Immunology

by Joachim Pietzsch

Biology or chemistry, that was the question, which accompanied immunology from its birth as a scientific discipline in 1883 all through the seven decades of its adolescence until 1957, and the dispute whether it is nobler to study cells or take advantage of molecules still lingers on today when immunologists ask whether a particular immune response is an innate or an adaptive one[1]. Gerald Edelman who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1972 with Rodney Porter “for their discoveries concerning the chemical structures of antibodies,” humorously illustrated this formative dichotomy of his discipline when he lectured in Lindau for the first time.

 

Gerald Edelman on two kinds of immunologists
(00:00:36 - 00:01:31)

 

A formative dichotomy

Paul Ehrlich and Ilya Mechnikov shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1908 “in recognition of their work on immunity”. It was the first Nobel Prize that in its quotation explicitly referred to immunity. For good reasons its award can be regarded as the official birthday of immunology.[2] It acknowledged the existence of two different arms of the immune system, a cellular defence line involving macrophages and a humoral defence line involving antibodies. By doing so, it reinforced the notion that “the phenomena of immunity (…) can be approached from various directions” and “that protection against disease can be of two kinds” [3].

In 1883, Ilya Mechnikov, a zoologist by training, had conducted an experiment, in which he introduced sharp splinters into transparent starfish larvae. The next day, he observed “a mass of moving cells surrounding the foreign bodies to form a thick cushion layer.” He deduced “that the afflux of mobile cells towards point of lesions” speaks for the hypothesis that “disease would be a fight between the morbid agent, the microbe from outside, and the mobile cells of the organism itself. Cure would come from the victory of the cells and immunity would be the sign of their acting sufficiently to prevent the microbial onslaught.” He succeeded in verifying this hypothesis in water-fleas. Consequently, he developed a general theory of immunity, which was primarily based on the action of “’phagocytes’, i.e. devouring cells, and the whole function that ensures immunity has been given the name of ‘phagocytosis’”.[4]

Emil von Behring, a medical doctor by training, and his colleague Shibasaburo Kitasato had taken a different approach to immunity. In their experiments, they observed that certain animals were not affected by infections with tetanus or diphtheria bacteria. They demonstrated that the administration of small doses of tetanus or diphtheria toxins stimulated the production of antitoxins in these animals, and that they were able to immunize other animals with these molecules. In December 1890, they published a paper, in which they proved the following hypothesis: “The immunity of rabbits and mice, which have been immunised against tetanus, is based on the ability of the cell-free blood liquid to render harmless the toxic compounds that are produced by tetanus bacilli”[5]. In a second paper, published one week later, von Behring added respective data on diphtheria. These two papers mark the beginning of serum therapy with anti-toxins, i.e., passive vaccination through the transfer of antibodies[6]. Clinical trials with a diphtheria antiserum that started three years later demonstrated an overall cure rate of almost 77 percent – a fantastic result in the fight against a disease that then was known as the “strangling angel of children”[7]. In 1901, von Behring received the first Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for his work on serum therapy, especially its application against diphtheria (…)”

Paul Ehrlich had been instrumental in realising von Behring’s success. He developed the methods for standardising antisera production and optimising its yield. In 1897, Ehrlich outlined his side-chain theory. He postulated that all cells of an organism carry a lot of preformed structures on their surface, which under healthy conditions “exist (…) in order to combine chemically with normal products of metabolism, i.e. to assimilate them”. Yet, in case of an infection and toxin injection, respectively, these structures could also bind bacterial toxins. “As these receptors, which may be regarded as lateral chains ("Seitenketten") of the protoplasm (…), become occupied by the toxin, the relevant normal function of this group is eliminated (…) - the deficiency is not merely exactly compensated, but made up to excess, i.e., there is hyperregeneration. Finally, if the injections are increased and repeated, so many such groupings are formed in the body of the cells that they inhibit as it were the normal functions and the cells get rid of the disturbing excess by discharging them into the blood.”[8] Although this theory proved to be wrong in many details, it offered the correct paradigm for the description of antibody formation and for our present understanding of adaptive immunity.

Chemistry takes over

Mechnikov’s cellular approach to immunity seemed not to be as applicable to medicine as humoral ones, in which pathogens could be defeated by antibodies, as von Behring and Ehrlich had proven. In the long term, it appeared that no infectious disease would resist the armamentarium of vaccination and serum treatment. Yet, such hopes did not fulfil. Consequently, immunologists shifted their focus towards chemistry and laid the emphasis of their research on antigens and antibodies, thereby inaugurating an era that lasted almost fifty years and was even dubbed “the ‘Dark Ages’ of immunochemistry.”[9] Nevertheless, three Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine related to immunology were awarded during these years. To Charles Richet in 1913 “in recognition of his work on anaphylaxis”; to Jules Bordet in 1919 “for his discoveries relating to immunity”; and to Karl Landsteiner in 1930 “for his discovery of human blood groups.” The discoveries that lead to these Prizes had already been made between 1900 and 1902, however. Peter Medawar looked back at the era of the “old immunology”, as he called it, when he lectured in Lindau in 1978.

 

Peter Medawar on the “old immunology”
(00:01:27 - 00:03:09)

 

The chemists who dominated immunology tended to tune out the biological aspects of their discipline. “Allergy was left to the clinicians, and any excursions into questions of immunopathology were left to experimental pathologists, and little remarked in the mainstream of immunology.”[10] Yet several biological observations emerged, which could not easily be integrated into the prevailing chemical concept of immunology. These observations made it especially difficult to explain the huge diversity of antibodies. Their formation must be instructed by antigens, chemists argued. Antigens obviously serve as templates, which – comparable to casting a mould – determine the patterns of their respective antibodies. But how would an organism then be able to distinguish between self- and non-self-antigens to avoid autoimmune responses, and how could it be explained that antibody production eventually continues in the absence of antigen?

Return to biology

With his natural selection theory of antibody formation, Niels Jerne (Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1984) set out to answer such questions by returning to biology. According to Jerne, each higher organism possesses enough ready-made antibodies for all antigens it encounters. The enormous variety of antibodies is generated independently of foreign antigens. ”Somewhere in the beginning...we have to postulate a spontaneous production of globulin molecules of a great variety of random specificities in order to start the process. Possibly a specialized lymphoid tissue, such as that of the thymus...is engaged in this function”[11]. Because these antibodies developed in the foetus in the absence of external antigens they normally had acquired self-tolerance. Each antibody molecule selected the antigen with the best fit. As a result, the antibody would be shuttled into specialised cells for a stimulated production. 

Jerne was almost right. Two years later, Frank Macfarlane Burnet went one step further, inspired both by Niels Jerne and David Talmage. “A modification of Jerne’s theory of antibody production using the concept of clonal selection” was the title of the paper he published in the „Australian Journal of Science“ on 21 October 1957. His intention was to optimise Jerne’s theory by ascribing “the recognition of foreign pattern (…) to clones of lymphatic cells and not to circulating antibody”[12]. As a result, he formulated his theory of clonal expansion: Lymphocytes express antibodies. Each lymphocyte carries only one antibody receptor. If it detects its suitable antigen, it begins to proliferate and thus produces a clone of countless lymphocytes that produce and secrete millions of antibodies against this specific antigen. When he came to Lindau in 1963, Burnet explained the essence of his theory to his audience:

 

Frank Macfarlane Burnet on the theory of clonal selection
(00:32:03 - 00:35:45)

 

The golden years of systemic immunology

The clonal selection theory can be regarded as a revolution. It “presented clearly for the first time the ideas that underlie the modern science of immunology”[13]. It reconciled the concepts of cell biology and humoral chemistry and established the basis for a mature, systemic immunology. When Burnet shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1960 with Peter Medawar it was not for this theory, however, but for their “discovery of acquired immunological tolerance,” which had been proven in 1953. The ability to distinguish between “self” and “non-self” is a prerequisite for a normally functioning immune system. It also underlies the phenomenon of graft rejection after transplants of foreign tissues or organs. George Snell had begun to discover the body’s own antigens that are responsible for this rejection already in 1945 and first spotted the genes encoding them in 1951. Until the mid-1960s his work was complemented by Jean Dausset and Baruj Benacerraf. Consequently, the three scientists shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1980 "for their discoveries concerning genetically determined structures on the cell surface that regulate immunological reactions". The early insights on self-recognition and graft rejection had challenged, as already foretold, the conventional instructive theories of antibody formation and finally spurred the formulation of the clonal selection theory.

After its publication, immunological research began to flourish in a broad variety. Within two decades (between 1959 and 1976) the main principles of the adaptive immune system were unravelled, resulting in the award of four Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine: 1972 to Gerald M. Edelman and Rodney R. Porter "for their discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies," 1984 to Niels K. Jerne, Georges J.F. Köhler and César Milstein "for theories concerning the specificity in development and control of the immune system and the discovery of the principle for production of monoclonal antibodies," 1987 to Susumu Tonegawa "for his discovery of the genetic principle for generation of antibody diversity," and 1996 to Peter C. Doherty and Rolf M. Zinkernagel "for their discoveries concerning the specificity of the cell mediated immune defence." Other very important results of research into adaptive immunity in those years included, to name but a few: 1961 the discovery of the role of the thymus for the development of the immune system by Jacques Miller, 1962 the proof that lymphocytes are cells that circulate between blood, tissue and lymph as potential initiators of the immune response by James Gowans, and 1965 the identification of two separate lymphocyte lineages, namely T and B cells, by Max Cooper.

Within these golden years of systemic immunology, in 1973, Ralph Steinman discovered the dendritic cell, which he later showed to have an exceptional capacity to activate T lymphocytes. Thus, dendritic cells turned out to be the crucial link between the innate and the adaptive immune system. How the innate immune system is activated, however, remained unknown until the late 1990s when Jules Hoffmann and Bruce Beutler answered this question. "For their discoveries concerning the activation of innate immunity” they shared one half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2011. The other half went to Ralph M. Steinman "for his discovery of the dendritic cell and its role in adaptive immunity." Sadly, Ralph Steinman passed away before the news of his Nobel Prize reached him.

Two immune response-abilities

Eleven of the 15 laureates who have received a Nobel Prize related to immunology between 1960 and 2011 have lectured in Lindau. Their lectures offer an excellent source to briefly summarise our present knowledge on what happens when a pathogen attacks our body.[14] Any pathogen is a harmful invader. Yet not every microbe is a pathogen. To the contrary, most microbial species are useful companions of our life on earth. Even when they reside within our body, they are normally good friends without whom we couldn’t live. In fact, each of us consists of more microbes than proprietary cells. Our body contains about ten trillion human cells while it is additionally colonised by a hundred trillion bacterial, fungal and protozoan cells and even viruses whose entirety represents our normal flora[15]. Today we know that an imbalance in this microbial flora may contribute to many diseases. Its constituents are harmless, however. Pathogens, on the other hand, are dangerous. They surround us anywhere at any time. We eat them, we drink them, we inhale them. They sit on our skin or mingle with our mucosa. Thanks to our immune system, however, most of them fail in making us sick. This system protects us with two separate but intertwined defence mechanisms. Innate immune responses (to which Mechnikov’s phagocytes belong) appeared already in the first multicellular organisms one billion years ago, whereas additional adaptive immune responses (to which Ehrlich’s antibodies belong) began to emerge in vertebrates about 450 million years ago, as Jules Hoffmann illustrated in the summarising slide of his lecture in Lindau 2014.

 

Jules Hoffmann (2014) - Innate Immunity: From Flies to Humans

Dear colleagues and friends, I would like to start also thanking the organisers for the invitation and for this wonderful meeting which I really do enjoy. So in the first slide the question which I got most often over the last 3 years by journalists and by varied people, many people in society: Why do you work on insects? So let me say, just in this slide is shown, insects they account for 80% of all living species on earth. They annually destroy one third of human crops and they put one third of humanity and livestock at risk of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections via the bacteria roles. And, what we knew when I started my PhD, they are particularly resistant to infections. So here we were in the presence of a very large important group on earth, of animals on earth, and knowing that they were resistant to infections but we didn't understand the mechanisms. Except for the role of phagocytosis. So I'll go rapidly with you through the steps which we took over the last 20 years. And first of all that part of our work was done on drosophila which has of course great advantages, as all of you are aware of, in terms of genetics. And in this slide we show that when we prick a fly at times zero and then take off the blood we see that we induce a very strong potent antimicrobial activity. This is a very simple growth inhibition assay. So we started out asking 3 questions. Number 1: What is the identity of the affected molecules? We knew from work from Hans Boman in Stockholm in the early '80s that in butterflies antimicrobial peptide was induced which he named cecropin. Second question was: What is - this is Hans Boman - what is the control of gene expression if we find that the molecules in the fly are also peptides like in the butterfly? And a third question: What is the identity of the receptors of those microbial infections, and is the fly able to distinguish between various types of infecting molecules? Now, it took us several years to go through chemical analytical chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to find that drosophila, the flies, in response to the challenge I've shown you on the previous slide, produce several families of strongly...of powerful antimicrobial peptides which are shown in these slides. They are produced in the fat body, in what is now a classical way, as pro-molecules and then matured, secreted into the blood where the concentrations reach very high values in the order of 0.5 millimolar. Important among those molecules - they are certainly unimportant for the fly but important for us -was diptericin, which was the first molecule which we found which is anti-active against gram-negative bacteria. Attacins and cecropins are homologous through the molecules identified in butterflies by Hans Boman. And then we found drosomycin which is a potently antifungal peptide, and metchnikowin, defensin and so on. So this sort of solved the first question about the identity of the inducible molecules which in the circulating blood accounted for the protection, at least for large particle protection. Now the second question is, how are the genes and cloning of those peptides controlled? And as shown on this slide, when we cloned still the Diptericin gene at that time, the one which is antibacterial, anti-Gram-negative bacterial, we found in the promoters of the Diptericin gene kappaB response elements. That is to say nucleotides sequences which had been reported in mammalian systems by David Baltimore and his colleagues to be responsive to the NF-kappaB transactivator which is the central transactivator of immune and distress responses. Now when we mutated these sites and report the flies we abolished the inducibility showing that their presence is mandatory for an immune response. Now in the fly at the time it was known that there were at least one homologue of NF-kappaB, which is presented here, which was named Dorsal by the inventor Nüsslein-Volhard, I'll show that in the slide, and was retained in the cytoplasm binding to an inhibitor which she named Cactus. Now as I explained or as I will explain now, when you do this type of work in the fly or in other systems - at that time it was done through mutagenesis, unbiased mutagenesis. And you were screening for phenotypes and you could give for phenotypes... you could give a name and this was in the context of screening for abnormally developing embryos. Now just to illustrate this and this is not work from any of these groups but from whole groups in the community to explain to you what NF-kappaB is like. This is NF-kappaB and it is linked to the inhibitor which goes by the name of I-kappaB. So the whole story and the immune response here, and in development occasionally, is via kinase which is named IKK here to phosphorylate I-kappaB which will change its confirmation, disassociate from NF-kappaB and then free NF-kappaB which then is able to translocate into the nucleus and bind to DNA as shown. This is the nice butterfly figure where NF-kappaB dimer instead of NF-kappaB binds to DNA. So the question was, would this system which had been discovered in the dorso-ventral axis formation by Nüsslein-Volhard, would this system also be used in immune response? And as illustrated here and the work of Nüsslein-Volhard and a certain number of other scientists including Eric Wieschaus. Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were awarded the Nobel Prize in the '90s for their work on the determination of dorso-ventral and antro-posterior axis and other aspects of development in the fly. So here we have in the cytoplasm NF-kappaB bound to the inhibitor I-kappaB. This association is brought about when a signal comes from a transmembrane receptor. And that transmembrane receptor was dubbed by Nüsslein-Volhard 'Toll' for the bizarre appearance of the mutated embryo. Again I repeat, adults are at the time of reproduction fed mutagens and then the embryos are screened for those which do not normally develop and they are given a phenotype then. And Toll becomes activated by a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in the cleavage of a cytokine which was named Spätzle by Nüsslein-Volhard. I suppose in this audience I don't have to explain the phenotype of the Spätzle embryo. And so what we did and now I'm going to summarise the work which took really several years, about 5 years in the laboratory for a whole group, prominent among whom were Jean-Marc Reichhart and Bruno Lemaitre and the chemists identifying additional inducable antimicrobial molecules. So our initial idea that Toll might be involved in the expression, in the control of the genes, and coding these antimicrobial peptides was blocked by the fact that we used diptericin; diptericin was the first peptide which we had in our hands. Now diptericin turned out not to be dependent on Toll pathway, and it took us again as I said quite a lot of time to identify other inducible molecules and namely antifungal peptide drosomycin which appeared to really depend on the Toll pathway. So as you see in this slide fungi and as we later learnt, quite a few years later, Gram-positive bacteria activate via Toll NF-kappaB and lead to the production of antifungal and antibacterial peptides. Now this didn't help us for diptericin. And again it took several years for us to find that there was an additional pathway, unsuspected pathway in the system here which we referred to IMD for immune deficiency. And this pathway controlled the expression in response to Gram-negative bacteria of NF-kappaB and led to the production, to the expression of the genes and coding of antibacterial peptides and namely that of diptericin. So we were now, by '96, and in a position where we thought we understood that the defence molecules that they were dependent on two distinct pathways, Toll pathway, a partial reuse of the embryonic regulatory cascade for dorsoventral development, and another pathway of which we did not know anything at that time. We were not even sure that it was a pathway. But things evolved and before going into that let me just show you experiments which were done by Bruno Lemaitre, 2 postdoctoral students, and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory. Here we are looking at Aspergillus fungal infection in wild-type versus Toll mutant flies, and you see that there's a very marked difference. The Toll mutant flies have died, 50% have died after two days already in this experiment. Now on the other side of the slide you see that in the case of IMD mutants which control the expression of peptides active against Gram-negative bacteria, we see that E. coli infection is very well survived by wild-type fly. But in IMD mutants there's a very rapid dying off of the flies. So this then led us to propose in '96 that the dorsoventral regulatory gene cassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus controls the potent antifungal response in Drosophila adults. This is a Toll deficient fly. You see that the fungi have developed in the dying fly and covered everything of the body. Now this was sort of an important time in the work in the communities, because - I'll explain to you - because innate immunity not much was known about it. Innate immunity was not a very popular field at the time. It was essentially defective immunity which was the objective of the community of immunologists. And there were few receptors known in innate immunity and there was none known which would single to NF-kappaB. And as we have seen in the previous slide the hallmark of the activation both of the IMD pathway and the Toll pathway was the activation of NF-kappaB and then control of gene expression. And this was now the case for all electins which were known at that time in the system of innate immunity. There's also a belief that innate immunity was required to activate the production of cytokines, which would activate adaptive immunity and induce increased synthesis of MHC molecules and so on. I'm not going into this because what happened after this, after the publication of this paper, was that many people of the immunology community in adaptive system went into looking for homologous molecules of Toll in mammalian systems, and within a few years about 12 of these molecules were found. Paramount about that was of course the discovery that the LPS receptor was a member of the Toll family which Bruce Beutler is going to present to you in a few minutes. So taken together, the results in the fly and in the mammalian systems suggested that these Toll receptors would play an important role in innate immunity and possibly also in adaptive immunity via activating NF-kappaB. As shown in this slide, this is Shizuo Akira who is to be credited for having done a lot of work on identifying the ligands of the Toll-like receptors. This is the mammalian system. And here we see Toll-like receptors on the cytoplasmic membrane. The activators are lipopolysaccharide as has been conclusively shown by genetic approach by Bruce Beutler. And various other lipopeptides, even Flagellin, and in the endosome we have various nucleotides sequences either double-stranded RNA, single-stranded RNA or CpG DNA. Now in response to the activation via adaptive molecules, mammals will activate NF-kappaB as flies do in their special system. And also mammals will activate IRFs, interferon regulatory factors, which are absent; there is no interference system in flies. And this will lead on one side to the production of antimicrobial peptides and many other molecules. We know now there are hundreds of molecules which are activated in the innate immune response downstream of NF-kappaB. And also the activation of adaptive immune responses as I've already mentioned. Now taken together, I'm told - I've not made the check but I'm told - that about 20,000 papers of clinical interest have been published over the last 20 years now on the role of TLRs and the implication in defence reactions. And again, I mentioned, we have only worked on insects and we continue to work on insects. So this is from the community and not from our laboratory. So the primary role of course of TLRs we would say is fighting infectious diseases, which was the way they were discovered. And also we now know they play an important role in inflammation and this is becoming really one of the most central areas of research within the TLR field. They play a role in vaccination as they recognise some adjuvants - they are not the only molecules working on adjuvants but they do play a role in this field. They play a role in autoimmunity; they play a role in allergy; and importantly they are now accredited of playing a role in the new avenue of research of immunotherapy including cancer immunotherapy. But let me come back to my field and that is flies. And in flies they play a role in infections as I've pointed out a few minutes ago. And in the case of Gram-positive bacterial infection and fungal infection. We also have found, and others that over the last few years, that they also seem to play a role in inflammation. This is again a new field; it's a very interesting new field and there is aspects - I have no time to go into that, but maybe with the students this week to show what is coming up in this field. That will be certainly also very nice, very nice parallels to draw with inflammation in mammalian systems, which as you are aware of is now one of the central problems in human disease. Then essentially, and I insist on that, Toll receptors play a role in development in the fly. So the fly has 9 Toll receptors, they are activated by Spätzle or Spätzle-like molecules. So there are 6 Spätzle-like molecules in the fly which are, believe it or not, neurotrophins including Spätzle. So we have a set of regular developmental regulatory molecules, 6 neurotrophins and 9 Tolls - they all play a role in development, particularly of the nervous system, in the embryo and later in the larvae. And of these molecules, of this 6 + 9, nature has selected, for reasons we do not understand, So this is still a very important intellectual philosophical question, which is unsolved till today. So coming back to the fly. I was just mentioning now the story of non-Toll receptors, of Spätzle. So Spätzle becomes activated in this system, like in the embryonic system, by proteolytic cascade. This cascade is different from the one which is found in the embryos so it's an immune proteolytic cascade. But what are the receptors then? The receptors are not Toll and this is in contrast to what is known now in the mammalian system where Toll receptors directly interact with microbial inducers. In the fly Toll is not a receptor, but it is on the pathway of activation of the immune response. And the real, the actual receptors were found around 2000: We did work, we did unbiased mutagenesis which was the first genetic demonstration of the role of these receptors; and PGRP stands here which was one which we found at that time. It was Julian Royet in the laboratory who found that. Gram-positive bacteria interact with peptidoglycan recognition receptors activate the proteolytic cascade. The members of this cascade have been identified by now. Then dedicated protein, which is a Gram-negative binding protein also in the blood, reacts to beta-glucan of fungal origin, activates a cascade. And very interestingly Dominique Ferrandon and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory have found that microbial proteases activated dedicated protease in zymogen in the hemolymph. Most of the pathogens when they invade, or most of the microbes, when they invade their host will secrete proteases. And to our surprise we found that - and this is a very precise model of Beauveria bassiana fungus where you can do all the genetics and you can do the genetics on the fly. And so we were able to show, they were able to show, that microprotease interacts with and activates this zymogen which will then feed into the same proteolytic cascade. This is interesting because it really is a virus factor and as time goes on we see that this is valid for many other pathogens and also in other systems. Finally Gram-negative bacteria will activate through a transmembrane receptor again peptidoglycan recognition protein, will activate the other pathway, the IMD pathway, which will lead to effector genes which fight against Gram-negative bacteria. Now, I want to summarise this to make it very clear. The microbial inducers and their cognate receptors in the innate immune response of Drosophila: Bacterial peptidoglycans are recognised by dedicated circulating or transmembrane proteins referred to as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have evolutionarily derived from amidases. And we also point out that we humans product 4 families of PGRPs every day, as we produce many, many antimicrobial peptides every day, up to 10 grams on our skin per day. And so these are very highly conserved molecules. And in the case of humans they are not recognition proteins, PGRPs, but they are directly antibacterial. And fungal beta-glucans are recognised by circulating proteins referred to as glucan binding proteins. Now we have now understood some aspects about the affected molecules, we have understood some aspects about the receptors. Now let me shortly concentrate just in one example on the signalling cascades which link the recognition to the control of gene transcription. I've selected this antibody pathway which is also involved, as we have seen, in these inflammatory-like reactions. Now the receptor PGRP is shown here, it interacts with IMD and the first surprise came when we cloned the IMD gene - it was 2001 - was to see that it has a DEF domain which is very similar to mammalian RIP1. Now RIP stands for TNF receptor interacting protein. Second surprise: IMD binds to fat which is DEF domain protein conserved in the TNF receptor pathway in mammals. Then this system will activate TAK1, which is a MAP3 kinase, also highly conserved in the mammalian system, linking to TAK2, also conserved in the mammalian TNF3 receptor pathway. Then TAK1 will activate an IKK complex which has an IKK-beta and IKK-gamma component, which are highly conserved in mouse and humans. And then the reactivation, the phosphorylation of Relish which is the NF-kappaB family member in this pathway. And that will be cleaved by a caspase, and that caspase goes by the name of Dredd in the fly and is homologous to mammalian caspase-8. And then the active part of Relish, that is to say the real homologous domain, will go into nucleus and control expression of diptericin and hundreds of other genes. I put a note here about existence of negative regulation but we have no time to go into that. Now this was extremely striking to us. Remember we started off in a time of...when I started my PhD work with Professor Joly we started off thinking we would find something different from mammalian immune response, which was at the time essentially considered, as I mentioned already, in terms of adaptive immunity. And here we found many, many players in innate immune response which were similar to the ones which were present in mammals. Now I'm putting here a slide where I compare the Toll pathway and the IMD pathway of the fly to the TLR4 pathway and TNF pathway. So these are innate immune pathways - of course in the fly which has no adaptive immunity and in mammals which have adaptive immunity, but these pathways here are of the innate immune response. Now just looking at the colours - I have no time unfortunately to go into the details - but we have membrane receptors, which either react to a cleaved cytokine, as in the case of Spätzle or TNF-alpha, or directly interacts with the microbial ligand, this is the case of lipopolysaccharides or peptidoglycan in the fly or mouse system. We have adaptive proteins which are either identical, like MyD88 between Toll and TLR4, or very similar like IMD and RIP in systems of the IMD pathway and TNF pathway. Then we activate, we - that is to say the system - will activate central kinases like the TAK1 kinase which will also in turn activate the adjunct kinase pathway; it's not relevant this time. And then we have an IKK complex which is nearly identical in TLR4, IMD and TNF. It's a little bit simplified in the pathway of Toll in the fly. The end product will be activation of NF-kappaB and control of gene expression. So this is really something which, again I insist, was totally unexpected by us and in the community: to find that we have a system which is so highly conserved between mammals and flies. Now this raises the question, when did this system appear? Of course, flies do not derive from mice and mice do not derive from flies. So we did data mining and there's about 6,000 sequences of genomes are available now. And in this summarising slide, to our large surprise all the molecules which we found in Drosophila are already present in sea anemones and mostly also in sponges, that's to say really at the beginning of the differentiation of the eukaryotes. They are present in worms, with the exception of C. elegans, which is a special worm. And they are present in crustaceans, the fly, in cephalochordates, and they are all present in vertebrates. A striking aspect of this comparison is that the members of the innate immune response in vertebrates are closer to those of the sea anemones than to the flies - because flies have highly evolved systems, it's not a primitive flying thing out there. It has simplified its immune defence, namely remember that there are only 2 inducers: the highly conserved peptidoglycan and the highly conserved beta-glucan. These are the only inducers in addition to violence factors which depend on the aggressing system. Now, all this leads us to believe that innate immunity in the way we understand it now has appeared, probably, with multi-similarity that is to say roughly one billion years ago. And that sort of tool box of innate immunity is nearly fully present in sea anemones at the beginning of this evolution. And then over evolution various groups have either simplified or a little bit diversified and this is the case namely as I've mentioned. I could mention here that sea urchins for instance have 220 Toll-like receptors. And you could say that's because they live in the sea they filter the sea. But ciona which lives close to the sea urchins has only 3. So that's not really going to help us, that sort of calculation will not help us. Now the important thing here on which everyone seems to agree is that a full adaptive immunity in mammals requires the input from a boost from innate immunity, be it via cytokines of other aspects. And so again I insist on the fact that the innate immune cascade in vertebrates has all the elements which we found in the fly plus some additionals which are absent from fly today but present in sea anemones. So, I was going - but time here in Lindau runs so quickly - I was going to say a few words on the antiviral defences. Let me just point out I should have a summarising slide here which will, yes. I have 1 minute and that will be enough to summarise. So in the fly, like in C elegans, like in plants, RNA interference plays an essential role - this is not the case in the antiviral defences in mammals. And in addition to RNA interference, hallmark of the antiviral defences in this group, there's an induction of genes which will restrict the viral infection on which we are working on now. Receptors are largely unknown as are the pathways. Now in the mammalian system the innate response is essentially based on interferon, the interferon arm. The TLR receptors and other receptors which are absent from invertebrates like NLRs, RLRs...or I should say from the fly. Activate expression of interferon genes and of ISG interference simulative genes, the active natural killer cells which kill infected cells. And the adaptive immune response here which is stimulated by the immune response. B lymphocytes produce neutralising antibodies. And T lymphocytes kill infected cells. Now, I would like to acknowledge the contribution of many senior scientists and their groups. Let me just mention here over the years: Daniele Hoffmann, who started with me; she did the work on diptericin gene. She's my wife, she's with me in Lindau and she is taking the excursion today. Charles Hetru a chemist, Jean-Luc Dirmarcq the biochemist. Jean-Marc Reichhart, development geneticist and also now Drosophila geneticist. Bruno Lemaitre was the first Drosophila geneticist whom we hired in our group, he is now in Lausanne. Dominique Ferrandon did his PhD work interestingly with Nüsslein-Volhard before joining our group, and he is working on certain aspects now of recognition, of gut immunity, resilience and so on. Julien Royet, now in Marseille, has worked a lot on the PGRP receptors, peptidoglycan recognition receptors. Jean-Luc Imler is working on the antiviral field, he will be very upset that I was so quick on his data. But that will be at the next meeting if you still invite me, I will speak essentially about...or he will speak about his data. Elena Levashina works on the defences against parasites, against plasmodium in anopheles, and she has done really stellar work identifying a complement-like molecule in the mosquito in a complex system fighting off the infection. Philippe Bulet has also done work on the antimicrobial peptide. Just putting on the names of people in other laboratories in other countries who have contributed to this field in recent years. Thank you very much for your attention.

Sehr geehrte Kollegen und Freunde, ich möchte mich zunächst bei den Veranstaltern für die Einladung zu dieser wunderbaren Tagung bedanken, dir mir wirklich großes Vergnügen bereitet. Meine erste Folie formuliert die Frage, die mir Journalisten und viele andere Leute in den letzten drei Jahren am häufigsten gestellt haben: Warum arbeiten Sie an Insekten? Wie auf der Folie dargestellt machen Insekten 80% aller aktuell auf der Erde lebenden Arten aus. Sie zerstören jährlich ein Drittel der Ernten und setzen einen ebenso großen Prozentsatz der Menschheit und des Viehbestandes dem Risiko bakterieller, mykotischer, viraler und parasitärer Infektionen aus, infolge ihrer Funktion als Vektoren. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit begann, wusste man bereits, dass sie gegenüber Infektionen besonders resistent sind. Wir sahen uns also der Situation gegenüber, dass auf der Erde eine sehr große und bedeutsame Tiergruppe existiert, die gegenüber Infektionen resistent ist, wir aber mit Ausnahme der Rolle der Phagozytose die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen nicht verstanden. Ich gehe mit Ihnen rasch die Schritte, die wir in den letzten 20 Jahren durchlaufen haben, durch. Wir arbeiteten hauptsächlich mit Drosophila, was, wie Sie alle wissen, vom genetischen Standpunkt aus sehr vorteilhaft ist. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie, was geschieht, wenn wir einer Fliege zum Zeitpunkt Null Bakterien injizieren und ihr dann in bestimmten Zeitabständen Blut abnehmen: Es wird eine sehr starke antimikrobielle Aktivität ausgelöst. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen ganz einfachen Wachstumsinhibititonstest. Zu Beginn hatten wir drei Fragen. Erstens: Was sind die Effektormoleküle? Wir wussten aus Arbeiten von Hans Boman in Stockholm Anfang der 80er Jahre, dass in Schmetterlingen ein von ihm Cecropin getauftes antimikrobielles Peptid induziert wird. Zweitens fragten wir uns - das ist übrigens Hans Boman - wie die Genexpression gesteuert wird, wenn sich herausstellt, dass es sich, wie beim Schmetterling, bei den Molekülen in der Fliege um Peptide handelt. Und schließlich wollten wir wissen, welche Rezeptoren an diesen mikrobiellen Infektionen beteiligt sind und ob die Fliege zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Infektionsmolekülen unterscheiden kann. Wir benötigten mehrere Jahre, bis wir mit Hilfe chemisch-analytischer, biochemischen und molekulargenetischen Untersuchungen herausfanden, dass Drosophila als Reaktion auf die in der vorherigen Folie dargestellten Infektionen verschiedene Familien wirksamer antimikrobieller Peptide erzeugt - zu sehen hier auf dieser Folie. Sie entstehen auf klassische Weise in den Fettkörperzellen in Form von Promolekülen, reifen dann heran und werden ins Blut ausgeschüttet, wo sie sehr hohe Konzentrationen einer Größenordnung von 0,5 Millimol erreichen. Ein wichtiges Molekül - d.h. wichtig für uns, nicht für die Fliege - war Diptericin. Es war das erste Molekül, das wir fanden, das gegen gramnegativ Bakterien wirksam ist. Attacine und Cecropine sind homolog zu den von Hans Boman in Schmetterlingen identifizierten Molekülen. Weiterhin fanden wir Drosomycin, ein stark antimykotisch wirkendes Peptid, Metchnikowin, Defensin etc. Damit war die erste Frage bezüglich der Identität der induzierbaren Moleküle, die im Blutkreislauf vor Infektionen schützen, mehr oder weniger geklärt. Nun fragten wir uns, wie diese Gene bzw. die Klonierung der Peptide gesteuert werden. Wie auf dieser Folie dargestellt fanden wir bei der Klonierung des Gens, das für die Erzeugung des gegen gramnegative Bakterien wirksamen Moleküls Diptericin zuständig ist - so genannte KappaB-Response-Elemente in der Promotorregion. Dabei handelt es sich um Nukleotidsequenzen, die nach Angaben von David Baltimore und Kollegen in Säugetiersystemen verantwortlich für den NF-KappaB-Transaktivator sind welcher der zentralen Transaktivator bei Immun- und Belastungsreaktionen ist. Durch Mutation dieser Genstellen in Schmetterlingen hoben wir die Induzierbarkeit auf und zeigten, dass sie für eine Immunreaktion zwingend notwendig sind. Bei der Fliege war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt bekannt, dass sie zumindest ein Homolog von NF-KappaB besitzt. Dieses von seiner Entdeckerin Nüsslein-Volhard Dorsal getaufte Protein - ich zeige Ihnen das auf der Folie - wird durch Bindung an einen Inhibitor namens Cactus, ebenfalls eine Wortschöpfung von Nüsslein-Volhard, im Zytoplasma gehalten. Sie müssen wissen, dass bei derartigen Untersuchungen an Fliegen oder anderen Systemen so geschehen z.B. im Zusammenhang mit der Suche nach embryonalen Entwicklungsstörungen. Ich möchte Ihnen veranschaulichen und erläutern, worum es sich bei NF-KappaB handelt. Hier sehen Sie NF-KappaB; es ist an einen Inhibitor namens IKappaB gebunden. Bei der Immunreaktion, und gelegentlich auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung, wird IKappaB von der Kinase IKK phosphoryliert, so dass es seine Konfirmation ändert, von NF-KappaB dissoziiert und dieses schließlich freisetzt, so dass es in den Nukleus translozieren und sich dort wie dargestellt an die DNA binden kann. Dabei entsteht diese hübsche Schmetterlingsform, in der sich das NF-KappaB-Dimer anstelle von NF-KappaB an die DNA bindet. Die Frage war, ob dieses von Nüsslein-Volhard entdeckte, an der Entwicklung der dorsoventralen Achse beteiligte System auch bei der Immunreaktion eine Rolle spielt. Hier sehen Sie die Arbeit von Nüsslein-Volhard und weiteren Wissenschaftlern wie Eric Wieschaus. In den 90er Jahren erhielten Nüsslein-Volhard und Wieschaus den Nobelpreis für die Erforschung der dorsoventralen und anteroposterioren Achse und anderer Aspekte der Embryonalentwicklung bei der Fliege. NF-KappaB bindet sich infolge eines von einem Transmembranrezeptor ausgesendeten Signals im Zytoplasma an den Inhibitor IKappaB. Diesen Transmembranrezeptor taufte Nüsslein-Volhard aufgrund des bizarren Aussehens des mutierten Embryos 'Toll'. Um es noch einmal zu wiederholen: Zum Zeitpunkt der Fortpflanzung werden die adulten Tiere FADD-mutagenisiert; anschließend werden die Embryos nach Exemplaren untersucht, die sich nicht normal entwickeln, und die jeweiligen Phänotypen erhalten Namen. diese Bezeichnung stammt ebenfalls von Nüsslein-Volhard. Ich gehe davon aus, dass ich diesem Publikum den Phänotyp des Spätzle-Embryos nicht erläutern muss. Ich möchte unsere langwierige, sich über etwa 5 Jahre hinziehende Arbeit im Labor kurz zusammenfassen. An ihr war eine ganze Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern beteiligt; hervorzuheben sind insbesondere Jean-Marc Reichhart und Bruno Lemaitre sowie die Chemiker, die weitere induzierbare antimikrobielle Moleküle identifizierten. Unserer ursprünglichen Idee, dass Toll möglicherweise an der Expression bzw. Steuerung der Gene sowie an der Kodierung der antimikrobiellen Peptide beteiligt ist, konnten wir aufgrund der Tatsache, dass wir mit Diptericin, dem ersten Peptid, das uns zur Verfügung stand, arbeiteten, nicht nachgehen, da sich herausstellte, dass Diptericin nicht vom Toll-Signalweg abhängt. Es dauerte wie gesagt ziemlich lange, bis wir andere induzierbare Moleküle identifiziert hatten, u.a. ein antimykotisches Peptid namens Drosomycin, das, so schien es, eindeutig von diesem Signalweg abhing. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie sehen, führen Pilze und, wie wir einige Jahre später feststellten, grampositive Bakterien mittels Aktivierung von Toll-NF-KappaB zur Entstehung antimykotischer und antibakterieller Peptide. Das nützte uns bei Diptericin allerdings wenig. Es dauerte wieder mehrere Jahre, bis sich herausstellte, dass es in diesem System einen weiteren unvermuteten Signalweg gab, den wir als Immundefizienz (IMD)-Signalweg bezeichneten. Und dieser Signalweg steuert die Expression von NF-KappaB als Reaktion auf gramnegative Bakterien und führt zur Expression der Gene und somit zur Kodierung der antibakteriellen Peptide, in unserem Fall Diptericin. von zwei bestimmten Signalwegen abhängen, dem Toll-Signalweg, einem Teil der embryonalen Steuerkaskade für die dorsoventrale Entwicklung, und einem anderen Signalweg, über den wir bis dato nichts wussten, ja bei dem wir noch nicht einmal sicher waren, dass es sich dabei überhaupt um einen Signalweg handelt. Doch die Dinge gerieten ins Rollen - bevor ich Ihnen jedoch davon berichte, möchte ich Ihnen ein paar Experimente vorstellen, die Bruno Lemaitre und Jean-Marc Reichhart zusammen mit zwei Postdocs im Labor durchführten. Das hier ist eine Aspergillus-Pilzinfektion bei Wildtyp-Fliegen und Toll-mutierten Fliegen; Sie sehen, es besteht ein ganz deutlicher Unterschied. Nach nur zwei Tagen starben 50% der Toll-mutierten Fliegen in diesem Experiment. Auf der rechten Seite der Folie sehen Sie, dass Wildtyp-Fliegen eine Infektion mit E. coli problemlos überleben. IMD-Mutanten sterben dagegen sehr rasch ab. Dies führte dazu, dass wir 1996 zu dem Schluss kamen, dass die dorsoventrale regulatorische Genkassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus die wirksame antimykotische Reaktion bei adulten Drosophila-Fliegen steuert. Dieser Fliege fehlt das Toll-Gen. Sie sehen, dass die Pilze den gesamten Körper der sterbenden Fliege bedecken. Das war eine wichtige Zeit für die Forschung in unserem Fachgebiet - ich werde Ihnen das erläutern - weil man über die angeborene Immunität damals nicht viel wusste. Außerdem war dieses Thema nicht sonderlich populär, die Immunologen befassten sich lieber mit Immundefekten. Man kannte damals nur wenige an der angeborenen Immunität beteiligte Rezeptoren, von denen keiner für NF-KappaB signalisiert. Wie auf der vorherigen Folie dargestellt waren für die Aktivierung sowohl des IMD-Signalweges als auch des Toll-Signalweges die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB sowie die anschließende Steuerung der Genexpression besonders bezeichnend. Dies galt für sämtliche Lektine, die zum damaligen Zeitpunkt beim System der angeborenen Immunität bekannt waren. Man nahm an, dass die angeborene Immunität für die Aktivierung der Zytokinherstellung erforderlich ist, was wiederum die adaptive Immunität aktiviert und eine verstärkte Synthese von MHC-Molekülen etc. auslöst. Ich werde darauf aber nicht näher eingehen. Nach Veröffentlichung dieses Papers begannen viele Immunologen, die sich mit adaptiven Systemen beschäftigten, nach homologen Toll-Molekülen in Säugetiersystemen zu suchen und fanden innerhalb weniger Jahre etwa 12 dieser Moleküle. Am vorrangigsten war natürlich die Entdeckung, dass der LPS-Rezeptor ein Mitglied der Toll-Familie ist - Bruce Beutler wird Ihnen in ein paar Minuten mehr darüber erzählen. In der Zusammenschau legten die Ergebnisse der Fliegen- und Säugetiersysteme also nahe, dass die Toll-Rezeptoren eine wichtige Rolle bei der angeborenen Immunität und möglicherweise auch bei der adaptiven Immunität spielen über die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie Shizuo Akira, dem für die Identifizierung die Liganden der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren in mühevoller Arbeit große Anerkennung gebührt. Das hier ist das Säugetiersystem; hier sehen Sie Toll-artige Rezeptoren auf der Zytoplasma-Membran. Es handelt sich bei den Aktivatoren um Lipopolysaccharide, wie Bruce Beutler anhand eines genetischen Ansatzes schlüssig beweisen konnte, aber auch verschiedene andere Lipopeptide wie Flagellin. Im Endosom finden sich verschiedene Nukleotidsequenzen, entweder Doppelstrang-RNA, Einzelstrang-RNA oder CpG-DNA. Als Antwort auf die Aktivierung mittels adaptiver Moleküle aktivieren Säugetiere NF-KappaB, ebenso wie Fliegen dies in ihrem speziellen System tun. Säugetiere aktivieren zudem Interferon regulierende Faktoren (IRF), Fliegen dagegen verfügen nicht über dieses Interferonsystem. Dies führt zur Entstehung antimikrobieller Peptide und zahlreicher anderer Moleküle. Wir wissen, dass es Hunderte von Molekülen gibt, die - NF-KappaB nachgeschaltet - bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion aktiviert werden. Die gilt auch für die Aktivierung adaptiver Immunreaktionen, wie zuvor erwähnt. Ich habe das zwar nicht überprüft, aber mir wurde gesagt, dass in den letzten 20 Jahren etwa 20.000 Paper von klinischem Interesse zur Rolle der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren (TLR) bei Abwehrreaktionen veröffentlicht worden sind. Wie ich bereits sagte, haben wir ausschließlich an Insekten gearbeitet und werden dies auch weiterhin tun. Diese Angaben stammen also nicht aus unserem Labor, sondern aus der Gesamtheit unseres Fachbereichs. Die wichtigste Aufgabe der TLR ist natürlich die Bekämpfung von Infektionskrankheiten - auf diesem Wege wurden sie schließlich auch entdeckt. Zudem wissen wir heute, dass sie eine wichtige Rolle bei Entzündungen spielen, was immer mehr zu einem der zentralen Forschungsbereiche auf diesem Gebiet wird. Von Bedeutung sind sie auch bei Impfungen, da sie einige Wirkverstärker erkennen; zwar sind sie nicht die einzigen Moleküle, die dies tun, dennoch spielen sie auf diesem Gebiet eine Rolle. Das Gleiche gilt für die Autoimmunität und Allergien. Außerdem geht man heute davon aus, dass sie auch für den neuen Forschungszweig der Immuntherapie, z.B. bei Krebs von Bedeutung sind. Doch lassen Sie mich zu meinem Fachgebiet zurückkehren, den Fliegen. In Fliegen, wie ich vor einigen Minuten erwähnt habe, spielen TLR hier im Falle von grampositiven bakteriellen und mykotischen Infektionen eine Rolle. In den letzten Jahren stellten wir und andere fest, dass sie vermutlich auch im Zusammenhang mit Entzündungen von Bedeutung sind. Dieses Gebiet ist ganz neu und sehr interessant. Leider habe ich nicht die Zeit näher darauf einzugehen, aber vielleicht kann ich ja den Studenten diese Woche noch ein bisschen erzählen, was sich in diesem Bereich so tut. Sicherlich lassen sich auch hier sehr schöne Parallelen zu Entzündungen in Säugetiersystemen ziehen, die, wie Sie wissen, heute eines der zentralen Probleme bei Humanerkrankungen darstellen. Ich möchte betonen, dass Toll-Rezeptoren zudem auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung der Fliege eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Die Fliege besitzt 9 Toll-Rezeptoren, die durch Spätzle bzw. Spätzle-artige Moleküle aktiviert werden. Es gibt 6 Spätzle-artige Moleküle in der Fliege, bei denen es sich, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, um Neurotrophine handelt. Es existiert also ein Gruppe von Molekülen zur Entwicklungsregulation bestehend aus 6 Neurotrophinen und 9 Toll-artigen Rezeptoren, und sie alle sind bei der Entwicklung, insbesondere der des Nervensystems im Embryo und später in der Larve von Bedeutung. Von diesen 6 + 9 Molekülen hat die Natur aus Gründen, die wir nicht verstehen, einen Toll-Rezeptor und ein Spätzle-Molekül, d.h. ein Drosophila-Neurotrophin ausgewählt, diese so entscheidende Abwehr gegen eindringende Mikroorganismen zu aktivieren. Das ist eine sehr bedeutsame intellektuelle und philosophische Frage, die bislang ungelöst ist. Doch kehren wir zu den Fliegen zurück. Ich wollte Ihnen gerade etwas über die Nicht-Toll-Rezeptoren erzählen, die Spätzle. Spätzle werden auch in diesem System ebenso wie im Embryonalsystem durch eine proteolytische Kaskade aktiviert. Diese Kaskade unterscheidet sich jedoch insofern von derjenigen im Embryo, als es sich um eine immunproteolytische Kaskade handelt. Doch wie sehen deren Rezeptoren aus? Bei den Rezeptoren handelt es sich nicht um Toll, im Gegensatz zum Säugetiersystem, bei dem Toll-Rezeptoren direkt mit den mikrobiellen Induktoren interagieren. Toll ist bei der Fliege kein Rezeptor, sondern Teil der Aktivierungssignalweges der Immunreaktion. Auf die eigentlichen Rezeptoren stießen wir im Jahr 2000: Wir arbeiteten mit ergebnisoffener Mutagenese, wodurch wir die Rolle dieser Rezeptoren erstmals genetisch belegen konnten. Damals entdeckte Julian Royet im Labor die Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP), die mit grampositiven Bakterien in Wechselwirkungen treten und so die proteolytische Kaskade aktivieren, deren Mitglieder übrigens inzwischen bekannt sind. Dann reagiert ein spezielles Protein, ein gramnegatives Bindungsprotein im Blut, zu Beta-Glucan mykotischen Ursprungs und aktiviert eine Kaskade. Interessanterweise stellten Dominique Ferrandon und Jean-Marc Reichhart im Labor fest, dass mikrobielle Proteasen eine spezielle Protease im Zymogen der Hämolymphe aktivieren. Beim Eindringen von Erregern schüttet der Wirt für gewöhnlich Proteasen aus. Zu unserer Überraschung konnten sie zeigen, dass mit dessen Hilfe sich alle genetischen Experimente an der Fliege durchführen lassen - Sie konnten zeigen, dass Mikroproteasen mit dem Zymogen interagieren und es aktivieren, so dass es in die proteolytische Kaskade einfließt. Das ist interessant, denn es handelt sich tatsächlich um einen Virusfaktor. Mit der Zeit stellten wir fest, dass dies auch für viele andere Erreger und andere Systeme gilt. Schließlich aktivieren gramnegative Bakterien über den Transmembranrezeptor - das Peptidoglycan erkennende Protein - den IMD-Signalpfad, wodurch Effektorgene entstehen, die gramnegative Bakterien bekämpfen. Ich fasse zur Veranschaulichung jetzt noch einmal die mikrobiellen Induktoren und verwandten Rezeptoren der angeborenen Immunantwort von Drosophila zusammen: Bakterielle Peptidoglycane werden von speziellen zirkulierenden oder Transmembranproteinen, den so genannten Peptidoglycan erkennenden Proteinen (PGRP), die evolutionär von Amidasen abstammen, erkannt. Ich möchte anmerken, dass wir Menschen täglich vier PGRP-Familien, also enorm viele antimikrobielle Peptide produzieren - auf der Haut finden sich bis zu 10 g. Es handelt sich also um sehr stark konservierte Moleküle. Beim Menschen sind PGRP keine Erkennungsproteine, sondern direkt antibakteriell wirksame Moleküle. Die mykotischen Beta-Glucane werden von zirkulierenden Proteinen, den so genannten Glucan bindenden Proteinen erkannt. Wir haben jetzt einige Aspekte der entsprechenden Moleküle und ihrer Rezeptoren verstanden. Ich möchte mich nun kurz anhand eines Beispiels auf die Signalkaskaden konzentrieren, die die Erkennung mit der Steuerung der Gentranskription verknüpfen. Ich habe dafür diesen Antikörpersignalweg ausgesucht, der, wie wir gesehen haben, auch an Entzündungsreaktionen beteiligt ist. Das hier ist der Rezeptor PGRP; er interagiert mit IMD. Die erste Überraschung war, dass sich bei Klonierung des IMD-Gens im Jahr 2001 eine Todesdomäne zeigte, die dem TNF receptor interacting protein (RIP)bei Säugetieren (RIP1) stark ähnelt. Die zweite Überraschung bestand darin, dass sich IMD an FADD, ein im TNF-Rezeptor-Signalweg in Säugetieren konserviertes Todesdomänenprotein bindet. Dieses System aktiviert nun TAK1, eine im Säugetiersystem ebenfalls stark konservierte MAP3-Kinase und verknüpft sie mit TAK2, einer weiteren Kinase, die im Säugetier-TNF3-Rezeptorsignalweg konserviert ist. Nun aktiviert TAK1 einen IKK-Komplex aus einer IKK-Beta- und einer IKK-Gamma-Komponente, der in Mäusen und Menschen stark konserviert ist. Anschließend erfolgen die Reaktivierung, d.h. Phosphorylierung von Relish, einem Mitglied der NF-KappaB-Familie in diesem Signalpfad, sowie die Spaltung durch eine Caspase, die bei der Fliege als DREDD bezeichnet wird und zur Säugetier-Caspase-8 homolog ist. Jetzt dringt der aktive Teil von Relish, d.h. die eigentliche homologe Domäne in den Nukleus ein und steuert dort die Expression von Diptericin und hunderter anderer Gene. Ich habe hier eine Anmerkung bezüglich der Existenz einer Negativsteuerung gemacht, aber dafür haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wir fanden das sehr auffällig. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit bei Professor Joly begann, waren wir der Ansicht, wir würden etwas finden, das sich von der Immunreaktion von Säugetieren unterscheidet, unter der man, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, im Wesentlichen die adaptive Immunität verstand. Und dann fanden wir bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion so viele Akteure, die denen der Säugetiere ähnelten. Hier sehen Sie eine Folie, die den Toll-Signalweg und den IMD-Signalweg der Fliege mit dem TLR4- und dem TNF-Signalweg vergleicht. Es handelt sich hier sowohl bei der Fliege, die natürlich über keine adaptive Immunität verfügt, als auch bei Säugetieren, die eine solche Immunität besitzen, ausschließlich um die Signalwege der angeborenen Immunreaktion. Schauen wir uns die Farben an - ich habe leider keine Zeit mehr, Ihnen die Details zu erläutern. Wir haben Membranrezeptoren, die entweder wie im Falle von Spätzle oder TNF-Alpha zu einem gespaltenen Zytokin reagieren oder wie im Falle von Lipopolysacchariden oder Peptidoglycan im Fliegen- oder Maussystem mit dem mikrobiellen Liganden direkt interagieren. Wir haben adaptive Proteine, die entweder identisch sind, z.B. MyD88 in Toll und TLR4, oder sehr ähnlich, z.B. IMD und RIP in den Systemen des IMD- bzw. TNF-Signalweges. Dann aktiviert das System die zentralen Kinasen wie z.B. die TAK1-Kinase, die wiederum den JNK-Signalweg aktiviert; das ist aber jetzt nicht relevant. Dann haben wir einen IKK-Komplex, der in TLR4, IMD und TNF praktisch identisch ist; im Toll-Signalweg der Fliege ist er ein bisschen simpler. Am Ende stehen die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB und die Steuerung der Genexpression. Ich möchte noch einmal betonen, dass die Entdeckung für uns und die Wissenschaftler in unserem Fachgebiet völlig unerwartet kam: ein zwischen Säugetieren und Fliegen so stark konservierten Systems. Jetzt stellte sich die Frage, wann sich dieses System erstmals entwickelte. Natürlich stammen Fliegen nicht von Mäusen ab oder umgekehrt. Wir sammelten also Daten. Heute stehen etwa 6000 Genomsequenzen zur Verfügung. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie, die unsere Arbeit zusammenfasst, sehen, stellten wir zu unserer großen Überraschung fest, dass alle Moleküle, die wir in Drosophila entdeckt hatten, bereits in Seeanemonen und vor allem Schwämmen existieren, d.h. seit Beginn der Differenzierung der Eukaryonten. Es gibt sie in Würmern - mit Ausnahme von C. elegans, das ist ein Spezialfall - in Krustentieren, in Fliegen und Cephalochordaten und in sämtlichen Wirbeltieren. Auffällig ist bei diesem Vergleich, dass die an der angeborenen Immunreaktion bei Wirbeltieren beteiligten Moleküle denen der Seeanemonen ähnlicher sind als denen der Fliegen. Fliegen verfügen über hochentwickelte Systeme, sie sind keineswegs primitive Lebewesen. Sie haben ihre Immunabwehr auf nur zwei Induktoren vereinfacht: das hochkonservierte Peptidoglycan und das hochkonservierte Beta-Glucan. Das sind die einzihen Induktoren die sie neben Virulenzfaktoren, die vom jeweiligen Erregersystem abhängen, besitzen. All dies ließ uns vermuten, dass sich die angeborene Immunität so wie wir sie heute verstehen mit der Vielzelligkeit wahrscheinlich vor etwa einer Milliarde Jahren entwickelt hat. Bereits zu Beginn der Evolution findet sich bei den Seeanemonen fast der gesamte Werkzeugkasten der angeborenen Immunität. Im Verlauf der Evolution wurde er teilweise vereinfacht bzw. diversifiziert. Seeigel beispielsweise besitzen 220 Toll-artige Rezeptoren. Man könnte annehmen, dies läge daran, dass sie Meerwasser filtern, doch Cionen, die in enger Nachbarschaft zu Seeigeln leben, verfügen nur über 3 TLR. Diese Erklärungsversuche helfen uns also nicht weiter. Eine wichtige Erkenntnis, über die man sich einig zu sein scheint, ist, dass die adaptive Immunität bei Säugetieren durch die angeborene Immunität, z.B. Zytokine oder andere Faktoren unterstützt werden muss. Ich möchte also noch einmal betonen, dass die angeborene Immunitätskaskade bei Wirbeltieren neben all den Elementen, die wir bei der Fliege gefunden haben, noch weitere Elemente besitzt, über die Fliegen heute nicht mehr verfügen, wohl aber Seeanemonen. Ich wollte noch etwas zu den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen sagen, aber die Zeit hier in Lindau vergeht immer so schnell. Ich müsste eigentlich eine Folie mit der Zusammenfassung haben - hier ist sie. Ich habe noch eine Minute; das reicht. Bei Fliegen, ebenso wie bei C. elegans und Pflanzen, spielt die RNA-Interferenz eine wichtige Rolle; bei den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in Säugetieren ist sie dagegen nicht von Bedeutung. Neben der RNA-Interferenz, einem Kennzeichen der antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in dieser Gruppe, werden Gene angeregt, die die Virusinfektion eindämmen. Daran arbeiten wir momentan. Die Rezeptoren sowie die Signalwege sind aber noch weitgehend unbekannt. Im System der Säugetiere basieren die angeborenen Immunreaktionen im Wesentlichen auf dem Interferon-Arm. Die TLR-Rezeptoren sowie weitere Rezeptoren, die sich bei der Fliege nicht finden, z.B. NLR oder RLR aktivieren die Expression von Interferon- und Interferon-stimulierten Genen. Diese aktivieren natürliche Killerzellen, die wiederum infizierte Zellen abtöten. Die adaptive Immunantwort wird durch die angeborene Immunreaktion stimuliert, d.h. B-Lymphozyten erzeugen neutralisierende Antikörper und T-Lymphozyten töten infizierte Zellen ab. Ich möchte gerne den Beitrag, den zahlreiche hochrangige Wissenschaftler und ihre Arbeitsgruppen im Laufe der Jahre geleistet haben, würdigen. Da ist einmal meine Frau Daniele Hoffmann, die von Anfang an dabei war und am Diptericin-Gen arbeitete. Sie ist ebenfalls diese Woche in Lindau und leitet heute die Exkursion. Weiterhin haben wir den Chemiker Charles Hetru, den Biochemiker Jean-Luc Dirmarcq sowie den Entwicklungs- und inzwischen auch Drosophila-Genetiker Jean-Marc Reichhart. Der erste Drosophila-Genetiker, den wir in unsere Arbeitsgruppe aufnahmen, war Bruno Lemaitre; er ist heute in Lausanne tätig. Dominique Ferrandon - bevor er zu unserer Gruppe stieß, verfasste er seine Doktorarbeit interessanterweise bei Frau Nüsslein-Volhard - beschäftigt sich mittlerweile mit bestimmten Aspekten der Erkennung, intestinalen Immunität, Resilienz etc. Julien Royet, der heute in Marseille arbeitet, beschäftigte sich eingehend mit den Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP). Jean-Luc Imler erforschte die antiviralen Mechanismen und wird sehr aufgebracht sein, dass ich auf seine Daten nicht im Detail eingegangen bin. Bei der nächsten Tagung - sofern man mich noch einmal einlädt - werde ich mich diesem Thema ausführlich widmen bzw. er wird Ihnen seine Daten erläutern. Elena Levashina arbeitete an den Abwehrmechanismen gegen parasitäre Erreger wie das durch Anophelesmücken übertragene Plasmodium und hat herausragende Arbeit geleistet mit der Identifizierung eines komplement-artigen Moleküls in einem komplexen, die Infektion bekämpfenden System bei Moskitos. Philippe Bulet beschäftigte sich ebenfalls mit antimikrobiellen Peptiden. Hier sehen Sie eine Liste all der Leute aus anderen Labors und anderen Ländern, die in den letzten Jahren in diesem Forschungsbereich gearbeitet haben. Ich bedanke mich für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Jules Hoffmann on the first appearance of adaptive immunity
(00:25:16 - 00:26:03)

 

The triggers of innate immunity

When a pathogen tries to attack us, it mostly fails at the epithelial surfaces that form our skin or that line the mucosa of our respiratory, digestive, urinary and digestive tract. These surfaces, which cover the impressive area of about 100 m2 in our respiratory and up to 300 m2 in our digestive tract serve as both physical and chemical barriers[16]. If a pathogen nevertheless breaches one of these barriers of our body, non-epithelial cells of the innate immune system come into play and strive to render the invader harmless. It is important to note that this confrontation in most cases takes place in our tissue. A pathogen should never reach our blood circulation, otherwise a fatal sepsis could be the consequence. First of all, macrophages that reside within the tissue appear at the site of the invasion, followed by neutrophils that migrate from the blood. But how do these cells detect the presence of a pathogen? They can sense pathogen-specific molecules that normally are not present in our body, the so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through their pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The first PRR was discovered by Jules Hoffmann in 1996 when he studied how fruit flies fight fungal infections. He made his breakthrough discovery of a specific receptor complex involved in activation of innate immunity in a fruit fly with a specific gene mutation, which its originator Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (NP in Physiology or Medicine 1995) had called “toll” – the German word for “great” or “fantastic”. Hoffmann concluded that the “toll” receptor was necessary for fruit flies to be able to cope with fungal infection. When he came to Lindau in 2014, he spoke about the publication of his seminal paper and its consequences.

 

Jules Hoffmann (2014) - Innate Immunity: From Flies to Humans

Dear colleagues and friends, I would like to start also thanking the organisers for the invitation and for this wonderful meeting which I really do enjoy. So in the first slide the question which I got most often over the last 3 years by journalists and by varied people, many people in society: Why do you work on insects? So let me say, just in this slide is shown, insects they account for 80% of all living species on earth. They annually destroy one third of human crops and they put one third of humanity and livestock at risk of bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections via the bacteria roles. And, what we knew when I started my PhD, they are particularly resistant to infections. So here we were in the presence of a very large important group on earth, of animals on earth, and knowing that they were resistant to infections but we didn't understand the mechanisms. Except for the role of phagocytosis. So I'll go rapidly with you through the steps which we took over the last 20 years. And first of all that part of our work was done on drosophila which has of course great advantages, as all of you are aware of, in terms of genetics. And in this slide we show that when we prick a fly at times zero and then take off the blood we see that we induce a very strong potent antimicrobial activity. This is a very simple growth inhibition assay. So we started out asking 3 questions. Number 1: What is the identity of the affected molecules? We knew from work from Hans Boman in Stockholm in the early '80s that in butterflies antimicrobial peptide was induced which he named cecropin. Second question was: What is - this is Hans Boman - what is the control of gene expression if we find that the molecules in the fly are also peptides like in the butterfly? And a third question: What is the identity of the receptors of those microbial infections, and is the fly able to distinguish between various types of infecting molecules? Now, it took us several years to go through chemical analytical chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to find that drosophila, the flies, in response to the challenge I've shown you on the previous slide, produce several families of strongly...of powerful antimicrobial peptides which are shown in these slides. They are produced in the fat body, in what is now a classical way, as pro-molecules and then matured, secreted into the blood where the concentrations reach very high values in the order of 0.5 millimolar. Important among those molecules - they are certainly unimportant for the fly but important for us -was diptericin, which was the first molecule which we found which is anti-active against gram-negative bacteria. Attacins and cecropins are homologous through the molecules identified in butterflies by Hans Boman. And then we found drosomycin which is a potently antifungal peptide, and metchnikowin, defensin and so on. So this sort of solved the first question about the identity of the inducible molecules which in the circulating blood accounted for the protection, at least for large particle protection. Now the second question is, how are the genes and cloning of those peptides controlled? And as shown on this slide, when we cloned still the Diptericin gene at that time, the one which is antibacterial, anti-Gram-negative bacterial, we found in the promoters of the Diptericin gene kappaB response elements. That is to say nucleotides sequences which had been reported in mammalian systems by David Baltimore and his colleagues to be responsive to the NF-kappaB transactivator which is the central transactivator of immune and distress responses. Now when we mutated these sites and report the flies we abolished the inducibility showing that their presence is mandatory for an immune response. Now in the fly at the time it was known that there were at least one homologue of NF-kappaB, which is presented here, which was named Dorsal by the inventor Nüsslein-Volhard, I'll show that in the slide, and was retained in the cytoplasm binding to an inhibitor which she named Cactus. Now as I explained or as I will explain now, when you do this type of work in the fly or in other systems - at that time it was done through mutagenesis, unbiased mutagenesis. And you were screening for phenotypes and you could give for phenotypes... you could give a name and this was in the context of screening for abnormally developing embryos. Now just to illustrate this and this is not work from any of these groups but from whole groups in the community to explain to you what NF-kappaB is like. This is NF-kappaB and it is linked to the inhibitor which goes by the name of I-kappaB. So the whole story and the immune response here, and in development occasionally, is via kinase which is named IKK here to phosphorylate I-kappaB which will change its confirmation, disassociate from NF-kappaB and then free NF-kappaB which then is able to translocate into the nucleus and bind to DNA as shown. This is the nice butterfly figure where NF-kappaB dimer instead of NF-kappaB binds to DNA. So the question was, would this system which had been discovered in the dorso-ventral axis formation by Nüsslein-Volhard, would this system also be used in immune response? And as illustrated here and the work of Nüsslein-Volhard and a certain number of other scientists including Eric Wieschaus. Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were awarded the Nobel Prize in the '90s for their work on the determination of dorso-ventral and antro-posterior axis and other aspects of development in the fly. So here we have in the cytoplasm NF-kappaB bound to the inhibitor I-kappaB. This association is brought about when a signal comes from a transmembrane receptor. And that transmembrane receptor was dubbed by Nüsslein-Volhard 'Toll' for the bizarre appearance of the mutated embryo. Again I repeat, adults are at the time of reproduction fed mutagens and then the embryos are screened for those which do not normally develop and they are given a phenotype then. And Toll becomes activated by a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in the cleavage of a cytokine which was named Spätzle by Nüsslein-Volhard. I suppose in this audience I don't have to explain the phenotype of the Spätzle embryo. And so what we did and now I'm going to summarise the work which took really several years, about 5 years in the laboratory for a whole group, prominent among whom were Jean-Marc Reichhart and Bruno Lemaitre and the chemists identifying additional inducable antimicrobial molecules. So our initial idea that Toll might be involved in the expression, in the control of the genes, and coding these antimicrobial peptides was blocked by the fact that we used diptericin; diptericin was the first peptide which we had in our hands. Now diptericin turned out not to be dependent on Toll pathway, and it took us again as I said quite a lot of time to identify other inducible molecules and namely antifungal peptide drosomycin which appeared to really depend on the Toll pathway. So as you see in this slide fungi and as we later learnt, quite a few years later, Gram-positive bacteria activate via Toll NF-kappaB and lead to the production of antifungal and antibacterial peptides. Now this didn't help us for diptericin. And again it took several years for us to find that there was an additional pathway, unsuspected pathway in the system here which we referred to IMD for immune deficiency. And this pathway controlled the expression in response to Gram-negative bacteria of NF-kappaB and led to the production, to the expression of the genes and coding of antibacterial peptides and namely that of diptericin. So we were now, by '96, and in a position where we thought we understood that the defence molecules that they were dependent on two distinct pathways, Toll pathway, a partial reuse of the embryonic regulatory cascade for dorsoventral development, and another pathway of which we did not know anything at that time. We were not even sure that it was a pathway. But things evolved and before going into that let me just show you experiments which were done by Bruno Lemaitre, 2 postdoctoral students, and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory. Here we are looking at Aspergillus fungal infection in wild-type versus Toll mutant flies, and you see that there's a very marked difference. The Toll mutant flies have died, 50% have died after two days already in this experiment. Now on the other side of the slide you see that in the case of IMD mutants which control the expression of peptides active against Gram-negative bacteria, we see that E. coli infection is very well survived by wild-type fly. But in IMD mutants there's a very rapid dying off of the flies. So this then led us to propose in '96 that the dorsoventral regulatory gene cassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus controls the potent antifungal response in Drosophila adults. This is a Toll deficient fly. You see that the fungi have developed in the dying fly and covered everything of the body. Now this was sort of an important time in the work in the communities, because - I'll explain to you - because innate immunity not much was known about it. Innate immunity was not a very popular field at the time. It was essentially defective immunity which was the objective of the community of immunologists. And there were few receptors known in innate immunity and there was none known which would single to NF-kappaB. And as we have seen in the previous slide the hallmark of the activation both of the IMD pathway and the Toll pathway was the activation of NF-kappaB and then control of gene expression. And this was now the case for all electins which were known at that time in the system of innate immunity. There's also a belief that innate immunity was required to activate the production of cytokines, which would activate adaptive immunity and induce increased synthesis of MHC molecules and so on. I'm not going into this because what happened after this, after the publication of this paper, was that many people of the immunology community in adaptive system went into looking for homologous molecules of Toll in mammalian systems, and within a few years about 12 of these molecules were found. Paramount about that was of course the discovery that the LPS receptor was a member of the Toll family which Bruce Beutler is going to present to you in a few minutes. So taken together, the results in the fly and in the mammalian systems suggested that these Toll receptors would play an important role in innate immunity and possibly also in adaptive immunity via activating NF-kappaB. As shown in this slide, this is Shizuo Akira who is to be credited for having done a lot of work on identifying the ligands of the Toll-like receptors. This is the mammalian system. And here we see Toll-like receptors on the cytoplasmic membrane. The activators are lipopolysaccharide as has been conclusively shown by genetic approach by Bruce Beutler. And various other lipopeptides, even Flagellin, and in the endosome we have various nucleotides sequences either double-stranded RNA, single-stranded RNA or CpG DNA. Now in response to the activation via adaptive molecules, mammals will activate NF-kappaB as flies do in their special system. And also mammals will activate IRFs, interferon regulatory factors, which are absent; there is no interference system in flies. And this will lead on one side to the production of antimicrobial peptides and many other molecules. We know now there are hundreds of molecules which are activated in the innate immune response downstream of NF-kappaB. And also the activation of adaptive immune responses as I've already mentioned. Now taken together, I'm told - I've not made the check but I'm told - that about 20,000 papers of clinical interest have been published over the last 20 years now on the role of TLRs and the implication in defence reactions. And again, I mentioned, we have only worked on insects and we continue to work on insects. So this is from the community and not from our laboratory. So the primary role of course of TLRs we would say is fighting infectious diseases, which was the way they were discovered. And also we now know they play an important role in inflammation and this is becoming really one of the most central areas of research within the TLR field. They play a role in vaccination as they recognise some adjuvants - they are not the only molecules working on adjuvants but they do play a role in this field. They play a role in autoimmunity; they play a role in allergy; and importantly they are now accredited of playing a role in the new avenue of research of immunotherapy including cancer immunotherapy. But let me come back to my field and that is flies. And in flies they play a role in infections as I've pointed out a few minutes ago. And in the case of Gram-positive bacterial infection and fungal infection. We also have found, and others that over the last few years, that they also seem to play a role in inflammation. This is again a new field; it's a very interesting new field and there is aspects - I have no time to go into that, but maybe with the students this week to show what is coming up in this field. That will be certainly also very nice, very nice parallels to draw with inflammation in mammalian systems, which as you are aware of is now one of the central problems in human disease. Then essentially, and I insist on that, Toll receptors play a role in development in the fly. So the fly has 9 Toll receptors, they are activated by Spätzle or Spätzle-like molecules. So there are 6 Spätzle-like molecules in the fly which are, believe it or not, neurotrophins including Spätzle. So we have a set of regular developmental regulatory molecules, 6 neurotrophins and 9 Tolls - they all play a role in development, particularly of the nervous system, in the embryo and later in the larvae. And of these molecules, of this 6 + 9, nature has selected, for reasons we do not understand, So this is still a very important intellectual philosophical question, which is unsolved till today. So coming back to the fly. I was just mentioning now the story of non-Toll receptors, of Spätzle. So Spätzle becomes activated in this system, like in the embryonic system, by proteolytic cascade. This cascade is different from the one which is found in the embryos so it's an immune proteolytic cascade. But what are the receptors then? The receptors are not Toll and this is in contrast to what is known now in the mammalian system where Toll receptors directly interact with microbial inducers. In the fly Toll is not a receptor, but it is on the pathway of activation of the immune response. And the real, the actual receptors were found around 2000: We did work, we did unbiased mutagenesis which was the first genetic demonstration of the role of these receptors; and PGRP stands here which was one which we found at that time. It was Julian Royet in the laboratory who found that. Gram-positive bacteria interact with peptidoglycan recognition receptors activate the proteolytic cascade. The members of this cascade have been identified by now. Then dedicated protein, which is a Gram-negative binding protein also in the blood, reacts to beta-glucan of fungal origin, activates a cascade. And very interestingly Dominique Ferrandon and Jean-Marc Reichhart in the laboratory have found that microbial proteases activated dedicated protease in zymogen in the hemolymph. Most of the pathogens when they invade, or most of the microbes, when they invade their host will secrete proteases. And to our surprise we found that - and this is a very precise model of Beauveria bassiana fungus where you can do all the genetics and you can do the genetics on the fly. And so we were able to show, they were able to show, that microprotease interacts with and activates this zymogen which will then feed into the same proteolytic cascade. This is interesting because it really is a virus factor and as time goes on we see that this is valid for many other pathogens and also in other systems. Finally Gram-negative bacteria will activate through a transmembrane receptor again peptidoglycan recognition protein, will activate the other pathway, the IMD pathway, which will lead to effector genes which fight against Gram-negative bacteria. Now, I want to summarise this to make it very clear. The microbial inducers and their cognate receptors in the innate immune response of Drosophila: Bacterial peptidoglycans are recognised by dedicated circulating or transmembrane proteins referred to as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have evolutionarily derived from amidases. And we also point out that we humans product 4 families of PGRPs every day, as we produce many, many antimicrobial peptides every day, up to 10 grams on our skin per day. And so these are very highly conserved molecules. And in the case of humans they are not recognition proteins, PGRPs, but they are directly antibacterial. And fungal beta-glucans are recognised by circulating proteins referred to as glucan binding proteins. Now we have now understood some aspects about the affected molecules, we have understood some aspects about the receptors. Now let me shortly concentrate just in one example on the signalling cascades which link the recognition to the control of gene transcription. I've selected this antibody pathway which is also involved, as we have seen, in these inflammatory-like reactions. Now the receptor PGRP is shown here, it interacts with IMD and the first surprise came when we cloned the IMD gene - it was 2001 - was to see that it has a DEF domain which is very similar to mammalian RIP1. Now RIP stands for TNF receptor interacting protein. Second surprise: IMD binds to fat which is DEF domain protein conserved in the TNF receptor pathway in mammals. Then this system will activate TAK1, which is a MAP3 kinase, also highly conserved in the mammalian system, linking to TAK2, also conserved in the mammalian TNF3 receptor pathway. Then TAK1 will activate an IKK complex which has an IKK-beta and IKK-gamma component, which are highly conserved in mouse and humans. And then the reactivation, the phosphorylation of Relish which is the NF-kappaB family member in this pathway. And that will be cleaved by a caspase, and that caspase goes by the name of Dredd in the fly and is homologous to mammalian caspase-8. And then the active part of Relish, that is to say the real homologous domain, will go into nucleus and control expression of diptericin and hundreds of other genes. I put a note here about existence of negative regulation but we have no time to go into that. Now this was extremely striking to us. Remember we started off in a time of...when I started my PhD work with Professor Joly we started off thinking we would find something different from mammalian immune response, which was at the time essentially considered, as I mentioned already, in terms of adaptive immunity. And here we found many, many players in innate immune response which were similar to the ones which were present in mammals. Now I'm putting here a slide where I compare the Toll pathway and the IMD pathway of the fly to the TLR4 pathway and TNF pathway. So these are innate immune pathways - of course in the fly which has no adaptive immunity and in mammals which have adaptive immunity, but these pathways here are of the innate immune response. Now just looking at the colours - I have no time unfortunately to go into the details - but we have membrane receptors, which either react to a cleaved cytokine, as in the case of Spätzle or TNF-alpha, or directly interacts with the microbial ligand, this is the case of lipopolysaccharides or peptidoglycan in the fly or mouse system. We have adaptive proteins which are either identical, like MyD88 between Toll and TLR4, or very similar like IMD and RIP in systems of the IMD pathway and TNF pathway. Then we activate, we - that is to say the system - will activate central kinases like the TAK1 kinase which will also in turn activate the adjunct kinase pathway; it's not relevant this time. And then we have an IKK complex which is nearly identical in TLR4, IMD and TNF. It's a little bit simplified in the pathway of Toll in the fly. The end product will be activation of NF-kappaB and control of gene expression. So this is really something which, again I insist, was totally unexpected by us and in the community: to find that we have a system which is so highly conserved between mammals and flies. Now this raises the question, when did this system appear? Of course, flies do not derive from mice and mice do not derive from flies. So we did data mining and there's about 6,000 sequences of genomes are available now. And in this summarising slide, to our large surprise all the molecules which we found in Drosophila are already present in sea anemones and mostly also in sponges, that's to say really at the beginning of the differentiation of the eukaryotes. They are present in worms, with the exception of C. elegans, which is a special worm. And they are present in crustaceans, the fly, in cephalochordates, and they are all present in vertebrates. A striking aspect of this comparison is that the members of the innate immune response in vertebrates are closer to those of the sea anemones than to the flies - because flies have highly evolved systems, it's not a primitive flying thing out there. It has simplified its immune defence, namely remember that there are only 2 inducers: the highly conserved peptidoglycan and the highly conserved beta-glucan. These are the only inducers in addition to violence factors which depend on the aggressing system. Now, all this leads us to believe that innate immunity in the way we understand it now has appeared, probably, with multi-similarity that is to say roughly one billion years ago. And that sort of tool box of innate immunity is nearly fully present in sea anemones at the beginning of this evolution. And then over evolution various groups have either simplified or a little bit diversified and this is the case namely as I've mentioned. I could mention here that sea urchins for instance have 220 Toll-like receptors. And you could say that's because they live in the sea they filter the sea. But ciona which lives close to the sea urchins has only 3. So that's not really going to help us, that sort of calculation will not help us. Now the important thing here on which everyone seems to agree is that a full adaptive immunity in mammals requires the input from a boost from innate immunity, be it via cytokines of other aspects. And so again I insist on the fact that the innate immune cascade in vertebrates has all the elements which we found in the fly plus some additionals which are absent from fly today but present in sea anemones. So, I was going - but time here in Lindau runs so quickly - I was going to say a few words on the antiviral defences. Let me just point out I should have a summarising slide here which will, yes. I have 1 minute and that will be enough to summarise. So in the fly, like in C elegans, like in plants, RNA interference plays an essential role - this is not the case in the antiviral defences in mammals. And in addition to RNA interference, hallmark of the antiviral defences in this group, there's an induction of genes which will restrict the viral infection on which we are working on now. Receptors are largely unknown as are the pathways. Now in the mammalian system the innate response is essentially based on interferon, the interferon arm. The TLR receptors and other receptors which are absent from invertebrates like NLRs, RLRs...or I should say from the fly. Activate expression of interferon genes and of ISG interference simulative genes, the active natural killer cells which kill infected cells. And the adaptive immune response here which is stimulated by the immune response. B lymphocytes produce neutralising antibodies. And T lymphocytes kill infected cells. Now, I would like to acknowledge the contribution of many senior scientists and their groups. Let me just mention here over the years: Daniele Hoffmann, who started with me; she did the work on diptericin gene. She's my wife, she's with me in Lindau and she is taking the excursion today. Charles Hetru a chemist, Jean-Luc Dirmarcq the biochemist. Jean-Marc Reichhart, development geneticist and also now Drosophila geneticist. Bruno Lemaitre was the first Drosophila geneticist whom we hired in our group, he is now in Lausanne. Dominique Ferrandon did his PhD work interestingly with Nüsslein-Volhard before joining our group, and he is working on certain aspects now of recognition, of gut immunity, resilience and so on. Julien Royet, now in Marseille, has worked a lot on the PGRP receptors, peptidoglycan recognition receptors. Jean-Luc Imler is working on the antiviral field, he will be very upset that I was so quick on his data. But that will be at the next meeting if you still invite me, I will speak essentially about...or he will speak about his data. Elena Levashina works on the defences against parasites, against plasmodium in anopheles, and she has done really stellar work identifying a complement-like molecule in the mosquito in a complex system fighting off the infection. Philippe Bulet has also done work on the antimicrobial peptide. Just putting on the names of people in other laboratories in other countries who have contributed to this field in recent years. Thank you very much for your attention.

Sehr geehrte Kollegen und Freunde, ich möchte mich zunächst bei den Veranstaltern für die Einladung zu dieser wunderbaren Tagung bedanken, dir mir wirklich großes Vergnügen bereitet. Meine erste Folie formuliert die Frage, die mir Journalisten und viele andere Leute in den letzten drei Jahren am häufigsten gestellt haben: Warum arbeiten Sie an Insekten? Wie auf der Folie dargestellt machen Insekten 80% aller aktuell auf der Erde lebenden Arten aus. Sie zerstören jährlich ein Drittel der Ernten und setzen einen ebenso großen Prozentsatz der Menschheit und des Viehbestandes dem Risiko bakterieller, mykotischer, viraler und parasitärer Infektionen aus, infolge ihrer Funktion als Vektoren. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit begann, wusste man bereits, dass sie gegenüber Infektionen besonders resistent sind. Wir sahen uns also der Situation gegenüber, dass auf der Erde eine sehr große und bedeutsame Tiergruppe existiert, die gegenüber Infektionen resistent ist, wir aber mit Ausnahme der Rolle der Phagozytose die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen nicht verstanden. Ich gehe mit Ihnen rasch die Schritte, die wir in den letzten 20 Jahren durchlaufen haben, durch. Wir arbeiteten hauptsächlich mit Drosophila, was, wie Sie alle wissen, vom genetischen Standpunkt aus sehr vorteilhaft ist. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie, was geschieht, wenn wir einer Fliege zum Zeitpunkt Null Bakterien injizieren und ihr dann in bestimmten Zeitabständen Blut abnehmen: Es wird eine sehr starke antimikrobielle Aktivität ausgelöst. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen ganz einfachen Wachstumsinhibititonstest. Zu Beginn hatten wir drei Fragen. Erstens: Was sind die Effektormoleküle? Wir wussten aus Arbeiten von Hans Boman in Stockholm Anfang der 80er Jahre, dass in Schmetterlingen ein von ihm Cecropin getauftes antimikrobielles Peptid induziert wird. Zweitens fragten wir uns - das ist übrigens Hans Boman - wie die Genexpression gesteuert wird, wenn sich herausstellt, dass es sich, wie beim Schmetterling, bei den Molekülen in der Fliege um Peptide handelt. Und schließlich wollten wir wissen, welche Rezeptoren an diesen mikrobiellen Infektionen beteiligt sind und ob die Fliege zwischen verschiedenen Arten von Infektionsmolekülen unterscheiden kann. Wir benötigten mehrere Jahre, bis wir mit Hilfe chemisch-analytischer, biochemischen und molekulargenetischen Untersuchungen herausfanden, dass Drosophila als Reaktion auf die in der vorherigen Folie dargestellten Infektionen verschiedene Familien wirksamer antimikrobieller Peptide erzeugt - zu sehen hier auf dieser Folie. Sie entstehen auf klassische Weise in den Fettkörperzellen in Form von Promolekülen, reifen dann heran und werden ins Blut ausgeschüttet, wo sie sehr hohe Konzentrationen einer Größenordnung von 0,5 Millimol erreichen. Ein wichtiges Molekül - d.h. wichtig für uns, nicht für die Fliege - war Diptericin. Es war das erste Molekül, das wir fanden, das gegen gramnegativ Bakterien wirksam ist. Attacine und Cecropine sind homolog zu den von Hans Boman in Schmetterlingen identifizierten Molekülen. Weiterhin fanden wir Drosomycin, ein stark antimykotisch wirkendes Peptid, Metchnikowin, Defensin etc. Damit war die erste Frage bezüglich der Identität der induzierbaren Moleküle, die im Blutkreislauf vor Infektionen schützen, mehr oder weniger geklärt. Nun fragten wir uns, wie diese Gene bzw. die Klonierung der Peptide gesteuert werden. Wie auf dieser Folie dargestellt fanden wir bei der Klonierung des Gens, das für die Erzeugung des gegen gramnegative Bakterien wirksamen Moleküls Diptericin zuständig ist - so genannte KappaB-Response-Elemente in der Promotorregion. Dabei handelt es sich um Nukleotidsequenzen, die nach Angaben von David Baltimore und Kollegen in Säugetiersystemen verantwortlich für den NF-KappaB-Transaktivator sind welcher der zentralen Transaktivator bei Immun- und Belastungsreaktionen ist. Durch Mutation dieser Genstellen in Schmetterlingen hoben wir die Induzierbarkeit auf und zeigten, dass sie für eine Immunreaktion zwingend notwendig sind. Bei der Fliege war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt bekannt, dass sie zumindest ein Homolog von NF-KappaB besitzt. Dieses von seiner Entdeckerin Nüsslein-Volhard Dorsal getaufte Protein - ich zeige Ihnen das auf der Folie - wird durch Bindung an einen Inhibitor namens Cactus, ebenfalls eine Wortschöpfung von Nüsslein-Volhard, im Zytoplasma gehalten. Sie müssen wissen, dass bei derartigen Untersuchungen an Fliegen oder anderen Systemen so geschehen z.B. im Zusammenhang mit der Suche nach embryonalen Entwicklungsstörungen. Ich möchte Ihnen veranschaulichen und erläutern, worum es sich bei NF-KappaB handelt. Hier sehen Sie NF-KappaB; es ist an einen Inhibitor namens IKappaB gebunden. Bei der Immunreaktion, und gelegentlich auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung, wird IKappaB von der Kinase IKK phosphoryliert, so dass es seine Konfirmation ändert, von NF-KappaB dissoziiert und dieses schließlich freisetzt, so dass es in den Nukleus translozieren und sich dort wie dargestellt an die DNA binden kann. Dabei entsteht diese hübsche Schmetterlingsform, in der sich das NF-KappaB-Dimer anstelle von NF-KappaB an die DNA bindet. Die Frage war, ob dieses von Nüsslein-Volhard entdeckte, an der Entwicklung der dorsoventralen Achse beteiligte System auch bei der Immunreaktion eine Rolle spielt. Hier sehen Sie die Arbeit von Nüsslein-Volhard und weiteren Wissenschaftlern wie Eric Wieschaus. In den 90er Jahren erhielten Nüsslein-Volhard und Wieschaus den Nobelpreis für die Erforschung der dorsoventralen und anteroposterioren Achse und anderer Aspekte der Embryonalentwicklung bei der Fliege. NF-KappaB bindet sich infolge eines von einem Transmembranrezeptor ausgesendeten Signals im Zytoplasma an den Inhibitor IKappaB. Diesen Transmembranrezeptor taufte Nüsslein-Volhard aufgrund des bizarren Aussehens des mutierten Embryos 'Toll'. Um es noch einmal zu wiederholen: Zum Zeitpunkt der Fortpflanzung werden die adulten Tiere FADD-mutagenisiert; anschließend werden die Embryos nach Exemplaren untersucht, die sich nicht normal entwickeln, und die jeweiligen Phänotypen erhalten Namen. diese Bezeichnung stammt ebenfalls von Nüsslein-Volhard. Ich gehe davon aus, dass ich diesem Publikum den Phänotyp des Spätzle-Embryos nicht erläutern muss. Ich möchte unsere langwierige, sich über etwa 5 Jahre hinziehende Arbeit im Labor kurz zusammenfassen. An ihr war eine ganze Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern beteiligt; hervorzuheben sind insbesondere Jean-Marc Reichhart und Bruno Lemaitre sowie die Chemiker, die weitere induzierbare antimikrobielle Moleküle identifizierten. Unserer ursprünglichen Idee, dass Toll möglicherweise an der Expression bzw. Steuerung der Gene sowie an der Kodierung der antimikrobiellen Peptide beteiligt ist, konnten wir aufgrund der Tatsache, dass wir mit Diptericin, dem ersten Peptid, das uns zur Verfügung stand, arbeiteten, nicht nachgehen, da sich herausstellte, dass Diptericin nicht vom Toll-Signalweg abhängt. Es dauerte wie gesagt ziemlich lange, bis wir andere induzierbare Moleküle identifiziert hatten, u.a. ein antimykotisches Peptid namens Drosomycin, das, so schien es, eindeutig von diesem Signalweg abhing. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie sehen, führen Pilze und, wie wir einige Jahre später feststellten, grampositive Bakterien mittels Aktivierung von Toll-NF-KappaB zur Entstehung antimykotischer und antibakterieller Peptide. Das nützte uns bei Diptericin allerdings wenig. Es dauerte wieder mehrere Jahre, bis sich herausstellte, dass es in diesem System einen weiteren unvermuteten Signalweg gab, den wir als Immundefizienz (IMD)-Signalweg bezeichneten. Und dieser Signalweg steuert die Expression von NF-KappaB als Reaktion auf gramnegative Bakterien und führt zur Expression der Gene und somit zur Kodierung der antibakteriellen Peptide, in unserem Fall Diptericin. von zwei bestimmten Signalwegen abhängen, dem Toll-Signalweg, einem Teil der embryonalen Steuerkaskade für die dorsoventrale Entwicklung, und einem anderen Signalweg, über den wir bis dato nichts wussten, ja bei dem wir noch nicht einmal sicher waren, dass es sich dabei überhaupt um einen Signalweg handelt. Doch die Dinge gerieten ins Rollen - bevor ich Ihnen jedoch davon berichte, möchte ich Ihnen ein paar Experimente vorstellen, die Bruno Lemaitre und Jean-Marc Reichhart zusammen mit zwei Postdocs im Labor durchführten. Das hier ist eine Aspergillus-Pilzinfektion bei Wildtyp-Fliegen und Toll-mutierten Fliegen; Sie sehen, es besteht ein ganz deutlicher Unterschied. Nach nur zwei Tagen starben 50% der Toll-mutierten Fliegen in diesem Experiment. Auf der rechten Seite der Folie sehen Sie, dass Wildtyp-Fliegen eine Infektion mit E. coli problemlos überleben. IMD-Mutanten sterben dagegen sehr rasch ab. Dies führte dazu, dass wir 1996 zu dem Schluss kamen, dass die dorsoventrale regulatorische Genkassette Spätzle/Toll/Cactus die wirksame antimykotische Reaktion bei adulten Drosophila-Fliegen steuert. Dieser Fliege fehlt das Toll-Gen. Sie sehen, dass die Pilze den gesamten Körper der sterbenden Fliege bedecken. Das war eine wichtige Zeit für die Forschung in unserem Fachgebiet - ich werde Ihnen das erläutern - weil man über die angeborene Immunität damals nicht viel wusste. Außerdem war dieses Thema nicht sonderlich populär, die Immunologen befassten sich lieber mit Immundefekten. Man kannte damals nur wenige an der angeborenen Immunität beteiligte Rezeptoren, von denen keiner für NF-KappaB signalisiert. Wie auf der vorherigen Folie dargestellt waren für die Aktivierung sowohl des IMD-Signalweges als auch des Toll-Signalweges die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB sowie die anschließende Steuerung der Genexpression besonders bezeichnend. Dies galt für sämtliche Lektine, die zum damaligen Zeitpunkt beim System der angeborenen Immunität bekannt waren. Man nahm an, dass die angeborene Immunität für die Aktivierung der Zytokinherstellung erforderlich ist, was wiederum die adaptive Immunität aktiviert und eine verstärkte Synthese von MHC-Molekülen etc. auslöst. Ich werde darauf aber nicht näher eingehen. Nach Veröffentlichung dieses Papers begannen viele Immunologen, die sich mit adaptiven Systemen beschäftigten, nach homologen Toll-Molekülen in Säugetiersystemen zu suchen und fanden innerhalb weniger Jahre etwa 12 dieser Moleküle. Am vorrangigsten war natürlich die Entdeckung, dass der LPS-Rezeptor ein Mitglied der Toll-Familie ist - Bruce Beutler wird Ihnen in ein paar Minuten mehr darüber erzählen. In der Zusammenschau legten die Ergebnisse der Fliegen- und Säugetiersysteme also nahe, dass die Toll-Rezeptoren eine wichtige Rolle bei der angeborenen Immunität und möglicherweise auch bei der adaptiven Immunität spielen über die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB. Auf dieser Folie sehen Sie Shizuo Akira, dem für die Identifizierung die Liganden der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren in mühevoller Arbeit große Anerkennung gebührt. Das hier ist das Säugetiersystem; hier sehen Sie Toll-artige Rezeptoren auf der Zytoplasma-Membran. Es handelt sich bei den Aktivatoren um Lipopolysaccharide, wie Bruce Beutler anhand eines genetischen Ansatzes schlüssig beweisen konnte, aber auch verschiedene andere Lipopeptide wie Flagellin. Im Endosom finden sich verschiedene Nukleotidsequenzen, entweder Doppelstrang-RNA, Einzelstrang-RNA oder CpG-DNA. Als Antwort auf die Aktivierung mittels adaptiver Moleküle aktivieren Säugetiere NF-KappaB, ebenso wie Fliegen dies in ihrem speziellen System tun. Säugetiere aktivieren zudem Interferon regulierende Faktoren (IRF), Fliegen dagegen verfügen nicht über dieses Interferonsystem. Dies führt zur Entstehung antimikrobieller Peptide und zahlreicher anderer Moleküle. Wir wissen, dass es Hunderte von Molekülen gibt, die - NF-KappaB nachgeschaltet - bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion aktiviert werden. Die gilt auch für die Aktivierung adaptiver Immunreaktionen, wie zuvor erwähnt. Ich habe das zwar nicht überprüft, aber mir wurde gesagt, dass in den letzten 20 Jahren etwa 20.000 Paper von klinischem Interesse zur Rolle der Toll-artigen Rezeptoren (TLR) bei Abwehrreaktionen veröffentlicht worden sind. Wie ich bereits sagte, haben wir ausschließlich an Insekten gearbeitet und werden dies auch weiterhin tun. Diese Angaben stammen also nicht aus unserem Labor, sondern aus der Gesamtheit unseres Fachbereichs. Die wichtigste Aufgabe der TLR ist natürlich die Bekämpfung von Infektionskrankheiten - auf diesem Wege wurden sie schließlich auch entdeckt. Zudem wissen wir heute, dass sie eine wichtige Rolle bei Entzündungen spielen, was immer mehr zu einem der zentralen Forschungsbereiche auf diesem Gebiet wird. Von Bedeutung sind sie auch bei Impfungen, da sie einige Wirkverstärker erkennen; zwar sind sie nicht die einzigen Moleküle, die dies tun, dennoch spielen sie auf diesem Gebiet eine Rolle. Das Gleiche gilt für die Autoimmunität und Allergien. Außerdem geht man heute davon aus, dass sie auch für den neuen Forschungszweig der Immuntherapie, z.B. bei Krebs von Bedeutung sind. Doch lassen Sie mich zu meinem Fachgebiet zurückkehren, den Fliegen. In Fliegen, wie ich vor einigen Minuten erwähnt habe, spielen TLR hier im Falle von grampositiven bakteriellen und mykotischen Infektionen eine Rolle. In den letzten Jahren stellten wir und andere fest, dass sie vermutlich auch im Zusammenhang mit Entzündungen von Bedeutung sind. Dieses Gebiet ist ganz neu und sehr interessant. Leider habe ich nicht die Zeit näher darauf einzugehen, aber vielleicht kann ich ja den Studenten diese Woche noch ein bisschen erzählen, was sich in diesem Bereich so tut. Sicherlich lassen sich auch hier sehr schöne Parallelen zu Entzündungen in Säugetiersystemen ziehen, die, wie Sie wissen, heute eines der zentralen Probleme bei Humanerkrankungen darstellen. Ich möchte betonen, dass Toll-Rezeptoren zudem auch bei der Embryonalentwicklung der Fliege eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Die Fliege besitzt 9 Toll-Rezeptoren, die durch Spätzle bzw. Spätzle-artige Moleküle aktiviert werden. Es gibt 6 Spätzle-artige Moleküle in der Fliege, bei denen es sich, ob Sie es glauben oder nicht, um Neurotrophine handelt. Es existiert also ein Gruppe von Molekülen zur Entwicklungsregulation bestehend aus 6 Neurotrophinen und 9 Toll-artigen Rezeptoren, und sie alle sind bei der Entwicklung, insbesondere der des Nervensystems im Embryo und später in der Larve von Bedeutung. Von diesen 6 + 9 Molekülen hat die Natur aus Gründen, die wir nicht verstehen, einen Toll-Rezeptor und ein Spätzle-Molekül, d.h. ein Drosophila-Neurotrophin ausgewählt, diese so entscheidende Abwehr gegen eindringende Mikroorganismen zu aktivieren. Das ist eine sehr bedeutsame intellektuelle und philosophische Frage, die bislang ungelöst ist. Doch kehren wir zu den Fliegen zurück. Ich wollte Ihnen gerade etwas über die Nicht-Toll-Rezeptoren erzählen, die Spätzle. Spätzle werden auch in diesem System ebenso wie im Embryonalsystem durch eine proteolytische Kaskade aktiviert. Diese Kaskade unterscheidet sich jedoch insofern von derjenigen im Embryo, als es sich um eine immunproteolytische Kaskade handelt. Doch wie sehen deren Rezeptoren aus? Bei den Rezeptoren handelt es sich nicht um Toll, im Gegensatz zum Säugetiersystem, bei dem Toll-Rezeptoren direkt mit den mikrobiellen Induktoren interagieren. Toll ist bei der Fliege kein Rezeptor, sondern Teil der Aktivierungssignalweges der Immunreaktion. Auf die eigentlichen Rezeptoren stießen wir im Jahr 2000: Wir arbeiteten mit ergebnisoffener Mutagenese, wodurch wir die Rolle dieser Rezeptoren erstmals genetisch belegen konnten. Damals entdeckte Julian Royet im Labor die Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP), die mit grampositiven Bakterien in Wechselwirkungen treten und so die proteolytische Kaskade aktivieren, deren Mitglieder übrigens inzwischen bekannt sind. Dann reagiert ein spezielles Protein, ein gramnegatives Bindungsprotein im Blut, zu Beta-Glucan mykotischen Ursprungs und aktiviert eine Kaskade. Interessanterweise stellten Dominique Ferrandon und Jean-Marc Reichhart im Labor fest, dass mikrobielle Proteasen eine spezielle Protease im Zymogen der Hämolymphe aktivieren. Beim Eindringen von Erregern schüttet der Wirt für gewöhnlich Proteasen aus. Zu unserer Überraschung konnten sie zeigen, dass mit dessen Hilfe sich alle genetischen Experimente an der Fliege durchführen lassen - Sie konnten zeigen, dass Mikroproteasen mit dem Zymogen interagieren und es aktivieren, so dass es in die proteolytische Kaskade einfließt. Das ist interessant, denn es handelt sich tatsächlich um einen Virusfaktor. Mit der Zeit stellten wir fest, dass dies auch für viele andere Erreger und andere Systeme gilt. Schließlich aktivieren gramnegative Bakterien über den Transmembranrezeptor - das Peptidoglycan erkennende Protein - den IMD-Signalpfad, wodurch Effektorgene entstehen, die gramnegative Bakterien bekämpfen. Ich fasse zur Veranschaulichung jetzt noch einmal die mikrobiellen Induktoren und verwandten Rezeptoren der angeborenen Immunantwort von Drosophila zusammen: Bakterielle Peptidoglycane werden von speziellen zirkulierenden oder Transmembranproteinen, den so genannten Peptidoglycan erkennenden Proteinen (PGRP), die evolutionär von Amidasen abstammen, erkannt. Ich möchte anmerken, dass wir Menschen täglich vier PGRP-Familien, also enorm viele antimikrobielle Peptide produzieren - auf der Haut finden sich bis zu 10 g. Es handelt sich also um sehr stark konservierte Moleküle. Beim Menschen sind PGRP keine Erkennungsproteine, sondern direkt antibakteriell wirksame Moleküle. Die mykotischen Beta-Glucane werden von zirkulierenden Proteinen, den so genannten Glucan bindenden Proteinen erkannt. Wir haben jetzt einige Aspekte der entsprechenden Moleküle und ihrer Rezeptoren verstanden. Ich möchte mich nun kurz anhand eines Beispiels auf die Signalkaskaden konzentrieren, die die Erkennung mit der Steuerung der Gentranskription verknüpfen. Ich habe dafür diesen Antikörpersignalweg ausgesucht, der, wie wir gesehen haben, auch an Entzündungsreaktionen beteiligt ist. Das hier ist der Rezeptor PGRP; er interagiert mit IMD. Die erste Überraschung war, dass sich bei Klonierung des IMD-Gens im Jahr 2001 eine Todesdomäne zeigte, die dem TNF receptor interacting protein (RIP)bei Säugetieren (RIP1) stark ähnelt. Die zweite Überraschung bestand darin, dass sich IMD an FADD, ein im TNF-Rezeptor-Signalweg in Säugetieren konserviertes Todesdomänenprotein bindet. Dieses System aktiviert nun TAK1, eine im Säugetiersystem ebenfalls stark konservierte MAP3-Kinase und verknüpft sie mit TAK2, einer weiteren Kinase, die im Säugetier-TNF3-Rezeptorsignalweg konserviert ist. Nun aktiviert TAK1 einen IKK-Komplex aus einer IKK-Beta- und einer IKK-Gamma-Komponente, der in Mäusen und Menschen stark konserviert ist. Anschließend erfolgen die Reaktivierung, d.h. Phosphorylierung von Relish, einem Mitglied der NF-KappaB-Familie in diesem Signalpfad, sowie die Spaltung durch eine Caspase, die bei der Fliege als DREDD bezeichnet wird und zur Säugetier-Caspase-8 homolog ist. Jetzt dringt der aktive Teil von Relish, d.h. die eigentliche homologe Domäne in den Nukleus ein und steuert dort die Expression von Diptericin und hunderter anderer Gene. Ich habe hier eine Anmerkung bezüglich der Existenz einer Negativsteuerung gemacht, aber dafür haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wir fanden das sehr auffällig. Als ich mit meiner Doktorarbeit bei Professor Joly begann, waren wir der Ansicht, wir würden etwas finden, das sich von der Immunreaktion von Säugetieren unterscheidet, unter der man, wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, im Wesentlichen die adaptive Immunität verstand. Und dann fanden wir bei der angeborenen Immunreaktion so viele Akteure, die denen der Säugetiere ähnelten. Hier sehen Sie eine Folie, die den Toll-Signalweg und den IMD-Signalweg der Fliege mit dem TLR4- und dem TNF-Signalweg vergleicht. Es handelt sich hier sowohl bei der Fliege, die natürlich über keine adaptive Immunität verfügt, als auch bei Säugetieren, die eine solche Immunität besitzen, ausschließlich um die Signalwege der angeborenen Immunreaktion. Schauen wir uns die Farben an - ich habe leider keine Zeit mehr, Ihnen die Details zu erläutern. Wir haben Membranrezeptoren, die entweder wie im Falle von Spätzle oder TNF-Alpha zu einem gespaltenen Zytokin reagieren oder wie im Falle von Lipopolysacchariden oder Peptidoglycan im Fliegen- oder Maussystem mit dem mikrobiellen Liganden direkt interagieren. Wir haben adaptive Proteine, die entweder identisch sind, z.B. MyD88 in Toll und TLR4, oder sehr ähnlich, z.B. IMD und RIP in den Systemen des IMD- bzw. TNF-Signalweges. Dann aktiviert das System die zentralen Kinasen wie z.B. die TAK1-Kinase, die wiederum den JNK-Signalweg aktiviert; das ist aber jetzt nicht relevant. Dann haben wir einen IKK-Komplex, der in TLR4, IMD und TNF praktisch identisch ist; im Toll-Signalweg der Fliege ist er ein bisschen simpler. Am Ende stehen die Aktivierung von NF-KappaB und die Steuerung der Genexpression. Ich möchte noch einmal betonen, dass die Entdeckung für uns und die Wissenschaftler in unserem Fachgebiet völlig unerwartet kam: ein zwischen Säugetieren und Fliegen so stark konservierten Systems. Jetzt stellte sich die Frage, wann sich dieses System erstmals entwickelte. Natürlich stammen Fliegen nicht von Mäusen ab oder umgekehrt. Wir sammelten also Daten. Heute stehen etwa 6000 Genomsequenzen zur Verfügung. Wie Sie auf dieser Folie, die unsere Arbeit zusammenfasst, sehen, stellten wir zu unserer großen Überraschung fest, dass alle Moleküle, die wir in Drosophila entdeckt hatten, bereits in Seeanemonen und vor allem Schwämmen existieren, d.h. seit Beginn der Differenzierung der Eukaryonten. Es gibt sie in Würmern - mit Ausnahme von C. elegans, das ist ein Spezialfall - in Krustentieren, in Fliegen und Cephalochordaten und in sämtlichen Wirbeltieren. Auffällig ist bei diesem Vergleich, dass die an der angeborenen Immunreaktion bei Wirbeltieren beteiligten Moleküle denen der Seeanemonen ähnlicher sind als denen der Fliegen. Fliegen verfügen über hochentwickelte Systeme, sie sind keineswegs primitive Lebewesen. Sie haben ihre Immunabwehr auf nur zwei Induktoren vereinfacht: das hochkonservierte Peptidoglycan und das hochkonservierte Beta-Glucan. Das sind die einzihen Induktoren die sie neben Virulenzfaktoren, die vom jeweiligen Erregersystem abhängen, besitzen. All dies ließ uns vermuten, dass sich die angeborene Immunität so wie wir sie heute verstehen mit der Vielzelligkeit wahrscheinlich vor etwa einer Milliarde Jahren entwickelt hat. Bereits zu Beginn der Evolution findet sich bei den Seeanemonen fast der gesamte Werkzeugkasten der angeborenen Immunität. Im Verlauf der Evolution wurde er teilweise vereinfacht bzw. diversifiziert. Seeigel beispielsweise besitzen 220 Toll-artige Rezeptoren. Man könnte annehmen, dies läge daran, dass sie Meerwasser filtern, doch Cionen, die in enger Nachbarschaft zu Seeigeln leben, verfügen nur über 3 TLR. Diese Erklärungsversuche helfen uns also nicht weiter. Eine wichtige Erkenntnis, über die man sich einig zu sein scheint, ist, dass die adaptive Immunität bei Säugetieren durch die angeborene Immunität, z.B. Zytokine oder andere Faktoren unterstützt werden muss. Ich möchte also noch einmal betonen, dass die angeborene Immunitätskaskade bei Wirbeltieren neben all den Elementen, die wir bei der Fliege gefunden haben, noch weitere Elemente besitzt, über die Fliegen heute nicht mehr verfügen, wohl aber Seeanemonen. Ich wollte noch etwas zu den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen sagen, aber die Zeit hier in Lindau vergeht immer so schnell. Ich müsste eigentlich eine Folie mit der Zusammenfassung haben - hier ist sie. Ich habe noch eine Minute; das reicht. Bei Fliegen, ebenso wie bei C. elegans und Pflanzen, spielt die RNA-Interferenz eine wichtige Rolle; bei den antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in Säugetieren ist sie dagegen nicht von Bedeutung. Neben der RNA-Interferenz, einem Kennzeichen der antiviralen Abwehrmechanismen in dieser Gruppe, werden Gene angeregt, die die Virusinfektion eindämmen. Daran arbeiten wir momentan. Die Rezeptoren sowie die Signalwege sind aber noch weitgehend unbekannt. Im System der Säugetiere basieren die angeborenen Immunreaktionen im Wesentlichen auf dem Interferon-Arm. Die TLR-Rezeptoren sowie weitere Rezeptoren, die sich bei der Fliege nicht finden, z.B. NLR oder RLR aktivieren die Expression von Interferon- und Interferon-stimulierten Genen. Diese aktivieren natürliche Killerzellen, die wiederum infizierte Zellen abtöten. Die adaptive Immunantwort wird durch die angeborene Immunreaktion stimuliert, d.h. B-Lymphozyten erzeugen neutralisierende Antikörper und T-Lymphozyten töten infizierte Zellen ab. Ich möchte gerne den Beitrag, den zahlreiche hochrangige Wissenschaftler und ihre Arbeitsgruppen im Laufe der Jahre geleistet haben, würdigen. Da ist einmal meine Frau Daniele Hoffmann, die von Anfang an dabei war und am Diptericin-Gen arbeitete. Sie ist ebenfalls diese Woche in Lindau und leitet heute die Exkursion. Weiterhin haben wir den Chemiker Charles Hetru, den Biochemiker Jean-Luc Dirmarcq sowie den Entwicklungs- und inzwischen auch Drosophila-Genetiker Jean-Marc Reichhart. Der erste Drosophila-Genetiker, den wir in unsere Arbeitsgruppe aufnahmen, war Bruno Lemaitre; er ist heute in Lausanne tätig. Dominique Ferrandon - bevor er zu unserer Gruppe stieß, verfasste er seine Doktorarbeit interessanterweise bei Frau Nüsslein-Volhard - beschäftigt sich mittlerweile mit bestimmten Aspekten der Erkennung, intestinalen Immunität, Resilienz etc. Julien Royet, der heute in Marseille arbeitet, beschäftigte sich eingehend mit den Peptidoglycan erkennenden Rezeptoren (PGRP). Jean-Luc Imler erforschte die antiviralen Mechanismen und wird sehr aufgebracht sein, dass ich auf seine Daten nicht im Detail eingegangen bin. Bei der nächsten Tagung - sofern man mich noch einmal einlädt - werde ich mich diesem Thema ausführlich widmen bzw. er wird Ihnen seine Daten erläutern. Elena Levashina arbeitete an den Abwehrmechanismen gegen parasitäre Erreger wie das durch Anophelesmücken übertragene Plasmodium und hat herausragende Arbeit geleistet mit der Identifizierung eines komplement-artigen Moleküls in einem komplexen, die Infektion bekämpfenden System bei Moskitos. Philippe Bulet beschäftigte sich ebenfalls mit antimikrobiellen Peptiden. Hier sehen Sie eine Liste all der Leute aus anderen Labors und anderen Ländern, die in den letzten Jahren in diesem Forschungsbereich gearbeitet haben. Ich bedanke mich für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Jules Hoffmann on the discovery of the first pattern recognition receptor
(00:09:05 - 00:12:59)

 

When Jules Hoffmann discovered the Toll receptor in the fruit fly, Bruce Beutler had already been working for several years on a seemingly unrelated topic, namely how exactly the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria induces septic shock. Beutler suspected that a specific receptor for LPS existed. In search of this receptor, he systematically screened the genome of mouse mutants that could not react to LPS. He discovered that they had a mutation in a gene, which resembled the fruit fly’s Toll gene and encoded for the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. Thereby he confirmed that insects and mammals share a molecular sensor system, which activates the innate immune system. In 2015, he shared the excitement of this discovery with his audience in Lindau.

 

Bruce Beutler (2015) - Finding Mutations that Affect Immunity

Good morning. I'd like to talk to you today about our work with immunity, and about how the mouse has improved quite dramatically as a model organism for forward genetics. My work began with a kind of old premise, more than 100 years ago, when microbes had only recently been recognized as the causative agents of infectious disease, already people had begun to wonder about how they harmed the host. And Richard Pfeiffer, shown here in the background behind Robert Koch, had an interesting observation in that respect. In 1891, he coined the term "endotoxin" to describe something intrinsically toxic associated with Gram-negative bacteria. He noticed that even heat-killed organisms could, if injected into guinea pigs, cause shock and death, reminiscent of an authentic infection, although he couldn't recover any viable organisms from the peritoneal cavity after he administered the microbes. Richard Pfeiffer became very famous for this observation, and although he's a rather obscure character today, in his lifetime he was nominated 33 times to receive the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The reason for that was that, then as now, hundreds and maybe even thousands of people die every day of endotoxin-induced shock, and this is what a typical patient with Gram-negative septicaemia might look like. It's a child with meningococcal sepsis. This is a severe systemic form of inflammation, and it has to be recognized that all inflammation had obscure origins in those days, and here Pfeiffer had perhaps identified a single molecular species that could cause inflammation. Over the years that followed his initial report, it was found that endotoxin, which we now call lipopoly­saccharide or LPS, was associated with all Gram-negative bacteria. It was a structural component of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. It had a lipid and polysaccharide moiety, and the Lipid A moiety was the toxic part of the molecule. Eventually, Lipid A molecules were synthesized entirely artificially, and they can do most of what Pfeiffer recognized long ago. We might draw a typical LPS structure like this, and from our work and the work of others, it emerged more recently that LPS activates macrophages to make cytokines. These cytokines, and especially tumour necrosis factor among all of them, bind to receptors on many other cells, and trigger the release of terminal mediators of vasodilation and lead to shock and to aggregation of platelets and all of the things that contribute to the clinical syndrome. A major question, obviously, was, "What's the receptor for lipopoly­saccharide?" And this was a tough problem that resisted direct attempts to crack it biochemically. By 1990, from the work of Ulevitch and Wright, it was known that antibodies against the surface antigen CD14, present on macrophages, would inhibit the LPS response very strongly. But CD14 was a GPI-anchored protein. It had no cytoplasmic domain, and it was guessed that it could only work by associating with some kind of mysterious co-receptor, that did have a cytoplasmic domain and could transduce the signal across the membrane. The nature of that receptor was unknown, however, where TNF was concerned, it was known by that time that NF kappaB was the critical transcription factor that would lead to activation of the TNF gene. Once the TNF mRNA was made and processed, it was sequestered in a locked form, today we would say in P-bodies most likely, and that had to be unlocked in order to allow translation of the mRNA and production and processing of the protein. The big question still loomed: What was the true membrane-spanning, activating receptor for LPS? I felt that that question, if solved, would offer the key to understanding how the host becomes aware of infections within the first minutes after inoculation with bacteria. In short, how innate immune sensing works. Finding the LPS receptor ultimately depended on two unrelated sub-strains of mice that couldn't respond to LPS because of spontaneous mutations. The first of these had been identified in 1965 by Heppner and Weiss, it was the C3H/HeJ strain. It was shown to be refractory to any amount of LPS, yet the animals were highly susceptible to Salmonella typhimurium, as was later shown, and also to LPS and other Gram-negative microbes. In 1978 a completely unrelated strain of mouse was found to be refractory to LPS. This was the C57 black/10ScCr mouse, and by crossing the two strains, both of which had recessive problems, one found that the F1 hybrid offspring were refractory to LPS as well. So it was guessed that the two animals had allelic defects, and in both cases there were closely related control strains that showed a normal LPS response. This set the stage for positional cloning of what, by then, was called the LPS Locus. Positional cloning in the classical sense isn't practiced anymore, and not all of you know exactly what it is, but essentially, it's cloning by phenotype. It's possible, taking a phenotype alone to find the location of a gene, by first establishing a critical region, and that's the phase of genetic mapping, then one clones all of the DNA across the critical region in a physical mapping effort, and finally, one has identified all of the candidate genes within the critical region and would go and look for the mutation, the causative mutation. Typically there would be only one in this sort of circumstance. This was a very difficult kind of cloning to accomplish. Back in 1993, we set about to do genetic mapping using only 11 markers on mouse chromosome 4, where we knew the LPS Locus was, and that covered most of the chromosome. We expanded the area and on 2,093 meioses, we established a critical region between two new markers, B and 83.3, and we felt that this was about 2.6 million base pairs, though today we know it was about twice as large. We then did physical mapping, cloning a large number of bacterial artificial chromosomes in an overlapping format to span this region, and then we began to sequence them, starting at the middle of the interval and working outward bidirectionally. That was how our life went for about three years. We would fragment BACs, sequence them, blast the results against libraries of expressed sequence tags that were maintained at NCBI, and looked for genes. And over all that time we found only a collection of pseudogenes, though of course they didn't come with a label that they were authentic genes and that they had any mutation that would distinguish one strain from the other. We were getting rather scared by the summer of 1998, because we had covered more than 90% of the region and we were running out of material to sequence. And still we hadn't found the gene. Then, of course, it's always in the last place you look. Far toward the proximal end of the interval we found a gene encoding an orphan receptor, called the toll-like receptor 4. Now, this was very exciting right from the start. First of all, the gene we had found in our critical region had leucine-rich repeats in its ectodomain, just like CD14 did, and we could imagine that perhaps by proximity or by transfer, LPS would go from CD14 to TLR4 and then trigger a response. And this was, indeed, a single-spanning transmembrane protein. Second, on the cytoplasmic side, there was strong homology between the TLR4 receptor and the interleukin-1 receptor. The interleukin-1 receptor was known to have inflammatory effects when triggered by a protein ligand, interleukin-1, and it could activate NF kappaB. So again, we thought probably this motif would work to drive the activation of the TNF gene and other inflammatory cytokine genes, when stimulated. Third, there was an observation, then two years old, by Jules Hoffmann and his colleagues, who had been looking for mutations that would cause susceptibility to fungal infection in the fly. And in a beautiful paper, in Cell in 1996, Jules and his colleagues showed that flies with mutations in toll, the namesake of this super-family of proteins, would be susceptible to infection by fungi, specifically Aspergillus fumigatus. Here you see a dead fly with hyphae sprouting from its thorax because the fly couldn't make a critical antimicrobial peptide, drosomycin. This seemed a parallel story to the case that we were concerned with, where mutation made mice highly susceptible to Gram-negative bacterial infection. Of course, all of those ideas would amount to nothing if we didn't find a mutation, but in due course, we did. And we found that in the C3H/HeJ strain there was a single base pair change that altered the cytoplasmic domain of TLR4, making it unable to signal. And in the C57black/10ScCr strain there was a deletion encompassing all of the axons of the toll-like receptor 4 gene, a 74 kb deletion, and we ultimately defined its exact margins. And these two allelic defects, which weren't present in the control strains, convinced us completely that this was the gene we were after. There was still some question about whether TLR4 was actually a receptor for LPS. And over a period of a year it was determined by Kensuke Miyake and colleagues that there was another sub-unit to the complex, called MD-2, shown in magenta here, a basket-shaped protein that interacts strongly with TLR4, which is shown in cyan. It has all of these leucine-rich repeats, which make a kind of slinky-shaped molecule, and here you see that the molecule is dimeric and LPS, as it was shown in 2009 by Jie-O Li and colleagues, who finally crystallized the complex, fits into the pocket of MD-2 but has some contact with the backbone of TLR4 as well. This, when it occurs, creates a conformational change that's sensed across the membrane. And this is where all of the inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide begin, with this one molecule. The next questions we wanted to address had to do with signalling by TLR4 and how that worked. We were enamoured of the forward genetic approach by that time, but there were no other spontaneous mutations in mice that could tell us anything about how LPS signalling worked. So we decided that we'd have to create new phenotypes using a mutagen, and we began to do so in 2000. Over the next 11 years or so, we identified many phenotypes that were related to TLR signalling and we also focused on other aspects of immunity, keeping them under surveillance with different screens at the same time. In those days, ENU mutagenesis was a blind process. ENU or ethyl-nitrosourea is the only mutagen that one can really use effectively in the mouse, the only chemical mutagen. It's given to male mice, it mutates the spermatogonia and mutations are transmitted to the sons of these mice, the G1 generation. A single G1 defines a pedigree, and the G1 mice were bred to be six mice to produce daughters. They were then back-crossed to their own daughters, and that brought some of the mutations to homozygosity in every G3 offspring born to that cross. We typically made very small pedigrees because we didn't want to be in the position of screening the same mutations over and over, and our thinking on that has totally changed, as you'll see in a moment. We didn't know it at that time, but we know today that the average sperm derived from a G0 animal has 60 to 70 mutations that change coding sense. And it's known from long experience that if you see a phenotype, it's almost always from a coding change, rather than an intergenic change of some kind. Now, this was a blind process, as I've said. The only way we knew the ENU was working, was by seeing phenotypes or detecting them in our screens. And it was encouraging to see that we saw a lot of peculiar mice, and of course we would track down all of the mutations and anything we happened to see visibly, as well. Over 11 years we found 34 mutations that fell into 20 genes, that informed us quite a bit about how TLR signalling worked. We had mutations in the toll-like receptors themselves, of which there are 12 in the mouse, and I'm only illustrating some of those here. We also found mutations in co-receptors, in addition to those that I've mentioned already. Mutations in chaperones like UNC93B, that bring the TLRs where they need to be. Some channel proteins are required for signalling from the endosome by TLRs as well. Then there are adaptor proteins that are recruited to the receptor in order to signal further. There's a layer of kinases that become activated, then an ubiquitin ligase, TRAF6, becomes activated as a result. It ubiquitinates itself and other proteins and TAB2 brings these all together to allow signalling to proceed as it should. And finally, one has another layer of kinases that degrade, ultimately phosphorylate, and lead to the degradation of I kappaB and NF kappaB translocation, and there are still other proteins that are needed for TNF to be processed and released from the cell. We still took TNF production as the endpoint of our screen. In the beginning, this was very hard, just like it had been before. But it got easier when the mouse genome was sequenced and annotated, then one didn't have to make contagions anymore, you knew what all the genes were, it wasn't terra incognita, like in the old days. It also got faster when better sequencing technologies came online, first capillary sequencing, then after that, massively parallel sequencing platforms. But by 2011, it was clear that the rate-limiting step in mutation finding was genetic mapping. The usual paradigm of outcrossing an established stock to a marker strain, then backcrossing, making a critical region assignment, and then looking for mutation there, had begun to slow us down. And we could declare many more phenotypes than we could actually solve. Sometimes a year or more was required to track down a mutation. So a new approach was needed. I began to think of what the most magical approach would be, and I thought in terms of Google Glasses in those days. I wanted to have a magical pair of glasses, with which I could look at a family of mice, like this one here, and even if the mutation were not obvious, as I've shown it, it would tell you which mice were affected by a mutation. And not only that, but in the blink of an eye, it would tell you, this is a mutation in SOX10. These are the coordinates of the mutation, the amino acid change, the motif, the human homologue. And if there were structural data, it would even show that to you as well. Well, actually, this is all a reality now, and we are able to find mutations in real time, and I'll tell you precisely how it's done. First, we make G1 mice, just as we always did, but then we whole-exome sequence every G1 mouse that's produced, up front, to find every mutation they might transmit into the pedigree. We've been at this for quite a while and we found that the mean number of mutations that change coding sense was 63 per G1 mouse, and the modal number was 70. And there are ways to make it higher than that, but we'd prefer not to because we wind up with too much G3 lethality. If the number is greater than 30 mutations, then we move forward with that pedigree, otherwise it's discarded. Moving forward means we order an Ampliseq panel, which is a collected of PCR primers calculated not to interfere with one another, that target every one of the mutation sites and allow us to genotype them. Then, the G2 mice and G3 mice are all genotyped at all the mutation sites that we've created with ENU. Only then, the mice are released for phenotypic screening. In this case it involves visual inspection, weighing the mice, giving them a glucose tolerance test. Then subjecting them to a battery of tests for innate immune performance, by macrophages, immunizing them, and doing flow cytometry to assess adaptive immune development and performance. We do then a DSS challenge, we infect them with mouse cytomegalovirus, and then they are passed on for other screens that are in the area of neurobehavioural responses. As of June 28, 2015, we had created nearly 64,000 mutations in this way, and now it's no longer a blind process. We know what every mutation is, and we know what genes they affect. These mutations fell into 17,204 genes, or upwards of 3/4, I think, of the 24,981 genes that the mouse has in total. Now, this is an enormous number of mutations. If they were present, even in the heterozygous state in one G1 mouse, they would almost certainly be lethal. But, of course, they're distributed among more than 1,000 pedigrees and they affect We are able to calculate that we've mutated 17% of all genes to a state of phenovariance, and I'll come back to what I mean by that, and tested them in the homozygous state three times or more, in at least one of our screens. In all, we have about 135 screens, and that's what most of the mice were subjected to. Where adaptive immune performance alone is concerned, we came across 60 known genes that were known to be required for immune development or function, and we detected them by phenotype. But along with those, we found hundreds of genes that were previously not known to be involved in immunity. And all this suggests that a large fraction of our genome is needed for immune defence, as I would've guessed. But now we're in a position, maybe to make more precise estimates about just how large that fraction is. To look through these data, one needs software that lets the observer explore all of the mutations. And we wrote a programme called Linkage analyser, and a browsing programme called Linkage explorer that makes that possible. So one may focus on any particular gene, on any screen of interest, on a subset of the mice, or on a trivial phenotype name. One can restrict the search to different types of mutations, one can insist only on looking at large pedigrees if he or she wants to. The number of observations in the homozygous state can be controlled and the observer also chooses the p-value of association between the phenotype and the genotype of interest. And this is done by altering this value here. And there are other ways, as well, to restrict the quality of the observations. To give you an example, we might say that we're interested just in assays having to do with CD8 cells, with their number or activation state. So you can key in CD8 under the screen name, we insist on seeing the mutation three or more times in the homozygous state, we insist on a relatively strong p-value of association, .0005, and we check these other items as well, I won't go through all of them, and we click "submit." Then, in short order, you get back a list of genes, in this case, a list of 102 variant alleles of 100 implicated genes that come from 70 different pedigrees. From this fact alone you can see that we don't always resolve to a single mutation, sometimes we have linkage of two mutations that fall within one linkage peak, as you might guess. But usually we get down to a single mutation that's implicated. In the first column you see gene names, and some of these, if you're immunologists any of you, will be familiar to you. Themis is known to be involved for positive selection of t-cells, and it shows up in a screen for CD8 cells or the CD4-CD8 ratio. Some are unknown. I doubt any of you are aware that SNRNP40, which is a component of the U5 spliceosome, has a selective role in immunity, but it does. In the next column you see the coordinates of the mutation, estimates of what the mutation does, also you see the screens in which scoring was observed. And then farther over, you see the number of observations of homozygous reference allele, heterozygotes or homozygotes for the mutation. In these three columns, you see the score for linkage in either an additive, a recessive, or a dominant model of inheritance. And if you want to actually look at the plot of inheritance, you click on one of those numbers, and you see a Manhattan plot. This is a log-scale plot of the probability of linkage and you might mouse-over any of the mutations that you see here, all of these are the mutations in the pedigree, only one of them shows strong linkage above the Bonferroni correction line, and if you mouse-over it you find that this is SNRNP40. You might not know what SNRNP40 is, so you can click on that and you get some information about the gene, which has been precalculated. You see that our mutation makes a shortened version of the protein, and this would be interactive in the real programme, where you could mouse-over and see the domain structure. You can click on the gene model, and you find that the mutation is near to axon 5 and is believed to remove axon 5, which creates an in-frame product. And you find much other information as well, it's all been pre-calculated. If you'd like to see the authentic data, the raw data, you can click on the peak value as well, right click, and there you see the phenotypic performance of the homozygous mutants, the heterozygotes, and the reference allele homozygotes. Now, there's overlap between the heterozygotes and homozygotes. This would've been a terrible thing to try to map using a qualitative approach, as we always used in the old days, and you might not even completely believe these data because, after all, we have only a limited number of mice here. And you might think it's some kind of a fluke. But you have to keep in mind that gradually, as we approach saturation, we hit the same genes over and over again, and the computer detects this, and generates "superpedigrees" whenever this occurs. Either with identical alleles transmitted from the same G0 or different alleles that hit the same gene. They get combined into a single large artificial pedigree. Eventually all mutations will be incorporated that way. At present, more than half of all genes are falling into superpedigrees and the number is climbing quickly. With multiple alleles, confidence about an association between phenotype and genotype increases. The same kind of browsing programme is used to examine superpedigrees. In the case of SNRNP40, which I've looked up for you here, we have a total of 16 pedigrees, 16 G1 mice, but only four different alleles, so there is the one I showed you and three others. The one I showed you is a probably null allele by our estimation. And again, you have the same kinds of models of additive, recessive and dominant inheritance. If we click on one of these, we see something rather different. We find that now we've assayed 376 G3 mice from all of these pedigrees, here are all the mutations contained in all of the pedigrees, those in dark blue have multiple alleles of their own, and if you mouse-over the top value, that of course is the SNRNP40 shown in red. You see now there's really no ambiguity, you have a clear shift in the phenotypic performance of homozygotes compared to heterozygotes or reference allele. And that's what gives this spectacular p-value. I would say, in this case, you don't even really need further confirmation, but our standard procedure is to make a crisper targeted allele in every case. Now the great question that we can address nowadays that we couldn't before is, how much damage have we done to the genome with our 64,000 mutations? If we just concentrate on one screen, the CD8 screening, then we see that in all the pedigrees that were examined, but not all of these were even transmitted once to homozygocity. But, mutations in 45.9% of genes were transmitted to homozygosity three times or more. That says nothing about how much damage those mutations caused, but we can look at that as well. If we're talking about probably null alleles, premature stop codons or critical splice junction errors, then nearly 6% of all genes have been affected and examined three times or more in the homozygous state. This would be a very conservative estimate of how much damage was done. If we consider probably null or probably damaging alleles, where probably damaging is established by a programme called PolyPhen-2, that guesses about how much damage a particular amino acid change does, then we get to 24.91% of all genes were mutated and examined three or more times in homozygous state. This would be a very liberal estimate of how much damage was done to the genome. And the true value, we know, is bracketed by these two estimates. We don't know exactly where it lies between them, we have a sense that it's somewhere near the middle, and so we're inclined to say that about 16 to 17% of all of the protein-encoding genes have been mutated to phenovariance. We're only quite near the beginning of the process, of course, and we could draw a red line and say that these are the conservative and liberal estimates of damage. As time goes on, these two curves will converge with each other, though they'll never quite touch, and we'll always be somewhat in doubt about the exact amount of damage we've done to the genome. But what have we accomplished? In the old days it took us five years to positionally clone just one gene, now it takes about one hour. Then, one phenotype was solved in five years, now, one or two phenotypes are solved every day in our lab. That means we proceed 3,000 times as quickly as before. We're limited now only by the rate at which mutations can be produced and screened. And this means that we can interrogate about 1,400 mutations every week. And many of them, about 1/2% of them or so cause phenotype in at least one of our screens. We can project that we'll destroy the majority of genes and analyse their phenotypic consequences within about three years, and then we'll know what most of the genes are that are needed for robust immunity, as we define it. This story was a very long one in terms of time, and I have especially to credit Alexander Poltorak for the positional cloning of the LPS Locus. I now have a much larger group than I did back in those days and it's mainly in the present group, the computational people Chun Hui Bu, Stephen Lyon, Sara Hildebrand, David Pratt and Xaiowei Zhan who deserve the credit for the automated positional cloning that I showed you. And we had help as well from Tao Wang and Yang Xie in the Center forcomputational biology. Thanks very much to all of you.

Guten Morgen. Heute möchte ich gerne über unsere Arbeit zur Immunität sprechen, und wie sich die Maus ziemlich weitreichend als Modellorganismus für Forward Genetics vervollkommnet hat. Meine Arbeit begann mit einer eher alten Prämisse. Bereits vor mehr als 100 Jahren, als man Mikroben erst als Erreger von Infektionskrankheiten erkannt hatte, fragte man sich bereits, wie sie den Wirt schädigten. Richard Pfeiffer, hier im Hintergrund hinter Robert Koch zu sehen, machte dazu eine interessante Beobachtung. um damit etwas intrinsisch Toxisches im Zusammenhang mit Gram-negativen Bakterien zu beschreiben. Er bemerkte, selbst durch Hitze abgetötete Organismen konnten, wenn sie Meerschweinchen injiziert wurden, in Form eines echten Infekts, Schock oder Tod verursachen, obgleich er keine lebensfähigen Organismen aus der Bauchhöhle gewinnen konnte, nachdem er die Mikroben verabreicht hatte. Richard Pfeiffer wurde wegen dieser Beobachtung sehr berühmt, und obgleich er heute als ziemlich zweifelhafter Charakter angesehen wird, wurde er zu seinen Lebzeiten 33 Mal für den Nobelpreis in Physiologie oder Medizin nominiert. Grund dafür war, damals wie heute, sterben hunderte, vielleicht tausende Menschen täglich an Endotoxin-induziertem Schock und so etwa könnte ein typischer Patient mit Gram-negativer Septikämie aussehen. Das ist ein Kind mit einer Meningokokken-Blutvergiftung. Dies ist eine schwere systemische Form einer Entzündung und man muss verstehen, dass damals der Ursprung alle Entzündungen im Dunkeln lag. Pfeiffer hatte hier vielleicht eine einzelne molekulare Gattung identifiziert, durch die eine Entzündung hervorgerufen wurde. Im Laufe der Jahre, die auf seinen ersten Bericht folgten, entdeckte man, dass Endotoxin, nun Lipopolysaccharide oder LPS genannt, in Zusammenhang mit allen Gram-negativen Bakterien stand. Es war eine strukturelle Komponente der äußeren Schicht der äußeren Membran. Sie hat einen Lipid- und Polysaccharid-Teil und der Lipid A Teil war der toxische Teil des Moleküls. Lipid A Moleküle wurden schließlich vollständig künstlich hergestellt und vermögen das meiste von dem was Pfeiffer lange vorher erkannt hatte. Wir können eine typische LPS-Struktur so zeichnen und aus unserer Arbeit und der Arbeit anderer ergab sich kürzlich, dass LPS Makrophagen aktiviert, um Zytokine zu erzeugen. Diese Zytokine, und unter diesen vor allem der Tumor-Nekrose-Faktor, binden die Rezeptoren an viele andere Zellen und lösen die Freisetzung terminaler Mediatoren von Vasodilatation aus und führen zum Schock und der Aggregation von Blutplättchen und all solchen Dingen, die zum klinischen Krankheitsbild gehören. Eine der Hauptfragen war: „Welches ist der Rezeptor für Lipopolysaccharide?“ Dies war ein schwieriges Problem, das direkten Versuchen, es biochemisch zu knacken, widerstand. Ab 1990 war durch die Arbeiten von Ulevitch und Wright bekannt, dass Antikörper gegen das Oberflächenantigen CD14, welches an Makrophagen vorhanden ist, die LPS-Reaktion stark hemmen würden. Doch CD14 ist ein GPI-verankertes Protein. Es verfügte über keinen cytoplasmischen Bereich und man vermutete, es könnte nur funktionieren, indem man es mit einer Art mysteriösem Co-Rezeptor, der über einen cytoplasmischen Bereich verfügte und das Signal über die Membran leitete, verbinden würde. Die Art dieser Rezeptoren war nicht bekannt, aber was TNF betraf, war zu der Zeit bekannt, dass NF kappaB ein wesentlicher Transkriptionsfaktor war, der zur Aktivierung des TNF-Gen führen würde. Sobald das TNF mRNA hergestellt und verarbeitet wurde, wurde es in einer geschlossenen Form abgesondert, heute würden wir wahrscheinlich sagen in P-bodies, und diese mussten aufgeschlossen werden, um die Translation von mRNA und die Herstellung und Verarbeitung des Proteins zu ermöglichen. Die größte Frage stand nach wie vor im Raum: Was war der wirkliche Membran-überspannende aktivierende Rezeptor für LPS? Ich hatte das Gefühl, wenn dies gelöst ist, würde es den Schlüssel zum Verständnis liefern, wie der Wirt Kenntnis von den Infektionen innerhalb der ersten Minuten nach Beimpfung mit Bakterien erhält. Kurz gesagt, wie funktioniert die angeborene Immun-Erfassung. Das Finden des LPS Rezeptors ging letztlich von zwei unzusammenhängenden Unterstämmen von Mäusen aus, die auf LPS aufgrund spontaner Mutationen nicht ansprachen. Der erste Stamm wurde 1965 von Heppner und Weiss identifiziert, es war der C3H/HeJ Maus-Stamm. Er erwies sich widerstandsfähig gegen jede Menge von LPS, die Tiere waren aber hoch empfindlich gegen Salmonella Typhimurium, wie sich später zeigte, und auch gegen LPS und andere Gram-negativen Mikroben. Das war die C57 schwarz/10ScCr Maus, und durch Kreuzen der beiden Stämme, die beide rezessive Probleme hatten, fand man heraus, auch die F1 hybriden Nachkommen waren gegen LPS widerstandsfähig. Es wurde vermutet, dies beiden Tiere hätten defekte Allele und in beiden Fällen gab es eng verwandte Kontroll-Stämme mit normaler LPS-Reaktion. Damit waren die Voraussetzungen für Positionsklonierung geschaffen, was damals LPS Locus genannt wurde. Positionsklonierung im klassischen Sinne wird heute nicht mehr angewendet und nicht alle hier wissen genau, was das ist; im Wesentlichen ist es aber Klonierung nach Phänotyp. Es ist möglich, nur den Phänotyp zu nehmen und die Lokalisation eines Gens zu finden, indem man zuerst einen kritischen Bereich etabliert - das ist die Phase der genetischen Entschlüsselung - dann klont man die gesamte DNA quer durch den kritischen Bereich im Bestreben eine physikalische Abbildung zu erlangen, und schließlich hat man alle Gen-Kandidaten im kritischen Bereich identifiziert und hält dann nach einer Mutation Ausschau, nämlich der ursächlichen Mutation. Normalerweise gibt es unter diesen Umständen nur eine. Diese Klonierung war sehr schwer zu erreichen. Damals, 1993, machten wir uns an die genetische Kartierung und verwendeten nur 11 Marker bei Maus-Chromosom 4, von dem wir wussten, das dort der LPS Locus war, und das deckte die meisten Chromosomen ab. Wir erweiterten den Bereich und nach 2.093 Meiosen fanden wir einen kritischen Bereich zwischen zwei neuen Markern, B und 83.3, und wir glaubten, dies seien etwa 2,6 Millionen Basenpaare, heute wissen wir allerdings, dass es etwa doppelt so viele waren. Wir haben dann mit physikalischen Abbildungen gearbeitet, eine große Anzahl bakteriell artifiziell Chromosomen in einem überlappenden Format geklont, um diesen Bereich zu umfassen, und dann begannen wir sie zu sequenzieren, beginnend in der Mitte des Intervalls, und dann bidirektional nach außen arbeitend. So gestaltete sich unser Leben etwa drei Jahre lang. Wir fragmentierten BACs, sequenzierten sie, verglichen die Ergebnisse mit Bibliotheken von Expressed Sequence Tags, die beim NCBI vorlagen, und suchten nach Genen. Und während dieser ganzen Zeit fanden wir nur eine kleine Zahl von Pseudogenen, die natürlich nicht das Etikett dass es sich dabei nicht doch um authentische Gene handelt und sie irgendeine Mutation hätten, die einen Stamm vom anderen unterschied. Im Sommer 1998 bekamen wir es mit der Angst zu tun, wir hatten nämlich über 90% des Bereichs erfasst und uns ging das Material zum Sequenzieren aus. Und das Gen hatten wir noch nicht gefunden. Natürlich ist es dann, wie immer, am letzten Ort, an dem man sucht. Ziemlich gegen Ende des Intervalls fanden wir ein kodierendes Gen, einen Orphanrezeptor, genannt der Toll-like-Rezeptor 4. Das war von Anfang an sehr aufregend. Zum einen, das Gen, das wir in dem kritischen Bereich gefunden hatten, hatte Leucine-rich Repeats in seiner Ektodomäne, genauso wie CD14, und wir konnten uns vorstellen, dass vielleicht durch Nähe oder Transfer LPS von CD14 zu TLR4 gelangte und dann die Reaktion auslöst. Dies war tatsächlich ein einfach umspannendes Transmembranprotein. Zweitens, auf der zytoplasmatischen Seite gab es eine starke Homologie zwischen dem TLR4 Rezeptor und dem Interleukin-1 Rezeptor. Der Interleukin-1 Rezeptor war für entzündende Wirkungen bekannt, wenn er durch ein Proteinliganden, Interleukin-1 ausgelöst wurde, und er konnte NF kappaB aktivieren. Wir glaubten, dieses Motiv würde vermutlich bewirken, die Aktivierung des TNF-Gens und anderer entzündlicher Zytokinen-Gene bei einer Stimulation anzutreiben. Drittens gab es eine Beobachtung, die damals vor zwei Jahren Jules Hoffmann und seine Kollegen gemacht hatten, welche sich Mutationen ansahen, die eine Anfälligkeit für Pilzinfektionen bei der Fliege verursachten. In einem sehr schönen Arbeitspapier in Cell, 1996, zeigten Jules und seine Kollegen, dass Fliegen mit Mutationen in Toll, dem Namensvetter dieser Superfamilie von Proteinen, für Infektionen durch Pilze anfällig sind, insbesondere gegenüber dem Aspergillus fumigatus. Sie sehen hier eine tote Fliege mit Hyphen, die aus dem Thorax wachsen, da die Fliege kein wichtiges antimikrobielles Peptid, das Drosomycin, bilden konnte. Dies schien eine Parallelgeschichte zu dem Fall zu sein, um den es uns ging, bei dem eine Mutation Mäuse hochgradig anfällig gegen Gram-negative bakterielle Infektionen machte. Natürlich hätten sich alle diese Gedanken in nichts aufgelöst, sollten wir keine Mutation finden, aber wir fanden sie. Wir fanden, dass es im C3H/HeJ Stamm eine Veränderung in einem einzelnen Basenpaar gab, welche die zytoplasmische Domäne von TLR4 abänderte, weshalb es unfähig war, ein Signal zu geben. Im C57schwarz/10ScCr Maus-Stamm gab es eine Deletion, alle Axone des Toll-like-Rezeptor 4 Gen umfassend, eine 74 kb Deletion. Wir konnten schließlich die exakten Ränder festlegen. Diese beiden defekten Allele, die im Kontroll-Stamm nicht vorhanden waren, überzeugten uns vollständig, dass es sich hier um das Gen handelte, nach dem wir suchten. Es gab noch einige Fragen dahingehend, ob TLR4 wirklich ein Rezeptor für LPS sei. Innerhalb eines Jahres wurde von Kensuke Miyake und Mitarbeitern bestimmt, dass eine weitere Unter-Einheit beim Komplex vorhanden war, genannt MD-2, die hier in Violett zu sehen ist, ein korbförmiges Protein, das in starker Wechselwirkung zu TLR4 steht, das man hier in Türkis sieht. Es verfügt über alle diese Leucine-rich Repeats, die so ein geschmeidig geformtes Molekül erzeugen und hier sieht man, das Molekül ist dimer und LPS, so wie Jie-O Li und Mitarbeiter es 2009 zeigten, welcher schließlich den Komplex herauskristallisierte, passt in die Tasche des MD-2, hat aber auch etwas Kontakt mit dem Rückgrat des TLR4. Wenn dies auftritt, erzeugt es eine Konformationsänderung, die über die Membran hinweg wahrgenommen wird. Hier beginnen alle entzündlichen Wirkungen des Lipopolysaccharid, bei diesem einen Molekül. Die nächste Frage, der wir uns zuwenden wollten bezog sich auf die Signalgebung von TLR4 und wie sich diese vollzog. Wir waren damals von dem Forward Generic Ansatz fasziniert, es gab aber keine weiteren spontanen Mutationen bei Mäusen, die uns etwas über die Wirkungsweise der Signalgebung von LPS hätten sagen können. Wir entschieden daher, wir mussten neue Phänotypen unter Verwendung eines Mutagens erzeugen, womit wir 2000 begannen. Etwa während der nächsten 11 Jahre identifizierten wir viele Phänotypen, die eine Beziehung zur LPS Signalgebung hatten und wir konzentrierten uns auch auf andere Aspekte der Immunität, und überwachten sie mit verschiedenen Schirmen gleichzeitig. Damals war ENU-Mutagenese ein blindes Verfahren. ENU oder Ethyl-Nitrosoharnstoff ist das einzige Mutagen, das sich bei Mäusen wirklich effektiv einsetzen lässt. Es ist das einzige chemische Mutagen. Man verabreicht es männlichen Mäusen, es mutiert die Spermatogonien, und Mutationen werden auf den Sohn dieser Maus übertragen, auf die G1 Generation. Ein einzelner G1 legt den Stammbaum fest und die G1 wird auf sechs Mäuse gezüchtet, um weibliche Mäuse zu erhalten. Sie werden dann mit ihren eigenen Töchtern rückgekreuzt und das ergab einige der Mutationen bei Homozygotie in jedem G3 Nachwuchs, der von dieser Kreuzung geboren wurde. Wir schufen gewöhnlich sehr kleine Stammbäume, da wir nicht in die Situation kommen wollten, die gleichen Mutationen immer wieder sichten zu müssen und unsere Ansicht dazu hat sich grundlegend geändert, was Sie gleich sehen werden. Damals wussten wir das nicht, aber heute wissen wir, das durchschnittliche Sperma eines G0 Tieres verfügt über 60-70 Mutationen, die den genetischen Code verändern. Aus langjährigen Experimenten weiß man, sieht man einen Phänotyp, kommt das immer von einer Kodierungsänderung, statt von einer irgend gearteten intergenischen Änderung. Dies war, wie gesagt, ein blindes Verfahren. Der einzige Weg, weshalb wir wussten, dass ENU wirksam war, war über das Auftreten von Phänotypen in unseren Screenings. Es war ermutigend eine Menge spezieller Mäuse zu sehen und natürlich versuchten wir allen Mutationen, und auch allem was wir zu Gesicht bekamen, auf die Spur zu kommen. Im Laufe von 11 Jahren entdeckten wir 34 Mutationen bei 20 Genen, was uns einiges darüber erzählte, wie die TL-Rezeptorsignalgebung wirkt. Wir hatten Mutationen in den Toll-like-Rezeptoren selbst, von denen 12 in Mäusen vorkommen. Ich zeige hier nur einige davon. Wir fanden Mutationen auch in Co-Rezeptoren, zusätzlich zu den bereits von mir erwähnten. Mutationen in Chaperonen wie UNC93B, die die TLRs dahin bringen, wo sie benötigt werden. Einige Kanalproteine sind ebenfalls zur Signalgebung vom Endosom durch TLRs erforderlich. Dann gibt es Adaptorproteine, die zum Rezeptor gerufen werden, um weiter zu signalisieren. Es gibt eine Schicht von Kinasen, die aktiviert werden, dann wird in Folge eine Ubiquitin-Ligase, TRAF6, aktiviert. Es ubiquitiniert sich selbst und andere Proteine und TAB2 führt dies alles zusammen, damit die Signalgebung so fortgesetzt wird, wie es sein soll. Schließlich hat man eine weitere Schicht Kinasen, die sich abbauen, letztendlich phosphorylieren und zum Abbau von I kappaB und NF kappaB Translokation führen und da sind noch weitere Proteine, die benötigt werden, um TNF zu verarbeiten und aus der Zelle freizusetzen. Wir nahmen TNF als den Endpunkt unseres Screenings an. Anfangs war das sehr schwierig, genauso schwierig wie zuvor. Doch wurde es einfacher, als das Mausgenom sequenziert und annotiert wurde, man musste dann keine Ansteckungen mehr durchführen; man wusste, worum es sich bei allen Genen handelte. Es war kein Neuland, wie es früher noch war. Es ging auch schneller, da bessere Sequenzierungstechnologien Online verfügbar wurden, zuerst Kapillar-Sequenzierung, danach Plattformen zur massiven parallelen Sequenzierung. Aber 2011 war klar: der limitierende Schritt bei der Mutationssuche war die genetische Kartierung. Das gewöhnliche Paradigma bei der Auskreuzung eines Stammes zu einem Marker-Stamm, das Vornehmen einer kritischen Bereichszuordnung, um dann dort nach Mutationen zu suchen, hatte unsere Arbeit verlangsamt. Wir konnten zudem sehr viel mehr Phänotypen feststellen, als wir lösen konnten. Manchmal war ein Jahr erforderlich, eine Mutation aufzuspüren. Es wurde ein neuer Ansatz gebraucht. Ich fing an darüber nachzudenken, was der perfekte Ansatz sein könnte und ich dachte an sowas wie Google Glass. Ich wünschte mir eine magische Brille, durch die ich mir eine Familie von Mäusen anschauen könnte, so wie diese hier, und selbst wenn die Mutation nicht offensichtlich wäre, so wie ich das gezeigt habe, könnte ich sagen, welche Maus von der Mutation betroffen ist. Und nicht nur das, ich könnte auch in einem Augenblick sagen: dies ist eine Mutation in SOX10. Dieses sind die Koordinaten der Mutation, die Veränderung der Aminosäure, das Motiv, das menschliche Homolog. Wenn es Strukturdaten gäbe, würde sogar diese gezeigt werden. Das ist jetzt bereits Realität und wir sind in der Lage, Mutationen in Echtzeit zu finden. Ich sage Ihnen genau, wie das geht. Zuerst erzeugen wir eine G1 Maus, so wie wir das immer gemacht haben, dann aber nehmen wir bei jeder G1 Maus eine Gesamt-Exom-Sequenzierung vor, im Voraus, um jede Mutation zu finden, die sie in den Stammbaum übertragen könnte. Wir sind da seit einer Weile am Ball und fanden heraus, die durchschnittliche Anzahl an Mutationen, die den genetischen Code verändern war 63 pro G1 Maus und die Modalzahl ist 70. Es gibt Möglichkeiten, diese zu erhöhen, wir zogen es aber vor, es zu unterlassen, denn wir hatten am Ende zu viel G3 Letalität. Liegt die Anzahl bei über 30 Mutationen, arbeiten wir mit diesem Stammbaum weiter, anderenfalls wird er ignoriert. Damit weiterarbeiten bedeutet, wir bestellen ein Ampliseq Panel, das ist ein Ansammlung PCR Primer, so berechnet, dass sie sich gegenseitig nicht beeinträchtigen, diese peilen jede der Mutationsstellen an und wir können dann ihren Genotyp feststellen. Dann sind die Genotypen aller G2 und G3 Mäuse an den Mutationsstellen, die wir mit ENU erzeugt haben, festgestellt. Erst dann werden die Mäuse für das phänotypische Screening freigegeben. In diesem Falle schließt dies eine visuelle Überprüfung, das Wiegen der Maus und einen Glukosetoleranztest mit ein. Dann werden sie in einer Testserie auf die angeborene Immunleistung untersucht (mittels Makrophagen), wir immunisieren sie und verwenden die Durchflusscytometrie, um die adaptive Immunentwicklung und -leistung zu bewerten. Danach nehmen wir ein DSS Challenge vor, wir infizieren eine Maus mit dem Zytomegalievirus, danach werden sie zu weiteren Untersuchungen im Bereich der neurologischen Verhaltensreaktion weitergegeben. Bis zum 28. Juni 2015 hatten wir auf diese Weise nahezu 64.000 Mutationen geschaffen, und inzwischen ist es kein blindes Verfahren mehr. Wir wissen, was jede Mutation ist, und wir wissen, auf welche Gene sie wirken. Diese Mutationen erstreckten sich auf 17.204 Gene oder auf mehr als 3/4, ich glaube, die Maus hat insgesamt 24.981 Gene. Das ist eine enorme Anzahl an Mutationen. Wären diese, selbst im heterozygoten Zustand in einer G1 Maus vorhanden, wären sie beinahe mit Sicherheit tödlich. Sie sind natürlich über mehr als 1000 Stammbäume verteilt und tangieren insgesamt 26.455 G3 Mäuse. Wir können berechnen, dass wir 17% aller Gene in einen Zustand der Phänovarianz mutiert haben, darauf komme ich nochmal zurück, und wir haben sie drei Mal oder häufiger in homozygotem Zustand getestet, zumindest in einem unserer Screenings. Insgesamt führten wir 135 Überprüfungen durch, denen die meisten Mäuse unterzogen wurden. Da, wo es nur um die adaptive Immunleistung ging, begegneten wir 60 bekannten Genen, von denen bekannt war, dass sie für die Immunentwicklung oder –funktion erforderlich sind, und wir wiesen sie durch Phänotypen nach. Zusammen mit diesen entdeckten wir aber hunderte von Gene, von denen zuvor nicht bekannt war, dass sie etwas mit Immunität zu tun hatten. Alles dies weist darauf hin, dass ein großer Teil unserer Genome zur Immunabwehr notwendig ist, so wie ich es vermutet hatte. Wir sind jetzt aber in einer Position, in der wir möglicherweise präzisere Schätzungen darüber vornehmen können, wie groß dieser Anteil ist. Um diese Daten zu sichten braucht man eine Software, mit der der Betrachter alle Mutationen untersuchen kann. Wir schrieben ein Programm, genannt Linkage Analyser, und ein Programm zum Durchsuchen, genannt Linkage Explorer, mit denen dies möglich wurde. Man kann sich auf irgendein bestimmtes Gen konzentrieren, in jedem gewünschten Screening, bei einer Teilmenge von Mäusen oder anhand des trivialen Namens eines Phänotyps. Man kann die Suche auf verschiedene Arten der Mutation beschränken, man kann sich darauf festlegen, nur große Stammbäume anzusehen, sofern gewünscht. Die Anzahl der Beobachtungen im homozygoten Zustand lässt sich steuern und der Beobachter wählt ebenfalls den p-Wert der Zuordnung zwischen dem Phänotyp und dem interessierenden Genotyp. Dies wird durch die Änderung dieses Wertes hier vorgenommen. Und es gibt noch andere Methoden, die Qualität der Beobachtung zu begrenzen. Um Ihnen ein Beispiel zu geben, wir können sagen, wir sind nur an Proben in Verbindung mit CD8-Zellen interessiert, mit deren Anzahl oder Aktivierungszustand. Man kann CD8 unter dem Screeningnamen eingeben, wir bestehen darauf, die Mutation drei Mal oder öfter im homozygoten Zustand zu sehen, wir bestehen auf einem relativ starken p-Wert der Zuordnung, 0,0005, und prüfen ebenfalls diese anderen Elemente, ich will nicht alle durchgehen, und wir klicken auf „absenden“. Dann geht man unverzüglich zurück zur Liste der Gene, in diesem Falle eine Liste von 102 Allelen von 100 beteiligten Genen aus 70 verschiedenen Stammbäumen. Sie können alleine hieraus erkennen, dass es uns nicht immer um eine einzelne Mutation geht, manchmal haben wir eine Verkettung von zwei Mutationen, die auf einen Maximalwert der Verkettung fallen, wie Sie sich sicher vorstellen können. Gewöhnlich arbeiten wir aber mit einer einzelnen daran beteiligten Mutation. Sie sehen in der ersten Spalte Namen der Gene, und mit einigen, falls jemand unter Ihnen Immunbiologe ist, werden Sie vertraut sein. Themis ist für die Beteiligung bei der positiven Auswahl von T-Zellen bekannt und taucht in einem Screening für CD8-Zellen oder für das CD4-CD8 Verhältnis auf. Einige sind unbekannt. Ich zweifle daran ob es einem von Ihnen bewusst ist, dass SNRNP40, welches eine Komponente des U5 Spleißosoms ist, eine selektive Rolle bei der Immunität spielt, aber dem ist so. In der nächsten Spalte sehen Sie die Koordinaten der Mutation, Einschätzungen dessen, was die Mutation bewirkt, Sie sehen auch die Screenings, auf denen das Scoring überwacht wurde. Dann weiter da drüben sehen Sie die Anzahl der Beobachtungen homozygoter Referenzallele, heterozygote oder homozygote für die Mutation. In diesen drei Spalten sehen Sie die Bewertung der Verkettung, entweder in einem additiven, einem rezessiven oder einem dominanten Vererbungsmodell. Falls Sie sich den Vererbungsplan ansehen wollen, dann klicken Sie diese Nummer an und Sie sehen einen Manhattan-Plot. Dies ist ein Log-skalierter Plot der Wahrscheinlichkeit der Verkettung und man kann mit der Maus über irgendeine der Mutationen gehen, die Sie hier sehen; dies alles sind die Mutationen in dem Stammbaum, nur eine davon zeigt eine starke Verkettung über der Bonferroni Korrektur-Linie, und wenn Sie hier mit der Maus rübergehen, sehen Sie, dass dies SNRNP40 ist. Vielleicht wissen Sie nicht, was SNRNP40 ist, Sie können das also anklicken und erhalten einige Informationen zu diesem Gen, welche vorausberechnet wurden. Sie sehen, unsere Mutation bewirkt eine kürzere Version des Proteins und dies wäre im realen Programm interaktiv, Sie könnten mit der Maus darüber ziehen und die Domänenstruktur sehen. Sie können das Genmodell anklicken und sehen, die Mutation ist in der Nähe von Axon 5 und man nimmt an, dass es Axon 5 entfernt, was ein In-Frame-Produkt erzeugt. Sie finden noch viele weitere Informationen, dies wurde alles vorausberechnet. Wenn man die authentischen Daten sehen möchte, die Rohdaten, kann man auch den Maximalwert anklicken und hier sehen Sie die phänotypische Leistung der homozygoten Mutanten und die Referenzallele bei Homozygoten. Jetzt gibt es zwischen den Heterozygoten und den Homozygoten eine Überlappung. Bei einem qualitativen Ansatz wäre der Versuch, dies abzubilden, ein schrecklicher Aufwand, was wir früher immer gemacht haben und Sie werden diesen Daten nicht einmal vollständig vertrauen, denn, schließlich haben wir hier nur eine begrenzte Anzahl Mäuse. Und Sie denken vielleicht, das ist so eine Art Glücksfall. Beachten Sie aber, dass graduell, indem wir uns der Sättigung nähern, wir immer wieder die gleichen Gene treffen und der Computer erkennt das zeigt „Superstammbäume“ an, wann immer er darauf trifft, entweder bei identischen Allelen, die von der gleichen G0 übertragen wurden, oder bei verschiedenen Allelen, die das gleiche Gen getroffen haben. Sie werden in einem einzigen großen künstlichen Stammbaum zusammengefasst. Irgendwann werden alle Mutationen auf diese Art integriert sein. Derzeit fallen über die Hälfte aller Gene in Superstammbäume und die Zahlen steigen rasch. Mit mannigfaltigen Allelen wächst das Vertrauen in eine Verknüpfung zwischen Phänotyp und Genotyp. Das gleiche Browser-Programm wird dazu verwendet, Superstammbäume zu untersuchen. Im Falle von SNRNP40, das ich hier für Sie nachgeschaut habe, haben wir eine Gesamtzahl von 16 Stammbäumen, 16 G1 Mäuse, wir haben aber nur vier verschiedene Allele, hier ist das eine, das ich Ihnen gezeigt habe und drei weitere. Das eine, das ich Ihnen zeigte, ist vermutlich nach unserer Einschätzung das 0-Allel. Und wieder hat man die gleichen Modelle additiver, rezessiver und dominanter Vererbung. Wenn wir eines von diesen anklicken, sehen wir etwas recht Unterschiedliches. Wir haben jetzt 376 G3 Mäuse von allen diesen Stammbäumen untersucht, hier sind alle Mutationen, die in all diese Stammbäume enthalten sind; die dunkelblauen haben mehrere eigene Allele und wenn Sie mit der Maus über den Spitzenwert fahren, ist das natürlich SNRNP40, das Sie hier rot sehen. Hier gibt es wirklich keine Unklarheit, man hat eine deutliche Verschiebung bei der phänotypischen Leistung der Homozygoten im Vergleich zu den Heterozygoten oder Referenzallelen. Das ist es, was diesen spektakulären p-Wert ergibt. In diesem Falle würde ich sagen, man braucht keine weitere Bestätigung, doch unser Standardverfahren ist, bei jedem Fall ein schärfer ausgerichtetes Allel zu erzeugen. Die große Frage, die wir heute stellen können, und zuvor nicht stellen konnten ist, wie sehr haben wir die Genome mit unseren 64.000 Mutationen geschädigt? Wenn wir uns auf nur ein Screening konzentrieren, das CD8-Screening, sehen wir, in allen untersuchten Stammbäumen wurden mindestens 67,76% aller Gene angefasst, doch nicht alle davon wurden in Homozygotie überführt. Doch Mutationen in 45,9% der Gene wurden drei Mal oder öfter in Homozygotie überführt. Das sagt nichts darüber aus, wieviel Schäden diese Mutationen verursacht haben, wir haben uns aber auch das angesehen. Wenn wir etwa von 0-Allelen sprechen, von vorzeitigen Stoppcodons oder kritischen Fehlern der Spleißstelle, dann waren nahezu 6% aller Gene betroffen und wurden drei Mal oder öfter im homozygoten Zustand untersucht. Dies wäre eine sehr konservative Schätzung darüber, wieviel Schädigung erfolgte. Wenn wir die 0-Allele oder die wahrscheinlich schädigenden Allele betrachten, wobei wahrscheinlich schädigend durch ein Programm, genannt PolyPhen-2, festgelegt ist, das vermutet, wie viel Schaden eine bestimmte Aminosäure verursachen kann, dann haben wir: 24,91% aller Gene wurden drei Mal oder öfter im reinerbigen Zustand mutiert und untersucht. Dies wäre eine sehr großzügige Schätzung bezüglich der beim Genom erfolgten Schäden. Der wahre Wert, den wir kennen, wird von diesen beiden Schätzungen eingeklammert. Wir wissen nicht, wo genau er zwischen diesen beiden liegt, wir haben eine Ahnung, dass er sich irgendwo in Nähe der Mitte befindet, weshalb wir dahin tendieren zu sagen, dass es etwa 16-17% aller Protein-kodierender Gene sind, die zu phänotypischen Variationen mutierten. Wir stehen natürlich erst am Anfang dieses Prozesses, und wir könnten eine Linie ziehen und sagen, dies ist die konservative und dies die großzügige Schätzung der Schädigung. Mit der Zeit werden diese beiden Kurven sich annähern, sie werden sich aber nie wirklich berühren, und wir werden immer etwas im Zweifel über das genaue Schadensausmaß sein, das wir beim Genom verursacht haben. Was aber haben wir erreicht? Früher brauchten wir fünf Jahre, um nur ein Gen positionell zu klonen, jetzt benötigen wir etwa eine Stunde. Dann wurde ein Phänotyp in fünf Jahren gelöst, jetzt werden in unserem Labor jeden Tag ein oder zwei Phänotypen gelöst. Dies bedeutet, wir kommen 3.000 Mal schneller voran als zuvor. Wir werden derzeit nur durch die Zahl, in der sich Mutationen erzeugen und überprüfen lassen, beschränkt. Das bedeutet, wir können jede Woche etwa 1.400 Mutationen abfragen. Und viele davon, etwa 1/2% davon, verursachen einen Phänotyp auf mindestens einem unserer Screenings. Wir können projizieren, dass wir die Mehrheit der Gene zerstören und ihre phänotypischen Konsequenzen etwa innerhalb von drei Jahren analysieren, und dann wissen wir, welches die meisten Gene sind, die für eine starke Immunität, so wie wir dies definiert haben, erforderlich sind. Das war eine sehr langwierige Geschichte, und ich muss besonders Alexander Poltorak für das positionelle Klonen des LPS Locus danken. Ich habe jetzt eine sehr viel größere Gruppe als damals und in der gegenwärtigen Gruppe sind es besonders die Computerleute Chun Hui Bu, Stephen Lyon, Sara Hildebrand, David Pratt und Xaiowei Zhan, die Anerkennung für das automatische positionelle Klonen verdienen, das ich Ihnen gezeigt habe. Wir wurden auch von Tao Wang und Yang Xie im Center for Computational Biology unterstützt. Meinen herzlichen Dank an Sie alle.

Bruce Beutler on the discovery of the first toll-like receptor in mammals
(00:09:25 - 00:11:56)

 

Besides toll-like receptors, several other PRR families exist. Their mode of action is principally the same. Once a PRR has bound a PAMP, it triggers the secretion of signal molecules. This leads to a vasodilation, enabling further phagocytes to approach the site of infection and to induce a local inflammation. An acute inflammation is a good sign for a healthy immune response. It shows that the macrophages and neutrophils summoned to fight the infection are busy destroying pathogens.

Parasites that are too large to be ingested are surrounded by a group of phagocytes and killed during a joint attack with toxic molecules. Viral infections, however, are not associated with PAMPs. The host cell, after all, has been forced by the virus to produce its proteins. PRRs therefore strive to detect other suspicious molecules of a virus. If they succeed, they secrete specialised cytokines (type I interferons), which in turn can recruit natural killer cells that force the virus-infected cells to commit suicide by apoptosis.

A humoral cascade and a cellular mediator

The innate immune system does not rely on cellular responses alone, though. It also has at its disposal a powerful humoral defence, namely the complement system, which principally has already been discovered at the end of the 19th century by Hans Buchner and Jules Bordet (NP in Physiology or Medicine 1919). The complement system is an amplifying proteolytic cascade. It consists of 30 interacting soluble proteins. Its activation ultimately causes the formation of a protein complex on the surface of a pathogen. This complex pierces aqueous pores in the pathogen’s membrane to destroy it. An insight into the functionality of the complement system was given by Rodney Porter in Lindau in 1984:

 

Rodney Porter on the complement system
(00:06:58 - 00:10:04)

 

In many cases, such as after a scrape for example, the joined forces of phagocytes and the complement cascade will suffice to eliminate all invading pathogens, and the immune response ends. If this is not the case, the adaptive immune system is employed. This employment needs to be mediated by professional antigen-presenting cells of whom dendritic cells are the most potent ones. Dendritic cells were discovered by Ralph Steinman in the 1970s. They continuously patrol our tissues. When they detect a microbial invader, they engulf it and cleave it into peptide fragments. Then they migrate to a lymph node, where they present these fragments to T cells and activate them. Dendritic cells are also able to inhibit T cells, when it is necessary to avoid an overshooting immune reaction.

The two main actors of adaptive immunity

Our innate immune system reacts immediately once it has been activated by a pathogen. Its response lasts no longer than four days approximately and retains no memory of the invader. It is very effective against bacteria while disposing of modest means against viral infections. Our adaptive immune system, by contrast, reacts delayed in time. Normally, it cannot be directly activated by a pathogen. It rather depends on mediation of the innate immune system to be called into play. It disposes of a powerful armamentarium against viral infections. It develops a memory of its pathogenic enemies so that it can react more quickly at re-infection and is able to develop long-lasting immunity against established invaders.

The power of our adaptive immune system is based on the smart and sophisticated actions of two kinds of lymphocytes, which are called B cells and T cells, and whose entire cell mass resembles that of our brain. B cells develop in the bone marrow and T cells develop in the thymus. Their activation takes place in peripheral lymphoid organs such as the lymph nodes, the spleen and epithelium-associated lymphoid tissues. T cells are activated by dendritic cells, B cells either by antigen (plus innate signals) or with the help of T cells.

Activated B cells are called plasma cells. They can express five different classes of proteins that belong to the group of immunoglobulins (Igs). They both incorporate Igs into their cell membrane as B-cell receptors (BCRs) and secrete them as antibodies into the extracellular space. These antibodies fulfill two main functions: they neutralise extracellular viruses and toxins by preventing them to bind to receptors of potential host cells; and they mark pathogens for destruction by components of the innate immune system. T cells appear in three main classes: cytotoxic T cells destroy intracellular viruses by killing the virus-infected cells; helper T cells stimulate the activity of other cells of the innate and adaptive immune system while regulatory T cells serve as suppressors of those other immune cells. With their antibodies, activated B cells have a large operating range; activated T cells, in contrast, mainly act at short range. In the lecture he gave in Lindau in 2014, Rolf Zinkernagel emphasised the importance of a well-balanced interplay of B and T cells.

 

Rolf Zinkernagel (2014) - Why Do We Not Have a Vaccine Against HIV or Tuberculosis?

Ladies and gentlemen it is a pleasure to be here. And to talk to you about why we do not have certain vaccines. Now there is no doubt that vaccines have been probably the most efficacious medical activity that we have succeeded to do so far. And therefore it is of course a natural thing to think if we have a vaccine against pneumonia or measles, we must also be able to make a vaccine against HIV or TB. Now I will try today to explain to you why this equation doesn’t hold. And I do so by questioning certain text book dogmas, because I had to teach immunology for 30 years at a medical school. And while reading these text books I thought, you know, at least half of what we read in text books is wrong. Of course we don’t know which half. So the first question I raise: Is memory, immunological memory responsible for protection? And the answer as you may guess is of course 'no'. And the second is, you know: What is antigenic specificity and why do those agents that we have no vaccine against, all vary basically? And of course that tells you something about the antibody specificity that is needed. And these agents simply escape an otherwise efficient immune response. So the more general conclusion of course is: Is what we measure always what we SHOULD measure? Because usually we measure with a method that gives us the answer we want to see. This may be slightly overstated but I will illustrate some of these aspects. Let’s just set the stage. You know there is no doubt in a co-evolutionary context that we only have to live for 20 or 25 years at most. Because that’s what we need to set up the next generation. And anyway, our biggest problem today on this world is of course that there are too many humans. Now the reason why we have problems in acting rationally is that our human behaviour is very inadequate. In fact I think humans are very basically stupid. And of course we have difficulties to accept that not all humans are equal. But you know otherwise there would not be any co-evolutionary selection. And of course responsibility always collides with freedom of action. And we have enough examples, particularly in application of vaccines that today one of the major problems is that certain population parts actually resist applying vaccines which in a way you know, how stupid can we get? So I think we have to work as a scientific community in educating people in very general terms. With very simple newspapers, to educate and teach them, you know what science is all about. And that actually science, for example vaccines help. Now if you look at the basic problem. And I give you now a very short survey of a minimal sort of immunology. And then try to illustrate what I want to say about specificity and about protection. Now when you look at infections with viruses - but you can extrapolate that to bacteria and classical parasites Some viruses replicate, destroy the host cell, others don’t. In fact many more are noncytopathic than cytopathic. And HIV basically belongs to that category. And you see immediately where the problem lies. If you have an immune response that is very efficient in eliminating or stopping viral replication on this side via antibody, the hematogenic spread, then such a T cell immune response, particularly by CD8 T cells, of course is actually harmful in this context. Because the virus would not kill your cell, it’s the immune response. And this basically we call immunopathology. HIV is a good example, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and so on are other examples. Where the immune response simply is causing the problem. Now in physiology these types of viruses jump from one host to the next at a time where the T cell response doesn’t exist. And when is that? Of course either in utero or at birth. Because we are all born without a functioning immune system. And there if the virus carrying mother hands over the virus to the offspring, there is no immunopathology because the recipient has no immunocompetence. So that’s the normal physiology. All these viruses jump at birth point. Now the second very general point I’m going to make here is that if you look at intact viral particles that actually only the tips of these glycoproteins are exposed to the surface and can be addressed by antibodies or B cells. There is simply no room for antibodies to squeeze in between these glycoproteins. And therefore simply the idea of broadly cross-neutralising or cross-protective antibodies simply is an illusion. Because these antibodies can’t get to cover up the intact viral particle, because there is no access for them. Now if you look at, this is my second immunologist slide, at the location of infections and the immunological consequences. Of course normally you think of a virus hitting your mucosa or skin then spreading to the draining lymph nodes. That’s where the first initiation of an immuno-response happens. And this usually has to be quick enough not to have overwhelming hematogenic spread of the virus. Because if the virus gets to your brain you’re dead. And that’s why early IgM responses on day 3 or 4 are so crucial. Now there are 2 alternative extremes. One is papillomavirus, warts virus. They cause a proliferation of epithelial cells. They’re out of the reach of immune cells including Langerhans cells. And therefore this event out there, basically being a benign tumour at the start, is out of the reach of any immune reactivity. Because the draining lymph node doesn’t realise that there is something going on out there. The other extreme situation is where the mother has transfused virus to the offspring via the obligatory blood transfusion at birth. And of course in this case the virus spreads all over, there is no immunocompetence. And therefore the host becomes a viremic patient but has no immunopathology because there is no immune response. And any subsequently developing immune response is simply negatively selected in so-called deletion tolerance. So that’s all for the starter. And we go to evaluate the situation on the vaccine side. If you look at successful vaccines, you know the list is here. They are all mediating their protection via neutralising antibodies. There is not a single exception to that statement. All the ones we don’t have, TB, leprosy, HIV, malaria, etc. There we need both effector T cells and neutralising antibodies. But the left hand side, your right hand side candidate all vary. This is particularly true for HIV or malaria. TB hides away, I get to that. And of course leprosy can be put together with TB. And in a way you could argue your leprosy or your TB granuloma is basically the best vaccine against these types of infections. And the chronic infection that is not killing you in terms of a TB granuloma, actually increases or so-called innate resistance mechanisms to a considerable extent. So there is no doubt that innate resistance - and we have heard, you know from several speakers about it Without interferon Alpha for example you’re dead before the virus looks at you. There is a very interesting observation that chicken eggs, but all bird eggs, are full of maternal antibodies. Which is interesting. The same is true of course for humans and mice, mothers transfuse their immunological experience in the form of antibody to the offspring. Interesting also that autoimmunity, particularly those dependent on autoantibodies, only starts about after 22 and is predominant in females versus males. And this is at least an indication that to produce lots of antibody at high titers may have a cost, and this is the reflection in autoimmune’s susceptibility. Then also tumours of course come up in general terms, solid peripheral tumours come up after 30. So that puts all the problems we cannot solve immunologically easily into the later phase. Because what kills you are childhood infections. And up till 300 years ago our life expectancy would be in the order of 25 to 28 years, for Romans it was 18 years. So that shows you that basically what kills you in an evolutionarily important way is before puberty. So let’s look at specificity. Most of immunology in text books deals with hapten’s so-called small phenolic groups like NP or DNP, dinitrophenol groups. These are very small because they basically contain 6 carbon atoms. But the interaction of a neutralising antibody with the tip of the glycoprotein of course is a much larger interaction, one speculates about 10 to 15 amino acids. And therefore it’s no surprise that the affinity of hapten-specific antibodies is in the order of 10^-5. Whereas affinity of neutralising antibodies is in the order of 10^-10. So 5 orders of the magnitude difference. And since most of immunology deals with these low affinity type of responses it’s not a surprise that basic immunology says the limiting factor to any B cell response is T help. But this is not true because the frequency of these neutralising antibody producing B cells is 10^-6. Whereas the frequency of hapten-specific B cells is 10^-2. So for all biologically relevant protective B cell responses it’s the low frequency of the B cell that is the limiting factor. Now when you look at an acute cytopathic, acutely killing virus. And I just use vesicular stomatitis virus which is a rabies-like virus and in mice behaves like rabies, is neurotropic. You see virus replicates. You have a T cell response. You have an immediate ELISA response that is parallel to the neutralising protective antibody response. For noncytopathic infections, you could take hepatitis B or HIV, you see the discrepancy that you have a T cell response. You have an ELISA response. But your neutralising antibiotic response takes between 40 and 200 days. And the same is true in a model infection in mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus where you have the virus, you have the T cell response, you have the ELISA antibody response - remember at very low avidities and affinities. And the neutralising response takes 60 to 300 days. And what happens in these long slowly developing antibody responses is that while the affinity of the antibodies mature or increase, the virus by mutational escape simply runs ahead of any antibody response. And that is one of the major reasons why we don’t have a vaccine. And this in a way has a correlation to our B cell repertoire. If you take a normal serum, just from an SPF mouse or a normal human being that has not ever been exposed to a particular virus, you find usually a background neutralising titer of 1 in 20 to 1 in 40. Is this really specific or is it just sort of, you know, natural antibody? It is specific because you can cross absorb that titer by distinct stereotypically defined viruses of the same family. Now if you take a virus that does not kill you in 10 days but only kills you in 20 years, then you find there is no measurable natural or spontaneous antibody titer. Which indicates that these viruses start from a completely different repertoire usage. And of course it depends both on the virus and the repertoire whether, where and how quickly they start. So natural antibody represent or reflect the antibody repertoire and this can be illustrated. And these are experiments done by Adrian Ochsenbein in the lab. If you take mice that do not have antibodies, muMT knockouts, and you infect them with this rabies virus, they all die with a very low dose of virus. If however you give back to these mice just half a millilitre of normal mouse serum from an antibody competent mouse, you basically can correct that. And this is a very robust effect because you need now 10^8 or 10^7 viral particle to kill the mouse. So it's 4 logs difference. So natural antibody. You have them. Then you can deal with acute infections. It starts out with 1 in 30 and your protective level is 1 in 900. So it’s basically just increasing your titer by a 30-fold factor. Which is not very much but translates very easily in about the replication cycle of 6 hours of B cells once they get started. And of course the viruses that are noncytopathic can hide wherever they like. In neurons, for example with the herpes viruses, or in epithelial cells in the kidney for CMV. Or for LCMV in lung epithelial cells. And the same for CMV. Therefore there can be peripheral reservoirs that are not clinically apparent and that may well keep the immune response up like the TB granuloma and like the persisting HIV. I summarise at this point: B cells make antibodies. There is a local IgA - I didn’t talk about it but this is very important. On the mucosa there is a very primordial, ancient IgA system that actually is active in these muMT mice. Although they don’t have any serum antibody but they still have that local IgA in the mucosa. We need neutralising or opsonising IgM very early to prevent spread to the brain. The IgG depends on T help, I didn’t show that but that is very clear, it's 100% dependent on T help. And of course the IgG has a much longer half-life, IgM is in serum for about 12 hours, IgG for 20 days half-life. And it’s only the IgG that can be handed down to the offspring via the FC receptor. I don’t get into that. And basically, very interesting, there is almost no negative selection against antibodies. But that’s a different issue. Now for T cells they control and eliminate intracellular parasites of all sorts. Including and particularly important in solid organs. But to get a sufficiently activated T cell response to clear out all virus from your lung or your kidney, you would have to steam up the immune response so tremendously that your fingers probably would fall off because of an interleukin storm. So these things are well balanced and if we try to overdo them we obviously have to pay for that. The T cells are important for the long-lived IgG, but the T cells also cause immunopathology. Now why immunological memory? And is it responsible for protection?. Of course if you survive the first infection there is no need for memory because the system has shown efficient. If you die of the first infection then of course you don’t need memory either. And that is basically the starting point for discussing this issue. You see in text books 'memory' is defined as quicker and higher. So you prime, you come back with the same antigen: It's steeper, quicker and a higher titer. Now immunity as we define it is 'protection against'. And we have these positive, very efficient vaccines and we don’t have these vaccines. So what is the explanation? Well let’s look at a very simple experiment. Hans-Peter Raue did that as a PhD study in the lab. You vaccinate mice with this rabies-like virus. And then you take the so-called memory T+B cells and adoptively transfuse them into a naïve recipient. And then you challenge that recipient, either a few days later or 2 months later, they all die. So whatever memory T cells and memory B cells means, they can’t do the job. However, if you take the serum of this vaccinated mouse 3 months after vaccination and adoptively transfuse that to a recipient: Challenge, they all survive. Now that experiment of course is the experiment we all have survived at birth. Because we have received the immune IgG from our mother. And that covers basically us against all epidemiologically important infections during our first 1 or 2 years. And the mechanisms are actually quite fascinating and reflect this interesting co-evolution in humans or mice. You get FC receptors on the hemochorial side of the placenta. On the foetal side you have FC receptors and they pick up the IgG from the mother. In calves and all ruminants the situation is a bit more complicated but as illustrating, in that the placenta is a double membrane separation between the foetus and the mother. There are no double membrane transport systems for proteins. And therefore these have evolved FC receptors on their gut epithelial cells. And these FC receptors are expressed during the first 24 hours of life after birth. After that the renewal of the epithelial cells is such that the renewal cells don’t express the FC gamma receptor. So that’s why colostrum milk is so important to be given to these offspring because they absorb from the colostrums milk which basically is a dream for Nestlé, you know high concentration of immunoglobulins of both IgG and IgA type. And this actually is then absorbed by the gut epithelial FC. And that replenishes the foetal calf serum. Now that is the reason why we use foetal calf serum in tissue culture. Because foetal calf serum has no immunoglobulin. Because it cannot be transported from the mother to the offspring. And the immune, even the competence and anti-body production of the foetus of the calf is zero. So protection is via neutralising antibody. But of course if the agent is variable by mutation, you have a problem. Increase of memory B cell frequency is antigen-dependent and antigen-driven. But usually these frequencies drop back and end up you know by being 4 or 8 times higher than in an unprimed situation. But the differentiation of a so-called memory B cell to an antibody-producing B cell takes again 3 to 4 days. So even having memory B cells needs re-stimulation which is antigen-dependent. And it’s only the antigen that drives to maturation of an antibody-producing cell. And this re-exposure or antigen-driven or -dependent neutralising antibody titers can come from within. This of course is the case with persisting viruses. And measles is also noted here because measles of course cannot be isolated from immune measles survivors. But you know the disease of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, which is a central nervous complication of wild type measles infection, and when you look there in these lesions you always find crippled measles virus. The matrix protein is usually mutated. And therefore, SSP is the clinical case but you know down the line to no clinical symptoms, you find decreasing amounts of this crippled persisting in a way vaccine. So it can come from within via antigen antibody complexes on follicular dendritic cells for 1 to 4 years. And then of course from the outside polio, all the diarrhoea viruses and so on are classical examples of that. Now let’s go to the pregnant mother. Let’s say she is genetically AB, the father is CD. So the embryo is AC and the mother could react against the C which she doesn’t effectively because there is no HLA exposure on the surface of the foetus. The mother had to have survived the virus X infections otherwise she probably couldn’t have become pregnant. Because otherwise such an infection would kill her and of course the foetus. Therefore she has anti-X antibodies. Now after birth the offspring will have anti-X antibodies and will immediately be exposed to the epidemiologically you know active infections X. And this eventually will lead to an active immunisation because the maternal antibody slowly will go down because of the half-life of 20 days. And at some point the infection will be very attenuated but still active and you will have active immunisation. If this exposure is delayed for more than 2 or 3 years then of course the first exposure will be a disaster because your maternal acquired protection is gone. And the polio epidemics in the early ‘50’s of course illustrate that very nicely. We formally tested that and could actually show that if maternal antibodies get transferred you need periodic exposure to this infection to actually build up your acquired or active immunisation. If you don’t do that you basically die of the infection. So I can summarise here. Memory is a nice idea. You can publish wonderful papers in Journal of Experimental Medicine. It’s earlier and higher, everybody can repeat that. But it doesn’t explain protection by vaccines or infectious agents. This is always antigen dependent. To keep up the protection you need re-exposure from within, from without, from antibody, antigen complexes. Now I’ve talked about the problem of T cell immunity and the immunopathology in such diseases as HIV, hepatitis B. There is also immunopathology going on for TB. And that’s why the granuloma is such a successful isolation procedure, to isolate the infection in a chronic infectious environment. And it is this granuloma configuration that keeps the antigen you know going on the middle. Without causing open or destructive TB, which of course when your T cell and protective immunity dwindles, be it by HIV and so on, then of course this control is not any longer functioning. Now let me conclude in general. Of course research to find out how things work is what the younger part of this audience is all here. And I think that’s as important and as pleasurable as sports and arts. Hard work, good environment and a good support and, particularly, good luck you know is the foundation. Open critical competition of course helps because the best critic is always from ourselves. Because if we can negate or falsify our own wishes, I think, we are safe from the nasty reviewers. Beliefs of course don’t help. Because I’ve had many good ideas, but ideas are cheap. You have to work to falsify them. And we should never make false promises. So 25 years ago HIV vaccine was promised within 2 or 3 years. We still don’t have it. And I hope I have shown you why. The virus is variable, has to persist, to keep up the antigen-driven protective activation of the T cell response. And of course we cannot imitate that yet - I don’t say it’s impossible. But this apparently has been successfully done by TB. It persists, keeps up the immune response but doesn’t kill you. Only after 60 but we said 22 is good enough. And HIV basically the same. Thanks very much for your attention. Applause.

Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, es ist mir eine Freude, hier zu sein und in meinem Beitrag darüber zu sprechen, warum es bestimmte Impfstoffe nicht gibt. Es besteht kein Zweifel daran, dass Impfstoffe die wohl wirksamste medizinische Handlungsmöglichkeit repräsentieren, die wir bislang mit Erfolg entwickelt haben. Und von daher ist die Vorstellung nur zu verständlich, wir müssten – wenn es denn schon einen Impfstoff gegen Lungenentzündung und Masern gibt – auch in der Lage sein, einen Impfstoff gegen HIV oder TB herzustellen. Ich möchte Ihnen heute erklären, warum diese Gleichung nicht aufgeht. Und dabei werde ich auch einige Lehrbuchdogmen in Frage stellen, denn seit 30 Jahren lehre ich das Fach Immunologie an einer medizinischen Hochschule. Und als ich all diese Lehrbücher gelesen habe, dachte ich so bei mir, dass mindestens die Hälfte dessen, was dort zu lesen ist, falsch ist. Und natürlich wissen wir nicht, welche Hälfte das ist. Die erste Frage, die ich stellen möchte, lautet: Ist das Gedächtnis, das immunologische Gedächtnis für den immunologischen Schutz verantwortlich? Und die Antwort lautet, wie Sie sich denken können, natürlich: Nein. Und die zweite Frage lautet: Was ist die Antigenspezifität und warum variieren die Erreger, gegen die wir keine Impfstoffe haben, prinzipiell alle? Das sagt natürlich etwas über die erforderliche Antikörperspezifität aus. Diese Erreger entziehen sich ganz einfach einer ansonsten effizienten Immunantwort. Die allgemeinere Schlussfolgerung lautet: Ist das, was wir messen, immer das, was wir messen sollten? Denn üblicherweise messen wir mit einer Methode, die uns die Antwort beschert, die wir erhalten wollen. Das mag vielleicht etwas übertrieben klingen, aber ich werde Ihnen einige solche Aspekte erläutern. Lassen Sie mich den Rahmen abstecken. Sie wissen, dass wir aus der koevolutionären Perspektive nur 20 oder höchstens 25 Jahre leben müssen. Das ist die Zeit, die wir brauchen, um die nächste Generation aufzubauen. Und es ist heutzutage ohnehin unser größtes Problem, dass es zu viele Menschen gibt. Der Grund dafür, dass es uns so schwerfällt vernünftig zu handeln, ist die Tatsache, dass unser menschliches Verhalten inadäquat ist. Tatsächlich halte ich die Menschen in einer sehr grundsätzlichen Weise für dumm. Und natürlich fällt es uns schwer zu akzeptieren, dass nicht alle Menschen gleich sind. Aber Sie wissen auch, dass es ansonsten keine koevolutionäre Selektion gäbe. Und so kollidiert Verantwortung immer auch mit Handlungsfreiheit. Und wir haben, insbesondere in der Anwendung von Impfstoffen, genügend Beispiele dafür, dass heute eines der größten Probleme darin besteht, dass bestimmte Bevölkerungskreise die Anwendung von Impfstoffen ablehnen, was irgendwie … wie dumm können wir denn sein? Deshalb müssen wir als Wissenschaftler unsere Aufgabe auch darin sehen, Menschen in sehr grundsätzlicher Weise aufzuklären. Wir müssen sie mit sehr einfachen Zeitungsartikeln darüber aufklären und ihnen vermitteln, welchen Sinn und Zweck Wissenschaft hat und dass Wissenschaft, beispielsweise in Form von Impfstoffen, tatsächlich hilft. Lassen Sie uns zunächst das grundlegende Problem betrachten. Ich gebe Ihnen hier eine sehr kurze Übersicht über die Immunologie und versuche zu verdeutlichen, was ich zum Thema Spezifität und immunologischer Schutz sagen möchte. Wenn man virusbedingte Infektionen betrachtet dann hat man immer zwei Probleme. Einige Viren vermehren sich, zerstören die Wirtszelle, andere machen das nicht. Tatsächlich haben mehr Viren nichtzytopathische Effekte als zytopathische Effekte. Und HIV gehört grundsätzlich zu dieser Kategorie. Und Sie werden direkt begreifen, wo das Problem liegt. Eine Immunreaktion, die die Virusreplikation, die hämatogene Verbreitung, insbesondere durch CD8-T-Zellen, auf dieser Seite über Antikörper sehr effizient eliminiert oder stoppt, ist in diesem Kontext in Wirklichkeit von Nachteil, weil nicht der Virus die Zelle töten würde, sondern die Immunreaktion. Und das ist in Grundzügen das, was wir als Immunpathologie bezeichnen. HIV ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C usw. sind weitere Beispiele für Fälle, in denen schlicht und einfach die immunologische Abwehrreaktion das Problem verursacht. In physiologischer Hinsicht wandern diese Arten von Viren, sofern keine T-Zell-Reaktion erfolgt, von einem Wirt zum nächsten. Und wann geschieht das? Natürlich entweder im Mutterleib oder bei der Geburt. Denn wir alle kommen ohne ein funktionierendes Immunsystem auf die Welt. Wenn die virusbefallenen Hände der Mutter den Virus auf den Nachwuchs übertragen, gibt es keine Immunpathologie, weil der Empfänger keine Immunkompetenz besitzt. Das also ist die normale Physiologie. All diese Viren springen zum Geburtszeitpunkt über. Der zweite grundsätzliche Aspekt, auf den ich hier hinweisen möchte, ist der Folgende: Wenn man sich intakte Viruspartikel anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die entscheidenden Determinanten multimere, identische Determinanten sind, mit denen die Oberfläche so dicht bestückt ist, dass in Wirklichkeit nur die Spitzen dieser Glycoproteine der Oberfläche ausgesetzt sind und von Antikörpern oder B-Zellen angegriffen werden können. Antikörper haben einfach keinen Platz, sich zwischen diese Glycoproteine zu quetschen. Und deshalb ist die Idee von kreuzneutralisierenden oder kreuzprotektiven Antikörpern schlicht und einfach eine Illusion, weil diese Antikörper das intakte Viruspartikel nicht abdecken können, denn es gibt für sie keine Zugangsmöglichkeit. Wenn man sich den Ort von Infektionen und die immunologischen Konsequenzen anschaut, denkt man normalerweise an einen Virus, der auf die Schleimhaut oder Haut trifft und sich dann auf die drainierenden Lymphknoten ausbreitet. An dieser Stelle wird die erste Immunreaktion initiiert. Und die muss normalerweise schnell genug erfolgen, damit eine übermannende hämatogene Virusausbreitung verhindert wird. Wenn das Virus erst das Gehirn erreicht, ist man tot. Und deshalb sind frühzeitige IgM-Reaktionen an Tag 3 oder 4 so entscheidend. Es gibt zwei alternative Extreme. Die eine ist das Papillomavirus, Viruswarzen. Sie verursachen eine Proliferation der Epithelzellen und liegen außerhalb der Reichweite von Immunzellen, einschließlich der Langerhans-Zellen. Und deshalb liegt dieses Ereignis, zunächst ein gutartiger Tumor, außerhalb der Reichweite jeder Immunreaktivität. Denn der Lymphknoten realisiert nicht, dass da draußen etwas geschieht. Die andere Extremsituation entsteht, wenn die Mutter über die obligatorische Bluttransfusion bei der Geburt einen Virus auf den Nachwuchs übertragen hat. Der Virus breitet sich dann natürlich schnell aus, weil keine Immunkompetenz vorhanden ist. Der Wirt wird deshalb zu einem virämischen Patienten, aber ohne Immunpathologie, weil es keine Immunreaktion gibt. Und später wird die Entwicklung einer Immunreaktion in der so bezeichneten Deletionstoleranz einfach negativ selektioniert. Soweit zu Beginn. Und dann betrachten wir die Situation auf der Impfstoff-Seite. Erfolgreiche Impfstoffe, hier eine Liste, vermitteln ihren Schutz allesamt über neutralisierende Antikörper. Es gibt keine einzige Ausnahme zu dieser Aussage. Für alle Infektionen, für die wir keine Impfstoffe haben, TB, Lepra, HIV, Malaria usw., brauchen wir T-Zellen und neutralisierende Antikörper. Aber die linken, für Sie die rechten Kandidaten, verändern sich alle. Das gilt insbesondere für HIV oder Malaria. TB versteckt sich, dazu komme ich noch. Und Lepra kann natürlich mit TB zusammen genannt werden. In gewisser Weise könnte man behaupten, dass die Lepra- und TB-Granulome grundsätzlich die besten Impfstoffe gegen diese Art von Infektionen sind. Und die chronische Infektion, die einen im Sinne eines TB-Granuloms nicht umbringt, stärkt tatsächlich die so genannten angeborenen Resistenzmechanismen in erheblichem Maße. Es besteht also kein Zweifel, dass die angeborene Resistenz für mehr als 95% der Resistenzreaktionen verantwortlich ist. Ohne das Interferon Alpha ist man beispielsweise schon tot, bevor einen der Virus auch nur angeguckt hat. Interessanterweise hat man festgestellt, dass Hühnereier, alle Vogeleier, voller maternaler Antikörper sind. Das ist interessant. Das Gleiche gilt natürlich für Menschen und Mäuse. Die Mütter übertragen ihre immunologischen Erfahrungen in der Form von Antikörpern auf den Nachwuchs. Interessant ist auch, dass die Autoimmunität, insbesondere die von Autoantikörpern abhängigen Formen, erst nach dem 22. Lebensjahr beginnt und bei Frauen wesentlich häufiger auftritt als bei Männern. Und das ist zumindest ein Hinweis darauf, dass eine starke Antikörperbildung mit hohen Titern einen Preis haben könnte, nämlich den einer Anfälligkeit für Autoimmunkrankheiten. Dann tauchen natürlich auch grundsätzlich ab dem 30. Lebensjahr die Tumoren auf, solide periphere Tumoren. Und das verschiebt all die Probleme, die wir nicht einfach immunologisch lösen können, auf die spätere Phase. Denn was uns tötet, sind Infektionen in der Kindheit. Bis vor ungefähr 300 Jahren lag unsere Lebenserwartung bei ungefähr 25 bis 28 Jahren, bei den Römern waren es 18 Jahre. Das zeigt, dass alles, was uns in einer entwicklungsmäßig bedeutsamen Weise tötet, grundsätzlich vor der Pubertät liegt. Lassen Sie uns nun die Spezifität betrachten. Ein Großteil der Lehrbuch-Immunologie beschäftigt sich mit Haptenen, so genannten kleinen Phenolgruppen wie NP oder DNP, Dinitrophenol-Gruppen. Die sind sehr klein, weil sie grundsätzlich sechs Kohlenstoffatome enthalten. Aber die Interaktion eines neutralisierenden Antikörpers mit der Spitze des Glycoproteins ist natürlich eine wesentlich größere Interaktion. Man vermutet rund 10 bis 15 Aminosäuren. Und deshalb überrascht es nicht, dass die Affinität von hapten-spezifischen Antikörpern in einer Größenordnung von 10^-5 liegt, während sich die Affinität von neutralisierenden Antikörpern in einer Größenordnung von 10^-10 bewegt. Also eine Differenz um fünf Größenordnungen. Und da ein Großteil der Immunologie mit diesen niederaffinen Reaktionsarten zu tun hat, erstaunt es nicht, dass die grundlegende Immunologie sagt, der begrenzende Faktor einer B-Zellen-Reaktion sei die T-Zellen-Hilfe. Aber das stimmt nicht, weil die Frequenz dieser neutralisierenden, Antikörper produzierenden B-Zellen 10^-6 ist, während die Frequenz von hapten-spezifischen B-Zellen bei 10^-2 liegt. Die geringe Frequenz der B-Zelle ist also der begrenzende Faktor für alle biologisch relevanten, schützenden B-Zellen-Reaktionen. Betrachten wir nun einen akuten, zyopathischen, äußerst tödlichen Virus. Ich nehme den vesikulären Stomatitis-Virus, einen tollwutartigen Erreger, der sich in Mäusen wie Tollwut verhält. Er ist neurotrop. Sie sehen hier die Virusvermehrung. Die Antwort ist eine T-Zellen-Reaktion. Und es erfolgt eine sofortige ELISA-Reaktion, die parallel zur neutralisierenden, schützenden Antikörperreaktion abläuft. Für nichtzytopathische Infektionen – etwa Hepatitis B oder HIV – sehen wir die Diskrepanz, dass es eine T-Zellen-Reaktion gibt und es gibt eine ELISA-Reaktion. Aber die neutralisierende Antibiotika-Reaktion benötigt 40 bis 200 Tage. Und das Gleiche gilt für eine Modellinfektion bei Mäusen mit dem Virus der lymphozytären Choriomeningitis. Da hat man den Virus, die T-Zellen-Reaktion, die ELISA-Antikörperreaktion – Sie erinnern sich, mit sehr geringen Aviditäten und Affinitäten. Und die neutralisierende Reaktion braucht 60 bis 300 Tage. Und in diesen langwierigen, sich langsam entwickelnden Antikörperreaktionen geschieht das Folgende: Während sich die Affinität der Antikörper entwickelt und zunimmt, eilt der Virus einfach jeder Antikörperreaktion durch Fluchtmutation voraus. Und das ist einer der Hauptgründe dafür, dass wir keinen Impfstoff haben. Und in gewisser Hinsicht besteht hier ein Zusammenhang zu unserem B-Zellen-Repertoire. Nimmt man ein normales Serum, beispielsweise von einer spezifisch pathogenfreien (SPF) Maus oder einem normalen Menschen, die/der noch nie einem speziellen Virus ausgesetzt war, findet man normalerweise einen hintergrundneutralisierenden Titer von 1/20 oder 1/40. Ist das tatsächlich spezifisch oder ist das einfach so etwas wie ein natürlicher Antikörper? Es ist spezifisch, weil man diesen Titer mit deutlich stereotyp definierten Viren der gleichen Familie kreuzabsorbieren kann. Wenn man einen Virus nimmt, an dem man nicht innerhalb von zehn Tagen, sondern allenfalls innerhalb von 20 Jahren stirbt, so stellt man fest, dass kein messbarer natürlicher oder spontaner Antikörper-Titer zu messen ist. Offensichtlich starten diese Viren bei einem völlig anderen Repertoireverbrauch. Und natürlich hängt es sowohl vom Virus als auch vom Repertoire ab, ob, wo und wie sie starten. Natürliche Antikörper repräsentieren oder reflektieren also das Antikörper-Repertoire und das kann man darstellen. Das hier sind Experimente, die Adrian Ochsenbein im Labor durchgeführt hat. Infiziert man Mäuse ohne Antikörper, mit muMT-Knockouts, mit diesem Tollwuterreger, sterben sie alle bei einer sehr geringen Virusdosis. Verabreicht man allerdings diesen Mäusen gerade einmal einen halben Milliliter eines normalen Mausserums einer antikörperkompetenten Maus, lässt sich das grundlegend korrigieren. Und das hat einen sehr robusten Effekt. Man braucht jetzt 10^8 oder 10^7 virale Partikel, um die Maus zu töten, ein Unterschied also von vier Logstufen. Mit natürlichen Antikörpern kann man also akute Infektionen bekämpfen. Es beginnt bei 1/30 und die Schutzfunktion ist dann 1/900. Im Prinzip erhöht das also den Titer um das 30-fache. Das ist zwar nicht sehr viel, lässt sich aber sehr einfach in einen Replikationszyklus für die B-Zellen von etwa sechs Stunden übersetzen, wenn sie erst einmal initiiert wurden. Natürlich können sich die Viren, die nichtzytopathisch sind, verstecken, wo sie wollen. In Neuronen, beispielsweise bei den Herpesviren, oder in Epithelzellen in der Niere beim Cytomegalie-Virus (CMV). Oder beim lymphozytären Choriomeningitis-Virus (LCMV) in den Epithelzellen der Lunge. Und das gleiche gilt für CMV. Es können also periphere Reservoirs bestehen, die klinisch nicht in Erscheinung treten und die Immunreaktion aufrechterhalten, etwa im Fall des tuberkulösen Granuloms oder der persistenten HIV-Infektion. An diesem Punkt fasse ich zusammen: B-Lymphozyten bilden Antikörper. Es gibt lokales IgA – darüber habe ich noch nicht gesprochen, aber das ist sehr wichtig. Auf der Schleimhaut gibt es ein sehr ursprüngliches, altes IgA-System, das bei diesen muMT-Mäusen aktiv ist. Obwohl sie überhaupt keine Serumantikörper besitzen, haben sie dennoch lokales IgA in der Schleimhaut. Wir müssen das IgM sehr früh neutralisieren oder opsonieren, um eine Ausbreitung auf das Gehirn zu verhindern. Das IgG ist von der T-Zellen-Hilfe abhängig. Ich bin nicht näher darauf eingegangen, aber das ist klar, es ist auf T-Zellen-Hilfe angewiesen. Und das IgG hat eine wesentlich längere Halbwertzeit. IgM bleibt rund zwölf Stunden im Blut. Das IgG hat eine Halbwertzeit von 20 Tagen. Und nur das IgG kann über den Fc-Rezeptor an den Nachwuchs weitergegeben werden. Ich kann das hier nicht vertiefen. Und, was äußerst interessant ist: Es gibt fast keine negative Selektion bezüglich von Antikörpern. Aber das ist ein anderes Thema. T-Zellen steuern und eliminieren intrazelluläre Parasiten aller Art, insbesondere und besonders wichtig in festen Organen. Aber will man eine ausreichend aktive T-Zellen-Reaktion erreichen, die alle Viren aus Lunge oder Niere entfernt, müsste man die Immunreaktion so enorm anheizen, dass einem aufgrund des Interleukin-Ansturms wahrscheinlich die Finger abfallen würden. Diese Abläufe sind also perfekt ausbalanciert. Wenn wir sie überstrapazieren, bezahlen wir offensichtlich einen Preis dafür. Die T-Zellen sind wichtig für das langlebige IgG, aber T-Zellen verursachen auch Immunpathologie. Nun, warum immunologisches Gedächtnis? Ist es für den Schutz zuständig? Überlebt man die erste Infektion, ist kein Gedächtnis erforderlich, weil das System seine Effizienz bewiesen hat. Stirbt man, braucht man das immunologische Gedächtnis natürlich auch nicht mehr. Und genau das ist der Ausgangspunkt für die Erörterung dieses Themas. Wissen Sie, in Lehrbüchern wird ‚Gedächtnis’ als schneller und besser definiert. Also der Start, dann erneut dasselbe Antigen: Das verläuft steiler, schneller und hat einen höheren Titer. Immunität, wie wir sie definieren, ist ein ‚Schutz gegen’. Und wir haben positive, sehr wirksame Impfstoffe und wir haben solche Impfstoffe nicht. Wie ist das erklärbar? Betrachten wir einmal ein einfaches Experiment. Hans-Peter Raué hat das für seine Dissertation im Labor durchgeführt. Man impft Mäuse mit diesem tollwutartigen Erreger. Und dann nimmt man die so genannten T+B-Gedächtniszellen und überträgt sie adoptiv auf einen bisher unbehandelten Empfänger. Und dann kontrolliert man diesen Empfänger, entweder einige Tage später oder nach zwei Monaten. Sie sterben alle. Was auch immer T-Gedächtniszellen und B-Gedächtniszellen bedeuten, sie können ihre Aufgabe nicht erfüllen. Wenn man allerdings das Blut dieser geimpften Maus drei Monate nach der Impfung nimmt und adoptiv auf einen Empfänger überträgt, überleben sie alle. Das ist ein Experiment, das wir alle bei der Geburt überlebt haben, weil wir das Immun-IgG von unserer Mutter erhalten haben. Und das schützt uns in unserem ersten oder in unseren ersten beiden Lebensjahren grundsätzlich vor allen epidemiologisch relevanten Infektionen. Diese Mechanismen sind wirklich ziemlich faszinierend und zeigen die interessante Koevolution von Menschen und Mäusen. Man hat Fc-Rezeptoren auf der hämochorialen Seite der Plazenta. Auf der fötalen Seite gibt es Fc-Rezeptoren und die nehmen das IgG von der Mutter auf. Bei Kälbern und allen Wiederkäuern ist die Situation etwas komplizierter, aber genauso gut zu verdeutlichen: Die Plazenta bildet eine Doppelmembrantrennung zwischen Fötus und Mutter. Es gibt keine Doppelmembran-Transportsysteme für Proteine. Und deshalb haben sie Fc-Rezeptoren auf ihren Darmepithelzellen ausgebildet. Und diese Fc-Rezeptoren werden in den ersten 24 Stunden nach der Geburt exprimiert. Danach erfolgt die Zellerneuerung so, dass die erneuerten Zellen keinen Fc-Gammarezeptor exprimieren. Darum ist es so wichtig, diesem Nachwuchs Kolostralmilch zu geben, weil sie aus der Kolostralmilch das absorbieren, was für Nestlé im Wesentlichen ein Traum bleibt, nämlich eine hohe Konzentration von Immunglobulinen sowohl des Typs IgG als auch des Typs IgA. Und die wird dann von den Darmepithelzellen-Fc absorbiert. Und dadurch wird das fetale Kälberserum angereichert. Das ist der Grund dafür, dass wir fetales Kälberserum in Gewebekulturen verwenden. Denn fetales Kälberserum hat kein Immunglobulin, weil das nicht von der Mutter auf den Nachwuchs übertragen werden kann. Und die Immunkompetenz und die Antikörperproduktion eines Kälberfötus sind gleich null. Der Schutz erfolgt also über neutralisierende Antikörper. Wenn der Erreger aber variabel ist und mutiert, hat man ein Problem. Die Erhöhung der B-Gedächtniszell-Frequenz ist antigenabhängig und antigengesteuert. Aber diese Frequenzen fallen normalerweise zurück und landen schließlich bei vier oder acht Mal so hoch wie in der ungeprimten Situation. Aber die Differenzierung einer so genannten B-Gedächtniszelle zu einer antikörper-produzierenden B-Zelle nimmt erneut drei bis vier Tage in Anspruch. Also selbst bei Vorhandensein von B-Gedächtniszellen ist eine antigenabhängige Restimulierung erforderlich. Und nur das Antigen treibt den Reifungsprozess einer antikörper-produzierenden Zelle voran. Und diese Reexposition oder antigen-gesteuerte oder antigen-abhängige neutralisierende Antikörper-Titer können von innen kommen. Das ist bei persistierenden Viren der Fall. Und Masern werden hier auch genannt, weil sich Masern nicht aus immunen Masernüberlebenden isolieren lassen. Aber Sie kennen vielleicht die subakute sklerosierende Panenzephalitis (SSPE), eine das zentrale Nervensystem betreffende Komplikation der Wildtypmaserninfektion. Wenn man diese Läsionen untersucht, findet man immer lahm gelegte Masernviren. Normalerweise ist das Matrixprotein mutiert. Und deshalb ist SSP der klinische Fall, aber auf der ganzen Linie hinunter bis zu den nichtklinischen Symptomen findet man abnehmende Mengen dieses lahm gelegten, irgendwie persistenten Impfstoffes. Das kann also ein bis vier Jahre lang über Antigen-Antikörper-Komplexe auf follikulären dendritischen Zellen von innen kommen. Und dann sind natürlich auch aus dem externen Portfolio die gesamten durchfallerregenden Viren klassische Beispiele dafür. Und nun zur schwangeren Mutter. Gehen wir einmal davon aus, sie ist genetisch AB, der Vater ist CD. Der Embryo ist AC und die Mutter könnte auf das C reagieren, was aber in Wirklichkeit nicht der Fall ist, weil es keine HLA-Exposition auf der Oberfläche des Fötus gibt. Die Mutter muss die Virus-X-Infektionen überlebt haben, weil sie ansonsten nicht hätte schwanger werden können. Ansonsten würde eine solche Infektion nämlich sie und natürlich den Fötus töten. Deshalb hat sie Anti-X-Antikörper. Nach der Geburt hat der Nachwuchs Anti-X-Antikörper und wird sofort der epidemiologisch aktiven Infektion X ausgesetzt. Und das führt schließlich zu einer aktiven Immunisierung, weil die mütterlichen Antikörper aufgrund der Halbwertzeit von 20 Tagen langsam zurückgehen. Und irgendwann ist die Infektion stark gedämpft, aber noch aktiv und eine aktive Immunisierung gegeben. Wenn sich diese Exposition aber um mehr als zwei oder drei Jahre verzögert, ist die erste Exposition natürlich eine Katastrophe, weil der mütterlich erworbene Antikörper verschwunden ist. Dies hat die in den frühen 50er-Jahren aufgetretene Polioepidemie sehr gut verdeutlicht. Wir haben das formal getestet und konnten tatsächlich nachweisen, dass bei einer Übertragung von mütterlichen Antikörpern eine periodische Exposition gegenüber dieser Infektion erforderlich ist, um die erworbene oder aktive Immunisierung tatsächlich aufzubauen. Wenn das nicht geschieht, stirbt man an der Infektion. Ich kann also hier zusammenfassen: Das Gedächtnis ist ein nettes Konzept. Dazu kann man im Journal of Experimental Medicine wunderbare Artikel veröffentlichen. Das ist früher und höher, jeder kann das wiederholen. Aber es erklärt nicht den Schutz durch Impfstoffe oder infektiöse Erreger. Der ist immer antigen-abhängig. Um den Schutz aufrecht zu erhalten, braucht man eine erneute Exposition von innen, von außen, von Antikörper-Antigen-Komplexen. Ich habe über das Problem der T-Zell-Immunität und die Immunpathologie bei Krankheiten wie HIV und Hepatitis B berichtet. Es gibt auch die Immunpathologie bei TB. Und deshalb ist das Granulom ein so erfolgreiches Isolierungsverfahren, das die Infektion in einer chronischen Infektion isoliert. Und es ist diese Granulomkonfiguration, die das Antigen in Schach hält, ohne eine offene oder destruktive TB zu verursachen. Allerdings funktioniert diese Kontrolle nicht mehr, wenn die T-Zelle und die schützende Immunität, sei es durch HIV oder ähnliches, dahinschwindet. Ich möchte einige allgemeine Schlussfolgerungen ziehen. Dem jüngeren Teil des Publikums hier geht es darum, Forschung zu betreiben, um herauszufinden, wie die Dinge funktionieren. Und das ist, glaube ich, genauso wichtig und vergnüglich wie Sport und Kunst. Harte Arbeit, ein angenehmes Umfeld und gute Unterstützung und insbesondere Glück sind die beste Grundlage. Ein offener, kritischer Wettbewerb trägt natürlich ebenfalls dazu bei, weil die beste Kritik immer die von uns selbst ist. Denn, wenn wir unsere eigenen Wünsche negieren oder widerlegen können, sind wir wohl vor den üblen Kritikern sicher. Überzeugungen allein helfen natürlich auch nicht. Ich hatte viele gute Ideen, aber Ideen sind billig. Man muss daran arbeiten, sie zu falsifizieren. Und wir sollten nie falsche Versprechen abgeben. Vor 25 Jahren wurde ein HIV-Impfstoff innerhalb von zwei oder drei Jahren versprochen. Es gibt ihn bis heute nicht. Ich hoffe, ich konnte Ihnen aufzeigen, warum das so ist. Das Virus ist variabel, muss weiter existieren, um die antigen-gesteuerte, schützende Aktivierung der T-Zell-Reaktion aufrechtzuerhalten. Und natürlich können wir das bisher nicht nachmachen. Ich sage aber nicht, dass das unmöglich ist. Bei TB ist das offensichtlich erfolgreich gelungen. Sie besteht weiter, erhält die Immunantwort aufrecht, tötet uns aber nicht. Erst nach 60, aber wir sagten ja, 22 Jahre sind genug. Und für HIV gilt grundsätzlich das Gleiche. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit. Applaus.

Rolf Zinkernagel on the role of B and T cells
(00:18:26 - 00:20:26)

 

Setting two stages for effecting T cells

Antibodies detect and catch antigens that exactly fit their form. T cells can recognise antigens only if the host cell has processed these antigens into peptide fragments and presents them on its surface. The structures that display these antigen fragments are called MHC receptors. MHC stands for major histocompatibility complex. Each cell of our body displays MHC receptors. They resemble molecular identity cards of our body’s own tissue and are involved in the rejection of foreign tissue. Originally, they were discovered in transplantation research, where they became known as human leukocyte-associated (HLA) proteins. Jean Dausset was able to show that these HLA proteins are encoded by a single genetic complex system on one single chromosome. Four years after he had been awarded a Nobel Prize for this achievement, he lectured in Lindau.

 

Jean Dausset on HLA proteins
(00:02:52 - 00:04:38)

 

The insight that MHC receptors are not only involved in the rejection of foreign graft but also play a decisive role in the normal immune response of our body was gained by Peter Doherty and Rolf Zinkernagel in 1974. They conducted experiments with mice to study how the animals defended themselves against a viral infection. As expected, they observed that the mice developed cytotoxic T cells, which could kill virus-infected cells of these mice in a test tube. Unexpectedly, however, these T cells were not able to kill infected cells from another strain of mice. Apparently, the viral antigen alone could not provoke an effective T cell response. Additionally, the host organism’s proper MHC receptor had to be in place. Only if a viral antigen is presented by a MHC receptor, the infected cell will be recognised by a T cell.

During its development, each lymphocyte, both of B and T origin, is trained to recognise and respond to one specific antigen only. After being released from its “training camp” in the bone marrow or the thymus, each lymphocyte is continuously circulating in the blood and lymph stream until it encounters its specific antigen (or is replaced by its successor). Upon binding this antigen for the first time, it proliferates and produces a huge number of cells with the same specificity – the process of clonal expansion takes place, just as Burnet had hypothesised. At the same time, the cells of that clone differentiate into effector cells and memory cells. The latter are our body’s reservoir for a stronger and faster secondary immune response upon re-infection months or years later. The former move into the ongoing battle. How effectively they fight was shown by Peter Doherty in his lecture in Lindau in 2015, in which he also referred to the discovery of MHC restriction.

 

Peter C. Doherty (2015) - The Killer Defence

Thank you. This is a very diverse audience, and my subject, immunology, is a very messy and complicated subject, half of which is usually wrong. I'm going to give you some personal reminiscences, some science, and some other stuff. I started in life as a ... I trained in veterinary science. I trained to be a veterinarian. I was going to save the world by producing more food by doing research. Of course, if I was doing that now, and I realize that cow's bells chime in there all the time, I probably would have become a plant scientist rather than an animal scientist. I did research on diseases of domestic animals for about the first ten years of my career. Worked on sheep, and cattle, and pigs, and chickens and became one of the world's leading sheep neuropathologists - a very small field, but still I was a neuropathologist. Then, I was supposed to go and work ... I was working in Scotland. I was supposed to go and work for the big government research organization in Australia, the CSRO, and took a bit of time out to learn a bit of immunology. Made a big discovery, never got back to the veterinary world, and became an MD, a mouse doctor. That's been my career, and now I'm mostly at the University of Melbourne but I also work at Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, which is a wonderful paediatric cancer place. If you're at all interested in that, they've got lots of money for post-docs and it's really ... You might think Memphis is a pretty weird place to work, but it's really actually quite nice because it's very nice socially for the post-docs. I work with two teams of bright young people in Memphis and in Melbourne. They allow me to get money for them, to help rewrite their papers in English and, occasionally, to talk about their work - though I may get it wrong. I think the time that you're most likely to make a real discovery is the time when you're very close to the data. And it's often only in those rather junior academic years that you're very, very close to the data. Of course, some of us as senior scientists side stay very close to the lab, and so we still have that opportunity, though most get off into more managerial roles and all the rest of it. It's a great privilege to work with smart young people. The killer defence. The immune system is all about protecting us from pathogens. That's why it's evolved. We're large, complex, multi-organ, multi-cellular systems. We replicate very slowly, and the various pathogens that want to live in and on us, the bacteria, the viruses, the protozoa, replicate very quickly. They can change very quickly, and we have to have a very complex immune defence mechanism to get rid of them and to control them. There's nothing predictable about it, because anything can be thrown at it. New things come at us all the time, and that's one of the things we encounter constantly, is that there's always a potential for new, major infections coming out of wildlife, in particular. Also out of domestic animal species, but the new ones tend to come out of wildlife. And with all environments being under increasing pressure, especially in countries like Africa, with forest clearance, increasing population numbers, we're seeing constant emergence of pathogens from nature that we hadn't seen before. And that's been going on and it will continue to go on. Years ago people were saying the year of infectious disease was over. That was before HIV/AIDS, before antibiotic resistance and all the rest of it, and we're constantly challenged. There are those totally new infections, but our biggest known pandemic threat is always influenza. And the reason for that is that the influenza A viruses change very quickly. They change by mutation of the surface glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin, and the neuraminidase, which are selected by antibody-mediated pressures, and all lab vaccines are basically antibody-directed. They bind to those surface proteins, the purple one and the peaky ones on that little diagram. And so that changes all the time. Influenza has a genome with eight different segments, and if a cell gets infected, say with an influenza virus from humans and an influenza virus from a bird, and they're basically diseases of aquatic birds, they're maintained in nature in aquatic birds, then you can get a totally new influenza virus out. And that can cause a pandemic. We get regular pandemics, the worst being the 1918-19 pandemic, where we think 50 million people died. It had a dramatic effect, helped bring the First World War to an end, probably led to a really lousy settlement of the Treaty of Versailles, and probably led to the Second World War as well. So flu causes everything. The reason flu is so dangerous is because when we get infected ... It's very infectious. When we get infected we don't necessarily feel ill, and we get on an aeroplane, and we cough and sneeze and we spread the virus. You're not at particular risk from the air handling system on the plane. The flu doesn't go through the whole plane, but if you're in two or three rows from someone with influenza, then you're at increased risk on the plane. And if you're on an aisle seat you're at increased risk on the plane. Make of that what you will. Flu flies from city to city and people, and when people land, they go out, they spread the flu. We are the vectors of influenza, whereas mosquitoes are the vectors of the Chikungunya virus, which is a virus that's currently spreading all over the place, and we don't know why, and so on. Then, of course, we now know there are a whole lot of viruses carried by fruit bats. We didn't know that. If you had asked any of us back in the year 2000 how many viruses are carried by bats, we'd say rabies virus, vampire bats, South America, occasional lyssaviruses in fruit bats and insectivorous bats. An occasional case in England, we've had some in Australia. That's the same group of viruses. Now we know there's a whole spectrum of viruses carried by fruit bats. The first that emerged was the coronavirus. SARS in Southeast Asia. It caused a major epidemic, also spread to Toronto, so I suppose it can be called a pandemic. It comes out of fruit bats into a little animal called the Himalayan civet cats, and then gets into humans. If you saw the movie Contagion, which is about this type of virus, Gwyneth Paltrow catches it in Hong Kong. She shakes hands with a chef who has dressed a pig that's been infected by a fruit bat. Gwyneth gets kind of sick but she's not so sick that she doesn't have a bit of a liaison on the way back to America, and anyone who comes near this woman gets infected and dies horribly, and gives an enormous pandemic. Gwyneth has the top of her head taken off after she's dead. It's not real, it's a plastic one, a plastic Gwyneth. It's really quite a good movie. It didn't do well at the box office, it's too realistic. Now, of course, we have the Middle Eastern respiratory virus. Again, the same thing we think. Coming from fruit bats, they multiplied up in camels, and then going into humans, but also gong human-to-human. And of course now we've got an outbreak in Korea, an outbreak in Thailand, and it is getting around. It should be something we can handle reasonably easily because we understand the pathogenesis of it, how it works. We understand that people are infectious very late, which we didn't understand early on with SARS. Then, in Southeast Asia we've got henipaviruses, nipah virus in Thailand and Bangladesh. These are viruses that go from fruit bats to fruit, because fruit bats eat fruit. But then if that fruit is eaten by a pig, the partial remainder of the fruit is eaten by a pig, then they get infected and they can infect us. Also, if humans eat the sap that comes out of some of these trees where they cut it for sap and get sweet sap, the fruit bats feed on it. If we feed on it we can catch it directly, and the nipah virus can spread. Then, of course, the most famous bat-borne viruses that we've known about for a long time but didn't realize were carried by bats, are Marburg and Ebola. Of course, we also let the Ebola outbreak we had recently, a truly horrific outbreak, and basically because ... We should have been ready for it. We've always handled Ebola before, there have been regular outbreaks, simply by getting a lot of people in there quickly, practicing barrier nursing, and the local population understood what needed to be done. But then it got into West Africa, where people didn't know the disease. The international agencies didn't react quickly enough, WHO and so forth, CDC didn't get there quickly enough, and we had a really bad outbreak, which isn't totally over. We had an Ebola vaccine that was ready to go ten years ago. We had antivirals that were ready to go. But there's a real problem in that these, which were developed through the basic science mechanisms in places like NIH, they have no way of taking it back and saying, good for human use. That has to be taken up by a commercial company. Can't expect a commercial company to take up something for which there's no real market. So we've got a problem there, and we should be able to think about it. And we should be able to do this better by providing resources to develop vaccines and antivirals against potential threats, to the stage where they're ready to go into production and they're ready to be used. We should be doing that, but in these international agreements and international will, and we forget very quickly. We also need to keep our public health systems very good, and in these times of cost-cutting and so forth, that's a real issue. Now, immunity itself. Immunity, an extremely complex defence system. You've heard about part of it from Bruce Beutler and Jules Hoffmann. I'm not going to repeat any of that because they've discoursed on it so magnificently. The word immunity itself comes from the Latin, which comes from immunis, which means, "without tax". And it refers to the fact that soldiers who came back from the Rome wars were for a time exempt from tax. They're called the "Genio Immunium," just like rich Republicans in the United States, they pay no tax. They're there to prevent or to block the tax of infection, and of course the tax of infection can be death, and that's where we get "immunity". Immunology, I've been working in immunology now for forty-plus years. We've used immunology firstly to try and better understand the immune response to viruses, to develop better protective mechanisms, and to understand the pathology. Because the reason a virus kills is not just the effect of the virus, it's what happens in the tissue. Tissue damage, tissue repair, particularly in a very gentle and sensitive organ like the lung, the tissue repair process can be lethal. We don't necessarily know where to intervene in some of these mechanisms to get better clinical outcomes. But we're pulling it apart very quickly with work on the inflammazone, with knockout mice and all these sort of things. That pathogenesis, pathology thing, is to me enormously satisfying. We're actually starting to understand that now, that we haven't understood it for years. All specific immunity, and in fact pretty much all immunity ... well, not totally. All adaptive or specific immunity, which is the antibody response or T-cell response, is a property of white blood cells and their secreted products, that it's only there by white blood cells. The other thing that we've done over the years, is not to study the immune system itself, but use the immune response to viruses to actually study some of the basic biology of the system. And these are questions that are prominent in basic biology itself. Homeostasis, cell numbers, population size. The immune system, when you thing about it, we have two great systems for sensing the external environment. We have the brain, which obviously is in the skull and is a pretty stable organ, and we have the immune system, which is all over the body. We've got cells that are migrating everywhere. They increase in numbers, they increase in size, they invade into tissues. It's a totally fluid and dynamic system. And it also senses the external environment, not of the conscious level, of course, of the subconscious. They're the two systems we use to handle in a specific way, a very specific way, to handle new challenges and new stimuli. The other thing about the immune system, the T-cell system at least that I studied, I'll show you very, very briefly. It's great to study in differentiation, because we can get lineages of the cells with the same receptor that we can trace through from what we call the naïve state, before they've encountered any pathogen, where there are very, very low numbers, but they're there. To the effective state, where they're all armed, and angry, and ready to bump off any infected cell, and so forth. To the memory state, where they're ready to be recalled for protection more rapidly, which is of course the basis of memory. We can study those differentiation systems, we can study them in vitro. Of course, the perception of something external that's damaging in the immune system in the brain is a bit different. When you learn ... memory in the brain of course is a matter of connecting pathways. Memory in the immune system is a matter of cell division, increasing cell numbers, and also of differentiation and epigenetic change and all the rest of it. Now, if every time you had a thought you increased the numbers in your brain, you'd get terrible headaches, because the brain is so restricted by the skull. Just a little bit ... I'm kind of fascinated by history, and ... The red blood cells were actually seen by Leeuwenhoek way back when he first made those little microscopes. But it was another 140 years before we saw the white blood cells discovered, and that was because of better microscopes. It was a pathologist who discovered them, a couple of pathologists who discovered them. Not pathologists, the surgeons who discovered them. In 1840, surgeons, all they could do was cut legs off very quickly, and drain pus from abscesses and things. So they had to do something with their time in the meantime, when everyone's running all over, going around. And he actually described the colourless corpuscles. The white blood cells, which are rather infrequent, which is why Leeuwenhoek didn't describe them, though it does seem ... I've just gone back and read his paper in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, the world's oldest journal in the English language, now available online. And it does seem that he actually did see the white blood cell but he didn't recognize it for what it was. They were called "colourless corpuscles" because there were no stains. And they could see these colourless corpuscles or globules, they called them, at very low frequency, in the blood and in the pus, and so the ones in the pus have come from the blood, which is absolutely correct. They could also see inside the colourless corpuscles other corpuscles or globules. That was the cell nucleus. Nobody had realized what the cell nucleus was. Then, a little bit later, with the German aniline dye industry developing dyes and Rudolph Virchow, the great pathologist, and Paul Ehrlich, the immunologist, they started to stain cells. And then we started to see all these cells and started to understand the immune system. Macrophages, basophils, all these spectacular-looking cells. The actual white blood cells that are important to us, the lymphocyte, are the least interesting to a morphologist because they're tiny. They just have a nucleus, therefore almost no cytoplasm, and the lymphocytes weren't worked out until the 19... We didn't start to work them out till the 1960s with the work of Jim Gowans and then Jacques Miller identifying the T-cell, Henry Claman and Bruce Glick identifying the B-cell and B-lymphocyte. Or Max Cooper and the T-helper cell and the killer T-cell and all the rest of it. This is the basis of immunity. We start with a very few naïve precursor cells with a specific receptor, they multiply under the stimulus of the infection. We get cell division, we get differentiation, we get the effector cells which clear out the infection. All of those cells die off and then we get it in memory, which goes on for ages. For the life of a laboratory mouse or for up to fifty years in humans. That all goes in those lymph nodes in our neck, which swell up when we get sick. We're very interested in making better vaccines. We don't have a vaccine against HIV. Influenza, we'd like not to have to make a new vaccine every time an infection came along. We despaired of making a vaccine against hep-C, but now we've got a very good therapeutic and we can clear it with a drug. Of course, if you can handle a persistent infection with a small molecule, that's really fantastic. We handle HIV, of course, with drugs but because the thing hides back in the genome, you've got to keep giving the drug, and you've got to give triple therapy. It's really problematic from the cost point of view, especially in developing countries, though it's a tremendous advance. The CD8+ "killer" T-cell that I study is the kind of legionnaire of the immune system. It's the guy that comes up to the cell that's infected with a virus, because viruses only grow within cells, and they have to be bumped off in short range. So it comes up to it and bumps it off. It's a legionnaire. The legionnaire carried a very short, stabbing sword, and they had big shields. They'd come up close and they'd go like that. The dog is an immunological joke because there's nothing funny about it. There's nothing funny about jokes told by immunologists. Here's the killer cell. The green cell is going to kill that big cell, and when it does it also kills the virus inside it. You can see it permeablises the cell membrane in this red dye in the fluid, and that's kind of dead. That's what these T-cells do. These CD8 or "killer" T-cells, they invade the tissues, they go where viruses are growing, bump off the cells, cure the infection. They're highly specific. They don't actually kill, they actually turn on the cell's death path way in the cell. They cause apoptosis, so they're actually inducers of suicide cells rather than killer cells. And their recognition is very specific. And it goes through the fact that a small piece of the bar as a peptide is bound into the cleft of our transplantation molecules, the ones that are recognized in graft rejection. And that's carried to the cell surface and these cells recognize that. I don't have time to go into all that detail, but that's the way it works. We made a very superficial discovery way back in the 1970s. We made this discovery before there was any recombinant DNA technology, so you couldn't sequence small amounts of protein from cell surface. You could sequence bucket-loads of, like, myoglobin or something. We made it before molecular antibodies, before PCR, and it was a pretty primitive time. We made some good guesses, and we drew this hokey diagram that's on the far side there of the circles and things. And we wrote two 2-page letters in The Lancet, and a 5-page theoretical article in ... two 2-page letters in Nature, a 5-page letter in The Lancet in 1974-75. And we got the Nobel Prize years later after many, many people had worked on it and we got all the credit. That was a very good resolution. And that's me with my colleague Zinkernagel. That's after the Nobel Prize in 1996. We waited 23 years for the Nobel Prize, a fairly normal time to wait for a Nobel Prize. That photograph illustrates which surface ... much later. This was an honorary degree ceremony. It illustrates two things for you, and that is, one, that if all men aren't fools they can be made to look like them. And the other thing is men have absolutely no idea what to do with flowers. We're both standing there, there was no hand-off. There's usually a hand-off. You go to Asia, you give a lecture, they give you flowers, there's a nice lady, you hand them to her. But there was no handoff and we're stuck with them. We'd like to throw them away, but instead we're standing with them in front of our crotch. I don't know what actual thing was. The fact that we could do this work very quickly and we got a real resolution, was a consequence of the fact that we had just been able to tap into mouse transplantation and genetics. And that was thirty years of work particularly started by George Snell, who shared the 1980 Nobel Prize for transplantation, and there's a whole history there. I make that point, we would have gotten nowhere without having those mouse strains available, mutant in the H2 system compatibility area, and in recombinance in the transplantation area. Another point from it is, Zinkernagel and I did this work together as very junior people, and we were complementary. Rolf did the in vitro cytotoxicity experiments, I did the mouse stuff because I was a vet, and I also wrote the papers. If I had done the in vitro experiments and Rolf had written the papers, we would have remained totally unknown and completely obscure. Of course, with regards to George Snell and his colleagues, we reflect Isaac Newton's statement, That was in a letter to Robert Hooke. Actually, he was having a go at Hooke, he hated him. Hooke was very short, that's why he was saying "giants." And not only that. Towards the end of his life, when Newton was president of the Royal Society, he outlived Hooke and he had the one portrait of Hooke destroyed. That's real malevolence. Not all senior scientists are totally nice, so be careful of some of these Nobel Prize winners. They seem nice, but you're never quite sure. That's a recreation of what Hooke looked like. Nobody knows what the guy looked like. Not a problem there. We all get painted after you win the Nobel Prize. If you don't win all the Nobel Prize you don't get all the prizes usually after the Nobel Prize, unless you're incredibly smart, which some of these people are. I'm not, but you do get painted. The other thing is, you get things named after you. This is a street in my hometown, they've named the street in my honour, and the building in the background is Boggo Road Jail. Now, the killer T-cell response is very interesting, because a lot of the peptides that it recognizes come from internal proteins, and those proteins are shared between a lot of viruses. So it can get cross-protection. I'm running out of time, so I'm not going to be able to tell you what most of my slides are about because I talk too much. But we can make these tetrameric complexes of MHC like a protein, and peptide, and we can use them to quantitate the T-cell response, which we can only do from about 1997. And we can also use them to sort T-cells and actually look at their molecular profiles by using RTPCR, seeing what message is expressed in them. And even if we don't have an antibody to sign the cells of its protein, we can do single-cell PCR straight out of a mouse or straight out of a human. We've got an enormous amount of information very quickly. We've been able to study clonal lineages, clonal expansion, and recall responses. We've been able to study how clonal lineages survive by tracking through the T-cell receptors in these responses. We've developed that technology. We've been able to look at when the various effective molecules that did the killing are turned on. That's totally tied to cell division. Every time the cells divide they turn on more of these effective molecules. They turn most of them off actually afterwards, and we've been able to work all those things through. Now we're studying the actual epigenetic signatures that define these different cell lineages. The kind of question then in an intellectual sense is, what are these cells and what characterizes them, and can we really tell them apart and are there subdivisions of them? And that we're rapidly working through. The other important question, of course, is, can we optimize T-cell memory so that it would be very good for recall responses, because there is a capacity for cross-reactive responses between, say, different flu viruses. They can share the same internal proteins, though they may have totally different cell surface proteins, and so we can get some cross-protection. And here exactly is ... we can show that in a mouse, and we've shown it for years. Here is an experiment with the H7N9 influenza outbreak we've had recently in China, where an H7N9 chicken virus, which is an infection that's completely inapparent in birds, which is really dangerous, can kill humans. Particularly it kills older people, particularly it kills older men. Because when they retire the women send them out to buy the live chickens from the chicken market to get them out of the apartment, and they get infected and die. What we've seen, and the wonderful collaboration that Katherine Conzias, my colleague, has had with a group in Shanghai, is that the people who turn on the CD8-T-cells most quickly, that is the red cells in that diagram, they're the ones who survive. These are all people who were admitted to the hospital and they were quite sick, but if they turn on that response quickly they survive. If they don't turn it on fast, it takes longer to emerge, then you see other components in the immune system coming up. And that's a theme across immunity. If one part of it doesn't handle it, then other parts will get emphasized. The most would be, everything turns on very strongly and the people that die, they're just lacking the whole thing so that it doesn't work. We think there may be some possibility for some cross-reactive immunity, and possibly some sort of vaccination strategy that's working around that in combination with other effectors, other mechanisms. There's a lot of interest on that. That's about where we are. Much of what we're finding with the "killer" T-cells and the virus infections is probably applicable to some forms of cancer. Renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, we've long known, are under a degree of immune control, and of course, if you follow the recent experiments with anti-PD-1, anti-CLT-4, releasing those cells from apparent suppression of some sort, allows them to work. We're getting for the first time over the last few years real progress in the cancer immunotherapy area, which is really fantastic. As for me, I am still involved with the science, I still talk to the scientists. I've stopped running a lab, I'm now 75, and I've stepped back from that but I'm still involved in the research programme. I've been writing books. I think Steve Chu showed a baby picture. The one on the tricycle is me at age three. I've never looked better in my whole life. It was just downhill from then, and I've written other books, which increasingly I'm like many people at this meeting. I'm extremely perturbed about the situation with climate change, and I've been reading into that. I've been writing books about it, writing from an outsider point of view, but I'm not insider. Largely I can read the biology papers, but I can't really handle the mathematical modelling. And the latest book is a bit on writing about medical science from an insider perspective and about climate science from an outsider perspective. And try to talk to people about, "Hey, you can look at these sorts of issues," and that's going to be out later this year. I would like to say to you that I think science communication is enormously important. Not in the sense of telling people stuff. People are sick of being told stuff. There's too much stuff that comes top-down, and that's a bit of a problem with books. But you young guys that use social media, and YouTube, and you're generating great video material and all the rest of it, start a conversation out there if you can. Get things going as a sort of discourse, and put great video material up on YouTube. And just use that medium to try to have some connection, also try to connect with school kids. The other thing is, in Australia we just started this thing called theconversation.com. Take a look at The Conversation. You can sign up for it, get it free to your mailbox. It's in the UK, it's in the USA, Australia, and in Africa. You just go to theconversation.com, you put in your email address, it will deliver the content every day, like an online newspaper, to your blog. What it is, it's a thousand-word articles written by people who have an academic affiliation. You can sign up and write for it. You have to declare a conflict of interest. You can write really good stuff about what you know about, the things of general interest. It will then go through a professional newsroom, and they'll go backwards and forwards with you on that line. It's a very sophisticated platform. They'll add some nice illustrations, and your article that you publish in this can be picked up by any newspaper that wants to republish it. It's all free. They can pick it up for free, and a lot of it gets republished. And you can get metrics on how many times it's been republished, how many references have been to it, and all the rest of it. It's really good. You don't have to be in one of those countries to sign up. All you have to do is be affiliated with an academic institution. You can sign up for it anyway. And it's a way to start honing your skills in science communication with the broader community, and starting conversations, because there are responses and all the rest of it, with a broader spectrum of people. And getting also a view of how the general public is receiving and reacting to science. I'll leave you with that. Thank you very much.

Vielen Dank. Ich habe hier ein sehr vielfältiges Publikum vor mir, und mein Thema Immunologie ist ein sehr chaotisches, kompliziertes Thema, und die Hälfte davon ist für gewöhnlich falsch. Ich erzähle Ihnen zunächst etwas über persönlich Erfahrungen, etwas über Wissenschaft, und ein paar andere Dinge. Ich begann mit einer Ausbildung in der Tiermedizin. Ich studierte, um als Tierarzt zu arbeiten. Ich wollte die Welt retten, indem ich mehr Lebensmittel herstellte, indem ich wissenschaftlich tätig wurde. Natürlich, wenn ich das jetzt tun würde, und ich realisieren würde, dass Kuhmilchglocken die ganze Zeit bimmeln, dann wäre ich wohl eher in die Pflanzenkunde als die Tierkunde gegangen. Die ersten zehn Jahre meiner Karriere untersuchte ich Erkrankungen an Haustieren. Arbeitete mit Schafen, Rindern und Schweinen und Hühnern und wurde zu einem der weltweit führenden Schaf-Neuropathologen, ein sehr kleines Gebiet, aber immerhin, ich war ein Neuropathologe. Danach sollte ich für, ich arbeitete in Schottland zu dem Zeitpunkt, sollte ich für die große Regierungsforschungsorganisation in Australien, CSRO, arbeiten und ich nahm mir eine Auszeit, um mehr über Immunologie zu lernen. Ich machte eine große Entdeckung, und kehrte nie wieder in die Tiermedizin zurück, sondern wurde ein MD, ein Mausdoktor. Soweit zu meiner Karriere, und jetzt arbeite ich die meiste Zeit an der Universität Melbourne, aber ich arbeite auch am Saint Jude Kinderforschungskrankenhaus in Memphis, bei dem es sich um eine hervorragende Kinderkrebsklinik handelt. Falls Sie sich für dieses Gebiet interessieren, sie haben jede Menge Ressourcen für Post-Doktoranden und es ist wirklich - Sie denken vielleicht, dass Memphis ein ziemlich seltsamer Ort zum arbeiten ist - aber es ist wirklich ein guter Ort zum arbeiten, weil Post-Docs hier ein gutes gesellschaftliches Leben haben. Ich arbeite mit zwei Teams von jungen, schlauen Leuten in Memphis und in Melbourne. Sie erlauben es mir, Geldmittel für sie aufzutreiben, ihre Arbeiten auf Englisch zu prüfen, und ab und zu über ihre Arbeit zu sprechen, auch wenn ich es manchmal nicht ganz verstehe. Ich denke, die Zeit, in der man am wahrscheinlichsten eine wirkliche Entdeckung macht, ist die Zeit, wenn man sehr nah an den Daten ist. Und oft ist man nur in diesen Juniorhochschuljahren sehr, sehr nah an den Daten. Natürlich, einige von uns auf der erfahreneren Seite, halten engen Kontakt mit dem Laboratorium, sodass wir immer noch diese Möglichkeit haben, obwohl viele von uns sich eher in Führungspositionen und dergleichen begeben. Es ist ein großes Privileg mit intelligenten jungen Menschen zu arbeiten. Eine perfekte Verteidigung. Beim Immunsystem geht es um den Schutz vor Krankheitserregern. Dafür wurde es entwickelt. Wir sind ein großes, komplexes, multiorganisches, multizelluläres System. Wir vermehren uns sehr langsam, und die verschiedenen Pathogene, die in und auf uns leben wollen, die Bakterien, Viren, Protozoen, vermehren sich sehr schnell. Sie können sich sehr schnell verändern und wir brauchen einen sehr komplexen Immunabwehrmechanismus, um sie loszuwerden und sie zu kontrollieren. Es ist nicht vorhersehbar, denn alles kann ihm entgegengeworfen werden. Wir sind die ganze Zeit neuen Dingen ausgesetzt, und eines der Dinge, denen wir ständig begegnen, ist dass es immer ein Potenzial für neue, größere Infektionen gibt, die besonders aus der Tierwelt stammen. Das trifft auch auf Haustiere zu, aber nur die neuen Infektionen stammen auch hier aus der Tierwelt. Und mit den Ökosystemen weltweit vermehrt unter Druck, besonders in Ländern wie Afrika, betroffen von Waldrodung, steigenden Bevölkerungszahlen, beobachten wir eine ständige Entwicklung von Krankheitserregern aus der Natur, die wir so zuvor noch nie gesehen haben. Und das ist schon im Gange und wird sich auch weiterhin fortsetzen. Vor Jahren sagten die Leute, dass die Zeit der Infektionskrankheiten überstanden sei. Das war vor HIV/AIDS, vor Antibiotika-Resistenz, und dem ganzen Rest, und wir sind ständig herausgefordert. Es gibt die ganz neuen Infektionen, aber die größte uns bekannte Gefahr einer Pandemie ist immer Influenza, und das liegt daran, dass sich die Influenza A Viren sehr schnell verändern. Sie verändern sich durch Mutation der Glykoproteinoberfläche, das Hämagglutinin und die Neuraminidase, die durch Antikörper bedingten Druck ausgewählt werden, und alle Labor-Impfstoffe sind grundsätzlich gegen Antikörper gerichtet. Sie binden sich an diese Oberflächenproteine, die lilafarbigen, und die PT1 auf diesem kleinem Diagramm. Das ändert sich also die ganze Zeit. Influenza hat ein Genom mit acht verschiedenen Segmenten, und wenn eine Zelle mit einem Influenza-Virus eines Menschen und einem Influenza-Virus eines Vogels, und sie sind im Grunde Krankheiten von Wasservögeln, sie verbleiben in der Natur in Wasservögeln, infiziert wird, dann entwickelt sich ein ganz neuer Influenza-Virus. Und das kann eine Pandemie verursachen. Wir haben regelmäßige Pandemien, die schlimmste davon von 1918-19, bei der 50 Millionen von Menschen starben. Es hatte dramatische Auswirkungen und half den ersten Weltkrieg zu einem Ende zu bringen und führte zu einer wirklich miesen Einigung, dem Vertrag von Versailles, und wahrscheinlich führte dieser zum zweiten Weltkrieg - die Grippe verursacht also alles. Der Grund, warum die Grippe so gefährlich ist, ist wenn wir infiziert werden, sie sehr ansteckend ist, wenn wir infiziert werden, fühlen wir es nicht unbedingt, und wir steigen in ein Flugzeug und wir husten und niesen und wir verbreiten den Virus. Sie sind keinem besonderen Risiko durch das Belüftungssystem im Flugzeug ausgesetzt. Die Grippe zieht sich nicht durch das gesamte Flugzeug, aber wenn Sie zwei bis drei Reihen von der Person mit Influenza sitzen, dann sind Sie einem erhöhten Risiko im Flugzeug ausgesetzt. Und wenn Sie einen Gangplatz haben, dann sind Sie ebenfalls einem erhöhtem Risiko im Flugzeug ausgesetzt. Bilden Sie sich Ihre eigene Meinung. Grippeviren fliegen von einer Stadt und Person zur anderen, und nach der Landung wird die Grippe verbreitet. Wir sind die Träger der Influenza, und Moskitos sind die Träger Chikungunya-Virus, ein Virus der sich gerade überall verbreitet und wir wissen nicht warum, usw. Dann wissen wir natürlich jetzt, dass es eine ganze Reihe von Viren gibt, die durch Flughunde übertragen werden. Wir wussten das vorher nicht. Wenn Sie jemanden von uns im Jahre 2000 gefragt hätten, wieviele Viren durch Fledermäuse übertragen werden, dann hätten wir mit dem Tollwutvirus der Vampirfledermäuse in Südamerika geantwortet und der gelegentlichen Übertragung von Lyssaviren durch Flughunde und insektenfressenden Fledermäusen. Ein gelegentlicher Fall in England, einige in Australien. Dieselbe Virengruppe. Jetzt wissen wir, dass ein ganzes Spektrum an Viren von Flughunden getragen werden. Der Erste, der auftauchte, war der Coronavirus, SARS in Südostasien. Es verursachte eine große Epidemie und verbreitete sich bis Toronto, also kann man es durchaus eine Pandemie nennen. Es wird von Flughunden auf ein kleines Tier namens Himalaya-Zibetkatzen übertragen und gelangt dann an den Menschen. Wenn Sie den Film Contagion gesehen haben, bei dem handelt es sich um diesen Virus, mit dem sich Gwyneth Paltrow in Hong Kong infiziert. Sie gibt einem Koch die Hand, der ein Schwein zubereitet hat, dass durch einen Flughund infiziert wurde. Gwyneth erkrankt, aber noch nicht in dem Maße, dass es ihr versagt, eine kleine Liaison mit jemanden auf den Weg zurück nach Amerika einzugehen, und jeder der in die Nähe dieser Frau kommt, infiziert sich, und stirbt eines schrecklichen Todes und es kommt zu einer riesigen Pandemie. Gwyneths Kopfoberseite wird nach ihrem Tod abgenommen. Es ist nicht wirklich ihr Kopf, es ist aus Plastik. Ein wirklich guter Film. Er machte nicht allzu viel Umsatz, er ist einfach zu realistisch. Momentan haben wir natürlich den Atemwegsvirus aus dem Nahen Osten. Wieder das gleiche, er stammt von Flughunden, der sich in Kamelen multiplizierte, und dann auf Menschen übertragen wird, aber auch von Mensch zu Mensch. Und jetzt haben wir natürlich einen Ausbruch in Korea, einen Ausbruch in Thailand und es geht herum. Es sollte etwas sein, dass wir relativ gut handhaben können, weil wir die Pathogenese verstehen und wissen, wie es verbreitet wird. Wir verstehen, dass Menschen sehr spät infiziert werden, was wir erst nicht bei SARS verstanden. In Südostasien haben wir einen Henipavirus, und in Thailand und Bangladesh den Nipah-Virus. Diese Viren werden von Flughunden auf Früchte übertragen, weil Flughunde Früchte essen. Wenn diese Früchte aber dann von einem Schwein gegessen werden, der Rest der Frucht wird von Schweinen gegessen, dann infizieren sie sich und dann uns. Wenn Menschen den Saft trinken würden, der aus einigen Bäumen kommt, an der Stelle, wo sie die Rinde anschneiden, um den süßen Saft zu erhalten, an dieser Stelle füttern auch die Flughunde. Wenn wir dann an dieselbe Stelle gehen, infizieren wir uns direkt und der Nipah-Virus kann sich verbreiten. Dann gibt es natürlich die berühmtesten Fledermaus-Viren, von denen wir schon seit langer Zeit wissen, aber nicht wussten, dass Sie von Fledermäusen übertragen werden - Marburg und Ebola. Wir hatten den Ebola-Ausbruch vor kurzem, ein wirklich schrecklicher Ausbruch, und im Grunde hätten wir dafür bereit sein sollen. Wir haben Ebola zuvor immer gemanagt, es gab regelmäßige Ausbrüche, einfach indem wir viele Menschen schnell an den Ausbruchsort gebracht haben, die die Krankenpflege übernahmen und die Menschen vor Ort wussten, was zu tun war. Dann gelang es nach Westafrika, wo die Menschen die Erkrankung nicht kannten. Die internationalen Behörden reagierten nicht schnell genug, WHO etc., das CDC war nicht schnell genug dort, und wir hatten einen wirklich schlimmen Ausbruch, der immer noch nicht komplett überstanden ist. Wir hatten einen Ebola-Impfstoff, der schon vor 10 Jahren einsatzbereit war. Wir hatten antivirale Medikamente, die wir einsetzen hätten können. Es gibt aber ein wirkliches Problem bei diesen, die durch die Grundlagenforschung von damals diese für den Gebrauch am Menschen geeignet sind. Es muss von einem Handelsunternehmen vertrieben werden. Man kann aber nicht erwarten, dass ein Unternehmen etwas aufnimmt, für das es keinen wirklichen Markt gibt. Wir haben hier also ein Problem und wir sollten in der Lage sein darüber nachzudenken und wir sollten in der Lage sein, dies besser anzugehen, indem wir Ressourcen zur Verfügung stellen, um Impfstoffe und antivirale Medikamente gegen potenzielle Bedrohungen zu entwickeln, bis diese fertig für die Produktion sind und man sie verwenden kann. Das ist es, was wir tun sollten, aber es braucht internationale Vereinbarungen und Willen, und wir vergessen sehr schnell. Wir müssen auch unser Gesundheitssystem auf den neuesten Stand halten, und in Zeiten der Kostensenkungen etc. ist dies eine wahre Herausforderung. Kommen wir jetzt zur Immunität selbst. Immunität, ein extrem komplexes Abwehrsystem. Sie haben schon teilweise davon von Bruce Beutler und Jules Hoffmann gehört. Ich werde nichts davon wiederholen, denn meine Vorredner sind darauf schon so exzellent eingegangen. Das Wort Immunität stammt aus dem Lateinischen, und stammt von immunis, was "steuerfrei" bedeutet. Und es bezieht sich auf die Tatsache, dass die Soldaten, die von den Romkriegen zurückkehrten, von den Steuern befreit wurden. Sie wurden die "Genio Immunium" genannt, genau wie die reichen Republikaner in Amerika, sie zahlen keine Steuern. Sie sind da, um die Infektion vor Steuern zu schützen, und natürlich kann die Infektionssteuer Tod bedeuten, und an dieser Stelle erhalten wir "Immunität." Immunologie, ich arbeite jetzt seit über vierzig Jahren in diesen Bereich. Wir haben Immunologie zunächst eingesetzt, um die Immunantwort auf Viren besser zu verstehen, um bessere Schutzmechanismen zu entwickeln und um die Pathologie zu verstehen, denn der Grund, warum ein Virus tötet, ist nicht nur die Wirkung eines Viruses, es geht darum, was im Gewebe passiert. Gewebeschäden, Gewebereparatur, insbesondere in einem sehr zarten und empfindlichen Organ wie der Lunge, kann der Gewebereparaturprozess zum Tod führen. Wir wissen nicht unbedingt, wo wir bei solchen Mechanismen eingreifen sollen, um bessere klinische Ergebnisse zu erzielen. Aber wir nehmen es sehr schnell auseinander und arbeiten an der entzündeten Stelle, mit Knockout-Mäusen und ähnlichem. Die Pathogenese, die Pathologie ist enorm zufriedenstellend für mich. Wir verstehen jetzt, dass wir es jahrelang nicht richtig verstanden haben. Alle spezifische Immunität und in der Tat jede Immunität, ok, nicht wirklich, also alle adaptive und spezifische Immunität ist die Antikörper-Antwort oder T-Zell-Antwort, ist Eigentum von weißen Blutzellen und deren sezernierten Produkte, das nur durch die weißen Blutzellen existiert. Was wir außerdem noch über Jahre hinweg gemacht haben, ist, nicht das Immunsystem selbst zu studieren, aber die Immunantwort auf Viren zu nutzen, um die grundlegende Biologie des Systems zu studieren. Und diese Fragen sind in der grundlegenden Biologie selbst bekannt. Homöostase, Zellzahlen, Populationssgröße. Das Immunsystem, wenn man mal darüber nachdenkt, wir haben zwei großartige Systeme, um die äußere Umgebung wahrzunehmen. Wir haben das Gehirn, das sich offensichtlich im Schädel befindet und ein sehr stabiles Organ ist, und wir haben das Immunsystem, das sich im ganzen Körper befindet. Wir haben Zellen, die überall hin migrieren. Sie vermehren sich, sie werden größer, sie dringen in das Gewebe ein. Es ist ein völlig flüssiges und dynamisches System, und es verspürt auch die äußere Umgebung, nicht bewusst natürlich, sondern unbewusst. Sie sind die beiden Systeme, die wir auf eine gewisse Weise handhaben, eine sehr spezifische Art und Weise, um neue Herausforderungen in Ihren Reizen zu handhaben. Das andere Interessant über das Immunsystem ist das T-Zell-System, zumindest, dass, was ich studiert habe, ich zeige es Ihnen ganz, ganz kurz. Es ist toll, es in der Differenzierung zu studieren, weil wir Abstammungslinien von Zellen mit dem gleichen Rezeptor erhalten können, das wir durch den, wie wir es nennen, nativen Zustand verfolgen können, bevor Sie auf jegliche Pathogene getroffen sind, wo sie sehr, sehr wenig vorhanden sind, aber sie sind da. Dann bis zum effektiven Zustand, wo sie alle bewaffnet und wütend sind und bereit sind jegliche infizierte Zelle zu beseitigen etc. bis hin zum Speicherzustand, wo sie zum Schutz schneller zurückgerufen werden können, worum es natürlich grundlegend beim Speicher geht. Wir können diese Differenzierungsysteme studieren, wir können Sie in-vitro studieren. Natürlich ist die Wahrnehmung von etwas externem, das dem Immunsystem im Gehirn Schaden anrichten kann, etwas anderes. Wenn Sie lernen, dann handelt es sich bei der Erinnerung im Gehirn natürlich um die Verbindung von Pfaden. Bei der Erinnerung im Immunsystem geht es um Zellteilung, der Erhöhung der Zellzahlen, und auch um die Differenzierung und epigenetischen Veränderungen usw. Wenn sich jetzt jedes Mal, wenn Sie einen Gedanken hätten die Zellanzahl im Gehirn vermehren würde, dann bekämen Sie schreckliche Kopfschmerzen, da das Gehirn durch den Schädel eingeschränkt ist. Nur kurz, Geschichte fasziniert mich, die roten Blutzellen wurden tatsächlich von Leeuwenhoek gesehen, vor vielen Jahren, als er diese kleinen Mikroskope erfand. Aber es dauerte weitere 140 Jahre bevor wir die weißen Blutzellen entdeckten, und auch nur wegen der besseren Mikroskope. Es war ein Pathologe, der sie entdeckte, ein paar Pathologen, die die Entdeckung machten. Nicht Pathologen, es waren Chirurgen, die sie entdeckten. Im Jahre 1840 konnten Chirurgen nur ganz schnell Beine amputieren, und den Eiter von Abszessen usw. ablassen. Sie mussten sich also irgendwie ihre Zeit vertreiben. In der Zwischenzeit, wenn jeder umher ging, und er beschrieb sogar die farblosen Körperchen. Die weißen Blutzellen erscheinen eher selten, der Grund, warum Leeuwenhoek sie nicht beschrieb, obwohl es scheint, ich habe gerade noch einmal seine Arbeit zur Philosophical Transactions der Royal Society gelesen, dem weltweit ältestem Magazin in englischer Sprache, jetzt auch online verfügbar, und es scheint, dass er tatsächlich die weißen Blutzellen gesehen hat, aber nicht erkannte, um was es sich hier handelte. Sie wurden "farblose Körperchen" genannt, weil sie keine Farbe hatten. Und sie konnten diese farblosen Körperchen oder Kügelchen bei einer sehr niedrigen Frequenz im Blut oder im Eiter sehen, und schlussfolgten, dass diejenigen im Eiter vom Blut stammen mussten, womit sie sehr richtig lagen. Sie konnten auch in die farblosen Körperchen oder Kügelchen sehen. Hierbei handelte es sich um den Zellkern. Niemand realisierte, um was es sich bei dem Zellkern handelte. Dann, etwas später, mit der deutschen Anilin Farbindustrie, die Färbemittel entwarfen, und Rudolph Virchow, dem großartigen Pathologen, und Paul Ehrlich, dem Immunologen, wurden Zellen gefärbt und dann konnten wir alle diese Zellen sehen und verstanden das Immunsystem. Makrophagen, Basophile, alle diese spektakulär aussehenden Zellen. Die weißen Blutkörperchen, die uns wichtig sind, die Lymphozyten, die für einen Morphologen am wenigsten interessant sind, weil sie winzig sind. Sie haben nur einen Zellkern, also fast kein Zytoplasma, und die Lymphozyten wurden nicht verstanden, bis wir in den 60iger Jahren anfingen, sie zu untersuchen, mit der Arbeit von Jim Gowans und dann Jacques Miller, die die T-Zelle identifizierten, Henry Claman und Bruce Glick, die die B-Zellen- und B-Lymphozyten identifizierten. Oder Max Cooper und die T-Helferzelle und die T-Killerzelle usw. Dies ist die Grundlage der Immunität. Wir beginnen mit ein paar naiven Vorläuferzellen mit einem spezifischen Rezeptor, und sie multiplizierten sich infolge des Stimulus der Infektion. Wir erhalten Zellteilung und Differenzierung wir erhalten Effektor-Zellen, die die Infektion beseitigen. Alle Zellen sterben ab und dann ist die Erinnerung daran gespeichert, und dies wird jahrelang fortgesetzt. Für die Lebensdauer einer Labormaus oder für bis zu 50 Jahre im Menschen. Das geht alles in die Lymphknoten im Hals, die anschwellen, wenn wir krank werden. Wir sind sehr daran interessiert, bessere Impfstoffe zu entwickeln. Wir haben einen Impfstoff gegen HIV. Für Influenza möchten wir nicht jedes Mal einen Impfstoff machen, sobald eine Infektion auftritt. Wir rauften uns bei der Herstellung eines Impfstoffes gegen Hep C die Haare, aber jetzt haben wir ein sehr gutes Medikament und wir können es damit loswerden. Natürlich ist es fantastisch, wenn man eine hartnäckige Infektion mit einem kleinem Molekül kontrollieren kann. Wir haben HIV unter Kontrolle, natürlich mit Medikamenten, aber weil das Ding im Genom verbirgt, muss man weiterhin Medikamente und eine Dreifachtherapie verabreichen. Es ist auch aus Kostengründen sehr problematisch, besonders in den Entwicklungsländern, auch wenn es einen enormen Fortschritt darstellt. Die CD8 + Killer-T-Zellen, die ich studiere, die Legionäre des Immunsystems. Es ist der Typ, der zur Zelle kommt, die mit einem Virus infiziert ist, weil Viren nur innerhalb von Zellen arbeiten, und sie müssen aus kurzer Reichweite zerstört werden. Es nähert sich ihr also, und zerstört sie. Ein Legionär. Der Legionär trägt ein sehr kurzes, scharfes Schwert, und sie haben große Schilder. Sie kommen sehr nah und machen dies. Der Hund ist ein immunologischer Witz, weil es nichts darüber zu lachen gibt. Witze von Immunologen sind nicht witzig. Hier ist die Killerzelle. Die grüne Zelle tötet die große Zelle, und dabei tötet es auch gleichzeitig den Virus. Sie können sehen, wie es die Zellmembran durchdringt, in diesem roten Farbstoff in der Flüssigkeit, und jetzt ist es tot. Ok? Das ist die Aufgabe der T-Zellen. Diese CD8 oder T-Killerzellen überfallen das Gewebe, sie gehen dorthin, wo sich die Viren befinden, zerstören die Zelle, heilen die Infektion. Sie sind hochspezifisch. Sie töten nicht wirklich, in der Tat leiten sie den Todesweg der Zelle in der Zelle ein. Sie verursachen eine Apoptose, sie induzieren in Wirklichkeit den Selbstmord der Zelle, statt sie zu töten, und ihre Erkennungsmechanismus ist sehr spezifisch und beruht auf der Tatsache, dass ein kleiner Teil, das ist ein Peptid, an die Oberfläche gebunden ist, in den Spalt unserer Transplantationsmoleküle, diejenigen, die in der Transplantatabstoßung erkannt werden. Und dieser wird an die Zelloberfläche transportiert und diese Zellen erkennen dies. Ich habe keine Zeit detailliert darüber zu sprechen, aber so funktioniert es. Wir haben eine sehr oberflächliche Entdeckung in den 1970er Jahren gemacht. Wir machten diese Entdeckung, bevor es jegliche rekombinante DNA-Technologie gab, man konnte also die kleinen Proteinanteile der Zellenoberfläche nicht in einen Reihenfolge bringen. Man konnte jede Menge Myoglobin und ähnliches sequenzieren. Wir schafften dies vor dem molekularen Antikörper, vor PCR, und es war eine ziemlich "primitive" Zeit. Wir hatten ein paar gute Vermutungen und wir zeichneten das einfache Diagramm hier ganz rechts, dort mit den Kreisen usw. und wir schrieben 2-seitige Briefe in The Lancet, und eine 5-seitigen theoretischen Artikel, Und wir erhielten viele Jahre später den Nobelpreis, nachdem viele, viele Leute daran arbeiteten und wir wurden dafür belohnt. Das war eine sehr gute Auflösung. Und hier sieht man mich mit meinem Kollegen Zinkernagel. Das ist nach dem Nobelpreis im Jahre 1996. Wir warteten 23 Jahre auf den Nobelpreis, eine relativ normale Wartezeit für den Nobelpreis. Das Foto zeigt, was viel später ersichtlich wurde. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine Ehrendoktorverleihung. Es zeigt Ihnen zwei Dinge und das ist, auf der einen Seite, dass wenn Männer nicht dumm sind, sie trotzdem so dargestellt werden können. Und das andere ist, Männer haben absolut keine Ahnung, was sie mit Blumen anstellen sollen. Wir stehen beide hier, es gab niemanden, dem man sie reichen konnte. In der Regel gibt es jemanden. Man geht nach Asien, hält einen Vortrag, sie geben dir Blumen, es gibt eine nette Dame, dre sie diese reichen können, aber es gab diese Dame nicht und wir wussten nicht wohin damit. Wir wollten sie wegschmeißen, stattdessen halten wir sie vor unseren Schritt. Ich weiß nicht, worum es hier eigentlich ging. Die Tatsache, dass wir die Arbeit sehr schnell machen konnten und eine richtige Lösung hatten, war die Folge der Tatsache, dass wir gerade die Maus-Transplantationen und Genetik nutzen konnten. Und hierbei handelte es sich um 30 Jahre Arbeit, die besonders von George Snell eingeleitet wurde, der seinen Nobelpreis im Jahre 1980 erhielt, den 1980 Nobelpreis für Transplantation teilte, und es gibt dort eine ganze Geschichte. Ich erwähne dies, weil wir ohne diesen Anfang nicht erreicht hätten, mit der Verfügbarkeit dieser Mausstämme, Mutanten im H2 Systemkompatibilitätsbereich, und in der Rekombination im Transplantationsbereich. Ein weiterer Punkt ist, dass Zinkernagel und ich diese Arbeit zusammen als sehr junge Menschen gemacht haben und wir uns ergänzt haben. Rolf führte die In-Vitro-Zytotoxizität-Experimente durch, ich arbeitete mit den Mäusen, weil ich ein Tierarzt war, und ich schrieb auch die Abhandlungen. Wenn ich die In-Vitro-Experimente durchgeführt hätte und Rolf die Abhandlungen geschrieben hätte, wären wir weiterhin unbekannt geblieben, und völlig unbeachtet. Natürlich reflektieren wir in Bezug auf George Snell und seine Kollegen, Issac Newtons Aussage, Dieser Satz befand sich in einem Brief an Robert Hooke. In Wirklichkeit verpönte er Hooke, er hasste ihn. Hooke war sehr klein, darum sagte er "Riesen". Und nicht nur das. Gegen Ende seines Lebens, als Newton Präsident der Royal Society war, überlebt er Hooke und er ließ das einzige Porträt von Hooke zerstören. Das ist wirkliche Böswilligkeit. Nicht alle leitende Wissenschaftler sind nett, nehmen Sie sich also vor einigen der Nobelpreisgewinner in Acht. Sie scheinen nett, aber man ist sich nie ganz sicher. Das ist eine Versuch Hooke bildlich darzustellen. Keiner weiß, wie er wirklich aussah. Kein Problem heutzutage. Wir werden alle porträtiert, nachdem wir einen Nobelpreis gewinnen. Falls man den Nobelpreis nicht gewinnt, kriegt man nicht alle die Preise nach dem Nobelpreis, es sei denn, man ist unglaublich schlau, wie einige dieser Leute. Ich bin es nicht, aber man kriegt trotzdem ein Portrait. Noch ein Vorteil ist, dass Dinge nach dir benannt werden. Hier haben wir eine Straße in meiner Heimatstadt, sie haben die Straße mir zu Ehren benannt und das Gebäude im Hintergrund ist Boggo Road Gefängnis. Die Killer-T-Zell-Antwort ist sehr interessant, weil eine Menge der Peptide, die sie erkennt, von internen Proteinen stammen und diese Proteine werden zwischen vielen Viren geteilt. So erhält es einen Kreuzschutz. Mir läuft die Zeit davon, deshalb werde ich Ihnen nichts über das erzählen können, worum es sich bei den meisten meiner Folien handelt, weil ich zu viel rede. Aber wir können diese tetrameren Komplexe von MHC bilden, also ein Protein und Peptid, und wir können sie nutzen, um die T-Zell-Antwort zu quantifizieren, was wir erst seit etwa 1997 können. Und wir können sie auch verwenden, um T-Zellen zu sortieren und uns ihre molekularen Profile anzuschauen, indem wir RTPCR verwenden, und so sehen wir, welche Nachricht in ihnen enthalten ist. Und selbst wenn wir keinen Antikörper haben, um die Zelle mit seinem Protein zu signieren, können wir eine Einzelzell-PCR direkt aus einer Maus oder einem Menschen ziehen. Wir haben sehr schnell, sehr viel Information. Wir waren in der Lage, klonale Linien, klonale Expansion und Rückruf-Antworten zu studieren. Wir untersuchten, wie klonale Linien überleben, indem wir die die T-Zell-Rezeptoren und ihre Antworten verfolgten. Wir haben diese Technologie entwickelt , wir konnten beobachten, wann die verschiedenen wirksamen Moleküle, die das Zerstören vornahmen, angeschaltet werden. Das ist völlig an Zellteilung gebunden. Jedes Mal, wenn sich die Zellen teilen, schalten sie mehr dieser wirksamen Moleküle an. Sie schalten die meisten von ihnen danach aus, und wir waren in der Lage, alle diese Dinge zu untersuchen. Jetzt studieren wir die tatsächlichen epigenetischen Signaturen, die diese verschiedenen Zelllinien definieren. Die Art der Frage ist dann in einem intellektuellen Sinn, was sind diese Zellen und was charakterisiert sie, und können wir sie und jegliche Unterteilungen davon wirklich auseinander halten? Und hier arbeiten wir schnell viel durch. Die andere wichtige Frage ist natürlich, können wir T-Zellgedächtnis optimieren, was sehr gut für Rückruf-Antworten wäre, weil es eine Kapazität für kreuzreaktive Reaktionen zwischen verschiedene Grippeviren gibt. Sie können dieselben internen Proteine teilen, obwohl sie völlig andere Zelloberflächenproteine haben können und so erhalten wir einen überkreuzenden Schutz, und wo er exakt ist. Wir können das in einer Maus zeigen und haben es jahrelang gezeigt. Hier ist ein Experiment mit der H7N9 Grippewelle, die wir vor kurzem in China erlebt haben, wo ein H7N9-Huhnvirus, eine Infektion, die bei Vögeln völlig unentdeckt bleibt, wirklich gefährlich und tödlich für den Menschen ist. Es tötet besonders ältere Menschen, besonders ältere Männer, weil sie nach der Pensionierung von den Frauen rausgeschickt werden, lebende Hühner auf dem Hühnermarkt zu kaufen, um sie aus der Wohnung zu bekommen, und sie infizieren sich und sterben. Was wir gesehen haben aufgrund der wunderbaren Zusammenarbeit meiner Kollegin Katherine Conzias mit einer Gruppe in Shanghai, ist, dass die Menschen, die am schnellsten die CD8-T-Zellen anschalten, also die roten Zellen in diesem Diagramm, diejenigen sind, die überleben. Dies sind alle Menschen, die ins Krankenhaus eingeliefert wurden, und sie waren sehr krank, aber wenn sie diese Antwort schnell anschalten, überleben sie. Wenn sie es nicht schnell anschalten, braucht es länger, bis es auftaucht und andere Komponenten des Immunsystems treten auf, und das passiert sehr häufig. Das ist im Bereich der Immunität typisch. Wenn ein Teil nicht damit umgehen kann, dann werden die anderen Teile betont. Im ernsten Fall wird alles sehr stark eingeschaltet und den Menschen die sterben, fehlt das ganze Ding, so dass es nicht funktioniert. Wir denken, dass es eine gewisse Möglichkeit für kreuzreaktive Immunität gibt und möglicherweise einen Art von Impfstrategie, die einen Weg herum in Zusammenarbeit mit anderen Effektoren findet, andere Mechanismen, und es gibt großes Interesse daran. Hier befinden wir uns ungefähr. Vieles, was wir mit den T-Killerzellen und den Virusinfektionen herausfinden, trifft wahrscheinlich auf einige Formen von Krebs zu. Beim Nierenzellkarzinom, Melanom, wissen wir jetzt schon lange, dass es einem gewissen Grade der Immunkontrolle unterliegt, und natürlich, wenn Sie den letzten Experimenten mit Anti-PD-1, anti-CLT-4 folgen, erlaubt es Ihnen die Freigabe dieser Zellen von ersichtlicher Unterdrückung zu arbeiten. Wir machen zum ersten Male in den letzten Jahren echte Fortschritte in der Krebs-Immuntherapie, was fantastisch ist. Ich bin immer noch in der Wissenschaft involviert, ich spreche immer noch mit Wissenschaftlern. Ich habe kein Labor mehr, ich bin jetzt 75 Jahre alt und ich habe mich zurückgezogen, aber ich nehme noch am Forschungsprogramm teil. Ich habe Bücher geschrieben. Ich glaube, Steve Chu zeigte ein Babybild. Das auf dem Dreirad bin ich im Alter von 3 Jahren. Ich habe mein ganzes Leben nie besser ausgesehen. Von dort aus ging es nur bergab, und ich habe mehr Bücher geschrieben, und mehr und mehr bin ich wie die Menschen hier. Mich beunruhigt der Klimawandel sehr, und ich habe mich auf dem Gebiet belesen. Ich habe Bücher darüber geschrieben, als ein Außenseiter darüber geschrieben, nicht als Insider. Ich kann die Biologie-Zeitungen zum größten Teil lesen, aber ich verstehe die mathematische Modellierung nicht richtig und das neueste Buch schreibt ein wenig über medizinische Wissenschaft aus der Sicht eines Insiders und über den Klimawandel als Außenseiter, und ich versuche mit Leuten darüber zu reden. Sie können sich diese Problem anschauen, es wird später dieses Jahr veröffentlicht. Ich möchte Ihnen sagen, dass Wissenschaftskommunikation enorm wichtig ist aus meiner Sicht. Nicht in dem Sinne, dass man Leuten etwas erzählt. Die Leute möchten nichts mehr erzählt bekommen. Es gibt zu viel, dass von oben nach unten weitergeleitet wird, ein das Problem mit Büchern. Aber die jungen Leute, die soziale Medien nutzen, und YouTube, und diejenigen, die tolles Videomaterial usw. erstellen, beginnen Sie ein Gespräch, wenn Sie die Möglichkeit haben. Bringen Sie die Dinge im Gespräch ins Rollen, und laden Sie großartiges Videomaterial auf YouTube hoch. Und verwenden Sie dieses Medium, um Verbindungen zu schaffen, auch mit Schulkindern. In Australien haben wir gerade diese Aktion namens The Conversation.com. gestartet. Schauen Sie sich The Conversation an. Registrieren Sie sich und Sie erhalten es kostenfrei ins Postfach. Es gibt es in Großbritannien, in den USA, in Australien und in Afrika. Gehen Sie einfach auf The Conversation.com, geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse an und Sie erhalten jeden Tag Inhalte, wie eine Online-Zeitung, für Ihren Blog. Es handelt sich um Artikel mit tausend Wörtern, die von Akademikern geschrieben wurden. Sie können sich registrieren und einen Artikel schreiben. Sie müssen einen Interessenkonflikt erklären. Sie können wirklich gutes Zeug über das, was Sie wissen, schreiben, Dinge von allgemeinem Interesse. Es gelangt dann in einen professionellen Newsroom, und es wird mit Ihnen darüber diskutiert. Eine sehr anspruchsvolle Plattform. Sie fügen einige nette Abbildungen hinzu, und Ihr Artikel, den Sie hier veröffentlichen, kann von einer Zeitung aufgegriffen und veröffentlicht werden. Alles kostenlos. Sie haben kostenlos Zugang zu Artikeln und viel wird erneut veröffentlicht, und Sie sehen anhand einer Metrik, wie oft es erneut veröffentlicht wurde, wie oft sich darauf bezogen wurde usw. Richtig gut. Sie müssen nicht in einem der Länder leben, um sich zu registrieren. Alles, was Sie sein müssen, ist einer akademischen Institution anzugehören. Sie können sich auch so anmelden, und Ihre Kenntnisse in der Wissenschaftskommunikation in einer großen Community zu verbessern und ins Gespräche zu kommen, weil es hier Antworten usw. mithilfe eines breiteren Spektrum von Menschen gibt. Hier erhält man eine allgemeine Idee, wie die allgemeine Öffentlichkeit die Wissenschaft aufnimmt und auf sie reagiert. Hier findet mein Vortrag ein Ende. Vielen Dank.

Peter Doherty on killer T cells
(00:16:50 - 00:19:15)

 

Y antibodies are very diverse

The structure of antibodies – elucidated by Gerald Edelman and Rodney Porter – has become an icon of molecular biology, second only to the double helix. Its Y-shaped form, made up of two identical heavy and two identical light polypeptide chains, almost suggests its function, too. The N-terminal regions of the light and heavy chains with their variable amino acid sequences form the antigen-binding sites of an antibody. There are five types of heavy and two types of light chains. The C-terminal regions of an antibody’s heavy chains form its tail or Fc region, which can be involved in the activation both of the complement and the cells of the innate immune system.

The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of an antibody are encoded for by three and two different gene segments, respectively, which are located on three different chromosomes. Their rearrangement and recombination hold the clue for the almost limitless diversity of antibodies, enabling them to detect virtually any antigen. A developing B cell joins together these different segments. Then it draws at random genes from each of them. This can be compared to a lottery where numbers are drawn from different pots. The drawn genes finally encode for the respective antibody’s specific antigen-binding site. This gives rise to huge combinatorial possibilities. A loss or gain of nucleotides at the site of the joining further increases this number. Additionally, after antigen stimulation, somatic mutations occur that gradually increase the affinity of an antibody to its antigen during the course of an infection. Susumu Tonegewa who solved the puzzle of combinatorial diversification, explained this process precisely in Lindau.

 

Susumu Tonegawa on genetic recombination in antibody generation
(00:09:38 - 00:12:37)

 

An extraordinary valuable invention

The extraordinary capabilities of antibodies nourished the dream that it would become possible to produce monoclonal antibodies. In 1975, César Milstein and his post-doc Georges Köhler succeeded in making this dream come true. They fused a mutant cell line of mouse myeloma (a cancer of plasma cells) with mouse spleen cells that had been immunised with erythrocytes from sheep. They incubated them in a specific medium, in which only fused cells could survive. Thereby, they created a hybridoma with the immortality of a tumour cell and the specific ability to produce antibodies against sheep erythrocytes. The importance of their invention was not immediately realised by the scientific community. Nature didn’t accept their paper to be published in “the section reserved for findings of leading importance” but only accepted is as a letter to the editors. Gradually, however, the enormous impact of Milstein’s and Köhler’s invention became clear. “Besides gene technology, which has already been honoured by several Nobel Prizes, the hybridoma technique represents the most important methodological advance within the field of biomedicine during the 1970s,”[17] the Karolinska Institute stated on occasion of the award of the Nobel Prize in honour of “the principle for production of monoclonal antibodies.” Soon, monoclonal antibodies became a powerful tool in research and diagnostics. For therapeutic use, though, they had to be humanised, because antibodies generated in rodents are immunogenic. As soon as this difficult problem had been solved, the triumphal procession of monoclonal antibodies in clinical medicine began, mainly as therapies for autoimmune diseases and cancer. As of 2015, almost 30 monoclonal antibodies had received regulatory approval by the European Medical Agency[18]. “Such cultures could be valuable for medical and industrial use,”[19] was the last sentence of Köhler’s and Milstein’s letter to Nature in 1975. Forty years later, the global antibody market was estimated at 75 billion US-Dollars[20].

Sadly, Georges Köhler didn’t live to see this success. He passed away in 1995. In Lindau, he did not talk about his invention. “It’s a technique, which is now well-known, and the story is, for me, over,” he modestly opened his lecture in 1990, in which he went on to describe why transgenic mice are important and indispensable in immunological research.

 

Georges Köhler on self-tolerance education in the thymus
(00:12:46 - 00:16:04)

 

The foreignness of tumour cells

As mentioned before, the ability to distinguish self from non-self is the fundamental prerequisite for a normal function of our body’s immune defence, which both B and T cells need to learn during their development. A failure in this distinction can lead to severe autoimmune diseases, in which or body attacks its own cells. On the other hand, immune cells must not react to harmless, non-pathogenic foreign substances. Otherwise, severe allergic reactions may occur. To enable tissue and organ transplantations, our normally healthy hostility against foreign antigens has to suppressed. In his lecture in Lindau in 1978, Peter Medawar, one of the pioneers of transplantation medicine, looked back at his work in this field – and established its connection with the fight against cancer.

 

Peter Medawar on tumor rejection
(00:07:31 - 00:08:56)

 

Today, we know that Medawar’s observation “that some cancers arouse a defensive rejection similar to graft rejection” indeed has become “enough for us to build upon.” Immunotherapies that strive to harness our body’s immune defence against tumours have emerged as a great hope of oncology. When Harold Varmus, who had shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1989 with Michael Bishop “for their discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes” came to Lindau for the first time in 2015, he referred to these promising perspectives[21] in his lecture “From proto-oncogenes to precision oncology”.

 

Harold Varmus on the principle of checkpoint-blockade
(00:26:07 - 00:27:38)

 

The hope of immunotherapies

The principle of checkpoint inhibition that Varmus emphasizes, has long been successfully translated from bench to bedside. T cells have to send both stimulating and inhibiting signals to control the magnitude and duration of our immune responses. Therefore, they are equipped with certain receptors that serve as negative checkpoints to prevent our immune system from overshooting reactions. In 1996, James Allison and his group demonstrated that the blockade of the checkpoint receptor CTLA-4 by a specific antibody named ipilimumab results in the rejection of solid tumor grafts. Further investigation into this mechanism revealed additional modes of action of this antibody. This lead to its development for the treatment of melanoma. The clinical trials with the drug showed impressive results in overall survival rates of patients. In 2011, ipilimumab was the first checkpoint inhibitor to be approved by the FDA.

An application of engineered T cells has in the meantime also become a clinical reality in the treatment of certain advanced forms of leukaemia. It was invented by Carl June and his group and is in fact an individualised combined gene and immune therapy. It is based on the principle to take cells from the blood of a patient and extracorporeally equip them with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), namely, an antibody targeted to a specific tumour antigen. The first CAR-T cell therapy under the name of Tisagenlecleucel has been approved by the FDA in 2017.

Another potential immunotherapy, which has not yet reached the market, is based on messenger RNA molecules that carry the individual genetic information of a patient’s tumour. This personal tumour pattern needs first to be identified by gene sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Subsequently, via their mRNA templates, selected individual tumour proteins are presented to the patient’s dendritic cells. It is hoped that the dendritic cells in turn will activate T cells to massively attack the tumour antigens.

Immunology has come a long way since its foundation as a scientific discipline more than a dozen decades ago. Yet it looks fresh and young as if it only had just begun. Immunologists have delivered a lot of meaningful medical solutions, and they have also opened the window for many more meaningful questions. Certainly, many more Nobel Prizes will be awarded for new insights into the complexity of our immune system in the future.

 

Footnotes

[1] cf. Stefan Kaufmann. Immunology’s foundation: the 100-year anniversary of the Nobel prize to Paul Ehrlich and Elie Metchnikoff. Nat. Immunol. 9. 705-711 (2008).
[2] Stefan Kaufmann. Immunology’s foundation, l.c.
[3] https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1908/press.html
[4] All quotes from Mechnikov’s Nobel Lecture: https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1908/mechnikov-lecture.html
[5] Original German formulation: “Die Immunität von Kaninchen und Mäusen, die gegen Tetanus immunisiert sind, beruht auf der Fähigkeit der zellenfreien Blutflüssigkeit, die toxischen Substanzen, welche die Tetanusbazillen produzieren, unschädlich zu machen.” cf. Behring/ Kitasato. Ueber das Zustandekommen der Diphterie-Immunität und der Tetanus-Immunität bei Tieren. Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift. 49/1890, https://doi.org/10.17192/eb2013.0164
[6] It has to be taken into consideration that the first passive immunization had been conducted by Edward Jenner already in 1796, as the Karolinska Institute acknowledged in its press release on occasion of the NP in Physiology or Medicine 1908: “It was, therefore, rightly considered to be an epoch-making and blessed moment in the history of medicine when Edward Jenner introduced, more than a hundred years ago, protective vaccination with cow-pox substance which can give immunity against a disease, namely smallpox, the ravages of which the present generation can hardly imagine.” https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1908/press.html
[7] cf. Stefan Kaufmann. Emil von Behring: translational medicine at the dawn of immunology. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 17, 341-343 (2017)
[8] https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1908/ehrlich-lecture.pdf
[9] Arthur M. Silverstein. A History of Immunology. Second Edition 2009, p. 456
[10] ibid., p. 457
[11] Niels Jerne quoted by Hodgkin/Heath/Baxter: The clonal selection theory: 50 years since the revolution. Nat. Immunol. 8, 1019-1026 (2007), reprinted in: Nature Milestones Antibodies, December 2016, p. S40-S44
[12] F. M. Burnet. A Modification of Jerne’s theory of antibody production using the concept of clonal selection. The Australian Journal of Science. Vol. 20, Nr. 3, 21 October 1957
[13] Hodgkin/Heath/Baxter, l.c.
[14] Besides on information gained from the quoted Lindau lectures, the author also relied on two textbooks, namely L. Rind, A. Kruse, H. Haase. Immunologie für Einsteiger. 2nd edition, 2015; Bruce Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 6th edition, 2015, Chapter 23 and 24.
[15] Molecular Biology of the Cell, l.c., p. 1264
[16] Immunologie für Einsteiger, l.c., p. 34
[17] https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1984/press.html
[18] Immunologie für Einsteiger, l.c., p. 253
[19] Köhler, Milstein. Continous cultures of fused cells secreting antibody of predefined specificity. Nature 256, 495-497 (1975), quoted by Nature Milestones, l.c.
[20] Nature Milestones, l.c., p. S2
[21] An interesting blog on the prospects of immunotherapy was posted by Melissae Fallet on the website of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in October 2017, cf. http://www.lindau-nobel.org/blog-immunotherapy-the-next-revolution-in-cancer-treatment/


Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Share