Global Warming

by Hanna Kurlanda-Witek

The process of global warming begins with the release of greenhouse gases, such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapour and fluorinated gases. Outgoing infrared radiation, or longwave radiation, is absorbed from the Earth’s surface by these gases as well as aerosols, hence the lower layers of the atmosphere become warmer and less energy is emitted by the Earth’s surface. This is known as the greenhouse effect; without it, the Earth would be a very cold place, with a mean surface temperature about 33°C lower than it is now. But approximately since the beginning of the Industrial Age, the concentrations of greenhouse gases have reached unprecedented levels. The amount of carbon dioxide in the troposphere, or the lowest layer of the atmosphere, has risen from 280 ppm to about 400 ppm. methane levels have exceeded 1800 ppb, an increase from approximately 700 ppb in pre-Industrial times. The enormous amounts released into the atmosphere are both natural and linked to human activities. Here, Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen describes the man-made and natural sources of methane emissions:

 

Paul Crutzen describes the man-made and natural sources of methane emissions
(00:17:18 - 00:17:58)


Historical data demonstrate that the dynamics of global temperatures are correlated with the global carbon cycle. However, the association between rising greenhouse gas emissions and their effect on the climate, as well as to what extent these changes are brought about by anthropogenic activity, is still a matter of debate and controversy among scientists, let alone policymakers and the general public. To quote the topic cluster, “The Future” in the Lindau Mediatheque by David Siegel, “political, economic and scientific angles need to be considered”. There is evidence that the climate is becoming warmer. Many of us in Europe don’t need data from glacial ice cores – we can remember much colder winters and long periods of winter slowly turning into spring. In this lecture snippet, the biochemist and Nobel Laureate Hartmut Michel mentions his observations of first frosts in Germany, and explains a particular view on the evidence of global warming.

 

Hartmut Michel (2012) - Photosynthesis, Biomass, Biofuels: Conversion Efficiencies and Consequences

Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity and, of course, you're all aware that we had 2 very controversial talks. And I also would like to make one or the other comment on the controversies. I work actually at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics. And our institute works on membrane proteins. And membrane proteins is a point which is catalysed by, photosynthesis catalysed membrane proteins, mainly. And so it’s made up in photosynthesis. Importance of membrane proteins is seen here, there’s a text book figure, everything you see is membranes. And there are many important roles of the proteins in it. And for instance the catalyse transfer flow of, transport of substances across membranes are involved in biological electron transfer, that’s mainly for the synthesis in cellular respiration. And also signal receptors. Very important for medicine and also some membrane proteins are enzymes, preferentially for hydrophobic substrates. So primarily what we work at the present is respiration but the whole thing is too complicated. So I deal with easier things and give you more or less synthesis. You have seen already that the controversial discussion and so I will not rely on and go into that. And you also see that carbon dioxide concentration has increased and I think the warming as well as the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations are facts and cannot be disputed. I also should say it’s my personal experience in more than 60 years of life that it got warmer. I used to be a gardener as a child, taking care of the garden of my father, now I’m taking care of my own garden. I know when the first temperature below zero degrees used to be that was 15th of October and when you waited over 15th of October, when you waited until you had ice in your barrels, this happened in middle of November. But nowadays you have the first frost much later. And you don’t get ice before December in your barrels. So my personal experience tells me that there is some warming, but its local warming, not a global warming. But from that I am convinced that warming exists. We also have seen this temperature and Co2 concentration in the Vostok ice cores in the Antarctica, that’s the correlation. But it's true as the previous speaker said that actually it is the temperature rise. The temperature is before the rise in Co2 concentration. And this is, I would think it’s a problem for the climatologists. And the reason for that is that, the reason for this, I come to that later. And temperature rise precedes the rise in carbon dioxide concentration. That cannot be disputed. And the reason is that the temperature rise stimulates the activity of the biomass degrading aerobic bacteria. And this leads to carbon dioxide production more than it helps to increase the photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. That is truly a fact. Of course, this correlation and the increase of carbon dioxide concentration by fossil fuel as well as theoretical consideration led to the assumption that the increase in carbon dioxide and other green house gases, mainly methane, of course apart from water, causes the observed temperature rise which I do not dispute. The evidence that global warming is caused by green house gases is calculations, simulations and this is based on the infrared radiation transfer theory. And a person becoming very popular in that work field was Svante Arrhenius. His work was in 1896. He got a Nobel Prize in 1903. And for me the best evidence that green house gases actually cause global warming is the cooling of the troposphere which none of the previous speakers mentioned. There is a higher part of the atmosphere that is cooling down and this can be easily explained. It receives less infrared radiation from the surface on the earth. So this would be... For me this is the best piece of evidence that there is indeed global warming. But that’s the only piece of experiential evidence which I accept. What I really miss is, apart from the calculations, from the simulation, is that somebody fills a very long tube, evacuated with mirrors, puts in a source of infrared radiation and measures at the end how much infrared radiation comes up at the end. And if you come up then with a 2 watt per square meters, I would be completely happy. But I’m wondering why nobody does this pretty simple experiment. Now to...the major point is: Fossil fuels -that’s coal, petroleum, natural gas- are derived from photosynthesis. And in photosynthesis plants fix carbon dioxide from the atmospheres. And the question now is: Can plants be used to produce bio fuels and to solve the energy problem of mankind and reduce thus also global warming? Start off with a leaf, that's the primary site of photosynthesis. Of land plants and I start up with some few basic facts. Photosynthesis is mainly composed of 2 classes of reactions, one are the light reactions. That is: the absorption of light leads to the creation of chemical energy. That is redox energy. You can also call it also fixed hydrogen. And you release oxygen as a side product. So it was a waste product and this was the biggest change in the world was the invention of the oxygenic photosynthesis. And this was a catastrophe in earth and more than 90% of all organisms died when this was invented by nature about 3 billion years ago. Dark reactions, you have the redox energy there and you use that to take out the carbon dioxide from the air and convert it and fix it as sugar. So that’s a picture of that. You have the light reaction, water comes in, you release oxygen, you produce ATP, the universal energy currency in biology. And you produce NADPH and the other products are the oxidised substrate and the hydrolysed ATP. Then you come to the Kelvin cycle, there you fix carbon dioxide and the result of that will be the sugar. The absorption of light occurs by chlorophylls and by carotenoids. The chlorophylls are here the green molecules and the carotenes are the yellow molecules and they are light harvesting antennae. And then, as the next step is the transfer of the energy of the absorbed photon in a radiationless process to the photosynthetic reaction centre. There the charge separation takes place and you get a transport of electrons across a photosynthetic membrane. You reduce the electron receptor and you create an electric voltage across the membrane. That’s the machinery. We determined that structure in 1986 and that was, the result was the Nobel Prize in 1988. So here you have the primary electron donor that gets excited and you get transfer of an electron across the membrane. People now have learned to do the same work with plant systems. And you see here, this is a picture of the photo system 1 of the green plant, it’s very complicated. There are 100’s of chlorophylls, molecules, many, many proteins but we can determine the structure. We can find out the position of each non hydrogen atom in that huge complexes. Which is really I think a remarkable achievement. The electron flow in the photosynthetic membranes of chloroplasts and also cyanobacteria is seen here. You have in the plant and in cyanobacteria, you have first photo system 2. Photo system 2 is where the water splitting occurs with the release of the oxygen. You get a transfer of the electrons across the membrane. And there the electron moves on to another complex. Then you’re going to a PC1 complex where you transfer the electrons back across the membrane. You produce another molecule, called plastocyanin, this donates electrons to the photo system 1. Then the electrons are transferred here to another, to ferredoxins and at the end you reduce NADPH, which is a co-enzyme. So this is what happens in the light reaction. In addition the gradients formed across the photosynthetic membranes drive the synthesis of ATP here. And that’s a rotatory engine and the rotation here leads to the synthesis of ATP. So this is what happens in the basic steps of the light reaction. The conversion of the sun light in photosynthesis is considered to be very high with a really effective quantum yield. But one has to say that less than half of the sun light which reaches the earth is photosynthetically active. So it’s only the wavelength from 400 to 700 nanometres which can be used by the land plants. And quantum yield is high as I said but this means that each photon absorbed leads to electron transfer across the photosynthetic membrane. This does not mean that the energy yield is high. If we look at this schematic drawing with respect to energy, then we saw as I said with photo system 2 and went up with NADPH and that’s an energy scale. And most of the light energy is lost in the primary light reaction already. Theoretically you need 8 photons to rise the energy for electrons by 1.2 electron volts. That’s a difference here between the water and the NADPH up here. And this means that only between 19 and 33% of the energy of the absorbed photons are stored in the form of NADPH. So already most of the energy is lost in the photosynthetic electron flow here. And experimentally you always find and you need about 9.4 -the 8 is theory and the reality is 9.4- in order to reduce 2 molecules of NADP to NADPH. And if we consider that only 47% related to energy of the sun light are photosynthetically active you have to conclude that 11.9% must be the absolute maximal efficiency of photosynthetic light energy conversion of plants. This value is reduced substantially further by inhibition of photosynthesis as high light intensities, damage at high light intensities and the inefficiency of carbon dioxide fixation. Let me start off with the inhibition of photosynthesis at high light intensities. And this shows you here the Co2 fixation. The dependence of the strength of the sun light. And you see here that already at this rather low value here of about 200 you reach saturation. And the full sun light is about at the value of 1,600. So it would be well to the right of the scale. And this means that at 20% of the full sun light is the maximum already reached and 80% of the energy of sun light is not used by the land plants, of the full sun light. We have further losses of energy caused by photo inhibition, by photo damage at high light intensities, by photo respiration. That’s a process in which oxygen is used by the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bicarboxilase instead of carbon dioxide in Co2 fixation. The wrong product has to be removed by respiration and by other metabolic processes. At the end the theoretical limit for the efficiency of photosynthesis is around 4.5%. That’s the theoretical upper limit. But in reality it’s less than 1% of the sunlight energy which is stored in the form of biomass. And in particular I didn’t mention much about the photo damage and actually the plant is able to repair the photo system once every 20 minutes. So the plants repair their system 3 times an hour. And I don’t think that we can do that in a technological process. Now let’s start with some examples, we have here. Let’s start with biogas, that's produced by archaea, methanogenic micro organism. Biomass, contains 60% methane. The rest is mainly carbon dioxide but there’s also some danger in it because you produce hydrogen sulphide which caused some fatal accidents already. And this is how you can operate, you have the cows. You produce some products apart from milk. And this goes into the fermenter, you add mainly green stuff, mainly maize, leaves from the corn. Add this to the fermentation. And you get heat, you can use... the farmer can use this for heating the house. And you produce biogas and the biogas, the methane there is... drives a gas engine in a generator and you produce electricity. And you can use of course a residual stuff here as a fertiliser on the field. You can simply calculate, look up in the tables and you get about 4,600 cubic metres of methane per hectare. The energy yield is about 46,000 kilowatt hours. And this would convert to about 17,000 kilowatt hours electro energy or about 1.7 kilowatt hours per square metre and year resulting in 0.2 watt per square metre on a continues basis averaged over the year. And if you look about the distribution of the average energy of the sun light reaching the earth that you see here. We are now here in Constance, that would be about 150, we are in Lindau, not in Constance, we are at the Lake of Constance, we are in Lindau. So we are here. And in the Sahara you get about 315 watts per square metre so it’s only a difference of about 223 in the sun light energy between Sahara and Germany. If we use that energy here in Lindau, if we compare that, then we would only convert 0.2 watts into electric energy. That is about 0.13% of the sun light energy comes into the electric energy via biogas. So that’s a highly inefficient usage of land. And we have not considered with that value that we have to put in about 40% of the energy by using fertiliser, by tractor fuel to produce the biogas. So the real value here is below 0.1% if we go via biogas to produce electricity. And if we ask eventually could we produce Germany’s energy amount by that. And then we come up with a calculation that we would require 720,000 square kilometres. When we consider also the energy input by the energy, the entire area of Germany is about 350,000 square kilometres only. The agricultural area including meadows is about 170,000 square kilometres. So we cannot do that within Germany to save our energy crisis by biogas. Let’s go on with bio ethanol. In Europe it comes from sugar beet or wheat. And in the US it comes from corn. And the ethanol produced per hectare has energy content slightly higher than the biogas from the maize field. But 80 to 88% of the energy of the bio fuel has to be invested into the growth of the plants, harvest and into the concentration of the alcohol, the ethanol to 99.5% by distillation and other chemical processes. And if the energy for concentrating the alcohol comes from coal, then there is an increase of carbon dioxide emission, about 30% compared to the direct usage of fossil fuels. If natural gas, methane, is used as an energy resource, then there is a reduction of carbon dioxide emission by about 35%. And there is no effect when petrol is used for providing the energy as an input. So it depends on the energy input. And sugar cane in Brazil is very popular and there it’s competitive and saves carbon dioxide because it’s the only, it’s only cut for harvest, it’s re-grown, you don’t need to plough the field and to plant freshly. The squeezed stems are dried and burned for distillation. And the energy input there is about 1/9 of the energy contents of the ethanol. But when you compare the energy of the sun light and the bio ethanol that you get, it's still less than 0.2% of the energy of the sun light which has fallen on the sugar cane plantation. Also this is a pretty inefficient process. My vision for the whole thing is that we have to, for increasing the yield of biomass in general, improve carbon dioxide fixing enzyme RuBisCo, Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, by genetic engineering and selection techniques. And I think it might be possible to increase the efficiency of carbon dioxide fixation and therefore the overall yield of photosynthesis by 50 to 100%. One can try to expand the wavelength range used by plants, by introducing light arresting system which absorbs also UV light and more to the infrared light and also the green light. But if you do that, then your leaves will be black. And you can consider walking in a black forest and the meadows will be black. The grass will be black. How would you like that? Another point is one could try to reduce the photo inhibition at high light intensities. I said that already, at 20% of the full sun light photosynthetic apparatus is saturated. And this is potentially possible when you reduce the size and number of the light harvesting complexes. So that less energy from the light harvesting complexes is transferred to 1 reaction centre. Another crucial point is that the water availability will be crucial. Water is a limiting factor in photosynthesis of the plants. And actually there are reports that you need about 60,000 litres of water to produce 1 litre of German bio diesel. People are then also talking about the next generation of bio fuel. That is a process called biomass to liquid, BtL. Because conventional present day techniques like bio ethanol production from sugar cane or sugar beets or bio diesel use only rape seeds or use only parts of the plants. A future BtL production uses the whole plant which is gasified or converted enzymatically to be used to produce the biogas and less land is required to get the same amount of fuel. And the Fischer-Tropsch process is used for synthesis, called the FT diesel or sun diesel. And the raw material has to be dry, it would be wood or straw and other kind of biomass. And the claim is that you can get about 1 litre of this bio diesel from 4 kilograms of wood. And it was estimated that about 1 hectare provides 3,000 to 4,000 kilogram of FT diesel per year. But I have to say this is not a fair value here because the people don’t tell you that you have to add hydrogen in order to get a high yield in the synthesis process of the diesel. But the hydrogen comes from fossil fuels, is made from fossil fuels, from methane or from petrol. So you need... In this process also you have to put in fossil fuel. But also more recent estimates, there was a study sponsored by the European Union and they ended up with values of 890 to 2,300 kilograms per hectare, so much less than was the original claim. Poplar would be a pretty good source for wood because it has a pretty high efficient photosynthesis rate and it produces about 1% of biomass from the sun light’s energy. Similar this kind of grass, miscanthus, does in a similar way and you wouldn’t have to seed it every year. So that’s a good source for biomass. And if we assume that about 3,000 litres of this FT diesel per hectare can be produced but we have to consider also the input of external energy for its production. Then we would require the entire area of Germany to grow either poplar or the miscanthus in order to supply the present consumption of gasoline and diesel for cars and trucks in Germany. So that is not a viable way to get the fuel for our cars and engines. Another point which comes up is bio diesel from the oil palm. And from the palm plant here, the point is, the yield is pretty good, about 5,000 to 6,000 litres per hectare. But the point is, the forests are cleared primarily in South-East Asia, in Malaysia, Borneo, Sumatra are the most terrible examples. And the palm oil is exported to Europe and it even receives subsidies because it’s considered to be renewable energy. But with that actually we do a very bad job because the tropical rain forest in South-East Asia, they grow on peat. And the underlying organic material on the soil here is oxidised when you remove the forest. Its oxidised by yeast and bacteria and it takes about 430 years until you get a compensation of this carbon dioxide released by the bio diesel saving. And in my opinion we should stop to produce bio diesel in the tropics from the oil palm. And we should not allow the import of palm oil derived bio fuels in Europe. I also think that the result of the climate will be very negative because it is much, much drier than the original forest. And on the other hand we kill our eco systems. We kill many species and our natural resources which may have many, many unknown compounds which could be used in medicine to treat one or the other disease. And to reduce the carbon dioxide release it would be much better to grow poplars on the land used for bio fuel production. And to convert the bio mass to coal by a process called hydrothermal carbonisation. And you have to heat the biomass in water to about 160 degrees and this would actually save 207 kilograms carbon dioxide per hectare. Whereas when you produce bio fuels you save about 0.3 kilograms per square metres. So not producing bio fuels and instead reforesting the land saves you 10 times more carbon dioxide than the actual bio fuel production. This is why I think one of the most stupid things is bio fuel production. And I think the major reason why it is so popular is because there is subsidies for farmers. Particularly in Europe and there’s lots of lobbyism in parliament, to governments and that's why we have now also... we have 10% ethanol, bio ethanol in some kind of our super gasoline and diesel has to have 7% of bio diesel in it and with that actually we kill our environment. If we now compare the systems and we go to efficiency of commercially available photovoltaic cells, then here we have a yield of about 15 to 20% in electric energy compared to the sun light energy. And also you have seen such things as this thermal power plant where you have reflectors focusing the sun light onto absorber tubes. You can heat the liquid up to 400 degree and then you can produce electricity in a classical process via steam. And this is considered also to be very effective and you could produce energy also during night when no sun is shining in contrast to the photovoltaic cells. And the space requirements for solar cells providing all electric energy for the world is listed here. For Europe or for Germany, Germany would be a square of 50 times, 60 kilometres only of the Sahara would be sufficient to produce the energy, electric energy for Germany. My vision there is if we would be able to transport electric energy without losses by super conducting electricity cables then we would require 3 to 4 big photovoltaic fields, maybe one in north Africa or one also maybe in South Africa, Kalahari, one in China, one in Australia, one in Mexico. And if these cables would span the globe then we could have continuous energy all over the world, we wouldn’t need, there would be no need to store energy because the sun is shining somewhere at each hour. But even now without super conducting cables we can transport electric energy from the Sahara to central Europe with high voltage direct current cables and this is what is planned in the Desertec. But on the other hand the yield also in Germany is pretty good. And probably we don’t need that. Coming to the alternative to bio fuels and we have that car and this car is electric car and it uses 80% of the energy stored in the electric batteries for propulsion. So 80% of the energy in the electric battery is used for driving the wheels. If we see, have a look at this car with a combustion engine and then only 20% of the energy of the gasoline is used for driving the wheels. So there is an advantage of a factor of 4 of the electric system over the bio fuel system. So if we take that into account and we consider that bio fuel contains less than 0.2% of the energy of the sun light. And we can easily calculate that the combination of photovoltaic cells, electric battery, electric motor, uses the energy of sun light at least by a factor of 400 better than the combination biomass, bio fuel combustion engine. Clearly we need more powerful batteries and I don’t think that is... To get that is realistic and they are in the lab, in the development, they are tin-lithium-sulphur batteries and they store 10 times more energy than the present lithium batteries. Present day lithium batteries are the technology of 1995. The technology has improved and we, I think we will be able to drive our cars with the same range as by gasoline cars in the future. So with that I’m going to come to the end and summarise. And production of bio fuels from various kinds of biomass is a very inefficient land use. And we have to put too much fossil energy into the production of the biomass, into conversion into bio fuel. And the direct usage of biomass for heating or electricity conversion in power plants, replacing bio fuels is more efficient by a factor of 2 or 3 with respect to carbon dioxide fixation than the bio fuel production. Solar energy can and will be used to generate electricity either by solar thermal power plants or by photovoltaic cells. And cars have to be driven by electric batteries, electric motors. But I think with jets we have a problem, for that we cannot use. For our jet traffic in the air we’ll still need kerosene. But I think this can be solved. With that I want to come to the end and thank you for your attention. Applause.

Vielen Dank, dass Sie mir diese Gelegenheit geben. Wie Sie alle wissen, haben wir zwei sehr kontroverse Vorträge gehört. Ich möchte ebenfalls die eine oder andere Anmerkung zu diesen Kontroversen beisteuern. Ich arbeite am Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysik. Unser Institut befasst sich mit Membranproteinen. Membranproteine werden katalysiert... die Photosynthese wird hauptsächlich durch Membranproteine katalysiert; es geht also um Photosynthese. Die Bedeutung von Membranproteinen wird hieraus ersichtlich: Das ist eine Abbildung aus einem Lehrbuch; alles, was Sie sehen, sind Membrane. Und die Proteine spielen darin viele wichtige Rollen. Zum Beispiel katalysieren sie den Transfer (den "Fluss") bzw. den Transport von Substanzen zwischen Membranen, sie sind am biologischen Elektronentransfer beteiligt, hauptsächlich für die Synthese und die Zellatmung, und sie sind auch Signalrezeptoren. Das ist sehr wichtig für die Medizin. Einige Membranproteine sind außerdem Enzyme, vorzugsweise für wasserabweisende Substrate. Gegenwärtig arbeiten wir in erster Linie an der Veratmung, aber das Ganze ist zu kompliziert. Ich befasse mich also mit einfacheren Dingen und spreche mehr oder weniger über die Synthese. Sie haben die kontroverse Diskussion miterlebt; darauf werde ich nicht näher eingehen. Sie wissen auch, dass die Kohlendioxidkonzentration zugenommen hat. Ich glaube, dass die Erwärmung und die Zunahme der Kohlendioxidkonzentration Fakten sind, die nicht bestritten werden können. Ich würde außerdem sagen, dass es nach meiner persönlichen Erfahrung aus mehr als 60 Lebensjahren wärmer geworden ist. Als Kind war ich ein Gärtner, ich kümmerte mich um den Garten meines Vaters; heute kümmere ich mich um meinen eigenen Garten. Ich weiß, wann früher die ersten Minustemperaturen auftraten, nämlich am 15. Oktober, und wenn man nach dem 15.Oktober wartete, bis man Eis in den Bottichen hatte, war es Mitte November. Heutzutage kommt der erste Frost viel später. Und Eis hat man nicht vor Dezember im Bottich. Meine persönliche Erfahrung sagt mir also, dass es eine Erwärmung gibt, aber das ist eine lokale Erwärmung, keine globale Erwärmung. Doch das hat mich davon überzeugt, dass die Erwärmung existiert. Wir haben außerdem aus den Vostok-Eiskernen in der Antarktis die Temperatur und die CO2-Konzentrationen ermittelt; da gibt es eine Korrelation. Doch es stimmt, was mein Vorredner sagte - dass der Temperaturanstieg dem Anstieg der CO2-Konzentration vorangeht. Und das, denke ich, ist ein Problem für die Klimatologen. Der Grund dafür ist... darauf komme ich später zu sprechen. Der Temperaturanstieg kommt vor dem Anstieg der Kohlendioxidkonzentration. Das lässt sich nicht bestreiten. Der Grund dafür ist, dass der Temperaturanstieg die Aktivität der Biomasse, die aerobe Bakterien abbaut, stimuliert. Dies führt in höherem Maße zur Kohlendioxidproduktion als dass es dazu beiträgt, die photosynthetische Kohlendioxidfixierung zu erhöhen. Das ist in der Tat eine Tatsache. Diese Korrelation führte natürlich zusammen mit dem Anstieg der Kohlendioxidkonzentration durch fossile Brennstoffe und theoretischen Überlegungen zu der Annahme, dass die Zunahme von Kohlendioxid und anderen Treibhausgasen, in erster Linie Methan - mit Ausnahme natürlich von Wasser - den beobachteten Temperaturanstieg verursacht, was ich nicht bestreite. Der Beweis dafür, dass die Erderwärmung durch Treibhausgase verursacht wird, beruht auf Berechnungen, Simulationen, die wiederum auf der Theorie des Transfers der Infrarotstrahlung beruhen. Eine Person, die auf diesem Arbeitsgebiet große Bekanntheit erlangte, war Svante Arrhenius. Seine Arbeit stammt aus dem Jahr 1896. Im Jahr 1903 erhielt er den Nobelpreis. Der in meinen Augen beste Beweis dafür, dass Treibhausgase tatsächlich eine globale Erwärmung verursachen, ist die Abkühlung der Troposphäre, die keiner meiner Vorredner erwähnt hat. In großen Höhen kühlt sich die Atmosphäre ab, und das lässt sich leicht erklären. Sie erhält weniger Infrarotstrahlung von der Erdoberfläche. Das wäre also... in meinen Augen ist das der beste Beweis dafür, dass es die Erderwärmung tatsächlich gibt. Das ist aber auch schon der einzige experimentelle Beweis, den ich anerkenne. Was ich wirklich vermisse, jenseits der Berechnungen, der Simulationen, ist, dass jemand eine sehr lange, leere Röhre mit Spiegeln füllt, eine Infrarotstrahlungsquelle hinzufügt und am Ende misst, wie viel Infrarotstrahlung herauskommt. Wenn dabei zwei Watt pro Quadratmeter herauskommen, bin ich zufrieden. Aber ich frage mich, warum niemand dieses ziemlich einfache Experiment durchführt. Wir kommen zu... der Hauptpunkt ist folgender: Fossile Brennstoffe - also Kohle, Erdöl, Erdgas - gehen auf Photosynthese zurück. Und in der Photosynthese fixieren Pflanzen Kohlenstoff aus der Atmosphäre. Die Frage lautet jetzt: Können Pflanzen zur Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen verwendet werden, das Energieproblem der Menschheit lösen und dadurch gleichzeitig die Erderwärmung reduzieren? Beginnen wir mit dem Blatt einer Landpflanze, wo Photosynthese in erster Linie stattfindet. Zunächst einige grundlegende Fakten: Photosynthese besteht hauptsächlich aus zwei Reaktionsklassen. Eine Klasse sind die Lichtreaktionen: Die Absorption von Licht führt zur Erzeugung chemischer Energie. Das ist Redoxenergie; man kann es auch fixierten Wasserstoff nennen. Und als Nebenprodukt wird Sauerstoff freigesetzt. Es handelte sich also um ein Abfallprodukt. Und die Erfindung der oxygenen Photosynthese sorgte für die größte Veränderung, die es jemals auf der Erde gegeben hat. Es war eine weltweite Katastrophe; über 90 % aller Organismen starb, als das vor etwa drei Milliarden Jahren von der Natur erfunden wurde. Dunkelreaktionen... die Redoxenergie wird dazu verwendet, der Luft das Kohlendioxid zu entziehen, es umzuwandeln und als Zucker zu fixieren. Hier sehen Sie eine Darstellung davon. Es gibt die Lichtreaktion, Wasser kommt dazu, Sauerstoff wird freigesetzt, ATP wird produziert - die universelle Energiewährung in der Biologie. Außerdem wird NADPH produziert, und die anderen Produkte sind das oxidierte Substrat und das hydrolysierte ATP. Dann kommt der Calvin-Zyklus ins Spiel; das Kohlendioxid wird fixiert und das Ergebnis davon ist der Zucker. Die Absorption von Licht geschieht durch Chlorophylle und Carotinoide. Die Chlorophylle hier sind die grünen Moleküle, und die Carotinoide sind die gelben Moleküle; das sind lichtsammelnde Antennen. Der nächste Schritt ist dann die Übertragung der Energie des absorbierten Photons auf das photosynthetische Reaktionszentrum in einem strahlungslosen Prozess. Dort findet die Ladungstrennung statt, und es folgt ein Transport von Elektronen über eine photosynthetische Membran. Der Elektronenakzeptor wird reduziert, und über der Membran wird elektrische Spannung erzeugt. Das ist der Mechanismus. Wir erforschten diese Struktur im Jahr 1986, und das Ergebnis war der Nobelpreis 1988. Hier sehen Sie den primären Elektronendonor, der angeregt wird, und es kommt zum Transfer eines Elektrons über die Membran. Man hat mittlerweile gelernt, das Gleiche mit Pflanzensystemen anzustellen. Was Sie hier sehen, ist das Bild des Photosystems 1 der grünen Pflanze. Das ist sehr kompliziert; es gibt Hunderte von Chlorophyllen, Molekülen, viele, viele Proteine, aber wir können die Struktur untersuchen. Wir können die Position eines jeden Nicht-Wasserstoffatoms in diesem riesigen Komplex herausfinden, was, so denke ich, wirklich ein bemerkenswerter Erfolg ist. Hier sieht man den Elektronenfluss in den photosynthetischen Membranen der Chloroplasten und außerdem Cyanobakterien. Mit der Pflanze und den Cyanobakterien hat man das erste Photosystem 2. Im Photosystem 2 kommt es mit der Freisetzung des Sauerstoffs zur Wasserspaltung. Es folgt ein Transfer der Elektronen über die Membran; dort bewegt sich das Elektron weiter zu einem anderen Komplex. Dann kommt man zu einem PC1-Komplex, wo die Elektronen über die Membran zurücktransferiert werden. Es wird ein weiteres Molekül namens Plastocyanin produziert, das Elektronen an das Photosystem 1 abgibt. Dann werden die Elektronen hier auf Ferredoxine übertragen, und schließlich wird NADPH, ein Coenzym, reduziert. Das ist es also, was bei der Lichtreaktion geschieht. Darüber hinaus treiben die Gradienten, die sich in den photosynthetischen Membranen gebildet haben, die Synthese von ATP an. Es ist ein rotierendes Triebwerk, und die Rotation führt zur Synthese von ATP. Das ist es also, was in den grundlegenden Phasen der Lichtreaktion geschieht. Die Effizienz der Umwandlung des Sonnenlichts in der Photosynthese gilt mit einer wirklich effektiven Quantenausbeute als sehr hoch. Man muss aber sagen, dass weniger als die Hälfte des Sonnenlichts, das die Erde erreicht, photosynthetisch aktiv ist. Nur die Wellenlänge von 400 bis 700 Nanometer kann von den Landpflanzen genutzt werden. Wie gesagt - die Quantenausbeute ist hoch, aber das bedeutet nur, dass jedes absorbierte Photon zu einem Elektronentransfer über die photosynthetische Membran führt. Es bedeutet nicht, dass die Energieausbeute hoch ist. Sehen wir uns diese schematische Zeichnung im Hinblick auf Energie an: Wir beginnen, wie gesagt, mit Photosystem 2 und gehen mit NADPH nach oben; das ist eine Energieskala. Der größte Teil der Lichtenergie geht bereits in der primären Lichtreaktion verloren. Theoretisch benötigt man acht Photonen, um die Energie von vier Elektronen um 1,2 Elektronenvolt zu erhöhen. Das ist der Unterschied zwischen dem Wasser hier und dem NADPH dort oben. Und das bedeutet, das nur 19 % bis 33 % der Energie der absorbierten Photonen in Form von NADPH gespeichert werden. Der größte Teil der Energie geht also bereits hier im photosynthetischen Elektronenfluss verloren. Im Experiment stellt man immer fest, dass man etwa 9,4 Photonen benötigt - acht ist die Theorie; die Wirklichkeit sagt 9,4 - um zwei Moleküle von NADP zu NADPH zu reduzieren. Und wenn wir bedenken, dass nur 47 % - bezogen auf Energie - des Sonnenlichts photosynthetisch aktiv ist, kommt man zwangsläufig zu dem Schluss, dass 11,9 % die absolute maximale Effizienz der photosynthetischen Lichtenergieumwandlung durch Pflanzen darstellt. Dieser Wert wird noch weiter erheblich reduziert durch die Hemmung der Photosynthese bei hoher Lichtintensität, durch Photoschäden bei hoher Lichtintensität und durch die Ineffizienz der Kohlendioxidfixierung. Beginnen wir mit der Hemmung der Photosynthese bei hoher Lichtintensität. Hier sehen Sie die CO2-Fixierung, abhängig von der Stärke des Sonnenlichts. Sie sehen hier, dass schon bei diesem ziemlich niedrigen Wert von etwa 200 die Sättigung erreicht ist, und das volle Sonnenlicht liegt bei einem Wert von etwa 1.600. Das wäre also weit rechts auf der Skala. Und das bedeutet, dass bei 20 % des vollen Sonnenlichts das Maximum bereits erreicht ist, und 80 % der Energie des Sonnenlichts, des vollen Sonnenlichts, wird von den Landpflanzen nicht genutzt. Weitere Energieverluste entstehen durch Photoinhibition, durch Schäden bei hoher Lichtintensität, durch Photorespiration. Das ist ein Prozess, bei dem das Enzym Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphat-Carboxylase bei der CO2-Fixierung Sauerstoff statt Kohlendioxid verwendet. Das falsche Produkt muss durch Respiration und durch andere metabolische Prozesse entfernt werden. Am Ende liegt die theoretische Grenze für die Effizienz von Photosynthese bei etwa 4,5 %. Das ist die theoretische Obergrenze. Aber in der Realität wird weniger als 1 % der Sonnenlichtenergie in Form von Biomasse gespeichert. Ich bin auch nicht näher auf die Photoschäden eingegangen - die Pflanze ist in der Lage, das Photosystem alle 20 Minuten zu reparieren. Die Pflanze repariert also ihr System dreimal in einer Stunde. Ich glaube nicht, dass wir das in einem technischen Prozess bewerkstelligen können. Nun einige Beispiele. Beginnen wir mit Biogas, das durch Archaeen - methanogene Mikroorganismen aus Biomasse - produziert wird. Es enthält zu 60 % Methan; der Rest ist hauptsächlich Kohlendioxid. Es birgt aber auch Gefahren: Man produziert nämlich Schwefelwasserstoff, der bereits einige tödliche Unfälle verursacht hat. So kann man das Ganze betreiben: Man hat Kühe, die außer Milch noch andere Dinge produzieren. Das wandert in den Fermenter, man fügt Grünzeug hinzu, hauptsächlich Mais, Maisblätter. Das fügt man der Fermentierung hinzu. Und man erhält Wärme, die man nutzen kann... der Landwirt kann sie für die Beheizung des Hauses nutzen. Außerdem produziert man Biogas - das Biogas, das Methan, treibt eine Gasturbine in einem Generator an, und man produziert Elektrizität. Und den Reststoff hier kann man natürlich als Düngemittel auf dem Feld verwenden. Man kann eine einfache Berechnung anstellen. Ein Blick in die Tabelle zeigt, dass man etwa 400 - 600 Kubikmeter Methan pro Hektar erhält. Die Energieausbeute beträgt etwa 4.000 - 6.000 Kilowattstunden. Das entspricht etwa 17.000 Kilowattstunden elektrischer Energie oder etwa 1,7 Kilowattstunden pro Quadratmeter und Jahr, was im kontinuierlichen Jahresdurchschnitt 0,2 Watt pro Quadratmeter bedeutet. Dann wirft man einen Blick auf die Verteilung der durchschnittlichen Energie des Sonnenlichts, das die Erde erreicht; das sehen Sie hier. Wir befinden uns hier in Konstanz, das wären also 150... wir sind natürlich in Lindau, nicht in Konstanz, aber jedenfalls am Bodensee. Wir sind also hier. In der Sahara erhält man etwa 315 Watt pro Quadratmeter; die Differenz der Sonnenlichtenergie zwischen der Sahara und Deutschland beträgt also nur etwa 223. Wenn wir diese Energie hier in Lindau nutzen, wenn wir das vergleichen, dann wandeln wir nur 0,2 Watt in elektrische Energie um. Das bedeutet: Etwa 0,13 % der Sonnenlichtenergie fließt über Biogas in die elektrische Energie. Das ist also eine äußerst ineffiziente Landnutzung. Und bei diesem Wert haben wir noch gar nicht berücksichtigt, dass wir für die Produktion von Biogas etwa 40 % der Energie einsetzen müssen - durch die Verwendung von Düngemitteln, durch Treibstoff für den Traktor. Der echte Wert liegt hier also unter 0,1 %, wenn wir Elektrizität durch Biogas produzieren. Wenn wir uns schließlich fragen, ob wir damit Deutschlands Energiemenge produzieren können, dann landen wir bei einer Rechnung, wonach wir 720.000 Quadratkilometer brauchen, wenn wir auch den Energieeinsatz berücksichtigen. Die gesamte Fläche von Deutschland beträgt nur etwa 350.000 Quadratkilometer; die landwirtschaftlichen Flächen einschließlich Weideflächen machen etwa 170.000 Quadratkilometer aus. In Deutschland können wir unsere Energiekrise also nicht mit Biogas bewältigen. Machen wir weiter mit Bioethanol. In Europa kommt es von Zuckerrüben oder Weizen, in den USA von Mais. Das Ethanol weist pro Hektar einen geringfügig höheren Energiegehalt als das Biogas vom Maisfeld auf. Doch 80 % bis 88 % der Energie des Biotreibstoffs muss in das Wachstum der Pflanzen investierte werden sowie in die Ernte und in die Konzentrierung des Alkohols, des Ethanols, auf 99,5 % durch Destillation und andere chemische Prozesse. Und wenn die Energie zur Konzentrierung des Alkohols aus Kohle gewonnen wird, dann steigen die Kohlendioxidemissionen an, um etwa 30 % im Vergleich zur direkten Nutzung fossiler Treibstoffe. Wird Erdgas, Methan, als Energiequelle genutzt, dann reduzieren sich die Kohlendioxidemissionen um etwa 35 %. Wenn Erdöl zur Bereitstellung des Energieeinsatzes verwendet wird, hat das keine Auswirkungen. Es hängt also vom Energieeinsatz ab. Zuckerrohr ist in Brasilien sehr beliebt. Dort ist es wettbewerbsfähig und spart Kohlendioxid ein, denn es wird zur Ernte nur geschnitten, es wächst nach, man muss den Acker nicht pflügen, um es von neuem anzupflanzen. Die gepressten Stängel werden getrocknet und destilliert. Der Energieeinsatz beträgt hier etwa ein Neuntel des Energiegehalts von Ethanol.. Vergleicht man jedoch die Energie des Sonnenlichts mit dem Bioethanol, das man gewinnt, stellt man fest, dass immer noch weniger als 0,2 % der Energie des Sonnenlichts auf der Zuckerplantage ankommen. Das ist ebenfalls ein ziemlich ineffizienter Prozess. Meine Vision für das Ganze sieht folgendermaßen aus: Um den Ertrag von Biomasse allgemein zu steigern, müssen wir das Kohlenstoff fixierende Enzym RuBisCo - Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphat-Carboxylase - durch Gentechnik und Selektionsverfahren verbessern. Meiner Ansicht nach dürfte es möglich sein, die Effizienz der Kohlendioxid-Fixierung und damit den Gesamtertrag der Photosynthese um 50 % bis 100 % zu steigern. Man kann versuchen, den von Pflanzen verwendeten Wellenlängenbereich durch die Einführung eines lichthemmenden Systems, das auch UV-Licht sowie eher infrarotes und grünes Licht absorbiert, zu erweitern. Aber wenn man das macht, werden die Blätter schwarz. Und können sie sich vorstellen, in einem schwarzen Wald spazieren zu gehen? Die Wiesen sind ebenfalls schwarz. Das Gras ist schwarz. Wie würde Ihnen das gefallen? Man könnte auch versuchen, die Photoinhibition bei hohen Lichtintensitäten zu reduzieren. Ich habe schon gesagt, dass der photosynthetische Apparat bei 20 % des vollen Sonnenlichts gesättigt ist. Hier könnte man etwas erreichen, indem man Größe und Anzahl der lichtsammelnden Komplexe reduziert, so dass weniger Energie von den lichtsammelnden Komplexen auf ein Reaktionszentrum übertragen wird. Ein weiterer kritischer Punkt: Die Verfügbarkeit von Wasser ist von entscheidender Bedeutung. Wasser ist ein limitierender Faktor für die Photosynthese der Pflanzen. Es gibt Berichte, dass man zur Herstellung von einem Liter deutschem Biodiesel etwa 60.000 Liter Wasser benötigt. Dann spricht man von der nächsten Generation von Biotreibstoffen. Hierbei handelt es sich um einen Prozess mit der Bezeichnung "Biomasse zu Flüssigkeit" (biomass to liquid, BtL). Bei den heutigen, herkömmlichen Techniken, etwa bei der Herstellung von Bioethanol aus Zuckerrohr oder Zuckerrüben bzw. von Biodiesel aus Rapsöl werden nur Teile der Pflanzen verwendet. Bei einer künftigen BtL-Produktion wird die ganze Pflanze genutzt; zur Verwendung bei der Produktion von Biogas wird sie in Gas verwandelt bzw. enzymatisch umgewandelt. So wird zur Herstellung der gleichen Treibstoffmenge weniger Land benötigt. Und für die Synthese kommt der Fischer-Tropsch-Prozess zum Einsatz; das Ganze nennt man dann FT-Diesel oder Sonnendiesel. Das Rohmaterial muss trocken sein; es würde sich um Holz, um Stroh oder andere Arten von Biomasse handeln. Es wird behauptet, dass man aus vier Kilogramm Holz etwa einen Liter dieses Biodiesels gewinnen kann, und man schätzt, dass ein Hektar 3.000 bis 4.000 Kilogramm FT-Diesel jährlich erbringt. Ich muss allerdings sagen, dass diese Zahl trügerisch ist, denn man klärt Sie nicht darüber auf, dass man Wasserstoff hinzufügen muss, um im Syntheseprozess des Diesels einen hohen Ertrag zu erhalten. Der Wasserstoff aber kommt von fossilen Treibstoffen, er ist aus fossilen Treibstoffen gemacht, aus Methan oder Erdöl. Bei diesem Prozess muss man also ebenfalls fossile Treibstoffe einsetzen. Es gibt aber auch neuere Schätzungen - eine von der Europäischen Union finanzierte Studie ermittelte Werte von 890 bis 2.300 Kilogramm pro Hektar, also viel weniger als ursprünglich behauptet. Die Pappel wäre eine ziemlich guter Ausgangsstoff für Holz, denn sie weist eine sehr effiziente Photosyntheserate auf und produziert etwa 1 % Biomasse aus der Lichtenergie der Sonne. Bei dieser Grasart, Miscanthus, ist es ähnlich, und man müsste sie nicht jedes Jahr aussäen. Das ist also eine guter Ausgangsstoff für Biomasse. Wenn wir annehmen, dass etwa 3.000 Liter dieses FT-Diesels pro Hektar hergestellt werden können - wobei wir aber auch den Einsatz externer Energie für seine Herstellung berücksichtigen müssen - dann würden wir die gesamte Fläche von Deutschland benötigen, um den derzeitigen Bedarf an Benzin oder Diesel für PKW und LKW in Deutschland durch das Anpflanzen von Pappeln oder Miscanthus decken zu können. Das ist also kein tragfähiger Weg zur Gewinnung des Treibstoffs für unsere Autos und Maschinen. Biodiesel aus der Ölpalme wird ebenfalls immer wieder erwähnt. Der Ertrag aus dieser Palme ist ziemlich gut, etwa 5.000 bis 6.000 Liter pro Hektar. Die Sache hat aber einen Haken: Die Wälder werden hierfür hauptsächlich in Südostasien abgeholzt, Malaysia, Borneo, Sumatra sind die schrecklichsten Beispiele. Und das Palmöl wir nach Europa exportiert und dort sogar subventioniert, denn es gilt als erneuerbare Energie. Tatsächlich aber ist das eine sehr schlechte Tat, denn der tropische Regenwald in Südostasien wächst auf Torf. Und das zugrundeliegende organische Material auf dem Boden oxidiert, wenn man den Wald entfernt. Es oxidiert durch Hefe und Bakterien, und es dauert etwa 430 Jahre, bis diese Abgabe von Kohlendioxid durch die Biodiesel-Einsparungen ausgeglichen ist. Meiner Meinung nach sollten wir die Herstellung von Biodiesel aus der Ölpalme in den Tropen stoppen. Und wir sollten die Einfuhr von Biotreibstoffen aus Palmöl nach Europa verbieten. Ich bin auch der Ansicht, dass die Auswirkungen auf das Klima negativ sind, denn es ist viel trockener als im ursprünglichen Wald. Andererseits zerstören wir unsere Ökosysteme. Wir töten viele Arten und vernichten natürliche Ressourcen, die möglicherweise zahlreiche unbekannte Bestandteile aufweisen, mit denen die Medizin die eine oder andere Krankheit heilen könnte. Zur Senkung der Kohlendioxidabgabe wäre es viel besser, auf dem für die Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen genutzten Land Pappeln anzupflanzen und die Biomasse durch einen Prozess namens hydrothermale Karbonisierung in Kohle umzuwandeln. Dann muss man die Biomasse in Wasser auf etwa 160 Grad erhitzen; das würde 207 Kilogramm Kohlendioxid pro Hektar einsparen. Während man durch die Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen etwa 0,3 Kilogramm pro Quadratmeter einspart. Wenn man also die Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen unterlässt und stattdessen das Land wiederaufforstet, spart man damit zehnmal mehr Kohlendioxid ein als durch die Herstellung von Biotreibstoff. Deshalb bin ich der Ansicht, dass die Herstellung von Biotreibstoff zum Dümmsten gehört, was es gibt. Und ich glaube, der Hauptgrund für seine Beliebtheit liegt darin, dass es für die Landwirte Subventionen gibt, insbesondere in Europa. Lobbys üben auf Parlamente und Regierungen einen starken Druck aus, weshalb wir jetzt auch... wir haben 10 % Ethanol, Bioethanol in einer bestimmten Art unseres Superbenzins, und Diesel muss 7 % Biodiesel enthalten. Damit zerstören wir unsere Umwelt. Wenn wir nun die Systeme vergleichen und uns die Effizienz handelsüblicher Photovoltaikzellen ansehen, dann haben wir hier einen Ertrag von etwa 15 % bis 20 % an elektrischer Energie verglichen mit der Energie des Sonnenlichts. So etwas haben Sie auch schon einmal gesehen - das ist ein thermisches Kraftwerk, wo Reflektoren das Sonnenlicht auf Absorberrohre fokussieren. Man kann die Flüssigkeit auf bis zu 400 Grad erwärmen und Elektrizität in einem klassischen Prozess durch Dampf erzeugen. Das gilt ebenfalls als sehr effektiv. Im Gegensatz zu den Photovoltaikzellen könnten man hier auch nachts Energie erzeugen, wenn die Sonne nicht scheint. Der Platzbedarf für Solarzellen, mit denen man den gesamten weltweiten Bedarf an elektrischer Energie decken könnte, ist hier dargestellt. Für Europa bzw. Deutschland... schon ein Viereck von 50 mal 60 Kilometern in der Sahara würde ausreichen, um die elektrische Energie für Deutschland zu erzeugen. Meine Vision sieht folgendermaßen aus: Wenn wir in der Lage wären, elektrische Energie verlustfrei durch supraleitende Stromkabel zu transportieren, dann bräuchten wir drei bis vier große Photovoltaikanlagen, vielleicht eine in Nordafrika, vielleicht auch eine in Südafrika, in der Kalahari, eine in China, eine in Australien, eine in Mexiko. Wenn diese Kabel um die ganze Welt reichen würden, hätten wir weltweit kontinuierliche Energie, Energie müsste nicht gespeichert werden, denn die Sonne scheint immer irgendwo. Doch selbst jetzt schon, ohne supraleitende Kabel, können wir elektrische Energie in Hochspannungs-Gleichstromkabeln von der Sahara nach Mitteleuropa transportieren, und genau das ist für Desertec geplant. Andererseits ist aber auch der Ertrag in Deutschland schon ziemlich gut. Vielleicht brauchen wir das gar nicht. Kommen wir zur Alternative für Biotreibstoffe. Sie sehen dieses Auto - das ist ein Elektroauto, das 80 % der in den Batterien gespeicherten Energie für den Antrieb nutzt. Sehen wir uns nun dieses Auto mit Verbrennungsmotor an - nur 20 % der Energie des Benzins wird genutzt, um die Räder anzutreiben. Das elektrische System ist also gegenüber dem Biotreibstoffsystem um den Faktor vier im Vorteil. Wenn wir das berücksichtigen und daran denken, dass Biotreibstoff weniger als 0,2 % der Energie des Sonnenlichts enthält, können wir ganz einfach ausrechnen, dass die Kombination aus Photovoltaikzellen, Batterie, Elektromotor die Energie des Sonnenlichts mindestens um den Faktor 400 besser nutzt als die Kombination Biomasse, Biotreibstoff, Verbrennungsmotor. Natürlich brauchen wir leistungsstärkere Batterien, und ich denke nicht, dass das... es ist realistisch, damit zu rechnen, sie sind schon im Labor, in der Entwicklung. Es handelt sich um Zinn-Schwefel-Lithium-Akkus, die zehnmal mehr Energie speichern können als die heutigen Lithium-Batterien. Die heutigen Lithium-Batterien sind die Technik von 1995. Die Technik hat sich verbessert, und ich denke, wir können in der Zukunft mit diesen Autos die gleichen Reichweiten erzielen wie mit benzinbetriebenen Autos. Damit komme ich zum Ende. Ich fasse zusammen: Die Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen aus verschiedenen Arten von Biomasse ist eine sehr ineffiziente Landnutzung. Wir müssen zu viel fossile Energie für die Herstellung der Biomasse, für die Umwandlung in Biotreibstoff einsetzen. Und die direkte Nutzung von Biomasse für die Beheizung oder die Verstromung in Kraftwerken als Ersatz für Biotreibstoffe ist im Hinblick auf Kohlendioxid-Fixierung um den Faktor zwei oder drei effizienter als die Herstellung von Biotreibstoffen. Die Sonnenenergie kann und wird zur Stromerzeugung genutzt werden - entweder durch Solarthermiekraftwerke oder durch Photovoltaikzellen. Und Autos müssen durch Batterien angetrieben werden, durch Elektromotoren. Mit Flugzeugen haben wir allerdings ein Problem; dafür sind sie nicht verwendbar. Für den Flugverkehr in der Luft brauchen wir immer noch Kerosin. Aber ich denke, das lässt sich in den Griff bekommen. Damit möchte ich schließen. Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Hartmut Michel gives a particular view on the evidence of global warming
(00:01:27 - 00:05:06)

 

A much stronger opinion is expressed by Mario Molina, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995, along with Paul Crutzen and F. Sherwood Rowland. It is likely that global warming will push the climate system past a tipping point, after which any preventive measures are futile – the damage will already be done. “You can’t play roulette with the planet”, explains Molina.

 

Mario Molina (2009) - Energy and Climate Change - Is There a Solution?

Well, I’m going to continue with a topic you heard yesterday from my colleagues, Sherry Roland and Paul Crutzen. But as you see I’m going to emphasize a bit more the aspects of the solution to the problem. But I want to start by briefly reviewing where we left the theme yesterday. First, just to remind you of a few of the things that we heard very briefly. Paul Crutzen talked about this situation that we are now in, the anthropocene, that we’re so many people on this planet that we’re actually affecting the way the planet functions. And all I want to emphasize with this picture here is that our planet is really vulnerable from space, the blue planet really looks vulnerable. And in particular we are worried about the limited natural resources that it has and the fact that with over six billion people on the planet we are really stressing, we’re putting pressure on this limited amount of natural resources. But in particular we’re focusing on the atmosphere. The atmosphere from space as you see it, it’s very thin, you can only see the clouds. But the atmosphere itself is like the skin of an apple. It’s very thin and that’s why it’s feasible then, it’s understandable that human activities are really affecting it. We also saw both Sherry and Paul, they indicated how the chemical composition, excuse me, the chemical composition of the atmosphere is changing and it’s changing particularly in, in recent decades. You can see very easily how it’s a consequence of human activities and in fact Paul showed this particular view graph which comes from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. You can see the sudden change. And also the change in temperature. Here what we’re showing is the consensus of, from several different groups as to how the average temperature of the earth’s surface looks like. Of course it was not easy to measure a thousand years ago because there were no thermometers but you can look at the width of tree rings, coral rings, there are any number of ways that you can infer what that average temperature was. But in recent years there, of course millions of measurements, thousands of measurements so you can take this proper average and clearly there is an increase. And now the question is, are these two phenomena connected? Sherry Rowland already pointed out that you can see the, there is a judge in the United States, already he gave a quote that states, that the consensus of the scientific community is that these two observations, change in the chemical composition and change in the temperature, are indeed connected. And that’s the consensus. But to make it even clearer. This is what this group of scientists, close to two thousand scientists, working just on a voluntary fashion, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. By the way, the chairman of this group is Rajendra Pachauri who will be, I believe with us, this Friday and it’s this group that shared the Peace Nobel Prize with Al Gore just last year, okay. But anyhow the point is that this group, in the fourth assessment report, I was in fact part of that group, we concluded that indeed there is a connection between those two sets of observations, change in composition, change in temperature. But we’re not really absolutely certain, that’s a nature of science. We only have ninety, ninety five percent probability that that’s the case. So it already, is a number of years ago, we wanted this group to be more sort of, to explain in clearer terms when there was scientific uncertainty, what we were talking about. So that using language so that’s it’s very likely or likely. In this case it’s very likely that it is indeed human activities that are causing the climate change, but it’s not absolutely certain. Also, just to continue one more, I’m just repeating as you see, a few slides. One more that the, both Sherry and Paul again talked about is, has to do with what was the composition of the atmosphere thousands of years ago, in fact hundreds of thousands of years ago and it’s amazing that you can actually tell what the composition was, at least in terms of the stable gases by analysing the air bubbles trapped in ice course. But I want to show this again just to tackle the following question. There are a number of people sceptics, not very well informed, that suggest that even among the scientific community but not, not really the experts but they always wonder, well climate has always been changing, has changed in the past so it’s not really a surprise that it’s changing again. How do we know it’s in fact a consequence of human activities? Well the point of this long break or is to indicate that there is a basic understanding of how climate change. What drives the formation of ice ages and so on and so forth and in fact again as Paul mentioned it is the Milankovitch cycles, it turns out that if you look in deeper at the parameters of the earth’s orbit and that’s classical mechanics, Newtonian mechanics. You can calculate with great accuracy how these parameters change with time, the frequency, the eccentricity the ellipticity and so on and with those types of changes, you can explain basically the occurrence of ice ages. They have to be amplified this, this, different stages. The temperature changes are amplified by the presence of this greenhouse gases. Again as we heard yesterday they have the ones that affect the thermal balance of the planet absorbing infra-red radiation. But the point is the following. With that basic understanding it’s clear that what we’re seeing just in this last century is not expected. We don’t expect temperature or climate to have changed as we observe it from natural causes. There’s, the parameters of the earth’s orbit again, that is all well established that that is not the cause this time. It’s something unexpected. Furthermore, I won’t have time to do it in great detail but what this group, the IPCC, by the way they don’t do research. But they survey the scientific literature in great detail. And so what they assess is so-called attribution, is this temperature change consistent with the cause being, this increase in greenhouse gases. Consistent from the point of view of the way temperature changes with altitude and with latitude the so-called fingerprints. And indeed that’s, that’s a case. It’s not consistent with the changes being attributable just to a change in solar intensity for example. It’s all, you also do, but not exclusively but it’s an important part of the proof has to do with computer models. You model an entire climate system. It’s very complicated that’s why you’re not absolutely certain. But the consistency is all there. So the conclusion again, just to emphasize it, is that the, it is human activities that are changing the climate, that’s a consensus of the well informed scientific community which has also very well documented in the literature and there were remarkably few if any, scientific papers I would call them, through the scientific papers that really put a serious question on these conclusions and meaning again that yes there is some probability that it might have happened naturally. Also we recall that we’re not talking about weather or temperature in any one given year. This is climate which is an average over what the weather is over a number of years. So having established all that, what do, why should we worry about this? If you look at the temperature change I show it’s less than one degree Celsius. Like one seven point eight so that looks very small. On the other hand if we consider that ice ages, the temperature change between an ice age and an inter glacial was again relatively small, maybe four to eight degrees Celsius. That’s because we’re talking about the global average. But the consequences are already clear. It’s not that we’re predicting climate change for the end of the century. We are already seeing it very clearly. Most glaciers are melting, not all of them but for example in the, Himalayas these are very important events because the glaciers feed the rivers that in turn feed literally hundreds of millions of people in Asia. And so there is a significant change of servable already glaciers in California for example are also clearly melting. What about events such as Katrina? These are very costly damaging events. This is what we are, call extreme weather events. And here is the situation. We cannot really tell for certain that Katrina is a consequence of climate change. We’re again not sure. But we can use statistics. It’s very clear that floods as well as intense hurricanes, two symptoms of extreme weather events, the frequency has increased quite clearly in all continents. So coming back to Katrina all we can say that statistically it fits the pattern very well. Again we cannot choose any one particular event and be certain that it’s caused by climate change but statistically the number of such events are very clearly increasing. We also have events such as wildfires in California. We had that many where I work so it’s clearly increasing, with time. And so are droughts. So the, what’s happening is that the amount of rain falling on the planet is not, hasn’t really changed that much but it’s changed the way it’s distributed. It comes in events that give rise to floods or droughts and droughts are particularly costly. You can see that, how the very dry land in just the last thirty, forty years has actually, the amount has actually doubled. Let’s go now to the point, to the question so what should we do about it first and then is it possible? And one way to discuss this is, with this diagram that I’m borrowing from, the story from Nicolas Stern, an economist in the United Kingdom where we talk, he talks, we know in the community we, they have done that before but he summarizes it very neatly. What are the impacts of climate change, as a function of the expected average temperature change at the earth’s surface, reminding you that so far we’re less than one degree. And we have all sorts of possible impacts, agriculture, health and so on, which I won’t discuss in any detail, just mention two of them just for completeness. The second arrow means that some impacts actually are beneficial, positive, perhaps in some northern countries the growing seasons will be longer. But most impacts are negative particularly as you get to the higher temperature changes. They become clearly very damaging effects of climate change. There is also an arrow somewhere towards the bottom which I’ll come back to which has to do with abrupt changes or almost irreversible changes that are indeed very worrisome. But if you examine then these potential impacts and you examine the cost in human induced, it’s possible to reach a consensus as, as has the European Union and most experts. Not just scientists now but economists and politicians and so on. The consensus being that it would be wise to attempt for the temperature the surface temperature not to rise above two degrees Celsius and that’s because it begins to be very dangerous, very worrisome. Here however, I need to make a point very clear. Sometimes you hear that the science tells us that we should not let the temperature go above two degrees. It’s not really the science. The scientists are very careful about it, this panel, the IPCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, makes a point about not making policy judgments. What scientists do is simply say okay if the temperature goes up this much this is what is likely to happen, if it goes this much more, that’s what is likely to happen. But the judgment, what is a reasonable goal to shoot for involves not just science, it also involves economics, policy issues and value judgments, so scientists do not have a particular right or expertise to talk about that type of risk assessment. So when we talk about this consensus, I can be giving an opinion but it’s then more as an individual not as a scientist but that consensus clearly among informed people, scientists and other experts is that indeed we should shoot for less than a two degree hopefully certainly less than two and a half or three degrees temperature change because we’re getting into very dangerous terrain if we let that happen. And then the next question is, is it possible? How do we manage for the temperature not to go above two or three, if in fact the projections are that if we do nothing it will go much higher than that. What we have here is a graph of emissions. Emissions versus time of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, you will recall there are others. I will refer to that also in a minute, and you heard that already from Paul and Sherry yesterday. But the trend is for the emissions to continue increasing quite dramatically and you can see where they come from, in fact China is emitting at the moment about as much as the United States in terms of carbon dioxide. Although the cumulative amounts mean that of course, that are still significantly larger for the United States. But it’s clear that both developed and developing countries need to do something about it. What needs to be done? Well here again is a graph of these emissions versus time for the future and what we would have to do, if we don’t want to go above two degrees is to change from where we are, which is the upper red curve to somewhere in the green or yellow curves. And that is a very big change considering that all this has to do with the way society uses energy, mostly coming from fossil fuels. So we really need a revolution in the way society functions to be able to switch so that we, we achieve that goal which by the way is equivalent to not letting the carbon dioxide amount in the atmosphere raise about certain concentration, three fifty, four fifty parts per medium. We could also talk about CO2 equivalents, if we add, not just carbon dioxide but methane nitrous oxide and so on, we could talk about the equivalent total amount. But CO2 is perhaps the most challenging one. And the question is can this be done? Is it possible to switch in this very drastic way? And the answer is basically yes. We do have existing technologies. With existing technologies in this decade and possibly next one, we can already achieve very major changes but it’s imperative that we also start developing aggressively better and newer technologies so that this can be done, not just in the next decade for, but during the rest of the century. What I have here is again a graph of emissions versus time and it’s a graph borrowed from my Princeton colleagues, Steve Pacala and Rob Socolow. And here is a summary if you want in terms of what the solution is. First of all there is no silver bullet. There is no simple solution such as ah, let’s just switch to nuclear energy. Unfortunately if you look at the details we cannot do that fast enough. So the simple answer is, we need to take many measures. At least the ten that are indicated here and each of them is contributing just a wedge, a small decrease in the total amount of emissions so we have to do them all basically. An important number, the top ones, the ones that are already beneficial for society even if the climate change were not an issue have to do with using energy much more efficiently than we’re doing it today. That can be done with, with the transportation sector, with cars for example, United States just very recently passed a law that, of certain efficiency standards Europe had that law already some time ago. China has one and so on, so that’s one example. In the, the building, say the construction of housing and so again it’s possible to have much more efficient buildings, houses and so on so we don’t need to use more energy and so on. So I could go along the list, in fact we would have a panel discussion I believe after the break where the topic will be this, some of these energies. But clearly you need renewable energy sources, wind solar and so on. And which are now just barely beginning to be developed. Perhaps I’ll just make two brief points. Nuclear is a very interesting question but it would take too much time to discuss in any detail but it is a solution we should have on the table, particularly for the new generation of nuclear power plants if they’re safer and have less problems in terms of accidents. Nuclear proliferation is still a very big worry in terms of the availability of material for bombs and so on, but it’s possible. It’s an option that many agree, now agree in contrast with what the situation was a number of years ago that it’s an option society should have. It’s still regrettably costly but if you consider the investment as a long term investment, it turns out it does pay for itself. Anyhow nuclear is the subject of discussion. Bio fuels is also, can be discussed a lot for example using ethanol from corn as is the case in the United States. It’s only justifiable in terms of an energy supply in the United States, not to depend so much from a fall in oil, but it doesn’t have net environmental benefits because too much fossil fuel energy is used to generate that ethanol. So there are ways to generate bio fuels perhaps, from sugar cane in Brazil is a better example where it’s more favourable environmentally. But here again the bottom line is that there are second and third generation bio fuels that we should have that will indeed be much better for the environment and just continue using fossil fuels. And if we want to continue using fossil fuels there is only one way to do it safely in the future which is to capture and store the carbon dioxide that is emitted, and store it in for example, saline domes, on the one, not to let it go to the, to the atmosphere. Perhaps I should mention here briefly again that there is also the general idea in, in the community and particularly in the business community that we have a very serious problem that we will run out of oil in the next few decades. Two points. We’re not running out of fossil fuels because there is a lot of coal, okay, the United States and China again are examples of countries that generate a lot of electricity from coal and that is going to last a long time. Second indeed, we are going to run out of oil and that’s why it’s imperative to develop new sources of energy. But long before we run out of oil, we’re going to run out of atmosphere, or rather the capacity of the atmosphere to clean the emissions. So that cannot be the solution to the climate change program. We need to act much before that’s really the problem. Okay so the summary here is that there are ways to solve the problem, to address the problem, to reduce emissions with existing technologies, although we aggressively need to develop the newer and better technologies. But now I want to turn on to another point which is, which has to do with, again I want to review, why is it that it’s reasonable to sort of have a goal of two degrees or around there abouts in terms of a maximum temperature change. First of all what I want to show you is that we’re talking about statistics. This graph climate sensitivity talks about predicted temperature changes for, in this case for a particular model in the United Kingdom. And you can see that you have a distribution curve, depending on how much greenhouse gas you will end up in the atmosphere. So you’ll have to deal with statistics and one way to look at it is, I’m borrowing this now from my colleagues at the MIT, I spent many years at MIT, so my colleagues Ron Prinn, an atmospheric scientist and J.J. Cullen an economist, have been working together with a very complete model of climate and the economy of the planet. And this is one way to represent this idea in terms of risk, particular to the larger community, to the community of decision makers or politicians if you want. So imagine for a moment you are a politician and not a student. And I am explaining to you what is going on. I say we’re actually playing a game which is almost like a roulette game and if we look at the roulette into the left that’s where we are now. We’re gambling, we could put a number there, let’s say we play a game of a hundred thousand dollars. And I tell you if you win, you, to win the hundred thousand dollars the temperature has to increase less and to decrease. So you know you have some chances according to this roulette, better than twenty five percent or so, but not very big chances. If you really want to win you would be better off with the other roulette because we increase the chances that you will get. And the question is what will it cost, what does it cost to change roulette? I mean how much are you willing to give me from your hundred thousand dollars should you win it to change the roulette? And that’s of course what the economic studies are all about. So I think for a second what, how much would you willing to, to give up from a hundred thousand and I went to a survey here but it’s possible that it’s a reasonable amount to say okay well ten thousand, maybe twenty thousand or even thirty thousand dollars is what I would be willing to pay to move from the left to the right because I, I increase my chances. What is surprising is that what the economic stories indicate is that it only costs about one or two percent of global GDP. So it’s really only a thousand or two thousand dollars what you have to pay to change roulette. It’s a bargain. Why don’t we do it, that’s what the planet really should do. There is a worry though, this roulette, this, what my colleagues at MIT have calculated several years ago, in fact since the IPCC report came out, the more current findings all indicate that the problem is more urgent. Quite a bit more urgent than we had anticipated so the more recent roulettes that my colleagues just published look a lot worse and in particular I want to point out what’s happening with the red points there. You, you see there is a certain chance, maybe only ten percent, twenty percent that the temperature of the planet will increase more than five degrees. But that would be almost catastrophic, if you look at the details, that’s extremely dangerous. With a new roulette, that’s now a lot more likely. Twenty five percent probability that we’re really in trouble and again changing roulette, paying that amount that we’re talking about really makes a lot of sense, okay. And why? So let me briefly explain what has happened, why have things changed in these recent years in terms of assessing what has happened? You saw again yesterday this, this graph representing the contributions from the different forcing agents, CO2, all the greenhouse gases and then atmospheric particles. It turns out that particular sulphate particles from burning coal, counteract climate change. They make the planet more hazy and reflect part of solar radiation. So what the community of experts have done, they have their papers and so on, have under estimated this compensating effect, and so the more recent studies, I’ve looked at it very closely, indicate that actually the sensitivity of the planet to these increases in greenhouse gases is larger. So if we reduce the number of those sulphate particles as we should for public health reasons, and in order to have a cleaner planet, we’re making climate change, forcing worse. But we have to deal with that and the point is that it, anyhow that we’re expecting because of this, that the risk of these almost catastrophic events to increase. So that’s the main reason but there are others. Another important reason is the realization that carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere, in the environment much longer than really have been anticipated. It’s not just a hundred years but a recent paper by Susan Solomon and colleagues and so on, it’s practically millennium. So we’re making almost irreversible changes to the environment to the extent that we let this CO2 accumulate. And here is one additional big worry. What we call tipping points, okay. These are instabilities of the system, since time is short I’ll just let you read about it. But here is, let me graphically indicate what is happening. If we represent temperature of climate by the position of this little ball, in this diagram and we start from the front, we’re pushing the climate system, changing the shape of the stability diagram in such a way that the ball is moving slightly to the left. It’s getting warmer. But what we’re worried is that at some point, there is a tipping point. The ball will move quite significantly with very little additional forcing and that’s what we call either the tipping point, an abrupt climate change or something like that and the big worry is that we have a risk. This is now a paper from my colleagues, Ramanathan and Feng at Scripps. If you look at the temperature distribution that something we’re already committed to, and you look at various possibilities of the so-called tipping points. Arctic summer ice is already melting so that’s a tipping point we already achieved practically irreversible because once it melts it will take at least a millennium even if we clean the atmosphere for things to recover. But then there are other issues. The glaciers that I mentioned before, Greenland ice sheet, the Amazon rainforest could, could be in big trouble if you push the climate system far enough. Or the ocean circulation and so on. If the west Antarctic sheet were to melt you, you would have many meters of a sea level rise. Some of this, this has been analysed, I want to detail some of these tipping points will occur relatively soon and others will take many decades. But the bottom line here is that we have to think of what we’re doing to the, to the planet in this risk assessment point of view, giving a lot of weight to the risk of reaching these tipping points, even if it’s not the most likely thing. This has been analysed formally by economists, well particularly Martin Weitzman in, at Harvard with the following conclusion. I mentioned just a little while ago that the economic models suggest that it’s reasonable to make the changes I suggested. To shoot for two degrees as a maximum change because it’s something that will not cost very much. If you wanted to do that same change very fast, the cost might increase quite dramatically. So you need to give the economy some time to move. But according to Weitzman in these formal ways but according to just simple judgment that we have, we should not play roulette with the planet. If there is a ten percent risk for each of those tipping points, the cumulative risk that something drastic will happen begins to be very worrisome. Who would climb in an airplane if they tell you that there’s a ten percent risk that both engines will fail. You have the choice of waiting a few hours and taking the next one. You might have to pay ten percent more for the tickets. Well very few people I think would want to go into the first plane just to be there a few hours earlier, okay. So that’s what we’re talking about. We’re talking about what is dominance from the point of view of the economic issue is the fact that you have this fat tails as we call it, the distribution is really not just a Gaussian but there’s a significant probability that these red areas in the roulette that I mentioned will materialize. It’s a risk that is not wise to take. But now I summarise it not just from, for economic reasons but really it’s a matter of ethics. Our generation has the responsibility to protect the planet for future generations who will be highly responsible knowing that there is such a risk, just to gamble and say well it’s possible that not much will happen. But to let the planet sort of deteriorate so that it would be much harder for future generations to, to achieve the same standards of living that we have. I see that my time is basically running out so I just want to summarise briefly that it’s very important for the planet to reach a consensus and essentially for these actions to take place there has to be a price signal into the economy. The price of emissions has to be incorporated to the economy. You cannot achieve all this just through voluntary actions. Furthermore there has to be more to research, there has to be collaboration with, with developing countries, it’s imperative that developed and developing countries work together. The existing Kyoto Protocol really doesn’t work very well but the expectation is that in Copenhagen at the end of this year, something will happen so that developed and developing countries will really collaborate to solve this problem. And let me just finish seeing that my time is really up although I didn’t mention, I didn’t mention it very accurately but I want to finish with this story of the Montreal Protocol that again you already heard it yesterday from Paul and Sherry. To show an example that it is indeed possible for the planet to reach an agreement. Most nations on the planet or more than a hundred and ninety two, agreed already to phase out completely the CFCs and this is in connection with protecting the ozone layer, by the way because the CFCs are also the greenhouse gases, the Montreal Protocol has done a lot more, at least five or six times more for the climate change than the Kyoto Protocol so far. But the point is that it is possible, it is possible to reach an agreement and of course much more difficult if it involves energy because it’s important for the economy but let me just go to the, I’m going to skip things, I no longer have time to which is that we can do the economic studies much more carefully and show that it’s certainly beneficial but let me just end with this graph again that you, that shows the sudden explosions. And I will leave you with this final thought. The planet has been mostly affected, contaminated if you want with just a fraction of this population we have at the moment, one fourth maybe, which is the developed countries because of the way the economies have grown. Three fourths of that population is striving to reach the same standards of living to have rapid economic growth and they suddenly have the right to do that, developing countries. But the huge challenge, particularly for the younger generations, for you students, is somehow or other to allow that to happen, standards of living to increase, poverty to be eradicated. It’s an enormous challenge on its own but in a very different way we cannot possibly do it the same way that the developed countries have done it so far in terms of using energy, contaminating the planet and so on. The planet is just too small to do that, so we need to develop new ways to use energy. New ways to function much more efficiently, because of course we can in no way deny the right of all these people to have a huge, to increase in their standard of living and it is not just economics which makes a lot of sense but it’s a very strong responsibility from an ethical point of view. Thank you for your attention.

Mario Molina cautions about pushing the climate system past a tipping point
(00:28:07 - 00:31:34)

 

Despite the flood of opinions on what is the baseline temperature that any rise in temperatures should be compared to, how much of an impact on global warming is caused by burning fossil fuels, and what would be the outcome of a warmer planet, there is an underlying fact that is beyond dispute: humans are changing the planet and affecting the Earth System, not only the atmosphere, but also land and oceans. All of the natural cycles are linked together and imbalances caused by human-driven actions, such as wide-scale deforestation, changes in the chemistry of the oceans or emissions of sulphur dioxide trigger cascading impacts on the physical and biological environment. This magnitude of anthropogenic influence has given rise to a new geological epoch, Anthropocene, a term popularised by Paul Crutzen.

If human influence is dominant to such an extent, the natural question is, could this be the effect of an overcrowded planet? Human population has grown rapidly in the previous century, as explained by Nicolaas Bloembergen during the 47th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting:

 

Nicolaas Bloembergen gives an outlook on population growth
(00:03:54 - 00:04:35)

 

During his lecture in the following year, F. Sherwood Rowland asks, how can we take care of a burgeoning population without paying the environmental penalty? He underlines that population growth is one side of the coin, but it is rising affluence that is the bigger issue, and with it an unappeasable demand for energy.

 

Sherwood Rowland on the challenges of rising affluence
(00:27:13 - 00:30:26)

 

“We’ve been using energy as if there are no environmental problems associated with it”, said Rowland. To put this into perspective, it is worth considering that between 1970 and 1997, global energy use had risen by 87%. Moreover, 50% of the world’s oil production to date has been used since 1980. Vast reserves of coal, oil and natural gas are still able to meet these abnormally high energy demands and power the economy. And despite many predictions warning of an energy apocalypse in the near future, fossil fuels, especially coal and unconventional natural gas resources, will be available to use for centuries to come. The question is, should we use these reserves, and what will happen if we continue down the path of burning non-renewable resources?

 

Mario Molina (2009) - Energy and Climate Change - Is There a Solution?

Well, I’m going to continue with a topic you heard yesterday from my colleagues, Sherry Roland and Paul Crutzen. But as you see I’m going to emphasize a bit more the aspects of the solution to the problem. But I want to start by briefly reviewing where we left the theme yesterday. First, just to remind you of a few of the things that we heard very briefly. Paul Crutzen talked about this situation that we are now in, the anthropocene, that we’re so many people on this planet that we’re actually affecting the way the planet functions. And all I want to emphasize with this picture here is that our planet is really vulnerable from space, the blue planet really looks vulnerable. And in particular we are worried about the limited natural resources that it has and the fact that with over six billion people on the planet we are really stressing, we’re putting pressure on this limited amount of natural resources. But in particular we’re focusing on the atmosphere. The atmosphere from space as you see it, it’s very thin, you can only see the clouds. But the atmosphere itself is like the skin of an apple. It’s very thin and that’s why it’s feasible then, it’s understandable that human activities are really affecting it. We also saw both Sherry and Paul, they indicated how the chemical composition, excuse me, the chemical composition of the atmosphere is changing and it’s changing particularly in, in recent decades. You can see very easily how it’s a consequence of human activities and in fact Paul showed this particular view graph which comes from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. You can see the sudden change. And also the change in temperature. Here what we’re showing is the consensus of, from several different groups as to how the average temperature of the earth’s surface looks like. Of course it was not easy to measure a thousand years ago because there were no thermometers but you can look at the width of tree rings, coral rings, there are any number of ways that you can infer what that average temperature was. But in recent years there, of course millions of measurements, thousands of measurements so you can take this proper average and clearly there is an increase. And now the question is, are these two phenomena connected? Sherry Rowland already pointed out that you can see the, there is a judge in the United States, already he gave a quote that states, that the consensus of the scientific community is that these two observations, change in the chemical composition and change in the temperature, are indeed connected. And that’s the consensus. But to make it even clearer. This is what this group of scientists, close to two thousand scientists, working just on a voluntary fashion, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. By the way, the chairman of this group is Rajendra Pachauri who will be, I believe with us, this Friday and it’s this group that shared the Peace Nobel Prize with Al Gore just last year, okay. But anyhow the point is that this group, in the fourth assessment report, I was in fact part of that group, we concluded that indeed there is a connection between those two sets of observations, change in composition, change in temperature. But we’re not really absolutely certain, that’s a nature of science. We only have ninety, ninety five percent probability that that’s the case. So it already, is a number of years ago, we wanted this group to be more sort of, to explain in clearer terms when there was scientific uncertainty, what we were talking about. So that using language so that’s it’s very likely or likely. In this case it’s very likely that it is indeed human activities that are causing the climate change, but it’s not absolutely certain. Also, just to continue one more, I’m just repeating as you see, a few slides. One more that the, both Sherry and Paul again talked about is, has to do with what was the composition of the atmosphere thousands of years ago, in fact hundreds of thousands of years ago and it’s amazing that you can actually tell what the composition was, at least in terms of the stable gases by analysing the air bubbles trapped in ice course. But I want to show this again just to tackle the following question. There are a number of people sceptics, not very well informed, that suggest that even among the scientific community but not, not really the experts but they always wonder, well climate has always been changing, has changed in the past so it’s not really a surprise that it’s changing again. How do we know it’s in fact a consequence of human activities? Well the point of this long break or is to indicate that there is a basic understanding of how climate change. What drives the formation of ice ages and so on and so forth and in fact again as Paul mentioned it is the Milankovitch cycles, it turns out that if you look in deeper at the parameters of the earth’s orbit and that’s classical mechanics, Newtonian mechanics. You can calculate with great accuracy how these parameters change with time, the frequency, the eccentricity the ellipticity and so on and with those types of changes, you can explain basically the occurrence of ice ages. They have to be amplified this, this, different stages. The temperature changes are amplified by the presence of this greenhouse gases. Again as we heard yesterday they have the ones that affect the thermal balance of the planet absorbing infra-red radiation. But the point is the following. With that basic understanding it’s clear that what we’re seeing just in this last century is not expected. We don’t expect temperature or climate to have changed as we observe it from natural causes. There’s, the parameters of the earth’s orbit again, that is all well established that that is not the cause this time. It’s something unexpected. Furthermore, I won’t have time to do it in great detail but what this group, the IPCC, by the way they don’t do research. But they survey the scientific literature in great detail. And so what they assess is so-called attribution, is this temperature change consistent with the cause being, this increase in greenhouse gases. Consistent from the point of view of the way temperature changes with altitude and with latitude the so-called fingerprints. And indeed that’s, that’s a case. It’s not consistent with the changes being attributable just to a change in solar intensity for example. It’s all, you also do, but not exclusively but it’s an important part of the proof has to do with computer models. You model an entire climate system. It’s very complicated that’s why you’re not absolutely certain. But the consistency is all there. So the conclusion again, just to emphasize it, is that the, it is human activities that are changing the climate, that’s a consensus of the well informed scientific community which has also very well documented in the literature and there were remarkably few if any, scientific papers I would call them, through the scientific papers that really put a serious question on these conclusions and meaning again that yes there is some probability that it might have happened naturally. Also we recall that we’re not talking about weather or temperature in any one given year. This is climate which is an average over what the weather is over a number of years. So having established all that, what do, why should we worry about this? If you look at the temperature change I show it’s less than one degree Celsius. Like one seven point eight so that looks very small. On the other hand if we consider that ice ages, the temperature change between an ice age and an inter glacial was again relatively small, maybe four to eight degrees Celsius. That’s because we’re talking about the global average. But the consequences are already clear. It’s not that we’re predicting climate change for the end of the century. We are already seeing it very clearly. Most glaciers are melting, not all of them but for example in the, Himalayas these are very important events because the glaciers feed the rivers that in turn feed literally hundreds of millions of people in Asia. And so there is a significant change of servable already glaciers in California for example are also clearly melting. What about events such as Katrina? These are very costly damaging events. This is what we are, call extreme weather events. And here is the situation. We cannot really tell for certain that Katrina is a consequence of climate change. We’re again not sure. But we can use statistics. It’s very clear that floods as well as intense hurricanes, two symptoms of extreme weather events, the frequency has increased quite clearly in all continents. So coming back to Katrina all we can say that statistically it fits the pattern very well. Again we cannot choose any one particular event and be certain that it’s caused by climate change but statistically the number of such events are very clearly increasing. We also have events such as wildfires in California. We had that many where I work so it’s clearly increasing, with time. And so are droughts. So the, what’s happening is that the amount of rain falling on the planet is not, hasn’t really changed that much but it’s changed the way it’s distributed. It comes in events that give rise to floods or droughts and droughts are particularly costly. You can see that, how the very dry land in just the last thirty, forty years has actually, the amount has actually doubled. Let’s go now to the point, to the question so what should we do about it first and then is it possible? And one way to discuss this is, with this diagram that I’m borrowing from, the story from Nicolas Stern, an economist in the United Kingdom where we talk, he talks, we know in the community we, they have done that before but he summarizes it very neatly. What are the impacts of climate change, as a function of the expected average temperature change at the earth’s surface, reminding you that so far we’re less than one degree. And we have all sorts of possible impacts, agriculture, health and so on, which I won’t discuss in any detail, just mention two of them just for completeness. The second arrow means that some impacts actually are beneficial, positive, perhaps in some northern countries the growing seasons will be longer. But most impacts are negative particularly as you get to the higher temperature changes. They become clearly very damaging effects of climate change. There is also an arrow somewhere towards the bottom which I’ll come back to which has to do with abrupt changes or almost irreversible changes that are indeed very worrisome. But if you examine then these potential impacts and you examine the cost in human induced, it’s possible to reach a consensus as, as has the European Union and most experts. Not just scientists now but economists and politicians and so on. The consensus being that it would be wise to attempt for the temperature the surface temperature not to rise above two degrees Celsius and that’s because it begins to be very dangerous, very worrisome. Here however, I need to make a point very clear. Sometimes you hear that the science tells us that we should not let the temperature go above two degrees. It’s not really the science. The scientists are very careful about it, this panel, the IPCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, makes a point about not making policy judgments. What scientists do is simply say okay if the temperature goes up this much this is what is likely to happen, if it goes this much more, that’s what is likely to happen. But the judgment, what is a reasonable goal to shoot for involves not just science, it also involves economics, policy issues and value judgments, so scientists do not have a particular right or expertise to talk about that type of risk assessment. So when we talk about this consensus, I can be giving an opinion but it’s then more as an individual not as a scientist but that consensus clearly among informed people, scientists and other experts is that indeed we should shoot for less than a two degree hopefully certainly less than two and a half or three degrees temperature change because we’re getting into very dangerous terrain if we let that happen. And then the next question is, is it possible? How do we manage for the temperature not to go above two or three, if in fact the projections are that if we do nothing it will go much higher than that. What we have here is a graph of emissions. Emissions versus time of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, you will recall there are others. I will refer to that also in a minute, and you heard that already from Paul and Sherry yesterday. But the trend is for the emissions to continue increasing quite dramatically and you can see where they come from, in fact China is emitting at the moment about as much as the United States in terms of carbon dioxide. Although the cumulative amounts mean that of course, that are still significantly larger for the United States. But it’s clear that both developed and developing countries need to do something about it. What needs to be done? Well here again is a graph of these emissions versus time for the future and what we would have to do, if we don’t want to go above two degrees is to change from where we are, which is the upper red curve to somewhere in the green or yellow curves. And that is a very big change considering that all this has to do with the way society uses energy, mostly coming from fossil fuels. So we really need a revolution in the way society functions to be able to switch so that we, we achieve that goal which by the way is equivalent to not letting the carbon dioxide amount in the atmosphere raise about certain concentration, three fifty, four fifty parts per medium. We could also talk about CO2 equivalents, if we add, not just carbon dioxide but methane nitrous oxide and so on, we could talk about the equivalent total amount. But CO2 is perhaps the most challenging one. And the question is can this be done? Is it possible to switch in this very drastic way? And the answer is basically yes. We do have existing technologies. With existing technologies in this decade and possibly next one, we can already achieve very major changes but it’s imperative that we also start developing aggressively better and newer technologies so that this can be done, not just in the next decade for, but during the rest of the century. What I have here is again a graph of emissions versus time and it’s a graph borrowed from my Princeton colleagues, Steve Pacala and Rob Socolow. And here is a summary if you want in terms of what the solution is. First of all there is no silver bullet. There is no simple solution such as ah, let’s just switch to nuclear energy. Unfortunately if you look at the details we cannot do that fast enough. So the simple answer is, we need to take many measures. At least the ten that are indicated here and each of them is contributing just a wedge, a small decrease in the total amount of emissions so we have to do them all basically. An important number, the top ones, the ones that are already beneficial for society even if the climate change were not an issue have to do with using energy much more efficiently than we’re doing it today. That can be done with, with the transportation sector, with cars for example, United States just very recently passed a law that, of certain efficiency standards Europe had that law already some time ago. China has one and so on, so that’s one example. In the, the building, say the construction of housing and so again it’s possible to have much more efficient buildings, houses and so on so we don’t need to use more energy and so on. So I could go along the list, in fact we would have a panel discussion I believe after the break where the topic will be this, some of these energies. But clearly you need renewable energy sources, wind solar and so on. And which are now just barely beginning to be developed. Perhaps I’ll just make two brief points. Nuclear is a very interesting question but it would take too much time to discuss in any detail but it is a solution we should have on the table, particularly for the new generation of nuclear power plants if they’re safer and have less problems in terms of accidents. Nuclear proliferation is still a very big worry in terms of the availability of material for bombs and so on, but it’s possible. It’s an option that many agree, now agree in contrast with what the situation was a number of years ago that it’s an option society should have. It’s still regrettably costly but if you consider the investment as a long term investment, it turns out it does pay for itself. Anyhow nuclear is the subject of discussion. Bio fuels is also, can be discussed a lot for example using ethanol from corn as is the case in the United States. It’s only justifiable in terms of an energy supply in the United States, not to depend so much from a fall in oil, but it doesn’t have net environmental benefits because too much fossil fuel energy is used to generate that ethanol. So there are ways to generate bio fuels perhaps, from sugar cane in Brazil is a better example where it’s more favourable environmentally. But here again the bottom line is that there are second and third generation bio fuels that we should have that will indeed be much better for the environment and just continue using fossil fuels. And if we want to continue using fossil fuels there is only one way to do it safely in the future which is to capture and store the carbon dioxide that is emitted, and store it in for example, saline domes, on the one, not to let it go to the, to the atmosphere. Perhaps I should mention here briefly again that there is also the general idea in, in the community and particularly in the business community that we have a very serious problem that we will run out of oil in the next few decades. Two points. We’re not running out of fossil fuels because there is a lot of coal, okay, the United States and China again are examples of countries that generate a lot of electricity from coal and that is going to last a long time. Second indeed, we are going to run out of oil and that’s why it’s imperative to develop new sources of energy. But long before we run out of oil, we’re going to run out of atmosphere, or rather the capacity of the atmosphere to clean the emissions. So that cannot be the solution to the climate change program. We need to act much before that’s really the problem. Okay so the summary here is that there are ways to solve the problem, to address the problem, to reduce emissions with existing technologies, although we aggressively need to develop the newer and better technologies. But now I want to turn on to another point which is, which has to do with, again I want to review, why is it that it’s reasonable to sort of have a goal of two degrees or around there abouts in terms of a maximum temperature change. First of all what I want to show you is that we’re talking about statistics. This graph climate sensitivity talks about predicted temperature changes for, in this case for a particular model in the United Kingdom. And you can see that you have a distribution curve, depending on how much greenhouse gas you will end up in the atmosphere. So you’ll have to deal with statistics and one way to look at it is, I’m borrowing this now from my colleagues at the MIT, I spent many years at MIT, so my colleagues Ron Prinn, an atmospheric scientist and J.J. Cullen an economist, have been working together with a very complete model of climate and the economy of the planet. And this is one way to represent this idea in terms of risk, particular to the larger community, to the community of decision makers or politicians if you want. So imagine for a moment you are a politician and not a student. And I am explaining to you what is going on. I say we’re actually playing a game which is almost like a roulette game and if we look at the roulette into the left that’s where we are now. We’re gambling, we could put a number there, let’s say we play a game of a hundred thousand dollars. And I tell you if you win, you, to win the hundred thousand dollars the temperature has to increase less and to decrease. So you know you have some chances according to this roulette, better than twenty five percent or so, but not very big chances. If you really want to win you would be better off with the other roulette because we increase the chances that you will get. And the question is what will it cost, what does it cost to change roulette? I mean how much are you willing to give me from your hundred thousand dollars should you win it to change the roulette? And that’s of course what the economic studies are all about. So I think for a second what, how much would you willing to, to give up from a hundred thousand and I went to a survey here but it’s possible that it’s a reasonable amount to say okay well ten thousand, maybe twenty thousand or even thirty thousand dollars is what I would be willing to pay to move from the left to the right because I, I increase my chances. What is surprising is that what the economic stories indicate is that it only costs about one or two percent of global GDP. So it’s really only a thousand or two thousand dollars what you have to pay to change roulette. It’s a bargain. Why don’t we do it, that’s what the planet really should do. There is a worry though, this roulette, this, what my colleagues at MIT have calculated several years ago, in fact since the IPCC report came out, the more current findings all indicate that the problem is more urgent. Quite a bit more urgent than we had anticipated so the more recent roulettes that my colleagues just published look a lot worse and in particular I want to point out what’s happening with the red points there. You, you see there is a certain chance, maybe only ten percent, twenty percent that the temperature of the planet will increase more than five degrees. But that would be almost catastrophic, if you look at the details, that’s extremely dangerous. With a new roulette, that’s now a lot more likely. Twenty five percent probability that we’re really in trouble and again changing roulette, paying that amount that we’re talking about really makes a lot of sense, okay. And why? So let me briefly explain what has happened, why have things changed in these recent years in terms of assessing what has happened? You saw again yesterday this, this graph representing the contributions from the different forcing agents, CO2, all the greenhouse gases and then atmospheric particles. It turns out that particular sulphate particles from burning coal, counteract climate change. They make the planet more hazy and reflect part of solar radiation. So what the community of experts have done, they have their papers and so on, have under estimated this compensating effect, and so the more recent studies, I’ve looked at it very closely, indicate that actually the sensitivity of the planet to these increases in greenhouse gases is larger. So if we reduce the number of those sulphate particles as we should for public health reasons, and in order to have a cleaner planet, we’re making climate change, forcing worse. But we have to deal with that and the point is that it, anyhow that we’re expecting because of this, that the risk of these almost catastrophic events to increase. So that’s the main reason but there are others. Another important reason is the realization that carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere, in the environment much longer than really have been anticipated. It’s not just a hundred years but a recent paper by Susan Solomon and colleagues and so on, it’s practically millennium. So we’re making almost irreversible changes to the environment to the extent that we let this CO2 accumulate. And here is one additional big worry. What we call tipping points, okay. These are instabilities of the system, since time is short I’ll just let you read about it. But here is, let me graphically indicate what is happening. If we represent temperature of climate by the position of this little ball, in this diagram and we start from the front, we’re pushing the climate system, changing the shape of the stability diagram in such a way that the ball is moving slightly to the left. It’s getting warmer. But what we’re worried is that at some point, there is a tipping point. The ball will move quite significantly with very little additional forcing and that’s what we call either the tipping point, an abrupt climate change or something like that and the big worry is that we have a risk. This is now a paper from my colleagues, Ramanathan and Feng at Scripps. If you look at the temperature distribution that something we’re already committed to, and you look at various possibilities of the so-called tipping points. Arctic summer ice is already melting so that’s a tipping point we already achieved practically irreversible because once it melts it will take at least a millennium even if we clean the atmosphere for things to recover. But then there are other issues. The glaciers that I mentioned before, Greenland ice sheet, the Amazon rainforest could, could be in big trouble if you push the climate system far enough. Or the ocean circulation and so on. If the west Antarctic sheet were to melt you, you would have many meters of a sea level rise. Some of this, this has been analysed, I want to detail some of these tipping points will occur relatively soon and others will take many decades. But the bottom line here is that we have to think of what we’re doing to the, to the planet in this risk assessment point of view, giving a lot of weight to the risk of reaching these tipping points, even if it’s not the most likely thing. This has been analysed formally by economists, well particularly Martin Weitzman in, at Harvard with the following conclusion. I mentioned just a little while ago that the economic models suggest that it’s reasonable to make the changes I suggested. To shoot for two degrees as a maximum change because it’s something that will not cost very much. If you wanted to do that same change very fast, the cost might increase quite dramatically. So you need to give the economy some time to move. But according to Weitzman in these formal ways but according to just simple judgment that we have, we should not play roulette with the planet. If there is a ten percent risk for each of those tipping points, the cumulative risk that something drastic will happen begins to be very worrisome. Who would climb in an airplane if they tell you that there’s a ten percent risk that both engines will fail. You have the choice of waiting a few hours and taking the next one. You might have to pay ten percent more for the tickets. Well very few people I think would want to go into the first plane just to be there a few hours earlier, okay. So that’s what we’re talking about. We’re talking about what is dominance from the point of view of the economic issue is the fact that you have this fat tails as we call it, the distribution is really not just a Gaussian but there’s a significant probability that these red areas in the roulette that I mentioned will materialize. It’s a risk that is not wise to take. But now I summarise it not just from, for economic reasons but really it’s a matter of ethics. Our generation has the responsibility to protect the planet for future generations who will be highly responsible knowing that there is such a risk, just to gamble and say well it’s possible that not much will happen. But to let the planet sort of deteriorate so that it would be much harder for future generations to, to achieve the same standards of living that we have. I see that my time is basically running out so I just want to summarise briefly that it’s very important for the planet to reach a consensus and essentially for these actions to take place there has to be a price signal into the economy. The price of emissions has to be incorporated to the economy. You cannot achieve all this just through voluntary actions. Furthermore there has to be more to research, there has to be collaboration with, with developing countries, it’s imperative that developed and developing countries work together. The existing Kyoto Protocol really doesn’t work very well but the expectation is that in Copenhagen at the end of this year, something will happen so that developed and developing countries will really collaborate to solve this problem. And let me just finish seeing that my time is really up although I didn’t mention, I didn’t mention it very accurately but I want to finish with this story of the Montreal Protocol that again you already heard it yesterday from Paul and Sherry. To show an example that it is indeed possible for the planet to reach an agreement. Most nations on the planet or more than a hundred and ninety two, agreed already to phase out completely the CFCs and this is in connection with protecting the ozone layer, by the way because the CFCs are also the greenhouse gases, the Montreal Protocol has done a lot more, at least five or six times more for the climate change than the Kyoto Protocol so far. But the point is that it is possible, it is possible to reach an agreement and of course much more difficult if it involves energy because it’s important for the economy but let me just go to the, I’m going to skip things, I no longer have time to which is that we can do the economic studies much more carefully and show that it’s certainly beneficial but let me just end with this graph again that you, that shows the sudden explosions. And I will leave you with this final thought. The planet has been mostly affected, contaminated if you want with just a fraction of this population we have at the moment, one fourth maybe, which is the developed countries because of the way the economies have grown. Three fourths of that population is striving to reach the same standards of living to have rapid economic growth and they suddenly have the right to do that, developing countries. But the huge challenge, particularly for the younger generations, for you students, is somehow or other to allow that to happen, standards of living to increase, poverty to be eradicated. It’s an enormous challenge on its own but in a very different way we cannot possibly do it the same way that the developed countries have done it so far in terms of using energy, contaminating the planet and so on. The planet is just too small to do that, so we need to develop new ways to use energy. New ways to function much more efficiently, because of course we can in no way deny the right of all these people to have a huge, to increase in their standard of living and it is not just economics which makes a lot of sense but it’s a very strong responsibility from an ethical point of view. Thank you for your attention.

Mario Molina comments on the availability of fossil fuels
(00:21:03 - 00:21:57)


During a recent Meeting in Lindau, Physics Nobel Laureate Carlo Rubbia presented data on current and future carbon dioxide emissions, as well as only minor changes in the future proportion of energy sources, as predicted by the International Energy Agency.

 

Carlo Rubbia (2016) - The Future of Energy

We can see the clock started. We have 30 minutes, from here it's 29:59 - you lost 4 seconds. (Laughter) Thank you very much. Now we are going to move ourselves to another subject which is also very relevant to the future of mankind, which is the future of energy. And at the beginning I will start to discuss briefly the climate of the past, which is a clear premise for its future. The Earth was created about 4.56 billion years ago, much later than the Big Bang. The complex multi-cellular organic life was almost entirely born during the last 600 million years. Here you can see the temperature of planet Earth over the last 600 million years. You see there have been many changes from low and high temperatures. Some very warm temperatures have taken place down to glaciation. And in some instances we reached almost ice at the level of the equator. And various other periods were much higher and warmer than that. The last million years is represented by a large number of periods in which glaciations were reaching the equator and combined with "climate optima", about today’s temperature. And now the whole history of mankind is based on a remarkable uniform period, which you see in this graph, during the last 10,000 years, which has permitted to sustain the development of human civilisation. So the little trace we have here at the end has been the one which has made us be what we are today. If you look at these things: the last period, for instance, using Vostok ice core from the Antarctica. You can see that the situation is characterised by very short interglacial periods, equal to present warm air presence. Surrounded by very long glacial periods over the last half a billion years. You can see the probable beginning of the Homo sapiens occurred something like 300,000 years ago. That the earliest Homo sapiens moving to Africa was about 100,000 years ago. And agriculture, which is the beginning of our present civilization, only occured about 10,000 years ago. Notice the shortness of the warm period over very long glacial periods. And the question is, of course, the modern time - how long will it continue, how long will it last from this point of view? If you go on a shorter timescale and you look at the last 2,000 years, you can observe for instance in the northern hemisphere the natural changes between cooler and warmer conditions on a period which is roughly over 1,000 years. In Roman times the temperature was warmer than today. Then we had the dark ages in the middle of the millenium. And then around the year 1000 the temperature came up again. We had a little ice age around 1600/1700. And now we are coming to today’s situation. You can see that warmer and colder periods have been alternating. Extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. The current mean temperature variations relative to the variations are indicated in this graph with something like 2 standard deviation bars. At the present moment we have a major new phenomenon developing: the emergence of what is called "anthropogenic era". The permanence of the unique long stable period after the inter-glacial period has been essential to create and sustain life and civilisation as they are today. And, of course, it is an essential element for survival that we must preserve at all cost. But, as well-known, we are presently facing a new phenomenon which was coined by Eugene Stoermer and popularised by the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen: the emergence of a man made Anthropogenic era. For the first time, human activities may strongly influence the future of the Earth's climate. For instance, since 1750, about 1 million of million tonnes, 1000 Gtons, of CO2 have been injected into the atmosphere to which many other pollutants have to be added. The first sign of such an Anthropogenic era may have been already detected. This effect should be curbed to avoid the irreversible effects of a major climatic change. The amount of CO2 accumulation is, of course, enormous. You can see here the distribution over the planet. You can see that, for instance, in some of the countries we are using more than 100 kg of CO2 per day - each individual person. The second effect is that the CO2 production so far appears as uncurbed. You see here the function of time, the amount of emissions of CO2. The whole planet - you can see that there is a continuous line growing linearly, exponentially. The CO2 production is enough to fill with super-fluid CO2 at 100 bars, with a density similar to water, a volume like the lake of Geneva, which is 80 km^3, every 4 years. You can see the lake of Geneva here. And you can see how it has, in fact, been affected by the situation. The second question is, of course, how long does CO2 last in the biosphere? Here is a graph which shows the variations of the lifetime of the CO2 in the atmosphere and appears to be somewhere between 30 and 35 kilo years. You can see here what will happen over time. You see here 600 years in this plot with a certain emission of CO2, which, I assume, will occur for the first few 100 years and then they will stay steady for a long way to go. As a comparison, for instance, the lifetime of Plutonium 239 is 26 kilo years, associated with today’s public negative perception of nuclear energy. So we are talking about really incredible durations. The mean atmospheric lifetime of the order of 10^4 years is in contrast with the popular perception of many people who think that in a few hundred years CO2 will disappear. Now let’s see, what are the predictions for the next 25 years? Those are particularly gloomy. You can see the plot here from IEA, International Energy Agency, from Paris. You can observe here a massive expansion of fossils burning with no scarcity of resources, but a very slow growth of renewables, hydro included. You can see from this graph that, in fact, the renewables grow simply from 13% to some 18% over a quarter of a century. And the effect of this is coming from a situation which is very characteristic. You can see here that for the USA, Europe and other OECD countries essentially it is flat, constant in intensity. China and India are developing very rapidly, together with the remaining developing countries, and bringing the contribution of the CO2 by an increase of the order of about 33% over this period of 25 years. The immediate consequence of that is, of course, some change of the temperature of the Earth. You can see here the plot of the temperature of the Earth in the year 2015, referring to the baseline situation before the development between 1951 to 1980. And you can see that, in fact, there is a very substantial increase in temperature, mostly the northern hemisphere right here and in our situation. And you can see that the overall effect over the period is substantial, of the order of about 1 degree centigrade above what it was in 1961 to 1990 on average. There is a small little effect up here and down to the bottom of the Antarctica. But fundamentally most of the civilised world is now warming up very substantially. How do we go about this? - That’s the second question. To do this we need, of course, new technologies. The statement is that new technologies are the only key to solving sustainability of the future of energy. The transformation to energy with lower emissions and a quantitatively significant management of CO2 are amongst the most important technological challenges of our times. Of course, the current worldwide energy supply is dependent mainly on fossil fuels, which will remain indispensable for decades to come. But in order to curb environmental changes, it is necessary to proceed vigorously on 2 lines: One is the development and progressive utilisation of renewable energy sources. And the second is the more efficient utilisation of fossil fuels, limiting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and other emissions. I will briefly present here the main guidelines of major rules which are being followed by Europe on one side, the United States on the other. And finally the developing countries like China, to show what are the differences in interest and behaviours about the future of energy. Let me start with the first pillar of energy policy which is Europe. During as many as 20 years the energy policy in the European Union has been determined by 2 main priorities. The first strategic priority of the European Union has been one to prevent dangerous climate changes. The second consideration is based on the assumption that the energy prices will rise inexorably as global energy demand rises and resources become scarce. And this will necessarily make renewable energy competitively the winners. By 2040, about 80% of the European primary energy should aggressively be coming from renewables, abating both nuclear and fossils. And one of the development and progressive utilisation of renewable is positive action. Europe has missed substantially the consequence of technological progress. And the US successes of CO2 efficient, lower cost and abundant utilisation of unconventional natural gas, which we call also shale gas. So let me briefly show you the situation of the European future. You can see, for instance, the example here of Germany. You can see that from 1990 the amount of CO2 in 2050 will collapse by a factor of 20 - you can see there the situation. You can also see that hydrogen electrically produced by PV, hydro, wind, geothermal and solar, are the main energy sources of industry and transport. According to Europe, which is specifically presented according to the German situation, the amount of fossils will eventually disappear almost entirely and will be replaced by renewables. Let me show you here, as an example, wind energy which is a dominant element for Europe. You can see here that in fact most of the wind energy is really coming from northern Europe, with few little traces around here near France. This is how it’s distributed over Europe. Now let me show you here how it is realised in practice. Wind off-shore is probably the real solution. And you see enormous effort has been performed in order to carry out such a situation. Here you can see, for instance, how the average power now has grown up to something like 6 megawatts per unit. That some of these units go under the water up to 700 metres in depth. That they are, in fact, distributed mostly in the operation offshore in the region between England, Scandinavia and Germany. Now the real problem with wind is variability. You can see here, for instance, the variability of wind in Germany. You can see that essentially there are moments in which there is too much wind, and there are moments when there is not enough wind. Let me also point out that the power carried by wind is cubed in proportion to the speed of the wind. It's squared because 1,5 v^2,is squared, and another v because of the speed at which the wind travels. Therefore there are moments where the very large variability is a major problem, as you can discuss. If you go more generally, you can see that the renewable energy can be done with biomass, geothermal, wind and hydropower. The economic potentials of these various solutions are not very large when you compare them to the demand. Europe will foresee by 2050 to have 7,500 TWh/y of electric power. And you can see that the best you can do of economic potentials of these various alternatives of renewable energy are much smaller than this number. And therefore, long-term renewable dominance requires resources outside Europe. The key resource of Europe is, of course, the sun which has an enormous amount of economic potential, 600,000 TWh/y. Which is, of course, dominating in the southern part of Europe and most importantly in the Sahara desert and so forth and so on. And you can see how little of that can bring an enormous change. A total energy worldwide could be accumulated by covering with solar panels, a system of the order of this little graph you can see here around Africa. However, the situation now is not so clear because, although for solar energy the deserts are a necessity, you can see that transporting energy from Africa to Europe is not a simple task. In fact, the major disasters taking place recently, because the Desertec Industrial Initiative has abandoned its strategy to export solar power generated from the Sahara to Europe, killing hopes of boosting Africa’s share of renewable energy. Therefore it is not very clear what will be the situation in the future. Here you can see, for instance, the cost of large scale electricity and how they go as a function of the various systems. Conventional energies are hydro, geothermal, nuclear and biomass. Wind on-shore and off-shore, you can see them there. And you can see the on-shore wind is still reasonably acceptable, but the off-shore wind has a major cost increase. Then you have also carbon sequestration which is there, which is also again accumulating the CO2 from the coal. And this is also very high in terms of temperature. You also see the solar energies are there - very nice but, of course, extremely expensive. So you see that moneywise the situation is rather difficult to be understood. There are 2 main problems in Europe: one is the high cost as a function of fraction of renewables. You see here a graph which shows, for instance, what is the cost of electricity with about 1,000 watts per capita – which is the situation of Denmark and Germany. And you compare that with the situation in the United States, which is down here, for instance. Where you have in effect a much smaller renewable capacity, but the cost of electricity is almost a factor of 2 lower. The second question is that there are not enough renewables within Europe to satisfy fully the domestic resources. Therefore something has to be done elsewhere. But there is real difficulty in carrying over several thousand kilometres the energy from Africa to Europe. The key problems of renewable energy are, of course: the best energy is always the cheapest energy. Energy, however, must be available when it is needed. And the third important point: that electricity is now becoming the dominant source of energy for renewable energies. But renewable energies require much wider surface of collection, located in specific locations in which production is optimal. And therefore, electricity at very high powers must be transported over much longer distances than today, which is technically not very easy compared to the one possible today for natural gas and oil. So this is the European situation. Now what about the American situation? The second main pillar is coming from the US. And this is essentially based on the question of this graph coming from Time Magazine, which says, Commercial extraction for oil shale is now something which has already started over the last 10 years. And, in effect, the development is quite remarkably growing nowadays. In fact, you can see that there are possibilities to do natural gas from shales. This is how this is being organised. Or coalbed methane, again another possibility, which can be adsorbed to produce unconventional natural gas. And the world-wide shale resources are massive. You can see that both Americas, China and Europe have large amounts of these resources. Coalbed methane again is very rich in different countries. So there are plenty of resources there. In Europe we also have plenty of resources for this. But, as I said, resources are vast, but strong popular opposition forbids the use of these applications when it comes to Europe. Because Europe is totally absent at the present moment in a practical sense to these solutions, which are very strongly developed in the United States. This has produced a very fundamental difference between the prices of natural gas in the US in respect to Europe and Japan. As you see from this graph: while in 2006 to 2008 the situation was, in fact, very similar. Now in 2012/13 you can see that while the prices in US have been going down, the prices in Europe and in Japan are much higher. So there is a big difference between the predictions of the 2 systems. This has also introduced another important fact: that electricity production from coal has gone down in the US thanks to the development of shale gas, and production from gas has increased. The result is that the US has had a very substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. And the primary energy production in North America is, in fact, rising rapidly, while in Europe it is decreasing. And the petroleum production in various countries shows here that now the United States is producing as much petroleum as Saudi Arabia, which is a remarkable result. You can see, for instance, in the case of Texas, which shows clearly that the development of shale gas has created a real revolution in the amount of oil which is being used. The third question I’d like to mention very briefly in the few minutes I’ve got left, is the question of China. China is the world’s largest producer of electricity, surpassing the United States in 2011. Electricity generation in China has increased 9.6% annually, reaching a very large amount of terawatts. The real problem is the coal-fired plants currently make up two-thirds of the power generation, which is, of course, the result of an abundance of coal in China. The demand is expected to continue to increase at a very rapid pace. However, the growth of electricity from coal-fired plants resulted in an increase in air pollution and general lack of efficiency. China is now moving aggressively to curb pollution and increase supply of renewable power. China is the world’s largest wind energy producer with over 90 GW of installed power at the end of 2013. And 15% is the near-term renewables target for China. Here you can see how the renewables represent themselves in China: wind, solar and hydro are there. The electric demands are shown in this graph. You can see why wind and solar and hydro are optimal in some regions. The electric demands are dominant, of course, where the people are. There is a big business in the 2 distances. You can see here a long transmission of power is required, as I mentioned already. You can see that several thousand kilometres of distance are required between the best production of hydro power, wind power, solar power and the presence of the main people occupations. You can see that situation in China. Shale gas is strongly developed by China. You can see here the various companies exploring shale gas, most of them American companies, which are going into China to get this system productive. And you can see how quickly the shale gas is being developed in China to reduce the coal dependency. You can see here a graph showing the estimated annual production rising very rapidly, with a very impressive, high-aiming level of the situation. Let me then continue asking ourselves in the 8 minutes I’ve got left about the future of energy productions. Unconventional natural gas resources seem to be a major new effect, which we have to take into account. The process of progressive decarbonisation of fossils goes necessarily through an increased use and consumption of natural gas. It is quite clear that natural gas represents a practical alternative to the presently growing exploitation of coal as the main source of energy. In addition, many other new developments have to be introduced in order to ensure that the future can become a remarkable era of abundant and cheap production from fossils. And the key element to this is novel methods. Let me also point out to another new fact: the presence of a new source. The largest untapped reserve for natural gas on the crust is a thing called clathrate. Maybe some of you people only know what a clathrate is. The clathrate is a combination between some - you can see here some water and some natural gas, which combine in a situation which is stable at a temperature around zero degrees, and is called clathrate. And it’s very rich in methane. For instance, one litre of methane clathrate, so-called burning ice, will produce something like 168 litres of methane gas at the normal pressures. You can see here a picture of a small amount of this clathrate which is now burning, producing natural gas. And you can see the molecule and the structure of a system like that. The subject appeared to be purely academic until the people realised that a very large amount of methane hydrate could be present in any environment with suitable pressures and temperatures. And therefore the potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrate is enormous, with current estimates converging around a conservative value about 10,000 gigatons of methane carbon. As a comparison, the total estimates for conventional natural gas and oil are of the order of a few 100 gigatons. Therefore you can see here the location where clathrates were observed in the oceans. You can see almost everywhere around the world there are places in which recovered gas hydrate samples or infer gas hydrate occurrences have been observed. The procedure is extremely simple: You go underground. You can extract these clathrates out of the ocean or you can bring them eventually out from the permafrost. And you can recuperate the amount from the system either by having a depressurisation or having a thermal change which separates the natural gas from the water. Now, of course, the question is: How do we solve the question of future global warming? It’s quite clear that natural gas is inevitably emitting CO2 - although at a small fraction, which is half compared to coal. So the new project, the new question is, How can we reduce even further the CO2 productions? And the project - in which, by the way, I'm also involved – is, CO2 productions could be avoided with the help of spontaneous thermal decomposition at sufficient temperatures of methane into hydrogen and black carbon. You can see here the CH4 will transform itself into hydrogen and solid black carbon. This method is quite valuable because it does not use more energy than the existing reforming process, which, however, can produce a lot of CO2 - 4 tons of CO2 for each ton of hydrogen. And the black carbon can be recovered as a filler or construction material. And this is a process under investigation. You can see here the initial attempts which we did many years ago, in which we just took a tube. We put the tube in at the suitable temperature. Some kind of natural gas just naturally transforming itself into black carbon and hydrogen very quickly. And so forth and so on. The way of methane cracking is more or less represented here. You can see the methane input coming in. Through the methane cracking process hydrogen and carbon are separately produced. The efficiency is high. And, in fact, the numbers you can see can be explained comparing the standard method of producing CH4 with emission of CO2 or without emission of CO2. You can see that in both cases – (mobile phone is ringing) sorry, oh my God. (Laughter). Excuse me. Anyway, the situation is, in fact, that this is very similar. You can see here that 40% energy is lost by a conventional method. And about 42% is recovered and stored with a normal method in here. The technology - I cannot spend much time describing it. It’s represented by this picture here. It’s very efficient. We have reached in this case a 1,000 degrees, something like a major fraction of methane conversion today. It works. And the cost is also very valuable. So let me use the 2 minutes I’ve got left by mentioning a few more questions: the question of "fuel for transportations". A lot of people have claimed that you should use hydrogen for transportation. But, however, a future subsitute to petrol for transportation has to be a liquid. Now you can build a liquid by combining the amount of hydrogen produced by the previous method with remaining CO2, which is spent already, where plenty of CO2 is produced. In other words, the idea is to produce methanol through a process in which hydrogen plus CO2 transform themselves into methanol plus water. And this is an example, very briefly, how you do it: You take, this graph here, essentially the natural gas from the methane producing hydrogen with emission of carbon storage. And you take CO2 from already used CO2 and you combine them together in a methanol synthesis reactor, which then becomes a liquid. And its transform is used as a future replacement for oil. Now let me therefore conclude. What are we talking about energy for the future? In my view a new age of abundance is now developing. And it is based on unconventional gas resources, initially coalbed and shale gas in the foreseeable future. And methane hydrates later on, after the coalbed methane and shale gas has been more or less distributed. North America, India, China, Africa, Latin America will all have access to cheap and abundant shale gas and oil. Europe, of course, is, for political reasons still on hold. With both environmental sensitivities and gas consumption on the rise, the main question is, how to recover this huge novel natural gas resources, available for millennia to come. And economically harvest the immense energy wealth in the most efficient and effective manner and with minimal environmental footprint. I believe the natural gas resources with zero CO2 emissions are the winners: Shale gas, and ultimately clathrate, with the ability of becoming the dominant primary energy source for tens of centuries to come. Thank you very much.

Wie wir sehen, läuft die Uhr schon, uns bleiben noch 30 Minuten, ab jetzt sind es 29:59. Sie haben 4 Sekunden verloren. (Gelächter) Vielen Dank! Nun gehen wir zu einem anderen Thema, das ebenfalls für die Zukunft der Menschheit sehr relevant ist, die Zukunft der Energie. Und ich beginne mit einer kurzen Diskussion des Klimas in der Vergangenheit, das eine klare Voraussetzung für seine Zukunft ist. Die Erde wurde vor etwa 4,56 Milliarden Jahren geschaffen, viel später als der Urknall. Das komplexe, multizelluläre organische Leben wurde nahezu ausschließlich während der vergangenen 600 Millionen Jahre geboren. Hier kann man die Temperatur des Planeten Erde über die letzten 600 Millionen Jahre sehen. Wie man sieht, gab es viele Wechsel zwischen niedrigen und hohen Temperaturen. Es gab sehr hohe Temperaturen bis hin zur Vergletscherung, einige Male reichte das Eis fast bis an den Äquator. Und verschiedene andere Zeiten waren viel wärmer als das. Die letzten Millionen Jahre werden durch eine große Anzahl von Zeitspannen dargestellt, in denen die Vergletscherung den Äquator erreichte, und solchen mit optimalem Klima, ungefähr heutigen Temperaturen. Nun basiert die gesamte Menschheitsgeschichte auf einer bemerkenswert gleichförmigen Zeitspanne, die man in dieser Kurve sehen kann, während der letzten 10.000 Jahre, die es ermöglichte, die Entwicklung der menschlichen Zivilisation aufrecht zu erhalten. So, die kurze Linie, die wir hier am Ende haben, hat uns zu dem gemacht hat, was wir heute sind. Lassen Sie uns diese Dinge ansehen: die letzte Zeitspanne zum Beispiel, wo wir den Wostok-Eiskern aus der Antarktis zu Rate ziehen. Man sieht, dass die Situation durch sehr kurze Zwischeneiszeiten charakterisiert wird, die den derzeitigen Warmzeiten gleichen. Flankiert von sehr langen Eiszeiten über die letzten 500 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Wie man sehen kann, ist der wahrscheinliche Beginn des Homo Sapiens etwa 300.000 Jahre her. Und die frühesten Homo Sapiens in Afrika waren dort vor etwa 100.000 Jahren. Die Landwirtschaft, die den Beginn unserer jetzigen Zivilisation darstellt, begann erst vor etwa 10.000 Jahren. Beachten Sie die Kürze der Warmperioden zwischen sehr langen Eiszeiten. Und die Frage ist natürlich, wie lange die moderne Zeit andauern wird, wie lange wird es von diesem Gesichtspunkt her andauern? Wenn man sich kürzere Zeitskalen ansieht, und man sieht hier die letzten 2.000 Jahre, sieht man beispielsweise die natürlichen Wechsel zwischen kälteren und wärmeren Bedingungen auf der nördlichen Halbkugel mit einem Zyklus, der ungefähr 1000 Jahre beträgt. Zu Zeiten des römischen Reichs waren die Temperaturen höher als heute. Und dann hatten wir das frühe Mittelalter in der Mitte des Jahrtausends. Um das Jahr 1000 herum, begannen die Temperaturen wieder zu steigen. Wir hatten um 1600/1700 herum eine kleine Eiszeit. Und jetzt kommen wir zur heutigen Situation. Man sieht, dass wärmere und kältere Zeiten sich abgewechselt haben. Außerhalb der Tropen, auf der nördlichen Halbkugel - die derzeitigen mittleren Temperaturänderungen im Verhältnis zu den mittleren Temperaturen werden in dieser Kurve mit Fehlerbalken von etwa zwei Standardabweichungen angezeigt. Derzeit entwickelt sich ein neues, bedeutendes Phänomen: der Beginn des sogenannten „anthropogenen Zeitalters“. Das Andauern der einzigartig langen, stabilen Periode nach der Zwischeneiszeit war wesentlich, um das Leben und die Zivilisation so aufrechtzuerhalten, wie sie heute sind. Und das ist natürlich ein wesentliches Element zum Überleben, das wir auf jeden Fall erhalten müssen. Aber, wie wir wissen, sehen wir uns derzeit einem neuen Phänomen gegenüber. Ein Begriff, den Eugene Stoermer prägte und den der Nobelpreisträger Paul Crutzen allgemein bekannt machte: der Beginn der durch Menschen verursachten anthropogenen Ära. Zum ersten Mal könnten menschliche Handlungen die Zukunft des Erdklimas stark beeinflussen. Seit 1750 wurden beispielsweise etwa 1 Million Millionen Tonnen, 1000 Gigatonnen, CO2 in die Atmosphäre ausgestoßen, zusätzlich zu vielen anderen Schadstoffen. Die ersten Anzeichen eines solchen anthropogenen Zeitalters wurden vielleicht schon nachgewiesen. Dieser Einfluss sollte gedrosselt werden, um die irreversiblen Auswirkungen einer großen Klimaänderung zu vermeiden. Der Wert der CO2-Anreicherung ist natürlich enorm. Hier sieht man die Verteilung über den Planeten. Man sieht beispielsweise, dass wir in einigen Ländern jeden Tag mehr als 100 kg CO2 erzeugen - pro Person. Der zweite Effekt ist, dass die CO2-Produktion bis jetzt ungezügelt erscheint. Sie sehen hier die Menge an CO2-Ausstoß als Funktion der Zeit. Der gesamte Planet - Sie sehen hier, dass es eine kontinuierlich linear/exponentiell wachsende Linie ist. Die CO2-Produktion reicht aus, um alle 4 Jahre ein Volumen wie den Genfer See, was etwa 80 km^3 entspricht, mit suprafluidem CO2 bei 100 Bar mit einer Dichte ähnlich der des Wassers zu füllen. Hier sieht man den Genfer See. Und Sie können sehen, wie er tatsächlich durch die Situation betroffen wurde. Die zweite Frage ist natürlich, wie lange bleibt CO2 in der Biosphäre? Hier ist eine Kurve, die die Änderungen der CO2-Verweilzeit in der Atmosphäre zeigt Sie scheint irgendwo zwischen 30' und 35.000 Jahren zu liegen. Hier kann man sehen was über die Jahre passieren wird. In dieser Zeichnung sind 600 Jahre mit einer bestimmten CO2-Emission gezeigt, die, nehme ich an, über die ersten paar 100 Jahre auftritt und dann für eine lange Zeit gleich bleibt. Als Vergleich beträgt die Lebenszeit des Plutoniums 239 beispielsweise 26.000 Jahre, verbunden mit der heutigen öffentlichen negativen Wahrnehmung der Kernenergie. Wir reden daher von wirklich unglaublichen Zeitspannen. Die durchschnittliche Lebenszeit in der Atmosphäre von der Größenordnung von 10^4 Jahren ist im Widerspruch zu der gängigen Sicht vieler Menschen, die denken, dass das CO2 in ein paar hundert Jahren verschwinden wird. Nun schauen wir uns die Vorhersagen für die nächsten 25 Jahre an. Diese sind besonders düster. Hier sehen Sie die Kurven der IEA, International Energy Agency, in Paris. Man sieht hier eine massive Ausweitung der Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen ohne Ressourcenknappheit, dagegen ein sehr langsames Wachstum der erneuerbaren Energien, einschließlich der Wasserkraft. Aus dieser Kurve ersehen wir, dass über ein Vierteljahrhundert tatsächlich die erneuerbaren Energien von 13% auf etwa 18% wachsen. Und dieser Effekt entspringt aus einer sehr charakteristischen Situation. Sie sehen hier, dass sie für die USA, Europa und andere OECD-Staaten im Wesentlichen flach ist, konstante Intensität. China und Indien entwickeln sich sehr schnell, zusammen mit den übrigen Entwicklungsländern, und tragen zum CO2 durch einen Anstieg von etwa 33% über diesen Zeitraum von 25 Jahren bei. Die sofortige Konsequenz davon ist natürlich eine Änderung der Erdtemperatur. Hier sieht man die Kurve der Erdtemperatur im Jahr 2015, in Bezug auf die Basislinie vor der Entwicklung, zwischen 1951 und 1980. Und man kann tatsächlich einen sehr erheblichen Anstieg in den Temperaturen erkennen, am meisten auf der nördlichen Halbkugel genau hier und in unserer Situation. Man kann sehen, dass die Gesamtauswirkung über diesen Zeitraum beträchtlich ist, in der Größenordnung von etwa 1 Grad Celsius über dem Mittelwert zwischen 1961 und 1990. Da ist eine kleine Auswirkung hier oben und ganz unten in der Antarktis. Aber grundsätzlich erwärmt sich die zivilisierte Welt gerade sehr beträchtlich. Was machen wir jetzt? - Das ist die zweite Frage. Um etwas zu unternehmen, benötigen wir selbstverständlich neue Technologien. Man sagt, dass neue Technologien der einzige Schlüssel sind, die Nachhaltigkeit der Zukunft der Energie zu lösen. Der Übergang zu Energien mit geringeren Emissionen und ein mengenmäßig signifikantes CO2-Management sind einige der wichtigsten technologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Die derzeitige weltweite Energieversorgung hängt natürlich hauptsächlich von fossilen Brennstoffen ab, die für die nächsten Jahrzehnte unverzichtbar bleiben werden. Aber um die Umweltänderungen zu bändigen, müssen wir auf zwei Schienen nachdrücklich vorankommen: die eine ist die Entwicklung und fortschreitende Benutzung von erneuerbaren Energiequellen. Und die zweite ist die effizientere Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe, um die Auswirkungen des anthropogenen CO2 und anderer Emissionen zu begrenzen. Ich präsentiere hier kurz die Hauptleitlinien oder Hauptregeln, die von Europa auf der einen Seite und den Vereinigten Staaten auf der anderen befolgt werden. Und schließlich den Entwicklungsländern wie China, um die Interessen- und Verhaltensunterschiede bezüglich der Zukunft der Energie aufzuzeigen. Ich beginne mit der ersten Säule der Energiepolitik, das ist Europa. Über 20 Jahre hinweg bestimmten zwei Hauptprioritäten die Energiepolitik der Europäischen Gemeinschaft. Die erste strategische Priorität der Europäischen Gemeinschaft war es, gefährliche Klimaänderungen zu verhindern. Die zweite Überlegung basiert auf der Annahme, dass die Energiepreise unerbittlich ansteigen werden, während der globale Energiebedarf steigt und die Ressourcen knapper werden. Und dies wird notwendigerweise die erneuerbaren Energien zum Gewinner im Wettbewerb machen. Bis zum Jahr 2040 sollten etwa 80% der europäischen Primärenergie aggressiv von erneuerbaren Energien kommen, und damit sowohl Kernenergie als auch fossile Energie verringern. Und obwohl die Entwicklung und zunehmende Nutzung der erneuerbaren Energien eine positive Handlung ist, hat Europa die Konsequenzen des technischen Fortschritts ziemlich verpasst. Und die amerikanischen Erfolge der CO2-effizienten und breiten Nutzung von unkonventionellem Erdgas, das wir auch Schiefergas nennen, bei niedrigeren Kosten. Lassen Sie mich kurz die Situation der europäischen Zukunft zeigen. Sie sehen hier beispielsweise Deutschland. Sie können hier sehen, dass ab 1990 die CO2-Menge im Jahr 2050 um einen Faktor von 20 einbrechen wird – dort sehen Sie die Situation. Sie sehen, dass über Fotovoltaik, Wasserkraft, Wind-, Solar- und geothermale Energie elektrisch produzierter Wasserstoff die Hauptquelle der Industrie und des Verkehrs ist. In Europa, das spezifisch durch die deutsche Situation dargestellt ist, wird die Menge an fossiler Energie letztendlich fast gänzlich verschwinden und durch erneuerbare Ressourcen ersetzt. Lassen Sie mich hier, als ein Beispiel, die Windenergie zeigen, die das dominante Element für Europa ist. Hier können Sie sehen, dass tatsächlich die meiste Windenergie aus Nordeuropa kommt, mit kleineren Mengen hier bei Frankreich. So ist es über Europa verteilt. Nun lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie es in der Praxis realisiert ist. Offshore-Wind ist vermutlich die wirkliche Lösung. Und Sie sehen die enormen Anstrengungen, die durchgeführt wurden, um eine solche Situation herbeizuführen. Hier sehen Sie beispielsweise, wie die durchschnittliche Leistung jetzt auf etwa 6 Megawatt pro Einheit angewachsen ist. Einige dieser Einheiten stehen in eine Wassertiefe bis zu 700 Meter. Sie sind hauptsächlich verteilt im Offshore-Betrieb in der Region zwischen England, Skandinavien und Deutschland. Das wirkliche Problem mit Wind ist die Variabilität. Hier sieht man beispielsweise die Windvariabilität in Deutschland. Sie können hier im Wesentlichen sehen, dass es Zeiten gibt, in denen der Wind zu stark ist, und Zeiten, wo nicht genug Wind herrscht. Lassen Sie mich noch darauf hinweisen, dass die Leistung des Winds der Windgeschwindigkeit zur dritten Potenz entspricht. Es ist im Quadrat wegen 1,5 v^2, und noch einmal v, weil das die Windgeschwindigkeit ist. Es gibt daher Zeiten, wo die sehr große Variabilität ein Hauptproblem darstellt, wie man diskutieren kann. Wenn man es genereller betrachtet, kann man sehen, dass die erneuerbare Energie über Biomasse, geothermische Energie, Wind- und Wasserenergie erzeugt werden kann. Die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser verschiedenen Lösungen sind nicht sehr groß, wenn man sie mit dem Bedarf vergleicht. Die Voraussage für Europa bis 2050 sind 7.500 TWh/a elektrischer Leistung. Und hier können Sie sehen, dass die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser unterschiedlichen Alternativen für erneuerbare Energien in einer Größenordnung liegt, die viel kleiner ist als diese Zahl. Und daher benötigt eine langfristige Dominanz der erneuerbaren Energien Ressourcen außerhalb Europas. Die Hauptrohstoffquelle Europas ist natürlich die Sonne, die über ein enormes Wirtschaftspotential verfügt, 600.000 TWh/a. Das dominiert natürlich im südlichen Teil Europas und sehr wesentlich in der Sahara und so weiter. Und Sie sehen, wie wenig davon eine enorme Änderung herbeiführen kann. Die weltweite Gesamtenergie könnte durch eine Überdeckung mit Solarpaneelen gesammelt werden, ein System in der Größenordnung dieser kleinen Zeichnung hier in Afrika. Die Situation ist aber nicht so klar, weil man sieht, dass, obwohl die Wüsten für die Solarenergie notwendig sind, der Transport der Energie von Afrika nach Europa keine leichte Aufgabe ist. Das große Fiasko, das es kürzlich passiert gab, weil die Industrieinitiative Desertec ihre Strategie aufgegeben hat, in der Sahara erzeugte Solarenergie nach Europa zu exportieren. Das hat die Hoffnung zerschlagen, Afrikas Anteil an erneuerbaren Energien zu steigern. Es ist daher nicht sehr klar, wie die Situation in der Zukunft sein wird. Hier kann man beispielsweise die Kosten der flächendeckenden Stromerzeugung sehen und wie sie sich als Funktion der verschiedenen Systeme ändern. Konventionelle Energien sind Wasserkraft, geothermische, Kern- und Biomasseenergie. Onshore- und Offshore-Windenergie kann man hier sehen. Und man kann sehen, dass die Onshore-Windenergie noch einigermaßen akzeptabel ist, aber dass die Offshore-Windenergie große Kostensteigerungen verursacht. Dann haben wir noch die Kohlenstoffabscheidung, die dort ist, die das CO2 aus der Kohle auch wieder aufsammelt. Und dies ist auch sehr hoch bezogen auf die Kosten. Sie sehen auch die Solarenergien dort - sehr schön, aber natürlich auch extrem teuer. Sie sehen, dass in Sachen Geld die Situation recht schwierig zu verstehen ist. In Europa gibt es zwei Hauptprobleme: Eins sind die hohen Kosten als Funktion des Bruchteils der erneuerbaren Energien. Hier sehen Sie die Kurve, die beispielsweise zeigt, was die Stromkosten bei etwa 1.000 Watt pro Kopf sind, was der Situation in Dänemark und Deutschland entspricht. Und vergleichen Sie das zum Beispiel mit der Situation in den Vereinigten Staaten, die hier unten stehen. Dort gibt es eine viel kleinere Kapazität an erneuerbaren Energien, aber die Stromkosten sind fast einen Faktor 2 geringer. Die zweite Frage ist, dass es nicht genügend erneuerbare Ressourcen innerhalb Europas gibt, um den heimischen Bedarf komplett zu decken. Daher muss etwas irgendwo anders getan werden. Aber es ist sehr schwierig, die Energie über mehrere tausend Kilometer von Afrika nach Europa zu transportieren. Das Schlüsselproblem der erneuerbaren Energie ist natürlich: die billigste Energie ist immer die beste Energie. Energie muss aber dort zur Verfügung stehen, wo sie benötigt wird. Und der dritte wichtige Punkt: die Elektrizität wird jetzt die dominante Energiequelle für die erneuerbaren Energien werden. Aber erneuerbare Energien benötigen eine größere Sammelfläche, die in besonderen Gegenden angesiedelt ist, wo die Produktion optimal ist. Und daher muss Energie bei sehr hoher Leistung über viel längere Strecken transportiert werden als heute, was technisch nicht leicht durchführbar ist, verglichen mit den Möglichkeiten heute für Erdgas und Erdöl. So, das ist also die europäische Situation. Wie sieht nun die amerikanische Situation aus? Die zweite Hauptsäule kommt aus den USA. Und das basiert im Wesentlichen auf dieser Grafik aus dem Time-Magazin, die betitelt ist: Die kommerzielle Extraktion von Schieferöl ist jetzt schon etwas, das über die vergangenen 10 Jahre schon begonnen hat. Und die Entwicklung wächst inzwischen recht beachtlich. Man kann sehen, dass es Möglichkeiten gibt, Erdgas aus Schiefergestein zu gewinnen. So wird das gemacht. Oder Kohleflöz-Methan - wieder eine weitere Möglichkeit -, das adsorbiert werden kann, um unkonventionelles Erdgas zu produzieren. Und die globalen Schiefervorkommen sind gewaltig. Sie können sehen, dass der amerikanische Kontinent, China und Europa große Mengen dieser Vorkommen haben. Kohleflöz-Methan ist wiederum in verschiedenen Ländern sehr reichhaltig vorhanden. Es gibt also reichliche Vorkommen. In Europa haben wir auch viele Vorkommen dafür. Aber, wie ich sagte, obwohl die Vorkommen riesig sind, verbietet starker öffentlicher Widerstand die Benutzung dieser Anwendungen, soweit es Europa betrifft. Europa fehlt bei diesen Lösungen im praktischen Sinn derzeit komplett, während sie in den USA sehr stark entwickelt sind. Das hat zu einem einen sehr grundsätzlichen Unterschied zwischen den Preisen von Erdgas in den USA geführt, verglichen mit Europa und Japan. Wie man aus dieser Kurve sehen kann: Während zwischen 2006 und 2008 die Situation tatsächlich sehr ähnlich war, kann man jetzt im Jahr 2012/13 sehen, dass während die Preise in den USA gesunken sind, die Preise in Europa und in Japan viel höher sind. Es gibt also einen großen Unterschied zwischen den Vorhersagen der 2 Systeme. Dies hat zu einer anderen wichtigen Tatsache geführt, nämlich dass in den USA die Stromproduktion aus Kohle dank der Entwicklung des Schiefergases abgenommen und die Produktion aus Gas zugenommen hat. Im Ergebnis gibt es in den USA eine beträchtliche Reduzierung der CO2 Emissionen. Und die Primärenergieerzeugung in Nordamerika steigt tatsächlich schnell an, während sie in Europa sinkt. Die Erdölproduktion in verschiedenen Ländern zeigt hier, dass die Vereinigten Staaten jetzt so viel Erdöl produzieren wie Saudi-Arabien - ein erstaunliches Resultat. Sie können hier am Beispiel Texas sehen, dass die Entwicklung des Schiefergases eine richtige Revolution im Ölverbrauch erzeugt hat. Die dritte Frage, die ich sehr kurz in den wenigen verbliebenen Minuten erwähnen möchte, ist die Frage nach China. China ist der weltweit größte Stromerzeuger, nachdem es die USA in 2011 überholt hat. Die Stromerzeugung in China wächst um 9,6% jährlich, und erreicht eine sehr große Menge von Terawatt. Das eigentliche Problem ist, dass die Kohlekraftwerke derzeit 2 Drittel des Stroms erzeugen, was natürlich ein Resultat des Kohlereichtums in China ist. Es wird erwartet, dass der Bedarf sehr schnell weiter zunehmen wird. Die steigende Stromerzeugung durch Kohlekraftwerke resultierte in zunehmender Luftverschmutzung und einem generellen Mangel an Effizienz. China ist jetzt verstärkt bemüht, die Verschmutzung zu verringern und die erneuerbare Energieversorgung zu erhöhen. Ende 2013 war China der weltgrößte Windenergieproduzent mit über 90 GW installierter Leistung. Und 15% ist das kurzfristige Ziel für erneuerbare Energien in China. Hier kann man sehen, wie die erneuerbaren Energien sich in China darstellen: Wind-, Solarenergie und Wasserkraft sind dort. Der Strombedarf ist in diesem Diagramm dargestellt. Man kann sehen, während Wind- und Solarenergie und Wasserkraft in einigen Regionen optimal sind, ist der Hauptstrombedarf natürlich dort, wo die Menschen sind. Da gibt es große Entfernungen zu den zwei Gebieten. Man kann hier sehen, dass eine weite Übertragung der Elektrizität erforderlich ist, wie schon vorhin erwähnt. Wie man sieht, müssen mehrere tausend Kilometer Entfernung zwischen den besten Produktionsstätten aus der Wasserkraft, Windenergie, Solarenergie und den Hauptansiedlungen der Menschen überbrückt werden. Das ist gerade die Situation in China. Schiefergas wird durch China sehr stark entwickelt. Hier sehen Sie die verschiedenen Unternehmen, die nach Schiefergas suchen. Die meisten sind amerikanische Firmen, die nach China gehen, um dieses System zur Produktion zu bringen. Und Sie können sehen, wie schnell das Schiefergas in China entwickelt wird, um die Kohleabhängigkeit zu reduzieren. Und hier die Kurve zeigt, dass die geschätzte Jahresproduktion sehr schnell auf ein sehr eindrucksvolles, hohes Niveau ansteigen wird. Dann sollten wir uns in den noch verbliebenden 8 Minuten mit der Zukunft der Energieerzeugung beschäftigen. Unkonventionelle Erdgasvorkommen scheinen ein großer, neuer Effekt zu sein, den wir berücksichtigen müssen. Der Prozess der Reduzierung von Kohlendioxid bei fossilen Brennstoffen geht notwendigerweise über eine wachsende Nutzung und Verbrauch von Erdgas. Es ist recht klar, dass Erdgas eine praktische Alternative zu der derzeitig wachsenden Ausbeutung von Kohle als hauptsächliche Energiequelle darstellt. Zusätzlich müssen weitere neue Entwicklungen eingeführt werden, um sicherzustellen, dass die Zukunft ein bedeutendes Zeitalter der weitverbreiteten und billigen Erzeugung aus fossilen Brennstoffen wird. Und das Schlüsselelement hier sind neuartige Methoden. Lassen Sie mich auf eine weitere neue Tatsache hinweisen: das Vorhandensein einer neuen Quelle. Die größte ungenutzte Erdgasreserve in der Erdkruste ist etwas, das Clathrat genannt wird. Vielleicht wissen einige von Euch, was ein Clathrat ist. Das Clathrat ist eine Verbindung zwischen - hier sieht man etwas Wasser und Erdgas, die in einer Situation sich verbinden, die bei Temperaturen um null Grad stabil ist, und das wird Clathrat genannt. Es ist sehr reich an Methan. Ein Liter Methan-Clathrat, sogenanntes brennbares Eis, produziert bei Normaldruck etwa 168 Liter Methan. Sie können hier ein Bild einer kleinen Menge dieses Clathrats sehen, das jetzt brennt, und Erdgas produziert. Und Sie können das Molekül und die Struktur dieses Systems sehen. Das Thema schien zunächst rein akademisch zu sein, bis man erkannte, dass sehr große Mengen an Methanhydrat in jeder Umgebung mit den geeigneten Drucken und Temperaturen vorhanden sein könnten. Und daher ist die potentielle Methanmenge in Erdgashydraten gigantisch, wobei die derzeitigen Schätzungen bei einem konservativen Wert von 10.000 Gigatonnen Kohlenstoff aus Methan konvergieren. Zum Vergleich: die Gesamtschätzung für konventionelles Erdgas und -öl sind in der Größenordnung von einigen hundert Gigatonnen. Hier können Sie die Gegenden sehen, wo Clathrate in den Meeren beobachtet wurden. Man sieht, dass es überall auf der Welt Gegenden gibt, in denen man Gashydratproben gesammelt hat oder auf Gashydratvorkommen geschlossen hat. Die Prozedur ist extrem einfach: Man geht unter Tage. Man kann diese Clathrate aus den Meeren extrahieren, oder man kann sie vielleicht aus dem Permafrost herausholen. Und man kann die Menge aus dem System extrahieren, entweder durch Druckverminderung oder durch eine thermale Umwandlung, die das Erdgas vom Wasser trennt. Nun ist natürlich die Frage: Wie lösen wir die Frage der zukünftigen globalen Erwärmung? Es ist sehr klar, dass Erdgas zwangsläufig CO2 emittiert – wenn auch nur einen kleinen Bruchteil, der etwa halb so groß ist wie bei der Kohle. Daher ist das neue Projekt, die neue Frage: Wie können wir die CO2-Erzeugung noch weiter reduzieren? Und das Projekt - in das ich übrigens involviert bin - ist, dass die CO2-Erzeugung mit der Hilfe der spontanen thermischen Zersetzung des Methans in Wasserstoff und Industrieruß bei ausreichenden Temperaturen vermieden werden kann. Sie sehen hier, dass das CH4 sich in Wasserstoff und festen Industrieruß umwandelt. Diese Methode ist recht wertvoll, weil sie nicht mehr Energie verbraucht als der existierende Umbildungsprozess, der aber eine Menge CO2 produzieren kann - 4 Tonnen für jede Tonne Wasserstoff. Und der Industrieruß kann als ein Füllstoff oder Baumaterial benutzt werden. Und dieser Prozess wird gerade untersucht. Hier kann man die ersten Versuche sehen, die wir vor vielen Jahren durchführten, wo wir einfach ein Röhrchen benutzten. Wir brachten irgendein Erdgas in dem Röhrchen auf eine geeignete Temperatur, das sich natürlich und sehr schnell in Industrieruß und Wasserstoff umwandelte und so weiter. Die Methode der Methanaufspaltung ist hier mehr oder weniger dargestellt. Und hier sieht man, das Methan kommt herein. Durch den Methanaufspaltungsprozess werden Wasserstoff und Kohlenstoff separat hergestellt. Die Effizienz ist hoch. Und die Zahlen, die Sie sehen, können erklärt werden, wenn man die Standardmethoden der CH4-Herstellung mit oder ohne CO2-Emission vergleicht. Sie sehen, dass in beiden Fällen - (das Handy klingelt), Entschuldigung, ach mein Gott. (Gelächter) Entschuldigen Sie. Nun ja, die Situation ist tatsächlich, dass dies sehr ähnlich ist. Sie sehen hier, dass mit einer konventionellen Methode 40% der Energie verloren geht. Und etwa 42% wird wiedergewonnen und mit einer normalen Methode hier gespeichert. Die Technologie - ich kann nicht viel Zeit damit verbringen, sie hier zu beschreiben. Sie ist hier in diesem Bild dargestellt. Sie ist sehr effizient. Wir haben heute in diesem Fall bei 1.000 Grad so etwas wie den Großteil der Methanumwandlung erreicht. Das funktioniert. Und die Kosten sind auch sehr vernünftig. Lassen Sie mich die verbleibenden 2 Minuten benutzen, um ein paar weitere Fragen zu erwähnen: die Frage des „Brennstoffes für den Verkehr“. Eine Menge Leute haben behauptet, dass man Wasserstoff für den Verkehr benutzen sollte. Aber ein zukünftiger Benzinersatz für den Verkehr muss flüssig sein. Nun kann man eine Flüssigkeit erzeugen, indem man die Menge an Wasserstoff, die durch die vorherige Methode erzeugt, wird mit dem restlichen CO2, das bereits erzeugt wurde, wo viel CO2 erzeugt wird. Mit anderen Worten, die Idee ist, Methanol durch einen Prozess zu erzeugen, in dem sich Wasserstoff plus CO2 in Methanol plus Wasser umwandeln. Und dies ist, sehr kurz, ein Beispiel, wie man das macht: Nehmen Sie dieses Diagramm hier. Im Wesentlichen wird aus Erdgas vom Methan Wasserstoff mit Kohlenstoffemission oder -speicherung produziert. Und dann nimmt man schon erzeugtes CO2 und bringt sie in einem Methanolsynthesereaktor zusammen, und es wird dann eine Flüssigkeit. Das Umwandlungsprodukt wird als zukünftiger Ölersatz benutzt. So komme ich nun zum Schluss. Worüber reden wir bei der Energie für die Zukunft? Aus meiner Sicht, entwickelt sich gerade ein neues Zeitalter des Überflusses. Und es basiert auf unkonventionellen Gasvorkommen, zunächst Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas in der vorhersehbaren Zukunft. Und später Methanhydrat, nachdem das Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas mehr oder weniger verbraucht sein wird. Nordamerika, Indien, China, Afrika und Lateinamerika werden Zugang zu billigem und reichlich vorhandenem Schiefergas und -öl haben. Europa ist, aus politischen Gründen, noch im Stillstand. Mit steigender Umweltempfindlichkeit und Gasverbrauch verbleibt die Hauptfrage, wie man diese riesigen neuen Vorkommen an Erdgas erschließt, die für Jahrtausende zur Verfügung stehen. Und wie der immense Energiereichtum in der effizientesten und effektivsten Weise mit einem minimalen Umweltfußabdruck geerntet werden kann. Ich glaube, die Erdgasvorkommen mit null CO2-Emissionen sind die Gewinner. Schiefergas, und letztendlich Clathrate mit der Möglichkeit, die zukünftige primäre Energiequelle für viele, viele Jahrhunderte zu werden. Vielen Dank!

Carlo Rubbia presents data on carbon dioxide emissions
(00:04:55 - 00:07:40)

 

The data demonstrates that it’s still currently unfeasible to rely on renewable resources on a large scale. An often cited example is that, in terms of wind energy in Europe, the coldest days of the year are also the least windy. Although many changes in policy, as well as advances in research have taken place, renewables still do not meet the forecasted demands, and there are questions pertaining to energy intermittency, storage, location and a diversification of energy sources.

 

Carlo Rubbia (2016) - The Future of Energy

We can see the clock started. We have 30 minutes, from here it's 29:59 - you lost 4 seconds. (Laughter) Thank you very much. Now we are going to move ourselves to another subject which is also very relevant to the future of mankind, which is the future of energy. And at the beginning I will start to discuss briefly the climate of the past, which is a clear premise for its future. The Earth was created about 4.56 billion years ago, much later than the Big Bang. The complex multi-cellular organic life was almost entirely born during the last 600 million years. Here you can see the temperature of planet Earth over the last 600 million years. You see there have been many changes from low and high temperatures. Some very warm temperatures have taken place down to glaciation. And in some instances we reached almost ice at the level of the equator. And various other periods were much higher and warmer than that. The last million years is represented by a large number of periods in which glaciations were reaching the equator and combined with "climate optima", about today’s temperature. And now the whole history of mankind is based on a remarkable uniform period, which you see in this graph, during the last 10,000 years, which has permitted to sustain the development of human civilisation. So the little trace we have here at the end has been the one which has made us be what we are today. If you look at these things: the last period, for instance, using Vostok ice core from the Antarctica. You can see that the situation is characterised by very short interglacial periods, equal to present warm air presence. Surrounded by very long glacial periods over the last half a billion years. You can see the probable beginning of the Homo sapiens occurred something like 300,000 years ago. That the earliest Homo sapiens moving to Africa was about 100,000 years ago. And agriculture, which is the beginning of our present civilization, only occured about 10,000 years ago. Notice the shortness of the warm period over very long glacial periods. And the question is, of course, the modern time - how long will it continue, how long will it last from this point of view? If you go on a shorter timescale and you look at the last 2,000 years, you can observe for instance in the northern hemisphere the natural changes between cooler and warmer conditions on a period which is roughly over 1,000 years. In Roman times the temperature was warmer than today. Then we had the dark ages in the middle of the millenium. And then around the year 1000 the temperature came up again. We had a little ice age around 1600/1700. And now we are coming to today’s situation. You can see that warmer and colder periods have been alternating. Extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. The current mean temperature variations relative to the variations are indicated in this graph with something like 2 standard deviation bars. At the present moment we have a major new phenomenon developing: the emergence of what is called "anthropogenic era". The permanence of the unique long stable period after the inter-glacial period has been essential to create and sustain life and civilisation as they are today. And, of course, it is an essential element for survival that we must preserve at all cost. But, as well-known, we are presently facing a new phenomenon which was coined by Eugene Stoermer and popularised by the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen: the emergence of a man made Anthropogenic era. For the first time, human activities may strongly influence the future of the Earth's climate. For instance, since 1750, about 1 million of million tonnes, 1000 Gtons, of CO2 have been injected into the atmosphere to which many other pollutants have to be added. The first sign of such an Anthropogenic era may have been already detected. This effect should be curbed to avoid the irreversible effects of a major climatic change. The amount of CO2 accumulation is, of course, enormous. You can see here the distribution over the planet. You can see that, for instance, in some of the countries we are using more than 100 kg of CO2 per day - each individual person. The second effect is that the CO2 production so far appears as uncurbed. You see here the function of time, the amount of emissions of CO2. The whole planet - you can see that there is a continuous line growing linearly, exponentially. The CO2 production is enough to fill with super-fluid CO2 at 100 bars, with a density similar to water, a volume like the lake of Geneva, which is 80 km^3, every 4 years. You can see the lake of Geneva here. And you can see how it has, in fact, been affected by the situation. The second question is, of course, how long does CO2 last in the biosphere? Here is a graph which shows the variations of the lifetime of the CO2 in the atmosphere and appears to be somewhere between 30 and 35 kilo years. You can see here what will happen over time. You see here 600 years in this plot with a certain emission of CO2, which, I assume, will occur for the first few 100 years and then they will stay steady for a long way to go. As a comparison, for instance, the lifetime of Plutonium 239 is 26 kilo years, associated with today’s public negative perception of nuclear energy. So we are talking about really incredible durations. The mean atmospheric lifetime of the order of 10^4 years is in contrast with the popular perception of many people who think that in a few hundred years CO2 will disappear. Now let’s see, what are the predictions for the next 25 years? Those are particularly gloomy. You can see the plot here from IEA, International Energy Agency, from Paris. You can observe here a massive expansion of fossils burning with no scarcity of resources, but a very slow growth of renewables, hydro included. You can see from this graph that, in fact, the renewables grow simply from 13% to some 18% over a quarter of a century. And the effect of this is coming from a situation which is very characteristic. You can see here that for the USA, Europe and other OECD countries essentially it is flat, constant in intensity. China and India are developing very rapidly, together with the remaining developing countries, and bringing the contribution of the CO2 by an increase of the order of about 33% over this period of 25 years. The immediate consequence of that is, of course, some change of the temperature of the Earth. You can see here the plot of the temperature of the Earth in the year 2015, referring to the baseline situation before the development between 1951 to 1980. And you can see that, in fact, there is a very substantial increase in temperature, mostly the northern hemisphere right here and in our situation. And you can see that the overall effect over the period is substantial, of the order of about 1 degree centigrade above what it was in 1961 to 1990 on average. There is a small little effect up here and down to the bottom of the Antarctica. But fundamentally most of the civilised world is now warming up very substantially. How do we go about this? - That’s the second question. To do this we need, of course, new technologies. The statement is that new technologies are the only key to solving sustainability of the future of energy. The transformation to energy with lower emissions and a quantitatively significant management of CO2 are amongst the most important technological challenges of our times. Of course, the current worldwide energy supply is dependent mainly on fossil fuels, which will remain indispensable for decades to come. But in order to curb environmental changes, it is necessary to proceed vigorously on 2 lines: One is the development and progressive utilisation of renewable energy sources. And the second is the more efficient utilisation of fossil fuels, limiting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and other emissions. I will briefly present here the main guidelines of major rules which are being followed by Europe on one side, the United States on the other. And finally the developing countries like China, to show what are the differences in interest and behaviours about the future of energy. Let me start with the first pillar of energy policy which is Europe. During as many as 20 years the energy policy in the European Union has been determined by 2 main priorities. The first strategic priority of the European Union has been one to prevent dangerous climate changes. The second consideration is based on the assumption that the energy prices will rise inexorably as global energy demand rises and resources become scarce. And this will necessarily make renewable energy competitively the winners. By 2040, about 80% of the European primary energy should aggressively be coming from renewables, abating both nuclear and fossils. And one of the development and progressive utilisation of renewable is positive action. Europe has missed substantially the consequence of technological progress. And the US successes of CO2 efficient, lower cost and abundant utilisation of unconventional natural gas, which we call also shale gas. So let me briefly show you the situation of the European future. You can see, for instance, the example here of Germany. You can see that from 1990 the amount of CO2 in 2050 will collapse by a factor of 20 - you can see there the situation. You can also see that hydrogen electrically produced by PV, hydro, wind, geothermal and solar, are the main energy sources of industry and transport. According to Europe, which is specifically presented according to the German situation, the amount of fossils will eventually disappear almost entirely and will be replaced by renewables. Let me show you here, as an example, wind energy which is a dominant element for Europe. You can see here that in fact most of the wind energy is really coming from northern Europe, with few little traces around here near France. This is how it’s distributed over Europe. Now let me show you here how it is realised in practice. Wind off-shore is probably the real solution. And you see enormous effort has been performed in order to carry out such a situation. Here you can see, for instance, how the average power now has grown up to something like 6 megawatts per unit. That some of these units go under the water up to 700 metres in depth. That they are, in fact, distributed mostly in the operation offshore in the region between England, Scandinavia and Germany. Now the real problem with wind is variability. You can see here, for instance, the variability of wind in Germany. You can see that essentially there are moments in which there is too much wind, and there are moments when there is not enough wind. Let me also point out that the power carried by wind is cubed in proportion to the speed of the wind. It's squared because 1,5 v^2,is squared, and another v because of the speed at which the wind travels. Therefore there are moments where the very large variability is a major problem, as you can discuss. If you go more generally, you can see that the renewable energy can be done with biomass, geothermal, wind and hydropower. The economic potentials of these various solutions are not very large when you compare them to the demand. Europe will foresee by 2050 to have 7,500 TWh/y of electric power. And you can see that the best you can do of economic potentials of these various alternatives of renewable energy are much smaller than this number. And therefore, long-term renewable dominance requires resources outside Europe. The key resource of Europe is, of course, the sun which has an enormous amount of economic potential, 600,000 TWh/y. Which is, of course, dominating in the southern part of Europe and most importantly in the Sahara desert and so forth and so on. And you can see how little of that can bring an enormous change. A total energy worldwide could be accumulated by covering with solar panels, a system of the order of this little graph you can see here around Africa. However, the situation now is not so clear because, although for solar energy the deserts are a necessity, you can see that transporting energy from Africa to Europe is not a simple task. In fact, the major disasters taking place recently, because the Desertec Industrial Initiative has abandoned its strategy to export solar power generated from the Sahara to Europe, killing hopes of boosting Africa’s share of renewable energy. Therefore it is not very clear what will be the situation in the future. Here you can see, for instance, the cost of large scale electricity and how they go as a function of the various systems. Conventional energies are hydro, geothermal, nuclear and biomass. Wind on-shore and off-shore, you can see them there. And you can see the on-shore wind is still reasonably acceptable, but the off-shore wind has a major cost increase. Then you have also carbon sequestration which is there, which is also again accumulating the CO2 from the coal. And this is also very high in terms of temperature. You also see the solar energies are there - very nice but, of course, extremely expensive. So you see that moneywise the situation is rather difficult to be understood. There are 2 main problems in Europe: one is the high cost as a function of fraction of renewables. You see here a graph which shows, for instance, what is the cost of electricity with about 1,000 watts per capita – which is the situation of Denmark and Germany. And you compare that with the situation in the United States, which is down here, for instance. Where you have in effect a much smaller renewable capacity, but the cost of electricity is almost a factor of 2 lower. The second question is that there are not enough renewables within Europe to satisfy fully the domestic resources. Therefore something has to be done elsewhere. But there is real difficulty in carrying over several thousand kilometres the energy from Africa to Europe. The key problems of renewable energy are, of course: the best energy is always the cheapest energy. Energy, however, must be available when it is needed. And the third important point: that electricity is now becoming the dominant source of energy for renewable energies. But renewable energies require much wider surface of collection, located in specific locations in which production is optimal. And therefore, electricity at very high powers must be transported over much longer distances than today, which is technically not very easy compared to the one possible today for natural gas and oil. So this is the European situation. Now what about the American situation? The second main pillar is coming from the US. And this is essentially based on the question of this graph coming from Time Magazine, which says, Commercial extraction for oil shale is now something which has already started over the last 10 years. And, in effect, the development is quite remarkably growing nowadays. In fact, you can see that there are possibilities to do natural gas from shales. This is how this is being organised. Or coalbed methane, again another possibility, which can be adsorbed to produce unconventional natural gas. And the world-wide shale resources are massive. You can see that both Americas, China and Europe have large amounts of these resources. Coalbed methane again is very rich in different countries. So there are plenty of resources there. In Europe we also have plenty of resources for this. But, as I said, resources are vast, but strong popular opposition forbids the use of these applications when it comes to Europe. Because Europe is totally absent at the present moment in a practical sense to these solutions, which are very strongly developed in the United States. This has produced a very fundamental difference between the prices of natural gas in the US in respect to Europe and Japan. As you see from this graph: while in 2006 to 2008 the situation was, in fact, very similar. Now in 2012/13 you can see that while the prices in US have been going down, the prices in Europe and in Japan are much higher. So there is a big difference between the predictions of the 2 systems. This has also introduced another important fact: that electricity production from coal has gone down in the US thanks to the development of shale gas, and production from gas has increased. The result is that the US has had a very substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. And the primary energy production in North America is, in fact, rising rapidly, while in Europe it is decreasing. And the petroleum production in various countries shows here that now the United States is producing as much petroleum as Saudi Arabia, which is a remarkable result. You can see, for instance, in the case of Texas, which shows clearly that the development of shale gas has created a real revolution in the amount of oil which is being used. The third question I’d like to mention very briefly in the few minutes I’ve got left, is the question of China. China is the world’s largest producer of electricity, surpassing the United States in 2011. Electricity generation in China has increased 9.6% annually, reaching a very large amount of terawatts. The real problem is the coal-fired plants currently make up two-thirds of the power generation, which is, of course, the result of an abundance of coal in China. The demand is expected to continue to increase at a very rapid pace. However, the growth of electricity from coal-fired plants resulted in an increase in air pollution and general lack of efficiency. China is now moving aggressively to curb pollution and increase supply of renewable power. China is the world’s largest wind energy producer with over 90 GW of installed power at the end of 2013. And 15% is the near-term renewables target for China. Here you can see how the renewables represent themselves in China: wind, solar and hydro are there. The electric demands are shown in this graph. You can see why wind and solar and hydro are optimal in some regions. The electric demands are dominant, of course, where the people are. There is a big business in the 2 distances. You can see here a long transmission of power is required, as I mentioned already. You can see that several thousand kilometres of distance are required between the best production of hydro power, wind power, solar power and the presence of the main people occupations. You can see that situation in China. Shale gas is strongly developed by China. You can see here the various companies exploring shale gas, most of them American companies, which are going into China to get this system productive. And you can see how quickly the shale gas is being developed in China to reduce the coal dependency. You can see here a graph showing the estimated annual production rising very rapidly, with a very impressive, high-aiming level of the situation. Let me then continue asking ourselves in the 8 minutes I’ve got left about the future of energy productions. Unconventional natural gas resources seem to be a major new effect, which we have to take into account. The process of progressive decarbonisation of fossils goes necessarily through an increased use and consumption of natural gas. It is quite clear that natural gas represents a practical alternative to the presently growing exploitation of coal as the main source of energy. In addition, many other new developments have to be introduced in order to ensure that the future can become a remarkable era of abundant and cheap production from fossils. And the key element to this is novel methods. Let me also point out to another new fact: the presence of a new source. The largest untapped reserve for natural gas on the crust is a thing called clathrate. Maybe some of you people only know what a clathrate is. The clathrate is a combination between some - you can see here some water and some natural gas, which combine in a situation which is stable at a temperature around zero degrees, and is called clathrate. And it’s very rich in methane. For instance, one litre of methane clathrate, so-called burning ice, will produce something like 168 litres of methane gas at the normal pressures. You can see here a picture of a small amount of this clathrate which is now burning, producing natural gas. And you can see the molecule and the structure of a system like that. The subject appeared to be purely academic until the people realised that a very large amount of methane hydrate could be present in any environment with suitable pressures and temperatures. And therefore the potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrate is enormous, with current estimates converging around a conservative value about 10,000 gigatons of methane carbon. As a comparison, the total estimates for conventional natural gas and oil are of the order of a few 100 gigatons. Therefore you can see here the location where clathrates were observed in the oceans. You can see almost everywhere around the world there are places in which recovered gas hydrate samples or infer gas hydrate occurrences have been observed. The procedure is extremely simple: You go underground. You can extract these clathrates out of the ocean or you can bring them eventually out from the permafrost. And you can recuperate the amount from the system either by having a depressurisation or having a thermal change which separates the natural gas from the water. Now, of course, the question is: How do we solve the question of future global warming? It’s quite clear that natural gas is inevitably emitting CO2 - although at a small fraction, which is half compared to coal. So the new project, the new question is, How can we reduce even further the CO2 productions? And the project - in which, by the way, I'm also involved – is, CO2 productions could be avoided with the help of spontaneous thermal decomposition at sufficient temperatures of methane into hydrogen and black carbon. You can see here the CH4 will transform itself into hydrogen and solid black carbon. This method is quite valuable because it does not use more energy than the existing reforming process, which, however, can produce a lot of CO2 - 4 tons of CO2 for each ton of hydrogen. And the black carbon can be recovered as a filler or construction material. And this is a process under investigation. You can see here the initial attempts which we did many years ago, in which we just took a tube. We put the tube in at the suitable temperature. Some kind of natural gas just naturally transforming itself into black carbon and hydrogen very quickly. And so forth and so on. The way of methane cracking is more or less represented here. You can see the methane input coming in. Through the methane cracking process hydrogen and carbon are separately produced. The efficiency is high. And, in fact, the numbers you can see can be explained comparing the standard method of producing CH4 with emission of CO2 or without emission of CO2. You can see that in both cases – (mobile phone is ringing) sorry, oh my God. (Laughter). Excuse me. Anyway, the situation is, in fact, that this is very similar. You can see here that 40% energy is lost by a conventional method. And about 42% is recovered and stored with a normal method in here. The technology - I cannot spend much time describing it. It’s represented by this picture here. It’s very efficient. We have reached in this case a 1,000 degrees, something like a major fraction of methane conversion today. It works. And the cost is also very valuable. So let me use the 2 minutes I’ve got left by mentioning a few more questions: the question of "fuel for transportations". A lot of people have claimed that you should use hydrogen for transportation. But, however, a future subsitute to petrol for transportation has to be a liquid. Now you can build a liquid by combining the amount of hydrogen produced by the previous method with remaining CO2, which is spent already, where plenty of CO2 is produced. In other words, the idea is to produce methanol through a process in which hydrogen plus CO2 transform themselves into methanol plus water. And this is an example, very briefly, how you do it: You take, this graph here, essentially the natural gas from the methane producing hydrogen with emission of carbon storage. And you take CO2 from already used CO2 and you combine them together in a methanol synthesis reactor, which then becomes a liquid. And its transform is used as a future replacement for oil. Now let me therefore conclude. What are we talking about energy for the future? In my view a new age of abundance is now developing. And it is based on unconventional gas resources, initially coalbed and shale gas in the foreseeable future. And methane hydrates later on, after the coalbed methane and shale gas has been more or less distributed. North America, India, China, Africa, Latin America will all have access to cheap and abundant shale gas and oil. Europe, of course, is, for political reasons still on hold. With both environmental sensitivities and gas consumption on the rise, the main question is, how to recover this huge novel natural gas resources, available for millennia to come. And economically harvest the immense energy wealth in the most efficient and effective manner and with minimal environmental footprint. I believe the natural gas resources with zero CO2 emissions are the winners: Shale gas, and ultimately clathrate, with the ability of becoming the dominant primary energy source for tens of centuries to come. Thank you very much.

Wie wir sehen, läuft die Uhr schon, uns bleiben noch 30 Minuten, ab jetzt sind es 29:59. Sie haben 4 Sekunden verloren. (Gelächter) Vielen Dank! Nun gehen wir zu einem anderen Thema, das ebenfalls für die Zukunft der Menschheit sehr relevant ist, die Zukunft der Energie. Und ich beginne mit einer kurzen Diskussion des Klimas in der Vergangenheit, das eine klare Voraussetzung für seine Zukunft ist. Die Erde wurde vor etwa 4,56 Milliarden Jahren geschaffen, viel später als der Urknall. Das komplexe, multizelluläre organische Leben wurde nahezu ausschließlich während der vergangenen 600 Millionen Jahre geboren. Hier kann man die Temperatur des Planeten Erde über die letzten 600 Millionen Jahre sehen. Wie man sieht, gab es viele Wechsel zwischen niedrigen und hohen Temperaturen. Es gab sehr hohe Temperaturen bis hin zur Vergletscherung, einige Male reichte das Eis fast bis an den Äquator. Und verschiedene andere Zeiten waren viel wärmer als das. Die letzten Millionen Jahre werden durch eine große Anzahl von Zeitspannen dargestellt, in denen die Vergletscherung den Äquator erreichte, und solchen mit optimalem Klima, ungefähr heutigen Temperaturen. Nun basiert die gesamte Menschheitsgeschichte auf einer bemerkenswert gleichförmigen Zeitspanne, die man in dieser Kurve sehen kann, während der letzten 10.000 Jahre, die es ermöglichte, die Entwicklung der menschlichen Zivilisation aufrecht zu erhalten. So, die kurze Linie, die wir hier am Ende haben, hat uns zu dem gemacht hat, was wir heute sind. Lassen Sie uns diese Dinge ansehen: die letzte Zeitspanne zum Beispiel, wo wir den Wostok-Eiskern aus der Antarktis zu Rate ziehen. Man sieht, dass die Situation durch sehr kurze Zwischeneiszeiten charakterisiert wird, die den derzeitigen Warmzeiten gleichen. Flankiert von sehr langen Eiszeiten über die letzten 500 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Wie man sehen kann, ist der wahrscheinliche Beginn des Homo Sapiens etwa 300.000 Jahre her. Und die frühesten Homo Sapiens in Afrika waren dort vor etwa 100.000 Jahren. Die Landwirtschaft, die den Beginn unserer jetzigen Zivilisation darstellt, begann erst vor etwa 10.000 Jahren. Beachten Sie die Kürze der Warmperioden zwischen sehr langen Eiszeiten. Und die Frage ist natürlich, wie lange die moderne Zeit andauern wird, wie lange wird es von diesem Gesichtspunkt her andauern? Wenn man sich kürzere Zeitskalen ansieht, und man sieht hier die letzten 2.000 Jahre, sieht man beispielsweise die natürlichen Wechsel zwischen kälteren und wärmeren Bedingungen auf der nördlichen Halbkugel mit einem Zyklus, der ungefähr 1000 Jahre beträgt. Zu Zeiten des römischen Reichs waren die Temperaturen höher als heute. Und dann hatten wir das frühe Mittelalter in der Mitte des Jahrtausends. Um das Jahr 1000 herum, begannen die Temperaturen wieder zu steigen. Wir hatten um 1600/1700 herum eine kleine Eiszeit. Und jetzt kommen wir zur heutigen Situation. Man sieht, dass wärmere und kältere Zeiten sich abgewechselt haben. Außerhalb der Tropen, auf der nördlichen Halbkugel - die derzeitigen mittleren Temperaturänderungen im Verhältnis zu den mittleren Temperaturen werden in dieser Kurve mit Fehlerbalken von etwa zwei Standardabweichungen angezeigt. Derzeit entwickelt sich ein neues, bedeutendes Phänomen: der Beginn des sogenannten „anthropogenen Zeitalters“. Das Andauern der einzigartig langen, stabilen Periode nach der Zwischeneiszeit war wesentlich, um das Leben und die Zivilisation so aufrechtzuerhalten, wie sie heute sind. Und das ist natürlich ein wesentliches Element zum Überleben, das wir auf jeden Fall erhalten müssen. Aber, wie wir wissen, sehen wir uns derzeit einem neuen Phänomen gegenüber. Ein Begriff, den Eugene Stoermer prägte und den der Nobelpreisträger Paul Crutzen allgemein bekannt machte: der Beginn der durch Menschen verursachten anthropogenen Ära. Zum ersten Mal könnten menschliche Handlungen die Zukunft des Erdklimas stark beeinflussen. Seit 1750 wurden beispielsweise etwa 1 Million Millionen Tonnen, 1000 Gigatonnen, CO2 in die Atmosphäre ausgestoßen, zusätzlich zu vielen anderen Schadstoffen. Die ersten Anzeichen eines solchen anthropogenen Zeitalters wurden vielleicht schon nachgewiesen. Dieser Einfluss sollte gedrosselt werden, um die irreversiblen Auswirkungen einer großen Klimaänderung zu vermeiden. Der Wert der CO2-Anreicherung ist natürlich enorm. Hier sieht man die Verteilung über den Planeten. Man sieht beispielsweise, dass wir in einigen Ländern jeden Tag mehr als 100 kg CO2 erzeugen - pro Person. Der zweite Effekt ist, dass die CO2-Produktion bis jetzt ungezügelt erscheint. Sie sehen hier die Menge an CO2-Ausstoß als Funktion der Zeit. Der gesamte Planet - Sie sehen hier, dass es eine kontinuierlich linear/exponentiell wachsende Linie ist. Die CO2-Produktion reicht aus, um alle 4 Jahre ein Volumen wie den Genfer See, was etwa 80 km^3 entspricht, mit suprafluidem CO2 bei 100 Bar mit einer Dichte ähnlich der des Wassers zu füllen. Hier sieht man den Genfer See. Und Sie können sehen, wie er tatsächlich durch die Situation betroffen wurde. Die zweite Frage ist natürlich, wie lange bleibt CO2 in der Biosphäre? Hier ist eine Kurve, die die Änderungen der CO2-Verweilzeit in der Atmosphäre zeigt Sie scheint irgendwo zwischen 30' und 35.000 Jahren zu liegen. Hier kann man sehen was über die Jahre passieren wird. In dieser Zeichnung sind 600 Jahre mit einer bestimmten CO2-Emission gezeigt, die, nehme ich an, über die ersten paar 100 Jahre auftritt und dann für eine lange Zeit gleich bleibt. Als Vergleich beträgt die Lebenszeit des Plutoniums 239 beispielsweise 26.000 Jahre, verbunden mit der heutigen öffentlichen negativen Wahrnehmung der Kernenergie. Wir reden daher von wirklich unglaublichen Zeitspannen. Die durchschnittliche Lebenszeit in der Atmosphäre von der Größenordnung von 10^4 Jahren ist im Widerspruch zu der gängigen Sicht vieler Menschen, die denken, dass das CO2 in ein paar hundert Jahren verschwinden wird. Nun schauen wir uns die Vorhersagen für die nächsten 25 Jahre an. Diese sind besonders düster. Hier sehen Sie die Kurven der IEA, International Energy Agency, in Paris. Man sieht hier eine massive Ausweitung der Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen ohne Ressourcenknappheit, dagegen ein sehr langsames Wachstum der erneuerbaren Energien, einschließlich der Wasserkraft. Aus dieser Kurve ersehen wir, dass über ein Vierteljahrhundert tatsächlich die erneuerbaren Energien von 13% auf etwa 18% wachsen. Und dieser Effekt entspringt aus einer sehr charakteristischen Situation. Sie sehen hier, dass sie für die USA, Europa und andere OECD-Staaten im Wesentlichen flach ist, konstante Intensität. China und Indien entwickeln sich sehr schnell, zusammen mit den übrigen Entwicklungsländern, und tragen zum CO2 durch einen Anstieg von etwa 33% über diesen Zeitraum von 25 Jahren bei. Die sofortige Konsequenz davon ist natürlich eine Änderung der Erdtemperatur. Hier sieht man die Kurve der Erdtemperatur im Jahr 2015, in Bezug auf die Basislinie vor der Entwicklung, zwischen 1951 und 1980. Und man kann tatsächlich einen sehr erheblichen Anstieg in den Temperaturen erkennen, am meisten auf der nördlichen Halbkugel genau hier und in unserer Situation. Man kann sehen, dass die Gesamtauswirkung über diesen Zeitraum beträchtlich ist, in der Größenordnung von etwa 1 Grad Celsius über dem Mittelwert zwischen 1961 und 1990. Da ist eine kleine Auswirkung hier oben und ganz unten in der Antarktis. Aber grundsätzlich erwärmt sich die zivilisierte Welt gerade sehr beträchtlich. Was machen wir jetzt? - Das ist die zweite Frage. Um etwas zu unternehmen, benötigen wir selbstverständlich neue Technologien. Man sagt, dass neue Technologien der einzige Schlüssel sind, die Nachhaltigkeit der Zukunft der Energie zu lösen. Der Übergang zu Energien mit geringeren Emissionen und ein mengenmäßig signifikantes CO2-Management sind einige der wichtigsten technologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Die derzeitige weltweite Energieversorgung hängt natürlich hauptsächlich von fossilen Brennstoffen ab, die für die nächsten Jahrzehnte unverzichtbar bleiben werden. Aber um die Umweltänderungen zu bändigen, müssen wir auf zwei Schienen nachdrücklich vorankommen: die eine ist die Entwicklung und fortschreitende Benutzung von erneuerbaren Energiequellen. Und die zweite ist die effizientere Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe, um die Auswirkungen des anthropogenen CO2 und anderer Emissionen zu begrenzen. Ich präsentiere hier kurz die Hauptleitlinien oder Hauptregeln, die von Europa auf der einen Seite und den Vereinigten Staaten auf der anderen befolgt werden. Und schließlich den Entwicklungsländern wie China, um die Interessen- und Verhaltensunterschiede bezüglich der Zukunft der Energie aufzuzeigen. Ich beginne mit der ersten Säule der Energiepolitik, das ist Europa. Über 20 Jahre hinweg bestimmten zwei Hauptprioritäten die Energiepolitik der Europäischen Gemeinschaft. Die erste strategische Priorität der Europäischen Gemeinschaft war es, gefährliche Klimaänderungen zu verhindern. Die zweite Überlegung basiert auf der Annahme, dass die Energiepreise unerbittlich ansteigen werden, während der globale Energiebedarf steigt und die Ressourcen knapper werden. Und dies wird notwendigerweise die erneuerbaren Energien zum Gewinner im Wettbewerb machen. Bis zum Jahr 2040 sollten etwa 80% der europäischen Primärenergie aggressiv von erneuerbaren Energien kommen, und damit sowohl Kernenergie als auch fossile Energie verringern. Und obwohl die Entwicklung und zunehmende Nutzung der erneuerbaren Energien eine positive Handlung ist, hat Europa die Konsequenzen des technischen Fortschritts ziemlich verpasst. Und die amerikanischen Erfolge der CO2-effizienten und breiten Nutzung von unkonventionellem Erdgas, das wir auch Schiefergas nennen, bei niedrigeren Kosten. Lassen Sie mich kurz die Situation der europäischen Zukunft zeigen. Sie sehen hier beispielsweise Deutschland. Sie können hier sehen, dass ab 1990 die CO2-Menge im Jahr 2050 um einen Faktor von 20 einbrechen wird – dort sehen Sie die Situation. Sie sehen, dass über Fotovoltaik, Wasserkraft, Wind-, Solar- und geothermale Energie elektrisch produzierter Wasserstoff die Hauptquelle der Industrie und des Verkehrs ist. In Europa, das spezifisch durch die deutsche Situation dargestellt ist, wird die Menge an fossiler Energie letztendlich fast gänzlich verschwinden und durch erneuerbare Ressourcen ersetzt. Lassen Sie mich hier, als ein Beispiel, die Windenergie zeigen, die das dominante Element für Europa ist. Hier können Sie sehen, dass tatsächlich die meiste Windenergie aus Nordeuropa kommt, mit kleineren Mengen hier bei Frankreich. So ist es über Europa verteilt. Nun lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie es in der Praxis realisiert ist. Offshore-Wind ist vermutlich die wirkliche Lösung. Und Sie sehen die enormen Anstrengungen, die durchgeführt wurden, um eine solche Situation herbeizuführen. Hier sehen Sie beispielsweise, wie die durchschnittliche Leistung jetzt auf etwa 6 Megawatt pro Einheit angewachsen ist. Einige dieser Einheiten stehen in eine Wassertiefe bis zu 700 Meter. Sie sind hauptsächlich verteilt im Offshore-Betrieb in der Region zwischen England, Skandinavien und Deutschland. Das wirkliche Problem mit Wind ist die Variabilität. Hier sieht man beispielsweise die Windvariabilität in Deutschland. Sie können hier im Wesentlichen sehen, dass es Zeiten gibt, in denen der Wind zu stark ist, und Zeiten, wo nicht genug Wind herrscht. Lassen Sie mich noch darauf hinweisen, dass die Leistung des Winds der Windgeschwindigkeit zur dritten Potenz entspricht. Es ist im Quadrat wegen 1,5 v^2, und noch einmal v, weil das die Windgeschwindigkeit ist. Es gibt daher Zeiten, wo die sehr große Variabilität ein Hauptproblem darstellt, wie man diskutieren kann. Wenn man es genereller betrachtet, kann man sehen, dass die erneuerbare Energie über Biomasse, geothermische Energie, Wind- und Wasserenergie erzeugt werden kann. Die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser verschiedenen Lösungen sind nicht sehr groß, wenn man sie mit dem Bedarf vergleicht. Die Voraussage für Europa bis 2050 sind 7.500 TWh/a elektrischer Leistung. Und hier können Sie sehen, dass die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser unterschiedlichen Alternativen für erneuerbare Energien in einer Größenordnung liegt, die viel kleiner ist als diese Zahl. Und daher benötigt eine langfristige Dominanz der erneuerbaren Energien Ressourcen außerhalb Europas. Die Hauptrohstoffquelle Europas ist natürlich die Sonne, die über ein enormes Wirtschaftspotential verfügt, 600.000 TWh/a. Das dominiert natürlich im südlichen Teil Europas und sehr wesentlich in der Sahara und so weiter. Und Sie sehen, wie wenig davon eine enorme Änderung herbeiführen kann. Die weltweite Gesamtenergie könnte durch eine Überdeckung mit Solarpaneelen gesammelt werden, ein System in der Größenordnung dieser kleinen Zeichnung hier in Afrika. Die Situation ist aber nicht so klar, weil man sieht, dass, obwohl die Wüsten für die Solarenergie notwendig sind, der Transport der Energie von Afrika nach Europa keine leichte Aufgabe ist. Das große Fiasko, das es kürzlich passiert gab, weil die Industrieinitiative Desertec ihre Strategie aufgegeben hat, in der Sahara erzeugte Solarenergie nach Europa zu exportieren. Das hat die Hoffnung zerschlagen, Afrikas Anteil an erneuerbaren Energien zu steigern. Es ist daher nicht sehr klar, wie die Situation in der Zukunft sein wird. Hier kann man beispielsweise die Kosten der flächendeckenden Stromerzeugung sehen und wie sie sich als Funktion der verschiedenen Systeme ändern. Konventionelle Energien sind Wasserkraft, geothermische, Kern- und Biomasseenergie. Onshore- und Offshore-Windenergie kann man hier sehen. Und man kann sehen, dass die Onshore-Windenergie noch einigermaßen akzeptabel ist, aber dass die Offshore-Windenergie große Kostensteigerungen verursacht. Dann haben wir noch die Kohlenstoffabscheidung, die dort ist, die das CO2 aus der Kohle auch wieder aufsammelt. Und dies ist auch sehr hoch bezogen auf die Kosten. Sie sehen auch die Solarenergien dort - sehr schön, aber natürlich auch extrem teuer. Sie sehen, dass in Sachen Geld die Situation recht schwierig zu verstehen ist. In Europa gibt es zwei Hauptprobleme: Eins sind die hohen Kosten als Funktion des Bruchteils der erneuerbaren Energien. Hier sehen Sie die Kurve, die beispielsweise zeigt, was die Stromkosten bei etwa 1.000 Watt pro Kopf sind, was der Situation in Dänemark und Deutschland entspricht. Und vergleichen Sie das zum Beispiel mit der Situation in den Vereinigten Staaten, die hier unten stehen. Dort gibt es eine viel kleinere Kapazität an erneuerbaren Energien, aber die Stromkosten sind fast einen Faktor 2 geringer. Die zweite Frage ist, dass es nicht genügend erneuerbare Ressourcen innerhalb Europas gibt, um den heimischen Bedarf komplett zu decken. Daher muss etwas irgendwo anders getan werden. Aber es ist sehr schwierig, die Energie über mehrere tausend Kilometer von Afrika nach Europa zu transportieren. Das Schlüsselproblem der erneuerbaren Energie ist natürlich: die billigste Energie ist immer die beste Energie. Energie muss aber dort zur Verfügung stehen, wo sie benötigt wird. Und der dritte wichtige Punkt: die Elektrizität wird jetzt die dominante Energiequelle für die erneuerbaren Energien werden. Aber erneuerbare Energien benötigen eine größere Sammelfläche, die in besonderen Gegenden angesiedelt ist, wo die Produktion optimal ist. Und daher muss Energie bei sehr hoher Leistung über viel längere Strecken transportiert werden als heute, was technisch nicht leicht durchführbar ist, verglichen mit den Möglichkeiten heute für Erdgas und Erdöl. So, das ist also die europäische Situation. Wie sieht nun die amerikanische Situation aus? Die zweite Hauptsäule kommt aus den USA. Und das basiert im Wesentlichen auf dieser Grafik aus dem Time-Magazin, die betitelt ist: Die kommerzielle Extraktion von Schieferöl ist jetzt schon etwas, das über die vergangenen 10 Jahre schon begonnen hat. Und die Entwicklung wächst inzwischen recht beachtlich. Man kann sehen, dass es Möglichkeiten gibt, Erdgas aus Schiefergestein zu gewinnen. So wird das gemacht. Oder Kohleflöz-Methan - wieder eine weitere Möglichkeit -, das adsorbiert werden kann, um unkonventionelles Erdgas zu produzieren. Und die globalen Schiefervorkommen sind gewaltig. Sie können sehen, dass der amerikanische Kontinent, China und Europa große Mengen dieser Vorkommen haben. Kohleflöz-Methan ist wiederum in verschiedenen Ländern sehr reichhaltig vorhanden. Es gibt also reichliche Vorkommen. In Europa haben wir auch viele Vorkommen dafür. Aber, wie ich sagte, obwohl die Vorkommen riesig sind, verbietet starker öffentlicher Widerstand die Benutzung dieser Anwendungen, soweit es Europa betrifft. Europa fehlt bei diesen Lösungen im praktischen Sinn derzeit komplett, während sie in den USA sehr stark entwickelt sind. Das hat zu einem einen sehr grundsätzlichen Unterschied zwischen den Preisen von Erdgas in den USA geführt, verglichen mit Europa und Japan. Wie man aus dieser Kurve sehen kann: Während zwischen 2006 und 2008 die Situation tatsächlich sehr ähnlich war, kann man jetzt im Jahr 2012/13 sehen, dass während die Preise in den USA gesunken sind, die Preise in Europa und in Japan viel höher sind. Es gibt also einen großen Unterschied zwischen den Vorhersagen der 2 Systeme. Dies hat zu einer anderen wichtigen Tatsache geführt, nämlich dass in den USA die Stromproduktion aus Kohle dank der Entwicklung des Schiefergases abgenommen und die Produktion aus Gas zugenommen hat. Im Ergebnis gibt es in den USA eine beträchtliche Reduzierung der CO2 Emissionen. Und die Primärenergieerzeugung in Nordamerika steigt tatsächlich schnell an, während sie in Europa sinkt. Die Erdölproduktion in verschiedenen Ländern zeigt hier, dass die Vereinigten Staaten jetzt so viel Erdöl produzieren wie Saudi-Arabien - ein erstaunliches Resultat. Sie können hier am Beispiel Texas sehen, dass die Entwicklung des Schiefergases eine richtige Revolution im Ölverbrauch erzeugt hat. Die dritte Frage, die ich sehr kurz in den wenigen verbliebenen Minuten erwähnen möchte, ist die Frage nach China. China ist der weltweit größte Stromerzeuger, nachdem es die USA in 2011 überholt hat. Die Stromerzeugung in China wächst um 9,6% jährlich, und erreicht eine sehr große Menge von Terawatt. Das eigentliche Problem ist, dass die Kohlekraftwerke derzeit 2 Drittel des Stroms erzeugen, was natürlich ein Resultat des Kohlereichtums in China ist. Es wird erwartet, dass der Bedarf sehr schnell weiter zunehmen wird. Die steigende Stromerzeugung durch Kohlekraftwerke resultierte in zunehmender Luftverschmutzung und einem generellen Mangel an Effizienz. China ist jetzt verstärkt bemüht, die Verschmutzung zu verringern und die erneuerbare Energieversorgung zu erhöhen. Ende 2013 war China der weltgrößte Windenergieproduzent mit über 90 GW installierter Leistung. Und 15% ist das kurzfristige Ziel für erneuerbare Energien in China. Hier kann man sehen, wie die erneuerbaren Energien sich in China darstellen: Wind-, Solarenergie und Wasserkraft sind dort. Der Strombedarf ist in diesem Diagramm dargestellt. Man kann sehen, während Wind- und Solarenergie und Wasserkraft in einigen Regionen optimal sind, ist der Hauptstrombedarf natürlich dort, wo die Menschen sind. Da gibt es große Entfernungen zu den zwei Gebieten. Man kann hier sehen, dass eine weite Übertragung der Elektrizität erforderlich ist, wie schon vorhin erwähnt. Wie man sieht, müssen mehrere tausend Kilometer Entfernung zwischen den besten Produktionsstätten aus der Wasserkraft, Windenergie, Solarenergie und den Hauptansiedlungen der Menschen überbrückt werden. Das ist gerade die Situation in China. Schiefergas wird durch China sehr stark entwickelt. Hier sehen Sie die verschiedenen Unternehmen, die nach Schiefergas suchen. Die meisten sind amerikanische Firmen, die nach China gehen, um dieses System zur Produktion zu bringen. Und Sie können sehen, wie schnell das Schiefergas in China entwickelt wird, um die Kohleabhängigkeit zu reduzieren. Und hier die Kurve zeigt, dass die geschätzte Jahresproduktion sehr schnell auf ein sehr eindrucksvolles, hohes Niveau ansteigen wird. Dann sollten wir uns in den noch verbliebenden 8 Minuten mit der Zukunft der Energieerzeugung beschäftigen. Unkonventionelle Erdgasvorkommen scheinen ein großer, neuer Effekt zu sein, den wir berücksichtigen müssen. Der Prozess der Reduzierung von Kohlendioxid bei fossilen Brennstoffen geht notwendigerweise über eine wachsende Nutzung und Verbrauch von Erdgas. Es ist recht klar, dass Erdgas eine praktische Alternative zu der derzeitig wachsenden Ausbeutung von Kohle als hauptsächliche Energiequelle darstellt. Zusätzlich müssen weitere neue Entwicklungen eingeführt werden, um sicherzustellen, dass die Zukunft ein bedeutendes Zeitalter der weitverbreiteten und billigen Erzeugung aus fossilen Brennstoffen wird. Und das Schlüsselelement hier sind neuartige Methoden. Lassen Sie mich auf eine weitere neue Tatsache hinweisen: das Vorhandensein einer neuen Quelle. Die größte ungenutzte Erdgasreserve in der Erdkruste ist etwas, das Clathrat genannt wird. Vielleicht wissen einige von Euch, was ein Clathrat ist. Das Clathrat ist eine Verbindung zwischen - hier sieht man etwas Wasser und Erdgas, die in einer Situation sich verbinden, die bei Temperaturen um null Grad stabil ist, und das wird Clathrat genannt. Es ist sehr reich an Methan. Ein Liter Methan-Clathrat, sogenanntes brennbares Eis, produziert bei Normaldruck etwa 168 Liter Methan. Sie können hier ein Bild einer kleinen Menge dieses Clathrats sehen, das jetzt brennt, und Erdgas produziert. Und Sie können das Molekül und die Struktur dieses Systems sehen. Das Thema schien zunächst rein akademisch zu sein, bis man erkannte, dass sehr große Mengen an Methanhydrat in jeder Umgebung mit den geeigneten Drucken und Temperaturen vorhanden sein könnten. Und daher ist die potentielle Methanmenge in Erdgashydraten gigantisch, wobei die derzeitigen Schätzungen bei einem konservativen Wert von 10.000 Gigatonnen Kohlenstoff aus Methan konvergieren. Zum Vergleich: die Gesamtschätzung für konventionelles Erdgas und -öl sind in der Größenordnung von einigen hundert Gigatonnen. Hier können Sie die Gegenden sehen, wo Clathrate in den Meeren beobachtet wurden. Man sieht, dass es überall auf der Welt Gegenden gibt, in denen man Gashydratproben gesammelt hat oder auf Gashydratvorkommen geschlossen hat. Die Prozedur ist extrem einfach: Man geht unter Tage. Man kann diese Clathrate aus den Meeren extrahieren, oder man kann sie vielleicht aus dem Permafrost herausholen. Und man kann die Menge aus dem System extrahieren, entweder durch Druckverminderung oder durch eine thermale Umwandlung, die das Erdgas vom Wasser trennt. Nun ist natürlich die Frage: Wie lösen wir die Frage der zukünftigen globalen Erwärmung? Es ist sehr klar, dass Erdgas zwangsläufig CO2 emittiert – wenn auch nur einen kleinen Bruchteil, der etwa halb so groß ist wie bei der Kohle. Daher ist das neue Projekt, die neue Frage: Wie können wir die CO2-Erzeugung noch weiter reduzieren? Und das Projekt - in das ich übrigens involviert bin - ist, dass die CO2-Erzeugung mit der Hilfe der spontanen thermischen Zersetzung des Methans in Wasserstoff und Industrieruß bei ausreichenden Temperaturen vermieden werden kann. Sie sehen hier, dass das CH4 sich in Wasserstoff und festen Industrieruß umwandelt. Diese Methode ist recht wertvoll, weil sie nicht mehr Energie verbraucht als der existierende Umbildungsprozess, der aber eine Menge CO2 produzieren kann - 4 Tonnen für jede Tonne Wasserstoff. Und der Industrieruß kann als ein Füllstoff oder Baumaterial benutzt werden. Und dieser Prozess wird gerade untersucht. Hier kann man die ersten Versuche sehen, die wir vor vielen Jahren durchführten, wo wir einfach ein Röhrchen benutzten. Wir brachten irgendein Erdgas in dem Röhrchen auf eine geeignete Temperatur, das sich natürlich und sehr schnell in Industrieruß und Wasserstoff umwandelte und so weiter. Die Methode der Methanaufspaltung ist hier mehr oder weniger dargestellt. Und hier sieht man, das Methan kommt herein. Durch den Methanaufspaltungsprozess werden Wasserstoff und Kohlenstoff separat hergestellt. Die Effizienz ist hoch. Und die Zahlen, die Sie sehen, können erklärt werden, wenn man die Standardmethoden der CH4-Herstellung mit oder ohne CO2-Emission vergleicht. Sie sehen, dass in beiden Fällen - (das Handy klingelt), Entschuldigung, ach mein Gott. (Gelächter) Entschuldigen Sie. Nun ja, die Situation ist tatsächlich, dass dies sehr ähnlich ist. Sie sehen hier, dass mit einer konventionellen Methode 40% der Energie verloren geht. Und etwa 42% wird wiedergewonnen und mit einer normalen Methode hier gespeichert. Die Technologie - ich kann nicht viel Zeit damit verbringen, sie hier zu beschreiben. Sie ist hier in diesem Bild dargestellt. Sie ist sehr effizient. Wir haben heute in diesem Fall bei 1.000 Grad so etwas wie den Großteil der Methanumwandlung erreicht. Das funktioniert. Und die Kosten sind auch sehr vernünftig. Lassen Sie mich die verbleibenden 2 Minuten benutzen, um ein paar weitere Fragen zu erwähnen: die Frage des „Brennstoffes für den Verkehr“. Eine Menge Leute haben behauptet, dass man Wasserstoff für den Verkehr benutzen sollte. Aber ein zukünftiger Benzinersatz für den Verkehr muss flüssig sein. Nun kann man eine Flüssigkeit erzeugen, indem man die Menge an Wasserstoff, die durch die vorherige Methode erzeugt, wird mit dem restlichen CO2, das bereits erzeugt wurde, wo viel CO2 erzeugt wird. Mit anderen Worten, die Idee ist, Methanol durch einen Prozess zu erzeugen, in dem sich Wasserstoff plus CO2 in Methanol plus Wasser umwandeln. Und dies ist, sehr kurz, ein Beispiel, wie man das macht: Nehmen Sie dieses Diagramm hier. Im Wesentlichen wird aus Erdgas vom Methan Wasserstoff mit Kohlenstoffemission oder -speicherung produziert. Und dann nimmt man schon erzeugtes CO2 und bringt sie in einem Methanolsynthesereaktor zusammen, und es wird dann eine Flüssigkeit. Das Umwandlungsprodukt wird als zukünftiger Ölersatz benutzt. So komme ich nun zum Schluss. Worüber reden wir bei der Energie für die Zukunft? Aus meiner Sicht, entwickelt sich gerade ein neues Zeitalter des Überflusses. Und es basiert auf unkonventionellen Gasvorkommen, zunächst Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas in der vorhersehbaren Zukunft. Und später Methanhydrat, nachdem das Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas mehr oder weniger verbraucht sein wird. Nordamerika, Indien, China, Afrika und Lateinamerika werden Zugang zu billigem und reichlich vorhandenem Schiefergas und -öl haben. Europa ist, aus politischen Gründen, noch im Stillstand. Mit steigender Umweltempfindlichkeit und Gasverbrauch verbleibt die Hauptfrage, wie man diese riesigen neuen Vorkommen an Erdgas erschließt, die für Jahrtausende zur Verfügung stehen. Und wie der immense Energiereichtum in der effizientesten und effektivsten Weise mit einem minimalen Umweltfußabdruck geerntet werden kann. Ich glaube, die Erdgasvorkommen mit null CO2-Emissionen sind die Gewinner. Schiefergas, und letztendlich Clathrate mit der Möglichkeit, die zukünftige primäre Energiequelle für viele, viele Jahrhunderte zu werden. Vielen Dank!

Carlo Rubbia explains why it is currently unfeasible for Europe to rely on its own renewable resources
(00:11:21 - 00:14:08)

 

Yet in the last several years, general public interest, particularly in wind and solar power, has navigated from a niche, viewed by many as impractical and futuristic, to mainstream. A major part in this change of perception was spurred by governmental incentives, as well as falling costs. In an insightful interview with Nobel Laureate and former secretary of the US Energy Department, Steven Chu, which took place during the 66th Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Chu observed that the price of photovoltaic cells has decreased to a fifth of the cost, and the same may be said of the electronics and infrastructure associated with solar energy.

Scientists are becoming more inclined to view less-emitting, or even zero-emission fossil fuels as an alternative to those sources that emit large amounts of greenhouse gases, along with other pollutants, with the final aim of slowly replacing fossil fuels with renewables. As Chu put it succinctly, “(…) I think that natural gas should only be viewed as a transition step to decarbonizing. By mid-century or later, we want to start moving out of natural gas”.

Shale gas has become the fossil fuel of the 21st century, particularly in the United States, where intense extraction has significantly decreased the use of coal as a source of electricity. Depending on how effective the conversion process is, carbon dioxide emissions of natural gas combustion used for the production of electricity and heating are approximately 45% lower than those of coal. But shale gas and accompanying tight oil, found not only in shale, but also compact sandstone, are still fossil fuels. Methane leaks are a concern, as, on a 20 year scale, methane is an 84 times more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. Issues with land use, contamination of the water table and possible earthquakes have influenced a ban on shale gas extraction in many European countries. In his interview with Dan Drollette at Lindau, Steven Chu explained that these effects are “mostly due to sloppy drilling practices”, and regulation is key in overcoming the negative outcomes of any type of mining activity.

The next step in natural gas extraction could be offshore drilling for methane hydrates, ice crystals buried under ocean sediment or in permafrost, generally containing 46 water molecules, and gas molecules, usually methane, trapped in the central area of the hydrates. These substances are known as clathrates, a name stemming from the Latin word clathra, which means “cage”. Large amounts of methane clathrates can be found along the continental shelves. The US Geological Survey states that there may be 10 to 100 more methane clathrate reserves in the world than shale gas reserves in the United States. Carlo Rubbia presented the positive aspects of this unconventional gas resource:

 

Carlo Rubbia (2016) - The Future of Energy

We can see the clock started. We have 30 minutes, from here it's 29:59 - you lost 4 seconds. (Laughter) Thank you very much. Now we are going to move ourselves to another subject which is also very relevant to the future of mankind, which is the future of energy. And at the beginning I will start to discuss briefly the climate of the past, which is a clear premise for its future. The Earth was created about 4.56 billion years ago, much later than the Big Bang. The complex multi-cellular organic life was almost entirely born during the last 600 million years. Here you can see the temperature of planet Earth over the last 600 million years. You see there have been many changes from low and high temperatures. Some very warm temperatures have taken place down to glaciation. And in some instances we reached almost ice at the level of the equator. And various other periods were much higher and warmer than that. The last million years is represented by a large number of periods in which glaciations were reaching the equator and combined with "climate optima", about today’s temperature. And now the whole history of mankind is based on a remarkable uniform period, which you see in this graph, during the last 10,000 years, which has permitted to sustain the development of human civilisation. So the little trace we have here at the end has been the one which has made us be what we are today. If you look at these things: the last period, for instance, using Vostok ice core from the Antarctica. You can see that the situation is characterised by very short interglacial periods, equal to present warm air presence. Surrounded by very long glacial periods over the last half a billion years. You can see the probable beginning of the Homo sapiens occurred something like 300,000 years ago. That the earliest Homo sapiens moving to Africa was about 100,000 years ago. And agriculture, which is the beginning of our present civilization, only occured about 10,000 years ago. Notice the shortness of the warm period over very long glacial periods. And the question is, of course, the modern time - how long will it continue, how long will it last from this point of view? If you go on a shorter timescale and you look at the last 2,000 years, you can observe for instance in the northern hemisphere the natural changes between cooler and warmer conditions on a period which is roughly over 1,000 years. In Roman times the temperature was warmer than today. Then we had the dark ages in the middle of the millenium. And then around the year 1000 the temperature came up again. We had a little ice age around 1600/1700. And now we are coming to today’s situation. You can see that warmer and colder periods have been alternating. Extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. The current mean temperature variations relative to the variations are indicated in this graph with something like 2 standard deviation bars. At the present moment we have a major new phenomenon developing: the emergence of what is called "anthropogenic era". The permanence of the unique long stable period after the inter-glacial period has been essential to create and sustain life and civilisation as they are today. And, of course, it is an essential element for survival that we must preserve at all cost. But, as well-known, we are presently facing a new phenomenon which was coined by Eugene Stoermer and popularised by the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen: the emergence of a man made Anthropogenic era. For the first time, human activities may strongly influence the future of the Earth's climate. For instance, since 1750, about 1 million of million tonnes, 1000 Gtons, of CO2 have been injected into the atmosphere to which many other pollutants have to be added. The first sign of such an Anthropogenic era may have been already detected. This effect should be curbed to avoid the irreversible effects of a major climatic change. The amount of CO2 accumulation is, of course, enormous. You can see here the distribution over the planet. You can see that, for instance, in some of the countries we are using more than 100 kg of CO2 per day - each individual person. The second effect is that the CO2 production so far appears as uncurbed. You see here the function of time, the amount of emissions of CO2. The whole planet - you can see that there is a continuous line growing linearly, exponentially. The CO2 production is enough to fill with super-fluid CO2 at 100 bars, with a density similar to water, a volume like the lake of Geneva, which is 80 km^3, every 4 years. You can see the lake of Geneva here. And you can see how it has, in fact, been affected by the situation. The second question is, of course, how long does CO2 last in the biosphere? Here is a graph which shows the variations of the lifetime of the CO2 in the atmosphere and appears to be somewhere between 30 and 35 kilo years. You can see here what will happen over time. You see here 600 years in this plot with a certain emission of CO2, which, I assume, will occur for the first few 100 years and then they will stay steady for a long way to go. As a comparison, for instance, the lifetime of Plutonium 239 is 26 kilo years, associated with today’s public negative perception of nuclear energy. So we are talking about really incredible durations. The mean atmospheric lifetime of the order of 10^4 years is in contrast with the popular perception of many people who think that in a few hundred years CO2 will disappear. Now let’s see, what are the predictions for the next 25 years? Those are particularly gloomy. You can see the plot here from IEA, International Energy Agency, from Paris. You can observe here a massive expansion of fossils burning with no scarcity of resources, but a very slow growth of renewables, hydro included. You can see from this graph that, in fact, the renewables grow simply from 13% to some 18% over a quarter of a century. And the effect of this is coming from a situation which is very characteristic. You can see here that for the USA, Europe and other OECD countries essentially it is flat, constant in intensity. China and India are developing very rapidly, together with the remaining developing countries, and bringing the contribution of the CO2 by an increase of the order of about 33% over this period of 25 years. The immediate consequence of that is, of course, some change of the temperature of the Earth. You can see here the plot of the temperature of the Earth in the year 2015, referring to the baseline situation before the development between 1951 to 1980. And you can see that, in fact, there is a very substantial increase in temperature, mostly the northern hemisphere right here and in our situation. And you can see that the overall effect over the period is substantial, of the order of about 1 degree centigrade above what it was in 1961 to 1990 on average. There is a small little effect up here and down to the bottom of the Antarctica. But fundamentally most of the civilised world is now warming up very substantially. How do we go about this? - That’s the second question. To do this we need, of course, new technologies. The statement is that new technologies are the only key to solving sustainability of the future of energy. The transformation to energy with lower emissions and a quantitatively significant management of CO2 are amongst the most important technological challenges of our times. Of course, the current worldwide energy supply is dependent mainly on fossil fuels, which will remain indispensable for decades to come. But in order to curb environmental changes, it is necessary to proceed vigorously on 2 lines: One is the development and progressive utilisation of renewable energy sources. And the second is the more efficient utilisation of fossil fuels, limiting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and other emissions. I will briefly present here the main guidelines of major rules which are being followed by Europe on one side, the United States on the other. And finally the developing countries like China, to show what are the differences in interest and behaviours about the future of energy. Let me start with the first pillar of energy policy which is Europe. During as many as 20 years the energy policy in the European Union has been determined by 2 main priorities. The first strategic priority of the European Union has been one to prevent dangerous climate changes. The second consideration is based on the assumption that the energy prices will rise inexorably as global energy demand rises and resources become scarce. And this will necessarily make renewable energy competitively the winners. By 2040, about 80% of the European primary energy should aggressively be coming from renewables, abating both nuclear and fossils. And one of the development and progressive utilisation of renewable is positive action. Europe has missed substantially the consequence of technological progress. And the US successes of CO2 efficient, lower cost and abundant utilisation of unconventional natural gas, which we call also shale gas. So let me briefly show you the situation of the European future. You can see, for instance, the example here of Germany. You can see that from 1990 the amount of CO2 in 2050 will collapse by a factor of 20 - you can see there the situation. You can also see that hydrogen electrically produced by PV, hydro, wind, geothermal and solar, are the main energy sources of industry and transport. According to Europe, which is specifically presented according to the German situation, the amount of fossils will eventually disappear almost entirely and will be replaced by renewables. Let me show you here, as an example, wind energy which is a dominant element for Europe. You can see here that in fact most of the wind energy is really coming from northern Europe, with few little traces around here near France. This is how it’s distributed over Europe. Now let me show you here how it is realised in practice. Wind off-shore is probably the real solution. And you see enormous effort has been performed in order to carry out such a situation. Here you can see, for instance, how the average power now has grown up to something like 6 megawatts per unit. That some of these units go under the water up to 700 metres in depth. That they are, in fact, distributed mostly in the operation offshore in the region between England, Scandinavia and Germany. Now the real problem with wind is variability. You can see here, for instance, the variability of wind in Germany. You can see that essentially there are moments in which there is too much wind, and there are moments when there is not enough wind. Let me also point out that the power carried by wind is cubed in proportion to the speed of the wind. It's squared because 1,5 v^2,is squared, and another v because of the speed at which the wind travels. Therefore there are moments where the very large variability is a major problem, as you can discuss. If you go more generally, you can see that the renewable energy can be done with biomass, geothermal, wind and hydropower. The economic potentials of these various solutions are not very large when you compare them to the demand. Europe will foresee by 2050 to have 7,500 TWh/y of electric power. And you can see that the best you can do of economic potentials of these various alternatives of renewable energy are much smaller than this number. And therefore, long-term renewable dominance requires resources outside Europe. The key resource of Europe is, of course, the sun which has an enormous amount of economic potential, 600,000 TWh/y. Which is, of course, dominating in the southern part of Europe and most importantly in the Sahara desert and so forth and so on. And you can see how little of that can bring an enormous change. A total energy worldwide could be accumulated by covering with solar panels, a system of the order of this little graph you can see here around Africa. However, the situation now is not so clear because, although for solar energy the deserts are a necessity, you can see that transporting energy from Africa to Europe is not a simple task. In fact, the major disasters taking place recently, because the Desertec Industrial Initiative has abandoned its strategy to export solar power generated from the Sahara to Europe, killing hopes of boosting Africa’s share of renewable energy. Therefore it is not very clear what will be the situation in the future. Here you can see, for instance, the cost of large scale electricity and how they go as a function of the various systems. Conventional energies are hydro, geothermal, nuclear and biomass. Wind on-shore and off-shore, you can see them there. And you can see the on-shore wind is still reasonably acceptable, but the off-shore wind has a major cost increase. Then you have also carbon sequestration which is there, which is also again accumulating the CO2 from the coal. And this is also very high in terms of temperature. You also see the solar energies are there - very nice but, of course, extremely expensive. So you see that moneywise the situation is rather difficult to be understood. There are 2 main problems in Europe: one is the high cost as a function of fraction of renewables. You see here a graph which shows, for instance, what is the cost of electricity with about 1,000 watts per capita – which is the situation of Denmark and Germany. And you compare that with the situation in the United States, which is down here, for instance. Where you have in effect a much smaller renewable capacity, but the cost of electricity is almost a factor of 2 lower. The second question is that there are not enough renewables within Europe to satisfy fully the domestic resources. Therefore something has to be done elsewhere. But there is real difficulty in carrying over several thousand kilometres the energy from Africa to Europe. The key problems of renewable energy are, of course: the best energy is always the cheapest energy. Energy, however, must be available when it is needed. And the third important point: that electricity is now becoming the dominant source of energy for renewable energies. But renewable energies require much wider surface of collection, located in specific locations in which production is optimal. And therefore, electricity at very high powers must be transported over much longer distances than today, which is technically not very easy compared to the one possible today for natural gas and oil. So this is the European situation. Now what about the American situation? The second main pillar is coming from the US. And this is essentially based on the question of this graph coming from Time Magazine, which says, Commercial extraction for oil shale is now something which has already started over the last 10 years. And, in effect, the development is quite remarkably growing nowadays. In fact, you can see that there are possibilities to do natural gas from shales. This is how this is being organised. Or coalbed methane, again another possibility, which can be adsorbed to produce unconventional natural gas. And the world-wide shale resources are massive. You can see that both Americas, China and Europe have large amounts of these resources. Coalbed methane again is very rich in different countries. So there are plenty of resources there. In Europe we also have plenty of resources for this. But, as I said, resources are vast, but strong popular opposition forbids the use of these applications when it comes to Europe. Because Europe is totally absent at the present moment in a practical sense to these solutions, which are very strongly developed in the United States. This has produced a very fundamental difference between the prices of natural gas in the US in respect to Europe and Japan. As you see from this graph: while in 2006 to 2008 the situation was, in fact, very similar. Now in 2012/13 you can see that while the prices in US have been going down, the prices in Europe and in Japan are much higher. So there is a big difference between the predictions of the 2 systems. This has also introduced another important fact: that electricity production from coal has gone down in the US thanks to the development of shale gas, and production from gas has increased. The result is that the US has had a very substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. And the primary energy production in North America is, in fact, rising rapidly, while in Europe it is decreasing. And the petroleum production in various countries shows here that now the United States is producing as much petroleum as Saudi Arabia, which is a remarkable result. You can see, for instance, in the case of Texas, which shows clearly that the development of shale gas has created a real revolution in the amount of oil which is being used. The third question I’d like to mention very briefly in the few minutes I’ve got left, is the question of China. China is the world’s largest producer of electricity, surpassing the United States in 2011. Electricity generation in China has increased 9.6% annually, reaching a very large amount of terawatts. The real problem is the coal-fired plants currently make up two-thirds of the power generation, which is, of course, the result of an abundance of coal in China. The demand is expected to continue to increase at a very rapid pace. However, the growth of electricity from coal-fired plants resulted in an increase in air pollution and general lack of efficiency. China is now moving aggressively to curb pollution and increase supply of renewable power. China is the world’s largest wind energy producer with over 90 GW of installed power at the end of 2013. And 15% is the near-term renewables target for China. Here you can see how the renewables represent themselves in China: wind, solar and hydro are there. The electric demands are shown in this graph. You can see why wind and solar and hydro are optimal in some regions. The electric demands are dominant, of course, where the people are. There is a big business in the 2 distances. You can see here a long transmission of power is required, as I mentioned already. You can see that several thousand kilometres of distance are required between the best production of hydro power, wind power, solar power and the presence of the main people occupations. You can see that situation in China. Shale gas is strongly developed by China. You can see here the various companies exploring shale gas, most of them American companies, which are going into China to get this system productive. And you can see how quickly the shale gas is being developed in China to reduce the coal dependency. You can see here a graph showing the estimated annual production rising very rapidly, with a very impressive, high-aiming level of the situation. Let me then continue asking ourselves in the 8 minutes I’ve got left about the future of energy productions. Unconventional natural gas resources seem to be a major new effect, which we have to take into account. The process of progressive decarbonisation of fossils goes necessarily through an increased use and consumption of natural gas. It is quite clear that natural gas represents a practical alternative to the presently growing exploitation of coal as the main source of energy. In addition, many other new developments have to be introduced in order to ensure that the future can become a remarkable era of abundant and cheap production from fossils. And the key element to this is novel methods. Let me also point out to another new fact: the presence of a new source. The largest untapped reserve for natural gas on the crust is a thing called clathrate. Maybe some of you people only know what a clathrate is. The clathrate is a combination between some - you can see here some water and some natural gas, which combine in a situation which is stable at a temperature around zero degrees, and is called clathrate. And it’s very rich in methane. For instance, one litre of methane clathrate, so-called burning ice, will produce something like 168 litres of methane gas at the normal pressures. You can see here a picture of a small amount of this clathrate which is now burning, producing natural gas. And you can see the molecule and the structure of a system like that. The subject appeared to be purely academic until the people realised that a very large amount of methane hydrate could be present in any environment with suitable pressures and temperatures. And therefore the potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrate is enormous, with current estimates converging around a conservative value about 10,000 gigatons of methane carbon. As a comparison, the total estimates for conventional natural gas and oil are of the order of a few 100 gigatons. Therefore you can see here the location where clathrates were observed in the oceans. You can see almost everywhere around the world there are places in which recovered gas hydrate samples or infer gas hydrate occurrences have been observed. The procedure is extremely simple: You go underground. You can extract these clathrates out of the ocean or you can bring them eventually out from the permafrost. And you can recuperate the amount from the system either by having a depressurisation or having a thermal change which separates the natural gas from the water. Now, of course, the question is: How do we solve the question of future global warming? It’s quite clear that natural gas is inevitably emitting CO2 - although at a small fraction, which is half compared to coal. So the new project, the new question is, How can we reduce even further the CO2 productions? And the project - in which, by the way, I'm also involved – is, CO2 productions could be avoided with the help of spontaneous thermal decomposition at sufficient temperatures of methane into hydrogen and black carbon. You can see here the CH4 will transform itself into hydrogen and solid black carbon. This method is quite valuable because it does not use more energy than the existing reforming process, which, however, can produce a lot of CO2 - 4 tons of CO2 for each ton of hydrogen. And the black carbon can be recovered as a filler or construction material. And this is a process under investigation. You can see here the initial attempts which we did many years ago, in which we just took a tube. We put the tube in at the suitable temperature. Some kind of natural gas just naturally transforming itself into black carbon and hydrogen very quickly. And so forth and so on. The way of methane cracking is more or less represented here. You can see the methane input coming in. Through the methane cracking process hydrogen and carbon are separately produced. The efficiency is high. And, in fact, the numbers you can see can be explained comparing the standard method of producing CH4 with emission of CO2 or without emission of CO2. You can see that in both cases – (mobile phone is ringing) sorry, oh my God. (Laughter). Excuse me. Anyway, the situation is, in fact, that this is very similar. You can see here that 40% energy is lost by a conventional method. And about 42% is recovered and stored with a normal method in here. The technology - I cannot spend much time describing it. It’s represented by this picture here. It’s very efficient. We have reached in this case a 1,000 degrees, something like a major fraction of methane conversion today. It works. And the cost is also very valuable. So let me use the 2 minutes I’ve got left by mentioning a few more questions: the question of "fuel for transportations". A lot of people have claimed that you should use hydrogen for transportation. But, however, a future subsitute to petrol for transportation has to be a liquid. Now you can build a liquid by combining the amount of hydrogen produced by the previous method with remaining CO2, which is spent already, where plenty of CO2 is produced. In other words, the idea is to produce methanol through a process in which hydrogen plus CO2 transform themselves into methanol plus water. And this is an example, very briefly, how you do it: You take, this graph here, essentially the natural gas from the methane producing hydrogen with emission of carbon storage. And you take CO2 from already used CO2 and you combine them together in a methanol synthesis reactor, which then becomes a liquid. And its transform is used as a future replacement for oil. Now let me therefore conclude. What are we talking about energy for the future? In my view a new age of abundance is now developing. And it is based on unconventional gas resources, initially coalbed and shale gas in the foreseeable future. And methane hydrates later on, after the coalbed methane and shale gas has been more or less distributed. North America, India, China, Africa, Latin America will all have access to cheap and abundant shale gas and oil. Europe, of course, is, for political reasons still on hold. With both environmental sensitivities and gas consumption on the rise, the main question is, how to recover this huge novel natural gas resources, available for millennia to come. And economically harvest the immense energy wealth in the most efficient and effective manner and with minimal environmental footprint. I believe the natural gas resources with zero CO2 emissions are the winners: Shale gas, and ultimately clathrate, with the ability of becoming the dominant primary energy source for tens of centuries to come. Thank you very much.

Wie wir sehen, läuft die Uhr schon, uns bleiben noch 30 Minuten, ab jetzt sind es 29:59. Sie haben 4 Sekunden verloren. (Gelächter) Vielen Dank! Nun gehen wir zu einem anderen Thema, das ebenfalls für die Zukunft der Menschheit sehr relevant ist, die Zukunft der Energie. Und ich beginne mit einer kurzen Diskussion des Klimas in der Vergangenheit, das eine klare Voraussetzung für seine Zukunft ist. Die Erde wurde vor etwa 4,56 Milliarden Jahren geschaffen, viel später als der Urknall. Das komplexe, multizelluläre organische Leben wurde nahezu ausschließlich während der vergangenen 600 Millionen Jahre geboren. Hier kann man die Temperatur des Planeten Erde über die letzten 600 Millionen Jahre sehen. Wie man sieht, gab es viele Wechsel zwischen niedrigen und hohen Temperaturen. Es gab sehr hohe Temperaturen bis hin zur Vergletscherung, einige Male reichte das Eis fast bis an den Äquator. Und verschiedene andere Zeiten waren viel wärmer als das. Die letzten Millionen Jahre werden durch eine große Anzahl von Zeitspannen dargestellt, in denen die Vergletscherung den Äquator erreichte, und solchen mit optimalem Klima, ungefähr heutigen Temperaturen. Nun basiert die gesamte Menschheitsgeschichte auf einer bemerkenswert gleichförmigen Zeitspanne, die man in dieser Kurve sehen kann, während der letzten 10.000 Jahre, die es ermöglichte, die Entwicklung der menschlichen Zivilisation aufrecht zu erhalten. So, die kurze Linie, die wir hier am Ende haben, hat uns zu dem gemacht hat, was wir heute sind. Lassen Sie uns diese Dinge ansehen: die letzte Zeitspanne zum Beispiel, wo wir den Wostok-Eiskern aus der Antarktis zu Rate ziehen. Man sieht, dass die Situation durch sehr kurze Zwischeneiszeiten charakterisiert wird, die den derzeitigen Warmzeiten gleichen. Flankiert von sehr langen Eiszeiten über die letzten 500 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Wie man sehen kann, ist der wahrscheinliche Beginn des Homo Sapiens etwa 300.000 Jahre her. Und die frühesten Homo Sapiens in Afrika waren dort vor etwa 100.000 Jahren. Die Landwirtschaft, die den Beginn unserer jetzigen Zivilisation darstellt, begann erst vor etwa 10.000 Jahren. Beachten Sie die Kürze der Warmperioden zwischen sehr langen Eiszeiten. Und die Frage ist natürlich, wie lange die moderne Zeit andauern wird, wie lange wird es von diesem Gesichtspunkt her andauern? Wenn man sich kürzere Zeitskalen ansieht, und man sieht hier die letzten 2.000 Jahre, sieht man beispielsweise die natürlichen Wechsel zwischen kälteren und wärmeren Bedingungen auf der nördlichen Halbkugel mit einem Zyklus, der ungefähr 1000 Jahre beträgt. Zu Zeiten des römischen Reichs waren die Temperaturen höher als heute. Und dann hatten wir das frühe Mittelalter in der Mitte des Jahrtausends. Um das Jahr 1000 herum, begannen die Temperaturen wieder zu steigen. Wir hatten um 1600/1700 herum eine kleine Eiszeit. Und jetzt kommen wir zur heutigen Situation. Man sieht, dass wärmere und kältere Zeiten sich abgewechselt haben. Außerhalb der Tropen, auf der nördlichen Halbkugel - die derzeitigen mittleren Temperaturänderungen im Verhältnis zu den mittleren Temperaturen werden in dieser Kurve mit Fehlerbalken von etwa zwei Standardabweichungen angezeigt. Derzeit entwickelt sich ein neues, bedeutendes Phänomen: der Beginn des sogenannten „anthropogenen Zeitalters“. Das Andauern der einzigartig langen, stabilen Periode nach der Zwischeneiszeit war wesentlich, um das Leben und die Zivilisation so aufrechtzuerhalten, wie sie heute sind. Und das ist natürlich ein wesentliches Element zum Überleben, das wir auf jeden Fall erhalten müssen. Aber, wie wir wissen, sehen wir uns derzeit einem neuen Phänomen gegenüber. Ein Begriff, den Eugene Stoermer prägte und den der Nobelpreisträger Paul Crutzen allgemein bekannt machte: der Beginn der durch Menschen verursachten anthropogenen Ära. Zum ersten Mal könnten menschliche Handlungen die Zukunft des Erdklimas stark beeinflussen. Seit 1750 wurden beispielsweise etwa 1 Million Millionen Tonnen, 1000 Gigatonnen, CO2 in die Atmosphäre ausgestoßen, zusätzlich zu vielen anderen Schadstoffen. Die ersten Anzeichen eines solchen anthropogenen Zeitalters wurden vielleicht schon nachgewiesen. Dieser Einfluss sollte gedrosselt werden, um die irreversiblen Auswirkungen einer großen Klimaänderung zu vermeiden. Der Wert der CO2-Anreicherung ist natürlich enorm. Hier sieht man die Verteilung über den Planeten. Man sieht beispielsweise, dass wir in einigen Ländern jeden Tag mehr als 100 kg CO2 erzeugen - pro Person. Der zweite Effekt ist, dass die CO2-Produktion bis jetzt ungezügelt erscheint. Sie sehen hier die Menge an CO2-Ausstoß als Funktion der Zeit. Der gesamte Planet - Sie sehen hier, dass es eine kontinuierlich linear/exponentiell wachsende Linie ist. Die CO2-Produktion reicht aus, um alle 4 Jahre ein Volumen wie den Genfer See, was etwa 80 km^3 entspricht, mit suprafluidem CO2 bei 100 Bar mit einer Dichte ähnlich der des Wassers zu füllen. Hier sieht man den Genfer See. Und Sie können sehen, wie er tatsächlich durch die Situation betroffen wurde. Die zweite Frage ist natürlich, wie lange bleibt CO2 in der Biosphäre? Hier ist eine Kurve, die die Änderungen der CO2-Verweilzeit in der Atmosphäre zeigt Sie scheint irgendwo zwischen 30' und 35.000 Jahren zu liegen. Hier kann man sehen was über die Jahre passieren wird. In dieser Zeichnung sind 600 Jahre mit einer bestimmten CO2-Emission gezeigt, die, nehme ich an, über die ersten paar 100 Jahre auftritt und dann für eine lange Zeit gleich bleibt. Als Vergleich beträgt die Lebenszeit des Plutoniums 239 beispielsweise 26.000 Jahre, verbunden mit der heutigen öffentlichen negativen Wahrnehmung der Kernenergie. Wir reden daher von wirklich unglaublichen Zeitspannen. Die durchschnittliche Lebenszeit in der Atmosphäre von der Größenordnung von 10^4 Jahren ist im Widerspruch zu der gängigen Sicht vieler Menschen, die denken, dass das CO2 in ein paar hundert Jahren verschwinden wird. Nun schauen wir uns die Vorhersagen für die nächsten 25 Jahre an. Diese sind besonders düster. Hier sehen Sie die Kurven der IEA, International Energy Agency, in Paris. Man sieht hier eine massive Ausweitung der Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen ohne Ressourcenknappheit, dagegen ein sehr langsames Wachstum der erneuerbaren Energien, einschließlich der Wasserkraft. Aus dieser Kurve ersehen wir, dass über ein Vierteljahrhundert tatsächlich die erneuerbaren Energien von 13% auf etwa 18% wachsen. Und dieser Effekt entspringt aus einer sehr charakteristischen Situation. Sie sehen hier, dass sie für die USA, Europa und andere OECD-Staaten im Wesentlichen flach ist, konstante Intensität. China und Indien entwickeln sich sehr schnell, zusammen mit den übrigen Entwicklungsländern, und tragen zum CO2 durch einen Anstieg von etwa 33% über diesen Zeitraum von 25 Jahren bei. Die sofortige Konsequenz davon ist natürlich eine Änderung der Erdtemperatur. Hier sieht man die Kurve der Erdtemperatur im Jahr 2015, in Bezug auf die Basislinie vor der Entwicklung, zwischen 1951 und 1980. Und man kann tatsächlich einen sehr erheblichen Anstieg in den Temperaturen erkennen, am meisten auf der nördlichen Halbkugel genau hier und in unserer Situation. Man kann sehen, dass die Gesamtauswirkung über diesen Zeitraum beträchtlich ist, in der Größenordnung von etwa 1 Grad Celsius über dem Mittelwert zwischen 1961 und 1990. Da ist eine kleine Auswirkung hier oben und ganz unten in der Antarktis. Aber grundsätzlich erwärmt sich die zivilisierte Welt gerade sehr beträchtlich. Was machen wir jetzt? - Das ist die zweite Frage. Um etwas zu unternehmen, benötigen wir selbstverständlich neue Technologien. Man sagt, dass neue Technologien der einzige Schlüssel sind, die Nachhaltigkeit der Zukunft der Energie zu lösen. Der Übergang zu Energien mit geringeren Emissionen und ein mengenmäßig signifikantes CO2-Management sind einige der wichtigsten technologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Die derzeitige weltweite Energieversorgung hängt natürlich hauptsächlich von fossilen Brennstoffen ab, die für die nächsten Jahrzehnte unverzichtbar bleiben werden. Aber um die Umweltänderungen zu bändigen, müssen wir auf zwei Schienen nachdrücklich vorankommen: die eine ist die Entwicklung und fortschreitende Benutzung von erneuerbaren Energiequellen. Und die zweite ist die effizientere Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe, um die Auswirkungen des anthropogenen CO2 und anderer Emissionen zu begrenzen. Ich präsentiere hier kurz die Hauptleitlinien oder Hauptregeln, die von Europa auf der einen Seite und den Vereinigten Staaten auf der anderen befolgt werden. Und schließlich den Entwicklungsländern wie China, um die Interessen- und Verhaltensunterschiede bezüglich der Zukunft der Energie aufzuzeigen. Ich beginne mit der ersten Säule der Energiepolitik, das ist Europa. Über 20 Jahre hinweg bestimmten zwei Hauptprioritäten die Energiepolitik der Europäischen Gemeinschaft. Die erste strategische Priorität der Europäischen Gemeinschaft war es, gefährliche Klimaänderungen zu verhindern. Die zweite Überlegung basiert auf der Annahme, dass die Energiepreise unerbittlich ansteigen werden, während der globale Energiebedarf steigt und die Ressourcen knapper werden. Und dies wird notwendigerweise die erneuerbaren Energien zum Gewinner im Wettbewerb machen. Bis zum Jahr 2040 sollten etwa 80% der europäischen Primärenergie aggressiv von erneuerbaren Energien kommen, und damit sowohl Kernenergie als auch fossile Energie verringern. Und obwohl die Entwicklung und zunehmende Nutzung der erneuerbaren Energien eine positive Handlung ist, hat Europa die Konsequenzen des technischen Fortschritts ziemlich verpasst. Und die amerikanischen Erfolge der CO2-effizienten und breiten Nutzung von unkonventionellem Erdgas, das wir auch Schiefergas nennen, bei niedrigeren Kosten. Lassen Sie mich kurz die Situation der europäischen Zukunft zeigen. Sie sehen hier beispielsweise Deutschland. Sie können hier sehen, dass ab 1990 die CO2-Menge im Jahr 2050 um einen Faktor von 20 einbrechen wird – dort sehen Sie die Situation. Sie sehen, dass über Fotovoltaik, Wasserkraft, Wind-, Solar- und geothermale Energie elektrisch produzierter Wasserstoff die Hauptquelle der Industrie und des Verkehrs ist. In Europa, das spezifisch durch die deutsche Situation dargestellt ist, wird die Menge an fossiler Energie letztendlich fast gänzlich verschwinden und durch erneuerbare Ressourcen ersetzt. Lassen Sie mich hier, als ein Beispiel, die Windenergie zeigen, die das dominante Element für Europa ist. Hier können Sie sehen, dass tatsächlich die meiste Windenergie aus Nordeuropa kommt, mit kleineren Mengen hier bei Frankreich. So ist es über Europa verteilt. Nun lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie es in der Praxis realisiert ist. Offshore-Wind ist vermutlich die wirkliche Lösung. Und Sie sehen die enormen Anstrengungen, die durchgeführt wurden, um eine solche Situation herbeizuführen. Hier sehen Sie beispielsweise, wie die durchschnittliche Leistung jetzt auf etwa 6 Megawatt pro Einheit angewachsen ist. Einige dieser Einheiten stehen in eine Wassertiefe bis zu 700 Meter. Sie sind hauptsächlich verteilt im Offshore-Betrieb in der Region zwischen England, Skandinavien und Deutschland. Das wirkliche Problem mit Wind ist die Variabilität. Hier sieht man beispielsweise die Windvariabilität in Deutschland. Sie können hier im Wesentlichen sehen, dass es Zeiten gibt, in denen der Wind zu stark ist, und Zeiten, wo nicht genug Wind herrscht. Lassen Sie mich noch darauf hinweisen, dass die Leistung des Winds der Windgeschwindigkeit zur dritten Potenz entspricht. Es ist im Quadrat wegen 1,5 v^2, und noch einmal v, weil das die Windgeschwindigkeit ist. Es gibt daher Zeiten, wo die sehr große Variabilität ein Hauptproblem darstellt, wie man diskutieren kann. Wenn man es genereller betrachtet, kann man sehen, dass die erneuerbare Energie über Biomasse, geothermische Energie, Wind- und Wasserenergie erzeugt werden kann. Die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser verschiedenen Lösungen sind nicht sehr groß, wenn man sie mit dem Bedarf vergleicht. Die Voraussage für Europa bis 2050 sind 7.500 TWh/a elektrischer Leistung. Und hier können Sie sehen, dass die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser unterschiedlichen Alternativen für erneuerbare Energien in einer Größenordnung liegt, die viel kleiner ist als diese Zahl. Und daher benötigt eine langfristige Dominanz der erneuerbaren Energien Ressourcen außerhalb Europas. Die Hauptrohstoffquelle Europas ist natürlich die Sonne, die über ein enormes Wirtschaftspotential verfügt, 600.000 TWh/a. Das dominiert natürlich im südlichen Teil Europas und sehr wesentlich in der Sahara und so weiter. Und Sie sehen, wie wenig davon eine enorme Änderung herbeiführen kann. Die weltweite Gesamtenergie könnte durch eine Überdeckung mit Solarpaneelen gesammelt werden, ein System in der Größenordnung dieser kleinen Zeichnung hier in Afrika. Die Situation ist aber nicht so klar, weil man sieht, dass, obwohl die Wüsten für die Solarenergie notwendig sind, der Transport der Energie von Afrika nach Europa keine leichte Aufgabe ist. Das große Fiasko, das es kürzlich passiert gab, weil die Industrieinitiative Desertec ihre Strategie aufgegeben hat, in der Sahara erzeugte Solarenergie nach Europa zu exportieren. Das hat die Hoffnung zerschlagen, Afrikas Anteil an erneuerbaren Energien zu steigern. Es ist daher nicht sehr klar, wie die Situation in der Zukunft sein wird. Hier kann man beispielsweise die Kosten der flächendeckenden Stromerzeugung sehen und wie sie sich als Funktion der verschiedenen Systeme ändern. Konventionelle Energien sind Wasserkraft, geothermische, Kern- und Biomasseenergie. Onshore- und Offshore-Windenergie kann man hier sehen. Und man kann sehen, dass die Onshore-Windenergie noch einigermaßen akzeptabel ist, aber dass die Offshore-Windenergie große Kostensteigerungen verursacht. Dann haben wir noch die Kohlenstoffabscheidung, die dort ist, die das CO2 aus der Kohle auch wieder aufsammelt. Und dies ist auch sehr hoch bezogen auf die Kosten. Sie sehen auch die Solarenergien dort - sehr schön, aber natürlich auch extrem teuer. Sie sehen, dass in Sachen Geld die Situation recht schwierig zu verstehen ist. In Europa gibt es zwei Hauptprobleme: Eins sind die hohen Kosten als Funktion des Bruchteils der erneuerbaren Energien. Hier sehen Sie die Kurve, die beispielsweise zeigt, was die Stromkosten bei etwa 1.000 Watt pro Kopf sind, was der Situation in Dänemark und Deutschland entspricht. Und vergleichen Sie das zum Beispiel mit der Situation in den Vereinigten Staaten, die hier unten stehen. Dort gibt es eine viel kleinere Kapazität an erneuerbaren Energien, aber die Stromkosten sind fast einen Faktor 2 geringer. Die zweite Frage ist, dass es nicht genügend erneuerbare Ressourcen innerhalb Europas gibt, um den heimischen Bedarf komplett zu decken. Daher muss etwas irgendwo anders getan werden. Aber es ist sehr schwierig, die Energie über mehrere tausend Kilometer von Afrika nach Europa zu transportieren. Das Schlüsselproblem der erneuerbaren Energie ist natürlich: die billigste Energie ist immer die beste Energie. Energie muss aber dort zur Verfügung stehen, wo sie benötigt wird. Und der dritte wichtige Punkt: die Elektrizität wird jetzt die dominante Energiequelle für die erneuerbaren Energien werden. Aber erneuerbare Energien benötigen eine größere Sammelfläche, die in besonderen Gegenden angesiedelt ist, wo die Produktion optimal ist. Und daher muss Energie bei sehr hoher Leistung über viel längere Strecken transportiert werden als heute, was technisch nicht leicht durchführbar ist, verglichen mit den Möglichkeiten heute für Erdgas und Erdöl. So, das ist also die europäische Situation. Wie sieht nun die amerikanische Situation aus? Die zweite Hauptsäule kommt aus den USA. Und das basiert im Wesentlichen auf dieser Grafik aus dem Time-Magazin, die betitelt ist: Die kommerzielle Extraktion von Schieferöl ist jetzt schon etwas, das über die vergangenen 10 Jahre schon begonnen hat. Und die Entwicklung wächst inzwischen recht beachtlich. Man kann sehen, dass es Möglichkeiten gibt, Erdgas aus Schiefergestein zu gewinnen. So wird das gemacht. Oder Kohleflöz-Methan - wieder eine weitere Möglichkeit -, das adsorbiert werden kann, um unkonventionelles Erdgas zu produzieren. Und die globalen Schiefervorkommen sind gewaltig. Sie können sehen, dass der amerikanische Kontinent, China und Europa große Mengen dieser Vorkommen haben. Kohleflöz-Methan ist wiederum in verschiedenen Ländern sehr reichhaltig vorhanden. Es gibt also reichliche Vorkommen. In Europa haben wir auch viele Vorkommen dafür. Aber, wie ich sagte, obwohl die Vorkommen riesig sind, verbietet starker öffentlicher Widerstand die Benutzung dieser Anwendungen, soweit es Europa betrifft. Europa fehlt bei diesen Lösungen im praktischen Sinn derzeit komplett, während sie in den USA sehr stark entwickelt sind. Das hat zu einem einen sehr grundsätzlichen Unterschied zwischen den Preisen von Erdgas in den USA geführt, verglichen mit Europa und Japan. Wie man aus dieser Kurve sehen kann: Während zwischen 2006 und 2008 die Situation tatsächlich sehr ähnlich war, kann man jetzt im Jahr 2012/13 sehen, dass während die Preise in den USA gesunken sind, die Preise in Europa und in Japan viel höher sind. Es gibt also einen großen Unterschied zwischen den Vorhersagen der 2 Systeme. Dies hat zu einer anderen wichtigen Tatsache geführt, nämlich dass in den USA die Stromproduktion aus Kohle dank der Entwicklung des Schiefergases abgenommen und die Produktion aus Gas zugenommen hat. Im Ergebnis gibt es in den USA eine beträchtliche Reduzierung der CO2 Emissionen. Und die Primärenergieerzeugung in Nordamerika steigt tatsächlich schnell an, während sie in Europa sinkt. Die Erdölproduktion in verschiedenen Ländern zeigt hier, dass die Vereinigten Staaten jetzt so viel Erdöl produzieren wie Saudi-Arabien - ein erstaunliches Resultat. Sie können hier am Beispiel Texas sehen, dass die Entwicklung des Schiefergases eine richtige Revolution im Ölverbrauch erzeugt hat. Die dritte Frage, die ich sehr kurz in den wenigen verbliebenen Minuten erwähnen möchte, ist die Frage nach China. China ist der weltweit größte Stromerzeuger, nachdem es die USA in 2011 überholt hat. Die Stromerzeugung in China wächst um 9,6% jährlich, und erreicht eine sehr große Menge von Terawatt. Das eigentliche Problem ist, dass die Kohlekraftwerke derzeit 2 Drittel des Stroms erzeugen, was natürlich ein Resultat des Kohlereichtums in China ist. Es wird erwartet, dass der Bedarf sehr schnell weiter zunehmen wird. Die steigende Stromerzeugung durch Kohlekraftwerke resultierte in zunehmender Luftverschmutzung und einem generellen Mangel an Effizienz. China ist jetzt verstärkt bemüht, die Verschmutzung zu verringern und die erneuerbare Energieversorgung zu erhöhen. Ende 2013 war China der weltgrößte Windenergieproduzent mit über 90 GW installierter Leistung. Und 15% ist das kurzfristige Ziel für erneuerbare Energien in China. Hier kann man sehen, wie die erneuerbaren Energien sich in China darstellen: Wind-, Solarenergie und Wasserkraft sind dort. Der Strombedarf ist in diesem Diagramm dargestellt. Man kann sehen, während Wind- und Solarenergie und Wasserkraft in einigen Regionen optimal sind, ist der Hauptstrombedarf natürlich dort, wo die Menschen sind. Da gibt es große Entfernungen zu den zwei Gebieten. Man kann hier sehen, dass eine weite Übertragung der Elektrizität erforderlich ist, wie schon vorhin erwähnt. Wie man sieht, müssen mehrere tausend Kilometer Entfernung zwischen den besten Produktionsstätten aus der Wasserkraft, Windenergie, Solarenergie und den Hauptansiedlungen der Menschen überbrückt werden. Das ist gerade die Situation in China. Schiefergas wird durch China sehr stark entwickelt. Hier sehen Sie die verschiedenen Unternehmen, die nach Schiefergas suchen. Die meisten sind amerikanische Firmen, die nach China gehen, um dieses System zur Produktion zu bringen. Und Sie können sehen, wie schnell das Schiefergas in China entwickelt wird, um die Kohleabhängigkeit zu reduzieren. Und hier die Kurve zeigt, dass die geschätzte Jahresproduktion sehr schnell auf ein sehr eindrucksvolles, hohes Niveau ansteigen wird. Dann sollten wir uns in den noch verbliebenden 8 Minuten mit der Zukunft der Energieerzeugung beschäftigen. Unkonventionelle Erdgasvorkommen scheinen ein großer, neuer Effekt zu sein, den wir berücksichtigen müssen. Der Prozess der Reduzierung von Kohlendioxid bei fossilen Brennstoffen geht notwendigerweise über eine wachsende Nutzung und Verbrauch von Erdgas. Es ist recht klar, dass Erdgas eine praktische Alternative zu der derzeitig wachsenden Ausbeutung von Kohle als hauptsächliche Energiequelle darstellt. Zusätzlich müssen weitere neue Entwicklungen eingeführt werden, um sicherzustellen, dass die Zukunft ein bedeutendes Zeitalter der weitverbreiteten und billigen Erzeugung aus fossilen Brennstoffen wird. Und das Schlüsselelement hier sind neuartige Methoden. Lassen Sie mich auf eine weitere neue Tatsache hinweisen: das Vorhandensein einer neuen Quelle. Die größte ungenutzte Erdgasreserve in der Erdkruste ist etwas, das Clathrat genannt wird. Vielleicht wissen einige von Euch, was ein Clathrat ist. Das Clathrat ist eine Verbindung zwischen - hier sieht man etwas Wasser und Erdgas, die in einer Situation sich verbinden, die bei Temperaturen um null Grad stabil ist, und das wird Clathrat genannt. Es ist sehr reich an Methan. Ein Liter Methan-Clathrat, sogenanntes brennbares Eis, produziert bei Normaldruck etwa 168 Liter Methan. Sie können hier ein Bild einer kleinen Menge dieses Clathrats sehen, das jetzt brennt, und Erdgas produziert. Und Sie können das Molekül und die Struktur dieses Systems sehen. Das Thema schien zunächst rein akademisch zu sein, bis man erkannte, dass sehr große Mengen an Methanhydrat in jeder Umgebung mit den geeigneten Drucken und Temperaturen vorhanden sein könnten. Und daher ist die potentielle Methanmenge in Erdgashydraten gigantisch, wobei die derzeitigen Schätzungen bei einem konservativen Wert von 10.000 Gigatonnen Kohlenstoff aus Methan konvergieren. Zum Vergleich: die Gesamtschätzung für konventionelles Erdgas und -öl sind in der Größenordnung von einigen hundert Gigatonnen. Hier können Sie die Gegenden sehen, wo Clathrate in den Meeren beobachtet wurden. Man sieht, dass es überall auf der Welt Gegenden gibt, in denen man Gashydratproben gesammelt hat oder auf Gashydratvorkommen geschlossen hat. Die Prozedur ist extrem einfach: Man geht unter Tage. Man kann diese Clathrate aus den Meeren extrahieren, oder man kann sie vielleicht aus dem Permafrost herausholen. Und man kann die Menge aus dem System extrahieren, entweder durch Druckverminderung oder durch eine thermale Umwandlung, die das Erdgas vom Wasser trennt. Nun ist natürlich die Frage: Wie lösen wir die Frage der zukünftigen globalen Erwärmung? Es ist sehr klar, dass Erdgas zwangsläufig CO2 emittiert – wenn auch nur einen kleinen Bruchteil, der etwa halb so groß ist wie bei der Kohle. Daher ist das neue Projekt, die neue Frage: Wie können wir die CO2-Erzeugung noch weiter reduzieren? Und das Projekt - in das ich übrigens involviert bin - ist, dass die CO2-Erzeugung mit der Hilfe der spontanen thermischen Zersetzung des Methans in Wasserstoff und Industrieruß bei ausreichenden Temperaturen vermieden werden kann. Sie sehen hier, dass das CH4 sich in Wasserstoff und festen Industrieruß umwandelt. Diese Methode ist recht wertvoll, weil sie nicht mehr Energie verbraucht als der existierende Umbildungsprozess, der aber eine Menge CO2 produzieren kann - 4 Tonnen für jede Tonne Wasserstoff. Und der Industrieruß kann als ein Füllstoff oder Baumaterial benutzt werden. Und dieser Prozess wird gerade untersucht. Hier kann man die ersten Versuche sehen, die wir vor vielen Jahren durchführten, wo wir einfach ein Röhrchen benutzten. Wir brachten irgendein Erdgas in dem Röhrchen auf eine geeignete Temperatur, das sich natürlich und sehr schnell in Industrieruß und Wasserstoff umwandelte und so weiter. Die Methode der Methanaufspaltung ist hier mehr oder weniger dargestellt. Und hier sieht man, das Methan kommt herein. Durch den Methanaufspaltungsprozess werden Wasserstoff und Kohlenstoff separat hergestellt. Die Effizienz ist hoch. Und die Zahlen, die Sie sehen, können erklärt werden, wenn man die Standardmethoden der CH4-Herstellung mit oder ohne CO2-Emission vergleicht. Sie sehen, dass in beiden Fällen - (das Handy klingelt), Entschuldigung, ach mein Gott. (Gelächter) Entschuldigen Sie. Nun ja, die Situation ist tatsächlich, dass dies sehr ähnlich ist. Sie sehen hier, dass mit einer konventionellen Methode 40% der Energie verloren geht. Und etwa 42% wird wiedergewonnen und mit einer normalen Methode hier gespeichert. Die Technologie - ich kann nicht viel Zeit damit verbringen, sie hier zu beschreiben. Sie ist hier in diesem Bild dargestellt. Sie ist sehr effizient. Wir haben heute in diesem Fall bei 1.000 Grad so etwas wie den Großteil der Methanumwandlung erreicht. Das funktioniert. Und die Kosten sind auch sehr vernünftig. Lassen Sie mich die verbleibenden 2 Minuten benutzen, um ein paar weitere Fragen zu erwähnen: die Frage des „Brennstoffes für den Verkehr“. Eine Menge Leute haben behauptet, dass man Wasserstoff für den Verkehr benutzen sollte. Aber ein zukünftiger Benzinersatz für den Verkehr muss flüssig sein. Nun kann man eine Flüssigkeit erzeugen, indem man die Menge an Wasserstoff, die durch die vorherige Methode erzeugt, wird mit dem restlichen CO2, das bereits erzeugt wurde, wo viel CO2 erzeugt wird. Mit anderen Worten, die Idee ist, Methanol durch einen Prozess zu erzeugen, in dem sich Wasserstoff plus CO2 in Methanol plus Wasser umwandeln. Und dies ist, sehr kurz, ein Beispiel, wie man das macht: Nehmen Sie dieses Diagramm hier. Im Wesentlichen wird aus Erdgas vom Methan Wasserstoff mit Kohlenstoffemission oder -speicherung produziert. Und dann nimmt man schon erzeugtes CO2 und bringt sie in einem Methanolsynthesereaktor zusammen, und es wird dann eine Flüssigkeit. Das Umwandlungsprodukt wird als zukünftiger Ölersatz benutzt. So komme ich nun zum Schluss. Worüber reden wir bei der Energie für die Zukunft? Aus meiner Sicht, entwickelt sich gerade ein neues Zeitalter des Überflusses. Und es basiert auf unkonventionellen Gasvorkommen, zunächst Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas in der vorhersehbaren Zukunft. Und später Methanhydrat, nachdem das Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas mehr oder weniger verbraucht sein wird. Nordamerika, Indien, China, Afrika und Lateinamerika werden Zugang zu billigem und reichlich vorhandenem Schiefergas und -öl haben. Europa ist, aus politischen Gründen, noch im Stillstand. Mit steigender Umweltempfindlichkeit und Gasverbrauch verbleibt die Hauptfrage, wie man diese riesigen neuen Vorkommen an Erdgas erschließt, die für Jahrtausende zur Verfügung stehen. Und wie der immense Energiereichtum in der effizientesten und effektivsten Weise mit einem minimalen Umweltfußabdruck geerntet werden kann. Ich glaube, die Erdgasvorkommen mit null CO2-Emissionen sind die Gewinner. Schiefergas, und letztendlich Clathrate mit der Möglichkeit, die zukünftige primäre Energiequelle für viele, viele Jahrhunderte zu werden. Vielen Dank!

Carlo Rubbia discusses the potential of natural gas production through clathrates
(00:22:43 - 00:25:07)


Countries that rely on imports of fossil fuels, such as Japan or India, are keen to develop the technology for methane hydrate extraction. In 2013, Japan successfully carried out a test of extracting natural gas from seabed methane clathrates. But many experts express the view that drilling practices could trigger a runaway release of methane, further destabilising the atmosphere. Controlled release of methane during extraction is paramount in research on appropriate drilling techniques.

Carlo Rubbia optimistically concluded his lecture in Lindau, calling the period of extraction of unconventional gas resources the “new age of abundance”:

 

Carlo Rubbia (2016) - The Future of Energy

We can see the clock started. We have 30 minutes, from here it's 29:59 - you lost 4 seconds. (Laughter) Thank you very much. Now we are going to move ourselves to another subject which is also very relevant to the future of mankind, which is the future of energy. And at the beginning I will start to discuss briefly the climate of the past, which is a clear premise for its future. The Earth was created about 4.56 billion years ago, much later than the Big Bang. The complex multi-cellular organic life was almost entirely born during the last 600 million years. Here you can see the temperature of planet Earth over the last 600 million years. You see there have been many changes from low and high temperatures. Some very warm temperatures have taken place down to glaciation. And in some instances we reached almost ice at the level of the equator. And various other periods were much higher and warmer than that. The last million years is represented by a large number of periods in which glaciations were reaching the equator and combined with "climate optima", about today’s temperature. And now the whole history of mankind is based on a remarkable uniform period, which you see in this graph, during the last 10,000 years, which has permitted to sustain the development of human civilisation. So the little trace we have here at the end has been the one which has made us be what we are today. If you look at these things: the last period, for instance, using Vostok ice core from the Antarctica. You can see that the situation is characterised by very short interglacial periods, equal to present warm air presence. Surrounded by very long glacial periods over the last half a billion years. You can see the probable beginning of the Homo sapiens occurred something like 300,000 years ago. That the earliest Homo sapiens moving to Africa was about 100,000 years ago. And agriculture, which is the beginning of our present civilization, only occured about 10,000 years ago. Notice the shortness of the warm period over very long glacial periods. And the question is, of course, the modern time - how long will it continue, how long will it last from this point of view? If you go on a shorter timescale and you look at the last 2,000 years, you can observe for instance in the northern hemisphere the natural changes between cooler and warmer conditions on a period which is roughly over 1,000 years. In Roman times the temperature was warmer than today. Then we had the dark ages in the middle of the millenium. And then around the year 1000 the temperature came up again. We had a little ice age around 1600/1700. And now we are coming to today’s situation. You can see that warmer and colder periods have been alternating. Extra-tropical Northern Hemisphere. The current mean temperature variations relative to the variations are indicated in this graph with something like 2 standard deviation bars. At the present moment we have a major new phenomenon developing: the emergence of what is called "anthropogenic era". The permanence of the unique long stable period after the inter-glacial period has been essential to create and sustain life and civilisation as they are today. And, of course, it is an essential element for survival that we must preserve at all cost. But, as well-known, we are presently facing a new phenomenon which was coined by Eugene Stoermer and popularised by the Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen: the emergence of a man made Anthropogenic era. For the first time, human activities may strongly influence the future of the Earth's climate. For instance, since 1750, about 1 million of million tonnes, 1000 Gtons, of CO2 have been injected into the atmosphere to which many other pollutants have to be added. The first sign of such an Anthropogenic era may have been already detected. This effect should be curbed to avoid the irreversible effects of a major climatic change. The amount of CO2 accumulation is, of course, enormous. You can see here the distribution over the planet. You can see that, for instance, in some of the countries we are using more than 100 kg of CO2 per day - each individual person. The second effect is that the CO2 production so far appears as uncurbed. You see here the function of time, the amount of emissions of CO2. The whole planet - you can see that there is a continuous line growing linearly, exponentially. The CO2 production is enough to fill with super-fluid CO2 at 100 bars, with a density similar to water, a volume like the lake of Geneva, which is 80 km^3, every 4 years. You can see the lake of Geneva here. And you can see how it has, in fact, been affected by the situation. The second question is, of course, how long does CO2 last in the biosphere? Here is a graph which shows the variations of the lifetime of the CO2 in the atmosphere and appears to be somewhere between 30 and 35 kilo years. You can see here what will happen over time. You see here 600 years in this plot with a certain emission of CO2, which, I assume, will occur for the first few 100 years and then they will stay steady for a long way to go. As a comparison, for instance, the lifetime of Plutonium 239 is 26 kilo years, associated with today’s public negative perception of nuclear energy. So we are talking about really incredible durations. The mean atmospheric lifetime of the order of 10^4 years is in contrast with the popular perception of many people who think that in a few hundred years CO2 will disappear. Now let’s see, what are the predictions for the next 25 years? Those are particularly gloomy. You can see the plot here from IEA, International Energy Agency, from Paris. You can observe here a massive expansion of fossils burning with no scarcity of resources, but a very slow growth of renewables, hydro included. You can see from this graph that, in fact, the renewables grow simply from 13% to some 18% over a quarter of a century. And the effect of this is coming from a situation which is very characteristic. You can see here that for the USA, Europe and other OECD countries essentially it is flat, constant in intensity. China and India are developing very rapidly, together with the remaining developing countries, and bringing the contribution of the CO2 by an increase of the order of about 33% over this period of 25 years. The immediate consequence of that is, of course, some change of the temperature of the Earth. You can see here the plot of the temperature of the Earth in the year 2015, referring to the baseline situation before the development between 1951 to 1980. And you can see that, in fact, there is a very substantial increase in temperature, mostly the northern hemisphere right here and in our situation. And you can see that the overall effect over the period is substantial, of the order of about 1 degree centigrade above what it was in 1961 to 1990 on average. There is a small little effect up here and down to the bottom of the Antarctica. But fundamentally most of the civilised world is now warming up very substantially. How do we go about this? - That’s the second question. To do this we need, of course, new technologies. The statement is that new technologies are the only key to solving sustainability of the future of energy. The transformation to energy with lower emissions and a quantitatively significant management of CO2 are amongst the most important technological challenges of our times. Of course, the current worldwide energy supply is dependent mainly on fossil fuels, which will remain indispensable for decades to come. But in order to curb environmental changes, it is necessary to proceed vigorously on 2 lines: One is the development and progressive utilisation of renewable energy sources. And the second is the more efficient utilisation of fossil fuels, limiting the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and other emissions. I will briefly present here the main guidelines of major rules which are being followed by Europe on one side, the United States on the other. And finally the developing countries like China, to show what are the differences in interest and behaviours about the future of energy. Let me start with the first pillar of energy policy which is Europe. During as many as 20 years the energy policy in the European Union has been determined by 2 main priorities. The first strategic priority of the European Union has been one to prevent dangerous climate changes. The second consideration is based on the assumption that the energy prices will rise inexorably as global energy demand rises and resources become scarce. And this will necessarily make renewable energy competitively the winners. By 2040, about 80% of the European primary energy should aggressively be coming from renewables, abating both nuclear and fossils. And one of the development and progressive utilisation of renewable is positive action. Europe has missed substantially the consequence of technological progress. And the US successes of CO2 efficient, lower cost and abundant utilisation of unconventional natural gas, which we call also shale gas. So let me briefly show you the situation of the European future. You can see, for instance, the example here of Germany. You can see that from 1990 the amount of CO2 in 2050 will collapse by a factor of 20 - you can see there the situation. You can also see that hydrogen electrically produced by PV, hydro, wind, geothermal and solar, are the main energy sources of industry and transport. According to Europe, which is specifically presented according to the German situation, the amount of fossils will eventually disappear almost entirely and will be replaced by renewables. Let me show you here, as an example, wind energy which is a dominant element for Europe. You can see here that in fact most of the wind energy is really coming from northern Europe, with few little traces around here near France. This is how it’s distributed over Europe. Now let me show you here how it is realised in practice. Wind off-shore is probably the real solution. And you see enormous effort has been performed in order to carry out such a situation. Here you can see, for instance, how the average power now has grown up to something like 6 megawatts per unit. That some of these units go under the water up to 700 metres in depth. That they are, in fact, distributed mostly in the operation offshore in the region between England, Scandinavia and Germany. Now the real problem with wind is variability. You can see here, for instance, the variability of wind in Germany. You can see that essentially there are moments in which there is too much wind, and there are moments when there is not enough wind. Let me also point out that the power carried by wind is cubed in proportion to the speed of the wind. It's squared because 1,5 v^2,is squared, and another v because of the speed at which the wind travels. Therefore there are moments where the very large variability is a major problem, as you can discuss. If you go more generally, you can see that the renewable energy can be done with biomass, geothermal, wind and hydropower. The economic potentials of these various solutions are not very large when you compare them to the demand. Europe will foresee by 2050 to have 7,500 TWh/y of electric power. And you can see that the best you can do of economic potentials of these various alternatives of renewable energy are much smaller than this number. And therefore, long-term renewable dominance requires resources outside Europe. The key resource of Europe is, of course, the sun which has an enormous amount of economic potential, 600,000 TWh/y. Which is, of course, dominating in the southern part of Europe and most importantly in the Sahara desert and so forth and so on. And you can see how little of that can bring an enormous change. A total energy worldwide could be accumulated by covering with solar panels, a system of the order of this little graph you can see here around Africa. However, the situation now is not so clear because, although for solar energy the deserts are a necessity, you can see that transporting energy from Africa to Europe is not a simple task. In fact, the major disasters taking place recently, because the Desertec Industrial Initiative has abandoned its strategy to export solar power generated from the Sahara to Europe, killing hopes of boosting Africa’s share of renewable energy. Therefore it is not very clear what will be the situation in the future. Here you can see, for instance, the cost of large scale electricity and how they go as a function of the various systems. Conventional energies are hydro, geothermal, nuclear and biomass. Wind on-shore and off-shore, you can see them there. And you can see the on-shore wind is still reasonably acceptable, but the off-shore wind has a major cost increase. Then you have also carbon sequestration which is there, which is also again accumulating the CO2 from the coal. And this is also very high in terms of temperature. You also see the solar energies are there - very nice but, of course, extremely expensive. So you see that moneywise the situation is rather difficult to be understood. There are 2 main problems in Europe: one is the high cost as a function of fraction of renewables. You see here a graph which shows, for instance, what is the cost of electricity with about 1,000 watts per capita – which is the situation of Denmark and Germany. And you compare that with the situation in the United States, which is down here, for instance. Where you have in effect a much smaller renewable capacity, but the cost of electricity is almost a factor of 2 lower. The second question is that there are not enough renewables within Europe to satisfy fully the domestic resources. Therefore something has to be done elsewhere. But there is real difficulty in carrying over several thousand kilometres the energy from Africa to Europe. The key problems of renewable energy are, of course: the best energy is always the cheapest energy. Energy, however, must be available when it is needed. And the third important point: that electricity is now becoming the dominant source of energy for renewable energies. But renewable energies require much wider surface of collection, located in specific locations in which production is optimal. And therefore, electricity at very high powers must be transported over much longer distances than today, which is technically not very easy compared to the one possible today for natural gas and oil. So this is the European situation. Now what about the American situation? The second main pillar is coming from the US. And this is essentially based on the question of this graph coming from Time Magazine, which says, Commercial extraction for oil shale is now something which has already started over the last 10 years. And, in effect, the development is quite remarkably growing nowadays. In fact, you can see that there are possibilities to do natural gas from shales. This is how this is being organised. Or coalbed methane, again another possibility, which can be adsorbed to produce unconventional natural gas. And the world-wide shale resources are massive. You can see that both Americas, China and Europe have large amounts of these resources. Coalbed methane again is very rich in different countries. So there are plenty of resources there. In Europe we also have plenty of resources for this. But, as I said, resources are vast, but strong popular opposition forbids the use of these applications when it comes to Europe. Because Europe is totally absent at the present moment in a practical sense to these solutions, which are very strongly developed in the United States. This has produced a very fundamental difference between the prices of natural gas in the US in respect to Europe and Japan. As you see from this graph: while in 2006 to 2008 the situation was, in fact, very similar. Now in 2012/13 you can see that while the prices in US have been going down, the prices in Europe and in Japan are much higher. So there is a big difference between the predictions of the 2 systems. This has also introduced another important fact: that electricity production from coal has gone down in the US thanks to the development of shale gas, and production from gas has increased. The result is that the US has had a very substantial reduction of CO2 emissions. And the primary energy production in North America is, in fact, rising rapidly, while in Europe it is decreasing. And the petroleum production in various countries shows here that now the United States is producing as much petroleum as Saudi Arabia, which is a remarkable result. You can see, for instance, in the case of Texas, which shows clearly that the development of shale gas has created a real revolution in the amount of oil which is being used. The third question I’d like to mention very briefly in the few minutes I’ve got left, is the question of China. China is the world’s largest producer of electricity, surpassing the United States in 2011. Electricity generation in China has increased 9.6% annually, reaching a very large amount of terawatts. The real problem is the coal-fired plants currently make up two-thirds of the power generation, which is, of course, the result of an abundance of coal in China. The demand is expected to continue to increase at a very rapid pace. However, the growth of electricity from coal-fired plants resulted in an increase in air pollution and general lack of efficiency. China is now moving aggressively to curb pollution and increase supply of renewable power. China is the world’s largest wind energy producer with over 90 GW of installed power at the end of 2013. And 15% is the near-term renewables target for China. Here you can see how the renewables represent themselves in China: wind, solar and hydro are there. The electric demands are shown in this graph. You can see why wind and solar and hydro are optimal in some regions. The electric demands are dominant, of course, where the people are. There is a big business in the 2 distances. You can see here a long transmission of power is required, as I mentioned already. You can see that several thousand kilometres of distance are required between the best production of hydro power, wind power, solar power and the presence of the main people occupations. You can see that situation in China. Shale gas is strongly developed by China. You can see here the various companies exploring shale gas, most of them American companies, which are going into China to get this system productive. And you can see how quickly the shale gas is being developed in China to reduce the coal dependency. You can see here a graph showing the estimated annual production rising very rapidly, with a very impressive, high-aiming level of the situation. Let me then continue asking ourselves in the 8 minutes I’ve got left about the future of energy productions. Unconventional natural gas resources seem to be a major new effect, which we have to take into account. The process of progressive decarbonisation of fossils goes necessarily through an increased use and consumption of natural gas. It is quite clear that natural gas represents a practical alternative to the presently growing exploitation of coal as the main source of energy. In addition, many other new developments have to be introduced in order to ensure that the future can become a remarkable era of abundant and cheap production from fossils. And the key element to this is novel methods. Let me also point out to another new fact: the presence of a new source. The largest untapped reserve for natural gas on the crust is a thing called clathrate. Maybe some of you people only know what a clathrate is. The clathrate is a combination between some - you can see here some water and some natural gas, which combine in a situation which is stable at a temperature around zero degrees, and is called clathrate. And it’s very rich in methane. For instance, one litre of methane clathrate, so-called burning ice, will produce something like 168 litres of methane gas at the normal pressures. You can see here a picture of a small amount of this clathrate which is now burning, producing natural gas. And you can see the molecule and the structure of a system like that. The subject appeared to be purely academic until the people realised that a very large amount of methane hydrate could be present in any environment with suitable pressures and temperatures. And therefore the potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrate is enormous, with current estimates converging around a conservative value about 10,000 gigatons of methane carbon. As a comparison, the total estimates for conventional natural gas and oil are of the order of a few 100 gigatons. Therefore you can see here the location where clathrates were observed in the oceans. You can see almost everywhere around the world there are places in which recovered gas hydrate samples or infer gas hydrate occurrences have been observed. The procedure is extremely simple: You go underground. You can extract these clathrates out of the ocean or you can bring them eventually out from the permafrost. And you can recuperate the amount from the system either by having a depressurisation or having a thermal change which separates the natural gas from the water. Now, of course, the question is: How do we solve the question of future global warming? It’s quite clear that natural gas is inevitably emitting CO2 - although at a small fraction, which is half compared to coal. So the new project, the new question is, How can we reduce even further the CO2 productions? And the project - in which, by the way, I'm also involved – is, CO2 productions could be avoided with the help of spontaneous thermal decomposition at sufficient temperatures of methane into hydrogen and black carbon. You can see here the CH4 will transform itself into hydrogen and solid black carbon. This method is quite valuable because it does not use more energy than the existing reforming process, which, however, can produce a lot of CO2 - 4 tons of CO2 for each ton of hydrogen. And the black carbon can be recovered as a filler or construction material. And this is a process under investigation. You can see here the initial attempts which we did many years ago, in which we just took a tube. We put the tube in at the suitable temperature. Some kind of natural gas just naturally transforming itself into black carbon and hydrogen very quickly. And so forth and so on. The way of methane cracking is more or less represented here. You can see the methane input coming in. Through the methane cracking process hydrogen and carbon are separately produced. The efficiency is high. And, in fact, the numbers you can see can be explained comparing the standard method of producing CH4 with emission of CO2 or without emission of CO2. You can see that in both cases – (mobile phone is ringing) sorry, oh my God. (Laughter). Excuse me. Anyway, the situation is, in fact, that this is very similar. You can see here that 40% energy is lost by a conventional method. And about 42% is recovered and stored with a normal method in here. The technology - I cannot spend much time describing it. It’s represented by this picture here. It’s very efficient. We have reached in this case a 1,000 degrees, something like a major fraction of methane conversion today. It works. And the cost is also very valuable. So let me use the 2 minutes I’ve got left by mentioning a few more questions: the question of "fuel for transportations". A lot of people have claimed that you should use hydrogen for transportation. But, however, a future subsitute to petrol for transportation has to be a liquid. Now you can build a liquid by combining the amount of hydrogen produced by the previous method with remaining CO2, which is spent already, where plenty of CO2 is produced. In other words, the idea is to produce methanol through a process in which hydrogen plus CO2 transform themselves into methanol plus water. And this is an example, very briefly, how you do it: You take, this graph here, essentially the natural gas from the methane producing hydrogen with emission of carbon storage. And you take CO2 from already used CO2 and you combine them together in a methanol synthesis reactor, which then becomes a liquid. And its transform is used as a future replacement for oil. Now let me therefore conclude. What are we talking about energy for the future? In my view a new age of abundance is now developing. And it is based on unconventional gas resources, initially coalbed and shale gas in the foreseeable future. And methane hydrates later on, after the coalbed methane and shale gas has been more or less distributed. North America, India, China, Africa, Latin America will all have access to cheap and abundant shale gas and oil. Europe, of course, is, for political reasons still on hold. With both environmental sensitivities and gas consumption on the rise, the main question is, how to recover this huge novel natural gas resources, available for millennia to come. And economically harvest the immense energy wealth in the most efficient and effective manner and with minimal environmental footprint. I believe the natural gas resources with zero CO2 emissions are the winners: Shale gas, and ultimately clathrate, with the ability of becoming the dominant primary energy source for tens of centuries to come. Thank you very much.

Wie wir sehen, läuft die Uhr schon, uns bleiben noch 30 Minuten, ab jetzt sind es 29:59. Sie haben 4 Sekunden verloren. (Gelächter) Vielen Dank! Nun gehen wir zu einem anderen Thema, das ebenfalls für die Zukunft der Menschheit sehr relevant ist, die Zukunft der Energie. Und ich beginne mit einer kurzen Diskussion des Klimas in der Vergangenheit, das eine klare Voraussetzung für seine Zukunft ist. Die Erde wurde vor etwa 4,56 Milliarden Jahren geschaffen, viel später als der Urknall. Das komplexe, multizelluläre organische Leben wurde nahezu ausschließlich während der vergangenen 600 Millionen Jahre geboren. Hier kann man die Temperatur des Planeten Erde über die letzten 600 Millionen Jahre sehen. Wie man sieht, gab es viele Wechsel zwischen niedrigen und hohen Temperaturen. Es gab sehr hohe Temperaturen bis hin zur Vergletscherung, einige Male reichte das Eis fast bis an den Äquator. Und verschiedene andere Zeiten waren viel wärmer als das. Die letzten Millionen Jahre werden durch eine große Anzahl von Zeitspannen dargestellt, in denen die Vergletscherung den Äquator erreichte, und solchen mit optimalem Klima, ungefähr heutigen Temperaturen. Nun basiert die gesamte Menschheitsgeschichte auf einer bemerkenswert gleichförmigen Zeitspanne, die man in dieser Kurve sehen kann, während der letzten 10.000 Jahre, die es ermöglichte, die Entwicklung der menschlichen Zivilisation aufrecht zu erhalten. So, die kurze Linie, die wir hier am Ende haben, hat uns zu dem gemacht hat, was wir heute sind. Lassen Sie uns diese Dinge ansehen: die letzte Zeitspanne zum Beispiel, wo wir den Wostok-Eiskern aus der Antarktis zu Rate ziehen. Man sieht, dass die Situation durch sehr kurze Zwischeneiszeiten charakterisiert wird, die den derzeitigen Warmzeiten gleichen. Flankiert von sehr langen Eiszeiten über die letzten 500 Millionen Jahre hinweg. Wie man sehen kann, ist der wahrscheinliche Beginn des Homo Sapiens etwa 300.000 Jahre her. Und die frühesten Homo Sapiens in Afrika waren dort vor etwa 100.000 Jahren. Die Landwirtschaft, die den Beginn unserer jetzigen Zivilisation darstellt, begann erst vor etwa 10.000 Jahren. Beachten Sie die Kürze der Warmperioden zwischen sehr langen Eiszeiten. Und die Frage ist natürlich, wie lange die moderne Zeit andauern wird, wie lange wird es von diesem Gesichtspunkt her andauern? Wenn man sich kürzere Zeitskalen ansieht, und man sieht hier die letzten 2.000 Jahre, sieht man beispielsweise die natürlichen Wechsel zwischen kälteren und wärmeren Bedingungen auf der nördlichen Halbkugel mit einem Zyklus, der ungefähr 1000 Jahre beträgt. Zu Zeiten des römischen Reichs waren die Temperaturen höher als heute. Und dann hatten wir das frühe Mittelalter in der Mitte des Jahrtausends. Um das Jahr 1000 herum, begannen die Temperaturen wieder zu steigen. Wir hatten um 1600/1700 herum eine kleine Eiszeit. Und jetzt kommen wir zur heutigen Situation. Man sieht, dass wärmere und kältere Zeiten sich abgewechselt haben. Außerhalb der Tropen, auf der nördlichen Halbkugel - die derzeitigen mittleren Temperaturänderungen im Verhältnis zu den mittleren Temperaturen werden in dieser Kurve mit Fehlerbalken von etwa zwei Standardabweichungen angezeigt. Derzeit entwickelt sich ein neues, bedeutendes Phänomen: der Beginn des sogenannten „anthropogenen Zeitalters“. Das Andauern der einzigartig langen, stabilen Periode nach der Zwischeneiszeit war wesentlich, um das Leben und die Zivilisation so aufrechtzuerhalten, wie sie heute sind. Und das ist natürlich ein wesentliches Element zum Überleben, das wir auf jeden Fall erhalten müssen. Aber, wie wir wissen, sehen wir uns derzeit einem neuen Phänomen gegenüber. Ein Begriff, den Eugene Stoermer prägte und den der Nobelpreisträger Paul Crutzen allgemein bekannt machte: der Beginn der durch Menschen verursachten anthropogenen Ära. Zum ersten Mal könnten menschliche Handlungen die Zukunft des Erdklimas stark beeinflussen. Seit 1750 wurden beispielsweise etwa 1 Million Millionen Tonnen, 1000 Gigatonnen, CO2 in die Atmosphäre ausgestoßen, zusätzlich zu vielen anderen Schadstoffen. Die ersten Anzeichen eines solchen anthropogenen Zeitalters wurden vielleicht schon nachgewiesen. Dieser Einfluss sollte gedrosselt werden, um die irreversiblen Auswirkungen einer großen Klimaänderung zu vermeiden. Der Wert der CO2-Anreicherung ist natürlich enorm. Hier sieht man die Verteilung über den Planeten. Man sieht beispielsweise, dass wir in einigen Ländern jeden Tag mehr als 100 kg CO2 erzeugen - pro Person. Der zweite Effekt ist, dass die CO2-Produktion bis jetzt ungezügelt erscheint. Sie sehen hier die Menge an CO2-Ausstoß als Funktion der Zeit. Der gesamte Planet - Sie sehen hier, dass es eine kontinuierlich linear/exponentiell wachsende Linie ist. Die CO2-Produktion reicht aus, um alle 4 Jahre ein Volumen wie den Genfer See, was etwa 80 km^3 entspricht, mit suprafluidem CO2 bei 100 Bar mit einer Dichte ähnlich der des Wassers zu füllen. Hier sieht man den Genfer See. Und Sie können sehen, wie er tatsächlich durch die Situation betroffen wurde. Die zweite Frage ist natürlich, wie lange bleibt CO2 in der Biosphäre? Hier ist eine Kurve, die die Änderungen der CO2-Verweilzeit in der Atmosphäre zeigt Sie scheint irgendwo zwischen 30' und 35.000 Jahren zu liegen. Hier kann man sehen was über die Jahre passieren wird. In dieser Zeichnung sind 600 Jahre mit einer bestimmten CO2-Emission gezeigt, die, nehme ich an, über die ersten paar 100 Jahre auftritt und dann für eine lange Zeit gleich bleibt. Als Vergleich beträgt die Lebenszeit des Plutoniums 239 beispielsweise 26.000 Jahre, verbunden mit der heutigen öffentlichen negativen Wahrnehmung der Kernenergie. Wir reden daher von wirklich unglaublichen Zeitspannen. Die durchschnittliche Lebenszeit in der Atmosphäre von der Größenordnung von 10^4 Jahren ist im Widerspruch zu der gängigen Sicht vieler Menschen, die denken, dass das CO2 in ein paar hundert Jahren verschwinden wird. Nun schauen wir uns die Vorhersagen für die nächsten 25 Jahre an. Diese sind besonders düster. Hier sehen Sie die Kurven der IEA, International Energy Agency, in Paris. Man sieht hier eine massive Ausweitung der Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen ohne Ressourcenknappheit, dagegen ein sehr langsames Wachstum der erneuerbaren Energien, einschließlich der Wasserkraft. Aus dieser Kurve ersehen wir, dass über ein Vierteljahrhundert tatsächlich die erneuerbaren Energien von 13% auf etwa 18% wachsen. Und dieser Effekt entspringt aus einer sehr charakteristischen Situation. Sie sehen hier, dass sie für die USA, Europa und andere OECD-Staaten im Wesentlichen flach ist, konstante Intensität. China und Indien entwickeln sich sehr schnell, zusammen mit den übrigen Entwicklungsländern, und tragen zum CO2 durch einen Anstieg von etwa 33% über diesen Zeitraum von 25 Jahren bei. Die sofortige Konsequenz davon ist natürlich eine Änderung der Erdtemperatur. Hier sieht man die Kurve der Erdtemperatur im Jahr 2015, in Bezug auf die Basislinie vor der Entwicklung, zwischen 1951 und 1980. Und man kann tatsächlich einen sehr erheblichen Anstieg in den Temperaturen erkennen, am meisten auf der nördlichen Halbkugel genau hier und in unserer Situation. Man kann sehen, dass die Gesamtauswirkung über diesen Zeitraum beträchtlich ist, in der Größenordnung von etwa 1 Grad Celsius über dem Mittelwert zwischen 1961 und 1990. Da ist eine kleine Auswirkung hier oben und ganz unten in der Antarktis. Aber grundsätzlich erwärmt sich die zivilisierte Welt gerade sehr beträchtlich. Was machen wir jetzt? - Das ist die zweite Frage. Um etwas zu unternehmen, benötigen wir selbstverständlich neue Technologien. Man sagt, dass neue Technologien der einzige Schlüssel sind, die Nachhaltigkeit der Zukunft der Energie zu lösen. Der Übergang zu Energien mit geringeren Emissionen und ein mengenmäßig signifikantes CO2-Management sind einige der wichtigsten technologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Die derzeitige weltweite Energieversorgung hängt natürlich hauptsächlich von fossilen Brennstoffen ab, die für die nächsten Jahrzehnte unverzichtbar bleiben werden. Aber um die Umweltänderungen zu bändigen, müssen wir auf zwei Schienen nachdrücklich vorankommen: die eine ist die Entwicklung und fortschreitende Benutzung von erneuerbaren Energiequellen. Und die zweite ist die effizientere Nutzung fossiler Brennstoffe, um die Auswirkungen des anthropogenen CO2 und anderer Emissionen zu begrenzen. Ich präsentiere hier kurz die Hauptleitlinien oder Hauptregeln, die von Europa auf der einen Seite und den Vereinigten Staaten auf der anderen befolgt werden. Und schließlich den Entwicklungsländern wie China, um die Interessen- und Verhaltensunterschiede bezüglich der Zukunft der Energie aufzuzeigen. Ich beginne mit der ersten Säule der Energiepolitik, das ist Europa. Über 20 Jahre hinweg bestimmten zwei Hauptprioritäten die Energiepolitik der Europäischen Gemeinschaft. Die erste strategische Priorität der Europäischen Gemeinschaft war es, gefährliche Klimaänderungen zu verhindern. Die zweite Überlegung basiert auf der Annahme, dass die Energiepreise unerbittlich ansteigen werden, während der globale Energiebedarf steigt und die Ressourcen knapper werden. Und dies wird notwendigerweise die erneuerbaren Energien zum Gewinner im Wettbewerb machen. Bis zum Jahr 2040 sollten etwa 80% der europäischen Primärenergie aggressiv von erneuerbaren Energien kommen, und damit sowohl Kernenergie als auch fossile Energie verringern. Und obwohl die Entwicklung und zunehmende Nutzung der erneuerbaren Energien eine positive Handlung ist, hat Europa die Konsequenzen des technischen Fortschritts ziemlich verpasst. Und die amerikanischen Erfolge der CO2-effizienten und breiten Nutzung von unkonventionellem Erdgas, das wir auch Schiefergas nennen, bei niedrigeren Kosten. Lassen Sie mich kurz die Situation der europäischen Zukunft zeigen. Sie sehen hier beispielsweise Deutschland. Sie können hier sehen, dass ab 1990 die CO2-Menge im Jahr 2050 um einen Faktor von 20 einbrechen wird – dort sehen Sie die Situation. Sie sehen, dass über Fotovoltaik, Wasserkraft, Wind-, Solar- und geothermale Energie elektrisch produzierter Wasserstoff die Hauptquelle der Industrie und des Verkehrs ist. In Europa, das spezifisch durch die deutsche Situation dargestellt ist, wird die Menge an fossiler Energie letztendlich fast gänzlich verschwinden und durch erneuerbare Ressourcen ersetzt. Lassen Sie mich hier, als ein Beispiel, die Windenergie zeigen, die das dominante Element für Europa ist. Hier können Sie sehen, dass tatsächlich die meiste Windenergie aus Nordeuropa kommt, mit kleineren Mengen hier bei Frankreich. So ist es über Europa verteilt. Nun lassen Sie mich zeigen, wie es in der Praxis realisiert ist. Offshore-Wind ist vermutlich die wirkliche Lösung. Und Sie sehen die enormen Anstrengungen, die durchgeführt wurden, um eine solche Situation herbeizuführen. Hier sehen Sie beispielsweise, wie die durchschnittliche Leistung jetzt auf etwa 6 Megawatt pro Einheit angewachsen ist. Einige dieser Einheiten stehen in eine Wassertiefe bis zu 700 Meter. Sie sind hauptsächlich verteilt im Offshore-Betrieb in der Region zwischen England, Skandinavien und Deutschland. Das wirkliche Problem mit Wind ist die Variabilität. Hier sieht man beispielsweise die Windvariabilität in Deutschland. Sie können hier im Wesentlichen sehen, dass es Zeiten gibt, in denen der Wind zu stark ist, und Zeiten, wo nicht genug Wind herrscht. Lassen Sie mich noch darauf hinweisen, dass die Leistung des Winds der Windgeschwindigkeit zur dritten Potenz entspricht. Es ist im Quadrat wegen 1,5 v^2, und noch einmal v, weil das die Windgeschwindigkeit ist. Es gibt daher Zeiten, wo die sehr große Variabilität ein Hauptproblem darstellt, wie man diskutieren kann. Wenn man es genereller betrachtet, kann man sehen, dass die erneuerbare Energie über Biomasse, geothermische Energie, Wind- und Wasserenergie erzeugt werden kann. Die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser verschiedenen Lösungen sind nicht sehr groß, wenn man sie mit dem Bedarf vergleicht. Die Voraussage für Europa bis 2050 sind 7.500 TWh/a elektrischer Leistung. Und hier können Sie sehen, dass die Wirtschaftspotentiale dieser unterschiedlichen Alternativen für erneuerbare Energien in einer Größenordnung liegt, die viel kleiner ist als diese Zahl. Und daher benötigt eine langfristige Dominanz der erneuerbaren Energien Ressourcen außerhalb Europas. Die Hauptrohstoffquelle Europas ist natürlich die Sonne, die über ein enormes Wirtschaftspotential verfügt, 600.000 TWh/a. Das dominiert natürlich im südlichen Teil Europas und sehr wesentlich in der Sahara und so weiter. Und Sie sehen, wie wenig davon eine enorme Änderung herbeiführen kann. Die weltweite Gesamtenergie könnte durch eine Überdeckung mit Solarpaneelen gesammelt werden, ein System in der Größenordnung dieser kleinen Zeichnung hier in Afrika. Die Situation ist aber nicht so klar, weil man sieht, dass, obwohl die Wüsten für die Solarenergie notwendig sind, der Transport der Energie von Afrika nach Europa keine leichte Aufgabe ist. Das große Fiasko, das es kürzlich passiert gab, weil die Industrieinitiative Desertec ihre Strategie aufgegeben hat, in der Sahara erzeugte Solarenergie nach Europa zu exportieren. Das hat die Hoffnung zerschlagen, Afrikas Anteil an erneuerbaren Energien zu steigern. Es ist daher nicht sehr klar, wie die Situation in der Zukunft sein wird. Hier kann man beispielsweise die Kosten der flächendeckenden Stromerzeugung sehen und wie sie sich als Funktion der verschiedenen Systeme ändern. Konventionelle Energien sind Wasserkraft, geothermische, Kern- und Biomasseenergie. Onshore- und Offshore-Windenergie kann man hier sehen. Und man kann sehen, dass die Onshore-Windenergie noch einigermaßen akzeptabel ist, aber dass die Offshore-Windenergie große Kostensteigerungen verursacht. Dann haben wir noch die Kohlenstoffabscheidung, die dort ist, die das CO2 aus der Kohle auch wieder aufsammelt. Und dies ist auch sehr hoch bezogen auf die Kosten. Sie sehen auch die Solarenergien dort - sehr schön, aber natürlich auch extrem teuer. Sie sehen, dass in Sachen Geld die Situation recht schwierig zu verstehen ist. In Europa gibt es zwei Hauptprobleme: Eins sind die hohen Kosten als Funktion des Bruchteils der erneuerbaren Energien. Hier sehen Sie die Kurve, die beispielsweise zeigt, was die Stromkosten bei etwa 1.000 Watt pro Kopf sind, was der Situation in Dänemark und Deutschland entspricht. Und vergleichen Sie das zum Beispiel mit der Situation in den Vereinigten Staaten, die hier unten stehen. Dort gibt es eine viel kleinere Kapazität an erneuerbaren Energien, aber die Stromkosten sind fast einen Faktor 2 geringer. Die zweite Frage ist, dass es nicht genügend erneuerbare Ressourcen innerhalb Europas gibt, um den heimischen Bedarf komplett zu decken. Daher muss etwas irgendwo anders getan werden. Aber es ist sehr schwierig, die Energie über mehrere tausend Kilometer von Afrika nach Europa zu transportieren. Das Schlüsselproblem der erneuerbaren Energie ist natürlich: die billigste Energie ist immer die beste Energie. Energie muss aber dort zur Verfügung stehen, wo sie benötigt wird. Und der dritte wichtige Punkt: die Elektrizität wird jetzt die dominante Energiequelle für die erneuerbaren Energien werden. Aber erneuerbare Energien benötigen eine größere Sammelfläche, die in besonderen Gegenden angesiedelt ist, wo die Produktion optimal ist. Und daher muss Energie bei sehr hoher Leistung über viel längere Strecken transportiert werden als heute, was technisch nicht leicht durchführbar ist, verglichen mit den Möglichkeiten heute für Erdgas und Erdöl. So, das ist also die europäische Situation. Wie sieht nun die amerikanische Situation aus? Die zweite Hauptsäule kommt aus den USA. Und das basiert im Wesentlichen auf dieser Grafik aus dem Time-Magazin, die betitelt ist: Die kommerzielle Extraktion von Schieferöl ist jetzt schon etwas, das über die vergangenen 10 Jahre schon begonnen hat. Und die Entwicklung wächst inzwischen recht beachtlich. Man kann sehen, dass es Möglichkeiten gibt, Erdgas aus Schiefergestein zu gewinnen. So wird das gemacht. Oder Kohleflöz-Methan - wieder eine weitere Möglichkeit -, das adsorbiert werden kann, um unkonventionelles Erdgas zu produzieren. Und die globalen Schiefervorkommen sind gewaltig. Sie können sehen, dass der amerikanische Kontinent, China und Europa große Mengen dieser Vorkommen haben. Kohleflöz-Methan ist wiederum in verschiedenen Ländern sehr reichhaltig vorhanden. Es gibt also reichliche Vorkommen. In Europa haben wir auch viele Vorkommen dafür. Aber, wie ich sagte, obwohl die Vorkommen riesig sind, verbietet starker öffentlicher Widerstand die Benutzung dieser Anwendungen, soweit es Europa betrifft. Europa fehlt bei diesen Lösungen im praktischen Sinn derzeit komplett, während sie in den USA sehr stark entwickelt sind. Das hat zu einem einen sehr grundsätzlichen Unterschied zwischen den Preisen von Erdgas in den USA geführt, verglichen mit Europa und Japan. Wie man aus dieser Kurve sehen kann: Während zwischen 2006 und 2008 die Situation tatsächlich sehr ähnlich war, kann man jetzt im Jahr 2012/13 sehen, dass während die Preise in den USA gesunken sind, die Preise in Europa und in Japan viel höher sind. Es gibt also einen großen Unterschied zwischen den Vorhersagen der 2 Systeme. Dies hat zu einer anderen wichtigen Tatsache geführt, nämlich dass in den USA die Stromproduktion aus Kohle dank der Entwicklung des Schiefergases abgenommen und die Produktion aus Gas zugenommen hat. Im Ergebnis gibt es in den USA eine beträchtliche Reduzierung der CO2 Emissionen. Und die Primärenergieerzeugung in Nordamerika steigt tatsächlich schnell an, während sie in Europa sinkt. Die Erdölproduktion in verschiedenen Ländern zeigt hier, dass die Vereinigten Staaten jetzt so viel Erdöl produzieren wie Saudi-Arabien - ein erstaunliches Resultat. Sie können hier am Beispiel Texas sehen, dass die Entwicklung des Schiefergases eine richtige Revolution im Ölverbrauch erzeugt hat. Die dritte Frage, die ich sehr kurz in den wenigen verbliebenen Minuten erwähnen möchte, ist die Frage nach China. China ist der weltweit größte Stromerzeuger, nachdem es die USA in 2011 überholt hat. Die Stromerzeugung in China wächst um 9,6% jährlich, und erreicht eine sehr große Menge von Terawatt. Das eigentliche Problem ist, dass die Kohlekraftwerke derzeit 2 Drittel des Stroms erzeugen, was natürlich ein Resultat des Kohlereichtums in China ist. Es wird erwartet, dass der Bedarf sehr schnell weiter zunehmen wird. Die steigende Stromerzeugung durch Kohlekraftwerke resultierte in zunehmender Luftverschmutzung und einem generellen Mangel an Effizienz. China ist jetzt verstärkt bemüht, die Verschmutzung zu verringern und die erneuerbare Energieversorgung zu erhöhen. Ende 2013 war China der weltgrößte Windenergieproduzent mit über 90 GW installierter Leistung. Und 15% ist das kurzfristige Ziel für erneuerbare Energien in China. Hier kann man sehen, wie die erneuerbaren Energien sich in China darstellen: Wind-, Solarenergie und Wasserkraft sind dort. Der Strombedarf ist in diesem Diagramm dargestellt. Man kann sehen, während Wind- und Solarenergie und Wasserkraft in einigen Regionen optimal sind, ist der Hauptstrombedarf natürlich dort, wo die Menschen sind. Da gibt es große Entfernungen zu den zwei Gebieten. Man kann hier sehen, dass eine weite Übertragung der Elektrizität erforderlich ist, wie schon vorhin erwähnt. Wie man sieht, müssen mehrere tausend Kilometer Entfernung zwischen den besten Produktionsstätten aus der Wasserkraft, Windenergie, Solarenergie und den Hauptansiedlungen der Menschen überbrückt werden. Das ist gerade die Situation in China. Schiefergas wird durch China sehr stark entwickelt. Hier sehen Sie die verschiedenen Unternehmen, die nach Schiefergas suchen. Die meisten sind amerikanische Firmen, die nach China gehen, um dieses System zur Produktion zu bringen. Und Sie können sehen, wie schnell das Schiefergas in China entwickelt wird, um die Kohleabhängigkeit zu reduzieren. Und hier die Kurve zeigt, dass die geschätzte Jahresproduktion sehr schnell auf ein sehr eindrucksvolles, hohes Niveau ansteigen wird. Dann sollten wir uns in den noch verbliebenden 8 Minuten mit der Zukunft der Energieerzeugung beschäftigen. Unkonventionelle Erdgasvorkommen scheinen ein großer, neuer Effekt zu sein, den wir berücksichtigen müssen. Der Prozess der Reduzierung von Kohlendioxid bei fossilen Brennstoffen geht notwendigerweise über eine wachsende Nutzung und Verbrauch von Erdgas. Es ist recht klar, dass Erdgas eine praktische Alternative zu der derzeitig wachsenden Ausbeutung von Kohle als hauptsächliche Energiequelle darstellt. Zusätzlich müssen weitere neue Entwicklungen eingeführt werden, um sicherzustellen, dass die Zukunft ein bedeutendes Zeitalter der weitverbreiteten und billigen Erzeugung aus fossilen Brennstoffen wird. Und das Schlüsselelement hier sind neuartige Methoden. Lassen Sie mich auf eine weitere neue Tatsache hinweisen: das Vorhandensein einer neuen Quelle. Die größte ungenutzte Erdgasreserve in der Erdkruste ist etwas, das Clathrat genannt wird. Vielleicht wissen einige von Euch, was ein Clathrat ist. Das Clathrat ist eine Verbindung zwischen - hier sieht man etwas Wasser und Erdgas, die in einer Situation sich verbinden, die bei Temperaturen um null Grad stabil ist, und das wird Clathrat genannt. Es ist sehr reich an Methan. Ein Liter Methan-Clathrat, sogenanntes brennbares Eis, produziert bei Normaldruck etwa 168 Liter Methan. Sie können hier ein Bild einer kleinen Menge dieses Clathrats sehen, das jetzt brennt, und Erdgas produziert. Und Sie können das Molekül und die Struktur dieses Systems sehen. Das Thema schien zunächst rein akademisch zu sein, bis man erkannte, dass sehr große Mengen an Methanhydrat in jeder Umgebung mit den geeigneten Drucken und Temperaturen vorhanden sein könnten. Und daher ist die potentielle Methanmenge in Erdgashydraten gigantisch, wobei die derzeitigen Schätzungen bei einem konservativen Wert von 10.000 Gigatonnen Kohlenstoff aus Methan konvergieren. Zum Vergleich: die Gesamtschätzung für konventionelles Erdgas und -öl sind in der Größenordnung von einigen hundert Gigatonnen. Hier können Sie die Gegenden sehen, wo Clathrate in den Meeren beobachtet wurden. Man sieht, dass es überall auf der Welt Gegenden gibt, in denen man Gashydratproben gesammelt hat oder auf Gashydratvorkommen geschlossen hat. Die Prozedur ist extrem einfach: Man geht unter Tage. Man kann diese Clathrate aus den Meeren extrahieren, oder man kann sie vielleicht aus dem Permafrost herausholen. Und man kann die Menge aus dem System extrahieren, entweder durch Druckverminderung oder durch eine thermale Umwandlung, die das Erdgas vom Wasser trennt. Nun ist natürlich die Frage: Wie lösen wir die Frage der zukünftigen globalen Erwärmung? Es ist sehr klar, dass Erdgas zwangsläufig CO2 emittiert – wenn auch nur einen kleinen Bruchteil, der etwa halb so groß ist wie bei der Kohle. Daher ist das neue Projekt, die neue Frage: Wie können wir die CO2-Erzeugung noch weiter reduzieren? Und das Projekt - in das ich übrigens involviert bin - ist, dass die CO2-Erzeugung mit der Hilfe der spontanen thermischen Zersetzung des Methans in Wasserstoff und Industrieruß bei ausreichenden Temperaturen vermieden werden kann. Sie sehen hier, dass das CH4 sich in Wasserstoff und festen Industrieruß umwandelt. Diese Methode ist recht wertvoll, weil sie nicht mehr Energie verbraucht als der existierende Umbildungsprozess, der aber eine Menge CO2 produzieren kann - 4 Tonnen für jede Tonne Wasserstoff. Und der Industrieruß kann als ein Füllstoff oder Baumaterial benutzt werden. Und dieser Prozess wird gerade untersucht. Hier kann man die ersten Versuche sehen, die wir vor vielen Jahren durchführten, wo wir einfach ein Röhrchen benutzten. Wir brachten irgendein Erdgas in dem Röhrchen auf eine geeignete Temperatur, das sich natürlich und sehr schnell in Industrieruß und Wasserstoff umwandelte und so weiter. Die Methode der Methanaufspaltung ist hier mehr oder weniger dargestellt. Und hier sieht man, das Methan kommt herein. Durch den Methanaufspaltungsprozess werden Wasserstoff und Kohlenstoff separat hergestellt. Die Effizienz ist hoch. Und die Zahlen, die Sie sehen, können erklärt werden, wenn man die Standardmethoden der CH4-Herstellung mit oder ohne CO2-Emission vergleicht. Sie sehen, dass in beiden Fällen - (das Handy klingelt), Entschuldigung, ach mein Gott. (Gelächter) Entschuldigen Sie. Nun ja, die Situation ist tatsächlich, dass dies sehr ähnlich ist. Sie sehen hier, dass mit einer konventionellen Methode 40% der Energie verloren geht. Und etwa 42% wird wiedergewonnen und mit einer normalen Methode hier gespeichert. Die Technologie - ich kann nicht viel Zeit damit verbringen, sie hier zu beschreiben. Sie ist hier in diesem Bild dargestellt. Sie ist sehr effizient. Wir haben heute in diesem Fall bei 1.000 Grad so etwas wie den Großteil der Methanumwandlung erreicht. Das funktioniert. Und die Kosten sind auch sehr vernünftig. Lassen Sie mich die verbleibenden 2 Minuten benutzen, um ein paar weitere Fragen zu erwähnen: die Frage des „Brennstoffes für den Verkehr“. Eine Menge Leute haben behauptet, dass man Wasserstoff für den Verkehr benutzen sollte. Aber ein zukünftiger Benzinersatz für den Verkehr muss flüssig sein. Nun kann man eine Flüssigkeit erzeugen, indem man die Menge an Wasserstoff, die durch die vorherige Methode erzeugt, wird mit dem restlichen CO2, das bereits erzeugt wurde, wo viel CO2 erzeugt wird. Mit anderen Worten, die Idee ist, Methanol durch einen Prozess zu erzeugen, in dem sich Wasserstoff plus CO2 in Methanol plus Wasser umwandeln. Und dies ist, sehr kurz, ein Beispiel, wie man das macht: Nehmen Sie dieses Diagramm hier. Im Wesentlichen wird aus Erdgas vom Methan Wasserstoff mit Kohlenstoffemission oder -speicherung produziert. Und dann nimmt man schon erzeugtes CO2 und bringt sie in einem Methanolsynthesereaktor zusammen, und es wird dann eine Flüssigkeit. Das Umwandlungsprodukt wird als zukünftiger Ölersatz benutzt. So komme ich nun zum Schluss. Worüber reden wir bei der Energie für die Zukunft? Aus meiner Sicht, entwickelt sich gerade ein neues Zeitalter des Überflusses. Und es basiert auf unkonventionellen Gasvorkommen, zunächst Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas in der vorhersehbaren Zukunft. Und später Methanhydrat, nachdem das Kohleflözgas und Schiefergas mehr oder weniger verbraucht sein wird. Nordamerika, Indien, China, Afrika und Lateinamerika werden Zugang zu billigem und reichlich vorhandenem Schiefergas und -öl haben. Europa ist, aus politischen Gründen, noch im Stillstand. Mit steigender Umweltempfindlichkeit und Gasverbrauch verbleibt die Hauptfrage, wie man diese riesigen neuen Vorkommen an Erdgas erschließt, die für Jahrtausende zur Verfügung stehen. Und wie der immense Energiereichtum in der effizientesten und effektivsten Weise mit einem minimalen Umweltfußabdruck geerntet werden kann. Ich glaube, die Erdgasvorkommen mit null CO2-Emissionen sind die Gewinner. Schiefergas, und letztendlich Clathrate mit der Möglichkeit, die zukünftige primäre Energiequelle für viele, viele Jahrhunderte zu werden. Vielen Dank!

Carlo Rubbia on a new age of abundance based on unconventional gas resources
(00:29:05 - 00:30:16)

 

Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions is an ongoing issue, and reducing the amount of greenhouse gases, whether by curbing emissions or capturing the amount of carbon dioxide already released, will most likely be a priority for the coming decades. However, more and more countries and organisations are taking the next step forward by enforcing adaptation strategies – an acknowledgement that the climate is changing and additional measures and investments must be put into place in order to withstand the changing environment. These measures range from the establishment of local strategic plans, to modelling heat island effects in cities and actively preparing for likely natural disasters.

The causes and effects of global warming and what actions should be undertaken to mitigate it, is probably the most debated scientific topic of recent years. Climatologists’ opinions are either extolled or condemned and even brief online articles on climate change result in avalanches of opinions and comments, both from specialists and non-specialists alike. The opposing views can be viewed in a positive light; perhaps it’s the collective concern for the environment that’s manifesting itself in the global conversation on climate change. It’s a promising change when scientific discussions are transferred from academic meetings and conference halls to cafés and living rooms. There have been significant improvements in policy and education as well – from a very early age children are taught that the planet’s resources are limited and how energy must not be wasted.

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Kailash Satyarthi gave a memorable lecture in Lindau in 2015 on education and children’s rights, and this excerpt on the power of education is easily transferable to the world’s current challenges; striving for sustainability, equity, and development:

 

Kailash Satyarthi (2015) - Education Needs to be Equitable and Inclusive for All

Dear laureates and young scientists, now the time when everybody's gathered here during the meeting is slowly coming to an end. And I like to take this opportunity to address you once more once we're gathered here in the Inselhalle. I think so far we've had a wonderful meeting in Lindau, and I would like to give an extra applause to the laureates who are the main reason for this. Thank you. But I don't want to forget those who have been also working very hard to make this meeting a good meeting, and as I said in the beginning, after the meeting is before the meeting, so after the meeting 2014, was before the meeting 2015. And I want to thank the scientific chairpersons and also the team. And I have some words of thank you here behind me so you read that while I talk. May I go on talking? But unfortunately, no, not unfortunately, fortunately, it's not the end yet. There are wonderful sessions to come and among these, the trip to Mainau tomorrow. And also this day, although it's not here in the venue or in other venues that you have seen in Lindau, it will be full of dialogue and interaction, it will be also a science picnic after our closing panel on Mainau tomorrow. And I just want to give you this hint; it will be a really be a picnic sitting down on the ground so when choosing your clothes for tomorrow, maybe you want to think of that. And as we expect very high temperatures for tomorrow, I also want to encourage you to bring a hat because it will be very sunny, and very warm. We'll do everything to be sitting in the shade but I want to encourage you please bring a hat. And one more thing, please be aware of the times published tomorrow as there is a boat involved and about 900 people will be on that boat, it would be very hard to turn around and pick up one or two persons who've come too late. So please be in time because once the boat is gone, it's gone. We'll find a way to get you to Mainau and back but it will be less pleasant, there will be no laureates to talk to, no other students so if you want to talk to them, please be in time. But now, I want to talk about the upcoming session. And as you could read in the program, it will be held by Kailash Satyarthi. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, together with Malala Yousafzai for the struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education. And I'm particularly happy and honoured that Kailash Satyarthi accepted our invitation to come to Lindau and address you because he will talk about something very important. And I think you have already experience that yesterday evening. And here at this point, I would like to share an experience with you. Not long ago, I visited Nepal together with the trip to visit some projects of Cooperational Development Work and I brought one of our sons, he was then 18 years old. And during our trip, we met some Kamalari children, mainly girls. I don't know how many of you know what's Kamalari children are. It's a quite cruel tradition unfortunately where children work from the age of six on to 10, 12, 16. They don't suffer the most from the treatment they get from these families whom they work for, but they don't get any education. So the projects that we visited, oh, this is all happy, I shouldn't be crying. The project that we visited gives the possibility to these girls and boys to get educated after their liberation from Kamalari. And it's absolutely fascinating what these youngsters do. They walk to school up to two hours every day, back and forth, one hour. They take care of their family before they go, and they take care of their family after they come home. So they have these huge days from four in the morning until 11 in the evening. And after we had talked to these kids and youngsters, our son said to me, "You know, I really feel bad now because sometimes I hated school." And after that day, he was a very dedicated ambassador for school. And I say that to you because you'll be parents one day. I saw you all lifting your hands when Harry Kroto asked you that, so this is why I decided to tell you that actually. So now it's my pleasure to invite Kailash Satyarthi. I hope he's here to join me here on stage and to address all of us. Welcome. it is one of the biggest and most valuable place of scientists from all disciplines. And I was wondering what I'm going to do there. Then I found two justifications. The one was that, though I'm not a Nobel Laureate from any of the science disciplines but when I was a child, I was very good in science subjects. When I was securing almost 100% marks in mathematics and science, my parents wanted to make me a professor, a scientist. Then they realized that it would be good to send him to engineering. So I did my engineering, I taught in the university for about a year and a half, so I have some idea about science, so I thought that I should go there. The second reason, I thought that every scientist who is going to speak here and the young friends who are sitting here, the young scientists, at one stage of your life each one of you were a child. And the sweetest and most valuable memories are our memories of childhood, memories of freedom, purity, quest for learning and so many other things. Since I have been working for children, for the last 35 years or so, I thought that it's good to connect with the memories of your childhood, and the childhood of millions of other children. I really felt overwhelmed in the midst of all sorts of knowledge, but more importantly, feeling much more empowered in presence of the moral authorities. You're not only scientists but you carry tremendous moral authority and power, dear laureates. And also to be with the young scientists, no other segment of life can match with your idealism, with your potential, your energy and your possibilities. So I am in the midst of the present laureates and possibly future laureates as well. Friends, think for a while that if out of, say, 700 people sitting here, 100 were not able to read and write. What would be the case, would they be here? This is the global scenario. Almost one out of seven people on our planet are unable to read and write. What has enabled all of us to come here to participate in this important event? It could be the organizers, it could be your quest for knowledge, your determination, your commitment to make the world a better world, but the most fundamental factor is education. If we were not educated, we were not here. If we were not educated, we could not dream to bring about changes in society and in the world. Education is power. It is the most powerful enabler and equalizer. It is the key to sustainability, it is key to equity, gender equity as well, social justice and development. It is the right which is the fundament to rest on the rights of life and society. They'd be no. But those who know the power of education, they have not been able to appropriately ensure education for all children and all people in the world. But those who, there's another segment of society who also understands the power of education and they are fundamentalist forces, they are terrorist forces. And these forces are threatening an education today. Only few months ago, you might have read, You have also heard that few months ago in a fine morning, when about 400 students were sitting in classrooms, in Peshawar, Pakistan suddenly the terrorists entered and killed 132 students, young children. I felt ashamed, I was in tears. While talking to a mother in Pakistan, she says, He was a little late so I scolded him to prepare early. Somehow he went to school, but I received him in a coffin." She further says that all his body was shot with guns or bullets but the books in his bag were still intact as well as the water bottle, there was no bullet. And she was cursing that why not her son was saved. Over a year has passed, we have no idea whether they are alive or dead. Whether they are sold to brothels, or what has happened to them, no idea. Few days ago, some of you might have seen a picture or read in the newspapers that the girls in Syria, young girls who were kidnapped from schools and houses, 6, 8, 8 year old girls were sold to sexual slavery for a price less than a cigarette pack. A 7 year old boy who could not hold a gun to kill opponents, the militant of ISIS buried him alive. These pictures that appeared, can we call ourselves civilized? Can we call ourselves cultured? Can we call ourselves developed? When these things are happening almost every day. These forces have understood the power of education and that's why they are trying to destroy it completely. They're creating fears in the minds of young people in those countries. That is a new phenomenon which has been growing in last few years. In Syria and Iran, Nigeria, different parts of the world. Think for a while whose children are they. You may easily that I'm a scientist, I am doing research in my own area. Think! I know that your researches will bring some good news and make the world a better world. But think for while whose children are they, what kind of world we are living in. They are all our children. They are all our children. If you don't think, if you don't consider all children are our children, then the world can never be a beautiful world for everyone. Dear friends, this is the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureates meeting, and almost at the same time 65, 66 years ago the International Community has mentioned education as a Fundamental Right in the Universal Declaration. It is one of the human rights. But what happened to this right? For 40 years, no attention has been paid. International Community has never sit and discussed how we are going to deliver a Fundamental Right to education for all. Only 1990 in Jomtien, when the first forum on education was convened, a big slogan came out, "Education for all by year 2000". But no substantiate in terms of budgetary allocations, in terms of monitoring, in terms of accountability, nothing. So in 2000, when the International Community was to assemble again in Dakar in Senegal, then the people like me and my friends raised one question. A very fundamental question that the number of out of school children has grown from 75 million to 130 million. What have we achieved? The negative progress. The number of illiterate people in the world grew from 750 million to 880 million. More children were excluded, more adults were excluded from education. Without health, protection, development, equality and so on, justice, everything has been denied. And they are the people who sleep hungry, most of them. They are the people whom we call the people living below the abject poverty. They are the people who don't have safe drinking water. They are the people who are suffering from all sorts of miseries and diseases. And we wake up quite late when something like Ebola happens, erupts. Again, in the year 2000, the world has made a commitment to educate all children by 2015 and halve the adult illiteracy by that time. So many other things, commitment, but fundamental commitment was that all children will complete their basic education, primary education. Some progress has been made definitely; civil society has been quite a strong during those 15 years. And the number of out of school children has been reduced by half or even more than by half. Now, 58 million children are out of school. But these 58 million children who are not in school, have never been to school, or 250 million children who could not go to secondary classes or almost the same number of children who could not learn read and write in their primary schooling. They are not simply numbers. Each figure has a face. Each figure has some eyes which are looking at you and me for answers. If we are not able to find the answers then who will? Can we simply depend on the politicians to find answers? Can we simply depend on the religious community, faith community to find the answers? If the intellectuals, the people who have the good heart are not able to find the answers, who will? Who are these children, where are they? These are figures but no clear identification has been made. And the number for last 3 or 4 years is not going down, it is stagnated because these children are hard to reach children. These children are living in emergency situations. You must be wearing clothes, you must be wearing shoes, you must be using for your footballs and other things produced by children like them. they are working in extremely appalling hazardous conditions in human conditions. And in the year 2015, when we were talking, of not only talking, we have already conquered Mars, I had these school children, I have freed one, two hundred thousands of children in my work. And when a child asked Then I had no answer. Why are the children sold for a 10% or 20% price of an animal? Are we really civilized? Big question comes to my mind. And that makes me angry, that makes me angry. Though you can see me as peace laureate, but I know that peace can never come without equity and justice, without education in the lives of all these children. Education is the biggest enabler for peaceful societies, and sustainable societies. As I said, these are not figures. I was in Ivory Coast recently talking to a child who was working in a cocoa farm, cocoa field. And you know cocoa is the code ingredient for chocolate. All of you might be enjoying chocolate, one time or another. You must be giving gifts to your friends and families, chocolate gifts. But when I asked to this 14-year-old or 15-year-old boy, how do you like chocolates? He asked, "What chocolate?" That's the sweet candy, I was trying to explain chocolate but he could not understand, because he has never seen or tasted chocolate. A child who is losing all his childhoods, I saw the scars on his hands and legs while producing cocoa beans in the field had never tasted chocolate. I asked, "Do you want to go to school if you are freed?" He smiled, he said, "It is too late." I was with my colleagues and we have freed the group of girls from the streets of Columbia. And this girl was working as domestic helper and then thrown on the street. And she was selling small things like flowers and so on. She was also about 15 years old. I asked, that now you are free, do you want to go to school? She said, "It is too late for me." She was a victim of multiple rapes and sexual abuse and she has no idea whose child was he. For her it is too late. I was in Pakistan and also sometimes in my country, India, and talking to some children who are stitching footballs and I saw when they were trying to stitch carefully, sometimes the needle goes inside their fingers, the blood comes out, they suck the blood, start working again. And the group of children when I asked, My dear children, what do you want to become in the future? They had no answer, they had no dream. I asked again and again, do you have any dream? They had no dream. What else could be a bigger sin than denial of dreams of these children? Education gives us dreams, and we have excluded these children from education. After a while this child said, one of them said, He has never played with that football. And right from the football companies, to the players, they are making millions, hundreds of millions of dollars. If we ignore comfortably, conveniently, if we keep on ignoring these hard facts of our society, then we cannot make a peaceful world. We have to address it now with the sense of emergency. Friends, so many children are denied education. They are excluded because of several reasons. As I said, millions of children are working as child labourers. We cannot reach to them and bring them back to school gates, school doors. Children who are suffering from HIV and AIDS, we are not able to address them properly. It is not their fault. No child has ever created war. No child has ever fought wars, not responsible for any kind of insurgency or war but they are the worst sufferers. We are not able to mainstream them in our lives, we cannot give them, we are not able to give them a respectful life and they are not in schools, many of them, most of them. These are the hardest to reach children. And that's why when we talk of education, we cannot simply ensure education without inclusion, without equity, and without quality. Of course, some children get the best quality education. Education has become a commodity. If some people can buy expensive education as expensive commodity, they can get good quality or even best quality education, even in poorer countries. But at the cost of other children who are left behind and that is creating an enormous amount of social tensions. This is resulting in irreparable loss of homogenous society building. This is resulting in big challenges for a sustainable society and this is happening. And many times these issues are clubbed with ecological emergencies or global warming issues, where the people are losing their traditional livelihoods, migrating, trafficed to cities and towns, some of them are a kind of a refugees in their own countries in search of livelihood and they are not treated well in big cities in towns and urban setups. So many problems are clubbed together. If we are able to ensure good quality education in their schools, in their villages, in their communities then many of such problems will never occur. Friends, it is possible. As I said, the number of out of school children has been reduced by half in the last 15 years. The number of child labourers has also been reduced from 260 million to 168 million, we have made progress. The infant mortality rate has become half in the last 15 years or so. So we can do it. But what is needed? Social concern and movement. The movement in society, I'm not talking about political movement. The movement inside each one of us, the movement in schools, colleges, universities, movement in the community for inclusive education for all children. And that requires much more spending on education. What is the scenario today? primary education but only 110 follow it. And also in those 110 countries, in most cases, there are some hidden costs involved in education. So school fees are free but uniform and some other things are needed, syllabus books. So it is not completely free for the poor children. We all know the power of education, the economic power of education. There is a Worldbank report recently released, that was a study conducted in 50 countries and it has proven that just basic education in a country can help in enhancing 0.33% of GDP each year. But if good quality education and secondary education is provided, then the GDP growth rate becomes 1% and onwards. Very direct economic gains. There's another study of ILO and UNESCO which reveals that one single year of primary education for a child helps 5 to 15% increase in earnings when the child becomes older. And each single year of secondary education will increase the earning 15 to 25% in the later stage of life. So education has a strong economic aspect which we cannot ignore. But what has happened between 2010 and '12? There was a 65% decrease in education funding. Most of the countries in the world are spending, developing countries I mean, spending 2 to 4% of the GDP in education, and these are big questions. It's not a big deal I tell you. Only 22 billion dollars can educate our children every year, 22 billion dollars. And what is this 22 billion dollars? This is 4.5 days of military expenditures. This is equivalent to what? Not equivalent actually, it is one-fifth of what the Americans spend in tobacco, or one-fourth of what Europeans spent on cosmetics, so 22 billion dollars is not a big deal. We can do it, if we have political will, if we have social momentum. If we have demand from the public and well-meaning people who care for the society and for the world. Friends, we need teachers but look at a country like Syria, the number of soldiers is 2.5 times more than the teachers. And the country like Eritrea, the number of soldiers is 25 times more than the teachers. So children are not our priority. Dear friends, we have to make our children our priority. We have to raise the voice of scientists, we have to raise the voice as social workers, as journalists, as politicians, as faith leaders. We have to stand up for our children if we want to make this world a better world. Friends, my time is over but I'll take another minute if you allow to sum up. I know you are hungry, you wanted to go for lunch and I am also hungry. As I said, if we are able to enhance budgetary allocations, if we are able to prioritize the situation of the hardest to reach children, if we have enough schools and quality teachers, we can bring about changes in the society through education, that is possible. I, you might be aware that three major things are going to happen in coming months. The most important is sustainable development goals, they are going to replace the Millennium Development Goals in September General Assembly. There are many interesting things, the sustainable development goals have much more clear and stronger language on equitable and inclusive education, thanks to International Community. But I have been campaigning and I also wanted to seek your support and urge to be the partner in that. That we keep on ingoring 5.5 million child slaves in the world. And their number is not reducing, their number is not coming down, that is stable for the last 15, 20 years according to the United Nations. But the people like me think that the number has been increasing. The independent studies proved that it is more than 8 million, it has grown from 5.5 million to 8 million. There is no mentioning of child slavery in the future development agenda. And we are demanding an explicit language for abolition of child slavery in the future development goals, sustainable development goals. The second thing which is going to take place next week, in fact, in Oslo and is the financing for education meeting. We must demand, which has been an agreed principle in Incheon last month, when the International Community gathered together for the new education agenda, the demand was that between 4 to 6% of GDP must be spent on education. Between 15 to 20% of all State Development Aids must be spent on education, that has been the agreed principle. And we are asking the International Community to adhere to this agreed principle and I seek your support for that also. And the third important thing which is taking place is the Financing for Development Summit in Addis Ababa next month. So in most of these high profile political deliberations and discussions, discourses, the children are largely ignored. We must be the voice of the children because they are all our children. Children are rising up, young people are rising up all across the world, they are opposing child marriages. That is a silver lining, that's a great achievement. Young people are rising up and asking for good quality education. They are rising up against injustices occurring in our society around us, they are fighting for justice and equality in society. So we have to listen to the voices of young people and many of you all, You can be the voices in your own discipline in science and other technologically disciplines, you can speak on behalf of children and that is not too difficult. Your fingers are always on your small devices and you are playing with them. And sometimes you are just busy your social media issues, maybe your girlfriend, or boyfriend, or your friends. You are good at that, I know, so why can't you sometimes use your mind, your heart, and your soul, and your fingers on your smart phones and computers to raise the voices on behalf of all these children. And laureates, some of you, I can see your faces here and I would urgently request you that if your moral voices, if your outreach, if your power could be harnessed for the cause of these children, then we will have a much more beautiful world for our children. And ours should be the last generation. Ours should be the last generation to say with pride that we have seen and we have made the end of child slavery and exclusion of children and illiteracy of children a history. So that in the future, our generations, the coming generations will learn only in the history books that there was an evil called illiteracy, there was an evil called child slavery and child trafficking and all those things. And I would come back to you. I'm not going to leave. My dear laureates, I request you to join the demand for more financing for education and inclusive, equitable, and quality education for all children in the world. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Thank you.

Sehr geehrte Preisträger und Nachwuchswissenschaftler, unser Zusammenkommen hier neigt sich nun langsam dem Ende zu. Und ich möchte die Gelegenheit ergreifen, mich nochmals hier in der Inselhalle an Sie zu wenden. Ich denke, dass unser Treffen hier in Lindau bisher wunderbar war und ich möchte nochmals den Preisträger applaudieren, die dies ermöglicht haben. Ich danke Ihnen. Nicht zu vergessen sind all jene, die sehr hart gearbeitet haben, damit diese Tagung zu einem Erfolg wurde, denn, wie bereits erwähnt, nach der Tagung bedeutet vor der Tagung, nach der Tagung 2014 war vor der Tagung 2015. Und ich möchte den wissenschaftlichen Vorsitzenden und dem ganzen Team danken. Und ich habe hier einige Dankesworte hinter mir, Sie lesen das, während ich spreche. Darf ich weiterreden? Aber leider, nein, zum Glück sind wir noch nicht fertig. Wir haben weitere, wundervolle Termine wie zum Beispiel der Ausflug nach Mainau morgen. Und auch das wird ein Tag, obwohl er nicht hier in der Halle oder irgendwo anders in Lindau stattfindet, ein Tag voller Dialoge und Interaktion werden, mit einem wissenschaftlichen Picknick nach unserem Abschlusspodium morgen auf Mainau. Und ich möchte Ihnen diesen Tipp geben; es wird ein richtiges Picknick, man sitzt auf dem Boden, denken Sie also morgen bei Ihrer Kleiderwahl daran. Und es wird morgen sehr heiß werden. Ich rate, einen Hut mitzunehmen, denn es wird sehr warm und sonnig werden. Wir werden einen Platz im Schatten suchen, aber ich möchte Sie bitten, einen Hut mitzunehmen. Und noch etwas, beachten Sie morgen bitte die Uhrzeiten, denn wir nehmen ein Boot in dem etwa 900 Menschen mitfahren und es wäre schwierig umzudrehen, um ein oder zwei Personen abzuholen, die zu spät dran sind. Also bitte pünktlich kommen, denn wenn das Boot weg ist, ist es weg. Wir finden eine Weg, Sie nach Mainau zu bringen und abzuholen, aber das wird nicht so amüsant werden sein, denn es werden keine Preisträger oder Studenten zum unterhalten da sein und wenn Sie mit Ihnen sprechen möchten, dann sollten Sie pünktlich eintreffen. Aber ich möchte jetzt über den anstehenden Vortrag sprechen. Und wie im Programm zu sehen ist, wird er von Kailash Satyarthi gehalten. Er wurde im Jahr 2014 zusammen mit Malala Yousafzai mit dem Friedensnobelpreis ausgezeichnet für den Kampf gegen die Unterdrückung von Kindern und Jugendlichen und für das Recht aller Kinder auf Bildung. Und ich bin glücklich und fühle mich vor allem geehrt, dass Kailash Satyarthi unserer Einladung nach Lindau gefolgt ist und zu Ihnen spricht, denn es geht um ein sehr wichtiges Thema. Und ich denke, dass Sie das bereits gestern Abend erlebt haben. An dieser Stelle möchte ich mit Ihnen ein Erlebnis teilen. Vor kurzem besuchte ich Nepal und auf meiner Reise besuchte ich einige kooperative Entwicklungsarbeitsprojekte, zusammen mit einem meiner Söhne, der damals 18 war. Und auf unserer Reise trafen wir einige Kamalari- Kinder, überwiegend Mädchen. Ich weiß nicht, wer von Ihnen weiß, was Kamalari-Kinder sind. Es handelt sich leider um eine ziemlich grausame Tradition, bei der Kinder ab 6 Jahren arbeiten bis sie 10, 12, 16 sind. Die meisten werden von den Familien, bei denen sie arbeiten nicht schlecht behandelt, aber sie bekommen keine Ausbildung. Die Projekte also, die wir besucht haben, oh, das ist alles positiv, ich sollte nicht weinen. Das Projekt bietet diesen Mädchen und Jungen die Möglichkeit, nach Ihrer Befreiung von Kamalari eine Ausbildung zu erhalten. Und es ist sehr faszinierend, was diese Kinder machen. Sie laufen jeden Tag bis zu zwei Stunden in die Schule, hin und zurück, eine Stunde. Sie kümmern sich um ihre Familien, bevor sie gehen und wenn sie zurückkommen. Sie haben sehr lange Tage, von vier Uhr morgens bis 11 Uhr abends. Und nachdem wir mit diesen Kindern und Jugendlichen gesprochen hatten, sagte mein Sohn zu mir: „Ich fühle mich jetzt richtig schlecht, weil ich die Schule manchmal gehasst habe." Und von diesem Tag an war er ein sehr engagierter Botschafter für Schulen. Und ich erzähle Ihnen das, weil Sie auch einmal Eltern sein werden. Ich sah Sie alle die Finger heben, als Harry Kroto das gefragt hat und deshalb habe ich beschlossen, es zu erzählen. Jetzt ist es mir eine Freude, Kailash Satyarthi zu begrüßen. Ich hoffe, dass er hier zu mir auf die Bühne kommt und zu uns allen spricht. Willkommen. Sehr geehrte Preisträger und meine lieben jungen Freunde, als ich nach Lindau eingeladen wurde, wusste ich, dass das einer der wichtigsten und am meisten geschätzten Orte für Wissenschaftler aller Disziplinen ist. Und ich frage mich, was ich da sollte. Dann fand ich zwei Begründungen. Die eine war, dass sich, obwohl ich kein Nobelpreisträger der Wissenschaftsdisziplinen bin, als Kind sehr gut in naturwissenschaftlichen Fächern war. Da ich fast immer die besten Noten in Mathematik und Wissenschaft bekam, wollten meine Eltern, dass ich Professor oder Wissenschaftler werde. Dann fanden sie, dass es richtig wäre, mich zum Ingenieur zu machen. Ich wurde also Ingenieur und unterrichtete etwa anderthalb Jahre an der Universität, um eine Vorstellung von der Wissenschaft zu bekommen und dachte, dass ich hierher kommen sollte. Der zweite Grund war, dass ich dachte, dass jeder Wissenschaftler, der hier spricht, und die jungen Freunde, die hier sitzen, die jungen Wissenschaftler, alle einmal Kinder waren in ihrem Leben. Und die süßesten und wertvollsten Erinnerungen sind unsere Kindheitserinnerungen, Erinnerungen an Freiheit, Reinheit, Lerndrang und viele andere Dinge. Seit ich mich für Kinder einsetze, seit den letzten etwa 35 Jahren, denke ich, dass es gut ist, an die eigenen Kindheitserinnerungen anzuknüpfen und an die von Millionen anderer Kinder. Ich fühlte mich überwältigt inmitten der Vielfalt und Fülle von Wissen, aber viel wichtiger ist das Gefühl, sich inmitten moralischer Autoritäten zu fühlen. Sie sind nicht nur Wissenschaftler, Sie haben auch Autorität und Macht, liebe Preisträger. Und auch unter jungen Wissenschaftler zu sein. Nichts übertrifft Ihren Idealismus, Ihr Potenzial, Energie und Fähigkeiten. Ich weiß, dass ich mich inmitten der derzeitigen und möglicherweise auch zukünftigen Preisträger befinde. Freunde, stellen Sie sich kurz vor, sagen wir, 700 Menschen wären hier und 100 könnten weder lesen noch schreiben. Wie wäre das, kann das sein? Dies ist Realität. Circa eine von sieben Personen auf unserem Planeten kann weder lesen noch schreiben. Was hat uns dazu gebracht, bei dieser wichtigen Veranstaltung dabei zu sein? Es könnte die Veranstalter sein, es könnte Ihr Wissensdrang sein, Ihre Entschlossenheit, Ihr Engagement für eine bessere Welt, aber Hauptfaktor ist die Bildung. Hätten wir keine Bildung, wären wir nicht hier. hätten wir keine Bildung, könnten wir nicht davon träumen, die Gesellschaft und die Welt zu verändern. Bildung ist Macht. Sie ist der mächtigste Wegbereiter und Ausgleicher. Sie ist der Schlüssel zur Nachhaltigkeit, zur Gleichstellung, auch der Geschlechter, sozialen Gerechtigkeit und Entwicklung. Sie ist das Recht, die Grundlage, auf die sich die Rechte von Leben und Gesellschaft stützen. Sonst gäbe es keine. Aber diejenigen, die die Macht der Bildung kennen, sind nicht in der Lage, Bildung für alle Kinder und Menschen in der Welt zu garantieren. Aber ein anderer Teil der Gesellschaft versteht die Macht der Bildung und das sind fundamentalistischen Kräfte, terroristische Kräfte. Und diese Kräfte bedrohen die Bildung heutzutage. Erst vor wenigen Monaten haben Sie vielleicht gelesen, dass 132 College-Studenten an einer Universität in Kenia erschossen wurden. Vielleicht wissen Sie auch, dass vor einigen Monaten, am späten Morgen etwa 400 Schüler in den Klassenzimmern in Peshawar, Pakistan saßen, als plötzlich Terroristen hereinstürmten und 132 Schüler, kleine Kinder töteten. Ich schämte mich und weinte. Als ich mit einer Mutter in Pakistan sprach, sagte sie: Er war spät dran und deshalb mahnte ich ihn, nicht herumzutrödeln. Irgendwie kam er in der Schule an, aber ich erhielt ihn in einem Sarg zurück." Sie erzählte auch, dass sein Körper mit Kugeln übersäht war, aber dass die Bücher in seiner Tasche und auch die Wasserflasche unversehrt waren und keine Kugel abbekommen hatten. Und sie verfluchte, dass ihr Sohn nicht gerettet worden war. Mehr als ein Jahr ist vergangen und wir haben keine Ahnung, ob sie noch leben oder tot sind. Ob sie an Bordelle verkauft wurden oder was mit ihnen passiert ist, keine Ahnung. Vor wenigen Tagen haben vielleicht einige von euch in den Zeitungen Bilder gesehen oder gelesen, dass junge Mädchen in Syrien, aus Schulen und Häusern entführt wurden, 6, 8 Jahre alte Mädchen, die als Sex-Sklavinnen verkauft wurden, zu einem Preis von weniger als einer Schachtel Zigaretten. Ein 7-jähriger Junge wurde, als er keine Waffe halten konnte um den Gegner zu töten, von der ISIS lebendig begraben. Diese Bilder - können wir uns als zivilisiert bezeichnen? Können wir uns als kultiviert bezeichnen? Als weiterentwickelt? Wenn solche Dinge fast täglich geschehen? Diese Kräfte haben die Macht der Bildung zur Gänze verstanden und deshalb versuchen sie, alles zur Gänze zu zerstören. Sie verbreiten Angst bei den jungen Menschen dieser Länder. Das ist ein neues Phänomen, das in den letzten Jahren zugenommen hat. In Syrien und dem Iran, Nigeria, in verschiedenen Teilen der Welt. Denken Sie kurz darüber nach, wessen Kinder das sind. Sie erkennen, dass ich Wissenschaftler bin, ich forsche in meinem eigenen Bereich. Denken Sie nach! Ich weiß, dass Ihre Forschungen Positives bringt und die Welt zu einer besseren Welt machen wird. Aber denken Sie darüber nach, wessen Kinder das sind, in was für einer Welt wir leben. Sie alle sind unsere Kinder. Sie alle sind unsere Kinder. Wenn Sie das nicht denken, wenn Sie nicht alle Kinder als Ihre eigenen ansehen, dann wird die Welt nie zu einer schöneren Welt für alle werden. Liebe Freunde, das ist die 65. Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertagung und fast zeitgleich vor 65, 66 Jahren hat die internationale Gemeinschaft die Bildung als Grundrecht der Allgemeinen Erklärung anerkannt. Es ist eines der Menschenrechte. Aber was geschah mit diesem Recht? Seit 40 Jahren wird ihm keine Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Die Internationale Gemeinschaft hat nie zusammengesessen und diskutiert, wie man ein Grundrecht auf Bildung für alle sichert. Nur 1990 in Jomtien, als das erste Forum für die Bildung einberufen wurde, gab es den bekannten Slogan "Bildung für alle bis 2000". Aber es passierte nichts hinsichtlich Budgetzuweisungen, Kontrollen, Verantwortung, nichts. So etwa im Jahr 2000, als die internationale Gemeinschaft sich wieder in Dakar in Senegal traf, brachten Leute wie ich und meine Freunde einen Punkt ein. Einen grundlegenden Punkt, dass nämlich die Anzahl der Kinder ohne Schulbildung von 75 auf 130 Millionen angestiegen war. Was hatten wir erreicht? Eine negative Entwicklung. Die Zahl der Analphabeten stieg weltweit von 750 Millionen auf 880 Millionen. Mehr Kinder wurden ausgeschlossen, mehr Erwachsene wurden von der Ausbildung ausgeschlossen. Ohne Gesundheit, Schutz, Entwicklung, Gleichheit und so weiter, Gerechtigkeit, kein Zugang zu alledem. Und die meisten von ihnen gehen hungrig zu Bett. Es sind die Menschen, die unter der Armutsgrenze leben. Es sind die Menschen, die kein sauberes Trinkwasser haben. Menschen, die an allen möglichen Krankheiten leiden und Elend erfahren. Und wir wachen sehr spät auf, wenn so etwas wie Ebola ausbricht. und die Anzahl der Analphabeten unter den Erwachsenen bis dahin zu halbieren. Viele andere Dinge und Verpflichtungen, aber grundlegendes Ziel war, dass alle Kinder eine Grundbildung, Grundschulbildung erhalten würden. Einige Fortschritte wurden auf jeden Fall gemacht; die Zivilgesellschaft wurde während dieser 15 Jahre sehr stark. Und die Anzahl der Kinder, die keine Schule besuchen, wurde um die Hälfte oder mehr reduziert. Derzeit besuchen 58 Millionen Kinder keine Schule. Aber diese 58 Millionen Kinder, die in nicht zur Schule gehen, haben noch nie eine Schule besucht oder 250 Millionen Kinder konnten keine weiterführenden Schulen besuchen oder fast die gleiche Anzahl von Kindern konnte in der Grundschule nicht lesen und schreiben lernen. Das sind nicht nur Zahlen. Jede Zahl hat ein Gesicht. Und hat Augen, mit denen sie mich oder Sie anschauen und auf Antworten warten. Wenn wir keine Antworten finden, wer dann? Sollen wir das einfach den Politikern überlassen? Können wir es den religiösen Gemeinschaften, Glaubensgemeinschaft überlassen, die Antworten zu finden? Wenn die Intellektuellen, die Leute, die ein gutes Herz haben, keine Antworten finden, wer dann? Wer sind diese Kinder, wo sind sie? Das sind Zahlen, aber sie wurden nicht klar zugeordnet. Und die Zahlen der letzten 3 oder 4 Jahren sind nicht gesunken, sie stagnieren, denn diese Kinder sind schwer zu erreichende Kinder. Diese Kinder leben in Notsituationen. Ihr tragt Kleidung, ihr tragt Schuhe für euer Fußballspiel und anderes, was von den Kindern wie ihnen produziert wird. sie arbeiten unter extrem gefährlichen und unter entsetzlichen menschlichen Bedingungen. Und im Jahr 2015, als wir davon redeten, nicht nur zu reden, wir hatten bereits den Mars erreicht, aber 5,5 Millionen Kinder sind versklavt. Ich hatte diese Schulkinder, ich habe ein-, zweihundert Tausende Kinder von der Arbeit befreit. Und als ein Kind fragte: Darauf wusste ich keine Antwort. Warum werden Kinder zu 10% oder 20% des Preises eines Tieres verkauft? Sind wir wirklich zivilisiert? Eine große Frage kommt da auf. Und das macht mich wütend, das macht mich wütend. Zwar können Sie mich als Friedenspreisträger ansehen, aber ich weiß, dass es Frieden niemals ohne Gleichheit und Gerechtigkeit geben wird, ohne Bildung im Leben all dieser Kinder. Bildung ist der größte Wegbereiter für friedliche Gesellschaften und nachhaltige Gesellschaften. Wie ich bereits erwähnte, handelt es sich nicht um Zahlen. Ich habe vor kurzem an der Elfenbeinküste mit einem Kind geredet, das auf einer Kakaofarm, einem Kakao-Feld arbeitet. Und Sie wissen, der Kakao ist Hauptbestandteil der Schokolade. Alle von Ihnen gönnen sich hin und wieder einmal Schokolade. Sie werden Freunden und Familien etwas schenken, Schokolade. Aber als ich diesen 14- oder 15-jährigen Jungen fragte, ob er Schokolade mag, fragte er: „Welche Schokolade?" Das ist eine Süßigkeit, ich versuchte, ihm Schokolade zu erklären, aber er verstand es nicht, weil er Schokolade noch nie gesehen oder gegessen hatte. Ein Kind, dass die ganze Kindheit verpasst, ich sah die Narben an den Händen und Beinen, weil es Kakaobohnen auf der Farm bearbeitete, hatte noch nie Schokolade gegessen. Ich fragte: „Willst du zur Schule gehen, wenn du befreit wirst?" Er lächelte und sagte: „Dafür ist es zu spät." Ich habe mit meinen Kollegen eine Gruppe von Mädchen aus den Straßen von Kolumbien befreit. Und ein Mädchen hatte als Haushaltshilfe gearbeitet und war dann vor die Tür gesetzt worden. Und sie verkaufte kleine Dinge wie etwa Blumen. Auch sie war etwa 15 Jahre alt. Ich fragte sie, jetzt wo die frei bist, willst du jetzt zur Schule gehen? Sie sagte: „Für mich ist es zu spät." Sie war Opfer von mehreren Vergewaltigungen und sexuellen Missbrauch geworden und wusste nicht, von wem das Kind war. Für sie ist es zu spät. Ich war in Pakistan und auch manchmal in meinem Land, Indien, und ich sprach mit einigen Kindern, die Fußbälle zusammennähen und ich sah, dass, als sie versuchten, sorgfältig zu nähen, sich mit der Nadel in den Finger stachen, das Blut herauskam und sie das Blut aufsaugen und weiter arbeiteten. Und als ich die Gruppe von Kindern fragte, was sie mit ihrer Zukunft machen wollten, hatten sie keine Antwort, keinen Traum. Ich fragte sie immer und immer wieder: „Habt ihr keine Träume?‘‘ Sie hatten keine Träume. Was kann eine größere Sünde sein, als diesen Kindern ihre Träume zu nehmen? Bildung schafft Träume, und wir haben diese Kinder von der Bildung ausgeschlossen. Nach einer Weile sagte eines dieser Kinder: Er hat nie mit diesem Fußball gespielt. Und von den Fußball-Unternehmen bis zu den Spielern verdienen sie Millionen, Hunderte Millionen von Dollar. Wenn wir bequem weiter ignorieren, wenn wir weiterhin dieser harten Gesellschaftsfakten ignorieren, dann können wir keine friedliche Welt schaffen. Wir müssen uns jetzt mit einem Gefühl der Dringlichkeit darum kümmern. Freunde, so vielen Kindern wird die Bildung verwehrt. Sie werden aus verschiedenen Gründen ausgeschlossen. Wie ich bereits sagte, arbeiten Millionen von Kindern als Kinderarbeiter. Wir können sie nicht erreichen und wieder zurück an die Schulpforten, die Klassenzimmertüren bringen. Kinder, die an HIV und AIDS leiden, wir kommen nicht an sie heran. Das ist nicht ihre Schuld. Kein Kind hat jemals einen Krieg begonnen. Kein Kind hat jemals gekämpft und ist verantwortlich für Aufstände oder Kriege, aber sie trifft es am schlimmsten. Wir können sie nicht in unser Leben einbinden, ihnen etwas geben, ihnen ein respektvolles Leben schenken und sie gehen nicht zur Schulen, viele von ihnen, die meisten von ihnen. Es ist am schwersten, diese Kinder zu erreichen. Und wenn es um Bildung geht, können wir nicht einfach Bildung ohne Eingliederung garantieren, ohne Gleichheit und ohne Qualität. Natürlich erhalten einige Kinder die beste Ausbildung. Bildung wird zur Ware. Wenn einige Menschen eine teure Ausbildung wie eine Ware kaufen können, dann können sie auch eine gute oder sogar die beste Ausbildung erwerben, auch in ärmeren Ländern. Aber auf Kosten der anderen Kinder, die zurückgelassen werden, und das führt zu enormen soziale Spannungen. Dies führt zu einem irreparablen Verlust der homogenen Gesellschaftsstruktur. Dies hat große Herausforderungen für eine nachhaltige Gesellschaft zur Folge und es passiert bereits. Und oftmals steht die Thematik mit ökologischen Notlagen oder der globalen Erwärmung in Verbindung, wo die Menschen ihre traditionellen Existenzgrundlage verlieren, migrieren, Städte und Gemeinden verlassen, einige von ihnen sind eine Art von Flüchtlingen im eigenen Land, auf der Suche nach Lebensunterhalt und sie werden in den großen Städten und Vorstädten schlecht behandelt. So viele Probleme türmen sich aufeinander. Wenn wir eine gute Ausbildung in ihren Schulen ihren Dörfern, ihren Gemeinden gewährleisten können, dann wird es viele dieser Probleme niemals geben. Freunde, das ist machbar. Die Zahl der Kinder, die keine Schule besuchen, wurde bereits um die Hälfte in den letzten 15 Jahren reduziert. Die Zahl der Kinderarbeiter hat sich ebenfalls von 260 Millionen auf 168 Millionen verringert, wir haben Fortschritte gemacht. Die Kindersterblichkeit hat sich um die Hälfte in den letzten 15 Jahren verringert. Ich weiß, dass wir es schaffen können. Aber was brauchen wir? Soziales Engagement und eine gesellschaftliche Bewegung. Die Bewegung in der Gesellschaft, ich spreche nicht von der politischen Bewegung. Die Bewegung, die in jedem von uns steckt, die Bewegung an Schulen, Hochschulen, Universitäten, Bewegung in der Gemeinschaft für eine inklusive Bildung aller Kinder. Und das erfordert viel mehr Ausgaben für die Bildung. Wie ist die Lage heute? der Grundschulbildung, aber nur 110 haben sie befolgt. Und auch in den 110 Ländern sind in den meisten Fällen versteckte Kosten in der Bildung involviert. Ich weiß, es gibt keine Schulgebühren, aber die Uniform und andere Dinge werden benötigt, Schulbücher. Ich weiß, dass es ist nicht komplett umsonst ist für die armen Kinder. Wir alle kennen die Macht der Bildung, die Wirtschaftskraft der Bildung. Es wurde vor kurzem ein Bericht der Weltbank veröffentlicht, über eine in 50 Ländern durchgeführte Studie und es hat sich gezeigt, dass alleine die Grundbildung in einem Land das BIP pro Jahr um 0,33% steigern kann. Aber wenn eine gute Ausbildung und Sekundarschulbildung vorhanden ist, dann wird die Wachstumsrate des BIP 1% und mehr betragen. Sehr eindeutige wirtschaftliche Vorteile. Es gibt eine weitere Studie der IAO und der UNESCO die zeigen, dass ein einziges Schuljahr eines Kindes zu einer 5 bis 15% Ergebnissteigerung beiträgt, wenn das Kind älter wird. Und jedes einzelne Jahr der Sekundarstufe erhöht den Gewinn um 15 bis 25% in der späteren Lebensphase. Bildung hat also einen starken, wirtschaftlichen Aspekt, den wir nicht ignorieren können. Aber was ist zwischen 2010 und 2012 passiert? Es gab eine 65%-ige Abnahme der Bildungsfinanzierung. Die meisten Länder in der Welt geben, ich meine die Entwicklungsländer, Es ist keine große Sache, sage ich Ihnen. Nur 22 Milliarden US-Dollar könnten unsere Kinder ausbilden, jedes Jahr, 22 Milliarden Dollar. Und was sind diese 22 Milliarden Dollar? Das sind 4,5 Tage der Militärausgaben. Was entspricht das? Tatsächlich ist es nicht gleichwertig, ein Fünftel dessen, was die Amerikaner für Tabak ausgeben, oder ein Viertel von dem, was die Europäer für Kosmetika ausgegeben, 22 Milliarden Dollar ist also keine große Sache. Wir können es schaffen, wenn wir den politischen Willen haben, soziale Dynamik zeigen. Wenn die Öffentlichkeit und die engagierten Menschen, die sich um die Gesellschaft und die Welt kümmern, es fordern. Freunde, wir brauchen Lehrer, schaut euch ein Land wie Syrien an, die Zahl der Soldaten ist 2,5-mal höher als die der Lehrer. Und in einem Land wie Eritrea ist die Zahl der Soldaten 25 Mal höher als die der Lehrer. Kinder sind also nicht unsere Priorität. Liebe Freunde, wir müssen unsere Kinder zu unserer Priorität machen. Wissenschaftler müssen die Stimme erheben, wir als Sozialarbeiter müssen die Stimme erheben, als Journalisten, als Politiker, als Glaubensführer. Wir müssen uns für unsere Kinder einsetzen, wenn wir diese Welt zu einer besseren Welt machen wollen. Freunde, meine Zeit ist um, aber ich nehme mir noch eine Minute, um zusammenzufassen. Ich weiß, dass Sie hungrig seid, Mittagessen wollen, und das will ich auch. Wie gesagt, wir können die Budgetzuweisungen verbessern wenn wir die Situation der am schwersten zu erreichenden Kinder zu unserer Priorität machen, wenn wir genügend Schulen und qualifizierte Lehrer haben, können wir Änderungen in der Gesellschaft bewirken, durch Bildung, das ist möglich. Vielleicht wissen Sie, dass in den kommenden Monaten drei wichtige Dinge passieren werden. Das wichtigste sind die Ziele der nachhaltigen Entwicklung, sie werden die Millenniums-Entwicklungsziele im September bei der Generalversammlung ersetzen. Es gibt viele interessante Dinge, die Ziele der nachhaltigen Entwicklung haben viel deutlichere und stärkere Aussagen, was eine gerechte und inklusive Bildung angeht, dank der internationalen Gemeinschaft. Aber ich habe eine Kampagne gestartet und ich möchte auch Ihr Unterstützung und dass Sie Partner werden. Dass wir 5,5 Millionen Kindersklaven in der Welt ignorieren. Und ihre Zahl reduziert sich nicht, Ihre Zahl sinkt nicht, sie ist in den letzten 15, 20 Jahren laut der Vereinten Nationen stabil. Aber Leute wie ich denken, dass sie angestiegen ist. Unabhängige Studien bewiesen, dass sie höher als 8 Millionen ist, von 5.5 Millionen auf 8 Millionen angestiegen ist. Die Kindersklaverei wird in der zukünftigen Entwicklungsagenda nicht erwähnt. Und wir fordern klare Aussagen für die Abschaffung der Kindersklaverei bei den Entwicklungszielen, den Zielen der nachhaltigen Entwicklung. Der zweite Punkt ist, dass nächste Woche in Oslo ein Treffen stattfindet, das Financing for Education Meeting. Wir müssen einfordern, was letzten Monat in Incheon als Prinzip vereinbart wurde, als sich die internationale Gemeinschaft für die neue Bildungsagenda versammelte, nämlich dass 4 bis 6% des BIP für Bildung ausgegeben werden muss. Und wir fordern, dass die internationale Gemeinschaft dieses Prinzip einhält und ich möchte auch Ihre Unterstützung dafür. Und die drittwichtigste Sache, die stattfind, ist der Entwicklungsfinanzierungsgipfel in Addis Abeba im nächsten Monat. In den meisten dieser hochkarätigen politischen Gespräche und Diskussionen, Diskurse, werden Kinder weitgehend ignoriert. Wir müssen die Stimme der Kinder werden, da sie alle unsere Kinder sind. Kinder erheben sich, junge Menschen auf der ganzen Welt erheben sich, widersetzen sich Kinderehen. Das ist ein Silberstreifen am Horizont, ein großer Erfolg. Junge Menschen erheben sich und fordern eine gute Ausbildung. Sie erheben sich gegen die Ungerechtigkeit in unserer Gesellschaft, sie kämpfen für die Gerechtigkeit und Gleichheit in der Gesellschaft. Wir müssen auf die Stimmen der jungen Menschen hören und viele von euch, Ihr könnt die Stimme eurer eigenen wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen und anderer technologischen Disziplinen sein, im Namen der Kinder sprechen und das ist nicht allzu schwierig. Eure Finger bewegen sich immer auf euren kleinen technischen Spielzeugen und ihr spielt damit. Und manchmal seid ihr beschäftigt mit Social-Media-Themen, vielleicht mit eurer Freundin oder dem Freund oder Freunden. Ihr seid gut darin, dass weiß ich, warum könnt ihr also nicht ab und zu euren Verstand, euer Herz, eure Seele und eure Finger auf euren Smartphones und Computern benutzen, um die Stimmen im Namen all dieser Kinder zu erhöhen? Und Preisträger, einige von euch, ich kann eure Gesichter hier sehen, ich bitten euch eindringlich, dass wenn ihr eure moralischen Stimmen, eure Kontakte, eure Macht für das Anliegen Kinder dieser Kinder eingesetzt, dann wird es für unsere Kinder eine viel schönere Welt geben. Und die Unsrigen werden die letzte Generation sein. Wir sollten die letzte Generation sein, die mit Stolz verkündet, dass wir der Kindersklaverei, der Ausgrenzung von Kindern und dem Analphabetismus von Kindern ein Ende gesetzt haben. Sodass in Zukunft, die kommenden Generationen nur aus den Geschichtsbüchern wissen, dass etwas Böses existierte, das sich Analphabetismus, Kindersklaverei nannte, und Kinderhandel und all diese Dinge. Und ich komme auf euch zu. Ich gehe nicht weg. Meine lieben Preisträger, ich bitte euch, euch der Forderung nach mehr Finanzmitteln für Bildung anzuschließen, für eine integrative, gerechte und qualitativ hochwertige Bildung für alle Kinder in der Welt. Ich danke Ihnen. Ich danke Ihnen. Ich danke Ihnen. Danke.

Kailash Satyarthi points out the power of education as a key to sustainable development
(00:11:55 - 00:12:52)

 

As with all major targets regarding the improvement of life on Earth, research on global warming, the changing climate and low-emission energy sources has to be a common project, forming new partnerships and international cooperation. To quote the 2015 Mainau Declaration, “This endeavour will require the cooperation of all nations, whether developed or developing, and must be sustained into the future in accord with updated scientific assessments”.

 

Further Reading on Global Warming:

http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/current_ghg.html

https://www.ft.com/content/8925cbb4-7157-11e3-8f92-00144feabdc0

Cubasch, U., D. Wuebbles, D. Chen, M.C. Facchini, D. Frame, N. Mahowald, and J.-G. Winther, 2013: Introduction. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

da Rosa, A.V. (2013) Fundamentals of Renewable Energy Processes, Elsevier, Chapter 1.8, “Planetary Energy Resources”.

Drollette, D. Jr. (2016) Taking stock: Steven Chu, former secretary of the Energy Department, on fracking, renewables, nuclear weapons, and his work, post-Nobel Prize. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 72:6, 351-358.

Erbach, G. (2014) Unconventional Gas and Oil in North America: The impact of shale gas and tight oil on the US and Canadian economies and on global energy flows. In-depth analysis. European Parliamentary Research Service.

Jaccard, M., (2005) Sustainable Fossil Fuels: the Unusual Suspect in the Quest for Clean and Enduring Energy. Cambridge University Press.

Steffen, W., Sanderson, A., Tyson, P.D., Jäger, J., Matson, P.A., Moore III, B., Oldfield, F., Richardson, K., Schellnhuber, H.J., Turner II, B.L., Wasson, R.J. (2004) Global Change and the Earth System: A Planet Under Pressure. Executive summary. IGBP Secretariat, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.


Content User Level

Beginner  Intermediate  Advanced 

Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Content User Level

Beginner  Intermediate  Advanced 

Cite


Specify width: px

Share