Labour Markets

by Patricia Edema

Since the mid-1990s, the rate of labor productivity growth in Europe has slowed, while U.S. labor productivity growth accelerated, partly stemming from the country’s large-scale information and communication technologies investments as well as from a high productivity growth of market service sectors[1]. To both stimulate higher labor force participation and productivity growth rates in Europe, the European Commission pursues a concerted strategy – commonly referred to as “Europe 2020 Strategy”[2]. This plan intends to foster labor productivity growth in Europe with a defined labor market participation target of 75 percent for women and men aged 20 to 64 by 2020.

In light of a widening labor productivity growth gap between Europe and the United States, economist and 2010 recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize Christopher Pissarides points out the need of developing specific employment structures and market policies facilitating business development and productivity growth. By comparing European employment structures with U.S. work structures in his 2011 lecture, “The Future of Work in Europe” held in Lindau, Pissarides stresses the differing levels of marketization between the U.S. and European economies. By definition, marketized work is determined as work produced outside the home and offered as services to the public. The EU produces relatively more goods and services through household production and less through the market than the United States. As a matter of fact, the U.S. takes a leading role in the creation of jobs in the market service sectors as well as in developing new sectors of work, most notably the information and communications technology producing sectors (New Economy) that started to flourish in the mid-1990s.

Christopher Pissarides (2011) - The Future of Work in Europe

When I received the kind invitation from Countess Bettina Bernadotte to come and speak at this meeting, I correctly guessed that I would be following either Diamond or Mortensen or both. Because what I learned since the Nobel Award is that in Nobel terms the sequence is determined the sequence is determined either by age or by alphabet, and I come third in both so... I also correctly anticipated that the first speaker would be talking about search, unemployment, using data from the United States, so I decided to differentiate myself by talking about employment and data from Europe. Not only Europe as a whole, but from the sustainable group of countries known as the Eurozone and that’s what you’ll be seeing here. I’ll begin with the employment themes. Now, employment in Europe, as you know, has been a constant theme of labour market research and European leaders have attached a lot of importance to the employment record, you know, how many people are in work. They have targets which go up to 70 % for men, 50% for men over 55 and so on. That was more than ten years ago when they fixed those targets, and European countries, especially the Eurozone are still not quite there. Now, a lot of the recent work on employment in Europe is comparing performance of Europe and America. And there are reasons why we should be doing that. That’s partly because United States, being the leading nation in terms of economic and technological development, it leads the way in the creation of jobs, of new types of jobs, developing new sectors of work in the theme of Silicon Valley, for example. So by studying what is happening in employment trends in America and comparing what we have over here in Europe, we could learn a little bit about the future of work in Europe. But the other reason is that had we done the same things that they did in the United States, then we would have satisfied the targets that were set in 2000 and since then at the European summits. In other words, we would have had the preferred percentages of work, we would have had high tech jobs, you know, what you see in the final bullet point there, whereas we haven’t done that, and that’s why we’re still a bit behind. So what I am going to focus on is the comparison of the Eurozone with the US. Now, Europe 15, the sort of old members of the European Union, of course we also have data on that. There’s sort of two countries that are in Europe 15 but not in the Eurozone, that are of a relatively big size, Britain and Sweden, and I’m going to leave them out of this group of countries I want to look at, because they have some distinct characteristics that puts them apart and I will come back in fact and say something about Sweden in particular, about employment in Sweden. And I am going to sort of take a brief look at the various aspects that concern employment. Now, first, I’ll show you a graph which shows the hours of work per person employed in Europe and America. From now on, I should say, when I say Europe I mean the Eurozone, I think it’s ten countries are in the Eurozone, something like that. And you also see the employment record of these two continents maybe I should say. The blue top line is employment in the United States, the green line below is employment in the Eurozone. In 1977, when reliable data by sector began, we were more or less at the same level, we’re at about 70%, that is also the target of course in Europe currently. Then in America employment has been increasing, mainly because of increased participation of women. In Europe it’s been decreasing until about 1990 when it started increasing again. Where the biggest contrast is though, is in the hours of work per person employed, where in the United States there has been a small decline. In 1977 they used to work close to 36 hours a week. Now they are working 34,5/35. But in Europe we also used to work close to 36 hours a week and now we’re working about 31 hours a week. That’s the biggest contrast between that we’re taking. I think, to summarise here, the biggest contrast is, if you look at the figures overall, it’s that there are more women coming into the labour force in the United States, they have been coming for a long time and each person in the labour force in the Eurozone is working less and less. And that’s mainly come about through longer annual leave, whereas in 1977 we used to take about two weeks annual leave both here and in the States. In the States they still take more or less two weeks a year, Europe is now six weeks a year that we take leave. Unless you live in France, of course, where the duration of the working week has come down as well. Now, because of those changes, we created a big gap between the US and Europe, and of course we also created a fairly sizable gap between the targets that European leaders have set and where we are. I’ll skip that except to say that the gap currently but not historically, the gap in hours is, half of it is explained by persons, that there are more persons employed in America and half by hours of work per person. It’s not very interesting though. I’ll show you the, I mean I’ve been talking about the Eurozone as a whole, here is a breakdown of all the countries that we have data, and you can see where the failures are. The red lines is the United States, Europe 15 and Eurozone. The failures, as you can see, are right at the end, the new members of the European Union, Hungary, Slovakia, Poland and some of the old members that tend to be in the south, like Greece, except for Belgium, actually. I think Belgium, if you look at the economy of Belgium and regulation, it behaves exactly like a Mediterranean country, except that it doesn’t have the Mediterranean, so it seems to be getting the worst of both worlds actually. At least, when things go really badly in Greece, they all go to the islands and they forget about the economy, which is what happened in August. That is why the riots stopped. But in Belgium where do you go? And then there is Italy, Spain and so on, failing to satisfy targets, okay. Now, first point I want to make about the future of work and how we can improve things, it’s really summarising this graph here. I mean, I call it work sharing because what I do here is to see if the number of hours of work that each person works, influences the overall employment rate. Now, that’s very intuitive of course, you know. We’ll say, well, you know, if everyone of us was to work two or three hours a week less, then obviously we would need to bring more people into work. But economists did deny that many times in the past. They said, the hours of work you work have nothing to do with employment. In fact you do see a correlation here, Korea is always an outlier when it comes to work, because they work so hard in Korea. They work, well, here the average comes out to be about 46 hours, the average is 46 hours, you know, which is incredible. But the other thing, maybe the next slide in fact explains that a bit more. The other thing that you will see there is striking, I want to point out here, if you see the country there, GRC on the right down, I don’t know if you know this here, is Greece. And I’m going to compare it a little bit with the Netherlands, which is up here, see, NLD. Now, you see how completely apart those two countries are, you know. When you look at employment rates, for example, Greece is somewhere around under 55%, Netherlands had about 75%. But what’s happening in these countries? You know, Netherlands meets the EU targets comfortably. In fact, now if you ask – well, these two countries are, I should say they’re about the same size as well, about ten million people each, two small countries within the Eurozone. I think if you asked a sort of typical European now: Show me one country that is your kind of shop window, why should I think the Eurozone is a good idea? They will probably show you either Denmark or Netherlands. And if they ask you: Show me a country that’s been doing really badly and why the Eurozone is a bad idea, they’ll probably show you Greece, well, they might. And yet, when you look there, you know, the Greeks actually work more hours per year than the Dutch. The Greeks work 1.135 hours per year, per person in the age group, the Dutch work 1.066 hours. Easy to remember because it was the Battle of Hastings from what I remember in my British history. The reason of course is that when a Greek goes to work he stays to work much longer, and I say ‘he’ because not many women go to work in Greece, because men just leave their home and stay at work all day, all evening, so someone has to stay home and do the work at home, I guess. And the reason of course for that, if you look at the policy, you know, is that an important issue and should we do something about policy? Well, it is an important issue because the reason that we see this difference is that in the Netherlands part time work is widespread and it helps women a lot more when they come into the labour force. In Greece part time work is both highly regulated and part time workers are not well treated by employers because they cost too much. There are a lot of fixed costs of work. So one way to move forward, to improve the labour market performance of the southern countries, in this example Greece, is not so much to find ways of encouraging more, increase overall hours of work, but find a way of making it easier for employers to offer part time employment or what they call a-typical employment, to attract more people into work and do more work sharing, as it were. Okay, let me now change topic and move on to the distribution of employment, and in particular which sectors are creating jobs. And what I’m going to do is to look behind the aggregate figures and see where the biggest failures are in Europe and ask the question: Is that because of taxes or regulation? And in particular the question is: Does Europe tax too much and does it push work to the home or to self-help rather than in the market? Now, here I’m showing you a decomposition of the economy into six or seven, seven sectors rather. I mean, it might look complicated there and seem, the acronyms below may not be very easy to read. What I want to draw your attention to, though, is that - this here is the gap between United States and Eurozone, and of course the focus will be on these three sectors here, where the biggest gaps are. It’s about a hundred hours a year, as you can see there. The other four sectors, which is public administration, manufacturing is the brown line, agriculture and community services. We’re more or less at the same level. So the main differences are in these three sectors I pointed out, and I classified the sectors in the following way. The first one is trade hotels and restaurants, they’re mainly services provided directly to the public, the biggest sector in the first one is retail trade, the biggest employment sector is retail trade. The second one is finance/insurance/real estate and this is mainly employment where it’s business to business provision of services. The final one, sort of health and education, which is mainly sort of service for self improvement, you know, we get better educated or better health. Now, in the second one, in finance/insurance/real estate, you might think that the biggest gap, or at least the growth of the gap recently, is in computing or finance because so much, there is so much finance going on in the United States. In fact that is not true, the biggest difference between Europe and America in that sector is in the host of jobs that are completely unspecified in the statistics. It’s usually called ‘business services, not elsewhere classified’ and that would include accountants, expert advisors, outside people who have brought in the business, going out to get help, whereas in Europe a lot is done within the company and it’s done by the same people where they switch jobs from one to the other. There is much more specialisation in the States in business with a lot of outside work being used. And here you can see the gaps. Now, this first column is, it says real estate etc, but in fact what drives it is the business services that I just mentioned. And then the second biggest gap is in education, health, finance, retail, hotels, restaurants and catering, maintenance of motor vehicles and wholesale trade, where America has been a lot better than Europe in job creation. Okay, let me give you an evaluation of the figures you’ve just seen. Now, about one third of the overall gap is in sectors that have home production subsidies. I’m going to talk a little bit more about that, but it’s about health care, you know, for example, if you need, if you’re not well you might call the nurse to look after you, you might go and see a doctor or you might stay home until you recover if it’s not a serious illness. That’s what I call home subsidy. You might stay home and ask your partner or your children or someone to come in and take care of you or your might call a nurse or you might see a doctor. Retail trade, again I’ll talk a little bit more about it. You might go to a shop that has lots of assistants, you get served quickly, you leave. Or you might go into a shop that doesn’t have many assistants and you line up for hours to get served. Same for hotels and restaurants. You eat at home or you go to the restaurant, motor vehicle and maintenance, you spend hours trying to sort out why your car wouldn’t start in the morning or you just call an engineer and he comes and does it for you. Now, another third of the gap is explained by business services which I explain is mainly finance, accountants, consultants, financial advisors and so on. And the final third is in education and specialised health, like hospitals. They are more or less the same, it is about a third each one that the gap is there, so when we’re talking about job creation then those are the cases that you should look at. Let’s first look at market home substitution. Now if that’s important in explaining why there aren’t enough jobs being created in Europe in these sectors, then what we should be looking at mainly is, is childcare: Why do we look after children at home in Europe? And then retail trade: Why aren’t there more retail assistants in Europe than we have? Now with retail trade, regulations like minimum wage are extremely important because retail assistants usually are paid, get paid very low, very little. And then that probably applies also to motor maintenance and fuel sales, hotels and so on, but it’s mainly retail trade. Now, how does this work? I mention it because some of you may not have come across before. Now, households, you know, people spend their time in a variety of ways and the most convenient way of dividing this here is into three types of users. One is leisure, leisure time - or leisure if you like, for American colleagues – where what we define as leisure time is time you spend, that you actually enjoy the time you spend. Like if you’re watching television, you’re enjoying your time watching television. Or if you are talking to a friend, you’re enjoying the time that you’re making that conversation. And that should be contrasted with what you might call home production, where you are doing things for your own benefit at home or outside the home, where you don’t like the time that you spend doing it but you like the output of that good. And shopping is like that, you know like, most people don’t enjoy shopping as such, what they enjoy is the consumption of the goods that they buy. Same goes with cooking, you know, you don’t enjoy cooking, standing in a hot kitchen, but you enjoy the food if you’ve done a good job. So that is home production time. Then, other tasks of course, these are the things that we go and buy in the market, you know, you work in the market for a wage. That’s a use of your time, which is market use. Now, a lot of the tasks that are about home production, like shopping and cooking, they could be marketised, in other words rather than doing them yourself, rather than you spending your time doing it, then you let someone else do it and you let someone else do it and you buy the product which is close enough to what you have done. Rather than cooking at home you could go to a restaurant and eat, or you could ask a chef to cook for you and bring you that home, a caterer to bring it to your home. And that’s called the marketisation of work. Now, the claim that we make here - and I should say that this work followed the rather controversial short paper that Ed Prescott has written a few years ago - the claim made is that if you tax market work a lot, then people will switch their activities from the market to the home. They will marketise a lot less, you are going to do your own gardening, you are going to mow your lawn yourself, you are going to go to a shop like IKEA that doesn’t have assistants and you stand there for hours to buy your furniture, and you have to carry them on your shoulders maybe, and when you think you’ve succeeded and you’ve found what you want and you go to pay, you see a line that extends up to the end of the wall and you spend another hour doing it. Alternatively, I guess you may know of Harrods, you know, you could go and buy a similar thing in Harrods and you are in and out within fifteen minutes but you’re worse off, at least three times as much. That’s called marketising that time, the time that you spend queuing up in Ikea, you’ve given it to the successor of Mr. Al Fayed. I don’t know who actually bought Harrods from Mr. Al Fayed, but I know he doesn’t own it anymore. Now, if we look at total work. Now, here I’m adding market and home from time use surveys, then there is a lot of variation. I don’t know why Portugal comes out as the most hard working country with data, I’m assuming that there is something wrong with the survey, but there isn’t. I have checked it and double checked it on our Portuguese colleagues. The other countries are not so much of a surprise you know, like Japan, Sweden, Australia, Canada, United States, work a lot harder than Germany, Finland, France, Belgium and Netherlands, which are at the other end. The countries that are missing from here haven’t done a time use survey, so I can’t compare with Greece, Poland and the other countries that were at the low end before. Now what’s interesting, though, is that even within this context of total work, countries marketise differently, this is the share of market hours of all the hours of total work. The countries are marketised most, that do most things outside the home are the Asian countries, Japan and Korea. Countries that marketise less are Italy, Germany, Belgium. I was surprised to see Germany there. I’m not surprised to see France and Italy because they do like doing things at home, like especially child care. In fact, the biggest contrast between Italy and Sweden, which should be to the left, marketising a lot more, Denmark and all that, comes out in a recent survey that I’ve seen about asking young mothers whether they would trust their children to a child care centre outside, even if you subsidise them, of course the Swedish always, and the Scandinavians generally said I wouldn’t have my child be looked after by anyone else because the state is doing such a good job providing childminders outside. And when they asked the Italians they said I wouldn’t trust the state to look after my child, my mother is much better at this job. And therefore they do the childcare at home. That’s what explains the biggest difference in marketisation that a lot more things are done at home in Italy than in Denmark for example, or Sweden. In Belgium there is very little work anywhere, either market or home. Now, here is a sort of a general picture of ‘Does taxation play a role in the marketisation of work?’. This is a claim that Ed Prescott was making, for example, and the answer is that it seems, seems so. Countries that tax more heavily, which is the left figure, work less, take more leisure. That’s the way you should read the left feature, they spend more time watching television, for example, or talking to friends. In addition to that, countries that tax more, marketise less. They do more work at home. I mean, there are one or two outliers, but the whole trend is like that, you know. You can see on the marketisation graph, for example, you see that here, these are countries, Sweden and Finland are countries that tax a lot because this is one minus the tax. And they marketise very little, they do a lot of things at home. But then look at Japan, Korea, United States, they tax much less and they do things in the market rather than at home. Okay, that completes the first third of where job creation would be. The next one is in business services. And business services, again, there are a lot more business services being created in the United States. Here the main difference is that in Europe our campaigners seem to be doing a lot of things that could be done outside. They do it internally from the same people. They don’t use specialised advisors or accountants or anything people might do. You know, the manager of a small company in Europe might do his own accounts or his or her own tax returns, and that’s where we fail here. And I suspect again here the reason is that it’s not so easy to set up companies in Europe, there is a lot of product market regulation. If you look at the OECD index of product market regulation, here, there is a lot of product market regulation and regulation of small companies in Europe than there is in America, and maybe that is why we’re not setting them up. So again here you could say that it’s regulation of the business environment that is stopping more job creation, that will create these additional businesses. And finally, the third sector, which is education and health. Now, here it’s our biggest failure, we’re going to talk about this in the panel after lunch as well, because we have ageing populations and in America there’s been a lot of growth of jobs, especially in the health sector. In Europe there has been very little growth of jobs in the health sector, despite the fact that we have a more ageing population, and of course the main feature of these jobs in Europe is that they’re mainly funded by the State. Health is mainly nationalised, education is almost exclusively nationalised. So if we are going to pay for creation in these jobs, then we have some very difficult decisions to make and here is where I said that Sweden does things differently. What you see there is some contrasting countries. Like in Sweden for example, taxes generally are very high and that’s why you saw that low marketisation of activities like retailing and hotels and restaurants, you know. I mentioned IKEA before and it’s not a coincidence that IKEA is a Swedish company. How can you find a way of minimising the number of employees and getting people out to buy and, you know, letting them queue. But the other feature of Sweden is that a large fraction of that tax revenue is used to create jobs in health and education, and as you can see, it outperforms even the United States in job creation in those sectors. Then the United States is a much freer economy, both in education and health and you can see a lot of job creation again there. The Eurozone is the other extreme where it doesn’t encourage so much the private job creation in these sectors, but at the same time it doesn’t subsidise them very much. So it’s a really bad performer, as far as job creation there is concerned, whereas the United Kingdom, and I thought I should mention one of my two countries here, the United Kingdom, at least since the 1980s there has been a lot of encouragement of private job creation, both in health and education, but at the same time subsidisation is continuing at fairly high rates and you can see that it’s doing a fairly good amount of job creation in those sectors. In fact, around early 1980s, the UK and the Eurozone were at about the same level in the job creation, so this jump in the red columns that you see is one that’s taken place since the liberalisation and the encouragement of private job creation in these sectors. So if I should conclude, you’re probably thinking that I’m depriving you of your lunch but don’t worry, there isn’t much left to go. In terms of our targets that we set in Europe, we’re still lagging behind America. Had we done the same as America, we would have satisfied our targets, it seems that taxation and regulation, and especially at the lower end of the jobs market, is affecting the job creation. I should say that most of the recent research on this has focused on the market home substitution between Europe and America, the retailing example that I mentioned. But that accounts maybe for about a third of the gap. We really need new models of employment in business services, you know, whether you provide the business services internally or externally and why and what’s the difference and how does regulation affect this job creation in the business sector. Then we’ll be able to account for the second third in our failures in job creation over here, and finally, I shouldn’t say too much about that because we’re going to talk about it after lunch. But finally, the final third in the gap is sectors where in Europe we rely a lot on state financing. We’ve got a lot of debts as well and we have to come to terms on how are we going to move forward in those sectors and we haven’t really done that yet. Okay, thank you very much. That’s the end.

Christopher Pissarides on the marketization of work in the U.S. and Europe
(00:11:53 - 00:17:20)

Productivity growth in market services has been much faster in the United States than in Europe. The biggest gaps in annual working hours of marketized work between the U.S. and Europe occur in areas of retail trade services, restaurants and hotel services, financial and business services, personal services (including personal, community, and social services) as well as in health and education service offers[3]. These gaps can be partly explained by the high taxation of services in the EU, which negatively affects the marketization of work. People in the U.S. as well as in Asian countries like Japan and Korea, in which taxation of marketized work is much lower than in the Europe, employ market services much more often than in Europe.

Failure of job creation in the service sectors cannot be ascribed to high taxation only – the high level of product market regulation in Europe also impedes business development, according to Pissarides. As per the OECD index of product market regulation, restrictive product market regulation and regulation of small companies are much stronger in Europe compared to the U.S. In particular, regulations limiting new entry hinder technology transfer and have a negative impact on productivity. In addition, the U.S. has a more developed market for risk capital.[4]

Christopher Pissarides (2011) - The Future of Work in Europe

When I received the kind invitation from Countess Bettina Bernadotte to come and speak at this meeting, I correctly guessed that I would be following either Diamond or Mortensen or both. Because what I learned since the Nobel Award is that in Nobel terms the sequence is determined the sequence is determined either by age or by alphabet, and I come third in both so... I also correctly anticipated that the first speaker would be talking about search, unemployment, using data from the United States, so I decided to differentiate myself by talking about employment and data from Europe. Not only Europe as a whole, but from the sustainable group of countries known as the Eurozone and that’s what you’ll be seeing here. I’ll begin with the employment themes. Now, employment in Europe, as you know, has been a constant theme of labour market research and European leaders have attached a lot of importance to the employment record, you know, how many people are in work. They have targets which go up to 70 % for men, 50% for men over 55 and so on. That was more than ten years ago when they fixed those targets, and European countries, especially the Eurozone are still not quite there. Now, a lot of the recent work on employment in Europe is comparing performance of Europe and America. And there are reasons why we should be doing that. That’s partly because United States, being the leading nation in terms of economic and technological development, it leads the way in the creation of jobs, of new types of jobs, developing new sectors of work in the theme of Silicon Valley, for example. So by studying what is happening in employment trends in America and comparing what we have over here in Europe, we could learn a little bit about the future of work in Europe. But the other reason is that had we done the same things that they did in the United States, then we would have satisfied the targets that were set in 2000 and since then at the European summits. In other words, we would have had the preferred percentages of work, we would have had high tech jobs, you know, what you see in the final bullet point there, whereas we haven’t done that, and that’s why we’re still a bit behind. So what I am going to focus on is the comparison of the Eurozone with the US. Now, Europe 15, the sort of old members of the European Union, of course we also have data on that. There’s sort of two countries that are in Europe 15 but not in the Eurozone, that are of a relatively big size, Britain and Sweden, and I’m going to leave them out of this group of countries I want to look at, because they have some distinct characteristics that puts them apart and I will come back in fact and say something about Sweden in particular, about employment in Sweden. And I am going to sort of take a brief look at the various aspects that concern employment. Now, first, I’ll show you a graph which shows the hours of work per person employed in Europe and America. From now on, I should say, when I say Europe I mean the Eurozone, I think it’s ten countries are in the Eurozone, something like that. And you also see the employment record of these two continents maybe I should say. The blue top line is employment in the United States, the green line below is employment in the Eurozone. In 1977, when reliable data by sector began, we were more or less at the same level, we’re at about 70%, that is also the target of course in Europe currently. Then in America employment has been increasing, mainly because of increased participation of women. In Europe it’s been decreasing until about 1990 when it started increasing again. Where the biggest contrast is though, is in the hours of work per person employed, where in the United States there has been a small decline. In 1977 they used to work close to 36 hours a week. Now they are working 34,5/35. But in Europe we also used to work close to 36 hours a week and now we’re working about 31 hours a week. That’s the biggest contrast between that we’re taking. I think, to summarise here, the biggest contrast is, if you look at the figures overall, it’s that there are more women coming into the labour force in the United States, they have been coming for a long time and each person in the labour force in the Eurozone is working less and less. And that’s mainly come about through longer annual leave, whereas in 1977 we used to take about two weeks annual leave both here and in the States. In the States they still take more or less two weeks a year, Europe is now six weeks a year that we take leave. Unless you live in France, of course, where the duration of the working week has come down as well. Now, because of those changes, we created a big gap between the US and Europe, and of course we also created a fairly sizable gap between the targets that European leaders have set and where we are. I’ll skip that except to say that the gap currently but not historically, the gap in hours is, half of it is explained by persons, that there are more persons employed in America and half by hours of work per person. It’s not very interesting though. I’ll show you the, I mean I’ve been talking about the Eurozone as a whole, here is a breakdown of all the countries that we have data, and you can see where the failures are. The red lines is the United States, Europe 15 and Eurozone. The failures, as you can see, are right at the end, the new members of the European Union, Hungary, Slovakia, Poland and some of the old members that tend to be in the south, like Greece, except for Belgium, actually. I think Belgium, if you look at the economy of Belgium and regulation, it behaves exactly like a Mediterranean country, except that it doesn’t have the Mediterranean, so it seems to be getting the worst of both worlds actually. At least, when things go really badly in Greece, they all go to the islands and they forget about the economy, which is what happened in August. That is why the riots stopped. But in Belgium where do you go? And then there is Italy, Spain and so on, failing to satisfy targets, okay. Now, first point I want to make about the future of work and how we can improve things, it’s really summarising this graph here. I mean, I call it work sharing because what I do here is to see if the number of hours of work that each person works, influences the overall employment rate. Now, that’s very intuitive of course, you know. We’ll say, well, you know, if everyone of us was to work two or three hours a week less, then obviously we would need to bring more people into work. But economists did deny that many times in the past. They said, the hours of work you work have nothing to do with employment. In fact you do see a correlation here, Korea is always an outlier when it comes to work, because they work so hard in Korea. They work, well, here the average comes out to be about 46 hours, the average is 46 hours, you know, which is incredible. But the other thing, maybe the next slide in fact explains that a bit more. The other thing that you will see there is striking, I want to point out here, if you see the country there, GRC on the right down, I don’t know if you know this here, is Greece. And I’m going to compare it a little bit with the Netherlands, which is up here, see, NLD. Now, you see how completely apart those two countries are, you know. When you look at employment rates, for example, Greece is somewhere around under 55%, Netherlands had about 75%. But what’s happening in these countries? You know, Netherlands meets the EU targets comfortably. In fact, now if you ask – well, these two countries are, I should say they’re about the same size as well, about ten million people each, two small countries within the Eurozone. I think if you asked a sort of typical European now: Show me one country that is your kind of shop window, why should I think the Eurozone is a good idea? They will probably show you either Denmark or Netherlands. And if they ask you: Show me a country that’s been doing really badly and why the Eurozone is a bad idea, they’ll probably show you Greece, well, they might. And yet, when you look there, you know, the Greeks actually work more hours per year than the Dutch. The Greeks work 1.135 hours per year, per person in the age group, the Dutch work 1.066 hours. Easy to remember because it was the Battle of Hastings from what I remember in my British history. The reason of course is that when a Greek goes to work he stays to work much longer, and I say ‘he’ because not many women go to work in Greece, because men just leave their home and stay at work all day, all evening, so someone has to stay home and do the work at home, I guess. And the reason of course for that, if you look at the policy, you know, is that an important issue and should we do something about policy? Well, it is an important issue because the reason that we see this difference is that in the Netherlands part time work is widespread and it helps women a lot more when they come into the labour force. In Greece part time work is both highly regulated and part time workers are not well treated by employers because they cost too much. There are a lot of fixed costs of work. So one way to move forward, to improve the labour market performance of the southern countries, in this example Greece, is not so much to find ways of encouraging more, increase overall hours of work, but find a way of making it easier for employers to offer part time employment or what they call a-typical employment, to attract more people into work and do more work sharing, as it were. Okay, let me now change topic and move on to the distribution of employment, and in particular which sectors are creating jobs. And what I’m going to do is to look behind the aggregate figures and see where the biggest failures are in Europe and ask the question: Is that because of taxes or regulation? And in particular the question is: Does Europe tax too much and does it push work to the home or to self-help rather than in the market? Now, here I’m showing you a decomposition of the economy into six or seven, seven sectors rather. I mean, it might look complicated there and seem, the acronyms below may not be very easy to read. What I want to draw your attention to, though, is that - this here is the gap between United States and Eurozone, and of course the focus will be on these three sectors here, where the biggest gaps are. It’s about a hundred hours a year, as you can see there. The other four sectors, which is public administration, manufacturing is the brown line, agriculture and community services. We’re more or less at the same level. So the main differences are in these three sectors I pointed out, and I classified the sectors in the following way. The first one is trade hotels and restaurants, they’re mainly services provided directly to the public, the biggest sector in the first one is retail trade, the biggest employment sector is retail trade. The second one is finance/insurance/real estate and this is mainly employment where it’s business to business provision of services. The final one, sort of health and education, which is mainly sort of service for self improvement, you know, we get better educated or better health. Now, in the second one, in finance/insurance/real estate, you might think that the biggest gap, or at least the growth of the gap recently, is in computing or finance because so much, there is so much finance going on in the United States. In fact that is not true, the biggest difference between Europe and America in that sector is in the host of jobs that are completely unspecified in the statistics. It’s usually called ‘business services, not elsewhere classified’ and that would include accountants, expert advisors, outside people who have brought in the business, going out to get help, whereas in Europe a lot is done within the company and it’s done by the same people where they switch jobs from one to the other. There is much more specialisation in the States in business with a lot of outside work being used. And here you can see the gaps. Now, this first column is, it says real estate etc, but in fact what drives it is the business services that I just mentioned. And then the second biggest gap is in education, health, finance, retail, hotels, restaurants and catering, maintenance of motor vehicles and wholesale trade, where America has been a lot better than Europe in job creation. Okay, let me give you an evaluation of the figures you’ve just seen. Now, about one third of the overall gap is in sectors that have home production subsidies. I’m going to talk a little bit more about that, but it’s about health care, you know, for example, if you need, if you’re not well you might call the nurse to look after you, you might go and see a doctor or you might stay home until you recover if it’s not a serious illness. That’s what I call home subsidy. You might stay home and ask your partner or your children or someone to come in and take care of you or your might call a nurse or you might see a doctor. Retail trade, again I’ll talk a little bit more about it. You might go to a shop that has lots of assistants, you get served quickly, you leave. Or you might go into a shop that doesn’t have many assistants and you line up for hours to get served. Same for hotels and restaurants. You eat at home or you go to the restaurant, motor vehicle and maintenance, you spend hours trying to sort out why your car wouldn’t start in the morning or you just call an engineer and he comes and does it for you. Now, another third of the gap is explained by business services which I explain is mainly finance, accountants, consultants, financial advisors and so on. And the final third is in education and specialised health, like hospitals. They are more or less the same, it is about a third each one that the gap is there, so when we’re talking about job creation then those are the cases that you should look at. Let’s first look at market home substitution. Now if that’s important in explaining why there aren’t enough jobs being created in Europe in these sectors, then what we should be looking at mainly is, is childcare: Why do we look after children at home in Europe? And then retail trade: Why aren’t there more retail assistants in Europe than we have? Now with retail trade, regulations like minimum wage are extremely important because retail assistants usually are paid, get paid very low, very little. And then that probably applies also to motor maintenance and fuel sales, hotels and so on, but it’s mainly retail trade. Now, how does this work? I mention it because some of you may not have come across before. Now, households, you know, people spend their time in a variety of ways and the most convenient way of dividing this here is into three types of users. One is leisure, leisure time - or leisure if you like, for American colleagues – where what we define as leisure time is time you spend, that you actually enjoy the time you spend. Like if you’re watching television, you’re enjoying your time watching television. Or if you are talking to a friend, you’re enjoying the time that you’re making that conversation. And that should be contrasted with what you might call home production, where you are doing things for your own benefit at home or outside the home, where you don’t like the time that you spend doing it but you like the output of that good. And shopping is like that, you know like, most people don’t enjoy shopping as such, what they enjoy is the consumption of the goods that they buy. Same goes with cooking, you know, you don’t enjoy cooking, standing in a hot kitchen, but you enjoy the food if you’ve done a good job. So that is home production time. Then, other tasks of course, these are the things that we go and buy in the market, you know, you work in the market for a wage. That’s a use of your time, which is market use. Now, a lot of the tasks that are about home production, like shopping and cooking, they could be marketised, in other words rather than doing them yourself, rather than you spending your time doing it, then you let someone else do it and you let someone else do it and you buy the product which is close enough to what you have done. Rather than cooking at home you could go to a restaurant and eat, or you could ask a chef to cook for you and bring you that home, a caterer to bring it to your home. And that’s called the marketisation of work. Now, the claim that we make here - and I should say that this work followed the rather controversial short paper that Ed Prescott has written a few years ago - the claim made is that if you tax market work a lot, then people will switch their activities from the market to the home. They will marketise a lot less, you are going to do your own gardening, you are going to mow your lawn yourself, you are going to go to a shop like IKEA that doesn’t have assistants and you stand there for hours to buy your furniture, and you have to carry them on your shoulders maybe, and when you think you’ve succeeded and you’ve found what you want and you go to pay, you see a line that extends up to the end of the wall and you spend another hour doing it. Alternatively, I guess you may know of Harrods, you know, you could go and buy a similar thing in Harrods and you are in and out within fifteen minutes but you’re worse off, at least three times as much. That’s called marketising that time, the time that you spend queuing up in Ikea, you’ve given it to the successor of Mr. Al Fayed. I don’t know who actually bought Harrods from Mr. Al Fayed, but I know he doesn’t own it anymore. Now, if we look at total work. Now, here I’m adding market and home from time use surveys, then there is a lot of variation. I don’t know why Portugal comes out as the most hard working country with data, I’m assuming that there is something wrong with the survey, but there isn’t. I have checked it and double checked it on our Portuguese colleagues. The other countries are not so much of a surprise you know, like Japan, Sweden, Australia, Canada, United States, work a lot harder than Germany, Finland, France, Belgium and Netherlands, which are at the other end. The countries that are missing from here haven’t done a time use survey, so I can’t compare with Greece, Poland and the other countries that were at the low end before. Now what’s interesting, though, is that even within this context of total work, countries marketise differently, this is the share of market hours of all the hours of total work. The countries are marketised most, that do most things outside the home are the Asian countries, Japan and Korea. Countries that marketise less are Italy, Germany, Belgium. I was surprised to see Germany there. I’m not surprised to see France and Italy because they do like doing things at home, like especially child care. In fact, the biggest contrast between Italy and Sweden, which should be to the left, marketising a lot more, Denmark and all that, comes out in a recent survey that I’ve seen about asking young mothers whether they would trust their children to a child care centre outside, even if you subsidise them, of course the Swedish always, and the Scandinavians generally said I wouldn’t have my child be looked after by anyone else because the state is doing such a good job providing childminders outside. And when they asked the Italians they said I wouldn’t trust the state to look after my child, my mother is much better at this job. And therefore they do the childcare at home. That’s what explains the biggest difference in marketisation that a lot more things are done at home in Italy than in Denmark for example, or Sweden. In Belgium there is very little work anywhere, either market or home. Now, here is a sort of a general picture of ‘Does taxation play a role in the marketisation of work?’. This is a claim that Ed Prescott was making, for example, and the answer is that it seems, seems so. Countries that tax more heavily, which is the left figure, work less, take more leisure. That’s the way you should read the left feature, they spend more time watching television, for example, or talking to friends. In addition to that, countries that tax more, marketise less. They do more work at home. I mean, there are one or two outliers, but the whole trend is like that, you know. You can see on the marketisation graph, for example, you see that here, these are countries, Sweden and Finland are countries that tax a lot because this is one minus the tax. And they marketise very little, they do a lot of things at home. But then look at Japan, Korea, United States, they tax much less and they do things in the market rather than at home. Okay, that completes the first third of where job creation would be. The next one is in business services. And business services, again, there are a lot more business services being created in the United States. Here the main difference is that in Europe our campaigners seem to be doing a lot of things that could be done outside. They do it internally from the same people. They don’t use specialised advisors or accountants or anything people might do. You know, the manager of a small company in Europe might do his own accounts or his or her own tax returns, and that’s where we fail here. And I suspect again here the reason is that it’s not so easy to set up companies in Europe, there is a lot of product market regulation. If you look at the OECD index of product market regulation, here, there is a lot of product market regulation and regulation of small companies in Europe than there is in America, and maybe that is why we’re not setting them up. So again here you could say that it’s regulation of the business environment that is stopping more job creation, that will create these additional businesses. And finally, the third sector, which is education and health. Now, here it’s our biggest failure, we’re going to talk about this in the panel after lunch as well, because we have ageing populations and in America there’s been a lot of growth of jobs, especially in the health sector. In Europe there has been very little growth of jobs in the health sector, despite the fact that we have a more ageing population, and of course the main feature of these jobs in Europe is that they’re mainly funded by the State. Health is mainly nationalised, education is almost exclusively nationalised. So if we are going to pay for creation in these jobs, then we have some very difficult decisions to make and here is where I said that Sweden does things differently. What you see there is some contrasting countries. Like in Sweden for example, taxes generally are very high and that’s why you saw that low marketisation of activities like retailing and hotels and restaurants, you know. I mentioned IKEA before and it’s not a coincidence that IKEA is a Swedish company. How can you find a way of minimising the number of employees and getting people out to buy and, you know, letting them queue. But the other feature of Sweden is that a large fraction of that tax revenue is used to create jobs in health and education, and as you can see, it outperforms even the United States in job creation in those sectors. Then the United States is a much freer economy, both in education and health and you can see a lot of job creation again there. The Eurozone is the other extreme where it doesn’t encourage so much the private job creation in these sectors, but at the same time it doesn’t subsidise them very much. So it’s a really bad performer, as far as job creation there is concerned, whereas the United Kingdom, and I thought I should mention one of my two countries here, the United Kingdom, at least since the 1980s there has been a lot of encouragement of private job creation, both in health and education, but at the same time subsidisation is continuing at fairly high rates and you can see that it’s doing a fairly good amount of job creation in those sectors. In fact, around early 1980s, the UK and the Eurozone were at about the same level in the job creation, so this jump in the red columns that you see is one that’s taken place since the liberalisation and the encouragement of private job creation in these sectors. So if I should conclude, you’re probably thinking that I’m depriving you of your lunch but don’t worry, there isn’t much left to go. In terms of our targets that we set in Europe, we’re still lagging behind America. Had we done the same as America, we would have satisfied our targets, it seems that taxation and regulation, and especially at the lower end of the jobs market, is affecting the job creation. I should say that most of the recent research on this has focused on the market home substitution between Europe and America, the retailing example that I mentioned. But that accounts maybe for about a third of the gap. We really need new models of employment in business services, you know, whether you provide the business services internally or externally and why and what’s the difference and how does regulation affect this job creation in the business sector. Then we’ll be able to account for the second third in our failures in job creation over here, and finally, I shouldn’t say too much about that because we’re going to talk about it after lunch. But finally, the final third in the gap is sectors where in Europe we rely a lot on state financing. We’ve got a lot of debts as well and we have to come to terms on how are we going to move forward in those sectors and we haven’t really done that yet. Okay, thank you very much. That’s the end.

Christopher Pissarides on private job creation in Europe
(00:27:46 - 00:30:13)

Peter Diamond’s studies on labor market equilibrium modeling focus on questions of search and matching – the interrelations and quality of matches between unemployment and job vacancies[5]. Over the last two decades, as the 2010 recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in accordance with his co-recipient Christopher Pissarides notes, there has been a large percentage of U.S. job creation from one business quarter to the next. However, the rate of U.S. job creation and job destruction has been almost equally high during this period and the same applies to the difference between the hiring rate and the rate of separation. When analyzing the dynamics of the labor market with respect to efficient ways of job creation, Peter Diamond stresses the determinants of job creation and job destruction and how these processes interrelate to produce the small difference between them:

Peter Diamond (2011) - Search and Macro

Thank you, Martin, and I’m happy to say he wrote an outstanding thesis, and I had very little to do with it. When I was a young economist, and you’ve gotten some sense of how long ago that was from what Martin said, I thought that methodology was something old people did when they had nothing better to do. Now that it’s age appropriate, I want to stress to you the importance of methodology. The particular point I want to pick out is, when I was young, I would look at a model and think, is it a good model, is it a bad model? And I now think that’s the wrong way to frame the question, because the same model can be good for one purpose and bad for other purposes. The real question you should ask is: For this question, is this a model that adds to the insight of what we need to address that question, particularly important obviously for policy questions, where you’re going from, to my mind, if you’re doing it right, a number of different theory and empirical models, to drawing together a basis for policy inferences. And you do that because the economy is complex, the political process is complex. The essence of a model in order to be tractable is it’s not reality, it’s a simplification of reality, it gets things wrong. If it’s not getting things wrong, it’s not a model. And the issue is, the things that it’s getting wrong, are those important or unimportant for the particular question you’re asking? I say that because I will talk a little bit about the place where the search equilibrium labour market models are more useful in places where there are missing elements that really matter. So the outline is, first of all, to say a little bit about labour market flows, to give the context for the model, to then switch to the beverage curve which focuses on unemployment and vacancies over a business cycle, and then to talk about issues in macroeconomics generally. So one model that we’re all familiar with is the standard market model. Demand, supply, where price clears the market. The trouble with thinking about the labour market or the housing market from that framework is that the markets don’t clear in quite the same sense that the standard model has. So at any point in time, in any small area, you have unemployed workers, you have vacancies. Does that mean the market doesn’t clear? Well, in the market context, not clearing you would say the wage is wrong, the wage is too high or the wage is too low. There isn’t, within the context of that model, a different way of talking about what is going on. So just to bring out the magnitudes here, this is data from the US economy. Monthly worker flows, UE is the flow of workers from unemployment to employment, and as you see, based over a two decade period, a very large fraction of measured unemployed workers have jobs a month later. Interestingly, an almost as large fraction of unemployed workers are out of the labour force, I for Inactive a month later, given the official definition of what it means to be unemployed, which means actively doing something to find a job, not just wishing you had a job. And there’s quite a sizeable flow directly from out of the labour market, directly into employment, without a measured period of unemployment in between. I emphasise that because you’re interviewing people a month apart. It may be somebody started looking for a job, was not interviewed during that period and then found a job. On the other hand, there’s a good deal of direct flows that don’t go through looking for a job. Rather an opportunity finds you and you say because somebody has just made me an offer I can’t refuse’. And similarly there are large flows directly from employment to unemployment and out of the labour force. And one has to think about all of this in order to think about particularly the role of unemployment insurance, and in doing that, the supply demand price clears the market model, doesn’t really capture it. One can fit some unemployment into the model and of course the Lucas-Prescott model is very famous for that, but all the unemployment there was movement between different local markets, where the wage cleared the market. So there were never people applying for jobs and not getting them. There were people deciding the opportunities were better elsewhere, and that model also had the property that analogous to the Walrasian auctioneer, there was somebody directing the flows to the right places between markets. So that model, I think, really expanded some of our understanding of fitting some frictions into the Arrow-Debreu setting, but it doesn’t come to grips with the kind of issues there. The US has very high labour flows, much higher than any of the other economies, as really shown by this picture contrasting this. The first slide was really a three-state model, employed, unemployed, inactive. This second slide here is only two with inflows and outflows to unemployment, without breaking it down more heavily, the US is clearly an outlier. In the US we have some wonderful data referred to by its acronym, the JOLTS data, which is looking at flows from the perspective of the employers, interviewing the employers, rather than interviewing the workers. So you interview an employer and you say: And then you come back, and in this case a quarter later, and you say: And what happens when you do that is that if it’s gone up, natural to call it ‘job creation’. And as you see again, over the two decades for which this data has existed, there’s a large percentage of job creation from one quarter to the next. If instead, what has happened is the number of employed workers has gone down, natural to call that ‘job destruction’. And as you can see, there is almost as large a rate of job destruction as there is of job creation. So the change in total employment is the small difference between two large numbers. And if we want to think about various policies or want to think about various positive issues, then it seems to me you’ve got to focus on the determinants of these big numbers and how they interact to produce the small number, which is the difference between them. Secondly you can ask the question, how much hiring do you do? Hiring comes in two forms, one is job creation. The other is a worker leaves, maybe voluntarily, maybe looking for a better opportunity, maybe for other reasons, and you replace that worker with another worker. Maybe you dismissed the worker and you’ve replaced it. So a hire is just on a name basis, who do you have now that you didn’t have a quarter before? And as you can see, the hire rate is roughly twice the job creation rate, which gives you another sense of the large amount of flows going on in the economy. And separations is asking the same question. Who was here before, who isn’t here now? And again you see the separation rate and the hire rate are two very large numbers and the change in employment is the small difference between them. And as you can see, the big sources of separations are lay-offs and quits, on average they’re about the same size. In the course of the business cycle, there are dramatic differences between them, with lay offs spiking up early in a recession, and quits dropping as workers who quit either for a better job or in anticipation of finding a better job, recognise that the labour market is going soft, and those opportunities won’t be there. The sum of the two may not change a whole lot, but that doesn’t mean the underlying story isn’t telling us something important. Obviously when lay offs are way up and quits are way down, we’ve got a problem on the value. Two firms of hiring work, of having workers, and also we have a change in the perception, which is mostly accurate, of workers for their opportunities, should they seek additional employment. So the basic partial equilibrium model of the labour market, that is the heart of what this year’s or, I guess I can say this year’s until October, this year’s Nobel Prize was about, was really paying attention to the models that lead us to think about these flows. To think about the process of bringing together workers and jobs and the technical fix that has made modelling work is the matching function. The matching function thought about for the economy as a whole, says the change, the amount of hiring happening is a function of the number of unemployed workers and the number of vacancies. Vacancies again measured by, it used to be measured by looking at help wanted ads, before we had a survey, and now we have a survey that asks firms ‘Do you have a vacancy?’. And so we can fit an aggregate matching function. It fits pretty well. It fits ballpark as well as the aggregate production function and plays the same kind of role. The function, as far as we can tell, as constant returns to scale, and as work that Chris Pissarides has done with co-authors summarising and a lot of other estimates as well, Cobb Douglas fits fairly well. This doesn’t need to be something complex for thinking about the economy as a whole. And let me stress that, it’s for thinking about the economy as a whole, because if you have a question for which the answer involves looking more closely by industry or by aspects of firms, then the aggregate matching function may not be terribly informative. So one of the items that has gotten a lot of attention is that the matching function has deteriorated, and this particularly came up in the context here of the beverage curve. The beverage curve gives the vacancy rate relative to the unemployment rate and given the constant returns to scale we can work in these rates. And what you would expect if the value of workers to firms deteriorates over time, we would see a decline in vacancies arise in unemployment, and that’s the typical pattern. And what happened in the US economy is vacancy rates started coming back without much change in unemployment. And that led a number of people to say we have a serious structural problem in the US economy. And a structural problem is something that aggregate demand stimulation, whether monetary or fiscal, does not do well at, and therefore we should be very cautious about stimulating. Inflation is obviously a major concern of central banks, and the mix between how much are we addressing inadequate aggregate demand unemployment and how much are we addressing what might be a structural problem, is a critical part of setting monetary policy. Without studying the labour market, you cannot sensibly pursue monetary policy, particularly in the context of the US, where the official mandate of the Fed is to pay attention both to employment and inflation, and frankly, it strikes me as shocking that the mandates of so many central banks are only about inflation. And a relief that most of them view their role no different than in the US, the Fed views its role that the extent of concern goes beyond inflation, and that’s appropriate because to begin with, we don’t have a well settled optimal rate of inflation. Two percent or a bit under two percent is the typical target, where did that come from? Well, zero seems like a bad idea. Big numbers we know are a bad idea, so let’s pick a nice round small number, but is two better than three? I don’t think we have any idea of that. Olivier Blanchard has raised the idea that four might be better, not for the microeconomics of the steady state or normal times, let us say, for which inflation helps with things, but for dealing with financial crisis because they will give central banks more room, less likelihood of hitting the zero bound on interest rates. The timing of that suggestion may not have been optimal, but it seems to me absolutely right that there is nothing that says two percent is the right answer and nothing that says, a central bank that sometimes says two percent and sometimes says for the next few years we would be comfortable with three percent, nothing wrong with that. It might be a good response to circumstances, as long as credibility is preserved that that two or that three doesn’t become double digits, or doesn’t even become eight or nine, much less hyperinflation, in terms of the role of the central bank in having inflation, not create problems for the economy. Of course, in some circumstances, having inflation may help with things like debt overhang, but how much inflation, I think, is again an area where we don’t have a good answer. So I think we want to think about this process, as the central bank is addressing the economy. The economy keeping a steady inflation rate is an important part of planning, looking ahead, writing contracts etc, and the state of the labour market is important for two reasons. One the normative reason, a lot of unemployment is bad, bad for the workers, bad for the economy, bad for the workers’ families, bad for the future, particularly with long term unemployed of the labour market later on, as workers maybe losing skills, losing connections, etc. So there’s a need for central banks to pay attention for the normative reason, and on the positive side, estimating what will happen with more stimulus, depends again on the details of the labour market. So what’s happened in the US? In this picture is various people, including to my mind, particularly appallingly of the distinguished economist who is the President of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, suggesting that the structural problem was so large that central bank stimulus policies were misguided. There have been a number of studies trying to separate out the excess of US unemployment today, compared to what it was like before the crisis, between inadequate aggregate demand compared to before, and an increase in structural issues. Keep in mind there are always structural issues. There are always new needs by firms for skills of workers that some workers have, some workers don’t have. And the ability to hire workers who fit in well, who don’t need more training, that varies over the business cycle. Obviously firms are eager for workers that they feel better about and have to train less. At MIT, when we hire an assistant professor, we’re very pleased with the ones we hire, but that doesn’t stop us from wishing they were the young Paul Samuelson. The issue here, from the perspective of thinking about monetary policy is what has changed. And I’ve looked through a lot of these studies, and none of them have an adequate basis of really pinning down a number. The ones I’ve looked at most closely seem to me to give structural elements a larger role than the – seems appropriate based on the theoretical perspective. So in so far, as you’re looking at what unemployment insurance does to workers’ willingness to take jobs by reading off historic data on the connection between job finding hazards in unemployment, it’s ignoring the fact of the matching function at a time when you have a lot of unemployment. Just going off that is basically saying employment equals labour supply in the current climate with high unemployment, that’s not going to give you a good estimate. An interesting recent estimate by Barlevy focused on the aggregate matching function. In both cases they turn up that the majority of our excess unemployment is inadequate aggregate demand, and I’m suggesting it’s even too high and part of the issue is if you think about this aggregating, the aggregate matching function, which is a very handy tool for theorists, and a good starting place for empirical work, you’ll recognise as the work of Davis and Haltiwanger and a series of co-authors have been identifying that the matching process is very different in different sectors, in different size firms, in rapidly growing firms who are maybe doing multiple hiring, and slow growing firms that are doing less hiring. And so part of what has happened in the US, part of what is behind that picture there, is that construction is a place where jobs are filled very quickly. Employment has collapsed enormously from the overbuilding stage, both residential and commercial construction. And it’s because of the overhang of excessive building, it’s not coming back quickly, so that in part will be a sustained structural problem, because the level of employment there won’t go back to its previous level, and there is the frictional element of moving people elsewhere. In contrast, the sectors in the US that have done particularly well, education and health, are dominated by large firms and hire very slowly. As I’m sure you’re all aware, the assistant professor market in the US starts with posting a vacancy a year ahead of when anyone will actually get to work. So when you’re collecting vacancy statistics, do you have a vacancy, a great fraction of hiring happens without a measured vacancy, without a measured vacancy. Again as my previous example talking of the work in part, a lot of that is a posted vacancy, it’s filled, that’s happened between interviews, you know you’ve got an extra worker. You missed the measurement of the vacancy, so it looks like it’s happening very efficiently and it is, but the point is when you disaggregate, you have to say, from a perspective of what’s going on here, how much of this is due to the fact that the sectoral mix has changed, that the employer’s size has changed, small businesses doing particularly badly, because small banks are doing badly and they’re not lending as much, because a lot of small business depends on own wealth and a lot of that has been in housing and is now gone, and small business hires, fills vacancies much more quickly than large business does, where there’ll be a group who monitors the whole hiring process and goes through a series of steps. So there’s a whole set of issues, before you draw inferences about macro that you really want to do two things, make sure you’re not using a partial equilibrium model for a general equilibrium question. And secondly, working at the right level of disaggregation to inform the question you’re interested in. So let me just say a little bit here about macro and the problems of getting same kind of dynamics that I think, and I guess the Price committee thinks as well, we have made a lot of progress in, in terms of the labour market. There is a big literature on the housing market, I think that’s a harder problem because of the much larger role of finance in house purchases. So there is an informative interesting literature there as well, and thinking about the economy as a whole. So what’s been happening lately is the search labour market model is being embedded in a model that otherwise has a standard market clearing output market, and often one, where there is no particular role for short term finances. So if you have an infinite horizon budget constraint for a representative agent, then you’re missing all of one of the pieces Keynes talked about, which is the importance of current income for current spending, and indeed, disaggregated studies show there are a lot of people who are liquidity constrained, there is a lot of empirical link between income and spending on the part of a large fraction, but certainly by no means all of the consumers in the economy. What do we mean, so the two pillars of the kind of Keynes’ analysis I was taught as a student are sticky wages and prices, and the important role of income and so employment feeding back into aggregate demand. So if you’re thinking about unemployment insurance, and you have no role for unemployment insurance as a built in stabiliser, you’re leaving out a major part of the story. You can provide good insight into part of the story, but it would be wrong to draw policy inferences from just that part, without paying attention to the other parts. So sticky wages and prices, there is an ongoing effort to move away from assuming that all of the negotiations are successful, that recognise, particularly if you have multiple employees, that there are issues on how you’re paying new hires, relative to how you pay current workers, and issues about how you want to pay current workers. So there is a sticky wage problem there. Sticky prices looks like it’s not the same thing, but there is a related issue which is that firms have financial constraints, they’re going to do their pricing, if they could cut the prices enough to sell a lot more but not be able to pay off their debts or their workers, it’s not going to help. So there is the issue here of the dynamic process, in the output market which I’m not aware that we have, we have good pricing. I think we need to have income and demand come into it. We need to recognise that markets are incomplete, that many people don’t have a complex conditional plan on circumstances going forward, but looks good today and we’ll figure out tomorrow tomorrow. That’s missing by and large in all models, and so bankruptcy has played very little role in general equilibrium analyses, and yet it’s obviously an important part, particularly when you move to the macro dimension. If markets were incomplete and people were never allowed to have a positive probability of bankruptcy, we would have a disastrously bad economy. Allowing people to go bankrupt opens up, as it were, a richer set of assets. We could have pairwise negotiation that worked out all those alternatives without bankruptcy law, but first of all that would be expense on an individual each contract basis trying to figure it out, and secondly we have the dynamic problem that even small businesses are owing money to lots of different people, the people they borrow from, their suppliers, their workers etc. So we need some process for dealing with the interactions that come from the fact that, unlike the Arrow-Debreu model, trading plans are made sequentially with uncertainty about what opportunities you’ll have in the future. And so expectation formation and the magic word ‘confidence’ has a reduced form for expectation formation, plays an important role. If we’re going to build on search to get a better handle on macro, and I’d like to think that would be a good way, one of several, to be trying to get a better handle on macro, then I think we need to move beyond the partial equilibrium and do much more general equilibrium thinking, which is going to be inherently more difficult because of the additional complexities. But the advantage of being young is you look at things that people have been staring at for years and have run out of ideas on, and you have new ideas. And apart from the pay I’d love to be a young economist again, and I wish you well in helping our profession and our economies go forward. Thank you.

Vielen Dank, Martin. Er hat übrigens eine hervorragende Dissertation geschrieben - ich hatte so gut wie keine Arbeit damit. Als ich noch ein junger Wirtschaftswissenschaftler war – und nach Martins Vortrag können Sie sich ausmalen, wie lange das schon her ist – damals jedenfalls dachte ich, mit Methodik beschäftigen sich nur alte Leute, die nichts Besseres zu tun haben. Heute nun, wo es meinem Alter angemessen ist, möchte ich betonen, wie bedeutsam Methodik ist. Ein spezieller Punkt ist mir besonders wichtig: In meinen jungen Jahren habe ich Modelle angeschaut und mich jeweils gefragt, ob dies ein gutes oder ein schlechtes Modell ist. Heute denke ich dagegen, dass die Frage in dieser Form gar nicht sinnvoll ist, weil ein bestimmtes Modell für den einen Zweck gut und für einen anderen Zweck schlecht geeignet sein kann. Die Frage muss daher eher lauten: Trägt dieses Modell bei dieser speziellen Problemstellung etwas zum notwendigen Verständnis bei, um das Problem lösen zu können? Besonders wichtig ist dies bei politischen Fragestellungen, wo Sie – wenn Sie es richtig machen wollen – von mehreren verschiedenen theoretischen und empirischen Modellen ausgehen und daraus ein Konzept ableiten, aus dem dann politische Schlussfolgerungen zu ziehen sind. Das macht man so, weil das Wirtschaftsleben und politische Prozesse sehr komplex sind. Das Wesentliche für die praktische Eignung eines Modells ist, dass es nicht die Realität eins zu eins abbildet, sondern eine Vereinfachung der Realität darstellt. Aus diesem Grund enthält ein Modell immer Fehler. Wenn es keine Fehler enthält, ist es kein Modell. Entscheidend ist nur, ob diese Fehler im Hinblick auf die untersuchte Fragestellung bedeutend oder unbedeutend sind. Ich erwähne dies, weil ich näher darauf eingehen möchte, unter welchen Bedingungen Suchgleichgewichtsmodelle für Arbeitsmärkte geeignet sind, und in welchen Fällen ihnen dagegen entscheidende Elemente fehlen. Mein Vortrag gliedert sich wie folgt: zunächst spreche ich ein wenig über Arbeitskräftefluktuation, um den relevanten Modellkontext zu beschreiben, und anschließend gehe ich über zur Beveridge-Kurve, die den Verlauf von Arbeitslosigkeit und freien Stellen über den Konjunkturzyklus darstellt, bevor ich abschließend noch auf ein paar allgemeine Makro-Aspekte eingehe. Ein Modell, das wir alle kennen, ist das Standard-Marktmodell: Angebot und Nachfrage, und der Gleichgewichtspreis räumt den Markt. Wenn man auf dieser Grundlage nun aber den Arbeitsmarkt oder den Wohnungsmarkt betrachtet, ergibt sich das Problem, dass diese Märkte nicht auf dieselbe Weise geräumt werden wie beim Standardmodell. Zu jedem Zeitpunkt und in jeder noch so kleinen Region gibt es immer Arbeitslose und freie Stellen. Heißt das, dass der Markt nicht geräumt wird? Bei einer Interpretation nach dem Standard-Marktmodell würde das bedeuten, dass das Gehalt nicht stimmt, d.h. entweder zu hoch oder zu niedrig ist. Das Standardmodell enthält keine andere Betrachtungsmöglichkeit für das Marktgeschehen. Um die Größenordnungen einmal zu verdeutlichen, habe ich hier einige Wirtschaftsdaten aus den USA. Dies sind monatliche Arbeitskräftefluktuationen, „UE“ steht für die Fluktuation aus der Arbeitslosigkeit in eine Beschäftigung. Wie Sie sehen, hat über einen 20-jährigen Zeitraum betrachtet ein sehr großer Anteil der registrierten Arbeitslosen im darauffolgenden Monat schon wieder eine Beschäftigung. Und interessanterweise ist ein fast genauso großer Anteil der Arbeitslosen im darauffolgenden Monat aus dem Erwerbsleben ausgeschieden, „I“ steht für „Inaktiv“. Diese Angaben basieren auf der offiziellen Definition von Arbeitslosigkeit, d.h. aktiv auf Arbeitssuche zu sein und nicht nur den Wunsch auf eine Beschäftigung zu haben. Daneben gibt es hier auch eine beachtliche Fluktuation aus der Nicht-Erwerbstätigkeit direkt in eine Beschäftigung ohne eine vorherige Registrierung als arbeitslos. Ich betone das, weil die Befragungen im Abstand von einem Monat stattfinden. Es ist auch möglich, dass jemand mit der Stellensuche beginnt und sofort eine Beschäftigung findet, noch bevor er bzw. sie das nächste Mal befragt wird. Andererseits gibt es auch eine direkte Fluktuation in die Beschäftigung ohne vorherige Arbeitssuche, wenn man sozusagen von einer Beschäftigungs-möglichkeit überrascht wird und sich sagt: Gut, dann hänge ich jetzt nicht mehr länger auf den Parkbänken am Bodensee herum und gehe stattdessen arbeiten, dieses Stellenangebot kann ich mir nicht entgehen lassen. Und gleichzeitig gibt es auch eine beträchtliche Fluktuation direkt aus der Beschäftigung in die Arbeitslosigkeit und in die Nicht-Erwerbstätigkeit. Dies alles muss man berücksichtigen, vor allem wenn man die Bedeutung einer Arbeitslosenversicherung untersuchen will. In diesem Fall liefert das Marktmodell „Angebot – Nachfrage – Markträumung über den Preis“ kein geeignetes Abbild der Realität. Man kann zwar ein gewisses Maß an Arbeitslosigkeit in das Modell einbauen – dafür ist vor allem das Lucas-Prescott-Modell bekannt. Hier gab es bei Arbeitslosigkeit Fluktuationen zwischen verschiedenen lokalen Märkten, bei denen immer das Gehalt zur Markträumung führte. Es berücksichtigte nicht die Möglichkeit, dass sich Arbeitskräfte auf Stellen bewarben und sie nicht bekamen, sondern es war immer ihr Entschluss, dass es anderswo bessere Beschäftigungsmöglichkeiten gäbe. Eine weitere Eigenschaft des Modells war noch, dass es analog zum walrasianischen Auktionator jemanden gab, der die Fluktuationen zwischen den Märkten an die richtigen Stellen dirigierte. Durch dieses Modell haben wir meines Erachtens besser verstanden, dass das Arrow-Debreu-Modell um gewisse Reibungen erweitert werden muss, aber es bekommt diese Probleme nicht in den Griff. In den USA ist die Arbeitskräftefluktuation sehr hoch, viel höher als in irgendeiner anderen Volkswirtschaft, wie in dieser Abbildung zu sehen ist. Auf der ersten Folie hatten wir ein Modell mit drei Zuständen – beschäftigt, arbeitslos, inaktiv. Diese zweite Folie dagegen zeigt nur zwei Zustände, Zu- und Abgänge in die Arbeitslosigkeit, ohne sie weiter zu differenzieren. Die USA sind hier ein klarer Ausreißer. Wir haben in den USA wunderbare Daten, die sogenannten JOLTS-Daten, die diese Fluktuationen aus Arbeitgeberperspektive darstellen, d.h. hier werden anstelle der Arbeitskräfte die Arbeitgeber befragt. Man fragt sie: Und nach einem Quartal geht man erneut hin und fragt wieder: Wenn die angegebene Zahl steigt, nennt man das „Schaffung von Arbeitsplätzen“. Und Sie sehen, dass während der gesamten 20 Jahre, seit denen es diese Daten gibt, in jedem Quartal ein ganz schöner Prozentsatz an neuen Stellen geschaffen wurde. Wenn dagegen die Anzahl der besetzten Stellen sinkt, wird dies „Abbau von Arbeitsplätzen“ genannt. Und wie Sie hier sehen, ist die Rate des Stellenabbaus fast genauso hoch wie die der Stellenschaffung. Die Änderungsrate der Gesamtbeschäftigung ist somit die kleine Differenz zwischen den beiden hohen Einzelbeträgen. Wenn wir nun verschiedene politische Ansätze oder bestimmte positive Themen betrachten wollen, muss man meines Erachtens die Bestimmungsfaktoren dieser beiden hohen Zahlen verstehen und wie sie zusammenwirken, damit der kleine Differenzbetrag zwischen ihnen zustande kommt. Eine andere Möglichkeit besteht darin, die Arbeitgeber zu fragen: eine zur Stellenschaffung und die andere zur Ersetzung ausscheidender Arbeitskräfte, die vielleicht freiwillig, auf der Suche nach einer besseren Möglichkeit, oder aus anderen Gründen das Unternehmen verlassen. Oder ein Arbeitnehmer wird entlassen und durch einen neuen ersetzt. Die Neueinstellungen werden sozusagen auf Namensbasis erfasst, d.h. wer ist heute im Unternehmen, der bzw. die vor einem Quartal noch nicht da war. Sie erkennen hier, dass die Neueinstellungen etwa doppelt so hoch wie die Stellenschaffungen sind. Dadurch erhält man ein Gespür dafür, wie hoch die Arbeitskräftefluktuationen in einer Volkswirtschaft sind. Für das Ausscheiden von Arbeitnehmern wird dieselbe Frage gestellt: Wer war vor einem Quartal noch da und ist heute nicht mehr im Unternehmen? Hier ist es wieder genauso wie oben: Neueinstellungen und Ausscheidende Arbeitskräfte sind zwei sehr hohe Einzelzahlen, und der kleine Differenzbetrag zwischen beiden entspricht der Beschäftigungsveränderung. Die Hauptursache für das Ausscheiden von Arbeitskräften sind Entlassungen und Kündigungen, sie halten sich im Durchschnitt etwa die Waage. Im Verlauf eines Konjunkturzyklus gibt es allerdings enorme Abweichungen zwischen den beiden Größen. Zu Beginn einer Rezession steigen die Entlassungen stark an, während Kündigungen zurückgehen, da die Arbeitnehmer erkennen, dass der Arbeitsmarkt schwieriger wird und somit ihre Chancen sinken, eine bessere Stelle zu finden. Auch wenn sich also die Summe aus Entlassungen und Kündigungen vielleicht nur wenig ändert, kann man also den Daten eine Ebene tiefer dennoch wichtige Informationen entnehmen. Bei sehr hohen Entlassungen und sehr niedrigen Kündigungen haben wir natürlich ein Wertproblem. Zwei Unternehmen, die Arbeitnehmer einstellen und beschäftigen – und auch auf Seiten der Arbeitnehmer gibt es eine relativ realistische Wahrnehmungsverschiebung hinsichtlich ihrer Chancen bei der Suche nach einer anderen Stelle. Das grundlegende partielle Gleichgewichtsmodell des Arbeitsmarktes – und das ist übrigens, worum es im Kern beim diesjährigen, oder vielleicht sollte ich sagen bis diesen Oktober, beim diesjährigen Nobelpreis ging – hier lag der Schwerpunkt auf Modellen, mit deren Hilfe wir diese Fluktuationen - bzw. den Prozess, der Arbeitskräfte und Stellen zusammenbringt - besser analysieren können. Der technische Kniff, der hier zu funktionierenden Modellen geführt hat, war die Matching-Funktion. Die Matching-Funktion betrachtet auf Ebene einer gesamten Volkswirtschaft die Anzahl von Neueinstellungen als eine Funktion der Anzahl von arbeitslosen Arbeitskräften und offenen Stellen. Früher wurde die Anzahl offener Stellen noch über die „Gesucht“-Anzeigen erfasst, aber heute haben wir dafür Umfragen, bei denen Unternehmen zur Anzahl ihrer offenen Stellen befragt werden. Auf diese Weise können wir eine aggregierte Matching-Funktion erstellen. Sie passt ziemlich gut, in etwa genauso gut wie die aggregierte Produktionsfunktion, und spielt auch eine ähnliche Rolle wie sie. Soweit wir sagen können, hat die Funktion konstante Skalenerträge, und wie auch die Arbeit von Chris Pissarides und seinen Co-Autoren sowie viele andere Schätzungen bestätigen, scheint die Cobb-Douglas-Funktion ziemlich gut zu passen. Man braucht nicht unbedingt ein komplexes Modell, um eine Volkswirtschaft als Ganzes zu betrachten, und ich möchte betonen, dass bei der Matching-Funktion die Volkswirtschaft als Ganzes betrachtet wird. Wenn Sie dagegen eine Fragestellung haben, zu deren Beantwortung Sie stärker den Industriesektor oder einzelne Unternehmen berücksichtigen müssen, ist die aggregierte Matching-Funktion wahrscheinlich nicht sehr geeignet. Besonders viel Beachtung wurde der Tatsache geschenkt, dass die Matching-Funktion einen Abwärtstrend zeigt, was vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Beveridge-Kurve aufgekommen ist. Die Beveridge-Kurve zeigt die Rate offener Stellen im Verhältnis zur Arbeitslosenrate. Da wir konstante Skalenerträge haben, können wir mit diesen Raten arbeiten. Wenn also der Wert von Arbeitskräften gegenüber Unternehmen im Zeitverlauf sinkt, würde man eigentlich einen Rückgang der offenen Stellen bei Arbeitslosigkeit erwarten, das entspricht dem typischen Muster. In der US-Wirtschaft war dagegen zu beobachten, dass die Anzahl offener Stellen wieder anstieg, ohne dass sich die Arbeitslosigkeit nennenswert veränderte. Dies veranlasste einige Fachleute zur Schlussfolgerung, in der US-Wirtschaft bestehe ein ernsthaftes strukturelles Problem. Im Fall eines strukturellen Problems ist eine allgemeine Nachfragestimulierung, egal ob mit monetären oder fiskalpolitischen Mitteln, nicht hilfreich, so dass man sehr vorsichtig mit stimulierenden Maßnahmen sein sollte. Die Zentralbanken sorgen sich natürlich um die Inflation, und eine kritische Frage für die Geldpolitik ist, die richtige Mischung zu finden zwischen Einflussnahme auf die gestörte Beziehung zwischen aggregierter Nachfrage und Arbeitslosigkeit einerseits und auf das angenommene strukturelle Problem andererseits. Ohne Analyse des Arbeitsmarktes ist keine vernünftige Geldpolitik möglich. Das gilt von allem für die USA, wo es sogar zu den offiziellen Aufgaben der Fed gehört, neben der Inflation auch die Beschäftigung im Auge zu haben. Ehrlich gesagt finde ich es schockierend, dass sich das Mandat so vieler Zentralbanken nur auf die Inflation beschränkt deren Rolle über die Inflation hinausgeht. Das ist alleine schon deshalb richtig, weil es gar keine allgemeingültige optimale Inflationsrate gibt. Das typische Inflationsziel liegt bei zwei Prozent oder knapp darunter – aber woher kommt diese Zahl? Nun, Null erscheint nicht sehr sinnvoll. Und wie wir wissen ist eine hohe Inflation auch nicht sinnvoll, also sollten wir eine schöne runde kleinere Zahl nehmen – aber sind zwei Prozent besser als drei Prozent? Ich würde sagen, wir haben keine Ahnung, was richtig ist. Von Olivier Blanchard stammt die Idee, vielleicht wären vier Prozent besser. Zwar nicht in normalen Zeiten bei stabilen mikroökonomischen Bedingungen, wo Inflation auch helfen kann, aber in finanziellen Krisen, weil dann die Zentralbanken einen größeren Spielraum haben und die Wahrscheinlichkeit verringert wird, dass die Zinsen auf Nullniveau abrutschen. Der Vorschlag kam vielleicht nicht zum idealen Zeitpunkt, aber mir scheint völlig richtig, dass keineswegs feststeht, dass zwei Prozent richtig sind, sondern dass sich eine Zentralbank genauso gut einmal für zwei Prozent entscheiden und ein anderes Mal sagen kann: Für die nächsten Jahre fühlen wir uns mit drei Prozent wohler – daran ist nichts auszusetzen. Das könnte in bestimmten Situationen eine gute Lösung sein, solange die Glaubwürdigkeit gewahrt bleibt, dass aus diesen zwei oder drei Prozent keine acht oder neun Prozent werden, geschweige denn eine Hyperinflation – die Zentralbanken sollen zwar die Inflation steuern, aber schließlich keine zusätzlichen Probleme für die Volkswirtschaft schaffen. Unter bestimmten Bedingungen, wie z.B. bei einem Schuldenüberhang, kann Inflation zwar hilfreich sein – aber wie viel Inflation genau, für diese Frage haben wir schon wieder keine Antwort parat. Meines Erachtens sollten wir den Prozess genauer betrachten, wie die Zentralbank Einfluss auf die Volkswirtschaft nimmt. Die Inflationsrate auf gleichbleibendem Niveau zu halten ist wichtig im Hinblick auf Planung, Zukunftsaussichten, Vertragsabschlüsse usw., und der Zustand des Arbeitsmarktes spielt dabei aus zwei Gründen eine wichtige Rolle. Erstens ist ein normativer Grund, dass eine zu hohe Arbeitslosigkeit schlecht ist – schlecht für die Familien, schlecht für die Zukunft, vor allem durch die steigende Langzeitarbeitslosigkeit, bei der die Arbeitskräfte ihre Fähigkeiten, Kontakte usw. mit der Zeit verlieren. Neben diesen normativen Gründen müssen die Zentralbanken auf der positiven Seite abschätzen, wie sich eine Stimulierung auswirkt - was auch wiederum von den Bedingungen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt abhängig ist. Was ist also in den USA passiert? Hierzu gibt es verschiedenste Standpunkte, einschließlich der aus meiner Sicht erschreckenden Einschätzung eines angesehenen Ökonomen, der zudem Präsident der Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank ist. Nach seiner Meinung ist das strukturelle Problem so gewaltig, dass Stimulierungsmaßnahmen der Zentralbank unsinnig sind. In einer Reihe verschiedener Studien wurde versucht, den heutigen Arbeitslosigkeitsüberhang in den USA gegenüber vor der Krise zu quantifizieren und aufzuteilen auf beiden Faktoren der inadäquaten Gesamtnachfrage im Vergleich zu vor der Krise einerseits und den verstärkten strukturellen Problemen andererseits. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass es immer strukturelle Probleme gibt. Unternehmen stellen von Zeit zu Zeit neue Qualifikationsanforderungen, die von einigen Arbeitskräften erfüllt werden und von anderen nicht. Und die Verfügbarkeit von Arbeitskräften, die die benötigten Anforderungen ohne zusätzliche Ausbildungsmaßnahmen erfüllen, variiert außerdem im Laufe eines Konjunkturzyklus. Natürlich wollen Unternehmen die Arbeitskräfte für sich gewinnen, die ihnen am besten gefallen und möglichst wenig Zusatzausbildung benötigen. Auch wenn wir am MIT eine Assistenzprofessur besetzten, sind wir zwar immer sehr zufrieden mit unserer Entscheidung, aber trotzdem hoffen wir natürlich jedes Mal, einen jungen Paul Samuelson zu finden. Aus Sicht der Geldpolitik ist entscheidend zu verstehen, was genau sich verändert hat. Ich habe mir viele der Studien angeschaut, aber keine von ihnen liefert eine ausreichende Basis, um eine konkrete Zahl abzuleiten. Die Studien neigen eher dazu, strukturellen Faktoren eine wichtigere Rolle beizumessen als es aus theoretischer Sicht gerechtfertigt scheint. Wenn man untersuchen will, wie sich eine Arbeitslosenversicherung auf die Bereitschaft der Arbeitnehmer auswirkt, eine angebotene Stelle anzunehmen, und dazu lediglich historische Daten über bestimmte Probleme bei der Stellensuche von Arbeitslosen heranzieht, werden dabei die Informationen der Matching-Funktion bei hoher Arbeitslosigkeit übersehen. Das ist, als würde man trotz der aktuellen hohen Arbeitslosigkeit einfach sagen, die Beschäftigung entspreche dem Arbeitskräfteangebot – und das führt zu keiner guten Schätzung. Eine interessante Schätzung dagegen wurde kürzlich von Barlevy vorgelegt, bei der er sich auf die aggregierte Matching-Funktion stützt. Beide Studien kommen zu dem Ergebnis, dass die überschüssige Arbeitslosigkeit primär auf die inadäquate Gesamtnachfrage zurückzuführen ist. Ich gehe davon aus, dass sie sogar zu hoch ist und das Problem zum Teil darin besteht sie ist ein sehr nützliches Werkzeug für Theoretiker und bietet auch für empirische Arbeiten eine gute Ausgangsbasis – wie schon die Arbeit von Davis, Haltiwanger und einigen Co-Autoren gezeigt hat, ist der Matching-Prozess in verschiedenen Marktsektoren sehr unterschiedlich, wie z.B. in unterschiedlich großen Unternehmen oder in schnell wachsenden Firmen mit zahlreichen Neueinstellungen im Vergleich zu langsam wachsenden Firmen, die weniger Neueinstellungen haben. Was in den USA unter anderem passiert ist, was sich hinter diesem Bild verbirgt, ist dass speziell im Baugewerbe offene Stellen sehr schnell besetzt werden. Nach dem überzogenen Bauboom im Wohn- wie auch im Gewerbesegment ist die Beschäftigung im Bausektor extrem zurückgegangen. Das liegt jedoch an den zuvor übertrieben hohen Bauaktivitäten, so dass die Beschäftigung in diesem Sektor nicht so schnell wieder steigen wird. Ein nachhaltiges strukturelles Problem wird sich teilweise daraus ergeben, dass die Beschäftigung in diesem Sektor nicht wieder das alte Niveau erreichen wird. Es kommt hier der friktionelle Aspekt ins Spiel, Arbeitskräfte in andere Sektoren umschichten zu müssen. Einen Gegensatz dazu bilden der Ausbildungs- und Gesundheitssektor in den USA, die sich beide überdurchschnittlich stark entwickelt haben. Beide Sektoren werden von Großunternehmen dominiert, die bei Neueinstellungen sehr langsam vorgehen. Ein anderes Beispiel ist der Markt für Assistenzprofessuren in den USA, wo offene Stellen bereits ein Jahr im Voraus ausgeschrieben werden. Im Hinblick auf die Statistik offener Stellen wurde also bei einem großen Anteil aller Neueinstellungen im Vorfeld gar keine offene Stelle erhoben. Wie im obigen Beispiel beschrieben gibt es vielfach ausgeschriebene Stellen, die schon vor der nächsten statistischen Erhebung wieder besetzt sind. Man gibt also an, dass man jemanden neu eingestellt hat, aber die offene Stelle wurde vorher nicht erhoben. Aus diesem Grund sieht es dann nach einem sehr effizienten Prozess aus, und das stimmt grundsätzlich auch. Wenn man allerdings die Daten herunterbricht, um zu sehen was genau dahinter steckt – welches Teilergebnis ist beispielsweise darauf zurückzuführen, dass sich die Sektorenzusammensetzung oder die Unternehmensgröße der Arbeitgeber verändert hat oder dass es kleine Unternehmen besonders schwer haben, dass es den kleinen Banken schlecht geht und sie weniger Kredite vergeben, so dass kleine Unternehmen in hohem Maß von ihren eigenen Finanzreserven abhängig sind, dass vorübergehend viel Geld in den Wohnungsbau gesteckt wurde und jetzt verschwunden ist oder dass kleine Unternehmen offene Stellen viel schneller neu besetzen als Großunternehmen, in denen es eine extra Abteilung gibt, die den gesamten Rekrutierungsprozess überwacht, bei dem mehrere Schritte eingehalten werden müssen. Es sind also eine ganze Reihe verschiedener Faktoren zu untersuchen, bevor man makroökonomische Schlussfolgerungen ziehen kann. Zwei Dinge sind jedoch besonders wichtig: Erstens darf man kein partielles Gleichgewichtsmodell verwenden, wenn sich die untersuchte Fragestellung auf das Gesamtgleichgewicht bezieht, und zweitens muss man sicherstellen, immer auf der richtigen Aggregationsebene in Bezug auf die untersuchte Fragestellung zu arbeiten. Jetzt lassen Sie mich noch auf ein paar Makro-Aspekte eingehen - und auf die Herausforderung, dieselbe Dynamik, bei der wir aus meiner Sicht – und wahrscheinlich auch aus Sicht des Preiskomitees – schon gute Fortschritte erzielt haben, auch auf dem Arbeitsmarkt zu erreichen. Viel Literatur gibt es zum Privatimmobilienmarkt, den ich für noch schwieriger halte, weil beim Hauskauf die Finanzierung eine besonders große Rolle spielt. Es gibt also auch über diesen Bereich informative und interessante Literatur, ebenso wie über die Gesamtwirtschaft im Allgemeinen. In jüngerer Zeit wurde das Arbeitsmarkt-Suchmodell in ein Modell eingebunden, das den Markträumungsmechanismus des Standardmodells hat. Dabei geht es oft um Märkte, auf dem kurzfristige Finanzierung keine große Rolle spielt. Wenn Sie also einen repräsentativen Marktteilnehmer mit einer Budgetrestriktion über einen unendlichen Zeithorizont haben, fehlt Ihnen einer der Aspekte, von denen Keynes gesprochen hat, nämlich die wichtige Rolle des aktuellen Einkommens für die aktuellen Ausgaben. In der Tat zeigen disaggregierte Studien, dass viele Menschen in ihrer Liquidität eingeschränkt sind. Es gibt zwar einen starken empirischen Zusammenhang zwischen Einkommen und Ausgaben in weiten Bevölkerungsteilen, aber keinesfalls bei allen Konsumenten einer Volkswirtschaft. Was meine ich damit? Die beiden Eckpfeiler keynsianischer Analyse, die mir als Student beigebracht wurden, sind zum einen starre Löhne und Preise und zum anderen die wichtige Rolle des Einkommens, wodurch eine Rückkopplung zwischen Beschäftigungsniveau und Gesamtnachfrage entsteht. Wenn Sie also über eine Arbeitslosenversicherung nachdenken, dieser Versicherung aber nicht die Rolle eines integrierten Stabilisierungsfaktors zuweisen, fehlt ein wichtiger Aspekt. Sie können dann gute partielle Erkenntnisse liefern, aber es wäre falsch, politische Schlussfolgerungen nur aus dieser partiellen Sicht zu ziehen, ohne die fehlenden Aspekte zu berücksichtigen. Im Hinblick auf starre Löhne und Preise gibt es Bestrebungen, sich von der Annahme zu lösen, dass alle Verhandlungen erfolgreich abgeschlossen werden, und vor allem, dass sie bei mehreren Angestellten das Problem haben, wie viel Gehalt Sie Ihren neu eingestellten im Vergleich zu Ihren bestehenden Mitarbeitern zahlen bzw. wie viel Sie Ihren bestehenden Mitarbeitern zahlen. Hier gibt es also ein Problem mit starren Löhnen. Bei starren Preisen sieht das zunächst anders aus, allerdings gibt es hier ein ähnliches Problem – und zwar die Tatsache, dass Unternehmen finanziellen Beschränkungen unterliegen. Sie legen ihre Preise fest, aber wenn sie beispielsweise so niedrige Preise wählen, dass sie zwar viel mehr verkaufen, aber von den Einnahmen ihre Schulden und Angestellten nicht mehr bezahlen können, ist das kein gutes Ergebnis. Hier muss man also die Prozessdynamik untersuchen. Auf dem Absatzmarkt sollte es keine Probleme geben, denn wir haben gute Preise, aber aus meiner Sicht müssen wir Einkommen und Nachfrage mit ins Spiel bringen. Wir müssen berücksichtigen, dass Märkte unvollständig sind, dass viele Leute keine ausgetüftelten Entscheidungspläne haben, in denen sie die künftigen Bedingungen berücksichtigen – heute sieht es gut aus, und morgen sehen wir weiter. Das fehlt insgesamt in allen Modellen. So hat beispielsweise auch das Thema Insolvenz in der allgemeinen Gleichgewichtsanalyse kaum eine Rolle gespielt, obwohl Insolvenz natürlich ein wichtiges Element ist, vor allem auf der makroökonomischen Betrachtungsebene. Wenn Märkte unvollständig wären und Individuen niemals eine positive Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Insolvenz haben dürften, hätten wir eine desaströse Wirtschaftswelt. Indem wir Individuen die Möglichkeit zur Insolvenz einräumen, ermöglichen wir gewissermaßen reichhaltigere Vermögenswerte. Wir könnten beispielsweise paarweise Verhandlungen führen, bei denen alle möglichen Alternativen ohne Insolvenzrecht ausgehandelt würden. Aber das ginge erstens auf Kosten des einzelnen, jeden Vertrag individuell aushandeln zu können, und zweitens haben wir das dynamische Problem, dass selbst kleine Unternehmen sehr vielen verschiedenen Parteien Geld schulden – ihren Kreditgebern, Lieferanten, Angestellten usw. Daher brauchen wir einen Prozess für die Interaktionen, die sich daraus ergeben, dass Handelspläne im Gegensatz zum Arrow-Debreu-Modell sequenziell und unter Unsicherheit hinsichtlich der künftigen Möglichkeiten entwickelt werden. Eine wichtige Rolle spielen somit die Erwartungsbildung und das Zauberwort „Vertrauen“ als eine reduzierte Form von Erwartungsbildung. Wenn wir auf die Forschung aufbauen, um ein besseres Verständnis für die Makroprobleme zu bekommen müssen wir über partielle Gleichgewichtsbetrachtungen hinausgehen und zu einer viel allgemeineren Gleichgewichtsanalyse kommen, was aufgrund der zusätzlichen Komplexität natürlich deutlich schwieriger ist. Aber Sie sind noch jung, und das hat den Vorteil, dass Sie mit neuen Ideen an Themen herangehen, über die sich andere schon seit Jahren den Kopf zerbrechen und noch zu keiner Lösung gekommen sind. Abgesehen von meinem Gehalt wäre ich zu gerne heute nochmal ein junger Ökonom, und ich wünsche Ihnen viel Erfolg dabei, unseren Berufsstand und unsere Wirtschaftssysteme weiter voranzutreiben. Vielen Dank.

Peter Diamond on the relation of U.S. job destruction and job creation
(00:08:00 - 00:09:29)

The economic forces behind worker flows into and out of employment, unemployment and the labor force as well as the accompanying matching process are essential for the analysis of job creation and destruction.

Employment and Low Wage Work
A great amount of marketized work occurs in low wage labor sectors – namely distributive trade (including retail/wholesale trade, transport services) as well as in education, health, and public service sectors. Low wages are commonly determined relative to the national median hourly earnings in current research projects on the low-pay sector. According to the widely accepted definition of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), low wage work is defined as work that pays two-thirds or less of the national median hourly for all full-time workers. In the U.S., about 25 percent of all workers are classified as low-wage workers according to this definition. The range of low-wage work in the employed labor force varies from 25 percent in the U.S. to 8.5 percent in Denmark, which is a ratio of 3 to 1. In the European context, Germany and the UK come close to the U.S. level with 21 and 22 percent respectively of all workers being employed in minimum wage work sectors. Even though there is no legal national minimum wage in Denmark, a relatively low share of the overall labor force is employed in low wage work – namely 8.5 percent.[6]

Currently, 21 of the 28 EU countries have a statutory national minimum wage across industrial sectors. Due to the varying levels of income in the countries of the EU, the minimum wage levels differ widely between the EU member states, especially between the eastern, former socialist EU countries and the western European countries: Whereas Luxembourg stipulated a statutory monthly minimum wage of 1,874 euros (10,83 euros hourly rate) in 2013, in Bulgaria a monthly minimum wage of 159 euros (0,95 euros hourly rate) was paid.[7] However, due to nationally varying price levels and respectively varying levels of living expenses in each country, the minimum wages have highly differing levels of purchasing power. In this regard, the differences in minimum wage levels across countries as measured by purchasing power standard (PPS) are much smaller compared to the differences of wage levels as measured by the nominal minimum wage.

In his lecture “Low-wage work in Europe and America”, economist and 1987 recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize Robert Solow compares the characteristics of low-wage work in the U.S with six selected European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, and United Kingdom). In discussing the minimum wage in these countries, Solow denies any significant (negative or positive) employment effects when applying a minimum wage. Employers rather adjust or cut costs through improvements in organizational efficiency, reductions in wages of highly paid workers (“wage compression”), labor turnover decrease or price increases to consumers.

Robert Solow (2008) - Low-wage Work in Europe and America

Thank you. Yes, I should explain to you that four years ago, at the first of these Lindau meetings of economists, I gave a lecture, probably in this very same room. And there what I did was to talk not about research that had already been done, but about a research project that was planned for the future on low wage work in Europe and in the United States, or in selected countries in Europe and the United States. This was a project of the Russell Sage Foundation in New York and I discussed the questions we were going to ask and the way we planned to try answer them. And today it’s four years later and the project is complete. And we have published five volumes, one on each of the five European countries that we studied and there is a sixth volume. An explicit comparative study of those five European countries and the United States that will probably be finished and published in about six months. So I’ll take a couple of minutes to talk about the origins of this project, and then what I want to do is give you survey of some of the broader results. The Russell Sage Foundation in New York has had throughout its history an interest in the disadvantaged parts of the population. And years before 2004, perhaps three or four years before that, it had begun to study low wage workers in the United States. In perhaps as many as 20 or 25 different industries. The motivation was the thought, the worry that the combination of globalisation, technological change and deregulation might leave workers with very limited education and skills stranded in a modern economy. The question is: What would happen in a technologically sophisticated and internationally competing economy to workers with very poor education and very low skills? But there was much work, much analysis of industries in the United States looking at the low end of the workers. And two conclusions came out of those studies of the US. One of them was that, while most firms in the industries studied treated their unskilled workers like disposable parts, you don’t bother training them or trying to improve their productivity, hire them when you don’t need them, fire them, there are many more people out there who can be hired. And the research workers tended to call firms that followed this strategy as the low road strategy. They found, they thought they found in most of these industries a few firms that followed a different strategy which they called the “high road strategy”. These were firms that treated their unskilled workers as an asset to be developed, they engaged in more intense training. They increased capital intensity, they reorganized production processes and tried to adopt technologies that were suitable and they did things to increase the tenure of the length of time that such workers stayed with the firm. And the studies argue that there seemed to be a kind of multiple equilibrium possibility. That in the same industry at the same time firms following each of these strategies, the low road and the high road could both be viable. Could both exist, sustain themselves and earn decent profits. I have to tell you that I, as a typical economist, just like you, was instantly suspicious of this notion and wondered whether it could really in fact be the case. The second conclusion that came out of these studies of American firms and American industries was the sort of general presumption that the nature of labour market institutions, the nature of collective bargaining, the statutory minimum wage if there is one, things of that sort can have an important influence on the choice of the strategy by business firms. It occurred to me and to some other people that it would be a very good idea to test this kind of hypothesis or this kind of study by looking at the fate of unskilled workers, of low wage workers in some countries of Europe. What we wanted was a wider range of institutional practices to observe, but we wanted to observe these in advanced successful modern industrial economies with levels of income per head at the US level, because we were hoping to perhaps learn some lessons about the American economy from a close study of European economies. And so the five countries we chose, we chose five because that’s the number we could afford. That’s the number of research teams that we could finance. We chose the three indispensible large economies, France, Germany and the UK, and then we took two smaller economies, Denmark and the Netherlands. We left out countries like Spain and Greece, for instance, because we wanted to observe the unskilled labour market, the low wage labour market in countries with income levels like the US. We omitted Italy because Italy has two economies, not one. And it would be very difficult. We were extremely anxious that, compared with it – we did not want five separate studies with no really good prospect of comparison. We wanted comparison amongst the European economies and with the US to be legitimate and possible. And so, amongst other things, we asked each of the research teams we asked them to provide not only a statistical survey of low wage workers and low wage jobs in their own economy, and also a literary survey, so to speak, of the institutions, legal and informal in their own country that might affect the way that low wage work is organized and the way that low wage workers are treated. And then, in addition to that, we asked them to make a very careful study of five particular jobs, we chose five occupations that in the United States are definitely low wage occupations. The five jobs we chose were people who make beds and clean hotel rooms. Check out clerks in supermarkets and people who stack canned goods and other goods on the shelves in supermarkets. We chose nurse’s assistants, the people who clean hospital rooms, empty bed pans, and do the manual labour in hospitals. We wanted one manufacturing industry at least and we choose the food processing industry which has a lot of low wage unskilled work, putting candies in boxes, operating simple machines, grinding up sausage in ways you would rather not know intimately. And the fifth occupation we chose were the simplest outgoing calls in call centres. Call centres are rapidly growing in Europe as in North America, and actually there was an ongoing study of call centres that we could piggyback on, that we could use and keep expenses down. So the five research teams were instructed also to make a detailed study of each of these five occupations, not only collecting data but interviewing workers, managers, trade union officials, government regulators and any one concerned. By the way, I should specify something. In Europe universally low wage work is defined as work that pays less than 2/3 the median national wage. So that, when one looks at the volume of low wage work, what you are really looking at is the dispersion of the wage distribution below the median. There’s a lot of low wage work if that left hand tail of the distribution is relatively fat, there’s very little low wage work if the density function falls sharply as you go below the median. So low wage work is defined as relatively low wage work. The American tradition in this sort of thing is much more to define it absolutely in terms of some fixed standard of living. But that is not really possible if you are studying European labour markets because that’s not the way the data has been kept. So that’s what we set out to do four years ago and what I described in much more detail than I have told you now. We started out, I mentioned that, you see I always know what the average economist thinks because I am an average economist, I’ve all those instincts exactly. And my natural reaction to the low road/high road story was “ah, no, that’s not so, there’s the supply curves, the band curves, they intersect, you know, and the standard model applies everywhere, why not here”. So the two hypotheses that we started out with in our heads not formally stated really, but I think this is what we had expected to find, was first of all that the constraints on European employers would mean that the low skill jobs in Europe are fewer and differently organized, differently arranged from those in the US. That there would be more high road firms in Europe, because that kind of strategy would be pushed on them by legislation and custom. And secondly we expected there would be less employment of unskilled workers in Europe because we expected the wages of unskilled workers to be higher in Europe and we expected the working conditions to be better because either of law or of social custom. And the reality turned out to be quite different from that. And so I use the rest of my time by trying to describe to you, broadly speaking, what sort of things we found and what the sceptical economist, average economist, that’s me, now thinks about low wage work and the quality of the kinds of jobs that are offered to unskilled, uneducated people. The first fact that one comes upon immediately in making this kind of comparative study is really very striking. The share, the proportion of all workers, wage and salary workers, who are low wage workers, according to the definition that I gave you, varies enormously between the US and some countries of Europe and varies within Europe enormously. In the US the date here is the mid-2000s, around 2005, let’s say, give or take a year sometimes. In the US about 25% of all workers are classified according to the definition as low wage workers. Germany and the UK come close, somewhere around 21% or 22% of all workers. And that’s true of West Germany, by the way. Obviously, if you combine east and west, the former East Germany with West Germany that’s a rather peculiar arrangement. We can get the data for West Germany alone. Germany and the UK about 21% or 22% of all workers are low wage workers. And in the case of Germany that fraction has increased fairly dramatically during the last ten or twelve years. From 10 or 11 or 12% up to 21% or 22%. In the Netherlands about 18% of all workers are classified as low wage workers. In France 11% and in Denmark about 8 or 8.5%. So the range of the incidents of low wage work in the labour force, in the employed labour force ranges from 25% in the US to 8.5% in Denmark, 3 to 1, and within Europe from 21 or 22% in Germany and the UK to 8.5% in Denmark. So there’s a very great variety within Europe. And what’s more? The trends over the past 10 or 15 years in the European countries are not all the same. The fraction of low wage workers has been rising, as I said, in Germany, in Denmark it has been fairly steady. In some of the other countries it has been falling. That’s the first gross conclusion. A second one, and this is really quite remarkable and requires explanation, understanding. Across these countries there is little or no correlation between the incidents of low wage work and employment rates across those countries. It is simply not true in general that, when you look across these countries, the ones that pay relatively high wages to low wage workers, relatively, relative to the median, show very low employment of low wage workers and the ones that pay low wages, relatively speaking, to the bottom end, to the unskilled workers, have relatively high employment of unskilled workers. There are exceptions to this. France, which, as will come up again, France has a very high legal minimum wage and you can see a job gap in France. You can see that there are jobs which appear in other countries that do not appear in France and are presumably priced out of existence by that high minimum wage. But France is an outlier in this story and if you look at the other countries, the only one sentence generalization that makes sense is the sentence that I gave you. That there is little or no correlation between the status of low wage workers and the employment rates of low wage workers, across these countries. What this tells me as an economist is that, contrary to what I might have believed at the beginning of this study, the incidents of low wage work and the quality of the relatively low wage jobs is not narrowly determined by technology and market conditions. All of these countries dispose of the same technological knowledge, there are no technological gaps across those six countries. And they all operate in the world market. Some of them to a larger extent than others, but they are all operating in the world market and yet the number and quality of low wage jobs differs dramatically across them. The implication has to be, I think, that both the incidents of low wage work and the quality, the job quality at the low end can be modified fairly dramatically by public and private policy, by the formal and informal institutions of labour market. Now, on the other hand, this is rather interesting to me, too. There’s one important respect in which these countries are all alike, if these six countries are all alike, if you ask: Describe the low wage workers, the people themselves”, it’s the same everywhere. Who are the low wage workers? Women, young people and immigrants. Generally speaking, very poorly educated people, but those tend to be in all these countries women, young people and immigrants. And here’s another lesson for economists out of this. I think when I tell you that, when I state the fact that I just stated, it confirms another natural reaction of the economist which is that low wage work is determined by low productivity which is determined by low human capital. So that the low wage work is a low human capital phenomenon. I think that’s only partially true. And not nearly wholly true and the story that I tell myself to explain this, I will tell to you. There are jobs in a modern economy that are intrinsically low productivity jobs, has nothing to do with human capital. The classic case is the making of beds and cleaning of rooms in hotel rooms. I have a very good PhD in economics from a major university in the United States and I would be no more productive, maybe less productive, at making beds in hotel rooms than the uneducated immigrant woman who’s doing it now. That great Jamaican runner who has broken the world record in the 100m and 200m dash in the Olympics would be no more productive at doing that job than the person who does it now. It is a low productivity job. Now, the labour market is very clever. The labour market sorts into those jobs people with low human capital, because they don’t have much in the way of alternatives. But those jobs are not low wage jobs because of the low human capital of the people who do it, it’s just the other way round. The people who do it have low human capital because those are low wage jobs. So this is not the simple stories that one tends to tell oneself, not always right. The detailed industry studies in our five volumes, one on each of those countries, will confirm what I have just been telling you. You will find jobs that are intrinsically low productivity jobs and our societies have to find ways of dealing with those jobs. Now, let me go on and make a list of the sort of conclusions that readers of the comparative volume that we are putting out will come to. First of all, I’ve stated one of them which is very important, there is no simple US versus Europe story. There are differences between the US and Europe but there are differences within Europe of roughly the same order of magnitude. Second, this I haven’t mentioned, haven’t come upon during the course of this talk so far, it appears that the long run structural factors play a very small role. There is little or no correlation in terms of the quality and quantity of low wage work with GDP per head across these countries. There are small variations of course with growth rates of GDP per head, with indexes of industrial productivity, with growth rates of industrial productivity, or with broad demographic differences across the countries. These differences cannot be explained by the sort of standard long run structural factors, nor are the characteristics of low wage work correlated across these countries with the share of labour in the national income. What happens to low wage work is something that happens within the labour share, not between the labour share and the property income or capital share. If you have to describe what is the most important influence on the quantity and quality of low wage work in these countries, it is something that the teams themselves, the research teams themselves came to call the “inclusiveness of labour market institutions”. The extent to which the formal and informal institutions of the labour market tend to be inclusive to try to spread benefits across many people. This includes the nature of collective bargaining, it includes the possibility that many European countries have and exercise of extending the results of collective bargaining to weaker sub-sectors of the economy that did not participate in the collective bargaining. Depends on, amongst other things, whether there is a minimum wage and what the height, what the size of the minimum wage is. And it depends in a certain way on what I can only describe as the norms, the informal norms of business behaviour, trade union behaviour and so on. The minimum wage can be an important factor, it’s statutory in France. In Denmark there is no legal minimum wage, but there is an effective minimum wage that is determined by the trade, the large trade union federations and the employer federations together. Generally speaking for variations in the minimum wage in the range that these countries have, the US and all of the five European countries, with the exception of France, the employment effects of variation in the minimum wage are small. They may be there but they are not a dominant factor. Another conclusion that comes from this work is that income supports, unemployment insurance, children’s allowances, disability payments, early retirement possibilities, all that kind of income support tends, the bigger they are, the more they strengthen, supply conditions for unskilled workers and reduce the incidents of low wage work and improve the quality of low wage work. Those kinds of income supports, welfare state type supports, if they are available, limit the extent to which the earnings and the working conditions of low wage workers can fall before the supply of such workers dries up. We also find in looking at the detailed industry studies that the regulation of product markets can affect the bargaining power of the unskilled, or if not the bargaining power at least the outcomes for unskilled workers. Competitive differences in competitive pressure from industry to industry do matter. If one of the industries we studied comes under intensified competitive pressure – for instance the internet has increased the competitive pressure on hotels in all of these countries, because it is easier for people to search for the lowest rate. It wasn’t so easy before. The large German retailers have begun to compete in the Dutch retail market and that increases the competitive pressure on food retailers and electronics retailers, those are the two that we studied in the Netherlands. When a narrowly defined industry like that comes under increased competitive pressure, the natural reaction of every firm in the industry is to try and reduce its costs. It may also adopt other strategies and that's important, product refinements, product innovations, differentiating its product in various ways, increasing its capital intensity, all kinds of things like that, but the immediate reaction is to reduce costs and one of the easiest costs to reduce is the cost of unskilled labour. Why? Because unskilled workers are generally easier to replace, unskilled workers are generally not as much protected by trade unions as skilled workers are. And so one finds that as any economist would expect, that these local changes in competitive pressure and in the regulation of product markets does affect the quantity and quality of low wage work. Employment protection legislation is, as we all know from a lot of literature by now, ambiguous. There is no particular reason to believe that countries with strong employment protection legislation help their unskilled workers non-trivially or hurt their non-skilled workers non-trivially. There are pluses and minuses and they tend to cancel one another out. Last thing I want to mention in this connection is that immigrants, of course, play a big role in the unskilled low wage labour market, but when you look at it in detail, it turns out that the role of immigrant workers is clearly filtered through the country’s standard labour market institutions. So while immigrant workers are at the end of the queue, at the bottom end of the queue everywhere, how badly off they are depends on the labour market institutions of the host country. So an immigrant worker is better off in Denmark than in Germany or the United States, for that matter. So the last question I want to think about with you is this question: Why isn’t there a strong trade-off as one would normally expect between the level of low wage wages and the quality of low wage jobs and the employment of unskilled workers? I said, if you look across these countries, there is not a strong trade-off and one has to wonder why not? Why doesn’t it exist? That of course doesn’t really come in any clear way out of the research, but the research teams and the group that has planned this whole project had some hypothesis. First of all, some firms do tend to adopt the high road strategy, they adapt to norms and legislation. If there are regulations that somehow or other work to improve the quality of low wage work instead of laying off unskilled workers, many firms do increase the capital intensity, adapt their production processes, engage in more intense training activities, improve their internal organisation, redesign their products. They find other ways of adapting to a higher status for the low wage workers, besides simply laying them off or resisting the improvements in job quality. So there is some of that. Secondly, as I mentioned before, and this is really very, very important: Government provision of health care, holidays, pensions, training, all those things subsidise the high road strategies. Precisely, well, not precisely, roughly to the extent that governments provide supports to income and standard of living that in effect is a way in which the taxpayer subsidises the low end of the employment ladder. Thirdly, it is a fact that in Europe general wage compression, wage distributions in Europe are generally somewhat more compressed than in the US, the degree of compression varies from country to country, but wage compression is a way in which more skilled workers, whether they like it or not or realise it or not, are subsidising the status of low wage workers. And lastly, I should say that in all these countries of course there are loop holes. Legislated standards are often evaded, not often evaded but are sometimes evaded. So that in the worst cases, where there are industries or firms or occupations that simply cannot meet the national standards, one alternative to the disappearance of those firms or industries or occupations is that the laws are not strictly enforced. Three more brief remarks and I'm done. Of course we are very interested, the people doing this research are very interested in the degree of mobility into and out of low wage work. Low wage work is not, if you asked me what is an equitable way for society to get the dirty jobs done, the answer is the young people should do them. They should rotate in that way, exactly the way boring committee assignments rotate in academic departments and things like that. But we are interested, very interested in what we could learn about what is the probability that someone who is a low wage worker in Year T will still be a low wage worker in Year T+1 or Year T+3 or Year T+4. Information like this is very hard to come by, because it requires longitudinal studies of which there are very few - there should be more - and are very expensive. But what bits of information we have been able to find tell us that another part of the way Americans pat themselves on the back turns out to be false. And mobility out of low wage work is not greater in the US than it is in European countries. It varies from country to country within Europe and in many cases in Europe, the degree of mobility is at least as big as it is in the US. Secondly, and this is not a result of research, this is a reflection on the research, it’s probably not easy to imitate policies piecemeal across countries. It would not be easy for a president of the United States or a Prime Minister of the UK to say: When I said that the important factor appears to be what you would call the inclusiveness of labour market institutions, that comes in large part as a package and picking a piece of it here and picking a piece of it there is probably not a viable way to proceed. And the last thing I want to say is a pessimistic thing. I mentioned that changes in the intensity of competition often end up weakening the status of unskilled workers, of low wage workers. And there really is a question whether the relatively generous systems in Europe like the Danish one and to a certain extent the Dutch one, whether they are sustainable as international competition intensifies. I don’t’ think one can give an answer to that question right away. But the thing at the end of the tunnel might not be a light. And one just doesn’t know about those things. But why don’t I stop there, I don’t know if we have any time left for questions, but if we do, I would be happy to have them.

Danke. Sie müssen wissen, dass ich schon vor vier Jahren, beim ersten Ökonomentreffen in Lindau, einen Vortrag gehalten habe, wahrscheinlich sogar genau in diesem Raum. Dabei sprach ich nicht über bereits geleistete Forschungsarbeiten, sondern über ein für die Zukunft geplantes Forschungsprojekt im Hinblick auf Niedriglohnarbeit in Europa und den Vereinigten Staaten bzw. in ausgewählten Staaten Europas und in den Vereinigten Staaten. Es handelte sich um ein Projekt der Russell Sage Foundation in New York. Ich sprach über die Fragen, die wir stellen wollten und über die von uns geplante Art und Weise ihrer Beantwortung. Heute, vier Jahre später, ist das Projekt abgeschlossen. Wir haben fünf Bände veröffentlicht, einen über jedes europäische Land, das wir untersucht haben, und es gibt auch einen sechsten Band: eine Studie, in der diese fünf europäischen Länder mit den Vereinigten Staaten verglichen werden. Diese Vergleichsstudie ist voraussichtlich in etwa sechs Monaten fertig und wird dann veröffentlicht. Ich spreche zunächst kurz über die Ursprünge dieses Projekts, und dann möchte ich Ihnen einen umfassenden Überblick über die Ergebnisse verschaffen. Die Russell Sage Foundation in New York war während ihrer gesamten Geschichte an den benachteiligten Bevölkerungsschichten interessiert. Schon Jahre vor 2004, vielleicht drei oder vier Jahre davor, begann sie damit, sich mit Niedriglohnempfängern in den Vereinigten Staaten zu befassen. In nicht weniger als 20 oder 25 verschiedenen Branchen. Dahinter steckte der Gedanke, die Sorge, dass die Kombination aus Globalisierung, technischem Wandel und Deregulierung Arbeitnehmer mit sehr eingeschränkter Bildung und geringen Fähigkeiten hilflos zurücklassen könnte. Die Frage ist: Was würde in einer technisch anspruchsvollen und im internationalen Wettbewerb stehenden Wirtschaft mit schlecht ausgebildeten und sehr niedrig qualifizierten Arbeitnehmern geschehen? Es gab viel tun; die amerikanischen Branchen am unteren Ende des Arbeitsmarkts boten jede Menge Stoff zur Analyse. Und die Studien über die Vereinigten Staaten erbrachten zwei Schlussfolgerungen. Eine von ihnen war: Die meisten Unternehmen in den untersuchten Branchen behandelten ihre unqualifizierten Arbeitnehmer wie Ersatzteile – man macht sich nicht die Mühe, sie zu schulen oder zu versuchen, ihre Produktivität zu erhöhen, man stellt sie ein und feuert sie, wenn sie nicht mehr gebraucht werden, es gibt ja genug andere, die man einstellen kann. Die Forscher nannten Betriebe, die diese Strategie verfolgten, „Low-Road-Strategie“-Unternehmen. Sie fanden, so dachten sie jedenfalls, in den meisten dieser Branchen einige wenige Betriebe, die einen anderen Ansatz verfolgten, den sie „High-Road-Strategie“ nannten. Dabei handelte es sich um Unternehmen, die ihre unqualifizierten Arbeitnehmer als Aktivposten behandelten, die es zu entwickeln galt und sich stärker mit Schulungen befassten. Sie erhöhten die Kapitalintensität, reorganisierten Produktionsprozesse und versuchten, geeignete Technologien einzuführen. Sie bemühten sich um eine längere Beschäftigungsdauer dieser Arbeitnehmer im Unternehmen. Und die Studien deuten darauf hin, dass eine Art von mehrfachem Gleichgewicht möglich ist. Dass es in ein und derselben Branche für Unternehmen praktikabel sein könnte, gleichzeitig jede dieser Strategien zu verfolgen, die „Low-Road“-Strategie und die „High-Road“-Strategie. Dass beide nebeneinander bestehen, sich gegenseitig unterstützen und ordentliche Gewinne erwirtschaften können. Ich muss Ihnen sagen, dass ich als typischer Ökonom – wie Sie es auch sind – dieser Vorstellung sofort misstraute und mich fragte, ob sie tatsächlich der Wirklichkeit entsprechen könnte. Die zweite Schlussfolgerung, die sich aus diesen Untersuchungen amerikanischer Unternehmen und amerikanischer Branchen ergab, war die etwas allgemeine Vermutung, dass die Art der Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen, die Art der Tarifverhandlungen, der gesetzliche Mindestlohn, falls es einen gibt, dass Dinge dieser Art einen bedeutenden Einfluss darauf haben können, für welche Strategie sich die Unternehmen entscheiden. Mir und einigen anderen kam der Gedanke, dass es eine sehr gute Idee wäre, diese Art von Hypothese bzw. diese Art von Studie durch einen Blick auf das Schicksal unqualifizierter Niedriglohnempfänger in einigen europäischen Ländern zu testen. Worum es uns ging, war die Betrachtung einer größeren Bandbreite institutioneller Praktiken, doch wir wollten sie in fortschrittlichen, modernen Industrieländern mit einem Pro-Kopf-Einkommen auf amerikanischem Niveau untersuchen, da wir hofften, dass wir aus einer eingehenden Untersuchung europäischer Volkswirtschaften vielleicht einiges über die amerikanische Wirtschaft lernen könnten. Die fünf von uns ausgesuchten Länder… wir wählten fünf; so viele konnten wir uns leisten. Das war die Anzahl der Forschungsteams, die wir finanzieren konnten. Wir nahmen uns die drei unvermeidlichen, großen Volkswirtschaften Frankreich, Deutschland und Großbritannien vor; außerdem suchten wir uns mit Dänemark und den Niederlanden zwei kleinere Volkswirtschaften aus. Länder wie Spanien und Griechenland ließen wir unberücksichtigt, da wir ja den Arbeitsmarkt der Unqualifizierten, den Niedriglohn-Arbeitsmarkt, in Ländern mit einem Einkommensniveau ähnlich dem der USA untersuchen wollten. Italien ließen wir weg, weil Italien nicht eine, sondern zwei Volkswirtschaften hat. Das wäre sehr schwer geworden. Größte Bedenken hatten wir im Hinblick auf die Vergleichsmöglichkeit – was wir nicht wollten, waren fünf einzelne Studien ohne wirkliche Aussicht auf Vergleichbarkeit. Uns ging es darum, dass Vergleiche zwischen den europäischen Volkswirtschaften untereinander und mit den USA legitim und möglich sein sollten. Deshalb forderten wir jedes Forschungsteam auf – wir veranstalteten einen Wettbewerb und wählten ein Forschungsteam für jedes der fünf Länder aus – wir forderten sie also unter anderem auf, nicht nur einen statistischen Überblick über Niedriglohnempfänger und Niedriglohnjobs in ihrer eigenen Volkswirtschaft und außerdem sozusagen einen Literaturüberblick über die offiziellen und inoffiziellen Institutionen in ihrem eigenen Land zu liefern, durch die die Art der Organisation von Niedriglohnarbeit und der Behandlung von Niedriglohnempfängern beeinflusst werden könnte. Darüber hinaus forderten wir sie auf, eine äußerst sorgfältige Untersuchung fünf bestimmter Tätigkeiten vorzunehmen, wir wählten fünf Tätigkeiten aus, die in den Vereinigten Staaten definitiv Niedriglohnbeschäftigungen sind. Zu den fünf Jobs, die wir auswählten, gehörte einmal die Tätigkeit jener, die in Hotels Betten machen und die Zimmer reinigen. Dann Kassiererinnen und Kassierer in Supermärkten und Menschen, die im Supermarkt die Regale einräumen. Wir wählten Krankenpflegehelfer – die Menschen, die Krankenhauszimmer reinigen, Bettpfannen leeren und die manuelle Arbeit in Krankenhäusern verrichten. Wir wollten auch mindestens eine Tätigkeit aus der produzierenden Industrie und entschieden uns für die Branche der Lebensmittelverarbeitung, bei der es viele unqualifizierte Niedriglohnarbeiten gibt – Bonbons in Schachteln verpacken, einfache Maschinen bedienen, Würste auf eine Art und Weise zermahlen, die sie lieber nicht genau kennen wollen. Die fünfte Tätigkeit, die wir auswählten, war das Führen der einfachsten ausgehenden Gespräche in Callcentern. Callcenter nehmen in Europa und Nordamerika schnell zu, es gab sogar eine laufende Studie über Callcenter, auf die wir uns stützen konnten, die wir nutzen und dadurch die Kosten niedrig halten konnten. Die fünf Forschungsteams wurden also angewiesen, jede dieser fünf Tätigkeiten gründlich zu untersuchen – nicht nur Daten zu sammeln, sondern mit Arbeitnehmern, Managern, Gewerkschaftsvertretern, Regulierungsbehörden und allen Betroffenen zu sprechen. Übrigens muss ich etwas klarstellen. In Europa wird Niedriglohnarbeit allgemein als Arbeit definiert, für die weniger als zwei Drittel des mittleren nationalen Einkommens bezahlt werden. Wenn man also das Volumen der Niedriglohnarbeit betrachtet, sieht man in Wirklichkeit die Verteilung des Lohns unterhalb des Mittelwerts. Wenn das linke Ende der Verteilung vergleichsweise dick ist, gibt es viele Niedriglohnarbeiten; es gibt sehr wenig Niedriglohnarbeit, wenn die Dichtefunktion unter dem Mittelwert stark abfällt. Niedriglohnarbeit ist also als relative Niedriglohnarbeit definiert. In Amerika wird dies traditionell viel eher absolut definiert, bezogen auf einen festen Lebensstandard. Wenn man europäische Arbeitsmärkte untersucht, ist das aber nicht möglich, da die Daten nicht auf diese Weise erfasst wurden. Das war es also, was wir uns vor vier Jahren vorgenommen hatten; ich habe das an anderer Stelle wesentlich ausführlicher als gerade eben dargestellt. Wir begannen damit… wie ich schon erwähnte, weiß ich immer, was der Durchschnittsökonom denkt, denn ich bin ein Durchschnittsökonom, ich habe genau diese Instinkte, alle. Und meine natürliche Reaktion auf die „Low Road/High Road“-Geschichte war: das Standardmodell gilt überall, warum nicht hier.“ Die zwei Hypothesen, die wir anfangs in unseren Köpfen hatten, wurden also nicht „offiziell“ formuliert, doch ich denke, das ist es, was wir als Ergebnis erwarteten – zunächst einmal, dass die Einschränkungen für europäische Arbeitgeber zur Folge hätten, dass gering qualifizierte Tätigkeiten in Europa dünner gesät und anders ausgestaltet sind, anders als in den USA. Dass es in Europa mehr „High-Road“-Unternehmen gibt, da ihnen diese Art Strategie vom Gesetzgeber und der Tradition vorgegeben wird. Zweitens erwarteten wir, dass es für unqualifizierte Arbeitnehmer in Europa weniger Beschäftigung geben würde, da wir davon ausgingen, dass die Löhne unqualifizierter Arbeitnehmer in Europa höher und die Arbeitsbedingungen besser sind, entweder aufgrund von Gesetzen oder sozialer Gewohnheiten. Wie sich erweisen sollte, war die Wahrheit ganz anders. In der mir verbleibenden Zeit möchte ich Ihnen, grob gesagt, schildern, welche Art von Dingen wir herausgefunden haben und was der skeptische Ökonom, der Durchschnittsökonom – das bin ich – jetzt über Niedriglohnarbeit und die Qualität jener Art von Tätigkeiten denkt, die unqualifizierten, ungebildeten Menschen angeboten werden. Die erste Tatsache, auf die man sofort stößt, wenn man diese Art Vergleichsstudie durchführt, ist wirklich sehr verblüffend. Der Anteil aller Arbeitnehmer, aller Lohn- und Gehaltsempfänger, bei denen es sich gemäß der Definition, die ich Ihnen mitgeteilt habe, um Niedriglohnempfänger handelt, schwankt zwischen den USA und einigen Ländern Europas ganz enorm, und sie schwankt auch innerhalb Europas ganz erheblich. Die Daten für die USA stammen aus der Mitte des letzten Jahrzehnts, sagen wir etwa aus dem Jahr 2005, manchmal vielleicht ein Jahr früher oder später. In den USA werden etwa 25 % aller Arbeitnehmer definitionsgemäß als Niedriglohnempfänger eingestuft. Deutschland und Großbritannien kommen gleich danach mit etwa 21 % oder 22 % aller Arbeitnehmer. Das gilt, nebenbei, für Westdeutschland. Wenn man den Osten mit dem Westen zusammenfasst, das frühere Ostdeutschland mit dem früheren Westdeutschland, ist das eine sehr eigenartige Anordnung. Wir können die Daten für Westdeutschland allein erhalten. In Deutschland und Großbritannien sind etwa 21 % oder 22 % aller Arbeitnehmer Niedriglohnempfänger. Und im Falle Deutschlands hat sich dieser Anteil in den letzten zehn oder zwölf Jahren ziemlich drastisch erhöht. Von 10 %, 11 % oder 12 % auf 21 % oder 22 %. In den Niederlanden werden etwa 18 % aller Arbeitnehmer als Niedriglohnempfänger eingestuft, in Frankreich 11 % und in Dänemark ungefähr 8 % oder 8,5 %. Die Bandbreite der Niedriglohnempfänger unter den Erwerbstätigen, unter den beschäftigten Erwerbstätigen, reicht also von 25 % in den USA bis zu 8,5 % in Dänemark, drei zu eins, und innerhalb Europas von 21 % oder 22 % in Deutschland und Großbritannien bis zu 8,5 % in Dänemark. Innerhalb Europas gibt es demnach große Unterschiede. Und sonst? Die Trends der letzten zehn oder 15 Jahre sind in den europäischen Ländern nicht alle gleich. Die Quote der Niedriglohnempfänger hat, wie ich schon sagte, in Deutschland zugenommen, in Dänemark war sie ziemlich konstant. In einigen der anderen Länder hat sie abgenommen. Das ist die erste wichtige Schlussfolgerung. Eine zweite ist wirklich äußert bemerkenswert und bedarf einer Erklärung, wenn man sie verstehen will. In all diesen Ländern gibt es nur eine geringe oder gar keine Korrelation zwischen der Zahl der Niedriglohnempfänger und den Beschäftigungsquoten. Wenn man sich diese Länder ansieht, ist es schlechterdings nicht wahr, dass in jenen Ländern, in denen die Niedriglohnempfänger relativ hohe Löhne erhalten, relativ zum Mittelwert, die Zahl der beschäftigten Niedriglohnempfänger gering ist, und dass in jenen, in denen niedrige Löhne bezahlt werden – relativ zum unteren Ende, zu den unqualifizierten Arbeitern – die Zahl der beschäftigten Niedriglohnempfänger relativ hoch ist. Davon gibt es eine Ausnahme. Frankreich – ich werde darauf zurückkommen –Frankreich hat einen relativ hohen gesetzlichen Mindestlohn, und dort ist eine Arbeitsplatzlücke erkennbar. Man sieht, dass es Tätigkeiten, die in anderen Ländern ausgeübt werden, in Frankreich nicht gibt und vermutlich durch den hohen Mindestlohn verdrängt werden. Doch Frankreich ist in dieser Geschichte ein Sonderfall, und wenn man sich die anderen Länder ansieht, ist die einzige Erkenntnis, die einzige Verallgemeinerung, die einen Sinn ergibt, jene Erkenntnis, von der ich Ihnen erzählt habe. Dass es in all diesen Ländern wenig oder gar keine Korrelation zwischen der Lage von Niedriglohnempfängern und den Beschäftigungsquoten der Niedriglohnempfänger gibt. Dem entnehme ich als Ökonom, dass im Gegensatz zu dem, was ich zu Beginn dieser Studie geglaubt haben mag, die Anzahl der Niedriglohntätigkeiten und die Qualität der relativ gering bezahlten Tätigkeiten nicht unbedingt von Technik und Marktbedingungen abhängt. All diese Länder verfügen über die gleichen technischen Kenntnisse, es gibt keine Techniklücken zwischen den sechs Ländern. Und sie treten alle im Weltmarkt auf. Einige von ihnen in größerem Ausmaß als andere, doch sie sind alle im Weltmarkt vertreten, und doch gibt es zwischen ihnen dramatische Unterschiede im Hinblick auf die Zahl und die Qualität von Niedriglohntätigkeiten. Daraus ist, denke ich, zu folgern, dass sowohl die Anzahl der Niedriglohntätigkeiten als auch die Qualität, die Jobqualität am unteren Ende, durch Maßnahmen der öffentlichen Hand und des privaten Sektors, durch offizielle und inoffizielle Institutionen des Arbeitsmarkts, ziemlich grundlegend geändert werden können. Andererseits, auch das finde ich sehr interessant, gleichen sich all diese Länder in einem Gesichtspunkt. Wenn man sich nämlich fragt: Beschreiben Sie die Niedriglohnempfänger, die Menschen selbst“ – dann sind es überall die gleichen. Wer sind die Niedriglohnempfänger? Frauen, junge Menschen und Immigranten. Im Großen und Ganzen sehr schlecht ausgebildete Menschen, doch das sind in all diesen Ländern tendenziell Frauen, junge Menschen und Immigranten. Als Ökonom kann man daraus noch eine Lehre ziehen. Ich denke, wenn ich Ihnen das erzähle, wenn ich auf die soeben erwähnte Tatsache hinweise, bestätigt das eine weitere natürliche Reaktion des Ökonomen, die darin besteht, dass Niedriglohnarbeit durch geringe Produktivität und diese wiederum durch geringes Humankapital bedingt wird. Dass also Niedriglohnarbeit ein auf geringes Humankapital zurückzuführendes Phänomen ist. Aber ich denke, das ist nicht die ganze Wahrheit. Nicht einmal annähernd die ganze Wahrheit, und ich werde Ihnen darlegen, wie ich mir das erkläre. In einer modernen Volkswirtschaft gibt es Tätigkeiten, die ihrem Wesen nach von niedriger Produktivität sind; das hat nichts mit Humankapital zu tun. Der klassische Fall ist das Herrichten von Betten und das Reinigen von Zimmern in Hotels. Ich habe an einer großen Universität in den Vereinigten Staaten mit Auszeichnung promoviert, doch ich wäre beim Herrichten von Hotelbetten nicht produktiver, vielleicht sogar weniger produktiv als die ungebildete Immigrantin, die das jetzt macht. Jener große jamaikanische Sprinter, der bei der Olympiade im 100-Meter- und 200-Meter-Lauf neue Weltrekorde aufgestellt hat, wäre in dem Job nicht produktiver als die Person, die ihn jetzt macht. Es ist nun einmal ein Job von niedriger Produktivität. Nun ist aber der Arbeitsmarkt äußerst clever. Der Arbeitsmarkt weist diese Jobs Menschen mit geringem Humankapital zu, weil sie nicht viele Alternativen haben. Doch diese Jobs sind nicht wegen des geringen Humankapitals der Menschen, die sie ausüben, Niedriglohntätigkeiten – es ist genau anders herum. Die Menschen, die sie ausüben, haben deswegen ein niedriges Humankapital, weil es sich um Niedriglohntätigkeiten handelt. Es ist also nicht immer so einfach, wie man es sich gerne vorstellt. Unsere ausführlichen Branchenstudien in fünf Bänden – einer für jedes der angesprochenen Länder – werden bestätigen, was ich Ihnen gerade erzählt habe. Sie handeln von Tätigkeiten, bei denen es sich ihrem Wesen nach um Jobs niedriger Produktivität handelt, und unsere Gesellschaften müssen Wege finden, wie sie mit diesen Tätigkeiten umgehen. Lassen Sie mich fortfahren mit einer Liste jener Art von Schlussfolgerungen, die Leser des Vergleichsbandes, den wir herausbringen, ziehen werden. Die erste, sehr wichtige, habe ich schon genannt: Es gibt keine einfache Geschichte USA gegen Europa. Es gibt Unterschiede zwischen den USA und Europa, doch es gibt auch Unterschiede innerhalb Europas von etwa der gleichen Größenordnung. Die zweite Schlussfolgerung habe ich noch nicht erwähnt, ich bin im Verlauf dieses Vortrags noch nicht dazu gekommen: Es scheint, dass die langfristigen strukturellen Faktoren nur eine sehr kleine Rolle spielen. Es gibt nur wenig bzw. keine Korrelation zwischen der Qualität und Quantität von Niedriglohnarbeit und dem Pro-Kopf-BIP in jenen Ländern. Natürlich gibt es kleine Abweichungen bei den Wachstumsraten des Pro-Kopf-BIP, bei den Indizes industrieller Produktivität, bei den Wachstumsraten der industriellen Produktivität oder bei den grundsätzlichen demografischen Unterschieden zwischen jenen Ländern. Diese Unterschiede lassen sich nicht durch normale langfristige strukturelle Faktoren erklären, und die Merkmale von Niedriglohnarbeit korrelieren in diesen Ländern auch nicht mit der Lohnquote des inländischen Einkommens. Was mit der Niedriglohnarbeit geschieht, geschieht innerhalb der Lohnquote, nicht zwischen der Lohnquote und den Immobilieneinkünften oder dem Kapitalanteil. Wenn man beschreiben müsste, was den größten Einfluss auf Quantität und Qualität von Niedriglohntätigkeiten in jenen Ländern ausübt, dann ist das etwas, was die Teams selbst, die Forschungsteams, als „Inklusivität der Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen“ bezeichnen. Also das Ausmaß, in dem die offiziellen und inoffiziellen Institutionen des Arbeitsmarkts dazu neigen, integrativ zu wirken und versuchen, Vorteile unter vielen Menschen zu verteilen. Hierzu zählt die Eigenart der Tarifverhandlungen, die in vielen europäischen Ländern bestehende und verwirklichte Möglichkeit, Ergebnisse von Tarifverhandlungen auf schwächere Teilsektoren der Wirtschaft, die nicht an den Tarifverhandlungen teilgenommen haben, auszudehnen. Es hängt unter anderem davon ab, ob es einen Mindestlohn gibt und wie hoch der Mindestlohn ist. Und es hängt von einer bestimmten Art und Weise dessen ab, was ich nur als die Normen bezeichnen kann, die inoffiziellen Normen geschäftlichen Verhaltens, gewerkschaftlichen Verhaltens und so weiter. Der Mindestlohn kann ein bedeutender Faktor sein, in Frankreich ist er gesetzlich geregelt. In Dänemark gibt es keinen gesetzlichen Mindestlohn, doch es gibt einen effektiven Mindestlohn, der vom Gewerbe, den großen Gewerkschaftsverbänden und den Arbeitgeberverbänden gemeinsam festgelegt wird. Angesichts der in diesen Ländern, in den USA und in allen fünf europäischen Ländern, festzustellenden Bandbreite der Mindestlohnunterschiede sind die Beschäftigungseffekte dieser Unterschiede sehr gering. Es mag sie geben, doch sie sind kein dominanter Faktor. Eine weitere aus dieser Arbeit zu ziehende Schlussfolgerung besteht darin, dass Einkommensgarantien – Arbeitslosenversicherung, Kindergeld, Invaliditätsleistungen, die Möglichkeit des Vorruhestands – dass all diese Einkommensgarantien dazu neigen, die Nachfragesituation unqualifizierter Arbeitnehmer umso mehr zu stärken, den Umfang der Niedriglohnarbeit umso mehr zu reduzieren und die Qualität der Niedriglohnarbeit umso stärker zu verbessern, je höher sie sind. Diese Art von Einkommensgarantien nach Art des Wohlfahrtsstaats begrenzen, wenn sie verfügbar sind, das Ausmaß, in dem die Einkünfte und Arbeitsbedingungen von Niedriglohnempfängern sinken können, bevor das Angebot an derartigen Arbeitnehmern versiegt. Ein Blick in die ausführlichen Branchenstudien verrät uns auch, dass die Regulierung der Produktmärkte die Kaufkraft der Unqualifizierten beeinflussen kann. Oder jedenfalls die Ergebnisse für unqualifizierte Arbeitnehmer, wenn es nicht deren Kaufkraft ist. Ein je nach Branche unterschiedlicher Wettbewerbsdruck spielt eine gewisse Rolle, wenn also eine der von uns untersuchten Branche unter stärkeren Wettbewerbsdruck gerät – zum Beispiel hat das Internet den Wettbewerbsdruck auf die Hotels in all diesen Ländern erhöht, weil es jetzt viel leichter ist, nach dem niedrigsten Preis zu suchen. Früher war das nicht so einfach. Die großen deutschen Einzelhändler haben damit begonnen, auf dem holländischen Einzelhandelsmarkt zu konkurrieren, was den Wettbewerbsdruck auf den Lebensmittel- und Elektrohandel erhöht; das sind die beiden Branchen, die wir in den Niederlanden untersucht haben. Wenn eine eng definierte Branche wie diese unter verstärkten Wettbewerbsdruck gerät, besteht die natürliche Reaktion jedes Unternehmens in der Branche darin, dass versucht wird, die Kosten zu senken. Vielleicht werden auch, das ist wichtig, andere Strategien eingeschlagen – Produktverfeinerungen, Produktinnovationen, Differenzierung der Produkte in verschiedener Weise, Erhöhung der Kapitalintensität, alle möglichen Dinge dieser Art – doch die unmittelbare Reaktion ist die Kostensenkung, und zu den am einfachsten zu senkenden Kosten zählen die Kosten unqualifizierter Arbeit. Warum? Weil unqualifizierte Arbeitnehmer einfacher zu ersetzen sind; sie sind im Allgemeinen nicht so stark durch Gewerkschaften geschützt wie qualifizierte Arbeitnehmer. Und so erkennt man, was jeder Ökonom erwarten würde: dass diese örtlichen Veränderungen des Wettbewerbsdrucks und der Regulierung der Produktmärkte die Quantität und Qualität von Niedriglohnarbeit beeinflussen. Wie wir mittlerweile aus einer umfangreichen Literatur wissen, sind Arbeitsschutzgesetze ein zweischneidiges Schwert. Es gibt keinen besonderen Grund für die Annahme, dass Länder mit starken Arbeitsschutzgesetzen ihren unqualifizierten Arbeitnehmern nicht nur unwesentlich helfen oder ihnen mehr als unwesentlich schaden. Es gibt Vor- und Nachteile, die dazu neigen, sich gegenseitig aufzuheben. Zuletzt möchte ich in diesem Zusammenhang erwähnen, dass Immigranten auf dem Niedriglohn-Arbeitsmarkt der Unqualifizierten eine große Rolle spielen, doch wenn man etwas genauer hinsieht, erweist sich, dass die Rolle der zugewanderten Arbeitnehmer eindeutig durch die normalen Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen des betreffenden Landes gefiltert ist. Zwar stehen zugewanderte Arbeitnehmer überall am Ende der Schlange, doch wie schlecht es ihnen geht, hängt von den Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen des Gastlandes ab. Ein zugewanderter Arbeitnehmer ist also in Dänemark in der Tat besser gestellt als in Deutschland oder in den Vereinigten Staaten. Die letzte Frage, über die ich mit Ihnen nachdenken möchte, ist diese: Warum gibt es keinen starken Ausgleichseffekt zwischen dem Niveau der Niedriglöhne, der Qualität von Niedriglohnjobs und der Beschäftigungssituation unqualifizierter Arbeitnehmer, wie man erwarten würde? Ich sagte, wenn man diese Länder ansieht, gibt es keinen starken Ausgleichseffekt, und man fragt sich, warum das so ist. Warum existiert er nicht? Das ergibt sich natürlich nicht eindeutig aus der Forschungsarbeit, doch die Forschungsteams stellten ebenso wie die Gruppe, die das ganze Projekt geplant hatte, einige Hypothesen auf. Als Erstes ist festzuhalten, dass einige Unternehmen tatsächlich der „High-Road“-Strategie zuneigen, sie passen sich Normen und Gesetzen an. Wenn es Bestimmungen gibt, denen es auf die eine oder andere Weise gelingt, die Qualität der Niedriglohnarbeiten zu verbessern, anstatt dass unqualifizierte Arbeitnehmer entlassen werden, steigern viele Unternehmen ihre Kapitalintensität, passen ihre Produktionsprozesse an, unternehmen stärkere Schulungsanstrengungen, verbessern ihre interne Organisation, gestalten ihre Produkte um. Sie finden andere Wege der Anpassung an einen höheren Status der Niedriglohnempfänger, als sie einfach zu entlassen oder den Verbesserungen der Jobqualität zu widerstehen. Das spielt also eine gewisse Rolle. Zweitens, wie ich vorher erwähnt hatte, und das ist wirklich sehr, sehr wichtig: Die staatliche Bereitstellung von Gesundheitspflege, Urlaub, Renten, Schulung, all diese Dinge fördern die „High-Road“-Strategien. Genau in dem Ausmaß – nein, nicht genau, ungefähr in dem Ausmaß, in dem die Staaten die Einkünfte und den Lebensstandard sichern, ist das faktisch eine Art und Weise der Subventionierung des unteren Endes der Beschäftigungsleiter durch den Steuerzahler. Drittens ist es eine Tatsache, dass in Europa die allgemeine Lohnkomprimierung – dass die Einkommensverteilung in Europa im Allgemeinen etwas stärker komprimiert ist als in den USA. Der Grad der Komprimierung ist von Land zu Land unterschiedlich, doch die Lohnkomprimierung ist nichts anderes als eine Methode der Bezuschussung von Niedriglohnempfängern durch die qualifizierteren Arbeitnehmer – unabhängig davon, ob denen das gefällt oder ob sie es überhaupt merken. Zuletzt sollte ich erwähnen, dass es in all diesen Ländern natürlich Schlupflöcher gibt. Gesetzliche Standards werden häufig umgangen, nein, nicht häufig, sie werden manchmal umgangen. So dass schlimmstenfalls, wenn Branchen oder Unternehmen oder Tätigkeiten die nationalen Standards einfach nicht einhalten können, eine Alternative zum Verschwinden dieser Unternehmen, Branchen oder Tätigkeiten darin besteht, dass die Gesetze nicht konsequent durchgesetzt werden. Noch drei kurze Anmerkungen, dann bin ich fertig. Natürlich sind wir, sind die Personen, die diese Forschungsarbeit durchführen, sehr interessiert am Grad der Mobilität im Hinblick auf Niedriglohntätigkeiten. Niedriglohnarbeit ist nicht... wenn Sie mich fragen, wie eine Gesellschaft ihre schmutzigen Jobs auf gerechte Weise erledigt, dann lautet die Antwort: Die jungen Leute sollten sie übernehmen. Sie sollten genau auf dieselbe Weise rotieren wie langweilige Ausschussaufgaben in akademischen Fachbereichen und Ähnliches. Doch wir interessieren uns sehr dafür, wie groß die Wahrscheinlichkeit dafür ist, dass jemand, der im Jahr T ein Niedriglohnempfänger ist, im Jahr T+1, T+3 oder T+4 immer noch ein Niedriglohnempfänger ist. Informationen wie diese sind sehr schwer zu beschaffen, da hierfür Längsschnittstudien erforderlich sind, von denen es nur wenige gibt – es sollte mehr davon geben – und die sehr teuer sind. Doch die wenigen Informationen, an die wir gelangen konnten, sagen uns, dass es auch in dieser Hinsicht ungerechtfertigt ist, wenn sich die Amerikaner selbst auf die Schulter klopfen. Die Mobilität aus der Niedriglohnarbeit heraus ist in den USA nicht größer als in europäischen Ländern. Sie variiert innerhalb Europas von Land zu Land, und in vielen Fällen ist der Mobilitätsgrad in Europa nicht geringer als in den USA. Zweitens, und das ist kein Ergebnis der Forschung, es handelt sich um eine Reflexion über die Forschung: Es ist wahrscheinlich nicht einfach, politische Strategien länderübergreifend stückweise zu imitieren. Ein Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten oder ein britischer Premierminister könnte nicht einfach sagen: Als ich sagte, dass der wichtige Faktor anscheinend das ist, was man die Inklusivität der Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen nennen könnte, meinte ich, dass insoweit zum größten Teil Pakete geschnürt werden. Sich hier ein Stück herauszunehmen und da ein Stück herauszunehmen ist wahrscheinlich keine praktikable Vorgehensweise. Zuletzt möchte ich noch etwas Pessimistisches sagen. Ich erwähnte, dass Veränderungen der Wettbewerbsintensität oft mit einer Schwächung der Lage von unqualifizierten Arbeitnehmern oder Niedriglohnempfängern einhergehen. Und es ist wirklich fraglich, ob die vergleichsweise großzügigen Systeme in Europa wie das dänische und in einem gewissen Ausmaß das holländische mit zunehmender Verschärfung des internationalen Wettbewerbs aufrechtzuerhalten sind. Ich glaube nicht, dass man diese Frage jetzt schon beantworten kann. Aber das, was am Ende des Tunnels auf einen wartet, ist vielleicht kein Licht. Man weiß einfach nichts darüber. Damit möchte ich enden. Ich weiß nicht, ob wir noch Zeit für Fragen haben – wenn ja, können Sie sie jetzt gerne stellen.

Robert Solow on negligible minimum wage effects on the aggregate employment rates
(00:18:00 - 00:19:24)

With the exception of France, a legal minimum wage has only little, if any effects on the employment rates on a large scale, according to Robert Solow. Germany currently has no national minimum wage[8] and the same applies to Denmark, Finland, Italy, Austria, Sweden and Cyprus. With respect to the minimum wage debate currently taking place in Germany, political opponents of a statutory minimum wage deny Solow’s conception, arguing that a minimum wage would cause job losses and thereby increase unemployment and the dilution of industries. Instead, they advocate a system of collective bargaining where minimum wages are negotiated between employers’ associations and trade unions. Opponents of a legal minimum wage commonly refer to Scandinavia as an exemplary economic model with comparatively low social inequality and high levels of employment despite the fact that there is no legal minimum wage. Denmark in particular, has a high effective de facto minimum wage negotiated by the industry, employer associations and the large trade unions, to which more than 65 percent of Danish workers belong. Even unions perceive a national minimum wage as negatively interfering with collective bargaining power, causing labor devaluation within low-wage work sectors.

Whereas the share of low-wage workers differs tremendously between the U.S. and some European countries – there is proportionally three times as much low-wage work in the U.S. as in Denmark – and varies within the countries of the Europe enormously, the group of people mostly affected by low-wage work and unemployment are quite comparable in Europe and the United States. Generally speaking, the overall employment rate and quality of work is particularly low for women, young people and immigrants. In the U.S., the job growth after recession has been driven disproportionately by industries with median wages below 15 Dollar per hour. During the recovery period of the recession (2010 to 2012), employment increases have been primarily in the lower-wage occupations, which grew nearly three times as fast as mid-wage and higher-wage occupations. Lower-wage occupations constituted 21 percent of recession losses, but 58 percent of recovery growth. The explosion in low-wage job growth magnified wage polarization and the rise of social inequality, as well as America’s expanding deficit of mid-wage jobs and higher-wage positions[9]. Likewise, the share of low-wage earners has increased compared with pre-crisis levels in Europe[10]. In this context, Peter Diamond emphasizes the use of partial equilibrium modeling when analyzing the sectoral dynamics of the labor market – which in turn cannot necessarily be translated to the dynamics of the overall labor market:

Peter Diamond (2011) - Search and Macro

Thank you, Martin, and I’m happy to say he wrote an outstanding thesis, and I had very little to do with it. When I was a young economist, and you’ve gotten some sense of how long ago that was from what Martin said, I thought that methodology was something old people did when they had nothing better to do. Now that it’s age appropriate, I want to stress to you the importance of methodology. The particular point I want to pick out is, when I was young, I would look at a model and think, is it a good model, is it a bad model? And I now think that’s the wrong way to frame the question, because the same model can be good for one purpose and bad for other purposes. The real question you should ask is: For this question, is this a model that adds to the insight of what we need to address that question, particularly important obviously for policy questions, where you’re going from, to my mind, if you’re doing it right, a number of different theory and empirical models, to drawing together a basis for policy inferences. And you do that because the economy is complex, the political process is complex. The essence of a model in order to be tractable is it’s not reality, it’s a simplification of reality, it gets things wrong. If it’s not getting things wrong, it’s not a model. And the issue is, the things that it’s getting wrong, are those important or unimportant for the particular question you’re asking? I say that because I will talk a little bit about the place where the search equilibrium labour market models are more useful in places where there are missing elements that really matter. So the outline is, first of all, to say a little bit about labour market flows, to give the context for the model, to then switch to the beverage curve which focuses on unemployment and vacancies over a business cycle, and then to talk about issues in macroeconomics generally. So one model that we’re all familiar with is the standard market model. Demand, supply, where price clears the market. The trouble with thinking about the labour market or the housing market from that framework is that the markets don’t clear in quite the same sense that the standard model has. So at any point in time, in any small area, you have unemployed workers, you have vacancies. Does that mean the market doesn’t clear? Well, in the market context, not clearing you would say the wage is wrong, the wage is too high or the wage is too low. There isn’t, within the context of that model, a different way of talking about what is going on. So just to bring out the magnitudes here, this is data from the US economy. Monthly worker flows, UE is the flow of workers from unemployment to employment, and as you see, based over a two decade period, a very large fraction of measured unemployed workers have jobs a month later. Interestingly, an almost as large fraction of unemployed workers are out of the labour force, I for Inactive a month later, given the official definition of what it means to be unemployed, which means actively doing something to find a job, not just wishing you had a job. And there’s quite a sizeable flow directly from out of the labour market, directly into employment, without a measured period of unemployment in between. I emphasise that because you’re interviewing people a month apart. It may be somebody started looking for a job, was not interviewed during that period and then found a job. On the other hand, there’s a good deal of direct flows that don’t go through looking for a job. Rather an opportunity finds you and you say because somebody has just made me an offer I can’t refuse’. And similarly there are large flows directly from employment to unemployment and out of the labour force. And one has to think about all of this in order to think about particularly the role of unemployment insurance, and in doing that, the supply demand price clears the market model, doesn’t really capture it. One can fit some unemployment into the model and of course the Lucas-Prescott model is very famous for that, but all the unemployment there was movement between different local markets, where the wage cleared the market. So there were never people applying for jobs and not getting them. There were people deciding the opportunities were better elsewhere, and that model also had the property that analogous to the Walrasian auctioneer, there was somebody directing the flows to the right places between markets. So that model, I think, really expanded some of our understanding of fitting some frictions into the Arrow-Debreu setting, but it doesn’t come to grips with the kind of issues there. The US has very high labour flows, much higher than any of the other economies, as really shown by this picture contrasting this. The first slide was really a three-state model, employed, unemployed, inactive. This second slide here is only two with inflows and outflows to unemployment, without breaking it down more heavily, the US is clearly an outlier. In the US we have some wonderful data referred to by its acronym, the JOLTS data, which is looking at flows from the perspective of the employers, interviewing the employers, rather than interviewing the workers. So you interview an employer and you say: And then you come back, and in this case a quarter later, and you say: And what happens when you do that is that if it’s gone up, natural to call it ‘job creation’. And as you see again, over the two decades for which this data has existed, there’s a large percentage of job creation from one quarter to the next. If instead, what has happened is the number of employed workers has gone down, natural to call that ‘job destruction’. And as you can see, there is almost as large a rate of job destruction as there is of job creation. So the change in total employment is the small difference between two large numbers. And if we want to think about various policies or want to think about various positive issues, then it seems to me you’ve got to focus on the determinants of these big numbers and how they interact to produce the small number, which is the difference between them. Secondly you can ask the question, how much hiring do you do? Hiring comes in two forms, one is job creation. The other is a worker leaves, maybe voluntarily, maybe looking for a better opportunity, maybe for other reasons, and you replace that worker with another worker. Maybe you dismissed the worker and you’ve replaced it. So a hire is just on a name basis, who do you have now that you didn’t have a quarter before? And as you can see, the hire rate is roughly twice the job creation rate, which gives you another sense of the large amount of flows going on in the economy. And separations is asking the same question. Who was here before, who isn’t here now? And again you see the separation rate and the hire rate are two very large numbers and the change in employment is the small difference between them. And as you can see, the big sources of separations are lay-offs and quits, on average they’re about the same size. In the course of the business cycle, there are dramatic differences between them, with lay offs spiking up early in a recession, and quits dropping as workers who quit either for a better job or in anticipation of finding a better job, recognise that the labour market is going soft, and those opportunities won’t be there. The sum of the two may not change a whole lot, but that doesn’t mean the underlying story isn’t telling us something important. Obviously when lay offs are way up and quits are way down, we’ve got a problem on the value. Two firms of hiring work, of having workers, and also we have a change in the perception, which is mostly accurate, of workers for their opportunities, should they seek additional employment. So the basic partial equilibrium model of the labour market, that is the heart of what this year’s or, I guess I can say this year’s until October, this year’s Nobel Prize was about, was really paying attention to the models that lead us to think about these flows. To think about the process of bringing together workers and jobs and the technical fix that has made modelling work is the matching function. The matching function thought about for the economy as a whole, says the change, the amount of hiring happening is a function of the number of unemployed workers and the number of vacancies. Vacancies again measured by, it used to be measured by looking at help wanted ads, before we had a survey, and now we have a survey that asks firms ‘Do you have a vacancy?’. And so we can fit an aggregate matching function. It fits pretty well. It fits ballpark as well as the aggregate production function and plays the same kind of role. The function, as far as we can tell, as constant returns to scale, and as work that Chris Pissarides has done with co-authors summarising and a lot of other estimates as well, Cobb Douglas fits fairly well. This doesn’t need to be something complex for thinking about the economy as a whole. And let me stress that, it’s for thinking about the economy as a whole, because if you have a question for which the answer involves looking more closely by industry or by aspects of firms, then the aggregate matching function may not be terribly informative. So one of the items that has gotten a lot of attention is that the matching function has deteriorated, and this particularly came up in the context here of the beverage curve. The beverage curve gives the vacancy rate relative to the unemployment rate and given the constant returns to scale we can work in these rates. And what you would expect if the value of workers to firms deteriorates over time, we would see a decline in vacancies arise in unemployment, and that’s the typical pattern. And what happened in the US economy is vacancy rates started coming back without much change in unemployment. And that led a number of people to say we have a serious structural problem in the US economy. And a structural problem is something that aggregate demand stimulation, whether monetary or fiscal, does not do well at, and therefore we should be very cautious about stimulating. Inflation is obviously a major concern of central banks, and the mix between how much are we addressing inadequate aggregate demand unemployment and how much are we addressing what might be a structural problem, is a critical part of setting monetary policy. Without studying the labour market, you cannot sensibly pursue monetary policy, particularly in the context of the US, where the official mandate of the Fed is to pay attention both to employment and inflation, and frankly, it strikes me as shocking that the mandates of so many central banks are only about inflation. And a relief that most of them view their role no different than in the US, the Fed views its role that the extent of concern goes beyond inflation, and that’s appropriate because to begin with, we don’t have a well settled optimal rate of inflation. Two percent or a bit under two percent is the typical target, where did that come from? Well, zero seems like a bad idea. Big numbers we know are a bad idea, so let’s pick a nice round small number, but is two better than three? I don’t think we have any idea of that. Olivier Blanchard has raised the idea that four might be better, not for the microeconomics of the steady state or normal times, let us say, for which inflation helps with things, but for dealing with financial crisis because they will give central banks more room, less likelihood of hitting the zero bound on interest rates. The timing of that suggestion may not have been optimal, but it seems to me absolutely right that there is nothing that says two percent is the right answer and nothing that says, a central bank that sometimes says two percent and sometimes says for the next few years we would be comfortable with three percent, nothing wrong with that. It might be a good response to circumstances, as long as credibility is preserved that that two or that three doesn’t become double digits, or doesn’t even become eight or nine, much less hyperinflation, in terms of the role of the central bank in having inflation, not create problems for the economy. Of course, in some circumstances, having inflation may help with things like debt overhang, but how much inflation, I think, is again an area where we don’t have a good answer. So I think we want to think about this process, as the central bank is addressing the economy. The economy keeping a steady inflation rate is an important part of planning, looking ahead, writing contracts etc, and the state of the labour market is important for two reasons. One the normative reason, a lot of unemployment is bad, bad for the workers, bad for the economy, bad for the workers’ families, bad for the future, particularly with long term unemployed of the labour market later on, as workers maybe losing skills, losing connections, etc. So there’s a need for central banks to pay attention for the normative reason, and on the positive side, estimating what will happen with more stimulus, depends again on the details of the labour market. So what’s happened in the US? In this picture is various people, including to my mind, particularly appallingly of the distinguished economist who is the President of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, suggesting that the structural problem was so large that central bank stimulus policies were misguided. There have been a number of studies trying to separate out the excess of US unemployment today, compared to what it was like before the crisis, between inadequate aggregate demand compared to before, and an increase in structural issues. Keep in mind there are always structural issues. There are always new needs by firms for skills of workers that some workers have, some workers don’t have. And the ability to hire workers who fit in well, who don’t need more training, that varies over the business cycle. Obviously firms are eager for workers that they feel better about and have to train less. At MIT, when we hire an assistant professor, we’re very pleased with the ones we hire, but that doesn’t stop us from wishing they were the young Paul Samuelson. The issue here, from the perspective of thinking about monetary policy is what has changed. And I’ve looked through a lot of these studies, and none of them have an adequate basis of really pinning down a number. The ones I’ve looked at most closely seem to me to give structural elements a larger role than the – seems appropriate based on the theoretical perspective. So in so far, as you’re looking at what unemployment insurance does to workers’ willingness to take jobs by reading off historic data on the connection between job finding hazards in unemployment, it’s ignoring the fact of the matching function at a time when you have a lot of unemployment. Just going off that is basically saying employment equals labour supply in the current climate with high unemployment, that’s not going to give you a good estimate. An interesting recent estimate by Barlevy focused on the aggregate matching function. In both cases they turn up that the majority of our excess unemployment is inadequate aggregate demand, and I’m suggesting it’s even too high and part of the issue is if you think about this aggregating, the aggregate matching function, which is a very handy tool for theorists, and a good starting place for empirical work, you’ll recognise as the work of Davis and Haltiwanger and a series of co-authors have been identifying that the matching process is very different in different sectors, in different size firms, in rapidly growing firms who are maybe doing multiple hiring, and slow growing firms that are doing less hiring. And so part of what has happened in the US, part of what is behind that picture there, is that construction is a place where jobs are filled very quickly. Employment has collapsed enormously from the overbuilding stage, both residential and commercial construction. And it’s because of the overhang of excessive building, it’s not coming back quickly, so that in part will be a sustained structural problem, because the level of employment there won’t go back to its previous level, and there is the frictional element of moving people elsewhere. In contrast, the sectors in the US that have done particularly well, education and health, are dominated by large firms and hire very slowly. As I’m sure you’re all aware, the assistant professor market in the US starts with posting a vacancy a year ahead of when anyone will actually get to work. So when you’re collecting vacancy statistics, do you have a vacancy, a great fraction of hiring happens without a measured vacancy, without a measured vacancy. Again as my previous example talking of the work in part, a lot of that is a posted vacancy, it’s filled, that’s happened between interviews, you know you’ve got an extra worker. You missed the measurement of the vacancy, so it looks like it’s happening very efficiently and it is, but the point is when you disaggregate, you have to say, from a perspective of what’s going on here, how much of this is due to the fact that the sectoral mix has changed, that the employer’s size has changed, small businesses doing particularly badly, because small banks are doing badly and they’re not lending as much, because a lot of small business depends on own wealth and a lot of that has been in housing and is now gone, and small business hires, fills vacancies much more quickly than large business does, where there’ll be a group who monitors the whole hiring process and goes through a series of steps. So there’s a whole set of issues, before you draw inferences about macro that you really want to do two things, make sure you’re not using a partial equilibrium model for a general equilibrium question. And secondly, working at the right level of disaggregation to inform the question you’re interested in. So let me just say a little bit here about macro and the problems of getting same kind of dynamics that I think, and I guess the Price committee thinks as well, we have made a lot of progress in, in terms of the labour market. There is a big literature on the housing market, I think that’s a harder problem because of the much larger role of finance in house purchases. So there is an informative interesting literature there as well, and thinking about the economy as a whole. So what’s been happening lately is the search labour market model is being embedded in a model that otherwise has a standard market clearing output market, and often one, where there is no particular role for short term finances. So if you have an infinite horizon budget constraint for a representative agent, then you’re missing all of one of the pieces Keynes talked about, which is the importance of current income for current spending, and indeed, disaggregated studies show there are a lot of people who are liquidity constrained, there is a lot of empirical link between income and spending on the part of a large fraction, but certainly by no means all of the consumers in the economy. What do we mean, so the two pillars of the kind of Keynes’ analysis I was taught as a student are sticky wages and prices, and the important role of income and so employment feeding back into aggregate demand. So if you’re thinking about unemployment insurance, and you have no role for unemployment insurance as a built in stabiliser, you’re leaving out a major part of the story. You can provide good insight into part of the story, but it would be wrong to draw policy inferences from just that part, without paying attention to the other parts. So sticky wages and prices, there is an ongoing effort to move away from assuming that all of the negotiations are successful, that recognise, particularly if you have multiple employees, that there are issues on how you’re paying new hires, relative to how you pay current workers, and issues about how you want to pay current workers. So there is a sticky wage problem there. Sticky prices looks like it’s not the same thing, but there is a related issue which is that firms have financial constraints, they’re going to do their pricing, if they could cut the prices enough to sell a lot more but not be able to pay off their debts or their workers, it’s not going to help. So there is the issue here of the dynamic process, in the output market which I’m not aware that we have, we have good pricing. I think we need to have income and demand come into it. We need to recognise that markets are incomplete, that many people don’t have a complex conditional plan on circumstances going forward, but looks good today and we’ll figure out tomorrow tomorrow. That’s missing by and large in all models, and so bankruptcy has played very little role in general equilibrium analyses, and yet it’s obviously an important part, particularly when you move to the macro dimension. If markets were incomplete and people were never allowed to have a positive probability of bankruptcy, we would have a disastrously bad economy. Allowing people to go bankrupt opens up, as it were, a richer set of assets. We could have pairwise negotiation that worked out all those alternatives without bankruptcy law, but first of all that would be expense on an individual each contract basis trying to figure it out, and secondly we have the dynamic problem that even small businesses are owing money to lots of different people, the people they borrow from, their suppliers, their workers etc. So we need some process for dealing with the interactions that come from the fact that, unlike the Arrow-Debreu model, trading plans are made sequentially with uncertainty about what opportunities you’ll have in the future. And so expectation formation and the magic word ‘confidence’ has a reduced form for expectation formation, plays an important role. If we’re going to build on search to get a better handle on macro, and I’d like to think that would be a good way, one of several, to be trying to get a better handle on macro, then I think we need to move beyond the partial equilibrium and do much more general equilibrium thinking, which is going to be inherently more difficult because of the additional complexities. But the advantage of being young is you look at things that people have been staring at for years and have run out of ideas on, and you have new ideas. And apart from the pay I’d love to be a young economist again, and I wish you well in helping our profession and our economies go forward. Thank you.

Vielen Dank, Martin. Er hat übrigens eine hervorragende Dissertation geschrieben - ich hatte so gut wie keine Arbeit damit. Als ich noch ein junger Wirtschaftswissenschaftler war – und nach Martins Vortrag können Sie sich ausmalen, wie lange das schon her ist – damals jedenfalls dachte ich, mit Methodik beschäftigen sich nur alte Leute, die nichts Besseres zu tun haben. Heute nun, wo es meinem Alter angemessen ist, möchte ich betonen, wie bedeutsam Methodik ist. Ein spezieller Punkt ist mir besonders wichtig: In meinen jungen Jahren habe ich Modelle angeschaut und mich jeweils gefragt, ob dies ein gutes oder ein schlechtes Modell ist. Heute denke ich dagegen, dass die Frage in dieser Form gar nicht sinnvoll ist, weil ein bestimmtes Modell für den einen Zweck gut und für einen anderen Zweck schlecht geeignet sein kann. Die Frage muss daher eher lauten: Trägt dieses Modell bei dieser speziellen Problemstellung etwas zum notwendigen Verständnis bei, um das Problem lösen zu können? Besonders wichtig ist dies bei politischen Fragestellungen, wo Sie – wenn Sie es richtig machen wollen – von mehreren verschiedenen theoretischen und empirischen Modellen ausgehen und daraus ein Konzept ableiten, aus dem dann politische Schlussfolgerungen zu ziehen sind. Das macht man so, weil das Wirtschaftsleben und politische Prozesse sehr komplex sind. Das Wesentliche für die praktische Eignung eines Modells ist, dass es nicht die Realität eins zu eins abbildet, sondern eine Vereinfachung der Realität darstellt. Aus diesem Grund enthält ein Modell immer Fehler. Wenn es keine Fehler enthält, ist es kein Modell. Entscheidend ist nur, ob diese Fehler im Hinblick auf die untersuchte Fragestellung bedeutend oder unbedeutend sind. Ich erwähne dies, weil ich näher darauf eingehen möchte, unter welchen Bedingungen Suchgleichgewichtsmodelle für Arbeitsmärkte geeignet sind, und in welchen Fällen ihnen dagegen entscheidende Elemente fehlen. Mein Vortrag gliedert sich wie folgt: zunächst spreche ich ein wenig über Arbeitskräftefluktuation, um den relevanten Modellkontext zu beschreiben, und anschließend gehe ich über zur Beveridge-Kurve, die den Verlauf von Arbeitslosigkeit und freien Stellen über den Konjunkturzyklus darstellt, bevor ich abschließend noch auf ein paar allgemeine Makro-Aspekte eingehe. Ein Modell, das wir alle kennen, ist das Standard-Marktmodell: Angebot und Nachfrage, und der Gleichgewichtspreis räumt den Markt. Wenn man auf dieser Grundlage nun aber den Arbeitsmarkt oder den Wohnungsmarkt betrachtet, ergibt sich das Problem, dass diese Märkte nicht auf dieselbe Weise geräumt werden wie beim Standardmodell. Zu jedem Zeitpunkt und in jeder noch so kleinen Region gibt es immer Arbeitslose und freie Stellen. Heißt das, dass der Markt nicht geräumt wird? Bei einer Interpretation nach dem Standard-Marktmodell würde das bedeuten, dass das Gehalt nicht stimmt, d.h. entweder zu hoch oder zu niedrig ist. Das Standardmodell enthält keine andere Betrachtungsmöglichkeit für das Marktgeschehen. Um die Größenordnungen einmal zu verdeutlichen, habe ich hier einige Wirtschaftsdaten aus den USA. Dies sind monatliche Arbeitskräftefluktuationen, „UE“ steht für die Fluktuation aus der Arbeitslosigkeit in eine Beschäftigung. Wie Sie sehen, hat über einen 20-jährigen Zeitraum betrachtet ein sehr großer Anteil der registrierten Arbeitslosen im darauffolgenden Monat schon wieder eine Beschäftigung. Und interessanterweise ist ein fast genauso großer Anteil der Arbeitslosen im darauffolgenden Monat aus dem Erwerbsleben ausgeschieden, „I“ steht für „Inaktiv“. Diese Angaben basieren auf der offiziellen Definition von Arbeitslosigkeit, d.h. aktiv auf Arbeitssuche zu sein und nicht nur den Wunsch auf eine Beschäftigung zu haben. Daneben gibt es hier auch eine beachtliche Fluktuation aus der Nicht-Erwerbstätigkeit direkt in eine Beschäftigung ohne eine vorherige Registrierung als arbeitslos. Ich betone das, weil die Befragungen im Abstand von einem Monat stattfinden. Es ist auch möglich, dass jemand mit der Stellensuche beginnt und sofort eine Beschäftigung findet, noch bevor er bzw. sie das nächste Mal befragt wird. Andererseits gibt es auch eine direkte Fluktuation in die Beschäftigung ohne vorherige Arbeitssuche, wenn man sozusagen von einer Beschäftigungs-möglichkeit überrascht wird und sich sagt: Gut, dann hänge ich jetzt nicht mehr länger auf den Parkbänken am Bodensee herum und gehe stattdessen arbeiten, dieses Stellenangebot kann ich mir nicht entgehen lassen. Und gleichzeitig gibt es auch eine beträchtliche Fluktuation direkt aus der Beschäftigung in die Arbeitslosigkeit und in die Nicht-Erwerbstätigkeit. Dies alles muss man berücksichtigen, vor allem wenn man die Bedeutung einer Arbeitslosenversicherung untersuchen will. In diesem Fall liefert das Marktmodell „Angebot – Nachfrage – Markträumung über den Preis“ kein geeignetes Abbild der Realität. Man kann zwar ein gewisses Maß an Arbeitslosigkeit in das Modell einbauen – dafür ist vor allem das Lucas-Prescott-Modell bekannt. Hier gab es bei Arbeitslosigkeit Fluktuationen zwischen verschiedenen lokalen Märkten, bei denen immer das Gehalt zur Markträumung führte. Es berücksichtigte nicht die Möglichkeit, dass sich Arbeitskräfte auf Stellen bewarben und sie nicht bekamen, sondern es war immer ihr Entschluss, dass es anderswo bessere Beschäftigungsmöglichkeiten gäbe. Eine weitere Eigenschaft des Modells war noch, dass es analog zum walrasianischen Auktionator jemanden gab, der die Fluktuationen zwischen den Märkten an die richtigen Stellen dirigierte. Durch dieses Modell haben wir meines Erachtens besser verstanden, dass das Arrow-Debreu-Modell um gewisse Reibungen erweitert werden muss, aber es bekommt diese Probleme nicht in den Griff. In den USA ist die Arbeitskräftefluktuation sehr hoch, viel höher als in irgendeiner anderen Volkswirtschaft, wie in dieser Abbildung zu sehen ist. Auf der ersten Folie hatten wir ein Modell mit drei Zuständen – beschäftigt, arbeitslos, inaktiv. Diese zweite Folie dagegen zeigt nur zwei Zustände, Zu- und Abgänge in die Arbeitslosigkeit, ohne sie weiter zu differenzieren. Die USA sind hier ein klarer Ausreißer. Wir haben in den USA wunderbare Daten, die sogenannten JOLTS-Daten, die diese Fluktuationen aus Arbeitgeberperspektive darstellen, d.h. hier werden anstelle der Arbeitskräfte die Arbeitgeber befragt. Man fragt sie: Und nach einem Quartal geht man erneut hin und fragt wieder: Wenn die angegebene Zahl steigt, nennt man das „Schaffung von Arbeitsplätzen“. Und Sie sehen, dass während der gesamten 20 Jahre, seit denen es diese Daten gibt, in jedem Quartal ein ganz schöner Prozentsatz an neuen Stellen geschaffen wurde. Wenn dagegen die Anzahl der besetzten Stellen sinkt, wird dies „Abbau von Arbeitsplätzen“ genannt. Und wie Sie hier sehen, ist die Rate des Stellenabbaus fast genauso hoch wie die der Stellenschaffung. Die Änderungsrate der Gesamtbeschäftigung ist somit die kleine Differenz zwischen den beiden hohen Einzelbeträgen. Wenn wir nun verschiedene politische Ansätze oder bestimmte positive Themen betrachten wollen, muss man meines Erachtens die Bestimmungsfaktoren dieser beiden hohen Zahlen verstehen und wie sie zusammenwirken, damit der kleine Differenzbetrag zwischen ihnen zustande kommt. Eine andere Möglichkeit besteht darin, die Arbeitgeber zu fragen: eine zur Stellenschaffung und die andere zur Ersetzung ausscheidender Arbeitskräfte, die vielleicht freiwillig, auf der Suche nach einer besseren Möglichkeit, oder aus anderen Gründen das Unternehmen verlassen. Oder ein Arbeitnehmer wird entlassen und durch einen neuen ersetzt. Die Neueinstellungen werden sozusagen auf Namensbasis erfasst, d.h. wer ist heute im Unternehmen, der bzw. die vor einem Quartal noch nicht da war. Sie erkennen hier, dass die Neueinstellungen etwa doppelt so hoch wie die Stellenschaffungen sind. Dadurch erhält man ein Gespür dafür, wie hoch die Arbeitskräftefluktuationen in einer Volkswirtschaft sind. Für das Ausscheiden von Arbeitnehmern wird dieselbe Frage gestellt: Wer war vor einem Quartal noch da und ist heute nicht mehr im Unternehmen? Hier ist es wieder genauso wie oben: Neueinstellungen und Ausscheidende Arbeitskräfte sind zwei sehr hohe Einzelzahlen, und der kleine Differenzbetrag zwischen beiden entspricht der Beschäftigungsveränderung. Die Hauptursache für das Ausscheiden von Arbeitskräften sind Entlassungen und Kündigungen, sie halten sich im Durchschnitt etwa die Waage. Im Verlauf eines Konjunkturzyklus gibt es allerdings enorme Abweichungen zwischen den beiden Größen. Zu Beginn einer Rezession steigen die Entlassungen stark an, während Kündigungen zurückgehen, da die Arbeitnehmer erkennen, dass der Arbeitsmarkt schwieriger wird und somit ihre Chancen sinken, eine bessere Stelle zu finden. Auch wenn sich also die Summe aus Entlassungen und Kündigungen vielleicht nur wenig ändert, kann man also den Daten eine Ebene tiefer dennoch wichtige Informationen entnehmen. Bei sehr hohen Entlassungen und sehr niedrigen Kündigungen haben wir natürlich ein Wertproblem. Zwei Unternehmen, die Arbeitnehmer einstellen und beschäftigen – und auch auf Seiten der Arbeitnehmer gibt es eine relativ realistische Wahrnehmungsverschiebung hinsichtlich ihrer Chancen bei der Suche nach einer anderen Stelle. Das grundlegende partielle Gleichgewichtsmodell des Arbeitsmarktes – und das ist übrigens, worum es im Kern beim diesjährigen, oder vielleicht sollte ich sagen bis diesen Oktober, beim diesjährigen Nobelpreis ging – hier lag der Schwerpunkt auf Modellen, mit deren Hilfe wir diese Fluktuationen - bzw. den Prozess, der Arbeitskräfte und Stellen zusammenbringt - besser analysieren können. Der technische Kniff, der hier zu funktionierenden Modellen geführt hat, war die Matching-Funktion. Die Matching-Funktion betrachtet auf Ebene einer gesamten Volkswirtschaft die Anzahl von Neueinstellungen als eine Funktion der Anzahl von arbeitslosen Arbeitskräften und offenen Stellen. Früher wurde die Anzahl offener Stellen noch über die „Gesucht“-Anzeigen erfasst, aber heute haben wir dafür Umfragen, bei denen Unternehmen zur Anzahl ihrer offenen Stellen befragt werden. Auf diese Weise können wir eine aggregierte Matching-Funktion erstellen. Sie passt ziemlich gut, in etwa genauso gut wie die aggregierte Produktionsfunktion, und spielt auch eine ähnliche Rolle wie sie. Soweit wir sagen können, hat die Funktion konstante Skalenerträge, und wie auch die Arbeit von Chris Pissarides und seinen Co-Autoren sowie viele andere Schätzungen bestätigen, scheint die Cobb-Douglas-Funktion ziemlich gut zu passen. Man braucht nicht unbedingt ein komplexes Modell, um eine Volkswirtschaft als Ganzes zu betrachten, und ich möchte betonen, dass bei der Matching-Funktion die Volkswirtschaft als Ganzes betrachtet wird. Wenn Sie dagegen eine Fragestellung haben, zu deren Beantwortung Sie stärker den Industriesektor oder einzelne Unternehmen berücksichtigen müssen, ist die aggregierte Matching-Funktion wahrscheinlich nicht sehr geeignet. Besonders viel Beachtung wurde der Tatsache geschenkt, dass die Matching-Funktion einen Abwärtstrend zeigt, was vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Beveridge-Kurve aufgekommen ist. Die Beveridge-Kurve zeigt die Rate offener Stellen im Verhältnis zur Arbeitslosenrate. Da wir konstante Skalenerträge haben, können wir mit diesen Raten arbeiten. Wenn also der Wert von Arbeitskräften gegenüber Unternehmen im Zeitverlauf sinkt, würde man eigentlich einen Rückgang der offenen Stellen bei Arbeitslosigkeit erwarten, das entspricht dem typischen Muster. In der US-Wirtschaft war dagegen zu beobachten, dass die Anzahl offener Stellen wieder anstieg, ohne dass sich die Arbeitslosigkeit nennenswert veränderte. Dies veranlasste einige Fachleute zur Schlussfolgerung, in der US-Wirtschaft bestehe ein ernsthaftes strukturelles Problem. Im Fall eines strukturellen Problems ist eine allgemeine Nachfragestimulierung, egal ob mit monetären oder fiskalpolitischen Mitteln, nicht hilfreich, so dass man sehr vorsichtig mit stimulierenden Maßnahmen sein sollte. Die Zentralbanken sorgen sich natürlich um die Inflation, und eine kritische Frage für die Geldpolitik ist, die richtige Mischung zu finden zwischen Einflussnahme auf die gestörte Beziehung zwischen aggregierter Nachfrage und Arbeitslosigkeit einerseits und auf das angenommene strukturelle Problem andererseits. Ohne Analyse des Arbeitsmarktes ist keine vernünftige Geldpolitik möglich. Das gilt von allem für die USA, wo es sogar zu den offiziellen Aufgaben der Fed gehört, neben der Inflation auch die Beschäftigung im Auge zu haben. Ehrlich gesagt finde ich es schockierend, dass sich das Mandat so vieler Zentralbanken nur auf die Inflation beschränkt deren Rolle über die Inflation hinausgeht. Das ist alleine schon deshalb richtig, weil es gar keine allgemeingültige optimale Inflationsrate gibt. Das typische Inflationsziel liegt bei zwei Prozent oder knapp darunter – aber woher kommt diese Zahl? Nun, Null erscheint nicht sehr sinnvoll. Und wie wir wissen ist eine hohe Inflation auch nicht sinnvoll, also sollten wir eine schöne runde kleinere Zahl nehmen – aber sind zwei Prozent besser als drei Prozent? Ich würde sagen, wir haben keine Ahnung, was richtig ist. Von Olivier Blanchard stammt die Idee, vielleicht wären vier Prozent besser. Zwar nicht in normalen Zeiten bei stabilen mikroökonomischen Bedingungen, wo Inflation auch helfen kann, aber in finanziellen Krisen, weil dann die Zentralbanken einen größeren Spielraum haben und die Wahrscheinlichkeit verringert wird, dass die Zinsen auf Nullniveau abrutschen. Der Vorschlag kam vielleicht nicht zum idealen Zeitpunkt, aber mir scheint völlig richtig, dass keineswegs feststeht, dass zwei Prozent richtig sind, sondern dass sich eine Zentralbank genauso gut einmal für zwei Prozent entscheiden und ein anderes Mal sagen kann: Für die nächsten Jahre fühlen wir uns mit drei Prozent wohler – daran ist nichts auszusetzen. Das könnte in bestimmten Situationen eine gute Lösung sein, solange die Glaubwürdigkeit gewahrt bleibt, dass aus diesen zwei oder drei Prozent keine acht oder neun Prozent werden, geschweige denn eine Hyperinflation – die Zentralbanken sollen zwar die Inflation steuern, aber schließlich keine zusätzlichen Probleme für die Volkswirtschaft schaffen. Unter bestimmten Bedingungen, wie z.B. bei einem Schuldenüberhang, kann Inflation zwar hilfreich sein – aber wie viel Inflation genau, für diese Frage haben wir schon wieder keine Antwort parat. Meines Erachtens sollten wir den Prozess genauer betrachten, wie die Zentralbank Einfluss auf die Volkswirtschaft nimmt. Die Inflationsrate auf gleichbleibendem Niveau zu halten ist wichtig im Hinblick auf Planung, Zukunftsaussichten, Vertragsabschlüsse usw., und der Zustand des Arbeitsmarktes spielt dabei aus zwei Gründen eine wichtige Rolle. Erstens ist ein normativer Grund, dass eine zu hohe Arbeitslosigkeit schlecht ist – schlecht für die Familien, schlecht für die Zukunft, vor allem durch die steigende Langzeitarbeitslosigkeit, bei der die Arbeitskräfte ihre Fähigkeiten, Kontakte usw. mit der Zeit verlieren. Neben diesen normativen Gründen müssen die Zentralbanken auf der positiven Seite abschätzen, wie sich eine Stimulierung auswirkt - was auch wiederum von den Bedingungen auf dem Arbeitsmarkt abhängig ist. Was ist also in den USA passiert? Hierzu gibt es verschiedenste Standpunkte, einschließlich der aus meiner Sicht erschreckenden Einschätzung eines angesehenen Ökonomen, der zudem Präsident der Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank ist. Nach seiner Meinung ist das strukturelle Problem so gewaltig, dass Stimulierungsmaßnahmen der Zentralbank unsinnig sind. In einer Reihe verschiedener Studien wurde versucht, den heutigen Arbeitslosigkeitsüberhang in den USA gegenüber vor der Krise zu quantifizieren und aufzuteilen auf beiden Faktoren der inadäquaten Gesamtnachfrage im Vergleich zu vor der Krise einerseits und den verstärkten strukturellen Problemen andererseits. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass es immer strukturelle Probleme gibt. Unternehmen stellen von Zeit zu Zeit neue Qualifikationsanforderungen, die von einigen Arbeitskräften erfüllt werden und von anderen nicht. Und die Verfügbarkeit von Arbeitskräften, die die benötigten Anforderungen ohne zusätzliche Ausbildungsmaßnahmen erfüllen, variiert außerdem im Laufe eines Konjunkturzyklus. Natürlich wollen Unternehmen die Arbeitskräfte für sich gewinnen, die ihnen am besten gefallen und möglichst wenig Zusatzausbildung benötigen. Auch wenn wir am MIT eine Assistenzprofessur besetzten, sind wir zwar immer sehr zufrieden mit unserer Entscheidung, aber trotzdem hoffen wir natürlich jedes Mal, einen jungen Paul Samuelson zu finden. Aus Sicht der Geldpolitik ist entscheidend zu verstehen, was genau sich verändert hat. Ich habe mir viele der Studien angeschaut, aber keine von ihnen liefert eine ausreichende Basis, um eine konkrete Zahl abzuleiten. Die Studien neigen eher dazu, strukturellen Faktoren eine wichtigere Rolle beizumessen als es aus theoretischer Sicht gerechtfertigt scheint. Wenn man untersuchen will, wie sich eine Arbeitslosenversicherung auf die Bereitschaft der Arbeitnehmer auswirkt, eine angebotene Stelle anzunehmen, und dazu lediglich historische Daten über bestimmte Probleme bei der Stellensuche von Arbeitslosen heranzieht, werden dabei die Informationen der Matching-Funktion bei hoher Arbeitslosigkeit übersehen. Das ist, als würde man trotz der aktuellen hohen Arbeitslosigkeit einfach sagen, die Beschäftigung entspreche dem Arbeitskräfteangebot – und das führt zu keiner guten Schätzung. Eine interessante Schätzung dagegen wurde kürzlich von Barlevy vorgelegt, bei der er sich auf die aggregierte Matching-Funktion stützt. Beide Studien kommen zu dem Ergebnis, dass die überschüssige Arbeitslosigkeit primär auf die inadäquate Gesamtnachfrage zurückzuführen ist. Ich gehe davon aus, dass sie sogar zu hoch ist und das Problem zum Teil darin besteht sie ist ein sehr nützliches Werkzeug für Theoretiker und bietet auch für empirische Arbeiten eine gute Ausgangsbasis – wie schon die Arbeit von Davis, Haltiwanger und einigen Co-Autoren gezeigt hat, ist der Matching-Prozess in verschiedenen Marktsektoren sehr unterschiedlich, wie z.B. in unterschiedlich großen Unternehmen oder in schnell wachsenden Firmen mit zahlreichen Neueinstellungen im Vergleich zu langsam wachsenden Firmen, die weniger Neueinstellungen haben. Was in den USA unter anderem passiert ist, was sich hinter diesem Bild verbirgt, ist dass speziell im Baugewerbe offene Stellen sehr schnell besetzt werden. Nach dem überzogenen Bauboom im Wohn- wie auch im Gewerbesegment ist die Beschäftigung im Bausektor extrem zurückgegangen. Das liegt jedoch an den zuvor übertrieben hohen Bauaktivitäten, so dass die Beschäftigung in diesem Sektor nicht so schnell wieder steigen wird. Ein nachhaltiges strukturelles Problem wird sich teilweise daraus ergeben, dass die Beschäftigung in diesem Sektor nicht wieder das alte Niveau erreichen wird. Es kommt hier der friktionelle Aspekt ins Spiel, Arbeitskräfte in andere Sektoren umschichten zu müssen. Einen Gegensatz dazu bilden der Ausbildungs- und Gesundheitssektor in den USA, die sich beide überdurchschnittlich stark entwickelt haben. Beide Sektoren werden von Großunternehmen dominiert, die bei Neueinstellungen sehr langsam vorgehen. Ein anderes Beispiel ist der Markt für Assistenzprofessuren in den USA, wo offene Stellen bereits ein Jahr im Voraus ausgeschrieben werden. Im Hinblick auf die Statistik offener Stellen wurde also bei einem großen Anteil aller Neueinstellungen im Vorfeld gar keine offene Stelle erhoben. Wie im obigen Beispiel beschrieben gibt es vielfach ausgeschriebene Stellen, die schon vor der nächsten statistischen Erhebung wieder besetzt sind. Man gibt also an, dass man jemanden neu eingestellt hat, aber die offene Stelle wurde vorher nicht erhoben. Aus diesem Grund sieht es dann nach einem sehr effizienten Prozess aus, und das stimmt grundsätzlich auch. Wenn man allerdings die Daten herunterbricht, um zu sehen was genau dahinter steckt – welches Teilergebnis ist beispielsweise darauf zurückzuführen, dass sich die Sektorenzusammensetzung oder die Unternehmensgröße der Arbeitgeber verändert hat oder dass es kleine Unternehmen besonders schwer haben, dass es den kleinen Banken schlecht geht und sie weniger Kredite vergeben, so dass kleine Unternehmen in hohem Maß von ihren eigenen Finanzreserven abhängig sind, dass vorübergehend viel Geld in den Wohnungsbau gesteckt wurde und jetzt verschwunden ist oder dass kleine Unternehmen offene Stellen viel schneller neu besetzen als Großunternehmen, in denen es eine extra Abteilung gibt, die den gesamten Rekrutierungsprozess überwacht, bei dem mehrere Schritte eingehalten werden müssen. Es sind also eine ganze Reihe verschiedener Faktoren zu untersuchen, bevor man makroökonomische Schlussfolgerungen ziehen kann. Zwei Dinge sind jedoch besonders wichtig: Erstens darf man kein partielles Gleichgewichtsmodell verwenden, wenn sich die untersuchte Fragestellung auf das Gesamtgleichgewicht bezieht, und zweitens muss man sicherstellen, immer auf der richtigen Aggregationsebene in Bezug auf die untersuchte Fragestellung zu arbeiten. Jetzt lassen Sie mich noch auf ein paar Makro-Aspekte eingehen - und auf die Herausforderung, dieselbe Dynamik, bei der wir aus meiner Sicht – und wahrscheinlich auch aus Sicht des Preiskomitees – schon gute Fortschritte erzielt haben, auch auf dem Arbeitsmarkt zu erreichen. Viel Literatur gibt es zum Privatimmobilienmarkt, den ich für noch schwieriger halte, weil beim Hauskauf die Finanzierung eine besonders große Rolle spielt. Es gibt also auch über diesen Bereich informative und interessante Literatur, ebenso wie über die Gesamtwirtschaft im Allgemeinen. In jüngerer Zeit wurde das Arbeitsmarkt-Suchmodell in ein Modell eingebunden, das den Markträumungsmechanismus des Standardmodells hat. Dabei geht es oft um Märkte, auf dem kurzfristige Finanzierung keine große Rolle spielt. Wenn Sie also einen repräsentativen Marktteilnehmer mit einer Budgetrestriktion über einen unendlichen Zeithorizont haben, fehlt Ihnen einer der Aspekte, von denen Keynes gesprochen hat, nämlich die wichtige Rolle des aktuellen Einkommens für die aktuellen Ausgaben. In der Tat zeigen disaggregierte Studien, dass viele Menschen in ihrer Liquidität eingeschränkt sind. Es gibt zwar einen starken empirischen Zusammenhang zwischen Einkommen und Ausgaben in weiten Bevölkerungsteilen, aber keinesfalls bei allen Konsumenten einer Volkswirtschaft. Was meine ich damit? Die beiden Eckpfeiler keynsianischer Analyse, die mir als Student beigebracht wurden, sind zum einen starre Löhne und Preise und zum anderen die wichtige Rolle des Einkommens, wodurch eine Rückkopplung zwischen Beschäftigungsniveau und Gesamtnachfrage entsteht. Wenn Sie also über eine Arbeitslosenversicherung nachdenken, dieser Versicherung aber nicht die Rolle eines integrierten Stabilisierungsfaktors zuweisen, fehlt ein wichtiger Aspekt. Sie können dann gute partielle Erkenntnisse liefern, aber es wäre falsch, politische Schlussfolgerungen nur aus dieser partiellen Sicht zu ziehen, ohne die fehlenden Aspekte zu berücksichtigen. Im Hinblick auf starre Löhne und Preise gibt es Bestrebungen, sich von der Annahme zu lösen, dass alle Verhandlungen erfolgreich abgeschlossen werden, und vor allem, dass sie bei mehreren Angestellten das Problem haben, wie viel Gehalt Sie Ihren neu eingestellten im Vergleich zu Ihren bestehenden Mitarbeitern zahlen bzw. wie viel Sie Ihren bestehenden Mitarbeitern zahlen. Hier gibt es also ein Problem mit starren Löhnen. Bei starren Preisen sieht das zunächst anders aus, allerdings gibt es hier ein ähnliches Problem – und zwar die Tatsache, dass Unternehmen finanziellen Beschränkungen unterliegen. Sie legen ihre Preise fest, aber wenn sie beispielsweise so niedrige Preise wählen, dass sie zwar viel mehr verkaufen, aber von den Einnahmen ihre Schulden und Angestellten nicht mehr bezahlen können, ist das kein gutes Ergebnis. Hier muss man also die Prozessdynamik untersuchen. Auf dem Absatzmarkt sollte es keine Probleme geben, denn wir haben gute Preise, aber aus meiner Sicht müssen wir Einkommen und Nachfrage mit ins Spiel bringen. Wir müssen berücksichtigen, dass Märkte unvollständig sind, dass viele Leute keine ausgetüftelten Entscheidungspläne haben, in denen sie die künftigen Bedingungen berücksichtigen – heute sieht es gut aus, und morgen sehen wir weiter. Das fehlt insgesamt in allen Modellen. So hat beispielsweise auch das Thema Insolvenz in der allgemeinen Gleichgewichtsanalyse kaum eine Rolle gespielt, obwohl Insolvenz natürlich ein wichtiges Element ist, vor allem auf der makroökonomischen Betrachtungsebene. Wenn Märkte unvollständig wären und Individuen niemals eine positive Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Insolvenz haben dürften, hätten wir eine desaströse Wirtschaftswelt. Indem wir Individuen die Möglichkeit zur Insolvenz einräumen, ermöglichen wir gewissermaßen reichhaltigere Vermögenswerte. Wir könnten beispielsweise paarweise Verhandlungen führen, bei denen alle möglichen Alternativen ohne Insolvenzrecht ausgehandelt würden. Aber das ginge erstens auf Kosten des einzelnen, jeden Vertrag individuell aushandeln zu können, und zweitens haben wir das dynamische Problem, dass selbst kleine Unternehmen sehr vielen verschiedenen Parteien Geld schulden – ihren Kreditgebern, Lieferanten, Angestellten usw. Daher brauchen wir einen Prozess für die Interaktionen, die sich daraus ergeben, dass Handelspläne im Gegensatz zum Arrow-Debreu-Modell sequenziell und unter Unsicherheit hinsichtlich der künftigen Möglichkeiten entwickelt werden. Eine wichtige Rolle spielen somit die Erwartungsbildung und das Zauberwort „Vertrauen“ als eine reduzierte Form von Erwartungsbildung. Wenn wir auf die Forschung aufbauen, um ein besseres Verständnis für die Makroprobleme zu bekommen müssen wir über partielle Gleichgewichtsbetrachtungen hinausgehen und zu einer viel allgemeineren Gleichgewichtsanalyse kommen, was aufgrund der zusätzlichen Komplexität natürlich deutlich schwieriger ist. Aber Sie sind noch jung, und das hat den Vorteil, dass Sie mit neuen Ideen an Themen herangehen, über die sich andere schon seit Jahren den Kopf zerbrechen und noch zu keiner Lösung gekommen sind. Abgesehen von meinem Gehalt wäre ich zu gerne heute nochmal ein junger Ökonom, und ich wünsche Ihnen viel Erfolg dabei, unseren Berufsstand und unsere Wirtschaftssysteme weiter voranzutreiben. Vielen Dank.

Peter Diamond on the use of partial equilibrium modeling
(00:20:50 - 00:24:16)

Decreasing Poverty in Emerging Countries
Over the last fifteen years, the number of people living below the World Bank’s fixed, real poverty line of a dollar twenty five a day has gone down substantially and has been going down even more rapidly in the latest period. With a registered economic growth of 7.8 percent in 2012, China is the fastest growing national economy worldwide and has the second largest national economy after the U.S.

Developments in China
China’s impressive economic growth during the last 20 years can be primarily ascribed to drastic economic structural changes – the growth of urban industries and services and the migration of industries and services to urban areas with wage development increasing to above the poverty line. The growth of the industry and service sector has been two to three times faster than agriculture. Even though urban expansion, the growth of non-agricultural industries and export growth of municipally produced goods contributed heavily to the country’s fast economic development, the agricultural sector is still the dominant part of China’s economy. In his lecture “Poverty, Inequality and Food”, economist and 1996 recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize Sir James Mirrlees addresses questions of poverty and strategies of poverty reduction in developing countries. With respect to China, Mirrlees emphasizes the role of agriculture as a key determinant of economic growth and poverty reduction. Although the migration of industries to urban areas has expanded drastically during the last 20 years, almost half of the population in China still works in agriculture. While the number of people working in agriculture has not increased very fast, the income per capita in agriculture has. Rural incomes rose by 6 percent per year through the 1990s and continue to go up steadily. The annual growth of agriculture averaged about 5 percent over the last 10 years.[11] Agriculture plays a fundamental role in the development of farm industries by reallocating labor and workers to related non-agricultural sectors. Rising agricultural productivity, associated with specialization, growth of higher value crops production and livestock commodities, export and the expansion of related off farm labor and industries, contributed successfully to the sectoral and overall economic growth in China. In the context of rapid productivity growth in agriculture and its driving force for the overall economy, Mirrlees speaks of a “green revolution” currently at work in China:

Sir James Mirrlees  (2011) - Poverty, Inequality, and Food

Well, that’s quite a lot of the topics that you haven’t had yet this morning. It’s always a pleasure to come here to Lindau. Because we see a lot of fresh faces every time. Good. I’ve been interested in development issues for a very long time. What I’m going to be doing today is making some quite small points in a way but they’re small points about very important issues that have to do with reducing poverty. And it was suggested to me by, it’s a kind of reaction to things that I’ve seen in the press and, and heard in general conversation, let’s just start to make sure that you’re, you understand what’s going on here. Of course poverty is one of those words that is really incredibly vague, indefinable. Possibly you think this is some kind of idea of what is the least you need in order to live satisfactorily at all. But of course, if you actually try to calculate the cost of the necessary food to keep alive with a decent expectation of health, then that is incredibly cheap. Really one has to include a lot of things besides basic food but you saw food in the title of the talk, so of course I’m thinking of food particularly, but if we’re going to get any kind of measurement of somebody’s standard of living and relate it to a notion of poverty, we’d better measure real consumption in some sense and it, the better include things like education, health care and other very important publically provided infrastructure. Even then of course it’s still crude, you can’t really capture this in a single dimensional number. But having got there, I wonder what we should do about this inequality of consumption, which of course is revealed as soon as you start getting measures of this kind, and that’s really the topic of this talk. I’m going to be reacting a bit to what is the standard way of presenting the poverty, which is to concentrate very much on the crudest possible description of the inequality of consumption that we know exists by showing poverty head counts. Poverty head counts of course are simply the number of people below some almost arbitrarily chosen number for real consumption. And quite often when you see poverty head counts, they’re based on surveys that have estimated income, and they may not even be income per capita, and if they’re consumption, they might not be consumption per capita but consumption per household, and it can sometimes be a little tricky to track down which. But I don’t want to use alternative kinds of measures like gini coefficients because they pay just as much attention to what is going on in the upper part of the income distribution or consumption distribution as in the lower, hence I concentrate on that. And this is where we had got to. You may well wonder or you may well conjecture that the reason why this stops in 2005 is because I was too lazy to bring it up to date. But actually if you get onto the World Bank figures on the web, you will find that, Of course you can get later figures, particularly for your higher income countries and a few scattered figures, 2006, 2007, but the standard measure is what we’ve got here and I dare say we’ll quite soon get some later figures. Though I remind you of the dramatic feature of economic history, that the number of people living below a fixed real poverty line of a dollar twenty five a day has gone down very substantially in this period of fifteen years and it’s been going down more rapidly in the more recent period. And of course you can see from this diagram, this graph, that that’s largely what happened in Asia and East Asia, which is to say that China made a very large contribution to this. And I just remind you that through this period world population was growing at slightly over one percent a year, or a bit more than that, so it actually is a proportion. Poverty has been going down quite well, but there’s what happened in China which has been the really dramatic effect. So I’m going to start by saying a little bit about why I think or how I think China managed to achieve, if it is an achievement, because maybe it just happened rather than was planned as such, to do something quite this dramatic. I don’t know that anybody particularly believes in the 1980 figure which, this tremendously high proportion below that. Because certainly at that time China was using a poverty level way below a dollar twenty five a day for its own official measures, and the surveys were perhaps not terribly well conducted then, but in the more recent twenty years, I don’t think there’s much question that they’ve been fairly well done. And it makes it look as though there isn’t any poverty probably in China now, if you could properly project this curve forward. Now, I know, when I suggested to the Department of Chinese Government, informally over coffee, that looking at this graph, it appeared they should close down the office, that they immediately said there’s a lot of poverty in China, so I don’t know whether you regard that as clear evidence. But what I want to do is to talk a little bit now about how China reduced it. At least this is what I think. First thing to say is this is not only by official figures, it seems to be pretty much verified by the very careful consumer surveys that are being done, that poverty in this sense is mainly rural. Of course there are some poor people in cities, but numerically it appears not to be a very large figure. So therefore, what we have to consider is what has happened there. Now, the Chinese strategy for economic growth was quite deliberately to industrialise and to encourage urban expansion to get into export growth, which was expected to be largely exports of urban produced goods. And that has pretty much been what has happened. And you might therefore think that, if indeed poverty declined, and that means that rural poverty declined tremendously, though this just happened and there wasn’t particularly an outcome of that strategy. But of course there was migration into industry. I put it this way, into industry in urban areas. I put it this way because there was quite a lot of industry in towns and even villages, not so important nowadays but in the eighties that would have been quite important. Quite a lot of people therefore were drawn into industry and when in industry they were paid a wage that was above the poverty line, so clearly this makes some contribution. But it wouldn’t be unrealistic to say that the typical example is of somebody living in a rural area which is perhaps rather above the average standard of living. There is a great deal of inequality between villages, if I can put it that way, for reasons that I will come to in a couple of lines. And of course it’s the people in the better off villages who actually are more likely to be able to work well in the cities, and they’re more likely to migrate, and can afford the costs that are associated with migration, migration which is often temporary for a number of years rather than completely permanent. So what you’re seeing is people being lifted from an income level which may already be above the poverty line to an income level that is typically about three times the income that they have been receiving in rural areas. The one way of looking at that is to say that’s a really pretty expensive way of reducing poverty, of course there are some reasons for that, some good, some not so good. Another contribution that we made to reducing poverty is the one child policy, which has meant that population has grown rather more slowly in China than it otherwise would have. The population is still growing, it is expected to peak in about ten years, and even if the one child policy were now greatly weakened, that would still be true. Of course that means that if output is not too sensitive to the number of people in rural areas, not actually producing, that you’d expect income per head in rural areas to be a bit higher as a result of that, and rough calculations confirm that that’s pretty much true. What one might expect, and what I had naively thought before I looked into things properly, was that this very special feature of China might be a major reason why poverty is now quite low, namely that the use of land is distributed equally to people in the village, men, rather. Now that, that statement covers a variety of ways of doing it and there is still cases of common land being used in common and things like that. But broadly that’s right, so that unlike many countries, many poor countries, you don’t have land ownership in the hands of land owners who are quite rich for example. Another way of putting it is to say that the income of people in agriculture in rural areas in China is made up of an implicit wage and also implicit rent, because they don’t have to pay any rent for the land they get the use of. In theory they don’t own the land, they’re not allowed to borrow on it as security. Sometimes what is effectively selling of land takes place but that, that’s irrelevant to the point that I’m making now, that at least one of the major reasons why you’d expect considerable inequality in rural incomes, is simply not present in China. On the other hand, as I remarked before, as between villages you get very great differences, and because of what’s called the Hukou system, a registration system for where people live, people cannot easily move from village to village, in fact I’m told by some people that it just can’t happen. And therefore you don’t get equalisation between villages and provinces, and that in itself is clearly a major reason for continuing inequality. However, the reason why I say and I put the question mark here and say land distribution is what’s doing it, is that the land had been redistributed long before the beginning of what’s called the reform period, which is the period that I’m really looking at and the period that these inequality and poverty figures refer to, starting in 1978 or 1979. So that you wouldn’t expect any change in the poverty levels to be associated with this, relatively satisfactory land distribution. But it seems to me, and looking into it, that it comes down to agricultural growth in China. Now, as you’d probably guess by now, at least, I think the proportion of people living in rural areas, working in agriculture or the proportion of working hours in agriculture is probably less than a half. So that one shouldn’t think of incomes in rural areas as being entirely generated by agriculture, indeed incomes as such are only a part of the total incomes. But many of the other incomes, the services associated with it, services of distribution, of carting things by lorry from one place to another, all of the usual services that grow up as people get richer, are based on agriculture in some fundamental sense. The real source of agriculture, of growth, you can see like this. This is my calculation of agricultural value added in China. It happens not to be per capita, but the number of people working in agriculture had not been growing very fast and has now been declining for some years, so this gives you a pretty good indication of incomes per head in agriculture as well as elsewhere. And of course, as the income per head goes up in agriculture, so the wage for other activities in rural areas goes up as well. So this then gets into the general incomes in rural areas. Now, this pretty impressive growth rate, it’s nearly quadrupled in the thirty years that this picture refers to, but that’s nothing compared to the growth rate of the economy as a whole as measured by GDP or even GDP per head. So I must say, I think that this probably gives a better indication of the growth of people’s enjoyment of life, of standard of living than the headline growth figures that we hear of so frequently. Now there’s probably a more realistic one, it’s, if I remember right it’s around five percent a year. And in many ways that’s what it takes to get so many people out of poverty, because the distribution of income around this, the average that’s implied by the diagram is of course quite dispersed but the whole distribution moves upwards over time like this, and of course the number of people in the lower tail, below the dollar twenty five a day, which started off as a very high proportion. It then falls and by the way you can see that, we’ve really got it here. This fairly rapid growth and the average towards the end may well have to do with the way the distribution is moving up and the lower tail no longer matters so much. So my notion is that really quite a lot of the reduction in poverty can be put down to that and how did that come about? When you look at the various inputs into agriculture, and labour and input not been increasing, irrigation, irrigated land had gone up by about fifty percent in this period and fertiliser use had rocketed up and it looks very clear that this is the green revolution at work. The coming of the new varieties which was, even began in the early sixties, late fifties but really exploded in China in this period and allowed crops to use very large quantities of chemical fertilisers which of course are industrial products. So it’s very important that they were available and there were fertiliser subsidies that encouraged the use of land and there were considerable improvements and transportation facilities which meant that cash crops could be more useful and get a better price. So all of these things were there encouraging this growth, the availability of the fertilisers, which was possible because of the - it was actually because of export earnings by industry initially and later by the actual production of them. Now, that’s one way of looking at the importance of agriculture in the reduction of poverty and you notice that it’s just a simple straightforward view of it as generating income. And that’s not how most non economists at least tend to think about this. They think to deal with poverty the important thing is the production of food. Recently we’d had an FAO statement which I got off the web, by mid 2008 international food prices had sky rocketed to their highest level in thirty years. This, coupled with the global economic downturn, pushed millions more people into poverty and hunger. Now of course they don’t say how much of that is supposed to be the result of the global economic downturn, but this is FAO, so they really mean that it was mainly the rise in prices that did that. They’re quite explicit after this bit I’ve quoted in saying that their view of the problem with food prices was influenced by reports from countries who were asked to each estimate how much they thought their poverty would have changed as a result, and they’re mainly stories of riots which I draw your attention to the fact that they were urban. The point about them being urban is of course that workers in the cities certainly are made worse off by rising prices if they’re not compensated by higher wages, a higher price of food. But that’s not true of people who are net producers of food. So I’d advise some scepticism to this and I want to explore it a little further. Higher prices for food might well have brought millions out of poverty. If you have a very small farm and you’re struggling and have to sell some of the food, in order to pay for the other necessities of life, then higher prices for food grains are just what you want and we should bear in mind that that may well be important. And I think there is no question in that in China that it was very important because in the most recent years you have high value added because of higher prices. Just what happened to prices, well I hope that’s reasonably visible. Indeed you should read right from the bottom of the blue of the background of the graph because that’s roughly at zero level. It’s actually, it’s slightly positive but even allowing that the diagram might be a little misleading, that they were big jumps. I’m happy to be able to say that in 2008, just when the prices had gone up like mad, I was giving a lecture and I said I’m sure they will come down. You should not regard this as a new inflation in prices, and they did but I didn’t realise that they were going to jump up again and they have done that. Although more recently you can see on the left hand graph here that literally now we’ve gone high again, they came down a bit through 2010 and now they are, in the most recent figures from the FAO, they’re at their highest level. And I want you to compare that with what you see on the right hand graph, if you can see that at all clearly. The things I’m interested in here, now the green line and the orange line. The orange line is production, the best estimate one can get, and it does fluctuate rather a lot. I’d just emphasise that the horizontal axis is at 1800, so we’re not measuring up from 0 of course and the top level there is 2300. Now, this is of course quite a considerable growth. But if you look at utilisation, which is the actual use and the reason why the two are different is of course that you get inventory, the stocks change, that the green curve, the line, is remarkably smooth, so you’re getting considerable fluctuations in prices as reported, while you’re getting a fairly smooth change in actual demand as it comes up. What I’d of course very strongly suggest is that in the food market there is a great deal of sensitivity of prices to relatively small changes in the balance between demand and supply. Although strangely for a very long period food prices remained remarkably stable, food grain prices at least, and I don’t quite know why that should have been true when more recently they’ve started to go tumbling around, speculation may have had something to do with it, but it doesn’t show up all that clearly in the stock figures that we have here. That’s background to how important is food in all of this, and the lesson I was drawing there was the sensitivity of food prices to small changes. And hark that back to make, pointing out that there’s at least a belief that these changes in food prices could have a rather big impact on poverty so that it might – that doesn’t necessarily mean we can do anything about the whole thing, but that we may want to pay attention to that. And one of the things that we might draw from this is that the China story may not be something to be applied to the rest of the world very much. That’s to say that we shouldn’t necessarily expect that somehow poverty can be put right by relying on the agricultural sector. Particularly in Africa that might not be the way, and certainly Africa’s been having most of the time rather a bad time in agriculture. What’s the alternative? The classic way of dealing with poverty or low incomes or inequality is transfers. You might reasonably have guessed that whatever topic I’d take and I’d come round to taxes and subsidies sooner or later and it seems to me to make a great deal of sense in the area of poverty. So I want to explore just what the chances are of doing a good job of reducing poverty by transfers. Now, these are already used, cash transfers are used in Latin America, Mexico and Brazil, at least. And India has rather equivalent things like employment schemes and free school meals, so these would count and it’s considering other possibilities. There are also things like the World Food Programme, which distributes food to particularly needy areas, not simply on an emergency basis because for example East Timor has had a steady flow of food from the World Food Programme for quite a number of years, and it’s simply an important part of their income in effect. So transfers can certainly be used. How good do they work? Well, there isn’t a lot of time to do this. It’s a bit difficult to find out quite what the demand for function for food is, but we really need to have it in order to do a good assessment. So I’ll skip over this fairly quickly but, as you could understand, even although prices fluctuate quite a bit, it’s difficult that for long periods they really haven’t done so much and therefore it’s been hard to get to the price response. I think most people guess at the demand function, that treats the demand for food as a function out of income divided by food price, and that actually fits pretty well to data but not if it’s a linear function. Deaton and Subramaniam found that elasticity, demand was falling and within the range they were looking at for, I think it was Maharashtra, it got down to 0.4 and for higher incomes I’m sure it’s much less than that and presumably one at 0. Now, this is all important because it means that low income people are going to change their purchase of food much more as price changes or income changes than high income people. And the question is, what does that imply? Well, look at what happens if you said about redistributing from, say a bunch of rich people in order to pay poor people, modelling this, so the supply of goods is fixed, it’s convenient. You’ve got to do something that will reduce the demand for food by the rich because otherwise there won’t be extra food for the poor to have, and the only way that the poor’s standard of living can increase is if there is quite a lot of food, at least at the very bottom. It turns out with the kind of demand function I was describing, that the price of food will rise if you do this. And in fact it can rise quite a lot. Now you may say, mm, no, that would only be true if you had an enclosed food market within the country. Don’t countries trade with one another? Well, much less than you’d expect actually. Of course the richer countries do quite a lot of trade in food grains, but one of the reasons for these fluctuations in food grain prices is because of the countries that greatly restrict trade, international trade. So the internal price is probably quite important in practice. And there are several conclusions I want to get from this. One is that a successful transfer system is going to be associated with a rise in food price, food grain, food prices. That doesn’t exactly mean that if you see food prices have gone up you should applaud, but it suggests that that may be important. Second point, however, is that many of the poor may not be food producers at all and they may indeed suffer quite a lot from the consequential rise in food prices, so it’s necessary that the transfer they’ll receive, the amount of income paid to them, is big enough to more than compensate for the effects of the rising price. It doesn’t apply to food grain producing farmers but in another way it doesn’t, we don’t apply that to the landlords who may do very well from a higher food price, but they have to be taxed. And there is another issue that comes back to these urban riots which is of course, if indeed the process would necessarily mean a rise in prices, then you should think about the impact on others besides those that you’re particularly focused on in creating the transfer system. I suggest that the sensible way of doing this is that the transfer system should compensate the middle income, middle to lower income people, I’m thinking of them essentially as the urban wage earners so that they’re not worse off and so that they don’t start rioting in complaint. Of course that means that you’re going to have to take more from the rich in order to achieve any particular improvement of poverty at the lower end, but what I’m after here is that it’s actually quite important to design these transfer systems and paying attention to other people in the population, besides those that you think of as being particularly targeted by it. And the last point would be, if you accept that for poor people who are not food producers, that you want an increase in income and that must at least cover a cost that arises from the increased price of food, then a good delivery control matters, because if a lot of that were to evaporate through corruption and fraud, then you very quickly find that the net, there was a net loss for many of the poor people, rather than a net gain. And I think that’s a concern in practically every country. Thank you very much.

Nun, dies ist ein ganzes Bündel von Themen, die heute Vormittag noch nicht behandelt wurden. Es ist mir immer eine Freude, hier nach Lindau zu kommen – es sind jedes Mal wieder viele neue Gesichter zu sehen. Gut. Ich interessiere mich schon sehr lange für Entwicklungsthemen. Heute will ich ein paar ganz kleine Aspekte ansprechen, die allerdings zu sehr wichtigen Themenkomplexen im Zusammenhang mit der Reduzierung von Armut gehören. Ich kam darauf durch - es ist eine Reaktion auf Dinge, die ich in der Presse gelesen und in allgemeinen Gesprächen gehört habe. Lassen Sie uns als erstes sicherstellen, dass Sie verstehen, worum es hier genau geht. Armut ist einer dieser sehr ungenauen und nur schwer definierbaren Begriffe. Vielleicht meinen Sie, es gehe um die Frage, wie viel man mindestens benötigt, um einigermaßen überleben zu können. Wenn man aber nur die Kosten für die benötigten Nahrungsmittel zusammenrechnet, um sich einigermaßen gesund am Leben zu erhalten, ist das sehr billig. Stattdessen müssen neben den Grundnahrungsmitteln noch viele andere Faktoren berücksichtigt werden Wenn wir eine Maßeinheit für den Lebensstandard suchen, mit der wir auch Armut darstellen können, messen wir am besten auf irgendeine Weise das tatsächliche Konsumverhalten. Dazu zählen auch Aspekte wie Ausbildung, Gesundheitswesen und andere öffentliche Infrastrukturleistungen. Und selbst dann ist es immer noch eine grobe Rechnung, man kann den Verbrauch nicht wirklich in einer einzigen Zahl ausdrücken. Aber wenn wir diesen Ansatz einmal weiterverfolgen, ist meine nächste Frage, was wir gegen das bestehende Konsumungleichgewicht tun können, auf das man bei einer solchen Berechnung natürlich sofort stößt. Dies ist das eigentliche Thema meines Vortrags. Es ist eine Reaktion auf die allgemein übliche Darstellungsweise von Armut, die sich auf das gröbste, uns allen bewusste Verbrauchsungleichgewicht konzentriert, und zwar die Angabe von Armut als Anteil der Gesamtbevölkerung. Dies ist einfach die Anzahl von Menschen, deren gemessener Verbrauch unterhalb eines annähernd beliebig festgelegten Grenzbetrags liegt. Die auf diese Weise berechneten Armutszahlen basieren oft auf Umfragen, bei denen das Einkommen geschätzt wird, allerdings sehr grob und nicht unbedingt auf Ebene des Pro-Kopf-Einkommens. Auch der Verbrauch wird nicht unbedingt pro Kopf, sondern pro Haushalt erhoben, und hinzu kommt, dass oft nur schwer erkennbar ist, was von beiden gerade gemeint ist. Ich will aber auch nicht alternative Messgrößen wie z.B. Gini-Koeffizienten heranziehen, weil diese die oberen Einkommensschichten genauso stark berücksichtigen wie die unteren, um die es mir hier geht. Daher haben wir uns auf diesen Bereich konzentriert. Vielleicht fragen Sie sich, oder Sie ahnen schon, dass diese Zahlen nur bis zum Jahr 2005 gehen, weil ich zu faul war, sie weiter zu aktualisieren. Wenn Sie aber die Zahlen der Weltbank im Internet abrufen, ist auch dort 2005 das letzte Jahr, für das umfangreiche, ziemlich gut recherchierte Zahlen für eine größere Anzahl von Ländern vorliegen. Natürlich gibt es auch noch jüngere Zahlen, vereinzelte Zahlen für 2006 oder 2007, vor allem für die reicheren Länder. Auf jeden Fall ist dies die Standarddarstellung, und ich wage zu behaupten, dass es ziemlich bald wieder aktuelle Zahlen geben wird. Ich möchte darauf hinweisen, dass die dramatische Wirtschaftsentwicklung dazu geführt hat, dass die Anzahl von Menschen, die unter der definierten Armutsgrenze von 1,25 US-Dollar pro Tag leben, in den letzten 15 Jahren sehr stark zurückgegangen ist. Dieser Rückgang hat sich in den letzten Jahren noch beschleunigt. In dieser Grafik erkennen Sie, dass dieser Trend vor allem auf Asien und Ostasien zurückzuführen ist, vor allem China hat einen sehr großen Anteil daran. Das jährliche Wachstum der Weltbevölkerung betrug in diesem Zeitraum etwas über ein Prozent oder ein bisschen mehr. Es handelt sich also um eine ziemliche Größenordnung. Die Armut ist ziemlich stark zurückgegangen, wobei die dramatischste Entwicklung in China stattgefunden hat. Daher möchte ich zunächst kurz darauf eingehen, wie bzw. warum China meines Erachtens zu einer solch dramatischen Leistung in der Lage war – sofern man das als Leistung betrachtet, denn es könnte ja auch einfach nur eine ungeplante zufällige Entwicklung gewesen sein. Ich weiß nicht, ob jemand von Ihnen die Zahl für 1980, diesen extrem hohen Anteil, wirklich glaubt. Mit Sicherheit wurde damals bei den offiziellen chinesischen Zahlen eine Armutsgrenze von weniger als 1,25 US-Dollar pro Tag zu Grunde gelegt, und wahrscheinlich wurden auch die Umfragen nicht sehr professionell durchgeführt. Bei den Zahlen für die letzten zwanzig Jahre hingegen kann man davon ausgehen, dass sie ziemlich sauber erhoben wurden. Auf Basis dieser Zahlen müsste man annehmen, dass es heute in China überhaupt keine Armut mehr gibt Nun weiß ich aber - als ich Vertretern des chinesischen Ministeriums in einem informellen Gespräch beim Kaffee sagte, man hätte angesichts dieser Zahlen den Eindruck, sie könnten ihr Ministerium eigentlich zumachen, entgegneten sie: Nein, es gebe noch eine Menge Armut in China. Demnach bin ich also nicht so sicher, ob man diesen Zahlen vertrauen sollte. Ich möchte jetzt ein bisschen darüber sprechen, wie es in China zur Reduzierung der Armut gekommen ist Zunächst ist zu sagen, dass sich die Armut in China vor allem auf ländliche Regionen konzentriert. Dies belegen nicht nur die offiziellen Zahlen, sondern es wurde auch in offenbar sehr zuverlässig durchgeführten Erhebungen weitgehend bestätigt. Natürlich gibt es auch in Städten eine gewisse Armut, die numerisch gesehen aber nicht sehr hoch ist. Daher müssen wir näher betrachten, was hier geschehen ist. Nun, im Zentrum der Wachstumsstrategie für die chinesische Wirtschaft standen Industrialisierung und Urbanisierung. Die Exporte sollten erhöht werden und sich weitgehend auf Güter konzentrieren, die in Städten produziert wurden. Diese Strategie wurde ziemlich konsequent umgesetzt. Nun denken Sie vielleicht, wenn sich die Armut reduziert hat, müsste sie in ländlichen Regionen am stärksten zurückgegangen sein. Die Realität war jedoch, dass es einfach so geschah, ohne dass die Strategie hier einen bestimmten Einfluss hatte. Natürlich kam es durch die Industrialisierung zu einer gewissen Migration weil ein Großteil der Industrie in Städten und sogar Dörfern angesiedelt war. Das ist heute nicht mehr so stark der Fall, aber in den achtziger Jahren war das so. Es zog also viele Menschen zur Industrie, und wenn sie dort einen Lohn oberhalb der Armutsgrenze bekamen, lieferte dies einen großen Beitrag zur Reduzierung der Armut. Der typische Fall waren Menschen, die auf dem Land lebten, wo der Lebensstandard unter Umständen ein ganzes Stück über dem Landesdurchschnitt lag. Nun gibt es zwischen verschiedenen Dörfern große Einkommensunterschiede, auf deren Gründe ich gleich noch näher eingehe. Natürlich sind es eher Menschen aus besser situierten Dörfern, die in den Städten arbeiten. Sie migrieren eher in die Städte bzw. sie können sich den Umzug dorthin eher leisten, wobei die Migration oft nur vorübergehend für einige Jahre ist anstatt auf Dauer. Diese Menschen werden von einem Einkommensniveau, das vielleicht schon vorher über der Armutsgrenze lag, auf ein Einkommen gehievt, das in der Regel etwa dreimal höher liegt als ihr vorheriges Gehalt auf dem Land. Nun kann man natürlich einwenden, dies sei ein sehr teurer Weg, um die Armut zu reduzieren Einen weiteren Beitrag zur Reduzierung der Armut hat die Ein-Kind-Politik geleistet, in deren Folge die chinesische Bevölkerung langsamer wächst als es ansonsten der Fall gewesen wäre. Die Bevölkerung nimmt trotzdem noch weiter zu, und der höchste Stand wird ungefähr in zehn Jahren erwartet. Daran würde sich auch dann nichts ändern, wenn die Ein-Kind-Politik jetzt stark eingeschränkt würde. Wenn der Produktionsausstoß in ländlichen Regionen weitgehend unabhängig von der Bevölkerungszahl ist, müsste infolgedessen das Pro-Kopf-Einkommen auf dem Land etwas höher liegen. Dies wird von groben Berechnungen grundsätzlich bestätigt. Man würde erwarten - und ich ging irrtümlich selbst davon aus, bevor ich mich näher damit beschäftigte – einer der Hauptgründe für die inzwischen ziemlich niedrige Armut in China könnte sein, dass die Landnutzung gleichmäßig auf die Landbevölkerung – bzw. die dortigen Männer – verteilt ist. Dies lässt mehrere Möglichkeiten des Vorgehens offen, und so gibt es beispielsweise immer noch den Fall, dass gemeinsames Land gemeinschaftlich genutzt wird. Im Grundsatz stimmt es jedoch, dass in China anders als in vielen, vor allem armen Ländern das Land nicht in den Händen einer Handvoll reicher Grundbesitzer konzentriert ist. Oder mit anderen Worten: das Einkommen der chinesischen Landwirte setzt sich aus einem impliziten Lohn- und einem impliziten Pachtanteil zusammen, da sie keine Pacht für das Land zahlen müssen, das sie bewirtschaften. Theoretisch ist das Land nicht ihr Eigentum, und sie dürfen es zum Beispiel nicht beleihen. Es gibt zwar auch Landverkäufe, aber das ist nicht relevant für den Punkt, um den es mir hier geht für Einkommensunterschiede auf dem Land einfach wegfällt. Auf der anderen Seite bestehen in China wie oben erwähnt hohe Einkommensunterschiede zwischen verschiedenen Dörfern. Durch das sogenannte Hukou-System, in dem die gesamte Bevölkerung mit ihrem jeweiligen Wohnort registriert ist, können die Menschen nicht einfach in ein anderes Dorf umziehen. Mir wurde von mehreren Seiten bestätigt, dass dies einfach nicht möglich sei, so dass es infolgedessen keine Fluktuation zwischen verschiedenen Dörfern und Provinzen gibt. Dies ist mit Sicherheit eine der Hauptursachen für die anhaltenden Einkommensunterschiede zwischen Dörfern. Die Landverteilung spielt deshalb eine wichtige Rolle – und ich versehe dies mit einem Fragezeichen – weil das Land schon lange vor Beginn der sogenannten Reformperiode umverteilt wurde. Ich beschäftige mich hauptsächlich mit dem Zeitraum ab 1978/79, und auch diese Zahlen hier für Armut und Einkommensunterschiede beziehen sich auf diese Zeit. Die relativ befriedigende Landverteilung liefert also keinen Grund für die Reduzierung der Armutszahlen. Der entscheidende Faktor scheint mir stattdessen das Wachstum des chinesischen Landwirtschaftssektors zu sein, und bei näherer Betrachtung bestätigt sich diese Annahme. Wie Sie wahrscheinlich schon vermuten, dürfte der Anteil der in der Landwirtschaft tätigen Landbevölkerung bzw. der Anteil der in der Landwirtschaft erbrachten Arbeitsstunden weniger als 50 Prozent betragen. Man darf also nicht davon ausgehen, dass die Einkommen der Landbevölkerung ausschließlich aus landwirtschaftlicher Tätigkeit stammt, sondern nur zum Teil. Allerdings haben viele der übrigen Einkommensquellen einen engen Bezug zur Landwirtschaft all die üblichen Dienstleistungen, die mit steigendem Wohlstand der Menschen einhergehen. Dies kann man als die eigentliche Quelle für das Wachstum des chinesischen Landwirtschaftssektors betrachten, und auf dieser Grundlage berechne ich die landwirtschaftliche Wertschaffung in China. Es ist keine pro-Kopf-Betrachtung, denn die Anzahl der in der Landwirtschaft tätigen Menschen ist nicht sehr schnell gewachsen bzw. in den letzten Jahren sogar rückläufig. Dies liefert einen guten Anhaltspunkt für das Pro-Kopf-Einkommen im Landwirtschaftssektor und anderen Sektoren. Wenn das Pro-Kopf-Einkommen in der Landwirtschaft steigt, steigen auch die Gehälter für andere Tätigkeiten in ländlichen Regionen. Auf diese Weise kommen die allgemeinen Einkommen auf dem Land zustande. Dieses recht beeindruckende Wachstum – die Zahlen haben sich in den hier dargestellten 30 Jahren fast vervierfacht Dennoch muss ich sagen, dass diese Zahlen meines Erachtens einen besseren Anhaltspunkt für den tatsächlichen Zuwachs an Lebensqualität und Lebensstandard der Menschen geben als die Wachstumszahlen, die wir immer in den Überschriften lesen. Sie sind wahrscheinlich realistischer – es sind rund fünf Prozent pro Jahr, wenn ich mich recht entsinne. In vielerlei Hinsicht ist es das, was so viele Menschen aus der Armut führt. Die damit einhergehende Einkommensverteilung ist im Gegensatz zu dem Durchschnittswert in unserer Grafik in Wirklichkeit natürlich breit gestreut, aber die Gesamtverteilung zeigt einen Aufwärtstrend. Zu Anfang war der Anteil der Menschen am unteren Ende, die unter 1,25 US-Dollar pro Tag liegen, noch sehr hoch, aber er wird wie Sie sehen tatsächlich kleiner. Dieses ziemlich schnelle Wachstum und der steigende Durchschnittswert dürften damit zusammenhängen, dass die Einkommensverteilung insgesamt ansteigt und somit das untere Ende nicht mehr so stark ins Gewicht fällt. Aus meiner Sicht ist der Armutsrückgang in China weitgehend auf diesen Punkt zurückzuführen. Wie ist es also dazu gekommen? Wenn man die verschiedenen Inputfaktoren der Landwirtschaft betrachtet, sind die Faktoren Arbeit und Saatgut nicht gestiegen, während die Bewässerung im Betrachtungszeitraum um rund 50 Prozent gestiegen ist und auch deutlich mehr Düngemittel eingesetzt werden. Es scheint also, als wäre das Wachstum ein Ergebnis der grünen Revolution. Durch neue Anbausorten, die in den späten 50er/ frühen 60er Jahren erstmals in China aufkamen und in unserem Betrachtungszeitraum richtiggehend explodierten, konnten immer größere Mengen an chemischen Düngemitteln eingesetzt werden, die natürlich industriell hergestellt sind. Die Verfügbarkeit von Düngemitteln war also sehr wichtig. Um die Nutzung von Agrarflächen zu fördern, wurden Düngemittel-Subventionen gezahlt, und durch zahlreiche Verbesserungen und neue Transportmöglichkeiten konnten die Pflanzen besser genutzt werden und höhere Preise erzielt werden. Alle diese Faktoren zusammen ermöglichten also dieses Wachstum – wie die Verfügbarkeit von Düngemitteln, die zunächst durch Exporterträge infolge der Industrialisierung und später durch die eigene Herstellung dieser Mittel möglich war. Nun, dies ist eine mögliche Betrachtungsweise, welche Bedeutung der Landwirtschaft bei der Reduzierung der Armut zukommt. Wie Sie sehen, ist es einfach eine simple, gradlinige Sicht auf die Landwirtschaft als Einkommensfaktor. Sie unterscheidet sich von der Sichtweise zahlreicher Nicht-Ökonomen, für die beim Thema Armut grundsätzlich die Produktion von Nahrungsmitteln im Mittelpunkt steht. Neulich fand ich im Internet einen Artikel der UN-Ernährungs- und Landwirtschaftsorganisation FAO, laut dem die internationalen Nahrungsmittelpreise Mitte 2008 auf das höchste Niveau seit 30 Jahren angestiegen waren. Dies in Verbindung mit der weltweiten Rezession stürzte Millionen zusätzlicher Menschen in Armut und Hunger. Es wurde natürlich nicht angegeben, wie viel davon auf die globale Rezession zurückzuführen war – aber es ist typisch für die FAO zu denken, dass die Hauptursache im Preisanstieg liegt. Im Anschluss heißt es in dem Artikel ganz explizit, dass sie sich bei ihrer Einschätzung des Preisproblems auf Angaben von Reportern stützen, die schätzen sollten, wie stark der Einfluss der hohen Nahrungsmittelpreise auf die Armut in ihrem Land war. Ansonsten ging es in dem Artikel vor allem um Unruhen, die sich – und dies sollten Sie wissen – auf die Städte konzentrierten. Was ich damit sagen will: Die Arbeiter in den Städten leiden natürlich unter steigenden Lebensmittelpreisen, wenn sie keine entsprechende Gehaltsanpassung erhalten. Bei Menschen aber, die selbst Nettoerzeuger von Nahrungsmitteln sind, ist das anders. Ich rate daher, diese Aussagen skeptisch zu betrachten, und möchte meine Argumentation noch etwas weiterspinnen. Steigende Nahrungsmittelpreise können Millionen von Menschen aus der Armut helfen. Nehmen wir an, Sie haben einen kleinen Bauernhof, mit dem sie sich wirtschaftlich schwer tun, so dass Sie einen Teil der Erzeugnisse verkaufen müssen, um Ihre Lebenshaltung zu finanzieren. In diesem Fall kommen Ihnen steigende Lebensmittelpreise sehr gelegen. Es steht meines Erachtens außer Frage, dass dieser Punkt gerade in China eine wichtige Rolle gespielt hat, weil die höheren Preise in den letzten Jahren zu hohen Wertsteigerungen geführt haben. Es ist hoffentlich gut auf der Grafik erkennbar, was hier mit den Preisen geschehen ist. Sie müssen sich auf den unteren Bereich der Grafik konzentrieren, nahe der Nulllinie. Die Werte sind zwar leicht positiv, aber – und vielleicht ist diese Abbildung in diesem Punkt etwas irreführend – es geht hier um große Preissprünge. Ich bin froh sagen zu können, dass ich genau zur Zeit dieser verrückten Preisanstiege im Jahr 2008 in einer Vorlesung sagte, die Preise würden sicher wieder zurückgehen und es handele sich nicht um eine neue Inflation. So war es dann auch. Ich hatte zwar nicht erwartet, dass die Preise anschließend erneut steigen würden, aber so kam es. Auf der linken Grafik erkennen Sie, wie die Preise wieder stark ansteigen, 2010 dann nochmal leicht nachgeben und nach den jüngsten Zahlen der FAO gerade ihren bisherigen Höchststand erreicht haben. Wenn Sie dies mit der Grafik rechts vergleichen - ich hoffe Sie können sie einigermaßen erkennen – hier sind jetzt die grüne und die orange Linie von Interesse. Orange ist der beste verfügbare Näherungswert für die Produktion, die wie Sie sehen ziemlich schwankend verläuft. Die horizontale Achse liegt bei 1.800, wir messen also nicht von Null ab. Der höchste Wert beträgt hier 2.300 - das ist also wirklich ein ziemlich starkes Wachstum. Wenn Sie jedoch die Verwendung betrachten, d.h. die tatsächlich verbrauchten Mengen – die Abweichung zwischen Produktion und verbrachter Menge ergibt sich übrigens durch Veränderung der Lagerbestände. Die grüne Linie ist dagegen bedeutend gleichmäßiger. Sie zeigt an, dass die Preise zwar wie gesagt stark schwanken, die tatsächliche Nachfrage jedoch ziemlich gleichmäßig ansteigt. Ich möchte deutlich machen, dass im Lebensmittelmarkt schon bei geringen Verschiebungen zwischen Angebot und Nachfrage eine große Preissensitivität herrscht. Interessanterweise sind die Nahrungsmittelpreise über einen langen Zeitraum erstaunlich stabil geblieben, zumindest die Getreidepreise, und ich habe auch keine Erklärung dafür, dass in letzter Zeit plötzlich diese Preisschwankungen aufgekommen sind. Spekulationsgeschäfte könnten hierbei eine Rolle spielen, aber die Aktienmarkzahlen, die wir hier haben, geben darüber auch keinen genauen Aufschluss. Das ist der Hintergrund dafür, dass Nahrungsmittel in diesem gesamten Szenario eine so wichtige Rolle einnehmen. Meine wichtigste Erkenntnis war dabei die hohe Sensitivität der Nahrungsmittelpreise schon auf leichte Marktverschiebungen. Es besteht also zumindest die Annahme, dass Veränderungen der Nahrungsmittelpreise einen ziemlich starken Einfluss auf die Armut haben könnten. Das heißt nicht unbedingt, dass wir irgendetwas an dieser gesamten Situation ändern könnten, aber wir sollten zumindest ein Auge darauf haben. Eine der Schlussfolgerungen aus diesen Erkenntnissen ist, dass der Fall Chinas kaum auf andere Länder übertragbar ist. Damit meine ich, dass sich Armut nicht grundsätzlich dadurch verringern lässt, dass man sich auf den Agrarsektor verlässt. Vor allem in Afrika wäre das wahrscheinlich nicht möglich, und Afrika hat sich mit der Landwirtschaft immer schon ziemlich schwer getan. Was ist also die Alternative? Ein klassisches Vorgehen bei Armut oder niedrigen Einkommen oder ungleicher Einkommensverteilung ist der Einsatz von Transferleistungen. Sie können sich denken, dass ich bei jedem beliebigen Thema früher oder später auf Steuern und Subventionen zu sprechen komme. Ich habe jedenfalls den Eindruck, dass dies beim Thema Armut ein sinnvolles Vorgehen ist. Also möchte ich ergründen, in wieweit sich durch Transferleistungen die Armut reduzieren lässt. Es gibt schon zahlreiche Ansätze in diesem Bereich - in Lateinamerika beispielsweise, zumindest in Mexiko und Brasilien, wird Bargeld als Transferleistung eingesetzt. Auch in Indien gibt es solche Ansätze, wie z.B. Beschäftigungsmodelle und kostenlose Mahlzeiten in Schulen, und es sind noch weitere Einsatzbereiche geplant. Eine weitere Idee ist das World Food Programme, in dessen Rahmen besonders bedürftige Regionen mit Nahrungsmitteln versorgt werden - und zwar nicht nur im akuten Notfall, sondern wie z.B. in Osttimor versorgt das World Food Programme auch Regionen über mehrere Jahre hinweg kontinuierlich mit Nahrungsmitteln, die in solchen Fällen einen beträchtlichen Teil des Einkommens der Region repräsentieren. Transferleistungen sind also offensichtlich eine Möglichkeit. Wie gut sie funktioniert? Nun, es ist nicht viel Zeit dafür. Die genaue Lebensmittelnachfrage ist nur schwer zu ermitteln, für eine angemessene Beurteilung müssen wir sie aber genau kennen. Ich streife diesen Punkt also nur ganz kurz. Ein Problem ist, dass die Preise zwar insgesamt schwanken, sich aber manchmal über längere Zeiträume kaum ändern. Dadurch ist es schwierig, die Preisreaktion zu berechnen. Die Nachfragefunktion zeigt die Lebensmittelnachfrage als Funktion vom Quotienten aus Einkommen und Lebensmittelpreisen. Das passt ziemlich gut zu den Daten, zumindest sofern die Funktion nicht linear ist. Die Preiselastizität wurde von Deaton und Subramaniam festgestellt. Bei fallender Nachfrage ging in dem von ihnen betrachteten Bereich – ich glaube es war für Maharashtra - der Wert auf 0,4 zurück. Bei höheren Einkommen liegt der Wert sicher noch viel niedriger, wahrscheinlich fällt er bis auf Null. Dies liefert die wichtige Erkenntnis, dass Menschen mit niedrigerem Einkommen bei einer Preis- oder Einkommensänderung ihre Lebensmitteleinkäufe viel stärker verändern als Menschen mit höherem Einkommen. Was bedeutet das nun? Nun, schauen Sie was passiert, wenn man Geld von einer Handvoll reicher Leute an arme Leute umverteilt. In diesem Modell gehen wir von einem festen Güterangebot aus, um es einfacher zu machen. Man muss etwas tun, um die Lebensmittelnachfrage der Reichen zu drosseln, weil ansonsten nicht genügend für die Armen übrig bleibt. Man kann den Lebensstandard der Armen nur anheben, wenn genügend Lebensmittel zur Verfügung stehen, zumindest am unteren Ende. Bei der beschriebenen Nachfragefunktion zeigt sich, dass die Lebensmittelpreise in diesem Fall steigen, unter Umständen sogar ziemlich stark. Jetzt sagen Sie vielleicht: Nein, das würde nur in einem Land mit geschlossenem Lebensmittelmarkt stimmen, aber es gibt doch einen Handelsaustausch zwischen den Ländern. Nun, dieser Austausch ist viel geringer als Sie wahrscheinlich erwarten. Reichere Länder handeln natürlich in gewissem Umfang mit Getreide, aber einer der Gründe für die Preisschwankungen bei Getreide besteht darin, dass viele Länder nur sehr wenig internationalen Handel betreiben. Aus diesem Grund spielen in der Praxis die Binnenpreise eine große Rolle. Daraus möchte ich mehrere Schlussfolgerungen ableiten. Erstens geht ein erfolgreiches Transfersystem mit steigenden Nahrungsmittel- bzw. Getreidepreisen einher. Damit meine ich nicht, dass man sich über steigende Nahrungsmittelpreise freuen sollte, sondern dass Preissteigerungen eine wichtige Rolle spielen. Zweitens sind viele der armen Menschen selbst keine Nahrungsmittelproduzenten und leiden daher sehr unter steigenden Nahrungsmittelpreisen. Somit ist es wichtig, dass sie ausreichend hohe Transferleistungen, d.h. zusätzliches Einkommen erhalten, um die Auswirkungen des Preisanstiegs mehr als auszugleichen. Anders liegt der Fall bei getreideproduzierenden Landwirten. Ebenso wenig betrachten wir hier die Grundbesitzer, die unter Umständen von höheren Lebensmittelpreisen profitieren, aber sie müssen Steuern zahlen. Und es gibt noch ein weiteres Problem, bei dem ich auf die anfangs erwähnten städtischen Aufstände zurückkomme: Wenn es schon zu Preisanstiegen kommt, sollte man auch die Auswirkungen auf andere Gruppen berücksichtigen als nur die, die bei der Gestaltung des Transfersystems im Vordergrund stehen. Im Sinne eines umsichtigen Vorgehens sollte das Transfersystem einen Ausgleich für alle Menschen mit mittlerem bis niedrigem Einkommen schaffen. Ich denke dabei vor allem an Lohnempfänger in Städten. Ihre Position sollte sich nicht verschlechtern, damit sie nicht dazu verleitet werden Aufstände anzuzetteln. Um die Armut am unteren Ende erfolgreich zu lindern, muss man wiederum den Reichen mehr wegnehmen. Mir geht es zunächst einmal um die grundsätzliche Erkenntnis, dass dringend Transfersysteme geschaffen werden müssen und dabei auch andere Bevölkerungsgruppen zu berücksichtigen sind als nur die, auf die das System hauptsächlich abzielt. Und noch ein letzter Punkt: Wenn man das Einkommen armer Menschen, die selbst keine Nahrungsmittelproduzenten sind, so stark anheben will, dass mindestens ihre Mehrkosten infolge der höheren Lebensmittelpreise ausgeglichen werden, sind gute Kontrollmechanismen notwendig. Wenn zu viel Geld im Korruptions- und Betrugssumpf verschwindet, haben viele arme Menschen am Ende einen Nettoverlust statt einen Gewinn. Und ich gehe davon aus, dass Korruption und Betrug in praktisch jedem Land ein Problem sind. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

James Mirrlees on agriculture as a key determinant of China's economic growth
(00:18:26 - 00:19:59)

China has not yet joined the ranks of the modern, developed countries. Despite great structural changes, China will have to undergo a major shift of production and employment from agricultural-based to industrial/service-based industries.

Will the number of people living below the poverty line continue to go down with the economic rise of emerging market countries in Central and South America and East and Southeast Asia? Will Europe foster economic development in service product markets and improve the climate for enterprise and business development to accelerate labor productivity growth? Will Europe live up to its ambition of reaching a labor participation target of 75 percent by 2020? And finally, will the unbalanced recovery growth with lower-wage occupations making up a great share of labor growth after the worldwide recession induce a long-term increase in poverty and social inequality in the countries of the West?

Footnotes:
[1] As Strobel points out, “within Europe’s member countries growth developments have been quite heterogeneous. While Germany, France, and Italy, for example, exhibited declining productivity growth performances, northern countries like Sweden, Finland, and Denmark but also the UK were on the ascendant”. The Economic Impact of Capital-Skill Complementarities on Sectoral Productivity Growth. 2011. 2ff.
[2] The overall employment rate in the European Union, representing persons in employment as a percentage of the population of working age (15-64 years), reached 68.5 percent in 2012 – which is still significantly below the pre-crisis level. The “employment rate will have to increase by over 6 percentage points in order to reach the target of 75 %” set by the “Europe 2020 Strategy”. Source: Eurostat - Labour market and labour force statistics:
epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Labour_market_and_labour_force_statistics.
[3] In his most recent studies, economist and 2001 recipient of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize Michael Spence shows that the major part of U.S. job creation (97 percent) has occurred in non-tradable sectors (retail, health care, food service, government, construction) over the past twenty years. However, these jobs experienced much slower growth in value added than jobs in the tradable sectors (technology, consulting, government and finance). The rising of value added per person and incomes in tradable sectors did not lead to a significant increase of tradable jobs though. See also: Michael Spence and Sandile Hlatshwayo. The Evolving Structure of the American Economy and the Employment Challenge. 2012.
[4] Manufacturing still plays an important role in Europe particularly in France and Germany, where “manufacturing industries like machinery and car manufacturing are still important sources of productivity growth” (Bart van Ark et al. 93). Journal of Economic Perspectives. Vol. 22/1: Winter 2008. “The Productivity Gap between Europe and the United States.” 25-44.
[5] For a deeper understanding of labor market dynamics based on equilibrium modeling as well as on search and matching analyzes see Peter Diamond’s lecture “Search and Macro” held 2011 in Lindau: http://www.mediatheque.lindau-nobel.org/#/Video?id=602 as well as the 2010 panel discussion “On the Intellectual History of the 2010 Prize in Economic Science” with Laureates Peter Diamond and Dale Mortensen: http://www.mediatheque.lindau-nobel.org/#/Video?id=631
[6] See Robert Solow “Low-wage work in Europe and America”, lecture held 2008 in Lindau. See also Gerhard Bosch’ and Jerôme Gautié’s detailed analysis of the differences in the share of low wage work in the U.S., Denmark, Germany, France, the Netherlands and United Kingdom: “Low wage work in Five European Countries and the USA: the Role of National Institutions”. Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales Vol. 29/ 2: 2011. 303-335.
[7] Source: Destatis des Statistischen Bundesamts https://www.destatis.de/EN/FactsFigures/NationalEconomyEnvironment/EarningsLabourCosts/MinimumWages/CurrentEU.html For a detailed discussion on minimum wage employment in Europe see also Thorsten Schulten. “WSI-Mindestlohnbericht 2013”. WSI-Mitteilungen 2/2013. 125-132.
[8] The conservative and center-left parties of the grand coalition agreed on introducing a national minimum wage in 2016.
[9] Source National Employment Law Project: www.nelp.org/LowWageRecovery.
[10] Bezzina, Eusebio. Eurostat. Statistics in Focus. 48/2012. “Population and Social Conditions”.1-8.
[11] Data extracted from the World Bank: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.AGR.TOTL.KD.ZG.


Further Relevant Lindau Lectures on Labor Market Research:

2008 Muhammad Yunus "Social Business is the Solution"
2011 Panel Discussion "On the Intellectual History of the 2010 Prize in Economic Science"
2011 George Akerlof "Identity Economics, George Akerlof"
2011 Reinhard Selten "Reaching good Decisions without Utility and Probability Judgments"


Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Cite


Specify width: px

Share