DNA, Genes and Genetic Engineering

by Neysan Donnelly

In 1866, a German-speaking monk named Gregor Johann Mendel from today’s Czech Republic publishes a scientific treatise concerning the inheritance of traits in peas…

…five years later, a Swiss researcher called Friedrich Miescher isolates a mysterious phosphate-rich substance from the nuclei of white blood cells, which he christens “nuclein”. 

These two discoveries did not appear to be connected to each other; in any case, neither work made great waves at the time. However, Mendel and Miescher paved the way for the discovery and characterisation of DNA, and allowed researchers to determine that DNA contains genes, the individual units that encode the different functions required for life and that mediate the transmission of traits across generations.

After Miescher’s isolation of the curious substance, other researchers then took up the baton and got to grips with characterising its chemical structure. Albrecht Kossel, a biochemist from Rostock in Germany determined that “nuclein” was composed of both protein and non-protein portions. His crowning achievement, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1910, was the eventual isolation of the five so-called nucleobases from the non-protein portion: adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine and uracil. The next major milestone was the elucidation of the chemical structure of these building blocks of DNA. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1957 was awarded to Alexander Todd in recognition of synthesis and degradation studies that led to the realisation that nucleotides were composed of sugar, base and phosphate portions.

By 1900, Mendel’s principles had been independently verified and then rediscovered by at least four other scientists, and approximately 10 years previously the Dutch botanist Hugo de Vries proposed that the inheritance of traits might be mediated by discrete elements or particles, termed “pangenes”. Where were these mysterious “pangenes”?

The structures that we now know as chromosomes were independently observed by several German and Swiss scientists from the mid-1800s onwards. However, it wasn’t until the turn of the century that two researchers, the American Walter Sutton and the German Theodor Boveri, pointed to chromosomes as the carriers of genetic material, the so-called chromosome theory of inheritance. Subsequent work by two Americans: Eleanor Carothers and, most famously, Thomas Morgan provided strong support for this theory. Carothers was the first to observe that chromosomes are independently sorted during meiosis, while Morgan, in experiments with fruit flies, showed that certain traits were encoded on sex chromosomes and that it was likely that other traits were also carried on other individual chromosomes. Morgan received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1933 for his discoveries. Modern genetics was born.

However, an understanding of the actual composition of the genetic material was still lacking. For many years, in fact, it had been thought that protein mediated the transmission of traits and characteristics. This idea persisted until the seminal experiments of the American Oswald Avery in 1944. Avery succeeded in transferring disease-causing ability between bacterial strains and in proving that it was the nucleic acid that was transmitting this ability. This showed that genes are composed of nucleic acid. At around the same time that these findings of Avery were published, further impetus came from a perhaps unlikely source: Erwin Schrödinger, Nobel Laureate in Physics 1933. In a series of lectures given in Ireland in 1943, the Austrian physicist expounded ideas that would have a massive influence on a generation of physicists and biologists. Schrödinger argued that genetic material must contain a “code-script” that determines an individual’s development.

Inspired by the findings of Avery to study DNA, an Austro-Hungarian scientist named Erwin Chargaff formulated a law with profound implications. He was able to show that, under natural conditions, the number of guanine nucleobases is equal to the number of cytosines, and that the number of adenines is equal to the number of thymine nucleobases. This strongly suggested that these four bases were pairing with each other in DNA molecules, i.e., guanine with cytosine, and adenine with thymine. The stage was now set for perhaps the most spectacular discovery in the history of research into DNA: determination of its molecular structure and the realisation that the sequence of bases was responsible for determining the traits observed by Mendel, Sutton, Boveri and others, and was the “code-script” spoken of by Schrödinger.

The discovery of the structure of DNA by the American James Watson, the British scientist Francis Crick and the New Zealand-born Maurice Wilkins was undoubtedly inspired by this earlier work. However, it also received much more direct help: from the British crystallographer Rosalind Franklin. She had concluded that the phosphate molecules in DNA were located on the outer surface of the DNA molecule, and also made estimates of the amount of water that was to be found in it. Further, her famous “Photograph 51”, an X-ray image of DNA showing a fuzzy x-shaped structure was the last hint that Watson and Crick needed to make their breakthrough. They proposed a model in which DNA was a double helix of two anti-parallel strands with the phosphate on the outside and the bases pairing with each other on the inside. As well as paving the way for the unlocking of the code of DNA and genes, Watson, Crick and Wilkin’s findings also had deep implications for how DNA is replicated, which were immediately recognised by the scientists themselves. James Watson discussed these implications in relation to the replication of viruses at his 1967 lecture at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting:

 

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

James Watson talking about DNA replication and viruses.
(00:13:38 - 00:16:00)

 

But how are large molecules of DNA put together from their nucleotide building-blocks? Shortly after the seismic findings of Watson, Crick and Wilkins, two men, Severo Ochoa and Arthur Kornberg, discovered the enzymatic process in which DNA is synthesised from nucleotides. They shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959.

A student of Thomas Morgan, George Beadle, and Edward Tatum were responsible for another great leap forward: using X-rays to mutate the DNA of the bread mould Neurospora crassa led them to propose the famous “one gene-one enzyme hypothesis”, i.e., that each gene encodes one enzyme involved in biochemical reactions inside the cell. Although we now know the hypothesis is an oversimplification, Beadle and Tatum’s work has been hugely influential, and can be said to have ushered in the age of molecular biology and molecular genetics. In 1958, one year after Todd was honoured for his discovery of the chemical make-up of nucleotides, Beadle and Tatum shared one half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their ground-breaking work.

Three other researchers added critical detail to this picture, and elucidated the key principles of how our genetic code determines protein synthesis. The experiments of Har Gobind Khorana and Marshall Nirenberg revealed the triplet genetic code that is contained in DNA, and then transcribed into RNA and which encodes amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. In complementary work, Robert Holley characterised the structure of a transfer RNA, the adaptor molecules that assemble proteins by reading the messenger RNA code. The three researchers shared the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

The way in which the DNA molecule is organised and replicated leads to an inherent problem: DNA duplication cannot proceed all the way until the end of the molecule, and thus the chromosome shortens with each round of replication. How do cells counteract this detrimental phenomenon?

In 2009, Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and Jack Szostak were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries related to "how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Thanks to their findings and those of others we now know what telomerase is composed of and have an understanding of the exquisitely complex maintenance of telomeres, the structures that protect the ends of our chromosomes from erosion:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2015) - Telomeres: Telling Tails

It's truly a pleasure to be here again, at Lindau, and to have such wonderful interactions with all of the young scientists! So, what are telomeres, and more importantly, why would you care about it? So, I thought in the next half hour I'll take you through the journey that I had and which many others are continuing into, which has been a journey all the way from pond scum, rather unlikely journey to take us to something in humans, that we can call, the mind. And the general message and what comes out of this, quite surprisingly, from this journey, was implications of telomere maintenance for human health and disease. So, I'm going to tell you how I started on this journey, what took us into it, and then all of the things that have grown out and there are questions, of course, that'll be still exciting to answer. So, if we looked inside a cell that was about to divide, and took a picture of the chromosomes, which you can see in blue, you would see that the cell is about to divide, so all the chromosomes have replicated, so the DNA which is all compacted and looking blue, you can see is actually discernibly double. And at the end of the chromosomes, each end of each of those replicated chromosomes, you can see that there's a little blob. And that's actually lighting up the telomere. And what the telomere does, was for long time sort of known just by, a blob, but it was very functionally important It was known that it was actually protecting the end of the chromosome in ways that protected the genetic material, and without something, whatever that was, a protective structure, at the end of the chromosome, that chromosome could become very unstable, lose information, sometimes even stick by its ends to other chromosomes. Not good news! So, the telomere was a kind of a cap, capping off the end of the chromosomes. So, there was a mystery though. What was this blob? How could we answer that question? It required being able to get your hands on the molecules. And so, this is where the pond scum came in, because this little creature, called Tetrahymena thermophila, is a beautiful single-celled organism, it's lit up green, but it's not actually green. It lives in pond scum, but the point is, it has lots of very tiny and linear chromosomes. So, lots of ends per rest of the DNA. So, that enabled me to very directly analyse it molecularly and found out, sort of surprising, there was this very simple DNA sequence. It wasn't coding for proteins or anything, and the simple sequence was just repeated, over and over again. I'll show you an example in a moment. So, this was very curious and then we found that this was more general, this wasn't just confined to this wonderful creature, it was in yeast too, and that was work that we did together with Jack Szostak. And I collaborated with Jack and we found that, oh, it extended to yeast. And then, more and more people looked and found that actually, for eukaryotes, which have linear chromosomes, and, by the way, you're going to wonder about bacteria, they're just so much smarter, they have circular chromosomes, they don't worry about this stuff. So, we're talking about the eukaryotes, all of us, all the way down from us to pond scum. So, this is at every end, and this is the little repeat motif that you see at our ends. Now, in fact, there's much much more than I've shown, there's thousands and thousands of DNA building blocks, but the point is they make a scaffold, and that scaffold is a protective sheath of special protective proteins. And the point is, it has to be a big enough scaffold for that accretion of protective proteins, which are very well studied. I'll give you some names soon, that it has to be big enough to make a true protection. Now, that it has to be big enough. Okay, there was another mystery, and this was a real zinger, because people knew how DNA was replicated, they knew the machinery by the 1970s, and there was a real problem here, because the beautiful machinery that replicates all the rest of the chromosomal DNA is stupid enough that it can't replicate the very end. It's just the way it's built! So, if you just took this to its logical end, excuse the pun, it would be the, every time you replicated the DNA, you'd lose something from the end! And as the cells divided and replicated each time telomeres would get shorter and shorter and shorter. This would not be a great idea! And, in fact, it was predicted, perhaps this would lead to some kind of finishing off senescence, if you will, of the cells. But nobody knew what might be going on. So, at least we knew by then that the telomeres had repeated DNA at the ends, but also another observation was that they would, the numbers of repeats were actually more fluid, they were going up and down and changing at the ends of different chromosomes. Hmm, this was much more dynamic! Now, the shrinkage we could understand, the growing, that was weird! So, anyway, bottom line was that I decided that we should hunt for an enzymatic activity that maybe was adding DNA to the ends. So, very simply, here's what Carol Greider and I succeeded in doing: We made a synthetic little piece of telomere DNA, the little building blocks you can see here, from this Tetrahymena, the one that had lots and lots of linear chromosomes, so I thought maybe it has lots of something that makes those linear chromosome ends, and you could make the right sorts of extracts from these cells, and do it by chemical reaction, and just put in two building blocks, notice that the telomere DNA is just of these two in this species, and you could make that synthetic DNA grow. So, when we examined this a whole lot, we found it was a fascinating thing. It was putting on these nucleotides, doing something that normal cells were not thought to do. It was copying a bit of an RNA sequence information into complementary nucleotides added on to the DNA end, thereby elongating the DNA. So, this RNA is much bigger than this short sequence portion of it, but this RNA is built-in to this enzyme, which is partly protein and partly RNA. And the RNA helps the reaction, but it also provides this short portion of it as a template. Okay, so we're in the course of studying all of this mechanism, when serendipity happens. Okay, so, for various reasons we were making very precise mutations in the telomerase RNA, and we happen to make one at a particular place, which had actually an effect that was really useful for us. It kind of came back at the enzyme and made it stop. So, what that enabled us to do was ask a question, "How do cells feel if their telomerase isn't working well?" We had been doing things in the test tube and, lo and behold, we could go to Tetrahymena, which, I didn't tell you, but it's a lovely organism because it grows immortally, it just divides and divides and divides, so long as you feed it right, talk to it nicely, it'll keep dividing. Okay, and it had, as I showed you, relatively plenty of telomerase. So, the telomeres got a little bit shorter and longer, but there they were. So, what would happen if, we know inactivated it, using this very precise, surgical stiletto at the heart of the enzyme? It made it stop. And what happened is that the telomeres slowly shortened, took about 20 cell divisions, and then the cells simply stopped dividing. So, now our immortal cell, if you will, we'd turned it into a mortal cell. We had in fact, dealt it a mortal blow right at its heart. It now no longer was immortal, we just done this very simple, we knew what we were doing, we mutated just the telomerase, and it became mortal. So, the conclusion was then, the cell needs plenty of telomerase, it has it and it balances the shortening. Now, the shortening still happens, but the balances that you get, elongation when you need it, so these cells can keep going. Okay, so, now we'll go forward to lots and lots more work for many many different groups and synthesize what we now know is a much more complicated situation. Although the essence of what I told you, hang on to that, because that's exactly what's going to hold through all of what I'll tell you as we now move to thinking about this, essentially always from now and in humans. So, we have the RNA components, it's got a name, hTERC. We have a protein, which carries out this Reverse transcriptase, the core protein, hTERT, TERT, and that's the basic part of it! Now, what's known in humans is that this is extraordinarily complicatedly controlled. You don't have to read all of this, this is just to tell the aficionados that every kind of molecular control mechanism you can think of for the action of this enzyme, to make it more or less active, you can think of it'll be doing it. Telomere proteins themselves protect the telomere from too much telomerase action. They actually ration it a little bit. Telomerase levels, how much telomerase is made of the telomerase genes? How much the RNA products of the telomere transcription, telomere gene transcriptions are actually put into different spliced forms? How much they're assembled into the enzyme? Etcetera, etcetera. Okay, you get the idea, it's really complex how on earth we're going to work out which of these ones is actually the important ones, in humans. They're all doing something, somewhere. So, what you have to do, is you actually have to look in actual humans. And this is where it's really important to now think about scale of time, because humans, you might remember, we have a life expectancy, in many developed countries around the world, to something like, approaching 80 years. So, we can look at our experimental models, like a mouse, but it only lives for two years. And you look at a fruit fly, it's only about six weeks, and a worm, and it's only about three weeks. So, while we all have the same molecular and cellular building blocks in our cells, how that plays out in the whole organism is going to be on this very, very different time frame. And you don't know that what might be the critical rate limiting aspects of it, are going to be the same from organism to organism. And in fact, I'll tell you, each of those model organisms, the mouse, the worm, and so on, they don't die when they die of old age, they don't die of short telomeres. But they're on a really different time frame from us, so we have to look in us. Luckily, we can measure telomeres, we can take blood samples, we can take other samples. Commonly blood, sometimes just spit, our saliva, filled with useful cells, we can get a window inside our body, We can measure the telomeres and there's nice methodologies for doing that. I won't go into it, but I'm just tell you, you can measure in various ways and get good, reliable numbers out. So, bottom line is, what do we find? Well, we start off with about 10,000 nucleotides worth of these repeats. Really nice, long telomeres when we're born but by the time we get really old it's down to about half of that. Now, that half of that might sound like plenty to you, but what it's doing is it actually is now putting the cells in grave danger, because that protective sheath is no longer big enough. And what happens then, in humans, is really interesting. And there was no real reason to think this would be the case, because the telomeres gradually shorten as you look at most cell types, as we go through our decades and decades and decades, and the cells we gestate, called Senescence, which is a signal that those overly short telomeres cell send to the cells, and the say, "Stop!" And they say to do some other things too, that I'm going to tell you, but, first of all, they stop even multiplying, so if it's a replenishing cell type, it's not going to anymore. So, of course here was this gradual process, it's taking place over years. Is it like a life candle burning down, causing, eventually, is it related to our death? That's the question! Here was the cellular part of it, on this side and what was going on down here, what was going on in our whole lives here. So, and remember you've got that highly highly regulated telomerase, and now you could've imagined, well it could be saving things, but it isn't, it isn't doing a great job! It is good in certain cells, like certain cells that have to keep replenishing tissues over life, it's not bad, but not perfect. Luckily, it's really good in the cell lineages that give rise to our germ lines, otherwise we wouldn't be here. So, it does get maintained throughout our germ line, the sperm and egg-producing cells, that produce each of us and all our forebears and all our descendants. So, that's good, but it's pretty low in our body cells, in the many, many cell types. Now, there's also another variation, remember, I said this is complex. Turns out that human cancers, which of course, what are they, they're cells that just keep going and shouldn't keep going. They're not necessarily immortal, but they certainly are doing way too much replicating. They love their telomerase, and they actually rev it up really high. But they do a lot of other very bad things, too, as you know about cancers. Okay, so there we've got the situation in humans. How is all this going to play out? Now, we know a lot about the consequences of what happens if you look inside a cell and ask about the telomere. So, here we've got a nice human cell, looking at it under the microscope, so coiled up inside the nucleus, is all the chromosomes in purple, and out, filling the cytoplasm volume, lots of it is the mitochondria, which of course are the energy powerhouses of the cells. So, now we have 92 telomeres, 46 chromosomes, 92 telomeres, and so, here's one. Now, what is going to happen over life is that telomere in cells as they replicate, and even just as they undergo damages, you'll see, they will get shorter and shorter and now it will become too short and become uncapped. Now, that telomere is not silent, it talks to the cells, and one thing it talks to is mitochondria, and actually pushes them down, through a set of signalling molecules. Makes them less good. When mitochondria are not doing all their wonderful energy stuff really well they can start malfunctioning and producing reactive oxygen species. Really bad news, and particularly bad news for telomeres, and it actually sets up this vicious cycle, where telomeres can get even shorter. So, I've just shown one, but there are 92 and variously, they can get worse and worse. So, this is bad enough for the cell itself. But, these things are like these cells now, with these Uncapped Telomeres sending these signals, they're like a rotten apple in a barrel. They can now start affecting other things, because what happens is, another of a kind of signals that this Uncapped Telomere, which is a very worried telomere, is sending, is, for whatever reason, it is sending alarm signals which include secreting outside the cell. Factors that include those that are increasing inflammation. Now, through a whole series of things that go on in the wonderfully complex immune system, that also can up the body's reactive oxygen species, too. So, you've got even worse situation. Okay, so you can see a senescence cell with telomere damage is not a really good cell to have! So, this kind of cellular pathology is quite well studied, in cells and also in certain mouse models and so on. And there's every reason to think that it would go on if you get such cells in humans, as well. So, now let's say, well let's look at some consequences of what happens to telomere length. So, now, we had the good fortune to join a very large cohort project and we could measure telomere length in 100,000 people, so we can really start to get some good ideas about what happens in humanity, and first of all in a part of California. So, the first thing we did, was we looked at telomere length in 100,000 people just in spit samples. So you've got a nice sampling of cell types in the body. You look, just looked at average, over time, as people got older and older it was just one time point for each person, and what you saw was what I told you! There was this gradual decline. But then we saw something really interesting! Now, let me point out most mortality in this population is happening around here. So, you got this decline, most of the mortality, overall is around here. But there are people who you can see are surviving longer and longer. Now, it's just one time point, but what you see is the longer a person has survived, the more likely they are to have an average telomere length that's longer. So, this is very, very interesting, because it never been seen before! We replicated that males and females are different. But we did show that the difference, which is a bit less before about age 50, it sort of really splits off, between females and males. And then after this critical time, when most of the mortality, just population mortality happens to both of them show these sort of rises. So, really interesting. But now we can say what will happen if you actually ask if this has any consequence or any predictive value. And so, the DNA was taken in the year 2009, so the clock tick, and by 2012 you could go to the records and say who was still alive. And who had died in that time period. And then compared that, as a function of what were the telomeres like at the beginning. And, lo and behold, if you looked at the people in the bottom quartile and set their likelihood of dying to one, just as a reference, then you found that anybody whose telomeres where in the other quartiles, that is people whose telomeres three years earlier, or within that three year period you looked at deaths, you just found that, oh, longer telomeres actually had a decrease chance that you would be in that group of people who had died, within three years. We saw that age and sex clearly have an effect, so the blue line's actually, the blue bars show that that was already corrected for. But we also know that a lot of other things affect mortality. A lot of other things also affect telomere length. And we know what they are, and we can get the major ones out, and here's the big list. We did the age and gender, age and sex, race-ethnicity, education, cigarette packyears history, physical activity habits, alcohol intake, body mass index and so on, and, doesn't budge. What that's telling you is this is independent. This is a very diverse group of people, but California's, but you know Californians, meh, you know (laughs). Right, so, let's look at some serious, sober Danes, and see if the same thing happens. This is the Copenhagen study, Rode et al. published this beautiful work where they looked at 64,000 people's blood cell telomeres, just average telomere length, baseline and then time goes by and they looked at a bigger range but the average was about seven years, so longer than what we'd looked at. And they said, of those many people who did die, how many, in which telomere length category to begin with, how many had died? So, in other words, the same question, does the chance of you dying within that period of averaging about seven years, does the chance of you dying have any relationship to the telomere length, at the beginning of the baseline analysis? And, lo and behold, again, after correcting for all of these multiple possible variables that's called the Multivariate Adjusted, this is what this is, referring to telomere length shortness, as you see trends as worse and worse chance that you will have been in the group of people who died, the shorter the telomeres are, and it's a real kind of a trend. So, we get the message now, we got big studies, I think it's pretty clear. Reduced mortality, and I've shown you all causes is related to the observation, just observing the telomere length in people. Didn't show you the data from Rode at al.'s study and from others, that actually, when you start to divide it down into some of the major killers of the elderly, cardiovascular, all-cancers lumped together for the moment, all of those are related to reduced mortality from those causes, as well, are all related to observed having longer telomeres. Okay, and though the news is good too about longer telomeres in another parameter we care about. Well, lifespan, that's one thing, we want to know how long, how many years of healthy life we'll have, how long is our, quote, healthspan. And, in fact, again you see a relationship, here's a bit of numbers, but the point is they're related. Now, you can see another thing. You can say, now let's go the other way, what about bad news? What about diseases and shorter telomeres? Do we see a relationship? And the relationship goes in that direction, shorter telomeres correlate with, not only just finding an association, but actually also predicting, like I saw, I showed you predicting mortality, predicting, getting some disease, and there's a whole group of these diseases, and you can see they're very common kinds of impairments and diseases that happen with aging. Now, the observant of you have been noticing something, all of these arrows have double heads. I haven't said anything about causality yet. That's what we'd like to know! So, genetics! Genetics is wonderful because it gives us, if we can see a gene we can attribute a gene, especially one whose function we know, we can say causality. And wonderful beginning began in 2001, Vulliamy et al. found that if people inherit in families a mutation, fortunately rare, which is in the a Telomerase RNA Gene, remember that hTERC that I told you about, that RNA component of telomerase. If you have a mutation that knocks your telomerase down to half of its normal level, there's a very clear causality, we know what hTERC does, it's part of telomere maintenance, and people get really really short telomeres. Now the point is that really matters, there's a clear disease impact, related to how much the telomeres shorten. And the first things they've found were a bunch of very interesting diseases, they already showed certain overlapse with some of the diseases, which just occur in the population with aging. Here, we've got real causality, now, it's a bit extreme, these people are very much more likely to die much earlier, and as the telomeres get shorter and shorter, going down through the generations, because the short telomeres get passed down from person to person, they get worse and worse and die, sadly, earlier and earlier. So, the causality is extremely clear, but it is kind of extreme. Now, the genetics has just grown and grown since 2001, so more genetics has told us the same story, but really filled it out! So, again, inherit a rare mutation, half the telomerase level or other ways of reducing telomere maintenance, not only reducing telomerase levels, but also other ways that you can reduce it, which are to do with directly binding telomere proteins. So, what you see though is exactly what I showed you, but now, because there's more and more cases round the world there are various family pedigrees, people really, they find these sorts of things and the list now has got longer! So, now it's starting to even broaden out to neuropsychiatric diseases, very interestingly. This is looking like the big set of things that can happen, it doesn't all happen in one person. It varies on how much shorter the telomeres have got with succeeding generations. The genes though, and this is just for the specialists who'd like to look and say, "Yes, what genes are they?" Well, there's 11 of these now, six of them are related to telomerase itself or the biogenesis directly of telomerase, and there are five now, which are known telomere binding proteins. So, we know exactly what these things do, they are directly doing telomere maintenance. So, we got real causality here. So now let's look at the rest of us, who are fortunate enough not to have been afflicted with these rare, although extremely informative mutations. Now you can say, well, what about common alleles that actually just impair our telomere maintenance a bit? We had a wide range of telomere lengths, by the way, those means that I showed you with age, they're much much tighter than the actual range of telomere lengths at all ages. But you can do statistics on large numbers and in this beautiful study, looking at just what genes are associated with having shorter telomeres in the population at large. So, causality, because genes cause things. What was amazing was, the five top hits were our old friends, the known telomere telomerase genes. So, this was very clear, we know just what these do! And then they said, well, if you look at these alleles that actually are related to the shorter telomeres, and these are common ones, that can occur in all sorts of combinations in any of us, is there a disease impact? And there was, in cardiovascular in a particular form, coronary artery disease, and so, in fact, if you added up the short version alleles for each of these genes plus a couple more that were less related but showed up in the quantitative analyses, but these were the top five ones, we know what they do. Just out of the bat, you would have a 21% higher chance of getting coronary artery disease at some point in your life than the population at large. Now, to have all seven, right, there five plus two, seven genes, to have all the bad alleles of all, combinatorily it goes down and down, so it's probably only one in a few hundred or at most people. But, you can get that. Most of us have a mixture of these, because they're just all sorts of different genes. But this is really major thing, because again, it is saying that at least this short telomere thing, because we know what these genes do, must be able to contribute, contribute this particular form of cardiovascular disease. If you believe in the logic that genes have causality, and I think that's a rational thing to do, then, that's what we can say for this case. So, it's really useful! Now, telomeres is not all good news, because in the context of cells that are normal. You remember Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, it was one person in the daytime, he was this nice, good citizen, well-behaved, but at night-time, same person, was a horrible criminal, violent, right? And telomerase, in the setting of the night-time setting, if you will, cancer-prone cells that had changes. This can be really dangerous! Genetics, again, has told us. Now remember, I told you, if you have only half as much telomerase as you ought to have, one of the things that is caused is cancers. And it's actually a specific subset of cancers. But now, more recent genetics has come in, and we're finding another very interesting thing, that is just about cancers. Now, when I say, we, I mean the world at large. And so, just a little bit too much, even just as, less than twofold, too much expression of telomerase itself, actually causes some other cancers. You can see actual contributions here. And there are completely different set of cancers, and they're not the most frequent of the cancers in the world. But now, you can see where we are. Cancers first of all, vary. We are really living in a trade-off world here, right? We're precariously on a knife-edge here, because this is what has been learned by looking at actual humans and actual diseases and genetics and understanding the molecular basis of what's going on. You're going to say, "Well, telomeres, wait a minute, they are not cause to all diseases, diabetes, it's caused by other things. It's caused by insulin not working properly, there are other things that go on, it can't be all telomeres!" And I couldn't agree more! But I want to pose the idea that, in fact show you the data! Actually, it'll come from mouse models, because it's so clear that telomeres interact. So, now we've talked about this idea, the more the telomeres shorten, the more cells get engaged in harmful kinds of consequences, and the more severe the pathologies. And in a mouse, you actually have to delete telomerase completely, but then eventually if you breed the mice you can start to see these sort of graded effects. So now, let's look at mouse models, where we're looking at just single-gene mutations, which cause disease in humans. And so, here's three. One is Progeria, very premature, fast telomere shortening, sorry, premature, fast aging, actually, it has telomere shortening, too, in humans. Another one, completely different, a muscle wasting disease. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy, known mutation, another completely different one again, diabetes, not enough insulin in this mouse, single-gene mutation. So, completely different things. Now, each of these models, you put the same mutations that you find in humans, you put them into the mouse and it's actually a little bit disappointing. You don't get all the phenotypes, the Warner's doesn't have the full phenotype, the Duschenne Muscular dystrophy shows the skeletal muscles, but actual people with this disease die of cardiac disease. So, it's not really mimicking it perfectly! So, now let's go through with time and now let's superimpose in the mouse model a Telomerase deletion. What happens is really interesting, because well before the telomerase deletion is really showing any effect by itself, the telomeres only partly done some of the cells, you get an interaction, and what gets worse is the Warner's syndrome phenotypes. And you'd starts to look now like the human one. The right cells start to be showing pathologies. The same thing happened with the Duchenne muscular dystrophy in that setting, as the telomeres got shorter, now they started to get heart problems. And now, the same, the diabetes, part insulin deficiency, it became much worse and it was the diabetes symptoms that got worse. Okay, so bottom line is we've turned mice into furry little humans! Right? By removing telomerase and setting that as a background. So, interactions between telomeres and disease, we can see that in these mouse models. Now, I just want to tell you that it's not all genes, and in fact, people have long known that something you might think is totally different but, coming from the mind is something that does have an impact on telomeres. On disease, good example is heart disease, in fact. And so, we and others started studying this, and we started and found some effects on telomere maintenance. And now, the list is huge, I'm just going to show you this huge list of all these sorts of things, terrible things that happen in people's lives, which really argue, since it's the length of exposure that is often very much a quantitative predictor, or the duration, duration severity, length of abuse in these situation... It quantitatively predicts how short telomeres are. So, we think there's real causality here. And we know that Chronic psychological stress has impact on disease, but one of the things it does do is it reduces telomere maintenance. So, the big question is going to be, disease impact itself, and what can you do about it?" And why would you care? This is all very statistical. And now, I want to finish with something really remarkable. Which is: People who have bladder cancer, and you look at an interaction between something that you probably would never have dreamed of looking at if you're asking how much a bladder cancer patient will survive. An interaction of the short telomeres in the blood cells, the normal blood cells, with depression. Now, depression is fairly common. So, they just did a simple thing in this beautiful study, which was they divided people up at the time of their diagnosis, of course the bladder cancer had been developing all those years. Got to the point of being clinically diagnosed and they said that the person had depression, but not short telomeres or short telomeres and not depression, or neither, short telomeres or depression, or did they have both. Now this just says, well, they did the study right, this group at MD Anderson in Houston, Texas, I'm going to show it to you visually. Here are lots and lots of people! They had over 400 people. They're all just sorts of different people, and they've got bladder cancer. And at the diagnosis, they fell into one of those categories. One or either of depression and shorter blood cell telomeres, or neither, or both. After two and a half years, if you only had depression, or you only had short telomeres, or you had neither. it actually statistically didn't make much difference. So, this many people are no longer with us after two and a half years, they died within that two and a half years. But if you had both, it was that! So, this is a big difference, over half! And now, five years, is a very critical time for cancer. And now, if you only had one, well of course, more and more people did die, either depression or short telomeres, or neither, it's about the same. But if you had both, everybody had died. So, that starts to look clinically significant and I think the game that you've been seeing is, it's all about interactions. And so interactions between all sorts of factors. We've observed in lots of stress-like and other situations, things that will make your telomeres shorter. It has been observed things that will make them longer. The real thing is going to be finding out which of these things, quantitatively, will actually, in true, proper studies, that are not just looking, but really testing in trial-like arrangements, which of these kinds of things, and they'll be more, could actually improve telomere maintenance. And it's got to be this right balance, because remember, if you push it too far, cancer risks go up, of certain kinds of cancer. So, it's got to be really, really tuned right, and probably physiologically is important. Okay, so what I've done is I've said there are all sorts of inputs into the telomere shortening and the how it much it shortens is really a complex set of things. But you can measure all of that, and see what the telomere shortening is, and you can see these quantitative relationships, associations. And as I've shown you, the sum aspect of it, which is presenting causality, and of course there's plenty of other causality, all interacting as well, but we think that we have this sort of underlying situation, where we can say, here's something that's changeable in life, you can see it's influenced by a lot of things besides genes and it partly, at least, contributes to the very common diseases of aging, which account for so much morbidity in people. And that just is the long words way of saying what I just told you in a diagram. So, maintenance of telomeres is important, and it's something else that we think now is actually contributing to these diseases of aging. So, finally, I just want to finish with, the journey began, with curiosity, you have to be always willing to play with ideas, you had to had background knowledge to make all these kinds of discoveries, not only in the pond organism, but in humans. You had to have wonderful collaborators, so that meant working with people, working in a research environment that made this possible. So, I'm immensely grateful that I'd been able to have this journey, and the science community people, so important. I'm in the Bay Area, in San Francisco, but I have colleagues everywhere. This journey began in looking underwater, and I just thought I'd finish with this most beautiful graphic, it's a photograph taken just outside where I was born, in Tasmania, Australia. It's the shoreline at night, and beautiful, single-celled organisms, living under the sea, living underwater, just like Tetrahymena does. These beautiful organisms are shown lit up here, and of course, the wonders that they can show you are probably, perhaps almost as wondrous as the wonders that you can see when you look out into the galaxy. Thank you very much.

Es ist wirklich ein Vergnügen, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und solche wunderbaren Begegnungen mit jungen Wissenschaftlern zu pflegen! Was also sind Telomere und was noch wichtiger ist, warum sollte man sich darum kümmern? Ich dachte, in der nächsten halben Stunde nehme ich Sie auf die Reise mit, die ich gemacht habe und auf der ich mich noch immer mit vielen anderen befinde, eine Reise vom Wimpertierchen ausgehend, eine eher unwahrscheinliche Reise, die uns zu etwas Menschlichem führt, das wir Verstand nennen. Die allgemeine Botschaft und was aus der Reise folgt sind, als rechte Überraschung, Implikationen zum Telomeren-Erhalt für die Gesundheit und Krankheit des Menschen. Ich werden Ihnen also erzählen, wie ich diese Reise begonnen habe, was uns dazu veranlasste und dann alles das, was daraus erwuchs, und es gibt natürlich Fragen, die nach wie vor zu beantworten spannend sind. Wenn man in eine Zelle blickt, die im Begriff ist sich zu teilen und ein Bild von den Chromosomen machen würde, die Sie hier blau sehen, würden Sie sehen, die Zelle ist im Begriff, sich zu teilen, alle Chromosomen haben sich reproduziert, und die DNA, die ganz komprimiert ist und blau aussieht, Sie sehen, die ist deutlich doppelt. Am Ende jedes Chromosoms, an jedem Ende jedes dieser reproduzierten Chromosomen, da sehen Sie ein kleines Klümpchen. Das erhellt das Telomer. Die Funktion des Telomer war lange Zeit eigentlich nur durch ein Klümpchen bekannt, doch funktionell war es wichtig. Es war bekannt, dass es das Ende des Chromosoms in einer Weise schützte, die das genetische Material schützte, und ohne etwas, was auch immer das ist, eine schützende Struktur am Ende des Chromosoms, könnte das Chromosom sehr instabil werden, Informationen verlieren, es könnte sogar manchmal mit seinen Enden an anderen Chromosomen haften. Keine guten Nachrichten! Das Telomer war somit eine Art Kappe, die das Ende der Chromosomen abdeckt. Dennoch gab es da ein Rätsel. Was war dieses Klümpchen? Wie konnten wir diese Frage beantworten? Es erforderte, Moleküle in die Hand zu bekommen. Hier kam das Wimpertierchen ins Spiel, denn diese kleine Kreatur, genannt Tetrahymena thermophila ist ein schöner, einzelliger Organismus, er leuchtet grün auf, ist aber nicht wirklich grün. Es lebt im Wimpertierchen, der Punkt aber ist, es hat viele sehr kleine und lineare Chromosomen. Also viele Enden je Rest der DNA. Das ermöglichte es mir, es sehr direkt molekular zu analysieren und ich fand heraus, gewissermaßen überrascht, dass es diese sehr einfache DNA-Sequenz gab. Sie kodierte keine Proteine oder irgendetwas und die einfache Sequenz wurde einfach immer wieder wiederholt. Ich zeige Ihnen gleich ein Beispiel. Das war sehr seltsam und wir fanden dann, dies war allgemeiner, dies war nicht nur auf diese wundervolle Kreatur begrenzt, es fand sich auch in Hefe. Diese Arbeit führten wir mit Jack Szostak durch. Ich arbeitete mit Jack zusammen und wir entdeckten, oh, das erweitert sich zur Hefe. Und immer mehr Leute forschten und entdeckten das, für Eukaryoten, die linearen Chromosomen haben, und Sie werden sich übrigens wundern, wie das bei Bakterien ist, die sind so viel intelligenter, haben Ringchromosomen, die kümmern sich um so etwas nicht. Wir sprechen also von den Eukaryoten, wir alle bis hinunter zum Wimpertierchen. Das befindet sich also an jedem Ende und ist das kleine sich wiederholende Motiv, das Sie an unseren Enden sehen. Es gibt tatsächlich sehr viel mehr als was ich gezeigt habe und tausende von DNA-Bausteinen, der Punkt aber ist, sie bilden ein Gerüst und dieses Gerüst ist eine Schutzhülle besonders protektiver Proteine. Dabei muss das Gerüst groß genug für die Zunahme protektiver Proteinen sein, was sehr gut untersucht wurde. Ich werde Ihnen gleich ein paar Namen nennen, es muss groß genug sein, einen echten Schutz zu bieten. Nun, es musste groß genug sein. Gut, da gab es ein weiteres Rätsel und das war wirklich sensationell, denn man wusste, wie sich DNA replizierte, man kannte den Mechanismus seit 1970 und hier lag das wirkliche Problem. Der schöne Mechanismus, der den ganzen Rest der chromosomalen DNA repliziert, ist zu dumm, und kann das Ende nicht replizieren. So ist es eben gebaut! Wenn man das logisch zu Ende denkt, entschuldigen Sie das Wortspiel, würde man, jedes Mal, wenn man die DNA repliziert, etwas vom Ende verlieren. Indem sich Zellen teilen und replizieren würden Telomere jedes Mal immer kürzer werden. Das wäre keine gute Idee! Tatsächlich wurde vorausgesagt, dies würde vielleicht zu einer Art Beendigung des Alterungsprozesses der Zellen führen. Doch niemand wusste, was da vor sich ging. Zumindest wussten wir damit, dass Telomere DNA an den Enden wiederholten, aber es gab auch eine andere Beobachtung, dass sie, die Zahl der Wiederholungen war tatsächlich fließender, sie nahmen zu und ab und änderte sich an den Enden verschiedener Chromosomen. Hmm, dies war sehr viel dynamischer! Nun, die Verminderung konnten wir verstehen, das Wachstum, das war seltsam! Wie auch immer, wir entschieden uns schließlich nach einer enzymatischen Aktivität zu forschen, die DNA möglicherweise an die Enden anfügte. Also ganz einfach, dies ist es, was Carol Greider und mir glückte: Wir schufen ein kleines synthetisches Stück Telomer-DNA, die kleinen Bausteine, die Sie hier sehen, und zwar von diesem Tetrahymena, das sehr viele linear Chromosomen hat, ich dachte, vielleicht verfügt es über sehr viel von dem, was diese linearen Chromosomenenden erzeugt und man könne die richtigen Extrakte aus diesen Zellen erhalten, und dies durch eine chemische Reaktion vornehmen, und einfach zwei Bausteine nehmen, - beachten Sie, die Telomer-DNA ist nur von diesen beiden, in dieser Spezies, und diese synthetische DNA könne man zum Wachsen bringen. Als wir das ausgiebig untersuchten fanden wir, dass es eine faszinierende Sache war. Es legte diese Nukleotide an, und tat etwas, von dem man nicht angenommen hatte, dass normale Zellen dies tun würden. Es kopierte etwas der RNA-Sequenzinformation in komplementäre Nukleotide, die dem DNA-Ende hinzugefügt waren. Dadurch wurde die DNA verlängert. Diese RNA ist also sehr viel länger als diese kleine Teilsequenz, doch die RNA ist in dieses Enzym eingebaut, das zum Teil Protein, zum Teil RNA ist. Die RNA hilft bei der Reaktion, liefert aber auch dieses kurze Teil davon als Vorlage. Wir sind also dabei alle diese Mechanismen zu studieren, als sich ein Glücksfall ereignete. Aus verschiedenen Gründen ließen wir sehr präzise Mutationen der Telomerase RNA entstehen, und es gelang uns, eine an einem bestimmten Ort zu erzeugen, was eine Wirkung zeigte, die für uns sehr nützlich war. Es kam beim Enzym gewissermaßen zurück und ließ es stoppen. Das ermöglichte es uns, eine Frage zu stellen: „Was empfinden Zellen, wenn ihre Telomerase nicht gut funktioniert?“ Wir hatten im Reagenzglas Dinge vorgenommen und siehe da, wir konnten zum Tetrahymena gehen, das, was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe, ein wunderbarer Organismus ist, denn er wächst unsterblich, er teilt sich einfach ständig. Solange man ihn richtig ernährt, freundlich mit ihm spricht, fährt er fort sich zu teilen. Es hat, ich habe das gezeigt, relativ viel Telomerasen. Die Telomerasen wurden etwas kürzer und länger, aber da waren sie. Was würde nun geschehen, wenn, wir wussten es zu interaktivieren, wir dieses sehr präzise chirurgische Stilett am Herzen des Enzyms verwendeten? Es stoppte es. Die Telomere wurden langsam kürzer, es dauerte etwa 20 Zellteilungen und dann hörte die Zelle einfach auf sich zu teilen. Unsere unsterbliche Zelle, wenn Sie so wollen, wurde eine sterbliche Zelle. Wir hatten ihr in der Tat einen sterblichen Schlag ins Herz versetzt. Es war nicht mehr unsterblich, das hatten wir sehr einfach bewerkstelligt, wir wussten, was wir taten, wir mutierten die Telomerase und sie wurde sterblich. Die Schlussfolgerung war, die Zelle benötigt viel Telomerase, hat sie die, wird die Verkürzung balanciert. Nun, die Verkürzung findet weiterhin statt, doch das Geleichgewicht, das man erhält, Verlängerung, wenn sie benötigt wird, damit diese Zellen weiterleben. Wir gehen jetzt weiter zu sehr viel mehr Arbeit für sehr viele verschiedenen Gruppen und fassen das zusammen, von dem wir jetzt wissen, dass es sich um eine viel kompliziertere Situation handelt. Der Kern dessen, was ich ihnen erzählt habe, halten Sie den fest, denn genau das wird sich durch alles, was ich Ihnen erzähle, hindurchziehen, wenn wir jetzt darüber nachdenken, im Wesentlichen von jetzt an immer in Bezug auf den Menschen. Wir haben also die RNA-Komponenten, die haben einen Namen, hTERC. Wir haben ein Protein, das die reverse Transkriptase ausführt, das Kernprotein, hTERT, TERT und das ist der wichtigste Teil davon! Was man vom Menschen kennt ist, dass dies außerordentlich kompliziert gesteuert wird. Sie brauchen das nicht alles zu lesen, es geht nur darum, Ihnen die Aficionados zu nennen, damit jeder molekulare Kontrollmechanismus, den Sie sich für diese Aktion dieses Enzyms denken können, damit es mehr oder weniger aktiv wird, auch ausgeführt wird. Telomer-Proteine selbst schützen das Telomer vor einer zu starken Telomeraseaktivität. Sie rationieren diese ein bisschen. Telomerase-Ebenen, wie viel Telomerase wird aus Telomerase-Genen erzeugt? Wie viele RNA-Produkte der Telomer-Transkription, Telomer Transkription von Genen werden tatsächlich in verschiedene gespleißte Formen gegeben? Wie sehr werden sie in dem Enzym zusammengeführt? Und so weiter. Gut, Sie haben eine Vorstellung davon, es ist wirklich sehr komplex, wie erfährt man, welche von diesen sind die wirklich wichtigen im Menschen. Sie bewirken alle etwas irgendwo. Was man also tun muss, man muss sich die Menschen ansehen. Hier ist es sehr wichtig, in Bezug auf den Zeithorizont zu denken, denn Menschen, wie Sie sich erinnern, haben in vielen entwickelten Ländern weltweit eine Lebenserwartung von etwa annähernd 80 Jahren. Wir schauen uns unsere experimentellen Modelle an, etwa eine Maus, die lebt aber nur zwei Jahre lang. Und eine Fruchtfliege, die hat nur etwa sechs Wochen und ein Wurm, bei dem sind es etwa drei Wochen. Obgleich wir alle die gleichen molekularen und zellulären Bausteine in unseren Zellen haben, wie spielt sich das im gesamten Organismus ab, in Anbetracht dieser sehr verschiedenen Zeitrahmen. Was der kritische Anteil der begrenzenden Aspekte sein könnte, werden diese die Gleichen von Organismus zu Organismus sein? Ich sage Ihnen, jedes dieser Modellorganismen, die Maus, der Wurm und so weiter, die sterben nicht, wenn sie aus Altersschwäche sterben, die sterben nicht durch kurze Telomeren. Sie befinden sich aber in einem sehr anderen Zeitrahmen als wir, daher müssen wir unser Inneres schauen. Glücklicherweise können wir Telomere messen, man kann Blutproben nehmen, man kann andere Proben nehmen. Gewöhnlich nimmt man Blut, manchmal einfach Spucke, unseren Speichel, voller nützlicher Zellen, wir erhalten ein Fenster in unseren Körper. Wir können Telomere messen und es gibt schöne Methodologien dies zu tun. Ich werde das nicht weiter ausführen, nur so weit, man kann auf verschiedene Arten messen und gute, zuverlässige Zahlen erhalten. Also, was haben wir gefunden? Nun, wir begannen mit etwa 10.000 Nukleotiden, die diese Wiederholungen wert waren. Wirklich schöne, lange Telomere, wenn wir geboren werden, wenn wir dann wirklich alt sind, sind sie etwa halb so lang. Diese Hälfte mag Ihnen viel erscheinen, doch in Wirklichkeit bringt das die Zellen in ernste Gefahr, da die schützende Umhüllung nicht mehr groß genug ist. Was dann in den Menschen geschieht, ist wirklich interessant. Und es gab keinen realen Grund anzunehmen, dies sei der Fall, da die Telomere sich graduell verkürzen, wenn man sich die meisten Zellarten ansieht. Während wir ein Jahrzehnt nach dem anderen leben und die Zellen, die wir in uns tragen, genannt Seneszenz, ein Signal, das diese zu kurzen Telomeren an die Zellen senden, „Stopp!“ sagt. Sie teilen noch andere Dinge mit, die getan werden sollten, wovon ich Ihnen erzählen werde, aber zuallererst beenden sie sogar die Vermehrung. Wenn es sich um einen auffüllenden Zelltyp handelt, hört dieser damit auf. Hier war nun dieser allmähliche Prozess, der sich über Jahre erstreckt. Ist das wie eine Kerze, die herunterbrennt und vielleicht verursacht, - die mit unserem Tod in Verbindung steht? Das ist die Frage! Hier war der zelluläre Teil, auf dieser Seite und was hier unten stattfand, und hier was in unserem ganzen Leben stattfindet. Denken Sie daran, da ist diese sehr stark regulierte Telomerase und jetzt können Sie sich vorstellen, nun, es könnte etwas sagen, tut es aber nicht, es vollbringt eine großartige Arbeit. Das ist für gewissen Zellen gut, da gewisse Zellen die Gewebe im Lauf des Lebens auffüllen müssen, es ist nicht schlecht, aber nicht perfekt. Glücklicherweise ist das in den Zelllinien, die aus unseren Keimbahnen entstehen, wirklich gut, sonst wären wir nicht hier. Das wird also durchgehend in unseren Keimbahnen erhalten, den Sperma- und Ei-erzeugenden Zellen, die uns alle und alle unsere Vorfahren und Nachkommen hervorbringen. Das ist also gut, in unseren Körperzellen, in sehr vielen Zelltypen, aber ziemlich gering. Es gibt da noch eine andere Variante, erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte, es sei komplex. Es zeigt sich, beim menschlichen Krebs, natürlich handelt es sich dabei um Zellen die einfach weitermachen, was sie nicht sollten. Sie sind nicht notwendigerweise unsterblich, vermehren sich aber viel zu sehr. Sie lieben ihre Telomerase und bringen sie wirklich auf Hochtouren. Sie machen aber noch eine Menge anderer schlimmer Dinge, wie man das vom Krebs kennt. Gut, da haben wir die Situation im Menschen. Wie spielt sich das nun alles ab? Wir wissen jetzt viel über die Konsequenzen dessen, was geschieht, wenn man in eine Zelle sieht und etwas über Telomere wissen will. Hier haben wir eine schöne menschliche Zelle, die unter dem Mikroskop angesehen wird, aufgerollt innerhalb des Zellkerns sind alle Chromosomen in violett, und außen, der Zytoplasmainhalt gefüllt, vieles davon sind die Mitochondrien, die selbstverständlich die Kraftzentren der Zellen sind. Wir haben hier jetzt 92 Telomere, 46 Chromosomen, 92 Telomere und so, hier ist eines. Was im Lauf des Lebens geschieht ist, die Telomere in den Zellen, wenn diese sich vermehren, und selbst wenn sie nur beschädigt werden, dann werden Telomere immer kürzer und dann wird es zu kurz und das Ende ist offen. Das Telomer hält jetzt nicht still, es spricht zu den anderen Zellen und es spricht zu seinen Mitochondrien und drückt sie mit einem Satz signalgebender Moleküle nach unten. Dadurch wird ihre Qualität schlechter. Wenn Mitochondrien nicht ihre gesamte wunderbare Energiearbeit gut ausführen, können sie anfangen zu versagen und reaktive Sauerstoff-Spezies erzeugen. Die wirklich schlechte Nachricht ist, und teilweise eine schlechte Nachricht für Telomere, es baut sich ein Teufelskreis auf, in dem Telomere noch kürzer werden können. Ich habe nur eines gezeigt, aber da gibt es 92 und verschiedenartige, die können sich immer weiter verschlechtern. Das ist für die Zelle selbst ziemlich schlecht. Diese Dinge sind jetzt aber wie diese Zellen, diese Telomere mit offenem Ende senden Signale, sie sind wie ein fauler Apfel in einem Fass. Sie können jetzt andere Dinge infizieren. denn eine andere Art Signale, die diese Teloreme mit offenem Ende, welches sehr besorgte Telomere sind, senden, sind aus irgend einem Grund Alarmsignale, die beinhalten, außerhalb der Zelle sekretierend zu wirken. Dies schließt Faktoren ein, die die Entzündung steigern. Aufgrund einer Reihe Dinge, die in diesem wundervoll komplexen Immunsystem stattfinden, können auch reaktive Sauerstoffspezies erhöht werden. Man hat also eine noch schlimmere Situation. Gut, Sie können eine Zellenseneszenz mit geschädigtem Telomer sehen, und das ist keine gute Zelle. Diese Art zellulärer Pathologie wurde gut untersucht, in Zellen und in gewissen Mausmodellen und so weiter. Und es gibt allen Grund anzunehmen, dies würde so auch bei menschlichen Zellen weitergehen. Wir wollen uns jetzt einmal einige der Konsequenzen ansehen, von dem, was mit der Telomerlänge geschieht. Wir hatten das Glück an einer sehr großen Kohortenstudie teilzunehmen und wir konnten Telomerlängen von 100.000 Menschen messen, wir beginnen also einen guten Begriff davon zu erhalten, was in der Menschheit geschieht, zuallererst einmal in einem Teil Kaliforniens. Als erstes schauten wir uns Telomerlängen in Speichelproben von 100.000 Menschen an. Man bekommt eine schöne Stichprobe von Zelltypen des Körpers. Man schaut sich mit der Zeit einen Durchschnitt an, wenn Menschen immer älter werden, es gab für jede Person einen Zeitpunkt, und was sich zeigte ist das, was ich Ihnen erzählt habe! Es gab da diesen allmählichen Rückgang. Dann sahen wir aber etwas wirklich Interessantes! Lassen Sie mich darauf verweisen, die höchste Sterblichkeit in dieser Population findet hier statt. Sie haben also diesen Rückgang, die höchste Sterblichkeit ist insgesamt hier. Sie sehen aber, es gibt Menschen, die leben immer weiter. Nun, das ist nur ein Zeitpunkt, was man aber sieht ist, je länger die Person überlebt, desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass sie eine durchschnittlich längere Telomerlänge hat. Das ist jetzt sehr, sehr interessant, weil man das bisher noch nie gesehen hatte. Wir wiederholen, dass Männer und Frauen verschieden sind. Wir zeigten aber, dass die Differenz, die vor dem 50sten Lebensjahr etwas geringer ist, sich wirklich zwischen Männern und Frauen aufzuspalten beginnt. Und nach dieser kritischen Zeit, in der die meiste Sterblichkeit, nun die Bevölkerungssterblichkeit von beiden, diesen Anstieg zeigt. Also, wirklich interessant. Wir können jetzt sagen, was ist, wenn man sich fragt, ob das irgendeine Konsequenz oder einen prädikativen Wert hat. Die DNA wurde im Jahre 2009 genommen, die Uhr tickt also und 2012 konnte man in den Aufzeichnungen nachsehen, wer noch lebte. Und wer schon gestorben war. Und dann ein Beziehung hergestellt, als Funktion zu wie die Telomere zu Beginn waren. Und siehe da, wenn man sich die Leute im unteren Viertel ansieht und ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit zu sterben als eins nimmt, nur als Referenz, dann findet man, jeder, dessen Telomere sich drei Jahre zuvor in den anderen Vierteln befanden, oder innerhalb des Dreijahreszeitraums, und man sich die Sterberate ansieht, sieht man, oh, lange Telomere haben tatsächlich ein geringeres Risiko, dass man sich in der Menschengruppe befindet, die innerhalb dreier Jahre starb. Wir haben gesehen, Alter und Geschlecht haben eine deutliche Wirkung, die blaue Linie ist daher, der blaue Balken zeigt, dies wurde bereits bereinigt. Wir wissen aber auch, es gibt viele andere Dinge, die Sterblichkeit beeinflussen. Viele andere Dinge beeinflussen auch die Telomerlänge. Und wir kennen sie, und können die Hauptursachen herausnehmen und hier ist eine lange Liste. Wir beachteten Alter und Geschlecht, Rasse, Volkszugehörigkeit, Bildung, Zigaretten, Historie der Packungsjahre, Gewohnheiten bei körperlicher Betätigung, Alkoholkonsum, Body-Mass-Index und so weiter, und, es bewegte sich nichts. Das sagt Ihnen, es ist unabhängig. Dies ist eine sehr heterogene Gruppe von Menschen, aber wissen Sie, die Kalifornier, hm, wissen Sie (lacht). Also, schauen wir uns einige seriöse, nüchterne DNAs an, und sehen wir mal, ob das Gleiche zutrifft. Dies ist die Kopenhagen Studie, Rode et al. publizierten diese tolle Arbeit in der sie 64.000 Menschen untersuchten auf Blutzellen-Telomere, nur durchschnittliche Telomerlänge, Ausgangsdaten und dann im Laufe der Jahre sahen sie sich einen größeren Bereich an und der Durchschnitt war etwa sieben Jahre, etwa der Zeitraum, den wir untersucht hatten. Und sie fragten, von den vielen Menschen, die starben, zunächst wie viele, in welcher Telomerlängen-Kategorie, wie viele starben da? In anderen Worten, die gleiche Frage, ist das Risiko, dass Sie innerhalb dieses Zeitraums von durchschnittlich sieben Jahren sterben, steht dieses Risiko in irgendeiner Beziehung zur Telomerlänge bei Beginn der Analyse der Ausgangsdaten? Und siehe da, wieder, nach Bereinigen aller dieser vielen möglichen Variablen, die multivariat adjustiertes Modell genannt werden, das ist es, mit Bezug auf die Kürze der Telomerlänge, da sehen Sie, die Trends sind genauso schlecht und schlechte Aussichten in der Gruppe der Menschen zu sein, die starben, je kürzer die Telomere sind, es ist wirklich ein Trend. Wir haben jetzt die Botschaft erhalten, wir hatten große Studien, ich denke, es ist ziemlich klar. Verringerte Sterblichkeit, und ich zeigte Ihnen alle Ursachen, mit Bezug auf die Beobachtung, einfach durch Beobachtung der Telomerlänge in Menschen. Ich zeigte Ihnen die Daten der Untersuchung von Rode et al. und von anderen nicht, dass, wenn man beginnt es in die wesentlichen tödlichen Krankheiten älterer Menschen zu unterteilten, kardiovaskular, alle Krebserkrankungen für den Augenblick zusammengenommen, alle diese stehen in Beziehung zur verminderten Sterblichkeit aufgrund dieser Ursachen, und alle beziehen sich auch auf die Beobachtung des Vorhandenseins längerer Telomere. Gut, und jetzt die gute Nachricht über längere Telomere bei einem anderen Parameter, der uns ebenfalls interessiert. Lebensdauer ist eine Sache, wir möchten wissen wie lange, wie viele Jahre wir ein gesundes Leben leben können, wie lang ist unsere, Zitat, Langlebigkeit bei guter Gesundheit. In der Tat sehen Sie hier wieder eine Beziehung, hier ein paar Zahlen, der Punkt aber ist, sie stehen miteinander in Beziehung. Hier kann man jetzt etwas anderes sehen. Man kann sagen, gehen wir jetzt einmal den anderen Weg, wie verhält es sich mit den schlechten Nachrichten? Wie steht es bei kürzeren Telomeren mit Krankheiten? Sehen wir da eine Beziehung? Und die Beziehung geht in diese Richtung, kürzere Telomere korrelieren damit, nicht nur das Finden einer Zuordnung, sondern tatsächliche Voraussage, wie ich es sah, ich zeigte es Ihnen, wie Sterblichkeit vorausgesagt wird, Voraussage, eine Krankheit zu bekommen, und da gibt eine ganze Gruppe solcher Krankheiten und Sie sehen, die sind sehr häufig Formen von Beeinträchtigungen und Krankheiten, die im Alter auftreten. Die Aufmerksamen unter Ihnen haben etwas bemerkt, alle diese Pfeile haben doppelte Pfeilspitzen. Bislang habe ich noch nichts zur Kausalität gesagt. Das möchten wir gerne wissen! Also, Genetik! Genetik ist wunderbar, da sie uns ermöglicht, wenn wir ein Gen sehen können, wir ein Gen zuordnen können. Besonders eines, dessen Funktionen wir kennen, wir können von Kausalität sprechen. Ein wunderbarer Anfang wurde 2001 gemacht, Vulliamy et al. fanden heraus, wenn Menschen innerhalb einer Familie eine Mutation erbten, was glücklicherweise selten geschieht, dann liegt die in einem Telomerase RNA Gen, erinnern Sie sich, ich sprach von hTERC, diese RNA-Komponente der Telomerase. Wenn Sie eine Mutation haben, die Ihre Telomerase auf die Hälfte ihres normalen Niveaus zerlegt, da gibt es eine sehr deutliche Kausalität, wir wissen, was das hTERC bewirkt, es ist Teil des Telomeren-Erhalts und die Menschen erhalten sehr, sehr kurze Telomere. Der Punkt, der wirklich wichtig ist, es gibt einen deutlichen Krankheitseffekt in Bezug darauf, wie sehr sich Telomere verkürzen. Was ich sehr bald entdeckte waren eine Vielzahl sehr interessanter Krankheiten. sie zeigen bereits gewisse Überlappungen mit einigen der Krankheiten, die eben mit dem Alter in der Bevölkerung auftreten. Hier bekommen wir wirkliche Kausalität, nun ist das ein bisschen extrem, diese Menschen hier werden aller Wahrscheinlichkeit sehr viel früher sterben, und die Telomere werden immer kürzer, klingen im Laufe der Generationen ab, da die kürzeren Telomere von einer Person zur anderen weitergegeben werden, sie werden immer schlechter und sterben, leider, immer früher. Die Kausalität ist also ausgesprochen deutlich, aber etwas extrem. Nun befindet sich Genetik gerade im Wachsen und wuchs seit 2001, weitere Genetik hat uns die gleiche Geschichte erzählt, hat die aber ausgemalt. Also wiederum, erben einer seltenen Mutation, Hälfte der Telomerase-Ebene oder andere Wege, auf denen Telomer-Erhalt reduziert wird, nicht nur eine Verringerung von Telomerase-Ebenen, sondern auch andere Möglichkeiten, mit denen sich das reduzieren lässt, was mit dem direkten Binden von Telomer-Proteinen zu tun hat. Was man aber sieht ist genau das, was ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, da es weltweit immer mehr Fälle gibt. Es gibt verschiedene Familienstammbäume, die Leute finden solche Sachen und die Liste wird nun immer länger! Es beginnt sich jetzt sogar auf neuropsychiatrische Erkrankungen auszudehnen, sehr interessant. Es sieht wie eine wichtige Reihe von Dingen aus, die sich ereignen können, sie geschehen aber nicht alle in einem Menschen. Es variiert, je nachdem, wieviel kürzer die Telomere in den nachfolgenden Generationen wurden. Die Gene jedoch, und das ist nur für Spezialisten, die sich das gerne ansehen und sagen: „Ja, um welche Gene handelt es sich?“ Nun, da gibt es jetzt 11 von diesen, sechs davon sind selbst mit der Telomerase verwandt oder mit der unmittelbaren Biogenese von Telomerase, und hier sind jetzt fünf, die als Telomer-bindende Proteine bekannt sind. Wir wissen also genau, was die tun, sie kümmern sich direkt um den Telomer-Erhalt. Wir erhalten hier echte Kausalität. Schauen wir uns also die Verbleibenden unter uns an, die das Glück hatten, nicht von diese seltenen, wenn auch extremen informativen Mutationen betroffen zu sein. Sie können jetzt sagen, was ist mit den gemeinsamen Allelen, die unseren Telomer-Erhalt nur ein bisschen schädigen? Wir hatten übrigens einen großen Bereich an Telomerlängen, jene Mittel, die ich Ihnen beim Alter gezeigt habe, die sind viel enger als der tatsächliche Bereich von Telomerlängen aller Altersgruppen. Man kann aber bei hohen Zahlen Statistiken vornehmen und das ist eine schöne Studie, sich einfach einmal ansehen, womit Gene assoziiert sind, die kürzere Telomere in der Bevölkerung haben. Also Kausalität, weil Gene Dinge verursachen. Das Erstaunliche war, die fünf größten Hits waren unsere alten Freunde, die bekannten Telomer Telomerase Gene. Das war sehr deutlich, wir kennen deren Wirkung! Und dann sagten sie, wenn man sich diese Allele ansieht, die wirklich mit den kürzeren Telomeren verwandt sind, und dies die gewöhnlichen sind, dann kann dies in allen möglichen Kombinationen in jedem von uns auftreten, habe wir es hier mit dem Einfluss einer Krankheit zu tun? Da gab es, bei kardiovaskularer Erkrankung in einer bestimmten Form, der koronaren Herzkrankheit, in der Tat etwas, wenn man die kurze Allele-Version jedem dieser Gene hinzufügte und noch ein paar mehr, die weniger verwandt waren, sich aber in der quantitativen Analyse zeigten, doch dieses waren die Top fünf, und wir wissen wie die wirken. Man hätte einfach eine 21% höhere Chance, zu einer bestimmten Zeit seines Lebens an der koronaren Herzkrankheit zu erkranken, als dies bei der Allgemeinbevölkerung der Fall wäre. Jetzt haben wir alle sieben, hier sind fünf, plus zwei, sieben Gene, die alle schlechte Allele haben, kombinatorisch steigt das immer weiter ab, es befindet sich also vermutlich nur in wenigen hundert Menschen. Das kann man aber erhalten. Die meisten von uns haben hiervon eine Mischung, denn da gibt es allerlei verschiedene Gene. Die ist aber eine wichtige Sache, denn, noch einmal, man sagt, dass zumindest dieses kurze Telomer, da wir wissen, was diese Gene bewirken, in der Lage sein muss, einen Beitrag zu dieser bestimmten koronaren Herzkrankheit zu geben. Wenn man der Logik glaubt, diese Gene folgten einer Kausalität, und ich halte das für vernünftig, dann können wir das zu diesem Fall aussagen. Es ist also wirklich nützlich! Telomere bedeuten im Kontext normaler Zellen aber nicht nur gute Neuigkeiten. Sie erinnern sich an Dr. Jekyll und Mr. Hyde, am Tag waren sie eine Person, es war dieser nette, gute Bürger, gesittet, aber nachts war dieselbe Person ein schrecklicher Verbrecher, gewalttätig, stimmt's? Und Telomerase, in ihrem nächtlichen Umfeld, wenn Sie so wollen, Krebs anfällige Zellen, die sich veränderten. Das kann wirklich gefährlich sein! Das konnte uns, wiederum, die Genetik sagen. Erinnern Sie sich, ich sagte Ihnen, wenn Sie nur die Hälfte der Telomerase haben, die Sie haben sollten, ist eines, was dadurch veranlasst wird, Krebs. Es ist tatsächlich eine bestimmte Teilgruppe der Krebserkrankungen. Jetzt ist eine neuere Genetik dazugekommen, und wir finden etwas anderes, sehr Interessantes, was mit Krebs zusammenhängt. Wenn ich jetzt wir sage, dann meine ich die gesamte Welt. Ein bisschen zu viel, selbst etwas weniger als doppelt zu viel Expression von Telomerase, ruft andere Krebserkrankungen hervor. Sie können hier die tatsächlichen Beteiligungen sehen. Und es gibt vollständig verschiedene Krebsarten, und sie sind nicht die häufigsten Krebserkrankungen auf der Welt. Jetzt können Sie aber sehen, wo wir sind. Zunächst einmal variiert Krebs. Wir leben hier wirklich in einer Welt des Abwägens, stimmt's? Wir befinden uns hier in prekärer Weise auf Messers Schneide, denn dies ist es, was man erkannte, indem man sich reale Menschen und reale Krankheiten angesehen hat und Genetik und die molekulare Grundlage von dem was stattfindet verstanden hat. Sie werden sagen: „Nun, Telomere, einen Augenblick mal, die verursachen alle diese Krankheiten nicht, die Krankheiten haben andere Ursachen. Diese wird verursacht, weil das Insulin nicht richtig funktioniert, da finden noch andere Dinge statt, das kann nicht alles wegen der Telomeren sein!“ Und dem kann ich mich nur anschließen! Ich möchte aber den Gedanken hinstellen dass, sehen Sie sich diese Daten an! Die stammen von den Mausmodellen, denn da ist es so deutlich, dass Telomere interagieren. Wir haben den Gedanken besprochen, je kürzer Telomere werden, desto mehr Zellen befassen sich mit allen möglichen schädlichen Konsequenzen, und je schwerwiegender, desto pathologischer. In einer Maus muss man Telomerase vollständig tilgen, wenn man dann aber Mäuse züchtet, sieht man diese abgestuften Wirkungen. Sehen wir uns also ein Mausmodell an, bei dem wir uns nur einzelne Genmutationen ansehen, die im Menschen eine Krankheit verursachen. Hier sind drei. eines ist Progerie, sehr frühes Stadium, rapide Telomerverkürzung, Entschuldigung, frühes Stadium, schnell alternd, es hat auch Telomerverkürzung, bei Menschen. Ein weiteres, vollkommen anders, eine Muskelschwundkrankheit. Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, bekannte Mutation, eine weitere, vollkommen andere Krankheit, Diabetes, in dieser Maus kein ausreichendes Insulin, einzelne Genmutation. Also völlig verschiedene Dinge. Bei jedem dieser Modelle nimmt man die gleichen Mutationen, die man beim Menschen findet, fügt sie der Maus ein und in der Tat, es ist etwas enttäuschend. Man erhält nicht alle diese Phänotypen, das Werner-Syndrom hat nicht den ganzen Phänotyp, die Muskeldystrophie Duchenne zeigt die Skelettmuskeln, doch Menschen mit dieser Krankheit sind an einer Herzerkrankung gestorben. Es ahmt dies also nicht vollkommen nach! Wir gehen das jetzt mit der Zeit durch und kopieren in das Mausmodell eine Deletion der Telomerase. Etwas wirklich interessantes geschieht, denn lange vor der Deletion der Telomerase zeigt es eine eigene Wirkung, die Telomer haben nur einen Teil der Zellen gemacht, man erhält eine Interaktion und die Werner-Syndrom Phänotypen verschlechtern sich. Und die fangen nun an, wie die bei den Menschen auszusehen. Die richtigen Zellen zeigen Pathologien. Das gleiche geschieht bei diesem Milieu mit Muskeldystrophie Duchenne, während die Telomere kürzer werden, fangen sie an, Herzprobleme zu haben. Und jetzt das Gleiche, Diabetes, Teil Insulinmangel, der verschlechterte sich immer mehr und die Diabetessymptome verschlimmerten sich. Gut, im Grunde haben wir Mäuse in kleine pelzige Menschen verwandelt! Indem wir Telomerase entfernt und diesen Hintergrund geschaffen haben. Also, Wechselwirkungen zwischen Telomeren und Krankheit, wir können das in diesen Mausmodellen sehen. Jetzt möchte ich Ihnen sagen, dass nicht alles auf Gene hinausläuft, tatsächlich weiß man seit Langem, dass etwas, von dem man annimmt, es sei völlig anders, was vom Verstand her kommt, etwas ist, das eine Wirkung auf Telomere hat. Auf Krankheiten, ein gutes Beispiel ist die Herzerkrankung. Wir und andere fingen also damit an, dies zu studieren und wir fanden einige Wirkungen auf den Telomeren-Erhalt. Die Liste ist riesig, ich zeige Ihnen nur diese riesige Liste von all diesen Dingen, schrecklichen Dingen, die im Leben von Menschen geschehen, die wirklich dagegenhalten, denn es ist die Länge der Exposition, die häufig ein quantitativer Prädikator ist, oder die Dauer, Dauer und Ausmaß, Länge von Es sagt quantitativ voraus wie kurz Telomere sind. Also, wir glauben, da ist eine echte Kausalität. Wir wissen, dass chronischer Stress Hat eine Wirkung auf die Krankheit, doch etwas, was es ausführt ist, es reduziert den Telomer-Erhalt. Also, wird die große Frage sein: Und warum sollte einen das kümmern? Das ist alles sehr statistisch. Und jetzt möchte ich mit etwa wirklich Bemerkenswertem enden. Das ist: Menschen mit Blasenkrebs, und man sieht sich eine Wechselwirkung zwischen etwas an, von dem Sie sicher nie geträumt haben, dass Sie es ansehen werden, wenn man sich fragt, welche Überlebenschancen ein Blasenkrebspatient hat. Eine Interaktion der kurzen Telomere in den Blutzellen, den normalen Blutzellen mit Depression. Depression ist ziemlich verbreitet. Man nahm also etwas Einfaches in dieser schönen Studie vor, die teilten die Menschen zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Diagnose auf, natürlich hatte sich der Blasenkrebs bereits jahrelang entwickelt. An dem Punkt, an dem er klinisch diagnostiziert wurde, und man sagte, dass die Person Depressionen hat, aber keine kurzen Telomere oder kurze Telomere und keine Depression, oder nichts von beidem, kurze Telomere oder Depression, oder hatten sie beides. Dies sagt aus, die Studie war richtig angelegt, diese Gruppe des Arztes Anderson in Houston, Texas, ich zeige sie Ihnen in einem Bild. Hier sind sehr viele Menschen! Sie hatten mehr als 400 Menschen. Es waren Menschen von unterschiedlichster Art und alle hatten Blasenkrebs. Bei der Diagnose fielen sie jeweils unter eine dieser Kategorien. Entweder mit Depression und kürzeren Blutzellen-Telomeren, oder keins von beidem oder beides. Nach zweieinhalb Jahren, wenn man nur Depressionen hatte, oder man hatte nur kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann machte das statistisch gesehen tatsächlich einen Unterschied. Also so viele Menschen lebten nach zweieinhalb Jahren nicht mehr unter uns, sie starben innerhalb dieser zweieinhalb Jahre. Wenn man beides hatte, dann war dem so! Das ist also der große Unterschied, mehr als die Hälfte! Und jetzt fünf Jahre, das ist beim Krebs eine sehr kritische Zeit. Hatte man jetzt nur eines davon, natürlich starben immer mehr Menschen, entweder Depression oder kurze Telomere, oder keines von beidem, dann bleibt sich das etwa gleich. Wer aber beides hatte, da waren alle gestorben. Das beginnt nun klinisch signifikant zu sein, und ich glaube, was Sie sich hier abspielen sehen ist, es geht im Grunde um die Wechselwirkungen. Also Wechselwirkungen zwischen verschiedensten Faktoren. Wir haben viele stress-ähnliche und andere Situationen beobachtet, Dinge die Telomere kürzen. Es wurden Dinge beobachtet, die Telomere verlängern. Worum es wirklich geht ist herauszufinden, welches dieser Dinge, quantitativ, tatsächlich, in echten, geeigneten Studien, die nicht nur schauen, sondern wirklich in Versuchs-ähnlichen Anordnungen prüfen, welches dieser Dinge, und es werden mehr werden, tatsächlich den Telomer-Erhalt verbessern kann. Und es muss dieses richtige Gleichgewicht haben, denn, erinnern Sie sich, wenn man es zu weit treibt, steigt das Krebsrisiko, bei bestimmten Krebsarten. Das muss also wirklich, sehr gut abgestimmt sein und vermutlich wird Psychologie dabei von Bedeutung sein. Also was ich getan habe ist, ich sagte, es gibt verschiedenste Eingaben bei der Telomerverkürzung und wie sehr es verkürzt wird ist wirklich eine sehr komplexe Angelegenheit. Man kann das aber alles messen und sehen, was diese Telomerverkürzung ist, und man kann die quantitativen Beziehungen, Zuordnungen sehen. Und wie ich Ihnen gezeigt habe, der Aspekt davon ist, der die Kausalität repräsentiert, und natürlich gibt es eine Menge weitere Kausalitäten, welche auch alle miteinander interagieren, doch wir glauben, wir haben diese Art von Rahmenbedingungen, bei denen man sagen kann, hier ist etwas im Leben wandelbares, man sieht, es beeinflusst viele Dinge, neben Genen und es trägt zumindest teilweise zur den sehr verbreiteten Alterskrankheiten bei, die unter den Menschen eine so große Erkrankungsrate ausmachen. Es ist nur eine ausführliche Art das zu sagen, was ich Ihnen in einem Diagramm gezeigt habe. Also, Telomer-Erhalt ist wichtig, und es gibt etwas anderes, von dem wir jetzt annehmen, dass es zu den Alterserkrankungen beiträgt. Ich möchte am Ende damit schließen: Die Reise begann mit Neugierde, man muss immer gewillt sein mit Gedanken zu spielen, man muss über Hintergrundwissen verfügen, um alle diese Entdeckungen zu machen, nicht nur im Wimpertierchen-Organismus, sondern bei Menschen. Man braucht wunderbare Mitarbeiter, also das bedeutet mit Menschen zusammenzuarbeiten, in einer Forschungsumgebung arbeiten, in der dies ermöglicht wird. Ich bin also unglaublich dankbar, dass mir diese Reise möglich war, und der Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft, die ist so wichtig. Ich lebe in der Bay Area, in San Francisco, doch meine Kollegen sind überall. Diese Reise begann, indem man unter Wasser nachsah, und ich dachte, ich ende mit dieser so wunderschönen Grafik, einer Fotografie, die da draußen, wo ich geboren wurde, in Tasmanien, Australien, aufgenommen wurde. Es ist das Ufer bei Nacht und schöne Einzeller, die im Meer leben, die unter Wasser leben, so wie das Tetrahymena. Diese schönen Organismen werden hier erleuchtet gezeigt und, natürlich, die Wunder, die sie Ihnen zeigen können sind vermutlich so wunderbar, wie die Wunder, die Sie sehen können, wenn Sie hinaus ins Weltall schauen. Ich danke Ihnen.

Elizabeth Blackburn on the composition of telomerase and how telomeres are maintained.
(00:08:14 - 00:09:07)

 

In this excerpt from her talk at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2011, Blackburn discusses the challenges associated with understanding telomeres, how the technology developed by double Nobel Laureate Frederick Sanger and Walter Gilbert aided her initial investigations and the strategies that she then pursued to understand these critical structures:

 

Elizabeth H. Blackburn (2011) - Telomeres and Telomerase in Human Health and Disease

Thank you very much and good morning everybody, it's wonderful to see so many faces here this morning. I feel as if I'm looking out at the future hope of much of what we'll see I think in biomedical research and medical research and biological research in the future. So welcome, I'm very glad to be here and giving this talk today. So my talk is going to be telling you something about the science which has been my journey from basic science and which has led us more recently into issues of human health and disease. And so I'm going to tell you just a very little bit about the early part of our work and then go into the aspect which is the human health and disease related part of it. And tell you a little bit about how I started that and then take you into how we're looking at, more recently we're looking at the interesting ramifications of all of this. So telomeres, they're the ends of chromosomes. And this kind of blobby picture where you sort of see the telomere lit up in pink here, that was pretty much what we knew about telomeres from about, you know from the stage when cytogeneticists looked at chromosomes under microscopes and could see that telomeres were, you know something at the end of chromosomes. And when I say something they were more defined by what they weren't. They didn't behave like DNA breaks, they didn't you know try to heal themselves when a break appeared, they're the end but they were not a broken end. And so it was conceptualised that they were really very different from breaks, but what were they. There was an absence of things that they did that more defined a telomere than what it actually was. So I was fortunate to be able to approach this question because. So first of all cast your minds back to the possibility that imagine a world in which you couldn't sequence DNA. Ok so that was the world in which I started my project in Cambridge in England in the lab of Fred Sanger who subsequently developed methods of DNA. But we didn't know how to sequence DNA. So there was this wonderful mystery of what on earth was the DNA like at the ends of the chromosome. And so being in Fred Sanger's lab I got very, you know well-acquainted with the then nascent methods of trying to sequence DNA, which was to try and piece together nucleotides in little patches by using a variety of chemical and biological methods. It doesn't matter but in other words you couldn't believe how impossible it was to sequence DNA in those days. But at least it seemed as if the ends might be a way of accessibility. And so I turned to a system by going to Yale University and the lab of Joe Gall where you could actually get at the ends of chromosomal DNA's, that is the DNA's of eukaryotes and their chromosomes which of course is linear. And this was because Joe Gall and others had discovered that there are very short chromosomes and large numbers of them. And one particular kind in this beast, shown in the slide here, which is the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena. Now this is not a famous organism in the sense that it doesn't cause diseases and it's not one of the favourite model systems although it's very well used now for certain questions relating to telomeres but it was just an obscure pond organism. But it had these large numbers of linear short chromosomes and that allowed me to biochemically if you will, using molecular techniques to get my hands on these, purify them out and analyse what might be going on at the ends of these chromosomes. And in fact I found that they ended up with these repeated sequences, very strange, you know there was no president for why they would do this. And they ended with short repeated sequences and that's the repeat unit shown there. And so they were the chromosomes in tetrahymena and then ending with short repeats. And then in collaboration with Jack Szostak who was in a different institution, we found the same thing was going on in yeast. And I should say that this was an example of where it's marvellous to go to meetings and have conversations because Jack and I struck up a conversation. I had just been talking about the telomeres of tetrahymena and we talked about how would you make, how would you use this information and see if you could get at telomeres in yeast, to cut a long story short. And so we did and we were able to see somewhat similar kinds of repeated sequences. Now a little bit irregular as you see from the formula on the slides. But the same kind of thing, at the end of yeast chromosomes. So this wasn't a peculiarity of this strange little beast that lived in pond scum, this was something that was more general. And indeed it had been found by others, starting to show up in slide moulds and you know, so these kinds of things were showing up at the end of chromosomes. So it looked as if it would be pretty general. And in fact, you know we did know from molecular biology, even back then, before we could sequence DNA properly, we did know that underlying principles of course of life were very similar as you look right across the living world. And so it wasn't too surprising to find some generalities here. But still it was good to find. So basically that then let us address a question which had been asked by others and which arose from the mechanism of DNA replication which as you recall occurs by a very beautiful complicated DNA replication enzymes, beautiful set of these enzymes which beautifully copy all the internal regions of chromosomal DNA. That is any linear DNA but they're just terrible at copying the very ends, because of the mechanistic aspects of how DNA replication occurs. And I won't go into the details, it's all in every text book, but the point is that the beautifully complicated sophisticated DNA replication machinery that so successfully and faithfully copies the genetic information inside chromosomes is terrible at copying the ends. So the ends can't get replicated. So every time a DNA replicated, if it's linear and unless something happened, it would just get shorter and shorter and shorter and shorter. So this was a mystery, well recognised from the early 1970's onwards and explicated by Olovnikov and Watson for example. This was a mystery. And now we knew what was at the ends of chromosomes. So there was the problem and there was a whole lot of interesting pieces of information. And I'm going to list them here because sometimes it sounds as though, when you say well you discovered telomeres, it sounds as though it just sort of fell out of the sky or something or we stumbled on it. Didn't work that way and I think this is more typical of real science, how real science works. What happened was that there were pieces of evidence, not all from one system, there were pieces of evidence in tetrahymena that the numbers of repeats at the ends of the chromosomes differed in the population of molecules. You could find that during the development of new chromosomes in this organism, has a very complicated lifestyle but it makes new telomeres and they got added on to non-telomeres. How did that happen? There was an interesting observation in the organism that causes sleeping sickness, these organisms when propagated, you could see the end DNA getting longer and longer. How did that happen? And Jack Szostak and I found that when you put a tetrahymena and a telomere into yeast, yeast telomere repeats, it got joined on to the tetrahymena repeats. So that was mysterious. And I was intrigued by another observation from the geneticist, the cytogeneticist who really conceptualised and named the features of telomeres, although not the name of telomeres, that is important, Barbara McClintock, maize geneticist and she had conceptualised telomeres and had even found a mutant that failed to heal broken ends which can normally happen if ends are broken at certain stages in development. Now when you've got a mutant that fails to do something, that says ah ha, there must be a normal process here. So all these pieces of the puzzle were there. Was there something going on in cells that could extend telomere DNA. So now as my little advice for the young moving into their careers here, ok so this was the question, we had a lot of interesting hints here that there may be something going on. Now you can't sit and write a grant application and say well I think I might find a new enzyme. Doesn't go down well with the review sections, ok. But you can, you can have wonderful funding which opens up the possibility which says let's look at how telomeres work. And I'm so grateful to a funding agency like the NIH that said you have a grant that's called structure and function of telomerics and within that I could run with the question. But I also want to tell you another very important thing that matter to me and that helped. Now I was studying the telomeric DNA, I was studying proteins associated with telomeric DNA. And what I then did was I got tenure and I had my grant and so I felt really brave, I thought ah I can do anything I like, I've got tenure, I've got a grant, right. So there's a very empowering feeling, even though of course I realised, you know later that that's not always true, that you can't do everything you like. But I felt very empowered because I had tenure and I had a grant, so I thought I'm just going to start looking for this enzyme activity. Now we kept the normal sort of things in our lab going, right, things that were on the grant application, things that were, you know things that were producing steady results. But I thought well I'll just try and do these experiments. And started to get hints that it was working. And then another important thing happened was that I would present this to people as they decided to join the lab and I'd say I've got this project, so one of my very sober post doctoral fellows said I think, when he came, he said I think Liz I don't think I'll work on this rather risky project. But Carol Greider, my graduate student who joined the lab, Carol was happy to do that and she thought it was the most interesting project in the lab and so I think that's very important, you know to find PhD students who want to go for what they think is the most interesting projects in the lab, even though it mightn't be the one that generates results. But in this case it did and so what in the end we were able to do was to have a synthetic DNA and I'd been doing this with restriction enzymes and pieces of DNA and seeing bits of DNA added on that looked like telomeric DNA was being added. But we refined it down to putting in a DNA oligonucleotide. And we were just able to get them, again grab the technology when it becomes available because synthetic DNA, oligonucleotides were just becoming available to the research community, so we grabbed this opportunity, had a synthetic DNA made and then we found that it could get elongated after a lot of painful work with cell extracts. We could find an enzymatic activity that made that DNA longer by adding more repeats. And so the important point was that here I had a student who was willing to take on a project that was risky but this person thought, Carol thought this was the most interesting of the projects in the lab. And then as I said we could take advantage of technologies, there was terrific biochemical technologies in terms of enzymologist out there, we could use the precedence that people had from DNA replication studies to make our cell extracts and so forth and incubate and make reactions. And as I said along came the technology which happened to be DNA oligo synthesis. So what we found was this enzyme telomerase, so now I'm depicting the end of a chromosome in the ciliated protozoan tetrahymena which being a rich source of short DNAs, I reasoned would probably be a rich source of any enzyme that might be making these DNAs. And so sure enough if you look at a chromosome end in tetrahymena very simplified, just showing the DNA here, what it does is it gets elongated by the enzyme telomerase which is a truly fascinating enzyme because it's made up of both RNA and DNA. They both help the reaction work, although the catalytic, sorry it's made of RNA and protein, the catalytic site is actually the protein, it's not the RNA. But the RNA plays crucial roles in making that protein catalytic site work. It's a fascinating collaboration of protein and RNA. In that RNA and the crucial thing that I've shown you on the slide here is a short RNA sequence that's copied into DNA, just by adding nucleotides and so the DNA gets elongated. So here was in the test tube the wherewithal for overcoming that DNA replication problem, the end replication problem that I alluded to. So here it was in the test tube, did it actually work this way in cells. And so we used tetrahymena and my student Guo-Liang Yu developed a technology for introducing genes back into tetrahymena. So we had to sort of build it up from the roots so to speak. But we could get the first evidence that you needed telomerase in cells. Now in tetrahymena, I didn't tell you but these organisms are mortal, they just keep growing, if you feed them and talk to them nicely they'll keep on multiplying, right, forever, they're immortal, right. So they must have very good DNA repair systems by the way. And they had plenty, so to speak of telomerase. Now were those 2 facts related, right. So what do you do, well you experimentally interfere with the telomerase and genetically make it not work anymore. So that's what we did. And so then we found that now in the next 20 or so generations the telomeres progressively shortened and shortened and the cells ceased to divide. Now when I say genetically kill telomerase, I'll make a confession to you. This sounds all very deliberate, right, like we set out to kill it. Actually we were doing a different experiment at the time. We were looking at the RNA and asking about its templating ability. But we were very lucky because one of the mutations turned out not to be copied into the DNA and we were very frustrated by it but then we noticed oh look the telomeres are getting shorter and the cells are dying. And then we found that the enzyme was no longer active in the cells. And so then ah this was a very useful mutant. But we hadn't actually set out to ask that immediate question. But again what the take home from this was, always look at what the organism is telling you, right, we hadn't designed that particular experiment with that in mind but it turned out to be absolutely the perfect experiment to answer the question of do you need telomerase because we inadvertently made a mutation that ablated or ruined, spoiled, killed the activity of the enzyme in cells. And so that enabled us to ask the question, that I now put up here and looks as though I planned to say this and do this, planned to do this experiment but we actually just lucked into it. We probably would have tried this experiment next but we were lucky and got a mutant that worked. And so what it did was we struck at the heart of the activity of the ability of these cells to multiple, so this was really, you know these cells all died, right. The telomeres ran down and they died. So the important message was an immortal organism, all you had to do was mutate the component of telomerase. It was the RNA, we knew what it was, very, very exactly and the cells became mortal. So that told us that telomerase was maintaining telomeres. Ok so now we knew something about telomere structure which has repeated DNA, these DNA sequences are made by telomerase and they're maintained by telomerase in a very complex highly regulated process. And what that accomplishes for the cells is to make a platform, a platform of DNA binding sites upon which bind a great many very interesting, interactive proteins that bind the DNA sequence specifically. They have protein partners and they very dynamically associating and disassociating with the telomere. But the point is they make a sheath and that protective sheath is the whole point for the telomeres and that's the cap, that's the protective cap, ok. And we always liked it, you know it's like the aglet at the end of your shoe lace, right. But as I said there's this inherent problem and that is that telomeres because of their inherent replication properties and because now we know nuclease activities, telomeres have a propensity to shorten. So it's like the shoe lace end frayed away, right, the tip got lost and now you have a frayed shoe lace. And this is a very bad situation, the cell responds very clearly to this. And what happens is that that very shortened telomere sends a signal to the cells and the cells will not multiple. And in fact they can undergo genomic instabilities. So this frayed end if you will, which is just a metaphor is very literally a shortened telomere or telomeres and that prevents cells from multiplying. So bottom line is that if you have too much erosion the cells will not live, ok. Now let's got to human situations. Ok so now we're going to switch to well how does this all work out in humans. So now we have a very different situation from say tetrahymenas or yeasts and things like that, that just keep multiplying. We have now us and you know in developed societies for example where conditions are good, you know we can expect life expectances of something like 80 degrees, 80 years, sorry, thinking of the warm weather we're having in Lindau today. We have in life expectancy around 80 years. And you know maximum life span is what, somewhere around 120, that kind of thing, right. So now our lives are lived out over many, many decades. Well we certainly know that the underlying molecular machineries are going to be similar, you know across all the eukaryotes that's been amply seen. You know we have telomerase just as do tetrahymenas and yeast and so forth. But the important point is that the kinetics of all of this is now going to be played out over very long, you know decades of life. So how does it all play out? So that's been the subject of research for many, many different labs in the last few decades. So a simple observation, very broad brush and there will be exceptions, is that in a general way telomerase is often limiting in adult human cells. And so they do in fact undergo some shortening and various systems in the body one can see evidence that this is likely to be occurring, that the telomeres are progressively shortening and senescence is occurring. And one can see evidence for that in vivo, in people. Now the question was does that cellular phenomenon play out in our lifetimes, you know does the candle burning down for the telomeres so to speak, does that actually get reflected in human life courses or not. So that was the question that many, many labs had been collecting evidence for. And so I'm going to tell you first of all just a very brief overview of what's been seen and then I want to take you into some aspects of what might influence this process. Ok so back to the basics, what would first influence this process would be whether you have telomerase or not. And so many analysis have been done on where do we find telomerase in human cells. First of all normal cells, well in normal cells, in cells that are going to have to be effectively immortal or have very long replicated life spans you find actually plenty of telomerase. Like in stem cells, in germ cells, germ lineage cells, you know we're all here today, that's because our germ lineages have telomerase. Keeps the telomeres going from generation to generation. And in certain stem cells that will have long proliferative properties throughout life, notably the immune system. But you also find telomerase in other cells and we found that actually quite instructive, to look at other cells and particularly cells of the immune system and particularly cells in peripheral blood where you can take a sample from somebody with a pretty non-invasive blood draw. And healthy people will give you blood and you can study telomeres and how they're being maintained using the white blood cells, the immune system cells from a blood draw as a kind of a window into the cells. And now we can even find, as I'll show you later, we can even do it with saliva as well because there's a lot of cells that leak out into your saliva and it gives you a nice source of genomic DNA as well. And so we can quantify the telomerase in blood cells and so you might expect, you know more or less telomerase will be influencing how short the telomeres get, how quickly. And we also can measure telomere length, obviously in such cells. Now another thing that's important is that we do find that telomerase is very highly activated in cancer cells. And cancer cells as you know have among their many undesirable properties, the property of too much replication. The cells proliferate too much because they've undergone mutations and epigenetic changes that have now made them ignore signals to cease multiplying and to go to the right places in the body and so forth. And so cancer cells are rogue cells, they're out of control and telomerase allows those out of control cells to maintain their telomeres and keep on multiplying. So in the context of cancer cells, telomerase is actually very bad news. But the cancer cells have undergone a great many other changes. And in fact the high telomerase often doesn't appear in the common cancers until they're pretty advanced. I'm actually not going to talk about telomerase in cancer cells today, it's a fascinating question, there are interesting questions of can you inhibit it or monkey around with it to kill cancer cells but I want to focus today on the normal cells, ok. So let's just imagine what situations we might expect to play out over the decades of you know of human life. So imagine in germ cells, well we'll have the cells stay maintained, you know just like tetrahymena or yeast and so you know we expect a balance between shortening and lengthening because the telomeres over all are maintained. And there's a great deal of genetic and non-genetic control of these processes as I'll talk about in a moment. But you can also imagine the balance goes in the other direction and this has been seen for certain immune cells as they go through certain multiplicative stages in the body, telomeres actually get longer in normal differentiated cells. So that generality I showed you, they don't always have to get shorter but they often do get shorter. And so if you have some telomerase, you could imagine that they would be getting shorter by those natural processes shortening but telomerase might try and keep them up and so you know it might be able to stave off the, you know terrible moments when the telomeres get too short, for quite a while but senescence would eventually come. And that would be later than everything else being equal if there were less telomerase. And then it would, you know not be able to stave off senescence for so long. So how would all these things work and we know even from a yeast cell which has 350 genes, at least and counting which influence telomere lengths and length distributions. So we know this process is going to be under many, many elaborate genetic controls. So we expect genetic controls and we expect non-genetic controls because everything is influenced by non-genetic effects too. That will be the main topic that I'll get to but I just wanted to tell you that the reason that we got very interested in this is that over the years many groups have seen that many of the common diseases of aging and including cancers but many of these diseases that characterise aging humans have been linked to shorter telomeres in the normal cells. This is just a sampling of the kinds of diseases in which you see this association and the list of the authors on the right is extremely incomplete, it's just a little sampling. On the left is the common diseases and if you look at these diseases you can see that they include some of the big killers and the big serious medical problems in populations, cancer, pulmonary fibroses, cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia, degenerative conditions, diabetes, in fact risk factors for some of these. This has been seen in associative studies. And so let's just think about it, let's think about this means. And we are interested in this symposium, in this wonderful meeting on big questions of global health. And this just shows the graph for, I think this is the US numbers and it's going to be true in different degrees around the world, that we have a situation where there's an aging population first of all and I just pulled something from an article that was published on the 25th of June just a couple of days ago, nearly 10% of the world's adults have diabetes. The prevalence is rising and the point is that it's not just in developed countries, this is arising in developing countries, this is really a world-wide problem, 10% almost of the world's adults in all countries across the world have diabetes. And the prevalence is only going up. So we've got some big health issue and we heard about several of them yesterday. But I think we really have to think about these ones as well. And today I bring up these ones because our research has tied what we are understanding about telomere maintenance in humans to this kind of disease, of which diabetes is one example. Ok so it's a rising problem. Ok so what have I just said, I've just said that telomere shortness in the general population, that's people overall, in mini cohorts around the world, has been associated with common diseases of aging, ok. And so what's going on. Well is it telomere maintenance that's causing the shortness. So what you do is of course, you turn to human genetics and you look at rare Mendelian mutations and you say what can you learn from those. They've been very instructive in humans and people have deliberately using mouse models removed telomerase from mice and it's very clear that in humans the rare telomerase mutations that occur in people, that are known to cause telomere shortness, because they make telomerase work less well. They interrupt the enzymatic activity of telomerase or its ability to add telomeres, ok. So mutated telomerase genes which is just, you know the luck of the draw, right, the roulette wheel you know spins and your parents give you some combination of genes, right. So that's the luck of the genes. And in this case the bad luck of the genes. And that leads to telomere shortness. And it's very clear that there's a disease impact of this, both in people and in the mouse models where it's been done experimentally. And these sorts of diseases, their prevalence goes way up, they become very prone to these diseases. And look at that list, it starts to remind you of the list that I showed you before, these common diseases of aging in the general population. Which are associated with telomere shortness. Here in these rare mutations we've got causality so now of course the interesting question is well what about the common snips, the common variations in the genome that cause telomeres to be shorter, do they also lead to disease. Those studies which are much more complex epidemiologically and people have only just started posing them, are already suggesting yes. And there's a beautiful case, case of cancer where a certain cancer, it's bladder cancer, quite a common one, you can see that a snip that causes telomere shortness also causes bladder cancer. And part of that effect is mediated through the telomere shortening, ok. So that genetically speaking we know is the case. Now I'm going to turn to what's been very interesting to us and that is non-genetics. And do know when you think about future challenges, you know genetics, I'd say we've got genetics, if you will well in hand. Now I mean that's a trivial statement in some ways because of course there's huge complexities still, but we get it, we get it with genetics. We understand yes genes have effects, yes the genes interact, yes we know they're important to varying degrees. You know there's a lot of ways we can study this. And it's being done very activity and very productively. Let's do something harder. You know let's have some fun here, right let's choose something that's more difficult, non-genetic things. And this was, my next sort of point is that when somebody comes to you with a really interesting question that just grabs you and you think that person is good at that kind of research, go for it. So we started a collaboration. And this was wonderful because our friends in the UCSF department of psychiatry were very interested in chronic stress and we found low and behold that we could interact with them and show that people in which chronic stress by the way is a known risk factor for common diseases such as cardiovascular, that telomere shortness was associated with chronic stress. And my timing is up and so what I'm going to do is, that was the message, the important thing was that we found that it causes telomere shortening. Things that happen to you in childhood such as multiple trauma exposures influence your telomeres when you're an adult. And that's what this graph here is showing. And so we've become very, very fascinated by this question. And so now we've realised when I'm just going to zoom through all this, I had much too much to say to you, I knew I'd be so excited. And we're really trying to understand the interactions between chronic stress, telomere shortening which we know it causes and diseases. And how these all interact. So the bottom line was that we look over time and we see effects but my wonderful technician decided he would set up a machine for analysing 100,000 telomere lengths, he built a very complicated robot and here it is in action here, ok. So we were able to get, you know tones of telomeric DNA information out. And so now I'm going to end with this because this is going to be my plea to all of you who are really interested in huge complicated data sets and how you analyse those. Because what we did was we generated, as my marvellous technician said, more telomere length data than ever before, right. So here it is, you know this is the just the raw data right, tones, 100,000 people but the beauty is that it's tied in with a wonderful project of genome wide association, 675,000 different snips on these 100,000 people. And 20 years of clinical information all longitudinal electronic health records, data. So this is going to be so exciting to use all of this marvellous information and start relating all these things together. Because the end is that we really want to understand this road of life, we want to understand telomere loss on the one hand, telomere gain on the other hand, telomere maintenance. We know there's genetic components and what I didn't tell you but it's published, is we know adverse childhood events and chronic psychological stress are putting you on the telomere shortness and disease risk side of things. Education I'm very happy to tell you is clearly related to longer telomeres as is exercise and stress reduction. So on this happy note I want to finish and just tell you why we think this is important because I think there's so much more to be learned. And these are the folks in my lab and our collaborators with whom we have so much fun addressing what I think are important questions when we think about the question of human health, we're seeing very common sorts of disease situations which are growing world-wide. So I want to throw the challenge out to you, once we've solved these acute problems, these severe problems of infectious diseases and the major health problems in the world, why don't you look ahead to the next decades and say what are we left with, we're left with these other chronic diseases and these other diseases and I think we should think about how do we deal with the very complex problem of preventing these diseases. We want to treat the acute ones, let's think about how we prevent the other diseases that we're going to be left with now we survive all of the acute infectious and other diseases. Thank you very much.

Haben Sie vielen Dank und guten Morgen zusammen. Es ist wunderbar an diesem Morgen so viele Gesichter hier zu sehen. Ich habe das Gefühl, als schaute ich auf die Zukunftshoffnung von so vielem, was wir, denke ich, in der biomedizinischen, medizinischen und biologischen Forschung in Zukunft sehen werden. Seien Sie also alle willkommen. Ich freue mich sehr, heute hier sein und diesen Vortrag halten zu können. Mein Vortrag wird Ihnen etwas über die Wissenschaft erzählen, über meine Reise, die mit der Grundlagenforschung begann und mich in letzter Zeit zu Fragen geführt hat, die mit menschlicher Gesundheit und menschlichen Erkrankungen in Zusammenhang stehen. Ich werde Ihnen ein wenig über die Anfangsphase meiner Arbeit erzählen und dann zu demjenigen Aspekt übergehen, der mit der menschlichen Gesundheit und mit Krankheiten zu tun hat. Und ich werde Ihnen ein bisschen davon erzählen, wie ich damit angefangen habe. Dann werde ich Ihnen berichten, wie wir in letzter Zeit angefangen haben, die interessanten Implikationen all dieser Dinge zu untersuchen. Also Telomere sind die Enden von Chromosomen. Und dieser Art von unscharfem Bild, auf dem Sie die Telomere hier in rosa aufleuchten sehen: Das war so ziemlich alles, was man über Telomere wusste, in dem Stadium, in dem die Zytogenetiker Chromosomen unter dem Mikroskop betrachteten und sehen konnten, dass Telomere etwas am Ende von Chromosomen sind. Und wenn ich sage "etwas", dann meine ich, Sie waren mehr durch das definiert, was sie nicht sind. Sie verhielten sich nicht wie Brüche des DNA-Strangs, sie versuchten sich nicht selbst zu reparieren, wenn es zu einem Bruch kam. Sie waren zwar das Ende der DNA, aber kein "abgebrochenes" Ende. Und so entwickelte man die Vorstellung, dass sie sich von DNA-Brüchen deutlich unterschieden. Doch was waren sie dann? Ein Telomer wurde mehr durch das definiert, was er nicht tat, als durch das, was er in Wirklichkeit war. Ich hatte also das Glück, mich mit dieser Frage zu beschäftigen. Denken Sie also zunächst an die Möglichkeit zurück, denken Sie an eine Welt, in der sich die DNA nicht sequenzieren lässt, ok. Das war die Welt, in der ich in Cambridge in England im Labor von Fred Sanger, der später selbst Methoden der DNA-Sequenzierung entwickelte, die Arbeit an meinem Projekt begann. Doch wir wussten nicht, wie man die DNA-Sequenz analysiert. Und da gab es dieses wundervolle Rätsel: Wie war die DNA an den Enden der Chromosomen nur beschaffen? Und da ich im Labor von Fred Sanger war, wurde ich mit den damals aufkommenden Methoden sehr vertraut, die man bei dem Versuch, die DNA Sequenz zu analysieren, entwickelt hatte. Sie bestanden darin, dass man mithilfe einer Vielzahl chemischer und biologischer Methoden versuchte, Nukleotide in kleinen Abschnitten zusammenzufügen. Auf die Einzelheiten kommt es nicht an, doch ich will damit sagen, dass Sie sich nicht vorstellen können, wie unmöglich es damals war, die Sequenz der DNA zu analysieren. Doch zumindest schien es so, als seien die Enden ein Zugangsweg zur DNA. Und so wendete ich mich, indem ich an die Yale Universität und das Labor von Joe Gall ging, einem System zu, mit dem man tatsächlich an die Enden der chromosomalen DNA herankam, d.h. an die DNA von Eukaryoten und ihre Chromosomen, die natürlich linear sind. Der Grund hierfür war, dass Joe Gall und andere entdeckt hatten, dass es sehr kurze Chromosomen gibt, und zwar in sehr großer Zahl. Und eine bestimmte Art von ihnen fand man in diesem Tier, das auf diesem Dia dargestellt ist. Es handelt sich dabei um das mit Cilien besetzte Urtierchen Tetrahymena. Und dies ist insofern kein berühmter Organismus in dem Sinne, als er keine Krankheiten verursacht und es ist keines der beliebten Modellsysteme. Er wird allerdings heute für bestimmte Fragen, die mit Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen, sehr häufig verwendet. Es war lediglich ein unbekannter Organismus, der in Teichen lebt. Doch er verfügte über diese große Anzahl linearer, kurzer Chromosomen, und das erlaubte mir - wenn Sie so wollen auf biochemische Weise - molekulare Techniken zu verwenden, mit denen ich an diese herankommen, sie isolieren und so analysieren konnte, was sich an den Enden dieser Chromosomen abspielte. Tatsächlich fand ich heraus, dass sie mit sich wiederholenden Sequenzen endeten. Es war sehr seltsam, wissen Sie. Es gab keinen vergleichbaren Fälle, die hätten erklären können, warum sie dies tun sollten. Sie endeten mit kurzen sich wiederholenden Sequenzen. In dieser Abbildung hier sehen Sie die Wiederholungseinheit. Dies also waren die Chromosomen in Tetrahymena, und sie endeten in kurzen Wiederholungssequenzen. Zusammen mit Jack Szostak, der an einem anderen Institut arbeitete, fanden wir dann heraus, dass dasselbe bei der Hefe geschieht. Und ich sollte Ihnen sagen, dass dies ein Beispiel dafür ist, wie wunderbar es sein kann, zu Treffen zu gehen und Gespräche zu führen. Denn Jack und ich kamen ins Gespräch. Ich hatte gerade über die Telomere von Tetrahymena gesprochen, und wir sprachen darüber - um eine lange Geschichte kurzzufassen - wie man diese Information nutzen könnte, um an die Telomere der Hefe heranzukommen. Wir verfolgten die Sache und wir konnten am Ende der Hefechromosomen in etwa ähnliche Formen von Wiederholungssequenzen beobachten. Nun, ein bisschen unregelmäßig, wie Sie anhand der Formeln auf diesen Dias sehen können, doch von derselben Art. Dies war also keine Besonderheit dieses merkwürdigen kleinen Tieres, das im Oberflächenfilm von Tümpeln lebte. Dies war etwas wesentlich Allgemeineres. Und in der Tat wurde dies auch von anderen gefunden. Man fand es in kriechenden Schimmelpilzen, und diese Art von Sequenzen zeigten sich an den Enden von Chromosomen. Es sah also so aus, als sei dies ein recht allgemeingültiges Phänomen. Und wissen Sie, aus der Molekularbiologie wussten wir tatsächlich - selbst damals schon, bevor wir die DNA-Sequenz korrekt analysieren konnten -, dass die grundlegenden Prinzipen des Lebens, wenn man es sich in seiner Breite anschaut, natürlich sehr ähnlich waren. Es war also nicht weiter erstaunlich, dass man hier einige allgemein gültige Entdeckungen machte. Dennoch war es gut, dies herausgefunden zu haben. Dies erlaubte es uns also im Prinzip eine Frage zu stellen, die schon von anderen gestellt worden war und die aus dem Mechanismus der DNA-Replikation hervorging, der - wie Sie sich erinnern - mit Hilfe wunderschöner, komplizierter DNA-Replikationsenzyme abläuft, eines wunderschönen Satzes dieser Enzyme, die auf wunderbare Weise alle internen Regionen der chromosomalen DNA kopiert, d.h. sämtliche lineare DNA. Doch wenn es um das Kopieren dieser Enden geht, sind sie einfach hoffnungslos überfordert, und zwar aufgrund der mechanischen Aspekte der DNA-Replikation. Ich werde die Einzelheiten nicht erläutern. Man findet sie in jedem Lehrbuch. Worum es mir geht, ist jedoch Folgendes: Der wunderbar komplizierte, intelligente DNA-Replikationsmechanismus, der die genetische Information im Inneren der Chromosomen so erfolgreich und originalgetreu kopiert, versagt an den Enden der Chromosomen. Die Enden können also nicht repliziert werden. Jedes Mal, wenn eine DNA repliziert wird, wenn sie linear ist und sofern nicht etwas anderes passiert, wird sie kürzer und kürzer und immer kürzer. Dies war also ein Rätsel, das seit den frühen 1970er Jahren wohl bekannt war, und zum Beispiel von Olovnikov und Watson als solches auch klar formuliert worden war. Dies war ein Rätsel. Und nun wussten wir, was sich am Ende der Chromosomen befindet. Es gab also dieses Problem, und zusätzlich gab es eine ganze Menge interessanter Teilinformationen. Ich werde sie hier auflisten. Denn manchmal klingt es so - wenn man sagt, dass man Telomere entdeckt hat - als seien sie aus dem Himmel gefallen oder als sei man darüber gestolpert. So war es nicht. Ich glaube, dies ist typischer für die tatsächliche Wissenschaft, dafür wie, die wirkliche Wissenschaft voranschreitet. Was geschah, war Folgendes: Es gab verschiedene Hinweise, die nicht alle aus einem System stammten. Es gab in Tetrahymena Hinweise darauf, dass die Zahl der Wiederholungen an den Chromosomenenden in der Molekülpopulation unterschiedlich war. Man konnte feststellen, dass während der Entwicklung neuer Chromosomen in diesem Organismus - er hat einen sehr komplizierten Lebensstil - neue Telomere erzeugt werden, und sie werden an Nicht-Telomere angefügt. Wie ging das vor sich? Es gab eine interessante Beobachtung in dem Organismus, der die Schlafkrankheit verursacht: Wenn diese Organismen sich vermehrten, konnte man beobachten, wie die Enden der DNA länger und immer länger wurden. Wie kam es dazu? Und Jack Szostak und ich fanden heraus, dass - wenn man ein Tetrahymena-Telomer in Hefe bringt - dass dieses Telomer wiederholt wird: Es wurde an die Wiederholungssequenzen von Tetrahymena angefügt. Dies war höchst geheimnisvoll. Und ich war von einer anderen Beobachtung der Genetiker, der Zytogenetiker fasziniert, die die Eigenschaften der Telomere auf den Begriff gebracht und benannt hatten, obwohl sie den Begriff Telomere nicht erfunden hatten, das ist wichtig. Barbara McClintock, eine Genetikerin, die sich mit Mais befasste, hat Telomere theoretisch beschrieben. Sie fand sogar eine Mutante, der es nicht gelang, gebrochene Enden zu reparieren. Diese treten in der Regel in bestimmten Stadien der Entwicklung auf. Wenn man also eine Mutante gefunden hat, die etwas Bestimmtes nicht tun kann, kommt es zu einem Aha-Erlebnis: Es muss hier einen normalen Prozess geben. Alle Teile des Puzzles lagen vor uns: Fand in den Zellen etwas statt, wodurch die Telomer-DNA verlängert werden konnte? Nun möchte ich den Jungen, die am Beginn ihrer Karriere stehen, einen kleinen Ratschlag geben, ok. Dies war also die Frage. Wir verfügten über eine Fülle interessanter Hinweise, dass hier möglicherweise etwas geschah. Nun kann man sich nicht hinsetzen und einen Antrag für Forschungsgelder schreiben und sagen: Das kommt bei den Leuten, die diese Anträge durchsehen, nicht gut an, ok. Doch man kann, man kann wunderbare finanzielle Unterstützung kommen, die einem die Forschungsmöglichkeit eröffnet, indem man sagt: "Lasst uns untersuchen, wie Telomere funktionieren." Ich bin einem Geldgeber wie dem NIH so dankbar, der sagte: Sie haben ein Stipendium mit dem Titel: "Struktur und Funktion der Telomerik". Unter dieser Überschrift kann ich der Frage nachgehen. Doch ich möchte Ihnen außerdem noch eine andere äußerst wichtige Sachen erzählen, die mir wichtig ist und die mir geholfen hat. Ich untersuchte nun also die DNA der Telomere. Ich studierte Proteine, die mit der DNA der Telomere in Zusammenhang standen, und dann geschah Folgendes: Ich erhielt eine feste Stelle und meine Forschungsgelder. Dadurch fühlte ich mich sehr mutig. Ich dachte mir: "Ah, ich kann tun, was ich will! Ich habe eine feste Stelle, ich habe Forschungsgelder, oder etwa nicht?" Dies war ein sehr bestärkendes Gefühl, obwohl ich natürlich später erkannte, dass das nicht immer wahr ist, dass man nicht alles tun kann, was man möchte. Doch ich fühlte mich sehr dadurch bestärkt, dass ich eine feste Stelle und Forschungsgelder hatte, und so dachte ich mir: Wir ließen also die normalen Arbeiten in unserem Labor weiterlaufen, ok, Arbeiten, die in dem Forschungsantrag beschrieben waren und die stetige Ergebnisse lieferten. Doch ich dachte mir: "Ok, ich werde einfach versuchen, diese Experimente durchzuführen", und ich erhielt Hinweise darauf, dass dies tatsächlich funktionierte. Dann geschah noch etwas Wichtiges: Ich stellte dies Leuten vor, als sie sich dem Labor anschlossen, und ich sagte ihnen: Einer meiner sehr nüchternen PostDoc-Fellows sagte, glaube ich, als er ankam: Doch Carol Greider, eine Doktorandin von mir, die in unser Labor kam, war bereit dies zu tun. Sie meinte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig, wissen Sie, Doktoranden zu finden, die sich auf das einlassen, was sie für das interessanteste Projekt am Labor halten, selbst wenn es nicht dasjenige ist, das Ergebnisse liefert. Doch in diesem Fall lieferte es Ergebnisse, und was uns schließlich gelang, war die Herstellung synthetischer DNA. Ich hatte dies bereits mit Restriktionsenzymen und DNA-Bruchstücken getan, und es zeigte sich dabei, dass DNA-Bruchstücke, die wie Telomer-DNA aussahen, angefügt wurden. Doch wir entwickelten die Sache zur Einfügung eines DNA-Oligonukleotids weiter. Und wir waren in der Lage davon zu profitieren, dass wir DNA-Oligonukleotids bekommen konnten. Wieder konnten wir Technologie nutzen, als sie soeben erst verfügbar geworden war, da synthetische DNA, Oligonukleotide, der Forschergemeinschaft gerade erst verfügbar geworden waren. Also griffen wir diese Gelegenheit beim Schopf und ließen eine synthetische DNA herstellen. Dann stellten wir fest, dass sie nach langer, mühevoller Arbeit mit Zellextrakten verlängert werden konnte. Wir konnten eine Enzymaktivität finden, die die DNA dadurch verlängerte, dass sie weitere Wiederholungssequenzen anfügte. Der wichtigste Aspekt war also, dass ich da eine Studentin hatte, die bereit war, ein riskantes Projekt zu übernehmen, aber diese Person, Carol, dachte, dies sei das interessanteste Projekt im Labor. Und dann konnten wir, wie gesagt, die Vorteile von Technologien nutzen. Es gab fantastische biochemische Technologien in der Enzymologie. Wir konnten, um unsere Zellextrakte herzustellen usw. und um Inkubationen und Reaktionen durchzuführen, die früheren Erfahrungen nutzen, die Leute in DNA-Replikationsstudien gesammelt hatten. Wie ich bereits erwähnte, lief uns die Technologie über den Weg, bei der es sich zufällig um die DNA-Oligosynthese handelte. Was wir fanden, war dieses Enzym Telomerase. Jetzt zeige ich Ihnen das Ende eines Chromosoms im cilienbesetzten Urtierchen Tetrahymena, bei dem es sich um eine reiche Quelle kurzer DNAs handelt. Ich ging davon aus, dass dieser Organismus wahrscheinlich auch eine reiche Quelle für jegliche Enzyme sein würde, die diese DNAs herstellen würden. Und tatsächlich: Wenn man sich ein Chromosomende in Tetrahymena sehr vereinfacht anschaut, nur die DNA hier betrachtet, so geschieht hier Folgendes: Es wird durch das Enzym Telomerase verlängert. Dies ist ein wahrhaft faszinierendes Enzym, weil es sowohl aus RNA als auch aus DNA besteht. Beide Teile tragen zum Erfolg der Reaktion bei, obwohl der katalytische - Entschuldigung, es besteht aus RNA und Protein. Die katalytische Stelle ist tatsächlich das Protein. Es ist nicht die RNA. Doch die RNA spielt eine entscheidende Rolle dabei, diesen Ort der Proteinkatalyse funktionsfähig zu machen. Es ist eine faszinierende Zusammenarbeit zwischen einem Protein und der RNA. Und die entscheidende Sache, die ich Ihnen auf dem Dia hier gezeigt habe, ist eine kurze RNA-Sequenz, die in die DNA kopiert wird, einfach indem Nukleotide hinzugefügt werden, und auf diese Weise wird die DNA verlängert. In diesem Reagenzglas hatten wir also, was man brauchte, um das Problem der DNA-Replikation zu lösen, das Problem der Replikation der Enden, auf das ich angespielt habe. Hier war es also im Reagenzglas. Funktionierte es auch auf diese Weise in Zellen? Also verwendeten wir Tetrahymena und mein Student Guo-Liang Yu entwickelte eine Technologie, mit der man die Gene wieder in Tetrahymena zurückbringen konnte. Wir mussten die Sache sozusagen "von den Wurzeln her" wieder aufbauen. Doch wir erhielten die ersten Hinweise darauf, dass man Telomerase in Zellen benötigt. Nun, die Tetrahymena, ich habe Ihnen dies nicht gesagt, aber diese Organismen sind unsterblich. Sie vermehren sich einfach immer weiter. Wenn man sie füttert und freundlich mit ihnen spricht, vermehren sie sich endlos weiter. Sie sind unsterblich. Sie müssen also, nebenbei bemerkt, über sehr gute DNA-Reparatursysteme verfügen. Und sie besaßen jede Menge Telomerasen, sozusagen. Hingen diese beiden Tatsachen zusammen? Was tut man also? Nun, man manipuliert die Telomerase experimentell, und sorgt mit genetischen Methoden dafür, dass sie nicht mehr funktioniert. Das also taten wir. Dann stellten wir fest, dass in den nächsten 20 Generationen oder so, die Telomere nach und nach immer kürzer und kürzer wurden, und die Zellen hörten auf sich zu teilen. Wenn ich nun davon rede, dass wir die Telomerase genetisch zerstört haben, mache ich Ihnen ein Geständnis. Dies klingt alles sehr absichtlich nicht wahr, als hätten wir den Plan gehabt, sie zu zerstören. Tatsächlich führten wir damals ein anderes Experiment durch. Wir betrachteten die RNA und fragten uns nach ihrer Fähigkeit, als Schablone zu dienen. Doch wir hatten sehr großes Glück, weil es sich herausstellte, dass einige der Mutationen nicht in die DNA kopiert wurde, was uns sehr frustrierte. Doch dann bemerkten wir: "Oh, seht mal. Die Telomere werden kürzer und die Zellen sterben". Und dann stellten wir fest, dass das Enzym in den Zellen nicht mehr aktiv war. Und dies war nun also eine sehr nützliche Mutante. Doch wir hatten nicht damit begonnen, diese unmittelbare Frage zu stellen. Wieder war die Lektion dieser Sache: Schau immer nach dem, was der Organismus dir sagt. Wir hatten dieses besondere Experiment nicht mit dieser Frage im Hinterkopf entworfen. Doch es erwies sich als das absolut perfekte Experiment zur Beantwortung der Frage: "Braucht man Telomerase?" Denn wir hatten zufällig eine Mutation erzeugt, die die Aktivität der Enzyme in den Zellen beeinträchtigt oder ruiniert, verdirbt, zerstört. Und dies versetzte uns also in die Lage, die Frage zu stellen, die ich jetzt hier oben hinstelle. Und es sieht so aus, als ob ich die Absicht gehabt hätte, dies zu sagen und zu tun, als ob ich geplant hätte, dieses Experiment durchzuführen. Doch wir sind einfach durch einen glücklichen Zufall darüber gestolpert. Wahrscheinlich hätten wir dieses Experiment als nächstes durchzuführen versucht. Doch wir hatten Glück und erhielten eine Mutante, die funktioniert. Und was dies für uns bedeutete, war: Wir hatten das Zentrum der Fähigkeit dieser Zellen gefunden, sich zu vermehren. Dies war also wirklich.... Wissen Sie, alle diese Zellen starben. Die Telomere wurden immer kürzer und sie starben. Die wichtige Lektion war also ein unsterblicher Organismus: Wir mussten lediglich die Komponente der Telomerase mutieren. Es war die RNA. Wir wussten, was es war, sehr, sehr genau. Und die Zellen wurden sterblich. Das sagte uns, dass die Telomerase die Telomere erhielt. Nun gut, wir wussten nun also etwas über die Telomerstruktur, bei der es sich um sich wiederholende DNA handelt. Diese DNA-Sequenzen werden durch Telomerase hergestellt, und sie bleiben durch einen sehr komplizierten, hochgradig gesteuerten Prozess erhalten. Und was leistet das für die Zellen? Es erstellt eine Plattform, eine Plattform von DNA-Bindungsstellen, an die sich sehr viele sehr interessante interaktive Proteine binden, die speziell die DNA-Sequenz binden. Sie haben Proteinpartner und gehen auf dynamische Weise mit dem Telomer Verbindungen ein und lösen sie wieder auf. Doch das Wichtige ist: Sie erstellen eine Hülle, und diese Schutzhülle ist der ganze Zweck der Telomere. Und das ist diese Kappe. Das ist die Schutzkappe, ok. Ich vergleiche sie immer mit der Hülse am Ende von Schnürsenkeln. Doch wie ich sagte, gibt es dieses inhärente Problem, dass Telomere - aufgrund der ihnen wesentlichen Replikationseigenschaften und weil wir mittlerweile Nuklease-Aktivitäten kennen - dass Telomere die Tendenz haben, kürzer zu werden. Es ist also so, wie das verschlissene Ende eines Schnürsenkels: Sie haben die schützende Hülse verloren, und nun dröselt sich der Schnürsenkel auf. Und dies ist eine sehr schlechte Situation. Die Zelle reagiert eindeutig darauf. Was passiert, ist Folgendes: Dieses sehr verkürzte Telomer sendet ein Signal an die Zellen, und die Zellen stellen ihre Teilung ein. Tatsächlich können sie Instabilitäten ihres Genoms durchmachen. Und dieses "verschlissene Ende" - bei dem es sich lediglich um eine Metapher handelt - ist im wahrsten Sinne ein verkürztes Telomer oder es sind verkürzte Telomere, und das hindert Zellen an der weiteren Teilung. Zusammenfassend lässt sich also sagen: Wenn man zu viel Abnutzung hat, leben die Zellen nicht weiter, ok? Schauen wir uns nun also Situation beim Menschen an. Wir kommen nun zu der Frage: "Wie funktioniert all dies beim Menschen?" Wir haben jetzt eine deutlich andere Situation vor uns, als bei Tetrahymena oder Hefen und solchen Organismen, die sich einfach endlos weiter teilen. Wir haben es jetzt mit uns selbst zu tun. Und Sie wissen, dass wir in den Industriegesellschaften, in denen die Lebensbedingungen gut sind, zum Beispiel eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Grad haben, Entschuldigung, von 80 Jahren - ich denke an das warme Wetter, das wir heute in Lindau haben. Wir haben eine Lebenserwartung von etwa 80 Jahren. Und die maximale Lebensdauer beträgt etwa 120 Jahre. Sie entspricht in etwa diesem Wert. Unser Leben erstreckt sich heute über viele Jahrzehnte. Nun, wir wissen mit Sicherheit, dass die dem zugrundeliegenden molekularen Prozesse bei allen Eukaryoten ähnlich sein werden. Das hat man umfassend beobachtet. Wissen Sie, wir haben Telomerase ebenso wie Tetrahymena und Hefen usw. Doch der wichtige Aspekt hieran ist, dass die Genetik all dieser Dinge sich nun über einen sehr langen Zeitraum manifestiert, über Jahrzehnte des Lebens. Wie also spielt sich das alles ab? Das war in vielen, vielen verschiedenen Labors in den letzten paar Jahrzehnten das Forschungsthema. Eine einfache Beobachtung also - grob umrissen, und es wird Ausnahmen geben - lautet, dass die Telomerase durch einen allgemeinen Vorgang häufig die erwachsenen menschlichen Zellen an weiteren Teilungen hindert. Sie werden also tatsächlich kürzer, und in vielen Systemen des Körpers findet man Hinweise darauf, dass wahrscheinlich Folgendes geschieht: dass die Telomere immer kürzer werden und der Alterungsprozess voranschreitet. Man kann Hinweise darauf in vivo, bei Menschen beobachten. Nun, die Frage lautete: Spielt sich dieses zelluläre Phänomen im Laufe unseres Lebens ab? Brennt die Kerze sozusagen für die Telomere ab? Zeigt sich das tatsächlich im Lauf des menschlichen Lebens, oder nicht? Das war die Frage, zu deren Beantwortung viele, viele Labors Beweismaterial zusammengetragen haben. Und so werde ich Ihnen also als erstes einen sehr kurzen Überblick über das geben, was man beobachtet hat. Anschließend möchte ich mit Ihnen einige Aspekte dessen bedenken, was diesen Prozess beeinflussen könnte. Ok, gehen wir also zurück zum Grundsätzlichen! Was diesen Prozess als erstes beeinflussen würde, wäre die Tatsache, ob man über Telomerase verfügt oder nicht. Es wurden so viele Analysen dazu durchgeführt, wo wir in menschlichen Zellen Telomerase finden. Zunächst die normalen Zellen: Nun, in normalen Zellen, in Zellen, die tatsächlich unsterblich sein müssen oder die eine sehr lange Replikationslebensspanne haben, findet man sehr viel Telomerase, zum Beispiel in Stammzellen, Keimzellen, Keimbahnzellen. Wissen Sie, wir alle sind heute hier, weil die Zellen unserer Keimbahnen Telomerase enthalten. Sie erhalten die Telomere von Generation zu Generation. Und in bestimmten Stammzellen, die während ihres ganzen Lebens über lange andauernde proliferative Eigenschaften verfügen, besonders im Immunsystem. Doch man findet Telomerase auch in anderen Zellen, und wir fanden das eigentlich sehr instruktiv, andere Zellen anzuschauen und besonders Zellen des Immunsystems und Zellen des peripheren Blutes, wo sie jemandem mit einer ziemlich nicht-invasiven Blutentnahme eine Probe entnehmen können. Gesunde Leute geben einem Blut, und man kann anhand der weißen Blutkörperchen, der Zellen des Immunsystems aus einer Blutprobe, die Telomere untersuchen und wie sie erhalten werden, als eine Art Fenster in die Zellen. Heute können wir dies sogar, wie ich Ihnen später zeigen werde, anhand von Speichel untersuchen, denn es gibt viele Zellen, die in Ihren Speichel gelangen, und er gibt einem auch eine gute Quelle genomischer DNA. Und so können wir die Telomerase in Blutzellen quantifizieren, und so könnte man erwarten, dass die Telomerase mehr oder weniger beeinflussen wird, wie kurz die Telomere werden, und in welcher Zeit. In solchen Zellen können wir natürlich auch die Länge der Telomere bestimmen. Eine weitere wichtige Entdeckung war, dass die Telomerase in Krebszellen stark aktiviert ist. Und Krebszellen haben, wie Sie wissen, außer ihren vielen anderen unerwünschten Eigenschaften, die Eigenschaft, zu viel zu wachsen. Die Zellen wachsen zu viel, weil sie mutiert sind und epigenetischen Änderungen unterlagen, die dazu geführt haben, dass sie die Signale ignorieren, die ihnen zeigen, dass sie die Vermehrung einstellen und sich an die richtige Stelle im Körper bewegen sollen usw. Krebszellen sind also bösartige Zellen, die keiner Kontrolle unterliegen, und die Telomerase erlaubt diesen unkontrollierten Zellen, ihre Telomere zu erhalten und sich weiter zu vermehren. Im Zusammenhang mit Krebszellen ist die Telomerase wirklich eine schlechte Sache. Doch die Krebszellen haben zahlreiche andere Änderungen durchgemacht. Tatsächlich erscheint in gewöhnlichen Krebszellen eine erhöhte Telomerase-Konzentration erst, wenn sie sich in einem ziemlich fortgeschrittenen Stadium befinden. Über die Telomerase in Krebszellen werde ich heute nicht sprechen. Es ist eine faszinierende Frage. Es gibt interessante Fragen darüber, ob man sie hemmen oder manipulieren kann, um die Krebszellen zu zerstören. Doch für heute werde ich mich auf die normalen Zellen konzentrieren, ok? Stellen wir uns also einfach vor, von welchen Situationen wir erwarten könnten, dass sie sich in den nächsten Jahrzehnten im menschlichen Leben ereignen werden. Stellen Sie sich die Situation in Keimzellen vor. Nun, die Zellen werden erhalten bleiben, genau wie bei Tetrahymena oder der Hefe. Und daher wissen wir, dass wir eine Balance zwischen der Verkürzung und Verlängerung erwarten, da die Telomere im Großen und Ganzen erhalten bleiben. Es gibt eine Menge genetischer und nicht-genetischer Steuerungen dieser Prozesse, wie ich Ihnen sogleich erklären werden. Doch Sie können sich auch vorstellen, dass die Balance in die andere Richtung geht, und dies hat man bei bestimmten Immunzellen beobachtet, während sie verschiedene multiplikative Stadien im Körper durchlaufen. In normalen differenzierten Zellen werden Telomere tatsächlich länger. Also diese Allgemeingültigkeit, die ich Ihnen gezeigt habe: Sie müssen nicht immer kürzer werden, doch häufig werden sie kürzer. Und wenn die Zellen über etwas Telomerase verfügen, könnten Sie sich vorstellen, dass sie durch diese natürlichen Prozesse kürzer werden, doch die Telomerase könnte versuchen, ihre Länge zu erhalten. Sie könnte in der Lage sein, den furchtbaren Moment, in dem die Telomere zu kurz werden, eine ganze Zeit lang aufzuschieben. Doch der Alterungsprozess würde schließlich doch weitergehen. Und das wäre - wenn alles andere gleich bliebe - später als alles andere, wenn es weniger Telomerase gäbe. Und könnte sie die Alterung nicht so lange aufschieben. Wie würden alle diese Dinge funktionieren? Wir wissen sogar aus einer Hefezelle, dass sie 350 Gene hat - mindestens, wir zählen noch -, die die Länge der Telomere und die Längenverteilungen beeinflussen. Wir wissen also, dass dieser Prozess sehr vielen genetischen Steuerungen unterliegt. Wir erwarten demnach genetische Steuerungen und wir erwarten nicht-genetische Steuerungen, da alles auch von nicht-genetischen Einflüssen mitbestimmt wird. Das wird das Hauptthema sein, dem ich mich zuwende. Doch ich wollte Ihnen noch kurz sagen, dass der Grund dafür, warum wir hieran so ein großes Interesse entwickelten, der ist, dass viele Arbeitsgruppen erkannt hatten, dass viele übliche Erkrankungen des Alterns - einschließlich der Krebsleiden, aber auch viele Krankheiten, die für alternde Menschen charakteristisch sind - mit kürzeren Telomeren in den normalen Zellen in Zusammenhang gebracht worden sind. Dies ist nur eine kleine Auswahl der Krankheiten, bei denen Sie diese Zuordnung finden, und die Liste des Autors auf der rechten Seite ist äußerst unvollständig, es ist nur eine kleine Auswahl. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie die üblichen Krankheiten. Wenn Sie sich diese Krankheiten ansehen, werden Sie erkennen, dass sich darunter einige der Krankheiten wiederfinden, die zu den häufigsten Todesursachen gehören, und die in den Bevölkerungen zu den ernsten medizinischen Problemen führen: Krebs, pulmonale Fibrosen, Herzkranzgefäßerkrankungen, vaskuläre Demenz, degenerative Zustände, Diabetes, sogar Risikofaktoren für einige von ihnen. Dies hat man in verwandten Studien erkannt. Lassen Sie uns einfach darüber nachdenken. Denken wir darüber nach, was dies bedeutet. Wir sind an diesem Symposium interessiert, an diesem wunderbaren Treffen zu den großen Fragen der globalen Gesundheit. Und dies zeigt das Diagramm für.... Ich glaube dies sind die Zahlen für die USA. Es wir in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß überall auf der Welt zutreffen: dass wir zunächst die Situation haben, in der die Bevölkerung überaltert. Ich haben soeben erst etwas aus einem Aufsatz entnommen, der am 25. Juni veröffentlicht wurde, vor nur wenigen Tagen. Fast 10 % der Erwachsenen haben Diabetes. Die Häufigkeit nimmt zu, und das Wichtige ist, dass dies nicht nur für die Industrienationen gilt. Sie steigt in den Entwicklungsländern. Dies ist ein wahrhaft globales Problem: 10 % der Erwachsenen weltweit, in allen Ländern, leiden an Diabetes. Und die Häufigkeit nimmt nur zu. Wir haben also einige große Gesundheitsfragen. Über mehrere von ihnen haben wir heute bereits etwas gehört. Doch ich denke, dass wir auch über diese Fragen nachdenken müssen. Ich spreche diese Fragen heute an, weil unsere Forschung das, was wir über die Erhaltung von Telomeren beim Menschen verstehen, mit dieser Art von Krankheiten, von denen Diabetes ein Beispiel ist, in Verbindung gebracht hat. Ok, es ist also ein wachsendes Problem. Ok, was habe ich soeben gesagt? Ich habe gesagt, dass die Kürze von Telomeren in der allgemeinen Bevölkerung, d.h. bei der Mehrzahl der Menschen, in kleinen Gruppen weltweit, mit häufigen Alterserkrankungen in Verbindung gebracht worden ist. Ok. Was geht also vor? Nun, sind es die "Wartungsarbeiten" an den Telomeren, was zu dieser Verkürzung führt? Was man in dieser Situation tut, ist natürlich, dass man sich der Humangenetik zuwendet und sich seltene Mendel'sche Mutationen anschaut, und man stellt fest, was man davon lernen kann. Sie sind beim Menschen sehr instruktiv gewesen. Und Forscher haben in Versuchen mit Mäusen absichtlich Telomerase entfernt. Außerdem ist es eindeutig, dass die seltenen Telomerase-Mutationen, die beim Menschen auftreten, die Enzymaktivität der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit beeinträchtigen, Telomere hinzuzufügen. Sie unterbrechen die enzymatische Funktion der Telomerase oder ihre Fähigkeit, Telomere hinzuzufügen, ok. Mutierte Telomerasegene sind einfach reine Glückssache. Das Rouletterad dreht sich und Ihre Eltern geben Ihnen irgendeine Kombination von Genen. Es ist das Glück der Gene, und in diesem Fall das Unglück der Gene. Das führt zur Kürze der Telomere. Es ist sehr deutlich, dass dies eine Krankheitsfolge hat, sowohl beim Menschen als auch im Mausmodell, wo dies in Experimenten durchgeführt worden ist. Diese Art von Krankheiten, ihre Häufigkeit nimmt stark zu. Die betroffenen Organismen werden für diese Krankheiten sehr anfällig. Schauen Sie sich diese Liste an. Sie beginnt sie an die Liste zu erinnern, die ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, diese generellen Erkrankungen, die in der allgemein Bevölkerung mit dem Alterungsprozess und mit der Kürze von Telomeren in Zusammenhang stehen. Hier, bei diesen seltenen Mutationen, haben wir es mit einer Kausalkette zu tun. Die interessante Frage lautet nun: Wie verhält es sich mit den gewöhnlichen Verkürzungen, den allgemeinen Variationen im Genom, die zur Folge haben, dass Telomere kürzer sind. Führen auch sie zu Krankheiten? Diese Untersuchungen, die epidemiologisch wesentlich komplexer sind - man hat soeben erst begonnen, diese Frage zu stellen - legen bereits eine positive Antwort nahe. Und es gibt einen wunderbaren Fall, einen Fall von Krebs, bei dem man bei einem bestimmten Krebs - dem Blasenkrebs, einer ziemlich häufigen Form von Krebs - sehen kann, dass eine Verkürzung, die zu kürzeren Telomeren führt, auch Blasenkrebs verursacht. Ein Teil dieser Wirkung wird durch die Kürzung der Telomere vermittelt. Genetisch gesehen wissen wir, dass dies der Fall ist. Nun wende ich mich einem Thema zu, dass sehr interessant für uns gewesen ist: den nicht-genetischen Faktoren. Wissen Sie, wenn man über künftige Herausforderungen nachdenkt, die Genetik... Ich denke, wir haben die Genetik, wenn man so will, fest in der Hand. Nun, ich meine, dass das in mancher Hinsicht eine triviale Feststellung ist, denn natürlich gibt es nach wie vor ungeheur komplexe Zusammenhänge. Doch wir verstehen es, wir kommen mit der Genetik klar. Wir verstehen, dass Gene Auswirkungen haben. Ja, Gene wirken wechselseitig aufeinander ein. Ja, wir wissen, dass sie unterschiedlich wichtig sind. Es gibt viele verschiedene Wege, auf denen wir dies untersuchen können, und dies geschieht mit großer Intensität auf äußerst produktive Weise. Lassen Sie uns etwas Schwierigeres tun. Lassen Sie uns etwas Spaß haben, ok? Wählen wir etwas aus, was schwieriger ist: nicht-genetische Faktoren. Und mein nächster Punkt ist, wenn jemand mit einer wirklich interessanten Frage zu Ihnen kommt, die Sie einfach ergreift, und wenn Sie denken, dass diese Person für diese Art von Forschung gut geeignet ist, dann greifen Sie zu! Wir begannen also eine Zusammenarbeit. Und das war wunderbar, denn unsere Freunde in der Abteilung für Psychiatrie am UCSF waren sehr an chronischem Stress interessiert. Wir fanden - man höre und staune -, dass wir mit Ihnen zusammenarbeiten und zeigen konnten, dass Patienten, bei denen, nebenbei bemerkt, chronischer Stress ein bekannter Risikofaktor für allgemeine Erkrankungen war, etwa der Herzkranzgefäße, dass die Kürze von Telomeren mit chronischem Stress assoziiert war. Meine Zeit ist zu Ende, und was ich tun werde ist.... Das war die Botschaft. Das Wichtige war, dass wir herausfanden, dass Stress eine Verkürzung der Telomere bewirkt. Dinge, die einem in der Kindheit zustoßen, wie zum Beispiel mehreren Traumata ausgesetzt zu sein, haben einen Einfluss auf die Telomere, wenn man erwachsen ist. Das ist es, was aus diesem Diagramm hier hervorgeht. Daher hat uns diese Frage sehr, sehr fasziniert. Nun haben wir also erkannt... Wenn ich in einem Schritt durch alle diese Dinge gehe, ich hatte Ihnen viel zu viel zu sagen. Ich wusste, dass ich so aufgeregt sein würde. Wir versuchen wirklich die Interaktion zwischen chronischem Stress und der Verkürzung der Telomere zu verstehen, von der wir wissen, dass sie zu Krankheiten führt. Wir versuchen zu verstehen, wie alle diese Dinge miteinander zusammenhängen. Das Fazit war also, dass wir uns die Sachen in der zeitlichen Entwicklung anschauen, und wir sehen Auswirkungen. Doch mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent entschied, dass er eine Maschine zur Analyse der Länge von 100.000 Telomeren einrichten würde. Er baute einen sehr komplizierten Roboter, und hier sieht man ihn in Aktion, ok. Wir konnten also massenweise Informationen über die DNA der Telomere bekommen. Und nun werde ich hiermit enden, denn es ist meine Bitte an Sie alle, die sie an wirklich komplizierten Datensätzen interessiert sind und daran, wie man sie analysiert. Denn was wir taten, war, wir erstellten - wie mein wunderbarer technischer Assistent sagte - mehr Daten über Telomerlängen als jemals zuvor. Hier sind sie also. Dies sind einfach die rohen Daten, ok, tonnenweise, 100.000 Leute. Doch das Schöne ist, dass sie mit einem wunderbaren Projekt der genomweiten Assoziation verbunden sind: mit 675.000 Verkürzungen bei diesen 100.000 Leuten. Und 20 Jahren klinischer Daten, alles longitudinale, elektronische Gesundheitsdaten. Dies wird so faszinierend sein, diese wunderbaren Informationen zu verwenden und damit zu beginnen, sie miteinander in Beziehung zu setzen. Denn das eigentliche Ziel ist, dass wir diesen Lebensweg wirklich verstehen wollen. Wir möchten den Verlust der Telomere auf der einen Seite, den Gewinn von Telomeren auf der anderen verstehen, die Erhaltung der Telomere. Wir wissen, dass es genetische Komponenten gibt. Und was ich Ihnen nicht gesagt habe - es ist jedoch publiziert - wir wissen, dass negative Ereignisse in der Kindheit und chronischer psychischer Stress zu einer Verkürzung der Telomere und damit zu einem erhöhten Krankheitsrisiko führen. Bildung, das freue ich mich Ihnen sagen zu können, ist eindeutig mit längeren Telomeren assoziiert, ebenso wie körperliche Betätigung und Stressreduktion. Mit diesem erfreulichen Hinweis möchte ich schließen und Ihnen lediglich sagen, warum ich denke, dass dies so wichtig ist: Weil ich denke, dass es so viel mehr zu lernen gibt. Und dies sind die Leute in meinem Labor und unsere Mitarbeiter, mit denen wir so viel Spaß haben bei der Konfrontation mit Fragen, die meines Erachtens wichtig sind, wenn wir über Fragen menschlicher Gesundheit nachdenken. Wir sehen sehr allgemein verbreitete Krankheitssituationen, die weltweit zunehmen. Ich möchte Sie zur Annahme dieser Herausforderung einladen, nachdem wir die akuten Probleme, diese schweren Probleme der ansteckenden Krankheiten und der größten globalen Gesundheitsprobleme gelöst haben werden. Warum schauen Sie nicht in die Zukunft der nächsten Jahrzehnte und sagen, was uns noch bleibt. Uns bleiben diese anderen chronischen Erkrankungen und diese anderen Krankheiten, und ich denke, wir sollten uns um das sehr komplexe Problem kümmern, wie wir diese Krankheiten verhindern. Wir wollen die akuten Krankheiten behandeln. Lassen Sie uns darüber nachdenken, wie wir die anderen, die übrig bleiben werden, verhindern können, jetzt, da wir die akuten Infektionen und anderen Krankheiten überleben. Haben Sie vielen Dank.

Elizabeth Blackburn describing the experimental approaches she used to characterise telomeres.
(00:08:09 - 00:10:26)

 

Damage to our DNA and how our cells repair it

The realisation that X-rays and other forms of radiation can cause detrimental mutations was due, in large part, to the findings of the American geneticist Hermann Joseph Muller. In 1946, Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his important discovery. He devoted much of his later career to warning about the harmful effects of radiation, especially of the medical kind, on human health, like in this excerpt from his 1955 talk at the 5th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting:

 

Hermann Muller (1955) - The Effect of Radiation and other Present Day Influences Upon the Human Genetic Constitution

To begin with, I would like to express my appreciation and my sincere gratitude to the administration of the town of Lindau and to the hosts of this meeting for presenting us scientists with the opportunity to take part in these five days of mutual intellectual fertilisation, to get to know each other at a personal level and to enjoy your endearing hospitality in this beautiful and interesting environment. Above all, it is an encouraging example particularly for Americans to see to what intellectual and cultural heights a town as small as Lindau can raise itself – and also what sacrifices it is willing to make for this development. And now, if you pardon me, I should like to return to my mother tongue, English. This is because I fear, or, in a certain sense, I indeed hope that my German is worse than my genetics. Each cell contains a great collection of thousands of different genes, arranged in line in the chromosomes. It is by the interactions of the chemical products of these genes that the composition and structure of every living thing is determined. Each gene reproduces itself exactly, forming a daughter gene just like itself before each cell division. Thus, the daughter cells and individuals of later generations have genes like those originally present. However, these genes are subject to rare ultramicroscopic chemical accidents called gene mutations that usually strike but one gene at a time. The mutant gene that resulting from a mutation thereafter produces daughter genes that have the mutant composition. Thus, descendants arise which have some abnormal characteristic. These characteristics are of many thousands of diverse kinds. Very rarely a mutant gene arises which happens to have an advantageous affect. This allows the descendents who inherited to multiply more than the other individuals in the population. Until finally individuals with that mutant gene become so numerous as to establish the new type as the normal type, replacing the old. This process continued step after step, constitutes evolution. However, since the mutations result from ultramicroscopic chemical accidents, a mutant gene is in more than 99% of cases detrimental. That is it produces some kind of harmful effect, some disturbance of function. The disturbance may be enough to kill with certainty any individual who has inherited a mutant gene of this kind, this same kind from both his parents. An individual whom we will call homozygous because he has inherited the same kind of gene from both. Such a mutant gene which kills with certainty is called a lethal. More often the effect is not fully lethal but only somewhat detrimental, giving rise to some risk of premature death or failure to reproduce but not a 100% certainty of it. Now in the great majority of cases an individual who receives a given mutant gene from one of his parents receives from the other parent a corresponding but unlike gene, one of the original normal type. He is said to be heterozygous in contrast to homozygous. In the heterozygous individual it is usually found that the normal gene is dominant, the mutant gene recessive. That is the normal gene usually has much more influence than the mutant gene in determining the characteristics of the individual. However, exact studies show that the mutant gene is seldom completely recessive. It does usually have some slight detrimental affect on the heterozygous individual, subjecting him to some risk of premature death or failure to reproduce. That is a risk of genetic extinction. This risk is commonly of the order of a few percent down to some small fraction of 1%. It is readily seen that if a mutant gene causes an average risk of extinction of, for instance 5%. That is a chance of 1 in 20 of dying off without leaving offspring like itself. This mutant gene will on the average pass down through about 20 generations before the line of decent containing this gene is extinguished. Because that risk will continue generation after generation until extinction does occur. And a 1/20th chance in each generation takes on the average 20 generations to reach its fruition. It is therefore said that the persistence, P of that particular gene is 20 generations. There is some reason to estimate that the average persistence of mutant genes in general may be something like 40. Although there are vast differences between mutant genes in this respect. That would mean the risk of the extinction in any one generation of 2½%. Observations on the frequency of certain mutant characteristics in man, supported by recent more exact observations on mice by Russell working at Oak Ridge indicate that any one given gene on the average, any one gene, undergoes one mutation of a given type per generation among 50,000 to 100,000 human germ cells. That is the mutation frequency for one gene which we call My. Haldane invented this terminology, the Greek letter My for mutation. My for one gene. Observations on the fruit fly drosophila show that there are all together at least 10,000 times as many different mutations occurring as those of a given type in a given gene altogether. Now since it is very likely that man is at least as complicated genetically as the fly drosophila, we must multiple our figure of one in 100,000 which to be conservative we assume for one type of mutation by at least 10,000 to get a minimum estimate for the total number of mutations arising in each generation in all genes together in human germ cells. That is one in 10 to one in 5 according to whether we take one in 100,000 or one in 50,000. Now every individual, each of us, arises from 2 germ cells, sperm and egg and therefore contains twice this number of newly arisen mutations. That is 2 in 10 to 4 in 10. This is per germ cell per generation of course. This means that among each 10 of us on the average there are 2 to 4 mutations which arose in the germ cells of our parents, even though our parents were given no irradiation or other special treatment. This then is the frequency of so called spontaneous mutation. Now far more frequent than the mutant genes that have newly arisen in the parental generation, the immediate parents are those with arose in earlier generations and have been handed down and which have not yet been eliminated from the population by causing death or failure to reproduce. The average frequency, F, of all the mutant genes present per individual of the population, for you and me, is easily calculated if we know My and P by simply multiplying them together. For example if My is 2 in 10, that is 2 new mutant genes arising among 10 individuals in each generation on the average and P is 40. That is each gene tends to persist for 40 generations on the average. Then an individual of any given generation must contain an average accumulation of as many mutations as have arisen over the past 40 generations. That is 40 times 2 over 10 or 8. This very rough estimate which I made 6 years ago happens to agree well with the figure 8 estimated a few months ago by Slatis in Montreal by a very different and more direct method. His method was based on the frequency with which definite homozygous abnormalities appeared among the children of marriages between cousins. This figure 8 by the way does not include most of the multitude of more or less superficial differences, sometimes conspicuous but very minor in the conduct of life whereby we commonly recognise one another. These minor differences probably arise seldom by mutation, yet become inordinately numerous because of the very high value of P, persistence, which they have. The figure 8 then includes the more major detrimental characteristics. We can’t draw an exact line of course. These characteristics, these 8 or more detrimental genes however, being nearly always heterozygous in us are only slightly developed and yet enough developed to give each one of us a pattern of idiosyncrasies. I think I’d like to make a diagram to give you a more graphic idea of this relationship. Suppose we have here some individuals of a population. They reproduce and form 10 more. This is a much simplified diagram. And of these 10, 2 have a new mutation, just arisen in the previous generation and that’s passed down. And it’s passed down for 4 generations because the persistence we suppose in this simplified diagram is 4. And the mutation frequency is 2 in 10. Then in the next generation there’ll be 2 more. And in the next 2 more and so on. And you can see that if we start with no mutations the number here is each generation, a vertical column. The number gradually rises until it becomes 8. Then it says there until mutation stops occurring. Of course in the big population it would keep on. And so it would become stable at 8. And F, if F is the number of mutations it will equal MP. But of course in our case P is 40, where did I slip up there, I didn’t want to represent 40 but only as a matter of fact 8, Here the average individual only has 4 out of 10. And if the persistence was 40, the average individual would himself contain 8. That’s alright, that makes that 8/10th for this case. And if we have 40 it becomes 8. Gives each of us 8. Now as the diagram shows each mutant gene must at last cause the extinction of its own line of decent. Not only the gene comes to an end but that individual and his descendents come to an end. And they’re replaced by others who are multiplying. And in that way that gene causes a frustrated life at that point, an unsuccessful life. Moreover, that gene caused a succession of slight disturbances in the intermediate generations before the final extinction. It is interesting to note that a slightly detrimental gene, one that persists for many generations, also causes one frustrated life, one unsuccessful life, just as a very detrimental gene does. Only it takes longer before it happens to do that. Moreover, the slightly detrimental gene, although on the average it causes each individual carrying it to suffer less, is handed down to a larger number of individuals. To a number of individuals which is the reciprocal of the amount of harm expressed in terms of the risk of extinction that it causes. And in this way the slightly detrimental gene does as much harm in the end as a fully detrimental gene, a lethal. Now although each of us may be handicapped very little by any one of these genes in heterozygous condition, the sum of all 8 of them causes a noticeable amount of disability ranging, varying in pattern from one of us to another. And felt more in our later years of course, we feel our disabilities. Altogether we see that the group of the 8 or more, or less genes gives us a risk of premature death of roughly 20% or 1 in 5. Greater than that which an ideal normal man who is of course non existent, would have. Now these numbers are of course only approximations to give you an idea of the order of magnitude. Besides, the frequency F which is called the equilibrium frequency exists only when conditions for gene elimination and for mutation frequency have remained stable for many generations. Because over many generations as many mutations must arise per generation as are eliminated giving us stable value of F. Just as in the law of mass action in chemistry, a stable amount of a substance depends upon the same amount being destroyed as produced. But if the mutation rate changes, this again is like the law of mass action in chemistry. As for example by the application of radiation or if the persistence changes because of environmental conditions that cause mutant genes to have a more or a less harmful affect than before. Then the product MP assumes a new value. That means that there will be a new equilibrium level of F if the new values of My and P continue long enough. But it will be a long time before this new equilibrium is attained. Theoretically it’s never reached. Thus in our diagram we see that with P equals 4, it will take 4 generations before this equilibrium number is attained. This keeps increasing for 4 generations, equal to P equals 4. The actual case is more complicated because P doesn’t have a fixed value. Some genes are a little more and some less, some are much more and so it’s spread out. With P equals 40 on the average it would take something like 40 generations or about 1,000 to 1,200 years in man to get near an equilibrium value of F. And after only 20 generations or 500 or 600 years the equilibrium would be only about half reached. Let’s now see how a given dose of ionising radiation would affect the population. Radiation induces mutations similar to the spontaneous ones. At a frequency that’s linearly proportional to the dose of ionising radiation received by the germ cells. In no matter how long or short a time that’s been delivered. Now Russell’s data on mice, the organism studied in this respect which is nearest to man, show that it would take about 40 R/units, 40 R of radiation to produce mutations at a frequency equal to the natural frequency. Since we have estimated the spontaneous mutation frequency to be 2 mutations per individual that is to be 2 mutations in each 10 individuals at a minimum estimate. Then a dose at 40R by adding 2 induced mutations to these 2 spontaneous ones would result in a total frequency of 8 mutations among 10 individuals. That is the rate would be doubled. Yet the mutant gene content of the individuals being 8 per individual to begin with would be raised only from 8 to 8.2. An increase of only 2½% by this 40R in the next generation. This effect on the population would ordinarily be too small to be noticed. In causing decreased vigour or decreased size or increased mortality, or morbidity or frequency of abnormalities. One must remember in this connection that the error of any mean value for such characteristics is very large. Not only because of the great genetic differences between the individuals of the population. But because environment too is a source of differences in the expression of their inherited traits. And because one often gets determinate differences in environment between 2 groups that are compared. This explains why even Hiroshima survivors who had been near the blast and who may have received several hundred roentgens showed no statistically significant increase in genetic defects among their children. However, the offspring of American radiologists who probably got about the same amount over their life of radiation as the people at Hiroshima near the blast did in the studies of Macht and Lawrence just published, show a statistically significant increase in abnormalities among their children. A small but significant increase. Yet even though they do not show statistically that mutant genes are produced and they do take their toll in the end of genetic extinctions. But because of the value of P being so large, this toll is spread out over more than 1,000 years and so it’s quite small in any one generation, relatively. Actually, the most damage is done in the first generation after exposure. Because gradually the mutant genes die out. Contrary to common opinion which holds that later generations would show more affect. How much damage would be done in the first generation we can find in this way. If 40R were received then you have .2 new extra additional mutations received per individual. But since the persistence, P is 40, only 1/40th of those will cause extinction in any one generation, for example in the first generation. And therefore only 1/40th of .2 or 1 in 200 meet with extinction. It means that 1 in 200, ½ of 1% of the individuals of the first generation are killed. In other words in the population of 100 million it would be 500,000 in the first generation. Spread out over all the generations you multiply it by 40 and you find that there were 20 million. There will have been 20 million extinctions in a population of 100 million. Moreover, those are only the extinctions, the disabilities found in intermediate generations will of course be far more numerous. And yet in spite of this the amount of deterioration in the population as a whole is relatively very little. The situation would be very different if a doubling of the mutation frequency were carried out repeatedly by irradiating the population in each generation for a period comparable with P, say 1,000 years. For in that case F would gradually creep upwards towards the new equilibrium value proportional to the doubled mutation frequency. And after 1,000 years or so F would have been changed from 8 to about 16 by the 40R received over these many generations. Along with this double mutation frequency there would be a corresponding increase in the amount of disability manifested among the individuals of the population. And in the frequency with which they met genetically occasioned extinction. It is possible that this situation unlike that caused by only a single generations doubled mutation frequency would really be ruinous to a human population. For in man a given rise in mutation frequency is more dangerous than in most species. For the very low rate of multiplication of man does not allow nearly as rapid a rate of elimination per generation of detrimental mutant genes as in most species. And under modern civilised conditions this multiplication rate is reduced much more still. While at the same time the pressure of natural selection for the time being at least, in modern times is greatly reduced through the artificial saving of lives. Under these circumstances a long continued doubling of the mutation frequency by something like 40R per generation might call for a higher rate of elimination than the population could tolerate. This would mean in the long run the continued deterioration of the population in its gene content. More and more accumulation of mutant genes. And at last its diminution in numbers until finally total extinction ensued. We do not at present however have nearly enough knowledge of the strength of the various factors to pass a quantitative judgement as to how high the critical mutation frequency would have to be and how low the levels of multiplication and selection to bring about this denouement. We can only see that danger lies in this direction and ask for further study of the whole matter. Let us now consider the effects of nuclear explosions. As for test explosions, test explosions at the rate at which these have been carried on over the past 4 years, over the past year. They have been estimated to cause an approximate doubling of the background radiation of about 1/10th R per year. The background radiation we estimate causes about 6 to 12% of the spontaneous mutations in man. The others come from chemical causes. Therefore, a doubling of the background radiation would cause a 6 to 12% rise in the mutation frequency. Although this if continued does mean a very large absolute number of mutations per generation in the whole world population. About a million extinctions per generation caused by the test explosions in the whole world if they were continued at this rate. Nevertheless, its effect relatively to the whole population, the whole mutant gene content is extremely small. Atomic warfare presents a much more serious picture. In regions remote from the explosions such as the southern hemisphere might be it has been reckoned by Rotblat and by Lapp in the May and June issue of the bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that a hydrogen uranium fission fusion fission bomb like the ones recently tested in the Pacific would deliver an effective dose of about .04R throughout the whole period of its radio active disintegration, many years. Thus 1,500 such bombs used in war would deliver about 60R. That is to regions remote from the immediate fall outs. And so would approximately double the mutation frequency of the immediately exposed generation. In the regions subject to the more immediate fall outs, pattern bombing could have resulted in practically all populace areas receiving several 1,000 roentgens of gamma radiation. Even persons well protected in shelters during the first week might subsequently be subjected to a protracted exposure fading only very slowly and adding up to some 2,500 roentgens. You can look up Lapp, the article I’ve already referred to for that. Moreover, this estimate fails to take into account the soft radiation, alpha and beta from inhaled and ingested materials which under some circumstances as yet insufficiently dealt with in open publications may become concentrated in the air, water or food and find fairly permanent lodgement in the body. And some of them may there become concentrated also. Now although 400 roentgens is the semi lethal dose, that’s killing half of its recipients if received within a short time. A much higher dose can be tolerated if spread out over a long period of time. Thus a large proportion of those who survive and reproduce such fall outs may have received a dose of some 1,000 to 1,500R or even more. This would cause a 12 to 40 times rise in the mutation frequency of that generation. Not 12 to 40% understand, 12 to 40 times. If the mutant gene content is already because of P being 40, about 40 times the spontaneous mutation frequency, then the artificially induced mutation frequency here by adding to the germ cells another contingent of mutation genes. In fact the detrimental effect would be considerably greater than that indicated by these figures because the newly added mutant genes unlike those being stored at an equilibrium level would not yet have been subjected to any selective elimination in favour of the less detrimental ones. It can be estimated that this circumstance might cause the total detrimental influence of the newly induced genes to be twice as strong for each one on the average. As for each of the old stored so to speak genes. Therefore the increase in detrimental affect caused by the fall outs would be between 60 and 200%. Owing to these circumstances, an effect would be produced by this exposure to this one generation similar to that of a doubled accumulation of genes such as we saw would follow from a doubled mutation frequency only after about 1,000 years of its continued repetition when a new equilibrium level of accumulation had been approximated. Thus offspring of the fall out survivors might have genetic ills, twice or even 3 times as burdensome as ours. Yet at the same time the material and social disruptions occasioned by the war would enormously reduce the ability of the population to cope with and to compensate for these ills by means of medicine and all the other artificial aids to living on which we have come to depend so largely today. The worst of the matter is that this enormously increased genetic load, even though produced by a rise of the mutation frequency lasting little more than one generation, would be by no means confined to just 1 or 2 generations. Here is where the inertia of mutant gene content which in the case of a moderately increased mutation frequency works to retard, to delay and spread out, and so to soften the impact of the produced mutations, now shows the reverse side of its nature, its extreme prolongation of the effect. That is the gene content is difficult to raise. But once raised it is equally resistant to being reduced. In consequence the situation will for centuries resemble that in which an equilibrium had been attained with a mutation frequency that had been long continued at a level 2 or 3 times as high as the present one. Supposing the average content of markedly detrimental genes per person to be only doubled from 8 to 16, it can be reckoned that more than 50% of the population would come to contain a number of these mutant genes. When we consider how much we of today are already troubled with ills of partly or wholly genetic origin, especially as we grow older, the prospect of so great an increase in them is far from reassuring. It is fortunate in the long run that sterility and death ensue beyond a chronically administered dosage level of 1 or 2,000 roentgens. Because the frequency of mutations received by the descendents of an exposed population is in this way prevented from rising much beyond the amount that we have just now considered. This being the case it is probable that the offspring of the survivors, even though so considerably weakened genetically, would nevertheless, some of them be able to struggle through and re-establish a population that could continue to survive. Yet supposing that the population is able to re-establish its stability of numbers within say a couple of centuries, what price would the later generations have to pay in terms of premature death and failure to reproduce caused by the induced mutations? If in accordance with the evidence previously given, 40R admitted to produce .2 newly arisen mutant genes per person, then 1,000R must on the average add 5 mutant genes to each person’s composition. All of these 5 genes must ultimately lead to genetic extinction in a subsequent generation. But if to be conservative we suppose that 2 to 3 genes on the average combine in causing extinction. By their synergistic action we reach the conclusion that in a population whose numbers remain stable after the first generation following the explosions, there will be about 2 cases of premature death of failure to reproduce occurring in subsequent generation or other. For each first generation offspring of an exposed individual. That is if there had been 100,000 first generation offspring, there’d be 200,000 subsequent deaths in sub generation. The same in terms of millions. If however the descendents multiply so as in a century or 2 to re-establish a population equal in number to the original population, then since the great majority of the extinctions occur in more remote generations their number will be multiplied along with the number of the whole population. And so the number of genetic deaths or extinctions will become approximately twice as large altogether as the number of persons constituting the re-established population size of any one generation. The future extinctions would in this situation be several times as numerous as the deaths that have occurred in the directly exposed generation. If 70 million people had been killed at the time of the explosions then something like let’s say 2 or 300 million will be killed in future generations. At the same time the people suffering from more or less ... Even though we admit it to being probably that mankind would ultimately revive, let us not make the all too common mistake of gauging whether or not any given or proposed exposure to radiation is genetically permissible merely by the criterion of whether or not humanity at large would be completely destroyed by it. The instigation of atomic war or indeed of any other form of war can hardly find a valid defence in the proposition. Even though true that it will probably not wipe out the whole of mankind. It is by the more exacting standard of whether individuals are harmed, not by the criterion of whether mankind in general will all be wiped out, that we should judge the propriety of our other present day and proposed practices that may affect the human genetic constitution. We have to consider in this connection for one thing, the amount of radiation which the population should be allowed to receive as a result of the peace time uses of atomic energy in polluting that derived from atomic waste. How much effort in convenience of money are we willing to expend in the avoidance of one genetic extinction, of one line of decent of a person. One frustrated and other partially frustrated lives, not to be seen ever by us. Will we accept the present official view that the permissible dose for industrially exposed personnel may be as high as .3R per week, that is 300R in 20 years. A dose which would lead such a worker to transmit somewhere between ½ and 1½ mutations per offspring conceived after that time. Exactly the same questions apply in medical practice. The United States public health survey conducted 3 years ago showed that at that time Americans were receiving a skin dose of radiation averaging about 2R per person per year from diagnostic examinations alone. Of course only a small part of this would have reached the germ cells. But if the relative frequencies of the different types and amounts of exposure were similar to those in studies recently carried out in British hospitals by Stanford and Vance, we may calculate from their data that the total germ cell dose to the Americans was about 1/30th of the total skin dose. That is in this case about .06R per person per year. This is about 12 times as much as the dose that had previously been estimated to reach the reproductive organs of the general population in England. However America is notoriously lighting the wave of the future in regard to the employment of x-rays. And it is still engaged in rapidly expanding their use while other countries are following as fast as they can. Now this dose of .06R per year, per person is of the same order of magnitude but twice as large as the annual dose received in the United States over the past 4 years, per year from all nuclear tests, explosions. It is my personal opinion that at the stage of international relations at which we have been during the past several years, these nuclear tests have been justified as warnings and as defensive preparations against totalitarianism. Although it is to be hoped that this stage is now about to become obsolete. On the contrary however I cannot find justification for the large doses received from medical irradiations. Which as I have just shown you are about equal or more in amount. For comparatively little thought in convenience or expense would be involved in the routine provision of shielding over the reproductive organs of individuals who may later reproduce. My experience is that when they ask for such a shield, in our country at least, they’re simply laughed at and it’s refused. And little thought or inconvenience in making many obvious and easy rearrangements of the irradiations so as to reduce the dose being received by the reproductive organs and other parts not being examined. I won’t go into the details of that, it’s very simple most of the radiologists as an investigation by Sonnenblick has shown hardly, they don’t know what dose they’re delivering at all, not one in 100 knew. Moreover the widespread present day procedures of intentional heavy irradiation of the ovaries to induce ovulation in infertile women and the heavy irradiation of the testes to provide an admittedly temporary means of avoiding pregnancies should hence forth be regarded as malpractice, in my opinion. We must remember that atomic tests and possibly atomic warfare may be dangers of our own turbulent times only. Whereas physicians will in some form always be with us. It is easier and better to establish salutary policies with regard to any given medical practice early than late in its development. If we continue neglectful of the genetic damage from medical irradiations, the dose received by the germ cells will tend to creep higher and higher and to be joined by a rising dose received from industrial applications of radiation and of the energy from radioactivity. For the industrial powers that be will tend to take their cue, their advice in such matters from the physicians as they have done, not from the biologists, even as the military and administrative powers that be do today. It should be our generation’s concern to take note of this situation and to make further efforts to start the expected age of radiation, if there is to be one, off in a rational way as regards protection from this insidious agent so as to avoid that permanent significant raising of the mutation frequency which in the course of ages could do even more genetic damage than an atomic war. But radiation is by no means the only agent capable of greatly increasing mutation frequency. Various organic substances such as the mustard gas groups. Some peroxides, epoxides, carbonates, triazine, ethanol sulphate, formaldehyde and so on can raise the mutation frequency about as much as radiation. The important practical question is to what extent may man be unknowingly raising his mutation frequency by the ingestion or inhalation of such substances or substances which after entering the body may induce or result in the formation of mutagens, that is, mutation producing substances that penetrate to the genes, the germ cells. Although some of the known mutagens such as the mustards would seldom be encountered in daily life under normal conditions, others such as some peroxides would enter the body more frequently or would even be manufactured there. In the later cases however there are often efficient means of destruction, channelization or disposal in the body. Such as catalase and the cytochromes that ordinarily greatly reduce the opportunity of these substances to attack the genes. Yet under certain circumstances, more especially with certain combination treatments these protective mechanisms may not work. As yet far too little is known of the extent to which our genes under modern conditions of exposure to unusual chemicals are being subjected to such mutagenic influences. Other large differences in the frequency of so called spontaneous mutations have been found in my studies on the mutation frequency characterising different stages in the germ cycle of drosophila. Moreover some evidence has been introduced by Haldane dealing with data of Mørch and others that the germ cells of older men have a much higher frequency of newly arisen mutant genes than those of young men. If this result, which has been found not to hold for the fruit fly drosophila should be confirmed for men, there’s some doubt about it. It might prove to be more damaging genetically for human population to have the habit of reproduction at a relatively advanced age than for its members to be regularly exposed to some 50R of ionising radiation in each generation. It’s evident from these varied examples that the problem of maintaining the integrity of the genetic constitution is a much wider one than that of avoiding the irradiation of the germ cells, since other influences may play a mutagenic role as great or greater. Now since F equals My P and P, the persistence is the reciprocal of the rate of elimination of mutant genes. It is evident that the rate of elimination is just as important as the mutation frequency in the determination of the human genetic constitution. If one prescribes some more distinctive term, one may say selected, than elimination, one may say selective elimination. Selective multiplication or simply selection. The importance of this factor is seen in the fact that the ancestors of men and mice, in them much the same mutations must have occurred in the original common ancestors, yet the different conditions of their existence. The ever more mousey living of the mouse progenitors and the manlier living of the pre-men caused a different group of genes to become selected from out of their common store. A very distinctive feature of the type of selection operating among human beings living under the conditions of our modern industrial civilisation is the tremendous saving of human lives that under primitive conditions would have been sacrificed. This is accomplished in part by medicine and sanitation, but also by the abundant and diverse artificial aids to living supplied by industry and widely disseminated through the operation of modern social practices. So small is now the proportion of those who die prematurely that it must be considerably below the proportion who would have to be eliminated in order to keep the rate of elimination of mutant genes equal to the rate of their origination by mutation. Surely less than 2 in 10 for elimination. We know in America the great majority live to 65, 70, 69 anyway for men, over 70 for women. In other words many of the saved lives must represent persons who under more primitive conditions would have died as a result of genetic disabilities. Moreover among those who survive there does not seem to be much selective influence in hindering the marriage and multiplication of the genetically less capable. In fact there are certain oppositely working tendencies. Therefore it is probably a considerable underestimate to say that a half of the detrimental genes that under primitive conditions would have met genetic extinction, today survive and are passed on. Calculating on the basis of this conservative estimate we find that in some 10 generations, 250 to 300 years, the genetic affect would have become much like that of applying 200 to 400 roentgen units all at once, as with the offspring of the most heavily exposed Hiroshima survivors. Of course as time goes on the rate of rise in accumulation towards a new equilibrium level of F falls off more and more from linearity until at last at equilibrium the curve is again flat. However in the situation we are considering the simultaneous advance of techniques would tend to raise the equilibrium level ever higher. And would thereby foster continued accumulation. In this way the passage of 1,000 years would be likely to result in the population as heavily loaded with mutant genes as though it were derived from the survivors of hydrogen uranium fission fusion fission bomb fallouts. And 2,000 years would continue the story until the system fell of its own weight or became reformed. The process just depicted is a slow invisible, secular one. Like the damage resulting from many generations of exposure to overdoses of diagnostic x-rays. Therefore it is much less likely to gain credence or even attention than the sensational process of being overdosed by the fallouts from bombs. This situation then ever more than that of the fallouts calls for basic education on the part of the public and the publicists before they will be willing to reshape their deep rooted attitudes and practices as required. It is necessary for humanity to realise that a species rises no higher genetically and stays no higher than the pressure of selection forces it to do. And to any relaxation of that pressure, it responds by sinking correspondingly. It will in fact take as much rope in sinking as we play out to it. The policy of saving all possible genetic defectives for reproduction must if continued eventually rob us of the very important benefits now enjoyed by which afflictions of generic origin today have their effects ameliorated and are often prevented from causing genetic extinction. The reason for this is evident as soon as we consider that when by artificial means a moderately detrimental gene is made less detrimental, its frequency will gradually creep upward toward a new equilibrium level at which it is finally being eliminated anyway. At the same rate as that at which it had been eliminated originally. Namely at the rate at which it arises per generation by mutation. This rate of elimination being once more just as high as before medicine began will at the same time reflect the fact that as much suffering and frustration will be existing in consequence of that detrimental gene as existed under primitive conditions. I explained how a slightly detrimental gene causes as much trouble in the end as a more detrimental one because it affects more individuals. Thus with all our medicine and other techniques we will be as badly off so far as many of the considerable group of ailments which, of genetic origin are concerned as when we started out. Not all genetic ills however would be simply made less detrimental, some of them would be made not detrimental at all under the circumstances of a highly artificial civilisation in the sense that they were unable to persist indefinitely and thus to become established as the new norm of our descendants. The number of these disabilities would increase in abundance up to such a level that no more of them could be supported and compensated for by the technical means available and by the resources of the social system. The burden of the individual cases up to that level would have become largely shifted from given individuals themselves to the whole community, through its social services, a form of insurance. Yet the total cost would be divided among all individuals. And that cost would keep on rising as far as it was allowed to rise. Ultimately then in that utopia of inferiority, in the direction of which we are at the moment headed, people would be spending all their leisure time in having their ailments nursed and as much of their working time as possible in providing the means whereby the ailments of people in general were cared for. Thus we should have reached the acme of the benefits of modern medicine, modern industrialisation and modern socialisation. But because of the secular, the very long time scale of evolutionary change and the inertia which retards changes in gene frequency this condition would come upon the world with such insensible slowness that, except for a few long haired cracks who took genetics seriously and perhaps some archaeologists, no one would be conscious of the transformation. If it were called to their attention they would be likely to rationalise it off as progress. It is hard to think of such a system not at length collapsing as people lost the capabilities and the incentives needed to keep it going. Such a collapse could not be into barbarism anymore however since the population would have become unable to survive primitive conditions. Thus a collapse at that stage would mean annihilation, unless there was still primitive people living in some corner of the world many in a preserve. But we’d be too humanitarian for that. There is however an alternative policy open to mankind and I am hopeful that before too late it will be adopted. This alternative policy by no means abandons modern techniques or recommends a return to the fabulous golden age of noble savages or even of rugged individualism. It makes use of all the science, skills and genuine arts we have to ameliorate, improve and ennoble human life. And so far as is consistent with its quality and well being to extend its quantity and range. Medicine, especially that of a far seeing, preventive and still better, that of a promoting kind, seeking actively to foster health, vigour and ability becomes on this policy more developed than ever. Persons who nevertheless have defects would certainly have been treated and compensated for it. So as to help them to lead useful, satisfying lives. But, and here is the crux of the matter, those who were relatively heavily loaded with genetic defects would consider it their obligation. Even if these defects had been largely counteracted by medicine to refrain, to keep from transmitting their genes. Except where such unusually valuable genes were also present in them that the gain for the descendents was likely to outweigh the loss. Through the adoption of such an attitude towards genetics and reproduction, an attitude seldom found as yet. And by this means only unless with Doctor Stanley and his colleagues we learn to artificially change the gene in the ways that we want to. Otherwise through this means only will it be possible for future generations indefinitely to maintain and to extend the benefits of medicine, of technology, of science and of civilisation in general. Anything else is to sell ourselves to the genius of decay for the satisfaction of a vain glorious desire for offspring who may for a few evanescent generations perpetuate our petty idiosyncrasies. It is true that for evolutionary changes in outlook, motivation and procedure are required before such a policy can be effective. The heart of these changes is the adoption of the viewpoint that whether or not a child should be produced in the given case or to be decided primarily according to the good of the next and succeeding generations and of the child himself, rather than for the edification or glorification of that child’s parents or ancestors. Nevertheless, no southern revolution in this respect is necessary or likely. It is sufficient for more and more persons gradually to come around to the more rational attitude. With the advance of realistic education, if as we must hope it will resume its advance despite its present decline in some of the most literate countries, there should come a better realisation of man’s place in the great sweep of evolution and of the risks and the opportunities genetic as well as non genetic which are increasingly opening to him. The tremendous realities of insensible, secular, long drawn out changes will be brought home to child and youth by means of vivid dramatised portraits. And if teaching does its duty that youth will become imbued with a will to act as a conscious agent of his species in its advance against outer and inner nature. Whether or not his personal genes for the most part like those of everyone else, are to go on, will then be a relatively minor matter to him. So long as he can foster the handing down of good genes, if possible better genes. He will also find gratification in helping to provide conditions where in these genes will be given the opportunity in their corporeal expressions of flowering ever more rich. It is evident from these considerations that the same change in view point that leads to the policy of voluntary elimination of detrimental genes would carry with it the recognition that there is no reason to stop short at the arrested norm of today. For all goods genetic or otherwise are relative. And so far as the genetic side of things is concerned, our own highest fulfilment is attained by enabling the next generation to receive the best possible genetic equipment. What the implementation of this view point involves by way of techniques on the one hand and of wisdom in regard to values on the other hand is too large a matter for treatment here. Nevertheless, certain points regarding the genetic objectives to be more immediately sought do deserve our present notice and when then I’m through, won’t take long. For one thing the trite assertion that one cannot recognise anything better than oneself or in imagination rise above oneself is merely a foolish vanity on the part of the self complacent. On the other hand men’s prejudices are so deep seethed. Men’s imaginations are so limited. And the world is so complex and full of pitfalls that it is important to guard against the setting up of far flung programs for the attainment of this or that peculiarity that happens to be in vogue. Such superficialities of mankind as colouration, size or features and so on are 2 disputations under modern conditions of too little importance for us to allow them to distract our attention from the more important objectives. Among these all around health and vigour, joy of life and longevity are unquestionable to be solved. Yet they are far from the supreme aims. For these aims we must search through the most rational and humane thought of those who have gone before us and integrated with the thought based on our present vantage point of knowledge and experience. In the light of such a survey I think it becomes clear that man’s paramount, his most important present requirements are on the one hand a deeper and more integrated understanding, better intelligence all around. And on the other hand a more heartfelt keener sympathy, that is a deeper fellow feeling leading to a stronger impulse to cooperation, more in a word of love. It is wishful thinking on the part of some psychologists to assert that these qualities result purely from condition or education. For although such factors certainly do play vital roles in the development of these traits, nevertheless homo sapiens wherever he occurs is relatively to other organisms both an intelligent and a cooperating animal, even though cooperating in only small groups. It is these 2 complex genetic characteristics working in combination, and only in combination, and serviced by the deftness of his hands which above all others have brought man to his present state. Moreover, there still exist great diverse and numerous genetic differences in the biological basis of these traits within any human population. Although our means of recognition of these genetic differences are today very faulty and tend to confound differences of genetic with those of environmental origin. Nevertheless, these means can be improved. And there’s work being done to improve it. Thus we can be enabled to recognise our betters. Yet even today our techniques are doubtless more accurate than the trials and errors whereby after all nature did manage to evolve us up to this point where we became effective in counteracting nature. Certainly then it would be possible if people once became aware of the genetic road that is open to them for a population to be brought into existence. Most of whose members were as highly developed in regard to the genetic basis of both intelligence and social behaviour as are those scattered individuals of today who now stand highest in either separate respect. This would be really lifting us a long way by our boot straps so to speak. Perhaps after this great advance had been made, men could begin to think constructively. Not only of ways of progressing still further in these same directions but also of the development of other accessory genetic features that would enhance their lives. If the fear of the misuse of nuclear energy awakens mankind, not only to the genetic dangers confronting him, but also to the genetic opportunities then this will have been the greatest peace time benefit that radioactivity could bestow upon us. Thank you. Applause.

Hermann Muller warning against the harmful effects of radiation.
(00:46:40 - 00:47:47)

 

Radiation is not the only agent that engages in harmful interactions with our DNA. Viruses, small infectious particles that live and reproduce only after infecting host cells, also alter our genetic material, with potentially fatal consequences. In pioneering experiments performed as early as 1911, Peyton Rous had discovered that cancer could be transmitted by a virus. He finally received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1966. In 1975, David Baltimore, Renato Dulbecco and Howard Temin were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the interaction between tumour viruses and the genetic material of the cell". In essence, Baltimore, Dulbecco and Temin discovered that viruses can insert themselves into our DNA and in this way cause cancer. How do they do this? In this extract from his 1984 talk at the 34th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting entitled “How Some Viruses Cause Cancer”, Howard Temin explains how retroviruses, which are actually composed of RNA, integrate their genetic material into our DNA genomes:

 

Howard Temin (1984) - How Some Viruses Cause Cancer

As you can tell by the previous talks, oncogenes seem to be everywhere, both in us and in biological research now. I am going to talk on a similar topic to the last speaker and tell you about the development of the idea of oncogenes and proto-oncogenes. And how this work, originally with animal viruses in non-human hosts, led to our appreciation of the genetic mechanisms in all cancers. There are known viruses involved in human cancer. These are listed on the first slide, if I could get it. These include the DNA viruses, Epstein-Barr virus related to Burkitt’s lymphoma, a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the hepatitis B virus involved in primary hepatocellular carcinoma, and the recently described human retroviruses HTLV, ATLV involved in adult T-cell lymphoma. However, in the majority of human cancers in the developed countries viruses like these are not important. But other factors like cigarette smoking, radiation, various undefined life cycle factors are responsible for the development of most cancers. However, the study of cancer by viruses called highly oncogenic retro viruses has been avidly pursued for a great number of years, because of the very simple ability of these viruses to cause cancer. In contradistinction to the usual multistage nature of carcinogenesis, these viruses can infect a normal cell and in a single step change the normal cell into a cancer cell. The viruses that can do this differ from normal viruses. Normal viruses either have DNA as their genetic material and replace the genetic material of this cell with the viral DNA – could you focus the bottom of the slide please? – or they have viral RNA as their genetic material; viral RNA which replicates without the use of a DNA intermediate. Most of the viruses which infect us are of this type herpes virus and this type cold viruses, measles virus, so forth. The viruses which are able to cause cancer in this very rapid fashion are known as retroviruses, because they reverse the usual flow of information. Instead of information just flowing from DNA to RNA to proteins, in the case of the retroviruses the information flows in reverse, from RNA to DNA. This DNA then is added to cell DNA and multiplies as a cell gene with the cell DNA. The virus is able to do this because of 3 remarkable genes in the virus. Here we are looking at a diagram of the virus life cycle, with viral RNA indicated as this string. This viral RNA acts as a template. Here we are looking at the genome in DNA. And this gene called polymerase, pol, codes for an enzyme known as reverse transcriptase which, using specific primers, is able to transcribe this RNA into a linear DNA copy. The linear DNA copy contains at both ends, signified by the open boxes, a large terminal repeat with a small inverted repeat. These are the other viral genes. This process takes place in the cytoplasm. In a very specific manner, involving double jumps of the DNA polymerase complex. The linear unintegrated viral DNA is then transported to the nucleus where it is circularised by blunt-end ligation, so that the 2 ends of the linear DNA are juxtaposed, making a circle junction. This circle junction then contains an inverted repeat by putting this inverted repeat next to that one. The pol gene, in addition to coding for reverse transcriptase at its 3-prime end, codes for another activity which we call INT, for integrase, though this is not yet proven. And this activity acts on the circle junction sequence which we have called AT for attachment, to remove 4 base pairs in the centre and then to covalently insert the viral DNA as a co-linear copy minus 2 bases on each ends into the cell DNA. At the same time this enzyme, or another enzyme unknown, brings about a direct duplication of sequences in the cell DNA. So the virus contains an extremely specific and efficient machinery that is able to take external information in the form of RNA and add it to cell DNA as a covalent copy. Now I am not, because of what I was asked to do today, not going to tell you more of the details of this process, though I would be glad to discuss it with anyone who is interested this afternoon. So the first special features of retroviruses that enable them to cause cancer in such an efficient manner are their ability to make a DNA copy of RNA, and then to add this DNA into the cell genome, where it becomes a cell gene, an external gene into a cell gene. Next slide - automatic projectors work better sometimes. Now we’re looking again at a cartoon of the genome of the virus with at the ends the open boxes referring to this large terminal repeat, known as LTR, and in the middle instead of the genes I have just written viral coding sequences. The sequences coding for the proteins of the virus, including those for the coat and those responsible for reverse transcription and integration. And here I have enlarged the end of the viruses. So these large boxes are now the repeat. I have indicated here at the very ends the AT sequences which we have discussed as being responsible for the integration of the virus. In addition there are many other specific sequences in the LTR, and nearby here and here, responsible for control of RNA and DNA synthesis of the virus. And finally there is a sequence here known as E for encapsidation which is responsible for telling the viral proteins to encapsidate the viral RNA into a virus particle. So we can see that in the virus there has been a segregation of its sequences, with the viral coding sequences in the centre and the sequences which control the virus which we speak of as cis-acting sequences, since they act directly on the nucleic acid to which they are attached. As compared to these sequences we speak of as transacting because their product can act on separated molecules. These are segregated with the transacting coding sequences in the centre, the cis-acting sequences at the end. Now some of these viruses can cause cancer very rapidly and efficiently. This is an example of a chicken injected 2 weeks earlier with one of these viruses and the chicken is dead of a fulminating leukaemia. This is an example in cell culture of a cell infected 10 days previously by a virus and transformed into a cancer cell seen here on the dish. Now when we look at the structure of viruses able to bring about this very rapid transformation – and an example of one of these is shown at the bottom - we find that the structure of the virus is very different from the structure of the viruses I have been talking about. In these top viruses, which we call replication-competent viruses, we see the familiar open boxes of the large terminal repeat. Here various cis-acting sequences responsible for DNA synthesis and encapsidation and the 3 genes coding for viral proteins. In the highly oncogenic retrovirus we see that the terminal sequences at each end are the same. In other words the highly oncogenic retrovirus maintains the cis-acting sequences responsible for RNA and DNA synthesis and encapsidation of viral RNA. But it has sustained a deletion of coding sequences and a substitution of new sequences. To establish the role of these new sequences, we carry out genetic experiments using techniques of recombinant DNA, which allows us to make specific deletions in viral genomes and then using transfection of animal cells related to the transformation process described by Doctor Smith, we can recover the viruses and ask if they’re still capable of causing cancer. Here we have the genome of one of these highly oncogenic retroviruses containing the new sequences, the deletion and other viral sequences. If we delete more of the viral sequences - and it’s best to look at this construct -, so that all that is left are the cis-acting sequences at both ends and the new substituted sequences, we see the virus still transforms. However, if we maintain the viral sequences and make any kind of an alteration in the substituted sequences, the viruses which are recovered are no longer tumorigenic. This is the strict definition of an oncogene, an oncogene or oncogenes or genes in highly oncogenic retroviruses, the code for protein product required for neoplastic transformation. Similar types of experiments have been carried out with about 20 different viruses. And about 20 different oncogenes have been recognised. All from their appearance in retroviruses and their ability then to transform normal cells to neoplastic cells after addition to the cell genome by retrovirus infection. Of course you can’t read them and the names src, yes, fps, fes, abl, ros, fgr, erb, fms, mas, K-ras, H-ras, myc, myb, fos, raf, skirail and sis are merely 3 letter mnemonics. Listed here are the species of origin of the viruses. They have been found in chickens, cats, mice, rats, turkey and monkey. And in some case the same oncogene has been isolated from a virus from 2 different species. Furthermore the oncogenes are clustered into groups on the basis of similarities in sequence and function. So that these 6 oncogenes all have a tyrosine protein kinase activity. These 3 have no such activity but have a DNA sequence related to src. These 2 are related by sequence and by protein making a GTP-binding activity. These have a nuclear location and these have unknown functions and locations. So we see that viral oncogenes are not an infinite set, but are actually a small set with the same gene being isolated repeatedly from different species. And furthermore we see that even the different viral oncogenes fall into related families. So this tells us that at least from this definition of oncogene that only a small number, somewhere we would guess less than 40 genes, are able to be turned into these powerful cancer genes. And not any kind of a gene can become a cancer gene. Now as Professor Ochoa indicated, the viral oncogene comes from a normal cell gene known as proto-oncogene. In a number of steps a retrovirus picks up the cell DNA and makes it into an oncogene. This is again a specific cartoon comparing a replication-competent virus, a highly oncogenic retrovirus, and a proto-oncogene whose sequence is homologous to the sequence of the viral oncogene. And you can immediately see that the proto-oncogene does not resemble the viral oncogene. The proto-oncogene is split into exons and introns. The proto-oncogene has its own promoter and 3 prime sequences, while the viral oncogene uses the viral promotor and termination sequences. The proto-oncogene is expressed in normal cells and, as I guess Doctor Holley told you, at times can have a very important function controlling normal cell growth. So the proto-oncogenes are cell genes whose DNA sequences are homologous to viral oncogenes. And so as there are 20 to 40 oncogenes, we imagine there are only 20 to 40 proto-oncogenes, normal cell genes whose mutation in the way of transduction by a retrovirus can cause cancer. Now what is the difference between the proto-oncogene which does not cause cancer and the viral oncogene which does cause cancer? I have already indicated to you that there is a very big difference in regulation because in the one case the proto-oncogene is controlled by cell transcriptional control signals. In the case of the oncogene the expression is controlled by viral transcriptional controls. Furthermore, when the sequences are compared of the protein produced by the proto-oncogene, which is illustrated by the heavy black line as if the amino acid sequence was written out. And since this is the normal homologue, the precursor is written out as a continuous bore. When this is compared with the protein sequence of the viral oncogene, indicated here with circles, Xs, triangles and thin lines, we see there are numerous differences. First we’ll look at the similarities. Wherever the thin line is continuous the proteins are the same. Wherever there are triangles there are amino acid differences in the middle of the protein. And the Xs at the end and the circles and Xs at the beginning indicate that the viral oncogene uses sequences from the virus to code the amino and carboxy-termini of its protein. In other words the proto-oncogene has been severely modified on becoming a viral oncogene. It has had its regulation changed by losing its own control sequences, and having viral control sequences it has changed the ends of its protein molecule and it has changed some amino acids in the middle. Now these are correlational changes. I am just going to indicate to you, this one kind of experiment which tells you how we determine which of these changes are significant in the transforming process. Again there is an enormous amount more I could tell you about this but this is just to indicate how these are done. Again we’re looking at viral genomes with the boxes and the lines representing the cis-acting sequences which are all the same at the end. These are now what we call retrovirus vectors where we’ve removed all the virus-coding sequences and in this case replaced them with the thymidine kinase gene, or viral oncogenes, or cellular proto oncogene. So these are highly oncogenic-like viruses that have been constructed, as we say, by cut and paste in the laboratory. Where we make viruses at will, viruses of different kinds for different purposes. Now the purpose here is to look at 2 of these, this one and this one. This one contains a viral oncogene, the Harvey RAS gene. The virus is produced in good yield. It is able to transform normal chicken cells immediately upon infection. But it is not able to transform rat cells. Even though the virus is present in the rat cells and the gene in the virus is expressed at a low level. This difference is related to the regulation of the gene activity. The viral promotors are very active in chicken cells. But these particular virus promotors are not active in rat cells. In that case there is not sufficient product of the oncogene to transform the cells. Similarly, I will tell you, but not illustrate, with other viral oncogenes if the oncogene is expressed at a high level the cells are killed. And it is only when the oncogene is expressed at a low level that the cells are transformed. Thus we can conclude experimentally that the change in regulation has been important in the transforming process. We speak of this as a quantitative change. Now at the bottom we’re looking at a similar construct. For various technical reasons there had to be a deletion involving the proto-oncogene which, as Doctor Ochoa told you, just differs in a single amino acid from the viral oncogene. Again the virus is recovered at full yield. But it is unable to transform chicken cells even though the viral oncogene can transform them. Thus this experiment indicates that even when there is misregulation of the normal cell gene, it is unable to transform the cells. Thus we can answer the question of our title, how some viruses cause cancer. That highly oncogenic retroviruses cause cancer by introducing, by adding to the genomes of sensitive target cells at new locations a quantitatively and qualitatively altered cellular gene. The cellular gene is the proto-oncogene. It is qualitatively altered by base-pair mutations and fusion with viral coding sequences. It is quantitatively altered by being under viral regulation rather than cellular regulation. It is at new locations because the viral integration machinery is completely specific for the attachment sequence of the virus, but is not at all specific for the recipient sequences, the target sequences in the cell. There is no homology involved in integration. And this is another topic we can discuss later. The cell must be an appropriate cell. This has been a special kind of carcinogenesis carried out by special viruses. Such viruses exist in domestic cats, where they cause solid tumours in this very rapid fashion. Fortunately such viruses do not exist in man. And most cancer in man, as Doctor Ochoa indicates in this cartoon just confirms, arises in a multi-step fashion. Here we are considering a row of normal cells and watching this cohort of cells through time. Where first a single mutation appears and then replicates, giving an altered clone of cells. Then a second mutation appears giving a further altered clone of cells - now 2 altered clones. Then a third mutation appears. And somewhere between 3 and 7, we’re not sure of the number, mutations occur and the cell becomes cancerous. So we have 2 apparently very different kind of processes leading to cancer. But as Doctor Ochoa again told you, the same proto-oncogenes are apparently involved. How do we reconcile these differences? Over here we’re looking at proto-oncogenes and here at active oncogenes. In the case of carcinogenesis by a highly oncogenic retrovirus, the proto-oncogene has been altered through evolution in multiple steps to give a multiply altered product mutated, fused, differently regulated. So the highly oncogenic retrovirus is able to cause cancer so efficiently by adding the already multiply altered gene into the cell DNA. Now in the case of the non-viral cancers - could you focus at the bottom please - in the case of the non-viral cancers, again in some cases proto-oncogenes have been found to be altered: a base-pair mutation, an amplification, a translocation. However, in the case of the non-viral cancers there are several proto-oncogenes each which has been altered one time. And the multi-step process has been the accumulation of one change, a second change, a third change. The multi-step process here took place in time. But because of the nature of the viral vectors, all of the changes involved the single gene, the viral oncogene. So we see that the same process is involved in carcinogenesis by highly oncogenic retroviruses and by other kinds of agents. There are several genetic changes to normal cell genes which change them into active cancer genes. Thank you. Applause.

Wie Sie aus den vorigen Vorträgen sehen, scheinen Onkogene überall zu sein, sowohl in uns als jetzt auch in der biologischen Forschung. Ich werde über ein ähnliches Thema wie der letzte Vortragende sprechen über Ihnen über die Entwicklung der Idee der Onkogene und Proto-Onkogene erzählen. Und wie das funktioniert, ursprünglich mit tierischen Viren in nicht-humanen Wirtszellen, führte uns dazu, die genetischen Mechanismen in allen Krebsarten zu erkennen. Es gibt bekannte Viren, die mit menschlichem Krebs zusammenhängen. Sie stehen auf der ersten Folie, wenn ich sie sehen könnte. Darin sind DNA-Viren, der Epstein-Barr Virus, der mit Burkitt Lymphom in Verbindung gebracht wird, ein Nasopharynx-Karzinom, das Hepatitis B-Virus in Bezug auf das primäre Leberzellenkarzinom, und die kürzlich beschriebenen humanen Retroviren HTLV und ATLV im Zusammenhang mit dem T-Zellenlymphom beim Erwachsenen. Für die Mehrheit der menschlichen Krebserkrankungen in den entwickelten Ländern sind Viren wie diese aber nicht wichtig. Aber andere Faktoren wie Zigarettenrauch, Strahlung und verschiedene undefinierte Lebenszyklusfaktoren sind für die Entstehung der meisten Krebsarten verantwortlich. Die Krebsforschung nach Viren, die hoch onkogenetische Retroviren genannt werden, wird jedoch sehr eifrig seit vielen Jahren betrieben, weil diese Viren die sehr einfache Fähigkeit haben, Krebs zu verursachen. Im Gegensatz zur normalerweise mehrstufigen Natur von Karzinogenen können diese Viren eine normale Zelle infizieren, und in einem einfachen Schritt die normale Zelle in eine Krebszelle verändern. Die Viren, die das können, unterscheiden sich von den normalen Viren. Normale Viren haben entweder DNAs als ihr genetisches Material und ersetzen das genetische Material dieser Zelle mit der viralen DNA - könnten Sie den unteren Teil der Folie zeigen bitte? – oder sie haben virale RNAs als genetisches Material; eine virale RNA, die sich ohne DNA-Intermediate repliziert. Die meisten Viren, die uns infizieren, gehören zu diesem Typ von Herpesvirus, Erkältungsvirus, Masernvirus usw. Die Viren, die auf diese sehr schnelle Weise Krebs verursachen können, sind als Retroviren bekannt, weil sie den normalen Informationsfluss umkehren. Anstatt dass die Information von den DNA zur RNA und den Proteinen fließt, fließt sie im Fall der Retroviren in umgekehrter Richtung, von der RNA zur DNA. Diese DNA wird dann zur DNA der Zelle hinzugefügt und vervielfacht sich als Zellgen mit der Zell-DNA. Der Virus ist dazu aufgrund 3 bemerkenswerter Gene im Virus fähig: Hier sehen wir ein Diagramm des Virus-Lebenszyklus, wobei die virale RNA als diese Kette dargestellt ist. Diese virale RNA funktioniert als Vorlage. Wir sehen uns das Genom in der DNA an. Und dieses Gen, das Polymerase genannt wird, pol kodiert für ein Enzym, das Reverse Transkriptase genannt wird, und das mithilfe spezifischer Primer diese RNA in eine lineare DNA-Kopie abschreiben kann. Die lineare DNA-Kopie enthält an beiden Enden, die durch die offenen Felder angezeigt werden, eine LTR (large terminal repeat) mit einer kleinen Inverted Repeat. Das sind die anderen viralen Gene. Dieser Prozess findet im Zytoplasma statt. Auf sehr spezielle Weise, wobei Doppelsprünge des DNA-Polymerasekomplexes vorkommen. Die linear nicht-integrierte virale DNA wird dann zum Zellkern transportiert, wo sie von Ligation umgeben ist, sodass sich die 2 Enden der linearen DNA gegenüberliegen und sich kreisförmig verbinden. Diese Kreisbindung enthält eine invertierte Repeat, indem diese invertierte Repeat neben die nächste gesetzt wird. Das pol-Gen, zusätzlich zur Kodierung für die Reverse Transcriptase bei seinem 3-Prime-Ende, kodiert noch für eine weitere Aktivität, die wir INT nennen, für Integrase, obwohl das noch nicht nachgewiesen ist. Und diese Aktivität findet an der Kreisverbindungssequenz statt, die wir AT für Attachment (Anbindung) nennen,, um 4 Basenpaare im Zentrum zu entfernen und die virale DNA kovalent als co-lineare Kopie mit minus 2 Basen an jedem Ende in die Zell-DNA einzufügen. Gleichzeitig führt dieses Enzym, oder ein anderes unbekanntes Enzym, zu einer direkten Duplizierung der Sequenzen in der Zell-DNA. Also der Virus enthält eine extrem spezifische und effiziente Maschinerie, die fähig ist, externe Informationen in Form der RNA aufzunehmen und sie der Zell-DNA als kovalente Kopie hinzuzufügen. Ich werde Ihnen nicht mehr Einzelheiten dieses Prozesses erzählen, weil ich heute um etwas anderes gebeten wurde, obwohl ich sehr gerne mit jedem, der interessiert ist, heute Nachmittag darüber diskutieren würde. Also das erste spezielle Merkmal der Retroviren, wodurch sie auf so effiziente Weise Krebs verursachen können, ist ihre Fähigkeit eine DNA-Kopie der RNA z erstellen und dann diese DNA dem Zell-Genom hinzuzufügen, wo es zu einem Zellgen wird, ein externes Gen wird zu einem Zellgen. Nächste Folie - automatische Projektoren funktionieren manchmal besser. Hier sehen wir wieder einen Cartoon des Genoms des Virus, mit den offenen Feldern am Ende, die auf die large-terminal-repeat-Sequenz oder LTR verweisen, und in der Mitte anstelle der Gene schrieb ich einfach virale Kodierungssequenzen. Die Sequenzkodierung für die Proteine des Virus, einschließlich die für die Hülle und für die Umschreibung und Integration. Und hier habe ich die Enden der Viren vergrößert. Diese großen Felder sind jetzt die Repeat-Sequenz. Ich habe hier ganz am Ende die AT-Sequenzen angegeben, von denen wir hörten, dass sie für die Integration des Virus verantwortlich sind. Zusätzlich gibt es noch viele andere spezifische Sequenzen in der LTR und im Umfeld, die für die RNA- und DNA-Synthese des Virus zuständig sind. Und hier gibt es eine Sequenz, die als E für Enkapsidierung bekannt ist, die den viralen Proteinen sagt, dass sie die virale RNA in ein Viruspartikel enkapsidieren sollen. Wir können sehen, dass es im Virus eine Trennung der Sequenzen gab, wobei die virale Kodierungssequenzen in der Mitte sind, und die Sequenzen, die den Virus kontrollieren und als cis-Sequenzen bezeichnen, weil sie direkt an die nukleare Säure gebunden sind. Verglichen mit diesen Sequenzen sprechen wir von trans-agierend, weil ihr Produkt auf verschiedenen Molekülen agieren kann. Sie werden durch die trans-agierende Kodierungssequenz in der Mitte getrennt, wobei die cis-Sequenzen am Ende sind. Also einige dieser Viren können sehr schnell und effizient Krebs verursachen. Hier ein Beispiel eines Huhns, das vor 2 Wochen mit einem dieser Viren infiziert wurde, und das Huhn starb an einer spontan auftretenden Leukämie. Hier ein Beispiel einer Zelle in einer Zellkultur, die vor 10 Tagen mit dem Virus infiziert wurde, in sich in eine Krebszelle verwandelte. Wenn wir uns die Struktur der Viren ansehen, die eine so schnelle Veränderung herbeiführen - und ein Beispiel davon wir ganz unten gezeigt - sehen wir, dass die Struktur des Virus sich sehr stark von der Struktur der Viren, über die ich sprach, unterscheidet. In diesen Top-Viren, die wir als replikationskompetente Viren bezeichnen, können wir die bekannten offenen Felder der LTR sehen. Hier sind einige cis-Sequenzen, die für die DNA-Synthese und Enkapsidierung verantwortlich sind, und die 3 Gene, die für virale Proteine kodieren. Im hoch onkogenen Retrovirus sehen wir, dass die Endsequenzen an jedem Ende gleich sind. Anders gesagt, der hoch onkogene Retrovirus erhält die cis-Sequenzen, die für die RNA- und DNA-Synthese und Enkapsidierung der viralen RNA zuständig sind. Aber einige Kodierungssequenzen wurden entfernt und neue Sequenzen wurden ersetzt. Um die Rolle dieser neuen Sequenzen festzustellen, führen wir genetische Experimente anhand der rekombinanten DNA-Techniken durch, die es uns ermöglichen, spezifische Teile in viralen Genomen zu entfernen und dann die Transfektion tierischer Zellen zu verwenden, die mit dem von Dr. Smith beschriebenen Transformationsprozess zusammenhängen, und wir können die Viren wiederherstellen und sehen, ob sie noch immer Krebs verursachen können. Hier ist das Genom eines dieser hoch onkogenen Retroviren, das neue Sequenzen und andere virale Sequenzen enthält. Wenn wir mehrere virale Sequenzen entfernen - sehen wir uns dieses Konstrukt an - ist alles, was übrig bleibt, diese cis-Sequenzen an beiden Enden und die neue Ersatzsequenz, und wir sehen, dass sich der Virus immer noch verändert. Wenn wir jedoch die viralen Sequenzen erhalten und eine Änderung in den Ersatzsequenzen vornehmen, sind die wiederhergestellten Viren nicht mehr tumorauslösend. Das ist die genaue Definition von einem Onkogen, ein Onkogen oder Onkogene oder Gene in sehr onkogenen Retroviren, der Code für das Proteinprodukt, das für die neoplastische Transformation benötigt wird. Ähnliche Experimente wurden mit ca. 20 verschiedenen Viren durchgeführt. Und etwa 20 verschiedene Onkogene wurden gefunden. Alle fanden sich in Retroviren und hatten die Fähigkeit, normale Zellen in neoplastische Zellen zu verändern, nachdem sie zum Zellgenom durch die Retrovirusinfektion hinzugefügt wurden. Natürlich können Sie die Namen nicht lesen src, yes, fps, fes, abl, ros, fgr, erb, fms, mas, K-ras, H-ras, myc, myb, fos, raf, skirail und sis sind nur 3-Zeichen-lange Gedächtnisstützen. Hier sind die Ursprungsarten der Viren angegeben. Sie wurden in Hühnern, Katzen, Mäusen, Ratten, Truthähnen und Affen gefunden. In einigen Fällen wurde dasselbe Onkogen von einem Virus in 2 verschiedenen Arten isoliert. Außerdem sammeln sich die Onkogene in Gruppen basierend auf Ähnlichkeiten in der Sequenz und Funktion an. Also alle diese 6 Onkogene zeigen eine Tyrosin-Kinase-Aktivität. Diese 3 zeigen keine solche Aktivität, aber haben eine DNA-Sequenz, die mit scr verbunden ist. Diese 2 sind durch die Sequenz und ein Protein verbunden, das eine GTP-Bindungsaktivität ausführt. Diese befinden sich im Zellkern und die Funktion und der Ort der anderen sind nicht bekannt. Wir sehen, dass die viralen Onkogene kein unendlicher Satz sind, sondern ein kleiner Satz mit demselben Gen, das wiederholt von verschiedenen Arten isoliert wird. Außerdem sehen wir, dass auch die verschiedenen viralen Onkogene in zusammenhängende Familien fallen. Das sagt uns, dass zumindest gemäß dieser Definition von Onkogenen nur eine kleine Anzahl, wir glauben weniger als 40 Gene, in diese mächtigen Krebsgene verändert werden können. Und nicht, dass irgendeine Art von Gen ein Krebsgen werden kann. Wie Professor Ochoa bemerkte, kommt das virale Onkogen von einer normalen Zelle, die als Proto-Onkogen bekannt ist. Ein Retrovirus erkennt die Zell-DNA in einigen Schritten und verändert sie in ein Onkogen. Das ist wieder ein spezieller Cartoon, bei dem ein replikationskompetenter Virus, ein hoch onkogener Retrovirus, mit einem Proto-Onkogen, dessen Sequenz der Sequenz des viralen Onkogens entspricht, verglichen wird. Sie können sofort sehen, dass das Proto-Onkogen dem viralen Onkogen nicht ähnlich sieht. Das Proto-Onkogen ist in Exons und Introns aufgeteilt. Das Proto-Onkogen hat seinen eigenen Promoter und 3 Prime-Sequenzen, während das virale Onkogen den viralen Promoter und die Endsequenzen verwendet. Das Proto-Onkogen findet sich in normalen Zellen und ich glaube Dr. Holley erzählte Ihnen, dass es manchmal eine sehr wichtige Funktion bei der Kontrolle des normalen Zellwachstums hat. Also die Proto-Onkogenese sind Gene, deren DNA-Sequenzen ähnlich aussehen wie die der viralen Onkogene. Nachdem es 20 bis 40 Onkogene gibt, nehmen wir an, dass es nur 20 bis 40 Proto-Onkogene gibt, normale Zellgene, deren Mutation in Form einer Transduktion durch einen Retrovirus Krebs verursachen kann. Was ist jetzt der Unterschied zwischen dem Proto-Onkogen, das keinen Krebs verursacht, und dem viralen Onkogen, das Krebs verursacht? Ich habe schon erwähnt, dass es einen sehr großen Unterschied bei der Regulation gibt, denn in dem einen Fall wird das Proto-Onkogen durch zelluläre transkriptionale Kontrollsignale kontrolliert. Im Fall des Onkogens wird die Expression von viralen transkriptionalen Kontrollen kontrolliert. Außerdem, wenn die Proteinsequenzen, die vom Proto-Onkogen produziert werden, die durch die starke schwarze Linie dargestellt sind, als wäre die Aminosäurensequenz ausgeschrieben worden, und nachdem das ein normaler Homolog ist, ist der Vorläufer kontinuierlich dargestellt. Wenn man sie mit den Proteinsequenzen des viralen Onkogens vergleicht, die hier mit Kreisen, Xe, Dreiecken und dünnen Linien dargestellt ist, sehen wir, dass es zahlreiche Unterschiede gibt. Sehen wir uns zuerst die Ähnlichkeiten an. Immer wenn die dünne Linie kontinuierlich verläuft, sind die Proteine gleich. Wenn Dreiecke vorkommen, gibt es Unterschiede bei den Aminosäuren in der Mitte des Proteins. Und die Xe am Ende und die Kreise und Xe am Anfang zeigen an, dass das virale Onkogen Sequenzen des Virus verwendet, um die Amino- und Carboxy-Endungen seines Proteins zu kodieren. Anders gesagt, das Proto-Onkogen wurde stark modifiziert während es sich zu einem viralen Onkogen veränderte. Seine Regulation wurde verändert, indem es seine eigenen Kontrollsequenzen verlor und mit den viralen Kontrollsequenzen veränderten sich die Enden seiner Proteinmoleküle und einige Aminosäuren in der Mitte. Das sind Korrelationsveränderungen. Ich werde Sie nur auf diese eine Art von Experiment hinweisen, das Ihnen zeigt, wie wir feststellen, welche dieser Veränderungen im Transformationsprozess signifikant sind. Es gibt so viel mehr, das ich Ihnen darüber erzählen könnte, aber nur um zu zeigen, wie das gemacht wird. Wir sehen uns wieder die viralen Genome mit den Feldern und den Linien an die die cis-Sequenzen darstellen, deren Enden alle gleich sind. Das sind jetzt die sogenannten Retrovirus-Vektoren, von denen wir alle viruskodierten Sequenzen entfernt haben, und in diesem Fall mit dem Thymidin-Kinase-Gen oder viralem Onkogen oder zelluläres Proto-Onkogen ersetzt haben. Das sind die hoch onkogen-ähnlichen Viren, die konstruiert wurden, wie wir sagen, durch ausschneiden und einfügen im Labor. Wir können beliebig Viren erzeugen, verschiedene Arten von Viren für verschiedene Zwecke. Hier ist der Zweck, 2 von ihnen anzuschauen, das ein und das zweite. Das eine enthält ein virales Onkogen, das Harvey RAS-Gen. Der Virus wird ertragreich erzeugt. Er kann normale Hühnerzellen sofort bei der Infektion verändern. Aber er kann keine Rattenzellen verändern. Obwohl der Virus auch in der Rattenzelle vorhanden ist und die Genexpression im Virus auf einer niedrigen Ebene erfolgt. Dieser Unterschied hänge mit der Regulation der Genaktivität zusammen. Die viralen Promoter sind in Hühnerzellen sehr aktiv. Aber diese speziellen Viruspromoter sind in Rattenzellen nicht aktiv. In diesem Fall gibt es keine ausreichende Onkogenproduktion, um die Zellen zu verändern. Ähnlich verhält es sich mit anderen viralen Onkogenen, wenn die Onkogenexpression auf hoher Ebene erfolgt, werden die Zellen getötet. Nur wenn die Onkogenexpression auf niederer Ebene erfolgt, werden die Zellen verändert. Daher können wir experimentell folgern, dass die Veränderung in der Regulation wichtig für den Veränderungsprozess war. Wir beziehen uns hier auf eine quantitative Veränderung. Hier unten sehen wir ein ähnliches Konstrukt. Aus mehreren technischen Gründen wurde beim Proto-Onkogen etwas entfernt, das, wie Dr. Ochoa Ihnen erzählte, sich nur in einer einzigen Aminosäure vom viralen Onkogen unterscheidet. Wieder wird der Virus ertragreich hergestellt. Aber er kann keine Hühnerzellen verändern, obwohl das virale Onkogen sie verändern kann. Daher zeigt uns dieses Experiment, dass auch wenn es eine Fehlregulation des normalen Zellgens gibt, ist es nicht fähig, die Zellen zu verändern. Daher können wir die Frage im Titel beantworten, wie einige Viren Krebs verursachen können. Die hoch onkogenen Retroviren verursachen Krebs, indem sie in die Genome sensibler Zielzellen an neuen Orten ein quantitativ und qualitativ verändertes Zellgen einführen. Das Zellgen ist das Proto-Onkogen. Es ist qualitativ verändert, durch Basenpaar-Mutationen und die Fusion mit viralkodierten Sequenzen. Es ist quantitativ verändert, da es unter viraler Regulation statt der zellulären Regulation steht. Es ist an neuen Orten, weil der virale Integrationsapparat sehr spezifische für die Bindungssequenz des Virus ist, aber für die Empfängersequenzen, den Zielsequenzen in der Zelle, überhaupt nicht spezifisch ist. Bei der Integration gibt es keinen Homolog. Das ist ein weiteres Thema, das wir später besprechen können. Die Zelle muss eine geeignete Zelle sein. Das war eine spezielle Art der Karzinogenese, die durch spezielle Viren erfolgte. Solche Viren sind in Hauskatzen vorhanden, wo sie solide Tumore auf sehr schnelle Weise verursachen können. Glücklicherweise gibt es diese Viren nicht beim Menschen. Und die meisten Krebsarten beim Menschen, wie Dr. Ochoa im Cartoon zeigt, entsteht in mehrstufiger Form. Hier betrachten wir eine Reihe normaler Zellen und beobachten diese Zellen über eine Zeit, wo zuerst eine einzige Mutation erscheint und sich dann repliziert, woraus ein veränderter Zellklon entsteht. Dann erscheint eine zweite Mutation, die wiederum einen veränderten Zellklon erzeugt - jetzt 2 veränderte Klone. Dann erscheint eine 3. Mutation. Und irgendwann zwischen 3 und 7, wir wissen nicht genau wann, treten Mutationen auf und die Zelle wird krebsartig. Wir haben anscheinend 2 sehr verschiedene Arten von Prozessen, die zu Krebs führen. Wie Dr. Ochoa Ihnen bereits erzählte, sind anscheinend dieselben Proto-Onkogene daran beteiligt. Wie gleichen wir diese Unterschiede aus? Hier sehen wir Proto-Onkogene und hier aktive Onkogene. Im Fall der Karzinogenese durch den hoch onkogenen Retrovirus, wurde das Proto-Onkogen durch die Evolution in mehreren Schritten verändert, sodass ein vielfach verändertes Produkt entstand, das mutiert, fusioniert und unterschiedlich reguliert wird. Also der hoch onkogene Retrovirus ist fähig, Krebs so effizient zu verursachen, indem er das bereits mehrfach veränderte Gen in die Zell-DNA einführt. Im Fall von nicht-viralen Krebserkrankungen - könnten Sie auf den unteren Teil fokussieren bitte - im Fall der nicht-viralen Krebserkrankungen wurden wieder in einigen Fällen Proto-Onkogene gefunden, die verändert waren: eine Basenpaar-Mutation, eine Amplifikation, eine Translokation. Aber im Fall der nicht-viralen Krebserkrankungen gibt es einige Proto-Onkogene, die alle einmal verändert wurden. Und der mehrstufige Prozess ist die Akkumulierung einer Änderung, einer zweiten Änderung, einer dritten Änderung. Der mehrstufige Prozess fand über die Zeit statt. Aber aufgrund der Natur der viralen Vektoren ist bei allen Veränderungen das einzelne Gen, das virale Onkogen, beteiligt. Wir sehen also, dass derselbe Prozess bei der Karzinogenese durch hoch onkogene Retroviren und anderen Arten von Substanzen eine Rolle spielt. Es gibt mehrere genetische Veränderungen an normalen Zellgenen, die sie in aktive Krebszellen verwandeln. Danke!

Howard Temin explaining how retroviruses incorporate their genetic material into our DNA.
(00:03:40 - 00:06:53)

 

One important way in which such viruses can then go on to cause cancer is through proto-oncogenes, genes that the viruses can steal from our genomes and incorporate into their own ones. Such genes are then mutated or expressed inappropriately and drive abnormal growth. These findings were not only significant because they show how rogue microscopic agents can cause malignant transformation; they also led to the realisation that the seed of cancer lies in our own genes and DNA. For their work in studying retroviral oncogenes, J. Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus were awarded the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. In this lecture from 2015, Bishop briefly describes the discovery of the first oncogene, src:


J. Michael Bishop (2015) - A Virus, a Gene and Cancer: An Anatomy of Discovery

Thank you very much. It's nice once again to be here. I want to say that it was impressive that Eric Betzig did some of his crucial work in a living room, somebody's living room. This story starts with chickens. I don't think that would work. So late in... There we go. Late in the year 1909, a farmer on Long Island in New York noticed a tumour on the breast of one of his Plymouth Rock hens. He watched this tumour grow for several months, and then took it to the Rockefeller Institute in New York City to see what might be done. The farmer was referred to Peyton Rous, a young pathologist with an interest in cancer, although not much of a publication record in the field. He's said to have been a very forceful, even fiery individual. So perhaps by virtue of his personality, he was able to convince the farmer to donate his chicken to medical research. So this serendipitous encounter launched a sequence of discoveries that spanned almost three quarters of a century, and culminated in the realization that the seeds of cancer reside in our own genomes. And my purpose today is to explore how all that happened, in an effort to illustrate how discoveries are made. And then in the following lecture, my colleague Harold Varmus will explain where these discoveries have taken us in the struggle to understand and control cancer. Now Rous began with a very simple experiment, by attempting to pass the tumours with grafts from one chicken to another. The experiment was not exactly a resounding success. In this example, with each passage... there you go... Finky taught me that... (laughs) only a single engraftment succeeded. That's the black squares there. Moreover, the transplantation succeeded only when Rous used chickens from the inbred flock of the farmer. The tumour would not grow in Plymouth Rock hens from other sources, nor in other breeds of birds. Rous explained this by saying that the tumours were obeying what he called the laws of tissue biology. We call it histoincompatibility. Now mundane as this experiment may seem to us, it's widely believed that the passaging of the tumour was serendipitously essential to the next step, which took Peyton Rous to a new dimension and to lasting fame. Beginning with the sixth passage of tumours, Rous began to make cell-free extracts of the tumours, and found that injection of these into chickens from the same flock could elicit the identical tumour, a spindle cell sarcoma. He announced this discovery with a two page article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. You will not find much about chickens in that journal in this day and age. Now, Rous realized that he had made, in his words, a unique and significant finding, but he was very careful about what that finding might connote. And I quote from his first paper: active in this sarcoma of the fowl as a minute parasitic organism. But an agency of another sort is not out of the question. For the moment, we have not adopted either hypothesis." That sort of language would not get you into many journals these days either. Now within a year, however, Rous had identified a second filterable agent that caused a different kind of chicken tumour, an osteochondrosarcoma, and at that point, he succumbed to using the recently coined term "virus," the very concept of which was just about a decade old. In his writings, Rous was never particularly illuminating about his inspiration for his work. He explained his effort to transplant the tumour by pointing out that transplantation of tumours had succeeded in mammals, so why not try it in chickens? He justified his landmark experiments with filterable extracts by pointing out that such work had never succeeded with mammals, so why not try it in chickens? That's literally the case. Perhaps his motive was best captured by Nobel laureate Renato Dulbecco in his biographical sketch of Rous, who wrote that Rous was a medical man who wished to learn about cancer as a disease, and a biologist who did not want to follow the beaten path, willing to hunt for new clues in well-designed but slow experiments. The work with chicken viruses was greeted with what Rous described in his Nobel lecture as downright disbelief. Nobody really took it seriously. And Rous himself eventually became disillusioned when he failed to identify causative viruses in transplantable tumours of mammals, particularly rodents. It would be fifty-five years before his discovery of the chicken tumour virus earned him the Nobel Prize, and Finky, if you're in the audience, that's the real record. Okay. Rous certainly deserved the Nobel Prize, because he had fashioned two momentous legacies. The first, the eventual recognition that viruses are major causes of human cancer, something that Rous had toyed with but abandoned after his failure with rodent tumours. That's a story that Professor zur Hausen could tell you. The second legacy represents an unbroken chain of research that would eventually link wayward genes to cancer. For several decades after Rous, his sarcoma virus lay fallow. Beginning in the 1960s however, the pace quickened, and it became apparent that Rous's virus was an archetype for a vast and seemingly ubiquitous family of what came to be called RNA tumour viruses, signalling the nature of their newly discovered genome, RNA. The discovery of Peyton Rous now blossomed from a two page report in the Journal of the American Medical Association to a 1500 page monograph, and I doubt that many have ever read it cover to cover. I first encountered these viruses when I arrived at UCSF, University of California San Francisco, in 1968, to take up what proved to be my only academic job. As a newly minted assistant professor whose research concerned the replication of polio viruses, I really was not very much aware of RNA tumour viruses at the time. And there I was introduced to a fellow newcomer to the faculty, Warren Levinson, who was schooled in the biological aspects of Rous sarcoma virus. And all of us pretty much looked like that in those days. Under Warren's tutelage, it quickly became apparent to me that this virus represents a potentially powerful tool with which to probe the secrets of the cancer cell. It was a simple and tractable experimental system whose biological properties were actually pretty well characterized. It could transform cells in vitro, in a petri dish, to neoplastic phenotype, literally overnight. There was a well-established and highly reproducible bioassay for the virus in vitro, which among other things made the virus amenable to genetic analysis. The virus could be propagated and purified in very large quantities, sufficient for biochemical and structural analysis. And its inability to replicate in human cells meant it posed little if any threat to those of us who were working with it, and so it could be worked with under relatively unconstrained conditions. At the time, no other RNA tumour virus offered such a powerful suite of advantages. So we bashed ahead with the chicken virus. Warren and I joined to study Rous sarcoma virus, and two great puzzles defined the field at the time. First, it appeared that the viral genome could be established as a heritable property of the host cell. How could this happen with a virus whose genome was RNA rather than DNA? And second, there was that powerful tumorigenic potential to be explained. Warren and I resolved to take on the replication of Rous sarcoma virus, just how does it propagate, about which virtually nothing was known at the molecular level. And in doing so, we implicitly took on the puzzle of how the virus could establish itself as a heritable property of the host cell. And I can dramatize that puzzle by reviewing what happens when Rous sarcoma virus is applied to rodent cells. At first it appears that nothing has happened, because the virus cannot replicate in those cells. But in due course, clones of neoplastic cells emerge, cells that will form a tumour in the same species of animal. And although these cells produce no virus, their morphological phenotype is determined by the particular strain of virus that was used. And mirabile dictu, if at any subsequent point the transformed cells are fused with normal chicken cells, the virus re-emerges, phenotype intact. Where had it been hiding? Now looming over that puzzle was the central dogma, enunciated with special authority by Francis Crick, but generally ingrained in most biologists at the time. The transfer of genetic information was thought to be unidirectional from DNA to RNA to protein. It turns out that future events about, which I'll talk in a moment, would prompt Francis Crick in a bit of hindsight to point out that chemistry may preclude direct transfer of information from protein to RNA, but there had been no inherent reason to discredit transfer from RNA to DNA. But that bias was existent and powerful. In any event, two individuals paid little heed to the central dogma: Howard Temin and David Baltimore. The two first crossed paths in 1955 at a science camp for high school students put on by the Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine. At the time, Temin was a student at Swarthmore College who was serving as the guru for the camp, the one adult presence. Baltimore was a high school student from New York City who attended the camp. Temin is on the right, Baltimore is on the left. Look at that. I've never had one of those before. Now, although Baltimore went on to attend Swarthmore as well, Temin apparently had nothing to do with that, the two parted ways until the spring of 1970, when they independently wreaked havoc with the central dogma. Now, Temin and Baltimore came at the puzzle of Rous sarcoma virus from very different vantage points. Temin began work with the virus as a graduate student at Caltech, where he first of all helped develop the quantitative bioassay that we all then used thereafter. And at Caltech, he became familiar with the phenomenon of lysogenic conversion of bacteria by viruses that we call bacteriophage. And during the course of infection, the phage can go into hiding by inserting its genome into the genome of the host cell and from that position can bestow new properties on the host cell. The phage can be brought out of hiding by irradiating the cell. Temin thought this might just well represent how Rous sarcoma viruses might replicate, stabilize its genome in the host, and initiate neoplastic transformation of the host cell. There was only one problem with this of course. Lysogenic phage had double stranded DNA genomes, whereas Rous sarcoma virus has a single stranded RNA genome. How could that create a lysogenic phenomenon in the host cell? By 1964, Temin had solved this problem in his own mind by proposing what he called the DNA provirus hypothesis. The RNA genome of Rous sarcoma virus must be transcribed into DNA, which then serves as template for the synthesis of both viral messenger and genome RNA. Temin ruefully remarked in his Nobel lecture that for the next six years this hypothesis was essentially ignored. He might well have said soundly denigrated. I heard that done on many occasions. Most observers absolutely loathed the idea. Undeterred by criticism, Temin produced a variety of suggestive data to support his idea. Using chemical inhibitors, he demonstrated that infection by Rous sarcoma virus requires both new DNA synthesis and DNA dependent RNA synthesis. And using molecular hybridization, he claimed to have detected viral DNA in Rous sarcoma virus infected cells, although in all honesty the data were quite frail. In 1969 however, Satoshi Mizutani joined Temin's laboratory and in his first experiments, literally his very first experiments, he demonstrated that new protein synthesis was necessary for the early stages of Rous sarcoma virus replication. That result was actually never published, but it allowed Mizutani and Temin to conclude that the RNA directed DNA polymerase required by the provirus hypothesis must pre-exist infection. And at the time there was no precedent for such an enzyme in normal cells. We all know better now. So in that case ignorance was indeed bliss, because it directed Mizutani and Temin to look for a DNA polymerase in the virions of Rous sarcoma virus itself. David Baltimore came at the problem from a completely different perspective: the replication of animal viral genomes, which I have portrayed here, in terms of how the viral messenger RNA is generated in order to get replication underway. Baltimore had cut his research teeth on picornaviruses such as polio virus, whose single stranded RNA genomes serve directly as messenger RNA once they have gained access to the cell, so that's... yes. Consequently, we define the polarity of the genome as positive. That's a convention in the field. The messenger in turn produces all the necessary viral proteins including an RNA polymerase that replicates the viral genome. Baltimore discovered this RNA replicase while a graduate student. He completed, incidentally, he completed his thesis work in 18 months. The replicase was the first enzyme of its kind to be uncovered, and it was consistent with the idea, the conventional view that virus particles themselves contain nothing but the viral genome and the requisite structural proteins. That view was changed by the discovery that a variety of viruses carry within their virions an enzyme encoded by the viral genome and required to initiate infection by producing viral messenger RNA. And in chronological order of those discoveries: An RNA polymerase was discovered within the virions of the large pox viruses that transcribes the double stranded DNA genome of these viruses into messenger RNA. An RNA polymerase that transcribes the double stranded RNA genome of reoviruses into viral messenger RNA. And an RNA polymerase that transcribes RNA genomes of negative polarity into messenger RNA. And it was the last of these that carried the greatest weight for Baltimore because he and Alice Huang discovered the first such example in vesicular stomatitis virus and followed that by finding a similar polymerase in Newcastle disease virus. Like Rous sarcoma virus, these are envelope viruses with single stranded RNA genomes. But they have a negative polarity, remember. And although the genome of Rous sarcoma virus has a positive polarity, Baltimore was struck by the possibility that it might utilize a virion polymerase for its replication. So even before publishing the results on the negative stranded RNA genome viruses, Baltimore went looking for both RNA and DNA polymerases in the virions of RNA tumour viruses. And he had to get the virus from other labs, he had never laid a pipette on an RNA tumour virus before. He literally leaped into the field unannounced. He was undeterred by the reigning scepticism about Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis, because as he explained in his Nobel lecture, "I had no experience in the field and no axe to grind." And that too can be a state of bliss for the right scientist. In the late spring of 1970, the paths of Temin and Baltimore finally converged again when they simultaneously reported their respective discoveries of an RNA directed DNA polymerase within the virions of RNA tumour viruses, which soon acquired the name reverse transcriptase. And in turn the RNA tumour viruses were reffered to as retroviruses. Now the discovery of reverse transcriptase of course was a transformative event intellectually. But it also provided a powerfully enabling technique: the ability to copy any single stranded RNA into DNA, which made it invaluable to both fundamental research and the burgeoning biotechnology industry. For my colleagues and me it was a godsend. Now we could make probes so that we could examine infected cells for viral nucleic acids at will, and we quickly set up assays to do so. So, the means by which the virus could produce proviral DNA were at hand, but was there really a stable provirus in the infected cell, and if so, where was it hiding? Was infection by Rous sarcoma virus truly an analogue of lysogeny? The first credible sighting of proviral DNA was actually biological in nature. Introduction of DNA taken from Rous sarcoma virus infected cells into uninfected cells by transfection gave rise to the original virus. The entire viral genome must have been lurking in the DNA of infected cells. But exactly where was the provirus and what did it look like? Those questions were taken up by Harold Varmus, who joined me in San Francisco in 1970, and we were to work together for the next sixteen years. Here we are in 1978, with me as usual one step behind Harold. Well, his legs were considerably longer than mine. And using molecular hybridization with radioactive probe copied from the Rous sarcoma's genome, we and others were able to demonstrate where and when the provirus was synthesized, what molecular forms it took within the infected cell, its eventual integration into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, where it is perpetuated and expressed as an unwelcome addition to the cellular genome. Now all of this adhered to what Howard Temin had posited a decade before. And contemplating this intimate interaction between viral and cellular genomes prepared us for what was soon to follow. Meanwhile progress was made towards solving a second great puzzle: How does Rous sarcoma virus elicit malignant growth? The first step was the demonstration by genetic analysis that the virus possesses an oncogene that is responsible for malignant transformation of host cells. This is a beautiful story which time does not permit me to tell, but it was fundamental to the field. And this oncogene was dubbed src because it causes sarcomas in chickens. Now src proved to be one of the only four genes, simply put, in the Rous sarcoma virus. And remarkably this gene plays no role in viral replication. That's the job of the other three genes in this exquisitely compact and efficient genome. Now src gene itself raised two puzzles of its own. First, what is the biochemical mechanism by which the gene elicits cancerous growth, and second, why does the virus have such a gene, given that it is not required for replication? The mechanism puzzle was solved with a discovery by Art Levinson in our lab and Mark Collett and Ray Erickson's lab in Denver that src encodes a protein kinase. Two years later, Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute surprised himself and everyone else with the discovery that the src kinase carries out a heretofore unknown reaction, phosphorylation of tyrosine. And there is a direct line from this line of experimentation to modern therapeutic practices, but that's also a story for another time. The ways in which these discoveries emerged are illuminating. In Denver, it was an inspired guess, based on the pleiotropism of src. Protein phosphorylation ranks among the most versatile agents of change known to biochemists. What better way to evoke the myriad changes that give rise to the neoplastic cell? In San Francisco, shrewd enzymology by Art Levinson led to the recognition that the src protein was actually phosphorylating itself, and thus might well phosphorylate other proteins as well. And at the Salk Institute, Tony Hunter's fortuitous use of an outdated buffer that's pH had gone off led to the separation of phosphotyrosine from phosphothreonine for the first time in recorded history. And here is Art Levinson, in creative costume at a lab Halloween party, many years before he became CEO of Genentech, chair of the Apple board of directors... he doesn't dress like that for those meetings... and most recently the founder of his own company, Calico. Now what about the second puzzle, the origin of the src gene in Rous sarcoma virus? Many years, two opposing lines of thought directed us to the genome of normal cells. First, there was the so-called virogene oncogene hypothesis, formulated by Robert Huebner and George Todaro. It was sort of an effort to create a universal theory of cancer. I for one didn't take it very seriously, but nevertheless it was out there. The thought was that retroviruses had deposited themselves with their oncogenes in the germ lines of ancient ancestors of modern species. And these genes were normally repressed by the cell, but they could be activated by various cancer-causing agents. By this account, we might possibly find src in normal cells, but it would be in the form of a retroviral oncogene, and its origin would remain unexplained. The opposing thought was Darwinian in nature. Since src is irrelevant to the viral life cycle, it is not likely to have arisen in concert with the remainder of the viral genome. There was no apparent selective pressure to accomplish that. Instead the intermittent interaction between viral and cellular genomes during the course of infection might have created an accident in which src was acquired from the cell, in essence reversing the hypothesis of Huebner and Todaro. And this thought also favoured a search for src in normal DNA. The search required a radioactive probe that could be used in molecular hybridization with the exquisite specificity to detect the src gene with great sensitivity. Now in his previous work as a postdoctoral fellow, Harold had used deletion mutants of bacteriophage to detect the expression of individual genes by molecular hybridization. And we were able to adapt this technique to our purposes. Because our collaborator Peter Vogt had isolated spontaneous deletion mutants of Rous sarcoma virus that appeared to remove the bulk of src. So as illustrated here, we could use the RNA of one of these deletion mutants to perform what later came to called subtractive hybridization. First transcribe the genome, the entire genome, both the replication genes and the src gene, into complementary radioactive cDNA. Then second, hybridize that cDNA to RNA from the deletion mutant which would capture all the DNA except that representing src. And finally remove the double stranded hybrids, leaving the single stranded cDNA for src, the probe we needed. The preparation and use of the src probe was laborious, given that the work far antedated the advent of recombinant DNA. And the requisite experiments occupied more than three years. The fact that they were done at all was a tribute to the valiant efforts of two postdoctoral fellows, Ramareddy Guntaka, who demonstrated that we could probably make the probe we needed. And Dominique Stehelin, shown here, who carried the work to its decisive conclusion. Today, with the assistance of recombinant DNA and other contemporary technologies you could probably have it done in a matter of weeks or months, but I for one am very glad we didn't wait. By 1974 we knew that our probe could detect sequences homologous to the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus in the DNA of various avians. The top panel here demonstrates the specificity of the probe. It reacted with the RNA from which it had been transcribed, but not with RNA from the deletion mutant. The middle panel shows that the src probe reacted with normal chicken DNA, but so did a probe for the deletion mutant. And that reflects the presence of what we call endogenous retroviruses, known to pollute the genomes of many species, ourselves included. The bottom panel is the crucial one. Only the src probe reacted with DNA from other avians, and this was our first indication that we were picking up something that was not linked to a retrovirus, and unlike the genomes of endogenous retroviruses, was conserved across substantial phylogenetic distances. Note the results with emu DNA, among the most primitive of surviving avians. We published these findings in 1976 as a brief note in Nature, two figures and two tables. The simplicity belied the extraordinary difficulty of the underlying experiments, and the remarkable paradigm shift that they represented. We were pleased and so apparently was the Nobel committee. But oh how times have changed. A week ago, a colleague told me that he had asked a class of graduate students to read that paper. Their reaction? They got the Nobel Prize for that? Yeah, we did. Gradually, we built the case that our probe was detecting a normal cellular gene. We found that it was conserved across vast phylogenetic distances, suggesting that it serves a vital function. We found that normal cells contained a protein with the same biochemical properties, the same size as the viral src protein, and that this was expressed in numerous tissues. And when at long last we could use recombinant DNA to clone cellular src, we sealed the deal. Cellular src had the structural hallmarks of a normal cellular gene, the viral oncogene src had indeed been pirated from the host cell as a fully spliced version of the progenitor, and at some point the cellular gene had sustained a mutation which converted it to an oncogene. And it soon became apparent that src was more than an isolated curiosity. The inventory of retroviral oncogenes mounted steadily, and each of these had been derived from the genome of a normal cell. Thus for each viral oncogene, there was a cognate proto-oncogene in the cell. Accidents of nature had uncovered a battery of potential cancer genes in normal cells. The cellular src proto-oncogene is a well behaved and vital switch in the signalling network of normal cells, we know a great deal about that now. The viral src oncogene, however, is a mutant malefactor, whose gene product has been constitutively activated, a genetic gain of function that creates a cancer gene. Gain of function, by one means or another, proved true for all the other retroviral oncogenes as well. It was easy to imagine that the battery of cellular proto-oncogenes could be a keyboard on which all manner of carcinogens could play, independent of viruses, creating cellular oncogenes without the intervention of a retrovirus, for example. Such has proven to be the case. Proto-oncogenes that have suffered gain of function are a virtually inevitable feature of all human tumours. And as such they are major drivers for tumour genesis, and consequently, candidates as targets for new therapeutics, and that is a thriving industry now. With the assistance of modern genomic tools, the number of these genes has been expanded well beyond two hundred. The gain of function that creates oncogenes can be affected by various means. First, gain of chromosomes, or focal gene amplification, both of which increase gene dosage. Chromosomal translocations, which can either disturb the control of gene expression, or create mongrel gene products that malfunction. Point mutations, which can disrupt the control of gene expression, or create malfunctioning gene products. And defective epigenetic control of gene expression. All of these have been found in human tumours. But the end result is always the same: The equivalent of a jammed accelerator with the capacity to drive tumour genesis. The transduction of normal cellular genes into oncogenes by retroviruses, an accident of nature, had brought genetic seeds of cancer to view for the very first time. What are the factors that drove this line of discovery? Well here are a few, for the students. First of all, an eye for the main chance. David Baltimore discovered a reverse transcriptase with his very first experiment with an RNA tumour virus. He was not thinking about it before, but he saw an opportunity and seized it. Judicious disregard for received wisdom. Consider Temin and Baltimore's benign neglect of the central dogma. A willingness to gamble. Consider the years invested in the pursuit of cellular src, in what could easily have been a fool's errand. Faith in the universality of nature. The example? Our conviction that there was something to be learned about human cancer from studying a chicken virus, albeit not in anybody's living room. The choice of experimental system. The attractions that drew me to Rous sarcoma virus. Technical innovation. The assay that found cellular src. And self-confidence. Howard Temin's steadfast pursuit of his ideas during more than a decade in intellectual exile while he promulgated the provirus hypothesis to disbelieving ears. So I conclude with a shout out to Rous sarcoma virus, which has been a fecund friend of cancer research. Consider its offspring. Demonstration that viruses can cause cancer. Reverse transcriptase, a truly disruptive and generative discovery. The first example of a gene that can directly cause cancer, src. Nothing like it had been seen before. The role of protein kinases in tumorigenesis. Phosphorylation of tyrosine, now a prime player in cell signalling and a prime target in cancer therapeutics. Proto-oncogenes, the first glimpse of a genetic keyboard for carcinogens. And to date, for what it's worth, five Nobel laureates. Not bad for a chicken. Thank you.

Ich danke Ihnen. Es ist schön, wieder hier zu sein. Ich möchte anmerken, ich fand es beeindruckend, dass Eric Betzig einige seiner zentralen Arbeiten in einem Wohnzimmer durchgeführt hat. Diese Geschichte beginnt mit Hühnern. Ich glaubte nicht, dass es da geklappt hätte. Also Ende des… Da haben wir es. Ende des Jahres 1909 bemerkte ein Bauer auf Long Island in New York an der Brust einer seiner Plymouth Rock Hennen einen Tumor. Mehrere Monate lang beobachtete er das Wachsen des Tumors, dann brachte er sie in das Rockefeller Institute in New York City, um zu sehen, ob man da was tun könnte. Der Bauer wurde an Peyton Rous verwiesen, einen jungen Pathologen, der sich für Krebs interessierte, obgleich seine Publikationsliste dazu nicht groß waren. Über ihn wird gesagt, er sei eine sehr energische, sogar hitzige Person gewesen. Vielleicht war er dank seiner Persönlichkeit fähig, den Bauer davon zu überzeugen, dieses Huhn der medizinischen Forschung zu schenken. Diese zufällige Begegnung startete eine Reihe von Entdeckungen, die sich beinahe über drei Viertel eines Jahrhunderts erstreckten und zu der Erkenntnis führte, dass der Keim des Krebses in unseren eigenen Genomen sitzt. Ich möchte heute untersuchen, wie sich das alles zugetragen hat, um zu zeigen, wie Entdeckungen gemacht werden. Im darauf folgenden Vortrag wird mein Kollege Harold Varmus erläutern, wohin uns diese Entdeckungen im Kampf gegen Krebs geführt haben. Rous fing mit einem sehr einfachen Experiment an: er versuchte, den Tumor mittels Körpergewebe von einem Huhn auf ein anderes weiterzugeben. Das Experiment war nicht unbedingt ein voller Erfolg. In diesem Beispiel, mit jedem Durchgang… da haben wir es…Finky hat mir das beigebracht… (lacht) Es war nur eine Übertragung erfolgreich. Es ist dieses schwarze Quadrat. Zudem war die Transplantation nur erfolgreich, wenn Rous Hühner aus der durch Inzucht gewachsenen Hühnerschar des Bauern verwendete. Der Tumor wuchs nicht bei Plymouth Rock Hühnern aus anderen Quellen, auch nicht bei anderen Vogelarten. Rous erklärte dies damit, dass die Tumore dem folgten, was er die Gesetze der Gewebebiologie nannte. Wir nennen es Histokompatibilität. So banal uns dieses Experiment auch scheinen mag, es wird allgemein angenommen, dass die Weitergabe des Tumors glücklicherweise für den nächsten Schritt essentiell war, der Peyton Rous in eine neue Dimension führte und ihm bleibenden Ruhm verschaffte. Beginnend mit den sechs Passagen von Tumoren, begann Rous aus den Tumoren zellfreie Extrakte herzustellen und entdeckte, dass deren Injektionen bei Hühnern aus der gleichen Schar einen identischen Tumor hervorrufen konnten, ein Spindelzellsarkom. Er veröffentlichte diese Entdeckung in einem zweiseitigen Artikel im Journal of the American Medical Association. In jenen Tagen und zu jener Zeit werden Sie nicht viel über Hühner in dieser Fachzeitschrift finden. Rous erkannte, dass er, mit seinen eigenen Worten, eine einzigartige und signifikante Entdeckung gemacht hatte, er war aber sehr vorsichtig dahingehend, was diese Entdeckung implizieren könnte. Ich zitiere aus seinem ersten Artikel: in diesem Sarkom des Geflügels als einen winzigen parasitären Organismus zu betrachten. Aber eine andersartige Wirkung ist nicht ausgeschlossen. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt haben wir uns keiner der beiden Hypothesen verschrieben.“ Mit einer solchen Sprache könnten Sie heutzutage nicht in vielen Fachzeitschriften landen. Doch innerhalb eines Jahres hatte Rous einen zweiten filtrierbaren Erreger identifiziert, der eine andere Art Tumor bei Hühnern verursachte, ein Osteochondrosarkom, und an diesem Punkt erlag er der Versuchung, den vor Kurzem geprägten Begriff „Virus“ zu verwenden, ein Konzept, das erst seit einem Jahrzehnt vorlag. In seinen Schriften war Rous nie besonders eindeutig hinsichtlich der Inspiration zu seiner Arbeit. Er erklärte seine Bemühung den Tumor zu transplantieren, indem er darauf verwies, dass die Transplantation von Tumoren bei Säugetieren erfolgreich war, warum es also nicht auch an Hühnern ausprobieren? Er begründete seine Meilenstein-Experimente mit filtrierbaren Extrakten indem er darauf verwies, diese Arbeit sei bei Säugern nie erfolgreich gewesen, also warum es nicht mal an Hühnern versuchen? Das ist wortwörtlich der Fall. Vielleicht wird sein Motiv am besten von dem Nobelpreisträger Renato Dulbecco in seiner biographischen Schrift über Rous erklärt, der schrieb, dass Rous ein Mediziner war, der mehr über Krebs als Krankheit erfahren wollte und ein Biologe, der nicht den ausgetretenen Pfaden folgen wollte - gewillt, nach neuen Spuren in gut konzipierten, aber langsamen Experimenten zu suchen. Die Arbeit mit den Hühnerviren wurde, wie Rous es in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag beschreibt, ausgesprochen uninteressiert aufgenommen. Keiner nahm das wirklich ernst. Rous war schließlich selbst desillusioniert, da es ihm nicht gelang, die verursachenden Viren in den transplantierbaren Tumoren der Säugetiere, besonders der Nager, zu bestimmen. Es dauerte fünfundfünfzig Jahre, ehe seine Entdeckung des Hühnertumor-Virus ihm den Nobelpreis einbrachte und Finky, solltest du hier unter den Zuhörern sein, das ist wirklich ein Rekord. Gut. Rous hat sicherlich den Nobelpreis verdient, denn er hat zwei bedeutsame Vermächtnisse geformt. Das Erste ist die letztendliche Anerkennung, dass Viren eine Hauptursache für Krebs beim Menschen sind, etwas, mit dem Rous gespielt hatte, dies aber nach seinem Misserfolg mit Tumoren bei Nagern verwarf. Das ist eine Geschichte, die Ihnen Professor zur Hausen erzählen kann. Das zweite Vermächtnis stellt eine ununterbrochene Forschungskette dar, die schließlich fehlentwickelte Gene mit Krebs in Verbindung brachte. Einige Jahrzehnte lang nach Rous lag sein Sarkom-Virus brach. Doch Anfang der 1960er kam Tempo in die Angelegenheit und es wurde offensichtlich, dass das Rous Virus ein Archetyp einer umfangreichen und scheinbar ubiquitären Familie dessen war, was RNA-Tumorviren genannt wurde, was auf die Beschaffenheit ihres neu entdeckten Genom, RNA, hinwies. Die Entdeckung von Peyton Rous wuchs nun von einem zweiseitigen Bericht im Journal of the American Medical Association zu einer 1500 Seiten starken Monographie und ich habe meine Zweifel, ob es viele gibt, die diese Seite für Seite gelesen haben. Ich begegnete diesen Viren zum ersten Mal nachdem ich an der University of California San Francisco im Jahre 1968 begann, beim Antritt einer Stelle, die sich als meine einzige akademische Anstellung herausstellen sollte. Als frischgebackener Assistant Professor, dessen Forschungsarbeiten sich mit der Reproduktion von Polioviren befassten, wusste ich damals wirklich kaum etwas über RNA-Tumorvieren. Dann wurde ich einem weiteren Neuling der Fakultät, Warren Levinson, vorgestellt, der bei den biologischen Aspekten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus bewandert war. Damals sahen wir so ziemlich alle so aus. Unter Warrens Anleitung wurde es mir schnell deutlich: dieses Virus stellte eine potentiell kraftvolles Instrument dar, um die Geheimnisse der Krebszelle zu erforschen. Die Experimente waren einfach, die biologischen Grundmerkmale des Virus recht gut charakterisiert. Es konnte Zellen in vitro in einer Petrischale buchstäblich über Nacht in einen krebsartigen Phänotyp umwandeln. Es gab ein gut etabliertes und stark reproduzierbares Bioassay für das Virus in vitro, die das Virus unter anderem für die genetische Analyse nutzbar machte. Das Virus ließ sich in großen Mengen, die für eine biochemische und strukturelle Analyse ausreichten, vermehren und reinigen. Seine Unfähigkeit zur Vermehrung in menschlichen Zellen bedeutete, es würde kaum, wenn überhaupt, eine Bedrohung für diejenigen darstellen, die damit arbeiteten, weshalb man unter relativ lockeren Bedingungen würde arbeiten können. Zu der Zeit bot kein anderes RNA-Tumorvirus so viele Vorteile. Wir preschten also mit dem Hühnervirus vor. Warren und ich taten uns zusammen, um das Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu studieren, und zu der Zeit gab es zwei große Rätsel. Erstens: es schien, als könnte das virale Genom zu einer vererbbaren Eigenschaft der Wirtszelle werden. Wie war das mit einem Virus möglich, dessen Genom RNA statt DNA war? Und zweitens, gab es dieses starke tumorerregende Potential, das es zu erklären galt. Warren und ich entschieden, uns mit der Vermehrung des Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu befassen - einfach mal sehen, wie es sich vermehrt, wovon auf der molekularen Ebene so gut wie nichts bekannt war. Damit befassten wir uns implizit mit dem Rätsel, wie sich das Virus selbst als eine vererbbare Eigenschaft in der Wirtszelle herausbilden konnte. Ich kann dieses Rätsel noch weiter herausarbeiten, indem ich prüfe was geschieht, wenn das Rous-Sarkom-Virus in die Zellen von Nagern eingesetzt wird. Zuerst sieht es so aus, als würde nichts geschehen, da sich das Virus in diesen Zellen nicht vermehren kann. Doch zu gegebener Zeit tauchen Klone krebsartiger Zellen auf; Zellen, die einen Tumor in der gleichen Tierspezies formen werden. Obgleich diese Zellen keine Viren erzeugen, wird ihr morphologischer Phänotyp durch den verwendeten speziellen Virenstamm bestimmt. Und, mirabile dictu, werden irgendwann die umgewandelten Zellen mit normalen Hühnerzellen verschmolzen, taucht das Virus wieder auf, der Phänotyp ist intakt. Wo hat er sich versteckt? Über diesem Rätsel schwebte das zentrale Dogma, ausgesprochen durch die Autorität Francis Crick, damals aber auch ganz allgemein in den meisten Biologen tief verwurzelt. Man dachte nämlich, die Übertragung genetischer Informationen geschehe in einer Richtung von der DNA zur RNA zum Protein. Zukünftige Ereignisse, die ich gleich ansprechen werde, veranlassten Francis Crick, in einer etwas späten Einsicht, darauf hinzuweisen, dass die Chemie vielleicht die direkte Übertragung vom Protein zur RNA ausschloss, es gab aber keinen Grund, die Übertragung von der RNA zur DNA in zu verwerfen. Doch diese Grundannahme war vorhanden und sehr mächtig. Auf jeden Fall schenkten zwei Personen diesem zentralen Dogma wenig Aufmerksamkeit: Howard Temin und David Baltimore. das die Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine, veranstaltet hatten. Damals war Temin Student des Swarthmore College, der als Experte für das Camp amtierte, der einzig anwesende Erwachsene. Baltimore war ein Gymnasiast aus New York City, ein Teilnehmer des Camps. Temin ist rechts, Baltimore ist links zu sehen. Sehen Sie sich das an. So eines hatte ich noch nie. Obgleich Baltimore weiterhin in Swarthmore blieb, hatte Temin damit nichts mehr zu tun; die beiden gingen verschiedene Wege bis zum Frühjahr 1970, als sie unabhängig voneinander gegen das zentrale Dogma wüteten. Temin und Baltimore gingen aus sehr verschiedenen Blickwinkeln das Rätsel des Rous-Sarkom-Virus an. Temin fing als Doktorand bei Caltech an, mit dem Virus zu arbeiten, wobei er zuerst an der Entwicklung des quantitativen Bioassay mitwirkte, das wir danach alle verwendeten. Bei Caltech wurde er mit dem Phänomen der lysogenen Umwandlung von Bakterien durch Viren, die wir Bakteriophage nennen, bekannt. Im Laufe einer Infektion, kann der Phage sich verbergen, indem er sein Genom in das Genom der Wirtszelle einfügt. Aus dieser Position kann er der Wirtszelle neue Eigenschaften zuteilen. Der Phage lässt sich durch Bestrahlen der Zelle aus dem Versteck herausholen. Temin glaubte, dies könne vielleicht gut erklären, wie die Rous-Sarkom-Viren sich vermehren, ihr Genom im Wirt stabilisieren und krebsartige Transformationen der Wirtszelle auslösen. Es gab bei diesem Verlauf nur ein Problem: Der lysogene Phage hat doppelsträngige DNA-Genome, während das Rous-Sarkom-Virus ein einsträngiges RNA-Genom hat. Wie konnte dadurch ein lysogenes Phänomen in einer Wirtszelle erzeugt werden? den er die DNA-Provirus-Hypothese nannte. Das RNA-Genom des Rous-Sarkom-Virus muss in die DNA transkribiert werden, was dann als Schablone für die Synthese sowohl der viralen Boten-RNA und des RNA-Genom diente. Temin bemerkte in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag, dass seine Hypothese im wesentlich während der nächsten sechs Jahre ignoriert wurde. Er hätte auch sagen können, sie wurde entschieden verunglimpft. Ich habe das bei vielen Gelegenheiten gehört. Die meisten Beobachter verabscheuten diese Idee. Unbeirrt von der Kritik stellte Temin eine Vielfalt aussagekräftiger Daten her, um seine Idee zu stützen. Unter Verwendung von chemischen Inhibitoren demonstrierte er, dass die Infektion durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus sowohl eine neue DNA-Synthese als auch eine DNA-abhängige RNA-Synthese erforderte. Mit der molekularen Hybridisierung beanspruchte er für sich, die virale DNA in den durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen entdeckt zu haben, auch wenn, ehrlich gesagt, die Daten ziemlich schwach waren. Doch 1969 wurde Satoshi Mizutani Mitarbeiter in Temins Labor und in seinen ersten Experimenten, buchstäblich in seinen allerersten Experimenten, demonstrierte er, dass eine neue Proteinsynthese in den frühen Stadien der Rous-Sarkom-Virus-Reproduktion notwendig war. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nie publiziert, doch erlaubte es Mizutani und Temin die Schlussfolgerung, dass die RNA-abhängige DNA-Polymerase, die die Provirus-Hypothese forderte, vor der Infektion vorhanden sein musste. Zu dieser Zeit gab es keine Präzedenz für ein solches Enzym in normalen Zellen. Heute wissen wir es besser. In diesem Falle war Ahnungslosigkeit in der Tat ein Segen, denn sie veranlasste Mizutani und Temin, nach einer DNA-Polymerase in den Viria des Rous-Sarkom-Virus selbst zu suchen. David Baltimore näherte sich dem Problem aus einer vollkommen anderen Perspektive: Die Replikation tierischer viraler Genome, die ich hier porträtiert habe, in Hinblick auf die virale Boten-RNA wird erzeugt, um Replikationen in Gang zu setzen. Baltimore hatte sich bei seiner Forschung auf Picornaviren, wie etwa das Polio-Virus konzentriert, dessen einzelsträngiges RNA-Genom direkt als eine Boten-RNA diente, sobald dies einen Zugang zu den Zellen erlangte, so ist das… ja. Folglich definieren wir die Polarität des Genoms als positiv. Das ist in diesem Bereich eine Konvention. Der Bote wiederum erzeugt alle notwendigen viralen Proteine, einschließlich einer RNA- Polymerase, die das virale Genom kopiert. Baltimore entdeckte diese RNA-Replikase als Doktorand. Nebenbei bemerkt schloss er seine Doktorarbeit innerhalb von 18 Monaten ab. Die Replikase war das erste Enzym dieser Art, das aufgedeckt wurde, und es stimmte mit der konventionellen Ansicht überein, wonach Viruspartikel selbst nichts außer dem viralen Genom und den erforderlichen strukturellen Proteinen enthalten. Diese Ansicht änderte sich durch die Entdeckung einer Vielzahl an Viren, die in ihren Viria ein Enzym enthielten, kodiert durch das virale Genom, das für die Anfangsinfektion erforderlich war, da es die virale Boten-RNA erzeugte. Hier in chronologischer Folge die Entdeckungen: Eine RNA- Polymerase wurde in den Viria eines großen Pockenvirus entdeckt, die das doppelsträngige DNA-Genom dieser Viren in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Eine RNA-Polymerase die das doppelsträngige RNA-Genom von Reoviren in virale Boten-RNA transkribiert. Und eine RNA-Polymerase, die RNA-Genome von negativer Polarität in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Das Letztere hiervon hatte für Baltimore das größte Gewicht, da er und Alice Huang das erste entsprechende Beispiel im Vesicular Stomatitis Virus entdeckten und in der Folge eine ähnliche Polymerase im Newcastle Disease Virus. Wie das Rous-Sarkom-Virus sind dies verkapselte Viren mit einzelsträngigen RNA-Genomen. Doch erinnern Sie sich, sie haben eine negative Polarität. Und obgleich das Rous-Sarkom-Virus eine positive Polarität hat, war Baltimore von der Möglichkeit beeindruckt, es könne eine Virion-Polymerase zu seiner Replikation verwenden. Noch bevor die Ergebnisse der negative-strängigen RNA-Genom-Viren publiziert wurden, suchte Baltimore in Viria der RNA-Tumorviren sowohl nach RNA und DNA-Polymerasen. Er musste das Virus aus anderen Labors bekommen, er hatte zuvor nie ein RNA-Tumorvirus mit der Pinzette berührt. Er sprang buchstäblich unangekündigt in dieses Feld hinein. Er ließ sich nicht durch die herrschende Skepsis hinsichtlich Termins DNA-Provirus-Hypothese beirren, denn, wie er in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag erläuterte: „Ich hatte auf diesem Feld keine Erfahrung und auch keine persönlichen Interessen.“ Auch das kann für einen richtigen Wissenschaftler ein wahrer Segen sein. Schließlich, im späten Frühjahr 1970 führten die Wege von Temin und Baltimore erneut zueinander. Sie berichteten gleichzeitig von ihren jeweiligen Entdeckungen einer RNA-abhängigen DNA-Polymerase in den Viria der RNA-Tumorviren, welches bald reverse Transkriptase genannt wurde. Die RNA-Tumorviren wiederum wurden als die Retroviren bezeichnet. Diese Entdeckung der reversen Transkriptase bedeutete eine Umkehr vom normalen Denken. Es bot aber auch eine viele neue Möglichkeiten: Die Fähigkeit, eine einzelsträngige RNA in die DNA zu kopieren, was für die Grundlagenforschung und die im Entstehen begriffene industriell genutzte Biotechnologie von unschätzbarem Wert war. Für mich und meine Kollegen war es ein Geschenk des Himmels. Wir konnten jetzt beliebig infizierte Zellen auf virale Nukleinsäuren untersuchen und wir bauten sehr schnell Assays dafür auf. Die Mittel, mit denen das Virus provirale DNA erzeugen konnte, waren vorhanden. Gab es in der infizierten Zelle aber wirklich einen stabilen Provirus, und wenn dem so war, wo versteckte er sich? War die Infektion durch das Rous-Sarkom-Virus wirklich eine Nachbildung der Lysogenie? Die erste glaubwürdige Sichtung der proviralen DNA war biologischer Natur. Die Einführung der DNA, aus Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen in nichtinfizierte Zellen durch Transfektion, riefen das ursprüngliche Virus hervor. Das ganze virale Genom hatte sich offenbar in der DNA der infizierten Zellen versteckt. Doch wo genau war das Provirus und wie sah es aus? Dies Fragen wurden von Harold Varmus aufgegriffen, der 1970 in San Francisco zu mir stieß und wir arbeiteten dann die folgenden 16 Jahre zusammen. Hier sind wir im Jahr 1978, ich, wie gewöhnlich, einen Schritt hinter Harold. Nun, seine Beine waren sehr viel länger als meine. Unter Verwendung molekularer Hybridisierung mit radioaktiven Sonden, kopiert vom Rous-Sarkom-Genom, waren wir und andere in der Lage aufzuzeigen, wo und wann das Provirus synthetisiert wurde, welche molekularen Formen es innerhalb der infizierten Zelle annahm, seine endgültige Integration in die chromosomale DNA der Wirtszelle, in der es als ein unerwünschter Zusatz zum zellulären Genom bewahrt und ausgedrückt wird. Alles das stimmte mit dem überein, was Howard Temin bereits vor einem Jahrzehnt postulierte. Und das Nachdenken über diese innige Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen bereiteten uns auf das vor, was bald darauf folgte. Inzwischen gab es Fortschritte beim Lösen des zweiten großen Rätsels: Wie löste das Rous-Sarkom-Virus das maligne Wachstum aus? Der erste Schritt war der Beweis der Genanalyse, dass das Virus über ein Onkogen verfügte, welches für die maligne Transformation der Wirtszelle verantwortlich war. Es ist eine schöne Geschichte, aber ich habe nicht die Zeit, sie Ihnen zu erzählen, Sie war für dieses Gebiet jedoch grundlegend. Dieses Onkogen wurde Src genannt, da es Sarkome in Hühnern verursacht. Es zeigte sich, Src war, vereinfach gesagt, eines von nur vier Genen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus. Bemerkenswerter Weise spielt dieses Gen keine Rolle bei der viralen Replikation. Das ist die Aufgabe der anderen drei Gene in diesem ausnehmend kompakten und effizienten Genom. Nun werden durch das Src Gen selbst zwei Rätsel gestellt. Erstens: Was ist der biochemische Mechanismus, durch den das Gen das maligne Wachstum auslöst? Und zweitens: Warum verfügt das Virus über ein solches Gen, obwohl es dies nicht zur Replikation benötigt? Das Rätsel des Mechanismus wurde in unserem Labor durch die Entdeckung von Art Levinson, und im Labor von Mark Collett und Ray Erickson in Denver gelöst: Das Src kodiert eine Proteinkinase. Zwei Jahre danach überraschte Tony Hunter am Salk Institute sich selbst und alle anderen mit der Entdeckung, dass die Src Kinase bislang unbekannte Reaktionen vornahm, nämlich die Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin. Es besteht eine direkte Linie zwischen dieser Reihe von Experimenten zu modernen therapeutischen Behandlungen, doch auch das ist eine Geschichte für einen anderen Zeitpunkt. Die Arten, auf denen diese Entdeckungen gemacht wurden, sind wegweisend. In Denver war es eine inspirierte Vermutung auf Basis der Pleiotropie des Src. Proteinphosphorylierung zählt zu den unter Biochemikern bekannten vielseitigsten Wirkstoffen für Veränderungen. Was eignete sich besser für das Hervorrufen einer Unzahl von Veränderungen, die Anlass für eine neoplasmatische Zelle geben? In San Francisco hatte die schafsinnige Enzymologie Art Levinsons zu der Erkenntnis geführt, dass das Src-Protein selbst eine Phosphorylierung war und daher durchaus andere Proteine phosphorylieren könnte. Am Salk Institute hatte Tony Hunters zufällige Verwendung eines veralteten Puffers, dessen pH abgelaufen war, zum ersten Mal seit Menschengedenken zu einer Trennung des Phosphotyrosin vom Phosphothreonin geführt. Das hier ist Art Levinson in einem Fantasiekostüm bei der Halloween-Party des Labors, viele Jahre ehe er der CEO von Genentech, Vorsitzender des Apple-Vorstands wurde…. er kleidet sich für solche Sitzungen nicht so ein… und seit Kurzem ist er Gründer des eigenen Unternehmens Calico. Wie steht es nun mit dem zweiten Rätsel, dem Ursprung des Src-Gens im Rous-Sarkom-Virus? Viele Jahre lang haben uns zwei entgegengesetzte Ansätze zum Genom normaler Zellen geführt. Einmal war da die sogenannte virogene Onkogenhypothese, aufgestellt von Robert Huebner und George Todaro. Es war ein Bestreben, eine universelle Theorie über Krebs aufzustellen. Ich selbst bewertete sie nicht sehr hoch, doch es gab sie. Der Gedanke war, Retroviren hätten sich mit ihren Onkogenen selbst in die Keimbahnen der Urahnen der modernen Spezies deponiert. Diese Gene wurden gewöhnlich durch die Zelle unterdrückt, konnten aber durch verschiedene krebsverursachende Wirkungen aktiviert werden. Unter der Voraussetzung können wir Src möglicherweise in normalen Zellen finden, das wäre aber in Form eines retroviralen Onkogens, dessen Ursprung ungeklärt bliebe. Der entgegengesetzte Gedanke war darwinistischer Natur. Da Src für den viralen Lebenszyklus ohne Bedeutung ist, ist es unwahrscheinlich, dass es gemeinsam mit dem Rest des viralen Genoms entstanden ist. Es gab keinen ausreichend selektiven Druck, der dies erreicht hätte. Statt dessen könnte die periodische Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen im Laufe einer Infektion eine Störung verursacht haben, in der Src von der Zelle gewonnen wurde; im Wesentlichen wurde damit die Hypothese von Huebner und Todaro umgekehrt. Dieser Gedanke befürwortete auch die Suche nach Src in der normalen DNA. Die Suche erforderte eine radioaktive Sonde, die bei molekularer Hybridisierung verwendet wurde, um ein Src-Gen mit großer Sonden-Empfindlichkeit zu entdecken. In seiner vorherigen Arbeit als Post-Doc, hatte Harold Deletionsmutanten des Bakteriophagen verwendet, um die Expressionen einzelner Gene durch molekulare Hybridisierung zu erkennen. Wir waren in der Lage diese Technik für unsere Zwecke zu übernehmen. Denn unser Mitarbeiter Peter Vogt hatte den spontanen Deletionsmutanten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus isoliert, der den Hauptteil von Src zu entfernen schien. Wie hier dargestellt, konnten wir die RNA eines dieser Deletionsmutanten verwenden, um später das durchzuführen, was dann Substrathybridisierung genannt wurde. Zuerst transkribiert man das Genom, das gesamte Genom, sowohl die Replikationsgene und das Src-Gen in komplimentäre radioaktive cDNA. Als zweites hybridisiert man vom Deletionsmutanten cDNA mit RNA, was die gesamte DNA erfasst, ausgenommen jener, die Src repräsentiert. Schließlich entfernt man die doppelsträngigen Hybriden und lässt die einzelsträngige cDNA für Src über für die Sonde. Die Vorbereitung und Verwendung der Src-Sonde war mühselig, in Anbetracht, dass die Arbeit weit vor Erscheinen der rekombinanten DNA erfolgte. Die erforderlichen Experimente beanspruchten dann drei Jahre. Dass sie überhaupt durchgeführt wurden war das Verdienst zweier Post-Docs: Ramareddy Guntaka, der nachwies, dass wir die notwendige Sonde vermutlich herstellen können, und Dominique Stehelin, der hier zu sehen ist, hat die Arbeit bis zu ihrer entscheidenden Schlussfolgerung durchgeführte. Heute, mit Hilfe der rekombinanten DNA und weiteren zeitgemäßen Technologien, hätte man das vermutlich innerhalb von Wochen oder Monaten erreicht, ich bin allerdings froh, dass wir nicht gewartet haben. Onkogen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus in der DNA verschiedener Vogelarten. Die obere Tafel hier zeigt die Genauigkeit der Sonde. Sie reagiert mit der RNA aus der sie transkribiert wurde, nicht aber mit der RNA des Deletionsmutanten. Die mittlere Tafel zeigt dass die Src-Sonde mit normaler Hühner-DNA reagiert, doch das tat auch eine Sonde für den Deletionsmutanten. Das beweist die Anwesenheit dessen, was wir endogene Retroviren nannten, die dafür bekannt sind, dass sie die Genome vieler Spezies, auch die unseren, angreifen. Die untere Tafel ist die Entscheidende. Nur die Src-Sonde reagierte mit der DNA anderer Vogelarten und dies war unsere erste Indikation dafür, dass wir etwas erfasst hatten, das nicht mit dem Retrovirus verknüpft war, und anders als die Genome der endogenen Retroviren, über bedeutende phylogenetische Distanzen konserviert wurde. Beachten Sie die Ergebnisse mit Emu DNA, unter den primitivsten überlebenden Vogelarten. Wir publizierten diese Ergebnisse 1976 in einer kurzen Notiz in Nature, zwei Abbildungen und zwei Tabellen. Die Simplizität täuschte über die außerordentliche Schwierigkeit der zugrundeliegenden Experimente und den bemerkenswerten Paradigmenwechsel hinweg. Wir waren erfreut, und offenbar auch das Nobelpreiskomitee. Wie haben die Zeiten sich jedoch geändert. Vor einer Woche erzählte mir ein Kollege, er habe eine Klasse Studenten gebeten, das Papier zu lesen. Ihre Reaktion? Die haben dafür einen Nobelpreis erhalten? Ja, das haben wir. Schrittweise arbeiteten wir daran, dass unsere Sonde ein normales zelluläres Gen erkennen konnte. Wir entdeckten, es war über weite polygenetische Distanzen konserviert, was seine lebenswichtige Funktion nahelegte. Wir entdeckten, dass normale Zelle ein Protein mit den gleichen biochemischen Eigenschaften enthielten, von gleicher Größe wie die des Src-Proteins und das in zahllosen Geweben exprimiert war. Und als wir endlich die rekombinante DNA verwenden konnten, um zelluläres Src zu klonen, hatten wir das Ganze besiegelt. Zelluläres Src verfügte über die strukturellen Besonderheiten eines normalen zellulären Gens, Das virale Onkogen Src hatte sich tatsächlich unerlaubt von der Wirtszelle als vollständig gespleißte Version des Vorfahren kopiert und zugleich hatte das zelluläre Gen eine Mutation erhalten, die es in ein Onkogen umwandelte. Bald wurde klar: Src war mehr als eine abseitige Merkwürdigkeit. Der Bestand der introviralen Onkogene wuchs ständig und jedes davon wurde vom Genom einer normalen Zelle abgeleitet. Für jedes virale Onkogen gab es in der Zelle ein verwandtes Proto-Onkogen. Zufälligkeiten der Natur hatten eine Batterie potentieller Krebsgene in normalen Zellen aufgedeckt. Das zelluläre Src Proto-Onkogen ist ein sich anständig verhaltender und vitaler Schalter im Signalgebungsnetzwerk normaler Zellen. Darüber wissen wir inzwischen eine Menge. Das virale Src-Onkogen ist jedoch ein mutanter Übeltäter, dessen Genprodukt ständig aktiviert wird, mit einer genetischen “Gain-of-function”, die Krebszellen erzeugt. Die Gain-of-function erwies sich in der einen oder anderen Weise auch für alle weiteren retroviralen Onkogene als richtig. Es war leicht sich vorzustellen, dass die Vielzahl zellulärer Proto-Onkogene gleichsam eine Klaviatur sein kann, auf der alle denkbaren Karzinogene spielen konnten und - unabhängig von den Viren - zelluläre Onkogene erzeugten, wobei beispielsweise kein Retrovirus intervenieren konnte. Dies hat sich als zutreffend herausgestellt. Proto-Onkogene, die eine Gain-of-function erhalten haben, sind praktisch unvermeidbare Eigenschaften aller menschlichen Tumore. Als solches sind sie wesentliche Triebkräfte für die Tumorentstehen und folglich Kandidaten für Ziele von neuen Therapeutika, was nun ein blühender Wirtschaftszweig ist. Mit Hilfe moderner Genominstrumente ließ sich die Zahl dieser Gene auf weit über zweihundert erweitern. Die Gain-of-function, die Onkogene erzeugt, lässt sich durch verschiedene Methoden beeinträchtigen. Zuerst die Gewinne von Chromosomen oder fokale Genamplifikation, die beide die Gendosierung erhöhen. Chromosomale Translokationen, die entweder die Steuerung der Genexpression stören oder Bastard-Genprodukte erzeugen, die nicht richtig arbeiten. Punktmutationen, die die Steuerung der Genexpression unterbrechen oder nichtfunktionierende Genprodukte schaffen, und defekte epigenetische Steuerung der Genexpression. Alles das wurde in menschlichen Tumoren gefunden. Das Endergebnis ist aber immer das Gleiche: Das Äquivalent eines blockierten Gaspedals mit der Kapazität, die Tumorentstehung voranzutreiben. Die Signalübertragung normaler zellulärer Gene in Onkogenen durch Retroviren, ein Missgeschick der Natur, zeigte zum allerersten Mal die genetischen Merkmale von Krebs. Was sind die Faktoren, die diese Entdeckung förderten? Hier sind einige für die Studenten. Zu allererst, ein Auge für die beste Gelegenheit. David Baltimore entdeckte bei seinem allerersten Experiment eine reverse Transkriptase mit einem RNA-Tumorvirus. Er hatte zuvor nicht daran gedacht, aber er sah die Gelegenheit und ergriff sie. Umsichtige Missachtung der bestehenden Weisheit. Beachten Sie Temin und Baltimores wohlwollende Vernachlässigung eines zentralen Dogmas. Den Willen, etwas aufs Spiel zu setzen. Beachten Sie all die Jahre, die sie der zellulären Src nachjagten, was sich leicht als närrischer Irrtum hätte herausstellen können. Vertrauen in die Allgemeingültigkeit der Natur. Das Beispiel? Unsere Überzeugung, es gäbe etwas über den menschlichen Krebs zu lernen, indem man einen Hühnervirus untersuchte, wenn auch nicht in irgendjemandes Wohnzimmer. Die Wahl des experimentellen Systems. Der Anziehungskraft, die mich zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus führte. Technische Innovation. Das Assay, mit dem das zelluläre Src gefunden wurde. Und Selbstvertrauen. Howard Temins fokussiertes Verfolgen einer Idee über mehr als ein Jahrzehnt im intellektuellen Exil, wobei er die Provirus-Hypothese ungläubigen Ohren verkündete. Ich schließe also mit einem lauten Ruf zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus, der ein wertvoller Freund der Krebsforschung wurde. Bedenken Sie seinen Ursprung. Die Demonstration, dass Viren Krebs erregen. Reverse Transkriptase, eine wahrhaft revolutionäre und produktive Entdeckung. Das erste Beispiel eines Gens, das unmittelbar Krebs verursacht, Src. Dergleichen hatte man zuvor nie gesehen. Die Rolle der Protein-Kinasen bei der Tumorentstehung. Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin, nun maßgeblich bei der Zell-Signalgebung und vorrangiges Ziel bei Krebstherapien. Proto-Onkogene, der erste flüchtige Blick auf eine genetische Klaviatur für Karzinogene. Und bis heute, das auch noch: fünf Nobelpreise. Nicht schlecht, für ein Huhn. Vielen Dank

J. Michael Bishop describing how the first oncogene was discovered.
(00:19:51 - 00:22:10)

 

Towards the close of his lecture he describes how the discovery and characterisation of retroviral oncogenes led to an appreciation of the wider role of proto-oncogenes in cancer:

 

J. Michael Bishop (2015) - A Virus, a Gene and Cancer: An Anatomy of Discovery

Thank you very much. It's nice once again to be here. I want to say that it was impressive that Eric Betzig did some of his crucial work in a living room, somebody's living room. This story starts with chickens. I don't think that would work. So late in... There we go. Late in the year 1909, a farmer on Long Island in New York noticed a tumour on the breast of one of his Plymouth Rock hens. He watched this tumour grow for several months, and then took it to the Rockefeller Institute in New York City to see what might be done. The farmer was referred to Peyton Rous, a young pathologist with an interest in cancer, although not much of a publication record in the field. He's said to have been a very forceful, even fiery individual. So perhaps by virtue of his personality, he was able to convince the farmer to donate his chicken to medical research. So this serendipitous encounter launched a sequence of discoveries that spanned almost three quarters of a century, and culminated in the realization that the seeds of cancer reside in our own genomes. And my purpose today is to explore how all that happened, in an effort to illustrate how discoveries are made. And then in the following lecture, my colleague Harold Varmus will explain where these discoveries have taken us in the struggle to understand and control cancer. Now Rous began with a very simple experiment, by attempting to pass the tumours with grafts from one chicken to another. The experiment was not exactly a resounding success. In this example, with each passage... there you go... Finky taught me that... (laughs) only a single engraftment succeeded. That's the black squares there. Moreover, the transplantation succeeded only when Rous used chickens from the inbred flock of the farmer. The tumour would not grow in Plymouth Rock hens from other sources, nor in other breeds of birds. Rous explained this by saying that the tumours were obeying what he called the laws of tissue biology. We call it histoincompatibility. Now mundane as this experiment may seem to us, it's widely believed that the passaging of the tumour was serendipitously essential to the next step, which took Peyton Rous to a new dimension and to lasting fame. Beginning with the sixth passage of tumours, Rous began to make cell-free extracts of the tumours, and found that injection of these into chickens from the same flock could elicit the identical tumour, a spindle cell sarcoma. He announced this discovery with a two page article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. You will not find much about chickens in that journal in this day and age. Now, Rous realized that he had made, in his words, a unique and significant finding, but he was very careful about what that finding might connote. And I quote from his first paper: active in this sarcoma of the fowl as a minute parasitic organism. But an agency of another sort is not out of the question. For the moment, we have not adopted either hypothesis." That sort of language would not get you into many journals these days either. Now within a year, however, Rous had identified a second filterable agent that caused a different kind of chicken tumour, an osteochondrosarcoma, and at that point, he succumbed to using the recently coined term "virus," the very concept of which was just about a decade old. In his writings, Rous was never particularly illuminating about his inspiration for his work. He explained his effort to transplant the tumour by pointing out that transplantation of tumours had succeeded in mammals, so why not try it in chickens? He justified his landmark experiments with filterable extracts by pointing out that such work had never succeeded with mammals, so why not try it in chickens? That's literally the case. Perhaps his motive was best captured by Nobel laureate Renato Dulbecco in his biographical sketch of Rous, who wrote that Rous was a medical man who wished to learn about cancer as a disease, and a biologist who did not want to follow the beaten path, willing to hunt for new clues in well-designed but slow experiments. The work with chicken viruses was greeted with what Rous described in his Nobel lecture as downright disbelief. Nobody really took it seriously. And Rous himself eventually became disillusioned when he failed to identify causative viruses in transplantable tumours of mammals, particularly rodents. It would be fifty-five years before his discovery of the chicken tumour virus earned him the Nobel Prize, and Finky, if you're in the audience, that's the real record. Okay. Rous certainly deserved the Nobel Prize, because he had fashioned two momentous legacies. The first, the eventual recognition that viruses are major causes of human cancer, something that Rous had toyed with but abandoned after his failure with rodent tumours. That's a story that Professor zur Hausen could tell you. The second legacy represents an unbroken chain of research that would eventually link wayward genes to cancer. For several decades after Rous, his sarcoma virus lay fallow. Beginning in the 1960s however, the pace quickened, and it became apparent that Rous's virus was an archetype for a vast and seemingly ubiquitous family of what came to be called RNA tumour viruses, signalling the nature of their newly discovered genome, RNA. The discovery of Peyton Rous now blossomed from a two page report in the Journal of the American Medical Association to a 1500 page monograph, and I doubt that many have ever read it cover to cover. I first encountered these viruses when I arrived at UCSF, University of California San Francisco, in 1968, to take up what proved to be my only academic job. As a newly minted assistant professor whose research concerned the replication of polio viruses, I really was not very much aware of RNA tumour viruses at the time. And there I was introduced to a fellow newcomer to the faculty, Warren Levinson, who was schooled in the biological aspects of Rous sarcoma virus. And all of us pretty much looked like that in those days. Under Warren's tutelage, it quickly became apparent to me that this virus represents a potentially powerful tool with which to probe the secrets of the cancer cell. It was a simple and tractable experimental system whose biological properties were actually pretty well characterized. It could transform cells in vitro, in a petri dish, to neoplastic phenotype, literally overnight. There was a well-established and highly reproducible bioassay for the virus in vitro, which among other things made the virus amenable to genetic analysis. The virus could be propagated and purified in very large quantities, sufficient for biochemical and structural analysis. And its inability to replicate in human cells meant it posed little if any threat to those of us who were working with it, and so it could be worked with under relatively unconstrained conditions. At the time, no other RNA tumour virus offered such a powerful suite of advantages. So we bashed ahead with the chicken virus. Warren and I joined to study Rous sarcoma virus, and two great puzzles defined the field at the time. First, it appeared that the viral genome could be established as a heritable property of the host cell. How could this happen with a virus whose genome was RNA rather than DNA? And second, there was that powerful tumorigenic potential to be explained. Warren and I resolved to take on the replication of Rous sarcoma virus, just how does it propagate, about which virtually nothing was known at the molecular level. And in doing so, we implicitly took on the puzzle of how the virus could establish itself as a heritable property of the host cell. And I can dramatize that puzzle by reviewing what happens when Rous sarcoma virus is applied to rodent cells. At first it appears that nothing has happened, because the virus cannot replicate in those cells. But in due course, clones of neoplastic cells emerge, cells that will form a tumour in the same species of animal. And although these cells produce no virus, their morphological phenotype is determined by the particular strain of virus that was used. And mirabile dictu, if at any subsequent point the transformed cells are fused with normal chicken cells, the virus re-emerges, phenotype intact. Where had it been hiding? Now looming over that puzzle was the central dogma, enunciated with special authority by Francis Crick, but generally ingrained in most biologists at the time. The transfer of genetic information was thought to be unidirectional from DNA to RNA to protein. It turns out that future events about, which I'll talk in a moment, would prompt Francis Crick in a bit of hindsight to point out that chemistry may preclude direct transfer of information from protein to RNA, but there had been no inherent reason to discredit transfer from RNA to DNA. But that bias was existent and powerful. In any event, two individuals paid little heed to the central dogma: Howard Temin and David Baltimore. The two first crossed paths in 1955 at a science camp for high school students put on by the Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine. At the time, Temin was a student at Swarthmore College who was serving as the guru for the camp, the one adult presence. Baltimore was a high school student from New York City who attended the camp. Temin is on the right, Baltimore is on the left. Look at that. I've never had one of those before. Now, although Baltimore went on to attend Swarthmore as well, Temin apparently had nothing to do with that, the two parted ways until the spring of 1970, when they independently wreaked havoc with the central dogma. Now, Temin and Baltimore came at the puzzle of Rous sarcoma virus from very different vantage points. Temin began work with the virus as a graduate student at Caltech, where he first of all helped develop the quantitative bioassay that we all then used thereafter. And at Caltech, he became familiar with the phenomenon of lysogenic conversion of bacteria by viruses that we call bacteriophage. And during the course of infection, the phage can go into hiding by inserting its genome into the genome of the host cell and from that position can bestow new properties on the host cell. The phage can be brought out of hiding by irradiating the cell. Temin thought this might just well represent how Rous sarcoma viruses might replicate, stabilize its genome in the host, and initiate neoplastic transformation of the host cell. There was only one problem with this of course. Lysogenic phage had double stranded DNA genomes, whereas Rous sarcoma virus has a single stranded RNA genome. How could that create a lysogenic phenomenon in the host cell? By 1964, Temin had solved this problem in his own mind by proposing what he called the DNA provirus hypothesis. The RNA genome of Rous sarcoma virus must be transcribed into DNA, which then serves as template for the synthesis of both viral messenger and genome RNA. Temin ruefully remarked in his Nobel lecture that for the next six years this hypothesis was essentially ignored. He might well have said soundly denigrated. I heard that done on many occasions. Most observers absolutely loathed the idea. Undeterred by criticism, Temin produced a variety of suggestive data to support his idea. Using chemical inhibitors, he demonstrated that infection by Rous sarcoma virus requires both new DNA synthesis and DNA dependent RNA synthesis. And using molecular hybridization, he claimed to have detected viral DNA in Rous sarcoma virus infected cells, although in all honesty the data were quite frail. In 1969 however, Satoshi Mizutani joined Temin's laboratory and in his first experiments, literally his very first experiments, he demonstrated that new protein synthesis was necessary for the early stages of Rous sarcoma virus replication. That result was actually never published, but it allowed Mizutani and Temin to conclude that the RNA directed DNA polymerase required by the provirus hypothesis must pre-exist infection. And at the time there was no precedent for such an enzyme in normal cells. We all know better now. So in that case ignorance was indeed bliss, because it directed Mizutani and Temin to look for a DNA polymerase in the virions of Rous sarcoma virus itself. David Baltimore came at the problem from a completely different perspective: the replication of animal viral genomes, which I have portrayed here, in terms of how the viral messenger RNA is generated in order to get replication underway. Baltimore had cut his research teeth on picornaviruses such as polio virus, whose single stranded RNA genomes serve directly as messenger RNA once they have gained access to the cell, so that's... yes. Consequently, we define the polarity of the genome as positive. That's a convention in the field. The messenger in turn produces all the necessary viral proteins including an RNA polymerase that replicates the viral genome. Baltimore discovered this RNA replicase while a graduate student. He completed, incidentally, he completed his thesis work in 18 months. The replicase was the first enzyme of its kind to be uncovered, and it was consistent with the idea, the conventional view that virus particles themselves contain nothing but the viral genome and the requisite structural proteins. That view was changed by the discovery that a variety of viruses carry within their virions an enzyme encoded by the viral genome and required to initiate infection by producing viral messenger RNA. And in chronological order of those discoveries: An RNA polymerase was discovered within the virions of the large pox viruses that transcribes the double stranded DNA genome of these viruses into messenger RNA. An RNA polymerase that transcribes the double stranded RNA genome of reoviruses into viral messenger RNA. And an RNA polymerase that transcribes RNA genomes of negative polarity into messenger RNA. And it was the last of these that carried the greatest weight for Baltimore because he and Alice Huang discovered the first such example in vesicular stomatitis virus and followed that by finding a similar polymerase in Newcastle disease virus. Like Rous sarcoma virus, these are envelope viruses with single stranded RNA genomes. But they have a negative polarity, remember. And although the genome of Rous sarcoma virus has a positive polarity, Baltimore was struck by the possibility that it might utilize a virion polymerase for its replication. So even before publishing the results on the negative stranded RNA genome viruses, Baltimore went looking for both RNA and DNA polymerases in the virions of RNA tumour viruses. And he had to get the virus from other labs, he had never laid a pipette on an RNA tumour virus before. He literally leaped into the field unannounced. He was undeterred by the reigning scepticism about Temin's DNA provirus hypothesis, because as he explained in his Nobel lecture, "I had no experience in the field and no axe to grind." And that too can be a state of bliss for the right scientist. In the late spring of 1970, the paths of Temin and Baltimore finally converged again when they simultaneously reported their respective discoveries of an RNA directed DNA polymerase within the virions of RNA tumour viruses, which soon acquired the name reverse transcriptase. And in turn the RNA tumour viruses were reffered to as retroviruses. Now the discovery of reverse transcriptase of course was a transformative event intellectually. But it also provided a powerfully enabling technique: the ability to copy any single stranded RNA into DNA, which made it invaluable to both fundamental research and the burgeoning biotechnology industry. For my colleagues and me it was a godsend. Now we could make probes so that we could examine infected cells for viral nucleic acids at will, and we quickly set up assays to do so. So, the means by which the virus could produce proviral DNA were at hand, but was there really a stable provirus in the infected cell, and if so, where was it hiding? Was infection by Rous sarcoma virus truly an analogue of lysogeny? The first credible sighting of proviral DNA was actually biological in nature. Introduction of DNA taken from Rous sarcoma virus infected cells into uninfected cells by transfection gave rise to the original virus. The entire viral genome must have been lurking in the DNA of infected cells. But exactly where was the provirus and what did it look like? Those questions were taken up by Harold Varmus, who joined me in San Francisco in 1970, and we were to work together for the next sixteen years. Here we are in 1978, with me as usual one step behind Harold. Well, his legs were considerably longer than mine. And using molecular hybridization with radioactive probe copied from the Rous sarcoma's genome, we and others were able to demonstrate where and when the provirus was synthesized, what molecular forms it took within the infected cell, its eventual integration into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, where it is perpetuated and expressed as an unwelcome addition to the cellular genome. Now all of this adhered to what Howard Temin had posited a decade before. And contemplating this intimate interaction between viral and cellular genomes prepared us for what was soon to follow. Meanwhile progress was made towards solving a second great puzzle: How does Rous sarcoma virus elicit malignant growth? The first step was the demonstration by genetic analysis that the virus possesses an oncogene that is responsible for malignant transformation of host cells. This is a beautiful story which time does not permit me to tell, but it was fundamental to the field. And this oncogene was dubbed src because it causes sarcomas in chickens. Now src proved to be one of the only four genes, simply put, in the Rous sarcoma virus. And remarkably this gene plays no role in viral replication. That's the job of the other three genes in this exquisitely compact and efficient genome. Now src gene itself raised two puzzles of its own. First, what is the biochemical mechanism by which the gene elicits cancerous growth, and second, why does the virus have such a gene, given that it is not required for replication? The mechanism puzzle was solved with a discovery by Art Levinson in our lab and Mark Collett and Ray Erickson's lab in Denver that src encodes a protein kinase. Two years later, Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute surprised himself and everyone else with the discovery that the src kinase carries out a heretofore unknown reaction, phosphorylation of tyrosine. And there is a direct line from this line of experimentation to modern therapeutic practices, but that's also a story for another time. The ways in which these discoveries emerged are illuminating. In Denver, it was an inspired guess, based on the pleiotropism of src. Protein phosphorylation ranks among the most versatile agents of change known to biochemists. What better way to evoke the myriad changes that give rise to the neoplastic cell? In San Francisco, shrewd enzymology by Art Levinson led to the recognition that the src protein was actually phosphorylating itself, and thus might well phosphorylate other proteins as well. And at the Salk Institute, Tony Hunter's fortuitous use of an outdated buffer that's pH had gone off led to the separation of phosphotyrosine from phosphothreonine for the first time in recorded history. And here is Art Levinson, in creative costume at a lab Halloween party, many years before he became CEO of Genentech, chair of the Apple board of directors... he doesn't dress like that for those meetings... and most recently the founder of his own company, Calico. Now what about the second puzzle, the origin of the src gene in Rous sarcoma virus? Many years, two opposing lines of thought directed us to the genome of normal cells. First, there was the so-called virogene oncogene hypothesis, formulated by Robert Huebner and George Todaro. It was sort of an effort to create a universal theory of cancer. I for one didn't take it very seriously, but nevertheless it was out there. The thought was that retroviruses had deposited themselves with their oncogenes in the germ lines of ancient ancestors of modern species. And these genes were normally repressed by the cell, but they could be activated by various cancer-causing agents. By this account, we might possibly find src in normal cells, but it would be in the form of a retroviral oncogene, and its origin would remain unexplained. The opposing thought was Darwinian in nature. Since src is irrelevant to the viral life cycle, it is not likely to have arisen in concert with the remainder of the viral genome. There was no apparent selective pressure to accomplish that. Instead the intermittent interaction between viral and cellular genomes during the course of infection might have created an accident in which src was acquired from the cell, in essence reversing the hypothesis of Huebner and Todaro. And this thought also favoured a search for src in normal DNA. The search required a radioactive probe that could be used in molecular hybridization with the exquisite specificity to detect the src gene with great sensitivity. Now in his previous work as a postdoctoral fellow, Harold had used deletion mutants of bacteriophage to detect the expression of individual genes by molecular hybridization. And we were able to adapt this technique to our purposes. Because our collaborator Peter Vogt had isolated spontaneous deletion mutants of Rous sarcoma virus that appeared to remove the bulk of src. So as illustrated here, we could use the RNA of one of these deletion mutants to perform what later came to called subtractive hybridization. First transcribe the genome, the entire genome, both the replication genes and the src gene, into complementary radioactive cDNA. Then second, hybridize that cDNA to RNA from the deletion mutant which would capture all the DNA except that representing src. And finally remove the double stranded hybrids, leaving the single stranded cDNA for src, the probe we needed. The preparation and use of the src probe was laborious, given that the work far antedated the advent of recombinant DNA. And the requisite experiments occupied more than three years. The fact that they were done at all was a tribute to the valiant efforts of two postdoctoral fellows, Ramareddy Guntaka, who demonstrated that we could probably make the probe we needed. And Dominique Stehelin, shown here, who carried the work to its decisive conclusion. Today, with the assistance of recombinant DNA and other contemporary technologies you could probably have it done in a matter of weeks or months, but I for one am very glad we didn't wait. By 1974 we knew that our probe could detect sequences homologous to the oncogene of Rous sarcoma virus in the DNA of various avians. The top panel here demonstrates the specificity of the probe. It reacted with the RNA from which it had been transcribed, but not with RNA from the deletion mutant. The middle panel shows that the src probe reacted with normal chicken DNA, but so did a probe for the deletion mutant. And that reflects the presence of what we call endogenous retroviruses, known to pollute the genomes of many species, ourselves included. The bottom panel is the crucial one. Only the src probe reacted with DNA from other avians, and this was our first indication that we were picking up something that was not linked to a retrovirus, and unlike the genomes of endogenous retroviruses, was conserved across substantial phylogenetic distances. Note the results with emu DNA, among the most primitive of surviving avians. We published these findings in 1976 as a brief note in Nature, two figures and two tables. The simplicity belied the extraordinary difficulty of the underlying experiments, and the remarkable paradigm shift that they represented. We were pleased and so apparently was the Nobel committee. But oh how times have changed. A week ago, a colleague told me that he had asked a class of graduate students to read that paper. Their reaction? They got the Nobel Prize for that? Yeah, we did. Gradually, we built the case that our probe was detecting a normal cellular gene. We found that it was conserved across vast phylogenetic distances, suggesting that it serves a vital function. We found that normal cells contained a protein with the same biochemical properties, the same size as the viral src protein, and that this was expressed in numerous tissues. And when at long last we could use recombinant DNA to clone cellular src, we sealed the deal. Cellular src had the structural hallmarks of a normal cellular gene, the viral oncogene src had indeed been pirated from the host cell as a fully spliced version of the progenitor, and at some point the cellular gene had sustained a mutation which converted it to an oncogene. And it soon became apparent that src was more than an isolated curiosity. The inventory of retroviral oncogenes mounted steadily, and each of these had been derived from the genome of a normal cell. Thus for each viral oncogene, there was a cognate proto-oncogene in the cell. Accidents of nature had uncovered a battery of potential cancer genes in normal cells. The cellular src proto-oncogene is a well behaved and vital switch in the signalling network of normal cells, we know a great deal about that now. The viral src oncogene, however, is a mutant malefactor, whose gene product has been constitutively activated, a genetic gain of function that creates a cancer gene. Gain of function, by one means or another, proved true for all the other retroviral oncogenes as well. It was easy to imagine that the battery of cellular proto-oncogenes could be a keyboard on which all manner of carcinogens could play, independent of viruses, creating cellular oncogenes without the intervention of a retrovirus, for example. Such has proven to be the case. Proto-oncogenes that have suffered gain of function are a virtually inevitable feature of all human tumours. And as such they are major drivers for tumour genesis, and consequently, candidates as targets for new therapeutics, and that is a thriving industry now. With the assistance of modern genomic tools, the number of these genes has been expanded well beyond two hundred. The gain of function that creates oncogenes can be affected by various means. First, gain of chromosomes, or focal gene amplification, both of which increase gene dosage. Chromosomal translocations, which can either disturb the control of gene expression, or create mongrel gene products that malfunction. Point mutations, which can disrupt the control of gene expression, or create malfunctioning gene products. And defective epigenetic control of gene expression. All of these have been found in human tumours. But the end result is always the same: The equivalent of a jammed accelerator with the capacity to drive tumour genesis. The transduction of normal cellular genes into oncogenes by retroviruses, an accident of nature, had brought genetic seeds of cancer to view for the very first time. What are the factors that drove this line of discovery? Well here are a few, for the students. First of all, an eye for the main chance. David Baltimore discovered a reverse transcriptase with his very first experiment with an RNA tumour virus. He was not thinking about it before, but he saw an opportunity and seized it. Judicious disregard for received wisdom. Consider Temin and Baltimore's benign neglect of the central dogma. A willingness to gamble. Consider the years invested in the pursuit of cellular src, in what could easily have been a fool's errand. Faith in the universality of nature. The example? Our conviction that there was something to be learned about human cancer from studying a chicken virus, albeit not in anybody's living room. The choice of experimental system. The attractions that drew me to Rous sarcoma virus. Technical innovation. The assay that found cellular src. And self-confidence. Howard Temin's steadfast pursuit of his ideas during more than a decade in intellectual exile while he promulgated the provirus hypothesis to disbelieving ears. So I conclude with a shout out to Rous sarcoma virus, which has been a fecund friend of cancer research. Consider its offspring. Demonstration that viruses can cause cancer. Reverse transcriptase, a truly disruptive and generative discovery. The first example of a gene that can directly cause cancer, src. Nothing like it had been seen before. The role of protein kinases in tumorigenesis. Phosphorylation of tyrosine, now a prime player in cell signalling and a prime target in cancer therapeutics. Proto-oncogenes, the first glimpse of a genetic keyboard for carcinogens. And to date, for what it's worth, five Nobel laureates. Not bad for a chicken. Thank you.

Ich danke Ihnen. Es ist schön, wieder hier zu sein. Ich möchte anmerken, ich fand es beeindruckend, dass Eric Betzig einige seiner zentralen Arbeiten in einem Wohnzimmer durchgeführt hat. Diese Geschichte beginnt mit Hühnern. Ich glaubte nicht, dass es da geklappt hätte. Also Ende des… Da haben wir es. Ende des Jahres 1909 bemerkte ein Bauer auf Long Island in New York an der Brust einer seiner Plymouth Rock Hennen einen Tumor. Mehrere Monate lang beobachtete er das Wachsen des Tumors, dann brachte er sie in das Rockefeller Institute in New York City, um zu sehen, ob man da was tun könnte. Der Bauer wurde an Peyton Rous verwiesen, einen jungen Pathologen, der sich für Krebs interessierte, obgleich seine Publikationsliste dazu nicht groß waren. Über ihn wird gesagt, er sei eine sehr energische, sogar hitzige Person gewesen. Vielleicht war er dank seiner Persönlichkeit fähig, den Bauer davon zu überzeugen, dieses Huhn der medizinischen Forschung zu schenken. Diese zufällige Begegnung startete eine Reihe von Entdeckungen, die sich beinahe über drei Viertel eines Jahrhunderts erstreckten und zu der Erkenntnis führte, dass der Keim des Krebses in unseren eigenen Genomen sitzt. Ich möchte heute untersuchen, wie sich das alles zugetragen hat, um zu zeigen, wie Entdeckungen gemacht werden. Im darauf folgenden Vortrag wird mein Kollege Harold Varmus erläutern, wohin uns diese Entdeckungen im Kampf gegen Krebs geführt haben. Rous fing mit einem sehr einfachen Experiment an: er versuchte, den Tumor mittels Körpergewebe von einem Huhn auf ein anderes weiterzugeben. Das Experiment war nicht unbedingt ein voller Erfolg. In diesem Beispiel, mit jedem Durchgang… da haben wir es…Finky hat mir das beigebracht… (lacht) Es war nur eine Übertragung erfolgreich. Es ist dieses schwarze Quadrat. Zudem war die Transplantation nur erfolgreich, wenn Rous Hühner aus der durch Inzucht gewachsenen Hühnerschar des Bauern verwendete. Der Tumor wuchs nicht bei Plymouth Rock Hühnern aus anderen Quellen, auch nicht bei anderen Vogelarten. Rous erklärte dies damit, dass die Tumore dem folgten, was er die Gesetze der Gewebebiologie nannte. Wir nennen es Histokompatibilität. So banal uns dieses Experiment auch scheinen mag, es wird allgemein angenommen, dass die Weitergabe des Tumors glücklicherweise für den nächsten Schritt essentiell war, der Peyton Rous in eine neue Dimension führte und ihm bleibenden Ruhm verschaffte. Beginnend mit den sechs Passagen von Tumoren, begann Rous aus den Tumoren zellfreie Extrakte herzustellen und entdeckte, dass deren Injektionen bei Hühnern aus der gleichen Schar einen identischen Tumor hervorrufen konnten, ein Spindelzellsarkom. Er veröffentlichte diese Entdeckung in einem zweiseitigen Artikel im Journal of the American Medical Association. In jenen Tagen und zu jener Zeit werden Sie nicht viel über Hühner in dieser Fachzeitschrift finden. Rous erkannte, dass er, mit seinen eigenen Worten, eine einzigartige und signifikante Entdeckung gemacht hatte, er war aber sehr vorsichtig dahingehend, was diese Entdeckung implizieren könnte. Ich zitiere aus seinem ersten Artikel: in diesem Sarkom des Geflügels als einen winzigen parasitären Organismus zu betrachten. Aber eine andersartige Wirkung ist nicht ausgeschlossen. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt haben wir uns keiner der beiden Hypothesen verschrieben.“ Mit einer solchen Sprache könnten Sie heutzutage nicht in vielen Fachzeitschriften landen. Doch innerhalb eines Jahres hatte Rous einen zweiten filtrierbaren Erreger identifiziert, der eine andere Art Tumor bei Hühnern verursachte, ein Osteochondrosarkom, und an diesem Punkt erlag er der Versuchung, den vor Kurzem geprägten Begriff „Virus“ zu verwenden, ein Konzept, das erst seit einem Jahrzehnt vorlag. In seinen Schriften war Rous nie besonders eindeutig hinsichtlich der Inspiration zu seiner Arbeit. Er erklärte seine Bemühung den Tumor zu transplantieren, indem er darauf verwies, dass die Transplantation von Tumoren bei Säugetieren erfolgreich war, warum es also nicht auch an Hühnern ausprobieren? Er begründete seine Meilenstein-Experimente mit filtrierbaren Extrakten indem er darauf verwies, diese Arbeit sei bei Säugern nie erfolgreich gewesen, also warum es nicht mal an Hühnern versuchen? Das ist wortwörtlich der Fall. Vielleicht wird sein Motiv am besten von dem Nobelpreisträger Renato Dulbecco in seiner biographischen Schrift über Rous erklärt, der schrieb, dass Rous ein Mediziner war, der mehr über Krebs als Krankheit erfahren wollte und ein Biologe, der nicht den ausgetretenen Pfaden folgen wollte - gewillt, nach neuen Spuren in gut konzipierten, aber langsamen Experimenten zu suchen. Die Arbeit mit den Hühnerviren wurde, wie Rous es in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag beschreibt, ausgesprochen uninteressiert aufgenommen. Keiner nahm das wirklich ernst. Rous war schließlich selbst desillusioniert, da es ihm nicht gelang, die verursachenden Viren in den transplantierbaren Tumoren der Säugetiere, besonders der Nager, zu bestimmen. Es dauerte fünfundfünfzig Jahre, ehe seine Entdeckung des Hühnertumor-Virus ihm den Nobelpreis einbrachte und Finky, solltest du hier unter den Zuhörern sein, das ist wirklich ein Rekord. Gut. Rous hat sicherlich den Nobelpreis verdient, denn er hat zwei bedeutsame Vermächtnisse geformt. Das Erste ist die letztendliche Anerkennung, dass Viren eine Hauptursache für Krebs beim Menschen sind, etwas, mit dem Rous gespielt hatte, dies aber nach seinem Misserfolg mit Tumoren bei Nagern verwarf. Das ist eine Geschichte, die Ihnen Professor zur Hausen erzählen kann. Das zweite Vermächtnis stellt eine ununterbrochene Forschungskette dar, die schließlich fehlentwickelte Gene mit Krebs in Verbindung brachte. Einige Jahrzehnte lang nach Rous lag sein Sarkom-Virus brach. Doch Anfang der 1960er kam Tempo in die Angelegenheit und es wurde offensichtlich, dass das Rous Virus ein Archetyp einer umfangreichen und scheinbar ubiquitären Familie dessen war, was RNA-Tumorviren genannt wurde, was auf die Beschaffenheit ihres neu entdeckten Genom, RNA, hinwies. Die Entdeckung von Peyton Rous wuchs nun von einem zweiseitigen Bericht im Journal of the American Medical Association zu einer 1500 Seiten starken Monographie und ich habe meine Zweifel, ob es viele gibt, die diese Seite für Seite gelesen haben. Ich begegnete diesen Viren zum ersten Mal nachdem ich an der University of California San Francisco im Jahre 1968 begann, beim Antritt einer Stelle, die sich als meine einzige akademische Anstellung herausstellen sollte. Als frischgebackener Assistant Professor, dessen Forschungsarbeiten sich mit der Reproduktion von Polioviren befassten, wusste ich damals wirklich kaum etwas über RNA-Tumorvieren. Dann wurde ich einem weiteren Neuling der Fakultät, Warren Levinson, vorgestellt, der bei den biologischen Aspekten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus bewandert war. Damals sahen wir so ziemlich alle so aus. Unter Warrens Anleitung wurde es mir schnell deutlich: dieses Virus stellte eine potentiell kraftvolles Instrument dar, um die Geheimnisse der Krebszelle zu erforschen. Die Experimente waren einfach, die biologischen Grundmerkmale des Virus recht gut charakterisiert. Es konnte Zellen in vitro in einer Petrischale buchstäblich über Nacht in einen krebsartigen Phänotyp umwandeln. Es gab ein gut etabliertes und stark reproduzierbares Bioassay für das Virus in vitro, die das Virus unter anderem für die genetische Analyse nutzbar machte. Das Virus ließ sich in großen Mengen, die für eine biochemische und strukturelle Analyse ausreichten, vermehren und reinigen. Seine Unfähigkeit zur Vermehrung in menschlichen Zellen bedeutete, es würde kaum, wenn überhaupt, eine Bedrohung für diejenigen darstellen, die damit arbeiteten, weshalb man unter relativ lockeren Bedingungen würde arbeiten können. Zu der Zeit bot kein anderes RNA-Tumorvirus so viele Vorteile. Wir preschten also mit dem Hühnervirus vor. Warren und ich taten uns zusammen, um das Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu studieren, und zu der Zeit gab es zwei große Rätsel. Erstens: es schien, als könnte das virale Genom zu einer vererbbaren Eigenschaft der Wirtszelle werden. Wie war das mit einem Virus möglich, dessen Genom RNA statt DNA war? Und zweitens, gab es dieses starke tumorerregende Potential, das es zu erklären galt. Warren und ich entschieden, uns mit der Vermehrung des Rous-Sarkom-Virus zu befassen - einfach mal sehen, wie es sich vermehrt, wovon auf der molekularen Ebene so gut wie nichts bekannt war. Damit befassten wir uns implizit mit dem Rätsel, wie sich das Virus selbst als eine vererbbare Eigenschaft in der Wirtszelle herausbilden konnte. Ich kann dieses Rätsel noch weiter herausarbeiten, indem ich prüfe was geschieht, wenn das Rous-Sarkom-Virus in die Zellen von Nagern eingesetzt wird. Zuerst sieht es so aus, als würde nichts geschehen, da sich das Virus in diesen Zellen nicht vermehren kann. Doch zu gegebener Zeit tauchen Klone krebsartiger Zellen auf; Zellen, die einen Tumor in der gleichen Tierspezies formen werden. Obgleich diese Zellen keine Viren erzeugen, wird ihr morphologischer Phänotyp durch den verwendeten speziellen Virenstamm bestimmt. Und, mirabile dictu, werden irgendwann die umgewandelten Zellen mit normalen Hühnerzellen verschmolzen, taucht das Virus wieder auf, der Phänotyp ist intakt. Wo hat er sich versteckt? Über diesem Rätsel schwebte das zentrale Dogma, ausgesprochen durch die Autorität Francis Crick, damals aber auch ganz allgemein in den meisten Biologen tief verwurzelt. Man dachte nämlich, die Übertragung genetischer Informationen geschehe in einer Richtung von der DNA zur RNA zum Protein. Zukünftige Ereignisse, die ich gleich ansprechen werde, veranlassten Francis Crick, in einer etwas späten Einsicht, darauf hinzuweisen, dass die Chemie vielleicht die direkte Übertragung vom Protein zur RNA ausschloss, es gab aber keinen Grund, die Übertragung von der RNA zur DNA in zu verwerfen. Doch diese Grundannahme war vorhanden und sehr mächtig. Auf jeden Fall schenkten zwei Personen diesem zentralen Dogma wenig Aufmerksamkeit: Howard Temin und David Baltimore. das die Jackson Laboratories in Bar Harbor, Maine, veranstaltet hatten. Damals war Temin Student des Swarthmore College, der als Experte für das Camp amtierte, der einzig anwesende Erwachsene. Baltimore war ein Gymnasiast aus New York City, ein Teilnehmer des Camps. Temin ist rechts, Baltimore ist links zu sehen. Sehen Sie sich das an. So eines hatte ich noch nie. Obgleich Baltimore weiterhin in Swarthmore blieb, hatte Temin damit nichts mehr zu tun; die beiden gingen verschiedene Wege bis zum Frühjahr 1970, als sie unabhängig voneinander gegen das zentrale Dogma wüteten. Temin und Baltimore gingen aus sehr verschiedenen Blickwinkeln das Rätsel des Rous-Sarkom-Virus an. Temin fing als Doktorand bei Caltech an, mit dem Virus zu arbeiten, wobei er zuerst an der Entwicklung des quantitativen Bioassay mitwirkte, das wir danach alle verwendeten. Bei Caltech wurde er mit dem Phänomen der lysogenen Umwandlung von Bakterien durch Viren, die wir Bakteriophage nennen, bekannt. Im Laufe einer Infektion, kann der Phage sich verbergen, indem er sein Genom in das Genom der Wirtszelle einfügt. Aus dieser Position kann er der Wirtszelle neue Eigenschaften zuteilen. Der Phage lässt sich durch Bestrahlen der Zelle aus dem Versteck herausholen. Temin glaubte, dies könne vielleicht gut erklären, wie die Rous-Sarkom-Viren sich vermehren, ihr Genom im Wirt stabilisieren und krebsartige Transformationen der Wirtszelle auslösen. Es gab bei diesem Verlauf nur ein Problem: Der lysogene Phage hat doppelsträngige DNA-Genome, während das Rous-Sarkom-Virus ein einsträngiges RNA-Genom hat. Wie konnte dadurch ein lysogenes Phänomen in einer Wirtszelle erzeugt werden? den er die DNA-Provirus-Hypothese nannte. Das RNA-Genom des Rous-Sarkom-Virus muss in die DNA transkribiert werden, was dann als Schablone für die Synthese sowohl der viralen Boten-RNA und des RNA-Genom diente. Temin bemerkte in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag, dass seine Hypothese im wesentlich während der nächsten sechs Jahre ignoriert wurde. Er hätte auch sagen können, sie wurde entschieden verunglimpft. Ich habe das bei vielen Gelegenheiten gehört. Die meisten Beobachter verabscheuten diese Idee. Unbeirrt von der Kritik stellte Temin eine Vielfalt aussagekräftiger Daten her, um seine Idee zu stützen. Unter Verwendung von chemischen Inhibitoren demonstrierte er, dass die Infektion durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus sowohl eine neue DNA-Synthese als auch eine DNA-abhängige RNA-Synthese erforderte. Mit der molekularen Hybridisierung beanspruchte er für sich, die virale DNA in den durch den Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen entdeckt zu haben, auch wenn, ehrlich gesagt, die Daten ziemlich schwach waren. Doch 1969 wurde Satoshi Mizutani Mitarbeiter in Temins Labor und in seinen ersten Experimenten, buchstäblich in seinen allerersten Experimenten, demonstrierte er, dass eine neue Proteinsynthese in den frühen Stadien der Rous-Sarkom-Virus-Reproduktion notwendig war. Dieses Ergebnis wurde nie publiziert, doch erlaubte es Mizutani und Temin die Schlussfolgerung, dass die RNA-abhängige DNA-Polymerase, die die Provirus-Hypothese forderte, vor der Infektion vorhanden sein musste. Zu dieser Zeit gab es keine Präzedenz für ein solches Enzym in normalen Zellen. Heute wissen wir es besser. In diesem Falle war Ahnungslosigkeit in der Tat ein Segen, denn sie veranlasste Mizutani und Temin, nach einer DNA-Polymerase in den Viria des Rous-Sarkom-Virus selbst zu suchen. David Baltimore näherte sich dem Problem aus einer vollkommen anderen Perspektive: Die Replikation tierischer viraler Genome, die ich hier porträtiert habe, in Hinblick auf die virale Boten-RNA wird erzeugt, um Replikationen in Gang zu setzen. Baltimore hatte sich bei seiner Forschung auf Picornaviren, wie etwa das Polio-Virus konzentriert, dessen einzelsträngiges RNA-Genom direkt als eine Boten-RNA diente, sobald dies einen Zugang zu den Zellen erlangte, so ist das… ja. Folglich definieren wir die Polarität des Genoms als positiv. Das ist in diesem Bereich eine Konvention. Der Bote wiederum erzeugt alle notwendigen viralen Proteine, einschließlich einer RNA- Polymerase, die das virale Genom kopiert. Baltimore entdeckte diese RNA-Replikase als Doktorand. Nebenbei bemerkt schloss er seine Doktorarbeit innerhalb von 18 Monaten ab. Die Replikase war das erste Enzym dieser Art, das aufgedeckt wurde, und es stimmte mit der konventionellen Ansicht überein, wonach Viruspartikel selbst nichts außer dem viralen Genom und den erforderlichen strukturellen Proteinen enthalten. Diese Ansicht änderte sich durch die Entdeckung einer Vielzahl an Viren, die in ihren Viria ein Enzym enthielten, kodiert durch das virale Genom, das für die Anfangsinfektion erforderlich war, da es die virale Boten-RNA erzeugte. Hier in chronologischer Folge die Entdeckungen: Eine RNA- Polymerase wurde in den Viria eines großen Pockenvirus entdeckt, die das doppelsträngige DNA-Genom dieser Viren in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Eine RNA-Polymerase die das doppelsträngige RNA-Genom von Reoviren in virale Boten-RNA transkribiert. Und eine RNA-Polymerase, die RNA-Genome von negativer Polarität in Boten-RNA transkribiert. Das Letztere hiervon hatte für Baltimore das größte Gewicht, da er und Alice Huang das erste entsprechende Beispiel im Vesicular Stomatitis Virus entdeckten und in der Folge eine ähnliche Polymerase im Newcastle Disease Virus. Wie das Rous-Sarkom-Virus sind dies verkapselte Viren mit einzelsträngigen RNA-Genomen. Doch erinnern Sie sich, sie haben eine negative Polarität. Und obgleich das Rous-Sarkom-Virus eine positive Polarität hat, war Baltimore von der Möglichkeit beeindruckt, es könne eine Virion-Polymerase zu seiner Replikation verwenden. Noch bevor die Ergebnisse der negative-strängigen RNA-Genom-Viren publiziert wurden, suchte Baltimore in Viria der RNA-Tumorviren sowohl nach RNA und DNA-Polymerasen. Er musste das Virus aus anderen Labors bekommen, er hatte zuvor nie ein RNA-Tumorvirus mit der Pinzette berührt. Er sprang buchstäblich unangekündigt in dieses Feld hinein. Er ließ sich nicht durch die herrschende Skepsis hinsichtlich Termins DNA-Provirus-Hypothese beirren, denn, wie er in seinem Nobelpreisvortrag erläuterte: „Ich hatte auf diesem Feld keine Erfahrung und auch keine persönlichen Interessen.“ Auch das kann für einen richtigen Wissenschaftler ein wahrer Segen sein. Schließlich, im späten Frühjahr 1970 führten die Wege von Temin und Baltimore erneut zueinander. Sie berichteten gleichzeitig von ihren jeweiligen Entdeckungen einer RNA-abhängigen DNA-Polymerase in den Viria der RNA-Tumorviren, welches bald reverse Transkriptase genannt wurde. Die RNA-Tumorviren wiederum wurden als die Retroviren bezeichnet. Diese Entdeckung der reversen Transkriptase bedeutete eine Umkehr vom normalen Denken. Es bot aber auch eine viele neue Möglichkeiten: Die Fähigkeit, eine einzelsträngige RNA in die DNA zu kopieren, was für die Grundlagenforschung und die im Entstehen begriffene industriell genutzte Biotechnologie von unschätzbarem Wert war. Für mich und meine Kollegen war es ein Geschenk des Himmels. Wir konnten jetzt beliebig infizierte Zellen auf virale Nukleinsäuren untersuchen und wir bauten sehr schnell Assays dafür auf. Die Mittel, mit denen das Virus provirale DNA erzeugen konnte, waren vorhanden. Gab es in der infizierten Zelle aber wirklich einen stabilen Provirus, und wenn dem so war, wo versteckte er sich? War die Infektion durch das Rous-Sarkom-Virus wirklich eine Nachbildung der Lysogenie? Die erste glaubwürdige Sichtung der proviralen DNA war biologischer Natur. Die Einführung der DNA, aus Rous-Sarkom-Virus infizierten Zellen in nichtinfizierte Zellen durch Transfektion, riefen das ursprüngliche Virus hervor. Das ganze virale Genom hatte sich offenbar in der DNA der infizierten Zellen versteckt. Doch wo genau war das Provirus und wie sah es aus? Dies Fragen wurden von Harold Varmus aufgegriffen, der 1970 in San Francisco zu mir stieß und wir arbeiteten dann die folgenden 16 Jahre zusammen. Hier sind wir im Jahr 1978, ich, wie gewöhnlich, einen Schritt hinter Harold. Nun, seine Beine waren sehr viel länger als meine. Unter Verwendung molekularer Hybridisierung mit radioaktiven Sonden, kopiert vom Rous-Sarkom-Genom, waren wir und andere in der Lage aufzuzeigen, wo und wann das Provirus synthetisiert wurde, welche molekularen Formen es innerhalb der infizierten Zelle annahm, seine endgültige Integration in die chromosomale DNA der Wirtszelle, in der es als ein unerwünschter Zusatz zum zellulären Genom bewahrt und ausgedrückt wird. Alles das stimmte mit dem überein, was Howard Temin bereits vor einem Jahrzehnt postulierte. Und das Nachdenken über diese innige Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen bereiteten uns auf das vor, was bald darauf folgte. Inzwischen gab es Fortschritte beim Lösen des zweiten großen Rätsels: Wie löste das Rous-Sarkom-Virus das maligne Wachstum aus? Der erste Schritt war der Beweis der Genanalyse, dass das Virus über ein Onkogen verfügte, welches für die maligne Transformation der Wirtszelle verantwortlich war. Es ist eine schöne Geschichte, aber ich habe nicht die Zeit, sie Ihnen zu erzählen, Sie war für dieses Gebiet jedoch grundlegend. Dieses Onkogen wurde Src genannt, da es Sarkome in Hühnern verursacht. Es zeigte sich, Src war, vereinfach gesagt, eines von nur vier Genen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus. Bemerkenswerter Weise spielt dieses Gen keine Rolle bei der viralen Replikation. Das ist die Aufgabe der anderen drei Gene in diesem ausnehmend kompakten und effizienten Genom. Nun werden durch das Src Gen selbst zwei Rätsel gestellt. Erstens: Was ist der biochemische Mechanismus, durch den das Gen das maligne Wachstum auslöst? Und zweitens: Warum verfügt das Virus über ein solches Gen, obwohl es dies nicht zur Replikation benötigt? Das Rätsel des Mechanismus wurde in unserem Labor durch die Entdeckung von Art Levinson, und im Labor von Mark Collett und Ray Erickson in Denver gelöst: Das Src kodiert eine Proteinkinase. Zwei Jahre danach überraschte Tony Hunter am Salk Institute sich selbst und alle anderen mit der Entdeckung, dass die Src Kinase bislang unbekannte Reaktionen vornahm, nämlich die Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin. Es besteht eine direkte Linie zwischen dieser Reihe von Experimenten zu modernen therapeutischen Behandlungen, doch auch das ist eine Geschichte für einen anderen Zeitpunkt. Die Arten, auf denen diese Entdeckungen gemacht wurden, sind wegweisend. In Denver war es eine inspirierte Vermutung auf Basis der Pleiotropie des Src. Proteinphosphorylierung zählt zu den unter Biochemikern bekannten vielseitigsten Wirkstoffen für Veränderungen. Was eignete sich besser für das Hervorrufen einer Unzahl von Veränderungen, die Anlass für eine neoplasmatische Zelle geben? In San Francisco hatte die schafsinnige Enzymologie Art Levinsons zu der Erkenntnis geführt, dass das Src-Protein selbst eine Phosphorylierung war und daher durchaus andere Proteine phosphorylieren könnte. Am Salk Institute hatte Tony Hunters zufällige Verwendung eines veralteten Puffers, dessen pH abgelaufen war, zum ersten Mal seit Menschengedenken zu einer Trennung des Phosphotyrosin vom Phosphothreonin geführt. Das hier ist Art Levinson in einem Fantasiekostüm bei der Halloween-Party des Labors, viele Jahre ehe er der CEO von Genentech, Vorsitzender des Apple-Vorstands wurde…. er kleidet sich für solche Sitzungen nicht so ein… und seit Kurzem ist er Gründer des eigenen Unternehmens Calico. Wie steht es nun mit dem zweiten Rätsel, dem Ursprung des Src-Gens im Rous-Sarkom-Virus? Viele Jahre lang haben uns zwei entgegengesetzte Ansätze zum Genom normaler Zellen geführt. Einmal war da die sogenannte virogene Onkogenhypothese, aufgestellt von Robert Huebner und George Todaro. Es war ein Bestreben, eine universelle Theorie über Krebs aufzustellen. Ich selbst bewertete sie nicht sehr hoch, doch es gab sie. Der Gedanke war, Retroviren hätten sich mit ihren Onkogenen selbst in die Keimbahnen der Urahnen der modernen Spezies deponiert. Diese Gene wurden gewöhnlich durch die Zelle unterdrückt, konnten aber durch verschiedene krebsverursachende Wirkungen aktiviert werden. Unter der Voraussetzung können wir Src möglicherweise in normalen Zellen finden, das wäre aber in Form eines retroviralen Onkogens, dessen Ursprung ungeklärt bliebe. Der entgegengesetzte Gedanke war darwinistischer Natur. Da Src für den viralen Lebenszyklus ohne Bedeutung ist, ist es unwahrscheinlich, dass es gemeinsam mit dem Rest des viralen Genoms entstanden ist. Es gab keinen ausreichend selektiven Druck, der dies erreicht hätte. Statt dessen könnte die periodische Wechselwirkung zwischen viralen und zellulären Genomen im Laufe einer Infektion eine Störung verursacht haben, in der Src von der Zelle gewonnen wurde; im Wesentlichen wurde damit die Hypothese von Huebner und Todaro umgekehrt. Dieser Gedanke befürwortete auch die Suche nach Src in der normalen DNA. Die Suche erforderte eine radioaktive Sonde, die bei molekularer Hybridisierung verwendet wurde, um ein Src-Gen mit großer Sonden-Empfindlichkeit zu entdecken. In seiner vorherigen Arbeit als Post-Doc, hatte Harold Deletionsmutanten des Bakteriophagen verwendet, um die Expressionen einzelner Gene durch molekulare Hybridisierung zu erkennen. Wir waren in der Lage diese Technik für unsere Zwecke zu übernehmen. Denn unser Mitarbeiter Peter Vogt hatte den spontanen Deletionsmutanten des Rous-Sarkom-Virus isoliert, der den Hauptteil von Src zu entfernen schien. Wie hier dargestellt, konnten wir die RNA eines dieser Deletionsmutanten verwenden, um später das durchzuführen, was dann Substrathybridisierung genannt wurde. Zuerst transkribiert man das Genom, das gesamte Genom, sowohl die Replikationsgene und das Src-Gen in komplimentäre radioaktive cDNA. Als zweites hybridisiert man vom Deletionsmutanten cDNA mit RNA, was die gesamte DNA erfasst, ausgenommen jener, die Src repräsentiert. Schließlich entfernt man die doppelsträngigen Hybriden und lässt die einzelsträngige cDNA für Src über für die Sonde. Die Vorbereitung und Verwendung der Src-Sonde war mühselig, in Anbetracht, dass die Arbeit weit vor Erscheinen der rekombinanten DNA erfolgte. Die erforderlichen Experimente beanspruchten dann drei Jahre. Dass sie überhaupt durchgeführt wurden war das Verdienst zweier Post-Docs: Ramareddy Guntaka, der nachwies, dass wir die notwendige Sonde vermutlich herstellen können, und Dominique Stehelin, der hier zu sehen ist, hat die Arbeit bis zu ihrer entscheidenden Schlussfolgerung durchgeführte. Heute, mit Hilfe der rekombinanten DNA und weiteren zeitgemäßen Technologien, hätte man das vermutlich innerhalb von Wochen oder Monaten erreicht, ich bin allerdings froh, dass wir nicht gewartet haben. Onkogen des Rous-Sarkom-Virus in der DNA verschiedener Vogelarten. Die obere Tafel hier zeigt die Genauigkeit der Sonde. Sie reagiert mit der RNA aus der sie transkribiert wurde, nicht aber mit der RNA des Deletionsmutanten. Die mittlere Tafel zeigt dass die Src-Sonde mit normaler Hühner-DNA reagiert, doch das tat auch eine Sonde für den Deletionsmutanten. Das beweist die Anwesenheit dessen, was wir endogene Retroviren nannten, die dafür bekannt sind, dass sie die Genome vieler Spezies, auch die unseren, angreifen. Die untere Tafel ist die Entscheidende. Nur die Src-Sonde reagierte mit der DNA anderer Vogelarten und dies war unsere erste Indikation dafür, dass wir etwas erfasst hatten, das nicht mit dem Retrovirus verknüpft war, und anders als die Genome der endogenen Retroviren, über bedeutende phylogenetische Distanzen konserviert wurde. Beachten Sie die Ergebnisse mit Emu DNA, unter den primitivsten überlebenden Vogelarten. Wir publizierten diese Ergebnisse 1976 in einer kurzen Notiz in Nature, zwei Abbildungen und zwei Tabellen. Die Simplizität täuschte über die außerordentliche Schwierigkeit der zugrundeliegenden Experimente und den bemerkenswerten Paradigmenwechsel hinweg. Wir waren erfreut, und offenbar auch das Nobelpreiskomitee. Wie haben die Zeiten sich jedoch geändert. Vor einer Woche erzählte mir ein Kollege, er habe eine Klasse Studenten gebeten, das Papier zu lesen. Ihre Reaktion? Die haben dafür einen Nobelpreis erhalten? Ja, das haben wir. Schrittweise arbeiteten wir daran, dass unsere Sonde ein normales zelluläres Gen erkennen konnte. Wir entdeckten, es war über weite polygenetische Distanzen konserviert, was seine lebenswichtige Funktion nahelegte. Wir entdeckten, dass normale Zelle ein Protein mit den gleichen biochemischen Eigenschaften enthielten, von gleicher Größe wie die des Src-Proteins und das in zahllosen Geweben exprimiert war. Und als wir endlich die rekombinante DNA verwenden konnten, um zelluläres Src zu klonen, hatten wir das Ganze besiegelt. Zelluläres Src verfügte über die strukturellen Besonderheiten eines normalen zellulären Gens, Das virale Onkogen Src hatte sich tatsächlich unerlaubt von der Wirtszelle als vollständig gespleißte Version des Vorfahren kopiert und zugleich hatte das zelluläre Gen eine Mutation erhalten, die es in ein Onkogen umwandelte. Bald wurde klar: Src war mehr als eine abseitige Merkwürdigkeit. Der Bestand der introviralen Onkogene wuchs ständig und jedes davon wurde vom Genom einer normalen Zelle abgeleitet. Für jedes virale Onkogen gab es in der Zelle ein verwandtes Proto-Onkogen. Zufälligkeiten der Natur hatten eine Batterie potentieller Krebsgene in normalen Zellen aufgedeckt. Das zelluläre Src Proto-Onkogen ist ein sich anständig verhaltender und vitaler Schalter im Signalgebungsnetzwerk normaler Zellen. Darüber wissen wir inzwischen eine Menge. Das virale Src-Onkogen ist jedoch ein mutanter Übeltäter, dessen Genprodukt ständig aktiviert wird, mit einer genetischen “Gain-of-function”, die Krebszellen erzeugt. Die Gain-of-function erwies sich in der einen oder anderen Weise auch für alle weiteren retroviralen Onkogene als richtig. Es war leicht sich vorzustellen, dass die Vielzahl zellulärer Proto-Onkogene gleichsam eine Klaviatur sein kann, auf der alle denkbaren Karzinogene spielen konnten und - unabhängig von den Viren - zelluläre Onkogene erzeugten, wobei beispielsweise kein Retrovirus intervenieren konnte. Dies hat sich als zutreffend herausgestellt. Proto-Onkogene, die eine Gain-of-function erhalten haben, sind praktisch unvermeidbare Eigenschaften aller menschlichen Tumore. Als solches sind sie wesentliche Triebkräfte für die Tumorentstehen und folglich Kandidaten für Ziele von neuen Therapeutika, was nun ein blühender Wirtschaftszweig ist. Mit Hilfe moderner Genominstrumente ließ sich die Zahl dieser Gene auf weit über zweihundert erweitern. Die Gain-of-function, die Onkogene erzeugt, lässt sich durch verschiedene Methoden beeinträchtigen. Zuerst die Gewinne von Chromosomen oder fokale Genamplifikation, die beide die Gendosierung erhöhen. Chromosomale Translokationen, die entweder die Steuerung der Genexpression stören oder Bastard-Genprodukte erzeugen, die nicht richtig arbeiten. Punktmutationen, die die Steuerung der Genexpression unterbrechen oder nichtfunktionierende Genprodukte schaffen, und defekte epigenetische Steuerung der Genexpression. Alles das wurde in menschlichen Tumoren gefunden. Das Endergebnis ist aber immer das Gleiche: Das Äquivalent eines blockierten Gaspedals mit der Kapazität, die Tumorentstehung voranzutreiben. Die Signalübertragung normaler zellulärer Gene in Onkogenen durch Retroviren, ein Missgeschick der Natur, zeigte zum allerersten Mal die genetischen Merkmale von Krebs. Was sind die Faktoren, die diese Entdeckung förderten? Hier sind einige für die Studenten. Zu allererst, ein Auge für die beste Gelegenheit. David Baltimore entdeckte bei seinem allerersten Experiment eine reverse Transkriptase mit einem RNA-Tumorvirus. Er hatte zuvor nicht daran gedacht, aber er sah die Gelegenheit und ergriff sie. Umsichtige Missachtung der bestehenden Weisheit. Beachten Sie Temin und Baltimores wohlwollende Vernachlässigung eines zentralen Dogmas. Den Willen, etwas aufs Spiel zu setzen. Beachten Sie all die Jahre, die sie der zellulären Src nachjagten, was sich leicht als närrischer Irrtum hätte herausstellen können. Vertrauen in die Allgemeingültigkeit der Natur. Das Beispiel? Unsere Überzeugung, es gäbe etwas über den menschlichen Krebs zu lernen, indem man einen Hühnervirus untersuchte, wenn auch nicht in irgendjemandes Wohnzimmer. Die Wahl des experimentellen Systems. Der Anziehungskraft, die mich zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus führte. Technische Innovation. Das Assay, mit dem das zelluläre Src gefunden wurde. Und Selbstvertrauen. Howard Temins fokussiertes Verfolgen einer Idee über mehr als ein Jahrzehnt im intellektuellen Exil, wobei er die Provirus-Hypothese ungläubigen Ohren verkündete. Ich schließe also mit einem lauten Ruf zum Rous-Sarkom-Virus, der ein wertvoller Freund der Krebsforschung wurde. Bedenken Sie seinen Ursprung. Die Demonstration, dass Viren Krebs erregen. Reverse Transkriptase, eine wahrhaft revolutionäre und produktive Entdeckung. Das erste Beispiel eines Gens, das unmittelbar Krebs verursacht, Src. Dergleichen hatte man zuvor nie gesehen. Die Rolle der Protein-Kinasen bei der Tumorentstehung. Phosphorylierung von Tyrosin, nun maßgeblich bei der Zell-Signalgebung und vorrangiges Ziel bei Krebstherapien. Proto-Onkogene, der erste flüchtige Blick auf eine genetische Klaviatur für Karzinogene. Und bis heute, das auch noch: fünf Nobelpreise. Nicht schlecht, für ein Huhn. Vielen Dank

J. Michael Bishop on how the discovery of retroviral oncogenes led to an appreciation of the wider role of proto-oncogenes in cancer.
(00:28:58 - 00:30:36)

 

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2015 was jointly awarded to Thomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their characterisation of three of the most important repair mechanisms that safeguard the integrity of our genetic information. While X-ray radiation and viruses are important sources of damage to our genetic material, much DNA damage also occurs “naturally” or spontaneously, i.e., during normal processes of metabolism. In this excerpt from his lecture at the 67th Lindau Meeting in 2017, Lindahl stresses this point before going on to describe how cells repair some of the most common lesions to their DNA:

 

Thomas Lindahl delineating some of the mechanisms that cells use to repair their DNA.
(00:08:57 - 00:11:29)

 

The importance of DNA repair was also underlined by Werner Arber in his talk at the 61st Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2011, in which he discussed repair mechanisms that correct base-pair mismatches arising during DNA replication:

 

Werner Arber (2011) - Updated Notions on Darwinian Evolution

Well I’m very pleased to be with you this morning and I would like to talk as it was just said on evolution. Well biological evolution as well as cosmic evolution are very important things and philosophers, some thousands of years back and people starting to create religions were thinking on where do we come from, where do we go to and what is our environment. Nowadays we know a lot and it is in the 18th century that, sorry it is in the 19th century, 1860’s, 19th century that in fact biologists like Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin observed that individuals belonging to a particular species, not always had the same phenotype. And that was Mendel’s work, that some of these phenotypes got transferred into progeny, the first one, second one, third one and so on. That was the start of genetics. And more or less at the same time Charles Darwin reflected on his observations which he made that in some geographically isolated areas living beings populations belonging to a species which was also found elsewhere had in general another phenotype. So he reflected that natural selection favoured in fact that particular phenotype. That for example on some island and other phenotypes favoured the development of another variant elsewhere. One talked on variants and one had at that moment of course no idea as we have now on the basis of genetic information. What I show here is scheme of neo-Darwinistic evolution which came in the middle of the, around 1940 which was the fusion between classical genetics and evolutionary biology. You’ll see that genetic variation, I call it now genetic variation rather than phenotypic variation or mutation, I use these same 2 terms for the same characteristics. That these drive evolution. Of course if there would not be any mutation in any of the living beings there couldn’t be an evolution, couldn’t be a preference and selection. Now on the other side you see natural selection, this is a complex phenomena that the way how living beings deal with their encountered environments. And we do know of course that an environment is composed mainly on physical chemical, non-living matter and on biological environment. That means all the other living beings which live together in the same habitat as the one we look at can exert some selective influence on each other. We do know that what we do in the laboratory, I’m a microbial geneticist and I did most of my work with Escherichia coli bacteria, clearly defined, no other living beings around, in a medium which was a good growth medium. They had a generation time from 1 cell division to the next of 30 minutes, so everything was fast. And one could easily see these things. This is not what happens in nature, even in my body, I know now that not only me but you all carry at least as many microbial cells in your body as human cells. And you are not feeling sick by that, they help you actually in your life, we help them, we give them, provide them as a host the possibility. So we should consider – and this is quite important for medicine also – consider any living being higher organisms, being it human beings, animals or plants, as in fact ecosystems with a multitude of different kind of organisms which cohabitate. Then the rest is isolation, I mentioned already Charles Darwin’s observation that on isolated islands maybe that influences the biological evolution. So the general conclusion which you see here is without variation there wouldn’t be any evolution. So genetic variation is the driving force of genetic evolution on biological evolution. Natural selection, together with at any time available genetic variants and the parental forms decide where the branches on the tree on evolution are growing. That means the directions of evolution. And isolation of course modulates the process. The question is what are now the genetic variations, how do these variations occur. In many text books still nowadays you see that in the DNA these are errors of replication or accidents happening to the DNA. I wanted to invite you to give up that idea, it’s a wrong way of understanding nature. That the process of evolution is so important and you shouldn’t accept that this is based on errors. We will see how that works. And in order to see how that works we have to think how do we investigate that. On the lower part here in red I say individual processes of the generation of genetic variants should be studied case by case. And of course with animals or human beings that’s very difficult because of the very long generation time, on the very long genome. You do much better if you study that with bacteria or even with viruses. And I wanted to report to you results which were mainly obtained originally with microbial genetics. However since about 2 decades we have more and more nucleotide sequences available, these are entire genomes but you could also be interested to look in individual genes or even in a small domain on a gene which is homologous in other genes. And you could see groups of genes which sometimes collaborate with each other. And that can be easily done, this kind of comparison of nucleotide sequences by bio-informatic tools. So that’s also quite efficient. It doesn’t show how the process occurs but it can validate what you conclude from microbial genetics and that is quite beneficial. Now the E-coli bacteria have interestingly just one single circular DNA molecule as a genome which is almost carrying almost 5 million base pairs. And the genes of course we all know that it’s few decades which are coding for gene products which often are enzymes. These are mainly proteins, sometimes also RNA molecules. And of course genes have expression control signals which are located at different sites on which other proteins may interact, RNA may interact. And if you now consider a mutation, not any longer as a change in the phenotype but change in the nucleotide sequence, it becomes obvious that if you have a mutation within the reading frame of a gene, you may or may not have an alteration in the gene product. And if you have mutation in the expression control signal you may or may not have a different availability of that gene product. With that knowledge let me just see, I said may or may not, why, because it became clear and I think most of the biologists are in consent with that idea, that mutations, novel mutations are only relatively rarely favourable, that means useful for the individual which suffered the mutation. And providing a selective advantage in the encountered environment. Much more often novel mutation is unfavourable, providing selective disadvantage which can inhibit the life processes, sometimes very strongly so that in growing bacteria, dying bacteria, it’s just lethal. But many other mutants have no immediate influence on life processes, they are called silent and neutral and these may or may not at some later time together with additional novel mutations have some effect on the future evolution. And we do know several reasons why some of the mutations are silent. Under these conditions with rarely favourable mutants occurring spontaneously we can conclude that we indeed have no good evidence for a directedness of spontaneous mutations. My bacteria have no sensors to find out, oh I’m now in another environment, I should change this particular gene in this particular way in order to ferment, for example a sugar which was not present before. That doesn’t happen. It’s more random, by chance rarely this mutation, maybe in one cell or a few cells of the population and then it becomes selectively favoured and can eventually overgrow the rest of the population. And for the same reasons tolerable mutation frequencies in my haploid organisms and you can extrapolate to do this to diploids also must be very low, you don’t want per generation to accumulate many, many novel mutations in the genome because many are actually detrimental. So we will have to see for ways how mutations occur and how nature manages to keep evolution rates at low levels in order to tolerate life of a majority of the individuals in populations. What you see here again is on the right hand side, the sources of genetic variation, that means genetic variation, we have isolation there and natural selection. But I now comment on the processes of genetic variation. We do see that there are more than one, actually quite a number of different specific mechanisms contributing to the overall genetic variation in the microbial populations. And some of these occur during DNA replication, some of these are due to rearrangement intragenomically. A part, a segment of that linear genome can be duplicated, can be deleted, can be inverted and remaining at the same site, can transpose from one site to another and so on. And these processes, all of these processes are experimentally explored and we do know at least in some of them how nature manages to keep the rate at very low rates of these occurrences. Finally there is also, it is also known that sometimes a gene or a group of genes or even functional domain only can find its way from one type of organism into another type. And then we will see how that can behave there and exert some influence. So you see there are a number of different mechanisms and it is interesting to know that if you study for example E-coli strains and then you compare with some other bacteria you see that the specific mechanisms in these living beings are not always absolutely the same. There may be other genes there. But it is important to have such genes which help evolution and I will comment on those just in a moment. Before going you can see in fact you can attribute any of these observed specific mechanism to what I call natural strategy of genetic variation. And I can identify 3 strategies, one is a local sequence change, the other is a DNA rearrangement and the third one is DNA acquisition. So I go back to that, here we already said E-coli has a genome of about 5 million base pairs. If we compare that with our written language, where we put one letter after the next, the local sequence change is corresponding to changes within one word. You delete one letter in the word, you insert another one or you mingle up the sequences. And these are very local changes. The second one, you take a segment, maybe half a page which you duplicate and leave there so that the further evolution can work on one without changing the other one. Or you can invert that segment and so on. And the third strategy you take one page for example or part of a page from one organism of a different type and you bring it over into an organism which will be then the recipient organism. That’s horizontal transfer. I will come back at the very end, shortly to comment on this once more. By the way the bible, old and new testament have not quite, in the German edition, not quite 5 million letters, so E-coli is a book of the size of the bible. We human beings have about 700 times more, that means an encyclopaedia of about 700 volumes. And there are even living beings, including plants which go up to 1000 of these books in their genetic library. I want now to comment just very briefly without, I’m sorry in 30 minutes I cannot give you existing evidence for this what I say, but what you see here is what Watson and Crick already commented on in the Cold Spring Harbour Symposium of 1953. That in fact it was known from organic chemistry since quite some time that isomeric forms exist from organic chemical compounds and that also applies to nucleotides and the adenine which normally pairs with thymine. In fact has a most stable form but a short living tautomeric form in which one hydrogen atom is found not on the same place as in the standard form but slightly near to another nitrogen. That influences of course the 3-dimensional configuration of that molecule and it cannot pair any longer spontaneously with thymine. But interestingly Watson Crick already mentioned that time, it could in principle pair with cytosine. So then when the short living tautomeric form shifts back to the standard you have a mis-pairing. So mis-pairings of course if you reflect shouldn’t be attributed to errors, nature uses this kind of structural flexibility of bioorganic molecules to do something rarely. It doesn’t make it, during replication on long molecules of DNA, perhaps only a few times. But the longer the genome is the more that could bring you into problem because most of the nucleotide, many of the nucleotide changes may be unfavourable. And we do in the meantime know that in all living beings which have been studied so far, in fact there are efficient repair systems able to identify these nascent mis-pairings very rapidly. These enzymes largely, not quite all but largely can identify which is the parental strand and which is the newly synthesised strand in which the wrong nucleotide was added for creating afterwards the mis-pairing. And they can repair that. Without that I think life of higher organisms wouldn’t be possible, even for bacteria. So that's a wonderful thing. And the repair is not absolutely 100%, if a repair would be 100% you wouldn’t have local, this type of local nucleotide substitution which is an important contribution to biological evolution. So I think in the course of long past evolution these repair systems have been fine tuned to do their work so that those living beings which are among us, including us, in fact profit from having the possibility to do that work in order to keep local mutagenesis very low. There are other local mutants, for example local mutagenesis can also be due to the effect of chemical mutagens and so on. But I have no time to go into all these details. Rather I want to remind you that already in E-coli bacteria there are several systems of genetic recombination. All enzyme mediated. One is homologous recombination which is also called general recombination between sequence homologies which may occur at different places of a certain length. It has been shown also that transposable genetic, mobile genetic elements are carried, various types of such elements are carried in the genome. These have the size in general of a gene of about 1,000 nucleotides and if more than one copy is in the same genome of course they can also serve for rearrangement for making duplications by general recombination for inverting the DNA in between the site of these 2 identical mobile elements. Transposition per se, of course it’s called transposition because enzyme driven, they have their own enzymes which are called transposase, they are expressed at very low rates, all of that is controlled. Most of the cells have no enzymes for these but once in a while this enzyme, a few of these enzyme molecules may be synthesised, one may carry out the transposition and transposition is taking an element, putting it elsewhere, sometimes copying an element and putting the new copy elsewhere and so on and so forth. Not all of these elements work really absolutely the same way. And the third strategy is looking for so-called specific nucleotide sequences, these must be largely homologous, actually we call them consensus sequences. Experiments which we have carried out in our lab had these sequences of a length of 26 base pairs. And it was seen that these work relatively efficiently and reproducibly. So flip-flop systems which have been described are systems which any 1 or 2 generation, a segment of DNA just gets inverted and after another 1 or 2 back and so. So if none of the 2 orientations is lethal of course the bacteria can well survive. And sometimes it occurs that the site of recombination is within reading frames and you have fusion of reading frames when you make that and if one or even more identically 2 are of the same type then you get. I see I’m a bit on the long side, I will speed up. Because I wanted to say a few more words. This is classical microbial genetics, transformation, conjugation and viruses contribute to horizontal gene transfer. Gene transfer is considerably limited by various factors including restriction modification systems and these are also enzymatically guided. And because of the horizontal gene transfer, in fact I have no T-shirt for that but you should probably think about also occasionally make a horizontal connector between some of the trees because of allowing single genes or part of genes or small group of genes to transfer from one branch to the other and that enriches. Charles Darwin had said living beings have common origins and now we can say that’s still correct but also present living organisms have a common future because we don’t know when our progeny will profit from a horizontal transfer of genes which were developed elsewhere. And this brings me, what is the qualitative difference between these different genes. I just said that horizontal transfer, you may at some occasion acquire a foreign gene, that sharing in successful developments made by others and by just one step of horizontal transfer. Like for example if bacteria were antibiotic resistant, you may enormously profit from what others have developed in past times. DNA rearrangements, I mentioned that gene fusions can occur, operon fusion is fusion of a reading frame with an alternative expression control signal. And finally the local sequence changes is an improvement, possible improvement of available biological functions. And the molecular clock which is helping to see evolutionary times and differences is still valid but it applies only to local sequence changes. While the 2 other natural strategies could perhaps sometimes offer explanations for the emergency of novel properties which evolutionary biologists always wondered how they could come about. And I mentioned genes, recombination genes, these are variation generators. I mentioned repair enzymes, these are modulators of the frequency of genetic variations, so are restriction enzymes, they keep the rate of horizontal transfer between unrelated organisms relatively low, but not zero. And always non-genetic elements contribute. I mentioned the structural flexibility of nucleotides, that can be generalised probably to other reactions. Then random encounter for example the effect of the environmental mutagen or being infected by gene vector, bringing in a gene from another kind of organism and so on. Natural reality, that’s a conclusion, natural reality takes actively care of biological evolution. Because of these evolution genes we have to realise that in our genomes as well as in E-coli genome there are 2 kinds of genes, genes to the benefit of my own life, for the fulfilment of my life and other genes which in fact work for the evolution, expansion of life and they are the sources of biodiversity. Just a few words. I mentioned before these libraries. And in genetic engineering recombinant DNA techniques can be serving to study particular genes, for example if you have an organism which is under study you mutate a particular segment of the DNA. For example by making a local sequence change or by deleting the whole segment, bringing it back, the changed DNA into the living being. And looking for changing in phenotype, you often can conclude of what a particular part of the genome is actually good for in functions. Or alternatively you can take from a donor cell a small part, half a page or a page and insert it into a cell which is under your study or you want to use for production of that particular product. And this, if you see this critically, you see that the strategies in genetic engineering are just very, very similar to natural strategies which have always occurred in living beings since a long time. And therefore we can predict that risks, even long-term risks of genetic engineering are of the similar magnitude as long-term risk of natural biological evolution as well as on the classical breeding of plants and animals. That means this risks are very low because we know from long periods of observation that in nature these risks are really quite minute if not completely zero. And that allows you to see how that gives an advance and that's my last conclusion, for any type of biotechnology classically you looked into nature, you found something and you had to use that particular organism to use it to produce it. Insulin had to be taken from animals or ideally from human beings, if possible from very closely related animals, that’s not any longer needed. You can take that insulin gene from good human being, insert it into another kind of living being, being it a micro-organism, grow it up and harvest the product. If you want you could also improve by site-directed mutagenesis, that particular product before inducing into an appropriate organism. And this is a possibility which comes from the conclusion of biological evolution. Sorry I couldn’t give you any detailed really data but in the literature you’ll find for all what I said really solid background information. Thank you for your attention.

Ich freue mich sehr, heute Morgen bei Ihnen sein zu können, und ich möchte, wie soeben erwähnt wurde, über die Evolution zu Ihnen sprechen. Nun ja, die biologische Evolution ist ebenso wie die kosmische Evolution eine sehr bedeutsame Sache, und Philosophen vor einigen Tausend Jahren und Menschen, die Religionen zu stiften begannen, stellten sich die Fragen Heute wissen wir sehr viel, und es war im 18., nein, Entschuldigung, im 19. Jahrhundert, in den 1860er Jahren, im 19. Jahrhundert, dass Biologen wie Gregor Mendel und Charles Darwin beobachteten, dass Individuen, die einer bestimmten Art angehörten, nicht immer denselben Phänotyp hatten. Das war Mendels Leistung: erkannt zu haben, dass einigen dieser Phänotypen auf die Nachkommenschaft übertragen wurden, auf die erste Generation, die zweite, die dritte usw. Das war der Beginn der Genetik. Mehr oder weniger gleichzeitig dachte Charles Darwin über die von ihm angestellten Beobachtungen nach, dass in einigen geographisch isolierten Gebieten lebende Populationen, die zu einer Art gehören, die sich auch anderswo fand, im Allgemeinen einen anderen Phänotyp haben. So gelangte er zu der Ansicht, dass die natürliche Selektion diesen bestimmten Phänotyp begünstigt: dass zum Beispiel auf einer Insel eine bestimmte Variante begünstigt ist und dass andere Phänotypen die Entwicklung anderer Varianten anderswo fördern. Man sprach damals von Varianten, und man wusste zu dieser Zeit, im Gegensatz zu heute, noch nichts von den Grundlagen der genetischen Information. Was ich hier zeige, ist das Schema der neodarwinistischen Evolution, das in der Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts entwickelt wurde, um 1940. Dabei handelte es sich um die Verbindung der klassischen Genetik mit der Evolutionsbiologie. Sie sehen, dass genetische Variation - ich nenne sie nun genetische Variation statt phänotypische Variation oder Mutation Wenn es natürlich keinerlei Mutation in irgendeinem lebenden Wesen gäbe, könnte es keine Evolution geben, könnte es keine Präferenz und keine Auslese geben. Nun, auf der anderen Seite sehen Sie die natürliche Auslese. Dies ist ein komplexes Phänomen: die Art und Weise, wie Lebewesen mit der von ihnen angetroffenen Umwelt fertig werden. Und wir wissen natürlich, dass eine Umwelt hauptsächlich aus physikalischer, chemischer, nicht-lebender Materie zusammengesetzt ist und aus einer biologischen Umwelt. Das sind alle anderen Lebewesen, die zusammen im gleichen Habitat leben wie die untersuchte Art, und sie können einen gegenseitigen Einfluss aufeinander ausüben. Wir wissen, was wir im Labor tun. Ich beschäftige mich mit der Genetik der Mikroben, und ich habe den größten Teil meiner Arbeiten mit Escherichia coli durchgeführt: klar definiert, ohne irgendwelche anderen Lebewesen in der Nähe; in einem Medium, das ein guter Nährboden war. Die Mikroben hatten eine Generationszeitspanne - von einer Zellteilung zur nächsten - von 30 Minuten. Alles erfolgte also sehr schnell, und man konnte diese Dinge mühelos beobachten. Dies ist nicht, was in der Natur geschieht, noch nicht einmal in meinem Körper. Ich weiß jetzt, dass nicht nur ich, sondern dass Sie alle mindestens so viele Mikrobenzellen in ihrem Körper herumtragen wie menschliche Zellen. Und Sie fühlen sich deshalb nicht krank. Tatsächlich helfen Sie Ihnen zu leben. Wir helfen Ihnen, wir stellen uns Ihnen als Wirt bereit. Wir sollten uns also jeden lebenden höheren Organismus, und dies ist auch für die Medizin ein wichtiger Gedanke - seien es menschliche Wesen, Tiere oder Pflanzen - in Wirklichkeit als Ökosysteme aus einer Vielzahl verschiedener zusammenlebender Organismen vorstellen. Der Rest ist dann Isolation. Ich habe die Beobachtung von Charles Darwin bereits erwähnt, dass die Isolation auf Inseln vielleicht dasjenige sein konnte, was die biologische Evolution beeinflusst. Die allgemeine Schlussfolgerung, die Sie hier sehen können, lautet also: Ohne Variation würde es keine Evolution gegeben. Die genetische Variation ist demnach die treibende Kraft der genetischen Evolution oder biologischen Evolution. Die natürliche Auslese, zusammen mit den zu einer gegebenen Zeit vorhandenen genetischen Varianten und den Elternformen entscheiden darüber, in welche Richtung die Zweige am Baum der Evolution wachsen, d.h. die Richtung der Evolution. Und Isolation verändert diesen Vorgang natürlich. Die Frage lautet nun: Welches sind die gegenwärtigen genetischen Variationen? Wie treten diese Variationen auf? In vielen Lehrbüchern liest man heute noch, dass dies durch Replikationsfehler in der DNA zustandekommt oder dass es Beschädigungen der DNA sind. Ich wollte sie einladen, diese Vorstellung aufzugeben. Dies ist eine falsche Deutung der Natur. Der Prozess der Evolution ist so wichtig, und Sie sollten nicht akzeptieren, dass er auf Fehlern basiert. Wir werden sehen, wie das funktioniert. Und um zu verstehen, wie das funktioniert, müssen wir uns fragen, wie wir den Prozess untersuchen. Auf dem unteren Teil hier schreibe ich in rot, dass die einzelnen Vorgänge der Entstehung von genetischen Varianten von Fall zu Fall untersucht werden sollten. Und bei Tieren und Menschen ist das natürlich aufgrund der Länge einer Generation sehr schwer. Auch aufgrund des umfangreichen Genoms. Man hat es sehr viel leichter, wenn man das an Bakterien studiert oder sogar an Viren, und ich möchte Ihnen über Ergebnisse berichten, die ursprünglich hauptsächlich in der Genetik der Mikroben gewonnen wurden. Seit etwa zwei Jahrzehnten stehen uns jedoch mehr und mehr Nukleotidsequenzen zur Verfügung. Dies sind vollständige Genome, doch man könnte ebenso daran interessiert sein, in einzelne Gene hineinzuschauen oder sogar in eine kleine Domäne auf einem einzelnen Gen, die in anderen Genen homolog ist. Und man könnte Gruppen von Genen sehen, die manchmal miteinander zusammenarbeiten. Und das lässt sich leicht erreichen, diese Art des Vergleichs der Nukleotidsequenzen, mit Hilfsmitteln der Informatik. Sie sind ebenfalls sehr effizient. Sie zeigen zwar nicht, wie dieser Prozess abläuft, sie können jedoch die Schlussfolgerungen belegen, die man aus der Genetik der Mikroben gezogen hat, und das ist sehr nützlich. Interessanterweise verfügen die E. coli-Bakterien als Genom nur über ein einziges ringförmiges DNA-Molekül, das fast 5 Millionen Basenpaare enthält. Und die Gene: Natürlich wissen wir alle seit ein paar Jahrzehnten, dass sie die Genprodukte kodieren, bei denen es sich häufig um Enzyme handelt. Dies sind hauptsächlich Proteine, manchmal auch RNA-Moleküle. Und natürlich verfügen Gene über Expressionssteuerungssignale, die sich an verschiedenen Stellen befinden, mit denen andere Proteine interagieren können, mit denen RNA interagieren kann. Und wenn man nun eine Mutation nicht länger als eine Änderung im Phänotyp, sondern als eine Änderung in der Nukleotidsequenz betrachtet, wird offensichtlich, dass es - wenn eine Mutation im Leserahmen eines Gens auftritt - zu einer Mutation im Genprodukt kommen kann oder nicht. Kommt es zu einer Mutation im Steuerungssignal der Expression, so ist es möglich, dass eine unterschiedliche Verfügbarkeit dieses Genprodukts die Folge ist. Lassen Sie mich mit diesen Kenntnissen nun weitersehen.... Ich sagte, dass eine Veränderung der Verfügbarkeit die Folge sein kann oder nicht. Warum? Weil klar geworden ist - und ich glaube, dass die meisten Biologen dieser Idee zustimmen würden -, dass Mutationen, neue Mutationen, nur sehr selten von Vorteil sind, das heißt nützlich sind für das Individuum, das die Mutation erlitten hat, und einen selektiven Vorteil in der angetroffenen Umgebung darstellen. Viel häufiger sind neue Mutationen nachteilig. Sie stellen einen selektiven Nachteil dar, der sich auf alle Lebensprozesse auswirken kann, und zwar manchmal so stark, dass er in Bakterienkulturen einfach zum Tod führt. Viele andere Mutationen haben jedoch keinen unmittelbaren Einfluss auf die Lebensprozesse. Sie werden als "stille" oder neutrale Mutationen bezeichnet. Zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt können Sie allerdings, gemeinsam mit zusätzlichen neuen Mutationen, einen Einfluss auf die künftige Evolution haben, oder auch nicht. Und wir kennen mehrere Gründe, warum einige der Mutationen still sind. Unter diesen Bedingungen - selten spontan auftretenden, günstigen Mutationen - können wir tatsächlich die Schlussfolgerung ziehen, dass es keine guten Hinweise auf eine Gerichtetheit der spontanen Mutationen gibt. Meine Bakterien verfügen über keine Sensoren, mit denen sie herausfinden können Ich sollte dieses besondere Gen auf diese besondere Weise verändern, um zum Beispiel Zucker verdauen zu können, der sich vorher nicht in meiner Umgebung befand." Das kommt nicht vor. Es ist viel zufälliger. Diese Mutation kommt zufallsmäßig sehr selten vor, vielleicht in einer oder in ein paar Zellen einer Population. Und dann wird sie selektiv begünstigt und kann schließlich den Rest der Population verdrängen. Aus denselben Gründen muss die Mutationshäufigkeit in meinen haploiden Organismen - und man kann dies auch auf die diploiden übertragen - sehr gering sein. Man möchte nicht in jeder Generation im Genom zahlreiche neue Mutationen ansammeln, weil viele von ihnen schädlich sind. Wir müssen also nach Wegen suchen, wie Mutationen auftreten und wie es der Natur gelingt, die Evolutionsraten niedrig zu halten, um das Leben einer Mehrheit der Individuen einer Population erträglich zu halten. Was Sie hier wieder auf der rechten Seite sehen, sind die Quellen der genetischen Variationen, d.h. die genetische Variation. Wir haben dort Isolation und natürliche Selektion. Doch ich kommentiere jetzt die Prozesse der genetischen Variation. Wir haben erkannt, dass es mehr als einen, ja tatsächlich eine ganze Reihe verschiedener spezifischer Mechanismen gibt, die zur genetischen Gesamtvariation in den Populationen von Mikroorganismen beitragen. Einige von ihnen treten bei der DNA-Replikation auf, während andere aufgrund der Neuanordnung innerhalb des Genoms stattfinden. Ein Teil, ein Segment des linearen Genoms kann dupliziert werden, kann gelöscht werden, kann am selben Ort invertiert werden, kann von einer Stelle an eine andere versetzt werden, usw. Und diese Prozesse, alle diese Prozesse sind experimentell erforscht, und wir wissen - zumindest bei einigen von ihnen - wie es der Natur gelingt, die Häufigkeit dieser Vorkommnisse gering zu halten. Und schließlich gibt es auch..., ist auch bekannt, dass manchmal eine Gruppe von Genen oder sogar eine funktionale Domäne, ihren Weg von einem Typ eines Organismus in einen anderen Typ finden kann. Und dann können wir sehen, wie sie sich dort verhalten und welche Auswirkungen sie haben. Sie sehen also: Es gibt eine Reihe verschiedener Mechanismen, und es ist interessant zu wissen, dass man - wenn man zum Beispiel Stämme von E. coli untersucht und dann mit einigen anderen Bakterien vergleicht - sehen kann, dass die spezifischen Mechanismen in diesen Lebewesen nicht immer absolut identisch sind. Es kann sein, dass sich dort andere Gene befinden. Doch es ist wichtig, dass es solche Gene gibt, die die Evolution unterstützen, und ich werde sogleich mehr darüber sagen. Tatsächlich kann man sehen, dass man jeden dieser beobachteten spezifischen Mechanismen einer Strategie zuschreiben kann, die ich als "natürliche Strategie der genetischen Variation" bezeichne. Und ich kann 3 Strategien benennen: Eine ist eine lokale Sequenzänderung, die andere ist eine Neuanordnung der DNA und die dritte ist der Erwerb von DNA. Ich komme also hierauf zurück. Hier haben wir bereits gesagt, dass E. coli über ein Genom verfügt, das aus etwa 5 Millionen Basenpaaren besteht. Wenn wir das mit unserer geschriebenen Sprache vergleichen, in der wir einen Buchstaben an den anderen reihen, entspricht die lokale Sequenzänderung der Änderung innerhalb eines Wortes. Man löscht einen Buchstaben in einem Wort, man fügt einen anderen ein, oder man ändert die Reihenfolge der Wörter in den Sätzen. Dies sind sehr lokale Änderungen. Bei der zweiten Strategie nimmt man ein Segment, vielleicht die Hälfte einer Seite, das man dupliziert und an seiner ursprünglichen Stelle lässt, so dass die weitere Evolution auf eine Version einwirken kann, ohne die andere zu verändern. Oder man kann das Segment in umgekehrter Reihenfolge einfügen, usw. Bei der dritten Strategie nimmt man zum Beispiel eine Seite oder einen Teil einer Seite aus einem Organismus eines anderen Typs und bringt sie in einen Organismus, der dadurch zu einem Empfängerorganismus wird. Man bezeichnet dies als horizontalen Transfer. Ich werde zum Schluss darauf noch einmal eingehen und noch einmal kurz etwas dazu sagen. Nebenbei bemerkt besteht die Bibel, das Alte und Neue Testament, in der deutschen Ausgabe aus etwas weniger als 5 Millionen Buchstaben. Das Genom von E. coli ist also ein Buch vom Umfang der Bibel. Wir Menschen haben etwa 700mal mehr Buchstaben. Das bedeutet, unser Genom ist eine Enzyklopädie mit etwa 700 Bänden. Und es gibt sogar Lebewesen, einschließlich der Pflanzen, deren genetische Bibliothek aus bis zu 1000 solcher Bücher besteht. Ich möchte jetzt noch sehr kurz etwas über.... Es tut mir leid, in 30 Minuten kann ich Ihnen die vorhandenen Beweise für das, was ich Ihnen sage, nicht liefern... Doch was Sie hier sehen ist das, was Watson und Crick bereits auf dem Cold Spring Harbour Symposium im Jahr 1953 vorgestellt haben. Tatsächlich war es in der organischen Chemie schon seit einiger Zeit bekannt, dass von organischen Verbindungen isomere Formen existieren, und das gilt auch für Nukleotide und das Adenin, das normalerweise mit Thymin ein Basenpaar bildet. Tatsächlich hat Adenin eine sehr stabile, aber auch eine kurzlebige tautomerische Form, in der sich ein Wasserstoffatom nicht an derselben Stelle wie in der Standardversion befindet, sondern etwas näher am Stickstoff. Dadurch wird natürlich die räumliche Konfiguration des Moleküls beeinflusst, und es kann sich nicht mehr spontan mit Thymin verbinden. Doch interessanterweise erwähnten Watson und Crick bereits damals, dass es im Prinzip mit Cytosin eine Bindung eingehen kann. Ändert sich dann die kurzlebige tautomerische Form wieder zur Standardform, dann kommt es zu einer Fehlpaarung. Wenn man darüber nachdenkt, sollten Fehlpaarungen natürlich nicht Fehlern zugeschrieben werden. Die Natur verwendet diese Art von struktureller Flexibilität bioorganischer Moleküle, um in seltenen Fällen etwas zu tun. Sie tut dies während der Replikation langer DNA-Moleküle, vielleicht nur wenige Male. Doch je länger das Genom ist, je mehr kann dies zu einem Problem werden, denn viele der Nukleotidänderungen können nachteilig sein. Und wir haben zwischenzeitlich gelernt, dass es in allen bisher untersuchten Lebewesen tatsächlich effektive Reparatursysteme gibt, die diese Fehlpaarungen bereits im Anfangsstadium schnell erkennen können. Diese Enzyme können größtenteils - nicht alle, aber die meisten -erkennen, welches der Elternstrang ist und welches der neu synthetisierte, in dem das fehlerhafte Nukleotid hinzugefügt wurde, das dann später zur Fehlpaarung führt. Und sie können dies reparieren. Ich glaube, dass das Leben höherer Organismen ohne diesen Mechanismus nicht möglich wäre, nicht einmal das Leben von Bakterien. Es ist also eine wunderbare Sache. Die Reparatur ist nicht 100%ig. Wenn sie es wäre, gäbe es keine lokalen, diese Art lokaler Nukleotidsubstitutionen, die ein wichtiger Beitrag zur biologischen Evolution sind. Ich denke, dass in der langen Vergangenheit der Evolution diese Reparatursysteme für ihre Aufgabe perfektioniert worden sind, so dass diese Lebewesen um uns, einschließlich unserer selbst, tatsächlich davon profitieren, dass sie diese Aufgabe erfüllen können, um die Rate der lokalen Mutagenese sehr gering zu halten. Es gibt noch andere lokale Mutationen. Zum Beispiel kann die lokale Mutagenese auch auf die Wirkung chemischer Mutagene usw. zurückzuführen sein. Ich habe jedoch keine Zeit, um auf all diese Einzelheiten einzugehen. Ich möchte Sie stattdessen daran erinnern, dass es bereits bei E. coli-Bakterien mehrere Systeme der genetischen Rekombination gibt. Alle von ihnen werden durch Enzyme vermittelt. Eine ist die homologe Rekombination. Sie wird auch als generelle Rekombination zwischen Sequenzhomologien bezeichnet, die an bestimmten Genorten einer bestimmten Länge vorkommen kann. Man hat auch zeigen können, dass das Genom transponable, mobile genetische Elemente enthält. Verschiedene Arten solcher Elemente werden vom Genom mitgeführt. Im Allgemeinen haben sie die Größe eines Gens aus etwa 1000 Nukleotiden. Befindet sich mehr als eine Kopie im selben Genom, können Sie natürlich auch zur Neuanordnung dienen, zur Herstellung von Verdopplungen durch die allgemeine Rekombination, zur Invertierung der DNA zwischen den Orten dieser identischen mobilen Elemente. Die Transposition an sich wird natürlich als Transposition bezeichnet, weil sie von Enzymen gesteuert wird. Sie verfügt über ihre eigenen Enzyme, die als Transposasen bezeichnet werden. Sie werden nur sehr geringfügig exprimiert. All das ist gesteuert. Die meisten Zellen haben keine Enzyme dafür, doch gelegentlich kann dieses Enzym oder können einige dieser Enzymmoleküle synthetisiert werden. Eines kann die Transposition durchführen, und die Transposition nimmt ein Element und versetzt es an einen anderen Ort. Manchmal geschieht dies durch das Kopieren eines Elements und dadurch, dass dies an einer anderen Stelle eingefügt wird usw. Nicht alle diese Elemente arbeiten wirklich auf absolut identische Weise. Und die dritte Strategie sucht nach sogenannten spezifischen Nukleotidsequenzen. Diese müssen größtenteils homolog sein. Tatsächlich nennen wir sie "Konsenz-Sequenzen". Bei Experimenten, die wir in unserem Labor durchgeführt haben, hatten diese Sequenzen eine Länge von 26 Basenpaaren. Es wurde erkannt, dass sie relativ effizient und reproduzierbar arbeiten. Flip-Flop-Systeme, die beschrieben wurden, sind Systeme, bei denen in der 1. oder 2. Generation ein Segment der DNA einfach invertiert wird, und nach ein oder zwei Generationen wieder in seinen ursprünglichen Zustand zurückversetzt wird usw. Wenn also keine der zwei Ausrichtungen tödlich ist, können die Bakterien sehr wohl überleben. Und manchmal kommt es vor, dass der Ort der Rekombination sich innerhalb von Leserahmen befindet und es kommt dadurch zur Fusion von Leserahmen. Wenn es dazu kommt, und wenn 1 oder - noch identischer 2 - vom selben Typ sind, dann erhält man.... Ich sehe, dass ich nicht mehr viel Zeit habe. Ich werde mich beeilen, denn ich möchte noch ein paar Worte sagen. Dies ist die klassische Genetik der Mikroben: Transformation, Konjugation und Viren tragen zum horizontalen Gentransfer bei. Der Gentransfer wird durch verschiedene Faktoren stark eingeschränkt, einschließlich durch die Systeme zur Restriktion der Modifikationen, und auch diese sind enzymatisch gesteuert. Aufgrund des horizontalen Gentransfers.... Ein T-Shirt habe ich dafür nicht - doch Sie sollten wahrscheinlich gelegentlich auch daran denken, dass es zu einer horizontalen Verbindung zwischen einigen Ästen des Lebensbaumes kommt, weil es erlaubt ist, dass einzelne Gene oder Teile von Genen oder kleine Gruppen von Genen von einem Zweig zu einem anderen übertragen werden, und das stellt eine Bereicherung dar. Charles Darwin hatte gesagt, dass die lebenden Wesen einen gemeinsamen Ursprung haben. Jetzt können wir sagen, dass dies weiterhin korrekt ist, aber dass die gegenwärtig lebenden Organismen auch eine gemeinsame Zukunft haben, denn wir wissen nicht, wann unsere Nachkommen von einem horizontalen Transfer der Gene, die sich anderswo entwickelt haben, profitieren werden. Und dies bringt mich zu der Frage: Was ist der qualitative Unterschied zwischen diesen verschiedenen Genen? Ich sagte soeben, dass horizontaler Transfer - man kann zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt ein fremdes Gen erlangen -, dass es die gemeinsame Nutzung erfolgreicher Entwicklungen anderer gibt, durch nur einen Schritt eines horizontalen Transfers. Wenn Bakterien beispielsweise gegen Antibiotika resistent waren, kann man enorm von dem profitieren, was andere in der Vergangenheit entwickelt haben. DNA-Neuanordnungen. Ich erwähnte, dass es zur Fusion von Genen kommen kann. Operon-Fusion ist die Fusion eines Leserahmens mit einem alternativen Expressionssteuerungssignal. Und schließlich sind die lokalen Sequenzänderungen eine Verbesserung, eine mögliche Verbesserung der verfügbaren biologischen Funktionen. Die molekulare Uhr, die evolutionäre Zeiten und Unterschiede zu messen hilft, ist noch gültig, doch sie gilt nur für lokale Sequenzänderungen. Während die zwei anderen natürlichen Strategien - vielleicht - manchmal Erklärungen für das Auftreten von neuen Eigenschaften bieten könnten, bei denen sich Evolutionsbiologen stets gefragt haben, wie sie haben entstehen können. Und ich habe Gene erwähnt, die Rekombination von Genen, dies sind Variationsgeneratoren. Ich erwähnte Reparaturenzyme. Dies sind Modulatoren der Häufigkeit genetischer Variationen. Dasselbe sind Restriktionsenzyme. Sie halten die Rate des horizontalen Transfers zwischen nichtverwandten Organismen relativ gering, doch von Null verschieden. Und nichtgenetische Elemente leisten immer einen Beitrag. Ich erwähnte die strukturelle Flexibilität von Nukleotiden. Das kann wahrscheinlich bezüglich anderer Reaktionen verallgemeinert werden: die Zufallsbegegnung mit der Wirkung eines Mutagens der Umwelt oder die Infektion mit einem Genträger, der ein Gen von einer anderen Art von Organismus mitbringt usw. Die Wirklichkeit der Natur, das ist die Schlussfolgerung, die Wirklichkeit der Natur spielt eine aktive Rolle bei der biologischen Evolution. Aufgrund dieser Evolutionsgene müssen wir erkennen, dass sich in unseren Genomen, ebenso wie in den Genomen von E. coli, zwei Arten von Genen befinden: Gene, die meinem eigenen Leben dienen, für die Erfüllung meines Lebens, und andere Gene, die für die Evolution arbeiten, für die Erweiterung des Lebens. Sie sind die Quelle der biologischen Vielfalt. Nur noch ein paar Worte zum Schluss. Ich habe vorhin diese Bibliotheken erwähnt. Und im Genetic Engineering können DNA-Rekombinationstechniken dazu dienen, bestimmte Gene zu studieren. Wenn Sie zum Beispiel einen Organismus untersuchen, mutieren Sie ein bestimmtes Segment der DNA, etwa, indem Sie eine lokale Sequenzänderung vornehmen, oder indem Sie das gesamte Segment löschen oder die gelöschte DNA wieder in die Lebewesen zurückbringen, und indem Sie nach Änderungen des Phänotyps Ausschau halten. Sie können häufig erschließen, wozu ein bestimmter Teil des Genoms in den Funktionen dient. Oder Sie können einen kleinen Teil einer Spenderzelle nehmen, eine halbe Seite oder eine Seite, und ihn in eine von Ihnen untersuchte Zelle bringen. Oder Sie möchten ihn zur Herstellung dieses bestimmten Produkts verwenden. Und dies, wenn Sie bei dieser Einfügung kritisch vorgehen, zeigt, dass die Strategien im Genetic Engineering denjenigen, die in den Lebewesen seit sehr langer Zeit immer schon verwendet wurden, sehr, sehr ähnlich sind. Und daher können wir voraussagen, dass Risiken, selbst längerfristige Risiken des Genetic Engineering, eine vergleichbare Größe haben wie die längerfristigen Risiken der natürlichen biologischen Evolution sowie der klassischen Züchtung von Pflanzen und Tieren. Dies bedeutet, dass diese Risiken sehr niedrig sind, denn wir wissen aus langen Zeiträumen der Beobachtung, dass in der Natur diese Risiken tatsächlich sehr gering sind, wenn nicht sogar überhaupt nicht bestehen. Und das lässt uns erkennen, wie das zu einem Vorteil führt und das ist meine letzte Schlussfolgerung, denn traditionellerweise schaute man für jede Art von Biotechnologie in die Natur. Man suchte nach etwas, und man musste einen bestimmten Organismus verwenden, um dies herzustellen. Insulin musste von Tieren oder idealerweise von Menschen genommen werden, nach Möglichkeit von sehr eng verwandten Tieren. Dies ist jetzt nicht mehr erforderlich. Sie können das Gen für Insulin aus einem gesunden Menschen nehmen, es in ein beliebiges anderes Lebewesen einfügen, sei es auch ein Mikroorganismus, den Organismus vermehren und das Produkt ernten. Wenn Sie möchten, könnten sie das bestimmte Produkt auch durch eine gezielte Mutagenese verbessern, bevor sie es in den entsprechenden Organismus einführen. Und dies ist eine Möglichkeit, die sich als Schlussfolgerung aus der biologischen Evolution ergibt. Es tut mir leid, dass ich Ihnen keine detaillierten, konkreten Daten geben konnte. In der Literatur werden Sie jedoch für alles, was ich gesagt habe, solide Hintergrundinformationen finden. Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Werner Arber on some of the mechanisms that guard against nucleotide mismatches in our genetic material.
(00:21:31 - 00:22:23)

 

How Nature Ensures the Diversity of Genetic Material

Even though radiation, viruses and many other stimuli both from outside and inside our bodies have the potential to wreak havoc on our genetic material, a certain level of “mistakes” and genetic variation can be beneficial. Bacteria, for example, are highly adept at sharing genes between themselves in a process known as gene transfer. The American molecular biologist Joshua Lederberg discovered two modes of gene transfer, conjugation and transduction. For his achievement, he shared the 1958 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with George Beadle and Edward Tatum. In his talk at the 31st Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 1981, Nobel Laureate Hamilton Smith (Medicine or Physiology, 1978) talks about the three known mechanisms of gene transfer in bacteria:

 

Hamilton Smith (1981) - Mechanisms of Gene Transfer in Bacteria

Bacteria have been the favourite tool of geneticists and molecular biologists for a number of years because of their simplicity. This simplicity is both in structure and in their genetics, and also in their life cycle. They’re not only the simplest cellular organism, but extremely small in size and with other properties of rapid division and so forth that make them ideal objects for study in the laboratory. If I could have the first slide. I’ll show a scanning electron micrograph of a typical bacterial cell, one that we study in our own laboratory, haemophilus influenza. Now, for the purposes of my lecture, let me describe, very briefly, some of the characteristics of these bacteria. First of all, bacteria can be divided into two major categories based on the structure of their cell envelope. We have the gram-positive bacteria that have an outer boundary consisting of a cytoplasmic membrane and a rather thick cell wall. On the other hand the gram-negative bacteria have, in addition to these two layers, an outer membrane. So that when we talk about gene transfer, we have to think of the problem of getting genes, that is DNA, out of one cell, through these layers, and into a recipient cell. Now the bacteria also is rather simple inside. There is no true nucleus, the chromosome is in direct contact with the cytoplasm and genetic expression occurs in a coupled fashion, with the genes being transcribed and then directly and immediately translated into protein. The chromosome is a single molecule of some one hundred, some million or so base pairs, and the nucleotide sequence, of course, carries the complete genetic programme which specifies not only the structure of the bacterial cell, but also the complete life cycle. Perhaps we could show the first slide. The nucleotide sequence itself which carries this genetic information is organized into a series of contiguous units, which we call genes. And in a typical bacterial cell there might be some three thousand such genes which play out the genetic programme of this organism every twenty or thirty minutes as the cell divides. Here is the haemophilus influenza cell that we study and you should keep this in mind for future reference. These cells are only about one or two microns in size. Now, bacteria in general, if one looks in nature, grow in extremely large populations. And consequently, and they also divide very rapidly, a matter of twenty or thirty minutes for a cell, per doubling time. In addition, these large populations collectively carry an enormous variety of mutations. So that in adapting to their environment they can select for favourable mutations and in addition they have developed a variety of means of exchanging genes between cells so that they can play with various combinations of mutations in order to develop the most adaptable organism. So that many modern biologists, because of these reasons, have considered that bacteria may be the most highly evolved organism. This is not to mean that they are the most complex in structure, but genetically the most evolved. They have a genome with the highest density of genetic information of any that we know, other than the viruses. If I could go to the next slide then. Let me go over the known mechanisms for gene transfer in bacteria, as this is the subject of the lecture. We have transformation, transduction and conjugation. In transformation, a donor cell in the population releases its DNA into the medium by lysis or perhaps in some cases by a secretion mechanism, and other cells in the population act as competent recipients. That is they have become able to take up DNA from the medium into the cell. In transduction, you have a similar transfer from donor to recipient, except that the vector for transfer is a virus, which in a small frequency of the cases will package a piece of the bacterial DNA rather than phage DNA. In conjugation, we have a highly specialized mechanism in which there is an actual bridge between the donor and the recipient cells and there is a plasmid-mediated linear transport of the donor chromosome, or a copy of the donor chromosome into the recipient. Now in all these cases, once the DNA gets into the cell, into the recipient cell, if it contains homologous sequences, it can be recombined into the recipient chromosome to form recombinants. And this is ordinarily by several different biochemical pathways that all cells carry that enable them to recombine homologous sequences. My lecture will deal only with the transfer mechanism, and not with what happens in the cell after the DNA gets in, as this is fairly uniform. Alright let me then talk a little bit in more detail about each of these mechanisms. And I’ll start with transduction which in many ways is the most universal transfer mechanism because, as far as we know, all bacterial cells can be infected by at least some viruses, which are capable of the transduction mechanism. Let’s go to the next slide. And I want to concentrate really on the most salient features for this particular comparison. Here we have the essential mechanism for generalized transduction. In this case the virus itself replicates its DNA in the form of a tandem polymer in which individual viral chromosomes have been joined end to end, either by recombination or in the process of a rolling circle type of replication. And the mature virus is formed by packaging genome units sequentially along this polymer. Much as you would take an egg shell and stuff a long string into it. But the important feature is that the headful packaging starts from a particular site, identified by a nucleotide sequence which is called the “packed sequence” which occurs in each genome. But more or less randomly the packaging will start at one of these sites and then continue along, packaging slightly more than a complete genome unit without the requirement for additional recognition of the pack side as you go down. It’s only the initial one which seeds the packaging mechanism. Now this works very accurately in the cell so that the vast majority of packaged pieces of DNA are viral. However there are mistakes built into the mechanism. Bacterial DNA itself contains a few sites which are very similar but perhaps not identical to these sites, and this fools the packaging mechanism so that occasionally viral packaging will start on the bacterial chromosome and proceed sequentially, thus forming particles which contain bacterial DNA, and these are transducing particles. The other way that mistakes are made are by actual mutations within the viral protein, present on the phage head, which recognizes a site. And this, we know that these mutations play a role in the formation of transducing particles because in certain single bursts one sees a variety of transducing particles formed, originating from a number of sites in the bacterial cell. Now, if I could go to the next slide. I show the mechanism of specialized transduction. In this case, we have a virus which is integrated as prophage into the bacterial chromosome with neighbouring genes on either side, and when the virus induces at some subsequent time and begins to replicate, it must excise itself from the bacterial chromosome. Normally it would do this with great accuracy so that the excision occurs precisely at the two ends of the virus. But about one percent of the time, an error is made and the virus loops out and excises so as to lose some of the viral genes and gain some of the neighbouring bacteria genes. Thus you form a recombinant molecule containing virus and bacterial DNA. This can be packaged into a viral coat and then can subsequently infect another cell in the population and transfer these donor genes into the recipient cell. That’s nature’s way of doing recombinant DNA and it’s been known for some twenty to thirty years. Now let me emphasise in both cases that the transducing particles arise as a by-product of the normal replication in life cycle of these bacterial viruses. And the question arises as to whether nature could have evolved a more accurate process so that you would not make so many mistakes. But on the other hand you have to ask the question as to whether nature has found it more desirable to design a certain number of errors into the system, for the benefit of the host cell because ultimately the host cell must survive in the environment if the virus itself is to live. Let’s go to the next slide which will give us a brief picture of conjugation. Now this is actually quite a complicated mechanism. It’s one that is not yet clearly understood although we have a general picture of it. Here is the classic F factor mating cycle, and it starts with a bacterial cell, typically E-Coli containing the F factor, which is a plasmid, in supercoiled form, as shown by this figure of 8. Now the plasmid itself can replicate inside the cell and maintain itself in this cell and its daughter cells. But in addition, it has a mechanism to spread horizontally in the population, and this is the conjugation mechanism. The plasmid specifies, genetically specifies the synthesis of a tube-like pilus on the cell surface which contains specific recognition proteins at its tip that can interact with a so called female cell, which does not carry the plasmid. So you have here a donor or a male cell and a recipient, or female cell in contact. And when contact is made, a single break occurs at a specific origin in the plasmid, and thus relaxes the supercoil. We also have to imagine that the plasmid molecule is attached, probably in the vicinity of that nick at the base of the pilus. Then over a period of a few minutes, the pilus retracts by a mechanism that is not understood, and the cells are drawn together, so that an actual contact or bridge can be made. Replication of the plasmid then ensues from the original break in this one strand, and you have a linear transfer of the plasmid into the female cell and by DNA replication in the recipient, one forms a double helix and the molecule is rejoined to generate again the supercoiled molecule. And the cycle is complete. So that one has now, the plasmid has now successfully transferred itself into a previously non plasmid carrying cell in the population. In this way, one can have a very rapid infective process in a cell population. If one adds only a few fertile donor cells to a culture of female recipients, within a few hours the entire population can be converted to plasmid carrying cells. On this slide we see the genetic structure of the F plasmid. The complexity of the conjugation process is mirrored in the number of genes that are required to specify the process. There are some nineteen genes that have been located in this segment of DNA called TRA for transfer genes. And these genes not only specify the pilus structure but also specify a new and independent replication from this transfer origin, this replication mechanism being quite separate from the replication mechanism which maintains the plasmid in a particular cell. Now what I have described so far is simply the normal reproductive process for this plasmid, but the plasmid can also transfer bacterial genes under rare circumstances. And it does this by literally incorporating the entire bacterial chromosome into a particular site on the plasmid. And the incorporation occurs at particular sequences which occur also in the bacterial chromosome, so that one has homology between the plasmid and the bacterial chromosome at specific points, allowing a genetic recombination and co-integration of the two structures together. Then when the transfer occurs by the mechanism I described, the bacterial chromosome which now is part of this plasmid, is simultaneously transferred in a linear fashion. And so we have then the very useful transfer of bacterial genes which is of great benefit to the bacterial cells themselves. And one can, again, use the same argument, that although the mechanism is primarily for the benefit of the plasmid, it also has designed into it features which enable the bacteria to gain benefit and survival which is useful to the plasmid in a secondary way because the bacterial cell is a host for that plasmid. Now let me move onto transformation on the next slide. And here I want to describe the mechanism separately for the gram-positive cells as opposed to the gram-negative cells. Because we have in these two types of bacteria, a difference in the cell envelope which apparently has made it necessary for nature to evolve two separate mechanisms that are designed to allow naked DNA to penetrate the cell envelope and undergo recombination. The gram-positive transformation mechanism has been studied for some fifty years and only in the past few years have we begun to understand, through the work of a number of laboratories, the details of the mechanism. But I can make it very clear that it is not understood at a biochemical level. What we have really is a molecular description of some of the events. The slide here illustrates transformation for pneumococcus, which is a most widely studied organism. But the features hold also for the other gram-positive organisms, for example bacillus subtilis and a number of the other streptococcal strains. There are two stages to the transformation process. First we have confidence development which involves the induction of certain changes in the cell which allow it to become permeable or to transport DNA. As the pneumococcal cells grow in a broth medium, they elaborate an activator molecule which is secreted into the medium. As the population of cells increases in density, the amount of activator molecule builds up in concentration until it reaches a critical level at which the entire population of cells is induced to competence. The induction mechanism itself involves the binding of the activator to a membrane receptor, much as a hormone would act in a eukaryotic organism. This process, by unknown means, causes the induction of a series of a dozen or so genes, which specify proteins necessary for changes, which specify a protein that exposes certain binding proteins on the membrane surface, and also a number of proteins which act internally to facilitate transfer of the DNA. Now here we have a confident cell which is bound to a large DNA molecule and I show sequentially some of the steps in the uptake mechanism. The first thing that occurs is that this binding protein interacts with the DNA and produces a nick in one strand. This black protein then completes the break and in some cases DNA comes off, but some of the strands are then taken in to a space which is still outside the cytoplasmic membrane, here is the cell wall, and the DNA is converted to a single strand. And here we see the process further along. In addition there is a protein which has been induced by this process which binds to the DNA, to the single stranded DNA, in much the same way that a viral molecule would be packaged. This has a structure which is highly protected against nucleases and is stable enough to be isolated as a DNA protein complex in caesium chloride gradients and by several types of chromatography. Then by mechanisms which are not understood, we have an incorporation of the single strand into the chromosome to form a transformant. Now if I could move quickly to the gram-negative cells shown on the next slide. These are bacteria that my own laboratory is studying and we became interested in the whole process of how haemophilus bacteria take up DNA because of a discovery by a colleague John Scocca that haemophilus has the ability to recognize its own DNA during transformation. If you, for example, take a mixture of several types on DNA, haemophilus DNA, E-Coli DNA, calf thymus DNA and so on, the cells will selectively take up only the haemophilus molecules and incorporate them. And this is shown by radioactive label experiments here. Haemophilus DNA as opposed to the absence of uptake of a variety of foreign DNAs. It was clear from these experiments that the cells, somehow, at the surface, could identify which molecule was which, and we decided to determine what the recognition mechanism involved. If I could have the next slide. To do this we took a pure piece of haemophilus DNA that we obtained by molecular cloning, using the recombinant DNA techniques. That piece of DNA was then cleaved into a dozen or so fragments using a restriction enzyme ALU1. And the fragments were all labelled with radioactive phosphorus. And here is the mixture. That mixture then was incubated with competent cells and they were allowed to take up DNA. We found that they took up only two fragments out of this entire mixture. They recognized those two fragments but not the others. So the natural question is, what is there about the sequence in those two fragments that is different from the others? To obtain that answer, we continued to use restriction enzymes to break these fragments into smaller and smaller pieces, again asking which pieces are taken up, so that finally we obtained as shown on the next slide, four different fragments, which were small enough that we could easily determine their nucleotide sequence. And when we then allowed a computer to scan these sequences, it told us that they all contained an eleven base pair sequence in common. And they also told us that the probability of that event randomly occurring was about 10^-11. Well, if I could have the next slide. We continued then to study this presumed DNA uptake sequence which is shown here. We found that the sequence is present on all fragments which can be bound and taken up by the bacteria, whereas a number of sequenced molecules that are available that do not contain that eleven base pair site are not taken up. We also found that if we modified certain bases in this sequence, that would affect the uptake, implying that the cell was actually interacting with this site in a direct way. Finally we were able to obtain, by collaboration with Saran Narang and Ottawa, a chemically synthesized eleven base pair sequence which could be inserted into any foreign DNA molecule and then conferred on it the ability to be taken up, thus completing the proof that this sequence must be present and is the necessary and sufficient condition for uptake or at least for catalyzing uptake. Could I have the next slide please? Well, at this point we were very curious as to how the cell recognized the sequence in order to initiate uptake. So we began to look at the proteins on the membrane. And first let me point out that confidence induction itself involves the new synthesis of a number of proteins which are implanted in the membrane, and this occurs in a synthetic media over a period of about ninety minutes. If the cells are then returned to a rich medium, they lose the competence very quickly. So it’s a true induction and then deinduction mechanism which is called into play presumably only when the bacteria need to genetically recombine. The next slide shows our attempt to purify the membrane receptor. Here we have introduced S35 label during the induction step and then extracted the membranes and stabilised the membrane proteins with detergent, put then over a DNA affinity column. And we find that there is a small fraction of the proteins, about 3 or 4%, which are specifically bound to haemophilus DNA and can be eluded. This fraction contains about six different polypeptide chains which we believe to be a part of the transport mechanism for DNA, and one or two of those polypeptide chains probably are involved in the specific recognition of the eleven base pair sequence. If I could have the next slide. I show here evidence that the receptor is, in competent cells, is in the outer membrane, because if you separate outer membrane fragments from inner membrane fragments by a suitable density gradient, the specific binding activity is predominantly in the outer membrane fraction. The next slide shows a summary of what we believe to be the initial steps in the transformation process. One has then the outer membrane receptor present probably in only a few copies on the cell membrane and donor DNA containing eleven base pair sites. These interact in a reversible fashion which we have been able to demonstrate to form a complex which then at some point becomes irreversible and transport proceeds into the cell. Now here is the really the unknown and more difficult part of the problem. How does this highly negatively charged molecule actually penetrate the membrane? The receptor DNA interaction is only the trigger for this process and we are only now beginning to get some notion as to how this occurs. I see that my time has run out. The next slide shows a scanning electron micrograph of confident cells. And if you remember the first slide I showed, the surface was smooth. As the cells developed confidence, they formed little vesicular blebs on the surface, about a hundred nanometres in diameter, which are sufficient in size to contain fairly large molecules of DNA. If the cells are exposed to DNA, the vesicles disappear and in some cases can be visualized inside the cell. If the confident cells are returned to a rich medium to promote deinduction, the vesicles are released into the medium and we can harvest these vesicles. This is work done by a former student, Dr. Robert Dyke. The vesicles can be harvested and they, by themselves, will take up DNA in a specific fashion, so that it becomes tightly bound and is resistant to nucleases. In addition, if one looks at the protein content of the membranes of these vesicles, it’s highly enriched for the six proteins which we had previously purified from whole membranes. So we are building a circumstantial case for the involvement of these vesicles in the transport process. On the last slide, I show a schematic version of how the transport might take place. Here we have vesicular transport in which DNA could perhaps bind to the vesicle, which would then evaginate and package the DNA much as a virus would package DNA. And then transport it to the inner membrane, where it could be, by fusion, the DNA could be injected into the cell. I would like to discuss this with Dr. Luria perhaps to see if it is a feasible mechanism. On the other hand - so we believe that this is a likely mechanism for the haemophilus, or other gram-negative bacteria, whereas for the gram-positive bacteria we think it’s more likely that there is...

Hamilton Smith talking about the ways in which bacteria share genes among themselves.
(00:05:13 - 00:07:16)

 

Werner Arber has a particular interest in Darwinian evolution and how changes to DNA act as the raw material for natural selection. In this short excerpt from his lecture during the 57th Lindau Meeting, he discusses the different kinds of changes that can affect the DNA of microbial species:

 

Werner Arber (2007) - Darwinian evolution as understood by scientists of the 21st century

It is a very great pleasure for me to introduce the next speaker, Dr. Werner Arber from University of Boston. The discoveries were made when Dr. Arber was working at University of Geneva in the Department of Molecular Genetics. And he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1978 for the discovery of the restriction enzymes and their application to problems in molecular genetics. It’s actually one of the corner stones and starting points for the recombinant DNA technology. And the title of Dr. Arber’s work is ‘Darwinian Evolution as understood by scientists of the 21st century’. Please. I’m pleased to be with you. The important aspects of genetic engineering are actually reflected man-made contributions to biological evolution. Risks of doing so have been widely discussed and we realised rather rapidly already in the early 1970’s that a deeper insight into the Darwinian Evolution, now at the molecular level, would be appropriate to properly evaluate risks of genetic engineering, as compared to other risks which are and have always been in nature, namely by events of natural biological evolution. So this last topic I chose for you to show. And I start with a science historical view, starting with Charles Darwin, who in 1859 published his book in which he defends a theory of natural selection. That led to an insight into biological evolution. And interestingly just a few years later Gregor Mendel, absolutely independent of Charles Darwin, started the branch of science which nowadays is called genetics. It was done with plants, as you know, classical genetics didn’t immediately start, it started around 1900 and was developed. Then, around 1940 people realised that actually these two things have really tight connections, interconnections with each other. And it was clear that genetic variation, which is the driving force of biological evolution, is of course also the cause of genetic mutations here. And that led to the so called modern evolutionary synthesis. At that moment, genetics was not at the molecular level yet, it was just looking at phenotypes. It is microbial genetics which had its early development between 1940 and about ’55 with all the principle strategies of microbial genetics. And that then led finally by another kind of fusion with something which has its roots also in the 19th century, namely Friedrich Miescher’s work on nucleic acids. That then had its crown in 1953 by the double-helix structure published by Watson and Crick, as you know. Now, with this knowledge of microbial genetics and the double-helical structure, that led rather rapidly to molecular genetics and finally to genomics, proteomics, we are now here. And since a number of years there is another synthesis between molecular genetics and evolutionary biology, which I would call molecular evolution. And that's the topic of my contribution today. As we all know, neo-Darwinian evolution has three actually pillars. One is genetic variation, if there would be no genetic variations, there would be no way to get evolution. Natural selection is the way how organisms deal with the encountered environment, and there are not only physical or chemical constraints but also biological constraints. That means that all the organisms sharing the same ecosystem can mutually influence each other. Finally this influence can go to almost zero by isolation processes. We know reproductive isolation and geographic isolation. And that can modulate the process, while natural selection in fact gives the directions implurial on this tree of evolution. Of course always together with the available genetic variants. I’m a microbial geneticist, most evolutionary biologists work with higher animals. Many like to study the evolution from chimpanzee to human beings. That’s perfect but it’s very difficult to do molecular evolution experiments on that level. It’s much easier to do that with most simple organisms like bacterial cells, here you have a bacterial cell which is haploid and that is an advantage that any mutation that may occur gets rapidly manifested because of the haploidy. Here, symbolically, there’s a mutation having progeny, there is another mutation causing lethality, so there is no long term progeny. The drawing is a little bit wrong because the first mutation here should not show up when there are four cells but when there are about 400 cells. I couldn’t do that on that drawing, of course. And you see mutation rates of course are low and they must be low and I already mentioned that if there wouldn’t be – on the one hand, if it would be too low, no variation, there wouldn’t be any evolution. If it would be like here, as high as that, then, since many are lethal, the genetic stability would be in danger, and I think we couldn’t live under these conditions. Most of the evidence which I am going to show you today come actually from studies with such microbial systems. For those few of you who may not remember precisely how bacterial chromosome look like, it is an e-coli, very large circular molecule, drawn on a completely wrong scale, there is here symbolically one gene with a reading frame and several control signals for the expression of that information. You may have a mutation within the reading frame and that can alter the product of that gene, which is most of the time a protein, as you know. You can have a mutation in one of the control signals for gene expression and then you may alter the quantity of that gene product. I define from now on a mutation as an alteration in the nucleotide sequence. I’m aware that would be changing one letter or a few letters or many letters and so on. I will give you examples later on. But I’m aware that this does not correspond to the original definition of mutation, because in classical genetics, of course, a mutation is defined as an altered phenotype, that also is transmitted to the progeny. That’s called a mutation. While in the molecular reverse genetics one defines an altered nucleotide sequence as a mutation. I’m aware, and we are all aware that this altered phenotype is due to an old nucleotide sequence but you couldn’t expect that all mutations, all novel alternations in nucleotide sequence give also an altered phenotype. Indeed we do know that if you take that definition which I just gave, only rarely a mutation, spontaneous mutation, is favourable or useful under the encountered living conditions and gives a selective advantage. Much more often a mutation is unfavourable, giving selective disadvantage. It can inhibit the life processes. If it’s traumatic it’s just lethal from one case. If it’s a little bit less traumatic, these mutants will not be able to overcome more favourable genetic structures. And very often also novel mutation has no immediate influence on the life processes. These are found, described as either silent or neutral mutations. And if you think about that, there is no good evidence that the spontaneous mutagenesis per se would have any directedness, it’s more random. And it is also clear that one should, because many are unfavourable and only a few favourable, that you shouldn’t have too many mutations in a genome per generation. As I mentioned, an E.coli in the order of one mutation in a few hundred cells. What approaches do we have to get insight into evolution at the molecular level, that means generation of genetic variance. First of all, increasing availability of nucleotide sequences, which can be for specific genes, groups of genes or even a part of a gene, a domain, or more and more we have entire genomes. And it is hard to compare these with our eyes, to see how homologous are these genes, which sometimes are related. But the computer, bioinformatics helps us, so with that one can see for example two organisms which are, let’s say, evolutionary relatively closely related, still there are differences within a gene and seeing how that functions have developed and so on. It would be however important also to be able to look at one really chosen specific mutational process, to see, compare the sequence just before and just afterwards. And with that knowledge, which can most easily be done with microbial genomes, and I will show you examples for that. And then we can later on having ideas. What kind of natural mechanisms do exist in nature to bring about genetic variation? So one can bring that knowledge on this term and that helps us really to have a deep insight into the processes. Before giving some specific example, I start giving you an overview of the results which come out from that study. You’ll see again, as before, here is the source of genetic diversity, which is in fact source of mutation. I noted here often during replication of DNA, novel mutations can occur. Mutagens can interact, chemical radiation mutagens and so on. Then there are recombinational reshufflings within the genome and horizontal gene transfer. I will give you later on just one example for that and two perhaps from this and one from these. So you will then see it. You have here natural selection over there, I mentioned that already, and you have isolation. So that kind of three pillars are in that drawing. What I additionally added here is if you, we know quite a number of specific reactions for this process, we know quite a number from this and from this. And if you think are there specific strategies in nature, not strategies, human reflected strategies, just that you see. And you see, one strategy is local change, one or a few nucleotides on the go, a change. A DNA arrangement is a segment of perhaps part of a gene or a gene or a few genes get rearranged, duplicated, deleted and so on and so forth, changing place within the genome. Acquisition means that by horizontal gene transfer part of a gene, a gene or a few genes, never very long segments, become transferred in another organism which may find their way into the genome of that recipient cell and giving to the genome additional genetic information for capacities which were not yet available before in that organism. I give you here an example for replication in fidelity. This is just text book knowledge, adenine, thymine, the normal standard base pairing and guanine, cytosine. Organic chemistry tells us that these forms here, with this hydrogen attached to that nitrogen, corresponds to the most frequently found structure of adenine. However, sometimes the hydrogen jumps for a short period of time down here, as shown here. Then, if at that moment the replication fork moves by, of course it will not be able to fit in a thymine into this structure. But by chance a cytosine would fit pretty well with hydrogen bonds. Now, these forms are rather unstable, short living, and switch back to the normal form. And that moment, when the replication fork has already moved a little bit further away, then a miss pairing is there. Now, this would be a tremendous source of mutagenesis and, thanks to the presence of several repair systems, which are found in bacteria, all over in higher organisms, in human beings, these mispairings at an early time can be discovered as not fitting to the right information and they can be restored. So that cytosine, which then would be at that wrong place, would be removed and the thymine filled in. And interestingly the repair systems do even know which is the parental and which is the newly synthesised strand. So it’s a wonderful system. However, these repair systems are not 100% active. They leave an occasional number of mispairings there and that’s of course an important source for biological evolution. And we think that this and other processes which I will discuss later on, have been in long evolutionary times fine tuned to do this job at the right frequency. So here you see that nature uses an intrinsic property of matter, of the nucleotides, to make tautomeric forms as a source of local mutagenesis. There are other sources of local mutagenesis, which I have no time to describe. I now talk on DNA rearrangements. We do know of course generic combination, which is very important in higher organisms, animals during meiosis, but these enzymes do not their job during mitosis, that would be horrible if they would do it all the time. So you see, all of these rearrangement enzymes which are encoded in the genome, are kept at a very low frequency of expression if they are not needed. And for short periods of time, when they are appropriate to be used, they show up and do their job. The same as in bacteria, bacteria also have these kind of things and they can repair, for example radiation effects, cutting DNA fragments. Then there is transposition of mobile genetic elements. I give you one example of that, there is site specific recombination processes, I will talk briefly on one specific aspect of this and still other less well-known for many of these processes. The molecular mechanisms have been extremely well studied. Now, this is an example of a transposable genetic element. An E.coli bacteria, which has a size of a chromosome of almost 5,000 kilobase pairs. There is a number of, symbolically here in black, so called mobile genetic elements, IS element, insertion sequence elements. I have here drawn bacterial cells which in addition to its single chromosome has relatively small plasmid. That small plasmid in this particular case is in fact the genome, 90kb genome of bacterial virus P1, bacterial phage P1. And this phage can reside during long periods of time in the cell. Very occasionally only, all of a sudden the expression of these viral genes can be activated, then viral production occurs, the cell will die and liberate the progeny of several hundred viruses. That’s called the lysogenic cell. An experiment which we have done some decades ago actually was looking for lethal mutations. Think about how difficult it is to study lethal mutations. With this system you can do it. Because here you have about 50 really densely packed genes for bacterial virus production. And during that maintenance, you need only very few genes for plasmid replication. Then you can expect that sometimes spontaneous mutations occur in that cell, which may hit important viral genes which are important for viral reproduction. And some of these mutations may be insertions jumping, an IS element jumping from the chromosome over here to insert into that genome of the P1 virus. We have grown for about three months by diluting every day just in room temperature these cells, and after three months we looked for lethal mutations. That’s an easy task because we just irradiate the cells if their active virus is coming out, that’s easy to show, if no virus come out it’s a lack of virus reproduction. And then we had a big surprise, we could see that among all those isolated, no independent mutants, having undergone a lethal mutation, 95% were due to that transpositional event, inserting somewhere in that genome an IS element, which before was in the bacterial chromosome, 95%, only 5% were local mutations. So transposition of these mobile elements is a major source of lethal mutations. Having these mutations, one can see where did they insert. Is that the reproducible effect or not, is it more random? Look first, this is a linear outline of that P1 genome and obviously there are hot regions where we have many insertions, each point is independent, here is another region, here we know that there are quite important viral genes. If we would have isolated several thousand, we would certainly have some insertions there. But these insertions of IS elements kind of have a funny distribution. There is some randomness but certainly not full random. So particularly in the small segment we had many IS2s and three IS30, the blue ones are other, these are either IS1, 2, 5 or gamma delta. Then we sequenced some of these insertions here and surprisingly IS30 is a very site specific process, mediated by the enzyme transposase, and in IS2 we had not two of the analysed going in the same sequence. And even these sequences where they inserted, they do not show any obvious homology. So we conclude that some of these elements are very strict, they go and look at sequence, do it very site specifically there, although we do know from other studies that IS30 can occasionally go at other sites also. While IS2 prefers certainly this region and this region but with the insertions within this preferred large region are random. And we sub cloned some of these segments here and in the sub clone, it the plasmid they are still attracting IS2. So something must be there, I still don’t know what, so it’s interesting. You see each of these transposable elements has its own strategy. Now, I show you another, this is now a well-known integration of bacterial phage lambda. Which is here shown in its circular form after infection. And can site specifically incorporate into the genome, that’s also then a lysogenic cell, in contrast to the P1 lysogen, which you’ve seen before, which has the provirus as a plasmid, here the provirus lambda is carried as a part of the genome. When you shine light on that, UV light or even spontaneously, it can excise again precisely and go back and replicate and produce progeny virus. But sometimes, if one does that, the recombination doesn’t precisely occur, this is with this illegitimate excision occurring with a frequency of about 10 to the -4, as compared to the normal excision. And this gives rise to transducing viruses. Lambda inserts closely here to the galactose fermentation markers and therefore in this lambda transducing phage that can transduce by horizontal gene transfer, just by virus infection another bacterial cell and provide it with the ability to ferment the sugar galactose. This in fact for many of you - you know this is text book knowledge and I just summarise now what we know for horizontal gene transfer. The example which I just gave you is the one of a natural gene vector, lambda, having incorporated as part of its genome galactose fermentation markers. Other viruses, P1 among them, has another strategy to transfer host genes, symbolically shown here where these phages do not recombine with the viral genome host, but take a fragment of the host genome, about a headful of DNA from that host genome, incorporate it into a viral particle and transfer it horizontally to another recipient cell. There are basic knowledge bacterial genetics, is that by cell-cell contact in conjugation between here also two somewhat different bacterial strains, transfer can occur. And finally it is known, and that was already shown in 1944 by Avery and his collaborators, that free DNA, well purified from any attached protein, can provide genetic information to other pneumococcal cells, that’s called transformation. That was to prove that DNA is genetic information. Gene transfer, of course, if it should give some genetic addition to the recipient cell, the genes have to be incorporated and inherited later on. So I summarise the possibilities that can happen depending on the particular case by homologous recombination, by heterologous, for example here insertion of an IS element and so on. Or, as I showed you before, in the case of lambda by site specific integration. Or finally by maintaining as an autonomous plasmid. So there are various ways in nature to do that. Now, there are a number of factors limiting gene acquisition. First of all, surface compatibility, think on conjugation, not all different bacteria strains can make these close pairings. Or a virus must absorb on a particular surface. If they can do that, the DNA penetrates and encounters – practically bacterial strains have 1 or even a few systems for restriction modifications. These are, one can say simple immune systems, identifying foreign DNA and differentiating it from the cell’s own DNA, which is marked in particular methylation activities that cells own. And the restriction enzyme then cuts the DNA, that DNA is rapidly degraded, within a few minutes by exonucleases. But during that short period of time, some cut segments succeed to incorporate in the genome. So that keeps horizontal gene transfer low in order to ensure a certain stability. And it also contributes to the strategy of acquisition in small steps, small segments, because that’s important, because if let’s say half a chromosome would be incorporated into a cell having its own chromosome and these are genetically relatively unrelated, the functional compatibility would certainly be destroyed at that selection level. So all of that goes into the thing that per acquisition, you can acquire foreign DNA but usually in small steps. I come now, that leads me to discuss the qualitative differences between the 3 strategies which I explain, here local change DNA rearrangement, DNA acquisition. Local change, just a few nucleotides, is an improvement of available biological functions, that’s the main function of that. It’s probably one of the very essential thing that organisms can develop what they already have. DNA rearrangement within the genome gives rise to duplications, which can then be giving, in the long term possibilities, for maintaining an important gene and the duplicate can be modified slowly by local change and other aspects. But also the transposition, as we have seen, or site specific reshufflings and so on, can give rise to what we call gene fusions. This is that there is a recombination within the reading frames of two different genes and bringing functional domains together. And we do know from sequence analysis that many genes share some important function domain with other genes. And all these processes can by chance contribute to bring these things together. Or, what I define as operon fusion is to provide to a reading frame, an alternative segment for control of gene expression which may increase or decrease the frequency of gene expression and the efficiency. So all of that is good. Obviously all of these alternations are submitted to natural selection, if they are favourable in the environmental conditions in which the organisms grow, they are maintained and may even overgrow the parental population. If not, they are rapidly eliminated again. The final search strategy of acquisition, I consider it as a sharing in successful developments made by others, that’s a beautiful strategy, just get something from another organism who in long evolutionary development has now a functional thing, like antibiotic resistance. We microbiologists have learned a lot on that strategy just by studying the medical problem of antibiotic resistance which spreads around horizontally. Now, the evolutionary tree - it was mentioned yesterday, I think, in a talk - shouldn’t be seen just as a tree as such, but you may draw symbolically between any branch horizontal connectors in which at one time some genetic information can by horizontal transfer be transferred. So in some way I see interesting philosophical value in that drawing. Up to very recently we considered that if I’m up here, I’m linked with many others of those other organisms in the far past, evolutionary. But if you think about that evolution goes on and there is steady re-possibility of horizontal gene transfer, that we are also interlinked with many other organisms in our future. And I come to summarise what I said. I started to explain to you tautomeric forms and there are many other aspects of non-genetic elements contributing to spontaneous mutagenesis. But there are also evolution gene products which in the case of transposition, that example we just showed you, the IS elements, I consider as active variation generators. They generate variations driven by these enzymes, which are available at very low rates only. The repair systems which I mentioned, which are helping to keep the mutagenesis by for example tautomerism low, these I consider as modulators of the frequency of genetic variation. And I think these enzymes, together with the non-genetic elements really, which are also part of nature, are learning to us that natural reality takes actively care of the biological evolution. Evolution should not any longer be considered as due to accidents, due to errors, as you find in most text books, that’s a wrong attitude towards nature. I think we should learn from the molecular knowledge and see in evolution, in the generation of genetic variants a wonderful activity which is part of nature in which we live. With that I think I consider this as an expansion of the Darwinian Theory to the level of molecular processes. Very briefly, I was really, just in the lecture which we heard before the break, I’ve seen also that - you have to have proteins at the right moment in sufficient quality available, if they are not needed they should be removed. Here again, we have to promote genetic variation but also to limit, so that in order to have certain genetic stability but still allow a steady biological evolution, and we do think that that fine tuning was brought about in long evolutionary period by what we call second order selection. That means those organisms which had the capacities, they were able to come to what they are today. We only study evolution as it occurs today and I must just confess, I am not sure how the first living being on our planet came about. Now, you can ask, well, what you hear here, is that only true for bacteria? I believe no, I think, in order not to use too much time, I think I will go rather rapidly through that. For an evolutionary fitness I consider that organisms should be equipped with evolution genes for each strategy to generate genetic variance, the intrinsic properties of nature are available anyhow. Then you think that bacteria have learned to have cell differentiation also. It’s known that within certain colonies there is some cooperation that can give rise to multicultural organisms. And then bacteria come back as symbionts, endosymbionts and I attach much importance to that. Once you live for years and years in another organism, there is some chance during that cohabitation to make gene transfer and I think good examples are mitochondria and other organelles and so on and so forth. One should see that - I better not go further. We do see up to some 10 or 20 years ago, I believed that in my genome there are only genes of importance for my own personal life, from fertilisation to my death, I then realised that in my genome and in bacterial genomes and any other genome, there are other genes which are not serving the purpose of that individual life but serving for biological evolution, namely those evolution genes. It is also clear to anybody who looks into that, that some gene products serve both purposes. For the individual life it’s the fulfilment of that life and for the evolution genes it’s expansion of life, that’s the source of biodiversity. We suffer loss of biodiversity, the hope is that long term - not next year or in 10 years – but in long term, loss of biodiversity will be reconstituted. Not the same biodiversity, another one, but nature actually is able to propagate and produce biodiversity as long as living conditions exist on our planet. I had thought to just remind you that there are some medical implications of what I told you, we are aware that some unfavourable mutations in the germline give rise to inherited disease, chromosomal abnormalities. Then, at the somatic level there are, besides unfavourable, for example cancer, somatic mutations, there are also favourable aspects, like the immune system of higher animals is precisely using what we learn from bacteria, all these strategies are there. We also know that individual responses to some target specific therapies depend really on different alleles which are carried in different human beings. And, last but not least, infectious diseases by micro-organisms, pathogenicity in cohabitation and so on. And I mentioned already the microbial resistance to antibiotics. With these few remarks for those medical doctors among you, I’d like to close here. Thank you for your attention.

Werner Arber describing the different kinds of mutations that result in changes to the DNA of microbes.
(00:34:00 - 00:36:49)

 

Genetic Engineering

Scientists now possess a large kit of tools that can be used to alter DNA in beneficial ways, such as techniques that allow the transfer of genes between organisms or the replacement of defective genes with non-defective ones. In fact, thanks to CRISPR/Cas9 technology, the permanent modification of genes is easier today than it ever has been.

One fundamental technique of genetic engineering is molecular cloning, which involves the cutting out of a DNA sequence from one location and its pasting into a second one. This method has allowed a vast array of downstream applications, including the production of transgenic organisms, and gene therapy. Molecular cloning today would be unimaginable without the use of so-called restriction enzymes, proteins that cut DNA sequences at defined sites, and which evolved in bacteria as defence mechanisms against invading viruses. For their work in discovering different classes of these enzymes, Werner Arber, Daniel Nathans and Hamilton O. Smith were awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. In his talk at the 59th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2009, Werner Arber talks about the basic mechanisms of some of the different restriction enzymes:

 

Werner Arber (2009) - Molecular Darwinism

The name of Charles Darwin was mentioned earlier this morning and I think it is good to devote one lecture to Charles Darwin’s ideas on evolution, biological evolution. I will do that. Please do not expect that I explain you the origin of life, nor the very early evolution when life just started. But however, what we can do scientifically is look at the living beings among us today and try to understand how evolution works at the level of molecules. And I think in this audience of chemists I do not need to explain what I mean with molecules. Darwin, it’s 150 years ago that he published his important book in which he explained his ideas on how evolution works in the living world. It was, one can say, a theory of natural selection and he of course also realised that within a species of a given kind of organism not all individuals are alike. They show some phenotypic variations and he called that variance. And this mixture of variance are steadily submitted to natural selection. Nature prefers some of these variants and in fact inhibits some other variants. I will throughout my talk take that as the basic knowledge. It’s only a few years later that Gregor Mendel introduced genetics, this however took quite some time until about the beginning of the 20th century that classic genetics took really its start mainly with higher organisms. And around 1940 there was the so-called modern evolutionary synthesis stating that spontaneous mutants occurring in the genetic information of these living beings were actually the reason for the appearance of phenotypic variance. At that moment the gene was an abstract concept, no one had any answer what the gene is. And one felt at that moment still near the middle of last century that one knew that probably chromosomes are the carrier of genetic information. Chromosomes being composed of nucleic acids on the one hand and a lot of different proteins on the other and some matter substances. Since proteins are much more complex one felt that the genes are probably the protein components of the chromosomes, rather than the nucleic acids. An answer to that question came in then by microbial genetics, I will outline that just in a small moment. And I just wanted to make clear that Friedrich Miescher another few years later in the 19th century described for the first time nucleic acids and, as we know, DNA is the carrier of genetic information, will then be described later on, I come back to that. And together with our knowledge from microbial genetics with nucleic acid biochemistry that the molecular genetics have developed, and at that moment it is the time to make another synthesis between molecular genetics and evolutionary biologies and I called that either molecular evolution or molecular Darwinism. Actually, it’s not only that we know that gene activities are the substrate for natural selection but that mechanisms of genetic variation have now become known and this is the main content of my talk of today. So let’s have a view at the early times of microbial genetics. It’s relatively late that people have identified that not only higher organisms but also bacteria and their viruses have genes and can mutate. So one could do genetic investigations with these relatively simply micro organisms. There were three principle fundamental experiments of microbial genetics which were rather rapidly then described. First of all by Avery, MacLeod and McCarty, the transformation, this is taking from one kind of bacterial strains the DNA out and mixing it with other bacterial, perhaps which are related to those, and DNA can penetrate and give some properties which actually were the properties of the donor strain. In conjugation it's two bacterial cells which mate with each other, this is a kind of sexual mating and a part or sometimes even all of the chromosome can be transferred from one cell to another. Here a plasmid serves as gene vector, I mentioned that just for those of you who are familiar with these nomenclatures. In transduction you grow a virus in one of the strains, here the blue strains, and with low frequency rather than to build into the viral particles of the progeny, one can see that sometimes a small fragment of the genome of the host cell becomes integrated and upon infection that DNA fragment gets inside. So here obviously the gene vector is a virus. In conjugation, one has seen, looking at various markers on that genome, genetic mutants are serving as markers, that the DNA gets transferred linearly. You can interrupt a mating every few minutes and see which markers have already entered the cell. Therefore from these experiments it looked as if the genes would be on a long filamentous molecule. That was also obvious here. And what these authors did in transformation, they cleaned the bacterial DNA from the blue strain very carefully, from any proteins which are usually attached to the DNA, also in bacteria. Proteins and any other molecules which were attached were cleaned away and it could be shown that this highly purified DNA was actually giving properties from the blue strain to the green one while all the other fractions like proteins and so on didn’t give anything. So in 1944 it was clearly shown that DNA is the carrier of genetic information. You can imagine that the biologists didn’t pay much attention to that, most of evolutionary biologists anyhow at that moment were interested to study the evolution from higher animals to human beings. Or perhaps some of the plants also, but not for bacteria. So then Watson and Crick published a few years later, 1953, the structure of this DNA molecule which was a double helix. And they could explain by the linear arrangement of nucleotides that that might be the letters, as in our written language, putting just one letter behind another, could be the genetic message. That, later on, turned out to be indeed so. So let’s go further, for those of you who are not so familiar with microbial genetics, E.coli bacteria have just one circle molecule, symbolically drawn here, of nearly five million base pairs. And symbolically I draw a gene here with the reading frame which encodes for mostly a protein, sometimes it’s also an RNA molecule and of course at various sides there are expression control signals on which other proteins interact to have the gene expressed whenever the product is needed and the right amount. And now, if you define in this view a mutation as an alteration of the nucleotide sequence, which symbolically I put here flat. If you change this 8p base pair by a CG, that’s already a local mutation and if this is in the middle of the reading frame, it may or may not affect the gene product. If you may put that in an expression control sequence, it may increase or decrease the amount of products brought or it could inactivate completely the gene. So you see how particular mutations can have direct effects on the product side. Now, you may have been surprised in my definition of a mutation. We have to be aware that in the biological literature one uses two types of definitions for the word mutation. In classical genetics I mentioned these people did not know what a gene is and that there are genes on DNA. So they could see phenotypes and the definition for a mutation was an altered phenotype that is transmitted into the progeny. Not only in the first progeny, second, third, and so on. One has to be careful here, because there are epigenetic phenomena which also affect the transmission and sometimes fade away rapidly after one or two generations. So these are not real genetic mutations. In molecular or reversed genetics one defines an altered nucleotide sequence as a mutation. So there is this distinction, of course I should explain to you that if you take this mutation, alteration of the sequence of nucleotides that only rarely mutation is favourable or useful and gives selective advantage. Much more often a mutation is unfavourable, gives selective disadvantage. That means that at the longer term these mutants are eliminated again from the population. Some are immediately eliminated because some of these mutations are lethal. But also very many mutants are without immediate effect on the life processes and these are called silence and neutral mutations. There are several reasons. I have no time to explain you, one knows why this is so. So if you see this general knowledge, there is no good evidence that any novel mutation would be directed by some need. For example bacteria: I know that bacteria have no senses to know when they come into completely different environment to change a particular gene in a particular way, in order to facilitate the life under these novel environmental conditions. Many investigations have to be done to see whether there is this possibility. And all these experiments finally turned out to be not really meaningful, they could explain if effects were seen, some effects could be explained just by other reasons which were behind. So this is a general thing that none of these mutations are really a response to an identified need to have a particular gene function available. Now, also just for this reason, because many mutants are unfavourable, tolerable mutation rates have to be kept very low. So mutation cannot be tolerated at occurring at high rates in living beings. Now, this is neo-Darwinian evolution, I call this ‘the three pillars’. I mentioned genetic variation, that’s a mutation. And this is the driving force of evolution. If the genome would be entirely stable from generation to generation, there wouldn't be any possibility to evolve. Then the availability of variants together with its parents, non mutant, are steadily submitted to natural selection. And this directs where evolution goes on the tree of evolution, which I show you a little bit later. The third pillar is isolation, either by reproductive isolation, particularly in sexual organisms, one cannot get progeny with widely diverse living beings. And geographic, Charles Darwin has learned a lot for example on Galapagos Islands, where these living beings were separated from the mainland and have particular other phenotypic variations. So that modulates the evolution. This is a general view and I like to explain you now the basis of genetic variation. How does one do experiments? Nowadays it’s quite nice. Since ten, twenty years one can compare nucleotide sequences from a particular gene, even from a part of a gene which we call a functional domain. Groups of genes or the entire genome. And from that, where there are always some differences, the further apart evolutionary relatedness is one can conclude on what may have happened in the relatively recent past. Since the separation of these two kinds of living beings. However, that is unfortunately not yet a proof, we would like to see individual mechanisms on work on how the processes actually to generate the genetic variant goes case by case studies. This can most easily be done with the most simple living beings, that is bacterial cells and also bacterial viruses or other viruses. The outcome is that there are more than one specific process and I mentioned in particular specific process, you will see, I will explain you - without going into any detail because time is short. But I will explain you what I mean with that. Now, with bacteria, bacteria are haploid, unicellular organisms. Haploid means they have only one of these chromosomes. Of course there will be, before cell division occurs, two identical chromosomes as produced by replication. And one goes into each daughter cell. That takes about half an hour for E.coli bacteria, with which we usually work, under the appropriate growth conditions. And then after an hour we have four and so on. Now, once in a while there is a spontaneous mutation occurring this one is not little, it has progeny and this is little and has no progeny and so on. Now, the drawing is a bit misleading. Don’t believe that once you have four cells, the first mutation occurs. It’s once, about 300 identical cells are here, that the first mutation appears. So spontaneous mutagenesis is a rare event, must be a rare event. The nice thing of haploidy is that the phenotype is fast expressed, so you can see the effect of the mutation quite rapidly. All of these mutations express their phenotypes and you will have sooner or later mixed population, as drawn here, which are of course parental mutant forms and steadily submitted to natural selection. This is a summary of what we microbiologists know today. There are, you see again on the left side that genetic variation or mutagenesis. On the right side I have natural selection and isolation up here. So let’s concentrate on the left side. I mentioned that a number of different specific sources of mutagenesis are known and what I write here is just simplifying replication in infidelities. That includes several known forms of infidelities in the replication. Some of the mutagens are in the living cell, already in the body, some others are environmental radiation, for example, or chemical substances. And another source of mutagenesis is a combination of reshuffling within the genome. Then there is also a phenomenon of horizontal transfer, I have shown that already in the bacterial genetics explanation, I will come back to that later on. And when one realises that of course these are not specific, these are groups of specific processes and I like to explain a little bit what's behind. Now, before I go to that let’s just see, many of these replications infidelities are just local sequence changes. A substitution by one nucleotide by another, a deletion of one nucleotide, an insertion of a adjacent nucleotide upon replication and similar things perhaps mingling up a few adjacent nucleotides, very local. The rearrangement concerns fragments of the size of a gene or a very few genes in general. And I will explain you that this is often by the recombinational, reshuffling processes. By horizontal gene transfer I call this DNA acquisition, acquisition of genetic information from another kind of living being. So I just like, many of you are really chemists and you will like that. You will understand that. One source of replication infidelity, probably a quite important source, is that adenine when it normally pairs with thymine gives the space pairing and this is of course when DNA replicates, the base pairing opens. The DNA polymerase fills in the partner nucleotide and to adenine it should always be a thymine. But if that hydrogen atom is down here for a short period of time in an isomeric tautomeric form of adenine, thymine doesn’t make correct base pairing. It so happens that cytosine can base pair with this tautomeric form relatively good. And when after a fraction of a second the normal form is coming back, either it is up here, we have a mispairing. So that’s a potential source of nucleotide substitution. Now, I think, as far as we know, all studied living beings have enzymatic repair systems to identify such mispairings in the status of genesis of these mispairings very rapidly, and put it back to normal as soon as the normal form is reappearing. How do the repair systems do that? They must in fact, many of them - not quite all, but many of them - can identify which is the parental strand and which is the newly inserted partner. And they of course do not do the repair in the mispairing on the parental strand, but on the partner. And one way to identify the parental strand is looking on metal groups. We must know that behind the replication fork, with some delay, uncertain sequences, metal groups are attached to some of the nucleotides and that marks then the strand as a parental. Shortly after replication, new strands have not yet reached metal groups. So nature is very inventive and knows how to do these things. Here is a list, I do not have time to go through all these in detail. In transformation, you have already seen, this is the process to bring a DNA from one kind of bacteria into another. It usually works fine if the strains are just the same bacterial strain but distinguished by one or two or three mutations. But as soon as you go a bit further, related strains, you get into trouble. I will explain you why. This is true for transformation, for conjugation and for virus-mediated transduction, you have seen these things before. And I will now show you what the reasons are. Why in fact sometimes you get low efficiency of these processes. Of course, surface compatibility must exist. For example, these viruses must find a way to absorb and inject their DNA into the new host. Penetration through the cell wall, the same as in conjugation and free DNA molecules sometimes in some bacteria are taken up actively. In other bacteria they try to diffuse in with low efficiency. Then, practically all bacterial strains have one or a few restriction modification systems, these are systems able to identify if foreign DNA comes in or DNA from the same kind of bacteria as are infected. I will show you just afterwards how that works. Then functional compatibilities have to be considered in order to have a gene which comes in from another organism. If it doesn’t integrate into the genome in a stable way, it’s going to be lost rapidly. And, of course, then if it’s expressed, it’s a matter of knowledge whether the harmony of the cell is maintained, sometimes improved or most of the time inhibited, harmony destroyed. So that is not being maintained, of course. So the harmony can best be obtained if only a small segment of DNA is accepted, that can be one gene, sometimes only a functional domain. Or very few genes but not half a genome. That you usually doesn’t function. That’s natural strategy here, which we learn from these processes. Now, just one word to the restriction, for which, together with two American colleagues, I got the Nobel Prize 30 years ago. We had been working on the so-called type 1 restriction enzymes. I like to explain first the type 2, because these are those which many of you work in the laboratory. These are enzymes, each has its particular name, that’s Eco R1. This enzyme identifies the sequence GAATTC - you’ll see it’s also in both sides like that. And if there is no metal group attached to that adenine here, and to that adenine, unmethylated then, the DNA is cleaved in that way reproducibly. These enzymes, since they do cleave DNA reproducibly, and of course since there are these relatively short sequences are at various locations, then that fragments longer DNA molecules into handable fragments and these enzymes were used to produce these fragments and to analyse them, sequence analysis and functional analysis. The enzymes with which we had been working first were from Eco K12, this is Eco K1, it identifies again AACGTGC and any six nucleotides in between space. So that sequence is recognised by these restriction enzymes. They do not cleave here but they fix, they stay fixed there on that side and start to rope through the DNA. You can see that loop growing and growing in the electron microscope. It’s quite nice. So it continues here symbolically, this translocation goes in one direction. It goes also in the other but it’s irrelevant for that. But since there are more than, on longer DNA molecules there are others of these sides. The enzyme may also fix here. Certainly not simultaneously at the same time. Therefore here a fixation of the enzyme in time is translated into a cutting in space at various sides. When in fact these two translocation complexes run into each other. About half of all restriction modification systems are of one type, half of the other type. There are third types and so on, which are minor populations. So you see, nature is very inventive. And particularly this one I call a variation generator. Any of these fragments upon infection is cut at a different side. Evolutionary that’s quite interesting because in the Type 1 and Type 2 enzymes all is cut. Maybe that sequence is in the important gene. If it is cut it cannot acquire it. But here anything can be acquired in small steps. So evolutionary this is much more better for nature and probably that’s why, I mean there is some flexibility in nature to have all these different ways to do it. It shows you that, once you have explained something in nature, don’t believe that’s true for all of these things. Often the same purpose can be obtained by other means also. The evolutionary tree ... I draw it with horizontal connectors and these connectors of course are only for transferring genome fragments, they are just put there randomly. There’s no rule when that happens. The vertical flux is familiar to you, the whole genome. Now, Charles Darwin explained to us that living being have common ancestors. And in view of the horizontal transfer, in which gene functions are transferred horizontally, we have also common future. That’s a philosophical view which I would like to give you. I conclude with a few additional considerations. This is a summary of the three strategies, local sequence change, DNA rearrangements and DNA acquisition. I explained to you how that works, but as far as the quality of contribution to evolution, each strategy has its own quality. Here its search for the improvement of available biological functions. This search for improve also available capacities by fusing segments of genes with other segments of genes, or by fusing an open reading frame with an alternative reading control of the gene expression. The acquisition has a completely other quality, namely a sharing in successful development made by others. So from that, in one single step of acquisition, you can acquire a new capacity, which you didn’t possess before. I mentioned enzymes already. Repair enzymes, restriction enzymes. These are modulators of the frequency of genetic variation to keep the rate of mutagenesis very low, tolerably low. There are actual variation generators in the list of recombination enzymes. I had no time to explain to you all the details, but some of these are so-called mobile genetic elements and they act really, that has been shown, as variation generators inserting once in a while low rates at various places. Then, all the recombination enzymes giving rearrangements internally are also enzymatically guided. So these I call evolution genes because many of these enzymes which have been studied are non-essential for normal bacterial growth. They serve for evolution. And we think that their own evolution had been in the far past selected for doing the right job. They work together with non-genetic elements, we had seen the tautomeric forms and there are other reasons, random counter of virus carrying genes around and so on. So natural reality takes actively care of biological evolution. And I feel that text books should be corrected. In many text books, still nowadays, you see that spontaneous mutations are called ‘errors’ or ‘accidents’ to the DNA. That’s the wrong attitude towards nature. Nature uses for example tautomeric forms in order to produce mutants, local mutants and the available repair systems keeps these rates tolerably low. Where are the genes, these evolution genes? They can only be in the genome of bacteria, of me, human beings. So the genome has a duality. Many genes, housekeeping genes, genes for developmental genes in higher organisms, genes for particular living conditions. They serve for the fulfilment of these individual lives. But in the same individual are genes which are responsible for further evolutionary development. For the expansion of life and these are the sources of biodiversity. Restoration of lost biodiversity is slowly happening. It doesn’t happen from one year to another but in long periods of time. All that gives guarantee that biodiversity, under changing environmental conditions, life can go on. This is my last - you may ask is what I told you on bacteria and bacteria viruses. They are also relevant for me, for animals, for plants. I think it is. And I expect, without knowing whether this is absolutely correct, that any living being has its evolutionary fitness when it is equipped with at least one, ideally more than one of the specific mechanisms for each of these three strategies – local, internal rearrangement and acquisition. Then evolution can go on. It’s also important that the rates are kept low, as I mentioned. And then, with bacteria, we do know that some bacteria - when they form colonies, all of a sudden, on the outside of that colony cells do other things than those inside. So there is some tendency to differentiate and I think if at some time that continues, these colonies like to stick together and then already we have a primitive multi-cellular organism. Later on symbiosis may play a big role. I have only relatively recently learnt that in my body I carry about 1kg of bacteria around, and you do too and they help my life. They are not pathogenic, they are not my enemies, symbiosis. And many of these are intercellular. And if you live for decades together, finally this is a cohabitation which favours occasional rare gene transfer from one to another. So I see this as an additional way really for evolution. One has just to know that evolution is a stepwise thesauring. Means accumulating functions which have been accepted by natural selection, will be maintained as long as the conditions require that. And that leads not only to higher complexity but also to higher biodiversity. If talking on higher animals and plants, I just should say that some of these by me defined evolution genes are also of relevance and exert their functions at a somatic level. Probably the best example is our immune system which just follows the bacterial variation by rearrangement and somatic mutagenesis, but of course that’s done not in the germ line but at the somatic level. So I think we need lots of work and insight, particularly on higher organisms. But the basis of all that knowledge which I tried to transfer to you is really anchored in the micro-biogenetics. Thank you for your attention.

Der Name Charles Darwin wurde heute morgen bereits erwähnt, und ich denke es ist gut, eine Vorlesung Charles Darwins Ideen über die Evolution, die biologische Evolution, zu widmen. Ich werde das tun. Bitte erwarten Sie nicht, dass ich Ihnen den Ursprung des Lebens erkläre oder die sehr frühe Evolution des Lebens, nachdem es eben erst begonnen hatte. Was wir jedoch auf wissenschaftliche Weise tun können ist Folgendes: die uns heute umgebenden Lebewesen betrachten und zu verstehen versuchen, wie sich die Evolution auf der molekularen Ebene vollzieht. Und ich denke, dass ich vor diesem Publikum aus Chemikern nicht erklären muss, was ich unter einem Molekül verstehe. Darwin veröffentlichte sein wichtiges Buch vor 150 Jahren. Er erläuterte darin seine Ideen darüber, wie es zur Evolution in der Welt des Lebens kommt. Man kann sagen, dass es eine Theorie der natürlichen Zuchtwahl war, und er erkannte natürlich auch, dass nicht alle Individuen einer Art identisch sind. Sie zeigen ein gewisses Maß an phänotypischer Vielfalt, und er bezeichnete dies als Variation. Und diese Mischungen der Varianten sind ständig der natürlichen Auslese unterworfen. Die Natur bevorzugt einige dieser Varianten und blockiert einige andere. Während meines gesamten Vortrags werde ich dies als Grundwissen voraussetzen. Wenige Jahre später begann Gregor Mendel das Studium der Genetik. Es dauerte allerdings noch einige Zeit, bis die klassische Genetik zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts, hauptsächlich durch das Studium höherer Organismen, ihren Anfang nahm. Und um das Jahr 1940 kam es zur modernen, sogenannten synthetischen Evolutionstheorie, die behauptet, dass spontane Mutationen in der genetischen Information der Lebewesen der Grund für das Auftauchen phänotypischer Variationen sind. Zum damaligen Zeitpunkt war das Gen ein abstrakter Begriff, niemand hatte eine Vorstellung davon, was das Gen ist, und noch in der Mitte des letzten Jahrhunderts meinte man, man wisse, dass die Chromosomen wahrscheinlich Träger von Erbinformation sind. Chromosomen bestanden einerseits aus Nukleinsäuren und andererseits aus einer Vielzahl verschiedener anderer Proteine sowie aus einigen weiteren Substanzen. Da die Proteine wesentlich komplexer sind, nahm man an, dass die Gene, statt den Nukleinsäuren, wahrscheinlich den Proteinkomponenten der Chromosomen entsprachen. Eine Antwort auf diese Frage kam dann aus der Genetik der Mikroben. Ich werde das ein wenig später genauer ausführen. Ich möchte lediglich klarstellen, dass Fredrick Miescher wenige Jahre später im 19. Jahrhundert erstmals Nukleinsäuren beschrieben hat, und wie wir wissen ist die DNA der Träger der Erbinformation, und das wird dann später beschrieben. Ich werde darauf zurückkommen. Und zusammen mit unseren Erkenntnissen aus der Genetik der Mikroben, aus der Biochemie der Nukleinsäuren, die von der Molekulargenetik und der Evolutionsbiologie gewonnen wurden, ist der Zeitpunkt gekommen, eine weitere Synthese zwischen der Molekulargenetik und den Evolutionsbiologien vorzunehmen, und ich nannte das entweder molekulare Evolution oder molekularen Darwinismus. Tatsächlich wissen wir nicht nur, dass genetische Vorgänge das Substrat der natürlichen Auslese sind, sondern diese Mechanismen der genetischen Variation sind mittlerweile erkannt worden, und dies ist der Hauptgegenstand meines heutigen Vortrags. Schauen wir uns nun die Anfänge der Mikrobengenetik an. Erst relativ spät wurde erkannt, dass nicht nur höhere Organismen, sondern auch Bakterien und ihre Viren Gene haben und mutieren können. Man konnte also genetische Untersuchungen an diesen relativ einfachen Mikroorganismen durchführen. Es gab drei wichtige grundlegende Experimente in der Mikrobengenetik, die dann sehr schnell beschrieben wurden. Zunächst wurde von Avery, McLeod und McCarty die Transformation beschrieben. Hierbei wird die DNA aus einem Bakterienstamm entnommen und mit der DNA eines anderen Stammes gemischt, der möglicherweise mit dem ersten verwandt ist. Die DNA kann in die Bakterien eindringen und einige Eigenschaften darauf übertragen, die Eigenschaften des ursprünglichen Stammes waren, aus dem die DNA entnommen worden war. Bei der Konjugation legen sich zwei Bakterienzellen nebeneinander. Dies ist eine Art von sexueller Paarung, bei der ein Teil oder manchmal auch das ganze genetische Material von einer auf die andere Zelle übertragen werden kann. Hier dient ein Plasmid als Genträger. Ich erwähne das lediglich für diejenigen unter Ihnen, die mit dieser Terminologie vertraut sind. Bei der Transduktion züchtet man einen Virus in einem Bakterienstamm, hier in dem blauen Stamm, und zwar mit geringer Häufigkeit, statt die Virenpartikel in den Nachwuchs einzubauen. Man kann beobachten, dass manchmal ein kleines Bruchstück des Genoms der Host-Zelle integriert wird, und nach einer Infektion gelangt das DNA-Fragment in eine andere Zelle. In diesem Fall ist der Genträger offensichtlich ein Virus. Bei der Konjugation hat man beobachtet, indem man verschiedene Marker auf dem Genom betrachtet Man kann eine Paarung alle paar Minuten unterbrechen und überprüfen, welche Marker bereits in die Zelle eingedrungen sind. Nach diesen Experimenten sah es so aus, als befänden sich die Gene auf dem langen, fadenartigen Molekül. Das war auch in diesem Fall offensichtlich. Was dieser Autor tat, war Folgendes: Während der Transformation reinigte er die Bakterien-DNA aus dem blauen Stamm sehr vorsichtig von jeglichen Proteinen, die auch bei Bakterien normalerweise mit der DNA verbunden sind. Proteine und jegliche anderen Moleküle, die mit der DNA verbunden waren, wurden entfernt, und es konnte gezeigt werden, dass diese hochgradig gereinigte DNA Merkmale des blauen Stammes auf den grünen übertrug, während die anderen Fragmente, wie Proteine usw., keine Merkmale übertrugen. Im Jahre 1944 wurde also klar bewiesen, dass die DNA der Träger der Erbinformation ist. Sie können sich vorstellen, dass die Biologen dem wenig Aufmerksamkeit schenkten. Die meisten Evolutionsbiologen interessierten sich damals für das Studium der Evolution von höheren Tieren zum Menschen. Vielleicht auch für einige Pflanzen, jedoch nicht für Bakterien. Einige Jahre später, 1953, veröffentlichten dann Watson und Crick die Struktur des DNA-Moleküls, bei dem es sich um eine Doppelhelix handelte. Und sie konnten anhand der linearen Ordnung der Nukleotide erklären, dass dies die Buchstaben des genetischen Codes sind, ebenso wie in unserer Schriftsprache die Aneinanderreihung von Buchstaben eine Bedeutung ausdrücken kann. Später zeigte sich, dass es sich tatsächlich so verhielt. Gehen wir also weiter. Für diejenigen unter Ihnen, die mit der Genetik der Mikroben weniger vertraut sind: Das Bakterium E. coli verfügt über fast 5 Millionen Basenpaare in einem einzigen kreisförmigen Molekül, das hier symbolisch dargestellt ist. Und symbolisch zeichne ich hier ein Gen mit dem Leserahmen ein, das in der Regel ein Protein codiert, manchmal auch ein RNA-Molekül, und an verschiedenen Stellen befinden sich Expressionssteuerungssignale, mit denen andere Proteine interagieren, damit das Gen in der richtigen Menge exprimiert wird, wenn das Produkt benötigt wird. Und wenn man nun in dieser Darstellung eine Mutation als Änderung der Nukleotidsequenz definiert, symbolisch hier flach angegeben, wenn man dieses 8p-Basenpaar durch ein CG verändert, so ist das bereits eine lokale Mutation. Befindet diese sich in der Mitte des Leserahmens, hat dies möglicherweise eine Auswirkung auf das Genprodukt. Wenn man das in eine Expressionssteuerungssequenz einfügt, kann dadurch die Menge des Produkts vergrößert oder verringert oder das Gen vollständig deaktiviert werden. Sie sehen also, wie verschiedene Mutationen direkte Auswirkungen auf Seiten des Produkts haben können. Vielleicht hat Sie meine Definition einer Mutation überrascht. Wir müssen uns dessen bewusst sein, dass in der biologischen Literatur für das Wort "Mutation" zwei Arten von Definition verwendet werden. In der von mir erwähnten klassischen Genetik wussten die Leute nicht, was ein Gen ist, und dass es Gene auf der DNA gibt. Sie konnten Phänotypen sehen, und die Definition einer Mutation war, dass sie einem veränderten Phänotyp entsprach, der nicht nur bei den ersten Nachkömmlingen in den Nachwuchs übertragen wird, sondern auch bei den zweiten, dritten usw. Man muss hier vorsichtig sein, denn es gibt epigenetische Phänomene, die sich ebenfalls auf die Übertragung auswirken, nach ein oder zwei Generationen manchmal jedoch sehr schnell wieder verschwinden. Hierbei handelt es sich nicht um echte genetische Mutationen. In der molekularen Genetik, die umgekehrt nach dem Erbmaterial fragt, definiert man eine Mutation als veränderte Nukleotidsequenz. Es besteht also dieser Unterschied. Natürlich sollte ich Ihnen erklären, wenn man von dieser Art der Mutation ausgeht, von der Änderung der Sequenz der Nukleotide, dass Mutationen nur sehr selten günstig oder nützlich sind und einen selektiven Vorteil verschaffen. Wesentlich häufiger ist eine Mutation ungünstig und resultiert in einem selektiven Nachteil. Dies bedeutet, dass diese Mutanten auf längere Sicht wieder aus der Population eliminiert werden. Manche werden sofort eliminiert, da einige dieser Mutationen tödlich sind. Sehr viele Mutationen bleiben ohne jeden unmittelbaren Effekt auf die Lebensvorgänge. Man bezeichnet sie als stille und neutrale Mutationen. Es gibt mehrere Gründe hierfür. Ich habe keine Zeit Ihnen dies zu erklären. Man weiß warum dies so ist. Wenn Sie sich also diese allgemeinen Erkenntnisse anschauen, so gibt es keine Hinweise darauf, dass irgend eine neue Mutation von einem Bedürfnis gesteuert sein könnte. Nehmen wir zum Beispiel Bakterien. Ich weiß, dass Bakterien über keine Sinne verfügen, die sie wissen lassen könnten, wann sie in eine völlig veränderte Umgebung gelangen, um ein bestimmtes Gen auf eine bestimmte Weise zu verändern, um so das Leben unter diesen neuen Umweltbedingungen zu ermöglichen. Es mussten sehr viele Untersuchungen durchgeführt werden, um zu erkennen, ob diese Möglichkeit besteht. Und alle diese Experimente erwiesen sich schließlich als nicht wirklich aussagekräftig. Sie konnten Erklärungen geben, wenn Wirkungen beobachtet wurden. Manche Wirkungen konnten einfach durch andere Ursachen erklärt werden, die sich im Hintergrund befanden. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine allgemeine Angelegenheit: dass keine dieser Mutationen in Wirklichkeit eine Antwort auf das erkannte Bedürfnis ist, dass eine bestimmte Genfunktion benötigt wird. Aus diesem Grund, weil viele Mutationen ungünstig sind, ist es auch erforderlich, dass die Häufigkeit der Mutationen, die toleriert werden können, sehr gering sein muss. Es kann demnach nicht toleriert werden, dass Mutationen in Lebewesen in großer Häufigkeit auftreten. Dies ist die neodarwinistische Evolution. Ich nenne dies "die drei Säulen". Ich erwähnte die genetische Variation. Das ist eine Mutation, und dies ist die treibende Kraft der Evolution. Wäre das Genom von einer Generation zur nächsten vollkommen stabil, so gäbe es keine Möglichkeit zu irgendeiner Entwicklung. Dann werden die verfügbaren Varianten, zusammen mit ihren - nicht-mutierten - Eltern ständig der natürlichen Zuchtwahl ausgesetzt, und dies legt fest, wohin die Evolution auf dem Baum des Lebens geht. Ich zeige Ihnen das ein wenig später. Die dritte Säule ist die Isolation: entweder reproduktive Isolation, besonders bei Organismen mit sexueller Fortpflanzung - man erhält keine Nachkommenschaft von stark divergierenden Lebewesen - oder geographische Isolation. Charles Darwin hat hierüber zum Beispiel auf den Galapagos Inseln viel gelernt, wo die Lebewesen vom Festland getrennt waren und besondere, divergierende phänotypische Varianten zeigten. Hierdurch wird die Evolution abgewandelt. Dies ist eine allgemeine Darstellung, und ich möchte Ihnen nun die Grundlage der genetischen Variation erklären. Wie stellt man Experimente hierzu an? Heutzutage ist das sehr gut möglich, da man seit 10, 20 Jahren Nukleotidsequenzen eines bestimmten Gens sogar aus demjenigen Abschnitt eines Gens vergleichen kann, den wir als funktionale Domäne bezeichnen. Gruppen von Genen oder das gesamte Genom. Und daraus, wo sich stets einige Unterschiede finden je entfernter die evolutionäre Verwandtschaft ist, kann man Rückschlüsse darauf ziehen, was in der jüngeren Vergangenheit, seit der Trennung dieser beiden Arten von Lebewesen, passiert sein mag. Bedauerlicherweise ist das noch kein Beweis. Wir würden gern individuelle Mechanismen bei der Arbeit beobachten, in einzelnen Fallstudien erkennen, wie genau die genetischen Varianten erzeugt werden. Dies lässt sich am leichtesten bei den einfachsten Lebewesen untersuchen, d. h. bei Bakterienzellen und bei bakteriellen Viren oder anderen Viren. Das Ergebnis ist, dass es mehr als einen speziellen Vorgang gibt, und ich betone besonders "speziellen Vorgang". Sie werden sehen, was ich meine. Ich werde es Ihnen erklären, ohne ins Details zu gehen, weil die Zeit so kurz ist. Doch ich werde Ihnen erklären, was ich damit sagen will. Nun, Bakterien sind haploide, einzellige Organismen. Vor der Zellteilung liegen, als Ergebnis der Replikation, natürlich zwei identische Chromosomen vor, von denen jeweils eins in die beiden Tochterzellen gelangt. Bei E. Coli Bakterien, mit denen wir normalerweise arbeiten, dauert das bei angemessenen Wachstumsbedingungen etwa eine halbe Stunde. Nach einer weiteren halben Stunde habe wir dann vier Zellen usw. Ab und zu kommt es nun zu einer spontanen Mutation. Dies ist eine größere, sie führt zu Nachkommenschaft, und dies ist eine kleine ohne Nachkommenschaft usw. Die Zeichnung ist etwas irreführend. Denken Sie nicht, dass die erste Mutation auftritt, wenn vier Zellen vorliegen. Im Durchschnitt tritt eine Mutation auf, wenn etwa 300 identische Zellen vorliegen. Die Mutagenese, die spontane Entstehung von Mutationen, ist ein seltenes Ereignis, muss ein seltenes Ereignis sein. Das Schöne an der Haploidie ist, dass der Phänotyp sich schnell manifestiert, so dass man die Auswirkung der Mutation recht schnell beobachten kann. Alle diese Mutationen manifestieren Ihre Phänotypen, und früher oder später hat man eine gemischte Population, wie sie hier dargestellt ist. Sie enthält natürlich elterliche mutierte Formen, die anschließend der natürlichen Auslese unterworfen werden. Dies ist eine Zusammenfassung dessen, was wir Mikrobiologen heute wissen. Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie wieder die genetische Variation bzw. die Entstehung von Mutanten. Auf der rechten Seite haben wir die natürliche Auslese und hier oben die Isolation. Konzentrieren wir uns auf die linke Seite. Ich erwähnte bereits, dass wir eine Reihe verschiedener Ursachen für die Entstehung von Mutanten kennen, und was ich hier schreibe ist lediglich eine Vereinfachung der Replikation mit Ungenauigkeiten. Dies umfasst mehrere bekannte Formen der Ungenauigkeit während der Replikation. Mutagene Substanzen befinden sich in der lebenden Zelle, bereits im Körper, einige andere Faktoren sind zum Beispiel die Umweltstrahlung oder chemische Substanzen. Und eine weitere Quelle der Entstehung von Mutanten ist eine Kombination durch Neuanordnung innerhalb des Genoms. Dann gibt es da noch das Phänomen des horizontalen Transfers. Ich habe das bereits bei der Erklärung der Genetik der Bakterien gezeigt. Ich komme später noch darauf zurück. Man erkennt, dass diese Mutationsformen natürlich nicht spezifisch sind. Dies sind Gruppen spezifischer Vorgänge. Ich möchte ein wenig den Hintergrund dieser Dinge erläutern. Bevor ich jedoch darauf eingehe, wollen wir uns ansehen, dass es sich bei vielen dieser Replikationsungenauigkeiten lediglich um lokale Sequenzänderungen handelt. Die Substitution eines Nukleotids durch ein anderes, der Verlust eines Nukleotids, das Einfügen eines angrenzenden Nukleotids während der Replikation und ähnliche Dinge, möglicherweise die Vertauschung einiger angrenzender Nukleotide, örtlich sehr begrenzt. Die Neuanordnung betrifft Fragmente der Gesamtgröße eines Gens oder im Allgemeinen sehr wenige Gene, und ich werde Ihnen erklären, dass dies häufig durch den Vorgang der Neukombination und Umstrukturierung geschieht. Unter horizontalem Gentransfer verstehe ich den DNA-Erwerb, den Erwerb genetischer Information von einer anderen Art von Lebewesen. Viele von Ihnen sind Chemiker und es wird Ihnen gefallen, Sie werden das verstehen. Eine Quelle der Replikationsungenauigkeit, wahrscheinlich eine recht wichtige Quelle, besteht darin, dass Adenin, obwohl es normalerweise mit Thymin ein Paar bildet, diese Basenpaarung eingeht. Diese Bindung wird während der DNA-Replikation der Basenpaarung natürlich geöffnet. Die DNA-Polymerase fügt das Partnernukleotid ein, und für Adenin sollte dies immer ein Thymin sein. Wenn sich jedoch dieses Wasserstoffatom für kurze Zeit dort unten in einer isomerischen, tautomerischen Form von Adenin befindet, kommt es zu keiner korrekten Basenpaarung des Thymins. Es trifft sich nun so, dass Cytosin mit dieser tautomorphischen Form eine relativ gute Basenpaarung eingehen kann. Und wenn sich nach einem Bruchteil einer Sekunde die Normalform wiederherstellt und sich das Wasserstoffatom wieder hier oben befindet, haben wir eine Fehlpaarung. Dies ist also eine mögliche Quelle der Nukleotidsubstitution. Ich glaube, soweit wir wissen, verfügen alle untersuchten Lebewesen über enzymatische Reparatursysteme, die solche Fehlpaarungen im Verlauf ihrer Entstehung sehr schnell erkennen und wieder korrigieren, sobald wieder die normale Form erscheint. Wie gelingt dies den Reparatursystemen? Viele von ihnen, wenn auch nicht alle, aber viele von ihnen, können erkennen, welches der Elternstrang und welches der neueingefügte Partner ist, und sie nehmen die Reparatur der Fehlpaarung natürlich nicht auf dem Eltern-, sondern auf dem Partnerstrang vor. Eine Möglichkeit, den elterlichen Strang zu erkennen, besteht in der Suche nach Metallgruppen. Wir müssen wissen, dass hinter der Replikationsgabel mit einiger Verzögerung an einigen Sequenzen Metallgruppen mit einigen der Nukleotide eine Verbindung eingehen, und das markiert dann den Strang als Elternstrang. Unmittelbar nach der Replikation haben die neuen Stränge noch keine Metallgruppen erlangt. Die Natur ist also sehr einfallsreich und weiß, wie diese Dinge zu machen sind. Hier ist eine Liste, die im Einzelnen durchzugehen uns die Zeit fehlt. Bei der Transformation haben Sie gesehen, dass dies der Vorgang ist, durch den eine DNA von einer Art von Bakterium in eine andere gebracht wird. Normalerweise ist dies problemlos möglich, wenn die Stränge zum selben Bakterienstamm gehören und nur durch ein, zwei oder drei Mutationen voneinander verschieden sind. Sobald man jedoch etwas weiter hinter die neuesten Stränge zurückgeht, ergeben sich Schwierigkeiten. Ich werde Ihnen erklären, warum das so ist. Dies gilt für die Transformation, die Konjugation und für die durch Viren vermittelte Transduktion. Sie haben diese Dinge bereits gesehen, und ich werde Ihnen jetzt die Gründe dafür erläutern. Warum diese Vorgänge manchmal nicht sehr effizient sind. Eine Oberflächenkompatibilität muss natürlich vorhanden sein. Diese Viren müssen beispielsweise einen Weg finden, sich an der Oberfläche anzuheften und ihre DNA in den neuen Host zu injizieren. Das Eindringen durch die Zellwand, dasselbe wie bei der Konjugation, und freie DNA-Moleküle werden von manchen Bakterien manchmal aktiv aufgenommen. Bei anderen Bakterien versuchen sie durch Diffusion ins Innere der Zelle zu gelangen. Ferner verfügen fast alle Bakterienstämme über ein oder ein paar Systeme, die die Modifikation einschränken. Dies sind Systeme, die erkennen können, ob fremde DNA oder DNA derselben Art von Bakterien, die infiziert sind, in die Zelle gelangt ist. Ich werde Ihnen gleich noch zeigen, wie das funktioniert. Um über ein Gen verfügen zu können, das aus einem anderen Organismus stammt, ist dann zusätzlich noch die Kompatibilität von Funktionen zu bedenken. Wenn ein Gen nicht auf stabile Weise in ein Genom integriert werden kann, geht es schnell verloren. Und wenn das Gen dann exprimiert wird, muss man wissen, ob die Harmonie der Zelle erhalten bleibt: Manchmal wird sie verbessert, meistens jedoch gehemmt, die Harmonie wird zerstört. Das bleibt dann natürlich nicht erhalten. Die Harmonie lässt sich am einfachsten erhalten, wenn nur ein kleines Segment der DNA aufgenommen wird. Dabei kann es sich um ein Gen handeln, manchmal nur um eine funktionale Domäne. Oder um sehr wenige Gene, jedoch nicht um ein halbes Genom. Das funktioniert normalerweise nicht. Das ist die Strategie der Natur, die wir an diesen Vorgängen ablesen können. Nun nur noch ein Wort zu dieser Restriktion [der genetischen Modifikation], für die ich vor dreißig Jahren zusammen mit zwei amerikanischen Kollegen den Nobelpreis erhielt. Wir hatten über die sogenannten Typ 1 Restriktionsenzyme gearbeitet. Ich möchte zunächst den Typ 2 erklären, denn hierbei handelt es sich um diejenigen, mit denen viele von Ihnen in ihren Laboren arbeiten. Dies sind Enzyme, von denen jedes seinen eigenen Namen hat. Dies ist Eco R1. Dieses Enzym erkennt die Sequenz GAATTC. Sie werden sehen, dass es in der Gegenrichtung auf der anderen Seite dieselbe Sequenz ist. Und wenn mit diesem Adenin hier keine Metallgruppe verbunden ist, wenn es nicht methyliert ist, wird die DNA folgendermaßen auf reproduzierbare Weise aufgespalten. Diese Enzyme - da sie die DNA auf reproduzierbare Weise aufspalten und natürlich weil es diese relativ kurzen Sequenzen gibt - befinden sich an verschiedenen Stellen. Auf diese Weise werden längere DNA-Moleküle in handhabbare Fragmente zerlegt, und diese werden dann verwendet. Die Enzyme werden verwendet, um diese Fragmente herzustellen und dann zu analysieren, hinsichtlich ihrer Sequenz und Funktion. Die Enzyme, mit denen wir anfänglich gearbeitet haben, stammten von E. Coli K12. Dies ist Eco K1. Auch dieses Enzym erkennt AACGTGC und jegliche sechs Nukleotide in Zwischenräumen. Diese Sequenz wird also von diesen Restriktionsenzymen erkannt. Sie spalten die DNA hier nicht auf, sondern reparieren sie. Sie bleiben hier an dieser Stelle und beginnen, die DNA hindurchzuschieben. Im Elektronenmikroskop können Sie sehen, wie diese Schleife immer größer wird. Es ist sehr schön anzuschauen. So setzt sich dies hier symbolisch fort. Diese Translokation erfolgt in eine Richtung. Sie erfolgt auch in die andere Richtung, aber das ist hierfür irrelevant. Da es jedoch mehr als eine dieser Stellen gibt, gibt es bei langen DNA-Molekülen andere derartige Stellen. Die Enzyme können auch hier Reparaturen durchführen. Sicherlich nicht gleichzeitig. Daher wird hier eine Fixierung des Enzymes in der Zeit in einen Schneidevorgang an mehreren Stellen im Raum verwandelt, obwohl in Wirklichkeit diese beiden Translokationskomplexe ineinanderlaufen. Etwa die Hälfte aller Systeme zur Restriktion der Modifikation der DNA entspricht dem einen Typ, die andere Hälfte dem anderen. Es gibt auch noch einen dritten Typ usw. Dabei handelt es sich jedoch um kleine Populationen. Sie sehen also, dass die Natur sehr einfallsreich ist und besonders dieser Mechanismus. Ich nenne ihn einen "Variationsgenerator". Alle diese Fragmente werden nach einer Infektion an einer anderen Stelle geschnitten. Evolutionsmäßig ist dies sehr interessant, denn bei den Enzymen vom Typ 1 und Typ 2 kann es sein, wenn das Fragment geschnitten wird, dass die Sequenz in einem wichtigen Gen liegt. Wenn es geschnitten wird, kann man es nicht erlangen. Hier kann jedoch alles in kleinen Schritten erlangt werden. Evolutionsmäßig ist dies für die Natur sehr viel besser, und das ist wahrscheinlich auch der Grund dafür - ich meine es gibt ein gewisses Maß an Flexibilität in der Natur, dass es alle diese verschiedenen Wege gibt, dies zu tun. Es zeigt einem, dass man - wenn man etwas in der Natur erklärt hat - nicht annehmen soll, dass es für alle diese Dinge gültig ist. Häufig lässt sich derselbe Zweck auch durch andere Mittel erreichen. Der Baum der Evolution des Lebens, ich zeichne ihn mit horizontalen Verbindungen, und diese dienen natürlich lediglich der Übertragung von Genomfragmenten. Ich habe sie rein zufällig eingetragen. Es gibt keine Regel, die besagt, wann dies passiert. Der vertikale Fluss ist Ihnen vertraut. Dabei wird das gesamte Genom übertragen. Nun, Charles Darwin hat uns erklärt, dass die Lebewesen gemeinsame Vorfahren haben. Und angesichts der horizontalen Übertragung, bei der Genfunktionen horizontal übertragen werden, haben wir auch eine gemeinsame Zukunft. Das ist eine philosophische Sichtweise, die ich Ihnen nahe bringen möchte. Abschließend möchte ich nur noch einige wenige zusätzliche Überlegungen vortragen. Dies ist eine Zusammenfassung der drei Strategien: lokale Sequenzänderung, DNA-Neuanordnungen und DNA-Erwerb. Ich habe Ihnen erklärt, wie dies funktioniert, was jedoch ihren Beitrag zur Evolution betrifft, hat jede Strategie ihre eigene Qualität. Hier ist es die Suche nach der Verbesserung der vorhandenen biologischen Funktionen. Diese Suche nach der Verbesserung verfügbarer Fähigkeiten durch die Fusion von Segmenten von Genen mit anderen Segmenten anderer Gene oder durch die Fusion eines offenen Leserahmens mit einer alternativen Lesesteuerung der Genexpression. Der Erwerb hat eine völlig andere Qualität, nämlich die gemeinsame Nutzung der erfolgreichen Entwicklung anderer. Hierdurch ist es möglich, in einem Schritt eine neue Fähigkeit zu erlangen, die man vorher nicht besaß. Enzyme habe ich bereits erwähnt. Reparaturenzyme, Restriktionsenzyme. Hierbei handelt es sich um Modulatoren der Häufigkeit genetischer Variation, um die Rate der Entstehung von Mutationen gering zu halten, auf einem akzeptablen Niveau. Es gibt auch tatsächliche Variationsgeneratoren. In der Liste der Rekombinationsenzyme fehlte mir die Zeit, Ihnen alle Einzelheiten zu erklären, doch einige von diesen sind sogenannte "mobile genetische Elemente" und sie fungieren, das hat man bewiesen, als Variationsgeneratoren, die hin und wieder geringe Veränderungen an verschiedenen Stellen einfügen. Darüber hinaus werden sämtliche Rekombinationsenzyme, die zu internen Neuordnungen des genetischen Materials führen, ebenfalls durch Enzyme gesteuert. Ich nenne sie "Evolutionsgene", denn viele dieser Enzyme, die man untersucht hat, sind unwesentlich für das normale Wachstum eines Bakteriums. Sie dienen der Evolution. Und wir glauben, dass ihre eigene Evolution in der Frühzeit des Lebens sie genau für diese Aufgabe ausgewählt hat. Sie arbeiten mit nichtgenetischen Elementen zusammen. Die tautomerischen Formen haben wir gesehen, und es gibt andere Gründe, z.B. dass ein Organismus zufällig auf einen Virus trifft, der Gene mit sich führt, usw. Die Natur sorgt also aktiv für die biologische Evolution. Ich bin der Meinung, dass Lehrbücher korrigiert werden sollten. In vielen Lehrbüchern kann man auch heute noch lesen, dass spontane Mutationen als Fehler oder Störfälle der DNA-Replikation bezeichnet werden. Das ist die falsche Einstellung der Natur gegenüber. Die Natur verwendet zum Beispiel tautomerische Formen, um Mutanten hervorzubringen, lokale Mutanten, und die verfügbaren Reparatursysteme halten die Häufigkeit dieser Mutationen auf einem zuträglichen Niveau. Wo befinden sich nun diese Gene, diese Evolutionsgene? Sie können sich nur im Genom von Bakterien, von mir, dem Menschen befinden. Das Genom zeichnet sich demnach durch eine Dualität aus. Zahlreiche Gene, "Haushaltungsgene", Gene für Entwicklungsgene höherer Organismen, Gene für spezielle Lebensbedingungen: Sie dienen der Verwirklichung dieser individuellen Leben. Doch in denselben Individuen befinden sich Gene, die für die weitere evolutionäre Entwicklung verantwortlich sind, für die Expansion des Lebens, und sie sind die Quelle der Vielfalt des Lebens. Es kommt langsam zur Wiederherstellung früher verlorener Biodiversität. Dies geschieht nicht von einem Jahr zum anderen, sondern über lange Zeiträume. All dies garantiert Biodiversität unter veränderten Lebensbedingungen, veränderten Umweltbedingungen. Das Leben kann weitergehen. Dies ist mein letzter Punkt. Sie könnten fragen, ob dasjenige, was ich Ihnen über Bakterien erzählt habe, auch für Sie als Tiere relevant ist, oder für Pflanzen? Ich denke, dass es relevant ist. Und ich denke, ich erwarte - ohne zu wissen, ob dies absolut korrekt ist -, dass ein Lebewesen über evolutionäre Fitness verfügt, wenn es mindestens mit einem, idealerweise mit mehreren der spezifischen Mechanismen für jede dieser drei Strategien ausgerüstet ist - lokale, interne Neuanordnung und Neuerwerb [von genetischem Material]. Dann kann die Evolution weitergehen. Es ist ebenfalls wichtig, dass die Rate der Mutationen gering gehalten wird, wie ich gesagt habe. Und bei Bakterien wissen wir, dass sich - wenn sie Kolonien bilden - außerhalb einer solchen Kolonie plötzlich Zellen finden, die andere Dinge tun, als die Zellen innerhalb der Kolonie. Es gibt also eine bestimmte Tendenz zur Differenzierung, und ich bin der Auffassung, wenn sich das eine Zeit lang fortsetzt, dass diese Kolonien gerne zusammenbleiben, und dann haben wir bereits einen primitiven mehrzelligen Organismus. Später mag Symbiose eine wichtige Rolle spielen. Ich habe erst vor relativ kurzer Zeit erfahren, dass ich in meinem Körper etwa ein Kilogramm Bakterien mit mir herumtrage, und Sie tun das auch, und sie helfen unserem Leben. Es sind keine Krankheitserreger, es sind nicht meine Feinde: Es ist ein Fall von Symbiose. Und viele von diesen leben in den Zellen. Und wenn man jahrzehntelang zusammenlebt, so handelt es sich hierbei schließlich um eine Lebensgemeinschaft, die einen gelegentlichen, seltenen Gentransfer vom einen zum anderen begünstigt. Ich halte dies für einen zusätzlichen Weg der Evolution. Man muss nur wissen, dass die Evolution eine schrittweise Akkumulation von Mitteln, eine Anreicherung von Funktionen ist, die von der natürlichen Auslese akzeptiert worden sind und behalten werden, solange die Bedingungen es erfordern. Und das führt nicht nur zu einer höheren Komplexität, sondern auch zu einer höheren Biodiversität. Wenn von höheren Tieren und Pflanzen die Rede ist, sollte ich auch sagen, dass einige von den von mir als Evolutionsgene bezeichneten Gene auch auf der somatischen Ebene relevant sind und ihre Funktionen ausüben. Das beste Beispiel hierfür ist wahrscheinlich unser Immunsystem, das der Variation der Bakterien einfach durch Neuanordnung und die somatische Entstehung von Mutanten folgt, doch das geschieht natürlich nicht in der Keimbahn, sondern auf der somatischen Ebene. Ich denke daher, dass wir intensive Forschungen und Einsichten, besonders bei den höheren Organismen, benötigen. Die Grundlage dieses gesamten Wissens, das ich versucht habe Ihnen zu übermitteln, ist allerdings in der Genetik der Mikroben verankert. Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Werner Arber explaining how restriction enzymes work.
(00:29:13 - 00:32:09)

 

Scientists working on the effects of viruses on our genetic material soon realised that these viruses might also be engineered to introduce other genes into host species. The American Paul Berg was the first to successfully do this with a technique involving restriction enzymes; he was awarded one half of the 1980 Nobel Prize for this achievement. In his 1981 lecture entitled “The Evolution of Retroviruses”, Howard Temin talks about the steps involved in his work on the engineering of viruses to carry foreign genes:

 

Howard Temin (1981) - The Evolution of Retroviruses

Thank you. Today I’m going to build on several of the previous lectures as it turns out. Conceptually I’m going to use the systems that Dr. Dulbecco talked about, namely the retroviruses. And then I am going to talk about some of the mechanisms involved in the processes he mentioned and show a parallelism between viruses which infect animal cells, vertebrate cells, and the elements that have been described by Dr. Arber. And then show how we can use these viruses to promote the kinds of transfers discussed by Professor Smith. I’m going to begin with the first slide to illustrate the nature of the biological material I am working with, namely the retrovirus, a virus which is produced by budding from an infected cell and exists as a particle about a hundred milimicrons the virus synthesizes double-stranded DNA, linear and circular molecules, and then the virus particle has specific mechanisms to integrate its DNA into that of the cell DNA with a very high efficiency. And then this integrated molecule of a provirus is the template for the formation of new viral RNA which starts the cycle over again upon infection of another cell. This is just an illustration of some of those caused by a particular species of chicken viruses, various kinds of leukaemias, sarcomas and carcinomas can be caused by these viruses. Since the viruses are very efficient in infection, the formation of the cancers is very efficient. So these viruses are the most powerful and efficient of all carcinogenic agents. The non-oncogenic viruses, they only specify viral proteins in their coding sequences. But the strongly oncogenic viruses have, either in addition or replacement, other sequences, and these sequences arise from the host cell, as Professor Dulbecco again described, and, when present in the virus, become, with the virus genes, highly efficient oncogenic agents. Now to look in more detail at the nature of the viral sequences which can change, if you will, the expression or activate the cell genes to make them oncogenic, techniques of DNA cloning are used. These are used to take DNA now from a chicken cell infected with an animal virus, digest this with the restriction enzyme, separate the restriction enzyme, cut DNA molecules. Then take DNA, cut with the restriction enzyme, from a bacterial virus related to those discussed by Professor Arber. Ligate together the chicken DNA molecules and bacterial virus DNA molecules and package together this new recombinant molecule in the bacterial virus proteins, making now a bacterial virus. Infect cells, E-Coli cells, grow up virus which will contain chicken DNA and Bacterial DNA, and then by hybridization techniques select the particular recombinant virus, bacterial virus, which contains the chicken DNA which in turn contains the animal virus. Now in this particular case, we have not shown the virus, the bacterial virus DNA would be off the slide, there would be cell DNA and then animal virus DNA. And the names are not important but they show a particular pattern. Now if one blows up the ends of the provirus as shown down here, and then carries out further restriction enzyme mapping, as you see just the greater density of names, one finds that a particular sequence is repeated. And if we look here we have Sac. Here we have Sac. Then HhI HhI HaeIII HaeIII and so forth. A pattern of restrictions on cleavage sites is the same on both ends. This pattern shown here also by crosshatching is known as the LTR or long terminal repeat and has been sequenced in this virus and in others, next slide, and shown to have some remarkable features. These are shown diagrammatically here. One of the most remarkable features is actually the way it’s made but this is an extremely complicated process and is related to these names, U3R and U5. For our purposes, what is important is that in the sequence of the long terminal repeat, our sequence is shown here in boxes which have been shown in these virus systems and in systems of genes from vertebrate cells to be the controlling signals for synthesis of RNA, the so-called Goldberg-Hugness or TATA Box, the CAT Box of -85, -24, and a capping sequence telling the cell polymerases to start here synthesis of viral RNA. So in the LTR the virus has control sequences which will tell the cell to make new virus. Similarly, in the LTR the cell, the virus has control sequences like this one telling the cell to add Poly(A) at the end of the viral RNA and then sequences like these to tell the cell to stop the synthesis. So these sequences at the ends of the virus are control sequences which tell the cell start synthesis / stop synthesis. Now if we look at the end of this entire sequence, we find at the very end three base pairs which are present as an inverted repeat, TGT and ACA. and carry out this sequencing at both ends of these viruses we find several things. Firstly at the end of each virus we have the same sequence, TGT TGT TGT at the left end, then going all the way to the right end the inverted repeat ACA ACA ACA. We find the same sequences inside, since the virus is present inside, but then on the outside we find a different sequence in each virus. In this one CCTTC GATAC AAAAT. So where the virus sits is different. But if we look at any one virus at the sequences on both sides, we find that five base pairs are the same. CCTTC CCTTC GATAC GATAC and AAAT AAAT and so forth through a whole collection of these. So that in the next slide, it is possible to draw a very simple general picture of the structure of a provirus. Now the particular numbers are true for this particular virus but the general feature is true for all retroviruses. The important features are a direct repeat of cell DNA indicated by the dark arrows and the numbers 12345, an inverted repeat of element DNA, in this case the virus, and then a larger direct repeat of viral sequences. This structure is exactly the same as the transposons that Professor Arber was talking about. They can also be described as elements that form direct repeats of cell DNA and have inverted repeats, and in some cases, as shown in the next slide, they can further have exactly the same kind of structure. In this case I am showing at the top, the structure we have just seen from the animal virus. In this case I am showing the structures of cellular movable genetic elements like transposons but in this case from eukaryotic organisms, Ty1 from yeasts and copia from drosophila. You can immediately see a great similarity in the structures of these elements, especially a repeat of cell DNA, in this case the large terminal repeat in both cases and less clear the inverted repeats at the same. But it’s clear from these comparisons that there is an enormous sequence similarity not in the actual nucleotide sequence, but in the pattern of the nucleotide sequence between retroviruses, cellular movable genetic elements of eukaryotes and transposable elements of viruses. We can then suppose, in the next slide, following, I’m sorry, furthermore, not only are the patterns the same, but the actual nucleotide sequences are very similar. These are the same three elements from vertebrates, drosophilae, yeast, the sequences at the end are exactly the same and then all of these sequences are similar. This great similarity of pattern of sequence and of actual sequence is consistent with the hypothesis that the animal virus has evolved from the cellular movable genetic element. In other words, that the animal virus is a transposon which has escaped to be a free living virus. If we started with an insertion sequence, and this insertion sequence had certain signals for control of synthesis of RNA and in the insertion sequences made a transposon, or a protein like DNA polymerase which could be a precursor of the virus reverse transcriptase. showing in the open box the insertion sequence. Now if this transposon transposed around another cellular gene which could be the precursor of the viral internal protein. And then there was a deletion, giving rise to a new transposon which now would have two viral proteins. And then there was a mutation for another aspect of viral function, primer binding site. Then this transposon could transpose and transpose again around a cellular sequence which could be the precursor for another virus protein. And then by the same process a transposon could be formed which would be exactly the same as a viral provirus. Then from such a transposon, transcription would give viral RNA which then could be packaged and used as a virus. Now once we had reached this stage, actually, because the structures of the provirus and the product of transposition are exactly the same, one cannot tell, by looking in the cell at the structure of the DNA, whether this DNA resulted from infection or from transposition. And in fact now in animal cells there are many structures like these, the so called A-particles, the 30S-particles, and there are new ones being described all the time. The question is what are these? Are they proviruses, defective proviruses or are they transposons or are they a little bit of both? There is no way to tell from looking at them which they are because the structures are exactly the same and there are many of them in cells. Now this structure and this way of formation then indicates in the next slide, please, a way in which the strongly transforming viruses could have been formed. This is for a particular virus, the names are not important, this would be the proto-oncogene, which Professor Dulbecco spoke about yesterday. And in the virus the proto-oncogene would now be an oncogene in the virus flanked by the LTRs. The way in which it might have occurred is by the same series of transpositions and deletions, which could happen all at the same time or could happen in two successive cycles. These kind of results, and the fact that it appears a wide variety of cellular DNA can be carried in a virus between the LTR as a provirus and then be packaged in a virus indicated to us that it might be possible for us to put DNA inside a virus LTR and have the virus carry that DNA into other cells. In otherwise, to make the virus into a specialized transducing virus for any sequence we might choose to do. So what I have been telling you up to now has been natural evolution of viruses, one might say that researchers have selected some of these highly oncogenic viruses, but at least they were unplanned. Now I’m going to tell you how we have carried this evolution a step further by duplicating in the test tube the same kind of processes that we imagine have gone rise in the evolution of these viruses. and had been sequenced and that was easy to select for. And the gene we selected was that coding for thymidine kinase and coded for by the herpes simplex virus type 1. This had been cloned and sequenced by others and is shown here as a 3.4 kilobase pair BamHI fragment. This fragment codes for a messenger RNA which is coding for the thymidine Kinase protein. It is possible by the use of the appropriate antibiotics and nucleosides to select for the presence of an active protein. Now at the end of this there is a region which has the end of the virus protein, ending right here at this point. And then later on is the signal here the same as present in the retrovirus for the Poly(A) addition and the end of the messenger RNA synthesis. And there is in between these two a HAHA1 site, so that it will be important later that we are able to separate the end of RNA synthesis from the end of protein synthesis. This is done right here, where we have taken, by a very complicated process of genetic engineering, and removed all of the sequence between here, which is just at the end of the protein but not at the end of the RNA synthesis, and here. And then put this back here, giving rise to a shortened thymidine kinase fragment. First we will look at this fragment, the next slide. I will indicate how this fragment from herpes simplex virus was inserted into the retrovirus spleen necrosis virus. The herpes simplex thymidine kinase was present in a plasmid, and with BamHI the fragment was cut out from the plasmid. The animal virus had previously also been cloned into a plasmid, and it’s actually a circularly permuted fragment of the virus, but still a complete virus. And this was opened with the enzyme BamHI and the herpes simplex virus was ligated into it giving rise to a virus with thymidine kinase integrated into it. So by doing this, were now not showing the whole plasmid, but by doing the experiment shown, we can then insert the thymidine kinase in different orientations to the right or to the left in different positions in the retrovirus. Now we have a plasmid growing in E-Coli, but what were interested in is vertebrate cells. And we want to be able to ask about the activity of the virus and the activity of the thymidine kinase. So what we do is cut out the DNA from the bacterial plasmid, ligate it together with itself and then reintroduce this DNA into the animal cells and look for expression of these genes in the animal cells. So were started with animal viruses, went to bacteria, grew them in bacteria, and manipulated them in bacteria. Then isolated the DNA which still remains the DNA specifying the animal viruses, and reintroduced that DNA back in the animal cells. Now these are mouse cells and these are rat cells which are thymidine kinase negative. The plasmid itself can transform them, and in most cases, at least in these cases, the insertion of the herpes thymidine kinase into the virus DNA does not affect its activity. However here these are chicken cells where were looking at the replication of the virus, the virus itself replicates with a high efficiency as a result of the transfection, but the introduction of the thymidine kinase reduces or abolishes the infectivity. So it was necessary to make some modifications. And so to do this, we made these deleted viruses, and this is just to give you a feeling, nothing more than that, of the way one those these kinds of genetic engineering. But here we take one of these plasmids, now we’ve gone back to bacteria again, with the thymidine kinase inserted. And we now want to make a deletion of the virus from here to here, and we want to substitute this thymidine kinase for a thymidine kinase where we have deleted some of the control sequences. So to do this we digest this plasmid with HindIII and separate the two molecules and digest each of them, this one with BglII just isolating this fragment, this one with SacI discarding this fragment and keeping this fragment. And then digest this one with SacI and BamHI, just keeping this fragment. Then we can mix together these three fragments in a test tube with an enzyme and ligate them together and then by selecting get this modified plasmid. Then we can cut this plasmid and ligate and get a structure which, when introduced into animal cells again, will replicate. So first, we asked about the biological activity of these new structures which are deleted in virus and deleted in thymidine kinase. These are again in mouse and rat cells. We see that deletion of the end of the protein reduces the activity very much, deletion of the end of the RNA does not reduce the activity in the plasmid, but when we put this one into a deleted virus, we see there is some reduction. But generally we can see that we still have enough thymidine kinase with the modified virus and the modified gene to use. Now since we have modified the virus as I showed you, we cannot expect to get infectivity directly. The virus has lost three kilobase pairs for example. So the experiment becomes even more complicated that we take from bacteria cloned DNA of a complete virus, and so we transfect cells with a mixture of the two kinds of bacterial DNA: one bacterial DNA which specifies a complete virus known as a helper, the other the bacterial DNA which specifies the modified virus carrying the modified thymidine kinase gene. And when this entire mixture is put onto cells, virus will be produced. And now we are in the realm of animal virology again and can assay the virus which is produced. these complicated mixtures of the cloned DNA from bacteria. And we are assaying, here are the virus titers, the helper virus which grows to a very high titer, and this is just a virus, it’s not of particular interest. But these, and we can concentrate on this one, this is an assay for the thymidine kinase gene in the virus. And we see that, as the whole virus is produced, the defective virus, which is now transducing the thymidine kinase gene, is produced to quite respectable titers. Now to show it is important to get these high titers of production to remove the sequences specifying the end of the RNA. Just if we compare this point with this one, these are DNAs which are otherwise the same, except this one has been deleted for the sequences for termination of RNA synthesis and this one has them. Presumably the competition between this defective virus and the helper is too much, so there is little, and these are other, other kinds of these recombinant viruses. But you can see one can get a lot of this virus and to establish that this is still the virus which we started with from the bacteria, one can take this virus and infect chicken cells with it, (next slide), extract the DNA and study the structure of the DNA made in the chicken cells. So we now are looking at DNA from chicken cells which was infected by virus produced by other chicken cells which were infected by virus produced by still other chicken cells, which were transfected by DNA grown in E-Coli. And we find by hybridization, these are the experimental ones, that we have the same size of DNA as we had for bacteria, and if we look for the thymidine kinase gene, the thymidine kinase gene is still stably carried in these new recombinant viruses, as it was stably carried in the bacteria. Furthermore (the next slide), since we have a relatively high titer of these viruses, we can use them in transformation experiments to transform essentially an entire culture of cells. So this is an example of rat cells in the selective medium when they are uninfected all of the cells are killed. However if these cells were infected with these recombinant viruses and then selected, essentially all of the cells survive. Because essentially all of the cells have been infected by the transducing virus and since the virus is very efficient at introducing its genetic material, the thymidine kinase is now part of the virus genetic material and so is integrated efficiently into the sensitive cell, thereby the sensitive cell is made resistant. How the retro viruses behave as transposable elements which have an additional virus phase. This explains their ability to cause cancer at such a high efficiency because they can take these proto-oncogenes, activate them by putting them within their own control sequences. And then very efficiently integrate the modified sequences into a new cell. Furthermore I have shown you how we now, using the techniques of genetic engineering, can introduce any other cloned sequence into the virus. The virus, essentially, doesn’t care what’s in between the LTRs, whatever is between the LTRs over quite a wide range of size will now be just as efficiently introduced into any sensitive cell. If as in this case, the new DNA is DNA which codes for a protein which can be made essential to the cell, this can be used to protect the cell, this can be used in other ways which I think are obvious to all of you. Thank you.

Howard Temin highlighting the potential use of modified viruses to carry foreign genetic material.
(00:18:06 - 00:19:52)

 

Gene targeting is another revolutionary approach for manipulating DNA and has enabled important insights into the role of specific genes in a wide range of diseases and critical cellular process. The technique was developed independently by Oliver Smithies and Mario Capecchi in the 1980s, and in 2007 the pair was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. In this lecture from 2015, Smithies describes how he initially developed the gene targeting technique to treat the mutation that causes sickle cell anaemia:

 

Oliver Smithies (2015) - Ideas Come from Many Places

Well, where to begin? I'm not going to tell you what this slide is about. You'd have to come this afternoon, and we can talk about it. But "Where Do Ideas Come From" is the title of my talk, and it's always a question of where to begin. And I think this is a good place to begin because this is one of the joyful times that happens to a Nobel Laureate that somebody decides they would like to remember where you were at school, and I was at school here from age 5 to 11. And they unveiled a plaque here, and some of the kids are there celebrating with me. It's interesting to me because I already knew by the time I left this school at that age that I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know the word. The best I could come up with was I wanted to be an inventor, as a result of reading comic strips about inventors. And then I'd like you to see where it was that I lived. I lived in a little village called Copley with a population of only 1,500, and I'm curious, how many of you guys come from a village as small as that? Not very many. But it was a good place to live. The school was about over here, and my home was up here, and there was a rather lovely river there, the River Calder, except for the fact that when I was a kid it was badly polluted, though it no longer is I'm happy to say. If you go down this River Calder, you come to, there's Copley, and here is the River Calder... You come to another town, Elland, and Elland has a population of 15,000, so it's a rather bigger town. And it produced a Nobel Laureate in 1997 in chemistry. If you go upstream from Copley, you come to another town, Todmorden, that also has a population of about 15,000. It produced two Nobel Laureates. So the water? Obviously not. (laughs) The teachers is the answer. The teachers inspire you and give you all sorts of thoughts. And in fact, we can look at the teachers that were involved in all of these persons. And Smithies had a good teacher in elementary school and two teachers in high school. And Walker had a good science teacher. And Cockcroft and Wilkinson both had the same science teacher, so that science teacher was teaching for more than 20 years and produced, as it were, two Nobel Laureates. So if you're a teacher, think how much influence you can have in the future. Maybe you will have the enjoyment of being a teacher and being remembered. Maybe you'll produce a Nobel Laureate, who knows? So be a careful teacher when you're a teacher. I had a grand teacher when I went to college. I went to college in Oxford University, Balliol College. And this is my teacher, "Sandy" Ogston. He was trained in chemistry and then took a second degree in physiology and began to teach students, in the medical curriculum, and I had won my scholarship to the college with physics, but I for some reason that escapes me now, I decided to do medicine. Anyway, "Sandy" Ogston was my teacher. And he produced a Nobel Laureate in 1976 and another one in 2007, so some teachers can really inspire you. The way of teaching at that time in Oxford, and it still is the primary way, is a marvellous way, and I wish we could do it more easily all over the world. But it's an expensive way of teaching. And that is that once a week, you would meet with your teacher, in this case "Sandy" Ogston and present to him or her an essay that you had written over the preceding week on a topic that had been assigned to you. And you were expected to produce something that went back to the original literature. You couldn't work with a textbook, or you might read a textbook, you might read a review, but you were expected to write something original. Might get a topic, "Oh, write me an essay on pain." And that's all you'll be told, and you were expected to produce a learned article in a week. (laughs) Well Sandy set me the topic, "Write me an essay, Oliver, on energy metabolism." Now this was before the tricarboxylic acid cycle had been published, before Krebs' cycle. And I set about this task. And then I came across this. And why would I show you a book? I show you this book because what's in this book was so exciting that I remember where I was when I read it. I remember what the book looked like. I remember what the paper looked like. It was so inspiring to read something that made sense out of what appeared to be nonsense. And the nonsense was: Why doesn't the body just burn glucose and make carbon dioxide? It goes through all these complicated things of adding phosphate and doing this and that and the other. And why does it do it? And this book contains the answer. The answer is this little squiggle here, squiggle P, which means energy-rich phosphate, an energy-rich phosphate bond. And for the chemists, it's interesting that the energy-rich ones are all acid anhydrides, and acid anhydrides are very powerful organic compounds, have much more energy in them, for example, than a phosphate ester would have. And anyway, true to form, I came back with an essay the following week. And in it, I had Smithies' cycle. And it was rather a neat cycle because you could start with an inorganic phosphate and make a phosphate ester, and that's relatively low energy and take away a couple of hydrogens. And you can convert the phosphate ester into an acid anhydride here, and that's energy rich, from which you could make ATP. And then go around here and add the hydrogen back, and you could start over again, and you could produce energy for nothing. Well, I wasn't completely stupid. I did know it was wrong, but I didn't know why it was wrong. And that was an interesting problem. And "Sandy" Ogston proceeded to write an article on it eventually because it turned out that people had forgotten in making the calculations that you had to think about the concentration of things, not just about what was called standard free energies in those days, where every reaction component was at one molar concentration. And he worked out that there had to be a system that produced energy in moving electrons up the electromotive scale, you might say, in the cell. So he foresaw the importance of energy by concentration, and he also realised that the system wouldn't work if the substrates dissociated from their enzymes. They had to be handed over as it were without dissociating into free substrate. Otherwise, the kinetics would be wrong, so it was a good article. And he published it, and he was kind enough to add my name as a scholar of Balliol College, and I felt pretty good about this. And then this was 1948, so it's quite a long time ago. But then somewhere around about, oh let's say, I don't know the exact date, but say 1990 or thereabout somebody came up to me and said, you see 1990 would be And I rather modestly said, "Well as a matter of fact, I am." And he said, "Oh I thought you were dead." (laughs) So anyway, on with the game, and here's my PhD thesis, and you can see a lot of significant figures here. And in fact those are real significant figures. They're not due to not rounding off in a computer, which is the common method of getting many significant figures. But you can see that my experimental points are really rather closely together, and I was measuring osmotic pressure. It's not very important to know what that is, but the points were so close that I had to interrupt the line to put the theoretical line on, so I was very proud of this super precision method. And I published it, "A Dynamic Osmometer for Accurate Measurements," a neat paper. It has a record. Nobody ever quoted it. Nobody ever used the method again, and I never used the method again. So you have to ask yourself, "Well what was the point of it?" And I want you to think a moment. Well the point of it was that I learned to do good science, and I enjoyed it. And those are the critical things in the early stages of your career that you learn to do good work and to enjoy it. It does not matter what you do. It's absolutely unimportant. You do not want to be a clone of your advisor. You do not want to be a clone of your post-doctoral advisor. You want to be yourself, but you can learn from these people how to do good science, but you must be enjoying it. Otherwise, you won't have that fire that's needed. So I urge you, if you aren't doing what you like, go to your advisor and say, "I need another problem. I'm not enjoying it." If your advisor can't do that, change your advisor. I'm serious. It's so important because it's very unlikely, and I hope it is true that you will do work of the same type that you did when you were a graduate student or when you were a postdoc. You may use the skill, but you hope to do something different. And I didn't achieve that in my graduate work or in my postdoc. My postdoc was equally undistinguished, but I went to Toronto to get a job. And there I was given a job by David Scott, and he was an early worker in the field of insulin work because insulin was discovered in Toronto, and he was the first person to crystalize it and make a long-lasting insulin. And he said, "You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin." And I thought, There might be a precursor." Well, we now know there is a precursor. But in case you're waiting, I did not discover it, but I tried. And on the way, I had to find a way of looking at insulin, thinking I would find something slightly different in electrophoresis. And in those days, much electrophoresis was done on filter paper, where you would soak a filter paper with buffer, apply the protein, and allow it to migrate, and you can it just unrolled like a smear and really was very poor, and I was rather frustrated. And then I heard of the work of these two gentlemen: Kunkel and Slater, and they'd use a box, a box about this big, this big and so on. And they filled it full of starch grains, rather like a sandbox, except there were grains of starch, and they had buffer around it, and they applied the sample in the starch. And the advantage was that unlike the filter paper... This is from their paper... Here's a protein applied on filter paper, and it smeared, just as my insulin smeared. But when they put it on the starch grain, it came out as a nice peak. But in order to find the protein, you had to cut it up into 40 slices and do a protein determination on every slice, so you had to do 40 protein determinations for one electrophoresis run. I didn't even have a dishwasher in my lab, didn't have a technician. I couldn't do that. But I remembered helping my mother do the laundry, well I was there anyway. She took starch powder and cooked it up with hot water and made a slimy mix, which was used to apply to collars of my father's shirts, which needed to be stiff, and so it was ironed. And when you tied it up at the end of the day, the starch, it set into a jelly. And I thought, "Well my gosh, if I go back and make a starch gel out of the starch, cook it up, and then I can stain it, and I will get rid of all of that problem of 40 slices." Saturday morning was when I had that. And by the afternoon, I'd started my first experiment with it. There is a slot, and there is the insulin as a nice band and made the remark, And that was the beginning of gel electrophoresis. It went on because some time later just for a rough test, I put plasma or serum onto it, and I could see the bands that were known of the proteins that were known to be present in blood at that time. People thought there were five proteins: albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, and gamma globulin. We now know there are about 700 or something like that. But anyway at that time, people thought five, and I got these bands and set it up again, oh 12 midnight. And I could work at any time. And excuse me, and then a little bit later, I managed to see this sort of a pattern with many bands, and I had too many bands to label. In fact, I could find 11 all together, and here's when if you have a good boss, you can really make a step forward because I went to Scottie, as by then he and I called each other Scottie and Oliver. I went to Scottie and said, "Scottie, I've really found something very interesting. I'd like to stop working on insulin and work on this problem." And he said, he was a good scientist, "By all means, change", and that I hope you have that experience. You see I was long past my postdoc when it happened to me... That you get a time when you see you found something that you ought to do that's different from what has happened in the past. And I was ready to publish my work, and these are two of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself and so I got blood from my friends. And I mean that's what they're for, isn't it? And that's George Connell and Gordon Dixon, and why aren't there photographs? My lab didn't own a camera. It was such a poor lab at that time. But I was about ready to get ready to publish and getting photographs made. And then just by chance, I ran another sample from BW, and it was very strange, many extra bands. And so what was funny about BW? It was a woman. This is the first time that I'd run a sample from a woman. I thought I found a new method of telling men from women. And I called one pattern the M pattern and the other pattern the F pattern: M for male, F for female. And I could do two samples in a day for about a week or so, male and female always fit right. And then the sixth time, they were changed. And the man had changed into a woman. We gave him a real hard time. Come on Casey. Let's have look. But anyway, such is youth you might say. But here is my data file. Just remarkable, but it turned out the difference between the types had nothing to do with gender. It had nothing to do with the existing blood groups, and it was obviously something new. And I show this for another reason. It's a data file that's now, well what, almost 60 years old. You won't be able to produce your data file 60 years from now if you don't make a hard copy. You got to make hard copies of the important data that you have. Don't rely on your computer because you can't read a floppy disc now, and there was a time when that was what we had. You won't be able to read a CD in 10 years from now, for sure. Make some hard copies and keep good hard copies. Well those differences that were here turned out to be genetic. And just to close this story, it was a rather complicated genetic difference, and we worked it out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker, who was a marvellous geneticist and taught me genetics. And then as things moved on, we changed from not being able to do protein sequencing to be able to protein sequence, isolating genes, sequencing gene, and it began to become clear that there was something that one might do about this. For example, Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram showed that the sickle cell mutation was just due to a change of glutamic acid to a valine in the globin molecule. And I began to think it ought to be possible to correct the gene by gene targeting. We now are at a stage where we had cloned DNA, a normal DNA. And I thought if I introduce a piece of normal DNA, I might be able to get some crossing over, so SA lining up with SA and GE and change the bad gene into the good gene by crossing over. I knew it was possible in yeast, and Jack is here today... I don't know whether he's here in the audience now, but Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver had shown that in yeast you could target a gene, and I was teaching, so I had taught this. But the yeast genome is about, well what, two orders of magnitude smaller than the human genome. And so whether it could be done in a human was not at all clear. And then again in teaching "Where do ideas come from?" When you teach, you have to understand. And in order to understand, you sometimes have to spend a long time reading a paper before you can understand it well enough to teach it. And this was a paper that came out April 1st in 1982, and they talked about a method of rescuing a gene, and I can't go into the details, except to say, because of time, that it involved finding a piece of blue DNA, you might say, next to red DNA. The red DNA was what they wanted to isolate, and the blue DNA was what they used to find it. And I thought that I could use this method for gene targeting tests. So here's, only three weeks after that paper came out, an assay for gene placement. And my idea was to use their blue DNA, which you could score in bacteria and try to target the beta globin gene and look for this fragment. I should say: this is incoming DNA, this is the target. If I could find a piece of DNA where these two were together, I would've proved that targeting had occurred because this was not on the incoming DNA, and this was not on the target. And with quite a lot of work, we got further down and got to the stage of simplifying it and used a rather simpler plasmid, which looks very like the one that Terry Orr-Weaver had used, and you could see that if you hit the gene, this is a restriction enzyme map that in the right way, you could isolate a fragment of DNA that would be 11 kilobases if you didn't hit the gene. If you hit the gene, then the size would be eight kilobases. And a long set of experiments led to the final day, when on a Saturday when I developed a film of testing different colonies, and there is the one where the fragment is now a seven, eight kilobases long instead of larger, so this proved that gene targeting was possible. And once you've proved something is possible, then you can go and use it, and other people will start to do it. But the frequency was hopelessly low and not practical for the original purpose, which was to try to help a person with sickle cell anaemia. So what to do? Talk to somebody else, and I went and read about Martin Evans' work, which was using an embryonic stem cell. Here is a blastocyst. That's the part of the blastocyst that will give rise to the embryo. And what Martin Evans and his students learned how to culture those in culture, so that he had these cells growing in culture from a cream-coloured mouse. And if you put these cream-coloured stem cells back into a blastocyst, they would remember where they came from, and you could generate a mouse from this blastocyst by putting it back into a pseudopregnant female, and you would get chimeric mice, mixtures. And from them, you could breed out the gene that you were interested in. So that was an obvious thing. Let's use this method to alter gene. But the assay was terrible. And so we had to have help from a chemist, and we got help from Kary Mullis, who got the Nobel Prize for inventing polymerase chain reaction. And here is a little place in one of my notebooks, saying that we could use this method to detect the recombinant. And I made an apparatus to do it. This is my apparatus. Why would you make an apparatus? Well the reason was there wasn't one available. You could not get an apparatus for doing PCR. But I think this ought to have this label on it because that's what my graduate student friends used to put on an apparatus that was lying somewhere on the floor. And it stands for NBGBOKFO, no bloody good, but okay for Oliver because I would always make stuff out of junk, you see, and so these are all junk things. None of them were new, and yet that's the apparatus which we used and helped me towards the Nobel Prize. The method was good, and here's a super article about it, and you notice I'm not an author. I'm happy to say the author is down there. She's my wife, and she went and made a marvellous animal that could get atherosclerosis. Well, so where to? Well, I'm showing you this one more thing because I have one little more topic to talk about. Here's "Sandy" Ogston again, but there's a little difference now because I've got the date of his death. Because he asked, "When I die, Oliver, I'd like you to write my scientific memoirs." That was something that the Royal Society liked to have. And then you have to read all of his papers. And I read all his of his papers. And then he had this beautiful, little formula here, talking about the available space in a gel to molecules of radius big R when the gel is composed of fibres of radius little r, and there are n fibres per square centimetre. He was talking about a cross section of the gel. And this equation is beautifully precise. It worked in every gel you ever heard of and has been tested inordinately. These two guys in my lab, and they made this diagram to illustrate it, and I like it. If you have a small solute, it can find lots of space in a gel. But if you have a large solute, it can only find a limited space. And so I thought this might apply to the kidney, and I wrote a paper on this that the idea being that here the small molecules would come through the kidney easily. And big molecules, if they had to pass through a gel, would come rather low concentration, and I published a diagram illustrating the principle. This is a cross section of a kidney at electron microscope dimension. And these are the sizes of albumin molecules drawn to scale, and this is the gel in the kidney through which I thought the thing might happen. And so I went to our local person who was an expert in making a gold nanoparticle, which I wanted to use, to see in the electron microscope. And he said, I'm not going to make them for you, Oliver. You make your own. He said, "You'll learn more if you make them." I got hooked. They're marvellous, interesting things, and I spent a large amount of my personal time on them. I'll just show you one example here. That's what, four years ago. And this was the time when I first learned... Was still working at the weekend. This is the time when I found out that I could control the size of the molecule by varying the time of a reaction step in the procedure. I got a paper out of it in Langmuir, and I'm the first author. And I'm the first author because I did the work, not because I wrote the paper, though I did, but because the experiments were mine, most of them. And so, think about it. It's really rather neat to have a first author paper when you're 89 and especially if this is the first paper I ever published in a chemistry journal. But I have one more... Oh there's an example of working of it. Here is plasma with the large molecules in clusters, and they can't get into the basement membrane. It's more complicated than that, but that's an example. I've one last, a little thing to show you, and that's this. And what am I showing an aeroplane for? Wel,l partly because that's been a part of my life, but this is my instructor, Field Morey. And he taught me to fly, and I was a nervous flyer. And when I learned to fly with him, instructor sits here, and the pupil sit in the left seat. And sweat used to pour off me, I mean literally. And so one day I turned to him and said, "That was a good day for you. Only one drop dripped." That gives you some idea. Well, I later on learned to be an instructor, and I had a pupil, Jeff Bloch. And when we went flying together, I was teaching him to glide, he would come back absolutely sodden. His back would be completely sticking to himself. He went by himself when the time came, and he came back, and he said, "Look Oliver, dry." That's a very important lesson, not just for flying. It tells you that you can overcome fear with knowledge. If you're nervous about doing something new in science, you might say, "This guy over here, he's much smarter than me. Or this lady, she knows what to do. I couldn't possibly do that." You're frightened. Go and learn. Go and read. You can do anything. You can change fields. You don't have to be stuck somewhere. Go away and overcome fear with knowledge. That's my motor glider, and here's my companion. And if you're lucky, you will have a companion as I have in Nobuyo, and that's where I stop. applause

Gut, wo fangen wir an? Ich werde Ihnen jetzt nicht erzählen, worum es sich bei dieser Folie handelt. Sie müssen heute Nachmittag kommen und wir können darüber reden. Aber der Titel meiner Rede lautet “Wo die Ideen herkommen” und es ist immer eine Frage, wo man anfängt. Und ich glaube, dies ist ein guter Platz, um zu beginnen, weil dies einer der erfreulichen Momente für einen Nobelpreisträger ist, wenn jemand wissen will, wo Sie in der Schule waren, und ich war hier in der Schule im Alter von 5 bis 11 Jahren. Und Sie enthüllten hier eine Tafel, ein Paar Kinder feiern hier mit mir. Es ist interessant für mich, weil ich schon in der Zeit, in der ich diese Schule an diesem Alter verließ, wusste, dass ich ein Wissenschaftler sein möchte, aber ich kannte das Wort nicht. Das Beste, was ich zur Sprache bringen konnte, war, dass ich ein Erfinder sein wollte. Dies war ein Ergebnis davon, dass ich Comics über Erfinder gelesen habe. Und dann möchte ich gerne, dass Sie sehen, wo ich aufgewachsen bin. Ich lebte in einem kleinen Ort namens Copley mit einer Einwohnerzahl von nur 1,500, und ich bin neugierig, wie viele von Ihnen aus einem so kleinen Ort kommen. Nicht sehr viele. Aber es war gut, an diesem Ort zu leben. Die Schule war etwa hier und mein Zuhause etwa hier und es gab dort einen schönen Fluss, den River Calder. Von der Tatsache abgesehen, dass er, als ich ein Kind war, schlimm verschmutzt gewesen ist, aber dies ist nicht mehr so und ich freue mich, dies zu sagen. Wenn Sie den River Calder abwärts gehen kommen Sie zu, hier ist Copley und hier ist der River Calder ... Sie kommen zu einer anderen Stadt, Elland, und Elland hat eine Einwohnerzahl von 15.000, ist also eine etwas größere Stadt. Und sie brachte im Jahr 1997 einen Nobelpreis in Chemie hervor. Wenn Sie von Copley stromaufwärts gehen, dann kommen Sie zu einer anderen Stadt, Todmorden, die ebenfalls eine Einwohnerzahl von ungefähr 15.000 hat. Und sie brachte zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Also ist es das Wasser? Offensichtlich nicht. (Gelächter). Die Antwort lautet: die Lehrer. Die Lehrer inspirieren Sie und ermuntern Sie zu denken. Und tatsächlich können wir uns die Lehrer betrachten, die mit all diesen Personen zu tun hatten. Und Smithies hatte einen guten Lehrer in der Grundschule und zwei Lehrer im Gymnasium. Und Walker hatte einen guten Lehrer für Wissenschaften. Und Cockcroft und Wilkinson hatten beide denselben Lehrer für Wissenschaften, dieser Lehrer für Wissenschaften unterrichtete also mehr als 20 Jahre lang und brachte sozusagen zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Wenn Sie also Lehrer sind, dann denken Sie daran, wieviel Einfluss Sie in der Zukunft haben können. Vielleicht werden Sie das Vergnügen haben, ein Lehrer zu sein und nicht vergessen zu werden. Vielleicht bringen Sie einen Nobelpreisträger hervor, wer weiß? Seien Sie also ein sorgfältiger Lehrer, wenn Sie Lehrer sind. Ich hatte einen großartigen Lehrer, als ich zur Universität ging. Ich ging in das Balliol College der Universität von Oxford. Und dies ist mein Lehrer, “Sandy” Ogston. Er war in Chemie ausgebildet und machte einen zweiten Hochschulabschluss in Physik und fing an, Studenten im medizinischen Fachbereich zu unterrichten und ich habe das Stipendium für die Hochschule mit Physik erhalten, aber aus einem Grund, der mir im Moment nicht einfällt, habe ich mich für die Medizin entschieden. Jedenfalls war Sandy Ogston mein Lehrer. Und er brachte einen Nobelpreis im Jahr 1976 und einen weiteren im Jahr 2007 hervor, manche Lehrer können Sie also wirklich inspirieren. Die Art und Weise, in der damals in Oxford unterrichtet wurde, und dies wird hauptsächlich noch so gemacht, ist wunderbar. Ich wünsche mir, wir könnten es überall auf der Welt so machen. Aber es ist eine teure Art des Unterrichts. Und es war einmal in der Woche, dass Sie Ihren Lehrer treffen konnten, in diesem Fall Sandy Ogston, und ihm oder ihr einen Essay vorlegen, den Sie in der vergangenen Woche über ein Ihnen zugeteiltes Thema geschrieben haben. Und es wurde von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas erstellen, was zu der ursprünglichen Literatur zurückgeht. Sie können nicht mit einem Lehrbuch arbeiten, oder Sie lesen vielleicht ein Lehrbuch oder eine Besprechung - aber es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas Neues schreiben. Sie erhalten vielleicht ein Thema “Schreiben Sie einen Aufsatz über Brot.” Und das ist alles, was man Ihnen sagt, und es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie einen tiefgründigen Artikel innerhalb einer Woche erstellen. (lacht) Sandy hat mir folgendes Thema zugeteilt: "Oliver, schreib mir einen Essay über Energie-Metabolismus”. Dies war jetzt vor der Veröffentlichung des Zyklus über Trikarbonsäurezyklus, vor dem Zyklus von Krebs. Und ich machte mich an die Arbeit. Und dann kam mir dies in die Quere. Und warum sollte ich Ihnen ein Buch zeigen? Ich zeige Ihnen dieses Buch, denn was in diesem Buch stand war so aufregend, dass ich mich daran erinnere, wo ich war, als ich es las. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Buch aussah. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Papier aussah. Es war so inspirierend, etwas zu lesen, was Sinn machte aus etwas, was Unsinn zu sein schien. Und der Unsinn war: Warum verbrennt der Körper nicht einfach Glukose und macht Kohlendioxid? Es ging durch all diese komplizierten Dinge durch das Hinzufügen von Phosphat und indem man dies und jenes tut. Und warum funktioniert es? Und dieses Buch enthält die Antwort. Die Antwort ist dieser kleine Schnörkel hier, P-Schnörkel, der energiereiches Phosphat bedeutet, eine energiereiche Phosphatverbindung. Und für die Chemiker ist es interessant, dass die energiereichen Verbindungen alle saure Anhydride sind. Und saure Anhydride sind sehr mächtige organische Stoffe, die sehr viel mehr Energie in sich bergen als es zum Beispiel die Phosphat-Ester haben würden. Und ganz vorbildlich erschien ich in der folgenden Woche mit einem Essay. Und darin stand der Zyklus von Smithies. Es war ein ziemlich smarter Zyklus, weil er mit einem anorganischen Phosphat begann und einen Phosphat-Ester bildete, welches eine relativ geringe Energie hatte. Und man nimmt ein Paar Wasserstoffe weg, und Sie können hier den Phosphat-Ester in ein saures Anhydrid umwandeln, und dies ist energiereich, daraus können Sie ATP machen. Und dann gehen Sie hier herum und fügen das Hydrogen hinten hinzu, und Sie können wieder von vorne anfangen und Sie könnten Energie aus nichts herstellen. Nun war ich nicht völlig dumm. Ich wusste, es war falsch, aber ich wusste nicht, warum es falsch war. Und dies war ein interessantes Problem. Und Sandy Ogston schrieb einen Artikel darüber, weil Menschen bei den Berechnungen vergessen haben, dass man an die Konzentration denken muss und nicht nur an was damals die standardmäßige freie Energie genannt wurde, bei der jede Komponente der Reaktion auf einer molaren Konzentration beruhte. Und er arbeitete heraus, dass es ein System geben musste, dass Energie schuf, indem sich Elektronen aufwärts in der elektromotorischen Skala bewegten, sozusagen in der Zelle. Und er sah die Wichtigkeit der Energie durch Konzentration voraus. Und er wurde sich klar darüber, dass das System nicht mit Substraten arbeiten könnte, die von ihren Enzymen getrennt sind. Und sie mussten übergeben werden ohne sich in freie Substrate zu zerlegen. Andernfalls hätten die Kinetiker sich geirrt, es war also ein guter Artikel. Und er veröffentlichte ihn und er war nett genug, meinen Namen als Schüler des Balliol College hinzuzufügen, und ich fühlte mich sehr gut dabei. Dies geschah im Jahr 1948, ist also schon eine ganze Weile her. Aber dann etwa um, sagen wir mal... das genaue Datum weiß ich nicht... aber sagen wir mal im Jahr 1990 etwa kam jemand auf mich zu und sagte, Und ich erwiderte ziemlich bescheiden: “Das stimmt schon, das bin ich”. Und er sagte; „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären tot.“ (lacht) Und jedenfalls geht das Spiel weiter und hier ist meine Doktorarbeit und Sie können hier eine Menge bedeutender Zahlen sehen. Tatsächlich waren es sehr bedeutende Zahlen. Sie sind es nicht bedingt dadurch, dass sie in einem Computer abgerundet wurden, was eine gängige Methode ist, um viele signifikanten Werte zu erhalten. Aber Sie können sehen, dass meine experimentellen Punkte ziemlich gedrängt aneinander liegen und ich maß osmotischen Druck. Es ist nicht sehr wichtig zu wissen, was das ist, aber die Punkte waren so gedrängt, dass ich die Linie unterbrechen musste, um die theoretische Linie darauf zu setzen, und ich war auf diese sehr präzise Methode sehr stolz. Ich veröffentlichte es als “Ein dynamisches Osmometer für genaue Messungen”, ein ordentliches Papier. Es verzeichnete einen Rekord. Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Niemand hat diese Methode wieder verwendet und auch ich habe diese Methode nie wieder verwendet. Sie müssen sich also fragen “Nun, worum geht es hier?” Und ich möchte, dass Sie einen Augenblick nachdenken. Nun, es geht hier darum, dass ich lernte, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben und ich genoss es. Und dies sind die kritischen Dinge in den frühen Stadien Ihrer Karriere, dass Sie lernen, gute Arbeit zu leisten und das gerne zu tun. Es ist nicht wichtig, was Sie tun. Das ist absolut unwichtig. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres wissenschaftlichen Mentors sein. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres Doktorvaters sein. Sie möchten Sie selbst sein, aber Sie können von diesen Leuten lernen, wie Sie gute Wissenschaft betreiben aber Sie müssen es genießen. Andernfalls werden Sie nicht die Leidenschaft haben, die Sie brauchen. Ich bitte Sie also dringend, wenn Sie nicht das tun, was Sie möchten, dann gehen Sie zu Ihrem Berater und sagen „Ich brauche ein anderes Thema, ich genieße es nicht.“ Wenn der Berater es nicht tun kann, dann wechseln Sie den Berater. Ich meine es ernst. Es ist so wichtig, weil es unwahrscheinlich ist und ich hoffe, dass Sie die Arbeit derselben Art tun werden, die Sie gemacht haben als Sie ein graduierter Student waren oder nach der Doktorarbeit. Sie benutzen vielleicht die Fertigkeit aber Sie hoffen, etwas anderes zu tun. Und ich habe dies in meiner Diplomarbeit oder nach der Doktorarbeit nicht geschafft. Meine Zeit nach der Doktorarbeit war nichts Ungewöhnliches, aber ich ging nach Toronto, um einen Job anzunehmen. Und dort erhielt ich einen Job durch David Scott und er hat frühzeitig auf dem Gebiet des Insulins gearbeitet, weil das Insulin in Toronto entdeckt wurde, und er war der Erste, der es herauskristallisierte und dauerhaftes Insulin herstellte. Und er sagte” “Sie können über alles forschen, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat." Und ich dachte Es hat wohl einen Vorläufer geben.” Wir wissen nun, dass es einen Vorläufer gibt. Aber falls Sie es erwarten: ich habe es nicht entdeckt - aber ich versuchte es. Und dabei musste ich einen Weg finden, auf Insulin zu schauen, ich dachte, ich würde etwas Neues mittels Elektrophorese finden. Und damals wurden viele Elektrophoresen auf Filterpapier durchgeführt, wo Sie ein Filterpapier mit Pufferlösung einweichen, das Protein dazugeben und ihm erlauben zu wandern und Sie sehen es verschmiert. Dies war wirklich kein gutes Ergebnis und ich war ziemlich frustriert. Und dann hörte ich von der Arbeit dieser beiden Herren: Kunkel und Slater und Sie hatten einen Kasten verwendet, einen Kasten dieser Größe, dieser Größe und so weiter. Und sie füllten ihn mit Stärke, etwa so wie einen Sandkasten, nur war es Stärke, und sie hatten Puffer darin und sie gaben die Prüfsubstanz in die Stärke. Und der Vorteil war, dass anders als beim Filterpapier ... Dies ist von ihrem Papier … Hier ist ein auf das Filterpapier aufgebrachte Protein und es verschmierte, genau wie mein Insulin verschmierte. Aber wenn Sie es wieder auf die Stärke geben taucht es wie ein deutlicher Zacken wieder auf. Aber um das Protein zu finden müssen Sie es in 40 Scheiben schneiden und auf jeder Scheibe eine Proteinermittlung durchführen und Sie müssen für einen Elektrophorese-Durchgang 40 Proteinermittlungen durchführen. Ich hatte in meinem Labor keine Spülmaschine, ich hatte keinen Techniker. Ich konnte dies nicht machen. Aber ich erinnere mich, meiner Mutter beim Wäschemachen geholfen zu haben; ich war zumindest anwesend... Sie nahm Pulver aus Stärke und kochte es mit heißem Wasser auf und machte eine schleimige Mischung, die für die Hemdenkragen meines Vaters angewendet wurde, die steif sein mussten, und so wurden sie gebügelt. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wurde aus der Stärke ein Gallert. Und ich dachte “Ach du meine Güte, wenn ich ein Stärkegel aus der Stärke mache, es aufkoche, und es dann färben kann, dann werde ich dieses Problem der 40 Scheiben los.” Und am Samstagvormittag war ich damit durch. Und am Nachmittag begann ich mein erstes Experiment damit. Da gibt es einen Schnitt, und da ist das Insulin als ein nettes Band und ich machte den Vermerk Und dies war der Anfang der Elektrophorese mit Gel. Und als ich etwas später nur für einen groben Test fortfuhr hatte ich Plasma oder Serum darauf getan, und ich konnte die Bänder der Proteine sehen, die im Blut enthalten sind. Die Leute dachten, dass es fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha-1, Alpha-2, Beta und Gamma Globulin. Wir wissen heute, dass es etwa 700 von ihnen gibt. Aber die Leute wussten damals von fünf und ich bekam diese Bänder und ich startete das Experiment wieder um Mitternacht... Und ich konnte immer arbeiten. Und, Entschuldigung, und dann ein wenig später organisierte ich es so, dass ich ein Muster in den Bändern erkannte, und ich hatte viele zu beschriftende Bänder. Ich konnte tatsächlich 11 Bänder finden und wenn Sie einen guten Chef haben, können Sie dann eine Schritt nach vorne gehen, denn ich ging zu Scottie, wir nannten uns damals gegenseitig Scottie und Oliver, ich ging zu Scottie und sagte zu ihm: “Scottie, ich habe wirklich etwas sehr Interessantes gefunden. Ich möchte gerne mit der Arbeit am Insulin aufhören und an diesem Problem arbeiten.” Und er sagte, er war ein guter Wissenschaftler “Mach auf alle Fälle den Wechsel” und ich hoffe, dass Sie diese Möglichkeit auch haben. Sehen Sie, als mir das widerfuhr, war meine Doktorarbeit lange her … Es gibt den einen Augenblick und Sie erkennen, dass Sie etwas gefunden haben, das Sie dazu führen sollte etwas ganz Neues zu tun. Und ich war soweit, meine Arbeit zu veröffentlichen und dies waren zwei meiner Freunde. Ich hatte genug davon, selbst zu bluten, und so bekam ich Blut von meinen Freunden. Und ich denke, dafür sind sie da, oder nicht? Und dies sind George Connell und Gordon Dixon, und warum gibt es keine Fotos? Mein Labor hatte keine Kamera. Es war damals ein so karges Labor. Aber ich war bereit zu veröffentlichen und Fotos machen zu lassen. Und dann führte ich zufälligerweise ein Experiment mit Beth Wades Blutprobe durch und seltsamerweise gab es viele zusätzliche Bänder. Und was war an Beth Wades Blut anders? Es handelte sich um eine Frau. Es war das erste Mal, dass ich eine Probe einer Frau untersuchte. Ich dachte, ich habe eine neue Methode gefunden, um Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und ich nannte ein Muster das M-Muster und das andere das W-Muster: M für männlich, W für weiblich. Und ich konnte etwa eine Woche lang etwa zwei Proben täglich untersuchen, männlich und weiblich passten immer gut zusammen. Und dann beim sechsten Mal war alles ganz anders. Und der Mann änderte sich in eine Frau. Wir machten es ihm nicht leicht. Komm schon, Casey, schau dir das an. Aber Sie sagen vielleicht, so ist die Jugend. Aber hier ist mein Datenblatt. Ganz bemerkenswert, aber es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Typen mit dem Geschlecht nichts zu tun hat. Es hatte mit den existierenden Blutgruppen nichts zu tun und es war offenbar etwas Neues. Und ich zeige dies aus einem anderen Grund. Es ist ein Datenblatt, das jetzt fast 60 Jahre alt ist. Sie können Ihr Datenblatt nicht 60 Jahre verfügbar halten, wenn sie keinen Ausdruck machen. Sie müssen Ausdrucke machen von den wichtigen Daten, die Sie haben. Verlassen Sie sich nicht auf Ihren Computer, weil Sie einen Floppy jetzt nicht lesen können, und es gab einen Moment, da hatten wir genau das. Sie werden ganz bestimmt eine CD-ROM in 10 Jahren nicht lesen können. Machen Sie einige Ausdrucke und bewahren Sie gute Ausdrucke auf. Diese Unterschiede, die es hier gab, stellten sich als genetisch bedingt heraus. Und, nur um die Geschichte zu beenden, es war ein ziemlich komplizierter genetischer Unterschied und wir arbeiten daran mit Hilfe von Norma Ford-Walker, die eine hervorragende Genetikerin war und mir Genetik unterrichtet hatte. Und dann, weil die Dinge sich weiterentwickelten, vorher konnten wir keine Protein-Sequenzierung durchführen, jetzt konnten wir Proteine sequenzieren, Gene isolieren, Gene sequenzieren, und es wurde klar, dass es da etwas gab, was man damit tun könnte. Linus Pauling und Harvey Itano und Vernon zum Beispiel zeigten, dass die Sichelzellmutation aus einer Umwandlung der Glutaminsäure in ein Valin im Globinmolekül herrührte. Und ich begann zu glauben, dass es möglich sein sollte, das Gen durch Gentargeting zu korrigieren. Wir sind nun in dem Stadium, in dem wir eine geklonte DNA, eine normale DNA hatten. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einen Teil einer normalen DNA einführe, könnte ich eine Art Genaustausch bekommen, das SA und GE aneinanderzureihen und das schlechte Gen in ein gutes Gen durch Genaustausch umzuwandeln. Ich wusste, dass es in der Hefe möglich ist und Jack war heute hier … Ich weiß nicht, ob er heute unter den Zuhörern ist, Aber Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver zeigten, dass Sie in der Hefe ein Gen modifizieren konnten, und ich habe gelehrt und dass dann so auch unterrichten. Aber das Hefe-Genom ist ungefähr zwei Größenordnungen kleiner als das menschliche Genom. Und es war daher nicht klar, ob es in einem Menschen durchgeführt werden konnte. Und dann wieder, wenn man über “Woher kommen Ideen” spricht... Sie müssen verstehen, wenn Sie unterrichten. Und um zu verstehen, müssen Sie manchmal viel Zeit damit verbringen, ein Papier zu lesen, bevor sie es gut genug verstehen, um es zu unterrichten. Und dies war ein Papier, dass am 1. April 1982 veröffentlicht wurde, und sie sprachen über eine Methode, ein Gen zu befreien, und, ich kann aus Zeitgründen nicht ins Detail gehen, abgesehen davon, dass es das Auffinden eines Teiles blauer DNA beinhaltete, die sozusagen der roten DNA am nächsten ist. Die rote DNA war das, was sie isolieren wollten, und es war die blaue DNA, die sie gewöhnlich fanden. Und ich dachte, dass ich diese Methode für Tests des Genaustausches verwenden kann. Daher gibt es nur drei Wochen, nachdem dieses Papier veröffentlicht wurde, eine Probe für die Gen-Platzierung. Und meine Idee war, daraus die blaue DNA zu verwenden, die in Bakterien zu finden war, und zu versuchen, auf das Beta Globin-Gen abzuzielen und dieses Fragment zu suchen. Ich sollte sagen: dies ist hereinkommende DNA, dies ist das Zielobjekt. Wenn ich ein DNA finden könnte, wo diese beide kombiniert sind, würde ich bewiesen haben, dass die Modifizierung erfolgt ist, da dies nicht auf der hereinkommenden DNA geschehen ist und nicht auf dem Ziel. Und mit einer Menge Arbeit gehen wir tiefer und kommen zur Stufe, auf der wir es vereinfachen, und wir haben eine eher einfaches Plasmid verwendet, das sehr ähnlich aussieht wie das von Terry Orr-Weaver benutzte, und Sie können sehen, dass, wenn Sie das Gen treffen, dies ist eine Abbildung der Enzymbegrenzung, dass Sie ein DNA-Fragment isolieren können, das 11 Kilobasen sein würde, wenn Sie nicht auf das Gen treffen würden. Wenn Sie auf das Gen treffen dann würde die Größe acht Kilobasen sein. Und eine lange Reihe von Experimenten führt zu dem Tag schließlich, als ich an einem Samstag einen Film mit Tests verschiedener Kolonien entwickelte, und es gab einen, wo das Fragment jetzt eine Länge von sieben, acht Kilobasen hat statt mehr, so wurde bewiesen, dass Gentargeting möglich war. Und sobald Sie bewiesen haben, dass dies möglich ist, können Sie es verwenden und andere Leute werden beginnen, es zu verwenden. Aber die Frequenz war hoffnungslos niedrig und für den ursprünglichen Zweck nicht praktisch, der darin bestand, einer Person mit Sichelzellanämie zu helfen. Also was tun? Mit jemand anderem sprechen und ich las über das Werk von Martin Evans, der eine Embryo-Stammzelle verwendet hat. Hier ist eine Blastocyste. Dies ist der Teil der Blastocyste, aus dem der Embryo entsteht. Und Martin Evans und seine Studenten zeigten wie diese zu kultivieren sind, um auf diese Weise diese Zellen einer cremefarbigen Maus zu kultivieren. Und wenn er diese cremefarbigen Stammzelle in eine Blastocyste einfügen, würden sie sich daran erinnern, woher sie kommen, und Sie können aus dieser Blastocyste eine Maus erschaffen, indem sie sie in eine weibliche Maus einsetzen, und Sie würden chimärische Mäuse erhalten, Mischungen. Und von ihnen können Sie das Gen züchten, an dem Sie interessiert sind. Und dies war etwas Offensichtliches. Lasst uns eine Methode verwenden, um Gene zu verändern. Aber die Probe war furchtbar. Und so brauchten wir Hilfe von einem Chemiker und wir bekamen Hilfe von Kary Mullis, der den Nobelpreis für die Erfindung der Polymerase-Kettenreaktion erhielt. Und hier ist eine kleine Stelle in einem meiner Notizbücher, die besagt, dass Sie diese Methode verwenden können, um die rekombinante Passage zu lokalisieren. Und ich baute den Apparat, um dies zu tun. Dies ist mein Apparat. Warum würden Sie einen Apparat bauen? Nun, der Grund war, dass keiner zur Verfügung stand. Sie können keinen Apparat kaufen, um die Polymerase-Kettenreaktion zu machen. Aber ich glaube dass man dieses Schild anbringen sollte. Meine Kollegen taten es bei dem Apparat, der auf dem Boden lag. Und da steht NBGBOKFO “no bloody good, but okay for Oliver”, weil ich immer Material aus Abfall machen würde, wie Sie sehen, und das alles sind Gegenstände aus dem Abfall. Nichts davon ist neu und dies ist noch der Apparat, den wir benutzten für den Nobelpreis. Die Methode war gut und hier ist ein Superartikel darüber und Sie merken, dass ich nicht der Autor bin. Es freut mich zu sagen, dass die Autorin hier unten steht. Sie ist meine Frau und sie kam und schuf ein aufsehenerregendes Tier, das Atherosklerose bekommen kann. Nun, wohin nun? Ich zeige Ihnen auch diese Sache, weil es noch ein bisschen mehr gibt, worüber man reden kann. Hier ist Sandy Ogston wieder, aber hier gibt es jetzt einen kleinen Unterschied, weil hier auch sein Todesdatum steht. Weil er sagte “Wenn ich sterbe, Oliver, möchte ich gerne, dass Du meine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren schreibst”. Und dies war etwas, was die Royal Society gerne haben wollte. Und dann müssen Sie all diese Papers lesen. Und ich las alles von ihm aus seinen Papers. Und dann hatte er diese schöne kleine Formel hier, die über den verfügbaren Raum in einem Gel in Molekülen von einem Radius R spricht, wenn das Gel aus Fasern des Radius r besteht, und es gibt n Fasern pro Quadratzentimeter. Und er sprach über einen Querschnitt des Gels. Und diese Gleichung ist berückend genau. Sie funktioniert für jedes Gel, von dem Sie je gehört haben und wurde ausgiebig getestet. Diese zwei Herren in meinem Labor machten ein Diagramm, um sie zu veranschaulichen, und ich mochte es. Wenn Sie eine kleine gelöste Substanz haben, kann sie eine Menge Raum in einem Gel vorfinden. Aber wenn Sie eine große gelöste Substanz haben kann es nur einen begrenzten Raum vorfinden. Und ich dachte, dass dies auf die Niere angewendet werden könnte und ich schrieb ein Paper darüber, dass die Idee darin bestünde, dass hier kleine Moleküle leicht durch die Niere gehen würden. Und große Moleküle würden eine ziemlich niedrige Konzentration haben, wenn sie durch ein Gel gehen müssen und ich veröffentlichte ein Diagramm, das das Prinzip veranschaulichte. Dies ist ein Querschnitt einer Niere in EM-Auflösung. Und dies sind die Größen der Albumin-Moleküle, im Maßstab, und dies ist das Gel in der Niere, durch die, wie ich dachte, der Vorgang erfolgen würde. Und ich ging zu unserem Spezialisten für kolloidales Gold, das ich verwenden wollte, um sie in dem Elektronmikroskop zu sehen. Und er sagte, ich werde sie nicht für dich machen, Oliver. Sie machen ihre eigenen. Er sagte “Du wirst mehr lernen, wenn Du sie machst.” Ich war total begeistert. Es gibt wunderbare interessante Dinge und ich verbrachte einen großen Teil meiner Zeit mit ihnen. Ich werde Ihnen hier nur ein Beispiel zeigen. Dies war vor vier Jahren. Und dies war die Zeit, als ich zu lernen begann … Arbeitete immer noch am Wochenende. Das war der Zeit als ich herausfand, dass ich die Größe eines Moleküls kontrollieren konnte, indem ich die Zeitdauer der Reaktion im Verfahren variierte. Ich machte daraus in Langmuir ein Paper und ich bin der erste Autor. Und ich bin der erste Autor, weil ich die Arbeit gemacht habe, nicht weil ich das Paper geschrieben habe, sondern weil die Experimente meine waren, die meisten von ihnen. Denken Sie also darüber nach. Es ist wirklich nett, in einem Paper mit 89 Jahren der Hauptverfasser zu sein, und besonders wenn es das erste Paper ist, dass ich je in einer Chemie-Zeitschrift veröffentlicht habe. Aber ich habe noch etwas … Oh, hier ist ein Beispiel, an dem man arbeiten sollte. Hier ist ein Plasma mit großen Molekülen in Clustern und sie können nicht in die Basalmembran eindringen. Es ist komplizierter als das, aber dies ist ein Beispiel. Ich habe eine letzte kleine Sache, die ich Ihnen zeigen will, und hier ist es. Und warum zeige ich ein Flugzeug dafür? Es ist zum Teil, weil es ein Teil meines Lebens ist, aber dies ist mein Lehrer, Field Morey. Und er brachte mir das Fliegen bei, und ich war ein nervöser Flieger. Als ich lernte mit ihm zu fliegen, hier sitzt der Lehrer und der Schüler sitzt auf dem linkem Sitz. Schweiß strömte mir aus allen Poren, ich meine es wörtlich. Und so wandte ich mich eines Tages an ihn und sagte: „Dies war ein guter Tag für Sie. Nur ein Tropfen ist abgefallen.“ Und das führte mich zu einem Gedanken. Ich habe später gelernt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich hatte einen Schüler, Jeff Bloch. Und als wir zusammen flogen, ich brachte ihm das Gleiten bei, kam er komplett durchnässt zurück. Er klebte richtig an der Rückenlehne. Er flog dann irgendwann selbst und sagte später zu mir “Schau, Oliver, trocken.” Dies ist eine sehr interessante Lektion, nicht nur für das Fliegen. Sie zeigt Ihnen, dass Sie mit Wissen Angst bewältigen können. Wenn Sie nervös dabei sind, wenn Sie etwas Neues in der Wissenschaft machen, dann könnten Sie sagen “Dieser Kerl hier, er ist viel schlauer als ich. Oder diese Dame, sie weiß, was zu tun ist. Ich könnte das möglicherweise nicht tun”. Sie sind ängstlich. Gehen Sie, lernen Sie. Gehen Sie, lesen Sie. Sie können alles. Sie können Felder ändern. Sie müssen nicht irgendwo festgefahren sein. Gehen Sie und überwinden Sie Angst durch Wissen. Dies ist mein Motorgleiter und hier ist mein Freund. Und wenn Sie Glück haben werden Sie einen Freund haben wie ich ihn in Nobuyo habe und an dieser Stelle höre ich auf. Applaus

Oliver Smithies on how he developed gene targeting to treat sickle cell anaemia.
(00:22:04 - 00:26:02)

 

The polymerase chain reaction, a technique in which millions of copies of a given DNA molecule can be obtained from only one starting copy, has revolutionised molecular biology enabling many kinds of analysis and manipulation of DNA. Kary Mullis was awarded one-half of the 1993 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for inventing the method. In the same lecture from 2015, Oliver Smithies talks about how PCR also aided him in his ground-breaking work:

 

Oliver Smithies (2015) - Ideas Come from Many Places

Well, where to begin? I'm not going to tell you what this slide is about. You'd have to come this afternoon, and we can talk about it. But "Where Do Ideas Come From" is the title of my talk, and it's always a question of where to begin. And I think this is a good place to begin because this is one of the joyful times that happens to a Nobel Laureate that somebody decides they would like to remember where you were at school, and I was at school here from age 5 to 11. And they unveiled a plaque here, and some of the kids are there celebrating with me. It's interesting to me because I already knew by the time I left this school at that age that I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know the word. The best I could come up with was I wanted to be an inventor, as a result of reading comic strips about inventors. And then I'd like you to see where it was that I lived. I lived in a little village called Copley with a population of only 1,500, and I'm curious, how many of you guys come from a village as small as that? Not very many. But it was a good place to live. The school was about over here, and my home was up here, and there was a rather lovely river there, the River Calder, except for the fact that when I was a kid it was badly polluted, though it no longer is I'm happy to say. If you go down this River Calder, you come to, there's Copley, and here is the River Calder... You come to another town, Elland, and Elland has a population of 15,000, so it's a rather bigger town. And it produced a Nobel Laureate in 1997 in chemistry. If you go upstream from Copley, you come to another town, Todmorden, that also has a population of about 15,000. It produced two Nobel Laureates. So the water? Obviously not. (laughs) The teachers is the answer. The teachers inspire you and give you all sorts of thoughts. And in fact, we can look at the teachers that were involved in all of these persons. And Smithies had a good teacher in elementary school and two teachers in high school. And Walker had a good science teacher. And Cockcroft and Wilkinson both had the same science teacher, so that science teacher was teaching for more than 20 years and produced, as it were, two Nobel Laureates. So if you're a teacher, think how much influence you can have in the future. Maybe you will have the enjoyment of being a teacher and being remembered. Maybe you'll produce a Nobel Laureate, who knows? So be a careful teacher when you're a teacher. I had a grand teacher when I went to college. I went to college in Oxford University, Balliol College. And this is my teacher, "Sandy" Ogston. He was trained in chemistry and then took a second degree in physiology and began to teach students, in the medical curriculum, and I had won my scholarship to the college with physics, but I for some reason that escapes me now, I decided to do medicine. Anyway, "Sandy" Ogston was my teacher. And he produced a Nobel Laureate in 1976 and another one in 2007, so some teachers can really inspire you. The way of teaching at that time in Oxford, and it still is the primary way, is a marvellous way, and I wish we could do it more easily all over the world. But it's an expensive way of teaching. And that is that once a week, you would meet with your teacher, in this case "Sandy" Ogston and present to him or her an essay that you had written over the preceding week on a topic that had been assigned to you. And you were expected to produce something that went back to the original literature. You couldn't work with a textbook, or you might read a textbook, you might read a review, but you were expected to write something original. Might get a topic, "Oh, write me an essay on pain." And that's all you'll be told, and you were expected to produce a learned article in a week. (laughs) Well Sandy set me the topic, "Write me an essay, Oliver, on energy metabolism." Now this was before the tricarboxylic acid cycle had been published, before Krebs' cycle. And I set about this task. And then I came across this. And why would I show you a book? I show you this book because what's in this book was so exciting that I remember where I was when I read it. I remember what the book looked like. I remember what the paper looked like. It was so inspiring to read something that made sense out of what appeared to be nonsense. And the nonsense was: Why doesn't the body just burn glucose and make carbon dioxide? It goes through all these complicated things of adding phosphate and doing this and that and the other. And why does it do it? And this book contains the answer. The answer is this little squiggle here, squiggle P, which means energy-rich phosphate, an energy-rich phosphate bond. And for the chemists, it's interesting that the energy-rich ones are all acid anhydrides, and acid anhydrides are very powerful organic compounds, have much more energy in them, for example, than a phosphate ester would have. And anyway, true to form, I came back with an essay the following week. And in it, I had Smithies' cycle. And it was rather a neat cycle because you could start with an inorganic phosphate and make a phosphate ester, and that's relatively low energy and take away a couple of hydrogens. And you can convert the phosphate ester into an acid anhydride here, and that's energy rich, from which you could make ATP. And then go around here and add the hydrogen back, and you could start over again, and you could produce energy for nothing. Well, I wasn't completely stupid. I did know it was wrong, but I didn't know why it was wrong. And that was an interesting problem. And "Sandy" Ogston proceeded to write an article on it eventually because it turned out that people had forgotten in making the calculations that you had to think about the concentration of things, not just about what was called standard free energies in those days, where every reaction component was at one molar concentration. And he worked out that there had to be a system that produced energy in moving electrons up the electromotive scale, you might say, in the cell. So he foresaw the importance of energy by concentration, and he also realised that the system wouldn't work if the substrates dissociated from their enzymes. They had to be handed over as it were without dissociating into free substrate. Otherwise, the kinetics would be wrong, so it was a good article. And he published it, and he was kind enough to add my name as a scholar of Balliol College, and I felt pretty good about this. And then this was 1948, so it's quite a long time ago. But then somewhere around about, oh let's say, I don't know the exact date, but say 1990 or thereabout somebody came up to me and said, you see 1990 would be And I rather modestly said, "Well as a matter of fact, I am." And he said, "Oh I thought you were dead." (laughs) So anyway, on with the game, and here's my PhD thesis, and you can see a lot of significant figures here. And in fact those are real significant figures. They're not due to not rounding off in a computer, which is the common method of getting many significant figures. But you can see that my experimental points are really rather closely together, and I was measuring osmotic pressure. It's not very important to know what that is, but the points were so close that I had to interrupt the line to put the theoretical line on, so I was very proud of this super precision method. And I published it, "A Dynamic Osmometer for Accurate Measurements," a neat paper. It has a record. Nobody ever quoted it. Nobody ever used the method again, and I never used the method again. So you have to ask yourself, "Well what was the point of it?" And I want you to think a moment. Well the point of it was that I learned to do good science, and I enjoyed it. And those are the critical things in the early stages of your career that you learn to do good work and to enjoy it. It does not matter what you do. It's absolutely unimportant. You do not want to be a clone of your advisor. You do not want to be a clone of your post-doctoral advisor. You want to be yourself, but you can learn from these people how to do good science, but you must be enjoying it. Otherwise, you won't have that fire that's needed. So I urge you, if you aren't doing what you like, go to your advisor and say, "I need another problem. I'm not enjoying it." If your advisor can't do that, change your advisor. I'm serious. It's so important because it's very unlikely, and I hope it is true that you will do work of the same type that you did when you were a graduate student or when you were a postdoc. You may use the skill, but you hope to do something different. And I didn't achieve that in my graduate work or in my postdoc. My postdoc was equally undistinguished, but I went to Toronto to get a job. And there I was given a job by David Scott, and he was an early worker in the field of insulin work because insulin was discovered in Toronto, and he was the first person to crystalize it and make a long-lasting insulin. And he said, "You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin." And I thought, There might be a precursor." Well, we now know there is a precursor. But in case you're waiting, I did not discover it, but I tried. And on the way, I had to find a way of looking at insulin, thinking I would find something slightly different in electrophoresis. And in those days, much electrophoresis was done on filter paper, where you would soak a filter paper with buffer, apply the protein, and allow it to migrate, and you can it just unrolled like a smear and really was very poor, and I was rather frustrated. And then I heard of the work of these two gentlemen: Kunkel and Slater, and they'd use a box, a box about this big, this big and so on. And they filled it full of starch grains, rather like a sandbox, except there were grains of starch, and they had buffer around it, and they applied the sample in the starch. And the advantage was that unlike the filter paper... This is from their paper... Here's a protein applied on filter paper, and it smeared, just as my insulin smeared. But when they put it on the starch grain, it came out as a nice peak. But in order to find the protein, you had to cut it up into 40 slices and do a protein determination on every slice, so you had to do 40 protein determinations for one electrophoresis run. I didn't even have a dishwasher in my lab, didn't have a technician. I couldn't do that. But I remembered helping my mother do the laundry, well I was there anyway. She took starch powder and cooked it up with hot water and made a slimy mix, which was used to apply to collars of my father's shirts, which needed to be stiff, and so it was ironed. And when you tied it up at the end of the day, the starch, it set into a jelly. And I thought, "Well my gosh, if I go back and make a starch gel out of the starch, cook it up, and then I can stain it, and I will get rid of all of that problem of 40 slices." Saturday morning was when I had that. And by the afternoon, I'd started my first experiment with it. There is a slot, and there is the insulin as a nice band and made the remark, And that was the beginning of gel electrophoresis. It went on because some time later just for a rough test, I put plasma or serum onto it, and I could see the bands that were known of the proteins that were known to be present in blood at that time. People thought there were five proteins: albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, and gamma globulin. We now know there are about 700 or something like that. But anyway at that time, people thought five, and I got these bands and set it up again, oh 12 midnight. And I could work at any time. And excuse me, and then a little bit later, I managed to see this sort of a pattern with many bands, and I had too many bands to label. In fact, I could find 11 all together, and here's when if you have a good boss, you can really make a step forward because I went to Scottie, as by then he and I called each other Scottie and Oliver. I went to Scottie and said, "Scottie, I've really found something very interesting. I'd like to stop working on insulin and work on this problem." And he said, he was a good scientist, "By all means, change", and that I hope you have that experience. You see I was long past my postdoc when it happened to me... That you get a time when you see you found something that you ought to do that's different from what has happened in the past. And I was ready to publish my work, and these are two of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself and so I got blood from my friends. And I mean that's what they're for, isn't it? And that's George Connell and Gordon Dixon, and why aren't there photographs? My lab didn't own a camera. It was such a poor lab at that time. But I was about ready to get ready to publish and getting photographs made. And then just by chance, I ran another sample from BW, and it was very strange, many extra bands. And so what was funny about BW? It was a woman. This is the first time that I'd run a sample from a woman. I thought I found a new method of telling men from women. And I called one pattern the M pattern and the other pattern the F pattern: M for male, F for female. And I could do two samples in a day for about a week or so, male and female always fit right. And then the sixth time, they were changed. And the man had changed into a woman. We gave him a real hard time. Come on Casey. Let's have look. But anyway, such is youth you might say. But here is my data file. Just remarkable, but it turned out the difference between the types had nothing to do with gender. It had nothing to do with the existing blood groups, and it was obviously something new. And I show this for another reason. It's a data file that's now, well what, almost 60 years old. You won't be able to produce your data file 60 years from now if you don't make a hard copy. You got to make hard copies of the important data that you have. Don't rely on your computer because you can't read a floppy disc now, and there was a time when that was what we had. You won't be able to read a CD in 10 years from now, for sure. Make some hard copies and keep good hard copies. Well those differences that were here turned out to be genetic. And just to close this story, it was a rather complicated genetic difference, and we worked it out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker, who was a marvellous geneticist and taught me genetics. And then as things moved on, we changed from not being able to do protein sequencing to be able to protein sequence, isolating genes, sequencing gene, and it began to become clear that there was something that one might do about this. For example, Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram showed that the sickle cell mutation was just due to a change of glutamic acid to a valine in the globin molecule. And I began to think it ought to be possible to correct the gene by gene targeting. We now are at a stage where we had cloned DNA, a normal DNA. And I thought if I introduce a piece of normal DNA, I might be able to get some crossing over, so SA lining up with SA and GE and change the bad gene into the good gene by crossing over. I knew it was possible in yeast, and Jack is here today... I don't know whether he's here in the audience now, but Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver had shown that in yeast you could target a gene, and I was teaching, so I had taught this. But the yeast genome is about, well what, two orders of magnitude smaller than the human genome. And so whether it could be done in a human was not at all clear. And then again in teaching "Where do ideas come from?" When you teach, you have to understand. And in order to understand, you sometimes have to spend a long time reading a paper before you can understand it well enough to teach it. And this was a paper that came out April 1st in 1982, and they talked about a method of rescuing a gene, and I can't go into the details, except to say, because of time, that it involved finding a piece of blue DNA, you might say, next to red DNA. The red DNA was what they wanted to isolate, and the blue DNA was what they used to find it. And I thought that I could use this method for gene targeting tests. So here's, only three weeks after that paper came out, an assay for gene placement. And my idea was to use their blue DNA, which you could score in bacteria and try to target the beta globin gene and look for this fragment. I should say: this is incoming DNA, this is the target. If I could find a piece of DNA where these two were together, I would've proved that targeting had occurred because this was not on the incoming DNA, and this was not on the target. And with quite a lot of work, we got further down and got to the stage of simplifying it and used a rather simpler plasmid, which looks very like the one that Terry Orr-Weaver had used, and you could see that if you hit the gene, this is a restriction enzyme map that in the right way, you could isolate a fragment of DNA that would be 11 kilobases if you didn't hit the gene. If you hit the gene, then the size would be eight kilobases. And a long set of experiments led to the final day, when on a Saturday when I developed a film of testing different colonies, and there is the one where the fragment is now a seven, eight kilobases long instead of larger, so this proved that gene targeting was possible. And once you've proved something is possible, then you can go and use it, and other people will start to do it. But the frequency was hopelessly low and not practical for the original purpose, which was to try to help a person with sickle cell anaemia. So what to do? Talk to somebody else, and I went and read about Martin Evans' work, which was using an embryonic stem cell. Here is a blastocyst. That's the part of the blastocyst that will give rise to the embryo. And what Martin Evans and his students learned how to culture those in culture, so that he had these cells growing in culture from a cream-coloured mouse. And if you put these cream-coloured stem cells back into a blastocyst, they would remember where they came from, and you could generate a mouse from this blastocyst by putting it back into a pseudopregnant female, and you would get chimeric mice, mixtures. And from them, you could breed out the gene that you were interested in. So that was an obvious thing. Let's use this method to alter gene. But the assay was terrible. And so we had to have help from a chemist, and we got help from Kary Mullis, who got the Nobel Prize for inventing polymerase chain reaction. And here is a little place in one of my notebooks, saying that we could use this method to detect the recombinant. And I made an apparatus to do it. This is my apparatus. Why would you make an apparatus? Well the reason was there wasn't one available. You could not get an apparatus for doing PCR. But I think this ought to have this label on it because that's what my graduate student friends used to put on an apparatus that was lying somewhere on the floor. And it stands for NBGBOKFO, no bloody good, but okay for Oliver because I would always make stuff out of junk, you see, and so these are all junk things. None of them were new, and yet that's the apparatus which we used and helped me towards the Nobel Prize. The method was good, and here's a super article about it, and you notice I'm not an author. I'm happy to say the author is down there. She's my wife, and she went and made a marvellous animal that could get atherosclerosis. Well, so where to? Well, I'm showing you this one more thing because I have one little more topic to talk about. Here's "Sandy" Ogston again, but there's a little difference now because I've got the date of his death. Because he asked, "When I die, Oliver, I'd like you to write my scientific memoirs." That was something that the Royal Society liked to have. And then you have to read all of his papers. And I read all his of his papers. And then he had this beautiful, little formula here, talking about the available space in a gel to molecules of radius big R when the gel is composed of fibres of radius little r, and there are n fibres per square centimetre. He was talking about a cross section of the gel. And this equation is beautifully precise. It worked in every gel you ever heard of and has been tested inordinately. These two guys in my lab, and they made this diagram to illustrate it, and I like it. If you have a small solute, it can find lots of space in a gel. But if you have a large solute, it can only find a limited space. And so I thought this might apply to the kidney, and I wrote a paper on this that the idea being that here the small molecules would come through the kidney easily. And big molecules, if they had to pass through a gel, would come rather low concentration, and I published a diagram illustrating the principle. This is a cross section of a kidney at electron microscope dimension. And these are the sizes of albumin molecules drawn to scale, and this is the gel in the kidney through which I thought the thing might happen. And so I went to our local person who was an expert in making a gold nanoparticle, which I wanted to use, to see in the electron microscope. And he said, I'm not going to make them for you, Oliver. You make your own. He said, "You'll learn more if you make them." I got hooked. They're marvellous, interesting things, and I spent a large amount of my personal time on them. I'll just show you one example here. That's what, four years ago. And this was the time when I first learned... Was still working at the weekend. This is the time when I found out that I could control the size of the molecule by varying the time of a reaction step in the procedure. I got a paper out of it in Langmuir, and I'm the first author. And I'm the first author because I did the work, not because I wrote the paper, though I did, but because the experiments were mine, most of them. And so, think about it. It's really rather neat to have a first author paper when you're 89 and especially if this is the first paper I ever published in a chemistry journal. But I have one more... Oh there's an example of working of it. Here is plasma with the large molecules in clusters, and they can't get into the basement membrane. It's more complicated than that, but that's an example. I've one last, a little thing to show you, and that's this. And what am I showing an aeroplane for? Wel,l partly because that's been a part of my life, but this is my instructor, Field Morey. And he taught me to fly, and I was a nervous flyer. And when I learned to fly with him, instructor sits here, and the pupil sit in the left seat. And sweat used to pour off me, I mean literally. And so one day I turned to him and said, "That was a good day for you. Only one drop dripped." That gives you some idea. Well, I later on learned to be an instructor, and I had a pupil, Jeff Bloch. And when we went flying together, I was teaching him to glide, he would come back absolutely sodden. His back would be completely sticking to himself. He went by himself when the time came, and he came back, and he said, "Look Oliver, dry." That's a very important lesson, not just for flying. It tells you that you can overcome fear with knowledge. If you're nervous about doing something new in science, you might say, "This guy over here, he's much smarter than me. Or this lady, she knows what to do. I couldn't possibly do that." You're frightened. Go and learn. Go and read. You can do anything. You can change fields. You don't have to be stuck somewhere. Go away and overcome fear with knowledge. That's my motor glider, and here's my companion. And if you're lucky, you will have a companion as I have in Nobuyo, and that's where I stop. applause

Gut, wo fangen wir an? Ich werde Ihnen jetzt nicht erzählen, worum es sich bei dieser Folie handelt. Sie müssen heute Nachmittag kommen und wir können darüber reden. Aber der Titel meiner Rede lautet “Wo die Ideen herkommen” und es ist immer eine Frage, wo man anfängt. Und ich glaube, dies ist ein guter Platz, um zu beginnen, weil dies einer der erfreulichen Momente für einen Nobelpreisträger ist, wenn jemand wissen will, wo Sie in der Schule waren, und ich war hier in der Schule im Alter von 5 bis 11 Jahren. Und Sie enthüllten hier eine Tafel, ein Paar Kinder feiern hier mit mir. Es ist interessant für mich, weil ich schon in der Zeit, in der ich diese Schule an diesem Alter verließ, wusste, dass ich ein Wissenschaftler sein möchte, aber ich kannte das Wort nicht. Das Beste, was ich zur Sprache bringen konnte, war, dass ich ein Erfinder sein wollte. Dies war ein Ergebnis davon, dass ich Comics über Erfinder gelesen habe. Und dann möchte ich gerne, dass Sie sehen, wo ich aufgewachsen bin. Ich lebte in einem kleinen Ort namens Copley mit einer Einwohnerzahl von nur 1,500, und ich bin neugierig, wie viele von Ihnen aus einem so kleinen Ort kommen. Nicht sehr viele. Aber es war gut, an diesem Ort zu leben. Die Schule war etwa hier und mein Zuhause etwa hier und es gab dort einen schönen Fluss, den River Calder. Von der Tatsache abgesehen, dass er, als ich ein Kind war, schlimm verschmutzt gewesen ist, aber dies ist nicht mehr so und ich freue mich, dies zu sagen. Wenn Sie den River Calder abwärts gehen kommen Sie zu, hier ist Copley und hier ist der River Calder ... Sie kommen zu einer anderen Stadt, Elland, und Elland hat eine Einwohnerzahl von 15.000, ist also eine etwas größere Stadt. Und sie brachte im Jahr 1997 einen Nobelpreis in Chemie hervor. Wenn Sie von Copley stromaufwärts gehen, dann kommen Sie zu einer anderen Stadt, Todmorden, die ebenfalls eine Einwohnerzahl von ungefähr 15.000 hat. Und sie brachte zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Also ist es das Wasser? Offensichtlich nicht. (Gelächter). Die Antwort lautet: die Lehrer. Die Lehrer inspirieren Sie und ermuntern Sie zu denken. Und tatsächlich können wir uns die Lehrer betrachten, die mit all diesen Personen zu tun hatten. Und Smithies hatte einen guten Lehrer in der Grundschule und zwei Lehrer im Gymnasium. Und Walker hatte einen guten Lehrer für Wissenschaften. Und Cockcroft und Wilkinson hatten beide denselben Lehrer für Wissenschaften, dieser Lehrer für Wissenschaften unterrichtete also mehr als 20 Jahre lang und brachte sozusagen zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Wenn Sie also Lehrer sind, dann denken Sie daran, wieviel Einfluss Sie in der Zukunft haben können. Vielleicht werden Sie das Vergnügen haben, ein Lehrer zu sein und nicht vergessen zu werden. Vielleicht bringen Sie einen Nobelpreisträger hervor, wer weiß? Seien Sie also ein sorgfältiger Lehrer, wenn Sie Lehrer sind. Ich hatte einen großartigen Lehrer, als ich zur Universität ging. Ich ging in das Balliol College der Universität von Oxford. Und dies ist mein Lehrer, “Sandy” Ogston. Er war in Chemie ausgebildet und machte einen zweiten Hochschulabschluss in Physik und fing an, Studenten im medizinischen Fachbereich zu unterrichten und ich habe das Stipendium für die Hochschule mit Physik erhalten, aber aus einem Grund, der mir im Moment nicht einfällt, habe ich mich für die Medizin entschieden. Jedenfalls war Sandy Ogston mein Lehrer. Und er brachte einen Nobelpreis im Jahr 1976 und einen weiteren im Jahr 2007 hervor, manche Lehrer können Sie also wirklich inspirieren. Die Art und Weise, in der damals in Oxford unterrichtet wurde, und dies wird hauptsächlich noch so gemacht, ist wunderbar. Ich wünsche mir, wir könnten es überall auf der Welt so machen. Aber es ist eine teure Art des Unterrichts. Und es war einmal in der Woche, dass Sie Ihren Lehrer treffen konnten, in diesem Fall Sandy Ogston, und ihm oder ihr einen Essay vorlegen, den Sie in der vergangenen Woche über ein Ihnen zugeteiltes Thema geschrieben haben. Und es wurde von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas erstellen, was zu der ursprünglichen Literatur zurückgeht. Sie können nicht mit einem Lehrbuch arbeiten, oder Sie lesen vielleicht ein Lehrbuch oder eine Besprechung - aber es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas Neues schreiben. Sie erhalten vielleicht ein Thema “Schreiben Sie einen Aufsatz über Brot.” Und das ist alles, was man Ihnen sagt, und es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie einen tiefgründigen Artikel innerhalb einer Woche erstellen. (lacht) Sandy hat mir folgendes Thema zugeteilt: "Oliver, schreib mir einen Essay über Energie-Metabolismus”. Dies war jetzt vor der Veröffentlichung des Zyklus über Trikarbonsäurezyklus, vor dem Zyklus von Krebs. Und ich machte mich an die Arbeit. Und dann kam mir dies in die Quere. Und warum sollte ich Ihnen ein Buch zeigen? Ich zeige Ihnen dieses Buch, denn was in diesem Buch stand war so aufregend, dass ich mich daran erinnere, wo ich war, als ich es las. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Buch aussah. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Papier aussah. Es war so inspirierend, etwas zu lesen, was Sinn machte aus etwas, was Unsinn zu sein schien. Und der Unsinn war: Warum verbrennt der Körper nicht einfach Glukose und macht Kohlendioxid? Es ging durch all diese komplizierten Dinge durch das Hinzufügen von Phosphat und indem man dies und jenes tut. Und warum funktioniert es? Und dieses Buch enthält die Antwort. Die Antwort ist dieser kleine Schnörkel hier, P-Schnörkel, der energiereiches Phosphat bedeutet, eine energiereiche Phosphatverbindung. Und für die Chemiker ist es interessant, dass die energiereichen Verbindungen alle saure Anhydride sind. Und saure Anhydride sind sehr mächtige organische Stoffe, die sehr viel mehr Energie in sich bergen als es zum Beispiel die Phosphat-Ester haben würden. Und ganz vorbildlich erschien ich in der folgenden Woche mit einem Essay. Und darin stand der Zyklus von Smithies. Es war ein ziemlich smarter Zyklus, weil er mit einem anorganischen Phosphat begann und einen Phosphat-Ester bildete, welches eine relativ geringe Energie hatte. Und man nimmt ein Paar Wasserstoffe weg, und Sie können hier den Phosphat-Ester in ein saures Anhydrid umwandeln, und dies ist energiereich, daraus können Sie ATP machen. Und dann gehen Sie hier herum und fügen das Hydrogen hinten hinzu, und Sie können wieder von vorne anfangen und Sie könnten Energie aus nichts herstellen. Nun war ich nicht völlig dumm. Ich wusste, es war falsch, aber ich wusste nicht, warum es falsch war. Und dies war ein interessantes Problem. Und Sandy Ogston schrieb einen Artikel darüber, weil Menschen bei den Berechnungen vergessen haben, dass man an die Konzentration denken muss und nicht nur an was damals die standardmäßige freie Energie genannt wurde, bei der jede Komponente der Reaktion auf einer molaren Konzentration beruhte. Und er arbeitete heraus, dass es ein System geben musste, dass Energie schuf, indem sich Elektronen aufwärts in der elektromotorischen Skala bewegten, sozusagen in der Zelle. Und er sah die Wichtigkeit der Energie durch Konzentration voraus. Und er wurde sich klar darüber, dass das System nicht mit Substraten arbeiten könnte, die von ihren Enzymen getrennt sind. Und sie mussten übergeben werden ohne sich in freie Substrate zu zerlegen. Andernfalls hätten die Kinetiker sich geirrt, es war also ein guter Artikel. Und er veröffentlichte ihn und er war nett genug, meinen Namen als Schüler des Balliol College hinzuzufügen, und ich fühlte mich sehr gut dabei. Dies geschah im Jahr 1948, ist also schon eine ganze Weile her. Aber dann etwa um, sagen wir mal... das genaue Datum weiß ich nicht... aber sagen wir mal im Jahr 1990 etwa kam jemand auf mich zu und sagte, Und ich erwiderte ziemlich bescheiden: “Das stimmt schon, das bin ich”. Und er sagte; „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären tot.“ (lacht) Und jedenfalls geht das Spiel weiter und hier ist meine Doktorarbeit und Sie können hier eine Menge bedeutender Zahlen sehen. Tatsächlich waren es sehr bedeutende Zahlen. Sie sind es nicht bedingt dadurch, dass sie in einem Computer abgerundet wurden, was eine gängige Methode ist, um viele signifikanten Werte zu erhalten. Aber Sie können sehen, dass meine experimentellen Punkte ziemlich gedrängt aneinander liegen und ich maß osmotischen Druck. Es ist nicht sehr wichtig zu wissen, was das ist, aber die Punkte waren so gedrängt, dass ich die Linie unterbrechen musste, um die theoretische Linie darauf zu setzen, und ich war auf diese sehr präzise Methode sehr stolz. Ich veröffentlichte es als “Ein dynamisches Osmometer für genaue Messungen”, ein ordentliches Papier. Es verzeichnete einen Rekord. Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Niemand hat diese Methode wieder verwendet und auch ich habe diese Methode nie wieder verwendet. Sie müssen sich also fragen “Nun, worum geht es hier?” Und ich möchte, dass Sie einen Augenblick nachdenken. Nun, es geht hier darum, dass ich lernte, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben und ich genoss es. Und dies sind die kritischen Dinge in den frühen Stadien Ihrer Karriere, dass Sie lernen, gute Arbeit zu leisten und das gerne zu tun. Es ist nicht wichtig, was Sie tun. Das ist absolut unwichtig. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres wissenschaftlichen Mentors sein. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres Doktorvaters sein. Sie möchten Sie selbst sein, aber Sie können von diesen Leuten lernen, wie Sie gute Wissenschaft betreiben aber Sie müssen es genießen. Andernfalls werden Sie nicht die Leidenschaft haben, die Sie brauchen. Ich bitte Sie also dringend, wenn Sie nicht das tun, was Sie möchten, dann gehen Sie zu Ihrem Berater und sagen „Ich brauche ein anderes Thema, ich genieße es nicht.“ Wenn der Berater es nicht tun kann, dann wechseln Sie den Berater. Ich meine es ernst. Es ist so wichtig, weil es unwahrscheinlich ist und ich hoffe, dass Sie die Arbeit derselben Art tun werden, die Sie gemacht haben als Sie ein graduierter Student waren oder nach der Doktorarbeit. Sie benutzen vielleicht die Fertigkeit aber Sie hoffen, etwas anderes zu tun. Und ich habe dies in meiner Diplomarbeit oder nach der Doktorarbeit nicht geschafft. Meine Zeit nach der Doktorarbeit war nichts Ungewöhnliches, aber ich ging nach Toronto, um einen Job anzunehmen. Und dort erhielt ich einen Job durch David Scott und er hat frühzeitig auf dem Gebiet des Insulins gearbeitet, weil das Insulin in Toronto entdeckt wurde, und er war der Erste, der es herauskristallisierte und dauerhaftes Insulin herstellte. Und er sagte” “Sie können über alles forschen, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat." Und ich dachte Es hat wohl einen Vorläufer geben.” Wir wissen nun, dass es einen Vorläufer gibt. Aber falls Sie es erwarten: ich habe es nicht entdeckt - aber ich versuchte es. Und dabei musste ich einen Weg finden, auf Insulin zu schauen, ich dachte, ich würde etwas Neues mittels Elektrophorese finden. Und damals wurden viele Elektrophoresen auf Filterpapier durchgeführt, wo Sie ein Filterpapier mit Pufferlösung einweichen, das Protein dazugeben und ihm erlauben zu wandern und Sie sehen es verschmiert. Dies war wirklich kein gutes Ergebnis und ich war ziemlich frustriert. Und dann hörte ich von der Arbeit dieser beiden Herren: Kunkel und Slater und Sie hatten einen Kasten verwendet, einen Kasten dieser Größe, dieser Größe und so weiter. Und sie füllten ihn mit Stärke, etwa so wie einen Sandkasten, nur war es Stärke, und sie hatten Puffer darin und sie gaben die Prüfsubstanz in die Stärke. Und der Vorteil war, dass anders als beim Filterpapier ... Dies ist von ihrem Papier … Hier ist ein auf das Filterpapier aufgebrachte Protein und es verschmierte, genau wie mein Insulin verschmierte. Aber wenn Sie es wieder auf die Stärke geben taucht es wie ein deutlicher Zacken wieder auf. Aber um das Protein zu finden müssen Sie es in 40 Scheiben schneiden und auf jeder Scheibe eine Proteinermittlung durchführen und Sie müssen für einen Elektrophorese-Durchgang 40 Proteinermittlungen durchführen. Ich hatte in meinem Labor keine Spülmaschine, ich hatte keinen Techniker. Ich konnte dies nicht machen. Aber ich erinnere mich, meiner Mutter beim Wäschemachen geholfen zu haben; ich war zumindest anwesend... Sie nahm Pulver aus Stärke und kochte es mit heißem Wasser auf und machte eine schleimige Mischung, die für die Hemdenkragen meines Vaters angewendet wurde, die steif sein mussten, und so wurden sie gebügelt. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wurde aus der Stärke ein Gallert. Und ich dachte “Ach du meine Güte, wenn ich ein Stärkegel aus der Stärke mache, es aufkoche, und es dann färben kann, dann werde ich dieses Problem der 40 Scheiben los.” Und am Samstagvormittag war ich damit durch. Und am Nachmittag begann ich mein erstes Experiment damit. Da gibt es einen Schnitt, und da ist das Insulin als ein nettes Band und ich machte den Vermerk Und dies war der Anfang der Elektrophorese mit Gel. Und als ich etwas später nur für einen groben Test fortfuhr hatte ich Plasma oder Serum darauf getan, und ich konnte die Bänder der Proteine sehen, die im Blut enthalten sind. Die Leute dachten, dass es fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha-1, Alpha-2, Beta und Gamma Globulin. Wir wissen heute, dass es etwa 700 von ihnen gibt. Aber die Leute wussten damals von fünf und ich bekam diese Bänder und ich startete das Experiment wieder um Mitternacht... Und ich konnte immer arbeiten. Und, Entschuldigung, und dann ein wenig später organisierte ich es so, dass ich ein Muster in den Bändern erkannte, und ich hatte viele zu beschriftende Bänder. Ich konnte tatsächlich 11 Bänder finden und wenn Sie einen guten Chef haben, können Sie dann eine Schritt nach vorne gehen, denn ich ging zu Scottie, wir nannten uns damals gegenseitig Scottie und Oliver, ich ging zu Scottie und sagte zu ihm: “Scottie, ich habe wirklich etwas sehr Interessantes gefunden. Ich möchte gerne mit der Arbeit am Insulin aufhören und an diesem Problem arbeiten.” Und er sagte, er war ein guter Wissenschaftler “Mach auf alle Fälle den Wechsel” und ich hoffe, dass Sie diese Möglichkeit auch haben. Sehen Sie, als mir das widerfuhr, war meine Doktorarbeit lange her … Es gibt den einen Augenblick und Sie erkennen, dass Sie etwas gefunden haben, das Sie dazu führen sollte etwas ganz Neues zu tun. Und ich war soweit, meine Arbeit zu veröffentlichen und dies waren zwei meiner Freunde. Ich hatte genug davon, selbst zu bluten, und so bekam ich Blut von meinen Freunden. Und ich denke, dafür sind sie da, oder nicht? Und dies sind George Connell und Gordon Dixon, und warum gibt es keine Fotos? Mein Labor hatte keine Kamera. Es war damals ein so karges Labor. Aber ich war bereit zu veröffentlichen und Fotos machen zu lassen. Und dann führte ich zufälligerweise ein Experiment mit Beth Wades Blutprobe durch und seltsamerweise gab es viele zusätzliche Bänder. Und was war an Beth Wades Blut anders? Es handelte sich um eine Frau. Es war das erste Mal, dass ich eine Probe einer Frau untersuchte. Ich dachte, ich habe eine neue Methode gefunden, um Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und ich nannte ein Muster das M-Muster und das andere das W-Muster: M für männlich, W für weiblich. Und ich konnte etwa eine Woche lang etwa zwei Proben täglich untersuchen, männlich und weiblich passten immer gut zusammen. Und dann beim sechsten Mal war alles ganz anders. Und der Mann änderte sich in eine Frau. Wir machten es ihm nicht leicht. Komm schon, Casey, schau dir das an. Aber Sie sagen vielleicht, so ist die Jugend. Aber hier ist mein Datenblatt. Ganz bemerkenswert, aber es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Typen mit dem Geschlecht nichts zu tun hat. Es hatte mit den existierenden Blutgruppen nichts zu tun und es war offenbar etwas Neues. Und ich zeige dies aus einem anderen Grund. Es ist ein Datenblatt, das jetzt fast 60 Jahre alt ist. Sie können Ihr Datenblatt nicht 60 Jahre verfügbar halten, wenn sie keinen Ausdruck machen. Sie müssen Ausdrucke machen von den wichtigen Daten, die Sie haben. Verlassen Sie sich nicht auf Ihren Computer, weil Sie einen Floppy jetzt nicht lesen können, und es gab einen Moment, da hatten wir genau das. Sie werden ganz bestimmt eine CD-ROM in 10 Jahren nicht lesen können. Machen Sie einige Ausdrucke und bewahren Sie gute Ausdrucke auf. Diese Unterschiede, die es hier gab, stellten sich als genetisch bedingt heraus. Und, nur um die Geschichte zu beenden, es war ein ziemlich komplizierter genetischer Unterschied und wir arbeiten daran mit Hilfe von Norma Ford-Walker, die eine hervorragende Genetikerin war und mir Genetik unterrichtet hatte. Und dann, weil die Dinge sich weiterentwickelten, vorher konnten wir keine Protein-Sequenzierung durchführen, jetzt konnten wir Proteine sequenzieren, Gene isolieren, Gene sequenzieren, und es wurde klar, dass es da etwas gab, was man damit tun könnte. Linus Pauling und Harvey Itano und Vernon zum Beispiel zeigten, dass die Sichelzellmutation aus einer Umwandlung der Glutaminsäure in ein Valin im Globinmolekül herrührte. Und ich begann zu glauben, dass es möglich sein sollte, das Gen durch Gentargeting zu korrigieren. Wir sind nun in dem Stadium, in dem wir eine geklonte DNA, eine normale DNA hatten. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einen Teil einer normalen DNA einführe, könnte ich eine Art Genaustausch bekommen, das SA und GE aneinanderzureihen und das schlechte Gen in ein gutes Gen durch Genaustausch umzuwandeln. Ich wusste, dass es in der Hefe möglich ist und Jack war heute hier … Ich weiß nicht, ob er heute unter den Zuhörern ist, Aber Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver zeigten, dass Sie in der Hefe ein Gen modifizieren konnten, und ich habe gelehrt und dass dann so auch unterrichten. Aber das Hefe-Genom ist ungefähr zwei Größenordnungen kleiner als das menschliche Genom. Und es war daher nicht klar, ob es in einem Menschen durchgeführt werden konnte. Und dann wieder, wenn man über “Woher kommen Ideen” spricht... Sie müssen verstehen, wenn Sie unterrichten. Und um zu verstehen, müssen Sie manchmal viel Zeit damit verbringen, ein Papier zu lesen, bevor sie es gut genug verstehen, um es zu unterrichten. Und dies war ein Papier, dass am 1. April 1982 veröffentlicht wurde, und sie sprachen über eine Methode, ein Gen zu befreien, und, ich kann aus Zeitgründen nicht ins Detail gehen, abgesehen davon, dass es das Auffinden eines Teiles blauer DNA beinhaltete, die sozusagen der roten DNA am nächsten ist. Die rote DNA war das, was sie isolieren wollten, und es war die blaue DNA, die sie gewöhnlich fanden. Und ich dachte, dass ich diese Methode für Tests des Genaustausches verwenden kann. Daher gibt es nur drei Wochen, nachdem dieses Papier veröffentlicht wurde, eine Probe für die Gen-Platzierung. Und meine Idee war, daraus die blaue DNA zu verwenden, die in Bakterien zu finden war, und zu versuchen, auf das Beta Globin-Gen abzuzielen und dieses Fragment zu suchen. Ich sollte sagen: dies ist hereinkommende DNA, dies ist das Zielobjekt. Wenn ich ein DNA finden könnte, wo diese beide kombiniert sind, würde ich bewiesen haben, dass die Modifizierung erfolgt ist, da dies nicht auf der hereinkommenden DNA geschehen ist und nicht auf dem Ziel. Und mit einer Menge Arbeit gehen wir tiefer und kommen zur Stufe, auf der wir es vereinfachen, und wir haben eine eher einfaches Plasmid verwendet, das sehr ähnlich aussieht wie das von Terry Orr-Weaver benutzte, und Sie können sehen, dass, wenn Sie das Gen treffen, dies ist eine Abbildung der Enzymbegrenzung, dass Sie ein DNA-Fragment isolieren können, das 11 Kilobasen sein würde, wenn Sie nicht auf das Gen treffen würden. Wenn Sie auf das Gen treffen dann würde die Größe acht Kilobasen sein. Und eine lange Reihe von Experimenten führt zu dem Tag schließlich, als ich an einem Samstag einen Film mit Tests verschiedener Kolonien entwickelte, und es gab einen, wo das Fragment jetzt eine Länge von sieben, acht Kilobasen hat statt mehr, so wurde bewiesen, dass Gentargeting möglich war. Und sobald Sie bewiesen haben, dass dies möglich ist, können Sie es verwenden und andere Leute werden beginnen, es zu verwenden. Aber die Frequenz war hoffnungslos niedrig und für den ursprünglichen Zweck nicht praktisch, der darin bestand, einer Person mit Sichelzellanämie zu helfen. Also was tun? Mit jemand anderem sprechen und ich las über das Werk von Martin Evans, der eine Embryo-Stammzelle verwendet hat. Hier ist eine Blastocyste. Dies ist der Teil der Blastocyste, aus dem der Embryo entsteht. Und Martin Evans und seine Studenten zeigten wie diese zu kultivieren sind, um auf diese Weise diese Zellen einer cremefarbigen Maus zu kultivieren. Und wenn er diese cremefarbigen Stammzelle in eine Blastocyste einfügen, würden sie sich daran erinnern, woher sie kommen, und Sie können aus dieser Blastocyste eine Maus erschaffen, indem sie sie in eine weibliche Maus einsetzen, und Sie würden chimärische Mäuse erhalten, Mischungen. Und von ihnen können Sie das Gen züchten, an dem Sie interessiert sind. Und dies war etwas Offensichtliches. Lasst uns eine Methode verwenden, um Gene zu verändern. Aber die Probe war furchtbar. Und so brauchten wir Hilfe von einem Chemiker und wir bekamen Hilfe von Kary Mullis, der den Nobelpreis für die Erfindung der Polymerase-Kettenreaktion erhielt. Und hier ist eine kleine Stelle in einem meiner Notizbücher, die besagt, dass Sie diese Methode verwenden können, um die rekombinante Passage zu lokalisieren. Und ich baute den Apparat, um dies zu tun. Dies ist mein Apparat. Warum würden Sie einen Apparat bauen? Nun, der Grund war, dass keiner zur Verfügung stand. Sie können keinen Apparat kaufen, um die Polymerase-Kettenreaktion zu machen. Aber ich glaube dass man dieses Schild anbringen sollte. Meine Kollegen taten es bei dem Apparat, der auf dem Boden lag. Und da steht NBGBOKFO “no bloody good, but okay for Oliver”, weil ich immer Material aus Abfall machen würde, wie Sie sehen, und das alles sind Gegenstände aus dem Abfall. Nichts davon ist neu und dies ist noch der Apparat, den wir benutzten für den Nobelpreis. Die Methode war gut und hier ist ein Superartikel darüber und Sie merken, dass ich nicht der Autor bin. Es freut mich zu sagen, dass die Autorin hier unten steht. Sie ist meine Frau und sie kam und schuf ein aufsehenerregendes Tier, das Atherosklerose bekommen kann. Nun, wohin nun? Ich zeige Ihnen auch diese Sache, weil es noch ein bisschen mehr gibt, worüber man reden kann. Hier ist Sandy Ogston wieder, aber hier gibt es jetzt einen kleinen Unterschied, weil hier auch sein Todesdatum steht. Weil er sagte “Wenn ich sterbe, Oliver, möchte ich gerne, dass Du meine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren schreibst”. Und dies war etwas, was die Royal Society gerne haben wollte. Und dann müssen Sie all diese Papers lesen. Und ich las alles von ihm aus seinen Papers. Und dann hatte er diese schöne kleine Formel hier, die über den verfügbaren Raum in einem Gel in Molekülen von einem Radius R spricht, wenn das Gel aus Fasern des Radius r besteht, und es gibt n Fasern pro Quadratzentimeter. Und er sprach über einen Querschnitt des Gels. Und diese Gleichung ist berückend genau. Sie funktioniert für jedes Gel, von dem Sie je gehört haben und wurde ausgiebig getestet. Diese zwei Herren in meinem Labor machten ein Diagramm, um sie zu veranschaulichen, und ich mochte es. Wenn Sie eine kleine gelöste Substanz haben, kann sie eine Menge Raum in einem Gel vorfinden. Aber wenn Sie eine große gelöste Substanz haben kann es nur einen begrenzten Raum vorfinden. Und ich dachte, dass dies auf die Niere angewendet werden könnte und ich schrieb ein Paper darüber, dass die Idee darin bestünde, dass hier kleine Moleküle leicht durch die Niere gehen würden. Und große Moleküle würden eine ziemlich niedrige Konzentration haben, wenn sie durch ein Gel gehen müssen und ich veröffentlichte ein Diagramm, das das Prinzip veranschaulichte. Dies ist ein Querschnitt einer Niere in EM-Auflösung. Und dies sind die Größen der Albumin-Moleküle, im Maßstab, und dies ist das Gel in der Niere, durch die, wie ich dachte, der Vorgang erfolgen würde. Und ich ging zu unserem Spezialisten für kolloidales Gold, das ich verwenden wollte, um sie in dem Elektronmikroskop zu sehen. Und er sagte, ich werde sie nicht für dich machen, Oliver. Sie machen ihre eigenen. Er sagte “Du wirst mehr lernen, wenn Du sie machst.” Ich war total begeistert. Es gibt wunderbare interessante Dinge und ich verbrachte einen großen Teil meiner Zeit mit ihnen. Ich werde Ihnen hier nur ein Beispiel zeigen. Dies war vor vier Jahren. Und dies war die Zeit, als ich zu lernen begann … Arbeitete immer noch am Wochenende. Das war der Zeit als ich herausfand, dass ich die Größe eines Moleküls kontrollieren konnte, indem ich die Zeitdauer der Reaktion im Verfahren variierte. Ich machte daraus in Langmuir ein Paper und ich bin der erste Autor. Und ich bin der erste Autor, weil ich die Arbeit gemacht habe, nicht weil ich das Paper geschrieben habe, sondern weil die Experimente meine waren, die meisten von ihnen. Denken Sie also darüber nach. Es ist wirklich nett, in einem Paper mit 89 Jahren der Hauptverfasser zu sein, und besonders wenn es das erste Paper ist, dass ich je in einer Chemie-Zeitschrift veröffentlicht habe. Aber ich habe noch etwas … Oh, hier ist ein Beispiel, an dem man arbeiten sollte. Hier ist ein Plasma mit großen Molekülen in Clustern und sie können nicht in die Basalmembran eindringen. Es ist komplizierter als das, aber dies ist ein Beispiel. Ich habe eine letzte kleine Sache, die ich Ihnen zeigen will, und hier ist es. Und warum zeige ich ein Flugzeug dafür? Es ist zum Teil, weil es ein Teil meines Lebens ist, aber dies ist mein Lehrer, Field Morey. Und er brachte mir das Fliegen bei, und ich war ein nervöser Flieger. Als ich lernte mit ihm zu fliegen, hier sitzt der Lehrer und der Schüler sitzt auf dem linkem Sitz. Schweiß strömte mir aus allen Poren, ich meine es wörtlich. Und so wandte ich mich eines Tages an ihn und sagte: „Dies war ein guter Tag für Sie. Nur ein Tropfen ist abgefallen.“ Und das führte mich zu einem Gedanken. Ich habe später gelernt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich hatte einen Schüler, Jeff Bloch. Und als wir zusammen flogen, ich brachte ihm das Gleiten bei, kam er komplett durchnässt zurück. Er klebte richtig an der Rückenlehne. Er flog dann irgendwann selbst und sagte später zu mir “Schau, Oliver, trocken.” Dies ist eine sehr interessante Lektion, nicht nur für das Fliegen. Sie zeigt Ihnen, dass Sie mit Wissen Angst bewältigen können. Wenn Sie nervös dabei sind, wenn Sie etwas Neues in der Wissenschaft machen, dann könnten Sie sagen “Dieser Kerl hier, er ist viel schlauer als ich. Oder diese Dame, sie weiß, was zu tun ist. Ich könnte das möglicherweise nicht tun”. Sie sind ängstlich. Gehen Sie, lernen Sie. Gehen Sie, lesen Sie. Sie können alles. Sie können Felder ändern. Sie müssen nicht irgendwo festgefahren sein. Gehen Sie und überwinden Sie Angst durch Wissen. Dies ist mein Motorgleiter und hier ist mein Freund. Und wenn Sie Glück haben werden Sie einen Freund haben wie ich ihn in Nobuyo habe und an dieser Stelle höre ich auf. Applaus

Oliver Smithies describing the role of PCR in gene targeting.
(00:27:24 - 00:28:58)

 

What of DNA technology today? Not content with revolutionising biological research once with the discovery of restriction enzymes, in 1995 Hamilton Smith led the team that sequenced the first bacterial genome, that of Haemophilus influenzae. He now works in the field of synthetic biology and tries to understand the core genetic elements that are required for life. In this excerpt from a lecture he gave at the 64th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2014, Smith describes the concept behind his current work:

 

Hamilton Smith (2014) - Synthetic Biology for Genetic Engineering in the 21st Century

One of the first things friends told me when I got the Prize was that I should be sure to come to Lindau for the meetings. And I’ve been doing it now for 30 years. It’s always a wonderful experience. I meet old colleagues and new ones and of course the new crop of students. So today I’m talking about synthetic biology. And this means different things to different people. To me if you’re using chemically synthesised genes or DNA in your work, you’re essentially a synthetic biologist. It’s the same as in the past if you work with DNA and RNA you were a molecular biologist. So that’s a very simple way of putting it. A more elaborate definition of synthetic biology is that it’s the field of research that engages in the design and assembly of genes and genetic pathways from chemically synthesised DNA to produce organisms with new and improved functions that do not already exist in nature. The key thing in synthetic biology is that you can do things... that you’re not simply shuffling pieces that exist in nature but you can create new pieces. A branch of synthetic biology is synthetic genomics which focuses on rewriting and activating entire genomes or chromosomes to produce new ‘synthetic cells’. Synthetic biology postulates an analogy to computers that the genome of a cell is the operating system and the cytoplasm is the hardware. So the DNA genome is simply a piece of software written in a 4 letter code, AGCT, whereas in a computer it’s zeros and ones. The cytoplasm is the hardware and that runs the operating system or the genome. So the cytoplasm contains all of the parts and for example ribosomes, enzymes and proteins that are necessary to express the information in the genome. On the other hand the genome contains the information necessary to produce the cytoplasm and the cell envelop and to replicate itself. So each is worthless without the other. We wouldn’t have any synthetic biology without dramatic advances in sequencing and DNA synthesis that have occurred in the past couple of decades. And this is why it’s uniquely a 21st century field of research and technology. We see on the graph here that the ability to read DNA sequence really began in earnest around 1990 with the introduction of the first semi-automated DNA sequencers. It was still expensive at that stage and you could only produce a limited amount of data. But as these machines became fully automated and had much larger capacity, the cost of reading dropped rapidly and continued to drop. And then all of a sudden in the early 2000s there was a precipitous drop as highly parallel DNA sequencing machines were introduced to the point that now the 1,000 dollar human genome is within reach. On the other hand, writing DNA rather than just reading it, writing for example the synthesis of oligonucleotides has not dropped nearly as dramatically. But I think at some point we’ll experience a much more dramatic drop as this gets to the level of chips. Writing DNA sequences, for example gene synthesis, has dropped about 2 orders of magnitude but it’s still quite expensive. And that’s what’s limiting the development of the field. What we need is cheap DNA synthesis and fast accurate DNA synthesis. Here is another way of looking at things. The blue curve shows the rate at which the number of transistors on electronic chips have increased. This is Moore’s law which states that the number of transistors doubles every 18 months. And that’s been a consistent picture for many years now. On the other hand reading DNA, because of the highly parallel new sequencers, has taken a much more rapid course. And even writing DNA is exceeding the rate of the classic Moore’s law. In addition, the sizes of DNA that can be made is steadily increasing. The largest currently is about a megabase of synthetic DNA. Now, the power of synthetic biology is that you can synthesise any DNA sequence. The older methods of genetic engineering that use restriction enzymes, PCR and oligonucleotide mutagenesis for example always operate on sequences that already occur in nature. With the synthetic biology approach you can take a gene, you can change the codon sequence to that gene to fit it... to adapt it to the codon frequencies for example in coli or whatever. You could chemically synthesise that and you now have a sequence, a DNA sequence that does not occur anywhere else in nature. You can’t do that with any of the older methods of engineering. So it’s very powerful. However we still largely work with what nature has given us, genes, promoters, ribosome binding sites. And I’m talking particularly about single cell organisms which is the major focus currently. Transcriptional terminators, operators and so on. The genes themselves have evolved over millions of years by natural selection. We don’t know yet how to sit at the computer and invent a new gene or amino acid sequence that will fold into a predetermined structure. Let alone have a specific enzymatic activity. That’s in the future. And I don’t know how far in the future. As far as proteins go we can at best modify existing protein designs. And that’s certainly facilitated by the ability to change the DNA sequence that codes for a particular protein. So we’re still limited with adding, deleting, altering or rearranging DNA sequences using parts that generally already exist. Now, I always have trouble understanding what people are telling me unless they give me an example. So I’m going to give a few examples here. One is the introduction of BioBricks which is really an idea developed about 10 years ago by Tom Knight at MIT. And there’s a registry where you can go online and pick out any of a number of promoters with known strength. Or you have a large registry of genes that you can use or other regulatory parts. And these are provided. They’ll actually send you the DNA or the sequences involved. And you can put together various logical circuits with these pieces. So there has developed kind of an international competition among students every year. It’s called iGEM where student teams are given kits of parts and they have to come up with novel new circuitry and put it into a biological system for example coli and demonstrate that it does some particular operation. That’s become quite popular. Another example is what we call refactoring of existing pathways and genomes. It’s a term that comes from software developers where you take for example a code that was written perhaps by some amateurs, a spaghetti code that is very hard for somebody else to come and make sense out of it. But if you refactor it and put it into a more logical group of functions without changing the output of the system, that’s called refactoring. Refactoring in the biological system can improve on evolution by arranging genes in a more logical and modular fashion. Here’s an example. This is from Chris Voigt’s lab at MIT published a couple of years ago. This is the classic example of refactoring. He took the nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca which has about 20 genes in it. It’s a cluster. Not all the genes in the cluster have to do with nitrogen fixation. So he threw those away, he took the genes that were relevant to nitrogen fixation, resynthesized them with codon frequencies appropriate for coli, he eliminated non-coding DNA, removed transcription factors and basically randomized the codons but in an appropriate fashion. He then organised into 4 operons, whereas the original cluster had 7 operons. He added synthetic regulation and then some controlling and synthetic circuits and comes up with a nice logical looking group of genes that people can understand. And it’s something you can plug into an organism if you want to achieve nitrogen fixation. You can also refactor genomes of various sorts, particularly viral genomes. One of the first examples was refactoring T7 phage. Here’s an example of refactoring of PhiX174. And there are 6 genes that are overlapping. And you simply refactor it by putting them all into a linear array without overlaps. Building of synthetic bacterial and yeast genomes has come into the limelight recently. Our group synthesised a complete bacterial genome and assembled it in yeast and propagated it as DNA in a yeast cell and then transplanted it into a bacterial cytoplasm to produce a ‘synthetic cell’. Just a couple of months ago an article was published in which chromosome 3 of yeast was completely replaced with synthetic DNA. And they made some rather dramatic changes in the sequence and reduced the size of it by about 14%. This opens up the ability now to completely remake the yeast chromosomes. So our work in the past 10 years has been focused on what we call the minimal cell concept. We’re interested in using synthetic genomics to build a minimal cell that has only the core machinery of life. If you look at bacteria as they exist in nature, they often have fairly large genomes, several million base pairs. The core machinery to run the cell is a very small fraction of that, maybe a few hundred genes. Most of the DNA is occupied in various adaptive functions that enable the cells to adapt to many different issues in nature. What we want to do is throw away all the adaptive functions and take only the core functions. And we want to create a minimal cell with those core functions with the idea that we’ll hopefully understand life better when we achieve that. Richard Feynman has a famous quote: “What I cannot create I do not understand.” We hope that if we create we will understand. Our target for minimisation is mycoplasma mycoides which already in nature... It’s a goat pathogen by the way. But it’s a small cell. You can culture it readily in the laboratory. And it makes colonies on an agar plate. It’s capable of totally independent growth. It has all of the requirements for free life. It has a genome that’s a little over a million base pairs. There are 865 protein coding genes and 43 RNA genes. And it grows at a respectable rate of 60 to 70 minutes doubling time. So if we’re going to take this cell and try to strip away unnecessary genes and build a minimal cell, we need to be able to do 3 things. The first thing, the thing that we were most worried about was whether we would be able to chemically synthesise the genome and have it as free DNA in a test tube and then bring it back to life. We had to develop a method to transform it into a receptive compatible cytoplasm of a recipient cell and have it take over that cell, a process we call transplantation. We also had to develop methods to build large DNA molecules. And thirdly we had to have methods to identify what genes to keep and which to throw away. Genome transplantation in our original conception... I think this model is probably fairly accurate. We would take naked donor DNA genomes -for example extracted from a mycoplasma donor cell or perhaps extract it from yeast- and introduce it by methods that are similar to regular DNA transformation into the recipient cell. And then using selection for the donor genome after a number of generations every part of the cell that came from the original genome is replaced and you have a cell now that has only the donor genome. And all the parts in the cytoplasm are specified by that donor genome. Just very briefly, the key here was to be able to extract the large DNA molecules intact and then be able to somehow get them across the recipient cell membrane and to establish themselves. So we took recipient cells, we took very gently extracted donor DNA, combined them together in the presence of polyethylene glycol which facilitates the uptake and then grow for a period on the plate. And we were successful after a year or 2’s work in getting a procedure that’s quite robust and yields a couple of hundred transplants typically. We also learned how to put our mycoides genome into a yeast cell using yeast vector sequences that we added to the genome. And then we learned how to extract the DNA intact out of a yeast cell and transplant it. It took us a while to realise that in the yeast the methylation would be lost. And so the genome was subject to restriction then by the recipient. But we overcame that in either of 2 ways. We removed the restriction systems from the recipient cell or we methylated the DNA. And both of those worked. So we had a means of reasonably efficient ability to take DNA in the test tube, a whole genome, and bring it to life. We also at the same time were working on chemical synthesis and assembly of the whole genome. And this was done in steps starting with oligonucleotides, building one kilobase pieces which overlapped each other by 80 base pairs so they could be stitched together. And then we went to 10 Kb pieces, 100 Kb pieces and finally the complete genome which was assembled in yeast. In fact all of the last 3 assembly steps occurred in yeast which has a very powerful recombination system that can operate on the overlaps to assemble the molecules together. Now I turn to how we determined what genes we want to throw away and which ones we want to keep. So we’ve developed to a high degree a process called global transposon mutagenesis. If you introduce a transposon carrying an antibiotic resistance marker into a cell, it will jump somewhere into the genome. If it goes into a gene, it will disrupt that gene and knock it out. If the gene is essential, then you won’t get any colonies from that particular event, whereas if it goes into a non-essential gene, you will get colonies which you can recover. And then you can determine where the insertion site is by sequencing. So using all of that methodology that we developed we’re ready to now start designing a minimal genome and then building it and assembling it in yeast and then testing to see whether what we design works. If it doesn’t, we make additional changes to the circuit again. If we get something that does work but not very well, we can do modifications and just keep doing this design-build-test cycle. So, first let me elaborate more on our results of our transposon mutagenesis. We used Tn5 because you have... you can purchase the transposase. And so we constructed a small transposon that has just a puromycin resistance gene flanked by terminators and the 19 basepair sequences that are required for transposition. We take that DNA which is about a kilobase in size and add stoichiometric amounts of the transposase which binds to the ends and now makes it a very active transposon. You prevent it from jumping into itself or into other DNA in the test tube by excluding, by having no magnesium present. But once you introduce it into a cell, it’s now a very active transposon and will jump into the cell, into some place in the genome. So we prepared a library. We introduced the transposon into our mycoplasma mycoides, so-called wild-type cell, and allowed it to insert. And then we plated and obtained about 80,000 colonies typically on one of several plates. First of all each colony arises from a cell that has a single insertion of a transposon somewhere in the genome. The fact that the colony grows up means that you didn’t go into an essential part of the genome. So we pool the colonies here and make what we call Library 0. We isolate from a sample of that pool, we isolate DNA. And then another sample of that pool we passage 4 times for about 50 doublings with the idea that at the end of those 50 doublings only the fast growing cells will predominate. In other words if our transposon jumped into a gene that’s absolutely non-essential, that will appear in this final library which we call Library 4. We then take those libraries and use inverse PCR to determine the junction between the ends of the transposon and the genomic sequence. Here’s a 19 base pair sequence. And this is genomic DNA here. So we were able to find the insertion points of the transposons. And if you then map those on to a gene map... Here for example is a cluster of genes that are obviously non-essential. And we confirm that by deleting those and showing the cell was viable. Here’s genes that are essential. These have to do with initiating of DNA replication for example. And you look through. There are various clusters of genes that are non-essential with a few genes that are essential and so on. So we can catalogue all of that in an excel sheet. So, we saw 3 types of patterns. Here is a gene CTP synthase which is not hit at all. There are no transposons either in the 0 Library or the Library 4. That’s an essential gene. Here’s a gene that is hit by both libraries so it’s represented well. It’s a fast growing knock out so that’s a non-essential gene. And here’s one that’s hit heavily in the first library but it’s totally lost in the L4 library. So it’s growing slowly, its impaired. Whatever that gene does it’s not essential for life but it affects the viability of the cell. And so we could classify all of our genes. And we are able to put them into this large group of non-essential genes. Here’s the core set of essential genes. And here are the ones that are impaired. So our design will focus on this set of genes. And so we simply took all of the genes that we wanted to keep and put these purple arrows over them. The ones we’re going to throw away are the yellow areas. And we then just reduce the genome by putting together all of the genes that we want to keep. So we have a genome that we call reduced genome design. It’s about half the size of the original genome. And here are sizes of the... So an important thing is that we... the designs are made on 1/8th sections of the genome. So that we can troubleshoot each section if it doesn’t work very well. And here’s a relative size of the wild-type genome in our reduced design. So we went back to our next stage which is synthesis. And Dan Gibson at our company, Synthetic Genomics Inc. has developed automated DNA synthesising machines which can fairly quickly assembly each of the 8 reduced genome design pieces which he then ships to Rockville. You see in San Diego where I am we do the design and the building, Rockville does the testing. So we just send the pieces of DNA there. So, this is just briefly the 8 piece strategy. We wanted to test each of the individual pieces. So we combined each reduced piece with 7 wild-type pieces and then tested whether that genome is viable. And it turns out all of the 8 pieces we designed work. Some of them give a cell that’s a little bit slow in growth but they’re all quite viable. So the idea now is can we combine all those together and be finished basically, have our reduced genome. And the answer is no. We couldn’t put them all together but we could put different groups of them together. For example, here we have 2, 4, 6, 7 and 8 together and produce those colonies that are a little bit slow growing. Why doesn’t it work? We think it’s because there are undiscovered functional redundancies. In other words there are essential functions that are... So maybe fragment 6 has an essential function that if you knock it out by itself, the cell is ok because the essential function is also carried by a gene on segment one. But if you knock out both of those... In other words if we combine segment 1 with segment 6, that vital function is knocked out. And so we’re in the process now of discovering those few redundancies and correcting them. So, in summary then we’ve designed 8 reduced segments that are viable. And they work in several different combinations. And eventually we hope to get a cell that has no genes that you can remove without severely effecting the growth. Best case we think perhaps 50% reduction with a doubling time that’s not too far off from the wild-type. And it will have a genome that’s smaller than any free living cell that’s found in nature. That’s our goal. And just finally what can we do with a minimal cell? There are a number of different things. One that we have a lot of interest in is reorganising or defragging the cell so to speak. Bringing all the genes that have common... that are involved in common processes would be brought together so that you have a genome that’s very understandable. Here are some of the people that have worked on this. Thank you. Applause.

Eines der ersten Dinge, die mir Freunde nahelegten, als ich den Nobelpreis erhielt, war, dass ich unbedingt zu den Lindauer Treffen kommen sollte. Und das tue ich jetzt seit 30 Jahren und es ist jedes Mal wieder eine wundervolle Erfahrung. Ich treffe alte und neue Kollegen und natürlich all die jungen Studenten. Ich rede hier heute über die synthetische Biologie. Und das bedeutet für jeden etwas anderes. Für mich bedeutet das: Wenn man in seiner Arbeit chemisch synthetisierte Gene oder DNA einsetzt, ist man im Wesentlichen ein „Synthetischer Biologe“. Das ist in etwa so wie die Tatsache, dass man früher als Molekularbiologe galt, wenn man mit DNA und RNA arbeitete. Das ist also eine sehr einfache Art, es auszudrücken. Eine ausführlichere Definition von synthetischer Biologie bezeichnet sie als das Forschungsfeld, das sich mit dem Design und der Herstellung von Genen und genetischen Codes aus chemisch synthetisierter DNA beschäftigt, um Organismen mit neuen, verbesserten Funktionen herzustellen, die in der Natur noch nicht vorkommen. Das Entscheidende an der synthetischen Biologie ist, dass man Dinge tun kann … dass man nicht nur in der Natur vorkommende Bestandteile umgestaltet, sondern etwas Neues kreiert. Ein Zweig der synthetischen Biologie ist die synthetische Genomik, die schwerpunktmäßig ganze Genome oder Chromosomen umarbeitet und aktiviert, um neue „synthetische Zellen“ herzustellen. Die synthetische Biologie postuliert in Analogie zu Computern, dass das Genom einer Zelle das Betriebssystem ist und das Zytoplasma die Hardware. Das DNA-Genom ist also einfach eine Software, die in einem 4-Buchstaben-Code, AGCT, geschrieben ist, während sie bei einem Computer aus Nullen und Einsen besteht. Das Zytoplasma ist die Hardware, auf der das Betriebssystem oder das Genom läuft. Das Zytoplasma enthält also Teile, beispielsweise Ribosomen, Enzyme und Proteine, die erforderlich sind, um die Information im Genom zu exprimieren. Andererseits enthält das Genom die erforderlichen Informationen, um das Zytoplasma und die Zellhülle zu erzeugen und sich selbst zu replizieren. Also ist jedes ohne das andere wertlos. Ohne die enormen Fortschritte in der Sequenzierung und der DNA-Synthese, die in den letzten Jahrzehnten eingetreten sind, gäbe es keine synthetische Biologie. Und das ist auch der Grund dafür, warum dieses Gebiet ein Forschungs- und Technologiefeld des 21. Jahrhunderts ist. Wir sehen auf der Grafik hier, dass die Möglichkeit, eine DNA-Sequenz zu lesen, tatsächlich ernsthaft um 1990 herum mit der Einführung der ersten halbautomatischen DNA-Sequenzierer begann. Das war damals noch sehr teuer und man konnte nur begrenzte Datenmengen erzeugen. Aber mit zunehmender Vollautomatisierung dieser Maschinen und wesentlich größeren Kapazitäten sanken die Kosten für das Lesen der DNA kontinuierlich und in erheblichem Ausmaß. Und als Anfang der 2000er Jahre hochparallele DNA-Sequenziermaschinen auf den Markt kamen, sind die Kosten noch einmal rasant gesunken – bis hin zu dem Punkt heute, wo das Humangenom für 1.000 Dollar in Reichweite ist. Auf der anderen Seite sind die Kosten für das Schreiben von DNA im Gegensatz zum einfachen Lesen, beispielsweise die Synthese von Oligonukleotiden, nicht annähernd so dramatisch gesunken. Aber ich denke, dass wir irgendwann, wenn die Ebene der Chips erreicht ist, einen wesentlich deutlicheren Kostenrückgang erleben werden. Das Schreiben von DNA-Sequenzen, beispielsweise die Gen-Synthese, ist bereits um rund zwei Größenordnungen preisgünstiger geworden, aber immer noch relativ teuer. Und das begrenzt die Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten auf diesem Gebiet. Was wir brauchen, sind eine preisgünstige DNA-Synthese und eine schnelle, exakte DNA-Synthese. Das hier ist eine andere Möglichkeit, die Dinge zu betrachten. Die blaue Kurve zeigt die Zunahme der Anzahl von Transistoren auf elektronischen Chips. Das ist das Mooresche Gesetz, wonach sich die Anzahl der Transistoren alle 18 Monate verdoppelt. Und diese Entwicklung zeichnet sich jetzt bereits seit vielen Jahren ab. Andererseits zeigt das Lesen von DNA aufgrund der hochparallelen neuen Sequenzierer einen wesentlich schnelleren Verlauf. Und selbst das Schreiben von DNA übertrifft die Geschwindigkeit des klassischen Mooreschen Gesetzes. Darüber hinaus nehmen die DNA-Größen, die erzeugt werden können, ständig zu. Die derzeit größte synthetische DNA ist etwa 1 Megabase groß. Die Stärke der synthetischen Biologie besteht darin, dass man jede DNA-Sequenz synthetisieren kann. Die älteren gentechnischen Methoden, die mit Restriktionsenzymen, PCR und Oligonukleotid-Mutagenese arbeiten, nutzen beispielsweise immer bereits in der Natur vorkommende Sequenzen. Mit dem Ansatz der synthetischen Biologie kann man beispielsweise die Codon-Sequenz eines Gens so anpassen, dass sie zu den Codon-Frequenzen in Coli oder so passt. Man könnte das chemisch synthetisieren und hätte dann eine Sequenz, eine DNA-Sequenz, die nirgendwo sonst in der Natur vorkommt. Mit den älteren technischen Methoden ist so etwas nicht möglich. Das ist also wirklich ein sehr leistungsstarkes Konzept. Allerdings arbeiten wir nach wie vor größtenteils mit dem, was uns die Natur gegeben hat, also Genen, Promotoren, Ribosomenbindungsstellen – und ich rede insbesondere von einzelligen Organismen, die heute der Hauptfokus sind – transkriptionelle Terminatoren, Operatoren und so weiter. Die Gene selbst haben sich über Millionen von Jahren durch natürliche Selektion entwickelt. Wir wissen noch nicht, wie wir am Computer ein neues Gen oder eine Aminosäuresequenz mit einer Faltung in einer fest vorgegebenen Struktur, ganz zu schweigen davon, mit einer spezifischen enzymatische Aktivität erfinden können. Das ist Zukunftsmusik. Und ich weiß nicht, wie fern diese Zukunft liegt. Was Proteine betrifft, können wir höchstens bestehende Protein-Designs modifizieren. Und das wird sicherlich durch die Möglichkeit vereinfacht, die DNA-Sequenz zu verändern, die für ein bestimmtes Protein codiert. Wir sind also beim Hinzufügen, Entfernen, Verändern und Neuanordnen von DNA-Sequenzen nach wie vor auf die Verwendung von Bestandteilen begrenzt, die grundsätzlich bereits vorhanden sind. Ich finde es immer schwierig nachzuvollziehen, was Menschen erzählen, wenn sie das nicht anhand eines Beispiels verdeutlichen. Deshalb möchte ich hier einige Beispiele nennen. Eines ist die Einführung von BioBricks, eine Idee, die vor rund 10 Jahren von Tom Knight am MIT entwickelt wurde. Es gibt ein Register, auf das man online Zugriff nehmen kann und aus dem man verschiedene Promotoren in bekannter Stärke wählen kann. Oder es gibt ein riesiges Gen-Register, das man verwenden kann, und weitere andere regulatorische Elemente. Und die werden dann geliefert. Man verschickt tatsächlich die DNA oder die beteiligten Sequenzen. Und man kann dann verschiedene logische Schaltungen aus diesen Elementen zusammensetzen. Es hat sich auch eine Art von internationalem Wettbewerb unter Studenten entwickelt, der jedes Jahr stattfindet. Bei diesem Projekt, das unter der Bezeichnung iGEM läuft, erhalten Studententeams Elementesätze in Verbindung mit der Aufgabe, eine neuartige Schaltung zu entwickeln und diese in ein biologisches System, zum Beispiel Coli einzubringen und nachzuweisen, dass sie eine bestimmte Funktion erfüllt. Das ist inzwischen ziemlich populär geworden. Ein anderes Beispiel ist das, was wir als Refaktorisierung bestehender Signalwege und Genome bezeichnen. Dieser Begriff stammt aus der Welt der Software-Entwickler. Dabei nimmt man beispielsweise einen Code, der vielleicht von Amateuren geschrieben wurde, einen so genannten Spaghetti-Code, der für Außenstehende kaum zu verstehen ist. Wenn man ihn aber refaktorisiert und – ohne die Ausgabe des Systems zu verändern Die Refaktorisierung im biologischen System kann die Entwicklung verbessern, indem Gene in einem logischeren und modulareren Muster angeordnet werden. Hier ein Beispiel dazu: Dies stammt aus dem Labor von Chris Voigt beim MIT und wurde vor mehreren Jahren veröffentlicht. Es ist ein klassisches Beispiel für die Refaktorisierung. Er nahm das Gencluster für Stickstofffixierung von Klebsiella oxytoca, das rund 20 Gene enthält. Es ist ein Cluster. Nicht alle Gene im Cluster haben mit der Stickstofffixierung zu tun und die hat er entfernt und nur die Gene genommen, die für die Stickstofffixierung relevant waren und sie mit für Coli geeigneten Codon-Frequenzen resynthetisiert. Er hat nicht-codierende DNA entfernt, Transkriptionsfaktoren entfernt und im Wesentlichen die Codone randomisiert Er hat dann 4 Operone gebildet, wogegen das Original-Cluster aus 7 Operonen bestand. Er ergänzte eine synthetische Regulierung und noch einige steuernde und synthetische Schaltungen. Das Ergebnis war eine wirklich logisch angeordnete Gruppe von Genen, die die Menschen verstehen können. Und man kann das in einen Organismus einbringen, wenn man eine Stickstofffixierung erreichen möchte. Man kann auch Genome unterschiedlicher Art, insbesondere virale Genome refaktorisieren. Eines der ersten Beispiele dieser Art war die Refaktorisierung von T7-Phage. Hier ist ein Beispiel für die Refaktorisierung von PhiX174. Und da gibt es 6 überlappende Gene. Man refaktorisiert das einfach dadurch, dass man das linear ohne Überlappungen anordnet. Jetzt ist die Konstruktion von synthetischen Bakterien- und Hefegenomen ins Rampenlicht gerückt. Unser Team hat ein komplettes bakterielles Genom synthetisiert und es in Hefe zusammengebaut und es dann als DNA in einer Hefezelle vermehrt und in ein bakterielles Zytoplasma transplantiert, um eine „synthetische Zelle“ zu erzeugen. Erst vor einigen Monaten wurde ein Artikel darüber veröffentlicht, dass das Chromosom 3 von Hefe komplett durch eine synthetische DNA ersetzt wurde. Und man hat einige ziemlich drastische Veränderungen in der Sequenz vorgenommen und ihre Größe um rund 14% verringert. Dies eröffnet die Möglichkeit, die Hefe-Chromosomen komplett zu erneuern. Unsere Arbeit hat sich also in den letzten 10 Jahren auf das konzentriert, was wir das Minimalzellenkonzept nennen. Uns interessiert der Einsatz der synthetischen Genomik für den Bau einer Minimalzelle, die nur aus der zentralen Maschine des Lebens besteht. Wenn man in der Natur existierende Bakterien betrachtet, so verfügen sie oft über ziemlich riesige Genome, die aus mehreren Millionen von Basenpaaren bestehen. Die zentrale Maschine, die für den Betrieb der Zelle benötigt wird, macht einen sehr geringen Bruchteil dessen aus, vielleicht einige 100 Gene. Ein Großteil der DNA ist durch verschiedene Adaptionsfunktionen besetzt, die es den Zellen ermöglichen, sich in der Natur an verschiedene Gewebe anzupassen. Wir wollen die gesamten adaptiven Funktionen entfernen und nur die Kernfunktionen verwenden. Und wir wollen eine Minimalzelle mit diesen Kernfunktionen kreieren, damit wir hoffentlich endlich, wenn wir das erreicht haben, besser verstehen, was das Leben ausmacht. Richard Feynman hat den bekannten Ausspruch getan: „Was ich nicht erschaffen kann, kann ich nicht verstehen.“ Wir hoffen, dass wir das, was wir möglicherweise erschaffen, verstehen werden. Unser Target für eine Minimierung ist Mycoplasma mycoides, das bereits in der Natur ... das ist übrigens ein Krankheitserreger bei Ziegen … aber es ist eine kleine Zelle. Man kann sie einfach im Labor kultivieren. Und sie erzeugt auf einer Agarplatte Kolonien. Sie kann völlig unabhängig wachsen. Sie verfügt über alle Voraussetzungen für ein freies Leben. Ihr Genom umfasst etwas mehr als 1 Million Basenpaare. Es gibt 865 protein-kodierende Gene und 43 RNA-Gene. Und sie wächst in einer respektablen Geschwindigkeit von 60 bis 70 Minuten Verdopplungszeit. Wenn wir diese Zelle nehmen und versuchen, unnötige Gene zu entfernen und eine Minimalzelle zu konstruieren, müssen wir drei Dinge können: Die erste Sache, die uns die meisten Sorgen bereitet hat, war die Frage, ob es uns gelingen würde, das Genom chemisch zu synthetisieren, es als freie DNA in ein Reagenzglas zu geben und es dann wieder zum Leben zu erwecken. Wir mussten eine Methode entwickeln, es in ein rezeptives, kompatibles Zytoplasma einer Empfängerzelle zu transformieren und eine Übernahme durch diese Zelle zu gewährleisten – einen Prozess, den wir als Transplantation bezeichnen. Wir mussten zudem Methoden für den Bau riesiger DNA-Moleküle entwickeln. Und drittens brauchten wir Methoden, um identifizieren zu können, welche Gene behalten und welche entfernt werden sollen. Die Genom-Transplantation in unserem ursprünglichen Konzept … Ich glaube, dieses Darstellung ist ziemlich präzise. Wir wollten nackte Spender-DNA-Genome nehmen – beispielsweise aus einer Mykoplasma-Spenderzelle extrahieren oder vielleicht ein Extrakt aus Hefe – und diese mit Methoden, die der regulären DNA-Transformation ähneln, in die Empfängerzelle einbringen. Und durch Selektion beim Spendergenom ist nach einigen Generationen jeder Teil der Zelle, der vom Ursprungsgenom stammt, ersetzt und es ist eine Zelle entstanden, die nur aus dem Spendergenom besteht. Und alle Teile im Zytoplasma werden dann durch dieses Spendergenom spezifiziert. Kurz zusammengefasst, lag der Schlüssel hier in der Fähigkeit, die riesigen DNA-Moleküle intakt zu extrahieren und sie irgendwie über die Empfängerzellmembran einzubringen und ihre Etablierung zu initiieren. Wir nahmen also Empfängerzellen und sehr vorsichtig extrahierte Spender-DNA, kombinierten sie unter Zugabe von Polyethylenglycol, was die Aufnahme erleichtert, und ließen sie dann eine Zeitlang auf der Platte wachsen. Und nach ein oder zwei Jahren Arbeit gelang uns die Entwicklung eines Verfahrens, das relativ robust ist und typischerweise mehrere 100 Transplantate ergibt. Wir lernten, wie wir unser Mycoides-Genom mit Hilfe von Hefevektorsequenzen, die wir in das Genom integrieren, in eine Hefezelle einbringen können. Und dann fanden wir heraus, wie man die DNA intakt aus einer Hefezelle extrahiert und transplantiert. Wir brauchten etwas Zeit, bis wir feststellten, dass die Methylierung in der Hefe verloren geht. Und deshalb war das Genom der Restriktion durch den Empfänger ausgesetzt. Aber wir überwanden dieses Problem auf 2 unterschiedlichen Wegen: Wir entfernten die Restriktionssysteme aus der Empfängerzelle oder wir methylierten die DNA. Beide Wege funktionierten. So standen uns also wirksame Möglichkeiten zur Verfügung, die DNA, ein ganzes Genom, in das Reagenzglas zu bringen und es zum Leben zu erwecken. Gleichzeitig arbeiteten wir auch an der chemischen Synthese und dem Zusammenbau des gesamten Genoms. Das geschah in mehreren Schritten, beginnend mit Oligonukleotiden, dem Bau von 1-Kilobase-Stücken, die sich um 80 Basenpaare überlappten und deshalb zusammengeheftet werden konnten. Und dann machten wir weiter mit 10-kb-Stücken, 100-kb-Stücken und schließlich mit dem kompletten Genom, das in Hefe zusammengebaut wurde. Die letzten 3 Schritte erfolgten in Hefe, die über ein sehr wirksames Rekombinationssystem verfügt, das auf den Überlappungen eingesetzt werden kann, um Moleküle zusammenzubauen. Jetzt komme ich zu dem Punkt, wie wir festgelegt haben, welche Gene wir entfernen und welche wir behalten wollten. Wir haben dazu in einem hohen Maße einen Prozess entwickelt, der als globale Transposon-Mutagenese bezeichnet wird. Bringt man ein Transposon, das einen Antibiotikaresistenzmarker trägt, in eine Zelle ein, springt es irgendwo in das Genom. Wenn es in ein Gen eindringt, stört es dieses Gen und schaltet es aus. Wenn es sich um ein essentielles Gen handelt, erhält man aus diesem speziellen Ereignis keine Kolonien. Handelt es sich jedoch um ein nicht-essentielles Gen, erhält man Kolonien, die sich rückgewinnen lassen. Und dann lässt sich die Einfügestelle durch Sequenzierung ermitteln. Mit diesen von uns entwickelten Methoden konnten wir die Entwicklung eines Minimalgenoms starten, es in Hefe bauen und zusammensetzen und es dann testen, um zu sehen, ob unser Design funktioniert. Ist dies nicht der Fall, nehmen wir weitere Änderungen an der Schaltung vor. Wenn wir etwas erhalten, das zwar einigermaßen, aber nicht sehr gut funktioniert, können wir Änderungen vornehmen und diesen Zyklus von Entwickeln-Bauen-Testen immer weiter fortsetzen. Zunächst möchte ich noch etwas über die Ergebnisse unserer Transposon-Mutagenese berichten. Wir verwendeten Tn5, weil man … weil man Transposase kaufen kann. Und so haben wir ein kleines Transposon konstruiert, das gerade ein puromycin-resistentes Gen hat, flankiert von Terminatoren und 19 Basenpaare-Sequenzen, die für die Transposition erforderlich sind. Wir nehmen diese DNA, die ungefähr eine Kilobase groß ist, und fügen stöchiometrische Mengen der Transposase zu, die an die Enden bindet und es jetzt zu einem sehr aktiven Transposon macht. Man verhindert ein Überspringen auf sich selbst oder eine andere DNA im Reagenzglas durch Ausschluss von… indem man Magnesium ausschließt. Aber wenn man es einmal in eine Zelle einbringt, ist es ein sehr aktives Transposon und springt an irgendeine Stelle des Genoms in die Zelle. Wir erstellten dann eine Bibliothek. Wir brachten das Transposon in unser Mycoplasma mycoides, eine so genannte Wildtyp-Zelle, ein und ermöglichten seine Einnistung. Dann plattierten wir das aus und erhielten typischerweise auf einer von mehreren Platten rund 80.000 Kolonien. Zunächst entsteht jede Kolonie aus einer Zelle, in die eine einzige Transposon-Einschleusung irgendwo im Genom erfolgt ist. Wächst die Kolonie, weiß man, dass man keinen essentiellen Teil des Genoms getroffen hat. Wir fügen die Kolonien zusammen und erstellen das, was wir als Bibliothek 0 bezeichnen. Aus einer Probe dieser Gruppe isolieren wir DNA. Und eine andere Probe aus diesem Pool schleusen wir dann viermal durch, um rund 50 Verdopplungen zu erhalten. Dahinter steht die Vorstellung, dass am Ende dieser 50 Verdopplungen nur die schnellwachsenden Zellen dominieren werden. Mit anderen Worten: Wenn unser Transposon in ein Gen gesprungen ist, das absolut nicht essentiell ist, taucht es in dieser letzten Bibliothek auf, die wir als Bibliothek 4 bezeichnen. Wir nehmen diese Bibliotheken und wenden dann die inverse PCR an, um die Verbindung zwischen den Enden des Transposons und der genomischen Sequenz zu ermitteln. Hier ist eine 19-Basenpaare-Sequenz. Und das hier ist eine genomische DNA. So konnten wir die Einfügestellen der Transposonen herausfinden. Und wenn man sie dann auf einer Genkarte abbildet … hier ist beispielsweise ein Cluster von Genen, die offensichtlich nicht essentiell sind. Wir verifizieren das, indem wir sie entfernen und nachweisen, dass die Zelle lebensfähig ist. Diese Gene hier sind essentiell. Diese beispielsweise sind an der Initiierung der DNA-Replikation beteiligt. Und dann schaut man weiter. Es gibt verschiedene Cluster von Genen, die nicht essentiell sind und einige wenige essentielle Genen enthalten usw. Und das Ganze können wir dann in einer Excel-Tabelle katalogisieren. Wir entdeckten drei verschiedene Arten von Mustern. Hier ist eine Gen-CTP-Synthase ohne jeglichen Treffer. Es gibt weder in Bibliothek 0 noch in Bibliothek 4 Transposonen. Das ist ein essentielles Gen. Hier ist ein Gen, das beide Bibliotheken betrifft, sodass es gut repräsentiert ist. Es handelt sich um ein schnell wachsendes Knock-out-Exemplar, also ist es ein nicht essentielles Gen. Und hier ist eines, das eine starke Trefferquote in der ersten Bibliothek hat, aber in der L4-Bibliothek ganz verschwunden ist. Es wächst also langsam, ist beeinträchtigt. Was immer dieses Gen macht, es ist nicht lebenswesentlich, sondern beeinträchtigt die Überlebensfähigkeit der Zelle. Und so konnten wir unsere gesamten Gene klassifizieren und sie in diese riesige Gruppe nicht-essentieller Gene einordnen. Hier sehen Sie den Kernsatz an essentiellen Genen. Und hier sind die Gene, die beeinträchtigt sind. Unser Design wird sich also auf diesen Satz von Genen konzentrieren. Und so haben wir einfach alle Gene genommen, die wir behalten wollten und diese violetten Pfeile darüber angebracht. Und die, die wir beseitigen wollen, sind die gelb markierten Bereiche. Und wir reduzieren dann das Genom einfach, indem wir alle Gene zusammenstecken, die wir behalten wollen. So haben wir ein Genom, das wir als reduziertes Genom-Design bezeichnen. Es hat ungefähr die Hälfte der Größe des Originalgenoms. Und hier sind die Größen der ... wichtig ist also, dass wir … die Designs werden auf 1/8-Abschnitten des Genoms hergestellt. So können wir die Fehlersuche auf jeden einzelnen Abschnitt beschränken, wenn er nicht gut funktioniert. Und hier sehen Sie eine relative Größe des Wildtyp-Genoms in unserem reduzierten Design. Dann gingen wir zu unserer nächsten Phase über, die Synthese. Und Dan Gibson hat in unserem Unternehmen Synthetic Genomics Inc. automatisierte DNA-Synthetisierungsmaschinen entwickelt, die relativ schnell jedes der 8 reduzierten Genom-Designelemente zusammenbauen können, die er dann nach Rockville schickt. In San Diego sorge ich bzw. sorgen wir für das Design und den Zusammenbau. Getestet wird dann in Rockville. Wir senden also die DNA-Elemente einfach dorthin. Das ist in Kürze die 8-Elemente-Strategie. Wir wollten jedes der einzelnen Elemente testen. Deshalb kombinierten wir jedes reduzierte Element mit 7 Wildtyp-Elementen und testeten dann, ob das Genom überlebensfähig war. Und es hat sich herausgestellt, dass alle 8 Elemente, die wir entwickelt haben, funktionieren. Einige von ihnen ergeben eine Zelle, die etwas langsam wächst, aber sie sind alle durchaus lebensfähig. Jetzt stellt sich die Frage, ob wir sie alle miteinander kombinieren können und dann im Grunde genommen fertig sind und unser reduziertes Genom erhalten haben. Die Antwort lautet: Nein. Wir konnten sie nicht alle zusammensetzen, aber wir konnten verschiedene Gruppen davon zusammensetzen. Hier haben wir beispielsweise eine Zusammensetzung von 2, 4, 6, 7 und 8 und damit erzeugen wir die Kolonien, die etwas langsam wachsen. Warum funktioniert das nicht? Wir denken, dass das mit unentdeckten funktionalen Redundanzen zusammenhängt. Mit anderen Worten: Dies sind essentielle Funktionen, die … es kann also sein, dass Fragment 6 eine essentielle Funktion hat und die Zelle, wenn man den Knock-out durch sich selbst initiiert, trotzdem okay ist, weil die essentielle Funktion auch von einem Gen auf Segment 1 unterstützt wird. Aber wenn man aber diese beiden ausschaltet … mit anderen Worten, wenn wir Segment 1 mit Segment 6 kombinieren, wird die lebenswichtige Funktion abgeschaltet. Und deshalb beschäftigen wir uns jetzt damit, diese wenigen Redundanzen herauszufinden und zu korrigieren. Wir haben insgesamt 8 reduzierte Segmente entwickelt, die lebensfähig sind. Sie funktionieren in mehreren verschiedenen Kombinationen. Und wir hoffen, dass wir letztendlich eine Zelle erhalten, die keine Gene mehr hat, die man ohne schwerwiegende Auswirkungen auf das Wachstum entfernen könnte. Im besten Fall halten wir bei einer Verdopplungszeit, die nicht so weit vom Wildtyp entfernt liegt, eine Reduzierung von 50% für möglich. Und das Resultat wird ein Genom sein, das kleiner ist als jede frei lebende, in der Natur vorkommende Zelle. Das ist unser Ziel. Und zum Schluss die Frage: Was können wir mit so einer Minimalzelle anstellen? Es gibt verschiedene Dinge. Sehr interessiert sind wir daran, die Zelle sozusagen zu reorganisieren oder zu defragmentieren. Die Zusammenführung aller Gene, die gemeinsame Prozesse…die an gemeinsamen Prozessen beteiligt sind, würde dazu führen, dass man ein sehr verständliches Genom erhält. Hier sind einige der Menschen, die an diesem Projekt gearbeitet haben. Danke. Applaus.

Hamilton Smith elucidating the concept behind his work on synthetic biology.
(00:14:29 - 00:15:55)

 

Genetic engineering and alterations to the genetic code are some of the most controversial aspects of science. The ease with which genetic information can now be permanently altered means that this issue is more topical than ever, nowhere more than in discussions related to the use of CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Like the restriction enzymes discovered by Werner Arber and Hamilton Smith, CRISPR was first discovered as a defence system in bacteria, where it functions as a form of “molecular memory” that results in the targeting of the Cas9 enzyme to foreign DNA, ensuring its destruction. Its repurposing as a potent and specific gene editing technique has led to proposals to use it to permanently alter the DNA of human embryos in order to cure, or provide resistance, to human disease. However, concerns related to safety as well as the ethical implications of permanently editing the germline mean that its use is still heavily regulated. In this lecture from 2015, Werner Arber talks about the potential risks associated with genetic engineering in general, and specifically with transferring genes between species:

 

Werner Arber (2015) - Insight into the Laws of Nature for Biological Evolution

I'm trying to cover 150 years of history of science in 30 minutes. Let's start with Gregor Mendel, Charles Darwin, and Friedrich Miescher on three fields - genetics, evolutionary biology, and nucleic acid biochemistry. In the first almost 100 years, not very much advance was being done. At that moment, people looked at phenotypes. Genetics was not known as genetics, as such. Phenotypes means you look at the organisms, what they do, and you identify that with various tools, your eyes and other senses. Then, you come to some conclusions. It is in the 1940s only that genetics started to be done with microorganisms, bacteria, and with particular bacterial viruses,which are called bacteriophages. You see here that there are three important, very rapidly showing up conclusions. First, transformation, as investigated by Avery and his colleagues in the 1940s, showed that isolated DNA molecules sometimes can penetrate into bacterial cells. If these cells are variants of the one which is the so-called donor bacterium, then sometimes some genes are transferred and replace the mutated genes by the original wild-type. This is called transformation. When Avery and his colleagues discovered that in pneumococcal bacteria, what they actually did, it was known that a broken-open donor can transform other bacterial strains which are genetically different. It was known, but they didn't know what was the substance which made that difference. This group of three people, they purified several components. For example, the donor DNA was highly purified, so there were no other biological molecules in that fraction, and only that DNA fraction gave rise to this transformation and no other fraction. You can imagine, there was only a minority of biologists who believed that. They couldn't understand that, because one did expect that it would be not possible on nucleic acids, which have only four different building blocks, four nucleotides, to have that complex information which is the genetic information. The second possibility was that people working around Joshua Lederberg with E. coli bacteria, they could show that, by chance, these could sometimes give rise to coupling the donor cell with the recipient cell, and genes were transferred. It was pretty soon then later shown that transfer is a linear thing in this coupled transfer. That means that DNA molecules must be long filaments. Student Norton Zinder, working with Joshua Lederberg, had the chance to see whether what they had found with E. coli bacteria is also true for Salmonella bacteria. The first results indicated that it might be so. But when they looked more carefully, how the donor DNA was transferred into the recipient bacteria, they found that these were viral particles, bacteriophage particles, P22. Later on, it was shown that these are really able to do what we call now transduction. Bacteria sometimes incorporate in their coat the bacterial DNA rather than the viral DNA. A small minority, but you can select for specific markers. I forgot to say, in 1953, of course, were the two Nature papers in the spring of Watson and Crick showing the double-helical structure of this filament, this DNA. Everything became clear at that moment, and people started to pay attention to that. Slowly, the idea that DNA is really the carrier of genetic information became more strong. I show you here, symbolically, the large chromosome of E. coli bacteria, which carries almost 5 million base pairs. Base pairs as shown above - T, A, G, C, and so on - in various orders, are actually the genomes of these bacteria. Just one single, large DNA molecule. As I mentioned, from conjugation, one could already predict that this was just one molecule and it's circular. In the wrong scale I just showed there a gene, which is composed essentially on the coding region, which is important for synthesizing particular gene products, mostly proteins. There are expression control signals, of course, because these genes have to be expressed when the product may be needed. Then, from what we learned from Watson and Crick, is that actually a mutation, which is causing phenotypic variations, is most likely an alteration in the parental DNA sequences. At that moment, one was not able to identify these sequences yet. I started in the fall of 1953 my postdoctoral work at the University of Geneva. I came in with majoring in experimental physics, and I had to take care daily of a still relatively primitive electron microscope at that time. In the afternoons, when in the morning I had set up the microscope, cleaning the tube, and so on. In the afternoon, we did research. I started research looking at bacteria, at bacteriophages, and, in particular, at mutants of bacteriophage lambda. One of these mutants, which I also incorporated in this, is a particular mutant of lambda, which is a mutant not producing any visible particle in the electron microscope. But it was clear that the genome was there, that the genes became expressed, and some of the genes are actually host genes. My task then was to go not only with the microscope into these studies, but starting to do genetics. A few mutations of bacteriophage lambda were known at that time. I was able, as shown in this projection, that when this lambda genome - this was already known: Lysogenic bacteria are actually hybrids between the host genome and the viral genome. When you shine ultraviolet light on that, virus production is ... But sometimes the excision of the here black viral genome is not at the right size. So that you get the hybrid between part of the viral genome, which was still able to replicate, and a few adjacent bacterial genes which happen to be genes for galactose fermentation. That could be easily selected. The conclusion was: this defective virus was a hybrid still being able to replicate as a plasmid but not making real viral particles because host coat and tail genes were clearly missing and left behind in the donor bacterium. Instead there were these genes for the capacity to ferment galactose. This idea was accepted by, at that moment, relatively few molecular geneticists. And they reflected on it, knowing that the genome's are tremendously long DNA molecules with many genes; E. coli has almost five thousand genes in its genome. How do you study genes? The best is sorting it out as nature does in this particular case and then using that and replicating and harvesting from this bacteria, the DNA starting to see what the structure and finally the function of these genes are. That was in several pets, but the experiment was not so easy, because how do you sort out a gene which you want to study? We were aware already at that time that several factors limit gene acquisition. Namely, the surface of the donor and the recipient must fit together, for example in conjugation, in the phage infection. The phage must be able to infect the recipient cell and so on. When the DNA penetrates from another bacterial cell into the recipient cell, then restriction modification starts to act. This was a phenomenon which has been described but not explained. Then functional capacities, that's the selection level for propagation and for expression of noble genes. It was already concluded, nature uses these possibilities but it's a strategy in small steps of acquisition of foreign genetic information. Nowadays we call that horizontal gene transfer. I just briefly explain the phenomenon of restriction modification here. K strain red, drawn red here, if you grow that bacteriophage longer in K, you have a progeny after an infection of 100 or 200 particles and each one can go back to another still intact host K. So that can go forever. If you, however, change the host, sometimes we have a host which is marked here by zero, which has no restriction modification in the enzymes, you still go with an efficiency of one. But if you go back to the original host K from the host zero, with these phages, you only get only one in ten thousand which is reproductive. And the phage coming out is again red, so can go back to K and so on. This phenomenon is called restriction and putting the right colour is called modification. The conclusion was there must be these two enzymes for DNA restriction and for its modification of the host. The hunt for enzymes started in the 1960s. At the end of the '60s it was finally successful. You see not all of the restriction enzymes work in the same way. The type-one enzymes are more complex. We had already worked with E. coli which has a type-one restriction system that cuts the DNA into fragments but not reproducibly. You see here a DNA molecule having - down there, type one - having two recognition sites, and the recognition sites are such that wherever I put the star here in the post there is a metro group attached, that's the modification. Modification is DNA regulation. So that the metro group attached to one particular nucleotide does not hinder the expression of the gene. The other enzymes of type-two, this is also relatively widespread in nature, is that again you have the recognition sites for the enzyme E co R1 here - it's G-A-A-T-T-C - And when one or both stars there are not metro groups - they are foreign because the donor would have another recognition site - then the DNA is cut as shown here, reproducibly always in the same way. These enzymes had first been isolated from Haemophilus influenzae by my colleague Hamilton Smith who is also at our meeting. And he, together with me, finally got the Nobel Prize in 1978 together with another colleague, Nathan Smith, who had also been working in the same university as Ham Smith and he worked on human DNA cancer virus, S340. And the three of us got the prize for clearing up the restriction systems, being the first to isolate an enzyme which was very useful for genetic engineering as I will show you now. And a third for its applications of medical interest. So at that moment in the early 1970s, several groups started to use that knowledge, taking a vector that can be a viral DNA or another small, we call that plasmid in bacterias sometimes. There are these, and conjugation is actually due to plasmids working as fertility factors. If you take donor DNA from any origin, cut into fragments which are relatively small, you can incorporate it into that vector, transferring it into some bacteria by various tools. And if you are successful, you can multiply that plasmid and also express the genes which are carried on that, including the inserted red gene. So that's genetic engineering. We discussed early in the 1970s the possibility whether there is some risk to do that. Because if you are looking for a yet unknown gene of unknown function which you sort out,you multiply it highly in the lab and study its structure and function, then you have to be careful not to infect you because you don't know. It could be pathogenic or have some other toxic effect. So the question was then finally deliberated at a few scientific meetings, letter to 'Science' - one should really take that very carefully. And in February of 1974, it came to the Asilomar Conference where all these questions were discussed. And the conclusion was: There are short-term and long-term potential risks. Short-term, as I mentioned, pathogenicity and so on and so forth. And there the recommendation was: Just apply the same method as has already been done for a few decades in medical microbiology. If you take from a sick person some bacterial samples, sending them to an analysis laboratory. These people working in this analysis have to be very careful not to be infected also. That was the rule, but then there came the question: If ever some of this recombinant DNA would penetrate, would get into the environment, either by accident escaping from the lab, or by purpose, liberating something in order to produce these particular cheap products. Then it might be possible at that moment - remember we are in the mid-1970s - that it might be able to transfer into other bacterial strains. I didn't realize then that working with bacterial cultures, which grow very rapidly, generation time of - under very good living conditions - half an hour. So in one day you have a large population, and it's easier to do population genetics and studies with bacteria than with higher organisms which have often generation times of many years. I show you here, what at that moment in biological evolution was known. This is neo-Darwinian evolution that creation, spontaneous creation of mutations, that means genetic variation, is the driving force of evolution. Without having any alteration in the genome, you wouldn't have any evolution. The natural selection which is here characterized by the effect of the environment, and the environment is both physical-chemical and biological. All the other living beings in the same eco-system can also influence the selection of new variants. Third, isolation as Charles Darwin had seen on the Galapagos Islands. There, of course, this is geographic isolation; there are also many types of reproductive isolation that you wouldn't be fertile if you just bring in some DNA which is not related to the organism. That modulates the process of evolution. The idea was then in the 1970s, I decided to go together with many colleagues in microbial genetics into studying the molecular processes of genetic variation in order to understand how that works. We already knew at that time that a mutation, here defined as an alteration of the sequence of the nucleotides, is, in fact, not so often favourable in giving a selective advantage. More often you see selective disadvantage, even extreme lethality. Often also an alteration in the nucleotides is neutral, doesn't give any alteration in the phenotype. So we conclude from that, that the mutations should be relatively rare, spontaneous mutations. That's what one really observes also in bacterial cultures in higher organisms later on also. That's a fact that horizontal transfer does occur but relatively rarely. What I show you here is already ... I will come back later on to the details. This is an indication on how the mutations are created. There are a number of mechanisms. Nature is very inventive. You find a lot of different specific processes contributing to variation, and you can subdivide these into strategies of genetic variation, local one or a few adjacent nucleotides, DNA rearrangement and DNA acquisition by horizontal transfer. What I show you here, I'm pretty happy to show you that. This is a contribution to what I heard yesterday on interdisciplinarity. One does know that nucleotides sometimes have short living isomers called tautomeric forms. For example, the adenine can have its hydrogen atom jumping to another site and then it doesn't pair any longer with thymidine, but by chance it pairs with cytosine. At that moment you have, of course, the adenine goes back to its normal, stable standard form, you have a mispairing. Still nowadays most textbooks say, these mutants are replication errors. It's a completely wrong attitude of understanding nature. Nature uses short-living tautomeric forms of nucleotides in order to occasionally create a nucleotide variation and alteration. And, in fact, most individual organisms studied in that respect have been shown to have repair systems to inhibit rapidly the fixation of the wrong pairing and replacing correctly in the mutated strand that nucleotide. But again, cleverly, not with full, hundred percent efficiency so that very rarely you have substitution. Watson and Crick in the fall of 1953 already showed that, and people later on just ignored it for decades. I show you here there a number of rearrangements possible by enzymes, often general recombination. Transposition of mobile genetic elements jumping from one site to another in the genome. Site-specific recombination, these enzymes can give rise to duplications, to deletions. It can give rise to inversions and new fusions and that sometimes also has some effect. In fact, the three differences - local sequence change, DNA arrangement, and DNA acquisition - have different qualities in their contribution to evolution. Local sequence change often is a stepwise improvement of something, if natural selection selects for it. DNA arrangements give rise to new fusions of functional domains or of alternative expression control signal with a functional gene while the horizontal transfer is a sharing in successful developments made by others. That's quite successful. I come now to just mention a few conclusions. The blue type is what Charles Darwin said, that living beings have common - he doesn't say whether one or many - common origins, but it's good to show that tree, and there is good evidence for that With horizontal transfer you can draw between branches of these trees. Transfers which are only once used usually and that gives rise that, as I mentioned, you can profit from something, some gene functions which were developed elsewhere. And I conclude that Charles Darwin is right, we have common origin, but also common future. That's quite essential and I ask you to accept that as an important thing. And that's for me a very important additional argument to safeguard the big biodiversity. Because if we lose that biodiversity where are all these developed genes that could be at some time or another, at future times, helpful for any organism. I just go very rapidly. There are evolution genes which are either variation generators or modulators of the frequency of variation. Then nature also uses non-genetic elements; I just remind you of the tautomeric form of nucleotides. This is a structure of flexibility of biologically active molecule materials. Random encounters: If a virus carries genes from one organism to another, it's a chance to infect that one or another one and so on. And environmental mutagens. Nature uses that and the conclusion is that natural reality takes actively care of biological evolution. It's an active process and we have difficulty in understanding and believing that because it's inefficient. It must be inefficient, otherwise we wouldn't be able to live because our genome has to be of a good stability. Only rare individuals can try-out whether a newly known mutation can be advance or lethality. You see you have these two antagonistic principals, promotion of genetic variation and limitation. And it is really a very nice fine tuning that in the past the evolution genes have made. So we see if we study these things, that in most of the genomes it has been shown that the two kinds of genes are there. It's a duality of the genome to the benefit of individuals: the majority of the genes - the housekeeping genes, accessory genes and developmental genes - in higher organisms. Whereas the evolution genes are actually the source of, in fact, genetic evolution and biodiversity. I will finish here but just to say: If you apply all that knowledge to genetic engineering you will see that genetic engineering is not fundamentally different from what nature does in horizontal and other gene transfer all the time. And in biotechnology, in classical including agriculture, you go into nature, you see which plants can serve for me as a food, which animals are useful for me and you domesticate those. And nowadays you can include your knowledge and sometimes improve some function, making differently higher expression and so on. And introduce a gene of possible interest in another organism in order to harvest its product and use it. That's called domestication of genes. Thank you for your attention.

Ich versuche, 150 Jahre aus der Geschichte der Wissenschaft in 30 Minuten abzudecken. Wir beginnen mit Gregor Mendel, Charles Darwin und Friedrich Miescher und den drei Fachbereichen Genetik, Evolutionsbiologie und Nukleinsäure-Biochemie. In den ersten beinahe 100 Jahren gab es relativ wenig Fortschritt zu verzeichnen. Die Menschen betrachteten damals Phänotypen, die Genetik war als solche noch nicht bekannt. Phänotypen bedeutet hier, dass man sich die Organismen anschaut, was sie tun, und identifiziert dies mit diversen Werkzeugen, den Augen und anderen Sinnen, und zieht daraus einige Schlussfolgerungen. Erst in den 1940er-Jahren wurde mit der genetischen Untersuchung von Mikroorganismen, Bakterien und insbesondere bakteriellen Viren, den sogenannten Bakteriophagen, begonnen. Wie Sie hier sehen können, gibt es drei wichtige und sehr rasch auftretende Schlussfolgerungen. Zunächst zeigte die von Avery und seinen Kollegen in den 1940er-Jahren untersuchte Transformation, dass isolierte DNA-Moleküle manchmal in bakterielle Zellen eindringen können. Und dass, falls es sich bei diesen Zellen um Varianten der sogenannten "Spenderzelle" handelt, dabei unter Umständen Gene übertragen werden, welche die mutierten Gene mit dem ursprünglichen Wildtypen ersetzen. Dies wird als "Transformation" bezeichnet. Als Avery und dessen Kollegen dies an Pneumokokken entdeckten, basierte ihr Vorgehen auf dem damaligen Wissen, dass ein aufgebrochener Spender andere sich genetisch unterscheidende Bakterienstämme umwandeln konnte. Dies wusste man, jedoch war nicht bekannt, welche Substanzklasse den Unterschied ausmachte. Und diese aus drei Leuten bestehende Gruppe reinigte mehrere Komponenten, darunter die hochgradig gereinigte Spender-DNA, sodass sich in dieser Fraktion keine weiteren biologischen Moleküle befanden und nur diese DNA-Fraktion und keine andere zu diesen Transformationen führte. Wie Sie sich vielleicht vorstellen können, gab es nur wenige Biologen, die so etwas glaubten. Vielen fehlte das Verständnis, weil man davon ausging, dass es nicht möglich sei, aus Nukleinsäuren, die aus gerade einmal vier unterschiedlichen Kettengliedern, vier Nukleotiden bestehen, solch komplexe Informationen, also genetisches Wissen, zu erhalten. Eine zweite Möglichkeit bestand aus den Leuten, die um Joshua Lederberg mit E. coli Bakterien arbeiteten und herausfanden, dass diese manchmal zufällig zur Verbindung einer Spenderzelle mit einer Empfängerzelle führten und dabei Gene übertragen wurden. Und kurz darauf stellte sich heraus, dass die Übertragung bei dieser gekoppelten Verbindung linear verlief. Daraus leitete sich ab, dass DNA-Moleküle aus langen Filamenten bestehen. Der Student Norton Zinder, der mit Joshua Lederberg arbeitete, hatte die Möglichkeiten zu beobachten, ob die Ergebnisse aus E. coli Bakterien auch auf Salmonellen zutrafen. Die ersten Ergebnisse ließen diese Vermutung noch zu, als sie sich jedoch genauer anschauten, wie die Spender-DNA in das Empfängerbakterium übertragen wurde, stellten sie fest, dass es sich um Viruspartikel, Partikel von P22-Bakteriophagen, handelte. Später wurde gezeigt, dass diese tatsächlich zu dem, was wir heute als Transduktion bezeichnen, fähig sind, nämlich dass Bakterien in ihrem Code manchmal eher die bakterielle DNA als die Virus-DNA enthalten. Das gilt zwar nur für eine kleine Minderheit, aber man kann spezielle Marker wählen. Entschuldigung, ich vergaß zu sagen, dass im Frühjahr 1953 natürlich zwei Arbeiten von Watson und Crick in Nature erschienen waren, die die Doppelhelix-Struktur dieses Filaments, dieser DNA zeigten. In diesem Moment wurde also alles klar, die Leute wurden darauf aufmerksam und langsam verfestigte sich die Idee, dass es sich bei der DNA um den tatsächlichen Träger genetischer Informationen handelte. Hier zeige ich Ihnen sinnbildlich das lange Chromosom der E. coli Bakterie, welches fast fünf Millionen Basenpaare umfasst. Die Basenpaare werden oben gezeigt. TA, GC und so weiter, in verschiedenen Anordnungen, ist tatsächlich das Genom dieser Bakterie, nur ein einziges großes DNA-Molekül. Und wie ich bereits sagte, ließ aus der Konjugation bereits vorhersagen, dass es sich hier um ein einziges, kreisförmiges Molekül handelt. Ich zeige hier, wenn auch im falschen Maßstab, ein Gen, welches hauptsächlich in der Kodierungsregion gebildet wird, was für die Synthese bestimmter Genprodukte, zumeist Proteine, wichtig ist. Und es gibt natürlich Kontrollsignale zur Expression, weil diese Gene exprimiert werden müssen, wenn das Produkt möglicherweise gebraucht wird. Von Watson und Crick haben wir erfahren, dass es sich bei einer Mutation, die phänotypische Variationen verursacht, wahrscheinlich um eine Veränderung in den parentalen DNA-Sequenzen handelt. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war eine Identifikation dieser Sequenzen noch nicht möglich. Ich begann im Herbst 1953 nach Abschluss meiner Promotion mit der Arbeit an der Universität von Genf. Ich hatte im Hauptfach Experimentalphysik studiert und musste mich damals täglich um ein recht primitives Elektronenmikroskop kümmern. Nachmittags - nachdem ich morgens das Mikroskop vorbereitet und die Röhre gereinigt hatte und so weiter, wurde nachmittags geforscht. Und ich begann mit der Untersuchung von Bakterien, von Bakteriophagen und insbesondere von Mutationen der Bakteriophage Lambda. Und bei einer dieser Mutationen, welche ich ebenfalls mit einbezogen habe, handelt es sich um eine bestimmte Lambda-Mutation, welche im Elektronenmikroskop keinerlei sichtbare Partikel produziert. Es war jedoch klar, dass das Genom da war, dass die Gene exprimiert wurden und es sich bei einigen der Gene um Wirts-Gene handelte. Und meine Aufgabe bestand damals darin, diese Studien nicht nur mit dem Mikroskop zu betreiben, sondern anzufangen mit Genetik zu arbeiten. Einige Mutationen von Bakteriophage Lambda waren damals bekannt. Und ich konnte, wie in der Abbildung dargestellt, anhand dieses Lambda-Genoms, welches bereits bekannt war, zeigen, dass es sich bei der lysogenen Bakterie tatsächlich um Hybriden aus Wirts-Genom und Viren-Genom handelt. Und wenn man es mit ultraviolettem Licht bestrahlt, wird die Virenproduktion ... Aber manchmal findet die Entfernung des schwarzen Virusgenoms hier nicht in der richtigen Größe statt, sodass man den Hybrid zwischen Teilen des Virusgenoms erhält, welches sich immer noch nachbilden konnte, und einige benachbarte bakterielle Gene, bei denen es sich um Gene zur Fermentierung von Galaktose handelt. Und dies konnte auf einfache Weise ausgewählt werden. Die Schlussfolgerung lautete also, dass es sich bei dem defekten Virus um einen Hybriden handelte, der sich noch immer als Plasmid reproduzieren, aber keine richtigen Virenpartikel bilden konnte, weil der Wirtsmantel und die Endgene deutlich fehlten und im Spender-Bakterium zurückblieben. Stattdessen gab es diese Gene für die Fähigkeit, Galaktose zu fermentieren. Diese Idee fand zu jenem Zeitpunkt unter relativ wenigen Molekulargenetikern Zustimmung, denen auch bewusst war, dass es sich bei den Genomen um ungeheuer lange DNA-Moleküle mit vielen Genen handelte. E. coli enthält in seinem Genom fast fünftausend Gene. Und wie sollte man Gene studieren? Am besten sortiert man si aus, wie es auch die Natur in diesem speziellen Fall macht, und dies dazu nutzt, aus diesen Bakterien die DNA dieser Bakterie zu replizieren und ernten, um zunächst die Struktur und letzten Endes die Funktion dieser Gene zu erkunden. Diese Vorgehensweise steckte in mehreren Köpfen, aber das Experiment selbst stellte sich als nicht einfach heraus, denn wie sollte man ein Gen trennen, welches man erforschen möchte? Wir waren uns zu diesem Zeitpunkt bereits mehrerer Faktoren bewusst, die bei der Erfassung eines Gens Hindernisse darstellten. Etwa, dass die Oberfläche des Spenders und des Empfängers zusammenpassen musste, zum Beispiel bei Konjugation. Bei der Infizierung mit Phagen muss der Phage in der Lage sein, die Empfängerzelle zu infizieren, und so weiter. Wenn die DNA von einer anderen Bakterienzelle in die Empfängerzelle eindringt, tritt restriktive Modifikation in Kraft. Hierbei handelte es sich um ein Phänomen, dass zwar beschrieben aber nicht erklärt worden war. Dazu Funktionsfähigkeiten, wobei es sich um das Auswahlniveau zur Verbreitung und zur Expression von neuen Genen handelt. Man hatte also bereits festgestellt, dass die Natur diese Möglichkeiten nutzt, jedoch besteht diese Strategie aus kleinen Schritten, mit denen fremde genetische Informationen gewonnen werden. Heute nennen wir dies horizontalen Gentransfer. Ich erkläre an dieser Stelle nur kurz das Phänomen der restriktiven Modifikation. Der K-Strang, hier in Rot dargestellt. Wenn man den Bakteriophage Lambda in K züchtet, so erhält man nach der Infizierung eine Nachkommenschaft von 100 oder 200 Partikeln, von denen jeder zu einem noch intakten Wirt K zurückkehren kann. Das kann unaufhörlich so weitergehen. Wenn man jedoch den Wirt verändert, manchmal gibt es einen Wirt, der hier mit einer 0 markiert wurde, der keine restriktiven Modifikationsenzyme besitzt, so hat man noch immer eine Effizienz von Eins. Geht man jedoch mit diesen Phagen vom Wirt 0 zum ursprünglichen Wirt K zurück, erhält man lediglich einen in zehntausend, was reproduktiv ist und der dabei herauskommende Phage ist wiederum rot. Er kann also zurück zu K und so weiter. Dieses Phänomen nennt man "Restriktion", das Setzen der richtigen Farbe nennt man "Modifikation". Man kam zu dem Schluss, dass es diese zwei Enzyme für die DNA-Restriktion und für deren Modifikation des Wirtes geben musste. Es folgte die Jagd auf Enzyme, die in den 1960er-Jahren begann und Ende der '60er-Jahre stellte sich schließlich der Erfolg ein. Wie Sie sehen, arbeiten nicht alle Restriktionsenzyme auf dieselbe Weise. Die Typ-I-Enzyme sind komplexer. Wir hatten ursprünglich mit E. coli gearbeitet, welches ein Typ-I-Restriktionssystem besitzt, das die DNA in Fragmente schneidet, jedoch nicht reproduzierbar. Bei dem hier dargestellten DNA-Molekül können Sie sehen, dass Typ I über zwei Erkennungsstellen verfügt und die Erkennungsstellen so funktionieren, dass, egal, wohin ich den Stern hier im Wirt setze, eine Methylgruppe anliegt. Dies ist die Modifikation, Modifikation bedeutet DNA-Methylierung. Somit behindert die an einem bestimmten Nukleotid anliegende Methylgruppe die Expression des Gens nicht. Bei anderen Enzymen des Typs II, die auch in der Natur relativ häufig vorkommen, hat man Restriktionen. Die Erkennungsstellen für die Enzyme Eco R-1 hier lautet G-A-A-T-T-C. Und wenn es sich bei einem oder beiden Sternen nicht um Methylgruppen handelt, sie fremd sind, weil der Spender eine andere Erkennungsstelle besitzt, dann ist die DNA darin gefangen, wie man hier sieht, und immer auf dieselbe Weise reproduzierbar. Diese Enzyme wurden zum ersten Mal aus der Haemophilus Influenza isoliert und zwar durch meinen Kollegen Hamilton Smith, der ebenfalls an der Tagung teilnimmt. Gemeinsam erhielten wir im Jahr 1978 schließlich den Nobelpreis, zusammen mit einem weiteren Kollegen, Nathan Smith, der an derselben Universität wie Ham Smith arbeitete und den menschlichen DNA-Krebsvirus SV40 erforschte. Und wir drei erhielten den Preis für die Freilegung der Restriktionssysteme und dafür, dass wir die ersten waren, denen die Isolation eines Enzyms gelang, was sich für die Gentechnik als sehr nützlich erwies, wie ich Ihnen nun zeigen werde. Und drittens für dessen Anwendungen in medizinischen Interessen. Damals, in den frühen 1970er-Jahren, begannen also mehrere Gruppen mit der Nutzung dieses Wissens und der Verwendung eines Vektors. Das kann eine Virus-DNA sein oder etwas Kleineres, das wir manchmal "Plasmid" nennen und das in Bakterien vorkommt - Konjugation entsteht eigentlich aufgrund von als Fruchtbarkeitsfaktoren arbeitenden Plasmiden. Und wenn man Spender-DNA aus welcher Quelle auch immer entnimmt und sie in relativ kleine Fragmente schneidet, so kann man sie in diesen Vektor eingliedern und sie mit verschiedenen Werkzeugen in eine Bakterie überführen. Wenn das gelungen ist, dann kann man das Plasmid multiplizieren und zudem die darauf getragenen Gene inklusive des eingefügten roten Gens exprimieren. Und das ist Gentechnik. Wir haben damals, in den frühen 1970er-Jahren, über mögliche daraus entstehende Risiken diskutiert. Weil wenn man versucht, ein bislang unbekanntes Gen mit unbekannter Funktion ausfindig zu machen, es aussortiert und im Labour in großen Mengen vervielfacht, um seine Struktur und Funktion zu studieren, dann muss man vorsichtig sein, sich nicht damit anzustecken, weil man es eben nicht kennt. Es könnte krankheitserregend sein oder eine toxische Auswirkung haben. Es wurde also damals, auch im Anschluss an Beratungen in einigen wissenschaftlichen Treffen und in einem Brief an Science, darauf hingewiesen, dass man wirklich sehr vorsichtig damit umgehen sollte. Und im Februar 1974 wurden all diese Fragen auf der Asilomar-Konferenz diskutiert. Und die abschließende Erklärung war, dass es potentielle Kurzzeit- und Langzeitrisiken gab. Mit Kurzzeit war die angesprochene Pathogenität und so weiter gemeint. Und die Empfehlung der Konferenz lautete, nach derselben Methode vorzugehen, die bereits seit einigen Jahrzehnten in der Mikrobiologie angewendet wurde, wenn man von einer erkrankten Person eine Bakterienprobe nimmt und sie an ein Analyselabor sendet - wobei die an diesen Analysen arbeitenden Menschen ebenfalls aufpassen mussten, sich nicht anzustecken. So war also die Empfehlung, aber es kam daraufhin die Frage auf, was passierte, wenn solch rekombinante DNA in die Umwelt gelangte, sei es, dass sie versehentlich aus dem Labour gelangte, oder absichtlich, wenn es darum ging, etwas freizusetzen, um ein bestimmtes Genprodukt zu produzieren. Außerdem stand drei zu diesem Zeitpunkt - es war wie gesagt Mitte der '70er - noch die Möglichkeit im Raum, dass es in andere Bakterienstränge übertragen werden könnte. Mir war bewusst, dass bei der Arbeit mit bakteriellen Kulturen, die sehr schnell wachsen und mit denen man binnen eines Tages eine große Population erzielt, das Studium von Populationsgenetik und Bakterien im Vergleich zu höheren Organismen, deren Generationszeiten oft viele Jahre betragen, erleichtert. Ich zeige Ihnen hier, was man zu dem Zeitpunkt von biologischer Evolution wusste. Hierbei handelt es sich um die neodarwinistische Evolution, bei der die spontane Entstehung von Mutationen, also genetischer Abweichung, die treibende Kraft der Evolution ist. Ohne irgendeine Änderung am Genom würde es keine Evolution geben. Die natürliche Auswahl, die hier durch den Effekt auf die Umwelt charakterisiert wird, und die Umwelt ist physikalisch-chemisch und biologisch. All die anderen Lebewesen desselben Ökosystems können die Auswahl neuer Varianten ebenfalls beeinflussen. Und drittens noch Isolation, wie sie Charles Darwin auf den Galapagosinseln beobachtet hatte. Dabei handelte es sich selbstverständlich um eine geografische Isolation. Es gibt aber auch vielerlei Arten von reproduktiver Isolation und zwar, dass nicht automatisch Fruchtbarkeit entsteht, wenn man einfach eine DNA einführt, die mit dem Organismus nicht verwandt ist. Und das moduliert den Evolutionsprozess. Die Idee damals, in den 1970er-Jahren, war, dass ich mich - zusammen mit vielen Kollegen - in die mikrobiologischen Genetik gehen würde, um die Molekularprozesse genetischer Veränderung zu erforschen und zu verstehen, wie diese funktioniert. Wir wussten zu dieser Zeit bereits, dass die Mutation – die hier als Veränderung der Sequenz der Nukleotide definiert ist – tatsächlich nicht so häufig günstig verläuft und mit einem selektiven Vorteil einhergeht. Wesentlich öfter trifft man auf selektive Nachteile, sogar extreme Lethargie. Und oft ist eine Änderung in den Nukleotiden auch neutral und bringt keinerlei Veränderung im Phänotyp. Daraus schließen wir also, dass die spontanen Mutationen relativ selten sein sollten. Dasselbe beobachtet man auch bei bakteriellen Kulturen, später auch bei höheren Organismen. Es steht also fest, dass horizontaler Transfer vorkommt, jedoch relativ selten ist. Und was ich Ihnen hier zeige, ist bereits hier finden wir einen Hinweis darauf, wie Mutationen entstehen. Es gibt eine Reihe von Mechanismen, die Natur ist da sehr einfallsreich. Man findet eine Vielzahl an unterschiedlichen speziellen Prozessen, die zu einer Veränderung beitragen. Und diese lassen sich in Strategien für genetische Veränderung unterteilen: lokal (ein oder wenige benachbarte Nukleotiden), Neuanordnung von DNA und Aneignung von DNA durch horizontalen Transfer. Ich freue mich sehr, Ihnen dies hier zu zeigen, es handelt sich um den Beitrag darüber, was ich gestern fachübergreifend hörte. Man weiß, dass Nukleotide manchmal kurzlebige Isomere besitzen, die sogenannten Tautomerien. Beispielsweise kann das Adenin sein Wasserstoff-Atom haben, welches auf eine andere Seite springt und sich dann nicht mehr mit Thymidin verbindet, sich aber zufällig mit Cytosin verbindet. In diesem Moment kommt es, sobald das Adenin in seine normale, stabile Standardform zurückkehrt, zu einem Basenpaar. In den meisten Lehrbüchern werden diese Mutanten heute als Replikationsfehler bezeichnet. Dabei handelt es um eine völlig falsche Einstellung zum Verständnis der Natur. Die Natur benutzt kurzlebige, tautomere Formen von Nukleotiden, um gelegentlich Nukleotid-Varianten und -Veränderungen zu erzeugen. Und tatsächlich hat man bei den meisten Einzelorganismen bei entsprechenden Studien herausgefunden, dass diese Systeme zur Reparatur besitzen, anhand derer die Bindung des falschen Paares rasch unterbunden und in dem mutierten Strang dieses Nukleotids korrekt ersetzt wird. Allerdings wiederum, klugerweise, nicht mit 100-prozentiger Effizienz, so dass es, wenn auch sehr selten, zu Substitutionen kommt. Watson-Crick hatten dies bereits im Herbst 1953 gezeigt, was von den Leuten danach jahrzehntelang einfach ignoriert wurde. Ich zeige Ihnen hier diese Neuanordnungen. Es gibt eine Vielzahl an möglichen Neuanordnungen: oft durch Enzyme: durch allgemeine Rekombination, durch Transposition mobiler genetischer Elemente Und diese Enzyme können zu Verdopplungen, zu Löschungen führen, sie können zu Umkehrungen und neuen Verbindungen führen, woraus manchmal ein gewisser Effekt entsteht. In der Tat besitzen die drei Unterschiede – lokale Sequenzänderung, DNA-Neuordnung und DNA-Aneignung – in ihrem Beitrag zur Evolution unterschiedliche Qualitäten. Lokale Sequenzänderung passiert oft als schrittweise Verbesserung, wenn die natürliche Selektion dies aufruft. DNA-Neuanordnungen führen zu neuen Verbindungen von funktionalen Bereichen oder anderen alternativen Expressions-Kontrollsignalen mit einem funktionierenden Gen, während der horizontale Transfer lediglich an den erfolgreichen Entwicklungen durch andere teilnimmt. Das gelingt recht erfolgreich. Ich komme nun zu einigen Schlussfolgerungen. Der blaue Typ entspricht den Worten Charles Darwins, dass Lebewesen einen gemeinsamen Ursprung haben - er sagt nicht, ob es sich dabei um einen oder viele Ursprünge handelt - aber es ist gut, diesen Baum zu zeigen und hierfür gibt es gute Beweise. Beim horizontalen Transfer kann man zwischen den Ästen dieser Bäume zeichnen. Transfers, die in der Regel nur einmal genutzt werden und die dazu führen, dass von etwas profitiert werden kann, von Genfunktionen, die woanders entwickelt wurden. Und ich schließe daraus, dass Charles Darwin Recht hat: Wir haben einen gemeinsamen Ursprung - aber auch eine gemeinsame Zukunft. Dies ist recht essentiell, und ich möchte Sie bitten, dies als wichtige Sache zu akzeptieren. Für mich ist dies ein sehr wichtiges weiteres Argument für den Schutz der großen Artenvielfalt, denn wenn wir diese Artenvielfalt verlieren, wo bleiben sonst all diese entwickelten Gene, welche in der nahen oder fernen Zukunft für irgendeinen Organismus hilfreich wären? Ich mache noch schnell zu Ende. Es gibt Evolutionsgene, bei denen es sich entweder um Variationserzeuger oder Moderatoren zur Häufigkeit von Variation handelt. Zudem nutzt die Natur auch nicht-genetische Elemente - ich möchte Sie nur an die Tautomerieform von Nukleotiden erinnern. Hierbei handelt es sich um eine strukturelle Flexibilität von biologisch aktiven Materialien. Zufälliges Aufeinandertreffen: wenn ein Virus Gene von einem Organismus zu einem anderen trägt, entsteht dadurch die Chance, den ein oder anderen zu infizieren und so weiter. Und Umweltmutagene. Die Natur macht sich dies zu Nutzen, und daraus lässt sich ableiten, dass sich die natürliche Realität aktiv um die biologische Evolution sorgt, es sich dabei um einen aktiven Prozess handelt. Und wir tun uns schwer, dies zu verstehen und daran zu glauben, weil es unpraktisch ist, es unpraktisch sein muss, andernfalls wären wir nicht fähig zu leben, weil unser Genom eine gute Stabilität benötigt. Nur seltene Individuen können austesten, ob aus einer neuen Mutation ein Vorteil oder Letalität entsteht. Wie Sie also sehen, gibt es diese beiden entgegenwirkenden Prinzipien, die Förderung und die Beschränkung genetischer Veränderung. Es handelt sich dabei wirklich um sehr schöne Feinabstimmungen, die von den Evolutionsgenen in der Vergangenheit gemacht wurden. Wir stellen beim Studium dieser Dinge also fest, dass die Existenz dieser beiden Arten von Genen in den meisten Genomen bewiesen wurde. Es handelt sich um die Dualität des Genoms. Für die meisten Individuen entsteht ein Nutzen durch die meisten Gene, Haushaltsgene, akzessorische Gene und Entwicklungsgenen in höheren Organismen. Wohingegen in den Evolutionsgenen wirklich die Quelle der genetischen Evolution und der Artenvielfalt steckt. Ich komme jetzt zum Ende, aber ich möchte Ihnen noch sagen, dass, wenn Sie all dieses Wissen in der Gentechnik anwenden, Sie feststellen werden, dass es keinen wesentlicher Unterschied gibt zwischen der Gentechnik und dem, was die Natur in horizontalen oder anderen Gentransfers ständig tut. Ebenso in der Biotechnologie, in klassischen Bereichen einschließlich der Landwirtschaft: Man geht raus in die Natur, schaut sich an, welche Pflanzen als Nahrung nützlich sind, welche Tiere nützlich sind, und domestiziert diese. Und heutzutage kann man dieses Wissen einbeziehen und manchmal einige Funktionen verbessern - eine erhöhte Expression und so weiter - und ein bestimmtes Gen in einem anderen Organismus anwenden, um daraus ein Produkt zu gewinnen und dieses zu nutzen. Das ist dann die Domestizierung von Genen. Vielen Dank für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Werner Arber highlighting the potential risks associated with transferring genes between species.
(00:18:55 - 00:20:44)

 

One area where the potential of genetic engineering is perhaps greatest is that of crop production. World food demand is steadily rising and we require new ways of increasing crop yield. The genetic modification of food crops can help us to meet this goal, but is opposed by many. Richard Roberts shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1993 for his discovery that one and the same gene can code for different proteins. In this talk from the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2015, he explains why he believes that the genetic modification of plants is not more dangerous (and probably even safer) than traditional breeding methods:


Sir Richard J. Roberts (2015) - A Crime against Humanity

There's a very big difference when you think about medicine for the developing world and the developed world. In the developed world, it's okay if it costs a lot of money and, of course, the pharmaceutical companies love this. But when you come to the developing world, it is very important that the costs are kept low and that things are very practical. They do not have the money to invest in a lot of medicines, and they need cheap solutions to things. For instance, when it comes to vaccines. Vaccines are probably the best medicines that we have out there, and yet the vaccines we spread in the developed world tend to be against things that are not always appropriate for the developing world, in particular, vaccines against tropical diseases and so we don't do that. Cheap drugs. The moment we send out a lot of antibiotics, sort of common ones, and they overuse them. Targeted antibiotics would be much better. Antivirals would be much better. And of course, just basic care like pregnancy and primary diagnosis are very important. But you know what, if you're hungry, the thing that you really care about is food. You don't care about all these medicines, you want to get a good breakfast and you want to be able to eat during the course of the day. This is a problem for the developing world. In fact, in developing countries, in Africa, in South America, in Asia, in Central America, they need better crops. They need crops that will grow to a high yield on a small piece of land, because the bulk of the people only have a small piece of land on which to operate. They need to be able to mitigate the impact of global warming. Arid conditions are a big problem in many places, and water is not readily available. These kinds of improvements in crops can be made by genetic modification, by GMOs. Traditional plant breeding just doesn't do it. It's been tried on many occasions, and it doesn't do it. Part of the reason is because traditional plant breeding is very slow. Whereas, GM is a fast way of doing things. As I will argue, it is safer than doing it by traditional breeding. However, you'll notice the second line here, which says „Europe doesn't need GMOs“, and it's true. Because if you walk around almost any street in Europe, you don't find a lot of thin people. You don't find emaciated people, who have not had enough to eat. One has to ask why doesn't Europe endorse GMOs? Here is the technology that will be absolutely wonderful for the developing world, and yet Europe has decided they're against them. Why is that? Could it be politics? Could it be money? I would suggest to you it's a mix of both. Unfortunately, what happened was that when GMOs were first introduced into Europe, the Green Parties found it extremely useful to tackle GMOs. They did it because they didn't want some US Company or some other company to be controlling the food supply. They saw this as a move to take over the food supply - not just in Europe, but in the world. How could you stop that? Well, you could have complained to Monsanto and said, well, we will fight Monsanto and we'll boycott Monsanto. We'll have nothing to do with them. But that didn't happen. Why didn't it happen? It didn't happen because Monsanto provides a lot of the seeds from traditionally-bred plants that Europe needs in order to make its food. If you were against them, then you really would not have a lot of food, because it is a very important source of agricultural products in Europe. But the Green Parties saw this as a political opportunity. The politicians, as usual, said here is something that might be really risky. This could be very dangerous. But you know, I will protect you. I will save you from all of these problems. This is basically what happened. The beauty of this was that it had absolutely no consequence whatsoever for Europe because the Europeans don't need GMOs. The real villain here turned out to be Corporate America. It turned out to be Monsanto, DuPont, the companies that were trying to push GM foods on Europe. They did something that was rather foolish. What they did was to introduce crops that were very good for the farmers. The farmers could make a little more money. Monsanto could make a lot of money from them. And the consumers got nothing. One should realize that if you want to bring a new product to market, it's really good if you have something that you can offer the consumer. Lower prices, better taste, whatever. But, they didn't do that. They chose just to try to make money, and I think this was the downfall. It was something that was really very, very bad as far as Europe was concerned. Unfortunately, this has had some really tragic consequences. The consequences are that if you're going to say GMOs are bad, and they chose GMOs because this was the technology. It was something you could easily scare people with. I'm going to take a gene from here from a bacteria and put it in a plant, as though no genes had ever been transferred from bacteria to plants. And this could be dangerous. We don't know what it is. We don't know what it will do. This could be very dangerous. And so having picked GMOs as the target of their political wrath, they could then not go to the developing world and say, Doesn't make sense. Even they realized that this was not a very logical argument to make. So what did they do? They went out and started telling the rest of the world that here is a problem for you, too. I'll just recount one story that I rather like. They went down to Zimbabwe and talked to Robert Mugabe. Now, Mugabe is not the nicest man who runs a country. When he heard about this and was told that the US were giving a lot of food aid to Zimbabwe, but a lot of it was genetically modified, he locked it all up in warehouses. But the people in Zimbabwe were hungry, and so what did they do? They broke into the warehouses, stole the food and ate it. In this way, USA had actually had a probably better effect than it otherwise might have done, because here the people got it for nothing because they stole it out of the warehouse. Whereas, you can be pretty sure that Mugabe would have sold it to them if he'd had a chance. But this is a very, very dangerous message to be telling people who really need genetically modified plants, that they are dangerous and they can't have them. The other thing is, you have to realize that we have been genetically modifying our food ever since agriculture got started. Way, way back in Mesopotamia, they discovered here were some grasses that could produce a seed. You could farm them. Immediately they started crossing them. You do it by hybridization between two plants that are a little bit different, and then as far apart as you can, in the hope that you can make them grow taller, get bigger seeds, taste better. We have been doing this for a long, long, long time. This is traditional plant breeding and it's natural according to the Green Parties. However, what they don't usually bother to mention is that if by regular crossing you cannot get the trait you want. Then the next thing you do is you irradiate these plants and introduce a lot of mutations. Or you use chemical mutagens to try to get mutations that will introduce the traits you want. Don't worry, guys. This is safe. Nothing, no problems here. I give you one example of something that happens when you take this approach, in which what you do is you look for good traits. One of those traits is found in celery. Probably you've all eaten celery from time to time. However, if you work in a plant, in a factory where they are, say, chopping a lot of celery up, you discover that the ladies doing this, if they don't wear gloves, develop cancer in the hands and fingers because of psoralen. Celery contains psoralen, which is a known carcinogen. Just eating it is okay, the levels are pretty low, but if you get a lot of exposure, it is not good. If we were to test celery by the methods that the Europeans would have you test GM foods, you would not be eating celery any more. It would not be on the market, and it's not the only vegetable that falls into this category. One thing that happens with traditional plant breeding is that literally hundreds of genes are moved from one place to another. We don't know what those genes are. We don't test to see what's happened. Plants contain quite a lot of genes that are perhaps less than perfectly good for you. Ricin is a good example, one of the well-known poisons. But in general we don't know. We just do not know, and we don't test, and we do not require that the plants that result from this are as extensively tested as you would GM plants. But with GM methods, you can take one gene. You know exactly what it is. You can move it into another plant. Then you can test where did the gene go? Where did it insert in this plant? Nowadays, we can even make it insert where we want it to insert. You can look at it and see, did it go where you want it? Did it affect the transcription of the other genes? Inherently this so-called dangerous GMO method allows a level of precision in making new plants, in making GM plants, that greatly exceeds anything that is available by traditional plant breeding. Now, I'm not suggesting we stop traditional plant breeding. What I am suggesting, though, is that there is nothing dangerous, inherently dangerous, about the GMO method. If anything, it is more precise and likely to be safer than traditional methods. The important thing is, it doesn't matter what the method is. It's the product that is important. Once you test the product, find out is it safe? Is it good for you? But I would say we should do plants that have been made by traditional breeding methods in exactly the same way. You want to know, is the plant safe? Is the stuff that's going to go on your table, that you're going to feed to your children and your grandchildren - is it safe? It doesn't matter how it was made. Just, is it safe? I want to give what I find to be one of the most compelling studies here that really illustrates, to my mind at least, and I hope to yours, just how dangerous this position, that the Europeans have taken on GMOs, is for the rest of the world. This concerns Vitamin A-deficiency. If you do not get enough Vitamin A when you're a child, there are a number of problems. One of the problems is that you easily become blind. There are various developmental defects that can come from this, too. The estimate is that probably half a million children a year die because they're blind by age of one, because they don't get enough Vitamin A. Many others have developmental defects, and are not in good shape because Vitamin A affects other things other than the eyes. Somewhere between 1.9 - 2.7 million kids were affected every year because of this. Compare that with HIV and Tuberculosis and Malaria, which we worry about. But, you know these kids don't have a voice. No one hears them. The ones who are dead obviously have no voice, but even the ones who survive have a pretty hard life. You don't want to grow up in a hut in Africa if, in fact, you are deficient in any way. Two European Scientists, Ingo Potrykus at the ETH in Zurich, and Peter Beyer at the University of Freiburg, decided they were going to do something about this. They thought for much of the developing world, rice is a staple. This is shown here by this Philippine man, who is illustrating what they have made. They decided that they should put the gene for beta carotene, beta carotene is the precursor of Vitamin A, they would put this into the grain of rice. Now it turns out rice naturally produces beta carotene, it just doesn't go into the seed. It goes into the stalk and the roots and elsewhere. Initially they tried by traditional methods to get it to go into the grain. They were unable to do so. This is not unexpected. By traditional methods, you are very limited in what you can do. They took the gene for beta carotene from elsewhere, and arranged it with a suitable promoter so that it would be expressed in the grain of rice. The result was this yellow rice, golden rice, that is shown held by this Philippine man in this picture. For a good variety of golden rice, this provides almost all of the Vitamin A that is necessary and certainly enough to stop childhood blindness. Golden rice became a reality in February of 1999. By 2002, it was ready to go into the hands of the plant breeders. It was ready for people to start making commercial production of this. But it's a GMO. As a result of it being a GMO and the European regulations, it had to be extensively tested. Regulation after regulation after regulation was put in place. Originally, it was hoped that by 2014, last year, that it would actually be ready to go and be sold to people. Now, there's yet further delays and it's going to be at least 2016. In fact, one of those delays happened in the Philippines, not too long ago, where they wanted to do a small field test. The Green Parties in Norway, in particular, organized protests in the Philippines. They got a bunch of thugs to go out and burn the fields in which golden rice was being tested, because it's a GMO. Because GMOs are very dangerous. The bottom line here, there has been 14 years of delay because it's a GMO, because of regulation, and because of opposition from the Green Parties. Now you can ask, is it really dangerous? Are there some problems with this? On the left hand side, I have the start of a rather long list of national academies and prestigious scientific organizations, who have weighed in on this issue. One of the first was the Royal Society in London, who came out very positively in favour of GMOs. On the right hand side is the complete list of every professional scientific society that has said this is dangerous. You'll notice that there's no one on this list. There is not a single scientific society that believes GMOs are dangerous. But the Green Parties have convinced you, they have convinced the general public in Europe that these are dangerous, and that they should be banned, and that they should not be for sale, and maybe we need to label everything that has them in. I find it appalling, frankly. The bottom line is that since 2002, more than 15 million children - compare that with the Jews that died in the Holocaust – more than 15 million children have died or suffered because of Vitamin A deficiency. My question is how many children must die before we think this is a crime against humanity? I think more than enough have died already. It's high time that we decided that the Europeans must change their position, but in particular the Green Parties. And you know, the most appalling thing is, I'm a big supporter of the Green Parties, almost everything they do is terrific. We need to save the environment, but unfortunately this is one issue they got it wrong. Patrick Moore who started Greenpeace resigned some years ago now because of this policy on GMOs. Now he's walking around carrying banners protesting Greenpeace and protesting the Green Parties, because of what they're doing on GMOs. I think this is a very, very serious issue. It is one that we need to take action about now. My intention is to lead a campaign by the Nobel Laureates, most of whom I've already asked if they would join, and most have either responded positively or are thinking about it. I notice there are several people in this audience who have not yet responded positively. I hope they will. But more importantly, I hope that you will go out and talk about this issue. Will read about it. Will find out what is going on and will get at the truth. Will convince your families, your friends. Will convince your local societies. But this is really not an issue that we should just let the Green Parties take over. They've made a mistake. Why don't they just admit they made a mistake, get on with it, and do all the other good work that they really do? I just want to give you some idea of the kind of fabrications that the Green Parties come up with in order to promote the bans on GMOs. The first one was that you need massive amounts of golden rice in order to get sufficient Vitamin A. Well, they actually have backed off from that. For many years, they were - I'll show you a little slide they were using in a moment. The other thing is that they claim, well, there have been a lot of farmer suicides in India and that these are linked to biotechnology advances. I will show you a graph that really puts that one to rest. Finally, this idea that you need more pesticide if you use GMOs. This stems from one of the first crops that was produced by Monsanto, which was a Roundup-ready crop. Roundup is glyphosate. It is a compound that will kill pretty much everything that is green and grows in the ground. They made a variety of corn that was resistant to it: Roundup-ready corn. The nice thing is you plant the seed, spray it with Roundup, and corn is the only thing that grows. Glyphosate is not particularly dangerous. It naturally degrades within about one hundred days in the ground, long before it gets to market. There is no demonstrated danger associated with it, unless of course in its raw form you care to drink it. You know, that might be a problem, but I don't know too many people who think it's good to drink pesticides that are straight out of the bottle, so to speak. This is one of the posters they were using for golden rice. They said you need nine kilograms of cooked rice, three and a half kilograms of dry rice in order to get enough Vitamin A. The answer is 50 grams are actually enough, 150 grams of cooked rich, which is not a lot. I think anyone who's a Scientist knows 50 grams is not a lot of rice. This is the data on Indian Suicides starting in 1997. The two lines at the top, the one shows farmer suicides before Bt and then after Bt. Bt was adopted in cotton in 2003, and you'll see that the rate of suicides are essentially the same. They haven't gone up. And yet, still Greenpeace and Co. are telling you that this is a problem. That, you know, introducing biotech crops is causing Indian suicides. Finally, this is the one I like best of all. This is what I call the Pesticide Myth. In India, there is a lot of Bt cotton that is grown. Prior to 2001, traditional varieties of cotton were grown. Then, a GM cotton was produced in which the toxin, Bt, from bacillus thuringiensis, it's a protein on the outside of bacillus thuringiensis, which will kill insects. Prior to 2001, 5,750 metric tons of pesticides were being used. Bt, the bacteria that grows it, is often used just as a pesticide itself, but you need to put about a hundred times as much of the bacteria on as you need from the gene that goes in. In 2013, the use of pesticides for Bt cotton dropped to just a little over 200 metric tons. Massive decrease. And the yield? It almost doubled in the same time. I think you don't have to be terribly smart in order to realize that this is not leading to a vast increase in pesticide. Not only that, it's increasing yield, which means that in the long run, there is more land available to grow food. Food is a major problem for a huge number of people in this world. It's not a problem in Europe. Easy to get enough food in Europe, they have a supermarket down the road, and you go and buy whatever you need. You cannot do that in villages in Africa. You either grow it yourself or you have nothing. My conclusions here are that for developed countries, food is simply not a problem. But when we're going to take political actions and make statements, let's not forget the consequences of our statements and actions on the developing world. Because what works well in the developed countries, often doesn't work so well in the developing countries. I think one of the other points that I really feel we should make, because it relates to this, but to other things, too, is that we really need a lot more science going into politics and a lot less politics in science. At the moment, the politicians always claim they're going to have Science Advisors, and they're going to listen to the Scientists. Listening is one thing, but acting on the advice they receive is quite something else. In general, my experience has been that if you tell a politician something that they want to hear, and they can find some scientific basis for it, then they love it. But if you tell them something they don't want to hear, they just ignore it. This is not right. We really need to make sure that there a lot more science goes in. Finally, I think we've got to make sure that the media do a much better job of dealing with issues like this. The scientific consensus on GMO foods is clear - I showed you the table, And yet you go to the typical television programme, or a radio programme, or you go to the papers, and they will tell you this is a very controversial issue. In fact, the introduction to this talk said that this is a very sensitive issue. It should not be a sensitive issue. This is an issue where common sense should guide what is going on. The bottom line is that we, as Scientists, all need to do a better job of communicating to the public and telling them what is going on, and not just sit back in our labs and pretend somebody else is going to do it. Because you cannot trust the media to do it. You cannot trust the Green Parties to do it for you. Least of all can you trust the politicians to make the right decisions on issues like this. One of the things we are going to do is to put together a website - and there are plenty already, that will tell you about this - that will really point out what is good, what is bad. If anybody would like a copy of this set of slides to go talk to your friends, or your grandmother, or whoever, I will be more than happy to send it to you. But I think we all need to become active on issues like this, but this is a pressing one. There are going to be millions upon millions of people who die in the developing world, if we do not do something about the GMO issue. Thank you very much.

Es gibt einen sehr großen Unterschied zwischen der Medizin für Entwicklungsländer und der für die entwickelte Welt. In der entwickelten Welt es ist okay, wenn etwas teuer ist und natürlich lieben das die Pharmakonzerne. Aber wenn es um die Entwicklungsländer geht, ist es sehr wichtig, dass die Kosten niedrig gehalten werden und die Dinge praktisch sind. Sie haben nicht das Geld, in große Mengen von Medikamenten zu investieren und benötigen kostengünstige Lösungen. Ein Beispiel sind Impfstoffe. Impfungen sind wahrscheinlich einer die besten Medikamente, die existieren, und trotzen neigen die Impfstoffe, die wir in der entwickelten Welt verteilen, dazu, gegen Dinge zu wirken, die wir in der entwickelten Welt nicht brauchen, insbesondere Impfstoffe gegen Tropenkrankheiten, und daher machen wir das nicht. Günstige Medikamente. Wir geben Breitbandantibiotika heraus und die Bevölkerung missbraucht sie. Gezielte Antibiotika wären viel besser. Antivirale Mittel wären viel besser. Und natürlich ist die Grundversorgung wie Schwangerschafts- und Primärdiagnose sehr wichtig. Aber wenn Menschen Hunger leiden, dann ist das Essen das Wichtigste. Sie kümmern sich nicht um all diese Medikamente sondern um ein gutes Frühstück und um eine weitere Mahlzeit im Laufe des Tages. Das ist ein Problem für die Entwicklungsländer. In der Tat brauchen Entwicklungsländer wie Afrika, Südamerika, Asien und Zentralamerika bessere Nutzpflanzen. Nutzpflanzen, die auf einem kleinen Stück Land wachsen und hohe Erträge bringen, da der Großteil der Bevölkerung nur ein kleines Stück Land besitzt, dass bepflanzt werden kann. Sie müssen in der Lage sein, die Auswirkungen der globalen Erwärmung mildern zu können. Dürren sind an vielen Orten ein großes Problem und Wasser ist nicht immer verfügbar. Diese Arten der Verbesserung der Nutzpflanzen kann durch eine genetische Veränderung erfolgen, durch GVO. Traditionelle Pflanzenzüchtung reicht einfach nicht aus. Es wurde oftmals versucht und ist gescheitert. Das liegt zum Teil daran, dass traditionelle Pflanzenzüchtung sehr langwierig ist. In Anbetracht dessen ist GVO eine schnelle Lösung. Und sicherer als die herkömmliche Pflanzenzüchtung. Allerdings sehen Sie die zweite Zeile hier, die sagt: "Europa braucht kein GVO", und das stimmt. Denn auf fast allen Straßen in Europa findet man wenig dünne Menschen. Sie sehen keine abgemagerten Menschen, die nicht genug zu essen haben. Man muss sich also fragen, warum Europa GVO nicht zustimmen? Hier kommt eine für die Dritte Welt fantastische Technologie und trotzdem hat Europa beschlossen, dagegen zu stimmen. Warum das? Aus politischen Gründen? Aus finanziellen Gründen? Ich denke, es ist eine Mischung aus beidem. Als GVO erstmals in Europa eingeführt wurden, fanden die Grünen Parteien es äußerst nützlich, gegen den anzugehen. Sie taten es, weil sie nicht wollten, dass einige US-Unternehmen oder andere Unternehmen die Nahrungsmittelversorgung steuern. Sie sahen dies als einen Schritt, die Nahrungsmittelversorgung zu übernehmen - nicht nur in Europa, sondern auf der ganzen Welt. Wie konnte man das stoppen? Nun, man könnte sich über Monsanto beschweren und sagen, dass wir gegen Monsanto kämpfen und Monsanto boykottieren werden. Wir werden nichts mit denen zu tun haben. Aber das passierte nicht. Und warum nicht? Es passierte nicht, weil Monsanto eine Menge Samen von traditionell gezüchteten Pflanzen anbietet, die Europa für seine Nahrung braucht. Wenn man dagegen wäre, hätte man nicht besonders viele Lebensmittel zur Verfügung, denn sie sind eine sehr wichtige Quelle für Agrarprodukte in Europa. Aber die Grünen sahen dies als ihre politische Chance. Die Politiker sagten, wie üblich, dass das vielleicht etwas wirklich Gefährliches sein könnte. Dies könnte sehr gefährlich werden. Aber ich werde euch beschützen. Ich will euch vor all diesen Problemen bewahren. Dies ist das, was im Grunde passierte. Das Schöne daran war, dass es absolut keine Konsequenzen für Europa gab, weil die Europäer kein GVO brauchen. Der wirkliche Bösewicht hier war, wie sich herausstellte, "Corporate America". Es waren die Unternehmen Monsanto und DuPont, die versuchten, Europa gentechnisch veränderte Lebensmittel unterzujubeln. Sie taten etwas ziemlich Verrücktes. Sie führten Pflanzen ein, die für die Bauern sehr gut waren. Die Bauern konnten so ein bisschen mehr Geld verdienen. Monsanto konnte eine Menge Geld mit ihnen verdienen. Und der Verbraucher bekam nichts. Man sollte wissen, dass, wenn man ein neues Produkt auf den Markt bringen wollen, es wichtig ist, dass es auch dem Verbraucher etwas bietet. Niedrigere Preise, besserer Geschmack, was auch immer. Aber das machten sie nicht. Sie versuchen nur, mehr Geld zu verdienen und das war, glaube ich, ein Reinfall. Es war etwas ziemlich Negatives, zumindest für Europa. Leider hatte das ein paar wirklich tragische Folgen. Wenn Sie sagen, dass GVO schlecht ist und sie hätten für GVO gestimmt, weil das die richtige Technologie wäre, dann ist das etwas, mit dem man den Menschen Angst machen kann. Ich werde ein Gen von einem Bakterium hier nehmen und es in eine Pflanze transferieren, obwohl noch nie jemand Gene aus Bakterien in Pflanzen transferiert hat. Das könnte gefährlich sein. Wir wissen nicht, was es ist. Wir wissen nicht, was passiert. Dies könnte sehr gefährlich sein. Und nachdem GVO zu ihrem politischen Brennpunkt geworden war, konnten sie nicht zu den Entwicklungsländern gehen und sagen, Das macht keinen Sinn. Auch sie verstanden, dass das kein sehr logisches Argument war. Und was haben sie gemacht? Sie begannen dem Rest der Welt zu erzählen, dass das auch ihr Problem sei. Ich werde euch eine Geschichte erzählen, die ich sehr mag. Sie fuhren nach Simbabwe und sprachen mit Robert Mugabe. Nun ist Mugabe nicht der netteste Mann, der ein Land regiert. Als er davon hörte und erfuhr, dass die USA Simbabwe sehr viele Nahrungsmittel gab, die allerdings gentechnisch manipuliert waren, verbarrikadierte er alles in Lagerhallen. Aber die Menschen in Simbabwe waren sehr hungrig und was machten sie also? Sie brachen in die Lagerhäuser ein, stahlen das Essen und aßen es auf. Auf diese Weise hatten die USA einen besseren Effekt als irgendwie anders, denn die Menschen bekamen die Nahrungsmittel umsonst, weil sie sie aus dem Vorratslager holten. Sie können sich ziemlich sicher sein, dass Mugabe sie ansonsten an das Volk verkauft hätte, wenn er gekonnt hätte. Aber das sind sehr gefährliche Neuigkeiten für Menschen, die auf gentechnisch manipulierte Pflanzen angewiesen sind, dass sie gefährlich sind und sie sie nicht haben können. Die andere Sache, die Sie wissen sollten, ist, dass wir unser Essen genetisch manipulieren, seit es die Landwirtschaft gibt. Vor langer, langer Zeit in Mesopotamien wurden Gräser gefunden, die Samen produzieren konnten. Die konnte man einpflanzen. Und sie begannen unmittelbar sich zu kreuzen. Dass geschieht durch die Hybridisierung von zwei leicht unterschiedlichen Pflanzen, und dann, so weit auseinander wie möglich, in der Hoffnung, dass sie höher wachsen, größere Samen bekommen, besser schmecken. Wir haben das lange, lange, Zeit gemacht. Das ist traditionelle Pflanzenzüchtung und für die Grünen ist sie biologisch. Jedoch, was sie in der Regel nicht erwähnen, ist, dass man bei einer regelmäßigen Kreuzung nicht die Merkmale bekommt, die man will. Als nächstes bestrahlt man diese Pflanzen und fügt viele Mutationen bei. Oder man verwendet chemische Mutagene, um Mutationen zu fördern, die die Merkmale bringen, die man haben will. Keine Sorge, Leute. Das ist ungefährlich. Ohne Probleme. Ich gebe Ihnen ein Beispiel von dem, was passiert, wenn Sie diesen Ansatz verfolgen, der bedeutet, nach guten Merkmalen zu suchen. Eines dieser Merkmale findet man in Sellerie. Wahrscheinlich haben Sie alle ab und an Sellerie gegessen. Wenn Sie jedoch in einer Anlage arbeiten, in einer Fabrik, wo viel Sellerie zerkleinert wird, werden Sie sehen, das die Frauen, die die Arbeit ohne Schutzhandschuhe verrichten, an den Händen und Fingern Krebs entwickeln, aufgrund des Psoralens. Sellerie enthält Psoralen, das ist ein bekanntes Karzinogen. Ihn zu essen ist ok, da er nur einen geringen Anteil enthält, aber wenn man viel mit ihm in Berührung kommt, dann ist das nicht gut. Wenn wir Sellerie mit den Methoden testen würden, wie die Europäer die GVO-Lebensmittel testen, würden Sie keinen Sellerie mehr essen. Es gäbe ihn nicht auf dem Markt und es ist nicht das einzige Gemüse, das in diese Kategorie fällt. Eine Konsequenz traditioneller Pflanzenzüchtung ist, dass buchstäblich Hunderte von Genen von einem Ort zum anderen transferiert werden. Wir wissen nicht, was das für Gene sind. Wir testen sie nicht, um zu sehen, was passiert. Pflanzen enthalten viele Gene, die vielleicht nicht besonders gut für Sie sind. Rizin ist ein gutes Beispiel, einer der bekanntesten Giftstoffe. Aber allgemein wissen wir es nicht. Wir wissen es einfach nicht und wir testen es nicht und wir fordern nicht, das die daraus entstehenden Pflanzen so ausgiebig getestet werden, wie die genetisch veränderten Pflanzen. Aber mit der GV- Methode kann man ein Gen gewinnen. Sie wissen genau, was es ist. Sie können es in eine andere Pflanze transferieren. Dann können Sie testen, wohin das Gen gelangt ist. Wo wurde es der Pflanze beigefügt? Heutzutage ist es sogar möglich, es dort einzufügen, wo man möchte. Sie können betrachten und prüfen, ob es dort ist, wo man es haben möchte. Hat es Auswirkungen auf die Transkription von anderen Genen? Diese so genannte, gefährlich GVO-Methode ermöglicht Präzision bei der Herstellung von neuen Pflanzen, genetisch veränderten Pflanzen, die weitaus alles übertrifft, was man durch die traditionelle Pflanzenzüchtung erreicht. Nun, ich behaupte nicht, dass wir mit traditioneller Pflanzenzüchtung aufhören sollen. Was ich sagen will, ist, dass die GVO-Methode nicht grundsätzlich gefährlich ist. Wenn überhaupt, ist sie präziser und wahrscheinlich sicherer als herkömmliche Methoden. Die wichtigste Sache ist, egal, welche Methode es ist, es ist das Produkt, das wichtig ist. Sobald Sie das Produkt testen, finden Sie heraus, ob es sicher ist. Ist es gut für Sie? Ich schlage vor, wir machen Pflanzen, die in exakt gleicher Art und Weise wie von klassischen Züchtungsverfahren hergestellt werden. Sie wollen wissen, ob die Pflanze sicher ist? Ob das, was auf ihren Tisch kommt, Sie Ihren Kindern und Enkeln zu essen geben, ungefährlich ist? Es spielt keine Rolle, wie es hergestellt wurde. Aber, ist es gesund? Ich möchte eine der für mich am meisten überzeugenden Studien hier vortragen. Eine, die meiner Meinung nach aufzeigt, und auch eurer, wie ich hoffe, wie gefährlich diese Position, die die Europäer gegenüber GVO haben, für den Rest der Welt ist. Es betrifft den Vitamin A-Mangel. Wenn man während der Kindheit nicht genügend Vitamin A erhält, hat man mit zahlreichen Problemen zu kämpfen Eines der Probleme ist, dass man leicht erblinden kann. Und es gibt verschiedene Entwicklungsstörungen, die vom Vitamin A-Mangel kommen. Schätzungen nach sterben jährlich etwa eine halbe Million Kinder, weil sie im ersten Lebensjahr erblinden, da sie nicht genug Vitamin A erhalten. Viele andere Kinder haben Entwicklungsstörungen und sind nicht gesund, da sich ein Vitamin A-Mangel nicht nur bei den Augen bemerkbar macht. Zwischen 1,9 und 2,7 Millionen Kinder trifft es jedes Jahr. Vergleichen Sie das mit HIV und Tuberkulose, die uns ungleich mehr sorgen. Aber, die Stimme dieser Kinder zählt nicht. Niemand hört sie. Die Stimme der bereits Toten zählt natürlich nicht mehr aber auch die Überlebenden haben ein ziemlich hartes Leben. Man wünscht sich nicht, in einer Hütte in Afrika aufzuwachsen, denn dort mangelt es an allem. Zwei europäische Wissenschaftler, Ingo Potrykus von der ETH in Zürich und Peter Beyer von der Universität Freiburg hatten beschlossen, etwas dagegen zu unternehmen. Sie gingen davon aus, dass für den Großteil der Dritten Welt Reis ein Grundnahrungsmittel ist. Es wird hier durch diesen philippinischen Mann dargestellt, was sie getan haben. Sie beschlossen, das Gen für Beta-Carotin, Beta-Carotin ist die Vorstufe von Vitamin A, in das Reiskorn zu spritzen. Jetzt stellte sich heraus, das Reis auf natürliche Weise Beta-Carotin produziert, dass es allerdings nicht in die Samen wandert. Es wandert in den Stängel, die Wurzeln oder sonst wohin. Sie versuchten zunächst mit traditionellen Methoden, es in das Reiskorn zu verlagern. Aber sie waren nicht imstande, das zu tun. Dies kam nicht überraschend. Die traditionellen Methoden sind sehr begrenzt. Sie nahmen das Beta-Carotin-Gen von anderen Orten und drückten es mit einem geeigneten Haftmittel in das Reiskorn. Das Ergebnis war dieser gelb-goldene Reis, der von diesem philippinischen Mann auf diesem Bild gezeigt wird. Von einer gute Auswahl an goldenem Reis liefert dieser fast das gesamte Vitamin A, was der Körper braucht, in jedem Fall ausreichend, um die Kinderblindheit zu stoppen. Goldener Reis wurde im Februar 1999 Realität. Im Jahre 2002 war er soweit, dass er in die Hände der Pflanzenzüchter gelangen konnte. Bereit für eine kommerzielle Produktion. Aber es ist GVO. Da es GVO ist und somit europäischen Regeln unterliegt, wurde es ausgiebig getestet. Eine Verordnung folgte der anderen. Ursprünglich wurde gehofft, dass bis zum vergangenen Jahr, 2014, alles für den Verkauf an die Bevölkerung bereit sein würde. Jetzt gibt es noch weitere Verzögerungen und es wird mindestens bis 2016 dauern. In der Tat, einer jener Verzögerungen vollzog sich in den Philippinen, vor nicht zu langer Zeit, als sie einen kleinen Feldtest machen wollten. Insbesondere die Grüne Partei Norwegens organisierte die Proteste auf den Philippinen. Sie organisierten einen Haufen Schlägertypen, die die Felder, in denen man goldenen Reis testete, niederbrannten, weil es GVO war. Weil GVO sehr gefährlich ist. Unter dem Strich gesagt reden wir von einer 14-jährigen Verzögerung aufgrund von GVO, aufgrund von Verordnungen und wegen der Opposition der Grünen Parteien. Jetzt können Sie sich fragen: Ist es wirklich gefährlich? Gibt es damit Probleme? Auf der linken Seite sehen Sie eine lange Liste von nationalen Akademien und von renommierten wissenschaftlichen Organisationen, die etwas zu diesem Thema beigetragen haben. Einer der ersten war die Royal Society in London, die sich zugunsten GVO ausgesprochen hat. Auf der rechten Seite ist die vollständige Liste aller seriösen wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaften, die behaupten, es sei gefährlich. Sie werden bemerken, dass niemand auf dieser Liste steht. Es gibt nicht eine einzige wissenschaftliche Gesellschaft die glaubt, dass GVO eine Gefahr darstellt. Doch die Grünen Parteien haben Sie überzeugt, haben die Öffentlichkeit in Europa überzeugt, dass sie gefährlich sind und verboten werden sollten und nicht verkauft werden sollten und das wir alle Produkte beschriften müssen, die sie enthalten. Ich finde es erschreckend, ehrlich gesagt. Unterm Strich sind seit 2002 mehr als 15 Millionen Kinder – vergleichen Sie dies mit den Juden, die im Holocaust gestorben sind- mehr als 15 Millionen Kinder gestorben oder leiden an Vitamin A-Mangel. Meine Fragen ist, wie viele Kinder müssen noch sterben, bevor wir begreifen, dies ist ein Verbrechen an der Menschheit ist? Ich denke, es gibt bereits mehr als genug Opfer. Es ist höchste Zeit, dass wir begreifen, dass die Europäer ihren Standpunkt ändern müssen, insbesondere die Grünen Parteien. Und wissen Sie, dass Schlimmste ist, dass ich ein großer Anhänger der Grünen Parteien bin; beinahe alles, was sie machen, finde ich fantastisch. Wir müssen die Umwelt retten, aber leider ziehen sie hier am falschen Strang. Vor einigen Jahren trat der Greenpeace-Präsident Patrick Moore aufgrund der GVO-Politik zurück. Jetzt läuft er mit Transparenten herum und protestiert gegen Greenpeace und die Grünen Parteien, wegen deren Haltung zu GVO. Ich denke, dies ist ein sehr, sehr ernstes Thema. Eines, bei dem wir jetzt agieren sollten. Meine Absicht ist es, eine Kampagne mit Nobelpreisträgern zu führen; die meisten von ihnen habe ich eingeladen und die meisten haben akzeptiert oder sind am überlegen. Ich merke, dass einige Menschen hier im Publikum noch nicht positiv reagiert haben. Ich hoffe, sie werden es noch tun. Aber vor allem hoffe ich, dass Sie herausgehen und über dieses Thema diskutieren werden. Sich darüber informieren werden, herausfinden werden, was los ist, und die Wahrheit herausfinden werden. Ihre Familie und Freunde überzeugen werden. Ihre Forschungsinstitute überzeugen werden. Aber das ist kein Problem, dass wir den Grünen Parteien überlassen sollten. Sie haben einen Fehler gemacht. Warum geben sie ihren Fehler nicht einfach zu und machen weiter, und machen weiter mit all der guten Arbeit, die sie sonst doch machen? Ich möchte Ihnen eine Vorstellung davon geben, zu welchen Mitteln die Grünen Parteien greifen, um gentechnisch veränderte Produkte zu unterbinden. Das erste, was sie bemängelten, war, dass man enorme Mengen goldenen Reis verzehren muss, um genügend Vitamin A aufzunehmen. Nun, davon haben sie dann Abstand genommen. Viele Jahre lang haben sie... Ich zeige Ihnen eine kleine Folie, die sie irgendwann benutzt haben. Die andere Sache, die sie behaupten, ist, dass sich viele Bauern in Indien das Leben genommen haben, und das dies mit dem biotechnologischen Fortschritt in Verbindung steht. Ich zeige Ihnen ein Diagramm, das das Argument entkräftet. Und dann der Gedanke, dass man mehr Pestizide benötigt, wenn man GVO verwendet. Dies schlussfolgerte man aufgrund der ersten Samen, die Monsanto hergestellt hatte, das waren Roundup-Ready-Samen. Roundup ist Glyphosat. Es ist eine Verbindung, die so ziemlich alles tötet, was grünt und im Boden gedeiht. Sie haben eine Vielzahl an Mais gemacht, der resistent war: Roundup-Ready-Mais. Das Schöne ist, man pflanzt die Samen, besprüht Sie mit Roundup und Mais ist das einzige, was wächst. Glyphosat ist nicht besonders gefährlich. Es baut sich innerhalb von etwa 100 Tagen im Boden ab, lange, bevor die Früchte auf den Markt kommen. Es konnte keine zusammenhängende Gefährdung festgestellt werden, es sei denn, man trinkt es in rohem Zustand. Wissen Sie, das könnte ein Problem sein, aber ich kenne nicht besonders viele Menschen, die glauben, dass es eine gut Idee ist, Pestizide direkt aus der Flasche zu trinken. Dies ist eines der Plakate, das für den goldenen Reis verwendet wurde. Sie sagten, man muss neun Kilogramm gekochten Reis essen, dreieinhalb Kilogramm Trockenreis, um genügend Vitamin A. bekommen. Die Antwort ist: 50 Gramm sind ausreichend, eigentlich 150 Gramm gekochter Reis, was nicht viel ist. Ich denke, dass jeder Wissenschaftler weiß, dass 50 Gramm nicht viel Reis ist. Dies sind die Daten zu den indischen Selbstmorden ab dem Jahre 1997. Die beiden Linien oben zeigen die Selbstmorde der Bauern vor Bt und danach. Bt wurde 2003 bei der Baumwolle eingeführt und Sie sehen, die Selbstmordraten sind im Wesentlichen die Gleichen. Sie sind nicht gestiegen. Und doch behaupten Greenpeace und Co. immer noch, dass das ein Problem darstellt. Dass die Einführung von transgenen Nutzpflanzen Ursache für die indischen Selbstmorde ist. Schließlich der hier, meine Favorit. Ich nenne ihn den Pestizid-Mythos. In Indien wird viel Bt-Baumwolle angebaut. Vor dem Jahre 2001 wurden traditionelle Baumwollsorten angebaut. Dann wurde GVO-Baumwolle produziert, die den Giftstoff Bt, den Bacillus thuringiensis enthält, ein Protein der Außenseite des Bacillus thuringiensis, das Insekten tötet. Vor dem Jahr 2001 wurden 5.750 Tonnen Pestizide verwendet. Bt, das Bakterium was es ernährt, wird oftmals selbst als Pestizid verwendet, aber man muss hundert Mal so viel Bakterien benutzen als das Gen selbst hergibt. Im Jahr 2013 sank der Gebrauch von Pestiziden für die Bt-Baumwolle auf nur etwas mehr als 200 Tonnen. Massive Verringerung. Und der Ertrag? Hatte sich in der gleichen Zeit fast verdoppelt. Ich denke, man muss nicht außerordentlich intelligent sein, um zu erkennen, dass dies nicht zu einer immensen Erhöhung der Pestizide führt. Nicht nur das, es erhöht den Ertrag, was bedeutet, das auf lange Sicht mehr Land für den Nahrungsmittelanbau zur Verfügung steht. Nahrung ist ein großes Problem für viele Menschen auf dieser Welt. Es ist nicht ein Problem Europas. In Europa bekommt man leicht Nahrung, man geht die Straße entlang zum Supermarkt und kauft alles, was man braucht. Das kann man in den Dörfern von Afrika nicht. Entweder man baut selbst an oder man hat nichts zu essen. Meine Schlussfolgerungen sind, dass die Nahrung für Industrieländer kein Problem darstellt. Aber wenn wir politisch handeln und Erklärungen abgeben, sollten wir nicht die Folgen unserer Aussagen und unseres Handels für die Entwicklungsländer vergessen. Denn das, was in den Industrieländern gut funktioniert, funktioniert oft nicht so gut in Entwicklungsländern. Ich denke, ein weiteres Thema, dass wir anschneiden sollten, denn es ist hiermit verknüpft, aber in anderen Punkten, ist, dass mehr Wissenschaft in die Politik einfließen sollte als umgekehrt. Derzeit behaupten die Politiker immer, dass sie wissenschaftliche Berater haben werden und den Wissenschaftler zuhören werden. Zuhören ist eine Sache, aber den Rat anderer zu befolgen, ist etwas anderes. Meine Erfahrung ist: wenn Sie etwas sagen, was die Politiker hören wollen, und sie wissenschaftliche Belege dafür finden, dann werden sie es lieben. Wenn Sie etwas sagen, dass sie nicht hören wollen, dann ignorieren sie es einfach. Das ist falsch. Wir müssen dafür sorgen, dass es um mehr Wissenschaft geht. Und außerdem sollten wir viel dafür tun, dass die Medien mit diesen Fragen besser umgehen. Der wissenschaftliche Konsens hinsichtlich GVO-Lebensmittel ist klar - ich habe ihnen die Tabelle gezeigt, und trotzdem wird den Menschen in den klassischen Fernsehprogrammen oder Radiosendungen oder Zeitungen etwas anderes erzählt. In der Tat, sagt die Einleitung dieser Diskussion, dass dies ein sehr sensibles Thema ist. Und das sollte es nicht sein. Es ist ein Thema, was vom gesunden Menschenverstand geleitet werden sollte. Die Quintessenz ist, dass wir als Wissenschaftler eine bessere Arbeit in Bezug auf die Kommunikation mit der Öffentlichkeit leisten müssen, ihr erzählen müssen, was vor sich geht, und uns nicht in unseren Labors zurücklehnen sollten und die Aufgabe andren überlassen sollten. Denn Sie können nicht auf die Medien vertrauen. Sie können nicht den Grünen die Aufgabe überlassen. Am allerwenigsten können Sie den Politikern vertrauen, dass diese die richtigen Entscheidungen treffen. Eine der Sachen, die wir tun werden, ist, eine Website zu entwickeln. Es gibt bereits viele, die darüber berichten, die sagen, was gut ist und was schlecht ist. Falls irgendjemand eine Kopie der Folien von diesem Vortrag für Freunde, die Großmutter oder wen auch immer haben möchte, wird es mir eine Freunde sein, sie Ihnen zuzusenden. Ich denke, wir alle müssen uns aktiv mit Fragen beschäftigen, aber diese ist sehr dringend. Es werden Millionen und Abermillionen von Menschen in den Entwicklungsländern sterben, wenn wir uns nicht mit der GVO-Frage beschäftigen. Vielen Dank.

Richard Roberts offering an impassioned defence of the use of GM crops to meet rising food demand.
(00:09:33 - 00:11:28)

 

The issues surrounding the use of genetic engineering to boost food supply highlight how fraught the debate regarding genetic modification remains. Certainly, although the scientific evidence is strong, tinkering with human genetic material or with the genetic material of our food is still simply unacceptable to many on a very visceral level. Moving forward in a productive manner will require efforts from both sides of this debate. Scientists should avoid hubris and high-handedness and should instead endeavour to communicate clearly the technology, promise, but also potential risks associated with genetic engineering, whilst also trying to understand the doubts that people may have. Opponents of genetic engineering must, meanwhile, in good faith, examine the evidence for genetic engineering, instead of simply cherry-picking data that support the beliefs that they already hold.

 

Some Further Reading on DNA and Genetics:

Textbooks:

Bruce Alberts, et al., “Molecular Biology of the Cell (6th ed.)” (2014) Garland Science, ISBN 978-0815344322
Jocelyn E. Krebs, et al., “Lewin's GENES XII (12th ed.)” (2017) Jones & Bartlett Learning, ISBN 978-1284104493

Popular Science/Science History:

James D. Watson, “The Annotated and Illustrated Double Helix, edited by Alexander Gann and Jan Witkowski” (2012) Simon & Schuster, ISBN 978-1-4767-1549-0
Richard Dawkins, “The Selfish Gene (30th anniversary ed.)” (2006) Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-929115-1
John Quackenbush, “The Human Genome: Book of Essential Knowledge (Curiosity Guides)” (2011) Imagine, 978-1936140152

For Younger Readers:

Cheryl Bardoe, “Gregor Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas” (2015) Harry N. Abrams, ISBN 978-1419718403