A Brief History of Protein Biosynthesis and Ribosome Research

By Hans-Jörg Rheinberger

 

Introduction

This topic cluster gives an overview of the history of protein synthesis, the structure and function of ribosomes, and of other major components of translation (see Refs. [1, 11-18] for earlier accounts). It refers to over twenty Nobel Laureates, but it also stresses and evidences the fact that many more researchers that also deserve to be remembered have contributed to that – ongoing – research endeavor. Not only a great number of scientists and research groups were involved in this work (see Refs. [2-10] for autobiographical accounts), but also widely different experimental systems, methods, and skills were used. Moreover, the efforts to elucidate the protein synthesis machinery were scattered all over the world. Nevertheless, a scientific community of surprising cohesion developed over time (cf. Refs. [19–26]). Emerging to a considerable degree out of cancer research at its beginning, the field of protein synthesis research gradually became an integral part of molecular genetics. To trace the broader context of the emergence of the experimental culture of translation research is the aim of this historically oriented topic cluster. My survey will mainly focus on the decades between the 1940s and the 1970s, the period that for most present-day readers constitutes something like a forgotten prehistory. The developments of the past decades will be treated more cursorily, since they are largely and excellently covered in the recent Lindau presentations of Ada Yonath, Thomas Steitz, and Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (Nobel Prizes for Chemistry 2009) (Ada Yonath, The Amazing Ribosome, 2010, Thomas Steitz, From the Structure of the Ribosome to (the Design of) New Antibiotics, 2011 and 2014, and Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Seeing is Believing – A Hundred Years of Visualizing Molecules, 2015).

But first: a lesson in history. In May 1959, Paul Zamecnik, who must be regarded as the Nestor of protein synthesis research, was invited to deliver one of the prestigious Lectures at the Harvey Society in New York. He chose to speak about “Historical and current aspects of protein synthesis”, and he traced them back to “careful, patient studies” extending, as he said, “over half a century” [27, p. 256]. He then began with Franz Hofmeister [28] and Emil Fischer [29] (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1902), who recognized the peptide bond structure of proteins; went on to Henry Borsook [30], who realized that peptide bond formation was of an endergonic nature; to Fritz Lipmann [31] (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1953), who postulated the participation of a high-energy phosphate intermediate in protein synthesis; to Max Bergmann [32], who determined the specificity of proteolytic enzymes; to Rudolf Schoenheimer [33] and David Rittenberg [34], who pioneered the use of radioactive tracer techniques in following metabolic pathways; to Torbjörn Caspersson [35] and Jean Brachet [36], who became aware of the possible role of RNA in protein synthesis; to Frederick Sanger [37] (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1958 and 1980), who unraveled the first primary structure of a protein, showing the specificity and uniqueness of the amino acid composition of insulin; and finally to George Palade [38] (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1974), who gave visual evidence for the particulate structures in the cytoplasm acting as the cellular sites of protein synthesis. This is an impressive list of pioneers, who all, according to Zamecnik, “blazed the trail to the present scene” [27, p. 278]. The following offers a brief history of the quirks and breaks – continuing to the present - that marked protein synthesis research as an eminently collective and multidisciplinary endeavor.


The Archaeology of Protein Synthesis – The 1940s: Forgotten Paradigms

The early 1940s were the heydays of what Lily Kay [39] once aptly described as the ‘protein paradigm of life’. The transformation experiments of Oswald Avery and his colleagues at the Rockefeller Institute with DNA notwithstanding [40], proteins for quite some time continued to be seen as the key substances, not only of biochemical function, but also of hereditary transmission (from Delbrück [41] to Haurowitz [42]). It is surprising then to learn that, despite this early focus on proteins, the mechanism of protein synthesis largely remained a black box throughout the 1940s. Thoughts on mechanism during that decade mainly centered around the conception, favored by eminent biochemists of the time such as Max Bergmann and Joseph Fruton, that the mechanism of protein synthesis might be based on a reversal of proteolysis [43, 32, 44, 45]. The proteolysis concept, however, remained a controversial issue, especially since it could hardly be reconciled with the endergonic nature of peptide bond formation that appeared to be evident from Henry Borsook’s investigations at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. His measurements favored the idea that the formation of peptide bonds might involve some sort of activation of amino acids prior to their condensation, a topic on which Fritz Lipmann [31] as well as Herman Kalckar [46] had speculated as early as at the beginning of the 1940s. But despite the growing sophistication of experimental enzymology and of the structural, physical, and chemical analysis of proteins, including powerful new devices such as chromatography, electrophoresis, and X-ray crystallography (see Refs. [47, 48] for historical accounts), classical biochemistry alone and of itself did not provide a definite handle on the question of the cellular mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

 

Fritz Lipmann on protein biosynthesis
(00:00:16 - 00:05:00)

 

Some observations on the part of cytochemistry were intriguing but also remained erratic for the time being. Around 1940, Torbjörn Caspersson from Stockholm and Jack Schultz from the Kerckhoff Laboratories in Pasadena had developed techniques for measuring the UV absorption of nucleic acids within cells as well as UV microscopy of cells [35]. With that, they were able to correlate growth, i.e., the production of proteins, with the increased presence of ribonucleic acids at certain nuclear and cytoplasmic locations. Around the same time, Jean Brachet and his colleagues Raymond Jeener and Hubert Chantrenne in Brussels reached similar conclusions on the basis of differential staining and in situ RNase digestion of tissues [36].

The elucidation of the particulate structure of the cytoplasm by means of highspeed centrifugation dates back to the 1930s and derives from still other lines of research. Normand Hoerr and Robert Bensley in Chicago had used centrifugation to isolate and characterize mitochondria [49]. Albert Claude (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1974), in James Murphy’s Laboratory at the Rockefeller Institute in New York, was working on the isolation of Peyton Rous’ chicken sarcoma agent when he, around 1938, incidentally realized that the particles he was sedimenting from infected cells had exactly the same chemical constitution than those sedimented from normal chick embryo tissue and thus were cellular constituents [50]. They were definitely smaller than mitochondria, and Claude termed them “microsomes” [51] accordingly. They were particularly rich in ribonucleic acid (Albert Claude, The Coming Age of the Cell, 1975, 17:30-26:00). Claude was tempted to place them in the category of ‘plasmagenes’ [52]. But they tenaciously resisted all attempts by Claude and his collaborators, especially Walter Schneider and George Hogeboom, to correlate specific and unique enzymatic functions with them [53, 54]. In contrast, however, the microsomes became preferential objects of ultracentrifugation. The centrifugation methods of Hubert Chantrenne [55] from Brachet’s laboratory in Brussels, and of Cyrus Barnum and Robert Huseby [56] from the Division of Cancer Biology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis pointed to a greatly varying size of the particles – if they had a definable size at all. But despite Brachet’s recurrent claim of a close connection between microsomes and protein synthesis, no particular experimental efforts were made in all these studies to enforce this line of argument [57]. However, the various efforts of an in vitro characterization of the cytoplasm by means of ultracentrifugation resulted in a set of procedures for the gentle isolation of cytoplasmic fractions [58] that soon proved very useful in a wide variety of other experimental contexts.


Basic Mechanisms – The 1950s

This situation was bound to change between 1945 and 1950 through still another approach to assess metabolic events. Right after World War II, radioactive tracers, especially 35S, 14C, and 3H as well as 32P became available for research to a wider scientific constituency as a byproduct of expanding reactor technology. The ensuing new attack on the mechanism of protein synthesis by way of radioactive amino acids benefitted greatly from the vast resources made available for cancer research after the War [59], and from the efforts of the American Atomic Energy Commission to demonstrate the potentials of a peaceful use of radioactivity [60, 61]. In fact, cancer research programs provided the background for much of the protein synthesis research during those years. This constellation also explains why much of protein synthesis research during the decade between 1950 and 1960 was done on the basis of experimental systems derived from higher animals, especially rat liver, and not on bacteria, as might be expected from hindsight.


Steps toward an in vitro Protein Synthesis System

The first attempts at approaching protein synthesis via tracing consisted in administering radioactive amino acids to test animals and in following the incorporation of the label into the proteins of different tissues. However, radioactively labeled amino acids were not yet commercially available at that time. One of the biggest concerns of these early radioactive in vivo studies was to maintain control over the specific activity of the injected material. Consequently, researchers in the field attempted to establish test tube protein synthesizing systems from animal tissues. Among the first to use tissue slices were Jacklyn Melchior and Harold Tarver [62], as well as Theodore Winnick, Felix Friedberg and David Greenberg [63], all from the University of California Medical School at Berkeley. Attempts to incorporate amino acids into proteins of tissue homogenates were also made at that time by Melchior and Tarver [62], by Friedberg et al. [64], and by Henry Borsook’s team at Caltech [65]. They all used different amino acids: sulfur-labeled cysteine and methionine (Tarver), carbon-labeled glycine (Greenberg and Winnick), and carbon-labeled lysine (Borsook). But some of the amino acid ‘incorporations’ in these early in vitro studies turned out to be due to amino acid turnover reactions. Granting that the experimental observation of amino acid ‘uptake’ indeed meant peptide bond formation became one of the biggest concerns of all those trying protein synthesis in the test tube between 1950 and 1955.

Paul Zamecnik’s work at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston can rightly be considered to have been at the cutting edge of the field during the decade between 1950 and 1960. Zamecnik started his work on protein synthesis in 1945. In 1948, Robert Loftfield, an organic chemist from the Radioactivity Center at MIT, joined the staff of the Massachusetts General Hospital. In the preceding two years at MIT, he had worked out a suitable method for the synthesis of 14C-alanine and glycine [66]. Together with Loftfield, Warren Miller, and Ivan Frantz, Zamecnik started to introduce radioactive amino acids into slices of the livers of rats. In the laboratory of Lipmann, who was a neighbor of Zamecnik’s at MGH, William Loomis had just shown that dinitrophenol (DNP) specifically interfered with the process of phosphorylation [67]. When the Zamecnik group included DNP into one of their slice experiments, it stopped all amino acid incorporation activity. The result suggested that, as Lipmann had assumed for a long time on the basis of peptide bond model reactions, protein synthesis was indeed coupled with the utilization of phosphate bond energy [68].

 

Fritz Lipmann on the technique of ‘phosphate-ATP-exchange’
(00:19:15 - 00:22:19)

 

There was no chance, however, to approach the problem by further manipulating liver slices. But to proceed along the lines of cell homogenization was a largely unexplored experimental field [69], and the MGH group worked for 3 years, from 1948 to 1951, to demonstrate the ‘incorporation’ via peptide bond formation of radioactive amino acids into protein in the test tube. In 1951, Philip Siekevitz, who had joined Zamecnik’s group in 1949, had achieved a preliminary fractionation of the liver homogenate by means of a regular Sorvall laboratory centrifuge [70]. None of the fractions was active when incubated alone. But when all of them were put together again, the activity of the homogenate was restored. In 1953, besides the introduction of a gentle homogenization procedure [71], the ordinary laboratory centrifuge was replaced by a high-speed ultracentrifuge. The new instrument made a quantitative sedimentation of the microsomes possible, leaving behind a non-particulate, soluble enzyme supernatant. Incorporation activity was restored from these two fractions under the condition that the test tube was supplemented with ATP and an ATP-regenerating system [72, 73]. It should, however, not be forgotten that the nucleus, too, was considered a site of protein synthesis throughout the 1950s; cf. e.g., Ref. [74]).


Amino Acid Activation and the Emergence of Soluble RNA

Toward the end of 1953, Mahlon Hoagland took up his work in Zamecnik’s lab, after having spent a year with Lipmann. Hoagland realized that he could use the technique of ‘phosphate-ATP-exchange’ developed in Lipmann’s lab (Fritz Lipmann, Protein Biosynthesis, 1967, 19:30-22:00) as a tool in Zamecnik’s rat liver system. A first partial, molecular model of protein synthesis resulted [75]. The combination of the phosphate exchange reaction with another model reaction, that of amino acids with hydroxylamine, suggested the activation by ATP of amino acids. What until then had simply been the ‘soluble fraction’, or the ‘105 000 x g supernatant’, or the ‘pH 5 precipitate’, became now viewed as a set of activating enzymes. Soon, other groups reported similar observations obtained in other systems. David Novelli, who had moved from Lipmann’s lab to the Department of Microbiology at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, established an amino acid-dependent PP/ATP-exchange reaction with microbial extracts [76]. Paul Berg (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1980), from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, reported on the activation of methionine in yeast extracts [77, 78]. Lipmann’s lab took up the task of isolating and purifying one of the amino acid-activating enzymes. Soon, the general character of the carboxyl-activation mechanism appeared to be established [79].

At this point, the participation of ribonucleic acids in protein synthesis still appeared as a black box, although microsomal RNA, by 1955, was generally assumed to play the role of an ordering device, jig, or ‘template’ for the assembly of the amino acids. The actual point of discussion at that time, however, to which Sol Spiegelman from the University of Illinois at Urbana and Ernest Gale from Cambridge repeatedly referred, was accumulating evidence for a coupling of the synthesis of proteins with the actual synthesis of RNA [80–82]. That same year, Marianne Grunberg-Manago in Severo Ochoa’s (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1959) laboratory in New York identified an enzyme which was able to synthesize RNA from nucleoside diphosphates [83].

Late in 1955, Zamecnik, too, began to look for RNA synthesis activity in his fractionated protein synthesis system. He added radioactive ATP to a mixture of the enzyme supernatant and the microsomal fraction. In a parallel experiment, Zamecnik had incubated non-radioactive ATP and 14C-labeled leucine instead of non-radioactive leucine and 14C-labeled ATP together with the fractions. As Zamecnik recorded in his notebook, the assay suggested that radioactive leucine as well became attached to the RNA [84]. Zamecnik had found an RNA in the soluble fraction to which amino acids were attached. The new entity was termed ‘soluble RNA’.

Fritz Lipmann on ‘soluble RNA’
(00:21:56 - 00:26:01)

 

The further differentiation of the cell-free protein synthesis system now became the working field for a growing protein synthesis ‘industry’. In 1956, Robert Holley (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1968), from Cornell University, gathered evidence for the presence of an RNA intermediate in protein synthesis [85]. Paul Berg, soon joined by James Ofengand, went ahead with studies on the amino acid incorporation into soluble RNA of Escherichia coli [86]. Tore Hultin from the Wenner-Gren Institute in Stockholm obtained independent evidence for an intermediate step in protein synthesis from kinetic isotope dilution studies [87]. Kikuo Ogata and Hiroyoshi Nohara at the Niigata University School of Medicine in Japan also had collected hints for an RNA-connected intermediate in protein synthesis [88]. By the end of 1957, amino acid–oligonucleotide compounds were being investigated by at least three other research groups: Victor Koningsberger, Olav Van der Grinten, and Johannes Overbeek [89] at the Van’t Hoff Laboratory in Utrecht; Richard Schweet, Freeman Bovard, Esther Allen, and Edward Glassman [90] at the Biological Division of Caltech; and Samuel Weiss, George Acs, and Fritz Lipmann [91], who had moved from the Massachusetts General Hospital to the Rockefeller Institute in New York. All of them joined the race for adding items to the list of what these molecules and their activating enzymes did and what they failed to do. What had emerged as a biochemical intermediate in protein synthesis soon turned into one of those big missing pieces within the flow scheme of the expression of molecular information. At Richard Schweet’s suggestion, the molecule was later referred to as transfer RNA [92], and it became identified with what, based on considerations rooted in the double-helical structure of DNA, Francis Crick (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1962) had postulated as an adaptor of the genetic code [93–95].


From Microsomes to Ribosomes

As we have seen, it was not until the beginning of the 1950s, and in a context quite different from their original characterization, that the ‘small particles’ or ‘microsomes’ became linked to protein synthesis in vivo [97–102] and in vitro [70, 96, 102, 103]. But it took another decade before the isolation of active cytoplasmic particles through sucrose-gradient centrifugtion became a laboratory standard. To obtain ‘purified’ microsomes became one of the major issues in the development of cell-free protein synthesis [104]. For purification, Zamecnik’s colleague John Littlefield took advantage of the detergent sodium deoxycholate that solubilized the protein–lipid aggregates of the microsomal fraction. The RNA-to-protein content (1 : 1) of his particles corresponded to those of Howard Schachman from Wendell Stanley’s (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1946) Virus Laboratory in Berkeley for Pseudomonas fluorescens [105] and by Mary Petermann from the Sloan Kettering Institute in New York for rat liver and spleen [106].

Around the same time, George Palade [38] was able to visualize small, electron dense particles on the surface of the endoplasmatic reticulum in situ by means of electron microscopy. Siekevitz had joined Palade in 1954. He added his biochemical expertise to the work at the Rockefeller Institute [107]. Besides electron microscopy, the calibration of these ‘macromolecules’ involved velocity sedimentation and electrophoretic mobility [106, 108–110]. They became a synonym for cytoplasmic RNA, although the postmicrosomal supernatant invariably also contained RNA – approximately 10% of the cell’s total RNA [107]. From analytical ultracentrifugation, a sedimentation coefficient of the particles could be calculated.

In the course of the 1950s, the RNA of these particles was generally assumed to provide the template upon which the amino acids were assembled into proteins. In 1958, Howard Dintzis coined the term ‘ribosome’ for purified microsomes devoid of membrane fragments (Wim Möller, pers. comm.; see also Refs. [111, 112]). During the following years, this neologism made its way into the laboratories and into the literature. The reason for changing the name was the presumed role of the particle’s RNA. The new designation no longer reflected a mere technical representation, but a biological function. Like ‘transfer RNA’, the ‘ribosome’ began to relocate protein synthesis from biochemistry to molecular genetics, transforming it into an integral part of what Crick, apparently without minding about the theological connotations of the term, had called the “central dogma” of molecular biology [113, p. 153]. It codified the notion that the genetic information makes its way from DNA to RNA to protein. The central dogma subsumed the process of protein synthesis as the final, translational, step in the overarching process of gene expression.

With respect to their physical parameters, the protein synthesizing particles considerably changed their appearance between 1955 and 1960. Around 1956 and after many trials, Schachman had found yeast microsomes sedimenting with a velocity constant (S) of 80 and to dissociate reproducibly into two unequal portions of 60S and 40S [114]. In a similar manner, Petermann and co-workers were able to separate 78S liver ribosomes into 62S and 46S particles [115]. Alfred Tissières and James Watson (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1965), at Harvard, had their bacterial E. coli particles sediment with 70S. They could be dissociated reversibly into a 50S and a 30S component [116, 117]. It was realized that the secret of stabilization lay chiefly in the concentration of divalent Mg2+ ions. Work on a variety of particles from other sources began to converge on two distinguishing features: bacterial particles (roughly 70S) were consistently smaller than their eukaryotic counterparts (roughly 80S), but both could be separated into something that began to be recognized as a small and a large ribosomal subunit.


Models

The state-of-the-art of protein synthesis, as a process of translation of genetic information, was conceptually re-framed by Francis Crick and his colleagues, especially Sydney Brenner (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 2002), between 1955 and 1957, and summarized by Crick in his seminal paper of 1958. After years of theorizing from template models, starting with Hans Friedrich-Freksa [118] and Max Delbrück [41] (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1969), and continuing with Hubert Chantrenne [119], Felix Haurowitz [42], Alexander Dounce [120], Victor Koningsberger and Johannes Overbeek [121], Fritz Lipmann [122], George Gamow [123], Henry Borsook [124] and Robert Loftfield [125], Crick had come up with a new proposal. During the 1940s, models of autocatalytic protein replication had been at the forefront. Gene duplication thus meant protein duplication. Later models conceived the process of molecular information transfer in terms of a physicochemical interaction between ribonucleic acids and amino acids involving covalent bonding. In the aftermath of the Watson and Crick [126] seminal model of the DNA double helix, Gamow [123] proposed an interaction between DNA and amino acids based on the geometrical shape of holes in the double helix. Crick, thinking of the complementarity features of the DNA double helix, now envisaged what he called “adaptation”, i.e., a specific base-pairing interaction between an amino acid-carrying nucleic acid adaptor exposing a signature complementary to the code of a template nucleic acid. It is interesting to note that at the time Crick launched his adaptor hypothesis, he obviously did not judge it important enough to be published. It was only its linkage to soluble RNA that made it a prominent concept and a prophecy as seen in hindsight.

With the surprising emergence of soluble, amino acid-carrying RNAs, a new possibility of cracking the code seemed to appear on the horizon. Meanwhile, Zamecnik and Liza Hecht had established as a common feature of all S-RNAs a common 3’-end to which the amino acids became attached: an invariable -CCA trinucleotide [127]. This was anything but a distinct code! Hoagland had hoped to have, with transfer RNA, the “Rosetta Stone” for deciphering the code in his hands [128, p. 61]. But trying to obtain the code through transfer RNA with a direct experimental approach led only to a dead end. Ernest Gale and Joan Folkes at Cambridge, who were analyzing the relation between protein synthesis and the synthesis of nucleic acids in a staphylococcal in vitro system, also got stuck [129–131]. Robert Holley, who since 1957 had put all his efforts into isolating, purifying and sequencing the SRNA specific for alanine from yeast, needed many years and a massive crew of coworkers to arrive at the primary sequence of the first transfer RNA [132]. When he presented the sequence, the code had been solved on a completely different experimental track.


The Golden Age of Translation – The 1960s

The genetic code was solved between 1961 and 1965 with a breathtaking velocity that nobody would have dared to predict. The 1960s also saw the emergence of messenger RNA, the dissection of the ribosome into its components, and the resolution of the translational process into partial functions. Through transfer RNA, messenger RNA, and the code, the biochemistry of protein synthesis merged and for a while even tended to become synonymous with molecular biology, a situation that had been unimaginable a decade earlier when a gap still loomed large between those who considered themselves to be the avantgarde of molecular biology and those who did the messy work of experimentally draining the ‘bog’ of nucleic acid or protein biochemistry and metabolism [10]. In vitro systems remained central to the field. Of particular importance was the transition from mammalian systems to bacterial, especially E. coli systems of protein synthesis. E. coli, so vital as a genetic model throughout the 1950s, was not yet a model of translation during this decade. It was only around 1960 that molecular genetics and protein synthesis research joined forces on the basis of one single model organism (see Ref. [133] for an overview of the field around 1960).


From Enzymatic Adaptation to Gene Regulation:
Messenger RNA

Toward the end of the 1950s, the work of Jacques Monod (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1965) and François Jacob (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1965) at the Pasteur Institute in Paris resulted in a major contribution to understanding protein synthesis and its regulation. Since the beginning of the 1940s, Monod had studied ‘enzyme adaptation’ in E. coli [134]. Around 1955, he and his co-worker Georges Cohen distinguished three genes: the y-gene specifying a permease responsible for the import of lactose into the bacterial cell, the z-gene responsible for the sugar-decomposing ß-galactosidase, and an i-factor responsible for the induction of the system. François Jacob had started his work on the viral phenomenon of lysogeny in the laboratory of André Lwoff (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1965) at the Pasteur Institute in 1950. Around that time, decisive developments in bacterial genetics were about to take shape. William Hayes in London and Luigi Cavalli-Sforza in Milan found hints for a sexual differentiation in E. coli bacteria and learned to distinguish between donor and recipient cells during conjugation. In 1953, Hayes in addition characterized a high-frequency recombinant donor variant of E. coli (K12). In the process of doing recombination kinetics with multiple mutants of K12, Jacob and Eli Wollman invented a trick that proved to be highly consequential: If the process of conjugation was interrupted at certain time intervals by mechanical agitation in a mixer, the transfer of different characters could be resolved in a linear fashion. ‘Mapping by mating’ became a clue to the genetic mapping of bacterial chromosomes [135].

In 1957, Monod and Jacob joined forces and included Arthur Pardee from the virus laboratory of the University of California at Berkeley in their efforts. They resulted in the famous series of experiments that led to the operon model of gene expression. The experiments suggested the involvement of a cytoplasmic repressor and a functionally “unstable intermediate” responsible for the expression of the structural genes [136, p. 224]. When Jacob and Sydney Brenner drew a parallel between these experiments and the observation of Lazarus Astrachan and Elliot Volkin [137] from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory of a quickly metabolizing RNA that appeared after infection of their bacteria with T2 phages, the question became whether this unstable intermediate was some sort of an “information carrying RNA” [136, p. 225] that transiently combined with existing microsomes, thus inducing the immediate synthesis of a specific protein [6]. There had been hints in the literature pointing towards quickly metabolizing RNAs for quite some time. As early as 1955, microbiologist Ernest Gale in Cambridge had claimed that in inducible systems, protein synthesis is accompanied by or even dependent upon RNA synthesis [138]. In addition, Sol Spiegelman, who also worked on enzyme induction, had assumed that the RNA templates of induced enzymes are unstable [139].

The concept of microsomes had emerged from eukaryotic in vitro systems with reduced metabolic activity, and as it had gained currency towards the end of the 1950s, it was clearly at odds with these observations on bacterial metabolism. Microsomal RNA appeared to be inert, and for all those working on cells from higher organisms, the ribosome represented “a stable factory”, already containing an RNA transcript of DNA [10, p. 107]. Moreover, bacterial in vitro systems had a bad reputation in the leading circles of protein synthesis workers in the late 1950s. They were considered ‘dirty’ systems that were difficult to control [125].

The decisive experiment establishing the role of messenger RNA came from a joint effort of Jacob, Brenner and Matthew Meselson at Caltech: They grew bacteria on heavy isotopes to tag the ribosomes and infected the E. coli cells with a virulent phage in the presence of radioactive isotopes. What they found was that newly synthesized radioactive phage RNA indeed became associated with pre-existing heavy ribosomes [140]. ‘Messenger RNA’ [141] now assumed the general meaning of a molecular information transmitter whose transcription was controlled by feedback loops according to the operon model. Around the same time, Masayasu Nomura and Benjamin Hall, in Spiegelman’s laboratory at Urbana, had characterized a ‘soluble’ form of RNA synthesized in E. coli after bacteriophage T2 infection. It became associated with ribosomes in the presence of high magnesium concentrations [142]. And François Gros, Walter Gilbert (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1980), and Chuck Kurland, in the laboratory of Watson at Harvard, showed that unstable ‘messenger RNA templates’ also belonged to the metabolic makeup of uninfected E. coli cells [143].


A Bacterial in vitro System of Protein Synthesis and the
Cracking of the Genetic Code

The differentiation of reliable bacterial in vitro systems occurred in parallel, but independent of the experimental context of enzyme induction. The first to report on a system based on E. coli were Dietrich Schachtschabel and Wolfram Zillig at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Munich [144]. In 1958, Marvin Lamborg, a postdoctoral Fellow of the National Cancer Institute from NIH, had come to work with Zamecnik. Lamborg finally managed to establish a cell-free protein synthesis system based on E. coli extracts [145]. In a rapid dissemination, the Lamborg–Zamecnik type of system made its way into other laboratories and soon became a model system for protein synthesis research. Besides Tissières in Watson’s lab [146], among the first to use such a system were David Novelli at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [147], Daniel Nathans and Fritz Lipmann [148] at the Rockefeller Institute in New York, Kenichi Matsubara and Itaru Watanabe [149] at the University of Tokyo and at Kyoto University, and James Ofengand, then on a fellowship at the Medical Research Council Unit for Molecular Biology in Cambridge [150]. In Watson’s group, the structure and function of bacterial ribosomes and messenger RNA had moved to the center of attention. But the E. coli system was also being introduced at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. The days of the rat-liver system as a pace-maker for unprecedented events were over.

Marshall Nirenberg (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1968), at NIH, had just started to establish a cell-free E. coli system when Heinrich Matthaei joined him in the fall of 1960. Nirenberg had set himself the task of investigating the steps that connect DNA, RNA and proteins, and synthesizing, in a cell-free system, a specific protein [151]. Despite many efforts (cf., e.g., Ref. [152]), the synthesis of a defined and complete protein in vitro had remained a challenge ever since the end of the 1940s. To begin with, Nirenberg and Matthaei proceeded well within the context of the prevailing picture of the ribosome, its RNA still being assumed to play the role of a template. A minor, but finally decisive procedure set the stage for their accomplishment: the preincubation of the bacterial cell extract. Matthaei and Nirenberg put the system to work until its endogenous activity came to a halt. Then, according to a principle of variation, they introduced additional RNAs into the system. It was a lucky coincidence that the synthesis of RNA fell into the special expertise of Leon Heppel, who was the director of the laboratory in which Nirenberg and Matthaei were working. With these polymers at their disposal, they needed only a few months until they, by systematically varying their radioactive amino acids, had deciphered the first code word: The homopolymer polyuridylic acid coded for the artificial protein poly-phenylalanine [18, 153].

We have thus to assume that the concept of messenger arose at least twice in the history of molecular biology. It emerged from two experimental contexts that could not have been more different: from a delicate, genetically triggered in vivo system of enzyme induction, and from a comparatively modest, fractionated in vitro system of protein synthesis. Despite these radical breakthroughs, microsomal RNA continued to be considered for quite a while as a possible template [154].

After the Fifth International Congress of Biochemistry in August 1961 in Moscow, where Nirenberg reported the findings from his laboratory, the other attempts at deciphering the code by genetic and chemical microanalysis of phage mutants in Cambridge and of tobacco mosaic virus mutants in Berkeley and Tübingen could be dropped (see, e.g., Refs. [155–158]). The subsequent hunt for the different code words became a matter of refining the experimental conditions of the E. coli system. The triplet-binding assay of Philip Leder was one of the key accomplishments in the years to come [159]. Besides Nirenberg, it was mainly Severo Ochoa and his co-workers in New York and Gobind Khorana (Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine 1968) in Wisconsin who, on the basis of their experience with polymer synthesis, were able to join the race ([160], see Ref. [161] for a review). An initiation codon and the corresponding, formylated initiator tRNA [162, 163] as well as special codons functioning as stop signals were soon identified genetically [164, 165] and biochemically [166–168]. By 1967, the complete code was in place. For the next 10 years, the new findings on translation resulted, along the lines of ever-new twists, quirks, and refinements, from the dissection of bacterial systems [19].


The Functional Dissection of Translation

With the isolation of ribosomes, the purification of specific transfer RNAs and their corresponding synthetases, and the beginning of a deliberate manipulation of viral and synthetic messengers, the stage was set for the dissection of ribosomal function [169, 170]. From the first observations onwards [171], one of the big riddles concerning the energy turnover of peptide elongation had been the involvement of GTP in the process. Around 1960, it had become clear that GTP was not involved in the amino acid-activation reaction per se. In a manner still not understood, GTP did interfere with the amino acid transfer mechanism (see discussion in Ref. [172]). The transfer depended on a partial fraction of the pH 5 enzyme supernatant [173]. It took another three years until Jorge Allende and Robin Monro in Lipmann’s lab identified an enzyme fraction in E. coli whose transfer activity overlapped with a GTPase activity [174] and was termed ‘G factor’ ([175, 176], see Ref. [3] for a review). At the same time, a complementary ‘T factor’ was resolved into a temperature-stable component Ts and an unstable component Tu [177].

 

Fritz Lipmann on a complementary ‘T factor’ resolved into a temperature-stable component Ts and an unstable component Tu
(00:41:58 - 00:50:03)

 

In bacteria, they became known as elongation factors EF-G and EF-Tu/EF-Ts (EF2 and EF1A/EF1B, respectively, in eukaryotes). In a reticulocyte system, Boyd Hardesty and Richard Schweet, a few years earlier, had already identified two fractions, TF-1 and TF-2, that were involved in the GTP-dependent interaction of Phe-tRNA with poly(U)-programmed ribosomes [178]. The identification of three factors required for the initiation [179, 180], and of factors required for the termination of the translation process soon followed [181].

Transfer RNA binding to ribosomes and to their subunits became a major subfield for studying ribosomal function. Among the pioneers were Tore Hultin in Stockholm and Leendert Bosch in Leiden [182–185]. Around the same time, Hoagland found that uncharged S-RNA bound to the microsomes as well as did S-RNA charged with amino acids [186]. The majority of the ensuing tRNA binding studies was done in bacterial systems, where the poly(U)-dependent Phe-tRNA binding assay became by far the most prominent. Soon, Walter Gilbert showed that the tRNA carrying the growing polypeptide is associated with the 50S subunit [187], whereas the binding of poly(U) apparently involved the small subunit [188], and the binding of transfer RNA in general depended on the presence of a messenger [189]. Jonathan Warner and Alex Rich found active reticulocyte ribosomes carrying two transfer RNAs [190].

A functional and clearcut distinction between two different binding sites of charged tRNAs on the ribosome was still missing. Robert Traut and Robin Monro [191] provided it with the puromycin-peptidyltransferase assay which allowed investigators to distinguish a puromycin-sensitive (P-site) and a puromycin-insensitive binding state (A-site) of aminoacylated tRNA. Based on this observation, the two-site model of ribosomal elongation became codified by Watson [192] and continued to serve as a reference system for research on ribosomal function well into the 1980s. Many features of translational initiation [193], elongation [194–196], and termination [197] were outlined in more and more sophisticated and reduced partial in vitro systems [198].

 

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

James Watson on the two-site model of ribosomal elongation
(00:32:57 - 00:36:05)

 

Fritz Lipmann on the two-site model of ribosomal elongation
(00:30:51 - 00:37:53)

 

 

Antibiotics revealed themselves to be invaluable tools for the dissection of partial ribosomal functions as well as for the ongoing in vivo studies concerning regulation, speed, and accuracy of protein synthesis. Among the prominent drugs were puromycin as an elongation terminating agent (see Refs. [199–201] for early studies); chloramphenicol as a specific inhibitor of bacterial peptidyltransferase [202–204]; fusidic acid as interfering with the translocation factor EF-G [205, 206]; and streptomycin as inducing misreading [207, 208]. One of the earliest realistic measurements concerning the accuracy of the process of polypeptide formation came from Robert Loftfield [209].

Ada E.  Yonath (2010) - The Amazing Ribosome

It’s a great pleasure for me to be invited to this well-known annual meeting. Especially as a laureate and I’m so happy to see so many young people that want to listen. What I want to ask is to put off this light, as it as before, please. So I want to tell you all about the amazing ribosome and I have 25 minutes so I won’t be able to say all what I want and all what is worth saying. I’ll try to highlight several points. Ok, DNA is the mechanism of all cells to store and protect the genetic code. It’s a very good storage place because the genetic code which are the combinations of this basis is now protected by the external sort of walls, backbone of the DNA, and the DNA itself can be packed very closely, so very compactly so the information doesn’t or cannot leak out. The gene products, the genes is what the DNA has in it, are called proteins. And proteins can do, or are doing almost everything in the cell. Here is a picture from a children’s book, but I like it and I have some more children’s books, pictures. You can see what proteins can do, they can be structural, like hair or skin or connective tissues, there can be signalling, they can be involved in regulation, they can be transporting things from the transporting proteins. You surely, you surely know about haemoglobin that transports oxygen from the lung to the cell and CO2. They can be enzymes that I think that even high school students now study about them. They are the chopping, the connecting, the workers that do the chemistry and they also can be receptors like eyes and ears and so on. The proteins in the eyes, ears and so on. The fold of the proteins is carefully designed to facilitate the proteins function so it’s not just that every protein can do everything, each protein has its role. And this is decided, the role is decided by the fold and the fold is decided by the sequence of the building blocks. The building blocks of proteins are called amino acids and there are 20 types of them. So just let’s look again at the children’s book, actually I recommend very much this children’s book, it’s called Biokit and it was written in the ‘80’s, last century, still very correct except for the ribosome. There are 20 types of amino acids and they all have the same backbone, I just drew it here in different colours but the same structure. And they have side chains that may be tools and that when it becomes longer which is polymerisation this is the meaning of making the proteins from the amino acids. The tools are hanging out and they must be folded correctly in order that the tools can do the work. So they cannot be just something long, they have to be correctly folded. And I want to show you 1 or 2 possibilities of correct folding, like the lock and the key model for protein and its substrate. For instance here should be a match, total full perfect match between the lock and the key, in order that the key can work, the same is here. Protein is a structure, things will happen here in the active site. Let’s have a look at it closer, here is an active site of a protein. I’m sure that you know the names of the atoms, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, plus hydrogen and sulphur that you don’t see, sorry, the yellow. And the active site is just here. You see the cavity, here things happen and have a look at it closer, this is where things happen. Now there is a substrate that will be chopped here and the fit, the matching between the substrate and the protein has to be correct, otherwise there will not be chopping or adding or whatever the protein has to do. So as I said the sequence of the protein determines its fold and the sequence itself, it is determined by the sequence of the gene that codes for it. So what really happens is that there is DNA as we saw earlier. It is transcribed into a molecule that can be living, can function as a single chain, not a double chain like DNA, it’s called RNA. And in this particular case messenger RNA. RNA is very similar to DNA in terms of the basis but different a little bit in the main chain and therefore it can be existing and functioning as a single strand. This is being translated into proteins by the ribosome. From the same children’s book, this is what happens, there is a gene, the gene is being opened by an enzyme or actually enzyme couples that’s called opener and being copied by another complex that is called copier in this slide and now we have messenger RNA. That is dictated, the sequence of its basis is dictated by the sequence of the DNA because they make the same type of what's on correct base pairs. The ribosome is now the factory that gets the information, the instruction from the gene through the messenger as a papal tape that comes in, being read. Drugs are bringing the amino acids, these drugs are called tRNA and each amino acid has its own tRNA in every cell. Sometimes there is more than one tRNA for each amino acid. Here they are shown in different colours to distinguish between them but actually they are chemically different. Protein is being made here and comes out as a chain here. The drugs can go out, tRNA can go out, look for more work, also the suctions can go out, look for more ribosomes and the whole process is a consuming 2 GTP molecules. So the ribosome is actually a factory. And it builds the newly born protein by adding amino acids one at a time. Let’s have a look at it in a minute. Each cell contains a huge number of ribosomes, highly active mammalian cells can reach 6 millions for instance in the liver. Even bacteria can reach about 80 to 100,000 ribosomes working together when the bacteria grows. The ribosomes act continuously, they form 20 bonds, about 20 bonds in a second. And how do you make mistakes, fidelity rate of 99.99999%, it means one mistake in a million. I was a good student, I studied chemistry and I was a good student, I had a very good inorganic chemistry, I had to make a peptide bond as my second year exercise, took me a day, I needed 100 degrees, I needed high acidity like more than a lemon and I made mistakes and I was expected to make mistakes. I just told you this in order that you appreciate how amazing is the ribosome, it makes 20 in a second under the conditions of the cell where it is in. So let’s see, firstly what the ribosome has to do. Here comes messenger RNA, it has 4 bases like DNA. And I made them here in 4 different colours to distinguish between them. Each 3 of them, each triplet is coding for one amino acid, where are the triplets, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, have a look, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, there will be completely different protein if I start somewhere else. Or if I skip one, or if I don’t know where the first one is. So the ribosome knows to select the right framework and the right position. When the triplets are defined the first one to be translated has to be identified and it happens on the ribosome, like here. So we can see now there are triplets. And the first triplet has been already associated with the tRNA, remember the drug, that associates with this in one end of it which is called anti-codon loop, that can make Watson Crick base builds with the triplet and carries the cognate amino acid to it, far away actually from the anti-codon loop. And it all happens on the ribosome and I really want to show you how we visualise it and the first structures came out, back 8 years ago, this movie was made by art students together with us and it’s interpolation between our results and some others. So the messenger comes to the small sub unit, detects it, please forgive me, let’s go back for a minute. There are 2 subunits in the ribosome, I didn’t say this, sorry. First small subunit that is also initiating, this is the clever part of the ribosome, the small subunit, it knows to think or at least to select, select the frame, select the first one. It cannot make mistakes. The large one is where the peptide bond is being made. So now you can see the movie. So please pay attention to the movie. In the beginning when the messenger reaches the ribosome, the ribosome, the small subunit makes a motion to get it. If the movie doesn’t come I will tell you all about what you could have seen. Ah now you see. Usually this is what happens when I say it doesn’t come, it comes. So the messenger comes and it takes it, now it wraps around it and the RNA factor is non ribosomal factors, for instance the initiation factors that are associated to the initiation complex but we leave. The first tRNA is being brought by another factor, now all the factors leave. The large subunit can come and makes bridges by conformational changes. Now we have an active ribosome. That can continue peptide bond formation and protein production. So the ribosome helps the tRNA’s to come in, they are brought by factors, they can come out, peptide bond is being made in the large subunit. We take it away now so that you can see how the motion happens, tRNA moves, the lower part rotates, moves and moves together with the messenger and the protein goes out through a tunnel in the large sub unit. Now you see again the whole ribosome, protein will come here, it has to fold, either alone or mainly by chaperons or through the membrane if it goes through a membrane. And the whole process continues until stop codon is being recognised and then factors like recycling factors, release factors are replacing the tRNA. The 2 subunits can dissociate, protein comes out, tRNA’s can go and look for more jobs. In the movie you didn’t see structures, here you can see small subunit in bacteria is of the molecular rate of about .85 million Daltons. It’s made many of RNA, like the whole ribosome, RNA here is in silver and many proteins, So that’s a small subunit, you see it looks like a duck, here is a duck, so it’s called a duck. And the large subunit is called a crown and now it looks like a crown. So again RNA is in silver, many proteins, 34 proteins in bacteria, makes the peptide bond and make sure there is elongation and protection. These are ribosomal proteins, I won’t talk about them. What you saw actually in the movie was small subunit, large subunit, 3 positions for tRNA. A, P and E, A and P are above the active site, it’s called peptidyl transfer is centre. A for amino oscillated tRNA. The one that comes with amino acid. P for the peptidyl tRNA. Where the newly protein will grow. And E is the exiting one. So when one looks at the surfaces of the small, the duck and the crown get together, one sees that the surfaces are rich in RNA, almost no protein around. Here there will be the A, P and E and if you see here is the tRNA that combines them. This part will meet here and this part will meet here so what you see coming together means doing this, like my hands. Protein will be made here where the star is by the amino acids. What we found in the structures is the ribosome is not a protein enzyme, it’s an RNA enzyme, almost all its functions are made by RNA. So all what I told you in the beginning that proteins are very important, they themselves are made by RNA, RNA machine. Most of the ribosomes are made from 2 to 1 ribosomal RNA to ribosomal proteins except for mitochondrial that has more proteins. But still the active centres are made of RNA. And this is in a code with what Francis Crick promised us back in 1968. We found in the ribosomal region that accommodates the A and the P sites tRNA, it’s in all ribosomes and I have no time now to tell you about all what's known today. I show you 5 but there are about 30 structures today, all have this region that has symmetrical relation between the A and the P sites, where the A and the P tRNA bind. And we think that the motion between the A and the P is as we see here, the A blue goes into the P green, this is a snap shot, a computer snap shot of the motion where the ribosome is in red and the blinking part are those that help confine and make sure that the motion is correctly. At the end of the motion the stereochemistry is fit for making the A protein bond, peptide bond. And this is what we think the ribosome A provides, the frame for that. What is needed geometrically that this frame works and this reaction works, is that the A-site, tRNA sits exactly in place so it can rotate and the P-site tRNA, the first one goes to its position in the right orientation flipped. Now think about yourself, you're go into an empty room and it’s the same in both sides, which side will you take, this or that. You don’t know, correct. tRNA also doesn’t know but we have no time in the cell to wait until the tRNA thinks it’s better here, it’s better there, I stay here, I stay there. So the ribosome makes provision for that, it provides 2 potential base pairs on the P-site and only one on the A-site, so the first tRNA will go and take the 2, of course 100% more. And therefore the reaction can start. It was also found that when these 2 and this 1, base pairs are formed, the tRNA itself can be the catalyst of this reaction, catalyst of its own reaction, this is a very ancient way of catalysis. So this is what we studied until now, I just want to show you this region that I talked about, it does everything. It’s connected to the 2 hands that move when tRNA come in and out and also to the tunnel and this is where peptide bond is being made. You can see it here in a little bit more detail, tRNA would come here, you remember in the movie, these ends were moving. So we think that it can transmit messages, you can see it here, how beautiful it is, within the ribosome, in the large subunit but connected to the small one. From top you have seen it before, from the side it looks like a pocket. And this gave us the feeling that, you can see it now larger, that there is something in it. We looked into the conservation and we found out that this region is 98% conserved in all known sequences of ribosomes, from bacteria to elephants if you want, everywhere. We also thought because of it that the high conservation of the symmetrical region indicated existence beyond environmental conditions. This suggests that the proto ribosome which was a simple dimeric RNA enzyme, so there was a proto ribosome, is still embedded in the core of the contemporary ribosome, like here. So we think that we identify how the first peptide bonds were made and consequently proteins. We call it proto-ribosome this region and we are trying now to construct it. And this is our hypothesis, there were 2 pieces or many pieces of RNA that could dimerise and make this type of pocket that can do chemistry. So we found to our surprise that there is preferred selection of those that like to dimerise and those that do not. It means we see Darwin before Darwinism, we see selection that is usually given to animals or to cells, here functioning on molecules. So let’s forget this, what we think, this was the pocket, pocket opens and grows and so on and so on. It is in agreement with several studies done independently showing that looking at how the ribosome is built, it’s clear that it was made from a centre which is the symmetrical centre, this is from Steinberg’s group in Montreal. Or by peeling it, showing again that the centre is the most important one. So this gave us the feeling that we can start to think what was the first amino acid, was it an alanine and glycine because they are simple, or lysine and arginine or histidine because histidine can be made from left overs of RNA pieces. And the most important question is what was first, the genetic code or its products. According to our idea the products showed how genetic code will go because when small peptides were made those that existed indicated how to make new ones. The question, the more human type question is why should RNA make enzymes that are better than him, in the beginning all enzymes were RNA enzymes and they were not so successful as proteins. Why should it make a competitor that is better than him? We don’t think it happened like this, we think that it just, that there wasn’t just a machine that was there, that was taken over by the amino acid. I want to show you that the ribosome protects the newly born protein in this tunnel. And at the end of it there is a chaperone that helps it fold. In new bacteria the chaperone is called trigger factor, it’s made of 3 regions. The red one is the one that binds and when it binds it opens up. And when the trigger factor opens up it exposes the hydrophobic region that can help the newly born protein not to make mistakes in folding. When the protein comes out it’s still not full, it’s still not folded and it has to have a helper. And the helper here is the trigger factor that provides an environment that the newly born protein can like. For instance have a look here at the end of the tunnel, here is trigger factor bound in gold and if protein, newly born protein comes out and is protected by it so it will not make too many wrong foldings. You can see it even more beautifully from this side. Here is the protein coming out and the trigger factor helping it. So in the very little time left I want to talk a few minutes about antibiotics because this is the implication of our work. Because of the fundamental role played by the ribosome meant that antibiotics target it. The natural antibiotics are the ammunitions that bacteria from one type is making in order to eliminate another type when they have their fights, their microorganism fights. About 40% of the useful antibiotics target the ribosome and we like to compare it between David and Goliath. David had the small stone, had to kill big Goliath, small stone antibiotic, less than 1000 Dalton, about 800 Dalton, has to paralyse 2½ million Dalton. David hit the head of Goliath here because it’s exposed and because it’s important. It’s not the only exposed region but the most important for life functionally. The same are the antibiotics, they hit the ribosome in the important parts. Here there are 3 of them, one in the active site, the other where bond is being made and the third, the erythromycin in the tunnel. Have a look, this is the tunnel, so this is the large ribosomal subunit to tRNA’s. The tunnel is shown by polyalanine and goes through it. A zoom into it is shown here. And you pay attention, there is a very narrow region here where antibiotics from the family macrolides, the most abundant family bind. Like that, so here is the tRNA, the protein would go here, peptide bond is being here but if there is erythromycin on the site from the macrolide family it will stop it. What you see here is a cut through the ribosome where the large subunit is shown here in beige and the other parts I already show, talked about. From top you can see it like that, the whole ribosome, you look into the tunnel and it is now blocked by erythromycin. All antibiotics bind to the ribosome functional site, I just said it, this is the way they function, this is the way they kill the pathogenic bacteria. But the ribosomal functional sites are highly conserved. So how do the antibiotics differentiate between the pathogen and the patient? They do it by subtle differences. You want to see a subtle difference, here it is. So here is the tunnel wall, there are many, many antibiotics here, all structures determined by us in complex with the ribosome. All bind to one position, number 2058 in the RNA sequence. So you see here the tunnel and this is this particular nucleotide which is very important in the tunnel wall for binding macrolides. It’s an adenine in new bacteria. But it’s not an adenine in us, have a look here, adenine and erythromycin, this is the type of interactions, quite nice ones. Please concentrate here, this is now guanin so that’s pathogen and this is us. Eubacteria in human, that's the only difference. But this is already dictating too short contact and the erythromycin is rejected. So that’s the way they bind. But we do know that antibiotics have resistance and prominent mechanism of resistance is to modify the attachment part, the anchors. What do I mean, you remember earlier 2058, adenine and erythromycin here, this becomes larger, either by mutation or by ERM modification I want to show you. So what's here is antibiotic selectivity, A in eubacteria, G in eukaryotes, all what I had to do is to change the word here from selectivity to resistance. Exactly the same place. So either the bacteria do A to G mutation or post translational ERM modification which metylation making this larger. So this is the way antibiotics, clever antibiotics know to resist, clever bacteria knows to resist antibiotics. The way to combat this, either to make new compounds with additional anchors or minimise the need for the original anchors or make drugs from 2 components. So I want to show you first how companies try to make compounds that can bind without A2058. And I was really terrified because I thought if they bind to resistant bacteria they will also bind to the patient. I was wrong and I want to show you how we know that I was wrong. For this we want to talk about bacteria, human and in the middle there is an archaea. In the dead sea in Israel there is a bacteria that is an archaea. You can see the dead sea from top, from the side, you see it’s very salty, you can see the bacteria still going even on the salt and even in the summer after the water went down, it still grows there. This bacteria was crystallised by us and the structure was determined at Yale and the same antibiotics that bind to resistant bacteria binds to it, it has a G, instead of A. So I was really happy that I was wrong in my prediction. When we look at the patient’s model, that was done at Yale and pathogens that were done by us, one next to the other, we see that the antibiotic binds across the tunnel in the pathogens and along the tunnel in human or in human model. The other type that, so let me go back for a second, this shows that it’s not enough to bind, it has to be bind correctly. So those guys that want here to do drug design. The other type is to make antibiotics from 2 components, here they are again, the tunnel wall, one component, second component, each component is not so good but together they are the winning couple. They made my face from here to here when the first one came to the market called Synercid and we are now making one of our own on this. All antibiotics bind to important functional positions. I showed you here in the active site and in the tunnel, they also bind where messenger RNA goes. So few words, how did we do our studies because I think it’s good for young people. Crystallography is important to see very small distances between atoms. Crystals are made of unit cells that have to be the same. Crystallographers crystallise it, collect data by shining x-rays because there are no lenses that can look at such small distances as we need, atomic positions. And we get at the end many, many spots that we have to combine together to make electron density map that we may or may not be able to interpret. Crystallising salt is no problem, crystallising lysozyme is no problem but crystallising ribosome that is so complicated, so unstable, so deteriorating and so flexible, so heterogeneous, it was not really expected. But I write a paper about hibernating bears that when they sleep the ribosomes are packed on the inside of their cells, on the inside of the membranes and I understood that ribosomes can be orderly packed. I thought that this is the way nature preserve active ribosome’s for the whole winter. And I used for this very robust ribosomes as I said earlier. And at the end we got crystals, I don’t want to go into all details but the beginning was this and I will not talk about so much on the structure, just on what happened to these crystals when we measure them at synchrotrons. So synchrotrons are based on having particles running fast and on the tangentials we measure. Ribosomal crystals deteriorated within .1 of a second. Can you imagine 8 years to get good crystals and then losing them in .1 of a second. We found, we thought that we can fight it and I can explain later how, this is the day of the experiment, look how worried I looked. Within one night we found that by cryocrystallography we can preserve crystals. We got out patterns and the whole world got patterns. Now there are so many structures compared to what was before that. And other things happened the same time so I’m still happy 20 years later. And this is the machine, it’s more important the machine than me. I want to thank the Weizmann Institute that kept me and Max Planck, the NIH, the Weizmann Kimmelman Centre for financing what was called my dream, that was based on the bears. My groups in the Weizmann and at Max Planck for their enthusiasm in good and bad times. Dr. Wittmann that we started with. I want to show you the German group, the Hamburg group that went to the Dead Sea to look for bacteria themselves. And the Israeli group that is run by Annette Bashan when I am here. And Tamara that had birthday, she came for 10 weeks 12 years ago, she is still with us. She had birthday, she had a cake, this is her cake, which shows that ribosomes are sweet in my group. And my family, especially my granddaughter. Why do I say it, I say it for the young women that sit here, it’s possible to be scientist and be loved family member, look what she wrote here. There is no year, I asked her why there is no year, she said every year you have to reprove yourself. So they love me but they are also very demanding. Please young ladies go into science it’s a lot of fun, even without prizes. And that’s what happened to me, thank you very much for a very stimulating and I think a very good advice at the end of it.

Es ist mir eine große Freude, zu diesem bekannten jährlichen Treffen eingeladen worden zu sein, insbesondere als Preisträgerin, und ich bin sehr glücklich, so viele junge Leute zu sehen, die zuhören möchten. Die IT-Leute möchte ich bitten, dieses Licht auszumachen, so, wie es vorher war, bitte. Ich möchte Ihnen nun alles über das erstaunliche Ribosom erzählen, und da ich nur 25 Minuten zur Verfügung habe, werde ich nicht alles sagen können, was ich sagen möchte und was es Wert wäre, gesagt zu werden. Ich werde versuchen, mehrere Punkte hervorzuheben. DNA ist der in allen Zellen vorliegende Mechanismus, um den genetischen Code zu speichern und zu schützen. Sie ist ein sehr guter Speicherort, denn der genetische Code, der aus Kombinationen dieser Basen besteht, wird nun von einer Art externer Mauer geschützt, dem Rückgrat der DNA, und die DNA selbst kann ganz dicht gepackt werden, so kompakt, dass die Information nicht austreten kann. Die Genprodukte – die Gene sind das, was die DNA beinhaltet – werden als Proteine bezeichnet. Und Proteine können so ziemlich alles in der Zelle tun. Hier ist ein Bild aus einem Kinderbuch, aber mir gefällt es und ich habe noch weitere Kinderbücher, Bilder. Sie können sehen, was Gene tun können: Sie können Strukturen bilden, wie Haar oder Haut oder Bindegewebe, sie können Signale senden, sie können an der Regulierung beteiligt sein, sie können Dinge transportieren. Von den Transportproteinen ist Ihnen bestimmt das Hämoglobin bekannt, das Sauerstoff von den Lungen zur Zelle und CO2 zurück transportiert. Sie können Enzyme sein, und ich glaube, dass selbst Oberstufenschüler diese heutzutage untersuchen. Sie sind verantwortlich für die Prozesse der Aufspaltung und des Verbindens, sie sind die Arbeiter, die die Chemie erledigen, und sie können außerdem Rezeptoren sein, wie Augen, Ohren usw. Die Faltung der Proteine ist sorgfältig konzipiert, um die jeweilige Funktion der Proteine zu ermöglichen. Folglich kann nicht jedes Protein alles tun, sondern jedes einzelne Protein hat seine bestimmte Rolle. Diese Rolle wird durch die Faltung bestimmt, und die Faltung wird durch die Sequenz der Bausteine festgelegt. Die Bausteine der Proteine werden als Aminosäuren bezeichnet, von denen es 20 verschiedene Arten gibt. Lassen Sie uns nun wieder einen Blick in das Kinderbuch werfen. Tatsächlich kann ich dieses Kinderbuch sehr empfehlen. Es trägt den Titel Biokit, wurde in den 80er Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts geschrieben und ist noch immer sehr zutreffend – mit Ausnahme der Aussagen über das Ribosom.(Lachen.) Es gibt 20 Arten von Aminosäuren, und alle haben dasselbe Rückgrat. Ich habe das hier einfach in verschiedenen Farben aufgezeichnet, aber es ist dieselbe Struktur. Sie besitzen Seitenketten, die Werkzeuge sein können. Wenn das Protein durch Polymerisierung – Polymerisierung bedeutet die Bildung der Proteine aus Aminosäuren – länger wird, hängen die Werkzeuge heraus und müssen korrekt gefaltet werden, damit sie ihre Arbeit tun können. Sie dürfen also nicht einfach nur lang sein, sondern sie müssen korrekt gefaltet sein. Ich möchte Ihnen ein oder zwei Möglichkeiten einer korrekten Faltung vorstellen, wie das Schlüssel-Schloss-Prinzip für ein Protein und sein Substrat. Hier muss zum Beispiel eine Übereinstimmung, eine vollständige und perfekte Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Schloss und dem Schlüssel vorliegen, damit der Schlüssel funktionieren kann, und das Gleiche gilt hier. Ein Protein ist eine Struktur, die Dinge werden sich hier im aktiven Bereich ereignen. Lassen Sie uns genauer hinschauen – hier ist der aktive Bereich eines Proteins. Sicherlich kennen Sie die Namen der Atome: Sauerstoff, Stickstoff, Kohlenstoff, plus Wasserstoff und Schwefel, das gelbe Atom, das Sie hier leider nicht sehen. Der aktive Bereich befindet sich genau hier. Sie sehen die Aushöhlung, hier laufen die Prozesse ab. Schauen Sie näher hin, dort passiert es. Hier ist nun ein Substrat, das hier zerlegt werden wird. Die Passung, die Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Substrat und dem Protein muss stimmen. Sonst wird nichts zerlegt oder hinzugefügt werden oder das geschehen, was immer das Protein tun muss. Wie ich sagte, bestimmt also die Sequenz des Proteins seine Faltung. Die Sequenz selbst wird von der Sequenz des Gens bestimmt, das sie codiert. Was nun tatsächlich passiert, ist Folgendes: Wir haben hier DNA, wie wir zuvor gesehen haben,die DNA wird in ein Molekül transkribiert, das als eine einzelne Kette, nicht als eine Doppelkette wie die DNA, leben und funktionieren kann. Dieses Molekül wird als RNA bezeichnet. In diesem speziellen Fall handelt es sich um mRNA (Messanger- RNA, Boten-RNA). Hinsichtlich der Basen ist die RNA der DNA sehr ähnlich, aber sie unterscheidet sich in der Hauptkette ein bisschen von ihr, und sie kann daher als einzelner Strang existieren und funktionieren. Sie wird durch das Ribosom in Proteine übersetzt. Hier haben wir, aus demselben Kinderbuch, das, was passiert: Hier ist ein Gen, es wird von einem Enzym bzw. eigentlich von einem Enzymkomplex, der als Öffner bezeichnet wird, geöffnet und, auf diesem Dia, von einem anderen, Kopierer genannten Komplex, kopiert. Nun haben wir die mRNA. Die Sequenz ihrer Basen wird von der Sequenz der DNA vorgeschrieben. Bei beiden kommt es auf korrekte Basenpaare an. Das Ribosom stellt nun die Fabrik dar, welche die Information und damit vom Gen die Bauanweisung erhält, und zwar über einen Boten in Form eines eingehenden „Lochstreifens“, der ausgelesen wird. Lastwagen bringen die Aminosäuren herbei. Diese Lastwagen werden als tRNA bezeichnet, und in jeder Zelle hat jede Aminosäure ihre eigene tRNA. Manchmal gibt es für eine Aminosäure mehr als eine tRNA. Sie sind hier in unterschiedlichen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann, aber sie unterscheiden sich tatsächlich hinsichtlich ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung. Hier wird das Protein hergestellt, und hier kommt es als Kette heraus. Die Lastwagen können den Ort wieder verlassen, die RNA kann herausgehen und sich nach weiterer Arbeit umsehen. Auch die Bauanleitungen können herausgehen und weitere Ribosomen suchen. Der gesamte Prozess verbraucht zwei GTP-Moleküle. Das Ribosom ist also tatsächlich eine Fabrik und stellt die neuen Proteine her, indem es stückweise Aminosäuren hinzufügt. Schauen wir uns das in einer Minute einmal an. Jede Zelle enthält eine große Anzahl von Ribosomen. Bei hochaktiven Säugetierzellen, zum Beispiel in der Leber, können es bis zu sechs Millionen Ribosomen sein. Selbst bei Bakterien arbeiten ungefähr 80.000 bis 100.000 Ribosomen zusammen, wenn das Bakterium wächst. Die Ribosomen sind pausenlos in Aktion. Sie bilden 20 Bindungen, um die 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde. Unterlaufen ihnen dabei Fehler? Die Quote der Genauigkeit beträgt 99, 99999 % – das heißt ein Fehler in einer Million. Ich war eine gute Studentin. Ich studierte Chemie, und ich war eine gute Studentin, ich war sehr gut in anorganischer Chemie. Als Übungsaufgabe im zweiten Jahr musste ich eine Peptidbindung herstellen. Dafür benötigte ich einen Tag. Ich brauchte 100 Grad, ich brauchte einen Säuregehalt, der höher als der einer Zitrone war. Ich machte Fehler, und es wurde erwartet, dass ich Fehler machte. Das erzähle ich Ihnen nur deshalb, damit Sie zu würdigen wissen, wie erstaunlich das Ribosom ist. Unter den Bedingungen der Zelle, in der es sich befindet, stellt es 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde her. Schauen wir uns nun als erstes an, was das Ribosom zu tun hat. Hier kommt mRNA an, die wie DNA vier Basen besitzt. Ich habe sie hier in vier verschiedenen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann. Jeweils drei von ihnen, jedes Triplett, kodiert eine Aminosäure. Wo sind die Tripletts, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, schauen Sie, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, es wird ein ganz anderes Protein werden, wenn ich an einer anderen Stelle beginne. Oder wenn ich eine überspringe oder wenn ich nicht weiß, wo die erste Stelle ist. Das Ribosom kann also das richtige System und die richtige Position heraussuchen. Wenn die Tripletts definiert sind, muss dasjenige, das als erstes übersetzt werden soll, identifiziert werden, und dies geschieht am Ribosom, so wie hier. Wir können also sehen, dass es nun Tripletts gibt. Das erste Triplett ist bereits mit der tRNA verbunden worden – erinnern Sie sich an den Lastwagen – die sich mit ihm an einem seiner Enden, das als Anticodon-Schleife bezeichnet wird, verbindet. Sie kann Watson-Crick-Basenverbindungen mit dem Triplett aufbauen und transportiert die verwandte Aminosäure dorthin, also tatsächlich weit entfernt von der Anticodon-Schleife. Das alles passiert am Ribosom. Ich möchte Ihnen sehr gerne zeigen, wie wir dies visualisieren. Die ersten Strukturen kamen vor acht Jahren zum Vorschein. Dieser Film wurde von Kunststudenten und uns gemeinsam gemacht und stellt eine Interpolation unserer Ergebnisse und einiger anderer Ergebnissen dar. Der Bote kommt an der kleinen Untereinheit an, entdeckt sie – ich bitte um Verzeihung, lassen Sie uns für eine Minute zurückgehen. Das Ribosom hat zwei Untereinheiten, dies sagte ich noch nicht, Entschuldigung. Als erstes ist da die kleine Untereinheit, die auch den Vorgang einleitet. Sie ist der intelligente Teil des Ribosoms, die kleine Untereinheit, sie kann denken oder zumindest selektieren, den Rahmen und das erste Triplett aussuchen. Sie kann keine Fehler machen. Die große Untereinheit befindet sich dort, wo die Peptidbindung stattfindet. Jetzt können Sie sich den Film anschauen. Bitte achten Sie auf den Film. Zu Beginn, wenn der Bote das Ribosom erreicht, vollführt das Ribosom, die kleine Untereinheit, eine Bewegung, um ihn zu ergreifen. Wenn der Film nicht startet, werde ich Ihnen alles das erklären, was Sie hätten sehen können. Ah – jetzt können Sie es sehen. Das ist das, was normalerweise passiert, wenn ich sage, er startet nicht – dann startet er. Der Bote kommt also an, und die kleine Untereinheit ergreift ihn, wickelt sich jetzt um ihn herum, und der RNA-Faktor ist ein nicht-ribosomaler Faktor, wie zum Beispiel die Initiationsfaktoren, die mit dem Initiationskomplex verbunden sind, aber nun verlassen wir das. Die erste tRNA wird von einem anderen Faktor herbeigebracht. Nun gehen alle Faktoren. Die große Untereinheit kann kommen und baut Brücken durch Konformationsänderungen. Nun haben wir ein aktives Ribosom, das mit der Bildung der Peptidbindungen und der Proteinsynthese fortfahren kann. Das Ribosom hilft also den tRNAs beim Hereinkommen, sie werden von Faktoren herbeigebracht, sie können herauskommen, die Peptidbindung wird in der großen Untereinheit gebildet. Wir entfernen sie jetzt, damit Sie erkennen können, wie die Bewegung vonstatten geht. Die tRNA bewegt sich, der untere Teil rotiert und bewegt sich zusammen mit dem Boten, und das Protein tritt durch einen Tunnel in der großen Untereinheit aus. Nun sehen Sie wieder das gesamte Ribosom. Das Protein wird hier ankommen, es muss gefaltet werden, entweder durch sich selbst oder, in den meisten Fällen, durch Chaperon-Proteine oder durch die Membran, wenn es durch eine Membran hindurchtritt. Der ganze Prozess setzt sich fort, bis ein Stopp-Codon erkannt wird. Dann ersetzen Faktoren wie Recycling- oder Freigabefaktoren die tRNA. Die zwei Untereinheiten können sich voneinander lösen, die Proteine kommen heraus, die tRNAs können weiterziehen und nach neuer Arbeit Ausschau halten. In dem Film sahen Sie keine Strukturen. Hier können Sie erkennen, dass die kleine Untereinheit bei Bakterien eine molekulare Größe von ungefähr 0,85 Millionen Dalton hat. Sie besteht, wie das gesamte Ribosom, aus zahlreichen RNAs – die RNA ist hier silberfarben dargestellt – und vielen Proteinen, hier aus 20 Proteinen, von denen jedes in einer anderen Farbe dargestellt ist. Die Farben haben keine Bedeutung. Das also ist eine kleine Untereinheit. Sie sehen, dass sie einer Ente ähnelt, daher wird sie als Ente bezeichnet. Die große Untereinheit wird als Krone bezeichnet und sieht auch wie eine Krone aus. Die RNA ist wiederum silberfarben dargestellt. Viele Proteine – bei Bakterien 34 Proteine – bilden die Peptidbindung und stellen Elongation und Schutz sicher. Bei diesen handelt es sich um ribosomale Proteine, auf die ich nicht eingehen werde. Was Sie eigentlich in dem Film sahen, waren die kleine Untereinheit, die große Untereinheit und drei Positionen für die tRNA: A, P und E. A und P befinden sich über dem aktiven Bereich. Dies wird als Peptidyltransferase-Zentrum bezeichnet. A steht für Aminoacyl-tRNA, also für die tRNA, die mit der Aminosäure kommt. P steht für die Peptidyl-tRNA, wo das neue Protein wachsen wird, und E steht für die Exit-Position. Wenn man sich also die Oberflächen der kleinen Untereinheit, der Ente, und der Krone zusammen anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die Oberflächen reich an RNA sind und dass sich dort fast keine Proteine befinden. Hier werden die A-, die P- und die E-Position sein, und wenn Sie dort hinschauen, sehen Sie die sie kombinierende tRNA. Dieser Teil wird sich hier und dieser Teil wird sich dort treffen. Was Sie dort zusammentreffen sehen, bedeutet, dass dies hier getan wird, was meine Hände tun. Das Protein wird hier, wo sich der Stern befindet, aus den Aminosäuren gebildet. Was wir in den Strukturen feststellten, zeigt, dass es sich bei dem Ribosom nicht um ein Proteinenzym, sondern um ein RNA-Enzym handelt. Nahezu alle seine Funktionen werden durch RNA ausgeführt. Anfangs erzählte ich Ihnen vieles über die große Bedeutung der Proteine, doch die Proteine selbst werden von der RNA, der RNA-Maschine, erzeugt. Die meisten Ribosomen bestehen aus ribosomaler RNA und ribosomalem Protein im Verhältnis 2:1, mit Ausnahme der mitochondrialen Ribosome, die mehr Proteine enthalten. Aber auch hier bestehen die aktiven Zentren aus RNA. Dies ist in einem Code, den uns Francis Crick damals, 1968, versprochen hat. Die ribosomale Region, die die A- und P-Positionen-tRNA aufnimmt, findet sich in allen Ribosomen. Hier habe ich nicht die Zeit, um Ihnen all das zu erzählen, was heutzutage darüber bekannt ist. Ich zeige Ihnen fünf Strukturen, aber es gibt heute ungefähr 30. Alle verfügen über diese Region, die ein symmetrisches Verhältnis zwischen den A- und P-Positionen aufweist und wo sich die A- und P-tRNA verbinden. Wir sind der Ansicht, dass die Bewegung zwischen A und P so abläuft, wie wir hier sehen. A (blau) bewegt sich in P (grün) hinein. Es handelt sich hier um eine Momentaufnahme, eine Computer-Momentaufnahme der Bewegung, bei der das Ribosom in Rot dargestellt ist. Die blinkenden Teile sind jene, die bei der Bewegung helfen, die sie begrenzen und dafür sorgen, dass sie korrekt ausgeführt wird. Am Ende der Bewegung ist die räumliche Anordnung bereit für die Bildung der A-Protein-Bindung, der Peptidbindung. Das ist es, was unserer Meinung nach das Ribosom bereitstellt, den Rahmen dafür. Was in geometrischer Hinsicht für das Funktionieren dieses Rahmens und dieser Reaktion erforderlich ist, ist Folgendes: dass sich die tRNA an der A-Position genau an ihrem Platz befindet, damit sie rotieren kann, und dass sich die erste tRNA der P-Position in der richtigen Ausrichtung, nämlich umgedreht, auf ihre Position zubewegt. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, dass Sie selbst einen leeren Raum betreten. Beide Seiten sehen gleich aus – welche Seite werden Sie wählen, diese oder jene? Genau – Sie wissen es nicht. Die tRNA weiß es auch nicht, aber in der Zelle haben wir keine Zeit, um zu warten, bis die tRNA denkt: „Hier ist es besser, dort ist es besser, ich bleibe hier, ich bleibe dort.“ Deshalb trifft das Ribosom entsprechende Vorkehrungen und stellt auf der P-Position zwei potenzielle Basenpaare und auf der A-Position nur ein Basenpaar bereit. Folglich wird die erste tRNA die beiden Paare nehmen, natürlich die 100 % mehr. Und somit kann die Reaktion beginnen. Man hat auch herausgefunden, dass die tRNA, wenn diese zwei Basenpaare und dieses eine Basenpaar gebildet werden, selbst der Katalysator für diese Reaktion sein kann. Sie kann also der Katalysator ihrer eigenen Reaktion sein, was eine sehr alte Möglichkeit der Katalyse ist. Das also ist es, was wir bis heute untersucht haben. Ich möchte Ihnen diese Region zeigen, über die ich sprach. Sie tut alles. Sie ist mit den beiden Händen, die sich bewegen, wenn tRNA hinein- und herauskommt, und auch mit dem Tunnel verbunden, wo die Peptidbindung gebildet wird. Hier können Sie das Ganze etwas detaillierter betrachten. An diese Stelle würde die tRNA kommen – Sie erinnern sich an den Film, diese Enden bewegten sich. Wir glauben also, dass sie Botschaften übermitteln kann. Sie können sie hier sehen, wie schön sie ist, innerhalb des Ribosoms, in der großen Untereinheit, aber mit der kleinen Untereinheit verbunden. Von oben haben Sie sie vorhin gesehen, von der Seite betrachtet, sieht sie wie eine Tasche aus. Dies vermittelte uns den Eindruck, dass sich darin – jetzt können Sie es größer sehen – etwas befindet. Wir sahen uns die Konservierung an und stellten fest, dass diese Region in allen bekannten Sequenzen von Ribosomen zu 98 % konserviert ist, von den Bakterien bis zu den Elefanten, überall. Wir hatten außerdem den Gedanken, dass die hohe Konservierung dieser symmetrischen Region auf eine Existenz unabhängig von Umweltbedingungen hinwies. Dies legt nahe, dass das Proto-Ribosom, das ein einfaches Dimer-RNA-Enzym war, immer noch im Kern dieses gegenwärtigen Ribosoms, wie hier, eingebettet ist. Daher denken wir, dass wir herausgefunden haben, wie die ersten Peptidbindungen und folglich die ersten Proteine gebildet wurden. Wir bezeichnen diese Region als Proto-Ribosom und versuchen nun, sie zu konstruieren. Unsere Hypothese besagt, dass es zwei oder mehr RNA-Stücke gab, die dimerisieren konnten und diese Art von Tasche bildeten, die Chemie betreiben kann. Wir stellten zu unserer Überraschung fest, dass es eine bevorzugte Selektion jener, die gerne dimerisieren, und jener, die dies nicht tun, gibt. Das bedeutet, dass wir hier Darwin vor dem Darwinismus sehen, wir sehen, dass Selektion, die normalerweise bei Tieren oder bei Zellen zum Tragen kommt, auf Moleküle einwirkt. Vergessen wir das jetzt. Wir denken, dass dies die Tasche war, sie öffnete sich und wuchs und so weiter und so fort. Diese Überlegung stimmt mit verschiedenen unabhängig voneinander durchgeführten Untersuchungen überein, die nachweisen, dass, wenn man sich anschaut, wie das Ribosom aufgebaut ist, klar ist, dass es aus einem Zentrum gebildet wurde, das dem symmetrischen Zentrum entspricht. Dies stammt von Steinbergs Gruppe aus Montreal. Auch wenn man es auseinander wickelt, zeigt sich wieder, dass das Zentrum der wichtigste Bestandteil ist. Dies ließ uns daran denken, Überlegungen darüber anzustellen, welches die erste Aminosäure war oder um Lysin oder Arginin oder Histidin, weil Histidin aus Überresten von RNA-Stücken gebildet werden kann. Die wichtigste Frage ist, was zuerst da war: der genetische Code oder seine Produkte? Nach unserer Vorstellung zeigten die Produkte, wie der genetische Code funktioniert, denn als neue Peptide gebildet wurden, gaben die bereits existierenden Peptide Hinweise darauf, wie die neuen herzustellen seien. Die Frage, die eher eine typisch menschliche Frage ist, lautet: Warum sollte die RNA Enzyme herstellen sollte, die besser sind als sie. Anfangs waren alle Enzyme RNA-Enzyme, und diese waren nicht so erfolgreich wie Proteine. Warum sollte sie einen Konkurrenten erschaffen, der besser war als sie? Wir glauben nicht, dass es auf diese Art und Weise passiert ist. Wir nehmen an, dass es nicht einfach einen Mechanismus gab, der von der Aminosäure übernommen wurde. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, dass das Ribosom das neugeborene Protein in diesem Tunnel beschützt. Am Ende des Tunnels befindet sich ein Chaperon-Protein, das dem neuen Protein bei der Faltung hilft. Bei neuen Bakterien wird das Chaperon-Protein als Trigger-Faktor bezeichnet. Dieser Faktor besteht aus drei Regionen. Die rote ist diejenige, die bindet, und wenn sie bindet, öffnet sie sich. Und wenn sich der Trigger-Faktor öffnet, legt er die hydrophobe Region bloß, die dem neugeborenen Protein dabei helfen kann, Fehler bei der Faltung zu vermeiden. Wenn das Protein herauskommt, ist es immer noch nicht vollständig, immer noch nicht gefaltet und braucht einen Helfer. Der Helfer hier ist der Trigger-Faktor, der für eine Umgebung sorgt, in der das neugeborene Protein sich wohlfühlen kann. Schauen Sie zum Beispiel hier auf das Ende des Tunnels, hier ist ein Trigger-Faktor in einer goldfarben dargestellten Bindung. Wenn ein Protein, ein neugeborenes Protein, herauskommt, wird es von dem Trigger-Faktor beschützt, damit es nicht zu viele Fehlfaltungen macht. Von dieser Seite aus können Sie dies sogar noch schöner sehen. Hier kommt das Protein heraus, und der Trigger-Faktor hilft ihm. In der sehr kurzen Zeit, die wir noch haben, möchte ich über Antibiotika sprechen, denn diese sind die Folge unserer Arbeit. Die zentrale Rolle, die das Ribosom spielt, bedeutet, dass es zielgerichtet von Antibiotika angegriffen wird. Natürliche Antibiotika sind die Munition, die von den Bakterien der einen Art produziert wird, um Bakterien einer anderen Art bei ihren Kämpfen, ihren Kämpfen auf der Ebene der Mikroorganismen, zu eliminieren. Ungefähr 40 % der wirkungsvollen Antibiotika greifen das Ribosom an. Wir vergleichen dies gerne mit David und Goliath. David hatte den kleinen Stein zur Verfügung und musste den großen Goliath töten. Der kleine Stein ist das Antibiotikum, weniger als 1000 Dalton, ungefähr 800 Dalton, und muss zweieinhalb Millionen Dalton paralysieren. David traf Goliath hier am Kopf, da dieser ungeschützt und wichtig war. Der Kopf ist nicht der einzige ungeschützte Körperteil, aber der in funktionaler Hinsicht lebenswichtigste. Antibiotika verhalten sich ebenso. Sie treffen das Ribosom an den wichtigen Stellen. Hier sind drei von ihnen, eins im aktiven Bereich, ein zweites dort, wo die Bindung entsteht, und ein drittes, Erythromycin, im Tunnel. Werfen Sie einen Blick darauf – das ist der Tunnel, dies sind die große ribosomale Untereinheit und zwei tRNAs. Der Tunnel wird durch das Polyalanin gezeigt und geht hindurch. Hier haben wir eine Zoom-Aufnahme in den Tunnel. Sehen Sie genau hin: Hier gibt es eine sehr schmale Region, wo sich Antibiotika der Makrolid-Familie, der größten Familie, eine Bindung eingehen. Ungefähr so: Hier ist die tRNA, das Protein würde hierhin gehen, die Peptidbindung würde hier erfolgen. Befindet sich jedoch Erythromycin aus der Makrolid-Familie in diesem Bereich, wird es dies stoppen. Was Sie hier sehen, ist ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom, bei dem die große Untereinheit hier beige dargestellt ist. Außerdem sehen Sie die anderen Teile, die ich bereits gezeigt und von denen ich gesprochen hatte. Von oben können Sie es so sehen, das gesamte Ribosom, Sie schauen in den Tunnel hinein, und er wird nun durch das Erythromycin blockiert. Alle Antibiotika binden sich an die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms. Ich sagte dies soeben. Dies ist die Art und Weise, auf die sie wirken und auf die sie die pathogenen Bakterien töten. Jedoch sind die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms in hohem Maße konserviert. Wie unterscheiden also die Antibiotika zwischen Pathogen und Patient? Sie tun dies anhand feiner Unterschiede. Sie möchten einen feinen Unterschied sehen? Hier ist die Tunnelwand, mit vielen, vielen Antibiotika. Alle Strukturen wurden von uns in einem Komplex mit dem Ribosom bestimmt. Alle binden an eine Position, die Nummer 2058 in der RNA-Sequenz. Sie sehen hier also den Tunnel, und das ist das spezielle Nucleotid, das in der Tunnelwand für die Bindung von Makroliden sehr wichtig ist. Bei neu gebildeten Bakterien ist es ein Adenin. Aber bei uns ist es kein Adenin. Schauen Sie hierhin – Adenin und Erythromycin, das ist die Art von Interaktionen, ziemlich nette Interaktionen. Konzentrieren Sie sich bitte hierauf – das ist jetzt Guanin. Das also ist ein Pathogen, und das sind wir. Eubakterien im Menschen, das ist der einzige Unterschied. Aber das schreibt bereits einen zu kurzen Kontakt vor, und das Erythromycin wird abgewiesen. Das ist also die Art und Weise, auf die sie binden. Wir wissen jedoch, dass Antibiotika Resistenzen besitzen. Ein sehr wichtiger Resistenz-Mechanismus besteht in einer Modifizierung des Befestigungsteils, des Ankers. Was heißt das? Sie erinnern sich, vorhin sprachen wir über die Position 2058, Adenin und Erythromycin hier. Dies wird größer, entweder durch Mutation oder durch ERM-Modifizierung, wie ich Ihnen zeigen möchte. Hier haben wir antibiotische Selektivität: A bei Eubakterien, G bei Eukaryoten. Alles, was ich zu tun hatte, war, das Wort hier von „Selektivität“ zu „Resistenz“ zu ändern. Genau der gleiche Ort. Die Bakterien durchlaufen also entweder eine Mutation (von A zu G) oder eine post-translationale ERM-Modifizierung, bei der Methylierung dies hier vergrößert. Auf diese Art und Weise können demnach intelligente Bakterien den Antibiotika Widerstand leisten. Um Resistenzen zu bekämpfen, kann man entweder neue Präparate mit zusätzlichen Ankern herstellen oder den Bedarf an den ursprünglichen Ankern minimieren oder Medikamente aus zwei Komponenten herstellen. Als erstes möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie Firmen versuchen, Präparate herzustellen, die ohne eine 2058-Position binden können. Ich hatte wirklich Angst, denn ich dachte, dass diese Antibiotika, wenn sie sich an resistente Bakterien anheften können, sich auch an den Patienten anheften werden. Ich irrte mich, und ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, woher wir wissen, dass ich mich im Irrtum befand. Dafür wollen wir über Bakterien sprechen, über Menschen, und in der Mitte befinden sich die Archaeen. Im Toten Meer in Israel existiert ein Bakterium, das ein Archaeon ist. Sie können das Tote Meer von oben sehen, von der Seite, es ist sehr salzig, und sie sehen, dass die Bakterien selbst im Salz weiterleben. Sie wachsen sogar im Sommer, nachdem der Wasserstand gefallen ist. Dieses Bakterium wurde von uns kristallisiert und seine Struktur in Yale bestimmt. Dieselben Antibiotika, die sich an resistente Bakterien binden, binden sich auch an dieses Bakterium. Es hat ein G anstelle eines A. Ich war sehr glücklich, dass ich mit meiner Voraussage falsch lag. Wenn wir uns das Modell des Patienten anschauen, das in Yale erstellt wurde, und die Pathogene, mit denen wir uns dort nebenan beschäftigten, sehen wir, dass das Antibiotikum bei den Pathogenen durch den Tunnel und bei dem menschlichen Modell entlang des Tunnels bindet. Das zeigt, dass es nicht ausreicht, dass eine Bindung stattfindet, sondern es muss eine korrekte Bindung erfolgen. Für diejenigen hier, die in der Medikamentenentwicklung arbeiten möchten. Die zweite Möglichkeit besteht darin, Antibiotika aus zwei Komponenten herzustellen. Hier sind sie wieder – die Tunnelwand, eine Komponente, die zweite Komponente, jede Komponente für sich reicht nicht aus, zusammen sind sie jedoch ein Gewinnerpaar. Es sorgte für ein breites Lächeln auf meinem Gesicht, als das erste Medikament dieser Art unter dem Namen Synercid auf den Markt kam. Heute stellen wir ein eigenes Medikament dieser Art her. Alle Antibiotika binden an funktional bedeutenden Positionen, wie ich Ihnen zeigte, hier im aktiven Bereich und im Tunnel. Sie binden auch dort, wohin sich die mRNA bewegt. Noch einige wenige Worte dazu, wie wir unsere Untersuchungen vornahmen, denn ich denke, dies ist hilfreich für junge Menschen. Die Kristallografie ist wichtig, um sehr kleine Unterschiede zwischen den Atomen erkennen zu können. Kristalle sind aus Elementarzellen aufgebaut, die gleich sein müssen. Kristallografen kristallisieren sie und erheben Daten, indem sie Röntgenstrahlen einsetzen, da es keine Linsen gibt, mit deren Hilfe man solch kleine Entfernungen betrachten kann, wie wir sie benötigen, die Positionen von Atomen. Letztendlich brauchen wir viele, viele Punkte, die wir miteinander kombinieren müssen, um eine Karte der Elektronendichte zu erstellen, die wir dann interpretieren können – oder auch nicht. Salz zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, ein Lysozym zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, aber ein Ribosom zu kristallisieren, das so komplex, so instabil, so schnell verfallend und so dynamisch, so heterogen ist Aber ich schrieb an einem Artikel über Bären im Winterschlaf, deren Ribosomen, während sie schlafen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Zellen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Membranen gebündelt werden, und ich nahm an, dass Ribosomen ordentlich verstaut werden können. Ich ging davon aus, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Natur aktive Ribosomen den gesamten Winter über bewahrt und beschützt, und ich verwendete dafür, wie bereits gesagt, besonders robuste Ribosomen. Am Ende bekamen wir Kristalle. Ich möchte nicht auf sämtliche Details eingehen, aber das war der Anfang. Ich werde nicht so viel über die Struktur erzählen, sondern nur darüber, was mit diesen Kristallen geschah, als wir an ihnen Messungen in Synchrotronen vornahmen. Synchrotrone basieren auf der Beschleunigung von Teilchen und den Tangentialen, die wir messen. Ribosomale Kristalle zerfielen innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde. Können Sie sich vorstellen, acht Jahre damit zu verbringen, gute Kristalle zu bekommen und diese dann innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde zu verlieren? Wir dachten, wir könnten etwas dagegen tun, und ich kann später erklären, auf welche Art und Weise. Das ist am Tag des Experiments – schauen Sie nur, wie besorgt ich aussah. Innerhalb einer Nacht stellten wir fest, dass wir mit Hilfe der Kristallografie Kristalle am Zerfall hindern konnten. Wir erhielten unsere Muster, und die ganze Welt bekam Muster. Heutzutage gibt es, im Vergleich zu dem, was davor da war, so viele Strukturen. Zur selben Zeit geschahen noch andere Dinge, so dass ich 20 Jahre später immer noch glücklich bin. Und das ist die Maschine – sie ist wichtiger als ich. Danken möchte ich dem Weizmann-Institut für Wissenschaften, das zu mir hielt, und dem Max Planck-Institut, dem NIH (National Institute of Health) und dem Weizmann-Kimmelman-Zentrum, die finanzierten, was ich meinen Traum nannte, der auf Bären basierte. Ich danke meinen Forschungsgruppen am Weizmann-Institut und am Max Planck-Institut für ihren Enthusiasmus in guten wie in schlechten Zeiten. Ich danke Dr. Wittmann, bei dem wir anfingen. Ich möchte Ihnen die deutsche Forschungsgruppe zeigen, die Hamburger Gruppe, die selbst am Toten Meer nach Bakterien suchte, und die israelische Gruppe, die von Annette Bashan geleitet wird, wenn ich hier bin. Und ich danke Tamara, die vor zwölf Jahren für zehn Wochen zu uns kam und noch immer bei uns ist. Sie hatte Geburtstag, sie bekam einen Kuchen, das ist ihr Kuchen, und das zeigt, dass die Ribosomen in meiner Gruppe süß sind. Und ich danke meiner Familie, insbesondere meiner Enkelin. Warum ich das sage? Ich sage es wegen der jungen Frauen, die hier sitzen. Man kann eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein geliebtes Familienmitglied sein – schauen Sie, was sie hier schrieb. ich fragte sie, warum kein Jahr angegeben ist, und sie sagte, jedes Jahr musst du dich neu beweisen. (Lachen.) Sie lieben mich, aber sie sind auch sehr fordernd. Bitte, meine jungen Damen, gehen Sie in die Wissenschaft – es macht Spaß, auch ohne Auszeichnungen. Und das ist das, was mir passiert ist. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für einen sehr stimulierenden Vortrag und einen, wie ich denke, sehr guten Rat am Ende. (Applaus.)

Ada Yonath on antibiotics as essential tool for the dissection of partial ribosomal functions
(00:24:52 - 00:32:23)

 

James Watson (1967) - RNA Viruses and Protein Synthesis

Count Bernadotte, Professor … (inaudible) fellow laureates, ladies and gentlemen. I feel very honoured to be asked to come here, particularly in connection with the sort of honour of having received a Nobel Prize. On the other hand, I must confess being slightly nervous speaking to a large audience. I think speaking to a large audience about something to whom one always has slight doubts as to its ultimate importance. The Nobel Prize was always meant to signify something very great and outstanding and when one does science one always has doubts I think as to what one does, particularly at a given moment, whether it will be relevant or not. I'm also apprehensive speaking to a large group because, maybe partly because of my training in Cambridge, England, one always felt that one should understate a case, particularly if it’s important I think. That is if something is simple and important, you don’t have to talk about it. On the other hand it’s clear that I have to speak today and I feel maybe perhaps at a loss without my colleague Francis Crick, with whom I worked on the structure of DNA. Unlike myself, Francis is rather exuberant. Those of you who have heard him will know that he’s perhaps slightly un-English in liking to speak very loudly about what he has done. And this might be illustrated by the fact that several years after Crick and I had done the work in Cambridge England, I had gone home to the States and then come back, and during the time in which I had been away from Cambridge, England, the professor of the Cavendish laboratory in which we worked, the professorship had changed from Professor Sir Laurence Bragg to the physicist Nevill Mott. And Crick thought it appropriate that when I came back to the Cavendish that I should meet the new professor. So he went up to Mott and said that he’d like to have a meeting between Watson and the new professor. And Mott, who is, I guess you could say a rather quiet physicist, a theoretical physicist with interests I’d say not very far outside of physics, looks at Crick and said: Well, I think that indicated, you could say, maybe the interest of one physicist toward the field of, you could say biology, that is complete lack of interest. On the other hand that simply has not been the, I’d say the dominant theme, and in fact the work on which I will speak has in one sense a rather strong connection with physics. This connection arose I think rather gradually in the 1920s and 1930s when a number of physicists, particularly those who were interested in theory, thought that perhaps there should be some very fundamental laws as the basis of living existence. And just as quantum mechanics was, that way of thinking was revolutionising, both ones way of looking at physics and then also of chemistry, that perhaps new laws would be found, which would really do something to make us understand biology. That is perhaps behind the existence of living material were some new laws of physics perhaps, which physicists themselves had not understood. This feeling I think was expounded on a number of occasions by Niels Bohr who influenced a number of the younger physicists around him into thinking that perhaps the physicists had something to give biology. Now, among the students of Bohr, I’d say the important one was the young German physicist Max Delbrück who worked for a period in Berlin with Lise Meitner, and after that period came to the United States to learn some genetics. Because the physicist sort of reason that the most important aspect of biology was perhaps the gene, that is the gene was a sort of - and chromosomes were the most central thing, and that if you were to understand life you would have to understand the gene. Now, at that time one could say that there was sort of two ways, I guess, of approaching the problem. One was, I would say, seen from this distance now it’s slightly mystical. That was that there would be something really different about living systems, which only the physicist could find out, and this of course was a viewpoint which could hardly be accepted with ease by a biologist, because they were not physicists and therefore could never understand it. And the second view was more practical, that is that living material was made up of something and you had to find out what it was. And that smells suspiciously of chemistry. That one had to learn basically the chemistry of living material before you would find out what to do. So the physicist, I guess, you could say went in two directions in their interests. One was a slightly, I’d say mystical as we see it now, there’s something different, we don’t know what it is and therefore we’ll study genetics. The second was that, well, we don’t know what else to do, so we’ll try and find out what they’re made of. And if we know what they’re made of, then maybe the great insight will some day come. If you say study genetics, this was rather uninteresting statement because biologists had been studying genetics and they could continue to study genetics. So just by saying this, the physicists I’d say made little impact. The impact came however from a sort of general belief I think of people in physics that you should study the simplest of all possible systems if you’re going to get anywhere. That is that biology is at simplest a very complex subject, and therefore you won’t have the slightest chance of getting anywhere, unless you pick out the simplest of all forms of life to study. Now, this led by the sort of mid 1930s to the feeling that perhaps the thing, the sort of biological object, upon which everyone should concentrate were the viruses. Because in some way they were thought to be living and they were also known to be very small, that is they were sort of thought to be the smallest object which you could study, which had the property of being self reproducing, that is the property of going from 1 to 2. And so the thought was that if you study viruses and you ask how they go from 1 to 2, you may really get at the heart of the matter of living material. And also, if you study viruses, almost directly you may find out what the genes and the chromosomes are. Because there was the suspicion that perhaps a virus was nothing but a naked gene. This idea was expressed, I think, first in a very clean form by Hermann Muller, the very great American geneticist who won the Nobel Prize I believe in 1945. Muller was fascinated by viruses for a very long time and said, well, study them. But he never essentially followed you could say his own intuition that viruses were interesting, and that he remained sort of, you could say an exponent of studying the fruit fly drosophila. Which probably Muller’s own real intelligence would tell him would lead nowhere, which it did, the study of drosophila as such never gave us real insight into the nature of the gene that has, following its first very wonderful period. Instead our insight has come, as the physicists really I think predicted from a study of the simpler systems, in particular from the study of the viruses. Now, the viruses have been two main classes which I think have effected our thought. Well, there have been three, I guess you could say. One were the viruses which multiply in animal cells and they’ve interested us chiefly because they cause disease which affect us. And the second have been a series of viruses which have multiplied in plants and which have had a very great impact on science because they were the first viruses to be studied chemically in a very clean fashion. They were the first viruses that people realised were simple and this was I think expressed by the idea that perhaps they were nothing but molecules. And the awarding of the Nobel prize to Wendell Stanley for his discovery that tobacco mosaic virus particles could be purified and form crystalline-like aggregates expressed I think everyone’s deep, the deep impact of the discovery that perhaps a virus could be studied as a chemical object. And it’s Stanley’s original work with tobacco mosaic virus, followed up in a number of laboratories, of whom certainly one of the most important has been of Professor Schramm in Tübingen. And this led to, I guess you could say maybe two principles. One that they were simple and second that the most important part of the virus was the nucleic acid. That is viruses when you study them chemically were found to consist of a protein portion and a nucleic acid portion but the thought was that the genetic component was the nucleic acid portion. If one asked, well, why did they work on the plant virus? It was really the simple fact that you could isolate from plants very, very large amounts and so you could do chemistry on them. So that you could do chemistry on them in the 1930s when you required large amounts of the material. On the other hand, for everyone you could say, except a botanist, plants are rather difficult to work with, that is you say get one cycle of tobacco plants a year and you sort of have to think in year long cycles. It’s a rather slow, a slow thing to work with. And I guess I must confess, belonging to a sort of group of biologists who regarded that plants were really too uninteresting to work with. It maybe sounds prejudice but from the viewpoint of the geneticist, if you get just one cycle of plant a year, it’s rather dull. The system which instead really has dominated things from the biological viewpoint have been viruses which multiplied in bacteria. This was the system which the physicist Delbrück decided would be the most interesting to work on. And so in the late 1930’s at the California Institute of Technology he began studying in a very sort of simple fashion, what could he find out about the multiplication of a virus. This work which started 30 years ago has now multiplied manyfold and there are many 100’s of people now working in this area. And I am sort of particularly connected with this because it was my sort of first introduction to science some 20 years ago when I started working with Delbrück’s friend, the Italian microbiologist Luria. And then one’s sort of feelings were just largely of hope. That is you study the virus and you count how they go from 1 to many, and maybe this will give you great insight as to what happens. Now, there was just one problem with you could say the whole business such as you, you said you want to study something fundamental, which is the multiplication of a virus. And you think maybe the virus is something like a gene. And you count it going from 1 to many and you want to get some fundamental insight. And in the minds of at least a few of the people, maybe there’s the feeling that you only understand the real insight behind this process by understanding or developing some really new laws of physics. Now, the thing which essentially always sort of stuck in our throat was that you didn’t know what you were talking about. That is you had the word ‘virus’ and then you could simplify it by saying that just like tobacco mosaic virus was protein and nucleic acid, the bacterial virus had two parts, the protein component and the nucleic acid component. And here the guess was that just like with the plant virus one should concentrate on the nucleic acid. And so you would ask, well, how do you go from one nucleic acid molecule to many? Or 1 to 2, that was the real process. And here you really felt maybe that if you were very clever you could guess the whole thing. Or I guess in my own particular case what you tried to do was you said, well, you really can’t define the problem until you know what the nucleic acid is. So that means finding out what DNA is. It was at this stage that I for, you could say a brief period, abandoned any interest in bacterial viruses and went to Cambridge, England, with the thought that perhaps there with the sort of advanced techniques in x-ray crystallography one could find out what it was. And I won’t talk today about that sort of work because I imagine that virtually everyone here has at least read of this story on one occasion or another. But the answer which came out, that is that the structure of DNA which we guessed was the fundamental genetic material was a complementary double helix. And which, if you knew the structure of one chain, you knew the other, was, well, I guess you could say was a very, very pleasant shock. You could say, well, we don’t have any ideas, so we’ll study its structure. And we’ll be slightly afraid that we will find the structure and then it will be dull and someone else will have to work very hard to find out what it means. But when we found the structure of DNA, we knew that there would be, you could say if there was ever a case where understatement would do the job, it was DNA. That is the structure was so interesting that I guess our only fear was, not that it would be unimportant but that conceivably in some way that we could fool everyone by proposing something which was wrong. That is if it was right it had to be important, if it was wrong it would be a tremendous folly to have sort of raised everyone’s hopes that this was the answer to everything. But fortunately it was right, that is when we saw the double helix, the reactions of people varied but generally everyone said it was very pretty, so pretty that it had to be right and it was right. Now, this was important, I guess not only because it was right, but because you could say it simplified the problem enormously. When I was sort of, say in school and didn’t know what life was and used to read rather horrid biology books which would have open with one or two pages description of what living material was, which it moved or it got irritated or something like that, that one always felt there was something else. And as a boy one had always been told that it’s so complicated, physics was so complicated that it could only be understood by very few people. The sort of example which was always thrown at us was the theory of relativity, which was a profound idea and very difficult idea. And one worried that perhaps biology would be the same way, that is to really understand biology, it would take a very, very sophisticated mind who would finally master it and then have great difficulty communicating it to someone else. The truth however is just the opposite, that is that the fundamental sort of basis of the selfreplication is so simple that it can be taught to very young people and in fact now is. So the sort of whole theoretical basis I think in which one now develops biology, we now know to be very simple, that is the ideas are simple chemical ideas which can be communicated easily. Which is fortunate because whereas I will say, to start with that biology, the sort of fundamental genetic principles are simple, one would be very naïve if one said that it would be easy to solve many biological problems. But one can at least start with the fact that the theory is simple and there would be enormous complexity to find out, but that if you don’t get too confused to start with, that one may have a chance at really solving more complicated problems. Now, today I want to talk about a bacterial virus which is a very simple virus, that is the simplest virus we know about. And the reason we study it is just this fact, that it is the simplest. And we want to understand completely how a virus multiplies. In this sense one should understand that a virus is more complicated than a gene and maybe ... To summarise the sort of very, very large sort of collection of facts, we now know that the gene is a DNA molecule which we know now to be a double helix. Now, in fact I should, I’ve said the gene should be slightly inexact, I should say at least some chromosomes. Now, I’ll speak here of the bacterial chromosome which we know to be a single DNA molecule. Now, the relationship between the DNA molecule and the gene is that you can sub divide this DNA molecule which goes on and on and on into a number of segments which we can call a gene. Now, each of these genes is responsible for the sequence of aminoacids and proteins. This would be, DNA being sort of linear sequence of nucleotides, determines a linear sequence of aminoacids and proteins. So that’s the cycle and you could say, to use a phrase, quite old, one gene determines one protein. This was something the geneticists thought of, that there was a nice simple relationship. And they said this before one realised the sort of great simplifying fact that the gene was a linear collection of nucleotides and the proteins were a linear collection of aminoacids. So it was one linear sequence determining another linear sequence. Here one should have an idea of the, you could say the complexity of the organisms we’re dealing with, the bacterial viruses which virtually everyone has studied, multiplying a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Now, this is a relatively simple bacteria, looks like a rod, it has a rod shape, and it’s say two to three microns, in this direction it’s about one micron. In this the chromosome is a single DNA molecule which is... This is our bacteria, the chromosome will now simplify here, it’s a single circular DNA model. And from the chemist viewpoint, if you want to indicate how complex it is, the DNA has a molecular weight of 2 times 10 to the 9th of certainly the largest molecule which anyone has ever discovered. So the basis of it is a very large molecule. Now, this is divided into probably about 3,000 genes. We don’t know the exact number but it’s certainly not less than 2,000 and probably not more than 5,000. But the number of genes which one has is this number. Now, depending on your viewpoint, this can either be very simple or very complex. And I would say biochemistry has progressed to the viewpoint that 2,000 seems simple. That is it’s a number which doesn’t overwhelm us and send us out of science, it still keeps us within science. So you could say that if you could completely understand bacteria, if you would know each, the function of each of these genes. That’s sort of the level of what we’re trying to understand. Now, this is not the smallest bacteria, perhaps there are bacteria which are two to three times simpler, that is which would have maybe 1/3 of the genetic material. But by accident the bacteria which everyone has concentrated on has about this amount of DNA. If we started over we might have picked a slightly simpler one, but it wouldn’t have changed matters very much. Given this picture, one can say, well, what is the relationship now between the chromosome and the virus? Now, a virus is best looked at as a sort of small chromosome. That is a small piece of nucleic acid which is surrounded by a sort of protein shell. We now realise that, whereas 30 years ago one might have sort of said that a virus was perhaps a single gene surrounded by protein. We now know that it’s best to say that a virus is a small chromosome surrounded by protein. And it has the essential ability, so when you put this, you could say viral chromosome, if it gets into a cell, this chromosome will then multiply. It will multiply out of control and form large numbers of new copies and then be surrounded by new protein shells. Now, here you connect how many, really how complex is the viral chromosome, that is how big is it. Now, by accident the viruses which were studied by Delbrück, T2, T4, we now know to be relatively complex viruses and they contain probably around 200 genes within the viral parameter. So this is a fairly complicated obstacle and if you’re going to completely describe a virus like this, one would have to take this chromosome and say what each of these sections did. So if your aim was sort of complete chemical description, you would say that this is a little too complicated. And if you wanted to find a virus which you could say describe as well as you can describe a Swiss watch, that is every component, so you knew exactly how it worked. And if you wanted to describe the location of every atom, you wouldn’t work with this but you’d work with something smaller. So you would search for a smaller virus. In fact there are a number of much smaller viruses. But there’s sort of one further complication that one could make. That is up to now I have said either nucleic acid or DNA and the cycle which we now know is important. We could say that if you start out with DNA and then it determines the protein, in between is an intermediate that you make a second form of nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid which then serves the template protein. This sounds sort of unnecessarily complex but you could say this is the way it is and we now know the essential components of this story pretty well. Now, the key to the whole thing was that DNA you could say was self-duplicating. And the fundamental biological, sort of fundamental chemical basis of this self duplication was base pairing, that is the ability to form a complementary double helix with the base adenine pairing with thymine and the base guanine with cytosine. Which is a sort of basic principle behind selfreplication. That adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Now, this would be a sort of complete picture if it were not for the fact that some viruses, and you could say the most important was tobacco mosaic virus, a virus studied in great detail by Professor Schramm and his group, called TMV, doesn’t contain any DNA. And this was an embarrassing fact because if you said, well, DNA was the gene and you needed genes wherever you had life, and you were faced with the fact that this virus didn’t contain any. But that instead contained RNA. And so RNA also must be a genetic material. And this means that you must also have a cycle, which goes this way. That is RNA must in some way be able to selfreplicate itself and then this RNA must somehow determine protein. So you must have two different sort of cycles of the transferred genetic information. One which is based on DNA and the other which is based on RNA. Now, here one can ask, well, is this cycle here really the same as the cycle by which DNA went around? Are these based on the same principle? And here the first fact which one can really say is that chemically RNA is very similar to DNA and you can go further and say that if you took RNA chains, you could form a double helix just like this. So you could theoretically imagine a replication scheme for RNA, which was the same as DNA. The question however was not could it exist, but in fact is this the system which exists. Now, over the past nearly five years, this problem has been investigated in very great detail and it’s been investigated in detail largely with a group of bacterial viruses, that is viruses which multiply in the same e-coli. But these are bacterial viruses which, unlike T2, which are DNA viruses, there’s a group which contain RNA. These are bacterial viruses and they have different names. The first one which was discovered is called F2. In my laboratory we work with a very similar one called R17, in Tübingen they work with one which is called FR, they’re all very similar viruses. And they have two, you could say, well, what's the real interest, why focus attention? The first reason is that they contain RNA and you want to learn more about RNA. The second reason - and they contain RNA and they multiply on e-coli. And multiplying on e-coli is very important because it takes just 20 minutes for for the bacteria to multiply, you have an enormous knowledge of its genetics. And so it’s easier by several orders of magnitude to work with e-coli than to work with any other form of cell. If you want to take precise chemical analyses. So just the fact that this existed would mean that a large number of people would work on it. But even more interesting was that this group of viruses is chemically very simple and they’re very small. That is the total molecular weight is only 3 … (inaudible 30:12), whereas if one would look at T2, the molecular weight there was 2 times 10 to the 8th. So here we have a very simple virus, it’s simple and it’s made up of a single nucleic acid chain with a molecular weight of 10 to the 6th. Now, here one should make a fundamental distinction between this type of virus and the T2 one, which you could say is made up of DNA which is double helical. This virus is made up of just 1 strand of nucleic acid, it’s not two strands twisted around each other, but just 1 strand, it’s single stranded in contrast to being double strand. And it contains just 3000 nucleic acid. Now, the question we sort of pose to ourselves, can we completely describe how this virus multiplies. It’s the simplest virus we know. That is if I want to, the simplest and the one that has the shortest nucleic acid chain, and if one wants to compare it to tobacco mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus has a nucleic acid chain which is twice as long. So it just has one half the genetic information and so should be easier to study. We just have a couple of slides. Now, here’s the cycle in which everyone now knows about DNA, so maybe it’s a template for RNA, RNA making protein, with DNA being self-replicated. This is the normal transfer of genetic information within cells. Now, the second form of cycle which exists, you start out with RNA and RNA then, the genetic information in RNA can be translated into protein but you have this cycle here. We want to study how this happens. Now, this is the transferred genetic information following infection of a cell by an RNA virus. And up to now one can say that, as far as we know, this cycle exists only following infection of a cell by a virus. There is no evidence of it occurring without viruses, though this rule may be broken, one doesn’t know whether this will in fact always be the case. But it’s the only cases which we now can study. Now, in this next slide there’s a sort of summary of all the biochemical events in going from say DNA finally to a polypeptide chain and I won’t go into this in any detail because Professor Lipmann will speak about protein synthesis in detail two days from now. But the main sort of point here is that you have three forms of RNA, which one is the genetic message, and that the proteins are synthesised on sort of small bodies called ribosomes. And that, as the protein is synthesised the sort of genetic message, moves across the surface of the ribosome, and as it moves across the polypeptide chains are elongated. And one should say one other fact, that the sort of precursor for protein synthesis is an amino acid attached to a molecule which is called … (inaudible 33.33). Now, in the next slide there’s an electron micrograph of a ribosome, now, ribosomes are the small particles or the sort of factories for making proteins. And this electron micrograph was taken about six years ago, but unfortunately one must say that since then no one has taken a better one. Our detail is still, these are particles which are about 200 Å in diameter and the particles have molecular weight of about 3 million. And they are made of two sub units, there’s a small one and a large one. And in the next slide there’s a sort of very diagrammatic view of these, just as they are, the two sub units. And that the sub units are made up of a large number of different proteins. The structure of a ribosome is very, very complex and we’re nowhere close to finding it out. Now, in the next slide there’s again a sort of summary of the fact that when a polypeptide chain is grown, that the precursor is the amino acid attached to this small type of RNA and one should just sort of set one fact straight, is that, whereas all DNA is thought to be genetic. That is all the DNA in a cell, essentially codes for amino acid sequences, that RNA, there are three types of RNA of which only one type carries the genetic information. The type here which is attached to the amino acid, this is not genetic, but that one should just remember that the growing chain is attached to the molecule. Now, in the next slide there’s just sort of very schematic event of what happens in protein synthesis that you have the growing polypeptide chain sort of attached to a ribosome via ssRNA molecule and that a new amino acid comes in and the two form peptide bond. These details are basically unimportant to what I want to talk about so I won’t go into them now. Now, in the next slide, here we go over to the RNA virus which I’ll talk about. This is R17, which as I’ve said is very similar to several other of these small RNA viruses. Now, as far as its structure, we can say, well, we want to find out how it multiplies and it’s the simplest of all viruses that we know anything about. Now, how simple is it? Well, first of all in the centre of the virus is an RNA molecule which consists of a single chain which contains 3000 nucleotides. Now, this fact immediately tells us something, it tells us that the amount of genetic information here can essentially order 1,000 amino acids, because what we know of the genetic code is that successive groups of three nucleotides, so to determine a single amino acid. So if you have an RNA message which contains 3,000 nucleotides you can order essentially 1,000 amino acids by it. So we know essentially the limit. Now, essentially what is necessary for this? Well, what else is the virus? The virus in addition consists of two sorts of protein molecules. Now, one of the protein molecules we call the co-protein because it’s present in the largest amount and there are 180 copies of this protein in every virus particle. Now, the molecular weight of the protein is 14,700 and it contains 129 amino acids and a complete … (inaudible 37.22) has been determined. Now, in addition to this protein which makes up about, almost 99% of the total protein of the virus, there’s a second protein which we think is, it’s given different names, we call it the attachment protein. And the evidence which we have now suggests that probably there’s only one copy of this protein per virus particle and we know its molecular weight is about 35,000 and that it contains 300 amino acids. We’re not trying to study this protein in detail, but it will probably be several years before we can get enough of it to do an amino acid sequence. It’s not very easy to isolate, in fact it’s quite hard to isolate. So if you, you could say, well, what must you do when you make a new virus particle? Well, you’ve got to make new copies of the code protein, you're going to have to make new copies of this attachment protein and you're going to have to make new RNA. So you have three things to make when the virus particle replicates. Now, in the next slide, say, well, what is the life cycle of the virus? These viruses have a sort of peculiar sort of life cycle in that they all multiply only on male bacteria. E-coli, there are two sexes, the male and female and the male bacteria has small, very thin filaments coming out from them which are called pili. And the virus particles attach to these. This is the sort of first step in the multiplication of the virus. And what was within a minute or so after the virus attaches to these pili, then the nucleic acid somehow has got inside the bacteria. Now, we don’t know how you go from here to here, but in the next slide one puts it sort of diagrammatically, we think, well, in fact one knows that this filament is hollow and in some way we think the nucleic acid moves down through this narrow channel into the bacteria. Now, we can’t be more precise because we know nothing about the structure of these thin filaments and it’s an obvious thing for someone to do to find out their structure. However, there are only a very, very small percentage, only somewhere on the average between 1 and 3 of these per bacteria, they are only about 100 Å thick and so chemically they will be rather hard to isolate in large amounts though we’re starting to do this. This is probably you could say the first step. Now, in the next slide the sort of, in a very diagrammatic way, illustrates what must happen, the first within a sort of minute after the absorption of the virus to the pili, the nucleic acid is in, by about 15 minutes inside the bacteria you can see some completed new virus particles appearing. And by about 35 minutes after the cycle starts, holes develop in the wall of the bacteria and these newly formed virus particles leave the cell. Now, the number of virus particles which grow or appear within the cell is, it could be up to about 20,000 particles per cell, so you go from about 1 to 20,000 and this can occur in about 30 minutes. In fact they become so tightly packed that you can see actual 3-dimensional crystals of the virus particle forming in the cell, just before it breaks open. So you could say that the final stage may be 10% of the mass of the bacteria has become transformed into virus particles. So it’s extraordinarily efficient process. If one wants to analyse this in more detail, you can essentially measure three things. First you can measure the appearance of new molecules of the code protein, you can measure the appearance of the attachment protein and there is a third protein which is involved. And that is that it’s been discovered that in order to, for the RNA to replicate, that is to go from one RNA marker to several, there’s a new enzyme which appears in the cell, which is given several names but I’ll give it the name replicase, this is a specific enzyme which is not present in uninfected cells but which appears after virus infection and this enzyme is responsible for RNA replication. The reason you could say that RNA doesn’t self-replicate in normal cells is this enzyme is not present, and as we shall see in a moment, this enzyme is coded for by the genetic material of the virus. The RNA strand carries the genetic information to make this enzyme which causes RNA self-replication. Now, in the next slide, if you can sort of study the kinetics in an infected cell, the appearance of, you could say these three proteins which are necessary for making the virus. One the code protein and this is made in large amounts, long time and the second two proteins are the attachment protein and then the enzyme RNA replicase, the enzyme which is necessary for the self-replication of the RNA. Now, one sort of interesting fact here is you’ll notice that you make the code protein for a long period of time and you make very many copies of it whereas you make many fewer copies of the replicase and the attachment protein. And also the synthesis stops rather early. You make them for a short period of time and then you stop. You could say, well, this makes biological sense to stop making attachment protein early because you need only very few copies of it, you don’t want to make a large amount of it and it would be very silly to make equal copies when your virus particle only needs a small number. Now, here you could say this is an example of a control mechanism making more of one protein than another, what is its molecular basis. It’s essentially here a structure which shows the viral nucleic acid, our one chain and this shows it soon after it enters the cell. And after it enters the cell, the ribosomes attach at one end and they move along the RNA molecule and as they move along the protein which is being made comes off, this is code protein which is being made. And one can see now that there are essentially three genes here in the virus particle. All our evidence is that there are just three and we have identified each of them. The first is the code protein, which seems to be the first and then the attachment protein comes second, and then the replicase comes third. And the relative sizes we don’t know exactly but this would be smaller because this has the code for only 129 amino acids. This isn’t really drawn to scale, this one here has the code for about 300 and this one probably has the code for about 500. This adds up about to the 1,000 amino acids that we expected. Now, you could say are we absolutely sure? And the answer is no, if there was a very small protein between here and here, we might not have discovered it yet. But conceivably we now know each of the three. In this process you could say that we have an RNA molecule, a chromosome which codes for pregenes and that at the beginning here there must probably be a – well, you could say here, as you’re going along, there has to be a signal which says ‘stop’ and then you might guess also that there’s a signal which says ‘start’. So how quickly you just start and stop and there should be a stop here, start, stop and start. We now have some information on what the starts and stops are. So you might have thought that the chain would start with, that the first sort of sequence in nucleotides would be a start signal and the last would be a stop signal. But in fact it looks like that the virus chromosome was more complicated in that you have some nucleotides which are not the start. So you go along some nucleotides and then you get a start signal and at the end you have a stop signal and then you have another series of nucleotides which must do something that we don’t know yet. Now, in the next slide shows probably the essential principle for the general problem how do you make more of one protein than another, that is why do you make a large number or code protein molecules and only a small number of the attachment protein and the replicase. And the reason is that after you make a code protein, and it’s completed and it folds up into its right 3-dimensional form, then these molecules have the specificity so that they go and sit on the RNA chain and block the ribosome from moving on. There seems now little doubt that this happens and so, as soon as you’ve made a small number, so that the equilibrium will say that some will be sitting here and the ribosome can’t go on. It seems probably now likely that the ribosome only attaches at the end of the molecule and then moves across. So if in some way you block it, you will make more of the first then or the second. Now, in the next slide, well, here I just want to state the facts here, that in the genetic code we know that it’s groups of three nucleotides which determine given amino acids and that the start codons may be AUG and G. That essentially the code for an unusual amino acid called formlymathionine. And I simplify it here, I’m cheating slightly but just to point out that there are starts, it’s more complicated. Now, as far as stop, we know that these will all cause stopping, but we don’t know how this is done. Now, this was a funny story which came out firstly studying this virus was that you start, at least the making of all proteins in e-coli by putting in this amino acid called formylmethionine which is just the amino acid methionine with a formyl group attached to it at the amino end. Now, this was a funny fact, because when people had isolated proteins from the bacteria, they had never seen this before. In fact this led to the discovery of the cycle shown in the next slide in which you start, this shows you the beginning amino acid sequence for the code protein which goes formylmethionine, alanine, serine, asparagine, threonine, phenylalanine. Then after you had made this as a specific enzyme which we’ve isolated, deformalised, which removes the formal group. Then there’s a second enzyme which takes off the methionine and this gives you the sequence which we find inside the cell, in the intact virus particle. This is a sort of, you could say level of complexity which a theoretician would never guess at. We know this is the cycle which happens and no one can say why it happens, this is what the advantage of the cell of having this cycle, we know that you always start this way, you end up this way. This is a sort of general rule I guess that the biochemists never guess what's going to happen. That is you find out what happens and you try and find the reason afterwards. Whereas one can say theory helps you, it helps you in a few cases, but in most of the cases you just find out what's up, just by doing experiments. Now, this is you could say the general picture for making the protein. One RNA chain which codes for three proteins with start and stop signals and with something funny at the two ends which we don’t understand. Now, I’d like to sort of conclude with saying that it was the last factor, you could say, well, we have an enzyme which makes RNA and now how does this enzyme work. That is do you use the principle of base pairing or is there some other completely different cycle. In the next slide shows how this enzyme works. The enzyme works as we start out with a signal chain here and then the enzyme makes a complement. Now, the principle which you use in making this complement is base pairing. It’s the same principle which is involved in DNA replication is involved in the replication of RNA. In RNA you have, you don’t have the base thymine but you have uracil which from the viewpoint of the base pairing rule is identical. So I won’t bother you with that. But to say that in the replication of RNA you go through a double helical intermediate. And so in the middle of the replication you end you with a double helical RNA molecule. And we should say that we started, the strand which we started with, we call the plus strand and its complement we call the minus strand. So the enzyme has moved along here, you could say from right to left. Now, what we want to make however is not new minus strands, the virus particles contain only plus strands, that is you don’t find a mixture of the two in the virus particle, you only find the one sequence, the plus strand. Now, in the last slide we see here the second stage in the replication of the RNA, which is that, given the replicated form, the enzyme now moves in the opposite direction and makes a new plus strand. Then we end up with free enzyme and this enzyme will again go over and sit here and make new plus strands. Now, one can then conclude I think by saying that we probably understand all the essential steps in the multiplication of the simplest virus we know about. That is we understand both how it makes the protein which is involved. And the way it makes protein in the case of the virus is just to use exactly the same machinery for making protein as you find in the normal DNA, RNA protein cycle, it’s exactly the same system, nothing is different. The virus essentially uses the same system. In a replication of the RNA you use basically the same principle as you use in DNA, base pairing, but you have to have a specific enzyme which doesn’t exist in uninfected cells which essentially lets an RNA chain make its compliment. This is a very specific enzyme and its specificity is limited to that of a specific virus. Now, we can’t say in detail, you could say this enzyme, if you look at it in slight complication, it’s more complicated than you might guess, because the enzyme can make both plus and minus strands. It can move from right to left or from left to right, which when you think of it from a chemical viewpoint means that it’s quite an interesting enzyme and so far we cannot say anything about how this happens, no one has yet isolated the enzyme to determine. Well, the enzyme has been isolated and you can make infectious RNA in the test tube, this was first done in Spiegelman’s lab, which was a very important discovery because it showed you could really do everything in the test tube. But we haven’t gone to, you could say the second stage of really isolating the protein, determining its 3-dimensional structure and then saying how it can go both from right to left. These things really await the future. Now, you could say, where do we go from here? Well, I think one can say that the sort of chief conclusion is that the viruses as I say are no long very mysterious thing, that is we now see the relationship to the normal cell cycle. And we see the relationship now for both viruses which contain DNA and RNA. And we could also say that we now probably have the confidence that if we have a simple enough virus, we probably will be able to understand all its steps of its replication, at least if we have a simple system to work with. As long as we’re dealing with a virus which contains only a few genes, it should be possible to understand the virus almost as well as you understand the Swiss Watch, that is know all its components. Now, you can say is it worth the effort? Here I guess it’s partly a matter of one’s own interest, that is how deep do you actually want to understand it. That is there’s a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, should anyone go through the trouble of determining the exact sequence. I think probably yes would be my answer, even though right now it seems like an impossible task to do a sequence of 3,000 nucleotides, but 10 years ago one would have said doing a sequence of 100 was an impossible task and it’s been done in the case of … (inaudible 55.01). And so with basic improvement of chemical techniques it probably will be possible I’d say some day to do the complete sequence. Then you could say we know everything we want to about the virus. So you want to do it just because if you do the complete sequence, you’ll see the start signals, you’ll see the stop signals, you’ll find out more about the genetic code in great detail. Now, I think as an extension of this, which you could say maybe in medical directions, you could say that, well, we’re interested, everything I’ve talked about now has been viewing the virus as something which a pure scientist wants to find out about. There’s also you could say the medical question that the viruses, we’re interested in viruses because they cause disease and we may find out something about fighting them if we know their structure in complete detail. And from my own viewpoint, one of the most I’d say interesting things is that a number of the viruses which are able to cause cancer are very small viruses, they’re not big ones. And in particular there’s a virus called polyoma which is a DNA containing virus, it’s a circular DNA molecule which probably contains genetic information for only at most 6 to 7 genes. And this is a virus that multiplies in mice and it’s much harder to work with bacteria, you could say that if you move from a bacterial virus to an animal virus, maybe your level of complexity moves up 100 fold, harder to work with. But that sort of being optimistic that you could say every 10 years you can work with something in order of magnitude more difficult and also saying there’s some people who are more clever than others. That maybe within the next 10 years one can take a virus of this sort of complexity, of multiplying in animal cells and completely define what all its genetic information does. And if you know what all its genetic information does, then maybe one is much closer to understanding why this virus can cause a tumour. And I feel quite sure that maybe within 10 and certainly within 20 years one will have, someone will be able to get on this rostrum and take a virus like this and say what it does and why it causes cancer which I think will be a great achievement when it happens. Thank you.

Graf Bernadotte, Professor… (akustisch unverständlich), sehr geehrte Nobelpreisträger, sehr geehrte Damen und Herren. Ich fühle mich zutiefst geehrt, hierhin eingeladen worden zu sein, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit der Ehre den Nobelpreis erhalten zu haben. Andererseits muss ich gestehen, dass ich ein bisschen nervös bin, vor so einem großen Publikum zu sprechen. Das heißt, zu einem so großen Publikum über etwas zu sprechen, bezüglich dessen ultimativer Bedeutung man prinzipiell leichte Zweifel hat. Der Nobelpreis steht seit jeher für großartige und herausragende Leistungen, aber wenn man Wissenschaft betreibt, zweifelt man, denke ich, seine Arbeit immer an, vor allem in bestimmten Momenten, ob nun zu Recht oder zu Unrecht. Ich scheue mich auch ein bisschen vor einer großen Gruppe zu sprechen, weil ich immer das Gefühl habe – vielleicht auch aufgrund meiner Ausbildung im englischen Cambridge – dass Understatement angebracht wäre, vor allem wenn es um meiner Ansicht nach Wichtiges geht. Das heißt, wenn etwas einfach und bedeutend ist, muss man darüber nicht reden. Andererseits steht außer Frage, dass ich heute meinen Vortrag halten muss. Dennoch habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich möglicherweise ohne meinen Kollegen Francis Crick, mit dem ich an der Struktur der DNA gearbeitet habe, etwas verunsichert bin. Anders als ich ist Francis ziemlich überschwänglich. Wer von Ihnen ihn einmal gehört hat, weiß, dass seine Vorliebe laut über seine Arbeit zu reden vielleicht ein bisschen unenglisch ist. Das spiegelt sich auch in der Tatsache wider, dass ich einige Jahre, nachdem Crick und ich in Cambridge gearbeitet hatten, nach Hause in die Vereinigten Staaten gereist und dann wieder zurückgekommen bin, und es bei dem für unser Labor in Cavendish zuständigen Lehrstuhl während meiner Abwesenheit von Cambridge einen Wechsel gegeben hatte: Professor Sir Laurence Bragg war von dem Physiker Nevill Mott abgelöst worden. Crick hielt es für angebracht, dass ich den neuen Professor nach meiner Rückkehr nach Cavendish kennenlerne. Er ging also zu Mott und sagte, dass er gerne ein Treffen zwischen mir und ihm arrangieren würde. Mott, ein ziemlich ruhiger theoretischer Physiker mit wenigen Interessen außerhalb seines Fachgebietes, sah Crick an und meinte: was Physiker einem Gebiet wie der Biologie entgegenbringen, nämlich vollkommenes Desinteresse. Andererseits war das nicht grundsätzlich die vorherrschende Haltung, und de facto besteht in einer Hinsicht ein relativ enger Zusammenhang zwischen der Arbeit, über die ich hier sprechen möchte, und der Physik. Dieser Zusammenhang ergab sich, soweit ich weiß, erst allmählich in den 20er und 30er Jahren, als einige Physiker, vor allem solche, die an Theorie interessiert waren, dachten, dass auf der untersten Stufe des Lebens ganz fundamentale Gesetze herrschen müssten. Genau wie die Quantenmechanik war auch dieser Denkansatz vielleicht neue Gesetze zu entdecken, die uns wirklich helfen würden die Biologie zu verstehen – revolutionär. Vielleicht lagen der Existenz lebender Materie neue physikalische Gesetze zugrunde, die die Physiker selbst noch nicht verstanden hatten. Dieses Empfinden wurde bei verschiedenen Gelegenheiten von Niels Bohr thematisiert, der einige der jüngeren Physiker in seinem Umfeld dahingehend beeinflusste, dass sie der Ansicht waren, dass die Physiker vielleicht etwas zur Biologie beizutragen hätten. Der meiner Meinung nach bedeutendste unter Bohrs Studenten war der junge deutsche Physiker Max Delbrück, der eine Zeit lang mit Lise Meitner in Berlin arbeitete und im Anschluss daran in die Vereinigten Staaten ging, um sich mit Genetik zu befassen. Physiker denken nämlich mehr oder weniger, dass der wichtigste Aspekt der Biologie das Gen ist – das Gen und die Chromosomen – und dass man, um das Leben zu verstehen, das Gen verstehen müsse. Man kann sagen, dass es damals zwei Möglichkeiten gab, das Problem anzugehen. Aus der zeitlichen Distanz betrachtet erscheint die eine ein wenig geheimnisvoll, nämlich dass bei lebenden Systemen etwas grundlegend anders ist, das nur der Physiker herausfinden kann. Das war natürlich ein Standpunkt, den die Biologen nur schwer akzeptieren konnten, denn sie waren ja keine Physiker und würden diese Systeme deshalb nie verstehen. Die zweite Sichtweise war praktischer, nämlich dass lebende Materie aus etwas besteht und man herausfinden muss, aus was. Das riecht verdächtig nach Chemie, d.h. man muss erst die chemischen Eigenschaften lebender Materie grundlegend studieren, bevor man erkennt, was zu tun ist. Die Physiker schlugen also in ihrem Interesse zwei Wege ein. Der eine war aus heutiger Sicht ein wenig geheimnisvoll: Etwas ist anders, wir wissen aber nicht was und befassen uns deshalb mit Genetik. Der zweite lautete: Wir wissen nicht, was wir sonst tun sollen, also versuchen wir herauszufinden, woraus lebende Materie besteht. Wenn wir das wissen, kommt vielleicht eines Tages die große Erkenntnis. und konnten es auch weiterhin tun. Mit dieser Aussage machten die Physiker also keinen großen Eindruck. Die Bedeutung ergab sich vielmehr aus einer Art allgemeinem Glauben der Physiker, dass man das einfachste aller möglichen Systeme untersuchen sollte, um zu Ergebnissen zu gelangen, d.h. dass die Biologie einfach ausgedrückt ein sehr komplexes Gebiet ist und Sie daher nicht die geringste Chance haben, irgendetwas zu erreichen, wenn Sie nicht die einfachste aller Lebensformen für Ihre Forschung auswählen. Dies führte Mitte der 30er Jahre zu dem Empfinden, dass das biologische Objekt, auf das man sich konzentrieren sollte, vielleicht die Viren sind, da sie in gewisser Weise als Lebewesen galten und zudem bekanntermaßen sehr klein sind, d.h. sie wurden für die kleinsten Objekte gehalten, die man untersuchen kann, die sich selbst reproduzieren konnten, also die Fähigkeit hatten aus eins zwei zu machen. Die Idee war, erforscht man Viren und fragt, wie sie aus eins zwei machen können, gelangt man zum innersten Kern lebender Materie. Bei der Erforschung der Viren lässt sich zudem fast unmittelbar herausfinden, was Gene und Chromosomen sind. Es bestand nämlich der Verdacht, dass ein Virus vielleicht einfach nur ein Gen ist. Diese Vorstellung wurde, denke ich, erstmals ganz deutlich von Hermann Muller zum Ausdruck gebracht, dem großen amerikanischen Genetiker, der, soweit ich weiß, 1945 den Nobelpreis erhalten hat. Muller war zwar seit langer Zeit von Viren fasziniert und meinte „Gut, erforscht sie“, folgte aber seiner eigenen Intuition, dass Viren interessant sind, niemals konsequent, sondern beschäftigte sich weiterhin mit der Fruchtfliege Drosophila, was, wie dem eigentlich intelligenten Muller wahrscheinlich bewusst war, zu keinem Ergebnis führen würde und es auch nicht tat. Nach der ersten großartigen Phase brachte die Untersuchung der Drosophila per se keinen wirklichen Erkenntnisgewinn bezüglich der Natur des Gens. Stattdessen kam unsere Erkenntnis, wie die Physiker es vorausgesagt hatten, tatsächlich aus dem Studium der einfacheren Systeme, insbesondere der Erforschung der Viren. Zwei wichtige Virusklassen regten unser Denken an. Naja, eigentlich waren es drei. Einmal die Viren, die sich in tierischen Zellen vermehren; sie interessierten uns hauptsächlich, weil sie Krankheiten auslösen, die uns betreffen. Die zweite Klasse sind Viren, die sich in Pflanzen vermehren und eine große Bedeutung für die Wissenschaft hatten, da sie als erste Viren umfassend chemisch erforscht wurden. Bei diesen Viren wurde erstmals deutlich, dass es sich um einfache Strukturen handelt, was durch die Vorstellung zum Ausdruck kam, dass sie vielleicht nur Moleküle sind. Die Verleihung des Nobelpreises an Wendell Stanley für seine Entdeckung, dass Tabakmosaikvirus-Partikel gereinigt werden und kristallartige Aggregate bilden können, spiegelt meiner Ansicht nach den starken Einfluss der Entdeckung wider, dass möglicherweise ein Virus als chemisches Objekt untersucht werden könnte. Es war also Stanleys Originalarbeit mit dem Tabakmosaikvirus, die in einer Reihe von Labors weitergeführt wurde – eines der wichtigsten sicherlich das von Professor Schramm in Tübingen. Dies führte zu, man könnte sagen, zwei Prinzipien: Viren sind einfach und ihr wichtigster Bestandteil ist die Nukleinsäure. Das heißt, bei der chemischen Untersuchung der Viren stellt sich heraus, dass sie aus einem Proteinteil und einem Nukleinsäureteil bestehen; man ging aber davon aus, dass die genetische Komponente der Nukleinsäureteil war. Nun, warum wurde mit einem Pflanzenvirus gearbeitet? Es war schlichtweg die Tatsache, dass man aus Pflanzen sehr große Mengen Virus isolieren und chemisch untersuchen konnte. Auf diese Weise war man in den 30er Jahren, wo große Materialmengen nötig waren, in der Lage chemische Analysen durchzuführen. Andererseits ist es für alle Wissenschaftler außer vielleicht Botaniker ziemlich schwierig mit Pflanzen zu arbeiten, denn es gibt nur einen Tabakpflanzenzyklus pro Jahr, man muss also in jahrelangen Zyklen rechnen. Das Arbeitstempo ist relativ langsam, und ich muss gestehen, dass ich zu einer Gruppe von Biologen gehöre, die Pflanzen für zu langweilig für die Forschung hielten. Das klingt vielleicht wie ein Vorurteil, aber vom Standpunkt des Genetikers ist es ziemlich öde, wenn man nur einen Pflanzenzyklus pro Jahr hat. Das System, das stattdessen die Situation vom biologischen Standpunkt aus wirklich beherrschte, waren Viren, die sich in Bakterien vermehrten. Der Physiker Delbrück entschied sich an diesem System zu arbeiten, da er es für das interessanteste hielt. Also begann er Ende der 30er Jahre am California Institute of Technology mit einfachsten Mitteln der Virusvermehrung auf die Spur zu kommen. Anders als vor 30 Jahren befassen sich heute Hunderte von Wissenschaftlern mit diesem Gebiet. Ich habe gewissermaßen eine besondere Beziehung dazu, denn es war meine erste Einführung in die Wissenschaft vor 20 Jahren, als meine Zusammenarbeit mit Delbrücks Freund, dem italienischen Mikrobiologen Luria, begann. Unsere Gefühlslage war damals vor allem von Hoffnung geprägt – man untersucht das Virus und zählt, wie aus einem viele werden, und vielleicht gewinnt man die große Erkenntnis, was dabei geschieht. Es gab nur ein Problem bei der ganzen Angelegenheit: Sie wollen etwas Grundlegendes erforschen, nämlich die Vermehrung eines Virus, und Sie denken vielleicht, das Virus sei so etwas wie ein Gen. Sie zählen, wie aus einem viele werden, und Sie möchten eine fundamentale Erkenntnis gewinnen. In den Köpfen von zumindest ein paar Leuten spukt die Idee herum, dass sich wirkliche Einblicke in den Prozess vielleicht nur erzielen lassen, wenn man einige tatsächlich neue physikalische Gesetze versteht oder entwickelt. Was für uns jedoch die ganze Zeit im Grunde genommen inakzeptabel war, war die Tatsache, dass wir nicht wussten, wovon wir sprechen. Da war der Begriff ‘Virus’, den man vereinfachen konnte, indem man sagte, dass das Bakterienvirus genau wie das Tabakmosaikvirus aus Protein und Nukleinsäure bestand, also zwei Bestandteile besaß, die Proteinkomponente und die Nukleinsäurekomponente. Und auch hier vermutete man, dass man sich wie bei dem Pflanzenvirus auf die Nukleinsäure konzentrieren sollte. Jetzt könnten Sie fragen „Wie kommt man von einem Nukleinsäuremolekül zu vielen?“ bzw. von einem zu zwei, denn das war der tatsächliche Prozess. Hier hatte man wirklich das Gefühl, dass man, wenn man richtig schlau wäre, die Lösung vielleicht erraten könnte. In meinem speziellen Fall sagte ich mir: Das Problem lässt sich nicht endgültig definieren, solange du nicht weißt, was Nukleinsäure ist. Das bedeutete, ich musste herausfinden, was DNA ist. In diesem Stadium gab ich mein Interesse an Bakterienviren für kurze Zeit völlig auf und ging nach Cambridge mit dem Gedanken, dass ich vielleicht dort mit Hilfe der modernen röntgenkristallographischen Techniken neue Erkenntnisse gewinnen könnte. Ich möchte aber heute nicht über diese Arbeit sprechen, denn ich kann mir vorstellen, dass praktisch jeder hier bei der einen oder anderen Gelegenheit zumindest von dieser Geschichte gelesen hat. Die Antwort lautete jedoch, dass die Struktur der DNA, die wir für das fundamentale genetische Material hielten, eine komplementäre Doppelhelix ist. Kennt man also die Struktur einer Kette, kennt man auch die der anderen; das war – ich glaube, das kann man so sagen – ein sehr, sehr angenehmer Schock. Wir sagten uns, okay, wir haben keine Ideen, also untersuchen wir die Struktur. Dabei hatten wir ein bisschen Angst, dass die Struktur, die wir entdecken würden, vielleicht langweilig sein würde und jemand anderes ihre Bedeutung mühsam herausfinden würde müssen. Als wir aber die Struktur der DNA entdeckten, wussten wir, dass, wenn es überhaupt einen Fall gab, in dem Understatement angebracht war, es die DNA war. Diese Struktur war so interessant, dass unsere einzige Angst nicht war, dass sie unbedeutend sein könnte, sondern dass wir möglicherweise alle an der Nase herumführen könnten, indem wir etwas behaupteten, was nicht stimmt. Das heißt, wenn es stimmte, musste es bedeutend sein, wenn nicht, wäre es völlig aberwitzig Hoffnungen zu wecken, dass dies des Rätsels Lösung sei. Aber Gott sei Dank stimmte es, d.h. als die Leute die Doppelhelix sahen, reagierten sie zwar unterschiedlich, fanden sie im Allgemeinen aber sehr hübsch – so hübsch, dass sie richtig sein musste. Und sie war es. Das war wichtig, nicht nur, weil die Struktur stimmte, sondern weil sie das Problem sozusagen enorm vereinfachte. Als ich noch zur Schule ging, nichts über das Leben wusste und ziemlich grauenvolle Biologiebücher lesen musste, die mit einer ein- oder zweiseitigen Beschreibung dessen begannen, was lebende Materie ist, was sie aktiv werden lässt, was sie reizt etc., hatte man immer das Gefühl, dass es noch etwas anderes gibt. Als Junge wurde einem stets gesagt, dass die Physik so kompliziert ist, dass nur ganz wenige Menschen sie verstehen. Als Beispiel wurde einem jedes Mal die Relativitätstheorie entgegen geschleudert, ein tiefgreifendes und sehr schwieriges Konzept. Man befürchtete, dass es mit der Biologie genauso sein könnte, dass es also, um sie wirklich zu verstehen und zu meistern, einen ausgesprochen klugen Kopf brauchen würde, der anschließend größte Schwierigkeiten haben würde anderen seine Erkenntnisse zu vermitteln. Doch genau das Gegenteil ist der Fall: Die Grundlagen der Selbstreplikation sind so einfach, dass sie selbst sehr jungen Menschen beigebracht werden können, so wie es heute der Fall ist. Wir wissen, dass die theoretischen Grundlagen für die Entwicklung der heutigen Biologie ganz simpel sind, einfache chemische Konzepte, die sich problemlos vermitteln lassen. Das ist ein glücklicher Umstand, denn obwohl ich gesagt habe, dass diese grundlegenden genetischen Prinzipien simpel sind, wäre es äußerst naiv, die Lösung vieler biologischer Probleme ebenfalls für simpel zu halten. Die Tatsache, dass die Theorie einfach ist, kann aber zumindest als Ausgangspunkt für die Erforschung der enormen Komplexität dienen; sofern man sich nicht allzu sehr verwirren lässt, hat man mit dieser Theorie die Chance kompliziertere Probleme tatsächlich zu lösen. Heute möchte ich über ein Bakterienvirus sprechen, ein ganz simples Virus, das simpelste, das wir kennen. Diese Tatsache, dass es das simpelste ist, ist auch der Grund, warum wir es untersuchen. Wir möchten zur Gänze verstehen, wie sich ein Virus vermehrt. So gesehen muss man verstehen, dass ein Virus komplizierter ist als ein Gen und vielleicht... angesichts der Unmengen von gesammelten Fakten können wir heute zusammenfassend sagen, dass das Gen ein DNA-Molekül ist, das, wie wir wissen, aus einer Doppelhelix besteht. Nun, habe ich gesagt, das Gen sollte etwas ungenau sein; ich sollte vielleicht sagen, zumindest einige Chromosomen. Ich spreche hier vom bakteriellen Chromosom, das bekanntermaßen ein DNA-Einzelmolekül ist. Die Beziehung zwischen dem DNA-Molekül und dem Gen ist dergestalt, dass man dieses fortlaufende DNA-Molekül in eine Reihe von Segmenten unterteilen kann, die als Gene bezeichnet werden können. Jedes dieser Gene ist für die Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine verantwortlich, d.h. die DNA bestimmt als lineare Nukleotidsequenz eine lineare Sequenz der Aminosäuren und Proteine. Das ist also der Zyklus; um es mit einem altbekannten Satz zu beschreiben: Das war es, was die Genetiker dachten, dass es eine hübsche einfache Beziehung gab. Sie sprachen das aus, bevor man die unglaubliche, alles vereinfachende Tatsache erkannte, dass es sich bei einem Gen um eine lineare Ansammlung von Nukleotiden und bei einem Protein um eine lineare Ansammlung von Aminosäuren handelt, dass also eine lineare Sequenz eine andere bestimmt. An dieser Stelle sollten Sie einen Eindruck von der Komplexität der Organismen bekommen, mit denen wir uns befassen, den Bakterienviren, mit denen praktisch alle arbeiten und die sich in einem Bakterium namens Escherichia coli vermehren. Dabei handelt es sich um ein relativ simples Bakterium, das eine Stäbchenform besitzt und etwa 2 bis 3 Mikrometer groß ist, in diese Richtung etwa ein Mikrometer. Sein Chromosom ist ein DNA-Einzelmolekül. Hier ist unser Bakterium, das Chromosom wird jetzt vereinfacht dargestellt, es handelt sich um ein kreisförmiges DNA-Einzelmolekül. Wenn man die Komplexität der DNA vom chemischen Standpunkt aus angeben möchte, so ist sie mit einem Molekulargewicht von 2x10 hoch 9 sicherlich größer als das größte jemals entdeckte Molekül. Die Komplexität basiert also auf einem sehr großen Molekül. Die DNA ist wahrscheinlich in etwa 3000 Gene unterteilt. Die genaue Zahl kennen wir nicht, aber es sind sicherlich nicht weniger als 2000 und wahrscheinlich nicht mehr als 5000. Aber die Zahl der Gene, die wir haben, ist diese hier. Nun, je nach Standpunkt ist die Struktur damit entweder sehr einfach oder sehr komplex. Ich würde sagen, die Biochemie ist zu der Ansicht gekommen, dass 2000 Gene bedeuten, dass sie einfach ist. Diese Zahl überwältigt uns nicht, so dass wir von der Wissenschaft Abschied nehmen müssen – wir können ruhig weitermachen. Man könnte also sagen, dass wir, wenn wir die Bakterien vollständig verstanden haben, die Funktion jedes dieser Gene kennen. Das ist in etwa die Ebene, auf der wir die Dinge begreifen möchten. Nun, dies hier ist nicht das kleinste Bakterium, vielleicht gibt es zwei- bis dreimal simplere Bakterien, die möglicherweise nur ein Drittel des genetischen Materials aufweisen. Zufällig besitzt aber das Bakterium, auf das sich alle konzentriert haben, etwa diese Menge DNA. Würden wir noch einmal anfangen, würden wir vielleicht ein etwas einfacheres Bakterium auswählen, was die Sachlage jedoch auch nicht wesentlich ändern würde. Angesicht dieser Abbildung hier könnte man sagen “Welche Beziehung besteht zwischen dem Chromosom und dem Virus?“ Nun, ein Virus stellt man sich am besten als eine Art kleines Chromosom vor, also als ein kleines Stück Nukleinsäure, das von einer Art Proteinhülle umgeben ist. Heute wissen wir das, vor 30 Jahren dagegen dachte man, dass ein Virus möglicherweise ein von einem Protein umhülltes einzelnes Gen sei. Wir wissen also, dass man sich ein Virus am besten als ein von einem Protein umhülltes kleines Chromosom vorstellt, das über eine entscheidende Fähigkeit verfügt: Gelangt dieses virale Chromosom in eine Zelle, vermehrt es sich unkontrolliert, so dass eine große Anzahl an neuen Kopien entsteht, die dann von neuen Proteinhüllen umgeben werden. An dieser Stelle versteht man, wie komplex, d.h. wie groß das virale Chromosom wirklich ist. Wir wissen heute durch Zufall, dass es sich bei den von Delbrück untersuchten Viren T2 und T4 um relativ komplexe Viren handelt, die wahrscheinlich etwa 200 Gene innerhalb des viralen Parameters beinhalten. Das erschwerte und komplizierte die Sache erheblich. Wenn man ein solches Virus vollständig beschreiben will, muss man das Chromosom untersuchen und die Funktion der einzelnen Abschnitte ermitteln. Für eine vollständige chemische Beschreibung wären diese Viren etwas zu kompliziert. Wenn Sie ein Virus finden möchten, das Sie beschreiben können wie z.B. eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. jeden einzelnen Baustein, so dass Sie seine genaue Funktionsweise kennen, wenn Sie die Position jedes einzelnen Atoms beschreiben möchten, müssen Sie mit etwas Kleinerem arbeiten. Sie müssen also nach einem kleineren Virus suchen. De facto gibt es eine Reihe erheblich kleinerer Viren. Man kann die Sache aber noch etwas komplizierter machen. Bislang habe ich immer von Nukleinsäure oder DNA und dem Zyklus, der bekanntermaßen so wichtig ist, gesprochen. Die DNA bestimmt das Protein, doch während dieses Prozesses entsteht ein Zwischenprodukt, eine zweite Nukleinsäureform, die Ribonukleinsäure, die als Vorlage für das Protein dient. Das erscheint unnötig komplex, aber so ist es nun einmal, und wir kennen jetzt die wesentlichen Bestandteile dieser Geschichte ziemlich genau. Der Schlüssel zu der ganzen Sache war, dass sich die DNA selbst vervielfältigt. Die biologische und chemische Grundlage dieser Selbstvervielfältigung war die Bildung von Basenpaaren, d.h. die Fähigkeit zur Erzeugung einer komplementären Doppelhelix, an der die Basen Adenin und Thymin bzw. Guanin und Cytosin kombiniert werden. Das ist das grundlegende Prinzip der Selbstvervielfältigung – Adenin, Thymin, Guanin und Cytosin. Das ergäbe nun ein vollständiges Bild, wäre da nicht die Tatsache, dass manche Viren, am wichtigsten wohl das Tabakmosaikvirus (TMV), ein von Professor Schramm und seiner Arbeitsgruppe im Detail erforschtes Virus, keine DNA enthalten. Das war eine prekäre Tatsache, denn wenn man sagte, die DNA ist gleichbedeutend mit Genen und Gene sind für das Leben notwendig, musste man der Tatsache ins Auge blicken, dass dieses Virus keine DNA enthielt, sondern stattdessen RNA. Bei der RNA musste es sich also ebenfalls um genetisches Material handeln. Das bedeutete, auch hier musste es einen entsprechenden Zyklus geben, d.h. die RNA musste irgendwie in der Lage sein, sich selbst zu vervielfältigen und dann ein Protein zu bestimmen. Für die Übertragung von genetischen Informationen musste es also zwei unterschiedliche Zyklen geben, einen auf Grundlage der DNA, den anderen auf Grundlage der RNA. Hier könnte man fragen “Ist dieser Zyklus wirklich der gleiche wie bei der DNA? Basiert er auf demselben Prinzip?“ Tatsache ist zunächst einmal, dass sich RNA und DNA chemisch sehr ähnlich sind; weiterhin lässt sich sagen, dass man aus RNA-Ketten problemlos eine Doppelhelix bilden könnte. Theoretisch könnte man sich also für die RNA dasselbe Replikationsschema vorstellen wie für die DNA. Die Frage war jedoch nicht, ob dieses Schema existieren könnte, sondern vielmehr ob das existierende System diesem Schema entspricht. In den letzten 5 Jahren wurde dieses Problem hauptsächlich anhand einer Gruppe von Bakterienviren, also Viren, die sich alle in E. coli vermehren, eingehend untersucht. Anders als T2, bei dem es sich um ein DNA-Virus handelt, enthalten diese Bakterienviren RNA. Sie tragen zwar unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen – der erste, der entdeckt wurden, heißt F2, in meinem Labor arbeiten wir mit einem ähnlichen Virus namens R17, in Tübingen kommt FR zum Einsatz – doch die Viren sind sich alle recht ähnlich. Sie haben zwei, man könnte sagen… Nun, wofür genau interessieren wir uns, warum sollen wir unser Augenmerk auf diese Viren richten? Erstens weil sie RNA enthalten und wir mehr über RNA lernen möchten. Zweitens weil sie sich in E.coli vermehren, was von großer Bedeutung ist, denn die Bakterienvermehrung dauert nur 20 Minuten und der genetische Erkenntnisgewinn ist gewaltig. Es ist also um mehrere Größenordnungen einfacher mit E.coli zu arbeiten als mit einer anderen Zellform, wenn man genaue chemische Analysen durchführen möchte. Allein aufgrund dieser Sachlage benutzen viele Leute diese Viren für ihre Arbeit. Noch interessanter war allerdings, dass diese Viren chemisch äußerst simpel und sehr klein sind. Ihr Molekulargewicht beträgt insgesamt nur 3… (akustisch unverständlich 30.12), wohingegen das Molekulargewicht von T2 2x10 hoch 8 beträgt. Wir haben hier also ein sehr einfaches Virus, das aus einer einzelnen Nukleinsäurekette mit einem Molekulargewicht von 10 hoch 6 besteht. An dieser Stelle muss man grundsätzlich unterscheiden zwischen dieser Art Virus und T2, der aus DNA und damit einer Doppelhelix besteht. Dieses Virus besitzt bloß einen Nukleinsäurestrang, nicht zwei ineinander verdrehte Stränge, er ist also einsträngig und nicht doppelsträngig und enthält rund 3000 Nukleinsäuren. Nun, die Frage, die wir uns selbst stellen, lautet “Können wir die Vermehrung dieses Virus vollständig beschreiben?” Es ist das simpelste Virus, das wir kennen, d.h. das mit der kürzesten Nukleinsäurekette. Im Vergleich dazu ist die Nukleinsäurekette des Tabakmosaikvirus doppelt so lang. Unser Virus besitzt nur die Hälfte der genetischen Information und sollte daher einfacher zu analysieren sein. Ich zeigte Ihnen jetzt ein paar Dias. Hier sehen Sie den Zyklus: Die Rolle der DNA ist mittlerweile jedem bekannt, sie repliziert sich selbst und dient als Vorlage für die RNA, welche das Protein bildet. Das ist die übliche Art der Übertragung von genetischen Informationen innerhalb von Zellen. In der zweiten Zyklusform, in der RNA vorliegt, können deren genetische Informationen in ein Protein translatiert werden. Sie sehen hier diesen Zyklus; wir wollen ihn uns einmal näher anschauen. Das ist die übertragene genetische Information nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein RNA-Virus. Soweit wir wissen existiert dieser Zyklus nur nach der Infektion einer Zelle durch ein Virus. Es gibt keine Hinweise darauf, dass er auch ohne Viren stattfindet. Es mag Ausnahmen von der Regel geben, wir wissen nicht, ob es tatsächlich immer so ist. Doch es sind die einzigen Fälle, die wir heute untersuchen können. Das nächste Dia zeigt eine Art Zusammenfassung aller biochemischen Vorgänge von der DNA bis zur Polypeptidkette. Ich werde darauf nicht näher eingehen, da Professor Lipmann Ihnen übermorgen Näheres zur Proteinsynthese erläutern wird. Entscheidend ist, dass wir drei Formen von RNA haben – eine davon trägt die genetische Botschaft – und die Proteine auf kleinen Gebilden, sogenannten Ribosomen synthetisiert werden. Während der Proteinsynthese bewegt sich die genetische Botschaft über die Oberfläche des Ribosoms; dabei werden die Polypeptidketten länger. Ich möchte noch eine andere Tatsache erwähnen: Bei der Vorstufe der Proteinsynthese handelt es sich um eine Aminosäure, die an einem als… (unverständlich 33.33) bezeichneten Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme eines Ribosoms. Ribosomen sind kleine Partikel, sozusagen die Fabriken zur Proteinherstellung. Diese elektronenmikroskopische Aufnahme wurde vor ca. 6 Jahren gemacht; leider muss man sagen, dass es bis heute keine bessere gibt. Unser Detail ist unbewegt; diese Partikel haben einen Durchmesser von ca. 200 Å und ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 3 Millionen. Sie bestehen aus zwei Untereinheiten, einer kleinen und einer großen. Auf dem nächsten Dia sind die beiden Untereinheiten sehr schematisch dargestellt. Sie bestehen aus einer Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Proteine. Die Struktur eines Ribosoms ist äußerst komplex und wir sind noch weit davon entfernt sie zu entschlüsseln. Das nächste Dia ist erneut eine Art Zusammenfassung der Tatsache, dass es sich bei der während des Wachstums einer Polypeptidkette entstehenden Vorstufe um die an diesem kleinen Stück RNA hängende Aminosäure handelt. Ich möchte klarstellen, dass es im Gegensatz zur DNA, die grundsätzlich als genetisch gilt, d.h. in einer Zelle ausschließlich Aminosäuresequenzen codiert, bei der RNA drei Formen gibt, von denen nur eine die genetische Information trägt. Die Form, die an der Aminosäure hängt, ist zwar nicht genetisch, man sollte aber nicht vergessen, dass die wachsende Kette an diesem Molekül hängt. Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie eine sehr schematische Ansicht der Vorgänge bei der Proteinsynthese. Hier ist die wachsende Polypeptidkette, die mittels des ssRNA-Moleküls an einem Ribosom hängt; dann kommt eine neue Aminosäure und die beiden bilden eine Peptidbindung. Diese Details sind für das, worüber ich sprechen möchte, nicht weiter von Bedeutung, deshalb werde ich nicht näher darauf eingehen. Das nächste Dia zeigt nun das RNA-Virus, über das ich sprechen will, R17. Wie ich bereits sagte, ähnelt es stark verschiedenen anderen dieser kleinen RNA-Viren. Bezüglich seiner Struktur können wir sagen –wir möchten herausfinden, wie es sich vermehrt. Es ist das einfachste aller Viren, über die wir überhaupt etwas wissen. Aber wie einfach? Nun, zunächst einmal befindet sich im Zentrum des Virus ein aus einer Einzelkette mit 3000 Nukleotiden bestehendes RNA-Molekül. Aufgrund dieser Tatsache ist eines sofort klar: die Menge der genetischen Informationen ist dergestalt, dass prinzipiell 1000 Aminosäuren angeordnet werden können, denn wir wissen vom genetischen Code, dass aufeinander folgende Gruppen von drei Nukleotiden eine Aminosäure bestimmen. Hat man also eine RNA-Botschaft, die 3000 Nukleotide enthält, kann man damit theoretisch 1000 Aminosäuren anordnen. Wir kennen also grundsätzlich die Obergrenze. Was ist prinzipiell hierfür notwendig? Woraus besteht das Virus noch? Das Virus enthält zusätzlich zwei Arten von Proteinmolekülen. Das eine Proteinmolekül bezeichnen wir als Co-Protein, da es in großen Mengen vorliegt und jedes Viruspartikel 180 Kopien davon enthält. Das Molekulargewicht dieses Proteins liegt bei 14.700, es enthält 129 Aminosäuren und es wurde eine vollständige… (akustisch unverständlich 37.22) bestimmt. Neben diesem Protein, das etwa 99% der Gesamtproteinmenge des Virus ausmacht, gibt es noch ein zweites Protein, das unterschiedlich bezeichnet wird, wir nennen es Haftprotein. Die uns vorliegenden Hinweise legen nahe, dass es wahrscheinlich nur eine Kopie dieses Proteins pro Viruspartikel gibt. Wir wissen, dass es ein Molekulargewicht von etwa 35.000 besitzt und 300 Aminosäuren enthält. Wir wollen dieses Protein jetzt näher untersuchen, es wird aber wahrscheinlich noch einige Jahre dauern, bis wir genügend davon haben, um die Aminosäuresequenz zu bestimmen. Es ist nicht einfach zu isolieren, genaugenommen ist die Isolierung sogar ziemlich schwierig. Was muss man also tun, um ein neues Viruspartikel zu erzeugen? Nun, man muss während der Virusreplikation neue Kopien des Codeproteins, neue Kopien des Haftproteins und neue RNA herstellen. Jetzt das nächste Dia – wie sieht der Lebenszyklus des Virus aus? Diese Viren haben insofern einen etwas ungewöhnlichen Lebenszyklus, als sie sich nur in männlichen Bakterien vermehren. Hier haben wir das Bakterium E.coli, die beiden Geschlechter, das männliche und das weibliche; von dem männlichen Bakterium stehen kleine, ganz dünne Filamente, sogenannte Pili ab, an die sich die Viruspartikel heften. Das ist sozusagen der erste Schritt der Virusvermehrung. Innerhalb von etwa einer Minute, nachdem sich das Virus an diese Pili geheftet hat, gelangt die Nukleinsäure irgendwie in das Bakterium. Wir wissen nicht, wie sie von hier nach da gelangt, im nächsten Dia ist der Vorgang aber schematisch dargestellt. Wir denken bzw. wissen de facto, dass dieses Filament hohl ist und sich die Nukleinsäure vermutlich durch diesen engen Kanal in das Bakterium bewegt. Genaueres können wir nicht sagen, denn wir wissen nichts über die Struktur dieser dünnen Filamente. Es ist offensichtlich, dass sie ermittelt werden muss. Die Filamente stellen jedoch nur einen äußerst kleinen Prozentsatz dar, im Mittel 1 bis 3 Filamente pro Bakterium, sind nur etwa 100 Å dick und chemisch daher in großen Mengen recht schwer zu isolieren, auch wenn wir damit gerade beginnen. Das ist wahrscheinlich der erste Schritt. Das nächste Dia veranschaulicht streng schematisch, was geschieht: Innerhalb von einer Minute nach der Absorption des Virus an den Pili gelangt die Nukleinsäure in das Bakterium, nach etwa 15 Minuten im Inneren des Bakteriums werden einige fertige neue Viruspartikel sichtbar. und die neu entstandenen Viruspartikel treten aus der Zelle aus. Die Anzahl der in der Zelle wachsenden oder auftretenden Viruspartikel kann bis zu etwa 20.000 Partikel pro Zelle betragen, aus einem werden also 20.000, und das in ungefähr 30 Minuten. Tatsächlich können sie so dicht gepackt sein, dass man die Bildung richtiger dreidimensionaler Kristalle aus Viruspartikeln in der Zelle beobachten kann, bevor diese aufbricht. Man könnte sagen, dass das Endstadium so aussieht, dass 10% der Bakterienmasse in Viruspartikel umgewandelt wurden. Es handelt sich also um einen außerordentlich effizienten Prozess. Wenn man dies näher analysieren möchte, sollte man im Wesentlichen drei Dinge messen: die Entstehung neuer Moleküle des Codeproteins, die Entstehung des Haftproteins und die Entstehung eines dritten beteiligten Proteins. Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass, damit sich die RNA replizieren kann, d.h. aus einem RNA-Marker viele werden, ein neues Enzym in der Zelle gebildet werden muss. Es trägt unterschiedliche Namen, ich bezeichne es als Replikase. Dabei handelt es sich um ein spezifisches Enzym, das in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorliegt, sondern erst nach einer Virusinfektion gebildet wird. Dieses Enzym ist für die RNA-Replikation verantwortlich. Der Grund, warum sich die RNA in normalen Zellen nicht selbst repliziert, ist das Fehlen dieses Enzyms. Wie Sie gleich sehen werden, wird dieses Enzym durch das genetische Material des Virus codiert. Der RNA-Strang trägt die genetische Information zur Bildung dieses Enzyms, das die Selbstreplikation der RNA bewirkt. Im nächsten Dia können Sie die Kinetik in einer infizierten Zelle studieren, die Erzeugung dieser drei Proteine, die für die Herstellung des Virus notwendig sind. Das Codeprotein wird in großen Mengen über lange Zeit erzeugt. Die beiden anderen Proteine sind das Haftprotein und das Enzym RNA-Replikase, das für die Selbstreplikation der RNA verantwortlich ist. Eine interessante Tatsache, wie Sie feststellen werden, ist, dass das Codeprotein über lange Zeit hergestellt wird und zahlreiche Kopien davon entstehen, während von der Replikase und dem Haftprotein erheblich weniger Kopien erstellt werden und auch ihre Synthese recht bald eingestellt wird. Ihre Herstellung erfolgt kurzfristig und unterbleibt dann. Man könnte sagen, es ergibt einen biologischen Sinn, die Bildung des Haftproteins frühzeitig einzustellen, da man nur sehr wenige Kopien davon benötigt. Große Mengen sind nicht erforderlich und die Erstellung gleich vieler Kopien wäre völlig unsinnig, wenn das Viruspartikel nur wenige braucht. Man könnte sagen, dass es sich hier um ein Beispiel für einen Steuermechanismus handelt, anhand dessen ein Protein in größerer Menge hergestellt werden kann als ein anderes. Seine molekulare Basis ist im Wesentlichen eine Struktur aus einer Kette von viralen Nukleinsäuren; hier sieht man, wie sie gerade in die Zelle eingedrungen ist. Nach dem Eindringen der Kette in die Zelle heften sich die Ribosomen an ihr eines Ende und wandern an dem RNA-Molekül entlang. Während des Entlangwanderns löst sich das gebildete Protein – das Codeprotein ist entstanden. Wir sehen jetzt, dass sich in dem Viruspartikel im Wesentlichen drei Gene befinden. Alles deutet darauf hin, dass es nur drei sind, und wir haben alle drei identifiziert. An Nummer eins steht das Codeprotein, dann kommt als zweites das Haftprotein und drittens die Replikase. Die relativen Größen kennen wir nicht genau, aber dieses Gen müsste kleiner sein, da es nur 129 Aminosäuren codiert. Die Abbildung ist nicht wirklich maßstabsgetreu, dieses hier codiert etwa 300, dieses wahrscheinlich etwa 500. Zusammengenommen sind das die 1000 Aminosäuren, mit denen wir gerechnet haben. Nun, kann man sagen, dass wir absolut sicher sind? Die Antwort ist nein. Wenn es ein sehr kleines Protein hier dazwischen gibt, haben wir es unter Umständen noch nicht entdeckt. Definitiv kennen wir heute aber diese drei. In diesem Prozess haben wir ein RNA-Molekül, ein Chromosom, das drei Gene codiert, und zu Beginn, also etwas weiter hier, muss es wahrscheinlich ein Stopsignal geben. Wie Sie erraten können, gibt es auch ein Startsignal. Es wird also rasch gestartet und gestoppt; hier sollte ein Stop sein, Start, Stop und Start. Wir verfügen heute über Informationen darüber, was diese Starts und Stops sind. Sie haben vielleicht gedacht, dass die Kette mit…dass die erste Nukleotidsequenz ein Startsignal wäre und die letzte ein Stopsignal. In Wirklichkeit sieht es aber so aus, als ob das Viruschromosom insofern komplizierter ist, als dass einige Nukleotide nicht zum Start gehören. Wir wandern also erst an einigen Nukleotiden vorbei, erhalten dann ein Startsignal und am Ende ein Stopsignal, und danach folgen weitere Nukleotide, deren Funktion wir noch nicht kennen. Das nächste Dia zeigt wahrscheinlich das Grundprinzip des allgemeinen Problems d.h. warum erzeuge ich eine große Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen und nur eine kleine Anzahl von Haftprotein- und Replikasemolekülen?“ Der Grund ist, dass das Codeprotein, nachdem es sich im Anschluss an seine Herstellung in seine richtige dreidimensionale Form gefaltet hat, die Spezifität besitzt, sich an die RNA-Kette zu heften und die Ribosomen am Entlangwandern zu hindern. Heute steht mehr oder weniger zweifelsfrei fest, dass es sich so verhält; sobald eine kleine Anzahl von Codeproteinmolekülen entstanden ist, verlangt das Gleichgewicht, dass sie sich an die RNA heften, so dass sich das Ribosom nicht mehr bewegen kann. Es scheint heute wahrscheinlich, dass sich das Ribosom nur an das Ende des Moleküls heftet und dann entlangwandert. Blockiert man es also in irgendeiner Form, entsteht entweder mehr von dem ersten oder dem zweiten Protein. Mit Hilfe des nächsten Dias möchte ich den Sachverhalt darstellen, dass, wie wir wissen, im genetischen Code Gruppen aus drei Nukleotiden jeweils eine Aminosäuren codieren und die Startkodone möglicherweise AUG und G sind. Das ist im Wesentlichen der Code für eine ungewöhnliche Aminosäure namens Formlymethionin. Ich vereinfache das hier, ich mogle ein bisschen, aber nur um Ihnen zeigen, dass es Starts gibt; eigentlich ist es erheblich komplizierter. Was das Stopsignal angeht, wissen wir zwar, dass diese hier alle einen Stop auslösen, wir wissen aber nicht, wie. Eine lustige Geschichte, die bekannt wurde, als dieses Virus erstmals untersucht wurde, war, dass man die Herstellung aller Proteine zumindest in E.coli mit dieser Aminosäure namens Formylmethionin startete, also der Aminosäure Methionin mit einer am Aminoende hängenden Formylgruppe. Das war insofern komisch, als den Leuten dies bei der Proteinisolierung aus dem Bakterium nie aufgefallen war, und führte de facto zur Entdeckung des im nächsten Dia dargestellten Zyklus. Hier sehen Sie die beginnende Aminosäuresequenz für das Codeprotein: Formylmethionin, Alanin, Serin, Asparagin, Threonin, Phenylalanin. Daraus haben wir ein spezifisches Enzym hergestellt, das wir isoliert und einer Deformylierung zur Entfernung der Formylgruppe unterzogen haben. Dann gibt es ein zweites Enzym, das das Methionin entfernt. Dadurch entsteht die Sequenz, die wir in der Zelle, im intakten Viruspartikel vorfinden. Das ist ein Komplexitätsniveau, das ein Theoretiker nie vermuten würde. Wir wissen, dass dieser Zyklus abläuft, aber keiner weiß, wie dies geschieht, welchen Vorteil die Zelle von diesem Zyklus hat. Wir wissen, dass er immer so beginnt und immer so endet. Es ist wohl eine generelle Regel, dass Biochemiker nie raten, warum etwas geschieht; sie finden heraus, was geschieht, und versuchen den Grund dafür später zu ermitteln. Auch wenn es heißt, Theorie hilft, so hilft sie doch nur in manchen Fällen, meistens jedoch gewinnt man Erkenntnisse, indem man Experimente durchführt. Nun, das ist sozusagen das generelle Bild der Proteinherstellung. Eine RNA-Kette, die drei Proteine codiert, mit Start- und Stopsignalen und etwas Sonderbarem an ihren beiden Enden, das wir nicht verstehen. Abschließend kann man sagen, dass es gewissermaßen der letzte Faktor war… Wir haben ein Enzym, das RNA herstellt, aber wie funktioniert dieses Enzym? Das heißt, kommt das Prinzip der Basenpaarbildung zur Anwendung oder liegt ein völlig andersartiger Zyklus vor? Auf dem nächsten Dia sehen Sie, wie dieses Enzym funktioniert. Wenn wir hier mit einer Signalkette beginnen, stellt das Enzym ein Komplement her. Das bei der Komplementherstellung angewandte Prinzip ist die Bildung von Basenpaaren, die sich auch bei der DNA- bzw. RNA-Replikation findet. RNA enthält statt Thymin die Base Uracil, was vom Standpunkt der Basenpaarregel keinen Unterschied macht. Ich möchte Sie daher damit nicht weiter behelligen. Bei der RNA-Replikation entsteht jedoch ein Zwischenprodukt mit einer Doppelhelix. In der Mitte der Replikation haben wir also ein RNA-Molekül mit einer Doppelhelix. Der Strang, mit dem wir begonnen haben, ist der sogenannte Plusstrang, sein Komplement der sogenannte Minusstrang. Das Enzym ist also hier von rechts nach links entlang gewandert. Wir möchten aber keine neuen Minusstränge herstellen. Die Viruspartikel enthalten nur Plusstränge, d.h. man findet kein Gemisch aus beiden Strängen in dem Viruspartikel, sondern nur eine Sequenz, den Plusstrang. Das letzte Dia zeigt die zweite Stufe der RNA-Replikation, in der sich das Enzym aufgrund der replizierten Form in die entgegengesetzte Richtung bewegt und einen neuen Plusstrang erzeugt. Zum Schluss haben wir das freie Enzym, das sich wieder hierhin zurückbegibt und neue Plusstränge herstellt. Zum Schluss möchte ich sagen, dass wir wahrscheinlich alle entscheidenden Schritte bei der Vermehrung des einfachsten Virus, das wir kennen, verstehen, d.h. wir verstehen, wie das Virus Proteine herstellt. Das Virus benutzt bei der Proteinherstellung genau denselben Mechanismus, den wir vom normalen DNA-, RNA-Proteinzyklus kennen. Es ist exakt das gleiche System, es gibt keinen Unterschied. Das Virus benutzt im Wesentlichen dasselbe System. Die Replikation der RNA erfolgt im Grunde genommen nach demselben Prinzip wie die der DNA – es werden Basenpaare gebildet – doch man benötigt ein spezifisches, in nicht infizierten Zellen nicht vorhandenes Enzym, dass der RNA-Kette die Bildung ihres Komplements ermöglicht. Dieses Enzym ist äußerst spezifisch und seine Spezifität ist auf ein spezielles Virus beschränkt. Schaut man sich dieses Enzym in einer etwas komplexeren Darstellung an, ist es komplizierter als man denkt, denn es kann sowohl Plus- als auch Minusstränge produzieren. Es kann sich frei von rechts nach links oder von links nach rechts bewegen, was vom chemischen Standpunkt aus bedeutet, dass es sich um ein recht interessantes Enzym handelt. Bislang können wir noch überhaupt nicht sagen, wie dieser Vorgang abläuft, da bislang niemand das Enzym zu diesem Zweck isoliert hat. Ansonsten wurde das Enzym bereits isoliert, und man kann im Reagenzglas infektiöse RNA erzeugen. Das wurde erstmals in Spiegelmans Labor durchgeführt; eine sehr wichtige Entdeckung, zeigt sie doch, dass man im Reagenzglas fast alles machen kann. Wir sind aber noch nicht bis zum zweiten Stadium der eigentlichen Proteinisolierung vorgedrungen, nämlich der Bestimmung seiner dreidimensionalen Struktur und der Frage, wie es sich von rechts nach links und umgekehrt bewegen kann. Das wird uns in der Zukunft beschäftigen. Wohin führt unser Weg von hier? Ich denke, man kann sagen, dass die wichtigste Schlussfolgerung ist, dass die Viren keine völlig rätselhaften Gebilde mehr sind, dass wir jetzt den Zusammenhang mit dem normalen Zellzyklus und die Beziehung zwischen DNA- und RNA-haltigen Viren kennen. Man könnte auch sagen, dass wir jetzt wahrscheinlich das Vertrauen haben, dass wir – ein ausreichend einfaches Virus vorausgesetzt – wahrscheinlich all seine Replikationsschritte verstehen könnten. Solange wir es mit einem Virus zu tun haben, das nur ein paar Gene enthält, sollte es möglich sein, dieses Virus beinahe so gut zu verstehen wie eine Schweizer Uhr, d.h. all seine Bestandteile. Nun, ist all das die Mühe wert? Ich glaube, das ist teilweise eine Frage des eigenen Interesses, d.h. wie tiefgehend man die Sache wirklich verstehen möchte. Es gibt eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden, falls jemand sich die Mühe machen möchte die genaue Sequenz zu bestimmen. Ich glaube, meine Antwort lautet „Ja“, auch wenn es mir gerade eben als eine unmögliche Aufgabe erscheint, eine Sequenz aus 3000 Nukleotiden zu bestimmen, doch vor 10 Jahren hätte man die Bestimmung einer Sequenz von 100 Nukleotiden für nicht durchführbar gehalten, so auch für...(akustisch unverständlich 55.01). Eines Tages wird es wahrscheinlich möglich sein, mit grundlegend verbesserten chemischen Verfahren die vollständige Sequenz zu bestimmen. Dann werden wir sagen können, wir wissen alles über das Virus, was wir wissen wollen. Wir würden die Bestimmung der vollständigen Sequenz schon allein deswegen durchführen wollen, um die Start- und Stopsignale zu sehen und nähere Einzelheiten über den genetischen Code zu erfahren. Ich möchte das Thema noch etwas ausweiten, vielleicht in die medizinische Richtung. Bei allem, worüber ich heute gesprochen habe, wurde das Virus als etwas betrachtet, das einzig und allein der Erforschung durch Wissenschaftler dient. Es gibt aber auch die medizinische Fragestellung; wir interessieren uns für Viren, weil sie Krankheiten hervorrufen und wir vielleicht herausfinden, wie wir sie bekämpfen können, wenn wir ihre Struktur genau kennen. Von meiner Warte aus ist eine der interessantesten Tatsachen, dass eine Reihe von potentiell krebserregenden Viren sehr kleine Viren sind, keine großen. Zu nennen ist hier insbesondere das sich in Mäusen vermehrende sogenannte Polyomavirus, dessen kreisförmiges DNA-Molekül wahrscheinlich genetische Informationen für höchstens 6 bis 7 Gene enthält. Die Arbeit mit Tieren ist erheblich schwieriger; bei einem Wechseln von einem Bakterienvirus zu einem Tiervirus verhundertfacht sich das Komplexitätslevel. Mit der optimistischen Einstellung, dass man alle 10 Jahre etwas in Angriff nehmen kann, das eine Größenordnung schwieriger ist, und es außerdem immer Menschen gibt, die schlauer sind als andere, gelingt es uns vielleicht in den nächsten 10 Jahren ein Virus dieser Komplexität in Tierzellen zu vermehren und die Auswirkungen seiner genetischen Informationen umfassend zu definieren. Wenn wir das wissen, sind wir dem Verständnis dafür, warum dieses Virus einen Tumor auslösen kann, möglicherweise schon ein großes Stück nähergekommen. Ich bin mir ganz sicher, dass vielleicht in den nächsten 10 und sicherlich in den nächsten 20 Jahren jemand dieses Podium betritt und erklärt, was ein solches Virus tut und warum es Krebs auslöst. Dann werden wir von einer großen wissenschaftlichen Leistung sprechen können. Vielen Dank.

Thomas Steitz on antibiotics as essential tool for the dissection of partial ribosomal functions
(00:16:56 - 00:27:54)

 

In the context of pursuing ribosomal function, and after the mRNA concept had been established, gentle isolation of messenger–ribosome complexes became a matter of priority in the early 1960s. Particles larger than 70S or 80S appeared on sucrose-gradient patterns and electron microscopic images. For them, the term ‘polysomes’ quickly came into general use [210-214]. They appeared to consist of strings of ribosomes occupying a particular messenger RNA. Special isolation procedures were required to prevent them from breaking down to monosomes during fractionation. On the other hand, in vivo and in vitro evidence grew that ribosomes dissociated and reassociated during their functional cycle [215, 216], and that initiation started on the 30S subunit [217].

Around the same time, Peter Traub, together with Nomura, found the right temperature and ionic conditions for reconstituting the small ribosomal subunit of E. coli in the test tube [218] from its RNA and protein moieties, respectively. The 50S subunit assembly proved more difficult [219] but was finally achieved by Knud Nierhaus and Ferdinand Dohme [220]. After the much simpler, symmetric TMV in the early 1950s, the two highly asymmetric ribosomal subunits became the emblem of molecular self-assembly in the late 1960s and early 1970s [219, 220]. The possibility of in vitro ribosome assembly opened the field for a multiplicity of structure–function correlation studies at a previously unknown level. The hope, however, that a particular ribosomal protein might be singled out as responsible for the peptidyl transferase reaction did not materialize.


The Structural Dissection of the Ribosome

The original assumption of Watson at Harvard, Schachman in Berkeley, and others who started to analyze the structure of bacterial particles, had been that it might be analogous to that of RNA viruses: an RNA moiety wrapped with multiple copies of a coat protein. The analogy had certainly not been favorable either to the emergence of the concept of messenger RNA, or to the emergence of the view of an asymmetric particle consisting of many different proteins.

In view of the complex protein make-up of ribosomes, it is not surprising that their RNA moiety was the first component to be characterized in terms of sedimentation behavior, molecular weight, and overall base composition. As for the ribosomes, so for rRNA, too, sucrose-gradient centrifugation was crucial. Around 1960, there was still considerable uncertainty about the identity of ribosomal RNA. Before RNase-free strains of bacteria became available [221, 222], the problem of RNA breakdown during preparation could hardly be mastered. The introduction of the separation of RNA from cellular protein by phenol extraction greatly facilitated laboratory manipulation of RNA. This method came into quick and general use soon after its publication [223, 224]. In 1959, Paul Ts’o [225] separated rRNA from pea seedlings and rabbit reticulocytes into two major 28S and 18S peaks. A series of careful studies on E. coli ribosomes in Watson’s laboratory led Kurland to propose that ribosomal RNA came in two large species, 16S and 23S, respectively [226]. Alexander Spirin in Moscow had reached basically the same conclusion [227]. The question however whether this represented the ‘native’ state of ribosomal RNA, whether originally they were made up from smaller fragments or derived from a large precursor, continued to be a matter of debate for several years [228]. The controversy eventually came to a satisfactory end when it became evident that mature ribosomal RNA originated from a large transcript that was processed in the event of ribosome formation, and that, indeed, a small defined RNA, 5S RNA, was part of the 50S subunit [229]. Subsequently, 5S rRNA became the first ribosomal RNA molecule to be completely sequenced in 1968 [230]. This breakthrough had been made possible through Sanger’s 2D fractionation procedure for radioactive nucleotides [231]. It took three years to determine its 120 nucleotides. In comparison, sequencing the first transfer RNA (yeast tRNAAla) with slightly more than half the number of nucleotides had taken Holley and his co-workers some eight years [132]. Other groups soon followed with other tRNA species [232, 233]. The detailed functional elucidation of these molecules, however, had to await further studies. Their crystallization proved to be a major prerequisite for moving forward in this direction (see Refs. [234, 235] among others).

Serious analysis, on the basis of starch-gel electrophoresis, of the protein composition of ribosomes goes back to the work of Jean-Pierre Waller [236] and to the fractionation studies of David Elson [237] and Pnina Spitnik-Elson [238]. One of the first ribosomal proteins to be characterized individually was the acidic A-protein of the large subunit studied by Wim Moeller and later known as L7 (L12) [239]. Major efforts to develop methods for separating and purifying individual proteins came, among others, from Heinz Günter Wittmann and Brigitte Wittmann-Liebold’s laboratory in Berlin [240], Tissière’s in Geneva [241], and Kurland’s in Wisconsin [242]. A prominent achievement in this endeavor was the separation of all ribosomal proteins by 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis [243]. It served as an efficient and economizing standardization vehicle in the field of ribosomal protein identification.


1970s–1990s: A Brief Synopsis

The survey of the following three decades from the 1970s to the 1990s will be very brief. There is no need to go into the details of an ongoing research in this historical introduction, since the major events during these decades are extensively dealt with in some recent Lindau lectures. The 1970s can be regarded as the period of the elucidation of the primary structure of the components of the translational apparatus. Indeed, around the turn of the decade, the ribosome of E. coli became the first cellular organelle whose RNA [244–246] and protein components [247] were completely sequenced. Sequencing the complete ribosomal RNA became a feasible task only after the new sequencing methods of Maxam and Gilbert [248], and of Sanger [249] had been introduced.

The emergent recombinant DNA technologies helped to construct a detailed genetic map of the components involved in protein biosynthesis. The ribosomal RNA genes, however, were mapped before the era of recombinant DNA technology. A dozen years had elapsed between their first identification in 1962 [250] and their precise mapping [251]. Knowledge about ribosomal protein genes and operons rapidly accumulated after the subsequent isolation of protein gene-transducing lambda phages [252]. Another source of information was provided by the systematic work with ribosomal protein mutants [253, 254].

Molecular details of ribosomal function also became available, such as the interaction of mRNA with 16S RNA during initiation [255, 256], and the mechanisms by which ribosomes achieve their accuracy [257, 258]. The regulation of ribosome biosynthesis, starting with the early findings on the genetics of RNA synthesis [259], also became a major field of investigation during the 1970s [260–262]. Over the years, a detailed view, first of transcriptional, then of translational feedback regulation mechanisms emerged. Since Monod and Jacob’s work on the lac operon, transcriptional control had been the leading paradigm. The shift of interest from transcriptional to translational regulation was indeed an unprecedented turn, both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes (for the latter, see Severo Ochoa, The Regulation of Protein Synthesis in Reticulocytes, 1978). The major events in this area have both been initiated and reviewed some time ago by Nomura [8].

During the 1970s, ribosome research became a focus for the development and application of numerous advanced biochemical, biophysical and biological techniques. In vitro reconstitution of ribosomes [263] and in situ localization of ribosomal components via immunoelectron microscopy [264, 265], scattering studies [266], cross-linking [267] and affinity labeling [268] led to early insights into the quaternary structure of the protein synthesizing organelle and its functional characteristics such as factor binding and the constitution of the peptidyltransferase center.

The 1980s, on the one hand, were characterized by an increasing backshift of emphasis towards eukaryotic systems (see Ref. [269] for a contemporary overview). Ira Wool in Chicago had pioneered mammalian ribosomal proteins during the era of E. coli (see Ref. [270] for a review), Rudi Planta in Amsterdan had done much of the genetic and structural work on yeast ribosomal RNA (see Ref. [271] for a review). On the other hand, after a lag period, the tedious and time-consuming task of secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure modelling came to fruition and became linked to ribosomal function. Protein–protein crosslinking [272], protein–RNA crosslinking [273, 274], protection and modification studies [275], neutron scattering [276, 277], electron microscopy [278], and ribosome crystallization [279] figure prominently among the methods involved in this continuing endeavor. On the functional side, exhaustive tRNA-binding studies led to new model conceptions of the elongation cycle involving a third tRNA binding site [280–283, 275]. Peter Moore has judged on this topic: “The two-site model for the ribosome, which the world has accepted for a generation is dead. The existence of a third site for tRNA binding, the exit site, is now established beyond reasonable doubt. This is unquestionably the most significant advance in our understanding of the ribosomal events of protein synthesis in many years” [284].

Finally, the 1990s were dominated by major efforts to carry the structural analysis of ribosomes to atomic resolution. The availability of suitable crystals of ribosomes and ribosomal subunits, particularly from thermophilic and halophilic sources, and the solution of the phasing problem led to a proliferation of X-ray crystallographic studies to which Wittmann and Ada Yonath [285] in Berlin and the group at Pushchino [286] had laid the ground with their ribosome crystallization initiatives in the 1980s. After almost 20 years of continued efforts, atomic resolution has now been achieved for the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui [287] and Deinococcus radiodurans [288], the small subunit from Thermus thermophilus [289, 290], and near-atomic resolution for the 70S-tRNA–mRNA complex [291]. In parallel, the development of cryoelectron microscopic image reconstruction has helped to refine the overall 3D shape of ribosomal particles, in particular as related to specific functional states [292, 293]. Thus a dynamic picture of the ribosome at atomic resolution emerged around 2000 for which the Nober Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Ada Yonath, Thomas Steitz, and Venkatraman Ramakrishnan in 2009.

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan (2015) - Seeing is Believing - A Hundred Years of Visualizing Molecules

Kurt Wuethrich said, "You aren't 120 years old“ because my talk was called "120 Years of Visualizing Molecules“. So clearly, it's not going to be about my work. But after hearing 2 of the last 3 talks, I should say it's "100 years of visualizing molecular structure", because those are 2 somewhat different things. The first thing is, how did we even get to the idea that there are molecules? That's an amazing intellectual journey made by humans in the 18th and 19th century. And for those of you who are interested in knowing how we went from knowing nothing about the organization of ordinary matter to understanding molecular structure, I highly recommend this book. The point is that even before we could see molecules, we really knew a lot about what molecules were like and what their structures would be like. How do we actually see molecules? How do we directly visualize molecules? You heard 2 really amazingly brilliant talks about how to resolve fluorescent molecules beyond the Abbe limit and even in live cells, and that's really transforming biology. But now we come to the reality check that was discussed in the last talk. These techniques can show us where molecules are but not what their structure itself is. Because most of the atoms are not fluorescent, they simply scatter light, and so for the vast majority of atoms in any sample, the Abbe limit unfortunately still applies. In fact, it's ironic that if you want to know the structure of a fluorescent molecule or GFP, you can't use these super-resolution microscopy. You have to use something else. And what that something else is for the last 100 years was x-rays. X-rays are waves, and for that Max von Laue, for that discovery, won the Nobel Prize in, I believe, 1914. He showed that when he hit x-rays on a crystal, he would get these spots. Actually, he misinterpreted these spots, so he didn't get the analysis of these spots correct. That was done by a graduate student, Lawrence Bragg who, for his PhD work, went on to become the youngest ever Nobel laureate and still is the youngest one in science. In fact, because it was his original work, his supervisor didn't get the Nobel Prize because these were all published on his own. And that still remains something of a Cambridge tradition, not always honoured, I'm afraid, but still there. How did this work? What Bragg realized is that if you take crystals, which are regular 3-dimensional arrays of molecules, and you hit them with a beam of x-rays, then, because you have these arrays, you'll get interference. And that interference reinforces the x-rays only in certain directions and that gives rise to spots, which are now called Bragg reflections. If you collect these spots, then that's what this looks like. The point is that these scattered rays are there, whether there's a lens there or not. So the light rays - you can have a lens that recombines these scattered rays to form an image. With x-rays, you don't have a convenient lens, and so you have to recombine them in some other way. What you do is you measure them and you recombine them mathematically, which is equivalent to doing a Fourier transform, and you then get an image of the object. Since x-rays have wavelengths of about 1.5 Angstroms or now even shorter, you can resolve things, which are less than 1 Angstrom apart. And so you can actually resolve the atoms apart in a molecule. The first such structures were determined using guess work because there were only a few spots, so you could guess at the structure of your molecule and you could see if it agreed with the pattern of spots. Using that was the first surprise. The first molecule structure that Bragg discovered was was sodium chloride, just has 2 atoms, sodium and chlorine, and he found there was no sodium chloride molecule. This caused a big fight with the chemist who said that he's a physicist and he doesn't understand any chemistry and he's talking nonsense. Of course, this is one of the many ways in which crystallography has actually influenced chemistry. Now, subsequently, as it got more complex, people had to use mathematics to recombine those spots using Fourier methods to reconstruct an image of the molecule in order to be able to interpret it. In those days, there were no computer graphics. And so what they had to do was to take the Fourier density and contour it on these plastic plates and stack them up, That's how they'd look at their three-dimensional image of the molecule, But you can see here that these round blobs represent the atoms, you can actually see separate atoms, and so you can see what the atomic structure of the molecule is. This particular molecule was penicillin determined by Dorothy Hodgkin who is shown here on the postage stamp. She's the only scientist, I believe, in Britain who has 2 postage stamps at 2 different times after her. This shows the structure of penicillin, which again was a little bit of a controversy because of this rather square beta-lactam ring, which some chemist didn't believe existed because it would cause strain. Again, it's an example of how molecular structure has illuminated chemistry. Now, these kinds of methods were useful for molecules for a few up to a hundred atoms or even a couple of hundred atoms. But when you get to proteins, they consist of thousands of atoms, and that required another way of calculating the image. That was done by 2 people who founded the lab where I work, which is Max Perutz, who was Bragg's protégé, and John Kendrew, who was Bragg's PhD student originally. These are the molecules that they looked at at the bottom. This is haemoglobin and this is myoglobin. These are 2 oxygen-carrying proteins in our blood. That person in the middle is Gisela, who is Max's wife, and she's pinning a carnation on his coat doing the Nobel ceremony. Now, when you get a typical protein structure, you don't have enough detail to see individual atoms as little spheres as you saw in that picture of penicillin. So the question is, how would you go about looking at a molecule at an image and actually getting an atomic structure out of it. It's a little bit like solving a jigsaw puzzle. This would be what a 3-dimensional image of the molecule looks like. This happens to be the small subunit of the ribosome. It has about 200,000 atoms in it. What you would do is you would zoom in on it and look for things you recognize. If you see here, there are 2 ridges, 1 here and 1 here, and if you know what you're doing, you realize that these are 2 chains of nucleic acid that are wrapped around each other to form a double helix. And so suddenly you can start building in your molecular pieces into this image just like you would fit in a jigsaw puzzle, except it's a 3-dimensional puzzle, and you don't know the answer beforehand because it's not on the cover of the box. Now you suddenly have a molecular structure from an image. But it's only part of the structure, so what you have to do is figure out where it is, and you have to keep on building until you've essentially interpreted this entire molecule. Basically, until you've got no density, which is no part of the image left to interpret, you just keep on going and you end up with a complete structure. Now, this is a sort of process by which every molecule has been directly imaged for the last 100 years, just about. There are other ways of determining molecular structure. Kurt Wuethrich, as you know, invented a way of determining molecular structure by NMR, but this is by a set of constraints on a chain, which tells you how the chain will be folded and how groups in the chain will be arranged. It's not a direct visualization, or imaging, like crystallography or like optical microscopy. This technique went from sodium chloride, which is 2 atoms, and it's capable of determining the complete atomic structure of something like a whole ribosome, which is half a million atoms. And in fact, now we have a structure of the ribosome from higher organisms, which is close to a million atoms. So you can see it's an incredibly powerful technique that's transformed chemistry, and it's one reason why so many chemistry Nobel Prizes have gone for molecular structure. The problem is that when you're studying more and more complex molecules, it's harder and harder to get them to crystallize. Many of my people have spent years trying to crystallize something unsuccessfully. The other problem is many molecular assemblies are transient. They don't stay stable enough and they're not confirmationally homogeneous enough to be able to crystallize them and solve by x-ray crystallography. It leads to a question. I'm a ribosome biologist. I'm not really what you would call an x-ray crystallographer, and so it made me realize, what exactly is my goal? If you don't understand what your goal is, you can be in trouble. When I was a child, if someone had told me that Kodak would go bankrupt, I would've thought they were completely insane. And yet, after 131 years, Kodak became bankrupt because it didn't realize that its goal, it was in the imaging business, not in the film business. In fact, although they made one of the first really good digital chips for photography, some guy in Kodak apparently decided that they didn't want to push that too much because it would cannibalize their film business. Bad mistake. Okay. I didn't want to make that sort of mistake. So looking around, there is another technique, which is electron microscopy, which has the right sort of wavelength to look at molecular structure. This is Ernst Ruska on the left and that's his electron microscope on the right. What you'll notice is that he had to wait 53 years after his discovery to get his Nobel Prize, and he only died 2 years after he got his Nobel Prize. It's something of a record for the amount he had to wait for the Nobel Prize. Material scientists have also always been able to determine atomic structures using electron microscopy, almost since its inception. But the contrast and complexity of biological molecules meant you couldn't do it that for biological molecules. How did electron microscopy get used in biology? A classic way is to cut sections of cells and stain them with some heavy atom and look at what the cells look like, so these are ultra-structures of cells that are familiar from every textbook. But that's not what I mean. What I mean is how do you get at molecular structures using electron microscopy in biology? One of the first big advances was done by David De Rosier and Aaron Klug. This is a picture, a diagram from their paper in Nature in 1968, which was reproduced in Aaron Klug's Nobel Lecture in 1982. The idea is that if you have a sample here and you shine a beam of electrons, what you get when you have an image, when you focus it to form an image, is a 2-dimensional projection of the molecule or of the object. Now, if you were to look at it from a different direction, you would get a different 2-dimensional projection and same here. If you were able to combine all these 2-dimensional projections, you might be able to get a 3-dimensional structure of the object. Of course, in an electron microscope you don't change the direction of the beam. What you would do is you would tilt the sample, you would rotate the sample and that way you would sample different views. One of the things that De Rosier and Klug realized is that if you take a Fourier transform of the 2-dimensional image of the object, it would be like a plane in Fourier space. And so if you collected all these planes and then did a reverse transform of the Fourier planes, you would get back a 3-dimensional image of the object. Those of you who are more in the cell biology medical side, I can tell you this is exactly how CAT scan works. You get different projections of your object, and there's a way to recombine the projections to get a 3-dimensional image. The problem with this is that biological samples have very low contrast, so you have to stain them in order to see them very well. That's one problem. The other problem is if you don't stain them, the contrast is so low that you have to hit them with enough electrons to see them. And electrons are damaging, so if you rotate your sample, you have to collect a whole series of images. By the time you finish collecting your series, your sample is dead. You've destroyed your molecular structure. There are a couple of ways around that. One is if you have a mixture of the same molecule and you're looking at all of them at the same time, these molecules will all be in different orientations, and each of them will give rise to a different projection. Now, the trick is to find out which orientation of this molecule gave rise to this projection and same for this molecule and same for this molecule. If you can figure that out, then you know that if you have a molecule, you know that this projection here corresponds to this view, this projection here corresponds to this view, this projection corresponds to this view, so you get thousands of views at the same time. What this means also is that you don't have to hit the molecules very hard. You get the power of averaging from all these thousands of molecules, and so you can get a 3-dimensional structure. The other really major advance that has come out is that, by embedding these molecules in ice that has been cooled so rapidly that it doesn't crystallize to form crystalline ice (so it's what we call vitreous ice), you can look at these molecules in effectively their native state. And so you can look at very large complexes in their native state. The problem is that even when you do that, they're incredibly noisy. This is a field of ribosomes, which are fairly large molecules, and people in this field joke that the ribosomes are a particularly easy sample to work with. But nevertheless, if you look at what an individual projection of the molecule looks like, you can see it's barely visible. You can hardly see what it looks like and let alone get some sort of atomic structure. And yet, remarkably, this technique was used to get something at about 27 Angstroms resolution of the ribosome. It's the first time in the ribosome that you could actually visualize tRNA molecules inside the ribosome. Even though crystals of the ribosome had been around for about 15 years at this point, these were in 1995 by far the best images we had of ribosomes. Of course, they were soon superseded in the next few years by crystallographic methods. But nevertheless, it showed that you could get something about the shape of molecules by using this. But could you use this method to get structures of biological molecules? No one thought it was possible at the time, in 1995, because a very large molecule, which should be easy to see in a line, could only give you about 27 Angstroms resolution. But that very same year, there was actually a seminal paper that was published by another person who works in my lab - who was the director of the lab, who actually hired me, although I'm now his boss, I should say. He published this paper, which was essentially a theoretical paper that had come out of studies he had done on bacteriorhodopsin. And what he suggested was that with electrons, if you had molecules which were only about 100,000 Daltons or bigger, you should be able to determine the atomic structure with only 10,000 molecules. What did he mean by atomic structure? He meant 3 Angstroms resolution. Now, 15 years later, there were still no atomic structures except for viruses, which involved very large symmetric molecules that combined millions and millions of copies of the molecules. It wasn't clear that this thing would ever materialize, although no one could ever find a mistake in Richard's paper. In fact, everybody agreed that he was right and it wasn't clear what was happening, although Richard, himself, knew what the limitations were and was working on them for the last 20 years. Now, we have another Resolution Revolution - and that's not my term, that's the term of Werner Kuhlbrandt who wrote this perspective that accompanied our paper in Science last year on the mitochondrial ribosome. If you want to know in detail what's happened, I suggest that you read this very short perspective, which gives you an idea of what's happened in the field. But I'll just briefly tell you. There are 2 main advances. Firstly, we've had better microscopes over the last 20 years. We have better stages, more stable microscopes, et cetera, but that didn't take us to this point. It improved things but not to the point where we could get atomic structures. What has happened in the last few years is that we've had better detectors and better ways of processing the data. The first thing are better detectors. Classically, the way to detect electrons was by using film. Film is a reasonably good electron detector. It is actually a direct detector. To call these new electronic detectors 'direct detectors' is a slight misnomer, because so is film. Film is also slow and laborious. You have to scan it. It has its own problems of uniformity and noise and so on. Along the way, CCD detectors came out. But CCD detectors are actually a very bad electron detector because they take electrons, convert them to fluorescent light, and then that light is detected via fibre-optic into a CCD chip. Richard used to tell people that if you want to degrade your data and get worse data, then you should abandon film and go to CCDs. In the meantime, a new class of detectors based on CMOS chips have combined the advantages of film in that they directly detect electrons with the convenience of CCDs in that you don't have to develop and scan films and so on. They have better signal to noise than film, significantly better DQE than film, so they're more sensitive than film. The other thing that's happened is better image processing, better algorithms to look at these very noisy images and get the most out of them. The way we got into EM is because this post-doc, Israel Sanchez, spent 3 years trying to crystallize a ribosomal complex and was getting nowhere. And out of frustration, he decided to collaborate with another post-doc, Xiao-Chen Bai, who was working for my colleague, Sjors Scheres, and these 2 guys were doing electron microscopy. What they did was to figure out what his samples looked like. But to do that, first he thought, let me just put a test sample of ribosomes and see what I can get now, and then I'll look at my complex. Now, there are 2 things that happened. One is that it turns out that whenever electrons hit a sample, they ionize the sample. And if you're in a non-conductive medium like ice, vitreous ice, this creates very large local fields. It's a phenomenon called charging. And the molecules start to move because they're charged and they're experiencing these strong local fields. The moment you hit your sample, from the minute you start looking at it, the samples are moving around. This is just to show you what beam-induced movements look like. I'm showing it to you after the fact because now we can actually track them, but this is a problem. Now, the thing about these new detectors is that they're very fast, so we may be able actually be able to do something about these beam-induced movements. The first thing that these new algorithms do is that if you look at this image here, it's extremely noisy. And what you have to do is ask, what is the orientation of the molecule that gave rise to this particular projection? In order to do that, you do a mathematical thing. You calculate all possible projections and you decide which projection matches the observed projection. That's basically the essence of the idea. But if it's noisy, an incorrect projection can sometimes give you better agreement than the real orientation of the molecule. This is a classic problem with noisy data that you can converge on the wrong minimum. What Sjors Scheres did was apply a very well-known statistical method called Bayesian likelihood to this problem. So rather than asking what's the best align orientation of the molecule that matches this projection, he asked, By storing that entire Bayesian probability and then using all of that to do the recombination, you can arrive with a very robust and much more accurate 3-dimensional reconstruction of the molecule. The other thing I alluded to was the beam movement. Now, it turns out that these detectors are so fast, that what you're seeing here is a 1-second image, and that's what a 1-second projection of a particle looks like. But this 1-second image is actually 16 frames that are shown here. You might ask, if I could just watch this molecule move along these frames, then I might be able to track the movement of the molecules. In order to do that, you have to be able to detect the molecule within the frames. Now, clearly, if you add up all 16 frames, there's enough signal there to see the molecule and align it. Now, it turns out for ribosomes, you can do it for 8 frames, you can do it for 6 or 4 frames, but you can't do it for 2 frames - because it becomes so noisy that you get errors in the location and orientation of the molecule, so it's not good enough. What we can do is do a 4-frame average and then do a moving 4-frame window across those 16 frames. And what this does is it allows you to track the movement of the molecule during that 1 second. Once you can track it, what you can do is you can apply a correction for the movement to each one of those frames, and then add up the corrected frames. So now you have a projection that's corrected for the movement, so it's not blurred; it's effectively deblurred. Doing that what Sjors and his colleagues along with my post-doc, Israel, did was they took just 30,000 particles of the ribosome, and they could actually separate these molecular strands, which are called beta strands. And they could look at the helical structure of alpha helices and even see density for the side chains of helices. Suddenly, it looked like you could do atomic structures by electron microscopy. That indeed is what 2 other post-docs in my lab applied to a problem that had essentially defeated crystallographic methods for over a decade. And that is the structure of mitochondrial ribosomes. This is Alexey Amunts, who essentially started this mitochondrial project in my lab and really drove all of the biology. And this is Alan Brown, who did a brilliant job of interpreting what was an amazingly complex structure about which very little was known previously. These structures were published in 3 papers in Science over the last year, and that's just to tell you that the Nobel Prize doesn't have to mean the kiss of death. I know that there is a temptation after you get the prize to go around giving talks and being wined and dined. But if you say no to most of these invitations and really drive science in your lab and remember what actually got you into science in the first place, you can still be publishing important papers. Incidentally, Alexey Amunts is going to where Astrid works, which is the University of Stockholm, as a faculty member. The question is what are mitochondrial ribosomes and why are they interesting? Mitochondria are the energy powerhouses of our cell; they're organelles in our cell, But the way they are thought to have originated is that 2 billion years ago, 1 cell swallowed another cell. And the cell that it swallowed, which was now inside a bigger cell, eventually evolved to become mitochondria. But because, as species diverged, the mitochondria from 1 species could not recombine with the mitochondria from other species, the mitochondria of various species diverged in their own way and they're incredibly divergent. What Alexey did was to look at these mitochondrial ribosomes, and he found that there were a mixture of many different types of particles. And so this is not something that would ever have crystallized. Yet, using this method of electron microscopy, we can sort out mixtures of particles, and it can even sort out mixtures of different confirmations of the same particle in the object, which a crystallographic method could never do. He could get images that were detailed enough to build a molecular structure, so he and Alan Brown went on to build this molecule, which has almost a million atoms in its entirety. In fact, we have built 80 proteins, which have very little sequence homology with what was known. What this does is, it means that people who want to look at molecular structure are no longer at the mercy of having to crystallize something, which involves producing large amounts of stable homogeneous material. They can look at even mixtures of samples. They can look at molecules that assemble transiently and so on. And so just as these revolutions in optimal microscopy are going to transform cell biology, the revolution in electron microscopy is going to transform molecular structural biology. Thank you very much.

Kurt Wüthrich sagte: „Sie sind nicht 120 Jahre alt“, denn mein Vortrag wurde als „120 Jahre Visualisierung von Molekülen" betitelt. So wird es also klar: es geht nicht um meine Arbeit. Aber nach 2 der letzten 3 Diskussionen würde ich sagen, es lautet korrekt „100 Jahre Visualisierung der molekularen Struktur“, weil diese 2 etwas andere Themen angehen. Zunächst geht es um die Frage, wie wir auf die Idee gekommen sind, dass es Moleküle gibt. Das ist eine erstaunliche intellektuelle Reise der Menschen ins 18. und 19. Jahrhundert. Und für diejenige von euch, die es interessiert, wie wir vom Nichtwissen über die Organisation der herkömmlichen Materie zu Erkenntnis der Molekülstruktur kamen, empfehle ich dieses Buch. Es geht darum, dass noch bevor wir die Moleküle sehen konnten, wir wirklich viel darüber wussten, wie sie aussehen und wie ihre Strukturen aussehen. Wie sehen wir Moleküle? Wie können wir Moleküle visualisieren? Sie hörten 2 wirklich erstaunlich brillante Vorträge darüber an, wie man fluoreszierende Moleküle jenseits des Abbe-Limits und sogar in lebenden Zellen auflöst, und das ändert die Biologie ganz grundlegend. Aber jetzt kommen wir zum Realitätscheck, der während der letzten Diskussion angesprochen wurde. Diese Verfahren können uns zeigen, wo Moleküle sind, aber nicht, wie ihre Struktur ist. Da die Mehrheit von Atomen nicht fluoreszierend ist, streuen sie einfach das Licht, und dadurch gilt das Abbe-Limit leider noch immer für die überwiegende Mehrheit von Atomen in den Proben. Tatsächlich ist es ironisch, dass wenn Sie die Struktur eines Fluoreszenzmoleküls oder eines GFP wissen möchten, dann können Sie diese superauflösende Mikroskopie nicht benutzen. Sie müssen etwas anderes nutzen. Und etwas anderes schließt im Zeitrahmen der letzten 100 Jahre auch Röntgenstrahlen ein. Die Röntgenstrahlen sind die Wellen, für deren Entdeckung Max von Laue den Nobelpreis gewann, ich glaube 1914. Er zeigte, dass bei der Bestrahlung eines Kristalls mit den Röntgenstrahlen diese Flecken erscheinen. Eigentlich missdeutete er diese Flecken und erstellte eine fehlerhafte Analyse dieser Flecken. Das wurde von einem graduierten Studenten Lawrence Bragg gemacht, der für seine Doktorarbeit zum jüngsten Nobelpreisträger wurde und es immer noch ist. Und weil es seine eigene Arbeit war, erhielt sein Studiengangsleiter keinen Nobelpreis, weil die Arbeit ohne seine Hilfe veröffentlicht wurde. Und so etwas gehört noch immer zur Cambridge Tradition, leider nicht immer gebührend umgesetzt, aber noch immer existent. Wie sind die Details dazu? Bragg stellte fest, dass wenn man Kristalle nimmt, die reguläre dreidimensionale Anordnungen von Molekülen darstellen, und diese mit einem Röntgenstrahlenbündel bestrahlt, man dann eine Interferenz erhält, weil die Moleküle eine besondere Anordnung haben. Und die Interferenz verstärkt die Röntgenstrahlen nur in bestimmten Richtungen und verursacht Flecken, die jetzt als Bragg-Reflexionen bekannt sind. Wenn sie diese Flecken sammeln, dann sieht es so aus. Der Punkt ist, dass diese Streustrahlen da sind, unabhängig davon, ob eine Linse dort vorhanden ist oder nicht. Auch die Lichtstrahlen - man kann eine Linse haben, die diese Streustrahlen rekombiniert, um ein Abbild zu schaffen. Mit Röntgenstrahlen haben Sie keine geeignete Linse und deswegen müssen Sie diese auf eine andere Weise neu rekombinieren. Sie müssen sie messen und mathematisch rekombinieren, wie bei einer Fourier-Transformation, und Sie erhalten dann ein Abbild des Objekts. Da die Röntgenstrahlen Wellenlängen von etwa 1,5 Angström oder kürzer aufweisen, können sie Objekte auflösen, die weniger als 1 Angström voneinander entfernt sind. Und damit können Sie effektiv die Atome in einem Molekül auflösen. Die ersten solchen Strukturen wurden durch eine Raterei bestimmt, weil es nur ein paar Flecken gab, so dass man anhand der Struktur der Molekül Vermutungen anstellte, und man dann prüfte, ob sie mit dem Fleckenmuster übereinstimmte. Das bot die erste Überraschung. Die erste Molekülstruktur, die Bragg entdeckte, war Natriumchlorid, und hatte nur 2 Atome, Natrium und Chlor, und er fand heraus, dass es kein Natriumchlorid-Molekül gab. Dies rief einen großen Streit mit den Chemikern hervor, die sagten, er sei ein Physiker und er verstehe nichts von der Chemie und er rede Unsinn. Natürlich, ist es eine der vielen Arten, mit denen die Kristallographie tatsächlich Chemie beeinflusste. Nunmehr, da es immer komplizierter wurde, mussten die Menschen die Mathematik verwenden, um diese Flecken mit Fourier-Methoden zu rekombinieren, um so ein Abbild des Moleküls zu rekonstruieren und es zu interpretieren. Damals gab es keine Computergrafik. Und sie mussten die Fourier-Dichte nehmen, sie auf diesen Kunststoffplatten umreißen und die aufstapeln. Dadurch konnten sie ihr dreidimensionales Bild des Moleküls sehen, Aber Sie können hier sehen, dass diese runden Punkte die Atome darstellen, Sie können tatsächlich vereinzelte Atome sehen und damit können Sie sehen, wie die Atomstruktur des Moleküls aussieht. Dieses spezielle Molekül war Penicillin, das durch Dorothy Hodgkin bestimmt wurde, die hier auf der Briefmarke abgebildet ist. Sie ist die einzige Wissenschaftlerin, so glaube ich, die in Großbritannien auf 2 Briefmarken zu 2 verschiedenen Zeiten dargestellt wurde. Dies zeigt die Struktur von Penicillin, die wiederum aufgrund dieses eher quadratischen Beta-Lactam-Rings etwas umstritten war, weil einige Chemiker nicht einmal an deren Existenz glaubten, da sie Ringspannungen haben würden. Wiederum es ist ein Beispiel dafür, wie Molekülstruktur die Chemie verbessert. Diese Verfahren waren für Moleküle hilfreich, die aus wenigen bis 100 Atomen, oder sogar einigen 100 Atomen bestanden. Aber wenn man Proteine nimmt, wird sich herausstellen, dass die aus Tausenden Atomen bestehen, und somit eine andere Art der Berechnung des Abbildes nötig ist. Das wurde von 2 Personen gemacht, die das Labor gründeten, in dem ich arbeite: Max Perutz, der ein Protegé von Bragg war, und John Kendrew, der ursprünglich ein Doktorand von Bragg war. Dies sind die Moleküle, die sie betrachteten. Es handelt sich um Hämoglobin und Myoglobin, Hier in der Mitte ist Gisela, die Frau von Max, und sie heftet eine Nelke auf sein Jackett während der Nobel-Zeremonie. Wenn Sie eine typische Proteinstruktur haben, gibt es nicht genug Details, um einzelne Atome als kleine Kugeln zu sehen, wie es beim Penicillin der Fall war. Also ist die Frage, wie Sie vom Abbild des Moleküls zu seiner eine Atomstruktur kommen können. Es sieht ein bisschen so aus, als wäre das ein Puzzlespiel. Ungefähr so sieht ein 3-dimensionales Bild des Moleküls aus. Hier wird die kleine Untereinheit des Ribosoms gezeigt. Es weist etwa 200.000 Atome auf. Sie müssen nur das Bild vergrößern und nach den erkennbaren Teilen suchen. Wenn Sie hierher sehen, finden Sie 2 Kämme, einen hier und einen hier, und wenn Sie wissen, was Sie tun, werden Sie erkennen, dass es sich um zwei Ketten der Nukleinsäure geht, die umeinander in der Form einer Doppelhelix gewunden sind. Und plötzlich können Sie wie bei einem Puzzle die molekularen Stücke zu einem Bild zusammenfügen, mit dem Unterschied, dass es ein 3-dimensionales Puzzle ist, und Sie die Antwort im Voraus nicht wissen, weil sie nicht auf dem Deckel der Schachtel abgebildet ist. Und jetzt haben Sie plötzlich aus einem Bild eine Molekülstruktur abgeleitet. Aber es ist nur ein Teil der Struktur und Sie müssen herausfinden, wohin es gehört, und Sie müssen weiterbauen, bis Sie das gesamte Molekül zusammengesetzt haben. Eigentlich bauen Sie so lange, bis Sie keine Dichte mehr haben, die Teil des zu deutenden Bildes wäre, und haben am Ende dann eine komplette Struktur. Nun, dies ist eine Art von Prozess, mit dessen Hilfe jedes Molekül direkt während der letzten 100 Jahre abgebildet wurde. Es gibt andere Möglichkeiten zur Bestimmung der Molekülstruktur. Kurt Wüthrich, wie Sie wissen, erfand eine Methode zur Bestimmung der Molekülstruktur durch NMR, durch eine Reihe von Einschränkungen innerhalb einer Kette, die die Form der Kette und Anordnung der Gruppen an der Kette definiert. Es ist nicht eine direkte Visualisierung oder Bildgebung wie es die Kristallographie oder die Lichtmikroskopie ist. Dieses Verfahren kam von Natriumchlorid, das aus 2 Atomen besteht, und es kann die vollständige Atomstruktur von so etwas wie einem ganzen Ribosom bestimmen, das eine halbe Million Atome aufweist. Und in der Tat, jetzt haben wir eine Struktur des Ribosoms von höheren Organismen mit fast einer Million Atomen abgebildet. So können Sie sehen wie dieses unglaublich leistungsfähige Verfahren die Chemie veränderte und es ist ein Grund, warum so viele Nobelpreise für Chemie auf dem Gebiet der Molekülstruktur verliehen wurden. Das Problem besteht darin, dass wenn Sie immer komplexere Moleküle studieren, es immer schwerer wird, sie zu kristallisieren. Viele meiner Leute haben jahrelang erfolglos versucht, bestimmte Moleküle zu kristallisieren. Das andere Problem besteht darin, dass viele Molekülgebilde instabil sind. Sie bleiben nicht stabil genug und sie sind nicht konformativ homogen genug, um zu kristallisieren und durch Röntgenkristallographie abgebildet zu werden. Das wirft eine Frage auf. Ich bin ein Biologe der Struktur von Ribosomen untersucht. Ich bin kein echter Röntgen-Kristallograph, und daher kam mir die Frage, was ich wirklich sein will und tun will. Falls Sie nicht wissen, was Ihr Ziel ist, können Sie in Schwierigkeiten geraten. Falls jemand früher gesagt hätte, dass Kodak Pleite gehen würde, hätte ich ihn für verrückt gehalten. Und jetzt 131 Jahre später ist Kodak bankrott, weil die Firma nicht erkannte, dass ihre Zukunft im Bildverarbeitungsgeschäft und nicht im Filmgeschäft lag. Und das obwohl sie einen der ersten wirklich guten digitalen Chip für die Fotografie bauten, denn irgendjemand bei Kodak beschloss offenbar, nicht zu weit zu entwickeln um das Filmgeschäft nicht zu gefährden. Ein großer Fehler. Gut. Ich wollte nicht solche Fehler begehen. Wenn man sich umsieht, findet man eine andere Technik - die Elektronenmikroskopie, die die richtige Wellenlänge hat um Molekülstruktur zu betrachten. Hier links ist Ernst Ruska und hier rechts ist sein Elektronenmikroskop. Sie werden sehen, dass er 53 Jahre auf die Verleihung des Nobelpreises warten musste, und er starb nur 2 Jahre nachdem er den Nobelpreis erhielt. Es muss so etwas wie die Rekord-Wartezeit für den Nobelpreis sein. Die Materialwissenschaftler waren auch immer in der Lage, die Atomstruktur mit Hilfe der Elektronenmikroskopie fast seit ihrer Erfindung zu bestimmen. Aber der Kontrast und die Komplexität der biologischen Moleküle bedeuteten, dass man es bei biologischen Molekülen nicht machen konnte. Wie wurde die Elektronenmikroskopie in der Biologie eingesetzt? Ein klassischer Weg wäre, die Schnitte von Zellen zu machen und diese mit Schweratomen zu färben und dann die Zellen anzusehen, jene Feinstrukturen von Zellen, die uns aus jedem Lehrbuch vertraut sind. Aber das habe ich nicht gemeint. Was ich meinte ist, wie man die Molekülstrukturen mittels der Elektronenmikroskopie in der Biologie erhält. Pioniere waren hier David De Rosier und Aaron Klug. Dies ist ein Bild, ein Diagramm, aus ihrem Artikel in Nature aus dem Jahr 1968, wiedergegeben in Aaron Klugs Nobelpreisrede im Jahre 1982. Die Idee bestand darin, dass wenn Sie eine Probe hier haben und sie mit einem Elektronenstrahl durchstrahlen, und das Bild dann bündeln um ein Bild zu erzeugen, dann haben Sie eine zweidimensionale Projektion des Moleküls oder des Objekts. Nun, wenn Sie aus einer anderen Richtung daraufschauen, würden Sie eine andere zweidimensionale Projektion erhalten. Falls Sie imstande sind, alle diese zweidimensionalen Projektionen zu kombinieren, könnten Sie möglicherweise eine 3-dimensionale Struktur des Objekts erstellen. Natürlich ändert man in einem Elektronenmikroskop nicht die Strahlrichtung. Man kann aber die Probe drehen und auf diese Weise verschiedene Ansichten verprüfen. De Rosier und Klug erkannten eine Regelmäßigkeit, dass wenn sie eine Fourier-Transformation des zweidimensionalen Abbildes des Objekts vornahmen, dann wäre sie wie eine Ebene im Fourier-Raum. Und wenn Sie alle diese Ebenen zusammenführen und dann die Fourier-Ebenen umgekehrt transformieren, erhalten Sie wieder ein 3-dimensionales Abbild des Objekts. Denjenigen unter Ihnen, die in der Zellbiologie mehr auf der medizinischen Seite sind, kann ich sagen, dass es genau wie Computertomographie funktioniert. Sie haben verschiedene Projektionen des Objekts, und es gibt einen Weg, diese Projektionen zu rekombinieren, um ein 3-dimensionales Abbild zu erhalten. Das Problem dabei ist, dass biologische Proben einen sehr niedrigen Kontrast aufweisen, und deswegen diese einzufärben sind um sie gut zu sehen. Das ist das eine Problem. Ein anderes Problem ist, wenn Sie diese nicht färben, dann ist der Kontrast so gering, dass Sie viele Elektronen brauchen um ein gutes Abbild zu haben. Und Elektronen sind schädigend, und bis Sie Ihre Messreihe abgeschlossen haben, die aus vielen Einzelmessungen besteht, wird Ihre Probe tot sein. Sie haben ihre Molekülstruktur zerstört. Es gibt ein paar Möglichkeiten, das zu vermeiden. Eine besteht darin eine Mischung aus dem gleichen Molekül zu haben und sie alle gleichzeitig zu betrachten. Denn dann befinden sich alle diese Moleküle in verschiedenen Ausrichtungen und jedes von ihnen führt zu einer unterschiedlichen Projektion. Und der Trick ist herauszufinden, welche Ausrichtung dieses Moleküls zu dieser Projektion führt und dasselbe für dieses Molekül und dasselbe für dieses Molekül. Wenn Sie es herausfinden können, dann wissen Sie, dass diese Projektion hier dieser Ansicht, diese Projektion hier dieser Ansicht, diese Projektion dieser Ansicht entspricht. Und haben damit Tausende Ansichten gleichzeitig. Das bedeutet auch, dass Sie die Moleküle nicht so stark bestrahlen müssen. Sie erhalten die Möglichkeit den Durchschnitt aus all diesen Tausenden Molekülen zu ermitteln, und so können Sie eine 3-dimensionale Struktur erhalten. Der andere wirklich große Fortschritt besteht darin, dass man die Moleküle in ihrem natürlichen Zustand betrachten kann wenn man Sie in Eis einbettet, welches sehr schnell abgekühlt wurde und somit nicht kristallin ist (so etwas, was wir als Glaseis bezeichnen). Und so können sie sehr große Molekül-Komplexe in ihrem natürlichen Zustand betrachten. Das Problem besteht darin, dass selbst dann sehr viele Störsignale vorhanden sind. Hier ist ein Bereich von Ribosomen, der aus ziemlich großen Molekülen besteht, und die Forscher machen Witze, dass man mit einer Ribosomprobe besonders leicht arbeiten kann. Aber gleichwohl, wenn Sie schauen wollen, wie eine einzelne Projektion des Moleküls aussieht, können Sie sie kaum sehen. Sie können kaum sehen, wie diese aussieht, ganz zu schweigen von irgendeiner Art von Atomstruktur. Und doch wurde dieses Verfahren verwendet, um etwas mit einer ungefähren Auflösung von 27 Angström beim Ribosom abzubilden. Es ist das erste Mal, dass man tatsächlich die tRNA-Moleküle innerhalb des Ribosoms visualisierte. Obwohl es Ribosom-Kristalle schon damals seit ca. 15 Jahren gab, waren diese Bilder aus dem Jahre 1995 bei weitem die besten, die wir von Ribosomen hatten. Natürlich wurden sie schon in den nächsten Jahren durch kristallographische Methoden abgelöst. Aber trotzdem, es zeigte, dass man dadurch etwas über die Form der Moleküle herausfinden konnte. Aber konnte man diese Methode einsetzen, um Strukturen von biologischen Molekülen zu erhalten? Es schien damals im Jahre 1995 unmöglich, weil ein sehr großes Molekül, das gut zu sehen war, trotzdem nur etwa 27 Angström Auflösung lieferte. Aber in demselben Jahr gab es tatsächlich eine bahnbrechende Veröffentlichung, von jemandem, der in meinem Labor arbeitete - dem damaligen Laborleiter, der mich eigentlich angestellt war, obwohl, apropos, zurzeit bin ich sein Chef. Er veröffentlichte diesen Artikel, der im Grunde eine theoretische Arbeit war, die ein Ergebnis seiner Studien an Bakteriorhodopsin darstellte. Und er schlug vor, für Moleküle mit etwa 100.000 Dalton oder darüber, mittels Elektronen die Atomstruktur mit nur 10.000 Molekülen zu bestimmen. Was hat er unter Atomstruktur gemeint? Er meinte, 3 Angström-Auflösung. Jetzt 15 Jahre später, gibt es noch keine Atomstrukturen mit Ausnahme von Viren, die sehr große symmetrische Moleküle miterfassen, die Millionen und Abermillionen Kopien von Molekülen vereinigen. Es war fraglich, wie diese Dinge jemals zustande kämen, obwohl niemand jemals einen Fehler im Artikel von Richards finden konnte. In der Tat waren alle einig, dass er Recht hatte, und es war nicht klar, was genau vorging, obwohl Richard selbst vom Umfang der Einschränkungen wusste und daran die letzten 20 Jahre arbeitete. Jetzt haben wir eine weitere Revolution in der Auflösung - und das ist nicht mein Begriff, das ist der Begriff von Werner Kühlbrandt, der diese Zusammenfassung verfasste, die unserem Artikel über das mitochondriale Ribosom im Magazin Science vom letzten Jahr beilag. Wenn Sie im Detail wissen möchten, worum es ging, rate ich ihnen, diese sehr kurze Zusammenfassung zu lesen, um eine Vorstellung davon zu haben, was auf dem Gebiet passiert. Aber ich werde Ihnen ganz kurz darüber berichten. Es gibt zwei Hauptfortschritte. Zunächst sind die Mikroskope in den letzten 20 Jahren immer besser geworden. Wir haben bessere Objekttische, stabilere Mikroskope, usw., aber das alles hat nicht zu dieser Verbesserung geführt. Natürlich war es eine Verbesserung, aber nicht so sehr um Atomstrukturen zu sehen. In den letzten Jahren gab es Folgendes: wir bekamen bessere Detektoren und bessere Möglichkeiten zur Datenverarbeitung. Zunächst bessere Detektoren. Ein klassischer Weg zur Ermittlung der Elektronen ist die Verwendung des Filmes. Der Film ist ein einigermaßen guter Elektronendetektor. Eigentlich ist er ein Direktdetektor. Die Benennung dieser neuen elektronischen Detektoren als Direktdetektoren ist eine unglückliche Benennung, denn Film ist auch ein Direktdetektor. Der Film ist dazu zeit- und arbeitsaufwendig. Man muss ihn scannen. Er hat seine eigenen Probleme wie Homogenität und Störanfälligkeit und so weiter. Dann kamen CCD-Detektoren. Aber CCD-Detektor ist eigentlich ein sehr schlechter Elektronendetektor, denn er wandelt Elektronen in Fluoreszenzlicht um und danach wird das Licht über Glasfaser von einem CCD-Chip erfasst. Richard pflegte den Menschen zu sagen, dass wenn sie Ihre Daten ruinieren und noch schlechtere Daten haben möchten, dann sollten Sie auf Film verzichten und zu CCD wechseln. In der Zwischenzeit vereinigte eine neue Klasse von Detektoren auf Grundlage des CMOS-Chips die Vorteile des Films, direkt Elektronen zu ermitteln, mit der Bequemlichkeit des CCD, indem die Entwicklung und Scannen des Films usw. entfallen. Sie haben ein besseres Signal-Rausch-Verhältnis als Film und erheblich bessere detektive Quanten-Ausbeute als Film, so dass sie viel empfindlicher als Film sind. Zu den anderen Innovationen gehört eine bessere Bildverarbeitung, und bessere Algorithmen zur Optimierung von sehr verrauschten Bildern. Wir kamen auf die Elektronenmikrospie, weil dieser Postdoktorand, Israel Sanchez, Und aus Frustration entschied er sich mit einem anderen Postdoktorand, Xiao-Chen Bai, zusammenzuarbeiten, der für meinen Kollegen Sjors Scheres arbeitete, und diese 2 Männer beschäftigten sich mit der Elektronenmikroskopie. Sie gingen so vor, dass sie sich seine Proben im Detail ansahen. Um da voranzukommen nahm er zunächst Proben von Ribosomen, und danach Komplexe, um sie zu betrachten. Und dabei hat er zwei Entdeckungen gemacht. Eine war, dass die Probe ionisiert wird, wenn Elektronen auftreffen. Und wenn das in einem nicht leitfähigen Medium wie Eis, Glaseis geschieht, schafft es sehr große lokale Felder. Dieses Phänomen heiß Aufladung. Und die Moleküle beginnen sich zu bewegen, weil sie geladen sind und das ist ihre Reaktion auf die starken lokalen Felder. Sobald Ihre Probe getroffen wird, von der ersten Minute, wenn Sie die zu beobachten beginnen, bewegen sich die Proben. Ich zeige es Ihnen, um die strahlinduzierte Bewegung zu veranschaulichen. Ich zeige es Ihnen, obwohl wir das Problem jetzt im Griff haben, aber es war mal ein Problem. Nun, diesen neuen Detektoren sind sehr schnell, so sind wir in der Lage, tatsächlich etwas gegen diese strahlinduzierte Bewegung zu tun. Erstens, was diese neuen Algorithmen erstellen, wie sie auf diesem Abbild hier sehen, ist ziemlich verrauscht. Es bleibt uns nur noch übrig zu fragen, welche Ausrichtung die Moleküle haben, die zu dieser bestimmten Projektion führte? Um darauf die Antwort zu kriegen, machen sie eine mathematische Berechnung. Sie berechnen alle möglichen Projektionen und entscheiden, welche Projektion mit der beobachtenden Projektion übereinstimmt. Im Grunde genommen, ist das die Essenz der Idee. Aber wenn es verrauscht ist, kann Ihnen eine ungenaue Projektion manchmal eine bessere Übereinstimmung geben als die tatsächliche Ausrichtung des Moleküls. Das ist ein klassisches Problem mit verrauschten Daten, dass Sie nämlich das falsche Minimum als Basislevel definieren. Und was Sjors Scheres tat, war die Anwendung einer sehr bekannten statistischen Methode, die als Bayessche Wahrscheinlichkeit bekannt ist. Also anstatt zu fragen, welche angepasste Ausrichtung des Moleküls am besten mit dieser Projektion übereinstimmt, fragte er: Mit der Implementierung dieser Bayesschen Wahrscheinlichkeit und danach mit deren Benutzung für die Rekombination, können Sie zu einer sehr besseren und sehr viel genaueren 3-dimensionalen Rekonstruktion des Moleküls gelangen. Die andere Sache, worauf ich hingewiesen habe, ist die Strahlbewegung. Jetzt stellt sich heraus, dass diese Detektoren so schnell sind, das was Sie hier sehen, ist ein 1-Sekunden-Abbild, und das hier, wie eine 1-Sekunden-Projektion eines Teilchens aussieht. Aber dieses 1-Sekunden-Abbild stellt eigentlich 16 Einzelbilder dar, die hier gezeigt werden. Sie können fragen, falls ich die Bewegung dieses Moleküls von einem Einzelbild zu einem anderen beobachten konnte, dann könnte ich die Bewegung der Moleküle verfolgen. Um das zu tun, müssen Sie in der Lage sein, das Molekül innerhalb der Einzelbilder zu erkennen. Natürlich, wenn Sie alle 16 Einzelbilder addieren, gibt es hier eine genügende Zeichengabe zur Erkennung des Moleküls und dessen Ausrichtung. Jetzt stellt sich für die Ribosomen heraus, dass Sie es mit 8 Einzelbilder tun können, und Sie können es mit 6 oder 4 Einzelbildern aber nicht mit 2 Einzelbilder tun, da es so verrauscht wird, dass Sie eine fehlerhafte Position und Ausrichtung des Moleküls bekommen, was nicht gut genug ist. Wir können eine 4-Einzelbild-Zusammenfassung machen und dann dies über jene 16 Einzelbilder bewegen. Und das führt dazu, die Bewegung des Moleküls während dieser 1 Sekunde verfolgen zu können. Sobald Sie in der Lage sind, es zu verfolgen, können Sie eine Korrektur für die Bewegung in jedem dieser Einzelbilder vorzunehmen und dann die korrigierten Einzelbilder zusammenzufügen. So, jetzt haben Sie eine Projektion, deren Bewegung korrigiert ist, und so ist es nicht verschwommen; es ist gut scharfgestellt. Was Sjors und seine Kollegen zusammen mit meinem Postdoktorand Israel diese Arbeit taten, war, Sie nahmen nur 30.000 Teile des Ribosoms, und Sie konnten tatsächlich diese Molekülstränge abtrennen, die als beta-Stränge bezeichnet werden. Und Sie konnten die spiralförmige Struktur der alpha-Helices betrachten und sogar die Dichte an den Seitenketten-Helices erkennen. Plötzlich sah es so aus als ob sie Atomstrukturen mittels Elektronenmikroskopie bestimmen könnten. Das ist was 2 andere Postdoktoranden in meinem Labor gegen das Problem taten, und die kristallographischen Methoden damit in den Schatten gestellt hatten. Und hier ist die Struktur der mitochondrialen Ribosomen. Das ist Alexey Amunts, der dieses mitochondriale Projekt in meinem Labor anging und sich wirklich mit der Biologie beschäftigte. Und das hier ist Alan Brown, der eine brillante Interpretation einer erstaunlich komplexen Struktur durchführte, worüber vorher sehr wenig bekannt war. Diese Strukturen wurden in 3 Artikeln in Science binnen des letzten Jahres veröffentlicht, und das sage ich Ihnen um zu verdeutlichen, dass der Nobelpreis kein "Todeskuss" sein muss. Ich weiß, dass es eine Versuchung ist, nach der Auszeichnung des Preises Vorträge zu halten und zu Galas willkommen geheißen zu werden. Aber wenn Sie "Nein" zu den meisten dieser Einladungen sagen und sich wirklich mit der Wissenschaft in ihrem Labor beschäftigen und sich daran erinnern, was Sie tatsächlich in die Wissenschaft gebracht hat, können Sie immer noch wichtige Artikel veröffentlichen. Übrigens geht Alexey Amunts dorthin, wo Astrid arbeitet: an die Universität Stockholm als ein Fakultätsmietglied. Die Frage ist, was sind die mitochondrialen Ribosomen und warum sind sie interessant? Mitochondrien sind die Energiekraftwerke unserer Zelle; sie sind Organellen in unserer Zelle, aber man glaubt, dass sie dadurch entstanden, dass vor 2 Milliarden Jahren eine Zelle eine andere verschluckte. Und die Zelle, die verschlungen wurde, die nun in einer größeren Zelle war, sich schließlich zu Mitochondrien entwickelte. Aber weil, in dem Maße, wie Arten divergieren, die Mitochondrien von der 1. Art mit den Mitochondrien von anderen Arten nicht rekombinieren konnten, gingen die Mitochondrien verschiedener Arten ihren eigenen Weg auseinander und sie sind unglaublich divergent. Alexey sah sich diese mitochondrialen Ribosomen an, und er fand heraus, dass es eine Mischung aus vielen verschiedenen Arten von Teilchen gab. Und es ist nichts, was jemals herauskristallisiert wäre. Doch mit diesem Verfahren der Elektronenmikroskopie können wir Mischungen von Teilen sortieren, und sogar Mischungen verschiedener Konfirmationen des gleichen Teilchens im Objekt sortieren, was mit einer kristallographischen Methode nicht machbar ist. Er konnte Abbilder erhalten, die detailliert genug waren, um eine Molekülstruktur abzuleiten, und dann baute er mit Alan Brown dieses Molekül, das fast eine Million Atome umfasst. In der Tat haben wir 80 Proteine erstellt, die sehr wenig Sequenzhomologie zu dem haben, was zuvor bekannt war. Es bedeutet, dass Menschen, die die Molekülstruktur ansehen möchten, nicht mehr kristallisieren mussten was die Produktion von großen Mengen an stabilem homogenem Material voraussetzte. Sie können die gleichförmigen Mischungen von Proben ansehen. Sie können Molekülen ansehen, die instabil sind. Und auf dieselbe Weise, wie diese Revolutionen in der optischen Mikroskopie die Zellbiologie transformieren werden, wird die Revolution in der Elektronenmikroskopie die molekulare Strukturbiologie ändern. Vielen Dank.

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan on visualizing molecules
(00:07:28 - 00:31:00)

 

Thomas A. Steitz (2014) - From the Structure of the Ribosome to New Antibiotics

Well, it’s a pleasure to be here once again. And I’m going to talk about our studies again with the ribosome and eventually trying to understand antibiotic resistance. I just wanted to say a couple of words on how I... what my pathway was. In 1968 Brian Hartley who was an enzymologist in Cambridge at the LMB suggested my first project. There’s Brian. He came up to me in the hall which is what happened in Cambridge. And he said: “Tell me, what are you going to do when you go on for your next job?” And I said: He patted me on the back and he said: “There, there my boy, you ought to do something you can do. I suggest hexokinase.” So I thanked him and I ran off to the laboratory to find out what hexokinase did. And I discovered that Dan Koshland had used hexokinase as a model for why one had to have induced fit. He asked the question: “Why is it that ATP is not hydrolysed in the absence of glucose because glucose is just a water molecule with some carbon atoms?” And he said: “It’s because the glucose...” He proposed, he hypothesised glucose is inducing the conformational change necessary for catalysis. So we said: “Ok let’s find out.” And we solved the structure of hexokinase without glucose. And then we did it with glucose. And indeed it goes (click). And Koshland was right. But then we decided we had to move forward. And having been at both Harvard and Cambridge and knowing both Watson and Crick, I decided it was important to study the central dogma put forward by Crick. That is DNA gets copied into DNA. So we worked on replication, the replisome for many, many years. Gets transcribed into RNA by RNA polymerases. And is regulated at this stage. We’ve studied that for many years. And then finally as you heard in the last talk the ribosome reads out the tickertape and arranges the tRNase on the ribosome for protein synthesis. And so I’m going to concentrate on that last stage. Just as an aside, in 1989 about 20 years after my conversation with Brian Harley we solved the structure of glutamyl tRNA synthetase complex with glutamine tRNA. It was very... it was the first time and it was very interesting. And once again Hartley was right. You have to do the right problem at the right time. It’s great to have great ideas but you must do it at just the right time. So we then decided to start on the ribosome. This is what Jim Watson told me the ribosome was about. And when I was at Harvard, large sub-unit, small sub-unit, tRNA in the E-site, P-site, peptide. And then synthesis occurs. There were a few things that weren’t known then. Didn’t know the structure of tRNA. Didn’t know there was a tunnel for the exit. Didn’t know there was an E-site tRNA. And structural details were missing a bit. Then Jim Lake did some studies of the ribosome by electron microscopy, did the individual sub-units, found that they snuggle up together to form a complex. That was pretty good. Still didn’t tell you much about molecular detail. And then Joachim Frank actually in 1995 published this cryo-EM. The first cryo-EM which is now a method taking off I would say. But at this point it’s still relatively low resolution. And the positions of the tRNA were not exactly right. But getting there. So we decided in 1995 that it was time to move on to solve the structure of the ribosome. And there were 2 pivotally important individuals, Nenad Ban to begin with and then Poul Nissen who grew the crystals and started the structure and were important in solving the structure of the 50S ribosomal sub-unit. This is what the low resolution cryo-EM looked like. You can sort of make out what the structure is. There is a person holding a torch on his knees. You know it’s hard to get molecular detail out of this. But in 1998 we got our first 9 angstrom resolution map. That began to show some of the details but had the same shape. So we knew we were on the right path. And then we moved to higher resolution. And in 2000 we got a 2.4 angstrom resolution map. And there’s the structure that we saw in 2000 of the 50S ribosomal sub-unit. And it was kind of a surprise to us and to everybody to know that the RNA was so tightly packed. We had no idea that RNA could be quite so tightly packed. And there’s the peptidyl transferase centre marked by this inhibitor. Mostly there’s no protein in the neighbourhood. And there’s a lot of tightly packed RNA. Proteins scattered around on the surface. Now if you split the ribosome sub-unit in half like an apple, you can see the peptidyl transferase centre. And now you can see the tunnel, about 100 angstroms long. And in green are proteins that are extending into the interior of the ribosome. So there are bits of the protein that go into the ribosome and stabilise the structure. But you can see how tightly the RNA, in white, is packed. So here is the 70S ribosomal sub-unit with the RNA curved around and making complex structure. There it is, very complex. To misquote Watson: RNA is not boring like DNA. It has very complex structure. And the proteins are scattered around on the surface. And the tRNA, the decoding centre as you’ve heard is in the small ribosomal sub-unit. And the peptide bond formation is in the large sub-unit. So one of the things we wanted to study was the source of the ribosome’s catalytic power and peptide bond formation. Crick hypothesised in 1968 that the ribosome was a ribozyme realising of course that how could you have a machine that makes proteins, be made out of protein before there was a protein. So he suggested it must be RNA. And indeed we found that turns out to be true. I had a marvellous graduate student, Martin Schmeing who initiated this work and did most of the work, I’ll talk briefly about, and made the movie that you’ll see. And this is the reaction that’s catalysed by the ribosome. We have an amino acid on the A-site tRNA. The alpha amino group attacks the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl group and the peptidyl tRNA in the P-site to form a tetrahedral intermediate which then breaks down to give the products. I’m going to show you some results of the structural work but in the 50S sub-unit we only use CCA amino acid or peptide. More recently of course one can use the whole ribosome and tRNase and we’ve done that as well. So again splitting the ribosome 50S sub-unit in half, here is the polypeptide exit tunnel. Inside the box is where peptide bond formation occurs. And then without going into all of the many, many structures that were solved of the substrate complexes, this is eventually what Martin Schmeing and co-workers, what he found in the lab was happening at the catalytic site. The orientation of the P-site substrate here where the carbonyl carbon to be attacked there. And there’s the alpha amino group from the A-site substrate in a position to attack the carbonyl carbon interacting with the 2’ hydroxyl here and oriented by A2451. So what’s the mechanism? There’s a lot more known now and I won’t go into the details because it’s too much for this short talk. But the first step in understanding was Andrea Barta in Austria, her lab had proposed a proton shuttle mechanism in which a proton went from the alpha amino group of the attacking amino group, was transferred to the leaving 3 prime hydroxyl group. Now what we’ve subsequently found is it’s a much larger network of hydrogen bonds, including water and other side chains. But there is a sort of proton shuttling going on. So what’s the source of catalytic power? Actually like most enzymes the primary source of catalytic power is orienting the substrates properly for the chemistry. Get rid of that pesky entropy that has the molecules wandering around. The proton shuttle mechanism contributes chemically to it. And there may be some stabilisation of transition state, which is done by most enzymes. There are many steps in ribosome protein synthesis. And there’s an elongation cycle in which you have the peptidyl tRNA in the P-site, an empty A-site and an EF-Tu protein factor delivers a tRNA. And then it leaves and the tRNA with the amino acid is oriented. And then you get peptide bond formation. This is a low resolution structure of the process. But we have to know what the process is. And then this other factor, elongation factor G, EF-G comes in and causes translocation. And so the question I have is: how does this happen? Mostly what’s known is it comes in and it just sort of slips along. Well it must be more complex than that. So how does it go from here to here? What’s causing this change? What is the EF-G doing? It’s not just doing this on the fly. And we’ve discovered that’s true. Now with Peter Moore, a very important collaborator over the years on this project, we solved the structure EF-G by itself. But more recently we’ve solved the structure of complexes. Now the Ramakrishnan lab solved this structure of the complex of the EF-G in the post translocation state. We’ve solved the structure recently. Hopefully we can find a journal that’s willing to publish it because it’s so novel and you know you have to be... They don’t want to publish anything like this. And the compact confirmation. So this factor, the components of the factor have moved dramatically from where they are in the elongation complex. If you look at 4 and then see where 4 moves to. It’s moved a lot. And so then the question is: What’s happening? You know these 2 very large changes in the structure. And what’s happening? Well, look it’s swinging in like that. And so the thought is that maybe, maybe the conformational change is causing the translocation. We can make a movie of that with the thing moving. But we just conclude that it’s the conformational change occurs in going from that pre-translocation state to the post translocation state that pushes the tRNase along to the next stage. So my last 10 minutes or so I’m going to turn my attention to again antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. And you’ve seen many articles about the problems of antibiotic resistance and the resulting deaths due to it. And the question is how do antibiotics bind in 50S ribosomal sub-unit and what are the mechanisms of the resistance. You’ve just heard some thoughts on that matter. Our work was done initially by Jeff Hanson a postdoc and then subsequently by others. And the tRNA binding site here split through the ribosome. There are different locations for antibiotics that we’re going to talk about. The tuberactinomycins here, capreomycin and viomycin bind near the decoding centre. And they’re important for TB. They’re A-site inhibitors, which I won’t talk about. And then the macrolides are a little bit about a bind down the tunnel a bit. And we’ve looked at many of them but I’ll just talk to you about a couple, just to give an example. The macrolides, there are different size macrolide rings. They all bind in the same place down the tunnel. They have different substituents which interact with the ribosomal RNA in different ways. There can be changes in the side chain basis from the ribosome. But mostly it’s pretty steady. And this is where peptide bond formation occurs. So what the macrolide is doing is blocking the process. So how does it work? Here again looking through the split tunnel, there’s the binding site. The macrolide is in red. And in green are bases whose mutation gives rise to resistance. And you can see that they’re all interacting. This group is all interacting with the macrolide. And so you might assume and I think correctly that it’s the change in the shape of the binding site that stops the binding. Now this is in the absence of the macrolide. And this is in the presence of the macrolide. We’re looking up the tunnel. And so how does the macrolide function? It’s functioning by what I call molecular constipation. It blocks the egress of the polypeptide down the tunnel. So the mutation of A2058 to a G lowers the binding constant by 10,000 fold. And it’s a G in haloarcula marismortui and it doesn’t bind a lot of antibiotics, that one. And if we look at where the macrolide binds, you can see that the N2 of that G is right under the macrolide ring. To look at this Daqi Tu and Gregor Blaha mutated the G to an A in the haloarcula making it a pseudo bacteria. And the binding constant changed by many orders of magnitude. We could see where it bound. And in fact it binds exactly in the same place, the same orientation, except that the macrolide ring is displaced presumably due to this pesky N2 that comes into the position. So what do we do with this information? There are different families of antibiotics that bind to many sites and nearby sites as you’ve heard in the last talk. So here the binding sites near the peptidyl transferase centre are close together. And so what’s being done is a company which started out being Rib-X founded by a number of us who were interested in this area and now Melinta Therapeutics are using these structures to design new antibiotics. And the slides I’m going to show now are all theirs. I’m just the conveyer of the information. So here again is the peptidyl transferase centre with different families of antibiotics all bound near to each other in the peptidyl transferase centre. And so what you want... The strategy is, is to take a piece of one and chemically tie it to a piece of another one. So here for example are 3 antibiotics. And the first one called Radezolid has quite increased potency. Actually I’ll mention a bit more about that. It’s again combining fragments here. And then you can also combine the macrolide. And most importantly -and I can’t... I have no slides to show what they’ve actually done- is to take this whole area and design a whole new family of antibiotics. And that’s looking very promising work against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. So this RX-01 family. This takes Linezolid which has no potency against a number of strains. Red is bad, anything over 4 is bad, very bad. If you make the Radezolid, the combo, it works very well. And also is true looking at various enterococci. You see that Linezolid is not so great. RX-02, that’s the enhanced macrolide. The same thing. If you look at the macrolide, the azithromycin very bad, very, very, very bad, 128 is nothing against all these strains. Make the combo and it’s very good. So the strategy works. And I should just say that it works and it’s being developed. The Linezolid has completed phase 2 clinical trials. And other things are along the way. And then just one last thing about the A-site binding sites and this is our work showing that the viomycin and capreomycin bind to the A-site. And it binds to the small sub-unit. And there is the binding site. It’s interacting with large and small sub-units. And this shows where it’s located. It interacts with the tRNA of the large sub-unit and the small sub-unit. And here is where the decoding happens. So it’s locking the ribosome in this position. So it can’t move forward. Ok, that’s nice to know. But what are you going to do with it? Well, it turns out there are many compounds now that are known that bind in this neighbourhood. There’s the viomycin here but there are many other compounds. And so if one could make money off of a TB antibiotic, not so obvious, and if one could get a drug company to develop it, I speculate that one could put these together in some way or other. Or to just use the surface to design a new compound that would work against TB. So the idea is that you could use this information to create an antibiotic that would be active against all these resistant strains. And this is a major problem because the XDR strain is resistant to everything. So this is a major point that, a major closing point that I want to make. And that is that basic research is very important. Basic research on the structure and function of the ribosome is leading to the development of new antibiotics that are proving effective against resistant bacterial strains. And there’s a lot of push in the US and other places for the NIA to support translational research. And I have to say the only translational research I’m in favour of is the ribosome. And so I’ll stop there. Thank you. Applause.

Ich freue mich sehr, wieder hier sein zu können. Und ich werde auch diesmal über unsere Forschung zum Ribosom berichten und wie wir letztendlich versuchen, die Antibiotikaresistenz zu verstehen. Ich möchte Ihnen kurz erzählen, wie ich… wie mein Weg war. Er kam in der Eingangshalle in Cambridge, wo man sich üblicherweise begegnete, auf mich zu und sagte: Und ich antwortete: „Nun, ich möchte zur Struktur des Aminoacyl-tRNA-Synthetasekomplexes mit tRNA arbeiten.“ Er klopfte mir auf die Schultern und sagte: Ich bedankte mich bei ihm und rannte ins Labor, um herauszufinden, welche Bedeutung die Hexokinase hat. Und ich fand heraus, dass Dan Koshland die Hexokinase als ein Modell dafür verwendet hatte, wozu man das „Induced fit”-Konzept braucht. Er stellte nämlich die Frage: Warum wird dieses ATP in Abwesenheit von Glucose nicht hydrolysiert, wenn doch Glucose nur ein Wassermolekül mit einigen Kohlenstoffatomen ist? Und er sagte: Das ist deshalb der Fall, weil die Glucose… Er vermutete, dass Glucose die Konformationsänderung herbeiführt, die für die Katalyse benötigt wird. Wir sagten also: Okay, das wollen wir herausfinden. Und wir klärten die Struktur der Hexokinase ohne Glucose auf. Und dann machten wir das Gleiche mit Glucose. Und das funktioniert tatsächlich (klick). Koshland hatte also Recht. Aber dann beschlossen wir, dass wir noch weitergehen sollten. Und nachdem ich sowohl in Harvard als auch in Cambridge gewesen war und sowohl Watson als auch Crick kannte, hielt ich es für wichtig, das zentrale Dogma zu untersuchen, das Crick aufgestellt hatte. Nämlich: DNA wird in DNA kopiert. So arbeiteten wir also lange, lange Jahre an der Replikation, dem Replisom, das durch RNA-Polymerasen auf RNA transkribiert und in dieser Phase reguliert wird. Wir haben das viele Jahre lang untersucht. Letztendlich, wie Sie im letzten Vortrag gehört haben, greift das Ribosom den „Lochstreifen“ ab und arrangiert die tRNase für die Proteinsynthese auf dem Ribosom. Und deshalb werde ich mich hier auf diese letzte Phase konzentrieren. Nur als Randbemerkung: klärten wir die Struktur des Glutamyl-tRNA Synthetasekomplexes mit Glutamin-tRNA auf. Das war sehr… das war das erste Mal und es war sehr interessant. Und wieder einmal hatte Hartley Recht behalten. Man muss sich zum richtigen Zeitpunkt mit dem richtigen Problem befassen. Es ist großartig, tolle Ideen zu haben, aber man muss sie auch zum richtigen Zeitpunkt umsetzen. Wir entschieden uns dann, mit dem Ribosom zu beginnen. Das hier hat mir Jim Watson über das Ribosom erzählt, als ich in Harvard war. Große Untereinheit, kleine Untereinheit, tRNA an der E-Stelle, P-Stelle, Peptid. Und dann findet die Synthese statt. Einiges war damals noch nicht bekannt. Man kannte die Struktur der tRNA nicht. Man wusste nicht, dass es einen Tunnel für den Ausgang gab. Man wusste nicht, dass es die E-Stellen-tRNA gibt. Und auch strukturelle Details waren nicht bekannt. Und dann führte Jim Lake einige Untersuchungen des Ribosoms mit dem Elektronenmikroskop durch. Er beschäftigte sich mit den einzelnen Untereinheiten und stellte fest, dass sie sich aneinander drücken, um einen Komplex zu bilden. Das war schon ziemlich gut, sagte aber immer noch nicht viel über die molekularen Details aus. Und dann veröffentlichte Joachim Frank schließlich 1995 diese Kryo-EM. Das war die erste Kryo-EM. Inzwischen ist diese Methode so richtig durchgestartet, würde ich sagen. Aber damals hatte das noch eine relativ geringe Auflösung. Und die Positionen der tRNA waren nicht exakt richtig, aber auf einem guten Weg. Deshalb beschlossen wir 1995, weiter an der Aufklärung der Ribosomenstruktur zu arbeiten. Und da hatten vor allem zwei Menschen eine zentrale Bedeutung: Nenad Ban und Poul Nissen, die die Kristalle züchteten, mit der Bestimmung der Struktur begannen und wichtig für die Aufklärung der Struktur der ribosomalen 50S-Untereinheit waren. Und so sah die Kryo-EM mit geringer Auflösung aus. Man kann die Struktur irgendwie erkennen. Da hält jemand eine Taschenlampe auf seinen Knien. Es ist sehr schwer, daraus die molekularen Details zu entnehmen. Aber 1998 hatten wir unsere erste Karte mit einer Auflösung von 9 Angström. Da waren zum ersten Mal ein paar Details zu erkennen, das hatte aber die gleiche Form. Wir wussten also, dass wir auf dem richtigen Weg waren. Und dann machten wir mit einer höheren Auflösung weiter. Und 2000 hatten wir dann eine Karte mit einer Auflösung von 2,4 Angström. Und das hier ist die Struktur der ribosomalen 50S-Untereinheit, wie wir sie im Jahr 2000 sahen. Und die dichte Bepackung der RNA war für uns und alle ziemlich überraschend. Wir hatten keine Vorstellung, dass RNA so dicht gepackt sein konnte. Und hier ist das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum mit dem markanten Inhibitor. Meistens ist kein Protein in der Nähe. Und es gibt jede Menge dicht gepackte RNA und Proteine sind auf der Oberfläche verstreut. Wenn man die Ribosom-Untereinheit wie einen Apfel halbiert, sieht man das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum. Und jetzt erkennen Sie den Tunnel, rund 100 Angström lang. Das Grüne sind die Proteine, die in das Innere des Ribosoms reichen. Kleinste Teilchen des Proteins dringen also in das Ribosom ein und stabilisieren die Struktur. Aber Sie sehen, wie dicht die RNA, in Weiß, gepackt ist. Hier ist die ribosomale 70S-Untereinheit mit der RNA darum herum, die eine komplexe Struktur bildet. Hier sehen Sie das. Sehr komplex. Um Watson falsch zu zitieren: RNA ist nicht so langweilig wie DNA. Es hat eine sehr komplexe Struktur. Und die Proteine sind rundum auf der Oberfläche verstreut. Und die tRNA, das dekodierende Zentrum, wie Sie gehört haben, befindet sich in der kleinen ribosomalen Untereinheit. Die Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen erfolgt in der großen Untereinheit. Eines der Dinge, die wir herausfinden wollten, war die Quelle der katalytischen Eigenschaften des Ribosoms und der Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen. Crick hatte 1968 die Hypothese aufgestellt, dass das Ribosom ein Ribozym sei, wobei er sich natürlich die Frage realisierte, wie es sein könnte, dass eine Maschine, die Proteine herstellt, aus Protein bestehen kann, bevor ein Protein da ist? Deshalb vermutete er, dass es sich um RNA handeln musste. Und in der Tat fanden wir heraus, dass das stimmte. Ich hatte einen fantastischen Doktoranden, Martin Schmeing, der diese Arbeit initiiert hat und den größten Teil der Arbeiten durchgeführt hat, über die ich kurz erzählen werde und der das Video hergestellt hat, dass Sie noch sehen werden. Und das ist die Reaktion, die vom Ribosom katalysiert wird. Wir haben eine Aminosäure an der A-Stellen-tRNA. Die Alpha-Aminogruppe attackiert den Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff der Peptidylgruppe und die Peptidyl-tRNA an der P-Stelle bildet ein vierflächiges Zwischenprodukt, das dann aufbricht und die Produkte ergibt. Ich werde Ihnen einige Ergebnisse der strukturellen Arbeit zeigen, aber in der 50S-Untereinheit verwenden wir nur CCA-Aminosäure oder Peptid. Inzwischen kann man natürlich das ganze Ribosom und die tRNase verwenden und das haben wir auch gemacht. Also nochmal: Wenn man die ribosomale 50S-Untereinheit halbiert, hat man hier den Polypeptid-Ausgangstunnel. Innerhalb des angezeigten Feldes erfolgt die Bildung der Peptid-Bindung. Und dann, ohne all die vielen, vielen Strukturen zu besprechen, die aus dem Substratkomplexen aufgeklärt wurden, ist schließlich hier das, was Martin Schmeing und Kollegen…was er im Labor herausgefunden hat, was an der katalytischen Stelle passiert. Die Ausrichtung des P-Stellen-Substrats hier, der Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff, der angegriffen wird, hier. Und das ist die Alpha-Aminogruppe vom A-Stellen-Substrat in einer Position, in der sie den Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff attackieren kann, der hier mit dem 2’-OH interagiert und durch A2451 ausgerichtet wird. Welcher Mechanismus liegt dem zugrunde? Heute wissen wir wesentlich mehr und ich werde nicht auf die Details eingehen, weil das im Rahmen dieses kurzen Vortrags zu viel wäre. Aber den ersten Verständnisschritt dazu hat Andrea Barta in Österreich beigetragen. Ihr Labor vermutete einen Protonenshuttle-Mechanismus, bei dem ein Proton von der Alpha-Aminogruppe, von der angreifenden Aminogruppe, auf die zurück gelassene 3‘-OH-Gruppe übertragen wurde. Später haben wir herausgefunden, dass es ein wesentlich größeres Netz von Wasserstoffbrücken gibt, insbesondere Wasser und andere Seitenketten. Aber auf jeden Fall erfolgt eine Art Protonenshuttle. Woher kommen diese katalytischen Eigenschaften? Tatsächlich ist die primäre Quelle der katalytischen Eigenschaften wie bei den meisten Enzymen die richtige Ausrichtung der Substrate für die Chemie. Die lästige Entropie, die die Moleküle herumwandern lässt, soll beseitigt werden. Der Protonenshuttle-Mechanismus trägt chemisch zu diesem Vorgang bei. Und es könnte eine gewisse Stabilisierung des Übergangszustands dazukommen, zu dem die meisten Enzyme beitragen. Es gibt viele Schritte in der Ribosom-Protein-Synthese. Und es läuft ein Elongationszyklus ab, bei dem es eine Peptidyl-tRNA an der P-Stelle gibt, eine leere A-Stelle und einen EF-Tu-Proteinfaktor, der eine tRNA liefert. Und dann zieht er sich zurück und die tRNA mit der Aminosäure ist ausgerichtet. Und so kommt es zur Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen. Das hier ist eine Darstellung der Prozessstruktur mit geringer Auflösung. Aber wir müssen wissen, wie der Prozess abläuft. Und dann kommt dieser andere Faktor, der Elongationsfaktor G, EF-G, ins Spiel und verursacht eine Translokation. Die Frage, die ich mir dann stelle, ist: Wie ist das möglich? Alles, was man weiß, ist, dass dieser Faktor eintrifft und irgendwie „vorbeigleitet“. Aber das muss wesentlich komplexer sein als das. Wie also entwickelt sich das von hier nach da? Was verursacht diese Veränderung? Was macht der EF-G? Das passiert nicht so mal eben. Und wir haben herausgefunden, dass das stimmt. Mit Peter Moore, einem über all die Jahre sehr wichtigen Kollegen in diesem Projekt haben wir die Struktur EF-G an sich aufgeklärt. In jüngerer Zeit haben wir sogar die Struktur von Komplexen aufgeklärt. Das Labor von Ramakrishnan hat diese Struktur des Komplexes von EF-G im Posttranslokationszustand aufgeklärt. Wir haben die Struktur vor kurzem aufgeklärt. Hoffentlich finden wir ein Fachjournal, das zur Veröffentlichung bereit ist, weil das so neu ist und man muss… die wollen einfach so etwas gar nicht veröffentlichen. Und die kompakte Konformation. Dieser Faktor, die Komponenten des Faktors haben sich weit von dem Punkt, an dem sie sich im Elongationskomplex befinden, wegbewegt. Wenn Sie die 4 betrachten und sehen, wo sich die 4 hinbewegt. Sie hat sich enorm bewegt. Und deshalb ist die Frage: Was passiert da? Man kennt diese beiden sehr großen Veränderungen in der Struktur. Was geschieht? Das schwingt da herein, wie hier dargestellt. Und deshalb denken wir, dass vielleicht die Konformationsänderung Ursache der Translokation ist. Wir können ein Video davon mit dem sich bewegenden Teil herstellen. Also wir gehen davon aus, dass es die Konformationsänderung ist, die auf dem Weg von diesem Prätranslokationsstatus zum Posttranslokationsstatus geschieht, die die tRNase zur nächsten Stufe treibt. In den letzten zehn Minuten meines Vortrags möchte ich meine Aufmerksamkeit erneut auf die Antibiotika und die Antibiotikaresistenz richten. Sie haben viele Artikel über die Probleme der Antibiotikaresistenz und die daraus resultierenden Todesfälle gelesen. Die Frage ist, wie Antibiotika sich an die ribosomale 50S-Untereinheit binden und welche Resistenzmechanismen bestehen. Sie haben gerade einige Gedanken dazu gehört. Unsere Arbeit wurde ursprünglich von Jeff Hanson, einem Postdoc-Mitarbeiter durchgeführt und dann von anderen fortgesetzt. Die tRNA-Bindungsstelle, hier ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom. Es gibt verschiedene Orte für Antibiotika, über die wir reden werden. Tuberactinomycine hier, Capreomycin und Viomycin binden neben dem Dekodierungszentrum. Und sie spielen eine wichtige Rolle für TB. Sie sind A-Bindungsstellen-Inhibitoren, worauf ich aber hier nicht eingehe. Und die Makrolide sind so ein bisschen etwas wie eine Bindung in den Tunnel hinein, ein bisschen. Und wir haben viele von ihnen untersucht, aber ich werde nur beispielhaft über einige reden. Bei den Makroliden gibt es verschieden große Makrolidenringe, die alle an derselben Stelle im Tunnel binden. Ihre unterschiedlichen Substituenten interagieren mit der ribosomalen RNA in unterschiedlicher Weise. Die Seitenkettenbasis vom Ribosom kann sich verändern. Aber meistens ist das Ganze ziemlich stabil. Und das hier ist die Stelle, an der die Bildung der Peptid-Bindung erfolgt. Das Makrolid blockiert also den Prozess. Wie funktioniert das? Wenn man sich hier im Aufriss erneut den Tunnel anschaut, sieht man die Bindungsstelle. Das Makrolid ist rot. Die Basen sind in Grün dargestellt und deren Mutation verursacht die Resistenz. Und Sie sehen, dass sie alle miteinander interagieren. Diese gesamte Gruppe interagiert mit dem Makrolid. Und so könnte man, wie ich denke richtigerweise, annehmen, dass die Änderung in der Form der Bindungsstelle die Bindung verhindert. Das hier ist ohne Makrolid. Und das hier ist mit Makrolid. Wir blicken den Tunnel hinauf. Wie wirkt nun das Makrolid? Es wirkt durch einen Vorgang, den ich als molekulare Obstipation bezeichne. Es blockiert den Austritt des Polypeptids aus dem Tunnel. Die Mutation von A2058 auf ein G verringert die Bindungskonstante um das 10.000-fache. Und das ist ein G im Haloarcula marismortui und dieser Organismus bindet nicht viel Antibiotika. Und wenn wir uns anschauen, wo das Makrolid bindet, sieht man, dass sich das N2 von diesem G hier direkt unter dem Makrolidring befindet. Für diese Untersuchung haben Daqi Tu und Gregor Blaha im Haloarcula das G zu einem A mutiert und es so zu einem Pseudobakterium gemacht. Die Bindungskonstante veränderte sich um viele Größenordnungen. Wir konnten sehen, wo es gebunden hat. Und tatsächlich bindet es exakt an der gleichen Stelle, in derselben Ausrichtung, mit der Ausnahme, dass der Makrolidring verdrängt wird, vermutlich wegen dieser lästigen N2, die die Position einnimmt. Was machen wir mit diesen Informationen? Es gibt verschiedene Antibiotikafamilien, die an viele Stellen und benachbarte Stellen binden, wie Sie im letzten Vortrag gehört haben. Die Bindungsstellen neben dem Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum liegen dicht beieinander. Einige von uns, die Interesse an diesem Gebiet haben, haben eine Firma gegründet, Rib-X, heute Melinta Therapeutics, die diese Strukturen für die Entwicklung neuer Antibiotika nutzt. Und die Folien, die ich jetzt zeige, stammen alle von denen. Ich bin also nur der Überbringer der Botschaft. Hier ist also wieder das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum mit verschiedenen Antibiotikafamilien, die alle dicht aneinander im Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum gebunden sind. Und worum es dann geht…die Strategie ist, ein Stück von einer zu nehmen und sie chemisch mit einem Stück von einer anderen zu verbinden. Hier sind also beispielsweise drei Antibiotika. Und das erste mit der Bezeichnung Radezolid hat eine ziemlich erhöhte Potenz. Und dazu möchte ich noch etwas erklären. Hier werden erneut Fragmente miteinander kombiniert. Und dann kann man das Makrolid kombinieren. Und am wichtigsten ist es - und ich habe keine Folien, um Ihnen zu zeigen, was die tatsächlich gemacht haben -, diesen gesamten Bereich zu nehmen und eine völlig neue Antibiotikafamilie zu entwickeln. Und das sieht ziemlich vielversprechend aus, was die Bekämpfung von gram-positiven und gram-negativen Bakterien betrifft. Das ist die RX-01 Familie. Diese nimmt Linezolid, die bei zahlreichen Stämmen nicht wirksam ist. Rot ist schlecht, alles über 4 ist schlecht, sehr schlecht. Wenn man Radezolid nimmt, die Kombination, funktioniert das sehr gut. Und das gilt auch für verschiedene Enterokokken. Sie sehen, dass Linezolid nicht zu großartig ist. RX-02, das ist das verbesserte Makrolid. Genau das gleiche. Wenn man das Makrolid betrachtet, das Azithromycin... sehr schlecht, sehr, sehr, sehr schlecht, Stellt man die Kombination her, wird alles richtig gut. Die Strategie funktioniert also. Und ich sollte vielleicht einfach sagen, dass es funktioniert und dass es entwickelt wird. Linezolid hat die klinischen Studien der Phase 2 absolviert. Und weitere Dinge sind auf den Weg gebracht. Und dann noch eine Anmerkung zu den A-Bindungsstellen. In unserer Arbeit weisen wir nach, dass Viomycin und Capreomycin an die A-Stelle binden. Und es bindet an die kleine Untereinheit. Und dort ist die Bindungsstelle. Sie interagiert mit den großen und kleinen Untereinheiten. Und hier ist zu sehen, wo sich das befindet. Es interagiert mit dem tRNA der großen Untereinheit und der kleinen Untereinheit. Und an dieser Stelle erfolgt die Dekodierung. Dadurch wird das Ribosom in dieser Position blockiert. Es kann sich also nicht weiterbewegen. Das ist gut zu wissen. Aber was kann man damit machen? Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass jetzt viele Verbindungen bekannt sind, die in dieser Nachbarschaft binden. Es ist das Viomycin hier, aber das gilt auch für viele andere Verbindungen. Und wenn man Geld locker machen könnte für ein TB-Antibiotikum – was nicht so naheliegend ist – und wenn man ein Pharmazieunternehmen dazu bewegen könnte, so etwas zu entwickeln, könnte man die, so vermute ich, in irgendeiner Weise kombinieren oder einfach die Oberfläche nutzen, um eine neue Verbindung zu entwickeln, die gegen TB wirksam wäre. Die Idee ist also ist die, diese Informationen zur Entwicklung eines Antibiotikums zu nutzen, das gegen all diese resistenten Stämme wirksam wäre. Und das ist ein großes Problem, weil der XDR-Stamm gegen alles resistent ist. Das ist ein bedeutender Punkt, auf den ich noch hinweisen möchte. Nämlich der, dass Grundlagenforschung sehr wichtig ist. Grundlagenforschung zur Struktur und Funktion des Ribosoms führt zur Entwicklung neuer Antibiotika, die sich als wirksam gegen resistente Bakterienstämme erweisen. Es gibt eine Menge Anstöße in den USA und an anderen Orten für die NIA, die Translationsforschung zu unterstützen. Und ich muss sagen, dass die einzige Translationsforschung, die ich befürworte, die Ribosom-Forschung ist. Und hier damit möchte enden. Vielen Dank. Applaus..

Thomas Steitz on visualizing the atomic structure of the ribosome
(00:04:59 - 00:08:48)

 

Evidence of the involvement of rRNA in ribosomal functions has become overwhelming over the past two decades. Seminal in this context was certainly Carl Woese with his speculations on the origin of the protein synthetic machinery [294]. But it was the characterization of catalytic activities of precursor ribosomal RNA initiated by Thomas Cech (Nobel Prize for Chemistry 1989) [295] that turned the ‘protein paradigm’ of the ribosome, prevalent in the 1960s and 1970s, back into an ‘RNA paradigm’. (Indeed, in the early days of ribosomology, rRNA had been closely associated with ribosomal function. That function — of a template — however, did not survive history.) Indications accumulated that 23S RNA is involved in the peptidyltransferase reaction [296, 297], which until then was thought to be a domain of the ribosomal proteins. Efforts to achieve peptidyltransfer activity with ribosomal RNA alone have so far not been successful [298, 299]. The atomic model of the 50S subunit now appears to suggest that ribosomal RNA may indeed be able to do the job without direct involvement of proteins [300]. On this view, the ribosome finally turned out to be a veritable ribozyme, and there is now evidence at the atomic level concerning the nature of the catalytic mechanism of the peptidyltransfer reaction.

Ada E.  Yonath (2010) - The Amazing Ribosome

It’s a great pleasure for me to be invited to this well-known annual meeting. Especially as a laureate and I’m so happy to see so many young people that want to listen. What I want to ask is to put off this light, as it as before, please. So I want to tell you all about the amazing ribosome and I have 25 minutes so I won’t be able to say all what I want and all what is worth saying. I’ll try to highlight several points. Ok, DNA is the mechanism of all cells to store and protect the genetic code. It’s a very good storage place because the genetic code which are the combinations of this basis is now protected by the external sort of walls, backbone of the DNA, and the DNA itself can be packed very closely, so very compactly so the information doesn’t or cannot leak out. The gene products, the genes is what the DNA has in it, are called proteins. And proteins can do, or are doing almost everything in the cell. Here is a picture from a children’s book, but I like it and I have some more children’s books, pictures. You can see what proteins can do, they can be structural, like hair or skin or connective tissues, there can be signalling, they can be involved in regulation, they can be transporting things from the transporting proteins. You surely, you surely know about haemoglobin that transports oxygen from the lung to the cell and CO2. They can be enzymes that I think that even high school students now study about them. They are the chopping, the connecting, the workers that do the chemistry and they also can be receptors like eyes and ears and so on. The proteins in the eyes, ears and so on. The fold of the proteins is carefully designed to facilitate the proteins function so it’s not just that every protein can do everything, each protein has its role. And this is decided, the role is decided by the fold and the fold is decided by the sequence of the building blocks. The building blocks of proteins are called amino acids and there are 20 types of them. So just let’s look again at the children’s book, actually I recommend very much this children’s book, it’s called Biokit and it was written in the ‘80’s, last century, still very correct except for the ribosome. There are 20 types of amino acids and they all have the same backbone, I just drew it here in different colours but the same structure. And they have side chains that may be tools and that when it becomes longer which is polymerisation this is the meaning of making the proteins from the amino acids. The tools are hanging out and they must be folded correctly in order that the tools can do the work. So they cannot be just something long, they have to be correctly folded. And I want to show you 1 or 2 possibilities of correct folding, like the lock and the key model for protein and its substrate. For instance here should be a match, total full perfect match between the lock and the key, in order that the key can work, the same is here. Protein is a structure, things will happen here in the active site. Let’s have a look at it closer, here is an active site of a protein. I’m sure that you know the names of the atoms, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, plus hydrogen and sulphur that you don’t see, sorry, the yellow. And the active site is just here. You see the cavity, here things happen and have a look at it closer, this is where things happen. Now there is a substrate that will be chopped here and the fit, the matching between the substrate and the protein has to be correct, otherwise there will not be chopping or adding or whatever the protein has to do. So as I said the sequence of the protein determines its fold and the sequence itself, it is determined by the sequence of the gene that codes for it. So what really happens is that there is DNA as we saw earlier. It is transcribed into a molecule that can be living, can function as a single chain, not a double chain like DNA, it’s called RNA. And in this particular case messenger RNA. RNA is very similar to DNA in terms of the basis but different a little bit in the main chain and therefore it can be existing and functioning as a single strand. This is being translated into proteins by the ribosome. From the same children’s book, this is what happens, there is a gene, the gene is being opened by an enzyme or actually enzyme couples that’s called opener and being copied by another complex that is called copier in this slide and now we have messenger RNA. That is dictated, the sequence of its basis is dictated by the sequence of the DNA because they make the same type of what's on correct base pairs. The ribosome is now the factory that gets the information, the instruction from the gene through the messenger as a papal tape that comes in, being read. Drugs are bringing the amino acids, these drugs are called tRNA and each amino acid has its own tRNA in every cell. Sometimes there is more than one tRNA for each amino acid. Here they are shown in different colours to distinguish between them but actually they are chemically different. Protein is being made here and comes out as a chain here. The drugs can go out, tRNA can go out, look for more work, also the suctions can go out, look for more ribosomes and the whole process is a consuming 2 GTP molecules. So the ribosome is actually a factory. And it builds the newly born protein by adding amino acids one at a time. Let’s have a look at it in a minute. Each cell contains a huge number of ribosomes, highly active mammalian cells can reach 6 millions for instance in the liver. Even bacteria can reach about 80 to 100,000 ribosomes working together when the bacteria grows. The ribosomes act continuously, they form 20 bonds, about 20 bonds in a second. And how do you make mistakes, fidelity rate of 99.99999%, it means one mistake in a million. I was a good student, I studied chemistry and I was a good student, I had a very good inorganic chemistry, I had to make a peptide bond as my second year exercise, took me a day, I needed 100 degrees, I needed high acidity like more than a lemon and I made mistakes and I was expected to make mistakes. I just told you this in order that you appreciate how amazing is the ribosome, it makes 20 in a second under the conditions of the cell where it is in. So let’s see, firstly what the ribosome has to do. Here comes messenger RNA, it has 4 bases like DNA. And I made them here in 4 different colours to distinguish between them. Each 3 of them, each triplet is coding for one amino acid, where are the triplets, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, have a look, shall I start here, shall I start here, shall I start here, there will be completely different protein if I start somewhere else. Or if I skip one, or if I don’t know where the first one is. So the ribosome knows to select the right framework and the right position. When the triplets are defined the first one to be translated has to be identified and it happens on the ribosome, like here. So we can see now there are triplets. And the first triplet has been already associated with the tRNA, remember the drug, that associates with this in one end of it which is called anti-codon loop, that can make Watson Crick base builds with the triplet and carries the cognate amino acid to it, far away actually from the anti-codon loop. And it all happens on the ribosome and I really want to show you how we visualise it and the first structures came out, back 8 years ago, this movie was made by art students together with us and it’s interpolation between our results and some others. So the messenger comes to the small sub unit, detects it, please forgive me, let’s go back for a minute. There are 2 subunits in the ribosome, I didn’t say this, sorry. First small subunit that is also initiating, this is the clever part of the ribosome, the small subunit, it knows to think or at least to select, select the frame, select the first one. It cannot make mistakes. The large one is where the peptide bond is being made. So now you can see the movie. So please pay attention to the movie. In the beginning when the messenger reaches the ribosome, the ribosome, the small subunit makes a motion to get it. If the movie doesn’t come I will tell you all about what you could have seen. Ah now you see. Usually this is what happens when I say it doesn’t come, it comes. So the messenger comes and it takes it, now it wraps around it and the RNA factor is non ribosomal factors, for instance the initiation factors that are associated to the initiation complex but we leave. The first tRNA is being brought by another factor, now all the factors leave. The large subunit can come and makes bridges by conformational changes. Now we have an active ribosome. That can continue peptide bond formation and protein production. So the ribosome helps the tRNA’s to come in, they are brought by factors, they can come out, peptide bond is being made in the large subunit. We take it away now so that you can see how the motion happens, tRNA moves, the lower part rotates, moves and moves together with the messenger and the protein goes out through a tunnel in the large sub unit. Now you see again the whole ribosome, protein will come here, it has to fold, either alone or mainly by chaperons or through the membrane if it goes through a membrane. And the whole process continues until stop codon is being recognised and then factors like recycling factors, release factors are replacing the tRNA. The 2 subunits can dissociate, protein comes out, tRNA’s can go and look for more jobs. In the movie you didn’t see structures, here you can see small subunit in bacteria is of the molecular rate of about .85 million Daltons. It’s made many of RNA, like the whole ribosome, RNA here is in silver and many proteins, So that’s a small subunit, you see it looks like a duck, here is a duck, so it’s called a duck. And the large subunit is called a crown and now it looks like a crown. So again RNA is in silver, many proteins, 34 proteins in bacteria, makes the peptide bond and make sure there is elongation and protection. These are ribosomal proteins, I won’t talk about them. What you saw actually in the movie was small subunit, large subunit, 3 positions for tRNA. A, P and E, A and P are above the active site, it’s called peptidyl transfer is centre. A for amino oscillated tRNA. The one that comes with amino acid. P for the peptidyl tRNA. Where the newly protein will grow. And E is the exiting one. So when one looks at the surfaces of the small, the duck and the crown get together, one sees that the surfaces are rich in RNA, almost no protein around. Here there will be the A, P and E and if you see here is the tRNA that combines them. This part will meet here and this part will meet here so what you see coming together means doing this, like my hands. Protein will be made here where the star is by the amino acids. What we found in the structures is the ribosome is not a protein enzyme, it’s an RNA enzyme, almost all its functions are made by RNA. So all what I told you in the beginning that proteins are very important, they themselves are made by RNA, RNA machine. Most of the ribosomes are made from 2 to 1 ribosomal RNA to ribosomal proteins except for mitochondrial that has more proteins. But still the active centres are made of RNA. And this is in a code with what Francis Crick promised us back in 1968. We found in the ribosomal region that accommodates the A and the P sites tRNA, it’s in all ribosomes and I have no time now to tell you about all what's known today. I show you 5 but there are about 30 structures today, all have this region that has symmetrical relation between the A and the P sites, where the A and the P tRNA bind. And we think that the motion between the A and the P is as we see here, the A blue goes into the P green, this is a snap shot, a computer snap shot of the motion where the ribosome is in red and the blinking part are those that help confine and make sure that the motion is correctly. At the end of the motion the stereochemistry is fit for making the A protein bond, peptide bond. And this is what we think the ribosome A provides, the frame for that. What is needed geometrically that this frame works and this reaction works, is that the A-site, tRNA sits exactly in place so it can rotate and the P-site tRNA, the first one goes to its position in the right orientation flipped. Now think about yourself, you're go into an empty room and it’s the same in both sides, which side will you take, this or that. You don’t know, correct. tRNA also doesn’t know but we have no time in the cell to wait until the tRNA thinks it’s better here, it’s better there, I stay here, I stay there. So the ribosome makes provision for that, it provides 2 potential base pairs on the P-site and only one on the A-site, so the first tRNA will go and take the 2, of course 100% more. And therefore the reaction can start. It was also found that when these 2 and this 1, base pairs are formed, the tRNA itself can be the catalyst of this reaction, catalyst of its own reaction, this is a very ancient way of catalysis. So this is what we studied until now, I just want to show you this region that I talked about, it does everything. It’s connected to the 2 hands that move when tRNA come in and out and also to the tunnel and this is where peptide bond is being made. You can see it here in a little bit more detail, tRNA would come here, you remember in the movie, these ends were moving. So we think that it can transmit messages, you can see it here, how beautiful it is, within the ribosome, in the large subunit but connected to the small one. From top you have seen it before, from the side it looks like a pocket. And this gave us the feeling that, you can see it now larger, that there is something in it. We looked into the conservation and we found out that this region is 98% conserved in all known sequences of ribosomes, from bacteria to elephants if you want, everywhere. We also thought because of it that the high conservation of the symmetrical region indicated existence beyond environmental conditions. This suggests that the proto ribosome which was a simple dimeric RNA enzyme, so there was a proto ribosome, is still embedded in the core of the contemporary ribosome, like here. So we think that we identify how the first peptide bonds were made and consequently proteins. We call it proto-ribosome this region and we are trying now to construct it. And this is our hypothesis, there were 2 pieces or many pieces of RNA that could dimerise and make this type of pocket that can do chemistry. So we found to our surprise that there is preferred selection of those that like to dimerise and those that do not. It means we see Darwin before Darwinism, we see selection that is usually given to animals or to cells, here functioning on molecules. So let’s forget this, what we think, this was the pocket, pocket opens and grows and so on and so on. It is in agreement with several studies done independently showing that looking at how the ribosome is built, it’s clear that it was made from a centre which is the symmetrical centre, this is from Steinberg’s group in Montreal. Or by peeling it, showing again that the centre is the most important one. So this gave us the feeling that we can start to think what was the first amino acid, was it an alanine and glycine because they are simple, or lysine and arginine or histidine because histidine can be made from left overs of RNA pieces. And the most important question is what was first, the genetic code or its products. According to our idea the products showed how genetic code will go because when small peptides were made those that existed indicated how to make new ones. The question, the more human type question is why should RNA make enzymes that are better than him, in the beginning all enzymes were RNA enzymes and they were not so successful as proteins. Why should it make a competitor that is better than him? We don’t think it happened like this, we think that it just, that there wasn’t just a machine that was there, that was taken over by the amino acid. I want to show you that the ribosome protects the newly born protein in this tunnel. And at the end of it there is a chaperone that helps it fold. In new bacteria the chaperone is called trigger factor, it’s made of 3 regions. The red one is the one that binds and when it binds it opens up. And when the trigger factor opens up it exposes the hydrophobic region that can help the newly born protein not to make mistakes in folding. When the protein comes out it’s still not full, it’s still not folded and it has to have a helper. And the helper here is the trigger factor that provides an environment that the newly born protein can like. For instance have a look here at the end of the tunnel, here is trigger factor bound in gold and if protein, newly born protein comes out and is protected by it so it will not make too many wrong foldings. You can see it even more beautifully from this side. Here is the protein coming out and the trigger factor helping it. So in the very little time left I want to talk a few minutes about antibiotics because this is the implication of our work. Because of the fundamental role played by the ribosome meant that antibiotics target it. The natural antibiotics are the ammunitions that bacteria from one type is making in order to eliminate another type when they have their fights, their microorganism fights. About 40% of the useful antibiotics target the ribosome and we like to compare it between David and Goliath. David had the small stone, had to kill big Goliath, small stone antibiotic, less than 1000 Dalton, about 800 Dalton, has to paralyse 2½ million Dalton. David hit the head of Goliath here because it’s exposed and because it’s important. It’s not the only exposed region but the most important for life functionally. The same are the antibiotics, they hit the ribosome in the important parts. Here there are 3 of them, one in the active site, the other where bond is being made and the third, the erythromycin in the tunnel. Have a look, this is the tunnel, so this is the large ribosomal subunit to tRNA’s. The tunnel is shown by polyalanine and goes through it. A zoom into it is shown here. And you pay attention, there is a very narrow region here where antibiotics from the family macrolides, the most abundant family bind. Like that, so here is the tRNA, the protein would go here, peptide bond is being here but if there is erythromycin on the site from the macrolide family it will stop it. What you see here is a cut through the ribosome where the large subunit is shown here in beige and the other parts I already show, talked about. From top you can see it like that, the whole ribosome, you look into the tunnel and it is now blocked by erythromycin. All antibiotics bind to the ribosome functional site, I just said it, this is the way they function, this is the way they kill the pathogenic bacteria. But the ribosomal functional sites are highly conserved. So how do the antibiotics differentiate between the pathogen and the patient? They do it by subtle differences. You want to see a subtle difference, here it is. So here is the tunnel wall, there are many, many antibiotics here, all structures determined by us in complex with the ribosome. All bind to one position, number 2058 in the RNA sequence. So you see here the tunnel and this is this particular nucleotide which is very important in the tunnel wall for binding macrolides. It’s an adenine in new bacteria. But it’s not an adenine in us, have a look here, adenine and erythromycin, this is the type of interactions, quite nice ones. Please concentrate here, this is now guanin so that’s pathogen and this is us. Eubacteria in human, that's the only difference. But this is already dictating too short contact and the erythromycin is rejected. So that’s the way they bind. But we do know that antibiotics have resistance and prominent mechanism of resistance is to modify the attachment part, the anchors. What do I mean, you remember earlier 2058, adenine and erythromycin here, this becomes larger, either by mutation or by ERM modification I want to show you. So what's here is antibiotic selectivity, A in eubacteria, G in eukaryotes, all what I had to do is to change the word here from selectivity to resistance. Exactly the same place. So either the bacteria do A to G mutation or post translational ERM modification which metylation making this larger. So this is the way antibiotics, clever antibiotics know to resist, clever bacteria knows to resist antibiotics. The way to combat this, either to make new compounds with additional anchors or minimise the need for the original anchors or make drugs from 2 components. So I want to show you first how companies try to make compounds that can bind without A2058. And I was really terrified because I thought if they bind to resistant bacteria they will also bind to the patient. I was wrong and I want to show you how we know that I was wrong. For this we want to talk about bacteria, human and in the middle there is an archaea. In the dead sea in Israel there is a bacteria that is an archaea. You can see the dead sea from top, from the side, you see it’s very salty, you can see the bacteria still going even on the salt and even in the summer after the water went down, it still grows there. This bacteria was crystallised by us and the structure was determined at Yale and the same antibiotics that bind to resistant bacteria binds to it, it has a G, instead of A. So I was really happy that I was wrong in my prediction. When we look at the patient’s model, that was done at Yale and pathogens that were done by us, one next to the other, we see that the antibiotic binds across the tunnel in the pathogens and along the tunnel in human or in human model. The other type that, so let me go back for a second, this shows that it’s not enough to bind, it has to be bind correctly. So those guys that want here to do drug design. The other type is to make antibiotics from 2 components, here they are again, the tunnel wall, one component, second component, each component is not so good but together they are the winning couple. They made my face from here to here when the first one came to the market called Synercid and we are now making one of our own on this. All antibiotics bind to important functional positions. I showed you here in the active site and in the tunnel, they also bind where messenger RNA goes. So few words, how did we do our studies because I think it’s good for young people. Crystallography is important to see very small distances between atoms. Crystals are made of unit cells that have to be the same. Crystallographers crystallise it, collect data by shining x-rays because there are no lenses that can look at such small distances as we need, atomic positions. And we get at the end many, many spots that we have to combine together to make electron density map that we may or may not be able to interpret. Crystallising salt is no problem, crystallising lysozyme is no problem but crystallising ribosome that is so complicated, so unstable, so deteriorating and so flexible, so heterogeneous, it was not really expected. But I write a paper about hibernating bears that when they sleep the ribosomes are packed on the inside of their cells, on the inside of the membranes and I understood that ribosomes can be orderly packed. I thought that this is the way nature preserve active ribosome’s for the whole winter. And I used for this very robust ribosomes as I said earlier. And at the end we got crystals, I don’t want to go into all details but the beginning was this and I will not talk about so much on the structure, just on what happened to these crystals when we measure them at synchrotrons. So synchrotrons are based on having particles running fast and on the tangentials we measure. Ribosomal crystals deteriorated within .1 of a second. Can you imagine 8 years to get good crystals and then losing them in .1 of a second. We found, we thought that we can fight it and I can explain later how, this is the day of the experiment, look how worried I looked. Within one night we found that by cryocrystallography we can preserve crystals. We got out patterns and the whole world got patterns. Now there are so many structures compared to what was before that. And other things happened the same time so I’m still happy 20 years later. And this is the machine, it’s more important the machine than me. I want to thank the Weizmann Institute that kept me and Max Planck, the NIH, the Weizmann Kimmelman Centre for financing what was called my dream, that was based on the bears. My groups in the Weizmann and at Max Planck for their enthusiasm in good and bad times. Dr. Wittmann that we started with. I want to show you the German group, the Hamburg group that went to the Dead Sea to look for bacteria themselves. And the Israeli group that is run by Annette Bashan when I am here. And Tamara that had birthday, she came for 10 weeks 12 years ago, she is still with us. She had birthday, she had a cake, this is her cake, which shows that ribosomes are sweet in my group. And my family, especially my granddaughter. Why do I say it, I say it for the young women that sit here, it’s possible to be scientist and be loved family member, look what she wrote here. There is no year, I asked her why there is no year, she said every year you have to reprove yourself. So they love me but they are also very demanding. Please young ladies go into science it’s a lot of fun, even without prizes. And that’s what happened to me, thank you very much for a very stimulating and I think a very good advice at the end of it.

Es ist mir eine große Freude, zu diesem bekannten jährlichen Treffen eingeladen worden zu sein, insbesondere als Preisträgerin, und ich bin sehr glücklich, so viele junge Leute zu sehen, die zuhören möchten. Die IT-Leute möchte ich bitten, dieses Licht auszumachen, so, wie es vorher war, bitte. Ich möchte Ihnen nun alles über das erstaunliche Ribosom erzählen, und da ich nur 25 Minuten zur Verfügung habe, werde ich nicht alles sagen können, was ich sagen möchte und was es Wert wäre, gesagt zu werden. Ich werde versuchen, mehrere Punkte hervorzuheben. DNA ist der in allen Zellen vorliegende Mechanismus, um den genetischen Code zu speichern und zu schützen. Sie ist ein sehr guter Speicherort, denn der genetische Code, der aus Kombinationen dieser Basen besteht, wird nun von einer Art externer Mauer geschützt, dem Rückgrat der DNA, und die DNA selbst kann ganz dicht gepackt werden, so kompakt, dass die Information nicht austreten kann. Die Genprodukte – die Gene sind das, was die DNA beinhaltet – werden als Proteine bezeichnet. Und Proteine können so ziemlich alles in der Zelle tun. Hier ist ein Bild aus einem Kinderbuch, aber mir gefällt es und ich habe noch weitere Kinderbücher, Bilder. Sie können sehen, was Gene tun können: Sie können Strukturen bilden, wie Haar oder Haut oder Bindegewebe, sie können Signale senden, sie können an der Regulierung beteiligt sein, sie können Dinge transportieren. Von den Transportproteinen ist Ihnen bestimmt das Hämoglobin bekannt, das Sauerstoff von den Lungen zur Zelle und CO2 zurück transportiert. Sie können Enzyme sein, und ich glaube, dass selbst Oberstufenschüler diese heutzutage untersuchen. Sie sind verantwortlich für die Prozesse der Aufspaltung und des Verbindens, sie sind die Arbeiter, die die Chemie erledigen, und sie können außerdem Rezeptoren sein, wie Augen, Ohren usw. Die Faltung der Proteine ist sorgfältig konzipiert, um die jeweilige Funktion der Proteine zu ermöglichen. Folglich kann nicht jedes Protein alles tun, sondern jedes einzelne Protein hat seine bestimmte Rolle. Diese Rolle wird durch die Faltung bestimmt, und die Faltung wird durch die Sequenz der Bausteine festgelegt. Die Bausteine der Proteine werden als Aminosäuren bezeichnet, von denen es 20 verschiedene Arten gibt. Lassen Sie uns nun wieder einen Blick in das Kinderbuch werfen. Tatsächlich kann ich dieses Kinderbuch sehr empfehlen. Es trägt den Titel Biokit, wurde in den 80er Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts geschrieben und ist noch immer sehr zutreffend – mit Ausnahme der Aussagen über das Ribosom.(Lachen.) Es gibt 20 Arten von Aminosäuren, und alle haben dasselbe Rückgrat. Ich habe das hier einfach in verschiedenen Farben aufgezeichnet, aber es ist dieselbe Struktur. Sie besitzen Seitenketten, die Werkzeuge sein können. Wenn das Protein durch Polymerisierung – Polymerisierung bedeutet die Bildung der Proteine aus Aminosäuren – länger wird, hängen die Werkzeuge heraus und müssen korrekt gefaltet werden, damit sie ihre Arbeit tun können. Sie dürfen also nicht einfach nur lang sein, sondern sie müssen korrekt gefaltet sein. Ich möchte Ihnen ein oder zwei Möglichkeiten einer korrekten Faltung vorstellen, wie das Schlüssel-Schloss-Prinzip für ein Protein und sein Substrat. Hier muss zum Beispiel eine Übereinstimmung, eine vollständige und perfekte Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Schloss und dem Schlüssel vorliegen, damit der Schlüssel funktionieren kann, und das Gleiche gilt hier. Ein Protein ist eine Struktur, die Dinge werden sich hier im aktiven Bereich ereignen. Lassen Sie uns genauer hinschauen – hier ist der aktive Bereich eines Proteins. Sicherlich kennen Sie die Namen der Atome: Sauerstoff, Stickstoff, Kohlenstoff, plus Wasserstoff und Schwefel, das gelbe Atom, das Sie hier leider nicht sehen. Der aktive Bereich befindet sich genau hier. Sie sehen die Aushöhlung, hier laufen die Prozesse ab. Schauen Sie näher hin, dort passiert es. Hier ist nun ein Substrat, das hier zerlegt werden wird. Die Passung, die Übereinstimmung zwischen dem Substrat und dem Protein muss stimmen. Sonst wird nichts zerlegt oder hinzugefügt werden oder das geschehen, was immer das Protein tun muss. Wie ich sagte, bestimmt also die Sequenz des Proteins seine Faltung. Die Sequenz selbst wird von der Sequenz des Gens bestimmt, das sie codiert. Was nun tatsächlich passiert, ist Folgendes: Wir haben hier DNA, wie wir zuvor gesehen haben,die DNA wird in ein Molekül transkribiert, das als eine einzelne Kette, nicht als eine Doppelkette wie die DNA, leben und funktionieren kann. Dieses Molekül wird als RNA bezeichnet. In diesem speziellen Fall handelt es sich um mRNA (Messanger- RNA, Boten-RNA). Hinsichtlich der Basen ist die RNA der DNA sehr ähnlich, aber sie unterscheidet sich in der Hauptkette ein bisschen von ihr, und sie kann daher als einzelner Strang existieren und funktionieren. Sie wird durch das Ribosom in Proteine übersetzt. Hier haben wir, aus demselben Kinderbuch, das, was passiert: Hier ist ein Gen, es wird von einem Enzym bzw. eigentlich von einem Enzymkomplex, der als Öffner bezeichnet wird, geöffnet und, auf diesem Dia, von einem anderen, Kopierer genannten Komplex, kopiert. Nun haben wir die mRNA. Die Sequenz ihrer Basen wird von der Sequenz der DNA vorgeschrieben. Bei beiden kommt es auf korrekte Basenpaare an. Das Ribosom stellt nun die Fabrik dar, welche die Information und damit vom Gen die Bauanweisung erhält, und zwar über einen Boten in Form eines eingehenden „Lochstreifens“, der ausgelesen wird. Lastwagen bringen die Aminosäuren herbei. Diese Lastwagen werden als tRNA bezeichnet, und in jeder Zelle hat jede Aminosäure ihre eigene tRNA. Manchmal gibt es für eine Aminosäure mehr als eine tRNA. Sie sind hier in unterschiedlichen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann, aber sie unterscheiden sich tatsächlich hinsichtlich ihrer chemischen Zusammensetzung. Hier wird das Protein hergestellt, und hier kommt es als Kette heraus. Die Lastwagen können den Ort wieder verlassen, die RNA kann herausgehen und sich nach weiterer Arbeit umsehen. Auch die Bauanleitungen können herausgehen und weitere Ribosomen suchen. Der gesamte Prozess verbraucht zwei GTP-Moleküle. Das Ribosom ist also tatsächlich eine Fabrik und stellt die neuen Proteine her, indem es stückweise Aminosäuren hinzufügt. Schauen wir uns das in einer Minute einmal an. Jede Zelle enthält eine große Anzahl von Ribosomen. Bei hochaktiven Säugetierzellen, zum Beispiel in der Leber, können es bis zu sechs Millionen Ribosomen sein. Selbst bei Bakterien arbeiten ungefähr 80.000 bis 100.000 Ribosomen zusammen, wenn das Bakterium wächst. Die Ribosomen sind pausenlos in Aktion. Sie bilden 20 Bindungen, um die 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde. Unterlaufen ihnen dabei Fehler? Die Quote der Genauigkeit beträgt 99, 99999 % – das heißt ein Fehler in einer Million. Ich war eine gute Studentin. Ich studierte Chemie, und ich war eine gute Studentin, ich war sehr gut in anorganischer Chemie. Als Übungsaufgabe im zweiten Jahr musste ich eine Peptidbindung herstellen. Dafür benötigte ich einen Tag. Ich brauchte 100 Grad, ich brauchte einen Säuregehalt, der höher als der einer Zitrone war. Ich machte Fehler, und es wurde erwartet, dass ich Fehler machte. Das erzähle ich Ihnen nur deshalb, damit Sie zu würdigen wissen, wie erstaunlich das Ribosom ist. Unter den Bedingungen der Zelle, in der es sich befindet, stellt es 20 Bindungen pro Sekunde her. Schauen wir uns nun als erstes an, was das Ribosom zu tun hat. Hier kommt mRNA an, die wie DNA vier Basen besitzt. Ich habe sie hier in vier verschiedenen Farben dargestellt, damit man sie unterscheiden kann. Jeweils drei von ihnen, jedes Triplett, kodiert eine Aminosäure. Wo sind die Tripletts, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, schauen Sie, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, soll ich hier beginnen, es wird ein ganz anderes Protein werden, wenn ich an einer anderen Stelle beginne. Oder wenn ich eine überspringe oder wenn ich nicht weiß, wo die erste Stelle ist. Das Ribosom kann also das richtige System und die richtige Position heraussuchen. Wenn die Tripletts definiert sind, muss dasjenige, das als erstes übersetzt werden soll, identifiziert werden, und dies geschieht am Ribosom, so wie hier. Wir können also sehen, dass es nun Tripletts gibt. Das erste Triplett ist bereits mit der tRNA verbunden worden – erinnern Sie sich an den Lastwagen – die sich mit ihm an einem seiner Enden, das als Anticodon-Schleife bezeichnet wird, verbindet. Sie kann Watson-Crick-Basenverbindungen mit dem Triplett aufbauen und transportiert die verwandte Aminosäure dorthin, also tatsächlich weit entfernt von der Anticodon-Schleife. Das alles passiert am Ribosom. Ich möchte Ihnen sehr gerne zeigen, wie wir dies visualisieren. Die ersten Strukturen kamen vor acht Jahren zum Vorschein. Dieser Film wurde von Kunststudenten und uns gemeinsam gemacht und stellt eine Interpolation unserer Ergebnisse und einiger anderer Ergebnissen dar. Der Bote kommt an der kleinen Untereinheit an, entdeckt sie – ich bitte um Verzeihung, lassen Sie uns für eine Minute zurückgehen. Das Ribosom hat zwei Untereinheiten, dies sagte ich noch nicht, Entschuldigung. Als erstes ist da die kleine Untereinheit, die auch den Vorgang einleitet. Sie ist der intelligente Teil des Ribosoms, die kleine Untereinheit, sie kann denken oder zumindest selektieren, den Rahmen und das erste Triplett aussuchen. Sie kann keine Fehler machen. Die große Untereinheit befindet sich dort, wo die Peptidbindung stattfindet. Jetzt können Sie sich den Film anschauen. Bitte achten Sie auf den Film. Zu Beginn, wenn der Bote das Ribosom erreicht, vollführt das Ribosom, die kleine Untereinheit, eine Bewegung, um ihn zu ergreifen. Wenn der Film nicht startet, werde ich Ihnen alles das erklären, was Sie hätten sehen können. Ah – jetzt können Sie es sehen. Das ist das, was normalerweise passiert, wenn ich sage, er startet nicht – dann startet er. Der Bote kommt also an, und die kleine Untereinheit ergreift ihn, wickelt sich jetzt um ihn herum, und der RNA-Faktor ist ein nicht-ribosomaler Faktor, wie zum Beispiel die Initiationsfaktoren, die mit dem Initiationskomplex verbunden sind, aber nun verlassen wir das. Die erste tRNA wird von einem anderen Faktor herbeigebracht. Nun gehen alle Faktoren. Die große Untereinheit kann kommen und baut Brücken durch Konformationsänderungen. Nun haben wir ein aktives Ribosom, das mit der Bildung der Peptidbindungen und der Proteinsynthese fortfahren kann. Das Ribosom hilft also den tRNAs beim Hereinkommen, sie werden von Faktoren herbeigebracht, sie können herauskommen, die Peptidbindung wird in der großen Untereinheit gebildet. Wir entfernen sie jetzt, damit Sie erkennen können, wie die Bewegung vonstatten geht. Die tRNA bewegt sich, der untere Teil rotiert und bewegt sich zusammen mit dem Boten, und das Protein tritt durch einen Tunnel in der großen Untereinheit aus. Nun sehen Sie wieder das gesamte Ribosom. Das Protein wird hier ankommen, es muss gefaltet werden, entweder durch sich selbst oder, in den meisten Fällen, durch Chaperon-Proteine oder durch die Membran, wenn es durch eine Membran hindurchtritt. Der ganze Prozess setzt sich fort, bis ein Stopp-Codon erkannt wird. Dann ersetzen Faktoren wie Recycling- oder Freigabefaktoren die tRNA. Die zwei Untereinheiten können sich voneinander lösen, die Proteine kommen heraus, die tRNAs können weiterziehen und nach neuer Arbeit Ausschau halten. In dem Film sahen Sie keine Strukturen. Hier können Sie erkennen, dass die kleine Untereinheit bei Bakterien eine molekulare Größe von ungefähr 0,85 Millionen Dalton hat. Sie besteht, wie das gesamte Ribosom, aus zahlreichen RNAs – die RNA ist hier silberfarben dargestellt – und vielen Proteinen, hier aus 20 Proteinen, von denen jedes in einer anderen Farbe dargestellt ist. Die Farben haben keine Bedeutung. Das also ist eine kleine Untereinheit. Sie sehen, dass sie einer Ente ähnelt, daher wird sie als Ente bezeichnet. Die große Untereinheit wird als Krone bezeichnet und sieht auch wie eine Krone aus. Die RNA ist wiederum silberfarben dargestellt. Viele Proteine – bei Bakterien 34 Proteine – bilden die Peptidbindung und stellen Elongation und Schutz sicher. Bei diesen handelt es sich um ribosomale Proteine, auf die ich nicht eingehen werde. Was Sie eigentlich in dem Film sahen, waren die kleine Untereinheit, die große Untereinheit und drei Positionen für die tRNA: A, P und E. A und P befinden sich über dem aktiven Bereich. Dies wird als Peptidyltransferase-Zentrum bezeichnet. A steht für Aminoacyl-tRNA, also für die tRNA, die mit der Aminosäure kommt. P steht für die Peptidyl-tRNA, wo das neue Protein wachsen wird, und E steht für die Exit-Position. Wenn man sich also die Oberflächen der kleinen Untereinheit, der Ente, und der Krone zusammen anschaut, stellt man fest, dass die Oberflächen reich an RNA sind und dass sich dort fast keine Proteine befinden. Hier werden die A-, die P- und die E-Position sein, und wenn Sie dort hinschauen, sehen Sie die sie kombinierende tRNA. Dieser Teil wird sich hier und dieser Teil wird sich dort treffen. Was Sie dort zusammentreffen sehen, bedeutet, dass dies hier getan wird, was meine Hände tun. Das Protein wird hier, wo sich der Stern befindet, aus den Aminosäuren gebildet. Was wir in den Strukturen feststellten, zeigt, dass es sich bei dem Ribosom nicht um ein Proteinenzym, sondern um ein RNA-Enzym handelt. Nahezu alle seine Funktionen werden durch RNA ausgeführt. Anfangs erzählte ich Ihnen vieles über die große Bedeutung der Proteine, doch die Proteine selbst werden von der RNA, der RNA-Maschine, erzeugt. Die meisten Ribosomen bestehen aus ribosomaler RNA und ribosomalem Protein im Verhältnis 2:1, mit Ausnahme der mitochondrialen Ribosome, die mehr Proteine enthalten. Aber auch hier bestehen die aktiven Zentren aus RNA. Dies ist in einem Code, den uns Francis Crick damals, 1968, versprochen hat. Die ribosomale Region, die die A- und P-Positionen-tRNA aufnimmt, findet sich in allen Ribosomen. Hier habe ich nicht die Zeit, um Ihnen all das zu erzählen, was heutzutage darüber bekannt ist. Ich zeige Ihnen fünf Strukturen, aber es gibt heute ungefähr 30. Alle verfügen über diese Region, die ein symmetrisches Verhältnis zwischen den A- und P-Positionen aufweist und wo sich die A- und P-tRNA verbinden. Wir sind der Ansicht, dass die Bewegung zwischen A und P so abläuft, wie wir hier sehen. A (blau) bewegt sich in P (grün) hinein. Es handelt sich hier um eine Momentaufnahme, eine Computer-Momentaufnahme der Bewegung, bei der das Ribosom in Rot dargestellt ist. Die blinkenden Teile sind jene, die bei der Bewegung helfen, die sie begrenzen und dafür sorgen, dass sie korrekt ausgeführt wird. Am Ende der Bewegung ist die räumliche Anordnung bereit für die Bildung der A-Protein-Bindung, der Peptidbindung. Das ist es, was unserer Meinung nach das Ribosom bereitstellt, den Rahmen dafür. Was in geometrischer Hinsicht für das Funktionieren dieses Rahmens und dieser Reaktion erforderlich ist, ist Folgendes: dass sich die tRNA an der A-Position genau an ihrem Platz befindet, damit sie rotieren kann, und dass sich die erste tRNA der P-Position in der richtigen Ausrichtung, nämlich umgedreht, auf ihre Position zubewegt. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, dass Sie selbst einen leeren Raum betreten. Beide Seiten sehen gleich aus – welche Seite werden Sie wählen, diese oder jene? Genau – Sie wissen es nicht. Die tRNA weiß es auch nicht, aber in der Zelle haben wir keine Zeit, um zu warten, bis die tRNA denkt: „Hier ist es besser, dort ist es besser, ich bleibe hier, ich bleibe dort.“ Deshalb trifft das Ribosom entsprechende Vorkehrungen und stellt auf der P-Position zwei potenzielle Basenpaare und auf der A-Position nur ein Basenpaar bereit. Folglich wird die erste tRNA die beiden Paare nehmen, natürlich die 100 % mehr. Und somit kann die Reaktion beginnen. Man hat auch herausgefunden, dass die tRNA, wenn diese zwei Basenpaare und dieses eine Basenpaar gebildet werden, selbst der Katalysator für diese Reaktion sein kann. Sie kann also der Katalysator ihrer eigenen Reaktion sein, was eine sehr alte Möglichkeit der Katalyse ist. Das also ist es, was wir bis heute untersucht haben. Ich möchte Ihnen diese Region zeigen, über die ich sprach. Sie tut alles. Sie ist mit den beiden Händen, die sich bewegen, wenn tRNA hinein- und herauskommt, und auch mit dem Tunnel verbunden, wo die Peptidbindung gebildet wird. Hier können Sie das Ganze etwas detaillierter betrachten. An diese Stelle würde die tRNA kommen – Sie erinnern sich an den Film, diese Enden bewegten sich. Wir glauben also, dass sie Botschaften übermitteln kann. Sie können sie hier sehen, wie schön sie ist, innerhalb des Ribosoms, in der großen Untereinheit, aber mit der kleinen Untereinheit verbunden. Von oben haben Sie sie vorhin gesehen, von der Seite betrachtet, sieht sie wie eine Tasche aus. Dies vermittelte uns den Eindruck, dass sich darin – jetzt können Sie es größer sehen – etwas befindet. Wir sahen uns die Konservierung an und stellten fest, dass diese Region in allen bekannten Sequenzen von Ribosomen zu 98 % konserviert ist, von den Bakterien bis zu den Elefanten, überall. Wir hatten außerdem den Gedanken, dass die hohe Konservierung dieser symmetrischen Region auf eine Existenz unabhängig von Umweltbedingungen hinwies. Dies legt nahe, dass das Proto-Ribosom, das ein einfaches Dimer-RNA-Enzym war, immer noch im Kern dieses gegenwärtigen Ribosoms, wie hier, eingebettet ist. Daher denken wir, dass wir herausgefunden haben, wie die ersten Peptidbindungen und folglich die ersten Proteine gebildet wurden. Wir bezeichnen diese Region als Proto-Ribosom und versuchen nun, sie zu konstruieren. Unsere Hypothese besagt, dass es zwei oder mehr RNA-Stücke gab, die dimerisieren konnten und diese Art von Tasche bildeten, die Chemie betreiben kann. Wir stellten zu unserer Überraschung fest, dass es eine bevorzugte Selektion jener, die gerne dimerisieren, und jener, die dies nicht tun, gibt. Das bedeutet, dass wir hier Darwin vor dem Darwinismus sehen, wir sehen, dass Selektion, die normalerweise bei Tieren oder bei Zellen zum Tragen kommt, auf Moleküle einwirkt. Vergessen wir das jetzt. Wir denken, dass dies die Tasche war, sie öffnete sich und wuchs und so weiter und so fort. Diese Überlegung stimmt mit verschiedenen unabhängig voneinander durchgeführten Untersuchungen überein, die nachweisen, dass, wenn man sich anschaut, wie das Ribosom aufgebaut ist, klar ist, dass es aus einem Zentrum gebildet wurde, das dem symmetrischen Zentrum entspricht. Dies stammt von Steinbergs Gruppe aus Montreal. Auch wenn man es auseinander wickelt, zeigt sich wieder, dass das Zentrum der wichtigste Bestandteil ist. Dies ließ uns daran denken, Überlegungen darüber anzustellen, welches die erste Aminosäure war oder um Lysin oder Arginin oder Histidin, weil Histidin aus Überresten von RNA-Stücken gebildet werden kann. Die wichtigste Frage ist, was zuerst da war: der genetische Code oder seine Produkte? Nach unserer Vorstellung zeigten die Produkte, wie der genetische Code funktioniert, denn als neue Peptide gebildet wurden, gaben die bereits existierenden Peptide Hinweise darauf, wie die neuen herzustellen seien. Die Frage, die eher eine typisch menschliche Frage ist, lautet: Warum sollte die RNA Enzyme herstellen sollte, die besser sind als sie. Anfangs waren alle Enzyme RNA-Enzyme, und diese waren nicht so erfolgreich wie Proteine. Warum sollte sie einen Konkurrenten erschaffen, der besser war als sie? Wir glauben nicht, dass es auf diese Art und Weise passiert ist. Wir nehmen an, dass es nicht einfach einen Mechanismus gab, der von der Aminosäure übernommen wurde. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, dass das Ribosom das neugeborene Protein in diesem Tunnel beschützt. Am Ende des Tunnels befindet sich ein Chaperon-Protein, das dem neuen Protein bei der Faltung hilft. Bei neuen Bakterien wird das Chaperon-Protein als Trigger-Faktor bezeichnet. Dieser Faktor besteht aus drei Regionen. Die rote ist diejenige, die bindet, und wenn sie bindet, öffnet sie sich. Und wenn sich der Trigger-Faktor öffnet, legt er die hydrophobe Region bloß, die dem neugeborenen Protein dabei helfen kann, Fehler bei der Faltung zu vermeiden. Wenn das Protein herauskommt, ist es immer noch nicht vollständig, immer noch nicht gefaltet und braucht einen Helfer. Der Helfer hier ist der Trigger-Faktor, der für eine Umgebung sorgt, in der das neugeborene Protein sich wohlfühlen kann. Schauen Sie zum Beispiel hier auf das Ende des Tunnels, hier ist ein Trigger-Faktor in einer goldfarben dargestellten Bindung. Wenn ein Protein, ein neugeborenes Protein, herauskommt, wird es von dem Trigger-Faktor beschützt, damit es nicht zu viele Fehlfaltungen macht. Von dieser Seite aus können Sie dies sogar noch schöner sehen. Hier kommt das Protein heraus, und der Trigger-Faktor hilft ihm. In der sehr kurzen Zeit, die wir noch haben, möchte ich über Antibiotika sprechen, denn diese sind die Folge unserer Arbeit. Die zentrale Rolle, die das Ribosom spielt, bedeutet, dass es zielgerichtet von Antibiotika angegriffen wird. Natürliche Antibiotika sind die Munition, die von den Bakterien der einen Art produziert wird, um Bakterien einer anderen Art bei ihren Kämpfen, ihren Kämpfen auf der Ebene der Mikroorganismen, zu eliminieren. Ungefähr 40 % der wirkungsvollen Antibiotika greifen das Ribosom an. Wir vergleichen dies gerne mit David und Goliath. David hatte den kleinen Stein zur Verfügung und musste den großen Goliath töten. Der kleine Stein ist das Antibiotikum, weniger als 1000 Dalton, ungefähr 800 Dalton, und muss zweieinhalb Millionen Dalton paralysieren. David traf Goliath hier am Kopf, da dieser ungeschützt und wichtig war. Der Kopf ist nicht der einzige ungeschützte Körperteil, aber der in funktionaler Hinsicht lebenswichtigste. Antibiotika verhalten sich ebenso. Sie treffen das Ribosom an den wichtigen Stellen. Hier sind drei von ihnen, eins im aktiven Bereich, ein zweites dort, wo die Bindung entsteht, und ein drittes, Erythromycin, im Tunnel. Werfen Sie einen Blick darauf – das ist der Tunnel, dies sind die große ribosomale Untereinheit und zwei tRNAs. Der Tunnel wird durch das Polyalanin gezeigt und geht hindurch. Hier haben wir eine Zoom-Aufnahme in den Tunnel. Sehen Sie genau hin: Hier gibt es eine sehr schmale Region, wo sich Antibiotika der Makrolid-Familie, der größten Familie, eine Bindung eingehen. Ungefähr so: Hier ist die tRNA, das Protein würde hierhin gehen, die Peptidbindung würde hier erfolgen. Befindet sich jedoch Erythromycin aus der Makrolid-Familie in diesem Bereich, wird es dies stoppen. Was Sie hier sehen, ist ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom, bei dem die große Untereinheit hier beige dargestellt ist. Außerdem sehen Sie die anderen Teile, die ich bereits gezeigt und von denen ich gesprochen hatte. Von oben können Sie es so sehen, das gesamte Ribosom, Sie schauen in den Tunnel hinein, und er wird nun durch das Erythromycin blockiert. Alle Antibiotika binden sich an die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms. Ich sagte dies soeben. Dies ist die Art und Weise, auf die sie wirken und auf die sie die pathogenen Bakterien töten. Jedoch sind die funktionalen Bereiche des Ribosoms in hohem Maße konserviert. Wie unterscheiden also die Antibiotika zwischen Pathogen und Patient? Sie tun dies anhand feiner Unterschiede. Sie möchten einen feinen Unterschied sehen? Hier ist die Tunnelwand, mit vielen, vielen Antibiotika. Alle Strukturen wurden von uns in einem Komplex mit dem Ribosom bestimmt. Alle binden an eine Position, die Nummer 2058 in der RNA-Sequenz. Sie sehen hier also den Tunnel, und das ist das spezielle Nucleotid, das in der Tunnelwand für die Bindung von Makroliden sehr wichtig ist. Bei neu gebildeten Bakterien ist es ein Adenin. Aber bei uns ist es kein Adenin. Schauen Sie hierhin – Adenin und Erythromycin, das ist die Art von Interaktionen, ziemlich nette Interaktionen. Konzentrieren Sie sich bitte hierauf – das ist jetzt Guanin. Das also ist ein Pathogen, und das sind wir. Eubakterien im Menschen, das ist der einzige Unterschied. Aber das schreibt bereits einen zu kurzen Kontakt vor, und das Erythromycin wird abgewiesen. Das ist also die Art und Weise, auf die sie binden. Wir wissen jedoch, dass Antibiotika Resistenzen besitzen. Ein sehr wichtiger Resistenz-Mechanismus besteht in einer Modifizierung des Befestigungsteils, des Ankers. Was heißt das? Sie erinnern sich, vorhin sprachen wir über die Position 2058, Adenin und Erythromycin hier. Dies wird größer, entweder durch Mutation oder durch ERM-Modifizierung, wie ich Ihnen zeigen möchte. Hier haben wir antibiotische Selektivität: A bei Eubakterien, G bei Eukaryoten. Alles, was ich zu tun hatte, war, das Wort hier von „Selektivität“ zu „Resistenz“ zu ändern. Genau der gleiche Ort. Die Bakterien durchlaufen also entweder eine Mutation (von A zu G) oder eine post-translationale ERM-Modifizierung, bei der Methylierung dies hier vergrößert. Auf diese Art und Weise können demnach intelligente Bakterien den Antibiotika Widerstand leisten. Um Resistenzen zu bekämpfen, kann man entweder neue Präparate mit zusätzlichen Ankern herstellen oder den Bedarf an den ursprünglichen Ankern minimieren oder Medikamente aus zwei Komponenten herstellen. Als erstes möchte ich Ihnen zeigen, wie Firmen versuchen, Präparate herzustellen, die ohne eine 2058-Position binden können. Ich hatte wirklich Angst, denn ich dachte, dass diese Antibiotika, wenn sie sich an resistente Bakterien anheften können, sich auch an den Patienten anheften werden. Ich irrte mich, und ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, woher wir wissen, dass ich mich im Irrtum befand. Dafür wollen wir über Bakterien sprechen, über Menschen, und in der Mitte befinden sich die Archaeen. Im Toten Meer in Israel existiert ein Bakterium, das ein Archaeon ist. Sie können das Tote Meer von oben sehen, von der Seite, es ist sehr salzig, und sie sehen, dass die Bakterien selbst im Salz weiterleben. Sie wachsen sogar im Sommer, nachdem der Wasserstand gefallen ist. Dieses Bakterium wurde von uns kristallisiert und seine Struktur in Yale bestimmt. Dieselben Antibiotika, die sich an resistente Bakterien binden, binden sich auch an dieses Bakterium. Es hat ein G anstelle eines A. Ich war sehr glücklich, dass ich mit meiner Voraussage falsch lag. Wenn wir uns das Modell des Patienten anschauen, das in Yale erstellt wurde, und die Pathogene, mit denen wir uns dort nebenan beschäftigten, sehen wir, dass das Antibiotikum bei den Pathogenen durch den Tunnel und bei dem menschlichen Modell entlang des Tunnels bindet. Das zeigt, dass es nicht ausreicht, dass eine Bindung stattfindet, sondern es muss eine korrekte Bindung erfolgen. Für diejenigen hier, die in der Medikamentenentwicklung arbeiten möchten. Die zweite Möglichkeit besteht darin, Antibiotika aus zwei Komponenten herzustellen. Hier sind sie wieder – die Tunnelwand, eine Komponente, die zweite Komponente, jede Komponente für sich reicht nicht aus, zusammen sind sie jedoch ein Gewinnerpaar. Es sorgte für ein breites Lächeln auf meinem Gesicht, als das erste Medikament dieser Art unter dem Namen Synercid auf den Markt kam. Heute stellen wir ein eigenes Medikament dieser Art her. Alle Antibiotika binden an funktional bedeutenden Positionen, wie ich Ihnen zeigte, hier im aktiven Bereich und im Tunnel. Sie binden auch dort, wohin sich die mRNA bewegt. Noch einige wenige Worte dazu, wie wir unsere Untersuchungen vornahmen, denn ich denke, dies ist hilfreich für junge Menschen. Die Kristallografie ist wichtig, um sehr kleine Unterschiede zwischen den Atomen erkennen zu können. Kristalle sind aus Elementarzellen aufgebaut, die gleich sein müssen. Kristallografen kristallisieren sie und erheben Daten, indem sie Röntgenstrahlen einsetzen, da es keine Linsen gibt, mit deren Hilfe man solch kleine Entfernungen betrachten kann, wie wir sie benötigen, die Positionen von Atomen. Letztendlich brauchen wir viele, viele Punkte, die wir miteinander kombinieren müssen, um eine Karte der Elektronendichte zu erstellen, die wir dann interpretieren können – oder auch nicht. Salz zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, ein Lysozym zu kristallisieren, stellt kein Problem dar, aber ein Ribosom zu kristallisieren, das so komplex, so instabil, so schnell verfallend und so dynamisch, so heterogen ist Aber ich schrieb an einem Artikel über Bären im Winterschlaf, deren Ribosomen, während sie schlafen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Zellen, auf der Innenseite ihrer Membranen gebündelt werden, und ich nahm an, dass Ribosomen ordentlich verstaut werden können. Ich ging davon aus, dass auf diese Art und Weise die Natur aktive Ribosomen den gesamten Winter über bewahrt und beschützt, und ich verwendete dafür, wie bereits gesagt, besonders robuste Ribosomen. Am Ende bekamen wir Kristalle. Ich möchte nicht auf sämtliche Details eingehen, aber das war der Anfang. Ich werde nicht so viel über die Struktur erzählen, sondern nur darüber, was mit diesen Kristallen geschah, als wir an ihnen Messungen in Synchrotronen vornahmen. Synchrotrone basieren auf der Beschleunigung von Teilchen und den Tangentialen, die wir messen. Ribosomale Kristalle zerfielen innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde. Können Sie sich vorstellen, acht Jahre damit zu verbringen, gute Kristalle zu bekommen und diese dann innerhalb eines Zehntels einer Sekunde zu verlieren? Wir dachten, wir könnten etwas dagegen tun, und ich kann später erklären, auf welche Art und Weise. Das ist am Tag des Experiments – schauen Sie nur, wie besorgt ich aussah. Innerhalb einer Nacht stellten wir fest, dass wir mit Hilfe der Kristallografie Kristalle am Zerfall hindern konnten. Wir erhielten unsere Muster, und die ganze Welt bekam Muster. Heutzutage gibt es, im Vergleich zu dem, was davor da war, so viele Strukturen. Zur selben Zeit geschahen noch andere Dinge, so dass ich 20 Jahre später immer noch glücklich bin. Und das ist die Maschine – sie ist wichtiger als ich. Danken möchte ich dem Weizmann-Institut für Wissenschaften, das zu mir hielt, und dem Max Planck-Institut, dem NIH (National Institute of Health) und dem Weizmann-Kimmelman-Zentrum, die finanzierten, was ich meinen Traum nannte, der auf Bären basierte. Ich danke meinen Forschungsgruppen am Weizmann-Institut und am Max Planck-Institut für ihren Enthusiasmus in guten wie in schlechten Zeiten. Ich danke Dr. Wittmann, bei dem wir anfingen. Ich möchte Ihnen die deutsche Forschungsgruppe zeigen, die Hamburger Gruppe, die selbst am Toten Meer nach Bakterien suchte, und die israelische Gruppe, die von Annette Bashan geleitet wird, wenn ich hier bin. Und ich danke Tamara, die vor zwölf Jahren für zehn Wochen zu uns kam und noch immer bei uns ist. Sie hatte Geburtstag, sie bekam einen Kuchen, das ist ihr Kuchen, und das zeigt, dass die Ribosomen in meiner Gruppe süß sind. Und ich danke meiner Familie, insbesondere meiner Enkelin. Warum ich das sage? Ich sage es wegen der jungen Frauen, die hier sitzen. Man kann eine Wissenschaftlerin und ein geliebtes Familienmitglied sein – schauen Sie, was sie hier schrieb. ich fragte sie, warum kein Jahr angegeben ist, und sie sagte, jedes Jahr musst du dich neu beweisen. (Lachen.) Sie lieben mich, aber sie sind auch sehr fordernd. Bitte, meine jungen Damen, gehen Sie in die Wissenschaft – es macht Spaß, auch ohne Auszeichnungen. Und das ist das, was mir passiert ist. Ich danke Ihnen vielmals für einen sehr stimulierenden Vortrag und einen, wie ich denke, sehr guten Rat am Ende. (Applaus.)

Ada Yonath on the ribosome being a ribozyme, namely an RNA machine
(00:15:30 - 00:23:39)

 

Thomas A. Steitz (2014) - From the Structure of the Ribosome to New Antibiotics

Well, it’s a pleasure to be here once again. And I’m going to talk about our studies again with the ribosome and eventually trying to understand antibiotic resistance. I just wanted to say a couple of words on how I... what my pathway was. In 1968 Brian Hartley who was an enzymologist in Cambridge at the LMB suggested my first project. There’s Brian. He came up to me in the hall which is what happened in Cambridge. And he said: “Tell me, what are you going to do when you go on for your next job?” And I said: He patted me on the back and he said: “There, there my boy, you ought to do something you can do. I suggest hexokinase.” So I thanked him and I ran off to the laboratory to find out what hexokinase did. And I discovered that Dan Koshland had used hexokinase as a model for why one had to have induced fit. He asked the question: “Why is it that ATP is not hydrolysed in the absence of glucose because glucose is just a water molecule with some carbon atoms?” And he said: “It’s because the glucose...” He proposed, he hypothesised glucose is inducing the conformational change necessary for catalysis. So we said: “Ok let’s find out.” And we solved the structure of hexokinase without glucose. And then we did it with glucose. And indeed it goes (click). And Koshland was right. But then we decided we had to move forward. And having been at both Harvard and Cambridge and knowing both Watson and Crick, I decided it was important to study the central dogma put forward by Crick. That is DNA gets copied into DNA. So we worked on replication, the replisome for many, many years. Gets transcribed into RNA by RNA polymerases. And is regulated at this stage. We’ve studied that for many years. And then finally as you heard in the last talk the ribosome reads out the tickertape and arranges the tRNase on the ribosome for protein synthesis. And so I’m going to concentrate on that last stage. Just as an aside, in 1989 about 20 years after my conversation with Brian Harley we solved the structure of glutamyl tRNA synthetase complex with glutamine tRNA. It was very... it was the first time and it was very interesting. And once again Hartley was right. You have to do the right problem at the right time. It’s great to have great ideas but you must do it at just the right time. So we then decided to start on the ribosome. This is what Jim Watson told me the ribosome was about. And when I was at Harvard, large sub-unit, small sub-unit, tRNA in the E-site, P-site, peptide. And then synthesis occurs. There were a few things that weren’t known then. Didn’t know the structure of tRNA. Didn’t know there was a tunnel for the exit. Didn’t know there was an E-site tRNA. And structural details were missing a bit. Then Jim Lake did some studies of the ribosome by electron microscopy, did the individual sub-units, found that they snuggle up together to form a complex. That was pretty good. Still didn’t tell you much about molecular detail. And then Joachim Frank actually in 1995 published this cryo-EM. The first cryo-EM which is now a method taking off I would say. But at this point it’s still relatively low resolution. And the positions of the tRNA were not exactly right. But getting there. So we decided in 1995 that it was time to move on to solve the structure of the ribosome. And there were 2 pivotally important individuals, Nenad Ban to begin with and then Poul Nissen who grew the crystals and started the structure and were important in solving the structure of the 50S ribosomal sub-unit. This is what the low resolution cryo-EM looked like. You can sort of make out what the structure is. There is a person holding a torch on his knees. You know it’s hard to get molecular detail out of this. But in 1998 we got our first 9 angstrom resolution map. That began to show some of the details but had the same shape. So we knew we were on the right path. And then we moved to higher resolution. And in 2000 we got a 2.4 angstrom resolution map. And there’s the structure that we saw in 2000 of the 50S ribosomal sub-unit. And it was kind of a surprise to us and to everybody to know that the RNA was so tightly packed. We had no idea that RNA could be quite so tightly packed. And there’s the peptidyl transferase centre marked by this inhibitor. Mostly there’s no protein in the neighbourhood. And there’s a lot of tightly packed RNA. Proteins scattered around on the surface. Now if you split the ribosome sub-unit in half like an apple, you can see the peptidyl transferase centre. And now you can see the tunnel, about 100 angstroms long. And in green are proteins that are extending into the interior of the ribosome. So there are bits of the protein that go into the ribosome and stabilise the structure. But you can see how tightly the RNA, in white, is packed. So here is the 70S ribosomal sub-unit with the RNA curved around and making complex structure. There it is, very complex. To misquote Watson: RNA is not boring like DNA. It has very complex structure. And the proteins are scattered around on the surface. And the tRNA, the decoding centre as you’ve heard is in the small ribosomal sub-unit. And the peptide bond formation is in the large sub-unit. So one of the things we wanted to study was the source of the ribosome’s catalytic power and peptide bond formation. Crick hypothesised in 1968 that the ribosome was a ribozyme realising of course that how could you have a machine that makes proteins, be made out of protein before there was a protein. So he suggested it must be RNA. And indeed we found that turns out to be true. I had a marvellous graduate student, Martin Schmeing who initiated this work and did most of the work, I’ll talk briefly about, and made the movie that you’ll see. And this is the reaction that’s catalysed by the ribosome. We have an amino acid on the A-site tRNA. The alpha amino group attacks the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl group and the peptidyl tRNA in the P-site to form a tetrahedral intermediate which then breaks down to give the products. I’m going to show you some results of the structural work but in the 50S sub-unit we only use CCA amino acid or peptide. More recently of course one can use the whole ribosome and tRNase and we’ve done that as well. So again splitting the ribosome 50S sub-unit in half, here is the polypeptide exit tunnel. Inside the box is where peptide bond formation occurs. And then without going into all of the many, many structures that were solved of the substrate complexes, this is eventually what Martin Schmeing and co-workers, what he found in the lab was happening at the catalytic site. The orientation of the P-site substrate here where the carbonyl carbon to be attacked there. And there’s the alpha amino group from the A-site substrate in a position to attack the carbonyl carbon interacting with the 2’ hydroxyl here and oriented by A2451. So what’s the mechanism? There’s a lot more known now and I won’t go into the details because it’s too much for this short talk. But the first step in understanding was Andrea Barta in Austria, her lab had proposed a proton shuttle mechanism in which a proton went from the alpha amino group of the attacking amino group, was transferred to the leaving 3 prime hydroxyl group. Now what we’ve subsequently found is it’s a much larger network of hydrogen bonds, including water and other side chains. But there is a sort of proton shuttling going on. So what’s the source of catalytic power? Actually like most enzymes the primary source of catalytic power is orienting the substrates properly for the chemistry. Get rid of that pesky entropy that has the molecules wandering around. The proton shuttle mechanism contributes chemically to it. And there may be some stabilisation of transition state, which is done by most enzymes. There are many steps in ribosome protein synthesis. And there’s an elongation cycle in which you have the peptidyl tRNA in the P-site, an empty A-site and an EF-Tu protein factor delivers a tRNA. And then it leaves and the tRNA with the amino acid is oriented. And then you get peptide bond formation. This is a low resolution structure of the process. But we have to know what the process is. And then this other factor, elongation factor G, EF-G comes in and causes translocation. And so the question I have is: how does this happen? Mostly what’s known is it comes in and it just sort of slips along. Well it must be more complex than that. So how does it go from here to here? What’s causing this change? What is the EF-G doing? It’s not just doing this on the fly. And we’ve discovered that’s true. Now with Peter Moore, a very important collaborator over the years on this project, we solved the structure EF-G by itself. But more recently we’ve solved the structure of complexes. Now the Ramakrishnan lab solved this structure of the complex of the EF-G in the post translocation state. We’ve solved the structure recently. Hopefully we can find a journal that’s willing to publish it because it’s so novel and you know you have to be... They don’t want to publish anything like this. And the compact confirmation. So this factor, the components of the factor have moved dramatically from where they are in the elongation complex. If you look at 4 and then see where 4 moves to. It’s moved a lot. And so then the question is: What’s happening? You know these 2 very large changes in the structure. And what’s happening? Well, look it’s swinging in like that. And so the thought is that maybe, maybe the conformational change is causing the translocation. We can make a movie of that with the thing moving. But we just conclude that it’s the conformational change occurs in going from that pre-translocation state to the post translocation state that pushes the tRNase along to the next stage. So my last 10 minutes or so I’m going to turn my attention to again antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. And you’ve seen many articles about the problems of antibiotic resistance and the resulting deaths due to it. And the question is how do antibiotics bind in 50S ribosomal sub-unit and what are the mechanisms of the resistance. You’ve just heard some thoughts on that matter. Our work was done initially by Jeff Hanson a postdoc and then subsequently by others. And the tRNA binding site here split through the ribosome. There are different locations for antibiotics that we’re going to talk about. The tuberactinomycins here, capreomycin and viomycin bind near the decoding centre. And they’re important for TB. They’re A-site inhibitors, which I won’t talk about. And then the macrolides are a little bit about a bind down the tunnel a bit. And we’ve looked at many of them but I’ll just talk to you about a couple, just to give an example. The macrolides, there are different size macrolide rings. They all bind in the same place down the tunnel. They have different substituents which interact with the ribosomal RNA in different ways. There can be changes in the side chain basis from the ribosome. But mostly it’s pretty steady. And this is where peptide bond formation occurs. So what the macrolide is doing is blocking the process. So how does it work? Here again looking through the split tunnel, there’s the binding site. The macrolide is in red. And in green are bases whose mutation gives rise to resistance. And you can see that they’re all interacting. This group is all interacting with the macrolide. And so you might assume and I think correctly that it’s the change in the shape of the binding site that stops the binding. Now this is in the absence of the macrolide. And this is in the presence of the macrolide. We’re looking up the tunnel. And so how does the macrolide function? It’s functioning by what I call molecular constipation. It blocks the egress of the polypeptide down the tunnel. So the mutation of A2058 to a G lowers the binding constant by 10,000 fold. And it’s a G in haloarcula marismortui and it doesn’t bind a lot of antibiotics, that one. And if we look at where the macrolide binds, you can see that the N2 of that G is right under the macrolide ring. To look at this Daqi Tu and Gregor Blaha mutated the G to an A in the haloarcula making it a pseudo bacteria. And the binding constant changed by many orders of magnitude. We could see where it bound. And in fact it binds exactly in the same place, the same orientation, except that the macrolide ring is displaced presumably due to this pesky N2 that comes into the position. So what do we do with this information? There are different families of antibiotics that bind to many sites and nearby sites as you’ve heard in the last talk. So here the binding sites near the peptidyl transferase centre are close together. And so what’s being done is a company which started out being Rib-X founded by a number of us who were interested in this area and now Melinta Therapeutics are using these structures to design new antibiotics. And the slides I’m going to show now are all theirs. I’m just the conveyer of the information. So here again is the peptidyl transferase centre with different families of antibiotics all bound near to each other in the peptidyl transferase centre. And so what you want... The strategy is, is to take a piece of one and chemically tie it to a piece of another one. So here for example are 3 antibiotics. And the first one called Radezolid has quite increased potency. Actually I’ll mention a bit more about that. It’s again combining fragments here. And then you can also combine the macrolide. And most importantly -and I can’t... I have no slides to show what they’ve actually done- is to take this whole area and design a whole new family of antibiotics. And that’s looking very promising work against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. So this RX-01 family. This takes Linezolid which has no potency against a number of strains. Red is bad, anything over 4 is bad, very bad. If you make the Radezolid, the combo, it works very well. And also is true looking at various enterococci. You see that Linezolid is not so great. RX-02, that’s the enhanced macrolide. The same thing. If you look at the macrolide, the azithromycin very bad, very, very, very bad, 128 is nothing against all these strains. Make the combo and it’s very good. So the strategy works. And I should just say that it works and it’s being developed. The Linezolid has completed phase 2 clinical trials. And other things are along the way. And then just one last thing about the A-site binding sites and this is our work showing that the viomycin and capreomycin bind to the A-site. And it binds to the small sub-unit. And there is the binding site. It’s interacting with large and small sub-units. And this shows where it’s located. It interacts with the tRNA of the large sub-unit and the small sub-unit. And here is where the decoding happens. So it’s locking the ribosome in this position. So it can’t move forward. Ok, that’s nice to know. But what are you going to do with it? Well, it turns out there are many compounds now that are known that bind in this neighbourhood. There’s the viomycin here but there are many other compounds. And so if one could make money off of a TB antibiotic, not so obvious, and if one could get a drug company to develop it, I speculate that one could put these together in some way or other. Or to just use the surface to design a new compound that would work against TB. So the idea is that you could use this information to create an antibiotic that would be active against all these resistant strains. And this is a major problem because the XDR strain is resistant to everything. So this is a major point that, a major closing point that I want to make. And that is that basic research is very important. Basic research on the structure and function of the ribosome is leading to the development of new antibiotics that are proving effective against resistant bacterial strains. And there’s a lot of push in the US and other places for the NIA to support translational research. And I have to say the only translational research I’m in favour of is the ribosome. And so I’ll stop there. Thank you. Applause.

Ich freue mich sehr, wieder hier sein zu können. Und ich werde auch diesmal über unsere Forschung zum Ribosom berichten und wie wir letztendlich versuchen, die Antibiotikaresistenz zu verstehen. Ich möchte Ihnen kurz erzählen, wie ich… wie mein Weg war. Er kam in der Eingangshalle in Cambridge, wo man sich üblicherweise begegnete, auf mich zu und sagte: Und ich antwortete: „Nun, ich möchte zur Struktur des Aminoacyl-tRNA-Synthetasekomplexes mit tRNA arbeiten.“ Er klopfte mir auf die Schultern und sagte: Ich bedankte mich bei ihm und rannte ins Labor, um herauszufinden, welche Bedeutung die Hexokinase hat. Und ich fand heraus, dass Dan Koshland die Hexokinase als ein Modell dafür verwendet hatte, wozu man das „Induced fit”-Konzept braucht. Er stellte nämlich die Frage: Warum wird dieses ATP in Abwesenheit von Glucose nicht hydrolysiert, wenn doch Glucose nur ein Wassermolekül mit einigen Kohlenstoffatomen ist? Und er sagte: Das ist deshalb der Fall, weil die Glucose… Er vermutete, dass Glucose die Konformationsänderung herbeiführt, die für die Katalyse benötigt wird. Wir sagten also: Okay, das wollen wir herausfinden. Und wir klärten die Struktur der Hexokinase ohne Glucose auf. Und dann machten wir das Gleiche mit Glucose. Und das funktioniert tatsächlich (klick). Koshland hatte also Recht. Aber dann beschlossen wir, dass wir noch weitergehen sollten. Und nachdem ich sowohl in Harvard als auch in Cambridge gewesen war und sowohl Watson als auch Crick kannte, hielt ich es für wichtig, das zentrale Dogma zu untersuchen, das Crick aufgestellt hatte. Nämlich: DNA wird in DNA kopiert. So arbeiteten wir also lange, lange Jahre an der Replikation, dem Replisom, das durch RNA-Polymerasen auf RNA transkribiert und in dieser Phase reguliert wird. Wir haben das viele Jahre lang untersucht. Letztendlich, wie Sie im letzten Vortrag gehört haben, greift das Ribosom den „Lochstreifen“ ab und arrangiert die tRNase für die Proteinsynthese auf dem Ribosom. Und deshalb werde ich mich hier auf diese letzte Phase konzentrieren. Nur als Randbemerkung: klärten wir die Struktur des Glutamyl-tRNA Synthetasekomplexes mit Glutamin-tRNA auf. Das war sehr… das war das erste Mal und es war sehr interessant. Und wieder einmal hatte Hartley Recht behalten. Man muss sich zum richtigen Zeitpunkt mit dem richtigen Problem befassen. Es ist großartig, tolle Ideen zu haben, aber man muss sie auch zum richtigen Zeitpunkt umsetzen. Wir entschieden uns dann, mit dem Ribosom zu beginnen. Das hier hat mir Jim Watson über das Ribosom erzählt, als ich in Harvard war. Große Untereinheit, kleine Untereinheit, tRNA an der E-Stelle, P-Stelle, Peptid. Und dann findet die Synthese statt. Einiges war damals noch nicht bekannt. Man kannte die Struktur der tRNA nicht. Man wusste nicht, dass es einen Tunnel für den Ausgang gab. Man wusste nicht, dass es die E-Stellen-tRNA gibt. Und auch strukturelle Details waren nicht bekannt. Und dann führte Jim Lake einige Untersuchungen des Ribosoms mit dem Elektronenmikroskop durch. Er beschäftigte sich mit den einzelnen Untereinheiten und stellte fest, dass sie sich aneinander drücken, um einen Komplex zu bilden. Das war schon ziemlich gut, sagte aber immer noch nicht viel über die molekularen Details aus. Und dann veröffentlichte Joachim Frank schließlich 1995 diese Kryo-EM. Das war die erste Kryo-EM. Inzwischen ist diese Methode so richtig durchgestartet, würde ich sagen. Aber damals hatte das noch eine relativ geringe Auflösung. Und die Positionen der tRNA waren nicht exakt richtig, aber auf einem guten Weg. Deshalb beschlossen wir 1995, weiter an der Aufklärung der Ribosomenstruktur zu arbeiten. Und da hatten vor allem zwei Menschen eine zentrale Bedeutung: Nenad Ban und Poul Nissen, die die Kristalle züchteten, mit der Bestimmung der Struktur begannen und wichtig für die Aufklärung der Struktur der ribosomalen 50S-Untereinheit waren. Und so sah die Kryo-EM mit geringer Auflösung aus. Man kann die Struktur irgendwie erkennen. Da hält jemand eine Taschenlampe auf seinen Knien. Es ist sehr schwer, daraus die molekularen Details zu entnehmen. Aber 1998 hatten wir unsere erste Karte mit einer Auflösung von 9 Angström. Da waren zum ersten Mal ein paar Details zu erkennen, das hatte aber die gleiche Form. Wir wussten also, dass wir auf dem richtigen Weg waren. Und dann machten wir mit einer höheren Auflösung weiter. Und 2000 hatten wir dann eine Karte mit einer Auflösung von 2,4 Angström. Und das hier ist die Struktur der ribosomalen 50S-Untereinheit, wie wir sie im Jahr 2000 sahen. Und die dichte Bepackung der RNA war für uns und alle ziemlich überraschend. Wir hatten keine Vorstellung, dass RNA so dicht gepackt sein konnte. Und hier ist das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum mit dem markanten Inhibitor. Meistens ist kein Protein in der Nähe. Und es gibt jede Menge dicht gepackte RNA und Proteine sind auf der Oberfläche verstreut. Wenn man die Ribosom-Untereinheit wie einen Apfel halbiert, sieht man das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum. Und jetzt erkennen Sie den Tunnel, rund 100 Angström lang. Das Grüne sind die Proteine, die in das Innere des Ribosoms reichen. Kleinste Teilchen des Proteins dringen also in das Ribosom ein und stabilisieren die Struktur. Aber Sie sehen, wie dicht die RNA, in Weiß, gepackt ist. Hier ist die ribosomale 70S-Untereinheit mit der RNA darum herum, die eine komplexe Struktur bildet. Hier sehen Sie das. Sehr komplex. Um Watson falsch zu zitieren: RNA ist nicht so langweilig wie DNA. Es hat eine sehr komplexe Struktur. Und die Proteine sind rundum auf der Oberfläche verstreut. Und die tRNA, das dekodierende Zentrum, wie Sie gehört haben, befindet sich in der kleinen ribosomalen Untereinheit. Die Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen erfolgt in der großen Untereinheit. Eines der Dinge, die wir herausfinden wollten, war die Quelle der katalytischen Eigenschaften des Ribosoms und der Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen. Crick hatte 1968 die Hypothese aufgestellt, dass das Ribosom ein Ribozym sei, wobei er sich natürlich die Frage realisierte, wie es sein könnte, dass eine Maschine, die Proteine herstellt, aus Protein bestehen kann, bevor ein Protein da ist? Deshalb vermutete er, dass es sich um RNA handeln musste. Und in der Tat fanden wir heraus, dass das stimmte. Ich hatte einen fantastischen Doktoranden, Martin Schmeing, der diese Arbeit initiiert hat und den größten Teil der Arbeiten durchgeführt hat, über die ich kurz erzählen werde und der das Video hergestellt hat, dass Sie noch sehen werden. Und das ist die Reaktion, die vom Ribosom katalysiert wird. Wir haben eine Aminosäure an der A-Stellen-tRNA. Die Alpha-Aminogruppe attackiert den Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff der Peptidylgruppe und die Peptidyl-tRNA an der P-Stelle bildet ein vierflächiges Zwischenprodukt, das dann aufbricht und die Produkte ergibt. Ich werde Ihnen einige Ergebnisse der strukturellen Arbeit zeigen, aber in der 50S-Untereinheit verwenden wir nur CCA-Aminosäure oder Peptid. Inzwischen kann man natürlich das ganze Ribosom und die tRNase verwenden und das haben wir auch gemacht. Also nochmal: Wenn man die ribosomale 50S-Untereinheit halbiert, hat man hier den Polypeptid-Ausgangstunnel. Innerhalb des angezeigten Feldes erfolgt die Bildung der Peptid-Bindung. Und dann, ohne all die vielen, vielen Strukturen zu besprechen, die aus dem Substratkomplexen aufgeklärt wurden, ist schließlich hier das, was Martin Schmeing und Kollegen…was er im Labor herausgefunden hat, was an der katalytischen Stelle passiert. Die Ausrichtung des P-Stellen-Substrats hier, der Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff, der angegriffen wird, hier. Und das ist die Alpha-Aminogruppe vom A-Stellen-Substrat in einer Position, in der sie den Carbonyl-Kohlenstoff attackieren kann, der hier mit dem 2’-OH interagiert und durch A2451 ausgerichtet wird. Welcher Mechanismus liegt dem zugrunde? Heute wissen wir wesentlich mehr und ich werde nicht auf die Details eingehen, weil das im Rahmen dieses kurzen Vortrags zu viel wäre. Aber den ersten Verständnisschritt dazu hat Andrea Barta in Österreich beigetragen. Ihr Labor vermutete einen Protonenshuttle-Mechanismus, bei dem ein Proton von der Alpha-Aminogruppe, von der angreifenden Aminogruppe, auf die zurück gelassene 3‘-OH-Gruppe übertragen wurde. Später haben wir herausgefunden, dass es ein wesentlich größeres Netz von Wasserstoffbrücken gibt, insbesondere Wasser und andere Seitenketten. Aber auf jeden Fall erfolgt eine Art Protonenshuttle. Woher kommen diese katalytischen Eigenschaften? Tatsächlich ist die primäre Quelle der katalytischen Eigenschaften wie bei den meisten Enzymen die richtige Ausrichtung der Substrate für die Chemie. Die lästige Entropie, die die Moleküle herumwandern lässt, soll beseitigt werden. Der Protonenshuttle-Mechanismus trägt chemisch zu diesem Vorgang bei. Und es könnte eine gewisse Stabilisierung des Übergangszustands dazukommen, zu dem die meisten Enzyme beitragen. Es gibt viele Schritte in der Ribosom-Protein-Synthese. Und es läuft ein Elongationszyklus ab, bei dem es eine Peptidyl-tRNA an der P-Stelle gibt, eine leere A-Stelle und einen EF-Tu-Proteinfaktor, der eine tRNA liefert. Und dann zieht er sich zurück und die tRNA mit der Aminosäure ist ausgerichtet. Und so kommt es zur Bildung von Peptid-Bindungen. Das hier ist eine Darstellung der Prozessstruktur mit geringer Auflösung. Aber wir müssen wissen, wie der Prozess abläuft. Und dann kommt dieser andere Faktor, der Elongationsfaktor G, EF-G, ins Spiel und verursacht eine Translokation. Die Frage, die ich mir dann stelle, ist: Wie ist das möglich? Alles, was man weiß, ist, dass dieser Faktor eintrifft und irgendwie „vorbeigleitet“. Aber das muss wesentlich komplexer sein als das. Wie also entwickelt sich das von hier nach da? Was verursacht diese Veränderung? Was macht der EF-G? Das passiert nicht so mal eben. Und wir haben herausgefunden, dass das stimmt. Mit Peter Moore, einem über all die Jahre sehr wichtigen Kollegen in diesem Projekt haben wir die Struktur EF-G an sich aufgeklärt. In jüngerer Zeit haben wir sogar die Struktur von Komplexen aufgeklärt. Das Labor von Ramakrishnan hat diese Struktur des Komplexes von EF-G im Posttranslokationszustand aufgeklärt. Wir haben die Struktur vor kurzem aufgeklärt. Hoffentlich finden wir ein Fachjournal, das zur Veröffentlichung bereit ist, weil das so neu ist und man muss… die wollen einfach so etwas gar nicht veröffentlichen. Und die kompakte Konformation. Dieser Faktor, die Komponenten des Faktors haben sich weit von dem Punkt, an dem sie sich im Elongationskomplex befinden, wegbewegt. Wenn Sie die 4 betrachten und sehen, wo sich die 4 hinbewegt. Sie hat sich enorm bewegt. Und deshalb ist die Frage: Was passiert da? Man kennt diese beiden sehr großen Veränderungen in der Struktur. Was geschieht? Das schwingt da herein, wie hier dargestellt. Und deshalb denken wir, dass vielleicht die Konformationsänderung Ursache der Translokation ist. Wir können ein Video davon mit dem sich bewegenden Teil herstellen. Also wir gehen davon aus, dass es die Konformationsänderung ist, die auf dem Weg von diesem Prätranslokationsstatus zum Posttranslokationsstatus geschieht, die die tRNase zur nächsten Stufe treibt. In den letzten zehn Minuten meines Vortrags möchte ich meine Aufmerksamkeit erneut auf die Antibiotika und die Antibiotikaresistenz richten. Sie haben viele Artikel über die Probleme der Antibiotikaresistenz und die daraus resultierenden Todesfälle gelesen. Die Frage ist, wie Antibiotika sich an die ribosomale 50S-Untereinheit binden und welche Resistenzmechanismen bestehen. Sie haben gerade einige Gedanken dazu gehört. Unsere Arbeit wurde ursprünglich von Jeff Hanson, einem Postdoc-Mitarbeiter durchgeführt und dann von anderen fortgesetzt. Die tRNA-Bindungsstelle, hier ein Schnitt durch das Ribosom. Es gibt verschiedene Orte für Antibiotika, über die wir reden werden. Tuberactinomycine hier, Capreomycin und Viomycin binden neben dem Dekodierungszentrum. Und sie spielen eine wichtige Rolle für TB. Sie sind A-Bindungsstellen-Inhibitoren, worauf ich aber hier nicht eingehe. Und die Makrolide sind so ein bisschen etwas wie eine Bindung in den Tunnel hinein, ein bisschen. Und wir haben viele von ihnen untersucht, aber ich werde nur beispielhaft über einige reden. Bei den Makroliden gibt es verschieden große Makrolidenringe, die alle an derselben Stelle im Tunnel binden. Ihre unterschiedlichen Substituenten interagieren mit der ribosomalen RNA in unterschiedlicher Weise. Die Seitenkettenbasis vom Ribosom kann sich verändern. Aber meistens ist das Ganze ziemlich stabil. Und das hier ist die Stelle, an der die Bildung der Peptid-Bindung erfolgt. Das Makrolid blockiert also den Prozess. Wie funktioniert das? Wenn man sich hier im Aufriss erneut den Tunnel anschaut, sieht man die Bindungsstelle. Das Makrolid ist rot. Die Basen sind in Grün dargestellt und deren Mutation verursacht die Resistenz. Und Sie sehen, dass sie alle miteinander interagieren. Diese gesamte Gruppe interagiert mit dem Makrolid. Und so könnte man, wie ich denke richtigerweise, annehmen, dass die Änderung in der Form der Bindungsstelle die Bindung verhindert. Das hier ist ohne Makrolid. Und das hier ist mit Makrolid. Wir blicken den Tunnel hinauf. Wie wirkt nun das Makrolid? Es wirkt durch einen Vorgang, den ich als molekulare Obstipation bezeichne. Es blockiert den Austritt des Polypeptids aus dem Tunnel. Die Mutation von A2058 auf ein G verringert die Bindungskonstante um das 10.000-fache. Und das ist ein G im Haloarcula marismortui und dieser Organismus bindet nicht viel Antibiotika. Und wenn wir uns anschauen, wo das Makrolid bindet, sieht man, dass sich das N2 von diesem G hier direkt unter dem Makrolidring befindet. Für diese Untersuchung haben Daqi Tu und Gregor Blaha im Haloarcula das G zu einem A mutiert und es so zu einem Pseudobakterium gemacht. Die Bindungskonstante veränderte sich um viele Größenordnungen. Wir konnten sehen, wo es gebunden hat. Und tatsächlich bindet es exakt an der gleichen Stelle, in derselben Ausrichtung, mit der Ausnahme, dass der Makrolidring verdrängt wird, vermutlich wegen dieser lästigen N2, die die Position einnimmt. Was machen wir mit diesen Informationen? Es gibt verschiedene Antibiotikafamilien, die an viele Stellen und benachbarte Stellen binden, wie Sie im letzten Vortrag gehört haben. Die Bindungsstellen neben dem Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum liegen dicht beieinander. Einige von uns, die Interesse an diesem Gebiet haben, haben eine Firma gegründet, Rib-X, heute Melinta Therapeutics, die diese Strukturen für die Entwicklung neuer Antibiotika nutzt. Und die Folien, die ich jetzt zeige, stammen alle von denen. Ich bin also nur der Überbringer der Botschaft. Hier ist also wieder das Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum mit verschiedenen Antibiotikafamilien, die alle dicht aneinander im Peptidyl-Transferase-Zentrum gebunden sind. Und worum es dann geht…die Strategie ist, ein Stück von einer zu nehmen und sie chemisch mit einem Stück von einer anderen zu verbinden. Hier sind also beispielsweise drei Antibiotika. Und das erste mit der Bezeichnung Radezolid hat eine ziemlich erhöhte Potenz. Und dazu möchte ich noch etwas erklären. Hier werden erneut Fragmente miteinander kombiniert. Und dann kann man das Makrolid kombinieren. Und am wichtigsten ist es - und ich habe keine Folien, um Ihnen zu zeigen, was die tatsächlich gemacht haben -, diesen gesamten Bereich zu nehmen und eine völlig neue Antibiotikafamilie zu entwickeln. Und das sieht ziemlich vielversprechend aus, was die Bekämpfung von gram-positiven und gram-negativen Bakterien betrifft. Das ist die RX-01 Familie. Diese nimmt Linezolid, die bei zahlreichen Stämmen nicht wirksam ist. Rot ist schlecht, alles über 4 ist schlecht, sehr schlecht. Wenn man Radezolid nimmt, die Kombination, funktioniert das sehr gut. Und das gilt auch für verschiedene Enterokokken. Sie sehen, dass Linezolid nicht zu großartig ist. RX-02, das ist das verbesserte Makrolid. Genau das gleiche. Wenn man das Makrolid betrachtet, das Azithromycin... sehr schlecht, sehr, sehr, sehr schlecht, Stellt man die Kombination her, wird alles richtig gut. Die Strategie funktioniert also. Und ich sollte vielleicht einfach sagen, dass es funktioniert und dass es entwickelt wird. Linezolid hat die klinischen Studien der Phase 2 absolviert. Und weitere Dinge sind auf den Weg gebracht. Und dann noch eine Anmerkung zu den A-Bindungsstellen. In unserer Arbeit weisen wir nach, dass Viomycin und Capreomycin an die A-Stelle binden. Und es bindet an die kleine Untereinheit. Und dort ist die Bindungsstelle. Sie interagiert mit den großen und kleinen Untereinheiten. Und hier ist zu sehen, wo sich das befindet. Es interagiert mit dem tRNA der großen Untereinheit und der kleinen Untereinheit. Und an dieser Stelle erfolgt die Dekodierung. Dadurch wird das Ribosom in dieser Position blockiert. Es kann sich also nicht weiterbewegen. Das ist gut zu wissen. Aber was kann man damit machen? Es hat sich herausgestellt, dass jetzt viele Verbindungen bekannt sind, die in dieser Nachbarschaft binden. Es ist das Viomycin hier, aber das gilt auch für viele andere Verbindungen. Und wenn man Geld locker machen könnte für ein TB-Antibiotikum – was nicht so naheliegend ist – und wenn man ein Pharmazieunternehmen dazu bewegen könnte, so etwas zu entwickeln, könnte man die, so vermute ich, in irgendeiner Weise kombinieren oder einfach die Oberfläche nutzen, um eine neue Verbindung zu entwickeln, die gegen TB wirksam wäre. Die Idee ist also ist die, diese Informationen zur Entwicklung eines Antibiotikums zu nutzen, das gegen all diese resistenten Stämme wirksam wäre. Und das ist ein großes Problem, weil der XDR-Stamm gegen alles resistent ist. Das ist ein bedeutender Punkt, auf den ich noch hinweisen möchte. Nämlich der, dass Grundlagenforschung sehr wichtig ist. Grundlagenforschung zur Struktur und Funktion des Ribosoms führt zur Entwicklung neuer Antibiotika, die sich als wirksam gegen resistente Bakterienstämme erweisen. Es gibt eine Menge Anstöße in den USA und an anderen Orten für die NIA, die Translationsforschung zu unterstützen. Und ich muss sagen, dass die einzige Translationsforschung, die ich befürworte, die Ribosom-Forschung ist. Und hier damit möchte enden. Vielen Dank. Applaus..

Thomas Steitz on peptidyl transferase reaction
(00:15:30 - 00:23:39)

 


References
1 H.-J. Rheinberger: Toward a History of Epistemic Things. Synthesizing Proteins in the Test Tube, Stanford University Press, Stanford 1997.
2 P. C. Zamecnik, An historical account of protein synthesis, with current overtones – a personalized view,
Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 1–16.
3 F. Lipmann: Wanderings of a Biochemist, Wiley-Interscience, New York 1971.
4 P. C. Zamecnik, Historical aspects of protein synthesis, Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 1979, 325, 269–301.
5 P. Siekevitz, P. C. Zamecnik, The ribosome and protein synthesis, J. Cell. Biol. 1981, 91 (3), 53S–65S.
6 F. Jacob: The Statue Within, Basic Books, New York 1988.
7 F. H. C. Crick: What Mad Pursuit, Basic Books, New York 1988.
8 M. Nomura: History of Ribosome Research: A Personal Account, in The Ribosome. Structure, Function and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P.B. Moore, A. Dahlberg et al., ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 3–55.
9 A. Spirin: Ribosome Preparation and Cell-free Protein Synthesis, in The Ribosome. Structure, Function andEvolution, eds W. E. Hill, P.B. Moore, A. Dahlberg et al., ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 56–70.
10 M. Hoagland: Toward the Habit of Truth, W. W. Norton and Company, New York 1990.
11 F. H. Portugal, J. S. Cohen: A Century of DNA, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA 1977.
12 H. F. Judson: The Eighth Day of Creation, Simon and Schuster, New York 1979.
13 H.-J. Rheinberger: Experiment, difference, and writing. I. Tracing protein synthesis, and II. The laboratory production of transfer RNA, Stud. Hist. Philos. Sci. 1992, 23, 305–331, 389–422.
14 H.-J. Rheinberger, Experiment and orientation: early systems of in vitro protein synthesis, J. Hist. Biol. 1993, 26, 443–471.
15 H.-J. Rheinberger, From microsomes to ribosomes: ‘strategies’ of ‘representation’, J. Hist. Biol. 1995, 28, 49–89.
16 R. M. Burian, Task definition, and the transition from genetics to molecular genetics: aspects of the work on protein synthesis in the laboratories of J. Monod and P. Zamecnik, J. Hist. Biol. 1993, 26, 387–407.
17 M. Morange: Histoire de la biologie moléculaire, Editions La Découverte, Paris 1994.
18 L. E. Kay: Who Wrote the Book of Life? A History of the Genetic Code, Stanford University Press, Stanford 2000.
19 Symp Quant Biol 1969, 34: The Mechanism of Protein Synthesis.
20 M. Nomura, A. Tissières, P. Lengyel (eds): Ribosomes, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 1974.
21 G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al. (eds): Ribosomes. Structure, Function, and Genetics, University Park Press, Baltimore 1980.
22 B. Hardesty, G. Kramer (eds): Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, Springer, New York 1985.
23 W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore, A. Dahlberg et al. (eds): The Ribosome. Structure, Function, and Evolution, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990.
24 K. H. Nierhaus, F. Franceschi, A. R. Subramanian et al. (eds): The Translational Apparatus. Structure, Function, Regulation, Evolution, Plenum Press, New York 1993.
25 A. T. Matheson, J. E. Davies, P. P. Dennis et al. (eds): Frontiers in Translation. An International Conference on the Structure and Function of the Ribosome, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa 1995.
26 R. A. Garrett, S. R. Douthwaite, A. Liljas et al. (eds): The Ribosome. Structure, Function, Antibiotics, and Cellular Interactions, ASM Press, Washington, DC 2000.
27 P. C. Zamecnik: Historical and current aspects of the problem of protein synthesis, Harv. Lect. 1960, 54, 256–281.
28 F. Hofmeister, Über den Bau des Eiwei.molecüls, Naturwiss. Rundsch. 1902, 17, 529–533, 545–549.
29 E. Fischer: Untersuchungen über Aminosäuren, Polypeptide und Proteïne (1899–1906). Springer, Berlin 1906.
30 H. Borsook, J. W. Dubnoff, The biological synthesis of hippuric acid in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 1940, 132, 307–324.
31 F. Lipmann, Metabolic generation and utilization of phosphate bond energy, Adv. Enzymol. 1941, 1, 99–162.
32 M. Bergmann, A classification of proteolytic enzymes, Adv. Enzymol. 1942, 2, 49–68.
33 R. Schoenheimer: The Dynamic State of Body Constituents, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA 1942.
34 D. Rittenberg, The state of the proteins in animals as revealed by the use of isotopes, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1941, 9, 283–289.
35 T. Caspersson, Studien über den Eiweißumsatz der Zelle, Nat. Wiss. 1941, 29, 33–43.
36 J. Brachet, La localisation des acides pentosenucléiques dans les tissus animaux et les oeufs d’Amphibiens en voie de développement, Arch. Biol. 1942, 53, 207–257.
37 F. Sanger, The arrangement of amino acids in proteins, Adv. Prot. Chem. 1952, 7, 1–67.
38 G. E. Palade, A small particulate component of the cytoplasm, J. Biophys. Biochem. Cyt. 1955, 1, 59–68.
39 L. E. Kay: The Molecular Vision of Life, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1993.
40 O. T. Avery, C. M. MacLeod, M. McCarty, Induction of transformation by a desoxyribonucleic acid fraction isolated from Pneumococcus Type III, J. Exp. Med. 1944, 79, 137–158.
41 M. Delbrück, A theory of autocatalytic synthesis of polypeptides and its application to the problem of chromosome reproduction, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1941, 9, 122–126.
42 F. Haurowitz, Biological problems and immunochemistry, Quart. Rev. Biol. 1949, 24, 93–101.
43 M. Bergmann, J. S. Fruton, The specificity of proteinases, Adv. Enzymol. 1941, 1, 63–98.
44 J. S. Fruton, R. B. Johnston, M. Fried, Elongation of peptide chains in enzyme-catalyzed transamidation reactions, J. Biol. Chem. 1951, 190, 39–53.
45 D. Bartels, The multi-enzyme programme of protein synthesis – its neglect in the history of biochemistry and its current role in biotechnology, Hist. Philos. Life Sci. 1983, 5, 187–219.
46 H. M. Kalckar, The nature of energetic coupling in biological synthesis, Chem. Rev. 1941, 28, 71–178.
47 A. H. Gordon, Electrophoresis and chromatography of amino acids and proteins, Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 1979, 325, 95–105.
48 S. de Chadarevian: Designs for Life. Molecular Biology after World War II, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2002.
49 R. R. Bensley, N. L. Hoerr, Studies on cell structure by the freezing-drying method. VI. The preparation and properties of mitochondria, Anat. Rec. 1934, 60, 449–455.
50 A. Claude, A fraction from normal chick embryo similar to the tumor producing fraction of chicken tumor I, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 1938, 39, 398–403.

51 A. Claude, The constitution of protoplasm, Science 1943, 97, 451–456.
52 I. Sapp: Beyond the Gene: Cytoplasmic Inheritance and the Struggle for Authority in Genetics, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1987.
53 J. Brachet, R. Jeener, Recherches sur des particules cytoplasmiques de dimensions macromoléculaires riches en acide pentosenucléique, Enzymology 1943, 11, 196–212.
54 W. C. Schneider, A. Claude, G. H. Hogeboom, The distribution of cytochrome c and succinoxidase activity in rat liver fractions, J. Biol. Chem. 1948, 172, 451–458.
55 H. Chantrenne, Hétérogénéité des granules cytoplasmiques du foie de souris, Biochim. Biophys. A 1947, 1, 437–448.
56 C. P. Barnum, R. A. Huseby, Some quantitative analyses of the particulate fractions from mouse liver cell cytoplasm, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1948, 19, 17–23.
57 C. Claude, Studies on cells: morphology, chemical constitution, and distribution of biochemical function, Harv. Lect. 1950, 43, 121–164.
58 G. H. Hogeboom, W. C. Schneider, G. E. Palade, Cytochemical studies of mammalian tissues. I. Isolation of intact mitochondria from rat liver; some biochemical properties of mitochondria and submicroscopic particulate material, J. Biol. Chem. 1948, 172, 619–635.
59 J.-P. Gaudillière: Inventer la biomédicine: La France, L’Amérique et la production des savoirs du vivant (1945–1965), Éditions de la Découverte, Paris 2002.
60 H.-J. Rheinberger, Putting Isotopes to Work: Liquid Scintillation Counters 1950–1970, in Instrumentation Between Science, State, and Industry, eds B. Joerges T. Shinn, Kluwer, Dordrecht 2001, 143–174.
61 A. Creager, The Industrialization of Radioisotopes by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, in Nobel Symposium 123: Science and Industry in the 20th Century, ed. K. Grandin, in print.
62 J. B. Melchior, H. Tarver, Studies in protein synthesis in vitro . I. On the synthesis of labeled cystine (35S) and its attempted use as a tool in the study of protein synthesis; II. On the uptake of labeled sulfur by the proteins of liver slices incubated with labeled methionine (35S), Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1947, 12, 301–308, 309–315.
63 T. Winnick, F. Friedberg, D. Greenberg, Incorporation of C-labelled glycine into intestinal tissue and its inhibition by azide, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1947, 15, 160–161.
64 F. Friedberg, T. Winnick, D. M. Greenberg, Incorporation of labelled glycine into the protein of tissue homogenates, J. Biol. Chem. 1947, 171, 441–442.
65 H. Borsook, C. L. Deasy, A. J. Haagen-Smit et al., The incorporation of labelled lysine into the proteins of guinea pig liver homogenate, J. Biol. Chem. 1949, 179, 689–704.
66 R. B. Loftfield, Preparation of 14Clabelled hydrogen cyanide, alanine, and glycine, Nucl. 1947, 1, 54–57.
67 W. F. Loomis, F. Lipmann, Reversible inhibition of the coupling between phosphorylation and oxidation, J. Biol. Chem. 1948, 173, 807–808.
68 I. D. Frantz, Jr., P. C. Zamecnik, J. W. Reese et al., The effect of dinitrophenol on the incorporation of alanine labelled with radioactive carbon into the proteins of slices of normal and malignant rat liver, J. Biol. Chem. 1948, 174, 773–774.
69 P. C. Zamecnik, The use of labelled amino acids in the study of the protein metabolism of normal and malignant tissues: a review, Canc. Res. 1950, 10, 659–667.
70 P. Siekevitz, Uptake of radioactive alanine in vitro into the proteins of rat liver fractions, J. Biol. Chem. 1952, 195, 549–565.
71 N. L. R. Bucher, The formation of radioactive cholesterol and fatty acids from 14C-labelled acetate by rat liver homogenates, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1953, 75, 498.
72 E. B. Keller, P. C. Zamecnik, Anaerobic incorporation of 14C-amino acids into protein in cell-free liver preparations, Fed. Proc. 1954, 13, 239–240.
73 E. B. Keller, P. C. Zamecnik, R. B. Loftfield, The role of microsomes in the incorporation of amino acids into proteins, J. Histochem. Cytochem. 1954, 2, 378–386.
74 V. Allfrey, A. E. Mirsky, S. Osawa, Protein synthesis in isolated cell nuclei, J. Gen. Physiol. 1957, 40, 451–490.
75 M. B. Hoagland, An enzymic mechanism for amino acid activation in animal tissues, Biochim. Biophys. A 1955, 16, 288–289.
76 J. A. DeMoss, G. D. Novelli, An amino acid dependent exchange between inorganic pyrophosphate and ATP in microbial extracts, Biochim. Biophys. A 1955, 18, 592–593.
77 P. Berg, Participation of adenyl-acetate in the acetate-activating system, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1955, 77, 3163–3164.
78 P. Berg, Acyl adenylates: the interaction of adenosine triphosphate and L-methionine, J. Biol. Chem. 1956, 222, 1025–1034.
79 M. B. Hoagland, E. B. Keller, P. C. Zamecnik, Enzymatic carboxyl activation of amino acids, J. Biol. Chem. 1956, 218, 345–358.
80 E. F. Gale, J. P. Folkes, Effect of nucleic acids on protein synthesis and aminoacid incorporation in disrupted staphylococcal cells, Nature 1954, 173, 1223–1227.
81 S. Spiegelman, H. O. Halvorson,R. Ben-Ishai, Free Amino Acids and the Enzyme-forming Mechanism, in A Symposium on Amino Acid Metabolism (14–17 June 1954), eds W. D. McElroy and H. B. Glass, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore 1955, 124–170.
82 E. F. Gale: From Amino Acids to Proteins, in A Symposium on Amino Acid Metabolism (14–17 June 1954), eds W. D. McElroy and H. B. Glass, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore 1955, 171–192.
83 M. Grunberg-Manago, S. Ochoa, Enzymatic synthesis and breakdown of polynucleotides; polynucleotide phosphorylase, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1955, 77, 3165–3166.
84 M. B. Hoagland, P. C. Zamecnik, M. L. Stephenson, Intermediate reactions in protein biosynthesis, Biochim. Biophys. A 1957, 24, 215–216.
85 R. W. Holley, An alanine-dependent, ribonuclease-inhibited conversion of AMP to ATP, and its possible relationship to protein synthesis, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1957, 79, 658–662.
86 P. Berg, E. J. Ofengand, An enzymatic mechanism for linking amino acids to RNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1958, 44, 78–86.
87 T. Hultin, The incorporation in vitro of 1- 14C-glycine into liver proteins visualized as a two-step reaction, Exp. Cell. Res. 1956, 11, 222–224.
88 K. Ogata, H. Nohara, The possible role of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the pH 5 enzyme in amino acid activation, Biochim. Biophys. A 1957, 25, 659–660.
89 V. V. Koningsberger, Chr. O. Van der Grinten, J. Th. G. Overbeek, Possible intermediates in the biosynthesis of proteins. I. Evidence for the presence of nucleotide-bound carboxyl-activated peptides in baker’s yeast, Biochim. Biophys. A 1957, 26, 483–490.
90 R. S. Schweet, F. C. Bovard, E. Allen et al., The incorporation of amino acids into ribonucleic acid, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1958, 44, 173–177.
91 S. B. Weiss, G. Acs, F. Lipmann, Amino acid incorporation in pigeon pancreas fractions, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1958, 44, 189–196.
92 K. C. Smith, E. Cordes, R. S. Schweet, Fractionation of transfer ribonucleic acid, Biochim. Biophys. A 1959, 33, 286–287.
93 F. Crick, On degenerate templates and the adaptor hypothesis. A note for the RNA tie club, Unpublished Manuscript, 1955, reference in [94].
94 R. Olby: The Path to the Double Helix, Macmillan, London 1974.
95 F. H. C. Crick: Discussion Note, in The Structure of Nucleic Acids and their Role in Protein Synthesis. Biochemical Society Symposium 14 (18 February 1956), ed. E. M. Crook, Cambridge University Press, London 1957, 25–26
96 H. Borsook, C. L. Deasy, A. J. Haagen- Smit et al., The uptake in vitro of 14C-labelled glycine, L-leucine, and L-lysine by different components of guinea pig liver homogenate, J. Biol. Chem. 1950, 184, 529–543.
97 T. Hultin, Incorporation in vivo of 15N-labeled glycine into liver fractions of newly hatched chicks, Exp. Cell. Res. 1950, 1, 376–381.
98 E. B. Keller, Turnover of proteins of cell fractions of adult rat liver in vivo, Fed. Proc. 1951, 10, 206.
99 N. D. Lee, N. M. MacRae, R. H. Williams, Effect of p-dimethylaminoazobenzene on the incorporation of labelled cystine into protein of the subcellular components of rat liver, Fed. Proc. 1951, 10, 363.
100 E. P. Tyner, C. Heidelberger, G. A. LePage, Intracellular distribution of radioactivity in nucleic acid nucleotides and proteins following simultaneous administration of 32P and glycine-2-14C, Canc. Res. 1953, 13, 186–203.
101 R. M. S. Smellie, W. M. McIndoe, J. N. Davidson, The incorporation of 15N, 35S and 14C into nucleic acids and proteins of rat liver, Biochim. Biophys. A 1953, 11, 559–565.
102 V. Allfrey, M. M. Daly, A. E. Mirsky, Synthesis of protein in the pancreas. II. The role of ribonucleoprotein in protein synthesis, J. Gen. Physiol. 1953, 37, 157–175.
103 P. C. Zamecnik, E. B. Keller, Relation between phosphate energy donors and incorporation of labelled amino acids into proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 1954, 209, 337–354.
104 J. W. Littlefield, E. B. Keller, J. Gross et al., Studies on cytoplasmic ribonucleo-protein particles from the liver of the rat, J. Biol. Chem. 1955, 217, 111–123.
105 H. K. Schachman, A. B. Pardee, R. Y. Stanier, Studies on the macromolecular organization of microbial cells, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1952, 38, 245–260.
106 M. L. Petermann, M. G. Hamilton, N. A. Mizen, Eletrophoretic analysis of the macromolecular nucleoprotein particles of mammalian cytoplasm, Canc. Res. 1954, 14, 360–366.
107 G. E. Palade, P. Siekevitz, Liver microsomes. An integrated morphological and biochemical study, J. Biophys. Biochem. Cyt. 1956, 2, 171–200.
108 M. L. Petermann, M. G. Hamilton, An ultracentrifugal analysis of the macromolecular particles of normal and leukemic mouse spleen, Canc. Res. 1952, 12, 373–378.
109 M. L. Petermann, N. A. Mizen, M. G. Hamilton, The macromolecular particles of normal and regenerating rat liver, Canc. Res. 1953, 13, 372–375.
110 M. L. Petermann, M. G. Hamilton, A stabilizing factor for cytoplasmic nucleoproteins, J. Biophys. Biochem. Cyt. 1955, 1, 469–472.
111 R. B. Roberts, (ed.): Introduction, in Microsomal Particles and Protein Synthesis, Pergamon Press, New York 1958, vii–viii.


112 R. B. Roberts (ed.): Ribosomes. A. General Properties of Ribosomes, in Studies of Macromolecular Biosynthesis, Carnegie Inst., Washington, DC 1964, 147–168.
113 F. H. C. Crick, On protein synthesis, Symp. Soc. Exp. Biol. 1958, 12, 138–163.
114 F.-C. Chao, H. K. Schachman, The isolation and characterization of a macromolecular ribonucleoprotein from yeast, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 1956, 61, 220–230.
115 M. L. Petermann, M. G. Hamilton, M. E. Balis et al., Physicochemical and Metabolic Studies on Rat Liver Nucleoprotein, in Microsomal Particles and Protein Synthesis, ed. R. B. Roberts, Pergamon Press, New York 1958, 70–75.
116 A. Tissières, J. D. Watson, Ribonucleoprotein particles from Escherichia coli, Nature 1958, 182, 778–780.
117 A. Tissières, J. D. Watson, D. Schlessinger et al., Ribonucleoprotein particles from Escherichia coli, J. Mol. Biol. 1959, 1, 221–233.
118 H. Friedrich-Freksa, Bei der Chromosomenkonjugation wirksame Kräfte und ihre Bedeutung für die identische Verdopplung von Nucleoproteinen, Nat. Wiss. 1940, 28, 376–379.
119 H. Chantrenne, Un modèle de synthèse peptidique. Propriétés du benzoylphosphate de phényle, Biochim. Biophys. A 1948, 2, 286–293. References 43
120 A. L. Dounce, Duplicating mechanism for peptide chain and nucleic acid synthesis, Enzymology 1952, 15, 251–258.
121 V. V. Koningsberger, J. Th. G. Overbeek, On the role of the nucleic acids in the biosynthesis of the peptide bond, Proc. Kon. Ned. Ak. Wet. Ser. B:. Phys. 1953, 56, 248–254.
122 F. Lipmann: On the Mechanism of some ATP-linked Reactions and Certain Aspects of Protein Synthesis, in A Symposium on the Mechanism of Enzyme Action, eds W. D. McElroy and B. Glass, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore 1954, 599–607.
123 G. Gamow, Possible relation between deoxyribonucleic acid and protein structures, Nature 1954, 173, 318.
124 H. Borsook, The Biosynthesis of Peptides and Proteins, in Proc. III Int. Congress of Biochemistry, Brussels, 1955, ed. C. Liébecq, Academic Press, New York 1956, 92–104.
125 R. B. Loftfield, The biosynthesis of protein, Prog. Biophys. Biophys. Chem. 1957, 8, 348–386.
126 J. D. Watson, F. H. C. Crick, Molecular structure of nucleic acids. A structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid, Nature 1953, 171, 737–738.
127 L. I. Hecht, P. C. Zamecnik, M. L. Stephenson et al., Nucleoside triphosphates as precursors of ribonucleic acid end groups in a mammalian system, J. Biol. Chem. 1958, 233, 954–963.
128 M. B. Hoagland, Nucleic acids and proteins, SA 1959, 201, 55–61.
129 E. F. Gale, J. P. Folkes, Promotion of incorporation of amino-acids by specific di- and tri-nucleotides, Nature 1955, 175, 592–593.
130 E. F. Gale, J. P. Folkes, The assimilation of amino acids by bacteria. 25. The preparation and activities of a factor involved in the incorporation of amino acids in disrupted staphylococcal cells, Biochem. J. 1958, 69, 611–619.
131 H.-J. Rheinberger, Ernest. F. Gale and Protein synthesis. Difficulties in analysing a complex system, TIBS 1998, 23, 362–365.
132 R. W. Holley, J. Apgar, G. A. Everett et al., Structure of a ribonucleic acid, Science 1965, 147, 1462–1465.
133 H. Chantrenne: The Biosynthesis of Proteins, Pergamon Press, New York 1961.
134 J.-P. Gaudillière, J. Monod, S. Spiegelman, L’adaptation enzymatique. Programmes de recherche, cultures locales et traditions disciplinaires, Hist. Philos. Life Sci. 1992, 14, 23–71.
135 F. Jacob, E. Wollman, Genetic and physical determinations of chromosomal segments in Escherichia coli, Symp. Soc. Exp. Biol. 1958, 12, 75–92.
136 M. Riley, A. B. Pardee, F. Jacob et al., On the expression of a structural gene, J. Mol. Biol. 1960, 2, 216–225.
137 L. Astrachan, E. Volkin, Properties of ribonucleic acid turnover in T2-infected Escherichia coli, Biochim. Biophys. A 1958, 29, 536–544.
138 E. F. Gale, J. Folkes, The assimilation of amino acids by bacteria. 21. The effect of nucleic acids on the development of certain enzymic activities in disrupted staphylococcal cells, Biochem. J. 1955, 59, 675–684.
139 S. Spiegelman: Protein Synthesis in Protoplasts, in CIBA Foundation Symp. on Ionizing Radiations and Cell Metabolism, eds G. E. W. Wolstenholme and C. M. O’Connor, Churchill, London 1956, 185–195.
140 S. Brenner, F. Jacob, M. Meselson, An unstable intermediate carrying information from genes to ribosomes for protein synthesis, Nature 1961, 190, 576–581.
141 F. Jacob, J. Monod, Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins, J. Mol. Biol. 1961, 3, 316–356.
142 M. Nomura, B. D. Hall, S. Spiegelman, Characterization of RNA synthesized in Escherichia coli after bacteriophage T2 infection, J. Mol. Biol. 1960, 2, 306–326.
143 F. Gros, H. Hiatt, W. Gilbert et al., Unstable ribonucleic acid revealed by pulse labelling of E. coli, Nature 1961, 190, 581–585.
144 D. Schachtschabel, W. Zillig, Untersuchungen zur Biosynthese der Proteine. I. Über den Einbau 14C-markierter Aminosäuren ins Protein zellfreier Nucleoproteid- Enzyn-Systeme aus Escherichia coli B, Hoppe-Seylers Zs. 1959, 314, 262–275.
145 M. R. Lamborg, P. C. Zamecnik, Amino acid incorporation into protein by extracts of E. coli, Biochim. Biophys. A 1960, 42, 206–211.
146 A. Tissières, D. Schlessinger, F. Gros, Amino acid incorporation into proteins by E. coli ribosomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1960, 46, 1450–1463.
147 T. Kameyama, G. D. Novelli, The cell-free synthesis of ß-galactosidase by Escherichia coli, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1960, 2, 393–396.
148 D. Nathans, F. Lipmann, Amino acid transfer from aminoacyl-ribonucleic acids to protein on ribosomes of Escherichia coli, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1961, 47, 497–504.
149 K. Matsubara, I. Watanabe, Studies of amino acid incorporation with purified ribosomes and soluble enzymes from Escherichia coli, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1961, 5, 22–26.
150 J. Ofengand, R. Haselkorn, Viral RNA-dependent incorporation of amino acids into protein by cell-free extracts of E. coli, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1961/62, 6, 469–474.

151 M. Nirenberg, The genetic code, Nobel Lectures / Physiology or Medicine 1969, 1–21.
152 R. S. Schweet, H. Lamfrom, E. Allen, The synthesis of hemoglobin in cell-free system, Proc. Natl. Acad. USA 1958, 44, 1029–1035.
153 M. W. Nirenberg, J. H. Matthaei, The dependence of cell-free protein synthesis in E. coli upon naturally occurring or synthetic polyribonucleotides, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1961, 47, 1588–1602.
154 J. D. Watson: Molecular Biology of the Gene, W. A. Benjamin, Menlo Park, CA 1965.
155 F. H. C. Crick, L. Barnett, S. Brenner et al., General nature of the genetic code for proteins, Nature 1961, 192, 1227–1232.
156 H. -G. Wittmann, Ansätze zur Entschlüsselung des genetischen Codes, Nat. Wiss. 1961, 48, 729–734.
157 H.-G. Wittmann: Studies on the Nucleic acid–Protein Correlation in Tobacco Mosaic Virus, in Proc. Vth Int. Congress of Biochemistry, Moscow, 10-16 August 1961, Vol. I, ed. N.M. Sissakian, Pergamon Press, Oxford 1963, 240–254.
158 H. Fraenkel-Conrat, A. Tsugita, Biological and Protein–Structural Effects of Chemical Mutagenesis of TMV-RNA, in Proc. Vth Int. Congress of Biochemistry, Moscow, 10-16 August 1961, Vol. III, ed. N.M. Sissakian, Pergamon Press, Oxford 1963, 242–244.
159 M. W. Nirenberg, P. Leder, RNA codewords and protein synthesis, Science 1964, 145, 1399–1407.
160 P. Lengyel, J. F. Speyer, S. Ochoa, Synthetic polynucleotides and the amino acid code, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.USA 1961, 47, 1936–1942.
161 H. G. Khorana, H. Büchi, H. Ghosh et al., Polynucleotide synthesis and the genetic code, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1966, 31, 39–49.
162 B. F. C. Clark, K. A. Marcker, N -formylmethionyl-s-ribonucleic acid and chain initiation in protein biosynthesis, Nature 1966, 211, 378–380.
163 J. M. Adams, M. R. Capecchi, N –formylmethionyl-sRNA as the initiator of protein synthesis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1966, 55, 147–155.
164 S. Brenner, A. O. W. Stretton, S. Kaplan, Genetic code: the ‘nonsense’ triplets for chain termination and their suppression, Nature 1965, 206, 994–998.
165 M. G. Weigert, A. Garen, Base composition of nonsense codons in E. coli, Nature 1965, 206, 992–994. References 45
166 M. S. Bretscher, H. M. Goodman, J. R. Menninger et al., Polypeptide chain termination using synthetic polynucleotides, J. Mol. Biol. 1965, 14, 634–639.
167 M. C. Ganoza, T. Nakamoto, Studies on the mechanism of polypeptide chain termination in cell-free extracts of E. coli, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1966, 55, 162–169.
168 J. A. Last, W. M. Stanley, Jr., M. Salas et al., Translation of the genetic message. IV. UAA as a chain termination codon, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 1967, 57, 1062–1067.
169 J. D. Watson, Involvement of RNA in the synthesis of proteins, Science 1963, 140, 17–26.
170 F. Lipmann, Messenger ribonucleic acid, Prog. Nucl. Acid. Res. 1963, 1, 135–161.
171 E. B. Keller, P. C. Zamecnik, Effect of guanosine diphosphate on incorporation of labelled amino acids into proteins, Fed. Proc. 1955, 14, 234.
172 M. B. Hoagland, Some factors influencing protein synthetic activity in a cell-free mammalian system, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1961, 26, 153–157.
173 D. Nathans, F. Lipmann, Amino acid transfer from sRNA to microsome. II. Isolation of a heat-labile factor from liver supernatant, Biochim. Biophys. A 1960, 43, 126–128.
174 J. E. Allende, R. Monro, F. Lipmann, Resolution of the E. coli amino acyl sRNA transfer factor into two complementary fractions, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1964, 51, 1211–1216.
175 Y. Nishizuka, F. Lipmann, Comparison of guanosine triphosphate split and polypeptide synthesis with a purified E. coli system, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1966, 55, 212–219.
176 Y. Kaziro, N. Inoue, Y. Kuriki et al., Purification and properties of factor G, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 385–393.
177 J. Lucas-Lenard, F. Lipmann, Separation of three microbial amino acid polymerization factors, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1966, 55, 1562–1566.
178 B. Hardesty, R. Arlinghaus, J. Shaeffer et al., Hemoglobin and polyphenylalanine synthesis with reticulocyte ribosomes, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1963, 28, 215–222.
179 M. Salas, M. B. Hille, J. A. Last et al., Translation of the genetic message. II. Effect of initiation factors on the binding of formyl-methionyl-tRNA to ribosomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1967, 57, 387–394.
180 M. Revel, J. C. Lelong, G. Brawerman et al., Function of three protein factors and ribosomals subunits in the initiation of protein synthesis in E. coli. Nature 1968, 219, 1016–1021.
181 M. R. Capecchi, Polypeptide chain termination in vitro : isolation of a release factor, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1967, 58, 1144–1151.
182 A. Von der Decken, T. Hultin, A metabolic isotope transfer from soluble polynucleotides to microsomal nucleoprotein in a cell-free rat liver system, Exp. Cell. Res. 1958, 15, 254–256.
183 T. Hultin, A. Von der Decken, The transfer of soluble polynucleotides to the ribonucleic acid of rat liver microsomes, Exp. Cell. Res. 1959, 16, 444–447.
184 L. Bosch, H. Bloemendal, M. Sluyser, Metabolic interrelationships between soluble and microsomal RNA in ratliver cytoplasm, Biochim. Biophys. A 1959, 34, 272–274.
185 L. Bosch, H. Bloemendal, M. Sluyser, Studies on cytoplasmic ribonucleic acid from rat liver. I. Fractionation and function of soluble ribonucleic acid, and II. Fractionation and function of microsomal ribonucleic acid, Biochim. Biophys. A 1960, 41, 444–453, 454–461.
186 M. B. Hoagland, L. T. Comly, Interaction of soluble ribonucleic acid and microsomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1960, 46, 1554–1563.
187 W. Gilbert, Polypeptide synthesis in E. coli. II. The polypeptide chain and S-RNA. J. Mol. Biol. 1963, 6, 389–403.
188 M. Takanami, T. Okamoto, Interactions of ribosomes and synthetic polynucleo-tides, J. Mol. Biol. 1963, 7, 323–333.
189 H. Kaji, A. Kaji, Specific binding of sRNA with the template-ribosome complex, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1964, 52, 1541–547.
190 J. R. Warner, A. Rich, The number of soluble RNA molecules on reticulocyte polyribosomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1964, 51, 1134–1141.
191 R. R. Traut, R. E. Monro, The puromycin reaction and its relation to protein synthesis, J. Mol. Biol. 1964, 10, 63–72.
192 J. D. Watson, The synthesis of proteins upon ribosomes, Bull. Soc. Chim. Biol. 1964, 46, 1399–1425.
193 G. Brawerman, Role of initiation factors in the translation of messenger RNA, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 307–312.
194 S. Pestka, Translocation, aminoacyloligonucleotides, and antibiotic action, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 395–410.
195 P. Leder, A. Bernardi, D. Livingston et al., Protein biosynthesis: studies using synthetic and viral mRNAs, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 411–417.
196 H. Weissbach, N. Brot, D. Miller et al., Interaction of guanosine triphosphate with E. coli soluble transfer factors, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 419–431.
197 T. Caskey, E. Scolnick, R. Tompkins et al., Peptide chain termination, codon, protein factor, and ribosomal requirements, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1969, 34, 479–491.
198 A.-L. Haenni, F. Chapeville, The behaviour of acetylphenylalanyl soluble ribonucleic acid in polyphenylalanine synthesis, Biochim. Biophys. A. 1966, 114, 135–148.
199 M. B. Yarmolinsky, G. L. de la Haba, Inhibition by puromycin of amino acid incroproation into protein, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1959, 45, 1721–1729.
200 D. W. Allen, P. C. Zamecnik, The effect of puromycin on rabbit reticulocyte ribosomes, Biochim. Biophys. A 1962, 55, 865–874.

201 M. Rabinovitz, J. M. Fisher, A dissociative effect of puromycin on the patheway of protein synthesis by Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, J. Biol. Chem. 1962, 237, 477–481.
202 R. E. Monro, D. Vazquez, Ribosomecatalyzed peptidyl transfer: effects of some inhibitors of protein synthesis, J. Mol. Biol. 1967, 28, 161–165.
203 C. Coutsogeorgopoulos, Inhibitors of the reaction between puromycin and polylysyl-RNA in the presence of ribosomes, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1967, 27, 46–52.
204 E. Cundliffe, K. McQuillen, Bacterial protein synthesis: the effects of antibiotics, J. Mol. Biol 1967, 30, 137–146.
205 N. Tanaka, T. Kinoshita, H. Masukawa, Mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition by fusidic acid and related antibiotics, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1968, 30, 278–283.
206 A.-L. Haenni, J. Lucas-Lenard, Stepwise synthesis of a tripeptide, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1968, 61, 1363–1369.
207 J. Davies, W. Gilbert, L. Gorini, Streptomycin, suppression, and the code, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1964, 51, 883–890.
208 J. Davies, B. D. Davis, Misreading of ribonucleic acid code words induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics, J. Biol. Chem. 1968, 243, 3312–3316.
209 R. B. Loftfield, The frequency of errors in protein biosynthesis, Biochem. J. 1963, 89, 82–92.
210 J. R. Warner, A. Rich, C. E. Hall, Electron microscope studies of ribosomal clusters synthesizing hemoglobin, Science 1962, 138, 1399–1403.
211 W. Gilbert, Polypeptide synthesis in E. coli. I. Ribosomes and the active complex, J. Mol. Biol. 1963, 6, 374–388.
212 F. O. Wettstein, T. Staehelin, H. Noll. Ribosomal aggregate engaged in protein synthesis: characterization of the ergosome, Nature 1963, 197, 430–435.
213 A. Gierer, Function of aggregated reticulocyte ribosomes in protein synthesis, J. Mol. Biol. 1963, 6, 148–157.
214 J. R. Warner, P. M. Knopf, A. Rich, A multiple ribosomal structure in protein synthesis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1963, 49, 122–129.
215 D. Schlessinger, G. Mangiarotti, D. Apirion, The formation and stabilization of 30S and 50S ribosome couples in Escherichia coli. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1967, 58, 1782–1789.
216 R. Kaempfer, Ribosomal subunit exchange during protein synthesis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1968, 61,
106–113.
217 M. Nomura, C. V. Lowry, Phage f2 RNA-directed binding of formylmethionyl- tRNA to ribosomes and the role of 30S ribosomal subunits in initiation of protein synthesis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1967, 58, 946–953.
218 P. Traub, M. Nomura, Structure and function of E. coli ribosomes. V. Reconstitution of functionally active 30S ribosomal particles from RNA and proteins, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1968, 59, 777–784.
219 M. Nomura, V. A. Erdmann, Reconstitution of 50S ribosomal subunits from dissociated molecular components, Nature 1970, 228, 744–748.
220 K. H. Nierhaus, F. Dohme, Total reconstitution of functionally active 50S ribosomal subunits from E. coli, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1974, 71, 4713–4717.
221 K. A. Cammack, H. E. Wade, The sedimentation behavior of ribonuclease-active and –inactive ribosomes from bacteria, Biochem. J. 1965, 96, 671–680.
222 R. F. Gesteland, Unfolding of E. coli ribosomes by removal of magnesium, J. Mol. Biol. 1966, 18, 356–371.
223 K. S. Kirby, A new method for the isolation of ribonucleic acids from mammalian tissues, Biochem. J. 1956, 64, 405.
224 A. Gierer, G. Schramm, Infectivity of ribonucleic acid from tobacco mosaic virus, Nature 1956, 177, 702–703.
225 P. O. P Ts’o, R. Squires, Quantitative isolation of intact RNA from microsomal particles of pea seedlings and rabbit reticulocytes, Fed. Proc. 1959, 18, Abstract 1351, 341.
226 C. G. Kurland, Molecular characterization of ribonucleic acid from Escherichia coli ribosomes. I. Isolation and molecular weights, J. Mol. Biol. 1960, 2, 83–91.
227 A. S. Spirin, The ‘temperature effect’ and macromolecular structure of highpolymer ribonucleic acids of various origin, Biochemistry 1961, 26, 454–463.
228 W. Möller, H. Boedtker: The Integrity of High Molecular Weight Ribonucleic Acid, in Colloques Internationaux du CNRS No 106, Acides ribonucléiques et polyphosphates. Structure, synthèse et fonctions, Strasbourg, 6-12 Juillet 1961, Editions du CNRS, Paris 1962, 99–121.
229 R. Rosset, R. Monier, A propos de la présence d’acide ribonucléique de faible poids moléculaire dans les ribosomes d’Escherichia coli, Biochim. Biophys. A 1963, 68, 653–56.
230 G. G. Brownlee, F. Sanger, B. G. Barrell, The sequence of 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid, J. Mol. Biol. 1968, 34, 379–412.
231 F. Sanger, G. G. Brownlee, B. G. Barrell, A two-dimensional fractionation procedure for radioactive nucleotides, J. Mol. Biol. 1965, 13, 373–398.
232 H. G. Zachau, D. Dütting, H. Feldmann et al., Serine specific transfer ribonucleic acids. XIV. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and secondary structure models, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1966, 31, 417–424.
233 U. L. Raj Bhandary, A. Stuart, R. D. Faulkner et al., Nucleotide sequence studies on yeast phenylalanine sRNA, Symp. Quant. Biol. 1966, 31, 425–434.
234 S.-H. Kim, A. Rich, Single crystals of transfer RNA: an X-ray diffraction study, Science 1968, 162, 1381–1384.
235 F. Cramer, F. Von der Haar, W. Saenger et al., Einkristalle von phenylalanin-spezifischer Transfer- Ribonucleinsäure, Ang. Chem. 1968, 80, 969-970; Int. Ed. Engl. 1968, 7, 895–895.
236 J.-P. Waller, J. I. Harris, Studies on the composition of the protein from E. coli ribosomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1961, 47, 18–23.
237 D. Elson, A ribonucleic acid particle released from ribosomes by salt, Biochim. Biophys. A 1961, 53, 232–234.
238 P. Spitnik-Elson, Fractionation of the proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes, Biochim. Biophys. A 1962, 61, 624–625.
239 W. Möller, J. Widdowson, Fractionation studies of the ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli, J. Mol. Biol. 1967, 24, 367–378.
240 E. Kaltschmidt, M. Dzionara, D. Donner et al., Ribosomal proteins. I. Isolation, amino acid composition, molecular weights and peptide mapping of proteins from E. coli ribosomes, Mol. Gen. 1967, 100, 364–373.
241 R. R. Traut, P. B. Moore, H. Delius et al., Ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli. I. Demonstration of different primary structures, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.USA 1967, 57, 1294–1301.
242 S. J. S. Hardy, C. G. Kurland, P. Voynow et al., The ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli. I. Purification of the 30S ribosomal proteins, Biochemistry 1969, 8, 2897–2905.
243 E. Kaltschmidt, H. Günter Wittmann, Ribosomal proteins. XII. Number of proteins in small and large ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1970, 67, 1276–1282.
244 P. Carbon, C. Ehresmann, B. Ehresmann et al., The sequence of Escherichia coli ribosomal 16S RNA determined by new rapid gel methods, FEBS Lett. 1978, 94, 152–156.
245 J. Brosius, M. L. Palmer, P. J. Kennedy et al., Complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene from Escherichia coli, Proc. Natl. Acad.Sci.USA 1978, 75, 4801–4805.
246 H. F. Noller: Structure and topography of ribosomal RNA, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 3–22.
247 B. Wittmann-Liebold, Primary structure of Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins, Adv. Prot. Chem. 1984, 36, 56–78.
248 A. M. Maxam, W. Gilbert, A new method for sequencing DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1977, 74, 560–564.
249 F. Sanger, S. Nicklen A. R. Coulson, DNA sequencing with chainterminating inhibitors, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1977, 74, 5463–5467.

250 S. A. Yanofsky, S. Spiegelman, The identification of the ribosomal RNA cistron by sequence complementarity. I. Specificity of complex formation, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1962, 48, 1069–1078.
251 P. Sypherd, S. Osawa: Ribosome Genetics Revealed by Hybrid Bacteria, in Ribosome, eds M. Nomura, A. Tissières and P. Lengyel, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 1974, 669–678.
252 S. R. Jaskunas, L. Lindahl, M. Nomura, Specialized transducing phages for ribosomal protein genes of Escherichia coli, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1975, 72, 6–10.
253 K. Isono: Genetics of Ribosomal Proteins and their Modifying and Processing Enzymes in Escherichia coli, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et. al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 641–669.
254 E. R. Dabbs: Mutant Studies on the Prokaryotic Ribosome, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985 733–748.
255 J. Shine, L. Dalgarno, The 3_-terminal sequence of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA: complementarity to nonsense triplets and ribosome binding sites, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1974, 71, 1342–1346.
256 J. A. Steitz, K. Jakes, How ribosomes select initiator regions in mRNA: base pair formation between the 3_ terminus of 16S rRNA and the mRNA during initiation of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1975, 72, 4734–4738.
257 C. G. Kurland: On the Accuracy of Elongation, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 597–614.
258 J. J. Hopfield, T. Yamane: The Fidelity of Protein Synthesis, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 585–596.
259 G. S. Stent, S. Brenner, A genetic locus for the regulation of ribonucleic acid synthesis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1961, 47, 4734–4738.
260 N. O. Kjeldgaard, K. Gausing: Regulation of biosynthesis of ribosomes, in Ribosomes, eds M. Nomura, A. Tissières and P. Lengyel, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 1974, 369–392.
261 M. Cashel, J. Gallant: Cellular Regulation of Guanosine Tetraphosphate and Guanosine Pentaphosphate, in Ribosomes, eds M. Nomura, A. Tissières and P. Lengyel, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 1974, 733–745.
262 D. Richter, Stringent factor from Escherichia coli directs the ribosomal binding and release of uncharged tRNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1976, 73, 707–711.
263 K. H. Nierhaus: Analysis of the Assembly and Function of the 50S Subunit from Escherichia coli Ribosomes by Reconstitution, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 267–294.
264 G. Stöffler, R. Bald, B. Kastner et al.: Structural Organization of the Escherichia coli Ribosome and Localization of Functional Domains, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 171–205.
265 J. A. Lake: Ribosome Structure and Functional Sites, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 207–236.
266 P. B. Moore: Scattering Studies of the Three-dimensional Organization of the E. coli Ribosome, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 111–133.
267 R. R. Traut, J. M. Lambert, G. Boileau et al.: Protein Topography of Escherichia coli Ribosomal Subunits as Inferred from Protein Crosslinking, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 89–110.
268 B. S. Cooperman: Functional Sites on the E. coli Ribosome as defined by Affinity Labelling, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 531–554.
269 H. Bielka: The Eukaryotic Ribosome, Springer, New York 1982.
270 I. Wool: Studies of the Structure of Eukaryotic (mammalian) Ribosomes, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985, 391–411.
271 R. J. Planta, J. H. Meyerink: Organization of the Ribosomal RNA Genes in Eukaryotes, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 871–887.
272 M. Stöffler-Meilicke, G. Stöffler: Topography of the Ribosomal Proteins from Escherichia coli within the Intact Subunits as Determined by Immunoelectron Microscopy and Protein–protein Cross-linking, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 123–133.
273 R. Brimacombe, B. Greuer, P. Mitchell et al.: Three-dimensional Structure and Function of Escherichia coli 16S and 23S rRNA as Studied by Cross-linking Techniques, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 93–106.
274 B. Ehresmann, C. Ehresmann, P. Romby et al.: Detailed Structures of rRNAs: New Approaches, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 148–159.
275 H. F. Noller, D. Moazed, S. Stern et al.: Structure of rRNA and ist Functional Interactions in Translation, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 73–92.
276 P. B. Moore, M. Capel, M. Kjeldgaard et al.: A 19 Protein Map of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit of Escherichia coli, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985, 87–100.
277 V. Nowotny, R. P. May, K. H. Nierhaus: Neutron-scattering Analysis of Structural and Functional Aspects of the Ribosome: The Strategy of the Glassy Ribosome, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985, 101–111.
278 M. Boublik, G. T. Oostergetel, J. S. Wall et al.: Structure of Ribosomes and their Components by Advanced Techniques of Electron Microscopy and Computer Image Analysis, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985, 68–86.
279 Ada. Yonath, W. Bennett, S. Weinstein et al.: Crystallography and Image Reconstructions of Ribosomes, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 134–147.
280 H.-J. Rheinberger, H. Sternbach, K. H. Nierhaus, Three tRNA binding sites on E. coli ribosomes, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1981, 78, 5310–5314.
281 H.-J. Rheinberger, K. H. Nierhaus, Testing an alternative model of the ribosomal peptide elongation cycle, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1983, 80, 4213–4217.
282 H.-J. Rheinberger, U. Geigenmüller, A. Gnirke et al.: Allosteric Three-site Model for the Ribosomal Elongation Cycle, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 318–330.
283 W. Wintermeyer, R. Lill, J. M. Robertson, Role of the tRNA Exit Site in Ribosomal Translocation, in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, 348–357.
284 P. B. Moore, Comments on the 1989 International Conference on Ribosomes. in The Ribosome Structure, Function, and Evolution, eds W. E. Hill, P. B. Moore and A. Dahlberg, ASM Press, Washington, DC 1990, xxi–xxiii.
285 H.-G. Wittmann, J. Müssig, H. S. Gewitz et al.: Crystallization of E. coli ribosomes. FEBS Lett. 1982, 146, 217–220.
286 S. D. Trakhanov, M. M. Yusupov, S. C. Agalarov et al., Crystallization of 70S ribosomes and 30S ribosomal subunits from Thermus thermophilus, FEBS Lett. 1987, 220, 319–322.
287 N. Ban, P. Nissen, J. Hansen et al.: The complete atomic structure of the large ribosomal subunit at 2.4 Å resoultion, Science 2000, 289, 905–920.
288 J. Harms, F. Schluenzen, R. Zarivach et al.: High resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from a mesophilic eubacterium, Cell 2001, 107, 679–688.
289 F. Schluenzen, A. Tocilj, R. Zarivach et al., Structure of functionally activated small ribosomal subunit at 3.3 Å resolution, Cell 2000, 102, 615–623.
290 B. T. Wimberly, D. E. Brodersen, W. M. Clemons et al.: Structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit, Nature 2000, 407, 327–339.
291 J. H. Cate, M. M. Yusupov, G. Z. Yusupova et al., X-ray crystal structures of 70S ribosome functional complexes, Science 1999, 285, 2095–2104.
292 R. K. Agrawal, C. M. T. Spahn, P. Penczek et al., Visualization of tRNA movements on the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome during the elongation cycle, J. Cell. Biol. 2000, 150, 447–459.
293 H. Stark, M. Rodnina, H.-J. Wieden et al., Large-scale movement of elongation factor G and extensive conformational change of the ribosome during translocation, Cell 2000, 100, 301–309.
294 C. R. Woese: Just so Stories and Rube Goldberg Machines: Speculations on the Origin of the Protein Synthetic Machinery, in Structure, Function, and Genetics, eds G. Chambliss, G. R. Craven, J. Davies et al., University Park Press, Baltimore 1980, 357–373.
295 K. Kruger, P. J. Grabowski, A. J. Zaug et al., Self-splicing RNA: autoexcision and autocyclization of the ribosomal RNA intervening sequence of tetrahymena, Cell 1982, 31, 147–157.
296 A. Barta, G. Steiner, J. Brosius et al., Identification of a site on 23S ribosomal RNA located at the peptidyltransferase center, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1984, 81, 3607–3611.
297 H. F. Noller, M. Asire, A. Barta et al.: Studies on the Structure and Function of Ribosomal RNA, in Structure, Function, and Genetics of Ribosomes, eds B. Hardesty and G. Kramer, Springer, New York 1985, 143–163.
298 H. F. Noller, V. Hoffarth, L. Zimniak, Unusual resistance of peptidyl transferase to protein extraction procedures, Science 1992, 256, 1416–1419.
299 P. Khaitovich, A. S. Mankin, R. Green et al., Characterization of functionally active subribosomal particles from Thermus aquaticus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1999, 96, 85–90.
300 P. Nissen, J. Hansen, N. Ban et al., The structural basis of ribosome activity in peptide bond synthesis, Science 2000, 289, 920–930.