusst. Die Zeit für die Übertragung durch diese massive Verbindung von irgendeinem Teil der untergeordneten Hemisphäre in die andere Hemisphäre beträgt nur 1/100 Sekunde. Normalerweise wissen wir dies nicht, und ohne diese Split-Brain-Untersuchungen hätte man soetwas nie vorhersagen können. Doch so verhält es sich: Es stellt sich uns nun mit großer Klarheit dar. Es ist immer die sprechende Hemisphäre, die einem das Bewusstsein verleiht. Es ist vollkommen eingebunden. Sprache und Bewusstsein sind miteinander verbunden. Wir sollten uns, ausgestattet mit diesem Wissen, nun noch einmal der sprechenden Hemisphäre zuwenden. Was ist das Besondere an der dominanten Hemisphäre, das mit dieser unglaublichen Kommunikation zusammenhängt, die das Problem des Verhältnisses von Gehirn und Geist so deutlich sichtbar werden lässt? Was ist es? Nun, hier gehen wir zu den Hemisphären zurück, und hier ist das motorische Broca-Sprachzentrum, hier die hintere Wernicke-Sprachregion und hier befindet sich das bogenförmige Faserbündel, das die beiden verbindet. Bei allen sprachlichen Erfahrungen muss man denken und verstehen, was man sagt, und dann - um es auszusprechen - hierher gehen und den Sprachapparat in Gang setzen, wie ich es jetzt versuche. Dies sind also die beiden Hemisphären. Nun, man hat bis vor kurzem geglaubt, dass die beiden Hirnhälften in makroskopischer Sicht symmetrisch sind. Erstaunlicherweise hat man nun entdeckt, dass dies nicht der Fall ist, wenn man bestimmte Bereiche des Gehirns betrachtet. Hier ist die zerebrale Hemisphäre und hier der Schläfenlappen. Dies ist der linke Schläfenlappen, und die Sprachbereiche befinden sich hier und hier. Und hier ist die rechte Hemisphäre, die keine Sprachbereiche hat. Wenn man sich die Oberfläche des Gehirns anschaut, so sieht man - und würde ein Anatom uns sagen-, dass sie symmetrisch sind. Sie können zwischen der linken und rechten Seite keine Unterschiede feststellen, obwohl es diese bemerkenswerte Verbindung der Sprache mit dieser und nicht mit der anderen Hirnhälfte gibt. Dies hat sich als falsch herausgestellt. Man hatte die Sylvische Furche noch nicht geöffnet und von oben hineingeschaut. Es ist erstaunlich, dass diese Entdeckung bis heute warten musste, obwohl die Deutschen bereits früh, um 1908, darüber berichtet haben. Doch dann wurde es vergessen. Wenn man das jedoch tut und dann von oben auf diesen zurückbleibenden Teil schaut – dann erhält man dieses bemerkenswerte Ergebnis, dass der Wernicke-Bereich hier auf der linken Seite des Gehirns in den meisten Fällen im Vergleich mit dem rechten ziemlich asymmetrisch ist. Es gibt nur dieses kleine Stück, das diesem anderen Stück dort entspricht. Wir haben hier also eine wirklich außergewöhnliche, grobe makroskopische Beobachtung, die zeigt, dass der Sprachbereich über einen besonderen Teil des Gehirns verfügt, der in der rechten Hemisphäre keine Entsprechung hat. Die dominante Hemisphäre hat hier einige besondere Strukturen, denen auf der rechten Seite nichts entspricht. Dies gilt jedoch nicht in allen Fällen. Manchmal zeigt sich folgendes Bild, mit fast vollständiger Symmetrie auf beiden Seiten. Nebenbei bemerkt sind diese Bereiche bei Menschenaffen stets symmetrisch. Dies war also eine bemerkenswerte Tatsache. Es wurde von Wada auch für diesen Bereich gezeigt. Dies ist Geschwind in Boston, und Wada zeigt hier, dass das Broca-Sprachzentrum, wenn man in die Furche hineinschaut, ebenfalls diese Asymmetrie zeigt. Noch erstaunlicher ist die Entdeckung, dass dies bereits bei einem fünf Monate alten Fötus vorhanden ist, dass man – was verblüffend genug ist - in diesem frühen Stadium der Existenz bereits eine gewachsene Asymmetrie findet. Das ist es, worauf ich besonders hinweisen möchte: dass es eine genetische Information gibt, die das Gehirn und die Sprachbereiche in diesem frühen Stadium entstehen lässt, bereit für die Sprache, die erst später erlernt wird. Dieser Bereich wächst nicht durch das Sprechen, sein Wachstum ist genetisch gesteuert, bereits durch genetische Anweisungen im Voraus entstanden. Ich sage voraus, dass man in naher Zukunft andere Bereiche erkennen wird, die mit besonderen Leistungen, zum Beispiel musikalischen, verbunden sind. Wir wissen, dass Musik - und der Sinn für Musik - mit dem rechten Schläfenlappen assoziiert ist, nicht mit dem linken. Dies entspricht der Sprache, und Verletzungen oder Gewebeentfernungen im rechten Schläfenlappen zerstören den Sinn für Musik des Patienten. Nun, im Sperry-Fall kann dies nicht getestet werden. Vielleicht wäre es möglich, doch keiner dieser Patienten scheint über irgendwelche musikalischen Fähigkeiten zu verfügen, so dass es fast nichts zu testen gibt. Doch dies könnte hier der Fall sein. Hier, bei diesen Fällen, wo sich ein Sprachzentrum auf der linken Seite befindet, gibt es einen großen entsprechenden Bereich auf der rechten, bei dem es sich um kein Sprachzentrum handelt. Doch dies könnte der musikalische Bereich sein. Ich würde vermuten, dass wir feststellen werden, dass Menschen mit musikalischer Fähigkeit, wie im Fall der Sprache, hier bereits eine genetisch gesteuerte Struktur haben, die mit dieser musikalischen Fähigkeit besonders verbunden ist und sie ihnen verleiht. Natürlich bleibt es Ihnen überlassen, diese Veranlagung im Laufe ihres späteren Lebens zu realisieren, ebenso wie wir unsere Sprachfähigkeit realisieren müssen. Einige Menschen werden also als gute Sprecher geboren, mit guter Verwendung der Sprache, andere mit anderen Fähigkeiten, und einige mit beiden. Dies ist, denke ich, die Schlussfolgerung, die sich uns hieraus ergibt. Alles ist genetisch kodiert und genetisch vorgegeben. Die Gene kodieren die Gehirnstruktur für die speziellen Leistungen. Nun, ich möchte als Nächstes die Geschichte der rechten Hemisphäre betrachten, der untergeordneten Hemisphäre. Wir haben bereits die Musik erwähnt, und ich habe den Eindruck, ich hatte immer das Gefühl, dass dies etwas war, was man bei diesen Split-Brain-Patienten außer Acht gelassen hat, weil hierbei zwar vieles geschah, es aber nicht in die andere Hirnhälfte gelangte, um eine bestimmte Leistung, eine bewusste Leistung zu erzielen. Was geht in unserer großen, rechten Hirnhälfte vor? Sie hat dasselbe Gewicht wie die linke, häufig weist sie mehrere kleine Mängel auf: Doch worin besteht die Leistung dieser großen rechten Hemisphäre? Es lässt sich feststellen, dass sie in vieler Hinsicht sehr clever ist. Das nächste Dia zeigt Ihnen beispielsweise ... dies ist ein weiteres Dia, das die Asymmetrie zwischen der linken und der rechten Hemisphäre zeigt. Es gibt hier jedoch eine Hypertrophie, zwei für eins, für einen anderen Teil des Schläfenlappens. Er befindet sich im Zentrum des Wernicke-Bereichs, obwohl sie erkennen können, wie viel größer er dort ist. Das nächste Dia bitte. Dies ist ein Beispiel, das Ihnen einen Fall zeigen soll, bei dem die rechte Hemisphäre und die Steuerung der linken Hand eine beachtliche Leistung zeigen. Sie können hier eine Liste von Dingen blitzartig anzeigen, die sie der Versuchsperson bereits genannt haben, eine Liste von gewöhnlichen Wörtern wie „Buch“ und „Tasse“ und „Glas“ und „Bleistift“ usw. und dies sind die Dinge, die sie erhalten werden. Natürlich sind alle Personen hierfür vorher trainiert worden. Dann zeigen Sie hier blitzartig ein Buch an, und die linke Hand kann dann in gleichmäßiger Schrift schreiben, in Handschrift, keine Kopie des Wortes, sondern in normaler Schreibschrift. Die Testperson weiß nichts hiervon. Sie weiß, dass die Hand irgendetwas tut, doch nicht was sie tut. Wenn Sie sie fragen, spricht sie eine Vermutung aus wie etwa „Tasse“, was ein Wort auf der Liste ist. Sie weiß überhaupt nichts darüber, was von der rechten Hemisphäre aus erfolgt, von wo aus die linke Hand gesteuert wird. In anderer Hinsicht erbringt die rechte Hemisphäre eine wesentlich bessere Leistung. Wenn man zum Beispiel .... Ich zeige es Ihnen. Ich zeichne hier einen normalen Würfel ... und dieser wird dem Split-Brain-Patienten gezeigt. Und mit seiner linken Hand kann er ein einigermaßen gutes Bild zeichnen. Genau wie ich es jetzt ohne irgendwelche Schwierigkeiten tun kann. Mit seiner rechten Hand kann er dies überhaupt nicht. Dies ist die bewusste Seite. Er sieht dies, weiß, dass es ein Würfel in perspektivischer Zeichnung ist. Und die Hand tut Dinge wie die folgenden: zeichnet auf diese Weise eine Linie, er sieht die Zeichnung, und macht hier eine weitere Linie, und endlich gelingt es ihm. Doch dann zeichnet er hier oben die nächste Linie, und schließlich zeichnet er eine hier hin, und dann gibt er auf. Und dann beginnt er von vorn. Doch das bewusste Subjekt im Split-Brain-Patienten kann dies nicht tun. Im fehlt die Fähigkeit für geometrisches Zeichnen, es versteht die dreidimensionalen räumlichen Bilder überhaupt nicht, es hat keinen Sinn für bildliche Darstellungen. Dies ist das bewusste Subjekt. Die linke Hand kann dies, und wenn das Subjekt zusieht, wie seine linke Hand dies tut, ist es enttäuscht. Hier ist die unbewusste Bewegung, er kann sie nicht steuern, er kann sie nicht anhalten. Doch die linke Hand kann sie ausführen. Die rechte Hand tut dies, und dann möchte die linke Hand, die ständig zusieht, hinzukommen und die Zeichnung der rechten Hand korrigieren. Unbewusst muss man die linke Hand zurückhalten, denn wenn sie dorthin gelangte, würde sie sofort erkennen, wie man dieses Bild richtig zeichnet und dies tun, das Bild richtig zeichnen. Doch die rechte Hand kann es nicht. Dies zeigt, dass diese bildliche Fähigkeit in der rechten Hemisphäre die linke Hand steuert, die diese Fähigkeit hat, und es gibt zahlreiche ähnliche Fälle dieser Art. Schauen wir uns das nächste Dia an. Hier sehen Sie Sperry und Levy, die dies intensiv erforscht haben. Nun verlassen wir die dominante und die untergeordnete Hemisphäre, und zeigen hier eine Art Liste an, von Leistungen der Split-Brain-Patienten, über die wir berichtet haben. Sie ist recht erstaunlich. Dies ist 100%ig mit dem Bewusstsein verbunden. Rein garnichts gelangt von den Vorgängen in diesem Gehirn in das Bewusstsein der Testperson. Das steht 100%ig fest. Dies ist verbal, es enthält die linguistischen Zentren, dies ist fast non-verbal, kann jedoch Hauptwörter und einfache Ausdrücke lesen. Ich habe dies eingezeichnet, weil ich glaube, dass es zwar noch nicht getestet wurde, aber aus unseren anderen Arbeiten mit dem Verlust der musikalischen Fähigkeit – erwarten wir, dass die unterordnete Hemisphäre die musikalische ist. Dies könnte sich entsprechend verhalten wie bei der verbalen Fähigkeit. Dies ist ideenbildend, sprachliche Ideenbildung, die ausgedrückt und gedacht werden kann, und dies ist der Sinn für bildliche Darstellungen und Muster, wie Sie hier sehen. Diese Person verfügt über keinen Sinn für bildliche Darstellungen und Muster. Sie kann Bilder, die man ihr zeigt, nicht einander zuordnen oder irgendetwas mit ihrer bewussten, dominanten Hemisphäre tun. Diese Hemisphäre ist analytisch, man könnte sagen, sie nimmt Dinge auseinander, diese ist synthetisch. Dies ist Sperrys Idee. Diese ist sequenziell und diese holistisch. Und man stellt sich dies in Analogie zur Musik vor: Es ist synthetisch und holistisch. Es setzt Dinge aus der Gesamtheit der einzelnen Klänge, die gehört werden, zusammen und liefert eine einheitliche musikalische Erfahrung. Dies läuft in Ihrer untergeordneten Hemisphäre ab. Und dies ist arithmetisch und computerähnlich, und dies geometrisch und räumlich. Hier haben wir also eine außerordentliche Trennung in der Leistung unseres Gehirns. Bis zu diesen Experimenten hat dies niemand vorhersagen können. Welchem Zweck dient es? Nun, ich glaube, Sperry liegt richtig. Dies hat sich auf diese Weise, mit getrennten Funktionen für die beiden Hemisphären entwickelt, so dass jede Hälfe ihre eigenen Aufgaben lösen kann. Und wenn die beiden Hälften dann ihre Daten verarbeitet und integriert und kodiert und dekodiert haben, können sie sie über das corpus callosum zusammenführen und in das Bewusstsein einbringen. Dies ist die normale Arbeitsweise unserer Gehirne. Gehen wir also wieder zurück zu unserem Diagramm.... Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen sie eine andere Sichtweise auf das ganze Problem. Dies sind die drei Welten von Karl Popper, die ich hier am Rand aufgelistet habe. Welt 1 ist die Welt der physischen Gegenstände und Zustände. Das Ganze der Biologie einschließlich der menschlichen Gehirne, alle Abläufe in den Gehirnen gehören hierher sowie sämtliche Artefakte wie Bücher usw., das Papier und die Tinte und alle derartigen Dinge. Die Gesamtheit des materiellen Kosmos. Hier ist die Welt der Bewusstseinszustände, mit der ich begonnen habe, mit den zwei Arten der Empfindung: der äußeren Empfindung, der inneren Empfindung und dem Bewusstsein selbst. Und hier ist das Wissen und der Sinn für die Wirklichkeit, wobei es sich um unsere gesamte codierte Kultur handelt: alles was in Büchern niedergeschrieben ist, in Artefakten jeder Art kodiert, und alle unsere Theorien, die Gesamtheit der Wissenschaft gehört hierher, die Gesamtheit der Literatur, die Gesamtheit der Musik und Philosophie, alles was der Mensch geschaffen hat, ist hier in Gegenständen kodiert, die zur Welt 1 gehören. Ich glaube, dies ist ein ziemlich umfassendes Diagramm. Alles was existiert, alles was es gibt, und alles, was erlebt wird, ist darin enthalten. Wir kehren noch einmal zum Diagramm zurück. Hier ist die von uns besprochene Welt 3: Alles aus der gesamten Geschichte der Menschheit, was in sämtlichen Formen kodiert ist. Dies ist die Geschichte der Kultur und Zivilisation. Was in Welt 3 existiert, wurde vom Menschen geschaffen. Es ist in Gegenständen der Welt 1 kodiert, bei denen es sich natürlich um die Tinte und die Bücher und die Materialien von Bildern und Skulpturen handelt. Dies und alles Übrige ist die Basis für die Information, die kodiert ist, die kodierten Ideen. Normalerweise nehmen wir dies durch Lesen auf, es erreicht uns durch Rezeptoren wie diese und gelangt in die eine oder andere Hemisphäre und wird dort verarbeitet. Wenn es sich, sagen wir, um Musik handelt, wird es hauptsächlich hier verarbeitet und zur Erkennung dann blitzschnell hier herüber geschickt. Und wenn Sie etwas tun möchten, wenn Sie als Reaktion auf eine bestimmte Situation irgendeine Handlung ausführen wollen, leiten Sie sie an ihre rechte Hand. Es ist ganz einfach. Sie gehen hierdurch zu Ihrem motorischen Bereich und weiter zur rechten Hand. Wenn es die linke Hand ist, wenn ich mit ihr etwas tun möchte, kann ich auch das. Das Signal kommt dann hier heraus und geht auf diesem Weg zum motorischen Kortex weiter zu meiner linken Hand. Alles, was sich erklären lässt, befindet sich in diesem Diagramm, selbst die wenigen nichtgekreuzten Bahnen, die Sperrys seltsame Entdeckungen erklären, befinden sich in diesem Bild. Dies ist also ein Diagramm über unsere Art zu denken. Es bezieht sich auf das Ganze der Erfahrung. Sperry vertritt nun Vorstellungen, die meinen eigenen sehr ähnlich sind. Wir hatten ziemlich unterschiedliche Auffassungen, und mein Eindruck ist, dass er sich meiner Sicht annähert. Er wird vielleicht denken, dass ich mich seinen Auffassungen näher, doch das sei dahingestellt. In einer seiner neuesten Veröffentlichungen schreibt er: dass die bewussten Phänomene der subjektiven Erfahrung mit den Gehirnprozessen in Wechselwirkung stehen, und einen aktiven kausalen Einfluss darauf ausüben. In dieser Auffassung wird davon ausgegangen, dass das Bewusstsein eine direkte Rolle bei der Bestimmung der Strömungsmuster der zerebralen Erregung spielt.“ Dies ist, was es bewirkt. Hier ist das Bewusstsein mit einem bestimmten Strömungsmuster, von dem Wirkungen ausgehen, hier ist die Neuromaschinerie des Gehirns, jedoch nicht überall. Hier überhaupt nicht. Nur in bestimmten Bereichen, die nach meiner Auffassung mit sprachlichen und ideenbildenden Fähigkeiten der dominanten Hemisphäre assoziiert sind. Dies stellt natürlich ein großes Problem für die Vertreter der psychoneuralen Identitätshypothese dar. Sie stecken hier in Schwierigkeiten, weil sie ursprünglich annahmen, weil sie postulierten, dass sämtliche Aktivitäten in der Großhirnrinde auch eine bewusste Seite haben, die unsere eigenen Erfahrungen sind, die Innenseite, und dass die Funktion der Neuromaschinerie die Außenseite ist, die von einem Beobachter gesehen werden kann. Nun, abschließend komme ich zu dem Problem, wie all dies angefangen hat. Im Zusammenhang mit der Frage, wie das Gehirn dies entwickelt hat, stellen sich immense und fundamentale Probleme. Wie kam die Sprache in das Gehirn? Wie kam es, dass der vor etwa 1.000.000 Jahren lebende Affe, der primitive Hominide, diese Sprachbereiche und alles, was daraus folgt, in der dominanten Hemisphäre erwerben konnte, diese Bereiche auf der linken Seite des Gehirns, von denen Sie auf früher von mir gezeigten Bildern makroskopische Darstellungen gesehen haben? Mit dem Elektronenmikroskop wurden diese Bereiche bisher noch nicht angemessen untersucht, und physiologisch wurden sie überhaupt nicht analysiert. Im Studium dieser Sprachbereiche liegt eine Zukunft für Sie als Forscher, denn es muss sich hierbei um sehr besondere Bereiche der Großhirnrinde handeln. Ich bin mir sicher, dass sie auf elektronenmikroskopischer Ebene sehr verschieden sind. Sie werden Eigenschaften aufweisen, die nirgendwo sonst zu finden sind. Dies muss noch entdeckt werden. Der Mensch, glaube ich, hat sich ungefähr in den letzten 1.000.000 Jahren dadurch entwickelt, dass er sich eine sprachliche Kommunikation von immer größerer Genauigkeit erworben hat. Aus bloßen Schreien und Rufen usw. wurden deskriptive und später argumentative Äußerungen. Diese sprachliche Geschicklichkeit nahm zu, und der Mensch wurde nach und nach zu einem seiner selbstbewussten Wesen, das sich seiner Identität und seines Selbstseins bewusst war. Dies war der riesige Wandel vom Affen zum Menschen. Er kam, glaube ich, durch die evolutionäre Entwicklung von Bereichen hier zustande, die das Gehirn jetzt für die Gedächtnisfunktion und für den Ausdruck der Erfahrung im Dienste logischen Argumentierens verwendet. Man kann sich vorstellen, welche Bedeutung dies für die eigene Gruppe hatte: für das Überleben, bei der Jagd und für die inneren Angelegenheiten. Und das war alles gut so. Sie wurden wesentlich effektiver, doch gleichzeitig wurden sie, als sie sich mit Hilfe der Sprache der Existenz ihr eigenes Selbst bewusst wurden, eine Person und ein Selbst. Sie erkannten auch, dass sie wie andere menschliche Wesen waren, und als sie den Tod bei anderen erlebten, dass auch sie sterben würden. Und dieses furchtbare Bewusstsein des Todes führte zu all den Mythen, zur Erklärung des Lebenssinnes und des Lebensendes. Hiermit leben wir bis heute. Dies geschah vor mindestens 100.000 Jahren. Zu dieser Zeit kam es zu den ersten Beerdigungszeremonien für andere tote Menschen, und man hatte sie als erste Anzeichen dafür erkannt, dass der Mensch dieses Bewusstsein seiner Selbst erworben hatte. Ich bezweifle, dass es dieses Bewusstsein bereits früher gegeben hat. Doch all dies wird mit hochentwickelten sprachlichen Fähigkeiten in Beziehung gestanden haben. Diese Fähigkeiten werden im Laufe der Zeit allmählich immer weiter zugenommen haben, und dies ist der Punkt, an dem dies zu einer sich selbst oder kreuzweise katalysierenden Sache wurde. Je mehr die Menschen miteinander sprachen und diskutierten, umso effizienter wurden sie. Die Effektivität der Kommunikation führte zu einer besseren Leistungsfähigkeit des Menschen, und gab den Gehirnen, die diese Fähigkeiten entwickelt hatten, einen sehr hohen Überlebenswert usw. usw. Diese allmähliche Entwicklung führte in ein paar 100.000 Jahren - in erstaunlich kurzer Zeit – zum Gehirn des modernen Menschen mit all seinen Möglichkeiten, mit denen wir heute geboren werden und das bei der Geburt bereits genetisch programmiert und kodiert ist. Hieraus entwickelten wir unsere gesamte Kultur und Zivilisation. Nachdem der Mensch diese Fähigkeit zu denken, zu handeln und wahrzunehmen besaß, gelang es ihm nach und nach seinen Einfallsreichtum zu entwickeln. Die Geschichte dieser Entwicklung ist die Geschichte des Menschen, seiner Kultur und Zivilisation. Und dies ist nun die Welt, in die wir hineingeboren werden. Wir werden in sie hineingeboren, wobei all dies sozusagen bereits für uns getan ist. Wir sind die Erben dieser wunderbaren evolutionären Phase des Menschen, in der der Mensch sich selbst erschuf, indem er seine Kultur erschuf. Es war eine Symbiose des Vertrauens, eine kreuzweise Katalyse. Und so sehen wir nun den Menschen mit den Problemen konfrontiert, die sich ihm stellen. Was ist der Sinn und die Bedeutung des Lebens dieser unserer selbstbewussten Existenz? Hat es mehr Sinn als das Leben eines cleveren Tieres? Warum werden wir geboren? Wofür steht das Ganze? Wie sollten wir leben? Und all die Probleme der Moral usw. Dies sind die Probleme. Ich werde jetzt nicht darüber sprechen. Doch dies sind die Probleme, von denen ich denke, dass sie durch diese Entdeckung der Art und Weise, wie das Gehirn in Beziehung zum bewussten Selbst Vielen Dank.

 
(00:03:16 - 00:04:09)

The complete video is available here. 


Sperry’s split-brain research was based on experiments in which he severed the tissue connecting the two brain hemispheres. This was initially undertaken as a treatment for epilepsy as it was thought that it would hinder the two sides of the brain from ‘inciting’ each other during epileptic seizures. Indeed, the technique was highly effective in alleviating epileptic symptoms. Intriguingly, however, that was not all it did. Sperry looked very closely at patients who had undergone this treatment in what Eccles refers to as ‘the most important experiments ever done on human brains’. What did he find?

Sperry provided subjects with visual cues that were selectively perceived either by the right or left eye, which then provide input to the left and right brain hemispheres, respectively. He could then show that the subjects’ capacity to articulate what they had seen was a property harboured only by the left brain. The word ‘pencil’ was shown to the patients in a way that they could only see it with either their left or their right eye. Subjects who were exposed to the word ‘pencil’ in their left visual field could reach out and correctly identify and grab a pencil but could not say what they had done. In contrast, subjects who received the same cue in their right visual field (which provides input to the left hemisphere) had no problems in grabbing the correct object and could also verbally identify the object.[7]

 

We’ve Come a Long Way, We Have a Long Way Still to Go

Neuroscience and the study of brain function has undoubtedly made tremendous strides over the last 200 years as succinctly summarised here by Erwin Neher:


Erwin Neher (2014) - Short-term Synaptic Plasticity

Thank you, Dr. Blatt, for the introduction. It’s a great privilege to speak in front of about 600 hundred of the very best young researchers of the world which I hope a fraction of it at least is interested in a very interesting topic, namely understanding how our brain functions. So Roger Tsien a few minutes ago told you about some interesting ideas and interesting facts about the very long term forms of plasticity which indeed are believed or are apt to store information in the brain to mediate learning and memory. Let me go to the other side, to the very short term forms of plasticity. But before doing so, let me show you in a few slides a little bit about how our understanding of what happens in the brain developed over the last 200 years. And this of course starts with the famous experiments of the Italian scientists Walter and Galvani, Galvani who taught us or showed in spectacular experiments that the frog muscle can be made to twitch when the nerve is stimulated by a shock of electricity. This demonstrated that indeed there was something like electricity, electrical signalling in our body. that our brain is made up of this filigrane network of neurons. Roger Tsien already referred to this. And today we know that our brain is a network of about 10^12 of such neurons which are connected with each other via synapses. And on average a given neuron receives about 1000 or 10,000 inputs from other neurons. So what is it, this strange cell, a neuron? This strange structure? It is nothing else but a quite general cell which however has some special structures. So, even a normal cell has some kind of processes called microvilli. In the neuron such processes are exaggerated in the sense that a neuron possesses two kinds of protrusions some are called dendrites which are the receiving organs of the neuron. One special protrusion is the axon, a tube-like structure which can be very long and which transmits the nerve impulse to cells to which this given neuron is connected to. So each neuron receives inputs from thousands of other neurons primarily on its dendrites and these inputs delivered by proceeding cells can be both excitatory and inhibitory. A given neuron integrates or adds up these signals and whenever the electrical potential inside the cell soma, as a consequence of all these influences converging onto a given cell, whenever the potential inside the cell surpasses a certain threshold an action potential or a nerve impulse is generated at the so-called axon hillock. And this nerve action potential then travels down the axon to the nerve endings exciting or inhibiting other neurons. So there’s a nice movie or animation provided by Dr. Hasan from the Science Bridge in Heidelberg who illustrates, gives an impression on how this firework of axon potentials may happen in parts of our brain. You can see that an input fires an action potential which then spreads, excites other ones and this is going on. The movie is not correct in every detail but I think that doesn’t matter for getting the general idea. So the point of interest of course when you want to study the connectivity between neurons is the synapse. What appears to be here is this little bouton where a preceding neuron signals... or a sending neuron signals onto a receiving neuron. And knowledge about what happens at the synapse started actually not at the synapse between nerve cells but it started at the so-called neuromuscular junction, a synapse which makes a connection between a neuron and the underlying muscle cell. So when the nervous system wants a certain muscle to contract it sends an action potential through the motor nerve to the corresponding muscle cells. There the nerve ending splits up into several endings and what happens there is exactly the same thing which happens between two neurons, namely that the presynaptic ending liberates a transmitter which excites the underlying neuron. So our knowledge about these processes came to a large extent from experiments by Sir Bernard Katz Castillo and Del Castillo studying the synapse. And I show here one of their early registrations of the signal which can be recorded in a muscle fibre You can see two phases, first a so-called excitatory postsynaptic potential which represents the effect of the transmitter being liberated by the nerve and then surpassing the threshold just like in a nerve cell an action potential is being elicited in the muscle cell which then initiates the contraction. What Katz and Del Castillo did is they looked in detail at what happens here before or just during resting periods. And they recognised when they turned up the gain of their amplifier that there were all these little spontaneously occurring little blips. You know, very, very small signals. Now ordinarily many researchers dealing with sensitive amplifiers at high gain would dismiss such signals because there are multiple sources of interference, just influences by some instruments in the vicinity. Katz and Del Castillo did not do so. They actually started to study these small signals because they realised that they saw these little blips only when they recorded at sites close to the neuromuscular junction to where the nerve is. When they recorded a few millimetres away on the same muscle they wouldn't see these characteristic blips. Also some distance away from the muscle the wave form of the global signal would be different. This initial postsynaptic potential would be missing. What they saw is just the electrical excitability spreading in the muscle fibre. Also what they realised is that this amplitude of this excitatory postsynaptic signal is very much dependent on the calcium concentration in the medium. So when they reduced the calcium concentration, this initial signal became smaller so that eventually the action potential failed. What was left was a small signal. And when they reduced this to the extreme, they saw that the stimulating nerve impulse sometimes elicited a signal like this. And sometimes it failed to elicit any signal. So this kind of finding together with electron microscopy data from the De Robertis Laboratory in Argentina which showed that there were in the synaptic terminal some small structures, some vesicles now known as synaptic vesicles lead to this idea that indeed what happens at the nerve, at the synapse is the following. The nerve impulse causes influx of calcium into the nerve terminal. This is why the process is so much dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. The calcium causes the fusion of such vesicles which then release their contents in neurotransmitter. Now, of course an action potential with calcium influx leads to the simultaneous release of many of such vesicles. The little blips which they saw in the recording at high resolution was interpreted to be spontaneous fusion of such vesicles with the plasma membrane. And then postsynaptically the neurotransmitter diffuses to the postsynapse and opens ion channels in the postsynaptic membrane. So we have a kind of transformation of an electrical signal into a chemical signal released from a presynaptic terminal and back translated into an electrical signal in the postsynaptic membrane. Now, synaptic plasticity. The term plasticity describes the observation that synaptic strength which is the signal being produced in the postsynaptic neuron by a presynaptic action potential is not a fixed quantity like in the electronic computer but changes constantly depending on the use of the synapse. Neuroscientists are convinced that this plasticity is a very important aspect of neuronal signal processing in the nervous system. And that indeed particularly the long term changes, the long term changes in connectivity between neurons underlies learning and memory. And this as I understand was Roger Tsien’s topic. Now, short term plasticity on the other hand I think is not less important because it mediates basic information processing tasks like adaptation, filtering and others. I will mention a few of these tasks in one of my following slides. What's also interesting is that different types of synapses have their own personality with respect to this short term plasticity. Some synapses, when you stimulate them repetitively like those of the climbing fibres, show depression in the sense that after some rest period a first response is very large followed by smaller responses. Other synapses show exactly the opposite, namely at first smaller response followed by subsequently increasing responses. Still other synapses have more complex types of behaviour. So given synapse on average displays a certain type of plasticity. Now here is just an example of what short term depression can be good for in a network in which many of such neurons are put together to subserve some task. I mentioned already a depression is good for providing adaptation to sensory stimuli. It is good for so called gain control, regulating the amine activity in certain brain areas. You can build networks with synapses displaying depression which provide, which generate rhythms. You can do temporal filtering but also more complex tasks of the central nervous system like sound localisation can be implemented in neural networks which use a short term depression. And even the so-called orientation tuning, an individual system which is seen in the primary visual cortex in the sense, that there are certain cells which primarily respond to contrasts in a certain orientation. One can simulate this and obtain insensitivity towards, invariance towards differences in absolute contrast by implying in the network short term depression. Okay, so another aspect which is being discussed now is a manifestation of short term plasticity, is the switching between different brain states. We know that our brain can switch within seconds between different states such as quiet state, stress, arousal, and focusing, attention. There are different sleep states which can be observed with EEG, where within seconds again the pattern of the EEG can change between the well-known REM sleep phase and other phases. Such fast switching of course cannot be due to long term plastic changes because they need time to develop, they need time to be trained and so on. So it is known that such brain states are controlled by a number of diffusely projecting transmitter systems such as dopaminergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, peptidergic and so on. Basically all the kinds of input mechanisms which were discussed by Dr. Kobilka yesterday in his lecture. And it is also known that such diffusely projected transmitter systems short term change, short term plasticity in their target areas. So my conclusion is that studying such short term plasticity, its dynamic nature and its mechanism may reveal some very important aspects of brain function, which may not be less important than the long term changes. Now, although these short forms of plasticity have been described already in the very early work on the neuromuscular junction by Katz and Miledi, we still... I think there are still many things which we don’t know about them and some of the essential features that we don’t probably understand yet. Now, what can happen when a synapse changes its strength, its short term plasticity? These are of course many things because it’s a multi-step process. There may be changes in the action potential wave form and the associated calcium influx. There may be postsynaptic changes, there may be inhibitory so-called auto receptors which feed back so that the transmitter feeds back onto the willingness of the remaining vesicles to release. There is a problem of recycling of vesicles and consumption of vesicles. In general, I think these are processes which molecularly mainly involve changes in second messenger levels, changes in phosphorylation and possibly also cytoskeletal reorganisations due to all the trafficking. Now in the rest of my talk I want to concentrate on basically two aspects, namely the depression mediated by the depletion of vesicles and the changes in the... molecular changes in the release apparatus which modulate the willingness of release-ready vesicles to actually fuse in response to a calcium stimulus. Now, we have been studying this process for a number of years in a very special synapse, the so-called Calyx of Held synapse. This is a synapse in the auditory pathway. What you see here is a slice of the brain stem with the auditory pathway laid out. The auditory fibres make first synapse in the ventral cochlear nucleus. The axon of the receiving neuron transverses the midline and makes a contact here with another cell in the so-called medium MNTB, the medium nucleus of trapezoid body. And both of these synapses here which have this very special shape of a calix or cup-like presynaptic terminal surrounding a compact postsynaptic cell body. And the special shape of the synapses is probably due to the fact that for the sound localisation for directional hearing the signals are coming from the two ears have to be processed very precisely so that at the point where the information from one ear meets the information from the other ear in the lateral superior olive the very fine differences in intensity and timing can be detected. So we have here a synapse which is very special in its geometry but which offers for electrophysiology the advantage that both the pre- and the postsynaptic compartments can be voltage clamped, can be a subject of very precise electrophysiological measurements simultaneously. And this was indeed found in Bert Sakmann’s lab by Gerard Borst and Bert Sakmann now almost twenty years ago. So we studied this synapse and studied its plasticity. Just to point out what we can do since we can voltage clamp the pre- and postsynaptic compartments and record corresponding currents. We can control the ionic milieu inside both compartments for precise analysis of the current flow. We can load the terminal with fluorescent indicator. Theis and me have been doing so over fifteen years, mainly using Roger Tsien’s fluorescent dyes. Well, we can do many things with this synapse which cannot be done in other synapses because usually synapses are very small bouton-like structures which are just too small to be approached and targeted by electrophysiological electrodes. Now, most of the calyxes of this kind show prominent synaptic depression. This is a response to a 100 Hz stimulus after the synapse was given some rest. We see a very large first excitatory current now, an invert current which is induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate which is released from the presynaptic terminal. A second stimulus 10 ms later gives a smaller response and finally after four or five stimuli the response is quite small. Now the synapse works at very high spike rates. The auditory nerve is highly active with between 10 and 50 action potentials per second even in the completely silent state. So this synapse, at least the one shown here, would work in a permanent state of partial depression. So that’s the physiological state of the synapse. But when we look in detail... This is the average response. When we look in detail at the pattern of short term plasticity, we see that some of the cells here just one particular cell displayed does show this very strong depression. This is shown here for three frequencies: 200 Hz, 100 Hz and 50 Hz. But in the same preparation next to that cell which shows this behaviour maybe we may find another cell which shows exactly the opposite, namely an initial facilitation. The second response is bigger than the first one followed by depression. Now, this is understood in the sense... Or I should point out that compared to this cell that cell has a very much smaller first EPSC namely of only about 1.1 nanoamp, whereas this had 2.5 nanoamp. So the understanding of this pattern is that in this cell the release probability was so high that during the first response already a good fraction of the available vesicles got released so that subsequent responses were smaller. In this cell the release probability during the first stimulus was smaller so that the record reveals that indeed for the second and third stimulus the excitation power of the nerve is stronger that the release probability for the remaining vesicles increases. So this biphasic behaviour comes about by first an increase in the release probability which is seen only when the initial release probability is very small. But then eventually there’s more and more stimuli. The synapse will use up all its vesicles and will fall into depression. Okay, so this consideration already points out that the so-called paired-pulse ratio, the ratio of the second to the first stimulus is a kind of measure which is used by many physiologists to first of all characterise the short term plasticity behaviour of the synapse and then also this measure is used as a kind of indicator of how large initial release probability is. Now when I record from 31 synapses like this and plot this so-called paired-pulse ratio against the amplitude of the first EPSC, I see there is a systematic relationship and that the larger the first EPSCs, the smaller the paired-pulse ratio. This is in line with many observations that were made at other synapses. Okay, but still since we are dealing here with synapses which are supposed to do the same job, which are morphologically all the same, which no obvious differences, one asks the question Why does this have a smaller release probability and a large PPR and this one is the opposite? So the hypothesis is that vesicles which are release-ready can indeed exist in two states. In a state of low release probability, typically the numbers would be that about 5 - 10% of the vesicles would be released by a single action potential. And the so-called super prime state with high release probability. Now, this term “super-prime” has been used in a number of contexts and a number of molecular mechanisms have been proposed. Why a super-prime vesicle has higher release probability than the other one, I will come back to that and try to explain that it’s probably the energy barrier of fusion which is being changed by biochemical modulatory influences. Okay, that’s written here in this last sentence, namely that it’s background modulator influences probably by diffusely projecting transmitting systems which cause diversity. Now, what kind of signalling mechanism might be underlying this? The most prominent one which probably is connected to this is the diacylglycerol mediated signalling pathways, one variant of the g-protein mediated pathways discussed yesterday by Dr. Kobilka. Where a receptor interacts with a g-protein, the g-protein activates phospholipase C splitting inositol phospholipids generating the second messenger diacylglycerol and IP3 which releases calcium. Now, it has been shown before that this diacylglycerol branch of the pathway has a special role in priming of synaptic vesicles and also in the release of synaptic vesicles. Namely there is a protein called MON-13 which has a so-called C1 domain. A domain which responds to a diacylglycerol and previous work has shown that this MON-131 is involved in the priming process and probably also then in the regulation of the energy barrier for release. So, we cannot of course change the brain state by stimulating... by diffusely projecting neurons in the brain slice preparation. I should mention this, all these experiments are done in rat brain slices with the conventional electrophysiological techniques. But we can mimic so to speak the action of this diacylglycerol mediated signalling by applying a phorbol ester, a mimic of diacylglycerol. And what you observe is when you apply this substance all the EPSCs are on average 2-5 times larger than under control conditions. And if we now plot the paired-pulse ratio again against the first EPSCs, we see that these new data points which are the filled symbols nicely follow the trend from the control data point and this more or less seamless continuation also overlapping between some of the points under phorbol ester and some of the points under control conditions. Seems to tell me or provokes the hypothesis that phorbol ester shifts this equilibrium or this dynamic equilibrium between primed and super-primed vesicles to the super-primed site. Now when you look at this property further, you can see that super-priming is a property of rested synapses. At 200 Hz stimulation EPSCs converge to the same steady state value. This is shown here in these recordings. Here is the first response of a relatively large cell or a cell with large EPSC under the influence of phorbol ester. This value is from the same cell without phorbol ester. This is a cell with a relatively small amplitude but under phorbol ester and this is the corresponding first value for the same cell without phorbol ester. Now you see the first responses are very, very different. Nevertheless the second, third, fourth, fifth responses converge to the same level. And the same level is not 0, it is just very similar. So in that sense it seems that super-priming or this differentiation between synapses only occurs... it needs time. It’s only present when the time, when the synapses had time to develop its super-priming. Interpretation of this finding is that as I just mentioned if the synapse has time to develop a super-prime state, then there is this difference. If however during such a drain there is a kind of constant flow of vesicles being released and newly recruited... I mean this steady state is a kind of steady state between vesicle consumption and vesicle delivery. So the hypothesis is that, well, if the cell is not allowed to go into super-prime state, then all these cells behaves the same. Of course this can be readily put into a simple kinetic model, where you assume that in order for vesicles to be released, they have to first undergo some molecular, some step which puts them docked at the membrane and into a state which is ready to be released. And if there is enough time then they can even mature further into super-prime state. So the first priming state will be fast. The second state would be slow. Now, this explains this behaviour. It also explains quantitatively what you observe when you plot the steady state value of release versus stimulation frequency. Here you see two curves, one under control conditions, one under a phorbol ester. These are normalised to the respective first value but you can see that the broken curves which are predictions of this simple model very nicely follow the experimental points. This is also the case for the low end of the relationship connecting steady state release and frequency. And of course from this model you then can extract the relevant and most interesting parameters, namely the data are compatible with the idea that the normally primed state has a release probability of here in this case 0.06, a relatively small release probability, whereas the super-prime state has a probability of 0.42. The so-called priming rate is fast, 4 per second, which means that in about 250 mms a new vesicle is loaded onto a release site whereas the rate for this second super-priming step is very low in the control case and enhanced by the action of the phorbol ester. Okay, now the findings which I described are not singular to the Calyx of Held. The various aspects of the findings are shared by a variety of other synapses. So the heterogeneity between synapses of the same type has been described also for the mouse neuromuscular junction. The prototype synapse, the hippocampus between CA3 and CA1 neurons, has been shown a few years ago to show similar, very similar kind of heterogeneity by a series of papers by Hanse and Gustafsson and some more recent papers. Also this phenomenon of what I call here the collapse of heterogeneity at higher frequency has been described by Hanse and Gustafsson and discussed by Walters and Smith in the context of information processing in neuronal networks. And this slow conversion from prime to super-prime state has indeed also been an element in a model proposed by Stefan Hallermann for cerebellar mossy fibre synapses. So, although I think the action potential wave form and calcium influx is the strongest modulatory influence on the short term plasticity because calcium currents are known to be able to show what's called facilitation, also inactivation, they are regulated themselves by G-protein pathways and so on. And when there are changes in calcium influx there are very large changes as a consequence in the release due to the very steep relationship between calcium influx and release. But I think the experiments and the Calyx of Held make a strong point for this other form of modulation of short term plasticity which is not due to calcium influx. We can tell this is a Calyx of Held because the influence of phorbol ester on calcium influx has been very carefully studied by Ralf Schneggenburger’s laboratory a few years ago. Although these previous papers have shown that there are no major changes in pool size. So the phenomenon I described really seems to be a relatively novel form of change of modulation in the energy barrier for releasing a vesicle. Well, the similarity between modulation by phorbol ester and the heterogeneity at the synapses at rest suggests that the heterogeneity actually comes from different degrees of background modulation. And I think that this concept of two states of release-ready vesicles and the influence of super-priming will contribute to understanding a number of important phenomena of signal processing in our brain. So of course this is not my work, indeed all the data shown were obtained by Holger Taschenberger who until recently was a postdoctoral fellow in my lab. My contribution as an Emeritus is only data analysis and model building. Many of the ideas and background data were provided by Takeshi Sakaba, a long term collaborator who is now in Doshisha University in Kyoto, Ralf Schneggenburger who is a professor at the APFL in Lausanne and Suk-Ho Lee, a colleague from Seoul National University. Thank you for your attention.

Vielen Dank Ihnen, Dr. Blatt, für die einführenden Worte. Für mich ist es eine große Ehre, vor rund 600 der besten jungen Nachwuchswissenschaftler der Welt sprechen zu können, von denen, so hoffe ich, vielleicht einige an einem sehr spannenden Thema interessiert sind, nämlich zu verstehen, wie unser Gehirn funktioniert. Roger Tsien hat Ihnen eben einige interessante Theorien und Fakten über die sehr langzeitigen Formen von Plastizität vermittelt, von denen man sogar annimmt oder die dazu geeignet sind, Informationen im Gehirn zu speichern, um Mechanismen des Lernens und des Gedächtnisses zu vermitteln. Ich möchte die andere Seite beleuchten, nämlich die sehr kurzzeitigen Formen der Plastizität. Aber bevor ich damit beginne, möchte ich Ihnen zunächst einige Folien darüber zeigen, wie sich unsere Kenntnisse über die Vorgänge im Gehirn in den letzten 200 Jahren entwickelt haben. Und das beginnt natürlich mit den berühmten Experimenten der italienischen Wissenschaftler Walter und Galvani. Galvani, der uns gelehrt hat bzw. in spektakulären Experimenten gezeigt hat, dass der Froschmuskel durch eine Stromstoßstimulation des Nervs zum Kontrahieren angeregt werden kann. Damit wurde nachgewiesen, dass es in unserem Körper in der Tat so etwas wie Elektrizität, elektrische Signalwege gibt. Hundert Jahre später zeigten uns die wunderbaren Zeichnungen des spanischen Neuroanatomisten Ramón y Cajal, dass unser Gehirn aus diesem filigranen Neuronennetzwerk besteht. Roger Tsien hat bereits darauf Bezug genommen. Und heute wissen wir, dass unser Gehirn ein Netzwerk aus rund 10^12 solcher über Synapsen miteinander verbundenen Neuronen ist. Durchschnittlich empfängt jedes einzelne Neuron rund 1000 bis 10.000 Inputsignale von anderen Neuronen. Was ist eigentlich ein Neuron, diese merkwürdige Zelle, diese merkwürdige Struktur? Es ist nichts anderes als eine relativ normale Zelle, die allerdings mit einigen speziellen Strukturen ausgestattet ist. Selbst eine normale Zelle verfügt über bestimmte Prozesse, die als Mikrovilli bezeichnet werden. Im Neuron werden solche Prozesse in dem Sinne verstärkt, dass ein Neuron über zwei Arten von Protrusionen verfügt, von denen einige als Dendriten bezeichnet werden, die die Empfängerorgane des Neurons sind. Und ein spezielles Protrusion ist das Axon, eine röhrenartige Struktur, die sehr lang sein kann und die den Nervenimpuls auf Zellen überträgt, mit denen dieses spezielle Neuron verbunden ist. Jedes Neuron erhält also Input-Signale von Tausenden anderer Neurone, in erster Linie an seinen Dendriten. Diese Signale, die von sich entwickelnden Zellen geliefert werden, können sowohl erregend als auch hemmend wirken. Ein einzelnes Neuron integriert oder summiert diese Signale. Immer dann, wenn das elektrische Potenzial im Zellsoma infolge all dieser auf eine bestimmte Zelle einwirkenden Einflüsse einen bestimmten Schwellenwert übersteigt, wird ein Aktionspotenzial oder ein Nervenimpuls am so genannten Axonhügel erzeugt. Und dieses Nervenaktionspotenzial wandert dann das Axon herunter zu den Nervenenden, die andere Neuronen anregen oder hemmen. Es gibt einen netten Animationsfilm von Dr. Hasan von der Science Bridge in Heidelberg, der einen Eindruck darüber vermittelt bzw. verdeutlicht, wie dieses Feuerwerk von Axonpotenzialen in Teilen unseres Gehirns ablaufen könnte. Sie sehen hier, dass ein Signalinput ein Aktionspotenzial abfeuert, das sich verbreitet und weiter erregt. Und das setzt sich dann weiter fort. Der Film ist nicht in jedem Detail korrekt, aber das ändert nichts daran, dass man, wie ich finde, eine grundsätzliche Vorstellung erhält. Wenn man die Konnektivität zwischen Neuronen untersuchen möchte, gilt das Interesse der Synapse, die hier dieser kleine Bouton ist, wo ein vorausgehendes Neuron Signale … oder ein sendendes Neuron Signale auf ein empfangendes Neuron überträgt. Und Kenntnisse darüber, was an der Synapse passiert, wurden zunächst tatsächlich nicht an der Synapse zwischen Nervenzellen gesammelt, sondern das begann bei der neuromuskulären Verbindung – einer Synapse, die eine Verbindung zwischen einem Neuron und der zugrunde liegenden Muskelzelle herstellt. Wenn das Nervensystem die Kontraktion eines bestimmten Muskels erreichen will, sendet es über den motorischen Nerv ein Aktionspotenzial an die entsprechenden Muskelzellen. Dort verzweigen sich die Nervenenden in mehrere Enden und dort passiert dann exakt das Gleiche wie zwischen zwei Neuronen, nämlich, dass das präsynaptische Ende einen Transmitter freisetzt, der das zugrunde liegende Neuron erregt. Unsere Kenntnisse über diese Prozesse stammen größtenteils von Experimenten, die Sir Bernard Katz und Del Castillo zur Untersuchung der Synapse durchgeführt haben. Und ich zeige Ihnen hier eine ihrer frühen Registrierungen des Signals, das in einer Muskelfaser erfasst werden kann wenn der diesen Muskel integrierende Nerv stimuliert wird. Sie sehen hier zwei Phasen, zuerst ein sogenanntes exzitatorisches postsynaptisches Potenzial, das den Effekt des vom Nerv freigesetzten Transmitters repräsentiert. Und beim Überschreiten des Schwellenwertes wird genauso wie in einer Nervenzelle ein Aktionspotenzial in der Muskelzelle ausgelöst, das dann die Kontraktion initiiert. Katz und Del Castillo beschäftigten sich detailliert mit dem, was hier vor oder unmittelbar während der Ruheperioden geschieht. Und sie entdeckten, dass beim Aufdrehen der Leistung ihres Verstärkers all diese spontan auftretenden, kleinen Signalpunkte erschienen. Das waren wirklich sehr, sehr, sehr kleine Signale. Üblicherweise würden die meisten Forscher, die die Arbeit mit empfindlichen Verstärkern bei hoher Leistung gewohnt sind, solche Signale verwerfen, da es eine Vielzahl von Störquellen und Einflüssen durch andere Instrumente in der Nähe gibt. Katz und Del Castillo machten das aber nicht und untersuchten tatsächlich diese kleinen Signale, weil ihnen aufgefallen war, dass diese kleinen Signalpunkte nur zu sehen waren, wenn die Signalerfassung in der direkten Nähe der neuromuskulären Verbindung erfolgte, wo der Nerv ist. Erfolgte die Signalerfassung nur einige wenige Millimeter daneben auf demselben Muskel, beobachteten sie diese charakteristischen Signalpunkte nicht. In einiger Entfernung zum Muskel war auch die Wellenform des globalen Signals anders. Dieses anfängliche postsynaptische Potenzial fehlte. Was sie sahen, war einfach die elektrische Erregbarkeit, die sich in der Muskelfaser ausbreitet. Sie stellten außerdem fest, dass die Amplitude dieses exzitatorischen postsynaptischen Signals sehr stark von der Kalziumkonzentration im Medium abhängt. Wenn sie die Kalziumkonzentration reduzierten, wurde dieses Ausgangssignal kleiner, sodass schließlich das Aktionspotenzial versagte. Zurück blieb ein kleines Signal. Und wenn sie dieses extrem reduzierten, beobachteten sie, dass der stimulierende Nervenimpuls manchmal ein Signal wie dieses auslöste und es ihm manchmal nicht gelang, ein Signal auszulösen. Solche Ergebnisse führten in Kombination mit den elektronenmikroskopischen Daten aus dem De Robertis Labor in Argentinien über an den synaptischen Enden bestehende, kleine Strukturen, die heute als synaptische Vesikel bezeichnet werden, zu der Erkenntnis, dass an dem Nerv, an der Synapse das Folgende passiert: Der Nervenimpuls verursacht einen Kalziumeinstrom in die Nervenendigung. Deshalb ist dieser Prozess so stark von der extrazellulären Kalziumkonzentration abhängig. Das Kalzium verursacht die Fusion dieser Vesikel, die dann ihren Neurotransmitterinhalt freisetzen. Und natürlich führt ein Aktionspotenzial mit Kalziumeinstrom zu einer simultanen Freisetzung vieler solcher Vesikel. Die kleinen Signalpunkte, die bei der hochauflösenden Erfassung beobachtet worden waren, wurden als Spontanfusion solcher Vesikel mit der Plasmamembran interpretiert. Der Neurotransmitter diffundiert postsynaptisch zur Postsynapse und öffnet Ionenkanäle in der postsynaptischen Membran. Wir haben hier also eine Art von Transformation eines elektrischen Signals in ein chemisches Signal, das von einem präsynaptischen Ende freigesetzt wird und in der postsynaptischen Membran in ein elektrisches Signal zurückübersetzt wird. Nun zur synaptischen Plastizität. Der Begriff „Plastizität“ beschreibt die Beobachtung, dass die synaptische Erregung, bei der es sich um ein im postsynaptischen Neuron durch ein präsynaptisches Aktionspotenzial erzeugtes Signal handelt, keine feststehende Größenordnung wie bei einem Computer aufweist, sondern sich, abhängig vom Gebrauch der Synapse, kontinuierlich verändert. Neurowissenschaftler sind davon überzeugt, dass diese Plastizität ein sehr entscheidender Aspekt in der neuronalen Signalverarbeitung des Nervensystems ist und dass tatsächlich insbesondere die langfristigen Veränderungen der neuronalen Konnektivität Lernen und Gedächtnis zugrunde liegen. Und das war, so wie ich es verstanden habe, auch das Thema von Roger Tsien. Die Kurzzeitplastizität ist demgegenüber meiner Meinung nach genauso wichtig, weil sie grundsätzliche informationsverarbeitende Aufgaben wie Adaptation, Filterung und andere vermittelt. Ich werde in einer meiner nächsten Folien auf solche Aufgaben eingehen. Interessant ist auch, dass verschiedene Synapsentypen eine eigene Persönlichkeit in Bezug auf diese Kurzzeitplastizität zeigen. Wenn man Synapsen, etwa Kletterfasern, wiederholt stimuliert, zeigen einige Synapsen eine Art von Depression in dem Sinne, dass die erste Reaktion nach einer Ruhephase sehr groß ist und danach kleinere Reaktionen folgen. Bei anderen Synapsen ist exakt das Gegenteil zu beobachten, nämlich zunächst eine kleinere Reaktion, gefolgt von zunehmend größeren Reaktionen. Und wieder andere Synapsen weisen komplexere Verhaltensweisen auf. Eine bestimme Synapse verfügt also durchschnittlich über eine gewisse Form der Plastizität. Hier ist ein Beispiel dafür, wozu eine Kurzzeitdepression in einem Netzwerk gut sein kann, in dem viele solcher Neuronen zusammenkommen, um eine Aufgabe zu erfüllen. Ich erwähnte bereits, dass eine solche Depression gut dafür ist, die Adaptation an sensorische Stimuli zu ermöglichen. Das ist gut für die so genannte Verstärkungsregelung, die die Amin-Aktivität in bestimmten Hirnregionen reguliert. Man kann Netzwerke mit Synapsen bauen, an denen eine rhythmisch auftretende Depression erfolgt. Es kann eine zeitliche Filterung veranlasst werden. Aber auch komplexere Aufgaben des zentralen Nervensystems, wie die Schalllokalisation können in neuronalen Netzen mit Hilfe einer Kurzzeitdepression bewältigt werden. Und selbst das so genannte Orientierungstuning, ein im primären visuellen Kortex beobachtbares individuelles System mit bestimmten Zellen, die in erster Linie auf Kontraste in einer bestimmten Orientierung reagieren … Man kann das simulieren und eine Unempfindlichkeit gegenüber…eine Invarianz gegenüber Differenzen im absoluten Kontrast erreichen, indem man eine Kurzzeitdepression in das Netzwerk induziert. Auch ein weiterer, heute diskutierter Aspekt ist eine Erscheinungsform der Kurzzeitplastizität, nämlich das Umschalten zwischen verschiedenen Gehirnzuständen. Wir wissen, dass unser Gehirn innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen unterschiedlichen Zuständen hin und her schalten kann, beispielsweise Ruhezustand, Stresszustand, Erregungszustand, Fokussierung, Aufmerksamkeit. Mit dem EEG lassen sich verschiedene Schlafzustände beobachten, bei denen das EEG-Muster innerhalb von Sekunden zwischen den gut bekannten REM-Schlafphasen und anderen Phasen wechselt. Solche schnellen Wechsel können natürlich nicht auf Veränderungen in der Langzeitplastizität zurückgeführt werden, weil diese Zeit braucht, um sich zu entwickeln, und trainiert werden muss usw. Es ist bekannt, dass solche Gehirnzustände durch zahlreiche diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme gesteuert werden, wie dopaminerge, adrenerge, cholinerge, peptiderge Systeme usw. Da geht es grundsätzlich um all die Arten von Inputmechanismen, die Dr. Kobilka gestern in seinem Vortrag erläutert hat. Und man weiß auch, dass solche diffus projizierten Transmittersysteme Kurzzeitänderungen, Kurzzeitplastizität in ihren Zielgebieten [verursachen]. Meine Schlussfolgerung lautet deshalb, dass die Untersuchung dieser Kurzzeitplastizität, ihrer dynamischen Art und ihres Mechanismus einige sehr bedeutende Aspekte der Gehirnfunktion aufklären könnte, die ebenso wichtig sein dürften wie die Langzeitveränderungen. Obwohl diese kurzzeitigen Plastizitätstypen bereits in der sehr frühen Arbeit über die neuromuskuläre Verbindung von Katz und Miledi beschrieben wurden, gibt es immer noch … gibt es meiner Meinung nach immer noch viele Dinge, die wir darüber nicht wissen, und bis heute verstehen wir viele wesentliche Merkmale nicht. Was geschieht, wenn eine Synapse ihre Stärke, ihre kurzzeitige Plastizität verändert? Das sind natürlich viele Dinge, denn das ist ein mehrstufiger Prozess. Es können Veränderungen an der Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und im assoziierten Kalziumeinstrom auftreten. Es kann postsynaptische Veränderungen geben. Inhibitorische, so genannte Autorezeptoren können für eine Rückkopplung sorgen, sodass der Transmitter auf die Freisetzungsbereitschaft der restlichen Vesikel zurückwirkt. Dann entsteht ein Problem des Vesikelrecyclings und des Vesikelverbrauchs. Grundsätzlich glaube ich, dass es sich hier um Prozesse handelt, die molekular im Wesentlichen Änderungen auf der Ebene von Second Messenger-Systemen, Änderungen bei der Phosphorylierung und möglicherweise zytoskeletale Reorganisationen aufgrund des gesamten Transports verursachen. Ich möchte mich für den Rests meines Vortrags im Wesentlichen auf zwei Aspekte konzentrieren, nämlich auf die durch die Vesikeldepletion vermittelte Depression und auf die Änderungen im … die molekularen Änderungen im Freisetzungsapparat, die die Bereitschaft der freisetzungsbereiten Vesikel modulieren, in Reaktion auf einen Kalziumstimulus tatsächlich zu fusionieren. Wir untersuchen diesen Prozess seit einigen Jahren an einer sehr speziellen Synapse, der so genannten Heldsche-Calyx-Synapse, einer Synapse in der Hörbahn. Das hier ist ein Schnitt des Stammhirns mit der angelegten Hörbahn. Die Hörhärchen stellen im ventralen Bereich des Nukleus cochlearis eine erste Synapse her. Das Axon des empfangenden Neurons überquert die Mittellinie und stellt einen Kontakt zu einer anderen Zelle im so genannten mittleren MNTB her, dem mittleren Nukleus des trapezförmigen Körpers. Und diese beiden Synapsen hier haben diese sehr spezielle Form einer Kylix oder einer schalenförmigen, präsynaptischen Endigung, die einen kompakten postsynaptischen Zellkörper umgibt. Die spezielle Synapsenform hängt wahrscheinlich mit der Tatsache zusammen, dass die von beiden Ohren kommenden Signale für die Schalllokalisierung sehr exakt verarbeitet werden müssen, damit an dem Punkt, an dem die Informationen an der lateralen und superioren Hirnolive von einem Ohr auf die Informationen vom anderen Ohr treffen, sehr feine Intensitäts- und Zeitunterschiede erfasst werden können. Wir haben hier eine Synapse mit einer sehr speziellen Geometrie, die allerdings im Sinne der Elektrophysiologie den Vorteil bietet, dass die beiden prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgt werden und simultan sehr genauen elektrophysiologischen Messungen unterzogen werden können. Und dies wurde vor inzwischen mehr als 20 Jahren in Bert Sakmanns Labor von Gerard Borst und Bert Sakmann herausgefunden. Diese Synapse also haben wir untersucht und ihre Plastizität erforscht. Nur um Ihnen zu zeigen, was uns möglich ist, seit wir die prä- und postsynaptischen Kompartimente mit Spannung versorgen können und entsprechende Ströme erfassen können: Wir können in der ionischen Umgebung innerhalb der beiden Kompartimente den Stromfluss exakt messen. Wir können das Ende mit einem Fluoreszenzindikator aufladen. Theis und ich machen das seit über fünfzehn Jahren, wir arbeiten dazu hauptsächlich mit den Fluoreszenzfarbstoffen von Roger Tsien. Wir können mit dieser Synapse viele Dinge machen, die mit anderen Synapsen nicht möglich sind, weil Synapsen normalerweise sehr kleine, boutonartige Strukturen sind, die einfach zu klein sind, um sie mit elektrophysiologischen Elektroden anzugehen. Die meisten Calyxe dieser Art weisen eine markante synaptische Depression auf. Das hier ist die Reaktion auf einen 100-Hz-Reiz, nachdem die Synapse eine Erholungspause hatte. Wir sehen jetzt einen sehr großen ersten Erregungsstrom, einen inverten Strom, der durch das Neurotransmitter-Glutamat induziert wird, das von der präsynaptischen Endigung freigesetzt wird. Ein zweiter Reiz, 10 ms später, ergibt eine kleine Reaktion. Und schließlich ist die Reaktion nach vier oder fünf Stimuli nur noch sehr gering. Die Synapse arbeitet bei sehr hohen Spike-Raten. Der Hörnerv ist mit 10 bis 50 Aktionspotenzialen pro Sekunde sogar im vollständigen Ruhezustand äußerst aktiv. Diese Synapse, zumindest die hier dargestellte, würde also in einem Dauerzustand der partiellen Depression arbeiten, obwohl das der physiologische Zustand der Synapse ist. Aber wenn wir uns das genau anschauen … das ist die Durchschnittsreaktion. Wenn wir uns das Muster der kurzzeitigen Plastizität detailliert anschauen, erkennen wir, dass einige Zellen – hier nur eine dargestellte Zelle – diese sehr starke Depression aufweisen. Das wird hier für drei Frequenzen gezeigt: 200 Hz, 100 Hz und 50 Hz. In derselben Darstellung können wir neben der Zelle mit diesem Verhalten möglicherweise eine andere Zelle finden, die exakt das Gegenteil zeigt, nämlich eine erste Fazilitation. Die zweite Reaktion ist größer als die erste, gefolgt von einer Depression. Nun, dies ist in dem Sinne zu verstehen … oder ich sollte anmerken, dass diese Zelle im Vergleich zu dieser Zelle einen sehr viel geringeren ersten EPSC (Excitatory Postsynaptic Current) aufweist, nämlich nur rund 1,1 Nanoamp, wobei das hier bei 2,5 Nanoamp liegt. Das Muster ist also so zu verstehen, dass in dieser Zelle die Freisetzung wahrscheinlich so hoch ist, dass bereits während der ersten Reaktion ein guter Bruchteil der verfügbaren Vesikel freigesetzt wurde, sodass nachfolgende Reaktionen geringer ausfielen. In dieser Zelle war wahrscheinlich die Freisetzung während des ersten Reizes geringer, sodass die erfassten Daten offen legen, dass die Erregungsleistung des Nervs bei der zweiten und dritten Stimulierung tatsächlich stärker ist und die Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit für die restlichen Vesikel zunimmt. Diese biphasische Verhaltensweise hat zunächst einen Anstieg in der Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit zur Folge, die nur beobachtet wird, wenn die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit sehr gering ist. Aber dann gibt es schließlich mehr und mehr Stimuli und die Synapse wird ihre gesamten Vesikel verbrauchen und danach in die Depression verfallen. Okay, diese Überlegung deutet bereits darauf hin, dass das so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis, das Verhältnis des zweiten zum ersten Stimulus, ein Maßstab ist, den viele Physiologen zur ersten Charakterisierung des kurzzeitigen Plastizitätsverhaltens der Synapse verwenden. Dieser Parameter wird auch als eine Art Indikator darüber verwendet, wie groß die anfängliche Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit ist. Wenn man solche Erfassungen an 31 Synapsen vornimmt und dieses so genannte Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber der Amplitude des ersten EPSC darstellt, erkennt man, dass eine systematische Beziehung besteht: Je größer die ersten EPSCs sind, umso kleiner fällt das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis aus. Das stimmt mit vielen Beobachtungen überein, die an anderen Synapsen gemacht wurden. Okay, aber noch immer haben wir es hier mit Synapsen zu tun, die vermutlich die gleiche Aufgabe erfüllen, morphologisch alle gleich sind und keine offensichtlichen Unterschiede aufweisen. Und dann stellt man sich doch die Frage, was diese Synapsen so unterschiedlich macht? Warum hat diese dann eine wesentlich geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit und eine großes PPR (Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis) und warum ist bei dieser genau das Gegenteil der Fall? Die Hypothese ist, dass freisetzungsbereite Vesikel tatsächlich in zwei Zuständen vorkommen können: In einem Zustand mit geringer Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, wobei typischerweise rund 5 bis 10% der Vesikel durch ein einzelnes Aktionspotenzial freigesetzt würden, und im so genannten Super-Prime-Zustand mit hoher Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit. Der Begriff „Super Prime“ wurde in verschiedenen Kontexten verwendet, wobei verschiedene molekulare Mechanismen vermutet wurden. Warum ein Super-Prime-Vesikel eine höhere Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit aufweist als ein anderes, werde ich später erläutern. Wahrscheinlich hat das mit der Fusionsenergiebarriere zu tun, die sich durch biochemische modulatorische Einflüsse verändert. Okay, das steht hier in diesem letzten Satz hier, nämlich dass wahrscheinlich die modulatorischen Hintergrundeinflüsse durch diffus projektierende Transmittersysteme Diversität verursachen. Welche Signalmechanismen können dem zugrunde liegen? Der markanteste, der wahrscheinlich damit zu tun hat, sind die diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalwege, eine Variante der G-Protein-vermittelten Signalwege, die Dr. Kobilka gestern erläutert hat. Dabei interagiert ein Rezeptor mit einem G-Protein, das G-Protein aktiviert Phospholipase C, die Inositolphospholipide werden aufspalten, was Second-Messenger-Diacylglycerol und IP3 erzeugt, das dann Kalzium freisetzt. Es wurde nachgewiesen, dass dieser Diacylglyerol-Zweig des Signalweges eine spezielle Funktion beim Priming von synaptischen Vesikeln sowie in der Freisetzung von synaptischen Vesikeln übernimmt. Konkret gibt es ein Protein mit der Bezeichnung MON-13, das eine so genannte C1-Domäne hat, eine Domäne, die auf ein Diacylglycerol reagiert. Frühere Arbeiten haben gezeigt, dass dieses MON-13.1 am Primingprozess und wahrscheinlich auch an der Regulierung der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung beteiligt ist. Natürlich können wir den Gehirnzustand nicht durch Stimulation … durch diffuse Projektion von Neuronen im Hirnschnittpräparat verändern. Ich sollte erwähnen, dass all diese Experimente mit konventionellen elektrophysiologischen Techniken an Hirnschnitten von Ratten durchgeführt werden. Aber wir können sozusagen die Aktion dieses diacylglycerol-vermittelten Signalweges nachahmen, indem wir Phorbol-Ester anwenden, eine Nachahmung von Diacylglycerol. Und bei Anwendung dieser Substanz kann man beobachten, dass alle EPSCs durchschnittlich zwei bis fünf Mal stärker sind als unter Kontrollbedingungen. Und wenn wir dann erneut das Paired-Pulse-Verhältnis gegenüber den ersten EPSCs abbilden, sehen wir, dass diese neuen Datenpunkte, also diese gefüllten Symbole, sehr gut dem Trend der Kontrolldatenpunkte folgen und dann sieht man diese mehr oder weniger nahtlose Fortsetzung mit einer Überlappung zwischen einigen Punkten unter Phorbol-Ester und einigen Punkten unter Kontrollbedingungen. Das scheint mir zu sagen bzw. reizt mich zumindest zu der Hypothese, dass Phorbol-Ester dieses Gleichgewicht oder dieses dynamische Gleichgewicht zwischen geprimten und super-geprimten Vesikeln zur super-geprimten Seite hin verlagert. Bei näherer Betrachtung dieser Eigenschaft erkennt man, dass Super-Priming eine Eigenschaft von ausgeruhten Synapsen ist. Bei einer 200 Hz starken Stimulierung konvergieren die EPSCs beim gleichen Steady-State-Wert. Das wird hier an diesen Daten ersichtlich. Hier ist die erste Reaktion einer relativ großen Zelle oder einer Zelle mit großem EPSC unter dem Einfluss von Phorbol-Ester. Dieser Wert stammt von derselben Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Das hier ist eine Zelle mit einer relativ kleinen Amplitude, aber unter Phorbol-Ester, und das ist der entsprechende erste Wert für dieselbe Zelle ohne Phorbol-Ester. Die ersten Reaktionen weichen also sehr stark voneinander ab. Dennoch laufen die zweite, dritte, vierte, fünfte Reaktion auf derselben Ebene zusammen. Und dieselbe Ebene heißt nicht 0, aber ziemlich ähnlich. Und in diesem Sinne scheint es so zu sein, dass das Super-Priming oder diese Differenzierung zwischen Synapsen nur auftritt … sie braucht Zeit … sie also nur auftritt, wenn die …Synapsen Zeit hatten, ihr Super-Priming zu entwickeln. Die Interpretation dieses Ergebnisses ist die, die ich gerade bereits erwähnt habe: Wenn die Synapse Zeit genug hat, einen Super-Prime-Zustand zu entwickeln, ergibt sich diese Differenz. Wenn allerdings während eines solchen Ablaufs ein konstanter Vesikelstrom freigesetzt und neu rekrutiert wird…ich meine, dieser Dauerzustand ist eine Art von Steady-State zwischen Vesikelverbrauch und Vesikellieferung. Die Hypothese lautet also: Wenn es der Zelle nicht ermöglicht wird, in den Super-Prime-Zustand zu gehen, verhalten sich all diese Zellen gleich. Dies kann man natürlich in einem simplen kinetischen Modell darstellen, wobei man annimmt, dass die freizusetzenden Vesikel zunächst einige molekulare Schritte durchlaufen müssen, die sie an die Membran andocken und in einen Zustand versetzen, der eine Freisetzung ermöglicht. Und wenn genug Zeit ist, können sie sogar weiter zum Super-Prime-Zustand heranreifen. Der erste Priming-Zustand wird sich schnell entwickeln, der zweite wäre langsam. Das erklärt also dieses Verhalten. Es ist auch eine quantitative Erklärung dessen, was man bei der Darstellung des Steady-State-Wertes der Freisetzung gegenüber der Stimulationsfrequenz beobachtet. Hier sehen Sie zwei Kurven, eine unter Kontrollbedingungen, eine mit Phorbol-Ester. Sie sind auf den jeweiligen ersten Wert normalisiert. Aber man sieht, dass die unterbrochenen Kurven den Versuchspunkten sehr schön folgen. Dies gilt auch für das untere Ende der Beziehung, die Steady-State-Freisetzung und Frequenz verbindet. Und ausgehend von diesem Modell kann man dann die relevanten, interessantesten Parameter extrahieren. Die Daten sind vor allem mit der Theorie kompatibel, dass der normal-geprimte Zustand eine Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit von in diesem Fall 0,06 hat, also eine relativ geringe Freisetzungswahrscheinlichkeit, während der Super-Prime-Zustand eine Wahrscheinlichkeit von 0,42 aufweist. Die so genannte Priming-Rate ist schnell, vier pro Sekunde. Das bedeutet, dass in rund 250 mms ein neues Vesikel auf eine Freisetzungsstelle geladen wird, während die Rate für diesen zweiten Super-Priming-Schritt im Kontrollfall sehr gering ist und durch die Einwirkung des Phorbol-Esters verbessert wird. Die von mir beschriebenen Ergebnisse gelten nicht nur für die Heldsche Calyx. Verschiedene Aspekte der Resultate gelten für eine Vielzahl anderer Synapsen. Die Heterogenität zwischen Synapsen der gleichen Art wurde auch für die neuromuskuläre Verbindung in der Maus beschrieben. Die Prototypsynapse, der Hippocampus zwischen CA3- und CA1-Neuronen, weist, wie vor einigen Jahren nachgewiesen, eine sehr ähnliche Art der Heterogenität auf, wie es von Hanse und Gustafsson in einer Reihe von Aufsätzen und darüber hinaus in weiteren kürzlich erschienenen Papieren beschrieben wurde. Dieses Phänomen, das ich als den Kollaps der Heterogenität bei höherer Frequenz bezeichne, wurde auch von Hanse und Gustafsson beschrieben und von Walter und Smith im Kontext der Informationsverarbeitung in neuronalen Netzen erörtert. Und diese langsame Umstellung vom Prime- auf den Super-Prime-Status war tatsächlich auch Bestandteil eines Modells, das Stefan Hallermann für zerebellare Moosfasersynapsen vorgeschlagen hat. Obwohl ich denke, dass die Wellenform des Aktionspotenzials und der Kalziumeinstrom die stärksten modulatorischen Einflüsse auf die Kurzzeitplastizität haben, weil Kalziumströme bekanntermaßen in der Lage sind, das zu zeigen, was als Fazilitation bezeichnet wird, auch Inaktivierung, regulieren sie sich selbst durch G-Protein-Signale und so weiter. Veränderungen im Kalziumeinstrom verursachen in der Folge auch riesige Veränderungen in der Freisetzung, weil Kalziumeinstrom und Freisetzung sehr stark zusammenhängen. Aber ich denke, dass die Experimente und die Heldsche Calyx starke Argumente für diese andere Form der Modulation kurzzeitiger Plastizität liefern, die nicht auf den Kalziumeinstrom zurückzuführen ist. Wir können sagen, dass dies eine Heldsche Calyx ist, weil der Einfluss des Phorbol-Esters auf den Kalziumeinstrom vor mehreren Jahren sehr intensiv von Ralf Schneggenburgers Labor untersucht wurde, wenn auch diese früheren Papiere gezeigt haben, dass es keine bedeutende Veränderungen in der Pool-Größe gibt. Das von mir beschriebene Phänomen scheint also tatsächlich eine relative neuartige Form der Modulationsveränderung in der Energiebarriere für die Freisetzung eines Vesikels zu sein. Die Ähnlichkeit zwischen der Modulation durch Phorbol-Ester und der Heterogenität an den Synapsen im Ruhezustand lässt vermuten, dass die Heterogenität tatsächlich aus verschiedenen Abstufungen der Hintergrundmodulation hervorgeht. Und ich denke, dass dieses Konzept von zwei Zuständen freisetzungsbereiter Vesikel und dem Einfluss von Super-Priming dazu beitragen wird, einige wichtige Phänomene der Signalverarbeitung in unserem Gehirn zu verstehen. Das hier ist selbstverständlich nicht meine Arbeit. Vielmehr wurden alle präsentierten Daten von Holger Taschenberger zusammengetragen, der bis vor kurzem ein Postdoc-Wissenschaftler in meinem Labor war. Mein Beitrag als Emeritus besteht lediglich in einer Datenanalyse und in der Modellbildung. Viele der Ideen und Hintergrunddaten wurden von Takeshi Sakaba, einem langjährigen Kollegen, der heute an der Doshisha Hochschule in Kyoto arbeitet, von Ralf Schneggenburger, der Professor am APFL in Lausanne ist, und von Suk-Ho Lee, einem Kollegen von der Seoul National University, zur Verfügung gestellt. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

 
(00:01:14 - 00:02:44)

The complete video is available here.


In this time, the methodical approach of studying the brain cell by cell – as exemplified by Torsten Wiesel – has borne much fruit: we now understand the basic principles of how the brain goes about its work and also have at least some idea of where specific functions such as movement and speech are localised. What of the future?

Towards the end of his talk in 2018, Edvard Moser addressed the young scientists in the audience directly. His appeal to the next generation of researchers to move beyond the ‘nuts and bolts’ concerns of course primarily his own field of space and time, but his advice is surely relevant for all areas of neuroscience research.


The complete video is available here. 


Further Reading on Neuroscience and the Brain

Past The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Ramon y Cajal by Javier DeFelipe and Larry Swanson
Present Navigating cognition: Spatial codes for human thinking by Mellmund et al. in Science
Future Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Harari

 

Bibliography

1. Neuroscience. 2nd edition. Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, et al., editors. Sunderland (MA): Sinauer Associates; 2001.
2. Animal electricity and the birth of electrophysiology: the legacy of Luigi Galvani. Piccolino M. Brain Research Bulletin, 1998, Jul 15;46(5):381-407
3. Spatial representation in the hippocampal formation: a history. Moser EI, Moser MB, McNaughton BL. Nature Neuroscience, 2017 Oct 26;20(11):1448-1464.
4. Object-vector coding in the medial entorhinal cortex. Høydal ØA, Skytøen ER, Andersson SO, Moser MB, Moser EI. Nature, 2019 Apr;568(7752):400-404.
5. Integrating time from experience in the lateral entorhinal cortex. Tsao A, Sugar J, Lu L, Wang C, Knierim JJ, Moser MB, Moser EI. Nature, 2018 Sep;561(7721):57-62.
6. An introduction to the work of David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel. Kandel ER. J Physiol. 2009 Jun 15;587(Pt 12):2733-41.
7. The "split brain" and Roger Wolcott Sperry (1913-1994). Pearce JMS; FRCP. Rev Neurol (Paris). 2019 Apr;175(4):217-220.

 


Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Cite


Specify width: px

Share